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Sample records for aerosol water content

  1. Aerosol size distribution and aerosol water content measurements during Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment/Marine Aerosol and Gas Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Sievering, H.; Boatman, J.; Wellman, D.; Pszenny, A.

    1995-11-01

    Aerosol size distribution data measured during the June 1992 Marine Aerosol and Gas Exchange experiment are analyzed to investigate the characteristics of fine marine aerosol particles measured over the North Atlantic near the Azores Islands. Measured aerosol size distribution data were corrected using the corrected size calibration data based on the optical properties of particles being measured. The corrected size distribution data were then approximated with either one or two lognormal size distributions, depending on air mass conditions. Under clean air mass conditions <3 μm diameter aerosol size distributions typically exhibited two modes, consisting of an accumulation mode and the small end of the sea-salt particle mode. However, under the influence of continental polluted air masses, the aerosol size distribution was dominated by <1 μm diameter particles in a single mode with an increased aerosol concentration. Aerosol water content of accumulation mode marine aerosols was estimated from differences between several series of ambient and dried aerosol size distributions. The average aerosol water fraction was 0.31, which is in good agreement with an empirical aerosol growth model estimate. The average rate of SO4= production in the accumulation mode aerosol water by H2O2 oxidation was estimated to be <7×10-10 mol L-1 s-1, which is an insignificant contributor to the observed non-sea-salt SO4= in the accumulation mode.

  2. Measurements of total column ozone, precipitable water content and aerosol optical depth at Sofia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaleyna, P.; Kolev, N.; Savov, P.; Evgenieva, Ts.; Danchovski, V.; Muhtarov, P.

    2016-03-01

    This article reports the results of a study related to variations in total ozone content, aerosol optical depth, water vapor content and Ångström coefficients from summer campaign carried out in June-July 2014, at two sites in the city of Sofia (Astronomical Observatory in the Borisova Gradina Park and National Institute of Geophysics, Geodesy and Geography (NIGGG)). The results of data analysis indicate the following: Spectral dependence of aerosol optical depth (AOD); Greater AOD values due to greater portion of aerosols; Inverse relationship between the time variations of AOD or water vapor and ozone.

  3. Monitoring of Sahelian aerosol and Atmospheric water vapor content characteristics from sun photometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faizoun, C. A.; Podaire, A.; Dedieu, G.

    1994-11-01

    Atmospheric measurements in two Sahelian sites in West Africa are presented and analyzed. The measurements were performed using a sun photometer with five bands in the visible and near-infrared range of the solar spectrum. This instrument measures spectral values of the solar irradiances that are used to derive the aerosol optical thickness in three bands; the two other bands are used to derive the integrated atmospheric water vapor content using a differential absorption method. The Angstroem exponent, which is an estimate of the aerosol particle size, is derived from the spectral dependence of the optical thickness. Although the sites were located far from Sahara Desert aerosol sources, the observed aerosol optical thicknesses were high, with a mean annual value of 0.5 at 550 nm. The spectral dependence of aerosol optical thickness is generally low, with a mean annual value of Angstroem exponent of 0.4. The aerosol optical thickness and the atmosphereic water vapor content are both characterized by high temporal variability and exhibit seasonal cycles. From these measurements, climatological values and associated probability distribution laws are proposed.

  4. ASSESSMENT OF THE LIQUID WATER CONTENT OF SUMMERTIME AEROSOL IN THE SOUTHEAST UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The concentration of aerosol liquid water mass represents an important parameter for understanding the physical properties of PM2.5 in the atmosphere. Increases in ambient relative humidity can increase aerosol liquid water and thus the composite particle mass and particle volu...

  5. Submicron aerosol organic functional groups, ions, and water content at the Centreville SEARCH site (Alabama), during SOAS campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggeri, G.; Ergin, G.; Modini, R. L.; Takahama, S.

    2013-12-01

    The SOAS campaign was conducted from June 1 to July 15 of 2013 in order to understand the relationship between biogenic and anthropogenic emissions in the South East US1,2. In this study, the organic and inorganic composition of submicron aerosol in the Centreville SEARCH site was measured by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and the Ambient Ion Monitor (AIM; URG Corporation), whereas the aerosol water content was measured with a Dry Ambient Aerosol Size Spectrometer (DAASS)3. Organic functional group analysis was performed on PM1 aerosol selected by cyclone and collected on teflon filters with a time resolution of 4-12 hours, using one inlet heated to 50 °C and the other operated either at ambient temperature or 70 °C 4. The AIM measured both condensed and gas phase composition with a time resolution of 1 hour, providing partitioning behavior of inorganic species such as NH3/NH4+, HNO3/NO3-. These measurements collectively permit calculation of pure-component vapor pressures of candidate organic compounds and activity coefficients of interacting components in the condensed phase, using models such as SIMPOL.15, E-AIM6, and AIOMFAC7. From these results, the water content of the aerosol is predicted, and a comparison between modeled and measured partitioning of inorganic compounds and water vapor are discussed, in addition to organic aerosol volatility prediction based on functional group analysis. [1]- Goldstein, A.H., et al., Biogenic carbon and anthropogenic pollutants combine to form a cooling haze over the southeastern United States. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 2009. 106(22), 8835-8840. [2]- Carlton, A.G., Turpin, B.J., 2013. Particle partitioning potential of organic compounds is highest in the Eastern US and driven by anthropogenic water. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions 13, 12743-12770. [3]- Khlystov, A., Stanier, C.O., Takahama, S., Pandis, S.N., 2005. Water content of ambient

  6. Impacts of Sulfate Seed Acidity and Water Content on Isoprene Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation.

    PubMed

    Wong, Jenny P S; Lee, Alex K Y; Abbatt, Jonathan P D

    2015-11-17

    The effects of particle-phase water and the acidity of pre-existing sulfate seed particles on the formation of isoprene secondary organic aerosol (SOA) was investigated. SOA was generated from the photo-oxidation of isoprene in a flow tube reactor at 70% relative humidity (RH) and room temperature in the presence of three different sulfate seeds (effloresced and deliquesced ammonium sulfate and ammonium bisulfate) under low NOx conditions. High OH exposure conditions lead to little isoprene epoxydiol (IEPOX) SOA being generated. The primary result is that particle-phase water had the largest effect on the amount of SOA formed, with 60% more SOA formation occurring with deliquesced ammonium sulfate seeds as compared to that on effloresced ones. The additional organic material was highly oxidized. Although the amount of SOA formed did not exhibit a dependence on the range of seed particle acidity examined, perhaps because of the low amount of IEPOX SOA, the levels of high-molecular-weight material increased with acidity. While the uptake of organics was partially reversible under drying, the results nevertheless indicate that particle-phase water enhanced the amount of organic aerosol material formed and that the RH cycling of sulfate particles may mediate the extent of isoprene SOA formation in the atmosphere.

  7. Aerosol and graphitic carbon content of snow

    SciTech Connect

    Chy-acute-accentlek, P.; Srivastava, V.; Cahenzli, L.; Pinnick, R.G.; Dod, R.L.; Novakov, T.; Cook, T.L.; Hinds, B.D.

    1987-08-20

    Snow samples from southern New Mexico, west Texas, Antarctica, and Greenland were analyzed for aerosol and graphitic carbon. Graphitic carbon contents were found to be between 2.2 and 25 ..mu..g L/sup -1/ of snow meltwater; water-insoluble aerosol content varied between 0.62 and 8.5 mg L/sup -1/. For comparison, two samples of Camp Century, Greenland, ice core, having approximate ages of 4,000 and 6,000 years, were also analyzed. Ice core graphitic carbon contents were found to be 2.5 and 1.1 ..mu..g L/sup -1/. copyrightAmerican Geophysical Union 1987

  8. Comparison of the water vapor and aerosol profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penner, I. E.; Arshinov, M. Yu.; Balin, Yu. S.; Belan, B. D.; Voronin, B. A.; Kokhanenko, G. P.

    2014-11-01

    Analysis of the contents of water vapor and aerosol in the atmosphere measured by means of different instruments was performed based on the results of the comprehensive aerosol experiment carried out at the Institute of Atmospheric optics in May 2012. The data obtained using remote (lidar) and contact (balloon) methods were used. They are capable of obtaining the vertical profiles of the measured parameters with high spatial resolution. Lidar measurements of the water vapor content in the boundary layer of the atmosphere by Raman method have shown very good agreement with the data of measurements by balloon. Simultaneous lidar measurements of backscattering and mixing ratio of water vapor in the atmosphere give significant positive correlation of the contents of water vapor and aerosol in the layers.

  9. Information Content of Aerosol Retrievals in the Sunglint Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ottaviani, M.; Knobelspiesse, K.; Cairns, B.; Mishchenko, M.

    2013-01-01

    We exploit quantitative metrics to investigate the information content in retrievals of atmospheric aerosol parameters (with a focus on single-scattering albedo), contained in multi-angle and multi-spectral measurements with sufficient dynamical range in the sunglint region. The simulations are performed for two classes of maritime aerosols with optical and microphysical properties compiled from measurements of the Aerosol Robotic Network. The information content is assessed using the inverse formalism and is compared to that deriving from observations not affected by sunglint. We find that there indeed is additional information in measurements containing sunglint, not just for single-scattering albedo, but also for aerosol optical thickness and the complex refractive index of the fine aerosol size mode, although the amount of additional information varies with aerosol type.

  10. Measuring Sodium Chloride Contents of Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinha, M. P.; Friedlander, S. K.

    1986-01-01

    Amount of sodium chloride in individual aerosol particles measured in real time by analyzer that includes mass spectrometer. Analyzer used to determine mass distributions of active agents in therapeutic or diagnostic aerosols derived from saline solutions and in analyzing ocean spray. Aerosol particles composed of sodium chloride introduced into oven, where individually vaporized on hot wall. Vapor molecules thermally dissociated, and some of resulting sodium atoms ionized on wall. Ions leave oven in burst and analyzed by spectrometer, which is set to monitor sodium-ion intensity.

  11. On the implications of aerosol liquid water and phase separation for organic aerosol mass

    EPA Science Inventory

    Organic compounds and liquid water are major aerosol constituents in the southeast United States (SE US). Water associated with inorganic constituents (inorganic water) can contribute to the partitioning medium for organic aerosol when relative humidities or organic matter to org...

  12. Laser radar measurements of the aerosol content of the atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grams, G. W.

    1969-01-01

    A summary of the results of laser radar observations of atmospheric aerosols is presented along with a description of the laser radar system devised during the study and of the data handling techniques utilized for the analysis of the data of the temporal and spatial distribution of atmospheric aerosols. Current research conducted by the group is directed toward the analysis of the frequency spectrum of laser radar echoes to obtain absolute measurements of the dust content of the atmosphere by resolving the molecular and aerosol contributions to the laser radar echoes.

  13. Connecting Water Quality With Air Quality Through Microbial Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dueker, M. Elias

    Aerosol production from surface waters results in the transfer of aquatic materials (including nutrients and bacteria) to air. These materials can then be transported by onshore winds to land, representing a biogeochemical connection between aquatic and terrestrial systems not normally considered. In urban waterfront environments, this transfer could result in emissions of pathogenic bacteria from contaminated waters. Despite the potential importance of this link, sources, near-shore deposition, identity and viability of microbial aerosols are largely uncharacterized. This dissertation focuses on the environmental and biological mechanisms that define this water-air connection, as a means to build our understanding of the biogeochemical, biogeographical, and public health implications of the transfer of surface water materials to the near-shore environment in both urban and non-urban environments. The effects of tidal height, wind speed and fog on coastal aerosols and microbial content were first quantified on a non-urban coast of Maine, USA. Culture-based, culture-independent, and molecular methods were used to simultaneously sample microbial aerosols while monitoring meteorological parameters. Aerosols at this site displayed clear marine influence and high concentrations of ecologically-relevant nutrients. Coarse aerosol concentrations significantly increased with tidal height, onshore wind speed, and fog presence. Tidal height and fog presence did not significantly influence total microbial aerosol concentrations, but did have a significant effect on culturable microbial aerosol fallout. Molecular analyses of the microbes settling out of near-shore aerosols provided further evidence of local ocean to terrestrial transport of microbes. Aerosol and surface ocean bacterial communities shared species and in general were dominated by organisms previously sampled in marine environments. Fog presence strengthened the microbial connection between water and land through

  14. Information Content of Bistatic Lidar Observations of Aerosols from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexandrov, Mikhail D.; Mishchenko, Michael I.

    2017-01-01

    We present, for the first time, a quantitative retrieval error-propagation study for a bistatic high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) system intended for detailed quasi-global monitoring of aerosol properties from space. Our results demonstrate that supplementing a conventional monostatic HSRL with an additional receiver flown in formation at a scattering angle close to 165 degrees dramatically increases the information content of the measurements and allows for a sufficiently accurate characterization of tropospheric aerosols. We conclude that a bistatic HSRL system would far exceed the capabilities of currently flown or planned orbital instruments in monitoring global aerosol effects on the environment and on the Earth's climate. We also demonstrate how the commonly used a priori 'regularization' methodology can artificially reduce the propagated uncertainties and can thereby be misleading as to the real retrieval capabilities of a measurement system.

  15. Information content of bistatic lidar observations of aerosols from space.

    PubMed

    Alexandrov, Mikhail D; Mishchenko, Michael I

    2017-02-20

    We present, for the first time, a quantitative retrieval error-propagation study for a bistatic high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) system intended for detailed quasi-global monitoring of aerosol properties from space. Our results demonstrate that supplementing a conventional monostatic HSRL with an additional receiver flown in formation at a scattering angle close to 165° dramatically increases the information content of the measurements and allows for a sufficiently accurate characterization of tropospheric aerosols. We conclude that a bistatic HSRL system would far exceed the capabilities of currently flown or planned orbital instruments in monitoring global aerosol effects on the environment and on the Earth's climate. We also demonstrate how the commonly used a priori "regularization" methodology can artificially reduce the propagated uncertainties and can thereby be misleading as to the real retrieval capabilities of a measurement system.

  16. Environmental controls on coastal coarse aerosols: implications for microbial content and deposition in the near-shore environment.

    PubMed

    Dueker, M Elias; Weathers, Kathleen C; O'Mullan, Gregory D; Juhl, Andrew R; Uriarte, Maria

    2011-04-15

    Coarse aerosols (particle diameter (D(p)) > 2 μm) produced in coastal surf zones carry chemical and microbial content to shore, forming a connection between oceanic, atmospheric, and terrestrial systems that is potentially relevant to coastal ecology and human health. In this context, the effects of tidal height, wind speed, and fog on coastal coarse aerosols and microbial content were quantified on the southern coast of Maine, USA. Aerosols at this site displayed clear marine influence and had high concentrations of ecologically relevant nutrients. Coarse aerosol concentrations significantly increased with tidal height (i.e., decreasing distance from waterline), onshore wind speed, and fog presence. As onshore wind speeds rose above 3 m s(-1), the mean half-deposition distance of coarse aerosols increased to an observed maximum of 47.6 ± 10.9 m from the water's edge at wind speeds from 5.5-8 m s(-1). Tidal height and fog presence did not significantly influence total microbial aerosol concentrations but did have a significant effect on culturable microbial aerosol fallout. At low wind speeds, culturable microbial aerosols falling out near-shore decreased by half at a distance of only 1.7 ± 0.4 m from the water's edge, indicating that these microbes may be associated with large coarse aerosols with rapid settling rates.

  17. Water absorption by secondary organic aerosol and its effect on inorganic aerosol behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Ansari, A.S.; Pandis, S.N.

    2000-01-01

    The hygroscopic nature of atmospheric aerosol has generally been associated with its inorganic fraction. In this study, a group contribution method is used to predict the water absorption of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Compared against growth measurements of mixed inorganic-organic particles, this method appears to provide a first-order approximation in predicting SOA water absorption. The growth of common SOA species is predicted to be significantly less than common atmospheric inorganic salts such as (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} and NaCl. Using this group contribution method as a tool in predicting SOA water absorption, an integrated modeling approach is developed combining available SOA and inorganic aerosol models to predict overall aerosol behavior. The effect of SOA on water absorption and nitrate partitioning between the gas and aerosol phases is determined. On average, it appears that SOA accounts for approximately 7% of total aerosol water and increases aerosol nitrate concentrations by approximately 10%. At high relative humidity and low SOA mass fractions, the role of SOA in nitrate partitioning and its contribution to total aerosol water is negligible. However, the water absorption of SOA appears to be less sensitive to changes in relative humidity than that of inorganic species, and thus at low relative humidity and high SOA mass fraction concentrations, SOA is predicted to account for approximately 20% of total aerosol water and a 50% increase in aerosol nitrate concentrations. These findings could improve the results of modeling studies where aerosol nitrate has often been underpredicted.

  18. Effect of nitrate and sulfate relative abundance in PM2.5 on liquid water content explored through half-hourly observations of inorganic soluble aerosols at a polluted receptor site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Jian; Griffith, Stephen M.; Yu, Xin; Lau, Alexis K. H.; Yu, Jian Zhen

    2014-12-01

    Liquid water content (LWC) is the amount of liquid water on aerosols. It contributes to visibility degradation, provides a surface for gas condensation, and acts as a medium for heterogeneous gas/particle reactions. In this study, 520 half-hourly measurements of ionic chemical composition in PM2.5 at a receptor site in Hong Kong are used to investigate the dependence of LWC on ionic chemical composition, particularly on the relative abundance of sulfate and nitrate. LWC was estimated using a thermodynamic model (AIM-III). Within this data set of PM2.5 ionic compositions, LWC was highly correlated with the multivariate combination of sulfate and nitrate concentrations and RH (R2 = 0.90). The empirical linear regression result indicates that LWC is more sensitive to nitrate mass than sulfate. During a nitrate episode, the highest LWC (80.6 ± 17.9 μg m-3) was observed and the level was 70% higher than that during a sulfate episode despite a similar ionic PM2.5 mass concentration. A series of sensitivity tests were conducted to study LWC change as a function of the relative nitrate and sulfate abundance, the trend of which is expected to shift to more nitrate in China as a result of SO2 reduction and increase in NOx emission. Starting from a base case that uses the average of measured PM2.5 ionic chemical composition (63% SO42-, 11% NO3-, 19% NH4+, and 7% other ions) and an ionic equivalence ratio, [NH4+]/(2[SO42-] + [NO3-]), set constant to 0.72, the results show LWC would increase by 204% at RH = 40% when 50% of the SO42- is replaced by NO3- mass concentration. This is largely due to inhibition of (NH4)3H(SO4)2 crystallization while PM2.5 ionic species persist in the aqueous phase. At RH = 90%, LWC would increase by 12% when 50% of the SO42- is replaced by NO3- mass concentration. The results of this study highlight the important implications to aerosol chemistry and visibility degradation associated with LWC as a result of a shift in PM2.5 ionic chemical

  19. On the implications of aerosol liquid water and phase separation for organic aerosol mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pye, Havala O. T.; Murphy, Benjamin N.; Xu, Lu; Ng, Nga L.; Carlton, Annmarie G.; Guo, Hongyu; Weber, Rodney; Vasilakos, Petros; Wyat Appel, K.; Hapsari Budisulistiorini, Sri; Surratt, Jason D.; Nenes, Athanasios; Hu, Weiwei; Jimenez, Jose L.; Isaacman-VanWertz, Gabriel; Misztal, Pawel K.; Goldstein, Allen H.

    2017-01-01

    Organic compounds and liquid water are major aerosol constituents in the southeast United States (SE US). Water associated with inorganic constituents (inorganic water) can contribute to the partitioning medium for organic aerosol when relative humidities or organic matter to organic carbon (OM / OC) ratios are high such that separation relative humidities (SRH) are below the ambient relative humidity (RH). As OM / OC ratios in the SE US are often between 1.8 and 2.2, organic aerosol experiences both mixing with inorganic water and separation from it. Regional chemical transport model simulations including inorganic water (but excluding water uptake by organic compounds) in the partitioning medium for secondary organic aerosol (SOA) when RH > SRH led to increased SOA concentrations, particularly at night. Water uptake to the organic phase resulted in even greater SOA concentrations as a result of a positive feedback in which water uptake increased SOA, which further increased aerosol water and organic aerosol. Aerosol properties, such as the OM / OC and hygroscopicity parameter (κorg), were captured well by the model compared with measurements during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) 2013. Organic nitrates from monoterpene oxidation were predicted to be the least water-soluble semivolatile species in the model, but most biogenically derived semivolatile species in the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model were highly water soluble and expected to contribute to water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC). Organic aerosol and SOA precursors were abundant at night, but additional improvements in daytime organic aerosol are needed to close the model-measurement gap. When taking into account deviations from ideality, including both inorganic (when RH > SRH) and organic water in the organic partitioning medium reduced the mean bias in SOA for routine monitoring networks and improved model performance compared to observations from SOAS. Property updates from

  20. Aerosol water parameterisation: a single parameter framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, Swen; Steil, Benedikt; Abdelkader, Mohamed; Klingmüller, Klaus; Xu, Li; Penner, Joyce E.; Fountoukis, Christos; Nenes, Athanasios; Lelieveld, Jos

    2016-06-01

    We introduce a framework to efficiently parameterise the aerosol water uptake for mixtures of semi-volatile and non-volatile compounds, based on the coefficient, νi. This solute-specific coefficient was introduced in Metzger et al. (2012) to accurately parameterise the single solution hygroscopic growth, considering the Kelvin effect - accounting for the water uptake of concentrated nanometer-sized particles up to dilute solutions, i.e. from the compounds relative humidity of deliquescence (RHD) up to supersaturation (Köhler theory). Here we extend the νi parameterisation from single to mixed solutions. We evaluate our framework at various levels of complexity, by considering the full gas-liquid-solid partitioning for a comprehensive comparison with reference calculations using the E-AIM, EQUISOLV II and ISORROPIA II models as well as textbook examples. We apply our parameterisation in the EQuilibrium Simplified Aerosol Model V4 (EQSAM4clim) for climate simulations, implemented in a box model and in the global chemistry-climate model EMAC. Our results show (i) that the νi approach enables one to analytically solve the entire gas-liquid-solid partitioning and the mixed solution water uptake with sufficient accuracy, (ii) that ammonium sulfate mixtures can be solved with a simple method, e.g. pure ammonium nitrate and mixed ammonium nitrate and (iii) that the aerosol optical depth (AOD) simulations are in close agreement with remote sensing observations for the year 2005. Long-term evaluation of the EMAC results based on EQSAM4clim and ISORROPIA II will be presented separately.

  1. Aerosol water parameterization: a single parameter framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, S.; Steil, B.; Abdelkader, M.; Klingmüller, K.; Xu, L.; Penner, J. E.; Fountoukis, C.; Nenes, A.; Lelieveld, J.

    2015-11-01

    We introduce a framework to efficiently parameterize the aerosol water uptake for mixtures of semi-volatile and non-volatile compounds, based on the coefficient, νi. This solute specific coefficient was introduced in Metzger et al. (2012) to accurately parameterize the single solution hygroscopic growth, considering the Kelvin effect - accounting for the water uptake of concentrated nanometer sized particles up to dilute solutions, i.e., from the compounds relative humidity of deliquescence (RHD) up to supersaturation (Köhler-theory). Here we extend the νi-parameterization from single to mixed solutions. We evaluate our framework at various levels of complexity, by considering the full gas-liquid-solid partitioning for a comprehensive comparison with reference calculations using the E-AIM, EQUISOLV II, ISORROPIA II models as well as textbook examples. We apply our parameterization in EQSAM4clim, the EQuilibrium Simplified Aerosol Model V4 for climate simulations, implemented in a box model and in the global chemistry-climate model EMAC. Our results show: (i) that the νi-approach enables to analytically solve the entire gas-liquid-solid partitioning and the mixed solution water uptake with sufficient accuracy, (ii) that, e.g., pure ammonium nitrate and mixed ammonium nitrate - ammonium sulfate mixtures can be solved with a simple method, and (iii) that the aerosol optical depth (AOD) simulations are in close agreement with remote sensing observations for the year 2005. Long-term evaluation of the EMAC results based on EQSAM4clim and ISORROPIA II will be presented separately.

  2. Water uptake impedance of glassy organic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, T.; Zobrist, B.; Krieger, U. K.; Luo, B. P.; Soonsin, V.; Marcolli, C.; Koop, T.

    2009-04-01

    Depending on their concentration and composition, aerosols affect various atmospheric properties and processes, such as atmospheric chemistry and Earth's radiative budget. The atmospheric aerosol itself is a complex mixture of various inorganic and organic components, whereas the organic fraction can represent more than 50% of the total aerosol mass. It was recently shown that aerosols high in organics may be present in a glassy state (Zobrist et al., ACP, 8, 5221-5244, 2008). The glassy nature of the aerosols may influence their properties and restrict their functionalities severely, e.g. their water uptake, heterogeneous chemical reactions in their bulk or on their surfaces, as well as ice nucleation and ice crystal growth. Here, we present the first experiments on the water uptake by single levitated glassy aerosol particles using an electrodynamic balance (EDB). Sucrose was chosen as a model substance, which comprises functional groups typical of organic species in the atmosphere. In addition we developed a microphysical model, which enables us to calculate the liquid diffusion inside a glassy particle using water diffusion coefficients in aqueous sucrose particles adapted from the literature. As the diffusion coefficient of water in the particle, D(cH2O), depends on the water concentration cH2O itself, the solution of the diffusion equation presents an interesting non-linear problem. The combined experimental and modelling approach allows describing in detail the water uptake by glassy aerosols at atmospherically relevant temperatures and relative humidities (RH). Hygroscopicity cycles were perfomed in the EDB starting from a crystalline (non-spherical) sucrose particle at 291 K. No water uptake was observed while RH was increased until the particle deliquesces at roughly 85% RH leading to a liquid (spherical) particle. In the subsequent drying cycle, surprisingly no efflorescence was observed when the particle was dried to below 5% and it remained spherical

  3. On the implications of aerosol liquid water and phase ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Organic compounds and liquid water are major aerosol constituents in the southeast United States (SE US). Water associated with inorganic constituents (inorganic water) can contribute to the partitioning medium for organic aerosol when relative humidities or organic matter to organic carbon (OM ∕ OC) ratios are high such that separation relative humidities (SRH) are below the ambient relative humidity (RH). As OM ∕ OC ratios in the SE US are often between 1.8 and 2.2, organic aerosol experiences both mixing with inorganic water and separation from it. Regional chemical transport model simulations including inorganic water (but excluding water uptake by organic compounds) in the partitioning medium for secondary organic aerosol (SOA) when RH  >  SRH led to increased SOA concentrations, particularly at night. Water uptake to the organic phase resulted in even greater SOA concentrations as a result of a positive feedback in which water uptake increased SOA, which further increased aerosol water and organic aerosol. Aerosol properties, such as the OM ∕ OC and hygroscopicity parameter (κorg), were captured well by the model compared with measurements during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) 2013. Organic nitrates from monoterpene oxidation were predicted to be the least water-soluble semivolatile species in the model, but most biogenically derived semivolatile species in the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model were hig

  4. Aerosols, light, and water: Measurements of aerosol optical properties at different relative humidities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orozco, Daniel

    The Earth's atmosphere is composed of a large number of different gases as well as tiny suspended particles, both in solid and liquid state. These tiny particles, called atmospheric aerosols, have an immense impact on our health and on our global climate. Atmospheric aerosols influence the Earth's radiation budget both directly and indirectly. In the direct effect, aerosols scatter and absorb sunlight changing the radiative balance of the Earth-atmosphere system. Aerosols indirectly influence the Earth's radiation budget by modifying the microphysical and radiative properties of clouds as well as their water content and lifetime. In ambient conditions, aerosol particles experience hygroscopic growth due to the influence of relative humidity (RH), scattering more light than when the particles are dry. The quantitative knowledge of the RH effect and its influence on the light scattering coefficient and, in particular, on the phase function and polarization of aerosol particles is of substantial importance when comparing ground based observations with other optical aerosol measurements techniques such satellite and sunphotometric retrievals of aerosol optical depth and their inversions. This dissertation presents the aerosol hygroscopicity experiment investigated using a novel dryer-humidifier system, coupled to a TSI-3563 nephelometer, to obtain the light scattering coefficient (sp) as a function of relative humidity (RH) in hydration and dehydration modes. The measurements were performed in Porterville, CA (Jan 10-Feb 6, 2013), Baltimore, MD (Jul 3-30, 2013), and Golden, CO (Jul 12-Aug 10, 2014). Observations in Porterville and Golden were part of the NASA-sponsored DISCOVER-AQ project. The measured sp under varying RH in the three sites was combined with ground aerosol extinction, PM2:5mass concentrations, particle composition measurements, and compared with airborne observations performed during campaigns. The enhancement factor, f(RH), defined as the ratio of sp

  5. Hospital washbasin water: risk of Legionella-contaminated aerosol inhalation.

    PubMed

    Cassier, P; Landelle, C; Reyrolle, M; Nicolle, M C; Slimani, S; Etienne, J; Vanhems, P; Jarraud, S

    2013-12-01

    The contamination of aerosols by washbasin water colonized by Legionella in a hospital was evaluated. Aerosol samples were collected by two impingement technologies. Legionella was never detected by culture in all the (aerosol) samples. However, 45% (18/40) of aerosol samples were positive for Legionella spp. by polymerase chain reaction, with measurable concentrations in 10% of samples (4/40). Moreover, immunoassay detected Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 and L. anisa, and potentially viable bacteria were seen on viability testing. These data suggest that colonized hospital washbasins could represent risks of exposure to Legionella aerosol inhalation, especially by immunocompromised patients.

  6. Viscosity and electric properties of water aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shavlov, A. V.; Sokolov, I. V.; Dzhumandzhi, V. A.

    2016-09-01

    The flow of water mist in a narrow duct has been studied experimentally. The profile of the velocity of drops has been measured, and the viscosity of the mist has been calculated using the Navier-Stokes equation. It has been found that at low gradients of the rate of shear the viscosity of the mist can exceed that of clean air by tens and even hundreds of times. The electric charge of the drops has been measured. It has been found that the viscosity of the mist differs from that of clean air at gradients of the rate of shear that are less than the frequency of the establishment of electric equilibrium between the drops. A comparative analysis of the viscosities of the mist and a drop cluster has been carried out, and the dependence of the viscosity of the water aerosol on the radius and the charge of the drops has been predicted. The possible role of aerosols that contain submicron drops in the known "clear air turbulence" problem has been shown.

  7. 14C content in aerosols in Mexico City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, V.; Solís, C.; Chávez, E.; Andrade, E.; Ortiz, M. E.; Huerta, A.; Aragón, J.; Rodríguez-Ceja, M.; Martínez, M. A.; Ortiz, E.

    2016-03-01

    14C-AMS of total carbon was determined in aerosols (PM10 fraction), collected in Mexico City during two weeks from 21 November to 3 December 2012. Other tracers such as total carbon (TC), organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC) and trace element contents were also determined. F14C values varied from 0.39 to 0.48 with an average of 0.43. These values are slightly lower than those previously obtained for PM2.5 in 2003 and 2006 and reflect a high contribution of fossil CO2 to the carbonaceous matter in aerosols from Mexico City. In contrast, from 2006 to 2012 PM10 increased; EC, Ca, Ti and Fe concentrations remained constant, while OC, TC and K concentrations decreased. The use of potassium as an indicator of biomass burning showed that this source was negligible during this campaign. Combined analytical approaches allowed us to distinguish temporal variations of anthropogenic and natural inputs to the F14C.

  8. LASE measurements of aerosols and water vapor during TARFOX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrare, Richard A.; Ismail, Syed; Browell, Edward V.; Brackett, Vincent G.; Kooi, Susan A.; Clayton, Marian B.; Melfi, Harvey; Whiteman, David N.; Schwenner, Geary; Evans, Keith D.; Hobbs, Peter V.; Veefkind, J. Pepijn; Russell, Philip B.; Livingston, John M.; Hignett, Philip; Holben, Brent N.; Remer, Lorraine A.

    1998-01-01

    The TARFOX (Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment) intensive field campaign was designed to reduce uncertainties in estimates of the effects of anthropogenic aerosols on climate by measuring direct radiative effects and the optical, physical, and chemical properties of aerosols [1]. TARFOX was conducted off the East Coast of the United States between July 10-31, 1996. Ground, aircraft, and satellite-based sensors measured the sensitivity of radiative fields at various atmospheric levels to aerosol optical properties (i.e., optical thickness, phase function, single-scattering albedo) and to the vertical profile of aerosols. The LASE (Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment) instrument, which was flown on the NASA ER-2 aircraft, measured vertical profiles of total scattering ratio and water vapor during a series of 9 flights. These profiles were used in real-time to help direct the other aircraft to the appropriate altitudes for intensive sampling of aerosol layers. We have subsequently used the LASE aerosol data to derive aerosol backscattering and extinction profiles. Using these aerosol extinction profiles, we derived estimates of aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and compared these with measurements of AOT from both ground and airborne sun photometers and derived from the ATSR-2 (Along Track and Scanning Radiometer 2) sensor on ERS-2 (European Remote Sensing Satellite-2). We also used the water vapor mixing ratio profiles measured simultaneously by LASE to derive precipitable water vapor and compare these to ground based measurements.

  9. Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Richard A. Ferrare; David D. Turner

    2011-09-01

    Project goals: (1) Use the routine surface and airborne measurements at the ARM SGP site, and the routine surface measurements at the NSA site, to continue our evaluations of model aerosol simulations; (2) Determine the degree to which the Raman lidar measurements of water vapor and aerosol scattering and extinction can be used to remotely characterize the aerosol humidification factor; (3) Use the high temporal resolution CARL data to examine how aerosol properties vary near clouds; and (4) Use the high temporal resolution CARL and Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) data to quantify entrainment in optically thin continental cumulus clouds.

  10. Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, David, D.; Ferrare, Richard, A.

    2011-07-06

    The 'Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds' project focused extensively on the analysis and utilization of water vapor and aerosol profiles derived from the ARM Raman lidar at the Southern Great Plains ARM site. A wide range of different tasks were performed during this project, all of which improved quality of the data products derived from the lidar or advanced the understanding of atmospheric processes over the site. These activities included: upgrading the Raman lidar to improve its sensitivity; participating in field experiments to validate the lidar aerosol and water vapor retrievals; using the lidar aerosol profiles to evaluate the accuracy of the vertical distribution of aerosols in global aerosol model simulations; examining the correlation between relative humidity and aerosol extinction, and how these change, due to horizontal distance away from cumulus clouds; inferring boundary layer turbulence structure in convective boundary layers from the high-time-resolution lidar water vapor measurements; retrieving cumulus entrainment rates in boundary layer cumulus clouds; and participating in a field experiment that provided data to help validate both the entrainment rate retrievals and the turbulent profiles derived from lidar observations.

  11. Profiling soil water content sensor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A waveguide-on-access-tube (WOAT) sensor system based on time domain reflectometry (TDR) principles was developed to sense soil water content and bulk electrical conductivity in 20-cm (8 inch) deep layers from the soil surface to depths of 3 m (10 ft) (patent No. 13/404,491 pending). A Cooperative R...

  12. The impacts of aerosol loading, composition, and water uptake on aerosol extinction variability in the Baltimore-Washington, D.C. region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyersdorf, A. J.; Ziemba, L. D.; Chen, G.; Corr, C. A.; Crawford, J. H.; Diskin, G. S.; Moore, R. H.; Thornhill, K. L.; Winstead, E. L.; Anderson, B. E.

    2016-01-01

    In order to utilize satellite-based aerosol measurements for the determination of air quality, the relationship between aerosol optical properties (wavelength-dependent, column-integrated extinction measured by satellites) and mass measurements of aerosol loading (PM2.5 used for air quality monitoring) must be understood. This connection varies with many factors including those specific to the aerosol type - such as composition, size, and hygroscopicity - and to the surrounding atmosphere, such as temperature, relative humidity (RH), and altitude, all of which can vary spatially and temporally. During the DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality) project, extensive in situ atmospheric profiling in the Baltimore, MD-Washington, D.C. region was performed during 14 flights in July 2011. Identical flight plans and profile locations throughout the project provide meaningful statistics for determining the variability in and correlations between aerosol loading, composition, optical properties, and meteorological conditions. Measured water-soluble aerosol mass was composed primarily of ammonium sulfate (campaign average of 32 %) and organics (57 %). A distinct difference in composition was observed, with high-loading days having a proportionally larger percentage of sulfate due to transport from the Ohio River Valley. This composition shift caused a change in the aerosol water-uptake potential (hygroscopicity) such that higher relative contributions of inorganics increased the bulk aerosol hygroscopicity. These days also tended to have higher relative humidity, causing an increase in the water content of the aerosol. Conversely, low-aerosol-loading days had lower sulfate and higher black carbon contributions, causing lower single-scattering albedos (SSAs). The average black carbon concentrations were 240 ng m-3 in the lowest 1 km, decreasing to 35 ng m-3 in the free troposphere (above

  13. LASE Measurements of Water Vapor, Aerosol, and Cloud Distributions in Saharan Air Layers and Tropical Disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ismail, Syed; Ferrare, Richard A.; Browell, Edward V.; Kooi, Susan A.; Dunion, Jason P.; Heymsfield, Gerry; Notari, Anthony; Butler, Carolyn F.; Burton, Sharon; Fenn, Marta; Krishnamurti, T. N.; Chen, Gao; Anderson, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    LASE (Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment) on-board the NASA DC-8 measured high resolution profiles of water vapor and aerosols, and cloud distributions in 14 flights over the eastern North Atlantic during the NAMMA (NASA African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses) field experiment. These measurements were used to study African easterly waves (AEWs), tropical cyclones (TCs), and the Saharan Air Layer(s) (SAL). Interactions between the SAL and tropical air were observed during the early stages of the TC development. These LASE measurements represent the first simultaneous water vapor and aerosol lidar measurements to study the SAL and its impact on AEWs and TCs. Examples of profile measurements of aerosol scattering ratios, aerosol extinction coefficients, aerosol optical thickness, water vapor mixing ratios, RH, and temperature are presented to illustrate their characteristics in SAL, convection, and clear air regions. LASE data suggest that the SAL suppresses low-altitude convection at the convection-SAL interface region. Mid-level convection associated with the AEW and transport are likely responsible for high water vapor content observed in the southern regions of the SAL on August 20, 2008. This interaction is responsible for the transfer of about 7 x 10(exp 15) J latent heat energy within a day to the SAL. Measurements of lidar extinction-to-backscatter ratios in the range 36+/-5 to 45+/-5 are within the range of measurements from other lidar measurements of dust. LASE aerosol extinction and water vapor profiles are validated by comparison with onboard in situ aerosol measurements and GPS dropsonde water vapor soundings, respectively.

  14. Aerosol content survey by mini N 2 -Raman lidar: Application to local and long-range transport aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royer, Philippe; Chazette, Patrick; Lardier, Melody; Sauvage, Laurent

    2011-12-01

    This study shows an aerosol content survey in the low and middle troposphere over Paris with a compact and light Nitrogen-Raman lidar which has been recently developed by the Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique (CEA) and LEOSPHERE company. This eye-safe and wide field-of-view system (full overlap between 150 and 200 m) is particularly well-adapted to air pollution survey in the vicinity of Megalopolis. Extinction-to-backscatter coefficient (so-called Lidar Ratio LR) profiles obtained with a Tikhonov regularization scheme are presented for long-range transport events of aerosols (volcanic ash plume LR = 48 ± 10 sr, and desert dust, LR = 45 ± 8 sr) which may contribute to the local load of aerosols emitted by traffic and industries in Megalopolis. Due to an insufficient signal to noise ratio (SNR < 30), a new dichotomous algorithm has been developed to perform daytime inversions every hour which is in accordance with the typical time evolution of aerosols within the planetary boundary layer. This inversion scheme is based on the constraint of the elastic channel with the aerosol optical depth (between typically 0.2 and 0.7 km) determined with the N 2-Raman channel and thus only gives access to an equivalent LR between 0.2 and 0.7 km with a relative uncertainty lower than 15%. This approach has been applied to retrieve diurnal cycle of LR for polluted continental aerosols over Paris and is compared with Tikhonov regularization applied during the night. We found a mean value of 85 ± 18 sr for polluted continental aerosols which is in agreement with other studies performed around the Paris urban area. Results for aerosol optical properties are presented and the error sources are discussed for each approach.

  15. Effect of the Presence of Crustal Elements (Ca2+, K+, and Mg2+) in Estimating Water Content in PM2.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H.; Kim, Y.

    2009-12-01

    Water content in the ambient aerosols is an important characteristic since it affect various properties of the ambient aerosols such as aerosol hygroscopicity. Measurement of aerosol water content is difficult and usually estimated by using either empirical formula or gas/particle equilibrium model. It has been thought that major inorganic ions (Na+, SO42-, NH4+, NO3-, and Cl-) be the dominant figures in determining aerosol water content. A gas/particle equilibrium model, SCAPE2 was used to estimate the aerosol water content based on the PM2.5 and related gaseous species measurement data at Seoul (Apr. 2001 - Feb. 2002, Nov. 2004 - Jul. 2005) and Gosan (Mar. 1996 - Jan. 2007), the capital of Korea and a background area in Korea, respectively. For each site, seasonal characteristics were examined. Figure 1 shows estimated water content increasing with relative humidity at Gosan in spring. It was found that the increase of estimated aerosol water content curves to relative humidity with crustal elements (Ca2+, K+, and Mg2+) and without them show different behavior at the deliquescence points as shown. Thus, without crustal elements, the aerosol water content estimation might introduce significant errors in aerosol modeling such as 3-D chemical transport modeling. Estimated water content increasing with relative humidity of Gosan, Korea in spring

  16. Adsorptive uptake of water by semisolid secondary organic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pajunoja, Aki; Lambe, Andrew T.; Hakala, Jani; Rastak, Narges; Cummings, Molly J.; Brogan, James F.; Hao, Liqing; Paramonov, Mikhail; Hong, Juan; Prisle, Nønne L.; Malila, Jussi; Romakkaniemi, Sami; Lehtinen, Kari E. J.; Laaksonen, Ari; Kulmala, Markku; Massoli, Paola; Onasch, Timothy B.; Donahue, Neil M.; Riipinen, Ilona; Davidovits, Paul; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Petäjä, Tuukka; Virtanen, Annele

    2015-04-01

    Aerosol climate effects are intimately tied to interactions with water. Here we combine hygroscopicity measurements with direct observations about the phase of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles to show that water uptake by slightly oxygenated SOA is an adsorption-dominated process under subsaturated conditions, where low solubility inhibits water uptake until the humidity is high enough for dissolution to occur. This reconciles reported discrepancies in previous hygroscopicity closure studies. We demonstrate that the difference in SOA hygroscopic behavior in subsaturated and supersaturated conditions can lead to an effect up to about 30% in the direct aerosol forcing—highlighting the need to implement correct descriptions of these processes in atmospheric models. Obtaining closure across the water saturation point is therefore a critical issue for accurate climate modeling.

  17. Reactive nitrogen chemistry in aerosol water as a source of sulfate during haze events in China

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yafang; Zheng, Guangjie; Wei, Chao; Mu, Qing; Zheng, Bo; Wang, Zhibin; Gao, Meng; Zhang, Qiang; He, Kebin; Carmichael, Gregory; Pöschl, Ulrich; Su, Hang

    2016-01-01

    Fine-particle pollution associated with winter haze threatens the health of more than 400 million people in the North China Plain. Sulfate is a major component of fine haze particles. Record sulfate concentrations of up to ~300 μg m−3 were observed during the January 2013 winter haze event in Beijing. State-of-the-art air quality models that rely on sulfate production mechanisms requiring photochemical oxidants cannot predict these high levels because of the weak photochemistry activity during haze events. We find that the missing source of sulfate and particulate matter can be explained by reactive nitrogen chemistry in aerosol water. The aerosol water serves as a reactor, where the alkaline aerosol components trap SO2, which is oxidized by NO2 to form sulfate, whereby high reaction rates are sustained by the high neutralizing capacity of the atmosphere in northern China. This mechanism is self-amplifying because higher aerosol mass concentration corresponds to higher aerosol water content, leading to faster sulfate production and more severe haze pollution. PMID:28028539

  18. Aircraft observations of water-soluble dicarboxylic acids in the aerosols over China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan-Lin; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Qing Fu, Ping; Boreddy, Suresh K. R.; Watanabe, Tomomi; Hatakeyama, Shiro; Takami, Akinori; Wang, Wei

    2016-05-01

    Vertical profiles of dicarboxylic acids, related organic compounds and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) tracer compounds in particle phase have not yet been simultaneously explored in East Asia, although there is growing evidence that aqueous-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds may be responsible for the elevated organic aerosols (OA) in the troposphere. Here, we found consistently good correlation of oxalic acid, the most abundant individual organic compounds in aerosols globally, with its precursors as well as biogenic-derived SOA compounds in Chinese tropospheric aerosols by aircraft measurements. Anthropogenically derived dicarboxylic acids (i.e., C5 and C6 diacids) at high altitudes were 4-20 times higher than those from surface measurements and even occasionally dominant over oxalic acid at altitudes higher than 2 km, which is in contrast to the predominance of oxalic acid previously reported globally including the tropospheric and surface aerosols. This indicates an enhancement of tropospheric SOA formation from anthropogenic precursors. Furthermore, oxalic acid-to-sulfate ratio maximized at altitudes of ˜ 2 km, explaining aqueous-phase SOA production that was supported by good correlations with predicted liquid water content, organic carbon and biogenic SOA tracers. These results demonstrate that elevated oxalic acid and related SOA compounds from both the anthropogenic and biogenic sources may substantially contribute to tropospheric OA burden over polluted regions of China, implying aerosol-associated climate effects and intercontinental transport.

  19. On the Implications of aerosol liquid water and phase separation for modeled organic aerosol mass

    EPA Science Inventory

    Current chemical transport models assume that organic aerosol (OA)-forming compounds partition mostly to a water-poor, organic-rich phase in accordance with their vapor pressures. However, in the southeast United States, a significant fraction of ambient organic compounds are wat...

  20. Enhanced Volatile Organic Compounds emissions and organic aerosol mass increase the oligomer content of atmospheric aerosols.

    PubMed

    Kourtchev, Ivan; Giorio, Chiara; Manninen, Antti; Wilson, Eoin; Mahon, Brendan; Aalto, Juho; Kajos, Maija; Venables, Dean; Ruuskanen, Taina; Levula, Janne; Loponen, Matti; Connors, Sarah; Harris, Neil; Zhao, Defeng; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Mentel, Thomas; Rudich, Yinon; Hallquist, Mattias; Doussin, Jean-Francois; Maenhaut, Willy; Bäck, Jaana; Petäjä, Tuukka; Wenger, John; Kulmala, Markku; Kalberer, Markus

    2016-10-13

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) accounts for a dominant fraction of the submicron atmospheric particle mass, but knowledge of the formation, composition and climate effects of SOA is incomplete and limits our understanding of overall aerosol effects in the atmosphere. Organic oligomers were discovered as dominant components in SOA over a decade ago in laboratory experiments and have since been proposed to play a dominant role in many aerosol processes. However, it remains unclear whether oligomers are relevant under ambient atmospheric conditions because they are often not clearly observed in field samples. Here we resolve this long-standing discrepancy by showing that elevated SOA mass is one of the key drivers of oligomer formation in the ambient atmosphere and laboratory experiments. We show for the first time that a specific organic compound class in aerosols, oligomers, is strongly correlated with cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activities of SOA particles. These findings might have important implications for future climate scenarios where increased temperatures cause higher biogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions, which in turn lead to higher SOA mass formation and significant changes in SOA composition. Such processes would need to be considered in climate models for a realistic representation of future aerosol-climate-biosphere feedbacks.

  1. Enhanced Volatile Organic Compounds emissions and organic aerosol mass increase the oligomer content of atmospheric aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourtchev, Ivan; Giorio, Chiara; Manninen, Antti; Wilson, Eoin; Mahon, Brendan; Aalto, Juho; Kajos, Maija; Venables, Dean; Ruuskanen, Taina; Levula, Janne; Loponen, Matti; Connors, Sarah; Harris, Neil; Zhao, Defeng; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Mentel, Thomas; Rudich, Yinon; Hallquist, Mattias; Doussin, Jean-Francois; Maenhaut, Willy; Bäck, Jaana; Petäjä, Tuukka; Wenger, John; Kulmala, Markku; Kalberer, Markus

    2016-10-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) accounts for a dominant fraction of the submicron atmospheric particle mass, but knowledge of the formation, composition and climate effects of SOA is incomplete and limits our understanding of overall aerosol effects in the atmosphere. Organic oligomers were discovered as dominant components in SOA over a decade ago in laboratory experiments and have since been proposed to play a dominant role in many aerosol processes. However, it remains unclear whether oligomers are relevant under ambient atmospheric conditions because they are often not clearly observed in field samples. Here we resolve this long-standing discrepancy by showing that elevated SOA mass is one of the key drivers of oligomer formation in the ambient atmosphere and laboratory experiments. We show for the first time that a specific organic compound class in aerosols, oligomers, is strongly correlated with cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activities of SOA particles. These findings might have important implications for future climate scenarios where increased temperatures cause higher biogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions, which in turn lead to higher SOA mass formation and significant changes in SOA composition. Such processes would need to be considered in climate models for a realistic representation of future aerosol-climate-biosphere feedbacks.

  2. Enhanced Volatile Organic Compounds emissions and organic aerosol mass increase the oligomer content of atmospheric aerosols

    PubMed Central

    Kourtchev, Ivan; Giorio, Chiara; Manninen, Antti; Wilson, Eoin; Mahon, Brendan; Aalto, Juho; Kajos, Maija; Venables, Dean; Ruuskanen, Taina; Levula, Janne; Loponen, Matti; Connors, Sarah; Harris, Neil; Zhao, Defeng; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Mentel, Thomas; Rudich, Yinon; Hallquist, Mattias; Doussin, Jean-Francois; Maenhaut, Willy; Bäck, Jaana; Petäjä, Tuukka; Wenger, John; Kulmala, Markku; Kalberer, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) accounts for a dominant fraction of the submicron atmospheric particle mass, but knowledge of the formation, composition and climate effects of SOA is incomplete and limits our understanding of overall aerosol effects in the atmosphere. Organic oligomers were discovered as dominant components in SOA over a decade ago in laboratory experiments and have since been proposed to play a dominant role in many aerosol processes. However, it remains unclear whether oligomers are relevant under ambient atmospheric conditions because they are often not clearly observed in field samples. Here we resolve this long-standing discrepancy by showing that elevated SOA mass is one of the key drivers of oligomer formation in the ambient atmosphere and laboratory experiments. We show for the first time that a specific organic compound class in aerosols, oligomers, is strongly correlated with cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activities of SOA particles. These findings might have important implications for future climate scenarios where increased temperatures cause higher biogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions, which in turn lead to higher SOA mass formation and significant changes in SOA composition. Such processes would need to be considered in climate models for a realistic representation of future aerosol-climate-biosphere feedbacks. PMID:27733773

  3. Speciation and water soluble fraction of iron in aerosols from various sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Y.; Kurisu, M.; Uematsu, M.

    2015-12-01

    Iron (Fe) is an essential micronutrient and has been identified as a limiting factor for phytoplankton growth in high-nitrate low-chlorophyll (HNLC) regions of the ocean. In the North Pacific, three sources of iron (Fe) transported via. atmosphere can be suggested: (i) mineral dust from East Asia, (ii) anthropogenic Fe, and (iii) aerosols from volcanic origin. Considering these different sources, Fe can be found and transported in a variety of chemical forms, both water-soluble and -insoluble. It is generally believed that only the soluble fraction of Fe can be considered as bioavailable for phytoplankton. To assess the biogeochemical impact of the atmospheric input, attempt was made to determine Fe species by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and its water solubility, in particular to compare the three sources. Iron species, chemical composition, and soluble Fe concentration in aerosol collected at Tsukuba (Japan) through a year were investigated to compare the contributions of mineral dust and anthropogenic components. It was found that the concentration of soluble Fe in aerosol is correlated with those of sulfate and oxalate which originate from anthropogenic sources, suggesting that soluble Fe is mainly derived from anthropogenic sources. XAS analysis showed that main Fe species in aerosols in Tsukuba were illite, ferrihydrite, hornblende, and Fe(III) sulfate. Moreover, soluble Fe fraction is closely correlated with that of Fe(III) sulfate. In spite of supply of high concentrations of Fe in mineral dust from East Asia, it was found that anthropogenic fraction is important due to its high water solubility by the presence of Fe(III) sulfate. Marine aerosol samples originated from volcanic ash were collected in the western North Pacific during KH-08-2 cruise (August, 2008). XAS analysis suggested that Fe species of volcanic ashes changed during the long-range transport, while dissolution experiment showed that Fe solubility of the marine aerosol is larger than

  4. Infrared spectroscopy of sulfuric acid/water aerosols: Freezing characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clapp, M. L.; Niedziela, R. F.; Richwine, L. J.; Dransfield, T.; Miller, R. E.; Worsnop, D. R.

    1997-04-01

    A low-temperature flow cell has been used in conjunction with a Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometer to study sulfuric acid/water aerosols. The aerosols were generated with a wide range of composition (28 to 85 wt%), including those characteristic of stratospheric sulfate aerosols, and studied over the temperature range from 240 K to 160 K. The particles exhibited deep supercooling, by as much as 100 K below the freezing point in some cases. Freezing of water ice was observed in the more dilute (<40 wt% sulfuric acid) particles, in agreement with the predictions of Jensen et al. and recent observations by Bertram et al. In contrast with theoretical predictions, however, the entire particle often does not immediately freeze, at least on the timescale of the present experiments (seconds to minutes). Freezing of the entire particle is observed at lower temperatures, well below that characteristic of the polar stratosphere.

  5. Analyses of Heavy Metal Contents in the Bulk Atmospheric Aerosols Simultaneously Collected at Okinawa Archipelago, Japan by Using X-ray fluorescence spectrometric method (XRF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshiro, Y.; ITOH, A.; Azechi, S.; Somada, Y.; Handa, D.; Miyagi, Y.; Arakaki, T.; Tanahara, A.

    2012-12-01

    We studied heavy metal contents of bulk atmospheric aerosols using an X-ray fluorescence spectrometric method (XRF). The XRF method enables us to analyze heavy metal contents in the bulk aerosols rapidly without any chemical pretreatments. We used an energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer that is compact and portable. We prepared several different amounts of standard reference materials (referred to "SRM", NIES No.28 of Japanese National Institute of Environmental Studies) on quartz filters for calibration curves in two different methods; 1) water-insoluble materials were collected after dispersing SRM in pure water and filtered with the quartz filters ("wet method"), and 2) SRM was dispersed in air in the plastic container and the aerosols were collected by using the low-volume air sampler ("dry method"). Good linear relationships between X-ray intensity and amount of aerosols on the filter were seen in the following 9 metals; Al, K, Ti, V, Fe, Ni, Rb, Ba, and Pb (with wet method) and 12 metals; K, Ti, Fe, Ni, Rb, Ba, Pb, Sr, Ca, Mn, Zn, and Cu (with dry method). Furthermore, we evaluated quantitative responses of XRF method by comparing with the metal contents determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) after acid-digestion. We then used XRF method to determine heavy metal contents in authentic atmospheric aerosols collected in Okinawa islands, Japan. We simultaneously collected bulk aerosol samples by using identical high-volume air samplers at 3 islands; Cape Hedo Atmospheric Aerosol Monitoring Station (CHAAMS, Okinawa island), Kume island (ca. 160 km south-west of CHAAMS), and Minami-Daitou island (ca. 320 km south-east of CHAAMS). We report and discuss spatial and temporal distribution of heavy metals determined by the XRF method in the bulk atmospheric aerosols collected at the three islands during June 2008 to June 2010, and for CHAAMS during June 2008 to October 2012.

  6. Resolution and Content Improvements to MISR Aerosol and Land Surface Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garay, M. J.; Bull, M. A.; Diner, D. J.; Hansen, E. G.; Kalashnikova, O. V.

    2015-12-01

    Since early 2000, the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument on NASA's Terra satellite has been providing operational Level 2 (swath-based) aerosol optical depth (AOD) and particle property retrievals at 17.6 km spatial resolution and atmospherically corrected land surface products at 1.1 km resolution. The performance of the aerosol product has been validated against ground-based Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) observations, model comparisons, and climatological assessments. This product has played a major role in studies of the impacts of aerosols on climate and air quality. The surface product has found a variety of uses, particularly at regional scales for assessing vegetation and land surface change. A major development effort has led to the release of an update to the operational (Version 22) MISR Level 2 aerosol and land surface retrieval products, which has been in production since December 2007. The new release is designated Version 23. The resolution of the aerosol product has been increased to 4.4 km, allowing more detailed characterization of aerosol spatial variability, especially near local sources and in urban areas. The product content has been simplified and updated to include more robust measures of retrieval uncertainty and other fields to benefit users. The land surface product has also been updated to incorporate the Version 23 aerosol product as input and to improve spatial coverage, particularly over mountainous terrain and snow/ice-covered surfaces. We will describe the major upgrades incorporated in Version 23 and present validation of the aerosol product against both the standard AERONET historical database, as well as high spatial density AERONET-DRAGON deployments. Comparisons will also be shown relative to the Version 22 aerosol and land surface products. Applications enabled by these product updates will be discussed.

  7. Dissolved organic matter in sea spray: a transfer study from marine surface water to aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt-Kopplin, P.; Liger-Belair, G.; Koch, B. P.; Flerus, R.; Kattner, G.; Harir, M.; Kanawati, B.; Lucio, M.; Tziotis, D.; Hertkorn, N.; Gebefügi, I.

    2012-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosols impose direct and indirect effects on the climate system, for example, by absorption of radiation in relation to cloud droplets size, on chemical and organic composition and cloud dynamics. The first step in the formation of Organic primary aerosols, i.e. the transfer of dissolved organic matter from the marine surface into the atmosphere, was studied. We present a molecular level description of this phenomenon using the high resolution analytical tools of Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). Our experiments confirm the chemoselective transfer of natural organic molecules, especially of aliphatic compounds from the surface water into the atmosphere via bubble bursting processes. Transfer from marine surface water to the atmosphere involves a chemical gradient governed by the physicochemical properties of the involved molecules when comparing elemental compositions and differentiating CHO, CHNO, CHOS and CHNOS bearing compounds. Typical chemical fingerprints of compounds enriched in the aerosol phase were CHO and CHOS molecular series, smaller molecules of higher aliphaticity and lower oxygen content, and typical surfactants. A non-targeted metabolomics analysis demonstrated that many of these molecules corresponded to homologous series of oxo-, hydroxy-, methoxy-, branched fatty acids and mono-, di- and tricarboxylic acids as well as monoterpenes and sugars. These surface active biomolecules were preferentially transferred from surface water into the atmosphere via bubble bursting processes to form a significant fraction of primary organic aerosols. This way of sea spray production leaves a selective biological signature of the surface water in the corresponding aerosol that may be transported into higher altitudes up to the lower atmosphere, thus contributing to the formation of secondary organic aerosol on a global scale or transported laterally with

  8. Water soluble organic constituents in Arctic aerosols and snow pack

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Shaomeng ); Winchester, J.W. )

    1993-01-08

    Eight water-soluble organic anions were measured in 70 aerosol samples and 10 snow samples at Barrow, Alaska in March-April, 1989. The ranking of the ions in aerosols according to total (coarse + fine aerosol) median concentrations was acetate (44 ng m[sup [minus]3]), oxalate (27), benzoate (23), formate (22), propionate (6), methanesulfonate (5), lactate (4), and pyruvate (4). When added up, the median organic anion mass was 156 ng m[sup [minus]3]. The organic anions/nssSO[sub 4][sup =] mass ratio had a median of 0.18 and 0.07 in the coarse (>1 [mu]m) and fine (<1 [mu]m) size fractions, respectively, but can be very high on occasions. On average, the organic anions made up more than 10% of the water-soluble aerosol mass. A similar ranking in concentration was also found for the organic ions in the snow pack samples. The organic anion/nssSO[sub 4][sup =] mass ratio in these samples was >0.5, substantially higher than in aerosols. 18 refs., 2 tabs.

  9. Estimating canopy water content from spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Foliar water content is a dynamic quantity depending on water losses from transpiration and water uptake from the soil. Absorption of shortwave radiation by water is determined by various frequency overtones of fundamental bending and stretching molecular transitions. Leaf water potential and rela...

  10. Cloud water measurements of glyoxal and methylglyoxal during the Whistler Aerosol and Cloud Study (WACS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herckes, P.; Ervens, B.; Wang, Y.; Eagar, J.; Leaitch, R.; Macdonald, A.; Sjostedt, S.; Abbatt, J.

    2011-12-01

    Glyoxal and methylglyoxal are produced in high yields from both anthropogenic (aromatics) and biogenic (isoprene) precursors. The role of glyoxal and methylglyoxal in secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation in the aqueous phase of cloud water and aerosols has received great attention over the past years. In addition, gas phase oxidation and photolysis of these compounds yield radicals and, thus, impact the oxidant budgets. While the reactivity of methylglyoxal and glyoxal in both the gas and aqueous phases is nearly identical, the much higher solubility of glyoxal leads to its more efficient removal in the presence of clouds. Thus, the amount of cloud water (liquid water content, LWC) and cloud processing time will affect the concentration ratios and thus the reaction rates of oxidation processes in the gas and aqueous phase, respectively. The Whistler Aerosol and Cloud Study (WACS) investigated the interactions between clouds and biogenic aerosol in summer 2010 in Whistler (Canada). During this study, cloud samples were collected at two locations, Whistler peak and a mid mountain station Raven's Nest. Cloud samples were extensively chemically characterized including the measurements of glyoxal and methylglyoxal using liquid chromatography coupled to UV and mass spectrometric detection after derivatization. Concentrations were variable on the order of micromoles, accounting for 1% of the dissolved organic matter in clouds. Glyoxal and methylglyoxal concentrations at both locations are predicted by means of model studies using VOC measurements and liquid water contents as input data. These concentrations and their ratios are compared to those in different regions. It will be discussed how cloud liquid water content, cloud processing time and amount and mixture of precursors (emissions) affect these concentration ratios. Finally, the role of different emission scenarios and the presence of clouds for SOA formation and radical budgets will be briefly assessed.

  11. Modeling aerosol-water interactions in subsaturated and supersaturated environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fountoukis, Christos

    The current dissertation is motivated by the need for an improved understanding of aerosol - water interactions both in subsaturated and supersaturated atmospheric conditions with a strong emphasis on air pollution and climate change modeling. A cloud droplet formation parameterization was developed to (i) predict droplet formation from a lognormal representation of aerosol size distribution and composition, and, (ii) include a size-dependant mass transfer coefficient for the growth of water droplets which explicitly accounts for the impact of organics on droplet growth kinetics. The parameterization unravels most of the physics of droplet formation and is in remarkable agreement with detailed numerical parcel model simulations, even for low values of the accommodation coefficient. The parameterization offers a much needed rigorous and computationally inexpensive framework for directly linking complex chemical effects on aerosol activation in global climate models. The new aerosol activation parameterization was also tested against observations from highly polluted clouds (within the vicinity of power plant plumes). Remarkable closure was achieved (much less than the 20% measurement uncertainty). The error in predicted cloud droplet concentration was mostly sensitive to updraft velocity. Optimal closure is obtained if the water vapor uptake coefficient is equal to 0.06. These findings can serve as much needed constraints in modeling of aerosol-cloud interactions in the North America. Aerosol-water interactions in ambient relative humidities less than 100% were studied using a thermodynamic equilibrium model for inorganic aerosol and a three dimensional air quality model. We developed a new thermodynamic equilibrium model, ISORROPIA-II, which predicts the partitioning of semi-volatiles and the phase state of K+/Ca2+/M g2+ /NH4+/Na+/SO4 2-/NO3-/Cl-/H2O aerosols. A comprehensive evaluation of its performance was conducted over a wide range of atmospherically relevant

  12. Reconciling satellite aerosol optical thickness and surface fine particle mass through aerosol liquid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Thien Khoi V.; Ghate, Virendra P.; Carlton, Annmarie G.

    2016-11-01

    Summertime aerosol optical thickness (AOT) over the southeast U.S. is sharply enhanced over wintertime values. This seasonal pattern is unique and of particular interest because temperatures there have not warmed over the past 100 years. Patterns in surface fine particle mass are inconsistent with satellite reported AOT. In this work, we attempt to reconcile the spatial and temporal distribution of AOT over the U.S. with particle mass measurements at the surface by examining trends in aerosol liquid water (ALW), a particle constituent that scatters radiation and affects satellite AOT but is removed in mass measurements at routine surface monitoring sites. We employ the thermodynamic model ISORROPIAv2.1 to estimate ALW mass concentrations at Interagency Monitoring of PROtected Visual Environments sites using measured ion mass concentrations and North American Regional Reanalysis meteorological data. Excellent agreement between Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations AOT and estimated ALW provides a plausible explanation for the discrepancies in the geographical patterns of AOT and aerosol mass measurements.

  13. Water content in convective storm clouds.

    PubMed

    Kyle, T G; Sand, W R

    1973-06-22

    The condensed water content of convective storms was measured by the use of a penetrating aircraft. Regions 1 to 2 kilometers in extent and having condensed water contents of about 20 grams per cubic meter were found to be definite features of the cloud interior.

  14. CRISM Limb Observations of Aerosols and Water Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael D.; Wolff, M.J.; Clancy, R.T.; Seelos, F.; Murchie, S.L.

    2009-01-01

    Near-infrared spectra taken in a limb-viewing geometry by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) on-board the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) provide a useful tool for probing atmospheric structure. Here we describe preliminary work on the retrieval of vertical profiles of aerosols and water vapor from the CRISM limb observations. The first full set of CRISM limb observations was taken in July 2009, with subsequent limb observations planned once every two months. Each set of limb observations contains about four dozen scans across the limb giving pole-to-pole coverage for two orbits at roughly 100 and 290 W longitude. Radiative transfer modeling taking account of aerosol scattering in the limb-viewing geometry is used to model the observations. The retrievals show the height to which dust and water vapor extend and the location and height of water ice clouds. Results from the First set of CRISM limb observations (July 2009, Ls=300) show dust aerosol well-mixed to about three scale heights above the surface with thin water ice clouds above the dust near the equator and at mid-northern latitudes. Water vapor is concentrated at high southern latitudes.

  15. Contribution of marine and continental aerosols to the content of major ions in the precipitation of the central Mediterranean.

    PubMed

    Mihajlidi-Zelić, Aleksandra; Dersek-Timotić, Ivana; Relić, Dubravka; Popović, Aleksandar; Dordević, Dragana

    2006-11-01

    The region of the investigated receptor is situated in the southern part of the Adriatic Sea in the Mediterranean. The measuring station is located on the seashore, which, being considered as a border area, is representative for the qualitative and quantitative estimation of the influence of marine and continental aerosols on the content of major ions in precipitation. In the sampling period, precipitation in the region of the investigated receptor was more abundant during the summer and autumn than during the winter and spring. The most frequent precipitation heights were up to 20 mm, while high precipitation came exclusively from the continental region. The results of the measurements of ions readily soluble in water were used for the differentiation of marine from continental contributions of primary and secondary aerosols to their content in the precipitation. Using PCA, it was shown that main contribution of Cl(-), Na(+) and Mg(2+) came from primary marine aerosols, while the contribution from continental sources was dominant for the content of SO(4)(2-), NO(3)(-), NH(4)(+) and Ca(2+) in the precipitation. The continental origin of Ca(2+) was from a primary source, while SO(4)(2-), NO(3)(-) and NH(4)(+) were representatives of secondary aerosols produced by reactions between acid oxides and alkaline species in the atmosphere, but SO(4)(2-) and NO(3)(-) also exist in the precipitation as free acids. The origin of the trace elements Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn in the precipitation came from anthropogenic emission sources. The results obtained in this work are based on experimental data from 609 samples collected during the period 1995-2000.

  16. Aerosols

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    ... article title:  Aerosols over Central and Eastern Europe     View Larger Image ... last weeks of March 2003, widespread aerosol pollution over Europe was detected by several satellite-borne instruments. The Multi-angle ...

  17. Characterization of Cloud Water-Content Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Seungwon

    2010-01-01

    The development of realistic cloud parameterizations for climate models requires accurate characterizations of subgrid distributions of thermodynamic variables. To this end, a software tool was developed to characterize cloud water-content distributions in climate-model sub-grid scales. This software characterizes distributions of cloud water content with respect to cloud phase, cloud type, precipitation occurrence, and geo-location using CloudSat radar measurements. It uses a statistical method called maximum likelihood estimation to estimate the probability density function of the cloud water content.

  18. Molecular dynamics simulations of the water adsorption around malonic acid aerosol models.

    PubMed

    Darvas, Maria; Picaud, Sylvain; Jedlovszky, Pál

    2013-07-14

    Water nucleation around a malonic acid aggregate has been studied by means of molecular dynamics simulations in the temperature and pressure range relevant for atmospheric conditions. Systems of different water contents have been considered and a large number of simulations have allowed us to determine the phase diagram of the corresponding binary malonic acid-water systems. Two phases have been evidenced in the phase diagrams corresponding either to water adsorption on a large malonic acid grain at low temperatures, or to the formation of a liquid-like mixed aggregate of the two types of molecules, at higher temperatures. Finally, the comparison between the phase diagrams simulated for malonic acid-water and oxalic acid-water mixtures emphasizes the influence of the O : C ratio on the hydrophilic behavior of the aerosol, and thus on its ability to act as a cloud condensation nucleus, in accordance with recent experimental conclusions.

  19. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for determining the functional content of organic aerosols: a review.

    PubMed

    Chalbot, Marie-Cecile G; Kavouras, Ilias G

    2014-08-01

    The knowledge deficit of organic aerosol (OA) composition has been identified as the most important factor limiting our understanding of the atmospheric fate and implications of aerosol. The efforts to chemically characterize OA include the increasing utilization of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). Since 1998, the functional composition of different types, sizes and fractions of OA has been studied with one-dimensional, two-dimensional and solid state proton and carbon-13 NMR. This led to the use of functional group ratios to reconcile the most important sources of OA, including secondary organic aerosol and initial source apportionment using positive matrix factorization. Future research efforts may be directed towards the optimization of experimental parameters, detailed NMR experiments and analysis by pattern recognition methods to identify the chemical components, determination of the NMR fingerprints of OA sources and solid state NMR to study the content of OA as a whole.

  20. [Ethanol content of Kefir water].

    PubMed

    Rabl, W; Liniger, B; Sutter, K; Sigrist, T

    1994-03-01

    The question of the influence of kefir on blood-alcohol-level has been asked in a legal proceeding. The questioned recipe consisted of 21 water, 6 soup-spoons of kefir granules (about 120 g), 150 g sugar, 2 figs and one lemon. The consumption took place after two days of fermentation. Experimentally we found, that one liter of this kefir product may contain up to 38 g/l ethanol after 7 to 10 days. On the second day we measured up to 16 g/l ethanol. Our results may be import for expert appraisements concerning unability of driving.

  1. Water Activity Limits the Hygroscopic Growth Factor of Organic Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, L. I.; Cabrera, J. A.; Golden, D.; Tabazadeh, A.

    2007-12-01

    In this work we study the hygroscopic behavior of organic aerosols, which has important implications for Earth's climate. The hygroscopic growth factor (HGF) is defined as the ratio of the diameter of a spherical particle when it is exposed to dry conditions to that at humid conditions. We present a new formulation to express the HGF of an aerosol particle as a function of water activity (aw) in the aqueous phase. This new formulation matches reported HGFs for common inorganic salts and water-miscible organic particles that are known to deliquesce into aqueous drops at high relative humidities (RH). Many studies use tandem differential mobility analyzers (TDMA) to determine the HGF of organic aerosols. For example, Brooks et al. used a TDMA to measure a HGF of 1.2 for 2 μm phthalic acid (PA) particles at 90% RH (aw= 0.9). However, water activity limits the growth of a particle that can be attributed to water uptake. We have assembled a vapor pressure apparatus to measure aw of aqueous solutions at room temperature. Measured water activities for PA, used in our growth formulation, yield a HGF of ~ 1.0005 for 2 μm PA particles at 90% RH. Comparing our results against Brooks et al. suggests that TDMA experiments may grossly overestimate the HGF of PA particles since water activity limits this growth to below 1.0005. Alternatively, we suggest that the adsorption of a negligible mass of water by a highly porous PA particle can lead to an apparent growth in particle size by changing its morphology. Other studies also use TDMAs to measure HGFs of secondary organic aerosols (SOAs). HGFs reported for SOAs are very similar to PA, suggesting that the observed growth may be due to morphological changes in particle size rather than water uptake as commonly assumed. We built a smog chamber where an organic precursor, such as d-limonene, reacts with nitrogen oxides under UV radiation to produce SOAs. We compare the HGFs for SOAs obtained with our method to those obtained with

  2. Vertical profiles of cloud condensation nuclei, aerosol hygroscopicity, water uptake, and scattering across the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J. J.; Bougiatioti, A.; Nenes, A.; Anderson, B. E.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Brock, C. A.; Gordon, T. D.; Lack, D.; Law, D. C.; Liao, J.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Richardson, M.; Thornhill, K. L., II; Winstead, E.; Wagner, N. L.; Welti, A.; Ziemba, L. D.

    2014-12-01

    The evolutions of vertical distributions of aerosol chemical, microphysical, hygroscopic, and optical properties present fundamental challenges to the understanding of ground-level air quality and radiative transfer, and few datasets exist to date for evaluation of atmospheric models. Data collected from recent NASA and NOAA field campaigns in the California Central Valley (DISCOVER-AQ), southeast United States (SENEX, SEAC4RS) and Texas (DISCOVER-AQ) allow for a unique opportunity to constrain vertical profiles of climate-relevant aerosol properties. This work presents in-situ aircraft measurements of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentration and derivations of aerosol hygroscopicity, water uptake, and light scattering. Aerosol hygroscopicity is derived from CCN and aerosol measurements. Inorganic water uptake is calculated from aerosol composition using ISORROPIA, a chemical thermodynamic model, while organic water uptake is calculated from organic hygroscopicity. Aerosol scattering closure is performed between scattering from water uptake calculations and in-situ scattering measurements.

  3. Water Uptake and Hygroscopic Growth of Organosulfate Aerosol.

    PubMed

    Estillore, Armando D; Hettiyadura, Anusha P S; Qin, Zhen; Leckrone, Erin; Wombacher, Becky; Humphry, Tim; Stone, Elizabeth A; Grassian, Vicki H

    2016-04-19

    Organosulfates (OS) are important components of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) that have been identified in numerous field studies. This class of compounds within SOA can potentially affect aerosol physicochemical properties such as hygroscopicity because of their polar and hydrophilic nature as well as their low volatility. Currently, there is a dearth of information on how aerosol particles that contain OS interact with water vapor in the atmosphere. Herein we report a laboratory investigation on the hygroscopic properties of a structurally diverse set of OS salts at varying relative humidity (RH) using a Hygroscopicity-Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (H-TDMA). The OS studied include the potassium salts of glycolic acid sulfate, hydroxyacetone sulfate, 4-hydroxy-2,3-epoxybutane sulfate, and 2-butenediol sulfate and the sodium salts of benzyl sulfate, methyl sulfate, ethyl sulfate, and propyl sulfate. In addition, mixtures of OS and sodium chloride were also studied. The results showed gradual deliquescence of these aerosol particles characterized by continuous uptake and evaporation of water in both hydration and dehydration processes for the OS, while the mixture showed prompt deliquescence and effloresce transitions, albeit at a lower relative humidity relative to pure sodium chloride. Hygroscopic growth of these OS at 85% RH were also fit to parameterized functional forms. This new information provided here has important implications about the atmospheric lifetime, light scattering properties, and the role of OS in cloud formation. Moreover, results of these studies can ultimately serve as a basis for the development and evaluation of thermodynamic models for these compounds in order to consider their impact on the atmosphere.

  4. Retrieval of aerosol microphysical properties from AERONET photopolarimetric measurements: 1. Information content analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaoguang; Wang, Jun

    2015-07-01

    This paper is the first part of a two-part study that aims to retrieve aerosol particle size distribution (PSD) and refractive index from the multispectral and multiangular polarimetric measurements taken by the new-generation Sun photometer as part of the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). It provides theoretical analysis and guidance to the companion study in which we have developed an inversion algorithm for retrieving 22 aerosol microphysical parameters associated with a bimodal PSD function from real AERONET measurements. Our theoretical analysis starts with generating the synthetic measurements at four spectral bands (440, 675, 870, and 1020 nm) with a Unified Linearized Vector Radiative Transfer Model for various types of spherical aerosol particles. Subsequently, the quantitative information content for retrieving aerosol parameters is investigated in four observation scenarios, i.e., I1, I2, P1, and P2. Measurements in the scenario (I1) comprise the solar direct radiances and almucantar radiances that are used in the current AERONET operational inversion algorithm. The other three scenarios include different additional measurements: (I2) the solar principal plane radiances, (P1) the solar principal plane radiances and polarization, and (P2) the solar almucantar polarization. Results indicate that adding polarization measurements can increase the degree of freedom for signal by 2-5 in the scenario P1, while not as much of an increase is found in the scenarios I2 and P2. Correspondingly, smallest retrieval errors are found in the scenario P1: 2.3% (2.9%) for the fine-mode (coarse-mode) aerosol volume concentration, 1.3% (3.5%) for the effective radius, 7.2% (12%) for the effective variance, 0.005 (0.035) for the real-part refractive index, and 0.019 (0.068) for the single-scattering albedo. These errors represent a reduction from their counterparts in scenario I1 of 79% (57%), 76% (49%), 69% (52%), 66% (46%), and 49% (20%), respectively. We further

  5. Removal of Sarin Aerosol and Vapor by Water Sprays

    SciTech Connect

    Brockmann, John E.

    1998-09-01

    Falling water drops can collect particles and soluble or reactive vapor from the gas through which they fall. Rain is known to remove particles and vapors by the process of rainout. Water sprays can be used to remove radioactive aerosol from the atmosphere of a nuclear reactor containment building. There is a potential for water sprays to be used as a mitigation technique to remove chemical or bio- logical agents from the air. This paper is a quick-look at water spray removal. It is not definitive but rather provides a reasonable basic model for particle and gas removal and presents an example calcu- lation of sarin removal from a BART station. This work ~ a starting point and the results indicate that further modeling and exploration of additional mechanisms for particle and vapor removal may prove beneficial.

  6. Relative Content of Black Carbon in Submicron Aerosol as a Sign of the Effect of Forest Fire Smokes

    SciTech Connect

    Kozlov, V.S.; Panchenko, M.V.; Yauscheva, E.P.

    2005-03-18

    Biomass burning occurs often in regions containing vast forest tracts and peat-bogs. These processes are accompanied by the emission of a large amount of aerosol particles and crystal carbon (black carbon [BC], soot). BC is the predominant source of solar absorption in atmospheric aerosol, which impacts climate. (Jacobson 2001; Rozenberg 1982). In this paper, we analyze the results of laboratory and field investigations that focused on the relative content of BC in aerosol particles. Main attention is given to the study of possibility using this parameter as an informative sign for estimating the effect of remote forest fire smokes on the near-ground aerosol composition.

  7. Detection of Plant Water Content with Needle-Type In-Situ Water Content Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayanagi, Hitoshi; Miki, Norihisa

    A needle-type water content sensor with a polyethersulfone (PES) polymer membrane was developed for the low-invasive, direct in-situ measurement of plant water content (PWC) in prior work. In this paper we demonstrate a measurement of plant water stress that represents the demand for water of the plant and greatly affects its sweetness. We inserted the sensor into a stalk of strawberry (Fragaria×ananassa) and soil. The variation in both the plant and the soil water content were successfully detected, which revealed the delay between variation in the plant water stress and soil water content after irrigation. Such delay could only be detected by the proposed sensor that could directly measure the variation of PWC in situ and continuously. The experiments also showed the variation in the signals as a function of detection sites and suggested that the detection sites of plant water stress need to be considered when the sensor is applied to irrigation culture.

  8. Spectroscopic characteristics and organic carbon contents in the aerosols collected in Okinawa, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, H. J.; Kasaba, T.

    2015-12-01

    Organics in the atmospheric aerosols occupy 20 to 70% of the total mass. Since the proportion of organics is so large that it's important to understand their detailed characteristics. Polymeric compounds called HUmic-Like Substance (HULIS) are known to be present in the atmospheric aerosols. Biomass burning can be a source of HULIS. In this study, atmospheric aerosols were collected at Cape Hedo, a northern tip of Okinawa Island, and we characterized overall features of the organics collected in different seasons. In Okinawa, continental air mass prevails in spring, fall and winter, while maritime air mass from Pacific Ocean prevails in summer. Thus, it is relatively straightforward to identify sources of organics in different seasons. We measured total organic carbon (TOC) and water soluble organic carbon (WSOC) concentrations, and absorbance and fluorescence intensity for the aerosol samples collected during Nov 2012 and July 2014 (n=90). As a result, TOC and WSOC showed almost the same trend, higher concentrations when continental air mass prevailed in fall and winter, while lower concentrations in summer. Percentages of WSOC in TOC accounted for 33-44%. Absorption efficiency, absorbance per 1 ppm organic carbon concentration, of the samples showed higher values in winter and fall, and lower values in summer. Fluorescence efficiency, normalized fluorescence with quinine sulfate per 1 ppm organic carbon concentration, were also different, it is likely that different types of organics were present in the aerosols from different seasons. We are also planning to measure HULIS in the aerosols and will be discussed a link between their contribution and trans-boundary air pollution in Asia.

  9. Combined Dial Sounding of Ozone, Water Vapour and Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trickl, Thomas; Vogelmann, Hannes

    2016-06-01

    Routine high-quality lidar measurements of ozone, water vapour and aerosol at Garmisch-Partenkirchen since 2007 have made possible more comprehensive atmospheric studies and lead to a growing insight concerning the most frequently occurring long-range transport pathways. In this contribution we present as examples results on stratospheric layers travelling in the free troposphere for extended periods of time without eroding. In particular, we present a case of an intrusion layer that subsided over as many as fifteen days and survived the interference by strong Canadian fires. These results impose a challenge on atmospheric modelling that grossly overestimates free-tropospheric mixing.

  10. Hydroxyl radicals from secondary organic aerosol decomposition in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Haijie; Arangio, Andrea M.; Lakey, Pascale S. J.; Berkemeier, Thomas; Liu, Fobang; Kampf, Christopher. J.; Pöschl, Ulrich; Shiraiwa, Manabu

    2016-04-01

    We found that ambient and laboratory-generated secondary organic aerosols (SOA) form substantial amounts of OH radicals upon interaction with liquid water, which can be explained by the decomposition of organic hydroperoxides. The molar OH yield from SOA formed by ozonolysis of terpenes (α-pinene, β-pinene, and limonene) is ~ 0.1% upon extraction with pure water, and which increases to ~ 1.5% in the presence of iron ions due to Fenton-like reactions. Our findings imply that the chemical reactivity and aging of SOA particles is strongly enhanced upon interaction with water and iron. In cloud droplets under dark conditions, SOA decomposition can compete with the classical hydrogen peroxide Fenton reaction as the source of OH radicals. Also in the human respiratory tract, the inhalation and deposition of SOA particles may lead to a substantial release of OH radicals, which may contribute to oxidative stress and play an important role in the adverse health effects of atmospheric aerosols.

  11. Hydroxyl radicals from secondary organic aerosol decomposition in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Haijie; Arangio, Andrea M.; Lakey, Pascale S. J.; Berkemeier, Thomas; Liu, Fobang; Kampf, Christopher J.; Brune, William H.; Pöschl, Ulrich; Shiraiwa, Manabu

    2016-02-01

    We found that ambient and laboratory-generated secondary organic aerosols (SOA) form substantial amounts of OH radicals upon interaction with liquid water, which can be explained by the decomposition of organic hydroperoxides. The molar OH yield from SOA formed by ozonolysis of terpenes (α-pinene, β-pinene, limonene) is ˜ 0.1 % upon extraction with pure water and increases to ˜ 1.5 % in the presence of Fe2+ ions due to Fenton-like reactions. Upon extraction of SOA samples from OH photooxidation of isoprene, we also detected OH yields of around ˜ 0.1 %, which increases upon addition of Fe2+. Our findings imply that the chemical reactivity and aging of SOA particles is strongly enhanced upon interaction with water and iron. In cloud droplets under dark conditions, SOA decomposition can compete with the classical H2O2 Fenton reaction as the source of OH radicals. Also in the human respiratory tract, the inhalation and deposition of SOA particles may lead to a substantial release of OH radicals, which may contribute to oxidative stress and play an important role in the adverse health effects of atmospheric aerosols.

  12. Hydroxyl radicals from secondary organic aerosol decomposition in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, H.; Arangio, A. M.; Lakey, P. S. J.; Berkemeier, T.; Liu, F.; Kampf, C. J.; Pöschl, U.; Shiraiwa, M.

    2015-11-01

    We found that ambient and laboratory-generated secondary organic aerosols (SOA) form substantial amounts of OH radicals upon interaction with liquid water, which can be explained by the decomposition of organic hydroperoxides. The molar OH yield from SOA formed by ozonolysis of terpenes (α-pinene, β-pinene, limonene) is ~ 0.1 % upon extraction with pure water and increases to ~ 1.5 % in the presence of Fe2+ ions due to Fenton-like reactions. Our findings imply that the chemical reactivity and aging of SOA particles is strongly enhanced upon interaction with water and iron. In cloud droplets under dark conditions, SOA decomposition can compete with the classical H2O2 Fenton reaction as the source of OH radicals. Also in the human respiratory tract, the inhalation and deposition of SOA particles may lead to a substantial release of OH radicals, which may contribute to oxidative stress and play an important role in the adverse health effects of atmospheric aerosols.

  13. Role of Aerosol Liquid Water in Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation from Volatile Organic Compounds.

    PubMed

    Faust, Jennifer A; Wong, Jenny P S; Lee, Alex K Y; Abbatt, Jonathan P D

    2017-02-07

    A key mechanism for atmospheric secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation occurs when oxidation products of volatile organic compounds condense onto pre-existing particles. Here, we examine effects of aerosol liquid water (ALW) on relative SOA yield and composition from α-pinene ozonolysis and the photooxidation of toluene and acetylene by OH. Reactions were conducted in a room-temperature flow tube under low-NOx conditions in the presence of equivalent loadings of deliquesced (∼20 μg m(-3) ALW) or effloresced (∼0.2 μg m(-3) ALW) ammonium sulfate seeds at exactly the same relative humidity (RH = 70%) and state of wall conditioning. We found 13% and 19% enhancements in relative SOA yield for the α-pinene and toluene systems, respectively, when seeds were deliquesced rather than effloresced. The relative yield doubled in the acetylene system, and this enhancement was partially reversible upon drying the prepared SOA, which reduced the yield by 40% within a time scale of seconds. We attribute the high relative yield of acetylene SOA on deliquesced seeds to aqueous partitioning and particle-phase reactions of the photooxidation product glyoxal. The observed range of relative yields for α-pinene, toluene, and acetylene SOA on deliquesced and effloresced seeds suggests that ALW plays a complicated, system-dependent role in SOA formation.

  14. Water Content of Lunar Alkali Fedlspar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mills, R. D.; Simon, J. I.; Wang, J.; Alexander, C. M. O'D.; Hauri, E. H.

    2016-01-01

    Detection of indigenous hydrogen in a diversity of lunar materials, including volcanic glass, melt inclusions, apatite, and plagioclase suggests water may have played a role in the chemical differentiation of the Moon. Spectroscopic data from the Moon indicate a positive correlation between water and Th. Modeling of lunar magma ocean crystallization predicts a similar chemical differentiation with the highest levels of water in the K- and Th-rich melt residuum of the magma ocean (i.e. urKREEP). Until now, the only sample-based estimates of water content of KREEP-rich magmas come from measurements of OH, F, and Cl in lunar apatites, which suggest a water concentration of < 1 ppm in urKREEP. Using these data, predict that the bulk water content of the magma ocean would have <10 ppm. In contrast, estimate water contents of 320 ppm for the bulk Moon and 1.4 wt % for urKREEP from plagioclase in ferroan anorthosites. Results and interpretation: NanoSIMS data from granitic clasts from Apollo sample 15405,78 show that alkali feldspar, a common mineral in K-enriched rocks, can have approx. 20 ppm of water, which implies magmatic water contents of approx. 1 wt % in the high-silica magmas. This estimate is 2 to 3 orders of magnitude higher than that estimated from apatite in similar rocks. However, the Cl and F contents of apatite in chemically similar rocks suggest that these melts also had high Cl/F ratios, which leads to spuriously low water estimates from the apatite. We can only estimate the minimum water content of urKREEP (+ bulk Moon) from our alkali feldspar data because of the unknown amount of degassing that led to the formation of the granites. Assuming a reasonable 10 to 100 times enrichment of water from urKREEP into the granites produces an estimate of 100-1000 ppm of water for the urKREEP reservoir. Using the modeling of and the 100-1000 ppm of water in urKREEP suggests a minimum bulk silicate Moon water content between 2 and 20 ppm. However, hydrogen loss was

  15. Microwave remote sensing of soil water content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cihlar, J.; Ulaby, F. T.

    1975-01-01

    Microwave remote sensing of soils to determine water content was considered. A layered water balance model was developed for determining soil water content in the upper zone (top 30 cm), while soil moisture at greater depths and near the surface during the diurnal cycle was studied using experimental measurements. Soil temperature was investigated by means of a simulation model. Based on both models, moisture and temperature profiles of a hypothetical soil were generated and used to compute microwave soil parameters for a clear summer day. The results suggest that, (1) soil moisture in the upper zone can be predicted on a daily basis for 1 cm depth increments, (2) soil temperature presents no problem if surface temperature can be measured with infrared radiometers, and (3) the microwave response of a bare soil is determined primarily by the moisture at and near the surface. An algorithm is proposed for monitoring large areas which combines the water balance and microwave methods.

  16. Light water reactor aerosol containment experiment LA4 simulated by JERICHO and AEROSOLS-B2 codes

    SciTech Connect

    Passalacqua, R.; Tarabelli, D.; Renault, C.

    1996-12-01

    Large-scale experiments show that whenever a loss of coolant accident occurs water pools are generated. Stratification of steam-saturated gas develops above growing water pools causing a different thermal hydraulics in the subcompartment where the water pool is located. Hereafter, the LWR Aerosols Containment Experiment (LACE) LA4 experiment, performed at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory, will be studied; this experiment exhibited a strong stratification, at all times, above a growing wade pool. JERICHO and AEROSOLS-B2 are part of the Ensemble de Systemes de Codes d`Analyse d`Accident des Reacteurs a Eau (ESCADRE) code system, a tool for evaluating the response of a nuclear plant to severe accidents. These two codes are used here to simulate respectively the thermal hydraulics and the associated aerosol behavior. Code results have shown that modeling large containment thermal hydraulics without taking into account the stratification phenomenon leads to large overpredictions of containment pressure and temperature. If the stratification, above the water pool, is modeled as a zone with a higher steam condensation rate and a higher thermal resistance (that is acting as a barrier to heat exchanges with the upper and larger compartment), ESCADRE predictions match experimental data quite well. The stratification region is believed to be able to affect aerosol behavior; aerosol settling is improved by steam condensation on particles and by diffusiophoresis and thermophoresis. In addition, the lower aerosol concentration throughout the stratification might cause a nonnegligible aerosol concentration gradient and consequently a driving force for the motion of smaller particles toward the pool.

  17. Measurement of contemporary and fossil carbon contents of PM 2.5 aerosols: results from Turtleback Dome, Yosemite National Park

    SciTech Connect

    Bench, G

    2003-10-17

    The impact of aerosol particulate matter of mean mass aerodynamic diameter {le} 2.5 {proportional_to}m (PM 2.5 aerosols), on health, visibility, and compliance with EPA's regional haze regulations is a growing concern. Techniques that can help better characterize particulate matter are required to better understand the constituents, causes and sources of PM 2.5 aerosols. Measurement of the {sup 14}C/C ratio of the PM 2.5 aerosols, the absence of {sup 14}C in fossil carbon materials and the known {sup 14}C/C levels in contemporary carbon materials allows use of a two-component model to derive contemporary and fossil carbon contents of the particulate matter. Such data can be used to estimate the relative contributions of fossil fuels and biogenic aerosols to the total aerosol loading. Here, the methodology for performing such an assessment using total suspended particulate Hi-vol aerosol samplers to collect PM 2.5 aerosols on quartz fiber filters and the technique of accelerator mass spectrometry to measure {sup 14}C/C ratios is presented and illustrated using PM 2.5 aerosols collected at Yosemite National Park.

  18. [The water content reference material of water saturated octanol].

    PubMed

    Wang, Haifeng; Ma, Kang; Zhang, Wei; Li, Zhanyuan

    2011-03-01

    The national standards of biofuels specify the technique specification and analytical methods. A water content certified reference material based on the water saturated octanol was developed in order to satisfy the needs of the instrument calibration and the methods validation, assure the accuracy and consistency of results in water content measurements of biofuels. Three analytical methods based on different theories were employed to certify the water content of the reference material, including Karl Fischer coulometric titration, Karl Fischer volumetric titration and quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance. The consistency of coulometric and volumetric titration was achieved through the improvement of methods. The accuracy of the certified result was improved by the introduction of the new method of quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance. Finally, the certified value of reference material is 4.76% with an expanded uncertainty of 0.09%.

  19. Modeling aerosol water uptake in the arctic based on the κ-Kohler theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastak, N.; Ekman, A.; Silvergren, S.; Zieger, P.; Wideqvist, U.; Ström, J.; Svenningsson, B.; Tunved, P.; Riipinen, I.

    2013-05-01

    Water uptake or hygroscopicity is one of the most fundamental properties of atmospheric aerosols. Aerosol particles containing soluble materials can grow in size by absorbing water in ambient atmosphere. This property is measured by a parameter known as growth factor (GF), which is defined as the ratio of the wet diameter to the dry diameter. Hygroscopicity controls the size of an aerosol particle and therefore its optical properties in the atmosphere. Hygroscopic growth depends on the dry size of the particle, its chemical composition and the relative humidity in the ambient air (Fitzgerald, 1975; Pilinis et al., 1995). One of the typical problems in aerosol studies is the lack of measurements of aerosol size distributions and optical properties in ambient conditions. The gap between dry measurements and the real humid atmosphere is filled in this study by utilizing a hygroscopic model which calculates the hygroscopic growth of aerosol particles at Mt Zeppelin station, Ny Ålesund, Svalbard during 2008.

  20. Measurement of leaf relative water content by infrared reflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, E. Raymond, Jr.; Rock, Barrett N.; Nobel, Park S.

    1987-01-01

    From basic considerations and Beer's law, a leaf water content index incorporating reflectances of wavelengths from 0.76 to 0.90 microns and from 1.55 to 1.75 microns was developed that relates leaf reflectance to leaf relative water content. For the leaf succulent, Agave deserti, the leaf water content index was not significantly different from the relative water content for either individual leaves or an entire plant. Also, the relative water contents of intact plants of Encelia farinosa and Hilaria rigida in the field were estimated by the leaf water content index; variations in the proportion of living to dead leaf area could cause large errors in the estimate of relative water content. Thus, the leaf water content index may be able to estimate average relative water content of canopies when TM4 and TM5 are measured at a known relative water content and fraction of dead leaf material.

  1. Measuring water content by neutron thermalization

    SciTech Connect

    Buchanan, R.J.

    1992-01-21

    This patent describes an apparatus for measuring water content of a substance. It comprises a vessel for receiving the substance; sensor means for sensing thermalized neutrons; a thermal neutron absorber disposed around the vessel and the sensor means; means for emitting fast neutrons through the thermal neutron absorber into the vessel; and a biological shield encasing the sensor means, the thermal neutron absorber, and the means for emitting and extending around the vessel.

  2. Tracking Water Diffusion Fronts in a Highly Viscous Aerosol Particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastelberger, Sandra; Krieger, Ulrich; Peter, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Field measurements indicate that atmospheric secondary aerosol particles can be present in a highly viscous, glassy state [1]. In contrast to liquid state particles, the gas phase equilibration is kinetically limited and governed by condensed phase diffusion. In recent water diffusion experiments on highly viscous single aerosol particles levitated in an electrodynamic balance (EDB) we observed a characteristic shift behavior of the Mie whispering gallery modes (WGM) indicative of the changing radial structure of the particle, thus providing us with an experimental method to track the diffusion process inside the particle. When a highly viscous, homogeneous particle is exposed to an abrupt increase in relative humidity, the rapid gas phase diffusion and strong concentration dependence of the diffusion coefficient in the condensed phase lead to extremely steep water concentration gradients inside the particle, reminiscent of diffusion fronts. The resulting quasi step-like concentration profile motivates the introduction of a simple core-shell model describing the morphology of the non-equilibrium particle during humidification. The subsequent particle growth and reduction of the shell refractive index can be observed as red and blueshift behavior of the WGM, respectively. The shift pattern can be attributed to a core-shell radius ratio and particle radius derived from model calculations [2]. If supplemented with growth information obtained from the WGM redshift and thermodynamic equilibrium data, we can infer a comprehensive picture of the time evolution of the diffusion fronts in the framework of our core-shell model. The measured time dependent concentration profile is then compared with simulations solving the non-linear diffusion equation [3] [1] Virtanen, A., et al., Nature, 467, 824-827, 2010 [2] Kaiser, T., Schweiger, G., Computers in Physics, Vol. 7, No. 6, 682-686, Nov/Dec 1993 [3] Zobrist, B., Soonsin, V., Luo, B.P., Peter, T. et al., Phys. Chem. Chem

  3. Submicron Aerosol Characterization of Water by a Differential Mobility Particle Sizer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-02-01

    relevant to modern science and industry. N *% ~ ~ ~?1 *1?%~%~ 0.0 :~. % % his ’i tl’tt Security Classif ication KIEV WORDS Submricron aerosols Water ...7 :-711 no0 StIHICRON AEROSOL CHARACTERIZATION OF WATER DY A vi1 DIFFERENTIAL NOBILITY PA.. (U) DEFENCE RESEARCH ESTABLISHMENT SUFFIELD RALSTON... WATER BY A DIFFERENTIAL MOBILITY PARTICLE SIZER (U) by B. Kournikakis, A. Gunning, J. Fildes and J. Ho Project No. 251SD EL .TE APR 099?07uD February

  4. Cloud-Aerosol Interactions: Retrieving Aerosol Ångström Exponents from Calipso Measurements of Opaque Water Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, Mark; Liu, Zhaoyan; Hu, Yong-Xiang; Powell, Kathleen; Omar, Ali; Rodier, Sharon; Hunt, William; Kar, Jayanta; Tackett, Jason; Getzewich, Brian; Lee, Kam-Pui

    2016-06-01

    Backscatter and extinction from water clouds are well-understood, both theoretically and experimentally, and thus changes to the expected measurement of layer-integrated attenuated backscatter can be used to infer the optical properties of overlying layers. In this paper we offer a first look at a new retrieval technique that uses CALIPSO measurements of opaque water clouds to derive optical depths and Ångström exponents for overlying aerosol layers.

  5. Updating CMAQ secondary organic aerosol properties relevant for aerosol water interactions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Properties of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) compounds in CMAQ are updated with state-of-the-science estimates from structure activity relationships to provide consistency among volatility, molecular weight, degree of oxygenation, and solubility/hygroscopicity. These updated pro...

  6. Relative water content of Spruce needles determined by the leaf water content index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, E. Raymond, Jr.; Wong, Sam K. S.; Rock, Barrett N.

    1987-01-01

    Leaf relative water content (RWC) is defined as the volume of water in a leaf divided by the volume at full turgor. Using reflectance factors of wavelengths 0.83 micron and 1.6 microns, a Leaf Water Content Index (LWCI) was derived from the Lambert-Beer Law such that LWCI should equal RWC; LWCI was equal to RWC for Picea pungens, Picea rubens, Liquidambar styraciflua, and Quercus agrifolia. Algebraic manipulation shows that R(1.6)/R(0.83) termed the Moisture Stress Index (MSI), is near-linearly correlated to RWC and to the Equivalent Water Thickness (EWT). Five species tested so far had the same relationship between MSI and EWT, but EWT is not a measure of plant water status.

  7. Water uptake of clay and desert dust aerosol particles at sub- and supersaturated water vapor conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Herich, Hanna; Tritscher, Torsten; Wiacek, Aldona; Gysel, Martin; Weingartner, E.; Lohmann, U.; Baltensperger, Urs; Cziczo, Daniel J.

    2009-11-01

    Airborne mineral dust particles serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), thereby influencing the formation and properties of warm clouds. It is therefore of particular interest how dust aerosols with different mineralogy behave when exposed to high relative humidity (RH) or supersaturation with respect to liquid water similar to atmospheric conditions. In this study the sub-saturated hygroscopic growth and the supersaturated cloud condensation nucleus activity of pure clays and real desert dust aerosols was determined using a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA) and a cloud condensation nuclei counter (CCNC), respectively. Five different illite, montmorillonite and kaolinite clay samples as well as three desert dust samples (Saharan dust (SD), Chinese dust (CD) and Arizona test dust (ATD)) were used. Aerosols were generated both with a wet and a dry disperser and the water uptake was parameterized via the hygroscopicity parameter, κ. The hygroscopicity of dry generated dust aerosols was found to be negligible when compared to processed atmospheric aerosols, with CCNC derived κ values between 0.00 and 0.02. The latter value can be idealized as a particle consisting of 96.7% (by volume) insoluble material and ~3.3% ammonium sulfate. Pure clay aerosols were found to be generally less hygroscopic than real desert dust particles. All illite and montmorillonite samples had κ~0.003, kaolinites were least hygroscopic and had κ=0.001. SD (κ=0.023) was found to be the most hygroscopic dry-generated desert dust followed by CD (κ=0.007) and ATD (κ=0.003). Wet-generated dust showed an increased water uptake when compared to dry-generated samples. This is considered to be an artifact introduced by redistribution of soluble material between the particles while immersed in an aqueous medium during atomization, thus indicating that specification of the generation method is critically important when presenting such data. Any atmospheric processing of

  8. Atmospheric aerosol deposition influences marine microbial communities in oligotrophic surface waters of the western Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maki, Teruya; Ishikawa, Akira; Mastunaga, Tomoki; Pointing, Stephen B.; Saito, Yuuki; Kasai, Tomoaki; Watanabe, Koichi; Aoki, Kazuma; Horiuchi, Amane; Lee, Kevin C.; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Iwasaka, Yasunobu

    2016-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols contain particulates that are deposited to oceanic surface waters. These can represent a major source of nutrients, trace metals, and organic compounds for the marine environment. The Japan Sea and the western Pacific Ocean are particularly affected by aerosols due to the transport of desert dust and industrially derived particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 μm (PM2.5) from continental Asia. We hypothesized that supplementing seawater with aerosol particulates would lead to measurable changes in surface water nutrient composition as well as shifts in the marine microbial community. Shipboard experiments in the Pacific Ocean involved the recovery of oligotrophic oceanic surface water and subsequent supplementation with aerosol particulates obtained from the nearby coastal mountains, to simulate marine particulate input in this region. Initial increases in nitrates due to the addition of aerosol particulates were followed by a decrease correlated with the increase in phytoplankton biomass, which was composed largely of Bacillariophyta (diatoms), including Pseudo-nitzschia and Chaetoceros species. This shift was accompanied by changes in the bacterial community, with apparent increases in the relative abundance of heterotrophic Rhodobacteraceae and Colwelliaceae in aerosol particulate treated seawater. Our findings provide empirical evidence revealing the impact of aerosol particulates on oceanic surface water microbiology by alleviating nitrogen limitation in the organisms.

  9. Comparing the mechanism of water condensation and evaporation in glassy aerosol.

    PubMed

    Bones, David L; Reid, Jonathan P; Lienhard, Daniel M; Krieger, Ulrich K

    2012-07-17

    Atmospheric models generally assume that aerosol particles are in equilibrium with the surrounding gas phase. However, recent observations that secondary organic aerosols can exist in a glassy state have highlighted the need to more fully understand the kinetic limitations that may control water partitioning in ambient particles. Here, we explore the influence of slow water diffusion in the condensed aerosol phase on the rates of both condensation and evaporation, demonstrating that significant inhibition in mass transfer occurs for ultraviscous aerosol, not just for glassy aerosol. Using coarse mode (3-4 um radius) ternary sucrose/sodium chloride/aqueous droplets as a proxy for multicomponent ambient aerosol, we demonstrate that the timescale for particle equilibration correlates with bulk viscosity and can be ≫10(3) s. Extrapolation of these timescales to particle sizes in the accumulation mode (e.g., approximately 100 nm) by applying the Stokes-Einstein equation suggests that the kinetic limitations imposed on mass transfer of water by slow bulk phase diffusion must be more fully investigated for atmospheric aerosol. Measurements have been made on particles covering a range in dynamic viscosity from < 0.1 to > 10(13) Pa s. We also retrieve the radial inhomogeneities apparent in particle composition during condensation and evaporation and contrast the dynamics of slow dissolution of a viscous core into a labile shell during condensation with the slow percolation of water during evaporation through a more homogeneous viscous particle bulk.

  10. Enhanced water vapor in Asian dust layer: Entrainment processes and implication for aerosol optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Soon-Chang; Kim, Sang-Woo; Kim, Jiyoung; Sohn, Byung-Ju; Jefferson, Anne; Choi, Suk-Jin; Cha, Dong-Hyun; Lee, Dong-Kyou; Anderson, Theodore L.; Doherty, Sarah J.; Weber, Rodney J.

    The entrainment process of water vapor into the dust layer during Asian dust events and the effect of water vapor associated with the Asian dust layer (ADL) on aerosol hygroscopic properties are investigated. The entrainment processes of water vapor into the ADL is examined by using a PSU/NCAR MM5 together with the backward trajectory model, radiosonde data, and remotely sensed aerosol vertical distribution data. Two dust events in the spring of 1998 and 2001 are examined in detail. The results reveal that the water vapor mixing ratio (WVMR) derived by the MM5 fits in well with the WVMR observed by radiosonde, and is well coincident with the aerosol extinction coefficient ( σep) measured by the micro-pulse lidar. The temporal evolution of the vertical distributions of WVMR and σep exhibited similar features. On the basis of a well simulation of the enhanced water vapor within the dust layer by the MM5, we trace the dust storms to examine the entrainment mechanism. The enhancement of WVMR within the ADL was initiated over the mountainous areas. The relatively moist air mass in the well-developed mixing layer over the mountainous areas is advected upward from the boundary layer by an ascending motion. However, a large portion of the water vapor within the ADL is enhanced over the edge of a highland and the plains in China. This is well supported by the simulated WVMR and the wind vectors. Aircraft-based in situ measurements of the chemical and optical properties of aerosol enable a quantitative estimation of the effect of the enhanced WVMR on the aerosol hygroscopic properties. The submicron aerosol accompanied by the dust storm caused an increase of aerosol scattering through water uptakes during the transport. This increase could be explained by the chemical fact that water-soluble submicron pollution aerosols are enriched in the ADL.

  11. Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation over Coastal Ocean: Inferences from Atmospheric Water-Soluble Low Molecular Weight Organic Compounds.

    PubMed

    Bikkina, Srinivas; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Sarin, Manmohan

    2017-04-07

    A lack of consensus on the distributions and formation pathways of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) over oceanic regions downwind of pollution sources limits our ability to assess their climate impact globally. As a case study, we report here on water-soluble SOA components such as dicarboxylic acids, oxocarboxylic acids, and α-dicarbonyls in the continental outflows from the Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP) and Southeast Asia (SEA) to the Bay of Bengal. Oxalic acid (C2) is the dominant species followed by succinic (C4) and glyoxylic acids (ωC2) in the outflow. Nonsea-salt SO4(2-) also dominates (∼70%) total water-soluble inorganic constituents and correlates well with aerosol liquid water content (LWC) and C2, indicating their production through aqueous phase photochemical reactions. Furthermore, mass ratios of dicarboxylic acids (C2/C4, C2/ωC2), and their relative abundances in water-soluble organic carbon and total organic carbon are quite similar between the two continental (IGP and SEA) outflows, indicating the formation of SOA through aqueous phase photochemical reactions in LWC-enriched aerosols, largely controlled by anthropogenic SO4(2-).

  12. Potential of Aerosol Liquid Water to Facilitate Organic Aerosol Formation: Assessing Knowledge Gaps about Precursors and Partitioning.

    PubMed

    Sareen, Neha; Waxman, Eleanor M; Turpin, Barbara J; Volkamer, Rainer; Carlton, Annmarie G

    2017-03-06

    Isoprene epoxydiol (IEPOX), glyoxal, and methylglyoxal are ubiquitous water-soluble organic gases (WSOGs) that partition to aerosol liquid water (ALW) and clouds to form aqueous secondary organic aerosol (aqSOA). Recent laboratory-derived Setschenow (or salting) coefficients suggest glyoxal's potential to form aqSOA is enhanced by high aerosol salt molality, or "salting-in". In the southeastern U.S., aqSOA is responsible for a significant fraction of ambient organic aerosol, and correlates with sulfate mass. However, the mechanistic explanation for this correlation remains elusive, and an assessment of the importance of different WSOGs to aqSOA is currently missing. We employ EPA's CMAQ model to the continental U.S. during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) to compare the potential of glyoxal, methylglyoxal, and IEPOX to partition to ALW, as the initial step toward aqSOA formation. Among these three studied compounds, IEPOX is a dominant contributor, ∼72% on average in the continental U.S., to potential aqSOA mass due to Henry's Law constants and molecular weights. Glyoxal contributes significantly, and application of the Setschenow coefficient leads to a greater than 3-fold model domain average increase in glyoxal's aqSOA mass potential. Methylglyoxal is predicted to be a minor contributor. Acid or ammonium - catalyzed ring-opening IEPOX chemistry as well as sulfate-driven ALW and the associated molality may explain positive correlations between SOA and sulfate during SOAS and illustrate ways in which anthropogenic sulfate could regulate biogenic aqSOA formation, ways not presently included in atmospheric models but relevant to development of effective control strategies.

  13. Influence of organic films on the evaporation and condensation of water in aerosol.

    PubMed

    Davies, James F; Miles, Rachael E H; Haddrell, Allen E; Reid, Jonathan P

    2013-05-28

    Uncertainties in quantifying the kinetics of evaporation and condensation of water from atmospheric aerosol are a significant contributor to the uncertainty in predicting cloud droplet number and the indirect effect of aerosols on climate. The influence of aerosol particle surface composition, particularly the impact of surface active organic films, on the condensation and evaporation coefficients remains ambiguous. Here, we report measurements of the influence of organic films on the evaporation and condensation of water from aerosol particles. Significant reductions in the evaporation coefficient are shown to result when condensed films are formed by monolayers of long-chain alcohols [C(n)H(2n+1)OH], with the value decreasing from 2.4 × 10(-3) to 1.7 × 10(-5) as n increases from 12 to 17. Temperature-dependent measurements confirm that a condensed film of long-range order must be formed to suppress the evaporation coefficient below 0.05. The condensation of water on a droplet coated in a condensed film is shown to be fast, with strong coherence of the long-chain alcohol molecules leading to islanding as the water droplet grows, opening up broad areas of uncoated surface on which water can condense rapidly. We conclude that multicomponent composition of organic films on the surface of atmospheric aerosol particles is likely to preclude the formation of condensed films and that the kinetics of water condensation during the activation of aerosol to form cloud droplets is likely to remain rapid.

  14. Comparison of Vegetation Water Content Estimates from Windsat and Modis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Retrieval of soil moisture content from microwave sensors also returns an estimate of vegetation water content. Remotely sensed indices from optical sensors can be used to estimate canopy water content. For corn and soybean in central Iowa, there are allometric relationships between canopy water c...

  15. Response of North Pacific eastern subtropical mode water to greenhouse gas versus aerosol forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang; Luo, Yiyong

    2016-04-01

    Mode water is a distinct water mass characterized by a near vertical homogeneous layer or low potential vorticity, and is considered essential for understanding ocean climate variability. Based on the output of GFDL CM3, this study investigates the response of eastern subtropical mode water (ESTMW) in the North Pacific to two different single forcings: greenhouse gases (GHGs) and aerosol. Under GHG forcing, ESTMW is produced on lighter isopycnal surfaces and is decreased in volume. Under aerosol forcing, in sharp contrast, it is produced on denser isopycnal surfaces and is increased in volume. The main reason for the opposite response is because surface ocean-to-atmosphere latent heat flux change over the ESTMW formation region shoals the mixed layer and thus weakens the lateral induction under GHG forcing, but deepens the mixed layer and thus strengthens the lateral induction under aerosol forcing. In addition, local wind changes are also favorable to the opposite response of ESTMW production to GHG versus aerosol.

  16. An algorithm for hyperspectral remote sensing of aerosols: theoretical framework, information content analysis and application to GEO-TASO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, W.; Wang, J.; Xu, X.; Leitch, J. W.; Delker, T.; Chen, G.

    2015-12-01

    This paper includes a series of studies that aim to develop a hyperspectral remote sensing technique for retrieving aerosol properties from a newly developed instrument GEO-TASO (Geostationary Trance gas and Aerosol Sensor Optimization) that measures the radiation at 0.4-0.7 wavelengths at spectral resolution of 0.02 nm. GEOS-TASO instrument is a prototype instrument of TEMPO (Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution), which will be launched in 2022 to measure aerosols, O3, and other trace gases from a geostationary orbit over the N-America. The theoretical framework of optimized inversion algorithm and the information content analysis such as degree of freedom for signal (DFS) will be discussed for hyperspectral remote sensing in visible bands, as well as the application to GEO-TASO, which has mounted on the NASA HU-25C aircraft and gathered several days' of airborne hyperspectral data for our studies. Based on the optimization theory and different from the traditional lookup table (LUT) retrieval technique, our inversion method intends to retrieve the aerosol parameters and surface reflectance simultaneously, in which UNL-VRTM (UNified Linearized Radiative Transfer Model) is employed for forward model and Jacobians calculation, meanwhile, principal component analysis (PCA) is used to constrain the hyperspectral surface reflectance.The information content analysis provides the theoretical analysis guidance about what kind of aerosol parameters could be retrieved from GeoTASO hyperspectral remote sensing to the practical inversion study. Besides, the inversion conducted iteratively until the modeled spectral radiance fits with GeoTASO measurements by a Quasi-Newton method called L-BFGS-B (Large scale BFGS Bound constrained). Finally, the retrieval results of aerosol optical depth and other aerosol parameters are compared against those retrieved by AEROENT and/or in situ measurements such as DISCOVER-AQ during the aircraft campaign.

  17. Condensational growth and trace species scavenging in stratospheric sulfuric acid/water aerosol droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tompson, Robert V., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Stratospheric aerosols play a significant role in the environment. The composition of aerosols is believed to be a liquid solution of sulfuric acid and water with numerous trace species. Of these trace species, ozone in particular was recognized as being very important in its role of shielding the environment from harmful ultraviolet radiation. Also among the trace species are HCl and ClONO2, the so called chlorine reservoir species and various oxides of nitrogen. The quantity of stratospheric aerosol and its particle size distribution determines, to a large degree, the chemistry present in the stratosphere. Aerosols experience 3 types of growth: nucleation, condensation, and coagulation. The application of condensation investigations to the specific problem of stratospheric aerosols is discussed.

  18. Influence of aqueous chemistry on the chemical composition of fog water and interstitial aerosol in Fresno

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hwajin; Ge, Xinlei; Collier, Sonya; Xu, Jianzhong; Sun, Yele; Wang, Youliang; Herckes, Pierre; Zhang, Qi

    2015-04-01

    A measurement study was conducted in the Central Valley (Fresno) of California in January 2010, during which radiation fog events were frequently observed. Fog plays important roles in atmospheric chemistry by scavenging aerosol particles and trace gases and serving as a medium for various aqueous-phase reactions. Understanding the effects of fog on the microphysical and chemical processing of aerosol particles requires detailed information on their chemical composition. In this study, we characterized the chemical composition of fog water and interstitial aerosol particles to study the effects of fog processing on aerosol properties. Fog water samples were collected during the 2010 Fresno campaigns with a Caltech Active Strand Cloud water Collector (CASCC) while interstitial submicron aerosols were characterized in real time with an Aerodyne High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) and a scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS). The fog water samples were later analyzed using the HR-ToF-AMS, ion chromatography, and a total carbon analyzer. The chemical composition and characteristics of interstitial particles during the fog events were compared to those of dissolved inorganic and organic matter in fog waters. Compared to interstitial aerosols, fog water is composed of a higher fraction of ammonium nitrate and oxygenated organics, due to aqueous formation of secondary aerosol species as well as enhanced gas-to-particle partitioning of water soluble species under water rich conditions. Sulfate is formed most efficiently in fog water although its contribution to total dissolved mass is relatively low. The HR-ToF-AMS mass spectra of organic matter in fog water (FOM) are very similar to that of oxygenated organic aerosols (OOA) derived from positive matrix factorization (PMF) of the HR-ToF-AMS spectra of ambient aerosol (r2 = 0.96), but FOM appears to contain a large fraction of acidic functional groups than OOA. FOM is also enriched of

  19. Fluorescent behavior of B-phycoerythrin in microemulsions of aerosol OT/water/isooctane.

    PubMed

    Bermejo, Ruperto; Tobaruela, Diego J; Talavera, Eva M; Orte, Angel; Alvarez-Pez, Jose M

    2003-07-15

    Taking advantage of its unusual fluorescent properties, the incorporation of B-phycoerythrin (B-PE) in aerosol OT (AOT, sodium bis-(2-ethylhexyl) sulphosuccinate)/water/isooctane microemulsions was investigated by following their steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence as a function of the water-to-surfactant molar ratio, w(0). The fluorescent intensity at 575 nm increased continuously with increasing water content, saturating at a w(0) around 35 and staying practically constant at w(0)> or =40. The steady-state anisotropy showed an initial increase with increasing water content until w(0)=23 and then decreased strongly, staying practically constant when w(0)> or =40. The values of the fluorescent parameters, anisotropy and fluorescent intensity, were unchanged when the water content of the system increased in the range between w(0)=40 to 50. This implies the effective incorporation of B-PE in the microemulsion droplets with w(0)> or =40, as well as the equilibrium of the dispersion at these water/surfactant ratios, since higher water content does not affect the main surrounding microenvironment of the protein. The overall incorporation in the microemulsion droplets caused minor spectroscopic changes with respect to biliprotein in aqueous solution of 20 mM sodium phosphate buffer, pH 7.0, such as a blue absorption shift of 3 nm and an emission shift of 1.5 nm, as well as a slight increase in excitation anisotropy spectrum mainly caused by a decrease in protein mobility. Therefore, there are no important interactions between the chromophores and the AOT sulfonate head groups. Emission intensity decays followed complex kinetics in both aqueous and dispersion media. The stability with time and temperature of the biliprotein in the microemulsion was higher than in the aqueous solution. All the results can be explained in terms of B-PE inclusion in the water droplets of AOT microemulsions where the protein has similar configuration and conformation to that in

  20. Aerosol-Water Cycle Interaction: A New Challenge in Monsoon Climate Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, William K. M.

    2006-01-01

    Long recognized as a major environmental hazard, aerosol is now known to have strong impacts on both regional and global climate. It has been estimated that aerosol may reduce by up to 10% of the seasonal mean solar radiation reaching the earth surface, producing a global cooling effect that opposes global warming (Climate Change 2001). This means that the potential perils that humans have committed to global warming may be far greater than what we can detect at the present. As a key component of the Earth climate system, the water cycle is profoundly affected by the presence of aerosols in the atmosphere. Through the so-called direct effect , aerosol scatters and/or absorbs solar radiation, thus cooling the earth surface and changing the horizontal and vertical radiational heating contrast in the atmosphere. The heating contrast drives anomalous atmospheric circulation, resulting in changes in convection, clouds, and rainfall. Another way aerosol can affect the water cycle is through the so-called indirect effects, whereby aerosol increases the number of cloud condensation nuclei, prolongs life time of clouds, and inhibits the growth of cloud drops to raindrops. This leads to more clouds, and increased reflection of solar radiation, and further cooling at the earth surface. In monsoon regions, the response of the water cycle to aerosol forcing is especially complex, not only because of presence of diverse mix of aerosol species with vastly different radiative properties, but also because the monsoon is strongly influenced by ocean and land surface processes, land use, land change, as well as regional and global greenhouse warming effects. Thus, sorting out the impacts of aerosol forcing, and interaction with the monsoon water cycle is a very challenging problem. In this talk, I will offer some insights into how aerosols may impact the Asian monsoon based on preliminary results from satellite observations and climate model experiments. Specifically, I will discuss

  1. Aerosol-Water Cycle Interaction: A New Challenge in Monsoon Climate Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, William K. M.

    2006-01-01

    Long recognized as a major environmental hazard, aerosol is now known to have strong impacts on both regional and global climate. It has been estimated that aerosol may reduce by up to 10% of the seasonal mean solar radiation reaching the earth surface, producing a global cooling effect that opposes global warming (Climate Change 2001). This means that the potential perils that humans have committed to global warming may be far greater than what we can detect at the present. As a key component of the Earth climate system, the water cycle is profoundly affected by the presence of aerosols in the atmosphere. Through the so-called "direct effect", aerosol scatters and/or absorbs solar radiation, thus cooling the earth surface and changing the horizontal and vertical radiational heating contrast in the atmosphere. The heating contrast drives anomalous atmospheric circulation, resulting in changes in convection, clouds, and rainfall. Another way aerosol can affect the water cycle is through the so-called "indirect effects", whereby aerosol increases the number of cloud condensation nuclei, prolongs life time of clouds, and inhibits the growth of cloud drops to raindrops. This leads to more clouds, and increased reflection of solar radiation, and further cooling at the earth surface. In monsoon regions, the response of the water cycle to aerosol forcing is especially complex, not only because of presence of diverse mix of aerosol species with vastly different radiative properties, but also because the monsoon is strongly influenced by ocean and land surface processes, land use, land change, as well as regional and global greenhouse warming effects. Thus, sorting out the impacts of aerosol forcing, and interaction with the monsoon water cycle is a very challenging problem. In this talk, I will offer some insights into how aerosols may impact the Asian monsoon based on preliminary results from satellite observations and climate model experiments. Specifically, I will

  2. On the influence of the diurnal variations of aerosol content to estimate direct aerosol radiative forcing using MODIS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hui; Guo, Jianping; Ceamanos, Xavier; Roujean, Jean-Louis; Min, Min; Carrer, Dominique

    2016-09-01

    Long-term measurements of aerosol optical depth (AOD) from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) located in Beijing reveal a strong diurnal cycle of aerosol load staged by seasonal patterns. Such pronounced variability is matter of importance in respect to the estimation of daily averaged direct aerosol radiative forcing (DARF). Polar-orbiting satellites could only offer a daily revisit, which turns in fact to be even much less in case of frequent cloudiness. Indeed, this places a severe limit to properly capture the diurnal variations of AOD and thus estimate daily DARF. Bearing this in mind, the objective of the present study is however to evaluate the impact of AOD diurnal variations for conducting quantitative assessment of DARF using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) AOD data over Beijing. We provide assessments of DARF with two different assumptions about diurnal AOD variability: taking the observed hourly-averaged AOD cycle into account and assuming constant MODIS (including Terra and Aqua) AOD value throughout the daytime. Due to the AOD diurnal variability, the absolute differences in annual daily mean DARFs, if the constant MODIS/Terra (MODIS/Aqua) AOD value is used instead of accounting for the observed hourly-averaged daily variability, is 1.2 (1.3) Wm-2 at the top of the atmosphere, 27.5 (30.6) Wm-2 at the surface, and 26.4 (29.3) Wm-2 in the atmosphere, respectively. During the summertime, the impact of the diurnal AOD variability on seasonal daily mean DARF estimates using MODIS Terra (Aqua) data can reach up to 2.2 (3.9) Wm-2 at the top of the atmosphere, 43.7 (72.7) Wm-2 at the surface, and 41.4 (68.8) Wm-2 in the atmosphere, respectively. Overall, the diurnal variation in AOD tends to cause large bias in the estimated DARF on both seasonal and annual scales. In summertime, the higher the surface albedo, the stronger impact on DARF at the top of the atmosphere caused by dust and biomass burning (continental) aerosol. This

  3. Carbon content of atmospheric aerosols in a residential area during the wood combustion season in Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krecl, Patricia; Ström, Johan; Johansson, Christer

    Carbonaceous aerosol particles were observed in a residential area with wood combustion during wintertime in Northern Sweden. Filter samples were analyzed for elemental carbon (EC) and organic carbon (OC) content by using a thermo-optical transmittance method. The light-absorbing carbon (LAC) content was determined by employing a commercial Aethalometer and a custom-built particle soot absorption photometer. Filter samples were used to convert the optical signals to LAC mass concentrations. Additional total PM 10 mass concentrations and meteorological parameters were measured. The mean and standard deviation mass concentrations were 4.4±3.6 μg m -3 for OC, and 1.4±1.2 μg m -3 for EC. On average, EC accounted for 10.7% of the total PM 10 and the contribution of OC to the total PM 10 was 35.4%. Aethalometer and custom-built PSAP measurements were highly correlated ( R2=0.92). The hourly mean value of LAC mass concentration was 1.76 μg m -3 (median 0.88 μg m -3) for the winter 2005-2006. This study shows that the custom-built PSAP is a reliable alternative for the commercial Aethalometer with the advantage of being a low-cost instrument.

  4. Molecular simulation study of water mobility in aerosol-OT reverse micelles.

    PubMed

    Chowdhary, Janamejaya; Ladanyi, Branka M

    2011-06-16

    In this work, we present results from molecular dynamics simulations on the single-molecule relaxation of water within reverse micelles (RMs) of different sizes formed by the surfactant aerosol-OT (AOT, sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate) in isooctane. Results are presented for RM water content w(0) = [H(2)O]/[AOT] in the range from 2.0 to 7.5. We show that translational diffusion of water within the RM can, to a good approximation, be decoupled from the translation of the RM through the isooctane solvent. Water translational mobility within the RM is restricted by the water pool dimensions, and thus, the water mean-squared displacements (MSDs) level off in time. Comparison with models of diffusion in confined geometries shows that a version of the Gaussian confinement model with a biexponential decay of correlations provides a good fit to the MSDs, while a model of free diffusion within a sphere agrees less well with simulation results. We find that the local diffusivity is considerably reduced in the interfacial region, especially as w(0) decreases. Molecular orientational relaxation is monitored by examining the behavior of OH and dipole vectors. For both vectors, orientational relaxation slows down close to the interface and as w(0) decreases. For the OH vector, reorientation is strongly affected by the presence of charged species at the RM interface and these effects are especially pronounced for water molecules hydrogen-bonded to surfactant sites that serve as hydrogen-bond acceptors. For the dipole vector, orientational relaxation near the interface slows down more than that for the OH vector due mainly to the influence of ion-dipole interactions with the sodium counterions. We investigate water OH and dipole reorientation mechanisms by studying the w(0) and interfacial shell dependence of orientational time correlations for different Legendre polynomial orders.

  5. Ice crystallization in ultrafine water-salt aerosols: nucleation, ice-solution equilibrium, and internal structure.

    PubMed

    Hudait, Arpa; Molinero, Valeria

    2014-06-04

    Atmospheric aerosols have a strong influence on Earth's climate. Elucidating the physical state and internal structure of atmospheric aqueous aerosols is essential to predict their gas and water uptake, and the locus and rate of atmospherically important heterogeneous reactions. Ultrafine aerosols with sizes between 3 and 15 nm have been detected in large numbers in the troposphere and tropopause. Nanoscopic aerosols arising from bubble bursting of natural and artificial seawater have been identified in laboratory and field experiments. The internal structure and phase state of these aerosols, however, cannot yet be determined in experiments. Here we use molecular simulations to investigate the phase behavior and internal structure of liquid, vitrified, and crystallized water-salt ultrafine aerosols with radii from 2.5 to 9.5 nm and with up to 10% moles of ions. We find that both ice crystallization and vitrification of the nanodroplets lead to demixing of pure water from the solutions. Vitrification of aqueous nanodroplets yields nanodomains of pure low-density amorphous ice in coexistence with vitrified solute rich aqueous glass. The melting temperature of ice in the aerosols decreases monotonically with an increase of solute fraction and decrease of radius. The simulations reveal that nucleation of ice occurs homogeneously at the subsurface of the water-salt nanoparticles. Subsequent ice growth yields phase-segregated, internally mixed, aerosols with two phases in equilibrium: a concentrated water-salt amorphous mixture and a spherical cap-like ice nanophase. The surface of the crystallized aerosols is heterogeneous, with ice and solution exposed to the vapor. Free energy calculations indicate that as the concentration of salt in the particles, the advance of the crystallization, or the size of the particles increase, the stability of the spherical cap structure increases with respect to the alternative structure in which a core of ice is fully surrounded by

  6. [Estimation of vegetation water content from Landsat 8 OLI data].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xing-ming; Ding, Yan-ling; Zhao, Kai; Jiang, Tao; Li, Xiao-feng; Zhang, Shi-yi; Li, Yang-yang; Wu, Li-li; Sun, Jian; Ren, Jian-hua; Zhang, Xuan-xuan

    2014-12-01

    The present paper aims to analyze the capabilities and limitations for retrieving vegetation water content from Landsat8 OLI (Operational Land Imager) sensor-new generation of earth observation program. First, the effect of soil background on canopy reflectance and the sensitive band to vegetation water content were analyzed based on simulated dataset from ProSail model. Then, based on vegetation water indices from Landsat8 OLI and field vegetation water content during June 1 2013 to August 14 2013, the best vegetation water index for estimating vegetation water content was found through comparing 12 different indices. The results show that: (1) red, near infrared and two shortwave infrared bands of OLI sensor are sensitive to the change in vegetation water content, and near infrared band is the most sensitive one; (2) At low vegetation coverage, solar radiation reflected by soil background will reach to spectral sensor and influence the relationship between vegetation water index and vegetation water content, and simulation results from ProSail model also show that soil background reflectance has a significant impact on vegetation canopy reflectance in both wet and dry soil conditions, so the optimized soil adjusted vegetation index (OSAVI) was used in this paper to remove the effect of soil background on vegetation water index and improve its relationship with vegetation water content; (3) for the 12 vegetation water indices, the relationship between MSI2 and vegetation water content is the best with the R-square of 0.948 and the average error of vegetation water content is 0.52 kg · m(-2); (4) it is difficult to estimate vegetation water content from vegetation water indices when vegetation water content is larger than 2 kg · m(-2) due to spectral saturation of these indices.

  7. Sensitivity of the remote sensing reflectance of ocean and coastal waters to uncertainties in aerosol characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, F. C.; Garay, M. J.; Zhai, P.; Kalashnikova, O. V.; Diner, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Remote sensing is a powerful tool for optical oceanography and limnology to monitor and study ocean, coastal, and inland water ecosystems. However, the highly spatially and temporally variable nature of water conditions and constituents, as well as atmospheric conditions are challenging factors, especially for spaceborne observations.Here, we study the quantitative impact of uncertainties in the spectral aerosol optical and microphysical properties, namely aerosol optical depth (AOD), spectral absorption, and particle size, on the remote sensing reflectance (Rrs) of simulated typical open ocean and coastal waters. Rrs is related to the inherent optical properties of the water column and is a fundamental parameter in ocean optics retrievals. We use the successive order of scattering (SOS) method to perform radiative transfer calculations of the coupled system of atmosphere and water. The optics of typical open ocean and coastal waters are simulated with bio-optical models. We derive sensitivities by comparing spectral SOS calculations of Rrs with a reference aerosol model against similar calculations performed using a different aerosol model. One particular focus of this study lies on the impact of the spectral absorption of dust and brown carbon, or similar particles with greater absorption at short wavelengths on Rrs. The results are presented in terms of the minimum expected error in Rrs due to the choice of an incorrect aerosol model during the atmospheric correction of ocean color remote sensing data from space. This study is independent of errors related to observational data or retrieval techniques.The results are relevant for quantifying requirements of aerosol retrievals to derive accurate Rrs from spaceborne observations, such as NASA's future Pre-Aerosol, Clouds, and ocean Ecosystem (PACE) mission.

  8. Secondary organic aerosol formation from cyclohexene ozonolysis in the presence of water vapor and dissolved salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Bethany; Malloy, Quentin G. J.; Yee, Lindsay D.; Cocker, David R.

    A series of 90 experiments were conducted in the UC Riverside/CE-CERT environmental chamber to evaluate the impact of water vapor and dissolved salts on secondary organic aerosol formation for cyclohexene ozonolysis. Water vapor (low - 30 ± 2% RH, medium - 46 ± 2% RH, high - 63 ± 2% RH) was found to directly participate in the atmospheric chemistry altering the composition of the condensing species, thus increasing total organic aerosol formation by ˜22% as compared to the system under dry (<0.1% RH) conditions. Hygroscopicity measurements also indicate that the organic aerosol composition is altered in the presence of gaseous water. These results are consistent with water vapor reacting with the crigee intermediate in the gas phase resulting in increased aldehyde formation. The addition of dissolved salts ((NH 4) 2SO 4, NH 4HSO 4, CaCl 2, NaCl) had minimal effect; only the (NH 4) 2SO 4 and NaCl were found to significantly impact the system with ˜10% increase in total organic aerosol formation. These results indicate that the organics may be partitioning to an outer organic shell as opposed to into the aqueous salt. Hygroscopicity measurements indicate that the addition of salts does not alter the aerosol composition for the dry or water vapor system.

  9. Vertical Distribution of Dust and Water Ice Aerosols from CRISM Limb-geometry Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael Doyle; Wolff, Michael J.; Clancy, Todd; Kleinbohl, Armin; Murchie, Scott L.

    2013-01-01

    [1] Near-infrared spectra taken in a limb-viewing geometry by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) on board the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter provide a useful tool for probing atmospheric structure. Specifically, the observed radiance as a function of wavelength and height above the limb enables the vertical distribution of both dust and water ice aerosols to be retrieved. More than a dozen sets of CRISM limb observations have been taken so far providing pole-to-pole cross sections, spanning more than a full Martian year. Radiative transfer modeling is used to model the observations taking into account multiple scattering from aerosols and the spherical geometry of the limb observations. Both dust and water ice vertical profiles often show a significant vertical structure for nearly all seasons and latitudes that is not consistent with the well-mixed or Conrath-v assumptions that have often been used in the past for describing aerosol vertical profiles for retrieval and modeling purposes. Significant variations are seen in the retrieved vertical profiles of dust and water ice aerosol as a function of season. Dust typically extends to higher altitudes (approx. 40-50km) during the perihelion season than during the aphelion season (<20km), and the Hellas region consistently shows more dust mixed to higher altitudes than other locations. Detached water ice clouds are common, and water ice aerosols are observed to cap the dust layer in all seasons.

  10. Determining Water Content of Geologic Materials Using Reflectance Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milliken, R. E.; Mustard, J. F.

    2004-03-01

    TGA data and reflectance spectra are used to track changes in water absorptions as a function of absolute water content. Calculating band depth areas of absorptions in VIS-NIR data may prove useful for quantifying the water content of Mars' surface.

  11. Aerosol absorption measurement at SWIR with water vapor interference using a differential photoacoustic spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wenyue; Liu, Qiang; Wu, Yi

    2015-09-07

    Atmospheric aerosol plays an important role in atmospheric radiation balance through absorbing and scattering the solar radiation, which changes local weather and global climate. Accurate measurement is highly requested to estimate the radiative effects and climate effects of atmospheric aerosol. Photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) technique, which observes the aerosols on their natural suspended state and is insensitive to light scattering, is commonly recognized as one of the best candidates to measure the optical absorption coefficient (OAC) of aerosols. In the present work, a method of measuring aerosol OAC at the wavelength where could also be absorbed by water vapor was proposed and corresponding measurements of the absorption properties of the atmospheric aerosol at the short wave infrared (SWIR, 1342 nm) wavelength were carried out. The spectrometer was made up of two high performance homemade photoacoustic cells. To improve the sensitivity, several methods were presented to control the noise derived from gas flow and vibration from the sampling pump. Calibration of the OAC and properties of the system were also studied in detail. Using the established PAS instrument, measurement of the optical absorption properties of the atmospheric aerosol were carried out in laboratory and field environment.

  12. The effect of water to ethanol feed ratio on physical properties and aerosolization behavior of spray dried cromolyn sodium particles.

    PubMed

    Gilani, Kambiz; Najafabadi, Abdolhossien Rouholamini; Barghi, Mohammadali; Rafiee-Tehrani, Morteza

    2005-05-01

    Cromolyn sodium (CS) was spray dried under constant operation conditions from different water to ethanol feed ratios (50:50-0:100). The spray dried CS samples were characterized for their physicochemical properties including crystallinity, particle size distribution, morphology, density, and water/ethanol content. To determine quantitatively the crystallinity of the powders, an X-ray diffraction (XRD) method was developed using samples with different crystallinity prepared by physical mixing of 100% amorphous and 100% crystalline CS materials. The aerodynamic behavior of the CS samples was determined using an Andersen Cascade Impactor (ACI) with a Spinhaler at an air flow of 60 L/min. Binary mixtures of each spray dried CS powder and Pharmatose 325, a commercial alpha-lactose monohydrate available for DPI formulations, were prepared and in vitro aerosol deposition of the drug from the mixtures was analyzed using ACI to evaluate the effect of carrier on deposition profiles of the spray dried samples. CS spray dried from absolute ethanol exhibited XRD pattern characteristic for crystalline materials and different from patterns of the other samples. The crystallinity of spray dried CS obtained in the presence of water varied from 0% to 28.37%, depending on the ratio of water to ethanol in the feed suspensions. All samples presented different particle size, water/ethanol content, and bulk density values. CS particles spray dried from absolute ethanol presented uniform elongated shape whereas the other samples consisted mainly of particles with irregular shape. Overall, fine particle fraction increased significantly (p < 0.01) with decreasing d50% and water and ethanol content of spray dried CS samples. Significant difference (p < 0.01) in deposition profiles of the drug were observed between corresponding carrier free and carrier blended formulations. The difference in deposition profiles of CS aerosolized from various spray dried samples were described according to

  13. Impeded ice nucleation in glassy and highly viscous aerosol particles: the role of water diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcolli, C.; Peter, T.; Zobrist, B.; Krieger, U. K.; Luo, B. P.; Soonsin, V.; Pedernera, D. A.; Koop, T.

    2010-05-01

    In situ and remote observations in the upper troposphere have disclosed the existence of water vapor pressures up to and even above water saturation. Under such conditions ice particle formation by homogeneous nucleation is expected to set in followed by ice crystal growth until the supersaturation is consumed. While the highest measured water vapor values might not withstand rigorous quality checks, values up to water saturation seem to be occurring. Since air masses appear to contain sufficient numbers of aerosol particles for cloud formation, the question arises why these aerosols are not successful at nucleating ice. The atmospheric aerosol is a complex mixture of various inorganic and organic components, whereas the organic fraction can represent more than 50% of the total aerosol mass. The homogeneous ice nucleation threshold was established for atmospherically relevant salt solutions and sulfuric acid, but only for a few organic species. The organic aerosol fraction tends to remain liquid instead of crystallizing as the temperature is decreased and, thus, organic aerosol particles may form highly viscous liquids. When the viscosity of such liquids reaches values in the order of 1012 Pa s, the molecular motion becomes so slow, that the sample vitrifies at the glass transition temperature Tg. If aerosol particles were present as glasses, this would influence several physical and chemical processes in the atmosphere significantly: Water uptake from the gas phase would be drastically impeded and ice nucleation inhibited. We investigated the glass transition temperature of a series of aqueous organic solutions such as polyols, sugars and dicarboxylic acids as a function of the solute concentration using a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). These measurements show that the higher the molar mass of the organic solutes, the higher Tg of their respective solutions at a given water activity. Aerosol particles containing larger (≥150 g mol-1) organic molecules

  14. Certain Results of Measurements of Characteristics of Stratospheric Aerosol Layer and Total Ozone Content at Siberian Lidar Station in Tomsk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevzorov, Aleksey; Bazhenov, Oleg; Burlakov, Vladimir; Dolgii, Sergey

    2016-06-01

    We consider the results of long-term remote optical monitoring, obtained at the Siberian Lidar Station of Institute of Atmospheric Optics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences in Tomsk (56.5°N, 85.0°E). The scattering characteristics of stratospheric aerosol layer, obtained according to data of lidar measurements since 1986, are presented. We analyze the trends of changes in the total ozone (TO) content over Tomsk for the period 1996-2013 according to data of spectrophotometric measurements with employment of Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) data for the period 1979-1994. We determined the periods of elevated content of stratospheric aerosol over Tomsk aftera series of explosive eruptions of volcanoes of Pacific Ring of Fire and Iceland in 2006-2011. Since the second half of 1990s, we record an increasing TO trend, equaling 0.65 DU/yr for the period 1996-2013.

  15. Calcium and bromide contents of natural waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, R.J.; Graf, D.L.; Jones, B.F.

    1966-01-01

    The linear relation observed in a log Ca++ versus log Br - plot for subsurface Cl- waters is attributed to ultrafiltration by shale of sea water and fresh water that have passed through sedimentary rocks since their formation. Reactions between these solutions and sedimentary minerals, particularly dolomitization, must have contributed additional Ca+ + to solution.

  16. CART Raman Lidar Aerosol and Water Vapor Measurements in the Vicinity of Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, Marian B.; Ferrare, Richard A.; Turner, David; Newsom, Rob; Sivaraman, Chitra

    2008-01-01

    Aerosol and water vapor profiles acquired by the Raman lidar instrument located at the Climate Research Facility (CRF) at Southern Great Plains (SGP) provide data necessary to investigate the atmospheric variability in the vicinity of clouds near the top of the planetary boundary layer (PBL). Recent CARL upgrades and modifications to the routine processing algorithms afforded the necessarily high temporal and vertical data resolutions for these investigations. CARL measurements are used to investigate the behavior of aerosol backscattering and extinction and their correlation with water vapor and relative humidity.

  17. Comparison of activity coefficient models for atmospheric aerosols containing mixtures of electrolytes, organics, and water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Chinghang; Clegg, Simon L.; Seinfeld, John H.

    Atmospheric aerosols generally comprise a mixture of electrolytes, organic compounds, and water. Determining the gas-particle distribution of volatile compounds, including water, requires equilibrium or mass transfer calculations, at the heart of which are models for the activity coefficients of the particle-phase components. We evaluate here the performance of four recent activity coefficient models developed for electrolyte/organic/water mixtures typical of atmospheric aerosols. Two of the models, the CSB model [Clegg, S.L., Seinfeld, J.H., Brimblecombe, P., 2001. Thermodynamic modelling of aqueous aerosols containing electrolytes and dissolved organic compounds. Journal of Aerosol Science 32, 713-738] and the aerosol diameter dependent equilibrium model (ADDEM) [Topping, D.O., McFiggans, G.B., Coe, H., 2005. A curved multi-component aerosol hygroscopicity model framework: part 2—including organic compounds. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics 5, 1223-1242] treat ion-water and organic-water interactions but do not include ion-organic interactions; these can be referred to as "decoupled" models. The other two models, reparameterized Ming and Russell model 2005 [Raatikainen, T., Laaksonen, A., 2005. Application of several activity coefficient models to water-organic-electrolyte aerosols of atmospheric interest. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics 5, 2475-2495] and X-UNIFAC.3 [Erdakos, G.B., Change, E.I., Pandow, J.F., Seinfeld, J.H., 2006. Prediction of activity coefficients in liquid aerosol particles containing organic compounds, dissolved inorganic salts, and water—Part 3: Organic compounds, water, and ionic constituents by consideration of short-, mid-, and long-range effects using X-UNIFAC.3. Atmospheric Environment 40, 6437-6452], include ion-organic interactions; these are referred to as "coupled" models. We address the question—Does the inclusion of a treatment of ion-organic interactions substantially improve the performance of the coupled models over

  18. Satellite measurements of tropospheric aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griggs, M.

    1981-01-01

    This investigation uses LANDSAT 2 radiance data and ground-truth measurements of the aerosol optical thickness, obtained previously from five inland sites, to study the usefulness and limitations of the near infrared radiance over inland bodies of water. The linear relationship between LANDSAT 2 MSS7 and aerosol content found in this study can be used to estimate the aerosol content with a standard deviation of 0.42N. Analysis of the data for MSS6 and MSS7 suggest that the larger uncertainty is mostly due to water turbidity, with little contribution from the adjacency effect. The relationship found is best applied to determine an average aerosol content over a period of time at a given target, or an area average at a given time over several targets close together.

  19. Organic peroxide and OH formation in aerosol and cloud water: laboratory evidence for this aqueous chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Y. B.; Turpin, B. J.

    2015-06-01

    Aqueous chemistry in atmospheric waters (e.g., cloud droplets or wet aerosols) is well accepted as an atmospheric pathway to produce secondary organic aerosol (SOAaq). Water-soluble organic compounds with small carbon numbers (C2-C3) are precursors for SOAaq and products include organic acids, organic sulfates, and high molecular weight compounds/oligomers. Fenton reactions and the uptake of gas-phase OH radicals are considered to be the major oxidant sources for aqueous organic chemistry. However, the sources and availability of oxidants in atmospheric waters are not well understood. The degree to which OH is produced in the aqueous phase affects the balance of radical and non-radical aqueous chemistry, the properties of the resulting aerosol, and likely its atmospheric behavior. This paper demonstrates organic peroxide formation during aqueous photooxidation of methylglyoxal using ultra high resolution Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS). Organic peroxides are known to form through gas-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds. They contribute secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation directly by forming peroxyhemiacetals, and epoxides, and indirectly by enhancing gas-phase oxidation through OH recycling. We provide simulation results of organic peroxide/peroxyhemiacetal formation in clouds and wet aerosols and discuss organic peroxides as a source of condensed-phase OH radicals and as a contributor to aqueous SOA.

  20. Discrimination of water, ice and aerosols by light polarisation in the CLOUD experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichman, L.; Fuchs, C.; Järvinen, E.; Ignatius, K.; Höppel, N. F.; Dias, A.; Heinritzi, M.; Simon, M.; Tröstl, J.; Wagner, A. C.; Wagner, R.; Williamson, C.; Yan, C.; Bianchi, F.; Connolly, P. J.; Dorsey, J. R.; Duplissy, J.; Ehrhart, S.; Frege, C.; Gordon, H.; Hoyle, C. R.; Kristensen, T. B.; Steiner, G.; Donahue, N. M.; Flagan, R.; Gallagher, M. W.; Kirkby, J.; Möhler, O.; Saathoff, H.; Schnaiter, M.; Stratmann, F.; Tomé, A.

    2015-11-01

    Cloud microphysical processes involving the ice phase in tropospheric clouds are among the major uncertainties in cloud formation, weather and General Circulation Models (GCMs). The simultaneous detection of aerosol particles, liquid droplets, and ice crystals, especially in the small cloud-particle size range below 50 μm, remains challenging in mixed phase, often unstable ice-water phase environments. The Cloud Aerosol Spectrometer with Polarisation (CASPOL) is an airborne instrument that has the ability to detect such small cloud particles and measure their effects on the backscatter polarisation state. Here we operate the versatile Cosmics-Leaving-OUtdoor-Droplets (CLOUD) chamber facility at the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN) to produce controlled mixed phase and other clouds by adiabatic expansions in an ultraclean environment, and use the CASPOL to discriminate between different aerosols, water and ice particles. In this paper, optical property measurements of mixed phase clouds and viscous Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) are presented. We report observations of significant liquid - viscous SOA particle polarisation transitions under dry conditions using CASPOL. Cluster analysis techniques were subsequently used to classify different types of particles according to their polarisation ratios during phase transition. A classification map is presented for water droplets, organic aerosol (e.g., SOA and oxalic acid), crystalline substances such as ammonium sulphate, and volcanic ash. Finally, we discuss the benefits and limitations of this classification approach for atmospherically relevant concentration and mixtures with respect to the CLOUD 8-9 campaigns and its potential contribution to Tropical Troposphere Layer (TTL) analysis.

  1. Airborne water vapor DIAL system and measurements of water and aerosol profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higdon, Noah S.; Browell, Edward V.

    1991-01-01

    The Lidar Applications Group at NASA Langley Research Center has developed a differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system for the remote measurement of atmospheric water vapor (H2O) and aerosols from an aircraft. The airborne H2O DIAL system is designed for extended flights to perform mesoscale investigations of H2O and aerosol distributions. This DIAL system utilizes a Nd:YAG-laser-pumped dye laser as the off-line transmitter and a narrowband, tunable Alexandrite laser as the on-line transmitter. The dye laser has an oscillator/amplifier configuration which incorporates a grating and prism in the oscillator cavity to narrow the output linewidth to approximately 15 pm. This linewidth can be maintained over the wavelength range of 725 to 730 nm, and it is sufficiently narrow to satisfy the off-line spectral requirements. In the Alexandrite laser, three intracavity tuning elements combine to produce an output linewidth of 1.1 pm. These spectral devices include a five-plate birefringent tuner, a 1-mm thick solid etalon and a 1-cm air-spaced etalon. A wavelength stability of +/- 0.35 pm is achieved by active feedback control of the two Fabry-Perot etalons using a frequency stabilized He-Ne laser as a wavelength reference. The three tuning elements can be synchronously scanned over a 150 pm range with microprocessor-based scanning electronics. Other aspects of the DIAL system are discussed.

  2. Polarimetric remote sensing in oxygen A and B bands: sensitivity study and information content analysis for vertical profile of aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Shouguo; Wang, Jun; Xu, Xiaoguang

    2016-05-01

    Theoretical analysis is conducted to reveal the information content of aerosol vertical profile in space-borne measurements of the backscattered radiance and degree of linear polarization (DOLP) in oxygen (O2) A and B bands. Assuming a quasi-Gaussian shape for aerosol vertical profile characterized by peak height H and half width γ (at half maximum), the Unified Linearized Vector Radiative Transfer Model (UNL-VRTM) is used to simulate the Stokes four-vector elements of upwelling radiation at the top of atmosphere (TOA) and their Jacobians with respect to H and γ. Calculations for different aerosol types and different combinations of H and γ values show that the wide range of gas absorption optical depth in O2 A and B band enables the sensitivity of backscattered DOLP and radiance at TOA to the aerosol layer at different altitudes. Quantitatively, DOLP in O2 A and B bands is found to be more sensitive to H and γ than radiance, especially over the bright surfaces (with large visible reflectance). In many O2 absorption wavelengths, the degree of freedom of signal (DFS) for retrieving H (or γ) generally increases with H (and γ) and can be close to unity in many cases, assuming that the composite uncertainty from surface and aerosol scattering properties as well as measurements is less than 5 %. Further analysis demonstrates that DFS needed for simultaneous retrieval of H and γ can be obtained from a combined use of DOLP measurements at ˜ 10-100 O2 A and B absorption wavelengths (or channels), depending on the specific values of H. The higher the aerosol layer, the fewer number of channels for DOLP measurements in O2 A and B bands are needed for characterizing H and γ. Future hyperspectral measurements of DOLP in O2 A and B bands are needed to continue studying their potential and their combination with radiance and DOLP in atmospheric window channels for retrieving the vertical profiles of aerosols, especially highly scattering aerosols, over land.

  3. Contrasting the Evaporation and Condensation of Water from Glassy and Amorphous Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, J. P.; Bones, D. L.; Power, R.; Lienhard, D.; Krieger, U. K.

    2012-04-01

    The partitioning of water between the condensed and gas phases in atmospheric aerosol is usually assumed to occur instantaneously and to be regulated by solution thermodynamics. However, the persistence of high viscosity, glassy and amorphous aerosol to low relative humidity without crystallisation occurring is now widely recognised, suggesting that the timescale for water transport to or from the particle during condensation or evaporation may be significant. A kinetic limitation on water transport could have important implications for understanding hygroscopic growth measurements made on ambient particles, the ability of particles to act as ice nuclei or cloud condensation nuclei, the kinetics of chemical aging/heterogeneous chemistry, and the rate or condensation/evaporation of semi-volatile organic components. In this study we will report on measurements of the timescale of water transport to and from glassy aerosol and ultra-high viscosity solution droplets using aerosol optical tweezers to investigate the time-response of single particles to changes in relative humidity. As a benchmark system, mixed component aerosol particles containing sucrose and sodium chloride have been used; varying the mole fractions of the two solutes allows a wide range of solution viscosities to be studied. We will show that coarse particles can take many thousands of seconds to equilibrate in size and that the timescale correlates with the estimated bulk viscosity of the particle. We will also confirm that significant inhomogeneities in particle composition can be established during evaporation or condensation. Using the experimental data to benchmark a model for equilibration time, predictions can be made of the timescale for the equilibration of accumulation mode particles during water condensation or evaporation and these predictions will be described and their significance explored. Finally, the coalescence dynamics of highly viscous aerosol particles will be reported

  4. Modelling Ontogenetic Changes of Nitrogen and Water Content in Lettuce

    PubMed Central

    SEGINER, IDO; BLEYAERT, PETER; BREUGELMANS, MAAIKE

    2004-01-01

    • Background and Aims It is well established that the nitrogen content of plants, including lettuce, decreases with time. It has also been observed that water content of lettuce increases between planting and harvest. This paper is an attempt at modelling these observations. • Methods An existing dynamic model (Nicolet), designed to predict growth and nitrate content of glasshouse lettuce, is modified to accommodate the ontogenetic changes of reduced-nitrogen and water contents (on a dry matter basis). The decreasing reduced-N content and the increasing water content are mimicked by dividing the originally uniform plant into ‘metabolically active’ tissue and ‘support’ tissue. The ‘metabolic’ tissue is assumed to contain a higher nitrogen content and a lower water content than the ‘support’ tissue. As the plants grow, the ratio of ‘support’ to ‘metabolic’ tissue increases, resulting in an increased mean water content and a decreased reduced-N content. Simulations with the new model are compared with experimental glasshouse data over four seasons. • Key Results The empirical linear relationship between water and reduced-N contents, matches, to a good approximation, the corresponding relationship based on the model. The agreement between the two makes it possible to effectively uncouple the estimation of the ‘ontogenetic’ parameters from the estimation of the other parameters. The growth and nitrate simulation results match the data rather well and are hardly affected by the new refinement. The reduced-N and water contents are predicted much better with the new model. • Conclusion Prediction of nitrogen uptake for the substantial nitrate pool of lettuce depends on the water content. Hence, the modified model may assist in making better fertilization decisions and better estimates of nitrogen leaching. PMID:15294851

  5. Remote sensing of soil water content at large scales

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil water content at the near surface is a critical parameter for understanding land surface atmosphere interactions, influencing surface energy balances. Using microwave radiometry, an accurate global map of surface soil water content can be generated on a near daily basis. The accuracy of the p...

  6. Estimating the vegetation water content using a radar vegetation index

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vegetation water content is an important biophysical parameter. Here, the Radar Vegetation Index (RVI) based on polarimetric backscatter observations was evaluated for estimating vegetation water content. Analysis utilized a data set obtained by a ground-based multi-frequency polarimetric scatterome...

  7. Effects of atmospheric dynamics and aerosols on the fraction of supercooled water clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiming; Lv, Qiaoyi; Zhang, Min; Wang, Tianhe; Kawamoto, Kazuaki; Chen, Siyu; Zhang, Beidou

    2017-02-01

    Based on 8 years of (January 2008-December 2015) cloud phase information from the GCM-Oriented Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) Cloud Product (GOCCP), aerosol products from CALIPSO and meteorological parameters from the ERA-Interim products, the present study investigates the effects of atmospheric dynamics on the supercooled liquid cloud fraction (SCF) during nighttime under different aerosol loadings at global scale to better understand the conditions of supercooled liquid water gradually transforming to ice phase. Statistical results indicate that aerosols' effect on nucleation cannot fully explain all SCF changes, especially in those regions where aerosols' effect on nucleation is not a first-order influence (e.g., due to low ice nuclei aerosol frequency). By performing the temporal and spatial correlations between SCFs and different meteorological factors, this study presents specifically the relationship between SCF and different meteorological parameters under different aerosol loadings on a global scale. We find that the SCFs almost decrease with increasing of aerosol loading, and the SCF variation is closely related to the meteorological parameters but their temporal relationship is not stable and varies with the different regions, seasons and isotherm levels. Obviously negative temporal correlations between SCFs versus vertical velocity and relative humidity indicate that the higher vertical velocity and relative humidity the smaller SCFs. However, the patterns of temporal correlation for lower-tropospheric static stability, skin temperature and horizontal wind are relatively more complex than those of vertical velocity and humidity. For example, their close correlations are predominantly located in middle and high latitudes and vary with latitude or surface type. Although these statistical correlations have not been used to establish a certain causal relationship, our results may provide a unique point of view

  8. Aerosol scattering effects on water vapor retrievals over the Los Angeles Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Zhao-Cheng; Zhang, Qiong; Natraj, Vijay; Margolis, Jack S.; Shia, Run-Lie; Newman, Sally; Fu, Dejian; Pongetti, Thomas J.; Wong, Kam W.; Sander, Stanley P.; Wennberg, Paul O.; Yung, Yuk L.

    2017-02-01

    In this study, we propose a novel approach to describe the scattering effects of atmospheric aerosols in a complex urban environment using water vapor (H2O) slant column measurements in the near infrared. This approach is demonstrated using measurements from the California Laboratory for Atmospheric Remote Sensing Fourier Transform Spectrometer on the top of Mt. Wilson, California, and a two-stream-exact single scattering (2S-ESS) radiative transfer (RT) model. From the spectral measurements, we retrieve H2O slant column density (SCD) using 15 different absorption bands between 4000 and 8000 cm-1. Due to the wavelength dependence of aerosol scattering, large variations in H2O SCD retrievals are observed as a function of wavelength. Moreover, the variations are found to be correlated with aerosol optical depths (AODs) measured at the AERONET-Caltech station. Simulation results from the RT model reproduce this correlation and show that the aerosol scattering effect is the primary contributor to the variations in the wavelength dependence of the H2O SCD retrievals. A significant linear correlation is also found between variations in H2O SCD retrievals from different bands and corresponding AOD data; this correlation is associated with the asymmetry parameter, which is a first-order measure of the aerosol scattering phase function. The evidence from both measurements and simulations suggests that wavelength-dependent aerosol scattering effects can be derived using H2O retrievals from multiple bands. This understanding of aerosol scattering effects on H2O retrievals suggests a promising way to quantify the effect of aerosol scattering on greenhouse gas retrievals and could potentially contribute towards reducing biases in greenhouse gas retrievals from space.

  9. Size matters in the water uptake and hygroscopic growth of atmospherically relevant multicomponent aerosol particles.

    PubMed

    Laskina, Olga; Morris, Holly S; Grandquist, Joshua R; Qin, Zhen; Stone, Elizabeth A; Tivanski, Alexei V; Grassian, Vicki H

    2015-05-14

    Understanding the interactions of water with atmospheric aerosols is crucial for determining the size, physical state, reactivity, and climate impacts of this important component of the Earth's atmosphere. Here we show that water uptake and hygroscopic growth of multicomponent, atmospherically relevant particles can be size dependent when comparing 100 nm versus ca. 6 μm sized particles. It was determined that particles composed of ammonium sulfate with succinic acid and of a mixture of chlorides typical of the marine environment show size-dependent hygroscopic behavior. Microscopic analysis of the distribution of components within the aerosol particles show that the size dependence is due to differences in the mixing state, that is, whether particles are homogeneously mixed or phase separated, for different sized particles. This morphology-dependent hygroscopicity has consequences for heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry as well as aerosol interactions with electromagnetic radiation and clouds.

  10. Tropospheric aerosols remote sensing over the water surface of Penang Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashim, S. A.; MatJafri, M. Z.; Abdullah, K.; Lim, H. S.; Wong, C. J.; Salleh, N. Mohd.

    2006-05-01

    Tropospheric aerosols play an important role in climate change. Aerosols are typically studied over deep clear water, due to the relatively constant reflectance of water and the ability to easily separate surface and atmospheric contributions on the satellite signal. A methodology based on multi-spectral approach was employed to map tropospheric aerosols concentrations over the water areas surrounding Penang Island. The aim of this study was to estimate the pollutants concentrations using remote sensing techniques. In this study, we attempted to derive AOT (Aerosol Optical Thickness) values from the sky transmittance measurements in the visible spectrum. The transmittance values were measured at the sea surface using a handheld spectroradiometer. The correspond PM10 readings were taken simultaneously during the transmittance measurements acquisition of the imageries using a Dust Trak meter. The PCI Geomatica version 9.1 digital image processing software was used in all image-processing analyses. The results produced a linear relationship between PM10 and AOT values over the water surface of Penang Island. Finally, The PM10 concentration map over the water surface of Penang Island was generated using Kriging interpolation technique. This study has indicated the potential use of a handheld spectroradiometer for air quality study.

  11. Modeling Aerosol Effects on Clouds and Precipitation: Insights from CalWater 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, L. R.; Lim, K. S. S.; Fan, J.; Prather, K. A.; DeMott, P. J.; Spackman, J. R.; Ralph, F. M.

    2015-12-01

    The CalWater 2015 field campaign took place in northern California from mid January through early March of 2015. The field campaign, including collaborations between CalWater 2 and ACAPEX, aims to improve understanding and modeling of large-scale dynamics and cloud and precipitation processes associated with atmospheric rivers (ARs) and aerosol-cloud interactions that influence precipitation variability and extremes in the western U.S. An observational strategy was employed using land and offshore assets to monitor (1) the evolution and structure of ARs from near their regions of development, (2) long range transport of aerosols in eastern North Pacific and potential interactions with ARs, and (3) how aerosols from long-range transport and local sources influence cloud and precipitation in the U.S. During the field campaign, an AR developed in the Northeast Pacific Ocean in early February and made landfall in northern California. In-situ aerosol and cloud measurements from the G-1 aircraft; remote sensing data of clouds and aerosols; and meteorological measurements from aircraft, ship, and ground-based instruments collected from February 5 - 8, 2015 are analyzed to characterize the large-scale environment and cloud and precipitation forming processes. Modeling experiments are designed using a regional model for simulations with a cloud resolving limited area domain and quasi-global coarser resolution domain to evaluate the impacts of aerosols on clouds and precipitation, and to explore the relative contributions of long-range transported and regional aerosols that interacted with the clouds before, during, and after AR landfall. Preliminary results will be discussed in the context of the field data as well as a multi-year simulation of the climatological contributions of long-range transported dust during AR landfall in California.

  12. Techniques of Validation of Aerosol and Water Vapor Retrievals From MODIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ichoku, Charles; Chu, Allen; Mattoo, Shana; Kaufman, Yoram; Remer, Lorraine; Tanre, Didier; Slutsker, Ilya; Holben, Brent N.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Aerosols are extremely important for global climate studies and modeling in the quest to characterize the global radiation budget and forcing. The physical characteristics, composition, abundance, and spatial distribution and dynamics of aerosols are still very poorly known. Aerosol column optical thickness and other parameters as well as column precipitable water vapor amount are some of the main atmospheric parameters retrieved from the MODIS instrument on board the Terra satellite. To ensure the reliability of these parameters, we have embarked on a very massive validation effort. This involves cross correlation between the retrievals from the satellite data and those obtained from sunphotometer measurements at a large number of ground stations spread throughout the globe. Notable among these ground stations is a large network of over 100 stations coordinated under the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) project. Whereas MODIS retrieves the aerosol parameters throughout the globe once or twice a day during the daytime, the ground measurements cover only discrete locations of the earth, though the retrievals are done several times a day. We have devised a method to. match the MODIS and ground retrievals through spatial statistics for the MODIS data and temporal statistics for the ground data. This has produced good comparisons and has enabled the validation of MODIS aerosol and water vapor retrievals at over 100 discrete locations in various parts of the earth both over the land and over the ocean. Currently, the validation statistical data is produced routinely by the MODIS aerosol group and is even available not only for validation but also for use by the science community for short and long term studies at various parts of the earth. One important advantage is that the system can be expanded to incorporate more locations where ground measurements and other studies may be conducted at any time during the lifetime of MODIS.

  13. Attribution of the United States "warming hole": aerosol indirect effect and precipitable water vapor.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shaocai; Alapaty, Kiran; Mathur, Rohit; Pleim, Jonathan; Zhang, Yuanhang; Nolte, Chris; Eder, Brian; Foley, Kristen; Nagashima, Tatsuya

    2014-11-06

    Aerosols can influence the climate indirectly by acting as cloud condensation nuclei and/or ice nuclei, thereby modifying cloud optical properties. In contrast to the widespread global warming, the central and south central United States display a noteworthy overall cooling trend during the 20(th) century, with an especially striking cooling trend in summertime daily maximum temperature (Tmax) (termed the U.S. "warming hole"). Here we used observations of temperature, shortwave cloud forcing (SWCF), longwave cloud forcing (LWCF), aerosol optical depth and precipitable water vapor as well as global coupled climate models to explore the attribution of the "warming hole". We find that the observed cooling trend in summer Tmax can be attributed mainly to SWCF due to aerosols with offset from the greenhouse effect of precipitable water vapor. A global coupled climate model reveals that the observed "warming hole" can be produced only when the aerosol fields are simulated with a reasonable degree of accuracy as this is necessary for accurate simulation of SWCF over the region. These results provide compelling evidence of the role of the aerosol indirect effect in cooling regional climate on the Earth. Our results reaffirm that LWCF can warm both winter Tmax and Tmin.

  14. Attribution of the United States “warming hole”: Aerosol indirect effect and precipitable water vapor

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shaocai; Alapaty, Kiran; Mathur, Rohit; Pleim, Jonathan; Zhang, Yuanhang; Nolte, Chris; Eder, Brian; Foley, Kristen; Nagashima, Tatsuya

    2014-01-01

    Aerosols can influence the climate indirectly by acting as cloud condensation nuclei and/or ice nuclei, thereby modifying cloud optical properties. In contrast to the widespread global warming, the central and south central United States display a noteworthy overall cooling trend during the 20th century, with an especially striking cooling trend in summertime daily maximum temperature (Tmax) (termed the U.S. “warming hole”). Here we used observations of temperature, shortwave cloud forcing (SWCF), longwave cloud forcing (LWCF), aerosol optical depth and precipitable water vapor as well as global coupled climate models to explore the attribution of the “warming hole”. We find that the observed cooling trend in summer Tmax can be attributed mainly to SWCF due to aerosols with offset from the greenhouse effect of precipitable water vapor. A global coupled climate model reveals that the observed “warming hole” can be produced only when the aerosol fields are simulated with a reasonable degree of accuracy as this is necessary for accurate simulation of SWCF over the region. These results provide compelling evidence of the role of the aerosol indirect effect in cooling regional climate on the Earth. Our results reaffirm that LWCF can warm both winter Tmax and Tmin. PMID:25373416

  15. Some results of water vapor, ozone and aerosol balloon borne measurements during EASOE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khattatov, V.; Yushkov, V.; Khaplanov, M.; Zaitzev, I.; Rosen, J.; Kjome, N.

    As part of the European Arctic Stratospheric Ozone Experiment (EASOE) in the northern winter of 1991/92, regular measurements of the vertical distribution of ozone and aerosols were carried out from two Russian polar stations, Heiss Island (81N, 58E) and Dikson Island (73N, 81E). In addition measurements of the vertical distribution of water vapor and aerosols were made from Esrange (68N, 21E), near Kiruna in Sweden. The instruments used were electrochemical ozone sondes (ECC-4A), a fluorescence hygrometer, and the University of Wyoming backscattersonde. Following the eruption of Mt.Pinatubo, in the Philippines, in June 1991, volcanic aerosol had reached Arctic latitudes at altitudes below 19 km by September. At all three sites it was observed on every flight. Polar stratospheric clouds were encountered above the volcanic aerosol on two flights from Esrange. There were no indications of dehydration in the Arctic stratosphere. On all flights the minimum mixing ratio of water vapor was observed 2 to 3 km above the tropopause. Total ozone was much lower than the climatological mean, over Dikson Island from the January 27, and over Heiss Island from mid-February, until the end of EASOE. Ozone profiles over these stations showed rapid increases in partial pressure immediately above the peak values of backscatter ratio when the volcanic aerosol was especially dense.

  16. First lidar measurements of water vapor and aerosols from a high-altitude aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browell, Edward V.; Ismail, Syed

    1995-01-01

    Water vapor plays an important role in many atmospheric processes related to radiation, climate change, atmospheric dynamics, meteorology, the global hydrologic cycle, and atmospheric chemistry, and yet our knowledge of the global distribution of water vapor is very limited. The differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique has the potential of providing needed high resolution water vapor measurements from aircraft and from space, and the Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment (LASE) is a key step in the development of this capability. The LASE instrument is the first fully engineered, autonomous DIAL system, and it is designed to operate from a high-altitude aircraft (ER-2) and to make water vapor and aerosol profile measurements across the troposphere. The LASE system was flown from the NASA Wallops Flight Facility in a series of engineering flights during September 1994. This paper discusses the characteristics of the LASE system and presents the first LASE measurements of water vapor and aerosol profiles.

  17. Formation mechanisms of water-soluble organic compounds in atmospheric aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiaofeng

    Water-soluble organic compounds (WSOCs) are abundant in atmospheric aerosols, typically accounting for 20˜80% of particulate organic matter mass. Due to their affinity for water, WSOCs play an active role in aerosol-water interaction, and thus influence hygroscopic properties of aerosols, which in turn affect cloud formation processes and earth's radiation balance. Despite their abundance and significance, the sources of WSOCs are not well understood. Some primary sources (e.g., biomass burning) are known to emit WSOCs. It is also known from smog chamber experiments that photochemical oxidation of volatile organic compounds lead to less volatile oxygenated compounds that reside in the aerosol phase and are water-soluble because of the presence of polar functional groups. More recent work points to in-cloud/fog processes as a potentially important source for WSOCs. Work in this thesis aims to improve our understanding of the sources and formation mechanisms of WSOCs in atmospheric aerosols. Multiple approaches have been taken, including field measurements and controlled laboratory experiments. The thesis consists of the following four parts: (1) The formation mechanism of the most abundant WSOC species, oxalate, was investigated by synthesizing field measurement data obtained by our group and those available in the literature. Our measurements of aerosol sulfate and oxalate across a wide geographical span in the East Asia region, up to Beijing in the north and down to Hong Kong in the south, indicated that the two species were highly correlated. This good correlation was also found in measurements made elsewhere in the world by other researchers. Through a detailed analysis of factors influencing ambient oxalate, it can be argued that a common dominant formation pathway, likely in-cloud processing, explains the close tracking of the two chemically distinct species. This result also highlights the potential importance of in-cloud processing as a pathway leading to

  18. Major Ion Content of Aerosols from Denali Base Camp during Summer 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wake, C. P.; Burakowski, E. A.; Osterberg, E. C.

    2014-12-01

    Aerosol samples were collected on Teflon filters at a site up-glacier from Denali Base Camp (2380 m) in Denali National Park, Alaska during May and June of 2013 using an autonomous aerosol sampler powered by solar panels and batteries. The samples were analyzed for major ions via ion chromatography. Surface and fresh snow samples were also collected over the same time period and analyzed for major ions. Ion concentrations in the aerosol samples are completely dominated by NH4+ (mean concentration of 6.6 nmol/m3) and SO4= (mean concentration of 4.0 nmol/m3). Overall, the ion burden in aerosol samples from Denali Base Camp was much lower compared to aerosol samples collected from the Denali National Park and Trapper Creek IMPROVE sites over the same time period. In contrast to the aerosol chemistry, the snow chemistry is more balanced, with NH4+, Ca2+, and Na+ dominating the cation concentrations and NO3-, Cl-, and SO4= dominating the anion concentrations. The higher levels of Ca2+, Na+, and Cl- in the snow (relative to NH4+ and SO4=) compared to relative concentrations in the aerosol samples suggest that dry deposition of sea salt and dust are important contributors to the major ion signals preserved in the snow. This has important ramifications for improving our understanding of the reconstruction of North Pacific climate variability and change from glaciochemical records currently being developed from the 208 m ice cores recovered from the Mt. Hunter plateau (3900 m) during the summer of 2013.

  19. DEHYDRATION OF LOW WATER CONTENT ETHANOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pervaporation has emerged as an economically viable alternative technology for the dehydration of organic solvents, removal of organic compounds from water and organic/organic separations. Development of a membrane system with suitable flux and selectivity characteristics plays a...

  20. Raman lidar and sun photometer measurements of aerosols and water vapor during the ARM RCS experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrare, R. A.; Whiteman, D. N.; Melfi, S. H.; Evans, K. D.; Holben, B. N.

    1995-01-01

    The first Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Remote Cloud Study (RCS) Intensive Operations Period (IOP) was held during April 1994 at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site near Lamont, Oklahoma. This experiment was conducted to evaluate and calibrate state-of-the-art, ground based remote sensing instruments and to use the data acquired by these instruments to validate retrieval algorithms developed under the ARM program. These activities are part of an overall plan to assess general circulation model (GCM) parameterization research. Since radiation processes are one of the key areas included in this parameterization research, measurements of water vapor and aerosols are required because of the important roles these atmospheric constituents play in radiative transfer. Two instruments were deployed during this IOP to measure water vapor and aerosols and study their relationship. The NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Scanning Raman Lidar (SRL) acquired water vapor and aerosol profile data during 15 nights of operations. The lidar acquired vertical profiles as well as nearly horizontal profiles directed near an instrumented 60 meter tower. Aerosol optical thickness, phase function, size distribution, and integrated water vapor were derived from measurements with a multiband automatic sun and sky scanning radiometer deployed at this site.

  1. Water content and structure in malignant and benign skin tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gniadecka, M.; Nielsen, O. F.; Wulf, H. C.

    2003-12-01

    Analysis of the low frequency region of Raman spectra enables determination of water structure. It has been previously demonstrated by various techniques that water content and possibly also the water structure is altered in some malignant tumours. To further elucidate possible change in water structure in tumours we performed NIR FT Raman spectroscopy on biopsies from selected benign and malignant skin tumours (benign: seborrheic keratosis, pigmented nevi; malignant: malignant melanoma, basal cell carcinoma). We did not observe any differences in water content between malignant and benign skin tumours with an exception of seborrheic keratosis, in which the water content was decreased. Increase in the tetrahedral (free) water was found in malignant skin tumours and sun-damaged skin relative to normal young skin and benign skin tumours. This finding may add to the understanding of molecular alterations in cancer.

  2. Analysis of haloacetic acids in water and air (aerosols) from indoor swimming pools using HS-SPME/GC/ECD.

    PubMed

    Sá, Christopher S A; Boaventura, Rui A R; Pereira, Isabel B

    2012-01-01

    A solid phase microextraction method was used for the analysis of nine haloacetic acids (HAAs) in water and air (aerosols) from indoor swimming pools (ISPs). The analysis is characterized by derivatization of HAAs to their methyl-esters with dimethyl sulphate, headspace solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME) with a Carboxen-polydimethylsiloxane (CAR-PDMS) fiber and gas chromatography - electron capture detector (GC/ECD). High correlation coefficients were obtained for esters mixture calibration lines and detection limits were found to be at the low ppb level. Repeatability was assessed and coefficients of variation varied from 10 to 20%. Reproducibility was also evaluated and coefficients of variation from 15 to 25% were obtained. Analytical results from four Portuguese ISPs showed that the mean concentration of total HAAs (THAAs) in water ranged from 10 ± 2 to 183 ± 28 μg/L in which 55 ± 20% corresponded to trichloroacetic and dichloroacetic acids (TCAA and DCAA). THAAs highest concentrations were directly related to higher ISPs' water organic matter content. In the lack of European specific regulation for water from ISPs and taking into consideration that ingestion is a form of exposure, THAAs concentration values were compared with drinking water maximum contamination level (MCL) of 60 μg/L proposed by the US EPA for the sum of five HAAs. In 35% of water sampling campaigns the sum of MBAA (monobromoacetic acid), MCAA (monochloroacetic acid), DCAA and TCAA exceeded that MCL value. The concentrations obtained for THAAs in the ISPs' atmosphere ranged from 5 ± 1 to 64 ± 10 μg/m(3) (T = 28°C at 5 cm above the water surface) and were proportional to the aerosols' quantity, which was deeply related to indoor air ventilation system.

  3. Clearing of a polydisperse water aerosol by a laser pulse in the diffusive-convective regime

    SciTech Connect

    Kucherov, Arkadii N

    2006-04-30

    The propagation of an IR laser pulse through a water aerosol layer (fog, clouds) is studied. The relative motion of the beam and medium, the diffraction spread, thermal self-action of the laser beam, absorption and scattering of radiation by particles, evaporation of particles (aerosol clearing), and the size distribution of particles were taken into account. The propagation problem was solved numerically at a macroscopic scale of the order of the beam transverse size, and the action of radiation on drops was considered at a microscopic scale of the order of the particle radius. A satisfactory agreement was obtained between theoretical and experimental results. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  4. Water-soluble material on aerosols collected within volcanic eruption clouds ( Fuego, Pacaya, Santiaguito, Guatamala).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, D.B.; Zielinski, R.A.; Rose, W.I.; Huebert, B.J.

    1982-01-01

    In Feb. and March of 1978, filter samplers mounted on an aircraft were used to collect the aerosol fraction of the eruption clouds from three active Guatemalan volcanoes (Fuego, Pacaya, and Santiaguito). The elements dissolved in the aqueous extracts represent components of water-soluble material either formed directly in the eruption cloud or derived from interaction of ash particles and aerosol components of the plume. Calculations of enrichment factors, based upon concentration ratios, showed the elements most enriched in the extracts relative to bulk ash composition were Cd, Cu, V, F, Cl, Zn, and Pb.-from Authors

  5. Method for estimating the atmospheric content of sub-micrometer aerosol using direct-sun photometric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefan, S.; Filip, L.

    2009-04-01

    It is well known that the aerosol generated by human activity falls in the sub-micrometer rage [1]. The rapid increase of such emissions led to massive accumulations in the planetary boundary layer. Aerosol pollutants influence the quality of life on the Earth in at least two ways: by direct physiological effects following their penetration into living organisms and by the indirect implications on the overall energy balance of the Earth-atmosphere system. For these reasons monitoring the sub-micrometer aerosol on a global scale, become a stringent necessity in protecting the environment. The sun-photometry proved a very efficient way for such monitoring activities, mainly when vast networks of instruments (like AERONET [2]) are used. The size distribution of aerosols is currently a product of AERONET obtained through an inversion algorithm of sky-photometry data [3, 4]. Alternatively, various methods of investigating the aerosol size distribution have been developed through the use of direct-sun photometric data, with the advantages of simpler computation algorithms and a more convenient use [5, 6]. Our research aims to formulate a new simpler way to retrieve aerosol fine and coarse mode volume concentrations, as well as dimensional information, from direct-sun data. As in other works from the literature [3-6], the main hypothesis is that of a bi-modal shape of the size distribution of aerosols that can be reproduced rather satisfactorily by a linear combination of two lognormal functions. Essentially, the method followed in this paper relies on aerosol size information retrieval through fitting theoretical computations to measured aerosol optical depth (AOD) and related data. To this purpose, the experimental spectral dependence of AOD is interpolated and differentiated numerically to obtain the Ǻngström parameter. The reduced (i.e. normalized to the corresponding columnar volumetric content) contributions of the fine and coarse modes to the AOD have also been

  6. Volcanic eruptions and the increases in the stratospheric aerosol content: Lidar measurements from 1982 to 1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayashida, S.; Iikura, Y.; Shimizu, H.; Sasano, Y.; Nakane, H.; Sugimoto, N.; Matsui, I.; Takeuchi, N.

    1986-01-01

    The results of the observation for stratospheric aerosols which were carried out since the autumn of 1982 by using the NIES large lidar are described. Specifications of the lidar system are shown. The lidar has two wavelenghts of 1.06 and 0.53 micrometers. The 0.53 micrometer is mainly used for the stratospheric aerosols, because the PMT for 0.53 micrometers has higher sensitivity that that for 1.06 micrometers and the total efficiency is higher in the former. A switching circuit is used to control the PMT gain for avoiding signal induced noise in PMT. For the last four years, the stratospheric aerosol layer which was significantly perturbed by the El Chichon volcanic eruption was observed. The scattering ratio profiles observed from 1982 through 1983 are given.

  7. Microbial content of aerosols produced from suspensions exposed to megahertz frequency ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Grundy, M A; Coakley, W T; Clarke, D J

    1990-11-01

    A piezo-electric bowl transducer was used to generate aerosols by focusing ultrasound in the frequency range 1-7 MHz at a liquid/air interface. Atomization at the liquid surface and the production of a fountain contributed to aerosol formation. When the liquid consisted of suspensions of representatives from the viral, bacterial, and yeast groups of micro-organisms (covering a 0.2-11.5 microns size range) living organisms were isolated from the aerosols at all frequencies. The fountains were implicated as a major source of air-borne micro-organisms because significant numbers of isolates were obtained in the presence of fountains but in the absence of obvious atomization, and theoretical predictions make the sizes of droplets arising from atomization at the higher frequencies too small to have carried some of the larger organisms.

  8. Aerosols and water vapor dynamics over the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farahat, Ashraf; El-Askary, Hesham; Al-Shaibani, Abdulaziz; Dogan, Umran

    2014-05-01

    The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia contains a vast desert area and the home of some of the largest deserts worldwide. This nature subjects the area to numerous dust storms. This is in addition to local emissions transported from industrial activities. The Arabian Peninsula dust storms have a major impact on air quality and affects dust cycle around the world. The nature of dust also affects air, ground traffics, and human health. Aerosols play a pivotal role in global climate change through their effects on the hydrological cycle and solar energy budget. Recently there have been some trials to study the nature of dust over the kingdom using satellite remote sensing and modeling to investigate the impact of aerosols of natural and anthropogenic origins from both local emissions and long-range transport on the air quality and atmospheric composition, yet a lot more needs to be done. In this study, data obtained from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on board of Terra and Aqua satellites are used to analyze aerosols properties over the thirteen provinces of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia from April 2003 to January 2012. This analysis will help to characterize aerosol and cloud properties, and the seasonal hydrological factors to establish the relative contributions of aerosols derived from different regions to the different Saudi provinces and their impacts on local atmospheric composition and air quality. During this period, we have examined possible nature and anthropogenic/natural aerosols/dust sources. The analysis is based on important parameters including the aerosol optical depth (AOD), fine mode fraction (FMF), cloud properties including cloud top temperature (CTT), cloud top pressure (CTP) and the water vapor column. Correlation between water vapor and AOD was observed over three provinces which could be a result of pollution aerosols rather than dust and is, hence, acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Increasing anomalous aerosols pattern

  9. Determination of the Water Content of Snow by Dielectric Measurements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-07-01

    AD- A256 299 R*UIIUIUIIII• 0P Determination of the Water Content of Snow by Dielectric Measurements Paul R. Camp and David R. LaBrecque July 1992 a...kHz to deterrnlne wfether measurements made In this frequency range might prove useful in evaluating the water content of snow. Dielectric heating at...20 kHz proved a very useful means of modifying the water content from 0 to 30% by weight. Six different natural snows were used in these experiments

  10. Evaluation of Daytime Measurements of Aerosols and Water Vapor made by an Operational Raman Lidar over the Southern Great Plains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrare, Richard; Turner, David; Clayton, Marian; Schmid, Beat; Covert, David; Elleman, Robert; Orgren, John; Andrews, Elisabeth; Goldsmith, John E. M.; Jonsson, Hafidi

    2006-01-01

    Raman lidar water vapor and aerosol extinction profiles acquired during the daytime over the Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in northern Oklahoma (36.606 N, 97.50 W, 315 m) are evaluated using profiles measured by in situ and remote sensing instruments deployed during the May 2003 Aerosol Intensive Operations Period (IOP). The automated algorithms used to derive these profiles from the Raman lidar data were first modified to reduce the adverse effects associated with a general loss of sensitivity of the Raman lidar since early 2002. The Raman lidar water vapor measurements, which are calibrated to match precipitable water vapor (PWV) derived from coincident microwave radiometer (MWR) measurements were, on average, 5-10% (0.3-0.6 g/m(exp 3) higher than the other measurements. Some of this difference is due to out-of-date line parameters that were subsequently updated in the MWR PWV retrievals. The Raman lidar aerosol extinction measurements were, on average, about 0.03 km(exp -1) higher than aerosol measurements derived from airborne Sun photometer measurements of aerosol optical thickness and in situ measurements of aerosol scattering and absorption. This bias, which was about 50% of the mean aerosol extinction measured during this IOP, decreased to about 10% when aerosol extinction comparisons were restricted to aerosol extinction values larger than 0.15 km(exp -1). The lidar measurements of the aerosol extinction/backscatter ratio and airborne Sun photometer measurements of the aerosol optical thickness were used along with in situ measurements of the aerosol size distribution to retrieve estimates of the aerosol single scattering albedo (omega(sub o)) and the effective complex refractive index. Retrieved values of omega(sub o) ranged from (0.91-0.98) and were in generally good agreement with omega(sub o) derived from airborne in situ measurements of scattering and absorption. Elevated aerosol

  11. Aerosol Impacts on Cloud Properties Observed during CalWater 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suski, K.; Prather, K. A.; Hubbe, J.; Kluzek, C.; Jonsson, H.

    2011-12-01

    In February and March of 2011, an aircraft aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (A-ATOFMS) was deployed on the DOE G-1 during CalWater, a multiyear field campaign aimed at understanding the effects of aerosols and atmospheric rivers on precipitation in California. Flights were conducted out of Sacramento and traversed the western coast of California to the eastern edge of the Sierra Nevada Mountain Range. Initial results show that when heavily processed Asian dust was present, clouds contained more ice than when dust wasn't present, showing that cloud processed Asian dust acts as an efficient ice nucleus. In one particular cloud, salty, processed dust was at the core of most cloud droplets, while aged soot remained unactivated in the interstitial aerosol. These results show that atmospheric aging can have varying effects on CCN and IN abilities. Further analysis of chemical mixing state and atmospheric aging effects on cloud properties are presented.

  12. Physicochemical Characterization of Lake Spray Aerosol Generated from Great Lakes Water Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ault, A. P.; Axson, J. L.; May, N.; Pratt, K.

    2014-12-01

    Wave breaking across bodies of water releases particles into the air which can impact climate and human health. Similar to sea spray aerosols formed through marine wave breaking, freshwater lakes generate lake spray aerosol (LSA). LSA can impact climate directly through scattering/absorption and indirectly through cloud nucleation. In addition, these LSA are suggested to impact human health through inhalation of these particles during algal bloom periods characterized by toxic cyanobacteria. Few studies have been conducted to assess the physical and chemical properties of freshwater LSA. Herein, we discuss constructing a LSA generation system and preliminary physical and chemical characterization of aerosol generated from water samples collected at various sites across Lake Erie, Lake Huron, Lake Superior, and Lake Michigan. Information on aerosol size distributions, number concentrations, and chemical composition will be discussed as a function of lake water blue-green algae concentration, dissolved organic carbon concentration, temperature, conductivity, and dissolved oxygen concentration. These studies represent a first step towards evaluating the potential for LSA to impact climate and health in the Great Lakes region.

  13. Modeling the Thermodynamics of Mixed Organic-Inorganic Aerosols to Predict Water Activities and Phase Equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuend, A.; Marcolli, C.; Luo, B.; Peter, T.

    2008-12-01

    Tropospheric aerosol particles contain mixtures of inorganic salts, acids, water, and a large variety of organic compounds. Interactions between these substances in liquid mixtures lead to discrepancies from ideal thermodynamic behavior. While the thermodynamics of aqueous inorganic systems at atmospheric temperatures are well established, little is known about the physicochemistry of mixed organic-inorganic particles. Salting-out and salting-in effects result from organic-inorganic interactions and are used to improve industrial separation processes. In the atmosphere, they may influence the aerosol phases. Liquid-liquid phase separations into a mainly polar (aqueous) and a less polar organic phase may considerably influence the gas/particle partitioning of semi-volatile substances compared to a single phase estimation. Moreover, the phases present in the aerosol define the reaction medium for heterogeneous and multiphase chemistry occurring in aerosol particles. A correct description of these phases is needed when gas- or cloud-phase reaction schemes are adapted to aerosols. Non-ideal thermodynamic behavior in mixtures is usually described by an expression for the excess Gibbs energy. We present the group-contribution model AIOMFAC (Aerosol Inorganic-Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients), which explicitly accounts for molecular interactions between solution constituents, both organic and inorganic, to calculate activities, chemical potentials and the total Gibbs energy of mixed systems. This model allows to compute vapor-liquid (VLE), liquid-liquid (LLE) and solid-liquid (SLE) equilibria within one framework. Focusing on atmospheric applications we considered eight different cations, five anions and a wide range of alcohols/polyols as organic compounds. With AIOMFAC, the activities of the components within an aqueous electrolyte solution are very well represented up to high ionic strength. We show that the semiempirical middle

  14. Comparison of hyperspectral retrievals with vegetation water indices for leaf and canopy water content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, E. Raymond, Jr.; Daughtry, Craig S. T.; Qu, John J.; Wang, Lingli; Hao, Xianjun

    2011-09-01

    Leaf and canopy water contents provide information for leaf area index, vegetation biomass, and wildfire fuel moisture content. Hyperspectral retrievals of leaf and canopy water content are determined from the relationship of spectral reflectance and the specific absorption coefficient of water over the wavelength range of a water absorption feature. Vegetation water indices such as the Normalized Difference Water Index [NDWI = (R850 - R1240)/(R850 + R1240)] and Normalized Difference Infrared Index [NDII = (R850 - R1650)/(R850 + R1650)] may be calculated from multispectral sensors such as Landsat Thematic Mapper, SPOT HRG, or MODIS. Predicted water contents from hyperspectral data were much greater than measured water contents for both leaves and canopies. Furthermore, simulated spectral reflectances from the PROSPECT and SAIL models also had greater retrieved leaf and canopy water contents compared to the inputs. Used simply as an index correlated to leaf and canopy water contents, hyperspectral retrievals had better predictive capability than NDII or NDWI. Atmospheric correction algorithms estimate canopy water content in order to estimate the amount of water vapor. These results indicate that estimated canopy water contents should have a systematic bias, even though this bias does not affect retrieved surface reflectances from hyperspectral data. Field campaigns in a variety of vegetation functional types are needed to calibrate both hyperspectral retrievals and vegetation water indices.

  15. A new approach for the fractionation of water-soluble organic carbon in atmospheric aerosols and cloud drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andracchio, Antonella; Cavicchi, Catia; Tonelli, Domenica; Zappoli, Sergio

    A novel approach is described for the fractionation of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) in atmospheric aerosols and cloud drops. The method is based on the preliminary adsorption of the sample, acidified at pH 2, on a polymeric styrene-divinylbenzene resin (XAD-2) and subsequent elution with a series of solvents, which leads to the fractionation of the sample into three classes of compounds. The method was set up using synthetic mixtures of organic compounds and then applied to selected samples of atmospheric aerosols and cloud drops. All samples and collected fractions were analysed using size exclusion chromatography (SEC). This method proved particularly useful both in providing information on the organic content of the samples and for the characterisation of the macromolecular compounds (MMCs) in the samples. Synthetic samples were prepared using humic, fulvic and tannic acid to simulate naturally occurring MMCs. In the first fraction, eluted with HCl, only the most soluble organic compounds (oxalic acid, formic acid and acetic acid) were collected. In the second fraction, eluted with methanol, the major part of the organic material was collected together with the more hydrophilic constituents of the humic substances. In the third fraction, it was possible to separately recover the more hydrophobic component of the humic substances. A large number of atmospheric samples (fog, aerosol, cloud) were then analysed using SEC. Most of these samples evidenced a noteworthy chromatogram at 254 nm. Moreover, the chromatographic area evidenced a clear linear correlation with the total organic carbon (TOC) values. The fractionation method on XAD-2 was finally applied to selected atmospheric samples, yielding three classes of organic compounds. In each sample, a non-negligible amount of compounds with dimensional and chemical properties similar to humic substances were collected in the third fraction. The carbon content in this latter fraction was estimated both by TOC

  16. Ice Particle Impact on Cloud Water Content Instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emery, Edward F.; Miller, Dean R.; Plaskon, Stephen R.; Strapp, Walter; Lillie, Lyle

    2004-01-01

    Determining the total amount of water contained in an icing cloud necessitates the measurement of both the liquid droplets and ice particles. One commonly accepted method for measuring cloud water content utilizes a hot wire sensing element, which is maintained at a constant temperature. In this approach, the cloud water content is equated with the power required to keep the sense element at a constant temperature. This method inherently assumes that impinging cloud particles remain on the sensing element surface long enough to be evaporated. In the case of ice particles, this assumption requires that the particles do not bounce off the surface after impact. Recent tests aimed at characterizing ice particle impact on a thermally heated wing section, have raised questions about the validity of this assumption. Ice particles were observed to bounce off the heated wing section a very high percentage of the time. This result could have implications for Total Water Content sensors which are designed to capture ice particles, and thus do not account for bouncing or breakup of ice particles. Based on these results, a test was conducted to investigate ice particle impact on the sensing elements of the following hot-wire cloud water content probes: (1) Nevzorov Total Water Content (TWC)/Liquid Water Content (LWC) probe, (2) Science Engineering Associates TWC probe, and (3) Particle Measuring Systems King probe. Close-up video imaging was used to study ice particle impact on the sensing element of each probe. The measured water content from each probe was also determined for each cloud condition. This paper will present results from this investigation and attempt to evaluate the significance of ice particle impact on hot-wire cloud water content measurements.

  17. The stratospheric aerosol content above Spitsbergen during winter 1991/92

    SciTech Connect

    Beyerle, G.; Neuber, R. )

    1994-06-22

    This paper summarizes the lidar measurements made at Spitsbergen (79[degrees]N) during the period of EASOE. The lidar can see backscatter and depolarization effects from the tropopause to 30 km. No aerosols were detected above 20 km until the breakup of the polar vortex. Stratospheric loading from the Pinatubo eruption were clearly visible at lower altitudes.

  18. Anthropogenic contributions to the carbonaceous content of aerosols over the Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rau, John A.; Khalil, M. A. K.

    During a joint U.S./U.S.S.R. research cruise from 3 May to 27 July 1987 both total and fine (< 2 μm) particulate material was sampled. This cruise started in the Hawaiian Islands and then proceeded to the Kamchatka peninsula, south to Wellington, New Zealand, south of Australia into the Indian Ocean, to Singapore and then returned to the Hawaiian Islands by sailing just north of the Equator. Particulate samples, collected on quartz fiber and Teflon filters, were analysed for organic and elemental carbon by transmission thermo-optical carbon analysis and for trace elements by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence. In the Northern Hemisphere the total particulate, organic carbon and elemental carbon concentration ranges were, respectively, 10-25, 0.5-2.5 and 0-0.3 μg m -3. In the Southern Hemisphere they were, respectively, 5-10, <0.6 and <0.02 μg m -3. In the Northern Hemisphere the fine particulate concentration range was 2-15 μg m -3 and the fine fraction varied from 20 to 80% of total aerosol loading. In the Southern Hemisphere the fine particulate loading was 1.2-1.7 μg m -3 and was usually less than 20% of the total particulate mass. Chemical mass balance (CMB) modeling was used to determine possible anthropogenic particulate contributions to the ocean aerosol. Readily available source profiles were used for CMB modeling. Sea-salt aerosol was represented by either the conventional EPA marine source profile or by the average of ambient ocean aerosols sampled in very clean mid-ocean regions. Usually 60-90% of ambient particulate mass was "explained" by the CMB model. Sources such as soil, catalytic auto emissions and wood-burning emissions were found to be possible contributors to the ocean aerosol, especially in the Northern Hemisphere. Anthropogenic contributions were estimated to contribute from 10 to 30% of oceanic aerosol mass. Emissions from a hugh forest fire that burned in northern China during the spring of 1987 were possibly detected, but the CMB

  19. The CalWater 2 - ARM Cloud Aerosol Precipitation Experiment (ACAPEX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, L. Y.; Prather, K. A.; Ralph, F. M.; Rosenfeld, D.; Spackman, J. R.; Fairall, C. W.; DeMott, P. J.; Fan, J.; Zhao, C.

    2014-12-01

    The western U.S. receives precipitation predominantly during the cold season when storms approach from the Pacific Ocean. The snowpack that accumulates during winter storms provides about 70-90% of water supply for the region. Two elements of significant importance in predicting precipitation variability in the western U.S. are atmospheric rivers and aerosols. Atmospheric rivers (ARs) are narrow bands of enhanced water vapor associated with the warm sector of extratropical cyclones over the Pacific and Atlantic oceans. While ARs are responsible for a large fraction of heavy precipitation in the western U.S. during winter, much of the rest of the orographic precipitation occurs in post-frontal clouds, which are typically quite shallow, with tops just high enough to pass the mountain barrier. Such clouds are inherently quite susceptible to aerosol effects on both warm rain and ice precipitation-forming processes. In January - March 2015, the ARM Cloud Aerosol Precipitation Experiment (ACAPEX) field campaign will take place in northern California. Joined with CalWater 2, the field campaign aims to improve understanding and modeling of large-scale dynamics and cloud and precipitation processes associated with ARs and aerosol-cloud interactions that influence precipitation variability and extremes in the western U.S. We will implement an observational strategy consisting of the use of land and offshore assets to monitor (1) the evolution and structure of ARs from near their regions of development, (2) long range transport of aerosols in eastern North Pacific and potential interactions with ARs, and (3) how aerosols from long-range transport and local sources influence cloud and precipitation in the U.S. West Coast where ARs make landfall and post-frontal clouds are frequent. This presentation will provide an overview of the science questions and hypotheses to be addressed by CalWater 2/ACAPEX, review key results from prior studies, and discuss recent findings from

  20. Drinking water for stone formers: is the calcium content relevant?

    PubMed

    Jaeger, P; Portmann, L; Jacquet, A F; Burckhardt, P

    1984-01-01

    Stone formers are often told to select a drinking water with low Ca content. To see whether this measure has a rational biochemical background, 4 Ca hyperabsorbers were asked to drink, first tap water ad libitum, then 2 liters/day of tap water, then 2 liters/day of a low Ca water (A) and finally 2 liters/day of a high Ca water (B). On A, subjects were normocalciuric but hyperoxaluric; whereas on B, they were markedly hypercalciuric but normooxaluric. Therefore, Ca . Ox concentration products were similar on B and A. However, on A as well as on B, Ca . Ox products were much lower than on tap water ad libitum due to the high fluid intake which had thus been imposed. It is concluded that, in the prevention of the recurrence of nephrolithiasis, 'have a high fluid intake' is probably a more relevant advice than 'select a water with a particularly low Ca content'.

  1. The influence of small aerosol particles on the properties of water and ice clouds.

    PubMed

    Choularton, T W; Bower, K N; Weingartner, E; Crawford, I; Coe, H; Gallagher, M W; Flynn, M; Crosier, J; Connolly, P; Targino, A; Alfarra, M R; Baltensperger, U; Sjogren, S; Verheggen, B; Cozic, J; Gysel, M

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, results are presented of the influence of small organic- and soot-containing particles on the formation of water and ice clouds. There is strong evidence that these particles have grown from nano particle seeds produced by the combustion of oil products. Two series of field experiments are selected to represent the observations made. The first is the CLoud-Aerosol Characterisation Experiment (CLACE) series of experiments performed at a high Alpine site (Jungfraujoch), where cloud was in contact with the ground and the measuring station. Both water and ice clouds were examined at different times of the year. The second series of experiments is the CLOud Processing of regional Air Pollution advecting over land and sea (CLOPAP) series, where ageing pollution aerosol from UK cities was observed, from an airborne platform, to interact with warm stratocumulus cloud in a cloud-capped atmospheric boundary layer. Combining the results it is shown that aged pollution aerosol consists of an internal mixture of organics, sulfate, nitrate and ammonium, the organic component is dominated by highly oxidized secondary material. The relative contributions and absolute loadings of the components vary with location and season. However, these aerosols act as Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) and much of the organic material, along with the other species, is incorporated into cloud droplets. In ice and mixed phase cloud, it is observed that very sharp transitions (extending over just a few metres) are present between highly glaciated regions and regions consisting of supercooled water. This is a unique finding; however, aircraft observations in cumulus suggest that this kind of structure may be found in these cloud types too. It is suggested that this sharp transition is caused by ice nucleation initiated by oxidised organic aerosol coated with sulfate in more polluted regions of cloud, sometimes enhanced by secondary ice particle production in these regions.

  2. Information content and sensitivity of the 3β + 2α lidar measurement system for aerosol microphysical retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, Sharon P.; Chemyakin, Eduard; Liu, Xu; Knobelspiesse, Kirk; Stamnes, Snorre; Sawamura, Patricia; Moore, Richard H.; Hostetler, Chris A.; Ferrare, Richard A.

    2016-11-01

    There is considerable interest in retrieving profiles of aerosol effective radius, total number concentration, and complex refractive index from lidar measurements of extinction and backscatter at several wavelengths. The combination of three backscatter channels plus two extinction channels (3β + 2α) is particularly important since it is believed to be the minimum configuration necessary for the retrieval of aerosol microphysical properties and because the technological readiness of lidar systems permits this configuration on both an airborne and future spaceborne instrument. The second-generation NASA Langley airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL-2) has been making 3β + 2α measurements since 2012. The planned NASA Aerosol/Clouds/Ecosystems (ACE) satellite mission also recommends the 3β + 2α combination.Here we develop a deeper understanding of the information content and sensitivities of the 3β + 2α system in terms of aerosol microphysical parameters of interest. We use a retrieval-free methodology to determine the basic sensitivities of the measurements independent of retrieval assumptions and constraints. We calculate information content and uncertainty metrics using tools borrowed from the optimal estimation methodology based on Bayes' theorem, using a simplified forward model look-up table, with no explicit inversion. The forward model is simplified to represent spherical particles, monomodal log-normal size distributions, and wavelength-independent refractive indices. Since we only use the forward model with no retrieval, the given simplified aerosol scenario is applicable as a best case for all existing retrievals in the absence of additional constraints. Retrieval-dependent errors due to mismatch between retrieval assumptions and true atmospheric aerosols are not included in this sensitivity study, and neither are retrieval errors that may be introduced in the inversion process. The choice of a simplified model adds clarity to the

  3. In situ measurements of water uptake by black carbon-containing aerosol in wildfire plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perring, Anne E.; Schwarz, Joshua P.; Markovic, Milos Z.; Fahey, David W.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Campuzano-Jost, Pedro; Palm, Brett D.; Wisthaler, Armin; Mikoviny, Tomas; Diskin, Glenn; Sachse, Glen; Ziemba, Luke; Anderson, Bruce; Shingler, Taylor; Crosbie, Ewan; Sorooshian, Armin; Yokelson, Robert; Gao, Ru-Shan

    2017-01-01

    Water uptake by black carbon (BC)-containing aerosol was quantified in North American wildfire plumes of varying age (1 to 40 h old) sampled during the SEAC4RS mission (2013). A Humidified Dual SP2 (HD-SP2) is used to optically size BC-containing particles under dry and humid conditions from which we extract the hygroscopicity parameter, κ, of materials internally mixed with BC. Instrumental variability and the uncertainty of the technique are briefly discussed. An ensemble average κ of 0.04 is found for the set of plumes sampled, consistent with previous estimates of bulk aerosol hygroscopicity from biomass burning sources. The temporal evolution of κ in the Yosemite Rim Fire plume is explored to constrain the rate of conversion of BC-containing aerosol from hydrophobic to more hydrophilic modes in these emissions. A BC-specific κ increase of 0.06 over 40 h is found, fit well with an exponential curve corresponding to a transition from a κ of 0 to a κ of 0.09 with an e-folding time of 29 h. Although only a few percent of wildfire particles contain BC, a similar κ increase is estimated for bulk aerosol and the measured aerosol composition is used to infer that the observed κ change is driven by a combination of incorporation of ammonium sulfate and oxidation of existing organic materials. Finally, a substantial fraction of wildfire-generated BC-containing aerosol is calculated to be active as cloud condensation nuclei shortly after emission likely indicating efficient wet removal. These results can constrain model treatment of BC from wildfire sources.

  4. Examination of the potential impacts of dust and pollution aerosol acting as cloud nucleating aerosol on water resources in the Colorado River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Vandana

    In this study we examine the cumulative effect of dust acting as cloud nucleating aerosol (cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), giant cloud condensation nuclei (GCCN), and ice nuclei (IN)) along with anthropogenic aerosol pollution acting primarily as CCN, over the entire Colorado Rocky Mountains from the months of October to April in the year 2004-2005; the snow year. This ˜6.5 months analysis provides a range of snowfall totals and variability in dust and anthropogenic aerosol pollution. The specific objectives of this research is to quantify the impacts of both dust and pollution aerosols on wintertime precipitation in the Colorado Mountains using the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS). In general, dust enhances precipitation primarily by acting as IN, while aerosol pollution reduces water resources in the CRB via the so-called "spill-over" effect, by enhancing cloud droplet concentrations and reducing riming rates. Dust is more episodic and aerosol pollution is more pervasive throughout the winter season. Combined response to dust and aerosol pollution is a net reduction of water resources in the CRB. The question is by how much are those water resources affected? Our best estimate is that total winter-season precipitation loss for for the CRB the 2004-2005 winter season due to the combined influence of aerosol pollution and dust is 5,380,00 acre-feet of water. Sensitivity studies for different cases have also been run for the specific cases in 2004-2005 winter season to analyze the impact of changing dust and aerosol ratios on precipitation in the Colorado River Basin. The dust is varied from 3 to 10 times in the experiments and the response is found to be non monotonic and depends on various environmental factors. The sensitivity studies show that adding dust in a wet system increases precipitation when IN affects are dominant. For a relatively dry system high concentrations of dust can result in over-seeding the clouds and reductions in precipitation

  5. Sugar and water contents of honey with dielectrc property sensing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The dielectric properties of pure yellow locust, jujube and rape flower honey and their water-adulterated products with water content from 18% to 42.6% were measured with open-ended coaxial-line probe technology and a network analyzer from 10 to 4500 MHz at 25oC. Dielectric constants of pure honeys ...

  6. The mineral content of tap water in United States households

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The composition of tap water contributes to dietary intake of minerals. The USDA’s Nutrient Data Laboratory (NDL) conducted a study of the mineral content of residential tap water, to generate current data for the USDA National Nutrient Database. Sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, iron, copper...

  7. Towards mapping attenuation and water content in the Transition Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, B. K.

    2013-12-01

    The mantle transition zone is suggested to play a significant role in water storage due to the high solubility of H2O in transition zone minerals. However, quantifying the water content of the transition zone has proven difficult. Previous investigations of the transition zone using a variety of techniques have identified variations in water content globally, associated melt at 400 km, and variable thickness. The resulting water distribution models indicate substantially different Earth models and subsequent seismic responses. Water enhances attenuation with minimal change to seismic wave speed in the transition zone. Taken in combination with correlated temperature induced wave speed / attenuation reductions, the water content and temperature in the transition zone can be inferred. Using upper mantle seismic phases that propagate within the transition zone, we can isolate the effects of attenuation, or anelasticity, and seismic wave speeds. Synthetic seismograms at high frequency, around 1 Hz, from models with a "wet" transition zone show a distinct amplitude reduction and phase delay. Conversely, models with melt on top of the transition zone produce a delayed, secondary arrival with an upper mantle moveout velocity. These diagnostic arrivals, based on synthetic seismic responses, are best identified at the end of the triplicated 660 km branch. Full modeling of the seismic phases from the transition zone will enable a mapping of water content and temperature, while deciphering how water is distributed and transported throughout the mantle.

  8. Soil Water Content Sensor Response to Organic Matter Content under Laboratory Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Fares, Ali; Awal, Ripendra; Bayabil, Haimanote K.

    2016-01-01

    Studies show that the performance of soil water content monitoring (SWCM) sensors is affected by soil physical and chemical properties. However, the effect of organic matter on SWCM sensor responses remains less understood. Therefore, the objectives of this study are to (i) assess the effect of organic matter on the accuracy and precision of SWCM sensors using a commercially available soil water content monitoring sensor; and (ii) account for the organic matter effect on the sensor’s accuracy. Sand columns with seven rates of oven-dried sawdust (2%, 4%, 6%, 8%, 10%, 12% and 18% v/v, used as an organic matter amendment), thoroughly mixed with quartz sand, and a control without sawdust were prepared by packing quartz sand in two-liter glass containers. Sand was purposely chosen because of the absence of any organic matter or salinity, and also because sand has a relatively low cation exchange capacity that will not interfere with the treatment effect of the current work. Sensor readings (raw counts) were monitored at seven water content levels (0, 0.02, 0.04, 0.08, 0.12, 0.18, 0.24, and 0.30 cm3 cm−3) by uniformly adding the corresponding volumes of deionized water in addition to the oven-dry one. Sensor readings were significantly (p < 0.05) affected by the organic matter level and water content. Sensor readings were strongly correlated with the organic matter level (R2 = 0.92). In addition, the default calibration equation underestimated the water content readings at the lower water content range (<0.05 cm3 cm−3), while it overestimated the water content at the higher water content range (>0.05 cm3 cm−3). A new polynomial calibration equation that uses raw count and organic matter content as covariates improved the accuracy of the sensor (RMSE = 0.01 cm3 cm−3). Overall, findings of this study highlight the need to account for the effect of soil organic matter content to improve the accuracy and precision of the tested sensor under different soils and

  9. Soil Water Content Sensor Response to Organic Matter Content under Laboratory Conditions.

    PubMed

    Fares, Ali; Awal, Ripendra; Bayabil, Haimanote K

    2016-08-05

    Studies show that the performance of soil water content monitoring (SWCM) sensors is affected by soil physical and chemical properties. However, the effect of organic matter on SWCM sensor responses remains less understood. Therefore, the objectives of this study are to (i) assess the effect of organic matter on the accuracy and precision of SWCM sensors using a commercially available soil water content monitoring sensor; and (ii) account for the organic matter effect on the sensor's accuracy. Sand columns with seven rates of oven-dried sawdust (2%, 4%, 6%, 8%, 10%, 12% and 18% v/v, used as an organic matter amendment), thoroughly mixed with quartz sand, and a control without sawdust were prepared by packing quartz sand in two-liter glass containers. Sand was purposely chosen because of the absence of any organic matter or salinity, and also because sand has a relatively low cation exchange capacity that will not interfere with the treatment effect of the current work. Sensor readings (raw counts) were monitored at seven water content levels (0, 0.02, 0.04, 0.08, 0.12, 0.18, 0.24, and 0.30 cm³ cm(-3)) by uniformly adding the corresponding volumes of deionized water in addition to the oven-dry one. Sensor readings were significantly (p < 0.05) affected by the organic matter level and water content. Sensor readings were strongly correlated with the organic matter level (R² = 0.92). In addition, the default calibration equation underestimated the water content readings at the lower water content range (<0.05 cm³ cm(-3)), while it overestimated the water content at the higher water content range (>0.05 cm³ cm(-3)). A new polynomial calibration equation that uses raw count and organic matter content as covariates improved the accuracy of the sensor (RMSE = 0.01 cm³ cm(-3)). Overall, findings of this study highlight the need to account for the effect of soil organic matter content to improve the accuracy and precision of the tested sensor under different soils and

  10. Primary and Secondary Aerosol Investigation from Different Sea-Waters in the Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'anna, B.; Marchand, N.; Sellegri, K.; Sempéré, R.; Mas, S.; George, C.; Meme, A.; Frihi, A.; Pey, J.; Schwier, A.; Delmont, A.

    2014-12-01

    The Mediterranean Sea is a special marine environment characterized by low biological activity and high anthropogenic pressure. It is often difficult to discriminate the contribution of Primary and Secondary Aerosol formed at the sea-air interface from background level of the aerosol. We therefore decided to study the sea-air exchanges in a controlled environment provided by a 2m3simulation chamber, using freshly collected sea-water samples from the SEMEX site (43°15'64 N, 05°20'01 E) near Marseille bay. Two types of experiments were conducted for 4 weeks testing 3 different sea-waters. Primary sea-aerosol was generated by bubble-bursting method, then introduced in the simulation chamber and exposed to atmospheric oxidants (O3, OH) and light to simulated primary aerosol aging. A second set of experiments focused on secondary particle formation upon illumination and/or ozone exposure of the sea-water surface (15l of sea-water were deposited in a pyrex container located inside the simulation chamber). New particle formation was only observed for relatively high DOC level of the sea-water sample. Particles detection and analysis was followed by a PSM (1nm size), a CPC (2.5nm size), a SMPS (granulometry), a CCN chamber for hygroscopicity studies, a TOF-AMS (Aerodyne) for chemical analysis of the sub-micrometer fraction. Off-line analysis included TEM-EDX samples for morphology and size distribution studies and a hybrid quadrupole-orbitrap mass spectrometer (Thermo Fischer) for the molecular identification of the organic fraction. VOCs were measured on-line by PTR-HR-MS. The seawater samples were filtered at 60μm before use and were daily analyzed for chemical (colored dissolved organic matter, particulate matter and related polar compounds, transparent polysaccharides and nutrients concentration) and biological (chlorophyll a, virus, phytoplankton and zooplankton) analyses.

  11. Cloud and Aerosol Properties, Precipitable Water, and Profiles of Temperature and Water Vapor from MODIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Michael D.; Menzel, W. Paul; Kaufman, Yoram J.; Tanre, Didier; Gao, Bo-Cai; Platnick, Steven; Ackerman, Steven A.; Remer, Lorraine A.; Pincus, Robert; Hubanks, Paul A.

    2003-01-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) is an earth-viewing sensor that flies on the Earth Observing System (EOS) Terra and Aqua satellites, launched in 1999 and 2002, respectively. MODIS scans a swath width of 2330 km that is sufficiently wide to provide nearly complete global coverage every two days from a polar-orbiting, sun-synchronous, platform at an altitude of 705 km. MODIS provides images in 36 spectral bands between 0.415 and 14.235 pm with spatial resolutions of 250 m (2 bands), 500 m (5 bands) and 1000 m (29 bands). These bands have been carefully selected to en- able advanced studies of land, ocean, and atmospheric properties. Twenty-six bands are used to derive atmospheric properties such as cloud mask, atmospheric profiles, aerosol properties, total precipitable water, and cloud properties. In this paper we describe each of these atmospheric data products, including characteristics of each of these products such as file size, spatial resolution used in producing the product, and data availability.

  12. Time lapse imaging of water content with geoelectrical methods: on the interest of working with absolute water content data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumont, Gaël; Pilawski, Tamara; Robert, Tanguy; Hermans, Thomas; Garré, Sarah; Nguyen, Frederic

    2016-04-01

    The electrical resistivity tomography is a suitable method to estimate the water content of a waste material and detect changes in water content. Various ERT profiles, both static data and time-lapse, where acquired on a landfill during the Minerve project. In the literature, the relative change of resistivity (Δρ/ρ) is generally computed. For saline or heat tracer tests in the saturated zone, the Δρ/ρ can be easily translated into pore water conductivity or underground temperature changes (provided that the initial salinity or temperature condition is homogeneous over the ERT panel extension). For water content changes in the vadose zone resulting of an infiltration event or injection experiment, many authors also work with the Δρ/ρ or relative changes of water content Δθ/θ (linked to the change of resistivity through one single parameter: the Archie's law exponent "m"). This parameter is not influenced by the underground temperature and pore fluid conductivity (ρ¬w) condition but is influenced by the initial water content distribution. Therefore, you never know if the loss of Δθ/θ signal is representative of the limit of the infiltration front or more humid initial condition. Another approach for the understanding of the infiltration process is the assessment of the absolute change of water content (Δθ). This requires the direct computation of the water content of the waste from the resistivity data. For that purpose, we used petrophysical laws calibrated with laboratory experiments and our knowledge of the in situ temperature and pore fluid conductivity parameters. Then, we investigated water content changes in the waste material after a rainfall event (Δθ= Δθ/θ* θ). This new observation is really representatives of the quantity of water infiltrated in the waste material. However, the uncertainty in the pore fluid conductivity value may influence the computed water changes (Δθ=k*m√(ρw) ; where "m" is the Archie's law exponent

  13. The water, deuterium, gas and uranium content of tektites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, I.

    1958-01-01

    The water content, deuterium concentration of the water, total gas and uranium contents were determined on tektite samples and other glass samples from Texas, Australia, Philippine Islands, Java, French Indo-China, Czechoslovakia, Libyan Desert, Billiton Island, Thailand, French West Africa, Peru, and New Mexico. The water content ranges from 0.24 per cent for the Peru tektite, to 0.0002 per cent for a moldavite. The majority of the tektites have less than 0.05 per cent water, and average 0.005 per cent H2O by weight. No other gases were detected, the lower detection limit being about 1 p.p.m. by weight. The deuterium content of the water in tektites is in the same range as that in terrestrial waters, and varies from 0.010 mole per cent to 0.0166 mole per cent deuterium. The uranium content is about from 1 to 3 p.p.m. The possible origin of tektites is discussed. The experimental data presented favour their being originally terrestrial, but produced by some catastrophic event. An extra-terrestrial source is not ruled out. ?? 1958.

  14. Dependence of seismoelectric amplitudes on water content - a field study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strahser, M. H. P.; Matthey, P.-D.; Jouniaux, L.; Sailhac, P.

    2009-04-01

    In porous saturated media, seismic compressional waves can cause seismoelectric and seismoelectromagnetic signals through electrokinetic coupling. It has been observed that these measureable signals also occur in partially saturated media, but the theory is largely unknown for these circumstances. Seismoelectromagnetic tomography is expected to combine the sensitivity of electrical properties to water-content and permeability, to the high spatial resolution of seismic surveys. A better understanding of the physical processes and a reliable quantification of the conversion between seismic and electric energy are necessary and need to take into account the effect of water-content, especially for shallow subsurface investigations. In order to quantify seismoelectric signals with changing water content, we repeated seismoelectric and seismic measurements on the same profile in the Vosges Mountains during several months. The electrical resistivity was also monitored to take into account the water-content variations. We show that an exponential relation can be established between the seismoelectric amplitudes normalized with the seismic amplitudes and the resistivity which in turn is related to the saturation: Increasing resistivity (decreasing water content) leads to decreasing normalized seismoelectric amplitudes. These results imply that the electrokinetic coefficient should increase with water-saturation, as measured in laboratory, but not predicted by theory. This work was funded by CNRS and Université Louis Pasteur de Strasbourg.

  15. Fluoride Content of Bottled Drinking Water in Chennai, Tamilnadu

    PubMed Central

    Ravi, Karunya; Rajapandian, K.; Gurunathan, Deepa

    2015-01-01

    Context The optimum level of fluoride in drinking water is 0.7 to 1.2 ppm. Decreased fluoride concentration leads to increased risk of caries and increased concentration can lead to dental or skeletal fluorosis. One crore liters of water is supplied to Chennai and surrounding areas through pouches and bottles which carters about one third of city population. Aim The aim of this study is to determine the fluoride concentration in top 10 bottled waters in Chennai and to check the accuracy of their labelling. Materials and Methods Top selling bottled waters, 6 multinational and 4 Non- multinational brands were selected for the study. Three different batches of each brand were purchased. The labels of the bottled were removed after collecting the details regarding fluoride content. All the bottles were numbered and sent for fluoride content analysis using SPADNS calorimetric method. Results All the brands and batches which were analysed for the study had less than optimal fluoride content and there is a significant variation in fluoride concentration of each brand and among different batches of same brand bottled waters. The range of fluoride level in tested samples was between 0.27 to 0.59. Only one brand’s label had information regarding the fluoride content. Conclusion Standardization of fluoride levels in bottled waters and labelling of fluoride content should become mandatory. PMID:26557612

  16. [Near infrared spectroscopy study on water content in turbine oil].

    PubMed

    Chen, Bin; Liu, Ge; Zhang, Xian-Ming

    2013-11-01

    Near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy combined with successive projections algorithm (SPA) was investigated for determination of water content in turbine oil. Through the 57 samples of different water content in turbine oil scanned applying near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy, with the water content in the turbine oil of 0-0.156%, different pretreatment methods such as the original spectra, first derivative spectra and differential polynomial least squares fitting algorithm Savitzky-Golay (SG), and successive projections algorithm (SPA) were applied for the extraction of effective wavelengths, the correlation coefficient (R) and root mean square error (RMSE) were used as the model evaluation indices, accordingly water content in turbine oil was investigated. The results indicated that the original spectra with different water content in turbine oil were pretreated by the performance of first derivative + SG pretreatments, then the selected effective wavelengths were used as the inputs of least square support vector machine (LS-SVM). A total of 16 variables selected by SPA were employed to construct the model of SPA and least square support vector machine (SPA-LS-SVM). There is 9 as The correlation coefficient was 0.975 9 and the root of mean square error of validation set was 2.655 8 x 10(-3) using the model, and it is feasible to determine the water content in oil using near infrared spectroscopy and SPA-LS-SVM, and an excellent prediction precision was obtained. This study supplied a new and alternative approach to the further application of near infrared spectroscopy in on-line monitoring of contamination such as water content in oil.

  17. Soil water content inverse profiling from single TDR waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greco, R.

    2006-02-01

    An inverse procedure for the estimation of soil water content profiles along TDR probes is presented. A TDR metallic probe is considered as a transmission line, for which relevant partial derivatives equations apply. The direct problem consists in the integration of transmission line equations, providing V( x, t) along the line. To this aim, the unit length parameters of the transmission line must be known. In particular, unit length capacitance C( x) and transverse conductance G( x) depend on water content distribution along the probe θ( x) through relative permittivity ɛr( x) and bulk soil electrical conductivity σ( x), respectively. The inverse procedure consists in finding the water content distribution, and the relevant unit length parameters, giving rise to the best fit between the numerically simulated voltage V(x¯,t) at the beginning of the line and the experimental voltage trace V(x¯,t) measured by a cable tester. In order to reduce the ill-posedness of the inverse problem, unknown water content profiles are expressed by means of a four parameters functional form. The search for the best fitting parameters vector is carried out with a genetic algorithm. The proposed inverse procedure is successfully applied to the determination of vertical water content profiles along a soil sample in the laboratory by means of a single three rods metallic TDR probe. Water content profiles estimated either in steady flow conditions, or during controlled infiltration-evaporation transients are compared with independent water content measurements carried out by means of horizontal TDR probes at various depths, showing in all cases good agreement.

  18. Dielectric properties of low-water-content tissues.

    PubMed

    Smith, S R; Foster, K R

    1985-09-01

    The dielectric properties of two low-water-content tissues, bone marrow and adipose tissue, were measured from 1 kHz to 1 GHz. From 1 kHz to 13 MHz, the measurements were performed using a parallel-plate capacitor method. From 10 MHz to 1 GHz, a reflection coefficient technique using an open-ended coaxial transmission line was employed. The tissue water contents ranged from 1 to almost 70% by weight. The dielectric properties correlate well with the values predicted by mixture theory. Comparison with previous results from high-water-content tissues suggests that bone marrow and adipose tissues contain less motionally altered water per unit dry volume than do the previously studied tissues with lower lipid fractions. The high degree of structural heterogeneity of these tissues was reflected in the large scatter of the data, a source of uncertainty that should be considered in practical applications of the present data.

  19. Sensitivity of probabilistic MCO water content estimates to key assumptions

    SciTech Connect

    DUNCAN, D.R.

    1999-02-25

    Sensitivity of probabilistic multi-canister overpack (MCO) water content estimates to key assumptions is evaluated with emphasis on the largest non-cladding film-contributors, water borne by particulates adhering to damage sites, and water borne by canister particulate. Calculations considered different choices of damage state degree of independence, different choices of percentile for reference high inputs, three types of input probability density function (pdfs): triangular, log-normal, and Weibull, and the number of scrap baskets in an MCO.

  20. Water-soluble Organic Components in Aerosols Associated with Savanna Fires in Southern Africa: Identification, Evolution and Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Song; Hegg, Dean A.; Hobbs, Peter V.; Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Magi, Brian I.; Sadilek, Martin

    2003-01-01

    During the SAFARI 2000 field campaign, both smoke aerosols from savanna fires and haze aerosols in the boundary layer and in the free troposphere were collected from an aircraft in southern Africa. These aerosol samples were analyzed for their water-soluble chemical components, particularly the organic species. A novel technique, electrospray ionization-ion trap mass spectrometry, was used concurrently with an ion chromatography system to analyze for carbohydrate species. Seven carbohydrates, seven organic acids, five metallic elements, and three inorganic anions were identified and quantified. On the average, these 22 species comprised 36% and 27% of the total aerosol mass in haze and smoke aerosols, respectively. For the smoke aerosols, levoglucosan was the most abundant carbohydrate species, while gluconic acid was tentatively identified as the most abundant organic acid. The mass abundance and possible source of each class of identified species are discussed, along with their possible formation pathways. The combustion phase of a fire had an impact on the chemical composition of the emitted aerosols. Secondary formation of sulfate, nitrate, levoglucosan, and several organic acids occurred during the initial aging of smoke aerosols. It is likely that under certain conditions, some carbohydrate species in smoke aerosols, such as levoglucosan, were converted to organic acids during upward transport.

  1. CalWater 2015 — Atmospheric Rivers and Aerosol Impacts on Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spackman, J. R.; Ralph, F. M.; Prather, K. A.; Cayan, D.; DeMott, P. J.; Dettinger, M. D.; Doyle, J. D.; Fairall, C. W.; Leung, L. R.; Rosenfeld, D.; Rutledge, S. A.; Waliser, D. E.; White, A. B.

    2015-12-01

    The CalWater 2015 field experiment was conducted between January and March and consisted of more than fifty science flights, a major research cruise, and continuous ground-based observations coordinated to study phenomena driving the incidence of extreme precipitation events and the variability of water supply along the West Coast of the United States. CalWater 2015 examined key processes linked to (1) atmospheric rivers (ARs) in delivering much of the precipitation associated with major winter storms, and (2) aerosols, originating from local sources as well as from remote continents, within and between storms and their modulating effects on precipitation on the U.S. West Coast. As part of a large interagency field effort including NOAA, DOE, NASA, NSF, and the Naval Research Laboratory, four research aircraft from three government agencies were deployed in coordination with the oceangoing NOAA Ronald H. Brown and were equipped with meteorological and chemical observing systems in near-shore regions of California and the eastern Pacific. At the same time, ground-based measurements from NOAA's HydroMeteorological Testbed (HMT) network on the U.S. West Coast and a major NSF-supported observing site for aerosols and microphysics at Bodega Bay, California provided continuous near surface-level meteorological and chemical observations, respectively, during CalWater 2015. The DOE-sponsored ARM Cloud Aerosol and Precipitation Experiment (ACAPEX) was executed in close coordination with NOAA and NASA facilities and deployed airborne and ship-based observing systems. This presentation summarizes the objectives, implementation strategy, data acquisitions, and some preliminary results from CalWater 2015 addressing science gaps associated with (1) the evolution and structure of ARs including cloud and precipitation processes and air-sea interaction, and (2) aerosol interaction with ARs and the impact on precipitation, including locally-generated aerosol effects on orographic

  2. Influence of Water Content on the Mechanical Behaviour of Limestone: Role of the Clay Minerals Content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherblanc, F.; Berthonneau, J.; Bromblet, P.; Huon, V.

    2016-06-01

    The mechanical characteristics of various sedimentary stones significantly depend on the water content, where 70 % loss of their mechanical strengths can be observed when saturated by water. Furthermore, the clay fraction has been shown to be a key factor of their hydro-mechanical behaviour since it governs for instance the hydric dilation. This work aims at investigating the correlations between the clay mineral content and the mechanical weakening experienced by limestones when interacting with water. The experimental characterization focuses on five different limestones that exhibit very different micro-structures. For each of them, we present the determination of clay mineral composition, the sorption isotherm curve and the dependences of tensile and compressive strengths on the water content. It emerges from these results that, first, the sorption behaviour is mainly governed by the amount of smectite layers which exhibit the larger specific area and, second, the rate of mechanical strength loss depends linearly on the sorption capacity. Indeed, the clay fraction plays the role of a retardation factor that delays the appearance of capillary bridges as well as the mechanical weakening of stones. However, no correlation was evidenced between the clay content and the amplitude of weakening. Since the mechanisms whereby the strength decreases with water content are not clearly established, these results would help to discriminate between various hypothesis proposed in the literature.

  3. IMPACT OF AEROSOL LIQUID WATER ON SECONDARY ORGANIC AEROSOL YIELDS OF IRRADIATED TOLUENE/PROPYLENE/NOX/(NH4)2SO4/AIR MIXUTRES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to assess whether the presence of liquid water on pre-existing submicron ammonium sulfate aerosols affects yields of condensible organic compounds. Toluene/propylene/NOX/air mixtures were irradiated in the presence of submicron ammonium su...

  4. Effects of diethylenetriamine and Aerosol OT on the stability of oil-in-water emulsion stabilized by interfacial polyurea film.

    PubMed

    Mikami, T

    1994-01-01

    The stability of oil-in-water emulsions containing a triisocyanate soluble in the oil phase and an amine in the water phase was investigated. The oil component was di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) containing Aerosol OT as an emulsifier. The time required for the average size parameter to reach a constant value was studied. It was found that the polyurea film produced by an interfacial polymerization reaction between the amine and the triisocyanate contributed to forming a stable emulsion at a lower Aerosol OT concentration, but at a higher Aerosol OT concentration the amine did not show any effect on the emulsion stability.

  5. 2015 AAAR Conference Symposium: "The Role of Water in Aerosol Chemistry"

    SciTech Connect

    McNeill, V. Faye; Weber, Rodney

    2015-10-16

    The DOE-sponsored symposium, "The Role of Water in Aerosol Chemistry" was held at the 2015 Annual meeting of AAAR. The funding supported, in part, travel, lodging, and registration expenses for invited symposium speakers, and travel and lodging expenses allowing students to attend and make presentations at a special conference symposium that focuses on topics of interest to the U.S. DOE Atmospheric System Research (ASR) program.

  6. CalWater 2 - Precipitation, Aerosols, and Pacific Atmospheric Rivers Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spackman, J. R.; Ralph, F. M.; Prather, K. A.; Cayan, D. R.; DeMott, P. J.; Dettinger, M. D.; Fairall, C. W.; Leung, L. R.; Rosenfeld, D.; Rutledge, S. A.; Waliser, D. E.; White, A. B.

    2014-12-01

    Emerging research has identified two phenomena that play key roles in the variability of the water supply and the incidence of extreme precipitation events along the West Coast of the United States. These phenomena include the role of (1) atmospheric rivers (ARs) in delivering much of the precipitation associated with major storms along the U.S. West Coast, and (2) aerosols—from local sources as well as those transported from remote continents—and their modulating effects on western U.S. precipitation. A better understanding of these processes is needed to reduce uncertainties in weather predictions and climate projections of extreme precipitation and its effects, including the provision of beneficial water supply. This presentation summarizes the science objectives and strategies to address gaps associated with (1) the evolution and structure of ARs including cloud and precipitation processes and air-sea interaction, and (2) aerosol interaction with ARs and the impact on precipitation, including locally-generated aerosol effects on orographic precipitation along the U.S. West Coast. Observations are proposed for multiple winter seasons as part of a 5-year broad interagency vision referred to as CalWater 2 to address these science gaps (http://esrl.noaa.gov/psd/calwater). In January-February 2015, a field campaign has been planned consisting of a targeted set of aircraft and ship-based measurements and associated evaluation of data in near-shore regions of California and in the eastern Pacific. In close coordination with NOAA, DOE's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program is also contributing air and shipborne facilities for ACAPEX (ARM Cloud Aerosol and Precipitation Experiment), a DOE-sponsored study complementing CalWater 2. Ground-based measurements from NOAA's HydroMeteorological Testbed (HMT) network in California and aerosol chemical instrumentation at Bodega Bay, California have been designed to add important near surface-level context for the

  7. Tropical intercontinental optical measurement network of aerosol, precipitable water and total column ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holben, B. N.; Tanre, D.; Reagan, J. A.; Eck, T. F.; Setzer, A.; Kaufman, Y. A.; Vermote, E.; Vassiliou, G. D.; Lavenu, F.

    1992-01-01

    A new generation of automatic sunphotometers is used to systematically monitor clear sky total column aerosol concentration and optical properties, precipitable water and total column ozone diurnally and annually in West Africa and South America. The instruments are designed to measure direct beam sun, solar aureole and sky radiances in nine narrow spectral bands from the UV to the near infrared on an hourly basis. The instrumentation and the algorithms required to reduce the data for subsequent analysis are described.

  8. New Examination of the Traditional Raman Lidar Technique II: Temperature Dependence Aerosol Scattering Ratio and Water Vapor Mixing Ratio Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, David N.; Abshire, James B. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In a companion paper, the temperature dependence of Raman scattering and its influence on the Raman water vapor signal and the lidar equations was examined. New forms of the lidar equation were developed to account for this temperature sensitivity. Here we use those results to derive the temperature dependent forms of the equations for the aerosol scattering ratio, aerosol backscatter coefficient, extinction to backscatter ratio and water vapor mixing ratio. Pertinent analysis examples are presented to illustrate each calculation.

  9. Fluorescent water-soluble organic aerosols in the High Arctic atmosphere

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Pingqing; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Chen, Jing; Qin, Mingyue; Ren, Lujie; Sun, Yele; Wang, Zifa; Barrie, Leonard A.; Tachibana, Eri; Ding, Aijun; Yamashita, Youhei

    2015-01-01

    Organic aerosols are ubiquitous in the earth’s atmosphere. They have been extensively studied in urban, rural and marine environments. However, little is known about the fluorescence properties of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) or their transport to and distribution in the polar regions. Here, we present evidence that fluorescent WSOC is a substantial component of High Arctic aerosols. The ratios of fluorescence intensity of protein-like peak to humic-like peak generally increased from dark winter to early summer, indicating an enhanced contribution of protein-like organics from the ocean to Arctic aerosols after the polar sunrise. Such a seasonal pattern is in agreement with an increase of stable carbon isotope ratios of total carbon (δ13CTC) from −26.8‰ to −22.5‰. Our results suggest that Arctic aerosols are derived from a combination of the long-range transport of terrestrial organics and local sea-to-air emission of marine organics, with an estimated contribution from the latter of 8.7–77% (mean 45%). PMID:25920042

  10. The deuterium content of water in some volcanic glasses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, I.; Smith, R.L.

    1958-01-01

    The deuterium-hydrogen composition (relative to Lake Michigan water = 0.0) of water extractsd from coexisting perlite and obsidian from eleven different localities was determined. The water content of the obsidians is generally from 0.09 to 0.29 per cent by weight, though two samples from near Olancha, California, contain about 0.92 per cent. The relative deuterium concentration is from -4.6 to -12.3 per cent. The coexisting perlite contains from 2.0 to 3.8 per cent of water with a relative deuterium concentration of -3.1 to -16.6 per cent. The deuterium concentration in the perlites is not related to that in the enclosed obsidian. The deuterium concentration in the perlite water is related to the deuterium concentration of the modern meteoric water and the perlite water contains approximately 4 per cent less deuterium than does the groundwater of the area in which the perlites occur. The above relations hold true for perlites from northern New Mexico, east slope of the Sierra Nevada. California Coast Range, Yellowstone Park, Wyoming, and New Zealand. As the water in the obsidian is unrelated to meteoric water, but the enclosing perlite water is related, we believe that this is evidence for the secondary hydration of obsidian to form high water content perlitic glass. ?? 1958.

  11. Mobile multi-wavelength polarization Raman lidar for water vapor, cloud and aerosol measurement.

    PubMed

    Wu, Songhua; Song, Xiaoquan; Liu, Bingyi; Dai, Guangyao; Liu, Jintao; Zhang, Kailin; Qin, Shengguang; Hua, Dengxin; Gao, Fei; Liu, Liping

    2015-12-28

    Aiming at the detection of atmospheric water vapor mixing ratio, depolarization ratio, backscatter coefficient, extinction coefficient and cloud information, the Water vapor, Cloud and Aerosol Lidar (WACAL) is developed by the lidar group at Ocean University of China. The lidar consists of transmitter, receiver, data acquisition and auxiliary system. For the measurement of various atmospheric physical properties, three channels including Raman channel, polarization channel and infrared channel are integrated in WACAL. The integration and working principle of these channels are introduced in details. The optical setup, the housekeeping of the system and the data retrieval routines are also presented. After the completion of the construction of the lidar, the WACAL system was installed in Ocean University of China (36.165°N, 120.5°E), Qingdao for the measurement of atmosphere during 2013 and 2014. The measurement principles and some case studies corresponding to various atmospheric physical properties are provided. Finally, the result of one continuous measurement example operated on 13 June 2014 is presented. The WACAL can measure the aerosol and cloud optical properties as well as the water vapor mixing ratio. It is useful for studying the direct and indirect effects of the aerosol on the climate change.

  12. Reformulating Aerosol Thermodynamics and Cloud Microphysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, S.

    2006-12-01

    Modeling aerosol composition and cloud microphysics is rather complex due to the required thermodynamics, even if chemical and thermodynamical equilibrium is assumed. We show, however, that for deliquescent atmospheric aerosols thermodynamics can be considerably simplified, if we reformulate chemical equilibrium to include water purely based on thermodynamic principles. In chemical and thermodynamical equilibrium, the relative humidity (RH) fixes the molality of atmospheric aerosols. Although this fact is in theory well known, it has hardly been utilized in aerosol modeling nor has been the fact that for the same reason also the aerosol activity (including activity coefficients) and water content are fixed (by RH) for a given aerosol concentration and type. The only model that successfully utilizes this fact is the computationally very efficient EQuilibrium Simplified thermodynamic gas/Aerosol partitioning Model, EQSAM (Metzger et al., 2002a), EQSAM2 (Metzger et al., 2006). In both versions the entire gas/liquid/solid aerosol equilibrium partitioning is solved analytically and hence non-iteratively a substantial advantage in aerosol composition modeling. Here we briefly present the theoretical framework of EQSAM2, which differs from EQSAM in a way that the calculation of the water activity of saturated binary or mixed inorganic/organic salt solutions of multi-component aerosols has been generalized by including the Kelvin-term, thus allowing for any solute activity above the deliquescence relative humidity, including supersaturation. With application of our new concept to a numerical whether prediction (NWP) model, we demonstrate its wide implications for the computation of various aerosol and cloud properties, as our new concept allows to consistently and efficiently link the modeling of aerosol thermodynamics and cloud microphysics through the aerosol water mass, which therefore deserves special attention in atmospheric chemistry, air pollution, NWP and climate

  13. Leaf Relative Water Content Estimated from Leaf Reflectance and Transmittance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderbilt, Vern; Daughtry, Craig; Dahlgren, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Remotely sensing the water status of plants and the water content of canopies remain long term goals of remote sensing research. In the research we report here, we used optical polarization techniques to monitor the light reflected from the leaf interior, R, as well as the leaf transmittance, T, as the relative water content (RWC) of corn (Zea mays) leaves decreased. Our results show that R and T both change nonlinearly. The result show that the nonlinearities cancel in the ratio R/T, which appears linearly related to RWC for RWC less than 90%. The results suggest that potentially leaf water status and perhaps even canopy water status could be monitored starting from leaf and canopy optical measurements.

  14. Sodium Content of Community Water Supplies in California

    PubMed Central

    Steinkamp, Ruth C.; Young, Clarence L.; Nyhus, Dolores; Greenberg, Arnold E.

    1968-01-01

    The amount of sodium ion in water used for ingestion may be critical in effective use of a low sodium dietary regimen. Waters containing not over 20 mg of sodium per liter are provided for in the sodium restricted diets set forth by the American Heart Association. For diets containing more than 500 mg of sodium a day, waters of greater sodium content may be used if proper dietary adjustments are made. While assessment of the long-term average sodium content of a community water supply is difficult, the determined values for sodium lend to classification within range categories. The larger community water supplies in California are presented within several range categories of sodium content. The more commonly used water softeners add sodium to water. The sodium-restricted patient should be cautioned against their use. Similar consideration should probably be given to water supplies of retirement communities where the potential for disorders requiring sodium restriction is greater than in the general population. PMID:5673988

  15. Remote sensing of vegetation water content using shortwave infrared reflectances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, E. Raymond, Jr.; Yilmaz, M. Tugrul

    2007-09-01

    Vegetation water content is an important biophysical parameter for estimation of soil moisture from microwave radiometers. One of the objectives of the Soil Moisture Experiments in 2004 (SMEX04) and 2005 (SMEX05) were to develop and test algorithms for a vegetation water content data product using shortwave infrared reflectances. SMEX04 studied native vegetation in Arizona, USA, and Sonora, Mexico, while SMEX05 studied corn and soybean in Iowa, USA. The normalized difference infrared index (NDII) is defined as (R 850 - R 1650)/(R 800 + R 1650), where R 850 is the reflectance in the near infrared and R1650 is the reflectance in the shortwave infrared. Simulations using the Scattering by Arbitrarily Inclined Leaves (SAIL) model indicated that NDII is sensitive to surface moisture content. From Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper and other imagery, NDII is linear with respect to foliar water content with R2 = 0.81. The regression standard error of the y estimate is 0.094 mm, which is equivalent to about a leaf area index of 0.5 m2 m -2. Based on modeling the dynamic water flow through plants, the requirement for detection of water stress is about 0.01 mm, so detection of water stress may not be possible. However, this standard error is accurate for input into the tau-omega model for soil moisture. Therefore, NDII may be a robust backup algorithm for MODIS as a standard data product.

  16. [Use of laser flow-type fluorescence aerosol particle counter to evaluate the concentration of microbes in the surface air under high dust content].

    PubMed

    Kalinin, Iu T; Vorob'ev, S A; Khramov, E N; Vorob'eva, E A; Kuznetsov, A P; Kiselev, O S

    2000-01-01

    The paper deals with the use of a laser flow-type fluorescence aerosol particle counter to evaluate the concentrations of microbes in the surface air under high dust content. Various circuits of flow-type optic aerosol recorders are analyzed. Flow spectral luminescence analysis of some particles flow while exciting the fourth harmonics of a pulse laser on yttrium-aluminium garnet with neodymium by ultraviolet radiation is shown to be the most optimum method for indication of individual aerosol particles. Experiments were conducted on the authors' model of a pilot plant based on this method. The model of a laser flow-type optic analyzer was developed for experimental studies that give a clear display of biological aerosols in complex aerosols. The laser flow-type analyzer-based unit developed may provide a fluorescence signal of aerosol particles in the flow of a sample and that light diffusion signal from them at an exciting light wavelength of 266 nm. Experiments with BVC aerosols and soil dust particles were conducted in different regions of Russia. They showed it possible to detect and to rapidly calculate soil microorganisms by laser flow-type fluorescence assay of individual particles when excited by ultraviolet radiation.

  17. Fungal Spore Concentrations and Ergosterol Content in Aerosol Samples in the Caribbean During African Dust Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos-Figueroa, G.; Bolaños-Rosero, B.; Mayol-Bracero, O. L.

    2015-12-01

    Fungal spores are a major component of primary biogenic aerosol particles that are emitted to the atmosphere, are ubiquitous, and play an important role in the chemistry and physics of the atmosphere, climate, and public health. Every year, during summer months, African dust (AD) particles are transported to the Caribbean region causing an increase in the concentrations of particulate matter in the atmosphere. AD is one of the most important natural sources of mineral particulate matter at the global scale, and many investigations suggest that it has the ability to transport dust-associated biological particles through long distances. The relationship between AD incursions and the concentration of fungal spores in the Caribbean region is poorly understood. In order to investigate the effects of AD incursions on fungal spore's emissions, fungal spore concentrations were monitored using a Burkard spore trap at the tropical montane cloud forest of Pico del Este at El Yunque National Forest, Puerto Rico. The presence of AD was supported with satellite images of aerosol optical thickness, and with the results from the air masses backward trajectories calculated with the NOAA HYSPLIT model. Basidiospores and Ascospores comprised the major components of the total spore's concentrations, up to a maximum of 98%, during both AD incursions and background days. A considerably decrease in the concentration of fungal spores during AD events was observed. Ergosterol, biomarker for measuring fungal biomass, concentrations were determined in aerosols that were sampled at a marine site, Cabezas de San Juan Nature Reserve, in Fajardo Puerto Rico, and at an urban site, Facundo Bueso building at the University of Puerto Rico. Additional efforts to understand the relationship between the arrival of AD to the Caribbean and a decrease in spore's concentrations are needed in order to investigate changes in local spore's vs the contribution of long-range spores transported within the AD.

  18. The mechanism of sulforaphene degradation to different water contents.

    PubMed

    Tian, Guifang; Li, Yuan; Cheng, Li; Yuan, Qipeng; Tang, Pingwah; Kuang, Pengqun; Hu, Jing

    2016-03-01

    Sulforaphene extracted from radish seeds was strongly associated with cancer prevention. However, sulforaphene was unstable in aqueous medium and at high temperature. This instability impairs many useful applications of sulforaphene. In this paper, the stability of sulforaphene (purity above 95%) during storage at -20°C, 4°C and 26°C was studied. The degradation product was purified by preparative HPLC and identified by ESI/MS, NMR ((1)H and (13)C NMR) and FTIR spectroscopy. The degradation pathway of sulforaphene was presented. Furthermore, we found that the degradation rate of sulforaphene was closely related to the water content of sulforaphene sample. The higher the water content was, the faster the sulforaphene sample degraded. A mathematical model was developed to predict the degradation constant at various water contents. It provided a guideline for industry to improve the stability of sulforaphene during preparation, application and storage.

  19. Cloud Water Content Sensor for Sounding Balloons and Small UAVs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bognar, John A.

    2009-01-01

    A lightweight, battery-powered sensor was developed for measuring cloud water content, which is the amount of liquid or solid water present in a cloud, generally expressed as grams of water per cubic meter. This sensor has near-zero power consumption and can be flown on standard sounding balloons and small, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). The amount of solid or liquid water is important to the study of atmospheric processes and behavior. Previous sensing techniques relied on strongly heating the incoming air, which requires a major energy input that cannot be achieved on sounding balloons or small UAVs.

  20. Spatial separation of individual substances in effloresced crystals of ternary ammonium sulphate/dicarboxylic acid/water aerosols.

    PubMed

    Treuel, Lennart; Sandmann, Alice; Zellner, Reinhard

    2011-04-18

    This work examines the crystals resulting from the efflorescence of internally mixed aqueous aerosols comprising ammonium sulphate and different dicarboxylic acids. Most studies on the deliquescence of aerosols use previously effloresced aerosols in their experiments. However, during efflorescence a highly supersaturated solution crystallises in a kinetically controlled way unlike the case of thermodynamically controlled crystallisation. Herein the distribution of individual substances within the effloresced crystals is investigated using Raman scanning experiments. The data presented show an intriguingly complex behaviour of these ternary and quarternary aerosols. A spatial separation of substances in the crystals resulting from the efflorescence of previously internally mixed ternary salt/dicarboxylic acid/water aerosol droplets is demonstrated and mechanistic aspects are discussed.

  1. On the Water Uptake and CCN Activation of Tropospheric Organic Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastak, Narges; Pajunoja, Aki; Acosta Navarro, Juan-Camilo; Leong, Yu Jun; Cerully, Kate M.; Nenes, Athanasios; Kirkevåg, Alf; Topping, David; Virtanen, Annele; Riipinen, Ilona

    2016-04-01

    Aerosol particles introduce high uncertainties to radiative climate forcing. If exposed to a given relative humidity (RH), aerosol particles containing soluble material can absorb water and grow in size (hygroscopic growth). If RH is increased further beyond supersaturation (RH >100%) the particles can act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Aerosol particles interactions with water vapour determine to a large extent their influence on climate. Organic aerosols (OA) contribute a large fraction (20-90%) of atmospheric submicron particulate mass, on the other hand they often consist of thousands of compounds with different properties. One of these properties is solubility, which affects the hygroscopic growth and cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) activation of the organic particles. We investigate the hygroscopic behaviour of complex organic aerosols accounting for the distribution of solubilities present in these mixtures. We use the SPARC method to estimate the solubility distributions of isoprene (IP) and monoterpene (MT) SOA based on their chemical composition, as predicted by the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM). Combining these solubility distributions with the adsorption theory along with the non-ideal behaviour of organic mixtures, we predict the expected hygroscopic growth factors (HGFs), CCN activation behaviour and the related hygroscopicity parameters kappa for these mixtures. The predictions are compared to laboratory measurements as well as field data from MT- and IP-dominated measurement sites. The predicted solubility distributions do a good job in explaining the water uptake of these two mixture types at high relative humidities (RH around 90%), as well as their CCN activation - including the potential differences between the kappa values derived from HGF vs. CCN data. At lower relative humidities, however, the observed water uptake is higher than predicted on solubility alone, particularly for the MT-derived SOA. The data from the low RHs are further

  2. Detection and quantification of water-based aerosols using active open-path FTIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kira, Oz; Linker, Raphael; Dubowski, Yael

    2016-04-01

    Aerosols have a leading role in many eco-systems and knowledge of their properties is critical for many applications. This study suggests using active Open-Path Fourier Transform Infra-Red (OP-FTIR) spectroscopy for quantifying water droplets and solutes load in the atmosphere. The OP-FTIR was used to measure water droplets, with and without solutes, in a 20 m spray tunnel. Three sets of spraying experiments generated different hydrosols clouds: (1) tap water only, (2) aqueous ammonium sulfate (0.25–3.6%wt) and (3) aqueous ethylene glycol (0.47–2.38%wt). Experiment (1) yielded a linear relationship between the shift of the extinction spectrum baseline and the water load in the line-of-sight (LOS) (R2 = 0.984). Experiment (2) also yielded a linear relationship between the integrated extinction in the range of 880–1150 cm‑1 and the ammonium sulfate load in the LOS (R2 = 0.972). For the semi-volatile ethylene glycol (experiment 3), present in the gas and condense phases, quantification was much more complex and two spectral approaches were developed: (1) according to the linear relationship from the first experiment (determination error of 8%), and (2) inverse modeling (determination error of 57%). This work demonstrates the potential of the OP-FTIR for detecting clouds of water-based aerosols and for quantifying water droplets and solutes at relatively low concentrations.

  3. Joint retrieval of aerosol and water-leaving radiance from multispectral, multiangular and polarimetric measurements over ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Feng; Dubovik, Oleg; Zhai, Peng-Wang; Diner, David J.; Kalashnikova, Olga V.; Seidel, Felix C.; Litvinov, Pavel; Bovchaliuk, Andrii; Garay, Michael J.; van Harten, Gerard; Davis, Anthony B.

    2016-07-01

    An optimization approach has been developed for simultaneous retrieval of aerosol properties and normalized water-leaving radiance (nLw) from multispectral, multiangular, and polarimetric observations over ocean. The main features of the method are (1) use of a simplified bio-optical model to estimate nLw, followed by an empirical refinement within a specified range to improve its accuracy; (2) improved algorithm convergence and stability by applying constraints on the spatial smoothness of aerosol loading and Chlorophyll a (Chl a) concentration across neighboring image patches and spectral constraints on aerosol optical properties and nLw across relevant bands; and (3) enhanced Jacobian calculation by modeling and storing the radiative transfer (RT) in aerosol/Rayleigh mixed layer, pure Rayleigh-scattering layers, and ocean medium separately, then coupling them to calculate the field at the sensor. This approach avoids unnecessary and time-consuming recalculations of RT in unperturbed layers in Jacobian evaluations. The Markov chain method is used to model RT in the aerosol/Rayleigh mixed layer and the doubling method is used for the uniform layers of the atmosphere-ocean system. Our optimization approach has been tested using radiance and polarization measurements acquired by the Airborne Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager (AirMSPI) over the AERONET USC_SeaPRISM ocean site (6 February 2013) and near the AERONET La Jolla site (14 January 2013), which, respectively, reported relatively high and low aerosol loadings. Validation of the results is achieved through comparisons to AERONET aerosol and ocean color products. For comparison, the USC_SeaPRISM retrieval is also performed by use of the Generalized Retrieval of Aerosol and Surface Properties algorithm (Dubovik et al., 2011). Uncertainties of aerosol and nLw retrievals due to random and systematic instrument errors are analyzed by truth-in/truth-out tests with three Chl a concentrations, five aerosol loadings

  4. Is It Possible to Distinguish Between Dust and Salt Aerosol Over Waters with Unknown Chlorophyll Concentrations Using Spectral Remote Sensing?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, R. C.; Kaufman, Y. J.

    1999-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosol has uncertain impacts on the global climate system, as well as on atmospheric and bio-geo-chemical processes of regional and local scales. EOS-MODIS is one example of a satellite sensor designed to improve understanding of the aerosols' type, size and distribution at all temporal and spatial scales. Ocean scientists also plan to use data from EOS-MODIS to assess the temporal and spatial coverage of in-water chlorophyll. MODIS is the first sensor planned to observe the combined ocean-atmosphere system with a wide spectral range (from 410 to 2200 nm). Dust aerosol and salt aerosol have similar spectral signals for wavelengths longer than 550 nm, but because dust selectively absorbs blue light, they have divergent signals in the blue wavelength regions (412 to 490 nm). Chlorophyll also selectively absorbs blue radiation, so that varying chlorophyll concentrations produces a highly varying signal in the blue regions, but less variability in the green, and almost no signal in the red to mid-infrared regions. Thus, theoretically, it may be difficult to differentiate dust and salt in the presence of unknown chlorophyll in the ocean. This study attempts to address the cases in which aerosol and chlorophyll signals can and cannot be separated. For the aerosol spectra, we use the aerosol lookup table from the operational MODIS aerosol-over-ocean algorithm, and for chlorophyll spectra, we use the SeaBAM data set (created for SeaWiFS). We compare the signals using Principal Component Analysis and attempt to retrieve both chlorophyll and aerosol properties using a variant of the operational MODIS aerosol-over-ocean algorithm. Results show that for small optical depths, less than 0.5, it is not possible to differentiate between dust and salt and to determine the chlorophyll concentration at the same time. For larger aerosol optical depths, the chlorophyll signals are comparatively insignificant, and we can hope to distinguish between dust and salt.

  5. Water content or water activity: what rules crispy behavior in bread crust?

    PubMed

    van Nieuwenhuijzen, N H; Primo-Martín, C; Meinders, M B J; Tromp, R H; Hamer, R J; van Vliet, T

    2008-08-13

    A dry crust loses its crispness when water migrates into the crust. It is not clear if it is the amount of water absorbed or the water activity ( a w) that leads to a loss of crispness. The hysteresis effect observed when recording a water sorption isotherm allowed us to study the effects of a w and moisture content separately. All experiments were carried out on model bread crusts made from Soissons bread flour. The effect of water content and water activity on the glass transition of model bread crusts was studied in detail using two complimentary techniques: phase transition analysis (PTA) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The results were compared with sensory data and results from a puncture test, which provided data on acoustic emission and fracture mechanics during breaking of the crusts. The water content of the crust was found to be decisive for the transition point as measured by PTA and NMR. However, both water content and water activity had an effect on perceived crispness and number of force and sound peaks. From this may be concluded that the distribution of the water in the samples with a history of high water content is more inhomogeneous, which results in crispy and less crispy regions, thus making them overall more crispy than samples with the same water content but higher a w.

  6. Climatology of cloud water content associated with different cloud types observed by A-Train satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lei; Jiang, Jonathan H.; Wang, Zhien; Su, Hui; Deng, Min; Massie, Steven

    2015-05-01

    This study investigates the climatology of vertical distributions of cloud liquid water content, ice water content, and cloud fraction (CFR) associated with eight different cloud types, by utilizing the combined CloudSat radar and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations lidar measurements. The geographical and seasonal variations of these cloud properties for each cloud type are also analyzed. The cloud water content (CWC) of each cloud type is sorted by three parameters obtained from colocated satellite observations to investigate the relationships between large-scale conditions and the vertical structure of clouds. Results show that different cloud types have different altitudes of CWC and CFR peaks, and the altitude of CFR peak does not always overlap with that of CWC peak. Each type of cloud shows a clear asymmetric pattern of spatial distribution between Northern Hemisphere (NH) and Southern Hemisphere (SH). Stratocumulus and stratus clouds make the greatest contribution to the liquid water path, while the ice water path is mostly contributed by deep convective cloud over the tropics and nimbostratus over the middle and high latitudes. Over both middle and high latitudes, clouds have larger seasonal variation in the NH than in the SH. Over ocean, large CWCs of deep convective cloud, cirrus, and altostratus are above 7 km, and are associated with high convective available potential energy (>2000 J/kg), warm sea surface temperature (>303 K), and relatively high precipitation (>1 mm/h). Over land, most of the middle and high clouds have similar CWC distributions compared to those over ocean, but altocumulus and low clouds are quite different from those over ocean.

  7. LASE Measurements of Water Vapor, Aerosol, and Cloud Distributions in Saharan Air Layers and Tropical Disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ismail, Syed; Ferrare, Richard; Browell, Edward; Kooi, Susan; Notari, Anthony; Butler, Carolyn; Burton, Sharon; Fenn, Marta; Krishnamurti, T. N.; Dunion, Jason; Heymsfield, Gerry; Anderson, Bruce

    2008-01-01

    LASE (Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment) onboard the NASA DC-8 was used to measure high resolution profiles of water vapor and aerosols, and cloud distributions in 14 flights over the eastern Atlantic region during the NAMMA (NASA African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses) field experiment, which was conducted from August 15 to September 12, 2006. These measurements were made in conjunction with flights designed to study African Easterly Waves (AEW), Tropical Disturbances (TD), and Saharan Aerosol Layers (SALs) as well as flights performed in clear air and convective regions. As a consequence of their unique radiative properties and dynamics, SAL layers have a significant influence in the development of organized convection associated with TD. Interactions of the SAL with tropical air during early stages of the development of TD were observed. These LASE measurements represent the first simultaneous water vapor and aerosol lidar measurements to study the SAL and its impact on TDs and hurricanes. Seven AEWs were studied and four of these evolved into tropical storms and three did not. Three out of the four tropical storms evolved into hurricanes.

  8. Concentrations and composition of aerosols and particulate matter in surface waters along the transatlantic section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemirovskaya, I. A.; Lisitzin, A. P.; Novigatsky, A. N.; Redzhepova, Z. U.; Dara, O. M.

    2016-07-01

    Along the transatlantic section from Ushuaia to Gdańsk (March 26-May 7, 2015; cruise 47 of R/V Akademik Ioffe), data were obtained on the concentrations of aerosols in the near-water layer of the atmosphere and of particulate matter in surface waters, as well as of organic compounds within the considered matter (Corg, chlorophyll a, lipids, and hydrocarbons). The concentrations of aerosols amounted to 1237-111 739 particles/L for the fraction of 0.3-1 μm and to 0.02-34.4 μg/m2/day for the matter collected by means of the network procedure. The distribution of aerosols is affected by circumcontinental zoning and by the fluxes from arid areas of African deserts. The maximum concentration of the treated compounds were found in the river-sea frontal area (the runoff of the Colorado River, Argentina), as well as when nearing the coasts, especially in the English Channel.

  9. Data assimilation with soil water content sensors and pedotransfer functions in soil water flow modeling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil water flow models are based on a set of simplified assumptions about the mechanisms, processes, and parameters of water retention and flow. That causes errors in soil water flow model predictions. Soil water content monitoring data can be used to reduce the errors in models. Data assimilation (...

  10. Water content of latent fingerprints - Dispelling the myth.

    PubMed

    Kent, Terry

    2016-09-01

    Changing procedures in the handling of rare and precious documents in museums and elsewhere, based on assumptions about constituents of latent fingerprints, have led the author to an examination of available data. These changes appear to have been triggered by one paper using general biological data regarding eccrine sweat production to infer that deposited fingerprints are mostly water. Searching the fingerprint literature has revealed a number of reference works similarly quoting figures for average water content of deposited fingerprints of 98% or more. Whilst accurate estimation is difficult there is no evidence that the residue on fingers could be anything like 98% water, even if there were no contamination from sebaceous glands. Consideration of published analytical data of real fingerprints, and several theoretical considerations regarding evaporation and replenishment rates, indicates a probable initial average water content of a fingerprint, soon after deposition, of 20% or less.

  11. A mobile remote sensing laboratory for water vapor, trace gas, aerosol, and wind speed measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Slaughter, D.; White, W.; Tulloch, W.; DeSlover, D.

    1993-03-19

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has developed a mobile field laboratory for remote measurement of atmospheric processes and observables that are important in global climate change, dispersal of hazardous materials, and atmospheric pollution. Specific observables of interest are water vapor, trace gases, aerosol size and density, wind, and temperature. The goal is to study atmospheric processes continuously for extended periods in remote field locations. This laboratory has just reached field ready status with sensors for aerosol and trace gas measurement based on established techniques. A development program is underway to enhance the sensor suite with several new techniques and instruments that are expected to significantly extend the state of the art in remote trace gas analysis. The new sensors will be incorporated into the lab during the next two years.

  12. K-Basins particulate water content, and behavior

    SciTech Connect

    DUNCAN, D.R.

    1999-02-25

    This analysis summarizes the state of knowledge of K-basins spent nuclear fuel oxide (film, particulate or sludge) and its chemically bound water in order to estimate the associated multi-canister overpack (MCO) water inventory and to describe particulate dehydration behavior. This information can be used to evaluate the thermal and chemical history of an MCO and its contents during cold vacuum drying (CVD), shipping, and interim storage.

  13. Effect of hydration on the water content of human erythrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Levin, R L; Cravalho, E G; Huggins, C E

    1976-01-01

    An ideal, hydrated, nondilute pseudobinary salt-protein-water solution model of the RBC intracellular solution has been developed to describe the osmotic behavior of human erythrocytes during freezing and thawing. Because of the hydration of intracellular solutes (mostly cell proteins), our analytical results predict that at least 16.65% of the isotonic cell water content will be retained within RBCs placed in hypertonic solutions. These findings are consistent not only with the experimental measurements of the amount of isotonic cell water retained within RBCs subjected to nonisotonic extracellular solutions (20-32%) but also with the experimental evidence that all of the water within RBCs is solvent water. By modeling the RBC intracellular solution as a hydrated salt-protein-water solution, no anomalous osmotic behavior is apparent. PMID:990394

  14. Electrokinetics dependence on water-content in sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allègre, V.; Lehmann, F.; Jouniaux, L.; Sailhac, P.; Matthey, P.

    2009-12-01

    The electrokinetic potential results from the coupling between the water flow and the electrical current because of the presence of ions within water. This coupling is well described in fluid-saturated media, however its behavior under unsaturated flow conditions is still discussed. We propose here an experimental approach which can clearly describe streaming potential variations in unsaturated conditions. Several drainage experiments have been performed within a column filled with a clean sand. Streaming potential measurements are combined to capillary pressure and to water content measurements each 10 centimeter along the column. In order to model hydrodymanics during each experiment, we solve Richards equation in an inverse way which allows us to establish the relation between hydraulic conductivity and water content, and retention relation. The electrokinetic coefficient C shows a more complex behavior than it was previously reported and can not be fitted by the existing models. We show that the normalized electrokinetic coefficient increases first when water saturation decreases from 100% to about 80% - 95%, and then decreases as the water saturation decreases, whereas all previous works described a unifrom decrease of the normalized electrokinetic coefficient as water saturation decreases. We delimited two water saturation domains, and deduced two different empirical laws describing the evolution of the electrokinetic coefficient in unsaturated conditions. Finally, electrical potentials data from four different drainage experiments and hydrodynamics were jointly inversed, including electrical conductivity measurements in order to find a robust description of the electrokinetic coefficient behavior in unsaturated conditions.

  15. Contribution of water-soluble and insoluble components and their hydrophobic/hydrophilic subfractions to the reactive oxygen species-generating potential of fine ambient aerosols.

    PubMed

    Verma, Vishal; Rico-Martinez, Roberto; Kotra, Neel; King, Laura; Liu, Jiumeng; Snell, Terry W; Weber, Rodney J

    2012-10-16

    Relative contributions of water- and methanol-soluble compounds and their hydrophobic/hydrophilic subfractions to the ROS (reactive oxygen species)-generating potential of ambient fine aerosols (D(p) < 2.5 μm) are assessed. ROS-generating (or oxidative) potential of the particulate matter (PM) was measured by the dithiothreitol (DTT) assay. Particles were collected on quartz filters (N = 8) at an urban site near central Atlanta during January-February 2012 using a PM(2.5) high-volume sampler. Filter punches were extracted separately in both water and methanol. Hydrophobic and hydrophilic fractions were then subsequently segregated via a C-18 solid phase extraction column. The DTT assay response was significantly higher for the methanol extract, and for both extracts a substantial fraction of PM oxidative potential was associated with the hydrophobic compounds as evident from a substantial attenuation in DTT response after passing PM extracts through the C-18 column (64% for water and 83% for methanol extract; both median values). The DTT activities of water and methanol extracts were correlated with the water-soluble (R = 0.86) and water-insoluble organic carbon (R = 0.94) contents of the PM, respectively. Brown carbon (BrC), which predominantly represents the hydrophobic organic fraction (referred to as humic-like substances, HULIS), was also correlated with DTT activity in both the water (R = 0.78) and methanol extracts (R = 0.83). Oxidative potential was not correlated with any metals measured in the extracts. These findings suggest that the hydrophobic components of both water-soluble and insoluble organic aerosols substantially contribute to the oxidative properties of ambient PM. Further investigation of these hydrophobic organic compounds could help identify sources of a significant fraction of ambient aerosol toxicity.

  16. Inorganic, organic and macromolecular components of fine aerosol in different areas of Europe in relation to their water solubility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zappoli, S.; Andracchio, A.; Fuzzi, S.; Facchini, M. C.; Gelencsér, A.; Kiss, G.; Krivácsy, Z.; Molnár, Á.; Mészáros, E.; Hansson, H.-C.; Rosman, K.; Zebühr, Y.

    A chemical mass balance of fine aerosol (<1.5 μm AED) collected at three European sites was performed with reference to the water solubility of the different aerosol classes of components. The sampling sites are characterised by different pollution conditions and aerosol loading in the air. Aspvreten is a background site in central Sweden, K-puszta is a rural site in the Great Hungarian Plain and San Pietro Capofiume is located in the polluted Po Valley, northern Italy. The average fine aerosol mass concentration was 5.9 μg m -3 at the background site Aspvreten, 24 μg m -3 at the rural K-puszta and 38 μg m -3 at the polluted site San Pietro Capofiume. However, a similarly high soluble fraction of the aerosol (65-75%) was measured at the three sites, while the percentage of water soluble organic species with respect to the total soluble mass was much higher at the background site (ca. 50%) than at the other two sites (ca. 25%). A very high fraction (over 70%) of organic compounds in the aerosol consisted of polar species. The presence of water soluble macromolecular compounds was revealed in the samples from K-puszta and San Pietro Capofiume. At both sites these species accounted for between ca. 20-50% of the water soluble organic fraction. The origin of the compounds was tentatively attributed to biomass combustion.

  17. The 2005 catastrophic acid crater lake drainage, lahar, and acidic aerosol formation at Mount Chiginagak volcano, Alaska, USA: Field observations and preliminary water and vegetation chemistry results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Janet R.; Scott, William E.; Evans, William C.; Jorgenson, Janet; McGimsey, Robert G.; Wang, Bronwen

    2008-07-01

    A mass of snow and ice 400-m-wide and 105-m-thick began melting in the summit crater of Mount Chiginagak volcano sometime between November 2004 and early May 2005, presumably owing to increased heat flux from the hydrothermal system, or possibly from magma intrusion and degassing. In early May 2005, an estimated 3.8 × 106 m3 of sulfurous, clay-rich debris and acidic water, with an accompanying acidic aerosol component, exited the crater through a tunnel at the base of a glacier that breaches the south crater rim. Over 27 km downstream, the acidic waters of the flood inundated an important salmon spawning drainage, acidifying Mother Goose Lake from surface to depth (approximately 0.5 km3 in volume at a pH of 2.9 to 3.1), killing all aquatic life, and preventing the annual salmon run. Over 2 months later, crater lake water sampled 8 km downstream of the outlet after considerable dilution from glacial meltwater was a weak sulfuric acid solution (pH = 3.2, SO4 = 504 mg/L, Cl = 53.6 mg/L, and F = 7.92 mg/L). The acid flood waters caused severe vegetation damage, including plant death and leaf kill along the flood path. The crater lake drainage was accompanied by an ambioructic flow of acidic aerosols that followed the flood path, contributing to defoliation and necrotic leaf damage to vegetation in a 29 km2 area along and above affected streams, in areas to heights of over 150 m above stream level. Moss species killed in the event contained high levels of sulfur, indicating extremely elevated atmospheric sulfur content. The most abundant airborne phytotoxic constituent was likely sulfuric acid aerosols that were generated during the catastrophic partial crater lake drainage event. Two mechanisms of acidic aerosol formation are proposed: (1) generation of aerosol mist through turbulent flow of acidic water and (2) catastrophic gas exsolution. This previously undocumented phenomenon of simultaneous vegetation-damaging acidic aerosols accompanying drainage of an acidic

  18. Aerosol Measurements of the Fine and Ultrafine Particle Content of Lunar Regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, Paul S.; Chen, Da-Ren; Smith, Sally A.

    2007-01-01

    We report the first quantitative measurements of the ultrafine (20 to 100 nm) and fine (100 nm to 20 m) particulate components of Lunar surface regolith. The measurements were performed by gas-phase dispersal of the samples, and analysis using aerosol diagnostic techniques. This approach makes no a priori assumptions about the particle size distribution function as required by ensemble optical scattering methods, and is independent of refractive index and density. The method provides direct evaluation of effective transport diameters, in contrast to indirect scattering techniques or size information derived from two-dimensional projections of high magnification-images. The results demonstrate considerable populations in these size regimes. In light of the numerous difficulties attributed to dust exposure during the Apollo program, this outcome is of significant importance to the design of mitigation technologies for future Lunar exploration.

  19. Major 20th century changes of the content and chemical speciation of organic carbon archived in Alpine ice cores: Implications for the long-term change of organic aerosol over Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legrand, M.; Preunkert, S.; May, B.; Guilhermet, J.; Hoffman, H.; Wagenbach, D.

    2013-05-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and an extended array of organic compounds were investigated in an Alpine ice core covering the 1920-1988 time period. Based on this, a reconstruction was made of the long-term trends of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) aerosol in the European atmosphere. It is shown that light mono- and dicarboxylates, humic-like substances, and formaldehyde account together for more than half of the DOC content of ice. This extended chemical speciation of DOC is used to estimate the DOC fraction present in ice that is related to WSOC aerosol and its change over the past. It is suggested that after World War II, the WSOC levels have been enhanced by a factor of 2 and 3 in winter and summer, respectively. In summer, the fossil fuel contribution to the enhancement is estimated to be rather small, suggesting that it arises mainly from an increase in biogenic sources of WSOC.

  20. Mapping soil water content on golf course greens with GPR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) can be an effective and efficient method for high-resolution mapping of volumetric water content in the sand layer directly beneath the ground surface at a golf course green. This information could potentially be very useful to golf course superintendents for determi...

  1. Measurement of soil water content with dielectric dispersion frequency

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Frequency domain reflectometry (FDR) is an inexpensive and attractive methodology for repeated measurements of soil water content (SWC). Although there are some known measurement limitations for dry soil and sand, a fixed-frequency method is commonly employed using commercially available FDR probes....

  2. A review on temporal stability of soil water contents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Temporal stability of soil water content (TS SWC) has been observed across a wide range of soil types, landscapes, climates and scales. A better understanding of TS SWC controls and their interactions needs to be developed. The objective of this work is to develop a comprehensive inventory of publis...

  3. Optical sensing of vegetation water content: A synthesis study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vegetation Water Content (VWC) plays an important role in parameterizing the vegetation influence on microwave soil moisture retrieval. During the past decade, researchers have developed relationships between VWC and vegetation indices available from satellite optical sensors in order to create larg...

  4. SAPWOOD WATER CONTENT IS INSENSITIVE TO CHANGES IN SOIL MOISTURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Changes in sapwood water content of large Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) trees were measured throughout the year at two sites: a low elevation (600-m) site where precipitation occurs primarily as rain, and a high elevation (1200-m) site that receives significant snowfall. B...

  5. Effective Calibration of Low-Cost Soil Water Content Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Bogena, Heye Reemt; Huisman, Johan Alexander; Schilling, Bernd; Weuthen, Ansgar; Vereecken, Harry

    2017-01-01

    Soil water content is a key variable for understanding and modelling ecohydrological processes. Low-cost electromagnetic sensors are increasingly being used to characterize the spatio-temporal dynamics of soil water content, despite the reduced accuracy of such sensors as compared to reference electromagnetic soil water content sensing methods such as time domain reflectometry. Here, we present an effective calibration method to improve the measurement accuracy of low-cost soil water content sensors taking the recently developed SMT100 sensor (Truebner GmbH, Neustadt, Germany) as an example. We calibrated the sensor output of more than 700 SMT100 sensors to permittivity using a standard procedure based on five reference media with a known apparent dielectric permittivity (1 < Ka < 34.8). Our results showed that a sensor-specific calibration improved the accuracy of the calibration compared to single “universal” calibration. The associated additional effort in calibrating each sensor individually is relaxed by a dedicated calibration setup that enables the calibration of large numbers of sensors in limited time while minimizing errors in the calibration process. PMID:28117731

  6. WATER CONTENT-TEMPERATURE INTERACTIONS REGULATE SEED AGING

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Water content and temperature are important factors that influence the duration of seed survival in storage. The interacting effect of these two factors and the consequences on seed longevity is rarely recognized. An experiment to quantify the interaction was begun in 1994, using lettuce (Lactuca s...

  7. New Examination of the Traditional Raman Lidar Technique II: Evaluating the Ratios for Water Vapor and Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, David N.

    2003-01-01

    In a companion paper, the temperature dependence of Raman scattering and its influence on the Raman and Rayleigh-Mie lidar equations was examined. New forms of the lidar equation were developed to account for this temperature sensitivity. Here those results are used to derive the temperature dependent forms of the equations for the water vapor mixing ratio, aerosol scattering ratio, aerosol backscatter coefficient, and extinction to backscatter ratio (Sa). The error equations are developed, the influence of differential transmission is studied and different laser sources are considered in the analysis. The results indicate that the temperature functions become significant when using narrowband detection. Errors of 5% and more can be introduced in the water vapor mixing ratio calculation at high altitudes and errors larger than 10% are possible for calculations of aerosol scattering ratio and thus aerosol backscatter coefficient and extinction to backscatter ratio.

  8. Mass-based hygroscopicity parameter interaction model and measurement of atmospheric aerosol water uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, E.; Merkulov, V.; Vlasenko, S.; Rose, D.; Pöschl, U.

    2011-11-01

    In this study we derive and apply a mass-based hygroscopicity parameter interaction model for efficient description of concentration-dependent water uptake by atmospheric aerosol particles. The model approach builds on the single hygroscopicity parameter model of Petters and Kreidenweis (2007). We introduce an observable mass-based hygroscopicity parameter κm, which can be deconvoluted into a dilute intrinsic hygroscopicity parameter (κm,∞) and additional self- and cross-interaction parameters describing non-ideal solution behavior and concentration dependencies of single- and multi-component systems. For sodium chloride, the κm-interaction model (KIM) captures the observed concentration and humidity dependence of the hygroscopicity parameter and is in good agreement with an accurate reference model based on the Pitzer ion-interaction approach (Aerosol Inorganic Model, AIM). For atmospheric aerosol samples collected from boreal rural air and from pristine tropical rainforest air (secondary organic aerosol) we present first mass-based measurements of water uptake over a wide range of relative humidity (1-99%) obtained with a new filter-based differential hygroscopicity analyzer (FDHA) technique. By application of KIM to the measurement data we can distinguish three different regimes of hygroscopicity in the investigated aerosol samples: (I) A quasi-eutonic regime at low relative humidity (~60% RH) where the solutes co-exist in an aqueous and non-aqueous phase; (II) a gradually deliquescent regime at intermediate humidity (~60%-90% RH) where different solutes undergo gradual dissolution in the aqueous phase; and (III) a dilute regime at high humidity (≳90% RH) where the solutes are fully dissolved approaching their dilute intrinsic hygroscopicity. The characteristic features of the three hygroscopicity regimes are similar for both samples, while the RH threshold values vary as expected for samples of different chemical composition. In each regime, the

  9. Water content and water repellency in a field. Implications for irrigation strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thwaites, L. A.; de Rooij, G. H.; Salzman, S.; Allinson, G.; Stagnitti, F.; Carr, R.; Versace, V.; Struck, S.; March, T.

    2010-05-01

    The degree of water repellency of soil material depends on its water content. Irrigated soils preferably should be kept sufficiently wet to render the soil wettable, in order to prevent irrigation water bypassing the root zone. But if this leads to overirrigation, the risk of groundwater pollution increases. We applied three irrigation regimes to individual trees in a Eucalyptus plantation on water-repellent soil. The resulting unimodal distribution of shallow water contents produced a bimodal distribution in the degree of water repellency: at any location, the soil would most likely be either wettable, or strongly water-repellent. We developed a procedure to estimate from both distributions the area of wettable soil based on a population of locally determined water contents.

  10. Observed reflectivities and liquid water content for marine stratocumulus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coakley, J. A., Jr.; Snider, J. B.

    1989-01-01

    Simultaneous observations of cloud liquid water content and cloud reflectivity are used to verify their parametric relationship in a manner consistent with simple parameterizations often used in general-circulation climate models. The column amount of cloud liquid water was measured with a microwave radiometer on San Nicolas Island as described by Hogg et al., (1983). Cloud reflectivity was obtained through spatial coherence analysis of AVHRR imagery data as per Coakley and Baldwin (1984) and Coakley and Beckner (1988). The dependence of the observed reflectivity on the observed liquid water is discussed, and this empirical relationship is compared with the parameterization proposed by Stephens (1978).

  11. Evaluation of CALIOP 532-nm Aerosol Optical Depth Over Opaque Water Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Z.; Winker, D.; Omar, A.; Vaughan, M.; Kar, J.; Trepte, C.; Hu, Y.; Schuster, G.

    2015-01-01

    With its height-resolved measurements and near global coverage, the CALIOP lidar onboard the CALIPSO satellite offers a new capability for aerosol retrievals in cloudy skies. Validation of these retrievals is difficult, however, as independent, collocated and co-temporal data sets are generally not available. In this paper, we evaluate CALIOP aerosol products above opaque water clouds by applying multiple retrieval techniques to CALIOP Level 1 profile data and comparing the results. This approach allows us to both characterize the accuracy of the CALIOP above-cloud aerosol optical depth (AOD) and develop an error budget that quantifies the relative contributions of different error sources. We focus on two spatial domains: the African dust transport pathway over the tropical North Atlantic and the African smoke transport pathway over the southeastern Atlantic. Six years of CALIOP observations (2007-2012) from the northern hemisphere summer and early fall are analyzed. The analysis is limited to cases where aerosol layers are located above opaque water clouds so that a constrained retrieval technique can be used to directly retrieve 532 nm aerosol optical depth and lidar ratio. For the moderately dense Sahara dust layers detected in the CALIOP data used in this study, the mean/median values of the lidar ratios derived from a constrained opaque water cloud (OWC) technique are 45.1/44.4 +/- 8.8 sr, which are somewhat larger than the value of 40 +/- 20 sr used in the CALIOP Level 2 (L2) data products. Comparisons of CALIOP L2 AOD with the OWC-retrieved AOD reveal that for nighttime conditions the L2 AOD in the dust region is underestimated on average by approx. 26% (0.183 vs. 0.247). Examination of the error sources indicates that errors in the L2 dust AOD are primarily due to using a lidar ratio that is somewhat too small. The mean/median lidar ratio retrieved for smoke is 70.8/70.4 +/- 16.2 sr, which is consistent with the modeled value of 70 +/- 28 sr used in the

  12. Campaign datasets for Holistic Interactions of Shallow Clouds, Aerosols, and Land-Ecosystems (HISCALE)

    SciTech Connect

    Fast,Jerome; Mei,Fan; Hubbe,John; Kalukin,Andrew; Long,Chuck; Matthews,Alyssa; Pekour, Mikhail; Schobesberger,Siegfried; Shilling,John; Springston,Stephen; Tomlinson,Jason; Wang,Jian; Zelenyuk-Imre,Alla

    2016-11-21

    Most of the instruments were deployed on the ARM Aerial Facility (AAF) Gulfstream-159 (G-1) aircraft, including those that measure atmospheric turbulence, cloud water content and drop size distributions, aerosol precursor gases, aerosol chemical composition and size distributions, and cloud condensation nuclei concentrations. Aerosol microphysical property measurements supplemented routine ARM aerosol measurements made at the surface. The G-1 completed transects over the SGP Central Facility at multiple altitudes within the boundary layer, and within and above clouds.

  13. Total Water Content Measurements with an Isokinetic Sampling Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reehorst, Andrew L.; Miller, Dean R.; Bidwell, Colin S.

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center has developed a Total Water Content (TWC) Isokinetic Sampling Probe. Since it is not sensitive to cloud water particle phase nor size, it is particularly attractive to support super-cooled large droplet and high ice water content aircraft icing studies. The instrument is comprised of the Sampling Probe, Sample Flow Control, and Water Vapor Measurement subsystems. Analysis and testing have been conducted on the subsystems to ensure their proper function and accuracy. End-to-end bench testing has also been conducted to ensure the reliability of the entire instrument system. A Stokes Number based collection efficiency correction was developed to correct for probe thickness effects. The authors further discuss the need to ensure that no condensation occurs within the instrument plumbing. Instrument measurements compared to facility calibrations from testing in the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel are presented and discussed. There appears to be liquid water content and droplet size effects in the differences between the two measurement techniques.

  14. The water content of recurring slope lineae on Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edwards, Christopher S.; Piqueux, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    Observations of recurring slope lineae (RSL) from the High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiment have been interpreted as present-day, seasonally variable liquid water flows; however, orbital spectroscopy has not confirmed the presence of liquid H2O, only hydrated salts. Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) temperature data and a numerical heat transfer model definitively constrain the amount of water associated with RSL. Surface temperature differences between RSL-bearing and dry RSL-free terrains are consistent with no water associated with RSL and, based on measurement uncertainties, limit the water content of RSL to at most 0.5–3 wt %. In addition, distinct high thermal inertia regolith signatures expected with crust-forming evaporitic salt deposits from cyclical briny water flows are not observed, indicating low water salinity (if any) and/or low enough volumes to prevent their formation. Alternatively, observed salts may be preexisting in soils at low abundances (i.e., near or below detection limits) and largely immobile. These RSL-rich surfaces experience ~100 K diurnal temperature oscillations, possible freeze/thaw cycles and/or complete evaporation on time scales that challenge their habitability potential. The unique surface temperature measurements provided by THEMIS are consistent with a dry RSL hypothesis or at least significantly limit the water content of Martian RSL.

  15. The water content of recurring slope lineae on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Christopher S.; Piqueux, Sylvain

    2016-09-01

    Observations of recurring slope lineae (RSL) from the High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiment have been interpreted as present-day, seasonally variable liquid water flows; however, orbital spectroscopy has not confirmed the presence of liquid H2O, only hydrated salts. Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) temperature data and a numerical heat transfer model definitively constrain the amount of water associated with RSL. Surface temperature differences between RSL-bearing and dry RSL-free terrains are consistent with no water associated with RSL and, based on measurement uncertainties, limit the water content of RSL to at most 0.5-3 wt %. In addition, distinct high thermal inertia regolith signatures expected with crust-forming evaporitic salt deposits from cyclical briny water flows are not observed, indicating low water salinity (if any) and/or low enough volumes to prevent their formation. Alternatively, observed salts may be preexisting in soils at low abundances (i.e., near or below detection limits) and largely immobile. These RSL-rich surfaces experience ~100 K diurnal temperature oscillations, possible freeze/thaw cycles and/or complete evaporation on time scales that challenge their habitability potential. The unique surface temperature measurements provided by THEMIS are consistent with a dry RSL hypothesis or at least significantly limit the water content of Martian RSL.

  16. Comparison of Aerosol Optical Properties and Water Vapor Among Ground and Airborne Lidars and Sun Photometers During TARFOX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrare, R.; Ismail, S.; Browell, E.; Brackett, V.; Clayton, M.; Kooi, S.; Melfi, S. H.; Whiteman, D.; Schwemmer, G.; Evans, K.

    2000-01-01

    We compare aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and precipitable water vapor (PWV) measurements derived from ground and airborne lidars and sun photometers during the Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment. Such comparisons are important to verify the consistency between various remote sensing measurements before employing them in any assessment of the impact of aerosols on the global radiation balance. Total scattering ratio and extinction profiles measured by the ground-based NASA Goddard Space Flight Center scanning Raman lidar system, which operated from Wallops Island, Virginia (37.86 deg N, 75.51 deg W); are compared with those measured by the Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment (LASE) airborne lidar system aboard the NASA ER-2 aircraft. Bias and root-mean-square differences indicate that these measurements generally agreed within about 10%. Aerosol extinction profiles and estimates of AOT are derived from both lidar measurements using a value for the aerosol extinction/backscattering ratio S(sub a) = 60 sr for the aerosol extinction/backscattering ratio, which was determined from the Raman lidar measurements. The lidar measurements of AOT are found to be generally within 25% of the AOT measured by the NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sun Photometer (AATS-6). However, during certain periods the lidar and Sun photometer measurements of AOT differed significantly, possibly because of variations in the aerosol physical characteristics (e.g., size, composition) which affect S(sub a). Estimates of PWV, derived from water vapor mixing ratio profiles measured by LASE, are within 5-10% of PWV derived from the airborne Sun photometer. Aerosol extinction profiles measured by both lidars show that aerosols were generally concentrated in the lowest 2-3 km.

  17. Soil water content plays an important role in soil-atmosphere exchange of carbonyl sulfide (OCS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Zhigang; Behrendt, Thomas; Bunk, Rüdiger; Wu, Dianming; Kesselmeier, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (OCS) is a quite stable gas in the troposphere and is transported up to the stratosphere, where it contributes to the sulfate aerosol layer (Crutzen 1976). The tropospheric concentration seems to be quite constant, indicating a balance between sinks and sources. Recent work by Sandoval-Soto et al. (2005) demonstrated the enormous strength of the vegetation sink and the urgent needs to understand the sinks and sources. The role of soils is a matter of discussion (Kesselmeier et al., 1999; Van Diest and Kesselmeier, 2008; Maseyk et al., 2014; Whelan et al., 2015). To better understand the influence of soil water content and OCS mixing ratio on OCS fluxes, we used an OCS analyzer (LGR COS/CO Analyzer 907-0028, Los Gatos, CA, USA) coupled with automated soil chamber system (Behrendt et al., 2014) to measure the OCS fluxes with a slow drying of four different types of soil (arable wheat soil in Mainz, blueberry soil in Waldstein, spruce soil in Waldstein and needle forest soil in Finland). Results showed that OCS fluxes as well as the optimum soil water content for OCS uptake varied significantly for different soils. The net production rates changed significantly with the soil drying out from 100% to about 5% water holding capacity (WHC), implying that soil water content play an important role in the uptake processes. The production and uptake processes were distinguished by the regression of OCS fluxes under different OCS mixing ratios. OCS compensation points (CP) were found to differ significantly for different soil types and water content, with the lowest CP at about 20% WHC, implying that when estimating the global budgets of OCS, especially for soils fluxes, soil water content should be taken into serious consideration. References Crutzen, P. J. 1976, Geophys. Res. Lett., 3, 73-76. Sandoval-Soto, L. et al., 2005, Biogeosciences, 2, 125-132. Kesselmeier, J. et al., 1999, J. Geophys. Res., 104, 11577-11584. Van Diest, H. and Kesselmeier, J. 2008

  18. CalWater 2 - Precipitation, Aerosols, and Pacific Atmospheric Rivers Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spackman, Ryan; Ralph, Marty; Prather, Kim; Cayan, Dan; DeMott, Paul; Dettinger, Mike; Fairall, Chris; Leung, Ruby; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Rutledge, Steven; Waliser, Duane; White, Allen

    2014-05-01

    Emerging research has identified two phenomena that play key roles in the variability of the water supply and the incidence of extreme precipitation events along the West Coast of the United States. These phenomena include the role of (1) atmospheric rivers (ARs) in delivering much of the precipitation associated with major storms along the U.S. West Coast, and (2) aerosols—from local sources as well as those transported from remote continents—and their modulating effects on western U.S. precipitation. A better understanding of these processes is needed to reduce uncertainties in weather predictions and climate projections of extreme precipitation and its effects, including the provision of beneficial water supply. This presentation summarizes science gaps associated with (1) the evolution and structure of ARs including cloud and precipitation processes and air-sea interaction, and (2) aerosol interaction with ARs and the impact on precipitation, including locally-generated aerosol effects on orographic precipitation along the U.S. West Coast. Observations are proposed for multiple winter seasons as part of a 5-year broad interagency vision referred to as CalWater 2 to address these science gaps (http://esrl.noaa.gov/psd/calwater). In the near term, a science investigation is being planned including a targeted set of aircraft and ship-based measurements and associated evaluation of data in near-shore regions of California and in the eastern Pacific for an intensive observing period between January 2015 and March 2015. DOE's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program and NOAA are coordinating on deployment of airborne and ship-borne facilities for this period in a DOE-sponsored study called ACAPEX (ARM Cloud Aerosol and Precipitation Experiment) to complement CalWater 2. The motivation for this major study is based on findings that have emerged in the last few years from airborne and ground-based studies including CalWater and NOAA's HydroMeterology Testbed

  19. [Estimating canopy water content in wheat based on new vegetation water index].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiao-juan; Yang, Gui-jun; Xu, Xin-gang; Chen, Tian-en; Li, Zhen-hai; Feng, Hai-kuan; Wang, Dong

    2014-12-01

    Moisture content is an important indicator for crop water stress condition, timely and effective monitoring crop water content is of great significance for evaluate crop water deficit balance and guide agriculture irrigation. In order to improve the saturated problems of different forms of typical NDWI (Normalized Different Water Index), we tried to introduce EVI (Enhanced Vegetation Index) to build new vegetation water indices (NDWI#) to estimate crop water content. Firstly, PROSAIL model was used to study the saturation sensitivity of NDWI, and NDWI# to canopy water content and LAI (Leaf Area Index). Then, the estimated model and verified model were estimated using the spectral data and moisture data in the field. The result showed that the new indices have significant relationships with canopy water content. In particular, by implementing modified standardized for NDWI1450, NDWI1940, NDWI2500. The result indicated that newly developed indices with visible-infrared and shortwave infrared spectral feature may have greater advantage for estimation winter canopy water content.

  20. Functional characterization of the water-soluble organic carbon of size-fractionated aerosol in the southern Mississippi Valley

    PubMed Central

    Chalbot, M.-C. G.; Brown, J.; Chitranshi, P.; da Costa, G. Gamboa; Pollock, E. D.; Kavouras, I. G.

    2016-01-01

    The chemical content of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) as a function of particle size was characterized in Little Rock, Arkansas in winter and spring 2013. The objectives of this study were to (i) compare the functional characteristics of coarse, fine and ultrafine WSOC and (ii) reconcile the sources of WSOC for periods when carbonaceous aerosol was the most abundant particulate component. The WSOC accounted for 5 % of particle mass for particles with δp > 0.96 μm and 10 % of particle mass for particles with δp < 0.96 μm. Non-exchangeable aliphatic (H–C), unsaturated aliphatic (H–C–C=), oxygenated saturated aliphatic (H–C–O), acetalic (O–CH–O) and aromatic (Ar–H) protons were determined by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR). The total non-exchangeable organic hydrogen concentrations varied from 4.1 ± 0.1 nmol m−3 for particles with 1.5 < δp < 3.0 μm to 73.9 ± 12.3 nmol m−3 for particles with δp < 0.49 μm. The molar H/C ratios varied from 0.48 ± 0.05 to 0.92 ± 0.09, which were comparable to those observed for combustion-related organic aerosol. The R–H was the most abundant group, representing about 45 % of measured total non-exchangeable organic hydrogen concentrations, followed by H–C–O (27 %) and H–C–C= (26 %). Levoglucosan, amines, ammonium and methanesulfonate were identified in NMR fingerprints of fine particles. Sucrose, fructose, glucose, formate and acetate were associated with coarse particles. These qualitative differences of 1H-NMR profiles for different particle sizes indicated the possible contribution of biological aerosols and a mixture of aliphatic and oxygenated compounds from biomass burning and traffic exhausts. The concurrent presence of ammonium and amines also suggested the presence of ammonium/aminium nitrate and sulfate secondary aerosol. The size-dependent origin of WSOC was further corroborated by the increasing δ13C abundance from −26.81 ± 0.18 ‰ for the smallest particles to

  1. Hygroscopic behavior of water-soluble matter in marine aerosols over the East China Sea.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yu; Fu, Pingqing; Jing, Bo; Peng, Chao; Boreddy, S K R; Yang, Fan; Wei, Lianfang; Sun, Yele; Wang, Zifa; Ge, Maofa

    2017-02-01

    In this study, we investigated hygroscopic properties of water-soluble matter (WSM) in marine aerosols over the East China Sea, which were collected during a Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC) sharing cruise in 2014. Hygroscopic growth factors (g) of WSM were measured by a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (H-TDMA) with an initial dry particle mobility diameter of 100nm. The observed g at 90% relative humidity (RH), g(90%)WSM, defined as the ratio of the particle diameter at 90% RH to that at RH<5% (initial dry diameter), ranged from 1.67 to 2.41 (mean±std: 1.99±0.23). The g values were lower than that of seawater (2.1) but comparable with those reported for marine aerosols (1.79-2.08). The H-TDMA retrieved hygroscopicity parameter of WSM, κWSM, ranged from 0.46 to 1.56 (0.88±0.35). The observed g(90%)WSM during the daytime ranged from 1.67 to 2.40 (1.95±0.21) versus 1.71 to 2.41 (2.03±0.26) during the nighttime. κWSM was 0.81±0.32 in the daytime and 0.95±0.40 in the nighttime. The day/night differences of g(90%)WSM and κWSM indicated that nighttime marine aerosols were more hygroscopic than those in daytime, which was likely related to enhanced heterogeneous reaction of ammonium nitrate in nighttime and the higher Cl(-)/Na(+) molar ratios obtained (0.80) in nighttime than those (0.47) in daytime. Inorganic ions accounted for 72-99% of WSM with SO4(2-) being the dominant species, contributing to 47% of the total inorganic ion mass. The declined g(90%) comparing with sea water was likely due to the transport of anthropogenic aerosols, chemical aging of dust particles, the contribution of biomass burning products, and the aerosol hygroscopic growth inhibition of organics.

  2. Modeling water content effects in polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springer, T. E.; Zawodzinski, T. A.; Gottesfeld, S.

    Water content and transport is the key factor in the one-dimensional, steady-state model of a complete polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) described here. Water diffusion coefficients, electroosmotic drag coefficients, water sorption isotherms, and membrane conductivities, all measured in our laboratory as functions of membrane water content, were used in the model. The model predicts a net-water-per-proton flux ratio of 0.2 H2O/H(sup +) under typical operating conditions, which is much less than the measured electroosmotic drag coefficient for a fully hydrated membrane. It also predicts an increase in membrane resistance with increased current density and demonstrates the great advantage of thinner membranes in alleviating this resistance problem. Both of these predictions were verified experimentally under certain conditions. We also describe the sensitivity of the water concentration profile and associated observables to variations in the values of some of the transport parameters in anticipation of applying the model to fuel cells employing other membranes.

  3. Seasonal differences in aerosol water may reconcile AOT and surface mass measurements in the Southeast U.S.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, T. K. V.; Ghate, V. P.; Carlton, A. M. G.

    2015-12-01

    Summertime aerosol optical thickness (AOT) in the Southeast U.S. is high and sharply enhanced (2-3 times) compared to wintertime AOT. This seasonal pattern is unique to the Southeast U.S. and is of particular interest because temperatures there have not warmed over the past 100 years, contrasting with trends in other U.S. regions. Some investigators hypothesize the Southeast temperature trend is due to secondary organic aerosols (SOA) formed from interactions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) and anthropogenic emissions that create a cooling haze. However, aerosol measurements made at the surface do not exhibit strong seasonal differences in mass or organic fraction to support this hypothesis. In this work, we attempt to reconcile the spatial and temporal distribution of AOT over the U.S. with surface mass measurements by examining trends in particle-phase liquid water, an aerosol constituent that effectively scatters radiation and is removed from aerosols in mass measurements at routine surface monitoring sites. We employ the thermodynamic model ISORROPIA (v2.1) to estimate surface and aloft aerosol water mass concentrations at locations of Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) sites using measured speciated ion mass concentrations and NCEP North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) meteorological data. Results demonstrate strong seasonal differences in aerosol water in the eastern compared to the western part of the U.S., consistent with geographic patterns in AOT. The highest mean regional seasonal difference from 2000 to 2007 is 5.5 μg m-3 and occurs the Southeast, while the lowest is 0.44 μg m-3 and occurs in the dry Mountain West. Our findings suggest 1) similarity between spatial trends in aerosol water in the U.S. and previously published AOT data from the MODIS-TERRA instrument and 2) similar interannual trends in mean aerosol water and previously published interannual AOT trends from MISR, MODIS-TERRA, MODIS

  4. Large Martian regolith water content implied by rampart crater population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, S. T.; Ahrens, T. J.; O'Keefe, J. D.

    2001-12-01

    We estimate the global regolith water content using a new model for rampart crater formation (Stewart et al.~LPSC 2001). The Martian surface has a high fraction (probably significantly >20%) of craters with so-called fluidized ejecta blankets, characterized by the appearance of ground-hugging flow terminating in one or more continuous distal ramparts. While rampart craters have long held the promise of revealing information about the water content of the Martian regolith, the lack of a comprehensive physical model for the formation of fluidized ejecta blankets has hindered quantitative studies. We have developed a model for rampart crater formation based on ice shock data obtained at Martian temperatures and numerical simulations of impacts onto ice-rock mixtures under Martian conditions. We find that significant quantities of liquid water may be produced by an impact event and that the excavation process is modified by the presence of interstitial ice. As a result, single or multiple rampart ejecta blankets do not require the presence of pre-existing water in the liquid phase. A few to several volume percent of shock-produced liquid water may be incorporated into the continuous ejecta blanket for average impact conditions and reasonable regolith pore space assumptions, e.g. 15~vol% ice-filled near-surface pores. For a given diameter rampart crater, we calculate the associated minimum regolith ice content. Using the Viking-based rampart crater database by Barlow and Bradley (1990), the observed rampart crater population ( ~20% of all craters) implies a minimum regolith ice content of order 0.1~m global layer equivalent. The Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) data suggest that a much larger fraction of craters, especially in the northern plains, may have rampart ejecta features. To derive the implied global regolith ice content, we correct for the impact flux rate over the past ~3~Ga using a number density for 1-10~km diameter craters, the peak rampart crater size

  5. Water soluble organic aerosols in the Colorado Rocky Mountains, USA: composition, sources and optical properties

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Mingjie; Mladenov, Natalie; Williams, Mark W.; Neff, Jason C.; Wasswa, Joseph; Hannigan, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols have been shown to be an important input of organic carbon and nutrients to alpine watersheds and influence biogeochemical processes in these remote settings. For many remote, high elevation watersheds, direct evidence of the sources of water soluble organic aerosols and their chemical and optical characteristics is lacking. Here, we show that the concentration of water soluble organic carbon (WSOC) in the total suspended particulate (TSP) load at a high elevation site in the Colorado Rocky Mountains was strongly correlated with UV absorbance at 254 nm (Abs254, r = 0.88 p < 0.01) and organic carbon (OC, r = 0.95 p < 0.01), accounting for >90% of OC on average. According to source apportionment analysis, biomass burning had the highest contribution (50.3%) to average WSOC concentration; SOA formation and motor vehicle emissions dominated the contribution to WSOC in the summer. The source apportionment and backward trajectory analysis results supported the notion that both wildfire and Colorado Front Range pollution sources contribute to the summertime OC peaks observed in wet deposition at high elevation sites in the Colorado Rocky Mountains. These findings have important implications for water quality in remote, high-elevation, mountain catchments considered to be our pristine reference sites. PMID:27991554

  6. Water soluble organic aerosols in the Colorado Rocky Mountains, USA: composition, sources and optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Mingjie; Mladenov, Natalie; Williams, Mark W.; Neff, Jason C.; Wasswa, Joseph; Hannigan, Michael P.

    2016-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols have been shown to be an important input of organic carbon and nutrients to alpine watersheds and influence biogeochemical processes in these remote settings. For many remote, high elevation watersheds, direct evidence of the sources of water soluble organic aerosols and their chemical and optical characteristics is lacking. Here, we show that the concentration of water soluble organic carbon (WSOC) in the total suspended particulate (TSP) load at a high elevation site in the Colorado Rocky Mountains was strongly correlated with UV absorbance at 254 nm (Abs254, r = 0.88 p < 0.01) and organic carbon (OC, r = 0.95 p < 0.01), accounting for >90% of OC on average. According to source apportionment analysis, biomass burning had the highest contribution (50.3%) to average WSOC concentration; SOA formation and motor vehicle emissions dominated the contribution to WSOC in the summer. The source apportionment and backward trajectory analysis results supported the notion that both wildfire and Colorado Front Range pollution sources contribute to the summertime OC peaks observed in wet deposition at high elevation sites in the Colorado Rocky Mountains. These findings have important implications for water quality in remote, high-elevation, mountain catchments considered to be our pristine reference sites.

  7. LASE measurements of water vapor, aerosol, and cloud distribution in hurricane environments and their role in hurricane development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahoney, M. J.; Ismail, S.; Browell, E. V.; Ferrare, R. A.; Kooi, S. A.; Brasseur, L.; Notari, A.; Petway, L.; Brackett, V.; Clayton, M.; Halverson, J.; Rizvi, S.; Krishn, T. N.

    2002-01-01

    LASE measures high resolution moisture, aerosol, and cloud distributions not available from conventional observations. LASE water vapor measurements were compared with dropsondes to evaluate their accuracy. LASE water vapor measurements were used to assess the capability of hurricane models to improve their track accuracy by 100 km on 3 day forecasts using Florida State University models.

  8. Simultaneous measurement of unfrozen water content and ice content in frozen soil using gamma ray attenuation and TDR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaohai; Zhou, Jian; Kinzelbach, Wolfgang; Stauffer, Fritz

    2014-12-01

    The freezing temperature of water in soil is not constant but varies over a range determined by soil texture. Consequently, the amounts of unfrozen water and ice change with temperature in frozen soil, which in turn affects hydraulic, thermal, and mechanical properties of frozen soil. In this paper, an Am-241 gamma ray source and time-domain reflectometry (TDR) were combined to measure unfrozen water content and ice content in frozen soil simultaneously. The gamma ray attenuation was used to determine total water content. The TDR was used to determine the dielectric constant of the frozen soil. Based on a four-phase mixing model, the amount of unfrozen water content in the frozen soil could be determined. The ice content was inferred by the difference between total water content and unfrozen water content. The gamma ray attenuation and the TDR were both calibrated by a gravimetric method. Water contents measured by gamma ray attenuation and TDR in an unfrozen silt column under infiltration were compared and showed that the two methods have the same accuracy and response to changes of water content. Unidirectional column freezing experiments were performed to apply the combined method of gamma ray attenuation and TDR for measuring unfrozen water content and ice content. The measurement error of the gamma ray attenuation and TDR was around 0.02 and 0.01 m3/m3, respectively. The overestimation of unfrozen water in frozen soil by TDR alone was quantified and found to depend on the amount of ice content. The higher the ice content, the larger the overestimation. The study confirmed that the combined method could accurately determine unfrozen water content and ice content in frozen soil. The results of soil column freezing experiments indicate that total water content distribution is affected by available pore space and the freezing front advance rate. It was found that there is similarity between the soil water characteristic and the soil freezing characteristic of

  9. Comparison of the Mineral Content of Tap Water and Bottled Waters

    PubMed Central

    Azoulay, Arik; Garzon, Philippe; Eisenberg, Mark J

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Because of growing concern that constituents of drinking water may have adverse health effects, consumption of tap water in North America has decreased and consumption of bottled water has increased. Our objectives were to 1) determine whether North American tap water contains clinically important levels of calcium (Ca2+), magnesium (Mg2+), and sodium (Na+) and 2) determine whether differences in mineral content of tap water and commercially available bottled waters are clinically important. DESIGN We obtained mineral analysis reports from municipal water authorities of 21 major North American cities. Mineral content of tap water was compared with published data regarding commercially available bottled waters and with dietary reference intakes (DRIs). MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS Mineral levels varied among tap water sources in North America and among bottled waters. European bottled waters generally contained higher mineral levels than North American tap water sources and North American bottled waters. For half of the tap water sources we examined, adults may fulfill between 8% and 16% of their Ca2+ DRI and between 6% and 31% of their Mg2+ DRI by drinking 2 liters per day. One liter of most moderate mineralization European bottled waters contained between 20% and 58% of the Ca2+ DRI and between 16% and 41% of the Mg2+ DRI in adults. High mineralization bottled waters often contained up to half of the maximum recommended daily intake of Na+. CONCLUSION Drinking water sources available to North Americans may contain high levels of Ca2+, Mg2+, and Na+ and may provide clinically important portions of the recommended dietary intake of these minerals. Physicians should encourage patients to check the mineral content of their drinking water, whether tap or bottled, and choose water most appropriate for their needs. PMID:11318912

  10. Aerosol-assisted synthesis of mesoporous organosilica microspheres with controlled organic contents

    PubMed Central

    Yamauchi, Yusuke; Suzuki, Norihiro; Gupta, Prashant; Sato, Keisuke; Fukata, Naoki; Murakami, Miwa; Shimizu, Tadashi; Inoue, Satoru; Kimura, Tatsuo

    2009-01-01

    Periodic mesoporous organosilica (PMO) spherical particles with different organic contents were synthesized in one pot by reacting 1,2-bis(triethoxysilyl)ethane (BTSE) with tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) using a spray-drying technique. The scanning electron microscopy observation of spray-dried products clearly showed the formation of spherical particles. The 29Si magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance data revealed that the organic contents due to ethane fragments embedded in the frameworks were controllable and consistent with the BTSE/TEOS molar ratios of precursor solutions. Transmission electron microscopy, small-angle x-ray scattering, and N2 adsorption data of PMO with controlled organic contents indicated that the ethane fragments were embedded in the frameworks with the formation of ordered mesostructures. PMO with a high organic content (BTSE/TEOS=0.50) only showed a hydrophobic property. According to the same procedure, benzene groups were also integrated to a similar degree in the frameworks by using 1,4-bis(triethoxysilyl)benzene. PMID:27877292

  11. Detection and quantification of water-based aerosols using active open-path FTIR

    PubMed Central

    Kira, Oz; Linker, Raphael; Dubowski, Yael

    2016-01-01

    Aerosols have a leading role in many eco-systems and knowledge of their properties is critical for many applications. This study suggests using active Open-Path Fourier Transform Infra-Red (OP-FTIR) spectroscopy for quantifying water droplets and solutes load in the atmosphere. The OP-FTIR was used to measure water droplets, with and without solutes, in a 20 m spray tunnel. Three sets of spraying experiments generated different hydrosols clouds: (1) tap water only, (2) aqueous ammonium sulfate (0.25–3.6%wt) and (3) aqueous ethylene glycol (0.47–2.38%wt). Experiment (1) yielded a linear relationship between the shift of the extinction spectrum baseline and the water load in the line-of-sight (LOS) (R2 = 0.984). Experiment (2) also yielded a linear relationship between the integrated extinction in the range of 880–1150 cm−1 and the ammonium sulfate load in the LOS (R2 = 0.972). For the semi-volatile ethylene glycol (experiment 3), present in the gas and condense phases, quantification was much more complex and two spectral approaches were developed: (1) according to the linear relationship from the first experiment (determination error of 8%), and (2) inverse modeling (determination error of 57%). This work demonstrates the potential of the OP-FTIR for detecting clouds of water-based aerosols and for quantifying water droplets and solutes at relatively low concentrations. PMID:27121498

  12. Water content test for EOR crude simulates desalter

    SciTech Connect

    Duke, R.B. )

    1991-02-25

    Crude oil produced from enhanced oil recovery (EOR) projects employing micellar/polymer flooding can require an alternative test method for water content to the ASTM centrifuge test, or grindout procedure. The reason is that centrifuging cannot break the surfactant-stabilized emulsion. As an alternative, Marathon Oil Co. has developed a simulated desalter test (SDT) and necessary apparatus for the accurate evaluation of the quality of crude oil from such projects. Oil quality parameters such as basic sediment and water values are used almost universally for determining the acceptability of crude oil into pipeline or refinery systems.

  13. Monitoring of soil water content and quality inside and outside the water curtain cultivation facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, K.; Kim, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Water curtain cultivation system is an energy saving technique for winter season by splashing groundwater on the inner roof of green house. Artificial groundwater recharge application to the water curtain cultivation facilities was adopted and tested to use groundwater sustainably in a rural region of Korea. The groundwater level in the test site shows natural trend corresponding rainfall pattern except during mid-November to early April when groundwater levels decline sharply due to groundwater abstraction for water curtain cultivation. Groundwater levels are also affected by surface water such as stream, small dams in the stream and agricultural ditches. Infiltration data were collected from lysimeter installation and monitoring inside and outside water cultivation facility and compared with each other. The infiltration data were well correlated with rainfall outside the facility, but the data in the facility showed very different from the other. The missing infiltration data were attributed to groundwater level rise and level sensor location below water table. Soil water contents in the unsaturated zone indicated rainfall infiltration propagation at depth and with time outside the facility. According to rainfall amount and water condition at the initial stage of a rainfall event, the variation of soil water content was shown differently. Soil water contents and electrical conductivities were closely correlated with each other, and they reflected rainfall infiltration through the soil and water quality changes. The monitoring results are useful to reveal the hydrological processes from the infiltration to groundwater recharge, and water management planning in the water cultivation areas.

  14. Characteristics of Water-Soluble Inorganic Ions in Aerosol Particles in Jingjinji-Mega Typical Cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Li

    2013-06-01

    Aerosol has important effects on climate, environment and human health and water-soluble ions are important chemical composition in aerosol. It is important to study concentration levels, sources and size distributions of water-soluble ions in aerosol. In recent years, with the increasing of energy consumption and the amount of automobile, regional pollution has become more serious in Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei Region. Especially since the haze happened frequently in Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei Region, it is an imminent study about water-soluble ions in aerosol.To investigate the concentration levels, sources and size distributions of water soluble inorganic ions (WSI), size-segregated aerosol samples were collected using Andersen cascade sampler from Aug2010to Aug2011in Beijing, Tianjin, Tangshan and Baoding. The WSI were analyzed by ion chromatography(IC).The results indicated that the order of total WSI (TWSI) concentration of TSP in the region was Tianjin-Baoding-Beijing-Tangshan. The order of TWSI of the fine particles in the region was Baoding-Tianjin-Beijing-Tangshan. The annual mean concentrations of TWSI in the coarse mode were 41.36±15.76,48.04±15.79,39.40±11.03,40.49±13.32μg m-3in Beijing, Tianjin, Tangshan and Baoding, respectively. The annual mean concentrations of TWSI in the fine mode were 66.54±47.95,69.12±34.85, 61.80±44.63,71.73±45.12μg m-3in Beijing, Tianjin, Tangshan and Baoding, respectively. All the annual mean concentrations of TWSIin the fine mode in the four sites had exceeded averaged concentration of PM2.5in the environmental quality standards (35μg m-3), which indicated that the pollution of TWSI was serious. Secondary water-soluble ions (SWSI)(SO42-, NO3-and NH4+) and Cl-were the main components, and were mainly found in the fine particles in the four sites of Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei Region. In the coarse particles, NO3-Ca2+ and SO42-were the dominant contributions to WSI. Almost all water-soluble ions in fine particles are similar

  15. Airborne Sunphotometer Measurements of Aerosol Optical Depth and Water Vapor in ACE-Asia and Their Comparisons to Correlative Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, B.; Redemann, J.; Livingston, J.; Russell, P.; Hegg, D.; Wang, J.; Kahn, R.; Hsu, C.; Masonis, S.; Murayama, T.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In the Spring 2001 phase of the Asian Pacific Regional Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-Asia), the 6-channel NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-6) operated on 15 of the 19 research flights of the NCAR C-130, while its 14-channel counterpart (AATS-14) flew successfully on all 19 research flights of the CIRPAS Twin Otter. ACE-Asia studied aerosol outflow from the Asian continent to the Pacific basin. It was designed to integrate suborbital and satellite measurements and models to reduce the uncertainty in calculations of the climate forcing due to aerosols. AATS-6 and AATS-14 measured solar beam transmission at six and 14 wavelengths (380-1021 and 354-1558 nm, respectively), yielding aerosol optical depth (AOD) spectra and columnar water vapor (CWV). Vertical differentiation in profiles yielded aerosol extinction spectra and water vapor concentration. In this paper, we plan to present examples of the following, preliminary findings that are based in part on our airborne sunphotometer measurements: (1) The wavelength dependence of sunphotometer-derived AOD and extinction indicates that supermicron dust was often a major component of the aerosol, frequently extending to high altitudes. The percentage of full-column AOD (525 nm) that Jay above 3 km was typically 34+/-13%. In contrast, the analogous percentage of columnar water vapor was only 10+/-4%; (2) Initial comparison studies between AOD data obtained by AATS-6 and AATS-14 during coordinated low-level flight legs show agreement well within the instruments' error bars; (3) Aerosol extinction has been derived from airborne in situ measurements of scattering (nephelometers) and absorption (particle soot/ absorption photometer, PSAP) or calculated from particle size distribution measurements (mobility analyzers and aerodynamic particle sizers). Comparison with corresponding extinction values derived from the Ames airborne sunphotometer measurements shows good agreement for the vertical distribution

  16. Volume and surface area size distribution, water mass and model fitting of GCE/CASE/WATOX marine aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Sievering, H.; Boatman, J.

    1990-06-01

    As a part of the Global Change Expedition/Coordinated Air-Sea Experiment/Western Atlantic Ocean Experiment (GCE/CASE/WATOX), size distributions of marine aerosols were measured at two altitudes of about 2750 and 150 m above sea level (asl) over the size range 0.1 ˜ 32 μm. Lognormal fitting was applied to the corrected aerosol size spectra to determine the volume and surface area size distributions of the CASE-WATOX marine aerosols. Each aerosol size distribution was fitted with three lognormal distributions representing fine-, large-, and giant-particle modes. Water volume fraction and dry particle size of each aerosol size distribution were also calculated using empirical formulas for particle size as a function of relative humidity and particle type. Because of the increased influence from anthropogenic sources in the continental United States, higher aerosol volume concentrations were observed in the fine-particle mode near-shore off the east coast; 2.11 and 3.63 μm3 cm-3 for free troposphere (FT) and marine boundary layer (MBL), compared with the open-sea Bermuda area values; 0.13 and 0.74 μm3 cm-3 for FT and MBL. The large-particle mode exhibits the least variations in volume distributions between the east coast and open-sea Bermuda area, having a volume geometric median diameter (VGMD) between 1.4 and 1.6 μm and a geometric standard deviation between 1.57 and 1.68. For the giant-particle mode, larger VGMD and volume concentrations were observed for marine aerosols nearshore off the east coast than in the open-sea Bermuda area because of higher relative humidity and higher surface wind speed conditions. Wet VGMD and aerosol water volume concentrations at 15 m asl ship level were determined by extrapolating from those obtained by analysis of the CASE-WATOX aircraft aerosol data. Abundance of aerosol water in the MBL serves as an important pathway for heterogeneous conversion of SO2 in sea salt aerosol particles.

  17. Influence of the initial soil water content on Beerkan water infiltration experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lassabatere, L.; Loizeau, S.; Angulo-Jaramillo, R.; Winiarski, T.; Rossier, Y.; Delolme, C.; Gaudet, J. P.

    2012-04-01

    Understanding and modeling of water flow in the vadose zone are important with regards water management and infiltration devices design. Water infiltration process clearly depends on initial soil water content, in particular for sandy soils with high organic matter content. This study investigates the influence of initial water content on water infiltration in a hydrophobic sandy soil and on the related derivation of hydraulic parameters using the BEST algorithm (Lassabatere et al., 2006). The studied sandy soil has a high total organic content decreasing from 3.5% (w/w) at the surface to 0.5% (w/w) below 1cm depth. The highest TOC at surface was due to the presence of a dense biofilm and resulted in a high surface hydrophobicity under dry conditions (low initial water contents). The water infiltration experiments consisted in infiltrating known volumes of water through a simple ring at null pressure head (Beerkan method). The infiltrations were performed during three successive days after a dry period with a storm event between the first and the second day (5 mm) and another between the second and the third day (35 mm). These events resulted in an increase in initial water contents, from less than 5% for the first day to around 10% for the last day. Experiments were performed for appropriate conditions for Beerkan experiments: initial water contents below 1/4 of the saturated water content and uniform water profile resulting from water redistribution after each rainfall event. The analysis of the infiltration data clearly highlights the strong effect of hydrophobicity. For the driest initial conditions (first day), infiltration rates increased with time, whereas they decreased with time for wetter conditions. Such a decrease agreed with the principles of water infiltration without hydrophobicity. In addition, total cumulative infiltrations were far higher for the wettest conditions. Regarding hydraulic characterization, only the data obtained during the last

  18. Soil water content assessment: seasonal effects on the triangle method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltese, A.; Capodici, F.; Ciraolo, G.; La Loggia, G.; Cammalleri, C.

    2016-10-01

    Among indirect estimations of the soil water content in the upper layer, the "triangle method" is based on the relationship between the optical and thermal features sensed via Earth Observation. These features are controlled by water content at surface and within root zone, but also by meteorological forcing including air temperature and humidity, and solar radiation. Night and day-time MODIS composite land-surface temperature (LST) allowed applying the thermal admittance version of the method; by taking into account the temporal admittance of the soil, this version was previously found achieving high accuracy in estimate the soil water content at high spatial resolution within a short time period (a single irrigation season). In this study, the method has been applied on a long time series to analyse the seasonal influence of the meteorological forcing on the triangle method index (or temperature vegetation index, TVX). The Imera Meridionale hydrological basin (≍ 2000 km2, Sicily) has been chosen to test the method over a decade time series, since its climate varies during the year from arid to temperate. The climate is arid for ≍3-7 months (from April-May to August- October) depending on altitude. The temporal analysis reveals that NDVI and LST pairs moves circularly within the optical and thermal diachronic feature space. Concordantly, the boundaries of the triangle move during the seasons. Results suggest that the contribution of soil water content fluctuations need to be isolated from other environmental stress factors, or at least, the conceptual meaning of TVX have to be better interpreted.

  19. Interferometric tomography of fuel cells for monitoring membrane water content.

    PubMed

    Waller, Laura; Kim, Jungik; Shao-Horn, Yang; Barbastathis, George

    2009-08-17

    We have developed a system that uses two 1D interferometric phase projections for reconstruction of 2D water content changes over time in situ in a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell system. By modifying the filtered backprojection tomographic algorithm, we are able to incorporate a priori information about the object distribution into a fast reconstruction algorithm which is suitable for real-time monitoring.

  20. Determination of the sources and impacts of aerosols on clouds and orographic precipitation during CalWater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prather, K. A.; Suski, K.; Cazorla, A.; Cahill, J. F.; Creamean, J.; Collins, D. B.; Ralph, F. M.; Cayan, D. R.; Rosenfeld, D.; DeMott, P. J.; Sullivan, R. C.; Comstock, J. M.; Leung, L.; Tomlinson, J. M.; Roberts, G. C.; Nenes, A.; Lin, J. J.

    2011-12-01

    Climate projections for the remainder of this century for the U.S. Southwest, including parts of California, suggest a drying trend (reductions ~ 10 -15 %). Thus, understanding factors which could potentially influence the amount and type of precipitation is critical to future water resources in California. Previous studies suggest aerosols transported from the Central Valley into the mountains may be reducing the amount of orographic precipitation in the Sierra Nevada mountain range, the key region for water storage in the snowpack. CalWater, which commenced in the Winter of 2009, is an ongoing multi-year, multi-agency field campaign to investigate the primary sources of aerosols influencing clouds and precipitation in this region. Single particle measurements, used in both ground as well as PNNL G1 aircraft measurements, in the recent campaign provide insight into the sources of aerosols impacting the clouds and precipitation. Biomass burning, Central Valley pollution, long range transported Asian dust and pollution, locally generated newly formed particles, and marine aerosols all show strong impacts on the cloud microphysical properties. This presentation will provide a brief overview of the objective and key findings from CalWater measurements of aerosols, precipitation, clouds, and meteorology conducted from 2009-2011 in this region.

  1. Strong enhancement in light absorption by black carbon due to aerosol water uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fierce, Laura; Mena, Francisco; Riemer, Nicole; Bond, Tami C.; Bauer, Susanne E.

    2015-04-01

    Black carbon exerts a strong, yet highly uncertain, warming effect on the climate. One source of uncertainty in predicting black carbon's radiative effects is the absorption per black carbon mass. Although models suggest that light absorption is strongly enhanced if black carbon is coated with non-absorbing aerosol material, recent ambient observations find only weak absorption enhancement from aerosol coatings. In this study, we use a particle-resolved aerosol model to evaluate how oversimplified representations of particle composition impact modeled light absorption by black carbon. We show that oversimplifying the representation of particle composition leads to overestimation of modeled absorption enhancement. In order to improve global model representations of BC absorption, we performed a nonparametric regression on particle-reolved model data from a series of simulations. Through this nonparametric analysis we derived a relationship for absorption enhancement as a function of variables that global models already track, the population-averaged composition and the environmental relative humidity. Finally, we show how this nonparametric relationship can be exploited for use in global models to improve predictions of absorption by black carbon. In order to quantify the global-scale impact of water uptake on light absorption by black carbon, we applied the relationship for absorption enhancement to output of the climate model GISS-MATRIX. We find weak absorption enhancement in locations with low relative humidity, but light absorption is strongly enhanced in humid regions. This enhancement in light absorption by particles taking up water strongly impacts black carbon's radiative effects at the global scale, enhancing light absorption by black carbon by 20% relative to dry conditions.

  2. Water soluble ions in aerosols (TSP) : Characteristics, sources and seasonal variation over the central Himalayas, Nepal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathee, Lekhendra; Kang, Shichang; Zhang, Qianggong; Rupakheti, Dipesh

    2016-04-01

    Atmspheric pollutants transported from South Asia could have adverse impact on the Himalayan ecosystems. Investigation of aerosol chemistry in the Himalayan region in Nepal has been limited on a temporal and spatial scale to date. Therefore, the water-soluble ionic composition of aerosol using TSP sampler was investigated for a year period from April 2013 to March 2014 at four sites Bode, Dhunche, Lumbini and Jomsom characterized as an urban, rural, semi-urban and remote sites in Nepal. During the study period, the highest concentration of major cation was Ca2+ with an average concentration of 8.91, 2.17, 7.85 and 6.42 μg m-3 and the highest concentration of major anion was SO42- with an average of 10.96, 4.06, 6.85 and 3.30 μg m-3 at Bode, Dhunche, Lumbini and Jomsom respectively. The soluble ions showed the decrease in concentrations from urban to the rural site. Correlations and PCA analysis suggested that that SO42-, NO3- and NH4+ were derived from the anthropogenic sources where as the Ca2+ and Mg2+ were from crustal sources. Our results also suggest that the largest acid neutralizing agent at our sampling sites in the central Himalayas are Ca2+ followed by NH4+. Seasonal variations of soluble ions in aerosols showed higher concentrations during pre-monsoon and winter (dry-periods) due to limited precipitation amount and lower concentrations during the monsoon which can be explained by the dilution effect, higher the precipitation lower the concentration. K+ which is regarded as the tracer of biomss burning had a significant peaks during pre-monsoon season when the forest fires are active around the regions. In general, the results of this study suggests that the atmospheric chemistry is influenced by natural and anthropogenic sources. Thus, soluble ionic concentrations in aerosols from central Himalayas, Nepal can provide a useful database to assess atmospheric environment and its impacts on human health and ecosystem in the southern side of central

  3. Plant Response to Differential Soil Water Content and Salinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, A. B.; Dara, A.; Kamai, T.; Ngo, A.; Walker, R.; Hopmans, J. W.

    2011-12-01

    Root-zone soil water content is extremely dynamic, governed by complex and coupled processes such as root uptake, irrigation, evaporation, and leaching. Root uptake of water and nutrients is influenced by these conditions and the processes involved. Plant roots are living and functioning in a dynamic environment that is subjected to extreme changes over relatively short time and small distances. In order to better manage our agricultural resources and cope with increasing constraints of water limitation, environmental concerns and climate change, it is vital to understand plants responses to these changes in their environment. We grew chick pea (Cicer arietinum) plants, in boxes of 30 x 25 x 1 cm dimensions filled with fine sand. Layers of coarse sand (1.5 cm thick) were embedded in the fine-sand media to divide the root growth environment into sections that were hydraulically disconnected from each other. This way, each section could be independently treated with differential levels of water and salinity. The root growth and distribution in the soil was monitored on daily bases using neutron radiography. Daily water uptake was measured by weighing the containers. Changes of soil water content in each section of the containers were calculated from the neutron radiographs. Plants that part of their root system was stressed with drought or salinity showed no change in their daily water uptake rate. The roots in the stressed sections stayed turgid during the stress period and looked healthy in the neutron images. However the uptake rate was severely affected when the soil in the non-stressed section started to dry. The plants were then fully irrigated with water and the water uptake rate recovered to its initial rate shortly after irrigation. The neutron radiographs clearly illustrated the shrinkage and recovery of the roots under stress and the subsequent relief. This cycle was repeated a few times and the same trend could be reproduced. Our results show that plants

  4. Monitoring water content in Opalinus Clay within the FE-Experiment: Test application of dielectric water content sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaki, T.; Vogt, T.; Komatsu, M.; Müller, H. R.

    2013-12-01

    The spatiotemporal variation of water content in the near field rock around repository tunnels for radioactive waste in clay formations is one of the essential quantities to be monitored for safety assessment in many waste disposal programs. Reliable measurements of water content are important not only for the understanding and prediction of coupled hydraulic-mechanic processes that occur during tunnel construction and ventilation phase, but also for the understanding of coupled thermal-hydraulic-mechanical (THM) processes that take place in the host rock during the post closure phase of a repository tunnel for spent fuel and high level radioactive waste (SF/HLW). The host rock of the Swiss disposal concept for SF/HLW is the Opalinus Clay formation (age of approx. 175 Million years). To better understand the THM effects in a full-scale heater-engineered barrier-rock system in Opalinus Clay, a full-scale heater test, namely the Full-Scale Emplacement (FE) experiment, was initiated in 2010 at the Mont Terri underground rock laboratory in north-western Switzerland. The experiment is designed to simulate the THM evolution of a SF/HLW repository tunnel based on the Swiss disposal concept in a realistic manner during the construction, emplacement, backfilling, and post-closure phases. The entire experiment implementation (in a 50 m long gallery with approx. 3 m diameter) as well as the post-closure THM evolution will be monitored using a network of several hundred sensors. The sensors will be distributed in the host rock, the tunnel lining, the engineered barrier, which consists of bentonite pellets and blocks, and on the heaters. The excavation is completed and the tunnel is currently being ventilated. Measuring water content in partially saturated clay-rich high-salinity rock with a deformable grain skeleton is challenging. Therefore, we use the ventilation phase (before backfilling and heating) to examine the applicability of commercial water content sensors and to

  5. Effects of mineral content of bovine drinking water: does iron content affect milk quality?

    PubMed

    Mann, G R; Duncan, S E; Knowlton, K F; Dietrich, A D; O'Keefe, S F

    2013-01-01

    The composition of water given to dairy cattle is often ignored, yet water is a very important nutrient and plays a major role in milk synthesis. The objective of this study was to study effects of elevated levels of iron in bovine drinking water on milk quality. Ferrous lactate treatments corresponding to 0, 2, 5, and 12.5mg/kg drinking water concentrations were delivered through the abomasum at 10 L/d to 4 lactating dairy cows over 4 periods (1 wk infusion/period) in a Latin square design. On d 6 of infusion, milk was collected, processed (homogenized, pasteurized), and analyzed. Mineral content (Fe, Cu, P, Ca) was measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Oxidative stability of whole processed milk was measured by the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) assay for malondialdehyde (MDA) and sensory analysis (triangle test) within 72 h of processing and after 7d of storage (4°C). Significant sensory differences between processed milks from cows receiving iron and the control infusion were observed. No differences in TBARS (1.46±0.04 mg of MDA/kg) or mineral content (0.22±0.01 mg/kg Fe) were observed. A 2-way interaction (iron treatment by cow) for Ca, Cu, and Fe concentrations was seen. While iron added directly to milk causes changes in oxidation of milk, high levels of iron given to cattle have subtle effects that initially may not be obvious.

  6. High water content in primitive continental flood basalts.

    PubMed

    Xia, Qun-Ke; Bi, Yao; Li, Pei; Tian, Wei; Wei, Xun; Chen, Han-Lin

    2016-05-04

    As the main constituent of large igneous provinces, the generation of continental flood basalts (CFB) that are characterized by huge eruption volume (>10(5) km(3)) within short time span (<1-3 Ma) is in principle caused by an abnormally high temperature, extended decompression, a certain amount of mafic source rocks (e.g., pyroxenite), or an elevated H2O content in the mantle source. These four factors are not mutually exclusive. There are growing evidences for high temperature, decompression and mafic source rocks, albeit with hot debate. However, there is currently no convincing evidence of high water content in the source of CFB. We retrieved the initial H2O content of the primitive CFB in the early Permian Tarim large igneous province (NW China), using the H2O content of ten early-formed clinopyroxene (cpx) crystals that recorded the composition of the primitive Tarim basaltic melts and the partition coefficient of H2O between cpx and basaltic melt. The arc-like H2O content (4.82 ± 1.00 wt.%) provides the first clear evidence that H2O plays an important role in the generation of CFB.

  7. High water content in primitive continental flood basalts

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Qun-Ke; Bi, Yao; Li, Pei; Tian, Wei; Wei, Xun; Chen, Han-Lin

    2016-01-01

    As the main constituent of large igneous provinces, the generation of continental flood basalts (CFB) that are characterized by huge eruption volume (>105 km3) within short time span (<1–3 Ma) is in principle caused by an abnormally high temperature, extended decompression, a certain amount of mafic source rocks (e.g., pyroxenite), or an elevated H2O content in the mantle source. These four factors are not mutually exclusive. There are growing evidences for high temperature, decompression and mafic source rocks, albeit with hot debate. However, there is currently no convincing evidence of high water content in the source of CFB. We retrieved the initial H2O content of the primitive CFB in the early Permian Tarim large igneous province (NW China), using the H2O content of ten early-formed clinopyroxene (cpx) crystals that recorded the composition of the primitive Tarim basaltic melts and the partition coefficient of H2O between cpx and basaltic melt. The arc-like H2O content (4.82 ± 1.00 wt.%) provides the first clear evidence that H2O plays an important role in the generation of CFB. PMID:27143196

  8. High water content in primitive continental flood basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Qun-Ke; Bi, Yao; Li, Pei; Tian, Wei; Wei, Xun; Chen, Han-Lin

    2016-05-01

    As the main constituent of large igneous provinces, the generation of continental flood basalts (CFB) that are characterized by huge eruption volume (>105 km3) within short time span (<1–3 Ma) is in principle caused by an abnormally high temperature, extended decompression, a certain amount of mafic source rocks (e.g., pyroxenite), or an elevated H2O content in the mantle source. These four factors are not mutually exclusive. There are growing evidences for high temperature, decompression and mafic source rocks, albeit with hot debate. However, there is currently no convincing evidence of high water content in the source of CFB. We retrieved the initial H2O content of the primitive CFB in the early Permian Tarim large igneous province (NW China), using the H2O content of ten early-formed clinopyroxene (cpx) crystals that recorded the composition of the primitive Tarim basaltic melts and the partition coefficient of H2O between cpx and basaltic melt. The arc-like H2O content (4.82 ± 1.00 wt.%) provides the first clear evidence that H2O plays an important role in the generation of CFB.

  9. Inferring brown carbon content from UV aerosol absorption measurements during biomass burning season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mok, J.; Krotkov, N. A.; Arola, A. T.; Torres, O.; Jethva, H. T.; Andrade, M.; Labow, G. J.; Eck, T. F.; Li, Z.; Dickerson, R. R.; Stenchikov, G. L.; Osipov, S.

    2015-12-01

    Measuring spectral dependence of light absorption by colored organic or "brown" carbon (BrC) is important, because of its effects on photolysis rates of ozone and surface ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Enhanced UV spectral absorption by BrC can in turn be exploited for simultaneous retrievals of BrC and black carbon (BC) column amounts in field campaigns. We present an innovative ground-based retrieval of BC and BrC volume fractions and their mass absorption efficiencies during the biomass burning season in Santa Cruz, Bolivia in September-October 2007. Our method combines retrieval of BC volume fraction using AERONET inversion in visible wavelengths with the inversion of total BC+BrC absorption (i.e., column effective imaginary refractive index, kmeas) using Diffuse/Direct irradiance measurements in UV wavelengths. First, we retrieve BrC volume fraction by fitting kmeas at 368nm using Maxwell-Garnett (MG) mixing rules assuming: (1) flat spectral dependence of kBC, (2) known value of kBrC at 368nm from laboratory absorption measurements or smoke chamber experiments, and (3) known BC volume fraction from AERONET inversion. Next, we derive kBrC in short UVB wavelengths by fitting kmeas at 305nm, 311nm, 317nm, 325nm, and 332nm using MG mixing rules and fixed volume fractions of BC and BrC. Our retrievals show larger than expected spectral dependence of kBrC in UVB wavelengths, implying reduced surface UVB irradiance and inhibited photolysis rates of surface ozone destruction. We use a one-dimensional chemical box model to show that the observed strong wavelength dependence of BrC absorption leads to inhibited photolysis of ozone to O(1D), a loss mechanism, while having little impact or even accelerating photolysis of NO2, an ozone production mechanism. Although BC only absorption in biomass burning aerosols is important for climate radiative forcing in the visible wavelengths, additional absorption by BrC is important because of its impact on surface UVB radiation

  10. Cloud Retrieval Information Content Studies with the Pre-Aerosol, Cloud and ocean Ecosystem (PACE) Ocean Color Imager (OCI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coddington, Odele; Platnick, Steven; Pilewskie, Peter; Schmidt, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    The NASA Pre-Aerosol, Cloud and ocean Ecosystem (PACE) Science Definition Team (SDT) report released in 2012 defined imager stability requirements for the Ocean Color Instrument (OCI) at the sub-percent level. While the instrument suite and measurement requirements are currently being determined, the PACE SDT report provided details on imager options and spectral specifications. The options for a threshold instrument included a hyperspectral imager from 350-800 nm, two near-infrared (NIR) channels, and three short wave infrared (SWIR) channels at 1240, 1640, and 2130 nm. Other instrument options include a variation of the threshold instrument with 3 additional spectral channels at 940, 1378, and 2250 nm and the inclusion of a spectral polarimeter. In this work, we present cloud retrieval information content studies of optical thickness, droplet effective radius, and thermodynamic phase to quantify the potential for continuing the low cloud climate data record established by the MOderate Resolution and Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) missions with the PACE OCI instrument (i.e., non-polarized cloud reflectances and in the absence of midwave and longwave infrared channels). The information content analysis is performed using the GEneralized Nonlinear Retrieval Analysis (GENRA) methodology and the Collection 6 simulated cloud reflectance data for the common MODIS/VIIRS algorithm (MODAWG) for Cloud Mask, Cloud-Top, and Optical Properties. We show that using both channels near 2 microns improves the probability of cloud phase discrimination with shortwave-only cloud reflectance retrievals. Ongoing work will extend the information content analysis, currently performed for dark ocean surfaces, to different land surface types.

  11. Organic aerosols associated with the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by water-soluble PM2.5.

    PubMed

    Verma, Vishal; Fang, Ting; Xu, Lu; Peltier, Richard E; Russell, Armistead G; Ng, Nga Lee; Weber, Rodney J

    2015-04-07

    We compare the relative toxicity of various organic aerosol (OA) components identified by an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) based on their ability to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS). Ambient fine aerosols were collected from urban (three in Atlanta, GA and one in Birmingham, AL) and rural (Yorkville, GA and Centerville, AL) sites in the Southeastern United States. The ROS generating capability of the water-soluble fraction of the particles was measured by the dithiothreitol (DTT) assay. Water-soluble PM extracts were further separated into the hydrophobic and hydrophilic fractions using a C-18 column, and both fractions were analyzed for DTT activity and water-soluble metals. Organic aerosol composition was measured at selected sites using a high-resolution time-of-flight AMS. Positive matrix factorization of the AMS spectra resolved the organic aerosol into isoprene-derived OA (Isop_OA), hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA), less-oxidized oxygenated OA, (LO-OOA), more-oxidized OOA (MO-OOA), cooking OA (COA), and biomass burning OA (BBOA). The association of the DTT activity of water-soluble PM2.5 (WS_DTT) with these factors was investigated by linear regression techniques. BBOA and MO-OOA were most consistently linked with WS_DTT, with intrinsic water-soluble activities of 151 ± 20 and 36 ± 22 pmol/min/μg, respectively. Although less toxic, MO-OOA was most widespread, contributing to WS_DTT activity at all sites and during all seasons. WS_DTT activity was least associated with biogenic secondary organic aerosol. The OA components contributing to WS_DTT were humic-like substances (HULIS), which are abundantly emitted in biomass burning (BBOA) and include highly oxidized OA from multiple sources (MO-OOA). Overall, OA contributed approximately 60% to the WS_DTT activity, with the remaining probably from water-soluble metals, which were mostly associated with the hydrophilic WS_DTT fraction.

  12. Uncertainties in the measurements of water-soluble organic nitrogen in the aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Yamato, Koki

    2016-11-01

    In order to evaluate the positive and negative artifacts in the measurements of the water-soluble organic nitrogen (WSON) in the aerosols by filter sampling, comparative experiments between the filter sampling and denuder-filter sampling were conducted during both the warm and cold seasons. The results suggest that the traditional filter sampling underestimates the concentrations of the particulate WSON due to its volatilization loss, but this effect on the ratio of the WSON to the water-soluble total nitrogen (WSTN) was small probably because inorganic nitrogen species were also lost during the filter sampling. Approximately 32.5% of the WSON in the PM2.5 was estimated to be lost during the filter sampling. The denuder-filter sampling also demonstrated the existence of the WSON in the gas phase with approximately quarter concentrations of the WSON in the PM2.5. On the other hand, the filter sampling would overestimate the gaseous WSON concentration due to the loss of the WSON from the aerosol collection filter.

  13. Water uptake by organic aerosol and its influence on gas/particle partitioning of secondary organic aerosol in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jathar, Shantanu H.; Mahmud, Abdullah; Barsanti, Kelley C.; Asher, William E.; Pankow, James F.; Kleeman, Michael J.

    2016-03-01

    Organic aerosol (OA) is at least partly hygroscopic, i.e., water partitions into the organic phase to a degree determined by the relative humidity (RH), the organic chemical composition, and the particle size. This organic-phase water increases the aerosol mass and provides a larger absorbing matrix while decreasing its mean molecular weight, which can encourage additional condensation of semi-volatile organic compounds. Most regional and global atmospheric models account for water uptake by inorganic salts but do not explicitly account for organic-phase water and its subsequent impact on gas/particle partitioning of semi-volatile OA. In this work, we incorporated the organic-phase water model described by Pankow et al. (2015) into the UCD/CIT air quality model to simulate water uptake by OA and assessed its influence on total OA mass concentrations. The model was run for one summer month over two distinct regions: South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB) surrounding Los Angeles, California and the eastern United States (US). In SoCAB where the OA was dominated by non-hygroscopic primary OA (POA), there was very little organic-phase water uptake (0.1-0.2 μg m-3) and consequently very little enhancement (or growth) in total OA concentrations (OA + organic-phase water): a 3% increase in total OA mass was predicted for a 0.1 increase in relative humidity. In contrast, in the eastern US where secondary OA (SOA) from biogenic sources dominated the OA, substantial organic-phase water uptake and enhancement in total OA concentrations was predicted, even in urban locations. On average, the model predicted a 20% growth in total OA mass for a 0.1 increase in relative humidity; the growth was equivalent to a 250 nm particle with a hygroscopicity parameter (κ) of 0.15. Further, for the same relative humidity, the exact extent of organic-phase water uptake and total OA enhancement was found to be dependent on the particle mixing state. When the source-oriented mixing state of aerosols

  14. Intra-Abdominal Pressure Correlates with Extracellular Water Content

    PubMed Central

    Dąbrowski, Wojciech; Kotlinska-Hasiec, Edyta; Jaroszynski, Andrzej; Zadora, Przemyslaw; Pilat, Jacek; Rzecki, Ziemowit; Zaluska, Wojciech; Schneditz, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Background Secondary increase in intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) may result from extra-abdominal pathology, such as massive fluid resuscitation, capillary leak or sepsis. All these conditions increase the extravascular water content. The aim of this study was to analyze the relationship between IAP and body water volume. Material and Methods Adult patients treated for sepsis or septic shock with acute kidney injury (AKI) and patients undergoing elective pharyngolaryngeal or orthopedic surgery were enrolled. IAP was measured in the urinary bladder. Total body water (TBW), extracellular water content (ECW) and volume excess (VE) were measured by whole body bioimpedance. Among critically ill patients, all parameters were analyzed over three consecutive days, and parameters were evaluated perioperatively in surgical patients. Results One hundred twenty patients were studied. Taken together, the correlations between IAP and VE, TBW, and ECW were measured at 408 time points. In all participants, IAP strongly correlated with ECW and VE. In critically ill patients, IAP correlated with ECW and VE. In surgical patients, IAP correlated with ECW and TBW. IAP strongly correlated with ECW and VE in the mixed population. IAP also correlated with VE in critically ill patients. ROC curve analysis showed that ECW and VE might be discriminative parameters of risk for increased IAP. Conclusion IAP strongly correlates with ECW. PMID:25849102

  15. Water uptake is independent of the inferred composition of secondary aerosols derived from multiple biogenic VOCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfarra, M. R.; Good, N.; Wyche, K. P.; Hamilton, J. F.; Monks, P. S.; Lewis, A. C.; McFiggans, G.

    2013-12-01

    We demonstrate that the water uptake properties derived from sub- and super-saturated measurements of chamber-generated biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles are independent of their degree of oxidation, determined using both online and offline methods. SOA particles are formed from the photooxidation of five structurally different biogenic VOCs, representing a broad range of emitted species and their corresponding range of chemical reactivity: α-pinene, β-caryophyllene, limonene, myrcene and linalool. The fractional contribution of mass fragment 44 to the total organic signal (f44) is used to characterise the extent of oxidation of the formed SOA as measured online by an aerosol mass spectrometer. Results illustrate that the values of f44 are dependent on the precursor, the extent of photochemical ageing as well as on the initial experimental conditions. SOA generated from a single biogenic precursor should therefore not be used as a general proxy for biogenic SOA. Similarly, the generated SOA particles exhibit a range of hygroscopic properties, depending on the precursor, its initial mixing ratio and photochemical ageing. The activation behaviour of the formed SOA particles show no temporal trends with photochemical ageing. The average κ values derived from the HTDMA and CCNc are generally found to cover the same range for each precursor under two different initial mixing ratio conditions. A positive correlation is observed between the hygroscopicity of particles of a single size and f44 for α-pinene, β-caryophyllene, linalool and myrcene, but not for limonene SOA. The investigation of the generality of this relationship reveals that α-pinene, limonene, linalool and myrcene are all able to generate particles with similar hygroscopicity (κHTDMA ~0.1) despite f44 exhibiting a relatively wide range of values (~4 to 11%). Similarly, κCCN is found to be independent of f44. The same findings are also true when sub- and super-saturated water uptake

  16. Water uptake is independent of the inferred composition of secondary aerosols derived from multiple biogenic VOCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfarra, M. R.; Good, N.; Wyche, K. P.; Hamilton, J. F.; Monks, P. S.; Lewis, A. C.; McFiggans, G. B.

    2013-04-01

    We demonstrate that the water uptake properties derived from sub- and super-saturated measurements of chamber-generated biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles are independent of their degree of oxidation determined using both online and offline methods. SOA particles are formed from the photooxidation of five structurally different biogenic VOCs representing a broad range of emitted species and their corresponding range of chemical reactivity: α-pinene, β-caryophyllene, limonene, myrcene and linalool. The fractional contribution of mass fragment 44 to the total organic signal (f44) is used to characterise the extent of oxidation of the formed SOA as measured online by an aerosol mass spectrometer. Results illustrate that the values of f44 are dependent on the precursor, the extent of photochemical ageing as well as on the initial experimental conditions. SOA generated from a single biogenic precursor should therefore not be used as a general proxy for biogenic SOA. Similarly, the generated SOA particles exhibit a range of hygroscopic properties depending on the precursor, its initial mixing ratio and photochemical ageing. The activation behaviour of the formed SOA particles show no temporal trends with photochemical ageing. The average κ values derived from the HTDMA and CCNc are generally found to cover the same range for each precursor under two different initial mixing ratio conditions. A positive correlation is observed between the hygroscopicity of particles of a single size and f44 for α-pinene, β-caryophyllene, linalool and myrcene, but not for limonene SOA. The investigation of the generality of this relationship reveal that α-pinene, limonene, linalool and myrcene are all able to generate particles with similar hygroscopicity (κHTDMA ~0.1) despite f44 exhibiting a relatively wide range of values (~4 to 11%). Similarly, κCCN is found to be independent of f44. The same findings are also true when sub- and super-saturated water uptake

  17. Water Calibration Measurements for Neutron Radiography: Application to Water Content Quantification in Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Misun; Bilheux, Hassina Z; Voisin, Sophie; Cheng, Chu-lin; Perfect, Edmund; Horita, Juske; Warren, Jeffrey

    2013-04-01

    Using neutron radiography, the measurement of water thickness was performed using aluminum (Al) water calibration cells at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) Cold-Guide (CG) 1D neutron imaging facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, USA. Calibration of water thickness is an important step to accurately measure water contents in samples of interest. Neutron attenuation by water does not vary linearly with thickness mainly due to beam hardening and scattering effects. Transmission measurements for known water thicknesses in water calibration cells allow proper correction of the underestimation of water content due to these effects. As anticipated, strong scattering effects were observed for water thicknesses greater than 2 mm when the water calibration cells were positioned close to the face of the detector / scintillator (0 and 2.4 cm away, respectively). The water calibration cells were also positioned 24 cm away from the detector face. These measurements resulted in less scattering and this position (designated as the sample position) was used for the subsequent experimental determination of the neutron attenuation coefficient for water. Neutron radiographic images of moist Flint sand in rectangular and cylindrical containers acquired at the sample position were used to demonstrate the applicability of the water calibration. Cumulative changes in the water volumes within the sand columns during monotonic drainage determined by neutron radiography were compared with those recorded by direct reading from a burette connected to a hanging water column. In general, the neutron radiography data showed very good agreement with those obtained volumetrically using the hanging water-column method. These results allow extension of the calibration equation to the quantification of unknown water contents within other samples of porous media.

  18. Water calibration measurements for neutron radiography: Application to water content quantification in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, M.; Bilheux, H. Z.; Voisin, S.; Cheng, C. L.; Perfect, E.; Horita, J.; Warren, J. M.

    2013-04-01

    Using neutron radiography, the measurement of water thickness was performed using aluminum (Al) water calibration cells at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) Cold-Guide (CG) 1D neutron imaging facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, USA. Calibration of water thickness is an important step to accurately measure water contents in samples of interest. Neutron attenuation by water does not vary linearly with thickness mainly due to beam hardening and scattering effects. Transmission measurements for known water thicknesses in water calibration cells allow proper correction of the underestimation of water content due to these effects. As anticipated, strong scattering effects were observed for water thicknesses greater than 0.2 cm when the water calibration cells were positioned close to the face of the detector/scintillator (0 and 2.4 cm away, respectively). The water calibration cells were also positioned 24 cm away from the detector face. These measurements resulted in less scattering and this position (designated as the sample position) was used for the subsequent experimental determination of the neutron attenuation coefficient for water. Neutron radiographic images of moist Flint sand in rectangular and cylindrical containers acquired at the sample position were used to demonstrate the applicability of the water calibration. Cumulative changes in the water volumes within the sand columns during monotonic drainage determined by neutron radiography were compared with those recorded by direct reading from a burette connected to a hanging water column. In general, the neutron radiography data showed very good agreement with those obtained volumetrically using the hanging water-column method. These results allow extension of the calibration equation to the quantification of unknown water contents within other samples of porous media.

  19. Electrokinetics dependence on water-content: laboratory and field approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allègre, Vincent; Sénéchal, Pascale; Lehmann, François; Bordes, Clarisse; Jouniaux, Laurence; Sailhac, Pascal; Bano, Maksim

    2010-05-01

    Electrokinetics results from the coupling between the water flow and the electrical current through the electrokinetic coefficient. The Self-Potential (SP) method, which is based on this phenomenon, is currently used to investigate shallow transport in the vadose zone. Thus, the understanding of the electrokinetic coefficient behaviour in unsaturated conditions is crucial to interpret such methods. Empirical and theoretical models proposed in the literature to describe this behaviour are still discussed. Consequently, physical processes involved in the electrokinetic coefficient behaviour in unsaturated conditions need to be futher investigate. We propose here to study the electrokinetics dependence on water content through an experimental approach and the numerical solving of the Richards' equation. We show several continuous records of the electrokinetic coefficient as a function of water saturation. We found that the normalized electrokinetic coefficient behaviour in unsaturated conditions is more complex than it was previously proposed. Indeed, we first observed its increasing with decreasing water saturation. After it reaches a maximum, identified around 80 % of water saturation, it begins to decrease with decreasing saturation. It is an important result since previous works predicted a monotically decreasing of the electrokinetic coefficient with decreasing saturation. We found that the normalized value of the measured electrokinetic coefficient could be two orders of magnitude greater than the classical value in saturated conditions, Csat. We performed several experiments and tried to invert the electrokinetic coefficient data and interpret it in terms of physical processes. We also propose a field study through several geophysical methods, as electrical resistivity tomography, seismoelectrics, and GPR, in order to combine the results in terms of water-content dependence in soils.

  20. Estimating plant available water content from remotely sensed evapotranspiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dijk, A. I. J. M.; Warren, G.; Doody, T.

    2012-04-01

    Plant available water content (PAWC) is an emergent soil property that is a critical variable in hydrological modelling. PAWC determines the active soil water storage and, in water-limited environments, is the main cause of different ecohydrological behaviour between (deep-rooted) perennial vegetation and (shallow-rooted) seasonal vegetation. Conventionally, PAWC is estimated for a combination of soil and vegetation from three variables: maximum rooting depth and the volumetric water content at field capacity and permanent wilting point, respectively. Without elaborate local field observation, large uncertainties in PAWC occur due to the assumptions associated with each of the three variables. We developed an alternative, observation-based method to estimate PAWC from precipitation observations and CSIRO MODIS Reflectance-based Evapotranspiration (CMRSET) estimates. Processing steps include (1) removing residual systematic bias in the CMRSET estimates, (2) making spatially appropriate assumptions about local water inputs and surface runoff losses, (3) using mean seasonal patterns in precipitation and CMRSET to estimate the seasonal pattern in soil water storage changes, (4) from these, calculating the mean seasonal storage range, which can be treated as an estimate of PAWC. We evaluate the resulting PAWC estimates against those determined in field experiments for 180 sites across Australia. We show that the method produces better estimates of PAWC than conventional techniques. In addition, the method provides detailed information with full continental coverage at moderate resolution (250 m) scale. The resulting maps can be used to identify likely groundwater dependent ecosystems and to derive PAWC distributions for each combination of soil and vegetation type.

  1. Mobile Multiwavelength Polarization Raman Lidar for Water Vapor, Cloud and Aerosol Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Songhua; Song, Xiaoquan; Liu, Bingyi; Dai, Guangyao; Zhang, Kailin; Qin, Shengguang; Gao, Fei; Hua, Dengxin

    2016-06-01

    Aiming at the detection of water vapor mixing ratio, particle linear depolarization ratio, extinction coefficient and cloud information, the Water vapor, Cloud and Aerosol Lidar (WVCAL) was developed by the lidar group at Ocean University of China. The Lidar consists of transmitting subsystem, receiving subsystem, data acquisition and controlling subsystem and auxiliary subsystem. These parts were presented and described in this paper. For the measurement of various physical properties, three channels including Raman channel, polarization channel and infrared channel are integrated in this Lidar system. In this paper, the integration and working principle of these channels is introduced in details. Finally, a measurement example which was operated in coastal area-Qingdao, Shandong province, during 2014 is provided.

  2. Comparison of Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II and balloon-borne stratospheric water vapor measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pruvost, P.; Ovarlez, J.; Lenoble, J.; Chu, W. P.

    1993-01-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II has one channel at 940 nm related to water vapor. Two inversion procedures were developed independently in order to obtain the water vapor profile: the Chahine method by the Langley Research Center, and the Mill method by the Laboratoire d'Optique Atmospherique. Comparisons were made between these two algorithms and some results are presented at midlatitudes (about 45 deg N) and tropical latitudes (12-25 deg S). They are compared with in situ frost point hygrometer data provided by balloon experiments from the Laboratoire de Meteorologie Dynamique. At +/- 0.5 ppmv, agreement between the inversion results and the experimental results was obtained in the altitude range from 18-19 to 26-27 km. Below 18-19 km and above 26-27 km the error is larger (sometimes 1 ppmv and more).

  3. Characterization of Heavy Metal Contents in the Bulk Atmospheric Aerosols Simultaneously Collected at Three Islands in Okinawa, Japan by X-ray fluorescence spectrometric method (XRF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshiro, Y.; ITOH, A.; Azechi, S.; Somada, Y.; Handa, D.; Miyagi, Y.; Arakaki, T.; Tanahara, A.

    2011-12-01

    We studied heavy metal contents of atmospheric aerosols using an X-ray fluorescence spectrometric method (XRF). The XRF method enables us to analyze heavy metal contents of bulk aerosols rapidly without any chemical pretreatments. We used an energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer that is compact and portable. We prepared several different amounts of standard reference materials (NIES No.28) of Japanese National Institute of Environmental Studies on quartz filters for calibration curves. Then, we evaluated quantitative responses of XRF method by comparing with the metal contents determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) after acid-digestion. Good linear relationships between X-ray intensity and amount of aerosol on filter were seen in the following 10 metals; Al, K, Ti, V, Fe, Ni, Rb, Ba, Pb and As. We then used XRF method to determine heavy metal contents in authentic atmospheric aerosols collected in Okinawa islands, Japan. Okinawa islands, consisting of many small islands, are situated east of Asian continent, and its location in Asian is well suited for studying long-range transport of air pollutants. Also, in Okinawa islands, maritime air mass prevails during summer, while Asian continental air mass dominates during fall, winter, and spring. The maritime air mass data can be seen as background clean air and can be compared with continental air mass which has been affected by anthropogenic activities such as industries and automobiles. Therefore, Okinawa region is suitable area for studying impacts of air pollutants from East Asia. We simultaneously collected bulk aerosol samples by using identical high-volume air samplers at 3 islands; Cape Hedo Atmospheric Aerosol Monitoring Station (CHAAMS, Okinawa island), Kume island (ca. 160 km south-west of CHAAMS), and Minami-Daitou island (ca. 320 km south-east of CHAAMS). We report and discuss spatial and temporal distribution of heavy metals

  4. Runoff simulation sensitivity to remotely sensed initial soil water content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodrich, D. C.; Schmugge, T. J.; Jackson, T. J.; Unkrich, C. L.; Keefer, T. O.; Parry, R.; Bach, L. B.; Amer, S. A.

    1994-05-01

    A variety of aircraft remotely sensed and conventional ground-based measurements of volumetric soil water content (SW) were made over two subwatersheds (4.4 and 631 ha) of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Research Service Walnut Gulch experimental watershed during the 1990 monsoon season. Spatially distributed soil water contents estimated remotely from the NASA push broom microwave radiometer (PBMR), an Institute of Radioengineering and Electronics (IRE) multifrequency radiometer, and three ground-based point methods were used to define prestorm initial SW for a distributed rainfall-runoff model (KINEROS; Woolhiser et al., 1990) at a small catchment scale (4.4 ha). At a medium catchment scale (631 ha or 6.31 km2) spatially distributed PBMR SW data were aggregated via stream order reduction. The impacts of the various spatial averages of SW on runoff simulations are discussed and are compared to runoff simulations using SW estimates derived from a simple daily water balance model. It was found that at the small catchment scale the SW data obtained from any of the measurement methods could be used to obtain reasonable runoff predictions. At the medium catchment scale, a basin-wide remotely sensed average of initial water content was sufficient for runoff simulations. This has important implications for the possible use of satellite-based microwave soil moisture data to define prestorm SW because the low spatial resolutions of such sensors may not seriously impact runoff simulations under the conditions examined. However, at both the small and medium basin scale, adequate resources must be devoted to proper definition of the input rainfall to achieve reasonable runoff simulations.

  5. Effect of higher water vapor content on TBC performance

    SciTech Connect

    Pint, Bruce A; Haynes, James A

    2012-01-01

    Coal gasification, or IGCC (integrated gasification combined cycle), is one pathway toward cleaner use of coal for power generation with lower emissions. However, when coal-derived synthesis gas (i.e., syngas) is burned in turbines designed for natural gas, turbine manufacturers recommend 'derating,' or lowering the maximum temperature, which lowers the efficiency of the turbine, making electricity from IGCC more expensive. One possible reason for the derating is the higher water vapor contents in the exhaust gas. Water vapor has a detrimental effect on many oxidation-resistant high-temperature materials. In a turbine hot section, Ni-base superalloys are coated with a thermal barrier coating (TBC) allowing the gas temperature to be higher than the superalloy solidus temperature. TBCs have a low thermal conductivity ceramic top coating (typically Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-stabilized ZrO{sub 2}, or YSZ) and an oxidation-resistant metallic bond coating. For land-based gas turbines, the industry standard is air plasma sprayed (APS) YSZ and high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) sprayed NiCoCrAlY bond coatings. To investigate the role of higher water vapor content on TBC performance and possible mitigation strategies, furnace cycling experiments were conducted in dry O{sub 2} and air with 10% (typical with natural gas or jet fuel) or 50 vol% water vapor. Cycle frequency and temperature were accelerated to one hour at 1100 C (with 10 minute cooling to {approx}30 C between each thermal cycle) to induce early failures in coatings that are expected to operate for several years with a metal temperature of {approx}900 C. Coupons (16 mm diameter x 2 mm thick) of commercial second-generation single crystal superalloy CMSX4 were HVOF coated on both sides with {approx}125 {micro}m of Ni-22wt%Co-17Cr-12Al either with 0.7Y or 0.7Y-0.3Hf-0.4Si. One side was then coated with 190-240 {micro}m of APS YSZ. Coatings were cycled until the YSZ top coating spalled. Figure 2 shows the results of the

  6. Comparison of Aerosol Optical Properties and Water Vapor Among Ground and Airborne Lidars and Sun Photometers During TARFOX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrare, R.; Ismail, S.; Browell, E.; Brackett, V.; Clayton, M.; Kooi, S.; Melfi, S. H.; Whiteman, D.; Schwemmer, G.; Evans, K.; Russell, P.; Livingston, J.; Schmid, B.; Holben, B.; Remer, L.; Smirnov, A.; Hobbs, P. V.

    2000-01-01

    We compare aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and precipitable water vapor (PWV) measurements derived from ground and airborne lidars and Sun photometers during TARFOX (Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment). Such comparisons are important to verify the consistency between various remote sensing measurements before employing them in any assessment of the impact of aerosols on the global radiation balance. Total scattering ratio and extinction profiles measured by the ground-based NASA/GSFC Scanning Raman Lidar (SRL) system, which operated from Wallops Island, Virginia (37.86 deg N, 75.51 deg W), are compared with those measured by the Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment (LASE) airborne lidar system aboard the NASA ER-2 aircraft. Bias and rms differences indicate that these measurements generally agreed within about 10%. Aerosol extinction profiles and estimates of AOT are derived from both lidar measurements using a value for the aerosol extinction/backscattering ratio S(sub a)=60 sr for the aerosol extinction/backscattering ratio, which was determined from the Raman lidar measurements.

  7. Use of Water Content Reflectometers in Bioinfiltration/Bioretention to Measure Water Movement and Estimate Evapotranspiration

    EPA Science Inventory

    Most bioinfiltration/bioretention models assume runoff is evenly distributed across the surface area and after the engineered fill media is no longer saturated, the volumetric water content (VWC) is constant throughout the media profile and at field capacity. Four to nine water ...

  8. Performance evaluation of TDT soil water content and watermark soil water potential sensors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study evaluated the performance of digitized Time Domain Transmissometry (TDT) soil water content sensors (Acclima, Inc., Meridian, ID) and resistance-based soil water potential sensors (Watermark 200, Irrometer Company, Inc., Riverside, CA) in two soils. The evaluation was performed by compar...

  9. Both water intoxication and osmotic BBB disruption increase brain water content in rats.

    PubMed

    Kozler, P; Riljak, V; Pokorný, J

    2013-01-01

    Our previous experiments revealed that water intoxication and osmotic BBB disruption in the rat allow penetration of high-molecular substances into the brain and that resulting changes in the internal environment of the CNS lead to pathological development, such as the loss of integrity of myelin. The aim of the present study was to determine whether the previously described phenomena are associated with increased water content in the brain. To answer the question following methods were used: a) water intoxication: intraperitoneal administration of distilled water, b) osmotic BBB disruption: application of mannitol (20 %) selectively into the internal carotid artery, c) brain wet weight was measured after decapitation, and subsequently (after six days in thermostat set at 86 °C) the dry weight were estimated d) in animals with 20 % and 30 % hyperhydration the degree of myelin deterioration was estimated e) animal locomotor activity was tested by continuous behavior tracking and analysis. Brain water content after water intoxication and following the administration of mannitol was higher than in the control group. Different degrees of hyperhydration led to different levels of brain water content and to different degrees of myelin impairment. Hyperhydration corresponding to 20 % of the body weight brought about lower locomotor activity. Increased water content in the brain after the BBB osmotic disruption is surprising because this method is frequently used in the clinical practice.

  10. Effects of water stress on respiration, photosynthetic pigments and water content in two maize cultivars.

    PubMed

    Mohammadkhani, Nayer; Heidari, Reza

    2007-11-15

    Water stress is one of the most important environmental factors that reduce growth, development and production of plants. Stress was applied with polyethyleneglycol (PEG) 6000 and water potentials were: zero (control), -0.15 (PEG 10%), -0.49 (PEG 20%), -1.03 (PEG 30%) and -1.76 (PEG 40%) MPa. The roots and leaves respiration of two maize (Zea mays L.) cultivars -704 and 301- were determined in various concentrations of PEG 6000. Oxygen uptake declined in leaves and roots with increasing PEG concentrations. Decrease of oxygen uptake in roots and leaves of 704 variety were higher than 301 variety. Chlorophyll a, b and total chlorophyll content were significantly decreased (p < 0.05), but carotenoids content increased (p < 0.05) under water stress. Decrease of chlorophyll content in 704 var. was higher than 301 var., but carotenoids content in 301 var. was higher than 704 var. Relative Water Content (RWC) was used to indicate the degree of stress. RWC decreased with increasing PEG concentrations. Lowering of RWC reduced growth and increased shoot/root ratio. Decrease of water content in 704 plants was higher than 301 plants. Shoot/root ratio in 704 var. was higher than 301 var.

  11. Informing Aerosol Transport Models With Satellite Multi-Angle Aerosol Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Limbacher, J.; Patadia, F.; Petrenko, M.; Martin, M. Val; Chin, M.; Gaitley, B.; Garay, M.; Kalashnikova, O.; Nelson, D.; Scollo, S.

    2011-01-01

    As the aerosol products from the NASA Earth Observing System's Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) mature, we are placing greater focus on ways of using the aerosol amount and type data products, and aerosol plume heights, to constrain aerosol transport models. We have demonstrated the ability to map aerosol air-mass-types regionally, and have identified product upgrades required to apply them globally, including the need for a quality flag indicating the aerosol type information content, that varies depending upon retrieval conditions. We have shown that MISR aerosol type can distinguish smoke from dust, volcanic ash from sulfate and water particles, and can identify qualitative differences in mixtures of smoke, dust, and pollution aerosol components in urban settings. We demonstrated the use of stereo imaging to map smoke, dust, and volcanic effluent plume injection height, and the combination of MISR and MODIS aerosol optical depth maps to constrain wildfire smoke source strength. This talk will briefly highlight where we stand on these application, with emphasis on the steps we are taking toward applying the capabilities toward constraining aerosol transport models, planet-wide.

  12. Measuring ice and liquid water content in moderately supercooled clouds with Cloudnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bühl, Johannes; Seifert, Patric; Myagkov, Alexander; Albert, Ansmann

    2016-04-01

    The interaction between ice nuclei and clouds is an important topic in weather and climate research. Recent laboratory experiments and field in-situ field campaigns present more and more detailed measurements of ice nucleating particles (INP) at temperatures close to 0°C. This brings moderately supercooled mixed-phase clouds into the focus of current cloud research. One current example is the European Union BACCHUS project. A major goal of BACCHUS is the analysis of the anthropogenic impact on ice nucleation. Within this project, we use the Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Remote Observations System (LACROS) and the Cloudnet framework in order to get quantitative insight into the formation of ice in mixed-phase layered clouds with cloud top temperature (CTT) from -40 to 0°C. Depolarization measurements from lidar and radar show a clear dependence between particle shape and the temperature under which the particles have been formed. The special focus of this work is on the CTT range from -10 to 0°C. An algorithm is presented to decide between ice and liquid water precipitation falling from the clouds showing that between 10% and 30% of all layered clouds show ice precipitation with CTT between -5 and 0°C. For these slightly supercooled clouds an average ice-water-content between 10e-7 and 10e-8 [kg per cubic meter] is found.

  13. Water-Soluble Organic Species in Biomass Burning Aerosols in Southern Africa: Their Chemical Identification and Spatial Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, S.; Hegg, D. A.; Hobbs, P. V.; Kirchstetter, T. W.; Magi, B.

    2001-12-01

    During the SAFARI-2000 field campaign, 14 aerosol samples were collected from an aircraft in plumes from biomass fires (under both flaming and smoldering conditions), at various distances from the fire source. Also collected were 36 aerosol samples in haze layers ranging from the surface to 16,000 feet, some of which could be associated with specific fires. The samples were collected on teflon membrane filters (lower size limit of about 30nm in diameter) which were analyzed for total aerosol mass loading and chemical composition using several analytical techniques. Particular effort was made to speciate the water-soluble portion of the aerosol organics. Seven organic acids and seven carbohydrate species (and their possible stereoisomers) were identified and quantified, along with three inorganic anions and five inorganic cations. The identified organic species accounted for up to 32% of the total aerosol mass; compared with concurrent total carbon and organic carbon measurements, the identified organics constituted at least 5% to 30% of the mass of the total aerosol organics. A number of conspicuous spatial distribution patterns were observed for these species. For instance, using K+ to correct for dilution, it was found that gluconate, oxalate, succinate, and glutarate, along with sulfate and nitrate, all increased significantly in mass concentration from the fire source going downwind. This suggests secondary formation of these species during aerosol aging. On the other hand, formate and acetate showed decreasing trends downwind, probably due to the loss of these volatile species to the gas phase. Another striking pattern is that anhydrosugars (e.g. levoglucosan) had the highest aerosol mass fraction near smoldering fires but a very low fraction in the haze layers, whereas, dicarboxylic acids showed an almost opposite trend. This implies possible chemical reaction processes converting intermediate organic products, such as levoglucosan, to smaller products like

  14. Stalagmite water content as a proxy for drip water supply in tropical and subtropical areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, N.; Scheidegger, Y.; Brennwald, M. S.; Fleitmann, D.; Figura, S.; Wieler, R.; Kipfer, R.

    2012-07-01

    In this pilot study water was extracted from samples of two Holocene stalagmites from Socotra Island, Yemen, and one Eemian stalagmite from southern continental Yemen. The amount of water extracted per unit mass of stalagmite rock, termed "water yield" hereafter, serves as a measure for its total water content. The stalagmites' water yield records vary systematically with the corresponding oxygen isotopic compositions of the calcite (δ18Ocalcite). Low δ18Ocalcite values are thereby accompanied by low water yields and vice versa. Based on the paleoclimatic interpretation of the δ18Ocalcite records, water yields can be linked to drip water supply. High drip water supply caused by high precipitation rates supports homogeneous deposition of calcite with low porosity and therefore a small fraction of water-filled inclusions, resulting in low water yields of the respective samples. A reduction of drip water supply fosters irregular growth of calcite with higher porosity, leading to an increase of the fraction of water-filled inclusions and thus higher water yields. The results are consistent with the literature on stalagmite growth and supported by optical inspection of thin sections of our samples. We propose that for a stalagmite from a tropical or subtropical area, its water yield record represents a novel paleoclimate proxy recording changes in drip water supply, which can in turn be interpreted in terms of associated precipitation rates.

  15. Modeling Impacts On and Feedbacks Among Surface Energy and Water Budgets Due to Aerosols-In-Snow Across North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oaida, C. M.; Xue, Y.; Chin, M.; Flanner, M.; De Sales, F.; Painter, T. H.

    2014-12-01

    Snow albedo is known to have a significant impact on energy and water budgets by modulating land-atmosphere flux exchanges. In recent decades, anthropogenic activities that cause dust and soot emission and deposition on snow-covered areas have lead to the alteration of snow albedo. Our study aims to investigate and quantitatively assess the impact of aerosols-in-snow on surface energy and water budgets at a local and regional scale using a recently enhanced regional climate model that has physically based snow processes, including aerosols in snow. We employ NCAR's WRF-ARW model, which we have previously coupled with a land surface model, Simplified Simple Biosphere version 3 (SSiB-3). We improve the original WRF/SSiB-3 framework to include a snow-radiative transfer model, Snow, Ice, and Aerosol Radiative (SNICAR) model, which considers the effects of snow grain size and aerosols-in-snow on snow albedo evolution. Furthermore, the modified WRF/SSiB-3 can now account for the deposition and tracking of aerosols in snow. The model is run for 10 continuous years (2000-2009) over North America under two scenarios: (1) no aerosol deposition in snow, and (2) with GOCART dust, black carbon, and organic carbon surface deposition in snow. By comparing the two cases, we can investigate the impact of aerosols-in-snow. We examine the changes in surface energy balance, such as albedo, surface net solar radiation (radiative forcing), and surface air and skin temperature, and how these might interact with, and lead to, changes in the hydrologic cycle, including SWE, runoff, evapotranspiration and soil moisture. We investigate the mechanisms and feedbacks that might contribute to the changes seen across select regions of North America, which are potentially a result of both local and remote effects.

  16. Total ozone column, aerosol optical depth and precipitable water effects on solar erythemal ultraviolet radiation recorded in Malta.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilbao, Julia; Román, Roberto; Yousif, Charles; Mateos, David; Miguel, Argimiro

    2013-04-01

    The Universities of Malta and Valladolid (Spain) developed a measurement campaign, which took place in the Institute for Energy Technology in Marsaxlokk (Southern Malta) between May and October 2012, and it was supported by the Spanish government through the Project titled "Measurement campaign about Solar Radiation, Ozone, and Aerosol in the Mediterranean area" (with reference CGL2010-12140-E). This campaign provided the first ground-based measurements in Malta of erythemal radiation and UV index, which indicate the effectiveness of the sun exposure to produce sunburn on human skin. A wide variety of instruments was involved in the campaign, providing a complete atmospheric characterization. Data of erythemal radiation and UV index (from UVB-1 pyranometer), total shortwave radiaton (global and diffuse components from CM-6B pyranometers), and total ozone column, aerosol optical thickness, and precitable water column (from a Microtops-II sunphotometer) were available in the campaign. Ground-based and satellite instruments were used in the analysis, and several intercomparisons were carried out to validate remote sensing data. OMI, GOME, GOME-2, and MODIS instruments, which provide data of ozone, aerosol load and optical properties, were used to this end. The effects on solar radiation, ultraviolet and total shortwave ranges, of total ozone column, aerosol optical thickness and precipitable water column were obtained using radiation measurements at different fixed solar zenith angles. The empirical results shown a determinant role of the solar position, a negligible effect of ozone on total shortwave radiation, and a stronger attenuation provided by aerosol particles in the erythemal radiation. A variety of aerosol types from different sources (desert dust, biomass burning, continental, and maritime) reach Malta, in this campaign several dust events from the Sahara desert occurred and were analyzed establishing the air mass back-trajectories ending at Malta at

  17. ACE-Asia Aerosol Optical Depth and Water Vapor Measured by Airborne Sunphotometers and Related to Other Measurements and Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livingston, John M.; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, B.; Redemann, J.; Eilers, J. A.; Ramirez, S. A.; Kahn, R.; Hegg, D.; Pilewskie, P.; Anderson, T.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In the Spring 2001 phase of the Asian Pacific Regional Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-Asia), the 6-channel NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-6) operated on 15 of the 19 research flights of the NCAR C-130, while its 14-channel counterpart (AATS- 14) flew successfully on all 18 research flights of the CIRPAS Twin Otter. ACE-Asia studied aerosol outflow from the Asian continent to the Pacific basin. It was designed to integrate suborbital and satellite measurements and models so as to reduce the uncertainty in calculations of the climate forcing due to aerosols. AATS-6 and AATS-14 measured solar beam transmission at 6 and 14 wavelengths (380-1021 and 354-1558 nm, respectively), yielding aerosol optical depth (AOD) spectra and column water vapor (CWV). Vertical differentiation in profiles yielded aerosol extinction spectra and water vapor concentration. The wavelength dependence of these AOD and extinction spectra indicates that supermicron dust was often a major component of the ACE-Asia aerosol. Frequently this dust-containing aerosol extended to high altitudes. For example, in AATS- 14 profiles analyzed to date, 36% of full-column AOD at 525 nm was above 3 km. In contrast, only 10% of CWV was above 3 km. Analyses and applications of AATS-6 and AATS-14 data to date include comparisons to (i) extinction products derived using in situ measurements, (ii) extinction profiles derived from lidar measurements, and (iii) AOD retrievals from the Multi-angle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer (MISR) aboard the TERRA satellite. Other planned collaborative studies include comparisons to results from size spectrometers, chemical measurements, other satellite sensors, flux radiometers, and chemical transport models. Early results of these studies will be presented.

  18. Water soluble aerosols and gases at a UK background site - Part 1: Controls of PM2.5 and PM10 aerosol composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twigg, M. M.; Di Marco, C. F.; Leeson, S.; van Dijk, N.; Jones, M. R.; Leith, I. D.; Morrison, E.; Coyle, M.; Proost, R.; Peeters, A. N. M.; Lemon, E.; Frelink, T.; Braban, C. F.; Nemitz, E.; Cape, J. N.

    2015-07-01

    There is limited availability of long-term, high temporal resolution, chemically speciated aerosol measurements which can provide further insight into the health and environmental impacts of particulate matter. The Monitor for AeRosols and Gases (MARGA, Applikon B.V., NL) allows for the characterisation of the inorganic components of PM10 and PM2.5 (NH4+, NO3-, SO42-, Cl-, Na+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+) and inorganic reactive gases (NH3, SO2, HCl, HONO and HNO3) at hourly resolution. The following study presents 6.5 years (June 2006 to December 2012) of quasi-continuous observations of PM2.5 and PM10 using the MARGA at the UK EMEP supersite, Auchencorth Moss, SE Scotland. Auchencorth Moss was found to be representative of a remote European site with average total water soluble inorganic mass of PM2.5 of 3.82 μg m-3. Anthropogenically derived secondary inorganic aerosols (sum of NH4+, NO3- and nss-SO42-) were the dominating species (63 %) of PM2.5. In terms of equivalent concentrations, NH4+ provided the single largest contribution to PM2.5 fraction in all seasons. Sea salt was the main component (73 %) of the PMcoarse fraction (PM10-PM2.5), though NO3- was also found to make a relatively large contribution to the measured mass (17 %) providing evidence of considerable processing of sea salt in the coarse mode. There was on occasions evidence of aerosol from combustion events being transported to the site in 2012 as high K+ concentrations (deviating from the known ratio in sea salt) coincided with increases in black carbon at the site. Pollution events in PM10 (defined as concentrations > 12 μg m-3) were on average dominated by NH4+ and NO3-, where smaller loadings at the site tended to be dominated by sea salt. As with other western European sites, the charge balance of the inorganic components resolved were biased towards cations, suggesting the aerosol was basic or more likely that organic acids contributed to the charge balance. This study demonstrates the UK

  19. Water soluble aerosols and gases at a UK background site - Part 1: Controls of PM2.5 and PM10 aerosol composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twigg, M. M.; Di Marco, C. F.; Leeson, S.; van Dijk, N.; Jones, M. R.; Leith, I. D.; Morrison, E.; Coyle, M.; Proost, R.; Peeters, A. N. M.; Lemon, E.; Frelink, T.; Braban, C. F.; Nemitz, E.; Cape, J. N.

    2015-02-01

    There is limited availability of long-term, high temporal resolution, chemically speciated aerosol measurements, which can lead to further insight into the health and environmental impacts of particulate matter. The Monitor for AeRosols and Gases (MARGA, Applikon B.V., NL) allows characterisation of the inorganic components of PM10 and PM2.5 (NH4+, NO3-, SO42-, Cl-, Na+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+) and inorganic reactive gases (NH3, SO2, HCl, HONO and HNO3) at hourly resolution. The following study presents 6.5 years (June 2006 to December 2012) of quasi-continuous observations of PM2.5 and PM10 using the MARGA at the UK EMEP "Supersite", Auchencorth Moss, SE Scotland. Auchencorth Moss was found to be representative of a remote European site with average total water soluble inorganic mass of PM2.5 of 3.82 μg m-3. Anthropogenically derived secondary inorganic aerosols (sum of NH4+, NO3- and nss-SO42-), were the dominating species (63%) of PM2.5. In terms of equivalent concentrations, NH4+ provided the single largest contribution to PM2.5 fraction in all seasons. Sea salt, was the main component (73%) of the PMcoarse fraction (PM10-PM2.5), though NO3- was also found to make a relatively large contribution to the measured mass (17%) as providing evidence of considerable processing of sea salt in the coarse mode. There was on occasions evidence of aerosol from combustion events being transported to the site in 2012 as high K+ concentrations (deviating from the known ratio in sea salt) coincided with increases in black carbon at the site. Pollution events in PM10 (defined as concentrations > 12 μg m-3) were on average dominated by NH4+ and NO3-, where as smaller loadings at the site tended to be dominated by sea salt. As with other Western European sites, the charge balance of the inorganic components resolved were biased towards cations, suggesting the aerosol was basic or more likely, that organic acids contributed to the charge

  20. Characterization of Light Non-Methane Hydrocarbons, Surface Water DOC, and Aerosols over the Nordic Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, E. D.; Ariya, P. A.

    2006-12-01

    Whole air, size-fractionated marine aerosols, and surface ocean water DOC were sampled together during June-July 2004 on the Nordic seas, in order to explore factors leading to the formation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at the sea surface and their transfer to the atmosphere. High site-to-site variability in 19 non-methane hydrocarbon concentrations suggests highly variable, local sources for these compounds. Acetone, C5 and C6 hydrocarbons, and dimethylsulfide were identified in the seawater samples using solid-phase microextraction/GC-MS. The aerosols were analysed by SEM-EDX and contained primarily inorganic material (sea salt, marine sulfates, and carbonates) and little organic matter. However, a culturable bacterium was isolated from the large (9.9 - 18 μ m) fraction at one site, and identified as Micrococcus luteus. We will discuss the implication of these results on potential exchange processes at the ocean-atmosphere interface and the impact of bioaerosols in transferring marine organic carbon to atmospheric organic carbon.

  1. Liposome/water lipophilicity: methods, information content, and pharmaceutical applications.

    PubMed

    van Balen, Georgette Plemper; Martinet, Catherine a Marca; Caron, Giulia; Bouchard, Géraldine; Reist, Marianne; Carrupt, Pierre-Alain; Fruttero, Roberta; Gasco, Alberto; Testa, Bernard

    2004-05-01

    This review discusses liposome/water lipophilicity in terms of the structure of liposomes, experimental methods, and information content. In a first part, the structural properties of the hydrophobic core and polar surface of liposomes are examined in the light of potential interactions with solute molecules. Particular emphasis is placed on the physicochemical properties of polar headgroups of lipids in liposomes. A second part is dedicated to three useful methods to study liposome/water partitioning, namely potentiometry, equilibrium dialysis, and (1)H-NMR relaxation rates. In each case, the principle and limitations of the method are discussed. The next part presents the structural information encoded in liposome/water lipophilicity, in other words the solutes' structural and physicochemical properties that determine their behavior and hence their partitioning in such systems. This presentation is based on a comparison between isotropic (i.e., solvent/water) and anisotropic (e.g., liposome/water) systems. An important factor to be considered is whether the anisotropic lipid phase is ionized or not. Three examples taken from the authors' laboratories are discussed to illustrate the factors or combinations thereof that govern liposome/water lipophilicity, namely (a) hydrophobic interactions alone, (b) hydrophobic and polar interactions, and (c) conformational effects plus hydrophobic and ionic interactions. The next part presents two studies taken from the field of QSAR to exemplify the use of liposome/water lipophilicity in structure-disposition and structure-activity relationships. In the conclusion, we summarize the interests and limitations of this technology and point to promising developments.

  2. Validation of MODIS and VIIRS derived aerosol optical depth over complex coastal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilal, Muhammad; Nazeer, Majid; Nichol, Janet E.

    2017-04-01

    In this study, the Simplified Aerosol Retrieval Algorithm (SARA) was applied to both MODIS and Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suits (VIIRS) images to retrieve aerosol optical depth (AOD) over water for blue, green and red wavelengths at 500 m (MODISSARA) and 750 m (VIIRSSARA) resolutions, respectively. Retrievals were compared with the Terra-MODIS Dark Target (DT) AOD at 3 km resolution (MODIS3K) and the VIIRS Environmental Data Record (VIIRSEDR) AOD at 6 km resolution. Validation was conducted using 86 Microtops II Sun photometer AOD measurements collected over different classes of water quality (low to high sediment levels) for seven days (6, 8, 9, 13, and 15, 16 and 17 October 2014) between 10:00 to 15:00 local time. Thirty-eight to fifty percent and 44-54% of the MODIS3K and the VIIRSEDR AOD retrievals respectively, fall within the expected error (EE) with root mean square error from 0.12 to 0.14 and mean absolute error from 0.10 to 0.11. The MODISSARA and the VIIRSSARA AOD retrievals are well correlated with the ground-based measurements (R: MODISSARA = 0.86-0.89 and VIIRSSARA = 0.85-0.94), with a larger number of retrievals falling within the EE MODISSARA = 73-77% and VIIRSSARA = 71-82%) than MODIS3K and VIIRSEDR. The results indicate that the SARA algorithm is more robust than MODIS3K and VIIRSEDR global AOD products, and can retrieve accurate AOD over low to highly sedimented water surfaces, similar to good AOD retrievals over land.

  3. REMOTE ANALYSIS OF HIGH-TRITIUM-CONTENT WATER

    SciTech Connect

    Diprete, D; Raymond Sigg, R; Leah Arrigo, L; Donald Pak, D

    2007-08-07

    Systems to safely analyze for tritium in moisture collected from glovebox atmospheres are being developed for use at Savannah River Site (SRS) tritium facilities. Analysis results will guide whether the material contains sufficient tritium for economical recovery, or whether it should be stabilized for disposal as waste. In order to minimize potential radiation exposures that could occur in handling and diluting high-tritium-content water, SRS sought alternatives to the process laboratory's routine analysis by liquid-scintillation counting. The newer systems determine tritium concentrations by measuring bremsstrahlung radiation induced by low-energy beta interactions. One of the systems determines tritium activity in liquid streams, the other determines tritium activity in water vapor. Topics discussed include counting results obtained by modeling and laboratory testing and corrections that are made for low-energy photon attenuation.

  4. Secondary organic aerosol formation from aqueous chemistry of glyoxal, methylglyoxal, and glycolaldehyde in atmospheric waters: Chemical insights and kinetic model studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Y. B.; Tan, Y.; Altieri, K. E.; Perri, M. J.; Carlton, A. G.; Seitzinger, S.; Turpin, B. J.

    2010-12-01

    Aqueous chemistry in clouds, fog and aerosol water is now considered an important source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Modeling studies confirm that the underlying chemistry is kinetically favorable. Laboratory studies have begun to validate and refine the aqueous chemical mechanisms. Field observations, such as the atmospheric abundance of oxalate, ubiquitous presence of high molecular weight or humic-like substances (HULIS), high ambient O/C ratios, and correlations between SOA and aerosol liquid water content provide atmospheric evidence for SOA formation through aqueous chemistry. In the aqueous phase, small and volatile (C2-C3) but water soluble organic compounds undergo radical (photooxidation) and non-radical (acid/base catalysis) reactions, or reactions with inorganic constituents (sulfate, nitrate or ammonia) to form low volatility products including organic acids, organic-inorganic complexes and oligomers. These products are expected to remain at least in part in the particle phase after water evaporation, forming SOA. While not traditionally considered to be SOA precursors, atmospherically abundant and water soluble organic compounds like glyoxal (C2), methylglyoxal (C3) and glycolaldehyde (C2) have great potential to form SOA via aqueous chemistry. This paper presents a unified reaction mechanism and full kinetic model for the aqueous-phase reaction of glyoxal, methylglyoxal, glycolaldehyde, pyruvic acid and acetic acid with OH radical and validates this mechanism, in part, with laboratory experiments. At cloud relevant concentrations (~1E-6 M), the major product is oxalic acid and formation is well predicted by the previous cloud model (Lim et al., 2005). As concentrations increase radical-radical reactions become increasingly important and yield higher molecular weight products. The full kinetic model suggests that SOA formed in aerosol water (where organic concentrations are > 1 M) is comprised of high molecular weight multifunctional compounds

  5. Effect of water content on the water repellency for hydrophobized sands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subedi, S.; Kawamoto, K.; Kuroda, T.; Moldrup, P.; Komatsu, T.

    2011-12-01

    Alternative earthen covers such as capillary barriers (CBs) and evapotranspirative covers are recognized as useful technical and low-cost solutions for limiting water infiltration and controlling seepage flow at solid waste landfills in semi-arid and arid regions. However, their application to the landfills at wet regions seems to be matter of concern due to loss of their impending capability under high precipitation. One of the possible techniques to enhance the impermeable properties of CBs is to alter soil grain surfaces to be water-repellent by mixing/coating hydrophobic agents (HAs). In order to examine a potential use of model sands hydrophobized with locally available and environmental-friendly HAs such as oleic acid (OA) and stearic acid (SA) for hydrophobic CBs. In the present study, we first characterized the effect of water content on the degree of water repellency (WR) for hydrophobized sands and volcanic ash soil at different depth. Secondly, the time dependency of the contact angle in hydrophobized sands and volcanic ash soils at different water content was evaluated. Further, the effects of hydrophobic organic matter contents on the WR of hydrophobized sands were investigated by horizontal infiltration test. We investigated the degree of WR as functions of volumetric water content (θ) of a volcanic ash soil samples from different depth and water adjusted hydrophobized sand samples with different ratio of HAs by using sessile drop method (SDM). The initial contact angle (αi) measured from SDM decreased gradually with increasing water content in OA and SA coated samples. Measured αi values for volcanic ash soils increased with increasing water content and reached a peak values of 111.7o at θ= 0.325 cm3 cm-3, where-after αi gradually decreased. Each test sample exhibited sharp decrease in contact angle with time at higher water content. Sorptivity values for oleic acid coated samples decreased with increasing HA content and reached the minimum

  6. Sources and light absorption of water-soluble organic carbon aerosols in the outflow from northern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirillova, E. N.; Andersson, A.; Han, J.; Lee, M.; Gustafsson, Ö.

    2014-02-01

    High loadings of anthropogenic carbonaceous aerosols in Chinese air influence the air quality for over one billion people and impact the regional climate. A large fraction (17-80%) of this aerosol carbon is water-soluble, promoting cloud formation and thus climate cooling. Recent findings, however, suggest that water-soluble carbonaceous aerosols also absorb sunlight, bringing additional direct and indirect climate warming effects, yet the extent and nature of light absorption by this water-soluble "brown carbon" and its relation to sources is poorly understood. Here, we combine source estimates constrained by dual carbon isotopes with light-absorption measurements of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) for a March 2011 campaign at the Korea Climate Observatory at Gosan (KCOG), a receptor station in SE Yellow Sea for the outflow from northern China. The mass absorption cross section at 365 nm (MAC365) of WSOC for air masses from N. China were in general higher (0.8-1.1 m2 g-1), than from other source regions (0.3-0.8 m2 g-1). However, this effect corresponds to only 2-10% of the radiative forcing caused by light absorption by elemental carbon. Radiocarbon constraints show that the WSOC in Chinese outflow had significantly higher fraction fossil sources (30-50%) compared to previous findings in S. Asia, N. America and Europe. Stable carbon (δ13C) measurements were consistent with aging during long-range air mass transport for this large fraction of carbonaceous aerosols.

  7. Effect of the secondary organic aerosol coatings on black carbon water uptake, cloud condensation nuclei activity, and particle collapse

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ability of black carbon aerosols to absorb water and act as a cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) directly controls their lifetime in the atmosphere as well as their impact on cloud formation, thus impacting the earth’s climate. Black carbon emitted from most combustion pro...

  8. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of water content in the subsurface

    SciTech Connect

    J. Hendricks; T. Yao; A. Kearns

    1999-01-21

    Previous theoretical and experimental studies indicated that surface nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has the potential to provide cost-effective water content measurements in the subsurface and is a technology ripe for exploitation in practice. The objectives of this investigation are (a) to test the technique under a wide range of hydrogeological conditions and (b) to generalize existing NMR theories in order to correctly model NMR response from conductive ground and to assess properties of the inverse problem. Twenty-four sites with different hydrogeologic settings were selected in New Mexico and Colorado for testing. The greatest limitation of surface NMR technology appears to be the lack of understanding in which manner the NMR signal is influenced by soil-water factors such as pore size distribution, surface-to-volume ratio, paramagnetic ions dissolved in the ground water, and the presence of ferromagnetic minerals. Although the theoretical basis is found to be sound, several advances need to be made to make surface NMR a viable technology for hydrological investigations. There is a research need to investigate, under controlled laboratory conditions, how the complex factors of soil-water systems affect NMR relaxation times.

  9. Estimating canopy water content using hyperspectral remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clevers, J. G. P. W.; Kooistra, L.; Schaepman, M. E.

    2010-04-01

    Hyperspectral remote sensing has demonstrated great potential for accurate retrieval of canopy water content (CWC). This CWC is defined by the product of the leaf equivalent water thickness (EWT) and the leaf area index (LAI). In this paper, in particular the spectral information provided by the canopy water absorption feature at 970 nm for estimating and predicting CWC was studied using a modelling approach and in situ spectroradiometric measurements. The relationship of the first derivative at the right slope of the 970 nm water absorption feature with CWC was investigated with the PROSAIL radiative transfer model and tested for field spectroradiometer measurements on two test sites. The first site was a heterogeneous floodplain with natural vegetation like grasses and various shrubs. The second site was an extensively grazed fen meadow. PROSAIL simulations (using coupled SAIL/PROSPECT-5 models) showed a linear relationship between the first derivative over the 1015-1050 nm spectral interval and CWC ( R2 = 0.97). For 8 plots at the floodplain site the spectral derivative over the 1015-1050 nm interval obtained with an ASD FieldSpec spectroradiometer yielded an R2 of 0.51 with CWC. For 40 plots at the fen meadow ASD FieldSpec spectral measurements yielded an R2 of 0.68 for the derivative over the 1015-1050 nm interval with CWC. Consistency of the results confirmed the potential of using simulation results for calibrating the relationship between this first derivative and CWC.

  10. Effect of particle water on ozone and secondary organic aerosol formation from benzene-NO2-NaCl irradiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yujie; Luo, Hao; Jia, Long; Ge, Shuangshuang

    2016-09-01

    Ozone (O3) and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) are important pollutants in the urban atmosphere. Benzene is one of the most important aromatic species in urban air, which could produce O3 and SOA in the presence of NOx (x = 1, 2) and UV light. A series of experiments was carried out to study the effect of particle water on O3 and SOA formation from benzene under various humid conditions in an indoor smog chamber. The results show that the peak O3 concentrations decreased with the increase of RH or the mass concentration of liquid NaCl particles. The peak O3 concentration reduced by 30% as RH increased from 9% to 87% with the similar initial concentrations of NaCl (about 46 μg m-3), and decreased by 10% as the initial NaCl concentrations increased from 36.0 μg m-3 to 152.1 μg m-3 at about 73% RH. The relationships between liquid water content (LWC) and O3 or SOA were investigated. The results show that LWC is the key factor that leads to an opposite effect on O3 and SOA formation from benzene. The peak O3 concentration exponentially decreased 37% as LWC0 increased from zero to 349.8 μg m-3. Heterogeneous reaction of dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5) with particle water is the major reason for the decrease of O3. The yields of SOA increased from 5.2 to 10.5% as LWC0 increased from zero to 349.8 μg m-3. The relative intensities of bands Osbnd H, Cdbnd O, Csbnd OH and NO3- increased by 22.9, 6.8, 6.7 and 13.1 times respectively as compared with dry condition. Alcohols or hydrates are confirmed to be the major contributors to SOA with increasing LWC.

  11. Oxy-combustion of high water content fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Fei

    As the issues of global warming and the energy crisis arouse extensive concern, more and more research is focused on maximizing energy efficiency and capturing CO2 in power generation. To achieve this, in this research, we propose an unconventional concept of combustion - direct combustion of high water content fuels. Due to the high water content in the fuels, they may not burn under air-fired conditions. Therefore, oxy-combustion is applied. Three applications of this concept in power generation are proposed - direct steam generation for the turbine cycle, staged oxy-combustion with zero flue gas recycle, and oxy-combustion in a low speed diesel-type engine. The proposed processes could provide alternative approaches to directly utilize fuels which intrinsically have high water content. A large amount of energy to remove the water, when the fuels are utilized in a conventional approach, is saved. The properties and difficulty in dewatering high water content fuels (e.g. bioethanol, microalgae and fine coal) are summarized. These fuels include both renewable and fossil fuels. In addition, the technique can also allow for low-cost carbon capture due to oxy-combustion. When renewable fuel is utilized, the whole process can be carbon negative. To validate and evaluate this concept, the research focused on the investigation of the flame stability and characteristics for high water content fuels. My study has demonstrated the feasibility of burning fuels that have been heavily diluted with water in a swirl-stabilized burner. Ethanol and 1-propanol were first tested as the fuels and the flame stability maps were obtained. Flame stability, as characterized by the blow-off limit -- the lowest O2 concentration when a flame could exist under a given oxidizer flow rate, was determined as a function of total oxidizer flow rate, fuel concentration and nozzle type. Furthermore, both the gas temperature contour and the overall ethanol concentration in the droplets along the

  12. Characterization of water-soluble inorganic ions in size-segregated aerosols in coastal city, Xiamen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jinping; Zhang, Fuwang; Xu, Ya; Chen, Jinsheng

    2011-03-01

    The samples of water-soluble inorganic ions (WSIs), including anions (F-, Cl-, SO42-, NO3-) and cations (NH4+, K+, Na+, Ca2+, Mg2+) in 8 size-segregated particle matter (PM), were collected using a sampler (with 8 nominal cut-sizes ranged from 0.43 to 9.0 μm) from October 2008 to September 2009 at five sites in both polluted and background regions of a coastal city, Xiamen. The results showed that particulate matters in the fine mode (PM2.1, Dp < 2.1 μm) comprised large part of mass concentrations of aerosols, which accounted for 45.56-51.27%, 40.04-60.81%, 42.02-60.81%, and 40.46-57.07% of the total particulate mass in spring, summer, autumn, and winter, respectively. The water-soluble ionic species in the fine mode at five sampling sites varied from 15.33 to 33.82 (spring), 14.03 to 28.06 (summer), 33.47 to 72.52 (autumn), and 48.39 to 69.75 μg m- 3 (winter), respectively, which accounted for 57.30 ± 6.51% of the PM2.1 mass concentrations. Secondary pollutants of NH4+, SO42- and NO3- were the dominant contributors of WSIs, which suggested that pollutants from anthropogenic activities, such as SO2, NOx were formed in aerosols by photochemical reactions. The size distributions of Na+, Cl-, SO42- and NO3- were bimodal, peaking at 0.43-0.65 μm and 3.3-5.8 μm. Although some ions, such as NH4+ presented bimodal distributions, the coarse mode was insignificant compared to the fine mode. Ca2+ and Mg2+ exhibited unimodal distributions at all sampling sites, peaking at 2.1-3.3 μm, while K+ having a bimodal distributions with a major peak at 0.43-0.65 μm and a minor one at 3.3-4.7 μm, were used in most of samples. Seasonal and spatial variations in the size-distribution profiles suggested that meteorological conditions (seasonal patterns) and sampling locations (geographical patterns) were the main factors determining the formation of secondary aerosols and characteristics of size distributions for WSIs.

  13. Determination of Maintaining Time of Temperature Traces of Aerosol Droplet Water Flows During Motion in a Flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonov, D. V.; Voitkov, I. S.; Strizhak, P. A.

    2016-02-01

    To develop fire fighting technologies, the temperatures of combustible products were measured after passing an aerosol droplet flow of water through the flames (with monitored temperatures). It was applied the aerosol flows with droplets of sizes less than 100 μm, 100-200 μm, and 200-300 μm. Investigations were conducted at a temperature of combustible products from 500 K to 900 K. Temperatures of gases in droplet flow traces and maintaining times of relatively low temperatures in these areas (it can be considered as temperature trace) were defined. It was obtained the satisfactory agreement of experimental results and numerical simulation data.

  14. Relationship between optical extinction and liquid water content in fogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, C.; Dabas, A.

    2014-05-01

    Studies carried out in the late 1970s suggest that a simple linear relationship exists in practice between the optical extinction in the thermal IR and the liquid water content (LWC) in fogs. Such a relationship opens the possibility to monitor the vertical profile of the LWC in fogs with a rather simple backscatter lidar. Little is known on how the LWC varies as a function of height and during the fog life cycle, so the new measurement technique would help understand fog physics and provide valuable data for improving the quality of fog forecasts. In this paper, the validity of the linear relationship is revisited in the light of recent observations of fog droplet size distributions measured with a combination of sensors covering a large range of droplet radii. In particular, large droplets (radius above 15 μm) are now detected, which was not the case in the late 1970s. The results confirm that the linear relationship still holds, at least for the mostly radiative fogs observed during the campaign. The impact of the precise value of the real and imaginary parts of the refractive index on the coefficient of the linear relationship is also studied. The usual practice considers that droplets are made of pure water. This assumption is probably valid for big drops, but it may be questioned for small ones since droplets are formed from condensation nuclei of highly variable chemical composition. The study suggests that the precise nature of condensation nuclei will primarily affect rather light fogs with small droplets and light liquid water contents.

  15. Ancient climate from deuterium content of water in volcanic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Irving; Gleason, Jim; Warden, Augusta

    Explosive eruptions of rhyolitic tephras may eject ash to great heights where it is distributed by winds over large areas. This ash, within a few thousand years after deposition, incorporates relatively large amounts of environmental water (up to 3.5 percent by weight) into its glass structure. This secondary hydration water is shown to retain its original deuterium concentration through time, and because the deuterium content of precipitation has been used for climate characterization, the hydration water, which is related to ancient precipitation, can be used as an indication of ancient climates. Samples of water extracted from dated volcanic ash from Iceland, New Zealand, and the western and central United States have been analyzed for deuterium, and the results of these analyses are used to reconstruct elements of climate ranging in age from 885 years to 2.1 million years before present. Based on the analysis of ash samples erupted between 13,000 and 6800 years before present, the climate in northern Nevada, Oregon, western Washington and in western and central Montana has not changed greatly from about 6000 y BP to present, and the climate in western Washington has remained constant from about 13,000 y BP to present. However eastern Washington and western Montana may have been about 2°-6°C cooler at the end of the Pleistocene and early Holocene than the present. The deuterium concentrations of surface waters in the central and western United States appear to have been similar at 0.6 Ma, 0.75 Ma, and 2.1 Ma, but to have differed from the present concentrations in portions of the study area.

  16. Hygroscopicity of organic compounds from biomass burning and their influence on the water uptake of mixed organic ammonium sulfate aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, T.; Zuend, A.; Wang, W. G.; Zhang, Y. H.; Ge, M. F.

    2014-10-01

    Hygroscopic behavior of organic compounds, including levoglucosan, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, and humic acid, as well as their effects on the hygroscopic properties of ammonium sulfate (AS) in internally mixed particles are studied by a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA). The organic compounds used represent pyrolysis products of wood that are emitted from biomass burning sources. It is found that humic acid aerosol particles only slightly take up water, starting at RH (relative humidity) above ~70%. This is contrasted by the continuous water absorption of levoglucosan aerosol particles in the range 5-90% RH. However, no hygroscopic growth is observed for 4-hydroxybenzoic acid aerosol particles. Predicted water uptake using the ideal solution theory, the AIOMFAC model and the E-AIM (with UNIFAC) model are consistent with measured hygroscopic growth factors of levoglucosan. However, the use of these models without consideration of crystalline organic phases is not appropriate to describe the hygroscopicity of organics that do not exhibit continuous water uptake, such as 4-hydroxybenzoic acid and humic acid. Mixed aerosol particles consisting of ammonium sulfate and levoglucosan, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, or humic acid with different organic mass fractions, take up a reduced amount of water above 80% RH (above AS deliquescence) relative to pure ammonium sulfate aerosol particles of the same mass. Hygroscopic growth of mixtures of ammonium sulfate and levoglucosan with different organic mass fractions agree well with the predictions of the thermodynamic models. Use of the Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson (ZSR) relation and AIOMFAC model lead to good agreement with measured growth factors of mixtures of ammonium sulfate with 4-hydroxybenzoic acid assuming an insoluble organic phase. Deviations of model predictions from the HTDMA measurement are mainly due to the occurrence of a microscopical solid phase restructuring at increased humidity (morphology

  17. Characterization of soil water content variability and soil texture using GPR groundwave techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Grote, K.; Anger, C.; Kelly, B.; Hubbard, S.; Rubin, Y.

    2010-08-15

    Accurate characterization of near-surface soil water content is vital for guiding agricultural management decisions and for reducing the potential negative environmental impacts of agriculture. Characterizing the near-surface soil water content can be difficult, as this parameter is often both spatially and temporally variable, and obtaining sufficient measurements to describe the heterogeneity can be prohibitively expensive. Understanding the spatial correlation of near-surface soil water content can help optimize data acquisition and improve understanding of the processes controlling soil water content at the field scale. In this study, ground penetrating radar (GPR) methods were used to characterize the spatial correlation of water content in a three acre field as a function of sampling depth, season, vegetation, and soil texture. GPR data were acquired with 450 MHz and 900 MHz antennas, and measurements of the GPR groundwave were used to estimate soil water content at four different times. Additional water content estimates were obtained using time domain reflectometry measurements, and soil texture measurements were also acquired. Variograms were calculated for each set of measurements, and comparison of these variograms showed that the horizontal spatial correlation was greater for deeper water content measurements than for shallower measurements. Precipitation and irrigation were both shown to increase the spatial variability of water content, while shallowly-rooted vegetation decreased the variability. Comparison of the variograms of water content and soil texture showed that soil texture generally had greater small-scale spatial correlation than water content, and that the variability of water content in deeper soil layers was more closely correlated to soil texture than were shallower water content measurements. Lastly, cross-variograms of soil texture and water content were calculated, and co-kriging of water content estimates and soil texture

  18. A Study of Aerosol Effect on Marine Water Clouds with Long-term Satellite Climate Data Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, X.; Heidinger, A. K.; Walther, A.

    2015-12-01

    Cloud microphysical structures and properties provide a critical link between the energy and hydrological cycles of Earth's climate system. A change of cloud microphysical properties related to anthropogenic activities may result in distressing climate consequence and changes. Since atmospheric aerosol is the major source of cloud condensation nuclei (CNN) that is critical for the formation of cloud microphysical structures and properties, aerosol changes due to anthropogenic emissions will result in the modification of CCN and cloud microphysical properties and eventually cause the changes of Earth's climate. In this study, we will investigate the effect of aerosol on the microphysical properties, including cloud particle effective radius, cloud water path, and cloud optical depth, of marine stratus clouds by using more than 30-years climate data records (CDRs) of aerosols and clouds derived from NOAA operational AVHRR satellite observations. The correlation between satellite derived cloud and aerosol microphysical parameters will be determined and the statistics significance will be examined using the long-term AVHRR satellite CDRs.

  19. Sensing the water content of honey from temperature-dependent electrical conductivity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In order to predict water content in honey, electrical conductivity was measured on blossom honey types of milk-vetch, jujube and yellow-locust with water content of 18%-37% between 5-40ºC. Regression models of electrical conductivity were developed as functions of water content and temperature. The...

  20. Soil water content and green water estimations in a small farmed semiarid catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mekki, I.; Voltz, M.; Ben Mechlia, N.; Albergel, J.

    2012-04-01

    The main objective of this work is to analyze the spatial and temporal variation of soil water content and green water production over a farmed water harvesting catchment, located in north-eastern Tunisia. The area has a typical Mediterranean climate with a hot dry summer and a cool season, extending from October to April, where rainfall normally meets the water requirements of the usually grown cereals and legumes (500mm). The catchment has an area of 2.6 km2 and comprises at its outlet a dam, which retains the runoff water in a reservoir. Soil water balance measurements were carried out, about weekly, over two successive cropping cycles (2000-2002) on a network of eleven plots of 2 m2 each, representing the main land use and soil types. Soil water store investigations targeted the different individual plots as well as the entire catchment. We used a simple water balance model, where the root zone is considered as a single reservoir, to simulate soil water content variations. Results show a fairly good agreement between the calculated and measured water store for all experimental sites. The model reproduces accurately the soil water content during the beginning of the rainy season but underestimates it during the season when heavy rains occur. On heavy soils, simulated soil moisture was lower than measured values, giving differences as high as 25% between simulated water store amounts and the neutron probe measurement values. For the cereals/legume/pasture based cropping systems, most of rainfall water is stored in the soil and returns to the atmosphere by evapotranspiration. The 0-0.3 m soil layer is most active for water uptake by crops and intermittent replenishment by rainfall during the growing period; whereas drying involves the entire soil profile over the summer season (May-Seeptmber). The available water holding capacity of the soil turned out to be about seven times the storage capacity of the reservoir, showing the order of magnitude of rainfall

  1. LASE measurements of water vapor and aerosol profiles during the Plains Elevated Convection at Night (PECAN) field experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nehrir, A. R.; Ferrare, R. A.; Kooi, S. A.; Butler, C. F.; Notari, A.; Hair, J. W.; Collins, J. E., Jr.; Ismail, S.

    2015-12-01

    The Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment (LASE) system was deployed on the NASA DC-8 aircraft during the Plains Elevated Convection At Night (PECAN) field experiment, which was conducted during June-July 2015 over the central and southern plains. LASE is an active remote sensor that employs the differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique to measure range resolved profiles of water vapor and aerosols above and below the aircraft. The DC-8 conducted nine local science flights from June 30- July 14 where LASE sampled water vapor and aerosol fields in support of the PECAN primary science objectives relating to better understanding nocturnal Mesoscale Convective Systems (MCSs), Convective Initiation (CI), the Low Level Jet (LLJ), bores, and to compare different airborne and ground based measurements. LASE observed large spatial and temporal variability in water vapor and aerosol distributions in advance of nocturnal MCSs, across bores resulting from MCS outflow boundaries, and across the LLJ associated with the development of MCSs and CI. An overview of the LASE data collected during the PECAN field experiment will be presented where emphasis will be placed on variability of water vapor profiles in the vicinity of severe storms and intense convection in the central and southern plains. Preliminary comparisons show good agreement between coincident LASE and radiosonde water vapor profiles. In addition, an advanced water vapor DIAL system being developed at NASA Langley will be discussed.

  2. Surface fractal dimension, water adsorption efficiency, and cloud nucleation activity of insoluble aerosol

    PubMed Central

    Laaksonen, Ari; Malila, Jussi; Nenes, Athanasios; Hung, Hui-Ming; Chen, Jen-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Surface porosity affects the ability of a substance to adsorb gases. The surface fractal dimension D is a measure that indicates the amount that a surface fills a space, and can thereby be used to characterize the surface porosity. Here we propose a new method for determining D, based on measuring both the water vapour adsorption isotherm of a given substance, and its ability to act as a cloud condensation nucleus when introduced to humidified air in aerosol form. We show that our method agrees well with previous methods based on measurement of nitrogen adsorption. Besides proving the usefulness of the new method for general surface characterization of materials, our results show that the surface fractal dimension is an important determinant in cloud drop formation on water insoluble particles. We suggest that a closure can be obtained between experimental critical supersaturation for cloud drop activation and that calculated based on water adsorption data, if the latter is corrected using the surface fractal dimension of the insoluble cloud nucleus. PMID:27138171

  3. Stalagmite water content as a proxy for drip water supply in tropical and subtropical areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, N.; Scheidegger, Y.; Brennwald, M. S.; Fleitmann, D.; Figura, S.; Wieler, R.; Kipfer, R.

    2013-01-01

    In this pilot study water was extracted from samples of two Holocene stalagmites from Socotra Island, Yemen, and one Eemian stalagmite from southern continental Yemen. The amount of water extracted per unit mass of stalagmite rock, termed "water yield" hereafter, serves as a measure of its total water content. Based on direct correlation plots of water yields and δ18Ocalcite and on regime shift analyses, we demonstrate that for the studied stalagmites the water yield records vary systematically with the corresponding oxygen isotopic compositions of the calcite (δ18Ocalcite). Within each stalagmite lower δ18Ocalcite values are accompanied by lower water yields and vice versa. The δ18Ocalcite records of the studied stalagmites have previously been interpreted to predominantly reflect the amount of rainfall in the area; thus, water yields can be linked to drip water supply. Higher, and therefore more continuous drip water supply caused by higher rainfall rates, supports homogeneous deposition of calcite with low porosity and therefore a small fraction of water-filled inclusions, resulting in low water yields of the respective samples. A reduction of drip water supply fosters irregular growth of calcite with higher porosity, leading to an increase of the fraction of water-filled inclusions and thus higher water yields. The results are consistent with the literature on stalagmite growth and supported by optical inspection of thin sections of our samples. We propose that for a stalagmite from a dry tropical or subtropical area, its water yield record represents a novel paleo-climate proxy recording changes in drip water supply, which can in turn be interpreted in terms of associated rainfall rates.

  4. Estimation of Droplet Size and Liquid Water Content Using Radar and Lidar: Marine Cumulus Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivekanandan, J. Vivek; Jensen, Jorgen; Ellis, Scott; Morley, Bruce; Tsai, Peisang; Spuler, Scott; Ghate, Virendra; Schwartz, Christian

    2016-04-01

    During the Cloud Systems Evolution in the Trades (CSET) field campaign airborne measurements from the High-Performance Instrumented Airborne Platform for Environmental Research (HIAPER) Cloud Radar (HCR) and the High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) were made in the North Pacific. In addition, in situ observations of cloud and aerosols size distributions and radiation were also collected. The HCR operated at a frequency of 94 GHz (3 mm wavelength) and collected observations at high temporal (0.5 sec) and range (30 m) resolution. The capability of HCR is enhanced by the coordination with the HSRL that made high temporal and range resolution observations of calibrated backscatter and extinction. The lidar, designed and built by the University of Wisconsin. The radar and lidar are designed to fly on the NCAR Gulfstream V HIAPER aircraft. The remote and in situ measurements collected during CSET offer opportunities for evaluating the engineering performance of the instruments and developing cloud microphysical scientific products. The coincident HCR and HSRL measurements are analyzed for assess their utility to characterize cloud boundaries, estimate liquid water content (LWC) and mean particle size. Retrievals of LWC and mean particle sizes from remote radar and lidar measurements will be compared with those from the in situ instruments.

  5. Evaluation of the carbon content of aerosols from the burn- ing of biomass in the Brazilian Amazon using thermal, op- tical and thermal-optical analysis methods

    SciTech Connect

    Soto-Garcia, Lydia L.; Andreae, Meinrat O.; Andreae, Tracey W.; taxo, Paulo Ar-; Maenhaut, Willy; Kirchstetter, Thomas; Novakov, T.; Chow, Judith C.; Mayol-Bracero, Olga L.

    2011-06-03

    Aerosol samples were collected at a pasture site in the Amazon Basin as part of the project LBA-SMOCC-2002 (Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia - Smoke Aerosols, Clouds, Rainfall and Climate: Aerosols from Biomass Burning Perturb Global and Regional Climate). Sampling was conducted during the late dry season, when the aerosol composition was dominated by biomass burning emissions, especially in the submicron fraction. A 13-stage Dekati low-pressure impactor (DLPI) was used to collect particles with nominal aerodynamic diameters (D{sub p}) ranging from 0.03 to 0.10 m. Gravimetric analyses of the DLPI substrates and filters were performed to obtain aerosol mass concentrations. The concentrations of total, apparent elemental, and organic carbon (TC, EC{sub a}, and OC) were determined using thermal and thermal-optical analysis (TOA) methods. A light transmission method (LTM) was used to determine the concentration of equivalent black carbon (BC{sub e}) or the absorbing fraction at 880 nm for the size-resolved samples. During the dry period, due to the pervasive presence of fires in the region upwind of the sampling site, concentrations of fine aerosols (D{sub p} < 2.5 {mu}m: average 59.8 {mu}g m{sup -3}) were higher than coarse aerosols (D{sub p} > 2.5 {mu}m: 4.1 {mu}g m{sup -3}). Carbonaceous matter, estimated as the sum of the particulate organic matter (i.e., OC x 1.8) plus BC{sub e}, comprised more than 90% to the total aerosol mass. Concentrations of EC{sub a} (estimated by thermal analysis with a correction for charring) and BCe (estimated by LTM) averaged 5.2 {+-} 1.3 and 3.1 {+-} 0.8 {mu}g m{sup -3}, respectively. The determination of EC was improved by extracting water-soluble organic material from the samples, which reduced the average light absorption {angstrom} exponent of particles in the size range of 0.1 to 1.0 {mu}m from > 2.0 to approximately 1.2. The size-resolved BC{sub e} measured by the LTM showed a clear maximum between 0.4 and

  6. Characterization of Chromophoric Water-Soluble Organic Matter in Urban, Forest, and Marine Aerosols by HR-ToF-AMS Analysis and Excitation-Emission Matrix Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qingcai; Miyazaki, Yuzo; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Coburn, Sean; Volkamer, Rainer; Iwamoto, Yoko; Kagami, Sara; Deng, Yange; Ogawa, Shuhei; Ramasamy, Sathiyamurthi; Kato, Shungo; Ida, Akira; Kajii, Yoshizumi; Mochida, Michihiro

    2016-10-04

    Chromophoric water-soluble organic matter in atmospheric aerosols potentially plays an important role in aqueous reactions and light absorption by organics. The fluorescence and chemical-structural characteristics of the chromophoric water-soluble organic matter in submicron aerosols collected in urban, forest, and marine environments (Nagoya, Kii Peninsula, and the tropical Eastern Pacific) were investigated using excitation-emission matrices (EEMs) and a high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer. A total of three types of water-soluble chromophores, two with fluorescence characteristics similar to those of humiclike substances (HULIS-1 and HULIS-2) and one with fluorescence characteristics similar to those of protein compounds (PLOM), were identified in atmospheric aerosols by parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) for EEMs. We found that the chromophore components of HULIS-1 and -2 were associated with highly and less-oxygenated structures, respectively, which may provide a clue to understanding the chemical formation or loss of organic chromophores in atmospheric aerosols. Whereas HULIS-1 was ubiquitous in water-soluble chromophores over different environments, HULIS-2 was abundant only in terrestrial aerosols, and PLOM was abundant in marine aerosols. These findings are useful for further studies regarding the classification and source identification of chromophores in atmospheric aerosols.

  7. Impacts of surface adsorbed catechol on tropospheric aerosol surrogates: heterogeneous ozonolysis and its effects on water uptake.

    PubMed

    Woodill, Laurie A; O'Neill, Erinn M; Hinrichs, Ryan Z

    2013-07-11

    Surface adsorbed organics are ubiquitous components of inorganic tropospheric aerosols and have the potential to alter aerosol chemical and physical properties. To assess the impact of adsorbed organics on water uptake by inorganic substrates, we used diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy to compared water adsorption isotherms for uncoated NaCl and α-Al2O3 samples, samples containing a monolayer of adsorbed catechol, and adsorbed catechol samples following ozonolysis. Adsorption of gaseous catechol on to the inorganic substrates produced vibrational features indicating physisorption on NaCl and displacement of surface hydroxyl groups forming binuclear bidentate catecholate on α-Al2O3, with surface concentrations of 2-3 × 10(18) molecules m(-2). Subsequent heterogeneous ozonolysis produced muconic acid at a rate 4-5 times faster on NaCl compared to α-Al2O3, with predicted atmospheric lifetimes of 4.3 and 18 h, respectively, assuming a tropospheric ozone concentration of 40 ppb. Water adsorption isotherms for all NaCl samples were indistinguishable within experimental uncertainty, indicating that these organic monolayers had negligible impact on coadsorbed water surface concentrations for these systems. α-Al2O3-catechol samples exhibited dramatically less water uptake compared to uncoated α-Al2O3, while oxidation of surface adsorbed catechol had no effect on the extent of water uptake. For both substrates, adsorbed organics increased the relative abundance of "ice-like" versus "liquid-like" water, with the effect larger for catechol than oxidized ozonolysis products. These results highlight the importance of aerosol substrate in understanding the heterogeneous ozonolysis of adsorbed polyphenols and suggest such coatings may impair ice nucleation by aluminosilicate mineral aerosol.

  8. Relationship between optical extinction and liquid water content in fogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, C.; Dabas, A.

    2013-11-01

    Studies carried out in the late 1970s suggest a simple linear relationship exists in practice between the optical extinction in the thermal IR and the liquid water content (LWC) in fogs. Such a relationship opens the possibility to monitor the vertical profile of the LWC in fogs with a rather simple backscatter lidar. Little is known on how the LWC varies as a function of height and during the fog life cycle, so the new measurement technique would help understand fog physics and provide valuable data for improving the quality of fog forecasts. In the present article, the validity of the linear relationship is revisited at the light of recent observations of fog droplet size distributions measured with a combination of sensors covering a large range of droplet radii. In particular, large droplets (radius above 15 μm) are detected, which was not the case in the late 1970s. The results confirm the linear relationship still holds, at least for the mostly radiative fogs observed during the campaign. The impact of the precise value of the real and imaginary parts of the refractive index on the coefficient of the linear relationship is also studied. The usual practice considers droplets are made of pure water. This assumption is probably valid for big droplets, it may be questioned for small ones since droplets are formed from condensation nuclei of highly variable chemical composition. The study suggests the relationship is mostly sensitive to the real part of the refractive index and the sensitivity grows with the size of fog droplets. However, large fog droplets are more likely to have an index close to that of water since they are mainly composed of water.

  9. Water movement in stony soils: The influence of stoniness on soil water content profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Viliam; Knava, Karol

    2010-05-01

    WATER MOVEMENT IN STONY SOILS: THE INFLUENCE OF STONINESS ON SOIL WATER CONTENT PROFILES Viliam Novák, Karol Kňava Institute of Hydrology, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Racianska 75, 831 02 Bratislava 3, Slovakia, e-mail: novak@uh.savba.sk Soils containing rock fragments are widespread over the world, on Europe such soil account for 30%, 60% in Mediterranean region. In comparison to fine earth soils (soil particles are less then 2 mm) stony soils contain rock fragments characterized by the low retention capacity and hydraulic conductivity. So, for stony soils -in comparison to the fine-earth soils - is typical lower hydraulic conductivity and retention capacity, which lead to the decrease decrease of infiltration rate and low water retention. So, water movement and its modeling in stony soil would differ from fine earth (usually agricultural) soil. The aim of this contribution is to demonstrate the differences in water movement in homogeneous soil (fine earth) and stony soil. The influence of different stoniness on soil water content and soil water dynamics was studied too. Windthrow at High Tatra mountains in Slovakia (November 2004) cleared nearly 12 000 ha of 80 year conifers and this event initiated complex research of windthrow impact on the ecosystem. The important part of this study was water movement in impacted area. Specific feature of the soil in this area was moraine soil consisting of fine earth, characterized as silty sand, with the relative stone content up to 0.49, increasing with depth. Associated phenomenon to the forest clearing is the decrease of rain interception and higher undercanopy precipitation. Conifers interception capacity can be three times higher than low canopy interception, and can reach up to 40% of annual precipitation in Central Europe. Stones in the soil are decreasing infiltration rate, but paradoxically increased understorey precipitation and followingly the increased cumulative infiltration led to the increase of the soil

  10. Measurements of water potential and water content in unsaturated crystalline rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneebeli, Martin; Flühler, Hannes; Gimmi, Thomas; Wydler, Hannes; LäSer, Hans-Peter; Baer, Toni

    1995-08-01

    A water desaturation zone develops around a tunnel in water-saturated rock when the evaporative water loss at the rock surface is larger than the water flow from the surrounding saturated region of restricted permeability. We describe the methods with which such water desaturation processes in rock materials can be quantified. The water retention characteristic θ (ψ) of crystalline rock samples was determined with a pressure membrane apparatus. The negative water potential, identical to the capillary pressure, ψ, below the tensiometric range (ψ < -0.1 MPa) can be measured with thermocouple psychrometers (TP), and the volumetric water contents, θ, by means of time domain reflectometry (TDR). These standard methods were adapted for measuring the water status in a macroscopically unfissured granodiorite with a total porosity of approximately 0.01. The measured water retention curve of granodiorite samples from the Grimsel test site (central Switzerland) exhibits a shape which is typical for bimodal pore size distributions. The measured bimodality is probably an artifact of a large surface ratio of solid/voids. The thermocouples were installed without a metallic screen using the cavity drilled into the granodiorite as a measuring chamber. The water potentials observed in a cylindrical granodiorite monolith ranged between -0.1 and -3.0 MPa; those near the wall in a ventilated tunnel between -0.1 and -2.2 MPa. Two types of three-rod TDR probes were used, one as a depth probe inserted into the rock, the other as a surface probe using three copper stripes attached to the surface for detecting water content changes in the rock-to-air boundary. The TDR signal was smoothed with a low-pass filter, and the signal length determined based on the first derivative of the trace. Despite the low porosity of crystalline rock these standard methods are applicable to describe the unsaturated zone in solid rock and may also be used in other consolidated materials such as concrete.

  11. Changes in snow cover and water cycle over the Tibetan plateau induced by absorbing aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, W. K.; Kim, M.; Kim, K.; Lee, W.

    2009-12-01

    The warming of the land surface and retreating glacier and snowpack in Hindu-Kush-Himalayas-Tibet (HKHT) are well known observations often attributed to effect of greenhouse warming. In this study, based on numerical experiments with the NASA fvGCM, we find that the elevated -heat-pump (EHP) effect by absorbing aerosols (dust and black carbon) over the Indo-Gangetic Plain and Himalayas foothills can lead to substantial warming of the atmosphere and land surface, and reduction in snow cover over the HKHT region . Atmosphere and surface energy analyses show that beginning in April, the middle atmosphere, near the high-altitude surface over the Tibetan Plateau, heats up due to absorption of solar radiation by black carbon and dust. The near surface heating increases convection, which spreads the warming to the upper troposphere over the Plateau. As the monsoon season approaches in May, the increased convection draws in warmer and moister monsoon air into the HKHT, which further enhances the convection, cloudiness and precipitation over the region in late May and early June. The moister and warmer atmosphere over the HKHT region suppresses evaporation and sensible heat fluxes from the surface during April-May. The excess heat received by the surface goes into melting of the snowpack, exposing more of the bare land. The exposed land surface leads to further increase in land surface temperature over the HKHT. Results show that most of the snow melt occurs in the western region (west of 90E) in April and May, when black carbon aerosol loading in the atmosphere is highest, and dust loading is on the rise. The equivalent surface albedo change due to snow melt is reduced by about 8-10%, and 4-6% over the western and eastern TP respectively. The proposed mechanism appear to be relevant on interannnual time scales and beyond. The consequence of these changes in HKHT on the water cycle of Asia will be discussed.

  12. Remote Sensing of Cloud, Aerosol, and Water Vapor Properties from MODIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Michael D.; Platnick, Steven; Menzel, W. Paul; Kaufman, Yoram J.; Ackerman, Steven A.; Tanre, Didier; Gao, Bo-Cai

    2001-01-01

    MODIS is an earth-viewing cross-track scanning spectroradiometer launched on the Terra satellite in December 1999. MODIS scans a swath width sufficient to provide nearly complete global coverage every two days from a polar orbiting, sun-synchronous, platform at an altitude of 705 kilometers, and provides images in 36 spectral bands between 0.415 and 14.235 micrometers with spatial resolutions of 250 meters (2 bands), 500 meters (5 bands) and 1000 meters (29 bands). These bands have been carefully selected to enable advanced studies of land, ocean, and atmospheric processes. In this presentation we review the comprehensive set of remote sensing algorithms that have been developed for the remote sensing of atmospheric properties using MODIS data, placing primary emphasis on the principal atmospheric applications of (i) developing a cloud mask for distinguishing clear sky from clouds, (ii) retrieving global cloud radiative and microphysical properties, including cloud top pressure and temperature, effective emissivity, cloud optical thickness, thermodynamic phase, and effective radius, (iii) monitoring tropospheric aerosol optical thickness over the land and ocean and aerosol size distribution over the ocean, (iv) determining atmospheric profiles of moisture and temperature, and (v) estimating column water amount. The physical principles behind the determination of each of these atmospheric products will be described, together with an example of their application using MODIS observations. All products are archived into two categories: pixel-level retrievals (referred to as Level-2 products) and global gridded products at a latitude and longitude resolution of 1 degree (Level-3 products). An overview of the MODIS atmosphere algorithms and products, status, validation activities, and early level-2 and -3 results will be presented.

  13. An automated analyzer to measure surface-atmosphere exchange fluxes of water soluble inorganic aerosol compounds and reactive trace gases.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Rick M; Trebs, Ivonne; Otjes, René; Jongejan, Piet A C; Ten Brink, Harry; Phillips, Gavin; Kortner, Michael; Meixner, Franz X; Nemitz, Eiko

    2009-03-01

    Here, we present a new automated instrument for semicontinuous gradient measurements of water-soluble reactive trace gas species (NH3, HNO3, HONO, HCl, and SO2) and their related aerosol compounds (NH4+, NO3-, Cl-, SO4(2-)). Gas and aerosol samples are collected simultaneously at two heights using rotating wet-annular denuders and steam-jet aerosol collectors, respectively. Online (real-time) analysis using ion chromatography (IC) for anions and flow injection analysis (FIA) for NH4+ and NH3 provide a half-hourly averaged gas and aerosol gradients within each hour. Through the use of syringe pumps, IC preconcentration columns, and high-quality purified water, the system achieves detection limits (3sigma-definition) under field conditions of typically: 136/207,135/114, 29/ 22,119/92, and 189/159 ng m(-3) for NH3/NH4+, HNO3/NO3-, HONO/ NO2-, HCl/Cl- and SO2/SO4(2-), respectively. The instrument demonstrates very good linearity and accuracy for liquid and selected gas phase calibrations over typical ambient concentration ranges. As shown by examples from field experiments, the instrument provides sufficient precision (3-9%), even at low ambient concentrations, to resolve vertical gradients and calculate surface-atmosphere exchange fluxes undertypical meteorological conditions of the atmospheric surface layer using the aerodynamic gradient technique.

  14. High-Resolution Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Water- Soluble Organic Aerosols Collected with a Particle into Liquid Sampler

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, Adam P.; Nizkorodov, Serguei; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander

    2010-10-01

    This work demonstrates the utility of a particle-into-liquid sampler (PILS) a technique traditionally used for identification of inorganic ions present in ambient or laboratory aerosols for the analysis of water soluble organic aerosol (OA) using high resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HR ESI-MS). Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) was produced from 0.5 ppm mixing ratios of limonene and ozone in a 5 m3 Teflon chamber. SOA was collected simultaneously using a traditional filter sampler and a PILS. The filter samples were later extracted with either water or acetonitrile, while the aqueous PILS samples were analyzed directly. In terms of peak intensities, types of detectable compounds, average O:C ratios, and organic mass to organic carbon ratios, the resulting high resolution mass spectra were essentially identical for the PILS and filter based samples. SOA compounds extracted from both filter/acetonitrile extraction and PILS/water extraction accounted for >95% of the total ion current in ESI mass spectra. This similarity was attributed to high solubility of limonene SOA in water. In contrast, significant differences in detected ions and peak abundances were observed for pine needle biomass burning organic aerosol (BBOA) collected with PILS and filter sampling. The water soluble fraction of BBOA is considerably smaller than for SOA, and a number of unique peaks were detectable only by the filter/acetonitrile method. The combination of PILS collection with HR-ESI-MS analysis offers a new approach for molecular analysis of the water-soluble organic fraction in biogenic SOA, aged photochemical smog, and BBOA.

  15. A Review on Temporal Stability of Soil Water Contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderlinden, Karl; Vereecken, Harry; Hardelauf, Horst; Herbst, Michael; Martínez, Gonzalo; Cosh, Michael H.; Pachepsky, Yakov A.

    2013-04-01

    Temporal stability of soil water content (TS SWC) has been observed across a wide range of soil types, landscapes, climates and scales. A better understanding of TS SWC controls and their interactions needs to be developed. The objective of this work is to develop a comprehensive inventory of published data on TC SWC and to determine knowledge gaps. Mean relative difference (MRD) values and associated standard deviations (SDRD) were digitized from 157 graphs in 37 publications and analyzed. The MRD followed generally a Gaussian distribution with the determination coefficient R2 > 0.84. The standard deviation of MRD (SDMRD) showed a trend of increase with scale. No relationship between SDMRD and R2 was observed. The smallest R2 values were mostly found for negatively skewed and platykurtic MRD distributions. An analysis of seven measurement-, terrain-, and climate-related TS SWC controls suggested strong interactions and showed that combined effects are typically observed. Many of the existing datasets on TS WCS are mostly byproducts of soil water dynamics studies in agronomic or environmental projects. Future research should include more focused TS SWC studies tailored to understand interactions of controls, underlying mechanisms, and efficiency of applications.

  16. THE OSMOTICALLY FUNCTIONAL WATER CONTENT OF THE HUMAN ERYTHROCYTE.

    PubMed

    LEFEVRE, P G

    1964-01-01

    Experiments were directed toward estimation of the magnitude of error incurred by the presumption of idealized osmometric behavior in the author's recent studies of monosaccharide transport through the human erythrocyte membrane. Thick suspensions of washed cells in isotonic buffered balanced salt medium were mixed in fixed proportions with varying dilutions of a concentrate of either (a) the mixed chlorides of the medium, or (b) glucose in the isotonic medium, and the resultant freezing point and hematocrit values determined. The form of the responses in the tonicity and the cell volume, as functions of the variable dilution of sugar or salts, conformed consistently with relations derived from the classical van't Hoff-Boyle-Mariotte pressure-volume relation. However, the effective cell water contents appeared substantially less than the weight lost in conventional drying, and varied somewhat according to the index used: expressed as grams of H(2)O per milliliter of cells at isotonic volume, the cell water implied by the hematocrit behavior was 0.614 +/- 0.015 (SD); by the salt tonicity response, 0.565 +/- 0.027; by the immediate glucose tonicity response, 0.562 +/- 0.044; and by the equilibrium glucose tonicities, 0.589 +/- 0.043. Olmstead's reports of gross deviation from the van't Hoff relation, in the rabbit red cell's responses to tonicity displacement, are attributed primarily to a systematic aberration in his method of data analysis, the observations themselves agreeing substantially with the present findings.

  17. Discontinuities in hygroscopic growth below and above water saturation for laboratory surrogates of oligomers in organic atmospheric aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodas, Natasha; Zuend, Andreas; Schilling, Katherine; Berkemeier, Thomas; Shiraiwa, Manabu; Flagan, Richard C.; Seinfeld, John H.

    2016-10-01

    Discontinuities in apparent hygroscopicity below and above water saturation have been observed for organic and mixed organic-inorganic aerosol particles in both laboratory studies and in the ambient atmosphere. However, uncertainty remains regarding the factors that contribute to observations of low hygroscopic growth below water saturation but enhanced cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity for a given aerosol population. Utilizing laboratory surrogates for oligomers in atmospheric aerosols, we explore the extent to which such discontinuities are influenced by organic component molecular mass and viscosity, non-ideal thermodynamic interactions between aerosol components, and the combination of these factors. Measurements of hygroscopic growth under subsaturated conditions and the CCN activity of aerosols comprised of polyethylene glycol (PEG) with average molecular masses ranging from 200 to 10 000 g mol-1 and mixtures of PEG with ammonium sulfate (AS) were conducted. Experimental results are compared to calculations of hygroscopic growth at thermodynamic equilibrium conducted with the Aerosol Inorganic Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients (AIOMFAC) model, and the potential influence of kinetic limitations on observed water uptake was further explored through estimations of water diffusivity in the PEG oligomers. Particle-phase behavior, including the prevalence of liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS), was also modeled with AIOMFAC. Under subsaturated relative humidity (RH) conditions, we observed little variability in hygroscopic growth across PEG systems with different molecular masses; however, an increase in CCN activity with increasing PEG molecular mass was observed. This effect is most pronounced for PEG-AS mixtures, and, in fact, an enhancement in CCN activity was observed for the PEG10000-AS mixture as compared to pure AS, as evidenced by a 15 % reduction in critical activation diameter at a supersaturation of 0.8 %. We also

  18. Multiscale Bayesian neural networks for soil water content estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, Raghavendra B.; Mohanty, Binayak P.; Springer, Everett P.

    2008-08-01

    Artificial neural networks (ANN) have been used for some time now to estimate soil hydraulic parameters from other available or more easily measurable soil properties. However, most such uses of ANNs as pedotransfer functions (PTFs) have been at matching spatial scales (1:1) of inputs and outputs. This approach assumes that the outputs are only required at the same scale as the input data. Unfortunately, this is rarely true. Different hydrologic, hydroclimatic, and contaminant transport models require soil hydraulic parameter data at different spatial scales, depending upon their grid sizes. While conventional (deterministic) ANNs have been traditionally used in these studies, the use of Bayesian training of ANNs is a more recent development. In this paper, we develop a Bayesian framework to derive soil water retention function including its uncertainty at the point or local scale using PTFs trained with coarser-scale Soil Survey Geographic (SSURGO)-based soil data. The approach includes an ANN trained with Bayesian techniques as a PTF tool with training and validation data collected across spatial extents (scales) in two different regions in the United States. The two study areas include the Las Cruces Trench site in the Rio Grande basin of New Mexico, and the Southern Great Plains 1997 (SGP97) hydrology experimental region in Oklahoma. Each region-specific Bayesian ANN is trained using soil texture and bulk density data from the SSURGO database (scale 1:24,000), and predictions of the soil water contents at different pressure heads with point scale data (1:1) inputs are made. The resulting outputs are corrected for bias using both linear and nonlinear correction techniques. The results show good agreement between the soil water content values measured at the point scale and those predicted by the Bayesian ANN-based PTFs for both the study sites. Overall, Bayesian ANNs coupled with nonlinear bias correction are found to be very suitable tools for deriving soil

  19. A global sensitivity analysis of crop virtual water content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamea, S.; Tuninetti, M.; D'Odorico, P.; Laio, F.; Ridolfi, L.

    2015-12-01

    The concepts of virtual water and water footprint are becoming widely used in the scientific literature and they are proving their usefulness in a number of multidisciplinary contexts. With such growing interest a measure of data reliability (and uncertainty) is becoming pressing but, as of today, assessments of data sensitivity to model parameters, performed at the global scale, are not known. This contribution aims at filling this gap. Starting point of this study is the evaluation of the green and blue virtual water content (VWC) of four staple crops (i.e. wheat, rice, maize, and soybean) at a global high resolution scale. In each grid cell, the crop VWC is given by the ratio between the total crop evapotranspiration over the growing season and the crop actual yield, where evapotranspiration is determined with a detailed daily soil water balance and actual yield is estimated using country-based data, adjusted to account for spatial variability. The model provides estimates of the VWC at a 5x5 arc minutes and it improves on previous works by using the newest available data and including multi-cropping practices in the evaluation. The model is then used as the basis for a sensitivity analysis, in order to evaluate the role of model parameters in affecting the VWC and to understand how uncertainties in input data propagate and impact the VWC accounting. In each cell, small changes are exerted to one parameter at a time, and a sensitivity index is determined as the ratio between the relative change of VWC and the relative change of the input parameter with respect to its reference value. At the global scale, VWC is found to be most sensitive to the planting date, with a positive (direct) or negative (inverse) sensitivity index depending on the typical season of crop planting date. VWC is also markedly dependent on the length of the growing period, with an increase in length always producing an increase of VWC, but with higher spatial variability for rice than for

  20. New technique for online measurement of water-soluble Fe(II) in atmospheric aerosols.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Neeraj; Oakes, Michelle M; Schauer, James J; Shafer, Martin M; Majestic, Brian J; Weber, Rodney J

    2009-04-01

    A prototype instrument has been developed for online analysis of water-soluble Fe(II) (WS_Fe(II)) in atmospheric aerosols using a particle-into-liquid-sampler (PILS), which concentrates particles into a small flow of purified water, coupled with a liquid waveguide capillary cell (LWCC) and absorbance spectrophotometryto detect iron-ferrozine colored complexes. The analytical method is highly precise (<3% RSD), and the overall measurement uncertainty and limit of detection for the complete PILS-LWCC system are estimated at 12% and 4.6 ng m(-3), respectively. The online measurements compared well with those of 24 h integrated filter samples collected at two different sampling sites (n=27, R2 = 0.82, slope 0.90 +/- 0.08, and intercept 3.08 +/- 1.99 ng m(-3)). In urban Atlanta, fine particle WS_Fe(II) concentrations measured every 12 min exhibited large variability, ranging from below the detection limit (4.6) to 370 ng m(-3) during a 24 day period in June 2008. This instrument provides new capabilities for investigating the sources and atmospheric processing of fine particle WS_Fe(II) and may prove useful in studies ranging from effects of particle WS_Fe(II) on human health to effects of particle WS_Fe(II) on atmospheric chemistry and ocean biogeochemistry.

  1. Mixing and water-soluble characteristics of particulate organic compounds in individual urban aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weijun; Shao, Longyi

    2010-01-01

    Particulate organic compounds (POCs) in the atmosphere can alter the morphology and hygroscopicity of inorganic particles by coagulation and mixing. Direct observations can illustrate the mixing of organic and inorganic particles. Compositions, mixing states, and morphologies of 360 aerosol particles from urban Beijing collected on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) grids with Si-O substrate were obtained using TEM coupled with energy-dispersive X ray spectrometry (TEM/EDX). The Si-O substrate used in this study allows TEM/EDX to detect carbonaceous particles internally mixed with inorganic particles. POCs were present in approximately 90% of the nitrate-coated mineral particles on both hazy and clear days. Approximately 73% of K- and S-rich particles contained organic coatings and organic inclusions/aggregations on hazy days, while 53% of S-rich particles on clear days during the Beijing Olympics contained only organic coatings. Water dialysis of individual particles indicated that the organic inclusions/aggregations in the K- and S-rich particles were insoluble in water but that POCs from the coatings of individual particles were soluble. The organic coatings on individual inorganic particles may influence their surface hygroscopicity and optical properties.

  2. Removal of bio-aerosols by water flow on surfaces in health-care settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Han; Li, Yuguo

    2016-11-01

    Hand hygiene is one of the most important and efficient measures to prevent infections, however the compliance with hand hygiene remains poor especially for health-care workers. To improve this situation, the mechanisms of hand cleansing need to be explored and a detailed study on the adhesion interactions for bio-aerosols on hand surfaces and the process during particles removal by flow is significant for more efficient methods to decrease infections. The first part of presentation will focus on modelling adhesion interactions between particles, like bacteria and virus, and hand surfaces with roughness in water environment. The model presented is based on the DLVO and its extended theories. The removal process comes next, which will put forward a new model to describe the removal of particles by water flow. In this model, molecular dynamics is combined with particle motion and the results by the model will be compared with experiment results and existed models (RnR, Rock & Roll). Finally, possible improvement of the study and future design of experiments will be discussed.

  3. Understanding the bias between moisture content by oven drying and water content by Karl Fischer titration at moisture equilibrium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Multiple causes of the difference between equilibrium moisture and water content have been found. The errors or biases were traced to the oven drying procedure to determine moisture content. The present paper explains the nature of the biases in oven drying and how it is possible to suppress one ...

  4. Humidity-conditioned gravimetric method to measure the water content of hydrogel contact lens materials.

    PubMed

    Galas, S L; Enns, J B

    1993-07-01

    A method to determine the humidity-conditioned gravimetric water content of hydrogel contact lens materials has been developed, in which errors due to blotting have been eliminated by conditioning the lens in a series of relative humidity (RH) environments before measuring the water content gravimetrically, and then extrapolating the water content to 100% RH. This method has been used to determine the water contents of representative materials from each of the four FDA lens groups, which were compared with their labeled values, as well as with values obtained from refractive index measurements. The deviation of the water content of soft contact lenses as measured by refractive index from that obtained gravimetrically increased as the water content decreased. The humidity-conditioned gravimetric method to determine water content of hydrophilic contact lenses is being proposed as an International Organization for Standardization (ISO) standard, as an improvement over the gravimetric and refractive index methods.

  5. Natural abundance 13C and 14C analysis of water-soluble organic carbon in atmospheric aerosols.

    PubMed

    Kirillova, Elena N; Sheesley, Rebecca J; Andersson, August; Gustafsson, Örjan

    2010-10-01

    Water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) constitutes a large fraction of climate-forcing organic aerosols in the atmosphere, yet the sources of WSOC are poorly constrained. A method was developed to measure the stable carbon isotope (δ(13)C) and radiocarbon (Δ(14)C) composition of WSOC for apportionment between fossil fuel and different biogenic sources. Synthetic WSOC test substances and ambient aerosols were employed to investigate the effect of both modern and fossil carbon contamination and any method-induced isotope fractionation. The method includes extraction of aerosols collected on quartz filters followed by purification and preparation for off-line δ(13)C and Δ(14)C determination. The preparative freeze-drying step for isotope analysis yielded recoveries of only ∼70% for ambient aerosols and WSOC probes. However, the δ(13)C of the WSOC isolates were in agreement with the δ(13)C of the unprocessed starting material, even for the volatile oxalic acid probe (6.59 ± 0.37‰ vs 6.33 ± 0.31‰; 2 sd). A (14)C-fossil phthalic acid WSOC probe returned a fraction modern biomass of <0.008 whereas a (14)C-modern sucrose standard yielded a fraction modern of >0.999, indicating the Δ(14)C-WSOC method to be free of both fossil and contemporary carbon contamination. Application of the δ(13)C/Δ(14)C-WSOC method to source apportion climate-affecting aerosols was illustrated be constraining that WSOC in ambient Stockholm aerosols were 88% of contemporary biogenic C3 plant origin.

  6. Chemical characteristics of aerosol and rain water during an El Niño and PDO influenced Indian summer monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajeev, Pradhi; Rajput, Prashant; Gupta, Tarun

    2016-11-01

    According to the meteorological long-term variability pattern, year 2015 was influenced by El Niño and PDO (Pacific Decadal Oscillation; causes weakening of Indian Summer Monsoon). These conditions facilitate the assessment of chemical characteristics of fine-mode ambient aerosols (PM2.5; n = 48) and individual rain waters (pH: 6.4-7.6; n = 15) during the South-west monsoon (July-September 2015) in the central Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP; Kanpur). Water-soluble ionic species (WSIS) have been measured to assess the undergoing processes (neutralization, formation and below-cloud scavenging) and estimate their dry and wet deposition fluxes. The ∑WSIS varies from 4 to 32 μg/m3 in PM2.5, whereas it ranges from 32 to 102 mg/L in rain waters. The NH4+ and SO42- are found to be predominant in PM2.5 (16-120 μg/m3), whereas HCO3- and Ca2+ are predominant in rain water samples. The difference in chemical composition of PM2.5 and rain water is largely attributed to additional contribution of coarse-mode mineral dust in rain water. The Ca2+ and Mg2+ in both aerosols and rain water samples are associated with HCO3-. The NO3- and SO42- are neutralized predominantly by NH4+ and ∑-/∑+ ratio is ≈ 1 in both aerosols and rain waters. Furthermore, co-variability of NO3- with nss-Ca2+ in PM2.5 indicates role of fine-mode mineral dust surface in the formation of ammonium nitrate. Characteristic mass ratios (HCO3-/Ca2+ and SO42-/NH4+) in rain water look quite similar to those in aerosols (PM2.5). This suggests that below-cloud scavenging is predominant mechanism of aerosols wash-out. Dry deposition fluxes of Mg2+, NH4+ and SO42- are ∼13% of their wet deposition fluxes, whereas for K+, Ca2+ and NO3- it is <6%.

  7. Terahertz-dependent evaluation of water content in high-water-cut crude oil using additive-manufactured samplers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, LiMei; Zhan, HongLei; Miao, XinYang; Zhu, Jing; Zhao, Kun

    2017-04-01

    The evaluation of water content in crude oil is of significance to petroleum exploration and transportation. Terahertz (THz) waves are sensitive to fluctuations in the dipole moment of water. However, due to the strong absorption of water in the THz range, it is difficult for the THz spectrum to determine high water content with the common sampler. In this research, micron-grade samplers for THz detection were designed and manufactured using additive manufacturing (AM) technology. Oil-water mixtures with water content from 1.8% to 90.6% were measured with the THz-TDS system using sample cells. In addition, a detailed analysis was performed of the relationships among THz parameters such as signal peak, time delay, and refractive index as well as absorption coefficient and high water content (>60%). Results suggest that the combination of THz spectroscopy and AM technique is effective for water content evaluation in crude oil and can be further applied in the petroleum industry.

  8. Remote Sensing of Cloud, Aerosol, and Water Vapor Properties from MODIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Michael D.

    2001-01-01

    MODIS is an earth-viewing cross-track scanning spectroradiometer launched on the Terra satellite in December 1999. MODIS scans a swath width sufficient to provide nearly complete global coverage every two days from a polar-orbiting, sun-synchronous, platform at an altitude of 705 km, and provides images in 36 spectral bands from 0.415 to 14.235 microns with spatial resolutions of 250 m (2 bands), 500 m (5 bands) and 1000 m (29 bands). These bands have been carefully selected to enable advanced studies of land, ocean, and atmospheric processes. In this presentation I will review the comprehensive set of remote sensing algorithms that have been developed for the remote sensing of atmospheric properties using MODIS data, placing primary emphasis on the principal atmospheric applications of: (1) developing a cloud mask for distinguishing clear sky from clouds, (2) retrieving global cloud radiative and microphysical properties, including cloud top pressure and temperature, effective emissivity, cloud optical thickness, thermodynamic phase, and effective radius, (3) monitoring tropospheric aerosol optical thickness over the land and ocean and aerosol size distribution over the ocean, (4) determining atmospheric profiles of moisture and temperature, and (5) estimating column water amount. The physical principles behind the determination of each of these atmospheric products will be described, together with an example of their application using MODIS observations. All products are archived into two categories: pixel-level retrievals (referred to as Level-2 products) and global gridded products at a latitude and longitude resolution of 1 deg (Level-3 products). An overview of the MODIS atmosphere algorithms and products, status, validation activities, and early level-2 and -3 results will be presented. Finally, I will present some highlights from the land and ocean algorithms developed for processing global MODIS observations, including: (1) surface reflectance, (2

  9. Modeling soil water content for vegetation modeling improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cianfrani, Carmen; Buri, Aline; Zingg, Barbara; Vittoz, Pascal; Verrecchia, Eric; Guisan, Antoine

    2016-04-01

    Soil water content (SWC) is known to be important for plants as it affects the physiological processes regulating plant growth. Therefore, SWC controls plant distribution over the Earth surface, ranging from deserts and grassland to rain forests. Unfortunately, only a few data on SWC are available as its measurement is very time consuming and costly and needs specific laboratory tools. The scarcity of SWC measurements in geographic space makes it difficult to model and spatially project SWC over larger areas. In particular, it prevents its inclusion in plant species distribution model (SDMs) as predictor. The aims of this study were, first, to test a new methodology allowing problems of the scarcity of SWC measurements to be overpassed and second, to model and spatially project SWC in order to improve plant SDMs with the inclusion of SWC parameter. The study was developed in four steps. First, SWC was modeled by measuring it at 10 different pressures (expressed in pF and ranging from pF=0 to pF=4.2). The different pF represent different degrees of soil water availability for plants. An ensemble of bivariate models was built to overpass the problem of having only a few SWC measurements (n = 24) but several predictors to include in the model. Soil texture (clay, silt, sand), organic matter (OM), topographic variables (elevation, aspect, convexity), climatic variables (precipitation) and hydrological variables (river distance, NDWI) were used as predictors. Weighted ensemble models were built using only bivariate models with adjusted-R2 > 0.5 for each SWC at different pF. The second step consisted in running plant SDMs including modeled SWC jointly with the conventional topo-climatic variable used for plant SDMs. Third, SDMs were only run using the conventional topo-climatic variables. Finally, comparing the models obtained in the second and third steps allowed assessing the additional predictive power of SWC in plant SDMs. SWC ensemble models remained very good, with

  10. On the interpolation of volumetric water content in research catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dlamini, Phesheya; Chaplot, Vincent

    Digital Soil Mapping (DSM) is widely used in the environmental sciences because of its accuracy and efficiency in producing soil maps compared to the traditional soil mapping. Numerous studies have investigated how the sampling density and the interpolation process of data points affect the prediction quality. While, the interpolation process is straight forward for primary attributes such as soil gravimetric water content (θg) and soil bulk density (ρb), the DSM of volumetric water content (θv), the product of θg by ρb, may either involve direct interpolations of θv (approach 1) or independent interpolation of ρb and θg data points and subsequent multiplication of ρb and θg maps (approach 2). The main objective of this study was to compare the accuracy of these two mapping approaches for θv. A 23 ha grassland catchment in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa was selected for this study. A total of 317 data points were randomly selected and sampled during the dry season in the topsoil (0-0.05 m) for θg by ρb estimation. Data points were interpolated following approaches 1 and 2, and using inverse distance weighting with 3 or 12 neighboring points (IDW3; IDW12), regular spline with tension (RST) and ordinary kriging (OK). Based on an independent validation set of 70 data points, OK was the best interpolator for ρb (mean absolute error, MAE of 0.081 g cm-3), while θg was best estimated using IDW12 (MAE = 1.697%) and θv by IDW3 (MAE = 1.814%). It was found that approach 1 underestimated θv. Approach 2 tended to overestimate θv, but reduced the prediction bias by an average of 37% and only improved the prediction accuracy by 1.3% compared to approach 1. Such a great benefit of approach 2 (i.e., the subsequent multiplication of interpolated maps of primary variables) was unexpected considering that a higher sampling density (∼14 data point ha-1 in the present study) tends to minimize the differences between interpolations techniques and approaches. In the

  11. The Osmotically Functional Water Content of the Human Erythrocyte

    PubMed Central

    LeFevre, Paul G.

    1964-01-01

    Experiments were directed toward estimation of the magnitude of error incurred by the presumption of idealized osmometric behavior in the author's recent studies of monosaccharide transport through the human erythrocyte membrane. Thick suspensions of washed cells in isotonic buffered balanced salt medium were mixed in fixed proportions with varying dilutions of a concentrate of either (a) the mixed chlorides of the medium, or (b) glucose in the isotonic medium, and the resultant freezing point and hematocrit values determined. The form of the responses in the tonicity and the cell volume, as functions of the variable dilution of sugar or salts, conformed consistently with relations derived from the classical van't Hoff-Boyle-Mariotte pressure-volume relation. However, the effective cell water contents appeared substantially less than the weight lost in conventional drying, and varied somewhat according to the index used: expressed as grams of H2O per milliliter of cells at isotonic volume, the cell water implied by the hematocrit behavior was 0.614 ± 0.015 (SD); by the salt tonicity response, 0.565 ± 0.027; by the immediate glucose tonicity response, 0.562 ± 0.044; and by the equilibrium glucose tonicities, 0.589 ± 0.043. Olmstead's reports of gross deviation from the van't Hoff relation, in the rabbit red cell's responses to tonicity displacement, are attributed primarily to a systematic aberration in his method of data analysis, the observations themselves agreeing substantially with the present findings. PMID:14100971

  12. A comparison of the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II tropospheric water vapor to radiosonde measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, J.C.; Chiou, E.W. ); Chu, W.P.; McCormick, M.P.; McMaster, L.R. ); Oltmans, S. ); Rind, D. )

    1993-03-20

    Upper tropospheric Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II) water vapor observations are compared to correlative radiosonde observations and radiosonde based climatologies. The SAGE II 1987 monthly zonal mean water vapor climatology is compared to both the Global Atmospheric Circulation Statistics (1963-1973) climatology and to the 1987 radiosonde climatology. The clear sky SAGE II climatology is found to be approximately half the level of both the clear/cloudy sky radiosonde climatologies. To determine whether this is realistic for these two different climatologies or includes additional observational and instrumental biases, the authors took the 1987 radiosonde data set and identified approximately 800 correlative profile pairs. The observational biases inherent to SAGE II and the radiosondes produce a set of profile pairs characteristic of clear sky, land conditions. A critical review of the radiosonde measurement capability was carried out to establish the operating range and accuracy in the upper troposphere. The authors show that even with tight coincidence criterion, the quality of the profile pair comparisons varies considerably because of strong water vapor variability occurring on small time and space scales. Annual zonal means calculated from the set of profile pairs again finds SAGE II significantly drier in many latitude bands. Resolving the radiosonde data base by hygrometer type shows this to be true for all hygrometers except for the thin film capacitive type (Vaisala Humicap). For this hygrometer, between 4.5 and 6.5 km SAGE II is drier by approximately 25.%, and from 8.5 to 11.5 km they are nearly equivalent when global annual means are compared. The good agreement with the Vaisala Humicap, currently the most accurate and responsive hygrometer in operational use, suggests existing radiosonde climatologies contain a significant moist bias in the upper troposphere. 31 refs., 16 figs., 6 tabs.

  13. Impact of diurnal variation in vegetation water content on radar backscatter of maize during water stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Emmerik, Tim; Steele-Dunne, Susan; Judge, Jasmeet; van de Giesen, Nick

    2014-05-01

    Microwave emission and backscatter of vegetated surfaces are influenced by vegetation water content (VWC), which varies in response to availability of soil moisture in the root zone. Understanding the influence of diurnal VWC dynamics on radar backscatter will improve soil moisture retrievals using microwave remote sensing, and will provide insight into the potential use for radar to directly monitor vegetation water status. The goal of this research is to investigate the effect of diurnal variation in VWC of an agricultural canopy on backscatter for different radar configurations. Water stress was induced in a corn (Zea mays) canopy near Citra, Florida, between September 1 and October 20, 2013. Diurnal destructive samples from the canopy were collected to determine leaf, stalk and total VWC. Water stress was quantified by calculating the evaporation deficit and measuring the soil water tension. The water-cloud model was used to model the influence of VWC and soil moisture variations on backscatter for a range of frequencies, polarizations and incidence angles. Furthermore, radar backscatter time series was simulated to show the effect of water stress on the diurnal variation in backscatter due to VWC. Results of this study show the very significant effects that VWC dynamics have on radar backscatter. We also highlight the potential for vegetation and soil water status monitoring using microwave remote sensing.

  14. Water-soluble organic carbon, dicarboxylic acids, ketoacids, and α-dicarbonyls in the tropical Indian aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavuluri, Chandra Mouli; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Swaminathan, T.

    2010-06-01

    Tropical aerosol (PM10) samples (n = 49) collected from southeast coast of India were studied for water-soluble dicarboxylic acids (C2-C12), ketocarboxylic acids (C2-C9), and α-dicarbonyls (glyoxal and methylglyoxal), together with analyses of total carbon (TC) and water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC). Their distributions were characterized by a predominance of oxalic acid followed by terephthalic (t-Ph), malonic, and succinic acids. Total concentrations of diacids (227-1030 ng m-3), ketoacids (16-105 ng m-3), and dicarbonyls (4-23 ng m-3) are comparative to those from other Asian megacities such as Tokyo and Hong Kong. t-Ph acid was found as the second most abundant diacid in the Chennai aerosols. This feature has not been reported previously in atmospheric aerosols. t-Ph acid is most likely derived from the field burning of plastics. Water-soluble diacids were found to contribute 0.4%-3% of TC and 4%-11% of WSOC. Based on molecular distributions and backward air mass trajectories, we found that diacids and related compounds in coastal South Indian aerosols are influenced by South Asian and Indian Ocean monsoons. Organic aerosols are also suggested to be significantly transported long distances from North India and the Middle East in early winter and from Southeast Asia in late winter, but some originate from photochemical reactions over the Bay of Bengal. In contrast, the Arabian Sea, Indian Ocean, and South Indian continent are suggested as major source regions in summer. We also found daytime maxima of most diacids, except for C9 and t-Ph acids, which showed nighttime maxima in summer. Emissions from marine and terrestrial plants, combined with land/sea breezes and in situ photochemical oxidation, are suggested especially in summer as an important factor that controls the composition of water-soluble organic aerosols over the southeast coast of India. Regional emissions from anthropogenic sources are also important in megacity Chennai, but their influence is

  15. Long-term impacts of aerosols on vertical development of cloud and precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Li Z.; Liu Y.; Niu, F.; Fan, J.; Rosenfeld, D.; Ding, Y.

    2011-11-13

    Aerosols alter cloud density and the radiative balance of the atmosphere. This leads to changes in cloud microphysics and atmospheric stability, which can either suppress or foster the development of clouds and precipitation. The net effect is largely unknown, but depends on meteorological conditions and aerosol properties. Here, we examine the long-term impact of aerosols on the vertical development of clouds and rainfall frequencies, using a 10-year dataset of aerosol, cloud and meteorological variables collected in the Southern Great Plains in the United States. We show that cloud-top height and thickness increase with aerosol concentration measured near the ground in mixed-phase clouds-which contain both liquid water and ice-that have a warm, low base. We attribute the effect, which is most significant in summer, to an aerosol-induced invigoration of upward winds. In contrast, we find no change in cloud-top height and precipitation with aerosol concentration in clouds with no ice or cool bases. We further show that precipitation frequency and rain rate are altered by aerosols. Rain increases with aerosol concentration in deep clouds that have a high liquid-water content, but declines in clouds that have a low liquid-water content. Simulations using a cloud-resolving model confirm these observations. Our findings provide unprecedented insights of the long-term net impacts of aerosols on clouds and precipitation.

  16. Hygroscopic growth of water soluble organic carbon isolated from atmospheric aerosol collected at US national parks and Storm Peak Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Nathan F.; Collins, Don R.; Lowenthal, Douglas H.; McCubbin, Ian B.; Gannet Hallar, A.; Samburova, Vera; Zielinska, Barbara; Kumar, Naresh; Mazzoleni, Lynn R.

    2017-02-01

    Due to the atmospheric abundance and chemical complexity of water soluble organic carbon (WSOC), its contribution to the hydration behavior of atmospheric aerosol is both significant and difficult to assess. For the present study, the hygroscopicity and CCN activity of isolated atmospheric WSOC particulate matter was measured without the compounding effects of common, soluble inorganic aerosol constituents. WSOC was extracted with high purity water from daily high-volume PM2.5 filter samples and separated from water soluble inorganic constituents using solid-phase extraction. The WSOC filter extracts were concentrated and combined to provide sufficient mass for continuous generation of the WSOC-only aerosol over the combined measurement time of the tandem differential mobility analyzer and coupled scanning mobility particle sizer-CCN counter used for the analysis. Aerosol samples were taken at Great Smoky Mountains National Park during the summer of 2006 and fall-winter of 2007-2008; Mount Rainier National Park during the summer of 2009; Storm Peak Laboratory (SPL) near Steamboat Springs, Colorado, during the summer of 2010; and Acadia National Park during the summer of 2011. Across all sampling locations and seasons, the hygroscopic growth of WSOC samples at 90 % RH, expressed in terms of the hygroscopicity parameter, κ, ranged from 0.05 to 0.15. Comparisons between the hygroscopicity of WSOC and that of samples containing all soluble materials extracted from the filters implied a significant modification of the hydration behavior of inorganic components, including decreased hysteresis separating efflorescence and deliquescence and enhanced water uptake between 30 and 70 % RH.

  17. Aerosol-cloud interactions in the ECHAM6-HAM2 GCM and Aerosol_cci/Cloud_cci satellite products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neubauer, David; Lohmann, Ulrike

    2015-04-01

    The first indirect aerosol effect or cloud albedo effect can be estimated as a radiative forcing. While the sign of this forcing is agreed to be negative, model-based estimates of its magnitude show a large variability. The responses of cloud liquid water content and cloud cover to aerosol increases also referred to as secondary indirect aerosol effects or fast adjustments are uncertain as well. In studies that use the variability in the present day satellite data to infer aerosol-cloud interactions (ACI), or that constrain model parameterizations to better agree with satellite observations a less negative ACI radiative forcing is found. The projects of the Climate Change Initiative (CCI) programme of ESA aim at producing long time series of satellite data of essential climate variables with specific information on errors and uncertainties. The quantification of uncertainty in satellite retrievals provides an opportunity to get insights in the discrepancy between model based and satellite based estimates of ACI. Within the Aerosol_cci project susceptibilities of cloud properties from Cloud_cci to aerosol properties from Aerosol_cci datasets are to be compared to susceptibilities from the aerosol climate model ECHAM6-HAM2. Particularly interesting relationships for the first indirect aerosol effect and the second aerosol indirect effect will be investigated. Satellite studies show a strong effect of aerosol on cloud amount, which could be a methodological artefact such as aerosol swelling or meteorological covariation. The immediate vicinity of clouds needs to be excluded due to these potential cloud contaminations although it would be the most interesting region for associations between aerosol and clouds. As the resolution of the data can have an impact on statistical correlations between cloud and aerosol properties, the assessment will be done on different scales. First results will be presented at the conference.

  18. Comparative measurements of stratospheric particulate content by aircraft and ground-based lidar. [aerosol sampling and scattering data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viezee, W.; Russell, P. B.; Hake, R. D., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The matching method of lidar data analysis is explained, and the results from two flights studying the stratospheric aerosol using lidar techniques are summarized and interpreted. Support is lent to the matching method of lidar data analysis by the results, but it is not yet apparent that the analysis technique leads to acceptable results on all nights in all seasons.

  19. [Spectrum Variance Analysis of Tree Leaves Under the Condition of Different Leaf water Content].

    PubMed

    Wu, Jian; Chen, Tai-sheng; Pan, Li-xin

    2015-07-01

    Leaf water content is an important factor affecting tree spectral characteristics. So Exploring the leaf spectral characteristics change rule of the same tree under the condition of different leaf water content and the spectral differences of different tree leaves under the condition of the same leaf water content are not only the keys of hyperspectral vegetation remote sensing information identification but also the theoretical support of research on vegetation spectrum change as the differences in leaf water content. The spectrometer was used to observe six species of tree leaves, and the reflectivity and first order differential spectrum of different leaf water content were obtained. Then, the spectral characteristics of each tree species leaves under the condition of different leaf water content were analyzed, and the spectral differences of different tree species leaves under the condition of the same leaf water content were compared to explore possible bands of the leaf water content identification by hyperspectral remote sensing. Results show that the spectra of each tree leaf have changed a lot with the change of the leaf water content, but the change laws are different. Leaf spectral of different tree species has lager differences in some wavelength range under the condition of same leaf water content, and it provides some possibility for high precision identification of tree species.

  20. Estimating Canopy Water Content of Chaparral Shrubs Using Optical Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ustin, Susan L.; Scheer, George; Castaneda, Claudia M.; Jacquemoud, Stephane; Roberts, Dar; Green, Robert O.

    1996-01-01

    California chaparral ecosystems are exceptionally fire adapted and typically are subject to wildfire at decadal to century frequencies. The hot dry Mediterranean climate summers and the chaparral communities of the Santa Monica Mountains make wildfire one of the most serious economic and life-threatening natural disasters faced by the region. Additionally, the steep fire-burned hillsides are subject to erosion, slumpage, and mud slides during the winter rains. The Santa Monica Mountain Zone (SMMZ) is a 104,000 ha eastwest trending range with 607 m of vertical relief and located in the center of the greater Los Angeles region. A series of fires in the fall of 1993 burned from Simi Valley to Santa Monica within a few hours. Developing techniques to monitor fire hazard and predict the spread of fire is of major concern to the region. One key factor in the susceptibility to fire is the water content of the vegetation canopy. The development of imaging spectrometry and remote sensing techniques may constitute a tool to provide this information.

  1. Testing of an automated online EA-IRMS method for fast and simultaneous carbon content and stable isotope measurement of aerosol samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Major, István; Gyökös, Brigitta; Túri, Marianna; Futó, István; Filep, Ágnes; Hoffer, András; Molnár, Mihály

    2016-04-01

    Comprehensive atmospheric studies have demonstrated that carbonaceous aerosol is one of the main components of atmospheric particulate matter over Europe. Various methods, considering optical or thermal properties, have been developed for quantification of the accurate amount of both organic and elemental carbon constituents of atmospheric aerosol. The aim of our work was to develop an alternative fast and easy method for determination of the total carbon content of individual aerosol samples collected on prebaked quartz filters whereby the mass and surface concentration becomes simply computable. We applied the conventional "elemental analyzer (EA) coupled online with an isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS)" technique which is ubiquitously used in mass spectrometry. Using this technique we are able to measure simultaneously the carbon stable isotope ratio of the samples, as well. During the developing process, we compared the EA-IRMS technique with an off-line catalytic combustion method worked out previously at Hertelendi Laboratory of Environmental Studies (HEKAL). We tested the combined online total carbon content and stable isotope ratio measurement both on standard materials and real aerosol samples. Regarding the test results the novel method assures, on the one hand, at least 95% of carbon recovery yield in a broad total carbon mass range (between 100 and 3000 ug) and, on the other hand, a good reproducibility of stable isotope measurements with an uncertainty of ± 0.2 per mill. Comparing the total carbon results obtained by the EA-IRMS and the off-line catalytic combustion method we found a very good correlation (R2=0.94) that proves the applicability of both preparation method. Advantages of the novel method are the fast and simplified sample preparation steps and the fully automated, simultaneous carbon stable isotope ratio measurement processes. Furthermore stable isotope ratio results can effectively be applied in the source apportionment

  2. Airborne differential absorption lidar system for measurements of atmospheric water vapor and aerosols.

    PubMed

    Higdon, N S; Browell, E V; Ponsardin, P; Grossmann, B E; Butler, C F; Chyba, T H; Mayo, M N; Allen, R J; Heuser, A W; Grant, W B; Ismail, S; Mayor, S D; Carter, A F

    1994-09-20

    An airborne differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system has been developed at the NASA Langley Research Center for remote measurements of atmospheric water vapor (H(2)O) and aerosols. A solid-state alexandrite laser with a 1-pm linewidth and > 99.85% spectral purity was used as the on-line transmitter. Solid-state avalanche photodiode detector technology has replaced photomultiplier tubes in the receiver system, providing an average increase by a factor of 1.5-2.5 in the signal-to-noise ratio of the H(2)O measurement. By incorporating advanced diagnostic and data-acquisition instrumentation into other subsystems, we achieved additional improvements in system operational reliability and measurement accuracy. Laboratory spectroscopic measurements of H(2)O absorption-line parameters were perfo med to reduce the uncertainties in our knowledge of the absorption cross sections. Line-center H(2)O absorption cross sections were determined, with errors of 3-6%, for more than 120 lines in the 720-nm region. Flight tests of the system were conducted during 1989-1991 on the NASA Wallops Flight Facility Electra aircraft, and extensive intercomparison measurements were performed with dew-point hygrometers and H(2)O radiosondes. The H(2)O distributions measured with the DIAL system differed by ≤ 10% from the profiles determined with the in situ probes in a variety of atmospheric conditions.

  3. Airborne differential absorption lidar system for measurements of atmospheric water vapor and aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Arlen F.; Allen, Robert J.; Mayo, M. Neale; Butler, Carolyn F.; Grossman, Benoist E.; Ismail, Syed; Grant, William B.; Browell, Edward V.; Higdon, Noah S.; Mayor, Shane D.; Ponsardin, Patrick; Hueser, Alene W.

    1994-01-01

    An airborne differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system has been developed at the NASA Langley Research Center for remote measurements of atmospheric water vapor (H2O) and aerosols. A solid-state alexandrite laser with a 1-pm linewidth and greater than 99.85% spectral purity was used as the on-line transmitter. Solid-state avalanche photodiode detector technology has replaced photomultiplier tubes in the receiver system, providing an average increase by a factor of 1.5-2.5 in the signal-to-noise ratio of the H2O measurement. By incorporating advanced diagnostic and data-acquisition instrumentation into other subsystems, we achieved additional improvements in system operational reliability and measurement accuracy. Laboratory spectroscopic measurements of H2O absorption-line parameters were performed to reduce the uncertainties in our knowledge of the absorption cross sections. Line-center H2O absorption cross sections were determined, with errors of 3-6%, for more than 120 lines in the 720-nm region. Flight tests of the system were conducted during 1989-1991 on the NASA Wallops Flight Facility Electra aircraft, and extensive intercomparison measurements were performed with dew-point hygrometers and H2O radiosondes. The H2O distributions measured with the DIAL system differed by less than 10% from the profiles determined with the in situ probes in a variety of atmospheric conditions.

  4. Impact of Mars Water Ice Clouds and Thermal Aerosol Enforcement to the Shortscale Climate Dynamics: Evidence from 1-D Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodin, A. V.; Clancy, R. T.; Wilson, R. J.; Richardson, M.; Wolff, M.; Woods, S.

    1997-07-01

    Ground-based observations of Mars atmospheric temperatures, water, and aerosols have suggested that water ice clouds may regulate vertical distribution of dust and, hence, the global radiation balance, with strong seasonal forcing (Clancy et al., 1996). Under specific Martian conditions, condensation of atmospheric water occurs on the dust as Aitken cores, without external sources, dust is efficiently confined below the saturation level of water vapor. This in turn forces the thermal regime and the saturation conditions, particularly around the aphelion northern summer (Clancy et al., 1996). This effect is studied with two 1-D models, a time marching simulation (time step is 4 min), and reduced local steady-state model. Both models treat aerosol particle microphysics, turbulent transport and thermal enforcement interactively, including radiation transfer consistent with derived aerosol vertical and size distributions. Simulations show that in the aphelion season, when clouds are formed below or near 10 km, strong nonlinearity of cloud thermal feedback results in nonuniqueness of a steady-state solution with water vapor saturation level varying by as high as 5-7 km. Such model behavior appears related to observations of rapid variations of a global-average, lower atmosphere temperature over the planet in northern summer (Clancy, 1997). The stability of thermal equilibrium state is controlled by water vapor abundance and the strength of the dust source at the surface. Time marching simulations provide access to the dynamics of seasonal global dust storm relaxation that may play an important role in interannual climate variations on Mars. References: Clancy, R.T., A.W. Grossman, M.J. Wolff, P.B. James, Y.N. Billawala, B.J. Sandor, S.W. Lee, and D.J. Rudy. Water vapor saturation at low altitudes around Mars aphelion: A key to Mars climate? Icarus, 122, 36-62, 1996.

  5. Formulation and make-up of simulate dilute water, low ionic content aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Gdowski, G.

    1997-04-04

    This procedure describes the formulation and make-up of Simulated Dilute Water (SOW), a low-ionic-content water to be used for Activity E-20-50, Long-Term Corrosion Studies. This water has an ionic content which is nominally a factor of ten higher than that of representative waters at or near Yucca Mountain. Representative waters were chosen as J-13 well water [Harrar, 1990] and perched water at Yucca Mountain [Glassley, 1996]. J-13 well water is obtained from ground water that is in contact with the Topopah Spring tuff, which is the repository horizon rock. The perched water is located in the Topopah Spring tuff, but below the repository horizon and above the water table. A nominal times ten higher ionic content was chosen to simulate the effect of ionic concentrating due to elevated temperature water flowing through fractures where salts and minerals have been deposited due to evaporation and boiling.

  6. Does water content or flow rate control colloid transport in unsaturated porous media?

    PubMed

    Knappenberger, Thorsten; Flury, Markus; Mattson, Earl D; Harsh, James B

    2014-04-01

    Mobile colloids can play an important role in contaminant transport in soils: many contaminants exist in colloidal form, and colloids can facilitate transport of otherwise immobile contaminants. In unsaturated soils, colloid transport is, among other factors, affected by water content and flow rate. Our objective was to determine whether water content or flow rate is more important for colloid transport. We passed negatively charged polystyrene colloids (220 nm diameter) through unsaturated sand-filled columns under steady-state flow at different water contents (effective water saturations Se ranging from 0.1 to 1.0, with Se = (θ - θr)/(θs - θr)) and flow rates (pore water velocities v of 5 and 10 cm/min). Water content was the dominant factor in our experiments. Colloid transport decreased with decreasing water content, and below a critical water content (Se < 0.1), colloid transport was inhibited, and colloids were strained in water films. Pendular ring and water film thickness calculations indicated that colloids can move only when pendular rings are interconnected. The flow rate affected retention of colloids in the secondary energy minimum, with less colloids being trapped when the flow rate increased. These results confirm the importance of both water content and flow rate for colloid transport in unsaturated porous media and highlight the dominant role of water content.

  7. Does Water Content or Flow Rate Control Colloid Transport in Unsaturated Porous Media?

    SciTech Connect

    Thorsten Knappenberger; Markus Flury; Earl D. Mattson; James B. Harsh

    2014-03-01

    Mobile colloids can play an important role in contaminant transport in soils: many contaminants exist in colloidal form, and colloids can facilitate transport of otherwise immobile contaminants. In unsaturated soils, colloid transport is, among other factors, affected by water content and flow rate. Our objective was to determine whether water content or flow rate is more important for colloid transport. We passed negatively charged polystyrene colloids (220 nm diameter) through unsaturated sand-filled columns under steady-state flow at different water contents (effective water saturations Se ranging from 0.1 to 1.0, with Se = (? – ?r)/(?s – ?r)) and flow rates (pore water velocities v of 5 and 10 cm/min). Water content was the dominant factor in our experiments. Colloid transport decreased with decreasing water content, and below a critical water content (Se < 0.1), colloid transport was inhibited, and colloids were strained in water films. Pendular ring and water film thickness calculations indicated that colloids can move only when pendular rings are interconnected. The flow rate affected retention of colloids in the secondary energy minimum, with less colloids being trapped when the flow rate increased. These results confirm the importance of both water content and flow rate for colloid transport in unsaturated porous media and highlight the dominant role of water content.

  8. Properties of glasses with high water content. Progress report, 1 March 1980-31 January 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Tomozawa, M.; Watson, E.B.

    1981-01-01

    Glasses with high water content were prepared by a hydrothermal process and various properties were measured. The following unique features have been revealed: (1) electrical conductivity decreases substantially at first with the addition of water and then increases with the further addition of water. The phenomenon is somewhat similar to the mixed alkali effect; (2) the glass with higher water content is radiation coloration resistant; (3) with the addition of water, glasses became tougher at room temperature, suggesting the occurrence of plastic deformation.

  9. Effect of Aerosol Size and Hygroscopicity on Aerosol Optical Depth in the Southeastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brock, Charles; Wagner, Nick; Gordon, Timothy

    2016-04-01

    Aerosol optical depth (AOD) is affected by the size, optical characteristics, and hygroscopicity of particles, confounding attempts to link remote sensing observations of AOD to measured or modeled aerosol mass concentrations. In situ airborne observations of aerosol optical, chemical, microphysical and hygroscopic properties were made in the southeastern United States in the daytime in summer 2013. We use these observations to constrain a simple model that is used to test the sensitivity of AOD to the various measured parameters. As expected, the AOD was found to be most sensitive to aerosol mass concentration and to aerosol water content, which is controlled by aerosol hygroscopicity and the ambient relative humidity. However, AOD was also fairly sensitive to the mean particle diameter and the width of the size distribution. These parameters are often prescribed in global models that use simplified modal parameterizations to describe the aerosol, suggesting that the values chosen could substantially bias the calculated relationship between aerosol mass and optical extinction, AOD, and radiative forcing.

  10. Remote sensing of leaf, canopy and vegetation water contents for satellite climate data records

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Foliar water content is a dynamic quantity depending on water losses from transpiration and water uptake from the soil. Absorption of shortwave radiation by water is determined by various frequency overtones of fundamental bending and stretching molecular transitions. Leaf water potential and rela...

  11. Determining water content in activated carbon for double-layer capacitor electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egashira, Minato; Izumi, Takuma; Yoshimoto, Nobuko; Morita, Masayuki

    2016-09-01

    Karl-Fisher titration is used to estimate water contents in activated carbon and the distribution of impurity-level water in an activated carbon-solvent system. Normalization of the water content of activated carbon is attempted using vacuum drying after immersion in water was controlled. Although vacuum drying at 473 K and 24 h can remove large amounts of water, a substantial amount of water remains in the activated carbon. The water release to propylene carbonate is less than that to acetonitrile. The degradation of capacitor cell capacitance for activated carbon with some amount of water differs according to the electrolyte solvent type: acetonitrile promotes greater degradation than propylene carbonate does.

  12. Joint aerosol and water-leaving radiance retrieval from Airborne Multi-angle SpectroPolarimeter Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, F.; Dubovik, O.; Zhai, P.; Kalashnikova, O. V.; Diner, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    The Airborne Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager (AirMSPI) [1] has been flying aboard the NASA ER-2 high altitude aircraft since October 2010. In step-and-stare operation mode, AirMSPI typically acquires observations of a target area at 9 view angles between ±67° off the nadir. Its spectral channels are centered at 355, 380, 445, 470*, 555, 660*, and 865* nm, where the asterisk denotes the polarimetric bands. In order to retrieve information from the AirMSPI observations, we developed a efficient and flexible retrieval code that can jointly retrieve aerosol and water leaving radiance simultaneously. The forward model employs a coupled Markov Chain (MC) [2] and adding/doubling [3] radiative transfer method which is fully linearized and integrated with a multi-patch retrieval algorithm to obtain aerosol and water leaving radiance/Chl-a information. Various constraints are imposed to improve convergence and retrieval stability. We tested the aerosol and water leaving radiance retrievals using the AirMSPI radiance and polarization measurements by comparing to the retrieved aerosol concentration, size distribution, water-leaving radiance, and chlorophyll concentration to the values reported by the USC SeaPRISM AERONET-OC site off the coast of Southern California. In addition, the MC-based retrievals of aerosol properties were compared with GRASP ([4-5]) retrievals for selected cases. The MC-based retrieval approach was then used to systematically explore the benefits of AirMSPI's ultraviolet and polarimetric channels, the use of multiple view angles, and constraints provided by inclusion of bio-optical models of the water-leaving radiance. References [1]. D. J. Diner, et al. Atmos. Meas. Tech. 6, 1717 (2013). [2]. F. Xu et al. Opt. Lett. 36, 2083 (2011). [3]. J. E. Hansen and L.D. Travis. Space Sci. Rev. 16, 527 (1974). [4]. O. Dubovik et al. Atmos. Meas. Tech., 4, 975 (2011). [5]. O. Dubovik et al. SPIE: Newsroom, DOI:10.1117/2.1201408.005558 (2014).

  13. On the gas-particle partitioning of soluble organic aerosol in two urban atmospheres with contrasting emissions: 1. Bulk water-soluble organic carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaolu; Liu, Jiumeng; Parker, Eric T.; Hayes, Patrick L.; Jimenez, Jose L.; de Gouw, Joost A.; Flynn, James H.; Grossberg, Nicole; Lefer, Barry L.; Weber, Rodney J.

    2012-09-01

    The partitioning of semi-volatile compounds between the gas and particle phase influences the mass, size and chemical composition of the secondary organic aerosols (SOA) formed. Here we investigate the partitioning of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) and the formation of SOA in Los Angeles (LA), California and Atlanta, Georgia; urban regions where anthropogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions are dominated by vehicles, but are contrasted by an additional large source of biogenic VOCs exclusive to Atlanta. In Atlanta, evidence for WSOC partitioning to aerosol water is observed throughout the day, but is most prevalent in the morning. During drier periods (RH < 70%), the WSOC partitioning coefficient (Fp) was in proportion to the organic mass, suggesting that both particle water and organic aerosol (OA) can serve as an absorbing phase. In contrast, despite the higher average RH, in LA the aerosol water was not an important absorbing phase, instead, Fp was correlated with OA mass. Particle water concentrations from thermodynamic predictions based on measured inorganic aerosol components do not indicate significant differences in aerosol hygroscopicity. The observed different WSOC partitioning behaviors may be attributed to the contrasting VOC mixture between the two cities. In addition, different OA composition may also play a role, as Atlanta OA is expected to have a substantially more aged regional character. These results are consistent with our companion studies that find similar partitioning differences for formic acid and additional contrasts in SOA optical properties. The findings provide direct evidence for SOA formation through an equilibrium partitioning process.

  14. On the gas-particle partitioning of soluble organic aerosol in two urban atmospheres with contrasting emissions: 1. Bulk water-soluble organic carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaolu; Liu, Jiumeng; Parker, Eric T.; Hayes, Patrick L.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Gouw, Joost A.; Flynn, James H.; Grossberg, Nicole; Lefer, Barry L.; Weber, Rodney J.

    2011-11-01

    The partitioning of semi-volatile compounds between the gas and particle phase influences the mass, size and chemical composition of the secondary organic aerosols (SOA) formed. Here we investigate the partitioning of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) and the formation of SOA in Los Angeles (LA), California and Atlanta, Georgia; urban regions where anthropogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions are dominated by vehicles, but are contrasted by an additional large source of biogenic VOCs exclusive to Atlanta. In Atlanta, evidence for WSOC partitioning to aerosol water is observed throughout the day, but is most prevalent in the morning. During drier periods (RH < 70%), the WSOC partitioning coefficient (Fp) was in proportion to the organic mass, suggesting that both particle water and organic aerosol (OA) can serve as an absorbing phase. In contrast, despite the higher average RH, in LA the aerosol water was not an important absorbing phase, instead, Fp was correlated with OA mass. Particle water concentrations from thermodynamic predictions based on measured inorganic aerosol components do not indicate significant differences in aerosol hygroscopicity. The observed different WSOC partitioning behaviors may be attributed to the contrasting VOC mixture between the two cities. In addition, different OA composition may also play a role, as Atlanta OA is expected to have a substantially more aged regional character. These results are consistent with our companion studies that find similar partitioning differences for formic acid and additional contrasts in SOA optical properties. The findings provide direct evidence for SOA formation through an equilibrium partitioning process.

  15. Phase transformation and growth of hygroscopic aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, I.N.

    1995-09-01

    Ambient aerosols frequently contain large portions of hygroscopic inorganic salts such as chlorides, nitrates, and sulfates in either pure or mixed forms. Such inorganic salt aerosols exhibit the properties of deliquescence and efflorescence in air. The phase transformation from a solid particle to a saline droplet usually occurs spontaneously when the relative humidity of the atmosphere reaches a level specific to the chemical composition of the aerosol particle. Conversely, when the relative humidity decreases and becomes low enough, the saline droplet will evaporate and suddenly crystallize, expelling all its water content. The phase transformation and growth of aerosols play an important role in many atmospheric processes affecting air quality, visibility degradation, and climate changes. In this chapter, an exposition of the underlying thermodynamic principles is given, and recent advances in experimental methods utilizing single-particle levitation are discussed. In addition, pertinent and available thermodynamic data, which are needed for predicting the deliquescence properties of single and multi-component aerosols, are compiled. This chapter is useful to research scientists who are either interested in pursuing further studies of aerosol thermodynamics, or required to model the dynamic behavior of hygroscopic aerosols in a humid environment.

  16. Using measured soil water contents to estimate evapotranspiration and root water uptake profiles - a comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guderle, M.; Hildebrandt, A.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the role of plants in soil water relations, and thus ecosystem functioning, requires information about root water uptake. We evaluated four different complex water balance methods to estimate sink term patterns and evapotranspiration directly from soil moisture measurements. We tested four methods. The first two take the difference between two measurement intervals as evapotranspiration, thus neglecting vertical flow. The third uses regression on the soil water content time series and differences between day and night to account for vertical flow. The fourth accounts for vertical flow using a numerical model and iteratively solves for the sink term. None of these methods requires any a priori information of root distribution parameters or evapotranspiration, which is an advantage compared to common root water uptake models. To test the methods, a synthetic experiment with numerical simulations for a grassland ecosystem was conducted. Additionally, the time series were perturbed to simulate common sensor errors, like those due to measurement precision and inaccurate sensor calibration. We tested each method for a range of measurement frequencies and applied performance criteria to evaluate the suitability of each method. In general, we show that methods accounting for vertical flow predict evapotranspiration and the sink term distribution more accurately than the simpler approaches. Under consideration of possible measurement uncertainties, the method based on regression and differentiating between day and night cycles leads to the best and most robust estimation of sink term patterns. It is thus an alternative to more complex inverse numerical methods. This study demonstrates that highly resolved (temporally and spatially) soil water content measurements may be used to estimate the sink term profiles when the appropriate approach is used.

  17. Aerosol typing - key information from aerosol studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mona, Lucia; Kahn, Ralph; Papagiannopoulos, Nikolaos; Holzer-Popp, Thomas; Pappalardo, Gelsomina

    2016-04-01

    classification. The harmonization of the aerosol typing procedures is a fundamental need in aerosol studies for long-term perspectives, satellite validation, and accuracy. However, the possibilities and limits in defining a common set of aerosol types for satellite missions and ground-based measurements depends on different information content among measurement techniques and for different retrieval conditions (e.g. for low aerosol content there is smaller satellite aerosol type retrieval sensitivity), as well as different historical choices. The concept of aReference database for aerosol typing (REDAT) is developed with the specific purpose of providing a dataset suitable for the comparison of typing procedures (from ground-based, and satellite measurements) and to be used as reference dataset for the modelling community. It will also allow the definition of translating rules between the different aerosol typing nomenclature, information strongly needed for the more and more increased audience of scientific data with no scientific background, as well as policy and decision makers. Acknowledgments: The research leading to these results is partially funded by ACTRIS2 Research Infrastructure Project by the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the grant agreement n. 654169.

  18. Cloud ice water content retrieved from the CALIOP space-based lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avery, Melody; Winker, David; Heymsfield, Andrew; Vaughan, Mark; Young, Stuart; Hu, Yongxiang; Trepte, Charles

    2012-03-01

    Ice water content (IWC) profiles are derived from retrievals of optical extinction from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) satellite lidar, using a parameterization derived from particle probe measurements acquired during several aircraft field campaigns. With more than five years of data now available, CALIOP IWC is well suited for characterization of the climate-sensitive upper troposphere/lower stratosphere where reliable global IWC measurements are needed to reduce climate model uncertainty. We describe CALIOP IWC and compare it with global satellite-based and regional airborne IWC measurements made during August 2007. IWC distributions in a convective cloud sampled during the Tropical Clouds, Chemistry, Composition and Climate experiment show temperature-dependent differences between in situ measured IWC, IWC retrieved from CloudSat and CALIOP, and IWC parameterized from the airborne Cloud Physics Lidar (CPL) 532 nm volume extinction coefficients. At temperatures above -50°C the CALIOP IWC retrieval indicates less cloud ice than the other instruments, due to signal attenuation and screening for horizontally-oriented ice crystals. Above 12 km where temperatures drop below -50°C CALIOP compares well with in situ IWC measurements. In situ measurements are limited above 12 km, and more cold-temperature comparisons are needed. Global zonal in-cloud IWC averages at altitudes above 9 km show that CloudSat IWC is roughly an order of magnitude higher than CALIOP IWC, consistent with a higher detection threshold. When averaged to the vertical resolution characteristic of Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS), global zonal averages of CALIOP and MLS IWC were found to agree to about +/-50%.

  19. Aqueous aerosol SOA formation: impact on aerosol physical properties.

    PubMed

    Woo, Joseph L; Kim, Derek D; Schwier, Allison N; Li, Ruizhi; McNeill, V Faye

    2013-01-01

    Organic chemistry in aerosol water has recently been recognized as a potentially important source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) material. This SOA material may be surface-active, therefore potentially affecting aerosol heterogeneous activity, ice nucleation, and CCN activity. Aqueous aerosol chemistry has also been shown to be a potential source of light-absorbing products ("brown carbon"). We present results on the formation of secondary organic aerosol material in aerosol water and the associated changes in aerosol physical properties from GAMMA (Gas-Aerosol Model for Mechanism Analysis), a photochemical box model with coupled gas and detailed aqueous aerosol chemistry. The detailed aerosol composition output from GAMMA was coupled with two recently developed modules for predicting a) aerosol surface tension and b) the UV-Vis absorption spectrum of the aerosol, based on our previous laboratory observations. The simulation results suggest that the formation of oligomers and organic acids in bulk aerosol water is unlikely to perturb aerosol surface tension significantly. Isoprene-derived organosulfates are formed in high concentrations in acidic aerosols under low-NO(x) conditions, but more experimental data are needed before the potential impact of these species on aerosol surface tension may be evaluated. Adsorption of surfactants from the gas phase may further suppress aerosol surface tension. Light absorption by aqueous aerosol SOA material is driven by dark glyoxal chemistry and is highest under high-NO(x) conditions, at high relative humidity, in the early morning hours. The wavelength dependence of the predicted absorption spectra is comparable to field observations and the predicted mass absorption efficiencies suggest that aqueous aerosol chemistry can be a significant source of aerosol brown carbon under urban conditions.

  20. Aerosol Retrievals from Individual AVHRR Channels. Part II: Quality Control, Probability Distribution Functions, Information Content, and Consistency Checks of Retrievals.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignatov, Alexander; Stowe, Larry

    2002-02-01

    This second part of a two-part study evaluates retrievals of aerosol optical depths, 1 and 2, in Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) channels 1 and 2 centered at 1 = 0.63 and 2 = 0.83 m, and an effective Ångström exponent, , derived therefrom as = ln(1/2)/ln(1/2). The retrievals are made with the Second Simulation of the Satellite Signal in the Solar Spectrum (6S) radiative transfer model from four NOAA-14 AVHRR datasets, collected between February 1998 and May 1999 in the latitudinal belt of 5°-25°S. A series of quality control (QC) checks applied to the retrievals to identify outliers are described. These remove a total of 1% of points, which presumably originate from channel misregistration, residual cloud in AVHRR cloud-screened pixels, and substantial deviations from the assumptions used in the retrieval model (e.g., bright coastal and high altitude inland waters). First, from examining histograms of the derived parameters it is found that and are accurately fit by lognormal and normal probability distribution functions (PDFs), respectively. Second, the scattergrams 1 versus 2 are analyzed to see if they form a coherent pattern. They do indeed converge at the origin, as expected, but frequently are outside of the expected domain in 1-2 space, defined by two straight lines corresponding to = 0 and = 2. This results in a low bias in , which tends to fill in an interval of [1, 1] rather than

  1. Phase, morphology, and hygroscopicity of mixed oleic acid/sodium chloride/water aerosol particles before and after ozonolysis.

    PubMed

    Dennis-Smither, Benjamin J; Hanford, Kate L; Kwamena, Nana-Owusua A; Miles, Rachael E H; Reid, Jonathan P

    2012-06-21

    Aerosol optical tweezers are used to probe the phase, morphology, and hygroscopicity of single aerosol particles consisting of an inorganic component, sodium chloride, and a water insoluble organic component, oleic acid. Coagulation of oleic acid aerosol with an optically trapped aqueous sodium chloride droplet leads to formation of a phase-separated particle with two partially engulfed liquid phases. The dependence of the phase and morphology of the trapped particle with variation in relative humidity (RH) is investigated by cavity enhanced Raman spectroscopy over the RH range <5% to >95%. The efflorescence and deliquescence behavior of the inorganic component is shown to be unaffected by the presence of the organic phase. Whereas efflorescence occurs promptly (<1 s), the deliquescence process requires both dissolution of the inorganic component and the adoption of an equilibrium morphology for the resulting two phase particle, occurring on a time-scale of <20 s. Comparative measurements of the hygroscopicity of mixed aqueous sodium chloride/oleic acid droplets with undoped aqueous sodium chloride droplets show that the oleic acid does not impact on the equilibration partitioning of water between the inorganic component and the gas phase or the time response of evaporation/condensation. The oxidative aging of the particles through reaction with ozone is shown to increase the hygroscopicity of the organic component.

  2. Water Soluble Ions in Bulk Aerosol During the WINTER 2015 Campaign.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dibb, J. E.; Scheuer, E. M.; Brown, S. S.; Campuzano Jost, P.; Fibiger, D. L.; Guo, H.; Jimenez, J. L.; Lopez-Hilfiker, F.; McDuffie, E. E.; Schroder, J. C.; Sullivan, A.; Thornton, J. A.; Veres, P. R.; Weber, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosol samples were collected on filters from the NCAR C-130 during the WINTER campaign using an inlet believed to transmit particles up to 4 micron in diameter. Filter integration times were nominally 7 minutes. Aqueous extracts of the filter samples were analyzed by ion chromatography for 5 anions and 5 cations, we focus primarily on chloride and nitrate due to their roles coupling chlorine and nitrogen oxide chemistry. Comparison to measurements of submicron aerosol (by PILS and AMS) indicates that there was significant coarse chloride in the boundary layer on all WINTER flights, including the 7 flights over the continent. Significant super micron chloride at altitudes above 2 km was seen in just 3 of the filter samples from the entire mission, all of these were well inland. During the 6 flights over the Atlantic ocean we observed displacement of chloride from the dominant seasalt aerosol at times, but evidence for coarse mode nitrate or sulfate aerosol to explain this is less clear. While coarse aerosol chloride mixing ratios were sufficient to support observed production of nitryl chloride, no correlations between these compounds were observed on any flights. However, nitrate was positively correlated with nitryl chloride, as expected, on all flights when the latter exceeded several 100's of pptv for extended periods. Aerosol nitrate was also positively correlated with dinitrogen pentoxide when mixing ratios of the latter exceeded ~500 pptv for significant portions of a flight. On the WINTER flights in February aerosol nitrate was often more abundant than nitric acid, this was less often the case for the flights in March. This change in partitioning of nitrate between gas and particle phases reflects an increasing trend of nitric acid and a small decrease in abundance of aerosol nitrate through the campaign.

  3. Sensing the water content of honey from temperature-dependent electrical conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wenchuan; Liu, Yi; Zhu, Xinhua; Zhuang, Hong

    2011-08-01

    In order to predict the water content in honey, electrical conductivity was measured on blossom honey types milk-vetch, jujube and yellow-locust with the water content of 18-37% between 5 and 40 °C. The regression models of electrical conductivity were developed as functions of water content and temperature. The results showed that increases in either water content or temperature resulted in an increase in the electrical conductivity of honey with greater changes at higher water content and/or higher temperature. The linear terms of water content and temperature, a quadratic term of water content, and the interaction effect of water content and temperature had significant influence on the electrical conductivity of honey (p < 0.0001). Regardless of blossom honey type, the linear coefficient of the determination of measured and calculated electrical conductivities was 0.998 and the range error ratio was larger than 100. These results suggest that the electrical conductivity of honey might be used to develop a detector for rapidly predicting the water content in blossom honey.

  4. Effect of water content on stability of landslides triggered by earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyabanaki, S.; Bagtzoglou, A. C.; Anagnostou, E. N.

    2013-12-01

    Earthquake- triggered landslides are one of the most important natural hazards that often result in serious structural damage and loss of life. They are widely studied by several researchers. However, less attention has been focused on soil water content. Although the effect of water content has been widely studied for rainfall- triggered landslides [1], much less attention has been given to it for stability analysis of earthquake- triggered landslides. We developed a combined hydrology and stability model to investigate effect of soil water content on earthquake-triggered landslides. For this purpose, Bishop's method is used to do the slope stability analysis and Richard's equation is employed to model infiltration. Bishop's method is one the most widely methods used for analyzing stability of slopes [2]. Earthquake acceleration coefficient (EAC) is also considered in the model to analyze the effect of earthquake on slope stability. Also, this model is able to automatically determine geometry of the potential landslide. In this study, slopes with different initial water contents are simulated. First, the simulation is performed in the case of earthquake only with different EACs and water contents. As shown in Fig. 1, initial water content has a significant effect on factor of safety (FS). Greater initial water contents lead to less FS. This impact is more significant when EAC is small. Also, when initial water content is high, landslides can happen even with small earthquake accelerations. Moreover, in this study, effect of water content on geometry of landslides is investigated. For this purpose, different cases of landslides triggered by earthquakes only and both rainfall and earthquake for different initial water contents are simulated. The results show that water content has more significant effect on geometry of landslides triggered by rainfall than those triggered by an earthquake. Finally, effect of water content on landslides triggered by earthquakes

  5. Size-resolved, real-time measurement of water-insoluble aerosols in metropolitan Atlanta during the summer of 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwald, Roby; Bergin, Michael H.; Weber, Rodney; Sullivan, Amy

    During the month of August 2004, the size-resolved number concentration of water-insoluble aerosols (WIA) from 0.25 to 2.0 μm was measured in real-time in the urban center of Atlanta, GA. Simultaneous measurements were performed for the total aerosol size distribution from 0.1 to 2.0 μm, the elemental and organic carbon mass concentration, the aerosol absorption coefficient, and the aerosol scattering coefficient at a dry (RH=30%) humidity. The mean aerosol number concentration in the size range 0.1-2.0 μm was found to be 360±175 cm -3, but this quantity fluctuated significantly on time scales of less than one hour and ranged from 25 to 1400 cm -3 during the sample period. The mean WIA concentration (0.25-2.0 μm) was 13±7 cm -3 and ranged from 1 to 60 cm -3. The average insoluble fraction in the size range 0.25-2.0 μm was found to be 4±2.5% with a range of 0.3-38%. The WIA population was found to follow a consistent diurnal pattern throughout the month with concentration maxima concurring with peaks in vehicular traffic flow. WIA concentration also responded to changes in meteorological conditions such as boundary layer depth and precipitation events. The temporal variability of the absorption coefficient followed an identical pattern to that of WIA and ranged from below the detection limit to 55 Mm -1 with a mean of 8±6 Mm -1. The WIA concentration was highly correlated with both the absorption coefficient and the elemental carbon mass concentration, suggesting that WIA measurements are dominated by fresh emissions of elemental carbon. For both the total aerosol and the WIA size distributions, the maximum number concentration was observed at the smallest sizes; however the WIA size distribution also exhibited a peak at 0.45 μm which was not observed in the total population. Over 60% of the particles greater than 1.0 μm were observed to be insoluble in the water sampling stream used by this instrumentation. Due to the refractive properties of black

  6. Overview of the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II water vapor observations - Method, validation, and data characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rind, D.; Chiou, E.-W.; Chu, W.; Oltmans, S.; Lerner, J.; Larsen, J.; Mccormick, M. P.; Mcmaster, L.

    1993-01-01

    Results are presented of water vapor observations in the troposphere and stratosphere performed by the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II solar occultation instrument, and the analysis procedure, the instrument errors, and data characteristics are discussed. The results are compared with correlative in situ measurements and other satellite data. The features of the data set collected between 1985 and 1989 include an increase in middle- and upper-tropospheric water vapor during northern hemisphere summer and autumn; minimum water vapor values of 2.5-3 ppmv in the tropical lower stratosphere; slowly increasing water vapor values with altitude in the stratosphere, reaching 5-6 ppmv or greater near the stratopause; extratropical values with minimum profile amounts occurring above the conventionally defined tropopause; and higher extratropical than tropical water vapor values throughout the stratosphere except in locations of possible polar stratospheric clouds.

  7. High temperature ultralow water content carbon dioxide-in-water foam stabilized with viscoelastic zwitterionic surfactants.

    PubMed

    Alzobaidi, Shehab; Da, Chang; Tran, Vu; Prodanović, Maša; Johnston, Keith P

    2017-02-15

    Ultralow water content carbon dioxide-in-water (C/W) foams with gas phase volume fractions (ϕ) above 0.95 (that is <0.05 water) tend to be inherently unstable given that the large capillary pressures that cause the lamellar films to thin. Herein, we demonstrate that these C/W foams may be stabilized with viscoelastic aqueous phases formed with a single zwitterionic surfactant at a concentration of only 1% (w/v) in DI water and over a wide range of salinity. Moreover, they are stable with a foam quality ϕ up to 0.98 even for temperatures up to 120°C. The properties of aqueous viscoelastic solutions and foams containing these solutions are examined for a series of zwitterionic amidopropylcarbobetaines, R-ONHC3H6N(CH3)2CH2CO2, where R is varied from C12-14 (coco) to C18 (oleyl) to C22 (erucyl). For the surfactants with long C18 and C22 tails, the relaxation times from complex rheology indicate the presence of viscoelastic wormlike micelles over a wide range in salinity and pH, given the high surfactant packing fraction. The apparent viscosities of these ultralow water content foams reached more than 120cP with stabilities more than 30-fold over those for foams formed with the non-viscoelastic C12-14 surfactant. At 90°C, the foam morphology was composed of ∼35μm diameter bubbles with a polyhedral texture. The apparent foam viscosity typically increased with ϕ and then dropped at ϕ values higher than 0.95-0.98. The Ostwald ripening rate was slower for foams with viscoelastic versus non-viscoelastic lamellae as shown by optical microscopy, as a consequence of slower lamellar drainage rates. The ability to achieve high stabilities for ultralow water content C/W foams over a wide temperature range is of interest in various technologies including polymer and materials science, CO2 enhanced oil recovery, CO2 sequestration (by greater control of the CO2 flow patterns), and possibly even hydraulic fracturing with minimal use of water to reduce the requirements for

  8. A review of atmospheric aerosol measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMurry, Peter H.

    Recent developments in atmospheric aerosol measurements are reviewed. The topics included complement those covered in the recent review by Chow (JAWMA 45: 320-382, 1995) which focuses on regulatory compliance measurements and filter measurements of particulate composition. This review focuses on measurements of aerosol integral properties (total number concentration, CCN concentration, optical coefficients, etc.), aerosol physical chemical properties (density, refractive index, equilibrium water content, etc.), measurements of aerosol size distributions, and measurements of size-resolved aerosol composition. Such measurements play an essential role in studies of secondary aerosol formation by atmospheric chemical transformations and enable one to quantify the contributions of various species to effects including light scattering/absorption, health effects, dry deposition, etc. Aerosol measurement evolved from an art to a science in the 1970s following the development of instrumentation to generate monodisperse calibration aerosols of known size, composition, and concentration. While such calibration tools permit precise assessments of instrument responses to known laboratory-generated aerosols, unquantifiable uncertainties remain even when carefully calibrated instruments are used for atmospheric measurements. This is because instrument responses typically depend on aerosol properties including composition, shape, density, etc., which, for atmospheric aerosols, may vary from particle-to-particle and are often unknown. More effort needs to be made to quantify measurement accuracies that can be achieved for realistic atmospheric sampling scenarios. The measurement of organic species in atmospheric particles requires substantial development. Atmospheric aerosols typically include hundreds of organic compounds, and only a small fraction (˜10%) of these can be identified by state-of-the-art analytical methodologies. Even the measurement of the total particulate organic

  9. Satellite-Based Assessment of Possible Dust Aerosols Semi-Direct Effect on Cloud Water Path over East Asia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Jianping; Lin, Bing; Minnis, Patrick; Wang, Tainhe; Wang, Xin; Hu, Yongxiang; Yi, Yuhong; Ayers, J. Kirk

    2006-01-01

    The semi-direct effects of dust aerosols are analyzed over eastern Asia using 2 years (June 2002 to June 2004) of data from the Clouds and the Earth s Radiant Energy System (CERES) scanning radiometer and MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Aqua satellite, and 18 years (1984 to 2001) of International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) data. The results show that the water path of dust-contaminated clouds is considerably smaller than that of dust-free clouds. The mean ice water path (IWP) and liquid water path (LWP) of dusty clouds are less than their dust-free counterparts by 23.7% and 49.8%, respectively. The long-term statistical relationship derived from ISCCP also confirms that there is significant negative correlation between dust storm index and ISCCP cloud water path. These results suggest that dust aerosols warm clouds, increase the evaporation of cloud droplets and further reduce cloud water path, the so-called semi-direct effect. The semi-direct effect may play a role in cloud development over arid and semi-arid areas of East Asia and contribute to the reduction of precipitation.

  10. Effective water content reduction in sewage wastewater sludge using magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lakshmanan, Ramnath; Kuttuva Rajarao, Gunaratna

    2014-02-01

    The present work compares the use of three flocculants for sedimentation of sludge and sludge water content from sewage wastewater i.e. magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MION), ferrous sulfate (chemical) and Moringa crude extract (protein). Sludge water content, wet/dry weight, turbidity and color were performed for, time kinetics and large-scale experiment. A 30% reduction of the sludge water content was observed when the wastewater was treated with either protein or chemical coagulant. The separation of sludge from wastewater treated with MION was achieved in less than 5min using an external magnet, resulted in 95% reduction of sludge water content. Furthermore, MION formed denser flocs and more than 80% reduction of microbial content was observed in large volume experiments. The results revealed that MION is efficient in rapid separation of sludge with very low water content, and thus could be a suitable alternative for sludge sedimentation and dewatering in wastewater treatment processes.

  11. Rapid and Sensitive Detection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Chlorinated Water and Aerosols targeting gyrB gene using Real-time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang Soo; Wetzel, Kaedra; Buckley, Timothy; Wozniak, Daniel; Lee, Jiyoung

    2011-01-01

    Aims For the rapid detection of P. aeruginosa from chlorinated water and aerosols, gyrB gene-based real-time PCR assay was developed and investigated. Methods and Results Two novel primer sets (pa722F/746MGB/899R and pa722F/746MGB/788R) were designed using the most updated 611 Pseudomonas and 748 other bacterial gyrB genes for achieving high specificity. Their specificity showed 100% accuracy when tested with various strains including clinical isolates from cystic fibrosis patients. The assay was tested with P. aeruginosa-containing chlorinated water and aerosols to simulate the waterborne and airborne transmission routes (detection limit 3.3 × 102 CFU·PCR−1 − 2.3 × 103 CFU·PCR−1). No chlorine interference in real-time PCR was observed at drinking water level (~ 1 mg·L−1), but high level of chorine (12 mg·L−1) interfered the assay, thus neutralization was needed. P. aeruginosa in aerosol was successfully detected after capturing with gelatin filters with minimum 2 min of sampling time when the initial concentration of 104 CFU·mL−1 bacteria existed in the nebulizer. Conclusions A highly specific and rapid assay (2–3 hrs) was developed by targeting gyrB gene for the detection of P. aeruginosa in chlorinated water and aerosols, combined with optimized sample collection methods and sample processing, so the direct DNA extraction from either water or aerosol was possible while achieving the desired sensitivity of the method. Significance and Impact The new assay can provide timely and accurate risk assessment to prevent P. aeruginosa exposure from water and aerosol, resulting in reduced disease burden, especially among immune-compromised and susceptible individuals. This approach can be easily utilized as a platform technology for the detection of other types of microorganisms, especially for those that are transmitted via water and aerosol routes, such as Legionella pneumophila. PMID:21794031

  12. Thermal Infrared Radiative Forcing By Atmospheric Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Narayan

    the aerosol constituents. We have also demonstrated that LW aerosol radiative forcing is somewhat sensitive to the water vapor content in the atmosphere, and increases with the dryness of the atmosphere. This evidence supports our argument that the Great Basin area of the USA, which usually has extremely dry atmospheric conditions, can be an appropriate place to study the dry-desert aerosol climate forcing in a regional scale. An analysis of aerosol IR backscattering shows that the effect significantly contributes to both the BOA and TOA IR forcings, even if the aerosols do not exhibit absorption at all in the thermal IR. The general LW radiative forcing is, therefore, associated with both the absorption and scattering effects of the aerosols. Neglecting LW scattering will result in an underestimation of LW radiative forcing by aerosols. Finally, the discrepancy between the FTIR-observed and modeled radiance with aerosols indicates a significant uncertainty, which demands further research on the LW optical properties of fine and coarse mode aerosol.

  13. Electrical conductivity of orthopyroxene: Implications for the water content of the asthenosphere

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Lidong; Karato, Shun-ichiro

    2009-01-01

    Electrical conductivity of minerals is sensitive to water content and hence can be used to infer the water content in the mantle. However, previous studies to infer the water content in the upper mantle were based on pure olivine model of the upper mantle. Influence of other minerals particularly that of orthopyroxene needs to be included to obtain a better estimate of water content in view of the high water solubility in this mineral. Here we report new results of electrical conductivity measurements on orthopyroxene, and apply these results to estimate the water content of the upper mantle of Earth. We found that the electrical conductivity of orthopyroxene is enhanced by the addition of water in a similar way as other minerals such as olivine and pyrope garnet. Using these new results, we calculate the electrical conductivity of pyrolite mantle as a function of water content and temperature incorporating the temperature and water fugacity-dependent hydrogen partitioning. Reported values of asthenosphere conductivity of 4 × 10−2−10−1 S/m corresponds to the water content of 0.01–0.04 wt%, a result in good agreement with the petrological model of the upper mantle. PMID:20009379

  14. Remote measurement of the water content of snowpacks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linlor, W. I.

    1972-01-01

    Electronic equipment for sensing moisture content of snowpacks is described. Components of electronic test equipment are illustrated and methods of conducting tests are explained. Possibilities for airborne sensing are examined.

  15. On the Importance of Organic Oxygen for Understanding OrganicAerosol Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, Y.; Turpin, B.J.; Gundel, L.A.

    2005-04-01

    This study shows how aerosol organic oxygen data could provide new information about organic aerosol mass, aqueous solubility of organic aerosols, formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and the relative contributions of anthropogenic and biogenic sources. For more than two decades atmospheric aerosol organic mass (OM) concentration has been estimated by multiplying the measured carbon content by an assumed (OM)-to-organic carbon (OC) factor, usually 1.4. However, this factor can vary from 1.0 to 2.5 depending on location. This large uncertainty about aerosol organic mass limits our understanding of the influence of organic aerosol on climate, visibility and health. New examination of organic aerosol speciation data shows that the oxygen content is responsible for the observed range in the OM-to-OC factor. When organic oxygen content is excluded, the ratio of non-oxygen organic mass to carbon mass varies very little across different environments (1.12 to 1.14). The non-oxygen-OM-to-OC factor for all studied sites (urban and non-urban) averaged 1.13. The uncertainty becomes an order of magnitude smaller than the uncertainty in the best current estimates of organic mass to organic carbon ratios (1.6 {+-} 0.2 for urban and 2.1 {+-} 0.2 for non-urban areas). This analysis suggests that, when aerosol organic oxygen data become available, organic aerosol mass can be quite accurately estimated using just OC and organic oxygen (OO) without the need to know whether the aerosol is fresh or aged. In addition, aerosol organic oxygen data will aid prediction of water solubility since compounds with OO-to-OC higher than 0.4 have water solubilities higher than 1 g per 100 g water.

  16. Influence of Water Content on the β-Sheet Formation, Thermal Stability, Water Removal, and Mechanical Properties of Silk Materials.

    PubMed

    Yazawa, Kenjiro; Ishida, Kana; Masunaga, Hiroyasu; Hikima, Takaaki; Numata, Keiji

    2016-03-14

    Silk, which has excellent mechanical toughness and is lightweight, is used as a structural material in nature, for example, in silkworm cocoons and spider draglines. However, the industrial use of silk as a structural material has garnered little attention. For silk to be used as a structural material, its thermal processability and associated properties must be well understood. Although water molecules influence the glass transition of silk, the effects of water content on the other thermal properties of silks are not well understood. In this study, we prepared Bombyx mori cocoon raw fibers, degummed fibers, and films with different water contents and then investigated the effects of water content on crystallization, degradation, and water removal during thermal processing. Thermal gravimetric analyses of the silk materials showed that water content did not affect the thermal degradation temperature but did influence the water removal behavior. By increasing the water content of silk, the water molecules were removed at lower temperatures, indicating that the amount of free water in silk materials increased; additionally, the glass transition temperature decreased with increasing water plasticization. Differential scanning calorimetry and wide-angle X-ray scattering of the silk films also suggested that the water molecules in the amorphous regions of the silk films acted as a plasticizer and induced β-sheet crystallization. The plasticizing effect of water was not detected in silk fibers, owing to their lower amorphous content and mobility. The structural and mechanical characterizations of the silk films demonstrated the silk film prepared at RH 97% realized both crystallinity and ductility simultaneously. Thus, the thermal stability, mechanical, and other properties of silk materials are regulated by their water content and crystallinity.

  17. Prediction of water content at different potentials from soil property data in Jazan region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alturki, Ali; Ibrahim, Hesham

    2016-04-01

    In dry regions effective irrigation management is crucial to maintain crop production and sustain limited water resources. Effective irrigation requires good knowledge of soil water content in the root zone. However, measurement of soil water in the root zone over time is extremely expensive and time consuming. On the other hand, weather and basic soil property data are more available, either from existing databases or by direct measurement in the field. Simulation models can be used to efficiently and accurately estimate soil water content and subsequent irrigation requirements based on the available weather and soil data. In this study we investigated three hierarchical approaches to predict water content at variable potentials (0, 10, 33, 60, 100, 300, 500, 800, 1000, and 1500 kPa) using the Rosetta model: soil texture class (STC); percent of sand, silt, and clay (SSC); bulk density, percent of sand, silt, and clay, and water content measurements at 33 and 1500 kPa (SSC+WC). Estimation of soil water content at 43 locations in Jazan region using the three hierarchical approaches was compared with gravimetric water content. Results showed that the three approaches failed to describe water content accurately at saturation conditions (<10kPa). At water potentials lower than 10 kPa, good agreement was obtained, in general, between measured and simulated soil water content indicating that soil property data can be used to provide adequate estimates of the average soil water content in the root zone. The third approach gave the best results as indicated by an average NSCE value of 0.75 as compared to 0.16 and 0.18 for the first and second approaches, respectively. The ability to predict the amount of available water in the soil profile will facilitate the accurate estimate of irrigation requirements and achieve effective irrigation scheduling especially in locations where only limited weather and soil date are available.

  18. Pollution and mineral dust aerosol retrievals over dark water from MISR multi-angle satellite imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahn, R.; Kalashnikova, O.; Li, W.; McDonald, D.; Diner, D.; Martonchik, J.

    2003-04-01

    The MISR multi-angle imaging instrument, flying aboard the NASA Earth Observing System's Terra satellite, makes measurements at nine view angles, in each of four wavelengths, near-simultaneously. MISR systematically covers a range of air mass factors from one to three, and in mid-latitudes, samples scattering angles extending from about 60^o to 160^o. We are quantifying the information these data provide about particle size distribution, shape, composition, and amount, with the help of field data acquired during the ACE-Asia and CLAMS campaigns. In both campaigns, we obtained high-resolution data over a 400-km-wide swath, coincident with observations by multiple instruments on two or more surface and airborne aerosol-measuring platforms. The cases obtained capture a range of clean, dusty, and polluted aerosol conditions. Initial characterization of the detailed environmental conditions for five of these cases, based on the field observations, has been completed. This presentation uses the field results as ground truth, to critically test the sensitivity of MISR aerosol retrievals to assumed particle micro-physical properties, a key step in refining the satellite multi-angle retrieval algorithms. We concentrate here on our ability to distinguish pollution aerosols from naturally occurring, non-spherical Asian dust, to measure the total aerosol column optical depth, and to determine the size distribution and single scattering albedo of the pollution component.

  19. Comparison of Vegetation Water Content Estimates From WindSat and MODIS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Determination of soil moisture content by microwave remote sensing is important for quantifying the global energy, water and biogeochemical cycles. Vegetation water content (VWC, kg m-2) is one of the important parameters for retrieval of soil moisture using passive microwave radiometers. Liquid w...

  20. Estimating canopy water content of wetland vegetation using hyperspectral and multispectral remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yonghua; Wang, Yihan; Huang, Jin

    2015-10-01

    The canopy water content of wetland vegetation is an important measuring index of the health status of wetland ecosystem. This article takes the Honghe national wetland nature reserve as study area. We focus on innovative approaches for retrieving canopy water content from optical remote sensing data-multispectral and hyperspectral data. Spectral features, such as narrow band spectral indices, hyperspectral vegetation indices in early literatures, absorption features and vegetation indices extracted from TM image were used to estimate the canopy water content. For narrow band spectral indices, Normalized difference vegetation index comprised of 970 nm and at 900 nm had a highest correlation with canopy water content. For general hyperspectral vegetation indices in early literatures, WI had a highest correlation with canopy water content. For absorption features, the absorption deepness at 1200nm had a highest correlation with canopy water content. In addition, NDII (band5) extracted from TM images could be used for estimating canopy water content. Finally, a distribution map of canopy water content in HNNR was generated.

  1. Upper Washita River experimental watersheds: Multiyear stability of soil water content profiles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Scaling in situ soil water content time series data to a large spatial domain is a key element of watershed environmental monitoring and modeling. The primary method of estimating and monitoring large-scale soil water content distributions is via in situ networks. It is critical to establish the s...

  2. Concurrent temporal stability of the apparent electrical conductivity and soil water content

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowledge of spatio-temporal soil water content (SWC) variability within agricultural fields is useful to improve crop management. Spatial patterns of soil water contents can be characterized using the temporal stability analysis, however high density sampling is required. Soil apparent electrical c...

  3. Preliminary assestment of lint cotton water content in gin-drying temperature studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prior studies to measure total water (free and bound) in lint cotton by Karl Fischer Titration showed the method is more accurate and precise than moisture content by standard oven drying. The objective of the current study was to compare the moisture and total water contents from five cultivars de...

  4. Photosynthesis, chlorophyll fluorescence and spectral reflectance in Sphagnum moss at varying water contents.

    PubMed

    Van Gaalen, K Eric; Flanagan, Lawrence B; Peddle, Derek R

    2007-08-01

    Moss samples from the Fluxnet-Canada western peatland flux station in the Boreal Region of Alberta were measured in the laboratory to obtain the net photosynthesis rate and chlorophyll fluorescence of the moss under controlled environmental conditions, including the regulation of moss water content, simultaneously with measurements of moss spectral reflectance. One objective was to test whether the photochemical reflectance index (PRI) detected changes in moss photosynthetic light-use efficiency that were consistent with short-term (minutes to hours) changes in xanthophyll cycle pigments and associated changes in non-photochemical quenching (NPQ), as recorded by chlorophyll fluorescence. The rate of net photosynthesis was strongly inhibited by water content at values exceeding approximately 9 (fresh weight/dry weight) and declined as the water content fell below values of approximately 8. Chlorophyll fluorescence measurements of maximum photosystem II efficiency generally remained high until the water content was reduced from the maximum of about 20 to values of approximately 10-11, and then declined with further reductions in moss water content. A significant linear decline in NPQ was observed as moss water content was reduced from maximum to low water content values. There was a strong negative correlation between changes in NPQ and PRI. These data suggest that PRI measurements are a good proxy for short-term shifts in photosynthetic activity in Sphagnum moss. A second objective was to test how accurately the water band index (WBI, ratio of reflectance at 900 and 970 nm) recorded changes in moss water content during controlled laboratory studies. Strong linear relationships occurred between changes in moss water content and the WBI, although the slopes of the linear relationships were significantly different among sample replicates. Therefore, WBI appeared to be a useful tool to determine sample-specific water content without destructive measurements.

  5. Anthropogenic versus mineral aerosols in the stimulation of microbial planktonic communities in coastal waters of the northwestern Mediterranean Sea.

    PubMed

    Marín, I; Nunes, S; Sánchez-Pérez, E D; Aparicio, F L; Estrada, M; Marrasé, C; Moreno, T; Wagener, T; Querol, X; Peters, F

    2017-01-01

    The atmosphere of the northwestern (NW) Mediterranean Sea is affected by continuous inputs of anthropogenic aerosols and episodic Saharan dust events. These atmospheric inputs deliver to the surface waters high amounts of macronutrients and trace metals that can constitute their main source at certain times of the year. The effect of both anthropogenic and crustal particles over the autotrophic and heterotrophic planktonic community assembles was evaluated through three microcosm experiments carried out in the summer of 2013 and in the winter and spring of 2014 at an urban coastal location of the NW Mediterranean (Barcelona, Spain). Particles were added to seawater at a concentration of 0.8mgl(-1). The results showed that (i) a greater stimulation of the whole community was observed in summer and spring than in winter; (ii) both kinds of aerosols produced an increase in the growth of phytoplankton, although the stimulation of nanoeukaryotes was significantly larger with anthropogenic aerosols; and (iii) bacterial abundance increased more with mineral dust, whereas bacterial production was more stimulated with anthropogenic inputs. Overall, the effect of atmospheric particles was dependent on their composition and solubility in seawater, as well as on the initial biogeochemical conditions present in the seawater and had the potential to change the net metabolic balance of the microbial planktonic community.

  6. Determining the in situ water content of the Geysers Graywacke of Northern California

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, A.

    1994-12-01

    The water content, porosity and permeability measurements of the Northern California Geysers rocks are used to predict the lifetime of the geothermal resource, which provides 10% of Northern California`s electricity. The Geysers rock was drilled from defunct well SB-15-D, and some cores wee sealed in aluminum tubes to preserve the in situ water content. These cores were sent to the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory to measure the water content. Humidity measurements were taken of the air around a one and a half foot encased core, recovered from a depth of 918.9 feet. Over a seven day period, the humidity reached almost 100% indicating that the air around the core was saturated in water vapor. We believe the sealing method is effective, preserving the in-situ water content. To measure water content, I will use Archimede`s principle to determine the density of the core before and after drying in an oven. Ultrasonic measurements will be taken of the core upon removal from aluminum tube to determine the change of p-wave velocity with change in water content. Water in the pores increases the effective compressibility of the rock therefore increasing the p-velocity. The measured p-wave velocities can then be used in the field to determine in-situ water content. Three dimensional x-ray images will be used to determine the deviations from average density within individual cores. Since the density depends on water content as well as mineralogy, images can show the location of pore fluid and drilling mud. Archimede`s principle, humidity detection, ultrasonics and x-ray scanning are viable methods to measure the in-situ water content and pore water distribution in the graywacke.

  7. [The new method monitoring crop water content based on NIR-Red spectrum feature space].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiao-juan; Xu, Xin-gang; Chen, Tian-en; Yang, Gui-jun; Li, Zhen-hai

    2014-06-01

    Moisture content is an important index of crop water stress condition, timely and effective monitoring of crop water content is of great significance for evaluating crop water deficit balance and guiding agriculture irrigation. The present paper was trying to build a new crop water index for winter wheat vegetation water content based on NIR-Red spectral space. Firstly, canopy spectrums of winter wheat with narrow-band were resampled according to relative spectral response function of HJ-CCD and ZY-3. Then, a new index (PWI) was set up to estimate vegetation water content of winter wheat by improveing PDI (perpendicular drought index) and PVI (perpendicular vegetation index) based on NIR-Red spectral feature space. The results showed that the relationship between PWI and VWC (vegetation water content) was stable based on simulation of wide-band multispectral data HJ-CCD and ZY-3 with R2 being 0.684 and 0.683, respectively. And then VWC was estimated by using PWI with the R2 and RMSE being 0.764 and 0.764, 3.837% and 3.840%, respectively. The results indicated that PWI has certain feasibility to estimate crop water content. At the same time, it provides a new method for monitoring crop water content using remote sensing data HJ-CCD and ZY-3.

  8. Nitrate contents of well, raw, treated and pipe borne water in Vom, Plateau State, Nigeria

    SciTech Connect

    Gbodi, T.A.; Atawodi, S.E.

    1987-04-01

    Nitrate content of water available to man and animals in a rural community in Plateau State, Nigeria was determined. Water samples were obtained from artesian wells, raw untreated surface water, treated raw water, and pipe borne water. The examination of the samples was over a period of 3 mo at weekly intervals. Sixty percent of the artesian wells sampled had nitrate concentration above 5-50 ppm in June and August, while samples from other sources had less than 1 ppm. The proximity of pit latrines to some of the wells may have been responsible for high nitrate content of the well water.

  9. Nitrate contents of well, raw, treated and pipe borne water in Vom, Plateau State, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Gbodi, T A; Atawodi, S E

    1987-04-01

    Nitrate content of water available to man and animals in a rural community in Plateau State, Nigeria was determined. Water samples were obtained from artesian wells, raw untreated surface water, treated raw water, and pipe borne water. The examination of the samples was over a period of 3 mo at weekly intervals. Sixty percent of the artesian wells sampled had nitrate concentration above 5-50 ppm in June and August, while samples from other sources had less than 1 ppm. The proximity of pit latrines to some of the wells may have been responsible for high nitrate content of the well water.

  10. Influence of water content on Raman spectroscopy characterization of skin sample

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soogeun; Byun, Kyung Min; Lee, Soo Yeol

    2017-01-01

    We report that the Raman spectrum obtained from porcine skin varies significantly with the change of skin water content. At different water contents from 40 to 55 wt.%, the Raman spectra results using confocal Raman spectroscopy show that the spectral variation of porcine skin is highly affected by skin water content. Experimental data are consistent with the Monte Carlo calculation and it is proved that the intensity of the Raman spectrum depends on the angle distribution and collection efficiency of backscattered light from the sample surface for a varied water content. It is suggested that water content for a given skin sample should be controlled carefully to minimize errors and deviations in the Raman peak analyses. PMID:28271008

  11. Influence of water content on Raman spectroscopy characterization of skin sample.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soogeun; Byun, Kyung Min; Lee, Soo Yeol

    2017-02-01

    We report that the Raman spectrum obtained from porcine skin varies significantly with the change of skin water content. At different water contents from 40 to 55 wt.%, the Raman spectra results using confocal Raman spectroscopy show that the spectral variation of porcine skin is highly affected by skin water content. Experimental data are consistent with the Monte Carlo calculation and it is proved that the intensity of the Raman spectrum depends on the angle distribution and collection efficiency of backscattered light from the sample surface for a varied water content. It is suggested that water content for a given skin sample should be controlled carefully to minimize errors and deviations in the Raman peak analyses.

  12. Water Soluble Organic Nitrogen in atmospheric aerosol samples from urban, sub-urban and pristine areas of Venezuela

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canelon, R.; Giuliante, A.; Aguiar, G.; Ghneim, T.; Perez, T.

    2007-12-01

    Concentrations of water soluble organic nitrogen (WSON) were determined in atmospheric total suspended particles (TSP) collected between September of 2005 and May of 2006, in an urban continental (Caracas, 10° 29' 09'' N, 66° 53' 48'' W), an urban coastal (Catia la mar, 10° 35' 47'' N, 67° 01' 45'' W), a sub-urban coastal (Osma, 10° 32' N, 67° 28' W), a suburban continental (Altos de Pipe, 10° 23' 41'' N, 63° 59' 10'' W), a pristine coastal (Isla de Aves, 15° 40' N, 63° 36' W) and a pristine continental (La Gran Sabana National Park, 5° 41' 30'' N, 61° 34' 20'' W) areas of Venezuela. TSP samples were collected using a Hi-Vol airborne particle sampler. TSP were impacted on a fiberglass filter pretreated under 400° C for 4 hours to minimize organic nitrogen contamination. Ultra sound water extractions of the sample filters were performed and their NH4+, NO2- and NO3- concentrations were determined by ion exchange liquid chromatography. The water extracts were UV digested and the nitrogen inorganic ions were analyzed after the UV exposure. WSON concentrations were calculated by the difference between the inorganic nitrogen concentrations before and after UV digestion. Ninety five percent of the aerosol samples collected in the suburban and pristine areas showed a WSON concentration range from 0.03 to 0.6 μg/m3 whereas in urban areas the range was 0.21 to 1.09 μg/m3. These concentration values are on the same order of magnitude than the previously found in other tropical and subtropical areas. The contribution of aerosol WSON to the total soluble nitrogen in the coastal urban, sub-urban and pristine areas ranged from 23 to 67%, while in Caracas was smaller (38±8%, n=5). Therefore, aerosol WSON provides an important source of nitrogen to these pristine and suburban ecosystems, which could potentially have implications on the nutrient cycling. There was a statistically significant linear correlation between the aerosol WSON and the water soluble inorganic

  13. Direct photolysis of α-pinene ozonolysis secondary organic aerosol: effect on particle mass and peroxide content.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Scott A; Blair, Sandra L; Nizkorodov, Sergey A

    2014-10-07

    Primary and secondary organic aerosols (POA and SOA) contain a complex mixture of multifunctional chemicals, many of which are photolabile. Much of the previous work that aimed to understand the chemical evolution (aging) of POA and SOA has focused on the reactive uptake of gas-phase oxidants by particles. By stripping volatile compounds and ozone from α-pinene ozonolysis SOA with three 1-m-long denuders, and exposing the residual particles in a flow cell to near-ultraviolet (λ>300 nm) radiation, we find that condensed-phase photochemistry can induce significant changes in SOA particle size and chemical composition. The particle-bound organic peroxides, which are highly abundant in α-pinene ozonolysis SOA (22 ± 5% by weight), have an atmospheric photolysis lifetime of about 6 days at a 24-h average solar zenith angle (SZA) of 65° experienced at 34° latitude (Los Angeles) in the summer. In addition, the particle diameter shrinks 0.56% per day under these irradiation conditions as a result of the loss of volatile photolysis products. Experiments with and without the denuders show similar results, suggesting that condensed-phase processes dominate over heterogeneous reactions of particles with organic vapors, excess ozone, and gas-phase free radicals. These condensed-phase photochemical processes occur on atmospherically relevant time scales and should be considered when modeling the evolution of organic aerosol in the atmosphere.

  14. Evaluation of minerals content of drinking water in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Azlan, Azrina; Khoo, Hock Eng; Idris, Mohd Aizat; Ismail, Amin; Razman, Muhammad Rizal

    2012-01-01

    The drinking and mineral water samples obtained from different geographical locations had concentrations of the selected minerals lower than the standard limits, except for manganese, arsenic, and fluoride. The concentrations of manganese and arsenic in two mineral water samples were slightly higher than the standard international recommended limits. One mineral water sample had a fluoride concentration higher than the standard limits, whereas manganese was not detected in nine drinking and mineral water samples. Most of the selected minerals found in the tap water samples were below the international standard limits, except for iron and manganese. The concentrations of iron and manganese in the tap water samples were higher than the standard limits, which were obtained from one and three of the studied locations, respectively. The potable water obtained from various manufacturers and locations in Peninsular Malaysia is safe for consumption, as the minerals concentrations were below the standard limits prescribed by the Malaysian Food Regulations of 1985. The data obtained may also provide important information related to daily intake of these minerals from drinking water.

  15. Evaluation of Minerals Content of Drinking Water in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Azlan, Azrina; Khoo, Hock Eng; Idris, Mohd Aizat; Ismail, Amin; Razman, Muhammad Rizal

    2012-01-01

    The drinking and mineral water samples obtained from different geographical locations had concentrations of the selected minerals lower than the standard limits, except for manganese, arsenic, and fluoride. The concentrations of manganese and arsenic in two mineral water samples were slightly higher than the standard international recommended limits. One mineral water sample had a fluoride concentration higher than the standard limits, whereas manganese was not detected in nine drinking and mineral water samples. Most of the selected minerals found in the tap water samples were below the international standard limits, except for iron and manganese. The concentrations of iron and manganese in the tap water samples were higher than the standard limits, which were obtained from one and three of the studied locations, respectively. The potable water obtained from various manufacturers and locations in Peninsular Malaysia is safe for consumption, as the minerals concentrations were below the standard limits prescribed by the Malaysian Food Regulations of 1985. The data obtained may also provide important information related to daily intake of these minerals from drinking water. PMID:22649292

  16. Measurements of water content in hydroxypropyl-methyl-cellulose based hydrogels via texture analysis.

    PubMed

    Lamberti, Gaetano; Cascone, Sara; Cafaro, Maria Margherita; Titomanlio, Giuseppe; d'Amore, Matteo; Barba, Anna Angela

    2013-01-30

    In this work, a fast and accurate method to evaluate the water content in a cellulose derivative-based matrix subjected to controlled hydration was proposed and tuned. The method is based on the evaluation of the work of penetration required in the needle compression test. The work of penetration was successfully related to the hydrogel water content, assayed by a gravimetric technique. Moreover, a fitting model was proposed to correlate the two variables (the water content and the work of penetration). The availability of a reliable tool is useful both in the quantification of the water uptake phenomena, both in the management of the testing processes of novel pharmaceutical solid dosage forms.

  17. Aerosol light-scattering enhancement due to water uptake during TCAP campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titos, G.; Jefferson, A.; Sheridan, P. J.; Andrews, E.; Lyamani, H.; Alados-Arboledas, L.; Ogren, J. A.

    2014-02-01

    Aerosol optical properties were measured by the DOE/ARM (US Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurements) Program Mobile Facility in the framework of the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) deployed at Cape Cod, Massachusetts, for a~one year period (from summer 2012 to summer 2013). Measured optical properties included aerosol light-absorption coefficient (σap) at low relative humidity (RH) and aerosol light-scattering coefficient (σsp) at low and at RH values varying from 30 to 85%, approximately. Calculated variables included the single scattering albedo (SSA), the scattering Ångström exponent (SAE) and the scattering enhancement factor (f(RH)). Over the period of measurement, f(RH = 80%) had a mean value of 1.9 ± 0.3 and 1.8 ± 0.4 in the PM10 and PM1 fractions, respectively. Higher f(RH = 80%) values were observed for wind directions from 0-180° (marine sector) together with high SSA and low SAE values. The wind sector from 225 to 315° was identified as an anthropogenically-influenced sector, and it was characterized by smaller, darker and less hygroscopic aerosols. For the marine sector, f(RH = 80%) was 2.2 compared with a value of 1.8 obtained for the anthropogenically-influenced sector. The air-mass backward trajectory analysis agreed well with the wind sector analysis. It shows low cluster to cluster variability except for air-masses coming from the Atlantic Ocean that showed higher hygroscopicity. Knowledge of the effect of RH on aerosol optical properties is of great importance for climate forcing calculations and for comparison of in-situ measurements with satellite and remote sensing retrievals. In this sense, predictive capability of f(RH) for use in climate models would be enhanced if other aerosol parameters could be used as proxies to estimate hygroscopic growth. Toward this goal, we propose an exponential equation that successfully estimates aerosol hygroscopicity as a function of SSA at Cape Cod. Further work is needed to determine

  18. Aerosol light-scattering enhancement due to water uptake during the TCAP campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titos, G.; Jefferson, A.; Sheridan, P. J.; Andrews, E.; Lyamani, H.; Alados-Arboledas, L.; Ogren, J. A.

    2014-07-01

    Aerosol optical properties were measured by the DOE/ARM (US Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurements) Program Mobile Facility during the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) campaign deployed at Cape Cod, Massachusetts, for a 1-year period (from summer 2012 to summer 2013). Measured optical properties included aerosol light-absorption coefficient (σap) at low relative humidity (RH) and aerosol light-scattering coefficient (σsp) at low and at RH values varying from 30 to 85%, approximately. Calculated variables included the single scattering albedo (SSA), the scattering Ångström exponent (SAE) and the scattering enhancement factor (f(RH)). Over the period of measurement, f(RH = 80%) had a mean value of 1.9 ± 0.3 and 1.8 ± 0.4 in the PM10 and PM1 fractions, respectively. Higher f(RH = 80%) values were observed for wind directions from 0 to 180° (marine sector) together with high SSA and low SAE values. The wind sector from 225 to 315° was identified as an anthropogenically influenced sector, and it was characterized by smaller, darker and less hygroscopic aerosols. For the marine sector, f(RH = 80%) was 2.2 compared with a value of 1.8 obtained for the anthropogenically influenced sector. The air-mass backward trajectory analysis agreed well with the wind sector analysis. It shows low cluster to cluster variability except for air masses coming from the Atlantic Ocean that showed higher hygroscopicity. Knowledge of the effect of RH on aerosol optical properties is of great importance for climate forcing calculations and for comparison of in situ measurements with satellite and remote sensing retrievals. In this sense, predictive capability of f(RH) for use in climate models would be enhanced if other aerosol parameters could be used as proxies to estimate hygroscopic growth. Toward this goal, we propose an exponential equation that successfully estimates aerosol hygroscopicity as a function of SSA at Cape Cod. Further work is needed to determine if

  19. Sources and light absorption of water-soluble brown carbon aerosols in the outflow from northern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirillova, E. N.; Andersson, A.; Han, J.; Lee, M.; Gustafsson, Ö.

    2013-07-01

    High loadings of anthropogenic carbonaceous aerosols in Chinese air influence the air quality for over 1 billion people and impact the regional climate. A large fraction (17-80%) of this aerosol carbon is water soluble, promoting cloud formation and thus climate cooling. Recent findings, however, suggest that water-soluble carbonaceous aerosols also absorb sunlight, bringing additional direct and indirect climate warming effects, yet the extent and nature of light absorption by this water-soluble brown carbon (WS-BrC) and its relation to sources is poorly understood. Here, we combine source estimates constrained by dual-carbon-isotope with light absorption measurements of WS-BrC for a March 2011 campaign at the Korea Climate Observatory at Gosan (KCOG), a receptor station in SE Yellow Sea for the outflow from N. China. The mass absorption cross-section (MAC) of WS-BrC for air masses from N. China were in general higher (0.8-1.1 m2 g-1), than from other source regions (0.3-0.8 m2 g-1). We estimate that this effect corresponds to 13-49% of the radiative forcing caused by light absorption by black carbon. Radiocarbon constraints show that the WS-BrC in Chinese outflow had significantly higher amounts of fossil sources (30-50%) compared to previous findings in S. Asia, N. America and Europe. Stable carbon (δ13C) measurements indicated influence of aging during air mass transport. These results indicate the importance of incorporating WS-BrC in climate models and the need to constrain climate effects by emission source sector.

  20. Thermal properties of ration components as affected by moisture content and water activity during freezing.

    PubMed

    Li, J; Chinachoti, P; Wang, D; Hallberg, L M; Sun, X S

    2008-11-01

    Beef roast with vegetables is an example of a meal, ready-to-eat (MRE) ration entrée. It is a mixture of meat, potato, mushroom, and carrot with a gravy sauce. The thermal properties of each component were characterized in terms of freezing point, latent heat, freezable and unfreezable water contents, and enthalpy during freezing using differential scanning calorimetry. Freezing and thawing curves and the effect of freezing and thawing cycles on thermal properties were also evaluated. The freezing points of beef, potato, mushroom, and sauce were all in the range of -5.1 to -5.6 degrees C, but moisture content, water activity, latent heat, freezable and unfreezable water contents, and enthalpy varied among these components. Freezing temperature greatly affected the unfrozen water fraction. The unfreezable water content (unfrozen water fraction at -50 degrees C) of ration components was in the range of 8.2% to 9.7%. The freezing and thawing curves of vegetables with sauce differed from those of beef but took similar time to freeze or thaw. Freezing and thawing cycles did not greatly affect the thermal properties of each component. Freezing point and latent heat were reduced by decreasing moisture content and water activity of each component. Water activity was proportionally linear to freezing point at a(w) > 0.88, and moisture content was proportionally linear to freezable water content in all ration components. Water was not available for freezing when moisture content was reduced to 28.8% or less. This study indicates that moisture content and water activity are critical factors affecting thermal behavior of ration components during freezing.

  1. Accuracy of soil water content estimates from gamma radiation monitoring data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Jie; Huisman, Johan Alexander; Reemt Bogena, Heye; Vereecken, Harry

    2016-04-01

    Terrestrial gamma radiation is known to be sensitive to soil water content, and could be promising for soil water content determination because of the availability of continental-scale gamma radiation monitoring networks. However, the accuracy of soil water content estimates that can be obtained from this type of data is currently unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study is to assess the accuracy of soil water content estimates from measured time series of gamma radiation. For this, four gamma radiation monitoring stations were each equipped with four soil water content sensors at 5 and 15 cm depth to provide reference soil water content measurements. The contributions of terrestrial radiation and secondary cosmic radiation were separated from the total amount of measured gamma radiation by assuming that the long-term contribution of secondary cosmic radiation was constant, and that variations were related to changes in air pressure and incoming neutrons. In addition, precipitation effects related to atmospheric washout of radon progenies to the ground that cause an increase of gamma radiation were considered by excluding time periods with precipitation and time periods less than three hours after precipitation. The estimated terrestrial gamma radiation was related to soil water content using an exponential function with two fit parameters. For daily soil water content estimates, the goodness of fit ranged from R2= 0.21 to 0.48 and the RMSE ranged from 0.048 to 0.117 m3m-3. The accuracy of the soil water content estimates improved considerably when a weekly resolution was used (RMSE ranged from 0.029 to 0.084 m3m-3). Overall, these results indicate that gamma radiation monitoring data can be used to obtain useful soil water content information. The remaining differences between measured and estimated soil water content can at least partly be explained by the fact that the terrestrial gamma radiation is strongly determined by the upper few centimeters of the soil

  2. Fluoride Content of Bottled Drinking Waters in Qatar.

    PubMed

    Almulla, Hessa Ibrahim; King, Nigel M; Alnsour, Hamza Mohammad; Sajnani, Anand K

    2016-12-01

    Fluoridation of drinking water has been recognized as one of the most effective ways of achieving community-wide exposure to the caries prevention effects of fluoride (F). A vast majority of people in Qatar use bottled water for drinking. Use of bottled water without knowing the F level may expose children to dental caries risk if the F level is lower than optimal or to dental fluorosis if the F level is too high. The aim of this study was to determine the F concentration of bottled water available in Qatar. A total of 32 brands of bottled water were evaluated. The F concentrations displayed on the labels were recorded. The F ion-selective electrode method was used to measure the F concentration in water samples, and three measurements were taken for every sample to ensure reproducibility. The p value was set at 0.05. The F concentration ranged from 0.06 to 3.0 ppm with a mean value of 0.8 ppm (±0.88). The F levels were provided by the manufacturers on the labels of 60 % of the samples, but this was significantly lower than the measured F levels (p < 0.0001). Moreover, bottled water that was produced in Saudi Arabia had significantly higher levels of F when compared to those produced in other countries (p < 0.05). There was a wide variation in the F levels in the different brands of bottled water. Furthermore, there was a significant disparity between the F levels which were measured and those that were provided on the labels.

  3. New Aerosol Models for the Retrieval of Aerosol Optical Thickness and Normalized Water-Leaving Radiances from the SeaWiFS and MODIS Sensors Over Coastal Regions and Open Oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, Ziauddin; Franz, Bryan A.; McClain, Charles R.; Kwiatkowska, Ewa J.; Werdell, Jeremy; Shettle, Eric P.; Holben, Brent N.

    2010-01-01

    We describe the development of a new suite of aerosol models for the retrieval of atmospheric and oceanic optical properties from the SeaWiFs and MODIS sensors, including aerosol optical thickness (tau), angstrom coefficient (alpha), and water-leaving radiance (L(sub w)). The new aerosol models are derived from Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) observations and have bimodal lognormal distributions that are narrower than previous models used by the Ocean Biology Processing Group. We analyzed AERONET data over open ocean and coastal regions and found that the seasonal variability in the modal radii, particularly in the coastal region, was related to the relative humidity, These findings were incorporated into the models by making the modal radii, as well as the refractive indices, explicitly dependent on relative humidity, From those findings, we constructed a new suite of aerosol models. We considered eight relative humidity values (30%, 50%, 70%, 75%, 80%, 85%, 90%. and 95%) and, for each relative humidity value, we constructed ten distributions by varying the fine-mode fraction from zero to 1. In all. 80 distributions (8Rh x 10 fine-mode fractions) were created to process the satellite data. We. also assumed that the coarse-mode particles were nonabsorbing (sea salt) and that all observed absorptions were entirely due to fine-mode particles. The composition of fine mode was varied to ensure that the new models exhibited the same spectral dependence of single scattering albedo as observed in the AERONET data,

  4. System Regulates the Water Contents of Fuel-Cell Streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, Arturo; Lazaroff, Scott

    2005-01-01

    An assembly of devices provides for both humidification of the reactant gas streams of a fuel cell and removal of the product water (the water generated by operation of the fuel cell). The assembly includes externally-sensing forward-pressure regulators that supply reactant gases (fuel and oxygen) at variable pressures to ejector reactant pumps. The ejector supply pressures depend on the consumption flows. The ejectors develop differential pressures approximately proportional to the consumption flow rates at constant system pressure and with constant flow restriction between the mixer-outlet and suction ports of the ejectors. For removal of product water from the circulating oxygen stream, the assembly includes a water/gas separator that contains hydrophobic and hydrophilic membranes. The water separator imposes an approximately constant flow restriction, regardless of the quality of the two-phase flow that enters it from the fuel cell. The gas leaving the water separator is nearly 100 percent humid. This gas is returned to the inlet of the fuel cell along with a quantity of dry incoming oxygen, via the oxygen ejector, thereby providing some humidification.

  5. Attribution of the United States “warming hole”: Aerosol indirect effect andprecipitable water vapor

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aerosols can influence the climate indirectly by acting as cloud condensation nuclei and /or ice nuclei, thereby modifying cloud optical properties. Observations show a striking cooling trend in summertime daily maximum temperature (Tmax) in the central and...

  6. Influence of Water Content on Mechanical Properties of Rock in Both Saturation and Drying Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zilong; Cai, Xin; Cao, Wenzhuo; Li, Xibing; Xiong, Cheng

    2016-08-01

    Water content has a pronounced influence on the properties of rock materials, which is responsible for many rock engineering hazards, such as landslides and karst collapse. Meanwhile, water injection is also used for the prevention of some engineering disasters like rock-bursts. To comprehensively investigate the effect of water content on mechanical properties of rocks, laboratory tests were carried out on sandstone specimens with different water contents in both saturation and drying processes. The Nuclear Magnetic Resonance technique was applied to study the water distribution in specimens with variation of water contents. The servo-controlled rock mechanics testing machine and Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar technique were used to conduct both compressive and tensile tests on sandstone specimens with different water contents. From the laboratory tests, reductions of the compressive and tensile strength of sandstone under static and dynamic states in different saturation processes were observed. In the drying process, all of the saturated specimens could basically regain their mechanical properties and recover its strength as in the dry state. However, for partially saturated specimens in the saturation and drying processes, the tensile strength of specimens with the same water content was different, which could be related to different water distributions in specimens.

  7. Modeling aerosols and their interactions with shallow cumuli during the 2007 CHAPS field study

    SciTech Connect

    Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.; Berg, Larry K.; Fast, Jerome D.; Easter, Richard C.; Laskin, Alexander; Chapman, Elaine G.; Gustafson, William I.; Liu, Ying; Berkowitz, Carl M.

    2013-02-07

    The Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with chemistry (WRF-Chem) is used to simulate relationships between aerosols and clouds in the vicinity of Oklahoma City during the June 2007 Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study (CHAPS). The regional scale simulation completed using 2 km horizontal grid spacing evaluates four important relationships between aerosols and shallow cumulus clouds observed during CHAPS. First, the model reproduces the trends of higher nitrate volume fractions in cloud droplet residuals compared to interstitial non-activated aerosols, as measured using the Aerosol Mass Spectrometer. Comparing simulations with cloud chemistry turned on and off, we show that nitric acid vapor uptake by cloud droplets explains the higher nitrate content of cloud droplet residuals. Second, as documented using an offline code, both aerosol water and other inorganics (OIN), which are related to dust and crustal emissions, significantly affect predicted aerosol optical properties. Reducing the OIN content of wet aerosols by 50% significantly improves agreement of model predictions with measurements of aerosol optical properties. Third, the simulated hygroscopicity of aerosols is too high as compared to their hygroscopicity derived from cloud condensation nuclei and particle size distribution measurements, indicating uncertainties associated with simulating size-dependent chemical composition and treatment of aerosol mixing state within the model. Fourth, the model reasonably represents the observations of the first aerosol indirect effect where pollutants in the vicinity of Oklahoma City increase cloud droplet number concentrations and decrease the droplet effective radius. While previous studies have often focused on cloud-aerosol interactions in stratiform and deep convective clouds, this study highlights the ability of regional-scale models to represent some of the important aspects of cloud-aerosol interactions associated with fields of short

  8. Effects of stomatal density and leaf water content on the ¹⁸O enrichment of leaf water.