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Sample records for aerosol water uptake

  1. Water Uptake and Hygroscopic Growth of Organosulfate Aerosol.

    PubMed

    Estillore, Armando D; Hettiyadura, Anusha P S; Qin, Zhen; Leckrone, Erin; Wombacher, Becky; Humphry, Tim; Stone, Elizabeth A; Grassian, Vicki H

    2016-04-19

    Organosulfates (OS) are important components of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) that have been identified in numerous field studies. This class of compounds within SOA can potentially affect aerosol physicochemical properties such as hygroscopicity because of their polar and hydrophilic nature as well as their low volatility. Currently, there is a dearth of information on how aerosol particles that contain OS interact with water vapor in the atmosphere. Herein we report a laboratory investigation on the hygroscopic properties of a structurally diverse set of OS salts at varying relative humidity (RH) using a Hygroscopicity-Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (H-TDMA). The OS studied include the potassium salts of glycolic acid sulfate, hydroxyacetone sulfate, 4-hydroxy-2,3-epoxybutane sulfate, and 2-butenediol sulfate and the sodium salts of benzyl sulfate, methyl sulfate, ethyl sulfate, and propyl sulfate. In addition, mixtures of OS and sodium chloride were also studied. The results showed gradual deliquescence of these aerosol particles characterized by continuous uptake and evaporation of water in both hydration and dehydration processes for the OS, while the mixture showed prompt deliquescence and effloresce transitions, albeit at a lower relative humidity relative to pure sodium chloride. Hygroscopic growth of these OS at 85% RH were also fit to parameterized functional forms. This new information provided here has important implications about the atmospheric lifetime, light scattering properties, and the role of OS in cloud formation. Moreover, results of these studies can ultimately serve as a basis for the development and evaluation of thermodynamic models for these compounds in order to consider their impact on the atmosphere. PMID:26967467

  2. Vertical profiles of cloud condensation nuclei, aerosol hygroscopicity, water uptake, and scattering across the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J. J.; Bougiatioti, A.; Nenes, A.; Anderson, B. E.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Brock, C. A.; Gordon, T. D.; Lack, D.; Law, D. C.; Liao, J.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Richardson, M.; Thornhill, K. L., II; Winstead, E.; Wagner, N. L.; Welti, A.; Ziemba, L. D.

    2014-12-01

    The evolutions of vertical distributions of aerosol chemical, microphysical, hygroscopic, and optical properties present fundamental challenges to the understanding of ground-level air quality and radiative transfer, and few datasets exist to date for evaluation of atmospheric models. Data collected from recent NASA and NOAA field campaigns in the California Central Valley (DISCOVER-AQ), southeast United States (SENEX, SEAC4RS) and Texas (DISCOVER-AQ) allow for a unique opportunity to constrain vertical profiles of climate-relevant aerosol properties. This work presents in-situ aircraft measurements of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentration and derivations of aerosol hygroscopicity, water uptake, and light scattering. Aerosol hygroscopicity is derived from CCN and aerosol measurements. Inorganic water uptake is calculated from aerosol composition using ISORROPIA, a chemical thermodynamic model, while organic water uptake is calculated from organic hygroscopicity. Aerosol scattering closure is performed between scattering from water uptake calculations and in-situ scattering measurements.

  3. Effects of aerosol phase and water uptake for understanding organic aerosol oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, C.; Gallimore, P. J.; Fuller, S.; Lee, J.; Garrascon, V.; Achakulwisut, P.; Björkegren, A.; Spring, D. R.; Pope, F. D.; Kalberer, M.

    2012-04-01

    Oxidation reactions of atmospheric organic aerosols strongly influence many important processes in the atmosphere such as aerosol-cloud interactions or heterogeneous chemistry. We present results of an experimental laboratory study with three organic model aerosol systems (maleic, arachidonic and oleic acid) investigating the effect of particle phase and humidity on the oxidative processing of the particle. Two experimental techniques are combined in this investigation. An electrodynamic balance is used to levitate single particles and assess changes in particle size and mass (due to water uptake and/or loss of volatile oxidation products) and phase (liquid or solid) during and after chemical processing with ozone. An aerosol flow tube was used to investigate the detailed chemical composition of the oxidized aerosol with offline ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry. The role of water (i.e., relative humidity) in the oxidation scheme of the three carboxylic acids is very compound specific and the particle phase has a strong effect on the particle processing. Relative humidity was observed to have a major influence on the oxidation scheme of maleic acid and arachidonic acid, whereas no dependence was observed for the oxidation of oleic acid. In both, maleic acid and arachidonic acid, an evaporation of volatile oxidation products could only be observed when the particle was exposed to high relative humidities. Maleic and arachidonic acid change their phase from liquid to solid upon oxidation or upon changes in humidity and efficient oxidative processing of the particle bulk can only occur when the particle is in liquid form. A detailed oxidation mechanism for maleic acid is presented taking the strong effects of water into account. In contrast, oleic acid is liquid under all conditions at room temperature (dry or elevated humidity, pure or oxidized particle). Thus ozone can easily diffuse into the bulk of the particle irrespective of the oxidation conditions. In

  4. How fast is water uptake on glassy and amorphous aerosol?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bones, D. L.; Lienhard, D. M.; Krieger, U.; Reid, J. P.

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles are typically complex mixtures of organic and inorganic species with correspondingly complex behaviour in their response to changes in humidity. Indeed, it has been recently recognised that many aerosols exist as highly viscous solutions or as amorphous glasses, rather than a crystalline state, over a wide range of relative humidities (Virtanen, et al. 2010). In this work, we investigate the formation of glassy or highly viscous phases in aqueous sugar aerosols such as sucrose and levoglucosan and aerosols of mixtures of sugars and inorganic compounds, reporting the timescale for the mass transfer of water between the particle and the gas phase with variation in water activity. Optical tweezers are used to trap single aerosol particles and examine the time-dependent response in their size to stepwise changes in RH, which result in the evaporation or condensation of water. The evolving particle size and homogeneity in composition are estimated from the wavelengths of specific resonance modes of the cavity enhanced Raman scattering spectra, deducing size changes with an accuracy of better than 1 nm. The experimental data is compared with a kinetic model of diffusional limited size change (Zobrist, et al. 2011), in which the diffusion of water within the particle bulk limits the rate of water transport between the gas and condensed phases. We report measurements in which ternary mixtures, with varying mole ratios of sucrose and sodium chloride, have allowed us to examine the water transport and response time in particle size over a wide range of bulk viscosities. Changes in size are dramatically hindered at low RH, with time scales approaching 10000s, for both increasing and decreasing RH regimes (Tong, et al. 2011). We also observe a marked relative shift in resonance modes, suggesting initial formation of a layer of water on the surface of the glassy particle and subsequent establishment of a steep concentration gradient within the

  5. Water uptake of clay and desert dust aerosol particles at sub- and supersaturated water vapor conditions.

    PubMed

    Herich, Hanna; Tritscher, Torsten; Wiacek, Aldona; Gysel, Martin; Weingartner, Ernest; Lohmann, Ulrike; Baltensperger, Urs; Cziczo, Daniel J

    2009-09-28

    Airborne mineral dust particles serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), thereby influencing the formation and properties of warm clouds. It is therefore of atmospheric interest how dust aerosols with different mineralogy behave when exposed to high relative humidity (RH) or supersaturation (SS) with respect to liquid water. In this study the subsaturated hygroscopic growth and the supersaturated cloud condensation nucleus activity of pure clays and real desert dust aerosols were determined using a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA) and a cloud condensation nuclei counter (CCNC), respectively. Five different illite, montmorillonite and kaolinite clay samples as well as three desert dust samples (Saharan dust (SD), Chinese dust (CD) and Arizona test dust (ATD)) were investigated. Aerosols were generated both with a wet and a dry disperser. The water uptake was parameterized via the hygroscopicity parameter kappa. The hygroscopicity of dry generated dust aerosols was found to be negligible when compared to processed atmospheric aerosols, with CCNC derived kappa values between 0.00 and 0.02 (the latter corresponds to a particle consisting of 96.7% by volume insoluble material and approximately 3.3% ammonium sulfate). Pure clay aerosols were generally found to be less hygroscopic than natural desert dust particles. The illite and montmorillonite samples had kappa approximately 0.003. The kaolinite samples were less hygroscopic and had kappa=0.001. SD (kappa=0.023) was found to be the most hygroscopic dry-generated desert dust followed by CD (kappa=0.007) and ATD (kappa=0.003). Wet-generated dust showed an increased water uptake when compared to dry-generated samples. This is considered to be an artifact introduced by redistribution of soluble material between the particles. Thus, the generation method is critically important when presenting such data. These results indicate any atmospheric processing of a fresh mineral dust particle which

  6. Water uptake of clay and desert dust aerosol particles at sub- and supersaturated water vapor conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Herich, Hanna; Tritscher, Torsten; Wiacek, Aldona; Gysel, Martin; Weingartner, E.; Lohmann, U.; Baltensperger, Urs; Cziczo, Daniel J.

    2009-11-01

    Airborne mineral dust particles serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), thereby influencing the formation and properties of warm clouds. It is therefore of particular interest how dust aerosols with different mineralogy behave when exposed to high relative humidity (RH) or supersaturation with respect to liquid water similar to atmospheric conditions. In this study the sub-saturated hygroscopic growth and the supersaturated cloud condensation nucleus activity of pure clays and real desert dust aerosols was determined using a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA) and a cloud condensation nuclei counter (CCNC), respectively. Five different illite, montmorillonite and kaolinite clay samples as well as three desert dust samples (Saharan dust (SD), Chinese dust (CD) and Arizona test dust (ATD)) were used. Aerosols were generated both with a wet and a dry disperser and the water uptake was parameterized via the hygroscopicity parameter, κ. The hygroscopicity of dry generated dust aerosols was found to be negligible when compared to processed atmospheric aerosols, with CCNC derived κ values between 0.00 and 0.02. The latter value can be idealized as a particle consisting of 96.7% (by volume) insoluble material and ~3.3% ammonium sulfate. Pure clay aerosols were found to be generally less hygroscopic than real desert dust particles. All illite and montmorillonite samples had κ~0.003, kaolinites were least hygroscopic and had κ=0.001. SD (κ=0.023) was found to be the most hygroscopic dry-generated desert dust followed by CD (κ=0.007) and ATD (κ=0.003). Wet-generated dust showed an increased water uptake when compared to dry-generated samples. This is considered to be an artifact introduced by redistribution of soluble material between the particles while immersed in an aqueous medium during atomization, thus indicating that specification of the generation method is critically important when presenting such data. Any atmospheric processing of

  7. Size matters in the water uptake and hygroscopic growth of atmospherically relevant multicomponent aerosol particles.

    PubMed

    Laskina, Olga; Morris, Holly S; Grandquist, Joshua R; Qin, Zhen; Stone, Elizabeth A; Tivanski, Alexei V; Grassian, Vicki H

    2015-05-14

    Understanding the interactions of water with atmospheric aerosols is crucial for determining the size, physical state, reactivity, and climate impacts of this important component of the Earth's atmosphere. Here we show that water uptake and hygroscopic growth of multicomponent, atmospherically relevant particles can be size dependent when comparing 100 nm versus ca. 6 μm sized particles. It was determined that particles composed of ammonium sulfate with succinic acid and of a mixture of chlorides typical of the marine environment show size-dependent hygroscopic behavior. Microscopic analysis of the distribution of components within the aerosol particles show that the size dependence is due to differences in the mixing state, that is, whether particles are homogeneously mixed or phase separated, for different sized particles. This morphology-dependent hygroscopicity has consequences for heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry as well as aerosol interactions with electromagnetic radiation and clouds. PMID:25521409

  8. On the Water Uptake and CCN Activation of Tropospheric Organic Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastak, Narges; Pajunoja, Aki; Acosta Navarro, Juan-Camilo; Leong, Yu Jun; Cerully, Kate M.; Nenes, Athanasios; Kirkevåg, Alf; Topping, David; Virtanen, Annele; Riipinen, Ilona

    2016-04-01

    Aerosol particles introduce high uncertainties to radiative climate forcing. If exposed to a given relative humidity (RH), aerosol particles containing soluble material can absorb water and grow in size (hygroscopic growth). If RH is increased further beyond supersaturation (RH >100%) the particles can act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Aerosol particles interactions with water vapour determine to a large extent their influence on climate. Organic aerosols (OA) contribute a large fraction (20-90%) of atmospheric submicron particulate mass, on the other hand they often consist of thousands of compounds with different properties. One of these properties is solubility, which affects the hygroscopic growth and cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) activation of the organic particles. We investigate the hygroscopic behaviour of complex organic aerosols accounting for the distribution of solubilities present in these mixtures. We use the SPARC method to estimate the solubility distributions of isoprene (IP) and monoterpene (MT) SOA based on their chemical composition, as predicted by the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM). Combining these solubility distributions with the adsorption theory along with the non-ideal behaviour of organic mixtures, we predict the expected hygroscopic growth factors (HGFs), CCN activation behaviour and the related hygroscopicity parameters kappa for these mixtures. The predictions are compared to laboratory measurements as well as field data from MT- and IP-dominated measurement sites. The predicted solubility distributions do a good job in explaining the water uptake of these two mixture types at high relative humidities (RH around 90%), as well as their CCN activation - including the potential differences between the kappa values derived from HGF vs. CCN data. At lower relative humidities, however, the observed water uptake is higher than predicted on solubility alone, particularly for the MT-derived SOA. The data from the low RHs are further

  9. Water uptake is independent of the inferred composition of secondary aerosols derived from multiple biogenic VOCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfarra, M. R.; Good, N.; Wyche, K. P.; Hamilton, J. F.; Monks, P. S.; Lewis, A. C.; McFiggans, G. B.

    2013-04-01

    We demonstrate that the water uptake properties derived from sub- and super-saturated measurements of chamber-generated biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles are independent of their degree of oxidation determined using both online and offline methods. SOA particles are formed from the photooxidation of five structurally different biogenic VOCs representing a broad range of emitted species and their corresponding range of chemical reactivity: α-pinene, β-caryophyllene, limonene, myrcene and linalool. The fractional contribution of mass fragment 44 to the total organic signal (f44) is used to characterise the extent of oxidation of the formed SOA as measured online by an aerosol mass spectrometer. Results illustrate that the values of f44 are dependent on the precursor, the extent of photochemical ageing as well as on the initial experimental conditions. SOA generated from a single biogenic precursor should therefore not be used as a general proxy for biogenic SOA. Similarly, the generated SOA particles exhibit a range of hygroscopic properties depending on the precursor, its initial mixing ratio and photochemical ageing. The activation behaviour of the formed SOA particles show no temporal trends with photochemical ageing. The average κ values derived from the HTDMA and CCNc are generally found to cover the same range for each precursor under two different initial mixing ratio conditions. A positive correlation is observed between the hygroscopicity of particles of a single size and f44 for α-pinene, β-caryophyllene, linalool and myrcene, but not for limonene SOA. The investigation of the generality of this relationship reveal that α-pinene, limonene, linalool and myrcene are all able to generate particles with similar hygroscopicity (κHTDMA ~0.1) despite f44 exhibiting a relatively wide range of values (~4 to 11%). Similarly, κCCN is found to be independent of f44. The same findings are also true when sub- and super-saturated water uptake

  10. Water uptake is independent of the inferred composition of secondary aerosols derived from multiple biogenic VOCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfarra, M. R.; Good, N.; Wyche, K. P.; Hamilton, J. F.; Monks, P. S.; Lewis, A. C.; McFiggans, G.

    2013-12-01

    We demonstrate that the water uptake properties derived from sub- and super-saturated measurements of chamber-generated biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles are independent of their degree of oxidation, determined using both online and offline methods. SOA particles are formed from the photooxidation of five structurally different biogenic VOCs, representing a broad range of emitted species and their corresponding range of chemical reactivity: α-pinene, β-caryophyllene, limonene, myrcene and linalool. The fractional contribution of mass fragment 44 to the total organic signal (f44) is used to characterise the extent of oxidation of the formed SOA as measured online by an aerosol mass spectrometer. Results illustrate that the values of f44 are dependent on the precursor, the extent of photochemical ageing as well as on the initial experimental conditions. SOA generated from a single biogenic precursor should therefore not be used as a general proxy for biogenic SOA. Similarly, the generated SOA particles exhibit a range of hygroscopic properties, depending on the precursor, its initial mixing ratio and photochemical ageing. The activation behaviour of the formed SOA particles show no temporal trends with photochemical ageing. The average κ values derived from the HTDMA and CCNc are generally found to cover the same range for each precursor under two different initial mixing ratio conditions. A positive correlation is observed between the hygroscopicity of particles of a single size and f44 for α-pinene, β-caryophyllene, linalool and myrcene, but not for limonene SOA. The investigation of the generality of this relationship reveals that α-pinene, limonene, linalool and myrcene are all able to generate particles with similar hygroscopicity (κHTDMA ~0.1) despite f44 exhibiting a relatively wide range of values (~4 to 11%). Similarly, κCCN is found to be independent of f44. The same findings are also true when sub- and super-saturated water uptake

  11. Mass-based hygroscopicity parameter interaction model and measurement of atmospheric aerosol water uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, E.; Vlasenko, S.; Rose, D.; Pöschl, U.

    2013-01-01

    In this study we derive and apply a mass-based hygroscopicity parameter interaction model for efficient description of concentration-dependent water uptake by atmospheric aerosol particles with complex chemical composition. The model approach builds on the single hygroscopicity parameter model of Petters and Kreidenweis (2007). We introduce an observable mass-based hygroscopicity parameter κm which can be deconvoluted into a dilute hygroscopicity parameter (κm0) and additional self- and cross-interaction parameters describing non-ideal solution behavior and concentration dependencies of single- and multi-component systems. For reference aerosol samples of sodium chloride and ammonium sulfate, the κm-interaction model (KIM) captures the experimentally observed concentration and humidity dependence of the hygroscopicity parameter and is in good agreement with an accurate reference model based on the Pitzer ion-interaction approach (Aerosol Inorganic Model, AIM). Experimental results for pure organic particles (malonic acid, levoglucosan) and for mixed organic-inorganic particles (malonic acid - ammonium sulfate) are also well reproduced by KIM, taking into account apparent or equilibrium solubilities for stepwise or gradual deliquescence and efflorescence transitions. The mixed organic-inorganic particles as well as atmospheric aerosol samples exhibit three distinctly different regimes of hygroscopicity: (I) a quasi-eutonic deliquescence & efflorescence regime at low-humidity where substances are just partly dissolved and exist also in a non-dissolved phase, (II) a gradual deliquescence & efflorescence regime at intermediate humidity where different solutes undergo gradual dissolution or solidification in the aqueous phase; and (III) a dilute regime at high humidity where the solutes are fully dissolved approaching their dilute hygroscopicity. For atmospheric aerosol samples collected from boreal rural air and from pristine tropical rainforest air (secondary

  12. Viscous organic aerosol particles in the upper troposphere: diffusivity-controlled water uptake and ice nucleation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lienhard, D. M.; Huisman, A. J.; Krieger, U. K.; Rudich, Y.; Marcolli, C.; Luo, B. P.; Bones, D. L.; Reid, J. P.; Lambe, A. T.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Davidovits, P.; Onasch, T. B.; Worsnop, D. R.; Steimer, S. S.; Koop, T.; Peter, T.

    2015-09-01

    New measurements of water diffusion in aerosol particles produced from secondary organic aerosol (SOA) material and from a number of organic/inorganic model mixtures (3-methylbutane-1,2,3-tricarboxylic acid (3-MBTCA), levoglucosan, levoglucosan/NH4HSO4, raffinose) indicate that water diffusion coefficients are determined by several properties of the aerosol substance and cannot be inferred from the glass transition temperature or bouncing properties. Our results suggest that water diffusion in SOA particles is faster than often assumed and imposes no significant kinetic limitation on water uptake and release at temperatures above 220 K. The fast diffusion of water suggests that heterogeneous ice nucleation on a glassy core is very unlikely in these systems. At temperatures below 220 K, model simulations of SOA droplets suggest that heterogeneous ice nucleation may occur in the immersion mode on glassy cores which remain embedded in a liquid shell when experiencing fast updraft velocities. The particles absorb significant quantities of water during these updrafts which plasticize their outer layers such that these layers equilibrate readily with the gas phase humidity before the homogeneous ice nucleation threshold is reached. Glass formation is thus unlikely to restrict homogeneous ice nucleation. Only under most extreme conditions near the very high tropical tropopause may the homogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficient be reduced as a consequence of slow condensed-phase water diffusion. Since the differences between the behavior limited or non limited by diffusion are small even at the very high tropical tropopause, condensed-phase water diffusivity is unlikely to have significant consequences on the direct climatic effects of SOA particles under tropospheric conditions.

  13. Influence of water uptake on the aerosol particle light scattering at remote sites (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zieger, P.; Fierz-Schmidhauser, R.; Baltensperger, U.; Weingartner, E.

    2013-12-01

    Since ambient aerosol particles experience hygroscopic growth at enhanced relative humidity (RH), their microphysical and optical properties - especially the aerosol light scattering - are also strongly dependent on RH. The knowledge of this RH effect is of importance for climate forcing calculations or for the comparison of remote sensing with in-situ measurements because in the field aerosol in-situ measurements are often performed under dry conditions. The scattering enhancement factor f(RH,λ) is the key parameter to describe this effect of water uptake on the particle light scattering. It is defined as the particle light scattering coefficient σ(RH) at a certain RH and wavelength λ divided by its dry value. Here, we will present results from two remote sites: the Jungfraujoch located at 3580 m a.s.l. in the Swiss Alps and from Zeppelin station located at 78.5°N in the Arctic (Fierz-Schmidhauser et al., 2010; Zieger et al., 2010). Various aerosol optical and microphysical parameters were recorded at these sites using in-situ and remote sensing techniques. The scattering enhancement varied largely from very low values of f(RH=85%,λ=550 nm) around 1.28 for mineral dust transported to the Jungfraujoch to 3.41 for pristine Arctic aerosol. Compensating effects of size and hygroscopicity were observed in the Arctic, i.e. small but less hygroscopic particles eventually had the same magnitude in f(RH) as large but more hygroscopic particles like sea salt. Closure studies and Mie simulations showed that both size and chemical composition determine the magnitude of f(RH). The f(RH)-values from the two remote sites will also be related to values measured at other maritime, rural, and continental sites in Europe (Zieger et al., 2013). Active and passive remote sensing techniques were used to study the vertical distribution of aerosol optical properties around Jungfraujoch. Part of these in-situ measured parameters, together with the RH-dependent σ(RH) were used to

  14. Viscous organic aerosol particles in the upper troposphere: diffusivity-controlled water uptake and ice nucleation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lienhard, D. M.; Huisman, A. J.; Krieger, U. K.; Rudich, Y.; Marcolli, C.; Luo, B. P.; Bones, D. L.; Reid, J. P.; Lambe, A. T.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Davidovits, P.; Onasch, T. B.; Worsnop, D. R.; Steimer, S. S.; Koop, T.; Peter, T.

    2015-12-01

    New measurements of water diffusion in secondary organic aerosol (SOA) material produced by oxidation of α-pinene and in a number of organic/inorganic model mixtures (3-methylbutane-1,2,3-tricarboxylic acid (3-MBTCA), levoglucosan, levoglucosan/NH4HSO4, raffinose) are presented. These indicate that water diffusion coefficients are determined by several properties of the aerosol substance and cannot be inferred from the glass transition temperature or bouncing properties. Our results suggest that water diffusion in SOA particles is faster than often assumed and imposes no significant kinetic limitation on water uptake and release at temperatures above 220 K. The fast diffusion of water suggests that heterogeneous ice nucleation on a glassy core is very unlikely in these systems. At temperatures below 220 K, model simulations of SOA particles suggest that heterogeneous ice nucleation may occur in the immersion mode on glassy cores which remain embedded in a liquid shell when experiencing fast updraft velocities. The particles absorb significant quantities of water during these updrafts which plasticize their outer layers such that these layers equilibrate readily with the gas phase humidity before the homogeneous ice nucleation threshold is reached. Glass formation is thus unlikely to restrict homogeneous ice nucleation. Only under most extreme conditions near the very high tropical tropopause may the homogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficient be reduced as a consequence of slow condensed-phase water diffusion. Since the differences between the behavior limited or non limited by diffusion are small even at the very high tropical tropopause, condensed-phase water diffusivity is unlikely to have significant consequences on the direct climatic effects of SOA particles under tropospheric conditions.

  15. The impacts of aerosol loading, composition, and water uptake on aerosol extinction variability in the Baltimore-Washington, D.C. region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyersdorf, A. J.; Ziemba, L. D.; Chen, G.; Corr, C. A.; Crawford, J. H.; Diskin, G. S.; Moore, R. H.; Thornhill, K. L.; Winstead, E. L.; Anderson, B. E.

    2016-01-01

    In order to utilize satellite-based aerosol measurements for the determination of air quality, the relationship between aerosol optical properties (wavelength-dependent, column-integrated extinction measured by satellites) and mass measurements of aerosol loading (PM2.5 used for air quality monitoring) must be understood. This connection varies with many factors including those specific to the aerosol type - such as composition, size, and hygroscopicity - and to the surrounding atmosphere, such as temperature, relative humidity (RH), and altitude, all of which can vary spatially and temporally. During the DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality) project, extensive in situ atmospheric profiling in the Baltimore, MD-Washington, D.C. region was performed during 14 flights in July 2011. Identical flight plans and profile locations throughout the project provide meaningful statistics for determining the variability in and correlations between aerosol loading, composition, optical properties, and meteorological conditions. Measured water-soluble aerosol mass was composed primarily of ammonium sulfate (campaign average of 32 %) and organics (57 %). A distinct difference in composition was observed, with high-loading days having a proportionally larger percentage of sulfate due to transport from the Ohio River Valley. This composition shift caused a change in the aerosol water-uptake potential (hygroscopicity) such that higher relative contributions of inorganics increased the bulk aerosol hygroscopicity. These days also tended to have higher relative humidity, causing an increase in the water content of the aerosol. Conversely, low-aerosol-loading days had lower sulfate and higher black carbon contributions, causing lower single-scattering albedos (SSAs). The average black carbon concentrations were 240 ng m-3 in the lowest 1 km, decreasing to 35 ng m-3 in the free troposphere (above

  16. Hygroscopicity of organic compounds from biomass burning and their influence on the water uptake of mixed organic ammonium sulfate aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, T.; Zuend, A.; Wang, W. G.; Zhang, Y. H.; Ge, M. F.

    2014-10-01

    Hygroscopic behavior of organic compounds, including levoglucosan, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, and humic acid, as well as their effects on the hygroscopic properties of ammonium sulfate (AS) in internally mixed particles are studied by a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA). The organic compounds used represent pyrolysis products of wood that are emitted from biomass burning sources. It is found that humic acid aerosol particles only slightly take up water, starting at RH (relative humidity) above ~70%. This is contrasted by the continuous water absorption of levoglucosan aerosol particles in the range 5-90% RH. However, no hygroscopic growth is observed for 4-hydroxybenzoic acid aerosol particles. Predicted water uptake using the ideal solution theory, the AIOMFAC model and the E-AIM (with UNIFAC) model are consistent with measured hygroscopic growth factors of levoglucosan. However, the use of these models without consideration of crystalline organic phases is not appropriate to describe the hygroscopicity of organics that do not exhibit continuous water uptake, such as 4-hydroxybenzoic acid and humic acid. Mixed aerosol particles consisting of ammonium sulfate and levoglucosan, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, or humic acid with different organic mass fractions, take up a reduced amount of water above 80% RH (above AS deliquescence) relative to pure ammonium sulfate aerosol particles of the same mass. Hygroscopic growth of mixtures of ammonium sulfate and levoglucosan with different organic mass fractions agree well with the predictions of the thermodynamic models. Use of the Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson (ZSR) relation and AIOMFAC model lead to good agreement with measured growth factors of mixtures of ammonium sulfate with 4-hydroxybenzoic acid assuming an insoluble organic phase. Deviations of model predictions from the HTDMA measurement are mainly due to the occurrence of a microscopical solid phase restructuring at increased humidity (morphology

  17. Water uptake by organic aerosol and its influence on gas/particle partitioning of secondary organic aerosol in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jathar, Shantanu H.; Mahmud, Abdullah; Barsanti, Kelley C.; Asher, William E.; Pankow, James F.; Kleeman, Michael J.

    2016-03-01

    Organic aerosol (OA) is at least partly hygroscopic, i.e., water partitions into the organic phase to a degree determined by the relative humidity (RH), the organic chemical composition, and the particle size. This organic-phase water increases the aerosol mass and provides a larger absorbing matrix while decreasing its mean molecular weight, which can encourage additional condensation of semi-volatile organic compounds. Most regional and global atmospheric models account for water uptake by inorganic salts but do not explicitly account for organic-phase water and its subsequent impact on gas/particle partitioning of semi-volatile OA. In this work, we incorporated the organic-phase water model described by Pankow et al. (2015) into the UCD/CIT air quality model to simulate water uptake by OA and assessed its influence on total OA mass concentrations. The model was run for one summer month over two distinct regions: South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB) surrounding Los Angeles, California and the eastern United States (US). In SoCAB where the OA was dominated by non-hygroscopic primary OA (POA), there was very little organic-phase water uptake (0.1-0.2 μg m-3) and consequently very little enhancement (or growth) in total OA concentrations (OA + organic-phase water): a 3% increase in total OA mass was predicted for a 0.1 increase in relative humidity. In contrast, in the eastern US where secondary OA (SOA) from biogenic sources dominated the OA, substantial organic-phase water uptake and enhancement in total OA concentrations was predicted, even in urban locations. On average, the model predicted a 20% growth in total OA mass for a 0.1 increase in relative humidity; the growth was equivalent to a 250 nm particle with a hygroscopicity parameter (κ) of 0.15. Further, for the same relative humidity, the exact extent of organic-phase water uptake and total OA enhancement was found to be dependent on the particle mixing state. When the source-oriented mixing state of aerosols

  18. Competition between water uptake and ice nucleation by glassy organic aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkemeier, T.; Shiraiwa, M.; Pöschl, U.; Koop, T.

    2014-11-01

    Organic aerosol particles play a key role in climate by serving as nuclei for clouds and precipitation. Their sources and composition are highly variable, and their phase state ranges from liquid to solid under atmospheric conditions, affecting the pathway of activation to cloud droplets and ice crystals. Due to slow diffusion of water in the particle phase, organic particles may deviate in phase and morphology from their thermodynamic equilibrium state, hampering the prediction of their influence on cloud formation. We overcome this problem by combining a novel semi-empirical method for estimation of water diffusivity with a kinetic flux model that explicitly treats water diffusion. We estimate timescales for particle deliquescence as well as various ice nucleation pathways for a wide variety of organic substances, including secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from the oxidation of isoprene, α-pinene, naphthalene, and dodecane. The simulations show that, in typical atmospheric updrafts, glassy states and solid/liquid core-shell morphologies can persist for long enough that heterogeneous ice nucleation in the deposition and immersion mode can dominate over homogeneous ice nucleation. Such competition depends strongly on ambient temperature and relative humidity as well as humidification rate and particle size. Due to differences in glass transition temperature, hygroscopicity and atomic O / C ratio of the different SOA, naphthalene SOA particles have the highest potential to act as heterogeneous ice nuclei. Our findings demonstrate that kinetic limitations of water diffusion into organic aerosol particles are likely to be encountered under atmospheric conditions and can strongly affect ice nucleation pathways. For the incorporation of ice nucleation by organic aerosol particles into atmospheric models, our results demonstrate a demand for model formalisms that account for the effects of molecular diffusion and not only describe ice nucleation onsets as a function of

  19. Uptake of glyoxal by organic and Inorganic aerosol.

    PubMed

    Corrigan, Ashley L; Hanley, Sean W; De Haan, David O

    2008-06-15

    The uptake of glyoxal by a variety of organic and inorganic aerosol types was examined in a Teflon chamber. Rapid glyoxal uptake was observed for all liquid-phase aerosols at all relative humidity levels tested (< 5 to 50% RH). Even for aerosol with known water content, Henry's Law cannot predict glyoxal uptake: H* > (3 +/- 1.5) x 10(8) mol kg(-1) atm(-1) for l-tartaric acid, H* > (1 +/- 0.5) x 10(8) for dl-malic acid and H* = (2 +/- 1) x 10(7) for malonic acid aerosol. Other liquid-phase aerosol particles containing amine functional groups (arginine, aspartic acid, and glutamic acid) took up even more glyoxal (H* > 3 x 10(8)). The trend of higher glyoxal uptake onto aerosol containing more nucleophilic organic compounds suggests that glyoxal is reacting with organic compounds in the aerosol phase. Solid-phase aerosol showed RH-dependent glyoxal uptake, likely due to the existence of surface water layers. However, particle growth rates were the highestfor sodium sulfate aerosol. For organic aerosol, growth rates correlated with the acidity of the carboxylic acid groups of the aerosol material, suggesting that glyoxal uptake is enhanced by mildly acidic conditions. PMID:18605566

  20. The Importance of Water Uptake by Aerosols in the Climate Change Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaswamy, V.; Ginoux, P.; Randles, C.; Schwarzkopf, M. D.

    2007-12-01

    It is well understood that aerosol species have and are continuing to play a central role in the radiative forcing of the climate system. While the role of single-scattering properties of aerosols on climate is generally well- recognized, a key factor that governs the aerosol optical property viz., the hygroscopic growth has received insufficient attention particularly in terms of its role in the climatic impacts due to aerosols. A sensitivity investigation is performed that quantitatively highlights the consequence of the growth of sea-salt-organic carbon mixtures for radiative forcing. Next, we employ the GFDL coupled atmosphere-ocean model to study specifically the aerosol radiative forcing and climate response arising due to the hygroscopic features of sulfate aerosols as they have increased from preindustrial to present-day. We make use of observations of optical depth and surface concentrations to evaluate the reliability of the simulated hygroscopic growth. Regional climate responses in Europe, Asia and Africa are examined, with a focus on temperature, hydrological cycle and surface energy budgets. The importance of hygroscopicity in the climate change problem is put in perspective by comparing the climatic effects with those due to aerosol absorption as well as with those caused by the infrared-absorbing long- lived greenhouse gases. Further, we explore the climate consequence arising from the scenarios of the future emissions of aerosols and the associated hygroscopicity effects.

  1. Size segregated water uptake of the urban submicrometer aerosol in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massling, A.; Stock, M.; Wehner, B.; Wu, Z. J.; Hu, M.; Brüggemann, E.; Gnauk, T.; Herrmann, H.; Wiedensohler, A.

    Physical and chemical properties of submicrometer aerosol particles were measured in summer 2004 (June/July) and winter 2005 (January/February) in Beijing, Peoples Republic of China, using a Twin-Differential Mobility Particle Sizer (T-DMPS), a Hygroscopicity-Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (H-TDMA), and a Micro Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor (MOUDI). Particle number-size distributions were measured in the diameter range Dp = 3-800 nm and hygroscopic properties were determined at initial dry particle diameters of Dp j ( j = 30, 50, 80, 150, 250, and 350 nm) at a relative humidity (RH) of 90%. Hygroscopic properties were compared with chemical analyses of aerosol samples taken with the MOUDI. Based on the hygroscopicity data, the total hygroscopic particle volume was modeled, including dependence on dry particle size, season and level of pollution using a simple approach. Overall, the chemical analysis showed ammonium sulfate to be the major inorganic component of the urban submicrometer aerosol in Beijing along with relatively high fractions of elemental carbon (10-25%) and organic matter (15-60%) depending on particle size and season. The hygroscopic growth distributions (H-TDMA) subdivided the aerosol population into three different groups of particles with varying growth factors depending on dry particle size, namely nearly hydrophobic (growth factor = 0.96-1.07), less hygroscopic (1.06-1.29) and more hygroscopic (1.26-1.62). Hydrophobic particle fractions indicating freshly emitted soot/carbonaceous particles varied between 10 and 32% depending on dry particle size and season. During heavily polluted times, a decreasing number of hydrophobic particle fractions indicated that the urban submicrometer aerosol in Beijing was highly influenced by more aged aerosol transported from the industrial regions around Beijing containing sulfate as a major component. Based on model calculations, the urban submicrometer aerosol in Beijing showed strong compositional

  2. Aerosol light-scattering enhancement due to water uptake during TCAP campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titos, G.; Jefferson, A.; Sheridan, P. J.; Andrews, E.; Lyamani, H.; Alados-Arboledas, L.; Ogren, J. A.

    2014-02-01

    Aerosol optical properties were measured by the DOE/ARM (US Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurements) Program Mobile Facility in the framework of the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) deployed at Cape Cod, Massachusetts, for a~one year period (from summer 2012 to summer 2013). Measured optical properties included aerosol light-absorption coefficient (σap) at low relative humidity (RH) and aerosol light-scattering coefficient (σsp) at low and at RH values varying from 30 to 85%, approximately. Calculated variables included the single scattering albedo (SSA), the scattering Ångström exponent (SAE) and the scattering enhancement factor (f(RH)). Over the period of measurement, f(RH = 80%) had a mean value of 1.9 ± 0.3 and 1.8 ± 0.4 in the PM10 and PM1 fractions, respectively. Higher f(RH = 80%) values were observed for wind directions from 0-180° (marine sector) together with high SSA and low SAE values. The wind sector from 225 to 315° was identified as an anthropogenically-influenced sector, and it was characterized by smaller, darker and less hygroscopic aerosols. For the marine sector, f(RH = 80%) was 2.2 compared with a value of 1.8 obtained for the anthropogenically-influenced sector. The air-mass backward trajectory analysis agreed well with the wind sector analysis. It shows low cluster to cluster variability except for air-masses coming from the Atlantic Ocean that showed higher hygroscopicity. Knowledge of the effect of RH on aerosol optical properties is of great importance for climate forcing calculations and for comparison of in-situ measurements with satellite and remote sensing retrievals. In this sense, predictive capability of f(RH) for use in climate models would be enhanced if other aerosol parameters could be used as proxies to estimate hygroscopic growth. Toward this goal, we propose an exponential equation that successfully estimates aerosol hygroscopicity as a function of SSA at Cape Cod. Further work is needed to determine

  3. Aerosol light-scattering enhancement due to water uptake during the TCAP campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titos, G.; Jefferson, A.; Sheridan, P. J.; Andrews, E.; Lyamani, H.; Alados-Arboledas, L.; Ogren, J. A.

    2014-07-01

    Aerosol optical properties were measured by the DOE/ARM (US Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurements) Program Mobile Facility during the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) campaign deployed at Cape Cod, Massachusetts, for a 1-year period (from summer 2012 to summer 2013). Measured optical properties included aerosol light-absorption coefficient (σap) at low relative humidity (RH) and aerosol light-scattering coefficient (σsp) at low and at RH values varying from 30 to 85%, approximately. Calculated variables included the single scattering albedo (SSA), the scattering Ångström exponent (SAE) and the scattering enhancement factor (f(RH)). Over the period of measurement, f(RH = 80%) had a mean value of 1.9 ± 0.3 and 1.8 ± 0.4 in the PM10 and PM1 fractions, respectively. Higher f(RH = 80%) values were observed for wind directions from 0 to 180° (marine sector) together with high SSA and low SAE values. The wind sector from 225 to 315° was identified as an anthropogenically influenced sector, and it was characterized by smaller, darker and less hygroscopic aerosols. For the marine sector, f(RH = 80%) was 2.2 compared with a value of 1.8 obtained for the anthropogenically influenced sector. The air-mass backward trajectory analysis agreed well with the wind sector analysis. It shows low cluster to cluster variability except for air masses coming from the Atlantic Ocean that showed higher hygroscopicity. Knowledge of the effect of RH on aerosol optical properties is of great importance for climate forcing calculations and for comparison of in situ measurements with satellite and remote sensing retrievals. In this sense, predictive capability of f(RH) for use in climate models would be enhanced if other aerosol parameters could be used as proxies to estimate hygroscopic growth. Toward this goal, we propose an exponential equation that successfully estimates aerosol hygroscopicity as a function of SSA at Cape Cod. Further work is needed to determine if

  4. Heterogeneous Uptake of HO2 Radicals onto Atmospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, I. J.; Matthews, P. S.; Brooks, B.; Goddard, A.; Whalley, L. K.; Baeza-Romero, M. T.; Heard, D. E.

    2011-12-01

    The hydroxyl (OH) and hydroperoxyl (HO2) radicals, together known as HOx, play a vital role in atmospheric chemistry by controlling the oxidative capacity of the troposphere. The atmospheric lifetime and concentrations of many trace reactive species, such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs), are determined by HOx radical levels. Therefore, the ability to accurately predict atmospheric HOx concentrations from a detailed knowledge of their sources and sinks is a very useful diagnostic tool to assess our current understanding of atmospheric chemistry. Several recent field studies have observed significantly lower concentrations of HO2 radicals than predicted using box models, where HO2 loss onto aerosols was suggested as a possible missing sink [1, 2]. However, the mechanism on HO2 uptake onto aerosols and its impact on ambient HOx levels are currently not well understood. To improve our understanding of this process, we have conducted laboratory experiments to measure HO2 uptake coefficients onto submicron aerosol particles. The FAGE (Fluorescence Assay by Gas Expansion) technique, a highly sensitive laser induced fluorescence based detection method, was used to monitor HO2 uptake kinetics onto aerosol particles in an aerosol flow tube. The application of the FAGE technique allowed for kinetic experiments to be performed under low HO2 concentrations, i.e. [HO2] < 109 molecules cm-3. HO2 radicals were produced by the photolysis of water vapour in the presence of O2 and aerosol particles were produced either by atomizing dilute salt solutions or by homogeneous nucleation. HO2 uptake coefficients (γ) have been measured for single-component solid and aqueous inorganic salt and organic aerosol particles with a wide range of hygroscopicities. HO2 uptake coefficients on solid particles were below the detection limit (γ < 0.001), whereas on aqueous aerosols uptake coefficients were somewhat larger (γ = 0.001 - 0.008). HO2 uptake coefficients were highest on aerosols

  5. Effect of the secondary organic aerosol coatings on black carbon water uptake, cloud condensation nuclei activity, and particle collapse

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ability of black carbon aerosols to absorb water and act as a cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) directly controls their lifetime in the atmosphere as well as their impact on cloud formation, thus impacting the earth’s climate. Black carbon emitted from most combustion pro...

  6. Size-resolved aerosol water uptake and cloud condensation nuclei measurements as measured above a Southeast Asian rainforest during OP3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irwin, M.; Robinson, N.; Allan, J. D.; Coe, H.; McFiggans, G.

    2011-01-01

    The influence of the properties of fine particles on the formation of clouds and precipitation in the tropical atmosphere is of primary importance to their impacts on radiative forcing and the hydrological cycle. Measurements of aerosol number size distribution, hygroscopicity in both sub- and supersaturated regimes and composition were taken between March and July 2008 in the tropical rainforest in Borneo, Malaysia, marking the first study of this type in an Asian tropical rainforest. Hygroscopic growth factors (GF) at 90% relative humidity (RH) for the dry diameter range D0=32-258 nm, supersaturated water uptake behaviour for the dry diameter range D0=20-300 nm and aerosol chemical composition were simultaneously measured using a Hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyser (HTDMA), a Droplet Measurement Technologies Cloud Condensation Nuclei counter (CCNc) and an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS), respectively. The derived hygroscopicty parameter κ ranged from between 0.05-0.37 for the supersaturation range 0.11-0.73% compared to those between 0.17-0.37 for measurements performed at a relative humidity of 90%. In contrast, results from a study with similar methodology performed in the Amazon basin report more similar values for κ, indicating that the aerosol as measured from both sites shows similar hygroscopic properties. However, the derived number of cloud condensation nuclei (NCCN) were much higher than those measured in the Amazon, due to the higher particle number concentrations in the rainforests of Borneo. This first contrast between the two environments may be of substantial importance in describing the impacts of particles in the tropical atmosphere.

  7. Size-resolved aerosol water uptake and cloud condensation nuclei measurements as measured above a Southeast Asian rainforest during OP3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irwin, M.; Robinson, N.; Allan, J. D.; Coe, H.; McFiggans, G.

    2011-11-01

    The influence of the properties of fine particles on the formation of clouds and precipitation in the tropical atmosphere is of primary importance to their impacts on radiative forcing and the hydrological cycle. Measurements of aerosol number size distribution, hygroscopicity in both sub- and supersaturated regimes and composition were taken between March and July 2008 in the tropical rainforest in Borneo, Malaysia, marking the first study of this type in an Asian tropical rainforest. Hygroscopic growth factors (GF) at 90 % relative humidity (RH) for the dry diameter range D0 = 32-258 nm, supersaturated water uptake behaviour for the dry diameter range D0 = 45-300 nm and aerosol chemical composition were simultaneously measured using a Hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyser (HTDMA), a Droplet Measurement Technologies Cloud Condensation Nuclei counter (CCNc) and an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) respectively. The hygroscopicity parameter κ was derived from both CCNc and HTDMA measurements, with the resulting values of κ ranging from 0.05-0.37, and 0.17-0.37, respectively. Although the total range of κ values is in good agreement, there are inconsistencies between CCNc and HTDMA derived κ values at different dry diameters. Results from a study with similar methodology performed in the Amazon rainforest report values for κ within a similar range to those reported in this work, indicating that the aerosol as measured from both sites shows similar hygroscopic properties. However, the derived number of cloud condensation nuclei (NCCN) were much higher in the present experiment than the Amazon, resulting in part from the increased total particle number concentrations observed in the Bornean rainforest. This contrast between the two environments may be of substantial importance in describing the impacts of particles in the tropical atmosphere.

  8. Gas uptake and chemical aging of semisolid organic aerosol particles

    PubMed Central

    Shiraiwa, Manabu; Ammann, Markus; Koop, Thomas; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    Organic substances can adopt an amorphous solid or semisolid state, influencing the rate of heterogeneous reactions and multiphase processes in atmospheric aerosols. Here we demonstrate how molecular diffusion in the condensed phase affects the gas uptake and chemical transformation of semisolid organic particles. Flow tube experiments show that the ozone uptake and oxidative aging of amorphous protein is kinetically limited by bulk diffusion. The reactive gas uptake exhibits a pronounced increase with relative humidity, which can be explained by a decrease of viscosity and increase of diffusivity due to hygroscopic water uptake transforming the amorphous organic matrix from a glassy to a semisolid state (moisture-induced phase transition). The reaction rate depends on the condensed phase diffusion coefficients of both the oxidant and the organic reactant molecules, which can be described by a kinetic multilayer flux model but not by the traditional resistor model approach of multiphase chemistry. The chemical lifetime of reactive compounds in atmospheric particles can increase from seconds to days as the rate of diffusion in semisolid phases can decrease by multiple orders of magnitude in response to low temperature or low relative humidity. The findings demonstrate that the occurrence and properties of amorphous semisolid phases challenge traditional views and require advanced formalisms for the description of organic particle formation and transformation in atmospheric models of aerosol effects on air quality, public health, and climate. PMID:21690350

  9. The Humidity Dependence of N2O5 Uptake to Citric Acid Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzinic, G.; Bartels-Rausch, T.; Tuerler, A.; Ammann, M.

    2013-12-01

    Dinitrogen pentoxide is a significant reactive intermediate in the night time chemistry of nitrogen oxides. Depending on atmospheric conditions it can act either as a NO3 radical reservoir or as a major NOx sink by heterogeneous hydrolysis on aerosol surfaces. As such, it can influence tropospheric ozone production and therefore the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere. The heterogeneous loss of N2O5 to aerosol particles has remained uncertain, and reconciling lab and field data has demonstrated some gaps in our understanding of the detailed mechanism. We used the short-lived radioactive tracer 13N to study N2O5 uptake kinetics on aerosol particles in an aerosol flow reactor at ambient pressure, temperature and relative humidity. Citric acid, representing strongly oxidized polyfunctional organic compounds in atmospheric aerosols, has been chosen as a proxy due to its well established physical properties. Aerosol uptake measurements were performed with citric acid aerosols in a humidity range of 15-75 % RH, within which the uptake coefficient varies between about 0.001 and about 0.02. Taking into account the well established hygroscopic properties of citric acid, we interpret uptake in terms of disproportionation of N2O5 into nitrate ion and nitronium ion and reaction of the latter with liquid water.

  10. Uptake of Ambient Organic Gases to Acidic Sulfate Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liggio, J.; Li, S.

    2009-05-01

    The formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) in the atmosphere has been an area of significant interest due to its climatic relevance, its effects on air quality and human health. Due largely to the underestimation of SOA by regional and global models, there has been an increasing number of studies focusing on alternate pathways leading to SOA. In this regard, recent work has shown that heterogeneous and liquid phase reactions, often leading to oligomeric material, may be a route to SOA via products of biogenic and anthropogenic origin. Although oligomer formation in chamber studies has been frequently observed, the applicability of these experiments to ambient conditions, and thus the overall importance of oligomerization reactions remain unclear. In the present study, ambient air is drawn into a Teflon smog chamber and exposed to acidic sulfate aerosols which have been formed in situ via the reaction of SO3 with water vapor. The aerosol composition is measured with a High Resolution Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS), and particle size distributions are monitored with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS). The use of ambient air and relatively low inorganic particle loading potentially provides clearer insight into the importance of heterogeneous reactions. Results of experiments, with a range of sulfate loadings show that there are several competing processes occurring on different timescales. A significant uptake of ambient organic gases to the particles is observed immediately followed by a slow shift towards higher m/z over a period of several hours indicating that higher molecular weight products (possibly oligomers) are being formed through a reactive process. The results suggest that heterogeneous reactions can occur with ambient organic gases, even in the presence of ammonia, which may have significant implications to the ambient atmosphere where particles may be neutralized after their formation.

  11. Measurements of the HO2 uptake coefficients onto single component organic aerosols.

    PubMed

    Lakey, P S J; George, I J; Whalley, L K; Baeza-Romero, M T; Heard, D E

    2015-04-21

    Measurements of HO2 uptake coefficients (γ) were made onto a variety of organic aerosols derived from glutaric acid, glyoxal, malonic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid, squalene, monoethanol amine sulfate, monomethyl amine sulfate, and two sources of humic acid, for an initial HO2 concentration of 1 × 10(9) molecules cm(-3), room temperature and at atmospheric pressure. Values in the range of γ < 0.004 to γ = 0.008 ± 0.004 were measured for all of the aerosols apart from the aerosols from the two sources of humic acid. For humic acid aerosols, uptake coefficients in the range of γ = 0.007 ± 0.002 to γ = 0.09 ± 0.03 were measured. Elevated concentrations of copper (16 ± 1 and 380 ± 20 ppb) and iron (600 ± 30 and 51 000 ± 3000 ppb) ions were measured in the humic acid atomizer solutions compared to the other organics that can explain the higher uptake values measured. A strong dependence upon relative humidity was also observed for uptake onto humic acid, with larger uptake coefficients seen at higher humidities. Possible hypotheses for the humidity dependence include the changing liquid water content of the aerosol, a change in the mass accommodation coefficient or in the Henry's law constant. PMID:25811311

  12. Aerosol water parameterisation: a single parameter framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, Swen; Steil, Benedikt; Abdelkader, Mohamed; Klingmüller, Klaus; Xu, Li; Penner, Joyce E.; Fountoukis, Christos; Nenes, Athanasios; Lelieveld, Jos

    2016-06-01

    We introduce a framework to efficiently parameterise the aerosol water uptake for mixtures of semi-volatile and non-volatile compounds, based on the coefficient, νi. This solute-specific coefficient was introduced in Metzger et al. (2012) to accurately parameterise the single solution hygroscopic growth, considering the Kelvin effect - accounting for the water uptake of concentrated nanometer-sized particles up to dilute solutions, i.e. from the compounds relative humidity of deliquescence (RHD) up to supersaturation (Köhler theory). Here we extend the νi parameterisation from single to mixed solutions. We evaluate our framework at various levels of complexity, by considering the full gas-liquid-solid partitioning for a comprehensive comparison with reference calculations using the E-AIM, EQUISOLV II and ISORROPIA II models as well as textbook examples. We apply our parameterisation in the EQuilibrium Simplified Aerosol Model V4 (EQSAM4clim) for climate simulations, implemented in a box model and in the global chemistry-climate model EMAC. Our results show (i) that the νi approach enables one to analytically solve the entire gas-liquid-solid partitioning and the mixed solution water uptake with sufficient accuracy, (ii) that ammonium sulfate mixtures can be solved with a simple method, e.g. pure ammonium nitrate and mixed ammonium nitrate and (iii) that the aerosol optical depth (AOD) simulations are in close agreement with remote sensing observations for the year 2005. Long-term evaluation of the EMAC results based on EQSAM4clim and ISORROPIA II will be presented separately.

  13. Aerosol water parameterization: a single parameter framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, S.; Steil, B.; Abdelkader, M.; Klingmüller, K.; Xu, L.; Penner, J. E.; Fountoukis, C.; Nenes, A.; Lelieveld, J.

    2015-11-01

    We introduce a framework to efficiently parameterize the aerosol water uptake for mixtures of semi-volatile and non-volatile compounds, based on the coefficient, νi. This solute specific coefficient was introduced in Metzger et al. (2012) to accurately parameterize the single solution hygroscopic growth, considering the Kelvin effect - accounting for the water uptake of concentrated nanometer sized particles up to dilute solutions, i.e., from the compounds relative humidity of deliquescence (RHD) up to supersaturation (Köhler-theory). Here we extend the νi-parameterization from single to mixed solutions. We evaluate our framework at various levels of complexity, by considering the full gas-liquid-solid partitioning for a comprehensive comparison with reference calculations using the E-AIM, EQUISOLV II, ISORROPIA II models as well as textbook examples. We apply our parameterization in EQSAM4clim, the EQuilibrium Simplified Aerosol Model V4 for climate simulations, implemented in a box model and in the global chemistry-climate model EMAC. Our results show: (i) that the νi-approach enables to analytically solve the entire gas-liquid-solid partitioning and the mixed solution water uptake with sufficient accuracy, (ii) that, e.g., pure ammonium nitrate and mixed ammonium nitrate - ammonium sulfate mixtures can be solved with a simple method, and (iii) that the aerosol optical depth (AOD) simulations are in close agreement with remote sensing observations for the year 2005. Long-term evaluation of the EMAC results based on EQSAM4clim and ISORROPIA II will be presented separately.

  14. The effect of fatty acid surfactants on the uptake of nitric acid to deliquesced NaCl aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stemmler, K.; Vlasenko, A.; Guimbaud, C.; Ammann, M.

    2008-01-01

    Surface active organic compounds have been observed in marine boundary layer aerosol. Here, we investigate the effect such surfactants have on the uptake of nitric acid (HNO3), an important removal reaction of nitrogen oxides in the marine boundary layer. The uptake of gaseous HNO3 on deliquesced NaCl aerosol was measured in a flow reactor using HNO3 labelled with the short-lived radioactive isotope 13N. The uptake coefficient γ on pure deliquesced NaCl aerosol was γ=0.5±0.2 at 60% relative humidity and 30 ppb HNO3(g). The uptake coefficient was reduced by a factor of 5-50 when the aerosol was coated with saturated linear fatty acids with carbon chain lengths of 18 and 15 atoms in monolayer quantities. In contrast, neither shorter saturated linear fatty acids with 12 and 9 carbon atoms, nor coatings with the unsaturated oleic acid (C18, cis-double bond) had a detectable effect on the rate of HNO3 uptake. It is concluded that it is the structure of the monolayers formed, which determines their resistance towards HNO3 uptake. Fatty acids (C18 and C15), which form a highly ordered film in the so-called liquid condensed state, represent a significant barrier towards HNO3 uptake, while monolayers of shorter-chain fatty acids (C9, C12) and of the unsaturated oleic acid form a less ordered film in the liquid expanded state and do not hinder the uptake. Similarly, high contents of humic acids in the aerosol, a structurally inhomogeneous, quite water soluble mixture of oxidised high molecular weight organic compounds did not affect HNO3 uptake. As surfactant films on naturally occurring aerosol are expected to be less structured due to their chemical inhomogeneity, it is likely that their inhibitory effect on HNO3 uptake is smaller than that observed here for the C15 and C18 fatty acid monolayers.

  15. The effect of fatty acid surfactants on the uptake of nitric acid to deliquesced NaCl aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stemmler, K.; Vlasenko, A.; Guimbaud, C.; Ammann, M.

    2008-09-01

    Surface active organic compounds have been observed in marine boundary layer aerosol. Here, we investigate the effect such surfactants have on the uptake of nitric acid (HNO3), an important removal reaction of nitrogen oxides in the marine boundary layer. The uptake of gaseous HNO3 on deliquesced NaCl aerosol was measured in a flow reactor using HNO3 labelled with the short-lived radioactive isotope 13N. The uptake coefficient γ on pure deliquesced NaCl aerosol was γ=0.5±0.2 at 60% relative humidity and 30 ppb HNO3(g). The uptake coefficient was reduced by a factor of 5 50 when the aerosol was coated with saturated linear fatty acids with carbon chain lengths of 18 and 15 atoms in monolayer quantities. In contrast, neither shorter saturated linear fatty acids with 12 and 9 carbon atoms, nor coatings with the unsaturated oleic acid (C18, cis-double bond) had a detectable effect on the rate of HNO3 uptake. It is concluded that it is the structure of the monolayers formed, which determines their resistance towards HNO3 uptake. Fatty acids (C18 and C15), which form a highly ordered film in the so-called liquid condensed state, represent a significant barrier towards HNO3 uptake, while monolayers of shorter-chain fatty acids (C9, C12) and of the unsaturated oleic acid form a less ordered film in the liquid expanded state and do not hinder the uptake. Similarly, high contents of humic acids in the aerosol, a structurally inhomogeneous, quite water soluble mixture of oxidised high molecular weight organic compounds did not affect HNO3 uptake. As surfactant films on naturally occurring aerosol are expected to be less structured due to their chemical inhomogeneity, it is likely that their inhibitory effect on HNO3 uptake is smaller than that observed here for the C15 and C18 fatty acid monolayers.

  16. Reactive uptake of N2O5 by aerosol particles containing mixtures of humic acid and ammonium sulfate.

    PubMed

    Badger, Claire L; Griffiths, Paul T; George, Ingrid; Abbatt, Jonathan P D; Cox, R Anthony

    2006-06-01

    The kinetics of reactive uptake of N2O5 on submicron aerosol particles containing humic acid and ammonium sulfate has been investigated as a function of relative humidity (RH) and aerosol composition using a laminar flow reactor coupled with a differential mobility analyzer (DMA) to characterize the aerosol. For single-component humic acid aerosol the uptake coefficient, gamma, was found to increase from 2 to 9 x 10(-4) over the range 25-75% RH. These values are 1-2 orders of magnitude below those typically observed for single-component sulfate aerosols (Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 2003, 5, 3453-3463;(1) Atmos. Environ. 2000, 34, 2131-2159(2)). For the mixed aerosols, gamma was found to decrease with increasing humic acid mass fraction and increase with increasing RH. For aerosols containing only 6% humic acid by dry mass, a decrease in reactivity of more than a factor of 2 was observed compared with the case for single-component ammonium sulfate. The concentration of liquid water in the aerosol droplets was calculated using the aerosol inorganic model (for the ammonium sulfate component) and a new combined FTIR-DMA system (for the humic acid component). Analysis of the uptake coefficients using the water concentration data shows that the change in reactivity cannot be explained by the change in water content alone. We suggest that, due to its surfactant properties, the main effect of the humic acid is to reduce the mass accommodation coefficient for N2O5 at the aerosol particle surface. This has implications for the use of particle hygroscopicity data for predictions of the rate of N2O5 hydrolysis. PMID:16722713

  17. Do anthropogenic aerosols enhance CO2 uptake by plants?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strada, S.; Unger, N.

    2013-12-01

    Plant productivity (photosynthesis) is tightly connected to the supply of solar radiation and water and to surface temperature. Solar radiation reaching the Earth's surface and the water cycle are strongly modified by anthropogenic aerosols. Aerosols reduce the amount of global radiation and surface temperature, and they modify the partitioning between direct and diffuse radiation. Moreover, they modify cloud radiative properties and lifetime. These aerosols effects may influence Gross Primary Productivity (GPP): (1) by intensifying the diffuse-radiation fertilization effect (i.e. plant productivity is more efficient under diffuse light whose amount may increase due to aerosol loading); (2) by modifying water supply through suppression/enhancement of rainfall; (3) by reducing surface temperature. Among aerosol impacts on GPP, it is unclear if there exists a prevailing one, or if the prevailing impact varies across ecosystems. Feedbacks to GPP from the effects of biogenic secondary organic aerosol (BSOA) formed from vegetation reactive carbon emissions have not been investigated. Moreover, human-made pollution and biomass burning induce high ozone concentrations that simultaneously reduce plant productivity. We apply satellite observations and global model simulations to investigate the spatial pattern in the relationship between aerosols and plant productivity across different ecosystems, and whether plants control their diffuse radiation environment through the reactive carbon emissions. We quantify the correlation between MODIS GPP and: (1) fine-fraction Aerosol Optical Depth from MODIS (fAOD); (2) ozone levels in the middle troposphere from TES. The analysis of satellite data reveals strong positive correlation between GPP and fAOD in temperate and boreal ecosystems, and strong negative correlation in tropical ecosystems. The tropical ecosystem also presents strong negative correlation between GPP and O3. Simulations using Yale-E2 global carbon

  18. Uptake of Elements From Aerosols by Humans ~ A Case Study From Delhi & Bangalore Cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, S.; Yadav, S.; Jain, V. K.

    2006-05-01

    Aerosol research has gained tremendous importance globally due to the cumulative effects of increasing industrialization and urbanization on aerosol production which can have an alarming impact on the climate of the planet as well as the health of its inhabitants. Therefore, there is an increasing need to study aerosols for all of their physicochemical and biological aspects on both local and global scales. World over extensive research has gone into studying the physical and the chemical aspects of aerosols. However, little information is yet available on the health impacts of aerosols particularly in the Asian context. Here we report uptake of various elements that are concentrated in aerosols by the human body in Delhi and Bangalore cities and their possible health effects. In many urban areas, for example in Delhi, inhalable fractions of aerosols are known to have high concentrations of elements such as Cu, Zn, Pb, Ba, Ni and Cr (Yadav and Rajamani 2004). Also aerosols in the North West part of India seem to be particularly enriched in these elements. If so, there is a high possibility of these elements getting into the human system either directly or indirectly through water and food. To determine the concentrations of these elements that are present in significant concentrations in the inhalable fractions of aerosols, human hair and blood samples are used as proxies. Both these regions have contrasting geographic and climatic conditions. Delhi (altitude : 213-305m above MSL) located on the fringes of the Thar desert which supplies considerable amount of dust, is semi-arid with annual rainfall of 60-80 cms & temperatures varying between 1° - 45°. Bangalore (altitude of 900m above MSL) receives a high annual rainfall of 80-100 cms and being located on the fringes of tropical forests of the Sahyadri Mountains (Western Ghats) receives little crustal contribution to the aerosols. Samples from least polluted mountainous areas of Himalayas (Gangothri) and Sahyadri

  19. Clouds and climate: Ability of atmospheric particles to uptake water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farnham, Gabriella Joy Engelhart

    Atmospheric aerosols have significant impacts on human health, visibility and climate. Their interactions with water alter deposition within the human respiratory system, change particle optical properties, and change cloud microphysics by serving as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). These clouds have a considerable influence on climate by reflecting incoming solar radiation, which provides a negative forcing, or cooling effect on earth's climate due to increased reflectivity. Our current understanding of the interactions of aerosols with clouds and climate is limited; the parameterizations needed for modeling predictions of climate can be aided by constraints from laboratory and in-situ experiments. Much of the uncertainty regarding the water uptake by atmospheric particles resides in organic aerosols. This thesis utilizes smog chamber techniques to study the CCN activity of biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA) including isoprene, monoterpene and sesquiterpene precursors. Particular emphasis is placed on comparison to Kohler theory, surface tension, solubility, droplet growth kinetics and volatility. The work also studies the CCN activity of a less controlled mixture of primary aerosol from biomass burning and the potential for transformation in the atmosphere via oxidation. Finally, this dissertation utilizes a dry-ambient aerosol size spectrometer (DAASS) to study the water content of aged atmospheric particles in a remote environment. We find monoterpene and isoprene SOA serve as good CCN. The water soluble component of sesquiterpene SOA has similar properties to those observed for monoterpene SOA meaning that a predictive understanding of SOA CCN may require knowledge of the water soluble fraction, but not its exact speciation. Sesquiterpene SOA CCN activity is particularly sensitive to temperature, suggesting that the CCN active fraction of the SOA is semi-volatile. Biomass burning experiments reveal that the CCN characteristics of primary aerosols

  20. Glyoxal uptake on ammonium sulphate seed aerosol: reaction products and reversibility of uptake under dark and irradiated conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galloway, M. M.; Chhabra, P. S.; Chan, A. W. H.; Surratt, J. D.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J. H.; Keutsch, F. N.

    2008-12-01

    Chamber studies of glyoxal uptake onto neutral ammonium sulphate aerosol were performed under dark and irradiated conditions to gain further insight into processes controlling glyoxal uptake onto ambient aerosol. Organic fragments from glyoxal dimers and trimers were observed within the aerosol under dark and irradiated conditions; glyoxal oligomer formation and overall organic growth were found to be reversible under dark conditions. Analysis of high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectra provides evidence for irreversible formation of carbon-nitrogen (C-N) compounds in the aerosol. These compounds are likely to be imidazoles formed by reaction of glyoxal with the ammonium sulphate seed. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first time C-N compounds resulting from condensed phase reactions with ammonium sulphate seed have been detected in aerosol. Organosulphates were not detected under dark conditions. However, active oxidative photochemistry, similar to that found in cloud processing, was found to occur within aerosol during irradiated experiments. Organosulphates, carboxylic acids, and organic esters were identified within the aerosol. Our study suggests that both C-N compound formation and photochemical processes should be considered in models of secondary organic aerosol formation via glyoxal.

  1. Reactive uptake of HOCl to laboratory generated sea salt particles and nascent sea-spray aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, N. R.; Ryder, O. S.; Bertram, T. H.

    2013-12-01

    Field observations suggest that the reactive uptake of HOCl on marine aerosol particles is an important source of chlorine radicals, particularly under low NOx conditions. However to date, laboratory measurements disagree on the magnitude of the reactive uptake coefficient for HOCl by a factor of 5 (γ(HOCl) ranges between 0.0004 and 0.0018), and there are no measurements of γ(HOCl) on nascent sea-spray aerosol. Here, we present measurements of the reactive uptake of HOCl to laboratory generated sodium chloride and sea-spray aerosol particles generated in a novel Marine Aerosol Reference Tank (MART), coupled to an entrained aerosol flow reactor and Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS). Measurements of γ(HOCl) retrieved here are compared against those in the literature, and the role of organic coatings on nascent sea-spray aerosol is explored.

  2. Uptake of 13N-labeled N2O5 to citric acid aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzinic, Goran; Bartels-Rausch, Thorsten; Birrer, Mario; Türler, Andreas; Ammann, Markus

    2013-04-01

    Dinitrogen pentoxide is a significant reactive intermediate in the night time chemistry of nitrogen oxides. Depending on atmospheric conditions it can act either as a NO3 radical reservoir or as a major NOx sink by heterogeneous hydrolysis on aerosol surfaces. As such, it can influence tropospheric ozone production and therefore the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere. Furthermore it's suspected of being a non negligible source of tropospheric Cl, even over continental areas [1,2]. We used the short-lived radioactive tracer 13N delivered by PSI's PROTRAC facility [3] in conjunction with an aerosol flow tube reactor in order to study N2O5 uptake kinetics on aerosol particles. 13NO is mixed with non labeled NO and O3 in a gas reactor where N2O5 is synthesized under dry conditions to prevent hydrolysis on the reactor walls. The resulting N2O5 flow is fed into an aerosol flow tube reactor together with a humidified aerosol flow. By using movable inlets we can vary the length of the aerosol flow tube and thus the reaction time. The gas feed from the reactor is then directed into a narrow parallel plate diffusion denuder system that allows for selective separation of the gaseous species present in the gas phase. Aerosol particles are trapped on a particle filter placed at the end of the denuder system. The activity of 13N labeled species trapped on the denuder plates and in the particle filter can be monitored via scintillation counters. Aerosol uptake measurements were performed with citric acid aerosols in a humidity range of 27-61.5% RH. The results obtained from our measurements have shown that the uptake coefficient increases with humidity from 1.65±0.3x10-3 (~27% RH) to 1.25±0.3x10-2 (45% RH) and 2.00±0.3x10-2 (61.5% RH). Comparison to literature data shows that this is similar to values reported for some polycarboxylic acids (like malonic acid), while being higher than some others [4]. The increase is likely related to the increasing amount of water associated

  3. An Overview of Current Issues in the Uptake of Atmospheric Trace Gasses by Aerosols and Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Kolb, C. E.; Cox, R. A.; Abbatt, JPD; Ammann, M.; Davis, E. J.; Donaldson, D. J.; Garrett, Bruce C.; George, C.; Griffiths, T.; Hanson, D. R.; Kulmala, M.; McFiggans, Gordon; Poschl, U.; Riipinen, I.; Rossi, M.; Rudich, Yinon; Wagner, P. E.; Winkler, Paul J.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; O'Dowd, C. D.

    2010-11-10

    A workshop was held in the framework of the ACCENT (Atmospheric Composition Change a European Network) Joint Research Programme on Aerosols and the Programme on Access to Laboratory Data. The aim of the workshop was to hold ‘Gordon Conference’ type discussion covering accommodation and reactive uptake of water vapour and trace pollutant gases on condensed phase atmospheric materials. The scope was to review and define the current state of knowledge of accommodation coefficients for water vapour on water droplet and ice surfaces, and uptake of trace gas species on a variety of different surfaces characteristic of the atmospheric condensed phase particulate matter and cloud droplets. Twenty-six scientists participated in this meeting through presentations, discussions and the development of a consensus review. In this review we present an analysis of the state of knowledge on the thermal and mass accommodation coefficient for water vapour on aqueous droplets and ice and a survey of current state-of the-art of reactive uptake of trace gases on a range of liquid and solid atmospheric droplets and particles. The review recommends consistent definitions of the various parameters that are needed for quantitative representation of the range of gas/condensed surface kinetic processes important for the atmosphere and identifies topics that require additional research.

  4. Quartz Crystal Microbalance: Aerosol Viscoelastic Measurement Calibration and Subsiquent H2O Uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farland, D. R., Jr.; Gilles, M. K.; Harder, T.; Weis, J.; Mueller, S.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosol particles exposed to various atmospheric relative humidity (RH) levels exhibit hygroscopic properties which are not fully understood. Water adsorption or diffusion depends on particle viscosity in semi-solid to liquid states. This relationship between particle viscosity as a function of RH and the corresponding hygroscopic behavioral response is the purpose of this study. However, reliable techniques for viscosity quantification have been limited. A Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation (QCM-D) was used for viscosity measurements and to determine phase changes. Prior to studies on field samples, microscope immersion/viscosity standard oils, salt crystals, sugars and alpha-pinene secondary organic aerosol (SOA) surrogates are used for viscosity, RH calibrations, water uptake and phase change measurements. RH was controlled by flowing N2 gas saturated with H2O for RH's between 0-75% RH. For higher RH values, (75-100% RH range) saturated salt solutions were flowed over a gore membrane to protect the QCM sensor from direct contact with the solutions. The viscosity calibration constructed via QTools fitting software illustrates the limitations as well as the ranges of reliability of the QCM viscosity measurements. Deliquescing salt crystals of differing deliquescence relative humidity's (DRH), sugars and alpha-pinene SOA's provided insight into the detection of various phase change behaviors. Water uptake experiments performed on alpha-pinene SOA and sucrose sugar yielded significantly different frequency and dissipation responses than the deliquescing salts. Future work will apply these experimental methods and analysis on aerosol particles collected during the GoAmazon field campaign.

  5. Reactive uptake of N2O5 by aerosols containing dicarboxylic acids. Effect of particle phase, composition, and nitrate content.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Paul T; Badger, Claire L; Cox, R Anthony; Folkers, Mareike; Henk, Hartmut H; Mentel, Thomas F

    2009-04-30

    Reactive uptake coefficients for loss of N(2)O(5) to micron-size aerosols containing oxalic malonic, succinic, and glutaric acids, and mixtures with ammonium hydrogen sulfate and ammonium sulfate, are presented. The uptake measurements were made using two different systems: atmospheric pressure laminar flow tube reactor (Cambridge) and the Large Indoor Aerosol Chamber at Forschungszentrum Juelich. Generally good agreement is observed for the data recorded using the two techniques. Measured uptake coefficients lie in the range 5 x 10(-4)-3 x 10(-2), dependent on relative humidity, on particle phase, and on particle composition. Uptake to solid particles is generally slow, with observed uptake coefficients less than 1 x 10(-3), while uptake to liquid particles is around an order of magnitude more efficient. These results are rationalized using a numerical model employing explicit treatment of both transport and chemistry. Our results indicate a modest effect of the dicarboxylic acids on uptake and confirm the strong effect of particle phase, liquid water content, and particulate nitrate concentrations. PMID:19385680

  6. Heterogenous uptake of gaseous N(sub 2)O(sub 5) by sulfate aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leu, M. -T.; Kane, S. M.; Caloz, F.

    2001-01-01

    The heterogeneous uptake of gaseous N sub 2 O sub 5 by ammonium sulfate, ammonium bisulfate, and sulfuric acid aerosols as a function of relative humididty has been investigated at room temperature and atmsopheric pressure.

  7. Water uptake in stimulated cat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Watson, P D; Garner, R P; Ward, D S

    1993-04-01

    Isolated vasodilated cat hindlimb skeletal muscles were perfused at constant flow and stimulated at 4 Hz for 2-4 min in three studies. Water uptake rates were measured gravimetrically or calculated from venous protein concentration changes. Venous plasma sodium, potassium, chloride, and osmolality were also measured. Maximum water uptake rates averaged 1.8 +/- 0.2 (SE) ml.min-1 x 100 g-1, reaching twice that in some experiments. Water uptake continued after stimulation had ceased. Constant-flow perfusion maintained a constant capillary pressure that was corroborated by measurements of arterial and venous perfusate pressures. Water uptake rate was not influenced by hematocrit but was highly correlated with plasma flow rate. The evidence strongly suggests that small-molecule osmotic pressure was the primary pressure causing the transcapillary water flux. Venous plasma sodium and chloride concentrations increased almost as much as protein (108 and 87% of the protein increase, respectively), as would be expected when water fluxes are driven by small-molecule osmotic pressure. Peak potassium efflux averaged 36 +/- 3 mu eq.min-1 x 100 g-1, but potassium did not contribute significantly to the osmotic gradient. PMID:8476122

  8. A thermodynamic formulation of root water uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildebrandt, A.; Kleidon, A.; Bechmann, M.

    2015-12-01

    By extracting bound water from the soil and lifting it to the canopy, root systems of vegetation perform work. Here we describe how the energetics involved in root water uptake can be quantified. The illustration is done using a simple, four-box model of the soil-root system to represent heterogeneity and a parameterization in which root water uptake is driven by the xylem potential of the plant with a fixed flux boundary condition. We use this approach to evaluate the effects of soil moisture heterogeneity and root system properties on the dissipative losses and export of energy involved in root water uptake. For this, we derive an expression that relates the energy export at the root collar to a sum of terms that reflect all fluxes and storage changes along the flow path in thermodynamic terms. We conclude that such a thermodynamic evaluation of root water uptake conveniently provides insights into the impediments of different processes along the entire flow path and explicitly accounting not only for the resistances along the flow path and those imposed by soil drying but especially the role of heterogenous soil water distribution. The results show that least energy needs to be exported and dissipative losses are minimized by a root system if it extracts water uniformly from the soil. This has implications for plant water relations in forests where canopies generate heterogenous input patterns. Our diagnostic in the energy domain should be useful in future model applications for quantifying how plants can evolve towards greater efficiency in their structure and function, particularly in heterogenous soil environments. Generally, this approach may help to better describe heterogeneous processes in the soil in a simple, yet physically-based way.

  9. Water Uptake in PEMFC Catalyst Layers

    SciTech Connect

    Gunterman, Haluna P.; Kwong, Anthony H.; Gostick, Jeffrey T.; Kusoglu, Ahmet; Weber, Adam Z.

    2011-07-01

    Water uptake profiles of proton-exchange-membrane fuel-cell catalyst layers are characterized in the form of capillary-pressure saturation (Pc-S) curves. The curves indicate that the catalyst layers tested are highly hydrophilic and require capillary pressures as low as -80 kPa to eject imbibed water. Comparison of materials made with and without Pt indicates a difference in water ejection and uptake phenomena due to the presence of Pt. The addition of Pt increases the tendency of the catalyst layer to retain water. Dynamic vapor sorption (DVS) is used to characterize the water-vapor sorption onto Nafion, Pt/C, and C surfaces. The DVS results align with the trends found from the Pc-S curves and show an increased propensity for water uptake in the presence of Pt. The effect of the ion in Nafion, sodium or protonated form, is also compared and demonstrates that although the protonation of the Nafion in the catalyst layer also increases hydrophilicity, the effect is not as great as that caused by Pt.

  10. Modelling water uptake efficiency of root systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitner, Daniel; Tron, Stefania; Schröder, Natalie; Bodner, Gernot; Javaux, Mathieu; Vanderborght, Jan; Vereecken, Harry; Schnepf, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    Water uptake is crucial for plant productivity. Trait based breeding for more water efficient crops will enable a sustainable agricultural management under specific pedoclimatic conditions, and can increase drought resistance of plants. Mathematical modelling can be used to find suitable root system traits for better water uptake efficiency defined as amount of water taken up per unit of root biomass. This approach requires large simulation times and large number of simulation runs, since we test different root systems under different pedoclimatic conditions. In this work, we model water movement by the 1-dimensional Richards equation with the soil hydraulic properties described according to the van Genuchten model. Climatic conditions serve as the upper boundary condition. The root system grows during the simulation period and water uptake is calculated via a sink term (after Tron et al. 2015). The goal of this work is to compare different free software tools based on different numerical schemes to solve the model. We compare implementations using DUMUX (based on finite volumes), Hydrus 1D (based on finite elements), and a Matlab implementation of Van Dam, J. C., & Feddes 2000 (based on finite differences). We analyse the methods for accuracy, speed and flexibility. Using this model case study, we can clearly show the impact of various root system traits on water uptake efficiency. Furthermore, we can quantify frequent simplifications that are introduced in the modelling step like considering a static root system instead of a growing one, or considering a sink term based on root density instead of considering the full root hydraulic model (Javaux et al. 2008). References Tron, S., Bodner, G., Laio, F., Ridolfi, L., & Leitner, D. (2015). Can diversity in root architecture explain plant water use efficiency? A modeling study. Ecological modelling, 312, 200-210. Van Dam, J. C., & Feddes, R. A. (2000). Numerical simulation of infiltration, evaporation and shallow

  11. Rhizosphere biophysics and root water uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carminati, Andrea; Zarebanadkouki, Mohsen; Ahmed, Mutez A.; Passioura, John

    2016-04-01

    The flow of water into the roots and the (putative) presence of a large resistance at the root-soil interface have attracted the attention of plant and soil scientists for decades. Such resistance has been attributed to a partial contact between roots and soil, large gradients in soil matric potential around the roots, or accumulation of solutes at the root surface creating a negative osmotic potential. Our hypothesis is that roots are capable of altering the biophysical properties of the soil around the roots, the rhizosphere, facilitating root water uptake in dry soils. In particular, we expect that root hairs and mucilage optimally connect the roots to the soil maintaining the hydraulic continuity across the rhizosphere. Using a pressure chamber apparatus we measured the relation between transpiration rate and the water potential difference between soil and leaf xylem during drying cycles in barley mutants with and without root hairs. The samples were grown in well structured soils. At low soil moistures and high transpiration rates, large drops in water potential developed around the roots. These drops in water potential recovered very slowly, even after transpiration was severely decreased. The drops in water potential were much bigger in barley mutants without root hairs. These mutants failed to sustain high transpiration rates in dry conditions. To explain the nature of such drops in water potential across the rhizosphere we performed high resolution neutron tomography of the rhizosphere of the barleys with and without root hairs growing in the same soil described above. The tomograms suggested that the hydraulic contact between the soil structures was the highest resistance for the water flow in dry conditions. The tomograms also indicate that root hairs and mucilage improved the hydraulic contact between roots and soil structures. At high transpiration rates and low water contents, roots extracted water from the rhizosphere, while the bulk soil, due its

  12. Organics Substantially Reduce HO2 Uptake onto Aerosols Containing Transition Metal ions.

    PubMed

    Lakey, Pascale S J; George, Ingrid J; Baeza-Romero, Maria T; Whalley, Lisa K; Heard, Dwayne E

    2016-03-10

    A HO2 mass accommodation coefficient of α = 0.23 ± 0.07 was measured onto submicron copper(II)-doped ammonium sulfate aerosols at a relative humidity of 60 ± 3%, at 293 ± 2 K and at an initial HO2 concentration of ∼ 1 × 10(9) molecules cm(-3) by using an aerosol flow tube coupled to a sensitive fluorescence assay by gas expansion (FAGE) HO2 detection system. The effect upon the HO2 uptake coefficient γ of adding different organic species (malonic acid, citric acid, 1,2-diaminoethane, tartronic acid, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and oxalic acid) into the copper(II)-doped aerosols was investigated. The HO2 uptake coefficient decreased steadily from the mass accommodation value to γ = 0.008 ± 0.009 when EDTA was added in a one-to-one molar ratio with the copper(II) ions, and to γ = 0.003 ± 0.004 when oxalic acid was added into the aerosol in a ten-to-one molar ratio with the copper(II). EDTA binds strongly to copper(II) ions, potentially making them unavailable for catalytic destruction of HO2, and could also be acting as a surfactant or changing the viscosity of the aerosol. The addition of oxalic acid to the aerosol potentially forms low-volatility copper-oxalate complexes that reduce the uptake of HO2 either by changing the viscosity of the aerosol or by causing precipitation out of the aerosol forming a coating. It is likely that there is a high enough oxalate to copper(II) ion ratio in many types of atmospheric aerosols to decrease the HO2 uptake coefficient. No observable change in the HO2 uptake coefficient was measured when the other organic species (malonic acid, citric acid, 1,2-diaminoethane, and tartronic acid) were added in a ten-to-one molar ratio with the copper(II) ions. PMID:26484935

  13. Water Activity Limits the Hygroscopic Growth Factor of Organic Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, L. I.; Cabrera, J. A.; Golden, D.; Tabazadeh, A.

    2007-12-01

    In this work we study the hygroscopic behavior of organic aerosols, which has important implications for Earth's climate. The hygroscopic growth factor (HGF) is defined as the ratio of the diameter of a spherical particle when it is exposed to dry conditions to that at humid conditions. We present a new formulation to express the HGF of an aerosol particle as a function of water activity (aw) in the aqueous phase. This new formulation matches reported HGFs for common inorganic salts and water-miscible organic particles that are known to deliquesce into aqueous drops at high relative humidities (RH). Many studies use tandem differential mobility analyzers (TDMA) to determine the HGF of organic aerosols. For example, Brooks et al. used a TDMA to measure a HGF of 1.2 for 2 μm phthalic acid (PA) particles at 90% RH (aw= 0.9). However, water activity limits the growth of a particle that can be attributed to water uptake. We have assembled a vapor pressure apparatus to measure aw of aqueous solutions at room temperature. Measured water activities for PA, used in our growth formulation, yield a HGF of ~ 1.0005 for 2 μm PA particles at 90% RH. Comparing our results against Brooks et al. suggests that TDMA experiments may grossly overestimate the HGF of PA particles since water activity limits this growth to below 1.0005. Alternatively, we suggest that the adsorption of a negligible mass of water by a highly porous PA particle can lead to an apparent growth in particle size by changing its morphology. Other studies also use TDMAs to measure HGFs of secondary organic aerosols (SOAs). HGFs reported for SOAs are very similar to PA, suggesting that the observed growth may be due to morphological changes in particle size rather than water uptake as commonly assumed. We built a smog chamber where an organic precursor, such as d-limonene, reacts with nitrogen oxides under UV radiation to produce SOAs. We compare the HGFs for SOAs obtained with our method to those obtained with

  14. Worldwide data sets constrain the water vapor uptake coefficient in cloud formation

    PubMed Central

    Raatikainen, Tomi; Nenes, Athanasios; Seinfeld, John H.; Morales, Ricardo; Moore, Richard H.; Lathem, Terry L.; Lance, Sara; Padró, Luz T.; Lin, Jack J.; Cerully, Kate M.; Bougiatioti, Aikaterini; Cozic, Julie; Ruehl, Christopher R.; Chuang, Patrick Y.; Anderson, Bruce E.; Flagan, Richard C.; Jonsson, Haflidi; Mihalopoulos, Nikos; Smith, James N.

    2013-01-01

    Cloud droplet formation depends on the condensation of water vapor on ambient aerosols, the rate of which is strongly affected by the kinetics of water uptake as expressed by the condensation (or mass accommodation) coefficient, αc. Estimates of αc for droplet growth from activation of ambient particles vary considerably and represent a critical source of uncertainty in estimates of global cloud droplet distributions and the aerosol indirect forcing of climate. We present an analysis of 10 globally relevant data sets of cloud condensation nuclei to constrain the value of αc for ambient aerosol. We find that rapid activation kinetics (αc > 0.1) is uniformly prevalent. This finding resolves a long-standing issue in cloud physics, as the uncertainty in water vapor accommodation on droplets is considerably less than previously thought. PMID:23431189

  15. Root water uptake under water and salinity stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, A. B.; Bauser, H.; Ngo, A.; Kamai, T.; Walker, R.; Hopmans, J. W.

    2013-12-01

    Root uptake of water and nutrients is influenced by root-zone complex and dynamic processes such as soil water status, irrigation, evaporation, and leaching. Plant roots are living and functioning in a dynamic environment that is subjected to extreme changes over relatively short time and small distances. In order to better manage our agricultural resources and cope with increasing constraints of water limitation, environmental concerns and climate change, it is vital to understand plants responses to these changes in their environment. We grew chick pea (Cicer arietinum) plants, in boxes of 30 x 25 x 1 cm dimensions filled with fine sand. Layers of coarse sand (1.5 cm thick) were embedded in the fine-sand media to divide the root growth environment into sections that were hydraulically disconnected from each other. This way, each section could be independently treated with differential levels of water and salinity. The root growth and distribution in the soil was monitored on daily bases using neutron radiography. Daily water uptake was measured by weighing the containers. Changes of soil water content in each section of the containers were calculated from the neutron radiographs. Plants that part of their root system was stressed with drought or salinity showed no change in their daily water uptake rate. The roots in the stressed sections stayed turgid during the stress period and looked healthy in the neutron images. However the uptake rate was severely affected when the soil in the non-stressed section started to dry. The plants were then fully irrigated with water and the water uptake rate recovered to its initial rate shortly after irrigation. The neutron radiographs clearly illustrated the shrinkage and recovery of the roots under stress and the subsequent relief. This cycle was repeated a few times and the same trend could be reproduced. Our results show that plants' response to water- or salinity-stress ranges from full compensation to severe reduction in

  16. Viscosity controls humidity dependence of N2O5 uptake to citric acid aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gržinić, G.; Bartels-Rausch, T.; Berkemeier, T.; Türler, A.; Ammann, M.

    2015-12-01

    The heterogeneous loss of dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5) to aerosol particles has a significant impact on the night-time nitrogen oxide cycle and therefore the oxidative capacity in the troposphere. Using a 13N short-lived radioactive tracer method, we studied the uptake kinetics of N2O5 on citric acid aerosol particles as a function of relative humidity (RH). The results show that citric acid exhibits lower reactivity than similar dicarboxylic and polycarboxylic acids, with uptake coefficients between ∼ 3 × 10-4-∼ 3 × 10-3 depending on humidity (17-70 % RH). At RH above 50 %, the magnitude and the humidity dependence can be best explained by the viscosity of citric acid as compared to aqueous solutions of simpler organic and inorganic solutes and the variation of viscosity with RH and, hence, diffusivity in the organic matrix. Since the diffusion rates of N2O5 in highly concentrated citric acid solutions are not well established, we present four different parameterizations of N2O5 diffusivity based on the available literature data or estimates for viscosity and diffusivity of H2O. Above 50 % RH, uptake is consistent with the reacto-diffusive kinetic regime whereas below 50 % RH, the uptake coefficient is higher than expected from hydrolysis of N2O5 within the bulk of the particles, and the uptake kinetics is most likely limited by loss on the surface only. This study demonstrates the impact of viscosity in highly oxidized and highly functionalized secondary organic aerosol material on the heterogeneous chemistry of N2O5 and may explain some of the unexpectedly low loss rates to aerosol derived from field studies.

  17. Analysis of reversibility and reaction products of glyoxal uptake onto ammonium sulfate aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galloway, M. M.; Chhabra, P. S.; Chan, A. W.; Surratt, J. D.; Kwan, A. J.; Wennberg, P. O.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J. H.; Keutsch, F. N.

    2009-04-01

    Glyoxal, the smallest alpha-dicarbonyl, is an oxidation product of both biogenic and anthropogenic volatile organic compounds (Fu et al. JGR 113, D15303, 2008). Despite its low molecular weight, its role in secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation has gained interest and a recent study suggested that it accounts for more than 15% of SOA in Mexico City (Volkamer et al. GRL 34, L19807, 2007). Despite numerous previous studies, questions remain regarding the processes controlling glyoxal uptake onto aerosol, including the role of acid catalysis, degree of reversibility, and identity of aerosol phase reaction products. We present results of chamber aerosol studies (Galloway et al. ACPD 8, 20799, 2008) and laboratory studies of bulk samples aimed at improving the understanding of these processes, in particular formation of oligomers and organosulfates of glyoxal, as well as the formation of imidazoles (carbon-nitrogen containing heterocyclic aromatic compounds) under dark and irradiated conditions. The relevance of these classes of reaction products extends beyond glyoxal, as evidence of oligomers and organosulfates other than those of glyoxal have been found in ambient aerosol (Surratt et al. JPCA 112, 8345, 2008; Denkenberger et al. Environ. Sci. Technol. 41, 5439, 2007). Experiments in which a chamber air mass was diluted after equilibration of glyoxal uptake onto ammonium sulfate seed aerosol (relative humidity 60% and glyoxal mixing ratios of 25-200 ppbv) shows that under these conditions uptake is reversible. The most important condensed phase products are hydrated oligomers of glyoxal, which are also formed reversibly under these conditions. Our studies show that organosulfates were not formed under dark conditions for neutral or acidified aerosol; similarly, Minerath et al. have recently shown that formation of a different class of organosulfates (alkyl sulfates) also proceeds very slowly even under acidic conditions (Environ. Sci. Technol. 42, 4410, 2008). The

  18. Tracking the morphology of fulvic acids during water uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelenay, Veronika; Krepelova, Adela; Rudich, Yinon; Huthwelker, Thomas; Ammann, Markus

    2010-05-01

    Atmospheric humic like substances (HULIS) denote a range of oxidized, polyfunctional organic aerosol components widespread in the atmosphere, which show similar extraction behaviour on exchange columns as humic substances. Stemming from oxidation of primary gas phase and particulate organics, from e.g. biomass burning events, the HULIS constitute to a major fraction of the water soluble organic aerosol components in the atmosphere. Highly oxidized organic compounds play an important role in atmospheric processes like cloud formation or modification. Important factors therein are their hygroscopic properties and their microstructure, which influences their optical properties. HULIS somewhat resemble humic substances from terrestrial and aquatic sources, which consist mainly of carboxylic, aromatic and phenolic moieties assembled into hydrogen and van der Waals bonded supermolecular structures. Hence, the Suwannee River fulvic acid (SRFA), a chemically well characterized fulvic acid obtained from the International Humic Substances Society, was used to obtain combined data on hygroscopic properties and microstructural evolution during water uptake. The measurements were performed using x-ray absorption spectroscopy (NEXAFS, near edge x-ray absorption fine structure) in combination with an x-ray microscope (STXM, scanning x-ray transmission microscope) with a spatial resolution of about 30 nm. The measurements were performed at the PolLux beamline (SLS, Paul Scherrer Institut). The NEXAFS spectroscopy provides the possibility to map important chemical functional groups of carbon (as the one mentioned above) and oxygen atoms, and also to quantify the amount of carbon and oxygen atoms. To follow the submicron structure during water uptake a new device - a microreactor - was developed for the STXM. Using this reactor, the samples could be kept in a microenvironment with controlled temperature and humidity from 0 to 95 %. The samples were deposited either as droplets with

  19. Investigating the Influence of Sea Spray Particle Composition on Water Uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappa, C. D.; Forestieri, S.; Cornwell, G.; Helgestad, T.; Moore, K.; Lee, C.; Novak, G.; Sultana, C. M.; Wang, X.; Bertram, T. H.; Prather, K. A.

    2015-12-01

    Sea spray aerosol (SSA) particles influence climate by scattering solar radiation and serving as cloud seeds. Their specific influence depends, in part, on the extent to which they interact with water, which depends importantly on particle composition. The composition of freshly-emitted SSA particles is connected to the water (ocean) composition—especially biological activity—and the SSA production mechanism. Results from both field measurements and a suite of laboratory mesocosm experiments utilizing real ocean water and stimulated phytoplankton blooms with realistic simulated wave breaking will be discussed to demonstrate the complex relationships between nascent SSA particle water uptake and particle and source water composition.

  20. Heterogeneous oxidation of saturated organic aerosols by hydroxyl radicals: uptake kinetics, condensed-phase products, and particle size change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, I. J.; Vlasenko, A.; Slowik, J. G.; Broekhuizen, K.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2007-08-01

    The kinetics and reaction mechanism for the heterogeneous oxidation of saturated organic aerosols by gas-phase OH radicals were investigated under NOx-free conditions. The reaction of 150 nm diameter Bis(2-ethylhexyl) sebacate (BES) particles with OH was studied as a proxy for chemical aging of atmospheric aerosols containing saturated organic matter. An aerosol reactor flow tube combined with an Aerodyne time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (ToF-AMS) and scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) was used to study this system. Hydroxyl radicals were produced by 254 nm photolysis of O3 in the presence of water vapour. The kinetics of the heterogeneous oxidation of the BES particles was studied by monitoring the loss of a mass fragment of BES with the ToF-AMS as a function of OH exposure. We measured an initial OH uptake coefficient of γ0=1.3 (±0.4), confirming that this reaction is highly efficient. The density of BES particles increased by up to 20% of the original BES particle density at the highest OH exposure studied, consistent with the particle becoming more oxidized. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry analysis showed that the major particle-phase reaction products are multifunctional carbonyls and alcohols with higher molecular weights than the starting material. Volatilization of oxidation products accounted for a maximum of 17% decrease of the particle volume at the highest OH exposure studied. Tropospheric organic aerosols will become more oxidized from heterogeneous photochemical oxidation, which may affect not only their physical and chemical properties, but also their hygroscopicity and cloud nucleation activity.

  1. Chemical and Physical Properties of Bulk Aerosols Observed During TRACE-P: Evidence of Nitrate Uptake on Dust Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, C.; Anderson, B.; Hudgins, C.; Winstead, E.; Thornhill, L.; Talbot, R.; Russo, R.; Scheuer, E.; Seid, G.; Dibb, J.; Fuelberg, H.

    2002-12-01

    Back trajectories and bulk aerosol chemical properties have been used to group aerosol samples measured on the DC-8 during TRACE-P into five source regions. Each of these source region groups was further subdivided into three altitude bins (< 2 km, 2 - 7 km, and > 7 km). The mean chemical signatures, size distributions, and other physical properties (e.g., volatility, single scatter albedo) will be presented for these groups. By combining chemical and physical measurements, the observed aerosol population for each group may be partitioned between black carbon, sea salts, non-sea salt water soluble ions, and dust. Using this approach, we have found that the bulk of the dust emanating from Asia during TRACE-P came from one region. The highest concentrations of pollution species were also found in this region, including particulate nitrate. The presence of gas phase pollutants such as nitric acid co-located with the dust allows for the uptake of gas-phase nitrogen onto the dust surfaces. Results show that in the dust sector at mid-altitudes (2 - 7 km), where the influence of sea salt is reduced compared to lower altitudes, 50% of the total nitrate is in particulate form. This is in contrast to 15% for sectors with little dust.

  2. Understanding water uptake in bioaerosols using laboratory measurements, field tests, and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhry, Zahra; Ratnesar-Shumate, Shanna A.; Buckley, Thomas J.; Kalter, Jeffrey M.; Gilberry, Jerome U.; Eshbaugh, Jonathan P.; Corson, Elizabeth C.; Santarpia, Joshua L.; Carter, Christopher C.

    2013-05-01

    Uptake of water by biological aerosols can impact their physical and chemical characteristics. The water content in a bioaerosol can affect the backscatter cross-section as measured by LIDAR systems. Better understanding of the water content in controlled-release clouds of bioaerosols can aid in the development of improved standoff detection systems. This study includes three methods to improve understanding of how bioaerosols take up water. The laboratory method measures hygroscopic growth of biological material after it is aerosolized and dried. Hygroscopicity curves are created as the humidity is increased in small increments to observe the deliquescence point, then the humidity is decreased to observe the efflorescence point. The field component of the study measures particle size distributions of biological material disseminated into a large humidified chamber. Measurements are made with a Twin-Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (APS, TSI, Inc), -Relative Humidity apparatus where two APS units measure the same aerosol cloud side-by-side. The first operated under dry conditions by sampling downstream of desiccant dryers, the second operated under ambient conditions. Relative humidity was measured within the sampling systems to determine the difference in the aerosol water content between the two sampling trains. The water content of the bioaerosols was calculated from the twin APS units following Khlystov et al. 2005 [1]. Biological material is measured dried and wet and compared to laboratory curves of the same material. Lastly, theoretical curves are constructed from literature values for components of the bioaerosol material.

  3. Isoprene Epoxydiols as Precursors to Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation: Acid-Catalyzed Reactive Uptake Studies with Authentic Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ying-Hsuan; Zhang, Zhenfa; Docherty, Kenneth S.; Zhang, Haofei; Budisulistiorini, Sri Hapsari; Rubitschun, Caitlin L.; Shaw, Stephanie L.; Knipping, Eladio M.; Edgerton, Eric S.; Kleindienst, Tadeusz E.; Gold, Avram; Surratt, Jason D.

    2011-01-01

    Isoprene epoxydiols (IEPOX), formed from the photooxidation of isoprene under low-NOx conditions, have recently been proposed as precursors of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) on the basis of mass spectrometric evidence. In the present study, IEPOX isomers were synthesized in high purity (> 99%) to investigate their potential to form SOA via reactive uptake in a series of controlled dark chamber studies followed by reaction product analyses. IEPOX-derived SOA was substantially observed only in the presence of acidic aerosols, with conservative lower-bound yields of 4.7–6.4% for β-IEPOX and 3.4–5.5% for δ-IEPOX, providing direct evidence for IEPOX isomers as precursors to isoprene SOA. These chamber studies demonstrate that IEPOX uptake explains the formation of known isoprene SOA tracers found in ambient aerosols, including 2-methyltetrols, C5-alkene triols, dimers, and IEPOX-derived organosulfates. Additionally, we show reactive uptake on the acidified sulfate aerosols supports a previously unreported acid-catalyzed intramolecular rearrangement of IEPOX to cis- and trans-3-methyltetrahydrofuran-3,4-diols (3-MeTHF-3,4-diols) in the particle phase. Analysis of these novel tracer compounds by aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS) suggests that they contribute to a unique factor resolved from positive matrix factorization (PMF) of AMS organic aerosol spectra collected from low-NOx, isoprene-dominated regions influenced by the presence of acidic aerosols. PMID:22103348

  4. Molecular mechanisms of foliar water uptake in a desert tree.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xia; Zhou, Maoxian; Dong, Xicun; Zou, Songbing; Xiao, Honglang; Ma, Xiao-Fei

    2015-01-01

    Water deficits severely affect growth, particularly for the plants in arid and semiarid regions of the world. In addition to precipitation, other subsidiary water, such as dew, fog, clouds and small rain showers, may also be absorbed by leaves in a process known as foliar water uptake. With the severe scarcity of water in desert regions, this process is increasingly becoming a necessity. Studies have reported on physical and physiological processes of foliar water uptake. However, the molecular mechanisms remain less understood. As major channels for water regulation and transport, aquaporins (AQPs) are involved in this process. However, due to the regulatory complexity and functional diversity of AQPs, their molecular mechanism for foliar water uptake remains unclear. In this study, Tamarix ramosissima, a tree species widely distributed in desert regions, was investigated for gene expression patterns of AQPs and for sap flow velocity. Our results suggest that the foliar water uptake of T. ramosissima occurs in natural fields at night when the humidity is over a threshold of 85 %. The diurnal gene expression pattern of AQPs suggests that most AQP gene expressions display a circadian rhythm, and this could affect both photosynthesis and transpiration. At night, the PIP2-1 gene is also upregulated with increased relative air humidity. This gene expression pattern may allow desert plants to regulate foliar water uptake to adapt to extreme drought. This study suggests a molecular basis of foliar water uptake in desert plants. PMID:26567212

  5. Molecular mechanisms of foliar water uptake in a desert tree

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xia; Zhou, Maoxian; Dong, Xicun; Zou, Songbing; Xiao, Honglang; Ma, Xiao-Fei

    2015-01-01

    Water deficits severely affect growth, particularly for the plants in arid and semiarid regions of the world. In addition to precipitation, other subsidiary water, such as dew, fog, clouds and small rain showers, may also be absorbed by leaves in a process known as foliar water uptake. With the severe scarcity of water in desert regions, this process is increasingly becoming a necessity. Studies have reported on physical and physiological processes of foliar water uptake. However, the molecular mechanisms remain less understood. As major channels for water regulation and transport, aquaporins (AQPs) are involved in this process. However, due to the regulatory complexity and functional diversity of AQPs, their molecular mechanism for foliar water uptake remains unclear. In this study, Tamarix ramosissima, a tree species widely distributed in desert regions, was investigated for gene expression patterns of AQPs and for sap flow velocity. Our results suggest that the foliar water uptake of T. ramosissima occurs in natural fields at night when the humidity is over a threshold of 85 %. The diurnal gene expression pattern of AQPs suggests that most AQP gene expressions display a circadian rhythm, and this could affect both photosynthesis and transpiration. At night, the PIP2-1 gene is also upregulated with increased relative air humidity. This gene expression pattern may allow desert plants to regulate foliar water uptake to adapt to extreme drought. This study suggests a molecular basis of foliar water uptake in desert plants. PMID:26567212

  6. Time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometry: Measuring gaseous iodine species after selective uptake in lab-generated aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundel, Michael; Ries, Marco; Schott, Mathias; Hoffmann, Thorsten

    2010-05-01

    ) particles as selective sampling probes for ICl[4]. The selective uptake (i.e. derivatisation) was carried out in a reaction chamber that was placed in front of the ToF-AMS. Fine particles of the sampling probe material, which had been generated by an atomizer, were continuously introduced into the reaction chamber. Reactive iodine species were introduced into the chamber by a temperature controlled and nitrogen flushed test gas source that was based on an open tube diffusion technique. After exiting the reaction chamber the resultant aerosol was analysed by ToF-AMS in the positive ion mode. α-CD has the capability to form an inclusion complex with I2. Inclusion complex formation can be improved by addition of I- and Br-. The α-CD-I2-complex showed a typical signal at m/z 253.8 in the mass spectrum, that can be used for the identification and quantification of I2. ICl reacts with 1,3,5-TMB to form 1-iodo-2,4,6-TMB. The presence of ICl can be identified by the molecular ion of 1-iodo-2,4,6-TMB at m/z 294 in the mass spectrum. References 1. Ó Dowd, C.D., et al. (2002)., Nature, 417, 632-636 2. McFiggans, G., et al. (2004). Atmos. Chem. Phys., 4, 701-713 3. Drewnick, F., et al. (2005). Aerosol Sci. Technol., 39, 637-658 4. Huang, RJ., et al. (2009). Anal. Chem., 81, 1777-1783

  7. LASE measurements of aerosols and water vapor during TARFOX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrare, Richard A.; Ismail, Syed; Browell, Edward V.; Brackett, Vincent G.; Kooi, Susan A.; Clayton, Marian B.; Melfi, Harvey; Whiteman, David N.; Schwenner, Geary; Evans, Keith D.; Hobbs, Peter V.; Veefkind, J. Pepijn; Russell, Philip B.; Livingston, John M.; Hignett, Philip; Holben, Brent N.; Remer, Lorraine A.

    1998-01-01

    The TARFOX (Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment) intensive field campaign was designed to reduce uncertainties in estimates of the effects of anthropogenic aerosols on climate by measuring direct radiative effects and the optical, physical, and chemical properties of aerosols [1]. TARFOX was conducted off the East Coast of the United States between July 10-31, 1996. Ground, aircraft, and satellite-based sensors measured the sensitivity of radiative fields at various atmospheric levels to aerosol optical properties (i.e., optical thickness, phase function, single-scattering albedo) and to the vertical profile of aerosols. The LASE (Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment) instrument, which was flown on the NASA ER-2 aircraft, measured vertical profiles of total scattering ratio and water vapor during a series of 9 flights. These profiles were used in real-time to help direct the other aircraft to the appropriate altitudes for intensive sampling of aerosol layers. We have subsequently used the LASE aerosol data to derive aerosol backscattering and extinction profiles. Using these aerosol extinction profiles, we derived estimates of aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and compared these with measurements of AOT from both ground and airborne sun photometers and derived from the ATSR-2 (Along Track and Scanning Radiometer 2) sensor on ERS-2 (European Remote Sensing Satellite-2). We also used the water vapor mixing ratio profiles measured simultaneously by LASE to derive precipitable water vapor and compare these to ground based measurements.

  8. Variable effects of mucilage on root water uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carminati, Andrea; Zarebanadkouki, Mohsen

    2013-04-01

    Plants are big water movers. Without an adequate supply of water from the soil, water transpired from leaves cannot be compensated by root water uptake. Such a water shortage is a worldwide constraint to yield and food production. By exuding mucilage, roots keep the soil in their vicinity, the rhizosphere, wet and take up water more easily. However, mucilage turns hydrophobic after drying and it hinders the rewetting of the rhizosphere upon irrigation. Here we show that the temporarily water repellency of the rhizosphere decreases root water uptake after irrigation. We used neutron radiography to trace the transport of deuterated water in soil and roots of transpiring plants. We let one soil region dry for 2 days. Then, we irrigated it. We found that root water uptake in this location did not recover after irrigation. We conclude that, after drying, the rhizosphere became a significant resistance to water flow to roots. Mucilage has therefore dual effects on plant water relations: freshly exuded mucilage facilitates root water uptake until it dries out and it becomes a barrier to water flow. The profits of exuding mucilage depend on root traits and environmental conditions. In soils with water stored in deep regions, plants would benefit from fresh mucilage covering the deep roots segments, while dry mucilage would isolate the roots from the dry upper soil layers. Understanding the relations between mucilage, root traits and environmental conditions will help to increase water use efficiency and yield production in arid areas.

  9. Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, David, D.; Ferrare, Richard, A.

    2011-07-06

    The 'Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds' project focused extensively on the analysis and utilization of water vapor and aerosol profiles derived from the ARM Raman lidar at the Southern Great Plains ARM site. A wide range of different tasks were performed during this project, all of which improved quality of the data products derived from the lidar or advanced the understanding of atmospheric processes over the site. These activities included: upgrading the Raman lidar to improve its sensitivity; participating in field experiments to validate the lidar aerosol and water vapor retrievals; using the lidar aerosol profiles to evaluate the accuracy of the vertical distribution of aerosols in global aerosol model simulations; examining the correlation between relative humidity and aerosol extinction, and how these change, due to horizontal distance away from cumulus clouds; inferring boundary layer turbulence structure in convective boundary layers from the high-time-resolution lidar water vapor measurements; retrieving cumulus entrainment rates in boundary layer cumulus clouds; and participating in a field experiment that provided data to help validate both the entrainment rate retrievals and the turbulent profiles derived from lidar observations.

  10. Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Richard A. Ferrare; David D. Turner

    2011-09-01

    Project goals: (1) Use the routine surface and airborne measurements at the ARM SGP site, and the routine surface measurements at the NSA site, to continue our evaluations of model aerosol simulations; (2) Determine the degree to which the Raman lidar measurements of water vapor and aerosol scattering and extinction can be used to remotely characterize the aerosol humidification factor; (3) Use the high temporal resolution CARL data to examine how aerosol properties vary near clouds; and (4) Use the high temporal resolution CARL and Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) data to quantify entrainment in optically thin continental cumulus clouds.

  11. Effect of fatty acid coatings on ozone uptake to deliquesced KI/NaCl aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammann, M.; Rouvière, A.

    2009-12-01

    Phase transfer kinetics of gas phase oxidants may limit oxidative aging of aerosol particles. The aim of this work is to study the role of amphiphilic organic aerosol constituents on the kinetics of phase transfer of gaseous species to the bulk aqueous phase. The effect of (C9-C20) fatty acid surfactants on the phase transfer of ozone to deliquesced potassium iodide and sodium chloride have been investigated. Some other experiments of ozone uptake have been performed with different mixtures and proportions of fatty acids. The kinetic experiments were performed in an aerosol flow tube at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. To obtain deliquesced inorganic particles, the relative humidity was adjusted in the range of 75% to 80%. It is shown that the fatty acids in monolayer quantities may substantially inhibit the phase transfer of ozone to deliquesced particles. The results showed that especially the C15-C20 limit the mass transfer of ozone to the aqueous phase, whereby the magnitude of this effect was following the monolayer properties of the fatty acids. It was also possible to determine a resistance of such films to the transfer of ozone to the bulk phase.

  12. Ice crystallization in ultrafine water-salt aerosols: nucleation, ice-solution equilibrium, and internal structure.

    PubMed

    Hudait, Arpa; Molinero, Valeria

    2014-06-01

    Atmospheric aerosols have a strong influence on Earth's climate. Elucidating the physical state and internal structure of atmospheric aqueous aerosols is essential to predict their gas and water uptake, and the locus and rate of atmospherically important heterogeneous reactions. Ultrafine aerosols with sizes between 3 and 15 nm have been detected in large numbers in the troposphere and tropopause. Nanoscopic aerosols arising from bubble bursting of natural and artificial seawater have been identified in laboratory and field experiments. The internal structure and phase state of these aerosols, however, cannot yet be determined in experiments. Here we use molecular simulations to investigate the phase behavior and internal structure of liquid, vitrified, and crystallized water-salt ultrafine aerosols with radii from 2.5 to 9.5 nm and with up to 10% moles of ions. We find that both ice crystallization and vitrification of the nanodroplets lead to demixing of pure water from the solutions. Vitrification of aqueous nanodroplets yields nanodomains of pure low-density amorphous ice in coexistence with vitrified solute rich aqueous glass. The melting temperature of ice in the aerosols decreases monotonically with an increase of solute fraction and decrease of radius. The simulations reveal that nucleation of ice occurs homogeneously at the subsurface of the water-salt nanoparticles. Subsequent ice growth yields phase-segregated, internally mixed, aerosols with two phases in equilibrium: a concentrated water-salt amorphous mixture and a spherical cap-like ice nanophase. The surface of the crystallized aerosols is heterogeneous, with ice and solution exposed to the vapor. Free energy calculations indicate that as the concentration of salt in the particles, the advance of the crystallization, or the size of the particles increase, the stability of the spherical cap structure increases with respect to the alternative structure in which a core of ice is fully surrounded by

  13. Reactive uptake of ammonia to secondary organic aerosols: kinetics of organonitrogen formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Liggio, J.; Staebler, R.; Li, S.-M.

    2015-06-01

    As a class of brown carbon, organonitrogen compounds originating from the heterogeneous uptake of NH3 by secondary organic aerosol (SOA) have received significant attention recently. In the current work, particulate organonitrogen formation during the ozonolysis of α-pinene and the OH oxidation of m-xylene in the presence of ammonia (34-125 ppb) is studied in a smog chamber equipped with a High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer and a Quantum Cascade Laser instrument. A large diversity of nitrogen containing organic (NOC) fragments was observed which were consistent with the reaction of ammonia with carbonyl containing SOA. The uptake coefficients of NH3 to SOA leading to organonitrogen compounds are reported for the first time and were in the range of ∼ 10-3-10-2, decreasing significantly to < 10-5 after 6 h of reaction. At the end of experiments (∼ 6 h) the NOC mass contributed 8.9 ± 1.7 and 31.5 ± 4.4 wt% to the total α-pinene and m-xylene derived SOA, and 4-15 wt% of the total nitrogen in the system. Uptake coefficients were also found to be positively correlated with particle acidity and negatively correlated with NH3 concentration, indicating that heterogeneous reactions were responsible for the observed NOC mass, possibly limited by liquid phase diffusion. Under these conditions, the data also indicate that the formation of NOC can compete kinetically with inorganic acid neutralization. The formation of NOC in this study suggests that a significant portion of the ambient particle associated N may be derived from NH3 heterogeneous reactions with SOA. NOC from such a mechanism may be an important and unaccounted for source of PM associated nitrogen, and a mechanism for medium or long-range transport and dry/wet deposition of atmospheric nitrogen.

  14. Reactive uptake of ammonia to secondary organic aerosols: kinetics of organonitrogen formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Liggio, J.; Staebler, R.; Li, S.-M.

    2015-12-01

    As a class of brown carbon, organonitrogen compounds originating from the heterogeneous uptake of NH3 by secondary organic aerosol (SOA) have received significant attention recently. In the current work, particulate organonitrogen formation during the ozonolysis of α-pinene and the OH oxidation of m-xylene in the presence of ammonia (34-125 ppb) was studied in a smog chamber equipped with a high resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer and a quantum cascade laser instrument. A large diversity of nitrogen-containing organic (NOC) fragments was observed which were consistent with the reactions between ammonia and carbonyl-containing SOA. Ammonia uptake coefficients onto SOA which led to organonitrogen compounds were reported for the first time, and were in the range of ∼ 10-3-10-2, decreasing significantly to < 10-5 after 6 h of reaction. At the end of experiments (~ 6 h) the NOC mass contributed 8.9 ± 1.7 and 31.5 ± 4.4 wt % to the total α-pinene- and m-xylene-derived SOA, respectively, and 4-15 wt % of the total nitrogen in the system. Uptake coefficients were also found to be positively correlated with particle acidity and negatively correlated with NH3 concentration, indicating that heterogeneous reactions were responsible for the observed NOC mass, possibly limited by liquid phase diffusion. Under these conditions, the data also indicate that the formation of NOC can compete kinetically with inorganic acid neutralization. The formation of NOC in this study suggests that a significant portion of the ambient particle associated N may be derived from NH3 heterogeneous reactions with SOA. NOC from such a mechanism may be an important and unaccounted for source of PM associated nitrogen. This mechanism may also contribute to the medium or long-range transport and wet/dry deposition of atmospheric nitrogen.

  15. Water uptake in barley grain: Physiology; genetics and industrial applications.

    PubMed

    Cu, Suong; Collins, Helen M; Betts, Natalie S; March, Timothy J; Janusz, Agnieszka; Stewart, Doug C; Skadhauge, Birgitte; Eglinton, Jason; Kyriacou, Bianca; Little, Alan; Burton, Rachel A; Fincher, Geoffrey B

    2016-01-01

    Water uptake by mature barley grains initiates germination and is the first stage in the malting process. Here we have investigated the effects of starchy endosperm cell wall thickness on water uptake, together with the effects of varying amounts of the wall polysaccharide, (1,3;1,4)-β-glucan. In the latter case, we examined mutant barley lines from a mutant library and transgenic barley lines in which the (1,3;1,4)-β-glucan synthase gene, HvCslF6, was down-regulated by RNA interference. Neither cell wall thickness nor the levels of grain (1,3;1,4)-β-glucan were significantly correlated with water uptake but are likely to influence modification during malting. However, when a barley mapping population was phenotyped for rate of water uptake into grain, quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis identified specific regions of chromosomes 4H, 5H and 7H that accounted for approximately 17%, 18% and 11%, respectively, of the phenotypic variation. These data indicate that variation in water uptake rates by elite malting cultivars of barley is genetically controlled and a number of candidate genes that might control the trait were identified under the QTL. The genomics data raise the possibility that the genetic variation in water uptake rates might be exploited by breeders for the benefit of the malting and brewing industries. PMID:26566843

  16. Reactive Uptake of Ammonia to Secondary Organic Aerosols: Kinetics of Organonitrogen Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yongchun; Liggio, John; Staebler, Ralf; Li, Shao-Meng

    2015-04-01

    Organonitrogen compounds originating from the heterogeneous uptake of NH3 or amines by secondary organic aerosol (SOA) has received significant attention recently. This is primarily due to its potential contribution to brown carbon (BrC), which can absorb solar radiation and affect climate. In addition, particle phase Organonitrogen species may represent a means of altering regional nitrogen cycles and/or nitrogen deposition patterns though the sequestering of ambient ammonia which is ultimately deposited downwind. Several reduced nitrogen forming heterogeneous reactions have previously been proposed, including Schiff base and/or Mannich reactions between NH3, ammonium salts or amines and organic carbonyl functional groups in particles. In order to assess and model the possible impact of Schiff base, Mannich or other N-forming reactions (via NH3) on the radiative forcing ability of ambient SOA and/or its impact on N-deposition, the kinetics of such heterogeneous reactions are required, and yet remain largely unknown. In the current study, the uptake kinetics of NH3 to form organonitrogen compounds in SOA derived from the ozonolysis of α-pinene and the OH oxidation of m-xylene is reported for the first time from experiments performed in a 9 m3 smog chamber equipped with a High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer. The results demonstrate that particle bound organonitrogen compounds are mainly formed by NH3 uptake onto newly formed SOA (~1 hr), but relatively little onto more aged SOA. The uptake coefficients of NH3 to form organonitrogen compounds (between 0-150 min) are on the order of 10-4-10-3 and are prominently dependent upon particle acidity. Following 6 hours of reaction, the total organonitrogen mass contributed up to 10.0±1.5 wt% and 31.5±4.4 wt% to the total SOA mass from the ozonolysis of α-pinene and OH oxidation of m-xylene. The influence of VOC precursors, seed particle acidity and gaseous NH3 concentration on the obtained uptake

  17. Compensatory Root Water Uptake of Overlapping Root Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agee, E.; Ivanov, V. Y.; He, L.; Bisht, G.; Shahbaz, P.; Fatichi, S.; Gough, C. M.; Couvreur, V.; Matheny, A. M.; Bohrer, G.

    2015-12-01

    Land-surface models use simplified representations of root water uptake based on biomass distributions and empirical functions that constrain water uptake during unfavorable soil moisture conditions. These models fail to capture the observed hydraulic plasticity that allows plants to regulate root hydraulic conductivity and zones of active uptake based on local gradients. Recent developments in root water uptake modeling have sought to increase its mechanistic representation by bridging the gap between physically based microscopic models and computationally feasible macroscopic approaches. It remains to be demonstrated whether bulk parameterization of microscale characteristics (e.g., root system morphology and root conductivity) can improve process representation at the ecosystem scale. We employ the Couvreur method of microscopic uptake to yield macroscopic representation in a coupled soil-root model. Using a modified version of the PFLOTRAN model, which represents the 3-D physics of variably saturated soil, we model a one-hectare temperate forest stand under natural and synthetic climatic forcing. Our results show that as shallow soil layers dry, uptake at the tree and stand level shift to deeper soil layers, allowing the transpiration stream demanded by the atmosphere. We assess the potential capacity of the model to capture compensatory root water uptake. Further, the hydraulic plasticity of the root system is demonstrated by the quick response of uptake to rainfall pulses. These initial results indicate a promising direction for land surface models in which significant three-dimensional information from large root systems can be feasibly integrated into the forest scale simulations of root water uptake.

  18. Organic peroxide and OH formation in aerosol and cloud water: laboratory evidence for this aqueous chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Y. B.; Turpin, B. J.

    2015-06-01

    Aqueous chemistry in atmospheric waters (e.g., cloud droplets or wet aerosols) is well accepted as an atmospheric pathway to produce secondary organic aerosol (SOAaq). Water-soluble organic compounds with small carbon numbers (C2-C3) are precursors for SOAaq and products include organic acids, organic sulfates, and high molecular weight compounds/oligomers. Fenton reactions and the uptake of gas-phase OH radicals are considered to be the major oxidant sources for aqueous organic chemistry. However, the sources and availability of oxidants in atmospheric waters are not well understood. The degree to which OH is produced in the aqueous phase affects the balance of radical and non-radical aqueous chemistry, the properties of the resulting aerosol, and likely its atmospheric behavior. This paper demonstrates organic peroxide formation during aqueous photooxidation of methylglyoxal using ultra high resolution Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS). Organic peroxides are known to form through gas-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds. They contribute secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation directly by forming peroxyhemiacetals, and epoxides, and indirectly by enhancing gas-phase oxidation through OH recycling. We provide simulation results of organic peroxide/peroxyhemiacetal formation in clouds and wet aerosols and discuss organic peroxides as a source of condensed-phase OH radicals and as a contributor to aqueous SOA.

  19. Macroscopic modeling of plant water uptake: soil and root resistances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Tomas; Votrubova, Jana; Dohnal, Michal; Dusek, Jaromir

    2014-05-01

    The macroscopic physically-based plant root water uptake (RWU) model, based on water-potential-gradient formulation (Vogel et al., 2013), was used to simulate the observed soil-plant-atmosphere interactions at a forest site located in a temperate humid climate of central Europe and to gain an improved insight into the mutual interplay of RWU parameters that affects the soil water distribution in the root zone. In the applied RWU model, the uptake rates are directly proportional to the potential gradient and indirectly proportional to the local soil and root resistances to water flow. The RWU algorithm is implemented in a one-dimensional dual-continuum model of soil water flow based on Richards' equation. The RWU model is defined by four parameters (root length density distribution, average active root radius, radial root resistance, and the threshold value of the root xylem potential). In addition, soil resistance to water extraction by roots is related to soil hydraulic conductivity function and actual soil water content. The RWU model is capable of simulating both the compensatory root water uptake, in situations when reduced uptake from dry layers is compensated by increased uptake from wetter layers, and the root-mediated hydraulic redistribution of soil water, contributing to more natural soil moisture distribution throughout the root zone. The present study focusses on the sensitivity analysis of the combined soil water flow and RWU model responses in respect to variations of RWU model parameters. Vogel T., M. Dohnal, J. Dusek, J. Votrubova, and M. Tesar. 2013. Macroscopic modeling of plant water uptake in a forest stand involving root-mediated soil-water redistribution. Vadose Zone Journal, 12, 10.2136/vzj2012.0154.

  20. Organic aerosol formation from the reactive uptake of isoprene epoxydiols (IEPOX) onto non-acidified inorganic seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, T. B.; Coggon, M. M.; Bates, K. H.; Zhang, X.; Schwantes, R. H.; Schilling, K. A.; Loza, C. L.; Flagan, R. C.; Wennberg, P. O.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2014-04-01

    The reactive partitioning of cis and trans β-IEPOX was investigated on hydrated inorganic seed particles, without the addition of acids. No organic aerosol (OA) formation was observed on dry ammonium sulfate (AS); however, prompt and efficient OA growth was observed for the cis and trans β-IEPOX on AS seeds at liquid water contents of 40-75% of the total particle mass. OA formation from IEPOX is a kinetically limited process, thus the OA growth continues if there is a reservoir of gas-phase IEPOX. There appears to be no differences, within error, in the OA growth or composition attributable to the cis / trans isomeric structures. Reactive uptake of IEPOX onto hydrated AS seeds with added base (NaOH) also produced high OA loadings, suggesting the pH dependence for OA formation from IEPOX is weak for AS particles. No OA formation, after particle drying, was observed on seed particles where Na+ was substituted for NH4+. The Henry's Law partitioning of IEPOX was measured on NaCl particles (ionic strength ~9 M) to be 3 × 107 M atm-1 (-50 / +100%). A small quantity of OA was produced when NH4+ was present in the particles, but the chloride (Cl-) anion was substituted for sulfate (SO42-), possibly suggesting differences in nucleophilic strength of the anions. Online time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometry and offline filter analysis provide evidence of oxygenated hydrocarbons, organosulfates, and amines in the particle organic composition. The results are consistent with weak correlations between IEPOX-derived OA and particle acidity or liquid water observed in field studies, as the chemical system is nucleophile-limited and not limited in water or catalyst activity.

  1. Effect of Acids on Water Vapor Uptake by Pyrogenic Silica

    PubMed

    Bogdan; Kulmala

    1997-07-01

    Effect of gaseous HCl and HNO3 on the water vapor uptake by pyrogenic silica was studied at different relative humidities (RH) for pure water and different compositions of binary and ternary vapor mixtures. Experiments showed that the ability of silica to uptake water strongly depends on RH and on the type of acids and their concentration in the vapor mixtures. At low acid concentration in the binary mixtures the influence of acids is probably small. Water uptake by silica does not change monotonically with acid concentration: at first it decreases and then starts to grow. However, the presence of acids promotes water uptake, and the effect is very significant at low RH. HCl seems to be more effective acid to enhance water uptake than HNO3 . In the case of ternary mixtures the adsorbed weight of water is a bit larger than that adsorbed from the binary mixtures. Acids are accumulated by silica surface, and the accumulation is larger for nitric acid. PMID:9241208

  2. Quantitative measurements of root water uptake and root hydraulic conductivities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarebanadkouki, Mohsen; Javaux, Mathieu; Meunier, Felicien; Couvreur, Valentin; Carminati, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    How is root water uptake distributed along the root system and what root properties control this distribution? Here we present a method to: 1) measure root water uptake and 2) inversely estimate the root hydraulic conductivities. The experimental method consists in using neutron radiography to trace deuterated water (D2O) in soil and roots. The method was applied to lupines grown aluminium containers filled with a sandy soil. When the lupines were 4 weeks old, D2O was locally injected in a selected soil regions and its transport was monitored in soil and roots using time-series neutron radiography. By image processing, we quantified the concentration of D2O in soil and roots. We simulated the transport of D2O into roots using a diffusion-convection numerical model. The diffusivity of the roots tissue was inversely estimated by simulating the transport of D2O into the roots during night. The convective fluxes (i.e. root water uptake) were inversely estimating by fitting the experiments during day, when plants were transpiring, and assuming that root diffusivity did not change. The results showed that root water uptake was not uniform along the roots. Water uptake was higher at the proximal parts of the lateral roots and it decreased by a factor of 10 towards the distal parts. We used the data of water fluxes to inversely estimate the profile of hydraulic conductivities along the roots of transpiring plants growing in soil. The water fluxes in the lupine roots were simulated using the Hydraulic Tree Model by Doussan et al. (1998). The fitting parameters to be adjusted were the radial and axial hydraulic conductivities of the roots. The results showed that by using the root architectural model of Doussan et al. (1998) and detailed information of water fluxes into different root segments we could estimate the profile of hydraulic conductivities along the roots. We also found that: 1) in a tap-rooted plant like lupine water is mostly taken up by lateral roots; (2) water

  3. Modeling root water uptake in soils: opportunities and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javaux, Mathieu; Couvreur, Valentin; Huber, Katrin; Meunier, Félicien; Vanderborght, Jan; Vereecken, Harry

    2016-04-01

    Root water uptake modeling concepts have evolved over time. On one hand, mesoscopic models have been developed, which explicitly represent the fluxes at the soil root interfaces. On the other hand macroscopic approaches were proposed, which embedded root water uptake into a sink term in the macroscopic mass balance equation. Today, new techniques for imaging root architecture, water fluxes and soil properties open new possibilities to the understanding of water depletion in planted soils. Amongst others, architectural hydraulic root and soil models can be used to bridge the scale gap between single root and plant scales. In this talk, several new promising experimental approaches will be presented together with new models and upscaling procedures, possibly paving the way for the future models of root water uptake. Furthermore, open challenges will also be presented.

  4. Uptake of Nitrate and Sulfate on Dust Aerosols during TRACE-P

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, C. E.; Dibb, J. E.; Anderson, B. E.; Fuelberg, H. E.

    2003-01-01

    Aerosol data collected near Asia on the DC-8 aircraft platform during TRACE-P has been examined for evidence of uptake of NO3(-) and SO4(-) on dust surfaces. Data is compared between a sector where dust was predominant and a sector where dust was less of an influence. Coincident with dust were higher mixing ratios of anthropogenic pollutants. HNO3, SO2, and CO were higher in the dust sector than the nondust sector by factors of 2.7, 6.2, and 1.5, respectively. The colocation of dust and pollution sources allowed for the uptake of NO3(-) and nss-SO4(-) on the coarse dust aerosols, increasing the mixing ratios of these particulates by factors of 5.7 and 2.6 on average. There was sufficient nss-SO4(-) to take up all of the NH4(+) present, with enough excess nss-SO4(-) to also react with dust CaCO3. This suggests that the enhanced NO3(-) was not in fine mode NH4NO3. Particulate NO3(-) (p-NO3(-)) constituted 54% of the total NO3(-), (t-NO3(-)) on average, reaching a maximum of 72% in the dust sector. In the nondust sector, p-NO3(-) contributed 37% to t-NO3(-), likely due to the abundance of sea salts there. In two other sectors where the influence of dust and sea salt were minimal, p-NO3(-), accounted for < 15% of t-NO3(-).

  5. Plant water relations I: uptake and transport

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plants, like all living things, are mostly water. Water is the matrix of life, and its availability determines the distribution and productivity of plants on earth. Vascular plants evolved structures that enable them to transport water long distances with little input of energy, but the hollow trach...

  6. Water uptake of multicomponent organic mixtures and their influence on hygroscopicity of inorganic salts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Jing, Bo; Guo, Yucong; Li, Junling; Tong, Shengrui; Zhang, Yunhong; Ge, Maofa

    2016-07-01

    The hygroscopic behaviors of atmospherically relevant multicomponent water soluble organic compounds (WSOCs) and their effects on ammonium sulfate (AS) and sodium chloride were investigated using a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA) in the relative humidity (RH) range of 5%-90%. The measured hygroscopic growth was compared with predictions from the Extended-Aerosol Inorganics Model (E-AIM) and Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson (ZSR) method. The equal mass multicomponent WSOCs mixture containing levoglucosan, succinic acid, phthalic acid and humic acid showed gradual water uptake without obvious phase change over the whole RH range. It was found that the organic content played an important role in the water uptake of mixed particles. When organic content was dominant in the mixture (75%), the measured hygroscopic growth was higher than predictions from the E-AIM or ZSR relation, especially under high RH conditions. For mass fractions of organics not larger than 50%, the hygroscopic growth of mixtures was in good agreement with model predictions. The influence of interactions between inorganic and organic components on the hygroscopicity of mixed particles was related to the salt type and organic content. These results could contribute to understanding of the hygroscopic behaviors of multicomponent aerosol particles. PMID:27372129

  7. Plant water uptake strategies to cope with stochastic rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tron, Stefania; Laio, Francesco; Ridolfi, Luca

    2013-03-01

    We develop and compare two hydraulically-based schemes of the xylem structure of an individual plant. The dynamics of water uptake are analyzed under random conditions through the modeling of rainfall as a stochastic process. The two hydraulic schemes differ in the modeling of the root ability to cooperate, i.e., the capacity of roots to increase the water uptake from the wetter soil layers when other parts of the soil are dry (compensation effect) and to transfer water from moister into drier soil layers (water redistribution effect). Both compensation and water redistribution are direct consequences of the hydraulic structure of the root system, which is modeled here considering two contrasting cases corresponding to non-interacting uptake paths from different soil layers, and converging uptake paths. Only the latter hydraulic architecture allows for compensation and water redistribution. Another important difference between the hydraulic schemes is the stomatal response to soil dryness. When the soil water is unevenly distributed in the soil layers, the differences in the hydraulic schemes emerge. In semi-arid climates, plants characterized by a cooperative root system are shown to be less prone to water stress. In contrast, plants with non-interacting roots result to be better fit to humid climates, where the probability of droughts is small.

  8. Infrared emission by fine water aerosols and fogs.

    PubMed

    Carlon, H R

    1970-09-01

    Water aerosols, even when so finely divided as to be invisible, are capable of very strong absorption and emission in the infrared. This effect is pronounced in the 8-13-micro atmospheric window, owing to the 10(4) increase in the absorptivity of liquid water there over that for water vapor, and it contributes to the well known continuum in this spectral region. Water aerosol is found wherever suitable condensation nuclei exist and the relative humidity is above about 60%. Aerosol droplets increase in size and number with increasing relative humidity, affecting atmospheric radiance measurements accordingly. Trace quantities of aerosol can easily account for emission levels exceeding those of water vapor at 8-13 micro and are clearly indicated in cases where observed radiance levels cannot be accounted for by classical vapor band wing absorption theories. The aerosol emission mechanism is not associated with the formation or growth of the water droplets per se, but simply operates when droplets exist in the airborne state. Fog measurements are discussed and curves presented showing attenuation ratios between wavelengths in the visible and at 8-13 micro. Steam emission measurements leading to the formulation of an aerosol emission model are described briefly. PMID:20094188

  9. Models for root water uptake under deficit irrigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarovitch, Naftali; Krounbi, Leilah; Simunek, Jirka

    2010-05-01

    Modern agriculture, with its dependence on irrigation, fertilizers, and pesticide application, contributes significantly to the water and solute influx through the soil into the groundwater, specifically in arid areas. The quality and quantity of this water as it passes through the vadose zone is influenced primarily by plant roots. Root water uptake is a function of both a physical root parameter, commonly referred to as the root length density, and the soil water status. The location of maximum water uptake in a homogenous soil profile of uniform water content and hydraulic conductivity occurs in the soil layer containing the largest root length density. Under field conditions, in a drying soil, plants are both subject to, and the source of, great spatial variability in the soil water content. The upper soil layers containing the bulk of the root zone are usually the most water depleted, while the deeper regions of the soil profile containing fewer roots are wetter. Changes in the physiological functioning of plants have been shown to result from extended periods of water stress, but the short term effects of water stress on root water uptake are less well understood. While plants can minimize transpiration and the resulting growth rates under limiting conditions to conserve water, many plants maintain a constant potential transpiration rate long after the commencement of the drying process. Compensatory uptake, whereby plants respond to non-uniform, limiting conditions by increasing water uptake from areas in the root zone characterized by more favorable conditions, is one such mechanism by which plants sustain potential transpiration rates in drying soils. The development of models which accurately characterize temporal and spatial root water uptake patterns is important for agricultural resource optimization, upon which subsequent management decisions affecting resource conservation and environmental pollution are based. Numerical simulations of root water

  10. Mathematical modelling of plant water and nutrient uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roose, Tiina

    2010-05-01

    In this presentation I will describe a model of plant water and nutrient uptake and how to translate this model and experimental data from the single root scale to the root branching structure scale. The model starts at the single root scale and describes the water and nutrient movement in the soil using Richards' equation (water uptake) and diffusion-convection equation (nutrient uptake). The water and nutrient uptake in the single root scale model is represented by boundary conditions. In the case of nutrient uptake this has the form of a non-linear Michaelis-Menten uptake law and in the case of water this is given by a soil-xylem pressure difference boundary condition. The flow of water in the xylem is modeled as Poiseuille flow. We solve the single root scale models using the analytic approximate technique of asymptotic expansions similar to Oseen expansions known from fluid dynamics. We will then discuss how to use the analytic expression to estimate the water and nutrient uptake by growing root branching systems. We model the growth of the root system using a dynamic population model to describe the branching and elongation of roots in the branching system. This root branching population model results in a hyperbolic equation similar to age dependent population models and it can be solved fully analytically using the method of characteristics. Thus we have a fully analytic description of the root branching system evolution. We use this branching model to estimate the nutrient uptake in a scenario when the competition between subbranches is small, i.e., as it is in the case of phosphate, potassium and arsenic. We compare our approximate analytic model to a full 3d simulation of the root system phosphate uptake and find that the analytic model almost perfectly reproduces the 3d numerical model. In addition the analytic model can be included in larger field/catchment/climate scale models something which is not practically possible with the numerical simulations

  11. Effect of moisture content of concrete on water uptake

    SciTech Connect

    Rucker-Gramm, P.; Beddoe, R.E.

    2010-01-15

    The penetration of water and non-polar hexane in Portland cement mortar prisms with different initial moisture contents was investigated using nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 1}H NMR). The amount of water in gel pores strongly affects the penetration of water in much larger capillary pores. Water penetration is reduced by the self-sealing effect as characterized by non-sq roott dependence of capillary uptake and penetration depth. This is explained by the ongoing redistribution of water from capillaries into gel pores which results in internal swelling and loss of continuity of the capillary pore system; a correlation was observed between the amount of redistributed water and departure from sq roott behaviour. A descriptive model is used to explain the dependence of water uptake and penetration on moisture content. For increasing initial moisture contents up to a critical value equivalent to equilibrium with a relative humidity between 65 and 80%, less penetrating water is able to redistribute. Thus more penetrating water is in larger capillaries with less viscous resistance; uptake and penetration depth increase. Above the critical initial moisture content, uptake and penetration depth decrease towards zero. This is explained by (a) an overall reduction in capillary pressure because transport takes places in fewer and larger pores and (b) an increase in viscous resistance due to the connection of penetrating capillary water with pores already containing water. Less capillary pore space is available for transport. The surface region of concrete placed in contact with water is not instantaneously saturated. Water content increases with time depending on the degree of surface saturation. A new transition coefficient for capillary suction gamma is defined for the calculation of surface flux.

  12. Connecting Water Quality With Air Quality Through Microbial Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dueker, M. Elias

    Aerosol production from surface waters results in the transfer of aquatic materials (including nutrients and bacteria) to air. These materials can then be transported by onshore winds to land, representing a biogeochemical connection between aquatic and terrestrial systems not normally considered. In urban waterfront environments, this transfer could result in emissions of pathogenic bacteria from contaminated waters. Despite the potential importance of this link, sources, near-shore deposition, identity and viability of microbial aerosols are largely uncharacterized. This dissertation focuses on the environmental and biological mechanisms that define this water-air connection, as a means to build our understanding of the biogeochemical, biogeographical, and public health implications of the transfer of surface water materials to the near-shore environment in both urban and non-urban environments. The effects of tidal height, wind speed and fog on coastal aerosols and microbial content were first quantified on a non-urban coast of Maine, USA. Culture-based, culture-independent, and molecular methods were used to simultaneously sample microbial aerosols while monitoring meteorological parameters. Aerosols at this site displayed clear marine influence and high concentrations of ecologically-relevant nutrients. Coarse aerosol concentrations significantly increased with tidal height, onshore wind speed, and fog presence. Tidal height and fog presence did not significantly influence total microbial aerosol concentrations, but did have a significant effect on culturable microbial aerosol fallout. Molecular analyses of the microbes settling out of near-shore aerosols provided further evidence of local ocean to terrestrial transport of microbes. Aerosol and surface ocean bacterial communities shared species and in general were dominated by organisms previously sampled in marine environments. Fog presence strengthened the microbial connection between water and land through

  13. Simulations and field observations of root water uptake in plots with different soil water availability.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Gaochao; Vanderborght, Jan; Couvreur, Valentin; Javaux, Mathieu; Vereecken, Harry

    2015-04-01

    Root water uptake is a main process in the hydrological cycle and vital for water management in agronomy. In most models of root water uptake, the spatial and temporal soil water status and plant root distributions are required for water flow simulations. However, dynamic root growth and root distributions are not easy and time consuming to measure by normal approaches. Furthermore, root water uptake cannot be measured directly in the field. Therefore, it is necessary to incorporate monitoring data of soil water content and potential and root distributions within a modeling framework to explore the interaction between soil water availability and root water uptake. But, most models are lacking a physically based concept to describe water uptake from soil profiles with vertical variations in soil water availability. In this contribution, we present an experimental setup in which root development, soil water content and soil water potential are monitored non-invasively in two field plots with different soil texture and for three treatments with different soil water availability: natural rain, sheltered and irrigated treatment. Root development is monitored using 7-m long horizontally installed minirhizotubes at six depths with three replicates per treatment. The monitoring data are interpreted using a model that is a one-dimensional upscaled version of root water uptake model that describes flow in the coupled soil-root architecture considering water potential gradients in the system and hydraulic conductances of the soil and root system (Couvreur et al., 2012). This model approach links the total root water uptake to an effective soil water potential in the root zone. The local root water uptake is a function of the difference between the local soil water potential and effective root zone water potential so that compensatory uptake in heterogeneous soil water potential profiles is simulated. The root system conductance is derived from inverse modelling using

  14. UPTAKE OF URANIUM FROM DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The gastrointestinal absorption (G.I.) of uranium in man from drinking water was determined by measuring urinary and fecal excretion of 234U and 238U in eight subjects. In order to establish their normal backgrounds of uranium intake and excretion, the subjects collected 24 hour ...

  15. Water uptake of internally mixed ammonium sulfate and dicarboxylic acid particles probed by infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miñambres, Lorena; Méndez, Estíbaliz; Sánchez, María N.; Castaño, Fernando; Basterretxea, Francisco J.

    2013-05-01

    Tropospheric aerosols are usually mixtures of inorganic and organic compounds in variable proportions, and the relative amount of organic fraction can influence the hygroscopic properties of the particles. Infrared spectra of submicrometer internally mixed dry particles of ammonium sulfate (AS) with various dicarboxylic acids (oxalic, malonic, maleic, glutaric and pimelic) have been measured in an aerosol flow tube at several solute mass ratios. The spectra show a notable broadening in the bandwidth of sulfate ion ν3 vibrational band near 1115 cm-1 with respect to pure AS. We attribute these perturbations, that are biggest at AS/organic acid mass ratio near unity, to intermolecular interactions between inorganic ions and organic acid molecules in the internally mixed solids. The water uptake behavior of internally mixed particles has been measured by recording the infrared integrated absorbance of liquid water as a function of relative humidity (RH). The amount of water present in the particles prior to deliquescence correlates partially with the water solubilities of the dicarboxylic acids, and also with the relative magnitudes of intermolecular interactions in the internally mixed dry solids. Phase change of ammonium sulfate in the internally mixed particles with RH has been spectrally monitored, and it is shown that water uptaken before full deliquescence produces structural changes in the particles that are revealed by their vibrational spectra.

  16. Use Of Cosmogenic 35S To Trace The Uptake Process Of SO2 In Aerosols In The Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramian, A.; Corbin, A.

    2008-12-01

    Environmental issues, such as acid rain and global warming, are linked to increased sulfur emissions and sulfate production in the atmosphere. Sulfate aerosol particles act as cloud condensation nuclei and can reduce the greenhouse effect by the indirect effect. Our understanding of the chemical and photochemical processes that govern the chemical transformations and transport of sulfur compounds in the atmosphere is still incomplete due to the complex, multivalent nature of sulfur and uncertainties in aerosol chemistry and transport (particularly trans-oceanic). We explore the use of cosmogenically produced 35S (half-life~87 days) to trace the uptake of SO2 gas into aerosols, as a function of aerosol size, in two different environments by simultaneously collecting and measuring [35SO42- ]and [35SO2]. These measurements can in turn be used to understand the time scales of SO2 oxidation to SO42-, aerosol 'age' and boundary layer dynamics. Aerosol samples are collected on glass fiber filters twice a week at Scripps Institute of Oceanography Pier in La Jolla, CA and the San Fernando Valley, CA for a 21-day period. SO2 (g) was collected on KOH impregnated filters placed after a 4-stage aerosol filter stack. We present preliminary results for both fine and coarse aerosol sulfate [35SO4] as well as [35SO2]. These measurements were done using low-noise liquid scintillation spectroscopy. By measuring the activity of each sample repeatedly over a period of 100 days, the exponential decay of 35S was observed, confirming the identity of the radioactive signal. The coastal and inland measurements are compared and implications for the atmospheric chemistry of SO2 and SO4 are discussed. Finally, we assess the potential of using [35SO4]/[nss-SO4] as a tracer of primary sulfate and trans-oceanic transport by coupling the measurements of the cation (Na+, Ca2+, K+, Mg2+, NH4+) and anion (Cl, NO3, SO4) concentrations in the aerosols.

  17. Water uptake in biochars: The roles of porosity and hydrophobicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    We assessed the effects of porosity and hydrophobicity on water uptake by biochars. Biochars were produced from two feedstocks (hazelnut shells and Douglas fir chips) at three production temperatures (370 °C, 500 °C, and 620 °C). To distinguish the effects of porosity from the ...

  18. Uptake of Organic Vapors by Sulfate Aerosols: Physical and Chemical Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michelsen, R. R.; Ashbourn, S. F. M.; Iraci, L.T.; Staton, S. J. R.

    2003-01-01

    While it is known that upper tropospheric sulfate particles contain a significant amount of organic matter, both the source of the organic fraction and its form in solution are unknown. These studies explore how the chemical characteristics of the molecules and surfaces in question affect heterogeneous interactions. The solubilities of acetaldehyde [CH3CHO] and ethanol [CH3CH20H] in cold, aqueous sulfuric acid solutions have been measured by Knudsen cell studies. Henry's law solubility coefficients range from 10(exp 2) to 10(exp 5) M/atm for acetaldehyde, and from 10(exp 4) to 10(exp 9) M/atm for ethanol under upper tropospheric conditions (210-240 K, 40-80 wt. % H2S04). The multiple solvation pathways (protonation, enolization, etc.) available to these compounds in acidic aqueous environments will be discussed. Preliminary results from the interaction of acetaldehyde with solutions of formaldehyde in sulfuric acid will be presented as well. The physical and chemical processes that affect organic uptake by aqueous aerosols will be explored, with the aim of evaluating organic species not yet studied in low temperature aqueous sulfuric acid.

  19. Neutron imaging of root water uptake, transport and hydraulic redistribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, J.; Bilheux, H.; Kang, M.; Voisin, S.; Cheng, C.; Horita, J.; Perfect, E.

    2012-12-01

    Knowledge of plant water fluxes is critical for assessing mechanistic processes linked to biogeochemical cycles, yet resolving root water transport dynamics has been a particularly daunting task. Our objectives were to demonstrate the ability to non-invasively monitor individual root functionality and water fluxes within 1-3-week old Zea mays L. (maize) and Panicum virgatum L. (switchgrass) seedlings using neutron imaging. Seedlings were propagated in a growth chamber adjacent to the HFIR CG1 Beam Line at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in cylindrical or plate-like aluminum chambers containing sand. Seedlings were maintained under fairly dry conditions, with water added only to replace daily evapotranspiration. Plants were placed into the high flux cold neutron beam line and injections of H2O or deuterium oxide (D2O) were tracked through the soil and root systems by collecting consecutive CCD radiographs through time. Water fluxes within the root systems were manipulated by cycling on a growth lamp that altered foliar demand for water and thus internal water potential driving forces. 2D and 3D neutron radiography readily illuminated root structure, root growth, and relative plant and soil water content. 2D pulse-chase irrigation experiments with H2O and D2O, which have different neutron cross sections and thus differences in resulting image contrast, successfully allowed observation of uptake and mass flow of water within the root system. After irrigation there was rapid root water uptake from the newly wetted soil, followed by progressive hydraulic redistribution of water through the root systems to roots terminating in dry soil. Water flux within individual roots responded differentially to foliar illumination based on internal water potential gradients. Using 2D radiography, absolute fluxes of H2O or D2O through the system could not be easily determined since neutron attenuation through the sample was dependent on unknown and dynamic magnitudes of both D and H

  20. Quantifying the Reactive Uptake of OH by Organic Aerosols in aContinuous Flow Stirred Tank Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Che, Dung L.; Smith, Jared D.; Leone, Stephen R.; Ahmed, Musahid; Wilson, Kevin R.

    2009-03-01

    Here we report a new method for measuring the heterogeneous chemistry of submicron organic aerosol particles using a continuous flow stirred tank reactor. This approach is designed to quantify the real time heterogeneous kinetics, using a relative rate method, under conditions of low oxidant concentration and long reaction times that more closely mimic the real atmosphere. A general analytical expression, which couples the aerosol chemistry with the flow dynamics in the chamber is developed and applied to the heterogeneous oxidation of squalane particles by hydroxyl radicals (OH) in the presence of O2. The particle phase reaction is monitored via photoionization aerosol mass spectrometry and yields a reactive uptake coefficient of 0.51+-0.10, using OH concentrations of 1-7x108 molec cdot cm-3 and reaction times of 1.5+-3 hours. This uptake coefficient is larger than that found for the reaction carried out under high OH concentrations (~;;1x1010 molec cdot cm-3) and short reaction times in a flow tube reactor. This difference suggests that oxidant concentration and reaction time are not interchangeable quantities in reactions of organic aerosols with radicals. In general, this approach provides a new way to examine how the chemical aging of organic particles measured at short reaction times and high oxidant concentrations in flow tubes might differ from the long reaction times and low oxidant levels found in the real atmosphere.

  1. Morphology and Water Uptake in Block Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xi; Wong, David; Yakovlev, Sergey; Beers, Keith; Balsara, Nitash

    2014-03-01

    Polymer electrolyte membranes (PEMs) consisting of proton-conducting hydrophilic channels and a mechanically-strong hydrophobic matrix are attractive due to their wide clean energy applications. In an effort to understand the fundamentals of proton transport in PEMs, we fabricated a series of non-porous and mesoporous sulfonated poly(styrene-b-ethylene-b-styrene) (S-SES) copolymer membranes. We examine the effects of porosity and humidity level on the morphology of S-SES membranes. The relationship between morphology and water uptake of the membranes at different humidity levels are established. We show that by controlling the porosity of the membranes, we are able to optimize the water uptake of the membranes at desired humidity levels to maximize proton conductivity. Furthermore, we show the in situ morphology change of the membranes from fully hydrated state to dry state in a drying experiment. Morphology and water content of the membranes as a function of time are examined.

  2. Mucilage exudation facilitates root water uptake in dry soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Mutez; Kroener, Eva; Holz, Maire; Zarebanadkouki, Mohsen; Carminati, Andrea

    2014-05-01

    As plant roots take up water and the soil dries, water depletion is expected to occur in the rhizosphere. However, recent experiments showed that the rhizosphere of lupines was wetter than the bulk soil during root water uptake. On the other hand, after irrigation the rhizosphere remained markedly dry and it rewetted only after one-two days. We hypothesize that: 1) drying/wetting rates of the rhizosphere are controlled by mucilage exuded by roots; 2) mucilage alters the soil hydraulic conductivity: in particular, wet mucilage increases the soil hydraulic conductivity and dry mucilage makes the soil water repellent; 3) mucilage exudation favors root water uptake in dry soil; and 4) dry mucilage limits water loss from roots to dry soils. We used a root pressure probe to measure the hydraulic conductance of artificial roots sitting in soils. As an artificial root we employed a suction cup with a diameter of 2 mm and a length of 45 mm. The root pressure probe gave the hydraulic conductance of the soil-root continuum during pulse experiments in which water was injected into or sucked from the soil. First, we performed experiments with roots in a relatively dry soil with a volumetric water content of 0.03. Then, we repeated the experiment with artificial roots covered with mucilage and then placed into the soil. As a model for mucilage, we collected mucilage from Chia seeds. The water contents (including that of mucilage) in the experiments with and without mucilage were equal. The pressure curves were fitted with a model of root water that includes rhizosphere dynamics. We found that the artificial roots covered with wet mucilage took up water more easily. In a second experimental set-up we measured the outflow of water from the artificial roots into dry soils. We compared two soils: 1) a sandy soil and 2) the same soil wetted with mucilage from Chia seeds and then let dry. The latter soil became water repellent. Due to the water repellency, the outflow of water from

  3. Uptake of acid pollutants by mineral dust and their effect on aerosol solubility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saliba, N. A.; Chamseddine, Ashraf

    2012-01-01

    Due to the implications caused by mineral dust and sea-salt heterogeneous reactions with SO 2, NO x and NH 3 derivatives, this study aims to understand the interaction between gaseous and particulate phases; PM10 and PM2.5, in dust-rich and dust-poor environments. During dust outbreaks, the increase in PM10 and PM2.5 mass concentrations by 80 and 75%, respectively, was accompanied with approximately 30% decrease in water soluble inorganic ions. However, nitrate ion concentration, which increased by 36% during dust-rich episodes, was correlated with a 96% increase in gaseous HONO concentration. This implies a significant impact of dust storms on the tropospheric NO 2 to HONO conversion and consequently the formation of nitrate in PMs. Products of the reaction between HONO and mineral dust render atmospheric aerosols more soluble and consequently higher nitrogen deposition fluxes were calculated.

  4. A perspective on SOA generated in aerosol water from glyoxal and methylglyoxal and its impacts on climate-relevant aerosol properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sareen, N.; McNeill, V. F.

    2011-12-01

    In recent years, glyoxal and methylglyoxal have emerged to be potentially important SOA precursors with significant implications for climate-related aerosol properties. Here we will discuss how the chemistry of these and similar organic compounds in aerosol water can affect the aerosol optical and cloud formation properties. Aqueous-phase SOA production from glyoxal and methylglyoxal is a potential source of strongly light-absorbing organics, or "brown carbon". We characterized the kinetics of brown carbon formation from these precursors in mixtures of ammonium sulfate and water using UV-Vis spectrophotometry. This mechanism has been incorporated into a photochemical box model with coupled gas phase-aqueous aerosol chemistry. Methylglyoxal and related compounds also may impact an aerosol's ability to act as a cloud condensation nucleus. We recently showed via pendant drop tensiometry and aerosol chamber studies that uptake of methylglyoxal from the gas phase driven by aqueous-phase oligomerization chemistry is a potentially significant, previously unidentified source of surface-active organic material in aerosols. Results from pendant drop tensiometry showed significantly depressed surface tension in methylglyoxal-ammonium sulfate solutions. We further found that ammonium sulfate particles exposed to gas-phase methylglyoxal in a 3.5 m3 aerosol reaction chamber activate into cloud droplets at sizes up to 15% lower at a given supersaturation than do pure ammonium sulfate particles. The observed enhancement exceeds that predicted based on Henry's Law and our measurements of surface tension depression in bulk solutions, suggesting that surface adsorption of methylglyoxal plays a role in determining CCN activity. Methylglyoxal and similar gas-phase surfactants may be an important and overlooked source of enhanced CCN activity in the atmosphere. To characterize the SOA products formed in these solutions, an Aerosol Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS) was used

  5. Laboratory measurements of soot particle density change due to water uptake.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosbie, E.

    2015-12-01

    Black carbon containing soot particles are an important aerosol subclass owing to their light-absorbing properties. Furthermore, soot particles present challenges with regard to characterization and modeling of their microphysical, chemical, and optical properties, because of their inherent non-spherical, fractal morphology. Aggregation/coagulation of soot adds to the complexity of the particle morphology, while co-emitted organic compounds affect the chemical composition both during emission and though aging, which causes partitioning of secondary organic aerosol. Measurements of soot particles from vehicular and jet engine exhaust plumes have shown that the effective density can vary over a broad range (0.3-1.8 gm-3) and is affected by the fuel burn characteristics (fuel type, fuel equivalence ratio, combustion temperature), the particle size, and the extent of the aggregation. The action of organic coatings and the uptake of particle water, through hygroscopic growth, can cause a dramatic change in the morphology of soot. Restructuring of the fractal morphology into a more compact form has the effect of increasing the effective particle density, thus reducing the particle size, with important implications for the optical and hygroscopic properties. We present measurements of size-resolved particle density from laboratory generated fresh soot particles, under a range of operating conditions. We first filter by particle mass using an aerosol particle mass (APM) centrifugal analyzer and then subject the sample to a pre-humidification cycle in order to initiate particle restructuring. Finally, the sample is dried and the mobility size distribution is measured using a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS). A range of particle masses is scanned to determine the density as a function of size and, for each mass set point, a range of relative humidity settings are scanned to determine the extent of restructuring. We discuss the findings in relation to atmospherically

  6. Measuring Uptake Coefficients and Henry's Law Constants of Gas-Phase Species with Models for Secondary Organic Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairhurst, M. C.; Waring-Kidd, C.; Ezell, M. J.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    2014-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOC) are oxidized in the atmosphere and their products contribute to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. These particles have been shown to have effects on visibility, climate, and human health. Current models typically under-predict SOA concentrations from field measurements. Underestimation of these concentrations could be a result of how models treat particle growth. It is often assumed that particles grow via instantaneous thermal equilibrium partitioning between liquid particles and gas-phase species. Recent work has shown that growth may be better represented by irreversible, kinetically limited uptake of gas-phase species onto more viscous, tar-like SOA. However, uptake coefficients for these processes are not known. The goal of this project is to measure uptake coefficients and solubilities for different gases onto models serving as proxies for SOA and determine how they vary based on the chemical composition of the gas and the condensed phase. Experiments were conducted using two approaches: attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy and a flow system coupled to a mass spectrometer. The ATR crystal was coated with the SOA proxy and the gas-phase species introduced via a custom flow system. Uptake of the gas-phase species was characterized by measuring the intensity of characteristic IR bands as a function of time, from which a Henry's law constant and initial estimate of uptake coefficients could be obtained. Uptake coefficients were also measured in a flow system where the walls of the flow tube were coated with the SOA proxy and gas-phase species introduced via a moveable inlet. Uptake coefficients were derived from the decay in gas-phase species measured by mass spectrometry. The results of this work will establish a structure-interaction relationship for uptake of gases into SOA that can be implemented into regional and global models.

  7. Does the rhizosphere hydrophobicity limit root water uptake?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zare, Mohsen; Ahmed, Mutez; Kroener, Eva; Carminati, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    The ability of plants to extract water from the soil is influenced by the hydraulic conductivity of roots and their rhizosphere. Recent experiments showed that the rhizosphere turned hydrophobic after drying and it remained dry after rewetting [1]. Our objective was to investigate whether rhizosphere hydrophobicity is a limit to root water uptake after drying. To quantify the effect of rhizosphere hydrophobicity on root water uptake, we used neutron radiography to trace the transport of deuterated water (D2O) in the roots of lupines experiencing a severe, local soil drying. The plants were grown in aluminum containers (30×30×1 cm) filled with sandy soil. The soil was partitioned into nine compartments using three horizontal and three vertical layers of coarse sand (thickness of 1cm) as capillary barrier. When the plants were 28 days old, we let one of the upper lateral compartments dry to a water content of 2-4%, while keeping the other compartments to a water content of 20%. Then we injected 10 ml of D2O in the dry compartment and 10 ml in the symmetric location. The radiographs showed that root water uptake in the soil region that was let dry and then irrigated was 4-8 times smaller than in the wet soil region[2]. In a parallel experiment, we used neutron radiography to monitor the rehydration of lupine roots that were irrigated after a severe drying experiment. Based on root swelling and additional data on the xylem pressure, we calculated the hydraulic conductivity of the root-rhizosphere continuum. We found that the hydraulic conductivity of the root-rhizosphere continuum was initially 5.75×10-14 m s-1and it increased to 4.26×10-12 m s-1after four hours. Both experiments show that rhizosphere hydrophobicity after drying is associated with a reduction in root water uptake and a big decrease in hydraulic conductivity of the soil-root system. [1] Carminati et al (2010) Plant and Soil. Vol. 332: 163-176. [2] Zarebanadkouki and Carmianti (2013) Journal of Plant

  8. Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation in Aerosol Water by Photochemical Reactions of Gaseous Mixture of Monoterpene and Hydrogen Peroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, H.; Yi, S.; Park, J.; Cho, H.; Jung, K.

    2011-12-01

    There exist large uncertainties in model predictions for climate change and regional air quality. It could be caused by incomplete integration of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation in atmospheric chemical models. Recent laboratory studies have found SOA formation through chemical reactions on aerosol surface and in aerosol water. Water soluble organics formed by photochemical degradation of biogenic organics including isoprene and anthropogenic aromatics are predicted to form substantial amount of SOA through the newly found pathways. Although SOA formation in bulk aqueous solution was reported for laboratory experiments of various precursors (e.g., water soluble carbonyls and phenols), little is known for SOA formation in real aerosol water. In this study, photochemical reactions of the gaseous mixture of monoterpene and hydrogen peroxide were examined to investigate SOA formation through reactions in real aerosol phase water. SOA formation was conducted using a flow tube reactor (ID 30 cm x L 150 cm, FEP) and a smog chamber using FEP film in the presence of dry and wet seed particles. Acidity and chemical composition of seed aerosol were also controlled as important parameters influencing SOA formation. Particle size distribution and aerosol composition were analyzed to account for differences in SOA formation mechanisms and yields for dry and wet particles. The differences might be mainly associated with SOA formation in aerosol phase water. This work was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) grant funded by the Korea government (MEST) (No. 2011-0000221).

  9. Shock-induced behavior in micron-sized water aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Thomas C.; Davidson, David F.; Hanson, Ronald K.

    2007-05-01

    We have developed a suite of tools for studying aerosols behind shock waves. A Mie-extinction particle sizing diagnostic and a computational model, along with a specially designed square-section shock tube were developed to study the time-history of micrometer-sized aerosols behind shock waves. These tools are critically needed to pursue the use of shock tubes to study the combustion behavior of low-vapor-pressure fuels. While the facility is designed to study reactive systems, we began by measuring the behavior of water aerosols in the range of 1-10μm behind shock waves with temperatures between 450 and 600K and pressures between 0.64 and 1.1atm. From these data we determined evaporation rates and found a correlation that provides the noncontinuum evaporation rate in terms of the d2 evaporation rate and a correction function.

  10. Monitoring vegetation water uptake in a semiarid riparian corridor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, J.; Ochoa, C. G.; Leonard, J.

    2015-12-01

    With a changing global climate and growing demand for water throughout the world, responsible and sustainable land and water resource management practices are becoming increasingly important. Accounting for the amount of water used by riparian vegetation is a critical element for better managing water resources in arid and semiarid environments. The objective of this study was to determine water uptake by selected riparian vegetative species in a semiarid riparian corridor in North-Central Oregon. Exo-skin sap flow sensors (Dynamax, Houston, TX, U.S.A.) were used to measure sap flux in red alder (Alnus rubra) trees, the dominant overstory vegetation at the field site. Xylem sap flow data was collected from selected trees at the field site and in a greenhouse setting. Transpiration rates were determined based on an energy balance method, which makes it possible to estimate the mass flow of sap by measuring the velocity of electrical heat pulses through the plant stem. Preliminary field results indicate that red alder tree branches of about 1 inch diameter transpire between 2 and 6 kg of water/day. Higher transpiration rates of up to 7.3 kg of water/day were observed under greenhouse conditions. Streamflow and stream water temperature, vegetation characteristics, and meteorological data were analyzed in conjunction with transpiration data. Results of this study provide insight on riparian vegetation water consumption in water scarce ecosystems. This study is part of an overarching project focused on climate-vegetation interactions and ecohydrologic processes in arid and semiarid landscapes.

  11. Organosulfate formation during the uptake of pinonaldehyde on acidic sulfate aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liggio, John; Li, Shao-Meng

    2006-07-01

    Organosulfates are observed in studies of pinonaldehyde reactions with acidic sulfate aerosols using aerosol mass spectrometry, during which a significant fraction of the pinonaldehyde reaction products were found to consist of organosulfate compounds that account for 6-51% of the initial SO4= mass. Resultant aerosol mass spectra were consistent with proposed sulfate ester mechanisms, which likely form stable products. The existence of organosulfates was also confirmed in studies of the reaction system in bulk solution. The formation of organosulfates suggests that conventional inorganic SO4= chemical analysis may underestimate total SO4= mass in ambient aerosols.

  12. Water uptake strategies of maize under varying levels of water stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Ploeg, M.; Gooren, H. P. A.; Bakker, G.; de Rooij, G. H.

    2009-04-01

    More frequent and intense droughts due to global climate change, together with an increasing agricultural water use emphasize the importance of understanding root water uptake under water-stressed conditions. While root water uptake is driven by potential gradients, measurement of soil water potentials was limited by the measurement range of water-filled tensiometers (-0.085 MPa). A recently developed polymer tensiometer (POT) can measure soil water potentials down to -1.6 MPa. Monitoring low soil water potentials in the presence of root water uptake may help gain knowledge of a plant's strategy to cope with water stress, and allows improved determination of local water stress levels in experiments. To investigate plant strategies that cope with water stress, soil water potentials were measured in the vicinity of maize roots in three lysimeters. The lysimeters received different irrigation amounts: an optimal irrigation gift (-0.05 < p < -0.02 MPa) and minimized irrigation to create moderate (minimum p = -0.45 MPa) and severe (minimum p = -0.80 MPa) water stress. Measured soil water potentials showed that the water stressed plants started to take up water from deeper soil layers, and continued to take up water under very dry conditions. This research was funded by the Dutch Technology Foundation (STW).

  13. Aerosol chamber study of optical constants and N2O5 uptake on supercooled H2SO4/H2O/HNO3 solution droplets at polar stratospheric cloud temperatures.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Robert; Naumann, Karl-Heinz; Mangold, Alexander; Möhler, Ottmar; Saathoff, Harald; Schurath, Ulrich

    2005-09-15

    The mechanism of the formation of supercooled ternary H(2)SO(4)/H(2)O/HNO(3) solution (STS) droplets in the polar winter stratosphere, i.e., the uptake of nitric acid and water onto background sulfate aerosols at T < 195 K, was successfully mimicked during a simulation experiment at the large coolable aerosol chamber AIDA of Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe. Supercooled sulfuric acid droplets, acting as background aerosol, were added to the cooled AIDA vessel at T = 193.6 K, followed by the addition of ozone and nitrogen dioxide. N(2)O(5), the product of the gas phase reaction between O(3) and NO(2), was then hydrolyzed in the liquid phase with an uptake coefficient gamma(N(2)O(5)). From this experiment, a series of FTIR extinction spectra of STS droplets was obtained, covering a broad range of different STS compositions. This infrared spectra sequence was used for a quantitative test of the accuracy of published infrared optical constants for STS aerosols, needed, for example, as input in remote sensing applications. The present findings indicate that the implementation of a mixing rule approach, i.e., calculating the refractive indices of ternary H(2)SO(4)/H(2)O/HNO(3) solution droplets based on accurate reference data sets for the two binary H(2)SO(4)/H(2)O and HNO(3)/H(2)O systems, is justified. Additional model calculations revealed that the uptake coefficient gamma(N(2)O(5)) on STS aerosols strongly decreases with increasing nitrate concentration in the particles, demonstrating that this so-called nitrate effect, already well-established from uptake experiments conducted at room temperature, is also dominant at stratospheric temperatures. PMID:16834200

  14. Foliar water uptake: a common water acquisition strategy for plants of the redwood forest.

    PubMed

    Limm, Emily Burns; Simonin, Kevin A; Bothman, Aron G; Dawson, Todd E

    2009-09-01

    Evaluations of plant water use in ecosystems around the world reveal a shared capacity by many different species to absorb rain, dew, or fog water directly into their leaves or plant crowns. This mode of water uptake provides an important water subsidy that relieves foliar water stress. Our study provides the first comparative evaluation of foliar uptake capacity among the dominant plant taxa from the coast redwood ecosystem of California where crown-wetting events by summertime fog frequently occur during an otherwise drought-prone season. Previous research demonstrated that the dominant overstory tree species, Sequoia sempervirens, takes up fog water by both its roots (via drip from the crown to the soil) and directly through its leaf surfaces. The present study adds to these early findings and shows that 80% of the dominant species from the redwood forest exhibit this foliar uptake water acquisition strategy. The plants studied include canopy trees, understory ferns, and shrubs. Our results also show that foliar uptake provides direct hydration to leaves, increasing leaf water content by 2-11%. In addition, 60% of redwood forest species investigated demonstrate nocturnal stomatal conductance to water vapor. Such findings indicate that even species unable to absorb water directly into their foliage may still receive indirect benefits from nocturnal leaf wetting through suppressed transpiration. For these species, leaf-wetting events enhance the efficacy of nighttime re-equilibration with available soil water and therefore also increase pre-dawn leaf water potentials. PMID:19585154

  15. CRISM Limb Observations of Aerosols and Water Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael D.; Wolff, M.J.; Clancy, R.T.; Seelos, F.; Murchie, S.L.

    2009-01-01

    Near-infrared spectra taken in a limb-viewing geometry by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) on-board the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) provide a useful tool for probing atmospheric structure. Here we describe preliminary work on the retrieval of vertical profiles of aerosols and water vapor from the CRISM limb observations. The first full set of CRISM limb observations was taken in July 2009, with subsequent limb observations planned once every two months. Each set of limb observations contains about four dozen scans across the limb giving pole-to-pole coverage for two orbits at roughly 100 and 290 W longitude. Radiative transfer modeling taking account of aerosol scattering in the limb-viewing geometry is used to model the observations. The retrievals show the height to which dust and water vapor extend and the location and height of water ice clouds. Results from the First set of CRISM limb observations (July 2009, Ls=300) show dust aerosol well-mixed to about three scale heights above the surface with thin water ice clouds above the dust near the equator and at mid-northern latitudes. Water vapor is concentrated at high southern latitudes.

  16. Optimising root system hydraulic architectures for water uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meunier, Félicien; Couvreur, Valentin; Draye, Xavier; Javaux, Mathieu

    2015-04-01

    In this study we started from local hydraulic analysis of idealized root systems to develop a mathematical framework necessary for the understanding of global root systems behaviors. The underlying assumption of this study was that the plant is naturally optimised for the water uptake. The root system is thus a pipe network dedicated to the capture and transport of water. The main objective of the present research is to explain the fitness of major types of root architectures to their environment. In a first step, we developed links between local hydraulic properties and macroscopic parameters of (un)branched roots. The outcome of such an approach were functions of apparent conductance of entire root system and uptake distribution along the roots. We compared our development with some allometric scaling laws for the root water uptake: under the same simplifying assumptions we were able to obtain the same results and even to expand them to more physiological cases. Using empirical data of measured root conductance, we were also able to fit extremely well the data-set with this model. In a second stage we used generic architecture parameters and an existent root growth model to generate various types of root systems (from fibrous to tap). We combined both sides (hydraulic and architecture) then to maximize under a volume constraint either apparent conductance of root systems or the soil volume explored by active roots during the plant growth period. This approach has led to the sensitive parameters of the macroscopic parameters (conductance and location of the water uptake) of each single plant selected for this study. Scientific questions such as: "What is the optimal sowing density of a given hydraulic architecture ?" or "Which plant traits can we change to better explore the soil domain ?" can be also addressed with this approach: some potential applications are illustrated. The next (and ultimate phase) will be to validate our conclusions with real architectures

  17. Measurements of the HO2 uptake coefficient onto aqueous salt and organic aerosols and interpretation using the kinetic multi-layer model of aerosol surface and bulk chemistry (KM-SUB)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, P. S. J.; Berkemeier, T.; George, I. J.; Whalley, L. K.; Moon, D. R.; Ammann, M.; Baeza-Romero, M. T.; Poeschl, U.; Shiraiwa, M.; Heard, D. E.

    2014-12-01

    HO2 is closely coupled with OH which is responsible for the majority of the oxidation in the troposphere. Therefore, it is important to be able to accurately predict OH and HO2 concentrations. However, many studies have reported a large discrepancy between HO2 radical concentrations measured during field campaigns and predicted by constrained box models using detailed chemical mechanisms (1,2). However, there have been very few laboratory studies (3,4) on HO2 uptake by aerosols and the rates and mechanism is still uncertain. The HO2 uptake coefficients were measured for deliquesced ammonium nitrate and sodium chloride aerosols and copper doped sucrose aerosols. The measurements were performed using an aerosol flow tube coupled to a Fluorescence Assay by Gas Expansion (FAGE) detector. By either placing the HO2 injector in set positions and varying the aerosol concentration or by moving it along the flow tube at given aerosol concentrations, uptake coefficients could be measured. The aerosols were generated using an atomiser and the total aerosol surface area was measured using a SMPS. Larger uptake coefficients were measured at shorter times and lower HO2 concentrations for aqueous salt aerosols. The time dependence was able to be modelled by the KM-SUB model (5) as the HO2 concentration decreases along the flow tube and the HO2 uptake mechanism is known to be a second order reaction. Measurements have shown that at higher HO2 concentrations there was also more H2O2 exiting the injector which could convert back to HO2 if trace amounts of metals are present within the aerosol via Fenton reactions. Preliminary results have shown that the inclusion of a Fenton-like reaction within the KM-SUB model has the potential to explain the apparent HO2 concentration dependence. Finally, the KM-SUB model has been used to demonstrate that the increase in uptake coefficient observed when increasing the relative humidity for copper doped sucrose aerosols could be explained by an

  18. Measurement of gas/water uptake coefficients for trace gases active in the marine environment

    SciTech Connect

    Davidovits, P. . Dept. of Chemistry); Worsnop, D.W.; Zahniser, M.S.; Kolb, C.E. . Center for Chemical and Environmental Physics)

    1992-02-01

    Ocean produced reduced sulfur compounds including dimethylsulfide (DMS), hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), carbon disulfide (CS{sub 2}), methyl mercaptan (CH{sub 3}CH) and carbonyl sulfide (OCS) deliver a sulfur burden to the atmosphere which is roughly equal to sulfur oxides produced by fossil fuel combustion. These species and their oxidation products dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), dimethyl sulfone (DMSO{sub 2}) and methane sulfonic acid (MSA) dominate aerosol and CCN production in clean marine air. Furthermore, oxidation of reduced sulfur species will be strongly influenced by NO{sub x}/O{sub 3} chemistry in marine atmospheres. The multiphase chemical processes for these species must be understood in order to study the evolving role of combustion produced sulfur oxides over the oceans. We have measured the chemical and physical parameters affecting the uptake of reduced sulfur compounds, their oxidation products, ozone, and nitrogen oxides by the ocean's surface, and marine clouds, fogs, and aerosols. These parameters include: gas/surface mass accommodation coefficients; physical and chemically modified (effective) Henry's law constants; and surface and liquid phase reaction constants. These parameters are critical to understanding both the interaction of gaseous trace species with cloud and fog droplets and the deposition of trace gaseous species to dew covered, fresh water and marine surfaces.

  19. Equilibrium water and solute uptake in silicone hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Liu, D E; Dursch, T J; Oh, Y; Bregante, D T; Chan, S Y; Radke, C J

    2015-05-01

    Equilibrium water content of and solute partitioning in silicone hydrogels (SiHys) are investigated using gravimetric analysis, fluorescence confocal laser-scanning microscopy (FCLSM), and back extraction with UV/Vis-absorption spectrophotometry. Synthesized silicone hydrogels consist of silicone monomer, hydrophilic monomer, cross-linking agent, and triblock-copolymer macromer used as an amphiphilic compatibilizer to prevent macrophase separation. In all cases, immiscibility of the silicone and hydrophilic polymers results in microphase-separated morphologies. To investigate solute uptake in each of the SiHy microphases, equilibrium partition coefficients are obtained for two hydrophilic solutes (i.e., theophylline and caffeine dissolved in aqueous phosphate-buffered saline) and two oleophilic solutes (i.e., Nile Red and Bodipy Green dissolved in silicone oil), respectively. Measured water contents and aqueous-solute partition coefficients increase linearly with increasing solvent-free hydrophilic-polymer volume fraction. Conversely, oleophilic-solute partition coefficients decrease linearly with rising solvent-free hydrophilic-polymer volume fraction (i.e., decreasing hydrophobic silicone-polymer fraction). We quantitatively predict equilibrium SiHy water and solute uptake assuming that water and aqueous solutes reside only in hydrophilic microdomains, whereas oleophilic solutes partition predominately into silicone microdomains. Predicted water contents and solute partition coefficients are in excellent agreement with experiment. Our new procedure permits a priori estimation of SiHy water contents and solute partition coefficients based solely on properties of silicone and hydrophilic homopolymer hydrogels, eliminating the need for further mixed-polymer-hydrogel experiments. PMID:25725471

  20. Multiscale analysis of water uptake and erosion in biodegradable polyarylates

    PubMed Central

    Valenzuela, Loreto M.; Zhang, Guojin; Flach, Carol; Murthy, Sanjeeva; Mendelsohn, Richard; Michniak-Kohn, Bozena; Kohn, Joachim

    2011-01-01

    The role of hydration in degradation and erosion of materials, especially biomaterials used in scaffolds and implants, was investigated by studying the distribution of water at length scales from 0.1 nm to 0.1 mm using Raman spectroscopy, small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), Raman confocal imaging, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The measurements were demonstrated using L-tyrosine derived polyarylates. Bound- and free- water were characterized using their respective signatures in the Raman spectra. In the presence of deuterium oxide (D2O), H-D exchange occurred at the amide carbonyl but was not detected at the ester carbonyl. Water appeared to be present in the polymer even in regions where there was little evidence for N-H to N-D exchange. SANS showed that water is not uniformly dispersed in the polymer matrix. The distribution of water can be described as mass fractals in polymers with low water content (~5 wt%), and surface fractals in polymers with larger water content (15 to 60 wt%). These fluctuations in the density of water distribution are presumed to be the precursors of the ~ 20 μm water pockets seen by Raman confocal imaging, and also give rise to 10–50 μm porous network seen in SEM. The surfaces of these polymers appeared to resist erosion while the core of the films continued to erode to form a porous structure. This could be due to differences in either the density of the polymer or the solvent environment in the bulk vs. the surface, or a combination of these two factors. There was no correlation between the rate of degradation and the amount of water uptake in these polymers, and this suggests that it is the bound-water and not the total amount of water that contributes to hydrolytic degradation. PMID:22368310

  1. Spatiotemporal Pattern of Root Water Uptake for Locally Differing Soil Water Availability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dara, Abbas; Moradi, Ahmad B.; Oswald, Sascha

    2013-04-01

    One of the important but not well known questions is how the root system of a plant respond to water scarcity, especially if there is a locally heterogeneous distribution of soil moisture or accessibility of water. However, heterogeneous water availability is a typical characteristic of soils, for example by heterogeneity of soil properties, infiltration and evaporation or competition between plant roots. On top of that, water content in soil has a large temporal dynamics. Despite these intrinsic heterogeneities of soil-plant water relations, we know little about the ways how plants respond to local environmental properties. Recently imaging and tomography methods have become available, that facilitate the measurement of spatial and temporal distribution of water content and of the root system itself, which offers the possibility to investigate also the distribution of water uptake in a plant root system. To monitor root water uptake response to local soil water availability, we used neutron radiography especially suited to detect water distribution, to non-invasively image root growth and 2-D soil water distribution as time-lapsed images. We applied a method to hydraulically partition the soil to be able to actively control the level of water available locally and at the same time to locally quantify water uptake for these heterogeneous conditions. The key results for an imaging experiment running full three weeks show topological patterns of water uptake along the root system. Moreover, under water stress, compensatory root water uptake maximizes soil water utilization in response to transpiration demand. Lupin plants were grown in 40*35*1 cm³ aluminum containers. The root zone was partitioned into twenty compartments separated by capillary barriers and divides the root system into taproot and lateral roots, and into young and old later root segments at the top, middle and bottom profile positions. Three weeks after planting, four soil-water treatments in three

  2. Reactive uptake of Isoprene-derived epoxydiols to submicron aerosol particles: implications for IEPOX lifetime and SOA formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornton, J. A.; Gaston, C.; Riedel, T.; Zhang, Z.; Gold, A.; Surratt, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    The reactive uptake of isoprene-derived epoxydiols (IEPOX) is thought to be a significant source of atmospheric secondary organic aerosol (SOA). However, the IEPOX reaction probability (γIEPOX) and its dependence upon particle composition remain poorly constrained. We report measurements of γIEPOX for trans-b-IEPOX, the predominant IEPOX isomer, on submicron particles as a function of composition, acidity, and relative humidity (RH). Particle acidity had the strongest effect. γIEPOX is more than 500 times larger on ammonium bisulfate (γ ~ 0.05) than on ammonium sulfate (γ ≤ 1 x 10-4). We could accurately predict γIEPOX using an acid-catalyzed, epoxide ring-opening mechanism and a high Henry's law coefficient (1.6 x 108 M/atm). Suppression of γIEPOX was observed in particles containing both ammonium bisulfate and polyethylene glycol (PEG-300), likely due to diffusion and solubility limitations within a PEG-300 coating, suggesting that IEPOX uptake could be self-limiting. Using the measured uptake kinetics, the predicted atmospheric lifetime of IEPOX is a few hours in the presence of highly acidic particles (pH < 0), but is greater than a day on less acidic particles (pH > 3). We connect these net reactive uptake measurements to chamber studies of the SOA yield from IEPOX multiphase chemistry and discuss the implications of these findings for modeling the anthropogenic influence upon SOA formation from isoprene.

  3. Uptake of antibiotics from irrigation water by plants.

    PubMed

    Azanu, David; Mortey, Christiana; Darko, Godfred; Weisser, Johan Juhl; Styrishave, Bjarne; Abaidoo, Robert Clement

    2016-08-01

    The capacity of carrot (Daucus corota L.) and lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.), two plants that are usually eaten raw, to uptake tetracycline and amoxicillin (two commonly used antibiotics) from irrigated water was investigated in order to assess the indirect human exposure to antibiotics through consumption of uncooked vegetables. Antibiotics in potted plants that had been irrigated with known concentrations of the antibiotics were extracted using accelerated solvent extraction and analyzed on a liquid chromatograph-tandem mass spectrometer. The plants absorbed the antibiotics from water in all tested concentrations of 0.1-15 mg L(-1). Tetracycline was detected in all plant samples, at concentrations ranging from 4.4 to 28.3 ng/g in lettuce and 12.0-36.8 ng g(-1) fresh weight in carrots. Amoxicillin showed absorption with concentrations ranging from 13.7 ng g(-1) to 45.2 ng g(-1) for the plant samples. The mean concentration of amoxicillin (27.1 ng g(-1)) in all the samples was significantly higher (p = 0.04) than that of tetracycline (20.2 ng g(-1)) indicating higher uptake of amoxicillin than tetracycline. This suggests that the low antibiotic concentrations found in plants could be important for causing antibiotics resistance when these levels are consumed. PMID:27213239

  4. MACROSCOPIC APPROACHES TO ROOT WATER UPTAKE AS A FUNCTION OF WATER AND SALINITY STRESS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Computer simulation models can be important tools for analyzing and managing site-specific irrigation, soil salinization, or crop production problems. For many of these problems, computer analyses require simulations of root water uptake as a function of water and salinity stress. We give an over...

  5. Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation from Glyoxal: photochemical versus dark uptake and reversible versus irreversible SOA formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waxman, E.; Slowik, J.; Kampf, C.; Timkovsky, J.; Noziere, B.; Praplan, A.; Pffafenberger, L.; Holzinger, R.; Hoffmann, T.; Dommen, J.; Prevot, A.; Baltensperger, U.; Volkamer, R.

    2012-04-01

    Glyoxal forms secondary organic aerosol (SOA) by partitioning to the aerosol aqueous phase according to Henry's law. The subsequent processing by heterogeneous and multiphase reactions shifts the partitioning towards aerosols. Currently it is not well understood whether these reactions result in reversible or irreversible SOA formation, and what parameters influence the rate limiting step of multiphase processing. We conducted a series of simulation chamber experiments at PSI in April and May 2011 to investigate processing under dark conditions, UV and/or visible light irradiated conditions, and in the presence and absence of OH radicals. Experiments used ammonium sulfate or ammonium sulfate/fulvic acid mixtures as seed aerosols, and were conducted between 50% and 85% relative humidity at approximately constant RH over the course of any given experiment. Glyoxal was produced photochemically from acetylene, using HONO photolysis as the OH radical source. Gas-phase glyoxal was measured by the CU LED-Cavity Enhanced-DOAS. The Thermal-Desorption Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometer (TD-PTR-MS) and Ion Chromatography Mass Spectrometer (IC-MS) monitored both gas and aerosol-phase organic reaction products. Particle composition was monitored by High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (HR-ToF-AMS), and HPLC-ESI MS/MS and LC-MS analysis of filter samples.

  6. Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation from Glyoxal: photochemical versus dark uptake and reversible versus irreversible SOA formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waxman, E.; Slowik, J. G.; Kampf, C. J.; Timkovsky, J.; Noziere, B.; Praplan, A. P.; Pfaffenberger, L.; Holzinger, R.; Hoffmann, T.; Dommen, J.; Prevot, A. S.; Baltensperger, U.; Volkamer, R.

    2011-12-01

    Glyoxal forms secondary organic aerosol (SOA) by partitioning to the aerosol aqueous phase according to Henry's law. The subsequent processing by heterogeneous and multiphase reactions shifts the partitioning towards aerosols. Currently it is not well understood whether these reactions result in reversible or irreversible SOA formation, and what parameters influence the rate limiting step of multiphase processing. We conducted a series of simulation chamber experiments at PSI in April and May 2011 to investigate processing under dark conditions, UV and/or visible light irradiated conditions, and in the presence and absence of OH radicals. Experiments used ammonium sulfate or ammonium sulfate/fulvic acid mixtures as seed aerosols, and were conducted between 50% and 85% relative humidity at approximately constant RH over the course of any given experiment. Glyoxal was produced photochemically from acetylene, using HONO photolysis as the OH radical source. Gas-phase glyoxal was measured by the CU LED-Cavity Enhanced-DOAS. The Thermal-Desorption Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometer (TD-PTR-MS) and Ion Chromatography Mass Spectrometer (IC-MS) monitored both gas and aerosol-phase organic reaction products. Particle composition was monitored by High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (HR-ToF-AMS), and HPLC-ESI MS/MS and LC-MS analysis of filter samples.

  7. Impacts of Sulfate Seed Acidity and Water Content on Isoprene Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation.

    PubMed

    Wong, Jenny P S; Lee, Alex K Y; Abbatt, Jonathan P D

    2015-11-17

    The effects of particle-phase water and the acidity of pre-existing sulfate seed particles on the formation of isoprene secondary organic aerosol (SOA) was investigated. SOA was generated from the photo-oxidation of isoprene in a flow tube reactor at 70% relative humidity (RH) and room temperature in the presence of three different sulfate seeds (effloresced and deliquesced ammonium sulfate and ammonium bisulfate) under low NOx conditions. High OH exposure conditions lead to little isoprene epoxydiol (IEPOX) SOA being generated. The primary result is that particle-phase water had the largest effect on the amount of SOA formed, with 60% more SOA formation occurring with deliquesced ammonium sulfate seeds as compared to that on effloresced ones. The additional organic material was highly oxidized. Although the amount of SOA formed did not exhibit a dependence on the range of seed particle acidity examined, perhaps because of the low amount of IEPOX SOA, the levels of high-molecular-weight material increased with acidity. While the uptake of organics was partially reversible under drying, the results nevertheless indicate that particle-phase water enhanced the amount of organic aerosol material formed and that the RH cycling of sulfate particles may mediate the extent of isoprene SOA formation in the atmosphere. PMID:26460477

  8. Reactive Uptake of Dinitrogen Pentoxide on Aqueous Ammonium Nitrate Aerosols: Dependence on the Nitrate Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahner, A.; Folkers, M.; Mentel, T. F.; Sebald, H.; ten Brink, H. M.; Jongejan, P. A.

    2001-12-01

    The heterogeneous conversion of N2O_5 to HNO3 is an important step in the removal of nitrogen oxides from the atmosphere. In the planetary boundary layer this heterogeneous process occurs on the surfaces of aqueous aerosols. The fraction of NH4NO_3 in secondary inorganic aerosols in western Europe and in the United States is increasing, due to decreasing SO2 emissions at nearly constant NOX source strength. This may become of importance, since increasing nitrate concentrations in aerosols can reduce the reaction probability γ N2O5 by up to an order of magnitude ("nitrate effect" [1,2]). We measured γ N2O5 on NH4NO_3, (NH4)_2SO_4 and NH4HSO_4 aerosols in the large aerosol chamber at the FZ-Jülich. The decrease of N2O_5 and the formation of gas-phase HNO3 was monitored by high resolution FTIR spectroscopy. Simultaneously, the aerosol composition was determined on-line by Steam Jet Aerosol Collection/Ion Chromatography. The aerosol surface area was calculated from measured size distributions in the range of 20 nm to 5 μ m. The γ N2O5 of 0.02(+/- 0.003) on (NH4)_2SO_4 and NH4HSO_4 droplets are independent of the relative humidity (RH), like for the corresponding sodium salts at similar conditions. The γ N2O5 on NH4NO_3 aerosol is decreasing from 0.02 at 80% RH to 0.007 at 60% RH with decreasing relative humidity, thus increasing nitrate concentration. The functional dependence of γ N2O5 on the RH or on the ionic strength is different for NH4NO_3 and NaNO3. However it can be unified by supposing direct dependence of γ N2O5 on the mean nitrate activity. [1] A. Wahner, Th. F. Mentel, M. Sohn, J. Stier , J. Geophys. Res., 103 (1999), 31,103 [2] Th. F. Mentel, M. Sohn, A. Wahner , Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 1 (1999), 5451

  9. Stable isotopes in leaf water and transpiration - tools to assess leaf physiology and water uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gessler, Arthur; Roddy, Adam; Volkmann, Till; Haberer, Kristine

    2014-05-01

    New laser based isotope technology allows online determination of the isotopic composition of water transpired from leaves. With this tool we can get new insights into leaf water physiology during day-night-cycles but also track the dynamics of plant water uptake with high temporal resolution. This talk we will give an overview on the following emerging topics - Leaf level physiology: The isotopic non-steady state of leaf water during the diel course - Plant-soil-atmosphere coupling: Dynamics of water uptake by plants Brought together both topics allow to get deeper insights into the effects of environmental parameters on the water balance of ecosystems bridging temporal and spatial scales. The findings from this research might help integrating plant physiological information, soil hydrological processes and the interaction between plant and soil processes in hydrological models.

  10. The Impact of Rhizosphere Processes on Water Flow and Root Water Uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Nimrod; Kroener, Eva; Carminati, Andrea; Javaux, Mathieu

    2015-04-01

    For many years, the rhizosphere, which is the zone of soil in the vicinity of the roots and which is influenced by the roots, is known as a unique soil environment with different physical, biological and chemical properties than those of the bulk soil. Indeed, in recent studies it has been shown that root exudate and especially mucilage alter the hydraulic properties of the soil, and that drying and wetting cycles of mucilage result in non-equilibrium water dynamics in the rhizosphere. While there are experimental evidences and simplified 1D model for those concepts, an integrated model that considers rhizosphere processes with a detailed model for water and roots flow is absent. Therefore, the objective of this work is to develop a 3D physical model of water flow in the soil-plant continuum that take in consideration root architecture and rhizosphere specific properties. Ultimately, this model will enhance our understanding on the impact of processes occurring in the rhizosphere on water flow and root water uptake. To achieve this objective, we coupled R-SWMS, a detailed 3D model for water flow in soil and root system (Javaux et al 2008), with the rhizosphere model developed by Kroener et al (2014). In the new Rhizo-RSWMS model the rhizosphere hydraulic properties differ from those of the bulk soil, and non-equilibrium dynamics between the rhizosphere water content and pressure head is also considered. We simulated a wetting scenario. The soil was initially dry and it was wetted from the top at a constant flow rate. The model predicts that, after infiltration the water content in the rhizosphere remained lower than in the bulk soil (non-equilibrium), but over time water infiltrated into the rhizosphere and eventually the water content in the rhizosphere became higher than in the bulk soil. These results are in qualitative agreement with the available experimental data on water dynamics in the rhizosphere. Additionally, the results show that rhizosphere processes

  11. Role of water states on water uptake and proton transport in Nafion using molecular simulations and bimodal network

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Gi Suk; Kaviany, Massoud; Gostick, Jeffrey T.; Kientiz, Brian; Weber, Adam Z.; Kim, Moo Hwan

    2011-04-07

    In this paper, using molecular simulations and a bimodal-domain network, the role of water state on Nafion water uptake and water and proton transport is investigated. Although the smaller domains provide moderate transport pathways, their effectiveness remains low due to strong, resistive water molecules/domain surface interactions. Finally, the water occupancy of the larger domains yields bulk-like water, and causes the observed transition in the water uptake and significant increases in transport properties.

  12. Removal of Sarin Aerosol and Vapor by Water Sprays

    SciTech Connect

    Brockmann, John E.

    1998-09-01

    Falling water drops can collect particles and soluble or reactive vapor from the gas through which they fall. Rain is known to remove particles and vapors by the process of rainout. Water sprays can be used to remove radioactive aerosol from the atmosphere of a nuclear reactor containment building. There is a potential for water sprays to be used as a mitigation technique to remove chemical or bio- logical agents from the air. This paper is a quick-look at water spray removal. It is not definitive but rather provides a reasonable basic model for particle and gas removal and presents an example calcu- lation of sarin removal from a BART station. This work ~ a starting point and the results indicate that further modeling and exploration of additional mechanisms for particle and vapor removal may prove beneficial.

  13. Water uptake by growing cells: an assessment of the controlling roles of wall relaxation, solute uptake, and hydraulic conductance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    Growing plant cells increase in volume principally by water uptake into the vacuole. There are only three general mechanisms by which a cell can modulate the process of water uptake: (a) by relaxing wall stress to reduce cell turgor pressure (thereby reducing cell water potential), (b) by modifying the solute content of the cell or its surroundings (likewise affecting water potential), and (c) by changing the hydraulic conductance of the water uptake pathway (this works only for cells remote from water potential equilibrium). Recent studies supporting each of these potential mechanisms are reviewed and critically assessed. The importance of solute uptake and hydraulic conductance is advocated by some recent studies, but the evidence is indirect and conclusions remain controversial. For most growing plant cells with substantial turgor pressure, it appears that reduction in cell turgor pressure, as a consequence of wall relaxation, serves as the major initiator and control point for plant cell enlargement. Two views of wall relaxation as a viscoelastic or a chemorheological process are compared and distinguished.

  14. Effect of parameter choice in root water uptake models - the arrangement of root hydraulic properties within the root architecture affects dynamics and efficiency of root water uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechmann, M.; Schneider, C.; Carminati, A.; Vetterlein, D.; Attinger, S.; Hildebrandt, A.

    2014-10-01

    Detailed three-dimensional models of root water uptake have become increasingly popular for investigating the process of root water uptake. However, they suffer from a lack of information on important parameters, particularly on the spatial distribution of root axial and radial conductivities, which vary greatly along a root system. In this paper we explore how the arrangement of those root hydraulic properties and branching within the root system affects modelled uptake dynamics, xylem water potential and the efficiency of root water uptake. We first apply a simple model to illustrate the mechanisms at the scale of single roots. By using two efficiency indices based on (i) the collar xylem potential ("effort") and (ii) the integral amount of unstressed root water uptake ("water yield"), we show that an optimal root length emerges, depending on the ratio between roots axial and radial conductivity. Young roots with high capacity for radial uptake are only efficient when they are short. Branching, in combination with mature transport roots, enables soil exploration and substantially increases active young root length at low collar potentials. Second, we investigate how this shapes uptake dynamics at the plant scale using a comprehensive three-dimensional root water uptake model. Plant-scale dynamics, such as the average uptake depth of entire root systems, were only minimally influenced by the hydraulic parameterization. However, other factors such as hydraulic redistribution, collar potential, internal redistribution patterns and instantaneous uptake depth depended strongly on the arrangement on the arrangement of root hydraulic properties. Root systems were most efficient when assembled of different root types, allowing for separation of root function in uptake (numerous short apical young roots) and transport (longer mature roots). Modelling results became similar when this heterogeneity was accounted for to some degree (i.e. if the root systems contained between

  15. Modelling Water Uptake Provides a New Perspective on Grass and Tree Coexistence

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Root biomass distributions have long been used to infer patterns of resource uptake. These patterns are used to understand plant growth, plant coexistence and water budgets. Root biomass, however, may be a poor indicator of resource uptake because large roots typically do not absorb water, fine roots do not absorb water from dry soils and roots of different species can be difficult to differentiate. In a sub-tropical savanna, Kruger Park, South Africa, we used a hydrologic tracer experiment to describe the abundance of active grass and tree roots across the soil profile. We then used this tracer data to parameterize a water movement model (Hydrus 1D). The model accounted for water availability and estimated grass and tree water uptake by depth over a growing season. Most root biomass was found in shallow soils (0–20 cm) and tracer data revealed that, within these shallow depths, half of active grass roots were in the top 12 cm while half of active tree roots were in the top 21 cm. However, because shallow soils provided roots with less water than deep soils (20–90 cm), the water movement model indicated that grass and tree water uptake was twice as deep as would be predicted from root biomass or tracer data alone: half of grass and tree water uptake occurred in the top 23 and 43 cm, respectively. Niche partitioning was also greater when estimated from water uptake rather than tracer uptake. Contrary to long-standing assumptions, shallow grass root distributions absorbed 32% less water than slightly deeper tree root distributions when grasses and trees were assumed to have equal water demands. Quantifying water uptake revealed deeper soil water uptake, greater niche partitioning and greater benefits of deep roots than would be estimated from root biomass or tracer uptake data alone. PMID:26633177

  16. Modelling Water Uptake Provides a New Perspective on Grass and Tree Coexistence.

    PubMed

    Mazzacavallo, Michael G; Kulmatiski, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Root biomass distributions have long been used to infer patterns of resource uptake. These patterns are used to understand plant growth, plant coexistence and water budgets. Root biomass, however, may be a poor indicator of resource uptake because large roots typically do not absorb water, fine roots do not absorb water from dry soils and roots of different species can be difficult to differentiate. In a sub-tropical savanna, Kruger Park, South Africa, we used a hydrologic tracer experiment to describe the abundance of active grass and tree roots across the soil profile. We then used this tracer data to parameterize a water movement model (Hydrus 1D). The model accounted for water availability and estimated grass and tree water uptake by depth over a growing season. Most root biomass was found in shallow soils (0-20 cm) and tracer data revealed that, within these shallow depths, half of active grass roots were in the top 12 cm while half of active tree roots were in the top 21 cm. However, because shallow soils provided roots with less water than deep soils (20-90 cm), the water movement model indicated that grass and tree water uptake was twice as deep as would be predicted from root biomass or tracer data alone: half of grass and tree water uptake occurred in the top 23 and 43 cm, respectively. Niche partitioning was also greater when estimated from water uptake rather than tracer uptake. Contrary to long-standing assumptions, shallow grass root distributions absorbed 32% less water than slightly deeper tree root distributions when grasses and trees were assumed to have equal water demands. Quantifying water uptake revealed deeper soil water uptake, greater niche partitioning and greater benefits of deep roots than would be estimated from root biomass or tracer uptake data alone. PMID:26633177

  17. Modeling potato root growth and water uptake under water stress conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) growth and yield are sensitive to drought starting at mild stress levels. Accurate simulation of root growth is critical for estimating water and nutrient uptake dynamics of major crops and improving agricultural decision support tools for natural resource management. ...

  18. Vibrational energy relaxation of water in Aerosol OT reverse micelle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Yoonsoo; Deak, John; Dlott, Dana

    2005-03-01

    An IR-Raman technique with mid-IR pump and anti-Stokes Raman probe is used to investigate reverse micelle mixture of Aerosol OT, water, and carbon tetrachloride, where polar water phase and nonpolar oil phase is separated by a monolayer of surfactant molecules. Anti-Stokes Raman scattering is only dependent on the population of vibrationally excited states, thus time-dependent population changes of parent/daughter vibrations can be monitored with this technique. Vibrational energy from nanodroplet of water is transferred to the surfactant head group in 1.8 ps and then out to solvent in 10 ps. Vibrational energy directly pumped into the surfactant tail group results in a slower 20-40 ps energy transfer to solvent. This energy transfer cannot be explained by ordinary heat transfer, but the specific vibrational energy relaxation pathway such as sulfonate stretch of surfactant molecules should be used. We can change the water-to-solvent energy transfer rate by adopting different size of reverse micelles or changing pump frequency over the broad OH stretch mode of water due to hydrogen bond network. Water molecules confined in nanometer scale reverse micelles have very different properties from bulk water and we have found many differences between the vibrational dynamics of water in these reverse micelles and those of bulk water.

  19. Combined Dial Sounding of Ozone, Water Vapour and Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trickl, Thomas; Vogelmann, Hannes

    2016-06-01

    Routine high-quality lidar measurements of ozone, water vapour and aerosol at Garmisch-Partenkirchen since 2007 have made possible more comprehensive atmospheric studies and lead to a growing insight concerning the most frequently occurring long-range transport pathways. In this contribution we present as examples results on stratospheric layers travelling in the free troposphere for extended periods of time without eroding. In particular, we present a case of an intrusion layer that subsided over as many as fifteen days and survived the interference by strong Canadian fires. These results impose a challenge on atmospheric modelling that grossly overestimates free-tropospheric mixing.

  20. Hydroxyl radicals from secondary organic aerosol decomposition in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Haijie; Arangio, Andrea M.; Lakey, Pascale S. J.; Berkemeier, Thomas; Liu, Fobang; Kampf, Christopher J.; Brune, William H.; Pöschl, Ulrich; Shiraiwa, Manabu

    2016-02-01

    We found that ambient and laboratory-generated secondary organic aerosols (SOA) form substantial amounts of OH radicals upon interaction with liquid water, which can be explained by the decomposition of organic hydroperoxides. The molar OH yield from SOA formed by ozonolysis of terpenes (α-pinene, β-pinene, limonene) is ˜ 0.1 % upon extraction with pure water and increases to ˜ 1.5 % in the presence of Fe2+ ions due to Fenton-like reactions. Upon extraction of SOA samples from OH photooxidation of isoprene, we also detected OH yields of around ˜ 0.1 %, which increases upon addition of Fe2+. Our findings imply that the chemical reactivity and aging of SOA particles is strongly enhanced upon interaction with water and iron. In cloud droplets under dark conditions, SOA decomposition can compete with the classical H2O2 Fenton reaction as the source of OH radicals. Also in the human respiratory tract, the inhalation and deposition of SOA particles may lead to a substantial release of OH radicals, which may contribute to oxidative stress and play an important role in the adverse health effects of atmospheric aerosols.

  1. Hydroxyl radicals from secondary organic aerosol decomposition in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, H.; Arangio, A. M.; Lakey, P. S. J.; Berkemeier, T.; Liu, F.; Kampf, C. J.; Pöschl, U.; Shiraiwa, M.

    2015-11-01

    We found that ambient and laboratory-generated secondary organic aerosols (SOA) form substantial amounts of OH radicals upon interaction with liquid water, which can be explained by the decomposition of organic hydroperoxides. The molar OH yield from SOA formed by ozonolysis of terpenes (α-pinene, β-pinene, limonene) is ~ 0.1 % upon extraction with pure water and increases to ~ 1.5 % in the presence of Fe2+ ions due to Fenton-like reactions. Our findings imply that the chemical reactivity and aging of SOA particles is strongly enhanced upon interaction with water and iron. In cloud droplets under dark conditions, SOA decomposition can compete with the classical H2O2 Fenton reaction as the source of OH radicals. Also in the human respiratory tract, the inhalation and deposition of SOA particles may lead to a substantial release of OH radicals, which may contribute to oxidative stress and play an important role in the adverse health effects of atmospheric aerosols.

  2. Hydroxyl radicals from secondary organic aerosol decomposition in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Haijie; Arangio, Andrea M.; Lakey, Pascale S. J.; Berkemeier, Thomas; Liu, Fobang; Kampf, Christopher. J.; Pöschl, Ulrich; Shiraiwa, Manabu

    2016-04-01

    We found that ambient and laboratory-generated secondary organic aerosols (SOA) form substantial amounts of OH radicals upon interaction with liquid water, which can be explained by the decomposition of organic hydroperoxides. The molar OH yield from SOA formed by ozonolysis of terpenes (α-pinene, β-pinene, and limonene) is ~ 0.1% upon extraction with pure water, and which increases to ~ 1.5% in the presence of iron ions due to Fenton-like reactions. Our findings imply that the chemical reactivity and aging of SOA particles is strongly enhanced upon interaction with water and iron. In cloud droplets under dark conditions, SOA decomposition can compete with the classical hydrogen peroxide Fenton reaction as the source of OH radicals. Also in the human respiratory tract, the inhalation and deposition of SOA particles may lead to a substantial release of OH radicals, which may contribute to oxidative stress and play an important role in the adverse health effects of atmospheric aerosols.

  3. Linking Nitrate Uptake and Water Storage in an Antarctic Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, J. C.; McKnight, D. M.; Baeseman, J.

    2007-12-01

    A nitrate enrichment experiment was performed in Huey Creek, a glacial meltwater stream in the McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica, to determine processes responsible for nitrate loss in a polar desert stream with no visible vegetation. Streamflow in Huey follows a diel cycle, resulting in temporal and spatial variability in two separate storage areas - a near-stream and far-lateral hyporheic zone. Near-stream hyporheic exchange occurred in only one of four monitored stream reaches, with a mean uptake rate of 0.042 umol N/m2/hr. Uptake rates could not be balanced by nitrite, ammonium, and nitrous oxide production, suggesting the importance of biomass as a source and sink of nitrogen. During high flows, nitrate loss is accompanied by a pulse of ammonium that accounts for an average of 42% of the total nitrate loss. Ammonium production is 4.4 times greater than nitrate loss during one hour of the flood, providing further evidence that nitrogen has been stored in the subsurface biomass, and is mineralized as a result of the fresh water penetrating the hyporheic zone. Properties of the far-lateral hyporheic zone were also flow-dependent. Exchange from stream to subsurface occurred during floods, when anabranches moved water laterally across the channel banks. Exchange back to the stream occurred with the recession of flood stage. Pulses of nitrate species downstream of this storage zone suggest significant denitrification in this far-lateral hyporheic zone. The first flood recession plume consisted mainly of nitrite, while the second was dominated by ammonium, suggesting a greater amount of denitrification in the second pulse. Both pulses were accompanied by high quantities of DOC (121 and 287% of mean background mass, respectively) - an unexpected result in this carbon-limited system. These results highlight the linkage between water and desert ecosystems, and challenge researchers to understand both spatial and temporal variability in potential ecological hotspots and

  4. Hygroscopic behavior of atmospherically relevant water-soluble carboxylic salts and their influence on the water uptake of ammonium sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Z. J.; Nowak, A.; Poulain, L.; Herrmann, H.; Wiedensohler, A.

    2011-12-01

    The hygroscopic behavior of atmospherically relevant water-soluble carboxylic salts and their effects on ammonium sulfate were investigated using a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (H-TDMA). No hygroscopic growth is observed for disodium oxalate, while ammonium oxalate shows slight growth (growth factor = 1.05 at 90%). The growth factors at 90% RH for sodium acetate, disodium malonate, disodium succinate, disodium tartrate, diammonium tartrate, sodium pyruvate, disodium maleate, and humic acid sodium salt are 1.79, 1.78, 1.69, 1.54, 1.29, 1.70, 1.78, and 1.19, respectively. The hygroscopic growth of mixtures of organic salts with ammonium sulfate, which are prepared as surrogates of atmospheric aerosols, was determined. A clear shift in deliquescence relative humidity to lower RH with increasing organic mass fraction was observed for these mixtures. Above 80% RH, the contribution to water uptake by the organic salts was close to that of ammonium sulfate for the majority of investigated compounds. The observed hygroscopic growth of the mixed particles at RH above the deliquescence relative humidity of ammonium sulfate agreed well with that predicted using the Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson (ZSR) mixing rule. Mixtures of ammonium sulfate with organic salts are more hygroscopic than mixtures with organic acids, indicating that neutralization by gas-phase ammonia and/or association with cations of dicarbonxylic acids may enhance the hygroscopicity of the atmospheric particles.

  5. Bark water uptake promotes localized hydraulic recovery in coastal redwood crown

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Coastal redwood (Sequoia sempervirens), the world’s tallest tree species, rehydrates leaves via foliar water uptake during fog/rain events. Here we examine if bark also permits water uptake in redwood branches, along with potential flow mechanisms and biological significance. Using isotopic labeling...

  6. Kinetic regimes and limiting cases of gas uptake and heterogeneous reactions in atmospheric aerosols and clouds: a general classification scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkemeier, Thomas; Huisman, Andrew J.; Ammann, Markus; Shiraiwa, Manabu; Koop, Thomas; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2013-04-01

    Heterogeneous reactions are important to atmospheric chemistry and are therefore an area of intense research. In multiphase systems such as aerosols and clouds, chemical reactions are usually strongly coupled to a complex sequence of mass transport processes and results are often not easy to interpret. Here we present a systematic classification scheme for gas uptake by aerosol or cloud particles which distinguishes two major regimes: a reaction-diffusion regime and a mass-transfer regime. Each of these regimes includes four distinct limiting cases, characterized by a dominant reaction location (surface or bulk) and a single rate-limiting process: chemical reaction, bulk diffusion, gas-phase diffusion or mass accommodation. The conceptual framework enables efficient comparison of different studies and reaction systems, going beyond the scope of previous classification schemes by explicitly resolving interfacial transport processes and surface reactions limited by mass transfer from the gas phase. The use of kinetic multi-layer models instead of resistor model approaches increases the flexibility and enables a broader treatment of the subject, including cases which do not fit into the strict limiting cases typical of most resistor model formulations. The relative importance of different kinetic parameters such as diffusion, reaction rate and accommodation coefficients in this system is evaluated by a quantitative global sensitivity analysis. We outline the characteristic features of each limiting case and discuss the potential relevance of different regimes and limiting cases for various reaction systems. In particular, the classification scheme is applied to three different data sets for the benchmark system of oleic acid reacting with ozone. In light of these results, future directions of research needed to elucidate the multiphase chemical kinetics in this and other reaction systems are discussed. Reference: Berkemeier, T., Huisman, A. J., Ammann, M., Shiraiwa, M

  7. Chloroform and trichloroethylene uptake from water into human skin in vitro: Kinetics and risk implications

    SciTech Connect

    Bogen, K.T.; Keating, G.A.; Vogel, J.S.

    1995-03-01

    A model recently proposed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) predicts that short-term dermal uptakes of organic environmental water contaminants are proportional to the square root of exposure time. The model appears to underestimate dermal uptake, based on very limited in vivo uptake data obtained primarily using human subjects. To further assess this model, we examined in vitro dermal uptake kinetics for aqueous organic chemicals using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). Specifically, we examined the kinetics of in vitro dermal uptake of {sup 14}C-labeled chloroform and trichloroethylene from dilute (5-ppb) aqueous solutions using full-thickness human cadaver skin exposed for ({le}1 hr).

  8. Interactions of Water with Mineral Dust Aerosol: Water Adsorption, Hygroscopicity, Cloud Condensation, and Ice Nucleation.

    PubMed

    Tang, Mingjin; Cziczo, Daniel J; Grassian, Vicki H

    2016-04-13

    Mineral dust aerosol is one of the major types of aerosol present in the troposphere. The molecular level interactions of water vapor with mineral dust are of global significance. Hygroscopicity, light scattering and absorption, heterogneous reactivity and the ability to form clouds are all related to water-dust interactions. In this review article, experimental techniques to probe water interactions with dust and theoretical frameworks to understand these interactions are discussed. A comprehensive overview of laboratory studies of water adsorption, hygroscopicity, cloud condensation, and ice nucleation of fresh and atmspherically aged mineral dust particles is provided. Finally, we relate laboratory studies and theoretical simulations that provide fundemental insights into these processes on the molecular level with field measurements that illustrate the atmospheric significance of these processes. Overall, the details of water interactions with mineral dust are covered from multiple perspectives in this review article. PMID:27015126

  9. Laboratory studies of the reactive uptake of biogenic species: Evidence for the direct polymerization of isoprene, terpenes and sesquiterpenes on acidic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S.; Liggio, J.; Mihele, C.; Brook, J.

    2006-12-01

    Numerous studies on heterogeneous reactions have shown that polymerization of semi-volatile and volatile organic compounds occurs in aerosols. To date, most evidence suggests that gaseous hydrocarbon oxidation products containing carbonyl functionality are the prime candidates for these processes. Such processes involve primarily hydration, acetal formation, polymerization and aldol-condensation reactions, resulting in oligomer products of potential significance with respect to secondary organic aerosol formation (SOA). However, little information on the heterogeneous reactions of unsaturated hydrocarbons (olefins) is known. Given that biogenic species, many of them unsaturated, make up a considerable portion of hydrocarbons emitted globally, direct reactive uptake of these compounds on aerosols would also potentially be a major source of SOA. In the present study, individual biogenic hydrocarbons were exposed to pre-existing acidic sulfate aerosols within a 2 m3 Teflon reaction chamber under varying relative humidity conditions. An Aerosol Mass Spectrometer was used to quantify any subsequent increase in organic mass as a function of time, and to obtain information regarding the structure of products via aerosol mass spectra. A Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer was used to measure the gas-phase concentrations of isoprene, terpenes (?-pinene, ?-pinene, limonene, and carene) and sesquiterpenes (?-caryophylene and humulene) in the reaction chamber. Results from these experiments show that a significant amount of these compounds are taken up by the acidic aerosols rapidly, in a polymerization process which was highly dependent on the particle acidity. This polymerization mechanism likely involves the oxygenation of the resulting polymers via acid catalyzed hydration. The uptake of the unsaturated hydrocarbons suggests that gas-phase oxidation of biogenics to condensable products is not the only route to SOA. Details of the polymerization and hydration

  10. Nutrient uptake of peanut genotypes under different water regimes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Drought is a serious environmental stress limiting growth and productivity in peanut and other crops. Nutrient uptake of peanut is reduced under drought conditions, which reduces yield. The objectives of this study were to investigate nutrient uptake of peanut genotypes in response to drought and ...

  11. Acute Exposure from RADON-222 and Aerosols in Drinking Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhardt, George Paul, IV

    Radon-222 in water is released when the water is aerated, such as during showering. As a result, a temporary burst of radon-222 can appear as a short term, or acute, exposure. This study looked at homes with radon-222 concentrations in water from 800 picocuries per liter (pCi/l) to 53,000 pCi/l to determine the buildup of radon gas in a bathroom during showering. Samples from the tap and drain, compared to determine the percentage of radon-222 released, showed that between 58% and 88% of radon-222 in the water was released. The resultant radon-222 increase in air, measured with a flow-through detector, ranged from 2 pCi/l to 114 pCi/l in bathrooms due to a 10 to 15 minute shower with water flow rates ranging from 3 l/min to 6 l/min. Significantly, these rates did not fall rapidly but stayed approximately the same for up to 15 minutes after the water flow ceased. In examining exposures, the true danger is in the radon-222 progeny rather than the radon itself. The progeny can be inhaled and deposited in the tracheobronchial passages in the lung. Filter samples of bathroom air measured in a portable alpha spectrometer showed an increase in radon-222 progeny, notably polonium-218 and -214, in the air after showering. These increases were gradual and were on the order of 0.5 pCi/l at the highest level. Tap samples measured in a portable liquid scintillator showed that the progeny are present in the water but are not in true secular equilibrium with the radon-222 in the water. Therefore, the radon-222 does not have to decay to produce progeny since the progeny are already present in the water. A two stage sampler was used to examine the percentage of radiation available in aerosols smaller than 7 microns. Repeated trials showed that up to 85% of the radiation available in the aerosols is contained in the smaller, more respirable particles.

  12. Uptake of Small Organic Compounds by Sulfuric Acid Aerosols: Dissolution and Reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iraci, L. T.; Michelsen, R. R.; Ashbourn, S. F. M.; Staton, S. J. R.

    2003-01-01

    To assess the role of oxygenated volatile organic compounds in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, the interactions of a series of small organic compounds with low-temperature aqueous sulfuric acid will be evaluated. The total amount of organic material which may be taken up from the gas phase by dissolution, surface layer formation, and reaction during the particle lifetime will be quantified. Our current results for acetaldehyde uptake on 40 - 80 wt% sulfuric acid solutions will be compared to those of methanol, formaldehyde, and acetone to investigate the relationships between chemical functionality and heterogeneous activity. Where possible, equilibrium uptake will be ascribed to component pathways (hydration, protonation, etc.) to facilitate evaluation of other species not yet studied in low temperature aqueous sulfuric acid.

  13. ASSESSMENT OF THE LIQUID WATER CONTENT OF SUMMERTIME AEROSOL IN THE SOUTHEAST UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The concentration of aerosol liquid water mass represents an important parameter for understanding the physical properties of PM2.5 in the atmosphere. Increases in ambient relative humidity can increase aerosol liquid water and thus the composite particle mass and particle volu...

  14. On the shape of martian dust and water ice aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitman, K. M.; Wolff, M. J.; Clancy, R. T.; Clayton, G. C.

    2000-10-01

    Researchers have often calculated radiative properties of Martian aerosols using either Mie theory for homogeneous spheres or semi-empirical theories. Given that these atmospheric particles are randomly oriented, this approach seems fairly reasonable. However, the idea that randomly oriented nonspherical particles have scattering properties equivalent to even a select subset of spheres is demonstratably false} (Bohren and Huffman 1983; Bohren and Koh 1985, Appl. Optics, 24, 1023). Fortunately, recent computational developments now enable us to directly compute scattering properties for nonspherical particles. We have combined a numerical approach for axisymmetric particle shapes, i.e., cylinders, disks, spheroids (Waterman's T-Matrix approach as improved by Mishchenko and collaborators; cf., Mishchenko et al. 1997, JGR, 102, D14, 16,831), with a multiple-scattering radiative transfer algorithm to constrain the shape of water ice and dust aerosols. We utilize a two-stage iterative process. First, we empirically derive a scattering phase function for each aerosol component (starting with some ``guess'') from radiative transfer models of MGS Thermal Emission Spectrometer Emission Phase Function (EPF) sequences (for details on this step, see Clancy et al., DPS 2000). Next, we perform a series of scattering calculations, adjusting our parameters to arrive at a ``best-fit'' theoretical phase function. In this presentation, we provide details on the second step in our analysis, including the derived phase functions (for several characteristic EPF sequences) as well as the particle properties of the best-fit theoretical models. We provide a sensitivity analysis for the EPF model-data comparisons in terms of perturbations in the particle properties (i.e., range of axial ratios, sizes, refractive indices, etc). This work is supported through NASA grant NAGS-9820 (MJW) and JPL contract no. 961471 (RTC).

  15. Is the cellular uptake of respiratory aerosols delivered from different devices equivalent?

    PubMed

    Ong, Hui Xin; Traini, Daniela; Loo, Ching-Yee; Sarkissian, Lala; Lauretani, Gianluca; Scalia, Santo; Young, Paul M

    2015-06-01

    The study focuses on the application of a cell integrated modified Andersen Cascade Impactor (ACI) as an in vitro lung model for the evaluation of aerosols' behaviour of different formulation devices, containing the same active drug, specifically nebuliser, pressurised metered dose inhaler (pMDI) and dry powder inhaler (DPI). Deposition and transport profiles of the three different inhaled salbutamol sulphate (SS) formulations with clinically relevant doses were evaluated using a modified ACI coupled with the air interface Calu-3 bronchial cell model. Reproducible amounts of SS were deposited on Snapwells for the different formulations, with no significant difference in SS deposition found between the standard ACI plate and modified plate. The transport of SS aerosols produced from pMDI formulation had similar transport kinetics to nebulised SS but significantly higher compared to the DPI, which could have led to the differences in clinical outcomes. Furthermore, drug absorption of different inhaled formulation devices of the same aerodynamic fraction was found not to be equivalent due to their physical chemical properties upon aerosolisation. This study has established an in vitro platform for the evaluation of the different inhaled formulations in physiologically relevant pulmonary conditions. PMID:25930239

  16. Investigating water soluble organic aerosols: Sources and evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecobian, Arsineh N.

    Many studies are being conducted on the different properties of organic aerosols (OA-s) as it is first emitted into the atmosphere and the consequent changes in these characteristics as OA-s age and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is produced and in turn aged. This thesis attempts to address some of the significant and emerging issues that deal with the formation and transformation of water-soluble organic aerosols in the atmosphere. First, a proven method for the measurement of gaseous sulfuric acid, negative ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS), has been modified for fast and sensitive measurements of particulate phase sulfuric acid (i.e. sulfate). The modifications implemented on this system have also been the subject of preliminary verifications for measurements of aerosol phase oxalic acid (an organic acid). Second, chemical and physical characteristics of a wide range of biomass-burning plumes intercepted by the NASA DC-8 research aircraft during the three phases of the ARCTAS experiment are presented here. A statistical summary of the emission (or enhancement) ratios relative to carbon monoxide is presented for various gaseous and aerosol species. Extensive investigations of fire plume evolutions were undertaken during the second part of this field campaign. For four distinct Boreal fires, where plumes were intercepted by the aircraft over a wide range of down-wind distances, emissions of various compounds and the effect of aging on them were investigated in detail. No clear evidence of production of secondary compounds (e.g., WSOC and OA) was observed. High variability in emissions between the different plumes may have obscured any clear evidence of changes in the mass of various species with increasing plume age. Also, the lack if tropospheric oxidizing species (e.g., O3 and OH) may have contributed to the lack of SOA formation. Individual intercepts of smoke plumes in this study were segregated by source regions. The normalized excess mixing

  17. Controls on tree water uptake and information storage in tree rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blume, Theresa; Simard, Sonia; Heidbüchel, Ingo; Güntner, Andreas; Heinrich, Ingo

    2016-04-01

    Controls on tree water uptake are investigated in various forest stands in the northeastern German lowlands by a multi-method approach. This approach combines sapflow and dendrometer measurements as well as tree-ring analyses with soil moisture derived root water uptake rates. The latter method has the advantage that it provides depth distributions of root water uptake and thus additional information allowing for a more detailed analysis of the relationship between water availability and water uptake. High resolution climatic data makes it possible to investigate the site specific interplay between atmospheric demand and water availability on the one hand and tree response and adaptation on the other hand. The comparison of spatio-temporal patterns of these responses with concurrent tree growth as well as tree-ring analyses enables a first matching of actual and "archived" patterns and thus an estimate of how much of this information is stored in tree rings.

  18. Kinetic regimes and limiting cases of gas uptake and heterogeneous reactions in atmospheric aerosols and clouds: a general classification scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkemeier, T.; Huisman, A. J.; Ammann, M.; Shiraiwa, M.; Koop, T.; Pöschl, U.

    2013-07-01

    Heterogeneous reactions are important to atmospheric chemistry and are therefore an area of intense research. In multiphase systems such as aerosols and clouds, chemical reactions are usually strongly coupled to a complex sequence of mass transport processes and results are often not easy to interpret. Here we present a systematic classification scheme for gas uptake by aerosol or cloud particles which distinguishes two major regimes: a reaction-diffusion regime and a mass transfer regime. Each of these regimes includes four distinct limiting cases, characterised by a dominant reaction location (surface or bulk) and a single rate-limiting process: chemical reaction, bulk diffusion, gas-phase diffusion or mass accommodation. The conceptual framework enables efficient comparison of different studies and reaction systems, going beyond the scope of previous classification schemes by explicitly resolving interfacial transport processes and surface reactions limited by mass transfer from the gas phase. The use of kinetic multi-layer models instead of resistor model approaches increases the flexibility and enables a broader treatment of the subject, including cases which do not fit into the strict limiting cases typical of most resistor model formulations. The relative importance of different kinetic parameters such as diffusion, reaction rate and accommodation coefficients in this system is evaluated by a quantitative global sensitivity analysis. We outline the characteristic features of each limiting case and discuss the potential relevance of different regimes and limiting cases for various reaction systems. In particular, the classification scheme is applied to three different datasets for the benchmark system of oleic acid reacting with ozone in order to demonstrate utility and highlight potential issues. In light of these results, future directions of research needed to elucidate the multiphase chemical kinetics in this and other reaction systems are discussed.

  19. Kinetic regimes and limiting cases of gas uptake and heterogeneous reactions in atmospheric aerosols and clouds: a general classification scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkemeier, T.; Huisman, A. J.; Ammann, M.; Shiraiwa, M.; Koop, T.; Pöschl, U.

    2013-01-01

    Heterogeneous reactions are important to atmospheric chemistry and are therefore an area of intense research. In multiphase systems such as aerosols and clouds, chemical reactions are usually strongly coupled to a complex sequence of mass transport processes and results are often not easy to interpret. Here we present a systematic classification scheme for gas uptake by aerosol or cloud particles which distinguishes two major regimes: a reaction-diffusion regime and a mass-transfer regime. Each of these regimes includes four distinct limiting cases, characterized by a dominant reaction location (surface or bulk) and a single rate-limiting process: chemical reaction, bulk diffusion, gas-phase diffusion or mass accommodation. The conceptual framework enables efficient comparison of different studies and reaction systems, going beyond the scope of previous classification schemes by explicitly resolving interfacial transport processes and surface reactions limited by mass transfer from the gas phase. The use of kinetic multi-layer models instead of resistor model approaches increases the flexibility and enables a broader treatment of the subject, including cases which do not fit into the strict limiting cases typical of most resistor model formulations. The relative importance of different kinetic parameters such as diffusion, reaction rate and accommodation coefficients in this system is evaluated by a quantitative global sensitivity analysis. We outline the characteristic features of each limiting case and discuss the potential relevance of different regimes and limiting cases for various reaction systems. In particular, the classification scheme is applied to three different data sets for the benchmark system of oleic acid reacting with ozone. In light of these results, future directions of research needed to elucidate the multiphase chemical kinetics in this and other reaction systems are discussed.

  20. Tracking Water Diffusion Fronts in a Highly Viscous Aerosol Particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastelberger, Sandra; Krieger, Ulrich; Peter, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Field measurements indicate that atmospheric secondary aerosol particles can be present in a highly viscous, glassy state [1]. In contrast to liquid state particles, the gas phase equilibration is kinetically limited and governed by condensed phase diffusion. In recent water diffusion experiments on highly viscous single aerosol particles levitated in an electrodynamic balance (EDB) we observed a characteristic shift behavior of the Mie whispering gallery modes (WGM) indicative of the changing radial structure of the particle, thus providing us with an experimental method to track the diffusion process inside the particle. When a highly viscous, homogeneous particle is exposed to an abrupt increase in relative humidity, the rapid gas phase diffusion and strong concentration dependence of the diffusion coefficient in the condensed phase lead to extremely steep water concentration gradients inside the particle, reminiscent of diffusion fronts. The resulting quasi step-like concentration profile motivates the introduction of a simple core-shell model describing the morphology of the non-equilibrium particle during humidification. The subsequent particle growth and reduction of the shell refractive index can be observed as red and blueshift behavior of the WGM, respectively. The shift pattern can be attributed to a core-shell radius ratio and particle radius derived from model calculations [2]. If supplemented with growth information obtained from the WGM redshift and thermodynamic equilibrium data, we can infer a comprehensive picture of the time evolution of the diffusion fronts in the framework of our core-shell model. The measured time dependent concentration profile is then compared with simulations solving the non-linear diffusion equation [3] [1] Virtanen, A., et al., Nature, 467, 824-827, 2010 [2] Kaiser, T., Schweiger, G., Computers in Physics, Vol. 7, No. 6, 682-686, Nov/Dec 1993 [3] Zobrist, B., Soonsin, V., Luo, B.P., Peter, T. et al., Phys. Chem. Chem

  1. Influence of root-water-uptake parameterization on simulated heat transport in a structured forest soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Votrubova, Jana; Vogel, Tomas; Dohnal, Michal; Dusek, Jaromir

    2015-04-01

    Coupled simulations of soil water flow and associated transport of substances have become a useful and increasingly popular tool of subsurface hydrology. Quality of such simulations is directly affected by correctness of its hydraulic part. When near-surface processes under vegetation cover are of interest, appropriate representation of the root water uptake becomes essential. Simulation study of coupled water and heat transport in soil profile under natural conditions was conducted. One-dimensional dual-continuum model (S1D code) with semi-separate flow domains representing the soil matrix and the network of preferential pathways was used. A simple root water uptake model based on water-potential-gradient (WPG) formulation was applied. As demonstrated before [1], the WPG formulation - capable of simulating both the compensatory root water uptake (in situations when reduced uptake from dry layers is compensated by increased uptake from wetter layers), and the root-mediated hydraulic redistribution of soil water - enables simulation of more natural soil moisture distribution throughout the root zone. The potential effect on heat transport in a soil profile is the subject of the present study. [1] Vogel T., M. Dohnal, J. Dusek, J. Votrubova, and M. Tesar. 2013. Macroscopic modeling of plant water uptake in a forest stand involving root-mediated soil-water redistribution. Vadose Zone Journal, 12, 10.2136/vzj2012.0154. The research was supported by the Czech Science Foundation Project No. 14-15201J.

  2. Predicting perchlorate uptake in greenhouse lettuce from perchlorate, nitrate and chloride irrigation water concentrations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Perchlorate (ClO4-) has been detected in edible leafy vegetables irrigated with Colorado River water. The primary concern has been the ClO4- concentration in lettuce. There has been a limited number of studies on ClO4- uptake but the interactive effect of other anions on ClO4- uptake is not known in...

  3. Collection and analysis of inorganic and water soluble organic aerosols over Maryland and Virginia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brent, L. C.; Ziemba, L. D.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Phinney, K.; Conny, J.; Dickerson, R. R.

    2012-12-01

    Aerosols aloft have slower removal than those near the ground, in part, because dry and wet deposition rates result in longer lifetimes and greater range of influence. Knowledge of deposition rates and range of transport for different species are important for developing local and regional air quality policy. Currently, the vertical distribution of organic aerosols (OA's) and their polar, oxidized fraction is largely unknown. Comprehensive methods to analyze aerosol composition collected in the boundary layer and the lower free troposphere are lacking. During DISCOVER AQ 2011, both the NASA P3 and Cessna 402B collected aerosols, through shrouded aerosol inlets, onto Teflon and quartz fiber filters. Collection occurred in both the boundary layer and lower free troposphere over Maryland and Virginia, USA. After extraction with water and optimizing separation via ion chromatography, commonly identified secondary organic aerosols can be separated based on their functionality as mono-, di-, or polycarboxylic acids. Inorganic aerosol components can simultaneously be separated and identified with the same method. Individual organic acid compound analysis with detection limits in the low ppb range can be achieved when conductivity/ultraviolet/ and mass spectrometric detectors are placed in tandem. Additionally, thermo optical analysis can be used to determine the mass fraction of water soluble organic carbon versus the total collected mass. This research is designed to provide information on the vertical distribution of particulate organic carbon in the atmosphere, its optical properties, information on aerosol transport in the lower free troposphere, and to provide water soluble organic aerosol structural characterization.

  4. Soil Water in Relation to Irrigation, Uptake, and Potato Yield in a Humid Climate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Efficiently controlling soil water content with irrigation is essential for water conservation and often improves potato yield. Volumetric soil water content ('v) in relation to irrigation, plant uptake, and yield in potato hills and replicated plots was studied to evaluate four water management opt...

  5. Size-fractionated water-soluble ions, situ pH and water content in aerosol on hazy days and the influences on visibility impairment in Jinan, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Shu-hui; Yang, Ling-xiao; Zhou, Xue-hua; Xue, Li-kun; Gao, Xiao-mei; Zhou, Yang; Wang, Wen-xing

    2011-09-01

    To study the size-fractionated characteristics of aerosol chemical compounds including major water-soluble inorganic and organic ions, situ pH and water content as well as their influences on visibility, field sample collections using a Micro Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor (MOUDI) combined with simulations by Aerosol Inorganic Model (AIM) were conducted on hazy and clear days in Jinan, China from April, 2006 to January, 2007. Average concentrations of TSP, PM 10 and PM 1.8 on hazy days were found to be 1.49-5.13, 1.54-5.48 and 1.30-5.48 times those on clear days during the sampling periods, indicating that particulate pollution was very serious on hazy days. Size distributions of mass, SO 42-, NO 3-, formate and acetate were all bimodal with fine mode predominant on hazy days, demonstrating that fine particles and secondary pollutants were more easily formed on hazy days. The average total aerosol concentration of H + ([H +] total), of which free H + concentration ([H +] ins) inside aerosol accounted for 30%, was 2.36-4.21 times that in other cities in China and US. The [H +] ins on hazy days was 2.43-13.11 times that on clear days and the estimated situ pH was mainly influenced by RH and mole ratios of [NH 4+]/[SO 42-]. Size distributions of situ pH were unimodal peaked at 0.56 μm on clear days in spring and autumn as well as on hazy days in autumn, while a trend of increasing was shown on hazy days in spring and summer. The normalized water content (NWC) was higher on hazy days in autumn and winter because of the easier uptake of water by aerosol. It was found that when NWC < 2, if [NH 4+]/[SO 42-] < 2.0, aerosol chemical components were more sensitive to water content, while if [NH 4+]/[SO 42-] > 2.0, relative humidity (RH) was more important. Size distributions of water content showed a trend of sharp increasing on hazy days in spring and autumn. Correlation and regression analysis indicated that visibility was significantly influenced by the concentrations

  6. Foliar Water Uptake of Tamarix ramosissima from an Atmosphere of High Humidity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuang; Xiao, Hong-lang; Zhao, Liang; Zhou, Mao-Xian; Wang, Fang

    2014-01-01

    Many species have been found to be capable of foliar water uptake, but little research has focused on this in desert plants. Tamarix ramosissima was investigated to determine whether its leaves can directly absorb water from high humidity atmosphere and, if they can, to understand the magnitude and importance of foliar water uptake. Various techniques were adopted to demonstrate foliar water uptake under submergence or high atmospheric humidity. The mean increase in leaf water content after submergence was 29.38% and 20.93% for mature and tender leaves, respectively. In the chamber experiment, obvious reverse sap flow occurred when relative humidity (RH) was persistently above 90%. Reverse flow was recorded first in twigs, then in branches and stems. For the stem, the percentage of negative sap flow rate accounting for the maximum value of sap flow reached 10.71%, and its amount accounted for 7.54% of diurnal sap flow. Small rainfall can not only compensate water loss of plant by foliar uptake, but also suppress transpiration. Foliar uptake can appear in the daytime under certain rainfall events. High atmospheric humidity is beneficial for enhancing the water status of plants. Foliar uptake should be an important strategy of water acquisition for desert plants. PMID:24982964

  7. Decreasing Aerosol Water Is Consistent with OC Trends in the Southeast U.S.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thien Khoi V; Capps, Shannon L; Carlton, Annmarie G

    2015-07-01

    Water is a ubiquitous and abundant component of atmospheric aerosols. It influences light scattering, the hydrological cycle, atmospheric chemistry, and secondary particulate matter (PM) formation. Despite the critical importance of aerosol liquid water, mass concentrations are not well-known. Using speciated ion and meteorological data from the Southeastern Aerosol Research and Characterization network, we employ the thermodynamic model ISORROPIAv2.1 to estimate water mass concentrations and evaluate trends from 2001 to 2012 in urban and rural locations. The purpose of this study is to better understand the historical trends of aerosol liquid water in the southeast U.S. in the context of improved air quality and recently noted reductions in particulate organic carbon (OC). Aerosol water mass concentrations decrease by ∼79% from 2001 to 2012 in the region. Decreases are more prominent in rural than in urban areas. Fractional contribution of water to PM also decreases during the same time period, and this is consistent with recently noted improvements in visibility. These findings agree with the hypotheses that aerosol liquid water facilitates formation of biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and that biogenically derived SOA is modulated in the presence of anthropogenic perturbations. PMID:26030084

  8. Water uptake efficiency of a maize plant - A simulation case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meunier, Félicien; Leitner, Daniel; Bodner, Gernot; Javaux, Mathieu; Schnepf, Andrea

    2014-05-01

    Water uptake by plant roots is a complex mechanism controlled by biological and physical properties of the soil-plant-atmosphere system and affects a major component of the water cycle, transpiration. This uptake of water by plants is one of the major factors of plant development. Since water uptake occurs at the roots, root architecture and hydraulic properties both play a crucial role in plant productivity. A fundamental understanding of the main processes of water uptake will enable better breeding of drought resistant plants and the improvement of irrigation strategies. In this work we analyzed the differences of root water uptake between idealized genotypes of a plant using mathematical modelling The numerical simulations were performed by the R-SWMS software (Javaux et al., 2008). The model describes 3-D water movement in soil by solving Richard's equation with a sink term representing root uptake. Water flow within the root xylem network and between soil and root is modelled based on water pressure gradients and calculated according to Doussan's model. The sink term is calculated by integration of local uptakes within rooted representative elementary volumes of soil. The plant water demand is described by a boundary condition at the base of the shoot. We compare the water uptake efficiency of three types of root system architectures of a maize plant. Two are actual architectures from genotypes showing significant differences regarding the internodal distance, the root growth rate and the insertion angle of their primary roots. The third one is an ideotype according to Lynch of the maize plant designed to perform better in one dry environment. We generated with RootBox five repetitions of these three root systems with the same total root volume and simulated two drought scenarios at the flowering stage (lack of water at the top or at the bottom of the soil domain). We did these simulations for two distinct distributions of local conductivities of root

  9. Detecting spatio-temporal controls on depth distributions of root water uptake using soil moisture patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blume, Theresa; Heidbüchel, Ingo; Simard, Sonia; Güntner, Andreas; Weiler, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Landscape scale soil moisture patterns show a pronounced shift when plants become active during the growing season. Soil moisture patterns are then not only controlled by soils, topography and related abiotic site characteristics as well as site characteristic throughfall patterns but also by root water uptake. In this study root water uptake from different soil depths is estimated based on diurnal fluctuations in soil moisture content and was investigated with a setup of 15 field sites in a forest in northeastern Germany. These sites cover different topographic positions and forest stands. Vegetation types include pine forest (young and old) and different deciduous forest stands. Available data at all sites includes information at high temporal resolution from 5 soil moisture and soil temperature profiles, matric potential, piezometers and sapflow sensors as well as standard climate data. The resulting comprehensive data set of depth distributed root water uptake shows differences in overall amounts as well as in uptake depth distributions between different forest stands, but also related to slope position and thus depth to groundwater. Temporal dynamics of signal strength within the profile suggest a locally shifting spatial distribution of root water uptake depending on water availability. The relative contributions of the different depths to overall root water uptake shift as the summer progresses. However, the relationship of these depth resolved uptake rates to overall soil water availability varies considerably between tree species. This unique data set of depth specific contributions to root water uptake down to a depth of 2 m allows a much more detailed analysis of tree response to water availability than the more common transpiration estimates generated by sapflow or eddy flux measurements.

  10. Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation from 2-Methyl-3-Buten-2-ol Photooxidation: Evidence of Acid-Catalyzed Reactive Uptake of Epoxides

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Haofei; Zhang, Zhenfa; Cui, Tianqu; Lin, Ying-Hsuan; Bhathela, Neil A.; Ortega, John; Worton, David; Goldstein, Allen H.; Guenther, Alex B.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Gold, Avram; Surratt, Jason D.

    2014-04-08

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO) photooxidation has recently been observed in both field and laboratory studies. Similar to isoprene, MBO-derived SOA increases with elevated aerosol acidity in the absence of nitric oxide; therefore, an epoxide intermediate, (3,3-dimethyloxiran-2-yl)methanol (MBO epoxide) was synthesized and tentatively proposed here to explain this enhancement. In the present study, the potential of the synthetic MBO epoxide to form SOA via reactive uptake was systematically examined. SOA was observed only in the presence of acidic aerosols. Major SOA constituents, 2,3-dihydroxyisopentanol (DHIP) and MBO-derived organosulfate isomers, were chemically characterized in both laboratory-generated SOA and in ambient fine aerosols collected from the BEACHON-RoMBAS field campaign during summer 2011, where MBO emissions are substantial. Our results support epoxides as potential products of MBO photooxidation leading to formation of atmospheric SOA and suggest that reactive uptake of epoxides may generally explain acid enhancement of SOA observed from other biogenic hydrocarbons.

  11. Cloud-Aerosol Interactions: Retrieving Aerosol Ångström Exponents from Calipso Measurements of Opaque Water Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, Mark; Liu, Zhaoyan; Hu, Yong-Xiang; Powell, Kathleen; Omar, Ali; Rodier, Sharon; Hunt, William; Kar, Jayanta; Tackett, Jason; Getzewich, Brian; Lee, Kam-Pui

    2016-06-01

    Backscatter and extinction from water clouds are well-understood, both theoretically and experimentally, and thus changes to the expected measurement of layer-integrated attenuated backscatter can be used to infer the optical properties of overlying layers. In this paper we offer a first look at a new retrieval technique that uses CALIPSO measurements of opaque water clouds to derive optical depths and Ångström exponents for overlying aerosol layers.

  12. Comparing Sediment and Pore-water Measurements as Predictors of PCB Uptake by Oligochaetes from Sediments

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is an increasing amount of chemical and biological evidence that using sediment concentrations and commonly applied Koc values frequently overpredicts interstitial water concentrations of HOCs, and thereby overestimates uptake and/or effects of those chemicals on exposed or...

  13. Developing a Suitable Model for Water Uptake for Biodegradable Polymers Using Small Training Sets

    PubMed Central

    Valenzuela, Loreto M.; Knight, Doyle D.; Kohn, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Prediction of the dynamic properties of water uptake across polymer libraries can accelerate polymer selection for a specific application. We first built semiempirical models using Artificial Neural Networks and all water uptake data, as individual input. These models give very good correlations (R2 > 0.78 for test set) but very low accuracy on cross-validation sets (less than 19% of experimental points within experimental error). Instead, using consolidated parameters like equilibrium water uptake a good model is obtained (R2 = 0.78 for test set), with accurate predictions for 50% of tested polymers. The semiempirical model was applied to the 56-polymer library of L-tyrosine-derived polyarylates, identifying groups of polymers that are likely to satisfy design criteria for water uptake. This research demonstrates that a surrogate modeling effort can reduce the number of polymers that must be synthesized and characterized to identify an appropriate polymer that meets certain performance criteria. PMID:27200091

  14. Reactive uptake of ozone by proxies for organic aerosols: Surface-bound and gas-phase products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Elan R.; Frost, Gregory J.; Rudich, Yinon

    2001-02-01

    Gas-phase and surface-bound products were determined for the reaction of ozone with self assembled monolayers of alkanes and terminal alkenes serving as proxies for atmospheric organic aerosols. The organic surfaces were characterized using infrared (IR) spectroscopy (direct absorption and attenuated total reflection) as well as contact angle measurements with water before and after the reaction with ozone. The contact angle of the organic surfaces was reduced by ˜20° owing to the reaction. Following the reaction, IR absorption due to the presence of carbonyls and carboxylic acids was observed on the surface. Gas-phase products were determined using infrared spectroscopy immediately above the reaction surface. Under dry conditions, gas-phase formaldehyde yields of 0.5±0.1 for organic monolayers of allyltrichlorosilane (C3=) and octenyltrichlorosilane (C8=) terminal alkenes were observed, in good agreement with the yields observed for gas phase ozonolysis of terminal alkenes. Surfaces of n-octane (C8) as well as processed alkene surfaces were nonreactive toward ozone. The reaction mechanism of ozone with the surface alkenes is discussed. Finally, the possible implications for the chemistry of organic aerosols are discussed and studied using a box model and realistic atmospheric scenarios.

  15. Size Effect of Silica Shell on Gas Uptake Kinetics in Dry Water.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong; Zhang, Diwei; Bai, Dongsheng; Li, Shujing; Wang, Xinrui; Zhou, Wei

    2016-07-26

    Two kinds of dry water (DW) particles are prepared by mixing water and hydrophobic silica particles with nanometer or micrometer dimensions, and the two DW particles are found to have similar size distributions regardless of the size of the silica shell. The CO2 uptake kinetics of DW with nanometer (nanoshell) and micrometer shells (microshell) are measured, and both uptake rate and capacity show the obvious size effect of the silica shell. The DW with a microshell possesses a larger uptake capacity, whereas the DW with a nanoshell has a faster uptake rate. By comparing the uptake kinetics of soluble NH3 and CO2 further, we found that the microshell enhances the stability and the dispersion degree of DW and the nanoshell offers a shorter path for the transit of guest gas into the water core. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulation is introduced to illustrate the nanosize effect of the silica shell on the initial step of the gas uptake. It is found that the concentration of gas molecules close to the silica shell is higher than that in the bulk water core. With the increase in the size of the silica shell, the amount of CO2 in the silica shell decreases, and it is easier for the gas uptake to reach steady state. PMID:27350177

  16. Rainfall exclusion in an eastern Amazonian forest alters soil water movement and depth of water uptake.

    PubMed

    Romero-Saltos, Hugo; Sternberg, Leonel da S L; Moreira, Marcelo Z; Nepstad, Daniel C

    2005-03-01

    Deuterium-labeled water was used to study the effect of the Tapajós Throughfall Exclusion Experiment (TTEE) on soil moisture movement and on depth of water uptake by trees of Coussarea racemosa, Sclerolobium chrysophyllum, and Eschweilera pedicellata. The TTEE simulates an extended dry season in an eastern Amazonian rainforest, a plausible scenario if the El Niño phenomenon changes with climate change. The TTEE excludes 60% of the wet season throughfall from a 1-ha plot (treatment), while the control 1-ha plot receives precipitation year-round. Mean percolation rate of the label peak in the control plot was greater than in the treatment plot during the wet season (0.75 vs. 0.07 m/mo). The rate was similar for both plots during the dry season (ca. 0.15 m/mo), indicative that both plots have similar topsoil structure. Interestingly, the label peak in the control plot during the dry season migrated upward an average distance of 64 cm. We show that water probably moved upward through soil pores-i.e., it did not involve roots (hydraulic lift)-most likely because of a favorable gradient of total (matric + gravitational) potential coupled with sufficient unsaturated hydraulic conductivity. Water probably also moved upward in the treatment plot, but was not detectable; the label in this plot did not percolate below 1 m or beyond the depth of plant water uptake. During the dry season, trees in the rainfall exclusion plot, regardless of species, consistently absorbed water significantly deeper, but never below 1.5-2 m, than trees in the control plot, and therefore may represent expected root function of this understory/subcanopy tree community during extended dry periods. PMID:21652421

  17. CONVERGING PATTERNS OF UPTAKE AND HYDRAULIC REDISTRIBUTION OF SOIL WATER IN CONTRASTING WOODY VEGETATION TYPES

    EPA Science Inventory

    We used concurrent measurements of soil water content and soil water potential (Ysoil) to assess the effects of Ysoil on uptake and hydraulic redistribution (HR) of soil water by roots during seasonal drought cycles in six sites characterized by different types and amounts of woo...

  18. A Series RCL Circuit Theory for Analyzing Non-Steady-State Water Uptake of Maize Plants

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Jie; Yu, Gui-Rui; Nakayama, Keiichi

    2014-01-01

    Understanding water uptake and transport through the soil-plant continuum is vital for ecosystem management and agricultural water use. Plant water uptake under natural conditions is a non-steady transient flow controlled by root distribution, plant configuration, soil hydraulics, and climatic conditions. Despite significant progress in model development, a mechanistic description of transient water uptake has not been developed or remains incomplete. Here, based on advanced electrical network theory (RLC circuit theory), we developed a non-steady state biophysical model to mechanistically analyze the fluctuations of uptake rates in response to water stress. We found that the non-steady-state model captures the nature of instantaneity and hysteresis of plant water uptake due to the considerations of water storage in plant xylem and coarse roots (capacitance effect), hydraulic architecture of leaf system (inductance effect), and soil-root contact (fuse effect). The model provides insights into the important role of plant configuration and hydraulic heterogeneity in helping plants survive an adverse environment. Our tests against field data suggest that the non-steady-state model has great potential for being used to interpret the smart water strategy of plants, which is intrinsically determined by stem size, leaf size/thickness and distribution, root system architecture, and the ratio of fine-to-coarse root lengths. PMID:25335512

  19. A series RCL circuit theory for analyzing non-steady-state water uptake of maize plants.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Jie; Yu, Gui-Rui; Nakayama, Keiichi

    2014-01-01

    Understanding water uptake and transport through the soil-plant continuum is vital for ecosystem management and agricultural water use. Plant water uptake under natural conditions is a non-steady transient flow controlled by root distribution, plant configuration, soil hydraulics, and climatic conditions. Despite significant progress in model development, a mechanistic description of transient water uptake has not been developed or remains incomplete. Here, based on advanced electrical network theory (RLC circuit theory), we developed a non-steady state biophysical model to mechanistically analyze the fluctuations of uptake rates in response to water stress. We found that the non-steady-state model captures the nature of instantaneity and hysteresis of plant water uptake due to the considerations of water storage in plant xylem and coarse roots (capacitance effect), hydraulic architecture of leaf system (inductance effect), and soil-root contact (fuse effect). The model provides insights into the important role of plant configuration and hydraulic heterogeneity in helping plants survive an adverse environment. Our tests against field data suggest that the non-steady-state model has great potential for being used to interpret the smart water strategy of plants, which is intrinsically determined by stem size, leaf size/thickness and distribution, root system architecture, and the ratio of fine-to-coarse root lengths. PMID:25335512

  20. A Series RCL Circuit Theory for Analyzing Non-Steady-State Water Uptake of Maize Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Jie; Yu, Gui-Rui; Nakayama, Keiichi

    2014-10-01

    Understanding water uptake and transport through the soil-plant continuum is vital for ecosystem management and agricultural water use. Plant water uptake under natural conditions is a non-steady transient flow controlled by root distribution, plant configuration, soil hydraulics, and climatic conditions. Despite significant progress in model development, a mechanistic description of transient water uptake has not been developed or remains incomplete. Here, based on advanced electrical network theory (RLC circuit theory), we developed a non-steady state biophysical model to mechanistically analyze the fluctuations of uptake rates in response to water stress. We found that the non-steady-state model captures the nature of instantaneity and hysteresis of plant water uptake due to the considerations of water storage in plant xylem and coarse roots (capacitance effect), hydraulic architecture of leaf system (inductance effect), and soil-root contact (fuse effect). The model provides insights into the important role of plant configuration and hydraulic heterogeneity in helping plants survive an adverse environment. Our tests against field data suggest that the non-steady-state model has great potential for being used to interpret the smart water strategy of plants, which is intrinsically determined by stem size, leaf size/thickness and distribution, root system architecture, and the ratio of fine-to-coarse root lengths.

  1. Root Water Uptake and Soil Moisture Pattern Dynamics - Capturing Connections, Controls and Causalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blume, T.; Heidbuechel, I.; Hassler, S. K.; Simard, S.; Guntner, A.; Stewart, R. D.; Weiler, M.

    2015-12-01

    We hypothesize that there is a shift in controls on landscape scale soil moisture patterns when plants become active during the growing season. Especially during the summer soil moisture patterns are not only controlled by soils, topography and related abiotic site characteristics but also by root water uptake. Root water uptake influences soil moisture patterns both in the lateral and vertical direction. Plant water uptake from different soil depths is estimated based on diurnal fluctuations in soil moisture content and was investigated with a unique setup of 46 field sites in Luxemburg and 15 field sites in Germany. These sites cover a range of geologies, soils, topographic positions and types of vegetation. Vegetation types include pasture, pine forest (young and old) and different deciduous forest stands. Available data at all sites includes information at high temporal resolution from 3-5 soil moisture and soil temperature profiles, matrix potential, piezometers and sapflow sensors as well as standard climate data. At sites with access to a stream, discharge or water level is also recorded. The analysis of soil moisture patterns over time indicates a shift in regime depending on season. Depth profiles of root water uptake show strong differences between different forest stands, with maximum depths ranging between 50 and 200 cm. Temporal dynamics of signal strength within the profile furthermore suggest a locally shifting spatial distribution of root water uptake depending on water availability. We will investigate temporal thresholds (under which conditions spatial patterns of root water uptake become most distinct) as well as landscape controls on soil moisture and root water uptake dynamics.

  2. Measurement of gas/water uptake coefficients for trace gases active in the marine environment. [Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Davidovits, P.; Worsnop, D.W.; Zahniser, M.S.; Kolb, C.E.

    1992-02-01

    Ocean produced reduced sulfur compounds including dimethylsulfide (DMS), hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), carbon disulfide (CS{sub 2}), methyl mercaptan (CH{sub 3}CH) and carbonyl sulfide (OCS) deliver a sulfur burden to the atmosphere which is roughly equal to sulfur oxides produced by fossil fuel combustion. These species and their oxidation products dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), dimethyl sulfone (DMSO{sub 2}) and methane sulfonic acid (MSA) dominate aerosol and CCN production in clean marine air. Furthermore, oxidation of reduced sulfur species will be strongly influenced by NO{sub x}/O{sub 3} chemistry in marine atmospheres. The multiphase chemical processes for these species must be understood in order to study the evolving role of combustion produced sulfur oxides over the oceans. We have measured the chemical and physical parameters affecting the uptake of reduced sulfur compounds, their oxidation products, ozone, and nitrogen oxides by the ocean`s surface, and marine clouds, fogs, and aerosols. These parameters include: gas/surface mass accommodation coefficients; physical and chemically modified (effective) Henry`s law constants; and surface and liquid phase reaction constants. These parameters are critical to understanding both the interaction of gaseous trace species with cloud and fog droplets and the deposition of trace gaseous species to dew covered, fresh water and marine surfaces.

  3. Estimating plant water uptake source depths with optimized stable water isotope labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seeger, Stefan; Weiler, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Depth profiles of pore water stable isotopes in soils in conjunction with measurements of stable water isotopes (SWI) in plant transpiration allow the estimation of the contributions of different soil depths to plant water uptake (PWU).
 However, SWI depth profiles that result from the variations of SWI in natural precipitation may lead to highly ambiguous results, i.e. the same SWI signature in transpiration could result from different PWU patterns or SWI depth profiles. The aim of this study was to find an optimal stable water isotope depth profile to estimate plant water uptake patterns and to compare different PWU source depth estimation methods. We used a new soil water transport model including fractionation effects of SWI and exchange between the vapor and liquid phase to simulate different irrigation scenarios. Different amounts of water with differing SWI signatures (glacier melt water, summer precipitation water, deuterated water) were applied in order to obtain a wide variety of SWI depth profiles. Based on these simulated SWI depth profiles and a set of hypothetical PWU patterns, the theoretical SWI signatures of the respective plant transpiration were computed. In the next step, two methods - Bayesian isotope mixing models (BIMs) and optimization of a parametric distribution function (beta function) - were used to estimate the PWU patterns from the different SWI depth profiles and their respective SWI signatures in the resulting transpiration. Eventually, the estimated and computed profiles were compared to find the best SWI depth profile and the best method. The results showed, that compared to naturally occurring SWI depth profiles, the application of multiple, in terms of SWI, distinct labeling pulses greatly improves the possible spatial resolution and at the same time reduces the uncertainty of PWU estimates.
 For the PWU patterns which were assumed for this study, PWU pattern estimates based on an optimized parametric distribution function

  4. Improving macroscopic modeling of the effect of water and osmotic stresses on root water uptake.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorda Guerra, Helena; Vanderborght, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Accurate modeling of water and salt stresses on root water uptake is critical for predicting impacts of global change and climate variability on crop production and soil water balances. Soil-hydrological models use reduction functions to represent the effect of osmotic stress in transpiration. However, these functions, which were developed empirically, present limitations in relation to the time and spatial scale at which they need to be used, fail to include compensation processes and do not agree on how water and salt stresses interact. This research intends to develop a macroscopic reduction function for water and osmotic stresses based on biophysical knowledge. Simulation experiments are conducted for a range of atmospheric conditions, soil and plant properties, irrigation water quality and scheduling using a 3-D physically-based model that resolves flow and transport to individual root segments and that couples flow in the soil and root system (Schröder et al., 2013). The effect of salt concentrations on water flow in the soil-root system is accounted for by including osmotic water potential gradients between the solution at the soil root interface and the root xylem sap in the hydraulic gradient between the soil and root. In a first step, simulation experiments are carried out in a soil volume around a single root segment. We discuss how the simulation setup can be defined so as to represent: (i) certain characteristics of the root system such as rooting depth and root length density, (ii) plant transpiration rate, (iii) leaching fraction of the irrigation, and (iii) salinity of the irrigation water. The output of these simulation experiments gives a first insight in the effect of salinity on transpiration and on the relation between the bulk salinity in the soil voxel, which is used in macroscopic salt stress functions of models that do not resolve processes at the root segment scale, and the salinity at the soil-root interface, which determines the actual

  5. Comparing the mechanism of water condensation and evaporation in glassy aerosol

    PubMed Central

    Bones, David L.; Reid, Jonathan P.; Lienhard, Daniel M.; Krieger, Ulrich K.

    2012-01-01

    Atmospheric models generally assume that aerosol particles are in equilibrium with the surrounding gas phase. However, recent observations that secondary organic aerosols can exist in a glassy state have highlighted the need to more fully understand the kinetic limitations that may control water partitioning in ambient particles. Here, we explore the influence of slow water diffusion in the condensed aerosol phase on the rates of both condensation and evaporation, demonstrating that significant inhibition in mass transfer occurs for ultraviscous aerosol, not just for glassy aerosol. Using coarse mode (3–4 um radius) ternary sucrose/sodium chloride/aqueous droplets as a proxy for multicomponent ambient aerosol, we demonstrate that the timescale for particle equilibration correlates with bulk viscosity and can be ≫103 s. Extrapolation of these timescales to particle sizes in the accumulation mode (e.g., approximately 100 nm) by applying the Stokes-Einstein equation suggests that the kinetic limitations imposed on mass transfer of water by slow bulk phase diffusion must be more fully investigated for atmospheric aerosol. Measurements have been made on particles covering a range in dynamic viscosity from < 0.1 to > 1013 Pa s. We also retrieve the radial inhomogeneities apparent in particle composition during condensation and evaporation and contrast the dynamics of slow dissolution of a viscous core into a labile shell during condensation with the slow percolation of water during evaporation through a more homogeneous viscous particle bulk. PMID:22753520

  6. Measurements of total column ozone, precipitable water content and aerosol optical depth at Sofia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaleyna, P.; Kolev, N.; Savov, P.; Evgenieva, Ts.; Danchovski, V.; Muhtarov, P.

    2016-03-01

    This article reports the results of a study related to variations in total ozone content, aerosol optical depth, water vapor content and Ångström coefficients from summer campaign carried out in June-July 2014, at two sites in the city of Sofia (Astronomical Observatory in the Borisova Gradina Park and National Institute of Geophysics, Geodesy and Geography (NIGGG)). The results of data analysis indicate the following: Spectral dependence of aerosol optical depth (AOD); Greater AOD values due to greater portion of aerosols; Inverse relationship between the time variations of AOD or water vapor and ozone.

  7. Compact airborne Raman lidar for profiling aerosol, water vapor and clouds.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Wang, Zhien; Cai, Yong; Wechsler, Perry; Kuestner, William; Burkhart, Matthew; Welch, Wayne

    2014-08-25

    A compact airborne Raman lidar system, which can perform water vapor and aerosol measurements both during nighttime and daytime is described. The system design, setup and the data processing methods are described in the paper. The Raman lidar was tested on University of Wyoming King Air research aircraft (UWKA) during the Wyoming King Air PBL Exploratory Experiment (KAPEE) in 2010. An observation showing clouds, aerosols and a dry line is presented to illustrate the lidar detection capabilities. Comparisons of the water vapor and aerosol measurements using the Raman lidar and other in situ airborne instruments show good agreement. PMID:25321266

  8. Aircraft disinsecting: the effectiveness of Freon-based and water-based phenothrin and permethrin aerosols*

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, W. N.; Cawley, B. M.; Schechter, M. S.; Morgan, N. O.; Pal, R.

    1979-01-01

    In Miami, Florida, USA, passenger compartments of jet aircraft were disinsected at ”blocks away”. An application of a 20 g/litre Freon-based or water-based permethrin formulation at 35 mg of aerosol per 100 m3 was 100% effective against caged mosquitos and flies. The flammability hazard of the sprays from water-based hydrocarbon aerosols was evaluated. PMID:316739

  9. Photochemistry of Secondary Organic Aerosol Components in Water and Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epstein, S. A.; Tran, V. T.; Lignell, H.; Nizkorodov, S.; Shemesh, D.; Gerber, R.

    2011-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) can nucleate clouds in the atmosphere and may be scavenged by previously formed cloud droplets. Significant concentrations of dissolved organic matter are typically present in cloud droplets, snow, and ice particles, however the photochemical transformations of these organic components in liquid aqueous solutions and in ice are poorly understood. An apparatus was constructed to measure the absorption spectra of frozen aqueous solutions in the presence of ultra-violet (UV) light. We can monitor the disappearance of the original reactant as a function of UV exposure time with UV-Visible spectroscopy and identify products with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Initial experiments with methylhydroperoxide, the simplest organic peroxide, which is readily detectable in solid and liquid cloud particles, reveal no change in the absorption spectra between the liquid and frozen solution. With these photolysis experiments, we can establish quantum yields of methylhydroperoxide photodissociation and allow for the comparison between liquid and ice phase chemistry. Additional experiments with pinonic acid, a significant product formed from alpha-pinene ozonolysis, and a mixture of common SOA constituents will allow us to determine quantum yields and reveal important insight in the understanding of the cloud processing of water soluble SOA by sunlight.

  10. Modeling Foliar Uptake in Colocasia Esculenta Using High Resolution Maps of Leaf Water Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinkler, C. J.; Gerlein-Safdi, C.; Caylor, K. K.

    2014-12-01

    The uptake of carbon dioxide by vegetation is a major sink of CO2 and a factor that will determine future climate. Some studies predict a decrease in CO2 uptake from vegetation because of a general drying of the Amazon Basin. Because of the tight linkage between water availability and plant carbon uptake, a comprehensive model of plant water use at the individual scale is necessary to build a complete carbon budget at the global scale. Foliar uptake of non-meteoric water is a common process used by plants to alleviate water stress. However the occurrence of this process in tropical ecosystems, as well as its interaction with other physiological parameters, is not well understood. We present a model of leaf water balance that includes foliar uptake. The isotopic composition of the different sources as well as the leaf water are also included. The model is tested against a series of experiments on Colocasia esculenta, under two different water availability conditions: drought and artificial dew. The artificial dew is spiked with stable isotopes of water (δ18O = 8.56 permil, δ2H = 709.7 permil) that allow us to trace the partition of dew uptake within a leaf. We create high-resolution maps of the distribution of isotopes in one half of each leaf using a Picarro IM-CRDS. The maps show a clear enrichment due to foliar uptake for the artificial dew treatment. The water in the second half of the leaf is extracted by cryogenic extraction and analyzed using both IRIS and IRMS for quality control of the IM-CRDS data. Soil water is collected for isotope analysis and water content measurement. Finally, stomatal conductance data collected every two days shows no significant decrease due to either treatment over the course of the experiment. We conclude that foliar uptake of dew water is an important water acquisition mechanism for C. esculenta, even under high soil water content conditions, and we propose guidelines for further improvement of models of leaf-scale water

  11. Kinetics and uptake mechanisms for monomethylmercury between freshwater algae and water.

    PubMed

    Moye, H Anson; Miles, Carl J; Phlips, Edward J; Sargent, Bethany; Merritt, Kristen K

    2002-08-15

    Uptake kinetics of monomethylmercury chloride (MeHgCl) were measured for two species of green algae (Selenastrum capricomutum and Cosmarium botrytis), one blue-green algae (Schizothrix calcicola), and one diatom (Thalassiosira weissflogii), algal species that are commonly found in natural surface waters. Species differences were found with the two green algae giving the highest uptake rates, and one of them (Cosmarium) showing differences between cultures having widely different cell age (exponential versus stationary), where increases in uptake rate for cells 30 days old were about 25 times greater than cells only 3 days old when weights of cells were considered. Both Schizothrix and Thalassiosira exhibited nearly the same lower uptake rates, approximately 20 times lower than the two green algal species. Experiments with photosystem inhibitors, uncouplers, gamma-radiation, light deprivation, and extended range uptake all point to an active transport mechanism for MeHgCl. PMID:12214648

  12. Thermodynamic formalism of water uptakes on solid porous adsorbents for adsorption cooling applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Baichuan; Chakraborty, Anutosh

    2014-05-19

    This Letter presents a thermodynamic formulation to calculate the amount of water vapor uptakes on various adsorbents such as zeolites, metal organic frameworks, and silica gel for the development of an advanced adsorption chiller. This formalism is developed from the rigor of the partition distribution function of each water vapor adsorptive site on adsorbents and the condensation approximation of adsorptive water molecules and is validated with experimental data. An interesting and useful finding has been established that the proposed model is thermodynamically connected with the pore structures of adsorbent materials, and the water vapor uptake highly depends on the isosteric heat of adsorption at zero surface coverage and the adsorptive sites of the adsorbent materials. Employing the proposed model, the thermodynamic trends of water vapor uptakes on various adsorbents can be estimated.

  13. Influence of organic films on the evaporation and condensation of water in aerosol

    PubMed Central

    Davies, James F.; Miles, Rachael E. H.; Haddrell, Allen E.; Reid, Jonathan P.

    2013-01-01

    Uncertainties in quantifying the kinetics of evaporation and condensation of water from atmospheric aerosol are a significant contributor to the uncertainty in predicting cloud droplet number and the indirect effect of aerosols on climate. The influence of aerosol particle surface composition, particularly the impact of surface active organic films, on the condensation and evaporation coefficients remains ambiguous. Here, we report measurements of the influence of organic films on the evaporation and condensation of water from aerosol particles. Significant reductions in the evaporation coefficient are shown to result when condensed films are formed by monolayers of long-chain alcohols [CnH(2n+1)OH], with the value decreasing from 2.4 × 10−3 to 1.7 × 10−5 as n increases from 12 to 17. Temperature-dependent measurements confirm that a condensed film of long-range order must be formed to suppress the evaporation coefficient below 0.05. The condensation of water on a droplet coated in a condensed film is shown to be fast, with strong coherence of the long-chain alcohol molecules leading to islanding as the water droplet grows, opening up broad areas of uncoated surface on which water can condense rapidly. We conclude that multicomponent composition of organic films on the surface of atmospheric aerosol particles is likely to preclude the formation of condensed films and that the kinetics of water condensation during the activation of aerosol to form cloud droplets is likely to remain rapid. PMID:23674675

  14. Response of North Pacific eastern subtropical mode water to greenhouse gas versus aerosol forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang; Luo, Yiyong

    2016-04-01

    Mode water is a distinct water mass characterized by a near vertical homogeneous layer or low potential vorticity, and is considered essential for understanding ocean climate variability. Based on the output of GFDL CM3, this study investigates the response of eastern subtropical mode water (ESTMW) in the North Pacific to two different single forcings: greenhouse gases (GHGs) and aerosol. Under GHG forcing, ESTMW is produced on lighter isopycnal surfaces and is decreased in volume. Under aerosol forcing, in sharp contrast, it is produced on denser isopycnal surfaces and is increased in volume. The main reason for the opposite response is because surface ocean-to-atmosphere latent heat flux change over the ESTMW formation region shoals the mixed layer and thus weakens the lateral induction under GHG forcing, but deepens the mixed layer and thus strengthens the lateral induction under aerosol forcing. In addition, local wind changes are also favorable to the opposite response of ESTMW production to GHG versus aerosol.

  15. Simulating root water uptake from a shallow saline groundwater resource

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Disposal of saline drainage water is a significant problem for irrigated agriculture. One proposal to deal with this problem is sequential biological concentration (SBC), which is the process of recycling drainage water on increasingly more salt tolerant crops until the volume of drainage water has ...

  16. Influence of aqueous chemistry on the chemical composition of fog water and interstitial aerosol in Fresno

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hwajin; Ge, Xinlei; Collier, Sonya; Xu, Jianzhong; Sun, Yele; Wang, Youliang; Herckes, Pierre; Zhang, Qi

    2015-04-01

    A measurement study was conducted in the Central Valley (Fresno) of California in January 2010, during which radiation fog events were frequently observed. Fog plays important roles in atmospheric chemistry by scavenging aerosol particles and trace gases and serving as a medium for various aqueous-phase reactions. Understanding the effects of fog on the microphysical and chemical processing of aerosol particles requires detailed information on their chemical composition. In this study, we characterized the chemical composition of fog water and interstitial aerosol particles to study the effects of fog processing on aerosol properties. Fog water samples were collected during the 2010 Fresno campaigns with a Caltech Active Strand Cloud water Collector (CASCC) while interstitial submicron aerosols were characterized in real time with an Aerodyne High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) and a scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS). The fog water samples were later analyzed using the HR-ToF-AMS, ion chromatography, and a total carbon analyzer. The chemical composition and characteristics of interstitial particles during the fog events were compared to those of dissolved inorganic and organic matter in fog waters. Compared to interstitial aerosols, fog water is composed of a higher fraction of ammonium nitrate and oxygenated organics, due to aqueous formation of secondary aerosol species as well as enhanced gas-to-particle partitioning of water soluble species under water rich conditions. Sulfate is formed most efficiently in fog water although its contribution to total dissolved mass is relatively low. The HR-ToF-AMS mass spectra of organic matter in fog water (FOM) are very similar to that of oxygenated organic aerosols (OOA) derived from positive matrix factorization (PMF) of the HR-ToF-AMS spectra of ambient aerosol (r2 = 0.96), but FOM appears to contain a large fraction of acidic functional groups than OOA. FOM is also enriched of

  17. Condensational growth and trace species scavenging in stratospheric sulfuric acid/water aerosol droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tompson, Robert V., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Stratospheric aerosols play a significant role in the environment. The composition of aerosols is believed to be a liquid solution of sulfuric acid and water with numerous trace species. Of these trace species, ozone in particular was recognized as being very important in its role of shielding the environment from harmful ultraviolet radiation. Also among the trace species are HCl and ClONO2, the so called chlorine reservoir species and various oxides of nitrogen. The quantity of stratospheric aerosol and its particle size distribution determines, to a large degree, the chemistry present in the stratosphere. Aerosols experience 3 types of growth: nucleation, condensation, and coagulation. The application of condensation investigations to the specific problem of stratospheric aerosols is discussed.

  18. Studies on water transport through the sweet cherry fruit surface: IX. Comparing permeability in water uptake and transpiration.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Marco; Lau, Steffen; Knoche, Moritz

    2005-01-01

    Water uptake and transpiration were studied through the surface of intact sweet cherry (Prunus avium L.) fruit, exocarp segments (ES) and cuticular membranes (CM) excised from the cheek of sweet cherry fruit and astomatous CM isolated from Schefflera arboricola (Hayata) Hayata, Citrus aurantium L., and Stephanotis floribunda Brongn. leaves or from Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. and Capsicum annuum L. var. annuum Fasciculatum Group fruit. ES and CM were mounted in diffusion cells. Water (deionized) uptake into intact sweet cherry fruit, through ES or CM interfacing water as a donor and a polyethyleneglycol (PEG 6000, osmotic pressure 2.83 MPa)-containing receiver was determined gravimetrically. Transpiration was quantified by monitoring weight loss of a PEG 6000-containing donor (2.83 MPa) against dry silica as a receiver. The permeability coefficients for osmotic water uptake and transpiration were calculated from the amount of water taken up or transpired per unit surface area and time, and the driving force for transport. Permeability during osmotic water uptake was markedly higher than during transpiration in intact sweet cherry fruit (40.2-fold), excised ES of sweet cherry fruit (12.5- to 53.7-fold) and isolated astomatous fruit and leaf CM of a range of species (on average 23.0-fold). Partitioning water transport into stomatal and cuticular components revealed that permeability of the sweet cherry fruit cuticle for water uptake was 11.9-fold higher and that of stomata 56.8-fold higher than the respective permeability during transpiration. Increasing water vapor activity in the receiver from 0 to 1 increased permeability during transpiration across isolated sweet cherry fruit CM about 2.1-fold. Permeability for vapor uptake from saturated water vapor into a PEG 6000 receiver solution was markedly lower than from liquid water, but of similar magnitude to the permeability during self-diffusion of (3)H(2)O in the absence of osmotica. The energy of activation for

  19. Using thermodynamics to assess biotic and abiotic impediments to root water uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechmann, Marcel; Hildebrandt, Anke; Kleidon, Axel

    2016-04-01

    Root water uptake has been the subject of extensive research, dealing with understanding the processes limiting transpiration and understanding strategies of plants to avoid water stress. Many of those studies use models of water flow from the soil through the plant into the atmosphere to learn about biotic and abiotic factors affecting plant water relations. One important question in this context is to identify those processes that are most limiting to water transport, and specifically whether these processes lie within the plant or the soil? Here, we propose to use a thermodynamic formulation of root water uptake to answer this question. The method allows us to separate the energy exported at the root collar into a sum of energy fluxes related to all processes along the flow path, notably including the effect of increasing water retention in drier soils. Evaluation of the several contributions allows us to identify and rank the processes by how much these impede water flow from the soil to the atmosphere. The application of this approach to a complex 3-dimensional root water uptake model reveals insights on the role of root versus soil resistances to limit water flow. We investigate the efficiency of root water uptake in an ensemble of root systems with varying root hydraulic properties. While root morphology is kept the same, root radial and axial resistances are artificially varied. Starting with entirely young systems (uptake roots, high radial, low axial conductance) we increasingly add older roots (transport roots, high axial, low radial conductance) to improve transport within root systems. This yields a range of root hydraulic architectures, where the extremes are limited either by radial uptake capacity or low capacity to transport water along the root system. We model root water uptake in this range of root systems with a 3-dimensional root water uptake model in two different soils, applying constant flux boundary conditions in a dry down experiment and

  20. Water Uptake Threshold of Rabbiteye (Vaccunium ashei) Blueberries and its Influence on Fruit Splitting

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Splitting resistant and splitting susceptible Rabbiteye blueberry fruit were evaluated at all stages of development to determine water uptake thresholds by soaking in distilled water. Weight increase after soaking was measured, and percent weight gain was calculated to take into consideration the w...

  1. Perchlorate uptake in spinach as related to perchlorate, nitrate and chloride concentrations in irrigation water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several studies have reported on the detection of perchlorate in edible leafy vegetables irrigated with Colorado River water. However, there is no information on spinach as related to perchlorate in irrigation water nor on the effect of other anions on perchlorate uptake. A greenhouse perchlorate up...

  2. Simulated Soil Water Content Effects On Plant Nitrogen Uptake and Export for Watershed Management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In watershed nutrient management for water quality assessment, it is important to understand the critical pathways of nutrient cycles and nutrient transport processes from lands to the receiving water bodies. Soil moisture content influences plant nitrogen uptake significantly. This paper discussed...

  3. Aerosol-Water Cycle Interaction: A New Challenge in Monsoon Climate Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, William K. M.

    2006-01-01

    Long recognized as a major environmental hazard, aerosol is now known to have strong impacts on both regional and global climate. It has been estimated that aerosol may reduce by up to 10% of the seasonal mean solar radiation reaching the earth surface, producing a global cooling effect that opposes global warming (Climate Change 2001). This means that the potential perils that humans have committed to global warming may be far greater than what we can detect at the present. As a key component of the Earth climate system, the water cycle is profoundly affected by the presence of aerosols in the atmosphere. Through the so-called direct effect , aerosol scatters and/or absorbs solar radiation, thus cooling the earth surface and changing the horizontal and vertical radiational heating contrast in the atmosphere. The heating contrast drives anomalous atmospheric circulation, resulting in changes in convection, clouds, and rainfall. Another way aerosol can affect the water cycle is through the so-called indirect effects, whereby aerosol increases the number of cloud condensation nuclei, prolongs life time of clouds, and inhibits the growth of cloud drops to raindrops. This leads to more clouds, and increased reflection of solar radiation, and further cooling at the earth surface. In monsoon regions, the response of the water cycle to aerosol forcing is especially complex, not only because of presence of diverse mix of aerosol species with vastly different radiative properties, but also because the monsoon is strongly influenced by ocean and land surface processes, land use, land change, as well as regional and global greenhouse warming effects. Thus, sorting out the impacts of aerosol forcing, and interaction with the monsoon water cycle is a very challenging problem. In this talk, I will offer some insights into how aerosols may impact the Asian monsoon based on preliminary results from satellite observations and climate model experiments. Specifically, I will discuss

  4. Aerosol-Water Cycle Interaction: A New Challenge in Monsoon Climate Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, William K. M.

    2006-01-01

    Long recognized as a major environmental hazard, aerosol is now known to have strong impacts on both regional and global climate. It has been estimated that aerosol may reduce by up to 10% of the seasonal mean solar radiation reaching the earth surface, producing a global cooling effect that opposes global warming (Climate Change 2001). This means that the potential perils that humans have committed to global warming may be far greater than what we can detect at the present. As a key component of the Earth climate system, the water cycle is profoundly affected by the presence of aerosols in the atmosphere. Through the so-called "direct effect", aerosol scatters and/or absorbs solar radiation, thus cooling the earth surface and changing the horizontal and vertical radiational heating contrast in the atmosphere. The heating contrast drives anomalous atmospheric circulation, resulting in changes in convection, clouds, and rainfall. Another way aerosol can affect the water cycle is through the so-called "indirect effects", whereby aerosol increases the number of cloud condensation nuclei, prolongs life time of clouds, and inhibits the growth of cloud drops to raindrops. This leads to more clouds, and increased reflection of solar radiation, and further cooling at the earth surface. In monsoon regions, the response of the water cycle to aerosol forcing is especially complex, not only because of presence of diverse mix of aerosol species with vastly different radiative properties, but also because the monsoon is strongly influenced by ocean and land surface processes, land use, land change, as well as regional and global greenhouse warming effects. Thus, sorting out the impacts of aerosol forcing, and interaction with the monsoon water cycle is a very challenging problem. In this talk, I will offer some insights into how aerosols may impact the Asian monsoon based on preliminary results from satellite observations and climate model experiments. Specifically, I will

  5. Aerosol effects on stratocumulus water paths in a PDF-based parameterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, H.; Golaz, J.-C.; Donner, L. J.

    2011-09-01

    Successful simulation of aerosol indirect effects in climate models requires parameterizations that capture the full range of cloud-aerosol interactions, including positive and negative liquid water path (LWP) responses to increasing aerosol concentrations, as suggested by large eddy simulations (LESs). A parameterization based on multi-variate probability density functions with dynamics (MVD PDFs) has been incorporated into the single-column version of GFDL AM3, extended to treat aerosol activation, and coupled with a two-moment microphysics scheme. We use it to explore cloud-aerosol interactions. In agreement with LESs, our single-column simulations produce both positive and negative LWP responses to increasing aerosol concentrations, depending on precipitation and free atmosphere relative humidity. We have conducted sensitivity tests to vertical resolution and droplet sedimentation parameterization. The dependence of sedimentation on cloud droplet size is essential to capture the full LWP responses to aerosols. Further analyses reveal that the MVD PDFs are able to represent changes in buoyancy profiles induced by sedimentation as well as enhanced entrainment efficiency with aerosols comparable to LESs.

  6. Simple physics-based models of compensatory plant water uptake: concepts and eco-hydrological consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarvis, N. J.

    2011-07-01

    Many land surface schemes and simulation models of plant growth designed for practical use employ simple empirical sub-models of root water uptake that cannot adequately reflect the critical role water uptake from sparsely rooted deep subsoil plays in meeting atmospheric transpiration demand in water-limited environments, especially in the presence of shallow groundwater. A failure to account for this so-called "compensatory" water uptake may have serious consequences for both local and global modeling of water and energy fluxes, carbon balances and climate. Some purely empirical compensatory root water uptake models have been proposed, but they are of limited use in global modeling exercises since their parameters cannot be related to measurable soil and vegetation properties. Parsimonious physics-based models of uptake compensation have been developed that require no more parameters than empirical approaches. These models are described and compared from a conceptual point of view and some aspects of their behavior, including the phenomenon of hydraulic lift, are illustrated with the help of example simulations. These analyses demonstrate that the degree of compensation is a function of soil capillarity and the ratio of total effective root length to potential transpiration. Thus, uptake compensation increases as root to leaf area ratios increase, since potential transpiration depends on leaf area. Results of "scenario" simulations for two case studies, one at the local scale (riparian vegetation growing above shallow water tables in seasonally dry or arid climates) and one at a global scale (water balances across an aridity gradient in the continental USA), are presented to illustrate biases in model predictions that arise when water uptake compensation is neglected. In the first case, it is shown that only a compensated model can match the strong relationships between water table depth and leaf area and transpiration observed in riparian forest ecosystems, where

  7. Simple physics-based models of compensatory plant water uptake: concepts and eco-hydrological consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarvis, N. J.

    2011-11-01

    Many land surface schemes and simulation models of plant growth designed for practical use employ simple empirical sub-models of root water uptake that cannot adequately reflect the critical role water uptake from sparsely rooted deep subsoil plays in meeting atmospheric transpiration demand in water-limited environments, especially in the presence of shallow groundwater. A failure to account for this so-called "compensatory" water uptake may have serious consequences for both local and global modeling of water and energy fluxes, carbon balances and climate. Some purely empirical compensatory root water uptake models have been proposed, but they are of limited use in global modeling exercises since their parameters cannot be related to measurable soil and vegetation properties. A parsimonious physics-based model of uptake compensation has been developed that requires no more parameters than empirical approaches. This model is described and some aspects of its behavior are illustrated with the help of example simulations. These analyses demonstrate that hydraulic lift can be considered as an extreme form of compensation and that the degree of compensation is principally a function of soil capillarity and the ratio of total effective root length to potential transpiration. Thus, uptake compensation increases as root to leaf area ratios increase, since potential transpiration depends on leaf area. Results of "scenario" simulations for two case studies, one at the local scale (riparian vegetation growing above shallow water tables in seasonally dry or arid climates) and one at a global scale (water balances across an aridity gradient in the continental USA), are presented to illustrate biases in model predictions that arise when water uptake compensation is neglected. In the first case, it is shown that only a compensated model can match the strong relationships between water table depth and leaf area and transpiration observed in riparian forest ecosystems, where

  8. [CO2-gas exchange of mosses following water vapour uptake].

    PubMed

    Lange, O L

    1969-03-01

    The CO2-gas exchange of dry mosses which were exposed to air of high water vapour content has been followed. Some moss species behave as do lichens and aerophilic green algae: they are able to take up enough water vapour to make a rather high photosynthetic activity possible. Other species lack this ability. They need liquid water for reactivation of photosynthesis, as do poikilohydric ferns and phanerogams. In this respect too the mosses are located between the real thallophytes and the cormophytes. From this point of view they are useful objects for studying the relationships between water vapour reactivation, morphological organisation and ecological capability. PMID:24504355

  9. Hydrogeophysical Monitoring of Water Uptake in Root Zones of Small Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Hagrey, S.; Werban, U.; Meissner, R.; Ismaeil, A.; Rabbel, W.

    2005-05-01

    We have monitored the water content in root zones in hydrogeophysical experiments and studied daily and seasonal variations of water uptake. Plants grew in plastic pots filled with fine sand. The surface of the pots was isolated to minimize evaporation, i.e., most water is consumed for transpiration. We installed geoelectric surface and subsurface profiles (electrode interval = 1.5 cm), and used 900/1500 MHz antennas to measure the travel times of radar waves reflected from a metallic plate at the base. Also a central and peripheral TDR and a tensiometer probe were installed. A continuous data acquisition was conducted to monitor the spatiotemporal water content of root zones and its variations. Our observations clearly reflect a decrease of pore water content with time and its abrupt increase directly after each irrigation cycle. TDR and tensiometer curves are parallel and mirror images of the resistivity curve. Observed soil water content in the day time was consistently lower than in the night time (no plant transpiration). Long-term observations of water uptake by roots show that the plants behavior is a function of the background moisture content. The maximum water uptake of optimum growth occurs at intermediate water content. Seasonal variations could be observed. The water uptake in May is obviously twice that of November. This can be explained by the fact that the available light (required for photosynthesis) was higher in May than in November. Also the effect of day light on the water uptake can be observed. The light sunny days show higher water uptake than the dark rainy days. The peripheral water content values that decrease with time are lower than that of the central root zone and show small night and day changes. This may imply that the central TDR probe measures the water content both within the wet root branches and the bounding soils, whereas the peripheral TDR reading represents the soil pore water only. Electrical models of the root zone show a

  10. Bark water uptake promotes localized hydraulic recovery in coastal redwood crown.

    PubMed

    Mason Earles, J; Sperling, Or; Silva, Lucas C R; McElrone, Andrew J; Brodersen, Craig R; North, Malcolm P; Zwieniecki, Maciej A

    2016-02-01

    Coastal redwood (Sequoia sempervirens), the world's tallest tree species, rehydrates leaves via foliar water uptake during fog/rain events. Here we examine if bark also permits water uptake in redwood branches, exploring potential flow mechanisms and biological significance. Using isotopic labelling and microCT imaging, we observed that water entered the xylem via bark and reduced tracheid embolization. Moreover, prolonged bark wetting (16 h) partially restored xylem hydraulic conductivity in isolated branch segments and whole branches. Partial hydraulic recovery coincided with an increase in branch water potential from about -5.5 ± 0.4 to -4.2 ± 0.3 MPa, suggesting localized recovery and possibly hydraulic isolation. As bark water uptake rate correlated with xylem osmotic potential (R(2)  = 0.88), we suspect a symplastic role in transferring water from bark to xylem. Using historical weather data from typical redwood habitat, we estimated that bark and leaves are wet more than 1000 h per year on average, with over 30 events being sufficiently long (>24 h) to allow for bark-assisted hydraulic recovery. The capacity to uptake biologically meaningful volumes of water via bark and leaves for localized hydraulic recovery throughout the crown during rain/fog events might be physiologically advantageous, allowing for relatively constant transpiration. PMID:26178179

  11. Arsenic Uptake by Muskmelon (Cucumis melo) Plants from Contaminated Water.

    PubMed

    Hettick, Bryan E; Cañas-Carrell, Jaclyn E; Martin, Kirt; French, Amanda D; Klein, David M

    2016-09-01

    Arsenic is a carcinogenic element that occurs naturally in the environment. High levels of arsenic are found in water in some parts of the world, including Texas. The aims of this study were to determine the distribution of arsenic in muskmelon (Cucumis melo) plants accumulated from arsenic spiked water and to observe effects on plant biomass. Plants were grown and irrigated using water spiked with variable concentrations of arsenic. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was used to quantify arsenic in different parts of the plant and fruit. Under all conditions tested in this study, the highest concentrations of arsenic were found in the leaves, soil, and roots. Arsenic in the water had no significant effect on plant biomass. Fruits analyzed in this study had arsenic concentrations of 101 μg/kg or less. Consuming these fruits would result in less arsenic exposure than drinking water at recommended levels. PMID:27460822

  12. Uptake of Gas-Phase Nitric Acid by Water-Ice Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullerstam, M.; Abbatt, J. P.

    2004-05-01

    Nitric acid is a widespread molecule found in the atmosphere. It is mainly removed from the troposphere by wet or dry deposition. In colder regions such as the upper troposphere and tropopause where cirrus clouds are formed nitric acid can also be scavenged by cirrus ice particles. The uptake of gas-phase nitric acid by water-ice films has been re-examined with a coated-wall flow tube coupled to a chemical-ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS) at 228K. Previous flow tube studies of this system have shown little dependence of the uptake over the partial pressure regime studied. In these studies the initial, short-term uptake has been the focus and the long term uptake has not been quantified. In this experimental setup it was possible to study the uptake of nitric acid at lower partial pressures resulting in a more atmospherically appropriate determination of the adsorption isotherm and the long term uptake has also been addressed. Measurement of the initial uptake coefficient representing a lower limit will also be presented. Finally, possible burial of nitric acid into the bulk of the ice during continuous growth of the ice film has been studied. In the atmosphere ice particles will be subject to cycles of evaporation and condensation which could cause the nitric acid to be encapsulated into the particle, especially since the major part of the adsorption has been proven to be irreversible. This could enhance the ice particles capacity of scavenging nitric acid.

  13. Investigation of the kinetics of water uptake into partially saturated shales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roshan, H.; Andersen, M. S.; Rutlidge, H.; Marjo, C. E.; Acworth, R. I.

    2016-04-01

    Several processes have been proposed to describe the low recovery of hydraulic fracturing fluid in unconventional shale reservoirs which has caused both technical and environmental concerns. This study describes novel hydraulic experiments to quantitatively investigate the kinetics of water uptake into partially saturated shale through investigating the pressure response of injecting fluids (NaCl, KCl, MgCl2, and CaCl2 with different ionic concentrations) into crushed and sieved shale fragments. The results of the study indicate that the cumulative water uptake under pressure is likely to be controlled by three processes: surface hydration, capillary hydration including advective flow, and osmotic hydration. Each of these processes is a function of the differences between the in situ pore fluid and the injection fluid (solution chemistry and concentration) and the shale physicochemical properties, in particular the contact surface area, pore diameter, and the Cation Exchange Capacity (CEC). The uptake is not instantaneous, but is diffusion limited, with the rate governed by a number of kinetic processes. Uptake proceeds in three stages, each associated with a different process: (1) predominantly surface hydration, (2) predominantly capillary hydration and finally, (3) predominantly osmotic hydration. It was also shown that shale can take up a significant amount of water compared to its available solid volume. However, contrary to the conventional understanding, the increase in salinity of the injection fluid does not necessarily lead to reduced water uptake into shales, but is dependent on the type and concentration of cations within the shale and injecting fluid.

  14. Water Uptake by Dry Beans Observed by Micro-magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    KIKUCHI, KAORI; KOIZUMI, MIKA; ISHIDA, NOBUAKI; KANO, HIROMI

    2006-01-01

    • Background and Aims Water uptake by dry kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris ‘Rajma’) and adzuki beans (Vigna angularis) was traced using micro-magnetic resonance imaging in order to elucidate the channel of water entry, the manner of water delivery and the timing of swelling of the seeds. • Methods Magnetic resonance images of beans absorbing water were continuously measured with the single-point imaging method for 16 h or 20 h at 15-min intervals. With this technique, it was possible to detect and visualize the location of water in the beans, at a low water content, in the initial stages of water entry. • Key Results Water was taken up through a specified tissue, the lens, near the hilum, and distributed primarily to the testa. When water reached the radicle, it began to be incorporated into cotyledons with considerable swelling of the seeds. Water uptake took place within a short time for kidney beans. The initial process of water entry was associated with mechanical vibration of the seed. Rapid hydration of the testa and the swelling of the cotyledons were then observed. Water was supplied to cotyledons through the adaxial epidermis. In contrast, it took a long time, approx. 7 h, to activate the water channel of the lens for adzuki beans which have a tightly fitting testa. Steeping of the testa was not uniform, which induced temporary slanting before enlargement of the seed. • Conclusions The activation of the lens as the sole water channel, the delivery of water to the radicle within the testa, the swelling of the cotyledons, and the further increment of water are physiologically different processes during imbibition, and were separated by locating water in various tissues and by analysing the time course of water uptake using magnetic resonance imaging with the single-point imaging method. PMID:16845137

  15. Atmospheric water uptake by an atacama desert shrub.

    PubMed

    Mooney, H A; Gulmon, S L; Ehleringer, J; Rundel, P W

    1980-08-01

    Nolana mollis, a succulent-leaved shrub of the extreme coastal desert of Chile, has the capacity to condense water on its leaves out of unsaturated atmospheres, Metabolic energy would have to be expended to move this water either from the leaf surface directly to the mesophyll or, when dripped to the soil, from there into the roots. Because of the unusual aridity of its habitat and of the utilization of water-use-efficient metabolism by Nolana, at least during certain periods, such an energy expenditure could be effective. PMID:17821192

  16. Water Uptake, Diameter Change, and Nonlinear Diffusion in Tree Stems

    PubMed Central

    Parlange, Jean-Yves; Turner, Neil C.; Waggoner, Paul E.

    1975-01-01

    A diffusion model for phloem swelling and contraction is proposed in which the rate of water movement changes markedly with moisture content. Good agreement between the actual swelling of the phloem of cotton stems and that predicted by the model was obtained. This result implies that water moves more readily into the phloem when it becomes wetter. This model also explains the lag of shrinkage of pine stems behind the water potential of the foliage and predicts that the lag is related to the thickness of the phloem. PMID:16659060

  17. Known Unknowns Explained: Hono Daytime Production from the Anion-Catalyzed Uptake of NO2 on Secondary Organic Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colussi, A. J.

    2012-12-01

    Recent evidence strongly suggests that the decay of NO2 in urban air and the related production of HONO at daytime involve unidentified multiphase reactions. Here we address these issues and analyze the results of field campaigns from the perspective of our laboratory studies on interfacial NO2 chemistry. We note that the similar (~ 4 hr) NO2 decay lifetimes inferred from satellite sightings over megacities ranging from 2° N to 40° N at all seasons are incompatible with the conventional view that NO2 is removed (as HNO3) by gas-phase OH-radicals whose concentrations depend on solar irradiance. This insight also applies to the daytime source of HONO, a non-photochemical process that reaches its maximal strength at noon. Herein, we present new laboratory experiments and quantum mechanical calculations confirming that the reactive uptake of gaseous NO2 on aqueous interfaces is generally catalyzed by anions, and show that the preceding observations can be accounted for by the disproportionation of NO2 (via 2 NO2 + H2O = H+ + NO3- + HONO) on secondary organic aerosol particles containing carboxylate ion loadings that peak at noon, as reported elsewhere.IGURE 1 - Left axis: The frequencies of O(1D) atom production from the solar photolysis of ozone, J(O1D), at zero elevation under an ozone column of 300 Dobson units at noon on (from left to right) Feb. 1st, May 1st, Aug. 1st and Nov. 1st over: (1) Singapore 1.3° N, (2) Pearl River Delta 22.5° N, (3) Riyadh 24.6° N, (4) Isfahan 32.6° N, (5) Los Angeles 34° N, (6) Tokyo 35.6° N, (7) Four Corners 36.7° N, (8) Madrid 40.4° N and (9) Moscow 55.8° N. Right axis (note the logarithmic scale): red dashes correspond to the ratios J(O1D)mid-summer/J(O1D)mid-winter (herein midsummer is Aug. 1st, midwinter is Feb. 1st).

  18. Influence of soil structure and root water uptake strategy on unsaturated flow in heterogeneous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhlmann, A.; Neuweiler, I.; van der Zee, S. E. A. T. M.; Helmig, R.

    2012-02-01

    We analyze the combined effects of the spatial variability of soil hydraulic properties and the water uptake by plant roots on unsaturated water flow. For this analysis, we use a simplified macroscopic root water uptake model which is usually applied only for homogeneous or layered soil and therefore we also determine whether it is applicable for multidimensional heterogeneous media. Analytical solutions for mean and variance of pressure head (first-order second-moment approximations) in layered media and numerical solutions of two-dimensional (2-D) autocorrelated multi-Gaussian and non multi-Gaussian parameter fields are analyzed for steady state and transient flow conditions. For non-Gaussian topological features, that have little influence on the mean and the variance of the pressure field if root water uptake is ignored, we test whether the influence is significant if root water uptake is accounted for. The results reveal that, in field structures with large patches of coarse material, local regions with pressure head values at the wilting point develop; these are surrounded by wet material. Without a compensation mechanism for local stress, the global transpiration demand is not met if local wilting occurs. Various compensation mechanisms are tested that depend, respectively, on the saturation, the relative conductivity or a strategy where the deficit in the global uptake rate is equally distributed to unstressed locations. The strategies lead to a global actual transpiration rate at the potential value and attenuate the formation of locally wilted areas. Wilted regions can, however, still occur, and may be an artifact of the simplified model concept as root-soil interactions are neglected. Therefore simplified macroscopic models for root water uptake should be used with caution in heterogeneous media.

  19. Water uptake by a maize root system - An explicit numerical 3-dimensional simulation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitner, Daniel; Schnepf, Andrea; Klepsch, Sabine; Roose, Tiina

    2010-05-01

    Water is one of the most important resources for plant growth and function. An accurate modelling of the unsaturated flow is not only substantial to predict water uptake but also important to describe nutrient movement regarding water saturation and transport. In this work we present a model for water uptake. The model includes the simultaneous flow of water inside the soil and inside the root network. Water saturation in the soil volume is described by the Richards equation. Water flow inside the roots' xylem is calculated using the Poiseuille law for water flow in a cylindrical tube. The water saturation in the soil as well as water uptake of the root system is calculated numerically in three dimensions. We study water uptake of a maize plant in a confined pot under different supply scenarios. The main improvement of our approach is that the root surfaces act as spatial boundaries of the soil volume. Therefore water influx into the root is described by a surface flux instead of a volume flux, which is commonly given by an effective sink term. For the numerical computation we use the following software: The 3-dimensional maize root architecture is created by a root growth model based on L-Systems (Leitner et al 2009). A mesh of the surrounding soil volume is created using the meshing software DistMesh (Persson & Strang 2004). Using this mesh the partial differential equations are solved with the finite element method using Comsol Multiphysics 3.5a. Modelling results are related to accepted water uptake models from literature (Clausnitzer & Hopmans 1994, Roose & Fowler 2004, Javaux et al 2007). This new approach has several advantages. By considering the individual roots it is possible to analyse the influence of overlapping depletion zones due to inter root competition. Furthermore, such simulations can be used to estimate the influence of simplifying assumptions that are made in the development of effective models. The model can be easily combined with a nutrient

  20. LASE Measurements of Water Vapor, Aerosol, and Cloud Distributions in Saharan Air Layers and Tropical Disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ismail, Syed; Ferrare, Richard A.; Browell, Edward V.; Kooi, Susan A.; Dunion, Jason P.; Heymsfield, Gerry; Notari, Anthony; Butler, Carolyn F.; Burton, Sharon; Fenn, Marta; Krishnamurti, T. N.; Chen, Gao; Anderson, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    LASE (Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment) on-board the NASA DC-8 measured high resolution profiles of water vapor and aerosols, and cloud distributions in 14 flights over the eastern North Atlantic during the NAMMA (NASA African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses) field experiment. These measurements were used to study African easterly waves (AEWs), tropical cyclones (TCs), and the Saharan Air Layer(s) (SAL). Interactions between the SAL and tropical air were observed during the early stages of the TC development. These LASE measurements represent the first simultaneous water vapor and aerosol lidar measurements to study the SAL and its impact on AEWs and TCs. Examples of profile measurements of aerosol scattering ratios, aerosol extinction coefficients, aerosol optical thickness, water vapor mixing ratios, RH, and temperature are presented to illustrate their characteristics in SAL, convection, and clear air regions. LASE data suggest that the SAL suppresses low-altitude convection at the convection-SAL interface region. Mid-level convection associated with the AEW and transport are likely responsible for high water vapor content observed in the southern regions of the SAL on August 20, 2008. This interaction is responsible for the transfer of about 7 x 10(exp 15) J latent heat energy within a day to the SAL. Measurements of lidar extinction-to-backscatter ratios in the range 36+/-5 to 45+/-5 are within the range of measurements from other lidar measurements of dust. LASE aerosol extinction and water vapor profiles are validated by comparison with onboard in situ aerosol measurements and GPS dropsonde water vapor soundings, respectively.

  1. Aerosols containing Legionella pneumophila generated by shower heads and hot-water faucets.

    PubMed Central

    Bollin, G E; Plouffe, J F; Para, M F; Hackman, B

    1985-01-01

    Shower heads and hot-water faucets containing Legionella pneumophila were evaluated for aerosolization of the organism with a multistage cascade impaction air sampler. Air was collected above two shower doors and from the same rooms approximately 3 ft (91 cm) from the shower doors while the hot water was running. Low numbers (3 to 5 CFU/15 ft3 [0.43 m3] of air) of L. pneumophila were recovered above both shower doors, but none was recovered from the air in either room outside the shower door. Approximately 90% (7 of 8 CFU) of the L. pneumophila recovered were trapped in aerosol particles between 1 and 5 micron in diameter. Air was collected 1 to 3 ft (30 to 91 cm) from 14 sinks while the hot water was running. Low numbers (1 to 5 CFU/15 ft3 of air) were recovered from 6 of 19 air samples obtained. Approximately 50% (6 of 13 CFU) of the organisms recovered were trapped in aerosol particles between 1 and 8 microns in diameter. Shower heads and hot-water taps containing L. pneumophila can aerosolize low numbers of the organism during routine use. The aerosol particle size is small enough to penetrate to the lower human respiratory system. Thus, these sites may be implicated as a means of transmission of L. pneumophila from potable water to the patient. PMID:4091548

  2. Vertical Distribution of Dust and Water Ice Aerosols from CRISM Limb-geometry Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael Doyle; Wolff, Michael J.; Clancy, Todd; Kleinbohl, Armin; Murchie, Scott L.

    2013-01-01

    [1] Near-infrared spectra taken in a limb-viewing geometry by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) on board the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter provide a useful tool for probing atmospheric structure. Specifically, the observed radiance as a function of wavelength and height above the limb enables the vertical distribution of both dust and water ice aerosols to be retrieved. More than a dozen sets of CRISM limb observations have been taken so far providing pole-to-pole cross sections, spanning more than a full Martian year. Radiative transfer modeling is used to model the observations taking into account multiple scattering from aerosols and the spherical geometry of the limb observations. Both dust and water ice vertical profiles often show a significant vertical structure for nearly all seasons and latitudes that is not consistent with the well-mixed or Conrath-v assumptions that have often been used in the past for describing aerosol vertical profiles for retrieval and modeling purposes. Significant variations are seen in the retrieved vertical profiles of dust and water ice aerosol as a function of season. Dust typically extends to higher altitudes (approx. 40-50km) during the perihelion season than during the aphelion season (<20km), and the Hellas region consistently shows more dust mixed to higher altitudes than other locations. Detached water ice clouds are common, and water ice aerosols are observed to cap the dust layer in all seasons.

  3. Aerosol absorption measurement at SWIR with water vapor interference using a differential photoacoustic spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wenyue; Liu, Qiang; Wu, Yi

    2015-09-01

    Atmospheric aerosol plays an important role in atmospheric radiation balance through absorbing and scattering the solar radiation, which changes local weather and global climate. Accurate measurement is highly requested to estimate the radiative effects and climate effects of atmospheric aerosol. Photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) technique, which observes the aerosols on their natural suspended state and is insensitive to light scattering, is commonly recognized as one of the best candidates to measure the optical absorption coefficient (OAC) of aerosols. In the present work, a method of measuring aerosol OAC at the wavelength where could also be absorbed by water vapor was proposed and corresponding measurements of the absorption properties of the atmospheric aerosol at the short wave infrared (SWIR, 1342 nm) wavelength were carried out. The spectrometer was made up of two high performance homemade photoacoustic cells. To improve the sensitivity, several methods were presented to control the noise derived from gas flow and vibration from the sampling pump. Calibration of the OAC and properties of the system were also studied in detail. Using the established PAS instrument, measurement of the optical absorption properties of the atmospheric aerosol were carried out in laboratory and field environment. PMID:26368414

  4. The optical, physical and chemical properties of the products of glyoxal uptake on ammonium sulfate seed aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trainic, M.; Riziq, A. A.; Lavi, A.; Flores, J. M.; Rudich, Y.

    2011-07-01

    The heterogeneous reaction between gas phase glyoxal and ammonium sulfate (AS) aerosols, a proxy for inorganic atmospheric aerosol, was studied in terms of the dependence of the optical, physical and chemical properties of the product aerosols on initial particle size and ambient RH. The reactions were studied under different relative humidity (RH) conditions, varying from dry conditions (~20 % RH) and up to 90 % RH, covering conditions prevalent in many atmospheric environments. At λ = 355 nm, the reacted aerosols demonstrate a substantial growth in optical extinction cross section, as well as in mobility diameter under a broad range of RH values (35-90 %). The ratio of the product aerosol to seed aerosol geometric cross section reached up to ~3.5, and the optical extinction cross-section up to ~250. The reactions show a trend of increasing physical and optical growth with decreasing seed aerosol size, from 100nm to 300 nm, as well as with decreasing RH values from 90 % to ~40 %. Optically inactive aerosols, at the limit of the Mie range (100 nm diameter) become optically active as they grow due to the reaction. AMS analyses of the reaction of 300 nm AS at RH values of 50 %, 75 % and 90 % show that the main products of the reaction are glyoxal oligomers, formed by acetal formation in the presence of AS. In addition, imidazole formation, which is a minor channel, is observed for all reactions, yielding a product which absorbs at λ = 290 nm, with possible implications on the radiative properties of the product aerosols. The ratio of absorbing substances (C-N compounds, including imidazoles) increases with increasing RH value. A core/shell model used for the investigation of the optical properties of the reaction products of AS 300nm with gas phase glyoxal, shows that the refractive index (RI) of the reaction products are in the range between 1.57-1.71 for the real part and between 0-0.02 for the imaginary part of the RI at 355 nm. The observed increase in the

  5. O the Role of Water Growth in Atmospheric Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitchford, Marc Lynn

    1992-01-01

    Atmospheric particle growth by condensation of water vapor was investigated using sophisticated particle growth and compositional measurements made during the Winter of 1990 at Grand Canyon National Park, AZ. Growth measurements by the Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (TDMA) and fine particle compositional analysis data were examined to assess the nature of the particles and the applicability of certain growth and composition models. A model was developed to estimate the sulfate to ammonium ion concentration ratio by apportioning measured hydrogen concentrations between organic and sulfate aerosol components. The model had insufficient resolution for this data to determine the ion ratio. The overall volume fraction of soluble material as determined by chemical analysis of particle samples was apportioned between high growth and low growth particles by a model based upon TDMA measured growth data. Growth data indicate the simultaneous presence of two, and occasionally three, types of particles. At relative humidities above about 78%, particles split into two distinguishable growth categories. Most of the particles grew considerably (categorized as more hygroscopic), while a small fraction of the particles grew slightly (categorized as less hygroscopic). On a few days, particles separated by growth at relative humidities in the mid-60% range, with a small fraction of the particles having high growth. At higher relative humidities these particles became indistinguishable from the more hygroscopic particles. Sulfate species dominate the soluble fraction most days, with nitrates occasionally in comparable concentrations. The model to estimate the soluble fraction of the particles in the more and less hygroscopic growth categories also determines the soluble material growth characteristic, which is assumed to be the same for all particles in any individual TDMA measurement. The predicted growth characteristics for the soluble material is in good agreement with

  6. The relationship between water concentrations and individual uptake of chloroform: a simulation study.

    PubMed Central

    Whitaker, Heather J; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J; Best, Nicola G

    2003-01-01

    We simulated the relationship between water chloroform concentrations and chloroform uptake in pregnant women to assess the potential extent of exposure measurement error in epidemiologic studies of the health effects of exposure to water disinfection by-products. Data from the literature were used to assign statistical distributions to swimming pool chloroform concentrations, frequency and duration of swimming, showering and bathing, and average tap water consumption. Measured increases in blood chloroform concentrations after these activities were used to estimate average uptake per microgram per liter chloroform in the water, per minute spent in the activity or per liter consumed. Given average tap water chloroform concentrations from a U.K. epidemiologic study, an average daily uptake over 90 days was simulated for 300,000 mothers. The correlation between simulated uptakes and home tap chloroform concentration was 0.6. Mothers who swam regularly received far greater doses than did nonswimmers. Results suggest there will be considerable attenuation in risk estimates and/or power loss in epidemiologic studies if the putative agent is chloroform. PMID:12727595

  7. A new method for determining water uptake in elderberry plantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tőkei, László; Dunkel, Zoltán; Jung, András

    A considerable quantity of elderberry ( Sambucus nigra L.) fruit gets yearly on the market in Hungary. The decisive majority of this quantity is harvested from feral plants. The area of elderberry plantations is only 150-180 ha in spite of the fact that it would be possible to produce this valuable fruit on larger surface if suitable watering system were applied. The fruit of elderberry is important from the aspect of food industry. The goal of present study is promoting the effective irrigation of elder berry plantation. The experiments were carried out in the Experimental Farm of the University for Horticulture and Food Industry in Szigetcsép from 1989. The measuring of the water demand of elderberry using the heat pulse method was started in 1996. The measurement of the sap-flow in the trunk is a new element of phyto-climate researches. The development of the equipment was started in 1991 and improvement of the method is still going on. In this phase, first of all the connections between sap-flow velocity and meteorological data were investigated. Summarising the experiences of the trials it can be announced that: (1) The water circulation of elder plants principally depends on the conditions of atmosphere. It is barely sensitive to the water content of the soil. (2) The transpiration intensity reacts sensitively to the change of meteorological conditions. (3) The changing rate of the transpiration coefficient is particularly large in certain intervals of the meteorological elements.

  8. Influence of soil structure on unsaturated water flow including root uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhlmann, Anna; Neuweiler, Insa; van der Zee, Sjoerd; Helmig, Rainer

    2010-05-01

    The development of effective irrigation strategies is of great importance as the scarcity of water during extended dry periods in aride areas leads to limited water uptake by roots and thus to restricted growth and eventually to wilting of plants. To approach this goal a broad understanding of the factors which influence the distribution of the water potential and the interactions with root uptake is crucial. Soil structure is supposed to have a large impact on water flow especially under dry conditions when the variability of soil parameters is increased. For field applications, predictions of the water flow are needed for large scales where the scarcity of measurements leads to a high level of uncertainty about the detailed distribution of soil parameters. Thus stochastic methods in which heterogeneity of soil is described by a random parameter field are used. In this presentation, the interrelation of root uptake and heterogeneity is analyzed using numerical simulations. Random parameter fields with Gaussian and non-Gaussian dependence were parameterized according to the Las Cruces Trench Site dataset and used as input for the numerical model. Transpiration is considered in a macroscopic way as a sink term with a prescribed potential extraction rate at each node, determined by the density distribution of the plants and with restricted uptake due to unfavorable conditions as lack of water and oxygen (modeled according to the Feddes - Function). With this basic model, water flow in two dimensional random fields has been investigated under dry conditions. It was observed that dry spots - regions in which roots dry up to the wilting point form when the structure shows isolated high extreme values in conductivity. In these dry regions, roots take up a decreased amount of water such that the total potential demand is not met anymore. This seems rather unrealistic as sufficient water is available at other locations of the domain. Thus two other approaches are analyzed

  9. A Comparative Study of Iron Uptake Rates and Mechanisms amongst Marine and Fresh Water Cyanobacteria: Prevalence of Reductive Iron Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Lis, Hagar; Kranzler, Chana; Keren, Nir; Shaked, Yeala

    2015-01-01

    In this contribution, we address the question of iron bioavailability to cyanobacteria by measuring Fe uptake rates and probing for a reductive uptake pathway in diverse cyanobacterial species. We examined three Fe-substrates: dissolved inorganic iron (Fe') and the Fe-siderophores Ferrioxamine B (FOB) and FeAerobactin (FeAB). In order to compare across substrates and strains, we extracted uptake rate constants (kin = uptake rate/[Fe-substrate]). Fe' was the most bioavailable Fe form to cyanobacteria, with kin values higher than those of other substrates. When accounting for surface area (SA), all strains acquired Fe' at similar rates, as their kin/SA were similar. We also observed homogeneity in the uptake of FOB among strains, but with 10,000 times lower kin/SA values than Fe'. Uniformity in kin/SA suggests similarity in the mechanism of uptake and indeed, all strains were found to employ a reductive step in the uptake of Fe' and FOB. In contrast, different uptake pathways were found for FeAB along with variations in kin/SA. Our data supports the existence of a common reductive Fe uptake pathway amongst cyanobacteria, functioning alone or in addition to siderophore-mediated uptake. Cyanobacteria combining both uptake strategies benefit from increased flexibility in accessing different Fe-substrates. PMID:25768677

  10. Modified conceptual model for compensated root water uptake - A simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Andre

    2016-03-01

    Modeling root water uptake within the macroscopic approach is usually done by introducing a sink term in the Richards equation. This sink term represents potential water uptake reduced by a so-called stress reduction factor accounting for stress due to high suctions, oxygen deficit or salinity. Since stress in some parts of the soil can be compensated by enhanced water uptake in less stressed parts, several compensation models have been suggested. One of them is the empirical model of Jarvis, which is often applied due to its mathematical elegance and simplicity. However, it has been discussed that under certain conditions and assumptions this model might predict too high transpiration rates, which are not in agreement with the assumed stress reduction function. The aim of this paper is (i) to analyze these inconsistencies and (ii) to introduce a simple constraint for transpiration in a way as if the complete water would be taken form the location with highest uptake rate in the uncompensated case. Transpiration from 50 cm deep soils with hydraulic functions representing different textures, ranging from a clay loam to a coarse sand, was simulated with the original and the modified model using HYDRUS-1D. Root distribution was assumed to be uniform or linearly decreasing with depth. In case of the fine textured soils and uniform root density, the original model predicted transpiration equal to potential transpiration even when the complete root domain was already heavily stressed if the maximum enhancement factor for uptake was 2. These results are not in agreement with the original meaning of the stress reduction function. The modification eliminates the inconsistencies by limiting transpiration to a maximum value based on the highest uncompensated uptake rate in the root zone. It does neither increase the mathematical complexity nor require any additional parameters.

  11. Comparing the mechanism of water condensation and evaporation in glassy aerosol.

    PubMed

    Bones, David L; Reid, Jonathan P; Lienhard, Daniel M; Krieger, Ulrich K

    2012-07-17

    Atmospheric models generally assume that aerosol particles are in equilibrium with the surrounding gas phase. However, recent observations that secondary organic aerosols can exist in a glassy state have highlighted the need to more fully understand the kinetic limitations that may control water partitioning in ambient particles. Here, we explore the influence of slow water diffusion in the condensed aerosol phase on the rates of both condensation and evaporation, demonstrating that significant inhibition in mass transfer occurs for ultraviscous aerosol, not just for glassy aerosol. Using coarse mode (3-4 um radius) ternary sucrose/sodium chloride/aqueous droplets as a proxy for multicomponent ambient aerosol, we demonstrate that the timescale for particle equilibration correlates with bulk viscosity and can be ≫10(3) s. Extrapolation of these timescales to particle sizes in the accumulation mode (e.g., approximately 100 nm) by applying the Stokes-Einstein equation suggests that the kinetic limitations imposed on mass transfer of water by slow bulk phase diffusion must be more fully investigated for atmospheric aerosol. Measurements have been made on particles covering a range in dynamic viscosity from < 0.1 to > 10(13) Pa s. We also retrieve the radial inhomogeneities apparent in particle composition during condensation and evaporation and contrast the dynamics of slow dissolution of a viscous core into a labile shell during condensation with the slow percolation of water during evaporation through a more homogeneous viscous particle bulk. PMID:22753520

  12. Water uptake by seminal and adventitious roots in relation to whole-plant water flow in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.)

    PubMed Central

    Knipfer, Thorsten; Fricke, Wieland

    2011-01-01

    Prior to an assessment of the role of aquaporins in root water uptake, the main path of water movement in different types of root and driving forces during day and night need to be known. In the present study on hydroponically grown barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) the two main root types of 14- to 17-d-old plants were analysed for hydraulic conductivity in dependence of the main driving force (hydrostatic, osmotic). Seminal roots contributed 92% and adventitious roots 8% to plant water uptake. The lower contribution of adventitious compared with seminal roots was associated with a smaller surface area and number of roots per plant and a lower axial hydraulic conductance, and occurred despite a less-developed endodermis. The radial hydraulic conductivity of the two types of root was similar and depended little on the prevailing driving force, suggesting that water uptake occurred along a pathway that involved crossing of membrane(s). Exudation experiments showed that osmotic forces were sufficient to support night-time transpiration, yet transpiration experiments and cuticle permeance data questioned the significance of osmotic forces. During the day, 90% of water uptake was driven by a tension of about –0.15 MPa. PMID:20974734

  13. Temperature influences on water permeability and chlorpyrifos uptake in aquatic insects with differing respiratory strategies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buchwalter, D.B.; Jenkins, J.J.; Curtis, L.R.

    2003-01-01

    Aquatic insects have evolved diverse respiratory strategies that range from breathing atmospheric air to breathing dissolved oxygen. These strategies result in vast morphological differences among taxa in terms of exchange epithelial surface areas that are in direct contact with the surrounding water that, in turn, affect physiological processes. This paper examines the effects of acute temperature shifts on water permeability and chlorpyrifos uptake in aquatic insects with different respiratory strategies. While considerable differences existed in water permeability among the species tested, acute temperature shifts raised water influx rates similarly in air-breathing and gill-bearing taxa. This contrasts significantly with temperature-shift effects on chlorpyrifos uptake. Temperature shifts of 4.5??C increased 14C-chlorpyrifos accumulation rates in the gill-bearing mayfly Cinygma sp. and in the air-breathing hemipteran Sigara washingtonensis. However, the temperature-induced increase in 14C-chlorpyrifos uptake after 8 h of exposure was 2.75-fold higher in Cinygma than in Sigara. Uptake of 14C-chlorpyrifos was uniformly higher in Cinygma than in Sigara in all experiments. These findings suggest that organisms with relatively large exchange epithelial surface areas are potentially more vulnerable to both osmoregulatory distress as well as contaminant accumulation. Temperature increases appear more likely to impact organisms that have relatively large exchange epithelial surface areas, both as an individual stressor and in combination with additional stressors such as contaminants.

  14. Airborne water vapor DIAL system and measurements of water and aerosol profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higdon, Noah S.; Browell, Edward V.

    1991-01-01

    The Lidar Applications Group at NASA Langley Research Center has developed a differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system for the remote measurement of atmospheric water vapor (H2O) and aerosols from an aircraft. The airborne H2O DIAL system is designed for extended flights to perform mesoscale investigations of H2O and aerosol distributions. This DIAL system utilizes a Nd:YAG-laser-pumped dye laser as the off-line transmitter and a narrowband, tunable Alexandrite laser as the on-line transmitter. The dye laser has an oscillator/amplifier configuration which incorporates a grating and prism in the oscillator cavity to narrow the output linewidth to approximately 15 pm. This linewidth can be maintained over the wavelength range of 725 to 730 nm, and it is sufficiently narrow to satisfy the off-line spectral requirements. In the Alexandrite laser, three intracavity tuning elements combine to produce an output linewidth of 1.1 pm. These spectral devices include a five-plate birefringent tuner, a 1-mm thick solid etalon and a 1-cm air-spaced etalon. A wavelength stability of +/- 0.35 pm is achieved by active feedback control of the two Fabry-Perot etalons using a frequency stabilized He-Ne laser as a wavelength reference. The three tuning elements can be synchronously scanned over a 150 pm range with microprocessor-based scanning electronics. Other aspects of the DIAL system are discussed.

  15. CART Raman Lidar Aerosol and Water Vapor Measurements in the Vicinity of Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, Marian B.; Ferrare, Richard A.; Turner, David; Newsom, Rob; Sivaraman, Chitra

    2008-01-01

    Aerosol and water vapor profiles acquired by the Raman lidar instrument located at the Climate Research Facility (CRF) at Southern Great Plains (SGP) provide data necessary to investigate the atmospheric variability in the vicinity of clouds near the top of the planetary boundary layer (PBL). Recent CARL upgrades and modifications to the routine processing algorithms afforded the necessarily high temporal and vertical data resolutions for these investigations. CARL measurements are used to investigate the behavior of aerosol backscattering and extinction and their correlation with water vapor and relative humidity.

  16. Influence of aerosol estimation on coastal water products retrieved from HICO images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, Karen W.; Lamela, Gia

    2011-06-01

    The Hyperspectral Imager for the Coastal Ocean (HICO) is a hyperspectral sensor which was launched to the International Space Station in September 2009. The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) has been developing the Coastal Water Signatures Toolkit (CWST) to estimate water depth, bottom type and water column constituents such as chlorophyll, suspended sediments and chromophoric dissolved organic matter from hyperspectral imagery. The CWST uses a look-up table approach, comparing remote sensing reflectance spectra observed in an image to a database of modeled spectra for pre-determined water column constituents, depth and bottom type. In order to successfully use this approach, the remote sensing reflectances must be accurate which implies accurately correcting for the atmospheric contribution to the HICO top of the atmosphere radiances. One tool the NRL is using to atmospherically correct HICO imagery is Correction of Coastal Ocean Atmospheres (COCOA), which is based on Tafkaa 6S. One of the user input parameters to COCOA is aerosol optical depth or aerosol visibility, which can vary rapidly over short distances in coastal waters. Changes to the aerosol thickness results in changes to the magnitude of the remote sensing reflectances. As such, the CWST retrievals for water constituents, depth and bottom type can be expected to vary in like fashion. This work is an illustration of the variability in CWST retrievals due to inaccurate aerosol thickness estimation during atmospheric correction of HICO images.

  17. Lung inflammation in coal miners assessed by uptake of 67Ga-citrate and clearance of inhaled 99mTc-labeled diethylenetriamine pentaacetate aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    Susskind, H.; Rom, W.N. )

    1992-07-01

    The authors compared the diffuse lung uptake of 67Ga-citrate, an index of inflammatory lung activity, with the lung clearance of inhaled 99mTc-labeled diethylenetriamine pentaacetate (DTPA) aerosol, an index of pulmonary epithelial permeability, in a group of 19 West Virginia coal miners whose pulmonary status was compatible with coal worker's pneumoconiosis. 99mTc-DTPA clearance alone and 67Ga-citrate uptake alone were measured in nine and five additional subjects, respectively. The objective of this study was to determine if increased 99mTc-DTPA lung clearance was caused by inflammation at the lung epithelial surfaces. Subjects inhaled approximately 150 microCi (approximately 5.6 MBq) of 99mTc-DTPA aerosol, and quantitative gamma camera images of the lungs were acquired at 1-min increments for 25 min. Regions of interest (ROI) were selected to include (1) both lungs; (2) each individual lung; and (3) the upper, middle, and lower thirds of each lung. 99mTc-DTPA clearance was determined from the slopes of the respective time-activity plots for the different ROI. Each subject was intravenously administered 50 miCroCk (1.9 MBq)/kg 67Ga-citrate 48 to 72 h before imaging the body between neck and pelvis. The extent of 67Ga-citrate lung uptake was expressed as the gallium index (GI). Mean radioaerosol clearance half-time (T1/2) for the six nonsmoking coal miners (60.6 +/- 16.0 min) was significantly shorter (p less than 0.001) than for the nonsmoking control group (123.8 +/- 28.7 min). T1/2 for the 12 smoking miners (18.4 +/- 10.2 min) was shorter than for the smoking control group (33.1 +/- 17.8 min), but the difference did not attain statistical significance.

  18. Root type matters: measurements of water uptake by seminal, crown and lateral roots of maize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Mutez Ali; Zarebanadkouki, Mohsen; Kaestner, Anders; Carminati, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    Roots play a key role in water acquisition and are a significant component of plant adaptation to different environmental conditions. Although maize (Zea mays L.) is one of the most important crops worldwide, there is limited information on the function of different root segments and types in extracting water from soils. Aim of this study was to investigate the location of root water uptake in mature maize. We used neutron radiography to image the spatial distribution of maize roots and trace the transport of injected deuterated water (D2O) in soil and roots. Maize plants were grown in aluminum containers filled with a sandy soil that was kept homogeneously wet throughout the experiment. When the plants were five weeks-old, we injected D2O into selected soil regions. The transport of D2O was simulated using a diffusion-convection numerical model. By fitting the observed D2O transport we quantified the diffusion coefficient and the water uptake of the different root segments. The model was initially developed and tested with two weeks-old maize (Ahmed et. al. 2015), for which we found that water was mainly taken up by lateral roots and the water uptake of the seminal roots was negligible. Here, we used this method to measure root water uptake in a mature maize root system. The root architecture of five weeks-old maize consisted of primary and seminal roots with long laterals and crown (nodal) roots that emerged from the above ground part of the plant two weeks after planting. The crown roots were thicker than the seminal roots and had fewer and shorter laterals. Surprisingly, we found that the water was mainly taken up by the crown roots and their laterals, while the lateral roots of seminal roots, which were the main location of water uptake of younger plants, stopped to take up water. Interestingly, we also found that in contrast to the seminal roots, the crown roots were able to take up water also from their distal segments. We conclude that for the two weeks

  19. Discrimination of water, ice and aerosols by light polarisation in the CLOUD experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichman, L.; Fuchs, C.; Järvinen, E.; Ignatius, K.; Höppel, N. F.; Dias, A.; Heinritzi, M.; Simon, M.; Tröstl, J.; Wagner, A. C.; Wagner, R.; Williamson, C.; Yan, C.; Bianchi, F.; Connolly, P. J.; Dorsey, J. R.; Duplissy, J.; Ehrhart, S.; Frege, C.; Gordon, H.; Hoyle, C. R.; Kristensen, T. B.; Steiner, G.; Donahue, N. M.; Flagan, R.; Gallagher, M. W.; Kirkby, J.; Möhler, O.; Saathoff, H.; Schnaiter, M.; Stratmann, F.; Tomé, A.

    2015-11-01

    Cloud microphysical processes involving the ice phase in tropospheric clouds are among the major uncertainties in cloud formation, weather and General Circulation Models (GCMs). The simultaneous detection of aerosol particles, liquid droplets, and ice crystals, especially in the small cloud-particle size range below 50 μm, remains challenging in mixed phase, often unstable ice-water phase environments. The Cloud Aerosol Spectrometer with Polarisation (CASPOL) is an airborne instrument that has the ability to detect such small cloud particles and measure their effects on the backscatter polarisation state. Here we operate the versatile Cosmics-Leaving-OUtdoor-Droplets (CLOUD) chamber facility at the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN) to produce controlled mixed phase and other clouds by adiabatic expansions in an ultraclean environment, and use the CASPOL to discriminate between different aerosols, water and ice particles. In this paper, optical property measurements of mixed phase clouds and viscous Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) are presented. We report observations of significant liquid - viscous SOA particle polarisation transitions under dry conditions using CASPOL. Cluster analysis techniques were subsequently used to classify different types of particles according to their polarisation ratios during phase transition. A classification map is presented for water droplets, organic aerosol (e.g., SOA and oxalic acid), crystalline substances such as ammonium sulphate, and volcanic ash. Finally, we discuss the benefits and limitations of this classification approach for atmospherically relevant concentration and mixtures with respect to the CLOUD 8-9 campaigns and its potential contribution to Tropical Troposphere Layer (TTL) analysis.

  20. A comparative study of water uptake by and transport through ionomeric fuel cell membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Zawodzinski, T.A.Jr.; Springer, T.E.; Davey, J.; Jestel, R.; Lopez, C.; Valerio, J.; Gottesfeld, S. . Electronics Materials and Device Research)

    1993-07-01

    Water uptake and transport parameters measured at 30 C for several available perfluorosulfonic acid membranes are compared. The water sorption characteristics, diffusion coefficient of water, electroosmotic drag, and protonic conductivity were determined for Nafion 117, Membrane C, and Dow XUS 13204.10 developmental fuel cell membrane. The diffusion coefficient and conductivity of each of these membranes were determined as functions of membrane water content. Experimental determination of transport parameters, enables one to compare membranes without the skewing effects of extensive features such as membrane thickness which contributes in a nonlinear fashion to performance in polymer electrolyte fuel cells.

  1. Water Uptake along the Length of Grapevine Fine Roots: Developmental anatomy, tissue specific aquaporin expression, and pathways of water transport

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To better understand water uptake patterns in root systems of woody perennial crops, we detailed the developmental anatomy and hydraulic physiology along the length of grapevine fine roots- from the tip to secondary growth zones. Our characterization included localization of suberized structures an...

  2. Contrasting the Evaporation and Condensation of Water from Glassy and Amorphous Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, J. P.; Bones, D. L.; Power, R.; Lienhard, D.; Krieger, U. K.

    2012-04-01

    The partitioning of water between the condensed and gas phases in atmospheric aerosol is usually assumed to occur instantaneously and to be regulated by solution thermodynamics. However, the persistence of high viscosity, glassy and amorphous aerosol to low relative humidity without crystallisation occurring is now widely recognised, suggesting that the timescale for water transport to or from the particle during condensation or evaporation may be significant. A kinetic limitation on water transport could have important implications for understanding hygroscopic growth measurements made on ambient particles, the ability of particles to act as ice nuclei or cloud condensation nuclei, the kinetics of chemical aging/heterogeneous chemistry, and the rate or condensation/evaporation of semi-volatile organic components. In this study we will report on measurements of the timescale of water transport to and from glassy aerosol and ultra-high viscosity solution droplets using aerosol optical tweezers to investigate the time-response of single particles to changes in relative humidity. As a benchmark system, mixed component aerosol particles containing sucrose and sodium chloride have been used; varying the mole fractions of the two solutes allows a wide range of solution viscosities to be studied. We will show that coarse particles can take many thousands of seconds to equilibrate in size and that the timescale correlates with the estimated bulk viscosity of the particle. We will also confirm that significant inhomogeneities in particle composition can be established during evaporation or condensation. Using the experimental data to benchmark a model for equilibration time, predictions can be made of the timescale for the equilibration of accumulation mode particles during water condensation or evaporation and these predictions will be described and their significance explored. Finally, the coalescence dynamics of highly viscous aerosol particles will be reported

  3. The optical, physical and chemical properties of the products of glyoxal uptake on ammonium sulfate seed aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trainic, M.; Abo Riziq, A.; Lavi, A.; Flores, J. M.; Rudich, Y.

    2011-09-01

    The heterogeneous reaction between gas phase glyoxal and ammonium sulfate (AS) aerosols, a proxy for inorganic atmospheric aerosol, was studied in terms of the dependence of the optical, physical and chemical properties of the product aerosols on initial particle size and ambient relative humidity (RH). Our experiments imitate an atmospheric scenario of a dry particle hydration at ambient RH conditions in the presence of glyoxal gas followed by efflorescence due to decrease of the ambient RH. The reactions were studied under different RH conditions, starting from dry conditions (~20% RH) and up to 90% RH, covering conditions prevalent in many atmospheric environments, and followed by consequent drying of the reacted particles before their analysis by the aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS), cavity ring down (CRD) and scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) systems. At λ = 355 nm, the reacted aerosols demonstrate a substantial growth in optical extinction cross section, as well as in mobility diameter under a broad range of RH values (35-90%). The ratio of the product aerosol to seed aerosol geometric cross section reached up to ~3.5, and the optical extinction cross-section up to ~250. The reactions show a trend of increasing physical and optical growth with decreasing seed aerosol size, from 100 nm to 300 nm, as well as with decreasing RH values from 90% to ~40%. Optically inactive aerosols, at the limit of the Mie range (100 nm diameter) become optically active as they grow due to the reaction. AMS analyses of the reaction of 300 nm AS at RH values of 50%, 75% and 90% show that the main products of the reaction are glyoxal oligomers, formed by acetal formation in the presence of AS. In addition, imidazole formation, which is a minor channel, is observed for all reactions, yielding a product which absorbs at λ = 290 nm, with possible implications on the radiative properties of the product aerosols. The ratio of absorbing substances (C-N compounds, including

  4. Influence of aerosol loading, water vapor and surface topography trends on the regional hydrology of the Indo-Ganges basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manoharan, V.; Cadeddu, M. P.

    2012-12-01

    Satellite based measurements show high concentrations of aerosols (aerosol optical depth) over the Indo-Ganges basin. However, little is known about the vertical structure and distribution of the aerosols in this region. In addition the direct (microphysical) and indirect (radiative) influence of aerosols on the regional water vapor characteristics and cloud formation over different land cover and surface elevations remains uncertain. Previous studies have shown that carbonaceous aerosol can absorb incoming solar radiation, warming the aerosol layer and hence reduce the solar radiation reaching the surface. This in turn reduces the surface temperature, heat and moisture fluxes and increases the stability of the boundary layer resulting in slower regional hydrological cycle. However, on a microphysical scale the aerosols, as cloud condensation nuclei, tend to enhance the cloud formation, although the resulting cloud droplets are slower to coalesce and to form into precipitation. This study utilizes a combination of ground based measurements collected at the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment's (GVAX) and satellite based measurements collected by remote sensors (MODIS, CALIPSO) to carefully evaluate the potential effects of aerosol on the regional hydrology of the Ganges Valley. The study investigates how aerosol and water vapor properties (spatial and vertical distribution, aerosol speciation, etc.) differ between the Ganges valley, lowlands, and neighboring mountainous region and whether this difference enhances or suppresses the regional convective initiation and precipitation.

  5. Seed Anatomy and Water Uptake in Relation to Seed Dormancy in Opuntia tomentosa (Cactaceae, Opuntioideae)

    PubMed Central

    Orozco-Segovia, A.; Márquez-Guzmán, J.; Sánchez-Coronado, M. E.; Gamboa de Buen, A.; Baskin, J. M.; Baskin, C. C.

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims There is considerable confusion in the literature concerning impermeability of seeds with ‘hard’ seed coats, because the ability to take up (imbibe) water has not been tested in most of them. Seeds of Opuntia tomentosa were reported recently to have a water-impermeable seed coat sensu lato (i.e. physical dormancy), in combination with physiological dormancy. However, physical dormancy is not known to occur in Cactaceae. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine if seeds of O. tomentosa are water-permeable or water-impermeable, i.e. if they have physical dormancy. Methods The micromorphology of the seed coat and associated structures were characterized by SEM and light microscopy. Permeability of the seed-covering layers was assessed by an increase in mass of seeds on a wet substrate and by dye-tracking and uptake of tritiated water by intact versus scarified seeds. Key Results A germination valve and a water channel are formed in the hilum–micropyle region during dehydration and ageing in seeds of O. tomentosa. The funicular envelope undoubtedly plays a role in germination of Opuntia seeds via restriction of water uptake and mechanical resistance to expansion of the embryo. However, seeds do not exhibit any of three features characteristic of those with physical dormancy. Thus, they do not have a water-impermeable layer(s) of palisade cells (macrosclereids) or a water gap sensu stricto and they imbibe water without the seed coat being disrupted. Conclusions Although dormancy in seeds of this species can be broken by scarification, they have physiological dormancy only. Further, based on information in the literature, it is concluded that it is unlikely that any species of Opuntia has physical dormancy. This is the first integrative study of the anatomy, dynamics of water uptake and dormancy in seeds of Cactaceae subfamily Opuntioideae. PMID:17298989

  6. Tracking the diurnal signal of plant water uptake through the hydrologic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blume, Theresa; Hassler, Sibylle; Heidbüchel, Ingo; Weiler, Markus; Simard, Sonia; Güntner, Andreas; Heinrich, Ingo

    2015-04-01

    Plant water uptake during summer is characterized by strong diurnal fluctuations. As a result a diurnal sink term is imposed on catchment storage, affecting the unsaturated zone, sometimes the saturated zone and even streamflow. Detecting this signal and understanding its propagation through the hydrological system may help to better quantify eco-hydrological connectivity. The extent and strength of the propagation of this signal from plant to soil to ground- and stream water was investigated with a unique setup of 46 field sites in Luxemburg and 15 field sites in Germany. These sites cover a range of geologies, soils, topographies and types of vegetation. Vegetation types include grassland, pine forest (young and old) and different deciduous forest stands. Available data at all sites includes information at high temporal resolution from 3-5 soil moisture profiles, matrix potential, piezometers and sapflow sensors (as proxy for plant water uptake) as well as standard climate data. At sites with access to a stream, discharge or water level is also recorded. Signal strength (amplitude of diurnal fluctuations) can thus be traced through the system and gives an indication of the physical sphere of influence of plant water uptake i.e. the "eco-hydro-connectivity". Temporal dynamics of signal strength furthermore suggest a shifting spatial distribution of root water uptake with time. The analysis of time lags (or phase shifts) between daily fluctuations in temperature, radiation, sapflow, soil water, groundwater and streamflow gives further insights into the processes driving and propagating these signals and inter-site comparison allows for the investigation of local controls.

  7. Source attribution of water-soluble organic aerosol by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Decesari, Stefano; Mircea, Mihaiela; Cavalli, Fabrizia; Fuzzi, Sandro; Moretti, Fabio; Tagliavini, Emilio; Facchini, Maria Cristina

    2007-04-01

    The functional group compositions of atmospheric aerosol water-soluble organic compoundswere obtained employing proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) spectroscopy in a series of recent experiments in several areas of the world characterized by different aerosol sources and pollution levels. Here, we discuss the possibility of using 1H NMR functional group distributions to identifythe sources of aerosol in the different areas. Despite the limited variability of functional group compositions of atmospheric aerosol samples, characteristic 1H NMR fingerprints were derived for three major aerosol sources: biomass burning, secondary formation from anthropogenic and biogenic VOCs, and emission from the ocean. The functional group patterns obtained in areas characterized by one of the above dominant source processes were then compared to identify the dominant sources for samples coming from mixed sources. This analysis shows that H NMR spectroscopy can profitably be used as a valuable tool for aerosol source identification. In addition, compared to other existing methodologies, it is able to relate the source fingerprints to integral chemical properties of the organic mixtures, which determine their reactivity and their physicochemical properties and ultimately the fate of the organic particles in the atmosphere. PMID:17438803

  8. Aircraft observations of water-soluble dicarboxylic acids in the aerosols over China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan-Lin; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Qing Fu, Ping; Boreddy, Suresh K. R.; Watanabe, Tomomi; Hatakeyama, Shiro; Takami, Akinori; Wang, Wei

    2016-05-01

    Vertical profiles of dicarboxylic acids, related organic compounds and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) tracer compounds in particle phase have not yet been simultaneously explored in East Asia, although there is growing evidence that aqueous-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds may be responsible for the elevated organic aerosols (OA) in the troposphere. Here, we found consistently good correlation of oxalic acid, the most abundant individual organic compounds in aerosols globally, with its precursors as well as biogenic-derived SOA compounds in Chinese tropospheric aerosols by aircraft measurements. Anthropogenically derived dicarboxylic acids (i.e., C5 and C6 diacids) at high altitudes were 4-20 times higher than those from surface measurements and even occasionally dominant over oxalic acid at altitudes higher than 2 km, which is in contrast to the predominance of oxalic acid previously reported globally including the tropospheric and surface aerosols. This indicates an enhancement of tropospheric SOA formation from anthropogenic precursors. Furthermore, oxalic acid-to-sulfate ratio maximized at altitudes of ˜ 2 km, explaining aqueous-phase SOA production that was supported by good correlations with predicted liquid water content, organic carbon and biogenic SOA tracers. These results demonstrate that elevated oxalic acid and related SOA compounds from both the anthropogenic and biogenic sources may substantially contribute to tropospheric OA burden over polluted regions of China, implying aerosol-associated climate effects and intercontinental transport.

  9. Raman lidar profiling of water vapor and aerosols over the ARM SGP Site

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrare, R.A.

    2000-01-09

    The authors have developed and implemented automated algorithms to retrieve profiles of water vapor mixing ratio, aerosol backscattering, and aerosol extinction from Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) Raman Lidar data acquired during both daytime and nighttime operations. The Raman lidar sytem is unique in that it is turnkey, automated system designed for unattended, around-the-clock profiling of water vapor and aerosols. These Raman lidar profiles are important for determining the clear-sky radiative flux, as well as for validating the retrieval algorithms associated with satellite sensors. Accurate, high spatial and temporal resolution profiles of water vapor are also required for assimilation into mesoscale models to improve weather forecasts. The authors have also developed and implemented routines to simultaneously retrieve profiles of relative humidity. These routines utilize the water vapor mixing ratio profiles derived from the Raman lidar measurements together with temperature profiles derived from a physical retrieval algorithm that uses data from a collocated Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) and the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES). These aerosol and water vapor profiles (Raman lidar) and temperature profiles (AERI+GOES) have been combined into a single product that takes advantage of both active and passive remote sensors to characterize the clear sky atmospheric state above the CART site.

  10. RAMAN LIDAR PROFILING OF WATER VAPOR AND AEROSOLS OVER THE ARM SGP SITE.

    SciTech Connect

    FERRARE,R.A.

    2000-01-09

    We have developed and implemented automated algorithms to retrieve profiles of water vapor mixing ratio, aerosol backscattering, and aerosol extinction from Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) Raman Lidar data acquired during both daytime and nighttime operations. This Raman lidar system is unique in that it is turnkey, automated system designed for unattended, around-the-clock profiling of water vapor and aerosols (Goldsmith et al., 1998). These Raman lidar profiles are important for determining the clear-sky radiative flux, as well as for validating the retrieval algorithms associated with satellite sensors. Accurate, high spatial and temporal resolution profiles of water vapor are also required for assimilation into mesoscale models to improve weather forecasts. We have also developed and implemented routines to simultaneously retrieve profiles of relative humidity. These routines utilize the water vapor mixing ratio profiles derived from the Raman lidar measurements together with temperature profiles derived from a physical retrieval algorithm that uses data from a collocated Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) and the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) (Feltz et al., 1998; Turner et al., 1999). These aerosol and water vapor profiles (Raman lidar) and temperature profiles (AERI+GOES) have been combined into a single product that takes advantage of both active and passive remote sensors to characterize the clear sky atmospheric state above the CART site.

  11. Study of Aerosol Liquid Water Content based on Hygroscopicity Measurements at High Relative Humidity in the North China Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Y.; Zhao, C.

    2013-12-01

    Aerosol has significant effects on direct/indirect climate forcing, visibility, tropospheric chemistry and human health. Water can represent an extensive proportion of the mass of aerosol particles, and can also serve as a medium for aqueous-phase reactions in such particulate matter. In this study, a new method is proposed to estimate the aerosol liquid water content at high relative humidity, based on aerosol hygroscopic growth factors, particle number size distribution and relative humidity measured during the Haze in China (HaChi) campaign of July-August, 2009. The aerosol liquid water content estimated by this method is compared to the results calculated by a thermodynamic equilibrium model (ISORROPIA II). The calculation results from these two methods agree well at high relative humidity above 60% with the correlation coefficient of 0.9658. At relative humidity lower than 60%, the thermodynamic equilibrium model underestimates the aerosol liquid water content. The discrepancy is mainly caused by the ISORROPIA II model, which considers only limited chemical species. The mean and maximum value of aerosol liquid water content during July-August, 2009 in the North China Plain reached 1.69×10^{-4}g/m^3 and 9.71×10^{-4}g/m^3, respectively. Aerosol liquid water content is highly related to the relative humidity. There exists a distinct diurnal variation of the aerosol liquid water content, with lower values during daytime and higher ones during night time. The contribution to the aerosol liquid water content from the accumulation mode is dominating among all the aerosol particle modes.

  12. Balancing Water Uptake and Loss through the Coordinated Regulation of Stomatal and Root Development.

    PubMed

    Hepworth, Christopher; Turner, Carla; Landim, Marcela Guimaraes; Cameron, Duncan; Gray, Julie E

    2016-01-01

    Root development is influenced by nutrient and water availabilities. Plants are able to adjust many attributes of their root in response to environmental signals including the size and shape of the primary root, lateral roots and root hairs. Here we investigated the response of roots to changes in the levels of leaf transpiration associated with altered stomatal frequency. We found that plants with high stomatal density and conductance produce a larger rooting area and as a result have enhanced phosphate uptake capacity whereas plants with low stomatal conductance produce a smaller root. Manipulating the growth environment of plants indicated that enhanced root growth is most likely a result of an increased demand for water rather than phosphate. Plants manipulated to have an increase or reduction in root hair growth show a reduction or increase respectively, in stomatal conductance and density. Our results demonstrate that plants can balance their water uptake and loss through coordinated regulation of both stomatal and root development. PMID:27275842

  13. Balancing Water Uptake and Loss through the Coordinated Regulation of Stomatal and Root Development

    PubMed Central

    Hepworth, Christopher; Turner, Carla; Landim, Marcela Guimaraes; Cameron, Duncan; Gray, Julie E.

    2016-01-01

    Root development is influenced by nutrient and water availabilities. Plants are able to adjust many attributes of their root in response to environmental signals including the size and shape of the primary root, lateral roots and root hairs. Here we investigated the response of roots to changes in the levels of leaf transpiration associated with altered stomatal frequency. We found that plants with high stomatal density and conductance produce a larger rooting area and as a result have enhanced phosphate uptake capacity whereas plants with low stomatal conductance produce a smaller root. Manipulating the growth environment of plants indicated that enhanced root growth is most likely a result of an increased demand for water rather than phosphate. Plants manipulated to have an increase or reduction in root hair growth show a reduction or increase respectively, in stomatal conductance and density. Our results demonstrate that plants can balance their water uptake and loss through coordinated regulation of both stomatal and root development. PMID:27275842

  14. Influence of tragacanth gum in egg white based bioplastics: Thermomechanical and water uptake properties.

    PubMed

    López-Castejón, María Luisa; Bengoechea, Carlos; García-Morales, Moisés; Martínez, Inmaculada

    2016-11-01

    This study aims to extend the range of applications of tragacanth gum by studying its incorporation into bioplastics formulation, exploring the influence that different gum contents (0-20wt.%) exert over the thermomechanical and water uptake properties of bioplastics based on egg white albumen protein (EW). The effect of plasticizer nature was also evaluated through the modification of the water/glycerol ratio within the plasticizer fraction (fixed at 40wt.%). The addition of tragacanth gum generally yielded an enhancement of the water uptake capacity, being doubled at the highest content. Conversely, presence of tragacanth gum resulted in a considerable decrease in the bioplastic mechanical properties: both tensile strength and maximum elongation were reduced up to 75% approximately when compared to the gum-free system. Ageing of selected samples was also studied, revealing an important effect of storage time when tragacanth gum is present, possibly due to its hydrophilic character. PMID:27516250

  15. Effects of cell cycle on the uptake of water soluble quantum dots by cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Shen; Chen, Ji-Yao; Wang, Jun-Yong; Zhou, Lu-Wei; Peng, Qian

    2011-12-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) with excellent optical properties have become powerful candidates for cell imaging. Although numerous reports have studied the uptake of QDs by cells, little information exists on the effects of cell cycle on the cellular QD uptake. In this report, the effects of cell cycle on the uptake of water soluble thiol-capped CdTe QDs by the human cervical carcinoma Hela cell line, human hepatocellular carcinoma QGY7701 cell line, and human embryonic kidney 293T cell line were studied by means of laser scanning confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. All three cell lines show to take up CdTe QDs via endocytosis. After arresting cells at specific phases with pharmacological agents, the cells in G2/M phase take up the most CdTe QDs, probably due to an increased membrane expansion during mitosis; whereas the cells in G1 phase do the least. A mathematical physics model was built to calculate the relative uptake rates of CdTe QDs by cells in different phases of the cell cycle, with the result as the uptake rate in G2/M phase is 2-4 times higher than that in G1 phase for these three cell lines. The results obtained from this study may provide the information useful for intracellular delivery of QDs.

  16. Eco-Hydro-Connectivity: Tracking the Diurnal Signal of Plant Water Uptake through the Hydrologic System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blume, T.; Hassler, S. K.; Heidbuechel, I.; Simard, S.; Guntner, A.; Weiler, M.

    2014-12-01

    Plant water uptake during summer is characterized by strong diurnal fluctuations. As a result a diurnal sink term is imposed on catchment storage, affecting the unsaturated zone, sometimes the saturated zone and even streamflow. Detecting this signal and understanding its propagation through the hydrological system may help to better quantify eco-hydrological connectivity. The extent and strength of the propagation of this signal from plant to soil to ground- and streamwater was investigated with a unique setup of 46 field sites in Luxemburg and 15 field sites in Germany. These sites cover a range of geologies, soils, topographies and types of vegetation. Vegetation types include grassland, pine forest (young and old) and different deciduous forest stands. Available data at all sites includes information at high temporal resolution from 3-5 soil moisture profiles, matrix potential, piezometers and sapflow sensors (as proxy for plant water uptake) as well as standard climate data. At sites with access to a stream, discharge or water level is also recorded. Signal strength (amplitude of diurnal fluctuations) can thus be traced through the system and gives an indication of the physical sphere of influence of plant water uptake i.e. the "eco-hydro-connectivity". The analysis of time lags (or phase shifts) between daily fluctuations in temperature, radiation, sapflow, soil water, groundwater and streamflow gives further insights into the processes driving and propagating these signals and inter-site comparison allows for the investigation of local controls.

  17. Computational screening of iodine uptake in zeolitic imidazolate frameworks in a water-containing system.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yue; Dong, Xiuqin; Chen, Yifei; Zhang, Minhua

    2016-08-17

    Iodine capture is of great environmental significance due to the high toxicity and volatility of I2. Here we conduct a systematic computational investigation of iodine adsorption in zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (ZIFs) by adopting the grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulation and the density functional theory (DFT) method. The results confirm the vital structural factors for iodine adsorption at 298 K and moderate pressures including metal sites, organic linkers, symmetry, and topology types. The uptake will be enhanced by active metal sites, the simple imidazolate linker and single asymmetric linkers with polar functional groups. The symmetry effect is stronger than the surface properties. Meanwhile low steric hindrance is more beneficial than polar functional groups to iodine adsorption. The specific topology types like mer bringing large surface areas and large diameter cages result in high iodine capacities. Iodine molecules tend to locate in cages with large diameters and aggregates along the sides of cages. In contrast, water prefers small diameter cages. In hydrophilic materials, water has a negative impact on iodine uptake due to its similar adsorption sites to iodine. The selectivity of iodine over water increases with increasing water content due to the large diameter cages of ZIFs. This work proves that ZIFs can be identified as efficient and economical adsorbents with high diversity for iodine in a water-containing system. Furthermore, it provides comprehensive insights into key structural factors for iodine uptake and separation in silver-free porous solids. PMID:27499079

  18. Neutron radiography for the study of water uptake in painting canvases and preparation layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boon, J. J.; Hendrickx, R.; Eijkel, G.; Cerjak, I.; Kaestner, A.; Ferreira, E. S. B.

    2015-11-01

    Easel paintings on canvas are subjected to alteration mechanisms triggered or accelerated by moisture. For the study of the spatial distribution and kinetics of such interactions, a moisture exposure chamber was designed and built to perform neutron radiography experiments. Multilayered sized and primed canvas samples were prepared for time-resolved experiments in the ICON cold neutron beamline. The first results show that the set-up gives a good contrast and sufficient resolution to visualise the water uptake in the layers of canvas, size and priming. The results allow, for the first time, real-time visualisation of the interaction of water vapour with such layered systems. This offers important new opportunities for relevant, spatially and time-resolved material behaviour studies and opens the way towards numerical modelling of the process. These first results show that cellulose fibres and glue sizing have a much stronger water uptake than the chalk-glue ground. Additionally, it shows that the uptake rate is not uniform throughout the thickness of the sized canvas. With prolonged moisture exposure, a higher amount of water is accumulating at the lower edge of the canvas weave suggesting a decrease in permeability in the sized canvas with increased water content.

  19. Water uptake, ionic conductivity and swelling properties of anion-exchange membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, QJ; Ge, SH; Wang, CY

    2013-12-01

    Water uptake, ionic conductivity and dimensional change of the anion-exchange membrane made by Tokuyama Corporation (A201 membrane) are investigated at different temperatures and water activities. Specifically, the amount of water taken up by membranes exposed to water vapor and membranes soaked in liquid water is determined. The water uptake of the A201 membrane increases with water content as well as temperature. In addition, water sorption data shows Schroeder's paradox for the AEMs investigated. The swelling properties of the A201 membrane exhibit improved dimensional stability compared with Nafion membrane. Water sorption of the A201 membrane occurs with a substantial negative excess volume of mixing. The threshold value of hydrophilic fraction in the A201 membrane for ionic conductivity is around 0.34, above which, the conductivity begins to rise quickly. This indicates that a change in the connectivity of the hydrophilic domains occurs when hydrophilic fraction approaches 0.34. (C) 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. First lidar measurements of water vapor and aerosols from a high-altitude aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browell, Edward V.; Ismail, Syed

    1995-01-01

    Water vapor plays an important role in many atmospheric processes related to radiation, climate change, atmospheric dynamics, meteorology, the global hydrologic cycle, and atmospheric chemistry, and yet our knowledge of the global distribution of water vapor is very limited. The differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique has the potential of providing needed high resolution water vapor measurements from aircraft and from space, and the Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment (LASE) is a key step in the development of this capability. The LASE instrument is the first fully engineered, autonomous DIAL system, and it is designed to operate from a high-altitude aircraft (ER-2) and to make water vapor and aerosol profile measurements across the troposphere. The LASE system was flown from the NASA Wallops Flight Facility in a series of engineering flights during September 1994. This paper discusses the characteristics of the LASE system and presents the first LASE measurements of water vapor and aerosol profiles.

  1. Attribution of the United States “warming hole”: Aerosol indirect effect and precipitable water vapor

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shaocai; Alapaty, Kiran; Mathur, Rohit; Pleim, Jonathan; Zhang, Yuanhang; Nolte, Chris; Eder, Brian; Foley, Kristen; Nagashima, Tatsuya

    2014-01-01

    Aerosols can influence the climate indirectly by acting as cloud condensation nuclei and/or ice nuclei, thereby modifying cloud optical properties. In contrast to the widespread global warming, the central and south central United States display a noteworthy overall cooling trend during the 20th century, with an especially striking cooling trend in summertime daily maximum temperature (Tmax) (termed the U.S. “warming hole”). Here we used observations of temperature, shortwave cloud forcing (SWCF), longwave cloud forcing (LWCF), aerosol optical depth and precipitable water vapor as well as global coupled climate models to explore the attribution of the “warming hole”. We find that the observed cooling trend in summer Tmax can be attributed mainly to SWCF due to aerosols with offset from the greenhouse effect of precipitable water vapor. A global coupled climate model reveals that the observed “warming hole” can be produced only when the aerosol fields are simulated with a reasonable degree of accuracy as this is necessary for accurate simulation of SWCF over the region. These results provide compelling evidence of the role of the aerosol indirect effect in cooling regional climate on the Earth. Our results reaffirm that LWCF can warm both winter Tmax and Tmin. PMID:25373416

  2. Attribution of the United States “warming hole”: Aerosol indirect effect and precipitable water vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Shaocai; Alapaty, Kiran; Mathur, Rohit; Pleim, Jonathan; Zhang, Yuanhang; Nolte, Chris; Eder, Brian; Foley, Kristen; Nagashima, Tatsuya

    2014-11-01

    Aerosols can influence the climate indirectly by acting as cloud condensation nuclei and/or ice nuclei, thereby modifying cloud optical properties. In contrast to the widespread global warming, the central and south central United States display a noteworthy overall cooling trend during the 20th century, with an especially striking cooling trend in summertime daily maximum temperature (Tmax) (termed the U.S. ``warming hole''). Here we used observations of temperature, shortwave cloud forcing (SWCF), longwave cloud forcing (LWCF), aerosol optical depth and precipitable water vapor as well as global coupled climate models to explore the attribution of the ``warming hole''. We find that the observed cooling trend in summer Tmax can be attributed mainly to SWCF due to aerosols with offset from the greenhouse effect of precipitable water vapor. A global coupled climate model reveals that the observed ``warming hole'' can be produced only when the aerosol fields are simulated with a reasonable degree of accuracy as this is necessary for accurate simulation of SWCF over the region. These results provide compelling evidence of the role of the aerosol indirect effect in cooling regional climate on the Earth. Our results reaffirm that LWCF can warm both winter Tmax and Tmin.

  3. Attribution of the United States "warming hole": aerosol indirect effect and precipitable water vapor.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shaocai; Alapaty, Kiran; Mathur, Rohit; Pleim, Jonathan; Zhang, Yuanhang; Nolte, Chris; Eder, Brian; Foley, Kristen; Nagashima, Tatsuya

    2014-01-01

    Aerosols can influence the climate indirectly by acting as cloud condensation nuclei and/or ice nuclei, thereby modifying cloud optical properties. In contrast to the widespread global warming, the central and south central United States display a noteworthy overall cooling trend during the 20(th) century, with an especially striking cooling trend in summertime daily maximum temperature (Tmax) (termed the U.S. "warming hole"). Here we used observations of temperature, shortwave cloud forcing (SWCF), longwave cloud forcing (LWCF), aerosol optical depth and precipitable water vapor as well as global coupled climate models to explore the attribution of the "warming hole". We find that the observed cooling trend in summer Tmax can be attributed mainly to SWCF due to aerosols with offset from the greenhouse effect of precipitable water vapor. A global coupled climate model reveals that the observed "warming hole" can be produced only when the aerosol fields are simulated with a reasonable degree of accuracy as this is necessary for accurate simulation of SWCF over the region. These results provide compelling evidence of the role of the aerosol indirect effect in cooling regional climate on the Earth. Our results reaffirm that LWCF can warm both winter Tmax and Tmin. PMID:25373416

  4. Effect of plant-uptake representation on the water-optimal root depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guswa, A. J.

    2008-12-01

    The depth of roots depends on a variety of conditions, including soil properties, plant type, nutrient availability, and climate. A focus on water enables the determination of a water-optimal root depth by equating the marginal carbon cost of deeper roots with the benefit of those roots to continued transpiration and carbon assimilation. Calculation of the transpiration benefit requires the mathematical representation of plant uptake as a function of root depth and soil moisture. This work compares the effect of two bounding representations of plant uptake on the water-optimal root depth and the response of that depth to changes in precipitation. Soil-moisture dynamics are driven by precipitation events that arrive as a Poisson process and are characterized by a mean frequency and depth. Infiltration and drainage are instantaneous, filling the root zone up to a maximum field capacity. Plant uptake is represented in one case as a step function of soil moisture; transpiration proceeds at a potential rate until the wilting-point saturation is reached when uptake drops to zero. Until that critical threshold, soil moisture has no effect on transpiration. In the second case, transpiration decreases linearly from its potential at field capacity to zero at the wilting point; soil moisture exerts a continuous and gradual influence on plant uptake throughout the drying cycle. With both the linear and step-function representations, the water-optimal root depth is more sensitive to changes in precipitation depth than frequency under dry conditions and more sensitive to precipitation frequency when the climate is wet. Under wet conditions, optimal root depths predicted with the step function show a greater sensitivity to climate than do those based on the linear model. Under dry conditions, the reverse is true; the water-optimal root depth is slightly more sensitive to changes in precipitation when the linear model is employed than when the step function is used. For all

  5. Determination of the relative uptake of ground vs. surface water by Populus deltoides during phytoremediation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clinton, B.D.; Vose, J.M.; Vroblesky, D.A.; Harvey, G.J.

    2004-01-01

    The use of plants to remediate polluted groundwater is becoming an attractive alternative to more expensive traditional techniques. In order to adequately assess the effectiveness of the phytoremediation treatment, a clear understanding of water-use habits by the selected plant species is essential. We examined the relative uptake of surface water (i.e., precipitation) vs. groundwater by mature Populus deltoides by applying irrigation water at a rate equivalent to a 5-cm rain event. We used stable isotopes of hydrogen (D) and oxygen (18O) to identify groundwater and surface water (irrigation water) in the xylem sap water. Pretreatment isotopic ratios of both deuterium and 18O, ranked from heaviest to lightest, were irrigation water > groundwater > xylem sap. The discrepancy in preirrigation isotopic signatures between groundwater and xylem sap suggests that in the absence of a surface source of water (i.e., between rain events) there is an unknown amount of water being extracted from sources other than groundwater (i.e., soil surface water). We examined changes in volumetric soil water content (%), total hourly sapflux rates, and trichloroethene (TCE) concentrations. Following the irrigation treatment, volumetric soil water increased by 86% and sapflux increased by as much as 61%. Isotopic signatures of the xylem sap became substantially heavier following irrigation, suggesting that the applied irrigation water was quickly taken up by the plants. TCE concentrations in the xylem sap were diluted by an average of 21% following irrigation; however, dilution was low relative to the increase in sapflux. Our results show that water use by Populus deltoides is variable. Hence, studies addressing phytoremediation effectiveness must account for the relative proportion of surface vs. groundwater uptake.

  6. Exploring Picea glauca aquaporins in the context of needle water uptake and xylem refilling.

    PubMed

    Laur, Joan; Hacke, Uwe G

    2014-07-01

    Conifer needles have been reported to absorb water under certain conditions. Radial water movement across needle tissues is likely influenced by aquaporin (AQP) water channels. Foliar water uptake and AQP localization in Picea glauca needles were studied using physiological and microscopic methods. AQP expression was measured using quantitative real-time PCR. Members of the AQP gene family in spruce were identified using homology search tools. Needles of drought-stressed plants absorbed water when exposed to high relative humidity (RH). AQPs were present in the endodermis-like bundle sheath, in phloem cells and in the transfusion parenchyma of needles. Up-regulation of AQPs in high RH coincided with embolism repair in stem xylem. The present study also provides the most comprehensive functional and phylogenetic analysis of spruce AQPs to date. Thirty putative complete AQP sequences were found. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that AQPs facilitate radial water movement from the needle epidermis towards the vascular tissue. Foliar water uptake may occur in late winter when needles are covered by melting snow and may provide a water source for embolism repair before the beginning of the growing season. PMID:24702644

  7. Raman lidar and sun photometer measurements of aerosols and water vapor during the ARM RCS experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrare, R. A.; Whiteman, D. N.; Melfi, S. H.; Evans, K. D.; Holben, B. N.

    1995-01-01

    The first Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Remote Cloud Study (RCS) Intensive Operations Period (IOP) was held during April 1994 at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site near Lamont, Oklahoma. This experiment was conducted to evaluate and calibrate state-of-the-art, ground based remote sensing instruments and to use the data acquired by these instruments to validate retrieval algorithms developed under the ARM program. These activities are part of an overall plan to assess general circulation model (GCM) parameterization research. Since radiation processes are one of the key areas included in this parameterization research, measurements of water vapor and aerosols are required because of the important roles these atmospheric constituents play in radiative transfer. Two instruments were deployed during this IOP to measure water vapor and aerosols and study their relationship. The NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Scanning Raman Lidar (SRL) acquired water vapor and aerosol profile data during 15 nights of operations. The lidar acquired vertical profiles as well as nearly horizontal profiles directed near an instrumented 60 meter tower. Aerosol optical thickness, phase function, size distribution, and integrated water vapor were derived from measurements with a multiband automatic sun and sky scanning radiometer deployed at this site.

  8. AEROSOLS CONTAINING 'LEGIONELLA PNEUMOPHILA' GENERATED BY SHOWER HEADS AND HOT-WATER FAUCETS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Shower heads and hot-water faucets containing Legionella pneumophila were evaluated for aerosolization of the organism with a multistage cascade impaction air sampler. Air was collected above two shower doors and from the same rooms approximately 3 ft (91 cm) from the shower door...

  9. Heterogeneous ice nucleation and water uptake by field-collected atmospheric particles below 273 K

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Bingbing; Laskin, Alexander; Roedel, Tobias R.; Gilles, Marry K.; Moffet, Ryan C.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Knopf, Daniel A.

    2012-09-25

    Atmospheric ice formation induced by particles with complex chemical and physical properties through heterogeneous nucleation is not well understood. Heterogeneous ice nucleation and water uptake by ambient particles collected from urban environments in Los Angeles and Mexico City are presented. Using a vapour controlled cooling system equipped with an optical microscopy, the range of onset conditions for ice nucleation and water uptake by the collected particles was determined as a function of temperature (200{273 K) and relative humidity with respect to ice (RHice) up to water saturation. Three distinctly different types of authentic atmospheric particles were investigated including soot particles associated with organics/inorganics, inorganic particles of marine origin coated with organic material, and Pb/Zn containing inorganic particles apportioned to anthropogenic emissions relevant to waste incineration. Single particle characterization was provided by micro-spectroscopic analyses using computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption ne structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). Above 230 K, signicant differences in water uptake and immersion freezing effciencies of the different particle types were observed. Below 230 K, the particles exhibited high deposition ice nucleation effciencies and formed ice at RHice values well below homogeneous ice nucleation limits. The data show that the chemical composition of these eld{collected particles plays an important role in determining water uptake and immersion freezing. Heterogeneous ice nucleation rate coeffcients, cumulative ice nuclei (IN) spectrum, and IN activated fraction for deposition ice nucleation are derived. The presented ice nucleation data demonstrate that anthropogenic and marine particles comprising of various chemical and physical properties exhibit distinctly different ice

  10. Visualization of root water uptake: quantification of deuterated water transport in roots using neutron radiography and numerical modeling.

    PubMed

    Zarebanadkouki, Mohsen; Kroener, Eva; Kaestner, Anders; Carminati, Andrea

    2014-10-01

    Our understanding of soil and plant water relations is limited by the lack of experimental methods to measure water fluxes in soil and plants. Here, we describe a new method to noninvasively quantify water fluxes in roots. To this end, neutron radiography was used to trace the transport of deuterated water (D2O) into roots. The results showed that (1) the radial transport of D2O from soil to the roots depended similarly on diffusive and convective transport and (2) the axial transport of D2O along the root xylem was largely dominated by convection. To quantify the convective fluxes from the radiographs, we introduced a convection-diffusion model to simulate the D2O transport in roots. The model takes into account different pathways of water across the root tissue, the endodermis as a layer with distinct transport properties, and the axial transport of D2O in the xylem. The diffusion coefficients of the root tissues were inversely estimated by simulating the experiments at night under the assumption that the convective fluxes were negligible. Inverse modeling of the experiment at day gave the profile of water fluxes into the roots. For a 24-d-old lupine (Lupinus albus) grown in a soil with uniform water content, root water uptake was higher in the proximal parts of lateral roots and decreased toward the distal parts. The method allows the quantification of the root properties and the regions of root water uptake along the root systems. PMID:25189533

  11. Ozone uptake on glassy, semi-solid and liquid organic matter and the role of reactive oxygen intermediates in atmospheric aerosol chemistry.

    PubMed

    Berkemeier, Thomas; Steimer, Sarah S; Krieger, Ulrich K; Peter, Thomas; Pöschl, Ulrich; Ammann, Markus; Shiraiwa, Manabu

    2016-05-14

    Heterogeneous and multiphase reactions of ozone are important pathways for chemical ageing of atmospheric organic aerosols. To demonstrate and quantify how moisture-induced phase changes can affect the gas uptake and chemical transformation of organic matter, we apply a kinetic multi-layer model to a comprehensive experimental data set of ozone uptake by shikimic acid. The bulk diffusion coefficients were determined to be 10(-12) cm(2) s(-1) for ozone and 10(-20) cm(2) s(-1) for shikimic acid under dry conditions, increasing by several orders of magnitude with increasing relative humidity (RH) due to phase changes from amorphous solid over semisolid to liquid. Consequently, the reactive uptake of ozone progresses through different kinetic regimes characterised by specific limiting processes and parameters. At high RH, ozone uptake is driven by reaction throughout the particle bulk; at low RH it is restricted to reaction near the particle surface and kinetically limited by slow diffusion and replenishment of unreacted organic molecules. Our results suggest that the chemical reaction mechanism involves long-lived reactive oxygen intermediates, likely primary ozonides or O atoms, which may provide a pathway for self-reaction and catalytic destruction of ozone at the surface. Slow diffusion and ozone destruction can effectively shield reactive organic molecules in the particle bulk from degradation. We discuss the potential non-orthogonality of kinetic parameters, and show how this problem can be solved by using comprehensive experimental data sets to constrain the kinetic model, providing mechanistic insights into the coupling of transport, phase changes, and chemical reactions of multiple species in complex systems. PMID:27095585

  12. Clearing of a polydisperse water aerosol by a laser pulse in the diffusive-convective regime

    SciTech Connect

    Kucherov, Arkadii N

    2006-04-30

    The propagation of an IR laser pulse through a water aerosol layer (fog, clouds) is studied. The relative motion of the beam and medium, the diffraction spread, thermal self-action of the laser beam, absorption and scattering of radiation by particles, evaporation of particles (aerosol clearing), and the size distribution of particles were taken into account. The propagation problem was solved numerically at a macroscopic scale of the order of the beam transverse size, and the action of radiation on drops was considered at a microscopic scale of the order of the particle radius. A satisfactory agreement was obtained between theoretical and experimental results. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  13. Water-soluble material on aerosols collected within volcanic eruption clouds ( Fuego, Pacaya, Santiaguito, Guatamala).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, D.B.; Zielinski, R.A.; Rose, W.I., Jr.; Huebert, B.J.

    1982-01-01

    In Feb. and March of 1978, filter samplers mounted on an aircraft were used to collect the aerosol fraction of the eruption clouds from three active Guatemalan volcanoes (Fuego, Pacaya, and Santiaguito). The elements dissolved in the aqueous extracts represent components of water-soluble material either formed directly in the eruption cloud or derived from interaction of ash particles and aerosol components of the plume. Calculations of enrichment factors, based upon concentration ratios, showed the elements most enriched in the extracts relative to bulk ash composition were Cd, Cu, V, F, Cl, Zn, and Pb.-from Authors

  14. /sup 45/Ca uptake from water by snails (Lymnaea vulgaris) in control and detergent-polluted samples

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, V.; Lal, H.; Viswanathan, P.N.; Murti, C.R.

    1984-02-01

    A biostatic assay method involving /sup 45/Ca uptake into shells and tissues of snails (Lymnaea vulgaris) in 72 hr was developed to follow the effect of detergent-polluted water on ecosystems. There was a marked decrease in the /sup 45/Ca uptake by shells and tissues of linear alkyl benzene sulfonate-exposed animals as compared to controls. No change in /sup 45/Ca uptake was observed in dead shells, thereby excluding the possibility of passive exchange.

  15. Aerosols and water vapor dynamics over the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farahat, Ashraf; El-Askary, Hesham; Al-Shaibani, Abdulaziz; Dogan, Umran

    2014-05-01

    The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia contains a vast desert area and the home of some of the largest deserts worldwide. This nature subjects the area to numerous dust storms. This is in addition to local emissions transported from industrial activities. The Arabian Peninsula dust storms have a major impact on air quality and affects dust cycle around the world. The nature of dust also affects air, ground traffics, and human health. Aerosols play a pivotal role in global climate change through their effects on the hydrological cycle and solar energy budget. Recently there have been some trials to study the nature of dust over the kingdom using satellite remote sensing and modeling to investigate the impact of aerosols of natural and anthropogenic origins from both local emissions and long-range transport on the air quality and atmospheric composition, yet a lot more needs to be done. In this study, data obtained from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on board of Terra and Aqua satellites are used to analyze aerosols properties over the thirteen provinces of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia from April 2003 to January 2012. This analysis will help to characterize aerosol and cloud properties, and the seasonal hydrological factors to establish the relative contributions of aerosols derived from different regions to the different Saudi provinces and their impacts on local atmospheric composition and air quality. During this period, we have examined possible nature and anthropogenic/natural aerosols/dust sources. The analysis is based on important parameters including the aerosol optical depth (AOD), fine mode fraction (FMF), cloud properties including cloud top temperature (CTT), cloud top pressure (CTP) and the water vapor column. Correlation between water vapor and AOD was observed over three provinces which could be a result of pollution aerosols rather than dust and is, hence, acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Increasing anomalous aerosols pattern

  16. Water uptake by two river red gum ( Eucalyptus camaldulensis) clones in a discharge site plantation in the Western Australian wheatbelt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, John K.; Morgan, Anne L.; Akilan, Kandia; Farrell, Richard C. C.; Bell, David T.

    1997-12-01

    The heat-pulse technique was used to estimate year-long water uptake in a discharge zone plantation of 9-year-old clonal Eucalyptus camaldulensis Dehnh. near Wubin, Western Australia. Water uptake matched rainfall closely during weter months but exceeded rainfall as the dry season progressed. Average annual water uptake (1148 mm) exceeded rainfall (432 mm) by about 2.7 fold and approached 56% of pan evaporation for the area. The data suggest that at least 37% (i.e. ( {1}/{2.7}) × 100 ) of the lower catchment discharge zone should be planted to prevent the rise of groundwater. Water uptake varied with soil environment, season and genotype. Upslope trees used more water than did downslope trees. Water uptake was higher in E. camaldulensis clone M80 than in clone M66 until late spring. The difference reversed as summer progressed. Both clones, however, have the potential to dry out the landscape when potential evapotranspiration exceeds rainfall. This variation in water uptake within the species indicates the potential for manipulating plantation uptake by matching tree characteristics to site characteristics. Controlled experiments on the heat-pulse technique indicated accuracy errors of approximately 10%. This, combined with the ability to obtain long-term, continuous data and the superior logistics of use of the heat-pulse technique, suggests that results obtained by it would be much more reliable than those achieved by the ventilated chamber technique.

  17. Electro-Osmosis and Water Uptake in Polymer Electrolytes in Equilibrium with Water Vapor at Low Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, K. G.; Pivovar, B. S.; Fuller, T. F.

    2009-01-01

    Water uptake and electro-osmosis are investigated to improve the understanding and aid the modeling of water transport in proton-exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) below 0 C. Measurements of water sorption isotherms show a significant reduction in the water capacity of polymer electrolytes below 0 C. This reduced water content is attributed to the lower vapor pressure of ice compared to supercooled liquid water. At -25 C, 1100 equivalent weight Nafion in equilibrium with vapor over ice has 8 moles of water per sulfonic acid group. Measurements of the electro-osmotic drag coefficient for Nafion and both random and multiblock copolymer sulfonated poly(arylene ether sulfone) (BPSH) chemistries are reported for vapor equilibrated samples below 0 C. The electro-osmotic drag coefficient of BPSH chemistries is found to be {approx}0.4, and that of Nafion is {approx}1. No significant temperature effect on the drag coefficient is found. The implication of an electro-osmotic drag coefficient less than unity is discussed in terms of proton conduction mechanisms. Simulations of the ohmically limited current below 0 C show that a reduced water uptake below 0 C results in a significant decrease in PEMFC performance.

  18. Mesoscopic aspects of root water uptake modeling - Hydraulic resistances and root geometry interpretations in plant transpiration analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Tomas; Votrubova, Jana; Dusek, Jaromir; Dohnal, Michal

    2016-02-01

    In the context of soil water flow modeling, root water uptake is often evaluated based on water potential difference between the soil and the plant (the water potential gradient approach). Root water uptake rate is modulated by hydraulic resistance of both the root itself, and the soil in the root vicinity. The soil hydraulic resistance is a function of actual soil water content and can be assessed assuming radial axisymmetric water flow toward a single root (at the mesoscopic scale). In the present study, three approximate solutions of mesoscopic root water uptake - finite difference approximation, steady-state solution, and steady-rate solution - are examined regarding their ability to capture the pressure head variations in the root vicinity. Insignificance of their differences when implemented in the macroscopic soil water flow model is demonstrated using the critical root water uptake concept. Subsequently, macroscopic simulations of coupled soil water flow and root water uptake are presented for a forest site under temperate humid climate. Predicted soil water pressure heads and actual transpiration rates are compared with observed data. Scenario simulations illustrate uncertainties associated with estimates of root geometrical and hydraulic properties. Regarding the actual transpiration prediction, the correct characterization of active root system geometry and hydraulic properties seems far more important than the choice of a particular mesoscopic model.

  19. Physicochemical Characterization of Lake Spray Aerosol Generated from Great Lakes Water Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ault, A. P.; Axson, J. L.; May, N.; Pratt, K.

    2014-12-01

    Wave breaking across bodies of water releases particles into the air which can impact climate and human health. Similar to sea spray aerosols formed through marine wave breaking, freshwater lakes generate lake spray aerosol (LSA). LSA can impact climate directly through scattering/absorption and indirectly through cloud nucleation. In addition, these LSA are suggested to impact human health through inhalation of these particles during algal bloom periods characterized by toxic cyanobacteria. Few studies have been conducted to assess the physical and chemical properties of freshwater LSA. Herein, we discuss constructing a LSA generation system and preliminary physical and chemical characterization of aerosol generated from water samples collected at various sites across Lake Erie, Lake Huron, Lake Superior, and Lake Michigan. Information on aerosol size distributions, number concentrations, and chemical composition will be discussed as a function of lake water blue-green algae concentration, dissolved organic carbon concentration, temperature, conductivity, and dissolved oxygen concentration. These studies represent a first step towards evaluating the potential for LSA to impact climate and health in the Great Lakes region.

  20. Evaluation of Daytime Measurements of Aerosols and Water Vapor made by an Operational Raman Lidar over the Southern Great Plains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrare, Richard; Turner, David; Clayton, Marian; Schmid, Beat; Covert, David; Elleman, Robert; Orgren, John; Andrews, Elisabeth; Goldsmith, John E. M.; Jonsson, Hafidi

    2006-01-01

    Raman lidar water vapor and aerosol extinction profiles acquired during the daytime over the Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in northern Oklahoma (36.606 N, 97.50 W, 315 m) are evaluated using profiles measured by in situ and remote sensing instruments deployed during the May 2003 Aerosol Intensive Operations Period (IOP). The automated algorithms used to derive these profiles from the Raman lidar data were first modified to reduce the adverse effects associated with a general loss of sensitivity of the Raman lidar since early 2002. The Raman lidar water vapor measurements, which are calibrated to match precipitable water vapor (PWV) derived from coincident microwave radiometer (MWR) measurements were, on average, 5-10% (0.3-0.6 g/m(exp 3) higher than the other measurements. Some of this difference is due to out-of-date line parameters that were subsequently updated in the MWR PWV retrievals. The Raman lidar aerosol extinction measurements were, on average, about 0.03 km(exp -1) higher than aerosol measurements derived from airborne Sun photometer measurements of aerosol optical thickness and in situ measurements of aerosol scattering and absorption. This bias, which was about 50% of the mean aerosol extinction measured during this IOP, decreased to about 10% when aerosol extinction comparisons were restricted to aerosol extinction values larger than 0.15 km(exp -1). The lidar measurements of the aerosol extinction/backscatter ratio and airborne Sun photometer measurements of the aerosol optical thickness were used along with in situ measurements of the aerosol size distribution to retrieve estimates of the aerosol single scattering albedo (omega(sub o)) and the effective complex refractive index. Retrieved values of omega(sub o) ranged from (0.91-0.98) and were in generally good agreement with omega(sub o) derived from airborne in situ measurements of scattering and absorption. Elevated aerosol

  1. Heterogeneous ice nucleation and water uptake by field-collected atmospheric particles below 273 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bingbing; Laskin, Alexander; Roedel, Tobias; Gilles, Mary K.; Moffet, Ryan C.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Knopf, Daniel A.

    2012-09-01

    Ice formation induced by atmospheric particles through heterogeneous nucleation is not well understood. Onset conditions for heterogeneous ice nucleation and water uptake by particles collected in Los Angeles and Mexico City were determined as a function of temperature (200-273 K) and relative humidity with respect to ice (RHice). Four dominant particle types were identified including soot associated with organics, soot with organic and inorganics, inorganic particles of marine origin coated with organic material, and Pb/Zn-containing particles apportioned to emissions relevant to waste incineration. Single particle characterization was provided by micro-spectroscopic analyses using computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). Above 230 K, significant differences in onsets of water uptake and immersion freezing of different particle types were observed. Below 230 K, particles exhibited high deposition ice nucleation efficiencies and formed ice atRHicewell below homogeneous ice nucleation limits. The data suggest that water uptake and immersion freezing are more sensitive to changes in particle chemical composition compared to deposition ice nucleation. The data demonstrate that anthropogenic and marine influenced particles, exhibiting various chemical and physical properties, possess distinctly different ice nucleation efficiencies and can serve as efficient IN at atmospheric conditions typical for cirrus and mixed-phase clouds.

  2. Heterogeneous ice nucleation and water uptake by field-collected atmospheric particles below 273 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bingbing; Laskin, Alexander; Roedel, Tobias; Gilles, Mary K.; Moffet, Ryan C.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Knopf, Daniel A.

    2011-11-01

    Ice formation induced by atmospheric particles through heterogeneous nucleation is not well understood. Onset conditions for heterogeneous ice nucleation and water uptake by particles collected in Los Angeles and Mexico City were determined as a function of temperature (200-273 K) and relative humidity with respect to ice (RHice). Four dominant particle types were identified including soot associated with organics, soot with organic and inorganics, inorganic particles of marine origin coated with organic material, and Pb/Zn-containing particles apportioned to emissions relevant to waste incineration. Single particle characterization was provided by micro-spectroscopic analyses using computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). Above 230 K, significant differences in onsets of water uptake and immersion freezing of different particle types were observed. Below 230 K, particles exhibited high deposition ice nucleation efficiencies and formed ice atRHicewell below homogeneous ice nucleation limits. The data suggest that water uptake and immersion freezing are more sensitive to changes in particle chemical composition compared to deposition ice nucleation. The data demonstrate that anthropogenic and marine influenced particles, exhibiting various chemical and physical properties, possess distinctly different ice nucleation efficiencies and can serve as efficient IN at atmospheric conditions typical for cirrus and mixed-phase clouds.

  3. Simultaneous monitoring of electrical capacitance and water uptake activity of plant root system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cseresnyés, Imre; Takács, Tünde; Füzy, Anna; Rajkai, Kálmán

    2014-10-01

    Pot experiments were designed to test the applicability of root electrical capacitance measurement for in situ monitoring of root water uptake activity by growing cucumber and bean cultivars in a growth chamber. Half of the plants were inoculated with Funneliformis mosseae arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, while the other half served as non-infected controls. Root electrical capacitance and daily transpiration were monitored during the whole plant ontogeny. Phenology-dependent changes of daily transpiration (related to root water uptake) and root electrical capacitance proved to be similar as they showed upward trends from seedling emergence to the beginning of flowering stage, and thereafter decreased continuously during fruit setting. A few days after arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi-colonization, daily transpiration and root electrical capacitance of infected plants became significantly higher than those of non-infected counterparts, and the relative increment of the measured parameters was greater for the more highly mycorrhizal-dependent bean cultivar compared to that of cucumber. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi colonization caused 29 and 69% relative increment in shoot dry mass for cucumbers and beans, respectively. Mycorrhization resulted in 37% increase in root dry mass for beans, but no significant difference was observed for cucumbers. Results indicate the potential of root electrical capacitance measurements for monitoring the changes and differences of root water uptake rate.

  4. Aerosol optical properties and precipitable water vapor column in the atmosphere of Norway.

    PubMed

    Muyimbwa, Dennis; Frette, Øyvind; Stamnes, Jakob J; Ssenyonga, Taddeo; Chen, Yi-Chun; Hamre, Børge

    2015-02-20

    Between February 2012 and April 2014, we measured and analyzed direct solar radiances at a ground-based station in Bergen, Norway. We discovered that the spectral aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and precipitable water vapor column (PWVC) retrieved from these measurements have a seasonal variation with highest values in summer and lowest values in winter. The highest value of the monthly median AOT at 440 nm of about 0.16 was measured in July and the lowest of about 0.04 was measured in December. The highest value of the monthly median PWVC of about 2.0 cm was measured in July and the lowest of about 0.4 cm was measured in December. We derived Ångström exponents that were used to deduce aerosol particle size distributions. We found that coarse-mode aerosol particles dominated most of the time during the measurement period, but fine-mode aerosol particles dominated during the winter seasons. The derived Ångström exponent values suggested that aerosols containing sea salt could have been dominating at this station during the measurement period. PMID:25968219

  5. Variabilities and uncertainties in characterising water transport kinetics in glassy and ultraviscous aerosol.

    PubMed

    Rickards, Andrew M J; Song, Young-Chul; Miles, Rachael E H; Preston, Thomas C; Reid, Jonathan P

    2015-04-21

    We present a comprehensive evaluation of the variabilities and uncertainties present in determining the kinetics of water transport in ultraviscous aerosol droplets, alongside new measurements of the water transport timescale in sucrose aerosol. Measurements are performed on individual droplets captured using aerosol optical tweezers and the change in particle size during water evaporation or condensation is inferred from shifts in the wavelength of the whispering gallery mode peaks at which spontaneous Raman scattering is enhanced. The characteristic relaxation timescale (τ) for condensation or evaporation of water from viscous droplets following a change in gas phase relative humidity can be described by the Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts function. To adequately characterise the water transport kinetics and determine τ, sufficient time must be allowed for the particle to progress towards the final state. However, instabilities in the environmental conditions can prevent an accurate characterisation of the kinetics over such long time frames. Comparison with established thermodynamic and diffusional water transport models suggests the determination of τ is insensitive to the choice of thermodynamic treatment. We report excellent agreement between experimental and simulated evaporation timescales, and investigate the scaling of τ with droplet radius. A clear increase in τ is observed for condensation with increase in drying (wait) time. This trend is qualitatively supported by model simulations. PMID:25786190

  6. Water Uptake and Carbon Assimilation in Maize at Elevated and ambient CO2: Modeling and Measurement.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timlin, Dennis; Chun, Jong-Ahn; Kim, Soo-Hyung; Yang, Yang; Fleisher, David; Reddy, Vangimalla

    2013-04-01

    Potential transpiration in crops is dependent on both plant and environmental properties. Carbon dioxide content of the atmosphere is linked to potential transpiration because CO2 diffuses onto water saturated surfaces within plant stomata. At high CO2 concentrations, CO2 diffuses rapidly into stomata and therefore stomata do not have to remain open to the atmosphere for long periods of time. This results in lower transpiration rates per unit CO2 assimilated at elevated CO2 concentrations. The objective of this study was to measure CO2 assimilation and water uptake by maize under different irrigation regimes and two CO2 concentrations. The data were then used to evaluate the ability of the maize model MaizSim to simulate the effects of water stress and CO2 on water use and photosynthesis. MaizSim uses a Farquhar type photosynthesis model coupled a Ball-Berry stomatal control model. Non-linear beta functions are used to estimate the effects of temperature on growth and development processes. The experimental data come from experiments in outdoor, sunlit growth chambers at the USDA-ARS Beltsville Agricultural Research Center. The eight treatments comprised two levels of carbon dioxide concentrations (400 and 800 ppm) and four levels of water stress (well-watered control, mild, moderate, and severe). The water stress treatments were applied at both CO2 levels. Water contents were monitored hourly by a Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR) system. The model simulated higher water contents at the same time after applying water stress at the high CO2 treatment than for the low CO2 treatment as was found in the measured data. Measurement of water uptake by roots and carbon assimilation rates in the chambers will be addressed.

  7. Measurements of water uptake of maize roots: the key function of lateral roots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, M. A.; Zarebanadkouki, M.; Kroener, E.; Kaestner, A.; Carminati, A.

    2014-12-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.) is one of the most important crop worldwide. Despite its importance, there is limited information on the function of different root segments and root types of maize in extracting water from soils. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate locations of root water uptake in maize. We used neutron radiography to: 1) image the spatial distribution of maize roots in soil and 2) trace the transport of injected deuterated water (D2O) in soil and roots. Maizes were grown in aluminum containers (40×38×1 cm) filled with a sandy soil. When the plants were 16 days old, we injected D2O into selected soil regions containing primary, seminal and lateral roots. The experiments were performed during the day (transpiring plants) and night (not transpiring plants). The transport of D2O into roots was simulated using a new convection-diffusion numerical model of D2O transport into roots. By fitting the observed D2O transport we quantified the diffusional permeability and the water uptake of the different root segments. The maize root architecture consisted of a primary root, 4-5 seminal roots and many lateral roots connected to the primary and seminal roots. Laterals emerged from the proximal 15 cm of the primary and seminal roots. Water uptake occurred primarily in lateral roots. Lateral roots had the highest diffusional permeability (9.4×10-7), which was around six times higher that the diffusional permeability of the old seminal segments (1.4×10-7), and two times higher than the diffusional permeability of the young seminal segments (4.7×10-7). The radial flow of D2O into the lateral (6.7×10-5 ) was much higher than in the young seminal roots (1.1×10-12). The radial flow of D2O into the old seminal was negligible. We concluded that the function of the primary and seminal roots was to collect water from the lateral roots and transport it to the shoot. A maize root system with lateral roots branching from deep primary and seminal roots would be

  8. The uptake and solubility of water in quartz at elevated pressure and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerretsen, J.; Paterson, M. S.; McLaren, A. C.

    1989-02-01

    The uptake of water in quartz at 1.5 GPa total pressure, 1173 K and high water fugacity, over times up to 24 h, has been investigated using a newly developed assembly to prevent microcracking. It is found that the uptake is small, and below the detectability of the presently used technique of infrared spectroscopy and serial sectioning. This observation reflects either a low value for the diffusivity or the solubility or a combination of both, and is in agreement with the observations of Kronenberg et al. (1986) and Rovetta et al. (1986). It brings into question the interpretation of the early experiments on water weakening by Griggs and Blacic (1964) and the recent estimates of the solubility and diffusivity by Mackwell and Paterson (1985). Rults of a combined T.E.M., light-scattering and infrared-spectroscopy investigation of ‘wet’ synthetic quartz before and after heating at 0.1, 300 and 1500 MPa total pressure and 1173 K, strongly suggest that the water in ‘wet’ quartz is mainly in the form of H2O in inclusions, consistent with the solubility being low, possibly less than 100 H/106Si. From these observations, water-containing inclusions appear to play a major role in the plasticity of quartz, while any role of water in solid solution remains to be clarified.

  9. The Role of Organic Oxidation State and Liquid-Liquid Phase Separations on the Reactive Uptake of N2O5 to Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaston, C.; Thornton, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    We present laboratory measurements of N2O5(g) reactive uptake coefficients, γ(N2O5), onto mixed organic/inorganic submicron particles using organic compounds with a variety of oxidation states (e.g., atomic O:C ratios) and molecular weights. The organic mass fraction, organic molecular composition, and relative humidity were varied to assess the importance of organic mass, oxidation state, and particle phase on the N2O5(g) uptake coefficient. At a constant relative humidity, mixtures of organic components with a low oxidation state (e.g., O:C < 0.5) and ammonium bisulfate (ABS) were found to significantly suppress the uptake of N2O5(g) compared to pure inorganic components even when the organic mass fraction was small (e.g., ≤ 15%); the observed behavior was most consistent with the formation of an organic coating (i.e. phase separation). As the water content of the particles increased, the effect of organic coatings became less pronounced, presumably due to incorporation of water into the organic phase or to an eventual transition into a single mixed system. In contrast, highly oxygenated organic components had a smaller impact on N2O5(g) uptake even as the water content of the particles changed, consistent with these highly soluble components not exhibiting phase separations. Notably, at constant relative humidity the reactive uptake coefficient of mixtures of ABS and poly(ethylene glycol), PEG, decreased nearly linearly as the PEG mass fraction increased. These measurements were found to mimic, with striking similarity, observations of N2O5 uptake onto ambient particles as a function of organic mass fraction. We use the measurements of reactive uptake coefficients across a range of particle types and humidities to improve upon N2O5 reactivity parameterizations for use in atmospheric models that incorporate organic coatings. Our findings suggest that a decrease in N2O5 diffusion and/or solubility in the organic layer, by up to 97% compared to uncoated

  10. Studies of organic aerosol and aerosol-cloud interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duong, Hanh To

    Atmospheric aerosols can influence society and the environment in many ways including altering the planet's energy budget, the hydrologic cycle, and public health. However, the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change indicates that the anthropogenic radiative forcing associated with aerosol effects on clouds has the highest uncertainty in the future climate predictions. This thesis focuses on the nature of the organic fraction of ambient particles and how particles interact with clouds using a combination of tools including aircraft and ground measurements, models, and satellite data. Fine aerosol particles typically contain between 20 - 90% organic matter by mass and a major component of this fraction includes water soluble organic carbon (WSOC). Consequently, water-soluble organic species can strongly influence aerosol water-uptake and optical properties. However, the chemical composition of this fraction is not well-understood. PILS-TOC was used to characterize WSOC in ambient aerosol in Los Angeles, California. The spatial distribution of WSOC was found to be influenced by (i) a wide range of aerosol sources within this urban metropolitan area, (ii) transport of pollutants by the characteristic daytime sea breeze trajectory, (iii) topography, and (iv) secondary production during transport. Meteorology is linked with the strength of many of these various processes. Many methods and instruments have been used to study aerosol-cloud interactions. Each observational platform is characterized by different temporal/spatial resolutions and operational principles, and thus there are disagreements between different studies for the magnitude of mathematical constructs used to represent the strength of aerosol-cloud interactions. This work points to the sensitivity of the magnitude of aerosol-cloud interactions to cloud lifetime and spatial resolution of measurements and model simulations. Failure to account for above-cloud aerosol layers

  11. PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF INDOOR AEROSOLS RESULTING FROM THE USE OF TAP WATER IN PORTABLE HOME HUMIDIFIERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An indoor air quality study was conducted in Boise, ID, residences to evaluate the range of aerosol concentrations that result from using tap water in portable home humidifiers and to characterize the physical and chemical properties of the humidifier aerosol. M10 concentrations ...

  12. Uptake of hydrophobic xenobiotics by fish in water laden with sediments from the Fraser River

    SciTech Connect

    Qiao, P.; Farrell, A.P.

    1996-09-01

    The authors examined the uptake of three hydrophobic chemicals, TCB (1,2,4-trichlorobenzene), PeCB (1,2,3,4,5-pentachlorobenzene), and HCBP (2,2{prime}, 4,4{prime},6,6{prime}-hexachlorobiphenyl), by unfed juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in test aquaria containing sediments from the Fraser River. The working hypothesis was that the low organic carbon content of the Fraser River sediments would increase the bioavailability of xenobiotics associated with these sediments. The test chemicals and sediments were introduced into aquaria 9 d before the fish were introduced.Measured concentrations of he chemicals in the bottom sediments, suspended sediments, and filtered (0.45 {micro}m) water suggested that the test system had reached a quasiequilibrium state by day 9. Subsequently, a 6-d exposure of fish in the test aquaria resulted in a significant accumulation of the test chemicals in the fish tissues and significant reductions in the chemical concentration of the bottom sediments, suspended sediments, and filtered water. Mass balance analysis suggests that the appearance of HCBP and PeCB in the fish after 6 d could not be accounted for solely by the amount of chemical dissolved in the water at the time when the fish were introduced. A large unaccounted-for fraction of TCB, possibly due to fish metabolism, precluded an accurate mass balance analysis for this chemical. Because chemical uptake in fish with the pharynx plugged (to eliminate the gut uptake route) was similar to that in control fish and because direct access to bottom sediments did not alter chemical uptake, the authors conclude that hydrophobic chemicals such as PeCB and HCBP associated with suspended sediments from the Fraser River can readily desorb and be taken up across the gill.

  13. Reduced deep soil water uptake through forest conversion to pasture in Amazonia

    SciTech Connect

    Jipp, P.H.; Nepstad, D.C. Woods Hole Research Center, MA )

    1993-06-01

    Forests of eastern Amazonia are being replaced by pastures and secondary forests. We measured soil water storage and flux in adjacent forest and pasture ecosystems using Time Domain Reflectometry sensors installed in the walls of deep (9-m) shafts. The forest withdrew 597+/-25 mm of soil water stored below 1 m depth during the 1991 dry season (Jun-Dec), 1.7 times more than the pasture. Uptake from the bottom of the forest soil profile continued even after rainfall resumed in early 1992. The hydrologic impacts of tropical deforestation may be most severe for evergreen forests with deep rooting zones in areas of seasonal drought.

  14. Correlation Study of Water Vapor and Aerosol Distributions in Troposphere Using Scanning Raman Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, F.; Stanic, S.; Bergant, K.; He, T.-Y.

    2012-04-01

    Aiming at the study of water vapor and aerosol distributions in the lower atmosphere from the Otlica observatory, Slovenia (45.93°N, 13.91°E, elevation 945 m above sea level), we have built a new Raman lidar in parallel to the existing Mie lidar. The new system is oriented towards the Adriatic coast with a fixed azimuth angle of 235.1° and shares the transmitter (tripled Nd:YAG pulsed laser at 355 nm with pulse energy of 100 mJ and repetition rate of 20 Hz) and mechanical support with scanning functionality in zenith angle with the Mie lidar. The receiver part of the Raman lidar employs custom optics using a low f-number aspheric lens, designed to maximize the coupling of lidar returns collected by a parabolic mirror with a diameter of 800 mm and focal length of 410 mm and the 1000 μm core multi-mode optical fiber used to transport the light to the polychromator for spectral analysis. In the polychromator, 5-nm bandwidth interference filters combined with dichroic beam splitters were used to separate the vibrational Raman signals of nitrogen and water wapor molecules. The three return signals were detected by photo-multiplier tubes and sampled by transient recorders in photon-counting mode. System functionality was assessed in a number of preliminary experiments, where water vapor concentrations were calibrated using radiosonde data. During the nights of 24-25 August 2011 a series of measurements of water vapor and aerosol distributions along the lidar line of sight were performed at various elevation angles. In the vertical measurements, two layers with larger water vapor content were visible at altitudes of 1.5 km and 4.0 km with relative humidity in both cases exceeding 75%. Aerosol extinction decreased linearly between the altitudes of 2 km and 4.5 km, with aerosol layers appearing at 4.0 km, 4.7 km and 5.6 km. In horizontal measurements, the water vapor mixing ratio and the relative humidity were found to be almost constant in the range of 1.5 km to 4.5 km

  15. Model for a surface film of fatty acids on rain water and aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidl, Winfried

    Organic compounds with polar groups can form films on the water surface which lower the surface tension and may hinder the transport of water vapor and trace gases through the interface. A model is presented which describes in detail surface films formed by fatty acids. The model has been applied to measured concentrations of fatty acids on rain water and atmospheric aerosol particles. In most cases only a diluted film has been calculated which does not affect their physical and chemical properties. The exception was a clean region in the western USA, where the fatty acid concentrations are sufficiently high to form a dense film on atmospheric aerosol particles. An algorithm for the identification of the sources of fatty acids was developed. It showed leaf abrasion or biomass burning as a major source of fatty acids in the western USA.

  16. MISR research-aerosol-algorithm refinements for dark water retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limbacher, J. A.; Kahn, R. A.

    2014-11-01

    We explore systematically the cumulative effect of many assumptions made in the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) research aerosol retrieval algorithm with the aim of quantifying the main sources of uncertainty over ocean, and correcting them to the extent possible. A total of 1129 coincident, surface-based sun photometer spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements are used for validation. Based on comparisons between these data and our baseline case (similar to the MISR standard algorithm, but without the "modified linear mixing" approximation), for 558 nm AOD < 0.10, a high bias of 0.024 is reduced by about one-third when (1) ocean surface under-light is included and the assumed whitecap reflectance at 672 nm is increased, (2) physically based adjustments in particle microphysical properties and mixtures are made, (3) an adaptive pixel selection method is used, (4) spectral reflectance uncertainty is estimated from vicarious calibration, and (5) minor radiometric calibration changes are made for the 672 and 866 nm channels. Applying (6) more stringent cloud screening (setting the maximum fraction not-clear to 0.50) brings all median spectral biases to about 0.01. When all adjustments except more stringent cloud screening are applied, and a modified acceptance criterion is used, the Root-Mean-Square-Error (RMSE) decreases for all wavelengths by 8-27% for the research algorithm relative to the baseline, and is 12-36% lower than the RMSE for the Version 22 MISR standard algorithm (SA, with no adjustments applied). At 558 nm, 87% of AOD data falls within the greater of 0.05 or 20% of validation values; 62% of the 446 nm AOD data, and > 68% of 558, 672, and 866 nm AOD values fall within the greater of 0.03 or 10%. For the Ångström exponent (ANG), 67% of 1119 validation cases for AOD > 0.01 fall within 0.275 of the sun photometer values, compared to 49% for the SA. ANG RMSE decreases by 17% compared to the SA, and the median absolute error drops by

  17. The CalWater 2 - ARM Cloud Aerosol Precipitation Experiment (ACAPEX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, L. Y.; Prather, K. A.; Ralph, F. M.; Rosenfeld, D.; Spackman, J. R.; Fairall, C. W.; DeMott, P. J.; Fan, J.; Zhao, C.

    2014-12-01

    The western U.S. receives precipitation predominantly during the cold season when storms approach from the Pacific Ocean. The snowpack that accumulates during winter storms provides about 70-90% of water supply for the region. Two elements of significant importance in predicting precipitation variability in the western U.S. are atmospheric rivers and aerosols. Atmospheric rivers (ARs) are narrow bands of enhanced water vapor associated with the warm sector of extratropical cyclones over the Pacific and Atlantic oceans. While ARs are responsible for a large fraction of heavy precipitation in the western U.S. during winter, much of the rest of the orographic precipitation occurs in post-frontal clouds, which are typically quite shallow, with tops just high enough to pass the mountain barrier. Such clouds are inherently quite susceptible to aerosol effects on both warm rain and ice precipitation-forming processes. In January - March 2015, the ARM Cloud Aerosol Precipitation Experiment (ACAPEX) field campaign will take place in northern California. Joined with CalWater 2, the field campaign aims to improve understanding and modeling of large-scale dynamics and cloud and precipitation processes associated with ARs and aerosol-cloud interactions that influence precipitation variability and extremes in the western U.S. We will implement an observational strategy consisting of the use of land and offshore assets to monitor (1) the evolution and structure of ARs from near their regions of development, (2) long range transport of aerosols in eastern North Pacific and potential interactions with ARs, and (3) how aerosols from long-range transport and local sources influence cloud and precipitation in the U.S. West Coast where ARs make landfall and post-frontal clouds are frequent. This presentation will provide an overview of the science questions and hypotheses to be addressed by CalWater 2/ACAPEX, review key results from prior studies, and discuss recent findings from

  18. Lipid-water partition coefficients and correlations with uptakes by algae of organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Hung, Wei-Nung; Chiou, Cary T; Lin, Tsair-Fuh

    2014-08-30

    In view of the scarcity of the lipid-water partition coefficients (Ktw) for organic compounds, the logKtw values for many environmental contaminants were measured using ultra-pure triolein as the model lipid. Classes of compounds studied include alkyl benzenes, halogenated benzenes, short-chain chlorinated hydrocarbons, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, and organochlorine pesticides. In addition to logKtw determination, the uptakes of these compounds from water by a dry algal species were measured to evaluate the lipid effect on the algal uptake. The measured logKtw are closely related to their respective logKow (octanol-water), with logKow=1.9 to 6.5. A significant difference is observed between the present and early measured logKtw for compounds with logKow>∼5, which is attributed to the presence and absence of a triolein microemulsion in water affecting the solute partitioning. The observed lipid-normalized algae-water distribution coefficients (logKaw/lipid) are virtually identical to the respective logKtw values, which manifests the dominant lipid-partition effect of the compounds with algae. PMID:25064256

  19. a Three-Dimensional Approach to Modeling Root Water Uptake by Multiple Trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manoli, G.; Bonetti, S.; domec, J.; Putti, M.; Katul, G. G.; Marani, M.

    2013-12-01

    Competition for water among rooting zones of multiple trees is a ubiquitous feature of canopy-scale transpiration, yet rarely incorporated in watershed scale models. To accommodate the three-dimensional rooting overlap in space, a three-dimensional approach to modeling soil moisture and root-water uptake is developed in which the overlap of the rooting system is allowed. The model is based on the 3-D Richards equation and uses an Ohm's law type model to account for root, xylem and stomatal conductances needed to describe root water uptake (RWU). The hydraulic model is then linked to the atmosphere via a stomatal conductance, where the stomatal aperture is regulated so as to maximum carbon gain for a given water loss. Because of this tight coupling between Fickian mass transfer of CO2 and H2O through the stomatal pores, plant hydraulics and biochemical demand for CO2 via photosynthesis are simultaneously considered in the estimation of RWU. The model is then evaluated with field data and used to investigate tree-to-tree interactions in a well-drained loblolly pine plantation. The importance of three-dimensional modeling to upscale plant-water relations at large scales is discussed.

  20. Understanding the Effects of Compression and Constraints on Water Uptake of Fuel-Cell Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Kusoglu, Ahmet; Kienitz, Brian L.; Weber, Adam Z.

    2011-01-01

    Accurate characterization of polymer-electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) requires understanding the impact of mechanical and electrochemical loads on cell components. An essential aspect of this relationship is the effect of compression on the polymer membrane?s water-uptake behavior and transport properties. However, there is limited information on the impact of physical constraints on membrane properties. In this paper, we investigate both theoretically and experimentally how the water uptake of Nafion membrane changes under external compression loads. The swelling of a compressed membrane is modeled by modifying the swelling pressure in the polymer backbone which relies on the changes in the microscopic volume of the polymer. The model successfully predicts the water content of the compressed membrane measured through in-situ swelling-compression tests and neutron imaging. The results show that external mechanical loads could reduce the water content and conductivity of the membrane, especially at lower temperatures, higher humidities, and in liquid water. The modeling framework and experimental data provide valuable insight for the swelling and conductivity of constrained and compressed membranes, which are of interest in electrochemical devices such as batteries and fuel cells.

  1. Silicone Membranes to Inhibit Water Uptake into Thermoset Polyurethane Shape-Memory Polymer Conductive Composites

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ya-Jen; Infanger, Stephen; Grunlan, Melissa A.; Maitland, Duncan J.

    2014-01-01

    Electroactive shape memory polymer (SMP) composites capable of shape actuation via resistive heating are of interest for various biomedical applications. However, water uptake into SMPs will produce a depression of the glass transition temperature (Tg) resulting in shape recovery in vivo. While water actuated shape recovery may be useful, it is foreseen to be undesirable during early periods of surgical placement into the body. Silicone membranes have been previously reported to prevent release of conductive filler from an electroactive polymer composite in vivo. In this study, a silicone membrane was used to inhibit water uptake into a thermoset SMP composite containing conductive filler. Thermoset polyurethane (PU) SMPs were loaded with either 5 wt% carbon black (CB) or 5 wt% carbon nanotubes (CNT) and subsequently coated with either an Al2O3- or silica-filled silicone membrane. It was observed that the silicone membranes, particularly the silica-filled membrane, reduced the rate of water absorption (37 °C) and subsequent Tg depression versus uncoated composites. In turn, this led to a reduction in the rate of recovery of the permanent shape when exposed to water at 37 °C. PMID:25663711

  2. Coupling of phytoplankton uptake and air-water exchange of persistent organic pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Dachs, J.; Eisenreich, S.J.; Baker, J.E.; Ko, F.C.; Jeremiason, J.D.

    1999-10-15

    A dynamic model that couples air-water exchange and phytoplankton uptake of persistent organic pollutants has been developed and then applied to PCB data from a small experimental lake. A sensitivity analysis of the model, taking into account the influence of physical environmental conditions such as temperature, wind speed, and mixing depth as well as plankton-related parameters such as biomass and growth rate was carried out for a number of PCBs with different physical-chemical properties. The results indicate that air-water exchange dynamics are influenced not only by physical parameters but also by phytoplankton biomass and growth rate. New phytoplankton production results in substantially longer times to reach equilibrium. Phytoplankton uptake-induced depletion of the dissolved phase concentration maintains air and water phases out of equilibrium. Furthermore, PCBs in phytoplankton also take longer times to reach equilibrium with the dissolved water phase when the latter is supported by diffusive air-water exchange. However, both model analysis and model application to the Experimental Lakes Area of northwestern Ontario (Canada) suggest that the gas phase supports the concentrations of persistent organic pollutants, such as PCBs, in atmospherically driven aquatic environments.

  3. A Mechanistic Approach for Simulating Root Water Uptake Regulation by Plants in Soils with Heterogeneous Water Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, K.; Vanderborght, J.; Javaux, M.; Vereecken, H.

    2012-12-01

    Transpiration by plants is a key component of the terrestrial water cycle. Besides being controlled by atmospheric demand, plant transpiration depends also on availability of soil water for uptake by plant roots. In situations where potential transpiration cannot be upheld by available soil water plants have developed different strategies, i.e. isohydric and anisohydric [Tardieu and Simmoneau, 1998] leaf water potentials, for the adjustment of their water consumption. The quantification of water availability in soils and the regulation of root water uptake in land surface models are generally lacking strong empirical and mechanistic foundations. In this contribution we present a mechanistic modeling approach to address these issues. We used the model R-SWMS and built in three different possible plant physiological reactions on spatial variations in water availability in the root zone, as are often artificially created in split-root experiments. Two approaches were based on pure hydraulic regulation while for the third scenario an additional signal generated at the root tips was introduced. We could show that this signaling leads to a transpiration reduction for heterogeneous water distributions in the soil, even though the absolute amount of available water would be sufficient to maintain potential transpiration if it were only hydraulically controlled. Model simulations were subsequently used to evaluate the impact of signaling on transpiration reduction that was observed in split root experiments reported in the literature [Dodd et al., 2010]. Model simulations using R-SWMS for more natural soil and weather conditions could be used in future to parameterize the relation between soil water availability and transpiration in large scale land surface models and offer the possibility to include plant properties or plant species dependent regulation mechanisms in these parameterizations.

  4. Uptake and Reactions of Formaldehyde, Acetaldehyde, Acetone, Propanal and Ethanol in Sulfuric Acid solutions at 200-240 K: Implications for upper tropospheric aerosol composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iraci, L. T.; Williams, M. B.; Axson, J.; Michelsen, R.

    2007-12-01

    The production of light absorbing, organic material in aerosol that is normally considered to be transparent in the UV and visible wavelength regions has significant implications for biogeochemical cycling and climate modelling. Production mechanisms likely involve carbonyl compounds such as formaldehyde, acetone, acetaldehyde and propanal that are present in significant quantities in the upper troposphere (UT). In this study, we have performed experiments focusing on a class of acid catalyzed carbonyl reactions, the formation of acetals. R2C=O + 2R'OH --> R2C(OR')2 + H2O Using a Knudsen cell apparatus, we have measured the rate of uptake of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acetone, propanal, and ethanol into sulfuric acid solutions ranging between 40-70 wt% of acid, containing 0-0.1 M of ethanol, acetone or formaldehyde at temperatures of 220-250 K. For all reactant pairs, the aldol condensation path, including self reaction, should be insignificant at the acidities studied. Evidence for reaction between organics was observed for all pairs, except those involving propanal which were likely limited by the very low solubility. We attribute enhanced uptake to the formation of acetals, such as 1,1-diethoxyethane and 2,2- diethoxypropane, among others. Enhanced uptake was observed to proceed on timescales > 1 hour and sometimes shows complex dependence on acidity that is likely related to speciation of the individual carbonyls in acidic solution. The acetal products do not absorb in the visible but are less volatile than parent molecules, allowing for accumulation in sulfuric acid particles, and enhanced uptake. Cross reactions of carbonyls with alcohols in sulfuric acid medium have not been previously measured, yet methanol and ethanol show high solubility and are present at significant concentrations in the UT. Thus even at slow reaction rates, the acetal reaction has ample starting material and proceeds under conditions common to the UT. We will present results for the

  5. Relating Aerosol Mass and Optical Depth in the Summertime Continental Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brock, C. A.; Wagner, N.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Attwood, A. R.; Washenfelder, R. A.; Brown, S. S.; McComiskey, A. C.; Gordon, T. D.; Welti, A.; Carlton, A. G.; Murphy, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    Aerosol optical depth (AOD), the column-integrated ambient aerosol light extinction, is determined from satellite and ground-based remote sensing measurements. AOD is the parameter most often used to validate earth system model simulations of aerosol mass. Relating aerosol mass to AOD, however, is problematic due to issues including aerosol water uptake as a function of relative humidity (RH) and the complicated relationship between aerosol physicochemical properties and light extinction. Measurements of aerosol microphysical, chemical, and optical properties help to constrain the relationship between aerosol mass and optical depth because aerosol extinction at ambient RH is a function of the abundance, composition and size distribution of the aerosol. We use vertical profiles of humidity and dry aerosol extinction observed in the southeastern United States (U.S.) to examine the relationship between submicron aerosol mass concentration and extinction at ambient RH. We show that the κ-Köhler parameterization directly, and without additional Mie calculations, describes the change in extinction with varying RH as a function of composition for both aged aerosols typical of the polluted summertime continental boundary layer and the biomass burning aerosols we encountered. We calculate how AOD and the direct radiative effect in the eastern U.S. have likely changed due to trends in aerosol composition in recent decades. We also examine the sensitivity of AOD to the RH profile and to aerosol composition, size distribution and abundance.

  6. Elemental distribution and uptake by watercress (Nasturtium aquaticum) as a function of water quality.

    PubMed

    Kisten, Kimona; Gounden, Denisha; Moodley, Roshila; Jonnalagadda, Sreekantha B

    2015-01-01

    Watercress (Nasturtium aquaticum), is an edible plant commonly found in Southern Africa, which grows both in terrestrial and aquatic environments. The elemental concentrations in the plant and surrounding water (growth solution) were investigated to determine the plants nutritional value and to establish impact of water quality on elemental uptake by the plant. The concentrations in the leaves, roots and water were analyzed at eight different sites along the east coast of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa (30.0000° S, 25.0000° E). Elemental concentrations in the leaves/roots (μg g(-1), dry mass) and water exchangeable/total (μg L(-1)) at Verulam (situated in the northern part of KwaZulu-Natal) were: As (1.2/7.5 and 0.053/0.09), Ca (18272/26091 and 0.336/7.15), Cd (0.9/0.8 and 0.004/0.01), Co (37.2/34 and 0/0), Cr (7/35 and 0.003/0.03), Cu (3/19 and 0.016/0.16), Fe (528/4308 and 0.375/0.6), Mg (3444/1141 and 6.4/7), Mn (110/667 and 0/0), Ni (20/63 and 0/0.01), Pb (16/17 and 0.01/0.02), Se (28/11 and 0.003/0.01) and Zn (102/116 and 0.099/0.36). Elemental uptake was controlled by the plant but water quality did have an impact on uptake. Concentrations of metals in the leaves were in decreasing order of Ca > Mg > Fe > Mn > Zn > Cu > Cr > Ni > Pb > Se > Cd > As > Co. The watercress plant was found to be a rich source of essential elements especially Fe and Cr and contained low concentrations of the toxic metals investigated thereby making it safe for human consumption. PMID:25844866

  7. Impacts of Stabilized Criegee Intermediates, surface uptake processes and higher aromatic secondary organic aerosol yields on predicted PM2.5 concentrations in the Mexico City Metropolitan Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Qi; Cureño, Iris V.; Chen, Gang; Ali, Sajjad; Zhang, Hongliang; Malloy, Meagan; Bravo, Humberto A.; Sosa, Rodolfo

    2014-09-01

    The Community Multiscale Air Quality Model (CMAQ) with the SAPRC-99 gas phase photochemical mechanism and the AERO5 aerosol module was applied to model gases and particulate matter (PM) concentrations in the Mexico City Metropolitan Zone (MCMZ) and the surrounding regions for March 2006 using the official 2006 emission inventories, along with emissions from biogenic sources, biomass burning, windblown dust, the Tula Industrial Complex and the Popocatépetl volcano. The base case model was capable of reproducing the observed hourly concentrations of O3 and attaining CO, NO2 and NOx performance similar to previous modeling studies. Although the base case model performance of hourly PM2.5 and PM10 meets the model performance criteria, under-prediction of high PM2.5 concentrations in late morning indicates that secondary PM, such as sulfate and secondary organic aerosol (SOA), might be under-predicted. Several potential pathways to increase SOA and secondary sulfate were investigated, including Stabilized Criegee Intermediates (SCIs) from ozonolysis reactions of unsaturated hydrocarbons and their reactions with SO2, the reactive uptake processes of SO2, glyoxal and methylglyoxal on particle surface and higher SOA formation due to higher mass yields of aromatic SOA precursors. Averaging over the entire episode, the glyoxal and methylglyoxal reactive uptake and higher aromatics SOA yields contribute to ∼0.9 μg m-3 and ∼1.25 μg m-3 of SOA, respectively. Episode average SOA in the MCMZ reaches ∼3 μg m-3. The SCI pathway increases PM2.5 sulfate by 0.2-0.4 μg m-3 or approximately 10-15%. The relative amount of sulfate increase due to SCI agrees with previous studies in summer eastern US. Surface SO2 uptake significantly increases sulfate concentration in MCMZ by 1-3 μg m-3 or approximately 50-60%. The higher SOA and sulfate leads to improved PM2.5 and PM10 model performance.

  8. Hydraulic resistance of a plant root to water-uptake: A slender-body theory.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kang Ping

    2016-05-01

    A slender-body theory for calculating the hydraulic resistance of a single plant root is developed. The work provides an in-depth discussion on the procedure and the assumptions involved in calculating a root׳s internal hydraulic resistance as well as the physical and the mathematical aspects of the external three-dimensional flow around the tip of a root in a saturated soil and how this flow pattern enhances uptake and reduces hydraulic resistance. Analytical solutions for the flux density distribution on the stele-cortex interface, local water-uptake profile inside the stele core, the overall water-uptake at the base of the stele, and the total hydraulic resistance of a root are obtained in the slender-body limit. It is shown that a key parameter controlling a root's hydraulic resistance is the dimensionless axial conductivity in the stele, which depends on the permeabilities of the stele and the cortex as well as the root's radial and axial dimensions. Three-dimensional tip effect reduces a root's hydraulic resistance by as much as 36% when compared to the radial flow theory of Landsberg and Fowkes. In addition, the total hydraulic resistance cannot be generally decomposed into the direct sum of a radial resistance and an axial resistance. PMID:26920247

  9. Aerosol chemistry and the effect of aerosol water content on visibility impairment and radiative forcing in Guangzhou during the 2006 Pearl River Delta campaign.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jinsang; Lee, Hanlim; Kim, Young J; Liu, Xingang; Zhang, Yuanhang; Gu, Jianwei; Fan, Shaojia

    2009-08-01

    Optical and chemical aerosol measurements were obtained from 2 to 31 July 2006 at an urban site in the metropolitan area of Guangzhou (China) as part of the Program of Regional Integrated Experiment of Air Quality over Pearl River Delta (PRIDE-PRD2006) to investigate aerosol chemistry and the effect of aerosol water content on visibility impairment and radiative forcing. During the PRIDE-PRD2006 campaign, the average contributions of ammonium sulfate, organic mass by carbon (OMC), elemental carbon (EC), and sea salt (SS) to total PM(2.5) mass were measured to be 36.5%, 5.7%, 27.1%, 7.8%, and 3.7%, respectively. Compared with the clean marine period, (NH(4))(2)SO(4), NH(4)NO(3), and OMC were all greatly enhanced (by up to 430%) during local haze periods via the accumulation of a secondary aerosol component. The OMC dominance increased when high levels of biomass burning influenced the measurement site while (NH(4))(2)SO(4) and OMC did when both biomass burning and industrial emissions influenced it. The effect of aerosol water content on the total light-extinction coefficient was estimated to be 34.2%, of which 25.8% was due to aerosol water in (NH(4))(2)SO(4), 5.1% that in NH(4)NO(3), and 3.3% that in SS. The average mass-scattering efficiency (MSE) of PM(10) particles was determined to be 2.2+/-0.6 and 4.6+/-1.7m(2)g(-1) under dry (RH<40%) and ambient conditions, respectively. The average single-scattering albedo (SSA) was 0.80+/-0.08 and 0.90+/-0.04 under dry and ambient conditions, respectively. Not only are the extinction and scattering coefficients greatly enhanced by aerosol water content, but MSE and SSA are also highly sensitive. It can be concluded that sulfate and carbonaceous aerosol, as well as aerosol water content, play important roles in the processes that determine visibility impairment and radiative forcing in the ambient atmosphere of the Guangzhou urban area. PMID:19523748

  10. Cloud and Aerosol Properties, Precipitable Water, and Profiles of Temperature and Water Vapor from MODIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Michael D.; Menzel, W. Paul; Kaufman, Yoram J.; Tanre, Didier; Gao, Bo-Cai; Platnick, Steven; Ackerman, Steven A.; Remer, Lorraine A.; Pincus, Robert; Hubanks, Paul A.

    2003-01-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) is an earth-viewing sensor that flies on the Earth Observing System (EOS) Terra and Aqua satellites, launched in 1999 and 2002, respectively. MODIS scans a swath width of 2330 km that is sufficiently wide to provide nearly complete global coverage every two days from a polar-orbiting, sun-synchronous, platform at an altitude of 705 km. MODIS provides images in 36 spectral bands between 0.415 and 14.235 pm with spatial resolutions of 250 m (2 bands), 500 m (5 bands) and 1000 m (29 bands). These bands have been carefully selected to en- able advanced studies of land, ocean, and atmospheric properties. Twenty-six bands are used to derive atmospheric properties such as cloud mask, atmospheric profiles, aerosol properties, total precipitable water, and cloud properties. In this paper we describe each of these atmospheric data products, including characteristics of each of these products such as file size, spatial resolution used in producing the product, and data availability.

  11. Improvement of GOCI Yonsei Aerosol retrieval algorithm and validation during DRAGON campaign: Surface reflectance issue according to land, clear water and turbid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jhoon; Choi, Myungje; Lee, Jaehwa

    2015-04-01

    Aerosol optical properties (AOPs) over East Asia are retrieved hourly from the first Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI). GOCI Yonsei aerosol retrieval (YAER) algorithm was developed and improved continuously. Final products of GOCI YAER are aerosol optical depth (AOD), fine-mode fraction (FMF), single scattering albedo (SSA), Angstrom exponent (AE) and aerosol type in high spatial and temporal resolution. Previous aerosol retrieval algorithm over ocean adopts surface reflectance using cox and munk technique as fixed wind speed or the minimum reflectivity technique for continuous characteristics between ocean and land. This study adopt cox and munk technique using real time ECMWF wind speed data over clear water and the minimum reflectivity technique over turbid water. For detecting turbid water, TOA reflectance of 412, 660, and 865nm was used. Over the turbid water, TOA reflectance at 660nm increases more than 412 and 865nm. It also shows more sensitivity over turbid water than dust aerosol. We evaluated the accuracy of GOCI aerosol products using ground-based AERONET Level 2.0 products from total 38 East Asia sites and satellite-based MODIS-Aqua aerosol C6 products. The period of assessment is 3 months from March to May, 2012. Comparison results show that a correlation coefficient between the AODs at 550 nm of AERONET and GOCI is 0.884. Comparison results over ocean between GOCI and MODIS DT algorithm shows good agreement as R = 0.915.

  12. The Formation and Aerosol Uptake of Isoprene Nitrooxyhydroxyepoxide (INHE), a Newly Identified Product from the RO2 + HO2 Pathway of Isoprene NO3 Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwantes, R.; Teng, A.; Nguyen, T.; Coggon, M. M.; Zhang, X.; Schilling-Fahnestock, K.; Crounse, J.; St Clair, J. M.; Seinfeld, J.; Wennberg, P. O.

    2014-12-01

    Isoprene (C5H8) reacts with the nitrate radical (NO3) during the night to produce a peroxy nitrate radical (RO2). This RO2 can react with nitrogen oxides (i.e., NO, NO2, or NO3) and other RO2 radicals to form isoprene nitrates or with the hydroperoxyl radical (HO2) to form nitrooxyhydroperoxide (INP). Both model and field studies have found that in the ambient atmosphere much of the RO2 radical reacts with HO2. More specifically, during the 2013 SOAS field campaign, INP was one of the main species that increased at sunset suggesting the RO2 + HO2 pathway from NO3 oxidation is important in the southeastern US and similar areas. However, chamber studies so far have been run under conditions that optimize RO2 + NO3 reactions and/or RO2 + RO2 reactions. In this work, we present a new way to run NO3 oxidation chamber experiments that optimize for the RO2 + HO2 pathway creating a more atmospherically relevant product distribution. The gas phase formation of INP and subsequent oxidation products were monitored using a chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS). Because isoprene nitrates formed from NO3 oxidation react slowly with ozone (O3) and NO3, many of these nitrates will remain in the atmosphere until the sun rises and hydroxyl radical (OH) begins to form. Results from these chamber experiments suggest that OH will react with INP to form nitrooxyhydroxyepoxide (INHE), a newly identified product from INP. We suspect INHE could be important for Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) production due to its similarity to isoprene epoxydiol (IEPOX), a product from isoprene OH oxidation that has been shown to be a significant SOA precursor. We studied the uptake of INHE onto various seed types, and found that as expected INHE rapidly partitions to highly acidic seed aerosol due to an acid catalyzed ring opening. A time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (ToF-AMS) was used to understand the chemical composition of the aerosol produced from the various seed types.

  13. Using stable isotopes to determine seasonal variations in water uptake of summer maize under different fertilization treatments.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ying; Song, Xianfang

    2016-04-15

    Fertilization and water both affect root water uptake in the nutrient and water cycle of the Soil-Plant-Atmosphere-Continuum (SPAC). In this study, dual stable isotopes (D and (18)O) were used to determine seasonal variations in water uptake patterns of summer maize under different fertilization treatments in Beijing, China during 2013-2014. The contributions of soil water at different depths to water uptake were quantified by the MixSIAR Bayesian mixing model. Water uptake was mainly sourced from soil water in the 0-20cm depth at the seeding (67.7%), jointing (60.5%), tasseling (47.5%), dough (41.4%), and harvest (43.9%) stages, and the 20-50cm depth at the milk stage (32.8%). Different levels of fertilization application led to considerable differences in the proportional contribution of soil water at 0-20cm (6.0-58.5%) and 20-50cm (6.1-26.3%). There was little difference of contributions in the deep layers (50-200cm) among treatments in 2013, whereas differences were observed in 50-90cm at the milk stage and 50-200cm at the dough stage during 2014. The main water uptake depth was concentrated in the upper soil layers (0-50cm) during the wet season (2013), whereas a seasonal drought in 2014 promoted the contribution of soil water in deep layers. The contribution of soil water was significantly and positively correlated with the proportions of root length (r=0.753, p<0.01). The changes of soil water distribution were consistent with the seasonal variation in water uptake patterns. The present study identified water sources for summer maize under varying fertilization treatments and provided scientific implications for fertilization and irrigation management. PMID:26845183

  14. Changes in the shape of cloud ice water content vertical structure due to aerosol variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massie, Steven T.; Delanoë, Julien; Bardeen, Charles G.; Jiang, Jonathan H.; Huang, Lei

    2016-05-01

    Changes in the shape of cloud ice water content (IWC) vertical structure due to variations in Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aerosol optical depths (AODs), Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) absorptive aerosol optical depths (AAODs), and Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) CO (an absorptive aerosol proxy) at 215 hPa are calculated in the Tropics during 2007-2010 based upon an analysis of DARDAR IWC profiles for deep convective clouds. DARDAR profiles are a joint retrieval of CloudSat-CALIPSO data. Analysis is performed for 12 separate regions over land and ocean, and carried out applying MODIS AOD fields that attempt to correct for 3-D cloud adjacency effects. The 3-D cloud adjacency effects have a small impact upon our particular calculations of aerosol-cloud indirect effects. IWC profiles are averaged for three AOD bins individually for the 12 regions. The IWC average profiles are also normalized to unity at 5 km altitude in order to study changes in the shape of the average IWC profiles as AOD increases. Derivatives of the IWC average profiles, and derivatives of the IWC shape profiles, in percent change per 0.1 change in MODIS AOD units, are calculated separately for each region. Means of altitude-specific probability distribution functions, which include both ocean and land IWC shape regional derivatives, are modest, near 5 %, and positive to the 2σ level between 11 and 15 km altitude. Similar analyses are carried out for three AAOD and three CO bins. On average, the vertical profiles of the means of the derivatives based upon the profile shapes over land and ocean are smaller for the profiles binned according to AAOD and CO values, than for the MODIS AODs, which include both scattering and absorptive aerosol. This difference in character supports the assertion that absorptive aerosol can inhibit cloud development.

  15. Hexachlorobenzene uptake by fathead minnows and macroinvertebrates in recirculating sediment/water systems

    SciTech Connect

    Schuytema, G.S.; Krawczyk, D.F.; Griffis, W.L.; Nebeker, A.V.; Robideaux, M.L.

    1990-01-01

    Fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas), the worm, Lumbriculus variegatus, and the amphipods Hyalella azteca and Gammarus lacustris were exposed to hexachlorobenzene (HCB) in water with and without a bed of HCB-spiked sediment. Water HCB concentrations were maintained by recirculation through HCB-packed columns. Recirculating HCB-bound particulates and possibly eroded HCB particulates were an added source of HCB in addition to the sediment bed. Significant bioaccumulation of HCB in animal tissues was observed in water-only and water-sediment exposures. The presence of the HCB-spiked sediment did not result in a significant increase in the uptake of HCB by the organisms, but there was a substantial increase in sediment HCB levels over time. Higher tissue HCB levels in aquaria without sediment suggest that the sediment was a more efficient sink for HCB than the organisms.

  16. Model-aided characterization of Tenax-TA for aromatic compound uptake from water.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dongye; Pignatello, Joseph J

    2004-07-01

    The polymer adsorbent Tenax has been widely employed for studying desorption of organic contaminants in soils and sediments and for correlating physical availability with bioavailability. Although Tenax has been invoked to act as an infinite sink that completely and instantaneously removes solutes from the aqueous phase, to our knowledge no systematic characterization of Tenax resins has been carried out. The present study provides equilibrium and kinetic parameters for the uptake of benzene, nitrobenzene, naphthalene, phenanthrene, and pyrene by Tenax in selected water-solute-Tenax systems, and it offers guidelines for the use of Tenax resins. Sorption isotherms of the test compounds on Tenax-TA are nonlinear, and most show an inflection at high concentration, marking a change in physical state from glassy to rubbery. A simple dual-mode model was applied to the isotherms below the apparent inflection point. Sorption parameters for dissolution and hole-filling domains each correlate with the octanol-water partition coefficient. The effects of dissolved organic matter and salinity on Tenax-TA uptake are minor. Regeneration of Tenax-TA by hot-methanol extraction increased its affinity for naphthalene. Inclusion of 23% graphitized carbon in the polymer reduced affinity for phenanthrene. Uptake rate data were fit by the dual-mode diffusion model, which assumes diffusion in the polymer matrix. The obtained diffusion rate parameter correlates with molecular size. Equilibrium and kinetic parameters for benzene and nitrobenzene were comparable despite a three-orders-of-magnitude difference in their Henry's law coefficients, indicating that a pathway to the Tenax surface through the vapor phase is not required. Extrapolating to typical conditions in soil-desorption studies reveals that single-solute uptake is 95% or more complete within 4 min for the test compounds and within 7 min for benzo[a]pyrene. Thus, Tenax is suitable for compounds with desorption from soil or

  17. Primary and Secondary Aerosol Investigation from Different Sea-Waters in the Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'anna, B.; Marchand, N.; Sellegri, K.; Sempéré, R.; Mas, S.; George, C.; Meme, A.; Frihi, A.; Pey, J.; Schwier, A.; Delmont, A.

    2014-12-01

    The Mediterranean Sea is a special marine environment characterized by low biological activity and high anthropogenic pressure. It is often difficult to discriminate the contribution of Primary and Secondary Aerosol formed at the sea-air interface from background level of the aerosol. We therefore decided to study the sea-air exchanges in a controlled environment provided by a 2m3simulation chamber, using freshly collected sea-water samples from the SEMEX site (43°15'64 N, 05°20'01 E) near Marseille bay. Two types of experiments were conducted for 4 weeks testing 3 different sea-waters. Primary sea-aerosol was generated by bubble-bursting method, then introduced in the simulation chamber and exposed to atmospheric oxidants (O3, OH) and light to simulated primary aerosol aging. A second set of experiments focused on secondary particle formation upon illumination and/or ozone exposure of the sea-water surface (15l of sea-water were deposited in a pyrex container located inside the simulation chamber). New particle formation was only observed for relatively high DOC level of the sea-water sample. Particles detection and analysis was followed by a PSM (1nm size), a CPC (2.5nm size), a SMPS (granulometry), a CCN chamber for hygroscopicity studies, a TOF-AMS (Aerodyne) for chemical analysis of the sub-micrometer fraction. Off-line analysis included TEM-EDX samples for morphology and size distribution studies and a hybrid quadrupole-orbitrap mass spectrometer (Thermo Fischer) for the molecular identification of the organic fraction. VOCs were measured on-line by PTR-HR-MS. The seawater samples were filtered at 60μm before use and were daily analyzed for chemical (colored dissolved organic matter, particulate matter and related polar compounds, transparent polysaccharides and nutrients concentration) and biological (chlorophyll a, virus, phytoplankton and zooplankton) analyses.

  18. Correction of water vapor absorption for aerosol remote sensing with ceilometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiegner, M.; Gasteiger, J.

    2015-09-01

    In recent years attention was increasingly paid to backscatter profiles of ceilometers as a new source of aerosol information. Several case studies have shown that - although originally intended for cloud detection only - ceilometers can provide the planetary boundary layer height and even quantitative information such as the aerosol backscatter coefficient βp, provided that the signals have been calibrated. It is expected that the retrieval of aerosol parameters will become widespread as the number of ceilometers is steadily increasing, and continuous and unattended operation is provided. In this context however one should be aware of the fact that the majority of ceilometers provides signals that are influenced by atmospheric water vapor. As a consequence, profiles of aerosol parameters can only be retrieved if water vapor absorption is taken into account. In this paper we describe the influence of water vapor absorption on ceilometer signals at wavelengths around λ = 910 nm. Spectrally high-resolved absorption coefficients are calculated from HITRAN on the basis of realistic emission spectra of ceilometers. These results are used as a reference to develop a methodology ("WAPL") for routine and near-real time corrections of the water vapor influence. Comparison of WAPL with the reference demonstrates its very high accuracy. Extensive studies with simulations based on measurements reveal that the error when water vapor absorption is ignored in the βp-retrieval can be in the order of 20 % for mid-latitudes and more than 50 % for the tropics. It is concluded that the emission spectrum of the laser source should be provided by the manufacturer to increase the accuracy of WAPL, and that 910 nm is better suited than 905 nm. With WAPL systematic errors can be avoided, that would exceed the inherent errors of the Klett solutions by far.

  19. Correction of water vapor absorption for aerosol remote sensing with ceilometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiegner, M.; Gasteiger, J.

    2015-06-01

    In recent years attention was increasingly paid to backscatter profiles of ceilometers as a new source of aerosol information. Several case studies have shown that - although originally intended for cloud detection only - ceilometers can provide the planetary boundary layer height and even quantitative information such as the aerosol backscatter coefficient βp, provided that the signals have been calibrated. It is expected that the retrieval of aerosol parameters will become widespread as the number of ceilometers is steadily increasing, and continuous and unattended operation is provided. In this context however one should be aware of the fact that the majority of ceilometers emit wavelengths that are influenced by atmospheric water vapor. As a consequence, profiles of aerosol parameters can only be retrieved if water vapor absorption is taken into account. In this paper we describe the influence of water vapor absorption on ceilometer signals at wavelengths in the range around λ = 910 nm. Spectrally high resolved absorption coefficients are calculated from HITRAN on the basis of realistic emission spectra of ceilometers. These results are used as reference to develop a methodology ("WAPL") for routine and near real time corrections of the water vapor influence. Comparison of WAPL with the reference demonstrates its very high accuracy. Extensive studies with simulations based on measurements reveal that the error when water vapor absorption is ignored in the βp retrieval can be in the order of 20 % for mid-latitudes and more than 50 % for the tropics. It is concluded that the emission spectrum of the laser source should be provided by the manufacturer to increase the accuracy of WAPL, and that 910 nm is better suited than 905 nm. With WAPL systematic errors can be avoided, that would exceed the inherent random errors of the Klett solutions by far.

  20. Pore Distribution and Water Uptake in a Cenosphere-Cement Paste Composite Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baronins, J.; Setina, J.; Sahmenko, G.; Lagzdina, S.; Shishkin, A.

    2015-11-01

    Alumina silicate cenospheres (CS) is a significant waste material from power plants that use a coal. Use CS as Portland cement replacement material gives opportunity to control physical and mechanical properties and makes a product lighter and more cost-effective. In the frame of this study, Portland cement paste samples were produced by adding CS in the concentration range from 0 to 40 volume %. Water uptake of hardened samples was checked and pore size distribution by using the mercury porosimetry was determined. In a cold climate where the temperature often falls below 0 °C, it is important to avoid the amount of micrometer sized pores in the final structure and to decrease water absorption capacity of material. In winter conditions, water fills such pores and causes additional stresses to their walls by expansion while freezing. It was found that generally water uptake capacity for cement paste samples decreased up to 20% by increasing the concentration of CS up to 40 volume %, at the same time, the volume of micrometer sized opened pores increases.

  1. Conductivity and water uptake of aromatic-based proton exchange membrane electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kopitzke, R.W.; Linkous, C.A.; Anderson, H.R.; Nelson, G.L.

    2000-05-01

    Water uptake and proton conductivity as a function of temperature were determined for three aromatic-based, sulfonic acid-bearing polymers, plus the perfluoroalkyl sulfonic acid Nafion{reg_sign} 117. Water uptake of submerged, equilibrated samples ranged from less than five water molecules per acid group for a high equivalent weight, sulfonated polyethersulfone to almost fifty waters per acid for a low equivalent weight, sulfonated polyetheretherketone. The most conductive aromatic-based polymer, sulfonated polyphenylquinoxaline (S-PPQ), had a room temperature conductivity of 9.8 x 10{sup {minus}3} S/cm, about an order of magnitude less than that of a perfluoroalkyl sulfonic acid under identical conditions. The slope of the S-PPQ Arrhenius conductivity plot was sufficiently steep that at 180 C, the proton conductivity, 1.3 x 10{sup {minus}1} S/cm, was only a factor of two lower than that of Nafion under similar conditions. The lower conductivity of the aromatic-based sulfonic acid polymers can be attributed to chain rigidity, lack of ion channels, and lower acidity.

  2. Mathematical modelling study for water uptake of steadily growing plant root

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Jiaqing; Jiao, Weiping; Xu, Jianjun

    2008-02-01

    The root system of plant is a vitally important organ for living plant. One of the major functions of the root system is uptaking water and nutrients from the soil. The present paper analyzes the whole process of water uptake from soil by a steadily growing plant with a single slender root. We start from the basic principles of physics and fluid-dynamics, consider the structure characteristics of the water transport channel formed by the tiny xylems tubes inside plant, and establish a simplified coherent mathematical model to describe the water transport in the complete system consisting of soil, individual plant, including root, stem and leaves-atmosphere, on the basis of the plant physiology. Moreover, we resolve the proposed mathematical model for a simple artificial plant model under a variety of conditions, in terms of the numerical approach as well as analytical approach. It is shown that the results obtained by both approaches are in very good agreement; the theoretical predictions are qualitatively consistent with the practical experiences very well. The simplified mathematical model established in the present paper may provide a basis for the further investigations on the more sophisticated mathematical model.

  3. Marine sediment tolerances for remote sensing of atmospheric aerosols over water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitlock, C. H.

    1982-01-01

    In surveying the literature, it is pointed out that there is a need to quantify the turbidity below which reflectance from the water column is negligible in comparison with atmospheric effects to allow the monitoring of aerosol optical depth over water bodies. Data that partially satisfy this need are presented. Laboratory measurements of reflectance upwelled from the water column are given for mixtures with various types of sediment at wavelengths between 400 and 1600 nm. The results of the study described here are a quantitative endorsement of the recommendations of Morell and Gordon (1980).

  4. The impact of mucilage exudate on root water uptake - Numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, N.; Carminati, A.; Javaux, M.

    2015-12-01

    For many years, the rhizosphere, which is the zone of soil in the vicinity of the roots and which is influenced by the roots, is known as a unique soil environment with different physical, biological and chemical properties than those of the bulk soil. Indeed, in recent studies it has been shown that root exudates and especially mucilage alter the hydraulic properties of the soil, and that drying and wetting cycles of mucilage result in non-equilibrium water dynamics in the rhizosphere. While there are experimental evidences and simplified 1D model for those concepts, an integrated model that considers rhizosphere processes with a detailed model for water and roots flow is absent. Therefore, the objective of this work is to develop a 3D physical model of water flow in the soil-plant continuum that take in consideration root architecture and rhizosphere specific properties. We simulate wetting and drying cycles and examine the impact of various rhizosphere processes on water content distribution and root water uptake (RWU). For wetting, the model predict that after infiltration the rate of change in the rhizosphere water content is lower than in the bulk soil (due to non-equilibrium), but over time water infiltrated into the rhizosphere and eventually the water content in the rhizosphere became higher than in the bulk soil. For drying, the high water holding capacity of the rhizosphere, and the non-equilibrium between water content and water potential delay the onset of stress. Furthermore, when continues drying-wetting setup is examined, rhizosphere properties results in a lower fluctuation of the water content around the root. Overall, the model presented here is the first attempt to include rhizosphere specific processes within a detailed soil-plant water flow model. The model provides a tool to examine the impact of different rhizosphere processes on water dynamics and RWU under different irrigation practices.

  5. CalWater 2015 — Atmospheric Rivers and Aerosol Impacts on Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spackman, J. R.; Ralph, F. M.; Prather, K. A.; Cayan, D.; DeMott, P. J.; Dettinger, M. D.; Doyle, J. D.; Fairall, C. W.; Leung, L. R.; Rosenfeld, D.; Rutledge, S. A.; Waliser, D. E.; White, A. B.

    2015-12-01

    The CalWater 2015 field experiment was conducted between January and March and consisted of more than fifty science flights, a major research cruise, and continuous ground-based observations coordinated to study phenomena driving the incidence of extreme precipitation events and the variability of water supply along the West Coast of the United States. CalWater 2015 examined key processes linked to (1) atmospheric rivers (ARs) in delivering much of the precipitation associated with major winter storms, and (2) aerosols, originating from local sources as well as from remote continents, within and between storms and their modulating effects on precipitation on the U.S. West Coast. As part of a large interagency field effort including NOAA, DOE, NASA, NSF, and the Naval Research Laboratory, four research aircraft from three government agencies were deployed in coordination with the oceangoing NOAA Ronald H. Brown and were equipped with meteorological and chemical observing systems in near-shore regions of California and the eastern Pacific. At the same time, ground-based measurements from NOAA's HydroMeteorological Testbed (HMT) network on the U.S. West Coast and a major NSF-supported observing site for aerosols and microphysics at Bodega Bay, California provided continuous near surface-level meteorological and chemical observations, respectively, during CalWater 2015. The DOE-sponsored ARM Cloud Aerosol and Precipitation Experiment (ACAPEX) was executed in close coordination with NOAA and NASA facilities and deployed airborne and ship-based observing systems. This presentation summarizes the objectives, implementation strategy, data acquisitions, and some preliminary results from CalWater 2015 addressing science gaps associated with (1) the evolution and structure of ARs including cloud and precipitation processes and air-sea interaction, and (2) aerosol interaction with ARs and the impact on precipitation, including locally-generated aerosol effects on orographic

  6. Water-soluble Organic Components in Aerosols Associated with Savanna Fires in Southern Africa: Identification, Evolution and Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Song; Hegg, Dean A.; Hobbs, Peter V.; Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Magi, Brian I.; Sadilek, Martin

    2003-01-01

    During the SAFARI 2000 field campaign, both smoke aerosols from savanna fires and haze aerosols in the boundary layer and in the free troposphere were collected from an aircraft in southern Africa. These aerosol samples were analyzed for their water-soluble chemical components, particularly the organic species. A novel technique, electrospray ionization-ion trap mass spectrometry, was used concurrently with an ion chromatography system to analyze for carbohydrate species. Seven carbohydrates, seven organic acids, five metallic elements, and three inorganic anions were identified and quantified. On the average, these 22 species comprised 36% and 27% of the total aerosol mass in haze and smoke aerosols, respectively. For the smoke aerosols, levoglucosan was the most abundant carbohydrate species, while gluconic acid was tentatively identified as the most abundant organic acid. The mass abundance and possible source of each class of identified species are discussed, along with their possible formation pathways. The combustion phase of a fire had an impact on the chemical composition of the emitted aerosols. Secondary formation of sulfate, nitrate, levoglucosan, and several organic acids occurred during the initial aging of smoke aerosols. It is likely that under certain conditions, some carbohydrate species in smoke aerosols, such as levoglucosan, were converted to organic acids during upward transport.

  7. CalWater 2 - Precipitation, Aerosols, and Pacific Atmospheric Rivers Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spackman, J. R.; Ralph, F. M.; Prather, K. A.; Cayan, D. R.; DeMott, P. J.; Dettinger, M. D.; Fairall, C. W.; Leung, L. R.; Rosenfeld, D.; Rutledge, S. A.; Waliser, D. E.; White, A. B.

    2014-12-01

    Emerging research has identified two phenomena that play key roles in the variability of the water supply and the incidence of extreme precipitation events along the West Coast of the United States. These phenomena include the role of (1) atmospheric rivers (ARs) in delivering much of the precipitation associated with major storms along the U.S. West Coast, and (2) aerosols—from local sources as well as those transported from remote continents—and their modulating effects on western U.S. precipitation. A better understanding of these processes is needed to reduce uncertainties in weather predictions and climate projections of extreme precipitation and its effects, including the provision of beneficial water supply. This presentation summarizes the science objectives and strategies to address gaps associated with (1) the evolution and structure of ARs including cloud and precipitation processes and air-sea interaction, and (2) aerosol interaction with ARs and the impact on precipitation, including locally-generated aerosol effects on orographic precipitation along the U.S. West Coast. Observations are proposed for multiple winter seasons as part of a 5-year broad interagency vision referred to as CalWater 2 to address these science gaps (http://esrl.noaa.gov/psd/calwater). In January-February 2015, a field campaign has been planned consisting of a targeted set of aircraft and ship-based measurements and associated evaluation of data in near-shore regions of California and in the eastern Pacific. In close coordination with NOAA, DOE's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program is also contributing air and shipborne facilities for ACAPEX (ARM Cloud Aerosol and Precipitation Experiment), a DOE-sponsored study complementing CalWater 2. Ground-based measurements from NOAA's HydroMeteorological Testbed (HMT) network in California and aerosol chemical instrumentation at Bodega Bay, California have been designed to add important near surface-level context for the

  8. Tropical intercontinental optical measurement network of aerosol, precipitable water and total column ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holben, B. N.; Tanre, D.; Reagan, J. A.; Eck, T. F.; Setzer, A.; Kaufman, Y. A.; Vermote, E.; Vassiliou, G. D.; Lavenu, F.

    1992-01-01

    A new generation of automatic sunphotometers is used to systematically monitor clear sky total column aerosol concentration and optical properties, precipitable water and total column ozone diurnally and annually in West Africa and South America. The instruments are designed to measure direct beam sun, solar aureole and sky radiances in nine narrow spectral bands from the UV to the near infrared on an hourly basis. The instrumentation and the algorithms required to reduce the data for subsequent analysis are described.

  9. Scattering of intense femtosecond laser radiation at water aerosol in backward direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efimenko, E. S.; Malkov, Yu. A.; Murzanev, A. A.; Stepanov, A. N.

    2015-12-01

    We investigated the scattering of femtosecond laser pulses with intensities within the 1012-1013W/cm2 range at a water aerosol jet at 20° to backward direction. The scattered energy and spectra transformation as a function of incident intensity obtained in experiment show good agreement with the results of extensive numerical modeling based on self-consistent solution of Maxwell equations using a nonlinear 3D FDTD code and balance equation for plasma density.

  10. Fluorescent water-soluble organic aerosols in the High Arctic atmosphere

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Pingqing; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Chen, Jing; Qin, Mingyue; Ren, Lujie; Sun, Yele; Wang, Zifa; Barrie, Leonard A.; Tachibana, Eri; Ding, Aijun; Yamashita, Youhei

    2015-01-01

    Organic aerosols are ubiquitous in the earth’s atmosphere. They have been extensively studied in urban, rural and marine environments. However, little is known about the fluorescence properties of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) or their transport to and distribution in the polar regions. Here, we present evidence that fluorescent WSOC is a substantial component of High Arctic aerosols. The ratios of fluorescence intensity of protein-like peak to humic-like peak generally increased from dark winter to early summer, indicating an enhanced contribution of protein-like organics from the ocean to Arctic aerosols after the polar sunrise. Such a seasonal pattern is in agreement with an increase of stable carbon isotope ratios of total carbon (δ13CTC) from −26.8‰ to −22.5‰. Our results suggest that Arctic aerosols are derived from a combination of the long-range transport of terrestrial organics and local sea-to-air emission of marine organics, with an estimated contribution from the latter of 8.7–77% (mean 45%). PMID:25920042

  11. Measurements of water uptake of maize roots: insights for traits that influence water transport from the soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Mutez A.; Zarebanadkouki, Mohsen; Kroener, Eva; Carminati, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    Water availability is a primary constraint to the global crop production. Although maize (Zea mays L.) is one of the most important crops worldwide, there is limited information on the function of different root segments and types in extracting water from soils. Aim of this study was to investigate the location of water uptake in maize roots. We used neutron radiography to: 1) image the spatial distribution of maize roots in soil and 2) trace the transport of injected deuterated water (D2O) in soil and roots. Maize plants were grown in aluminum containers (40×38×1 cm) filled with sandy soil. The soil was partitioned into different compartments using 1-cm-thick layers of coarse sand. When the plants were two weeks-old we injected D2O into selected soil compartments. The experiments were performed during the day (transpiring plants) and night (non transpiring plants). The transport of D2O into roots was simulated using a convection-diffusion numerical model of D2O transport into roots. By fitting the observed D2O transport we quantified the diffusion coefficient and the water uptake of the different root segments. The maize root architecture consisted of a primary root, 4-5 seminal roots and many lateral roots connected to the primary and seminal roots. Laterals emerged from the proximal 15 cm of the primary and seminal roots. Both during day and night measurements, D2O entered more quickly into lateral roots than into primary and seminal roots. The quick transport of D2O into laterals was caused by the small radius of lateral roots. The diffusion coefficient of lateral roots (4.68×10-7cm2s-1)was similar to that of the distal segments of seminal roots (4.72×10-7cm2s-1) and higher than of the proximal segments (1.42×10-7cm2s-1). Water uptake of lateral roots (1.64×10-5cms-1)was much higher than that of the distal segments of seminal roots (1.18×10-12cms-1). Water uptake of the proximal seminal segments was negligible. We conclude that the function of lateral

  12. New Examination of the Traditional Raman Lidar Technique II: Temperature Dependence Aerosol Scattering Ratio and Water Vapor Mixing Ratio Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, David N.; Abshire, James B. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In a companion paper, the temperature dependence of Raman scattering and its influence on the Raman water vapor signal and the lidar equations was examined. New forms of the lidar equation were developed to account for this temperature sensitivity. Here we use those results to derive the temperature dependent forms of the equations for the aerosol scattering ratio, aerosol backscatter coefficient, extinction to backscatter ratio and water vapor mixing ratio. Pertinent analysis examples are presented to illustrate each calculation.

  13. Antarctic measurements of ozone, water vapor, and aerosol extinction by Sage 2 in the spring of 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, J. C.; Mccormick, M. Patrick

    1988-01-01

    Recent measurements of ozone, water vapor, and aerosol extinction from the spring of 1987 are presented and compared to 1985 and 1986. The observed changes to variations in meteorological conditions in the vortex for these three years are noted. March ozone data at similar latitudes for these three years will be used to investigate coupling between severity of the springtime depletion and early fall values. Researchers also investigate correlations between the measured species of water vapor, ozone, and aerosols throughout the vortex region.

  14. IMPACT OF AEROSOL LIQUID WATER ON SECONDARY ORGANIC AEROSOL YIELDS OF IRRADIATED TOLUENE/PROPYLENE/NOX/(NH4)2SO4/AIR MIXUTRES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to assess whether the presence of liquid water on pre-existing submicron ammonium sulfate aerosols affects yields of condensible organic compounds. Toluene/propylene/NOX/air mixtures were irradiated in the presence of submicron ammonium su...

  15. Mobile multi-wavelength polarization Raman lidar for water vapor, cloud and aerosol measurement.

    PubMed

    Wu, Songhua; Song, Xiaoquan; Liu, Bingyi; Dai, Guangyao; Liu, Jintao; Zhang, Kailin; Qin, Shengguang; Hua, Dengxin; Gao, Fei; Liu, Liping

    2015-12-28

    Aiming at the detection of atmospheric water vapor mixing ratio, depolarization ratio, backscatter coefficient, extinction coefficient and cloud information, the Water vapor, Cloud and Aerosol Lidar (WACAL) is developed by the lidar group at Ocean University of China. The lidar consists of transmitter, receiver, data acquisition and auxiliary system. For the measurement of various atmospheric physical properties, three channels including Raman channel, polarization channel and infrared channel are integrated in WACAL. The integration and working principle of these channels are introduced in details. The optical setup, the housekeeping of the system and the data retrieval routines are also presented. After the completion of the construction of the lidar, the WACAL system was installed in Ocean University of China (36.165°N, 120.5°E), Qingdao for the measurement of atmosphere during 2013 and 2014. The measurement principles and some case studies corresponding to various atmospheric physical properties are provided. Finally, the result of one continuous measurement example operated on 13 June 2014 is presented. The WACAL can measure the aerosol and cloud optical properties as well as the water vapor mixing ratio. It is useful for studying the direct and indirect effects of the aerosol on the climate change. PMID:26832047

  16. Radiative Forcing at the Surface by Clouds, Aerosols, and Water Vapor Over Tropical Oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Key, E.; Minnett, P.; Szczodrak, G.; Caniaux, G.; Voss, K.; Bourras, D.

    2007-12-01

    Data from recent campaigns conducted in the tropical Atlantic and Indian Oceans provide thorough testbeds for determining the contribution of clouds, aerosols, and water vapor to surface radiative forcing, with particular focus on areas of extreme SST gradients. Oceanographic cruises conducted during the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis included sampling monsoon onset in the Gulf of Guinea, which was characterized nearshore by rain and haze, the latter being a combination of water vapor and continental and pollution aerosols. Offshore and nearer to the equatorial cold tongue, the ITCZ was the dominant northern hemisphere cloud feature, while drier, cooler air masses existed south of the equator. The R/V Ronald H. Brown, operating a north-south transect along 23 W, encountered both atmospheric tropical wave conditions as well as dry Saharan Air Layers. In the Indian Ocean, the N/O Le Suroit occupied a point station near a positive SST anomaly to observe the onset of convection associated with the MJO and strong diurnal warming signatures. Combining radiative and turbulent flux data with measured and modeled profiles of the marine and atmospheric boundary layer, the evolution and interaction of the total air-sea column is observed. Particular emphasis is placed on the radiative forcing of clouds, aerosols, and water vapor on the sea surface skin temperature, towards the improvement of current diurnal warming models, which simplify atmospheric radiative effects into a general cloud parameter.

  17. Photosensitized Formation of Secondary Organic Aerosols above the Air/Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Bernard, F; Ciuraru, R; Boréave, A; George, C

    2016-08-16

    In this study, we evaluated photosensitized chemistry at the air-sea interface as a source of secondary organic aerosols (SOA). Our results show that, in addition to biogenic emissions, abiotic processes could also be important in the marine boundary layer. Photosensitized production of marine secondary organic aerosol was studied in a custom-built multiphase atmospheric simulation chamber. The experimental chamber contained water, humic acid (1-10 mg L(-1)) as a proxy for dissolved organic matter, and nonanoic acid (0.1-10 mM), a fatty acid proxy which formed an organic film at the air-water interface. Dark secondary reaction with ozone after illumination resulted in SOA particle concentrations in excess of 1000 cm(-3), illustrating the production of unsaturated compounds by chemical reactions at the air-water interface. SOA numbers via photosensitization alone and in the absence of ozone did not exceed background levels. From these results, we derived a dependence of SOA numbers on nonanoic acid surface coverage and dissolved organic matter concentration. We present a discussion on the potential role of the air-sea interface in the production of atmospheric organic aerosol from photosensitized origins. PMID:27434860

  18. Water Uptake By Mars Salt Analogs: An Investigation Of Stable Aqueous Solutions On Mars Using Raman Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuding, D.; Gough, R. V.; Jorgensen, S. K.; Tolbert, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    To understand the formation of briny aqueous solutions on Mars, a salt analog was developed to closely match the individual cation and anion concentrations as reported by the Wet Chemistry Laboratory aboard the Phoenix Lander. ';Instant Mars' is a salt analog developed to fully encompass the correct concentrations of magnesium, calcium, potassium, sodium, perchlorate, chloride, and sulfate ions. Using environmental Raman microscopy, we have studied the water uptake by the Instant Mars analog as a function of temperature and relative humidity. Water uptake was monitored using Raman spectroscopy in combination with optical microscopy. A MicroJet droplet generator was used to generate 30 μm diameter particles that were deposited onto a quartz disc. The particles undergo visual transformations as the relative humidity (RH) is increased and the presence of water uptake is confirmed by Raman spectroscopy. At -30° C, water uptake begins at ~ 35% RH as humidity is increased. The water uptake is marked by the growth of a sulfate peak at 990 cm-1, an indicator that sulfate has undergone a phase transition into an aqueous state. As the RH continues to increase, the peak in the O-H region (~3500 cm-1) broadens as more liquid water accumulates in the particles. The Instant Mars particles achieve complete deliquescence at 68% RH, indicated both visually and with Raman spectroscopy. The gradual water uptake observed suggests that deliquescence of the Instant Mars particles is not an immediate process, but that it occurs in steps marked by the deliquescence of the individual salts. Perhaps of even more significance is the tendency for the Instant Mars particles to remain aqueous at low humidity as RH is decreased. Raman spectra indicate that liquid water is present as low as 2% RH at -30° C. Ongoing work will examine the phase of Instant Mars particles under simulated Martian surface and subsurface conditions to gain insight into the possibility for aqueous solutions on Mars

  19. "Concordia res parvae crescunt" or how different approaches can be combined to decrypt root water uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meunier, Félicien; Couvreur, Valentin; Draye, Xavier; Javaux, Mathieu; Lobet, Guillaume

    2015-04-01

    In this study, we developed a new operation pipe showing that the combined use of computer models and in vivo experiments allows one a better analysis of the water fluxes in the soil-plant system and can help researchers to decrypt the root water uptake dynamics. From an experimental point of view, we monitored in 2D the evolution of soil water content around roots of transpiring maize plants using a light transmission imaging (LTI) technique on a rhizotron. Subsequently, we digitized the entire root system in order to create an input file for the model RSWMS (HYDRUS-like model for soil-plant water transfers). In the other hand, we performed a global sensitivity analysis of the modeled experiment to highlight the plant parameters that can be measured thanks to such a procedure. Then fitting the simulated changes of distributed Sink term in Richards equation to experimental data enabled us to depict the local radial and axial conductivities. The use of the RSWMS model in association with experimental data gave us an insight on the water potential distribution in the plant and fluxes by and through individual segments during the entire duration of the experiment. Finally, this analysis can be optimized by changing the timing and/or types of measurements included in the protocol in order to maximize the information content of the experiment. A validation of the results can also take place: the optimized conductivities of the root segments are indeed sensitive to a global conductance measurement and to other root water uptake experiments. In the future, this experimental set-up will enable us to compare genotypes hydraulic architectures in order to answer questions such as: which genotype is the best adapted to avoid a drought stress occurring at a certain time in a given environment?

  20. Water-soluble nitrogen at the New Hampshire sea coast: HNO3, aerosols, precipitation, and fog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, C. E.; Talbot, R. W.; Keim, B. D.

    2000-11-01

    An intensive sampling program was carried out from May 1994 through November 1997 on the shore of the Gulf of Maine in New Castle, New Hampshire. Daily (24 hour averages) samples of bulk aerosol and gas phase HNO3, precipitation, and 20 aerosol size distributions were obtained. Particulate NH4+ and gas phase HNO3 were the dominant water-soluble nitrogen species in the atmosphere. There was a summer peak in the mixing ratios of both of these species. Daily mixing ratios of HNO3 and all aerosol species were highly variable, yet the annual averages tended to be similar from one year to the next. The concentrations of all the inorganic species we measured in precipitation were generally higher than those of two National Acid Deposition Program (NADP) coastal sites. In particular, the annual volume-weighted means for NO3- (22-27μmol/L) and NH4+ (11-17μmol/L) were found to be 20%-60% and 40%-90% higher, respectively, than those reported from Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Nitrate was the dominant inorganic nitrogen ion in precipitation at New Castle. In autumn, concentrations of continentally derived species in precipitation decreased substantially while sea salts increased. There was insufficient NH3 to fully neutralize HNO3 and H2SO4 in aerosols and precipitation. The overall atmospheric chemistry in this region was heavily dominated by anthropogenic pollution products. The samples collected were used in conjunction with 1000 hPa streamlines to classify sampled air masses according to their surface level transport and chemistry. Eight characteristic groups were defined; of these the three primary groups were polluted continental, ``clean'' continental, and marine. Highly variable mixing ratios of HNO3 and aerosol species were observed within each group from day to day, yet each group had a unique average chemical signature. On average, the HNO3 and aerosol mixing ratios observed in 1995 were roughly a factor of 2 lower than seen for the groups in other years. Overall

  1. Influence of water availability on carbon uptake of two Mediterranean Holm oak forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magno, Ramona; Gioli, Beniamino; Primo Vaccari, Francesco; Canfora, Eleonora

    2010-05-01

    In the last decades changes in precipitation pattern were registered at global level as a consequence of temperature rise, with an increase in the intensity of precipitation events in many regions of the world. but also more intense and longer drought in others, and in particular in the Mediterranean basin. Climate changes can have direct influence on biological phenomena, like the earlier onset of spring and the lengthening of the growing season, playing a key role for the carbon fixation and for the amount of CO2 exchanged by the biosphere with the atmosphere. The impact of water availability variation on ecosystem functioning and carbon fluxes differs from species to species and depends on the period of occurrence. Mediterranean-type ecosystems (MTEs), which are mostly water and temperature-limited biomes and suffered prolonged and exacerbated human pressure, are particularly sensitive to changes in climate, as suggested by the observed decrease in plant productivity following recent heat waves and droughts events. Water availability for this region seems to be a crucial constraint for the net carbon assimilation, and biomes evolving in particularly negative soil and climatic conditions could be the most affected by changes in rainfall pattern. In this view a comparison between carbon uptake of two Holm oak (Quercus ilex L.) forests of Central Italy (Castelporziano-Rome and Lecceto-Siena), measured by eddy covariance technique, was done to analyze the possible adaptation to rainfall decrease. The two ecosystems are characterized by different soil water content of the upper soil layers, by the occurrence of a shallow water table in Castelporziano forest and by a strongly different net ecosystem exchange rate (NEE), with -360 gCm-2year-1 for Lecceto and -875 gCm-2year-1 for Castelporziano. The water supply of Lecceto was mostly driven by rainfall, reaching minimum values under 5% in particularly dry periods and increasing the carbon sink of the ecosystem after

  2. Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation by Reactive Condensation of Glyoxal and Water Vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hastings, W. P.; Koehler, C. A.; de Haan, D. O.

    2004-05-01

    The formation of secondary organic aerosol particles by particle-phase reactions is currently of great interest. Glyoxal has been identified as a significant component in the particle phase in recent smog chamber aromatic oxidation studies. This is surprising because glyoxal has a high vapor pressure and phase partitioning theory would predict that it remain almost entirely in the gas phase. Growth of inorganic seed aerosol in a particle chamber was monitored by scanning mobility particle sizing during addition of gas-phase glyoxal and small amounts of water vapor. Glyoxal was observed to condense on inorganic seed aerosol at concentrations that are at least 100 times below its vapor pressure. This behavior can be explained by a chemical reaction: glyoxal is known to polymerize when exposed to water vapor. This polymerization may be a general mechanism for secondary aerosol formation by alpha-dicarbonyl compounds. The reactivity of hydrated and polymerized forms of glyoxal during analysis by gas chromatography was assessed. Hydrated glyoxal was found to convert to glyoxal at even slightly elevated temperatures in GC injection ports. We then showed that breakdown of solid-phase glyoxal trimer dihydrate, forming gas phase glyoxal and water vapor, occurs at temperatures just above 50 *C, the boiling point of glyoxal. These observations suggest that reports of particle-phase glyoxal are likely caused by GC sampling artifacts, and that the actual particulate species are instead polymerized forms of glyoxal. It does not appear that chemical derivatization protects glyoxal polymers from thermal breakdown during GC analysis. The existence in the particle phase of glyoxal polymers with negligable vapor pressures, rather than volatile glyoxal, is consistent with phase partitioning theory.

  3. Detection and quantification of water-based aerosols using active open-path FTIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kira, Oz; Linker, Raphael; Dubowski, Yael

    2016-04-01

    Aerosols have a leading role in many eco-systems and knowledge of their properties is critical for many applications. This study suggests using active Open-Path Fourier Transform Infra-Red (OP-FTIR) spectroscopy for quantifying water droplets and solutes load in the atmosphere. The OP-FTIR was used to measure water droplets, with and without solutes, in a 20 m spray tunnel. Three sets of spraying experiments generated different hydrosols clouds: (1) tap water only, (2) aqueous ammonium sulfate (0.25–3.6%wt) and (3) aqueous ethylene glycol (0.47–2.38%wt). Experiment (1) yielded a linear relationship between the shift of the extinction spectrum baseline and the water load in the line-of-sight (LOS) (R2 = 0.984). Experiment (2) also yielded a linear relationship between the integrated extinction in the range of 880–1150 cm‑1 and the ammonium sulfate load in the LOS (R2 = 0.972). For the semi-volatile ethylene glycol (experiment 3), present in the gas and condense phases, quantification was much more complex and two spectral approaches were developed: (1) according to the linear relationship from the first experiment (determination error of 8%), and (2) inverse modeling (determination error of 57%). This work demonstrates the potential of the OP-FTIR for detecting clouds of water-based aerosols and for quantifying water droplets and solutes at relatively low concentrations.

  4. Detection and quantification of water-based aerosols using active open-path FTIR.

    PubMed

    Kira, Oz; Linker, Raphael; Dubowski, Yael

    2016-01-01

    Aerosols have a leading role in many eco-systems and knowledge of their properties is critical for many applications. This study suggests using active Open-Path Fourier Transform Infra-Red (OP-FTIR) spectroscopy for quantifying water droplets and solutes load in the atmosphere. The OP-FTIR was used to measure water droplets, with and without solutes, in a 20 m spray tunnel. Three sets of spraying experiments generated different hydrosols clouds: (1) tap water only, (2) aqueous ammonium sulfate (0.25-3.6%wt) and (3) aqueous ethylene glycol (0.47-2.38%wt). Experiment (1) yielded a linear relationship between the shift of the extinction spectrum baseline and the water load in the line-of-sight (LOS) (R(2) = 0.984). Experiment (2) also yielded a linear relationship between the integrated extinction in the range of 880-1150 cm(-1) and the ammonium sulfate load in the LOS (R(2) = 0.972). For the semi-volatile ethylene glycol (experiment 3), present in the gas and condense phases, quantification was much more complex and two spectral approaches were developed: (1) according to the linear relationship from the first experiment (determination error of 8%), and (2) inverse modeling (determination error of 57%). This work demonstrates the potential of the OP-FTIR for detecting clouds of water-based aerosols and for quantifying water droplets and solutes at relatively low concentrations. PMID:27121498

  5. Vertical Distribution of Aerosols and Water Vapor Using CRISM Limb Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M. D.; Wolff, M. J.; Clancy, R. T.; CRISM Science; Operations Teams

    2011-12-01

    Near-infrared spectra taken in a limb-viewing geometry by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) on-board the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) provide a useful tool for probing atmospheric structure. Specifically, the observed radiance as a function of wavelength and height above the limb allows the vertical distribution of both dust and ice aerosols to be retrieved. These data serve as an important supplement to the aerosol profiling provided by the MRO/MCS instrument allowing independent validation and giving additional information on particle physical and scattering properties through multi-wavelength studies. A total of at least ten CRISM limb observations have been taken so far covering a full Martian year. Each set of limb observations nominally contains about four dozen scans across the limb giving pole-to-pole coverage for two orbits at roughly 100 and 290 W longitude over the Tharsis and Syrtis/Hellas regions, respectively. At each longitude, limb scans are spaced roughly 10 degrees apart in latitude, with a vertical spatial resolution on the limb of roughly 800 m. Radiative transfer modeling is used to model the observations. We compute synthetic CRISM limb spectra using a discrete-ordinates radiative transfer code that accounts for multiple scattering from aerosols and accounts for spherical geometry of the limb observations by integrating the source functions along curved paths in that coordinate system. Retrieved are 14-point vertical profiles for dust and water ice aerosols with resolution of 0.4 scale heights between one and six scale heights above the surface. After the aerosol retrieval is completed, the abundances of CO2 (or surface pressure) and H2O gas are retrieved by matching the depth of absorption bands at 2000 nm for carbon dioxide and at 2600 nm for water vapor. In addition to the column abundance of water vapor, limited information on its vertical structure can also be retrieved depending on the signal available

  6. Quaternary polymethacrylate-magnesium aluminum silicate films: Water uptake kinetics and film permeability.

    PubMed

    Rongthong, Thitiphorn; Sungthongjeen, Srisagul; Siepmann, Florence; Siepmann, Juergen; Pongjanyakul, Thaned

    2015-07-25

    The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of the addition of different amounts of magnesium aluminum silicate (MAS) to polymeric films based on quaternary polymethacrylates (QPMs, here Eudragit RS and RL). MAS contains negatively charged SiO(-) groups, while QPM contains positively charged quaternary ammonium groups. The basic idea is to be able to provide desired water and drug permeability by simply varying the amount of added MAS. Thin, free films of varying composition were prepared by casting and exposed to 0.1M HCl and pH 6.8 phosphate buffer. The water uptake kinetics and water vapor permeability of the systems were determined gravimetrically. The transport of propranolol HCl, acetaminophen, methyl-, ethyl- and propylparaben across thin films was studied using side-by-side diffusion cells. A numerical solution of Fick's second law of diffusion was applied to determine the apparent compound diffusion coefficients, partition coefficients between the bulk fluids and the films as well as the apparent film permeability for these compounds. The addition of MAS resulted in denser inner film structures, at least partially due to ionic interactions between the positively charged quaternary ammonium groups and the negatively charged SiO(-) groups. This resulted in lower water uptake, reduced water vapor permeability and decreasing apparent compound diffusivities. In contrast, the affinity of the investigated drugs and parabens to the films substantially increased upon MAS addition. The obtained new knowledge can be helpful for the development of novel coating materials (based on QPM-MAS blends) for controlled-release dosage forms. PMID:26004005

  7. The Ag85B protein of the BCG vaccine facilitates macrophage uptake but is dispensable for protection against aerosol Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Prendergast, Kelly A; Counoupas, Claudio; Leotta, Lisa; Eto, Carolina; Bitter, Wilbert; Winter, Nathalie; Triccas, James A

    2016-05-17

    Defining the function and protective capacity of mycobacterial antigens is crucial for progression of tuberculosis (TB) vaccine candidates to clinical trials. The Ag85B protein is expressed by all pathogenic mycobacteria and is a component of multiple TB vaccines under evaluation in humans. In this report we examined the role of the BCG Ag85B protein in host cell interaction and vaccine-induced protection against virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. Ag85B was required for macrophage infection in vitro, as BCG deficient in Ag85B expression (BCG:(Δ85B)) was less able to infect RAW 264.7 macrophages compared to parental BCG, while an Ag85B-overexpressing BCG strain (BCG:(oex85B)) demonstrated improved uptake. A similar pattern was observed in vivo after intradermal delivery to mice, with significantly less BCG:(Δ85B) present in CD64(hi)CD11b(hi) macrophages compared to BCG or BCG:(oex85B). After vaccination of mice with BCG:(Δ85B) or parental BCG and subsequent aerosol M. tuberculosis challenge, similar numbers of activated CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells were detected in the lungs of infected mice for both groups, suggesting the reduced macrophage uptake observed by BCG:(Δ85B) did not alter host immunity. Further, vaccination with both BCG:(Δ85B) and parental BCG resulted in a comparable reduction in pulmonary M. tuberculosis load. These data reveal an unappreciated role for Ag85B in the interaction of mycobacteria with host cells and indicates that single protective antigens are dispensable for protective immunity induced by BCG. PMID:27060378

  8. Aerosol - cloud - water vapor relations for cloud systems of different heights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stathopoulos, Stavros; Kourtidis, Konstantinos; Georgoulias, Aristeidis

    2016-04-01

    Here we examine the annual and seasonal aerosol - cloud relations over three major urban clusters of China, for different cloud heights and atmospheric water vapor amounts, using a decade of Aerosol Optical Depth at 550nm (AOD), Cloud Cover (CC), Cloud Optical Depth (COD), Water Vapor (WV) and Cloud Top Pressure (CTP) data from the MODIS instrument. Over all regions (spanning from temperate to tropical monsoon climates) and for all seasons, CC is found to increase with AOD, WV and cloud height. Aerosols, at low WV environments and under constant cloud height, have less impact on CC than at high WV environments. In addition, AOD has a varying influence on COD depending on CTP. Finally, COD is found to increase with height for low and middle height clouds, and with increasing AOD, especially at low AOD, the latter being in line with the expected first indirect effect. This research has been financed under the FP7 Programme MarcoPolo (Grand Number 606953, Theme SPA.2013.3.2-01).

  9. Concentrations and composition of aerosols and particulate matter in surface waters along the transatlantic section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemirovskaya, I. A.; Lisitzin, A. P.; Novigatsky, A. N.; Redzhepova, Z. U.; Dara, O. M.

    2016-07-01

    Along the transatlantic section from Ushuaia to Gdańsk (March 26-May 7, 2015; cruise 47 of R/V Akademik Ioffe), data were obtained on the concentrations of aerosols in the near-water layer of the atmosphere and of particulate matter in surface waters, as well as of organic compounds within the considered matter (Corg, chlorophyll a, lipids, and hydrocarbons). The concentrations of aerosols amounted to 1237-111 739 particles/L for the fraction of 0.3-1 μm and to 0.02-34.4 μg/m2/day for the matter collected by means of the network procedure. The distribution of aerosols is affected by circumcontinental zoning and by the fluxes from arid areas of African deserts. The maximum concentration of the treated compounds were found in the river-sea frontal area (the runoff of the Colorado River, Argentina), as well as when nearing the coasts, especially in the English Channel.

  10. LASE Measurements of Water Vapor, Aerosol, and Cloud Distributions in Saharan Air Layers and Tropical Disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ismail, Syed; Ferrare, Richard; Browell, Edward; Kooi, Susan; Notari, Anthony; Butler, Carolyn; Burton, Sharon; Fenn, Marta; Krishnamurti, T. N.; Dunion, Jason; Heymsfield, Gerry; Anderson, Bruce

    2008-01-01

    LASE (Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment) onboard the NASA DC-8 was used to measure high resolution profiles of water vapor and aerosols, and cloud distributions in 14 flights over the eastern Atlantic region during the NAMMA (NASA African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses) field experiment, which was conducted from August 15 to September 12, 2006. These measurements were made in conjunction with flights designed to study African Easterly Waves (AEW), Tropical Disturbances (TD), and Saharan Aerosol Layers (SALs) as well as flights performed in clear air and convective regions. As a consequence of their unique radiative properties and dynamics, SAL layers have a significant influence in the development of organized convection associated with TD. Interactions of the SAL with tropical air during early stages of the development of TD were observed. These LASE measurements represent the first simultaneous water vapor and aerosol lidar measurements to study the SAL and its impact on TDs and hurricanes. Seven AEWs were studied and four of these evolved into tropical storms and three did not. Three out of the four tropical storms evolved into hurricanes.

  11. Is It Possible to Distinguish Between Dust and Salt Aerosol Over Waters with Unknown Chlorophyll Concentrations Using Spectral Remote Sensing?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, R. C.; Kaufman, Y. J.

    1999-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosol has uncertain impacts on the global climate system, as well as on atmospheric and bio-geo-chemical processes of regional and local scales. EOS-MODIS is one example of a satellite sensor designed to improve understanding of the aerosols' type, size and distribution at all temporal and spatial scales. Ocean scientists also plan to use data from EOS-MODIS to assess the temporal and spatial coverage of in-water chlorophyll. MODIS is the first sensor planned to observe the combined ocean-atmosphere system with a wide spectral range (from 410 to 2200 nm). Dust aerosol and salt aerosol have similar spectral signals for wavelengths longer than 550 nm, but because dust selectively absorbs blue light, they have divergent signals in the blue wavelength regions (412 to 490 nm). Chlorophyll also selectively absorbs blue radiation, so that varying chlorophyll concentrations produces a highly varying signal in the blue regions, but less variability in the green, and almost no signal in the red to mid-infrared regions. Thus, theoretically, it may be difficult to differentiate dust and salt in the presence of unknown chlorophyll in the ocean. This study attempts to address the cases in which aerosol and chlorophyll signals can and cannot be separated. For the aerosol spectra, we use the aerosol lookup table from the operational MODIS aerosol-over-ocean algorithm, and for chlorophyll spectra, we use the SeaBAM data set (created for SeaWiFS). We compare the signals using Principal Component Analysis and attempt to retrieve both chlorophyll and aerosol properties using a variant of the operational MODIS aerosol-over-ocean algorithm. Results show that for small optical depths, less than 0.5, it is not possible to differentiate between dust and salt and to determine the chlorophyll concentration at the same time. For larger aerosol optical depths, the chlorophyll signals are comparatively insignificant, and we can hope to distinguish between dust and salt.

  12. The effect of water on gas-particle partitioning of secondary organic aerosol. Part I: α-pinene/ozone system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocker, David R., III; Clegg, Simon L.; Flagan, Richard C.; Seinfeld, John H.

    The effect of relative humidity (RH) on aerosol formation by the semi-volatile oxidation products of the α-pinene/O 3 system has been comprehensively studied. Experiments were performed in the presence of ammonium sulfate (aqueous, dry), ammonium bisulfate seed (aqueous, dry), and aqueous calcium chloride seed aerosols to ascertain their effect on the partitioning of the oxidation products. The yield of organic aerosol varies little with RH, and is not affected by the presence of dry inorganic salt aerosols. Aqueous salt aerosols reduce the yield of organic aerosol compared to that under seed-free or dry seed conditions. The degree of reduction is electrolyte dependent, with aqueous ammonium sulfate leading to the largest reduction and aqueous calcium chloride the smallest. Hygroscopic growth of the organic aerosol from <2% to 85% RH was also monitored, and could be satisfactorily represented as the sum of the individual contributions of the organic and inorganic fractions. The implications of the growth factor measurements for concentration/activity relationships of the condensed phase organic material (assuming a liquid solution) was explored. The formation of the organic aerosol was investigated using a simple two component model, and also one including the 12 product compounds identified in a previous study. The experimental results for <2% and 50% RH (without salt seed aerosols) could be satisfactorily predicted. However, the aqueous salt seed aerosols are predicted to increase the overall yield due to the dissolution of the organic compounds into the water associated with the seed aerosol—the opposite effect to that observed. The implications of two distinct phases existing the aerosol phase were investigated.

  13. Joint retrieval of aerosol and water-leaving radiance from multispectral, multiangular and polarimetric measurements over ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Feng; Dubovik, Oleg; Zhai, Peng-Wang; Diner, David J.; Kalashnikova, Olga V.; Seidel, Felix C.; Litvinov, Pavel; Bovchaliuk, Andrii; Garay, Michael J.; van Harten, Gerard; Davis, Anthony B.

    2016-07-01

    An optimization approach has been developed for simultaneous retrieval of aerosol properties and normalized water-leaving radiance (nLw) from multispectral, multiangular, and polarimetric observations over ocean. The main features of the method are (1) use of a simplified bio-optical model to estimate nLw, followed by an empirical refinement within a specified range to improve its accuracy; (2) improved algorithm convergence and stability by applying constraints on the spatial smoothness of aerosol loading and Chlorophyll a (Chl a) concentration across neighboring image patches and spectral constraints on aerosol optical properties and nLw across relevant bands; and (3) enhanced Jacobian calculation by modeling and storing the radiative transfer (RT) in aerosol/Rayleigh mixed layer, pure Rayleigh-scattering layers, and ocean medium separately, then coupling them to calculate the field at the sensor. This approach avoids unnecessary and time-consuming recalculations of RT in unperturbed layers in Jacobian evaluations. The Markov chain method is used to model RT in the aerosol/Rayleigh mixed layer and the doubling method is used for the uniform layers of the atmosphere-ocean system. Our optimization approach has been tested using radiance and polarization measurements acquired by the Airborne Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager (AirMSPI) over the AERONET USC_SeaPRISM ocean site (6 February 2013) and near the AERONET La Jolla site (14 January 2013), which, respectively, reported relatively high and low aerosol loadings. Validation of the results is achieved through comparisons to AERONET aerosol and ocean color products. For comparison, the USC_SeaPRISM retrieval is also performed by use of the Generalized Retrieval of Aerosol and Surface Properties algorithm (Dubovik et al., 2011). Uncertainties of aerosol and nLw retrievals due to random and systematic instrument errors are analyzed by truth-in/truth-out tests with three Chl a concentrations, five aerosol loadings

  14. Water Vapor, Cloud and Aerosol Properties on the Tibetan Plateau Using Multi-Lidar Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Songhua; Dai, Guangyao; Wang, Dongxiang; Zhai, Xiaochun; Song, Xiaoquan

    2016-06-01

    The 3rd Tibetan Plateau atmospheric expedition experiment campaign were operated in the Tibetan Plateau during July and August 2014 by utilizing the Water vapor, Cloud and Aerosol Lidar (WVCAL), Coherent Doppler Wind Lidar and ceilometer VAISALA CL31. The observation was carried out in Nagqu area (31.5°N, 92.05°E), which is 4508 meters above the mean sea level. Water vapor mixing ratio, cloud height, vertical wind speed and vertical water vapor flux was measured by these lidars. The inversion methods of data products of lidars are described in details in this paper. Furthermore, the clouds heights measured by lidar and ceilometer were compared to verify the performance of the lidar. Finally, the case studies of water vapor mixing ratio, water vapor flux and cloud height and statistics were provided.

  15. Water and methanol uptakes in Nafion membranes and membrane effects on direct methanol cell performance

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, X.; Springer, T.E.; Gottesfeld, S.

    2000-01-01

    This paper compares direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) employing two types of Nafion{reg{underscore}sign} (E.I.DuPont de Nemours and Company) membranes of different equivalent weight (EW). Methanol and water uptakes in 1,100 and 1,200 EW Nafion membranes were determined by weighing P{sub 2}O{sub 5}-dried and methanol solution-equilibrated membranes. Both methanol and water uptakes in the 1,200 EW membrane were about 70--74% of those in the 1,100 EW membrane. The methanol crossover rate corresponding to that in a DMFC at open circuit was measured using a voltammetric method in the DMFC configuration and under the same cell operating conditions. After accounting for the thickness difference between the membrane samples, the methanol crossover rate through a 1,200 EW membrane was 52% of that through an 1,100 EW membrane. To resolve the cathode and anode performances in an operating DMFC, a dynamic hydrogen electrode was used as a reference electrode. Results show that in an operating DMFC the cathode can be easily flooded, as shown in a DMFC using 1,100 EW membrane. An increase in methanol crossover rate decreases the DMFC cathode potential at open circuit. At a high cell current density, the DMFC cathode potential can approach that of a H{sub 2}/air cell.

  16. Remote sensing of cloud, aerosol, and water vapor properties from the moderate resolution imaging spectrometer (MODIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Michael D.; Kaufman, Yoram J.; Menzel, W. Paul; Tanre, Didier D.

    1992-01-01

    The authors describe the status of MODIS-N and its companion instrument MODIS-T (tilt), a tiltable cross-track scanning spectrometer with 32 uniformly spaced channels between 0.410 and 0.875 micron. They review the various methods being developed for the remote sensing of atmospheric properties using MODIS, placing primary emphasis on the principal atmospheric applications of determining the optical, microphysical, and physical properties of clouds and aerosol particles from spectral reflection and thermal emission measurements. In addition to cloud and aerosol properties, MODIS-N will be used for determining the total precipitable water vapor and atmospheric stability. The physical principles behind the determination of each of these atmospheric products are described, together with an example of their application to aircraft and/or satellite measurements.

  17. Preliminary tropospheric ozone DIAL, water vapour, and aerosol lidar measurements during ARC-IONS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strawbridge, Kevin B.; Firanski, Bernard J.

    2009-09-01

    A new lidar instrument, dubbed AeRO (Aerosol Raman Ozone) Lidar, is being developed at Environment Canada's Centre For Atmospheric Research Experiments (CARE). The new system will use three lasers to simultaneously measure ozone, water vapour and aerosol profiles (including extinction) from near ground to the tropopause. The main thrust will focus on understanding Air Quality within the airshed with the capability of looking at Stratospheric Tropospheric Exchange (STE) processes to determine the magnitude and frequency of such events leading to elevated levels of tropospheric ozone. In addition a wind profiler through a partnership with University of Western Ontario will soon be deployed to CARE to provide complementary observations of the tropopause. The lidar participated in the ARC-IONS field campaign during April and July of 2008. During the field campaign, daily ozonesondes were released to further compliment the lidar measurements. Details of the system design and preliminary results from the lidar measurements will be presented.

  18. A mobile remote sensing laboratory for water vapor, trace gas, aerosol, and wind speed measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Slaughter, D.; White, W.; Tulloch, W.; DeSlover, D.

    1993-03-19

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has developed a mobile field laboratory for remote measurement of atmospheric processes and observables that are important in global climate change, dispersal of hazardous materials, and atmospheric pollution. Specific observables of interest are water vapor, trace gases, aerosol size and density, wind, and temperature. The goal is to study atmospheric processes continuously for extended periods in remote field locations. This laboratory has just reached field ready status with sensors for aerosol and trace gas measurement based on established techniques. A development program is underway to enhance the sensor suite with several new techniques and instruments that are expected to significantly extend the state of the art in remote trace gas analysis. The new sensors will be incorporated into the lab during the next two years.

  19. Stable isotopes reveal ecotypic variation of water uptake patterns in Aleppo pine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrio, Juan Pedro; Lucabaugh, Devon; Chambel, Regina; Voltas, Jordi

    2014-05-01

    Aleppo pine (Pinus halepensis Mill.) has a large natural distribution range that encompasses a multitude of thermal and moisture conditions found in the Mediterranean basin. We hypothesized that due to the recurrent incidences of drought stress and high temperatures that occur at varying degrees along its distribution range, populations of Aleppo pine have undergone ecotypic differentiation in soil water uptake patterns. This study analyzed stable isotopic compositions (δ18O and δ2H) of xylem water to identify adaptive divergence associated to the pattern of soil water consumption by roots of Aleppo pine populations originating from the Mediterranean region. The results from this study show that genetic diversity in the extraction pattern of soil water can be found among populations and ecological regions of Aleppo pine under common garden conditions. However, the ability to detect such differences depended on the period of the year examined. In particular, data collection in full summer (end of July) proved to be the most adequate in revealing genetic divergence among populations, while end of spring and, to a lesser extent, end of summer, were less successful for this purpose. Both water uptake patterns (as estimated by δ18O and δ2H) and above-ground growth, exhibited significant relationships with both climatic and geographical variables. This suggests that the underlying variation among populations can be explained by certain characteristics at origin. In addition, we used a bayesian mixing model (SIAR package for R) that incorporated isotopic signatures from xylem and soil water in order to determine the predominant soil layer of water source consumption at the aforementioned periods of the growing season, where water availably ranged from lowest to highest. This allowed us to gain some understanding of Aleppo pines' differential reaction to drought, at the intraspecific level, across the fluctuating conditions of the growing season by comparing the

  20. The impact of the microphysical properties of aerosol on the atmospheric correction of hyperspectral data in coastal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassani, C.; Manzo, C.; Braga, F.; Bresciani, M.; Giardino, C.; Alberotanza, L.

    2015-03-01

    Hyperspectral imaging provides quantitative remote sensing of ocean colour by the high spectral resolution of the water features. The HICO™ (Hyperspectral Imager for the Coastal Ocean) is suitable for coastal studies and monitoring. The accurate retrieval of hyperspectral water-leaving reflectance from HICO™ data is still a challenge. The aim of this work is to retrieve the water-leaving reflectance from HICO™ data with a physically based algorithm, using the local microphysical properties of the aerosol in order to overcome the limitations of the standard aerosol types commonly used in atmospheric correction processing. The water-leaving reflectance was obtained using the HICO@CRI (HICO ATmospherically Corrected Reflectance Imagery) atmospheric correction algorithm by adapting the vector version of the Second Simulation of a Satellite Signal in the Solar Spectrum (6SV) radiative transfer code. The HICO@CRI algorithm was applied on to six HICO™ images acquired in the northern Mediterranean basin, using the microphysical properties measured by the Acqua Alta Oceanographic Tower (AAOT) AERONET site. The HICO@CRI results obtained with AERONET products were validated with in situ measurements showing an accuracy expressed by r2 = 0.98. Additional runs of HICO@CRI on the six images were performed using maritime, continental and urban standard aerosol types to perform the accuracy assessment when standard aerosol types implemented in 6SV are used. The results highlight that the microphysical properties of the aerosol improve the accuracy of the atmospheric correction compared to standard aerosol types. The normalized root mean square (NRMSE) and the similar spectral value (SSV) of the water-leaving reflectance show reduced accuracy in atmospheric correction results when there is an increase in aerosol loading. This is mainly when the standard aerosol type used is characterized with different optical properties compared to the local aerosol. The results suggest

  1. Uptake and physiological response of crop plants irrigated with water containing RDX and TNT

    SciTech Connect

    Simini, M.; Checkai, R.T.

    1995-12-31

    Regulatory agencies have expressed concern about possible bioconcentration of TNT (2,4,6-trinitrotoluene) and RDX (cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine) in food and forage crops irrigated with contaminated groundwater. Field and home-garden crops grown in site-collected soil were irrigated with water containing RDX and TNT to simulate field conditions at Cornhusker Army Ammunition Plant (CAAP), Nebraska. Pots were watered in an environment-controlled greenhouse to field capacity throughout the life-cycle of each crop with 2, 20, and 100 ppb RDX; 2, 100, and 800 ppb TNT; 100 ppb RDX + 800 ppb TNT; or uncontaminated water in response to evapo-transpirative demand. Uptake of RDX in lettuce leaves, corn stover, and alfalfa shoots was positively correlated with treatment level, however, concentrations of RDX in these crops were generally equal to or below soil loading concentrations. RDX was not significantly (p = 0.05) taken up into tomato fruit, bush bean seeds and pods, radish roots, and soybean seeds. TNT was not significantly take up into tissues of any of the crops analyzed in this study. Yield and biomass of tomato fruit, bush bean fruit, corn stover, and soybean seeds were significantly (p = 0.05) less when irrigated with the RDX + TNT treatment compared to controls. Lettuce leaf, radish root, and alfalfa shoot yield and biomass were unaffected by treatment level. For site-specific criteria used in this study, RDX and TNT did not bioconcentrate in edible plant tissues. This is the first controlled study to investigate uptake of RDX and TNT in crops irrigated with water containing explosives concentrations commonly found in contaminated groundwater.

  2. In situ study of water uptake by the seeds, endosperm and husk of barley using infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cozzolino, D; Degner, S; Eglinton, J K

    2015-11-01

    Variations in the amount and rates of water uptake influence the seed hydration as well as the modification of the endosperm for industrial uses (e.g., malting). The aim of this study was to investigate and interpret absorption frequencies in the mid infrared (MIR) region associated with water uptake in whole seeds, husk and endosperm of barley seeds during the initial period of soaking in water. Partial least squares (PLS) regression models for the prediction of water uptake in the set of samples yield a coefficient of determination (R(2)) and a standard error in cross validation of 0.75 and 2.57 (% w/w), respectively. The biological implications of this study are that the first stages of germination can be monitored using the information derived from the MIR spectra. These results also demonstrated that whole seeds, endosperm and husk derived from the same variety or genotype have different patterns in the MIR region. PMID:26048560

  3. Unraveling the hydrodynamics of split root water uptake experiments using CT scanned root architectures and three dimensional flow simulations

    PubMed Central

    Koebernick, Nicolai; Huber, Katrin; Kerkhofs, Elien; Vanderborght, Jan; Javaux, Mathieu; Vereecken, Harry; Vetterlein, Doris

    2015-01-01

    Split root experiments have the potential to disentangle water transport in roots and soil, enabling the investigation of the water uptake pattern of a root system. Interpretation of the experimental data assumes that water flow between the split soil compartments does not occur. Another approach to investigate root water uptake is by numerical simulations combining soil and root water flow depending on the parameterization and description of the root system. Our aim is to demonstrate the synergisms that emerge from combining split root experiments with simulations. We show how growing root architectures derived from temporally repeated X-ray CT scanning can be implemented in numerical soil-plant models. Faba beans were grown with and without split layers and exposed to a single drought period during which plant and soil water status were measured. Root architectures were reconstructed from CT scans and used in the model R-SWMS (root-soil water movement and solute transport) to simulate water potentials in soil and roots in 3D as well as water uptake by growing roots in different depths. CT scans revealed that root development was considerably lower with split layers compared to without. This coincided with a reduction of transpiration, stomatal conductance and shoot growth. Simulated predawn water potentials were lower in the presence of split layers. Simulations showed that this was related to an increased resistance to vertical water flow in the soil by the split layers. Comparison between measured and simulated soil water potentials proved that the split layers were not perfectly isolating and that redistribution of water from the lower, wetter compartments to the drier upper compartments took place, thus water losses were not equal to the root water uptake from those compartments. Still, the layers increased the resistance to vertical flow which resulted in lower simulated collar water potentials that led to reduced stomatal conductance and growth. PMID

  4. Unraveling the hydrodynamics of split root water uptake experiments using CT scanned root architectures and three dimensional flow simulations.

    PubMed

    Koebernick, Nicolai; Huber, Katrin; Kerkhofs, Elien; Vanderborght, Jan; Javaux, Mathieu; Vereecken, Harry; Vetterlein, Doris

    2015-01-01

    Split root experiments have the potential to disentangle water transport in roots and soil, enabling the investigation of the water uptake pattern of a root system. Interpretation of the experimental data assumes that water flow between the split soil compartments does not occur. Another approach to investigate root water uptake is by numerical simulations combining soil and root water flow depending on the parameterization and description of the root system. Our aim is to demonstrate the synergisms that emerge from combining split root experiments with simulations. We show how growing root architectures derived from temporally repeated X-ray CT scanning can be implemented in numerical soil-plant models. Faba beans were grown with and without split layers and exposed to a single drought period during which plant and soil water status were measured. Root architectures were reconstructed from CT scans and used in the model R-SWMS (root-soil water movement and solute transport) to simulate water potentials in soil and roots in 3D as well as water uptake by growing roots in different depths. CT scans revealed that root development was considerably lower with split layers compared to without. This coincided with a reduction of transpiration, stomatal conductance and shoot growth. Simulated predawn water potentials were lower in the presence of split layers. Simulations showed that this was related to an increased resistance to vertical water flow in the soil by the split layers. Comparison between measured and simulated soil water potentials proved that the split layers were not perfectly isolating and that redistribution of water from the lower, wetter compartments to the drier upper compartments took place, thus water losses were not equal to the root water uptake from those compartments. Still, the layers increased the resistance to vertical flow which resulted in lower simulated collar water potentials that led to reduced stomatal conductance and growth. PMID

  5. Atmospheric pressure flow reactor / aerosol mass spectrometer studies of tropospheric aerosol nucleat and growth kinetics. Final report, June, 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Worsnop, Douglas R.

    2001-06-01

    The objective of this program was to determine the mechanisms and rates of growth and transformation and growth processes that control secondary aerosol particles in both the clear and polluted troposphere. The experimental plan coupled an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) with a chemical ionization mass spectrometer to provide simultaneous measurement of condensed and particle phases. The first task investigated the kinetics of tropospheric particle growth and transformation by measuring vapor accretion to particles (uptake coefficients, including mass accommodation coefficients and heterogeneous reaction rate coefficients). Other work initiated investigation of aerosol nucleation processes by monitoring the appearance of submicron particles with the AMS as a function of precursor gas concentrations. Three projects were investigated during the program: (1) Ozonolysis of oleic acid aerosols as model of chemical reactivity of secondary organic aerosol; (2) Activation of soot particles by measurement deliquescence in the presence of sulfuric acid and water vapor; (3) Controlled nucleation and growth of sulfuric acid aerosols.

  6. Uptake of microcontaminants by crops irrigated with reclaimed water and groundwater under real field greenhouse conditions.

    PubMed

    Calderón-Preciado, Diana; Matamoros, Víctor; Savé, Robert; Muñoz, Pere; Biel, Carme; Bayona, J M

    2013-06-01

    The use of reclaimed water for agricultural irrigation has emerged as a new strategy for coping with water scarcity in semiarid countries. However, the incorporation of the organic microcontaminants in such water into the diet through crop uptake poses a potential risk to human health. This paper aims to assess the presence of organic microcontaminants in different crops irrigated with groundwater and reclaimed water (secondary or tertiary effluents) in a greenhouse experiment. The determination of microcontaminants in water and vegetation samples was performed by solid-phase extraction and matrix solid-phase dispersion procedure with GC-MS/MS, respectively. The presence of nitrates in the groundwater used for irrigation increased biomass production by a higher proportion than the harvest index. The concentration of microcontaminants in lettuce, carrots, and green beans ranged from less than the limit of quantitation to 571 ng g(-1) (fresh weight). Tributyl phosphate and butylated hydroxyanisole exhibited the highest concentration levels in crops. The concentration and frequency of detection of microcontaminants were lower in green bean pods than in green bean roots and leaves. Although the concentrations were generally low, the simultaneous presence of a variety of microcontaminants should be taken into consideration when assessing the risk to human health. PMID:23397176

  7. OH- Initiated Heterogeneous Oxidation of Saturated Organic Aerosols in the Presence of SO2: Uptake Kinetics and Product Identification.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards-Henderson, N. K.; Ward, M.; Goldstein, A. H.; Wilson, K. R.

    2014-12-01

    Gas-phase oxidation mechanisms for organic gases are often used as a starting point to understand heterogeneous oxidation. The reaction of a simple alkane hydrocarbon by OH proceeds through hydrogen abstraction and under ambient conditions leads to peroxy radical (RO2) formation. RO2 can further react to form: (1) smaller molecular weight products (i.e. fragmentation) via alkoxy radical formation and dissociation and/or (2) higher molecular weight products with oxygenated functional groups (i.e. functionalization). The ability to perturb these two pathways (functionalization vs. fragmentation) is critical for understanding the detailed reaction mechanism that control atmospheric aging chemistry of particles. At high temperatures the presence of sulfur dioxide (SO2) during organic-OH gas-phase oxidation enhances the fragmentation pathway leading to increased alkoxy formation. It is unknown if a comparative affect occurs at room temperature during a heterogeneous reaction. We used the heterogeneous reaction of OH radicals with sub-micron squalane particles in the presence and absence of SO2 as a model system to explore changes in individual mechanistic pathways. Detailed kinetic measurements were made in a flow tube reactor using a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization aerosol mass spectrometer and oxidation products are identified from samples collected on quartz filters using thermal desorption two-dimensional chromatographic separation and ionization by either VUV (10.5 eV) or electron impact (70 eV), with detection by high resolution time of flight mass spectrometry (GCxGC-VUV/EI-HRTOFMS). In the presence of SO2 the yields of alcohols were enhanced compared to without SO2, suggesting that the alkoxy formation pathway was dominant. The results from this work will provide an experimentally-confirmed kinetic framework that could be used to model atmospheric aging mechanisms.

  8. Water dynamics in the rhizosphere - a new model of coupled water uptake and mucilage exudation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroener, E.

    2015-12-01

    The flow of water from soil to plant roots is affected by the narrow region of soil close to the roots, the so called rhizosphere. The rhizosphere is influenced by mucilage, a polymeric gel exuded by roots that alters the hydraulic properties of the rhizosphere. Here we present a model that accounts for: (a) an increase in equilibrium water retention curve caused by the water holding capacity of mucilage, (b) a reduction of hydraulic conductivity at same water content due to the higher viscosity of mucilage and (c) the swelling and shrinking dynamics by decoupling water content and water potential and introducing a non-equilibrium water retention curve. The model has been tested for mixtures of soil and mucilage and we applied it to simulate observations of previous experiments with real plants growing in soil that show evidences of altered hydraulic dynamics in the rhizosphere. Furthermore we presen results about how the parameters of the model depend on soil texture and root age. Finally we couple our hydraulic model to a diffusion model of mucilage into the soil. Opposed to classical solute transport experiments the water flow in the rhizosphere is affected by the concentration distribution of mucilage.

  9. Water dynamics in the rhizosphere - a new model of coupled water uptake and mucilage exudation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroener, Eva; Holz, Maire; Ahmed, Mutez; Zarebanadkouki, Mohsen; Bittelli, Marco; Carminati, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    The flow of water from soil to plant roots is affected by the narrow region of soil close to the roots, the so-called rhizosphere. The rhizosphere is influenced by mucilage, a polymeric gel exuded by roots that alters the hydraulic properties of the rhizosphere. Here we present a model that accounts for: (a) an increase in equilibrium water retention curve caused by the water holding capacity of mucilage, (b) a reduction of hydraulic conductivity at a given water content due to the higher viscosity of mucilage and (c) the swelling and shrinking dynamics by decoupling water content and water potential and introducing a non-equilibrium water retention curve. The model has been tested for mixtures of soil and mucilage and we applied it to simulate observations of previous experiments with real plants growing in soil that show evidences of altered hydraulic dynamics in the rhizosphere. Furthermore we present results about how the parameters of the model depend on soil texture and root age. Finally we couple our hydraulic model to a diffusion model of mucilage into the soil. Opposed to classical solute transport models here the water flow in the rhizosphere is affected by the concentration distribution of mucilage.

  10. Evaluation of CALIOP 532-nm Aerosol Optical Depth Over Opaque Water Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Z.; Winker, D.; Omar, A.; Vaughan, M.; Kar, J.; Trepte, C.; Hu, Y.; Schuster, G.

    2015-01-01

    With its height-resolved measurements and near global coverage, the CALIOP lidar onboard the CALIPSO satellite offers a new capability for aerosol retrievals in cloudy skies. Validation of these retrievals is difficult, however, as independent, collocated and co-temporal data sets are generally not available. In this paper, we evaluate CALIOP aerosol products above opaque water clouds by applying multiple retrieval techniques to CALIOP Level 1 profile data and comparing the results. This approach allows us to both characterize the accuracy of the CALIOP above-cloud aerosol optical depth (AOD) and develop an error budget that quantifies the relative contributions of different error sources. We focus on two spatial domains: the African dust transport pathway over the tropical North Atlantic and the African smoke transport pathway over the southeastern Atlantic. Six years of CALIOP observations (2007-2012) from the northern hemisphere summer and early fall are analyzed. The analysis is limited to cases where aerosol layers are located above opaque water clouds so that a constrained retrieval technique can be used to directly retrieve 532 nm aerosol optical depth and lidar ratio. For the moderately dense Sahara dust layers detected in the CALIOP data used in this study, the mean/median values of the lidar ratios derived from a constrained opaque water cloud (OWC) technique are 45.1/44.4 +/- 8.8 sr, which are somewhat larger than the value of 40 +/- 20 sr used in the CALIOP Level 2 (L2) data products. Comparisons of CALIOP L2 AOD with the OWC-retrieved AOD reveal that for nighttime conditions the L2 AOD in the dust region is underestimated on average by approx. 26% (0.183 vs. 0.247). Examination of the error sources indicates that errors in the L2 dust AOD are primarily due to using a lidar ratio that is somewhat too small. The mean/median lidar ratio retrieved for smoke is 70.8/70.4 +/- 16.2 sr, which is consistent with the modeled value of 70 +/- 28 sr used in the

  11. Characteristics of the water-soluble components of aerosol particles in Hefei, China.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xue-liang; Shi, Chun-e; Wu, Bi-wen; Yang, Yuan-jian; Jin, Qi; Wang, Hong-lei; Zhu, Song; Yu, Caixia

    2016-04-01

    Size-classified daily aerosol mass concentrations and concentrations of water-soluble inorganic ions were measured in Hefei, China, in four representative months between September 2012 and August 2013. An annual average mass concentration of 169.09 μg/m(3) for total suspended particulate (TSP) was measured using an Andersen Mark-II cascade impactor. The seasonal average mass concentration was highest in winter (234.73 μg/m(3)) and lowest in summer (91.71 μg/m(3)). Water-soluble ions accounted for 59.49%, 32.90%, 48.62% and 37.08% of the aerosol mass concentration in winter, spring, summer, and fall, respectively, which indicated that ionic species were the primary constituents of the atmospheric aerosols. The four most abundant ions were NO3(-), SO4(2-), Ca(2+) and NH4(+). With the exception of Ca(2+), the mass concentrations of water-soluble ions were in an intermediate range compared with the levels for other Chinese cities. Sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium were the dominant fine-particle species, which were bimodally distributed in spring, summer and fall; however, the size distribution became unimodal in winter, with a peak at 1.1-2.1 μm. The Ca(2+) peak occurred at approximately 4.7-5.8 μm in all seasons. The cation to anion ratio was close to 1.4, which suggested that the aerosol particles were alkalescent in Hefei. The average NO3(-)/SO4(2-) mass ratio was 1.10 in Hefei, which indicated that mobile source emissions were predominant. Significant positive correlation coefficients between the concentrations of NH4(+) and SO4(2-), NH4(+) and NO3(-), SO4(2-) and NO3(-), and Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) were also indicated, suggesting that aerosol particles may be present as (NH4)2SO4, NH4HSO4, and NH4NO3. PMID:27090692

  12. New Examination of the Traditional Raman Lidar Technique II: Evaluating the Ratios for Water Vapor and Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, David N.

    2003-01-01

    In a companion paper, the temperature dependence of Raman scattering and its influence on the Raman and Rayleigh-Mie lidar equations was examined. New forms of the lidar equation were developed to account for this temperature sensitivity. Here those results are used to derive the temperature dependent forms of the equations for the water vapor mixing ratio, aerosol scattering ratio, aerosol backscatter coefficient, and extinction to backscatter ratio (Sa). The error equations are developed, the influence of differential transmission is studied and different laser sources are considered in the analysis. The results indicate that the temperature functions become significant when using narrowband detection. Errors of 5% and more can be introduced in the water vapor mixing ratio calculation at high altitudes and errors larger than 10% are possible for calculations of aerosol scattering ratio and thus aerosol backscatter coefficient and extinction to backscatter ratio.

  13. Comparative uptake from sea water and tissue distribution of 60Co in marine mollusks

    SciTech Connect

    Carvalho, F.P.

    1987-07-01

    Five different species of marine mollusks, Mytilus galloprovincialis Lmk., Tapes decussatus L., Cerastoderma (Cardium) edule (L.), Donax vittatus (da Costa) and Patella vulgata L., were exposed to /sup 60/Co-labelled sea water under laboratory conditions. After a 1-mo exposure, tested species reached different whole-body /sup 60/Co concentration factors (CF) over radioactive sea water of 73 +/- 27, 22 +/- 10, 84 +/- 25, 6.3 +/- 1.4 and 31 +/- 10, respectively, which are not dependent upon the size of mollusks. Equations for the experimental uptake curves, obtained using a multi-exponential model, indicate that /sup 60/Co uptake by mollusks involves two or three compartments, according to the species. In all species, the larger compartments turn over with long biological half-lives, dependent upon species. At the beginning of the experiment, /sup 60/CoCl2 added to sea water was mainly in cationic forms. These forms were progressively converted into anionic plus neutral forms most likely due to complex formation with organic ligands. With time this physico-chemical evolution had a lowering effect on /sup 60/Co bioaccumulation by mollusks. Analysis of /sup 60/Co in tissues revealed that Donax shell and mantle do not accumulate the radionuclide in great quantities, generating the low whole-body concentration factor found. In contrast, shell and mantle from all other species displayed variable but high CFs. Shell by itself accounts for more than half of the /sup 60/Co whole-body burden. Among soft tissues, gills and viscera displayed the highest CF and muscle the lowest. From these experiments, one may conclude that significant differences among species do exist regarding Co bioaccumulation potential.

  14. Modeling the effects of different irrigation water salinity on soil water movement, uptake and multicomponent solute transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lekakis, E. H.; Antonopoulos, V. Z.

    2015-11-01

    Simulation models can be important tools for analyzing and managing irrigation, soil salinization or crop production problems. In this study a mathematical model that describes the water movement and mass transport of individual ions (Ca2+, Mg2+ and Na+) and overall soil salinity by means of the soil solution electrical conductivity, is used. The mass transport equations of Ca2+, Mg2+ and Na+ have been incorporated as part of the integrated model WANISIM and the soil salinity was computed as the sum of individual ions. The model was calibrated and validated against field data, collected during a three year experiment in plots of maize, irrigated with three different irrigation water qualities, at Thessaloniki area in Northern Greece. The model was also used to evaluate salinization and sodification hazards by the use of irrigation water with increasing electrical conductivity of 0.8, 3.2 and 6.4 dS m-1, while maintaining a ratio of Ca2+:Mg2+:Na+ equal to 3:3:2. The qualitative and quantitative procedures for results evaluation showed that there was good agreement between the simulated and measured values of the water content, overall salinity and the concentration of individual soluble cations, at two soil layers (0-35 and 35-75 cm). Nutrient uptake was also taken into account. Locally available irrigation water (ECiw = 0.8 dS m-1) did not cause soil salinization or sodification. On the other hand, irrigation water with ECiw equal to 3.2 and 6.4 dS m-1 caused severe soil salinization, but not sodification. The rainfall water during the winter seasons was not sufficient to leach salts below the soil profile of 110 cm. The modified version of model WANISIM is able to predict the effects of irrigation with saline waters on soil and plant growth and it is suitable for irrigation management in areas with scarce and low quality water resources.

  15. CalWater 2 - Precipitation, Aerosols, and Pacific Atmospheric Rivers Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spackman, Ryan; Ralph, Marty; Prather, Kim; Cayan, Dan; DeMott, Paul; Dettinger, Mike; Fairall, Chris; Leung, Ruby; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Rutledge, Steven; Waliser, Duane; White, Allen

    2014-05-01

    Emerging research has identified two phenomena that play key roles in the variability of the water supply and the incidence of extreme precipitation events along the West Coast of the United States. These phenomena include the role of (1) atmospheric rivers (ARs) in delivering much of the precipitation associated with major storms along the U.S. West Coast, and (2) aerosols—from local sources as well as those transported from remote continents—and their modulating effects on western U.S. precipitation. A better understanding of these processes is needed to reduce uncertainties in weather predictions and climate projections of extreme precipitation and its effects, including the provision of beneficial water supply. This presentation summarizes science gaps associated with (1) the evolution and structure of ARs including cloud and precipitation processes and air-sea interaction, and (2) aerosol interaction with ARs and the impact on precipitation, including locally-generated aerosol effects on orographic precipitation along the U.S. West Coast. Observations are proposed for multiple winter seasons as part of a 5-year broad interagency vision referred to as CalWater 2 to address these science gaps (http://esrl.noaa.gov/psd/calwater). In the near term, a science investigation is being planned including a targeted set of aircraft and ship-based measurements and associated evaluation of data in near-shore regions of California and in the eastern Pacific for an intensive observing period between January 2015 and March 2015. DOE's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program and NOAA are coordinating on deployment of airborne and ship-borne facilities for this period in a DOE-sponsored study called ACAPEX (ARM Cloud Aerosol and Precipitation Experiment) to complement CalWater 2. The motivation for this major study is based on findings that have emerged in the last few years from airborne and ground-based studies including CalWater and NOAA's HydroMeterology Testbed

  16. Sump bay fever: inhalational fever associated with a biologically contaminated water aerosol.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, K; McSharry, C P; Clark, C; Clark, C J; Barclay, G R; Morris, G P

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the clinical, serological, and environmental features of a work related inhalational fever associated with exposure to an aerosol generated from a biologically contaminated 130,000 gallon water pool in a building used for testing scientific equipment. METHOD: Cross sectional survey of all exposed subjects (n = 83) by symptom questionnaire, clinical examination, spirometry, and serology for antibody to Pseudomonads, pool water extract, and endotoxin. In symptomatic patients diffusion capacity was measured, and chest radiology was performed if this was abnormal. Serial peak flow was recorded in those subjects with wheeze. Bacterial and fungal air sampling was performed before and during operation of the water pool pump mechanism. Endotoxin was measured in the trapped waters and in the pumps. Serum cotinine was measured as an objective indicator of smoking. RESULTS: Of the 20 symptomatic subjects, fever was most common in those with the highest exposure (chi 2 42.7, P < 0.001) in the sump bay when the water was (torrentially) recirculated by the water pumps. Symptoms occurred late in the working day only on days when the water pumps were used, and were independent of the serum cotinine. Pulmonary function was normal in most subjects (spirometry was normal in 79/83, diffusion capacity was low in five subjects, chest radiology was normal). Peak flow recording did not suggest a work relation. The bacterial content of the aerosol rose from 6 to > 10,000 colony forming units per cubic metre (cfu/m3) (predominantly environmental Pseudomonads) when the pumps were operating. High endotoxin concentrations were measured in the waters and oil sumps in the pumps. Low concentrations of antibody to the organisms isolated were detected (apart from two subjects with high antibody) but there was no relation to exposure or the presence of symptoms and similar antibody was found in the serum samples from a non-exposed population. The fever symptoms settled

  17. Comparison of Aerosol Optical Properties and Water Vapor Among Ground and Airborne Lidars and Sun Photometers During TARFOX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrare, R.; Ismail, S.; Browell, E.; Brackett, V.; Clayton, M.; Kooi, S.; Melfi, S. H.; Whiteman, D.; Schwemmer, G.; Evans, K.

    2000-01-01

    We compare aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and precipitable water vapor (PWV) measurements derived from ground and airborne lidars and sun photometers during the Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment. Such comparisons are important to verify the consistency between various remote sensing measurements before employing them in any assessment of the impact of aerosols on the global radiation balance. Total scattering ratio and extinction profiles measured by the ground-based NASA Goddard Space Flight Center scanning Raman lidar system, which operated from Wallops Island, Virginia (37.86 deg N, 75.51 deg W); are compared with those measured by the Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment (LASE) airborne lidar system aboard the NASA ER-2 aircraft. Bias and root-mean-square differences indicate that these measurements generally agreed within about 10%. Aerosol extinction profiles and estimates of AOT are derived from both lidar measurements using a value for the aerosol extinction/backscattering ratio S(sub a) = 60 sr for the aerosol extinction/backscattering ratio, which was determined from the Raman lidar measurements. The lidar measurements of AOT are found to be generally within 25% of the AOT measured by the NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sun Photometer (AATS-6). However, during certain periods the lidar and Sun photometer measurements of AOT differed significantly, possibly because of variations in the aerosol physical characteristics (e.g., size, composition) which affect S(sub a). Estimates of PWV, derived from water vapor mixing ratio profiles measured by LASE, are within 5-10% of PWV derived from the airborne Sun photometer. Aerosol extinction profiles measured by both lidars show that aerosols were generally concentrated in the lowest 2-3 km.

  18. Uptake and distribution of bisphenol A and nonylphenol in vegetable crops irrigated with reclaimed water.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jian; Wu, Jun; Stoffella, Peter J; Wilson, P Chris

    2015-01-01

    The potential uptake and distribution of bisphenol A (BPA) and nonylphenol (NP) (from reclaimed irrigation water) in edible crops was investigated. BPA and NP were spiked into simulated reclaimed water at environmentally relevant concentrations. Two crops (lettuce, Lactuca sativa and tomato, Lycopersicon esculentum) were grown hydroponically in a greenhouse using the spiked irrigation water under two irrigation exposure scenarios (overhead foliar exposure and subsurface root exposure). BPA concentrations in tomato fruit were 26.6 ± 5.8 (root exposure) and 18.3 ± 3.5 (foliar exposure) μg kg(-1), while concentrations in lettuce leaves were 80.6 ± 23.1 (root exposure) and 128.9 ± 17.4 (foliar exposure) μg kg(-1). NP concentrations in tomato fruit were 46.1 ± 6.6 (root exposure) and 24.6 ± 6.4 (foliar exposure) μg kg(-1), while concentrations in lettuce leaves were 144.1 ± 9.2 (root exposure) and 195.0 ± 16.9 (foliar exposure) μg kg(-1). BPA was relatively mobile in lettuce plants regardless of exposure route. Limited mobility was observed for NP in both crops and BPA in tomatoes. The estimated daily intake of BPA and NP through consumption of vegetables irrigated with reclaimed water ranged from 8.9-62.9 to 11.9-95.1 μg, respectively, depending on the exposure route. PMID:25464330

  19. Use of Gold Nanoparticles to Detect Water Uptake in Vascular Plants

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Bae Geun; Ahn, Sungsook; Lee, Sang Joon

    2014-01-01

    Direct visualization of water-conducting pathways and sap flows in xylem vessels is important for understanding the physiology of vascular plants and their sap ascent. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) combined with synchrotron X-ray imaging technique is a new promising tool for investigating plant hydraulics in opaque xylem vessels of vascular plants. However, in practical applications of AuNPs for real-time quantitative visualization of sap flows, their interaction with a vascular network needs to be verified in advance. In this study, the effect of AuNPs on the water-refilling function of xylem vessels is experimentally investigated with three monocot species. Discrepancy in the water uptakes starts to appear at about 20 min to 40 min after the supply of AuNP solution to the test plant by the possible gradual accumulation of AuNPs on the internal structures of vasculature. However conclusively, it is observed that the water-refilling speeds in individual xylem vessels are virtually unaffected by hydrophilically surface-modified AuNPs (diameter ∼20 nm). Therefore, the AuNPs can be effectively used as flow tracers in the xylem vessels in the first 20∼30 min without any physiological barrier. As a result, AuNPs are found to be useful for visualizing various fluid dynamic phenomena occurring in vascular plants. PMID:25502567

  20. Inactivation efficiency to Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli bacterial aerosols of spraying neutral electrolyzed water.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Chi-Yu; Yang, Shinhao; Chang, Ming-Yih; Huang, Hsiao-Chien; Luo, Chin-Hsiang; Hung, Po-Chen; Fang, Wei

    2013-12-01

    The main objective of this study is to apply neutral electrolyzed water (NEW) spraying to inactivate bioaerosols. We evaluated the inactivation efficiency of NEW applied to inactivate two airborne bacterial Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis aerosols inside an environmental-controlled chamber in the study. Generated with electrolyzing 6.15 M sodium chloride brine, the NEW with free available chlorine (FAC) concentration 50, 100, and 200 ppm was pumped with an air pressure of 70 kg/cm2 through nozzle into the chamber to inactive E. coli and B. subtilis aerosols precontaminated air (initial counts of 3 x 10(4) colony-forming units [CFU]/m3). Bacterial aerosols were collected and cultured from chamber before and after NEW spray. The air exchange rate (ACH, hr(-1)) of the chamber was set to simulate fresh air ventilating dilution of indoor environment. First-order concentration decaying coefficients (Ka, min(-1)) of both bacterial aerosols were measured as an index of NEW inactivation efficiency. The result shows that higher FAC concentration of NEW spray caused better inactivation efficiency. The Ka values under ACH 1.0 hr(-1) were 0.537 and 0.598 for E. coli of FAC 50 and 100 ppm spraying, respectively. The Ka values of FAC 100 ppm and 200 ppm spraying for B. subtilis were 0.063 and 0.085 under ACH 1.0 hr(-1), respectively. The results indicated that NEW spray is likely to be effective in inactivation of bacterial airborne contamination. Moreover, it is observed in the study that the increase of ventilation rate and the use of a larger orifice-size nozzle may facilitate the inactivation efficiency. PMID:24558707

  1. Modeling the dynamic root water uptake and its hydrological impact at the Reserva Jaru site in Amazonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Zhe; Wang, Guiling

    2007-12-01

    An empirical approach is proposed to represent the impact of dynamic root water uptake by plant roots in two land surface models (Community Land Model version 3 (CLM3) and Integrated Biosphere Simulator version 2 (IBIS2)). This approach is compared with a more physically based approach that simulates the hydraulic redistribution, using the Reserva Jaru site in Amazonia as an example. For each model and each approach, two different root profiles are experimented on, an exponential profile and an observed, deeper profile. In both CLM3 and IBIS2, including dynamic root uptake significantly improves the model simulation of latent heat fluxes, regardless of what root profile is used. In both models, the impact of hydraulic redistribution (as accounted for by the physically based approach) is comparable to that of a low degree of dynamic root water uptake (as accounted for by the empirical approach). The latent heat flux simulation in IBIS2 is closer to observation than is that in CLM3, with or without the impact of dynamic root water uptake. Despite the model improvement due to including dynamic root water uptake, significant biases in soil moisture simulations remain. Assimilating soil moisture observations into the land surface models produces a remarkably improved latent heat flux simulation. Parameterization in surface and subsurface runoff (which influences soil moisture) is suggested as a likely cause for the severe biases in the default model simulations, which highlights the critical importance of correctly simulating the fundamental hydrological processes in land surface models.

  2. Hygroscopic behavior of atmospherically relevant water-soluble carboxylic salts and their influence on the water uptake of ammonium sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Z. J.; Nowak, A.; Poulain, L.; Herrmann, H.; Wiedensohler, A.

    2011-03-01

    The hygroscopic behavior of atmospherically relevant water-soluble carboxylic salts and their effects on ammonium sulfate was investigated using a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (H-TDMA). No hygroscopic growth is observed for sodium oxalate, while ammonium oxalate shows slight growth (growth factor = 1.05 at 90%). The growth factors at 90% RH for sodium acetate, sodium malonate, sodium succinate, sodium tartrate, ammonium tartrate, sodium pyruvate, sodium maleate, and humic acid sodium salt are 1.79, 1.78, 1.69, 1.54, 1.29, 1.70, 1.78, and 1.19, respectively. The mixtures of organic salts with ammonium sulfate, which are prepared simulating the atmospheric aerosols, are determined. A clear shift in DRH of mixture to lower RH is observed with increasing organic mass fraction. Above RH = 80%, the humidograms of the different mixtures are quite close to that of pure ammonium sulfate. Köhler theory is used to predict the effective hygroscopicity parameter, κ, for mixtures at 90% RH. The results show that Köhler theory underestimated kappa for mixtures without considering the water solubility of ammonium oxalate. However, if the water solubility of ammonium oxalate is taken into account, the results show a much better agreement with those derived from H-TDMA measurements.

  3. Water vapour absorption in the penicillate millipede Polyxenus lagurus (Diplopoda: Penicillata: Polyxenida): microcalorimetric analysis of uptake kinetics.

    PubMed

    Wright, Jonathan C; Westh, Peter

    2006-07-01

    The aberrant millipedes of the order Polyxenida are minute animals that inhabit xeric microclimates of bark and rock faces. The lichens and algae that provide their main food substrates tolerate extensive dehydration, effectively eliminating a liquid water source during periods of drought. In this study, we used microcalorimetry to test whether Polyxenus lagurus (L.) exploits active water vapour absorption (WVA) for water replenishment. Individual animals were pre-desiccated to 10-20% mass-loss and heat fluxes then monitored using a TAM 2277 microcalorimeter. The calorimetric cell was exposed to an air stream increasing progressively in humidity from 84% to 96%. WVA was distinguishable as large exothermic fluxes seen in > or = 86% RH. Owing to very small and opposing heat fluxes from metabolism and passive water loss, the measured flux provided a good measure of water uptake. WVA showed an uptake threshold of 85% RH and linear sorption kinetics until >94% RH, when uptake became asymptotic. Uptake was rapid, and would allow recovery from 20% dehydration (by mass) in little over 5 h. The uptake flux scales proportional, variant mass (0.61), suggesting an area-limited mechanism. Polyxenus possesses a cryptonephric system, analogous to that of tenebrionid beetle larvae. Measurements of water absorption and desorption from faecal pellets voided in different humidities gave an estimated rectal humidity of 85.5%. The close congruence between this value and the WVA threshold provides evidence for a cryptonephric uptake mechanism derived independently from that of tenebrionids. Polyxenus represents the first documented example of WVA in the myriapod classes. PMID:16788032

  4. Seasonal differences in aerosol water may reconcile AOT and surface mass measurements in the Southeast U.S.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, T. K. V.; Ghate, V. P.; Carlton, A. M. G.

    2015-12-01

    Summertime aerosol optical thickness (AOT) in the Southeast U.S. is high and sharply enhanced (2-3 times) compared to wintertime AOT. This seasonal pattern is unique to the Southeast U.S. and is of particular interest because temperatures there have not warmed over the past 100 years, contrasting with trends in other U.S. regions. Some investigators hypothesize the Southeast temperature trend is due to secondary organic aerosols (SOA) formed from interactions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) and anthropogenic emissions that create a cooling haze. However, aerosol measurements made at the surface do not exhibit strong seasonal differences in mass or organic fraction to support this hypothesis. In this work, we attempt to reconcile the spatial and temporal distribution of AOT over the U.S. with surface mass measurements by examining trends in particle-phase liquid water, an aerosol constituent that effectively scatters radiation and is removed from aerosols in mass measurements at routine surface monitoring sites. We employ the thermodynamic model ISORROPIA (v2.1) to estimate surface and aloft aerosol water mass concentrations at locations of Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) sites using measured speciated ion mass concentrations and NCEP North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) meteorological data. Results demonstrate strong seasonal differences in aerosol water in the eastern compared to the western part of the U.S., consistent with geographic patterns in AOT. The highest mean regional seasonal difference from 2000 to 2007 is 5.5 μg m-3 and occurs the Southeast, while the lowest is 0.44 μg m-3 and occurs in the dry Mountain West. Our findings suggest 1) similarity between spatial trends in aerosol water in the U.S. and previously published AOT data from the MODIS-TERRA instrument and 2) similar interannual trends in mean aerosol water and previously published interannual AOT trends from MISR, MODIS-TERRA, MODIS

  5. [Assessment method of the pathogenic microbial exposure caused by aerosolization of reclaimed water].

    PubMed

    Xie, Xing; Hu, Hong-ying; Guo, Mei-ting; Wu, Qian-yuan

    2009-01-01

    Inhalation is one of the main exposure routes to pathogenic microorganisms during wastewater reuse. An applicable method is introduced to assess the pathogenic microbial exposure from inhalation. Firstly, emission intensity of pathogenic microorganisms during reclaimed water spraying is determined by the concentration of pathogenic microorganisms in reclaimed water, spraying intensity and aerosolizing efficiency factor. The value of the aerosolizing efficiency factor is usually between 0.003 and 0.01. Then the concentration of pathogenic microorganisms in air is calculated by referring to the model of air pollutant dispersion and considering the microorganisms decay. The value of the microbial viability decay factor is between -0.23 s(-1) and 0 s(-1), and that of the environmental impact factor is between 0.016 and 73, varied by different kinds of microorganisms. And then the exposure from inhalation route can be finally attained by multiplying inhalation rate and exposure time. The daily average inhalation rate is 4.5-17 m3 x d(-1), and the hourly average inhalation rate is 0.3-3.2 m3 x h(-1), differentiated by age, gender, and activity of susceptible population. The method proposed in this study can be directly used to assess the pathogenic microbial exposure caused by reclaimed water used for agriculture irrigation, gardening, or fountain spraying. PMID:19353859

  6. Estimating dermal uptake of nonionic organic chemicals from water and soil: I. Unified fugacity-based models for risk assessments

    SciTech Connect

    McKone, T.E. ); Howd, R.A. )

    1992-12-01

    Contamination of water and soil that might eventually contact human skin makes it imperative to include the dermal uptake route in efforts to assess potential environmental health risks. Direct measurements of dermal uptake from either water or soil are only available for a small number of the thousands of chemicals likely to be found in the environment. We propose here a mass-transfer model for estimating skin permeability and dermal uptake for organic chemicals that contaminate soil and water. Statistical relationships between measured permeabilities and chemical properties reveal that permeability varies primarily with the octanol-water partition coefficient (K[sub ow]) and secondarily with the molecular weight. From these results, we derive a fugacity-based model for skin permeability that addresses the inherent permeability of the skin, the interaction of the skin with the environmental medium on skin (water or soil), and retains a relatively simple algebraic form. Model predictions are compared to measured human skin permeabilities for some 50 compounds in water and four compounds in soil. The model is adjusted to account for dermal uptake during both short-term (10-20 min) and long-term (several hour) exposures. This model is recommended for compounds with molecular weight less than or equal to 280 g.

  7. An improved approach for remotely sensing water stress impacts on forest C uptake.

    PubMed

    Sims, Daniel A; Brzostek, Edward R; Rahman, Abdullah F; Dragoni, Danilo; Phillips, Richard P

    2014-09-01

    Given that forests represent the primary terrestrial sink for atmospheric CO2 , projections of future carbon (C) storage hinge on forest responses to climate variation. Models of gross primary production (GPP) responses to water stress are commonly based on remotely sensed changes in canopy 'greenness' (e.g., normalized difference vegetation index; NDVI). However, many forests have low spectral sensitivity to water stress (SSWS) - defined here as drought-induced decline in GPP without a change in greenness. Current satellite-derived estimates of GPP use a vapor pressure deficit (VPD) scalar to account for the low SWSS of forests, but fail to capture their responses to water stress. Our objectives were to characterize differences in SSWS among forested and nonforested ecosystems, and to develop an improved framework for predicting the impacts of water stress on GPP in forests with low SSWS. First, we paired two independent drought indices with NDVI data for the conterminous US from 2000 to 2011, and examined the relationship between water stress and NDVI. We found that forests had lower SSWS than nonforests regardless of drought index or duration. We then compared satellite-derived estimates of GPP with eddy-covariance observations of GPP in two deciduous broadleaf forests with low SSWS: the Missouri Ozark (MO) and Morgan Monroe State Forest (MMSF) AmeriFlux sites. Model estimates of GPP that used VPD scalars were poorly correlated with observations of GPP at MO (r(2) = 0.09) and MMSF (r(2) = 0.38). When we included the NDVI responses to water stress of adjacent ecosystems with high SSWS into a model based solely on temperature and greenness, we substantially improved predictions of GPP at MO (r(2) = 0.83) and for a severe drought year at the MMSF (r(2) = 0.82). Collectively, our results suggest that large-scale estimates of GPP that capture variation in SSWS among ecosystems could improve predictions of C uptake by forests under drought. PMID:24464936

  8. Lead uptake and lead loss in the fresh water field crab, Barytelphusa guerini, on exposure to organic and inorganic lead

    SciTech Connect

    Tulasi, S.J.; Yasmeen, R.; Reddy, C.P.; Rao, J.V.R.

    1987-07-01

    Lead is a heavy metal which is widely used in paint industry, pigments, dyes, electrical components and electronics, plastic chemicals and in various other things. Since some of the lead salts are soluble in water, lead presents a potential threat to aquatic organisms. Studies dealing with invertebrates include those on mortality, growth and lead uptake in Lymnaea palustris and bioaccumulation of heavy metals in oysters and mussels. Little information exists regarding the effect of lead on the fresh water crustaceans. Hence the present investigation has been undertaken to study the uptake and loss of lead on exposure to subtoxic levels or organic and inorganic lead.

  9. Impact of interspecific interactions on the soil water uptake depth in a young temperate mixed species plantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossiord, Charlotte; Gessler, Arthur; Granier, André; Berger, Sigrid; Bréchet, Claude; Hentschel, Rainer; Hommel, Robert; Scherer-Lorenzen, Michael; Bonal, Damien

    2014-11-01

    Interactions between tree species in forests can be beneficial to ecosystem functions and services related to the carbon and water cycles by improving for example transpiration and productivity. However, little is known on below- and above-ground processes leading to these positive effects. We tested whether stratification in soil water uptake depth occurred between four tree species in a 10-year-old temperate mixed species plantation during a dry summer. We selected dominant and co-dominant trees of European beech, Sessile oak, Douglas fir and Norway spruce in areas with varying species diversity, competition intensity, and where different plant functional types (broadleaf vs. conifer) were present. We applied a deuterium labelling approach that consisted of spraying labelled water to the soil surface to create a strong vertical gradient of the deuterium isotope composition in the soil water. The deuterium isotope composition of both the xylem sap and the soil water was measured before labelling, and then again three days after labelling, to estimate the soil water uptake depth using a simple modelling approach. We also sampled leaves and needles from selected trees to measure their carbon isotope composition (a proxy for water use efficiency) and total nitrogen content. At the end of the summer, we found differences in the soil water uptake depth between plant functional types but not within types: on average, coniferous species extracted water from deeper layers than did broadleaved species. Neither species diversity nor competition intensity had a detectable influence on soil water uptake depth, foliar water use efficiency or foliar nitrogen concentration in the species studied. However, when coexisting with an increasing proportion of conifers, beech extracted water from progressively deeper soil layers. We conclude that complementarity for water uptake could occur in this 10-year-old plantation because of inherent differences among functional groups (conifers

  10. LASE measurements of water vapor, aerosol, and cloud distribution in hurricane environments and their role in hurricane development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahoney, M. J.; Ismail, S.; Browell, E. V.; Ferrare, R. A.; Kooi, S. A.; Brasseur, L.; Notari, A.; Petway, L.; Brackett, V.; Clayton, M.; Halverson, J.; Rizvi, S.; Krishn, T. N.

    2002-01-01

    LASE measures high resolution moisture, aerosol, and cloud distributions not available from conventional observations. LASE water vapor measurements were compared with dropsondes to evaluate their accuracy. LASE water vapor measurements were used to assess the capability of hurricane models to improve their track accuracy by 100 km on 3 day forecasts using Florida State University models.

  11. Maintenance of water uptake and reduced water loss contribute to water stress tolerance of Spiraea alba Du Roi and Spiraea tomentosa L.

    PubMed Central

    Stanton, Kelly M; Mickelbart, Michael V

    2014-01-01

    Two primarily eastern US native shrubs, Spiraea alba Du Roi and Spiraea tomentosa L., are typically found growing in wet areas, often with standing water. Both species have potential for use in the landscape, but little is known of their environmental requirements, including their adaptation to water stress. Two geographic accessions of each species were evaluated for their response to water stress under greenhouse conditions. Above-ground biomass, water relations and gas exchange were measured in well-watered and water stress treatments. In both species, water stress resulted in reduced growth, transpiration and pre-dawn water potential. However, both species also exhibited the ability to osmotically adjust to lower soil water content, resulting in maintained midday leaf turgor potential in all accessions. Net CO2 assimilation was reduced only in one accession of S. alba, primarily due to large reductions in stomatal conductance. S. tomentosa lost a larger proportion of leaves than S. alba in response to water stress. The primary water stress tolerance strategies of S. alba and S. tomentosa appear to be the maintenance of water uptake and reduced water loss. PMID:26504542

  12. Detection and quantification of water-based aerosols using active open-path FTIR

    PubMed Central

    Kira, Oz; Linker, Raphael; Dubowski, Yael

    2016-01-01

    Aerosols have a leading role in many eco-systems and knowledge of their properties is critical for many applications. This study suggests using active Open-Path Fourier Transform Infra-Red (OP-FTIR) spectroscopy for quantifying water droplets and solutes load in the atmosphere. The OP-FTIR was used to measure water droplets, with and without solutes, in a 20 m spray tunnel. Three sets of spraying experiments generated different hydrosols clouds: (1) tap water only, (2) aqueous ammonium sulfate (0.25–3.6%wt) and (3) aqueous ethylene glycol (0.47–2.38%wt). Experiment (1) yielded a linear relationship between the shift of the extinction spectrum baseline and the water load in the line-of-sight (LOS) (R2 = 0.984). Experiment (2) also yielded a linear relationship between the integrated extinction in the range of 880–1150 cm−1 and the ammonium sulfate load in the LOS (R2 = 0.972). For the semi-volatile ethylene glycol (experiment 3), present in the gas and condense phases, quantification was much more complex and two spectral approaches were developed: (1) according to the linear relationship from the first experiment (determination error of 8%), and (2) inverse modeling (determination error of 57%). This work demonstrates the potential of the OP-FTIR for detecting clouds of water-based aerosols and for quantifying water droplets and solutes at relatively low concentrations. PMID:27121498

  13. Water uptake, priming, drying and storage effects in Cassia excelsa Schrad seeds.

    PubMed

    Jeller, H; Perez, S C; Raizer, J

    2003-02-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the effects of osmotic potential on the water uptake curve in Cassia excelsa seeds and use the results to analyze the effects of dehydration and storage on primed seed germination. Seeds were imbibed in distilled water and polyethylene glicol (PEG 6000) osmotic solutions at -0.2, -0.4, and -0.6 MPa, at 20 degrees C. The radicle emergence and seed moisture content were evaluated at 6-hour intervals during 240 hours. Afterwards, seeds were primed in distilled water and PEG 6000 solutions at -0.2, -0.4, and -0.6 MPa for 48, 72, 96, and 168 hours at 20 degrees C, followed by air drying and storage for 15 days at 5 degrees C. The lower the osmotic potential, the higher the time required for priming. The osmoconditioning yields benefits with PEG solutions at 0.0 and -0.2 MPa; seed improvements were maintained during storage for 15 days at 5 degrees C, but were reverted by seed drying. PMID:12914415

  14. The effect of soil surface sealing on vegetation water uptake along a dry climatic gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sela, Shai; Svoray, Tal; Assouline, Shmuel

    2015-09-01

    Soil surface sealing is a widespread natural process occurring frequently in bare soil areas between vegetation patches. The low hydraulic conductivity that characterizes the seal layer reduces both infiltration and evaporation fluxes from the soil, and thus has the potential to affect local vegetation water uptake (VWU). This effect is investigated here using experimental data, 2-D physically based modeling, and a long-term climatic data set from three dry sites presenting a climatic gradient in the Negev Desert, Israel. The Feddes VWU parameters for the dominant shrub at the study site (Sarcopoterium spinosum) were acquired using lysimeter experiments. The results indicate that during the season surface sealing could either increase or decrease VWU depending on initial soil water content, rainfall intensity, and the duration of the subsequent drying intervals. These factors have a marked effect on interannual variability of the seal layer effect on VWU, which on average was found to be 26% higher under sealed conditions than in the case of unsealed soil surfaces. The seal layer was found to reduce the period where the vegetation was under water stress by 31% compared with unsealed conditions. This effect was more pronounced for seasons with total rainfall depth higher than 10 cm/yr, and was affected by interseasonal climatic variability. These results shed light on the importance of surface sealing in dry environments and its contribution to the resilience of woody vegetation.

  15. Carbon uptake in low dissolved inorganic carbon environments: the effect of limited carbon availability on photosynthetic organisms in thermal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, K. D.; Omelon, C. R.; Bennett, P.

    2010-12-01

    Photosynthesis is the primary carbon fixation process in thermal waters below 70°C, but some hydrothermal waters have extremely low dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), potentially limiting the growth of inorganic carbon fixing organisms such as algae and cyanobacteria. To address the issue of how carbon is assimilated by phototrophs in these environments, we conducted experiments to compare inorganic carbon uptake mechanisms by two phylogenetically distinct organisms collected from geographically distinct carbon limited systems: the neutral pH geothermal waters of El Tatio, Chile, and the acidic geothermal waters of Tantalus Creek in Norris Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park. Discharge waters at El Tatio have low total DIC concentrations (2 to 6 ppm) found mainly as HCO3-; this is in contrast to even lower measured DIC values in Tantalus Creek (as low as 0.13 ppm) that, due to a measured pH of 2.5, exists primarily as CO2. Cyanobacteria and algae are innately physiologically plastic, and we are looking to explore the possibility that carbon limitation in these environments is extreme enough to challenge that plasticity and lead to a suite of carbon uptake adaptations. We hypothesize that these microorganisms utilize adaptive modes of Ci uptake that allow them to survive under these limiting conditions. Cyanobacteria (primarily Synechococcus spp.) isolated from El Tatio can utilize either passive CO2 uptake or active HCO3- uptake mechanisms, in contrast to the eukaryotic alga Cyanidium spp. from Tantalus Creek, which is restricted to an energy-dependent CO2 uptake mechanism. To test this hypothesis, we conducted pH drift experiments (Omelon et al., 2008) to examine changes in pH and [DIC] under a range of pH and [DIC] culture conditions. This work provides baseline information upon which we will begin to investigate the effects of low [DIC] on the growth of phototrophs collected from these and other less carbon limited systems.

  16. Amino-acid uptake by mussels, Mytilus edulis, from natural sea water in a flow-through system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebers, D.; Winkler, A.

    1984-03-01

    Natural Wadden Sea water taken from the North Sea (island of Sylt) was pumped at rates of 150 and 300 l h-1 through a 4 l plexiglass tube mounted on a wooden tripod on the beach. The tube was densely filled with numerous cleaned mussels, Mytilus edulis. HPLC analysis of sea water showed that total dissolved amino acids are patchily distributed, varying by 100 % within 15 min, though proportions of individual amino acids were remarkably constant. Total amino-acid concentrations were 1528±669 nM (N=3) in October 1983 and 1198±597 nM (N=7) in July 1984. Samples taken at the entrance and the outlet of the experimental mussel bed revealed that the mussels had taken up 29 to 66 % of the amino acids dissolved in sea water. Uptake was observed for all amino acids detected in the chromatograms. 78 % of uptake resulted from the 5 most concentrated amino acids: serine, alanine, glycine/threonine, ornithine, aspartic acid. The nutritional profit obtained from uptake of dissolved amino acids amounted to 12 % (N=5, range 5 23 %, flow rate 150 l h-1) and to 24 % (N=3, range 13 38 %, flow rate 300 l h-1) of metabolic rate. The present data suggest that amino-acid concentration predominantly determines the magnitude of the nutritional profit obtained from uptake, and to a smaller extent the flow rate. These findings are in contrast to results of previous studies on Asterias rubens, interacting in small-volume closed systems with the natural bacterial sea water flora (Siebers, 1982). In these experiments, bacteria, due to rapid uptake, outcompeted the sea stars in absorption of dissolved amino acids. The present results suggest that bivalve mussels, can, due to their large gill surface areas and the great amounts of water pumped through their mantle cavity, successfully compete with bacteria in uptake of dissolved organic matter. Mussels, therefore, suggestedly play an important role in cycling dissolved organic matter.

  17. Modelling orange tree root water uptake active area by minimally invasive ERT data and transpiration measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanella, Daniela; Boaga, Jacopo; Perri, Maria Teresa; Consoli, Simona; Cassiani, Giorgio

    2015-04-01

    The comprehension of the hydrological processes involving plant root dynamics is crucial for implementing water saving measures in agriculture. This is particular urgent in areas, like those Mediterranean, characterized by scarce water availability. The study of root water dynamics should not be separated from a more general analysis of the mass and energy fluxes transferred in the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum. In our study, in order to carry this inclusive approach, minimal invasive 3D time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) for soil moisture estimation was combined with plant transpiration fluxes directly measured with Sap Flow (SF) techniques and Eddy Covariance methods, and volumetric soil moisture measurements by TDR probes. The main objective of this inclusive approach was to accurately define root-zone water dynamics and individuate the root-area effectively active for water and nutrient uptake process. The monitoring was carried out in Eastern Sicily (south Italy) in summers 2013 and 2014, within an experimental orange orchard farm. During the first year of experiment (October 2013), ERT measurements were carried out around the pertinent volume of one fully irrigated tree, characterized by a vegetation ground cover of 70%; in the second year (June 2014), ERT monitoring was conducted considering a cutting plant, thus to evaluate soil water dynamics without the significant plant transpiration contribution. In order to explore the hydrological dynamics of the root zone volume surrounded by the monitored tree, the resistivity data acquired during the ERT monitoring were converted into soil moisture content distribution by a laboratory calibration based on the soil electrical properties as a function of moisture content and pore water electrical conductivity. By using ERT data in conjunction with the agro-meteorological information (i.e. irrigation rates, rainfall, evapotranspiration by Eddy Covariance, transpiration by Sap Flow and soil moisture

  18. Modular lidar systems for high-resolution 4-dimensional measurements of water vapor, temperature, and aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrendt, Andreas; Wagner, Gerd; Petrova, Anna; Shiler, Max; Pal, Sandip; Schaberl, Thorsten; Wulfmeyer, Volker

    2005-01-01

    Three lidar systems are currently in development at University of Hohenheim. A water vapor lidar based on the differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technology working near 815 or 935 nm, a temperature and aerosol lidar employing the rotational Raman technique at 355 nm, and an aerosol lidar working with eye-safe laser radiation near 1.5 μm. The transmitters of these three systems are based on an injection-seeded, diode laser pumped Nd:YAG laser with an average power of 100 W at 1064 nm and a repetition rate of 250 Hz. This laser emits a nearly Gaussian-shaped beam which permits frequency-doubling and tripling with high efficiencies. The frequency-doubled 532-nm radiation is employed for pumping a Ti:Sapphire ring-resonator which will be used for DIAL water vapor measurements. In a second branch, a Cr4+:YAG crystal is pumped with the 1064-nm radiation to reach 1400 to 1500 nm for eye-safe monitoring of aerosol particles and clouds. The 532 and 1064 nm radiation are also used for backscatter lidar observations. Frequency tripling gives 355-nm radiation for measurements of temperature with the rotational Raman technique and particle extinction and particle backscattering coefficients in the UV. High transmitter power and effective use of the received signals will allow scanning operation of these three lidar systems. The lidar transmitters and detectors are designed as modules which can be combined for simultaneous measurements with one scanning telescope unit in a ground-based mobile container. Alternatively, they can be connected to different Nd:YAG pump lasers and to telescope units on separate platforms.

  19. Water soluble ions in aerosols (TSP) : Characteristics, sources and seasonal variation over the central Himalayas, Nepal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathee, Lekhendra; Kang, Shichang; Zhang, Qianggong; Rupakheti, Dipesh

    2016-04-01

    Atmspheric pollutants transported from South Asia could have adverse impact on the Himalayan ecosystems. Investigation of aerosol chemistry in the Himalayan region in Nepal has been limited on a temporal and spatial scale to date. Therefore, the water-soluble ionic composition of aerosol using TSP sampler was investigated for a year period from April 2013 to March 2014 at four sites Bode, Dhunche, Lumbini and Jomsom characterized as an urban, rural, semi-urban and remote sites in Nepal. During the study period, the highest concentration of major cation was Ca2+ with an average concentration of 8.91, 2.17, 7.85 and 6.42 μg m-3 and the highest concentration of major anion was SO42- with an average of 10.96, 4.06, 6.85 and 3.30 μg m-3 at Bode, Dhunche, Lumbini and Jomsom respectively. The soluble ions showed the decrease in concentrations from urban to the rural site. Correlations and PCA analysis suggested that that SO42-, NO3- and NH4+ were derived from the anthropogenic sources where as the Ca2+ and Mg2+ were from crustal sources. Our results also suggest that the largest acid neutralizing agent at our sampling sites in the central Himalayas are Ca2+ followed by NH4+. Seasonal variations of soluble ions in aerosols showed higher concentrations during pre-monsoon and winter (dry-periods) due to limited precipitation amount and lower concentrations during the monsoon which can be explained by the dilution effect, higher the precipitation lower the concentration. K+ which is regarded as the tracer of biomss burning had a significant peaks during pre-monsoon season when the forest fires are active around the regions. In general, the results of this study suggests that the atmospheric chemistry is influenced by natural and anthropogenic sources. Thus, soluble ionic concentrations in aerosols from central Himalayas, Nepal can provide a useful database to assess atmospheric environment and its impacts on human health and ecosystem in the southern side of central

  20. Estimating relationships among water use, nitrogen uptake and biomass production in a short-rotation woody crop plantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Short-rotation woody crop has been identified as one of the best feedstocks for bioenergy production due to their fast-growth rates. However, the biomass production, nutrient uptake, and water use efficiency under adverse environmental condition are still poorly understood. In this study, a computer model was developed to undertake these issues using STELLA (Structural Thinking and Experiential Learning Laboratory with Animation) software. Two simulation scenarios were employed: one was to quantify the mechanisms of water use, nitrogen uptake and biomass production in a eucalypt plantation under the normal soil conditions, the other was to estimate the same mechanisms under the wet and dry soil conditions. In general, the rates of evaporation, transpiration, evapotranspiration (ET), and root water uptake were in the following order: ET > root uptake > leaf transpiration > soil evaporation. A profound discrepancy in water use was observed between the wet and dry soil conditions. Leaching of nitrate-N and soluble organic N depended not only on soil N content but also on rainfall rate and duration. The yield of biomass from the eucalypt was primarily regulated by water availability in a fertilized plantation.

  1. On the application of Open-Path Fourier Transform Infra-Red spectroscopy to measure aerosols: Observations of water droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Hashmonay, R.A.; Yost, M.G.

    1999-04-01

    This paper proposes the application of Open-Path Fourier Transform Infra-Red (OP-FTIR) spectroscopy to measure aerosols. A preliminary experiment conducted in a standard shower chamber generated a condensed water aerosol cloud. The OP-FTIR beam acquired spectra through the cloud of water droplets. The authors matched calculated extinction spectra to measured extinction in the spectral range between 500 and 5,000 wavenumbers by using Mie theory for spherical particles. The results indicate that size distribution parameters may be retrieved from OP-FTIR spectra acquired over a 1 km optical path with reasonable detection limits on the order of 10 {micro}g{center_dot}m{sup {minus}3} for aerosols with optical properties equivalent to water.

  2. Subsecond Morphological Changes in Nafion during Water Uptake Detected by Small-Angle X-ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Kusoglu, Ahmet; Modestino, Miguel A.; Hexemer, Alexander; Segalman, Rachel A.; Weber, Adam Z.

    2011-11-09

    The ability of the Nafion membrane to absorb water rapidly and create a network of hydrated interconnected water domains provides this material with an unmatched ability to conduct ions through a chemically and mechanically robust membrane. The morphology and composition of these hydrated membranes significantly affects their transport properties and performance. This research demonstrates that differences in interfacial interactions between the membranes exposed to vapor or liquid water can cause significant changes in kinetics of water uptake. In situ small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) experiments captured the rapid swelling of the membrane in liquid water with a nanostructure rearrangement on the order of seconds. For membranes in contact with water vapor, morphological changes are four orders-of-magnitude slower than in liquid water, suggesting that interfacial resistance limits the penetration of water into the membrane. Furthermore, upon water absorption from liquid water, a structural rearrangement from a distribution of spherical and cylindrical domains to exclusively cylindrical-like domains is suggested. These differences in water-uptake kinetics and morphology provide a new perspective into Schroeder's paradox, which dictates a different water content for vapor- and liquid-equilibrated ionomers at unit activity. Lastly, the findings of this work provide critical insights into the fast kinetics of water absorption of the Nafion membrane, which can aid in the design of energy conversion devices that operate under frequent changes in environmental conditions.

  3. Organic aerosols associated with the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by water-soluble PM2.5.

    PubMed

    Verma, Vishal; Fang, Ting; Xu, Lu; Peltier, Richard E; Russell, Armistead G; Ng, Nga Lee; Weber, Rodney J

    2015-04-01

    We compare the relative toxicity of various organic aerosol (OA) components identified by an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) based on their ability to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS). Ambient fine aerosols were collected from urban (three in Atlanta, GA and one in Birmingham, AL) and rural (Yorkville, GA and Centerville, AL) sites in the Southeastern United States. The ROS generating capability of the water-soluble fraction of the particles was measured by the dithiothreitol (DTT) assay. Water-soluble PM extracts were further separated into the hydrophobic and hydrophilic fractions using a C-18 column, and both fractions were analyzed for DTT activity and water-soluble metals. Organic aerosol composition was measured at selected sites using a high-resolution time-of-flight AMS. Positive matrix factorization of the AMS spectra resolved the organic aerosol into isoprene-derived OA (Isop_OA), hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA), less-oxidized oxygenated OA, (LO-OOA), more-oxidized OOA (MO-OOA), cooking OA (COA), and biomass burning OA (BBOA). The association of the DTT activity of water-soluble PM2.5 (WS_DTT) with these factors was investigated by linear regression techniques. BBOA and MO-OOA were most consistently linked with WS_DTT, with intrinsic water-soluble activities of 151 ± 20 and 36 ± 22 pmol/min/μg, respectively. Although less toxic, MO-OOA was most widespread, contributing to WS_DTT activity at all sites and during all seasons. WS_DTT activity was least associated with biogenic secondary organic aerosol. The OA components contributing to WS_DTT were humic-like substances (HULIS), which are abundantly emitted in biomass burning (BBOA) and include highly oxidized OA from multiple sources (MO-OOA). Overall, OA contributed approximately 60% to the WS_DTT activity, with the remaining probably from water-soluble metals, which were mostly associated with the hydrophilic WS_DTT fraction. PMID:25748105

  4. Comparison of aerosol behavior during sodium fires in CSTF with the HAA-3B code. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Postma, A.K.; Owen, R.K.

    1980-03-01

    Four large-scale tests using sodium fire aerosol sources have been carried out in the Containment System Test Facility (CSTF). Two of the tests employed pool fires and two used spray fires as the aerosol source. Because the CSTF containment vessel is approximately half-scale (20.3 m in height) of a typical reactor building, the CSTF results have provided a large-scale proof test of the HAA-3B Code. For the two pool fire tests, the measured and predicted airborne concentrations were in good agreement when the aerosol source term was based on post-test measurements of aerosol formation, accounting for water vapor uptake.

  5. Enhancement of tritium concentrations on uptake by marine biota: experience from UK coastal waters.

    PubMed

    Hunt, G J; Bailey, T A; Jenkinson, S B; Leonard, K S

    2010-03-01

    Concentrations of tritium in sea water and marine biota as reported over the last approximately 10 years from monitoring programmes carried out by this laboratory under contract to the UK Food Standards Agency are reviewed from three areas: near Cardiff; Sellafield; and Hartlepool. Near Cardiff, enhancement of concentration factors (CFs) above an a priori value of approximately 1 have already been studied, and attributed to compounds containing organically bound tritium in local radioactive waste discharges. Further data for Cardiff up to 2006 are reported in this note. Up to 2001, CFs increased to values of more than approximately 7000 in flounders and approximately 4000 in mussels, but have subsequently reduced; this variability could be due to changes in the organic constitution of compounds discharged. Near Sellafield and Hartlepool, enhancements to the tritium concentration factor are observed but they are relatively small compared with those near Cardiff. Near Sellafield, plaice and mussels appear to have a CF for tritium of approximately 10; in some cases concentrations of tritium in winkles are below detection limits and positively measured values indicate a CF of approximately 3. The variation could be due to mechanisms of uptake by the different organisms. Near Hartlepool there were only a few cases where tritium was positively measured. These data give a value of approximately 5 for the CF in plaice (on the basis of two samples); approximately 15 in winkles (eight samples); and > 45 in mussels (two samples). Any differences between the behaviours at Sellafield and Hartlepool would need to be confirmed by improved measurements. Possible causes are the organic composition of the effluent and differences in environmental behaviour and uptake by organisms near the two sites. These potential causes need further investigation. It is emphasised that results from tritium analyses are heavily method dependent; thus comparison with results from other programmes

  6. Evaluation of the rate of uptake of nitrogen dioxide by atmospheric and surface liquid water

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.; Schwartz, S.E.

    1981-12-20

    The rate of uptake of NO/sub 2/ by liquid water according to (R1), 2NO/sub 2/(g)+H/sub 2/O(l)..-->..2H+NO/sub 3//sup -/+NO/sub 2//sup -/, is shown to be unaffected by O/sub 2/(0.2 atm). Hence the rate constant and Henry's law solubility constant of NO/sub 2/ previously obtained may be employed to evaluate the rates of aqueous phase reactions of NO/sub 2/ in the ambient atmosphere. Reactions (R1) and (R2), NO/sub 2/(g)+NO(g)+H/sub 2/O(l)..-->..2H/sup +/+2NO/sub 2//sup -/, are quite slow at representative atmospheric partial pressures and cloud liquid water content; the characteristic times range upward from 10/sup 3/--10/sup 4/ hours at 10/sup -7/ atm, increasing with decreasing partial pressures of the gases. Direct acidification of cloud liquid water by (R1) or (R2) is also unimportant. Catalytic enhancement of (R1) is potentially important for catalyst concentrations of order 10/sup -7/ M, assuming sufficiently fast rate constants (approx.10/sup 8/ M/sup -1/s/sup -1/). Iron-catalyzed reaction in particular, however, is found to be unimportant. Reaction of NO/sub 2/ with dissolved S(IV) is potentially important, based upon an assumed upper limit rate constant of 2.5 x 10/sup 7/ M/sup -1/ s/sup -1/. Deposition of NO/sub 2/ to surface (ocean or lake) water is shown to be controlled by aqueous phase mass transport and/or reaction and is much slower than heretofore assumed.

  7. Mobile Multiwavelength Polarization Raman Lidar for Water Vapor, Cloud and Aerosol Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Songhua; Song, Xiaoquan; Liu, Bingyi; Dai, Guangyao; Zhang, Kailin; Qin, Shengguang; Gao, Fei; Hua, Dengxin

    2016-06-01

    Aiming at the detection of water vapor mixing ratio, particle linear depolarization ratio, extinction coefficient and cloud information, the Water vapor, Cloud and Aerosol Lidar (WVCAL) was developed by the lidar group at Ocean University of China. The Lidar consists of transmitting subsystem, receiving subsystem, data acquisition and controlling subsystem and auxiliary subsystem. These parts were presented and described in this paper. For the measurement of various physical properties, three channels including Raman channel, polarization channel and infrared channel are integrated in this Lidar system. In this paper, the integration and working principle of these channels is introduced in details. Finally, a measurement example which was operated in coastal area-Qingdao, Shandong province, during 2014 is provided.

  8. Comparison of Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II and balloon-borne stratospheric water vapor measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pruvost, P.; Ovarlez, J.; Lenoble, J.; Chu, W. P.

    1993-01-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II has one channel at 940 nm related to water vapor. Two inversion procedures were developed independently in order to obtain the water vapor profile: the Chahine method by the Langley Research Center, and the Mill method by the Laboratoire d'Optique Atmospherique. Comparisons were made between these two algorithms and some results are presented at midlatitudes (about 45 deg N) and tropical latitudes (12-25 deg S). They are compared with in situ frost point hygrometer data provided by balloon experiments from the Laboratoire de Meteorologie Dynamique. At +/- 0.5 ppmv, agreement between the inversion results and the experimental results was obtained in the altitude range from 18-19 to 26-27 km. Below 18-19 km and above 26-27 km the error is larger (sometimes 1 ppmv and more).

  9. Comparison of Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II and balloon-borne stratospheric water vapor measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Pruvost, P.; Lenoble, J. ); Ovarlez, J. ); Chu, W.P. )

    1993-03-20

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II has one channel at 940 nm related to water vapor. Two inversion procedures were developed independently in order to obtain the water vapor profile: the Chahine method by the Langley Research Center, and the Mill method by the Laboratoire d'Optique Atmospherique. Comparisons were made between these two algorithms and some results are presented at mid-latitudes ([approximately]45[degrees]N) and tropical latitudes (12[degrees]S-25[degrees]S). They are compared with in situ frost point hygrometer data provided by balloon experiments from the Laboratoire de Meteorologie Dynamique. At [plus minus]0.5 ppmv, agreement between the inversion results and the experimental results was obtained in the altitude range from 18-19 to 26-27 km. Below 18-19 km and above 26-27 km the error is larger (sometimes 1 ppmv and more). 17 refs., 4 figs.

  10. Turn-key Raman lidar for profiling atmospheric water vapor, clouds, and aerosols.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, J E; Blair, F H; Bisson, S E; Turner, D D

    1998-07-20

    We describe an operational, self-contained, fully autonomous Raman lidar system that has been developed for unattended, around-the-clock atmospheric profiling of water vapor, aerosols, and clouds. During a 1996 three-week intensive observational period, the system operated during all periods of good weather (339 out of 504 h), including one continuous five-day period. The system is based on a dual-field-of-view design that provides excellent daytime capability without sacrificing nighttime performance. It is fully computer automated and runs unattended following a simple, brief (~5-min) start-up period. We discuss the theory and design of the system and present detailed analyses of the derivation of water-vapor profiles from the lidar measurements. PMID:18285967

  11. Comparison of Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II and balloon-borne stratospheric water vapor measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pruvost, P.; Ovarlez, J.; Lenoble, J.; Chu, W. P.

    1993-03-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II has one channel at 940 nm related to water vapor. Two inversion procedures were developed independently in order to obtain the water vapor profile: the Chahine method by the Langley Research center, and the Mill method by the Laboratoire d'Optique Atmosphérique. Comparisons were made between these two algorithms and some results are presented at mid-latitudes (~45°N) and tropical latitudes (12°S-25°S). They are compared with in situ frost point hygrometer data provided by balloon experiments from the Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique. At +/-0.5 ppmv, agreement between the inversion results and the experimental results was obtained in the altitude range from 18-19 to 26-27 km. Below 18-19 km and above 26-27 km the error is larger (sometimes 1 ppmv and more).

  12. Arsenate uptake by Al nanoclusters and other Al-based sorbents during water treatment.

    PubMed

    Mertens, Jasmin; Rose, Jérôme; Wehrli, Bernhard; Furrer, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    In many parts of the world, arsenic from geogenic and anthropogenic sources deteriorates the quality of drinking water resources. Effective methods of arsenic removal include adsorption and coagulation with iron- and aluminum-based materials, of which polyaluminum chloride is widely employed as coagulant in water treatment due to its low cost and high efficiency. We compared the arsenic uptake capacity and the arsenic bonding sites of different Al-based sorbents, including Al nanoclusters, polyaluminum chloride, polyaluminum granulate, and gibbsite. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy revealed that As(V) forms bidentate-binuclear complexes in interaction with all Al-based removal agents. The octahedral configuration of nanoclusters and the distribution of sorption sites remain the same in all types of removal agents consisting of nano-scale Al oxyhydroxide particles. The obtained distances for As(V)-O and As(V)-Al agreed with previously published data and were found to be 1.69 ± 0.02 Å and 3.17-3.21 Å, respectively. Our study suggests that As(V) binds to Al nanoclusters as strongly as to Al oxide surfaces. The As sorption capacity of Al nanoclusters was found to be very similar to that of Al clusters in a polyaluminum chloride. The most efficient Al-based sorbents for arsenic removal were Al nanoclusters, followed by polyaluminum granulate. PMID:26613179

  13. The effect of water uptake gradient in membrane electrode assembly on fuel cell performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, H.; Shiraki, F.; Oshima, Y.; Tatsumi, T.; Yoshikawa, T.; Sasaki, T.; Oshima, A.; Washio, M.

    2011-02-01

    Novel proton exchange membranes (PEMs) with functionally gradient ionic sites were fabricated utilizing low energy electron beam (EB) irradiations. The low energy electron beam irradiation to polymer membranes possessed the property of gradient energy deposition in the membrane thickness direction. In the process of EB grafting of styrene onto base films, selective ranges of the gradient energy deposition were used. Micro FT-IR spectra showed that the simulated energy deposition of EB irradiation to base polymer membranes in the thickness direction corresponded to the amount of styrene grafted onto EB-irradiated films. After sulfonation, a functionally gradient ionic site PEM (gradient-PEM) was prepared, corresponding to EB depth-dose profile. The functionally gradients of ionic sites in the gradient-PEM and flat-PEM were evaluated with XPS and SEM-EDX. The results of XPS and SEM-EDX suggest that the prepared gradient-PEM had a gradient sulfonated acid groups. In addition, the polarization performance of MEA based on gradient-PEM was improved in high current density. It was thought that water uptake gradient could have a function to prevent flooding in the MEA during FC operation. Thus, the functionally gradient-PEMs could be a promising solution to manage the water behavior in MEA.

  14. Estimates of aerosol species scattering characteristics as a function of relative humidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malm, William C.; Day, Derek E.

    The absorption of water by ambient aerosols can significantly increase the light scattering coefficient and thereby affect issues such as visibility and climate forcing. Although water absorption by inorganic compounds and mixtures of inorganic compounds can often be modeled with adequate certainty for most applications, modeling water uptake by organic aerosols at present is speculative. In this paper, we present data in the form of f (RH)=b scat(RH)/b scat,dry , where bscat(RH) is the scattering coefficient measured at some relative humidity (RH)>20% and bscat,dry is the scattering coefficient measured at RH <20%. The f(RH) has been measured at Great Smoky Mountains National Park in Tennessee and at Grand Canyon National Park in Arizona. The f(RH) curves obtained from these two sites, which show distinctly different aerosol composition and average RH values, are compared. We also present comparisons between the measured water uptake by ambient aerosol with modeled water uptake by inorganic compounds to estimate the water uptake by organic aerosol.

  15. Uptake of deuterium by dead leaves exposed to deuterated water vapor in a greenhouse at daytime and nighttime.

    PubMed

    Momoshima, N; Matsushita, R; Nagao, Y; Okai, T

    2006-01-01

    Dead leaves were exposed to deuterated water vapor (D(2)O) as a substitute of tritiated water (HTO) in a greenhouse at daytime and nighttime to examine uptake and release of tritium by dead leaves because they cover a wide area of the forest floor and are therefore a major target material to be exposed when HTO is atmospherically derived to the forest. The dead cedar needles showed faster uptake and faster release rates during and after the exposure than the fresh ones, and the equilibrium concentration of the dead cedar needles was about two times higher than the fresh ones, indicating a quick response and a high buffering potential of dead leaves. The relation between uptake of D(2)O and number of stoma was examined for dead deciduous leaves; the species with larger number of stoma accumulated more D(2)O at the daytime and nighttime exposures. However, drying of the dead leaves suppressed D(2)O uptake greatly at daytime, suggesting stomata's opening and closing controls the D(2)O uptake of dead leaves. PMID:16513228

  16. Evaluation of aerosol direct radiative forcing in MIRAGE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghan, Steven; Laulainen, Nels; Easter, Richard; Wagener, Richard; Nemesure, Seth; Chapman, Elaine; Zhang, Yang; Leung, Ruby

    2001-03-01

    A variety of measurements have been used to evaluate the treatment of aerosol radiative properties and radiative impacts of aerosols simulated by the Model for Integrated Research on Atmospheric Global Exchange (MIRAGE). The treatment of water uptake in MIRAGE agrees with laboratory measurements, and the growth of aerosol extinction with relative humidity in MIRAGE simulations agrees with field measurements. The simulated frequency of relative humidity near 100% is about twice that of analyzed relative humidity. When the analyzed relative humidity is used to calculate aerosol water uptake in MIRAGE, the simulated aerosol optical depth agrees with most surface measurements after cloudy conditions are filtered out and differences between model and station elevations are accounted for, but simulated optical depths are too low over Brazil and central Canada. Simulated optical depths are mostly within a factor of 2 of satellite estimates, but are too high off the east coasts of the United States and China and too low off the coast of West Africa and in the Arabian Sea. The simulated single-scatter albedo is consistent with surface measurements. MIRAGE correctly simulates a larger Ångström exponent near regions with emissions of submicron particles and aerosol precursor gases, and a smaller exponent near regions with emissions of coarse particles. The simulated sensitivity of radiative forcing to aerosol optical depth is consistent with estimates from measurements. The simulated direct forcing is within the uncertainty of estimates from measurements in the North Atlantic.

  17. Water Vapor Uptake of Ultrathin Films of Biologically Derived Nanocrystals: Quantitative Assessment with Quartz Crystal Microbalance and Spectroscopic Ellipsometry.

    PubMed

    Niinivaara, Elina; Faustini, Marco; Tammelin, Tekla; Kontturi, Eero

    2015-11-10

    Despite the relevance of water interactions, explicit analysis of vapor adsorption on biologically derived surfaces is often difficult. Here, a system was introduced to study the vapor uptake on a native polysaccharide surface; namely, cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) ultrathin films were examined with a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) and spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE). A significant mass uptake of water vapor by the CNC films was detected using the QCM-D upon increasing relative humidity. In addition, thickness changes proportional to changes in relative humidity were detected using SE. Quantitative analysis of the results attained indicated that in preference to being soaked by water at the point of hydration each individual CNC in the film became enveloped by a 1 nm thick layer of adsorbed water vapor, resulting in the detected thickness response. PMID:26461931

  18. Irrigation depth far exceeds water uptake depth in an oasis cropland in the middle reaches of Heihe River Basin

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bin; Wen, Xuefa; Sun, Xiaomin

    2015-01-01

    Agricultural irrigation in the middle reaches of the Heihe River Basin consumes approximately 80% of the total river water. Whether the irrigation depth matches the water uptake depth of crops is one of the most important factors affecting the efficiency of irrigation water use. Our results indicated that the influence of plastic film on soil water δ18O was restricted to 0–30 cm soil depth. Based on a Bayesian model (MixSIR), we found that irrigated maize acquired water preferentially from 0–10 cm soil layer, with a median uptake proportion of 87 ± 15%. Additionally, maize utilised a mixture of irrigation and shallow soil water instead of absorbing the irrigation water directly. However, only 24.7 ± 5.5% of irrigation water remained in 0–10 cm soil layer, whereas 29.5 ± 2.8% and 38.4 ± 3.3% of the irrigation water infiltrated into 10–40 cm and 40–80 cm layers. During the 4 irrigation events, approximately 39% of the irrigation and rainwater infiltrated into soil layers below 80 cm. Reducing irrigation amount and developing water-saving irrigation methods will be important strategies for improving the efficiency of irrigation water use in this area. PMID:26463010

  19. Irrigation depth far exceeds water uptake depth in an oasis cropland in the middle reaches of Heihe River Basin.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bin; Wen, Xuefa; Sun, Xiaomin

    2015-01-01

    Agricultural irrigation in the middle reaches of the Heihe River Basin consumes approximately 80% of the total river water. Whether the irrigation depth matches the water uptake depth of crops is one of the most important factors affecting the efficiency of irrigation water use. Our results indicated that the influence of plastic film on soil water δ(18)O was restricted to 0-30 cm soil depth. Based on a Bayesian model (MixSIR), we found that irrigated maize acquired water preferentially from 0-10 cm soil layer, with a median uptake proportion of 87 ± 15%. Additionally, maize utilised a mixture of irrigation and shallow soil water instead of absorbing the irrigation water directly. However, only 24.7 ± 5.5% of irrigation water remained in 0-10 cm soil layer, whereas 29.5 ± 2.8% and 38.4 ± 3.3% of the irrigation water infiltrated into 10-40 cm and 40-80 cm layers. During the 4 irrigation events, approximately 39% of the irrigation and rainwater infiltrated into soil layers below 80 cm. Reducing irrigation amount and developing water-saving irrigation methods will be important strategies for improving the efficiency of irrigation water use in this area. PMID:26463010

  20. Irrigation depth far exceeds water uptake depth in an oasis cropland in the middle reaches of Heihe River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bin; Wen, Xuefa; Sun, Xiaomin

    2015-10-01

    Agricultural irrigation in the middle reaches of the Heihe River Basin consumes approximately 80% of the total river water. Whether the irrigation depth matches the water uptake depth of crops is one of the most important factors affecting the efficiency of irrigation water use. Our results indicated that the influence of plastic film on soil water δ18O was restricted to 0-30 cm soil depth. Based on a Bayesian model (MixSIR), we found that irrigated maize acquired water preferentially from 0-10 cm soil layer, with a median uptake proportion of 87 ± 15%. Additionally, maize utilised a mixture of irrigation and shallow soil water instead of absorbing the irrigation water directly. However, only 24.7 ± 5.5% of irrigation water remained in 0-10 cm soil layer, whereas 29.5 ± 2.8% and 38.4 ± 3.3% of the irrigation water infiltrated into 10-40 cm and 40-80 cm layers. During the 4 irrigation events, approximately 39% of the irrigation and rainwater infiltrated into soil layers below 80 cm. Reducing irrigation amount and developing water-saving irrigation methods will be important strategies for improving the efficiency of irrigation water use in this area.

  1. Comparison of Aerosol Optical Properties and Water Vapor Among Ground and Airborne Lidars and Sun Photometers During TARFOX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrare, R.; Ismail, S.; Browell, E.; Brackett, V.; Clayton, M.; Kooi, S.; Melfi, S. H.; Whiteman, D.; Schwemmer, G.; Evans, K.; Russell, P.; Livingston, J.; Schmid, B.; Holben, B.; Remer, L.; Smirnov, A.; Hobbs, P. V.

    2000-01-01

    We compare aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and precipitable water vapor (PWV) measurements derived from ground and airborne lidars and Sun photometers during TARFOX (Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment). Such comparisons are important to verify the consistency between various remote sensing measurements before employing them in any assessment of the impact of aerosols on the global radiation balance. Total scattering ratio and extinction profiles measured by the ground-based NASA/GSFC Scanning Raman Lidar (SRL) system, which operated from Wallops Island, Virginia (37.86 deg N, 75.51 deg W), are compared with those measured by the Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment (LASE) airborne lidar system aboard the NASA ER-2 aircraft. Bias and rms differences indicate that these measurements generally agreed within about 10%. Aerosol extinction profiles and estimates of AOT are derived from both lidar measurements using a value for the aerosol extinction/backscattering ratio S(sub a)=60 sr for the aerosol extinction/backscattering ratio, which was determined from the Raman lidar measurements.

  2. Significant formation of water-insoluble secondary organic aerosols in semi-arid urban environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favez, Olivier; Sciare, Jean; Cachier, Hélène; Alfaro, Stéphane C.; Abdelwahab, Magdy M.

    2008-08-01

    Diurnal variations of submicron elemental carbon (EC), water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) and water-insoluble organic carbon (WIOC) were investigated at an urban background site in Cairo (Egypt) from 23 March to 14 April 2005. Well-marked diurnal patterns, with minima during the traffic-influenced morning period (6:00-9:00) and maxima during the intense photochemical period (12:00-15:00), were observed for the WSOC/EC ratio and, more surprisingly, for the WIOC/EC ratio. Such diurnal variations suggest significant formation of both water-soluble and water-insoluble secondary organic aerosols during the afternoon. Applying the EC-tracer method, freshly-formed secondary organic carbon (fresh SOC) was found to possibly account for more than 50% of OC concentrations measured during the 12:00-15:00 period, and this fresh SOC was calculated to be mainly (~60%) composed of water-insoluble species. The latter (unexpected) result could be due to low ambient relative humidity as well as to the importance of anthropogenic volatile organic compounds in Cairo.

  3. Characterization of water-soluble organic matter in urban aerosol by 1H-NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalbot, Marie-Cecile G.; Chitranshi, Priyanka; Gamboa da Costa, Gonçalo; Pollock, Erik; Kavouras, Ilias G.

    2016-03-01

    The functional and 13C isotopic compositions of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) in atmospheric aerosol were determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) and isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) in an urban location in the Southern Mississippi Valley. The origin of WSOC was resolved using the functional distribution of organic hydrogen, δ13C ratio, and positive matrix factorization (PMF). Three factors were retained based on NMR spectral bins loadings. Two factors (factors 1 and 3) demonstrated strong associations with the aliphatic region in the NMR spectra and levoglucosan resonances. Differences between the two factors included the abundance of the aromatic functional group for factor 1, indicating fresh emissions and, for factor 3, the presence of resonances attributed to secondary ammonium nitrate and low δ13C ratio values that are indicative of secondary organic aerosol. Factors 1 and 3 added 0.89 and 1.08 μgC m-3, respectively, with the highest contribution in the summer and fall. Factor 2 retained resonances consistent with saccharides and was attributed to pollen particles. Its contribution to WSOC varied from 0.22 μgC m-3 in winter to 1.04 μgC m-3 in spring.

  4. Characterization of Light Non-Methane Hydrocarbons, Surface Water DOC, and Aerosols over the Nordic Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, E. D.; Ariya, P. A.

    2006-12-01

    Whole air, size-fractionated marine aerosols, and surface ocean water DOC were sampled together during June-July 2004 on the Nordic seas, in order to explore factors leading to the formation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at the sea surface and their transfer to the atmosphere. High site-to-site variability in 19 non-methane hydrocarbon concentrations suggests highly variable, local sources for these compounds. Acetone, C5 and C6 hydrocarbons, and dimethylsulfide were identified in the seawater samples using solid-phase microextraction/GC-MS. The aerosols were analysed by SEM-EDX and contained primarily inorganic material (sea salt, marine sulfates, and carbonates) and little organic matter. However, a culturable bacterium was isolated from the large (9.9 - 18 μ m) fraction at one site, and identified as Micrococcus luteus. We will discuss the implication of these results on potential exchange processes at the ocean-atmosphere interface and the impact of bioaerosols in transferring marine organic carbon to atmospheric organic carbon.

  5. Total ozone column, aerosol optical depth and precipitable water effects on solar erythemal ultraviolet radiation recorded in Malta.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilbao, Julia; Román, Roberto; Yousif, Charles; Mateos, David; Miguel, Argimiro

    2013-04-01

    The Universities of Malta and Valladolid (Spain) developed a measurement campaign, which took place in the Institute for Energy Technology in Marsaxlokk (Southern Malta) between May and October 2012, and it was supported by the Spanish government through the Project titled "Measurement campaign about Solar Radiation, Ozone, and Aerosol in the Mediterranean area" (with reference CGL2010-12140-E). This campaign provided the first ground-based measurements in Malta of erythemal radiation and UV index, which indicate the effectiveness of the sun exposure to produce sunburn on human skin. A wide variety of instruments was involved in the campaign, providing a complete atmospheric characterization. Data of erythemal radiation and UV index (from UVB-1 pyranometer), total shortwave radiaton (global and diffuse components from CM-6B pyranometers), and total ozone column, aerosol optical thickness, and precitable water column (from a Microtops-II sunphotometer) were available in the campaign. Ground-based and satellite instruments were used in the analysis, and several intercomparisons were carried out to validate remote sensing data. OMI, GOME, GOME-2, and MODIS instruments, which provide data of ozone, aerosol load and optical properties, were used to this end. The effects on solar radiation, ultraviolet and total shortwave ranges, of total ozone column, aerosol optical thickness and precipitable water column were obtained using radiation measurements at different fixed solar zenith angles. The empirical results shown a determinant role of the solar position, a negligible effect of ozone on total shortwave radiation, and a stronger attenuation provided by aerosol particles in the erythemal radiation. A variety of aerosol types from different sources (desert dust, biomass burning, continental, and maritime) reach Malta, in this campaign several dust events from the Sahara desert occurred and were analyzed establishing the air mass back-trajectories ending at Malta at

  6. Modeling Impacts On and Feedbacks Among Surface Energy and Water Budgets Due to Aerosols-In-Snow Across North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oaida, C. M.; Xue, Y.; Chin, M.; Flanner, M.; De Sales, F.; Painter, T. H.

    2014-12-01

    Snow albedo is known to have a significant impact on energy and water budgets by modulating land-atmosphere flux exchanges. In recent decades, anthropogenic activities that cause dust and soot emission and deposition on snow-covered areas have lead to the alteration of snow albedo. Our study aims to investigate and quantitatively assess the impact of aerosols-in-snow on surface energy and water budgets at a local and regional scale using a recently enhanced regional climate model that has physically based snow processes, including aerosols in snow. We employ NCAR's WRF-ARW model, which we have previously coupled with a land surface model, Simplified Simple Biosphere version 3 (SSiB-3). We improve the original WRF/SSiB-3 framework to include a snow-radiative transfer model, Snow, Ice, and Aerosol Radiative (SNICAR) model, which considers the effects of snow grain size and aerosols-in-snow on snow albedo evolution. Furthermore, the modified WRF/SSiB-3 can now account for the deposition and tracking of aerosols in snow. The model is run for 10 continuous years (2000-2009) over North America under two scenarios: (1) no aerosol deposition in snow, and (2) with GOCART dust, black carbon, and organic carbon surface deposition in snow. By comparing the two cases, we can investigate the impact of aerosols-in-snow. We examine the changes in surface energy balance, such as albedo, surface net solar radiation (radiative forcing), and surface air and skin temperature, and how these might interact with, and lead to, changes in the hydrologic cycle, including SWE, runoff, evapotranspiration and soil moisture. We investigate the mechanisms and feedbacks that might contribute to the changes seen across select regions of North America, which are potentially a result of both local and remote effects.

  7. Water soluble aerosols and gases at a UK background site