Science.gov

Sample records for aerospace research summer

  1. Langley Aerospace Research Summer Scholars. Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwan, Rafaela (Compiler)

    1995-01-01

    The Langley Aerospace Research Summer Scholars (LARSS) Program was established by Dr. Samuel E. Massenberg in 1986. The program has increased from 20 participants in 1986 to 114 participants in 1995. The program is LaRC-unique and is administered by Hampton University. The program was established for the benefit of undergraduate juniors and seniors and first-year graduate students who are pursuing degrees in aeronautical engineering, mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, material science, computer science, atmospheric science, astrophysics, physics, and chemistry. Two primary elements of the LARSS Program are: (1) a research project to be completed by each participant under the supervision of a researcher who will assume the role of a mentor for the summer, and (2) technical lectures by prominent engineers and scientists. Additional elements of this program include tours of LARC wind tunnels, computational facilities, and laboratories. Library and computer facilities will be available for use by the participants.

  2. Technical Reports: Langley Aerospace Research Summer Scholars. Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwan, Rafaela (Compiler)

    1995-01-01

    The Langley Aerospace Research Summer Scholars (LARSS) Program was established by Dr. Samuel E. Massenberg in 1986. The program has increased from 20 participants in 1986 to 114 participants in 1995. The program is LaRC-unique and is administered by Hampton University. The program was established for the benefit of undergraduate juniors and seniors and first-year graduate students who are pursuing degrees in aeronautical engineering, mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, material science, computer science, atmospheric science, astrophysics, physics, and chemistry. Two primary elements of the LARSS Program are: (1) a research project to be completed by each participant under the supervision of a researcher who will assume the role of a mentor for the summer, and (2) technical lectures by prominent engineers and scientists. Additional elements of this program include tours of LARC wind tunnels, computational facilities, and laboratories. Library and computer facilities will be available for use by the participants.

  3. The 1992 Langley Aerospace Research Summer Scholars (LARSS) program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The overwhelming majority of the LARSS participants rated their overall summer research experience as good or excellent. Even though the 1992 LARSS Program has met its goals, all areas of the program need to be considered for continuous improvement. Of the various recommendations provided by the participants, the following will be implemented in the 1993 LARSS Program: (1) LARSS participants will be housed in two or three apartment complexes; (2) mentors will be encouraged to contact their student before the beginning of the LARSS Program; (3) LARSS participants will be notified of a tentative payroll schedule before the Program begins; (4) LARSS participants will be strongly encouraged to give an oral presentation on their research project in their respective Divisions; and (5) a Career Conference, in conjunction with a forum where the participants can share their individual research projects will be held. The participant recommendations made in the 1992 LARSS Student Exit Survey will ensure a more successful and improved LARSS Program in 1993.

  4. The 1975 NASA/ASEE summer faculty fellowship research program. [research in the areas of aerospace engineering, aerospace systems, and information systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A research program was conducted to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members, to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA engineers and scientists, and to enrich the research activities of the participants' institutions. Abstracts of reports submitted at the end of the program are presented. Topics investigated include multispectral photography, logic circuits, gravitation theories, information systems, fracture mechanics, holographic interferometry, surface acoustic wave technology, ion beams in the upper atmosphere, and hybrid microcircuits.

  5. Aerospace Industry and Research. Aerospace Education II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackin, T. E.

    This book, to be used in the Air Force ROTC program only, discusses various aspects of the aerospace industry and its importance to the society. Not only does a modern and strong aerospace technology help in national defense, but it is a major economic industry as well. The vast number of people employed could shake the roots of economic…

  6. NASA-OAI Collaborative Aerospace Research and Fellowship Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyward, Ann O.; Kankam, Mark D.

    2003-01-01

    During the summer of 2003, a IO-week activity for university faculty entitled the NASA-OAI Collaborative Aerospace Research and Fellowship Program (CFP) was conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center in collaboration with the Ohio Aerospace Institute (OAI). The objectives of CFP are: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty, (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between teaching participants and employees of NASA, (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions, and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of Glenn. This report is intended primarily to summarize the research activities comprising the 2003 CFP Program at Glenn.

  7. NASA Ames aerospace systems directorate research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albers, James A.

    1991-01-01

    The Aerospace Systems Directorate is one of four research directorates at the NASA Ames Research Center. The Directorate conducts research and technology development for advanced aircraft and aircraft systems in intelligent computational systems and human-machine systems for aeronautics and space. The Directorate manages research and aircraft technology development projects, and operates and maintains major wind tunnels and flight simulation facilities. The Aerospace Systems Directorate's research and technology as it relates to NASA agency goals and specific strategic thrusts are discussed.

  8. An Aerospace Workshop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Bill

    1972-01-01

    Describes the 16-day, 10,000 mile national tour of the nation's major aerospace research and development centers by 65 students enrolled in Central Washington State College's Summer Aerospace Workshop. (Author/MB)

  9. Astronomy research at the Aerospace Corporation. [research projects - NASA programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paulikas, G. A.

    1974-01-01

    This report reviews the astronomy research carried out at The Aerospace Corporation during 1974. The report describes the activities of the San Fernando Observatory, the research in millimeter wave radio astronomy as well as the space astronomy research.

  10. Stanford Aerospace Research Laboratory research overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballhaus, W. L.; Alder, L. J.; Chen, V. W.; Dickson, W. C.; Ullman, M. A.

    1993-01-01

    Over the last ten years, the Stanford Aerospace Robotics Laboratory (ARL) has developed a hardware facility in which a number of space robotics issues have been, and continue to be, addressed. This paper reviews two of the current ARL research areas: navigation and control of free flying space robots, and modelling and control of extremely flexible space structures. The ARL has designed and built several semi-autonomous free-flying robots that perform numerous tasks in a zero-gravity, drag-free, two-dimensional environment. It is envisioned that future generations of these robots will be part of a human-robot team, in which the robots will operate under the task-level commands of astronauts. To make this possible, the ARL has developed a graphical user interface (GUI) with an intuitive object-level motion-direction capability. Using this interface, the ARL has demonstrated autonomous navigation, intercept and capture of moving and spinning objects, object transport, multiple-robot cooperative manipulation, and simple assemblies from both free-flying and fixed bases. The ARL has also built a number of experimental test beds on which the modelling and control of flexible manipulators has been studied. Early ARL experiments in this arena demonstrated for the first time the capability to control the end-point position of both single-link and multi-link flexible manipulators using end-point sensing. Building on these accomplishments, the ARL has been able to control payloads with unknown dynamics at the end of a flexible manipulator, and to achieve high-performance control of a multi-link flexible manipulator.

  11. NASA-OAI Collaborative Aerospace Research and Fellowship Program at NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyward, Ann O.; Montegani, Francis J.

    2003-01-01

    During the summer of 2002, a IO-week activity for university faculty entitled the NASA-OAI Collaborative Aerospace Research and Fellowship Program (CFP) was conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center in collaboration with the Ohio Aerospace Institute (OAI). This is a companion program to the highly successful NASA Faculty Fellowship Program and its predecessor, the NASA- ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, that operated for 38 years at Glenn. This year s program began officially on June 3, 2002 and continued through August 9, 2002. This report is intended primarily to summarize the research activities comprising the 2002 CFP Program at Glenn. Fifteen research summaries are included.

  12. Materials research. [research concerning materials for aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The research is reported concerned with materials for aerospace applications. Areas reported include: electrical properties of glasses, oxides and metals; structural and high temperature properties of crystalline and amorphous materials; and physical properties, and microstructure of materials.

  13. Research reports: 1990 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, L. Michael (Editor); Chappell, Charles R. (Editor); Six, Frank (Editor); Karr, Gerald R. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    Reports on the research projects performed under the NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program are presented. The program was conducted by The University of Alabama and MSFC during the period from June 4, 1990 through August 10, 1990. Some of the topics covered include: (1) Space Shuttles; (2) Space Station Freedom; (3) information systems; (4) materials and processes; (4) Space Shuttle main engine; (5) aerospace sciences; (6) mathematical models; (7) mission operations; (8) systems analysis and integration; (9) systems control; (10) structures and dynamics; (11) aerospace safety; and (12) remote sensing

  14. Summer Student Research Presentations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casey, Carol (Editor)

    2005-01-01

    In 2005, over 150 undergraduate students and first-year graduate students participated in a variety of research programs coordinated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Education Office in conjunction with the Caltech Student- Faculty Programs Office. The programs give students the opportunity to conduct research under the guidance of an experienced mentor for a 10-week period. Students gain valuable experience while contributing to the ongoing goals of JPL. Students are required to submit progress reports and an abstract, and to give an oral presentation of their projects to an audience of JPL staff and other students. This set of abstracts provides brief descriptions of the projects that were conducted by these students and their mentors. A schedule of student talks is also included.

  15. Summer Research Technical Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) U.S. Army Research Laboratory Computational and Information Sciences Directorate Battlefield Environment Division...ATTN: RDRL-CIE-M) White Sands Missile Range, NM 88002-5501 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER ARL-TN-0565 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING...program is referred to as the Impact Magnitude Gradation Scheme ( IMGS ) and is also intended to use the extrapolated curve and compare data sets with one

  16. Research needs in aerospace structural dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amos, A. K.; Goetz, R. C.

    1979-01-01

    The perspective of a NASA Ad Hoc Study Committee on future research needs in structural dynamics within the aerospace industry is presented. It identifies the common aspects of the design process across the industry and establishes the role of structural dynamics in it through a discussion of various design considerations having their basis in structural dynamics. The specific structural dynamics issues involved in these considerations are identified and assessed as to their current technological status and trends. Projections of future requirements based on this assessment are made and areas of research to meet them are identified.

  17. Summer Research Paper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Zarana

    2011-01-01

    Certain populations such as chemotherapy patients and atomic bomb survivors have been exposed to ionizing radiation and experience tissue damage and cancer initiation and progression. One cancer that can be initiated from radiation is esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), an epithelial cancer that has a survival rate as low as 20%. Researchers have found that when protein tyrosine kinase receptors (RPTK) activate oncogenes, they can create epithelial tumors and cause deadly cancers like ESCC. The RPTK family has one group, MET, that has only two receptors, MET and RON, present in the human body. MET s ligand is the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and RON's ligand is the macrophage-stimulating protein (MSP-1). Both HGF and MSP-1 have been shown to activate their receptors and are implicated in certain processes. Since radiation damages cells throughout the biological system, researchers are investigating whether or not HGF and MSP-1 protects or kills certain normal and cancerous cells by being part of cell recovery processes. One research group recently reviewed that the HGF-MET pathway has an important role in the embryonic development in the liver, migration of myogenic precursor cells, regulation of epithelial morphogenesis and growth, and regeneration and protection in tissues. In addition, since the RON receptor is more commonly expressed in cells of epithelial origin, and when activated is part of epithelial cell matrix invasion, dissociation, and migration processes, scientists conclude that RON might be one of the factors causing epithelial cancer initiation in the biological system. In order to examine HGF and MSP-1 s effect on cancer initiation and progression we used two immortalized esophageal epithelial cell lines. One is a normal human cell line (EPC2-hTERT), while the other had a p53 mutation at the 175th amino acid position (EPC2-hTERT-p53(sup R175H)). For this investigation, we used 0(control), 2, and 4 Gray doses of gamma (Cs137) radiation and

  18. Research Opportunities in Advanced Aerospace Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Gregory S.; Bangert, Linda S.; Garber, Donald P.; Huebner, Lawrence D.; McKinley, Robert E.; Sutton, Kenneth; Swanson, Roy C., Jr.; Weinstein, Leonard

    2000-01-01

    This report is a review of a team effort that focuses on advanced aerospace concepts of the 21st Century. The paper emphasis advanced technologies, rather than cataloging every unusual aircraft that has ever been attempted. To dispel the myth that "aerodynamics is a mature science" an extensive list of "What we cannot do, or do not know" was enumerated. A zeit geist, a feeling for the spirit of the times, was developed, based on existing research goals. Technological drivers and the constraints that might influence these technological developments in a future society were also examined. The present status of aeronautics, space exploration, and non-aerospace applications, both military and commercial, including enabling technologies are discussed. A discussion of non-technological issues affecting advanced concepts research is presented. The benefit of using the study of advanced vehicles as a tool to uncover new directions for technology development is often necessary. An appendix is provided containing examples of advanced vehicle configurations currently of interest.

  19. Summer Research Apprentice Program report. [Summer Research Apprentice Program

    SciTech Connect

    Curington, B.

    1982-01-01

    The Summer Research Apprentice Program is designed to provide students with their first look at college life while preparing them for possible careers in mathematics, science and engineering. The 23 students, enrolled as college freshmen for 8 hours of college credit, took courses in Trigonometry, College Algebra and introduction to Research (4 students were enrolled in Calculus 1 instead of Trigonometry and College Albebra). During this third year of operation, refinements were made in both the administration of the program and in the method of implementation.

  20. Microelectronics packaging research directions for aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galbraith, L.

    2003-01-01

    The Roadmap begins with an assessment of needs from the microelectronics for aerospace applications viewpoint. Needs Assessment is divided into materials, packaging components, and radiation characterization of packaging.

  1. Collaborative Aerospace Research and Fellowship Program at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyward, Ann O.; Kankam, Mark D.

    2004-01-01

    During the summer of 2004, a 10-week activity for university faculty entitled the NASA-OAI Collaborative Aerospace Research and Fellowship Program (CFP) was conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center in collaboration with the Ohio Aerospace Institute (OAI). This is a companion program to the highly successful NASA Faculty Fellowship Program and its predecessor, the NASA-ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program that operated for 38 years at Glenn. The objectives of CFP parallel those of its companion, viz., (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty,(2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between teaching participants and employees of NASA, (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants institutions, and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of Glenn. However, CFP, unlike the NASA program, permits faculty to be in residence for more than two summers and does not limit participation to United States citizens. Selected fellows spend 10 weeks at Glenn working on research problems in collaboration with NASA colleagues and participating in related activities of the NASA-ASEE program. This year's program began officially on June 1, 2004 and continued through August 7, 2004. Several fellows had program dates that differed from the official dates because university schedules vary and because some of the summer research projects warranted a time extension beyond the 10 weeks for satisfactory completion of the work. The stipend paid to the fellows was $1200 per week and a relocation allowance of $1000 was paid to those living outside a 50-mile radius of the Center. In post-program surveys from this and previous years, the faculty cited numerous instances where participation in the program has led to new courses, new research projects, new laboratory experiments, and grants from NASA to continue the work initiated during the summer. Many of the fellows mentioned amplifying material, both in

  2. Summer Reading Lists: Research and Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindley, Sarah; Giles, Rebecca M.; Tunks, Karyn

    2016-01-01

    Decades of research have focused on the impact of summer learning loss and effective tools in stemming the flow of knowledge lost during summer break. While reading lists have become a standard practice for addressing students' needs to maintain learning levels over the summer months, very little research has been conducted on the book lists…

  3. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 10: The NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Kennedy, John M.; Barclay, Rebecca O.

    1991-01-01

    The role of the NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge DIffusion Research Project in helping to maintain U.S. competitiveness is addressed. The phases of the project are examined in terms of the focus, emphasis, subjects, methods, and desired outcomes. The importance of the project to aerospace R&D is emphasized.

  4. The context. [technological spinoffs from aerospace research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The relationships among science, technology, and applications are discussed. Special emphasis is placed on public support of space exploration and aerospace sciences in general. Examples of technological spinoffs are presented.

  5. USAF Summer Research Program - 1994 Summer Faculty Research Program Final Reports, Volume 5B, Wright Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-12-01

    Research Laboratory Technical Directorates and Air Force Air Logistics Centers. Each participant provided a report of their research , and these...reports are consolidated into this annual report. 14. SUBJECT TERMS AIR FORCE RESEARCH , AIR FORCE , ENGINEERING, LABORATORIES , REPORTS, SUMMER...216-6940 UNITED STATES AIR FORCE SUMMER RESEARCH PROGRAM - 1994 SUMMER FACULTY RESEARCH PROGRAM FINAL REPORTS

  6. AGARD (Advisory Group for Aerospace Research & Development)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-01

    of the AGARD publications printing and distribution programme, as well as for press and public relations and similar activities. The total staff...authority to approve up to two topics from the Military Committee Memorandum as Aerospace Applications Studies each year. The selected topics are anounced

  7. Advancements in medicine from aerospace research.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wooten, F. T.

    1971-01-01

    Discussion of a NASA-sponsored medical program under which work is done by multidiscipline teams to provide an interface between aerospace and medicine. A prosthetic urethral valve, an ear oximeter for measurement of oxygen content in the blood, a radiation dosimeter and an electromyographic muscle trainer are noted as the products of this program.

  8. Center for Computing Research Summer Research Proceedings 2015.

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, Andrew Michael; Parks, Michael L.

    2015-12-18

    The Center for Computing Research (CCR) at Sandia National Laboratories organizes a summer student program each summer, in coordination with the Computer Science Research Institute (CSRI) and Cyber Engineering Research Institute (CERI).

  9. The 1981 Summer Research Fellowship Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, J. H. (Compiler)

    1981-01-01

    The NASA-Hampton Institute Summer Research Fellowship Program, offering capable scientists and engineers at traditionally black institutions an opportunity to participate in research activities in an environment at the Langley Research Center where basic research is of primary importance is considered. The Summer Research Fellowship Program, specifically designed to assist these faculty members in identifying areas of research which correlate positively with their individual interest and capabilities is discussed. It is also designed to help them to initiate viable research which increases their technical knowledge about how research efforts at their institutions might be increased.

  10. Public Sector Benefits From Aerospace Research and Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Jeffrey T.

    1973-01-01

    Many benefits from aerospace research have occurred: research on quiet aircraft engines, worldwide news coverage, contributions to the national economy, development of reliable fluid amplifiers and logic systems, attempts to control airport congestion, a low speed air sensor for use on a pulmonary flow meter and even as a flow meter in a large…

  11. Naval Aerospace Medical Research Laboratory Bibliography, 1981-1986.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-01

    n Ltd.. 6 pp., 1981. Olsen, R.G., Microwave-induced Developmental Defects in the Common Mealworm Tenerio mlit-ýr_--A Decade o’ Re-seaFch-, NAMRL-1283...Tri-service Aeromedical Research Panel Fall Technical Meeting , NAMRL Monograph 33, Naval Aerospace A Medical Research Laboratory, Pensacola, FL

  12. Aerospace Communications at the NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, Felix A.

    2006-01-01

    The Communications Division at the NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland Ohio has as its charter to provide NASA and the Nation with our expertise and services in innovative communications technologies that address future missions in Aerospace Technology, Spaceflight, Space Science, Earth Science, Life Science and Exploration.

  13. Research and Development of Rapid Design Systems for Aerospace Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaeffer, Harry G.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes the results of research activities associated with the development of rapid design systems for aerospace structures in support of the Intelligent Synthesis Environment (ISE). The specific subsystems investigated were the interface between model assembly and analysis; and, the high performance NASA GPS equation solver software system in the Windows NT environment on low cost high-performance PCs.

  14. Local and national impact of aerospace research and technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccarthy, J. F., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    An overview of work at the NASA Lewis Research Center in the areas of aeronautics space, and energy is presented. Local and national impact of the work is discussed. Some aspects of the U.S. research and technology base, the aerospace industry, and foreign competition are discussed. In conclusion, U.S. research and technology programs are cited as vital to U.S. economic health.

  15. Key Actions of Successful Summer Research Mentors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raman, D. Raj; Geisinger, Brandi N.; Kemis, Mari R.; de la Mora, Arlene

    2016-01-01

    Summer research opportunities for undergraduates, such as those supported by the National Science Foundation's Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) program, can be critical experiences that help persuade students to pursue research through graduate studies. Studies analyzing the key actions of successful mentors are scarce. The goal of…

  16. NASA-ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prahl, Joseph M.; Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Montegani, Francis J.

    1996-01-01

    During the summer of 1996, a ten-week Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted at the NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) in collaboration with Case Western Reserve University (CWRU), and the Ohio Aerospace Institute (OAI). This is the thirty-third summer of this program at Lewis. It was one of nine summer programs sponsored by NASA in 1996, at various field centers under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE). The objectives of the program are: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science educators, (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA, (3) to enrich and refresh the research activities of participants' institutions. (4) to contribute to the research objectives of LeRC. This report is intended to recapitulate the activities comprising the 1996 Lewis Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, to summarize evaluations by the participants, and to make recommendations regarding future programs.

  17. Summer Research Internships at Biosphere 2 Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Through the support of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth, Biosphere 2 Center hosted 10 research interns for a 10 week period during the summer of 1998. In addition, we were able to offer scholarships to 10 students for Columbia University summer field courses. Students participating in these programs were involved in numerous earth systems activities, collecting data in the field and conducting analyses in the laboratory. Students enrolled in the field program were expected to design independent research projects as part of their coursework. In addition to laboratory and field research, students participated in weekly research seminars by resident and visiting scientists. Field school students were involved in field trips exposing them to the geology and ecology of the region including Arizona Sonora Desert Museum, Mount Lemmon, Aravaipa Canyon and the Gulf of California. Interns participated in laboratory-based research. All students were expected to complete oral and written presentations of their work during the summer.

  18. SHARP {Summer High School Apprenticeship Research Program}

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glasco, Deborah (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Year 2002 was another successful year for SHARP. Even after 22 years of SHARP, the Program continues to grow. There were 12 NASA Field Installations with a total of 210 apprentices who participated in the summer 2002 Program supported by 215 mentors in the fields of science and engineering. The apprentices were chosen from a pool of 1,379 applicants. This was a record year for applications exceeding the previous year by over 60%. For the second consecutive year, the number of female participants exceeded the number of males with 53% female and 47% male participants in the program. The main thrust of our recruiting efforts is still focused on underrepresented populations; especially African American, Hispanic, and Native American. At the conclusion of the summer program, most SHARP Apprentices indicated on the EDCATS that they would be interested in pursuing careers in Aerospace (56.2%) while the second largest career choice was a job at NASA (45.7%). The smallest number (11.9%) were interested in careers in the government. The table of responses is listed in the Appendix. Once again this year we were fortunate in that the SHARP COTR, Ms. Deborah Glasco, gained the support of MURED funding sources at NASA to fully fund additional apprentices and boost the number of apprentices to 210.

  19. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 19: Computer and information technology and aerospace knowledge diffusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Kennedy, John M.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Bishop, Ann P.

    1992-01-01

    To remain a world leader in aerospace, the US must improve and maintain the professional competency of its engineers and scientists, increase the research and development (R&D) knowledge base, improve productivity, and maximize the integration of recent technological developments into the R&D process. How well these objectives are met, and at what cost, depends on a variety of factors, but largely on the ability of US aerospace engineers and scientists to acquire and process the results of federally funded R&D. The Federal Government's commitment to high speed computing and networking systems presupposes that computer and information technology will play a major role in the aerospace knowledge diffusion process. However, we know little about information technology needs, uses, and problems within the aerospace knowledge diffusion process. The use of computer and information technology by US aerospace engineers and scientists in academia, government, and industry is reported.

  20. Current Research: 2013 Summer Reading Suggestions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of College Science Teaching, 2013

    2013-01-01

    To supplement the summer reading of National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) members, the NSTA Committee on Research in Science Education suggested a list of science education research articles that were published in the journals of NSTA's affiliates in 2012. These articles covered a variety of topics that include learning about…

  1. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 12: The diffusion of federally funded aerospace research and development (R/D) and the information seeking behavior of US aerospace engineers and scientists

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Kennedy, John M.; Barclay, Rebecca O.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper, the diffusion of federally funded aerospace R&D is explored from the perspective of the information-seeking behavior of U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists. The following three assumptions frame this exploration: (1) knowledge production, transfer, and utilization are equally important components of the aerospace R&D process; (2) the diffusion of knowledge resulting from federally funded aerospace R&D is indispensable for the U.S. to remain a world leader in aerospace; and (3) U.S. government technical reports, produced by NASA and DOD, play an important, but as yet undefined, role in the diffusion of federally funded aerospace R&D. A conceptual model for federally funded aerospace knowledge diffusion, one that emphasizes U.S. goverment technical reports, is presented. Data regarding three research questions concerning the information-seeking behavior of U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists are also presented.

  2. Research in the aerospace physical sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitehurst, R. N.

    1973-01-01

    Research efforts are reported in various areas including dynamics of thin films, polymer chemistry, mechanical and chemical properties of materials, radar system engineering, stabilization of lasers, and radiation damage of organic crystals. Brief summaries of research accomplished and literature citations are included.

  3. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 41: Technical communication practices of Dutch and US aerospace engineers and scientists: International perspective on aerospace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barclay, Rebecca O.; Pinelli, Thomas E.; Kennedy, John M.

    1994-01-01

    As part of Phase 4 of the NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project, studies were conducted that investigated the technical communications practices of Dutch and U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists. The studies had the following objectives: (1) to solicit the opinions of aerospace engineers and scientists regarding the importance of technical communication to their professions, (2) to determine the use and production of technical communication by aerospace engineers and scientists, (3) to investigate their use of libraries and technical information centers, (4) to investigate their use of and the importance to them of computer and information technology, (5) to examine their use of electronic networks, and (6) to determine their use of foreign and domestically produced technical reports. Self-administered (mail) questionnaires were distributed to Dutch aerospace engineers and scientists at the National Aerospace Laboratory (NLR) in the Netherlands, the NASA Ames Research Center in the U.S., and the NASA Langley Research Center in the U.S. Responses of the Dutch and U.S. participants to selected questions are presented in this paper.

  4. NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 30: The electronic transfer of information and aerospace knowledge diffusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Bishop, Ann P.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1992-01-01

    Increasing reliance on and investment in information technology and electronic networking systems presupposes that computing and information technology will play a major role in the diffusion of aerospace knowledge. Little is known, however, about actual information technology needs, uses, and problems within the aerospace knowledge diffusion process. The authors state that the potential contributions of information technology to increased productivity and competitiveness will be diminished unless empirically derived knowledge regarding the information-seeking behavior of the members of the social system - those who are producing, transferring, and using scientific and technical information - is incorporated into a new technology policy framework. Research into the use of information technology and electronic networks by U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists, collected as part of a research project designed to study aerospace knowledge diffusion, is presented in support of this assertion.

  5. Summer Research Internships at Biosphere 2 Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broecker, Wallace S.; Colodner, Debra; Griffin, Kevin

    1997-01-01

    Through the support of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth, Biosphere 2 Center hosted 11 research interns for 6 to 8 weeks each during the summer of 1997. In addition, we were able to offer scholarships to 14 students for Columbia University summer field courses. These two types of programs engaged students in much of the range of activity of practicing Earth Scientists, with an emphasis on the collection and analysis of data in both the field and the laboratory. Research interns and students in the field courses also played an important part in the design and evolution of their research projects. In addition to laboratory and field research, students participated in weekly research seminars by resident and visiting scientists. Research interns were exposed to the geology and ecology of the region via short field trips to the Arizona Sonora Desert Museum, Mount Lemmon, Aravaipa Canyon and the Gulf of California, while field course students were exposed to laboratory-based research via intern-led hands-on demonstrations of their work. All students made oral and written presentations of their work during the summer, and two of the research interns have applied to present their results at the National Conference on Undergraduate Research in Maryland in April, 1998.

  6. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 5: Aerospace librarians and technical information specialists as information intermediaries: A report of phase 2 activities of the NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Kennedy, John M.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of the NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project is to provide descriptive and analytical data regarding the flow of scientific and technical information (STI) at the individual, organizational, national, and international levels, placing emphasis on the systems used to diffuse the results of federally funded aerospace STI. An overview of project assumptions, objectives, and design is presented and preliminary results of the phase 2 aerospace library survey are summarized. Phase 2 addressed aerospace knowledge transfer and use within the larger social system and focused on the flow of aerospace STI in government and industry and the role of the information intermediary in knowledge transfer.

  7. Visualization in aerospace research with a large wall display system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, Yuichi

    2002-05-01

    National Aerospace Laboratory of Japan has built a large- scale visualization system with a large wall-type display. The system has been operational since April 2001 and comprises a 4.6x1.5-meter (15x5-foot) rear projection screen with 3 BARCO 812 high-resolution CRT projectors. The reason we adopted the 3-gun CRT projectors is support for stereoscopic viewing, ease with color/luminosity matching and accuracy of edge-blending. The system is driven by a new SGI Onyx 3400 server of distributed shared-memory architecture with 32 CPUs, 64Gbytes memory, 1.5TBytes FC RAID disk and 6 IR3 graphics pipelines. Software is another important issue for us to make full use of the system. We have introduced some applications available in a multi- projector environment such as AVS/MPE, EnSight Gold and COVISE, and been developing some software tools that create volumetric images with using SGI graphics libraries. The system is mainly used for visualization fo computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation sin aerospace research. Visualized CFD results are of our help for designing an improved configuration of aerospace vehicles and analyzing their aerodynamic performances. These days we also use it for various collaborations among researchers.

  8. Summer Undergraduate Research Program: Environmental studies

    SciTech Connect

    McMillan, J.

    1994-12-31

    The purpose of the summer undergraduate internship program for research in environmental studies is to provide an opportunity for well-qualified students to undertake an original research project as an apprentice to an active research scientist in basic environmental research. The students are offered research topics at the Medical University in the scientific areas of pharmacology and toxicology, epidemiology and risk assessment, environmental microbiology, and marine sciences. Students are also afforded the opportunity to work with faculty at the University of Charleston, SC, on projects with an environmental theme. Ten well-qualified students from colleges and universities throughout the eastern United States were accepted into the program.

  9. United States Air Force Summer Faculty Research Program (1984). Program Management Report. Volume 3

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-01

    Medical College V Research Location: School of Aerospace Medicine Clinical Sciences Division Neurosciences Branch Brooks Air Force Base, Texas USAF...to continue investigations begun in the summer of 1983. Project supervision was by Dr. John Taboada, Neurosciences Branch of the Clinical Sciences...agen- cies utilize DES to encrypt privacy data. Unfortunately DES has not been, nor does it appear that it will be, certified by NSA for classified data

  10. Defining risk in aerospace medical unconsciousness research.

    PubMed

    Whinnery, J E

    1989-07-01

    The maneuverability envelopes of current and future fighter/attack aircraft exceed unprotected human tolerance to environmental stress. Human exposure to unconsciousness therefore can result not only inflight, but in research and training laboratories which endeavor to provide methods of enhanced protection for aircrew. Solving the problem of unconsciousness requires a thorough understanding of the phenomenon itself. This can only be accomplished by defining the psychophysiologic aspects of unconsciousness and techniques to prevent its occurrence or enhance recovery, should it occur. The safety of experimental human exposure to G-LOC however, remains of some concern. A framework for discussing the relative insult to the central nervous system may be constructed from what is currently known about G-LOC. The results of animal experimentation allow an estimation of the central nervous system tolerance to hypoxia without permanent alteration of tissue integrity. Clinical medicine documentation of syncope and fainting episodes, coupled with a long history of uncomplicated G-LOC episodes suggests that a certain window of safe exposure exists. Utilization of G-LOC as an endpoint included exposure of very large numbers of humans to unconsciousness without significant complication. Animal experimentation suggests that 180 s of central nervous system hypoxia is associated with uncomplicated recovery. Human exposure as long as 100 s has also been safely accomplished. Centrifuge G-LOC exposure typically results in only 15-20 s of central nervous system hypoxia. As long as G-LOC experimentation using humans is performed within well defined limits, it may be accomplished within an acceptable risk envelope.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. USAF Summer Research Program - 1994 Summer Faculty Research Program, Final Reports, Volume 5A, Wright Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-12-01

    made out of some Aluminum alloy have a minimum thickness that has to be maintained for fabrication and structural integrity. What other material can...We should then assume a design with a base thickness made of an Aluminum alloy , and compute the cost differential in achieving a different...Properties Research Laboratory, Purdue University, Lafayette, IN. 30-17 10. Aerospace Structural Metals Handbook, Vol. I (Ferrous Alloys ), 1968, AFML-TR-68

  12. USAF Summer Research Program - 1993 Summer Research Extension Program Final Reports, Volume 2, Phillips Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-11-01

    Research Extension Program Phillips Laboratory Kirtland Air Force Base Sponsored by: Air Force Office of Scientific Research Boiling Air Force Base...Program Phillips Laboratory Sponsored by: Air Force Office of Scientific Research Bolling Air Force Base, Washington, D.C. and Arkansas Tech University...Summer Research Extension Program (SREP) Phillips

  13. Summer Student Breast Cancer Research Training Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: DAMD17-03- 1 -0338 TITLE: Summer Student Breast Cancer Research...average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and...currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1 . REPORT DATE 01-05-2006 2. REPORT TYPE Annual

  14. Summer Student Breast Cancer Research Training Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    AD( Award Number: DAMD17-03- 1 -0338 TITLE: Summer Student Breast Cancer Research Training Program PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Gary P. Zaloga, M.D...PAGE .OM No. 07Ap0o88 Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per responsb, including the time for...VA 22202-4302, and t6 the Office of Management and Budget, Paperwork Reduction Project (0704-0188), Washington, DC 20503 1 . AGENCY USE ONLY 2. REPORT

  15. Undergraduate Research Summer Fellowships Undergo Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elgren, Timothy E.

    2000-09-01

    At the 22nd Annual Council Meeting of Council on Undergraduate Research (CUR), held this past June at the College of Wooster, the general council voted to make fundamental changes to the Undergraduate Research Summer Fellowship Program. The most important change is that awards will no longer be made to individual students. Instead, awards will be made to individual faculty member on the basis of applications written by faculty members comprised of a curriculum vitae, a description of the proposed research project, and the role of undergraduate collaborators in the proposed research activities. This change brings the program more in line with the overall CUR objective to support faculty in their efforts to provide research experiences for undergraduate students. Faculty members selected for awards will be asked to designate a student recipient at the time the funds are awarded, a key change to the fellowship program.

  16. Internal fluid mechanics research on supercomputers for aerospace propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Brent A.; Anderson, Bernhard H.; Szuch, John R.

    1988-01-01

    The Internal Fluid Mechanics Division of the NASA Lewis Research Center is combining the key elements of computational fluid dynamics, aerothermodynamic experiments, and advanced computational technology to bring internal computational fluid mechanics (ICFM) to a state of practical application for aerospace propulsion systems. The strategies used to achieve this goal are to: (1) pursue an understanding of flow physics, surface heat transfer, and combustion via analysis and fundamental experiments, (2) incorporate improved understanding of these phenomena into verified 3-D CFD codes, and (3) utilize state-of-the-art computational technology to enhance experimental and CFD research. Presented is an overview of the ICFM program in high-speed propulsion, including work in inlets, turbomachinery, and chemical reacting flows. Ongoing efforts to integrate new computer technologies, such as parallel computing and artificial intelligence, into high-speed aeropropulsion research are described.

  17. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 42: An analysis of the transfer of Scientific and Technical Information (STI) in the US aerospace industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, John M.; Pinelli, Thomas E.; Hecht, Laura F.; Barclay, Rebecca O.

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. aerospace industry has a long history of federal support for research related to its needs. Since the establishment of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) in 1915, the federal government has provided continuous research support related to flight and aircraft design. This research has contributed to the international preeminence of the U.S. aerospace industry. In this paper, we present a sociological analysis of aerospace engineers and scientists and how their attitudes and behaviors impact the flow of scientific and technical information (STI). We use a constructivist framework to explain the spotty dissemination of federally funded aerospace research. Our research is aimed towards providing federal policymakers with a clearer understanding of how and when federally funded aerospace research is used. This understanding will help policymakers design improved information transfer systems that will aid the competitiveness of the U.S. aerospace industry.

  18. Summer Research Program (1992). Summer Faculty Research Program (SFRP) Reports. Volume 3. Phillips Laboratory.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-28

    Phillips Laboratory Kirtland Air Force Base NM 87117-6008 Sponsored by: Air Force Office of Scientific Research Bolling Air Force Base...Zindel, D.: 1963, Z. Astrophys. 57, 82. 29-13 FINAL REPORT SUMMER FACULTY RESEARCH PROGRAM AT PHILLIPS LABORATORY KIRTLAND AIR FORCE BASE...Program Phillips Laboratory Sponsored by: Air Force Office of Scientific

  19. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 6: Aerospace knowledge diffusion in the academic community: A report of phase 3 activities of the NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Kennedy, John M.

    1990-01-01

    Descriptive and analytical data regarding the flow of aerospace-based scientific and technical information (STI) in the academic community are presented. An overview is provided of the Federal Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project, illustrating a five-year program on aerospace knowledge diffusion. Preliminary results are presented of the project's research concerning the information-seeking habits, practices, and attitudes of U.S. aerospace engineering and science students and faculty. The type and amount of education and training in the use of information sources are examined. The use and importance ascribed to various information products by U.S. aerospace faculty and students including computer and other information technology is assessed. An evaluation of NASA technical reports is presented and it is concluded that NASA technical reports are rated high in terms of quality and comprehensiveness, citing Engineering Index and IAA as the most frequently used materials by faculty and students.

  20. The Role of Aerospace Technology in Agriculture. The 1977 Summer Faculty Fellowship Program in Engineering Systems Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Possibilities were examined for improving agricultural productivity through the application of aerospace technology. An overview of agriculture and of the problems of feeding a growing world population are presented. The present state of agriculture, of plant and animal culture, and agri-business are reviewed. Also analyzed are the various systems for remote sensing, particularly applications to agriculture. The report recommends additional research and technology in the areas of aerial application of chemicals, of remote sensing systems, of weather and climate investigations, and of air vehicle design. Also considered in detail are the social, legal, economic, and political results of intensification of technical applications to agriculture.

  1. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 49: Becoming an aerospace engineer: A cross-gender comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hecht, Laura M.; Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1995-01-01

    We conducted a mail (self-reported) survey of 4300 student members of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) during the spring of 1993 as a Phase 3 activity of the NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. The survey was designed to explore students' career goals and aspirations, communications skills training, and their use of information sources, products, and services. We received 1723 completed questionnaires for an adjusted response rate of 42%. In this article, we compare the responses of female and male aerospace engineering students in the context of two general aspects of their educational experience. First, we explore the extent to which women and men differ in regard to factors that lead to the choice to study aerospace engineering, their current level of satisfaction with that choice, and their career-related goals and aspirations. Second, we examine students' responses to questions about communications skills training and the helpfulness of that training, and their use of and the importance to them of selected information sources, products, and services. The cross-gender comparison revealed more similarities than differences. Female students appear to be more satisfied than their male counterparts with the decision to major in aerospace engineering. Both female and male student respondents consider communications skills important for professional success, but females place a higher value than males do on oral communications skills. Women students also place a higher value than men do on the roles of other students and faculty members in satisfying their needs for information.

  2. NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report Number 14. Engineering Work and Information Use in Aerospace: Results of a Telephone Survey

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-10-01

    Kennedy; and Rebecca 0. Barclay. "The NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project." Government Information Quarterly 8.2 (1991): 219-233...Rebecca 0. Barclay. The NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Reprinted from Government Information Quarterly , Volume 8, "’). 2

  3. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 11: The Voice of the User: How US Aerospace Engineers and Scientists View DoD Technical Reports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Kennedy, John M.

    1991-01-01

    The project examines how the results of NASA/DOD research diffuse into the aerospace R&D process, and empirically analyzes the implications of the aerospace knowledge diffusion process. Specific issues considered are the roles played by government technical reports, the recognition of the value of scientific and technical information (STI), and the optimization of the STI aerospace transfer system. Information-seeking habits are assessed for the U.S. aerospace community, the general community, the academic sector, and the international community. U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists use 65 percent of working time to communicate STI, and prefer 'internal' STI over 'external' STI. The isolation from 'external' information is found to be detrimental to U.S. aerospace R&D in general.

  4. The NASA/DOD aerospace knowledge diffusion research project: A research agenda

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Kennedy, John M.

    1990-01-01

    The project has both immediate and long term purposes. In the first instance it provides a practical and pragmatic basis for understanding how the results of NASA/DoD research diffuse into the aerospace R and D process. Over the long term it provides an empirical basis for understanding the aerospace knowledge diffusion process itself, and its implications at the individual, organizational, national, and international levels. The project is studying the major barriers to effective knowledge diffusion. This project will provide descriptive and analytical data regarding the flow of scientific and technical information (STI). It will examine both channels used to communicate information and the social system of the aerospace knowledge diffusion process.

  5. Advanced Virtual Reality Simulations in Aerospace Education and Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plotnikova, L.; Trivailo, P.

    2002-01-01

    Recent research developments at Aerospace Engineering, RMIT University have demonstrated great potential for using Virtual Reality simulations as a very effective tool in advanced structures and dynamics applications. They have also been extremely successful in teaching of various undergraduate and postgraduate courses for presenting complex concepts in structural and dynamics designs. Characteristic examples are related to the classical orbital mechanics, spacecraft attitude and structural dynamics. Advanced simulations, reflecting current research by the authors, are mainly related to the implementation of various non-linear dynamic techniques, including using Kane's equations to study dynamics of space tethered satellite systems and the Co-rotational Finite Element method to study reconfigurable robotic systems undergoing large rotations and large translations. The current article will describe the numerical implementation of the modern methods of dynamics, and will concentrate on the post-processing stage of the dynamic simulations. Numerous examples of building Virtual Reality stand-alone animations, designed by the authors, will be discussed in detail. These virtual reality examples will include: The striking feature of the developed technology is the use of the standard mathematical packages, like MATLAB, as a post-processing tool to generate Virtual Reality Modelling Language files with brilliant interactive, graphics and audio effects. These stand-alone demonstration files can be run under Netscape or Microsoft Explorer and do not require MATLAB. Use of this technology enables scientists to easily share their results with colleagues using the Internet, contributing to the flexible learning development at schools and Universities.

  6. My Rewarding Summer Research Experience at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aviles, Andres

    2007-01-01

    My summer research experience at the Kennedy Space Center has been a truly rewarding one. As an electrical engineering student at the University of South Florida, I was blessed with a beneficial opportunity to gain valuable knowledge in my career, and also apply it through working at NASA. One of my inspirations in becoming an engineer is to work at NASA someday, and I was very excited and honored to have this opportunity. My goal in this internship was to strengthen my preparation in becoming an engineer by learning new material, acquiring skills by practicing what I learned, and discovering the expectations of engineering work at NASA. Through this summer research, I was able to learn new computer programs and perform various tasks that gave me experience and skills as an engineer. My primary job was to conduct work on the Constellation Test article, which is a simulation model of the Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV) tanking system. This is a prototype of a launch facility and an Ares I Vehicle, which God willing will transport astronauts to the moon. Construction of the CLV is in progress and a test launch is anticipated for 2010. Moreover, the Test Article serves as a demonstration too, training test bed, and may be expanded for new simulation of launch system elements, which could be applied to real life operations. The test article is operated and run by a Programmable Logic Controller (PLC), which is a digital computer that is used to control all forms of machinery such as those in manufacturing buildings and other industries. PLCs are different than other computers because of the physical protection they have against damaging environmental conditions that would destroy other computers. Also, PLCs are equipped with lots of input and output connections that allow extensive amounts of commands to be executed, which would normally require many computers to do. Therefore, PLCs are small, rugged, and extremely powerful tools that may continue to be employed at NASA

  7. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report 35: The use of computer networks in aerospace engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Ann P.; Pinelli, Thomas E.

    1995-01-01

    This research used survey research to explore and describe the use of computer networks by aerospace engineers. The study population included 2000 randomly selected U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists who subscribed to Aerospace Engineering. A total of 950 usable questionnaires were received by the cutoff date of July 1994. Study results contribute to existing knowledge about both computer network use and the nature of engineering work and communication. We found that 74 percent of mail survey respondents personally used computer networks. Electronic mail, file transfer, and remote login were the most widely used applications. Networks were used less often than face-to-face interactions in performing work tasks, but about equally with reading and telephone conversations, and more often than mail or fax. Network use was associated with a range of technical, organizational, and personal factors: lack of compatibility across systems, cost, inadequate access and training, and unwillingness to embrace new technologies and modes of work appear to discourage network use. The greatest positive impacts from networking appear to be increases in the amount of accurate and timely information available, better exchange of ideas across organizational boundaries, and enhanced work flexibility, efficiency, and quality. Involvement with classified or proprietary data and type of organizational structure did not distinguish network users from nonusers. The findings can be used by people involved in the design and implementation of networks in engineering communities to inform the development of more effective networking systems, services, and policies.

  8. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. A Comparison of the Technical Communication Practices of Aerospace Engineers and Scientists in India and the United States

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-01

    34The NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project." Government Information Quarterly 8:2 (1991): 219-233. 35 APPENDIX A AEROSPACE KNOWLEDGE... Government Information Quarterly , Volume 8, No. 2 (1991): 219-233. (Available from AIAA 91A35455.) 1 1 Pinelli, Thomas E. and John M. Kennedy. The

  9. Summer Undergraduate Fellowships in Breast Cancer Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-01

    NE) F No E.P. Hasty 2003 Wickley, Aaron BYU-Hawaii (HI) M Yes H. Rao 2003 Wilson, Brian UT-Austin (TX) M No A. Tomkinson 2003 Yanez , Maria UT-Pan Am...AbileneChristianU. (TX) M No S.E. Lee 2004 Kim, Pamela Vassar College (NY) F No M. Gaczynska 2004 Martinez , Sonia Texas Lutheran U (TX) F Yes B. Chatterjee...Pamela Student participant Summer 2004 Martinez , Sonia Student particpant Summer 2004 McDonald, Samuel Student participant Summer 2006 Moshfeghian

  10. Summer High School Apprenticeship Research Program (SHARP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The summer of 1997 will not only be noted by NASA for the mission to Mars by the Pathfinder but also for the 179 brilliant apprentices that participated in the SHARP Program. Apprentice participation increased 17% over last year's total of 153 participants. As indicated by the End-of-the-Program Evaluations, 96% of the programs' participants rated the summer experience from very good to excellent. The SHARP Management Team began the year by meeting in Cocoa Beach, Florida for the annual SHARP Planning Conference. Participants strengthened their Education Division Computer Aided Tracking System (EDCATS) skills, toured the world-renowned Kennedy Space Center, and took a journey into space during the Alien Encounter Exercise. The participants returned to their Centers with the same goals and objectives in mind. The 1997 SHARP Program goals were: (1) Utilize NASA's mission, unique facilities and specialized workforce to provide exposure, education, and enrichment experiences to expand participants' career horizons and inspire excellence in formal education and lifelong learning. (2) Develop and implement innovative education reform initiatives which support NASA's Education Strategic Plan and national education goals. (3) Utilize established statistical indicators to measure the effectiveness of SHARP's program goals. (4) Explore new recruiting methods which target the student population for which SHARP was specifically designed. (5) Increase the number of participants in the program. All of the SHARP Coordinators reported that the goals and objectives for the overall program as well as their individual program goals were achieved. Some of the goals and objectives for the Centers were: (1) To increase the students' awareness of science, mathematics, engineering, and computer technology; (2) To provide students with the opportunity to broaden their career objectives; and (3) To expose students to a variety of enrichment activities. Most of the Center goals and

  11. An Overview of Aerospace Propulsion Research at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, D. R.

    2007-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research center is the recognized leader in aerospace propulsion research, advanced technology development and revolutionary system concepts committed to meeting the increasing demand for low noise, low emission, high performance, and light weight propulsion systems for affordable and safe aviation and space transportation needs. The technologies span a broad range of areas including air breathing, as well as rocket propulsion systems, for commercial and military aerospace applications and for space launch, as well as in-space propulsion applications. The scope of work includes fundamentals, components, processes, and system interactions. Technologies developed use both experimental and analytical approaches. The presentation provides an overview of the current research and technology development activities at NASA Glenn Research Center .

  12. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report 31: The technical communications practices of US aerospace engineers and scientists: Results of the phase 1 SME mail survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. government technical report is a primary means by which the results of federally funded research and development (R&D) are transferred to the U.S. aerospace industry. However, little is known about this information product in terms of its actual use, importance, and value in the transfer of federally funded R&D. To help establish a body of knowledge, the U.S. government technical report is being investigated as part of the NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. In this report, we summarize the literature on technical reports and provide a model that depicts the transfer of federally funded aerospace R&D via the U.S. government technical report. We present results from our investigation of aerospace knowledge diffusion vis-a-vis the U.S. government technical communications practices of U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists affiliated with, not necessarily belonging to, the Society of Manufacturing Engineers (SME).

  13. The 1982 NASA/ASEE summer faculty fellowship research program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Aht NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Research Program conducted at the Marshall Space Flight Center by the University of Alabama at Huntsville, Ala. during the summer of 1982 is described. Abstracts of the Final Reports submitted by the Fellows detailing the results of their research are also presented.

  14. SEPEC conference proceedings: Hypermedia and Information Reconstruction. Aerospace applications and research directions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Papers presented at the conference on hypermedia and information reconstruction are compiled. The following subject areas are covered: real-world hypermedia projects, aerospace applications, and future directions in hypermedia research and development.

  15. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 33: Technical communications practices and the use of information technologies as reported by Dutch and US aerospace engineers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barclay, Rebecca O.; Pinelli, Thomas E.; Tan, Axel S. T.; Kennedy, John M.

    1993-01-01

    As part of Phase 4 of the NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project, two studies were conducted that investigated the technical communications practices of Dutch and U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to aerospace engineers and scientists at the National Aerospace Laboratory (The Netherlands), and NASA ARC (U.S.), and NASA LaRC (U.S.). This paper presents responses of the Dutch and U.S. participants to selected questions concerning four of the seven project objectives: determining the importance of technical communications to aerospace engineering professionals, investigating the production of technical communications, examining the use and importance of computer and information technology, and exploring the use of electronic networks.

  16. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 14: An analysis of the technical communications practices reported by Israeli and US aerospace engineers and scientists

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barclay, Rebecca O.; Pinelli, Thomas E.; Elazar, David; Kennedy, John M.

    1991-01-01

    As part of Phase 4 of the NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project, two pilot studies were conducted that investigated the technical communications practices of Israeli and U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists. Both studies had the same five objectives: first, to solicit the opinions of aerospace engineers and scientists regarding the importance of technical communications to their profession; second, to determine the use and production of technical communications by aerospace engineers and scientists; third, to seek their view about the appropriate content of an undergraduate course in technical communications; fourth, to determine aerospace engineers' and scientists' use of libraries, technical information centers, and on-line databases; and fifth, to determine the use and importance of computer and information technology to them. A self-administered questionnaire was mailed to randomly selected U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists who are working in cryogenics, adaptive walls, and magnetic suspension. A slightly modified version was sent to Israeli aerospace engineers and scientists working at Israel Aircraft Industries, LTD. Responses of the Israeli and U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists to selected questions are presented in this paper.

  17. Bioengineering and Bioinformatics Summer Institutes: Meeting Modern Challenges in Undergraduate Summer Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Peter J.; Dong, Cheng; Snyder, Alan J.; Jones, A. Daniel; Sheets, Erin D.

    2008-01-01

    Summer undergraduate research programs in science and engineering facilitate research progress for faculty and provide a close-ended research experience for students, which can prepare them for careers in industry, medicine, and academia. However, ensuring these outcomes is a challenge when the students arrive ill-prepared for substantive research…

  18. Solid Modeling Aerospace Research Tool (SMART) user's guide, version 2.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmillin, Mark L.; Spangler, Jan L.; Dahmen, Stephen M.; Rehder, John J.

    1993-01-01

    The Solid Modeling Aerospace Research Tool (SMART) software package is used in the conceptual design of aerospace vehicles. It provides a highly interactive and dynamic capability for generating geometries with Bezier cubic patches. Features include automatic generation of commonly used aerospace constructs (e.g., wings and multilobed tanks); cross-section skinning; wireframe and shaded presentation; area, volume, inertia, and center-of-gravity calculations; and interfaces to various aerodynamic and structural analysis programs. A comprehensive description of SMART and how to use it is provided.

  19. USAF Summer Research Program - 1993 Graduate Student Research Program Final Reports, Volume 8, Phillips Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-12-01

    Research Program Phillips Laboratory Kirtland Air Force Base Albuquerque, New Mexico Sponsored by: Air ...Summer Research Program Phillips Laboratory Sponsored by. Air Force Office of Scientific Research Kirtland Air Force Base, Albuquerque, New Mexico...UNITED STATES AIR FORCE SUMMER RESEARCH PROGRAM -- 1993 SUMMER RESEARCH PROGRAM FINAL REPORTS VOLUME 8

  20. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report 17: A comparison of the technical communication practices of Dutch and US aerospace engineers and scientists

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barclay, Rebecca O.; Pinelli, Thomas E.; Kennedy, John M.

    1993-01-01

    As part of Phase 4 of the NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project, two studies were conducted that investigated the technical communications practices of Dutch and U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists. Both studies have the same seven objectives: first, to solicit the opinions of aerospace engineers and scientists regarding the importance of technical communications to their profession; second, to determine the use and production of technical communications by aerospace engineers and scientists; third, to seek their views about the appropriate content of an undergraduate course in technical communications; fourth, to determine aerospace engineers' and scientists' use of libraries, technical information centers, and on-line data bases; fifth, to determine the use and importance of computer and information technology to them; sixth, to determine their use of electronic networks; and seventh, to determine their use of foreign and domestically produced technical reports. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to aerospace engineers and scientists at the National Aerospace Laboratory (NLR), and NASA Ames Research Center, and the NASA Langley Research Center. The completion rates for the Dutch and U.S. surveys were 55 and 61 percent, respectively. Responses of the Dutch and U.S. participants to selected questions are presented.

  1. [NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 4:] Technical communications in aerospace: An analysis of the practices reported by US and European aerospace engineers and scientists

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.; Glassman, Myron

    1990-01-01

    Results are reported from pilot surveys on the use of scientific and technical information (STI) by U.S. and NATO-nation aerospace scientists and engineers, undertaken as part of the NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. The survey procedures and the demographic characteristics of the 67 scientists and engineers who responded to the survey are summarized, and the results are presented in a series of tables and discussed in detail. Findings emphasized include: (1) both U.S. and NATO respondents spend around 60 percent of their work week producing or using STI products; (2) NATO respondents are more likely than their U.S. counterparts to use 'formal' STI products (like technical reports and papers) and the services of librarians and online data bases; (3) most of the respondents use computers and information technology in preparing STI products; and (4) respondents who had taken courses in technical communication agreed on the value and ideal subject matter of such courses.

  2. TRANSFERABILITY OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT SKILLS IN THE AEROSPACE INDUSTRY.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    industry scientists and engineers . Studies performed by four aerospace contractors for the State of California are used as case examples of the...transferability of industry scientists and engineers , the four California studies are inconclusive; (2) the largest group of scientists and engineers in the... industry , those engaged in design and development , may well be the least transferable; and (3) civilian-public projects are unlikely to become in the next 5 years or so a significant part of the industry’s

  3. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 66: Emerging Trends in the Globalization of Knowledge: The Role of the Technical Report in Aerospace Research and Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli,Thomas E.; Golich, Vicki L.

    1997-01-01

    Economists, management theorists, business strategists, and governments alike recognize knowledge as the single most important resource in today's global economy. Because of its relationship to technological progress and economic growth, many governments have taken a keen interest in knowledge; specifically its production, transfer, and use. This paper focuses on the technical report as a product for disseminating the results of aerospace research and development (R&D) and its use and importance to aerospace engineers and scientists. The emergence of knowledge as an intellectual asset, its relationship to innovation, and its importance in a global economy provides the context for the paper. The relationships between government and knowledge and government and innovation are used to place knowledge within the context of publicly-funded R&D. Data, including the reader preferences of NASA technical reports, are derived from the NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project, a ten-year study of knowledge diffusion in the U.S. aerospace industry.

  4. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report number 21: US aerospace industry librarians and technical information specialists as information intermediaries: Results of the phase 2 survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. government technical report is a primary means by which the results of federally funded research and development (R&D) are transferred to the U.S. aerospace industry. However, little is known about this information product in terms of its actual use, importance, and value in the transfer of federally funded R&D. To help establish a body of knowledge, the U.S. government technical report is being investigated as part of the NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. In this report, we summarize the literature on technical reports and provide a model that depicts the transfer of federally funded aerospace R&D via the U.S. government technical report. We present results from our investigation of aerospace knowledge diffusion vis-a-vis the U.S. government technical report, and present the results of research that investigated aerospace knowledge diffusion vis-a-vis U.S. aerospace industry librarians and technical information specialists as information intermediaries.

  5. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report 24: The technical communications practices of US aerospace engineers and scientists: Results of the phase 1 SAE mail survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. government technical report is a primary means by which the results of federally funded research and development (R&D) are transferred to the U.S. aerospace industry. However, little is known about this information product in terms of its actual use, importance, and value in the transfer of federally funded R&D. To help establish a body of knowledge, the U.S. government technical report is being investigated as part of the NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. In this report, we summarize the literature on technical reports and provide a model that depicts the transfer of federally funded aerospace R&D via the U.S. government technical report. We present results from our investigation of aerospace knowledge diffusion vis-a-vis the U.S. government technical report, and present the results of research that investigated aerospace knowledge diffusion vis-a-vis the technical communications practices of U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists affiliated with the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE).

  6. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report 34: How early career-stage US aerospace engineers and scientists produce and use information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. government technical report is a primary means by which the results of federally funded research and development (R&D) are transferred to the U.S. aerospace industry. However, little is known about this information product in terms of its actual use, importance, and value in the transfer of federally funded R&D. To help establish a body of knowledge, the U.S. government technical report is being investigated as part of the NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. In this report, we summarize the literature on technical reports and provide a model that depicts the transfer of federally funded aerospace R&D via the U.S. government technical report. We present results from our investigation of aerospace knowledge diffusion vis-a-vis the U.S. government technical report, and present the results of research that investigated aerospace knowledge diffusion vis-a-vis the production and use of information by U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists who had changed their American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) membership from student to professional in the past five years.

  7. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report 23: The communications practices of US aerospace engineering faculty and students: Results of the phase 3 survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. government technical report is a primary means by which the results of federally funded research and development (R&D) are transferred to the U.S. aerospace industry. However, little is known about this information product in terms of its actual use, importance, and value in the transfer of federally funded R&D. To help establish a body of knowledge, the U.S. government technical report is being investigated as part of the NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. In this report, we summarize the literature on technical reports and provide a model that depicts the transfer of federally funded aerospace R&D via the U.S. government technical report. We present results from our investigation of aerospace knowledge diffusion vis-a-vis the U.S. government technical report, and present the results of research that investigated aerospace knowledge diffusion vis-a-vis U.S. aerospace engineering faculty and students.

  8. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 28: The technical communication practices of Russian and US aerospace engineers and scientists

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Keene, Michael L.; Flammia, Madelyn; Kennedy, John M.

    1993-01-01

    As part of Phase 4 of the NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project, two studies were conducted that investigated the technical communication practices of Russian and U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists. Both studies had the same five objectives: first, to solicit the opinions of aerospace engineers and scientists regarding the importance of technical communication to their professions; second, to determine the use and production of technical communication by aerospace engineers and scientists; third, to seek their views about the appropriate content of the undergraduate course in technical communication; fourth, to determine aerospace engineers' and scientists' use of libraries, technical information centers, and on-line databases; and fifth, to determine the use and importance of computer and information technology to them. A self administered questionnaire was distributed to Russian aerospace engineers and scientists at the Central Aero-Hydrodynamic Institute (TsAGI) and to their U.S. counterparts at the NASA Ames Research Center and the NASA Langley Research Center. The completion rates for the Russian and U.S. surveys were 64 and 61 percent, respectively. Responses of the Russian and U.S. participants to selected questions are presented in this paper.

  9. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report 33: The technical communications practices of US aerospace engineers and scientists: Results of the phase 1 AIAA mail survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. government technical report is a primary means by which the results of federally funded research and development (R&D) are transferred to the U.S. aerospace industry. However, little is known about this information product in terms of its actual use, importance, and value in the transfer of federally funded R&D. To help establish a body of knowledge, the U.S. government technical report is being investigated as part of the NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. In this report, we summarize the literature on technical reports and provide a model that depicts the transfer of federally funded aerospace R&D via the U.S. government technical report. We present results from our investigation of aerospace knowledge diffusion vis-a-vis the U.S. government technical report, and present the results of research that investigated aerospace knowledge diffusion vis-a-vis the technical communications practices of U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists who are members of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA).

  10. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report 29: A comparison of the technical communications practices of Japanese and US aerospace engineers and scientists

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1994-01-01

    As part of Phase 4 of the NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project, two studies were conducted that investigated the technical communications practices of Japanese and U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists. Both studies have the same seven objectives: first, to solicit the opinions of aerospace engineers and scientists regarding the importance of technical communications to their profession; second, to determine the use and production of technical communications by aerospace engineers and scientists; third; to seek their views about the appropriate content of an undergraduate course in technical communications; fourth, to determine aerospace engineers' and scientists' use of libraries, technical information centers, and on-line data bases; fifth, to determine the use and importance of computer and information technology to them; sixth, to determine their use of electronic networks; and seventh, to determine their use of foreign and domestically produced technical reports. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to aerospace engineers and scientists in Japan and at the NASA Ames Research Center and the NASA Langley Research Center. The completion rates for the Japanese and U.S. surveys were 85 and 61 percent, respectively. Responses of the Japanese and U.S. participants to selected questions are presented in this report.

  11. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 39: The role of computer networks in aerospace engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Ann P.; Pinelli, Thomas E.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents selected results from an empirical investigation into the use of computer networks in aerospace engineering. Such networks allow aerospace engineers to communicate with people and access remote resources through electronic mail, file transfer, and remote log-in. The study drew its subjects from private sector, government and academic organizations in the U.S. aerospace industry. Data presented here were gathered in a mail survey, conducted in Spring 1993, that was distributed to aerospace engineers performing a wide variety of jobs. Results from the mail survey provide a snapshot of the current use of computer networks in the aerospace industry, suggest factors associated with the use of networks, and identify perceived impacts of networks on aerospace engineering work and communication.

  12. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report 18: A comparison of the technical communication practices of aerospace engineers and scientists in India and the United States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1993-01-01

    As part of Phase 4 of the NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project, two studies were conducted that investigated the technical communications practices of India and U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists. Both studies have the same seven objectives: first, to solicit the opinions of aerospace engineers and scientists regarding the importance of technical communications to their profession; second, to determine the use and production of technical communications by aerospace engineers and scientists; third, to seek their views about the appropriate content of an undergraduate course in technical communications; fourth, to determine aerospace engineers' and scientists' use of libraries, technical information centers, and on-line data bases; fifth, to determine the use and importance of computer and information technology to them; sixth, to determine their use of electronic networks; and seventh, to determine their use of foreign and domestically produced technical reports. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to aerospace engineers and scientists at the Indian Institute of Science and the NASA Langley Research Center. The completion rates for the India and U.S. surveys were 48 and 53 percent, respectively. Responses of the India and U.S. participants to selected questions are presented in this report.

  13. NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 29: The US government technical report and the transfer of federally funded aerospace R and D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1993-01-01

    This article discusses the U.S. government technical report and the transfer of federally funded aerospace research and development in a conceptual framework of the federal government as a producer of scientific and technical information. The article summarizes current literature and research and discusses U.S. government technical report use and the importance of using data obtained from the NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. The authors make a case for changing existing U.S. technology policy and present a research agenda for the U.S. government technical report.

  14. Research and development of optical measurement techniques for aerospace propulsion research: A NASA Lewis Research Center perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesco, Daniel J.

    1991-01-01

    The applied research effort required to develop new nonintrusive measurement techniques capable of obtaining the data required by aerospace propulsion researchers and of operating in the harsh environments encountered in research and test facilities is discussed and illustrated through several ongoing projects at NASA's Lewis Research Center. Factors including length of development time, funding levels, and collaborative support from fluid-thermal researchers are cited. Progress in developing new instrumentation via a multi-path approach, including NASA research, grant, and government-sponsored research through mechanisms like the Small Business Innovative Research program, is also described.

  15. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report 45; The Technical Communications Practices of US Aerospace Engineers and Scientists: Results of the Phase 3 US Aerospace Engineering Educators Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1996-01-01

    The U.S. government technical report is a primary means by which the results of federally funded research and development (R&D) are transferred to the U.S. aerospace industry. However, little is known about this information product in terms of its actual use, importance, and value in the transfer of federally funded R&D. Little is also known about the intermediary-based system that is used to transfer the results of federally funded R&D to the U.S. aerospace industry. To help establish a body of knowledge, the U.S. government technical report is being investigated as part of the NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. In this report, we summarize the literature on technical reports, present a model that depicts the transfer of federally funded aerospace R&D via the U.S. government technical report, and present the results of research that investigated aerospace knowledge diffusion vis-a-vis the technical communication practices of U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists who were members of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) and identified themselves as educators.

  16. An Evaluation of a Course That Introduces Undergraduate Students to Authentic Aerospace Engineering Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mena, Irene B.; Schmitz, Sven; McLaughlin, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation and assessment of an aerospace engineering course in which undergraduate students worked on research projects with graduate research mentors. The course was created using the principles from cooperative learning and project-based learning, and consisted of students working in small groups on a complex,…

  17. Current research activities at the NASA-sponsored Illinois Computing Laboratory of Aerospace Systems and Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Kathryn A.

    1994-01-01

    The Illinois Computing Laboratory of Aerospace Systems and Software (ICLASS) was established to: (1) pursue research in the areas of aerospace computing systems, software and applications of critical importance to NASA, and (2) to develop and maintain close contacts between researchers at ICLASS and at various NASA centers to stimulate interaction and cooperation, and facilitate technology transfer. Current ICLASS activities are in the areas of parallel architectures and algorithms, reliable and fault tolerant computing, real time systems, distributed systems, software engineering and artificial intelligence.

  18. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 55: Career goals and educational preparation of aerospace engineering and science students: An international perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Kennedy, John M.; Barclay, Rebecca O.

    1995-01-01

    Results are presented of a survey of aerospace engineering and science students conducted in India, Japan, Russia, the United Kingdom, and the United States. The similarities and differences among aerospace engineering and science students from the five countries are examined in the context of two general aspects of educational experience. First, the extent to which students differ regarding the factors that led to the choice of a career in aerospace, their current levels of satisfaction with that choice, and career-related goals and objectives is considered. Second, the importance of certain communications/information-use skills for professional use is examined, as well as the frequency of use and importance of specific information sources and products to meet students' educational needs. Overall, the students who participated in this research remain relatively happy with the choice of a career in aerospace engineering, despite pessimism in some quarters about the future of the industry. Regardless of national identity, aerospace engineering and science students appear to share a similar vision of the profession in terms of their career goals and aspirations. The data also indicate that aerospace engineering and science students are well aware of the importance of communications/information-use skills to professional success and that competency in these skills will help them to be productive members of their profession. Collectively, all of the students appear to use and value similar information sources and products, although some differences appear by country.

  19. 77 FR 38840 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR) Summer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-29

    ... Nursing Research (NINR) Summer Genetics Institute Alumni Survey SUMMARY: In compliance with the... Nursing Research (NINR) Summer Genetics Institute Alumni Survey. Type of Information Collection Request: NEW. Need and Use of Information Collection: The NINR Summer Genetics Institute Alumni Survey...

  20. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 35: The US government technical report and aerospace knowledge diffusion: Results of an on-going investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Khan, A. Rahman; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1993-01-01

    The U.S. government technical report is a primary means by which the results of federally funded research and development (R&D) are transferred to the U.S. aerospace industry. However, little is known about this information product in terms of its actual use, importance, and value in the transfer of federally funded (U.S.) R&D. To help establish a body of knowledge, the U.S. government technical report is being investigated as part of the NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. In this paper, we summarize the literature on technical reports and provide a model that depicts the transfer of federally funded aerospace R&D via the U.S. government technical report. We present results from two surveys (one of five studies) of our investigation of aerospace knowledge diffusion vis-a-vis the U.S. government technical report and close with a brief overview of on-going research into the use of the U.S. government technical report as a rhetorical device for transferring federally funded aerospace R&D.

  1. HAARP 2011 Summer Student Research Campaign

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-16

    1010 5e. TASK NUMBER PPM00004080 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER EF004032 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) NorthWest Research Associates...Inc. 4118 148th Ave NE Redmond, WA 98052 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER NWRA-12-RS478 9. SPONSORING / MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S...activities in a later section. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. 2 The second biennial SSRC was planned and organized for the

  2. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 47: The value of computer networks in aerospace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Ann Peterson; Pinelli, Thomas E.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents data on the value of computer networks that were obtained from a national survey of 2000 aerospace engineers that was conducted in 1993. Survey respondents reported the extent to which they used computer networks in their work and communication and offered their assessments of the value of various network types and applications. They also provided information about the positive impacts of networks on their work, which presents another perspective on value. Finally, aerospace engineers' recommendations on network implementation present suggestions for increasing the value of computer networks within aerospace organizations.

  3. The NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging (NEPP) Program - Presentation to Korean Aerospace Research Institute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.; Sampson, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    This presentation will provide basic information about NASA's Electronic Parts and Packaging Program (NEPP), for sharing with representatives of the South Korean Aerospace Research Institute (KARI) as part of a larger presentation by Headquarters Office of Safety and Mission Assurance. The NEPP information includes mission and goals, history of the program, basic focus areas, strategies, deliverables and some examples of current tasks.

  4. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 45: A comparison of the information-seeking behaviors of three groups of US aerospace engineers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, John M.; Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.

    1995-01-01

    To understand the transfer of scientific and technical information (STI) in aerospace, it is necessary to understand the characteristics and behaviors of those who create and use STI. In this paper, we analyze the similarities and differences in the scientific and technical information-seeking behaviors of three groups of US aerospace engineers and scientists. We describe some of their demographic characteristics and their duties and responsibilities as a method of understanding their STI use patterns. There is considerable diversity among aerospace engineers in their use of STI. In general, engineers engaged in research use more STI than those who are in design/development and manufacturing/production. Research engineers also use different standards to determine the STI sources and products that they will use.

  5. USAF Summer Research Program - 1994 Graduate Student Research Program Final Reports, Volume 8, Phillips Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-12-01

    Research Group at the Phillips Laboratory at Kirtland Air Force Base...for Summer Graduate Student Research Program Phillips Laboratory Sponsored by: Air Force Office of Scientific Research Boiling Air Force Base, DC...2390 S. York Street Denver, CO 80208-0177 Final Report for: Summer Faculty Research Program Phillips Laboratory Sponsored by: Air Force

  6. Summer Research Institute Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Barlow, Stephan E.

    2004-10-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) hosted its first annual Summer Research Institute in Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics from May through September 2004. During this period, fourteen PNNL scientists hosted sixteen young scientists from eleven different universities. Of the sixteen participants, fourteen were graduate students; one was transitioning to graduate school; and one was a university faculty member.

  7. NASA Ames Summer High School Apprenticeship Research Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, P.

    1985-01-01

    The Summer High School Apprenticeship Research Program (SHARP) is described. This program is designed to provide engineering experience for gifted female and minority high school students. The students from this work study program which features trips, lectures, written reports, and job experience describe their individual work with their mentors.

  8. Research reports: 1985 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, G. R. (Editor); Osborn, T. L. (Editor); Dozier, J. B. (Editor); Freeman, L. M. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    A compilation of 40 technical reports on research conducted by participants in the 1985 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is given. Weibull density functions, reliability analysis, directional solidification, space stations, jet stream, fracture mechanics, composite materials, orbital maneuvering vehicles, stellar winds and gamma ray bursts are among the topics discussed.

  9. NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program: 1988 research reports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Loren A. (Editor); Armstrong, Dennis W. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    This contractor's report contains all sixteen final reports prepared by the participants in the 1988 Summer Faculty Fellowship Program. Reports describe research projects on a number of topics including controlled environments, robotics, cryogenic propellant storage, polymers, hydroponic culture, adaptive servocontrol, and computer aided design

  10. A Summer Academic Research Experience for Disadvantaged Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kabacoff, Cathryn; Srivastava, Vasudha; Robinson, Douglas N.

    2013-01-01

    Internships are an effective way of connecting high school students in a meaningful manner to the sciences. Disadvantaged minorities have fewer opportunities to participate in internships, and are underrepresented in both science, technology, engineering, and mathematics majors and careers. We have developed a Summer Academic Research Experience…

  11. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 20: Engineers as information processors: A survey of US aerospace engineering faculty and students

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, Maurita Peterson; Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1991-01-01

    U.S. aerospace engineering faculty and students were surveyed as part of the NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Research Project. Faculty and students were viewed as information processors within a conceptual framework of information seeking behavior. Questionnaires were received from 275 faculty members and 640 students, which were used to determine: (1) use and importance of information sources; (2) use of specific print sources and electronic data bases; (3) use of information technology; and (4) the influence of instruction on the use of information sources and the products of faculty and students. Little evidence was found to support the belief that instruction in library or engineering information use has significant impact either on broadening the frequency or range of information products and sources used by U.S. aerospace engineering students.

  12. NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report Number 21. U.S. Aerospace Industry Librarians and Technical Information Specialists as Information Intermediaries: Results of the Phase 2 Survey

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-02-01

    Merill. D. W. Stevenson 1976 McClure, C. R. "The Federal Technical Report Literature: Research Needs and 1988 Issues." Government Information Quarterly . 5... Information Quarterly 8(2): 219-233. R. 0. Barclay 1991 Pinelli, T. E., "Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research." World Aerospace J. M. Kennedy, Technology 󈨟...Sciences; AKA the SATCOM 1969 Report. Pinelli, T. E., "The NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research J. M. Kennedy, and Project." Government

  13. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 5: Aerospace librarians and technical information specialists as information intermediaries: A report of phase 2 activities of the NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Kennedy, John M.

    1990-01-01

    The flow of U.S. government-funded and foreign scientific and technical information (STI) through libraries and related facilities to users in government and industry is examined, summarizing preliminary results of Phase 2 of the NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project (NAKDRP). The design and objectives of NAKDRP are reviewed; the NAKDRP model of STI transfer among producers, STI intermediaries, surrogates (technical report repositories or clearinghouses), and users is explained and illustrated with diagrams; and particular attention is given to the organization and operation of aerospace libraries. In a survey of North American libraries it was found that 25-30 percent of libraries regularly receive technical reports from ESA and the UK; the corresponding figures for Germany and for France, Sweden, and Japan are 18 and 5 percent, respectively. Also included is a series of bar graphs showing the librarians' assessments of the quality and use of NASA Technical Reports.

  14. Research Reports: 1986 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, L. Michael (Editor); Speer, Fridtjof A. (Editor); Cothran, Ernestine K. (Editor); Karr, Gerald R. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    For the 22th consecutive year, a NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted for the summer of 1986 by the University of Alabama and Marshall Space Flight Center. The basic objectives of the program are: (1)to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2)to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3)to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of the participants' institution; and (4)to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center. The Faculty Fellows spent ten weeks at MSFC engaged in a research project compatible with their interest and background and worked in collaboration with a NASA/MSFC colleague. This is a compilation of Fellows' reports on their research.

  15. Research Reports: 1984 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, L. M. (Editor); Osborn, T. L. (Editor); Dozier, J. B. (Editor); Karr, G. R. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    A NASA/ASEE Summer Faulty Fellowship Program was conducted at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The basic objectives of the programs are: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of the participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Centers. The Faculty Fellows spent ten weeks at MSFC engaged in a research project compatible with their interests and background and worked in collaboration with a NASA/MSFC colleague. This document is a compilation of Fellows' reports on their research during the summer of 1984. Topics covered include: (1) data base management; (2) computational fluid dynamics; (3) space debris; (4) X-ray gratings; (5) atomic oxygen exposure; (6) protective coatings for SSME; (7) cryogenics; (8) thermal analysis measurements; (9) solar wind modelling; and (10) binary systems.

  16. Research reports: 1994 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, L. Michael (Editor); Chappell, Charles R. (Editor); Six, Frank (Editor); Karr, Gerald R. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    For the 30th consecutive year, a NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The basic objectives of the programs, which are in the 31st year of operation nationally, are (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA centers. The Faculty Fellows spent 10 weeks at MSFC engaged in a research project compatible with their interests and background and worked in collaboration with a NASA/MSFC colleague. This document is a compilation of Fellows' reports on their research during the summer of 1994.

  17. Guides to Aerospace Research and Development in NATO Countries.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    Documentation Scientifique analysis centers, research coordinating offices in agriculture, art, business, education , et Technique, Brussels (Belgium). (In...Direty. Martin. J. (ed.). American Association of Small The guide indudes information on pure and applied siences , engineering, medicine, Research...Constitution, the Armed Forces, educational institutions, under which research units operate. The Institutional Index directs the user to a libraries

  18. Research reports: 1987 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, Gerald R. (Editor); Cothran, Ernestine K. (Editor); Freeman, L. Michael (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    For the 23rd consecutive year, a NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The program was conducted by the University of Alabama in Huntsville and MSFC during the period 1 June to 7 August 1987. Operated under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education, the MSFC program, as well as those at other NASA Centers, was sponsored by the Office of University Affairs, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The basic objectives of the program are: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of the participant's institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Centers. This document is a compilation of Fellow's reports on their research during the Summer of 1987.

  19. Research reports: 1991 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, Gerald R. (Editor); Chappell, Charles R. (Editor); Six, Frank (Editor); Freeman, L. Michael (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The basic objectives of the programs, which are in the 28th year of operation nationally, are: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of the participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Centers. The faculty fellows spent 10 weeks at MSFC engaged in a research project compatible with their interests and background and worked in collaboration with a NASA/MSFC colleague. This is a compilation of their research reports for summer 1991.

  20. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 36: Technical uncertainty as a correlate of information use by US industry-affiliated aerospace engineers and scientists

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Glassman, Nanci A.; Affelder, Linda O.; Hecht, Laura M.; Kennedy, John M.; Barclay, Rebecca O.

    1994-01-01

    This paper reports the results of an exploratory study that investigated the influence of technical uncertainty on the use of information and information sources by U.S. industry-affiliated aerospace engineers and scientists in completing or solving a project, task, or problem. Data were collected through a self-administered questionnaire. Survey participants were U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists whose names appeared on the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) mailing list. The results support the findings of previous research and the following study assumptions. Information and information-source use differ for projects, problems, and tasks with high and low technical uncertainty. As technical uncertainty increases, information-source use changes from internal to external and from informal to formal sources. As technical uncertainty increases, so too does the use of federally funded aerospace research and development (R&D). The use of formal information sources to learn about federally funded aerospace R&D differs for projects, problems, and tasks with high and low technical uncertainty.

  1. Program of Research and Education in Aerospace Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitesides, John L.; Johansen, Laurie W.

    2005-01-01

    Since its inception in January 2003, the program has provided support for 1 research professor and a total of 10 Graduate Research Scholar Assistants of these all 10 have completed their MS degree program. The program has generated 10 MS thesis. Final report lists papers presented in seminars for the period January 1, 2003 through June 30, 2005.

  2. Lower body negative pressure as a tool for research in aerospace physiology and military medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, V. A.

    2001-01-01

    Lower body negative pressure (LBNP) has been extensively used for decades in aerospace physiological research as a tool to investigate cardiovascular mechanisms that are associated with or underlie performance in aerospace and military environments. In comparison with clinical stand and tilt tests, LBNP represents a relatively safe methodology for inducing highly reproducible hemodynamic responses during exposure to footward fluid shifts similar to those experienced under orthostatic challenge. By maintaining an orthostatic challenge in a supine posture, removal of leg support (muscle pump) and head motion (vestibular stimuli) during LBNP provides the capability to isolate cardiovascular mechanisms that regulate blood pressure. LBNP can be used for physiological measurements, clinical diagnoses and investigational research comparisons of subject populations and alterations in physiological status. The applications of LBNP to the study of blood pressure regulation in spaceflight, groundbased simulations of low gravity, and hemorrhage have provided unique insights and understanding for development of countermeasures based on physiological mechanisms underlying the operational problems.

  3. Lower body negative pressure as a tool for research in aerospace physiology and military medicine.

    PubMed

    Convertino, V A

    2001-12-01

    Lower body negative pressure (LBNP) has been extensively used for decades in aerospace physiological research as a tool to investigate cardiovascular mechanisms that are associated with or underlie performance in aerospace and military environments. In comparison with clinical stand and tilt tests, LBNP represents a relatively safe methodology for inducing highly reproducible hemodynamic responses during exposure to footward fluid shifts similar to those experienced under orthostatic challenge. By maintaining an orthostatic challenge in a supine posture, removal of leg support (muscle pump) and head motion (vestibular stimuli) during LBNP provides the capability to isolate cardiovascular mechanisms that regulate blood pressure. LBNP can be used for physiological measurements, clinical diagnoses and investigational research comparisons of subject populations and alterations in physiological status. The applications of LBNP to the study of blood pressure regulation in spaceflight, groundbased simulations of low gravity, and hemorrhage have provided unique insights and understanding for development of countermeasures based on physiological mechanisms underlying the operational problems.

  4. [NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 4:] Technical communications in aerospace: An analysis of the practices reported by US and European aerospace engineers and scientists

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.; Glassman, Myron

    1990-01-01

    Two pilot studies were conducted that investigated the technical communications practices of U.S. and European aerospace engineers and scientists. Both studies had the same five objectives: (1) solicit opinions regarding the importance of technical communications; (2) determine the use and production of technical communications; (3) seek views about the appropriate content of an undergraduate course in technical communications; (4) determine use of libraries, information centers, and online database; (5) determine use and importance of computer and information technology to them. A self-administered questionnaire was mailed to randomly selected aerospace engineers and scientists, with a slightly modified version sent to European colleagues. Their responses to selected questions are presented in this paper.

  5. Research Reports: 1989 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, Gerald R. (Editor); Six, Frank (Editor); Freeman, L. Michael (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    For the twenty-fifth consecutive year, a NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The basic objectives of the programs are: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of the participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Centers. The Faculty Fellows spent ten weeks at MSFC engaged in a research project compatible with their interests and background and worked in collaboration with a NASA/MSFC colleague.

  6. Summer Undergraduate Training Program in Breast Cancer Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-01

    done. Jack Laney. This summer I worked on synthesizing small molecule inhibitors of SH2 domains. My work was strictly organic synthesis directed...student in medicinal chemistry. The research I conducted was mainly organic synthesis with little biological experiments being performed. I successfully...synthesized eight compounds that are being sent for top1 inhibition testing. Andrew gave me insight into organic synthesis and helped me gain the

  7. USAF/SCEEE Summer Faculty Research Program (1979). Volume 3

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    SUMMER FACULTY I RESEARCH PROGRAM Conductedo by: UNCLASSIFIED . SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE (fhen Date Entered) REPORT DOCUMENTATIOI" P ...AFtL (Wrisht-Patteron) Houston, TX 77004 (713) 749-4652 Dr. Michael J. Henchman Degree: PhD., Chemistry, 1961 Associate Professor of Chemistry Dept...Dr. Michael J. Pappas Degree: PhD., Mechanical Eng., 1970 Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering Specialty: Structural Optmization New Jersey

  8. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report 13: Source selection and information use by US aerospace engineers and scientists: Results of a telephone survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Glassman, Nanci A.

    1992-01-01

    A telephone survey of U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists belonging to the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) was conducted between December 4, 1991 and January 5, 1992. The survey was undertaken to (1) validate the telephone survey as an appropriate technique for collecting data from U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists; (2) collect information about how the results of NASA/DoD aerospace research are used in the R&D process; (3) identify those selection criteria which affect the use of federally-funded aerospace R&D; and (4) obtain information that could be used to develop a self-administered mail questionnaire for use with the same population. The average rating of importance of U.S. government technical reports was 2.5 (on a 4-point scale); The mean/median number of times U.S. government technical reports were used per 6 months was 8/2. Factors scoring highest for U.S. government technical reports were technical accuracy (2.9), reliable data and technical information (2.8), and contains comprehensive data and information (2.7) on a 4-point system. The factors scoring highest for influencing the use of U.S. government technical reports were relevance (3.1), technical accuracy (3.06), and reliable data/information (3.02). Ease of use, familiarity, technical accuracy, and relevance correlated with use of U.S. government technical reports. Survey demographics, survey questionnaire, and the NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project publications list are included.

  9. The Center for Aerospace Research: A NASA Center of Excellence at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lai, Steven H.-Y.

    1992-01-01

    This report documents the efforts and outcomes of our research and educational programs at NASA-CORE in NCA&TSU. The goal of the center was to establish a quality aerospace research base and to develop an educational program to increase the participation of minority faculty and students in the areas of aerospace engineering. The major accomplishments of this center in the first year are summarized in terms of three different areas, namely, the center's research programs area, the center's educational programs area, and the center's management area. In the center's research programs area, we focus on developing capabilities needed to support the development of the aerospace plane and high speed civil transportation system technologies. In the educational programs area, we developed an aerospace engineering option program ready for university approval.

  10. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 38: Computer Mediated Communication (CMC) and the communication of technical information in aerospace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Daniel J.; Pinelli, Thomas E.

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses the use of computers as a medium for communication (CMC) used by aerospace engineers and scientists to obtain and/or provide technical information related to research and development activities. The data were obtained from a questionnaire survey that yielded 1006 mail responses. In addition to communication media, the research also investigates degrees of task uncertainty, environmental complexity, and other relevant variables that can affect aerospace workers' information-seeking strategies. While findings indicate that many individuals report CMC is an important function in their communication patterns, the research indicates that CMC is used less often and deemed less valuable than other more conventional media, such as paper documents, group meetings, telephone and face-to-face conversations. Fewer than one third of the individuals in the survey account for nearly eighty percent of the reported CMC use, and another twenty percent indicate they do not use the medium at all, its availability notwithstanding. These preliminary findings suggest that CMC is not as pervasive a communication medium among aerospace workers as the researcher expect a priori. The reasons underlying the reported media use are not yet fully known, and this suggests that continuing research in this area may be valuable.

  11. Aerospace Plane Technology, Research and Development Efforts in Europe

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-07-25

    developed by 2005. The official also said that Saenger II development would follow between 2015 and 2020. A Federal Ministry for Research and Technology...degrees Fahrenheit. NASP’S first flight is scheduled for 1997, which is still ahead of HOTOL’S first planned flight in 2000 and Saenger II’s in 2015 ...completing the project by 2015 . The milestones do not include scramjet technology, which, according to Avions Marcel Dassault-Breguet Aviation officials

  12. NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report Number 16. A Comparison of the Technical Communications Practices of Russian and U.S. Aerospace Engineers and Scientists

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    Barclay. "The NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project." Government Information Quarterly 8:2 (1991): 219-233. 29 APPENDIX A NASA/DoD...M. Kennedy; and Rebecca 0. Barclay. The NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Reprinted from Government Information Quarterly , Volume

  13. 2015 Los Alamos Space Weather Summer School Research Reports

    SciTech Connect

    Cowee, Misa; Chen, Yuxi; Desai, Ravindra; Hassan, Ehab; Kalmoni, Nadine; Lin, Dong; Depascuale, Sebastian; Hughes, Randall Scott; Zhou, Hong

    2015-11-24

    The fifth Los Alamos Space Weather Summer School was held June 1st - July 24th, 2015, at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). With renewed support from the Institute of Geophysics, Planetary Physics, and Signatures (IGPPS) and additional support from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science, we hosted a new class of five students from various U.S. and foreign research institutions. The summer school curriculum includes a series of structured lectures as well as mentored research and practicum opportunities. Lecture topics including general and specialized topics in the field of space weather were given by a number of researchers affiliated with LANL. Students were given the opportunity to engage in research projects through a mentored practicum experience. Each student works with one or more LANL-affiliated mentors to execute a collaborative research project, typically linked with a larger ongoing research effort at LANL and/or the student’s PhD thesis research. This model provides a valuable learning experience for the student while developing the opportunity for future collaboration. This report includes a summary of the research efforts fostered and facilitated by the Space Weather Summer School. These reports should be viewed as work-in-progress as the short session typically only offers sufficient time for preliminary results. At the close of the summer school session, students present a summary of their research efforts. Titles of the papers included in this report are as follows: Full particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation of whistler wave generation, Hybrid simulations of the right-hand ion cyclotron anisotropy instability in a sub-Alfvénic plasma flow, A statistical ensemble for solar wind measurements, Observations and models of substorm injection dispersion patterns, Heavy ion effects on Kelvin-Helmholtz instability: hybrid study, Simulating plasmaspheric electron densities with a two

  14. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report No. 36: The Technical Communications Practices of US Aerospace Engineers and Scientists: Results of the Phase 1 NASA Langley Research Center Mail Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. government technical report is a primary means by which the results of federally funded research and development (R&D) are transferred to the U.S. aerospace industry. However, little is known about this information product in terms of its actual use, importance, and value in the transfer of federally funded R&D. To help establish a body of knowledge, the U.S. government technical report is being investigated as part of the NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. In this report, we summarize the literature on technical reports and provide a model that depicts the transfer of federally funded aerospace R&D via the U.S. government technical report. We present results from our investigation of aerospace knowledge diffusion vis-a-vis the U.S. government technical report, and present the results of research that investigated aerospace knowledge diffusion vis-a-vis the technical communications practices of U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists who were assigned to the Research and Technology Group (RTG) at the NASA Langley Research Center in September 1995.

  15. Nebraska Initiative for Aerospace Research and Industrial Development (NIARID)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowen, Brent; Reichenbach, Steve; Ianno, Ned; Farr, Lynne; Tarry, Scott; Narayanan, Ram; Lehrer, Henry

    2002-01-01

    The UNO Aviation Institute Monograph Series began in 1994 as a key component of the education outreach and information transfer missions of the Aviation Institute and the NASA Nebraska Space Grant & EPSCoR Programs. The series is an outlet for aviation materials to be indexed and disseminated through an efficient medium. Publications are welcome in all aspects of aviation. Publication formats may include, but are not limited to, conference proceedings, bibliographies, research reports, manuals, technical reports, and other documents that should be archived and indexed for future reference by the aviation and world wide communities.

  16. Photogrammetric Tracking of Aerodynamic Surfaces and Aerospace Models at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shortis, Mark R.; Robson, Stuart; Jones, Thomas W.; Goad, William K.; Lunsford, Charles B.

    2016-06-01

    Aerospace engineers require measurements of the shape of aerodynamic surfaces and the six degree of freedom (6DoF) position and orientation of aerospace models to analyse structural dynamics and aerodynamic forces. The measurement technique must be non-contact, accurate, reliable, have a high sample rate and preferably be non-intrusive. Close range photogrammetry based on multiple, synchronised, commercial-off-the-shelf digital cameras can supply surface shape and 6DoF data at 5-15Hz with customisable accuracies. This paper describes data acquisition systems designed and implemented at NASA Langley Research Center to capture surface shapes and 6DoF data. System calibration and data processing techniques are discussed. Examples of experiments and data outputs are described.

  17. 2001 Research Reports NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This document is a collection of technical reports on research conducted by the participants in the 2001 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Research areas are broad. Some of the topics addressed include: project management, space shuttle safety risks induced by human factor errors, body wearable computers as a feasible delivery system for 'work authorization documents', gas leak detection using remote sensing technologies, a history of the Kennedy Space Center, and design concepts for collabsible cyrogenic storage vessels.

  18. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 46: Technical communications in aerospace: A comparison across four countries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, John M.; Pinelli, Thomas E.; Hecht, Laura Frye; Barclay, Rebecca O.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper we describe the preliminary analysis of four groups of aerospace engineering and science students -- student members of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) and students from universities in Japan, Russia, and Great Britain. We compare: (1) the demographic characteristics of the students; (2) factors that affected their career decision; (3) their career goals and aspirations; (4) their training in technical communication; and (5) their training in techniques for finding and using aerospace scientific and technical information (STI). Many employers in the US aerospace industry think there is a need for increased training of engineering students in technical communication. Engineers in the US and other countries believe that technical communication skills are critical for engineers' professional success. All students in our study agree about the importance of technical communication training for professional success, yet relatively few are happy with the instruction they receive. Overall, we conclude that additional instruction in technical communication and accessing STI would make it easier for students to achieve their career goals.

  19. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 21: Technological innovation and technical communications: Their place in aerospace engineering curricula. A survey of European, Japanese, and US Aerospace Engineers and Scientists

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Holland, Maurita Peterson; Keene, Michael L.; Kennedy, John M.

    1991-01-01

    Aerospace engineers and scientists from Western Europe, Japan, and the United States were surveyed as part of the NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Questionnaires were used to solicit their opinions regarding the following: (1) the importance of technical communications to their profession; (2) the use and production of technical communications; and (3) their views about the appropriate content of an undergraduate course in technical communications. The ability to communicate technical information effectively was very important to the aerospace engineers and scientists who participated in the study. A considerable portion of their working week is devoted to using and producing technical information. The types of technical communications used and produced varied within and among the three groups. The type of technical communication product used and produced appears to be related to respondents' professional duties. Respondents from the three groups made similar recommendations regarding the principles, mechanics, and on-the-job communications to be included in an undergraduate technical communications course for aerospace majors.

  20. Innovative Educational Aerospace Research at the Northeast High School Space Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luyet, Audra; Matarazzo, Anthony; Folta, David

    1997-01-01

    Northeast High Magnet School of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania is a proud sponsor of the Space Research Center (SPARC). SPARC, a model program of the Medical, Engineering, and Aerospace Magnet school, provides talented students the capability to successfully exercise full simulations of NASA manned missions. These simulations included low-Earth Shuttle missions and Apollo lunar missions in the past, and will focus on a planetary mission to Mars this year. At the end of each scholastic year, a simulated mission, lasting between one and eight days, is performed involving 75 students as specialists in seven teams The groups are comprised of Flight Management, Spacecraft Communications (SatCom), Computer Networking, Spacecraft Design and Engineering, Electronics, Rocketry, Robotics, and Medical teams in either the mission operations center or onboard the spacecraft. Software development activities are also required in support of these simulations The objective of this paper is to present the accomplishments, technology innovations, interactions, and an overview of SPARC with an emphasis on how the program's educational activities parallel NASA mission support and how this education is preparing student for the space frontier.

  1. [NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 7:] The NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project: The DOD perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Kennedy, John M.

    1990-01-01

    This project will provide descriptive and analytical data regarding the flow of STI at the individual, organizational, national, and international levels. It will examine both the channels used to communicate information and the social system of the aerospace knowledge diffusion process. Results of the project should provide useful information to R and D managers, information managers, and others concerned with improving access to and use of STI. Objectives include: (1) understanding the aerospace knowledge diffusion process at the individual, organizational, and national levels, placing particular emphasis on the diffusion of Federally funded aerospace STI; (2) understanding the international aerospace knowledge diffusion process at the individual and organizational levels, placing particular emphasis on the systems used to diffuse the results of Federally funded aerospace STI; (3) understanding the roles NASA/DoD technical report and aerospace librarians play in the transfer and use of knowledge derived from Federally funded aerospace R and D; (4) achieving recognition and acceptance within NASA, DoD and throughout the aerospace community that STI is a valuable strategic resource for innovation, problem solving, and productivity; and (5) providing results that can be used to optimize the effectiveness and efficiency of the Federal STI aerospace transfer system and exchange mechanism.

  2. Development of aerospace nursing.

    PubMed

    Barron, N J

    1975-04-01

    In the initial development, the primary purpose of the USAF aerospace nursing program was to prepare the nurse to function as an integral member of the aerospace medical team in support of bioastronautics, occupational health and aerospace medical research programs. The absence of an expanded manned space program has required the aerospace nurse to redirect her energies toward the immediate needs of the aerospace medicine program. Many of the aerospace nurse's more specific functions are dependent upon the mission objectives of the command and military base to which she is assigned. Aerospace nursing reflects a concern for the total health needs of the Air Force community and the application of a holistic approach. It includes all aspects of health and all environmental hazards which alter health. The development of aerospace nursing paves the way for this expanded view of nursing practice.

  3. Research Reports: 1997 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, G. R. (Editor); Dowdy, J. (Editor); Freeman, L. M. (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    For the 33rd consecutive year, a NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The program was conducted by the University of Alabama in Huntsville and MSFC during the period June 2, 1997 through August 8, 1997. Operated under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education, the MSFC program was sponsored by the Higher Education Branch, Education Division, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The basic objectives of the program, which are in the 34th year of operation nationally, are: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of the participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA centers. The Faculty Fellows spent 10 weeks at MSFC engaged in a research project compatible with their interests and background and worked in collaboration with a NASA/MSFC colleague. This document is a compilation of Fellows' reports on their research during the summer of 1997. The University of Alabama in Huntsville presents the Co-Directors' report on the administrative operations of the program. Further information can be obtained by contacting any of the editors.

  4. Research Reports: 1995 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, G. R. (Editor); Chappell, C. R. (Editor); Six, F. (Editor); Freeman, L. M. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    For the 31st consecutive year, a NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The program was conducted by the University of Alabama in Huntsville and MSFC during the period 15 May 1995 - 4 Aug. 1995. Operated under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education, the MSFC program, as well as those at other NASA centers, was sponsored by the Higher Education Branch, Education Division, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The basic objectives of the programs, which are in the 32nd year of operation nationally, are (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of the participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA centers. The Faculty Fellows spent 10 weeks at MSFC engaged in a research project compatible with their interests and background and worked in collaboration with a NASA/MSFC colleague. This document is a compilation of Fellows' reports on their research during the summer of 1995. The University of Alabama in Huntsville presents the Co-Directors' report on the administrative operations of the program. Further information can be obtained by contacting any of the editors.

  5. Research Reports: 1996 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, M. (Editor); Chappell, C. R. (Editor); Six, F. (Editor); Karr, G. R. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    For the 32nd consecutive year, a NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The program was conducted by the University of Alabama and MSFC during the period May 28, 1996 through August 2, 1996. Operated under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education, the MSFC program, as well as those at other NASA centers, was sponsored by the Higher Education Branch, Education Division, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The basic objectives of the programs, which are in the 33rd year of operation nationally, are (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of the participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA centers. The Faculty Fellows spent 10 weeks at MSFC engaged in a research project compatible with their interests and background and worked in collaboration with a NASA/MSFC colleague. This document is a compilation of Fellows' reports on their research during the summer of 1996. The University of Alabama presents the Co-Directors' report on the administrative operations of the program. Further information can be obtained by contacting any of the editors.

  6. Research Reports: 2001 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, G. (Editor); Pruitt, J. (Editor); Nash-Stevenson, S. (Editor); Freeman, L. M. (Editor); Karr, C. L. (Editor)

    2002-01-01

    For the thirty-seventh consecutive year, a NASA/ASEE (American Society for Engineering Education) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The program was conducted by The University of Alabama in Huntsville and MSFC during the period May 29 - August 3, 2001. Operated under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education, the MSFC program, as well as those at other NASA Centers, was sponsored by the University Affairs Office, NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC. The basic objectives of the programs, which are in the thirty-seventh year of operation nationally, are (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of the participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Centers. The Faculty Fellows spent ten weeks at MSFC engaged in a research project compatible with their interests and background and worked in collaboration with a NASA MSFC colleague. This document is a compilation of Fellows' reports on their research during the summer of 2001.

  7. Undergraduate Summer Research Programs and Graduate School Outcomes: Don't Ignore Rejected Program Applicants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibulkin, Amy E.; Butler, J. S.

    2015-01-01

    We tracked a sample of primarily Black psychology baccalaureates' advanced degree enrollments and completions and estimated the association of those outcomes with summer research experience by merging three data sets: (a) summer research program participants, (b) a comparison group of alumni, mostly without summer research, and (c) degree…

  8. A Summer Research Experience in Particle Physics Using Skype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Curran; Alexander, Steven; Mahmood, A. K.

    2012-10-01

    This last summer I did research in particle physics as part of a ``remote REU.'' This poster will describe that experience and the results of my project which was to experimentally verify the mass ranges of the Z' boson. Data from the LHC's Atlas detector was filtered by computers to select for likely Z boson decays; my work was in noting all instances of Z or Z' boson decays in one thousand events and their masses, separating the Z from Z' bosons, and generating histograms of the masses.

  9. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 1: The value of scientific and technical information (STI), its relationship to Research and Development (R/D), and its use by US aerospace engineers and scientists

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Glassman, Myron; Oliu, Walter E.

    1990-01-01

    This paper is based on the premise that scientific and technical information (STI), its use by aerospace engineers and scientists, and the aerospace research and development (R&D) process are related. We intend to support this premise with data gathered from numerous studies concerned with STI, the relationship of STI to the performance and management of R&D activities, and the information use and seeking behavior of engineers in general and aerospace engineers and scientists in particular. We intend to develop and present a synthesized appreciation of how aerospace R&D managers can improve the efficacy of the R&D process by understanding the role and value of STI in this process.

  10. NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. XXXIII - Technical communications practices and the use of information technologies as reported by Dutch and U.S. aerospace engineers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barclay, Rebecca O.; Pinelli, Thomas E.; Tan, Axel S. T.; Kennedy, John M.

    1993-01-01

    As part of Phase 4 of the NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project, two studies were conducted that investigated the technical communications practices of Dutch and U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to aerospace engineers and scientists at the National Aerospace Laboratory (The Netherlands), and NASA Ames Research Center (U.S.), and the NASA Langley Research Center (U.S.). This paper presents responses of the Dutch and U.S. participants to selected questions about four of the seven project objectives: determining the importance of technical communications to aerospace engineering professionals, investigating the production of technical communications, examining the use and importance of computer and information technology, and exploring the use of electronic networks.

  11. USAF Summer Research Program - 1993 Summer Research Extension Program Final Reports, Volume 1A, Armstrong Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-11-01

    contexts. The information transmitted in rhesus calls appears to include spatial location and identity, predator alarm, degrees of agressive threat...used types of captive primate housing are manifest in the vocal behavior of this important research animal. The first acoustical studies of rhesus...reflect differential effects of housing conditions. We believe this to be the first study in which continuous vocal records of captive primates were

  12. NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program. 1994 research reports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Loren A. (Editor); Hosler, E. Ramon (Editor); Camp, Warren (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    This document is a collection of technical reports on research conducted by the participants in the 1994 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). This was the tenth year that a NASA/ASEE program has been conducted at KSC. The 1994 program was administered by the University of Central Florida in cooperation with KSC. The program was operated under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) with sponsorship and funding from the Office of Educational Affairs, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The KSC Program was one of nine such Aeronautics and Space Research Programs funded by NASA Headquarters in 1994. The NASA/ASEE program is intended to be a two-year program to allow in-depth research by the University faculty member. The editors of this document were responsible for selecting appropriately qualified faculty to address some of the many problems of current interest to NASA/KSC.

  13. 1997 Research Reports: NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosler, E. Ramon (Editor); Buckingham, Gregg (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    This document is a collection of technical reports on research conducted by the participants in the 1997 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). This was the 13th year that a NASA/ASEE program has been conducted at KSC. The 1997 program was administered by the University of Central Florida in cooperation with KSC. The program was operated under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) with sponsorship and funding from the Education Division, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C., and KSC. The KSC Program was one of nine such Aeronautics and Space Research Programs funded by NASA in 1997. The NASA/ASEE Program is intended to be a two-year program to allow in-depth research by the university faculty member. The editors of this document were responsible for selecting appropriately qualified faculty to address some of the many problems of current interest to NASA/KSC.

  14. 1999 Research Reports: NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosler, E. Ramon (Editor); Buckingham, Gregg (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    This document is a collection of technical reports on research conducted by the participants in the 1999 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). This was the 15th year that a NASA/ASEE program has been conducted at KSC. The 1999 program was administered by the University of Central Florida in cooperation with KSC. The program was operated under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE and the Education Division, NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC, and KSC. The KSC Program was one of nine such Aeronautics and Space Research Programs funded by NASA Headquarters in 1999. The NASA/ASEE Program is intended to be a two-year program to allow in-depth research by the university faculty member.

  15. 1998 Research Reports: NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosler, E. Ramon (Editor); Buckingham, Gregg (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    This document is a collection of technical reports on research conducted by the participants in the 1998 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). This was the 14th year that a NASA/ASEE program has been conducted at KSC. The 1998 program was administered by the University of Central Florida in cooperation with KSC. The program was operated under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) with sponsorship and funding from the Education Division, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C., and KSC. The KSC Program was one of nine such Aeronautics and Space Research Programs funded by NASA in 1998. The NASA/ASEE Program is intended to be a two-year program to allow in-depth research by the university faculty member. The editors of this document were responsible for selecting appropriately qualified faculty to address some of the many problems of current interest to NASA/KSC.

  16. 2000 Research Reports: NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosler, E. Ramon (Editor); Buckingham, Gregg (Editor)

    2001-01-01

    This document is a collection of technical reports on research conducted by the participants in the 2000 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). This was the 16th year that a NASA/ASEE program has been conducted at KSC. The 2000 program was administered by the University of Central Florida in cooperation with KSC. The program was operated under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) with sponsorship and funding from the Education Division, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C., and KSC. The KSC Program was one of nine such Aeronautics and Space Research Programs funded by NASA in 2000. The NASA/ASEE Program is intended to be a two-year program to allow in-depth research by the university faculty member. The editors of this document were responsible for selecting appropriately qualified faculty to address some of the many problems of current interest to NASA/KSC.

  17. United States Air Force Summer Research Program -- 1993 Summer Research Program Final Reports. Volume 12. Armstrong Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    0000 Decker, Michael Laboratory: RL/ZR 2601 Oneida--St. Vol-Page No: 14- 8 Sauquoit Valley Central School Sauquoit, TY 13456-0000 Deibler, Nancy...No: 15-18 A. Crawford Mosley Lynn Raven, FL 32444-5609 Panara, Michael Laboratory: RL/C3 500 Turin St. Vol-Page No: 14- 5 Rome Free AoadWY Rome, NY...School 6500 Ingram Rd. San Antonio, TX 78238 Dr. John Taboada Mentor Final Report for: AFOSR Summer Research Program Armstrong Laboratory Sponsored by

  18. Minority Summer Research Program in the Plant Sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Poff, Kenneth L.

    2004-08-12

    Gutierrez and Larcom (2000) suggest that ''According to the National Science Foundation/Division of Science Resources Studies in 1997, the percentage distribution of scientists and engineers in the labor force by race/ethnicity changed little between 1993 and 1997''. According to this report, Black, non-Hispanic went from 3.6 in 1993 to 3.4 in 1997. Hispanic went from 3.0 in 1993 to 3.1 in 1997; and American Indian/Alaskan Native stayed the same at 0.3 during the same period. The only exceptions were a slight increase in the percentage of Asian from 9.2 in 1993 to 10.4 in 1997, while a slight decrease in percentage White from 83.9 in 1993 to 82.8 in 1997. Overall, no major changes in minorities were present in the science and engineering fields during that period. These data shows that major efforts are needed in order to improve and achieve better results for diversity in the workplace (Gutierrez & Larcom, 2000). This does not mean that major steps have not been taken over this period. For example, the Minority Summer Research Program in Plant Sciences (also funded in part by NSF under the title, ''Undergraduate Researchers in Plant Sciences Program'') was established in an effort to enhance the diversity of the plant science community. The Minority Summer Research Program in Plant Sciences was designed to encourage members of underrepresented groups to seek career opportunities in the plant sciences. To achieve this end, the program contained several components with the primary focus on mentored research for undergraduate students. The research experience was provided during the summer months on the campus of Michigan State University in East Lansing, Michigan. At the end of the summer experience, each participant presented an oral report on their research, and submitted a written paper on the same topic. This was deliberately designed to mimic the plant science professions in which research leads to presentations in the form of reports, papers, etc. In addition

  19. NASA-Ames Summer High School Apprenticeship Research Program (SHARP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, P.

    1983-01-01

    The function of SHARP is to recognize high school juniors who have demonstrated unusually high promise for sucess in mathemtics and science. Twenty academically talented students who will be seniors in high school in September were chosen to participate in SHARP 83. Mentors were selected to provide students with first-hand experiences in a research and development environment in order that each student might try out his or her tentative professional career choice. Some special features of SHARP included field trips to private industries doing similar and related research, special lectures on topics of research here at ARC, individual and group counseling sessions, written research papers and oral reports, and primarily the opportunity to be exposed to the present frontiers in space exploration and research. The long-range goal of SHARP is to contribute to the future recruitment of needed scientists and engineers. This final report is summary of all the phases of the planning and implemenation of the 1983 Summer High School Apprenticeship Research Program (SHARP).

  20. Research on Hazardous States of Awareness and Physiological Factors in Aerospace Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prinzel, Lawrence J., III

    2002-01-01

    The technical memorandum describes research conducted to examine the etiologies and nature of hazardous states of awareness and the psychophysiological factors involved in their onset in aerospace operations. A considerable amount of research has been conducted at NASA that examines psychological and human factors issues that may play a role in aviation safety. The technical memorandum describes some of the research that was conducted between 1998 and 2001, both in-house and as cooperative agreements, which addressed some of these issues. The research was sponsored as part of the physiological factors subelement of the Aviation Operation Systems (AOS) program and Physiological / Psychological Stressors and Factors project. Dr. Lance Prinzel is the Level III subelement lead and can be contacted at l.j.prinzel@larc.nasa.gov.

  1. Summer Research Program (1992). Graduate Student Research Program (GSRP) Reports. Volume 8. Phillips Laboratory.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-28

    Research Program Starfire Optical Range, Phillips Laboratory /LITE Kirtland Air Force Base, Albuquerque, NM 87117 Sponsored by: Air ... Phillips Laboratory Sponsored by: Air Force Office of Scientific Research Kirtland Air Force Base, Albuquerque, New Mexico September, 1992 18-1 PROGRESS...Report for: Summer Research Program Phillips Laboratory Sponsored by: Air

  2. Summer Internship Program at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, G. I.

    2009-12-01

    The Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute formally started the Internship Program in 1997. The program is open to undergraduate and graduate students and educators. The purpose of the Program is to provide an opportunity for talented students and teachers to come to MBARI for a certain period of time and to work on a research project under MBARI staff supervision. The interns are selected following a rigorous application procedure, merit review and, in some cases, an interview process. They are from around the world and represent a variety of different backgrounds, experience, and education. They all share a common desire to learn more about the marine environment and to work with MBARI staff. The mission of the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute is to serve as a world center for advanced research and education in ocean science and technology. MBARI strives to achieve this mission through the development of better instruments, systems, and methods for scientific research in the deep ocean. MBARI emphasizes peer relationships between engineers and scientists as a basic principle of its operation. Teams at MBARI use cutting-edge technology to develop equipment, software, and research methods to meet the specific needs of deep-sea research. The focus of the MBARI internship is on the intern’s professional development—learning research techniques and improving communication and collaboration skills. Each intern has an MBARI mentor who will supervise a specific project. Interns will also serve as peer-mentors to other interns. This presentation will provide a brief overview of the history of the program as well as lessons learned. 2009 MBARI SUMMER INTERNS WITH PRESIDENT AND CEO MARCIA MCNUTT

  3. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 23: Information technology and aerospace knowledge diffusion: Exploring the intermediary-end user interface in a policy framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Bishop, Ann P.; Kennedy, John M.

    1992-01-01

    Federal attempts to stimulate technological innovation have been unsuccessful because of the application of an inappropriate policy framework that lacks conceptual and empirical knowledge of the process of technological innovation and fails to acknowledge the relationship between knowled reproduction, transfer, and use as equally important components of the process of knowledge diffusion. It is argued that the potential contributions of high-speed computing and networking systems will be diminished unless empirically derived knowledge about the information-seeking behavior of the members of the social system is incorporated into a new policy framework. Findings from the NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project are presented in support of this assertion.

  4. NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. XXIII - Information technology and aerospace knowledge diffusion: Exploring the intermediary-end user interface in a policy framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Bishop, Ann P.; Kennedy, John M.

    1992-01-01

    Federal attempts to stimulate technological innovation have been unsuccessful because of the application of an inappropriate policy framework that lacks conceptual and empirical knowledge of the process of technological innovation and fails to acknowledge the relationship between knowledge production, transfer, and use as equally important components of the process of knowledge diffusion. This article argues that the potential contributions of high-speed computing and networking systems will be diminished unless empirically derived knowledge about the information-seeking behavior of members of the social system is incorporated into a new policy framework. Findings from the NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project are presented in support of this assertion.

  5. A summer academic research experience for disadvantaged youth.

    PubMed

    Kabacoff, Cathryn; Srivastava, Vasudha; Robinson, Douglas N

    2013-01-01

    Internships are an effective way of connecting high school students in a meaningful manner to the sciences. Disadvantaged minorities have fewer opportunities to participate in internships, and are underrepresented in both science, technology, engineering, and mathematics majors and careers. We have developed a Summer Academic Research Experience (SARE) program that provides an enriching academic internship to underrepresented youth. Our program has shown that to have a successful internship for these disadvantaged youth, several issues need to be addressed in addition to scientific mentoring. We have found that it is necessary to remediate and/or fortify basic academic skills for students to be successful. In addition, students need to be actively coached in the development of professional skills, habits, and attitudes necessary for success in the workplace. With all these factors in place, these youths can become better students, compete on a more level playing field in their internships, and increase their potential of participating actively in the sciences in the future.

  6. Looking for seismic scatterers: summer research experience for undergraduate students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerasimenko, I.; Bagchi, S.; Toteva, T.; Peng, Z.

    2008-12-01

    This project was part of collaboration between Randolph College (VA) and Georgia Institute of Technology (GA). It was designed as summer research experience for undergraduate students. The duration of the project was eight weeks. The aim of this study was to search for fault zone scatterers in the Parkfield section of the San Andreas Fault, and examine the presence or absence of physical changes in the scattering intensity before and after the 2004 M6 Parkfield earthquake. The two students visited Georgia Tech for a week and were trained to manipulate seismic data in Seismic Analysis Code (SAC) format. They assembled a data base of over a thousand events that occurred before and after the M6 earthquake and were recorded by the USGS Parkfield, California, dense seismograph array (UPSAR). They manually picked the arrivals for the P and S waves. Additional signal processing such as frequency filtering and semblance analysis were applied to the records in search for isolated scatterers in the seismic coda. While the eight-week-long research was not enough for the students to complete their project, it was certainly enough to sparkle excitement for conducting seismological research. Currently both students are enrolled in a research topics class and continue to work on this project. Their past and future work will be presented at the meeting.

  7. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 26: The relationship between technology policy and scientific and technical information within the US and Japanese aerospace industries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1993-01-01

    Government technology policy has nurtured the growth of the aerospace industry which is vital to both the U.S. and Japanese economies. Japanese technology policy differs significantly from U.S. technology policy, however, particularly with respect to the production, transfer, and use of scientific and technical information (STI). In this paper, we discuss the unique position of the aerospace industry in the U.S. and Japan, U.S. and Japanese aerospace policy, and the role of STI in the process of aerospace innovation. The information-seeking behaviors of U.S. and Japanese aerospace engineers and scientists are compared. The authors advocate the development of innovation-adoption technology and STI policy goals for U.S. aerospace and the inclusion of an aerospace knowledge diffusion transfer system with an 'active' component for scanning and acquiring foreign aerospace technology and STI.

  8. The Summer Undergraduate Research Internship Program at the Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cline, J. Donald; Castelaz, M.; Whitworth, C.; Clavier, D.; Owen, L.; Barker, T.

    2012-01-01

    Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute (PARI) offers summer undergraduate research internships. PARI has received support for the internships from the NC Space Grant Consortium, NSF awards for public science education, private donations, private foundations, and through a collaboration with the Pisgah Astronomical Research and Education Center of the University of North Carolina - Asheville. The internship program began in 2001 with 4 students. This year 7 funded students participated in 2011. Mentors for the interns include PARI's Science, Education, and Information Technology Directors and visiting faculty who are members of the PARI Research Affiliate Faculty program. Students work with mentors on radio and optical astronomy research, electrical engineering for robotic control of instruments, software development for instrument control and software for citizen science projects, and science education by developing curricula and multimedia and teaching high school students in summer programs at PARI. At the end of the summer interns write a paper about their research which is published in the PARI Summer Student Proceedings. Several of the students have presented their results at AAS Meetings. We will present a summary of specific research conducted by the students with their mentors, the logistics for hosting the PARI undergraduate internship program, and plans for growth based on the impact of an NSF supported renovation to the Research Building on the PARI campus.

  9. The Summer Undergraduate Research Internship Program at the Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelaz, Michael W.; Cline, J.; Whitworth, C.; Clavier, D.

    2011-01-01

    Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute (PARI) offers summer undergraduate research internships. PARI has received support for the internships from the NC Space Grant Consortium, NSF awards for public science education, private donations, private foundations, and through a collaboration with the Pisgah Astronomical Research and Education Center of the University of North Carolina - Asheville. The internship program began in 2001 with 4 students. This year 9 funded students participated in 2010. Mentors for the interns include PARI's Directors of Science, Education, and Information Technology and visiting faculty who are members of the PARI Research Affiliate Faculty program. Students work with mentors on radio and optical astronomy research, electrical engineering for robotic control of instruments, software development for instrument control and applets for citizen science projects, and science education by developing curricula and multimedia and teaching high school students in summer programs at PARI. At the end of the summer interns write a paper about their research which is published in the PARI Summer Student Proceedings. Several of the students have presented their results at AAS Meetings. We will present a summary of specific research conducted by the students with their mentors, the logistics for hosting the PARI undergraduate internship program, and plans for growth based on the impact of an NSF supported renovation to the Research Building on the PARI campus.

  10. The 2013 Summer Undergraduate Research Internship Program at the Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelaz, Michael W.; Cline, J. D.; Whitworth, C.; Clavier, D.; Barker, T.

    2014-01-01

    Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute (PARI) offers summer undergraduate research internships. PARI has received support for the internships from the EMC Corporation, private donations, private foundations, and through a collaboration with the Pisgah Astronomical Research and Education Center of the University of North Carolina - Asheville. The internship program began in 2001 with 4 students. This year 10 funded students participated. Mentors for the interns include PARI’s Directors of Science, Education, and Information Technology and visiting faculty who are members of the PARI Research Faculty Affiliate program. Students work with mentors on radio and optical astronomy research, electrical engineering for robotic control of instruments, software development for instrument control and and science education by developing curricula and multimedia and teaching high school students in summer programs at PARI. At the end of the summer interns write a paper about their research which is published in the PARI Summer Student Proceedings. Students are encouraged to present their research at AAS Meetings. We will present a summary of specific research conducted by the students with their mentors.

  11. Introducing Summer High School Student-Researchers to Ethics in Scientific Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mabrouk, Patricia Ann

    2007-01-01

    A case based workshop on science ethics for high school students participating in summer research apprenticeships is developed and tested. It is found that this case-based approach is useful in facilitating faculty-student discussions of research ethics with their proteges.

  12. United States Air Force Summer Research Program -- 1993. Volume 8. Phillips Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-12-01

    Research Program Phillips Laboratory Kirtland Air Force Base Albuquerque. New Mexico Sponsored by...Best Available Copy UNITED STATES AIR FORCE SUMMER RESEARCH PROGRAM -- 1993 SUMMER RESEARCH PROGRAM FINAL REPORTS VOLUME 8 PHILLIPS LABORATORY ...Alabama Box 870344 Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0344 Final Report for: Graduate Student Research Program Phillips Laboratory , Hanscom AFB Sponsored by: Air

  13. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 69: Writing for the Aerospace Industry. Chapter 3; The Practice of Technical and Scientific Communication: Writing in Professional Contexts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barclay, Rebecca O.; Pinelli, Thomas E.

    1997-01-01

    The large and complex aerospace industry, which employed approximately 850,000 people in 1994 (Aerospace Facts, 1994-95, p. 11), plays a vital role in the nation's economy. Although only a small percentage of those employed in aerospace are technical communicators, they perform a wide variety of communication duties in government and the private sector.

  14. Research reports: The 1980 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program. [aeronautical research and development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barfield, B. F. (Editor); Kent, M. I. (Editor); Dozier, J. (Editor); Karr, G. (Editor)

    1980-01-01

    The Summer Faculty Fellowship Research Program objectives are: to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants and institutions; and to contribute to the research objectives at the NASA centers. The Faculty Fellows engaged in research projects commensurate with their interests and background and worked in collaboration with a NASA/MSFC colleague.

  15. A Program of Research and Education in Aerospace Structures at the Joint Institute for Advancement of Flight Sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolson, Robert H.

    2000-01-01

    The objectives of the cooperative effort with NASA was to conduct research related to aerospace structures and to increase the quality and quantity of highly trained engineers knowledgeable about aerospace structures. The program has successfully met the objectives and has been of significant benefit to NASA LARC, the GWU and the nation. The program was initiated with 3 students in 1994 under the direction of Dr. Robert Tolson as the Principal Investigator. Since initiation, 14 students have been involved in the program, resulting in 11 MS degrees with 2 more expected in 2000. The 11 MS theses and projects are listed. For technology transfer purposes some research is not reported in thesis form. Graduates from the program have been hired at aerospace and other companies across the nation, providing GWU and LARC with important industry and government contacts.

  16. United States Air Force Summer Research Program -- 1993. Volume 13. Phillips Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-12-01

    Research Kirtland Air Force Base, Albuquerque, NM August 1993 14-1 My Summer Apprenticeship At Kirtland Air Force Base, Phillips Laboratory Andrea Garcia...AFOSR Summer Research Program Phillips Laboratory Sponsored By: Air Force Office of Scientific Research Kirtland Air Force Base, Albuquerque, NM... Phillips Laboratory Sponsored by: Air

  17. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report 26: The technical communication practices of aerospace engineering students: Results of the phase 3 AIAA National Student Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Hecht, Laura M.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes similarities and differences between undergraduate and graduate engineering students in the context of two general aspects of the educational experience. First, we explore the extent to which students differ regarding the factors that lead to the choice of becoming an engineer, current satisfaction with that choice, and career-related goals and objectives. Second, we look at the technical communication practices, habits, and training of aerospace engineering students. The reported data were obtained from a survey of student members of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA). The survey was undertaken as a phase 3 activity of the NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Data are reported for the following categories: student demographics; skill importance, skill training, and skill helpfulness; collaborative writing; computer and information technology use and importance; use of electronic networks; use and importance of libraries and library services; use and importance of information sources and products; use of foreign language technical reports; and foreign language (reading and speaking) skills.

  18. Aerospace Community. Aerospace Education I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mickey, V. V.

    This book, one in the series on Aerospace Education I, emphasizes the two sides of aerospace--military aerospace and civilian aerospace. Chapter 1 includes a brief discussion on the organization of Air Force bases and missile sites in relation to their missions. Chapter 2 examines the community services provided by Air Force bases. The topics…

  19. The Brazilian Research and Teaching Center in Biomedicine and Aerospace Biomedical Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Russomano, T; Falcao, P F; Dalmarco, G; Martinelli, L; Cardoso, R; Santos, M A; Sparenberg, A

    2008-01-01

    The recent engagement of Brazil in the construction and utilization of the International Space Station has motivated several Brazilian research institutions and universities to establish study centers related to Space Sciences. The Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUCRS) is no exception. Method: The University initiated in 1993 the first degree course training students to operate commercial aircraft in South America (the School of Aeronautical Sciences. A further step was the decision to build the first Brazilian laboratory dedicated to the conduct of experiments in ground-based microgravity simulation. Established in 1998, the Microgravity Laboratory, which was located in the Instituto de Pesquisas Cientificas e Tecnologicas (IPCT), was supported by the Schools of Medicine, Aeronautical Sciences and Electrical Engineering/Biomedical Engineering. At the end of 2006, the Microgravity Laboratory became a Center and was transferred to the School of Engineering. Results: The principal activities of the Microgravity Centre are the development of research projects related to human physiology before, during and after ground-based microgravity simulation and parabolic flights, to aviation medicine in the 21st century and to aerospace biomedical engineering. Conclusion: The history of Brazilian, and why not say worldwide, space science should unquestionably go through PUCRS. As time passes, the pioneering spirit of our University in the aerospace area has become undeniable. This is due to the group of professionals, students, technicians and staff in general that have once worked or are still working in the Center of Microgravity, a group of faculty and students that excel in their undeniable technical-scientific qualifications. PMID:19048090

  20. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report 7:Summary report to phase 2 respondents including frequency distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Kennedy, John M.; White, Terry F.

    1991-01-01

    Phase 2 of the four phase NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project was undertaken to study the transfer of scientific and technical information (STI) from government to the aerospace industry and the role of librarians and technical information specialists in the transfer process. Data was collected through a self-administered mailback questionnaire. Libraries identified as holding substantial aerospace or aeronautical technical report collections were selected to receive the questionnaires. Within each library, the person responsible for the technical report was requested to answer the questionnaire. Questionnaires were returned from approx. 68 pct. of the libraries. The respondents indicated that scientists and engineer are not aware of the services available from libraries/technical information centers and that scientists and engineers also under-utilized their services. The respondents also indicated they should be more involved in the process.

  1. A Summer Academic Research Experience for Disadvantaged Youth

    PubMed Central

    Kabacoff, Cathryn; Srivastava, Vasudha; Robinson, Douglas N.

    2013-01-01

    Internships are an effective way of connecting high school students in a meaningful manner to the sciences. Disadvantaged minorities have fewer opportunities to participate in internships, and are underrepresented in both science, technology, engineering, and mathematics majors and careers. We have developed a Summer Academic Research Experience (SARE) program that provides an enriching academic internship to underrepresented youth. Our program has shown that to have a successful internship for these disadvantaged youth, several issues need to be addressed in addition to scientific mentoring. We have found that it is necessary to remediate and/or fortify basic academic skills for students to be successful. In addition, students need to be actively coached in the development of professional skills, habits, and attitudes necessary for success in the workplace. With all these factors in place, these youths can become better students, compete on a more level playing field in their internships, and increase their potential of participating actively in the sciences in the future. PMID:24006390

  2. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report 25: The technical communications practices of British aerospace engineers and scientists: Results of the phase 4 RAeS mail survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. government technical report is a primary means by which the results of federally funded research and development (R&D) are transferred to the U.S. aerospace industry. However, little is known about this information product in terms of its actual use, importance, and value in the transfer of federally funded R&D. To help establish a body of knowledge, the U.S. government technical report is being investigated as part of the NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. In this report, we summarize the literature on technical reports and provide a model that depicts the transfer of federally funded aerospace R&D via the U.S. government technical report. We present results from our investigation of aerospace knowledge diffusion vis-a-vis the U.S. government technical report, and present the results of research that investigated aerospace knowledge diffusion vis-a-vis the technical communications practices of British aerospace engineers and scientists.

  3. NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project: Report 43: The Technical Communication Practices of U.S. Aerospace Engineers and Scientists: Results of the Phase 1 Mail Survey -- Manufacturing and Production Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1996-01-01

    The U.S. government technical report is a primary means by which the results of federally funded research and development (R&D) are transferred to the U.S. aerospace industry. However, little is known about this information product in terms of its actual use, importance, and value in the transfer of federally funded R&D. To help establish a body of knowledge, the U.S. government technical report is being investigated as part of the NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. In this report, we summarize the literature on technical reports and provide a model that depicts the transfer of federally funded aerospace R&D via the U.S. government technical report. We present results from our investigation of aerospace knowledge diffusion vis-a-vis the U.S. government technical report, and present the results of research that investigated aerospace knowledge diffusion vis-a-vis the technical communication practices of U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists who were members of the Society of Manufacturing Engineers.

  4. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report 15: Technical uncertainty and project complexity as correlates of information use by US industry-affiliated aerospace engineers and scientists: Results of an exploratory investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Glassman, Nanci A.; Affelder, Linda O.; Hecht, Laura M.; Kennedy, John M.; Barclay, Rebecca O.

    1993-01-01

    An exploratory study was conducted that investigated the influence of technical uncertainty and project complexity on information use by U.S. industry-affiliated aerospace engineers and scientists. The study utilized survey research in the form of a self-administered mail questionnaire. U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists on the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) mailing list served as the study population. The adjusted response rate was 67 percent. The survey instrument is appendix C to this report. Statistically significant relationships were found to exist between technical uncertainty, project complexity, and information use. Statistically significant relationships were found to exist between technical uncertainty, project complexity, and the use of federally funded aerospace R&D. The results of this investigation are relevant to researchers investigating information-seeking behavior of aerospace engineers. They are also relevant to R&D managers and policy planners concerned with transferring the results of federally funded aerospace R&D to the U.S. aerospace industry.

  5. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 8: The role of the information intermediary in the diffusion of aerospace knowledge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Kennedy, John M.; Barclay, Rebecca O.

    1990-01-01

    The United States aerospace industry is experiencing profound changes created by a combination of domestic actions and circumstances such as airline deregulation. Other changes result from external trends such as emerging foreign competition. These circumstances intensify the need to understand the production, transfer, and utilization of knowledge as a precursor to the rapid diffusion of technology. Presented here is a conceptual framework for understanding the diffusion of technology. A conceptual framework is given for understanding the diffusion of aerospace knowledge. The framework focuses on the information channels and members of the social system associated with the aerospace knowledge diffusion process, placing particular emphasis on aerospace librarians as information intermediaries.

  6. 2012 Summer Research Experiences for Undergraduates at Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelaz, Michael W.; Cline, J. D.; Whitworth, C.; Clavier, D.; Owen, L.

    2013-01-01

    Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute (PARI) offers research experiences for undergraduates (REU). PARI receives support for the internships from the NC Space Grant Consortium, NSF awards, private donations, and industry partner funding. The PARI REU program began in 2001 with 4 students and has averaged 6 students per year over the past 11 years. This year PARI hosted 8 funded REU students. Mentors for the interns include PARI’s Science, Education, and Information Technology staff and visiting faculty who are members of the PARI Research Faculty Affiliate program. Students work with mentors on radio and optical astronomy research, electrical engineering for robotic control of instruments, software development for instrument control and software for citizen science projects, and science education by developing curricula and multimedia and teaching high school students in summer programs at PARI. At the end of the summer interns write a paper about their research which is published in the annually published PARI Summer Student Proceedings. Several of the students have presented their results at AAS Meetings. We will present a summary of specific research conducted by the students with their mentors and the logistics for hosting the PARI undergraduate internship program.

  7. Goddard Summer Interns: Alejandro Arambula

    NASA Video Gallery

    Alejandro Arambula is an aerospace engineering student at M.I.T. and a 2011 summer intern in Goddard's Propulsion Lab. This summer he is working with his mentor Khary Parker in building a test asse...

  8. Emerging Trends in the Globalization of Knowledge: The Role of the Technical Report in Aerospace Research and Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Golich, Vicki L.

    1997-01-01

    Economists, management theorists, business strategists, and governments alike recognize knowledge as the single most important resource in today's global economy. Because of its relationship to technological progress and economic growth, many governments have taken a keen interest in knowledge, specifically its production, transfer, and use. This paper focuses on the technical report as a product for disseminating the results of aerospace research and development (R&D) and its use and importance to aerospace engineers and scientists. The emergence of knowledge as an intellectual asset, its relationship to innovation, and its importance in a global economy provides the context for the paper. The relationships between government and knowledge and between government and innovation are used to placed knowledge within the context of publicly-funded R&D. Data, including the reader preferences of NASA technical reports, are derived from the NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project, a ten-year study of knowledge diffusion in the U.S. aerospace industry.

  9. NASA Glenn Research in Controls and Diagnostics for Intelligent Aerospace Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Sanjay

    2007-01-01

    With the increased emphasis on aircraft safety, enhanced performance and affordability, and the need to reduce the environmental impact of aircraft, there are many new challenges being faced by the designers of aircraft propulsion systems. The Controls and Dynamics Branch (CDB) at NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) Glenn Research Center (GRC) in Cleveland, Ohio, is leading and participating in various projects in partnership with other organizations within GRC and across NASA, the U.S. aerospace industry, and academia to develop advanced controls and health management technologies that will help meet these challenges through the concept of Intelligent Propulsion Systems. This presentation describes the current CDB activities in support of the NASA Aeronautics Research Mission, with an emphasis on activities under the Integrated Vehicle Health Management (IVHM) and Integrated Resilient Aircraft Control (IRAC) projects of the Aviation Safety Program. Under IVHM, CDB focus is on developing advanced techniques for monitoring the health of the aircraft engine gas path with a focus on reliable and early detection of sensor, actuator and engine component faults. Under IRAC, CDB focus is on developing adaptive engine control technologies which will increase the probability of survival of aircraft in the presence of damage to flight control surfaces or to one or more engines. The technology development plans are described as well as results from recent research accomplishments.

  10. Aerospace Medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michaud, Vince

    2015-01-01

    NASA Aerospace Medicine overview - Aerospace Medicine is that specialty area of medicine concerned with the determination and maintenance of the health, safety, and performance of those who fly in the air or in space.

  11. Tailoring Summer Research Experiences to Diverse Student Cohorts: Lessons Learned from Teaching Scientific Communication to Summer Interns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batchelor, R. L.; Haacker, R.

    2014-12-01

    Scientific posters, presentations and papers are frequently assigned outputs for students participating in summer research experiences, yet previous exposure to any form of scientific communication is not a given. Providing training in scientific communication in some form is thus a necessity for many internship programs, especially those aimed towards academically younger students. In this presentation, we will share some of the experiences we've gained from teaching scientific communication workshops to summer interns who range from high school to graduate school. Building on the many years of experience learned through the Significant Opportunities in Atmospheric Research Science (SOARS) program, course material has been adapted and tailored to students participating in the National Center for Atmospheric Research High-School Internship Research Opportunity (HIRO, now the NCAR PreCollege Internship) and Research Experiences for Community College Students (RECCS, based with Colorado University's Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science). SOARS also has experience supporting graduate students towards publication. Weekly communications workshops have served not only to provide necessary scientific skills, but also as a place to gather, reflect, discuss and build community. The unique opportunities and challenges in working with each of these groups will be discussed as part of the larger community discussion of how we can increase diversity in STEM through providing genuine research experiences to diverse and academically young students.

  12. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 34: Users and uses of DOD technical reports: A report from the field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1993-01-01

    The NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project attempts to understand the information environment in which U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists work, the information-seeking behavior of U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists, and the factors that influence the use of scientific and technical information (STI) (Pinelli, Barclay, and Kennedy, 1991). Such an understanding could (1) lead to the development of practical theory, (2) contribute to the design and development of aerospace information systems, and (3) have practical implications for transferring the results of federally funded aerospace research and development (R&D) to the U.S. aerospace community. This paper presents data from two information-seeking behavior studies involving U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists that were undertaken as Phase 1 activities of the NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Responses from three groups of respondents - DoD, other government, and industry - are presented for two sets of selected questions. One set focuses on DoD technical reports: their use and importance, reasons for non-use, the factors affecting their use, the sources used to find out about them and the sources used to physically obtain them, and the quality of DoD technical reports. The second set focuses on information sources used in problem solving: the use of U.S. government technical reports in problem solving and the information sources used to find out about U.S. government technical reports.

  13. Cultivating a Grassroots Aerospace Innovation Culture at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Souza, Sarah; Sanchez, Hugo; Lewis, Ryan

    2017-01-01

    This paper details the adaptation of specific 'knowledge production' methods to implement a first of its kind, grassroots event that provokes a cultural change in how the NASA Ames civil servant community engages in the creation and selection of innovative ideas. Historically, selection of innovative proposals at NASA Ames Research Center is done at the highest levels of management, isolating the views and perspectives of the larger civil servant community. Additionally, NASA innovation programs are typically open to technical organizations and do not engage non-technical organizations to bring forward innovative processes/business practices. Finally, collaboration on innovative ideas and associated solutions tend to be isolated to organizational silos. In this environment, not all Ames employees feel empowered to innovate and opportunities for employee collaboration are limited. In order to address these issues, the 'innovation contest' method was adapted to create the NASA Ames Innovation Fair, a unique, grassroots innovation opportunity for the civil servant community. The Innovation Fair consisted of a physical event with a virtual component. The physical event provided innovators the opportunity to collaborate and pitch their innovations to the NASA Ames community. The civil servant community then voted for the projects that they viewed as innovative and would contribute to NASA's core mission, making this event a truly grassroots effort. The Innovation Fair website provided a location for additional knowledge sharing, discussion, and voting. On March 3rd, 2016, the 'First Annual NASA Ames Innovation Fair' was held with 49 innovators and more than 300 participants collaborating and/or voting for the best innovations. Based on the voting results, seven projects were awarded seed funding for projects ranging from innovative cost models to innovations in aerospace technology. Surveys of both innovators and Fair participants show the Innovation Fair was successful

  14. Project Head Start, Psychological Services Report, Research, Summer 1968.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornton, Sam

    In a summer program, 351 Head Start children were assessed. Goals of the program were (1) to assess the educability of these children as a group, (2) to identify to public schools the children in need of early special help, and (3) to obtain information germane for future Head Start programs. Children were screened with reference to probable…

  15. Emerging and Future Computing Paradigms and Their Impact on the Research, Training, and Design Environments of the Aerospace Workforce

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K. (Compiler)

    2003-01-01

    The document contains the proceedings of the training workshop on Emerging and Future Computing Paradigms and their impact on the Research, Training and Design Environments of the Aerospace Workforce. The workshop was held at NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia, March 18 and 19, 2003. The workshop was jointly sponsored by Old Dominion University and NASA. Workshop attendees came from NASA, other government agencies, industry and universities. The objectives of the workshop were to a) provide broad overviews of the diverse activities related to new computing paradigms, including grid computing, pervasive computing, high-productivity computing, and the IBM-led autonomic computing; and b) identify future directions for research that have high potential for future aerospace workforce environments. The format of the workshop included twenty-one, half-hour overview-type presentations and three exhibits by vendors.

  16. MCTP Summer Research Internship Program. Research Presentation Day: Experience Mathematics and Science in the Real World

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents the summaries of the MCTP Summer Research Internship Program. Technological areas discussed include: Mathematical curriculum development for real world problems; Rain effects on air-water gas exchange; multi-ring impact basins on mars; developing an interactive multimedia educational cd-rom on remote sensing; a pilot of an activity for for the globe program; fossils in maryland; developing children's programming for the american horticultural society at river farm; children's learning, educational programs of the national park service; a study of climate and student satisfaction in two summer programs for disadvantaged students interested in careers in mathematics and science; the maryland governor's academy, integrating technology into the classroom; stream sampling with the maryland biological stream survey (MBSS); the imaging system inspection software technology, the preparation and detection of nominal and faulted steel ingots; event-based science, the development of real-world science units; correlation between anxiety and past experiences; environmental education through summer nature camp; enhancing learning opportunities at the Salisbury zoo; plant growth experiment, a module for the middle school classroom; the effects of proxisome proliferators in Japanese medaka embryos; development of a chapter on birth control and contraceptive methodologies as part of an interactive computer-based education module on hiv and aids; excretion of gentamicin in toadfish and goldfish; the renaissance summer program; and Are field trips important to the regional math science center?

  17. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report number 20: The use of selected information products and services by US aerospace engineers and scientists: Results of two surveys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. government technical report is a primary means by which the results of federally funded research and development (R&D) are transferred to the U.S. aerospace industry. However, little is known about this information product in terms of its actual use, importance, and value in the transfer of federally, funded R&D. To help establish a body of knowledge, the U.S. government technical report is being investigated as part of the NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. In this report, we summarize the literature on technical reports and provide a model that depicts the transfer of federally funded aerospace R&D via the U.S. government technical report. We present results from two surveys of our investigation of aerospace knowledge diffusion vis-a-vis the U.S. government technical report and close with a brief overview of on-going research into aerospace knowledge diffusion focusing on the role of the industry-affiliated information intermediary.

  18. NADA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report number 19: The US government technical report and the transfer of federally funded aerospace R/D: An analysis of five studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. government technical report is a primary means by which the results of federally funded research and development are transferred to the U.S. aerospace industry. However, little is known about this information product in terms of its actual use, importance, and value in the transfer of federally funded R&D. To help establish a body of knowledge, the U.S. government technical report is being investigated as part of the 'NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project'. In this report, we summarize the literature on technical reprts and provide a model that depicts the transfer of federally funded aerospace R&D via the U.S. government technical report. We present results from five studies of our investigation of aerospace knowledge diffusion vis-a-vis the U.S. government technical report and close with a brief overview of on-going research into the use of the U.S. government technical report as a rhetorical device for transferring federally funded aerospace R&D.

  19. NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report Number 20. The Use of Selected Information Products and Services by U.S. Aerospace Engineers and Scientists: Results of Two Surveys.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-02-01

    Stevenson 1976 McClure, C. R. "The Federal Technical Report Literature: Research Needs and 1988 Issues." Government Information Quarterly 5(1): 27-44...Pinelli, T. E., "The NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research J. M. Kennedy, and Project." Government Information Quarterly 8(2): 219-233. R. 0

  20. NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report Number 13. Source Selection and Information Use by U.S. Aerospace Engineers and Scientists: Results of a Telephone Survey

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-09-01

    Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Government Information Quarterly 8(2), 219- 233. Shuchman, H. L. (1981). Information Transfer in...Research Project. Reprinted from Government Information Quarterly , Volume 8, No. 2 (1991): 219-233. (Available from AIAA 91A35455.) 1 1 Pinelli, Thomas

  1. NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report Number 19. The U. S. Government Technical Report and the Transfer of Federally Funded Aerospace R&D: An Analysis of Five Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    Merrill. D. W. Stevenson 1976 McClure, C. R. "The Federal Technical Report Literature: Research Needs and 1988 Issues." Government Information Quarterly 5...T. E., "The NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research J. M. Kennedy, and Project." Government Information Quarterly 8(2): 219-233. R. 0

  2. The Lincoln Laboratory-Aerospace Medical Research Laboratory digital speech test facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tierney, J.; Schecter, H.

    1984-05-01

    A narrowband digital speech communication test facility has been established and operates between Lincoln Laboratory and the Wright-Patterson Aerospace Medical Research Laboratory. Noise fields simulating the acoustic environments of E3A and F-15 aircraft are established and Air Force personnel use the link operating at 2400 bps with a vocoder designed at Lincoln Laboratory, and a commercial telephone line modem. The facility includes a digital signal processing computer which can introduce bit errors and delay into the transmit and receive data. Communication scenarios are used to exercise the vocoder-modem channel with the dynamics and vocabulary of typical operational exchanges. Answers to a standard questionnaire provide acceptability data for the 2400 bps JTIDS class 2 voice channel. For the tests run so far, the 2400 bps voice is acceptable in the sense of positive user response to the questionnaire. Further testing using error and delay simulations will follow. An F-15 to F-15 link will be simulated at AMRL using a pair of vocoders operating back-to-back and in separate noise chambers.

  3. NASA Glenn Research in Controls and Diagnostics for Intelligent Aerospace Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    With the increased emphasis on aircraft safety, enhanced performance and affordability, and the need to reduce the environmental impact of aircraft, there are many new challenges being faced by the designers of aircraft propulsion systems. Also the propulsion systems required to enable the NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) Vision for Space Exploration in an affordable manner will need to have high reliability, safety and autonomous operation capability. The Controls and Dynamics Branch at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) in Cleveland, Ohio, is leading and participating in various projects in partnership with other organizations within GRC and across NASA, the U.S. aerospace industry, and academia to develop advanced controls and health management technologies that will help meet these challenges through the concept of Intelligent Propulsion Systems. The key enabling technologies for an Intelligent Propulsion System are the increased efficiencies of components through active control, advanced diagnostics and prognostics integrated with intelligent engine control to enhance operational reliability and component life, and distributed control with smart sensors and actuators in an adaptive fault tolerant architecture. This paper describes the current activities of the Controls and Dynamics Branch in the areas of active component control and propulsion system intelligent control, and presents some recent analytical and experimental results in these areas.

  4. NASA Ames Summer High School Apprenticeship Research Program: 1986 research papers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Patricia

    1988-01-01

    Engineering enrollments are rising in universities; however the graduate engineering shortage continues. Particularly, women and minorities will be underrepresented for many years. As one means of solving this shortage, Federal agencies facing future scientific and technological challenges were asked to participate in the Summer High School Apprenticeship Research Program (SHARP). This program was created to provide an engineering experience for gifted female and minority high school students at an age when they could still make career and education decisions. The SHARP program is designed for high school juniors who are U.S. citizens, are 16 years old, and who have very high promise in math and science through outstanding academic performance in high school. Students who are accepted into this summer program will earn as they learn by working 8 hr days in a 5-day work week. Reports from SHARP students are presented.

  5. The 1983 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Research Program research reports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horn, W. J. (Editor); Duke, M. B. (Editor)

    1983-01-01

    The 1983 NASA/ASEE Summary Faculty Fellowship Research Program was conducted by Texas A&M University and the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center (JSC). The 10-week program was operated under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE). The basic objectives of the programs, which began in 1965 at JSC and in 1964 nationally, are (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members, (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA, (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions, and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Centers. The faculty fellows spent 10 weeks at JSC engaged in a research project commensurate with their interests and background. They worked in collaboration with a NASA/JSC colleague. This document is a compilation of final reports on their research during the summer of 1983.

  6. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 16: A comparison of the technical communications practices of Russian and US aerospace engineers and scientists

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Kennedy, John M.; Barclay, Rebecca O.

    1993-01-01

    As part of Phase 4 of the NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Project, two studies were conducted that investigated the technical communications practices of Russian and U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists. Both studies have the same five objectives: first, to solicit the opinions of aerospace engineers and scientists regarding the importance of technical communications to their profession; second, to determine the use and production of technical communications by aerospace engineers and scientists; third, to seek their views about the appropriate content of an undergraduate course in technical communications; fourth, to determine aerospace engineers' and scientists' use of libraries, technical information centers, and on-line data bases; and fifth, to determine the use and importance of computer and information technology to them. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to aerospace engineers and scientists at the Central Aero-Hydrodynamic Institute (TsAGI), NASA ARC, and NASA LaRC. The completion rates for the Russian and U.S. surveys were 64 and 61 percent, respectively. The responses of the Russian and U.S. participants, to selected questions, are presented in this report.

  7. United States Air Force Summer Faculty Research Program. Program Technical Report. 1990. Volume 3

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-05

    Biomechanics Melbourne Univ. Australia Assigned: Aerospace Medical Research Lab. Parkville 3052 Victoria Australia, (03) 344-5158 Shannon Lieb Degree: PhD...Materials 112 Structural Analysis of Polymer Precursors Dr. David Grossie with Potential Nonlinear Optical Properties xlix Volume i 113 Eddy Current Testing...flow of Newtonian fluid with constant properties , the governing equations for the unsteady flow and heat transfer in cartesian tensor form are

  8. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report 28: The technical communication practices of aerospace engineering and science students: Results of the phase 4 cross-national surveys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Hecht, Laura M.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes similarities and differences between undergraduate and graduate aerospace engineering and science students in the context of two general aspects of the educational experience. First, we explore the extent to which students differ regarding the factors that lead to the choice of becoming an aerospace engineer or a scientist, current satisfaction with that choice, and career-related goals and objectives. Second, we look at the technical communication skills, practices, habits, and training of aerospace engineering and science students. The reported data were obtained from a survey of students enrolled in aerospace engineering and science programs at universities in India, Japan, Russia, and the United Kingdom. The surveys were undertaken as part of the NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Data are reported for the following categories: student demographics; skill importance, skill training, and skill helpfulness; collaborative writing; computer and information technology use and importance, use of electronic networks; use and importance of libraries and library services; use and importance of information sources and products; use of foreign language technical reports; and foreign language (reading and speaking) skills.

  9. The NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project: A Research Agenda

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    DC: National Science to-Industry Advanced Technology Transfer. A Case Foundation, 1986. (Available from NTIS, Springfield, Study." Research Policy 12...1982): 133-136. munications in Technological Innovation." Research Policy 2 (1973): 204-225. Tushman. Michael L and David A. Nadler. "Com- munication

  10. NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program. 1991 Research Reports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosler, E. Ramon (Editor); Beymer, Mark A. (Editor); Armstrong, Dennis W. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    Reports from the NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program are presented. The editors are responsible for selecting appropriately qualified faculty to address some of the many problems of current interest to NASA Kennedy. Some representative titles are as follows: Development of an Accelerated Test Method for the Determination of Susceptibility to Atmospheric Corrosion; Hazardous Gas Leak Analysis in the Space Shuttle; Modeling and Control of the Automated Radiator Inspection Device; Study of the Finite Element Software Packages at KSC; Multispectral Image Processing for Plants; Algorithms for Contours Depicting Static Electric Fields during Adverse Weather Conditions; Transient Study of a Cryogenic Hydrogen Filling System; and Precision Cleaning Verification of Nonvolatile Residues by using Water, Ultrasonics, and Turbidity Analyses.

  11. Aerospace Plane Technology: Research and Development Efforts in Japan and Australia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-10-01

    However, only with the develop- Aerospace Planes ment of better test facility instruments and more trained personnel, together with the renovation and...necessary. Such a rocket booster (the H-IID) would be one of the largest launchers in the world after the Soviet Energia booster and U.S. Titan IV launch

  12. A model for estimating the cost impact of schedule perturbations on aerospace research and development programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, D. F.

    1972-01-01

    The problem of determining the cost impact attributable to perturbations in an aerospace R and D program schedule is discussed in terms of the diminishing availability of funds. The methodology from which a model is presented for updating R and D cost estimates as a function of perturbations in program time is presented.

  13. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report 14: Engineering work and information use in aerospace: Results of a telephone survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Kennedy, John M.; White, Terry F.

    1992-01-01

    A telephone survey of U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists who were on the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) mailing list was conducted between August 14-26, 1991. The survey was undertaken to obtain information on the daily work activities of aerospace engineers and scientists, to measure various practices used by aerospace engineers and scientists to obtain STI, and to ask aerospace engineers and scientists about their use of electronic networks. Co-workers were found important sources of information. Co-workers are used to obtain technical information because the information they have is relevant, not because co-workers are accessible. As technical uncertainty increases, so does the need for information internal and external to the organization. Electronic networks enjoy widespread use within the aerospace community. These networks are accessible and they are used to contact people at remote sites. About 80 percent of the respondents used electronic mail, file transfer, and information or data retrieval to commercial or in-house data bases.

  14. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report 30: Computer-Mediated Communication (CMC) and the communication of technical information in aerospace. Ph.D Thesis - Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst. Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Daniel J.; Pinelli, Thomas E.

    1994-01-01

    This research used survey research to examine the use of communication media in general and electronic media specifically in the U.S. aerospace industry. The survey population included 1,006 randomly selected U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists who belong to the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA). Survey data were compared with qualitative information obtained from 32 AIAA members in telephone and face-to-face conversations. The Information Processing (IP) model developed by Tushman and Nadler and Daft and Lengel constituted the study's theoretical basis. This research analyzed responses regarding communication methods of U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists who create use and disseminate aerospace knowledge and explored selected contextual environmental variables related to media use and effective performance. The results indicate that uncertainty is significantly reduced in environments when levels of analyzability are high. When uncertainty is high there is significantly more use of electronic media. However no relation was found between overall effectiveness and media use in environments stratified by levels by analyzability or equivocality. The results indicate modest support for the influences of uncertainty and analyzability on electronic media use. Although most respondents reported that electronic networks are important for their work the data suggest that there are sharply disparate levels of use.

  15. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 43: The role of information resource training in aerospace education. Expanded version

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, Barbara; Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.; Holloway, Karen

    1994-01-01

    Information resource instruction for undergraduate aerospace engineering students has traditionally been limited to an occasional part of the education process--a written paper required in the capstone design course or a library tour. Efforts to encourage the use of aerospace literature and information resources have been made in the past decade, with a recent push from information and, especially, networking technology. This paper presents data from a survey of U.S. aerospace engineering students regarding their instruction in the use of information resources. We find that more than 25 percent of the students surveyed had no instruction in technical communications skills or the use of information resources. We consider the need for instruction in the use of information resources and technical communications skills and the opportunities presented for improvement.

  16. Selected Research and Development Topics on Aerospace Communications at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, Felix A.; Romanofsky, Robert R.; Nessel, James A.

    2014-01-01

    This presentation discusses some of the efforts on communications RD that have been performed or are currently underway at NASA Glenn Research Center. The primary purpose of this presentation is to outline some RD topics to serve as talking points for a Technical Interchange Meeting with the Ohio State University. The meeting is scheduled to take place at The ElectroScience Laboratory of the Ohio State University on February 24, 2014.

  17. The STEM Pipeline: The Role of Summer Research Experience in Minority Students' Ph.D. Aspirations.

    PubMed

    Pender, Matea; Marcotte, Dave E; Sto Domingo, Mariano R; Maton, Kenneth I

    2010-12-10

    Practical research experience has been seen as an important tool to enhance learning in STEM fields and shape commitment to science careers. Indeed, this was a prominent recommendation of the Boyer Commission. Further, there is evidence this is especially important for minority students. In this paper, we examine the role of practical research experience during the summer for talented minority undergraduates in STEM fields. We focus on the link between summer research and STEM Ph.D. program matriculation. We examine evidence on this question using detailed data on students participating in the Meyerhoff Scholarship Program over a 14 year period at the University of Maryland Baltimore County. Our results provide evidence of strong positive effects of summer research on participation in STEM Ph.D. programs. Further, we show that the effects of summer research vary with the frequency and timing of these experiences. The evidence that educational strategies such as summer research experiences improve academic outcomes of minorities is vital, given concern about the science pipeline in the U.S. and the continuing growth in the racial/ethnic diversity of the college-age population.

  18. The STEM Pipeline: The Role of Summer Research Experience in Minority Students' Ph.D. Aspirations

    PubMed Central

    Pender, Matea; Marcotte, Dave E.; Sto. Domingo, Mariano R.; Maton, Kenneth I.

    2011-01-01

    Practical research experience has been seen as an important tool to enhance learning in STEM fields and shape commitment to science careers. Indeed, this was a prominent recommendation of the Boyer Commission. Further, there is evidence this is especially important for minority students. In this paper, we examine the role of practical research experience during the summer for talented minority undergraduates in STEM fields. We focus on the link between summer research and STEM Ph.D. program matriculation. We examine evidence on this question using detailed data on students participating in the Meyerhoff Scholarship Program over a 14 year period at the University of Maryland Baltimore County. Our results provide evidence of strong positive effects of summer research on participation in STEM Ph.D. programs. Further, we show that the effects of summer research vary with the frequency and timing of these experiences. The evidence that educational strategies such as summer research experiences improve academic outcomes of minorities is vital, given concern about the science pipeline in the U.S. and the continuing growth in the racial/ethnic diversity of the college-age population. PMID:21841903

  19. Langley Research Highlights 1999: Advanced Aerospace Technology Clouds That Help Create the Ozone Hole Capturing Comet Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This report contains highlights of some of the major accomplishments and applications made by NASA Langley Research Center and its university partners and industry colleagues during 1999. The highlights illustrate the broad range of research and technology activities carried out by NASA Langley and the contributions of this work toward maintaining United States' leadership in aeronautics and space research. The Center's historic national role since 1917 continues in Aerospace Technology research with an additional major role in Earth Science research. Langley also partners closely with other NASA Centers and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Space Science and the Human Exploration and Development of Space. A color version is available at http://larcpubs.larc.nasa.gov/randt/1999/. For further information, contact Dennis Bushnell, Senior Scientist, Mail Stop 110, NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia 23681-2199, (757)-864-8987, e-mail address: d.m.bushnell@larc.nasa.gov.

  20. Military Aerospace. Aerospace Education II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, J. C.

    This book is a revised publication in the series on Aerospace Education II. It describes the employment of aerospace forces, their methods of operation, and some of the weapons and equipment used in combat and combat support activities. The first chapter describes some of the national objectives and policies served by the Air Force in peace and…

  1. Aerospace Environment. Aerospace Education I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savler, D. S.; Smith, J. C.

    This book is one in the series on Aerospace Education I. It briefly reviews current knowledge of the universe, the earth and its life-supporting atmosphere, and the arrangement of celestial bodies in outer space and their physical characteristics. Chapter 1 includes a brief survey of the aerospace environment. Chapters 2 and 3 examine the…

  2. United States Air Force Summer Research Program -- 1992 High School Apprenticeship Program (HSAP) Reports. Volume 13. Phillips Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    Research Program Phillips Laboratory I4oJ A*6Iv4 Sponsored by: Air Force Office of Scientific Research Kirtland Air ...UNITED STATES AIR FORCE SUMMER RESEARCH PROGki"A -- 1992 HIGH SCHOOL APPRENTICESHIP PROGRAM (HSAP) REPORTS VOLUME 13 (t PHILLIPS LABORATORY . RESEARCH ...Arlington High School Final Report for: Summer Research Program Geophysics Directorate Phillips Laboratory

  3. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 52: A comparison of the technical communications practices of Japanese and US aerospace engineers and scientists

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Holloway, Karen; Sato, Yuko; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1995-01-01

    To understand the diffusion of aerospace knowledge, it is necessary to understand the communications practices and the information-seeking behaviors of those involved in the production, transfer, and use of aerospace knowledge at the individual, organizational, national, and international levels. In this paper, we report selected results from a survey of Japanese and U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists that focused on communications practices and information-seeking behaviors in the workplace. Data are presented for the following topics: importance of and time spent communicating information, collaborative writing, need for an undergraduate course in technical communications, use of libraries, the use and importance of electronic (computer) networks, and the use and importance of foreign and domestically produced technical reports. The responses of the survey respondents are placed within the context of the Japanese culture. We assume that differences in Japanese and U.S. cultures influence the communications practices and information-seeking behaviors of Japanese and U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists.

  4. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 40: Technical communications in aerospace education: A study of AIAA student members

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, John M.; Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the preliminary analysis of a survey of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) student members. In the paper we examine (1) the demographic characteristics of the students, (2) factors that affected their career decisions, (3) their career goals and aspirations, and (4) their training in technical communication and techniques for finding and using aerospace scientific and technical information (STI). We determine that aerospace engineering students receive training in technical communication skills and the use of STI. While those in the aerospace industry think that more training is needed, we believe the students receive the appropriate amount of training. We think that the differences between the amount of training students receive and the perception of training needs is related partially to the characteristics of the students and partially to the structure of the aerospace STI dissemination system. Overall, we conclude that the students' technical communication training and knowledge of STI, while limited by external forces, makes it difficult for students to achieve their career goals.

  5. AGARD (Advisory Group for Aerospace Research & Development) Index of Publications, 1986-1988

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-08-01

    THE UTILIZATION OF THIN FILM SENSORS FOR MEASUREMENTS IN TURBOMACHINERY [ UTILISATION DES CAPTEURS PELLICULAIRES POUR LA MESURE SUR TURROMACHINES] A... UTILISATION DES CODES EULER EN are coupled with solutions of the Euler and the boundary-layer AERODYNAMIGUE NON LINEAIRE] equations. The basic idea...Prospects of this technique for avionics AEROSPACE EXPERT SYSTEMS ( UTILISATION DE EMICAT are assessed. ESA POUR LE DEVELOPPEMENT DE SYSTEMES EXPERTS

  6. Overview of the AgRISTARS research program. I. [AGgriculture and Resources Inventory Surveys Through Aerospace Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caudill, C. E.; Hatch, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    An account is given of the activities and accomplishments to date of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Agriculture and Resources Inventory Surveys Through Aerospace Remote Sensing (AgRISTARS) program, which is a cooperative venture with NASA and the Departments of the Interior and of Commerce. AgRISTARS research activities encompass early warning and crop condition assessment, inventory technology development for production forecasting, crop yield model development, soil moisture monitoring, domestic crops and land cover sensing, renewable resources inventory, and conservation and pollution assessment.

  7. 2002 Research Reports: NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kotnour, Tim (Editor); Black, Cassandra (Editor)

    2002-01-01

    This document is a collection of technical reports on research conducted by the participants in the 2002 NASA/ASEE Faculty Fellowship Program at the John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC). This was the 18th year that a NASA/ASEE program has been conducted at KSC. The 2002 program was administered by the University of Central Florida (UCF) in cooperation with KSC. The program was operated under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) and the Education Division, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The KSC Program was one of nine such Aeronautics and Space Research Programs funded by NASA Headquarters in 2002. The KSC Faculty Fellows spent ten weeks working with NASA scientists and engineers on research of mutual interest to the university faculty member and the NASA colleague. The editors of this document were responsible for selecting appropriately qualified faculty to address some of the many research areas of current interest to NASA/KSC. The NASA/ASEE program is intended to be a two-year program to allow in-depth research by the university faculty member.

  8. Interdisciplinary Research in a Dense Summer Bridge: The Role of a Writing Intensive Chemistry Seminar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waratuke, Stephen; Kling, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We describe the structure of a writing-intensive, chemistry first year seminar designed to support a three week, research focused summer bridge program. Writing assignments in the seminar helped students understand their research activities, learn to conduct themselves as scientists, and reflect upon their lab work. The writing intensive seminar…

  9. Arrival: Notes from the 2005 "Views on Understanding" Summer Institute, Harvard University Project Zero Research Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fluellen, Jerry E., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    Of all the summer institutes for educators, the Harvard University Project Zero Research Center's "Views on Understanding" institute stands out as one of the few offering extensive exchanges amongst researchers and practitioners from all over the world. "Arrival" captures the experience of one participant while capturing the essences of plenary…

  10. Research Reports: 1988 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, L. Michael (Editor); Chappell, Charles R. (Editor); Cothran, Ernestine K. (Editor); Karr, Gerald R. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The basic objectives are to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA: to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of the participants' institutions; and to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA centers. Topics addressed include: cryogenics; thunderstorm simulation; computer techniques; computer assisted instruction; system analysis weather forecasting; rocket engine design; crystal growth; control systems design; turbine pumps for the Space Shuttle Main engine; electron mobility; heat transfer predictions; rotor dynamics; mathematical models; computational fluid dynamics; and structural analysis.

  11. The Los Alamos Space Weather Summer School: Career and Research Benefits to Students and Mentors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowee, M.

    2014-12-01

    This last summer we held the 4th Los Alamos Space Weather Summer School. This 8-week long program is designed for mid-career graduate students in related fields to come to LANL, receive lectures on space physics and space environment topics, and carry out a research project under the mentorship of LANL staff members. On average we have accepted ~10 students per year to the program, with a strong applicant pool to choose from. This type of summer school program is relatively unique in the space physics community—there are several other summer schools but they are of shorter duration and do not include the mentor-research project aspect which builds a strong one-on-one connection between the summer student and his/her LANL mentor(s). From the LANL perspective, this program was intended to have several benefits including building collaborations between LANL staff and universities and recruitment of potential postdocs. From the student perspective, this program is not only an educational opportunity but a strong networking opportunity and a chance to enhance their professional skills and publication record. Students are permitted to work on projects directly related to their thesis or on projects in areas that are completely new to them. At the end of the summer school, the students also develop their presentation skills by preparing and giving 20 min presentations on their research projects to the research group. Over the past four years the summer school has increased in popularity, and the feedback from the student participants has been very positive. Alumni of the program have continued collaborations with their mentors, resulting in publications and conference presentations, and one postdoc hire to date.

  12. The Los Alamos Space Weather Summer School: Career and Research Benefits to Students and Mentors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowee, M.

    2015-12-01

    This last summer we held the 5th Los Alamos Space Weather Summer School. This 8-week long program is designed for mid-career graduate students in related fields to come to LANL, receive lectures on space physics and space environment topics, and carry out a research project under the mentorship of LANL staff members. We accept typically 6-8 students to the program, with a strong applicant pool to choose from. This type of summer school program is relatively unique in the space physics community—there are several other summer schools but they are of shorter duration and do not include the mentor-research project aspect which builds a strong one-on-one connection between the summer student and his/her LANL mentor(s). From the LANL perspective, this program was intended to have several benefits including building collaborations between LANL staff and universities and recruitment of potential postdocs. From the student perspective, this program is not only an educational opportunity but a strong networking opportunity and a chance to enhance their professional skills and publication record. Students are permitted to work on projects directly related to their thesis or on projects in areas that are completely new to them. At the end of the summer school, the students also develop their presentation skills by preparing and giving AGU-style presentations on their research projects to the research group. Over the past five years the summer school has increased in popularity, and the feedback from the student participants has been very positive. Alumni of the program have continued collaborations with their mentors, resulting in publications and conference presentations, and one postdoc hire to date.

  13. USAF/SCEEE Summer Faculty Research Program (1979). Volume 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    contend with environmental events could prove quite enlightening . 29-26 1b The second research issue that is a recently realized implicit assumption is...human performance is heavily influenced by Cannon’s (1932) neurophysiological model and Selye’s (1956) endocrinological model. In short, these models

  14. Isaac Dickson Multicultural Summer Research Team Project, 1992.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGlinn, Jeanne; And Others

    This collection of papers represents the reading, writing, film-viewing, and discussion exercises that were the center of a 5-week research institute held in North Carolina for educators from the Isaac Dickson Elementary School and the University of North Carolina, Asheville. The papers are (1) "A Model for Staff Development in Multiculturalism"…

  15. Aerospace Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paschke, Jean; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Describes the Sauk Rapids (Minnesota) High School aviation and aerospace curriculum that was developed by Curtis Olson and the space program developed by Gerald Mayall at Philadelphia's Northeast High School. Both were developed in conjunction with NASA. (JOW)

  16. Microbial ecology summer research program, June 20-August 26, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    The personnel, lecture topics, and summaries of research reports generated are presented. Research topics include: mutants of Escherichia coli affected in inducer exclusion; anaerobic chitin degradation; feeding relationships of harpacticoid copepods and microbial flora; degradation of ortho phenyl phenol by streptomycetes; biodegradation of dieldrin and aromatic compounds; the effect of neurotoxins on chemotaxis is Spirochaeta aurantia; chemotaxis and algal attachment of caulobacter; pigment formation in Lyngbya aestuari; diel movements of bacteria in a salt marsh; chemotaxis in S. Aurantia; isolation of marine toluate-oxidizing bacteria; growth inhibition of enteric bacteria by methyl-..cap alpha..-D-glucoside; studies of magnetic bacteria in brackish waters; and mechanisms of interaction between two microbial populations in activated sludge. (ACR)

  17. USAF/SCEEE Summer Faculty Research Program (1979). Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    Dover Publications, 1958. (2] L. H. Koopmans, THE SPECTRAL ANALYSIS OF TIME SERIES, Academic Press, New York, 1974. [3] D. G. Childers , MODERN...Estimates and Applications of the Maximum Entropy Method," Journal of Geophysical Research, 80, No. 4, pp. 619-625, February 1975. 6. D. G. Childers ...1947, Loolau basalt series, Oahu, Hawaii: Geol. Soc. America Bull., v.58, p.49-78. 95. Stearns, H.T., 1939, Geologic map and guide of the island of

  18. Summer Synthesis Institutes: A Novel Approach for Transformative Research and Student Career Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, J.; Hermans, C. M.

    2010-12-01

    It is believed that breakthroughs tend to occur when small groups of highly motivated scientists are driven by challenges encountered in real problem-solving situations and given the freedom to experiment with new ideas. Summer synthesis institutes provide a mechanism to facilitiate these breakthroughs and by which graduate students may engage in interdisciplinary research in a way that is not often available in their normal course of study. In this presentation we examine two complementary models of summer synthesis institutes in hydrology, how these intensive programs facilitate scientific outcomes and the impact of synthesis and the summer institute model on student perceptions of academic roles, collaboration opportunities and team science. Five summer synthesis institutes were held over three years, sharing similar duration and structure but different degrees of participant interdisciplinarity and focus questions. Through informal assessments, this presentation will demonstrate how these programs offered a unique opportunity for the development of student-student and student-mentor relationships and facilitated deeper understanding of a student’s own research as well as new techniques, perspective and disciplines. Additionally, though the summer synthesis institute model offers a unique ability to leverage limited funding (on the order of a single graduate student) to advance earth sciences, the model also presents specific challenges for research follow-through and may require specific content and interpersonal dynamics for optimum success.

  19. Research reports: 1990 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Loren A. (Editor); Beymer, Mark A. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    A collection of technical reports on research conducted by the participants in this program is presented. The topics covered include: human-computer interface software, multimode fiber optic communication links, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, rocket-triggered lightning, robotics, a flammability study of thin polymeric film materials, a vortex shedding flowmeter, modeling of flow systems, monomethyl hydrazine vapor detection, a rocket noise filter system using digital filters, computer programs, lower body negative pressure, closed ecological systems, and others. Several reports with respect to space shuttle orbiters are presented.

  20. The Handbook of Research Impact Assessment. Edition 7. Summer 1997.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-01-01

    34IgA Nephropathy - A Citation-Classic Commentary on IgA Glomerular Deposits in Renal - Disease by Berger,J.", CURRENT CONTENTS/LIFE SCIENCES,1992, Iss...Cerebrovascular- Disease in Elderly Hypertensives ", AGE AND AGEING,1994, Vol 23, Iss 6, pp 517-523 Kameoka-A, "Evaluating Research Projects at Toshiba...that the basic application of Iodine-131 to toxic goiter diseases was developed from 1939-1941. The initial AEC involvement is reported in 1946 (when

  1. Optical Information Processing for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Current research in optical processing is reviewed. Its role in future aerospace systems is determined. The development of optical devices and components demonstrates that system concepts can be implemented in practical aerospace configurations.

  2. Fine-Tuning Summer Research Programs to Promote Underrepresented Students’ Persistence in the STEM Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ghee, Medeva; Keels, Micere; Collins, Deborah; Neal-Spence, Cynthia; Baker, Earnestine

    2016-01-01

    Although the importance of undergraduate research experiences in preparing students for graduate study and research careers is well documented, specific examination of program components is needed to assess the impact of these programs on underrepresented (UR) students. The Leadership Alliance, a consortium of leading PhD-granting and minority-serving institutions (MSIs), has leveraged its diverse partnership to place UR students from MSI and non-MSI institutions in competitive research environments through its national Summer Research Early Identification Program. Using longitudinal pre/post data collected from student surveys, we applied social cognitive career theory as a conceptual framework to examine how research engagement, skill development, and mentorship aspects of a summer research program affect students’ commitment to pursue research careers. Self-reported knowledge of research skills, time engaged in research activity, and students’ understanding of and attitudes toward pursuing graduate study were measured in relation to the classification of students’ home undergraduate institution, level of students’ pre-existing research experience, and demographic factors. Our results provide evidence of specific programmatic components that are beneficial for UR students from varying academic and cultural backgrounds. This study describes important aspects of summer research programs that will contribute to students’ ability to persist in science careers. PMID:27496359

  3. [NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 18:] Scientific and Technical Information (STI) policy and the competitive position of the US aerospace industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernon, Peter; Pinelli, Thomas E.

    1992-01-01

    With its contribution to trade, its coupling with national security, and its symbolism of U.S. technological strength, the U.S. aerospace industry holds a unique position in the Nation's industrial structure. Federal science and technology policy and Federal scientific and technical information (STI) policy loom important as strategic contributions to the U.S. aerospace industry's leading competitive position. However, three fundamental policy problems exist. First, the United States lacks a coherent STI policy and a unified approach to the development of such a policy. Second, policymakers fail to understand the relationship of STI to science and technology policy. Third, STI is treated as a part of general information policy, without any recognition of its uniqueness. This paper provides an overview of the Federal information policy structure as it relates to STI and frames the policy issues that require resolution.

  4. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 18: Scientific and Technical Information (STI) policy and the competitive position of the US aerospace industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernon, Peter; Pinelli, Thomas E.

    1992-01-01

    With its contribution to trade, its coupling with national security, and its symbolism of U.S. technological strength, the U.S. aerospace industry holds a unique position in the Nation's industrial structure. Federal science and technology policy and Federal scientific and technical information (STI) policy loom important as strategic contributions to the U.S. aerospace industry's leading competitive position. However, three fundamental policy problems exist. First, the United States lacks a coherent STI policy and a unified approach to the development of such a policy. Second, policymakers fail to understand the relationship of STI to science and technology policy. Third, STI is treated as a part of general information policy, without any recognition of its uniqueness. This paper provides an overview of the Federal information policy structure as it relates to STI and frames the policy issues that require resolution.

  5. National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) JSC Summer Projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowdy, Forrest Ryan

    2014-01-01

    This project optimized the calorie content in a breakfast meal replacement bar for the Advanced Food Technology group. Use of multivariable optimization yielded the highest weight savings possible while simultaneously matching NASA Human Standards nutritional guidelines. The scope of this research included the study of shelf-life indicators such as water activity, moisture content, and texture analysis. Key metrics indicate higher protein content, higher caloric density, and greater mass savings as a result of the reformulation process. The optimization performed for this study demonstrated wide application to other food bars in the Advanced Food Technology portfolio. Recommendations for future work include shelf life studies on bar hardening and overall acceptability data over increased time frames and temperature fluctuation scenarios.

  6. USAF/SCEEE Graduate Student Summer Research Program (1984). Program Management Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-10-01

    adjunct effort to the SFRP. Its purpose is to provide funds for selected graduate students to do research at an appropriate Air Force laboratory or...under the Summer Faculty Research Program or an Air Force laboratory designated *- colleague. The students were U.S. citizens, working toward . an...faculty member; excellent laboratory experience. Good opportunity to become acquainted with Air Force research . Good concept. Good stipend

  7. United States Air Force Summer Research Program 1991. Summer Faculty Research Program (SFRP) Reports. Volume 5A. Wright Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-09

    effects become significant. The reduction in film thickness at high speeds has been observed experimentally by researchers at Battelle Memorial ...time of 10-4 this instrument is very short. Signals from individual drops can be processed and the data transferred to compuler memory in 20 lisec. For...plane array architectures and for different video formats. What’s important is that at some time during the readout process the pulse train will

  8. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report 22: US academic librarians and technical information specialists as information intermediaries: Results of the phase 3 survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. government technical report is a primary means by which the results of federally funded research and development (R&D) are transferred to the U.S. aerospace industry. However, little is known about this information product in terms of its actual use, importance, and value in the transfer of federally funded R&D. To help establish a body of knowledge, the U.S. government technical report is being investigated as part of the NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. In this report, we summarize the literature on technical reports and provide a model that depicts the transfer of federally funded aerospace R&D via the U.S. government technical report. We present results from our investigation of aerospace knowledge diffusion vis-a-vis the U.S. government technical report, and present the results of research that investigated aerospace knowledge diffusion vis-a-vis U.S. academic librarians and technical information specialists as information intermediaries.

  9. The 1985 National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Summer High School Apprenticeship Research Program (SHARP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    In 1985, a total of 126 talented high school students gained first hand knowledge about science and engineering careers by working directly with a NASA scientist or engineer during the summer. This marked the sixth year of operation for NASA's Summer High School Apprenticeship Research Program (SHARP). The major priority of maintaining the high standards and success of prior years was satisfied. The following eight sites participated in the Program: Ames Research Center, Ames' Dryden Flight Research Facility, Goddard Space Flight Center, Goddard's Wallop Flight Facility, Kennedy Space Center, Langley Research Center, Lewis Research Center, and Marshall Space Flight Center. Tresp Associates served as the SHARP contractor and worked closely with NASA staff at headquarters and the sites just mentioned to plan, implement, and evaluate the program.

  10. Summer High School Apprenticeship Research Program (SHARP) of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    A total of 125 talented high school students had the opportunity to gain first hand experience about science and engineering careers by working directly with a NASA scientist or engineer during the summer. This marked the fifth year of operation for NASA's Summer High School Apprenticehsip Research Program (SHARP). Ferguson Bryan served as the SHARP contractor and worked closely with NASA staff at Headquarters and the eight participating sites to plan, implement, and evaluate the Program. The main objectives were to strengthen SHARP and expand the number of students in the Program. These eight sites participated in the Program: Ames Research Center North, Ames' Dryden Flight Research Facility, Goddard Space Flight Center, Goddard's Wallops Flight Facility, Kennedy Space Center, Langley Research Center, Lewis Research Center, and Marshall Space Flight Center.

  11. 2005 Annual Report Summer Research Institute Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Barlow, Stephan E.

    2005-11-15

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) hosted its second annual Summer Research Institute in Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics from May through September 2005. During this period, sixteen PNNL scientists hosted fourteen young scientists from eleven different universities. Of the fourteen participants, twelve were graduate students; one was a postdoctoral fellow; and one was a university faculty member.

  12. Preliminary Reports, Memoranda and Technical Notes of the Materials Research Council Summer Conference, La Jolla, California

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-07-01

    Forword This collection of papers does not constitute a formal reporting of the activities of the DARPA Materials Research Council Summer...distribution Streak photography Plasma electron density Fast pyrometers impulse measurement - front surface Incident and reflected pulse - back surface...efficient, fast and economical way to assess shock wave hardening. The following parameters should be varied in a systematic manner: 1. UV absorption

  13. Science Teachers' Beliefs about the Influence of Their Summer Research Experiences on Their Pedagogical Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miranda, Rommel J.; Damico, Julie B.

    2013-01-01

    This study sought to determine the beliefs that tenured, in-service high school science teachers hold about how their participation in a large mid-Atlantic university's 6-week summer research experiences for teachers (RET) program might influence their pedagogical practices. The findings show a number of factors that teachers believed helped them…

  14. Research and Teaching: Association of Summer Bridge Program Outcomes with STEM Retention of Targeted Demographic Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomasko, David L.; Ridgway, Judith S.; Waller, Rocquel J.; Olesik, Susan V.

    2016-01-01

    Retention of students to science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) major has been studied for four cohorts participating in a summer bridge program supported by the National Science Foundation. Students participated in a 6-week program prior to their first term of enrollment at a research-intensive land grant university. Comparisons…

  15. COMPOSITION OF PM 2.5 DURING THE SUMMER OF 2003 IN RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK, NC

    EPA Science Inventory

    A field study was carried out during the summer of 2003 to examine the overall composition of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, USA, with particular emphasis on polar compounds from secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Collected sa...

  16. Fulbright Summer Seminars Abroad Program, 1990. China's Economic Development: Research Essays.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Committee on United States-China Relations, New York, NY.

    This collection of nine research papers concerning aspects of the economy of China were written by U.S. college and university professors who traveled to China as part of the Fulbright Hays Summer Seminars Abroad Program. The papers include: "The Impact of Economic Reforms on the Status of Women in China" (M. Eysenbach); "China's…

  17. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 17: The relationship between seven variables and the use of US government technical reports by US aerospace engineers and scientists

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.; Glassman, Nanci; Demerath, Loren

    1991-01-01

    A study was undertaken to investigate the relationship between the use of U.S. government technical reports by U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists and seven selected sociometric variables. Data were collected by means of a self-administered mail survey which was distributed to a randomly drawn sample of American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) members. Two research questions concerning the use of conference meeting papers, journal articles, in-house technical reports, and U.S. government technical reports were investigated. Relevance, technical quality, and accessibility were found to be more important determinants of the overall extent to which U.S. government technical reports and three other information products were used by U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists.

  18. Contributions of co-curricular summer research programs to my professional growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, K. D.

    2014-12-01

    The co-curricular summer research program, in which I was involved over three summers as an undergraduate student, greatly benefited me. In this paper I will briefly describe the program and how the experience contributed to my value and growth. The U.S. Department of Energy operated the Global Change Education Program (GCEP), from 1999-2013, as an outreach to both undergraduate and graduate students. Its goals were to: provide students with hands-on research experience in a one-on-one setting with leaders in global change fields, encourage undergraduate students to enter graduate school, and increase the number of high quality U.S. scientists. I took part in GCEP as a Summer Undergraduate Research Experience (SURE) Fellow. Each Fellow was teamed with a scientist to conduct research over the summer. I spent one summer at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, WA working with Dr. William Shaw. The next two summers I spent working at Aerodyne Research, Inc. in Billerica, MA with Dr. Leah Williams. My experiences as a SURE Fellow have benefitted me in many ways. The research presentations, required of SURE Fellows, helped to improve my presentation skills. The GCEP workshops expanded the scope of my knowledge about global change impacts at all scales. I was involved in two large, collaborative field studies, which provided experiences and examples that have helped me lead my own field studies. I took part in well-functioning research teams, helping me see the value of open communication in collaborative work. My critical and analytical thinking abilities were continually honed. My problem solving skills were challenged in laboratory and field work. I worked with talented professionals and students that are now part of my professional network. My contributions resulted in being a coauthor on two peer-reviewed publications. I was able to experience research teams outside of academia, which included government and private sectors. The time spent as a SURE

  19. Designing Summer Research Experiences for Teachers and Students That Promote Classroom Science Inquiry Projects and Produce Research Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, L. A.; Parra, J.; Rao, M.; Offerman, L.

    2007-12-01

    Research experiences for science teachers are an important mechanism for increasing classroom teachers' science content knowledge and facility with "real world" research processes. We have developed and implemented a summer scientific research and education workshop model for high school teachers and students which promotes classroom science inquiry projects and produces important research results supporting our overarching scientific agenda. The summer training includes development of a scientific research framework, design and implementation of preliminary studies, extensive field research and training in and access to instruments, measurement techniques and statistical tools. The development and writing of scientific papers is used to reinforce the scientific research process. Using these skills, participants collaborate with scientists to produce research quality data and analysis. Following the summer experience, teachers report increased incorporation of research inquiry in their classrooms and student participation in science fair projects. This workshop format was developed for an NSF Biocomplexity Research program focused on the interaction of urban climates, air quality and human response and can be easily adapted for other scientific research projects.

  20. The National Astronomy Consortium Summer Student Research Program at NRAO-Socorro: Year 2 structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Elisabeth A.; Sheth, Kartik; Giles, Faye; Perez, Laura M.; Arancibia, Demian; Burke-Spolaor, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    I will present a summary of the program structure used for the second year of hosting a summer student research cohort of the National Astronomy Consortium (NAC) at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Socorro, NM. The NAC is a program partnering physics and astronomy departments in majority and minority-serving institutions across the country. The primary aim of this program is to support traditionally underrepresented students interested in pursuing a career in STEM through a 9-10 week summer astronomy research project and a year of additional mentoring after they return to their home institution. I will describe the research, professional development, and inclusivity goals of the program, and show how these were used to create a weekly syllabus for the summer. I will also highlight several unique aspects of this program, including the recruitment of remote mentors for students to better balance the gender and racial diversity of available role models for the students, as well as the hosting of a contemporaneous series of visiting diversity speakers. Finally, I will discuss structures for continuing to engage, interact with, and mentor students in the academic year following the summer program. A goal of this work going forward is to be able to make instructional and organizational materials from this program available to other sites interested in joining the NAC or hosting similar programs at their own institution.

  1. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 44: Becoming an aerospace engineer: Some thoughts on the career goals and educational preparation of AIAA student members

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.; Hecht, Laura M.

    1994-01-01

    Similarities and differences between undergraduate and graduate engineering students in the context of two general aspects of educational experience are described. Considered first is the extent to which students differ regarding the factors that led to the choice of a career in aerospace engineering, their current levels of satisfaction with that choice, and career-related goals and objectives. Second, the importance of certain information-use skills for professional success, and the frequency of use and importance of specific information sources and products to meet students' educational needs, are explored.

  2. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report 4: Summary report to phase 1 respondents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Kennedy, John M.; White, Terry F.

    1991-01-01

    Phase 1 of a 4 part study was undertaken studying the use of scientific and technical information (STI) by U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists. Specific attention was paid to institutional and socioeconomic variables and to the step-by-step process of information gathering used by the respondents. Data were collected by means of three self administered mail-back questionnaires. The approximately 34,000 members of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) served as the study population. More than 65 percent of the randomly selected respondents returned the questionnaires in each of the three groups. Respondents relied more heavily upon informal sources of information than formal sources and turned to librarians and other technical information specialists only when they did not obtain results via informal means or their own formal searches.

  3. 2007 Annual Report Summer Research Institute Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, Kenneth M.

    2007-10-31

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) hosted its fourth annual Summer Research Institute in Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics from April through September 2007. During this time, 21 PNNL scientists hosted 23 participants from 20 different universities. Of the 23 participants, 20 were graduate students, 1 was a postdoctoral fellow, and 2 were university faculty members. This report covers the essense of the program and the research the participants performed.

  4. Frontier Aerospace Opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, Dennis M.

    2014-01-01

    Discussion and suggested applications of the many ongoing technology opportunities for aerospace products and missions, resulting in often revolutionary capabilities. The, at this point largely unexamined, plethora of possibilities going forward, a subset of which is discussed, could literally reinvent aerospace but requires triage of many possibilities. Such initial upfront homework would lengthen the Research and Development (R&D) time frame but could greatly enhance the affordability and performance of the evolved products and capabilities. Structural nanotubes and exotic energetics along with some unique systems approaches are particularly compelling.

  5. Aerospace Medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Jeffrey R.

    2006-01-01

    This abstract describes the content of a presentation for ground rounds at Mt. Sinai School of Medicine. The presentation contains three sections. The first describes the history of aerospace medicine beginning with early flights with animals. The second section of the presentation describes current programs and planning for future missions. The third section describes the medical challenges of exploration missions.

  6. Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The following areas of NASA's responsibilities are examined: (1) the Space Transportation System (STS) operations and evolving program elements; (2) establishment of the Space Station program organization and issuance of requests for proposals to the aerospace industry; and (3) NASA's aircraft operations, including research and development flight programs for two advanced X-type aircraft.

  7. Aerospace Bibliography, Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    This third edition bibliography lists books and teaching aids related to aeronautics and space. Aeronautics titles are limited to aerospace-related research subjects, and books on astronomy to those directly related to space exploration. Also listed are pertinent references like pamphlets, films, film strips, booklets, charts, pictures,…

  8. NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report Number 9. Summary Report to Phase 3 Faculty and Student Respondents Including Frequency Distributions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-01

    Information Quarterly Volume 8, No 2 (1991): 219-233. 7 FREQUENCY DISTRIBUTIONS OF RESPONDENTS’ ANSWERS The following tables reflect the actual number of...Thomas E.; John M. Kennedy; and Rebecca 0. Barclay. The NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 10. Reprinted from Government

  9. NASA-UVA Light Aerospace Alloy and Structures Technology Program (LA2ST). Research on Materials for the High Speed Civil Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, Richard P.; Starke, Edgar A., Jr.; Kelly, Robert G.; Scully, John R.; Stoner, Glenn E.; Wert, John A.

    1997-01-01

    Since 1986, the NASA-Langley Research Center has sponsored the NASA-UVa Light Alloy and Structures Technology (LA2ST) Program at the University of Virginia (UVa). The fundamental objective of the LA2ST program is to conduct interdisciplinary graduate student research on the performance of next generation, light-weight aerospace alloys, composites and thermal gradient structures. The LA2ST program has aimed to product relevant data and basic understanding of material mechanical response, environmental/corrosion behavior, and microstructure; new monolithic and composite alloys; advanced processing methods; measurement and modeling advances; and a pool of educated graduate students for aerospace technologies. The scope of the LA2ST Program is broad. Research areas include: (1) Mechanical and Environmental Degradation Mechanisms in Advanced Light Metals and Composites, (2) Aerospace Materials Science, (3) Mechanics of materials for Aerospace Structures, and (4) Thermal Gradient Structures. A substantial series of semi-annual progress reports issued since 1987 documents the technical objectives, experimental or analytical procedures, and detailed results of graduate student research in these topical areas.

  10. [NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 2:] External Information Sources and aerospace R&D: The use and importance of technical reports by US aerospace engineers and scientists

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blados, Walter R.; Pinelli, Thomas E.; Kennedy, John M.; Barclay, Rebecca O.

    1990-01-01

    This paper formulates and studies two propositions. Proposition 1 states that information that is external to the aerospace organization tends to be used less than internal sources of information; the more geographically removed the information is from the organization, the less likely it is to be used. Proposition 2 states that of the various sociometric variables assumed to influence the use of an information channel or source, perceived accessibility exerts the greatest influence. Preliminary analysis based on surveys supports Proposition 1. This analysis does not support Proposition 2, however. Evidence here indicates that reliability and relevance influence the use of an information source more than the idea of perceived accessibility.

  11. Engaging Middle School Students in Authentic Research based on a summer research cruise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manley, J.; Ellins, K. K.; Conte, M. H.

    2011-12-01

    In summer 2010, as a participant in the TXESS Revolution, a National Science Foundation (NSF)-sponsored professional development program for teachers in support of Earth and Space Science, I participated in a scientific research cruise led by Dr. Maureen Conte of the Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences (BIOS). The primary purpose of the cruise was to collect water samples from different ocean depths, make temperature and conductivity measurements, and retrieve biologic particle debris collection equipment deployed as part of the NSF-sponsored Oceanic Flux Program to measure particle fluxes in the deep Sargasso Sea. A secondary objective involved the collection of plastic debris floating within the sargassum grass trapped in the North Atlantic gyre in order to investigate plastic pollution. As a member of the science team I worked alongside of Dr. Conte, scientists and graduate students, giving me a personal experience to inspire my students' interest in the marine ecosystem. In the classroom, I used a Project Based Learning (PBL) approach to translate my experience and knowledge gained into productive learning for my students. With Project Based Learning, teams of students solve a real world, open-ended challenge problem through research and experimentation. In this Problem, the challenge was to design a virtual product to motivate ordinary people to change their habits regarding their use and improper disposal of plastics. Team products included websites, social network pages, and in-school announcements to create awareness about plastic pollution in the ocean. Fulfilling one of the basic principles of the PBL approach to provide student access to experts, cruise participant and University of North Carolina graduate student Bonnie Monteleone dedicated an entire day to speak with each of my classes about her experiences studying ocean plastics and answer their questions via SKYPE. In addition, Ms. Monteleone used her extensive contacts to post the best of my

  12. Engaging undergraduate nursing students in research: the students' experience of a summer internship program pilot project.

    PubMed

    Cepanec, Diane; Clarke, Diana; Plohman, James; Gerard, Judy

    2013-08-01

    Educators continue to struggle with ways to foster an interest in and a passion for nursing research among undergraduate students. The purpose of this article is to describe the introduction of undergraduate student internships at the Manitoba Centre for Nursing and Health Research, Faculty of Nursing, University of Manitoba, as an innovation in education that allowed students to be employed while engaging them in student learning, scientific inquiry, and scholarship through one-to-one faculty-student research mentorships. In this article, the key components of the summer internship program are described, along with five nursing students' experiences of their participation in the program.

  13. The 1989 NASA-ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program in Aeronautics and Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boroson, Harold R.; Soffen, Gerald A.; Fan, Dah-Nien

    1989-01-01

    The 1989 NASA-ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program at the Goddard Space Flight Center was conducted during 5 Jun. 1989 to 11 Aug. 1989. The research projects were previously assigned. Work summaries are presented for the following topics: optical properties data base; particle acceleration; satellite imagery; telemetry workstation; spectroscopy; image processing; stellar spectra; optical radar; robotics; atmospheric composition; semiconductors computer networks; remote sensing; software engineering; solar flares; and glaciers.

  14. Summer Internships for Students through the Air Force Research Laboratory’s Scholars Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnaby, David A.; Hwang, Eunsook; McCullough, Julie A.

    2017-01-01

    Did you know that the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) has sponsored a summer research program for students for the last 15 years? The AFRL Scholars Program hires high school, undergraduate, and graduate students as payed interns for 12-18 weeks each summer to work on space science and astronomy projects at one of four AFRL locations. By now, more than 1200 students from 34 states have participated. Like advisors in other summertime astrophysics research programs, the AFRL mentors benefit from extra staff for their research efforts at no cost (the Scholars are funded centrally within AFRL). Likewise, the students benefit from summer pay, job experience in a science lab, university housing, and comradery with students from other states. Pay is based on the intern’s academic level with the range being $395/week for high school up to $1115/week for recent Ph.Ds. Benefits not available from other programs include a secret clearance, socializing with a cohort exceeding 100 peers, and exposure to a pathway to a professional science career outside academia. Benefits to AFRL include persuading young people to choose science-technical-engineering-math (STEM) degrees, and roughly 89% of participants show increased interest in STEM courses following their internship.In this poster, we present the advantages to college students (and their mentors) to participating. We outline the topic areas, 60% of which are related to space science and astronomy. We quantify the range of participants’ scholastic level and majors, as well as the impact the program has on stimulating STEM careers and sight stories of students going onto rewarding careers in AFRL. To be eligible, an applicant must be a U.S. citizen, at least 16 years old, available to work a 40-hour business week, agree to a background check, and be enrolled at the time of application. To apply for the summer 2017 program, start at http://afrlscholars.usra.edu.

  15. 2006 Annual Report Summer Research Institute Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Avery, Nikki B.; Barlow, Stephan E.

    2006-11-10

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) hosted its third annual Summer Research Institute in Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics from May through September 2006. During this period, twenty PNNL scientists hosted twenty-seven scientists from twenty-five different universities. Of the twenty-seven participants, one was a graduating senior; twenty-one were graduate students; one was a postdoctoral fellow; and four were university faculty members.

  16. An Undergraduate Summer Research Program Through A University-Community College Partnership: Design and Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hood, Carol E.; Hood, Michael; Woodney, Laura

    2016-06-01

    We present a model for an undergraduate summer research program in astronomy targeted at 2-year and 4-year students and the short-term success of student participants. California State University San Bernardino (CSUSB) is Hispanic Serving Institution (HSI) serving 16,000 students, with no dominant ethnic or racial majority. Most (80%) CSUSB students are first-generation college students, and many of the students - both minority and “majority” - are economically disadvantaged and cannot afford to take on research projects without compensation. Approximately 60 percent of our students transfer from two year colleges, and all of the local community colleges are also officially designated as minority serving institutions. Mt. San Antonio College (Mt. SAC) is the largest single-campus community college in the state of California. It serves a student population of approximately 60,000 students (~35,000 full-time equivalent), also with no dominant ethnic or racial majority. Mt. SAC is currently 5th in the state in transfer ranking into the CSU system.In an effort to involve students in research as early as possible, we selected 2 students from each campus to participate in a summer research program. This program taught students observational techniques, data reduction and analysis skills, and then allowed them to work on more complex faculty astronomical research projects. These students were not selected based on their grades, or specific courses completed, simply based on their essays expressing their interests in astronomy. Students were only required to have already completed at least 1 physics or astronomy class and typically would be classified as freshman or sophomores. This program ran for 2 summers, before funding ran out. By the end of each summer, students were able to run the state-of-the-art campus observatory, and many chose to continue working on their research projects into the school year. To date, 3 students were selected for further summer research

  17. NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper Twelve: The Diffusion of Federally Funded Aerospace Research and Development (R and D) and the Information Seeking Behavior of U.S. Aerospace Engineers and Scientists

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    Studies." Research Policy 8:2 (April 1979): 102-153. 15 Pinelli, Thomas E. ’The Information-Seeking Habits and Practices of Engineers." Science and...Springfield, VA; N67-31477.) Goldhor, Richard S. and Robert T. Lund. "University-to-Industry Advanced Technology Transfer: A Case Study." Research ... Policy 12 (1983): 121-152. McCullough, Robert A. et al., A Review and Evaluation of the Langley RIsearch Center’s Scientific and Technical Information

  18. Aerospace Dermatology.

    PubMed

    Arora, Gp Capt Sandeep

    2017-01-01

    Evolutionarily, man is a terrestrial mammal, adapted to land. Aviation and now space/microgravity environment, hence, pose new challenges to our physiology. Exposure to these changes affects the human body in acute and chronic settings. Since skin reflects our mental and physical well-being, any change/side effects of this environment shall be detected on the skin. Aerospace industry offers a unique environment with a blend of all possible occupational disorders, encompassing all systems of the body, particularly the skin. Aerospace dermatologists in the near future shall be called upon for their expertise as we continue to push human physiological boundaries with faster and more powerful military aircraft and look to colonize space stations and other planets. Microgravity living shall push dermatology into its next big leap-space, the final frontier. This article discusses the physiological effects of this environment on skin, effect of common dermatoses in aerospace environment, effect of microgravity on skin, and occupational hazards of this industry.

  19. Aerospace Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Gp Capt Sandeep

    2017-01-01

    Evolutionarily, man is a terrestrial mammal, adapted to land. Aviation and now space/microgravity environment, hence, pose new challenges to our physiology. Exposure to these changes affects the human body in acute and chronic settings. Since skin reflects our mental and physical well-being, any change/side effects of this environment shall be detected on the skin. Aerospace industry offers a unique environment with a blend of all possible occupational disorders, encompassing all systems of the body, particularly the skin. Aerospace dermatologists in the near future shall be called upon for their expertise as we continue to push human physiological boundaries with faster and more powerful military aircraft and look to colonize space stations and other planets. Microgravity living shall push dermatology into its next big leap-space, the final frontier. This article discusses the physiological effects of this environment on skin, effect of common dermatoses in aerospace environment, effect of microgravity on skin, and occupational hazards of this industry. PMID:28216729

  20. NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. XXVI - The relationship between technology policy and scientific and technical information within the U.S. and Japanese aerospace industries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Lahr, Tom; Hoetker, Glenn

    1993-01-01

    Government technology policy has nurtured the growth of the aerospace industry, which is vital to both the U.S. and Japanese economies. Japanese technology policy differs significantly from U.S. technology policy, however, particularly with respect to the production, transfer, and use of scientific and technical information (STI). In this paper, we discuss the unique position of the aerospace industry in the U.S. and Japan, U.S. and Japanese aerospace policy, and the role of STI in the process of aerospace innovation. The information-seeking behaviors of U.S. and Japanese aerospace engineers and scientists are compared. The authors advocate the development of innovation-adoption technology and STI policy goals for U.S. aerospace and the inclusion of an aerospace knowledge diffusion transfer system with an 'active' component for scanning and acquiring foreign aerospace technology and STI.

  1. [Environmental Hazards Assessment Program annual report, June 1992--June 1993]. Summer undergraduate research program: Environmental studies

    SciTech Connect

    McMillan, J.

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of the summer undergraduate internship program for research in environmental studies is to provide an opportunity for well-qualified students to undertake an original research project as an apprentice to an active research scientist in basic environmental research. Ten students from throughout the midwestern and eastern areas of the country were accepted into the program. These students selected projects in the areas of marine sciences, biostatistics and epidemiology, and toxicology. The research experience for all these students and their mentors was very positive. The seminars were well attended and the students showed their interest in the presentations and environmental sciences as a whole by presenting the speakers with thoughtful and intuitive questions. This report contains the research project written presentations prepared by the student interns.

  2. SOMAS-URM: The Evolution of a Mentoring and Summer Research Program.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Julio J; Tonidandel, Scott

    2009-01-01

    The need to enhance recruitment and retention of students in the sciences to strengthen the economic and scientific foundation of the United States was recently underscored by the National Science Board. The SOMAS Program (Support Of Mentors And their Students) addresses this need using a two-pronged strategy: 1) Junior faculty receive mentoring and instruction in launching research programs that engage student collaborators; and 2) College students are introduced to discovery in the neurosciences by conducting original research with their professors. Junior faculty from predominantly undergraduate institutions are invited to submit applications to obtain summer research support for undergraduate students who will spend 10 weeks collaborating with the faculty member on projects of common interest. Awards cover a travel and a supply budget, summer student housing, as well as faculty and student stipends. The faculty mentors and their students are to use the travel support to attend the joint Annual Meetings of the Society for Neuroscience (SfN) and the Faculty for Undergraduate Neuroscience (FUN). Faculty Awardees are required to participate in the Survival Skills and Ethics Workshop held at the SfN Meeting to prepare them to write grants aimed at supporting their research programs. Students are to present their summer research findings at the FUN Poster Session held jointly with the SfN Meeting. Students are also required to attend Survival Skills Workshop sessions that focus on ethics in research and that provide tips on applying to graduate school. The SOMAS-URM Program presently emphasizes recruitment and retention of underrepresented groups to enhance participation in scientific discovery by the full range of the American population.

  3. Theoretical-research summer: For a new generation of experts on high energy physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos-Sánchez, Saúl

    2016-10-01

    Motivated by the need to strengthen the comprehensive training of young Mexican physicists interested in theoretical high energy physics, the Theoretical-research summer on high energy physics program was conceived. This program, that celebrates its sixth anniversary, consists in a yearly, nationwide challenging contest in which a board of experts identify the best undergraduate contestants to support them during short research stays in high-energy- theory groups of prestigious international institutions. Out of 80 contestants, the eight awarded students have demonstrated their skills, producing highly advanced (and publicly available) reviews on particle physics, field theory, cosmology and string theory, and a published paper.

  4. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 65: Survey of Reader Preferences Concerning the Format of NASA Langley-Authored Technical Reports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1997-01-01

    The U.S. government technical report is a primary means by which the results of federally funded research and development (R&D) are transferred to the U.S. aerospace industry. However, little is known about this information product in terms of its actual use, importance, and value in the transfer of federally funded R&D. Little is also known about the intermediary-based system that is used to transfer the results of federally funded R&D to the U.S. aerospace industry. To help establish a body of knowledge, the U.S. government technical report is being investigated as part of the NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. In this article, we summarize the literature on the U.S. government technical report and present the results of a survey of U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists that solicited their opinions concerning the format of NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC)-authored technical reports. To learn more about the preferences of U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists concerning the format of NASA LaRC-authored technical reports, we surveyed 133 report producers (i.e., authors) and 137 report users in March-April 1996. Questions covered such topics as: (a) the order in which report components are read; (b) components used to determine if a report would be read; (c) those components that could be deleted; (d) the placement of such components as the symbols list; (e) the desirability of a table of contents; (f) the format of reference citations; (g) column layout and right margin treatment; and (h) writing style in terms of person and voice. Mail (self-reported) surveys were used to collect the data. The response rates for report producers (i.e., authors) was 68% and for users was 62%.

  5. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 58; Survey of Reader Preferences Concerning the Format of NASA Langley-Authored Technical Reports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1996-01-01

    The U.S. government technical report is a primary means by which the results of federally funded research and development (R&D) are transferred to the U.S. aerospace industry. However, little is known about this information product in terms of its actual use, importance, and value in the transfer of federally funded R&D. Little is also known about the intermediary-based system that is used to transfer the results of federally funded R&D to the U.S. aerospace industry. To help establish a body of knowledge, the U.S. government technical report is being investigated as part of the NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. In this paper, we summarize the literature on the U.S. government technical report and present the results of a survey of U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists that solicited their opinions concerning the format of NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC)-authored technical reports. To learn more about the preferences of U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists concerning the format of NASA LaRC-authored technical reports, we surveyed 133 report producers (i.e., authors) and 137 report users in March-April 1996. Questions covered such topics as (1) the order in which report components are read, (2) components used to determine if a report would be read, (3) those components that could be deleted, (4) the placement of such components as the symbols list, (e) the de-sirability of a table of contents, (5) the format of reference citations, (6) column layout and right margin treatment, and (7) and person and voice. Mail (self-reported) surveys were used to collect the data. The response rates for report producers (i.e., authors) was 68% and for users was 62%.

  6. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 22: Establishing a research agenda for Scientific and Technical Information (STI): Focus on the user

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.

    1992-01-01

    The goal is the creation of a generally accepted, systematically developed and implemented, but user focused, research agenda for the Advisory Group for Aerospace Research and Development (AGARD) and the Technical Information Panel (TIP) member countries. Information use seldom exists as an isolated incident. Information use usually takes place within organizational and interpersonal contexts. Therefore, it should not be studied in isolation, but rather in an holistic environment. Once implemented, this research agenda could be completed within 3 to 5 years. The results would be generalizable to AGARD member nations, would form the basis for the development of theory based practice, and would form a significant body of knowledge that can be used by AGARD information professionals for policy, practice, product, and systems development.

  7. Introducing students to cancer prevention careers through programmed summer research experiences.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Carrie; Collie, Candice L; Chang, Shine

    2012-06-01

    Training programs in cancer prevention research play an important role in addressing impending shortages in the cancer prevention workforce. Published reports on the effectiveness of these programs, however, often focus on a program's success in recruiting and retaining a demographically diverse trainee population or on academic successes of the trainees, in general. Little has been reported about programs' success in stimulating long-term interest in cancer prevention per se, whether in research or in other choATsen applications. We set out to examine the success of our National Cancer Institute (NCI) R25E American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA)-funded summer research experiences program for undergraduates at fostering awareness of and career interest in cancer prevention. Fourteen summer research undergraduates participated in a 12-week structured training program which featured a variety of experiences designed to create awareness of and interest in cancer prevention and cancer prevention research as career tracks. Experiences included career talks by faculty, informational interviewing of role model faculty, career exploration workshops, and structured interactions with graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and junior faculty. Students were surveyed about the effectiveness of the program via SurveyMonkey 8 months after completing the program. This article reports on the results of the survey and analyzes the relative effectiveness of the various types of programming strategies used. Implications for use in training program development are discussed.

  8. Research on optimal control, stabilization and computational algorithms for aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Athans, M.

    1984-01-01

    The research carried out in the areas of optimal control and estimation theory and its applications under this grant is reviewed. A listing of the 257 publications that document the research results is presented.

  9. Research on optimal control, stabilization and computational algorithms for aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Athans, M.

    1985-01-01

    The research carried out in the areas of optimal control and estimation theory and its applications under this grant is reviewed. A listing of the 257 publications that document the research results is presented.

  10. A Cooperative Program of Research and Education in Aerospace Vehicle Mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitesides, John L.

    2005-01-01

    Since its inception in January 2003, the program has provided support for 1 faculty, 1 research scientist. 1 research assistant, and a total of 7 Graduate Research Scholar Assistants, of these all 7 have gram. The program has generated 4 MS thesis. Attachment: Appendix A, B, C, and D.

  11. An international basic science and clinical research summer program for medical students.

    PubMed

    Ramjiawan, Bram; Pierce, Grant N; Anindo, Mohammad Iffat Kabir; Alkukhun, Abedalrazaq; Alshammari, Abdullah; Chamsi, Ahmad Talal; Abousaleh, Mohannad; Alkhani, Anas; Ganguly, Pallab K

    2012-03-01

    An important part of training the next generation of physicians is ensuring that they are exposed to the integral role that research plays in improving medical treatment. However, medical students often do not have sufficient time to be trained to carry out any projects in biomedical and clinical research. Many medical students also fail to understand and grasp translational research as an important concept today. In addition, since medical training is often an international affair whereby a medical student/resident/fellow will likely train in many different countries during his/her early training years, it is important to provide a learning environment whereby a young medical student experiences the unique challenges and value of an international educational experience. This article describes a program that bridges the gap between the basic and clinical research concepts in a unique international educational experience. After completing two semester curricula at Alfaisal University in Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, six medical students undertook a summer program at St. Boniface Hospital Research Centre, in Winnipeg, MB, Canada. The program lasted for 2 mo and addressed advanced training in basic science research topics in medicine such as cell isolation, functional assessment, and molecular techniques of analysis and manipulation as well as sessions on the conduct of clinical research trials, ethics, and intellectual property management. Programs such as these are essential to provide a base from which medical students can decide if research is an attractive career choice for them during their clinical practice in subsequent years. An innovative international summer research course for medical students is necessary to cater to the needs of the medical students in the 21st century.

  12. Aerospace Education - An Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Aerospace Education, 1975

    1975-01-01

    Discusses the surge of interest throughout the country in aerospace education and discusses what aerospace education is, the implications in career education and the relevance of aerospace education in the curriculum. (BR)

  13. Basic Aerospace Education Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Aerospace Education, 1975

    1975-01-01

    Lists the most significant resource items on aerospace education which are presently available. Includes source books, bibliographies, directories, encyclopedias, dictionaries, audiovisuals, curriculum/planning guides, aerospace statistics, aerospace education statistics and newsletters. (BR)

  14. Aerospace gerontology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comfort, A.

    1982-01-01

    The relevancy of gerontology and geriatrics to the discipline of aerospace medicine is examined. It is noted that since the shuttle program gives the facility to fly passengers, including specially qualified older persons, it is essential to examine response to acceleration, weightlessness, and re-entry over the whole adult lifespan, not only its second quartile. The physiological responses of the older person to weightlessness and the return to Earth gravity are reviewed. The importance of the use of the weightless environment to solve critical problems in the fields of fundamental gerontology and geriatrics is also stressed.

  15. Some contributions to energetics by the Lewis Research Center and a review of their potential non-aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, R. W.; Gutstein, M. U.

    1972-01-01

    The primary technology areas are aerospace propulsion, power and materials. As examples in these technologies, the programs in the fields of cryogenics and liquid metals are reviewed and potential non-aerospace applications for the results of these programs are discussed. These include such possibilities as: hydrogen as a non-polluting industrial fuel; more efficient central power stations; and powerplants for advanced ground transportation.

  16. Heat transfer in aerospace propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simoneau, Robert J.; Hendricks, Robert C.; Gladden, Herbert J.

    1988-01-01

    Presented is an overview of heat transfer related research in support of aerospace propulsion, particularly as seen from the perspective of the NASA Lewis Research Center. Aerospace propulsion is defined to cover the full spectrum from conventional aircraft power plants through the Aerospace Plane to space propulsion. The conventional subsonic/supersonic aircraft arena, whether commercial or military, relies on the turbine engine. A key characteristic of turbine engines is that they involve fundamentally unsteady flows which must be properly treated. Space propulsion is characterized by very demanding performance requirements which frequently push systems to their limits and demand tailored designs. The hypersonic flight propulsion systems are subject to severe heat loads and the engine and airframe are truly one entity. The impact of the special demands of each of these aerospace propulsion systems on heat transfer is explored.

  17. New frontiers: the 2002 FASEB Summer Research Conference in Transplant Immunology.

    PubMed

    Ingulli, Elizabeth

    2003-02-01

    The first Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB) summer research conference on transplantation immunology was organized by Angus Thomson (University of Pittsburgh), Robert Lechler (Imperial College London), Laurence Turka (University of Pennsylvania) and Megan Sykes (Massachusetts General Hospital). Over the past four decades, patient and graft survival rates for solid organ transplant recipients have improved dramatically; however, chronic rejection and the untoward effects of potent immunosuppressive drugs continue to loom. This symposium is a testament to the importance of bringing investigators from diverse biological backgrounds together in a single forum to discuss the fundamental issues of immune biology and advance the goal of transplant-specific tolerance.

  18. An Aerospace Nation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-25

    aircraft order share of Boeing or Air - bus in recent years.24 America’s leadership in the high-technology sector is also faltering and, if not corrected...Executive Order 9781, establishing the Air Coordinating Commit- tee, with the mission to “examine aviation problems and development affecting more...robotics, drones, information technologies, energy research, and aerospace design. Establish a New Air and Space Structure Like its predecessor

  19. Aerospace safety advisory panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This report from the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP) contains findings, recommendations, and supporting material concerning safety issues with the space station program, the space shuttle program, aeronautics research, and other NASA programs. Section two presents findings and recommendations, section three presents supporting information, and appendices contain data about the panel membership, the NASA response to the March 1993 ASAP report, and a chronology of the panel's activities during the past year.

  20. The 1995 Research Reports: NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosler, E. Ramon (Editor); Buckingham, Gregg (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    This document is a collection of technical reports on research conducted by the participants in the 1995 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). This was the eleventh year that a NASA/ASEE program has been conducted at KSC. The 1995 program was administered by the University of Central Florida in cooperation with KSC. The program was operated under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) with sponsorship and funding from the Office of Educational Affairs, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The KSC Program was one of nine such Aeronautics and Space Research Programs funded by NASA Headquarters in 1995. The NASA/ASEE Program is intended to be a two-year program to allow in-depth research by the University faculty member.

  1. The Aerospace Age. Aerospace Education I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, J. C.

    This book is written for use only in the Air Force ROTC program and cannot be purchased on the open market. The book describes the historical development of aerospace industry. The first chapter contains a brief review of the aerospace environment and the nature of technological changes brought by the aerospace revolution. The following chapter…

  2. [AVIATION MEDICINE: THEORETICAL CONCEPTS AND FOCAL FUNDAMENTAL AND PRACTICAL ISSUES (for the 80th anniversary of the Research Test Center of Aerospace Medicine and Military Ergonomics)].

    PubMed

    Zhdanko, I M; Pisarev, A A; Vorona, A A; Lapa, V V; Khomenko, M N

    2015-01-01

    The article discloses postulates of theoretical concepts that make the methodological basis for addressing the real-world aviation medicine challenges of humanizing aviator's environment, labor content and means, and health and performance maintenance. Under consideration are focal fundamental and practical issues arising with the technological progress in aviation and dealt with at the AF CRI Research Test Center of Aerospace Medicine and Military Ergonomics.

  3. The summer institute in clinical dental research methods: still going and growing after twenty years.

    PubMed

    Derouen, Timothy A; Wiesenbach, Carol

    2012-11-01

    The first Summer Institute in Clinical Dental Research Methods, a faculty development program at the University of Washington, was offered in the summer of 1992 for sixteen participants. The primary objective of the program was to give clinical faculty members in dentistry an introduction to and an understanding of the fundamental principles and methods used in good clinical research. In the twentieth offering of the institute in 2011, there were thirty-five participants, and over the twenty institutes, there has been a cumulative total of 463 participants who have come from thirty U.S. states as well as forty-three countries outside the United States. The curriculum has expanded from the initial offering of biostatistics, clinical epidemiology, behavioral research methods, and ethics in clinical research to now include clinical trials, grantsmanship, data analysis, an elective in molecular biology, and a team project that provides participants with hands-on experience in research proposal development as members of an interdisciplinary team. Enrollment has doubled since the first year, yet exit evaluations of the program content have remained consistently high (rated as very good to excellent). One of the indicators of program quality is that at least 50 percent of recent participants indicated that they attended because the program was recommended by colleagues who had attended. There seems to be an ever-increasing pool of dental faculty members who are eager to learn more about clinical research methodology through the institute despite the intensive demands of full-time participation in a six-week program.

  4. Refined Synthesis and Characterization of Controlled Diameter, Narrow Size Distribution Microparticles for Aerospace Research Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiemsin, Pacita I.; Wohl, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    Flow visualization using polystyrene microspheres (PSL)s has enabled researchers to learn a tremendous amount of information via particle based diagnostic techniques. To better accommodate wind tunnel researchers needs, PSL synthesis via dispersion polymerization has been carried out at NASA Langley Research Center since the late 1980s. When utilizing seed material for flow visualization, size and size distribution are of paramount importance. Therefore, the work described here focused on further refinement of PSL synthesis and characterization. Through controlled variation of synthetic conditions (chemical concentrations, solution stirring speed, temperature, etc.) a robust, controllable procedure was developed. The relationship between particle size and salt concentration, MgSO4, was identified enabling the determination of PSL diameters a priori. Suggestions of future topics related to PSL synthesis, stability, and size variation are also described.

  5. [NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 1:] The value of Scientific and Technical Information (STI), its relationship to Research and Development (R&D), and its use by US aerospace engineers and scientists

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Glassman, Myron; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Oliu, Walter E.

    1990-01-01

    The relationship between scientific and technical information (STI), its use by aerospace engineers and scientists, and the aerospace R&D process is examined. Data are presented from studies of the role of STI in the performance and management of R&D activities and the behavior of engineers when using and seeking information. Consideration is given to the information sources used to solve technical problems, the production and use of technical communications, and the use of libraries, technical information centers, and on-line data bases.

  6. Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel report to the NASA acting administrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The level of activity of the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel was increased smewhat during 1985 in concert with the increased mission rate of the National Space Transportation System, the evolutionary changes in management and operation of that program, and the preparation of the Vandenberg Launch Site; the implementation of the Program Definition Phase of the Space Station Program; and the actual flight testing of the X-29 research aircraft. Impending payload STS missions and NASA's overall aircraft operations are reviewed. The safety aspects of the LEASAT salvage mission were assessed. The findings and recommendation of the committee are summerized.

  7. A Data Acquisition System (DAS) for marine and ecological research from aerospace technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    The efforts of researchers at Mississippi State University to utilize space-age technology in the development of a self-contained, portable data acquisition system for use in marine and ecological research are presented. The compact, lightweight data acquisition system is capable of recording 14 variables in its present configuration and is suitable for use in either a boat, pickup truck, or light aircraft. This system will provide the acquisition of reliable data on the structure of the environment and the effect of man-made and natural activities on the observed phenomenon. Utilizing both self-contained analog recording and a telemetry transmitter for real-time digital readout and recording, the prototype system has undergone extensive testing.

  8. 2008 Summer Research Institute Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, Bruce C.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Avery, Nachael B.

    2008-11-01

    For the fifth year, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, Washington, invited graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, university faculty, and students entering graduate students from around the world to participate in the Summer Research Institute in Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics. The institute offers participants the opportunity to gain hands-on experience in top-notch research laboratories while working along internationally respected mentors. Of the 38 applicants, 20 were accepted for the 8- to 10-week program. The participants came from universities as close as Seattle and Portland and as far away as Germany and Singapore. At Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the 20 participants were mentored by 13 scientists. These mentors help tailor the participant’s experience to the needs of that person. Further, the mentors provide guidance on experimental and theoretical techniques, research design and completion, and other aspects of scientific careers in interfacial and condensed phase chemical physics. The research conducted at the institute can result in tangible benefits for the participants. For example, many have co-authored papers that have been published in peer-reviewed journals, including top-rated journals such as Science. Also, they have presented their research at conferences, such as the Gordon Research Conference on Dynamics at Surfaces and the AVS national meeting. Beyond that, many of the participants have started building professional connections with researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, connections that will serve them well during their careers.

  9. Applications of aerospace technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rouse, Doris J.

    1984-01-01

    The objective of the Research Triangle Institute Technology Transfer Team is to assist NASA in achieving widespread utilization of aerospace technology in terrestrial applications. Widespread utilization implies that the application of NASA technology is to benefit a significant sector of the economy and population of the Nation. This objective is best attained by stimulating the introduction of new or improved commercially available devices incorporating aerospace technology. A methodology is presented for the team's activities as an active transfer agent linking NASA Field Centers, industry associations, user groups, and the medical community. This methodology is designed to: (1) identify priority technology requirements in industry and medicine, (2) identify applicable NASA technology that represents an opportunity for a successful solution and commercial product, (3) obtain the early participation of industry in the transfer process, and (4) successfully develop a new product based on NASA technology.

  10. Polymeric Materials for Aerospace Power and Propulsion: Overview of Polymer Research at NASA Glenn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Michael A.

    2007-01-01

    Weight, durability and performance are all major concerns for any NASA mission. Use of lightweight materials, such as fiber reinforced polymer matrix composites can lead to significant reductions in vehicle weight and improvements in vehicle performance. Research in the Polymeric Materials Branch at NASA Glenn is focused on improving the durability, properties, processability and performance of polymeric materials by utilizing both conventional polymer science and engineering as well as nanotechnology and bioinspired approaches. This presentation will provide an overview of these efforts and highlight recent progress.

  11. Engineering science research issues in high power density transmission dynamics for aerospace applications. [rotorcraft geared rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Rajendra; Houser, Donald R.

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses analytical and experimental approaches that will be needed to understand dynamic, vibro-acoustic and design characteristics of high power density rotorcraft transmissions. Complexities associated with mathematical modeling of such systems will be discussed. An overview of research work planned during the next several years will be presented, with emphasis on engineering science issues such as gear contact mechanics, multi-mesh drive dynamics, parameter uncertainties, vibration transmission through bearings, and vibro-acoustic characteristics of geared rotor systems and housing-mount structures. A few examples of work in progress are cited.

  12. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report 8: Summary report to phase 3 faculty and student respondents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Kennedy, John M.; White, Terry F.

    1991-01-01

    Phase 3 of a four part study was undertaken to investigate the use of scientific and technical information (STI) in the academic aerospace community. Three questionnaires that were sent to three groups (i.e., faculty, librarians, and students) in the academic aerospace community were used. Specific attention was paid to the types of STI used and the methods in which academic users acquired STI. The focus is on the responses of two of the three groups: faculty in aerospace departments and students enrolled in the USRA-funded capstone design courses. Respondents in both groups relied heavily upon informal sources of information, although students were less inclined to regard their personal collections of STI as important. Both groups relied upon most formal sources of STI about the same, but students reported more difficulty in using the formal resources.

  13. Student research activities in the Technology Assessments Section of the Health and Safety Research Division, Summer 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Chester, R.O.; Roberts, D.A.

    1981-08-01

    Reports summarizing activities of students assigned to the Technology Assessments Section of the Health and Safety Research Division for the summer 1980 are presented. Unless indicated otherwise, each report was written by the student whose work is being described. For each student, the student's supervisor, the name of the program under which the student was brought to ORNL, the academic level of the student, and the name of the ORNL project to which the student was assigned are tabulated. The reports are presented in alphabetical order of the students' last names.

  14. The Caater Facility Falcon of the German Aerospace Cente: A multipurpose airborne research Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giez, A.; Krautstrunk, M.

    2003-04-01

    The DLR research aircraft Falcon D-CMET was available to scientists through an EC-funded IHP-ARI contract. 9 different research projects have been funded by CAATER on the Falcon with an average of about 10 flight hours per project. More than 20 users from 5 countries have benefited from this access project between 1999--2003. As a fan jet the Falcon covers a wide atmospheric range between the boundary layer and the lower stratosphere. Many modifications have been added to the aircraft to provide suitable interfaces for the scientific payload: openings in the fuselage to house large optical windows and inlets for in situ experiments, hard points under wings and fuselage, additional electrical generators and standardized electrical and mechanical interfaces for the installation of scientific instrumentation onboard. The Falcon is equipped with a data acquisition system and a basic instrumentation providing data on aircraft parameters and meteorology for the scientific users. Additional instrumentation is available from the different DLR institutes in Oberpfaffenhofen and can be added to the aircraft. CAATER users have access to an extensive infrastructure on the ground which includes workshops, calibration setups, an environmental simulation chamber and an own user lab. They are supported by several groups within the Facility who lead them through the different steps of an airborne field experiment such as certification and installation of their instruments on the aircraft, campaign and flight planning and the processing and preparation of aircraft data right after a flight. The users have been stimulated to use DLR's Approved Design Organisation status together with its Airworthiness Office to develop and operate new airborne instrumentation . Several new instrument packages have been installed and certified for the first time on the Falcon within CAATER.

  15. Curriculum in aerospace science and technology in cooperation with NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garner-Gilchrist, Cathine

    1988-01-01

    A curriculum was written to show teachers how to best use the many resources that are available at the Teacher Resource Center (TRC). This curriculum packet was written using teaching units that teachers in both the elementary and middle schools can use to help students better understand some of the research that has been conducted at NASA and will be conducted in the future. The units are written with certain standards. Each unit contains: (1) specific objectives, using the Virginia standards of learning; (2) the materials that are available from the TRC; (3) many activities that teachers can use in a variety of ways; and (4) specific strategies for measuring the objectives to determine if the students mastered the knowledge, concepts or skills that were taught. The curriculum packet contains specific units on several topics. They are: (1) Careers in Aerospece Science and Technology; (2) The History of Flight; (3) The History of Satellites; (4) The History of the Manned Space Projects and the Future of the Future of the Space Program; (5) The Solar System; and (6) The History of Rockets.

  16. Aerospace Engineering Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanDalsem, William R.; Livingston, Mary E.; Melton, John E.; Torres, Francisco J.; Stremel, Paul M.

    1999-01-01

    Continuous improvement of aerospace product development processes is a driving requirement across much of the aerospace community. As up to 90% of the cost of an aerospace product is committed during the first 10% of the development cycle, there is a strong emphasis on capturing, creating, and communicating better information (both requirements and performance) early in the product development process. The community has responded by pursuing the development of computer-based systems designed to enhance the decision-making capabilities of product development individuals and teams. Recently, the historical foci on sharing the geometrical representation and on configuration management are being augmented: Physics-based analysis tools for filling the design space database; Distributed computational resources to reduce response time and cost; Web-based technologies to relieve machine-dependence; and Artificial intelligence technologies to accelerate processes and reduce process variability. Activities such as the Advanced Design Technologies Testbed (ADTT) project at NASA Ames Research Center study the strengths and weaknesses of the technologies supporting each of these trends, as well as the overall impact of the combination of these trends on a product development event. Lessons learned and recommendations for future activities will be reported.

  17. Aerospace Human Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Kevin

    1999-01-01

    The following contains the final report on the activities related to the Cooperative Agreement between the human factors research group at NASA Ames Research Center and the Psychology Department at San Jose State University. The participating NASA Ames division has been, as the organization has changed, the Aerospace Human Factors Research Division (ASHFRD and Code FL), the Flight Management and Human Factors Research Division (Code AF), and the Human Factors Research and Technology Division (Code IH). The inclusive dates for the report are November 1, 1984 to January 31, 1999. Throughout the years, approximately 170 persons worked on the cooperative agreements in one capacity or another. The Cooperative Agreement provided for research personnel to collaborate with senior scientists in ongoing NASA ARC research. Finally, many post-MA/MS and post-doctoral personnel contributed to the projects. It is worth noting that 10 former cooperative agreement personnel were hired into civil service positions directly from the agreements.

  18. Unification - An international aerospace information issue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cotter, Gladys A.; Lahr, Thomas F.

    1992-01-01

    Scientific and Technical Information (STI) represents the results of large investments in research and development (R&D) and the expertise of a nation and is a valuable resource. For more than four decades, NASA and its predecessor organizations have developed and managed the preeminent aerospace information system. NASA obtains foreign materials through its international exchange relationships, continually increasing the comprehensiveness of the NASA Aerospace Database (NAD). The NAD is de facto the international aerospace database. This paper reviews current NASA goals and activities with a view toward maintaining compatibility among international aerospace information systems, eliminating duplication of effort, and sharing resources through international cooperation wherever possible.

  19. A Program Evaluation of a Summer Research Training Institute for American Indian and Alaska Native Health Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaback, Tosha; Becker, Thomas M.; Dignan, Mark B.; Lambert, William E.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe a unique summer program to train American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) health professionals in a variety of health research-related skills, including epidemiology, data management, statistical analysis, program evaluation, cost-benefit analysis, community-based participatory research, grant writing, and…

  20. Are Self-Perception Measures Used in School Library Research Transferable to the Context of Public Library Summer Reading Programs?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnone, Marilyn P.; Small, Ruth V.; Weng, Shicheng

    2016-01-01

    Several instruments previously validated for use in school library research were tested for their appropriateness in the context of public libraries' summer reading programs for youth. The researchers were also interested in whether the connection between perceived competence in one's own information skills and perceived competence in one's own…

  1. NASA-UVa light aerospace alloy and structures technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, Richard P.; Haviland, John K.; Herakovich, Carl T.; Pilkey, Walter D.; Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Scully, John R.; Stoner, Glenn E.; Swanson, Robert E.; Thornton, Earl A.; Wawner, Franklin E., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The general objective of the NASA-UVa Light Aerospace Alloy and Structures Technology Program was to conduct research on the performance of next generation, light weight aerospace alloys, composites, and associated thermal gradient structures. The following research areas were actively investigated: (1) mechanical and environmental degradation mechanisms in advanced light metals and composites; (2) aerospace materials science; (3) mechanics of materials and composites for aerospace structures; and (4) thermal gradient structures.

  2. Cleveland Clinic's summer research program in reproductive medicine: an inside look at the class of 2014.

    PubMed

    Durairajanayagam, Damayanthi; Kashou, Anthony H; Tatagari, Sindhuja; Vitale, Joseph; Cirenza, Caroline; Agarwal, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Background The American Center for Reproductive Medicine's summer internship course in reproductive medicine and research at Cleveland Clinic is a rigorous, results-oriented annual program that began in 2008 to train both local and international students in the fundamentals of scientific research and writing. The foremost goal of the program is to encourage premedical and medical students to aspire toward a career as a physician-scientist. The internship provides participants with an opportunity to engage in original bench research and scientific writing while developing theoretical knowledge and soft skills. This study describes selected survey responses from interns who participated in the 2014 internship program. The objective of these surveys was to elicit the interns' perspective on the internship program, its strengths and weaknesses, and to obtain insight into potential areas for improvement. Methods Questionnaires were structured around the five fundamental aspects of the program: 1) theoretical knowledge, 2) bench research, 3) scientific writing, 4) mentorship, and 5) soft skills. In addition, an exit survey gathered information on factors that attracted the interns to the program, communication with mentors, and overall impression of the research program. Results The opportunity to experience hands-on bench research and scientific writing, personalized mentorship, and the reputation of the institution were appreciated and ranked highly among the interns. Nearly 90% of the interns responded that the program was beneficial and well worth the time and effort invested by both interns and faculty. Conclusion The outcomes portrayed in this study will be useful in the implementation of new programs or refinement of existing medical research training programs.

  3. Cleveland Clinic's summer research program in reproductive medicine: an inside look at the class of 2014

    PubMed Central

    Durairajanayagam, Damayanthi; Kashou, Anthony H; Tatagari, Sindhuja; Vitale, Joseph; Cirenza, Caroline; Agarwal, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Background The American Center for Reproductive Medicine's summer internship course in reproductive medicine and research at Cleveland Clinic is a rigorous, results-oriented annual program that began in 2008 to train both local and international students in the fundamentals of scientific research and writing. The foremost goal of the program is to encourage premedical and medical students to aspire toward a career as a physician–scientist. The internship provides participants with an opportunity to engage in original bench research and scientific writing while developing theoretical knowledge and soft skills. This study describes selected survey responses from interns who participated in the 2014 internship program. The objective of these surveys was to elicit the interns' perspective on the internship program, its strengths and weaknesses, and to obtain insight into potential areas for improvement. Methods Questionnaires were structured around the five fundamental aspects of the program: 1) theoretical knowledge, 2) bench research, 3) scientific writing, 4) mentorship, and 5) soft skills. In addition, an exit survey gathered information on factors that attracted the interns to the program, communication with mentors, and overall impression of the research program. Results The opportunity to experience hands-on bench research and scientific writing, personalized mentorship, and the reputation of the institution were appreciated and ranked highly among the interns. Nearly 90% of the interns responded that the program was beneficial and well worth the time and effort invested by both interns and faculty. Conclusion The outcomes portrayed in this study will be useful in the implementation of new programs or refinement of existing medical research training programs. PMID:26563960

  4. United States Air Force Summer Faculty Research Program. Management Report. Volume 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    1975 Teaching Associate Specialty: Exercise Physiology Dept. of Education Assigned: School uf Aerospace Medicine Univ. of Texas - San Antonio San...those cases where it is energetically favored, we were curious as to whether association would be observed in cases where the thermochemistry predicted

  5. United States Air Force Summer Faculty Research Program. 1988 Program Technical Report. Volume 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    1975 Teaching Associate Specialty: Exercise Physiology Dept. of Education Assigned: School of Aerospace Medicine Univ. of Texas - San Antonio San... thermochemistry predicted charge exchange to be unimportant. In v.Lew of this, it is most interesting to note that we did not observe association in any of

  6. A Summer Research Program of NASA/Faculty Fellowships at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albee, Arden

    2004-01-01

    The NASA Faculty Fellowship Program (NFFP) is designed to give college and university faculty members a rewarding personal as well as enriching professional experience. Fellowships are awarded to engineering and science faculty for work on collaborative research projects of mutual interest to the fellow and his or her JPL host colleague. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) have participated in the NASA Faculty Fellowship Program for more than 25 years. Administrative offices are maintained both at the Caltech Campus and at JPL; however, most of the activity takes place at JPL. The Campus handles all fiscal matters. The duration of the program is ten continuous weeks. Fellows are required to conduct their research on-site. To be eligible to participate in the program, fellows must be a U.S. citizen and hold a teaching or research appointment at a U.S. university or college. The American Society of Engineering Education (ASEE) contracts with NASA and manages program recruitment. Over the past several years, we have made attempts to increase the diversity of the participants in the NFFP Program. A great deal of attention has been given to candidates from minority-serving institutions. There were approximately 100 applicants for the 34 positions in 2002. JPL was the first-choice location for more than half of them. Faculty from 16 minority-serving institutions participated as well as four women. The summer began with an orientation meeting that included introduction of key program personnel, and introduction of the fellows to each other. During this welcome, the fellows were briefed on their obligations to the program and to their JPL colleagues. They were also given a short historical perspective on JPL and its relationship to Caltech and NASA. All fellows received a package, which included information on administrative procedures, roster of fellows, seminar program, housing questionnaire, directions to JPL, maps of

  7. Challenges in aerospace medicine education.

    PubMed

    Grenon, S Marlene; Saary, Joan

    2011-11-01

    Aerospace medicine training and research represents a dream for many and a challenge for most. In Canada, although some opportunities exist for the pursuit of education and research in the aerospace medicine field, they are limited despite the importance of this field for enabling safe human space exploration. In this commentary, we aim to identify some of the challenges facing individuals wishing to get involved in the field as well as the causal factors for these challenges. We also explore strategies to mitigate against these.

  8. Highlights of the 2009 SEG summer research workshop on ""CO2 sequestration geophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Lianjie; Lumley, David; Sherlock, Don; Daley, Tom; Lawton, Don; Masters, Ron; Verliac, Michel; White, Don

    2009-01-01

    The 2009 SEG Summer Research Workshop on 'CO{sub 2} Sequestration Geophysics' was held August 23-27, 2009 in Banff, Canada. The event was attended by over 100 scientists from around the world, which proved to be a remarkably successful turnout in the midst of the current global financial crisis and severe corporate travel restrictions. Attendees included SEG President Larry Lines (U. Calgary), and CSEG President John Downton (CGG Veritas), who joined SRW Chairman David Lumley (UWA) in giving the opening welcome remarks at the Sunday Icebreaker. The workshop was organized by an expert technical committee representing a good mix of industry, academic, and government research organizations. The format consisted of four days of technical sessions with over 60 talks and posters, plus an optional pre-workshop field trip to the Columbia Ice Fields to view firsthand the effects of global warming on the Athabasca glacier. Group technical discussion was encouraged by requiring each presenter to limit themselves to 15 minutes of presentation followed by a 15 minute open discussion period. Technical contributions focused on the current and future role of geophysics in CO{sub 2} sequestration, highlighting new research and field-test results with regard to site selection and characterization, monitoring and surveillance, using a wide array of geophysical techniques. While there are too many excellent contributions to mention all individually here, in this paper we summarize some of the key workshop highlights in order to propagate new developments to the SEG community at large.

  9. Highlights of the 2009 SEG summer research workshop on"CO2 Sequestration Geophysics"

    SciTech Connect

    Lumley, D.; Sherlock, D.; Daley, T.; Huang, L.; Lawton, D.; Masters, R.; Verliac, M.; White, D.

    2010-01-15

    The 2009 SEG Summer Research Workshop on CO2 Sequestration Geophysics was held August 23-27, 2009 in Banff, Canada. The event was attended by over 100 scientists from around the world, which proved to be a remarkably successful turnout in the midst of the current global financial crisis and severe corporate travel restrictions. Attendees included SEG President Larry Lines (U. Calgary), and CSEG President John Downton (CGG Veritas), who joined SRW Chairman David Lumley (UWA) in giving the opening welcome remarks at the Sunday Icebreaker. The workshop was organized by an expert technical committee (see side bar) representing a good mix of industry, academic, and government research organizations. The format consisted of four days of technical sessions with over 60 talks and posters, plus an optional pre-workshop field trip to the Columbia Ice Fields to view firsthand the effects of global warming on the Athabasca glacier (Figures 1-2). Group technical discussion was encouraged by requiring each presenter to limit themselves to 15 minutes of presentation followed by a 15 minute open discussion period. Technical contributions focused on the current and future role of geophysics in CO2 sequestration, highlighting new research and field-test results with regard to site selection and characterization, monitoring and surveillance, using a wide array of geophysical techniques. While there are too many excellent contributions to mention all individually here, in this paper we summarize some of the key workshop highlights in order to propagate new developments to the SEG community at large.

  10. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: Brookhaven Summer Program on Nucleon Spin Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Aschenauer, A.; Qiu, Jianwei; Vogelsang, W.; Yuan, F.

    2011-08-02

    Understanding the structure of the nucleon is of fundamental importance in sub-atomic physics. Already the experimental studies on the electro-magnetic form factors in the 1950s showed that the nucleon has a nontrivial internal structure, and the deep inelastic scattering experiments in the 1970s revealed the partonic substructure of the nucleon. Modern research focuses in particular on the spin and the gluonic structure of the nucleon. Experiments using deep inelastic scattering or polarized p-p collisions are carried out in the US at the CEBAF and RHIC facilities, respectively, and there are other experimental facilities around the world. More than twenty years ago, the European Muon Collaboration published their first experimental results on the proton spin structure as revealed in polarized deep inelastic lepton-nucleon scattering, and concluded that quarks contribute very little to the proton's spin. With additional experimental and theoretical investigations and progress in the following years, it is now established that, contrary to naive quark model expectations, quarks and anti-quarks carry only about 30% of the total spin of the proton. Twenty years later, the discovery from the polarized hadron collider at RHIC was equally surprising. For the phase space probed by existing RHIC experiments, gluons do not seem to contribute any to the proton's spin. To find out what carries the remaining part of proton's spin is a key focus in current hadronic physics and also a major driving force for the new generation of spin experiments at RHIC and Jefferson Lab and at a future Electron Ion Collider. It is therefore very important and timely to organize a series of annual spin physics meetings to summarize the status of proton spin physics, to focus the effort, and to layout the future perspectives. This summer program on 'Nucleon Spin Physics' held at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) on July 14-27, 2010 [http://www.bnl.gov/spnsp/] is the second one following the

  11. Research and technology operating plan summary: Fiscal year 1975 research and technology program. [space programs, energy technology, and aerospace sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Summaries are presented of Research and Technology Operating Plans currently in progress throughout NASA. Citations and abstracts of the operating plans are presented along with a subject index, technical monitor index, and responsible NASA organization index. Research programs presented include those carried out in the Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology, Office of Energy Programs, Office of Applications, Office of Space Sciences, Office of Tracking and Data Acquisition, and the Office of Manned Space Flight.

  12. Journey in Aeronautical Research: A Career at NASA Langley Research Center. No. 12; Monographs in Aerospace History

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, W. Hewitt

    1998-01-01

    An autobiography, of a noted aeronautical engineer, W. Hewitt Phillips, whose career spanned 58 years (1940-1998) at NASA Langley is presented. This work covers his early years to the Sputnik launch. His interests have been in research in aeronautics and in the related problems of spaceflight. After an introduction, his early life through the college years is reviewed, and his early interest in model airplanes is described. The first assignment for the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA), which would later become NASA, was with the Flight Research Division. His early work involved "Flying Qualities", i.e., the stability and control characteristics of an airplane. The next chapter describes his early analytical studies. His work during World War II in the design of military airplanes, and the other effects of the war on research activities, is covered in the next two chapters. This research was involved in such innovations and refinements as the swept wing, the flettner tabs, servo tabs, spring tabs and whirlerons. The rest of the work covers the research which Mr. Hewitt was involved in, after the war until the Sputnik launch. These areas include unsteady lift, measurements of turbulence in the atmosphere, gust alleviation, and lateral response to random turbulence. He was also involved in several investigations of airplane accidents. The last two chapters cover the administration of the Langley Research Center, and the dawn of the Space Age. A complete bibliography of reports written by Mr. Hewitt, is included.

  13. Snake River Spring/Summer Chinook Captive Broodstock Rearing and Research, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    McAuley, W. Carlin; Flagg, Thomas N.

    2003-03-01

    In 1995, the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), in cooperation with the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG), the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), and the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) established captive broodstock programs to aid in the recovery of Snake River spring/summer chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) listed as endangered under the U.S. Endangered Species Act (ESA). These programs were intended to provide safety nets for Salmon and Grande Ronde River Basins spring/summer chinook salmon stocks. They also provide a basis of examining the efficacy of captive rearing and captive breeding programs as tools for recovering listed salmonid populations. In years when no or few naturally produced fish return from the sea, captive fish and their progeny can be used to maintain populations in these two Snake River Basin tributaries. The NMFS facility at Manchester, WA, provides the crucial seawater environment needed to culture anadromous salmonids during the marine phase of their life cycle. At the Manchester Research Station, the fish are cultured in 6.1m diameter circular tanks housed in a fully enclosed and secure building. The tanks are supplied with seawater that has been processed to eliminate most marine pathogens. The fish are fed a commercially prepared diet and held at densities and loading rates designed to maximize fish quality. When fish begin to mature, they are transferred to ODFW or IDFG freshwater facilities in Oregon and Idaho for final maturation. The states then release the mature fish (Idaho) or their progeny (Oregon) back into their native Snake River tributary waters in restoration efforts. In FY 2001, NMFS cultured 1996, 1997, 1998, and 1999 broodyear fish at its Manchester Facility. This report addresses program activities from September 1, 2000 to August 31, 2001.

  14. Snake River Spring/Summer Chinook Captive Broodstock Rearing and Research, 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    McAuley, W. Carlin; Maynard, Desmond J.

    2003-03-01

    In 1995, the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), in cooperation with the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG), the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), and the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) established captive broodstock programs to aid in the recovery of Snake River spring/summer chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) listed as endangered under the U.S. Endangered Species Act (ESA). These programs were intended to provide safety nets for Salmon and Grande Ronde River Basins spring/summer chinook salmon stocks. They also provide a basis of examining the efficacy of captive rearing and captive breeding programs as tools for recovering listed salmonid populations. In years when no or few naturally produced fish return from the sea, captive fish and their progeny can be used to maintain populations in these two Snake River Basin tributaries. The NMFS facility at Manchester, WA, provides the crucial seawater environment needed to culture anadromous salmonids during the marine phase of their life cycle. At the Manchester Research Station, the fish are cultured in 6.1m diameter circular tanks housed in a fully enclosed and secure building. The tanks are supplied with seawater that has been processed to eliminate most marine pathogens. The fish are fed a commercially prepared diet and held at densities and loading rates designed to maximize fish quality. When fish begin to mature, they are transferred to ODFW or IDFG freshwater facilities in Oregon and Idaho for final maturation. The states then release the mature fish (Idaho) or their progeny (Oregon) back into their native Snake River tributary waters in restoration efforts. In FY 2002, NMFS cultured 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, and 2000 broodyear fish at its Manchester Facility. This report addresses program activities from September 1, 2001 to August 31, 2002.

  15. Snake River Spring/Summer Chinook Captive Broodstock Rearing and Research, 2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Maynard, Desmond J.; McAuley, W. Carlin

    2004-08-01

    In 1995, the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), in cooperation with the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG), the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), and the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) established captive broodstock programs to aid in the recovery of Snake River spring/summer chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) listed as endangered under the U.S. Endangered Species Act (ESA). These programs are intended to provide safety nets for Salmon and Grande Ronde River Basins spring/summer chinook salmon stocks. They also provide a basis of examining the efficacy of captive rearing and captive breeding programs as tools for recovering listed salmonid populations. In years when no or few naturally produced fish return from the sea, captive fish and their progeny can be used to maintain populations in these two Snake River Basin tributaries. The NMFS facility at Manchester, WA provides the crucial seawater environment needed to culture anadromous salmonids during the marine phase of their life cycle. At the Manchester Research Station, the fish are cultured in 6.1m diameter circular tanks housed in a fully enclosed and secure building. The tanks are supplied with seawater that has been processed to eliminate most marine pathogens. The fish are fed a commercially prepared diet and held at densities and loading rates intended to maximize fish quality. When fish begin to mature, they are transferred to ODFW or IDFG freshwater facilities in Oregon and Idaho for final maturation. The states then release the mature fish (Idaho) or their progeny (Oregon) back into their native Snake River tributary waters in restoration efforts. In FY 2003, NMFS cultured 1998, 1999, 2000, and 2001 broodyear fish at its Manchester Facility. This report addresses program activities from September 1, 2002 to August 31, 2003.

  16. Small Business Demand Response with Communicating Thermostats: SMUD's Summer Solutions Research Pilot

    SciTech Connect

    Herter, Karen; Wayland, Seth; Rasin, Josh

    2009-09-25

    This report documents a field study of 78 small commercial customers in the Sacramento Municipal Utility District service territory who volunteered for an integrated energy-efficiency/demand-response (EE-DR) program in the summer of 2008. The original objective for the pilot was to provide a better understanding of demand response issues in the small commercial sector. Early findings justified a focus on offering small businesses (1) help with the energy efficiency of their buildings in exchange for occasional load shed, and (2) a portfolio of options to meet the needs of a diverse customer sector. To meet these expressed needs, the research pilot provided on-site energy efficiency advice and offered participants several program options, including the choice of either a dynamic rate or monthly payment for air-conditioning setpoint control. An analysis of hourly load data indicates that the offices and retail stores in our sample provided significant demand response, while the restaurants did not. Thermostat data provides further evidence that restaurants attempted to precool and reduce AC service during event hours, but were unable to because their air-conditioning units were undersized. On a 100 F reference day, load impacts of all participants during events averaged 14%, while load impacts of office and retail buildings (excluding restaurants) reached 20%. Overall, pilot participants including restaurants had 2007-2008 summer energy savings of 20% and bill savings of 30%. About 80% of participants said that the program met or surpassed their expectations, and three-quarters said they would probably or definitely participate again without the $120 participation incentive. These results provide evidence that energy efficiency programs, dynamic rates and load control programs can be used concurrently and effectively in the small business sector, and that communicating thermostats are a reliable tool for providing air-conditioning load shed and enhancing the ability

  17. The 28th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohn, Douglas A. (Compiler)

    1994-01-01

    The proceedings of the 28th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium, which was hosted by the NASA Lewis Research Center and held at the Cleveland Marriott Society Center on May 18, 19, and 20, 1994, are reported. Technological areas covered include actuators, aerospace mechanism applications for ground support equipment, lubricants, pointing mechanisms joints, bearings, release devices, booms, robotic mechanisms, and other mechanisms for spacecraft.

  18. Optical Information Processing for Aerospace Applications 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stermer, R. L. (Compiler)

    1984-01-01

    Current research in optical processing, and determination of its role in future aerospace systems was reviewed. It is shown that optical processing offers significant potential for aircraft and spacecraft control, pattern recognition, and robotics. It is demonstrated that the development of optical devices and components can be implemented in practical aerospace configurations.

  19. Improving Science Literacy and Earth Science Awareness Through an Intensive Summer Research Experience in Paleobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heim, N. A.; Saltzman, J.; Payne, J.

    2014-12-01

    The chasm between classroom science and scientific research is bridged in the History of Life Internships at Stanford University. The primary foci of the internships are collection of new scientific data and original scientific research. While traditional high school science courses focus on learning content and laboratory skills, students are rarely engaged in real scientific research. Even in experiential learning environments, students investigate phenomena with known outcomes under idealized conditions. In the History of Life Internships, high school youth worked full time during the summers of 2013 and 2014 to collect body size data on fossil Echinoderms and Ostracods, measuring more than 20,000 species in total. These data are contributed to the larger research efforts in the Stanford Paleobiology Lab, but they also serve as a source of data for interns to conduct their own scientific research. Over the course of eight weeks, interns learn about previous research on body size evolution, collect data, develop their own hypotheses, test their hypotheses, and communicate their results to their peers and the larger scientific community: the 2014 interns have submitted eight abstracts to this meeting for the youth session entitled Bright STaRS where they will present their research findings. Based on a post-internship survey, students in the 2013 History of Life cohort had more positive attitudes towards science and had a better understanding of how to conduct scientific research compared to interns in the Earth Sciences General Internship Program, where interns typically do not complete their own research project from start to finish. In 2014, we implemented both pre- and post-internship surveys to determine if these positive attitudes were developed over the course of the internship. Conducting novel research inspires both the students and instructors. Scientific data collection often involves many hours of repetitive work, but answering big questions typically

  20. USAF/SCEEE Summer Faculty Research Program (1982). Research Reports. Volume 2.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-10-01

    1981 Stevens Institute of Technology Specialty: Sensitivity Theory for Mechanical Engineering Department Linear Multivariable Hoboken, NJ 07030 Optimal...University of Florida 6. Dr. Rama Yedavalli - Stevens Institute of Technology PIAN K J. SEILER RESEARCH LABORATORY (USAF Academy) 1. Dr. Keith...and summarizing brief stories. In D. LaBerge & J. Samuels (’Edo.), Basic processes in reading: Perception and comprehension. Hillsdale, New Jersey

  1. Slowing the Summer Slide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Lorna

    2012-01-01

    Research shows that summer slide--the loss of learning over the summer break--is a huge contributor to the achievement gap between low-income students and their higher-income peers. In fact, some researchers have concluded that two-thirds of the 9th-grade reading achievement gap can be explained by unequal access to summer learning opportunities…

  2. M.U.S.T. 2007 Summer Research Project at NASA's KSC MILA Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    PintoRey, Christian R.

    2007-01-01

    The summer research activity at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) aims to introduce the student to the basic principles in their field of study. While at KSC, a specific research project awaits the student to complete. As an Aeronautical Engineering student, my assigned project is to assist the cognizant engineer, Mr. Troy Hamilton, in the six engineering phases for replacing the Ponce De Leon (PDL)4.3M Antenna Control Unit (ACU). Although the project mainly requires the attention of two engineers and two students, it also involves the participation of many colleagues at various points during the course of the engineering change (EC). Since the PDL 4.3M ACU engineering change makes both hardware and software changes, it calls upon the expertise of a Hardware Engineer as well as a Software Engineer. As students, Mr. Jeremy Bresette and I have worked side by side with the engineers, gaining invaluable experience. We work in two teams, the hardware team and the software team, On certain tasks, we assist the engineers, while on others we assume their roles. By diligently working in this fashion, we are learning how to communicate effectively as professionals, despite the fact that we are studying different engineering fields. This project has been a great fit for my field of study, as it has highly improved my awareness of the many critical tasks involved in carrying out an engineering project.

  3. Research Laboratory for Engineering and Tehnology (ReLEnT)-Summer Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okhio, Cyril B.

    1996-01-01

    During the fiscal years 1994-1995 students at Central State University (CSU) have worked diligently under the supervision of the PI and associates to plan, design and conduct a four-week hands on summer program for high school students in grades 9 to 12. These workshops consists of experiments and computer aided design and manufacturing, designed to constructively stimulate interests in engineering and technology, and promote enrollment at CSU after they matriculate from high school. The experience gained in two years will be utilized to realize one of the deliverables for CSU engineering program during 1996. In FY-96 a new total of 30 students are now being interviewed for the 1996 program. This grant also provides resource for students enrolled in CSU's engineering program to work as undergraduate research assistants and ReLEnT tuition scholarship awards. These students are involved in the development of research, design projects, workshop procedures, laboratory exercises and seminars. Undergraduate students receiving tuition scholarships are required to maintain a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or higher. Finally, the ReLEnT award has made it possible for CSU to acquire some experimental and CFD capability which now provides us with the opportunity to compete and respond to RFP's on a competitive basis and a timely manner.

  4. What Went Wrong (and Right) in my Research for Undergraduates Program this Summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalbotten, D. M.; Geraghty Ward, E. M.; Berthelote, A. R.; Ito, E.; Myrbo, A.; Drake, C.; Howes, T.; Woods, P.

    2013-12-01

    The Research Experience for Undergraduates Site on Sustainable Land and Water Resources (NSF GEO-055346) is a complicated affair (like many REUs) with research teams on site on two different Native American reservations (the Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Reservation, Minnesota, and the Flathead Indian Reservation of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes, Montana), mentors from 2 universities and 2 reservations, and diverse participants from across the country. Students are diverse in ethnicity, academic majors, institution type, age, and life situation, with many nontraditional students as participants. While this all adds up to an interesting and exciting program, it is not without challenges. Herein the program directors discuss some of the particular challenges faced this summer, feedback the outside evaluation specialist received from participants and mentors, and ways the program's mentor team might respond in the future. This discussion will include a look at how systemic changes to an REU can lead to positive change, including a review of the recruiting and application process, communication between and among mentors and participants, the team structure of the REU, and supports in place to lead to participant success. Also included will be a discussion of how the relationship between the Native American reservations and the academic institutions was developed and how we continue to evolve based on annual feedback from all participants.

  5. Community-Based Summer Learning Programs for School- Age Children: Research-to-Policy Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Samuel A.

    2016-01-01

    Summer learning experiences for school-age children can be provided in a variety of ways and settings, including summer school programs (often remedial), community-based programs (often a continuation of afterschool programs), and home-based programs (in which families are provided with information and resources to encourage reading, often run by…

  6. Advanced Placement® Summer Institute: A Survey of Florida AP® Teachers. Research Notes. RN-39

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godfrey, Kelly E.

    2009-01-01

    Advanced Placement Program Summer Institute (APSI) courses provide teachers with an overview of the curriculum, structure, and content of specific AP courses. Attention is devoted not only to the development of curriculum but also to teaching strategies and the relationship of the course to the AP Examination. During the summers of 2006 and 2007,…

  7. Women in Flight Research at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center from 1946 to 1995. Number 6; Monographs in Aerospace History

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, Sheryll Goecke

    1997-01-01

    This monograph discusses the working and living environment of women involved with flight research at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center during the late 1940s and early 1950s. The women engineers, their work and the airplanes they worked on from 1960 to December 1995 are highlighted. The labor intensive data gathering and analysis procedures and instrumentation used before the age of digital computers are explained by showing and describing typical instrumentation found on the X-series aircraft from the X-1 through the X-15. The data reduction technique used to obtain the Mach number position error curve for the X-1 aircraft and which documents the historic first flight to exceed the speed of sound is described and a Mach number and altitude plot from an X-15 flight is shown.

  8. Aerospace in the future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccarthy, J. F., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    National research and technology trends are introduced in the environment of accelerating change. NASA and the federal budget are discussed. The U.S. energy dependence on foreign oil, the increasing oil costs, and the U.S. petroleum use by class are presented. The $10 billion aerospace industry positive contribution to the U.S. balance of trade of 1979 is given as an indicator of the positive contribution of NASA in research to industry. The research work of the NASA Lewis Research Center in the areas of space, aeronautics, and energy is discussed as a team effort of government, the areas of space, aeronautics, and energy is discussed as a team effort of government, industry, universities, and business to maintain U.S. world leadership in advanced technology.

  9. Teachers, Aerospace, Involvement: The Ingredients for Attitude Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard, Rex; Bell, Michael L.

    1975-01-01

    Describes a two week workshop which concentrated on involving teachers in action oriented aerospace activities and sharing ideas and materials for the application of aerospace concepts in the classroom. Research was also done to see if participants' attitudes toward aerospace education could be positively influenced to enhance personal teaching…

  10. United States Air Force Summer Faculty Research Program. Management Report. Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    Entomology , 1982 Associate Professor Specialty: Insect Behavior Dept. of Biology Assigned: School of Aerospace Medicine Oral Roberts University 7777 S...installed in the Forensic Laboratory at Tyndall AFB to provide additional work space. The existing bench as well as the new one should be equipped with... Forensic Laboratory at Tyndall AFB. Rationale: (1) the required microtiter equipment and antisera may be unavailable in the field, particularly at small

  11. United States Air Force Summer Faculty Research Program. 1988 Program Technical Report. Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    Entomology , 1982 Associate Professor Specialty: Insect Behavior Dept. of Biology Assigned: School of Aerospace Medicine Oral Roberts University 7777 S. Lewis...second work bench should be installed in the Forensic Laboratory at Tyndall AFB to provide additional work space. The existing bench as well as the new one...accomplished in the Forensic Laboratory at Tyndall AFB. Rationale: (1) the required microtiter equipment and antisera may be unavailable in the field

  12. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report 9: Summary report to phase 3 faculty and student respondents including frequency distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Kennedy, John M.; White, Terry F.

    1991-01-01

    This project is designed to explore the diffusion of scientific and technical information (STI) throughout the aerospace industry. The increased international competition and cooperation in the industry promises to significantly affect the STI standards of U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists. Therefore, it is important to understand the aerospace knowledge diffusion process itself and its implications at the individual, organizational, national, and international levels. Examined here is the role of STI in the academic aerospace community.

  13. Middle/High School Students in the Research Laboratory: A Summer Internship Program Emphasizing the Interdisciplinary Nature of Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMiller, Tracee; Lee, Tameshia; Saroop, Ria; Green, Tyra; Johnson, Casonya M.

    2006-01-01

    We describe an eight-week summer Young Scientist in Training (YSIT) internship program involving middle and high school students. This program exposed students to current basic research in molecular genetics, while introducing or reinforcing principles of the scientific method and demonstrating the uses of mathematics and chemistry in biology. For…

  14. Capacity-Building for African American Mental Health Training and Research: Lessons from the Howard-Dartmouth Collaborative Summer School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hipolito, Maria M. S.; Malik, Mansoor; Carpenter-Song, Elizabeth; Whitley, Rob

    2012-01-01

    Background: Many psychiatric residents have traditionally received little-or-no training in cross cultural approaches to psychiatric training and research. Method: The Dartmouth-Howard Collaboration summer school training program had a 5-year grant to explore approaches to enhancing understanding of cultural factors in mental health treatment and…

  15. Does Attendance in Summer School Increase Reading and Math Achievement of Elementary Students? PREPS Research Project 1979-1980.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abram, Marie J.; Maurelli, John A.

    The Daviess County, Kentucky, PREPS research project focused on evaluating the county's 1979 summer school program. This program invited children to attend if they were functioning at least one year below their grade placement level. Learning activities were structured around specific behavioral objectives; the emphasis was on reading and…

  16. Computers and the aerospace engineer

    SciTech Connect

    Trego, L.E.

    1990-03-01

    The use of computers in aerospace for design and analysis is described, and examples of project enhancements are presented. NASA is working toward the design of a numerical test cell that will allow integrated, multidisciplinary design, analysis, and optimization of propulsion systems. It is noted that with continuing advances in computer technology, including areas such as three-dimensional computer-aided design, finite element analysis, supercomputers, and artificial intelligence, the possibilities seem limitless for the aerospace engineer. Research projects are currently underway for design and/or reconfiguration of the V-22, B-767, SCRAMJET engines, F-16, and X29A using these techniques.

  17. Scientific Research on a Barrier Island: A Rice University In-service K-12 Summer Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, D. J.; Sawyer, D. S.

    2011-12-01

    In July 2011, a Rice University Summer course consisting of 21 in-service K-12 science teachers conducted fieldwork on Galveston Island, Texas. The goal of this class was to better prepare local teachers to teach the Texas state standards (TEKS) in addition to gaining valuable research, fieldwork, and technology experience. Participant groups developed independent research projects aimed at investigating hurricane impacts, barrier island erosion, nearshore oceanographic conditions, coastal environments, and natural versus anthropogenic dunes. These projects were carried out through the collection and use of ArcGIS, stratigraphical, sedimentological, and geophysical data comprised of satellite/aerial photography, elevation data, sediment push cores, and Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR). Participants analyzed Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) elevation data and several years of Galveston Island imagery, in order to locate appropriate areas to collect cores and GPR lines. Sediment push cores up to ~2 meters in length were collected, and they provided a valuable stratigraphic framework. Participants analyzed core sections for grain size and color variations, mollusc shells, and organic material to make environmental interpretations. These cores revealed hurricane washover beds, dune stratigraphy, and shoreline facies. GPR profiles were collected along the central part of Galveston Island, and the teachers interpreted and characterized the subsurface to ~2 meters depth. Several coastal geologic features, such as beach ridges, swales, and barrier island seaward dipping reflectors, were imaged clearly. Furthermore, sediment cores were collected along many GPR lines in order to verify subsurface interpretations. To seamlessly record and share data in the field, 3G enabled iPads were incorporated into the course. Participants used these devices to take field notes, pictures, and videos, in addition to having access to LIDAR and satellite imagery processed on campus. Merging

  18. 1999 Summer Research Program for High School Juniors at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    SciTech Connect

    2002-10-09

    oak-B202--During the summer of 1999, 12 students from Rochester-area high schools participated in the Laboratory for Laser Energetics' Summer High School Research Program. The goal of this program is to excite a group of high school students about careers in the areas of science and technology by exposing them to research in a state-of-the-art environment. Too often, students are exposed to ''research'' only through classroom laboratories that have prescribed procedures and predictable results. In LLE's summer program, the students experience all of the trials, tribulations, and rewards of scientific research. By participating in research in a real environment, the students often become more enthusiastic about careers in science and technology. In addition, LLE gains from the contributions of the many highly talented students who are attracted to the program. The students spent most of their time working on their individual research projects with members of LLE's technical staff. The projects were related to current research activities at LLE and covered a broad range of areas of interest including laser modeling, diagnostic development, chemistry, liquid crystal devices, and opacity data visualization. The students, their high schools, their LLE supervisors and their project titles are listed in the table. Their written reports are collected in this volume. The students attended weekly seminars on technical topics associated with LLE's research. Topics this year included lasers, fusion, holography, optical materials, global warming, measurement errors, and scientific ethics. The students also received safety training, learned how to give scientific presentations, and were introduced to LLE's resources, especially the computational facilities. The program culminated with the High School Student Summer Research Symposium on 25 August at which the students presented the results of their research to an audience that included parents, teachers, and members of LIX. Each

  19. Aerospace Education: A Pilot Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerlovich, Jack; Fagle, David

    1983-01-01

    Describes development of K-12 aerospace education materials. The ninth-grade component, adopted as a pilot program, consists of four parts: history, applications (principles of flight, weather, navigation), spin-offs of research, and careers/organizations. Program evaluation results are reported. (JN)

  20. Careers in the Aerospace Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Aviation Administration (DOT), Washington, DC. Office of General Aviation.

    The document briefly presents career information in the field of aerospace industry. Employment exists in three areas: (1) professional and technical occupations in research and development (engineers, scientists, and technicians); (2) administrative, clerical, and related occupations (engineers, scientists, technicians, clerks, secretaries,…

  1. 35th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boesiger, Edward A. (Compiler); Doty, Laura W. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The proceedings of the 35th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium are reported. Ames Research Center hosted the conference, which was held at the Four Points Sheraton, Sunnyvale, California, on May 9-11, 2001. The symposium was sponsored by the Mechanisms Education Association. Technology areas covered included bearings and tribology; pointing, solar array, and deployment mechanisms; and other mechanisms for spacecraft and large space structures.

  2. Summer Research Experiences for Science and Art Teachers to Explore Astrobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cola, J.; Gaucher, E.; Snell, T.; Greenwood, J.; Angra, A.; Zimmerman, C.; Williams, L. D.

    2012-12-01

    The Georgia Tech Center for Ribosomal Origins and Evolution, a center funded by the NASA Astrobiology Institute, developed an educational program titled, "Life on the Edge: Astrobiology." The purpose of the program was to provide high school educators with the exposure, materials, and skills necessary to prepare our future workforce and to foster student interest in scientific discovery on Earth and throughout the universe. In an effort to promote and encourage entry into teaching careers, Georgia Tech paired teachers in the Georgia Intern-Fellowship for Teachers (GIFT) program with undergraduate students interested in becoming a teacher through the NSF Pre-Teaching REU program. The GIFT and Pre-Teaching fellows investigated extremophiles, which became the focus of a week-long, "Life on the Edge: Astrobiology " summer program developed by three high school educators, two undergraduate students and faculty in the Schools of Biology, and Chemistry and Biochemistry at Georgia Tech. Twenty high school students were introduced to hands-on activities, such as astrobiology inspired art and techniques such as genomic DNA purification, gel electrophoresis, and Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). The impact of the Astrobiology program on the GIFT researchers, Pre-Teaching REU students, high school students, and faculty are discussed.

  3. Investigation on a summer operation effect of a district energy system at Kitakyushu science research city

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Weijun; Zhou, Nan; Nishida, Masaru; Sagara, Noriyasu; Ryu, Yuji; Ojima, Toshio

    2004-05-24

    In Kitakyushu Science and Research Park, a new district energy system has been introduced. In this study, we chose this system as a case study and have carried out an analysis on the efficiency of the power generation and heat release utilization of the fuel cell and gas engine in summer by using the recorded data. The results can be summarized as follows; (1) Although the power generation efficiencies of the gas engine and fuel cell are a little bit lower than the standard designated value, they are almost running at stable condition. (2) The collected heat energy is lower than the designated value. The heat release utilization, which is used for cooling and hot water, is fairly low. Considering the efficient use of energy, it is a key to have a good use of heat release when we introduce a district energy system. (3) The discarded heat energy of the system is very big in this investigation when evaluating the system as a whole. It is fundamental to the future of energy conservation to use primary energy more efficiently.

  4. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report 6: The relationship between the use of US government technical reports by US aerospace engineers and scientists and selected institutional and sociometric variables. Ph.D. Thesis - Indiana Univ., Nov. 1990 No. 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.

    1991-01-01

    The relationship between the use of U.S. government technical reports by U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists and selected institutional and sociometric variables was investigated. The methodology used for this study was survey research. Data were collected by means of a self-administered mail questionnaire. The approximately 34,000 members of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronauts (AIAA) served as the study population. The response rate for the survey was 70 percent. A dependent relationship was found to exist between the use of U.S. government technical reports and three of the institutional variables (academic preparation, years of professional aerospace work experience, and technical discipline). The use of U.S. government technical reports was found to be independent of all of the sociometric variables. The institutional variables best explain the use of U.S. government technical reports by U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists.

  5. Denali Rocks - An Innovative Geology Module for High School Students at the Alaska Summer Research Academy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipman, J. S.; Henton, S.; Chebul, E.; White, E.; Johnson, P.; Briggs, D.; Webley, P. W.; Drake, J.

    2011-12-01

    Scientific summer camps give high school students the unique opportunity to interact within the university environment. During July 2011, the Alaska Summer Research Academy (ASRA) provided such an opportunity for over 100 high school students. University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) instructors led a two-week long ASRA module, called 'Denali Rocks', where six student participants from across the USA learned the fundamentals of geology and went on a field expedition to Denali National Park and Preserve, with assistance from the National Park Service. The students documented their field experiences through photography and video recordings. For the videos, they were both news reporters and experts in the field. The module educated students in three important aspects of geosciences: natural hazards, natural resources, and the formation of geological landscapes. Students learned about natural hazards in Alaska by visiting two world leading monitoring facilities at UAF. Day excursions as part of the module included the Fort Knox Gold Mine and the Trans-Alaska Pipeline. The students learned how to identify major rock types, their emplacement, and their deposition in the field. They learned how to read topographic and geologic maps as well as how to use a geologic compass to take strike and dip measurements. Students also used technological equipment such as GPS to track the hikes, a Gigapan camera to create panoramic photos, and a handheld Niton X-ray fluorescence spectrometer for compositional analyses. All observations were documented in their field notebooks. By the end of the field camp, the six students were seasoned naturalists. The video and photographic documentation was used in a final presentation to 150 of their peers and instructors in the other ASRA modules. This was in the format of an evening news program complete with anchors, meteorologists, and lighting and camera crews. The students performed all duties during the presentation, and prepared all the footage

  6. The Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation Summer Research Internship Program: the benefits of preprofessional experience for prospective physicians.

    PubMed

    Willenbring, Benjamin D; McKee, Katherine C; Wilson, Betsy V; Henry, Timothy D

    2008-08-01

    There is a distinct shortage of preprofessional opportunities for undergraduate premedical students. During the last 7 summers, the Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation Summer Research Internship Program has exposed interested students to cardiology and clinical research. The goals of the internship program are threefold: to bring students in contact with the medical profession, to offer experiences in the various disciplines of cardiology, and to introduce students to clinical research. The success of the program can be measured by its influence on participants' academic pursuits and scholarly contributions. Of the 65 internship alumni, 52 are studying to become physicians and most of the others are in health-related fields. Interns have also contributed abstracts and manuscripts to peer-reviewed journals and presented their research at major conferences.

  7. Novel Wiring Technologies for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Tracy L.; Parrish, Lewis M.

    2014-01-01

    Because wire failure in aerospace vehicles could be catastrophic, smart wiring capabilities have been critical for NASA. Through the years, researchers at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) have developed technologies, expertise, and research facilities to meet this need. In addition to aerospace applications, NASA has applied its knowledge of smart wiring, including self-healing materials, to serve the aviation industry. This webinar will discuss the development efforts of several wiring technologies at KSC and provide insight into both current and future research objectives.

  8. [NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report 2:] Technical communications in aeronautics: Results of an exploratory study. An analysis of managers' and nonmanagers' responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Glassman, Myron; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Oliu, Walter E.

    1989-01-01

    Data collected from an exploratory study concerned with the technical communications practices of aerospace engineers and scientists were analyzed to test the primary assumption that aerospace managers and nonmanagers have different technical communications practices. Five assumptions were established for the analysis. Aerospace managers and nonmanagers were found to have different technical communications practices for three of the five assumptions tested. Although aerospace managers and nonmanagers were found to have different technical communications practices, the evidence was neither conclusive nor compelling that the presumption of difference in practices could be attributed to the duties performed by aerospace managers and nonmanagers.

  9. Summer School: Unfulfilled Promise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denton, David R.

    This report reviews the research on summer school and demonstrates that summer school makes a difference in students' lives if it is done right. A survey of more than 1,000 schools in the southern United States found that one-third of the responding schools did not offer summer school, many programs being the victims of budget cuts. Of those…

  10. Research Developments in Nondestructive Evaluation and Structural Health Monitoring for the Sustainment of Composite Aerospace Structures at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cramer, K. Elliott

    2016-01-01

    The use of composite materials continues to increase in the aerospace community due to the potential benefits of reduced weight, increased strength, and manufacturability. Ongoing work at NASA involves the use of the large-scale composite structures for spacecraft (payload shrouds, cryotanks, crew modules, etc). NASA is also working to enable both the use and sustainment of composites in commercial aircraft structures. One key to the sustainment of these large composite structures is the rapid, in-situ characterization of a wide range of potential defects that may occur during the vehicle's life. Additionally, in many applications it is necessary to monitor changes in these materials over their lifetime. Quantitative characterization through Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) of defects such as reduced bond strength, microcracking, and delamination damage due to impact, are of particular interest. This paper will present an overview of NASA's applications of NDE technologies being developed for the characterization and sustainment of advanced aerospace composites. The approaches presented include investigation of conventional, guided wave, and phase sensitive ultrasonic methods and infrared thermography techniques for NDE. Finally, the use of simulation tools for optimizing and validating these techniques will also be discussed.

  11. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 53: From student to entry-level professional: Examining the technical communications practices of early career-stage US aerospace engineers and scientists

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Holloway, Karen; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1995-01-01

    Studies indicate that communications and information-related activities take up a substantial portion of an engineer's work week; therefore, effective communications and information-use skills are one of the key engineering competencies that early career-stage aerospace engineers and scientists must possess to be successful. Feedback from industry rates communications and information-use skills high in terms of their importance to engineering practice; however, this same feedback rates the communications and information-use skills of early career-stage engineers low. To gather adequate and generalizable data about the communications and information-related activities of entry-level aerospace engineers and scientists, we surveyed 264 members of the AIAA who have no more than 1-5 years of aerospace engineering work experience. To learn more about the concomitant communications norms, we compared the results of this study with data (1,673 responses) we collected from student members of the AIAA and with data (341 responses) we collected from a study of aerospace engineering professionals. In this paper, we report selected results from these studies that focused on the communications practices and information-related activities of early career-stage U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists in the workplace.

  12. The development of aerospace polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, A. K.; St.clair, T. L.

    1983-01-01

    Few materials are available which can be used as aerospace adhesives at temperatures in the range of 300 C. The Materials Division at NASA-Langley Research Center developed several high temperature polyimide adhesives to fulfill the stringent needs of current aerospace programs. These adhesives are the result of a decade of basic research studies on the structure property relationships of both linear and addition aromatic polyimides. The development of both in house and commercially available polyimides is reviewed with regards to their potential for use as aerospace adhesives.

  13. The development of aerospace polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St. Clair, A. K.; St. Clair, T. L.

    1984-01-01

    Few materials are available which can be used as aerospace adhesives at temperatures in the range of 300 C. The Materials Division at NASA-Langley Research Center developed several high temperature polyimide adhesives to fulfill the stringent needs of current aerospace programs. These adhesives are the result of a decade of basic research studies on the structure property relationships of both linear and addition aromatic polyimides. The development of both in house and commercially available polyimides is reviewed with regards to their potential for use as aerospace adhesives.

  14. A research facility for habitation questions to be built at the German Aerospace Center in Cologne: future challenges of Space medicine

    PubMed Central

    Koch, B; Gerzer, R

    2008-01-01

    For long term habitation in space and for living on Moon and Mars, many questions still need to be resolved. Such habitation questions include prevention of and rehabilitation from negative effects of weightlessness that are, in many instances, comparable to problems of aging people on Earth as well as of patients during and recovery from long term stays in bed. Therefore the DLR Institute of Aerospace Medicine has designed a concept for a research facility that will make it possible to join space research directly with terrestrial applications. From a strategic point of view, one major emphasis of :envihab is to form a closely interrelated network of scientists and the industry and the public. The project has been in the planning phase for several years. After an international architectural contest, the winning concept was selected in 2007 by a Jury with ESA participation. PMID:19048099

  15. A research facility for habitation questions to be built at the German Aerospace Center in Cologne: future challenges of Space medicine.

    PubMed

    Koch, B; Gerzer, R

    2008-08-01

    For long term habitation in space and for living on Moon and Mars, many questions still need to be resolved. Such habitation questions include prevention of and rehabilitation from negative effects of weightlessness that are, in many instances, comparable to problems of aging people on Earth as well as of patients during and recovery from long term stays in bed. Therefore the DLR Institute of Aerospace Medicine has designed a concept for a research facility that will make it possible to join space research directly with terrestrial applications. From a strategic point of view, one major emphasis of :envihab is to form a closely interrelated network of scientists and the industry and the public. The project has been in the planning phase for several years. After an international architectural contest, the winning concept was selected in 2007 by a Jury with ESA participation.

  16. Aerospace Sector. Basic Skills Needs Assessment. Bristol Aerospace Limited & Canadian Auto Workers, Local 3005.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Lee Thomas

    A project examined the skill gaps within the aerospace industry, identified and prioritized the skills common to all jobs and work areas within the industry, and provided insight into the skills that workers need to upgrade and develop. The research was conducted June-August 1994 at Bristol Aerospace's Winnipeg, Manitoba, operations. The basic…

  17. [NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report 5:] Summary report to phase 1 respondents including frequency distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Kennedy, John M.; White, Terry F.

    1991-01-01

    Phase 1 of a four part study was undertaken to investigate the use of scientific and technical information (STI) by U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists. Specific attention was paid to institutional and sociometric variables and to the step-by-step process of information gathering used by the respondents. Data were collected by means of three self-administered mail-back questionnaires. The approximately 34,000 members of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics served as the study population. More than 65 percent of the randomly selected respondants returned the questionnaires in each of the three groups. Respondants relied more heavily on informal sources of information than formal sources and turned to librarians and other technical information specialists only when they did not obtain results via informal means or their own formal searches. The report includes frequency distributions for the questions.

  18. Development of a summer field-based hydrogeology research experience for undergraduates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singha, K.

    2011-12-01

    A critical problem in motivating and training the next generation of environmental scientists is providing them with an integrated scientific experience that fosters a depth of understanding and helps them build a network of colleagues for their future. As the education part of an NSF-funded CAREER proposal, I have developed a three-week summer research experience for undergraduate students that links their classroom education with field campaigns aiming to make partial differential equations come "alive" in a practical, applied setting focused on hydrogeologic processes. This course has been offered to freshman- to junior-level undergraduate students from Penn State and also the three co-operating Historically Black Universities (HBUs)--Jackson State University, Fort Valley State University, and Elizabeth City State University-since 2009. Broad learning objectives include applying their knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering to flow and transport processes in the field and communicating science effectively in poster and oral format. In conjunction with ongoing research about solute transport, students collected field data in the Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory in Central Pennsylvania, including slug and pumping tests, ground-penetrating radar, electrical resistivity imaging, wireline logging, and optical televiewers, among other instruments. Students conducted tracer tests, where conservative solutes are introduced into a local stream and monitored. Students also constructed numerical models using COMSOL Multiphysics, a research-grade code that can be used to model any physical system; with COMSOL, students create models without needing to be trained in computer coding. With guidance, students built basic models of fluid flow and transport to visualize how heterogeneity of hydraulic and transport properties or variations in forcing functions impact their results. The development of numerical models promoted confidence in predicting flow and

  19. Cognitive engineering in aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, David D.

    1993-01-01

    The progress that was made with respect to the objectives and goals of the research that is being carried out in the Cognitive Systems Engineering Laboratory (CSEL) under a Cooperative Agreement with NASA Ames Research Center is described. The major objective of this project is to expand the research base in Cognitive Engineering to be able to support the development and human-centered design of automated systems for aerospace applications. This research project is in support of the Aviation Safety/Automation Research plan and related NASA research goals in space applications.

  20. Aerospace Applications of Microprocessors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    An assessment of the state of microprocessor applications is presented. Current and future requirements and associated technological advances which allow effective exploitation in aerospace applications are discussed.

  1. Supercomputing in Aerospace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kutler, Paul; Yee, Helen

    1987-01-01

    Topics addressed include: numerical aerodynamic simulation; computational mechanics; supercomputers; aerospace propulsion systems; computational modeling in ballistics; turbulence modeling; computational chemistry; computational fluid dynamics; and computational astrophysics.

  2. NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report Number 3. Technical Communications in Aerospace: Results of Phase 1 Pilot Study. An Analysis of Profit Managers’ and Nonprofit Managers’ Responses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-10-01

    Aerospace: Results of Phase 1 Flot Study - An Analysis of Profit Managers’ and Nonprofit Managers’ Responses Thomas E. Pinelli D wlC NASA Langley...2 BACKGROUND FOR THE ANALYSIS OF PROFIT MANAGERS’ AND NONPROFIT MANAGERS’ RESPONSES ........ ........... 4 Assumptions...7 PRESENTATION AND DISCUSSION OF PROFIT MANAGERS’ AND NONPROFIT MANAGERS’ RESPONSES ....... ............. 8 Survey Objective 1

  3. Dynamics of aerospace vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, David K.

    1991-01-01

    The focus of this research was to address the modeling, including model reduction, of flexible aerospace vehicles, with special emphasis on models used in dynamic analysis and/or guidance and control system design. In the modeling, it is critical that the key aspects of the system being modeled be captured in the model. In this work, therefore, aspects of the vehicle dynamics critical to control design were important. In this regard, fundamental contributions were made in the areas of stability robustness analysis techniques, model reduction techniques, and literal approximations for key dynamic characteristics of flexible vehicles. All these areas are related. In the development of a model, approximations are always involved, so control systems designed using these models must be robust against uncertainties in these models.

  4. Training of aerospace medicine physicians.

    PubMed

    Mohler, S R

    1985-03-01

    In the U. S. there are 23 recognized medical specialty boards. One of these is preventive medicine. Within preventive medicine there are three areas: Aerospace Medicine, Occupational Medicine, and Public Health/General Preventive Medicine. The preventive medicine specialties have a common core of required training including biostatistics, epidemiology, health services administration and environmental health. These, plus associated topics are covered during year one of training. Year two of training involves clinical rotations specifically tailored to the eye, ear, heart, lungs and brain, plus flight training to the private pilot level, and a Masters Degree research project for the required thesis. During year three the physicians in aerospace medicine practice full-time aerospace medicine in a NASA or other government laboratory or a private facility. To date, more than 40 physicians have received aerospace medicine training through the Wright State University School of Medicine program. Among these are physicians from Japan, Australia, Taiwan, Canada and Mexico. In addition to the civilian program at Wright State University, there are programs conducted by the U. S. Air Force and Navy. The Wright State program has been privileged to have officers from the U. S. Army, Navy and Air Force. A substantial supporter of the Wright State program is the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and a strong space component is contained in the program.

  5. Collaboration and Community Building in Summer Undergraduate Research Programs in the School of Earth Sciences at Stanford University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevle, R. J.; Watson Nelson, T.; Harris, J. M.; Klemperer, S. L.

    2012-12-01

    In 2012, the School of Earth Sciences (SES) at Stanford University sponsored two summer undergraduate research programs. Here we describe these programs and efforts to build a cohesive research cohort among the programs' diverse participants. The two programs, the Stanford School of Earth Sciences Undergraduate Research (SESUR) Program and Stanford School of Earth Sciences Summer Undergraduate Research in Geoscience and Engineering (SURGE) Program, serve different undergraduate populations and have somewhat different objectives, but both provide students with opportunities to work on strongly mentored yet individualized research projects. In addition to research, enrichment activities co-sponsored by both programs support the development of community within the combined SES summer undergraduate research cohort. Over the course of 6 to 9 months, the SESUR Program engages Stanford undergraduates, primarily rising sophomores and juniors, with opportunities to deeply explore Earth sciences research while learning about diverse areas of inquiry within SES. Now in its eleventh year, the SESUR experience incorporates the breadth of the scientific endeavor: finding an advisor, proposal writing, obtaining funding, conducting research, and presenting results. Goals of the SESUR program include (1) providing a challenging and rewarding research experience for undergraduates who wish to explore the Earth sciences; (2) fostering interdisciplinary study in the Earth sciences among the undergraduate population; and (3) encouraging students to major or minor in the Earth sciences and/or to complete advanced undergraduate research in one of the departments or programs within SES. The SURGE Program, now in its second year, draws high performing students, primarily rising juniors and seniors, from 14 colleges and universities nationwide, including Stanford. Seventy percent of SURGE students are from racial/ethnic backgrounds underrepresented in STEM fields, and approximately one

  6. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report 10: Summary report to phase 3 academic library respondents including frequency distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Kennedy, John M.; White, Terry F.

    1991-01-01

    Phase 3 of a 4 part study was undertaken to study the use of scientific and technical information (STI) in the academic aerospace community. Phase 3 of this project used three questionnaires that were sent to three groups (i.e., faculty, librarians, and students) in the academic aerospace community. Specific attention was paid to the types of STI used and the methods in which academic users acquire STI. The responses of the academic libraries are focussed on herein. Demographic information on academic aerospace libraries is provided. Data regarding NASA interaction with academic aerospace libraries is also included, as is the survey instrument.

  7. [NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report 3:] Technical communications in aeronautics: Results of an exploratory study. An analysis of profit managers' and nonprofit managers' responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Glassman, Myron; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Oliu, Walter E.

    1989-01-01

    Data collected from an exploratory study concerned with the technical communications practices of aerospace engineers and scientists were analyzed to test the primary assumption that profit and nonprofit managers in the aerospace community have different technical communications practices. Five assumptions were established for the analysis. Profit and nonprofit managers in the aerospace community were found to have different technical communications practices for one of the five assumptions tested. It was, therefore, concluded that profit and nonprofit managers in the aerospace community do not have different technical communications practices.

  8. Involving REU interns in community-based research in southern Louisiana - Lessons learned from a summer on the Bayou

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haacker-Santos, R.; Pandya, R. E.; Sloan, V.; Peterson, K.; Laska, S.; Foret, J.; Denning, S.

    2012-12-01

    Many students from under-represented communities choose not to pursue graduate school in geoscience in part because they see few immediate and concrete opportunities to serve society by doing so. To address this, RESESS and SOARS, two long-standing undergraduate-to-graduate geoscience research internships, offer interested students the opportunity work with local and indigenous communities to design and conduct research with clear societal relevance . Our presentation will describe one such community-based research project in coastal areas of Louisiana. This summer, RESESS and SOARS worked with the Center for Hazards Assessment, Response and Technology (CHART) at the University of New Orleans to introduce our interns to projects that support community viability in the face of current and historical ecosystem change by integrating physical science, geospatial technology and traditional ecological knowledge. For nine weeks, three interns lived and worked in Louisiana coastal communities and learned how projects can be defined by, guided by and assessed against community priorities. CHART introduced our interns to participatory action research (PAR) and helped them apply PAR to their research. The interns developed and implemented community-based research projects around land-loss, ecology of culturally important plants, and water quality. The experience has earned positive informal feedback from the students and the communities they worked with and we have already learned valuable lessons about doing community-based work. After the completion of the summer program, student and mentor experiences will be assessed formally through surveys and interviews. Our presentation will describe the projects our three interns worked on, lessons-learned by the interns and our programs, and share recommendations for a successful off-site summer experience for other programs considering community-based research.

  9. NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report Number 23. U.S. Academic Librarians and Technical Information Specialists as Information Intermediaries: Results of the Phase 3 Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-03-01

    Issues." Government Information Quarterly . 5(1): 27-44. McGowan, R. P. and "Strategies for Information Management: The Administrator’s S. Loveless...Kennedy, and Project." Government Information Quarterly 8(2): 219-233. R. 0. Barclay 1991 Pinelli, T. E., "Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research

  10. Summer Research Program - 1997 Summer Faculty Research Program Volume 6 Arnold Engineering Development Center United States Air Force Academy Air Logistics Centers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-12-01

    Looking Radar Signal Procesing a Literature Review DR Milton L Cone WL/AACF 5- 13 Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University , Prescott , AZ Scheduling in the...Dayton , OH Develop an Explosive Simulated Testing Apparatus for Impact Physics Research at Wright Laboratory DR James S Marsh WL/MNSI 5- 46...compute the flow in the defined portion of the arc heater. Heat addition was used to simulate the joule heating process inside the arc heater. The Solver A

  11. Aerospace - Aviation Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Arthur I.; Jones, K. K.

    This document outlines the aerospace-aviation education program of the State of Texas. In this publication the course structures have been revised to fit the quarter system format of secondary schools in Texas. The four courses outlined here have been designed for students who will be consumers of aerospace products, spinoffs, and services or who…

  12. Crew factors in the aerospace workplace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanki, Barbara G.; Foushee, H. C.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of technological change in the aerospace workplace on pilot performance are discussed. Attention is given to individual and physiological problems, crew and interpersonal problems, environmental and task problems, organization and management problems, training and intervention problems. A philosophy and conceptual framework for conducting research on these problems are presented and two aerospace studies are examined which investigated: (1) the effect of leader personality on crew effectiveness and (2) the working undersea habitat known as Aquarius.

  13. Research on lock-in thermography for aerospace materials of nondestructive test based on image sequence processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Junyan; Dai, Jingmin; Wang, Yang

    2008-11-01

    IR Lock in thermography is an active thermography technology based on thermal wave signal processing, especially, it has many advantages for nondestructive test of composite materials and compound structure application and has been applied on aerospace, automotive, mechanics and electric fields. In lock in thermography, given sufficient time for periodic heating, the surface temperature will evolve periodically in a sinusoidal pattern form the transient state to the steady state. In this paper, the principle of lock in thermography is introduced and the heat transferring process is analyzed by the sinusoidal variation heating flow transferred in materials by means of FEM method. In experiment, the modulating optical stimulation is applied to sample, and image sequences are collected by Jade MWIR 550 FPA IR camera. The digital filter algorithm which is Savitzky-Golay digital smoothness filters is used to remove the effects of high frequency noise. A phase image at the frequency of periodic heating can be calculated using a Fourier transform of the periodic heating frequency in transient state for defect detection. The IR lock in thermography processing software is developed by using of visual C++ programmed based image sequence collected. The experimental results show that the developed system reached up to high level of conventional steady state Lock in method.

  14. 30th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, O.H. Jr.; Rogers, J.F.

    1996-05-01

    The proceedings of the 30th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium are reported. NASA Langley Research Center hosted the proceedings held at the Radisson Hotel in Hampton, Virginia on May 15-17, 1996, and Lockheed Martin Missiles and Space Company, Inc. co-sponsored the symposium. Technological areas covered include bearings and tribology; pointing, solar array, and deployment mechanisms; orbiter/space station; and other mechanisms for spacecraft. Separate abstracts have been indexed into the database for some articles from this proceedings.

  15. 30th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Obie H., Jr. (Compiler); Rogers, John F. (Compiler)

    1996-01-01

    The proceedings of the 30th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium are reported. NASA Langley Research Center hosted the proceedings held at the Radisson Hotel in Hampton, Virginia on May 15-17, 1996, and Lockheed Martin Missiles and Space Company, Inc. co-sponsored the symposium. Technological areas covered include bearings and tribology; pointing, solar array, and deployment mechanisms; orbiter/space station; and other mechanisms for spacecraft.

  16. Aerospace Materials for Extreme Environments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-07

    AFOSR/RTD Air Force Research Laboratory AEROSPACE MATERIALS FOR EXTREME ENVIRONMENTS Date: 7 March 2013 Report Documentation Page Form...ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for...to Washington Headquarters Services, Directorate for Information Operations and Reports , 1215 Jefferson Davis Highway, Suite 1204, Arlington VA

  17. NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report Number 10. Summary Report to Phase 3 Academic Library Respondents Including Frequency Distributions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-08-01

    Phase 3 of a four part study was undertaken to investigate the use of scientific and technical information (STI) in the academic aerospace community... Phase 3 of this project used three questionnaires that were sent to three groups (i.e., faculty librarians, and students) in the academic aerospace

  18. NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report Number 8. Summary Report to Phase 3, Faculty and Student Respondents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-01

    Phase 3 of a four part study was undertaken to investigate the use of scientific and technical information (STI) in the academic aerospace community... Phase 3 of this project used three questionnaires that were sent to three groups (i.e., faculty, librarians, and students) in the academic aerospace

  19. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 60: Culture and Workplace Communications: A Comparison of the Technical Communications Practices of Japanese and US Aerospace Engineers and Scientists

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Sato, Yuko; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1997-01-01

    The advent of global markets elevates the role and importance of culture as a mitigating factor in the diffusion of knowledge and technology and in product and process innovation. This is especially true in the Large Commercial Aircraft (LCA) sector where the production and market aspects are becoming increasingly international. As firms expand beyond their national borders, using such methods as risk- sharing partnerships, joint ventures, outsourcing, and alliances, they have to contend with national and corporate cultures. Our focus is on Japan, a 'program participant' in the production of the Boeing Company's 777; the influence of Japanese culture on the diffusion of knowledge and technology in aerospace at the national and international levels; those cultural determinants-the propensity to work together, a willingness to subsume individual interests to a greater good, and an emphasis on consensual decisionmaking-that have a direct bearing on the ability of Japanese firms to form alliances and compete in international markets; and those cultural determinants thought to influence the information- seeking behaviors and workplace communication practices of Japanese aerospace engineers and scientists. In this paper, we report selective results from a survey of Japanese and U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists that focused on workplace communications. Data are presented for the following topics: importance of and time spent communicating information, collaborative writing, need for an undergraduate course in technical communication, use of libraries, use and importance of electronic (computer) networks, and the use and importance of foreign and domestically produced technical reports.

  20. Summer library reading programs.

    PubMed

    Fiore, Carole D

    2007-01-01

    Virtually all public libraries in the United States provide some type of summer library reading program during the traditional summer vacation period. Summer library reading programs provide opportunities for students of many ages and abilities to practice their reading skills and maintain skills that are developed during the school year. Fiore summarizes some of the research in the field and relates it to library programs and usage by students. Several traditional and innovative programs from U.S. and Canadian libraries are described. She concludes with a call for further research related to summer library reading programs.

  1. The HSCaRS Summer Enrichment Program; Research Opportunities for Minority and Women Undergraduates in Global Change Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, Jr., Maurice G.; Perkey, Donald J.; Coleman, T. L.

    1997-01-01

    The primary objective of the HSCaRS Summer Enrichment Program (SEP) is to make significant contributions to the NASA Mission to Planet Earth (MTPE) and the Alabama A&M University (AAMU) Center for Hydrology, Soil Climatology and Remote Sensing (HSCaRS) research missions by providing undergraduate student research internships with an emphasis on minority and women students. Additional objectives are to encourage more minority and women students to pursue advanced degrees in Earth system and global change science and to increase the participation of minority institutions in the U.S. Global Change Research Program. Also, the SEP strives to make students in the traditional science disciplines more aware of the opportunities in Earth System Science. In designing the SEP, it was acknowledged that HSCaRS was a new research effort and Center. Consequently, students were not expected to immediately recognize the Center as one would older, more established research laboratories with national reputations, such as Los Alamos, Battelle, National Consortium for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), etc. Yet we still wanted to compete nationally for the best students. Therefore, we designed the program with a competitive financial package that includes a stipend of $400 per week, round-trip transportation from home to the summer research site, and free campus housing and meal plans provided by Alabama A&M University. Students also received a modest living allowance of approximately $25 per week. The internship program was 10 weeks in residence at Alabama A&M University or IGCRE, and gave students the opportunity to select from six general research areas: micro-meteorology, soil data analysis, soil moisture modeling, instrumentation, geographic information systems, and computer science. Student participants also enrolled in an introductory global change science course as part of the summer program (a copy of the course outline is in the appendix). The program included participation in a

  2. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 3: The impact of a sponsor letter on mail survey response rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, John M.; Pinelli, Thomas E.

    1990-01-01

    We describe the impact of two interventions in the design of mail surveys. The interventions were devised to increase response rates and to clarify sample eligibility. To test their effectiveness, the interventions occurred at different points in each of three surveys. One intervention was a letter from the research sponsor (NASA) supporting the research. The other intervention was the inclusion of a postcard that could be used by the respondent to indicate that the questionnaire was not appropriate for him/her. The sample was drawn from the membership of a professional aerospace research society, the American Institute for Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA). Scientists and engineers are difficult to survey for two reasons. First, there are significant problems with the definition of scientists and engineers. Second, typically there are low response rates in surveys of this group. These two problems were found in the NASA surveys. The results indicate that the sponsor letter improved response rates under certain conditions described here. The postcards assisted in identifying non-eligible persons, particularly when the postcards accompanied a pre-survey letter. The implications for survey costs are discussed.

  3. Review of "Evaluation of Pilot Summer Activities for 16 Year Olds: Summer 2000," by Jo Hutchinson, David Henderson, and Sarah Francis. (DfEE Research Report No. 260.)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Geoff

    2001-01-01

    Questionnaires completed by 777 participants evaluated 32 pilot summer programs in the United Kingdom designed to help high-risk 16-year-olds make the transition from secondary school to adult life and to enhance eight personal and social skills through outdoor activities. Results indicate the programs had a positive impact, but numerous…

  4. Third Aerospace Environmental Technology Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, A. F. (Editor); Cross, D. R. (Editor); Caruso, S. V. (Editor); Clark-Ingram, M. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    The elimination of CFC's, Halons, TCA, other ozone depleting chemicals, and specific hazardous materials is well underway. The phaseout of these chemicals has mandated changes and new developments in aerospace materials and processes. We are beyond discovery and initiation of these new developments and are now in the implementation phase. This conference provided a forum for materials and processes engineers, scientists, and managers to describe, review, and critically assess the evolving replacement and clean propulsion technologies from the standpoint of their significance, application, impact on aerospace systems, and utilization by the research and development community. The use of these new technologies, their selection and qualification, their implementation, and the needs and plans for further developments are presented.

  5. 38th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boesiger, Edward A. (Compiler)

    2006-01-01

    The Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium (AMS) provides a unique forum for those active in the design, production and use of aerospace mechanisms. A major focus is the reporting of problems and solutions associated with the development and flight certification of new mechanisms. Organized by the Mechanisms Education Association, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC) share the responsibility for hosting the AMS. Now in its 38th symposium, the AMS continues to be well attended, attracting participants from both the U.S. and abroad. The 38th AMs, hosted by the NASA Langley Research Center in Williamsburg, Virginia, was held May 17-19, 2006. During these three days, 34 papers were presented. Topics included gimbals, tribology, actuators, aircraft mechanisms, deployment mechanisms, release mechanisms, and test equipment. Hardware displays during the supplier exhibit gave attendees an opportunity to meet with developers of current and future mechanism components.

  6. KIBO Industry, innovates in aerospace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paillard, Jean-Philippe

    2016-07-01

    The conquest of space is a true inspiration. Imagine a long-duration mission to a distant destination. What shall we take to produce our food? A cow, fish, chicken, or just eggs. In the current state of the animal production technologies are complicated and expensive to implement, except perhaps one: the breeding of edible insects. Based on this postulate KIBO in partnership with Space Agriculture Task Force and the university's department of Nutrition Nagoya most innovative research program is created in modern nutrition. This program is called Pegasus. Pegasus research program aims to develop food productions and modules applicable to the aerospace conquest. Kibo industry is the first entomocole production company creat in Europe to human food; it aims to become the world leader by 2020. Kibo industry is particularly specialized in producing entomosource (products with insects). The first phase of the program is to achieve an outcome cereal bar edible insect to aerospace. So we will present the issues and objectives of the project, for aerospace and us. Jean-Philippe Paillard is the KIBO industry CEO and Vice President of the FFPIDI insects farms federation. He is also the co computer alone authorization dossier on the market in Europe and therefore the privileged interlocutor of the General Directorate for Health and Customer Review on this topic. He intervened at the last conference on the insect organized by FAO in Wageningen and various universities in France.

  7. KIBO Industry, innovates in aerospace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, Naomi; Paillard, Jean-Philippe

    2016-07-01

    The conquest of space is a true inspiration. Imagine a long-duration mission to a distant destination. What shall we take to produce our food? A cow, fish, chicken, or just eggs. In the current state of the animal production technologies are complicated and expensive to implement, except perhaps one: the breeding of edible insects. Based on industry KIBO is postulated in partnership with Space Agriculture Task Force and the university's department of Nutrition Nagoya most innovative research program is created in modern nutrition. This program is called Pegasus. Pegasus research program aims to develop food productions and modules applicable to the aerospace conquest. Kibo entomocole industry is the first production company in Europe to human food, it aims to become the world leader by 2020. Kibo industry is particularly specialized in producing entomosource (products with insects). The first phase of the program is to achieve an outcome cereal bar edible insect to aerospace. So we will present the issues and objectives of the project, for aerospace and us. Jean-Philippe Paillard is the KIBO industry CEO and Vice President of the FFPIDI insects farms federation. He is also the co computer alone authorization dossier on the market in Europe and therefore the privileged interlocutor of the General Directorate for Health and Customer Review on this topic. He intervened at the last conference on the insect organized by FAO in Wageningen and in the universities of Angers, Nantes, Lille.

  8. The Gatsby Plant Science Summer School: Inspiring the Next Generation of Plant Science Researchers[OA

    PubMed Central

    Levesley, Aurora; Jopson, Juliet; Knight, Celia

    2012-01-01

    We provide evidence from a 5-year study to show that a single concerted effort at the start of undergraduate study can have a clear and lasting effect on the attitudes of students toward plant science. Attendance at a week-long residential plant science summer school in the first year of an undergraduate degree resulted in many students changing courses to include more plant science and increased numbers of graduates selecting plant-based PhDs. The evidence shows that the Gatsby Plant Science Summer School has increased the pool of high-quality plant science related PhD applicants in the UK and has had a positive impact on students’ career aspirations. The results are discussed within the context of enhancing the pipeline of future plant scientists and reversing the decline of this vulnerable and strategically important subject relevant to addressing food security and other major global challenges. We have shown that a single well-designed and timely intervention can influence future student behavior and as such offers a framework of potential use to other vulnerable disciplines. PMID:22534129

  9. The Potential Use of Summer Rainfall Enhancement in Illinois. Part II: Integration of Factors Affecting Enhancement Projects and Future Research.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Changnon, Stanley A.

    1993-03-01

    technology that could produce a 40% increase in all summer rains, the estimated crop-yield benefit in the simulated project area would have been $25 million.The 1987 91 field trials sampled only 30% of the growing conditions that occur in Illinois, and thus, the rain-modification results are only estimates of the possible outcomes from added rainfall. Nevertheless, they reveal clear needs for research relating to weather modification in the humid climate of the Corn Bell. First, more field trials are needed to define crop yield-rain relations in other types of growing seasons. Second, methods for seeding clouds at night must be developed if agriculturally useful increases are to occur. Since the value of choosing to modify rain in a given summer depends on the availability of an accurate forecast of summer rainfall, increased attention should be given to seasonal forecasting research.

  10. The aerospace technology laboratory (a perspective, then and now)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connors, J. F.; Hoffman, R. G.

    1982-01-01

    The physical changes that have taken place in aerospace facilities since the Wright brothers' accomplishment 78 years ago are highlighted. For illustrative purposes some of the technical facilities and operations of the NASA Lewis Research Center are described. These simulation facilities were designed to support research and technology studies in aerospace propulsion.

  11. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 64: Culture and Workplace Communications: A Comparison of the Technical Communications Practices of Japanese and US Aerospace Engineers and Scientists

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Sato, Yuko; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1997-01-01

    The advent of global markets elevates the role and importance of culture as a mitigating factor in the diffusion of knowledge and technology and in product and process innovation. This is especially true in the large commercial aircraft (LCA) sector where the production and market aspects are becoming increasingly international. As firms expand beyond their national borders, using such methods as risk-sharing partnerships, joint ventures, outsourcing, and alliances, they have to contend with national and corporate cultures. Our focus is on Japan, a program participant in the production of the Boeing Company's 777. The aspects of Japanese culture and workplace communications will be examined: 1.) the influence of Japanese culture on the diffusion of knowledge and technology in aerospace at the national and international levels; 2.) those cultural determinants-the propensity to work together, a willingness to subsume individual interests to a greater good, and an emphasis on consensual decision making-that have a direct bearing on the ability of Japanese firms to form alliances and compete in international markets; 3.) and those cultural determinants thought to influence the information-seeking behaviors and workplace communication practices of Japanese aerospace engineers and scientists. In this article, we report selective results from a survey of Japanese and U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists that focused on workplace communications. Data are presented for the following topics: importance of and time spent communicating information, collaborative writing, need for an undergraduate course in technical communication, use of libraries, use and importance of electronic (computer) networks, and the use and importance of foreign and domestically produced technical reports.

  12. Ninteenth Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The proceedings of the 19th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium are reported. Technological areas covered include space lubrication, bearings, aerodynamic devices, spacecraft/Shuttle latches, deployment, positioning, and pointing. Devices for spacecraft docking and manipulator and teleoperator mechanisms are also described.

  13. Aerospace bibliography, seventh edition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blashfield, J. F. (Compiler)

    1983-01-01

    Space travel, planetary probes, applications satellites, manned spaceflight, the impacts of space exploration, future space activities, astronomy, exobiology, aeronautics, energy, space and the humanities, and aerospace education are covered.

  14. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 37: The impact of political control on technical communications: A comparative study of Russian and US aerospace engineers and scientists

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barclay, Rebecca O.; Pinelli, Thomas E.; Flammia, Madelyn; Kennedy, John M.

    1994-01-01

    Until the recent dissolution of the Soviet Union, the Communist Party exerted a strict control of access to and dissemination of scientific and technical information (STI). This article presents models of the Soviet-style information society and the Western-style information society and discusses the effects of centralized governmental control of information on Russian technical communication practices. The effects of political control on technical communication are then used to interpret the results of a survey of Russian and U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists concerning the time devoted to technical communication, their collaborative writing practices and their attitudes toward collaboration, the kinds of technical documents they produce and use, and their use of computer technology, and their use of and the importance to them of libraries and technical information centers. The data are discussed in terms of tentative conclusions drawn from the literature. Finally, we conclude with four questions concerning government policy, collaboration, and the flow of STI between Russian and U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists.

  15. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 50: From student to entry-level professional: Examining the role of language and written communications in the reacculturation of aerospace engineering students

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Keene, Michael L.; Kennedy, John M.; Hecht, Laura F.

    1995-01-01

    When students graduate and enter the world of work, they must make the transition from an academic to a professional knowledge community. Kenneth Bruffee's model of the social construction of knowledge suggests that language and written communication play a critical role in the reacculturation process that enables successful movement from one knowledge community to another. We present the results of a national (mail) survey that examined the technical communications abilities, skills, and competencies of 1,673 aerospace engineering students, who represent an academic knowledge community. These results are examined within the context of the technical communications behaviors and practices reported by 2,355 aerospace engineers and scientists employed in government and industry, who represent a professional knowledge community that the students expect to join. Bruffee's claim of the importance of language and written communication in the successful transition from an academic to a professional knowledge community is supported by the responses from the two communities we surveyed. Implications are offered for facilitating the reacculturation process of students to entry-level engineering professionals.

  16. Project INSPIRE-HBCU Undergraduate Collaborative Summer Training Program to Inspire Students in Prostate Cancer Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-01

    continuum of opportunities including didactic and meaningful research experience and training in basic, biomedical, clinical and/or population...minority scientists, there is a gap in the early phases of the training pipeline, including the current prostate cancer education , training and...including didactic and meaningful research experience and training in basic, biomedical, clinical and/or population sciences research for promising

  17. Life's Lessons in the Lab: A Summer of Learning from Undergraduate Research Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nadelson, Louis S.; Warner, Don; Brown, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Research experiences for undergraduates (REUs) seek to increase the participating students' knowledge and perceptions of scientific research through engagement in laboratory research and related activities. Various REU outcomes have been investigated including influence on participants' content knowledge, career plans, and general perceptions of…

  18. NASA Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology Summer Workshop. Volume 10: Basic research panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Possible research experiments using the space transportation system are identified based on user requirements. Opportunity driven research areas include quantum electronics, cryogenics system technology, superconducting devices and detectors, and photo-induced reactions. Mission driven research requirements were examined and ranked based on inputs from the user group.

  19. Selected Proceedings and Information from the 1968 Summer Workshop in Research in Vocational-Technical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zancanella, James, Ed.; Black, Fred P., Jr., Ed.

    The 3-week workshop concentrated on techniques and procedures for research proposals and projects in vocational education, with special emphasis on research at the local level. Participants were involved both in the formal workshop sessions and in the design of actual research proposals. A summary of two panel discussions and manuscripts for the…

  20. Capital raising of aerospace companies: equities or debts?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui-Shan, L.; Taw-Onn, Y.; Wai-Mun, H.

    2016-10-01

    Aerospace products enhance national and economic activities, thus maintaining the sustainability of aerospace industry is crucial. One of the perspectives in ensuring sustainability of aerospace companies is expansion of firms by raising funds for research and development in order to provide a reasonable profitability to the firms. This study comprises a sample of 47 aerospace companies from 2009 to 2015 to analyze the impact of raising fund by equities or debts to the profitability of the firms. The result indicates that capital raising through equities is preferable than debts. Moreover, the study also identifies that the profit of aerospace industry is volatile and there is cyclical reduction of the net income in the first quarter of the year. The management needs to make wise decisions in raising fund to ensure a healthy growth of the aerospace company.

  1. Research pilots at NASA Dryden tested a prototype helmet during the summer and fall of 2002. The obj

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Research pilots from the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif., tested a prototype two-part helmet. Built by Gentex Corp., Carbondale, Pa., the helmet was evaluated by five NASA pilots during the summer and fall of 2002. The objective was to obtain data on helmet fit, comfort and functionality. The inner helmet of the modular system is fitted to the individual crewmember. The outer helmet features a fully integrated spectral mounted helmet display and a binocular helmet mounted display. The helmet will be adaptable to all flying platforms. The Dryden evaluation was overseen by the Center's Life Support office. Assessments have taken place during normal proficiency flights and some air-to-air combat maneuvering. Evaluation platforms included the F-18, B-52 and C-12. The prototype helmet is being developed by the Naval Air Science and Technology Office and the Aircrew Systems Program Office, Patuxent River, Md.

  2. LEOS Summer Topical Meetings (1991) on Spaceborne Photonics: Aerospace Applications of Lasers and Electro-Optics and Optical Millimeter-Wave Interactions: Measurements, Generation, Transmission and Control Held in Newport Beach, California on July 22-26, 1991

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-02-29

    AlinAsGalnAs graded superlattice," Appi. Phys. Lett., 54, pp. 16-17, 1988. 4. W . J. Kozlovsky, C. D. Nabors , and R. L. Byer, ’Efficient second harmonic...A D-A 269 037 MENTATION PAGE ,Mo.70 muhIhIII m N1 I urn mmi et iii NIe d H jHeracUe i hour per respon•e.. including he ti , w .or e•weoing e rstru...Library of Congress #: 90-85245 ISBN: 0-87942-618-7 Softbound 0-87942-619-5 Microfiche IIm mm F 0 R E W 0 R D Welcome to the first summer topical meeting

  3. Knowledge-based diagnosis for aerospace systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkinson, David J.

    1988-01-01

    The need for automated diagnosis in aerospace systems and the approach of using knowledge-based systems are examined. Research issues in knowledge-based diagnosis which are important for aerospace applications are treated along with a review of recent relevant research developments in Artificial Intelligence. The design and operation of some existing knowledge-based diagnosis systems are described. The systems described and compared include the LES expert system for liquid oxygen loading at NASA Kennedy Space Center, the FAITH diagnosis system developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the PES procedural expert system developed at SRI International, the CSRL approach developed at Ohio State University, the StarPlan system developed by Ford Aerospace, the IDM integrated diagnostic model, and the DRAPhys diagnostic system developed at NASA Langley Research Center.

  4. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report 27: The technical communication practices of engineering and science students: Results of the phase 3 academic surveys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Hecht, Laura M.; Kennedy, John M.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes similarities and differences between undergraduate and graduate engineering science students in the context of two general aspects of the educational experience. First, we explore the extent to which students differ regarding the factors that lead to the choice of becoming an engineer or a scientist, current satisfaction with that choice, and career-related goals and objectives. Second, we look at the technical communication practices, habits, and training of engineers and science (Physics) students. The reported data were obtained from a survey of students enrolled in the College of Engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Bowling Green State University, and Texas A&M University. The survey was undertaken as part of the NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Data are reported for the following categories: student demographics; skill importance, skill training, and skill helpfulness; collaborative writing; computer and information technology use and importance, use of electronic networks; use and importance of libraries and library services; use and importance of information sources and products; use of foreign technical reports; and foreign language (reading and speaking) skills.

  5. Environmentally regulated aerospace coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Virginia L.

    1995-01-01

    Aerospace coatings represent a complex technology which must meet stringent performance requirements in the protection of aerospace vehicles. Topcoats and primers are used, primarily, to protect the structural elements of the air vehicle from exposure to and subsequent degradation by environmental elements. There are also many coatings which perform special functions, i.e., chafing resistance, rain erosion resistance, radiation and electric effects, fuel tank coatings, maskants, wire and fastener coatings. The scheduled promulgation of federal environmental regulations for aerospace manufacture and rework materials and processes will regulate the emissions of photochemically reactive precursors to smog and air toxics. Aerospace organizations will be required to identify, qualify and implement less polluting materials. The elimination of ozone depleting chemicals (ODC's) and implementation of pollution prevention requirements are added constraints which must be addressed concurrently. The broad categories of operations affected are the manufacture, operation, maintenance, and repair of military, commercial, general aviation, and space vehicles. The federal aerospace regulations were developed around the precept that technology had to be available to support the reduction of organic and air toxic emissions, i.e., the regulations cannot be technology forcing. In many cases, the regulations which are currently in effect in the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD), located in Southern California, were used as the baseline for the federal regulations. This paper addresses strategies used by Southern California aerospace organizations to cope with these regulatory impacts on aerospace productions programs. All of these regulatory changes are scheduled for implementation in 1993 and 1994, with varying compliance dates established.

  6. United States Air Force Summer Faculty Research Program. Management Report. Volume 4

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    off between the two tasks. This finding has major implications for a multiple resources theory of attention. However, several problems with the optimum...performance, and physiological measures of workload. My past research interests have been in the area of multiple resources theory of attention and its...suggested that the different strategies placed different demands on the subject. This research, as well as my research in the area of multiple resources

  7. Learning Benefits of a Summer Research Program at a Community College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salm, Sarah; Goodwyn, Lauren; van Loon, Nanette; Jayant, Lalitha; DeLeon, Patricia

    2008-01-01

    The authors recently conducted a Student Assessment of Learning Gains (SALG) survey at Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC) among students who had participated in mentored research projects. In all ten categories examined, 80-90% of the students agreed that their research experience had been of great benefit, increasing their academic…

  8. Research & Action Report. Volume 31, Number 2, Spring/Summer 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mongeon, Rebecca, Ed.; Tambascio, Donna, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    The "Research & Action Report," published twice a year, is a window on the activities and initiatives at the Wellesley Centers for Women. The report typically features news about the Centers, interviews with researchers, commentary on recent events or social trends affecting women and girls, announcements of new publications, and…

  9. Research & Action Report. Volume 28, Number 2, Spring/Summer 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mongeon, Rebecca, Ed.; Tambascio, Donna, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    The "Research & Action Report," published twice a year, is a window on the activities and initiatives at the Wellesley Centers for Women. The report typically features news about the Centers, interviews with researchers, commentary on recent events or social trends affecting women and girls, announcements of new publications, and much more.…

  10. Research & Action Report. Volume 32, Number 2, Spring/Summer 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mongeon, Rebecca, Ed.; Tambascio, Donna, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    The "Research & Action Report," published twice a year, is a window on the activities and initiatives at the Wellesley Centers for Women. The report typically features news about the Centers, interviews with researchers, commentary on recent events or social trends affecting women and girls, announcements of new publications, and much more.…

  11. Research & Action Report. Volume 30, Number 2, Spring/Summer 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mongeon, Rebecca, Ed.; Tambascio, Donna, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    The "Research & Action Report," published twice a year, describes the latest activities and initiatives at the Wellesley Centers for Women (WCW). Typically featured are: news about the Centers, interviews with researchers, commentary on recent events or social trends affecting women and girls, and announcements of new publications. Articles…

  12. Research & Action Report. Volume 29, Number 2, Spring/Summer 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mongeon, Rebecca, Ed.; Tambascio, Donna, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    The "Research & Action Report," published twice a year, is a window on the activities and initiatives at the Wellesley Centers for Women. The report typically features news about the Centers, interviews with researchers, commentary on recent events or social trends affecting women and girls, announcements of new publications, and much more.…

  13. An International Basic Science and Clinical Research Summer Program for Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramjiawan, Bram; Pierce, Grant N.; Anindo, Mohammad Iffat Kabir; AlKukhun, Abedalrazaq; Alshammari, Abdullah; Chamsi, Ahmad Talal; Abousaleh, Mohannad; Alkhani, Anas; Ganguly, Pallab K.

    2012-01-01

    An important part of training the next generation of physicians is ensuring that they are exposed to the integral role that research plays in improving medical treatment. However, medical students often do not have sufficient time to be trained to carry out any projects in biomedical and clinical research. Many medical students also fail to…

  14. Gummi-Bears On Fire! Bringing Students and Scientists Together at the Alaska Summer Research Academy (ASRA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, J.; Schamel, D.; Fisher, P.; Terschak, J. A.; Stelling, P.; Almberg, L.; Phillips, E.; Forner, M.; Gregory, D.

    2002-12-01

    When a gummi-bear is introduced into hot potassium chlorate there is a powerful reaction. This is analogous to the response we have seen to the Alaska Summer Research Academy (ASRA). ASRA is a residential science research camp supported by the College of Science, Engineering and Mathematics at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. The hallmark of ASRA is the opportunity for small groups of 4 or fewer students, ages 10-17, to conduct scientific research and participate in engineering design projects with university faculty and researchers as mentors. Participating scientists, engineers, faculty, graduate students, and K-12 teachers from a variety of disciplines design individual research units and guide the students through designing and constructing a project, collecting data, and synthesizing results. The week-long camp culminates with the students from each project making a formal presentation to the camp and public. In its second year ASRA is already a huge success, quadrupling in size from 21 students in 2001 to 89 students in 2002. Due to a high percentage of returning students, we anticipate there will be a waiting list next year. This presentation contains perspectives from administrators, instructors, staff, and students. Based on our experience we feel there is a large potential demand for education and public outreach (EPO) in university settings. We believe the quality and depth of the ASRA experience directly contributes to the success of a worthwhile EPO program. ASRA will be portrayed as a useful model for EPO at other institutions.

  15. Aerospace engineering educational program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craft, William; Klett, David; Lai, Steven

    1992-01-01

    The principle goal of the educational component of NASA CORE is the creation of aerospace engineering options in the mechanical engineering program at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. To accomplish this goal, a concerted effort during the past year has resulted in detailed plans for the initiation of aerospace options in both the BSME and MSME programs in the fall of 1993. All proposed new courses and the BSME aerospace option curriculum must undergo a lengthy approval process involving two cirriculum oversight committees (School of Engineering and University level) and three levels of general faculty approval. Assuming approval is obtained from all levels, the options will officially take effect in Fall '93. In anticipation of this, certain courses in the proposed curriculum are being offered during the current academic year under special topics headings so that current junior level students may graduate in May '94 under the BSME aerospace option. The proposed undergraduate aerospace option curriculum (along with the regular mechanical engineering curriculum for reference) is attached at the end of this report, and course outlines for the new courses are included in the appendix.

  16. [Application of lower body negative pressure (LBNP) in aerospace medicine].

    PubMed

    Wu, Ping; Xie, Bao-sheng; Huang, Wei-fen

    2002-06-01

    Effects of LBNP is similar to that produced by gravitational force, especially as a stress factor on the cardiovascular system as has been concerned in the area of aerospace medicine. This paper described experimental equipment, methods and physiological effects of LBNP, especially its application in the area of aerospace medicine. Several aspects for future research were put forward.

  17. A Program of Research and Education to Advance the Design, Synthesis, and Optimization of Aero-Space System Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandusky, Robert

    2002-01-01

    Since its inception in December 1999, the program has provided support for a total of 11 Graduate Research Scholar Assistants, of these, 6 have completed their MS degree program. The program has generated 3 MS theses and a total of 4 publications/presentations.

  18. Advanced Materials and Coatings for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    2004-01-01

    In the application area of aerospace tribology, researchers and developers must guarantee the highest degree of reliability for materials, components, and systems. Even a small tribological failure can lead to catastrophic results. The absence of the required knowledge of tribology, as Professor H.P. Jost has said, can act as a severe brake in aerospace vehicle systems-and indeed has already done so. Materials and coatings must be able to withstand the aerospace environments that they encounter, such as vacuum terrestrial, ascent, and descent environments; be resistant to the degrading effects of air, water vapor, sand, foreign substances, and radiation during a lengthy service; be able to withstand the loads, stresses, and temperatures encountered form acceleration and vibration during operation; and be able to support reliable tribological operations in harsh environments throughout the mission of the vehicle. This presentation id divided into two sections: surface properties and technology practice related to aerospace tribology. The first section is concerned with the fundamental properties of the surfaces of solid-film lubricants and related materials and coatings, including carbon nanotubes. The second is devoted to applications. Case studies are used to review some aspects of real problems related to aerospace systems to help engineers and scientists to understand the tribological issues and failures. The nature of each problem is analyzed, and the tribological properties are examined. All the fundamental studies and case studies were conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center.

  19. United States Air Force Summer Faculty Research Program (1987). Program Management Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-01

    departments included biology, genetics, ecology, entomology , chemistry, computer science, graphics, mathematics, physics, aeronautical engineering...essential to the oroper - oerformance of the investigators duties. Current techniques in Forensic Antnrooology, and specific areas of research needs of

  20. 76 FR 93 - Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowships (SURF) NIST Gaithersburg and Boulder Programs...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-03

    ... computer science as described in the Federal Funding Opportunity. The SURF NIST Boulder Programs are..., mathematics, and computer science as described in the Federal Funding Opportunity. Applications for the... research, engineering, computer science, mathematics, or physics. Participating students must be...

  1. United States Air Force Summer Faculty Research Program. 1980 Program Management Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-01

    Surprisingly good, slow start up but developed considerate depth, very well prepared, excellent, had done a great deal of background research after pre...reactions have large cross sections (e.g., up to 400 x 10 - 1’ cm 2 ) at low energies, decreasing as (energy) - 1/2 up to I eV, and then decreasing...AAA Fire Control; Evasive Maneuvering Against a Multiple Missile Threat. A portion of this report summarizes research results obtained todate ; the

  2. United States Air Force Summer Faculty Research Program, 1988. Program Technical Report. Volume 4

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    off between the two tasks. This finding has major implications for a multiple resources theory of attention. However, several problems with the optimum...performance, and physiological measures of workload. My past research interests have been in the area of multiple resources theory of attention and its...suggested that the different strategies placed different demands on the subject. This resear’, as well as my research in the area of multiple resources

  3. Non-technical write-up of summer research for the Department of Homeland Security

    SciTech Connect

    Shoulders, M D

    2005-07-29

    My project at LLNL this past summer was to improve upon the available methodology for synthesis of C-terminal polypeptide {alpha}-thioesters (all of which methods suffer from certain disadvantages requiring too much detail to discuss herein). Our initial approach to synthesis of {alpha}-thioesters is outlined in Figure 2. The approach utilizes a resin containing an aryl hydrazine linker to which the growing polypeptide chain is attached. The aryl hydrazine linker can be oxidized under mild conditions to the corresponding diazene. Our objective was to use the weak N-nucleophile benzotriazole to cleave the peptide from the resin. The acyl benzotriazole formed by the cleavage may be thiolyzed using ethanethiol and triethylamine to form the corresponding C-terminal polypeptide {alpha}-thioester, which can then be employed in NCL. My initial experiments failed to result in formation of any {alpha}-thioester. Instead, the exclusive product of acyl diazene cleavage was the peptide hydrolysis product. A number of experiments were performed to identify the stage at which hydrolysis was occurring. It was found that hydrolysis occurred during the benzotriazole-mediated cleavage of the acyl diazene. After extensive experimentation, I discovered that C-terminal polypeptide {alpha}-thioesters could, in fact, be formed by performing the acyl diazene cleavage in the absence of diisopropylethylamine (DIEA). I performed other experiments to study the variables that could improve the ratio of the hydrolysis product to the thiolysis product and was able to obtain replicable results in which the product mixture was 30% {alpha}-thioester and 70% hydrolysis. While the yield must still be improved for this to represent a viable method of peptide {alpha}-thioester synthesis, it does represent significant progress towards development of such a method. I was able to effect a three- to five-fold improvement in the yield of {alpha}-thioester relative to the {alpha}-thioester yield when

  4. An age of enlightenment for cilia: The FASEB Summer Research Conference on the “Biology of Cilia and Flagella”

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Pamela V.; Lechtreck, Karl F.

    2015-01-01

    From July 19–24, 2015, 169 clinicians and basic scientists gathered in the vertiginous heights of Snowmass, Colorado (2,502 m) for the fourth FASEB summer research conference on the ‘Biology of Cilia and Flagella’. Organizers Maureen Barr (Rutgers University), Iain Drummond (Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School), and Jagesh Shah (Brigham and Women’s Hospital/Harvard Medical School) assembled a program filled with new data and forward-thinking ideas documenting the ongoing growth of the field. Sixty oral presentations and 77 posters covered novel aspects of cilia structure, ciliogenesis, cilia motility, cilia-mediated signaling, and cilia-related disease. In this report, we summarize the meeting, highlight exciting developments and discuss open questions. PMID:26597000

  5. An age of enlightenment for cilia: The FASEB summer research conference on the "Biology of Cilia and Flagella".

    PubMed

    Tran, Pamela V; Lechtreck, Karl F

    2016-01-15

    From July 19-24, 2015, 169 clinicians and basic scientists gathered in the vertiginous heights of Snowmass, Colorado (2502 m) for the fourth FASEB summer research conference on the 'Biology of Cilia and Flagella'. Organizers Maureen Barr (Rutgers University), Iain Drummond (Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School), and Jagesh Shah (Brigham and Women's Hospital/Harvard Medical School) assembled a program filled with new data and forward-thinking ideas documenting the ongoing growth of the field. Sixty oral presentations and 77 posters covered novel aspects of cilia structure, ciliogenesis, cilia motility, cilia-mediated signaling, and cilia-related disease. In this report, we summarize the meeting, highlight exciting developments and discuss open questions.

  6. Summer Doldrums.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muchnick, Bruce

    2002-01-01

    For camp staff, factors that contribute to the summer doldrums are weather, level of general fatigue, unsatisfied expectations, sensory overload, accumulation of negative "self-talk," and an underlying sense of hurry. Strategies for overcoming summer doldrums involve novelty and stress management, and include promoting health, challenging…

  7. Summer Astronomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riddle, Bob

    2004-01-01

    This brief article describes what can be expected of the skies in the summer of 2004 with quite a few celestial thrills to anticipate. In addition to the planet viewing opportunities, there is a very rare Venus transit of the Sun and the annual Perseid meteor shower. The 2004 summer also marks both an end and beginning for the Cassini/Huygens…

  8. Using ePortfolios to Assess Applied and Collaborative Learning and Academic Identity in a Summer Research Program for Community College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer-Freeman, Karen; Bastone, Linda; Skrivanek, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    We evaluate the extent to which ePortfolios can be used to assess applied and collaborative learning and academic identity among community college students from underrepresented minority groups who participated in a summer research program. Thirty-eight students were evaluated by their research sponsor and two or three naïve faculty evaluators.…

  9. United States Air Force Summer Research Program -- 1993. Volume 3. Phillips Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-12-01

    Assistant Professor, PhD Laboratory: WL/NN Dept. of Else & Coamp . Eng Louisiana State University Vol-Page No: 5-52 Baton Rouge, LA 70803-0000 -im-cann...time of publication. 5-1 LARGE-SCALE CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELDS: NOISE STORMS , SOFT X-RAYS AND INVERSION OF RADIO POLARIZATION Robert F. Willson Research...LARGE-SCALE CORONAL M.’ FIELDS: NOISE STORMS , SOFT X-RA’K D INVERSION OF RADIO POLARI2_ )N Robert F. Willson Research Associate Professor of Astro

  10. Aerospace Environmental Technology Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, A. F. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    The mandated elimination of CFC's, Halons, TCA, and other ozone depleting chemicals and specific hazardous materials has required changes and new developments in aerospace materials and processes. The aerospace industry has been involved for several years in providing product substitutions, redesigning entire production processes, and developing new materials that minimize or eliminate damage to the environment. These activities emphasize replacement cleaning solvents and their application verifications, compliant coatings including corrosion protection systems, and removal techniques, chemical propulsion effects on the environment, and the initiation of modifications to relevant processing and manufacturing specifications and standards. The Executive Summary of this Conference is published as NASA CP-3297.

  11. Adaptive control with aerospace applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadient, Ross

    Robust and adaptive control techniques have a rich history of theoretical development with successful application. Despite the accomplishments made, attempts to combine the best elements of each approach into robust adaptive systems has proven challenging, particularly in the area of application to real world aerospace systems. In this research, we investigate design methods for general classes of systems that may be applied to representative aerospace dynamics. By combining robust baseline control design with augmentation designs, our work aims to leverage the advantages of each approach. This research contributes the development of robust model-based control design for two classes of dynamics: 2nd order cascaded systems, and a more general MIMO framework. We present a theoretically justified method for state limiting via augmentation of a robust baseline control design. Through the development of adaptive augmentation designs, we are able to retain system performance in the presence of uncertainties. We include an extension that combines robust baseline design with both state limiting and adaptive augmentations. In addition we develop an adaptive augmentation design approach for a class of dynamic input uncertainties. We present formal stability proofs and analyses for all proposed designs in the research. Throughout the work, we present real world aerospace applications using relevant flight dynamics and flight test results. We derive robust baseline control designs with application to both piloted and unpiloted aerospace system. Using our developed methods, we add a flight envelope protecting state limiting augmentation for piloted aircraft applications and demonstrate the efficacy of our approach via both simulation and flight test. We illustrate our adaptive augmentation designs via application to relevant fixed-wing aircraft dynamics. Both a piloted example combining the state limiting and adaptive augmentation approaches, and an unpiloted example with

  12. The STEM Pipeline: The Role of Summer Research Experience in Minority Students' Ph.D. Aspirations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pender, Matea; Marcotte, Dave E.; Sto. Domingo, Mariano R.; Maton, Kenneth I.

    2010-01-01

    Practical research experience has been seen as an important tool to enhance learning in STEM fields and shape commitment to science careers. Indeed, this was a prominent recommendation of the Boyer Commission. Further, there is evidence this is especially important for minority students. In this paper, we examine the role of practical research…

  13. Final report [FASEB Summer Research Conference ''Virus Assembly''--agenda and attendee list

    SciTech Connect

    Feiss, Michael

    2001-01-31

    The conference brought together researchers working on virus structure and virus assembly in diverse systems. Information was integrated from many viral systems, including plant bacterial and eukaryotic viruses, and many techniques such as biophysical approaches of x-ray diffraction, electron microscopy and spectroscopy, along with molecular biological and molecular genetic analysis.

  14. United States Air Force Summer Faculty Research Program - Management Report - 1985.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    research, publishable in standard journals. Involved academic type topics: Chemical Kinetics ; Isotope Effects; Activation Parameters; Reaction...Assistant Professor 1978 Louisiana State University Specialty: Ion-Molecule Chemistry, Department of Chemistry Kinetics Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803...Synthetic Organic Chemistry, Fredonia, New York 14063 Chemical Kinetics , Reaction (716) 673-3285 Mechanisms, Explosives, q Aviation Fuels Assigned: AD

  15. Educational Innovation: Research and Evaluation Techniques. (Report of 1967 Summer Institutes).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Robert L.

    Three 4-week institutes were held, one each in Los Angeles, St. Louis, and Philadelphia, to prepare competent school personnel at the state, county, and district levels to formulate, conduct, and evaluate educational experiments. Participants included teachers, principals, curriculum specialists, research consultants, and superintendents. The…

  16. Substance Abuse among Youth with Disabilities. Prevention Research Update, Number Seven/Summer 1990.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prendergast, Michael; And Others

    This literature review focuses on the state of current knowledge concerning alcohol and other drug (AOD) abuse among people with developmental, learning, hearing, visual, and mobility impairments. The review is divided into four main sections. The first section addresses the limits of the available research-based information. The second section…

  17. Nondestructive Evaluation for Aerospace Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leckey, Cara; Cramer, Elliott; Perey, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques are important for enabling NASA's missions in space exploration and aeronautics. The expanded and continued use of composite materials for aerospace components and vehicles leads to a need for advanced NDE techniques capable of quantitatively characterizing damage in composites. Quantitative damage detection techniques help to ensure safety, reliability and durability of space and aeronautic vehicles. This presentation will give a broad outline of NASA's range of technical work and an overview of the NDE research performed in the Nondestructive Evaluation Sciences Branch at NASA Langley Research Center. The presentation will focus on ongoing research in the development of NDE techniques for composite materials and structures, including development of automated data processing tools to turn NDE data into quantitative location and sizing results. Composites focused NDE research in the areas of ultrasonics, thermography, X-ray computed tomography, and NDE modeling will be discussed.

  18. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 13: The information-seeking habits and practices of engineers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.

    1991-01-01

    It is argued that only by maximizing the research and development process can the United States maintain and possibly capture its international competitive edge. Key to this goal is the provision of information services and products which meet the information needs of engineers. Evidence exists which indicates that traditional information services and products may, in fact, not be meeting the information needs of engineers. The primary reason for this deficiency is three fold. First, the specific information needs of engineers are neither well known nor well understood. Second, what is known about the information seeking habits and practices of engineers has not been applied to existing engineering information services. Third, the information professionals continue to over-emphasize technology instead of concentrating on the quality of the information itself and the ability of the information to meet the needs of the user.

  19. NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 31: The information-seeking behavior of engineers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Bishop, Ann P.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1993-01-01

    Engineers are an extraordinarily diverse group of professionals, but an attribute common to all engineers is their use of information. Engineering can be conceptualized as an information processing system that must deal with work-related uncertainty through patterns of technical communications. Throughout the process, data, information, and tacit knowledge are being acquired, produced, transferred, and utilized. While acknowledging that other models exist, we have chosen to view the information-seeking behavior of engineers within a conceptual framework of the engineer as an information processor. This article uses the chosen framework to discuss information-seeking behavior of engineers, reviewing selected literature and empirical studies from library and information science, management, communications, and sociology. The article concludes by proposing a research agenda designed to extend our current, limited knowledge of the way engineers process information.

  20. Aerospace Education. NSTA Position Statement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Science Teachers Association (NJ1), 2008

    2008-01-01

    National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) has developed a new position statement, "Aerospace Education." NSTA believes that aerospace education is an important component of comprehensive preK-12 science education programs. This statement highlights key considerations that should be addressed when implementing a high quality aerospace education…

  1. USAF Summer Research Program - 1993 High School Apprenticeship Program Final Reports, Volume 12, Armstrong Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-12-01

    that this was an exceptionally good and enlightening experience for me in that I became able to assume an overall better generalized assessment of...Some topics I researched were on teaching, mentoring, behavior, EEG and complex decision making, neurophysiology of complex decision making, gender...found it to be very productive and enlightening . I had many opportunities to learn new concepts. I learned to use "Word Perfect", "Microsoft Windows

  2. USAF Summer Research Program - 1995 High School Apprenticeship Program Final Reports, Volume 12A, Armstrong Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-12-01

    A two - stage bioreactor was developed in which an anaerobic bacterium was isolated that would reduce the perchlorate to chloride. After labatory...solutions which cause no toxic waste, and is done in a completely enclosed chamber, unlike the electroplating process . RESULTS Two tests were conducted on...research contractor, teamed with Armstrong Laboratory’s Environics Directorate at Tyndall AFB, Fla., have field-tested a two - stage bioreactor designed to

  3. The 1981 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program: Research reports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, G. R.; Dozier, J. B.; Kent, M. I.; Barfield, B. F.

    1982-01-01

    Research reports related to spacecraft industry technological advances, requirements, and applications were considered. Some of the topic areas addressed were: (1) Fabrication, evaluation, and use of high performance composites and ceramics, (2) antenna designs, (3) electronics and microcomputer applications and mathematical modeling and programming techniques, (4) design, fabrication, and failure detection methods for structural materials, components, and total systems, and (5) chemical studies of bindary organic mixtures and polymer synthesis. Space environment parameters were also discussed.

  4. United States Air Force Summer Faculty Research Program: Program Management Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    REPRODUCE LEGIBLY. BEST AVAILABLE COPY I 1F 7 N I’l NkhI A IiI 40) j Wj m𔃾 | L A a SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE . REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE SPORT...266 Wilford Hall Medical Center ... ............. ... 284 LIST OF TABLES 1 Growth of GSRP ...... ..................... . l ... 1 2 Growth of...proposals to: RESEARCH INITIATION PROGRAM Universal Energy Systems, Inc. 4401 Dayton-Xenia Road Dayton, Ohio 45432 25 .... . .. . .. . .4 m N H l m

  5. United States Air Force Summer Research Program -- 1993. Volume 1. Program Management Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-12-01

    Field: Assistant Profef! ior, PhD Laboratory: WL/MH Dept. of Elec Coamp . Eng Louisiana State University Vol-Page No: 5-52 Baton Rouge, LA 70803-0000...publication. F-177 LARGE-SCALE CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELDS: NOISE STORMS , SOFT X-RAYS AND INVERSION OF RADIO POLARIZATION Robert F. Willbon Research Associate...regions in opposite hemispheres of the Sun. The presence of such features are inferred from Very Large Array (VLA) observations of noise storms located

  6. United States Air Force Summer Faculty Research Program (1983). Program Management Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    common carrier at coach rates or less, by driving your private auto, or by a combination of both. (Please note that funding for rental cars requires...following the invoicing instructions referenced above. In the view of the convenience of having a car at the research location, SCEEE strongly recommends...attached in order for these charges to be allowed. iv) Please remember that SCREE must give rirw.iten approval for rental car use and without this

  7. United States Air Force Summer Faculty Research Program (1983). Technical Report. Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    Monkey Analogs for Evaluation of CD Agents : Dr. L. W. Buckalew .’. Pitch and Alcohol xxi -. . Report Number Title Research Associate * 14 Combined Blast...FINAL REPORT AIRCREW-RELEVANT MAN-MONKEY ANALOGS FOR EVALUATION OF CD AGENTS : PITCH AND ALCOHOL Prepared by: L. W. Buckalew Academic Rank: Associate...EVALUATION OF CD AGENTS : PITCH AND ALCOHOL by L. W. Buckalew ABSTRACT With the growing possibility of military personnel encountering chemical

  8. Summer Research Program (1992). High School Apprenticeship Program (HSAP) Reports. Volume 15. Wright Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-28

    York. (1965) 5. Touloukian , Y. S., ed. Thermophysical Properties of Matter, vol. 13, Thermal Expansion of Nonmetallic Solids. Purdue Research...placed in unvented aluminum pans and sealed prior to their exposure to elevated temperature. DINGU/KEL F was also done in an unvented pan, only it was...the practicality of the box needed to be maintaineo. Weight, portability, and convenience were considered. Aluminum seemed to be the logical choice, as

  9. A Summer Research Program of NASA/Faculty Fellowships at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albee, Arden

    2004-01-01

    The NASA Faculty Fellowship Program (NFFP) is designed to give college and university faculty members a rewarding personal as well as enriching professional experience. Fellowships are awarded to engineering and science faculty for work on collaborative research projects of mutual interest to the fellow and JPL host colleague. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) have participated in the NASA Faculty Fellowship Program for the past 25 years. Administrative offices are maintained both at the Caltech Campus and at JPL; however, most of the activity takes place at JPL. The Campus handles all fiscal matters. The duration of the program is ten continuous weeks. Fellows are required to conduct their research on-site. To be eligible to participate in the program, fellows must be a U.S. citizen and hold a teaching or research appointment at a U.S. university or college. A travel allowance is paid to those fellows outside the 50-mile radius of JPL.

  10. NASA-UVA Light Aerospace Alloy and Structures Technology Program (LA2ST). Supplement: Research on Materials for the High Speed Civil Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, Richard P.; Starke, Edgar A., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    This report documents the progress achieved over the past 6 to 12 months on four graduate student projects conducted within the NASA-UVA Light Aerospace Alloy and Structures Technology Program. These studies were aimed specifically at light metallic alloy issues relevant to the High Speed Civil Transport. Research on Hydrogen-Enhanced Fracture of High-Strength Titanium Alloy Sheet refined successfully the high resolution R-curve method necessary to characterize initiation and growth fracture toughnesses. For solution treated and aged Low Cost Beta without hydrogen precharging, fracture is by ductile transgranular processes at 25 C, but standardized initiation toughnesses are somewhat low and crack extension is resolved at still lower K-levels. This fracture resistance is degraded substantially, by between 700 and 1000 wppm of dissolved hydrogen, and a fracture mode change is affected. The surface oxide on P-titanium alloys hinders hydrogen uptake and complicates the electrochemical introduction of low hydrogen concentrations that are critical to applications of these alloys. Ti-15-3 sheet was obtained for study during the next reporting period. Research on Mechanisms of deformation and Fracture in High-Strength Titanium Alloys is examining the microstructure and fatigue resistance of very thin sheet. Aging experiments on 0. 14 mm thick (0.0055 inch) foil show microstructural agility that may be used to enhance fatigue performance. Fatigue testing of Ti-15-3 sheet has begun. The effects of various thermo-mechanical processing regimens on mechanical properties will be examined and deformation modes identified. Research on the Effect of Texture and Precipitates on Mechanical Property Anisotropy of Al-Cu-Mg-X and Al-Cu alloys demonstrated that models predict a minor influence of stress-induced alignment of Phi, caused by the application of a tensile stress during aging, on the yield stress anisotropy of both modified AA2519 and a model Al-Cu binary alloy. This project

  11. Summary Report of the Summer Conference of the DARPA-Materials Research Council Held in La Jolla, California on 6-30 July 1987

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-07-01

    L k• In 04 024549 7 " - rý’ . SUMMARY REPORT OF THE SUMMER CONFERENCE DARPA-MATERIALS RESEARCH COUNCIL La Jolla, California DTICQ ELECTED M R 1 7 9 8...Order No. 6029 Department of Chemicag Engineering 88 3 17 007 II I I i SSUMMARY REPORT OF THE SUMMER CO NFERENCE of the DARPA-MATERIALS RESEARCH...in whole or In part of the Report is permitted for any purpose of the United States Government. HP ii¶ I-, I INTRODUCTION This report Is a summary of

  12. NASA aerospace battery systems program update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manzo, Michelle A.; Schulze, Norman R.

    1989-01-01

    An overview of a battery systems program designed to enhance the safety, reliability, and performance of NASA's aerospace primary and secondary batteries as well as battery power systems is presented. The status of research in all three areas is reviewed. The approach to achieving the program objectives involves increasing the fundamental understanding of primary and secondary cells; providing for improved nickel-cadmium manufacturing process control; providing for the establishment of a NASA standard nickel-hydrogen cell design; establishing specifications, design and operational guidelines for both primary and secondary cells and batteries; providing training relating to the above areas; and opening and maintaining communication lines within NASA and the aerospace battery community.

  13. Aerospace concurrent engineering: a modern global approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imbert, Mariano; Li, Xiaoxing

    2009-12-01

    System engineering aspects, like concurrent engineering (CE) in the aerospace sector, has been studied by many authors. The change and evolution in this regard is continually influenced by the information technology advances. But global cooperation is only discussed by developed countries and high technology corporations. A review of CE and its ramifications in the aerospace industry is presented. Based on the current literature, the general lifecycle of a spacecraft and its phases are explained as well as the tools that are implemented in today's industry. In this paper we propose a new approach for the product development process in the spacecraft production industry the Aerospace Concurrent Engineering (ACE), which is mainly focused in the technology itself, its optimal design and environment impact rather than costs and marketing impact. And the potential of globally oriented research and implementation of space programs is discussed for its consideration.

  14. Psychiatric considerations in military aerospace medicine.

    PubMed

    Jones, D R; Marsh, R W

    2001-02-01

    Military aerospace medicine requires a psychiatric selection and certification process that determines not only the absence of significant mental disorders, but also the presence of positive qualities in the realms of motivation, ability and stability: not all normal people are fit to fly. Other issues of aerospace psychiatry involve maintenance of mental resilience and hardiness during a flying career, aeromedical decisions about when to remove from flight duties and when to return, criteria for waivers for psychiatric conditions, use of medications for treatment of psychiatric symptoms, questions of substance abuse, and research in such areas as genetics. This report reviews the basis for military aerospace psychiatry, primarily as practiced in the United States Air Force (USAF), and presents some of its underlying principles as they apply to clinical situations.

  15. Conservation of Strategic Aerospace Materials (COSAM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    Research efforts to reduce the dependence of the aerospace industry on strategic metals, such as cobalt (Co), columbium (Cb), tantalum (Ta), and chromium (Cr), by providing the materials technology needed to minimize the strategic metal content of critical aerospace components for gas turbine engines are addressed. Thrusts in three technology areas are identified: near term activities in the area of strategic element substitution; intermediate-range activities in the area of materials processing; and long term, high risk activities in the area of 'new classes' of high temprature metallic materials. Specifically, the role of cobalt in nickel-base and cobalt-base superalloys vital to the aerospace industry is examined along with the mechanical and physical properties of intermetallics that will contain a minimum of the stragetic metals.

  16. United States Air Force Summer Research Program 1991. Volume 1. Program Management Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-09

    0 6 0 Wisconsin 3 0 1 G 4 0 Wyoming 3 1 1 4 2 2 Canada 1 1 0 0 1 1 Total 505 170 1251 142 1 7561 312 A- 13 Table A-8. High School Participants (HSAP...Professor SPECIALTY: Mathematics Dept of Math & Comuter SO LAB ASSIGNMENT: TSD LWWyne-Owen Cotlto Meqhis, TN 38126 George Harley Hartung DEGREE: PhD...SUBMAXIMAL EXERCISE TESTING IN AEROBICALLY FIT AND NONFIT SUBJECTS G. Harley Hartung, Ph.D. Faculty Research Associate (Professor of Physiology) ABSTRACT

  17. The 1984 ASEE-NASA summer faculty fellowship program (aeronautics and research)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dah-Nien, F.; Hodge, J. R.; Emad, F. P.

    1984-01-01

    The 1984 NASA-ASEE Faculty Fellowship Program (SFFP) is reported. The report includes: (1) a list of participants; (2) abstracts of research projects; (3) seminar schedule; (4) evaluation questionnaire; and (5) agenda of visitation by faculty programs committee. Topics discussed include: effects of multiple scattering on laser beam propagation; information management; computer techniques; guidelines for writing user documentation; 30 graphics software; high energy electron and antiproton cosmic rays; high resolution Fourier transform infrared spectrum; average monthly annual zonal and global albedos; laser backscattering from ocean surface; image processing systems; geomorphological mapping; low redshift quasars; application of artificial intelligence to command management systems.

  18. The 1974 NASA-ASEE summer faculty fellowship aeronautics and space research program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, J. F., Jr.; Jones, C. O.; Barfield, B. F.

    1974-01-01

    Research activities by participants in the fellowship program are documented, and include such topics as: (1) multispectral imagery for detecting southern pine beetle infestations; (2) trajectory optimization techniques for low thrust vehicles; (3) concentration characteristics of a fresnel solar strip reflection concentrator; (4) calaboration and reduction of video camera data; (5) fracture mechanics of Cer-Vit glass-ceramic; (6) space shuttle external propellant tank prelaunch heat transfer; (7) holographic interferometric fringes; and (8) atmospheric wind and stress profiles in a two-dimensional internal boundary layer.

  19. Aerospace at Saint Francis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aviation/Space, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Discusses an aviation/aerospace program as a science elective for 11th and 12th year students. This program is multi-faceted and addresses the needs of a wide variety of students. Its main objective is to present aviation and space sciences which will provide a good base for higher education in these areas. (SK)

  20. Aerospace applications of batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Habib, Shahid

    1993-01-01

    NASA has developed battery technology to meet the demanding requirements for aerospace applications; specifically, the space vacuum, launch loads, and high duty cycles. Because of unique requirements and operating environments associated with space applications, NASA has written its own standards and specifications for batteries.

  1. Aerospace technology comes home.

    PubMed

    Coleman, C

    1997-07-01

    Science is expanding the options for homebound patients. Many of the new technologies coming into the home care industry are the result of aerospace innovations. What are these new technologies, and what can the home care industry expect to see in the future.

  2. Aerospace Bibliography. Seventh Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blashfield, Jean F., Comp.

    Provided for teachers and the general adult reader is an annotated and graded list of books and reference materials dealing with aerospace subjects. Only non-fiction books and pamphlets that need to be purchased from commercial or government sources are included. Free industrial materials and educational aids are not included because they tend to…

  3. Guide to Canadian Aerospace Related Industries,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-02-28

    Cloud Seeding. Cloud Physics; Weather Average Work Force: 25 - Total Modification; Convective Storms; Hydrometeorology; Precipita- tion Measurement...8217.v.r.. .,~r’:: Experience: Cametoid has more than 25 years of active sub- Canada Ltd, Bata Engineering; Bell Northern Research, Canada contract...the US Coast Guard over the past 25 years. meeting international aerospace and defense companies all military specifications satisfactorily The

  4. Careers in Aerospace: A Broad Horizon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aerospace, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Summarizes career opportunities in the aerospace industry. The 1.2 million workers (including 20 percent in research and development) are employed in professional and technical positions, management/administrative occupations, and plants. General training and qualifications are given for each area. The outlook for future employment in these areas…

  5. Development of Collaborative Research Initiatives to Advance the Aerospace Sciences-via the Communications, Electronics, Information Systems Focus Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knasel, T. Michael

    1996-01-01

    The primary goal of the Adaptive Vision Laboratory Research project was to develop advanced computer vision systems for automatic target recognition. The approach used in this effort combined several machine learning paradigms including evolutionary learning algorithms, neural networks, and adaptive clustering techniques to develop the E-MOR.PH system. This system is capable of generating pattern recognition systems to solve a wide variety of complex recognition tasks. A series of simulation experiments were conducted using E-MORPH to solve problems in OCR, military target recognition, industrial inspection, and medical image analysis. The bulk of the funds provided through this grant were used to purchase computer hardware and software to support these computationally intensive simulations. The payoff from this effort is the reduced need for human involvement in the design and implementation of recognition systems. We have shown that the techniques used in E-MORPH are generic and readily transition to other problem domains. Specifically, E-MORPH is multi-phase evolutionary leaming system that evolves cooperative sets of features detectors and combines their response using an adaptive classifier to form a complete pattern recognition system. The system can operate on binary or grayscale images. In our most recent experiments, we used multi-resolution images that are formed by applying a Gabor wavelet transform to a set of grayscale input images. To begin the leaming process, candidate chips are extracted from the multi-resolution images to form a training set and a test set. A population of detector sets is randomly initialized to start the evolutionary process. Using a combination of evolutionary programming and genetic algorithms, the feature detectors are enhanced to solve a recognition problem. The design of E-MORPH and recognition results for a complex problem in medical image analysis are described at the end of this report. The specific task involves the

  6. Summer Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schumann, Herbert

    1975-01-01

    Summer employment and participation in professional programs offer the vocational agriculture teacher the unique opportunity to attain excellence in his program. Most administrators appreciate the teacher's efforts and the resulting well-planned and implemented programs. (MW)

  7. Research results reported by OEO summer (1981) student employees of LLNL working with Earth Sciences (K) Division personnel

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, M. C.; Griffith, P. J.; Kreevoy, E. P.; Turner, III, H. J.; Tatman, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    Significant experimental results were achieved in a number of research programs that were carried out during the summer of 1981 by students sponsored by the Office of Equal Opportunity at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. These students were working with Earth Sciences (K) Division personnel. Accomplishments include the following: (1) preparation of post-burn stratigraphic sections for the Hoe Creek III experiment, Underground Coal Gasification project; (2) preparation of miscellaneous stratigraphic sections in the Climax granite near the Spent Fuel Test, Nevada Test Site, for the Waste Isolation Project; (3) confirmation of the applicability of a new theory relating to subsidence (solid matrix movement); (4) experimental confirmation that organic groundwater contaminants produced during an underground coal gasification experiment can be removed by appropriate bacterial treatment; (5) development of data supporting the extension of the Greenville Fault Zone into the Northern Diablo Range (Alameda and Santa Clara Counties, California); (6) completion of a literature review on hazardous waste (current disposal technology, regulations, research needs); (7) preparation of a map showing levels of background seismic noise in the USSR; (8) demonstration of a correlation of explosion size with the P-wave magnitude of the seismic signal produced by the explosion; and (9) reduction of data showing the extent of ground motion resulting from subsidence in the vicinity of the Hoe Creek III experiment, Underground Coal Gasification Project.

  8. 1991 Summer research program for high school juniors at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    SciTech Connect

    Meyerhofer, David D.

    1991-09-01

    Ten students participated in the 1991 summer high school student research program at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE). The participants spent 8 weeks working and learning at LLE. They spent most of their time working on individual research projects. Each student was assigned a project, upon which he/she worked under the direct supervision of one of the staff members of the laboratory. The students, their high schools, and their projects are listed in Table 1. The program culminated in oral and written reports describing their work. The oral reports were presented at a symposium on 23 August 1991, at which the student's parents and teachers and members of the LLE staff were present. The written reports are collected in this volume. The titles of the works are UV alignment table; neutron yields can be measured by using the relative gain of a photomultiplier tube; scattering in isotropic and anisotropic media; a better approximation of the diffusion equation; use of the SLAC code to produce a photoemissive electrostatic electron gun; spatial resolution deteriorates with increasing film exposure; analysis of refractive image distortion; making of pinholes for x-ray pinhole cameras; does perturbation theory accurately describe multiphoton ionization and wave front analysis using shearing interferometry.

  9. United States Air Force 1993 Summer Research Program. Volume 10: Wright Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The paper outlines two main tasks assigned during my employment as a graduate student research associate at the Wright Laboratory, Wright Paterson Air Force Base. Upon arrival at the Wright Laboratories, I was to investigate a method of signal processing, different from the common Fourier transform, in that inherent mathematical properties of the signal space were exploited in retrieving the spectrum of the signal. The two alternative signal processing methods investigated are the MUSIC and Minimum-Norm procedures for high resolution signal processing. The results of the investigation are included with a general comment section regarding the performance of the algorithms. The second main task assigned was the investigation of angle of arrival (AOA) calculation. Traditionally, methods such as beamforming have been used to estimate AOA using arrays of sensors and sophisticated signal processing algorithms. We are curious as to whether the AOA can be measured using only two sensors and FFT processing measuring of the phase difference of the signal at two adjacent sensors. Results of this study are presented with general comments as to the validity of the measuring paradigm.

  10. The potential use of summer rainfall enhancement in Illinois. Part II: Integration of factors affecting enhancement projects and future research

    SciTech Connect

    Changnon, S.A. )

    1993-03-01

    Rain-yield findings were integrated with the average incidence of rain days and areal distribution of rain in a potential rain-modification area in Illinois to simulate regional aspects of a cloud-seeding project over a 13,000-km[sup 2] area. Potential seeding opportunities are limited because clouds cannot be effectively seeded at night, and 46% of all rain events occur at night. Further, 32% of all remaining rain events occur with severe weather warnings when Illinois law does not allow seeding. The number of candidate rain periods for modification is reduced from a regional average of 31 days to 11 days. Yield increases from the best treatment, based on all years' performance are further reduced regionally because on 53% of the moderate rain events, 50% of the simulated project area receives less than the minimum moderate rain level. These factors combine to reduce yield gains from 20% to 43% of the yield responses found in the 1987-91 field trials. The effects of the resulting crop-yield changes over the simulated project area ranged from an average annual increase of $3.4 million to an average decrease of $2.6 million per year. The estimated annual cost of a quality cloud-seeding project over the area is $1 million. Regional benefits could be larger if summer rainfall forecasts were sufficently accurate to allow selection in those summers when natural rainfall met crop water needs. The 1987-91 field trials sampled only 30% of the growing conditions that occur in Illinois. The rain-modification results are only estimates of the possible outcomes from an added rainfall. They reveal clear needs for research relating to weather modification in the humid climate of the corn belt. More field trials are needed to define crop yield-rain relations in other types of growing seasons. Methods for seeding clouds at night must be developed if agriculturally useful increases are to occur. Increased attention should be given to seasonal forecasting research. 12 refs.

  11. The New Mexico EPSCoR Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program: A Successful Summer Research Program for Community College and PUI College Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pullin, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    The statewide NSF New Mexico EPSCoR Program (Climate Change and Water in New Mexico) sponsored a summer undergraduate research program from 2009 to 2013. This program was open to undergraduates attending the state's community colleges and primarily undergraduate institutions (PUIs). Participants who are chosen for the program attend a week of workshops on climate change, hydrology, water quality and professional development. Following that, they spend eight weeks working with an EPSCoR-funded scientist at a research intensive university or related field site. Participants are paired during their research project. This strategy has been shown to be a key factor in the success and comfort level of the participants. The program concludes with a research conference and many of the participants later present their work at national and regional conferences. The program has shown to be effective at introducing students from non-research institutions to authentic research in the Earth and Environmental Sciences and improving their confidence in future success at higher degree levels. The program is also successful at recruiting underrepresented minority students, mainly from Hispanic and Native American populations. We will also present data on participant degree completions, transfers to four year colleges, STEM career attainment, and graduate school admissions.

  12. National Aerospace Fuels Research Complex

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    formulated or supplied the drawings, specifications, or other data does not license the holder or any other person or corporation ; or convey any rights...Logistics Agency) ECAT Estudios Combustibles y Altas Temperaturas (rig) F-T Fischer-Tropsch FSII Fuel System Icing Inhibitor GC Gas Chromatograph

  13. Microfiche Collection Of Clearinghouse Documents Reported In Abstracts Of Research and Related Materials In Vocational and Technical Education (ARM), Summer 1969.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center for Vocational and Technical Education.

    Documents announced with VT numbers only in the Summer 1969 issue (VT 009 006) of "Abstracts of Research and Related Materials in Vocational and Technical Education" (ARM), are included in this microfiche set. Microfiche availability for these documents is shown on the ARM resume as MF AVAILABLE IN VT-ERIC SET. The microfiche set is arranged in…

  14. Microfiche Collection of Clearinghouse Documents Reported in Abstracts of Research and Related Materials in Vocational and Technical Education (ARM), Summer 1970.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center for Vocational and Technical Education.

    Documents announced with VT numbers only in the Summer 1970 issue (VT 011 509) of "Abstracts of Research and Related Materials in Vocational and Technical Education" (ARM) are included in this microfiche set. Microfiche availability for these documents is shown on the ARM resume as MF AVAILABLE IN VT-ERIC SET. The microfiche set is arranged in the…

  15. The Cosmic Ray Observatory Project: Results of a Summer High-School Student, Teacher, University Scientist Partnership Using a Capstone Research Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shell, Duane F.; Snow, Gregory R.; Claes, Daniel R.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports results from evaluation of the Cosmic Ray Observatory Project (CROP), a student, teacher, scientist partnership to engage high-school students and teachers in school based cosmic ray research. Specifically, this study examined whether an intensive summer workshop experience could effectively prepare teacher-student teams to…

  16. "I Actually Contributed to Their Research": The Influence of an Abbreviated Summer Apprenticeship Program in Science and Engineering for Diverse High-School Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgin, Stephen R.; McConnell, William J.; Flowers, Alonzo M., III

    2015-01-01

    This study describes an investigation of a research apprenticeship program that we developed for diverse high-school students often underrepresented in similar programs and in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) professions. Through the apprenticeship program, students spent 2 weeks in the summer engaged in biofuels-related research…

  17. Ultrasonic Characterization of Aerospace Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leckey, Cara; Johnston, Patrick; Haldren, Harold; Perey, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Composite materials have seen an increased use in aerospace in recent years and it is expected that this trend will continue due to the benefits of reduced weight, increased strength, and other factors. Ongoing work at NASA involves the investigation of the large-scale use of composites for spacecraft structures (SLS components, Orion Composite Crew Module, etc). NASA is also involved in work to enable the use of composites in advanced aircraft structures through the Advanced Composites Project (ACP). In both areas (space and aeronautics) there is a need for new nondestructive evaluation and materials characterization techniques that are appropriate for characterizing composite materials. This paper will present an overview of NASA's needs for characterizing aerospace composites, including a description of planned and ongoing work under ACP for the detection of composite defects such as fiber waviness, reduced bond strength, delamination damage, and microcracking. The research approaches include investigation of angle array, guided wave, and phase sensitive ultrasonic methods. The use of ultrasonic simulation tools for optimizing and developing methods will also be discussed.

  18. Energy Storage for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez-Davis, Marla E.; Loyselle, Patricia L.; Hoberecht, Mark A.; Manzo, Michelle A.; Kohout, Lisa L.; Burke, Kenneth A.; Cabrera, Carlos R.

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has long been a major contributor to the development and application of energy storage technologies for NASAs missions and programs. NASA GRC has supported technology efforts for the advancement of batteries and fuel cells. The Electrochemistry Branch at NASA GRC continues to play a critical role in the development and application of energy storage technologies, in collaboration with other NASA centers, government agencies, industry and academia. This paper describes the work in batteries and fuel cell technologies at the NASA Glenn Research Center. It covers a number of systems required to ensure that NASAs needs for a wide variety of systems are met. Some of the topics covered are lithium-based batteries, proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells, and nanotechnology activities. With the advances of the past years, we begin the 21st century with new technical challenges and opportunities as we develop enabling technologies for batteries and fuel cells for aerospace applications.

  19. Automated design of aerospace structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fulton, R. E.; Mccomb, H. G.

    1974-01-01

    The current state-of-the-art in structural analysis of aerospace vehicles is characterized, automated design technology is discussed, and an indication is given of the future direction of research in analysis and automated design. Representative computer programs for analysis typical of those in routine use in vehicle design activities are described, and results are shown for some selected analysis problems. Recent and planned advances in analysis capability are indicated. Techniques used to automate the more routine aspects of structural design are discussed, and some recently developed automated design computer programs are described. Finally, discussion is presented of early accomplishments in interdisciplinary automated design systems, and some indication of the future thrust of research in this field is given.

  20. Access to Japanese aerospace-related scientific and technical information: The NASA Aerospace Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoetker, Glenn P.; Lahr, Thomas F.

    1993-01-01

    With Japan's growing R&D strength in aerospace-related fields, it is increasingly important for U.S. researchers to be aware of Japanese advances. However, several factors make it difficult to do so. After reviewing the diffusion of aerospace STI in Japan, four factors which make it difficult for U.S. researchers to gather this information are discussed: language, the human network, information scatter, and document acquisition. NASA activities to alleviate these difficulties are described, beginning with a general overview of the NASA STI Program. The effects of the new National Level Agreement between NASA and NASDA are discussed.