Science.gov

Sample records for aerospace alloys composites

  1. NASA-UVa light aerospace alloy and structures technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, Richard P.; Haviland, John K.; Herakovich, Carl T.; Pilkey, Walter D.; Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Scully, John R.; Stoner, Glenn E.; Swanson, Robert E.; Thornton, Earl A.; Wawner, Franklin E., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The general objective of the NASA-UVa Light Aerospace Alloy and Structures Technology Program was to conduct research on the performance of next generation, light weight aerospace alloys, composites, and associated thermal gradient structures. The following research areas were actively investigated: (1) mechanical and environmental degradation mechanisms in advanced light metals and composites; (2) aerospace materials science; (3) mechanics of materials and composites for aerospace structures; and (4) thermal gradient structures.

  2. NASA-UVA light aerospace alloy and structures technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, Richard P.; Haviland, John K.; Herakovich, Carl T.; Pilkey, Walter D.; Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Stoner, Glenn E.; Swanson, Robert E.; Thornton, Earl A.; Wawner, Franklin E., Jr.; Wert, John A.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of the Light Aerospace Alloy and Structures Technology Program is to conduct interdisciplinary graduate student research on the performance of next generation, light weight aerospace alloys, composites, and associated thermal gradient structures. Individual technical objectives are established for each project. Efforts aim to produce basic understanding of material behavior, monolithic and composite alloys, processing methods, solid and mechanics analyses, measurement advances, and a pool of educated graduate students. Progress is reported for 11 areas of study.

  3. Advances in processing of NiAl intermetallic alloys and composites for high temperature aerospace applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochenek, Kamil; Basista, Michal

    2015-11-01

    Over the last few decades intermetallic compounds such as NiAl have been considered as potential high temperature structural materials for aerospace industry. A large number of investigations have been reported describing complex fabrication routes, introducing various reinforcing/alloying elements along with theoretical analyses. These research works were mainly focused on the overcoming of main disadvantage of nickel aluminides that still restricts their application range, i.e. brittleness at room temperature. In this paper we present an overview of research on NiAl processing and indicate methods that are promising in solving the low fracture toughness issue at room temperature. Other material properties relevant for high temperature applications are also addressed. The analysis is primarily done from the perspective of NiAl application in aero engines in temperature regimes from room up to the operating temperature (over 1150 °C) of turbine blades.

  4. RETRACTED ARTICLE: Microstructural evolution of AA7449 aerospace alloy refined by intensive shearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghayeghi, R.; Nastac, L.

    2012-10-01

    Many aerospace alloys are sensitive to their composition thus cannot be chemically grain refined. In addition, only 1% grain refiners can act as nuclei for refining the structure. In this paper, physical refinement by intensive shearing above liquidus as an alternative technique will be investigated for AA7449 aerospace alloy. The results can open a new gateway for aerospace industry for refining their microstructure.

  5. Statistical Analysis of Strength Data for an Aerospace Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neergaard, Lynn; Malone, Tina; Gentz, Steven J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Aerospace vehicles are produced in limited quantities that do not always allow development of MIL-HDBK-5 A-basis design allowables. One method of examining production and composition variations is to perform 100% lot acceptance testing for aerospace Aluminum (Al) alloys. This paper discusses statistical trends seen in strength data for one Al alloy. A four-step approach reduced the data to residuals, visualized residuals as a function of time, grouped data with quantified scatter, and conducted analysis of variance (ANOVA).

  6. Statistical Analysis of Strength Data for an Aerospace Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neergaard, L.; Malone, T.

    2001-01-01

    Aerospace vehicles are produced in limited quantities that do not always allow development of MIL-HDBK-5 A-basis design allowables. One method of examining production and composition variations is to perform 100% lot acceptance testing for aerospace Aluminum (Al) alloys. This paper discusses statistical trends seen in strength data for one Al alloy. A four-step approach reduced the data to residuals, visualized residuals as a function of time, grouped data with quantified scatter, and conducted analysis of variance (ANOVA).

  7. Ceramic composites: Enabling aerospace materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, S. R.

    1992-01-01

    Ceramics and ceramic matrix composites (CMC) have the potential for significant impact on the performance of aerospace propulsion and power systems. In this paper, the potential benefits are discussed in broad qualitative terms and are illustrated by some specific application case studies. The key issues in need of resolution for the potential of ceramics to be realized are discussed.

  8. NASA-UVA light aerospace alloy and structures technology program (LA(sup 2)ST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, Richard P.; Haviland, John K.; Herakovich, Carl T.; Pilkey, Walter D.; Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Scully, John R.; Starke, Edgar A., Jr.; Stoner, Glenn E.; Thornton, Earl A.; Wawner, Franklin E., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The general objective of the Light Aerospace Alloy and Structures Technology (LA(sup 2)ST) Program is to conduct interdisciplinary graduate student research on the performance of next generation, light weight aerospace alloys, composites, and thermal gradient structures in collaboration with Langley researchers. Specific technical objectives are established for each research project. We aim to produce relevant data and basic understanding of material behavior and microstructure, new monolithic and composite alloys, advanced processing methods, new solid and fluid mechanics analyses, measurement advances, and critically, a pool of educated graduate students for aerospace technologies. Four research areas are being actively investigated, including: (1) Mechanical and Environmental Degradation Mechanisms in Advanced Light Metals and Composites; (2) Aerospace Materials Science; (3) Mechanics of Materials and Composites for Aerospace Structures; and (4) Thermal Gradient Structures.

  9. NASA-UVA light aerospace alloy and structures technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, Richard P.; Haviland, John K.; Herakovich, Carl T.; Pilkey, Walter D.; Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Thornton, Earl A.; Stoner, Glenn E.; Swanson, Robert E.; Wawner, Franklin E., Jr.; Wert, John A.

    1989-01-01

    The report on progress achieved in accomplishing of the NASA-UVA Light Aerospace Alloy and Structures Technology Program is presented. The objective is to conduct interdisciplinary graduate student research on the performance of next generation, light weight aerospace alloys and associated thermal gradient structures in close collaboration with researchers. The efforts will produce basic understanding of material behavior, new monolithic and composite alloys, processing methods, solid and fluid mechanics analyses, measurement advances, and a pool of educated graduate students. The presented accomplishments include: research on corrosion fatigue of Al-Li-Cu alloy 2090; research on the strengthening effect of small In additions to Al-Li-Cu alloys; research on localized corrosion of Al-Li alloys; research on stress corrosion cracking of Al-Li-Cu alloys; research on fiber-matrix reaction studies (Ti-1100 and Ti-15-3 matrices containing SCS-6, SCS-9, and SCS-10 fibers); and research on methods for quantifying non-random particle distribution in materials that has led to generation of a set of computer programs that can detect and characterize clusters in particles.

  10. New materials in the aerospace industries. [emphasizing heat resistant and light alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangler, J. J.

    1973-01-01

    Trends in the development of new aerospace metals and alloys are reviewed, and applications of these advanced materials in nonaerospace fields are indicated. Emphasis is placed on the light metals and the high-temperature alloys. Attention is given to the properties and uses of the high-strength aluminum alloy 7050, alpha and beta titanium alloys, dispersion strengthened superalloys, metal-metal composites, eutectic superalloys, and coated columbium alloys.

  11. Ultrasonic Characterization of Aerospace Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leckey, Cara; Johnston, Patrick; Haldren, Harold; Perey, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Composite materials have seen an increased use in aerospace in recent years and it is expected that this trend will continue due to the benefits of reduced weight, increased strength, and other factors. Ongoing work at NASA involves the investigation of the large-scale use of composites for spacecraft structures (SLS components, Orion Composite Crew Module, etc). NASA is also involved in work to enable the use of composites in advanced aircraft structures through the Advanced Composites Project (ACP). In both areas (space and aeronautics) there is a need for new nondestructive evaluation and materials characterization techniques that are appropriate for characterizing composite materials. This paper will present an overview of NASA's needs for characterizing aerospace composites, including a description of planned and ongoing work under ACP for the detection of composite defects such as fiber waviness, reduced bond strength, delamination damage, and microcracking. The research approaches include investigation of angle array, guided wave, and phase sensitive ultrasonic methods. The use of ultrasonic simulation tools for optimizing and developing methods will also be discussed.

  12. NASA-UVA Light Aerospace Alloy and Structures Technology Program (LA2ST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scully, John R.; Shiflet, Gary J.; Stoner, Glenn E.; Wert, John A.

    1996-01-01

    The NASA-UVA Light Aerospace Alloy and Structures Technology (LA2ST) Program was initiated in 1986 and continues with a high level of activity. The objective of the LA2ST Program is to conduct interdisciplinary graduate student research on the performance of next generation, light-weight aerospace alloys, composites and thermal gradient structures in collaboration with NASA-Langley researchers. Specific technical objectives are presented for each research project. We generally aim to produce relevant data and basic understanding of material mechanical response, environmental/corrosion behavior, and microstructure; new monolithic and composite alloys; advanced processing methods; new solid and fluid mechanics analyses; measurement and modeling advances; and a pool of educated graduate students for aerospace technologies. Three research areas are being actively investigated, including: (1) Mechanical and environmental degradation mechanisms in advanced light metals, (2) Aerospace materials science, and (3) Mechanics of materials for light aerospace structures.

  13. Nondestructive Evaluation for Aerospace Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leckey, Cara; Cramer, Elliott; Perey, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques are important for enabling NASA's missions in space exploration and aeronautics. The expanded and continued use of composite materials for aerospace components and vehicles leads to a need for advanced NDE techniques capable of quantitatively characterizing damage in composites. Quantitative damage detection techniques help to ensure safety, reliability and durability of space and aeronautic vehicles. This presentation will give a broad outline of NASA's range of technical work and an overview of the NDE research performed in the Nondestructive Evaluation Sciences Branch at NASA Langley Research Center. The presentation will focus on ongoing research in the development of NDE techniques for composite materials and structures, including development of automated data processing tools to turn NDE data into quantitative location and sizing results. Composites focused NDE research in the areas of ultrasonics, thermography, X-ray computed tomography, and NDE modeling will be discussed.

  14. Aerospace applications of advanced aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chellman, D. J.; Langenbeck, S. L.

    1993-01-01

    Advanced metallic materials within the Al-base family are being developed for applications on current and future aerospace vehicles. These advanced materials offer significant improvements in density, strength, stiffness, fracture resistance, and/or higher use temperature which translates into improved vehicle performance. Aerospace applications of advanced metallic materials include space structures, fighters, military and commercial transport aircraft, and missiles. Structural design requirements, including not only static and durability/damage tolerance criteria but also environmental considerations, drive material selections. Often trade-offs must be made regarding strength, fracture resistance, cost, reliability, and maintainability in order to select the optimum material for a specific application. These trade studies not only include various metallic materials but also many times include advanced composite materials. Details of material comparisons, aerospace applications, and material trades will be presented.

  15. NASA-UVA Light Aerospace Alloy and Structures Technology program (LA2ST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starke, Edgar A., Jr.; Gangloff, Richard P.; Herakovich, Carl T.; Scully, John R.; Shiflet, Gary J.; Stoner, Glenn E.; Wert, John A.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of the LA2ST Program is to conduct interdisciplinary graduate student research on the performance of next generation, light-weight aerospace alloys, composites, and thermal gradient structures in collaboration with NASA-Langley researchers. The general aim is to produce relevant data and basic understanding of material mechanical response, environment/corrosion behavior, and microstructure; new monolithic and composite alloys; advanced processing methods; new solid and fluid mechanics analyses; measurement and modeling advances; and a pool of educated students for aerospace technologies. Specific technical objectives are presented for each of the following research projects: time-temperature dependent fracture in advanced wrought ingot metallurgy, and spray deposited aluminum alloys; cryogenic temperature effects on the deformation and fracture of Al-Li-Cu-In alloys; effects of aging and temperature on the ductile fracture of AA2095 and AA2195; mechanisms of localized corrosion in alloys 2090 and 2095; hydrogen interactions in aluminum-lithium alloys 2090 and selected model alloys; mechanisms of deformation and fracture in high strength titanium alloys (effects of temperature and hydrogen and effects of temperature and microstructure); evaluations of wide-panel aluminum alloy extrusions; Al-Si-Ge alloy development; effects of texture and precipitates on mechanical property anisotropy of Al-Cu-Mg-X alloys; damage evolution in polymeric composites; and environmental effects in fatigue life prediction - modeling crack propagation in light aerospace alloys.

  16. NASA-UVA Light Aerospace Alloy and Structures Technology Program (LA2ST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, Richard P.

    1991-01-01

    The general objective of the Light Aerospace Alloy and Structures Technology (LA2ST) Program is to conduct interdisciplinary graduate student research on the performance of next generation, light weight aerospace alloys, composites, and associated thermal gradient structures in close collaboration with Langley researchers. Specific technical objectives are established for each research project. Relevant data and basic understanding of material behavior and microstructure, new monolithic and composite alloys, advanced processing methods, new solid and fluid mechanic analyses, measurement advances, and a pool of educated graduate students are sought.

  17. NASA-UVA light aerospace alloy and structures technology program (LA2ST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, Richard P.

    1992-01-01

    The NASA-UVa Light Aerospace Alloy and Structure Technology (LAST) Program continues to maintain a high level of activity, with projects being conducted by graduate students and faculty advisors in the Departments of Materials Science and Engineering, Civil Engineering and Applied Mechanics, and Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at the University of Virginia. This work is funded by the NASA-Langley Research Center under Grant NAG-1-745. Here, we report on progress achieved between January 1 and June 30, 1992. The objectives of the LA2ST Program is to conduct interdisciplinary graduate student research on the performance of the next generation, light weight aerospace alloys, composites and thermal gradient structures in collaboration with Langley researchers. Technical objectives are established for each research project. We aim to produce relevant data and basic understanding of material mechanical response, corrosion behavior, and microstructure; new monolithic and composite alloys; advanced processing methods; new solid and fluid mechanics analyses; measurement advances; and critically, a pool of educated graduate students for aerospace technologies. The accomplishments presented in this report cover topics including: (1) Mechanical and Environmental Degradation Mechanisms in Advance Light Metals and Composites; (2) Aerospace Materials Science; (3) Mechanics of Materials and Composites for Aerospace Structures; and (4) Thermal Gradient Structures.

  18. Processability and High Temperature Behavior of Emerging Aerospace Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-01

    I F opy IOSR-Th. 8-O0 970 - SC5459.AR - c Copy No. 4 0i Q PROCESSABILITY AND HIGH TEMPERATURE BEHAVIOR OF EMERGING AEROSPACE ALLOYS ANNUAL REPORT NO...NO. NO. ACCESSION NO. b0’ 2306 A\\ 11. TITLE finclude Security Classficationi PROCESSABILITY AND HIGH TEMPERATURE BEHAVIOR OF EMERGING AEROSPACE ALLOYS...conducted. Progress of microstruc - turel refinement and changes in misorientation between subgrains are determined to delineate the path for optimum

  19. NASA-UVA Light Aerospace Alloy and Structures Technology Program (LA2ST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, Richard P.; Scully, John R.; Stoner, Glenn E.; Thornton, Earl A.; Wawner, Franklin E., Jr.; Wert, John A.

    1993-01-01

    The NASA-UVA Light Aerospace Alloy and Structures Technology (LA2ST) Program continues a high level of activity. Progress achieved between 1 Jan. and 30 Jun. 1993 is reported. The objective of the LA2ST Program is to conduct interdisciplinary graduate student research on the performance of next generation, light weight aerospace alloys, composites, and thermal gradient structures in collaboration with NASA-Langley researchers. The following projects are addressed: environmental fatigue of Al-Li-Cu alloys; mechanisms of localized corrosion and environmental fracture in Al-Cu-Li-Mg-Ag alloy X2095 and compositional variations; the effect of zinc additions on the precipitation and stress corrosion cracking behavior of alloy 8090; hydrogen interactions with Al-Li-Cu alloy 2090 and model alloys; metastable pitting of aluminum alloys; cryogenic fracture toughness of Al-Cu-Li + In alloys; the fracture toughness of Weldalite (TM); elevated temperature cracking of advanced I/M aluminum alloys; response of Ti-1100/SCS-6 composites to thermal exposure; superplastic forming of Weldalite (TM); research to incorporate environmental effects into fracture mechanics fatigue life prediction codes such as NASA FLAGRO; and thermoviscoplastic behavior.

  20. NASA-UVA light aerospace alloy and structures technology program (LA2ST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, Richard P.; Starke, Edger A., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    This progress report covers achievements made between January 1 and June 30, 1966 on the NASA-UVA Light Aerospace Alloy and Structures Technology (LA2ST) Program. The objective of the LA2ST Program is to conduct interdisciplinary graduate student research on the performance of next generation, light-weight aerospace alloys, composites and thermal gradient structures in collaboration with NASA-Langley researchers. Specific technical objectives are presented for each research project. . The accomplishments presented in this report are: (1) Mechanical and Environmental Degradation Mechanisms in Advanced Light Metals, (2) Aerospace Materials Science, and (3) Mechanics of Materials for Light Aerospace Structures. Collective accomplishments between January and June of 1996 include: 4 journal or proceedings publications, 1 NASA progress report, 4 presentations at national technical meetings, and 2 PhD dissertations published.

  1. Laser welding of selected aerospace alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebadan, Gracie E.

    The study was aimed at developing an understanding of the microstructural effects of the laser welding process on the alloys, and assessing the structural integrity of the resultant welds. The effect of laser processing parameters such as laser power, laser beam traverse speed, lens focal length, and the manipulation of these parameters on the welding efficiency and weld area integrity was also investigated. Other tasks within the project included a study on the possibility of using an anodic film to enhance the laser weld ability of Al 6061. Finally, attempts were made to identify phases observed in the weld area of the composite materials. Nimonics C263 and PE11 exhibited laser welds free of cracks and porosity. The difference in composition between the two alloys did not result in any significant dissimilarities in their response to the laser welding process. The welds in both alloys exhibited a fine columnar dendritic microstructure, and while carbides were observed in the interdendritic regions of the welds, electron optical analysis did not reveal any gamma' precipitates in this region. It was concluded that for the welding of thin gage materials above a threshold laser power the resultant welding efficiency shows a greater dependence on laser beam mode, and laser spot size, than on laser power, and beam traverse speed. Aluminum 6061 was not easily welded with a laser in its as received form, and the welds showed some degree of porosity. Anodizing was found to improve the welding efficiency in this material. While the presence of an anodic film on the metal surface increased the welding efficiency of the alloy, no relationship was found between the thickness of the anodic film and welding efficiency in the range of film thicknesses investigated. Weld regions were observed to be cellular dendritic in structure, with narrow heat affected zones. No precipitates or low melting point phases could be identified in the weld region. Melt zones were successfully

  2. Nonlinear analyses of composite aerospace structures in sonic fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, Chuh

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes the semiannual research progress, accomplishments, and future plans performed under the NASA Langley Research Center Grant No. NAG-1-1358. The primary research effort of this project is the development of analytical methods for the prediction of nonlinear random response of composite aerospace structures subjected to combined acoustic and thermal loads. The progress, accomplishments, and future plates on four sonic fatigue research topics are described. The sonic fatigue design and passive control of random response of shape memory alloy hybrid composites presented in section 4, which is suited especially for HSCT, is a new initiative.

  3. NASA-UVA Light Aerospace Alloy and Structures Technology Program (LA2ST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, Richard P.; Starke, Edgar A., Jr.; Kelly, Robert G.; Scully, John R.; Shiflet, Gary J.; Stoner, Glenn E.; Wert, John A.

    1997-01-01

    The NASA-UVA Light Aerospace Alloy and Structures Technology (LA2ST) Program was initiated in 1986 and continues with a high level of activity. Here, we report on progress achieved between July I and December 31, 1996. The objective of the LA2ST Program is to conduct interdisciplinary graduate student research on the performance of next generation, light-weight aerospace alloys, composites and thermal gradient structures in collaboration with NASA-Langley researchers. Specific technical objectives are presented for each research project. We generally aim to produce relevant data and basic understanding of material mechanical response, environmental/corrosion behavior, and microstructure; new monolithic and composite alloys; advanced processing methods; new solid and fluid mechanics analyses; measurement and modeling advances; and a pool of educated graduate students for aerospace technologies. The accomplishments presented in this report are summarized as follows. Three research areas are being actively investigated, including: (1) Mechanical and Environmental Degradation Mechanisms in Advanced Light Metals, (2) Aerospace Materials Science, and (3) Mechanics of Materials for Light Aerospace Structures.

  4. Metal Matrix Composite Materials for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, Biliyar N.; Jones, C. S. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Metal matrix composites (MMC) are attractive materials for aerospace applications because of their high specific strength, high specific stiffness, and lower thermal expansion coefficient. They are affordable since complex parts can be produced by low cost casting process. As a result there are many commercial and Department of Defense applications of MMCs today. This seminar will give an overview of MMCs and their state-of-the-art technology assessment. Topics to be covered are types of MMCs, fabrication methods, product forms, applications, and material selection issues for design and manufacture. Some examples of current and future aerospace applications will also be presented and discussed.

  5. Computational composite mechanics for aerospace propulsion structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    1987-01-01

    Specialty methods are presented for the computational simulation of specific composite behavior. These methods encompass all aspects of composite mechanics, impact, progressive fracture and component specific simulation. Some of these methods are structured to computationally simulate, in parallel, the composite behavior and history from the initial frabrication through several missions and even to fracture. Select methods and typical results obtained from such simulations are described in detail in order to demonstrate the effectiveness of computationally simulating: (1) complex composite structural behavior in general, and (2) specific aerospace propulsion structural components in particular.

  6. Computational composite mechanics for aerospace propulsion structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.

    1986-01-01

    Specialty methods are presented for the computational simulation of specific composite behavior. These methods encompass all aspects of composite mechanics, impact, progressive fracture and component specific simulation. Some of these methods are structured to computationally simulate, in parallel, the composite behavior and history from the initial fabrication through several missions and even to fracture. Select methods and typical results obtained from such simulations are described in detail in order to demonstrate the effectiveness of computationally simulating (1) complex composite structural behavior in general and (2) specific aerospace propulsion structural components in particular.

  7. Development and Processing Improvement of Aerospace Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lisagor, W. Barry; Bales, Thomas T.

    2007-01-01

    This final report, in multiple presentation format, describes a comprehensive multi-tasked contract study to improve the overall property response of selected aerospace alloys, explore further a newly-developed and registered alloy, and correlate the processing, metallurgical structure, and subsequent properties achieved with particular emphasis on the crystallographic orientation texture developed. Modifications to plate processing, specifically hot rolling practices, were evaluated for Al-Li alloys 2195 and 2297, for the recently registered Al-Cu-Ag alloy, 2139, and for the Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy, 7050. For all of the alloys evaluated, the processing modifications resulted in significant improvements in mechanical properties. Analyses also resulted in an enhanced understanding of the correlation of processing, crystallographic texture, and mechanical properties.

  8. NASA-UVA Light Aerospace Alloy and Structures Technology Program: LA(2)ST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, Richard P.; Haviland, John K.; Herakovich, Carl T.; Pilkey, Walter D.; Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Scully, John R.; Stoner, Glenn E.; Thornton, Earl A.; Wawner, Franklin E., Jr.; Wert, John A.

    1993-01-01

    The NASA-UVA Light Aerospace Alloy and Structures Technology (LA(2)ST) Program continues a high level of activity, with projects being conducted by graduate students and faculty advisors in the Departments of Materials Science and Engineering, Civil Engineering and Applied Mechanics, and Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at the University of Virginia. This work is funded by the NASA-Langley Research Center under Grant NAG-1-745. We report on progress achieved between July 1 and December 31, 1992. The objective of the LA(2)ST Program is to conduct interdisciplinary graduate student research on the performance of next generation, light weight aerospace alloys, composites and thermal gradient structures in collaboration with NASA-Langley researchers. Specific technical objectives are presented for each research project. We generally aim to produce relevant data and basic understanding of material mechanical response, corrosion behavior, and microstructure; new monolithic and composite alloys; advanced processing methods; new solid and fluid mechanics analyses; measurement advances; and critically, a pool of educated graduate students for aerospace technologies.

  9. NASA-UVA light aerospace alloy and structures technology program (LA2ST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, Richard P.; Scully, John R.; Starke, Edgar A., Jr.; Stoner, Glenn E.; Thornton, Earl A.; Wawner, Franklin E., Jr.; Wert, John A.

    1994-01-01

    The NASA-UVA Light Aerospace Alloy and Structures Technology (LA2ST) Program was initiated in 1986, and continues a high level of activity, with projects being conducted by graduate students and faculty advisors in the Departments of Materials Science and Engineering, and Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at the University of Virginia. This work is funded by the NASA-Langley Research Center under Grant NAG-1-745. Here, we report on progress achieved between July 1 and December 31, 1993. The objective of the LA2ST Program is to conduct interdisciplinary graduate student research on the performance of next generation, light weight aerospace alloys, composites and thermal gradient structures in collaboration with NASA-Langley researchers. Specific technical objectives are presented for each research project. We generally aim to produce relevant data and basic understanding of material mechanical response, environmental/corrosion behavior, and microstructure; new monolithic and composite alloys; advanced processing methods; new solid and fluid mechanics analyses; measurement and modeling advances; and critically, a pool of educated graduate students for aerospace technologies.

  10. Non-Destructive Evaluation of Aerospace Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    Master of Science in Materials Science Jeremy D. Johnson, BS Captain, USAF March 2009 APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED...non-destructive material evaluation (NDE) were used to inspect various forms of damage commonly found in aerospace fiberglass composites: voids...ultrasound, and flash IR thermography were analyzed for the detection of defects. Test results and analysis of each NDE method’s capabilities

  11. High-strength nanostructured titanium alloy for aerospace industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naydenkin, E. V.; Mishin, I. P.; Ratochka, I. V.; Vinokurov, V. A.

    2015-10-01

    The technological regimes of receiving of round bars of VT22 titanium alloy with the diameter 22 mm and hierarchically organized ultrafine-grained (nano-) structure by helical rolling and subsequent heat treatment (aging) were developed. It was shown that such structure formation results in a substantial increase (by more than 20%) of strength properties of the alloy as compared to the initial state. The obtained rods with a high specific strength may be used in the aerospace industry in the manufacture of critical structural elements.

  12. Precipitation hardening in the first aerospace aluminum alloy: the wright flyer crankcase.

    PubMed

    Gayle, F W; Goodway, M

    1994-11-11

    Aluminum has had an essential part in aerospace history from its very inception: An aluminum copper alloy (with a copper composition of 8 percent by weight) was used in the engine that powered the historic first flight of the Wright brothers in 1903. Examination of this alloy shows that it is precipitation-hardened by Guinier-Preston zones in a bimodal distribution, with larger zones (10 to 22 nanometers) originating in the casting practice and finer ones (3 nanometers) resulting from ambient aging over the last 90 years. The precipitation hardening in the Wright Flyer crankcase occurred earlier than the experiments of Wilm in 1909, when such hardening was first discovered, and predates the accepted first aerospace application of precipitation-hardened aluminum in 1910.

  13. NASA-UVA light aerospace alloy and structures technology program (LA2ST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starke, Edgar A., Jr.; Gangloff, Richard P.; Herakovich, Carl T.; Scully, John R.; Shiflet, Gary J.; Stoner, Glenn E.; Wert, John A.

    1995-01-01

    The NASA-UVa Light Aerospace Alloy and Structures Technology (LA2ST) Program was initiated in 1986 and continues with a high level of activity. Projects are being conducted by graduate students and faculty advisors in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, as well as in the Department of Civil Engineering and Applied Mechanics, at the University of Virginia. Here, we report on progress achieved between July 1 and December 31, 1994. The objective of the LA2ST Program is to conduct interdisciplinary graduate student research on the performance of next generation, light-weight aerospace alloys, composites and thermal gradient structures in collaboration with NASA-Langley researchers. Specific technical objectives are presented for each research project. We generally aim to produce relevant data and basic understanding of material mechanical response, environmental/corrosion behavior, and microstructure; new monolithic and composite alloys; advanced processing methods; new solid and fluid mechanics analyses; measurement and modeling advances; and a pool of educated graduate students for aerospace technologies.

  14. NASA-UVA Light Aerospace Alloy and Structures Technology Program (LA2ST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, Richard P.

    1994-01-01

    The NASA-UVA Light Aerospace Alloy and Structures Technology (LA2ST) Program was initiated in 1986 and continues with a high level of activity. Projects are being conducted by graduate students and faculty advisors in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, as well as in the Department of Civil Engineering and Applied Mechanics, at the University of Virginia. This work is funded by the NASA-Langley Research Center under Grant NAG-1-745. Here, we report on progress achieved between January 1 and June 30, 1994. These results were presented at the Fifth Annual NASA LA2ST Grant Review Meeting held at the Langley Research Center in July of 1994. The objective of the LA2ST Program is to conduct interdisciplinary graduate student research on the performance of next generation, lightweight aerospace alloys, composites, and thermal gradient structures in collaboration with NASA-Langley researchers. Specific technical objectives are presented for each research project. We generally aim to produce relevant data and basic understanding of material mechanical response, environmental/corrosion behavior, and microstructure; new monolithic and composite alloys; advanced processing methods; new solid and fluid mechanics analyses; measurement and modeling advances; and a pool of educated graduate students for aerospace technologies.

  15. NASA-UVa light aerospace alloy and structures technology program supplement: Aluminum-based materials for high speed aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starke, E. A., Jr. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    This report on the NASA-UVa light aerospace alloy and structure technology program supplement: Aluminum-Based Materials for High Speed Aircraft covers the period from July 1, 1992. The objective of the research is to develop aluminum alloys and aluminum matrix composites for the airframe which can efficiently perform in the HSCT environment for periods as long as 60,000 hours (certification for 120,000 hours) and, at the same time, meet the cost and weight requirements for an economically viable aircraft. Current industry baselines focus on flight at Mach 2.4. The research covers four major materials systems: (1) Ingot metallurgy 2XXX, 6XXX, and 8XXX alloys, (2) Powder metallurgy 2XXX alloys, (3) Rapidly solidified, dispersion strengthened Al-Fe-X alloys, and (4) Discontinuously reinforced metal matrix composites. There are ten major tasks in the program which also include evaluation and trade-off studies by Boeing and Douglas aircraft companies.

  16. Compressive strength of delaminated aerospace composites.

    PubMed

    Butler, Richard; Rhead, Andrew T; Liu, Wenli; Kontis, Nikolaos

    2012-04-28

    An efficient analytical model is described which predicts the value of compressive strain below which buckle-driven propagation of delaminations in aerospace composites will not occur. An extension of this efficient strip model which accounts for propagation transverse to the direction of applied compression is derived. In order to provide validation for the strip model a number of laminates were artificially delaminated producing a range of thin anisotropic sub-laminates made up of 0°, ±45° and 90° plies that displayed varied buckling and delamination propagation phenomena. These laminates were subsequently subject to experimental compression testing and nonlinear finite element analysis (FEA) using cohesive elements. Comparison of strip model results with those from experiments indicates that the model can conservatively predict the strain at which propagation occurs to within 10 per cent of experimental values provided (i) the thin-film assumption made in the modelling methodology holds and (ii) full elastic coupling effects do not play a significant role in the post-buckling of the sub-laminate. With such provision, the model was more accurate and produced fewer non-conservative results than FEA. The accuracy and efficiency of the model make it well suited to application in optimum ply-stacking algorithms to maximize laminate strength.

  17. Eutectic alloys. Citations from the International Aerospace Abstracts data base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, P.

    1980-01-01

    These 250 abstracts from the international literature provide summaries of the preparation, treatments, composition and structure, and properties of eutectic alloys. Techniques for directional solidification and treatments including glazing, coating, and fiber reinforcement are discussed. In addition to the mechanical and thermal properties, the superconducting, corrosion, resistance, and thermionic emission and adsorption properties are described.

  18. Advances in Computational Stability Analysis of Composite Aerospace Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Degenhardt, R.; Araujo, F. C. de

    2010-09-30

    European aircraft industry demands for reduced development and operating costs. Structural weight reduction by exploitation of structural reserves in composite aerospace structures contributes to this aim, however, it requires accurate and experimentally validated stability analysis of real structures under realistic loading conditions. This paper presents different advances from the area of computational stability analysis of composite aerospace structures which contribute to that field. For stringer stiffened panels main results of the finished EU project COCOMAT are given. It investigated the exploitation of reserves in primary fibre composite fuselage structures through an accurate and reliable simulation of postbuckling and collapse. For unstiffened cylindrical composite shells a proposal for a new design method is presented.

  19. High temperature metal matrix composites for future aerospace systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Joseph R.

    1988-01-01

    Research was conducted on metal matrix composites and intermetallic matrix composites to understand their behavior under anticipated future operating conditions envisioned for aerospace power and propulsion systems of the 21st century. Extremes in environmental conditions, high temperature, long operating lives, and cyclic conditions dictate that the test evaluations not only include laboratory testing, but simulated flight conditions. The various processing techniques employed to fabricate composites are discussed along with the basic research underway to understand the behavior of high temperature composites, and the relationship of this research to future aerospace systems.

  20. High temperature metal matrix composites for future aerospace systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Joseph R.

    1987-01-01

    Research was conducted on metal matrix composites and intermetallic matrix composites to understand their behavior under anticipated future operating conditions envisioned for aerospace power and propulsion systems of the 21st century. Extremes in environmental conditions, high temperature, long operating lives, and cyclic conditions dictate that the test evaluations not only include laboratory testing, but simulated flight conditions. The various processing techniques employed to fabricate composites are discussed along with the basic research underway to understand the behavior of high temperature composites, and the relationship of this research to future aerospace systems.

  1. Fracture characteristics of structural aerospace alloys containing deep surface flaws. [aluminum-titanium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masters, J. N.; Bixler, W. D.; Finger, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    Conditions controlling the growth and fracture of deep surface flaws in aerospace alloys were investigated. Static fracture tests were performed on 7075-T651 and 2219-T87 aluminum, and 6Ai-4V STA titanium . Cyclic flaw growth tests were performed on the two latter alloys, and sustain load tests were performed on the titanium alloy. Both the cyclic and the sustain load tests were performed with and without a prior proof overload cycle to investigate possible growth retardation effects. Variables included in all test series were thickness, flaw depth-to-thickness ratio, and flaw shape. Results were analyzed and compared with previously developed data to determine the limits of applicability of available modified linear elastic fracture solutions.

  2. Hybrid Titanium Composite Laminates: A New Aerospace Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.; Cobb, Ted Q.; Lowther, Sharon; St.Clair, T. L.

    1998-01-01

    In the realm of aerospace design and performance, there are few boundaries in the never-ending drive for increased performance. This thirst for ever-increased performance of aerospace equipment has driven the aerospace and defense industries into developing exotic, extremely high-performance composites that are pushing the envelope in terms of strength-to-weight ratios, durability, and several other key measurements. To meet this challenge of ever-increasing improvement, engineers and scientists at NASA-Langley Research Center (NASA-LaRC) have developed a high-temperature metal laminate based upon titanium, carbon fibers, and a thermoplastic resin. This composite, known as the Hybrid Titanium Composite Laminate, or HTCL, is the latest chapter in a significant, but relatively short, history of metal laminates.

  3. Deployable aerospace PV array based on amorphous silicon alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanak, Joseph J.; Walter, Lee; Dobias, David; Flaisher, Harvey

    1989-01-01

    The development of the first commercial, ultralight, flexible, deployable, PV array for aerospace applications is discussed. It is based on thin-film, amorphous silicon alloy, multijunction, solar cells deposited on a thin metal or polymer by a proprietary, roll-to-roll process. The array generates over 200 W at AM0 and is made of 20 giant cells, each 54 cm x 29 cm (1566 sq cm in area). Each cell is protected with bypass diodes. Fully encapsulated array blanket and the deployment mechanism weigh about 800 and 500 g, respectively. These data yield power per area ratio of over 60 W/sq m specific power of over 250 W/kg (4 kg/kW) for the blanket and 154 W/kg (6.5 kg/kW) for the power system. When stowed, the array is rolled up to a diameter of 7 cm and a length of 1.11 m. It is deployed quickly to its full area of 2.92 m x 1.11 m, for instant power. Potential applications include power for lightweight space vehicles, high altitude balloons, remotely piloted and tethered vehicles. These developments signal the dawning of a new age of lightweight, deployable, low-cost space arrays in the range from tens to tens of thousands of watts for near-term applications and the feasibility of multi-100 kW to MW arrays for future needs.

  4. Deployable aerospace PV array based on amorphous silicon alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanak, Joseph J.; Walter, Lee; Dobias, David; Flaisher, Harvey

    1989-04-01

    The development of the first commercial, ultralight, flexible, deployable, PV array for aerospace applications is discussed. It is based on thin-film, amorphous silicon alloy, multijunction, solar cells deposited on a thin metal or polymer by a proprietary, roll-to-roll process. The array generates over 200 W at AM0 and is made of 20 giant cells, each 54 cm x 29 cm (1566 sq cm in area). Each cell is protected with bypass diodes. Fully encapsulated array blanket and the deployment mechanism weigh about 800 and 500 g, respectively. These data yield power per area ratio of over 60 W/sq m specific power of over 250 W/kg (4 kg/kW) for the blanket and 154 W/kg (6.5 kg/kW) for the power system. When stowed, the array is rolled up to a diameter of 7 cm and a length of 1.11 m. It is deployed quickly to its full area of 2.92 m x 1.11 m, for instant power. Potential applications include power for lightweight space vehicles, high altitude balloons, remotely piloted and tethered vehicles. These developments signal the dawning of a new age of lightweight, deployable, low-cost space arrays in the range from tens to tens of thousands of watts for near-term applications and the feasibility of multi-100 kW to MW arrays for future needs.

  5. Graphite fiber reinforced glass matrix composites for aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prewo, K. M.; Bacon, J. F.; Dicus, D. L.

    1979-01-01

    The graphite fiber reinforced glass matrix composite system is described. Although this composite is not yet a mature material, it possesses low density, attractive mechanical properties at elevated temperatures, and good environmental stability. Properties are reported for a borosilicate glass matrix unidirectionally reinforced with 60 volume percent HMS graphite fiber. The flexural strength and fatigue characteristics at room and elevated temperature, resistance to thermal cycling and continuous high temperature oxidation, and thermal expansion characteristics of the composite are reported. The properties of this new composite are compared to those of advanced resin and metal matrix composites showing that graphite fiber reinforced glass matrix composites are attractive for aerospace applications.

  6. Corrosion protection of aerospace grade magnesium alloy Elektron 43(TM) for use in aircraft cabin interiors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baillio, Sarah S.

    Magnesium alloys exhibit desirable properties for use in transportation technology. In particular, the low density and high specific strength of these alloys is of interest to the aerospace community. However, the concerns of flammability and susceptibility to corrosion have limited the use of magnesium alloys within the aircraft cabin. This work studies a magnesium alloy containing rare earth elements designed to increase resistance to ignition while lowering rate of corrosion. The microstructure of the alloy was documented using scanning electron microscopy. Specimens underwent salt spray testing and the corrosion products were examined using energy dispersive spectroscopy.

  7. Key Issues for Aerospace Applications of Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clinton, R. G., Jr.; Levine, S. R.

    1998-01-01

    Ceramic matrix composites (CMC) offer significant advantages for future aerospace applications including turbine engine and liquid rocket engine components, thermal protection systems, and "hot structures". Key characteristics which establish ceramic matrix composites as attractive and often enabling choices are strength retention at high temperatures and reduced weight relative to currently used metallics. However, due to the immaturity of this class of materials which is further compounded by the lack of experience with CMC's in the aerospace industry, there are significant challenges involved in the development and implementation of ceramic matrix composites into aerospace systems. Some of the more critical challenges are attachment and load transfer methodologies; manufacturing techniques, particularly scale up to large and thick section components; operational environment resistance; damage tolerance; durability; repair techniques; reproducibility; database availability; and the lack of validated design and analysis tools. The presentation will examine the technical issues confronting the application of ceramic matrix composites to aerospace systems and identify the key material systems having potential for substantial payoff relative to the primary requirements of light weight and reduced cost for future systems. Current programs and future research opportunities will be described in the presentation which will focus on materials and processes issues.

  8. Recent advancement in optical fiber sensing for aerospace composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minakuchi, Shu; Takeda, Nobuo

    2013-12-01

    Optical fiber sensors have attracted considerable attention in health monitoring of aerospace composite structures. This paper briefly reviews our recent advancement mainly in Brillouin-based distributed sensing. Damage detection, life cycle monitoring and shape reconstruction systems applicable to large-scale composite structures are presented, and new technical concepts, "smart crack arrester" and "hierarchical sensing system", are described as well, highlighting the great potential of optical fiber sensors for the structural health monitoring (SHM) field.

  9. Mechanically Alloyed High Entropy Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, G.; Adrian, M. M.; Csaki, I.; Popescu, C. A.; Mitrică, D.; Vasile, S.; Carcea, I.

    2016-08-01

    In the last years high entropy alloys have been investigated due to their high hardness, high temperature stability and unusual properties that make these alloys to have significant interest. In comparison with traditional alloys that are based on two or three major elements, this new generation alloys consists at least of 5 principal elements, with the concentration between 5 and 35 at.%. The present paper reports synthesis of high entropy alloys (HEA) and high entropy composites (HEC) synthesized by mechanical alloying (MA). The equiatomic AlCrFeNiMn matrix was used for creating the HEA matrix, starting from elemental powders and as reinforcing material for composites was used pure graphite. The mechanical alloying process was carried out at different duration, in a high energy planetary ball mill, under argon atmosphere. The elemental powders alloying began after '5 hours of milling and was complete after 40 hours. The mechanical alloyed matrix and composite was pressed and heat treated under argon protection. The elemental powers were investigated for physical - technological properties, and by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Phase pressing operation was realized with a hydraulic press and the applied pressure was progressive. The sintering process was carried out at 850°C for 2 h. The X-ray diffraction revealed that the MA process resulted in solid solutions formation and also revealed body- centred cubic (BCC) and face-centred cubic (FCC) structures with average grain size around 40 nm. In addition, nanoscale particles were highlighted by scanning electron microscopy, as well as the homogeneity of the chemical composition of the matrix and composite that was confirmed by EDX microanalysis. It was noted that HEA matrix and HEA composites were processed with a high degree of compaction and with a quite large capacity of mixed powder densification (around 70%).

  10. Aerospace Industries Association (AIA) work practices report for composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luca, Jackie

    1994-01-01

    In an effort to gain a better understanding of effective safety and health work practice controls for composite manufacturing operations, the Aerospace Industries Association (AIA) Occupational Safety and Health Committee established a Composites Task Group. The group's task was to provide AIA members with recommendations for minimizing occupational exposure risk and to determine research needs and information gaps. The strategy included a review of toxicological information on composites, a review of member company experience and control methods, and interaction with other professional organizations who share an interest in composite work practices.

  11. Aerospace Patented High-Strength Aluminum Alloy Used in Commercial Industries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    NASA structural materials engineer, Jonathan Lee, displays blocks and pistons as examples of some of the uses for NASA's patented high-strength aluminum alloy originally developed at Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. NASA desired an alloy for aerospace applications with higher strength and wear-resistance at elevated temperatures. The alloy is a solution to reduce costs of aluminum engine pistons and lower engine emissions for the automobile industry. The Boats and Outboard Engines Division at Bombardier Recreational Products of Sturtevant, Wisconsin is using the alloy for pistons in its Evinrude E-Tec outboard engine line.

  12. Evaluation of Sc-Bearing Aluminum Alloy C557 for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Domack, Marcia S.; Dicus, Dennis L.

    2002-01-01

    The performance of the Al-Mg-Sc alloy C557 was evaluated to assess its potential for a broad range of aerospace applications, including airframe and launch vehicle structures. Of specific interest were mechanical properties at anticipated service temperatures and thermal stability of the alloy. Performance was compared with conventional airframe aluminum alloys and with other emerging aluminum alloys developed for specific service environments. Mechanical properties and metallurgical structure were evaluated for commercially rolled sheet in the as-received H116 condition and after thermal exposures at 107 C. Metallurgical analyses were performed to de.ne grain morphology and texture, strengthening precipitates, and to assess the effect of thermal exposure.

  13. Hybrid manufacturing processes for fusion welding and friction stir welding of aerospace grade aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gegesky, Megan Alexandra

    Friction stir welding and processing can provide for joints in aerospace grade aluminum alloys that have preferable material properties as compared to fusion welding techniques. Aerospace grade aluminum alloys such as AA2024-T3 and AA7075-T6 are considered non-weldable by traditional fusion welding techniques. Improved mechanical properties over previously used techniques are usually preferable for aerospace applications. Therefore, by combining traditional fusion welding and friction stir processing techniques, it could be plausible to create more difficult geometries in manufactured parts instead of using traditional techniques. While this combination of fusion welding and friction stir processing is not a new technology, its introduction to aerospace grade aluminum alloys as well as non-weldable alloys, is new. This is brought about by a lowered required clamping force required by adding a fusion weld before a friction stir processing technique. The changes in properties associated with joining techniques include: microstructural changes, changes in hardness, tensile strength, and corrosion resistance. This thesis illustrates these changes for the non-weldable AA2024-T351 and AA7075-T651 as well as the weldable alloy AA5052-H32. The microhardness, tensile strength and corrosion resistance of the four processing states: base material, fusion welded material, friction stir welded material, and friction stir processed fusion welded material is studied. The plausibility of this hybrid process for the three different materials is characterized, as well as plausible applications for this joining technique.

  14. Nonlinear analyses of composite aerospace structures in sonic fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, Chuh

    1992-01-01

    The primary research effort of this project is the development of analytical methods for the prediction of nonlinear random response of composite aerospace structures subjected to combined acoustic and thermal loads. The progress, accomplishments, and future plans of three random response research topics are discussed, namely acoustics-structure interactions using boundary/finite element methods, nonlinear vibrations of beams and composite plates under harmonic and random excitations, and numerical simulation of the nonlinear response of composite plates under combined thermal and acoustic loading.

  15. Benign joining of ultrafine grained aerospace aluminum alloys using nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Longtin, Rémi; Hack, Erwin; Neuenschwander, Jürg; Janczak-Rusch, Jolanta

    2011-12-22

    Ultrafine grained aluminum alloys have restricted applicability due to their limited thermal stability. Metalized 7475 alloys can be soldered and brazed at room temperature using nanotechnology. Reactive foils are used to release heat for milliseconds directly at the interface between two components leading to a metallurgical joint without significantly heating the bulk alloy, thus preserving its mechanical properties.

  16. /SiC Composite to Titanium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, X.; Jiménez, C.; Mergia, K.; Yialouris, P.; Messoloras, S.; Liedtke, V.; Wilhelmi, C.; Barcena, J.

    2014-08-01

    In view of aerospace applications, an innovative structure for joining a Ti alloy to carbon fiber reinforced silicon carbide has been developed. This is based on the perforation of the CMC material, and this procedure results in six-fold increase of the shear strength of the joint compared to the unprocessed CMC. The joint is manufactured using the active brazing technique and TiCuAg as filler metal. Sound joints without defects are produced and excellent wetting of both the composite ceramic and the metal is observed. The mechanical shear tests show that failure occurs always within the ceramic material and not at the joint. At the CMC/filler, Ti from the filler metal interacts with the SiC matrix to form carbides and silicides. In the middle of the filler region depletion of Ti and formation of Ag and Cu rich regions are observed. At the filler/Ti alloy interface, a layered structure of the filler and Ti alloy metallic elements is formed. For the perforation to have a significant effect on the improvement of the shear strength of the joint appropriate geometry is required.

  17. NASA-UVA Light Aerospace Alloy and Structures Technology Program (LA2ST). Research on Materials for the High Speed Civil Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, Richard P.; Starke, Edgar A., Jr.; Kelly, Robert G.; Scully, John R.; Stoner, Glenn E.; Wert, John A.

    1997-01-01

    Since 1986, the NASA-Langley Research Center has sponsored the NASA-UVa Light Alloy and Structures Technology (LA2ST) Program at the University of Virginia (UVa). The fundamental objective of the LA2ST program is to conduct interdisciplinary graduate student research on the performance of next generation, light-weight aerospace alloys, composites and thermal gradient structures. The LA2ST program has aimed to product relevant data and basic understanding of material mechanical response, environmental/corrosion behavior, and microstructure; new monolithic and composite alloys; advanced processing methods; measurement and modeling advances; and a pool of educated graduate students for aerospace technologies. The scope of the LA2ST Program is broad. Research areas include: (1) Mechanical and Environmental Degradation Mechanisms in Advanced Light Metals and Composites, (2) Aerospace Materials Science, (3) Mechanics of materials for Aerospace Structures, and (4) Thermal Gradient Structures. A substantial series of semi-annual progress reports issued since 1987 documents the technical objectives, experimental or analytical procedures, and detailed results of graduate student research in these topical areas.

  18. NASA-UVa light aerospace alloy and structure technology program supplement: Aluminum-based materials for high speed aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starke, E. A., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    This report on the NASA-UVa Light Aerospace Alloy and Structure Technology Program Supplement: Aluminum-Based Materials for High Speed Aircraft covers the period from January 1, 1992 to June 30, 1992. The objective of the research is to develop aluminum alloys and aluminum matrix composites for the airframe which can efficiently perform in the HSCT environment for periods as long as 60,000 hours (certification for 120,000 hours) and, at the same time, meet the cost and weight requirements for an economically viable aircraft. Current industry baselines focus on flight at Mach 2.4. The research covers four major materials systems: (1) ingot metallurgy 2XXX, 6XXX, and 8XXX alloys, (2) powder metallurgy 2XXX alloys, (3) rapidly solidified, dispersion strengthened Al-Fe-X alloys, and (4) discontinuously reinforced metal matrix composites. There are ten major tasks in the program which also include evaluation and trade-off studies by Boeing and Douglas aircraft companies.

  19. Effects of Cryogenic Treatment on the Residual Stress and Mechanical Properties of an Aerospace Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Po; Malone, Tina; Bod, Robert; Torres, Pablo

    2000-01-01

    Investigators at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) are studying the potential benefits of cryogenic treatment for aerospace Aluminum (Al) alloys. This paper reports the effects of cryogenic treatment on residual stress, tensile strength, hardness, fatigue life, and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance.

  20. Effects of Cryogenic Treatment on the Residual Stress and Mechanical Properties of an Aerospace Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, P.; Malone, T.; Bond, R.; Torres, P.

    2001-01-01

    Investigators at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) are studying the potential benefits of cryogenic treatment for aerospace Aluminum (Al) alloys. This paper reports the effects of cryogenic treatment on residual stress, tensile strength, hardness, fatigue life, and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance.

  1. Progress in patch repair of aerospace composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Weiguo; Zhang, Weifang; Tang, Qingyun

    2011-11-01

    With the rapid application of the composite structure in the aerospace industry, more load-bearing structures and components are used with composites instead of conventional engineering materials. However, the composite structures are inevitably suffered damages in the complex environment, the composites structures repair become more important in the airplane maintenance. This paper describes the composites patch repair progress. Firstly, the flaws and damages concerned to composite structures are concluded, and also the repair principles are presented. Secondly, the advantages and disadvantages for different repair methods are analyzed, as well as the different bonded repair and their applicability to different structures is discussed. According the recent research in theory and experiment, the scarf repair effects under different parameters are analyzed. Finally, the failure mechanisms of repair structure are discussed, and some prospects are put forward.

  2. Progress in patch repair of aerospace composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Weiguo; Zhang, Weifang; Tang, Qingyun

    2012-04-01

    With the rapid application of the composite structure in the aerospace industry, more load-bearing structures and components are used with composites instead of conventional engineering materials. However, the composite structures are inevitably suffered damages in the complex environment, the composites structures repair become more important in the airplane maintenance. This paper describes the composites patch repair progress. Firstly, the flaws and damages concerned to composite structures are concluded, and also the repair principles are presented. Secondly, the advantages and disadvantages for different repair methods are analyzed, as well as the different bonded repair and their applicability to different structures is discussed. According the recent research in theory and experiment, the scarf repair effects under different parameters are analyzed. Finally, the failure mechanisms of repair structure are discussed, and some prospects are put forward.

  3. VARTM Process Modeling of Aerospace Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Xiao-Lan; Grimsley, Brian W.; Hubert, Pascal; Cano, Roberto J.; Loos, Alfred C.

    2003-01-01

    A three-dimensional model was developed to simulate the VARTM composite manufacturing process. The model considers the two important mechanisms that occur during the process: resin flow, and compaction and relaxation of the preform. The model was used to simulate infiltration of a carbon preform with an epoxy resin by the VARTM process. The model predicted flow patterns and preform thickness changes agreed qualitatively with the measured values. However, the predicted total infiltration times were much longer than measured most likely due to the inaccurate preform permeability values used in the simulation.

  4. The fabricability and corrosion resistance of several Al-Cu-Li aerospace alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, D.W.; Danford, M.; Sanders, J.

    1996-12-31

    Al-Li-Cu alloys are attractive to the aerospace industry. The high specific strength and stiffness of these alloys will improve lift efficiency, fuel economy, performance and increase payload capabilities. The objectives of this study were to measure the fabricability of Al 2195 (Al-4Cu-1Li) and to assess the effect of welding on corrosion behavior. Al 2219 samples were used in parallel tests to provide a baseline for the data generated. In this study samples were exposed to 3.5% NaCl and mild corrosive water solutions in both the as received and as welded conditions. Fabricability was assessed using Gleeble testing, Varestraint testing and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Results indicate that Alloy 2195 is much more susceptible to hot cracking than Al 2219, and that cracking sensitivity is a strong function of chemical composition within specification ranges for Al 2195. Furthermore, for base metal samples, corrosion in mild corrosive water was more severe than corrosion in salt water. In addition, welding increases the corrosion rate in Al 2195 and 2219, and causes severe localization in Al 2195. Furthermore, autogenously welded Al 2195 samples were more susceptible to attack than heterogeneously welded Al 2195 samples and autogenously welded Al2219 samples were less susceptible to corrosion than autogenously welded Al 2195 samples. Heterogeneously welded samples in both materials had high corrosion rates, but only the Al 2195 material was subject to localization of attack. The partially melted zones of Al 2195 samples were subject to severe, focused attack. In all cases, interdendritic constituents in welded areas and intergranular constituents in base material were cathodic to the Al rich matrix materials. Fabricability and corrosion resistance were correlated to material microstructure using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, electron probe microanalysis, polarization resistance and environmental scanning electron microscopy.

  5. Bending strength of delaminated aerospace composites.

    PubMed

    Kinawy, Moustafa; Butler, Richard; Hunt, Giles W

    2012-04-28

    Buckling-driven delamination is considered among the most critical failure modes in composite laminates. This paper examines the propagation of delaminations in a beam under pure bending. A pre-developed analytical model to predict the critical buckling moment of a thin sub-laminate is extended to account for propagation prediction, using mixed-mode fracture analysis. Fractography analysis is performed to distinguish between mode I and mode II contributions to the final failure of specimens. Comparison between experimental results and analysis shows agreement to within 5 per cent in static propagation moment for two different materials. It is concluded that static fracture is almost entirely driven by mode II effects. This result was unexpected because it arises from a buckling mode that opens the delamination. For this reason, and because of the excellent repeatability of the experiments, the method of testing may be a promising means of establishing the critical value of mode II fracture toughness, G(IIC), of the material. Fatigue testing on similar samples showed that buckled delamination resulted in a fatigue threshold that was over 80 per cent lower than the static propagation moment. Such an outcome highlights the significance of predicting snap-buckling moment and subsequent propagation for design purposes.

  6. Ageing characteristics of aluminium alloy aluminosilicate discontinuous fiber reinforced composites

    SciTech Connect

    Nath, D.; Singh, V.

    1999-03-05

    Development of continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composites is aimed at providing high specific strength and stiffness needed for aerospace and some critical high temperature structural applications. Considerable efforts have been made, during the last decade, to improve the strength of age-hardening aluminium alloy matrix composites by suitable heat treatment. It has also been well established that age-hardenable aluminium alloy composites show accelerated ageing behavior because of enhanced dislocation density at the fiber/matrix interface resulting from thermal expansion mismatch between ceramic fiber and the metal matrix. The accelerated ageing of aluminium alloy composites either from dislocation density or the residual stress, as a result of thermal expansion mismatch is dependent on the size of whisker and particulate. Investigations have also been made on the effect of volume fraction of particulate on the ageing behavior of aluminium alloys. The present investigation is concerned with characterization of age-hardening behavior of an Al-Si-Cu-Mg(AA 336) alloy alumino-silicate discontinuous fiber-reinforced composites (referred to as aluminium MMCs in the present text) being developed for automotive pistons. An effort is made to study the effect of volume fraction of the reinforcement on age-hardening behavior of this composite.

  7. A critical review of nanotechnologies for composite aerospace structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostopoulos, Vassilis; Masouras, Athanasios; Baltopoulos, Athanasios; Vavouliotis, Antonios; Sotiriadis, George; Pambaguian, Laurent

    2017-03-01

    The past decade extensive efforts have been invested in understanding the nano-scale and revealing the capabilities offered by nanotechnology products to structural materials. Integration of nano-particles into fiber composites concludes to multi-scale reinforced composites and has opened a new wide range of multi-functional materials in industry. In this direction, a variety of carbon based nano-fillers has been proposed and employed, individually or in combination in hybrid forms, to approach the desired performance. Nevertheless, a major issue faced lately more seriously due to the interest of industry is on how to incorporate these nano-species into the final composite structure through existing manufacturing processes and infrastructure. This interest originates from several industrial applications needs that request the development of new multi-functional materials which combine enhanced mechanical, electrical and thermal properties. In this work, an attempt is performed to review the most representative processes and related performances reported in literature and the experience obtained on nano-enabling technologies of fiber composite materials. This review focuses on the two main composite manufacturing technologies used by the aerospace industry; Prepreg/Autoclave and Resin Transfer technologies. It addresses several approaches for nano-enabling of composites for these two routes and reports latest achieved results focusing on performance of nano-enabled fiber reinforced composites extracted from literature. Finally, this review work identifies the gap between available nano-technology integration routes and the established industrial composite manufacturing techniques and the challenges to increase the Technology Readiness Level to reach the demands for aerospace industry applications.

  8. A critical review of nanotechnologies for composite aerospace structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostopoulos, Vassilis; Masouras, Athanasios; Baltopoulos, Athanasios; Vavouliotis, Antonios; Sotiriadis, George; Pambaguian, Laurent

    2016-07-01

    The past decade extensive efforts have been invested in understanding the nano-scale and revealing the capabilities offered by nanotechnology products to structural materials. Integration of nano-particles into fiber composites concludes to multi-scale reinforced composites and has opened a new wide range of multi-functional materials in industry. In this direction, a variety of carbon based nano-fillers has been proposed and employed, individually or in combination in hybrid forms, to approach the desired performance. Nevertheless, a major issue faced lately more seriously due to the interest of industry is on how to incorporate these nano-species into the final composite structure through existing manufacturing processes and infrastructure. This interest originates from several industrial applications needs that request the development of new multi-functional materials which combine enhanced mechanical, electrical and thermal properties. In this work, an attempt is performed to review the most representative processes and related performances reported in literature and the experience obtained on nano-enabling technologies of fiber composite materials. This review focuses on the two main composite manufacturing technologies used by the aerospace industry; Prepreg/Autoclave and Resin Transfer technologies. It addresses several approaches for nano-enabling of composites for these two routes and reports latest achieved results focusing on performance of nano-enabled fiber reinforced composites extracted from literature. Finally, this review work identifies the gap between available nano-technology integration routes and the established industrial composite manufacturing techniques and the challenges to increase the Technology Readiness Level to reach the demands for aerospace industry applications.

  9. Molybdenum disilicide alloy matrix composite

    DOEpatents

    Petrovic, John J.; Honnell, Richard E.; Gibbs, W. Scott

    1990-01-01

    Compositions of matter consisting of matrix matrials having silicon carbide dispersed throughout them and methods of making the compositions. A matrix material is an alloy of an intermetallic compound, molybdenum disilicide, and at least one secondary component which is a refractory silicide. The silicon carbide dispersant may be in the form of VLS whiskers, VS whiskers, or submicron powder or a mixture of these forms.

  10. Molybdenum disilicide alloy matrix composite

    DOEpatents

    Petrovic, John J.; Honnell, Richard E.; Gibbs, W. Scott

    1991-01-01

    Compositions of matter consisting of matrix materials having silicon carbide dispersed throughout them and methods of making the compositions. A matrix material is an alloy of an intermetallic compound, molybdenum disilicide, and at least one secondary component which is a refractory silicide. The silicon carbide dispersant may be in the form of VLS whiskers, VS whiskers, or submicron powder or a mixture of these forms.

  11. Molybdenum disilicide alloy matrix composite

    DOEpatents

    Petrovic, J.J.; Honnell, R.E.; Gibbs, W.S.

    1991-12-03

    Compositions of matter consisting of matrix materials having silicon carbide dispersed throughout them and methods of making the compositions are disclosed. A matrix material is an alloy of an intermetallic compound, molybdenum disilicide, and at least one secondary component which is a refractory silicide. The silicon carbide dispersant may be in the form of VLS whiskers, VS whiskers, or submicron powder or a mixture of these forms. 3 figures.

  12. Capacitance-based damage detection sensing for aerospace structural composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahrami, P.; Yamamoto, N.; Chen, Y.; Manohara, H.

    2014-04-01

    Damage detection technology needs improvement for aerospace engineering application because detection within complex composite structures is difficult yet critical to avoid catastrophic failure. Damage detection is challenging in aerospace structures because not all the damage detection technology can cover the various defect types (delamination, fiber fracture, matrix crack etc.), or conditions (visibility, crack length size, etc.). These defect states are expected to become even more complex with future introduction of novel composites including nano-/microparticle reinforcement. Currently, non-destructive evaluation (NDE) methods with X-ray, ultrasound, or eddy current have good resolutions (< 0.1 mm), but their detection capabilities is limited by defect locations and orientations and require massive inspection devices. System health monitoring (SHM) methods are often paired with NDE technologies to signal out sensed damage, but their data collection and analysis currently requires excessive wiring and complex signal analysis. Here, we present a capacitance sensor-based, structural defect detection technology with improved sensing capability. Thin dielectric polymer layer is integrated as part of the structure; the defect in the structure directly alters the sensing layer's capacitance, allowing full-coverage sensing capability independent of defect size, orientation or location. In this work, capacitance-based sensing capability was experimentally demonstrated with a 2D sensing layer consisting of a dielectric layer sandwiched by electrodes. These sensing layers were applied on substrate surfaces. Surface indentation damage (~1mm diameter) and its location were detected through measured capacitance changes: 1 to 250 % depending on the substrates. The damage detection sensors are light weight, and they can be conformably coated and can be part of the composite structure. Therefore it is suitable for aerospace structures such as cryogenic tanks and rocket

  13. Metals Technology for Aerospace Applications in 2020: Development of High Temperature Aluminum Alloys For Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicus, Dennis (Technical Monitor); Starke, Edgar A., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    The role of trace additions on the nucleation and stability of the primary strengthening phase, omega, is of paramount importance for the enhancement of mechanical properties for moderate temperature application of Al-Cu-Mg-(Ag) alloys. In order to better understand the competition for solute, which governs the microstructural evolution of these alloys, a series of Al-Cu-Mg-Si quaternary alloys were prepared to investigate the role of trace Si additions on the nucleation of the omega phase. Si additions were found to quell omega nucleation in conjunction with the enhanced matrix precipitation of competing phases. These initial results indicate that it is necessary to overcome a critical Mg/Si ratio for omega precipitation, rather than a particular Si content.

  14. Ceramics and ceramic matrix composites - Aerospace potential and status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Stanley R.

    1992-01-01

    Thermostructural ceramics and ceramic-matrix composites are attractive in numerous aerospace applications; the noncatastrophic fracture behavior and flaw-insensitivity of continuous fiber-reinforced CMCs renders them especially desirable. The present development status evaluation notes that, for most highly-loaded high-temperature applications, the requisite fiber-technology base is at present insufficient. In addition to materials processing techniques, the life prediction and NDE methods are immature and require a projection of 15-20 years for the maturity of CMC turbine rotors. More lightly loaded, moderate temperature aircraft engine applications are approaching maturity.

  15. Health monitoring studies on composite structures for aerospace applications

    SciTech Connect

    James, G.; Roach, D.; Hansche, B.; Meza, R.; Robinson, N.

    1996-02-01

    This paper discusses ongoing work to develop structural health monitoring techniques for composite aerospace structures such as aircraft control surfaces, fuselage sections or repairs, and reusable launch vehicle fuel tanks. The overall project is divided into four tasks: Operational evaluation, diagnostic measurements, information condensation, and damage detection. Five composite plates were constructed to study delaminations, disbonds, and fluid retention issues as the initial step in creating an operational system. These four square feet plates were graphite-epoxy with nomex honeycomb cores. The diagnostic measurements are composed of modal tests with a scanning laser vibrometer at over 500 scan points per plate covering the frequency range up to 2000 Hz. This data has been reduced into experimental dynamics matrices using a generic, software package developed at the University of Colorado at Boulder. The continuing effort will entail performing a series of damage identification studies to detect, localize, and determine the extent of the damage. This work is providing understanding and algorithm development for a global NDE technique for composite aerospace structures.

  16. Mishap risk control for advanced aerospace/composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, John M.

    1994-01-01

    Although advanced aerospace materials and advanced composites provide outstanding performance, they also present several unique post-mishap environmental, safety, and health concerns. The purpose of this paper is to provide information on some of the unique hazards and concerns associated with these materials when damaged by fire, explosion, or high-energy impact. Additionally, recommended procedures and precautions are addressed as they pertain to all phases of a composite aircraft mishap response, including fire-fighting, investigation, recovery, clean-up, and guidelines are general in nature and not application-specific. The goal of this project is to provide factual and realistic information which can be used to develop consistent and effective procedures and policies to minimize the potential environmental, safety, and health impacts of a composite aircraft mishap response effort.

  17. Aerospace Patented High-Strength Aluminum Alloy Used in Commercial Industries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    NASA structural materials engineers at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama developed a high-strength aluminum alloy for aerospace applications with higher strength and wear-resistance at elevated temperatures. The alloy is a solution to reduce costs of aluminum engine pistons and lower engine emissions for the automobile industry. The Boats and Outboard Engines Division at Bombardier Recreational Products of Sturtevant, Wisconsin is using the alloy for pistons in its Evinrude E-Tec outboard, 40-90 horsepower, engine line. The alloy pistons make the outboard motor quieter and cleaner, while improving fuel mileage and increasing engine durability. The engines comply with California Air resources Board emissions standards, some of the most stringent in the United States. (photo credit: Bombardiier Recreational Products)

  18. Neutron diffraction studies of welds of aerospace aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Martukanitz, R.P.; Howell, P.R.; Payzant, E.A.; Spooner, S.; Hubbard, C.R.

    1996-10-01

    Neutron diffraction and electron microscopy were done on residual stress in various regions comprising variable polarity plasma arc welds of alloys 2219 (Al-6.3Cu) and 2195 (Al-4.0Cu-1.0Li-0.5Mg-0.5Ag). Results indicate that lattice parameter changes in the various weld regions may be attributed to residual stresses generated during welding, as well as local changes in microstructure. Distribution of longitudinal and transverse stress of welded panels shows peaks of tension and compression, respectively, within the HAZ and corroborate earlier theoretical results. Position of these peaks are related to position of minimum strength within the HAZ, and the magnitude of these peaks are a fraction of the local yield strength in this region. Weldments of alloy 2195-T8 exhibited higher peak residual stress than alloy 2219-T87. Comparison of neutron diffraction and microstructural analysis indicate decreased lattice parameters associated with the solid solution of the near HAZ; this results in decreased apparent tensile residual stress within this region and may significantly alter interpretation of residual stress measurements of these alloys. Considerable relaxation of residual stress occurs during removal of specimens from welded panels and was used to aid in differentiating changes in lattice parameters attributed to residual stress from welding and modifications in microstructure.

  19. Intercalated graphite fiber composites as EMI shields in aerospace structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.

    1990-01-01

    The requirements for electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding in aerospace structures are complicated over that of ground structures by their weight limitations. As a result, the best EMI shielding materials must blend low density, high strength, and high elastic modulus with high shielding ability. In addition, fabrication considerations including penetrations and joints play a major role. The EMI shielding properties are calculated for shields formed from pristine and intercalated graphite fiber/epoxy composites and compared to preliminary experimental results and to shields made from aluminum. Calculations indicate that EMI shields could be fabricated from intercalated graphite composites which would have less than 12 percent of the mass of conventional aluminum shields, based on mechanical properties and shielding properties alone.

  20. Correlating Hardness Retention and Phase Transformations of Al and Mg Cast Alloys for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasprzak, W.; Czerwinski, F.; Niewczas, M.; Chen, D. L.

    2015-03-01

    The methodology based on correlating hardness and phase transformations was developed and applied to determine the maximum temperature of hardness retention of selected Al-based and Mg-based alloys for aerospace applications. The Al alloys: A356, F357, and C355 experienced 34-66% reduction of the initial hardness, in comparison to 4-22% hardness reduction observed in Mg alloys: QE22A, EV31A, ZE41A, and WE43B after the same annealing to 450 °C. For Al alloys the hardness reduction showed a steep transition between 220 and 238 °C. In contrast, Mg alloys showed a gradual hardness decrease occurring at somewhat higher temperatures between 238 and 250 °C. The hardness data were correlated with corresponding phase transformation kinetics examined by dilatometer and electrical resistivity measurements. Although Mg alloys preserved hardness to higher temperatures, their room temperature tensile strength and hardness were lower than Al alloys. The experimental methodology used in the present studies appears to be very useful in evaluating the softening temperature of commercial Al- and Mg-based alloys, permitting to assess their suitability for high-temperature applications.

  1. Experimental process development and aerospace alloy formability studies for hydroforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mojarad Farimani, Saeed

    In tube hydroforming process, a pressurized liquid is used to expand a thin walled tube inside a closed die in order to fill the die cavity. Tube hydroforming has many advantages that make it interesting for different industries such as automotive and aerospace, but due to the effects of different factors, such as formability of the material, load path (end feeding force and internal pressure during the process), tool geometry and friction, it is a quite complex manufacturing process. Therefore, finite element simulation along with optimization methods can significantly reduce the cost of trial and error approach used in conventional manufacturing methods. In this work, to investigate the effects of different process parameters such as friction condition, tube thickness and end feeding on the final product, tube hydroforming experiments were performed using a round to square-shape die. Experiments were performed on stainless steel 321 tubes with 50.8 mm (2 in) diameter and two different thicknesses; 0.9 mm and 1.2 mm. Experimental load paths were obtained via the data acquisition system of the hydroforming press, which is fully instrumented. An automated deformation measurement system, Argus, was used to measure the strains on the hydroformed tubes. Data collected from the initial experiments were used to simulate and then optimize the process. The process was simulated and optimized using Ls-Dyna and Ls-Opt software, respectively. Strains and thickness variations measured from experiments were compared to FE simulation results at critical sections. The comparison of the results from FE simulations and experiments were in good agreement, indicating that the approach can be used for predicting the final shape and thickness variations of the hydroformed parts for aerospace applications.

  2. Aerospace Structural Metals Handbook. Volume 5. Supplement XI. Nonferrous Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-12-01

    355, C355 Mar 77 3105 A1-7Si- 0 .3Mg...Ix INTRODUCTION I GENERAL DISCUSSION OF HANDBOOK CONTENTS 3 0 . INTRODUCTION 1. GENERAL 2. PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES 3. MECHANICAL PROPERTIES 4...FABRICATION CODE DESIGNATION REVISED CARBON AND LOW ALLOY STEELS (FeC) 1103 Fe-(T.15C)-0.9?M,-O.8801-O.50Cr- 0 . 4 6ro-0.3?Cu-0.265 1 0 -1 Dec 72 ULTRA

  3. Advanced aerospace composite material structural design using artificial intelligent technology

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, S.H.; Chen, J.L.; Hwang, W.C.

    1993-12-31

    Due to the complexity in the prediction of property and behavior, composite material has not substituted for metal widely yet, though it has high specific-strength and high specific-modulus that are more important in the aerospace industry. In this paper two artificial intelligent techniques, the expert systems and neural network technology, were introduced to the structural design of composite material. Expert System which has good ability in symbolic processing can helps us to solve problem by saving experience and knowledge. It is, therefore, a reasonable way to combine expert system technology to tile composite structural design. The development of a prototype expert system to help designer during the process of composite structural design is presented. Neural network is a network similar to people`s brain that can simulate the thinking way of people and has the ability of learning from the training data by adapting the weights of network. Because of the bottleneck in knowledge acquisition processes, the application of neural network and its learning ability to strength design of composite structures are presented. Some examples are in this paper to demonstrate the idea.

  4. Nondestructive Damage Evaluation in Ceramic Matrix Composites for Aerospace Applications

    PubMed Central

    Dassios, Konstantinos G.; Kordatos, Evangelos Z.; Aggelis, Dimitrios G.; Matikas, Theodore E.

    2013-01-01

    Infrared thermography (IRT) and acoustic emission (AE) are the two major nondestructive methodologies for evaluating damage in ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) for aerospace applications. The two techniques are applied herein to assess and monitor damage formation and evolution in a SiC-fiber reinforced CMC loaded under cyclic and fatigue loading. The paper explains how IRT and AE can be used for the assessment of the material's performance under fatigue. IRT and AE parameters are specifically used for the characterization of the complex damage mechanisms that occur during CMC fracture, and they enable the identification of the micromechanical processes that control material failure, mainly crack formation and propagation. Additionally, these nondestructive parameters help in early prediction of the residual life of the material and in establishing the fatigue limit of materials rapidly and accurately. PMID:23935428

  5. Nondestructive damage evaluation in ceramic matrix composites for aerospace applications.

    PubMed

    Dassios, Konstantinos G; Kordatos, Evangelos Z; Aggelis, Dimitrios G; Matikas, Theodore E

    2013-01-01

    Infrared thermography (IRT) and acoustic emission (AE) are the two major nondestructive methodologies for evaluating damage in ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) for aerospace applications. The two techniques are applied herein to assess and monitor damage formation and evolution in a SiC-fiber reinforced CMC loaded under cyclic and fatigue loading. The paper explains how IRT and AE can be used for the assessment of the material's performance under fatigue. IRT and AE parameters are specifically used for the characterization of the complex damage mechanisms that occur during CMC fracture, and they enable the identification of the micromechanical processes that control material failure, mainly crack formation and propagation. Additionally, these nondestructive parameters help in early prediction of the residual life of the material and in establishing the fatigue limit of materials rapidly and accurately.

  6. Crack Repair in Aerospace Aluminum Alloy Panels by Cold Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavaliere, P.; Silvello, A.

    2017-02-01

    The cold-spray process has recently been recognized as a very useful tool for repairing metallic sheets, achieving desired adhesion strengths when employing optimal combinations of material process parameters. We present herein the possibility of repairing cracks in aluminum sheets by cold spray. A 2099 aluminum alloy panel with a surface 30° V notch was repaired by cold spraying of 2198 and 7075 aluminum alloy powders. The crack behavior of V-notched sheets subjected to bending loading was studied by finite-element modeling (FEM) and mechanical experiments. The simulations and mechanical results showed good agreement, revealing a remarkable K factor reduction, and a consequent reduction in crack nucleation and growth velocity. The results enable prediction of the failure initiation locus in the case of repaired panels subjected to bending loading and deformation. The stress concentration was quantified to show how the residual stress field and failure are affected by the mechanical properties of the sprayed materials and by the geometrical and mechanical properties of the interface. It was demonstrated that the crack resistance increases more than sevenfold in the case of repair using AA2198 and that cold-spray repair can contribute to increased global fatigue life of cracked structures.

  7. Complex multidisciplinary system composition for aerospace vehicle conceptual design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Lex

    Although, there exists a vast amount of work concerning the analysis, design, integration of aerospace vehicle systems, there is no standard for how this data and knowledge should be combined in order to create a synthesis system. Each institution creating a synthesis system has in house vehicle and hardware components they are attempting to model and proprietary methods with which to model them. This leads to the fact that synthesis systems begin as one-off creations meant to answer a specific problem. As the scope of the synthesis system grows to encompass more and more problems, so does its size and complexity; in order for a single synthesis system to answer multiple questions the number of methods and method interface must increase. As a means to curtail the requirement that the increase of an aircraft synthesis systems capability leads to an increase in its size and complexity, this research effort focuses on the idea that each problem in aerospace requires its own analysis framework. By focusing on the creation of a methodology which centers on the matching of an analysis framework towards the problem being solved, the complexity of the analysis framework is decoupled from the complexity of the system that creates it. The derived methodology allows for the composition of complex multi-disciplinary systems (CMDS) through the automatic creation and implementation of system and disciplinary method interfaces. The CMDS Composition process follows a four step methodology meant to take a problem definition and progress towards the creation of an analysis framework meant to answer said problem. The unique implementation of the CMDS Composition process take user selected disciplinary analysis methods and automatically integrates them, together in order to create a syntactically composable analysis framework. As a means of assessing the validity of the CMDS Composition process a prototype system (AVDDBMS) has been developed. AVD DBMS has been used to model the

  8. Transient thermographic technique for NDI of aerospace composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCullough, Robert W.

    2004-04-01

    Transient thermography is well established as a capable tool for non-destructive testing (NDT) in aerospace composite structures (see for example Favro, et. al 1995). The basic process involves altering the steady state thermal condition of a structure by adding or removing thermal energy (heat) and then observing the transient temperature patterns on a surface by means of a sensitive infrared imaging system. Many techniques for heat addition have been tried including most commonly convective and radiative transfer to external surfaces. As an NDT technique it is especially appealing for composite structures whose constituent thermal properties may vary considerably leading to interesting and illuminating transient patterns (Favro, et. al. 1993). We have developed a novel application of transient thermography with an application to detecting bonding flaws in boron/epoxy skinned aluminum honeycomb composite structures as found for example in the F14 and F15 aircraft. The technique described below uses induction to selectively heat the structure near the flaw region and has potential benefits in a range of applications.

  9. Thermal Decoating of Aerospace Aluminum Alloys for Aircraft Recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñiz Lerma, Jose Alberto; Jung, In-Ho; Brochu, Mathieu

    2016-06-01

    Recycling of aircraft aluminum alloys can be complex due to the presence of their corrosion protection coating that includes inorganic compounds containing Cr(VI). In this study, the characterization and thermal degradation behavior of the coating on aluminum substrates coming from an aircraft destined for recycling are presented. Elements such as Sr, Cr, Si, Ba, Ti, S, C, and O were found in three different layers by EDS elemental mapping corresponding to SrCrO4, Rutile-TiO2, SiO2, and BaSO4 with an overall particle size D 50 = 1.96 µm. The thermal degradation profile analyzed by TGA showed four different stages. The temperature of complete degradation at the fourth stage occurred at 753.15 K (480 °C) at lower heating rates. At higher heating rates and holding an isotherm at the same temperature, the residence time to fully decompose the aircraft coating has been estimated as 4.0 ± 0.2 minutes. The activation energy calculated by the Flynn-Wall-Ozawa and the modified Coats-Redfern methods for multiple fraction of decomposition showed a non-constant behavior indicating the complexity of the reaction. Finally, the concentration of Cr(VI) released to the environment during thermal decoating was obtained by UV-Vis spectroscopy. It was found that 2.6 ± 0.1 µg of Cr(VI)/mm2 of aluminum substrate could be released unless adequate particle controls are used.

  10. Finite element analysis of composites materials for aerospace applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurhaniza, M.; Ariffin, M. K. A.; Ali, Aidy; Mustapha, F.; Noraini, A. W.

    2010-05-01

    Composites materials are intended to be used more extensively as an alternative of aluminum structure in aircraft and aerospace applications. This is due to their attractive properties as high strength-to-weight ratio and stiffness-to-weight ratio. Besides that it clarifies the growing interest for composites materials due to advantages of lightweight, high strength, high stiffness, superior fatigue life, tremendous corrosion resistance and low cost manufacturing. In this study, a finite element analysis (FEA) of fiberglass unidirectional E-type was analyzed in the framework of ABAQUS finite element commercial software. The analysis was done to quantify the mechanical properties and response of unidirectional E-glass in term of tensile, compression and thermal responses. From the analysis, the maximum and minimum values of stress and strain for E-glass 21xK43 Gevetex and Silenka E-glass 1200tex were obtained and stress-strain curve is presented. The ultimate load of failure, elastic behavior, tensile strength and other properties for each laminated plates under tensile and thermal-stress are determined from stress-strain curves. The simulation will run twice for each material where the first simulation based on orientation angles of 45° for ply-1, -45° for ply-2 and 90° for ply-3 while the second simulation, the orientation angles is 0° for all plies. The simulation is successfully conducted and verified by experimental data.

  11. Effect of thermal exposure on mechanical properties hypo eutectic aerospace grade aluminium-silicon alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagesh Kumar, R.; Ram Prabhu, T.; Siddaraju, C.

    2016-09-01

    The effect of thermal exposure on the mechanical properties of a C355.0 aerospace grade aluminum-silicon alloy (5% Si - 1.2% Cu - 0.5% Mg) was investigated in the present study. The alloy specimens were subjected to T6 (solution treatment and artificial ageing treatment) temper treatment to enhance the strength properties through precipitation hardening. The T6 temper treatment involved solution heat treatment at 520oC for 6h, followed by water quenching and ageing at 150oC. After the heat treatment, the specimens were exposed to various temperatures (50oC, 100oC, 150oC, 200oC and 250oC) for 5 and 10 h to study the structural applications of this alloy to the various Mach number military aircrafts. After the thermal exposure, specimens were tested for tensile, hardness and impact properties (Charpy). The microstructure of the thermal exposed specimens was examined in the optical microscopes and correlated with the mechanical properties results. In summary, an increase of exposure time has a different effect on the tensile and hardness properties of the alloy. For the exposure time 5h, the tensile and hardness properties increase upto 100oC and later decrease with an increase of temperature. In contrast, the tensile and hardness properties linearly decrease with an increase of temperature. Several factors such as matrix grain growth, diffusion rate, Si particles size and distribution, precipitate stability play a key role on deciding the tensile properties of the alloy. Comparing the relative effects of temperature and time, the temperature effects dominate more in deteriorating tensile properties of the alloy. There are no effects of exposure temperature and/or time on the impact properties of the alloy.

  12. Manufacturing Techniques for Titanium Aluminide Based Alloys and Metal Matrix Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    that dispersion strengthening is the primary strengthening mechanism reported in TiAl-C based composites. Similarly, the addition of nitrogen leads... strengthening for TiAl alloys. As a result, the ductility, strength as well as oxidation resistance of a TiAl + TiB2 composite were found to be...aerospace and automobile applications. High specific strength coupled with good high temperature performance in the areas of creep and oxidation

  13. Electronic Noses for Composites Surface Contamination Detection in Aerospace Industry.

    PubMed

    Vito, Saverio De; Miglietta, Maria Lucia; Massera, Ettore; Fattoruso, Grazia; Formisano, Fabrizio; Polichetti, Tiziana; Salvato, Maria; Alfano, Brigida; Esposito, Elena; Francia, Girolamo Di

    2017-04-02

    The full exploitation of Composite Fiber Reinforced Polymers (CFRP) in so-called green aircrafts design is still limited by the lack of adequate quality assurance procedures for checking the adhesive bonding assembly, especially in load-critical primary structures. In this respect, contamination of the CFRP panel surface is of significant concern since it may severely affect the bonding and the mechanical properties of the joint. During the last years, the authors have developed and tested an electronic nose as a non-destructive tool for pre-bonding surface inspection for contaminants detection, identification and quantification. Several sensors and sampling architectures have been screened in view of the high Technology Readiness Level (TRL) scenarios requirements. Ad-hoc pattern recognition systems have also been devised to ensure a fast and reliable assessment of the contamination status, by combining real time classifiers and the implementation of a suitable rejection option. Results show that e-noses could be used as first line low cost Non Destructive Test (NDT) tool in aerospace CFRP assembly and maintenance scenarios.

  14. Environmental, Safety, and Health Considerations: Composite Materials in the Aerospace Industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Huai-Pu (Compiler)

    1994-01-01

    The Aerospace Industries Association, Suppliers of Advanced Composite Materials Association, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration co-sponsored a conference on 'Environmental, Safety, and Health Considerations--Composite Materials in the Aerospace Industry.' The conference was held in Mesa, Arizona, on October 20-21, 1994. Seventeen papers were presented in four sessions including general information, safety, waste, and emissions from composites. Topics range from product stewardship, best work practice, biotransformation of uncured composite materials, to hazardous waste determination and offgassing of composite materials.

  15. Advanced powder metallurgy aluminum alloys and composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lisagor, W. B.; Stein, B. A.

    1982-01-01

    The differences between powder and ingot metallurgy processing of aluminum alloys are outlined. The potential payoff in the use of advanced powder metallurgy (PM) aluminum alloys in future transport aircraft is indicated. The national program to bring this technology to commercial fruition and the NASA Langley Research Center role in this program are briefly outlined. Some initial results of research in 2000-series PM alloys and composites that highlight the property improvements possible are given.

  16. Amorphous metal alloy and composite

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Rong; Merz, Martin D.

    1985-01-01

    Amorphous metal alloys of the iron-chromium and nickel-chromium type have excellent corrosion resistance and high temperature stability and are suitable for use as a protective coating on less corrosion resistant substrates. The alloys are stabilized in the amorphous state by one or more elements of titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, tantalum, molybdenum, and tungsten. The alloy is preferably prepared by sputter deposition.

  17. Shape memory alloy actuation effect on subsonic static aeroelastic deformation of composite cantilever plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, A. M. H.; Majid, D. L. Abdul; Abdullah, E. J.

    2016-10-01

    Shape memory alloy (SMA) is one of the smart materials that have unique properties and used recently in several aerospace applications. SMAs are metallic alloys that can recover permanent strains when they are heated above a certain temperature. In this study, the effects of SMA actuation on the composite plate under subsonic aeroelastic conditions are examined. The wind tunnel test is carried out for two configurations of a cantilever shape memory alloy composite plate with a single SMA wire fixed eccentrically. Strain gage data for both bending and torsional strain are recorded and demonstrated during the aeroelastic test for active and non-active SMA wire in two locations. The cyclic actuation of the SMA wire embedded inside the composite plate is also investigated during the aeroelastic test. The results show reduction in both bending and torsional strain of the composite plate after activation of the SMA wire during the wind tunnel test.

  18. Trends in aerospace structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Card, M. F.

    1978-01-01

    Recent developments indicate that there may soon be a revolution in aerospace structures. Increases in allowable operational stress levels, utilization of high-strength, high-toughness materials, and new structural concepts will highlight this advancement. Improved titanium and aluminum alloys and high-modulus, high-strength advanced composites, with higher specific properties than aluminum and high-strength nickel alloys, are expected to be the principal materials. Significant advances in computer technology will cause major changes in the preliminary design cycle and permit solutions of otherwise too-complex interactive structural problems and thus the development of vehicles and components of higher performance. The energy crisis will have an impact on material costs and choices and will spur the development of more weight-efficient structures. There will also be significant spinoffs of aerospace structures technology, particularly in composites and design/analysis software.

  19. New ASTM Standards for Nondestructive Testing of Aerospace Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waller, Jess M.; Saulsberry, Regor L.

    2010-01-01

    Problem: Lack of consensus standards containing procedural detail for NDE of polymer matrix composite materials: I. Flat panel composites. II. Composite components with more complex geometries a) Pressure vessels: 1) composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs). 2) composite pressure vessels (CPVs). III. Sandwich core constructions. Metal and brittle matrix composites are a possible subject of future effort.

  20. Advanced composites - An assessment of the future. [for use in aerospace technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, L. A.

    1976-01-01

    An assessment concerning the possibilities of a use of advanced composites in aerospace and space technology identified a lack of confidence and high cost as the major factors inhibiting composite applications. Attention is given to the present employment of composites and plans for its future use in the Army, Navy, and Air Force. Various programs conducted by NASA are concerned with the development of a technological base for the extended use of advanced composites in aerospace and space applications. A future commercial transport is considered in which virtually the entire airframe could be of advanced composites. The attitude of aircraft manufacturers, engine manufacturers, airlines, spacecraft users, and material suppliers with regard to an employment of composites is also examined.

  1. Composition-tunable alloyed semiconductor nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Regulacio, Michelle D; Han, Ming-Yong

    2010-05-18

    The ability to engineer the band gap energy of semiconductor nanocrystals has led to the development of nanomaterials with many new exciting properties and applications. Band gap engineering has thus proven to be an effective tool in the design of new nanocrystal-based semiconductor devices. As reported in numerous publications over the last three decades, tuning the size of nanocrystalline semiconductors is one way of adjusting the band gap energy. On the other hand, research on band gap engineering via control of nanocrystal composition, which is achieved by adjusting the constituent stoichiometries of alloyed semiconductors, is still in its infancy. In this Account, we summarize recent research on colloidal alloyed semiconductor nanocrystals that exhibit novel composition-tunable properties. Alloying of two semiconductors at the nanometer scale produces materials that display properties distinct not only from the properties of their bulk counterparts but also from those of their parent semiconductors. As a result, alloyed nanocrystals possess additional properties that are composition-dependent aside from the properties that emerge due to quantum confinement effects. For example, although the size-dependent emission wavelength of the widely studied CdSe nanocrystals can be continuously tuned to cover almost the entire visible spectrum, the near-infrared (NIR) region is far outside its spectral range. By contrast, certain alloy compositions of nanocrystalline CdSe(x)Te(1-x), an alloy of CdSe and CdTe, can efficiently emit light in the NIR spectral window. These NIR-emitting nanocrystals are potentially useful in several biomedical applications. In addition, highly stable nanocrystals formed by alloying CdSe with ZnSe (i.e., Zn(x)Cd(1-x)Se) emit blue light with excellent efficiency, a property seldom achieved by the parent binary systems. As a result, these materials can be used in short-wavelength optoelectronic devices. In the future, we foresee new discoveries

  2. Standardization of shape memory alloy test methods toward certification of aerospace applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartl, D. J.; Mabe, J. H.; Benafan, O.; Coda, A.; Conduit, B.; Padan, R.; Van Doren, B.

    2015-08-01

    The response of shape memory alloy (SMA) components employed as actuators has enabled a number of adaptable aero-structural solutions. However, there are currently no industry or government-accepted standardized test methods for SMA materials when used as actuators and their transition to commercialization and production has been hindered. This brief fast track communication introduces to the community a recently initiated collaborative and pre-competitive SMA specification and standardization effort that is expected to deliver the first ever regulatory agency-accepted material specification and test standards for SMA as employed as actuators for commercial and military aviation applications. In the first phase of this effort, described herein, the team is working to review past efforts and deliver a set of agreed-upon properties to be included in future material certification specifications as well as the associated experiments needed to obtain them in a consistent manner. Essential for the success of this project is the participation and input from a number of organizations and individuals, including engineers and designers working in materials and processing development, application design, SMA component fabrication, and testing at the material, component, and system level. Going forward, strong consensus among this diverse body of participants and the SMA research community at large is needed to advance standardization concepts for universal adoption by the greater aerospace community and especially regulatory bodies. It is expected that the development and release of public standards will be done in collaboration with an established standards development organization.

  3. Polymer-based composites for aerospace: An overview of IMAST results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milella, Eva; Cammarano, Aniello

    2016-05-01

    This paper gives an overview of technological results, achieved by IMAST, the Technological Cluster on Engineering of Polymeric Composite Materials and Structures, in the completed Research Projects in the aerospace field. In this sector, the Cluster developed different solutions: lightweight multifunctional fiber-reinforced polymer composites for aeronautic structures, advanced manufacturing processes (for the optimization of energy consumption and waste reduction) and multifunctional components (e.g., thermal, electrical, acoustic and fire resistance).

  4. Aluminum-Alloy-Matrix/Alumina-Reinforcement Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kashalikar, Uday; Rozenoyer, Boris

    2004-01-01

    Isotropic composites of aluminum-alloy matrices reinforced with particulate alumina have been developed as lightweight, high-specific-strength, less-expensive alternatives to nickel-base and ferrous superalloys. These composites feature a specific gravity of about 3.45 grams per cubic centimeter and specific strengths of about 200 MPa/(grams per cubic centimeter). The room-temperature tensile strength is 100 ksi (689 MPa) and stiffness is 30 Msi (206 GPa). At 500 F (260 C), these composites have shown 80 percent retention in strength and 95 percent retention in stiffness. These materials also have excellent fatigue tolerance and tribological properties. They can be fabricated in net (or nearly net) sizes and shapes to make housings, pistons, valves, and ducts in turbomachinery, and to make structural components of such diverse systems as diesel engines, automotive brake systems, and power-generation, mining, and oil-drilling equipment. Separately, incorporation of these metal matrix composites within aluminum gravity castings for localized reinforcement has been demonstrated. A composite part of this type can be fabricated in a pressure infiltration casting process. The process begins with the placement of a mold with alumina particulate preform of net or nearly net size and shape in a crucible in a vacuum furnace. A charge of the alloy is placed in the crucible with the preform. The interior of the furnace is evacuated, then the furnace heaters are turned on to heat the alloy above its liquidus temperature. Next, the interior of the furnace is filled with argon gas at a pressure about 900 psi (approximately equal to 6.2 MPa) to force the molten alloy to infiltrate the preform. Once infiltrated, the entire contents of the crucible can be allowed to cool in place, and the composite part recovered from the mold.

  5. High Volume Fraction Carbon Nanotube Composites for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siochi, E. J.; Kim, J.-W.; Sauti, G.; Cano, R. J.; Wincheski, R. A.; Ratcliffe, J. G.; Czabaj, M.

    2016-01-01

    Reported mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) at the nanoscale suggest their potential to enable significantly lighter structures of interest for space applications. However, their utility depends on the retention of these properties in bulk material formats that permit practical fabrication of large structures. This presentation summarizes recent progress made to produce carbon nanotube composites with specific tensile properties that begin to rival those of carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites. CNT content in these nanocomposites was greater than 70% by weight. Tested nanocomposite specimens were fabricated from kilometers or tens of square meters of CNT, depending on the starting material format. Processing methods to yield these results, and characterization and testing to evaluate the performance of these composites will be discussed. The final objective is the demonstration of a CNT composite overwrapped pressure vessel to be flight tested in the Fall of 2016.

  6. Creation of composite bronze - maraging steel alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potekhin, B. A.; Ilyushin, V. V.; Khristolyubov, A. S.; Zhilyakov, A. Yu.; Ernandes, A.

    2013-09-01

    The possibility is demonstrated of creating alloys based on the system Cu - Fe - Ni - Al, within which the matrix is bronze BrNA 4-1, "reinforced" with dendrites containing, apart from Fe and Cu, about 15% Ni and 1% Al. This dendrite composition provides dispersion hardening. Favorable dendrite morphology provides high deformability of these bronzes, and makes it possible to control mechanical and service properties by heat treatment over a wide range.

  7. Mechanical Characterization of Composites and Foams for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veazie, D. R.; Glinsey, C.; Webb, M. M.; Norman, M.; Meador, Michael A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Experimental studies to investigate the mechanical properties of ultra-lightweight polyimide foams for space applications, compression after impact (CAI) properties for low velocity impact of sandwich composites, and aspen fiber/polypropylene composites containing an interface adhesive additive, Maleic Anhydride Grafted Polypropylene (MAPP), were performed at Clark Atlanta University. Tensile, compression, flexural, and shear modulus tests were performed on TEEK foams categorized by their densities and relative cost according to ASTM specifications. Results showed that the mechanical properties of the foams increased as a function of higher price and increasing density. The CAI properties of Nomex/phenolic honeycomb core, fiberglass/epoxy facesheet sandwich composites for two damage arrangements were compared using different levels of impact energy ranging from 0 - 452 Joules. Impact on the thin side showed slightly more retention of CAI strength at low impact levels, whereas higher residual compressive strength was observed from impact on the thick side at higher impact levels. The aspen fiber/polypropylene composites studied are composed of various percentages (by weight) of aspen fiber and polypropylene ranging from 30%-60% and 40%-100%, respectively. Results showed that the MAPP increases tensile and flexural strength, while having no significant influence on tensile and flexural modulus.

  8. High temperature resin matrix composites for aerospace structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J. G., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Accomplishments and the outlook for graphite-polyimide composite structures are briefly outlined. Laminates, skin-stiffened and honeycomb sandwich panels, chopped fiber moldings, and structural components were fabricated with Celion/LARC-160 and Celion/PMR-15 composite materials. Interlaminar shear and flexure strength data obtained on as-fabricated specimens and specimens that were exposed for 125 hours at 589 K indicate that epoxy sized and polyimide sized Celion graphite fibers exhibit essentially the same behavior in a PMR-15 matrix composite. Analyses and tests of graphite-polyimide compression and shear panels indicate that utilization in moderately loaded applications offers the potential for achieving a 30 to 50 percent reduction in structural mass compared to conventional aluminum panels. Data on effects of moisture, temperature, thermal cycling, and shuttle fluids on mechanical properties indicate that both LARC-160 and PMR-15 are suitable matrix materials for a graphite-polyimide aft body flap. No technical road blocks to building a graphite-polyimide composite aft body flap are identified.

  9. Laser Surface Preparation and Bonding of Aerospace Structural Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belcher, Marcus A.; Wohl, Christopher J.; Connell, John W.

    2009-01-01

    A Nd:YAG laser was used to etch patterns conducive to adhesive bonding onto CFRP surfaces. These were compared to typical pre-bonding surface treatments including grit blasting, manual abrasion, and peel ply. Laser treated composites were then subjected to optical microscopy, contact angle measurements, and post-bonding mechanical testing.

  10. Manufacturing and NDE of Large Composite Aerospace Structures at MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, Ann

    2000-01-01

    NASA's vision for transportation to orbit calls for new vehicles built with new materials technology. The goals of this new launch system development are to improve safety, dramatically reduce cost to orbit, and improve vehicle turn around time. Planned Space Shuttle upgrades include new reusable liquid propellant boosters to replace the solid propellant boosters. These boosters are to have wings and return to the launch site for a horizontal landing on an airport runway. New single and two stages to orbit concepts are being investigated. To reduce weight and improve performance composite materials are proposed for fuel and oxidizer tanks, fuel feedlines, valve bodies, aerostructures, turbomachinery components. For large composite structures new methods of fabrication are being proposed and developed. Containment of cryogenic fuel or oxidizer requires emphases on composite material densification and chemical compatibility. Ceramic matrix and fiber composites for hot rotating turbomachinery have been developed with new fabrication processes. The new requirements on the materials for launcher components are requiring development of new manufacturing and inspection methods. This talk will examine new and proposed manufacturing methods to fabricate the revolutionary components. New NDE methods under consideration include alternative X-ray methods, X-ray laminagraphy, advanced CT, Thermography, new ultrasonic methods, and imbedded sensors. The sizes, complexity, use environment, and contamination restrictions will challenge the inspection process. In flight self-diagnosis and rapid depot inspection are also goals of the NDE development.

  11. Advances in Ceramic Matrix Composite Blade Damping Characteristics for Aerospace Turbomachinery Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, James B.; Harris, Donald L.; Ting, J. M.

    2011-01-01

    For advanced aerospace propulsion systems, development of ceramic matrix composite integrally-bladed turbine disk technology is attractive for a number of reasons. The high strength-to-weight ratio of ceramic composites helps to reduce engine weight and the one-piece construction of a blisk will result in fewer parts count, which should translate into reduced operational costs. One shortcoming with blisk construction, however, is that blisks may be prone to high cycle fatigue due to their structural response to high vibration environments. Use of ceramic composites is expected to provide some internal damping to reduce the vibratory stresses encountered due to unsteady flow loads through the bladed turbine regions. A goal of our research was to characterize the vibration viscous damping behavior of C/SiC composites. The vibration damping properties were measured and calculated. Damping appeared to decrease with an increase in the natural frequency. While the critical damping amount of approximately 2% is required for typical aerospace turbomachinery engines, the C/SiC damping at high frequencies was less than 0.2% from our study. The advanced high-performance aerospace propulsion systems almost certainly will require even more damping than what current vehicles require. A purpose of this paper is to review some work on C/SiC vibration damping by the authors for the NASA CMC turbine blisk development program and address an importance of the further investigation of the blade vibration damping characteristics on candidate CMC materials for the NASA s advanced aerospace turbomachinery engine systems.

  12. High Volume Fraction Carbon Nanotube Composites for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siochi, Emilie J.; Kim, Jae-Woo; Sauti, Godfrey; Cano, Roberto J.; Wincheski, Russell A.; Ratcliffe, James G.; Czabaj, Michael; Jensen, Benjamin D.; Wise, Kristopher E.

    2015-01-01

    Reported nanoscale mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) suggest that their use may enable the fabrication of significantly lighter structures for use in space applications. To be useful in the fabrication of large structures, however, their attractive nanoscale properties must be retained as they are scaled up to bulk materials and converted into practically useful forms. Advances in CNT production have significantly increased the quantities available for use in manufacturing processes, but challenges remain with the retention of nanoscale properties in larger assemblies of CNTs. This work summarizes recent progress in producing carbon nanotube composites with tensile properties approaching those of carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites. These advances were achieved in nanocomposites with CNT content of 70% by weight. The processing methods explored to yield these CNT composite properties will be discussed, as will the characterization and test methods that were developed to provide insight into the factors that contribute to the enhanced tensile properties. Technology maturation was guided by parallel advancements in computational modeling tools that aided in the interpretation of experimental data.

  13. Resilient and Corrosion-Proof Rolling Element Bearings Made from Superelastic Ni-Ti Alloys for Aerospace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical components (bearings, gears, mechanisms) typically utilize hardened construction materials to minimize wear and attain long life. In such components, loaded contact points (e.g., meshing gear teeth, bearing balls-raceway contacts) experience high contact stresses. The combination of high hardness and high elastic modulus often leads to damaging contact stress and denting, particularly during transient overload events such as shock impacts that occur during the launching of space vehicles or the landing of aircraft. In this webinar, Dr. DellaCorte will introduce the results of a research project that employs a superelastic alloy, Ni-Ti for rolling element bearing applications. Bearings and components made from such alloys can alleviate many problems encountered in advanced aerospace applications and may solve many terrestrial applications as well

  14. Effects of proof loads and combined mode loadings on fracture and flaw growth characteristics of aerospace alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, R. C.

    1974-01-01

    This experimental program was undertaken to determine the effects of (1) combined tensile and bending loadings, (2) combined tensile and shear loadings, and (3) proof overloads on fracture and flaw growth characteristics of aerospace alloys. Tests were performed on four alloys: 2219-T87 aluminum, 5Al-2.5Sn (ELl) titanium, 6Al-4V beta STA titanium and high strength 4340 steel. Tests were conducted in room air, gaseous nitrogen at -200F (144K), liquid nitrogen and liquid hydrogen. Flat center cracked and surface flawed specimens, cracked tube specimens, circumferentially notched round bar and surface flawed cylindrical specimens were tested. The three-dimensional photoelastic technique of stress freezing and slicing was used to determine stress intensity factors for surface flawed cylindrical specimens subjected to tension or torsion. Results showed that proof load/temperature histories used in the tests have a small beneficial effect or no effect on subsequent fracture strength and flaw growth rates.

  15. Ultrasonic and radiographic evaluation of advanced aerospace materials: Ceramic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Generazio, Edward R.

    1990-01-01

    Two conventional nondestructive evaluation techniques were used to evaluate advanced ceramic composite materials. It was shown that neither ultrasonic C-scan nor radiographic imaging can individually provide sufficient data for an accurate nondestructive evaluation. Both ultrasonic C-scan and conventional radiographic imaging are required for preliminary evaluation of these complex systems. The material variations that were identified by these two techniques are porosity, delaminations, bond quality between laminae, fiber alignment, fiber registration, fiber parallelism, and processing density flaws. The degree of bonding between fiber and matrix cannot be determined by either of these methods. An alternative ultrasonic technique, angular power spectrum scanning (APSS) is recommended for quantification of this interfacial bond.

  16. Friction Stir Welding of Metal Matrix Composites for use in aerospace structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prater, Tracie

    2014-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a relatively nascent solid state joining technique developed at The Welding Institute (TWI) in 1991. The process was first used at NASA to weld the super lightweight external tank for the Space Shuttle. Today FSW is used to join structural components of the Delta IV, Atlas V, and Falcon IX rockets as well as the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle. A current focus of FSW research is to extend the process to new materials which are difficult to weld using conventional fusion techniques. Metal Matrix Composites (MMCs) consist of a metal alloy reinforced with ceramics and have a very high strength to weight ratio, a property which makes them attractive for use in aerospace and defense applications. MMCs have found use in the space shuttle orbiter's structural tubing, the Hubble Space Telescope's antenna mast, control surfaces and propulsion systems for aircraft, and tank armors. The size of MMC components is severely limited by difficulties encountered in joining these materials using fusion welding. Melting of the material results in formation of an undesirable phase (formed when molten Aluminum reacts with the reinforcement) which leaves a strength depleted region along the joint line. Since FSW occurs below the melting point of the workpiece material, this deleterious phase is absent in FSW-ed MMC joints. FSW of MMCs is, however, plagued by rapid wear of the welding tool, a consequence of the large discrepancy in hardness between the steel tool and the reinforcement material. This work characterizes the effect of process parameters (spindle speed, traverse rate, and length of joint) on the wear process. Based on the results of these experiments, a phenomenological model of the wear process was constructed based on the rotating plug model for FSW. The effectiveness of harder tool materials (such as Tungsten Carbide, high speed steel, and tools with diamond coatings) to combat abrasive wear is explored. In-process force, torque, and

  17. An evaluation of fiber-reinforced titanium matrix composites for advanced high-temperature aerospace applications

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, J.M.; Russ, S.M.; Jones, J.W.

    1995-12-01

    The current capabilities of continuous silicon-carbide fiber-reinforced titanium matrix composites (TMCs) are reviewed with respect to application needs and compared to the capabilities of conventional high-temperature monolithic alloys and aluminides. In particular, the properties of a first-generation titanium aluminide composite, SCS-6/Ti-24Al-11Nb, and a second-generation metastable beta alloy composite, SCS-6/TIMETAL 21S, are compared with the nickel-base superalloy IN100, the high-temperature titanium alloy Ti-1100, and a relatively new titanium aluminide alloy. Emphasis is given to life-limiting cyclic and monotonic properties and to the influence of time-dependent deformation and environmental effects on these properties. The composite materials offer a wide range of performance capabilities, depending on laminate architecture. In many instances, unidirectional composites exhibit outstanding properties, although the same materials loaded transverse to the fiber direction typically exhibit very poor properties, primarily due to the weak fiber/matrix interface. Depending on the specific mechanical property under consideration, composite cross-ply laminates often show no improvement over the capability of conventional monolithic materials. Thus, it is essential that these composite materials be tailored to achieve a balance of properties suitable to the specific application needs if these materials are to be attractive candidates to replace more conventional materials.

  18. Development and Processing Improvement of Aerospace Aluminum Alloys-Development of AL-Cu-Mg-Ag Alloy (2139)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, Alex; Lisagor, W. Barry; Bales, Thomas T.

    2007-01-01

    This final report supplement in presentation format describes a comprehensive multi-tasked contract study to continue the development of the silver bearing alloy now registered as aluminum alloy 2139 by the Aluminum Association. Two commercial scale ingots were processed into nominal plate gauges of two, four and six inches, and were extensively characterized in terms of metallurgical and crystallographic structure, and resulting mechanical properties. This report includes comparisons of the property combinations for this alloy and 2XXX and 7XXX alloys more widely used in high performance applications. Alloy 2139 shows dramatic improvement in all combinations of properties, moreover, the properties of this alloy are retained in all gauge thicknesses, contrary to typical reductions observed in thicker gauges of the other alloys in the comparison. The advancements achieved in this study are expected to result in rapid, widespread use of this alloy in a broad range of ground based, aircraft, and spacecraft applications.

  19. Laser Surface Preparation and Bonding of Aerospace Structural Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belcher, M. A.; Wohl, C. J.; Hopkins, J. W.; Connell, J. W.

    2010-01-01

    Adhesive bonds are critical to the integrity of built-up structures. Disbonds can often be detected but the strength of adhesion between surfaces in contact is not obtainable without destructive testing. Typically the number one problem in a bonded structure is surface contamination, and by extension, surface preparation. Standard surface preparation techniques, including grit blasting, manual abrasion, and peel ply, are not ideal because of variations in their application. Etching of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) panels using a neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser appears to be a highly precise and promising way to both clean a composite surface prior to bonding and provide a bond-promoting patterned surface akin to peel ply without the inherent drawbacks from the same (i.e., debris and curvature). CFRP surfaces prepared using laser patterns conducive to adhesive bonding were compared to typical prebonding surface treatments through optical microscopy, contact angle goniometry, and post-bonding mechanical testing.

  20. Composite multilayer insulations for thermal protection of aerospace vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, Demetrius A.; Pitts, William C.

    1989-01-01

    Composite flexible multilayer insulation systems (MLI), consisting of alternating layers of metal foil and scrim cloth or insulation quilted together using ceramic thread, were evaluated for thermal performance and compared with a silica fibrous (baseline) insulation system. The systems studied included: (1) alternating layers of aluminoborosilicate (ABS) scrim cloth and stainless steel foil, with silica, ABS, or alumina insulation; (2) alternating layers of scrim cloth and aluminum foil, with silica or ABS insulation; (3) alternating layers of aluminum foil and silica or ABS insulation; and (4) alternating layers of aluminum-coated polyimide placed on the bottom of the silica insulation. The MLIs containing aluminum were the most efficient, measuring as little as half the backface temperature increase of the baseline system.

  1. Design and Test of Low-Profile Composite Aerospace Tank Dome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmed, R.

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes the design, analysis, manufacture, and test of a subscale, low-profile composite aerospace dome under internal pressure. A low-profile dome has a radius-to-height ratio greater than the square root of two. This effort demonstrated that a low-profile composite dome with a radius-to-height ratio of three was a feasible design and could adequately withstand the varying stress states resulting from internal pressurization. Test data for strain and displacement versus pressure are provided to validate the design.

  2. NDE of Fiber Reinforced Foam Composite Structures for Future Aerospace Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, james; Roth, Don; Hopkins, Dale

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the complexities of non-destructive evaluation (NDE) of fiber reinforced foam composite structures to be used for aerospace vehicles in the future.Various views of fiber reinforced foam materials are shown and described. Conventional methods of NDE for composites are reviewed such as Micro-computed X-Ray Tomography, Thermography, Shearography, and Phased Array Ultrasonics (PAUT). These meth0ods appear to work well on the face sheet and face sheet ot core bond, they do not provide adequate coverage for the webs. There is a need for additional methods that will examine the webs and web to foam core bond.

  3. Laser Surface Preparation for Adhesive Bonding of Aerospace Structural Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belcher, M. A.; Wohl, C. J.; Hopkins, J. W.; Connell, J. W.

    2010-01-01

    Adhesive bonds are critical to the integrity of built-up structures. Disbonds can often be detected but the strength of adhesion between surfaces in contact is not obtainable without destructive testing. Typically the number one problem in a bonded structure is surface contamination, and by extension, surface preparation. Standard surface preparation techniques, including grit blasting, manual abrasion, and peel ply, are not ideal because of variations in their application. Etching of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) panels using a neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser appears to be a highly precise and promising way to both clean a composite surface prior to bonding and provide a bond-promoting patterned surface akin to peel ply without the inherent drawbacks from the same (i.e., debris and curvature). CFRP surfaces prepared using laser patterns conducive to adhesive bonding were compared to typical pre-bonding surface treatments through optical microscopy, contact angle goniometry, and post-bonding mechanical testing.

  4. Corrosion characteristics of nickel alloys. Citations from the International Aerospace Abstracts data base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zollars, G. F.

    1979-01-01

    This bibliography cites 118 articles from the international literature concerning corrosion characteristics of nickel alloys. Articles dealing with corrosion resistance, corrosion tests, intergranular corrosion, oxidation resistance, and stress corrosion cracking of nickel alloys are included.

  5. Surface Composition of NiPd Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noebe, Ronald D.; Khalil, Joe; Bozzolo, Guillermo; Gray, Hugh R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Surface segregation in Ni-Pd alloys has been studied using the BFS method for alloys. Not only does the method predict an oscillatory segregation profile but it also indicates that the number of Pd-enriched surface planes can vary as a function of orientation. The segregation profiles were computed as a function of temperature, crystal face, and composition. Pd enrichment of the first layer is observed in (111) and (100) surfaces, and enrichment of the top two layers occurs for (110) surfaces. In all cases, the segregation profile shows oscillations that are actually related to weak ordering tendencies in the bulk. An atom-by-atom analysis was performed to identify the competing mechanisms leading to the observed surface behaviors. Large-scale atomistic simulations were also performed to investigate the temperature dependence of the segregation profiles as well as for analysis of the bulk structures. Finally, the observed surface behaviors are discussed in relation to the bulk phase structure of Ni-Pd alloys, which exhibit a tendency to weakly order.

  6. Integrity assessment of preforms and thick textile reinforced composites for aerospace applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saboktakin Rizi, Abbasali

    Three-dimensional (3D) textile composites containing in-plane fibers and fibers oriented in the thickness direction offer some advantages over two-dimensional (2D) textile composites. These advantages include high delamination resistance and improved damage tolerance. Textile composites containing 3D textile preforms have mostly been developed by the aerospace industry for structural applications such as wing panels, landing gear, rocket nozzles, and the Orion capsule, and so forth. This thesis is devoted to structural integrity assessment of textile composites including 2D and 3D tufted composites by combining destructive and non-destructive techniques. In the first part of the thesis, non-destructive techniques including X-ray computed tomography (CT) and ultrasound-based techniques (UT) were used to detect two significant processinduced defects called fiber breakage and fabric misalignment. The second part focuses on studying of the influence of manufacturing defects introduced during the tufting process on the mechanical properties. Experimental results proved that X-ray CT facilitates the characterization of those two manufacturing defects as well as the architecture of the textile fabrics. Furthermore, mesoscale modeling of a 2D woven composite was successfully performed for the analysis of the fiber breakage defect influence and fiber architecture on wave propagation. Experimental results prove that tufting the preform assists in locking and restricting the yarn's movement in the preform. The threads used for tufting have a major influence on tensile strength, as stronger threads may give higher resistance. Tufting increases the compaction force due locking of fiber bundles, therefore, a higher compaction force is needed to obtain a fiber volume of up to 50 percent in comparison to an untufted preform. The drape behaviour of a tufted preform is influenced by tufting so that high drapability is observed for a tufted preform along with local variation of fiber

  7. Handbook of International Alloy Compositions and Designations. Volume 1. Titanium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-11-01

    Alloys for the Aerospace Industry (Revised), DMIC Memor- andum 232, Metals and Ceramics Information Center, Battelle’s Columbus Laboratories, Columbus...The Titanium Industry in the Mid-1970’s, Metals and Ceramics Information Center, Battelle’s Columbus Laboratories, Columbus, Ohio, MCIC-75-26 (June...Volume I - TlHinium Harold Hucek and Marshal J. Wahll 9. HcRfORMING 0=?CANI Z ATION N^Mh AND ADDRESS Metals nrid Ceramics Information

  8. The effect of alloy composition on the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking of titanium alloys in aqueous environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, J. D.; Williams, D. N.; Wood, R. A.; Jaffee, R. I.

    1972-01-01

    The effects of alloy composition on the aqueous stress corrosion of titanium alloys were studied with emphasis on determining the interrelations among composition, phase structure, and deformation and fracture properties of the alpha phase in alpha-beta alloys. Accomplishments summarized include the effects of alloy composition on susceptibility, and metallurgical mechanisms of stress-corrosion cracking.

  9. Effects of chemical composition on the corrosion of dental alloys.

    PubMed

    Galo, Rodrigo; Ribeiro, Ricardo Faria; Rodrigues, Renata Cristina Silveira; Rocha, Luís Augusto; de Mattos, Maria da Glória Chiarello

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the oral environment on the corrosion of dental alloys with different compositions, using electrochemical methods. The corrosion rates were obtained from the current-potential curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The effect of artificial saliva on the corrosion of dental alloys was dependent on alloy composition. Dissolution of the ions occurred in all tested dental alloys and the results were strongly dependent on the general alloy composition. Regarding the alloys containing nickel, the Ni-Cr and Ni-Cr-Ti alloys released 0.62 mg/L of Ni on average, while the Co-Cr dental alloy released ions between 0.01 and 0.03 mg/L of Co and Cr, respectively.The open-circuit potential stabilized at a higher level with lower deviation (standard deviation: Ni-Cr-6Ti = 32 mV/SCE and Co-Cr = 54 mV/SCE). The potenciodynamic curves of the dental alloys showed that the Ni-based dental alloy with >70 wt% of Ni had a similar curve and the Co-Cr dental alloy showed a low current density and hence a high resistance to corrosion compared with the Ni-based dental alloys. Some changes in microstructure were observed and this fact influenced the corrosion behavior for the alloys. The lower corrosion resistance also led to greater release of nickel ions to the medium. The quantity of Co ions released from the Co-Cr-Mo alloy was relatively small in the solutions. In addition, the quantity of Cr ions released into the artificial saliva from the Co-Cr alloy was lower than Cr release from the Ni-based dental alloys.

  10. Real-Time Impact Visualization Inspection of Aerospace Composite Structures with Distributed Sensors.

    PubMed

    Si, Liang; Baier, Horst

    2015-07-08

    For the future design of smart aerospace structures, the development and application of a reliable, real-time and automatic monitoring and diagnostic technique is essential. Thus, with distributed sensor networks, a real-time automatic structural health monitoring (SHM) technique is designed and investigated to monitor and predict the locations and force magnitudes of unforeseen foreign impacts on composite structures and to estimate in real time mode the structural state when impacts occur. The proposed smart impact visualization inspection (IVI) technique mainly consists of five functional modules, which are the signal data preprocessing (SDP), the forward model generator (FMG), the impact positioning calculator (IPC), the inverse model operator (IMO) and structural state estimator (SSE). With regard to the verification of the practicality of the proposed IVI technique, various structure configurations are considered, which are a normal CFRP panel and another CFRP panel with "orange peel" surfaces and a cutout hole. Additionally, since robustness against several background disturbances is also an essential criterion for practical engineering demands, investigations and experimental tests are carried out under random vibration interfering noise (RVIN) conditions. The accuracy of the predictions for unknown impact events on composite structures using the IVI technique is validated under various structure configurations and under changing environmental conditions. The evaluated errors all fall well within a satisfactory limit range. Furthermore, it is concluded that the IVI technique is applicable for impact monitoring, diagnosis and assessment of aerospace composite structures in complex practical engineering environments.

  11. Real-Time Impact Visualization Inspection of Aerospace Composite Structures with Distributed Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Si, Liang; Baier, Horst

    2015-01-01

    For the future design of smart aerospace structures, the development and application of a reliable, real-time and automatic monitoring and diagnostic technique is essential. Thus, with distributed sensor networks, a real-time automatic structural health monitoring (SHM) technique is designed and investigated to monitor and predict the locations and force magnitudes of unforeseen foreign impacts on composite structures and to estimate in real time mode the structural state when impacts occur. The proposed smart impact visualization inspection (IVI) technique mainly consists of five functional modules, which are the signal data preprocessing (SDP), the forward model generator (FMG), the impact positioning calculator (IPC), the inverse model operator (IMO) and structural state estimator (SSE). With regard to the verification of the practicality of the proposed IVI technique, various structure configurations are considered, which are a normal CFRP panel and another CFRP panel with “orange peel” surfaces and a cutout hole. Additionally, since robustness against several background disturbances is also an essential criterion for practical engineering demands, investigations and experimental tests are carried out under random vibration interfering noise (RVIN) conditions. The accuracy of the predictions for unknown impact events on composite structures using the IVI technique is validated under various structure configurations and under changing environmental conditions. The evaluated errors all fall well within a satisfactory limit range. Furthermore, it is concluded that the IVI technique is applicable for impact monitoring, diagnosis and assessment of aerospace composite structures in complex practical engineering environments. PMID:26184196

  12. Boron-bearing species in ceramic matrix composites for long-term aerospace applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naslain, R.; Guette, A.; Rebillat, F.; Pailler, R.; Langlais, F.; Bourrat, X.

    2004-02-01

    Boron-bearing refractory species are introduced in non-oxide ceramic matrix fibrous composites (such as SiC/SiC composites) to improve their oxidation resistance under load at high temperatures with a view to applications in the aerospace field. B-doped pyrocarbon and hex-BN have been successfully used as interphase (instead of pure pyrocarbon) either as homogeneous or multilayered fiber coatings, to arrest and deflect matrix cracks formed under load (mechanical fuse function) and to give toughness to the materials. A self-healing multilayered matrix is designed and used in a model composite, which combines B-doped pyrocarbon mechanical fuse layers and B- and Si-bearing compound (namely B 4C and SiC) layers forming B 2O 3-based fluid healing phases when exposed to an oxidizing atmosphere. All the materials are deposited by chemical vapor infiltration. Lifetimes under tensile loading of several hundreds hours at high temperatures are reported.

  13. Fabrication of a smart air intake structure using shape memory alloy wire embedded composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Beom-Seok; Kim, Min-Saeng; Kim, Ji-Soo; Kim, Yun-Mi; Lee, Woo-Yong; Ahn, Sung-Hoon

    2010-05-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMAs) have been actively studied in many fields utilizing their high energy density. Applying SMA wire-embedded composite to aerospace structures, such as air intake of jet engines and guided missiles, is attracting significant attention because it could generate a comparatively large actuating force. In this research, a scaled structure of SMA wire-embedded composite was fabricated for the air intake of aircraft. The structure was composed of several prestrained Nitinol (Ni-Ti) SMA wires embedded in ∩-shape glass fabric reinforced plastic (GFRP), and it was cured at room temperature for 72 h. The SMA wire-embedded GFRP could be actuated by applying electric current through the embedded SMA wires. The activation angle generated from the composite structure was large enough to make a smart air intake structure.

  14. The effects of aluminum alloy compositions in DIMOX process

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Chang Wook; Kim, Cheol Soo

    1996-12-31

    Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Al composites have been produced by the directed oxidation of binary and ternary aluminum alloys. The Mg, Si, Zn, Sn, Cu, Ni, Ca and Ce have been investigated as alloying elements. The oxidation amount of Al-1wt%Mg alloy was more than that of Al-3wt%Mg alloy. The ternary systems such as Al-Mg-(Si, Sn) alloys were fabricated in the form of porous composites with large amount of oxidation. The amount of oxidation in Al-Mg-(Cu, Ni) was relatively less than that in Al-Mg-(Si, Sn) with some micro pores. Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Al composite is always locally growing in Al-xMg-xZn alloys at 1200{degrees}C.

  15. Application of thermal life prediction model to high-temperature aerospace alloys B1900+Hf and Haynes 188

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, Gary R.; Saltsman, James F.; Verrilli, Michael J.; Arya, Vinod K.

    1990-01-01

    The results of the application of a newly proposed thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) life prediction method to a series of laboratory TMF results on two high-temperature aerospace engine alloys are presented. The method, referred to as TMF/TS-SRP, is based on three relatively recent developments: the total strain version of the method of Strainrange Partitioning (TS-SRP), the bithermal testing technique for characterizing TMF behavior, and advanced viscoplastic constitutive models. The high-temperature data reported in a companion publication are used to evaluate the constants in the model and to provide the TMF verification data to check its accuracy. Predicted lives are in agreement with the experimental lives to within a factor of approximately 2.

  16. Manufacturing Challenges Associated with the Use of Metal Matrix Composites in Aerospace Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prater, Tracie

    2014-01-01

    Metal Matrix Composites (MMCs) consist of a metal alloy reinforced with ceramic particles or fibers. These materials possess a very high strength to weight ratio, good resistance to impact and wear, and a number of other properties which make them attractive for use in aerospace and defense applications. MMCs have found use in the space shuttle orbiter's structural tubing, the Hubble Space Telescope's antenna mast, control surfaces and propulsion systems for aircraft, and tank armors. The size of MMC components is severely limited by difficulties encountered in joining these materials using fusion welding. Melting of the material results in formation of an undesirable phase (formed when molten Aluminum reacts with the reinforcement) which leaves a strength depleted region along the joint line. Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a relatively nascent solid state joining technique developed at The Welding Institute (TWI) in 1991. The process was first used at NASA to weld the super lightweight external tank for the Space Shuttle. Today FSW is used to join structural components of the Delta IV, Atlas V, and Falcon IX rockets as well as NASA's Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle and Space Launch System. A current focus of FSW research is to extend the process to new materials, such as MMCs, which are difficult to weld using conventional fusion techniques. Since Friction Stir Welding occurs below the melting point of the workpiece material, this deleterious phase is absent in FSW-ed MMC joints. FSW of MMCs is, however, plagued by rapid wear of the welding tool, a consequence of the large discrepancy in hardness between the steel tool and the reinforcement material. This chapter summarizes the challenges encountered when joining MMCs to themselves or to other materials in structures. Specific attention is paid to the influence of process variables in Friction Stir Welding on the wear process characterizes the effect of process parameters (spindle speed, traverse rate, and length

  17. Fabrication of tungsten wire reinforced nickel-base alloy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brentnall, W. D.; Toth, I. J.

    1974-01-01

    Fabrication methods for tungsten fiber reinforced nickel-base superalloy composites were investigated. Three matrix alloys in pre-alloyed powder or rolled sheet form were evaluated in terms of fabricability into composite monotape and multi-ply forms. The utility of monotapes for fabricating more complex shapes was demonstrated. Preliminary 1093C (2000F) stress rupture tests indicated that efficient utilization of fiber strength was achieved in composites fabricated by diffusion bonding processes. The fabrication of thermal fatigue specimens is also described.

  18. The Effects of Chemical Wash Additives on the Corrosion of Aerospace Alloys in Marine Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacDowell, Louis; Calle, Luz Marina; Curran, Joseph; Hodge, Tim; Barile, Ronald; Heidersbach, Robert; Steinrock, T. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents the methodology for comparing the relative effectiveness of four chemical products used for rinsing airplanes and helicopters. The products were applied on a weekly basis to a series of flat alloy panels exposed to an oceanfront marine environment for one year. The results are presented along with comparisons of exposures of the same alloys that were not washed, were washed with seawater, or washed with de-ionized water.

  19. Resilient and Corrosion-Proof Rolling Element Bearings Made from Superelastic Ni-Ti Alloys for Aerospace Mechanism Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher; Noebe, Ronald D.; Stanford, Malcolm; Padula, Santo A.

    2011-01-01

    Mechanical components (bearings, gears, mechanisms) typically utilize hard materials to minimize wear and attain long life. In such components, heavily loaded contact points (e.g., meshing gear teeth, bearing ball-raceway contacts) experience high contact stresses. The combination of high hardness, heavy loads and high elastic modulus often leads to damaging contact stress. In addition, mechanical component materials, such as tool steel or silicon nitride exhibit limited recoverable strain (typically less than 1 percent). These material attributes can lead to Brinell damage (e.g., denting) particularly during transient overload events such as shock impacts that occur during the launching of space vehicles or the landing of aircraft. In this paper, a superelastic alloy, 60NiTi, is considered for rolling element bearing applications. A series of Rockwell and Brinell hardness, compressive strength, fatigue and tribology tests are conducted and reported. The combination of high hardness, moderate elastic modulus, large recoverable strain, low density, and intrinsic corrosion immunity provide a path to bearings largely impervious to shock load damage. It is anticipated that bearings and components made from alloys with such attributes can alleviate many problems encountered in advanced aerospace applications.

  20. The relative stress-corrosion-cracking susceptibility of candidate aluminum-lithium alloys for aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizzo, P. P.

    1982-01-01

    Stress corrosion tests of Al-Li-Cu powder metallurgy alloys are described. Alloys investigated were Al-2.6% Li-1.4% and Al-2.6% Li-1.4% Cu-1.6% Mg. The base properties of the alloys were characterized. Process, heat treatment, and size/orientational effects on the tensile and fracture behavior were investigated. Metallurgical and electrochemical conditions are identified which provide reproducible and controlled parameters for stress corrosion evaluation. Preliminary stress corrosion test results are reported. Both Al-Li-Cu alloys appear more susceptible to stress corrosion crack initiation than 7075-T6 aluminum, with the magnesium bearing alloy being the most susceptible. Tests to determine the threshold stress intensity for the base and magnesium bearing alloys are underway. Twelve each, bolt loaded DCB type specimens are under test (120 days) and limited crack growth in these precracked specimens has been observed. General corrosion in the aqueous sodium chloride environment is thought to be obscuring results through crack tip blunting.

  1. [Composition and morphology of oxides on porcelain fused to Ni-Cr alloys. Be containing alloys].

    PubMed

    Watanabe, T

    1989-06-01

    Bonding strength between porcelain and Ni-Cr alloy for the porcelain fused-to metal crown in which Be is contained in the alloy is known to be higher than those in which Be is not contained. Since, bonding between porcelain and alloy is the reaction of oxides and porcelain, the bonding is thought to be influenced by the quality the oxides film which forms on the alloy surface. The purpose of this study was to determine the composition and morphology of the oxides formed on both Be containing and non-Be contained Ni-Cr alloys. The oxides analysis was done using an EPMA and Auger analysis. Also, the Porcelain/Ni-Cr alloy interface was observed by a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The following results are indicated from this investigation: 1. The oxides from the alloys not containing Be are corundum type Cr2O3 and spinel type NiCr2O4. These oxide layers are uniform, thick and porous and the adhesion to alloy is poor. 2. The oxides from alloy containing Be is BeO only. The BeO is uniform, thin and condensed. The adhesion to the alloy is good. 3. The oxide layer formed when the porcelain is fused to alloy containing Be is thin (1 micron average) and has good adhesion to alloy. 4. Be is selectively oxidized and controlled the form of Cr2O3 and NiO.

  2. Shape memory polymers and their composites in aerospace applications: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yanju; Du, Haiyang; Liu, Liwu; Leng, Jinsong

    2014-02-01

    As a new class of smart materials, shape memory polymers and their composites (SMPs and SMPCs) can respond to specific external stimulus and remember the original shape. There are many types of stimulus methods to actuate the deformation of SMPs and SMPCs, of which the thermal- and electro-responsive components and structures are common. In this review, the general mechanism of SMPs and SMPCs are first introduced, the stimulus methods are then discussed to demonstrate the shape recovery effect, and finally, the applications of SMPs and SMPCs that are reinforced with fiber materials in aerospace are reviewed. SMPC hinges and booms are discussed in the part on components; the booms can be divided again into foldable SMPC truss booms, coilable SMPC truss booms and storable tubular extendible member (STEM) booms. In terms of SMPC structures, the solar array and deployable panel, reflector antenna and morphing wing are introduced in detail. Considering the factors of weight, recovery force and shock effect, SMPCs are expected to have great potential applications in aerospace.

  3. Surface compositional variations of Mo-47Re alloy as a function of temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoekje, S. J.; Outlaw, R. A.; Sankaran, S. N.

    1993-01-01

    Molybdenum-rhenium alloys are candidate materials for the National Aero-Space Plane (NASP) as well as for other applications in generic hypersonics. These materials are expected to be subjected to high-temperature (above 1200 C) casual hydrogen (below 50 torr), which could potentially degrade the material strength. Since the uptake of hydrogen may be controlled by the contaminant surface barriers, a study of Mo-47Re was conducted to examine the variations in surface composition as a function of temperature from 25 C to 1000 C. Pure molybdenum and rhenium were also examined and the results compared with those for the alloy. The analytical techniques employed were Auger electron spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, ion scattering spectroscopy, and x ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The native surface was rich in metallic oxides that disappeared at elevated temperatures. As the temperature increased, the carbon and oxygen disappeared by 800 C and the surface was subsequently populated by the segregation of silicon, presumably from the grain boundaries. The alloy readily chemisorbed oxygen, which disappeared with heating. The disappearance temperature progressively increased for successive dosings. When the alloy was exposed to 800 torr of hydrogen at 900 C for 1 hour, no hydrogen interaction was observed.

  4. Proceedings of the American Society for Composites: Biotechnology Aided Synthesis of Aerospace Composite Resins Held in Dayton, Ohio 25-26 August 1987.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-08-26

    aerospace technology for high temperature structural applications. The carbon-matrix composites consist of a carbonaceous binder, reinforcing fiber , and...systems. The current and future work in the Air Force on organic matrix resins for fiber reinforced structural composite applications is focused upon...o ymers based upon the ;, .y’ inzobisimidazole, polybenzobisoxazole and polybenzobisthiazole systems. A potential application area for the ordered

  5. Oxidation resistant coating for titanium alloys and titanium alloy matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brindley, William J. (Inventor); Smialek, James L. (Inventor); Rouge, Carl J. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An oxidation resistant coating for titanium alloys and titanium alloy matrix composites comprises an MCrAlX material. M is a metal selected from nickel, cobalt, and iron. X is an active element selected from Y, Yb, Zr, and Hf.

  6. New vistas in the determination of hydrogen in aerospace engine metal alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.

    1986-01-01

    The application of diffusion theory to the analysis of hydrogen desorption data has been studied. From these analyses, important information concerning hydrogen solubilities and the nature of the hydrogen distributions in the metal has been obtained. Two nickel base alloys, Rene' 41 and Waspaloy, and one ferrous alloy, 4340 steel, were studied in this work. For the nickel base alloys, it was found that the hydrogen distributions after electrolytic charging conformed closely to those which would be predicted by diffusion theory. The hydrogen distributions in electrolytically charged 4340 steel, on the other hand, were essentially uniform in nature, which would not be predicted by diffusion theory. Finally, it has been found that the hydrogen desorption is completely explained by the nature of the hydrogen distribution in the metal, and that the 'fast' hydrogen is not due to surface and subsurface hydride formation, as was originally proposed.

  7. Processing and response of aluminum-lithium alloy composites reinforced with copper-coated silicon carbide particulates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khor, K. A.; Cao, Y.; Boey, F. Y. C.; Hanada, K.; Murakoshi, Y.; Sudarshan, T. S.; Srivatsan, T. S.

    1998-02-01

    Lithium-containing aluminum alloys have shown promise for demanding aerospace applications because of their light weight, high strength, and good damage tolerance characteristics. Additions of ceramic reinforcements to an aluminum-lithium alloy can significantly enhance specific strength, and specific modulus while concurrently offering acceptable performance at elevated temperatures. The processing and fabrication of aluminum-lithium alloy-based composites are hampered by particulate agglomeration or clustering and the existence of poor interfacial relationships between the reinforcing phase and the matrix. The problem of distribution of the reinforcing phase in the metal matrix can be alleviated by mechanical alloying. This article presents the results of a study aimed at addressing and improving the interfacial relationship between the host matrix and the reinforcing phase. Copper-coated silicon carbide particulates are introduced as the particulate reinforcing phase, and the resultant composite mixture is processed by conventional milling followed by hot pressing and hot extrusion. The influence of extrusion ratio and extrusion temperature on microstructure and mechanical properties was established. Post extrusion processing by hot isostatic pressing was also examined. Results reveal the increase in elastic modulus of the aluminum-lithium alloy matrix reinforced with copper-coated SiC to be significantly more than the mechanically alloyed Al-Li/SiC counterpart. This suggests the possible contributions of interfacial strengthening on mechanical response in direct comparison with a uniform distribution of the reinforcing ceramic particulates.

  8. Fatigue-crack propagation in advanced aerospace materials: Aluminum-lithium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Venkateswara Rao, K.T.; Ritchie, R.O.

    1988-10-01

    Characteristics of fatigue-crack propagation behavior are reviewed for recently developed commercial aluminum-lithium alloys, with emphasis on the underlying micromechanisms associated with crack advance and their implications to damage-tolerant design. Specifically, crack-growth kinetics in Alcoa 2090-T8E41, Alcan 8090 and 8091, and Pechiney 2091 alloys, and in certain powder-metallurgy alloys, are examined as a function of microstructure, plate orientation, temperature, crack size, load ratio and loading sequence. In general, it is found that growth rates for long (> 10 mm) cracks are nearly 2--3 orders of magnitude slower than in traditional 2000 and 7000 series alloys at comparable stress-intensity levels. In additions, Al-Li alloys shown enhanced crack-growth retardations following the application of tensile overloads and retain superior fatigue properties even after prolonged exposure at overaging temperatures; however, they are less impressive in the presence of compression overloads and further show accelerated crack-growth behavior for microstructurally-small (2--1000 {mu}m) cracks (some three orders of magnitude faster than long cracks). These contrasting observations are attributed to a very prominent role of crack-tip shielding during fatigue-crack growth in Al-Li alloys, promoted largely by the tortuous and zig-zag nature of the crack-path morphologies. Such crack paths result in locally reduced crack-tip stress intensities, due to crack deflection and consequent crack wedging from fracture-surface asperities (roughness-induced crack closure); however, such mechanisms are far less potent in the presence of compressive loads, which act to crush the asperities, and for small cracks, where the limited crack wake severely restricts the shielding effect. 50 refs., 21 figs.

  9. NASA-UVA Light Aerospace Alloy and Structure Technology Program Supplement: Aluminum-Based Materials for High Speed Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starke, E. A., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    This is the final report of the study "Aluminum-Based Materials for High Speed Aircraft" which had the objectives (1) to identify the most promising aluminum-based materials with respect to major structural use on the HSCT and to further develop those materials and (2) to assess the materials through detailed trade and evaluation studies with respect to their structural efficiency on the HSCT. The research team consisted of ALCOA, Allied-Signal, Boeing, McDonnell Douglas, Reynolds Metals and the University of Virginia. Four classes of aluminum alloys were investigated: (1) I/M 2XXX containing Li and I/M 2XXX without Li, (2) I/M 6XXX, (3) two P/M 2XXX alloys, and (4) two different aluminum-based metal matrix composites (MMC). The I/M alloys were targeted for a Mach 2.0 aircraft and the P/M and MMC alloys were targeted for a Mach 2.4 aircraft. Design studies were conducted using several different concepts including skin/stiffener (baseline), honeycomb sandwich, integrally stiffened and hybrid adaptations (conventionally stiffened thin-sandwich skins). Alloy development included fundamental studies of coarsening behavior, the effect of stress on nucleation and growth of precipitates, and fracture toughness as a function of temperature were an integral part of this program. The details of all phases of the research are described in this final report.

  10. Microstructural and Mechanical Property Characterization of Shear Formed Aerospace Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Troeger, Lillianne P.; Domack, Marcia S.; Wagner, John A.

    2000-01-01

    Advanced manufacturing processes such as near-net-shape forming can reduce production costs and increase the reliability of launch vehicle and airframe structural components through the reduction of material scrap and part count and the minimization of joints. The current research is an investigation of the processing-microstructure-property relationships for shear formed cylinders of the Al-Cu-Li-Mg-Ag alloy 2195 for space applications and the Al-Cu-Mg-Ag alloy C415 for airframe applications. Cylinders which had undergone various amounts of shear-forming strain were studied to correlate the grain structure, texture, and mechanical properties developed during and after shear forming.

  11. Bisphenyl-Polymer/Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Composite Compared to Titanium Alloy Bone Implant

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Richard C.

    2014-01-01

    Aerospace/aeronautical thermoset bisphenyl-polymer/carbon-fiber-reinforced composites are considered as new advanced materials to replace metal bone implants. In addition to well-recognized nonpolar chemistry with related bisphenol-polymer estrogenic factors, carbon-fiber-reinforced composites can offer densities and electrical conductivity/resistivity properties close to bone with strengths much higher than metals on a per-weight basis. In vivo bone-marrow tests with Sprague-Dawley rats revealed far-reaching significant osseoconductivity increases from bisphenyl-polymer/carbon-fiber composites when compared to state-of-the-art titanium-6-4 alloy controls. Midtibial percent bone area measured from the implant surface increased when comparing the titanium alloy to the polymer composite from 10.5% to 41.6% at 0.8 mm, P < 10−4, and 19.3% to 77.7% at 0.1 mm, P < 10−8. Carbon-fiber fragments planned to occur in the test designs, instead of producing an inflammation, stimulated bone formation and increased bone integration to the implant. In addition, low-thermal polymer processing allows incorporation of minerals and pharmaceuticals for future major tissue-engineering potential. PMID:25553057

  12. Dynamic fiber Bragg gratings based health monitoring system of composite aerospace structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panopoulou, A.; Loutas, T.; Roulias, D.; Fransen, S.; Kostopoulos, V.

    2011-09-01

    The main purpose of the current work is to develop a new system for structural health monitoring of composite aerospace structures based on real-time dynamic measurements, in order to identify the structural state condition. Long-gauge Fibre Bragg Grating (FBG) optical sensors were used for monitoring the dynamic response of the composite structure. The algorithm that was developed for structural damage detection utilizes the collected dynamic response data, analyzes them in various ways and through an artificial neural network identifies the damage state and its location. Damage was simulated by slightly varying locally the mass of the structure (by adding a known mass) at different zones of the structure. Lumped masses in different locations upon the structure alter the eigen-frequencies in a way similar to actual damage. The structural dynamic behaviour has been numerically simulated and experimentally verified by means of modal testing on two different composite aerospace structures. Advanced digital signal processing techniques, e.g. the wavelet transform (WT), were used for the analysis of the dynamic response for feature extraction. WT's capability of separating the different frequency components in the time domain without loosing frequency information makes it a versatile tool for demanding signal processing applications. The use of WT is also suggested by the no-stationary nature of dynamic response signals and the opportunity of evaluating the temporal evolution of their frequency contents. Feature extraction is the first step of the procedure. The extracted features are effective indices of damage size and location. The classification step comprises of a feed-forward back propagation network, whose output determines the simulated damage location. Finally, dedicated training and validation activities were carried out by means of numerical simulations and experimental procedures. Experimental validation was performed initially on a flat stiffened panel

  13. Composition Dependence of Bulk Alloy Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo; Ferrante, John

    1994-01-01

    We introduce an approximate expression for the direct calculation of properties of alloys in terms of the pure components. This rule can be obtained as a particular case from the Bozzolo-Ferrante-Smith (BFS) method, a recently developed semiempirical method for alloys. In particular, we examine the application of this rule to several examples of the concentration dependence of the lattice parameter of binary and ternary alloys.

  14. Guided waves in anisotropic and quasi-isotropic aerospace composites: three-dimensional simulation and experiment.

    PubMed

    Leckey, Cara A C; Rogge, Matthew D; Raymond Parker, F

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) elastic wave simulations can be used to investigate and optimize nondestructive evaluation (NDE) and structural health monitoring (SHM) ultrasonic damage detection techniques for aerospace materials. 3D anisotropic elastodynamic finite integration technique (EFIT) has been implemented for ultrasonic waves in carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite laminates. This paper describes 3D EFIT simulations of guided wave propagation in undamaged and damaged anisotropic and quasi-isotropic composite plates. Comparisons are made between simulations of guided waves in undamaged anisotropic composite plates and both experimental laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) wavefield data and dispersion curves. Time domain and wavenumber domain comparisons are described. Wave interaction with complex geometry delamination damage is then simulated to investigate how simulation tools incorporating realistic damage geometries can aid in the understanding of wave interaction with CFRP damage. In order to move beyond simplistic assumptions of damage geometry, volumetric delamination data acquired via X-ray microfocus computed tomography is directly incorporated into the simulation. Simulated guided wave interaction with the complex geometry delamination is compared to experimental LDV time domain data and 3D wave interaction with the volumetric damage is discussed.

  15. a Low-Power Wireless Sensor Network for Monitoring the Microcrack Initiations in Aerospace Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian; Plotnikov, Yuri; Lin, Wendy W.

    2008-02-01

    A low power wireless sensor network was developed to monitor the microcrack events in aerospace composites. The microcracks in the composites mostly result from a stress loading or temperature and/or humidity cycles. Generally, a single microcrack is too small to be detected by conventional techniques such as X-ray or ultrasonic C-scan. The whole developed sensor network is aimed to capture the released acoustic signals by the microcracking events in real time. It comprises of a receiving station as well as a series of sensor nodes. Each sensor node includes two acoustic emission transducers as well as two signal amplification and data acquisition channels. Much of our development effort has been focused on reducing the power consumption of each node and improving the detection reliability for each event. Each sensor node is battery-powered and works in a sleep mode most of time. Once a microcrack is initiated in the composite, the acoustic signal triggers the node and wakes it up. The node will then react in several microseconds and digitize the signal. The digitized data is sent to the station wirelessly. The developed wireless sensor network system has been validated with microscopy of microcracked samples after temperature and humidity cycling and has proved to be an effective tool for microcracking detection. Furthermore, our low power consumption design and sophisticated wireless transmission mechanism enables a system with great potential for field structural health monitoring applications.

  16. Comparative evaluation of aerospace composites using thermography and ultrasonic NDT techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodorakeas, P.; Avdelidis, N. P.; Hatziioannidis, I.; Cheilakou, E.; Marini, R.; Koui, M.

    2015-05-01

    In the present research work a study was carried out evaluating the applicability of two NDT techniques, this of Transient Thermography (TT) and Ultrasonic Testing (UT) for the inspection of different types of composite materials (i.e. laminated CFRPs, laminated hybrid FRPs and sandwiched panels). The composite structures were consisted of a variety of artificial defects, while inspection was performed through different testing configurations. In particular, transient thermography was implemented through the monitoring of the surface transient cooling after flash heating the samples and ultrasonic testing was applied using both a conventional single element probe (immersion technique) and a linear phased array transducer consisted of 128 elements. The main objective of this work was to compare the applicability and effectiveness of the two techniques in aerospace composites inspection as well as to evaluate the accuracy produced regarding the quantitative characterisation of the detected features. The obtained results showed that all the defects were revealed by either transient thermography or ultrasonic testing, whilst thermographic inspection can display the acquired results in a more rapid manner. On the other hand UT testing can provide efficient results for deeper probing requiring however longer inspection times. In other words, the acquired data and the respective analyses highlighted the different capability of each testing configuration, to detect defects and to gain knowledge for the interior of the structures.

  17. Prediction of Burst Pressure in Multistage Tube Hydroforming of Aerospace Alloys.

    PubMed

    Saboori, M; Gholipour, J; Champliaud, H; Wanjara, P; Gakwaya, A; Savoie, J

    2016-08-01

    Bursting, an irreversible failure in tube hydroforming (THF), results mainly from the local plastic instabilities that occur when the biaxial stresses imparted during the process exceed the forming limit strains of the material. To predict the burst pressure, Oyan's and Brozzo's decoupled ductile fracture criteria (DFC) were implemented as user material models in a dynamic nonlinear commercial 3D finite-element (FE) software, ls-dyna. THF of a round to V-shape was selected as a generic representative of an aerospace component for the FE simulations and experimental trials. To validate the simulation results, THF experiments up to bursting were carried out using Inconel 718 (IN 718) tubes with a thickness of 0.9 mm to measure the internal pressures during the process. When comparing the experimental and simulation results, the burst pressure predicated based on Oyane's decoupled damage criterion was found to agree better with the measured data for IN 718 than Brozzo's fracture criterion.

  18. Prediction of Thermophysical and Thermomechanical Characteristics of Porous Carbon-Ceramic Composite Materials of the Heat Shield of Aerospace Craft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reznik, S. V.; Prosuntsov, P. V.; Mikhailovskii, K. V.

    2015-05-01

    A procedure for predicting thermophysical and thermomechanical characteristics of porous carbon-ceramic composite materials of the heat shield of aerospace craft as functions of the type of reinforcement, porosity of the structure, and the characteristics of the material's components has been developed. Results of mathematical modeling of the temperature and stressed-strained states of representative volume elements for determining the characteristics of a carbon-ceramic composite material with account taken of its anisotropy have been given.

  19. Effect of alloy surface composition on release of elements from dental casting alloys.

    PubMed

    Wataha, J C; Malcolm, C T

    1996-09-01

    The release of elements from dental casting alloys is a continuing concern because of the potentially harmful biological effects the elements may have on local tissues. The surfaces of the alloys appear to be most important in controlling the release of these elements. In the current study, the surfaces of high-, reduced-, and no-gold dental alloys were analysed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy before and after they were exposed to a biological medium for up to 96 h. The goal was to relate the release of elements from these alloys to their surface composition, and to determine the depth of the effect of the medium. The depth of the effect of the exposure was determined by argon milling of the alloy surface after exposure to the medium. Elements that were released into the medium were measured by means of atomic absorption spectroscopy. The release of elements from alloys was greater when the atomic ratio of noble to non-noble elements at the surface was less than 1. The depth of the effect of the medium varied with the alloy, but was always less than 100 A. The surface composition was significantly different from layers only 5 A below. It was concluded that the surface concentration of noble elements is important in controlling the release of non-noble elements from these alloys, and the surface composition appeared to be only one or two atomic layers thick. Of the three types of alloys, the high-gold alloy appeared to develop the most stable surface composition which released the lowest levels of elements.

  20. Composition and bandgap-graded semiconductor alloy nanowires.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Xiujuan; Ning, C Z; Pan, Anlian

    2012-01-03

    Semiconductor alloy nanowires with spatially graded compositions (and bandgaps) provide a new material platform for many new multifunctional optoelectronic devices, such as broadly tunable lasers, multispectral photodetectors, broad-band light emitting diodes (LEDs) and high-efficiency solar cells. In this review, we will summarize the recent progress on composition graded semiconductor alloy nanowires with bandgaps graded in a wide range. Depending on different growth methods and material systems, two typical nanowire composition grading approaches will be presented in detail, including composition graded alloy nanowires along a single substrate and those along single nanowires. Furthermore, selected examples of applications of these composition graded semiconductor nanowires will be presented and discussed, including tunable nanolasers, multi-terminal on-nanowire photodetectors, full-spectrum solar cells, and white-light LEDs. Finally, we will make some concluding remarks with future perspectives including opportunities and challenges in this research area.

  1. AFM study of the effects of laser surface remelting on the morphology of Al-Fe aerospace alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Pariona, Moises Meza; Teleginski, Viviane; Santos, Kelly dos; Leandro Ribeiro dos Santos, Everton; Aparecida de Oliveira Camargo de Lima, Angela; Riva, Rudimar

    2012-12-15

    Laser beam welding has recently been incorporated into the fabrication process of aircraft and automobile structures. Surface roughness is an important parameter of product quality that strongly affects the performance of mechanical parts, as well as production costs. This parameter influences the mechanical properties such as fatigue behavior, corrosion resistance, creep life, etc., and other functional characteristics such as friction, wear, light reflection, heat transmission, lubrification, electrical conductivity, etc. The effects of laser surface remelting (LSR) on the morphology of Al-Fe aerospace alloys were examined before and after surface treatments, using optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), low-angle X-ray diffraction (LA-XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), microhardness measurements (Vickers hardness), and cyclic voltammetry. This analysis was performed on both laser-treated and untreated sanded surfaces, revealing significant differences. The LA-XRD analysis revealed the presence of alumina, simple metals and metastable intermetallic phases, which considerably improved the microhardness of laser-remelted surfaces. The morphology produced by laser surface remelting enhanced the microstructure of the Al-Fe alloys by reducing their roughness and increasing their hardness. The treated surfaces showed passivity and stability characteristics in the electrolytic medium employed in this study. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The samples laser-treated and untreated showed significant differences. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The La-XRD revealed the presence of alumina in Al-1.5 wt.% Fe. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The laser-treated reducing the roughness and increasing the hardness. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The laser-treated surfaces showed characteristic passive in the electrolytic medium. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The laser-treated is a promising technique for applications technological.

  2. Improvement of Strength Characteristics of Aerospace Fiber Reinforced Composite Materials using Atmospheric Pressure Plasma-Graft Polymerization Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoi, Tatsuji; Kuroki, Tomoyuki; Tahara, Mitsuru; Okubo, Masaaki

    The atmospheric pressure nonthermal plasma-graft polymerization treatment is applied for the surface modification of the organic fibers in order to enhance the strength of the aerospace structural composite material consisting of the laminated textiles. The influence of the treatment on the composite materials' strength properties is examined. As a result, the plasma-graft polymerization surface treatment is effective for the compression and bend of the composite materials. Because the interfacial bonding between each fiber and matrix resin is strengthened by the treatment, the strengths of the composite materials are increased.

  3. The aqueous corrosion behavior of technetium - Alloy and composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Jarvinen, G.; Kolman, D.; Taylor, C.; Goff, G.; Cisneros, M.; Mausolf, E.; Poineau, F.; Koury, D.; Czerwinski, K.

    2013-07-01

    Metal waste forms are under study as possible disposal forms for technetium and other fission products. The alloying of Tc is desirable to reduce the melting point of the Tc-containing metal waste form and potentially improve its corrosion resistance. Technetium-nickel composites were made by mixing the two metal powders and pressing the mixture to make a pellet. The as-pressed composite materials were compared to sintered composites and alloys of identical composition in electrochemical corrosion tests. As-pressed samples were not robust enough for fine polishing and only a limited number of corrosion tests were performed. Alloys and composites with 10 wt% Tc appear to be more corrosion resistant at open circuit than the individual components based on linear polarization resistance and polarization data. The addition of 10 wt% Tc to Ni appears beneficial at open circuit, but detrimental upon anodic polarization. Qualitatively, the polarizations of 10 wt% Tc alloys and composites appear like crude addition of Tc plus Ni. The 1 wt% Tc alloys behave like pure Ni, but some effect of Tc is seen upon polarization. Cathodic polarization of Tc by Ni appears feasible based on open circuit potential measurements, however, zero resistance ammetry and solution measurements are necessary to confirm cathodic protection.

  4. Real-Time Radiographic In-Situ Characterization Of Ply Lift In Composite Aerospace Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beshears, Ronald D.; Doering, Edward R.

    2006-01-01

    The problem of ply lifting in composite materials is a significant issue for various aerospace and military applications. A fundamental element in the prevention or mitigation of ply lift is determination of the timing of the ply lifting event during exposure of the composite material to flight conditions. The Marshall Space Flight Center s Nondestructive Evaluation Team developed a real-time radiographic technique for the detection of ply lift in carbon phenolic ablative materials in situ during live firings of subscale test motors in support of NASA s Reusable Solid Rocket Motor program, using amorphous silicon detector panels. The radiographic method has successfully detected ply lifting in seven consecutive carbon phenolic converging cones attached to solid fuel torches, providing the time of ply lift initiation in each test. Post-processing of the radiographic images improved the accuracy of timing measurements and allowed measurement of the ply lifting height as a function of time. Radiographic data correlated well with independent pressure and temperature measurements that indicate the onset of ply lift in the nozzle material.

  5. Thermal Performance of Composite Flexible Blanket Insulations for Hypersonic Aerospace Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, Demetrius A.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the thermal performance of a Composite Flexible Blanket Insulation (C.F.B.I.) considered for potential use as a thermal protection system or thermal insulation for future hypersonic vehicles such as the National Aerospace Plane (N.A.S.P.). Thermophysical properties for these insulations were also measured including the thermal conductivity at various temperatures and pressures and the emissivity of the fabrics used in the flexible insulations. The thermal response of these materials subjected to aeroconvective heating from a plasma arc is also described. Materials tested included two surface variations of the insulations, and similar insulations coated with a Protective Ceramic Coating (P.C.C.). Surface and backface temperatures were measured in the flexible insulations and on Fibrous Refractory Composite Insulation (F.R.C.I.) used as a calibration model. The uncoated flexible insulations exhibited good thermal performance up to 35 W/sq cm. The use of a P.C.C. to protect these insulations at higher heating rates is described. The results from a computerized thermal analysis model describing thermal response of those materials subjected to the plasma arc conditions are included. Thermal and optical properties were determined including thermal conductivity for the rigid and flexible insulations and emissivity for the insulation fabrics. These properties were utilized to calculate the thermal performance of the rigid and flexible insulations at the maximum heating rate.

  6. Advances in SiC/SiC Composites for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiCarlo, James A.

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, supported by a variety of materials development programs, NASA Glenn Research Center has significantly increased the thermostructural capability of SiC/SiC composite materials for high-temperature aerospace applications. These state-of-the-art advances have occurred in every key constituent of the composite: fiber, fiber coating, matrix, and environmental barrier coating, as well as processes for forming the fiber architectures needed for complex-shaped components such as turbine vanes for gas turbine engines. This presentation will briefly elaborate on the nature of these advances in terms of performance data and underlying mechanisms. Based on a list of first-order property goals for typical high-temperature applications, key data from a variety of laboratory tests are presented which demonstrate that the NASA-developed constituent materials and processes do indeed result in SiC/SiC systems with the desired thermal and structural capabilities. Remaining process and microstructural issues for further property enhancement are discussed, as well as on-going approaches at NASA to solve these issues. NASA efforts to develop physics-based property models that can be used not only for component design and life modeling, but also for constituent material and process improvement will also be discussed.

  7. Fiber Bragg Grating Sensor System for Monitoring Smart Composite Aerospace Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moslehi, Behzad; Black, Richard J.; Gowayed, Yasser

    2012-01-01

    Lightweight, electromagnetic interference (EMI) immune, fiber-optic, sensor- based structural health monitoring (SHM) will play an increasing role in aerospace structures ranging from aircraft wings to jet engine vanes. Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensors for SHM include advanced signal processing, system and damage identification, and location and quantification algorithms. Potentially, the solution could be developed into an autonomous onboard system to inspect and perform non-destructive evaluation and SHM. A novel method has been developed to massively multiplex FBG sensors, supported by a parallel processing interrogator, which enables high sampling rates combined with highly distributed sensing (up to 96 sensors per system). The interrogation system comprises several subsystems. A broadband optical source subsystem (BOSS) and routing and interface module (RIM) send light from the interrogation system to a composite embedded FBG sensor matrix, which returns measurand-dependent wavelengths back to the interrogation system for measurement with subpicometer resolution. In particular, the returned wavelengths are channeled by the RIM to a photonic signal processing subsystem based on powerful optical chips, then passed through an optoelectronic interface to an analog post-detection electronics subsystem, digital post-detection electronics subsystem, and finally via a data interface to a computer. A range of composite structures has been fabricated with FBGs embedded. Stress tensile, bending, and dynamic strain tests were performed. The experimental work proved that the FBG sensors have a good level of accuracy in measuring the static response of the tested composite coupons (down to submicrostrain levels), the capability to detect and monitor dynamic loads, and the ability to detect defects in composites by a variety of methods including monitoring the decay time under different dynamic loading conditions. In addition to quasi-static and dynamic load monitoring, the

  8. Al and Mg Alloys for Aerospace Applications Using Rapid Solidification and Powder Metallurgy Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-28

    might exhibit high elastic moduli , and the second concerned the improvement in fracture toughness when Si is added to ALFe- Mo alloys. It was found that...however, the elastic modulus3 was about the same. Fractography revealed that the failure mode for both materials was by void coalescence. Extruded Al-3.7Be...Cast Al-4.8Be* U Elastic Modulus 71.5 GPa 74.4 GPa Yield Strength 126 MPa 127 MPa Ultimate Strength 163 MPa 120 MPa Reduction in Area 83% 30%3 True

  9. Mechanical Properties of Particulate Reinforced Aluminium Alloy Matrix Composite

    SciTech Connect

    Sayuti, M.; Sulaiman, S.; Baharudin, B. T. H. T.; Arifin, M. K. A.; Suraya, S.; Vijayaram, T. R.

    2011-01-17

    This paper discusses the mechanical properties of Titanium Carbide (TiC) particulate reinforced aluminium-silicon alloy matrix composite. TiC particulate reinforced LM6 alloy matrix composites were fabricated by carbon dioxide sand molding process with different particulate weight fraction. Tensile strength, hardness and microstructure studies were conducted to determine the maximum load, tensile strength, modulus of elasticity and fracture surface analysis have been performed to characterize the morphological aspects of the test samples after tensile testing. Hardness values are measured for the TiC reinforced LM6 alloy composites and it has been found that it gradually increases with increased addition of the reinforcement phase. The tensile strength of the composites increased with the increase percentage of TiC particulate.

  10. System integration and demonstration of adhesive bonded high temperature aluminum alloys for aerospace structure, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falcone, Anthony; Laakso, John H.

    1993-01-01

    Adhesive bonding materials and processes were evaluated for assembly of future high-temperature aluminum alloy structural components such as may be used in high-speed civil transport aircraft and space launch vehicles. A number of candidate high-temperature adhesives were selected and screening tests were conducted using single lap shear specimens. The selected adhesives were then used to bond sandwich (titanium core) test specimens, adhesive toughness test specimens, and isothermally aged lap shear specimens. Moderate-to-high lap shear strengths were obtained from bonded high-temperature aluminum and silicon carbide particulate-reinforced (SiC(sub p)) aluminum specimens. Shear strengths typically exceeded 3500 to 4000 lb/in(sup 2) and flatwise tensile strengths exceeded 750 lb/in(sup 2) even at elevated temperatures (300 F) using a bismaleimide adhesive. All faceskin-to-core bonds displayed excellent tear strength. The existing production phosphoric acid anodize surface preparation process developed at Boeing was used, and gave good performance with all of the aluminum and silicon carbide particulate-reinforced aluminum alloys investigated. The results of this program support using bonded assemblies of high-temperature aluminum components in applications where bonding is often used (e.g., secondary structures and tear stoppers).

  11. The Role of the Interface in Refractory Metal Alloy Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grobstein, Toni; Yun, Hee M.

    1991-01-01

    Creep-rupture and tensile tests have been used to evaluate thoriated W-wire reinforced Nb-1 percent Zr alloy matrix composites fabricated via arc-spray monotape technique. A significant creep strength enhancement was observed over the unreinforced matrix alloy while matrix integrity was maintained; the fiber/matrix interface phase is noted to be a strong and ductile W/Nb alloy, which is formed due to the mutual solubility of the constituent metals. High strength, toughness, and thermal stability are demonstrated by this material system, which is also resistant to liquid alkali metal corrosion.

  12. Analysis and Evaluation of Novel Al-Mg-Sc-Zr Aerospace Alloy Strip Produced Using the Horizontal Single Belt Casting (HSBC) Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Sa; Celikin, Mert; Isac, Mihaiela; Guthrie, Roderick I. L.

    2015-04-01

    Horizontal single belt casting (HSBC) is a near net shape casting process in which molten metal is directly cast into thin strips, at high cooling rates (order of several 100 °C/s), with the potential for high volume, friction free, continuous production of metal strips. This casting process was used in the present work to produce strips of Al-Mg alloys in the AA5000 series, with additions of Sc and Zr. Such aluminum alloys show exceptional potential as a structural material for transportation/aerospace applications. To demonstrate the suitability of the HSBC process to manufacture competitive strip products of Al-Mg-Sc-Zr, the mechanical properties and microstructures of the strips produced using the HSBC process were compared with conventionally cast products. The effects of annealing on the mechanical properties of the strip-cast Al-Mg-Sc-Zr alloys were also investigated.

  13. Self-Repairing Fatigue Damage in Metallic Structures for Aerospace Vehicles Using Shape Memory Alloy Self-healing (SMASH) Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, M. Clara; Manuel, Michele; Wallace, Terryl; Newman, Andy; Brinson, Kate

    2015-01-01

    This DAA is for the Phase II webinar presentation of the ARMD-funded SMASH technology. A self-repairing aluminum-based composite system has been developed using liquid-assisted healing theory in conjunction with the shape memory effect of wire reinforcements. The metal matrix composite was thermodynamically designed to have a matrix with a relatively even dispersion of low-melting phase, allowing for repair of cracks at a pre-determined temperature. Shape memory alloy wire reinforcements were used within the composite to provide crack closure. Investigators focused the research on fatigue cracks propagating through the matrix in order to optimize and computer model the SMASH technology for aeronautical applications.

  14. Validating finite element models of composite aerospace structures for damage detection applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, J. A.; Kosmatka, J. B.; Hemez, François M.; Farrar, Charles R.

    2006-03-01

    Carbon-fiber-reinforced-polymer (CFRP) composites represent the future for advanced lightweight aerospace structures. However, reliable and cost-effective techniques for structural health monitoring (SHM) are needed. Modal and vibration-based analysis, when combined with validated finite element (FE) models, can provide a key tool for SHM. Finite element models, however, can easily give spurious and misleading results if not finely tuned and validated. These problems are amplified in complex structures with numerous joints and interfaces. A small series of all-composite test pieces emulating wings from a lightweight all-composite Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) have been developed to support damage detection and SHM research. Each wing comprises two CFRP prepreg and Nomex honeycomb co-cured skins and two CFRP prepreg spars bonded together in a secondary process using a structural adhesive to form the complete wings. The first of the set is fully healthy while the rest have damage in the form of disbonds built into the main spar-skin bondline. Detailed FE models were created of the four structural components and the assembled structure. Each wing component piece was subjected to modal characterization via vibration testing using a shaker and scanning laser Doppler vibrometer before assembly. These results were then used to correlate the FE model on a component-basis, through fitting and optimization of polynomial meta-models. Assembling and testing the full wing provided subsequent data that was used to validate the numerical model of the entire structure, assembled from the correlated component models. The correlation process led to the following average percent improvement between experimental and FE frequencies of the first 20 modes for each piece: top skin 10.98%, bottom skin 45.62%, main spar 25.56%, aft spar 10.79%. The assembled wing model with no further correlation showed an improvement of 32.60%.

  15. The effect of alloy composition on the localized corrosion behavior of nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Fariaty

    Ni-Cr-Mo alloys are one of the most versatile Ni-based alloys because they resist corrosion in a variety of environments. This versatility is due to the combination of Cr and Mo additions to the alloy. These alloying elements complement each other in producing a highly corrosion resistant alloy. The concentration of the elements in the alloy establishes the corrosion behavior of these alloys. In this study, Ni-Cr-Mo alloys with varying composition were studied using electrochemical methods. The dependency of pitting corrosion on the alloy chemistry was captured in empirical models that roughly rank the pitting susceptibility of the Ni-Cr-Mo alloys studied. The same type of model was also constructed for capturing the effect of alloy composition on the repassivation potential. It was found that these models were specific in terms of alloying element effects on the type of environments exposed to the alloys particularly, pH and temperature. The addition of chromium was shown to contribute to the higher pitting potential on the Ni-Cr-Mo alloys in neural chloride environment while molybdenum was dominant in acidified chloride solutions. In regards to the repassivation potential, both chromium and molybdenum affect the repassivation potential more or less evenly in neutral pH solutions. Under low pH high temperature conditions, molybdenum content has a greater effect on the repassivation potential value than chromium. Stabilization of localized corrosion is increasingly difficult as alloying element content increases. However, metastable pitting occurs in most alloys and the metastable pitting behavior of several Ni-Cr-Mo alloys was studied through potentiostatic analysis. Higher chromium and molybdenum contents decreased the metastable pitting incidence; although, the effect of Mo content was observed to be more dominant. Molybdenum additions were found to suppress the growth of the metastable pits. The growth rate of the fastest growing pits was also reduced by

  16. Intelligent Multi-scale Sensors for Damage Identification and Mitigation in Woven Composites for Aerospace Structural Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-15

    resulting from project: Journal Publications 1. R. Garret , K. Peters and M. A. Zikry (2009), “In-situ Impact-induced Damage Assessment of Woven...Polymer Composites,” to be submitted. Conference Proceedings Publications 1. R. Garret , J. Pearson, K. Peters and M. Zikry (2007...Structures Technologies for Civil, Mechanical and Aerospace Systems, Smart Materials and Structures, San Diego, CA, 6529. 2. R. Garret , K. Peters

  17. Conference on Occupational Health Aspects of Advanced Composite Technology in the Aerospace Industry Held in Dayton, Ohio on 6-9 February 1989. Volume 1. Executive Summary

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-01

    ITIC FILE (MOPY AAMR1I.TR49OO8 o CONFERENCE ON OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH ASPECTS OF ADVANCED N COMPOSITE TECHNOLOGY IN THE AEROSPACE INDUSTRY VOLUME I...ADDRESS -(City. S00,SANIZI CO*e) 10. SOURCE OF FUNDING NUMBERS PROGRAM PROJECT TASK WORK UNIT ELEMENT NO. NO. NO ACCESSION NO. -- COFREC ON OCCUPs ~cls...conference on the Occupational Health Aspects of Advanced Composite Materials in% the Aerospace Industry, 6-9 February 989, in Dayton, Ohio. The

  18. Mechanochromic Fluorescent Probe Molecules for Damage Detection in Aerospace Polymers and Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toivola, Ryan E.

    The detection of damage in aerospace composites can be improved by incorporation of mechanochromic fluorescent probe molecules into the polymers used in composite parts. This study focuses on a novel series of mechanochromic probes, AJNDE15 and AJNDE17, which are incorporated in structural epoxy resin DGEBA-DETA. Chapter 1 details the characterization of the DGEBA-DETA epoxy system used in this study. The important characteristics of DGEBA-DETA's response to mechanical loading will be discussed within the larger field of glassy amorphous polymer deformation. The mechanical, thermal, and chemical properties of DGEBA-DETA relevant to this work will be measured using standardized techniques and instrumentation. Chapters 2 and 3 focus on the mechanochromic probes AJNDE15 and AJNDE17 in the DGEBA-DETA system. Chapter 2 presents research designed to identify the mechanism through which the probes display mechanochromism. The possible mechanochromic mechanisms are introduced in a literature review. Research on these probes in DGEBA-DETA will be presented and discussed with respect to the possible mechanisms, and the mechanism that best fits the results will be identified as a mechanochemical reaction. Chapter 3 continues the analysis of the mechanochromism of the probes in DGEBA-DETA. The kinetics of the mechanochromic reaction will be studied and compared with the current understanding of glassy polymer deformation. Possible models for the molecular interactions responsible for mechanochromism in this system will be put forward. Research will be presented to evaluate the mechanochromism kinetics and for comparison with the behavior predicted by the models.

  19. Novel Diels-Alder based self-healing epoxies for aerospace composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coope, T. S.; Turkenburg, D. H.; Fischer, H. R.; Luterbacher, R.; van Bracht, H.; Bond, I. P.

    2016-08-01

    Epoxy resins containing Diels-Alder (DA) furan and maleimide moieties are presented with the capability to self-heal after exposure to an external heat source. A conventional epoxy amine system has been combined with furfuryl and maleimide functional groups in a two-step process, to avoid major side-reactions, and the concentration of a thermo-reversibly binding cross-linker was considered to balance thermoset and thermoplastic behaviours, and the subsequent self-healing performance. In the context of self-repair technologies an inbuilt ‘intrinsic’ self-healing system is deemed favourable as the healing agent can be placed in known ‘hot spot’ regions (i.e. skin-stringer run outs, ply drops and around drilled holes) where operational damage predominately occurs in load bearing aerospace structures. In this study, the mechanical and self-healing performance of furan functionalised epoxy resins containing varying amounts (10, 20, 30 or 40 pph) of bismaleimide were investigated using a bulk epoxy polymer tapered double cantilever beam test specimen geometry. Two forms, a thin film and a bulk material, were evaluated to account for future integration methods into fibre reinforced polymer (FRP) composites. The highest healing efficiency, with respect to the obtained initial load value, was observed from the 20 pph bulk material derivative. The polymers were successful in achieving consistent multiple (three) healing cycles when heated at 150 °C for 5 min. This novel investigated DA material exhibits favourable processing characteristics for FRP composites as preliminary studies have shown successful coextrution with reinforcing fibres to form free standing films and dry fibre impregnation.

  20. Ion Nitriding of Ti-10V-2Fe-3Al Alloy for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Jin

    In this study, a low-temperature ion nitriding treatment has been developed with the aim of improving the sliding behaviour of Ti-10V-2Fe-3Al, without adverse effects on its strength and ductility. The optimized nitriding treatment was carried out at a temperature of 600°C for 8 hours in a pressure dilute nitriding atmosphere of 67 Pa and 2.9 vol.% N2. The microstructural analysis indicated that the ion nitriding treatment led to the formation of a 0.5 mum thick compound layer. The microhardness measurements revealed the formation of an approximately 35 mum thick nitrogen diffusion zone beneath the compound layer. The tensile test results showed improvements in the tensile and yield strengths of the alloy with a minor decrease in the elongation. The load bearing capacity and friction properties of the nitrided surfaces under sliding were investigated by microscratch tests. It was found that the coefficient of friction values were reduced and the surfaces exhibited an excellent load bearing capacity.

  1. Progress toward a tungsten alloy wire/high temperature alloy composite turbine blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritzert, F. J.; Dreshfield, R. L.

    1992-01-01

    A tungsten alloy wire reinforced high temperature alloy composite is being developed for potential application as a hollow turbine blade for advanced rocket engine turbopumps. The W-24Re-HfC alloy wire used for these composite blades provides an excellent balance of strength and wire ductility. Preliminary fabrication, specimen design, and characterization studies were conducted by using commercially available W218 tungsten wire in place of the W-24Re-Hfc wire. Subsequently, two-ply, 50 vol pct composite panels using the W-24Re-HfC wire were fabricated. Tensile tests and metallographic studies were performed to determine the material viability. Tensile strengths of a Waspaloy matrix composite at 870 C were 90 pct of the value expected from rule-of-mixtures calculations. During processing of this Waspaloy matrix composite, a brittle phase was formed at the wire/matrix interface. Circumferential wire cracks were found in this phase. Wire coating and process evaluation efforts were performed in an attempt to solve the reaction problem. Although problems were encountered in this study, wire reinforced high temperature alloy composites continue to show promise for turbopump turbine blade material improvement.

  2. The kinetics of composite particle formation during mechanical alloying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aikin, B. J. M.; Courtney, T. H.

    1993-01-01

    The kinetics of composite particle formation during attritor milling of insoluble binary elemental powders have been examined. The effects of processing conditions (i.e., mill power, temperature, and charge ratio) on these kinetics were studied. Particle size distributions and fractions of elemental and composite particles were determined as functions of milling time and processing conditions. This allowed the deduction of phenomenological rate constants describing the propensity for fracture and welding during processing. For the mill-operating conditions investigated, the number of particles in the mill generally decreased with milling time, indicating a greater tendency for particle welding than fracture. Moreover, a bimodal size distribution is often obtained as a result of preferential welding. Copper and chromium 'alloy' primarily by encapsulation of Cr particles within Cu. This form of alloying also occurs in Cu-Nb alloys processed at low mill power and/or for short milling times. For other conditions, however, Cu-Nb alloys develop a lamellar morphology characteristic of mechanically alloyed two-phase ductile metals. Increasing mill power or charge (ball-to-powder weight) ratio (CR) increases the rate of composite particle formation.

  3. Structural Acoustic Response of Shape Memory Alloy Hybrid Composite Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L.

    1996-01-01

    A method has been developed to predict the structural acoustic response of shape memory alloy hybrid composite panels subjected to acoustic excitation. The panel is modeled by a finite element analysis and the radiated field is predicted using Rayleigh's integral. Transmission loss predictions for the case of an aluminum panel excited by a harmonic acoustic pressure are shown to compare very well with a classical analysis. Predictions of the normal velocity response and transmitted acoustic pressure for a clamped aluminum panel show excellent agreement with experimental measurements. Predicted transmission loss performance for a composite panel with and without shape memory alloy reinforcement are also presented. The preliminary results demonstrate that the transmission loss can be significantly increased with shape memory alloy reinforcement.

  4. NASA-UVA Light Aerospace Alloy and Structures Technology Program (LA2ST). Supplement: Research on Materials for the High Speed Civil Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, Richard P.; Starke, Edgar A., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    This report documents the progress achieved over the past 6 to 12 months on four graduate student projects conducted within the NASA-UVA Light Aerospace Alloy and Structures Technology Program. These studies were aimed specifically at light metallic alloy issues relevant to the High Speed Civil Transport. Research on Hydrogen-Enhanced Fracture of High-Strength Titanium Alloy Sheet refined successfully the high resolution R-curve method necessary to characterize initiation and growth fracture toughnesses. For solution treated and aged Low Cost Beta without hydrogen precharging, fracture is by ductile transgranular processes at 25 C, but standardized initiation toughnesses are somewhat low and crack extension is resolved at still lower K-levels. This fracture resistance is degraded substantially, by between 700 and 1000 wppm of dissolved hydrogen, and a fracture mode change is affected. The surface oxide on P-titanium alloys hinders hydrogen uptake and complicates the electrochemical introduction of low hydrogen concentrations that are critical to applications of these alloys. Ti-15-3 sheet was obtained for study during the next reporting period. Research on Mechanisms of deformation and Fracture in High-Strength Titanium Alloys is examining the microstructure and fatigue resistance of very thin sheet. Aging experiments on 0. 14 mm thick (0.0055 inch) foil show microstructural agility that may be used to enhance fatigue performance. Fatigue testing of Ti-15-3 sheet has begun. The effects of various thermo-mechanical processing regimens on mechanical properties will be examined and deformation modes identified. Research on the Effect of Texture and Precipitates on Mechanical Property Anisotropy of Al-Cu-Mg-X and Al-Cu alloys demonstrated that models predict a minor influence of stress-induced alignment of Phi, caused by the application of a tensile stress during aging, on the yield stress anisotropy of both modified AA2519 and a model Al-Cu binary alloy. This project

  5. The influence of alloy composition and casting procedure upon the corrosion behaviour of dental alloys: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Mülders, C; Darwish, M; Holze, R

    1996-12-01

    The influence of the composition and the casting process upon the electrochemical corrosion of a selection of palladium-based alloys and non-precious metal alloys has been investigated in vitro using an electrochemical method. No influence of the casting process upon the corrosion resistance was observed with palladium-based alloys. Changes in the crystallographic structure effected by the different composition of the alloys were found, the casting process did not cause significant effects. With nickel-chromium alloys rather low corrosion stabilities were observed.

  6. A Unified Model for Predicting the Open Hole Tensile and Compressive Strengths of Composite Laminates for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Paul; Pineda, Evan J.; Heinrich, Christian; Waas, Anthony M.

    2013-01-01

    The open hole tensile and compressive strengths are important design parameters in qualifying fiber reinforced laminates for a wide variety of structural applications in the aerospace industry. In this paper, we present a unified model that can be used for predicting both these strengths (tensile and compressive) using the same set of coupon level, material property data. As a prelude to the unified computational model that follows, simplified approaches, referred to as "zeroth order", "first order", etc. with increasing levels of fidelity are first presented. The results and methods presented are practical and validated against experimental data. They serve as an introductory step in establishing a virtual building block, bottom-up approach to designing future airframe structures with composite materials. The results are useful for aerospace design engineers, particularly those that deal with airframe design.

  7. Wear behavior of Al-Si alloy based metal matrix composite reinforced with TiB2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, J. K.; Sahoo, S. K.; Sutar, H.; Sarangi, B.

    2017-02-01

    Al-Si alloy based composites are widely used in automotive, aerospace and for structural application due to improved strength to weight ratio, low density, and better wear resistance. In the present work, Al-xSi-5TiB2 (x=7, 11, 12.6) in-situ composite was synthesized successfully by stir casting method. Here the composites were prepared by the exothermic reaction of K2TiF6 and KBF4 salts with the molten Al-x Si alloy. The dry sliding wear behavior of Al-Si matrix composites reinforced with 5 % TiB2 was studied using a pin-on-disc wear testing machine to study the effect of % Si, load (10, 20, 30 N), sliding speed (1.36, 1.82, 2.27 m.s-1) and sliding distance on stir cast Al–xSi-5TiB2 composites. The Al-Si alloy and the reinforcement mixers were confirmed by the X-ray Diffraction analysis. The microstructure of Al-xSi-5TiB2 composite was investigated by using Optical Microscope to determine the phases present in the prepared composites. The prepared AMC composites were tested for hardness using Vickers Hardness tester with the variation of Si. Wear rate (mm3/m), Wear resistance (m/mm3), Specific Wear rate (m3/N.m) and were analyzed with various conditions. The worn surfaces of the specimens were analyzed before and after wear testing by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) to determine the governing wear mechanisms in the composites. Wear rate and specific wear rate decreases at all the operating condition with increase in wt% Si. Wear resistance all most increases with increase in wt% Si. Hardness values are increased with increase in amount of Si.

  8. Research Developments in Nondestructive Evaluation and Structural Health Monitoring for the Sustainment of Composite Aerospace Structures at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cramer, K. Elliott

    2016-01-01

    The use of composite materials continues to increase in the aerospace community due to the potential benefits of reduced weight, increased strength, and manufacturability. Ongoing work at NASA involves the use of the large-scale composite structures for spacecraft (payload shrouds, cryotanks, crew modules, etc). NASA is also working to enable both the use and sustainment of composites in commercial aircraft structures. One key to the sustainment of these large composite structures is the rapid, in-situ characterization of a wide range of potential defects that may occur during the vehicle's life. Additionally, in many applications it is necessary to monitor changes in these materials over their lifetime. Quantitative characterization through Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) of defects such as reduced bond strength, microcracking, and delamination damage due to impact, are of particular interest. This paper will present an overview of NASA's applications of NDE technologies being developed for the characterization and sustainment of advanced aerospace composites. The approaches presented include investigation of conventional, guided wave, and phase sensitive ultrasonic methods and infrared thermography techniques for NDE. Finally, the use of simulation tools for optimizing and validating these techniques will also be discussed.

  9. Functionally Graded Al Alloy Matrix In-Situ Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, S.; Subramaniya Sarma, V.; Murty, B. S.

    2010-01-01

    In the present work, functionally graded (FG) aluminum alloy matrix in-situ composites (FG-AMCs) with TiB2 and TiC reinforcements were synthesized using the horizontal centrifugal casting process. A commercial Al-Si alloy (A356) and an Al-Cu alloy were used as matrices in the present study. The material parameters (such as matrix and reinforcement type) and process parameters (such as mold temperature, mold speed, and melt stirring) were found to influence the gradient in the FG-AMCs. Detailed microstructural analysis of the composites in different processing conditions revealed that the gradients in the reinforcement modify the microstructure and hardness of the Al alloy. The segregated in-situ formed TiB2 and TiC particles change the morphology of Si particles during the solidification of Al-Si alloy. A maximum of 20 vol pct of reinforcement at the surface was achieved by this process in the Al-4Cu-TiB2 system. The stirring of the melt before pouring causes the reinforcement particles to segregate at the periphery of the casting, while in the absence of such stirring, the particles are segregated at the interior of the casting.

  10. ALLOY COMPOSITION FOR NEUTRONIC REACTOR CONTROL RODS

    DOEpatents

    Lustman, B.; Losco, E.F.; Snyder, H.J.; Eggleston, R.R.

    1963-01-22

    This invention relates to alloy compositons suitable as cortrol rod material consisting of, by weight, from 85% to 85% Ag, from 2% to 20% In, from up to 10% of Cd, from up to 5% Sn, and from up to 1.5% Al, the amount of each element employed being determined by the equation X + 2Y + 3Z + 3W + 4V = 1.4 and less, where X, Y, Z, W, and V represent the atom fractions of the elements Ag, Cd, In, Al and Sn. (AEC)

  11. Tungsten wire-nickel base alloy composite development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brentnall, W. D.; Moracz, D. J.

    1976-01-01

    Further development and evaluation of refractory wire reinforced nickel-base alloy composites is described. Emphasis was placed on evaluating thermal fatigue resistance as a function of matrix alloy composition, fabrication variables and reinforcement level and distribution. Tests for up to 1,000 cycles were performed and the best system identified in this current work was 50v/o W/NiCrAlY. Improved resistance to thermal fatigue damage would be anticipated for specimens fabricated via optimized processing schedules. Other properties investigated included 1,093 C (2,000 F) stress rupture strength, impact resistance and static air oxidation. A composite consisting of 30v/o W-Hf-C alloy fibers in a NiCrAlY alloy matrix was shown to have a 100-hour stress rupture strength at 1,093 C (2,000 F) of 365 MN/square meters (53 ksi) or a specific strength advantage of about 3:1 over typical D.S. eutectics.

  12. Laser-surface-alloyed carbon nanotubes reinforced hydroxyapatite composite coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Yao; Gan Cuihua; Zhang Tainua; Yu Gang; Bai Pucun; Kaplan, Alexander

    2005-06-20

    Carbon-nanotube (CNT)-reinforced hydroxyapatite composite coatings have been fabricated by laser surface alloying. Microstructural observation using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy showed that a large amount of CNTs remained with their original tubular morphology, even though some CNTs reacted with titanium element in the substrate during laser irradiation. Additionally, measurements on the elastic modulus and hardness of the composite coatings indicated that the mechanical properties were affected by the amount of CNTs in the starting precursor materials. Therefore, CNT-reinforced hydroxyapatite composite is a promising coating material for high-load-bearing metal implants.

  13. Laser-surface-alloyed carbon nanotubes reinforced hydroxyapatite composite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yao; Gan, Cuihua; Zhang, Tainua; Yu, Gang; Bai, Pucun; Kaplan, Alexander

    2005-06-01

    Carbon-nanotube (CNT)-reinforced hydroxyapatite composite coatings have been fabricated by laser surface alloying. Microstructural observation using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy showed that a large amount of CNTs remained with their original tubular morphology, even though some CNTs reacted with titanium element in the substrate during laser irradiation. Additionally, measurements on the elastic modulus and hardness of the composite coatings indicated that the mechanical properties were affected by the amount of CNTs in the starting precursor materials. Therefore, CNT-reinforced hydroxyapatite composite is a promising coating material for high-load-bearing metal implants.

  14. Metal Alloy Compositions And Process Background Of The Invention

    DOEpatents

    Flemings, Merton C.; Martinez-Ayers, Raul A.; de Figueredo, Anacleto M.; Yurko, James A.

    2003-11-11

    A skinless metal alloy composition free of entrapped gas and comprising primary solid discrete degenerate dendrites homogeneously dispersed within a secondary phase is formed by a process wherein the metal alloy is heated in a vessel to render it a liquid. The liquid is then rapidly cooled while vigorously agitating it under conditions to avoid entrapment of gas while forming solid nuclei homogeneously distributed in the liquid. Agitation then is ceased when the liquid contains a small fraction solid or the liquid-solid alloy is removed from the source of agitation while cooling is continued to form the primary solid discrete degenerate dendrites in liquid secondary phase. The solid-liquid mixture then can be formed such as by casting.

  15. Refractory metal alloys and composites for space power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, R.; Petrasek, D. W.; Titran, R. H.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented on recent studies of refractory-metal-alloy and refractory-metal-composite technologies for space power systems, with emphasis on work performed at the Lewis Research Center in support of the Ground Engineering System (GES) for the SP-100 reactor. Special attention is given to the mechanical properties of alloys with compositions Nb-1Zr and Nb-0.1Zr-0.1C (the PWC-11 alloy) and to advanced fiber-reinforced composites. The results to date indicate that, for the GES at a power level of about 100 kWe, the PWC-11 has attractive creep properties that will extend the capabilities of the SP-100 reactor compared to a similar system fabricated from Nb-1Zr. On the other hand, tungsten-reinforced Nb-1Zr composites were found to provide a ten-fold and four-fold creep strength over Nb-1Zr and PWC-11, respectively, at 1400 to 1500 K.

  16. Phase Composition and Microstructure of Ti-Nb Alloy Produced by Selective Laser Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharkeev, Yu P.; Eroshenko, A. Yu; Kovalevskaya, Zh G.; Saprykin, A. A.; Ibragimov, E. A.; Glukhov, I. A.; Chimich, M. A.; Uvarkin, P. V.; Babakova, E. V.

    2016-07-01

    The phase composition and microstructure of Ti-Nb alloy produced from composite titanium and niobium powder by selective laser melting (SLM) was studied. Produced monolayered Ti-Nb alloy enhanced the formation of fine-grained and medium-grained zones with homogeneous element composition of 36-38% Nb mass interval. Alloy phase composition responded to β-alloy substrate phase (grain size was 5-7 pm) and non-equilibrium martensite α"- phase (grain size was 0.1-0.7 µm). α"-phase grains were found along β-phase grain boundaries and inside grains, including decreased niobium content. Alloy microhardness varied within 4200-5500 MPa.

  17. A review on the fabrication method of bio-sourced hybrid composites for aerospace and automotive applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zin, M. H.; Razzi, M. F.; Othman, S.; Liew, K.; Abdan, K.; Mazlan, N.

    2016-10-01

    Development of bio-sourced materials over the recent years has shown growing interests due to their eco-friendly characteristics. The combination of bio-sourced material such as kenaf, jute, sisal and many more into current synthetic fibres such as glass and carbon fibre, which is also known as hybrid composites, offers several significant benefits including sustainability, cost reduction, product variety and high specific mechanical properties. There are many methods used to fabricate composite parts nowadays. However, each method has its own requirement and usability. This review paper intends to focus on suitable technique to be adopted in order to fabricate bio-sourced hybrid composites. Some of the fabrication methods are customized in order to suit with the application of natural fibres. The selected methods are also highlighted with the application in aerospace and automotive industry. The process and outcomes are presented comparatively.

  18. Wear Behavior of Aluminum Alloy 6061-Based Composites Reinforced with SiC, Al2O3, and Red Mud: A Comparative Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singla, Yogesh Kumar; Chhibber, Rahul; Bansal, Hitesh; Kalra, Anil

    2015-09-01

    Metal-matrix composites are widely used in shipping, aerospace, automotive, and nuclear applications. Research attempts have been made in the past to reduce the cost of processing of composites, decrease the weight of the composites, and increase the desired performance characteristics. In this research article, an attempt has been made in using red mud obtained as an industrial waste during the production of aluminum from bauxite ore. This article discusses the novel findings of the experimental study on the dry sliding wear behavior of aluminum alloy 6061-based composites reinforced individually with red mud, SiC, and Al2O3. The microstructural characterization of the composites provides the further insight into the structure—wear behavior of the processed composites.

  19. Composite of coated magnetic alloy particle

    DOEpatents

    Moorhead, Arthur J.; Kim, Hyoun-Ee

    2000-01-01

    A composite structure and method for manufacturing same, the composite structure being comprised of metal particles and an inorganic bonding media. The method comprises the steps of coating particles of a metal powder with a thin layer of an inorganic bonding media selected from the group of powders consisting of a ceramic, glass, and glass-ceramic. The particles are assembled in a cavity and heat, with or without the addition of pressure, is thereafter applied to the particles until the layer of inorganic bonding media forms a strong bond with the particles and with the layer of inorganic bonding media on adjacent particles. The resulting composite structure is strong and remains cohesive at high temperatures.

  20. AI-Li/SiCp composites and Ti-AI alloy powders and coatings prepared by a plasma spray atomization (PSA) technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khor, K. A.; Boey, F. Y. C.; Murakoshi, Y.; Sano, T.

    1994-06-01

    There has been increasing use of Al-Li alloys in the aerospace industry, due mainly to the low density and high elastic modulus of this material. However, the problem of low ductility and fracture toughness of this material has limited its present application to only weight- and stiffness-critical components. Development of Al-Li/ceramic composites is currently being investigated to enhance the service capabilities of this material. The Ti-Al alloy is also of interest to aerospace-type applications, engine components in particular, due to its attractive high-temperature properties. Preparation of fine powders by plasma melting of composite feedstock and coatings formed by plasma spraying was carried out to examine the effect of spray parameters on the microstructure and properties of these materials. Characterization of the powders and coatings was performed using the scanning electron microscope and image analyzer. Examination of the plasma-sprayed powders and coatings has shown that in the Al-Li/SiC composite there is melting of both materials to form a single composite particle. The SiC reinforcement was in the submicron range and contributed to additional strengthening of the composite body, which was formed by a cold isostatic press and consolidated by hot extrusion or hot forging processes. The plasma-sprayed Ti-Al powder showed four categories of microstructures: featureless, dendritic, cellular, and martensite-like.

  1. Phase composition of heat-resisting alloy modified by ageing and alloyed by rhenium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koneva, Nina; Nikonenko, Elena; Popova, Natalya; Gibert, Ivan; Kozlov, Eduard

    2016-11-01

    The paper presents the transmission electron microscope (TEM) investigations of the structure of Ni-Al-Cr-based superalloy which is obtained by directional crystallization technique. The structural TEM investigations are carried out in two stages: 1) annealing at 1150°C for 1 h and 2) annealing at 1100°C for 480 h. The qualitative and quantitative analysis is given for the structure, phase composition and morphology of heat-resisting alloy additionally alloyed by rhenium Re both in the original state and after thermal treatment. The heat-resisting alloy comprises ˜70 at % Ni, ˜17 at % Al and ˜5 at % Cr. The total amount of the primary alloying elements of Mo, W, Ta, Ti, Co, La was ˜7 at % and 0.4 at % Re. It is shown that the structure of the superalloy is represented by (γ + γ')-phase mixture which has a morphologically correct crystallographic orientation and quasi-monocrystalline structure. σ-phase is formed in this superalloy due to rhenium. Since Re distribution in the alloy is not uniform, only a part of (γ + γ')-phase quasi-cuboids is distorted. It is shown that Re modification distorts the ideal structure of (γ + γ')-phase quasi-cuboids and results in the formation of β-, χ-and σ-phases.

  2. Cermet anode compositions with high content alloy phase

    DOEpatents

    Marschman, Steven C.; Davis, Norman C.

    1989-01-01

    Cermet electrode compositions comprising NiO-NiFe.sub.2 O.sub.4 -Cu-Ni, and methods for making, are disclosed. Addition of nickel metal prior to formation and densification of a base mixture into the cermet allows for an increase in the total amount of copper and nickel that can be contained in the NiO-NiFe.sub.2 O.sub.4 oxide system. Nickel is present in a base mixture weight concentration of from 0.1% to 10%. Copper is present in the alloy phase in a weight concentration of from 10% to 30% of the densified composition. Such cermet electrodes can be formed to have electrical conductivities well in excess of 100 ohm.sup.-1 cm.sup.-1. Other alloy and oxide system cermets having high content metal phases are also expected to be manufacturable in accordance with the invention.

  3. Cracking of Composite Modified Alloy 825 Primary Air Port Tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Kish, Joseph R.; Keiser, James R; Singbeil, Douglas; Willoughby, Adam W; Longmire, Hu Foster

    2007-04-01

    Twenty primary air ports fabricated from modified Alloy 825-based composite tubes underwent a metallurgical examination to document the mode and extent of cracking on the external fireside surface of a kraft recovery boiler. Collectively, the crack features found are most consistent with thermal fatigue, but corrosion fatigue cannot be ruled out. Regardless of the true cracking mechanism, temperature cycling is implicated as a critical factor for crack propagation. on the basis of the relative crack lengths observed, membrane welds and tube weld repairs, and their adjacent heat-affected zones, appear to be more susceptible to cracking than the cladding itself. This work suggests that mills should avoid boiler operating conditions that promote large temperature fluctuations, which can cause Alloy 825-based composite tubes to crack.

  4. Corrosive wear behavior of 2014 and 6061 aluminum alloy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varma, S. K.; Andrews, S.; Vasquez, G.

    1999-02-01

    Alloys of 2014 and 6061 aluminum reinforced with 0.1 volume fraction of alumina particles (VFAP) were subjected to impact scratching during a corrosive wear process. The transient currents generated due to the impact were measured in the two composites as well as in their respective monoliths. The effect of solutionizing time on the transient currents was correlated to the near surface microstructures, scratch morphology, concentration of quenched-in vacancies, and changes in grain sizes. It was observed that the transient current values increase with an increase in solutionizing time, indicating that the corrosive wear behavior is not strongly affected by the grain boundaries. However, a combination of pitting and the galvanic corrosion may account for the typical corrosive wear behavior exhibited by the alloys and the composites of this study.

  5. Surface Characterization of Carbon Fiber Polymer Composites and Aluminum Alloys After Laser Interference Structuring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabau, Adrian S.; Greer, Clayton M.; Chen, Jian; Warren, Charles D.; Daniel, Claus

    2016-07-01

    The increasing use of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer matrix composites (CFPC) and aluminum alloys as lightweight materials in the automotive and aerospace industries demands enhanced surface preparation and control of surface morphology prior to joining. In this study, surfaces of both composite and aluminum were prepared for joining using an Nd:YAG laser in a two-beam interference setup, enabling the (1) structuring of the AL 5182 surface, (2) removal of the resin layer on top of carbon fibers, and (3) structuring of the carbon fibers. CFPC specimens of T700S carbon fiber, Prepreg—T83 epoxy, 5 ply thick, 0°/90° plaques were used. The effects of laser fluence, scanning speed, and number of shots-per-spot were investigated on the removal rate of the resin without an excessive damage of the fibers. Optical micrographs, 3D imaging, and scanning electron microscope imaging were used to study the effect of the laser processing on the surface morphology. It was found that an effective resin ablation and a low density of broken fibers for CFPC specimens was attained using laser fluences of 1-2 J/cm2 and number of 2-4 pulses per spot. A relatively large area of periodic line structures due to energy interference were formed on the aluminum surface at laser fluences of 12 J/cm2 and number of 4-6 pulses per spot.

  6. Surface characterization of carbon fiber polymer composites and aluminum alloys after laser interference structuring

    DOE PAGES

    Sabau, Adrian S.; Greer, Clayton M.; Chen, Jian; ...

    2016-05-03

    Here, the increasing use of Carbon Fiber-reinforced Polymer matrix Composites (CFPC) and aluminum alloys as lightweight materials in the automotive and aerospace industries demands enhanced surface preparation and control of surface morphology prior to joining. In this study, surfaces of both composite and aluminum were prepared for joining using an Nd:YAG laser in a two-beam interference setup, enabling the (a) structuring of the AL 5182 surface, (b) removal of the resin layer on top of carbon fibers, and (c) structuring of the carbon fibers. CFPC specimens of T700S carbon fiber, Prepreg - T83 epoxy, 5 ply thick, 0/90o plaques weremore » used. The effect of laser fluence, scanning speed, and number of shots-per-spot was investigated on the removal rate of the resin without an excessive damage of the fibers. Optical micrographs, 3D imaging, and scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging were used to study the effect of the laser processing on surface morphology.« less

  7. Surface characterization of carbon fiber polymer composites and aluminum alloys after laser interference structuring

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S.; Greer, Clayton M.; Chen, Jian; Warren, Charles David; Daniel, Claus

    2016-05-03

    Here, the increasing use of Carbon Fiber-reinforced Polymer matrix Composites (CFPC) and aluminum alloys as lightweight materials in the automotive and aerospace industries demands enhanced surface preparation and control of surface morphology prior to joining. In this study, surfaces of both composite and aluminum were prepared for joining using an Nd:YAG laser in a two-beam interference setup, enabling the (a) structuring of the AL 5182 surface, (b) removal of the resin layer on top of carbon fibers, and (c) structuring of the carbon fibers. CFPC specimens of T700S carbon fiber, Prepreg - T83 epoxy, 5 ply thick, 0/90o plaques were used. The effect of laser fluence, scanning speed, and number of shots-per-spot was investigated on the removal rate of the resin without an excessive damage of the fibers. Optical micrographs, 3D imaging, and scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging were used to study the effect of the laser processing on surface morphology.

  8. The relative stress-corrosion-cracking susceptibility of candidate aluminum-lithium alloys for aerospace structural applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizzo, P. P.

    1980-01-01

    The microstructure and tensile properties of two powder metallurgy processed aluminum-lithium alloys were determined. Strength properties of 480 MPa yield and 550 MPa ultimate tensile strength with 5% strain to fracture were attained. Very little reduction in area was observed and fracture characteristics were brittle. The magnesium bearing alloy exhibited the highest strength and ductility, but fracture was intergranular. Recrystallization and grain growth, as well as coarse grain boundary precipitation, occurred in Alloy 2. The fracture morphology of the two alloys differed. Alloy 1 fractured along a plane of maximum shear stress, while Alloy 2 fractured along a plane of maximum tensile stress. It is found that a fixed orientation relationship exists between the shear fracture plane and the rolling direction which suggests that the PM alloys are strongly textured.

  9. Aerospace Community. Aerospace Education I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mickey, V. V.

    This book, one in the series on Aerospace Education I, emphasizes the two sides of aerospace--military aerospace and civilian aerospace. Chapter 1 includes a brief discussion on the organization of Air Force bases and missile sites in relation to their missions. Chapter 2 examines the community services provided by Air Force bases. The topics…

  10. Refractory metal alloys and composites for space nuclear power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Titran, R.H.; Stephens, J.R.; Petrasek, D.W.

    1988-01-01

    Space power requirements for future NASA and other United States missions will range from a few kilowatts to megawatts of electricity. Maximum efficiency is a key goal of any power system in order to minimize weight and size so that the space shuttle may be used a minimum number of times to put the power supply into orbit. Nuclear power has been identified as the primary power source to meet these high levels of electrical demand. One method to achieve maximum efficiency is to operate the power supply, energy conversion system, and related components at relatively high temperatures. For systems now in the planning stages, design temperatures range from 1300 K for the immediate future to as high as 1700 K for the advanced systems. NASA Lewis Research Center has undertaken a research program on advanced technology of refractory metal alloys and composites that will provide base line information for space power systems in the 1900's and the 21st century. Special emphasis is focused on the refractory metal alloys of niobium and on the refractory metal composites which utilize tungsten alloy wire for reinforcement. Basic research on the creep and creep-rupture properties of wires, matrices, and composites will be discussed. 20 refs., 27 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Refractory metal alloys and composites for space nuclear power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titran, Robert H.; Stephens, Joseph R.; Petrasek, Donald W.

    1988-01-01

    Space power requirements for future NASA and other U.S. missions will range from a few kilowatts to megawatts of electricity. Maximum efficiency is a key goal of any power system in order to minimize weight and size so that the Space Shuttle may be used a minimum number of times to put the power supply into orbit. Nuclear power has been identified as the primary power source to meet these high levels of electrical demand. One method to achieve maximum efficiency is to operate the power supply, energy conservation system, and related components at relatively high temperatures. For systems now in the planning stages, design temperatures range from 1300 K for the immediate future to as high as 1700 K for the advanced systems. NASA Lewis Research Center has undertaken a research program on advanced technology of refractory metal alloys and composites that will provide baseline information for space power systems in the 1900's and the 21st century. Special emphasis is focused on the refractory metal alloys of niobium and on the refractory metal composites which utilize tungsten alloy wires for reinforcement. Basic research on the creep and creep-rupture properties of wires, matrices, and composites are discussed.

  12. Design and analysis of variable-twist tiltrotor blades using shape memory alloy hybrid composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jae-Sang; Kim, Seong-Hwan; Jung, Sung Nam; Lee, Myeong-Kyu

    2011-01-01

    The tiltrotor blade, or proprotor, acts as a rotor in the helicopter mode and as a propeller in the airplane mode. For a better performance, the proprotor should have different built-in twist distributions along the blade span, suitable for each operational mode. This paper proposes a new variable-twist proprotor concept that can adjust the built-in twist distribution for given flight modes. For a variable-twist control, the present proprotor adopts shape memory alloy hybrid composites (SMAHC) containing shape memory alloy (SMA) wires embedded in the composite matrix. The proprotor of the Korea Aerospace Research Institute (KARI) Smart Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (SUAV), which is based on the tiltrotor concept, is used as a baseline proprotor model. The cross-sectional properties of the variable-twist proprotor are designed to maintain the cross-sectional properties of the original proprotor as closely as possible. However, the torsion stiffness is significantly reduced to accommodate the variable-twist control. A nonlinear flexible multibody dynamic analysis is employed to investigate the dynamic characteristics of the proprotor such as natural frequency and damping in the whirl flutter mode, the blade structural loads in a transition flight and the rotor performance in hover. The numerical results show that the present proprotor is designed to have a strong similarity to the baseline proprotor in dynamic and load characteristics. It is demonstrated that the present proprotor concept could be used to improve the hover performance adaptively when the variable-twist control using the SMAHC is applied appropriately.

  13. Improved Damage Resistant Composite Materials Incorporating Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paine, Jeffrey S. N.; Rogers, Craig A.

    1996-01-01

    Metallic shape memory alloys (SMA) such as nitinol have unique shape recovery behavior and mechanical properties associated with a material phase change that have been used in a variety of sensing and actuation applications. Recent studies have shown that integrating nitinol-SMA actuators into composite materials increases the composite material's functionality. Hybrid composites of conventional graphite/epoxy or glass/epoxy and nitinol-SMA elements can perform functions in applications where monolithic composites perform inadequately. One such application is the use of hybrid composites to function both in load bearing and armor capacities. While monolithic composites with high strength-to-weight ratios function efficiently as loadbearing structures, because of their brittle nature, impact loading can cause significant catastrophic damage. Initial composite failure modes such as delamination and matrix cracking dissipate some impact energy, but when stress exceeds the composite's ultimate strength, fiber fracture and material perforation become dominant. One of the few methods that has been developed to reduce material perforation is hybridizing polymer matrix composites with tough kevlar or high modulus polyethynylene plies. The tough fibers increase the impact resistance and the stiffer and stronger graphite fibers carry the majority of the load. Similarly, by adding nitinol-SMA elements that absorb impact energy through the stress-induced martensitic phase transformation, the composites' impact perforation resistance can be greatly enhanced. The results of drop-weight and high velocity gas-gun impact testing of various composite materials will be presented. The results demonstrate that hybridizing composites with nitinol-SMA elements significantly increases perforation resistance compared to other traditional toughening elements. Inspection of the composite specimens at various stages of perforation by optical microscope illustrates the mechanisms by which

  14. The effect of in-service aerospace contaminants on X-band dielectric properties of a bismaleimide/quartz composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Luis A.; García, Carla; Grace, Landon R.

    2015-05-01

    The impact of three common aerospace in-service liquid contaminants on the X-band dielectric properties of a polymer composite radar protecting structure (radome) is investigated and quantified. The dielectric properties of the composite laminate are critical to radar transparency, and thus performance, of the radome structure. Further, polymer composites are highly susceptible to absorption of liquids. As such, the effect of common aerospace contaminants on the dielectric properties of composite laminates is crucial. Measurement of relative permittivity and loss tangent via a split-post dielectric resonant technique at 10 GHz is used to determine the effect of water, deicing fluid, and propylene glycol absorption in a three-ply quartz-reinforced bismaleimide laminate. Additionally, fluid uptake kinetics are investigated as a function of liquid type. An approximately linear relationship between fluid content and relative permittivity is observed for all three contaminant types. A 1% increase in contaminant content by weight results in a 7.8%, 4.5%, and 2.5% increase in relative permittivity of the material due to water, deicing fluid, and propylene glycol, respectively. A more significant impact is seen in material loss tangent, where a 1% increase in contaminant content by weight is responsible for a 378.5%, 593.0%, and 441.5% increase in loss tangent due to the aforementioned fluids, respectively. A fluid uptake weight content of 1.31%, 3.41%, and 4.28% is achieved for water, deicing fluid, and propylene glycol respectively, at approximately 1300 hours exposure. Based on the reported observations, the dielectric property degradation of composite laminates due to these commonly used fluids is of significant concern for in-service aircraft radar systems routinely exposed to these contaminants.

  15. Elemental composition of brazing alloys in metallic orthodontic brackets.

    PubMed

    Zinelis, Spiros; Annousaki, Olga; Eliades, Theodore; Makou, Margarita

    2004-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the elemental composition of the brazing alloy of representative orthodontic brackets. The brackets examined were Gemini (3M, Unitec, Monrovia, Calif), MicroLoc (GAC, Bohemia, NY), OptiMESHxrt (Ormco, Glendora, Calif), and Ultratrim (Dentarum, Ispringen, Germany). Four metallic brackets for each brand were embedded in epoxy resin and after metallographic grinding and polishing were cleaned in a water ultrasonic bath. Scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive x-ray microanalysis (EDS) were used to assess the quantitative composition of the brazing alloy. Four EDS spectra were collected for each brazing alloy, and the mean value and standard deviation for the concentration of each element were calculated. The elemental composition of the brazing alloys was determined as follows (percent weight): Gemini: Ni = 83.98 +/- 1.02, Si = 6.46 +/- 0.37, Fe = 5.90 +/- 0.93, Cr = 3.52 +/- 0.34; MicroLoc: Ag = 42.82 +/- 0.18, Au = 32.14 +/- 0.65, Cu = 24.53 +/- 0.26, Mg = 1.12 +/- 0.33; OptiMESHxrt: Au = 67.79 +/- 0.97, Fe = 15.69 +/- 0.29, Ni = 13.01 +/- 0.93, Cr = 4.01 +/- 0.35; Ultratrim: Ag = 87.97 +/- 0.33, Cu = 10.51 +/- 0.45, Mg = 1.29 +/- 0.63, Zn = 1.13 +/- 0.24. The findings of this study showed that different brazing materials were used for the different brands, and thus different performances are expected during intraoral exposure; potential effects on the biological properties also are discussed.

  16. The Influence of ScF3 Nanoparticles on the Physical and Mechanical Properties of New Metal Matrix Composites Based on A356 Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorozhtsov, S.; Zhukov, I.; Promakhov, V.; Naydenkin, E.; Khrustalyov, A.; Vorozhtsov, A.

    2016-12-01

    The development of the aerospace and automotive industries demands the development of aluminum alloys and composites reinforced with new nanoparticles. In this work, metal matrix composites (MMC) with an A356 aluminum alloy matrix reinforced with 0.2 wt.% and 1 wt.% of ScF3 nanoparticles were produced by ultrasonic dispersion of nanoparticles in the melt followed by casting in a metallic mold. Structure as well as physical and mechanical properties of the cast samples were examined using electron and optical microscopy, hardness and tensile testing. It is shown that nanoparticles clusters are formed during the solidification at grain boundaries and silicon inclusions. Increasing nanoparticles content significantly reduced the grain size in the MMC and increased the mechanical properties—ultimate tensile strength, elongation and hardness. The contribution of different strengthening mechanisms is discussed. It is suggested that the coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch between the nanoparticles ScF3 and the aluminum matrix is a dominant strengthening mechanism.

  17. Technical features and criteria in designing fiber-reinforced composite materials: from the aerospace and aeronautical field to biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Gloria, Antonio; Ronca, Dante; Russo, Teresa; D'Amora, Ugo; Chierchia, Marianna; De Santis, Roberto; Nicolais, Luigi; Ambrosio, Luigi

    2011-01-01

    Polymer-based composite materials are ideal for applications where high stiffness-to-weight and strength-to-weight ratios are required. From aerospace and aeronautical field to biomedical applications, fiber-reinforced polymers have replaced metals, thus emerging as an interesting alternative. As widely reported, the mechanical behavior of the composite materials involves investigation on micro- and macro-scale, taking into consideration micromechanics, macromechanics and lamination theory. Clinical situations often require repairing connective tissues and the use of composite materials may be suitable for these applications because of the possibility to design tissue substitutes or implants with the required mechanical properties. Accordingly, this review aims at stressing the importance of fiber-reinforced composite materials to make advanced and biomimetic prostheses with tailored mechanical properties, starting from the basic principle design, technologies, and a brief overview of composites applications in several fields. Fiber-reinforced composite materials for artificial tendons, ligaments, and intervertebral discs, as well as for hip stems and mandible models will be reviewed, highlighting the possibility to mimic the mechanical properties of the soft and hard tissues that they replace.

  18. Interactions Between Solidification and Compositional Convection in Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, S. H.; Worster, M. G.; Chiareli, A. O. P.; Anderson, D. M.; Schultze, T. P.

    1998-01-01

    This project combined theoretical and experimental ground-based studies of the interactions between convection and solidification of binary melts. Particular attention was focused on the alteration of the composition and microstructure of castings caused by convective flows through the interstices of mushy layers. Two different mechanisms causing convection were investigated. (i) Compositional, buoyancy driven convection is known to cause chimneys and freckles in directionally cast alloys on Earth. The analytical studies provide quantitative criteria for the formation of chimneys that can be used to assess the expediency of producing alloys in Space. (ii) Flow of the melt is also driven by the contraction (expansion) that typically occurs during change of phase. Such convection will occur even in the absence of gravity, and may indeed be the primary cause of macrosegregation during the production of alloys in Space. The studies will employed asymptotic methods in order to determine conditions for the stability of various states of solidifying systems. Further, simple macroscopic models of complete systems were developed and solved. These analytical studies were augmented by laboratory experiments using aqueous solutions, in which the convective flows could be easily observed and the effects of convection could be readily measured. These y experiments guided the development of the theoretical models and provided data against which the predictions of the models can be tested.

  19. Aerospace Medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michaud, Vince

    2015-01-01

    NASA Aerospace Medicine overview - Aerospace Medicine is that specialty area of medicine concerned with the determination and maintenance of the health, safety, and performance of those who fly in the air or in space.

  20. Identification of the Factors Governing the Origin and Propagation of Corrosion Failure of Organically Coated Aluminum Aerospace Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-14

    temperature regardless of surface pretreatment with activation energy of 30- 40 kJ/mol, as well as by artificial aging of the alloy and certain alloy...regardless of surface pretreatment with activation energy of 30-40 kJ/mol, as well as by artificial aging and surface pretreatments. Scribe-creep rate...heterogeneities. Upon the departure of S. Ray Taylor from UVA- CESE in 2003, the statement of work was revised to reflect those portions of the study

  1. Lattice measurement and alloy compositions in metal and bimetallic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Tsen, S-C Y; Crozier, P A; Liu, J

    2003-12-01

    A new reliable method for determining the lattice spacings of metallic and bimetallic nanoparticles in phase contrast high resolution electron microscopy (HREM) images was developed. In this study, we discuss problems in applying HREM techniques to single metal (Pt and Au) and bimetallic (AuPd) nanoparticles of unknown shapes and random orientations. Errors arising from particle tilt and edge effects are discussed and analysis criteria are presented to reduce these errors in measuring the lattice parameters of nanoparticles. The accuracy of an individual particle lattice measurement is limited by an effective standard deviation which depends on the size of the individual nanoparticle. For example, the standard deviation for 20-30 A Pt or Au nanoparticles is about 1.5%. To increase the accuracy in determining the lattice spacings of nanoparticles, statistical methods have to be used to obtain the average lattice spacing of an ensemble of nanoparticles. We measured approximately 100 nanoparticles with sizes in the range of 20-30 A and found that the mean lattice spacing can be determined to within 0.2%. By applying Vegard's law to the AuPd bimetallic systems we successfully detected the presence of alloying. For 30 A nanoparticles, the estimated ultimate error in determining the composition of the AuPd alloy is about 3% provided that at least 100 particles are measured. Finally, the challenges in determining the presence of more than one alloy phases in bimetallic nanoparticle systems were also discussed.

  2. Low Cost Al-Si Casting Alloy As In-Situ Composite for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A.

    2000-01-01

    A new aluminum-silicon (Al-Si) alloy has been successfully developed at NASA- Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) that has significant improvement in tensile and fatigue strength at elevated temperatures (500 F-700 F). The alloy offers a number of benefits such as light weight, high hardness, low thermal expansion and high surface wear resistance. In hypereutectic form, this alloy is considered as an in-situ Al-Si composite with tensile strength of about 90% higher than the auto industry 390 alloy at 600 F. This composite is very economically produced by using either conventional permanent steel molds or die casting. The projected material cost is less than $0.90 per pound, and automotive components such as pistons can be cast for high production rate using conventional casting techniques with a low and fully accounted cost. Key Words: Metal matrix composites, In-situ composite, aluminum-silicon alloy, hypereutectic alloy, permanent mold casting, die casting.

  3. Refractory metal alloys and composites for space power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, J.R.; Petrasek, D.W.; Titran, R.H.

    1994-09-01

    Space power requirements for future NASA and other United States missions will range from a few kilowatts to megawatts of electricity. Maximum efficiency is a key goal of any power system in order to minimize weight and size so that the space shuttle may be used a minimum number of times to put the power supply into orbit. Nuclear power has been identified as the primary power source to meet these high levels of electrical demand. One method to achieve maximum efficiency is to operate the power supply, energy conversion system, and related components at relatively high temperatures. NASA Lewis Research Center has undertaken a research program on advanced technology of refractory metal alloys and composites that will provide base line information for space power systems in the 1900`s and the 21st century. Basic research on the tensile and creep properties of fibers, matrices, and composites will be discussed.

  4. Refractory metal alloys and composites for space power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Joseph R.; Petrasek, Donald W.; Titran, Robert H.

    1988-01-01

    Space power requirements for future NASA and other U.S. missions will range from a few kilowatts to megawatts of electricity. Maximum efficiency is a key goal of any power system in order to minimize weight and size so that the space shuttle may be used a minimum number of times to put the power supply into orbit. Nuclear power has been identified as the primary source to meet these high levels of electrical demand. One way to achieve maximum efficiency is to operate the power supply, energy conversion system, and related components at relatively high temperatures. NASA Lewis Research Center has undertaken a research program on advanced technology of refractory metal alloys and composites that will provide baseline information for space power systems in the 1900's and the 21st century. Basic research on the tensile and creep properties of fibers, matrices, and composites is discussed.

  5. Microstructure and properties of a titanium alloy-orthorhombic titanium aluminide layered composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galeev, R. M.; Valiakhmetov, O. R.; Safiullin, R. V.; Imaev, V. M.; Imaev, R. M.

    2009-03-01

    The microstructure and tensile properties of a layered composite material fabricated by solid-state bonding of its components using pressure welding are studied at room and elevated temperatures. The components are made of a high-temperature VT25U titanium alloy and an intermetallic alloy ( O alloy) based on orthorhombic titanium aluminide of the composition Ti-23Al-22.7Nb-1.1V-0.6Zr-0.2Si-0.3C (at %). The study of the microstructure and chemical composition of the composite by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis demonstrates that this method of producing a layered composite provides high-quality poreless bonding of materials of different types. The solid-state bonding zone has an intermediate chemical composition. Mechanical tests demonstrate that the room-temperature strength of the composite is comparable with that of the O alloy and is higher than that of the titanium alloy; as the fraction of the titanium alloy in the composite decreases, this strength increases. The relative elongation of the layered composite is found to be higher than that of the O alloy and lower than that of the titanium alloy. In the temperature range 500-700°C, the strength of the composite material is 25% higher than that of the titanium alloy, and its plasticity is lower than that of the titanium alloy. Our method is shown to be promising for producing layered composite materials that have high mechanical properties over a wide temperature range.

  6. Laser Cladding of Composite Bioceramic Coatings on Titanium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiang; Han, Jiege; Wang, Chunming; Huang, Anguo

    2016-02-01

    In this study, silicon nitride (Si3N4) and calcium phosphate tribasic (TCP) composite bioceramic coatings were fabricated on a Ti6Al4V (TC4) alloy using Nd:YAG pulsed laser, CO2 CW laser, and Semiconductor CW laser. The surface morphology, cross-sectional microstructure, mechanical properties, and biological behavior were carefully investigated. These investigations were conducted employing scanning electron microscope, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and other methodologies. The results showed that both Si3N4 and Si3N4/TCP composite coatings were able to form a compact bonding interface between the coating and the substrate by using appropriate laser parameters. The coating layers were dense, demonstrating a good surface appearance. The bioceramic coatings produced by laser cladding have good mechanical properties. Compared with that of the bulk material, microhardness of composite ceramic coatings on the surface significantly increased. In addition, good biological activity could be obtained by adding TCP into the composite coating.

  7. Role of the micro/macro structure of welds in crack nucleation and propagation in aerospace aluminum-lithium alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Talia, G.E.

    1996-02-01

    Al-Li alloys offer the benefits of increased strength, elastic modulus and lower densities as compared to conventional aluminum alloys. Martin Marietta Laboratories has developed an Al-Li alloy designated 2195 which is designated for use in the cryogenic tanks of the space shuttle. The Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) welding process is currently being used to produce these welds. VPPA welding utilizes high temperature ionized gas (plasma) to transfer heat to the workpiece. An inert gas, such as Helium, is used to shield the active welding zone to prevent contamination of the molten base metal with surrounding reactive atmospheric gases. (1) In the Space Shuttle application, two passes of the arc are used to complete a butt-type weld. The pressure of the plasma stream is increased during the first pass to force the arc entirely through the material, a practice commonly referred to as keyholing. Molten metal forms on either side of the arc and surface tension draws this liquid together as the arc passes. 2319 Al alloy filler material may also be fed into the weld zone during this pass. During the second pass, the plasma stream pressure is reduced such that only partial penetration of the base material is obtained. Al 2319 filler material is added during this pass to yield a uniform, fully filled welded joint. This additional pass also acts to alter the grain structure of the weld zone to yield a higher strength joint.

  8. Role of the micro/macro structure of welds in crack nucleation and propagation in aerospace aluminum-lithium alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talia, George E.

    1996-01-01

    Al-Li alloys offer the benefits of increased strength, elastic modulus and lower densities as compared to conventional aluminum alloys. Martin Marietta Laboratories has developed an Al-Li alloy designated 2195 which is designated for use in the cryogenic tanks of the space shuttle. The Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) welding process is currently being used to produce these welds [1]. VPPA welding utilizes high temperature ionized gas (plasma) to transfer heat to the workpiece. An inert gas, such as Helium, is used to shield the active welding zone to prevent contamination of the molten base metal with surrounding reactive atmospheric gases. [1] In the Space Shuttle application, two passes of the arc are used to complete a butt-type weld. The pressure of the plasma stream is increased during the first pass to force the arc entirely through the material, a practice commonly referred to as keyholing. Molten metal forms on either side of the arc and surface tension draws this liquid together as the arc passes. 2319 Al alloy filler material may also be fed into the weld zone during this pass. During the second pass, the plasma stream pressure is reduced such that only partial penetration of the base material is obtained. Al 2319 filler material is added during this pass to yield a uniform, fully filled welded joint. This additional pass also acts to alter the grain structure of the weld zone to yield a higher strength joint.

  9. Surface compositions of solid and liquid indium-tin alloys by auger electron spectroscopy using ion bombardment

    SciTech Connect

    Komiyama, M.; Tsukamoto, H.; Ogino, Y.

    1986-09-01

    Equilibrium surface compositions of solid and liquid In-Sn alloys of various bulk compositions were examined by Auger electron spectroscopy. The composition relaxation at the solid surfaces of this alloy system was very fast, and utilizing this the bulk compositions of the solid alloys and the corresponding surface compositions were determined using Xe-ion bombardment in conjunction. Above the temperature 1.2 times the melting point, the surface compositions were constant regardless of temperature, and coincided with the nominal bulk composition. As the temperature was lowered toward the melting point, surface segregation became apparent, and at around the melting point the surface composition nearly coincided with those of the solid alloys. When surface segregation occurred, In segregated to the surfaces of Sn-rich alloys and Sn to the surfaces of In-rich alloys. Under the influence of surface oxygen In segregates to the solid surface at any alloy composition.

  10. Understanding Plasticity and Fracture in Aluminum Alloys and their Composites by 3D X-ray Synchrotron Tomography and Microdiffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hruby, Peter

    Aluminum alloys and their composites are attractive materials for applications requiring high strength-to-weight ratios and reasonable cost. Many of these applications, such as those in the aerospace industry, undergo fatigue loading. An understanding of the microstructural damage that occurs in these materials is critical in assessing their fatigue resistance. Two distinct experimental studies were performed to further the understanding of fatigue damage mechanisms in aluminum alloys and their composites, specifically fracture and plasticity. Fatigue resistance of metal matrix composites (MMCs) depends on many aspects of composite microstructure. Fatigue crack growth behavior is particularly dependent on the reinforcement characteristics and matrix microstructure. The goal of this work was to obtain a fundamental understanding of fatigue crack growth behavior in SiC particle-reinforced 2080 Al alloy composites. In situ X-ray synchrotron tomography was performed on two samples at low (R=0.1) and at high (R=0.6) R-ratios. The resulting reconstructed images were used to obtain three-dimensional (3D) rendering of the particles and fatigue crack. Behaviors of the particles and crack, as well as their interaction, were analyzed and quantified. Four-dimensional (4D) visual representations were constructed to aid in the overall understanding of damage evolution. During fatigue crack growth in ductile materials, a plastic zone is created in the region surrounding the crack tip. Knowledge of the plastic zone is important for the understanding of fatigue crack formation as well as subsequent growth behavior. The goal of this work was to quantify the 3D size and shape of the plastic zone in 7075 Al alloys. X-ray synchrotron tomography and Laue microdiffraction were used to non-destructively characterize the volume surrounding a fatigue crack tip. The precise 3D crack profile was segmented from the reconstructed tomography data. Depth-resolved Laue patterns were obtained using

  11. Ceramic Matrix Composites: High Temperature Effects. (Latest Citations from the Aerospace Database)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the development and testing of ceramic matrix composites for high temperature use. Tests examining effects of the high temperatures on bond strength, thermal degradation, oxidation, thermal stress, thermal fatigue, and thermal expansion properties are referenced. Applications of the composites include space structures, gas turbine and engine components, control surfaces for spacecraft and transatmospheric vehicles, heat shields, and heat exchangers.

  12. Equations for determining CVD tungsten-rhenium alloy composition and plating rate

    SciTech Connect

    Klingsporn, P.E.

    1987-04-01

    The composition and plating rate of CVD tungsten-rhenium alloy, formed by hydrogen reduction of a tungsten and rhenium metal hexafluoride gas mixture on a heated substrate, depend on the substrate temperature, hydrogen gas flow, metal fluoride gas flow, and the pressure. An equation was derived that allows the alloy composition to be calculated for any combination of the variables, based on the measured composition for one set of the variables. Also, equations were derived from which the W-Re alloy plating rate can be calculated in terms of the measured rate and composition at one set of the variables, or, in terms of the measured rates at two sets of the variables, without knowledge of the composition. W-Re alloy compositions and plating rates calculated with the equations were compared with experimental data.

  13. Metal Matrix Composites: Fatigue and Fracture Testing. (Latest citations from the Aerospace Database)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning techniques and results of testing metal matrix composites for fatigue and fracture. Methods include non-destructive testing techniques, and static and cyclic techniques for assessing compression, tensile, bending, and impact characteristics.

  14. Ductile alloy and process for preparing composite superconducting wire

    DOEpatents

    Verhoeven, J.D.; Finnemore, D.K.; Gibson, E.D.; Ostenson, J.E.

    An alloy for the commercial production of ductile superconducting wire is prepared by melting together copper and at least 15 weight percent niobium under non-oxygen-contaminating conditions, and rapidly cooling the melt to form a ductile composite consisting of discrete, randomly distributed and oriented dendritic-shaped particles of niobium in a copper matrix. As the wire is worked, the dendritic particles are realigned parallel to the longitudinal axis and when drawn form a plurality of very fine ductile superconductors in a ductile copper matrix. The drawn wire may be tin coated and wound into magnets or the like before diffusing the tin into the wire to react with the niobium. Impurities such as aluminum or gallium may be added to improve upper critical field characteristics.

  15. Ductile alloy and process for preparing composite superconducting wire

    DOEpatents

    Verhoeven, John D.; Finnemore, Douglas K.; Gibson, Edwin D.; Ostenson, Jerome E.

    1983-03-29

    An alloy for the commercial production of ductile superconducting wire is prepared by melting together copper and at least 15 weight percent niobium under non-oxygen-contaminating conditions, and rapidly cooling the melt to form a ductile composite consisting of discrete, randomly distributed and orientated dendritic-shaped particles of niobium in a copper matrix. As the wire is worked, the dendritric particles are realigned parallel to the longitudinal axis and when drawn form a plurality of very fine ductile superconductors in a ductile copper matrix. The drawn wire may be tin coated and wound into magnets or the like before diffusing the tin into the wire to react with the niobium. Impurities such as aluminum or gallium may be added to improve upper critical field characteristics.

  16. Development of a High-Temperature Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding Testbed for Aerospace Grade Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-11-10

    conventional RTM and hand lay-up prepreg/autoclave techniques. Manufacturing high-quality, large composite parts for high temperature applications using VARTM ...composite 3 parts via RTM and/or resin infusion (here called VARTM ) [3]. Thereafter Connell and Criss et al. fabricated carbon fiber reinforced...It was found that these imide resins show the combination of processability for RTM and high performance. The goal of the HT- VARTM research is to

  17. Stochastic Models of Composite Mechanics in the Problems of Designing Structural Elements in Aerospace Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolkin, Yu. V.; Makarova, E. Yu.

    2002-09-01

    The present-day trends and development prospects of stochastic averaging methods in composite mechanics are analyzed. The following methods are considered: the traditional one (the medium of comparison is homogeneous), the method of periodic components (the medium of comparison has a regular structure), the numerical method of local approximation with regard for the short-range order in the arrangement and interaction of inhomogeneities, and a synthesis of the periodic-component and local-approximation methods. A detailed procedure is presented for calculating the functionals of second, third, and higher orders of the stochastic problem. The results obtained are used for evaluating, in an explicit form, corrections to the effective elastic moduli found for quasi-isotropic and unidirectional fiber composites by the traditional averaging method and the method of periodic components. Analytical formulas for the second-order moment functions of structural stresses and strains are derived. It is shown that the fields of structural stresses and strains are locally ergodic. A new multilevel approach is proposed for designing composites, which takes into account the effect of structurally technological factors. Thus, unidirectional fiber composites are calculated by a two-level model, layered structures - by a three-level model, and carbon-carbon structures - by a five-level model. A stage-by-stage solution procedure is suggested for the boundary-value problem of micromechanics of composites. For a wide class of composites, the effective elastic moduli are calculated and the strength surfaces are constructed.

  18. Interface Effects of the Properties and Processing of Graded Composite Aluminum Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-31

    Final Report: Interface effects of the properties and processing of graded composite aluminum alloys Report Title The objective of this STIR program...architecturally graded aluminum composite with a diffuse interface between alloys 5456 and 7055. The program supported the education and training of one graduate...2015 Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: Interface effects of the properties and processing of graded composite aluminum

  19. Experimental Modal Analysis and Dynaic Strain Fiber Bragg Gratings for Structural Health Monitoring of Composite Aerospace Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panopoulou, A.; Fransen, S.; Gomez Molinero, V.; Kostopoulos, V.

    2012-07-01

    The objective of this work is to develop a new structural health monitoring system for composite aerospace structures based on dynamic response strain measurements and experimental modal analysis techniques. Fibre Bragg Grating (FBG) optical sensors were used for monitoring the dynamic response of the composite structure. The structural dynamic behaviour has been numerically simulated and experimentally verified by means of vibration testing. The hypothesis of all vibration tests was that actual damage in composites reduces their stiffness and produces the same result as mass increase produces. Thus, damage was simulated by slightly varying locally the mass of the structure at different zones. Experimental modal analysis based on the strain responses was conducted and the extracted strain mode shapes were the input for the damage detection expert system. A feed-forward back propagation neural network was the core of the damage detection system. The features-input to the neural network consisted of the strain mode shapes, extracted from the experimental modal analysis. Dedicated training and validation activities were carried out based on the experimental results. The system showed high reliability, confirmed by the ability of the neural network to recognize the size and the position of damage on the structure. The experiments were performed on a real structure i.e. a lightweight antenna sub- reflector, manufactured and tested at EADS CASA ESPACIO. An integrated FBG sensor network, based on the advantage of multiplexing, was mounted on the structure with optimum topology. Numerical simulation of both structures was used as a support tool at all the steps of the work. Potential applications for the proposed system are during ground qualification extensive tests of space structures and during the mission as modal analysis tool on board, being able via the FBG responses to identify a potential failure.

  20. Evolution of and projections for automated composite material placement equipment in the aerospace industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarville, Douglas A.

    2009-12-01

    As the commercial aircraft industry attempts to improve airplane fuel efficiency by shifting from aluminum to composites (reinforced plastics), there is a concern that composite processing equipment is not mature enough to meet increasing demand and that delivery delays and loss of high tech jobs could result. The research questions focused on the evolution of composite placement machines, improvement of machine functionality by equipment vendors, and the probability of new inventions helping to avoid production shortfalls. An extensive review of the literature found no studies that addressed these issues. Since the early twentieth century, exploratory case study of pivotal technological advances has been an accepted means of performing historic analysis and furthering understanding of rapidly changing marketplaces and industries. This qualitative case study investigated evolution of automated placement equipment by (a) codifying and mapping patent data (e.g., claims and functionality descriptions), (b) triangulating archival data (i.e., trade literature, vender Web sites, and scholarly texts), and (c) interviewing expert witnesses. An industry-level sensitivity model developed by the author showed that expanding the vendor base and increasing the number of performance enhancing inventions will most likely allow the industry to make the transition from aluminum to composites without schedule delays. This study will promote social change by (a) advancing individual and community knowledge (e.g., teaching modules for students, practitioners, and professional society members) and (b) providing an empirical model that will help in the understanding and projection of next generation composite processing equipment demand and productivity output.

  1. Application of composites to the selective reinforcement of metallic aerospace structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, W. A., Jr.; Mathauser, E. E.; Pride, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    The use of composite materials to selectively reinforce metallic structures provides a low-cost way to reduce weight and a means of minimizing the risks usually associated with the introduction of new materials. An overview is presented of the NASA Langley Research Center programs to identify the advantages and to develop the potential of the selective reinforcement approach to the use of composites. These programs have shown that selective reinforcement provides excellent strength and stiffness improvements to metallic structures. Significant weight savings can be obtained in a cost effective manner. Flight service programs which have been initiated to validate further the merits of selective reinforcement are described.

  2. MoS2-Filled PEEK Composite as a Self-Lubricating Material for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theiler, Geraldine; Gradt, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    At BAM, several projects were conducted in the past years dealing with the tribological properties of friction couples at cryogenic temperature and in vacuum environment. Promising candidates for vacuum application are MoS2-filled PEEK/PTFE composites, which showed a friction coefficient as low as 0.03 in high vacuum. To complete the tribological profile of these composites, further tests were performed in ultra-high vacuum (UHV) at room temperature. In this paper, friction and stick slip behavior, as well as outgassing characteristics during the test are presented.

  3. Military Aerospace. Aerospace Education II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, J. C.

    This book is a revised publication in the series on Aerospace Education II. It describes the employment of aerospace forces, their methods of operation, and some of the weapons and equipment used in combat and combat support activities. The first chapter describes some of the national objectives and policies served by the Air Force in peace and…

  4. Aerospace Environment. Aerospace Education I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savler, D. S.; Smith, J. C.

    This book is one in the series on Aerospace Education I. It briefly reviews current knowledge of the universe, the earth and its life-supporting atmosphere, and the arrangement of celestial bodies in outer space and their physical characteristics. Chapter 1 includes a brief survey of the aerospace environment. Chapters 2 and 3 examine the…

  5. Reactive Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) of Nitride Reinforced Titanium Alloy Composites (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-15

    AFRL-RX-WP-JA-2014-0177 REACTIVE SPARK PLASMA SINTERING (SPS) OF NITRIDE REINFORCED TITANIUM ALLOY COMPOSITES (POSTPRINT) Jaimie S...titanium–vanadium alloys, has been achieved by introducing reactive nitrogen gas during the spark plasma sintering (SPS) of blended titanium and...lcomReactive spark plasma sintering (SPS) of nitride reinforced titanium alloy compositeshttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jallcom.2014.08.049 0925-8388

  6. Low energy milling method, low crystallinity alloy, and negative electrode composition

    DOEpatents

    Le, Dihn B; Obrovac, Mark N; Kube, Robert Y; Landucci, James R

    2012-10-16

    A method of making nanostructured alloy particles includes milling a millbase in a pebble mill containing milling media. The millbase comprises: (i) silicon, and (ii) at least one of carbon or a transition metal, and wherein the nanostructured alloy particles are substantially free of crystalline domains greater than 50 nanometers in size. A method of making a negative electrode composition for a lithium ion battery including the nanostructured alloy particles is also disclosed.

  7. Chemical, mechanical and antibacterial properties of silver nanocluster/silica composite coated textiles for safety systems and aerospace applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraris, S.; Perero, S.; Miola, M.; Vernè, E.; Rosiello, A.; Ferrazzo, V.; Valletta, G.; Sanchez, J.; Ohrlander, M.; Tjörnhammar, S.; Fokine, M.; Laurell, F.; Blomberg, E.; Skoglund, S.; Odnevall Wallinder, I.; Ferraris, M.

    2014-10-01

    This work describes the chemical, mechanical and antibacterial properties of a novel silver nanocluster/silica composite coating, obtained by sputtering, on textiles for use in nuclear bacteriological and chemical (NBC) protection suites and for aerospace applications. The properties of the coated textiles were analyzed in terms of surface morphology, silver concentration and silver release in artificial sweat and synthetic tap water, respectively. No release of silver nanoparticles was observed at given conditions. The water repellency, permeability, flammability and mechanical resistance of the textiles before and after sputtering demonstrated that the textile properties were not negatively affected by the coating. The antibacterial effect was evaluated at different experimental conditions using a standard bacterial strain of Staphylococcus aureus and compared with the behavior of uncoated textiles. The coating process conferred all textiles a good antibacterial activity. Optimal deposition conditions were elaborated to obtain sufficient antibacterial action without altering the aesthetical appearance of the textiles. The antibacterial coating retained its antibacterial activity after one cycle in a washing machine only for the Nylon based textile.

  8. Depression and panic attacks related to phenol-formaldehyde composite material exposure in an aerospace manufacturing plant.

    PubMed

    Sparks, P J; Ayars, G H; Simon, G E; Katon, W J; Altman, L C; Johnson, R L

    1991-01-01

    In a case series study we evaluated 53 composite-materials workers in an aerospace plant who filed workers' compensation claims for illness allegedly related to phenol-formaldehyde resin exposure. Symptoms ranged from mucosal and skin irritation to depression and cognitive impairment. Certain health practitioners implying they had immunologic dysfunction and organic brain injury, led workers to believe they were chemically poisoned. Industrial hygiene evaluation failed to show levels of chemicals above permissible levels. Thorough evaluation by our multidisciplinary panel failed to find significant objective abnormalities by physical exam and laboratory testing. Thirty-nine percent of the workers had sensory irritation and/or skin complaints that generally resolved rapidly with removal from exposure. Psychiatric diagnoses (including major depression and/or panic attacks) were made in 74% of the workers, but only 26% of these had antecedent disease. Fourteen (26%) had multiple somatic complaints that generally persisted despite removal from exposure, but they also had long histories of significant pre-existing psychological illness. Detailed neuropsychologic testing failed to show any definite evidence or organic brain dysfunction in any of the workers tested. We speculate that sensory irritation from low-level volatile organic compounds with autonomic arousal, reinforced by the belief they were "chemically poisoned," led to psychogenic illness.

  9. The effect of water vapor on fatigue crack Growth in 7475-t651 aluminum alloy plate. [for aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicus, D. L.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of water vapor on fatigue crack growth in 7475-T651 aluminum alloy plate at frequencies of 1 Hz and 10 Hz were investigated. Twenty-five mm thick compact specimens were subjected to constant amplitude fatigue testing at a load ratio of 0.2. Fatigue crack growth rates were calculated from effective crack lengths determined using a compliance method. Tests were conducted in hard vacuum and at water vapor partial pressures ranging from 94 Pa to 3.8 kPa. Fatigue crack growth rates were frequency insensitive under all environment conditions tested. For constant stress intensity factor ranges crack growth rate transitions occurred at low and high water vapor pressures. Crack growth rates at intermediate pressures were relatively constant and showed reasonable agreement with published data for two Al-Cu-Mg alloys. The existence of two crack growth rate transitions suggests either a change in rate controlling kinetics or a change in corrosion fatigue mechanism as a function of water vapor pressure. Reduced residual deformation and transverse cracking specimens tested in water vapor versus vacuum may be evidence of embrittlement within the plastic zone due to environmental interaction.

  10. Effect of water vapor on fatigue crack growth in 7475-T651 aluminum alloy plate. [for aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicus, D. L.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of water vapor on fatigue crack growth in 7475-T651 aluminum alloy plate at frequencies of 1 Hz and 10 Hz were investigated. Twenty-five mm thick compact specimens were subjected to constant amplitude fatigue testing at a load ratio of 0.2. Fatigue crack growth rates were calculated from effective crack lengths determined using a compliance method. Tests were conducted in hard vacuum and at water vapor partial pressures ranging from 94 Pa to 3.8 kPa. Fatigue crack growth rates were frequency insensitive under all environment conditions tested. For constant stress intensity factor ranges crack growth rate transitions occurred at low and high water vapor pressures. Crack growth rates at intermediate pressures were relatively constant and showed reasonable agreement with published data for two Al-Cu-Mg alloys. The existence of two crack growth rate transitions suggests either a change in rate controlling kinetics or a change in corrosion fatigue mechanism as a function of water vapor pressure. Reduced residual deformation and transverse cracking specimens tested in water vapor versus vacuum may be evidence of embrittlement within the plastic zone due to environmental interaction.

  11. Study of low-cost fabrication methods for aerospace composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, H. H.

    1978-01-01

    Flat and hat section specimens of graphite/epoxy composite materials have been fabricated by the resin bath or wet pultrusion process. This demonstrated the feasibility of incorporating crossplied graphite fiber reinforcements in conjunction with epoxy resin systems in the wet pultrusion process. However, the thickness constraints of the pultrusion process, the lack of dimensional stability of the crossply materials and equipment limitations affect the quality of the hat section pultrusions. The wet pultrusion process shows promise of being a low cost method for producing composite parts with constant cross section along the length. A cost analysis showed at least 80 percent cost reduction for the hat section and 40 percent for flat panel by pultrusion over the conventional manual and automated lay-up.

  12. Thermodynamic method of calculating the effect of alloying additives on interphase interaction in composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuchinsky, L. I.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of alloying additives to the matrix of a composite on the high temperature solubility rate of a single component fiber was analyzed thermodynamically. With an example of binary Ni alloys, with Group IV-VI transition metals reinforced with W fibers, agreement between the calculated and experimental data was demonstrated.

  13. A Study of Phase Composition and Structure of Alloys of the Al - Mg - Si - Fe System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mailybaeva, A. D.; Zolotorevskii, V. S.; Smagulov, D. U.; Islamkulov, K. M.

    2017-03-01

    The Thermo-Calc software is used to compute the phase transformations occurring during cooling of alloys. Polythermal and isothermal sections of the phase diagram of the Al - Mg - Si - Fe system are plotted. The phase composition and the structure of aluminum alloys in cast condition and after a heat treatment are studied experimentally.

  14. Novel Nanolaminates for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volz, Martin; Mazuruk, consty

    2006-01-01

    Nanolaminate manufacturing (NLM) is a new way of developing materials whose properties can far exceed those of homogeneous materials. Traditional alloys, composites and bulk laminates tend to average the properties of the materials from which they were made. With nanostructured materials, the high density of interfaces between dissimilar materials results in novel material properties. For example, materials made -from alternating nanoscale layers of metals and oxides have exhibited thermal conductivities far below those of the oxides themselves. Also, metallic nanolaminates can have peak strengths 100 times lager than the bulk constituent metals. Recent work at MSFC has focused on the development of nickel/aluminum oxide (Ni/Al2O3)) nanolaminates. Ni/Al2O3 nanolaminates are expected to have better strength, creep and fatigue resistance, oxygen compatibility, and corrosion resistance than the traditional metal-matrix composites of this material, which has been used in a variety of aerospace applications. A chemical vapor deposition (CW) system has been developed and optimized for the deposition of nanolaminates. Nanolaminates with layer thicknesses between 10 and 300 nm have been successfully grown and characterization has included scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) Nanolaminates have a large variety of potential applications. They can be tailored to have both very small and anisotropic thermal conductivities and are promising as thermal coatings for both rock$ engine components and aerobraking structures. They also have the potential to be used in aerospace applications where strength at high temperatures, corrosion resistance or resistance to hydrogen embrittlement is important. Both CVD and magnetron sputtering facilities are available for the deposition of nanolayered materials. Characterization equipment includes SEM, AFM, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, optical profilometry, and mechanical tensile pull

  15. Aerospace Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paschke, Jean; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Describes the Sauk Rapids (Minnesota) High School aviation and aerospace curriculum that was developed by Curtis Olson and the space program developed by Gerald Mayall at Philadelphia's Northeast High School. Both were developed in conjunction with NASA. (JOW)

  16. Design, Fabrication and Test of Graphite/Polyimide Composite Joints and Attachments for Advanced Aerospace Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cushman, J. B.

    1981-01-01

    Standard and advanced bonded joint concepts were evaluated to develop a data base for the design and analysis of advanced composite joints for use at elevated temperatures (561K (550F)). Design concepts for specific joint applications and the fundamental parameters controlling the static strength characteristics of such joints were identified. Test results are presented for rail shear and sandwich beam compression tests and tension tests of moisture conditioned specimens and bonded on "T" sections. Coefficients of thermal expansion data are presented for A7F (LARC 13 Amide-imide modified) adhesion. Static discriminator test results for type 1 and type 2 bonded and bolted preliminary attachment concepts are presented and discussed.

  17. Ultrasonic characterization of the fiber-matrix interfacial bond in aerospace composites.

    PubMed

    Aggelis, D G; Kleitsa, D; Matikas, T E

    2013-01-01

    The properties of advanced composites rely on the quality of the fiber-matrix bonding. Service-induced damage results in deterioration of bonding quality, seriously compromising the load-bearing capacity of the structure. While traditional methods to assess bonding are destructive, herein a nondestructive methodology based on shear wave reflection is numerically investigated. Reflection relies on the bonding quality and results in discernable changes in the received waveform. The key element is the "interphase" model material with varying stiffness. The study is an example of how computational methods enhance the understanding of delicate features concerning the nondestructive evaluation of materials used in advanced structures.

  18. Ultrasonic Characterization of the Fiber-Matrix Interfacial Bond in Aerospace Composites

    PubMed Central

    Aggelis, D. G.; Kleitsa, D.; Matikas, T. E.

    2013-01-01

    The properties of advanced composites rely on the quality of the fiber-matrix bonding. Service-induced damage results in deterioration of bonding quality, seriously compromising the load-bearing capacity of the structure. While traditional methods to assess bonding are destructive, herein a nondestructive methodology based on shear wave reflection is numerically investigated. Reflection relies on the bonding quality and results in discernable changes in the received waveform. The key element is the “interphase” model material with varying stiffness. The study is an example of how computational methods enhance the understanding of delicate features concerning the nondestructive evaluation of materials used in advanced structures. PMID:23935408

  19. Microstructure and Tensile Behaviour of B4C Reinforced ZA43 Alloy Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adaveesh, B.; Halesh, G. M.; Nagaral, Madeva; Mohan Kumar, T. S.

    2016-09-01

    The work is carried out to investigate and study the mechanical properties of B4C reinforced ZA43 alloy metal matrix composites. In the present work ZA43 alloy is taken as the base matrix and B4C particulates as reinforcement material to prepare metal matrix composites by stir casting method. For metal matrix composites the reinforcement material was varied from 0 to 6 wt.% in steps of 3 wt.%. For each composite, the reinforcement particulates were preheated to a temperature of 300°C and dispersed into a vortex of molten ZA43 alloy. The microstructural characterization was done using scanning electron microscope. Mechanical properties like hardness, ultimate tensile strength and yield strength were evaluated as per ASTM standards. Further, scanning electron microphotographs revealed that there was uniform distribution of B4C particulates in ZA43 alloy matrix. Hardness, ultimate tensile strength and yield strength increased as wt.% of B4C increased in the base matrix.

  20. Automatix Incorporated in aerospace applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilmer, C.

    1983-03-01

    Robotic assembly and artificial vision applications are currently employed or have potential in aerospace manufacturing. Automatix vision guided robotics have been used for electronic component assembly, welding of aluminum alloys with both gas metal arc welding (MIG). Other applications include gas tungsten arc welding (TIG), and visual gauging. The unique control concept has provided a single robotic controller with virtual robotic arm interchangeability.

  1. Design, fabrication and test of graphite/polyimide composite joints and attachments for advanced aerospace vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The development of several types of graphite/polyimide (GR/PI) bonded and bolted joints is reported. The program consists of two concurrent tasks: (1) design and test of specific built up attachments; and (2) evaluation of standard advanced bonded joint concepts. A data base for the design and analysis of advanced composite joints for use at elevated temperatures (561K (550 deg F)) to design concepts for specific joining applications, and the fundamental parameters controlling the static strength characteristics of such joints are evaluated. Data for design and build GR/PI of lightly loaded flight components for advanced space transportation systems and high speed aircraft are presented. Results for compression and interlaminar shear strengths of Celion 6000/PMR-15 laminates are given. Static discriminator test results for type 3 and type 4 bonded and bolted joints and final joint designs for TASK 1.4 scale up fabrication and testing are presented.

  2. Effect of composition on antiphase boundary energy in Ni3Al based alloys: Ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbatov, O. I.; Lomaev, I. L.; Gornostyrev, Yu. N.; Ruban, A. V.; Furrer, D.; Venkatesh, V.; Novikov, D. L.; Burlatsky, S. F.

    2016-06-01

    The effect of composition on the antiphase boundary (APB) energy of Ni-based L 12-ordered alloys is investigated by ab initio calculations employing the coherent potential approximation. The calculated APB energies for the {111} and {001} planes reproduce experimental values of the APB energy. The APB energies for the nonstoichiometric γ' phase increase with Al concentration and are in line with the experiment. The magnitude of the alloying effect on the APB energy correlates with the variation of the ordering energy of the alloy according to the alloying element's position in the 3 d row. The elements from the left side of the 3 d row increase the APB energy of the Ni-based L 12-ordered alloys, while the elements from the right side slightly affect it except Ni. The way to predict the effect of an addition on the {111} APB energy in a multicomponent alloy is discussed.

  3. Design, fabrication and test of graphite/polyimide composite joints and attachments for advanced aerospace vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barclay, D. L.

    1980-01-01

    Results of an experimental program to develop several types of graphite/polyimide (GR/PI) bonded and bolted joints for lightly loaded flight components for advanced space transportation systems and high speed aircraft are presented. Tasks accomplished include: a literature survey; design of static discriminator specimens; design allowables testing; fabrication of test panels and specimens; small specimen testing; and standard joint testing. Detail designs of static discriminator specimens for each of the four major attachment types are presented. Test results are given for the following: (1) transverse tension of Celion 3000/PMR-15 laminate; (2) net tension of a laminate for both a loaded and unloaded bolt hole; (3) comparative testing of bonded and co-cured doublers along with pull-off tests of single and double bonded angles; (4) single lap shear tests, transverse tension and coefficient of thermal expansion tests of A7F (LARC-13 amide-imide modified) adhesive; and (5) tension tests of standard single lap, double lap, and symmetric step lap bonded joints. Also, included are results of a finite element analysis of a single lap bonded composite joint.

  4. Comparison of the Effects of Tool Geometry for Friction Stir Welding Thin Sheet Aluminum Alloys for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merry, Josh; Takeshita, Jennifer; Tweedy, Bryan; Burford, Dwight

    2006-01-01

    In this presentation, the results of a recent study on the effect of pin tool design for friction stir welding thin sheets (0.040") of aluminum alloys 2024 and 7075 are provided. The objective of this study was to investigate and document the effect of tool shoulder and pin diameter, as well as the presence of pin flutes, on the resultant microstructure and mechanical properties at both room temperature and cryogenic temperature. Specifically, the comparison between three tools will include: FSW process load analysis (tool forces required to fabricate the welds), Static Mechanical Properties (ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, and elongation), and Process window documenting the range of parameters that can be used with the three pin tools investigated. All samples were naturally aged for a period greater than 10 days. Prior research has shown 7075 may require post weld heat treatment. Therefore, an additional pair of room temperature and cryogenic temperature samples was post-weld aged to the 7075-T7 condition prior to mechanical testing.

  5. Size-confined fixed-composition and composition-dependent engineered band gap alloying induces different internal structures in L-cysteine-capped alloyed quaternary CdZnTeS quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adegoke, Oluwasesan; Park, Enoch Y.

    2016-06-01

    The development of alloyed quantum dot (QD) nanocrystals with attractive optical properties for a wide array of chemical and biological applications is a growing research field. In this work, size-tunable engineered band gap composition-dependent alloying and fixed-composition alloying were employed to fabricate new L-cysteine-capped alloyed quaternary CdZnTeS QDs exhibiting different internal structures. Lattice parameters simulated based on powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) revealed the internal structure of the composition-dependent alloyed CdxZnyTeS QDs to have a gradient nature, whereas the fixed-composition alloyed QDs exhibited a homogenous internal structure. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis confirmed the size-confined nature and monodispersity of the alloyed nanocrystals. The zeta potential values were within the accepted range of colloidal stability. Circular dichroism (CD) analysis showed that the surface-capped L-cysteine ligand induced electronic and conformational chiroptical changes in the alloyed nanocrystals. The photoluminescence (PL) quantum yield (QY) values of the gradient alloyed QDs were 27–61%, whereas for the homogenous alloyed QDs, the PL QY values were spectacularly high (72–93%). Our work demonstrates that engineered fixed alloying produces homogenous QD nanocrystals with higher PL QY than composition-dependent alloying.

  6. Ag-Pt alloy nanoparticles with the compositions in the miscibility gap

    SciTech Connect

    Peng Zhenmeng; Yang Hong

    2008-07-15

    Silver platinum binary alloys with compositions between about Ag{sub 2}Pt{sub 98} and Ag{sub 95}Pt{sub 5} at <{approx} 400 deg. C have largely not been observed in bulk due to the large immiscibility between these two metals. We present in this paper that Ag-Pt alloy nanostructures can be made in a broad composition range. The formation of Ag-Pt nanostructures is studied by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) and energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX). Our results indicate that lattice parameter changes almost linearly with composition in these Ag-Pt nanomaterials. In another word, lattice parameter and composition relationship follows the Vegard's law, which is a strong indication for the formation of metal alloys. Our transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study shows that the silver-rich Ag-Pt alloy nanostructures have spherical shape, while the platinum-rich ones possess wire-like morphology. The stability and crystal phase are investigated by annealing the alloy nanostructures directly or on carbon supports. - Graphical abstract: While platinum and silver cannot form a solid solution with the composition between about Ag{sub 2}Pt{sub 98} and Ag{sub 95}Pt{sub 5} at 400 deg. C or below in bulk form, alloy particles and wires can be made within this miscibility gap at the nanometer scale.

  7. Single target sputter deposition of alloy nanoparticles with adjustable composition via a gas aggregation cluster source.

    PubMed

    Vahl, Alexander; Strobel, Julian; Reichstein, Wiebke; Polonskyi, Oleksandr; Strunskus, Thomas; Kienle, Lorenz; Faupel, Franz

    2017-04-28

    Alloy nanoparticles with variable compositions add a new dimension to nanoscience and have many applications. Here we suggest a novel approach for the fabrication of variable composition alloy nanoparticles that is based on a Haberland type gas aggregation cluster source with a custom-made multicomponent target for magnetron sputtering. The approach, which was demonstrated here for gold-rich AgAu nanoparticles, combines a narrow nanoparticle size distribution with in operando variation of composition via the gas pressure as well as highly efficient usage of target material. The latter is particularly attractive for precious metals. Varying argon pressure during deposition, we achieved in operando changes of AgAu alloy nanoparticle composition of more than 13 at%. The alloy nanoparticles were characterized by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. The characteristic plasmon resonances of multilayer nanoparticle composites were analyzed by UV-vis spectroscopy. Tuning of the number of particles per unit area (particle densities) within individual layers showed an additional degree of freedom to tailor the optical properties of multilayer nanocomposites. By extension of this technique to more complex systems, the presented results are expected to encourage and simplify further research based on plasmonic multi-element nanoparticles. The present method is by no means restricted to plasmonics or nanoparticle based applications, but is also highly relevant for conventional magnetron sputtering of alloys and can be extended to in operando control of alloy concentration by magnetic field.

  8. Production of semi-solid feedstock of A356 alloy and A356-5TiB2 in-situ composite by cooling slope casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, S. Deepak; Acharya, Mihira; Mandal, A.; Chakraborty, M.

    2015-02-01

    Cooling Slope casting process has gained significant importance for manufacturing of semi-solid feedstock Al alloys and composites which find applications in automotive and aerospace industries. The primary objective of this research is to generate the semi-solid feedstock suitable for thixoforming process. The current work discusses the phenomena involved in the evolution of microstructure of the semi-solid feed stock by Cooling Slope casting process and the effect of various parameters. The process parameters like the angle and length of inclined plate affect the size and morphology of α-Al phase. The Cooling slope process resulted in the formation of fine grain size of about 38 μm of α-Al phase, compared to that of 98 μm processed conventionally. Further, the pouring temperature played a crucial role in the generation of semi-solid microstructures in case of both the alloy and composites. Moreover, fine TiB2 particles of size 0.2-0.5 μm are uniformly distributed in the almost spherical α-Al grains and at the grain boundaries in the composite feed stock. Cooling slope casting route is a suitable and economical route for semi-solid slurry generation by effectively varying the process parameters.

  9. The Microstructure-Processing-Property Relationships in an Al Matrix Composite System Reinforced by Al-Cu-Fe Alloy Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Fei

    2004-01-01

    Metal matrix composites (MMC), especially Al matrix composites, received a lot of attention during many years of research because of their promise for the development of automotive and aerospace materials with improved properties and performance, such as lighter weight and better structural properties, improved thermal conductivity and wear resistance. In order to make the MMC materials more viable in various applications, current research efforts on the MMCs should continue to focus on two important aspects, including improving the properties of MMCs and finding more economical techniques to produce MMCs. Solid state vacuum sintering was studied in tap densified Al powder and in hot quasi-isostatically forged samples composed of commercial inert gas atomized or high purity Al powder, generated by a gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS) technique. The GARS process results in spherical Al powder with a far thinner surface oxide. The overall results indicated the enhanced ability of GARS-processed Al and Al alloy powders for solid state sintering, which may lead to simplification of current Al powder consolidation processing methods. Elemental Al-based composites reinforced with spherical Al-Cu-Fe alloy powders were produced by quasi-isostatic forging and vacuum hot pressing (VHP) consolidation methods. Microstructures and tensile properties of AYAl-Cu-Fe composites were characterized. It was proved that spherical Al-Cu-Fe alloy powders can serve as an effective reinforcement particulate for elemental Al-based composites, because of their high hardness and a preferred type of matrix/reinforcement interfacial bonding, with reduced strain concentration around the particles. Ultimate tensile strength and yield strength of the composites were increased over the corresponding Al matrix values, far beyond typical observations. This remarkable strengthening was achieved without precipitation hardening and without severe strain hardening during consolidation because of

  10. Effect of composition on the high rate dynamic behaviour of tungsten heavy alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latif, Kesemen; Kaan, Çalışkan N.; Emrah, Konokman H.; Nuri, Durlu

    2015-09-01

    Tungsten heavy alloys are currently used as kinetic energy penetrators in military applications due to their high density and superior mechanical properties. In the literature, quasi-static properties of different tungsten heavy alloys based on W-Ni-Cu and W-Ni-Fe ternary systems are well documented and presented. However, comparison of the dynamic behaviour of these alloys in terms of the correlation between quasi-static mechanical characterization and dynamical properties is lacking. In the present study, dynamic properties of tungsten heavy alloys having different binder phase compositions (90W-7Ni-3Cu and 90W-8Ni-2Fe) at different projectile velocities were investigated. The examined and tested alloys were produced through the conventional powder metallurgy route of mixing, cold compaction and sintering. Mechanical characterization of these alloys was performed. In the ballistic tests, cylindrical tungsten heavy alloys with L/D ratio of 3 were impacted to hardened steel target at different projectile velocities. After the ballistic tests, deformation characteristics of test specimens during dynamic loading were evaluated by comparing the change of length and diameter of the specimens versus kinetic energy densities. The study concluded that 90W-8Ni-2Fe alloy has better perforation characteristics than 90W-7Ni-3Cu alloy.

  11. Investigation of Microstructural Factors that Cause Low Fracture Toughness in Silicon Carbide Whisker/Al Alloy Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-10-01

    TOUGHNESS IN SILICON CARBIDE WHISKER/Al ALLOY COMPOSITES oSubmittLJ to: Office of Naval Research 800 N. Quincy Street Arlington, VA 22217-5000...September 30, 1988 INVESTIGATION OF MICROSTRUCTURAL FACTORS THAT CAUSE LOW FRACTURE TOUGHNESS IN SILICON CARBIDE WHISKER/Al ALLOY COMPOSITES Submitted...Investigation of Microstructural Factors that Cause Low Fracture Toughness in Silicon Carbide Whisker/Al Alloy Composites .12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) F. E. Wawner

  12. Alloy 718 for Oilfield Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    deBarbadillo, John J.; Mannan, Sarwan K.

    2012-02-01

    Alloy 718 (UNS N07718) was developed for use in aircraft gas turbine engines, but its unique combination of room-temperature strength and aqueous corrosion resistance made it a candidate for oilfield fasteners, valves, drill tools, and completion equipment. As well environments became more severe, stress corrosion and hydrogen embrittlement failures in production equipment drove the evolution of the composition and microstructure that distinguish today's oilfield-grade 718 from aerospace grades. This paper reviews the development of the grade and its applications and describes some of its unique characteristics, testing, and manufacturing methods as well as newer alloys designed for high-pressure high-temperature (HPHT) conditions.

  13. The influence of alloy composition on residual stresses in heat treated aluminium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, J.S.; Redington, W.

    2015-07-15

    The as quenched properties of eight different heat treatable aluminium alloys are related to residual stress magnitudes with the objective being to establish if there is a relationship between the residual stress and the as quenched alloy hardness and strength. Near surface residual stresses were assessed with X-ray diffraction using both the established sin{sup 2}ψ method and the more recent cos α technique. Through thickness residual stresses were also characterised using neutron diffraction. The alloys were chosen to encompass a wide range of strengths. The low to medium strength alloys were 6060 and 6082, medium to high strength 2618A, 2014A, 7075, 7010 and two variants of 7449, while the very high strength alloy was the powder metallurgy alloy N707. To assess the as quenched strength, dynamic hardness and tensile properties were determined from samples tested immediately after quenching to minimise the influence of precipitation hardening by natural aging. In addition, hot hardness measurements were made in situ on samples cooled to simulate quench paths. Within the experimental constraints of the investigation, the distribution of residual stress through the thickness was found to follow the same pattern for all the alloys investigated, varying from tensile in the interior to surface compression. The influence of alloy strength was manifested as a change in the observed residual stress magnitudes, and surface residual stresses were found to vary linearly with as quenched hardness and strength. - Highlights: • As quenched aluminium alloys contain high magnitude residual stresses. • Surface is compressive balance by a tensile core. • As quenched surface residual stress is linear function of alloy strength. • In situ hot hardness demonstrates rapid change in intrinsic hardness during rapid cooling.

  14. Geometric and Chemical Composition Effects on Healing Kinetics of Voids in Mg-bearing Al Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Miao; Du, Kui; Wang, Chunyang; Wen, Shengping; Huang, Hui; Nie, Zuoren; Ye, Hengqiang

    2016-05-01

    The healing kinetics of nanometer-scale voids in Al-Mg-Er and Al-Mg-Zn-Er alloy systems were investigated with a combination of in situ transmission electron microscopy and electron tomography at different temperatures. Mg was observed completely healing the voids, which were then rejuvenated to the alloy composition with further aging, in the Al-Mg-Er alloy. On the contrary, Mg51Zn20 intermetallic compound was formed in voids in the Al-Mg-Zn-Er alloy, which leads to complete filling of the voids but not rejuvenation for the material. For voids with different geometrical aspects, different evolution processes were observed, which are related to the competition between bulk and surface diffusion of the alloys. For voids with a large size difference in their two ends, a viscous flow of surface atoms can be directly observed with in situ electron microscopy, when the size of one end becomes less than tens of nanometers.

  15. Aerospace Medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Jeffrey R.

    2006-01-01

    This abstract describes the content of a presentation for ground rounds at Mt. Sinai School of Medicine. The presentation contains three sections. The first describes the history of aerospace medicine beginning with early flights with animals. The second section of the presentation describes current programs and planning for future missions. The third section describes the medical challenges of exploration missions.

  16. Effect of Anodized Oxide Layer Aging on Wettability of Alkyl Silane Coating Developed on Aerospace Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoganandan, G.; Bharathidasan, T.; Soumya Sri, M.; Vasumathy, D.; Balaraju, J. N.; Basu, Bharathibai J.

    2015-01-01

    Incipient nanoporous texture was developed by phosphoric acid anodization (PAAO) process on AA2024 specimen. The developed oxide layer was modified with low surface energy material fluoroalkyl-silane (FAS-13) by simple immersion technique to improve the hydrophobic property of the surface. Atomic force microscopy results showed that there was a significant reduction (30 pct) in surface roughness due to the aging of PAAO. The water contact angle measurement revealed that there was a gradual increase in WCA from 130 to 160 deg due to the aging of PAAO. A systematic composition analysis was carried out to understand the interfacial chemical reaction and also to differentiate the coating formation mechanism between the natural and artificial aging processes. The potentiodynamic polarization results revealed that the superhydrophobic (SH) surface exhibited about 15 and 4 times improved corrosion resistance compared to bare specimen and PAAO, respectively. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy results also showed the improved corrosion inhibition behavior of vacuum heat-treated and FAS-modified SH surface among the developed coatings.

  17. Composition dependence of magnetic properties in perpendicularly magnetized epitaxial thin films of Mn-Ga alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizukami, S.; Kubota, T.; Wu, F.; Zhang, X.; Miyazaki, T.; Naganuma, H.; Oogane, M.; Sakuma, A.; Ando, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Mn-Ga binary alloys show strong magnetism and large uniaxial magnetic anisotropy even though these alloys do not contain any noble, rare-earth metals or magnetic elements. We investigate the composition dependence of saturation magnetization MS and uniaxial magnetic anisotropy Ku in epitaxial films of MnxGa1-x alloys (x˜0.5-0.75) grown by magnetron sputtering. The MS values decrease linearly from approximately 600 to 200 emu/cm3 with increasing x, whereas the Ku values decrease slightly from approximately 15 to 10 Merg/cm3 with increasing x. These trends are distinct from those for known tetragonal hard magnets obtained in a limited composition range in Mn-Al and Fe-Pt binary alloys. These data are analyzed using a localized magnetic moment model.

  18. Effects of alloy composition in alleviating embrittlement problems associated with the tantalum alloy T-111

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    The causes of aging embrittlement in T-111 (Ta-8W-2Hf) and the effect of alloy modification were investigated. Results show that T-111 possesses a critical combination of tungsten and hafnium that leads to loss in ductility at -196 C after aging near 1040 C. It was found that this occurs because tungsten enhances hafnium segregation to grain boundaries, which also leads to increased susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement. Aging embrittlement was not observed in tantalum alloys with reduced tungsten or hafnium contents; most of the alloys studied have lower strengths than T-111 and exhibit susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement.

  19. Effects of alloy composition in alleviating embrittlement problems associated with the tantalum alloy T-111

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    The causes of aging embrittlement in T-111 (Ta-8W-2Hf) and the effects of alloy modification were investigated. Results showed that T-111 contains a critical combination of tungsten and hafnium that leads to loss of ductility at -196 C after aging near 1040 C. This appears to occur because tungsten enhances hafnium segregation to grain boundaries and this also leads to increased susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement. Aging embrittlement was not observed in tantalum alloys with reduced tungsten or hafnium contents; however, most of the alloys studied have lower strengths than T-111 and exhibit susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement.

  20. Development of Deployable Elastic Composite Shape Memory Alloy Reinforced (DECSMAR) Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-01

    battens nest. To mitigate the compromise of deployed performance due to the hinge cross-section, Nitinol SMA wires can be embedded in the composite...proportional limit by slip or conventional plastic deformation. As a logistics example, the particular Nitinol alloy used for proto-typing has...Memory Alloys,” Johnson Matthey, 2004. 10Cross, WB, Kariotis, AH, & Stimler, FJ, “ Nitinol Characterization Study,” NASA CR-1433, 1970. 11Proft, JL

  1. Thermoelectric homogeneity and stability of platinum-rhodium alloyed thermoelements of different compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edler, F.; Ederer, P.

    2013-09-01

    This paper discusses the different oxidation behavior of platinum and rhodium and their alloys usable as thermocouple materials. A specially prepared thermocouple containing thermoelements of different platinum-rhodium alloys (Pt-5%Rh, Pt-6%Rh, Pt-13%Rh, Pt-17%Rh and Pt-20%Rh) and a Pt-67 thermoelement was investigated. It was annealed at different temperatures in air. The thermoelectric homogeneity and stability of the thermocouple was tested by measurements of immersion profiles at 400 °C in a salt bath. The alloys of Pt-17%Rh and Pt-20%Rh were found to be the most suitable compositions with regard to thermoelectric homogeneity and stability.

  2. a Study on Fatigue Damage of Shape Memory Alloy Composite Using Nde Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Young-Chul; Lee, Jin-Kyung; Lee, Sang-Pill; Lee, Gyu-Chang; Lee, Joon-Hyun; Cho, Youn-Ho; Lee, Jong-Back

    TiNi shape memory alloy was used to recover the shape of transformed objects using its shape memory effect. This shape memory effect plays an important role inside metal matrix composite. A composite using shape memory alloy has a large advantage that can control crack initiation and propagation, when compared with other composites due to the shape memory effect of shape memory alloy under high temperature. In this study, TiNi/Al6061 and TiNi/2024 shape memory composites were fabricated by the hot press method, and a fatigue test was performed to evaluate the fatigue damage for the shape memory composites under room temperature and high temperature. The relationship of the crack growth rate and the stress intensity factor for these shape memory composites were clarified at both temperature conditions. The delay effect of crack propagation due to shape memory alloy was also evaluated under high temperature. In addition, an acoustic emission technique was used to evaluate the crack initiation and the control of crack propagation by shape memory effect under fatigue test nondestructively. The relationship between AE parameter and the degree of fatigue damage of the shape memory composites was discussed.

  3. Shape Memory Alloy Modeling and Applications to Porous and Composite Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Pingping

    There has been a growing concern about an exciting class of advanced material -- shape memory alloys (SMAs) since their discovery several decades ago. SMAs exhibit large reversible stresses and strains owing to a thermoelastic phase transformation. They have been widely used in many engineering fields including aerospace, biomedical, and automotive engineering, especially as sensors, actuators, bone implants and deployable switches. The behavior of SMAs is very complex due to the coupling between thermal and mechanical effects. Theoretical and computational tools are used in this dissertation to investigate the mechanical behavior of SMA and its related structures for seeking better and wider application of this material. In the first part of this dissertation, we proposed an improved macroscopic phenomenological constitutive model of SMA that accounts for all major mechanical behaviors including elasticity, phase transformation, reorientation and plasticity. The model is based on some previous work developed in the Brinson group, and the current efforts are focused on plasticity, the application of a pre-defined strain, unification of notations, and other coding-related work. A user subroutine script VUMAT is developed to implement the constitutive model to the commercial finite element software Abaqus. Typical simulation results based on the model are presented, as well as verification with some experimental results. In the second part, we apply the developed constitutive model to a series of two-dimensional SMA plates with structured arrays of pores to investigate the structural response, especially the stress, strain, phase transformation, and plastic fields. Results are documented about the coupling of the elastic, transformation and plastic fields about the arrays of pores. Theoretical and experimental DIC results are also utilized to validate some simulation results. Conclusions are then drawn to provide understanding in the effect of pores and the

  4. Formation of an interstitially alloyed phase in Mg/C60 composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jaehyuck; Yoon, Sock-yeon; Choi, Hyunjoo; Shin, Seeun; Bae, Donghyun

    2013-07-01

    The formation of an interstitially alloyed phase and its effects on mechanical properties are investigated for a magnesium-based composite containing fullerene (Mg/C60). The Mg/C60 composite was fabricated using the ball milling method followed by hot rolling and then the composite sheet was annealed at 425°C for up to 37 h. The fullerene was dispersed during the ball milling process and it was decomposed. The carbon atoms from the decomposed fullerene diffused into the magnesium matrix, which increasingly occupied the octahedral sites of the magnesium as the annealing continued. The formed interstitially alloyed phase expanded as the annealing time increased, and magnesium carbide was formed after 37 h. Vickers hardness value increased as the interstitially alloyed phase continuously formed and it decreased when the magnesium carbide was formed, because the carbon atoms at the magnesium interstices may interact with moving dislocations, resulting in an increase in the hardness of the magnesium.

  5. Properties of High Volume Fraction Fly Ash/Al Alloy Composites Produced by Infiltration Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kountouras, D. T.; Stergioudi, F.; Tsouknidas, A.; Vogiatzis, C. A.; Skolianos, S. M.

    2015-09-01

    In the present study, pressure infiltration is employed to synthesize aluminum alloy 7075-fly ash composites. The microstructure and chemical composition of the fly ash and the produced composite material was examined using optical and scanning electron microscopy, as well as x-ray diffraction. Several properties of the produced composite material were examined and evaluated including macro-hardness, wear, thermal expansion, and corrosion behavior. The wear characteristics of the composite, in the as-cast conditions, were studied by dry sliding wear tests. The corrosion behavior of composite material was evaluated by means of potentiodynamic corrosion experiments in a 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. The composite specimens exhibit a homogeneous distribution of fly ash particles and present enhanced hardness values, compared to the matrix material. The high volume fraction of the fly ash reinforcement (>40%) in the composite material led to increased wear rates, attributed to the fragmentation of the fly ash particles. However, the presence of fly ash particles in the Al alloy matrix considerably decreased the coefficiency of thermal expansion, while resulting in an altered corrosion mechanism of the composite material with respect to the matrix alloy.

  6. Aerospace Dermatology.

    PubMed

    Arora, Gp Capt Sandeep

    2017-01-01

    Evolutionarily, man is a terrestrial mammal, adapted to land. Aviation and now space/microgravity environment, hence, pose new challenges to our physiology. Exposure to these changes affects the human body in acute and chronic settings. Since skin reflects our mental and physical well-being, any change/side effects of this environment shall be detected on the skin. Aerospace industry offers a unique environment with a blend of all possible occupational disorders, encompassing all systems of the body, particularly the skin. Aerospace dermatologists in the near future shall be called upon for their expertise as we continue to push human physiological boundaries with faster and more powerful military aircraft and look to colonize space stations and other planets. Microgravity living shall push dermatology into its next big leap-space, the final frontier. This article discusses the physiological effects of this environment on skin, effect of common dermatoses in aerospace environment, effect of microgravity on skin, and occupational hazards of this industry.

  7. Aerospace Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Gp Capt Sandeep

    2017-01-01

    Evolutionarily, man is a terrestrial mammal, adapted to land. Aviation and now space/microgravity environment, hence, pose new challenges to our physiology. Exposure to these changes affects the human body in acute and chronic settings. Since skin reflects our mental and physical well-being, any change/side effects of this environment shall be detected on the skin. Aerospace industry offers a unique environment with a blend of all possible occupational disorders, encompassing all systems of the body, particularly the skin. Aerospace dermatologists in the near future shall be called upon for their expertise as we continue to push human physiological boundaries with faster and more powerful military aircraft and look to colonize space stations and other planets. Microgravity living shall push dermatology into its next big leap-space, the final frontier. This article discusses the physiological effects of this environment on skin, effect of common dermatoses in aerospace environment, effect of microgravity on skin, and occupational hazards of this industry. PMID:28216729

  8. Actuation curvature limits for a composite beam with embedded shape memory alloy wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naghashian, S.; Fox, B. L.; Barnett, M. R.

    2014-06-01

    Shape memory alloy composites were manufactured using NiTi wires and woven glass fiber pre-impregnated fabrics. A closed form analytical model was developed to investigate the curvature achievable during actuation. The experimental results of actuation showed reasonable agreement with the model. Actuation temperatures were between ˜55 and 110 °C, curvatures of 0.25-0.5 m-1 were obtained and the stresses in the wires were estimated to have reached 265 MPa during actuation. An actuation curvature map was produced, which shows the actuation limits and approximate temperature-curvature curves for the general case of a composite containing shape memory alloy wires.

  9. Growth and Characterization of Chalcogenide Alloy Nanowires with Controlled Spatial Composition Variation for Optoelectronic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, Patricia

    The energy band gap of a semiconductor material critically influences the operating wavelength of an optoelectronic device. Realization of any desired band gap, or even spatially graded band gaps, is important for applications such as lasers, light-emitting diodes (LEDs), solar cells, and detectors. Compared to thin films, nanowires offer greater flexibility for achieving a variety of alloy compositions. Furthermore, the nanowire geometry permits simultaneous incorporation of a wide range of compositions on a single substrate. Such controllable alloy composition variation can be realized either within an individual nanowire or between distinct nanowires across a substrate. This dissertation explores the control of spatial composition variation in ternary alloy nanowires. Nanowires were grown by the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism using chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The gas-phase supersaturation was considered in order to optimize the deposition morphology. Composition and structure were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and x-ray diffraction (XRD). Optical properties were investigated through photoluminescence (PL) measurements. The chalcogenides selected as alloy endpoints were lead sulfide (PbS), cadmium sulfide (CdS), and cadmium selenide (CdSe). Three growth modes of PbS were identified, which included contributions from spontaneously generated catalyst. The resulting wires were found capable of lasing with wavelengths over 4000 nm, representing the longest known wavelength from a sub-wavelength wire. For CdxPb1-xS nanowires, it was established that the cooling process significantly affects the alloy composition and structure. Quenching was critical to retain metastable alloys with x up to 0.14, representing a new composition in nanowire form. Alternatively, gradual cooling caused phase segregation, which created heterostructures with light emission in

  10. A study of high {Tc} superconducting ceramic/metal alloy composites

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, M.G.; Du, J.; Lee, R.M; Unsworth, J.; Hely, J.; Hodges, J.

    1995-09-01

    High-{Tc} superconducting ceramic YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}x}/metal alloy composites were fabricated. The metal matrix was a low melting point alloy of bismuth, lead, tin, cadmium and indium. The structure, DC electrical resistivity, AC magnetic susceptibility, levitation and mechanical strength of the composites were investigated. The influence of filler content on these properties was also studied. The composites behaved as a typical metal with the resistivity increasing with temperature increase and, further, did not undergo the characteristic superconducting transition to zero resistance that is obtained with the ceramic superconductor. On the other hand, the diamagnetic properties of the superconducting ceramic were preserved in the composites. The values of diamagnetic susceptibility and levitation force increase with the volume fraction of the superconducting material. The flexural strength of the composites is improved significantly in comparison with the ceramic superconductor.

  11. Hybrid Shape Memory Alloy Composites for Extreme Environments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    Shape Memory Alloys in Oil Well Applications,” Sintef Petroleum Research, 1999, Trondheim, Norway. 5. Hartl, D. J., Lagoudas, D., Mabe, J., Calkins ...Materials and Structures, Vol. 19, No. 1., 2009. 6. Hartl, D. J., Lagoudas, D., Mabe, J., Calkins , F., and Mooney, J., “Use of Ni60Ti Shape Memory

  12. Thermoelectric metal comparator determines composition of alloys and metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, C. C.; Walker, D. E.

    1967-01-01

    Emf comparing device nondestructively inspects metals and alloys for conformance to a chemical specification. It uses the Seebeck effect to measure the difference in emf produced by the junction of a hot probe and the junction of a cold contact on the surface of an unknown metal.

  13. Preparation and optical properties of silica Ag-Cu alloy core-shell composite colloids

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Jianhui Liu Huaiyong; Wang Zhenlin; Ming Naiben

    2007-04-15

    The silica Ag-Cu alloy core-shell composite colloids have been successfully synthesized by an electroless plating approach to explore the possibility of modifying the plasmon resonance at the nanoshell surface by varying the metal nanoshell composition for the first time. The surface plasmon resonance of the composite colloids increases in intensity and shifts towards longer, then shorter wavelengths as the Cu/Ag ratio in the alloy shell is increased. The variations in intensity of the surface plasmon resonance with the Cu/Ag ratio obviously affect the Raman bands of the silica colloid core. The report here may supply a new technique to effectively modify the surface plasmon resonance. - Graphical abstract: The silica Ag-Cu alloy core-shell colloids have been successfully synthesized to explore the possibility of modifying the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) by varying the metal nanoshell composition for the first time. Varying the Cu/Ag ratio of the alloy nanoshell has obvious influences on the SPR of the composite colloids and the Raman bands of the amorphous silica core.

  14. Recent advances in research on magnesium alloys and magnesium-calcium phosphate composites as biodegradable implant materials.

    PubMed

    Kuśnierczyk, Katarzyna; Basista, Michał

    2016-07-01

    Magnesium alloys are modern biocompatible materials suitable for orthopaedic implants due to their biodegradability in biological environment. Many studies indicate that there is a high demand to design magnesium alloys with controllable in vivo corrosion rates and required mechanical properties. A solution to this challenge can be sought in the development of metal matrix composites based on magnesium alloys with addition of relevant alloying elements and bioceramic particles. In this study, the corrosion mechanisms along with corrosion protection methods in magnesium alloys are discussed. The recently developed magnesium alloys for biomedical applications are reviewed. Special attention is given to the newest research results in metal matrix composites composed of magnesium alloy matrix and calcium phosphates, especially hydroxyapatite or tricalcium phosphate, as the second phase with emphasis on the biodegradation behavior, microstructure and mechanical properties in view of potential application of these materials in bone implants.

  15. Advanced Ceramic Materials for Future Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay

    2015-01-01

    With growing trend toward higher temperature capabilities, lightweight, and multifunctionality, significant advances in ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) will be required for future aerospace applications. The presentation will provide an overview of material requirements for future aerospace missions, and the role of ceramics and CMCs in meeting those requirements. Aerospace applications will include gas turbine engines, aircraft structure, hypersonic and access to space vehicles, space power and propulsion, and space communication.

  16. Recent advances and developments in refractory alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Nieh, T.G.; Wadsworth, J.

    1993-11-01

    Refractory metal alloys based on Mo, W, Re, Ta, and Nb (Cb) find applications in a wide range of aerospace applications because of their high melting points and high-temperature strength. This paper, presents recent progress in understanding and applications of these alloys. Recent studies to improve the oxidation and mechanical behavior of refractory metal alloys, and particularly Nb alloys, are also discussed. Some Re structures, for extremely high temperature applications (> 2000C), made by CVD and P/M processes, are also illustrated. Interesting work on the development of new W alloys (W-HfC-X) and the characterization of some commercial refractory metals, e.g., K-doped W, TZM, and Nb-1%Zr, continues. Finally, recent developments in high temperature composites reinforced with refractory metal filaments, and refractory metal-based intermetallics, e.g., Nb{sub 3}Al, Nb{sub 2}Be{sub 17}, and MoSi{sub 2}, are briefly described.

  17. Method of preparing copper-dendritic composite alloys for mechanical reduction

    DOEpatents

    Verhoeven, John D.; Gibson, Edwin D.; Schmidt, Frederick A.; Spitzig, William A.

    1988-01-01

    Copper-dendritic composite alloys are prepared for mechanical reduction to increase tensile strength by dispersing molten droplets of the composite alloy into an inert gas; solidifying the droplets in the form of minute spheres or platelets; and compacting a mass of the spheres or platelets into an integrated body. The spheres preferably have diameters of from 50 to 2000 .mu.m, and the platelets thicknesses of 100 to 2000 .mu.m. The resulting spheres or platelets will contain ultra-fine dendrites which produce higher strengths on mechanical reduction of the bodies formed therefrom, or comparable strengths at lower reduction values. The method is applicable to alloys of copper with vanadium, niobium, tantalum, chromium, molybdenum, tungsten, iron and cobalt.

  18. Method of preparing copper-dendritic composite alloys for mechanical reduction

    DOEpatents

    Verhoeven, J.D.; Gibson, E.D.; Schmidt, F.A.; Spitzig, W.A.

    1988-09-13

    Copper-dendritic composite alloys are prepared for mechanical reduction to increase tensile strength by dispersing molten droplets of the composite alloy into an inert gas; solidifying the droplets in the form of minute spheres or platelets; and compacting a mass of the spheres or platelets into an integrated body. The spheres preferably have diameters of from 50 to 2,000 [mu]m, and the platelets thicknesses of 100 to 2,000 [mu]m. The resulting spheres or platelets will contain ultra-fine dendrites which produce higher strengths on mechanical reduction of the bodies formed therefrom, or comparable strengths at lower reduction values. The method is applicable to alloys of copper with vanadium, niobium, tantalum, chromium, molybdenum, tungsten, iron and cobalt. 3 figs.

  19. VAMAS tests of structural materials on aluminum alloy and composite material at cryogenic temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Ogata, T.; Evans, D.

    1997-06-01

    A Technical Working Area 17, cryogenic structural materials, has been organized in the Versailles Project on Advanced Materials and Standards (VAMAS) to promote the prestandardization program on material properties tests of glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) composite materials and alloys at liquid helium temperature. A series of international interlaboratory comparisons of both tensile and fracture toughness tests for aluminum alloy 2219 and compression and shear tests for composite material G-10CR were performed. Nine research institutes from seven nations have participated in this project. The results prove that there are few problems in cryogenic tensile tests for alloy materials. In compression and shear tests, the amount of data scatter was identified and further experiments are planned. This paper presents the program details and interim results of round robin tests.

  20. Aerospace Education - An Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Aerospace Education, 1975

    1975-01-01

    Discusses the surge of interest throughout the country in aerospace education and discusses what aerospace education is, the implications in career education and the relevance of aerospace education in the curriculum. (BR)

  1. Basic Aerospace Education Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Aerospace Education, 1975

    1975-01-01

    Lists the most significant resource items on aerospace education which are presently available. Includes source books, bibliographies, directories, encyclopedias, dictionaries, audiovisuals, curriculum/planning guides, aerospace statistics, aerospace education statistics and newsletters. (BR)

  2. Application of Laser Design of Amorphous Feco-Based Alloys for the Formation of Amorphous-Crystalline Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Permyakova, I. E.; Glezer, A. M.; Ivanov, A. A.; Shelyakov, A. V.

    2016-01-01

    Morphological and fractographic features of change of FeCo-based amorphous alloy surfaces after laser treatment are studied in detail. Regimes of laser treatment that allow various degrees of crystallization of the examined alloys to be obtained, including thin (<1 •m) crystal layers on amorphous alloy surfaces, amorphous-crystalline composites, and completely crystalline alloys are adjusted. The Vickers hardness is estimated in zones of selective laser irradiation. The structure of the examined alloys attendant to the change of their mechanical properties is analyzed.

  3. Effects of compositional complexity on the ion-irradiation induced swelling and hardening in Ni-containing equiatomic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, K.; Lu, C.; Wang, L. M.; Qu, J.; Weber, W. J.; Zhang, Y.; Bei, H.

    2016-04-14

    The impact of compositional complexity on the ion-irradiation induced swelling and hardening is studied in Ni and six Ni-containing equiatomic alloys with face-centered cubic structure. The irradiation resistance at the temperature of 500 °C is improved by controlling the number and, especially, the type of alloying elements. Alloying with Fe and Mn has a stronger influence on swelling reduction than does alloying with Co and Cr. Lastly, the quinary alloy NiCoFeCrMn, with known excellent mechanical properties, has shown 40 times higher swelling tolerance than nickel.

  4. Aerospace gerontology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comfort, A.

    1982-01-01

    The relevancy of gerontology and geriatrics to the discipline of aerospace medicine is examined. It is noted that since the shuttle program gives the facility to fly passengers, including specially qualified older persons, it is essential to examine response to acceleration, weightlessness, and re-entry over the whole adult lifespan, not only its second quartile. The physiological responses of the older person to weightlessness and the return to Earth gravity are reviewed. The importance of the use of the weightless environment to solve critical problems in the fields of fundamental gerontology and geriatrics is also stressed.

  5. Preparation and corrosion resistance of MAO/Ni-P composite coat on Mg alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xizhi; Wang, Ying; Zou, Binglin; Gu, Lijian; Huang, Wenzhi; Cao, Xueqiang

    2013-07-01

    Microarc oxidation (MAO) coat was designed as an intermediate layer for the electroless plated Ni-P top coat, providing inert surface and necessary hardness for Mg alloy substrate. The composite coat was successfully prepared to improve the corrosion resistance of Mg alloy. The preparation and the characterization of the composite coat were investigated. The results show that the pre-treatment of MAO before electroless plating plays an important role in the deposition of compact composite coat. The activation (by HF solution) makes the MAO coat dense with uniform cracks which supply excellent bonding interface for Ni-P coat. Compared with monolithic MAO or Ni-P coat, the composite coat has excellent corrosion resistance and stable bonding interface. There is main pit corrosion at substrate after the corrosive medium penetrating through the whole coat. With the inert MAO interlayer, the electrochemical corrosion between the Ni-P and substrate is effectively inhibited.

  6. Preparation, Characterization and Mechanical Properties of Cu-Sn Alloy/Graphite Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Ruifeng; Cui, Zhenduo; Zhu, Shengli; Xu, Xu; Yang, Xianjin

    2014-10-01

    Ni-B coating was prepared on the surface of graphite particles using the electroless plating method. The Ni-B coating was composed of spherical grains with average diameter of 80 nm. The phases of Ni-B coating were indexed as nanosized crystal Ni phase and amorphous Ni-B phase. Cu-Sn alloy/graphite composites with 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 wt pct graphite contents were synthesized by the powder metallurgy method. Ni-B coating improved the wettability and bonding strength between the Cu-Sn alloy and graphite. The composite with Ni-B coated graphite exhibited higher density, hardness, and compression strength compared with the composites with bare graphite. The crack propagation mechanism of the composites was also analyzed.

  7. Dry Sliding Wear Behavior of Fly Ash Cenosphere/AZ91D Mg Alloy Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, S. R.; Huang, Z. Q.

    2014-10-01

    Fly ash cenosphere/AZ91D Mg alloy (FAC/AZ91D) composites were prepared using stir casting method. The effects of the applied load, the wearing time, and the diameter and the content of fly ash cenosphere on the wear behavior of the composites were investigated under dry sliding condition. The results showed the wear resistance of FAC/AZ91D composites is generally better than that of AZ91D Mg alloy. The mass fraction and diameter of FAC have important effects on the wear resistance of the composites, and the wear resistance of the composites is excellent when the mass fraction and diameter of FAC are moderate. When the mass fraction and diameter of FAC are more than the critical values, the wear resistance of the composites lowers again. The wear resistance of the composites decreases with the increase in the applied load. The relationship between the worn mass loss and the applied load is nonlinear. When the applied load is smaller, the worn mass loss of the composites increases rapidly with the increase of the applied load. These research results show that the composites have broad application prospects under dry sliding wear condition, and they can provide guidance for the selection of the raw materials, the structure design, and the application conditions of the composites.

  8. Effect of nano-hydroxyapatite reinforcement in mechanically alloyed NiTi composites for biomedical implant.

    PubMed

    Akmal, Muhammad; Raza, Ahmad; Khan, Muhammad Mudasser; Khan, M Imran; Hussain, Muhammad Asif

    2016-11-01

    Equi-atomic NiTi alloy composites reinforced with 0, 2, 4 and 6vol.% nano-hydroxyapatite (HA) were successfully synthesized using pressureless sintering. Pure Ni and Ti elements were ball milled for 10h in order to produce a mechanically alloyed equi-atomic NiTi alloy (MA-NiTi). Mechanically alloyed NiTi and HA powders were blended, compacted and then sintered for 3h at 1325K. The sintered density varied inversely with volume percent of HA reinforcement. The X-Ray diffraction spectra and SEM images showed the formation of multiple phases like NiTi, NiTi2, Ni3Ti, and Ni4Ti3. The back scattered-SEM image analysis confirmed the presence of Ni-rich and Ti-rich phases with increasing HA content. The 6vol.% HA reinforced composite showed Ni3Ti as the major phase having the highest hardness value which can be attributed to the presence of relatively harder phases along with higher HA content as a reinforcement. The composite of MA-NiTi with 2vol.% HA manifested the most desirable results in the form of better sintering density mainly due to the minute decomposition of NiTi into other phases. Therefore, the 2vol.% reinforced MA-NiTi composite can be exploited as a novel material for manufacturing biomedical implants.

  9. Compositional correlation and anticorrelation in quaternary alloys: competition between bulk thermodynamics and surface kinetics.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, M; Abu-Farsakh, H; Remmele, T; Geelhaar, L; Riechert, H; Neugebauer, J

    2007-11-16

    We analyze the atomistic mechanisms driving the compositional correlation of In and N in the quaternary Inx Ga1-xAs1-yNy alloys combining atomic scale chemical analysis in transmission electron microscopy and density-functional theory calculations. Our results show that for typical growth conditions surface kinetics prevail over bulk thermodynamics resulting in a hitherto unexpected compositional anticorrelation between In and N.

  10. Investigations on the influence of composition in the development of Ni-Ti shape memory alloy using laser based additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiva, S.; Palani, I. A.; Mishra, S. K.; Paul, C. P.; Kukreja, L. M.

    2015-06-01

    Among the various shaped memory alloys (SMA), nitinol (Ni-Ti alloy) finds applications in automotive, aerospace, biomedical and robotics. The conventional route of fabrication of SMA has several limitations, like formation of stable secondary phases, fabrication of simple geometries, etc. This paper reports a novel method of fabricating SMA using a laser based additive manufacturing technique. Three different compositions of Ni and Ti powders (Ni-45% Ti-55%; Ni-50% Ti-50%; Ni-55% Ti45%) were pre-mixed using ball-milling and laser based additive manufacturing system was employed to fabricate circular rings. The material properties of fabricated rings were evaluated using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Differential scanning calorimeter (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD) system and micro-hardness test. All the characterized results showed that SMA could be manufactured using the laser based additive manufacturing process. The properties of laser additive manufactured SMA (Ni-50% Ti-50%) were found to be close to that of conventionally processed SMA.

  11. FIBER-REINFORCED METALLIC COMPOSITE MATERIALS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    COMPOSITE MATERIALS), (*FIBER METALLURGY, TITANIUM ALLOYS , NICKEL ALLOYS , REINFORCING MATERIALS, TUNGSTEN, WIRE, MOLYBDENUM ALLOYS , COBALT ALLOYS , CHROMIUM ALLOYS , ALUMINUM ALLOYS , MECHANICAL PROPERTIES, POWDER METALLURGY.

  12. Characterization and Properties of Micro-arc Composite Ceramic Coatings on Magnesium Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Long; Jiang, Bailing; Ge, Yanfeng; Nyberg, Eric A.; Liu, Ming

    2013-05-21

    Magnesium alloys are of growing interest for many industrial applications due to their favorable strength-to-weight ratio and excellent cast ability. However, one of the limiting factors in the use of magnesium on production vehicles is its poor corrosion resistance. Micro-arc Composite Ceramic (MCC) coatings on AZ91D magnesium alloys were prepared in combination with Micro-arc Oxidation (MAO) and electrophoresis technologies. The microstructure, corrosion resistance, abrasion resistance, stone impact resistance, thermal shock resistance and adhesion of MCC coating were studied, respectively. The surface and cross-section morphologies of MAO and MCC coating showed that the outer organic coating filled the holes on the surface of the MAO coating. It acted as a shelter on the MAO coating surface when the MCC coatings were exposed to corrosive environments. The corrosion resistance of the MCC coating was characterized by a copper-accelerated acetic acid salt spray test. The testing results showed that the creep back from scribe lines was less than 1mm and completely fit the evaluation standard. The composite structure of the MCC coating vastly improved the corrosion resistance of Mg alloys. According to testing standards, the resistance to abrasion, stone impact resistance, thermal shock resistance and adhesion of MCC coatings completely met the evaluation standard requirements. The MCC coated AZ91D magnesium alloys possessed excellent properties; this is a promising corrosion and wear resistance surface treatment technology on magnesium alloys for production vehicles.

  13. Development of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Stellite Alloy Based Composites for Tribocorrosion Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoddamzadeh, Alireza

    This thesis reports the design and development of two classes of new composite materials, which are low-carbon Stellite alloy matrices, reinforced with either chopped plain carbon fiber or chopped nickel-coated carbon fiber. The focus of this research is on obviating the problems related to the presence of carbides in Stellite alloys by substituting carbides as the main strengthening agent in Stellite alloys with the aforementioned carbon fibers. Stellite 25 was selected as the matrix because of its very low carbon content (0.1 wt%) and thereby relatively carbide free microstructure. The nickel coating was intended to eliminate any chance of carbide formation due to the possible reaction between carbon fibers and the matrix alloying additions. The composite specimens were fabricated using the designed hot isostatic pressing and sintering cycles. The fabricated specimens were microstructurally analyzed in order to identify the main phases present in the specimens and also to determine the possible carbide formation from the carbon fibers. The material characterization of the specimens was achieved through density, hardness, microhardness, corrosion, wear, friction, and thermal conductivity tests. These novel materials exhibit superior properties compared to existing Stellite alloys and are expected to spawn a new generation of materials used for high temperature, severe corrosion, and wear resistant applications in various industries.

  14. Wear resistance of TiN(Ti2N)/Ti composite layer formed on C17200 alloy by plasma surface Ti-alloying and nitriding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Shen, H. H.; Liu, X. Z.; Guo, Q.; Meng, T. X.; Wang, Z. X.; Yang, H. J.; Liu, X. P.

    2016-12-01

    The duplex treatment of plasma Ti-alloying and plasma nitriding was applied on the surface of C17200 alloy to improve its wear resistance. C17200 substrate was alloyed with Ti using double glow plasma alloying to form a Ti-alloyed layer in its surface, and then treated by plasma nitriding to make a TiN(Ti2N) alloying layer based on the Ti-alloyed surface. The microstructure and formation mechanism were studied by using GDOES, XRD and SEM. The hardness, tribological property and electrical conductivity of C17200 alloy after plasma alloying and nitriding were investigated by mean of micro-hardness tester, friction and wear testers as well as impedance analyzers. Modulus of elasticity and the adhesive strength of TiN(Ti2N)/Ti composite layer were evaluated by nano-indenter and scratch tester. The result shows that a TiN(Ti2N)-Ti-Be-Cu composite layer with a thickness of 27 μm is formed in the C17200 surface and is mainly composed of TiN, Ti2N, Cu(Ti) solid solution, etc. The composite alloying surface consists of the hard TiN(Ti2N)-rich layer on the top surface and Ti-Cu-Be diffusion layer, showing a strong adhesive strength with the C17200 substrate and a little decrease in the modulus of elasticity. A certain amount of Cu and Be together with TiN/Ti2N exists in the outmost, resulting in a better combination of wear resistance and conductive performance.

  15. Using Composites in Seismic Retrofit Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    AEROSPACE REPORT NO. ATR -2005(7796)-2 Using Composites in Seismic Retrofit Applications 20 April 2005 Prepared by V. M. KARI3HARI DISTRIBUTION...REPORT NO. ATR -2005(7796)-2 USING COMPOSITES IN SEISMIC RETROFIT APPLICATIONS Prepared V. M. I¢•HARJ Outside Consultant Approved G. F. HAWI S...performance sporting goods such as skating blades and golf club heads. Metal matrix composites (MMC) use metals and metallic alloys as the matrix phase

  16. The Aerospace Age. Aerospace Education I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, J. C.

    This book is written for use only in the Air Force ROTC program and cannot be purchased on the open market. The book describes the historical development of aerospace industry. The first chapter contains a brief review of the aerospace environment and the nature of technological changes brought by the aerospace revolution. The following chapter…

  17. Development of Compositionally Graded Metallic Glass Alloys with Desirable Properties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-01

    band towards apparent brittle fracture .24,28,29,30 However, despite their general reputation as brittle materials compared to work-hardenable...engineering alloys, intrinsically “tough” Pd-based and Zr-Cu-Al-based BMGs with surprisingly high resistance to fracture have recently been discov- ered...related to a high Poisson’s ratio (ν) or equivalently, a low ratio of shear modulus to bulk modulus (μ/B).33,34 By plotting the fracture energy versus ν

  18. Study on the Friction and Wear Behavior of a TA15 Alloy and Its Ni-SiC Composite Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Bao-hui; Wang, Zhen-ya; Li, Hai-long

    2016-05-01

    Ni-SiC composite coatings were prepared on TA15 alloy by composite electroplating technology. The friction and wear behavior of TA15 alloy, and the coating were comparatively studied at both room temperature and 600 °C using GCr15 as the counterparts. The results show that the obtained coating is relatively dense and compact, and possesses higher micro-hardness than TA15 alloy. The coating has significant friction reduction effect sliding at 600 °C, but has no obvious friction reduction effect sliding at room temperature. The coating possesses superior wear resistance than TA15 alloy, evidenced by its much lower mass losses than those of TA15 alloy sliding at both room temperature and 600 °C. The TA15 alloy and the coating showed different wear mechanisms under the given sliding conditions.

  19. Formation of Structure, Phase Composition and Properties in Refractory Titanium Alloy Under Quenching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadeev, D. V.; Illarionov, A. G.; Demakov, S. L.

    2015-11-01

    The evolution of structure and phase composition in titanium alloy VT18U under cooling from 900 - 1035°C is studied by the methods of light and electron microscopy, x-ray imaging, hardness measurement and measurement of the modulus of elasticity. The critical temperature of heating for quenching and the dependence of the volume fraction of the phases on this temperature are determined. The effect of the structural and phase state of the alloy quenched from different temperatures on the combination of its physical and mechanical properties (modulus of elasticity, hardness) is analyzed.

  20. Understanding the Cu-Zn brass alloys using a short-range-order cluster model: significance of specific compositions of industrial alloys

    PubMed Central

    Hong, H. L.; Wang, Q.; Dong, C.; Liaw, Peter K.

    2014-01-01

    Metallic alloys show complex chemistries that are not yet understood so far. It has been widely accepted that behind the composition selection lies a short-range-order mechanism for solid solutions. The present paper addresses this fundamental question by examining the face-centered-cubic Cu-Zn α-brasses. A new structural approach, the cluster-plus-glue-atom model, is introduced, which suits specifically for the description of short-range-order structures in disordered systems. Two types of formulas are pointed out, [Zn-Cu12]Zn1~6 and [Zn-Cu12](Zn,Cu)6, which explain the α-brasses listed in the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) specifications. In these formulas, the bracketed parts represent the 1st-neighbor cluster, and each cluster is matched with one to six 2nd-neighbor Zn atoms or with six mixed (Zn,Cu) atoms. Such a cluster-based formulism describes the 1st- and 2nd-neighbor local atomic units where the solute and solvent interactions are ideally satisfied. The Cu-Ni industrial alloys are also explained, thus proving the universality of the cluster-formula approach in understanding the alloy selections. The revelation of the composition formulas for the Cu-(Zn,Ni) industrial alloys points to the common existence of simple composition rules behind seemingly complex chemistries of industrial alloys, thus offering a fundamental and practical method towards composition interpretations of all kinds of alloys. PMID:25399835

  1. A combinatorial approach to the development of composition-microstructure-property relationships in titanium alloys using directed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Peter C.

    2004-12-01

    The Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENS(TM)) system, a type of directed laser manufacturing, has been used to create compositionally graded materials. Using elemental blends, it is possible to quickly vary composition, thus allowing fundamental aspects of phase transformations and microstructural development for particular alloy systems to be explored. In this work, it is shown that the use of elemental blends has been refined, such that bulk homogeneous specimens can be produced. When tested, the mechanical properties are equivalent to conventionally prepared specimens. Additionally, when elemental blends are used in LENS(TM) process, it is possible to deposit compositionally graded materials. In addition to the increase in design flexibility that such compositionally graded, net shape, unitized structures offer, they also afford the capability to rapidly explore composition-microstructure-property relationships in a variety of alloy systems. This research effort focuses on the titanium alloy system. Several composition gradients based on different classes of alloys (designated alpha, alpha + beta, and beta alloys) have been produced with the LENS(TM). Once deposited, such composition gradients have been exploited in two ways. Firstly, binary gradients (based on the Ti-xV and Ti-xMo systems) have been heat treated, allowing the relationships between thermal histories and microstructural features (i.e. phase composition and volume fraction) to be explored. Neural networks have been used to aid in the interpretation of strengthening mechanisms in these binary titanium alloy systems. Secondly, digitized steps in composition have been achieved in the Ti-xAl-yV system. Thus, alloy compositions in the neighborhood of Ti-6Al-4V, the most widely used titanium alloy, have been explored. The results of this have allowed for the investigation of composition-microstructure-property relationships in Ti-6-4 based systems.

  2. Dry Sliding Wear Behaviour of Flyash Reinforced ZA-27 Alloy Based Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, S. C.; Krishna, M.; Bhattacharyya, D.

    In the present investigation, an attempt has been made to evaluate the wear rate of ZA-27 alloy composites reinforced with fly ash particles from 1 to 3 wt% in steps of 1 wt%. The compo-casting method has been used to fabricate the composites using Raichur fly ash of average size 3-5 microns. The wear specimens are tested under dry conditions using a pin-on-disc sliding wear testing machine with wear loads of 20-120 N in steps of 20 N, and the sliding distances in the range of 0.5 km to 2.5 km. The results indicate that the wear rate of the composites is less than that of the matrix alloy and it further decreases with the increase in fly ash content. However, the material loss in terms of wear rate and wear volume increases with the increase in load and sliding distance, both in the cases of composites and the matrix alloy. An increase in the applied load increases the wear severity by changing the wear mechanism from abrasion to particle-cracking induced delamination wear. It is found that with the increase in fly ash content, the wear resistance increases monotonically. The observations have been explained using scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis of the worn surfaces of the composites.

  3. Evaporation monitoring and composition control of alloy systems with widely differing vapor pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Anklam, T.M.; Berzins, L.V.; Braun, D.G.; Haynam, C.; McClelland, M.A.; Meier, T.

    1994-10-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is developing sensors and controls to improve and extend electron beam materials processing technology to alloy systems with constituents of widely varying vapor pressure. The approach under development involves using tunable lasers to measure the density and composition of the vapor plume. A laser based vaporizer control system for vaporization of a uranium-iron alloy has been previously demonstrated in multi-hundred hour, high rate vaporization experiments at LLNL. This paper reviews the design and performance of the uranium vaporization sensor and control system and discusses the extension of the technology to monitoring of uranium vaporization. Data is presented from an experiment in which titanium wire was fed into a molten niobium pool. Laser data is compared to deposited film composition and film cross sections. Finally, the potential for using this technique for composition control in melting applications is discussed.

  4. Superconducting properties of Nb-Cu nano-composites and nano-alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parab, Pradnya; Kumar, Sanjeev; Bhui, Prabhjyot; Bagwe, Vivas; Bose, Sangita

    2016-05-01

    The evolution of the superconducting transition temperature (Tc) in nano-composite and nano-alloys of Nb-Cu, grown by DC magnetron co-sputtering are investigated. Microstructure of these films depends less strongly on the ratio of Nb:Cu but more on the growth temperature. At higher growth temperature, phase separated granular films of Nb and Cu were formed which showed superconducting transition temperatures (Tc) of ~ 7.2±0.5K, irrespective of the composition. Our results show that this is primarily influenced by the microstructure of the films determined during growth which rules out the superconducting proximity effect expected in these systems. At room temperature growth, films with nano-scale alloying were obtained at the optimal compositional range of 45-70 atomic% (At%) of Nb. These were also superconducting with a Tc of 3.2K.

  5. Characterization of fabricated cobalt-based alloy/nano bioactive glass composites.

    PubMed

    Bafandeh, Mohammad Reza; Gharahkhani, Raziyeh; Fathi, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-12-01

    In this work, cobalt-based alloy/nano bioactive glass (NBG) composites with 10, 15 and 20wt% NBG were prepared and their bioactivity after immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF) for 1 to 4weeks was studied. Scanning electron microscopy images of two- step sintered composites revealed relatively dense microstructure. The results showed that density of composite samples decreased with increase in NBG amount. The microstructure analysis as well as energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) revealed that small amount of calcium phosphate phases precipitates on the surface of composite samples after 1week immersion in SBF. After 2weeks immersion, considerable amounts of cauliflower-like shaped precipitations were seen on the surface of the composites. Based on EDX analysis, these precipitations were composed mainly from Ca, P and Si. The observed bands in the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy of immersed composites samples for 4weeks in SBF, were characteristic bands of hydroxyapatite. Therefore it is possible to form hydroxyapatite layer on the surface of composite samples during immersion in SBF. The results indicated that prepared composites unlike cobalt-based alloy are bioactive, promising their possibility for implant applications.

  6. Changes in the composition of a nickel-base partial denture casting alloy upon fusion and casting.

    PubMed

    Lewis, A J

    1975-02-01

    Three series of tensile test pieces were produced using a nickel-base partial denture casting alloy. For the first series induction heating was employed for melting the alloy, for the second a resistance crucible, and for the third an oxy-acetylene torch. In each series the same metal was cast sequentially five times, following which samples of the alloy were subjected to a ten element quantitative analysis to ascertain compositional changes associated with the three methods of fusion.

  7. Structure, phases, and mechanical response of Ti-alloy bioactive glass composite coatings.

    PubMed

    Nelson, G M; Nychka, J A; McDonald, A G

    2014-03-01

    Porous titanium alloy-bioactive glass composite coatings were manufactured via the flame spray deposition process. The porous coatings, targeted for orthodontic and bone-fixation applications, were made from bioactive glass (45S5) powder blended with either commercially pure titanium (Cp-Ti) or Ti-6Al-4V alloy powder. Two sets of spray conditions, two metallic particle size distributions, and two glass particle size distributions were used for this study. Negative control coatings consisting of pure Ti-6Al-4V alloy or Cp-Ti were sprayed under both conditions. The as-sprayed coatings were characterized through quantitative optical cross-sectional metallography, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and ASTM Standard C633 tensile adhesion testing. Determination of the porosity and glassy phase distribution was achieved by using image analysis in accordance with ASTM Standard E2109. Theoretical thermodynamic and heat transfer modeling was conducted to explain experimental observations. Thermodynamic modeling was performed to estimate the flame temperature and chemical environment for each spray condition and a lumped capacitance heat transfer model was developed to estimate the temperatures attained by each particle. These models were used to establish trends among the choice of alloy, spray condition, and particle size distribution. The deposition parameters, alloy composition, and alteration of the feedstock powder size distribution had a significant effect on the coating microstructure, porosity, phases present, mechanical response, and theoretical particle temperatures that were attained. The most promising coatings were the Ti-6Al-4V-based composite coatings, which had bond strength of 20±2MPa (n=5) and received reinforcement and strengthening from the inclusion of a glassy phase. It was shown that the use of the Ti-6Al-4V-bioactive glass composite coatings may be a superior choice due to the possible osteoproductivity from the bioactive glass, the potential ability to

  8. Effect of Microalloying, with Rem Inclusively, on the Structure, Phase Composition and Properties of (α + β)-Titanium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illarionov, A. G.; Popov, A. A.; Illarionova, S. M.

    2016-03-01

    The effect of microalloying with yttrium and zirconium in the amount of 0.06 and 0.07 wt.% respectively on the formation of structure, phase composition and measured hardness characteristics of a two-phase titanium alloy of the Ti - Al - Mo - V - Cr - Fe system is studied. The laws of variation of the phase composition and structure of the alloy with microadditives in the temperature range of 700 - 950°C and during subsequent cooling in water and air are determined. The diagram of variation of the phase composition of the alloy under water quenching is plotted.

  9. Composition Tunability and (111)-Dominant Facets of Ultrathin Platinum-Gold Alloy Nanowires toward Enhanced Electrocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Fangfang; Shan, Shiyao; Petkov, Valeri; Skeete, Zakiya; Lu, Aolin; Ravid, Jonathan; Wu, Jinfang; Luo, Jin; Yu, Gang; Ren, Yang; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2016-09-21

    The ability for tuning not only the composition but also the type of surface facets of alloyed nanomaterials is important for the design of catalysts with enhanced activity and stability through optimizing both ensemble and ligand effects. Herein we report the first example of ultrathin platinum-gold alloy nanowires (PtAu NWs) featuring composition-tunable and (111) facet-dominant surface characteristics, and the electrocatalytic enhancement for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). PtAu NWs of different bimetallic compositions synthesized by a single-phase and surfactant-free method are shown to display an alloyed, parallel-bundled structure in which the individual nanowires exhibit Boerdijk-Coxeter helix type morphology predominant in (111) facets. Results have revealed intriguing catalytic correlation with the binary composition, exhibiting an activity maximum at a Pt:Au ratio of ∼3:1. As revealed by high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction and atomic pair distribution function analysis, NWs of this ratio exhibit a clear shrinkage in interatomic bonding distances. In comparison with PtAu nanoparticles of a similar composition and degree of shrinking of atomic-pair distances, the PtAu NWs display a remarkably higher electrocatalytic activity and stability. The outperformance of NWs over nanoparticles is attributed to the predominant (111)-type facets on the surface balancing the contribution of ensemble and ligand effects, in addition to the composition synergy due to optimal adsorption energies for molecular and atomic oxygen species on the surface as supported by DFT computation of models of the catalysts. The findings open up a new pathway to the design and engineering of alloy nanocatalysts with enhanced activity and durability.

  10. Compositional landscape for glass formation in metal alloys.

    PubMed

    Na, Jong Hyun; Demetriou, Marios D; Floyd, Michael; Hoff, Andrew; Garrett, Glenn R; Johnson, William L

    2014-06-24

    A high-resolution compositional map of glass-forming ability (GFA) in the Ni-Cr-Nb-P-B system is experimentally determined along various compositional planes. GFA is shown to be a piecewise continuous function formed by intersecting compositional subsurfaces, each associated with a nucleation pathway for a specific crystalline phase. Within each subsurface, GFA varies exponentially with composition, wheres exponential cusps in GFA are observed when crossing from one crystallization pathway to another. The overall GFA is shown to peak at multiple exponential hypercusps that are interconnected by ridges. At these compositions, quenching from the high-temperature melt yields glassy rods with diameters exceeding 1 cm, whereas for compositions far from these cusps the critical rod diameter drops precipitously and levels off to 1 to 2 mm. The compositional landscape of GFA is shown to arise primarily from an interplay between the thermodynamics and kinetics of crystal nucleation, or more precisely, from a competition between driving force for crystallization and liquid fragility.

  11. PALLADIUM/COPPER ALLOY COMPOSITE MEMBRANES FOR HIGH TEMPERATURE HYDROGEN SEPARATION

    SciTech Connect

    J. Douglas Way

    2004-08-31

    This report summarizes progress made during the first year of research funding from DOE Grant No. DE-FG26-03NT41792 at the Colorado School of Mines. The period of performance was September 1, 2003 through August of 2004. Composite membranes, consisting of a thin Pd alloy film supported on a porous substrate have been investigated as a means of reducing the membrane cost and improving H{sub 2} flux. An electroless plating technique was utilized to deposit subsequent layers of palladium and copper over zirconia and alumina-based microfilters. The composite membranes thus made were annealed and tested at temperatures ranging from 250 to 500 C, under very high feed pressures (up to 450 psig) using pure gases and gaseous mixtures containing H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O and H{sub 2}S, with the purpose of determining the effects these variables had on the H{sub 2} permeation rate, selectivity and percent recovery. The inhibition caused by CO/CO{sub 2} gases on a 7 {micro}m thick Pd-Cu composite membrane was less than 17% over a wide range of compositions at 350 C. H{sub 2}S caused a strong inhibition of the H{sub 2} flux of the same Pd-Cu composite membrane, which is accentuated at levels of 100 ppm or higher. The membrane was exposed to 50 ppm three times without permanent damage. At higher H{sub 2}S levels, above 100 ppm the membrane suffered some physical degradation and its performances was severely affected. The use of sweep gases improved the hydrogen flux and recovery of a Pd-Cu composite membrane. Recently, we have been able to dramatically reduce the thickness of these Pd alloy membranes to approximately one micron. This is significant because at this thickness, it is the cost of the porous support that controls the materials cost of a composite Pd alloy membrane, not the palladium inventory. Very recent results show that the productivity of our membranes is very high, essentially meeting the DOE pure hydrogen flux target value set by the DOE Hydrogen

  12. Poly(L-lactic acid)/hydroxyapatite/collagen composite coatings on AZ31 magnesium alloy for biomedical application.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen-Lin; Yan, Yu-Hua; Wan, Tao; Yang, Hui

    2013-10-01

    Surface modification of biomedical magnesium alloy using composite coating shows an attemptable approach for the development of Mg-based biomaterials with excellent cytocompatibility. Hydroxyapatite/collagen composite was preliminarily fabricated by biomineralization, the bioactive poly(l-lactic acid)/hydroxyapatite/collagen composite coatings were spin coated on AZ31 magnesium alloy using poly(l-lactic acid) solution mixed with hydroxyapatite/collagen particles, and the resultant materials and coatings were characterized in structure and related properties; furthermore, the in vitro degradation behavior of modified magnesium alloy in 1.5-fold Hank's solution was investigated. The results show that hydroxyapatite/collagen composite achieved chemical bonding between hydroxyapatite and collagen similar to natural bone; composite coatings on AZ31 magnesium alloy retained the bioactive functional groups of the componential materials and improved the corrosion resistance of Mg alloy; the mass fraction of hydroxyapatite/collagen particles incorporated into the composite affected the porous structure, interfacial adhesion and thus the corrosion resistance of the composite coating due to phase separation as well as volume concentration effects of polymer solution. Composite coatings suppressed the sharp rising of pH value and the released Mg(2+) from substrate to extensive degree, and the degradation behavior of the modified magnesium alloy was supposed to be correlated to microstructure of the coating as well as the synergistic reactions among alkaline- and acidic-degraded products.

  13. Fabrication of surface self-lubricating composites of aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenjing; Zhang, Dong; Le, Yongkang; Li, Lian; Ou, Bin

    2008-12-01

    Porous aluminum anodic oxide films fabricated by anodizing in phosphoric acid electrolyte containing organic acid were investigated. By controlling its microstructure, a macroporous and thick alumina template were obtained. Surface self-lubricating composites were prepared by taking ultra-sonic impregnation in PTFE latex and the relative subsequent heat treatment technology. The studies on the tribological behavior of the surface self-lubricating composite indicated that the tribological properties of aluminum surface can be improved obviously. Compared with the surface coating of hard-anodization, the friction coefficient of self-lubricating composite can be effectively reduced from the 0.575 to 0.166.

  14. Properties of a new type Al/Pb-0.3%Ag alloy composite anode for zinc electrowinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hai-tao; Liu, Huan-rong; Zhang, Yong-chun; Chen, Bu-ming; Guo, Zhong-cheng; Xu, Rui-dong

    2013-10-01

    An Al/Pb-0.3%Ag alloy composite anode was produced via composite casting. Its electrocatalytic activity for the oxygen evolution reaction and corrosion resistance was evaluated by anodic polarization curves and accelerated corrosion test, respectively. The microscopic morphologies of the anode section and anodic oxidation layer during accelerated corrosion test were obtained by scanning electron microscopy. It is found that the composite anode (hard anodizing) displays a more compact interfacial combination and a better adhesive strength than plating tin. Compared with industrial Pb-0.3%Ag anodes, the oxygen evolution overpotentials of Al/Pb-0.3%Ag alloy (hard anodizing) and Al/Pb-0.3%Ag alloy (plating tin) at 500 A·m-2 were lower by 57 and 14 mV, respectively. Furthermore, the corrosion rates of Pb-0.3%Ag alloy, Al/Pb-0.3%Ag alloy (hard anodizing), and Al/Pb-0.3%Ag alloy (plating tin) were 13.977, 9.487, and 11.824 g·m-2·h-1, respectively, in accelerated corrosion test for 8 h at 2000 A·m-2. The anodic oxidation layer of Al/Pb-0.3%Ag alloy (hard anodizing) is more compact than Pb-0.3%Ag alloy and Al/Pb-0.3%Ag alloy (plating tin) after the test.

  15. [Research on the mechanical properties of bone scaffold reinforced by magnesium alloy/bioceramics composite with stereolithography double channels].

    PubMed

    Li, Changhai; Lian, Qin; Zhuang, Pei; Wang, Junzhong; Li, Dichen

    2015-02-01

    Focusing on the poor mechanical strength of porous bioceramics bone scaffold, and taking into account of the good mechanical properties of biodegradable magnesium alloy, we proposed a novel method to fabricate magnesium alloy/bioceramics composite bone scaffold with stereolithography double channels. Firstly, a scaffold structure without mutually connected double channels was designed. Then, an optimized bioceramics scaffold was fabricated according to stereolithography and gel-casing. Molten AZ31 magnesium alloy was perfused into the secondary channel of scaffold by low-pressure casting, and magnesium alloy/bioceramics composite bone scaffold was obtained when magnesium alloy was solidified. The compression test showed that the strength of bioceramics scaffold with only one channel and without magnesium alloy was (9.76 ± 0.64) MPa, while the strength of magnesium alloy/bioceramics composite scaffold with double channels was (17.25 ± 0.88) MPa. It can be concluded that the magnesium alloy/bioceramics composite is obviously able to improve the scaffold strength.

  16. Electrochemical characteristics of a carbon fibre composite and the associated galvanic effects with aluminium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.; Curioni, M.; Jamshidi, P.; Walker, A.; Prengnell, P.; Thompson, G. E.; Skeldon, P.

    2014-09-01

    The electrochemical behaviour of a carbon fibre reinforced epoxy matrix composite in 3.5% NaCl and 3.5% NaCl + 0.5 M CuSO4 electrolytes was examined by potentiodynamic polarisation, potentiostatic polarisation and scanning electron microscopy. Exposed carbon fibres on two defined regions (“front” and “side”) are a focus of the investigation. The large size of the exposed carbon fibres on the side region is responsible for a higher cathodic current density than the front region in the NaCl electrolyte. The deposition of copper on the front surface of composite confirmed that the significantly higher cathodic current resulted from the exposure of the fibres to the NaCl electrolyte. Galvanic coupling between the composite and individual aluminium alloys (AA7075-T6 and AA1050) was used to measure galvanic potentials and galvanic current densities. The highly alloyed AA7075-T6 alloy and its high population density of cathodic sites compared to the AA1050 acted to reduce the galvanic effect when coupled to the composite front or side regions.

  17. Thermal oxidation induced degradation of carbon fiber reinforced composites and carbon nanotube sheet enhanced fiber/matrix interface for high temperature aerospace structural applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haque, Mohammad Hamidul

    Recent increase in the use of carbon fiber reinforced polymer matrix composite, especially for high temperature applications in aerospace primary and secondary structures along with wind energy and automotive industries, have generated new challenges to predict its failure mechanisms and service life. This dissertation reports the experimental study of a unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced bismaleimide (BMI) composites (CFRC), an excellent candidate for high temperature aerospace components, undergoing thermal oxidation at 260 °C in air for over 3000 hours. The key focus of the work is to investigate the mechanical properties of the carbon fiber BMI composite subjected to thermal aging in three key aspects - first, studying its bulk flexural properties (in macro scale), second, characterizing the crack propagation along the fiber direction, representing the interfacial bonding strength between fiber and matrix (in micro scale), and third, introducing nano-structured materials to modify the interface (in nano scale) between the carbon fiber and BMI resin and mechanical characterization to study its influence on mitigating the aging effect. Under the first category, weight loss and flexural properties have been monitored as the oxidation propagates through the fiber/matrix interface. Dynamic mechanical analysis and micro-computed tomography analysis have been performed to analyze the aging effects. In the second category, the long-term effects of thermal oxidation on the delamination (between the composite plies) and debonding (between fiber and matrix) type fracture toughness have been characterized by preparing two distinct types of double cantilever beam specimens. Digital image correlation has been used to determine the deformation field and strain distribution around the crack propagation path. Finally the resin system and the fiber/matrix interface have been modified using nanomaterials to mitigate the degradations caused by oxidation. Nanoclay modified

  18. Manufacturing techniques for titanium aluminide based alloys and metal matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kothari, Kunal B.

    Dual phase titanium aluminides composed vastly of gamma phase (TiAl) with moderate amount of alpha2 phase (Ti3Al) have been considered for several high temperature aerospace and automobile applications. High specific strength coupled with good high temperature performance in the areas of creep and oxidation resistance makes titanium aluminides "materials of choice" for next generation propulsion systems. Titanium alumnides are primarily being considered as potential replacements for Ni-based superalloys in gas turbine engine components with aim of developing more efficient and leaner engines exhibiting high thrust-to-weight ratio. Thermo-mechanical treatments have shown to enhance the mechanical performance of titanium aluminides. Additionally, small additions of interstitial elements have shown further and significant improvement in the mechanical performance of titanium alumnide alloys. However, titanium aluminides lack considerably in room temperature ductility and as a result manufacturing processes of these aluminides have greatly suffered. Traditional ingot metallurgy and investment casting based methods to produce titanium aluminide parts in addition to being expensive, have also been unsuccessful in producing titanium aluminides with the desired mechanical properties. Hence, the manufacturing costs associated with these methods have completely outweighed the benefits offered by titanium aluminides. Over the last two decades, several powder metallurgy based manufacturing techniques have been studied to produce titanium aluminide parts. These techniques have been successful in producing titanium aluminide parts with a homogeneous and refined microstructure. These powder metallurgy techniques also hold the potential of significant cost reduction depending on the wide market acceptance of titanium aluminides. In the present study, a powder metallurgy based rapid consolidation technique has been used to produce near-net shape parts of titanium aluminides. Micron

  19. Shape and composition-controlled platinum alloy nanocrystals using carbon monoxide as reducing agent.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianbo; Gross, Adam; Yang, Hong

    2011-02-09

    The shape of metal alloy nanocrystals plays an important role in catalytic performances. Many methods developed so far in controlling the morphologies of nanocrystals are however limited by the synthesis that is often material and shape specific. Here we show using a gas reducing agent in liquid solution (GRAILS) method, different Pt alloy (Pt-M, M = Co, Fe, Ni, Pd) nanocrystals with cubic and octahedral morphologies can be prepared under the same kind of reducing reaction condition. A broad range of compositions can also be obtained for these Pt alloy nanocrystals. Thus, this GRAILS method is a general approach to the preparation of uniform shape and composition-controlled Pt alloy nanocrystals. The area-specific oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activities of Pt(3)Ni catalysts at 0.9 V are 0.85 mA/cm(2)(Pt) for the nanocubes, and 1.26 mA/cm(2)(Pt) for the nanooctahedra. The ORR mass activity of the octahedral Pt(3)Ni catalyst reaches 0.44 A/mg(Pt).

  20. Reactive spark plasma sintering (SPS) of nitride reinforced titanium alloy composites

    SciTech Connect

    Borkar, Tushar; Nag, Soumya; Ren, Yang; Tiley, Jaimie; Banerjee, Rajarshi

    2014-12-25

    Coupled in situ alloying and nitridation of titanium–vanadium alloys, has been achieved by introducing reactive nitrogen gas during the spark plasma sintering (SPS) of blended titanium and vanadium elemental powders, leading to a new class of nitride reinforced titanium alloy composites. The resulting microstructure includes precipitates of the d-TiN phase with the NaCl structure, equiaxed (or globular) precipitates of a nitrogen enriched hcp a(Ti,N) phase with a c/a ratio more than what is expected for pure hcp Ti, and fine scale plate-shaped precipitates of hcp a-Ti, distributed within a bcc b matrix. During SPS processing, the d-TiN phase appears to form at a temperature of 1400 C, while only hcp a(Ti,N) and a-Ti phases form at lower processing temperatures. Consequently, the highest microhardness is exhibited by the composite processed at 1400 C while those processed at 1300 C or below exhibit lower values. Processing at temperatures below 1300 C, resulted in an incomplete alloying of the blend of titanium and vanadium powders. These d-TiN precipitates act as heterogeneous nucleation sites for the a(Ti,N) precipitates that appear to engulf and exhibit an orientation relationship with the nitride phase at the center. Furthermore, fine scale a-Ti plates are precipitated within the nitride precipitates, presumably resulting from the retrograde solubility of nitrogen in titanium.

  1. Electronic Structure Evolution with Composition Alteration of RhxCuy Alloy Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Palina, Natalia; Sakata, Osami; Kumara, L. S. R.; Song, Chulho; Sato, Katsutoshi; Nagaoka, Katsutoshi; Komatsu, Tokutaro; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Kusada, Kohei; Kitagawa, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    The change in electronic structure of extremely small RhxCuy alloy nanoparticles (NPs) with composition variation was investigated by core-level (CL) and valence-band (VB) hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A combination of CL and VB spectra analyses confirmed that intermetallic charge transfer occurs between Rh and Cu. This is an important compensation mechanism that helps to explain the relationship between the catalytic activity and composition of RhxCuy alloy NPs. For monometallic Rh and Rh-rich alloy (Rh0.77Cu0.23) NPs, the formation of Rh surface oxide with a non-integer oxidation state (Rh(3−δ)+) resulted in high catalytic activity. Conversely, for alloy NPs with comparable Rh:Cu ratio (Rh0.53Cu0.47 and Rh0.50Cu0.50), the decreased fraction of catalytically active Rh(3−δ)+ oxide is compensated by charge transfer from Cu to Rh. As a result, ensuring negligible change in the catalytic activities of the NPs with comparable Rh:Cu ratio to those of Rh-rich and monometallic Rh NPs. PMID:28120907

  2. Electronic Structure Evolution with Composition Alteration of RhxCuy Alloy Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palina, Natalia; Sakata, Osami; Kumara, L. S. R.; Song, Chulho; Sato, Katsutoshi; Nagaoka, Katsutoshi; Komatsu, Tokutaro; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Kusada, Kohei; Kitagawa, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    The change in electronic structure of extremely small RhxCuy alloy nanoparticles (NPs) with composition variation was investigated by core-level (CL) and valence-band (VB) hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A combination of CL and VB spectra analyses confirmed that intermetallic charge transfer occurs between Rh and Cu. This is an important compensation mechanism that helps to explain the relationship between the catalytic activity and composition of RhxCuy alloy NPs. For monometallic Rh and Rh-rich alloy (Rh0.77Cu0.23) NPs, the formation of Rh surface oxide with a non-integer oxidation state (Rh(3‑δ)+) resulted in high catalytic activity. Conversely, for alloy NPs with comparable Rh:Cu ratio (Rh0.53Cu0.47 and Rh0.50Cu0.50), the decreased fraction of catalytically active Rh(3‑δ)+ oxide is compensated by charge transfer from Cu to Rh. As a result, ensuring negligible change in the catalytic activities of the NPs with comparable Rh:Cu ratio to those of Rh-rich and monometallic Rh NPs.

  3. Subtask 12A3: Fabrication and properties of compositional variants of vanadium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Grossbeck, M.L.; Alexander, D.J.; Gubbi, A.N.

    1995-03-01

    Procurement of five 15 kg heats of V-Cr-Ti alloys with variations in Cr and Ti concentrations from the primary V-4Cr-4Ti composition. Fabrication into sheet product, determination of the tensile and Charpy impact properties, and preparation of specimens for reactor irradiation experiments. Data obtained from these alloys will be used to define the allowable ranges of Cr and Ti within which consistent properties may be obtained. Four 15 kg heats with variations in Cr and Ti concentration have been procured in various plate and sheet thicknesses. Measurements of recovery and recrystallization kinetics, precipitation behavior, and Charpy impact properties are in progress to compare properties with the behavior of the primary alloy composition V-4Cr-4Ti. In the fully recrystallized condition, the impact properties of the V-6Cr-3Ti alloy are inferior to those of the 500 kg heat of V-4Cr-4Ti. However, properties comparable to those of the V-4Cr-4Ti can be obtained of the V-6Cr-3Ti as tested in a partially-recrystallized condition. 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Action of Cryogenic chill on Mechanical properties of Nickel alloy Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, B. K. Anil; Ananthaprasad, M. G.; GopalaKrishna, K.

    2016-09-01

    In the area of material science engineering, metallurgists may be at the forefront of new technologies, developing metals for new applications, or involved in the traditional manufacture. By doing so it is possible for metallurgist to apply their knowledge of metals to solve complex problems and looking for ways to improve the mechanical properties of the materials. Therefore, an investigation in the present research was made to fabricate and evaluate the microstructure and mechanical properties of composites developed using cryogenically cooled copper chills, consisting of nickel alloy matrix and garnet particles as the reinforcement. The reinforcement being added ranges from 3 to 12 wt.% in steps of 3%. A stir casting process was used to fabricate the nickel base matrix alloy fused with garnet reinforcement particle. The matrix alloy was melted in a casting furnace at around 1350°C, the garnet particulates which was preheated to 600°C, was introduced evenly into the molten metal alloy. An arrangement was made at one end of the mould by placing copper chill blocks of varying thickness brazed with MS hallow block in which liquid nitrogen was circulated for cryogenic effect. After solidification, the composite materials thus synthesized were examined for microstructural and mechanical properties as per ASTM standards.

  5. Composite of ceramic-coated magnetic alloy particles

    DOEpatents

    Moorhead, Arthur J.; Kim, Hyoun-Ee

    2000-01-01

    A composite structure and method for manufacturing same, the composite structure being comprised of metal particles and an inorganic bonding media. The method comprises the steps of coating particles of a metal powder with a thin layer of an inorganic bonding media selected from the group of powders consisting of a ceramic, glass, and glass-ceramic. The particles are assembled in a cavity and heat, with or without the addition of pressure, is thereafter applied to the particles until the layer of inorganic bonding media forms a strong bond with the particles and with the layer of inorganic bonding media on adjacent particles. The resulting composite structure is strong and remains cohesive at high temperatures.

  6. Materials Design for Joinable, High Performance Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glamm, Ryan James

    An aluminum alloy compatible with friction stir welding is designed for automotive and aerospace structural applications. Current weldable automotive aluminum alloys do not possess the necessary strength to meet safety standards and therefore are not able to replace steel in the automotive body. Significant weight savings could be achieved if steel components are replaced with aluminum. Current aerospace alloys are not weldable, requiring machining of large pieces that are then riveted together. If an aerospace alloy could be friction stir welded, smaller pieces could be welded, reducing material waste. Using a systems approach for materials design, property goals are set from performance objectives. From previous research and computational predictions, a structure is designed for a prototype alloy containing dynamic precipitates to readily dissolve and re-precipitate and high stability precipitates to resist dissolution and coarsening in the weld region. It is found that a Ag modified Al-3.9Mg-0.04Cu (at. %) alloy enhanced the rate and magnitude of hardening during ageing, both beneficial effects for dynamic precipitation. In the same alloy, ageing at 350°C results in hardening from Al 3(Sc,Zr) precipitates. Efforts to effectively precipitate both populations simultaneously are unsuccessful. The Al3(Sc,Zr) precipitation hardened prototype is friction stir processed and no weak zones are found in the weld hardness profile. An aerospace alloy design is proposed, utilizing the dual precipitate structure shown in the prototype. The automotive alloy is designed using a basic strength model with parameters determined from the initial prototype alloy analysis. After ageing to different conditions, the alloy is put through a simulated heat affected zone thermal cycle with a computer controlled induction heater. The aged samples lose hardness from the weld cycle but recover hardness from a post weld heat treatment. Atom probe tomography and transmission electron

  7. Environmental effects on composite airframes: A study conducted for the ARM UAV Program (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Unmanned Aerospace Vehicle)

    SciTech Connect

    Noguchi, R.A.

    1994-06-01

    Composite materials are affected by environments differently than conventional airframe structural materials are. This study identifies the environmental conditions which the composite-airframe ARM UAV may encounter, and discusses the potential degradation processes composite materials may undergo when subjected to those environments. This information is intended to be useful in a follow-on program to develop equipment and procedures to prevent, detect, or otherwise mitigate significant degradation with the ultimate goal of preventing catastrophic aircraft failure.

  8. Optimization of Wear Behavior of Magnesium Alloy AZ91 Hybrid Composites Using Taguchi Experimental Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girish, B. M.; Satish, B. M.; Sarapure, Sadanand; Basawaraj

    2016-06-01

    In the present paper, the statistical investigation on wear behavior of magnesium alloy (AZ91) hybrid metal matrix composites using Taguchi technique has been reported. The composites were reinforced with SiC and graphite particles of average size 37 μm. The specimens were processed by stir casting route. Dry sliding wear of the hybrid composites were tested on a pin-on-disk tribometer under dry conditions at different normal loads (20, 40, and 60 N), sliding speeds (1.047, 1.57, and 2.09 m/s), and composition (1, 2, and 3 wt pct of each of SiC and graphite). The design of experiments approach using Taguchi technique was employed to statistically analyze the wear behavior of hybrid composites. Signal-to-noise ratio and analysis of variance were used to investigate the influence of the parameters on the wear rate.

  9. Investigation of the Thermomechanical Response of Shape Memory Alloy Hybrid Composite Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Brian A.

    2005-01-01

    Previous work at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) involved fabrication and testing of composite beams with embedded, pre-strained shape memory alloy (SMA) ribbons. That study also provided comparison of experimental results with numerical predictions from a research code making use of a new thermoelastic model for shape memory alloy hybrid composite (SMAHC) structures. The previous work showed qualitative validation of the numerical model. However, deficiencies in the experimental-numerical correlation were noted and hypotheses for the discrepancies were given for further investigation. The goal of this work is to refine the experimental measurement and numerical modeling approaches in order to better understand the discrepancies, improve the correlation between prediction and measurement, and provide rigorous quantitative validation of the numerical model. Thermal buckling, post-buckling, and random responses to thermal and inertial (base acceleration) loads are studied. Excellent agreement is achieved between the predicted and measured results, thereby quantitatively validating the numerical tool.

  10. Powder Processing of Amorphous Tungsten-bearing Alloys and Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    applications. The composite was to have high strength, toughness, abrasion resistance, tailorable density, and a propensity for shear localization ... localization fulfilled the target material requirements of described in our proposal. 2 What was accomplished under these goals? For this reporting period...homogenize or remain dual-phase during processing. By modifying these simulations to exhibit strain partitioning due to differences in phase

  11. Micromechanics of composites with shape memory alloy fibers in uniform thermal fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birman, Victor; Saravanos, Dimitris A.; Hopkins, Dale A.

    1995-01-01

    Analytical procedures are developed for a composite system consisting of shape memory alloy fibers within an elastic matrix subject to uniform temperature fluctuations. Micromechanics for the calculation of the equivalent properties of the composite are presented by extending the multi-cell model to incorporate shape memory alloy fibers. A three phase concentric cylinder model is developed for the analysis of local stresses which includes the fiber, the matrix, and the surrounding homogenized composite. The solution addresses the complexities induced by the nonlinear dependence of the in-situ martensite fraction of the fibers to the local stresses and temperature, and the local stresses developed from interactions between the fibers and matrix during the martensitic and reverse phase transformations. Results are presented for a nitinol/epoxy composite. The applications illustrate the response of the composite in isothermal longitudinal loading and unloading, and in temperature induced actuation. The local stresses developed in the composite under various stages of the martensitic and reverse phase transformation are also shown.

  12. Shock response of boron carbide based composites infiltrated with magnesium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafri, Mathan; Dariel, Moshe; Frage, Nahum; Zaretsky, Eugene

    2011-06-01

    The fully dense composites were obtained by vacuum infiltrating the boron carbide compacts (80% green density) with liquid AZ91 magnesium alloy (850 °C) and with the melt of 50/50 AZ91-silicon mixture (1050 °C). The densities, the elastic moduli and the Vickers hardness values of the obtained composites were, respectively, 2.44 g/cm3 and 2.54 g/cm3, 300 and 350 GPa, and 1200 and 1800 HV. The impact response of the composites was studied in a series of VISAR-instrumented planar impact experiments with velocities of W and Cu impactors ranged from 100 to 1000 m/s. It was found that velocity histories recorded for the composites produced by infiltration with Mg-Si alloy contain a distinct elastic precursor front followed by a plastic ramp. On the contrary, the velocity histories of the composites infiltrated with AZ91 do not display any step-like front; the amplitude of the elastic wave grows gradually from zero level and transforms smoothly into the plastic front. The influence of the composites microstructure on the compressive elastic-plastic behavior and on the dynamic tensile (spall) strength is discussed.

  13. Effects of chemical composition on the corrosion behavior of A7N01S-T5 Al alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaomin; Liao, Xiaoyao; Ma, Chuanping; Zhang, Shufang; Liu, Yan; Chen, Hui

    2015-03-01

    Corrosion behavior of 7N01 Al alloy is sensitive to chemical composition. In this paper, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and electrochemical behaviors of A7N01S-T5 Al alloys with three different chemical compositions were investigated. The corrosion weight loss and corrosion pits depth statistics showed that Alloy #3 (4.53wt.%Zn, 1.27%Mg, < 0.001%Cu, 0.24%Cr, 0.15%Zr) possesses the best anti-SCC property, while Alloy #1 (4.54%Zn, 1.09%Mg, 0.102%Cu, 0.25%Cr, 0.15%Zr) was the weakest one. The different SCC susceptibility was mainly related to the Cu content as Alloy #3 contains higher Cu than Alloys #1 and #2. Electrochemical test result showed that Alloy #3 has higher corrosion potential and lower corrosion current density than Alloys #1 and #2. It is believed that a trace Cu can significantly improve the SC resistance of Al alloy, mainly because that Cu element can reduce the potential difference between grain inside and grain boundaries.

  14. Controllable synthesis of molybdenum tungsten disulfide alloy for vertically composition-controlled multilayer

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jeong-Gyu; Ryu, Gyeong Hee; Lee, Su Jeong; Sim, Sangwan; Lee, Chang Wan; Choi, Taejin; Jung, Hanearl; Kim, Youngjun; Lee, Zonghoon; Myoung, Jae-Min; Dussarrat, Christian; Lansalot-Matras, Clement; Park, Jusang; Choi, Hyunyong; Kim, Hyungjun

    2015-01-01

    The effective synthesis of two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides alloy is essential for successful application in electronic and optical devices based on a tunable band gap. Here we show a synthesis process for Mo1−xWxS2 alloy using sulfurization of super-cycle atomic layer deposition Mo1−xWxOy. Various spectroscopic and microscopic results indicate that the synthesized Mo1−xWxS2 alloys have complete mixing of Mo and W atoms and tunable band gap by systematically controlled composition and layer number. Based on this, we synthesize a vertically composition-controlled (VCC) Mo1−xWxS2 multilayer using five continuous super-cycles with different cycle ratios for each super-cycle. Angle-resolved X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, Raman and ultraviolet–visible spectrophotometer results reveal that a VCC Mo1−xWxS2 multilayer has different vertical composition and broadband light absorption with strong interlayer coupling within a VCC Mo1−xWxS2 multilayer. Further, we demonstrate that a VCC Mo1−xWxS2 multilayer photodetector generates three to four times greater photocurrent than MoS2- and WS2-based devices, owing to the broadband light absorption. PMID:26204328

  15. SISGR: Theoretically relating the surface composition of Pt alloys to their performance as the electrocatalysts of low-temperature fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Guofeng

    2010-12-31

    The main goal of this project is to gain fundamental knowledge about the relation between surface composition and catalytic performance of Pt alloy catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Specific objectives are: to develop and improve a first-principles based multiscale computation approach to simulating surface segregation phenomena in Pt alloy surfaces; to evaluate the surface electronic structure and catalytic activity of Pt alloy catalysts and; to relate the surface composition to the catalytic performance of Pt alloy catalysts.

  16. Microbiologically-Facilitated Effects on the Surface Composition of Alloy 22, A Candidate Nuclear Waste Packaging Material

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, J; Lian, T; Martin, S I

    2001-12-07

    The effects of microbiological activities on the surface composition of Alloy 22 was investigated. Prior studies suggesting microbially-generated selective dissolution of chromium from Alloy 22 were based solely on analyzing solubilized Alloy 22 elements. These and other investigations point to the insufficiencies of analyzing solubilized (or solubilized and reprecipitated) alloying elements to discern between homogeneous/stoichiometric dissolution and selective/non-stoichiometric dissolution of alloying elements. Therefore, an approach using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) to interrogate the surface layers of treated Alloy 22 specimens was taken to resolve this issue. Sputtering into the surface of the samples, coupled with XPS analysis at given intervals, allowed a high resolution quantitative elemental evaluation of the alloy as a function of depth. Biotically-incubated Alloy 22 show a region that could be depleted of chromium. Surfacial XPS analysis of these same coupons did not detect the presence of re-precipitated Alloy 22 component elements, also supporting the possible occurrence of non-stoichiometric dissolution. Thus, these preliminary data do not exclude the possibility of selective dissolution. It also appears that this experimental approach shows promise to unequivocally resolve this issue. Further tests using smoother-surface, more highly polished coupons should allow for better resolution between surface layers to permit a decisive determination of the mode of Alloy 22 dissolution using sputtering XPS analysis.

  17. AuPt Alloy Nanostructures with Tunable Composition and Enzyme-like Activities for Colorimetric Detection of Bisulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Weiwei; Han, Xiangna; Jia, Huimin; Cai, Junhui; Zhou, Yunlong; Zheng, Zhi

    2017-01-01

    Tuning the enzyme-like activity and studying the interaction between biologically relevant species and nano-enzymes may facilitate the applications of nanostructures in mimicking natural enzymes. In this work, AuPt alloy nanoparticles (NPs) with varying compositions were prepared through a facile method by co-reduction of Au3+ and Pt2+ in aqueous solutions. The composition could be tuned easily by adjusting the molar ratios of added Pt2+ to Au3+. It was found that both peroxidase-like and oxidase-like activity of AuPt alloy NPs were highly dependent on the alloy compositions, which thus suggesting an effective way to tailor their catalytic properties. By investigating the inhibitory effects of HS‑ on the enzyme-like activity of AuPt alloy NPs and natural enzyme, we have developed a method for colorimetric detection of HS‑ and evaluation of the inhibiting effects of inhibitors on natural and artificial enzymes. In addition, the responsive ability of this method was influenced largely by the composition: AuPt alloy NPs show much lower limit of detection for HS‑ than Pt NPs while Pt NPs show wider linear range than AuPt alloy NPs. This study suggests the facile way not only for synthesis of alloy nanostructures, but also for tuning their catalytic activities and for use in bioanalysis.

  18. AuPt Alloy Nanostructures with Tunable Composition and Enzyme-like Activities for Colorimetric Detection of Bisulfide

    PubMed Central

    He, Weiwei; Han, Xiangna; Jia, Huimin; Cai, Junhui; Zhou, Yunlong; Zheng, Zhi

    2017-01-01

    Tuning the enzyme-like activity and studying the interaction between biologically relevant species and nano-enzymes may facilitate the applications of nanostructures in mimicking natural enzymes. In this work, AuPt alloy nanoparticles (NPs) with varying compositions were prepared through a facile method by co-reduction of Au3+ and Pt2+ in aqueous solutions. The composition could be tuned easily by adjusting the molar ratios of added Pt2+ to Au3+. It was found that both peroxidase-like and oxidase-like activity of AuPt alloy NPs were highly dependent on the alloy compositions, which thus suggesting an effective way to tailor their catalytic properties. By investigating the inhibitory effects of HS− on the enzyme-like activity of AuPt alloy NPs and natural enzyme, we have developed a method for colorimetric detection of HS− and evaluation of the inhibiting effects of inhibitors on natural and artificial enzymes. In addition, the responsive ability of this method was influenced largely by the composition: AuPt alloy NPs show much lower limit of detection for HS− than Pt NPs while Pt NPs show wider linear range than AuPt alloy NPs. This study suggests the facile way not only for synthesis of alloy nanostructures, but also for tuning their catalytic activities and for use in bioanalysis. PMID:28051159

  19. Highly mismatched crystalline and amorphous GaN(1-x)As(x) alloys in the whole composition range

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, K. M.; Novikov, S. V.; Broesler, R.; Demchenko, I. N.; Denlinger, J. D.; Liliental-Weber, Z.; Luckert, F.; Martin, R. W.; Walukiewicz, W.; Foxon, C. T.

    2009-08-29

    Alloying is a commonly accepted method to tailor properties of semiconductor materials for specific applications. Only a limited number of semiconductor alloys can be easily synthesized in the full composition range. Such alloys are, in general, formed of component elements that are well matched in terms of ionicity, atom size, and electronegativity. In contrast there is a broad class of potential semiconductor alloys formed of component materials with distinctly different properties. In most instances these mismatched alloys are immiscible under standard growth conditions. Here we report on the properties of GaN1-xAsx, a highly mismatched, immiscible alloy system that was successfully synthesized in the whole composition range using a nonequilibrium low temperature molecular beam epitaxy technique. The alloys are amorphous in the composition range of 0.17composition, and sharp, well defined optical absorption edges. The band gap energy varies in a broad energy range from ~;;3.4 eV in GaN to ~;;0.8 eV at x~;;0.85. The reduction in the band gap can be attributed primarily to the downward movement of the conduction band for alloys with x>0.2, and to the upward movement of the valence band for alloys with x<0.2. The unique features of the band structure offer an opportunity of using GaN1-xAsx alloys for various types of solar power conversion devices.

  20. Determination of the area density and composition of alloy film using dual alpha particle energy loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiaojun; Li, Bo; Gao, Dangzhong; Xu, Jiayun; Tang, Yongjian

    2017-02-01

    A novel method based on dual α-particles energy loss (DAEL) is proposed for measuring the area density and composition of binary alloy films. In order to obtain a dual-energy α-particles source, an ingenious design that utilizes the transmitted α-particles traveling the thin film as a new α-particles source is presented. Using the DAEL technique, the area density and composition of Au/Cu film are determined accurately with an uncertainty of better than 10%. Finally, some measures for improving the combined uncertainty are discussed.

  1. Preparation and Characterization of Binder Less Mg/Mg Alloy Infiltrated SiCp Reinforced Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthu Kumar, S.; Dhindaw, B. K.

    2007-10-01

    SiCp-reinforced commercial pure magnesium and AZ91 alloy MMCs’ were prepared through infiltration route without the use of any special atmospheres. The preform was prepared using a mixture of reinforcement particles and the matrix metal particles. The composites were prepared with various volume percentage of the reinforcement and their properties with the variation of SiCp were analyzed. The interfacial properties of the composites were analyzed using microstructure, microhardness, and wear studies. Calculation of thermal conditions during infiltration was done to study the effect of adding matrix metal particles on the infiltration behavior and its effect on the uniformity distribution of the reinforcements.

  2. Rapid solidification of Nb-base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokhale, A. B.; Javed, K. R.; Abbaschian, G. J.; Lewis, R. E.

    1988-01-01

    New Nb-base alloys are of interest for aerospace structural applications at high temperatures, viz, 800 to 1650 C. Fundamental information regarding the effects of rapid solidification in achieving greatly refined microstructures, extended solid solubility, suppression of embrittling equilibrium phases, and formation of new phases is desired in a number of Nb-X alloys. The microstructures and selected properties of Nb-Si and other Nb-base alloys are presented for materials both rapidly quenched from the equilibrium liquidus and rapidly solidified following deep supercooling. Electromagnetic levitation was used to achieve melting and supercooling in a containerless inert gas environment. A variety of solidification conditions were employed including splatting or drop casting of supercooled samples. The morphology and composition of phases formed are discussed in terms of both solidification history and bulk composition.

  3. 3D Simulation of the Growth of Alloy Semiconductor Quantum Dots Considering Morphological and Compositional Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Junyan; Zhang, Yong-Wei; Narayanaswamy, Sridhar

    2012-02-01

    Fabrication of quantum dots (QDs) with high density may be realized by self-assembly via heteroepitaxial growth of thin films. Since the electronic and optoelectronic properties of QDs are sensitive to size, morphology, strain and especially composition, it is of great importance to control their composition profiles and morphology, and engineer the strain in them. Since the growth is a dynamic process, which carries out via surface diffusion driven primarily by strain relaxation and entropy change due to chemical intermixing, a strong coupling between morphological and composition evolutions during this process leads to a rather complex dynamics, which has not been fully understood. In this work, a 3-D finite element model is developed, which is capable of modeling the formation, self-assembly and coarsening of hetero-epitaxial alloy islands by considering the coupling of morphological and compositional evolution. Several interesting experimental observations, such as fast coarsening kinetics; asymmetries in composition profile and island shape; lateral motion of alloy islands have been observed in our simulations. Our model predictions have painted a rather complete picture for the entire dynamic evolution during the growth of nanoscale heteroepitaxial islands.

  4. A novel biodegradable nicotinic acid/calcium phosphate composite coating on Mg-3Zn alloy.

    PubMed

    Song, Yingwei; Shan, Dayong; Han, En-Hou

    2013-01-01

    A novel biodegradable composite coating is prepared to reduce the biodegradation rate of Mg-3Zn alloy. The Mg-3Zn substrate is first immersed into 0.02 mol L(-1) nicotinic acid (NA) solution, named as vitamin B3, to obtain a pretreatment film, and then the electrodeposition of calcium phosphate coating with ultrasonic agitation is carried out on the NA pretreatment film to obtain a NA/calcium phosphate composite coating. Surface morphology is observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Chemical composition is determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and EDX. Protection property of the coatings is evaluated by electrochemical tests. The biodegradable behavior is investigated by immersion tests. The results indicate that a thin but compact bottom layer can be obtained by NA pretreatment. The electrodeposition calcium phosphate coating consists of many flake particles and ultrasonic agitation can greatly improve the compactness of the coating. The composite coating is biodegradable and can reduce the biodegradation rate of Mg alloys in stimulated body fluid (SBF) for twenty times. The biodegradation process of the composite coating can be attributed to the gradual dissolution of the flake particles into chippings.

  5. Structural and Phase State of Ti-Nb Alloy at Selective Laser Melting of the Composite Powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharkeev, Yu. P.; Eroshenko, A. Yu.; Kovalevskaya, Zh. G.; Saprykin, A. A.; Ibragimov, E. A.; Glukhov, I. A.; Khimich, M. A.; Uvarkin, P. V.; Babakova, E. V.

    2016-07-01

    Phase composition and microstructure of Ti-Nb alloy produced from the composite titanium and niobium powder by selective laser melting (SLM) method were studied in the present research. Ti-Nb alloy produced by SLM is a monolayer and has zones of fine-grained and medium-grained structure with homogenous elemental composition within the range of 36-38 wt.% Nb. Phase state of the alloy corresponds to the main phase of β- solid solution (grain size of 5-7 μm) and non-equilibrium martensite α″-phase (grain size of 0.1-0.7 μm). Grains of the α″-phase are localized along the boundaries of β-phase grains and have a reduced content of niobium. Microhardness of the alloy varies within the range of 4200-5500 MPa.

  6. Mechanically Stretchable and Electrically Insulating Thermal Elastomer Composite by Liquid Alloy Droplet Embedment

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Seung Hee; Chen, Si; Huo, Jinxing; Gamstedt, Erik Kristofer; Liu, Johan; Zhang, Shi-Li; Zhang, Zhi-Bin; Hjort, Klas; Wu, Zhigang

    2015-01-01

    Stretchable electronics and soft robotics have shown unsurpassed features, inheriting remarkable functions from stretchable and soft materials. Electrically conductive and mechanically stretchable materials based on composites have been widely studied for stretchable electronics as electrical conductors using various combinations of materials. However, thermally tunable and stretchable materials, which have high potential in soft and stretchable thermal devices as interface or packaging materials, have not been sufficiently studied. Here, a mechanically stretchable and electrically insulating thermal elastomer composite is demonstrated, which can be easily processed for device fabrication. A liquid alloy is embedded as liquid droplet fillers in an elastomer matrix to achieve softness and stretchability. This new elastomer composite is expected useful to enhance thermal response or efficiency of soft and stretchable thermal devices or systems. The thermal elastomer composites demonstrate advantages such as thermal interface and packaging layers with thermal shrink films in transient and steady-state cases and a stretchable temperature sensor. PMID:26671673

  7. Aluminum alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackburn, Linda B. (Inventor); Starke, Edgar A., Jr. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    This invention relates to aluminum alloys, particularly to aluminum-copper-lithium alloys containing at least about 0.1 percent by weight of indium as an essential component, which are suitable for applications in aircraft and aerospace vehicles. At least about 0.1 percent by weight of indium is added as an essential component to an alloy which precipitates a T1 phase (Al2CuLi). This addition enhances the nucleation of the precipitate T1 phase, producing a microstructure which provides excellent strength as indicated by Rockwell hardness values and confirmed by standard tensile tests.

  8. The effect of interface properties on nickel base alloy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groves, M.; Grossman, T.; Senemeier, M.; Wright, K.

    1995-01-01

    This program was performed to assess the extent to which mechanical behavior models can predict the properties of sapphire fiber/nickel aluminide matrix composites and help guide their development by defining improved combinations of matrix and interface coating. The program consisted of four tasks: 1) selection of the matrices and interface coating constituents using a modeling-based approach; 2) fabrication of the selected materials; 3) testing and evaluation of the materials; and 4) evaluation of the behavior models to develop recommendations. Ni-50Al and Ni-20AI-30Fe (a/o) matrices were selected which gave brittle and ductile behavior, respectively, and an interface coating of PVD YSZ was selected which provided strong bonding to the sapphire fiber. Significant fiber damage and strength loss was observed in the composites which made straightforward comparison of properties with models difficult. Nevertheless, the models selected generally provided property predictions which agreed well with results when fiber degradation was incorporated. The presence of a strong interface bond was felt to be detrimental in the NiAI MMC system where low toughness and low strength were observed.

  9. Influence of artificial biological fluid composition on the biocorrosion of potential orthopedic Mg-Ca, AZ31, AZ91 alloys.

    PubMed

    Gu, X N; Zheng, Y F; Chen, L J

    2009-12-01

    The electrochemical behavior of potential orthopedic Mg-Ca, AZ31 and AZ91 alloys was studied in Hank's solution, Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium (DMEM) and serum-containing medium (DMEM adding 10% fetal bovine serum (DMEM+FBS)) over a 7 day immersion period. The biocorrosion of the above three alloys for various immersion time intervals was investigated by linear polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). After 7 day immersion, potentiodynamic polarization tests were carried out and the surface morphologies of experimental samples were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observation complemented by energy-disperse spectrometer (EDS) analysis. It was shown that the corrosion of magnesium alloys was influenced by the composition of the solution. The results indicated that chloride ion could reduce the corrosion resistance and the hydrocarbonate ions could induce rapid surface passivation. The adsorbed amino acid on the experimental magnesium alloys' surface increased their polarization resistance and reduced current densities. The influence of the serum protein on corrosion was found to be associated with the magnesium alloy compositions. A Mg-Ca alloy exhibited an increased corrosion rate in the presence of serum protein. An AZ31 alloy showed an increased corrosion rate in DMEM+FBS in the initial 3 day immersion and the corrosion rate decreased thereafter. An AZ91 alloy, with high Al content, showed a reduced corrosion rate with the addition of FBS into DMEM.

  10. Development of aerospace nursing.

    PubMed

    Barron, N J

    1975-04-01

    In the initial development, the primary purpose of the USAF aerospace nursing program was to prepare the nurse to function as an integral member of the aerospace medical team in support of bioastronautics, occupational health and aerospace medical research programs. The absence of an expanded manned space program has required the aerospace nurse to redirect her energies toward the immediate needs of the aerospace medicine program. Many of the aerospace nurse's more specific functions are dependent upon the mission objectives of the command and military base to which she is assigned. Aerospace nursing reflects a concern for the total health needs of the Air Force community and the application of a holistic approach. It includes all aspects of health and all environmental hazards which alter health. The development of aerospace nursing paves the way for this expanded view of nursing practice.

  11. An Aerospace Workshop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Bill

    1972-01-01

    Describes the 16-day, 10,000 mile national tour of the nation's major aerospace research and development centers by 65 students enrolled in Central Washington State College's Summer Aerospace Workshop. (Author/MB)

  12. Effect of alloy composition on high-temperature bending fatigue strength of ferritic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Yong-Sik; Song, Jeon-Young

    2011-12-01

    Exhaust manifolds are subjected to an environment in which heating and cooling cycles occur due to the running pattern of automotive engines. This temperature profile results in the repeated bending stress of exhaust pipes. Therefore, among high-temperature characteristics, the bending fatigue strength is an important factor that affects the lifespan of exhaust manifolds. Here, we report on the effect of the alloy composition, namely the weight fraction of the elements Cr, Mo, Nb, and Ti, on the high-temperature bending fatigue strength of the ferritic stainless steel used in exhaust manifolds. Little difference in the tensile strength and bending fatigue strength of the different composition steels was observed below 600 °C, with the exception of the low-Cr steel. However, steels with high Cr, Mo, or Nb fractions showed considerably larger bending fatigue strength at temperatures of 800 °C. After heating, the precipitates from the specimens were extracted electrolytically and analyzed using scanning electron microscopy energy dispersive spectrometry and transmission electron microscopy. Alloying with Cr and Mo was found to increase the bending fatigue strength due to the substitutional solid solution effect, while alloying with Nb enhanced the strength by forming fine intermetallic compounds, including NbC and Fe2Nb.

  13. Understanding the Cu-Zn brass alloys using a short-range-order cluster model: Significance of specific compositions of industrial alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, H. L.; Wang, Q.; Dong, C.; Liaw, Peter K.

    2014-11-17

    Metallic alloys show complex chemistries that are not yet understood so far. It has been widely accepted that behind the composition selection lies a short-range-order mechanism for solid solutions. The present paper addresses this fundamental question by examining the face-centered-cubic Cu-Zn a-brasses. A new structural approach, the cluster-plus-glue-atom model, is introduced, which suits specifically for the description of short-range-order structures in disordered systems. Two types of formulas are pointed out, [Zn-Cu12]Zn1,6 and [Zn-Cu12](Zn,Cu)6, which explain the a-brasses listed in the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) specifications. In these formulas, the bracketed parts represent the 1st-neighbor cluster, and each cluster is matched with one to six 2nd-neighbor Zn atoms or with six mixed (Zn,Cu) atoms. Such a cluster-based formulism describes the 1st- and 2nd-neighbor local atomic units where the solute and solvent interactions are ideally satisfied. The Cu-Ni industrial alloys are also explained, thus proving the universality of the cluster-formula approach in understanding the alloy selections. The revelation of the composition formulas for the Cu-(Zn,Ni) industrial alloys points to the common existence of simple composition rules behind seemingly complex chemistries of industrial alloys, therefore offering a fundamental and practical method towards composition interpretations of all kinds of alloys.

  14. Understanding the Cu-Zn brass alloys using a short-range-order cluster model: Significance of specific compositions of industrial alloys

    DOE PAGES

    Hong, H. L.; Wang, Q.; Dong, C.; ...

    2014-11-17

    Metallic alloys show complex chemistries that are not yet understood so far. It has been widely accepted that behind the composition selection lies a short-range-order mechanism for solid solutions. The present paper addresses this fundamental question by examining the face-centered-cubic Cu-Zn a-brasses. A new structural approach, the cluster-plus-glue-atom model, is introduced, which suits specifically for the description of short-range-order structures in disordered systems. Two types of formulas are pointed out, [Zn-Cu12]Zn1,6 and [Zn-Cu12](Zn,Cu)6, which explain the a-brasses listed in the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) specifications. In these formulas, the bracketed parts represent the 1st-neighbor cluster, and eachmore » cluster is matched with one to six 2nd-neighbor Zn atoms or with six mixed (Zn,Cu) atoms. Such a cluster-based formulism describes the 1st- and 2nd-neighbor local atomic units where the solute and solvent interactions are ideally satisfied. The Cu-Ni industrial alloys are also explained, thus proving the universality of the cluster-formula approach in understanding the alloy selections. The revelation of the composition formulas for the Cu-(Zn,Ni) industrial alloys points to the common existence of simple composition rules behind seemingly complex chemistries of industrial alloys, therefore offering a fundamental and practical method towards composition interpretations of all kinds of alloys.« less

  15. Application of composites to the selective reinforcement of metallic aerospace structures. [application of structural design criteria for weight reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, W. A., Jr.; Mathauser, E. E.; Pride, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    The use of composite materials to selectively reinforce metallic structures provides a low-cost way to reduce weight and a means of minimizing the risks usually associated with the introduction of new materials. An overview is presented of the NASA Langley Research Center programs to identify the advantages and to develop the potential of the selective reinforcement approach to the use of composites. These programs have shown that selective reinforcement provides excellent strength and stiffness improvements to metallic structures. Significant weight savings can be obtained in a cost effective manner. Flight service programs which have been initiated to validate further the merits of selective reinforcement are described.

  16. Aerospace Industry and Research. Aerospace Education II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackin, T. E.

    This book, to be used in the Air Force ROTC program only, discusses various aspects of the aerospace industry and its importance to the society. Not only does a modern and strong aerospace technology help in national defense, but it is a major economic industry as well. The vast number of people employed could shake the roots of economic…

  17. Effect of compositional variation on the shock wave response of bulk amorphous alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaglinski, T.; Turneaure, Stefan J.; Gupta, Y. M.

    2012-09-01

    The objective of this work was to determine how variations in composition influence the shock wave response of bulk amorphous alloys (BAAs). Toward this end, (Hf,Zr)-based bulk amorphous alloy specimens (nominal composition of (Hf0.5Zr0.5)56.7Cu15.3Ni12.5Nb5.0Al10.0Y0.5) were subjected to peak stresses of 4-16 GPa in plate impact experiments and their response was compared to a previously studied Zr-based BAA (nominal composition of Zr56.7Cu15.3Ni12.5Nb5.0Al10.0Y0.5). The (Hf,Zr)-based BAA displayed a Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL) of ˜7.4 GPa corresponding to an elastic strain of 4.3%. (Hf,Zr)-based BAAs shock compressed above the HEL exhibited distinct two wave structures, small elastic precursor relaxation, non-steady plastic waves, and strength loss. All of these features are qualitatively similar to previous observations in various Zr-based BAAs. One dimensional wave propagation simulations incorporating a strain-softening strength model, developed previously for a Zr-based BAA, showed excellent agreement between measured and simulated particle velocity histories for the (Hf,Zr)-based BAA. The only significant differences in the shock wave responses of the (Hf,Zr)-based alloy and the Zr-based alloy are elastic shock velocity and plastic shock velocity differences which are due to the different ambient densities and different elastic moduli for the two alloy compositions. These findings demonstrate that, apart from differences related to ambient density and elastic stiffness, the substitution of Hf for 50% of the Zr did not significantly alter the shock compression response of the (Hf,Zr)-based BAA as compared to the previously examined Zr-based BAA. Based on the results of this study and other relevant data in the literature, it is expected that monolithic BAAs displaying brittle quasi-static compression behavior will likely display shock compression response that is comparable to Zr-based and (Hf,Zr)-based BAAs.

  18. NASA technology utilization survey on composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leeds, M. A.; Schwartz, S.; Holm, G. J.; Krainess, A. M.; Wykes, D. M.; Delzell, M. T.; Veazie, W. H., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    NASA and NASA-funded contractor contributions to the field of composite materials are surveyed. Existing and potential non-aerospace applications of the newer composite materials are emphasized. Economic factors for selection of a composite for a particular application are weight savings, performance (high strength, high elastic modulus, low coefficient of expansion, heat resistance, corrosion resistance,), longer service life, and reduced maintenance. Applications for composites in agriculture, chemical and petrochemical industries, construction, consumer goods, machinery, power generation and distribution, transportation, biomedicine, and safety are presented. With the continuing trend toward further cost reductions, composites warrant consideration in a wide range of non-aerospace applications. Composite materials discussed include filamentary reinforced materials, laminates, multiphase alloys, solid multiphase lubricants, and multiphase ceramics. New processes developed to aid in fabrication of composites are given.

  19. Microstructure and mechanical behavior of metallic glass fiber-reinforced Al alloy matrix composites.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z; Georgarakis, K; Nakayama, K S; Li, Y; Tsarkov, A A; Xie, G; Dudina, D; Louzguine-Luzgin, D V; Yavari, A R

    2016-04-12

    Metallic glass-reinforced metal matrix composites are an emerging class of composite materials. The metallic nature and the high mechanical strength of the reinforcing phase offers unique possibilities for improving the engineering performance of composites. Understanding the structure at the amorphous/crystalline interfaces and the deformation behavior of these composites is of vital importance for their further development and potential application. In the present work, Zr-based metallic glass fibers have been introduced in Al7075 alloy (Al-Zn-Mg-Cu) matrices using spark plasma sintering (SPS) producing composites with low porosity. The addition of metallic glass reinforcements in the Al-based matrix significantly improves the mechanical behavior of the composites in compression. High-resolution TEM observations at the interface reveal the formation of a thin interdiffusion layer able to provide good bonding between the reinforcing phase and the Al-based matrix. The deformation behavior of the composites was studied, indicating that local plastic deformation occurred in the matrix near the glassy reinforcements followed by the initiation and propagation of cracks mainly through the matrix. The reinforcing phase is seen to inhibit the plastic deformation and retard the crack propagation. The findings offer new insights into the mechanical behavior of metal matrix composites reinforced with metallic glasses.

  20. Microstructure and mechanical behavior of metallic glass fiber-reinforced Al alloy matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Georgarakis, K.; Nakayama, K. S.; Li, Y.; Tsarkov, A. A.; Xie, G.; Dudina, D.; Louzguine-Luzgin, D. V.; Yavari, A. R.

    2016-04-01

    Metallic glass-reinforced metal matrix composites are an emerging class of composite materials. The metallic nature and the high mechanical strength of the reinforcing phase offers unique possibilities for improving the engineering performance of composites. Understanding the structure at the amorphous/crystalline interfaces and the deformation behavior of these composites is of vital importance for their further development and potential application. In the present work, Zr-based metallic glass fibers have been introduced in Al7075 alloy (Al-Zn-Mg-Cu) matrices using spark plasma sintering (SPS) producing composites with low porosity. The addition of metallic glass reinforcements in the Al-based matrix significantly improves the mechanical behavior of the composites in compression. High-resolution TEM observations at the interface reveal the formation of a thin interdiffusion layer able to provide good bonding between the reinforcing phase and the Al-based matrix. The deformation behavior of the composites was studied, indicating that local plastic deformation occurred in the matrix near the glassy reinforcements followed by the initiation and propagation of cracks mainly through the matrix. The reinforcing phase is seen to inhibit the plastic deformation and retard the crack propagation. The findings offer new insights into the mechanical behavior of metal matrix composites reinforced with metallic glasses.

  1. Microstructure and mechanical behavior of metallic glass fiber-reinforced Al alloy matrix composites

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Z.; Georgarakis, K.; Nakayama, K. S.; Li, Y.; Tsarkov, A. A.; Xie, G.; Dudina, D.; Louzguine-Luzgin, D. V.; Yavari, A. R.

    2016-01-01

    Metallic glass-reinforced metal matrix composites are an emerging class of composite materials. The metallic nature and the high mechanical strength of the reinforcing phase offers unique possibilities for improving the engineering performance of composites. Understanding the structure at the amorphous/crystalline interfaces and the deformation behavior of these composites is of vital importance for their further development and potential application. In the present work, Zr-based metallic glass fibers have been introduced in Al7075 alloy (Al-Zn-Mg-Cu) matrices using spark plasma sintering (SPS) producing composites with low porosity. The addition of metallic glass reinforcements in the Al-based matrix significantly improves the mechanical behavior of the composites in compression. High-resolution TEM observations at the interface reveal the formation of a thin interdiffusion layer able to provide good bonding between the reinforcing phase and the Al-based matrix. The deformation behavior of the composites was studied, indicating that local plastic deformation occurred in the matrix near the glassy reinforcements followed by the initiation and propagation of cracks mainly through the matrix. The reinforcing phase is seen to inhibit the plastic deformation and retard the crack propagation. The findings offer new insights into the mechanical behavior of metal matrix composites reinforced with metallic glasses. PMID:27067824

  2. Characterizing the Use of Ultrasonic Energy in Promoting Uniform Composite Growth in Immiscible Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard N.; Fedoseyev, A. I.

    2000-01-01

    The results of experimental investigation and mathematical modeling for immiscible alloys subjected to ultrasonic influence are presented. It is known that in inoculated light alloy melts, ultrasonic treatment creates a new type of cast structure with extremely fine grains of uniform composition. This effect is produced across a wide range of freezing rates and technologies. However, it has not been demonstrated that the process can be successfully applied during controlled directional solidification processing. In this work we present the results from a set of directional solidification experiments and suggest describing the droplet size versus ultrasonic frequency and amplitude using an energy approach, followed with a more detailed analysis through numerical modeling of the ultrasonic field.

  3. Oxidation and corrosion behavior of modified-composition, low-chromium 304 stainless steel alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.; Barrett, C. A.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of substituting less strategic elements than Cr on the oxidation and corrosion resistance of AISI 304 stainless steel were investigated. Cyclic oxidation resistance was evaluated at 870 C. Corrosion resistance was determined by exposure of specimens to a boiling copper-rich solution of copper sulfate and sulfuric acid. Alloy substitutes for Cr included Al, Mn, Mo, Si, Ti, V, Y, and misch metal. A level of about 12% Cr was the minimum amount of Cr required for adequate oxidation and corrosion resistance in the modified composition 304 stainless steels. This represents a Cr saving of at least 33%. Two alloys containing 12% Cr and 2% Al plus 2% Mo and 12% Cr plus 2.65% Si were identified as most promising for more detailed evaluation.

  4. Composition-dependent metallic glass alloys correlate atomic mobility with collective glass surface dynamics.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Duc; Zhu, Zhi-Guang; Pringle, Brian; Lyding, Joseph; Wang, Wei-Hua; Gruebele, Martin

    2016-06-22

    Glassy metallic alloys are richly tunable model systems for surface glassy dynamics. Here we study the correlation between atomic mobility, and the hopping rate of surface regions (clusters) that rearrange collectively on a minute to hour time scale. Increasing the proportion of low-mobility copper atoms in La-Ni-Al-Cu alloys reduces the cluster hopping rate, thus establishing a microscopic connection between atomic mobility and dynamics of collective rearrangements at a glass surface made from freshly exposed bulk glass. One composition, La60Ni15Al15Cu10, has a surface resistant to re-crystallization after three heating cycles. When thermally cycled, surface clusters grow in size from about 5 glass-forming units to about 8 glass-forming units, evidence of surface aging without crystal formation, although its bulk clearly forms larger crystalline domains. Such kinetically stable glass surfaces may be of use in applications where glassy coatings stable against heating are needed.

  5. Effect of chemical composition variation on microstructure and mechanical properties of a 6060 aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, M. S.; Barbosa, C.; Acselrad, O.; Pereira, L. C.

    2004-04-01

    The 6XXX series aluminum alloys (Al-Mg-Si) are widely used in many different engineering and architectural applications. These alloys usually undergo a thermal treatment, which consists of a heat treatment solution and artificial aging, since the desirable mechanical properties depend on the microstructural state of the material. The recycling of materials has been increasing recently for economic and ecologic reasons. By using scrap was raw material, important reductions in energy and total costs can be achieved, and, at the same time, negative environmental impacts can be greatly reduced. In the present work, the possibility of using a larger amount of scrap as raw material in the production of an AA 6060 alloy is evaluated by analyzing the difference in microstructure and mechanical properties between a commercial 6060 alloy and a variation with higher Fe and lower Si contents that was specially produced for this study. Both materials were placed into a heat treatment solution at 560 °C for 1 h, and then underwent water quenching followed by artificial aging at 180 °C for different periods of time. Hardness and tension tests were used to evaluate the mechanical properties. Light and transmission electron microscopy have been used to determine important features such as grain size before and after being placed into the heat treatment solution, and the characteristics of the second-phase particles in the two materials. This study leads to the conclusion that a higher amount of scrap material can be used in the production of 6060 Al alloy without significant changes in mechanical properties compared with the more usual compositions.

  6. Shear strain mediated magneto-electric effects in composites of piezoelectric lanthanum gallium silicate or tantalate and ferromagnetic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Sreenivasulu, G.; Piskulich, E.; Srinivasan, G.; Qu, P.; Qu, Hongwei; Petrov, V. M.; Fetisov, Y. K.; Nosov, A. P.

    2014-07-21

    Shear strain mediated magneto-electric (ME) coupling is studied in composites of piezoelectric Y-cut lanthanum gallium silicate (LGS) or tantalate (LGT) and ferromagnetic Fe-Co-V alloys. It is shown that extensional strain does not result in ME effects in these layered composites. Under shear strain generated by an ac and dc bias magnetic fields along the length and width of the sample, respectively, strong ME coupling is measured at low-frequencies and at mechanical resonance. A model is discussed for the ME effects. These composites of Y-cut piezoelectrics and ferromagnetic alloys are of importance for shear strain based magnetic field sensors.

  7. Flaky FeSiAl alloy-carbon nanotube composite with tunable electromagnetic properties for microwave absorption

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lina; Liu, Xiaofang; Chuai, Dan; Chen, Yaxin; Yu, Ronghai

    2016-01-01

    Flaky FeSiAl alloy/multi-wall carbon nanotube (FeSiAl/MWCNT) composite was fabricated by facile and scalable ball milling method. The morphology and electromagnetic properties of the FeSiAl alloy can be well tuned by controlling the milling time. It is found that the magnetic loss of the FeSiAl alloy is improved by optimizing the milling time due to the increased anisotropy field. Meanwhile the addition of MWCNTs enhances the dielectric loss of the composite by increasing the interfacial polarizations, dipolar polarizations and conductive paths. Relative to conventional FeSiAl absorbers, the FeSiAl/MWCNT composite exhibits greatly improved microwave absorption performance with advantages of strong absorption and small thickness. The minimum reflection loss of the composite reaches −42.8 dB at 12.3 GHz at a very thin thickness of 1.9 mm. PMID:27762327

  8. Flaky FeSiAl alloy-carbon nanotube composite with tunable electromagnetic properties for microwave absorption.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lina; Liu, Xiaofang; Chuai, Dan; Chen, Yaxin; Yu, Ronghai

    2016-10-20

    Flaky FeSiAl alloy/multi-wall carbon nanotube (FeSiAl/MWCNT) composite was fabricated by facile and scalable ball milling method. The morphology and electromagnetic properties of the FeSiAl alloy can be well tuned by controlling the milling time. It is found that the magnetic loss of the FeSiAl alloy is improved by optimizing the milling time due to the increased anisotropy field. Meanwhile the addition of MWCNTs enhances the dielectric loss of the composite by increasing the interfacial polarizations, dipolar polarizations and conductive paths. Relative to conventional FeSiAl absorbers, the FeSiAl/MWCNT composite exhibits greatly improved microwave absorption performance with advantages of strong absorption and small thickness. The minimum reflection loss of the composite reaches -42.8 dB at 12.3 GHz at a very thin thickness of 1.9 mm.

  9. Flaky FeSiAl alloy-carbon nanotube composite with tunable electromagnetic properties for microwave absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lina; Liu, Xiaofang; Chuai, Dan; Chen, Yaxin; Yu, Ronghai

    2016-10-01

    Flaky FeSiAl alloy/multi-wall carbon nanotube (FeSiAl/MWCNT) composite was fabricated by facile and scalable ball milling method. The morphology and electromagnetic properties of the FeSiAl alloy can be well tuned by controlling the milling time. It is found that the magnetic loss of the FeSiAl alloy is improved by optimizing the milling time due to the increased anisotropy field. Meanwhile the addition of MWCNTs enhances the dielectric loss of the composite by increasing the interfacial polarizations, dipolar polarizations and conductive paths. Relative to conventional FeSiAl absorbers, the FeSiAl/MWCNT composite exhibits greatly improved microwave absorption performance with advantages of strong absorption and small thickness. The minimum reflection loss of the composite reaches ‑42.8 dB at 12.3 GHz at a very thin thickness of 1.9 mm.

  10. The effect of Co alloying content on the kinetics of reaction zone growth in tungsten fiber reinforced superalloy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, A.; Tien, J. K.; Caulfield, T.; Petrasek, D. W.

    1988-01-01

    A Co-free modified superalloy similar in composition to Waspaloy is investigated in an effort to understand the effect of Co on reaction zone growth kinetics and verify the chemistry dependence of reaction zone growth in the matrix of tungsten fiber reinforced superalloy composites. The values of the parabolic rate constant, characterizing the kinetics of reaction zone growth, for the Waspaloy matrix and the C-free alloy as well as five other alloys from a previous study confirm the dependence of reaction zone growth kinetics on cobalt content of the matrix. The Co-free alloy composite exhibits the slowest reaction zone growth among all tungsten fiber reinforced composites studied to date.

  11. Ligand-free gold-silver nanoparticle alloy polymer composites generated by picosecond laser ablation in liquid monomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menéndez-Manjón, Ana; Schwenke, Andreas; Steinke, Timo; Meyer, Matthias; Giese, Ulrich; Wagener, Philipp; Barcikowski, Stephan

    2013-02-01

    Polymer matrix nanocomposites filled with metallic and alloy nanoparticles add functionality in various applications such as optical devices and in the energy sector. However, matrix coupling agents or nanoparticle ligands may be unwanted additives, potentially inhibiting the resulting nanocomposite to be processed by injection molding. The generation of stabilizer-free Au, Ag, and AuAg alloy nanoparticle acrylate composites is achieved by picosecond-pulsed laser ablation of the respective metal target in the liquid monomer. Complementary to laser ablation of the solid alloy, we have alloyed nanoparticles by post-irradiation of Au and Ag colloids in the liquid monomer. The optical properties of the colloidal nanoparticles are successfully transferred to the solid poly(methyl methacrylate) matrix and characterized by their plasmon resonance that can be easily tuned between 400 and 600 nm by laser alloying in the liquid monomer.

  12. Laminated composite of magnetic alloy powder and ceramic powder and process for making same

    DOEpatents

    Moorhead, Arthur J.; Kim, Hyoun-Ee

    1999-01-01

    A laminated composite structure of alternating metal powder layers, and layers formed of an inorganic bonding media powder, and a method for manufacturing same are discosed. The method includes the steps of assembling in a cavity alternating layers of a metal powder and an inorganic bonding media of a ceramic, glass, and glass-ceramic. Heat, with or without pressure, is applied to the alternating layers until the particles of the metal powder are sintered together and bonded into the laminated composite structure by the layers of sintered inorganic bonding media to form a strong composite structure. The method finds particular application in the manufacture of high performance magnets wherein the metal powder is a magnetic alloy powder.

  13. Compressive behavior of titanium alloy skin-stiffener specimens selectively reinforced with boron-aluminum composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, H. W.; Carri, R. L.; Webster, R. C.

    1971-01-01

    A method of selectively reinforcing a conventional titanium airframe structure with unidirectional boron-aluminum composite attached by brazing was successfully demonstrated in compression tests of short skin-stiffener specimens. In a comparison with all-titanium specimens, improvements in structural performance recorded for the composite-reinforced specimens exceeded 25 percent on an equivalent-weight basis over the range from room temperature to 700 K (800 F) in terms of both initial buckling and maximum strengths. Performance at room temperature was not affected by prior exposure at 588 K (600 F) for 1000 hours in air or by 400 thermal cycles between 219 K and 588 K (-65 F and 600 F). The experimental results were generally predictable from existing analytical procedures. No evidence of failure was observed in the braze between the boron-aluminum composite and the titanium alloy.

  14. Deep ultraviolet distributed Bragg reflectors based on graded composition AlGaN alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Brummer, Gordie; Nothern, Denis; Nikiforov, A. Yu.; Moustakas, T. D.

    2015-06-01

    Distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) with peak reflectivity at approximately 280 nm, based on compositionally graded Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N alloys, were grown on 6H-SiC substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. DBRs with square, sinusoidal, triangular, and sawtooth composition profiles were designed with the transfer matrix method. The crystal structure of these DBRs was studied with high-resolution x-ray diffraction of the (1{sup ¯}015) reciprocal lattice point. The periodicity of the DBR profiles was confirmed with cross-sectional Z-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy. The peak reflectance of these DBRs with 15.5 periods varies from 77% to 56% with corresponding full width at half maximum of 17–14 nm. Coupled mode analysis was used to explain the dependence of the reflectivity characteristics on the profile of the graded composition.

  15. Precipitation Sequence of a SiC Particle Reinforced Al-Mg-Si Alloy Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Rujuan; Wang, Yihan; Guo, Baisong; Song, Min

    2016-11-01

    In this study, the precipitation sequence of a 5 vol.% SiC particles reinforced Al-1.12 wt.%Mg-0.77 wt.%Si alloy composite fabricated by traditional powder metallurgy method was investigated by transmission electron microscopy and hardness measurements. The results indicated that the addition of SiC reinforcements not only suppresses the initial aging stage but also influences the subsequent precipitates. The precipitation sequence of the composite aged at 175 °C can be described as: Guinier-Preston (G.P.) zone → β″ → β' → B', which was confirmed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. This work might provide the guidance for the design and fabrication of hardenable automobile body sheet by Al-based composites with enhanced mechanical properties.

  16. Laminated composite of magnetic alloy powder and ceramic powder and process for making same

    SciTech Connect

    Moorhead, A.J.; Kim, H.

    1999-08-10

    A laminated composite structure of alternating metal powder layers, and layers formed of an inorganic bonding media powder, and a method for manufacturing same are disclosed. The method includes the steps of assembling in a cavity alternating layers of a metal powder and an inorganic bonding media of a ceramic, glass, and glass-ceramic. Heat, with or without pressure, is applied to the alternating layers until the particles of the metal powder are sintered together and bonded into the laminated composite structure by the layers of sintered inorganic bonding media to form a strong composite structure. The method finds particular application in the manufacture of high performance magnets wherein the metal powder is a magnetic alloy powder. 9 figs.

  17. Compositional grading of CZTSSe alloy using exponential and uniform grading laws in SCAPS-ID simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simya, O. K.; Mahaboobbatcha, A.; Balachander, K.

    2016-04-01

    The SCAPS (Solar cell capacitance simulation) program were employed to analyze the compositional dependence of CZTSSe (Copper Zinc Tin Sulphur Selenium) absorber layers with Cadmium Sulphide (CdS) as buffer layer and Zinc Oxide (ZnO) as window layer for thin film solar cells applications. The primary motivation of this simulation work is to optimize the composition for Se/(S + Se) ratio, which would yield higher efficiency. The exponential and uniform grading law in SCAPS were set for the composition grading y(x) over a layer, as well as to set the composition dependence P(y) of a property. By varying the different compositions with exponential law and by using uniform law for the same composition, best efficiency of 14.97% were achieved for 0.4-0.1 composition of sulphur and selenium with Se/(S + Se) ratio of 0.80. Higher efficiency were obtained with higher Se content. The influences of the band gap of the CZTSSe alloys, which decreases linearly with an increase in its Se content, were further analyzed. The corresponding open circuit voltage, short circuit voltage, fill factor and efficiency of the simulated values on a photovoltaic cell with Mo back contact were studied in detail.

  18. Characterization of tribological behaviour of graphitic aluminum matrix composites, grey cast iron, and aluminum silicon alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riahi, Ahmad Reza

    In recent years a number of aluminum-silicon alloys and some graphitic aluminum matrix composites have been fabricated for potential tribological applications in the automotive industry, in particular for lightweight high efficiency internal combustion engines to replace conventional uses of cast iron. This study provides a systematic investigation for wear mechanisms in dry sliding of the graphitic aluminum-matrix composites (A356 Al-10%SiC-4%Gr and A356 Al-5%Al2O3-3%Gr) developed for cylinder liner applications. Two eutectic Al-Si alloys (modified with rare earth elements) developed for wear resistant engine blocks were also studied. The tribological behavior of grey cast iron (ASTM A30), which is a traditional material for engine components, was also investigated as reference. For graphitic aluminum matrix composites, a wear mapping approach has been adopted. Three main regimes: ultra mild, mild and severe wear regions were determined in the maps; additionally, a scuffing region was observed. In the ultra mild wear regime the wear resistance was primarily due to the hard particles supporting the load. It was shown that the onset of severe wear in graphitic composites occurred at considerably higher loads compared to A356 aluminum alloy and A356 Al-20% SiC composite. At the onset of severe wear, the surface temperatures and coefficient of friction of the graphitic composites was lower than that of A356 Al-20% SiC. At all testing conditions in the mild wear regime, a protective tribo-layer was formed, which by increasing the speed and load became more continuous, more compact, smoother, and harder. The tribo-layers were removed at the onset of severe wear. An experimental wear map of grey cast iron was constructed; it consisted of three wear regimes: ultra mild, mild and severe wear. In the ultra mild regime a compacted fine iron oxide powder formed on the contact. The onset of severe wear was started with local material transfer to the steel counterface, and

  19. Lattice Structures For Aerospace Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Olmo, E.; Grande, E.; Samartin, C. R.; Bezdenejnykh, M.; Torres, J.; Blanco, N.; Frovel, M.; Canas, J.

    2012-07-01

    The way of mass reduction improving performances in the aerospace structures is a constant and relevant challenge in the space business. The designs, materials and manufacturing processes are permanently in evolution to explore and get mass optimization solutions at low cost. In the framework of ICARO project, EADS CASA ESPACIO (ECE) has designed, manufactured and tested a technology demonstrator which shows that lattice type of grid structures is a promising weight saving solution for replacing some traditional metallic and composite structures for space applications. A virtual testing methodology was used in order to support the design of a high modulus CFRP cylindrical lattice technology demonstrator. The manufacturing process, based on composite Automatic Fiber Placement (AFP) technology developed by ECE, allows obtaining high quality low weight lattice structures potentially applicable to a wide range of aerospace structures. Launcher payload adaptors, satellite platforms, antenna towers or instrument supports are some promising candidates.

  20. Preparation and characterization of Ni-P/Ni3.1B composite alloy coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yurong; He, Jiawei; Wang, Wenchang; Shi, Jianhua; Mitsuzaki, Naotoshi; Chen, Zhidong

    2014-02-01

    The preparation of Ni-P/Ni3.1B composite alloy coating on the surface of copper was achieved by co-deposition of Ni3.1B nanoparticles with Ni-P coating during electroless plating. Ni-P-B alloy coating was obtained by heat-treating the as-plated Ni-P/Ni3.1B composite coating. The effect of the concentration of sodium alginate, borax, thiourea, Ni3.1B, temperature, and pH value on the deposition rate and B content were investigated and determined to be: 30 g L-1, 10 g L-1, 2 mg L-1, 20 mg L-1, 70 °C and 9.0 , respectively. Sodium alginate and thiourea were played as surfactant for coating Ni3.1B nanoparticles and stabilizer for the plating bath, respectively. Ni-P/Ni3.1B composite coating had good performance such as corrosion resistance and solderability.

  1. Effect of gelatin additive on microstructure and composition of electrodeposited rhenium-nickel alloys in aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wangping

    2016-12-01

    Re-Ni alloys with high Re content were electrodeposited galvanostatically from aqueous solutions with addition of gelatin. The influence of gelatin on the Faradaic efficiency (FE), chemical composition, morphology and crystallographic structure of the alloys was investigated. Morphology, surface roughness, chemical composition and phase identification of the alloys were characterized by an environmental scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction, respectively. The addition of gelatin in the plating led to the increase in Re content, and the decrease in the FE and deposition rate. In the absence and presence of gelatin, the alloys with high Re content consisted of an amorphous phase. The addition of gelatin resulted in small amount of carbon in the alloys due to the adsorption of gelatin in the alloy. The gelatin had a great influence on the morphology of the alloys, resulting in significant grain coarsening, the increase in surface roughness and the decrease in crack size. The optimum concentration of gelatin was found to be about 0.9-2.7 g L-1.

  2. Inhibiting Corrosion in Gr/Al and Gr/Mg Metal Matrix Composites Using Nonequilibrium Alloying Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-01

    the alloy was immediately visually inspected and the appearance recorded. Distinguishing features such as reflectivity, cloudiness, color and surface...solid solution in the Al, and lack of properly oriented planes in the highly textured film. After heat treating, several new peaks were present in the AI...done to determine If the alloy composition or film texture were dependent on the type of substrate. The rationale behind using glass was that it would

  3. Palladium/Copper Alloy Composite Membranes for High Temperature Hydrogen Separation

    SciTech Connect

    J. Douglas Way; Paul M. Thoen

    2006-08-31

    This report summarizes progress made during the a three year University Coal Research grant (DEFG26-03NT41792) at the Colorado School of Mines. The period of performance was September 1, 2003 through August of 2006. We made excellent progress toward our goal of contributing to the development of high productivity, sulfur tolerant composite metal membranes for hydrogen production and membrane reactors. Composite Pd and Pd alloy metal membranes with thin metal films (1-7 {micro}m) were prepared on porous stainless steel and ceramic supports that meet or exceed the DOE 2010 and 2015 pure hydrogen flux targets at differential pressure of only 20 psi. For example, a 2 {micro}m pure Pd membrane on a Pall AccuSep{reg_sign} substrate achieved an ideal H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} separation factor of over 6000, with a pure hydrogen flux of 210 SCFH/ft{sup 2} at only 20 psig feed pressure. Similar performance was achieved with a Pd{sub 80}Au{sub 20} composite membrane on a similar stainless steel substrate. Extrapolating the pure hydrogen flux of this PdAu membrane to the DOE Fossil Energy target conditions of 150 psia feed pressure and 50 psia permeate pressure gives a value of 508 SCFH/ft{sup 2}, exceeding the 2015 target. At these thicknesses, it is the support cost that will dominate the cost of a large scale module. In a direct comparison of FCC phase PdCu and PdAu alloys on identical supports, we showed that a Pd{sub 85}Au{sub 15} (mass %) alloy membrane is not inhibited by CO, CO{sub 2}, or steam present in a water-gas shift feed mixture at 400 C, has better resistance to sulfur than a Pd{sub 94}Cu{sub 6} membrane, and has over twice the hydrogen permeance.

  4. Analytical study of effects of surface and environmental thermal properties on moisture in composites. [for aerospace application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tompkins, S. S.

    1977-01-01

    The influence of surface and environmental thermal properties on the moisture absorption in fiber-reinforced polymeric-resin-matrix composite materials which have been subjected to convection and solar radiation was studied. Predicted moisture contents based on the conditions at the heated surface and in the ambient air were compared for both short term and long term exposures over a wide range of values for emittance, solar absorptance, convective heat transfer coefficient, solar radiation, ambient temperature, and orientation of the surface with respect to the sun. The calculations showed that absorptance and heat transfer coefficient have significant effects on the moisture content.

  5. Effects of interface treatment on the fatigue behaviour of shape memory alloy reinforced polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiremath, S. R.; Harish, K.; Vasireddi, Ramakrishna; Benal, M. M.; Mahapatra, D. R.

    2015-04-01

    Interfacial properties of Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) reinforced polymer matrix composites can be enhanced by improving the interfacial bonding. This paper focuses on studying the interfacial stresses developed in the SMAepoxy interface due to various laser shot penning conditions. Fiber-pull test-setup is designed to understand the role of mechanical bias stress cycling and thermal actuation cycling. Phase transformation is tracked over mechanical and thermal fatigue cycles. A micromechanics based model developed earlier based on shear lag in SMA and energy based consistent homogenization is extended here to incorporate the stress-temperature phase diagram parameters for modeling fatigue.

  6. Mechanical properties of molybdenum alloyed liquid phase-sintered tungsten-based composites

    SciTech Connect

    Kemp, P.B.; German, R.M.

    1995-08-01

    Tungsten-based composites are fabricated from mixed elemental powders using liquid phase sintering, usually with a nickel-iron matrix. During sintering, the tungsten undergoes grain growth, leading to microstructure coarsening that lowers strength but increases ductility. Often the desire is to increase strength at the sacrifice of ductility, and historically, this has been performed by postsintering deformation. Swaging a 93W-5Ni-2Fe alloy with 15 to 20 pct area reduction gives a 1000 to 1200 MPa tensile strength, 70 HRA hardness, and 15 to 20 pct fracture elongation.

  7. Spray-forming monolithic aluminum alloy and metal matrix composite strip

    SciTech Connect

    McHugh, K.M.

    1995-10-01

    Spray forming with de Laval nozzles is an advanced materials processing technology that converts a bulk liquid metal to a near-net-shape solid by depositing atomized droplets onto a suitably shaped substrate. Using this approach, aluminum alloys have been spray formed as strip, with technoeconomic advantages over conventional hot mill processing and continuous casting. The spray-formed strip had a flat profile, minimal porosity, high yield, and refined microstructure. In an adaptation to the technique, 6061 Al/SiC particulate-reinforced metal matrix composite strip was produced by codeposition of the phases.

  8. Penetration of tungsten-alloy rods into composite ceramic targets: Experiments and 2-D simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, Z.; Dekel, E.; Hohler, V.; Stilp, A. J.; Weber, K.

    1998-07-01

    A series of terminal ballistics experiments, with scaled tungsten-alloy penetrators, was performed on composite targets consisting of ceramic tiles glued to thick steel backing plates. Tiles of silicon-carbide, aluminum nitride, titanium-dibroide and boron-carbide were 20-80 mm thick, and impact velocity was 1.7 km/s. 2-D numerical simulations, using the PISCES code, were performed in order to simulate these shots. It is shown that a simplified version of the Johnson-Holmquist failure model can account for the penetration depths of the rods but is not enough to capture the effect of lateral release waves on these penetrations.

  9. The effects of composition on the environmental embrittlement of Fe{sub 3}Al alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Alven, D.A.; Stoloff, N.S.

    1997-12-01

    This paper reviews recent research on embrittlement of iron aluminides at room temperature brought about by exposure to moisture or hydrogen. The tensile and fatigue crack growth behavior of several Fe-28Al-5Cr alloys with small additions of Zr and C are described. It will be shown that fatigue crack growth behavior is dependent on composition, environment, humidity level, and frequency. Environments studied include vacuum, oxygen, hydrogen gas, and moist air. All cases of embrittlement are ultimately traceable to the interaction of hydrogen with the crack tip.

  10. Corrosion protection of Al alloys and Al-based metal-matrix composites by chemical passivation

    SciTech Connect

    Mansfeld, F.; Lin, S.; Sim, S.; Shih, H.

    1989-08-01

    Chemical passivation by immersion of aluminium alloys and aluminium 6061/ silicon carbide and aluminium 6061/graphite metal-matrix composites in cerium chloride solution produces very corrosion-resistant surfaces. Aluminium 6061 and aluminium 7075-T6 that had been immersed in 1000 ppm cerium chloride for one week did not suffer from pitting corrosion during immersion in acerated 0.5 N NaCl for three weeks. For aluminium 7075-T7l3 some improvement of the corrosion resistance was also achieved, but to a much lesser extent. Chemical passivation in cerium chloride was also successful for aluminium/silicon carbide and Allgraphite.

  11. SeZnSb alloy and its nano tubes, graphene composites properties

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Abhay Kumar

    2013-04-15

    Composite can alter the individual element physical property, could be useful to define the specific use of the material. Therefore, work demonstrates the synthesis of a new composition Se{sub 96}-Zn{sub 2}-Sb{sub 2} and its composites with 0.05% multi-walled carbon nano tubes and 0.05% bilayer graphene, in the glassy form. The diffused amorphous structure of the multi walled carbon nano tubes and bilayer gaphene in the Se{sub 96}-Zn{sub 2}-Sb{sub 2} alloy have been analyzed by using the Raman, X-ray photoluminescence spectroscopy, Furrier transmission infrared spectra, photoluminescence, UV/visible absorption spectroscopic measurements. The diffused prime Raman bands (G and D) have been appeared for the multi walled carbon nano tubes and graphene composites, while the X-ray photoluminescence core energy levels peak shifts have been observed for the composite materials. Subsequently the photoluminescence property at room temperature and a drastic enhancement (upto 80%) in infrared transmission percentage has been obtained for the bilayer graphene composite, along with optical energy band gaps for these materials have been evaluated 1.37, 1.39 and 1.41 eV.

  12. Effect of Particle Size on Wear of Particulate Reinforced Aluminum Alloy Composites at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Suresh; Pandey, Ratandeep; Panwar, Ranvir Singh; Pandey, O. P.

    2013-11-01

    The present paper describes the effect of particle size on operative wear mechanism in particle reinforced aluminum alloy composites at elevated temperatures. Two composites containing zircon sand particles of 20-32 μm and 106-125 μm were fabricated by stir casting process. The dry sliding wear tests of the developed composites were performed at low and high loads with variation in temperatures from 50 to 300 °C. The transition in wear mode from mild-to-severe was observed with variation in temperature and load. The wear at 200 °C presented entirely different wear behavior from the one at 250 °C. The wear rate of fine size reinforced composite at 200 °C at higher load was substantially lower than that of coarse size reinforced composite. Examination of wear tracks and debris revealed that delamination occurs after run in wear mode followed by formation of smaller size wear debris, transfer of materials from the counter surfaces and mixing of these materials on the contact surfaces. The volume loss was observed to increase with increase in load and temperature. Composite containing bigger size particles exhibit higher loss under similar conditions.

  13. Composition-structure-function diagrams of Ti-Ni-Au thin film shape memory alloys.

    PubMed

    Buenconsejo, Pio John S; Ludwig, Alfred

    2014-12-08

    Ti-Ni-Au thin film materials libraries were prepared from multilayer precursors by combinatorial sputtering. The materials libraries were annealed at 500, 600, and 700 °C for 1 h and then characterized by high-throughput methods to investigate the relations between composition, structure and functional properties. The identified relations were visualized in functional phase diagrams. The goal is to identify composition regions that are suitable as high temperature shape memory alloys. Phase transforming compositions were identified by electrical resistance measured during thermal cycles in the range of -20 and 250 °C. Three phase transformation paths were confirmed: (1) B2-R, (2) B2-R-B19', and (3) B2-B19. For the materials library annealed at 500 °C only the B2-R transformation was observed. For the materials libraries annealed at 600 and 700 °C, all transformation paths were observed. High transformation temperatures (M(s) ≈ 100 °C) were only obtained by annealing at 600 or 700 °C, and with compositions of Ti ≈ 50 at. % and Au > 20 at. %. This is the composition range that undergoes B2-B19 transformation. The phase transformation behaviors were explained according to the compositional and annealing temperature dependence of phase/structure formation, as revealed by X-ray diffraction analysis of the materials libraries.

  14. Effect of scandium on the phase composition and mechanical properties of ABM alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molchanova, L. V.

    2010-09-01

    The effect of scandium on the composition and mechanical properties of ABM-1 alloys (Al-30% Be-5% Mg) is studied. The scandium content is varied from 0.1 to 0.5 wt %. It is established that, in the studied part of the Al-Be-Mg-Sc system, an aluminum solid solution (Al) and the ScBe13 compound are in equilibrium with a beryllium solid solution (Be). Magnesium dissolves in both the aluminum component and the ScBe13 compound. The strengthening effect related to the decomposition of the solid solution and the precipitation of Al3Sc cannot be extended to the strengthening of ABM-type alloys. Additions of 0.1-0.15 wt % Sc only weakly improve the mechanical properties of the alloys due to the refinement of beryllium-component grains. At high scandium contents, the strength increases insignificantly due to primary precipitation of ScBe13 and the plasticity decreases simultaneously.

  15. In vitro performance assessment of new beta Ti-Mo-Nb alloy compositions.

    PubMed

    Neacsu, Patricia; Gordin, Doina-Margareta; Mitran, Valentina; Gloriant, Thierry; Costache, Marieta; Cimpean, Anisoara

    2015-02-01

    New β-titanium based alloys with low Young's modulus are currently required for the next generation of metallic implant materials to ensure good mechanical compatibility with bone. Several of these are representatives of the ternary Ti-Mo-Nb system. The aim of this paper is to assess the in vitro biological performance of five new low modulus alloy compositions, namely Ti12Mo, Ti4Mo32Nb, Ti6Mo24Nb, Ti8Mo16Nb and Ti10Mo8Nb. Commercially pure titanium (cpTi) was used as a reference material. Comparative studies of cell activity exhibited by MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblasts over short- and long-term culture periods demonstrated that these newly-developed metallic substrates exhibited an increased biocompatibility in terms of osteoblast proliferation, collagen production and extracellular matrix mineralization. Furthermore, all analyzed biomaterials elicited an almost identical cell response. Considering that macrophages play a pivotal role in bone remodeling, the behavior of a monocyte-macrophage cell line, RAW 264.7, was also investigated showing a slightly lower inflammatory response to Ti-Mo-Nb biomaterials as compared with cpTi. Thus, the biological performances together with the superior mechanical properties recommend these alloys for bone implant applications.

  16. Determination of a brass alloy concentration composition using calibration-free laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Achouri, M.; Baba-Hamed, T.; Beldjilali, S. A. Belasri, A.

    2015-09-15

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a technique that can provide qualitative and quantitative measurements of the characteristics of irradiated metals. In the present work, we have calculated the parameters of the plasma produced from a brass alloy sample under the action of a pulsed Nd: YAG laser operating at 1064 nm. The emission lines of copper atoms (Cu I), zinc atoms (Zn I), and lead atoms (Pb I), which are elements of a brass alloy composition, were used to investigate the parameters of the brass plasma. The spectral profiles of Cu, Zn, and Pb lines have been used to extract the electron temperature and density of the brass alloy plasma. The characteristics of Cu, Zn, and Pb were determined quantatively by the calibration-free LIBS (CF-LIBS) method considering for accurate analysis that the laser-induced ablated plasma is optically thin in local thermodynamic equilibrium conditions and the plasma ablation is stoichiometric. The Boltzmann plot method was used to evaluate the plasma temperature, and the Stark broadened profiles were used to determine the electron density. An algorithm based on the experimentally measured values of the intensity of spectral lines and the basic laws of plasma physics was developed for the determination of Cu, Zn, and Pb concentrations in the brass sample. The concentrations C{sub CF-LIBS} calculated by CF-LIBS and the certified concentrations C{sub certified} were very close.

  17. Preparation and properties of Al-alloy coconut shell char particulate composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murali, T. P.; Surappa, M. K.; Rohatgi, P. K.

    1991-12-01

    A technique to produce cast Al-11.8 pct Si alloy composites containing up to 40 vol pct (15 pct by weight) dispersions of 125 µm size coconut shell char particles is described. The technique consists of stirring shell char particles into the vortex created by mechanical stirring of melts and subsequent casting of composite melts in suitable molds. The composite melts were also pressure die cast at a pressure of 100 MPa into cylindrical castings. The incorporation of large volume fraction of shell char particles is aided by (a) preheating of the particles to about 500 ‡C to 600 ‡C for two hours before introduction into the melts, and (b) alloying of Al-11.8 pct Si melts with 3 to 6 pct Mg. Electron Probe Micro Analysis (EPMA) analysis indicated an Mg enriched region around dispersed char particles in the composite indicating that prealloying with Mg probably improves wetting between char particles and the melt. Dispersions of 15 pct wt of char particles lead to decreases in hardness (from 85 BHN to 55 BHN), compression strength (from 542.30 MPa to 218.68 MPa), U. T. S., (from 164.16 MPa to 63.75 MPa), and electrical conductivity (from 27.8 pct I ACS to 11 pct I ACS). However, since these decreases are accompanied by a decrease in density, specific strength values of Al-11.8 pct-shell char composites are adequate for a variety of applications. Adhesive wear rates and friction coefficient values at low sliding speeds (0.56 m per second, and at loads of 10 N and 60 N) decrease with increase in wt pct of char particles under dry conditions.

  18. Preparation and properties of Al-alloy coconut shell char particulate composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murali, T. P.; Surappa, M. K.; Rohatgi, P. K.

    1982-09-01

    A technique to produce cast Al-11.8 pct Si alloy composites containing up to 40 vol pct (15 pct by weight) dispersions of 125 μm size coconut shell char particles is described. The technique consists of stirring shell char particles into the vortex created by mechanical stirring of melts and subsequent casting of composite melts in suitable molds. The composite melts were also pressure die cast at a pressure of 100 MPa into cylindrical castings. The incorporation of large volume fraction of shell char particles is aided by (a) preheating of the particles to about 500 ° to 600 ° for two hours before introduction into the melts, and (b) alloying of Al-11.8 pct Si melts with 3 to 6 pct Mg. Electron Probe Micro Analysis (EPMA) analysis indicated an Mg enriched region around dispersed char particles in the composite indicating that prealloying with Mg probably improves wetting between char particles and the melt. Dispersions of 15 pct wt of char particles lead to decreases in hardness (from 85 BHN to 55 BHN), compression strength (from 542.30 MPa to 218.68 MPa), U. T. S., (from 164.16 MPa to 63.75 MPa), and electrical conductivity (from 27.8 pct IACS to 11 pct IACS). However, since these decreases are accompanied by a decrease in density, specific strength values of Al-11.8 pct-shell char composites are adequate for a variety of applications. Adhesive wear rates and friction coefficient values at low sliding speeds (0.56 m per second, and at loads of 10 N and 60 N) decrease with increase in wt pct of char particles under dry conditions.

  19. In vitro degradation, hemolysis, and cytocompatibility of PEO/PLLA composite coating on biodegradable AZ31 alloy.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhongling; Tian, Peng; Liu, Xuanyong; Zhou, Bangxin

    2015-02-01

    Magnesium and its alloys have large potential as degradable and absorbable biomaterials because of their mechanical properties and biocompatibility. However, their corrosion resistance is usually inadequate especially in physiological environment, which limits their broad applications in biomedical areas. In this work, plasma electrolytic oxidized/poly(l-lactide) (PEO/PLLA) composite coating was successfully fabricated on biodegradable AZ31 alloy by combing PEO process and sealing with PLLA. The microstructure, elemental composition, and phase composition of the PEO/PLLA composite coating were investigated. The in vitro degradation of the PEO/PLLA composite coating in simulated body fluid (SBF) was also systematically evaluated. The results revealed that the PEO/PLLA composite coating improved the corrosion resistance of AZ31 alloy significantly. The corrosion potential shifted from -1.663V to more positive position -1.317 V and the corrosion current density was reduced with six-order of magnitude. The Mg(2+) ions, hydrogen release, and pH value change of solution caused by degradation were all decreased significantly. Moreover, the PEO process played a critical role in sustaining the integrity of the implant in long-term service. The result of hemolysis test showed that the PEO/PLLA composite coating vested AZ31 alloy a low hemolysis ratio (0.806 ± 0.771)%, which is much lower than the safe value of 5% according to ISO 10993-4. For the cytocompatibility test, compared with bare AZ31 alloy and PEO coating, MC3T3-E1 cells showed much better adhesion and proliferation on the PEO/PLLA composite coating with nearly 4-fold increase of cells after 7-day cultivation, indicating that the PEO/PLLA composite coating has good biocompatibility for biomedical applications.

  20. Precipitation Hardening and Statistical Modeling of the Aging Parameters and Alloy Compositions in Al-Cu-Mg-Ag Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Obaisi, A. M.; El-Danaf, E. A.; Ragab, A. E.; Soliman, M. S.

    2016-06-01

    The addition of Ag to Al-Cu-Mg systems has been proposed to replace the existing high-strength 2xxx and 7xxx Al alloys. The aged Al-Cu-Mg-Ag alloys exhibited promising properties, due to special type of precipitates named Ω, which cooperate with other precipitates to enhance the mechanical properties significantly. In the present investigation, the effect of changing percentages of alloying elements, aging time, and aging temperature on the hardness values was studied based on a factorial design. According to this design of experiments (DOE)—23 factorial design, eight alloys were cast and hot rolled, where (Cu, Mg, and Ag) were added to aluminum with two different levels for each alloying element. These alloys were aged at different temperatures (160, 190, and 220 °C) over a wide range of time intervals from 10 min. to 64 h. The resulting hardness data were used as an input for Minitab software to model and relate the process variables with hardness through a regression analysis. Modifying the alloying elements' weight percentages to the high level enhanced the hardness of the alloy with about 40% as compared to the alloy containing the low level of all alloying elements. Through analysis of variance (ANOVA), it was figured out that altering the fraction of Cu had the greatest effect on the hardness values with a contribution of about 49%. Also, second-level interaction terms had about 21% of impact on the hardness values. Aging time, quadratic terms, and third-level interaction terms had almost the same level of influence on hardness values (about 10% contribution). Furthermore, the results have shown that small addition of Mg and Ag was enough to improve the mechanical properties of the alloy significantly. The statistical model formulated interpreted about 80% of the variation in hardness values.

  1. Composition dependent band offsets of ZnO and its ternary alloys

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Haitao; Chen, Junli; Wang, Yin; Wang, Jian; Guo, Hong

    2017-01-01

    We report the calculated fundamental band gaps of wurtzite ternary alloys Zn1−xMxO (M = Mg, Cd) and the band offsets of the ZnO/Zn1−xMxO heterojunctions, these II-VI materials are important for electronics and optoelectronics. Our calculation is based on density functional theory within the linear muffin-tin orbital (LMTO) approach where the modified Becke-Johnson (MBJ) semi-local exchange is used to accurately produce the band gaps, and the coherent potential approximation (CPA) is applied to deal with configurational average for the ternary alloys. The combined LMTO-MBJ-CPA approach allows one to simultaneously determine both the conduction band and valence band offsets of the heterojunctions. The calculated band gap data of the ZnO alloys scale as Eg = 3.35 + 2.33x and Eg = 3.36 − 2.33x + 1.77x2 for Zn1−xMgxO and Zn1−xCdxO, respectively, where x being the impurity concentration. These scaling as well as the composition dependent band offsets are quantitatively compared to the available experimental data. The capability of predicting the band parameters and band alignments of ZnO and its ternary alloys with the LMTO-CPA-MBJ approach indicate the promising application of this method in the design of emerging electronics and optoelectronics. PMID:28134298

  2. Palladium/Copper Alloy Composite Membranes for High Temperature Hydrogen Separation

    SciTech Connect

    J. Douglas Way; Paul M. Thoen

    2005-08-31

    This report summarizes progress made during the second year of research funding from DOE Grant DE-FG26-03NT41792 at the Colorado School of Mines. The period of performance was September 1, 2004 through August of 2005. We have reformulated our Pd plating process to minimize the presence of carbon contamination in our membranes. This has improved durability and increased permeability. We have developed techniques for plating the outside diameter of ceramic and metal substrate tubes. This configuration has numerous advantages including a 40% increase in specific surface area, the ability to assay the alloy composition non-destructively, the ability to potentially repair defects in the plated surface, and the ability to visually examine the plated surfaces. These improvements have allowed us to already meet the 2007 DOE Fossil Energy pure H{sub 2} flux target of 100 SCFH/ft{sup 2} for a hydrogen partial pressure difference of 100 psi with several Pd-Cu alloy membranes on ceramic microfilter supports. Our highest pure H{sub 2} flux on inexpensive, porous alumina support tubes at the DOE target conditions is 215 SCFH/ft{sup 2}. Progress toward meeting the other DOE Fossil Energy performance targets is also summarized. Additionally, we have adapted our membrane fabrication procedure to apply Pd and Pd alloy films to commercially available porous stainless steel substrates. Stable performance of Pd-Cu films on stainless steel substrates was demonstrated over a three week period at 400 C. Finally, we have fabricated and tested Pd-Au alloy membranes. These membranes also exceed both the 2007 and 2010 DOE pure H{sub 2} flux targets and exhibit ideal H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} selectivities of over 1000 at partial pressure difference of 100 psi.

  3. Ti-Mo alloys employed as biomaterials: effects of composition and aging heat treatment on microstructure and mechanical behavior.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Flavia F; Ferrandini, Peterson L; Lopes, Eder S N; Cremasco, Alessandra; Caram, Rubens

    2014-04-01

    The correlation between the composition, aging heat treatments, microstructural features and mechanical properties of β Ti alloys is of primary significance because it is the foundation for developing and improving new Ti alloys for orthopedic biomaterials. However, in the case of Ti-Mo alloys, this correlation is not fully described in the literature. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to experimentally investigate the effect of composition and aging heat treatments on the microstructure, Vickers hardness and elastic modulus of Ti-Mo alloys. These alloys were solution heat-treated and water-quenched, after which their response to aging heat treatments was investigated. Their microstructure, Vickers hardness and elastic modulus were evaluated, and the results allow us to conclude that stabilization of the β phase is achieved with nearly 10% Mo when a very high cooling rate is applied. Young's modulus was found to be more sensitive to phase variations than hardness. In all of the compositions, the highest hardness values were achieved by aging at 723K, which was attributed to the precipitation of α and ω phases. All of the compositions aged at 573K, 623K and 723K showed overaging within 80h.

  4. Three-dimensional nanometer scale analyses of precipitate structures and local compositions in titanium aluminide engineering alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerstl, Stephan S. A.

    Titanium aluminide (TiAl) alloys are among the fastest developing class of materials for use in high temperature structural applications. Their low density and high strength make them excellent candidates for both engine and airframe applications. Creep properties of TiAl alloys, however, have been a limiting factor in applying the material to a larger commercial market. In this research, nanometer scale compositional and structural analyses of several TiAl alloys, ranging from model Ti-Al-C ternary alloys to putative commercial alloys with 10 components are investigated utilizing three dimensional atom probe (3DAP) and transmission electron microscopies. Nanometer sized borides, silicides, and carbide precipitates are involved in strengthening TiAl alloys, however, chemical partitioning measurements reveal oxygen concentrations up to 14 at. % within the precipitate phases, resulting in the realization of oxycarbide formation contributing to the precipitation strengthening of TiAl alloys. The local compositions of lamellar microstructures and a variety of precipitates in the TiAl system, including boride, silicide, binary carbides, and intermetallic carbides are investigated. Chemical partitioning of the microalloying elements between the alpha2/gamma lamellar phases, and the precipitate/gamma-matrix phases are determined. Both W and Hf have been shown to exhibit a near interfacial excess of 0.26 and 0.35 atoms nm-2 respectively within ca. 7 nm of lamellar interfaces in a complex TiAl alloy. In the case of needle-shaped perovskite Ti3AlC carbide precipitates, periodic domain boundaries are observed 5.3+/-0.8 nm apart along their growth axis parallel to the TiAl[001] crystallographic direction with concomitant composition variations after 24 hrs. at 800°C.

  5. Deformation and fracture of Ti- and Ti3Al-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, J.M.; Jeng, S.M. )

    1992-06-01

    Continuous fiber-reinforced composites having Ti-alloy or Ti aluminide matrices are under consideration for refractory aerospace structural applications. An account is presently given of microscopic damage mechanisms, flaw evolution, and fracture behavior of fiber-reinforced Ti alloy and Ti aluminide matrices under various loading conditions. Attention is given to representative levels of tensile behavior, low-cycle fatigue and fatigue-crack propagation, and creep and environmentally-assisted damage. 40 refs.

  6. Experimental Analysis and Numerical Simulation of Tensile Behaviour of TiNi Shape Memory Alloy Fibres Reinforced Epoxy Matrix Composite at High Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Sahli, M. L.; Necib, B.

    2011-05-04

    The shape memory alloys (SMA) possess both sensing and actuating functions due to their shape memory effect, pseudo-elasticity, high damping capability and other remarkable properties. Combining the SMA with other materials can create intelligent or smart composites. The epoxy resin composites filled with TiNi alloys fibres were fabricated and their mechanical properties have been investigated. In this study, stress/strain relationships for a composite with embedded shape memory materials (SMA) fibres are presented. The paper illustrates influence of the SMA fibres upon changes in mechanical behaviour of a composite plate with the SMA components, firstly and secondly, the actuating ability and reliability of shape memory alloy hybrid composites.

  7. Effect of preliminary irradiation on the bond strength between a veneering composite and alloy.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Yoshifumi; Furuchi, Mika; Oshima, Akiko; Tanoue, Naomi; Koizumi, Hiroyasu; Matsumura, Hideo

    2010-01-01

    The shear bond strength of a veneering composite (Solidex) and silver-palladium-copper-gold alloy (Castwell M.C.12) was evaluated for different duration times and irradiance for preliminary photo-polymerization. A veneering composite was applied onto a cast disk. Preliminary photo irradiation was performed using different duration times or irradiance. After final polymerization, the bond strength and the spectral distribution of each curing unit were determined. Shear bond strength was significantly higher for 90 s (12.4 MPa), than that for 0 s (8.3 MPa). With regard to the effect of irradiance, that from Solidilite (11.4 MPa) was significantly higher than that from Sublite S at 3 cm (8.7 MPa). The irradiance of Hyper LII and Sublite S at 3 cm was higher than Sublite S at 15 cm or Solidilite unit. Long time irradiation and low intensity is effective for preliminary irradiation in order to enhance the bond strength.

  8. Self-healing coatings based on halloysite clay polymer composites for protection of copper alloys.

    PubMed

    Abdullayev, Elshad; Abbasov, Vagif; Tursunbayeva, Asel; Portnov, Vasiliy; Ibrahimov, Hikmat; Mukhtarova, Gulbaniz; Lvov, Yuri

    2013-05-22

    Halloysite clay nanotubes loaded with corrosion inhibitors benzotriazole (BTA), 2-mercaptobenzimidazole (MBI), and 2-mercaptobenzothiazole (MBT) were used as additives in self-healing composite paint coating of copper. These inhibitors form protective films on the metal surface and mitigate corrosion. Mechanisms involved in the film formation have been studied with optical and electron microscopy, UV-vis spectrometry, and adhesivity tests. Efficiency of the halloysite lumen loading ascended in the order of BTA < MBT < MBI; consequently, MBI and MBT halloysite formulations have shown the best protection. Inhibitors were kept in the tubes buried in polymeric paint layer for a long time and release was enhanced in the coating defects exposed to humid media with 20-50 h, sufficient for formation of protective layer. Anticorrosive performance of the halloysite-based composite acrylic and polyurethane coatings have been demonstrated for 110-copper alloy strips exposed to 0.5 M aqueous NaCl for 6 months.

  9. Measurement and Prediction of the Thermomechanical Response of Shape Memory Alloy Hybrid Composite Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Brian; Turner, Travis L.; Seelecke, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    An experimental and numerical investigation into the static and dynamic responses of shape memory alloy hybrid composite (SMAHC) beams is performed to provide quantitative validation of a recently commercialized numerical analysis/design tool for SMAHC structures. The SMAHC beam specimens consist of a composite matrix with embedded pre-strained SMA actuators, which act against the mechanical boundaries of the structure when thermally activated to adaptively stiffen the structure. Numerical results are produced from the numerical model as implemented into the commercial finite element code ABAQUS. A rigorous experimental investigation is undertaken to acquire high fidelity measurements including infrared thermography and projection moire interferometry for full-field temperature and displacement measurements, respectively. High fidelity numerical results are also obtained from the numerical model and include measured parameters, such as geometric imperfection and thermal load. Excellent agreement is achieved between the predicted and measured results of the static and dynamic thermomechanical response, thereby providing quantitative validation of the numerical tool.

  10. Formation of the properties of antimony matrix alloys for frame-type composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulevskii, V. A.; Antipov, V. I.; Vinogradov, L. V.; Kolmakov, A. G.; Lazarev, E. M.; Samarina, A. M.; Mukhina, Yu. E.

    2009-12-01

    A frame-type composite material (CM) produced upon impregnation represents a system consisting of a rigid porous frame and a matrix material filling its voids. When metals are used as a matrix material, they bring up specific problems related to melting of a metal, such as the thermal effect of the metal on the frame and the chemical interaction of the matrix and frame with the formation of brittle compounds. A CM that combines the best characteristics of its components can be produced. Since impregnation is, as a rule, performed under vacuum, melting of a matrix metal is accompanied by an increase in the evaporation rate. The evaporation of a matrix metal can be decreased by controlling its chemical composition, decreasing the melting temperature of the melt, and controlling the cooling rate. In this work, antimony alloys are used as a matrix material and their properties are studied.

  11. Soft Magnetic Alloy-Polymer Composite for High-Frequency Power Electronics Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calata, Jesus N.; Lu, Guo-Quan; Ngo, Khai

    2014-01-01

    Soft magnetic alloys are limited to lower frequencies because of increased eddy-current losses at higher frequencies. A simple low-temperature solvent-based process was developed to coat permalloy powder with a benzocyclobutene insulating layer to reduce interparticle eddy-current loss. Low-signal measurements show that the permeability of the cured composite exhibits a bandwidth beyond 10 MHz. In contrast, the permeability of the pure powder rolled off well below 1 MHz with a corresponding increase in the imaginary permeability. Measurements of the core loss density at 5 MHz on pressed composite cores show a core loss of 300 mW/cm3 at more than 90 gauss, while the pure powder core achieved the same core loss density at just over 10 gauss. The results demonstrate that the polymer coating process is an effective way of reducing the interparticle eddy-current loss in powdered magnetic cores at high frequencies.

  12. Vibration characteristics in a smart bridge model using shape-memory alloy fiber reinforced composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimamoto, A.; Zhao, H.; Abe, H.

    2005-05-01

    A smart bridge model was proposed for active control on strength and vibration by changing material properties of shape memory alloy embedded in the bridge structure using TiNi/acrylic composite. A systemic experimental study was carried out to investigate the self-strengthening effect by shape recovery of pre-strained TiNi wires as well as vibration control by stiffness changing with direct electric heating method. The deflection and vibration responses are measured by electric strain gages affixed on the bridge floor on which the model train goes through. From these results, we know the smart bridge model of composite material beam has not only been able to reduce the vibration response, but also change the frequency of the structure. The damping and vibration control for the bridge model is confirmed by the measurement.

  13. Deformation and Fracture Behavior of Metallic Glassy Alloys and Glassy-Crystal Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louzguine-Luzgin, D. V.; Vinogradov, A.; Li, S.; Kawashima, A.; Xie, G.; Yavari, A. R.; Inoue, A.

    2011-06-01

    The present work demonstrates the deformation behavior of Zr-Cu-Ni-Al bulk glassy alloys and Zr-Ni-Cu-Al-Pd glassy foils as well as Ni-Cu-Ti-Zr bulk crystal-glassy composites. Fracture of Zr60Cu16Ni14Al10 and Zr64.13Ni10.12Cu15.75Al10 bulk glassy alloys is featured by nearly equal fraction areas of cleavage-like and vein-type relief. The observed pattern of alternating cleavage-like and vein-type patterns illustrates a result of dynamically self-organizing shear propagation at the final catastrophic stage. The deformation behavior of Zr64.13Ni10.12Cu15.75Al10 alloy has also been tested at LN2 temperature. The strength of the sample decreases with temperature, and no clear serrated flow typical for bulk glassy samples tested at room temperature is observed in the case of the samples tested at LN2 temperature. We also studied the deformation behavior of Zr-Ni-Cu-Al-Pd glassy foils thinned to electron transparency in situ in tension in a transmission electron microscope. We also present a Ni-Cu-Ti-Zr crystal-glassy composite material having a superior strength paired with a considerable ductility exceeding 10 pct. The metastable cP2 crystalline phase promotes a strain-induced martensitic transformation leading to pseudoelastic behavior as well as enhanced plasticity at room temperature. Underlying mechanisms of plastic deformation are discussed in terms of the interplay between the dislocation slip in the crystalline phase and the shear deformation in the glassy matrix.

  14. Influence of machining parameters on cutting tool life while machining aluminum alloy fly ash composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, C. R. Prakash; chandra, Poorna; Kiran, R.; Asha, P. B.

    2016-09-01

    Metal matrix composites containing fly ash as reinforcement are primarily preferred because these materials possess lower density and higher strength to weight ratio. The metal matrix composites possess hetrogeneous microstructure which is due to the presence of hard ceramic particles. While turning composites, the catastrophic failure of cutting tools is attributed to the presence of hard particles. Selection of optimal cutting conditions for a given machining process and grade of cutting tools are of utmost importance to enhance the tool life during turning operation. Thus the research work was aimed at the experimental investigation of the cutting tool life while machining aluminum alloy composite containing 0-15% fly-ash. The experiments carried out following ISO3685 standards. The carbide inserts of grade K10 and style CGGN120304 were the turning tools. The cutting speed selected was between 200m/min to 500m/min in step of 100m/min, feed of 0.08 & 0.16 mm/revolution and constant depth of cut of 1.0 mm. The experimental results revealed that the performance of K10 grade carbide insert found better while machining composite containing 5% filler, at all cutting speeds and 0.08mm/revolution feed. The failures of carbide tools are mainly due to notch wear followed by built up edge and edge chipping.

  15. Measurement and Prediction of the Thermomechanical Response of Shape Memory Alloy Hybrid Composite Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Brian; Turner, Travis L.; Seelecke, Stefan

    2005-01-01

    Previous work at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) involved fabrication and testing of composite beams with embedded, pre-strained shape memory alloy (SMA) ribbons within the beam structures. That study also provided comparison of experimental results with numerical predictions from a research code making use of a new thermoelastic model for shape memory alloy hybrid composite (SMAHC) structures. The previous work showed qualitative validation of the numerical model. However, deficiencies in the experimental-numerical correlation were noted and hypotheses for the discrepancies were given for further investigation. The goal of this work is to refine the experimental measurement and numerical modeling approaches in order to better understand the discrepancies, improve the correlation between prediction and measurement, and provide rigorous quantitative validation of the numerical analysis/design tool. The experimental investigation is refined by a more thorough test procedure and incorporation of higher fidelity measurements such as infrared thermography and projection moire interferometry. The numerical results are produced by a recently commercialized version of the constitutive model as implemented in ABAQUS and are refined by incorporation of additional measured parameters such as geometric imperfection. Thermal buckling, post-buckling, and random responses to thermal and inertial (base acceleration) loads are studied. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of SMAHC structures in controlling static and dynamic responses by adaptive stiffening. Excellent agreement is achieved between the predicted and measured results of the static and dynamic thermomechanical response, thereby providing quantitative validation of the numerical tool.

  16. Corrosive wear of SiC whisker- and particulate-reinforced 6061 aluminum alloy composites

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, S.Y.; Ishii, H.; Chuang, T.H.

    1996-09-01

    Wear tests on SiC whisker- and SiC particulate-reinforced 6061-T6 aluminum matrix composites (SiCw/Al and SiCp/Al), fabricated using a high pressure infiltration method, were performed in laboratory air, ion-exchanged water and a 3 pct NaCl aqueous solution using a block-on-ring type apparatus. The effects of environment, applied load, and rotational (sliding) speed on the wear properties against a sintered alumina block were evaluated. Electrochemical measurements in ion-exchanged water and a 3 pct NaCl aqueous solution were also made under the same conditions as the wear tests. A comparison was made with the properties of the matrix aluminum alloy 6061-T6. The SiC-reinforced composites exhibited better wear resistance compared with the monolithic 6061 Al alloy even in a 3 pct NaCl aqueous solution. Increase in the wear resistance depended on the shape, size, and volume fraction of the SiC reinforcement. Good correlation was obtained between corrosion resistance and corrosion wear. The ratios of wear volume due to the corrosive effect to noncorrosive wear were 23 to 83 pct, depending on the wear conditions.

  17. Re-determination of the reaction path parameters of silicon deposition for aerospace silicon carbide composites via chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrasekaram, Sandeep D.

    Development of air travel technology is always increasing and fuel efficiency is one of the most important factors that's being looked into. For a 25% increase in fuel efficiency in the future aeroplanes, reduction in the weight of the engine is one of the factors that should be addressed while increasing the strength and power generated. For this purpose, General Electric Aviation has chosen Silicon Carbide as the material to build the turbine blades of its engines. Silicon carbide works best as it is strong, can withstand high temperature and lightweight. The downside of this material is that it reacts with water vapor at temperatures greater than 2700°F to form volatile Silicon hydroxide from Silicon dioxide, its protective layer; and furthermore it reduces to Silicon monoxide that vaporizes. To counter this problem, scientists at the National Aeronautics & Space Administration (NASA) have found that a rare earth silicate could be used as an environmental barrier coating (EBC) to prevent the exposure of Silicon Carbide to water vapor. The EBC can't be directly coated on the Silicon Carbide surface as it isn't chemically adhesive enough, therefore Silicon was chosen to act as the bond coat between the Silicon Carbide and EBC. The goal of this research is to design a reactor for the composites to be coated with Silicon using the reaction and diffusion kinetics determined at higher temperatures and different partial pressures compared to the standard electronics industry. Chemical Vapor Deposition is the technique that will be used in determining the necessary parameters. The findings from this research can be further used in optimizing the utilization of the reagents and optimizing the process economically.

  18. Simulation and optimization of Al-Fe aerospace alloy processed by laser surface remelting using geometric Multigrid solver and experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pariona, Moisés Meza; de Oliveira, Fabiane; Teleginski, Viviane; Machado, Siliane; Pinto, Marcio Augusto Villela

    2016-05-01

    Al-1.5 wt% Fe alloy was irradiate by Yb-fiber laser beam using the laser surface remelting (LSR) technique, generating weld fillets that covered the whole surface of the sample. The laser-treatment showed to be an efficient technology for corrosion resistance improvements. In this study, the finite element method was used to simulate the solidification processes by LSR technique. The method Multigrid was employed in order to reduce the CPU time, which is important to the viability for industrial applications. Multigrid method is a technique very promising of optimization that reduced drastically the CPU time. The result was highly satisfactory, because the CPU time has fallen dramatically in comparison when it was not used Multigrid method. To validate the result of numerical simulation with the experimental result was done the microstructural characterization of laser-treated layer by the optical microscopy and SEM techniques and however, that both results showing be consistent.

  19. Metal alloy identifier

    DOEpatents

    Riley, William D.; Brown, Jr., Robert D.

    1987-01-01

    To identify the composition of a metal alloy, sparks generated from the alloy are optically observed and spectrographically analyzed. The spectrographic data, in the form of a full-spectrum plot of intensity versus wavelength, provide the "signature" of the metal alloy. This signature can be compared with similar plots for alloys of known composition to establish the unknown composition by a positive match with a known alloy. An alternative method is to form intensity ratios for pairs of predetermined wavelengths within the observed spectrum and to then compare the values of such ratios with similar values for known alloy compositions, thereby to positively identify the unknown alloy composition.

  20. Influence of composition and heat treatment on damping and magnetostrictive properties of Fe-18%(Ga+Al) alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Golovin, I S; Palacheva, V V; Zadorozhnyy, V Yu; Zhu, J; Jiang, H; Cifre, J; Lograsso, Thomas A

    2014-10-01

    The structure, magnetostriction and damping properties of Fe82Ga(18?x)Alx(x = 0, 5, 8, 12) alloys were analyzed. The anelastic response of Fe–18(Ga + Al) alloys was studied as a function of temperature (from 0 to 600 ?C), frequency (from 0.01 to 200 Hz) and amplitude (from 0.0004% to 0.2%) of forced vibrations. The origin of the relatively high damping capacity of Fe–Ga–Al alloy at room temperature was determined by applying a magnetic field and different heat treatment regimes. The substitution of Ga by Al in Fe–18% Ga alloys was found to decrease magnetostriction and damping. The heat treatment of alloys influences the damping capacity of alloys more than variations of their chemical compositions. Thermally activated frequency and temperature-dependent anelastic effects in Fe– Ga–Al alloys were analyzed and the corresponding activation parameters for relaxation processes were evaluated. Internal friction effects caused by structural transformations were recorded and were found to be consistent with the A2 ! D03! L12reaction. The physical mechanisms for all anelastic effects are discussed

  1. Processing and Composition Effects on the Fracture Behavior of Spray-Formed 7XXX Series Al Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, M. M.; Ziemian, C. W.; Eden, T. J.

    2010-12-01

    The fracture properties of high-strength spray-formed Al alloys were investigated, with consideration of the effects of elemental additions such as zinc, manganese, and chromium and the influence of the addition of SiC particulate. Fracture resistance values between 13.6 and 25.6 MPa (m)1/2 were obtained for the monolithic alloys in the T6 and T7 conditions, respectively. The alloys with SiC particulate compared well and achieved fracture resistance values between 18.7 and 25.6 MPa (m)1/2. The spray-formed materials exhibited a loss in fracture resistance ( K I) compared to ingot metallurgy 7075 alloys but had an improved performance compared to high-solute powder metallurgy alloys of similar composition. Characterization of the fracture surfaces indicated a predominantly intergranular decohesion, possibly facilitated by the presence of incoherent particles at the grain boundary regions and by the large strength differential between the matrix and precipitate zone. It is believed that at the slip band-grain boundary intersection, particularly in the presence of large dispersoids and/or inclusions, microvoid nucleation would be significantly enhanced. Differences in fracture surfaces between the alloys in the T6 and T7 condition were observed and are attributed to inhomogeneous slip distribution, which results in strain localization at grain boundaries. The best overall combination of fracture resistance properties were obtained for alloys with minimum amounts of chromium and manganese additions.

  2. Influence of composition and heat treatment on damping and magnetostrictive properties of Fe–18%(Ga + Al) alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Golovin, I. S.; Palacheva, V. V.; Zadorozhnyy, V. Yu.; Zhu, J.; Jiang, H.; Cifre, J.; Lograsso, T. A.

    2014-07-16

    The structure, magnetostriction and damping properties of Fe82Ga(18–x)Alx (x = 0, 5, 8, 12) alloys were analyzed. The anelastic response of Fe–18(Ga + Al) alloys was studied as a function of temperature (from 0 to 600 °C), frequency (from 0.01 to 200 Hz) and amplitude (from 0.0004% to 0.2%) of forced vibrations. The origin of the relatively high damping capacity of Fe–Ga–Al alloy at room temperature was determined by applying a magnetic field and different heat treatment regimes. The substitution of Ga by Al in Fe–18% Ga alloys was found to decrease magnetostriction and damping. The heat treatment of alloys influences the damping capacity of alloys more than variations of their chemical compositions. Thermally activated frequency and temperature-dependent anelastic effects in Fe–Ga–Al alloys were analyzed and the corresponding activation parameters for relaxation processes were evaluated. Internal friction effects caused by structural transformations were recorded and were found to be consistent with the A2 → D03 → L12 reaction. Thus, the physical mechanisms for all anelastic effects are discussed.

  3. Aerospace Applications of Microprocessors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    An assessment of the state of microprocessor applications is presented. Current and future requirements and associated technological advances which allow effective exploitation in aerospace applications are discussed.

  4. Supercomputing in Aerospace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kutler, Paul; Yee, Helen

    1987-01-01

    Topics addressed include: numerical aerodynamic simulation; computational mechanics; supercomputers; aerospace propulsion systems; computational modeling in ballistics; turbulence modeling; computational chemistry; computational fluid dynamics; and computational astrophysics.

  5. Rheological Behavior and Microstructure of Ceramic Particulate/Aluminum Alloy Composites. Ph.D. Thesis Final Technical Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moon, Hee-Kyung

    1990-01-01

    The rheological behavior and microstructure were investigated using a concentric cylinder viscometer for three different slurries: semi-solid alloy slurries of a matrix alloy, Al-6.5wt percent Si: composite slurries, SiC (sub p) (8.5 microns)/Al-6.5wt percent Si, with the same matrix alloy in the molten state, and composite slurries of the same composition with the matrix alloy in the semi-solid state. The pseudoplasticity of these slurries was obtained by step changes of the shear rate from a given initial shear rate. To study the thixotropic behavior of the system, a slurry was allowed to rest for different periods of time, prior to shearing at a given initial shear rate. In the continuous cooling experiments, the viscosities of these slurries were dependent on the shear rate, cooling rate, volume fraction of the primary solid of the matrix alloy, and volume fraction of silicon carbide. In the isothermal experiments, all three kinds of slurries exhibited non-Newtonian behavior, depending on the volume fraction of solid particles.

  6. Technical Seminar "Shape Memory Alloys"

    NASA Video Gallery

    Shape memory alloys are a unique group of materials that remember their original shape and return to that shape after being strained. How could the aerospace, automotive, and energy exploration ind...

  7. Residual stresses in shape memory alloy fiber reinforced aluminium matrix composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsz Loong, Tang; Jamian, Saifulnizan; Ismail, Al Emran; Nur, Nik Hisyammudin Muhd; Watanabe, Yoshimi

    2017-01-01

    Process-induced residual stress in shape memory alloy (SMA) fiber reinforced aluminum (Al) matrix composite was simulated by ANSYS APDL. The manufacturing process of the composite named as NiTi/Al is start with loading and unloading process of nickel titanium (NiTi) wire as SMA to generate a residual plastic strain. Then, this plastic deformed NiTi wire would be embedded into Al to become a composite. Lastly, the composite is heated form 289 K to 363 K and then cooled back to 300 K. Residual stress is generated in composite because of shape memory effect of NiTi and mismatch of thermal coefficient between NiTi wire and Al matrix of composite. ANSYS APDL has been used to simulate the distribution of residual stress and strain in this process. A sensitivity test has been done to determine the optimum number of nodes and elements used. Hence, the number of nodes and elements used are 15680 and 13680, respectively. Furthermore, the distribution of residual stress and strain of nickel fiber reinforced aluminium matrix composite (Ni/Al) and titanium fiber reinforced aluminium matrix composite (Ti/Al) under same simulation process also has been simulated by ANSYS APDL as comparison to NiTi/Al. The simulation results show that compressive residual stress is generated on Al matrix of Ni/Al, Ti/Al and NiTi/Al during heating and cooling process. Besides that, they also have similar trend of residual stress distribution but difference in term of value. For Ni/Al and Ti/Al, they are 0.4% difference on their maximum compressive residual stress at 363K. At same circumstance, NiTi/Al has higher residual stress value which is about 425% higher than Ni/Al and Ti/Al composite. This implies that shape memory effect of NiTi fiber reinforced in composite able to generated higher compressive residual stress in Al matrix, hence able to enhance tensile property of the composite.

  8. Pressure-composition-isotherm behaviors of MgHx-BCY composites by reactive mechanical alloying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Soo-Sun; Lee, Na-Ri; Kim, Kyeong-Il; Hong, Tae-Whan

    2013-11-01

    The aim of the present paper is to report results on hydrogenation behavior of a new composite material, MgHx-BCY10. Rare earth element-doped ABO3 perovskite oxides have been studied for their possibility use in hydrogen storage. Especially, materials based on BaCeO3 are known not only for their proton conductivity in hydrogen but also for the fact that they have higher hydrogen solubility than that of other metal oxides. So, the admixing of perovskite-type oxide in storage materials has to consider the possibility of MgHx leading to sorption kinetics. And, these materials can be new materials for hydrogen storage. This research considers Pressure-Composition-Isothermal behavior according to perovskite-type oxide powder ratio and hydrogen pressure. The effects of added amount of BCY show a temperature of dehydrogenation that has decreased.From the results shown in the P-C-T curves, the MgHx-5wt% BCY composite was evaluated as having a 2.81 wt% maximum hydrogen storage capacity at 623 K. The absorption curves show that the MgHx-10wt% BCY was composite evaluated at a maximum 0.43wt%/s hydrogen absorption rate at 623 K. From the results of the hydrogenation behavior observed, the role of BCY as a catalyst in hydrogen absorption is confirmed.

  9. Effect of milling time and CNT concentration on hardness of CNT/Al{sub 2024} composites produced by mechanical alloying

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Bustamante, R.; Perez-Bustamante, F.; Estrada-Guel, I.; Licea-Jimenez, L.; Miki-Yoshida, M.; Martinez-Sanchez, R.

    2013-01-15

    Carbon nanotube/2024 aluminum alloy (CNT/Al{sub 2024}) composites were fabricated with a combination of mechanical alloying (MA) and powder metallurgy routes. Composites were microstructurally and mechanically evaluated at sintering condition. A homogeneous dispersion of CNTs in the Al matrix was observed by a field emission scanning electron microscopy. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy confirmed not only the presence of well dispersed CNTs but also needle-like shape aluminum carbide (Al{sub 4}C{sub 3}) crystals in the Al matrix. The formation of Al{sub 4}C{sub 3} was suggested as the interaction between the outer shells of CNTs and the Al matrix during MA process in which crystallization took place after the sintering process. The mechanical behavior of composites was evaluated by Vickers microhardness measurements indicating a significant improvement in hardness as function of the CNT content. This improvement was associated to a homogeneous dispersion of CNTs and the presence of Al{sub 4}C{sub 3} in the aluminum alloy matrix. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The 2024 aluminum alloy was reinforced by CNTs by mechanical alloying process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Composites were microstructural and mechanically evaluated after sintering condition. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The greater the CNT concentration, the greater the hardness of the composites. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Higher hardness in composites is achieved at 20 h of milling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The formation of Al{sub 4}C{sub 3} does not present a direct relationship with the milling time.

  10. The isothermal fatigue behavior of a unidirectional SiC/Ti composite and the Ti alloy matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, John, Jr.; Gabb, Timothy P.; Freed, Alan D.

    1989-01-01

    The high temperature fatigue behavior of a metal matrix composite (MMC) consisting of Ti-15V-3Cr-3Al-3Sn (Ti-15-3) matrix reinforced by 33 vol percent of continuous unidirectional SiC fibers was experimentally and analytically evaluated. Isothermal MMC fatigue tests with constant amplitude loading parallel to the fiber direction were performed at 300 and 550 C. Comparative fatigue tests of the Ti-15-3 matrix alloy were also conducted. Composite fatigue behavior and the in-situ stress state of the fiber and matrix were analyzed with a micromechanical model, the Concentric Cylinder Model (CCM). The cyclic stress-strain response of the composite was stable at 300 C. However, an increase in cyclic mean strain foreshortened MMC fatigue life at high strain ranges at 550 C. Fatigue tests of the matrix alloy and CCM analyses indicated this response was associated with stress relaxation of the matrix in the composite.

  11. AN INVESTIGATION OF THE IMPACT OF ALLOY COMPOSITION AND PH ON THE CORROSION OF BRASS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A better understanding of brass corrosion may provide information and guidance on the use of the safest materials for the production of plumbing fixtures, and optimization of corrosion control treatments. The effect of alloy composition and pH on the metal leached from six differ...

  12. Aerospace - Aviation Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Arthur I.; Jones, K. K.

    This document outlines the aerospace-aviation education program of the State of Texas. In this publication the course structures have been revised to fit the quarter system format of secondary schools in Texas. The four courses outlined here have been designed for students who will be consumers of aerospace products, spinoffs, and services or who…

  13. Determination of surface oxide compositions on Alloy 600 using Rutherford backscattering

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, A.L.; Isaacs, H.S.; Kraner, H.W.

    1984-01-01

    The surface composition of oxides formed on Alloy 600 under conditions similar to those in the primary side of PWR heat exchangers has been studied as a function of potential using Rutherford backscattering and proton inelastic scattering. Electropolished samples of Alloy 600 were exposed at several potentials to a solution of 0.18M H/sub 3/BO/sub 3/(2000 ppM B) with 0.28M LiOH (1.4 ppM Li) at 300/sup 0/C for 450 hours. The potentials relative to an internal hydrogen electrode ranged from -.09 to 750 mV. RBS analysis showed little or no oxide formation on samples exposed at 0 mV. Above 0 mV oxide layers formed whose thicknesses increased with potential. In addition the RBS showed a significantly enhanced concentration of aluminum and silicon in oxide. Both the oxygen and the sum of the aluminum and silicon content appeared to maintain a fixed surface concentration independent of the oxide thickness. Boron and lithium concentration were analyzed with proton inelastic scattering. No lithium was found in any sample. The boron concentration was found to follow the thickness of the oxide.

  14. Extrusion of AlSi/SiCp composite alloys in the semi-solid state

    SciTech Connect

    Laplante, S.; Ajersch, F.; Legros, N.

    1995-10-01

    Semi-solid A356 alloys with 15 vol % SiC particles (10--15{micro}m) were extruded through cylindrical dies of variable dimension in order to evaluate the resistance to extrusion of these composites. The samples were first prepared by isothermal mixing in the semi-solid state for controlled periods of time and shear rates in order to obtain 20, 30 and 40 vol% primary fraction of the alloy ({alpha}-aluminum) generating a consistent globular-agglomerated structure. The quenched samples were introduced into the die chamber of a computer controlled extrusion press where the temperature was again raised to the semi-solid state and then extruded at a constant rate. Extrusions were carried out to evaluate the effect of extrusion rate, die length and diameter and variable solid fraction. All examples exhibited a sharp rise in extrusion force, and then reaching a plateau for the duration of the extrusion. Die entrance resistance was found to be the predominant force measured. Analysis of sections of the extruded material showed that the primary phase particles are deformed axially along the extrusion direction resulting in a non-isotropic structure with increased tensile strength and ductility.

  15. Ni-WC composite coatings by carburizing electrodeposited amorphous and nanocrystalline Ni-W alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latif, Saadia; Mehmood, Mazhar; Ahmad, Jamil; Aslam, Muhammad; Ahmed, Maqsood; Zhang, Zhi-dong

    2010-03-01

    In situ formation of tungsten carbide in the matrix of FCC nickel has been achieved by carburizing of the electrodeposited Ni-W alloy coatings. The size of the carbide particles ranges between 100 and 500 nm. The carbide phase is also present in the form of very small precipitates inside the nickel grains. The size of such precipitates is between 10 and 40 nm. The carburizing environment was created by introducing a flowing mixture of vaporized 95.5% alcohol (0.25 ml/min, liquid) and argon (0.5 L/min, gas) into the carburizing furnace. Supersaturated nature of electrodeposited amorphous and nanocrystalline alloys, in addition to high diffusivity, have been attributed for the formation of carbide phase in the deposits at a temperature range of 700-850 °C. The carbide-metal interface is clean and the composite coatings are compact. Hardness values up to about 1100 KHN are achieved. Hardness increases with tungsten content and carburizing temperature.

  16. Surface composite nanostructures of AZ91 magnesium alloy induced by high current pulsed electron beam treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M. C.; Hao, S. Z.; Wen, H.; Huang, R. F.

    2014-06-01

    High current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) treatment was conducted on an AZ91 cast magnesium alloy with accelerating voltage 27 kV, energy density 3 J/cm2 and pulse duration 2.5 μs. The surface microstructure was characterized by optical microscope (OM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS), and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The surface corrosion property was tested with electrochemical method in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. It is found that after 1 pulse of HCPEB treatment, the initial eutectic α phase and Mg17Al12 particles started to dissolve in the surface modified layer of depth ∼15 μm. When using 15 HCPEB pulses, the Al content in surface layer increased noticeably, and the phase structure was modified as composite nanostructures consisted of nano-grained Mg3.1Al0.9 domains surrounded by network of Mg17Al12 phase. The HCPEB treated samples showed an improved corrosion resistance with cathodic current density decreased by two orders of magnitude as compared to the initial AZ91 alloy.

  17. 5th Conference on Aerospace Materials, Processes, and Environmental Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, M. B. (Editor); Stanley, D. Cross (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    Records are presented from the 5th Conference on Aerospace Materials, Processes, and Environmental Technology. Topics included pollution prevention, inspection methods, advanced materials, aerospace materials and technical standards,materials testing and evaluation, advanced manufacturing,development in metallic processes, synthesis of nanomaterials, composite cryotank processing, environmentally friendly cleaning, and poster sessions.

  18. Evaluation on the Effect of Composition on Radiation Hardening and Embrittlement in Model FeCrAl Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Field, Kevin G.; Briggs, Samuel A.; Edmondson, Philip; Hu, Xunxiang; Littrell, Kenneth C.; Howard, Richard; Parish, Chad M.; Yamamoto, Yukinori

    2015-09-18

    This report details the findings of post-radiation mechanical testing and microstructural characterization performed on a series of model and commercial FeCrAl alloys to assist with the development of a cladding technology with enhanced accident tolerance. The samples investigated include model alloys with simple ferritic grain structure and two commercial alloys with minor solute additions. These samples were irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) up to nominal doses of 7.0 dpa near or at Light Water Reactor (LWR) relevant temperatures (300-400 C). Characterization included a suite of techniques including small angle neutron scattering (SANS), atom probe tomography (APT), and transmission based electron microscopy techniques. Mechanical testing included tensile tests at room temperature on sub-sized tensile specimens. The goal of this work was to conduct detailed characterization and mechanical testing to begin establishing empirical and/or theoretical structure-property relationships for radiation-induced hardening and embrittlement in the FeCrAl alloy class. Development of such relationships will provide insight on the performance of FeCrAl alloys in an irradiation environment and will enable further development of the alloy class for applications within a LWR environment. A particular focus was made on establishing trends, including composition and radiation dose. The report highlights in detail the pertinent findings based on this work. This report shows that radiation hardening in the alloys is primarily composition dependent due to the phase separation in the high-Cr FeCrAl alloys. Other radiation induced/enhanced microstructural features were less dependent on composition and when observed at low number densities, were not a significant contributor to the observed mechanical responses. Pre-existing microstructure in the alloys was found to be important, with grain boundaries and pre-existing dislocation

  19. Structural Acoustic Response of a Shape Memory Alloy Hybrid Composite Panel (Lessons Learned)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L.

    2002-01-01

    This study presents results from an effort to fabricate a shape memory alloy hybrid composite (SMAHC) panel specimen and test the structure for dynamic response and noise transmission characteristics under the action of thermal and random acoustic loads. A method for fabricating a SMAHC laminate with bi-directional SMA reinforcement is described. Glass-epoxy unidirectional prepreg tape and Nitinol ribbon comprise the material system. Thermal activation of the Nitinol actuators was achieved through resistive heating. The experimental hardware required for mechanical support of the panel/actuators and for establishing convenient electrical connectivity to the actuators is presented. Other experimental apparatus necessary for controlling the panel temperature and acquiring structural acoustic data are also described. Deficiency in the thermal control system was discovered in the process of performing the elevated temperature tests. Discussion of the experimental results focuses on determining the causes for the deficiency and establishing means for rectifying the problem.

  20. Role of Laser Cladding Parameters in Composite Coating (Al-SiC) on Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riquelme, Ainhoa; Escalera-Rodriguez, María Dolores; Rodrigo, Pilar; Rams, Joaquin

    2016-08-01

    The effect of the different control parameters on the laser cladding fabrication of Al/SiCp composite coatings on AA6082 aluminum alloy was analyzed. A high-power diode laser was used, and the laser control parameters were optimized to maximize the size (height and width) of the coating and the substrate-coating interface quality, as well as to minimize the melted zone depth. The Taguchi DOE method was applied using a L18 to reduce the number of experiments from 81 to only 18 experiments. Main effects, signal-noise ratio and analysis of variance were used to evaluate the effect of these parameters in the characteristics of the coating and to determine their optimum values. The influence of four control parameters was evaluated: (1) laser power, (2) scanning speed, (3) focal condition, and (4) powder feed ratio. Confirmation test with the optimal control parameters was carried out to evaluate the Taguchi method's effectivity.

  1. Investigation of compositional segregation during unidirectional solidification of solid solution semiconducting alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. C.

    1982-01-01

    Compositional segregation of solid solution semiconducting alloys in the radial direction during unidirectional solidification was investigated by calculating the effect of a curved solid liquid interface on solute concentration at the interface on the solid. The formulation is similar to that given by Coriell, Boisvert, Rehm, and Sekerka except that a more realistic cylindrical coordinate system which is moving with the interface is used. Analytical results were obtained for very small and very large values of beta with beta = VR/D, where V is the velocity of solidification, R the radius of the specimen, and D the diffusivity of solute in the liquid. For both very small and very large beta, the solute concentration at the interface in the solid C(si) approaches C(o) (original solute concentration) i.e., the deviation is minimal. The maximum deviation of C(si) from C(o) occurs for some intermediate value of beta.

  2. Atomic mobility in a ternary liquid Ga-In-Sn alloy of the eutectic composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nefedov, D. Yu.; Antonenko, A. O.; Podorozhkin, D. Yu.; Uskov, A. V.; Charnaya, E. V.; Lee, M. K.; Chang, J. L.; Haase, J.; Michel, D.; Kumzerov, Yu. A.; Fokin, A. V.; Samoilovich, M. I.; Bugaev, A. S.

    2017-02-01

    The nuclear spin-lattice relaxation and Knight shift of 71Ga, 69Ga, and 115In nuclei in a ternary liquid gallium-indium-tin alloy of the eutectic composition, which was introduced into pores of an opal matrix and porous glasses with pore sizes of 18 and 7 nm, have been investigated and compared with those for the bulk melt. It has been found that longitudinal relaxation is accelerated and the Knight shift is decreased, depending on the size of pores. The correlation time of the atomic motion has been calculated for the nanostructured melt in porous matrices. It has been shown that the atomic mobility in the melt decreases with decreasing size of pores in the glasses.

  3. Influence of composition and heat treatment on damping and magnetostrictive properties of Fe–18%(Ga + Al) alloys

    DOE PAGES

    Golovin, I. S.; Palacheva, V. V.; Zadorozhnyy, V. Yu.; ...

    2014-07-16

    The structure, magnetostriction and damping properties of Fe82Ga(18–x)Alx (x = 0, 5, 8, 12) alloys were analyzed. The anelastic response of Fe–18(Ga + Al) alloys was studied as a function of temperature (from 0 to 600 °C), frequency (from 0.01 to 200 Hz) and amplitude (from 0.0004% to 0.2%) of forced vibrations. The origin of the relatively high damping capacity of Fe–Ga–Al alloy at room temperature was determined by applying a magnetic field and different heat treatment regimes. The substitution of Ga by Al in Fe–18% Ga alloys was found to decrease magnetostriction and damping. The heat treatment of alloysmore » influences the damping capacity of alloys more than variations of their chemical compositions. Thermally activated frequency and temperature-dependent anelastic effects in Fe–Ga–Al alloys were analyzed and the corresponding activation parameters for relaxation processes were evaluated. Internal friction effects caused by structural transformations were recorded and were found to be consistent with the A2 → D03 → L12 reaction. Thus, the physical mechanisms for all anelastic effects are discussed.« less

  4. Electrical Resistivity of Ten Selected Binary Alloy Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-04-01

    alloys --* Aluminum Alloys --*Copper alloys --*Gold alloys --*Nickel Alloys --*Silver alloys --*Iron alloys --*Palladium alloys ... aluminum -magnesium, and copper-zinc) are given for 27 compositions: 0 (pure element).* For aluminum -copper, aluninu.-eagnes tur, end copper-zinc alloy ...available data and infor- mation. The ten binary alloy systems selected are the systems of aluminum - copper, aluminum -magnesium, copper-gold,

  5. Fracture behavior of reinforced aluminum alloy matrix composites using thermal imaging tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avdelidis, N. P.; Exarchos, D.; Vazquez, P.; Ibarra-Castanedo, C.; Sfarra, S.; Maldague, X. P. V.; Matikas, T. E.

    2016-05-01

    In this work the influence of the microstructure at the vicinity of the interface on the fracture behavior of particulate-reinforced aluminum alloy matrix composites (Al/SiCp composites) is studied by using thermographic tools. In particular, infrared thermography was used to monitor the plane crack propagation behavior of the materials. The deformation of solid materials is almost always accompanied by heat release. When the material becomes deformed or is damaged and fractured, a part of the energy necessary to initiate and propagate the damage is transformed in an irreversible way into heat. The thermal camera detects the heat wave, generated by the thermo-mechanical coupling and the intrinsic dissipated energy during mechanical loading of the sample. By using an adapted detector, thermography records the two dimensional "temperature" field as it results from the infrared radiation emitted by the object. The principal advantage of infrared thermography is its noncontact, non-destructive character. This methodology is being applied to characterise the fracture behavior of the particulate composites. Infrared thermography is being used to monitor the plane crack propagation behavior of such materials. Furthermore, an innovative approach to use microscopic measurements using IR microscopic lenses was attempted, in order to enable smaller features (in the micro scale) to be imaged with accuracy and assurance.

  6. Analysis of interfacial debonding in shape memory alloy wire-reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miramini, A.; Kadkhodaei, M.; Alipour, A.; Mashayekhi, M.

    2016-01-01

    One of the common types of failure in shape memory alloy (SMA) wire-reinforced composites is interfacial debonding between the fiber and the matrix. In this paper, a three dimensional finite element model for an SMA wire-reinforced composite is developed based on cohesive zone modeling to predict interfacial debonding between the SMA wire and the surrounding matrix. The interfacial debonding is also experimentally investigated by conducting a number of pull-out tests on steel as well as Nitinol wires embedded in an epoxy matrix. To evaluate the presented method, the developed finite element analysis is employed to simulate a single wire pull-out test for ordinary (e.g. steel) wires. In order to simulate SMA wire pull-out, a 3D SMA constitutive model is implemented into the commercial finite element software ABAQUS using a user material subroutine (UMAT). An acceptable agreement is shown to exist between the theoretical results and the experimental data, indicating the efficiency of the proposed approach to model interfacial debonding in SMA wire-reinforced composites.

  7. Microstructures and mechanical properties of compositionally complex Co-free FeNiMnCr18 FCC solid solution alloy

    DOE PAGES

    Wu, Z.; Bei, H.

    2015-07-01

    Recently, a structurally-simple but compositionally-complex FeNiCoMnCr high entropy alloy was found to have excellent mechanical properties (e.g., high strength and ductility). To understand the potential of using high entropy alloys as structural materials for advanced nuclear reactor and power plants, it is necessary to have a thorough understanding of their structural stability and mechanical properties degradation under neutron irradiation. Furthermore, this requires us to develop a similar model alloy without Co because material with Co will make post-neutron-irradiation testing difficult due to the production of the 60Co radioisotope. In order to achieve this goal, a FCC-structured single-phase alloy with amore » composition of FeNiMnCr18 was successfully developed. This near-equiatomic FeNiMnCr18 alloy has good malleability and its microstructure can be controlled by thermomechanical processing. By rolling and annealing, the as-cast elongated-grained-microstructure is replaced by homogeneous equiaxed grains. The mechanical properties (e.g., strength and ductility) of the FeNiMnCr18 alloy are comparable to those of the equiatomic FeNiCoMnCr high entropy alloy. Both strength and ductility increase with decreasing deformation temperature, with the largest difference occurring between 293 and 77 K. Extensive twin-bands which are bundles of numerous individual twins are observed when it is tensile-fractured at 77 K. No twin bands are detected by EBSD for materials deformed at 293 K and higher. Ultimately the unusual temperature-dependencies of UTS and uniform elongation could be caused by the development of the dense twin substructure, twin-dislocation interactions and the interactions between primary and secondary twinning systems which result in a microstructure refinement and hence cause enhanced strain hardening and postponed necking.« less

  8. Roles of Alloy Composition and Grain Refinement on Hot Tearing Susceptibility of 7××× Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Q. L.; Li, Y.; Li, H. X.; Du, Q.; Zhang, J. S.; Zhuang, L. Z.

    2016-08-01

    During the production of high-strength 7××× aluminum alloys, hot tearing has set up serious obstacles for attaining a sound billet/slab. In this research, some typical 7××× alloys were studied using constrained rod casting together with the measurement of thermal contraction and load development in the freezing range, aiming at investigating their hot tearing susceptibility. The results showed that the hot tearing susceptibility of an alloy depends not only on the thermal contraction in freezing range, which can decide the accumulated thermal strain during solidification, but also on the amount of nonequilibrium eutectics, which can effectively accommodate the thermally induced deformation. Our investigations reveal that Zn content has very profound effect on hot tearing susceptibility. The Zn/Mg ratio of the alloys also plays a remarkable role though it is not as pronounced as Zn content. The effect of Zn/Mg ratio is mainly associated with the amount of nonequilibrium eutectics. Grain refinement will considerably reduce the hot tearing susceptibility. However, excessive addition of grain refiner may promote hot tearing susceptibility of semi-solid alloy due to deteriorated permeability which is very likely to be caused by the heavy grain refinement and the formation of more intermetallic phases.

  9. Unraveling the composition dependence of the martensitic transformation temperature: A first-principles study of Ti-Ta alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Tanmoy; Rogal, Jutta; Drautz, Ralf

    2016-12-01

    The martensitic start temperature Ms is one of the key characteristics of shape memory materials. High-temperature shape memory alloys are a special class of materials where transformation temperatures between the martensite and austenite phase above 373 K are desirable. For the design of new high-temperature shape memory alloys it is therefore important to understand and predict the dependence of Ms on the composition of the material. Using density functional theory in combination with the quasiharmonic Debye model, we evaluate the different contributions to the free energy to determine the transition temperature T0 over a wide range of compositions in Ti-Ta alloys. Our approach provides physical insight into the various contributions that explain the strong composition dependence of Ms that is observed experimentally. Based on our calculations, we identify the relative phase stability at T =0 K and the vibrational entropy difference between the involved phases as critical parameters to predict changes in T0. We propose a simple, one-dimensional descriptor to estimate the transition temperature that can be used in the identification of new alloys suitable for high-temperature shape memory applications.

  10. Hemocompatibility and selective cell fate of polydopamine-assisted heparinized PEO/PLLA composite coating on biodegradable AZ31 alloy.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhongling; Tian, Peng; Liu, Xuanyong; Zhou, Bangxin

    2014-09-01

    Biodegradable magnesium and its alloys have attracted much attention, as they have been used as cardiovascular stents recently because of their biodegradation after implantation. However, their corrosion resistance, hemocompatibility and surface biocompatibility are needed for practical applications. In this work, heparinization of the plasma electrolytic oxidation/poly(l-lactic acid) (PEO/PLLA) composite coating on biodegradable AZ31 alloy was achieved by the strong adhesion of mussel-inspired polydopamine (PDAM). The corrosion resistance of the coated substrates was evaluated in simulated body fluid. In particular, the hemolysis ratio and platelet adhesion tests were conducted to evaluate the hemocompatibility of the composite coatings. The in vitro cytotoxicity of the composite coatings was evaluated with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). The adhesion and proliferation of HUVECs and human umbilical artery smooth muscle cells (HUASMCs) directly incubated on the composite coatings were also investigated. The results showed that although PDAM modification and further heparinization reduced the corrosion resistance of the PEO/PLLA composite coating, the protection of the coating for the substrate was mainly maintained. Moreover, PDAM modification and further heparinization significantly suppressed the adhesion of platelets and had little influence on sustaining a low hemolysis ratio thus resulting in good surface hemocompatibility of the composite coating. The in vitro cell test demonstrated that none of the composite coatings presented obvious cytotoxicity. Significantly, after surface heparinization, the composite coating became more suitable for HUVEC growth and simultaneously inhibited HUASMC growth. The results show that further modification of the PEO/PLLA composite coating on biodegradable magnesium alloy is a promising method to obtain good surface hemocompatibility for anticoagulation and to regulate the cell fate for fast re

  11. Temporal Evolution of the Nanostructure and Phase Compositions in a Model Ni-Al-Cr Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sudbrack, Chantal K.; Yoon, Kevin E.; Seidman, David N.; Seidman, David N.

    2006-01-01

    In a Ni-5.2 Al-14.2 Cr at.% alloy with moderate solute supersaturations and a very small gamma/gamma prime lattice parameter misfit, the nanostructural and compositional pathways during gamma prime(L12) precipitation at 873 K are investigated using atom-probe tomography, conventional transmission electron microscopy, and hardness measurements. Nucleation of high number densities (N(sub v) greater than 10(sup 23) per cubic meters) of solute-rich precipitates (mean radius = [R] = 0.75 nm), with a critical nucleus composition of Ni-18.3 plus or minus 0.9 Al-9.3 plus or minus 0.7 Cr at.%, initiates between 0.0833 and 0.167 h. With increasing aging time (a) the solute concentrations decay in spheroidal precipitates ([R] less than 10 nm); (b) the observed early-stage coalescence peaks at maximum N(sub v) in coincidence with the smallest interprecipitate spacing; and (c) the reaction enters a quasi-stationary regime where growth and coarsening operate concomitantly. During this quasi-stationary regime, the c (face-centered cubic)-matrix solute supersaturations decay with a power-law dependence of about -1/3, while the dependencies of [R] and N(sub v) are 0.29 plus or minus 0.05 and -0.64 plus or minus 0.06 at a coarsening rate slower than model predications. Coarsening models allow both equilibrium phase compositions to be determined from the compositional measurements. The observed early-stage coalescence is discussed in further detail.

  12. Alloying Behavior and Properties of Al-Based Composites Reinforced with Al85Fe15 Metallic Glass Particles Fabricated by Mechanical Alloying and Hot Pressing Consolidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lanxiang; Yang, LiKun; Leng, Jinfeng; Wang, Tongyang; Wang, Yan

    2017-01-01

    In this study, Al85Fe15 metallic glass particles with high onset crystallization temperature (1209 K) were synthesized by a mechanical alloying method. High-quality 6061Al-based composites reinforced with Al85Fe15 metallic glass particles were fabricated by a vacuum hot-pressing sintering technique. The glass particles with flake-like shape are distributed uniformly in the Al matrix. The bulk composites possess high relative density, excellent hardness and strength. The microhardness values of the Al-based bulk composites with the additions of 20 vol.% and 30 vol.% Al85Fe15 particles are 204 MPa and 248 MPa, respectively, which are much higher than that of 6061Al (61 MPa). The compressive yield strength of the 30 vol.% glass-reinforced composite is 478 MPa, which is enhanced by 273% compared with 6061Al. The amorphous characteristic and homogeneous dispersion of glass particles account for the excellent mechanical properties of the Al-based composites. In addition, the corrosion behavior of Al-based composites in a seawater solution has been investigated by electrochemical polarization measurements. Compared to 6061Al, the 30 vol.% glass-reinforced composite shows the lower corrosion/passive current density and larger passive region, indicating the greatly enhanced corrosion resistance.

  13. Feeding and Distribution of Porosity in Cast Al-Si Alloys as Function of Alloy Composition and Modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiedje, Niels Skat; Taylor, John A.; Easton, Mark A.

    2012-12-01

    Unmodified, Na-modified, and Sr-modified castings of Al-7 pct Si and Al-12.5 pct Si alloys were cast in molds in which it was possible to create different cooling conditions. It is shown how solidification influences the distribution of porosity at the surface and the center of the castings as a function of modification and Si content in sand- and chill-cast samples. Eutectic modification, Si content, and cooling conditions have a great impact on the distribution of porosity. Unmodified and Na-modified castings are more easily fed with porosity tending to congregate near the centerline of the casting, while Sr-modified castings solidify in a mushy manner that creates a more homogeneous distribution of porosity in the casting. The amount of porosity was highest in the Sr-modified alloys, lower in the Na-modified alloys, and lowest in the unmodified alloys. The size of the porosity-free layer and the effectiveness of the feeders were greater in the castings made with the steel chills due to the increased thermal gradients and consequent increase in the directionality of solidification.

  14. Finite Element Analysis of the Random Response Suppression of Composite Panels at Elevated Temperatures using Shape Memory Alloy Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L.; Zhong, Z. W.; Mei, Chuh

    1994-01-01

    A feasibility study on the use of shape memory alloys (SMA) for suppression of the random response of composite panels due to acoustic loads at elevated temperatures is presented. The constitutive relations for a composite lamina with embedded SMA fibers are developed. The finite element governing equations and the solution procedures for a composite plate subjected to combined acoustic and thermal loads are presented. Solutions include: 1) Critical buckling temperature; 2) Flat panel random response; 3) Thermal postbuckling deflection; 4) Random response of a thermally buckled panel. The preliminary results demonstrate that the SMA fibers can completely eliminate the thermal postbuckling deflection and significantly reduce the random response at elevated temperatures.

  15. Assessment of a High-Throughput Methodology for the Study of Alloy Oxidation using AlxFeyNi1-x-y Composition Gradient Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Payne, Matthew A; Miller, James B; Oliveros, Martin E; Perez, Geronimo; Gouvea, Cristol P; Archanjo, Bráulio S; Achete, Carlos A; Gellman, Andrew J

    2016-07-11

    The high-temperature oxidation of multicomponent metal alloys exhibits complex dependencies on composition, which are not fully understood for many systems. Combinatorial screening of the oxidation of many different compositions of a given alloy offers an ideal means for gaining fundamental insights into such systems. We have previously developed a high-throughput methodology for studying AlxFeyNi1-x-y alloy oxidation using ∼100 nm thick composition spread alloy films (CSAFs). In this work, we critically assess two aspects of this methodology: the sensitivity of CSAF oxidation behavior to variations in AlxFeyNi1-x-y composition and the differences between the oxidation behavior of ∼100 nm thick CSAFs and that of bulk AlxFeyNi1-x-y alloys. This was done by focusing specifically on AlxFe1-x and AlxNi1-x oxidation in dry air at 427 °C. Transitions between phenomenologically distinguishable types of oxidation behavior are found to occur over CSAF compositional ranges of <2 at. %. The oxidation of AlxFe1-x CSAFs is found to be very similar to that of bulk AlxFe1-x alloys, but some minor differences between CSAF and bulk behavior are observed for AlxNi1-x oxidation. On the basis of our assessment, high-throughput studies of CSAF oxidation appear to be an effective method for gaining fundamental insights into the composition dependence of the oxidation of bulk alloys.

  16. Nanoscale compositional analysis of NiTi shape memory alloy films deposited by DC magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, S. K.; Mohan, S.; Bysakh, S.; Kumar, A.; Kamat, S. V.

    2013-11-15

    The formation of surface oxide layer as well as compositional changes along the thickness for NiTi shape memory alloy thin films deposited by direct current magnetron sputtering at substrate temperature of 300 °C in the as-deposited condition as well as in the postannealed (at 600 °C) condition have been thoroughly studied by using secondary ion mass spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and scanning transmission electron microscopy-energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy techniques. Formation of titanium oxide (predominantly titanium dioxide) layer was observed in both as-deposited and postannealed NiTi films, although the oxide layer was much thinner (8 nm) in as-deposited condition. The depletion of Ti and enrichment of Ni below the oxide layer in postannealed films also resulted in the formation of a graded microstructure consisting of titanium oxide, Ni{sub 3}Ti, and B2 NiTi. A uniform composition of B2 NiTi was obtained in the postannealed film only below a depth of 200–250 nm from the surface. Postannealed film also exhibited formation of a ternary silicide (Ni{sub x}Ti{sub y}Si) at the film–substrate interface, whereas no silicide was seen in the as-deposited film. The formation of silicide also caused a depletion of Ni in the film in a region ∼250–300 nm just above the film substrate interface.

  17. NASA's Software Bank (Heath Tecna Aerospace)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Heath Tecna Aerospace used a COSMIC program, "Analysis of Filament Reinforced Metal Shell Pressure Vessels," to predict stresses in motorcase walls in a composite hybrid rocket and calculate the ideal geometry for the domes at either end of the filament-wound pressure vessel. The COSMIC program predictions were confirmed in testing.

  18. Using Aerospace Technology To Design Orthopedic Implants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, D. A.; Mraz, P. J.; Davy, D. T.

    1996-01-01

    Technology originally developed to optimize designs of composite-material aerospace structural components used to develop method for optimizing designs of orthopedic implants. Development effort focused on designing knee implants, long-term goal to develop method for optimizing designs of orthopedic implants in general.

  19. [Studies on the pre-treatment of dental alloy for adhesive restorations. 4. Adhesive durability of adhesive resin to various dental alloys treated with composite plating].

    PubMed

    Kondo, Y; Yamashita, A; Suzuki, K; Omura, I; Yamauchi, J I

    1989-07-01

    In this study, the durability of adhesion between an adhesive resin (Panavia EX) and dental alloys (gold or Ni-Cr) were examined in regard to thermal cycling, immersion, either in water (70 degrees C or 100 degrees C) or in sodium chloride solutions (pH was 3, 7 and 9). An favourable adhesive strength, such as 450-500 kgf/cm2, was obtained even after 24 hours immersion in 37 degrees C water, when the surface pre-treatment of the alloy was done with either Sn- or composite (TMSAC/Sn or PVC/Sn)-plating. However, during the durability test, the adhesive strength has decreased to such on extent, that about 60% of early strength with Sn-plating and 80% with TMSAC/Sn composite plating. But, with PVC/Sn composite-plating, more than 90% of the early strength was maintained. In regard to the pH of the corrosive solution, no apparent difference was observed regarding the above mentioned adhesive characteristics.

  20. First principles theoretical investigations of low Young's modulus beta Ti-Nb and Ti-Nb-Zr alloys compositions for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Karre, Rajamallu; Niranjan, Manish K; Dey, Suhash R

    2015-05-01

    High alloyed β-phase stabilized titanium alloys are known to provide comparable Young's modulus as that to the human bones (~30 GPa) but is marred by its high density. In the present study the low titanium alloyed compositions of binary Ti-Nb and ternary Ti-Nb-Zr alloy systems, having stable β-phase with low Young's modulus are identified using first principles density functional framework. The theoretical results suggest that the addition of Nb in Ti and Zr in Ti-Nb increases the stability of the β-phase. The β-phase in binary Ti-Nb alloys is found to be fully stabilized from 22 at.% of Nb onwards. The calculated Young's moduli of binary β-Ti-Nb alloy system are found to be lower than that of pure titanium (116 GPa). For Ti-25(at.%)Nb composition the calculated Young's modulus comes out to be ~80 GPa. In ternary Ti-Nb-Zr alloy system, the Young's modulus of Ti-25(at.%)Nb-6.25(at.%)Zr composition is calculated to be ~50 GPa. Furthermore, the directional Young's moduli of these two selected binary (Ti-25(at.%)Nb) and ternary alloy (Ti-25(at.%)Nb-6.25(at.%)Zr) compositions are found to be nearly isotropic in all crystallographic directions.

  1. Ninteenth Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The proceedings of the 19th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium are reported. Technological areas covered include space lubrication, bearings, aerodynamic devices, spacecraft/Shuttle latches, deployment, positioning, and pointing. Devices for spacecraft docking and manipulator and teleoperator mechanisms are also described.

  2. Aerospace bibliography, seventh edition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blashfield, J. F. (Compiler)

    1983-01-01

    Space travel, planetary probes, applications satellites, manned spaceflight, the impacts of space exploration, future space activities, astronomy, exobiology, aeronautics, energy, space and the humanities, and aerospace education are covered.

  3. Effects of grain boundary composition and structure on IGSCC of Alloy 600

    SciTech Connect

    Was, G.S.; Hertzberg, J.L.; Thaveeprungsriporn, V.

    1996-12-31

    The metallurgical factors responsible for intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of alloy 600 on the secondary side of steam generators are identified and evaluated for their known and potential impact. These include grain boundary composition: chromium and segregated impurities such as phosphorus and boron, chromium carbides, solid solution carbon, grain boundary structure and grain size. Each of these factors is defined and described in the context of commercial alloy 600 steam generator tubing. Each is then evaluated in terms of its known or potential effect on IGSCC in the secondary side environment. A higher bulk chromium concentration is known to impart resistance to IGSCC through increased passivity and solid solution strengthening. Grain boundary chromium depletion is detrimental in acidic solutions, but not in neutral solutions. In caustics, chromium depletion combined with carbon segregation may act to lower resistance to IGSCC. Carbon is a potent solid solution strengthener and increases the strength and resistance to creep deformation in inert and high temperature water environments. However, segregation at the grain boundary may be detrimental in caustic. While phosphorus and boron are the most important grain boundary impurities, P is benign in all environments and B may have an effect if not incorporated into the carbide. Grain boundary misorientation has a profound effect on the creep behavior, strength and IG cracking resistance of Ni-16Cr-9Fe. It has the potential for development as a tool for control of IGSCC. A smaller grain size correlates with increased IGSCC resistance, most likely through an increase in flow stress. 123 refs., 35 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Manufacture and experimental and theoretical evaluation of adaptative glass/epoxy composites with embedded shape memory alloy wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Young-Kuk; Salvia, Michelle

    2001-07-01

    Adaptable hybrid composites are materials into which actuators are embedded in polymer matrix composites. Shape memory alloys (SMA) are amongst the potential candidates for actuators embedded in such composite smart structures. In order to test the influence of the processing conditions on the actuation properties of adaptive hybrid composites, a model system based on a glass epoxy asymmetric laminate composite with prestrained shape memory nitinol-copper wires, was used. When the SMA wires were electrically heated and cooled, undergoing a reversible martensite to austenite transformation, reversible bending of the host composite was observed. The most important deflection of the host composite was obtained for the material, processed with embedded wires in TWSME conditions. Nevertheless, for samples just prestrained for the OWSME, a self-training effect occurred in relation to the reverse polarized austenite to martensite transformation, during cooling after actuation. The experimental results obtained in the conditions of the sample processed with embedded wires in TWSME conditions can be modeled in the frame of recent phenomenological modeling. In spite of some drastic simplifications, the quasi-linear variation of the bending effect with temperature is correctly described using the metallurgical parameters defined from the Clausius-Clapeyron diagrams of this alloy previously determined.

  5. Mechanical Properties and Corrosion Behavior of CeO2 and SiC Incorporated Al5083 Alloy Surface Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amra, M.; Ranjbar, Khalil; Dehmolaei, R.

    2015-08-01

    In this investigation, nano-sized cerium oxide (CeO2) and silicon carbide (SiC) particles were stirred and mixed into the surface of an Al5083 alloy rolled plate using friction stir processing (FSP) to form a surface nano-composite layer. For this purpose, various volume ratios of the reinforcements either separately or in the combined form were packed into a pre-machined groove on the surface of the plate. Microstructural features, mechanical properties, and corrosion behavior of the resultant surface composites were determined. Microstructural analysis, optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, showed that reinforcement particles were fairly dispersed inside the stir zone and grain refinement was gained. Compared with the base alloy, all of the FSP composites showed higher hardness and tensile strength values with the maximum being obtained for the composite containing 100% SiC particles, i.e., Al5083/SiC. The corrosion behavior of the samples was studied by conducting potentiodynamic polarization tests and assessed in terms of corrosion potential, pitting potential, and passivation range. The result shows a significant increase in corrosion resistance of the base alloy; i.e., the longest passivation range when CeO2 alone was incorporated into the surface by acting as cathodic inhibitors. Composites reinforced with SiC particles exhibited lower pitting resistance due to the formation of microgalvanic couples between cathodic SiC particles and anodic aluminum matrix. The study was aimed to fabricate metal matrix surface composites with improved hardness, tensile strength, and corrosion resistance by the incorporation of CeO2 and SiC reinforcement particles into the surface of Al5083 base alloy. Optimum mechanical properties and corrosion resistance were obtained for the FSP composite Al5083/(75%CeO2 + 25%SiC). In this particular FSP composite, hardness and tensile strength were increased by 30, and 14%, respectively, and passivation range was increased

  6. Electronic consequences of lateral composition modulation in Ga_xIn_1-xAs semiconductor alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattila, Tomi; Bellaiche, Laurent; Wang, Lin-Wang; Zunger, Alex

    1998-03-01

    Experiments [1] have shown that if a short-period (AC)n (BC)m (A=Al, Ga; B=In; C=P, As) superlattice is grown along the [001] direction with n,m=fractional, then an alloy composition modulation with wavelength ~ 100-200 Åis discovered in the lateral [110] direction. We present results of plane-wave empirical pseudopotential calculations of sinusoidal compositon modulation in Ga_xIn_1-xAs alloys. We find that pure composition modulation leads to only a small red-shift of band gap relative to the random alloy, but that a combination of short-period superlattice and composition modulation leads to a large shift, comparable to the experimentally observed shifts. We show that composition modulation leads to wavefunction localization in the In-rich regions and a consequent significant red-shift in the band gap value. [1] J. Mirecki Millunchick et al., MRS Bulletin 22, 38 (1997), and references therein. *Supported under BES/OER/DMS contract No. DE---AC36---83CH10093

  7. Deformation and fracture of a particle-reinforced aluminum alloy composite: Part I. Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, A. B.; Majumdar, B. S.; Miracle, D. B.

    2000-03-01

    Mechanical tests were performed on a powder-metallurgically processed 7093/SiC/15p discontinuously reinforced aluminum (DRA) composite in different heat-treatment conditions, to determine the influence of matrix characteristics on the composite response. The work-hardening exponent and the strain to failure varied inversely to the strength, similar to monolithic Al alloys, and this dependence was independent of the dominant damage mode. The damage consisted of SiC particle cracks, interface and near-interface debonds, and matrix rupture inside intense slip bands. Fracture surfaces revealed particle fracture-dominated damage for most of the heat-treatment conditions, including an overaged (OA) condition that exhibited a combination of precipitates at the interface and a precipitate-free zone (PFZ) in the immediate vicinity. In the highly OA conditions and in a 450°C as-rolled condition, when the composite strength became less than 400 MPa, near-interface matrix rupture became dominant. A combination of a relatively weak matrix and a weak zone around the particle likely contributed to this damage mode over that of particle fracture. Fracture-toughness tests show that it is important to maintain a proper geometry and testing procedure to obtain valid fracture-toughness data. Overaged microstructures did reveal a recovery of fracture toughness as compared to the peak-aged (PA) condition, unlike the lack of toughness recovery reported earlier for a similar 7XXX (Al-Zn-Cu-Mg)—based DRA. The PA material exhibited extensive localization of damage and plasticity. The low toughness of the DRA in this PA condition is explored in detail, using fractography and metallography. The damage and fracture micromechanisms formed the basis for modeling the strength, elongation, toughness, and damage, which are described in Part II of this work.

  8. NASA's activities in the conservation of strategic aerospace materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    The primary objective of the Conservation of Strategic Aerospace Materials (COSAM) Program is to help reduce the dependence of the United States aerospace industry on strategic metals by providing the materials technology needed to minimize the strategic metal content of critical aerospace components with prime emphasis on components for gas turbine engines. Initial emphasis was placed in the area of strategic element substinction. Specifically, the role of cobalt in nickel base and cobalt base superalloys vital to the aerospace industry is being examined in great detail by means of cooperative university-industry-government research efforts. Investigations are underway in the area of "new classes" of alloys. Specifically, a study was undertaken to investigate the mechanical and physical properties of intermetallics that contain a minimum of the strategic metals. Current plans for the much larger COSAM Program are also presented.

  9. Microstructure and wear characteristics of si particulate reinforced al matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Suk-Jin; Kim, Do-Hyang; Kim, Jun-Su

    1997-08-01

    In order to obtain a homogeneous distribution of fine Si particles in aluminium matrix and thus to improve the adaptability of Al-Si alloy for aerospace and automobile applications, Si particulate reinforced aluminium matrix composites have been processed by using powder metallurgy method. The Si pariticulates with 20-40 μm size and Al alloy powders were mixed, degassed and extruded at 350°C or 400°C depending on the composition of the matrix alloy. The microstructural characteristics of the composites such as interfacial stability at high temperatures have been investigated by various experimental techniques. Wear properties of the composites were investigated by using a pin-on-disk type wear tester. The results were compared with these obtained from the conventionally cast hypereutectic Al-Si alloys and discussed in terms of the observed microstructural characteristics and physical properties such as hardness and tensile properties.

  10. Structures Technology for Future Aerospace Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Venneri, Samuel L.; Paul, Donald B.; Hopkins, Mark A.

    2000-01-01

    An overview of structures technology for future aerospace systems is given. Discussion focuses on developments in component technologies that will improve the vehicle performance, advance the technology exploitation process, and reduce system life-cycle costs. The component technologies described are smart materials and structures, multifunctional materials and structures, affordable composite structures, extreme environment structures, flexible load bearing structures, and computational methods and simulation-based design. The trends in each of the component technologies are discussed and the applicability of these technologies to future aerospace vehicles is described.

  11. Relationship between High-Strain-Rate Superplasticity and Interface Microstructure in Aluminum Alloy Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, J.; Mitchell, T.E.; Sickafus, K.E.

    1999-02-01

    The Al alloy composites reinforced with Si3N4 or SiC have been reported to exhibit superplasticity at high strain rate of faster than 1x 10-2s-1. It has been shown in many aluminum alloy composites that the optimum superplastic temperature coincides with an incipient melting temperature. The coincidence suggests a contribution of the liquid phase to the superplasticity mechanism. This paper shows a direct evidence of partial melting along matrix grain boundaries and matrix-reinforcement interfaces. Based on the obtained results, the role of the liquid phase in the high-strain-rate superplasticity is discussed. The sample was Al-Mg (5052) alloy reinforced with 20vol% Si3N4 particles, fabricated by a powder metallurgy process. The sample showed an excellent superplasticity under the conditions given in Table 1. Partial melting was confirmed to occur at 821 K by differentail scanning calorimetry. The microstructural changes during heating were observed in situ by TEM using a heating stage. The structure of interfaces and grain boundaries was observed by HREM. Chemical analysis was performed with EDS attached to VG-STEM. A bright-field image of the composite is shown in Fig. 1. Notice that the edge of the Si3N4 particles are fragmented. Fig. 2 (a) shows a selected-area diffraction pattern taken at 821 K. A halo ring appears at this temperature, indicating partial melting. Fig. 2 (b) shows a dark- field image with an inverted contrast, taken from a part of the halo ring. The location of partial melting can be identified by a dark contrast along the matrix grain boundaries and the matrix- reinforcement interfaces. Above this temperature, grain-boundary corners become a rounded shape caused by the formation of the liquid phase at triple grain junctions. Figure 3 shows a concentration profile across a matrix-reinforcement interface. The left side is the aluminum matrix and the right is a Si3

  12. Development of Composite Spectrophotometric Procedures for the Analysis of Low-Alloy Steels and of Aluminum and Its Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1952-11-01

    alloys, granulated lead was added to separate any copper (iron was simultaneously reduced); complete reduction of the iron was effected by addition of...aliquot of the diluted solution taken for the analysis. Copper in the solution was removed by the addition of granulated lead; the precipitated...lest the reaction become too vigorous and the material froth over. too rarcid effervescence may be moderated by adding a little cold water. 3. Some

  13. Casting alloys.

    PubMed

    Wataha, John C; Messer, Regina L

    2004-04-01

    Although the role of dental casting alloys has changed in recent years with the development of improved all-ceramic materials and resin-based composites, alloys will likely continue to be critical assets in the treatment of missing and severely damaged teeth. Alloy shave physical, chemical, and biologic properties that exceed other classes of materials. The selection of the appropriate dental casting alloy is paramount to the long-term success of dental prostheses,and the selection process has become complex with the development of many new alloys. However, this selection process is manageable if the practitioner focuses on the appropriate physical and biologic properties, such as tensile strength, modulus of elasticity,corrosion, and biocompatibility, and avoids dwelling on the less important properties of alloy color and short-term cost. The appropriate selection of an alloy helps to ensure a longer-lasting restoration and better oral health for the patient.

  14. Laser surface alloying of 316L stainless steel coated with a bioactive hydroxyapatite-titanium oxide composite.

    PubMed

    Ghaith, El-Sayed; Hodgson, Simon; Sharp, Martin

    2015-02-01

    Laser surface alloying is a powerful technique for improving the mechanical and chemical properties of engineering components. In this study, laser surface irradiation process employed in the surface modification off 316L stainless steel substrate using hydroxyapatite-titanium oxide to provide a composite ceramic layer for the suitability of applying this technology to improve the biocompatibility of medical alloys and implants. Fusion of the metal surface incorporating hydroxyapatite-titania ceramic particles using a 30 W Nd:YAG laser at different laser powers, 40, 50 and 70% power and a scan speed of 40 mm s(-1) was observed to adopt the optimum condition of ceramic deposition. Coatings were evaluated in terms of microstructure, surface morphology, composition biocompatibility using XRD, ATR-FTIR, SEM and EDS. Evaluation of the in vitro bioactivity by soaking the treated metal in SBF for 10 days showed the deposition of biomimetic apatite.

  15. Monodisperse gold-palladium alloy nanoparticles and their composition-controlled catalysis in formic acid dehydrogenation under mild conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metin, Önder; Sun, Xiaolian; Sun, Shouheng

    2013-01-01

    Monodisperse 4 nm AuPd alloy nanoparticles with controlled composition were synthesized by co-reduction of hydrogen tetrachloroaurate(iii) hydrate and palladium(ii) acetylacetonate with a borane-morpholine complex in oleylamine. These NPs showed high activity (TOF = 230 h-1) and stability in catalyzing formic acid dehydrogenation and hydrogen production in water at 50 °C without any additives.Monodisperse 4 nm AuPd alloy nanoparticles with controlled composition were synthesized by co-reduction of hydrogen tetrachloroaurate(iii) hydrate and palladium(ii) acetylacetonate with a borane-morpholine complex in oleylamine. These NPs showed high activity (TOF = 230 h-1) and stability in catalyzing formic acid dehydrogenation and hydrogen production in water at 50 °C without any additives. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental procedures (NP synthesis, characterization and catalytic FA dehydrogenation) and figures (Fig. S1-S5). See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr33637e

  16. Carbide Coatings for Nickel Alloys, Graphite and Carbon/Carbon Composites to be used in Fluoride Salt Valves

    SciTech Connect

    Nagle, Denis; Zhang, Dajie

    2015-10-22

    The focus of this research was concerned with developing materials technology that supports the evolution of Generation IV Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR) concepts. Specifically, we investigate refractory carbide coatings for 1) nickel alloys, and 2) commercial carbon-carbon composites (CCCs). Numerous compelling reasons have driven us to focus on carbon and carbide materials. First, unlike metals, the strength and modulus of CCCs increase with rising temperature. Secondly, graphite and carbon composites have been proven effective for resisting highly corrosive fluoride melts such as molten cryolite [Na₃AlF₆] at ~1000°C in aluminum reduction cells. Thirdly, graphite and carbide materials exhibit extraordinary radiation damage tolerance and stability up to 2000°C. Finally, carbides are thermodynamically more stable in liquid fluoride salt than the corresponding metals (i.e. Cr and Zr) found in nickel based alloys.

  17. Optical properties and electrochemical dealloying of Gold-Silver alloy nanoparticles immobilized on composite thin-film electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starr, Christopher A.

    Gold-silver alloy nanoparticles (NPs) capped with adenosine 5'-triphosphate were synthesized by borohydride reduction of dilute aqueous metal precursors. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy showed the as-synthesized particles to be spherical with average diameters ~4 nm. Optical properties were measured by UV-Visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis), and the formation of alloy NPs was verified across all gold:silver ratios by a linear shift in the plasmon band maxima against alloy composition. The molar absorptivities of the NPs decreased non-linearly with increasing gold content from 2.0 x 108 M-1 cm-1 (lambdamax = 404 nm) for pure silver to 4.1 x 107 M-1 cm -1 (lambdamax = 511 nm) for pure gold. The NPs were immobilized onto transparent indium-tin oxide composite electrodes using layer-by-layer (LbL) deposition with poly(diallyldimethylammonium) acting as a cationic binder. The UV-Vis absorbance of the LbL film was used to calculate the surface coverage of alloy NPs on the electrode. Typical preparations had average NP surface coverages of 2.8 x 10-13 mol NPs/cm2 (~5% of cubic closest packing) with saturated films reaching ~20% of ccp for single-layer preparations (1.0 ~ 10-12 mol NPs/cm2). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed the presence of alloy NPs in the LbL film and showed silver enrichment of the NP surfaces by ~9%. Irreversible oxidative dissolution (dealloying) of the less noble silver atoms from the NPs on LbL electrodes was performed by cyclic voltammetry (CV) in sulfuric acid. Alloy NPs with higher gold content required larger overpotentials for silver dealloying. Dealloying of the more-noble gold atoms from the alloy NPs was also achieved by CV in sodium chloride. The silver was oxidized first to cohesive silver chloride, and then gold dealloyed to soluble HAuCl 4- at higher potentials. Silver oxidation was inhibited during the first oxidative scan, but subsequent cycles showed typical, reversible silver-to-silver chloride voltammetry. The

  18. Challenges and Progress in the Development of High-Temperature Shape Memory Alloys Based on NiTiX Compositions for High-Force Actuator Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padula, Santo, II; Bigelow, Glen; Noebe, Ronald; Gaydosh, Darrell; Garg, Anita

    2006-01-01

    Interest in high-temperature shape memory alloys (HTSMA) has been growing in the aerospace, automotive, process control, and energy industries. However, actual materials development has seriously lagged component design, with current commercial NiTi alloys severely limited in their temperature capability. Additions of Pd, Pt, Au, Hf, and Zr at levels greater than 10 at.% have been shown to increase the transformation temperature of NiTi alloys, but with few exceptions, the shape memory behavior (strain recovery) of these NiTiX systems has been determined only under stress free conditions. Given the limited amount of basic mechanical test data and general lack of information regarding the work attributes of these materials, a program to investigate the mechanical behavior of potential HTSMAs, with transformation temperatures between 100 and 500 C, was initiated. This paper summarizes the results of studies, focusing on both the practical temperature limitations for ternary TiNiPd and TiNiPt systems based on the work output of these alloys and the ability of these alloys to undergo repeated thermal cycling under load without significant permanent deformation or "walking". These issues are ultimately controlled by the detwinning stress of the martensite and resistance to dislocation slip of the individual martensite and austenite phases. Finally, general rules that govern the development of useful, high work output, next-generation HTSMA materials, based on the lessons learned in this work, will be provided

  19. Synthesis of amorphous alloys and amorphous-crystalline composites in the Cu-Nb-Hf system by ion beam mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, S. Y.; Cui, Y. Y.; Wang, T. L.; Ding, N.; Li, J. H.; Liu, B. X.

    2011-06-15

    Seven sets of Cu-Nb-Hf multilayered films were designed and prepared with the overall compositions of Cu{sub 21}Nb{sub 65}Hf{sub 14}, Cu{sub 33}Nb{sub 49}Hf{sub 18}, Cu{sub 34}Nb{sub 34}Hf{sub 32}, Cu{sub 34}Nb{sub 10}Hf{sub 56}, Cu{sub 50}Nb{sub 23}Hf{sub 27}, Cu{sub 58}Nb{sub 10}Hf{sub 32}, and Cu{sub 70}Nb{sub 8}Hf{sub 22}, and an ion beam mixing experiment was then conducted using 200 keV xenon ions. It is found that the Cu-Nb-Hf system is a metallic glass forming one, and the single amorphous alloys could be synthesized in the Cu-Nb-based alloys with less than 18 at.% of Hf as a third addition. Also, when the Hf concentration is greater than 18 at.%, i.e., at the compositions of Cu{sub 34}Nb{sub 34}Hf{sub 32}, Cu{sub 34}Nb{sub 10}Hf{sub 56}, Cu{sub 50}Nb{sub 23}Hf{sub 27}, Cu{sub 58}Nb{sub 10}Hf{sub 32}, and Cu{sub 70}Nb{sub 8}Hf{sub 22}, ion beam mixing resulted in the formation of amorphous-crystalline composites, which might have better mechanical properties than single-phase glassy alloys. In addition, a detailed discussion was presented for the formation mechanism of the amorphous alloys and amorphous-crystalline composites.

  20. Computational-Experimental Processing of Boride/Carbide Composites by Reactive Infusion of Hf Alloy Melts into B4C

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-16

    oxidation resistance of ultrahigh temperature ceramic composites (UHTCC), the processing of these reactive metals and non- metals must be improved...processing of these reactive metals and non- metals must be improved dramatically to control the eventual development of the oxide scale. The research...with strategic experimentation of liquid Al-Sm alloys containing Hf, Ti or Y. • Investigate the phases formed as the liquid metal flows into the packed