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Sample records for aerostructures test wing

  1. Aerostructures Test Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lind, RIck; Voracek, David F.; Doyle, Tim; Truax, Roger; Potter, Starr; Brenner, Marty; Voelker, Len; Freudinger, Larry; Stocjt. C (off)

    2003-01-01

    The Aerostructures Test Wing (ATW) was an apparatus used in a flight experiment during a program of research on aeroelastic instabilities. The ATW experiment was performed to study a specific instability known as flutter. Flutter is a destructive phenomenon caused by adverse coupling of structural dynamics and aerodynamics. The process of determining a flight envelope within which an aircraft will not experience flutter, known as flight flutter testing, is very dangerous and expensive because predictions of the instability are often unreliable. The ATW was a small-scale airplane wing that comprised an airfoil and boom (see upper part of Figure 1). For flight tests, the ATW was mounted on the F-15B/FTF-II testbed, which is a second-generation flight-test fixture described in Flight-Test Fixture for Aerodynamic Research (DRC- 95-27), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 19, No. 9, September 1995, page 84. The ATW was mounted horizontally on this fixture, and the entire assembly was attached to the undercarriage of the F-15B airplane (see lower part of Figure 1). The primary objective of the ATW project was to investigate traditional and advanced methodologies for predicting the onset of flutter. In particular, the ATW generated data that were used to evaluate a flutterometer. This particular flutterometer is an on-line computer program that uses method analysis to estimate worst-case flight conditions associated with flutter. This software was described in A Flutterometer Flight Test Tool NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 23, No. 1, January 1999, page 52.

  2. Ground Vibration Test of the Aerostructure Test Wing 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrera, Claudia; Moholt, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    The Aerostructures Test Wing (ATW) was developed to test unique concepts for flutter prediction and control synthesis. A follow-on to the successful ATW, denoted ATW2, was fabricated as a test bed to validate a variety of instrumentation in flight and to collect data for development of advanced signal processing algorithms for flutter prediction and aviation safety. As a means to estimate flutter speed, a ground vibration test (GVT) was performed. The results of a GVT are typically utilized to update structural dynamics finite element (FE) models used for flutter analysis. In this study, two GVT methodologies were explored to determine which nodes provide the best sensor locations: (i) effective independence and (ii) kinetic energy sorting algorithms. For measurement, ten and twenty sensors were used for three and 10 target test modes. A total of six accelerometer configurations measured frequencies and mode shapes. This included locations used in the original ATW GVT. Moreover, an optical measurement system was used to acquire data without mass effects added by conventional sensors. A considerable frequency shift was observed in comparing the data from the accelerometers to the optical data. The optical data provided robust data for use of the ATW2 finite element model update.

  3. Aerostructures Test Wing (ATW) experiment in flight during an intentional failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This thirty second video shows the Aerostructures Test Wing (ATW) experiment, which consisted of an 18-inch carbon fiber test wing with surface-mounted pieizoelectric strain actuators, during intentional failure on April 24, 2001. The test wing was mounted on a special ventral flight test fixture and flown on Dryden's F-15B Research Testbed aircraft.

  4. Current Progress of a Finite Element Computational Fluid Dynamics Prediction of Flutter for the AeroStructures Test Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arena, Andrew S., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    This progress report focuses on the use of the STructural Analysis RoutineS suite program, SOLIDS, input for the AeroStructures Test Wing. The AeroStructures Test Wing project as a whole is described. The use of the SOLIDS code to find the mode shapes of a structure is discussed. The frequencies, and the structural dynamics to which they relate are examined. The results of the CFD predictions are compared to experimental data from a Ground Vibration Test.

  5. Updating the Finite Element Model of the Aerostructures Test Wing using Ground Vibration Test Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lung, Shun-fat; Pak, Chan-gi

    2009-01-01

    Improved and/or accelerated decision making is a crucial step during flutter certification processes. Unfortunately, most finite element structural dynamics models have uncertainties associated with model validity. Tuning the finite element model using measured data to minimize the model uncertainties is a challenging task in the area of structural dynamics. The model tuning process requires not only satisfactory correlations between analytical and experimental results, but also the retention of the mass and stiffness properties of the structures. Minimizing the difference between analytical and experimental results is a type of optimization problem. By utilizing the multidisciplinary design, analysis, and optimization (MDAO) tool in order to optimize the objective function and constraints; the mass properties, the natural frequencies, and the mode shapes can be matched to the target data to retain the mass matrix orthogonality. This approach has been applied to minimize the model uncertainties for the structural dynamics model of the Aerostructures Test Wing (ATW), which was designed and tested at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC) (Edwards, California). This study has shown that natural frequencies and corresponding mode shapes from the updated finite element model have excellent agreement with corresponding measured data.

  6. Updating the Finite Element Model of the Aerostructures Test Wing Using Ground Vibration Test Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lung, Shun-Fat; Pak, Chan-Gi

    2009-01-01

    Improved and/or accelerated decision making is a crucial step during flutter certification processes. Unfortunately, most finite element structural dynamics models have uncertainties associated with model validity. Tuning the finite element model using measured data to minimize the model uncertainties is a challenging task in the area of structural dynamics. The model tuning process requires not only satisfactory correlations between analytical and experimental results, but also the retention of the mass and stiffness properties of the structures. Minimizing the difference between analytical and experimental results is a type of optimization problem. By utilizing the multidisciplinary design, analysis, and optimization (MDAO) tool in order to optimize the objective function and constraints; the mass properties, the natural frequencies, and the mode shapes can be matched to the target data to retain the mass matrix orthogonality. This approach has been applied to minimize the model uncertainties for the structural dynamics model of the aerostructures test wing (ATW), which was designed and tested at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Dryden Flight Research Center (Edwards, California). This study has shown that natural frequencies and corresponding mode shapes from the updated finite element model have excellent agreement with corresponding measured data.

  7. Reduced Uncertainties in the Flutter Analysis of the Aerostructures Test Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pak, Chan-gi; Lung, Shun-fat

    2010-01-01

    Tuning the finite element model using measured data to minimize the model uncertainties is a challenging task in the area of structural dynamics. A test validated finite element model can provide a reliable flutter analysis to define the flutter placard speed to which the aircraft can be flown prior to flight flutter testing. Minimizing the difference between numerical and experimental results is a type of optimization problem. Through the use of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Dryden Flight Research Center s (Edwards, California, USA) multidisciplinary design, analysis, and optimization tool to optimize the objective function and constraints; the mass properties, the natural frequencies, and the mode shapes are matched to the target data and the mass matrix orthogonality is retained. The approach in this study has been applied to minimize the model uncertainties for the structural dynamic model of the aerostructures test wing, which was designed, built, and tested at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Dryden Flight Research Center. A 25-percent change in flutter speed has been shown after reducing the uncertainties

  8. Reduced Uncertainties in the Flutter Analysis of the Aerostructures Test Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pak, Chan-Gi; Lung, Shun Fat

    2011-01-01

    Tuning the finite element model using measured data to minimize the model uncertainties is a challenging task in the area of structural dynamics. A test validated finite element model can provide a reliable flutter analysis to define the flutter placard speed to which the aircraft can be flown prior to flight flutter testing. Minimizing the difference between numerical and experimental results is a type of optimization problem. Through the use of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Dryden Flight Research Center's (Edwards, California) multidisciplinary design, analysis, and optimization tool to optimize the objective function and constraints; the mass properties, the natural frequencies, and the mode shapes are matched to the target data, and the mass matrix orthogonality is retained. The approach in this study has been applied to minimize the model uncertainties for the structural dynamic model of the aerostructures test wing, which was designed, built, and tested at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Dryden Flight Research Center. A 25 percent change in flutter speed has been shown after reducing the uncertainties.

  9. Aerostructural Shape and Topology Optimization of Aircraft Wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Kai

    A series of novel algorithms for performing aerostructural shape and topology optimization are introduced and applied to the design of aircraft wings. An isoparametric level set method is developed for performing topology optimization of wings and other non-rectangular structures that must be modeled using a non-uniform, body-fitted mesh. The shape sensitivities are mapped to computational space using the transformation defined by the Jacobian of the isoparametric finite elements. The mapped sensitivities are then passed to the Hamilton-Jacobi equation, which is solved on a uniform Cartesian grid. The method is derived for several objective functions including mass, compliance, and global von Mises stress. The results are compared with SIMP results for several two-dimensional benchmark problems. The method is also demonstrated on a three-dimensional wingbox structure subject to fixed loading. It is shown that the isoparametric level set method is competitive with the SIMP method in terms of the final objective value as well as computation time. In a separate problem, the SIMP formulation is used to optimize the structural topology of a wingbox as part of a larger MDO framework. Here, topology optimization is combined with aerodynamic shape optimization, using a monolithic MDO architecture that includes aerostructural coupling. The aerodynamic loads are modeled using a three-dimensional panel method, and the structural analysis makes use of linear, isoparametric, hexahedral elements. The aerodynamic shape is parameterized via a set of twist variables representing the jig twist angle at equally spaced locations along the span of the wing. The sensitivities are determined analytically using a coupled adjoint method. The wing is optimized for minimum drag subject to a compliance constraint taken from a 2 g maneuver condition. The results from the MDO algorithm are compared with those of a sequential optimization procedure in order to quantify the benefits of the MDO

  10. Aerostructural Level Set Topology Optimization for a Common Research Model Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunning, Peter D.; Stanford, Bret K.; Kim, H. Alicia

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to use level set topology optimization to improve the design of a representative wing box structure for the NASA common research model. The objective is to minimize the total compliance of the structure under aerodynamic and body force loading, where the aerodynamic loading is coupled to the structural deformation. A taxi bump case was also considered, where only body force loads were applied. The trim condition that aerodynamic lift must balance the total weight of the aircraft is enforced by allowing the root angle of attack to change. The level set optimization method is implemented on an unstructured three-dimensional grid, so that the method can optimize a wing box with arbitrary geometry. Fast matching and upwind schemes are developed for an unstructured grid, which make the level set method robust and efficient. The adjoint method is used to obtain the coupled shape sensitivities required to perform aerostructural optimization of the wing box structure.

  11. Adaptive aerostructures: the first decade of flight on uninhabited aerial vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Ronald M.

    2004-07-01

    Although many subscale aircraft regularly fly with adaptive materials in sensors and small components in secondary subsystems, only a handful have flown with adaptive aerostructures as flight critical, enabling components. This paper reviews several families of adaptive aerostructures which have enabled or significantly enhanced flightworthy uninhabited aerial vehicles (UAVs), including rotary and fixed wing aircraft, missiles and munitions. More than 40 adaptive aerostructures programs which have had a direct connection to flight test and/or production UAVs, ranging from hover through hypersonic, sea-level to exo-stratospheric are examined. Adaptive material type, design Mach range, test methods, aircraft configuration and performance of each of the designs are presented. An historical analysis shows the evolution of flightworthy adaptive aerostructures from the earliest staggering flights in 1994 to modern adaptive UAVs supporting live-fire exercises in harsh military environments. Because there are profound differences between bench test, wind tunnel test, flight test and military grade flightworthy adaptive aerostructures, some of the most mature industrial design and fabrication techniques in use today will be outlined. The paper concludes with an example of the useful load and performance expansions which are seen on an industrial, military-grade UAV through the use of properly designed, flight-hardened adaptive aerostructures.

  12. Experimental Characterization of the Structural Dynamics and Aero-Structural Sensitivity of a Hawkmoth Wing Toward the Development of Design Rules for Flapping-Wing Micro Air Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    flight. Figure 7 also underscores a dearth of any relevant flapping - wing research throughout the aeronautical community up until the period when MAVs... wings bounce, usually gently, up and down during flight. But this bouncing or “ flapping ” motion compared with Nature’s flapping - wing is quite...rotational motions of the wing about the aircraft’s roll, pitch , and yaw axes respectively. Since insect flapping frequencies vary wildly, from tens of

  13. Mission Adaptive Wing test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birk, Frank T.; Smith, Rogers E.

    1986-01-01

    With the completion of the F-111 test-bed Mission Adaptive Wing (MAW) test program's manual flight control system, emphasis has been shifted to flight testing of MAW automatic control modes. These encompass (1) cruise camber control, (2) maneuver camber control, (3) maneuver load control, and (4) maneuver enhancement and load alleviation control. The aircraft is currently cleared to a 2.5-g maneuvering limit due to generally higher variable-incidence wing pivot loads than had been anticipated, especially at the higher wing-camber settings. Buffet is noted to be somewhat higher than expected at the higher camber settings.

  14. Aero/structural tailoring of engine blades (AERO/STAEBL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, K. W.

    1988-01-01

    This report describes the Aero/Structural Tailoring of Engine Blades (AERO/STAEBL) program, which is a computer code used to perform engine fan and compressor blade aero/structural numerical optimizations. These optimizations seek a blade design of minimum operating cost that satisfies realistic blade design constraints. This report documents the overall program (i.e., input, optimization procedures, approximate analyses) and also provides a detailed description of the validation test cases.

  15. Aero-Structural Interaction, Analysis, and Shape Sensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, James C., III

    1999-01-01

    A multidisciplinary sensitivity analysis technique that has been shown to be independent of step-size selection is examined further. The accuracy of this step-size independent technique, which uses complex variables for determining sensitivity derivatives, has been previously established. The primary focus of this work is to validate the aero-structural analysis procedure currently being used. This validation consists of comparing computed and experimental data obtained for an Aeroelastic Research Wing (ARW-2). Since the aero-structural analysis procedure has the complex variable modifications already included into the software, sensitivity derivatives can automatically be computed. Other than for design purposes, sensitivity derivatives can be used for predicting the solution at nearby conditions. The use of sensitivity derivatives for predicting the aero-structural characteristics of this configuration is demonstrated.

  16. Effective L/D: A Theoretical Approach to the Measurement of Aero-Structural Efficiency in Aircraft Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guynn, Mark D.

    2015-01-01

    There are many trade-offs in aircraft design that ultimately impact the overall performance and characteristics of the final design. One well recognized and well understood trade-off is that of wing weight and aerodynamic efficiency. Higher aerodynamic efficiency can be obtained by increasing wing span, usually at the expense of higher wing weight. The proper balance of these two competing factors depends on the objectives of the design. For example, aerodynamic efficiency is preeminent for sailplanes and long slender wings result. Although the wing weight-drag trade is universally recognized, aerodynamic efficiency and structural efficiency are not usually considered in combination. This paper discusses the concept of "aero-structural efficiency," which combines weight and drag characteristics. A metric to quantify aero-structural efficiency, termed effective L/D, is then derived and tested with various scenarios. Effective L/D is found to be a practical and robust means to simultaneously characterize aerodynamic and structural efficiency in the context of aircraft design. The primary value of the effective L/D metric is as a means to better communicate the combined system level impacts of drag and structural weight.

  17. Advanced wing design survivability testing and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruno, J.; Tobias, M.

    1992-01-01

    Composite wings on current operational aircraft are conservatively designed to account for stress/strain concentrations, and to assure specified damage tolerance. The technology that can lead to improved composite wing structures and associated structural efficiency is to increase design ultimate strain levels beyond their current limit of 3500 to 4000 micro-in/in to 6000 micro-in/in without sacrificing structural integrity, durability, damage tolerance, or survivability. Grumman, under the sponsorship of the Naval Air Development Center (NADC), has developed a high-strain composite wing design for a subsonic aircraft wing using novel and innovative design concepts and manufacturing methods, while maintaining a state-of-the-art fiber/resin system. The current advanced wing design effort addressed a tactical subsonic aircraft wing using previously developed, high-strain wing design concepts in conjunction with newer/emerging fiber and polymer matrix composite (PMC) materials to achieve the same goals, while reducing complexity. Two categories of advanced PMC materials were evaluated: toughened thermosets; and engineered thermoplastics. Advanced PMC materials offer the technological opportunity to take maximum advantage of improved material properties, physical characteristics, and tailorability to increase performance and survivability over current composite structure. Damage tolerance and survivability to various threats, in addition to structural integrity and durability, were key technical issues addressed during this study, and evaluated through test. This paper focuses on the live-fire testing, and the results performed to experimentally evaluate the survivability of the advanced wing design.

  18. Reflexive aerostructures: increased vehicle survivability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margraf, Thomas W.; Hemmelgarn, Christopher D.; Barnell, Thomas J.; Franklin, Mark A.

    2007-04-01

    Aerospace systems stand to benefit significantly from the advancement of reflexive aerostructure technologies for increased vehicle survivability. Cornerstone Research Group Inc. (CRG) is developing lightweight, healable composite systems for use as primary load-bearing aircraft components. The reflexive system is comprised of piezoelectric structural health monitoring systems, localized thermal activation systems, and lightweight, healable composite structures. The reflexive system is designed to mimic the involuntary human response to damage. Upon impact, the structural health monitoring system will identify the location and magnitude of the damage, sending a signal to a discrete thermal activation control system to resistively heat the shape memory polymer (SMP) matrix composite above activation temperature, resulting in localized shape recovery and healing of the damaged areas. CRG has demonstrated SMP composites that can recover 90 percent of flexural yield stress and modulus after postfailure healing. During the development, CRG has overcome issues of discrete activation, structural health monitoring integration, and healable resin systems. This paper will address the challenges associated with development of a reflexive aerostructure, including integration of structural health monitoring, discrete healing, and healable shape memory resin systems.

  19. BMI Sandwich Wing Box Analysis and Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palm, Tod; Mahler, Mary; Shah, Chandu; Rouse, Marshall; Bush, Harold; Wu, Chauncey; Small, William J.

    2000-01-01

    A composite sandwich single bay wing box test article was developed by Northrop Grumman and tested recently at NASA Langley Research Center. The objectives for the wing box development effort were to provide a demonstration article for manufacturing scale up of structural concepts related to a high speed transport wing, and to validate the structural performance of the design. The box concept consisted of highly loaded composite sandwich wing skins, with moderately loaded composite sandwich spars. The dimensions of the box were chosen to represent a single bay of the main wing box, with a spar spacing of 30 inches, height of 20 inches constant depth, and length of 64 inches. The bismaleimide facesheet laminates and titanium honeycomb core chosen for this task are high temperature materials able to sustain a 300F service temperature. The completed test article is shown in Figure 1. The tests at NASA Langley demonstrated the structures ability to sustain axial tension and compression loads in excess of 20,000 lb/in, and to maintain integrity in the thermal environment. Test procedures, analysis failure predictions, and test results are presented.

  20. Wing Leading Edge Joint Laminar Flow Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, Aaron; Westphal, Russell V.; Zuniga, Fanny A.; Kennelly, Robert A., Jr.; Koga, Dennis J.

    1996-01-01

    An F-104G aircraft at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center has been equipped with a specially designed and instrumented test fixture to simulate surface imperfections of the type likely to be present near the leading edge on the wings of some laminar flow aircraft. The simulated imperfections consisted of five combinations of spanwise steps and gaps of various sizes. The unswept fixture yielded a pressure distribution similar to that of some laminar flow airfoils. The experiment was conducted at cruise conditions typical for business-jets and light transports: Mach numbers were in the range 0.5-0.8, and unit Reynolds numbers were 1.5-2.5 million per foot. Skin friction measurements indicated that laminar flow was often maintained for some distance downstream of the surface imperfections. Further work is needed to more precisely define transition location and to extend the experiments to swept-wing conditions and a broader range of imperfection geometries.

  1. Flapping Wing Micro Air Vehicle Wing Manufacture and Force Testing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-03

    Thankfully, nature has already optimized micro air vehicles with the evolution of birds and insects, which become the instinctual inspirational candidates...properties to those wings found in nature. More specifically, with size comparable to a hummingbird , elastic modulus comparable to a cicada, and

  2. Wing Torsional Stiffness Tests of the Active Aeroelastic Wing F/A-18 Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lokos, William A.; Olney, Candida D.; Crawford, Natalie D.; Stauf, Rick; Reichenbach, Eric Y.

    2002-01-01

    The left wing of the Active Aeroelastic Wing (AAW) F/A-18 airplane has been ground-load-tested to quantify its torsional stiffness. The test has been performed at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center in November 1996, and again in April 2001 after a wing skin modification was performed. The primary objectives of these tests were to characterize the wing behavior before the first flight, and provide a before-and-after measurement of the torsional stiffness. Two streamwise load couples have been applied. The wing skin modification is shown to have more torsional flexibility than the original configuration has. Additionally, structural hysteresis is shown to be reduced by the skin modification. Data comparisons show good repeatability between the tests.

  3. Flex Wing Fabrication and Static Pressure Testing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-06-01

    Vehicle, by H. Kredit , January 1964, 144 pages AD. B252433, Pilot’s Handbook for the Flexible Wing Aerial Utility Vehicle XV-8A, Match 1964, 52 pp AD...Vehicle, H. Kredit , Feb. 1965. 100 pages .- AD 460405, XV-8A Flexible Wing Aerial Utility Vehicle. Final Report. Feb. 1965, 113 page; -- AD 431128

  4. A Scalable, Parallel Approach for Multi-Point, High-Fidelity Aerostructural Optimization of Aircraft Configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenway, Gaetan K. W.

    This thesis presents new tools and techniques developed to address the challenging problem of high-fidelity aerostructural optimization with respect to large numbers of design variables. A new mesh-movement scheme is developed that is both computationally efficient and sufficiently robust to accommodate large geometric design changes and aerostructural deformations. A fully coupled Newton-Krylov method is presented that accelerates the convergence of aerostructural systems and provides a 20% performance improvement over the traditional nonlinear block Gauss-Seidel approach and can handle more exible structures. A coupled adjoint method is used that efficiently computes derivatives for a gradient-based optimization algorithm. The implementation uses only machine accurate derivative techniques and is verified to yield fully consistent derivatives by comparing against the complex step method. The fully-coupled large-scale coupled adjoint solution method is shown to have 30% better performance than the segregated approach. The parallel scalability of the coupled adjoint technique is demonstrated on an Euler Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model with more than 80 million state variables coupled to a detailed structural finite-element model of the wing with more than 1 million degrees of freedom. Multi-point high-fidelity aerostructural optimizations of a long-range wide-body, transonic transport aircraft configuration are performed using the developed techniques. The aerostructural analysis employs Euler CFD with a 2 million cell mesh and a structural finite element model with 300 000 DOF. Two design optimization problems are solved: one where takeoff gross weight is minimized, and another where fuel burn is minimized. Each optimization uses a multi-point formulation with 5 cruise conditions and 2 maneuver conditions. The optimization problems have 476 design variables are optimal results are obtained within 36 hours of wall time using 435 processors. The TOGW

  5. Energy harvesting for self-powered aerostructure actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, Matthew; Pizzonia, Matthew; Mehallow, Michael; Garcia, Ephrahim

    2014-04-01

    This paper proposes and experimentally investigates applying piezoelectric energy harvesting devices driven by flow induced vibrations to create self-powered actuation of aerostructure surfaces such as tabs, flaps, spoilers, or morphing devices. Recently, we have investigated flow-induced vibrations and limit cycle oscillations due to aeroelastic flutter phenomena in piezoelectric structures as a mechanism to harvest energy from an ambient fluid flow. We will describe how our experimental investigations in a wind tunnel have demonstrated that this harvested energy can be stored and used on-demand to actuate a control surface such as a trailing edge flap in the airflow. This actuated control surface could take the form of a separate and discrete actuated flap, or could constitute rotating or deflecting the oscillating energy harvester itself to produce a non-zero mean angle of attack. Such a rotation of the energy harvester and the associated change in aerodynamic force is shown to influence the operating wind speed range of the device, its limit cycle oscillation (LCO) amplitude, and its harvested power output; hence creating a coupling between the device's performance as an energy harvester and as a control surface. Finally, the induced changes in the lift, pitching moment, and drag acting on a wing model are quantified and compared for a control surface equipped with an oscillating energy harvester and a traditional, static control surface of the same geometry. The results show that when operated in small amplitude LCO the energy harvester adds negligible aerodynamic drag.

  6. Acoustic tests of augmentor wing model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodykoontz, J. H.

    1977-01-01

    Acoustic and aerodynamic data were obtained for a full-scale section of an augmentor wing. Features of the design included a single-row, multielement nozzle array and acoustically tuned panels placed on the interior surfaces of the augmentor. When the data were extrapolated to a 91,000-kilogram aircraft, the calculated sideline perceived noise levels were approximately the same for either the takeoff or approach condition.

  7. Hypersonic wing test structure design, analysis, and fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plank, P. P.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to provide the analyses, data, and hardware required to experimentally validate the beaded panel concept and demonstrate its usefulness as a basis for design of a hypersonic research airplane (HRA). Combinations of beaded panel structure, heat shields, channel caps, and corrugated webs for ribs and spars were analyzed for the wing of a specified HRA to operate at Mach 8 with a life span of 150 flights. Detailed analyses, conducted in accordance with established design criteria, included aerodynamic heating and load predictions, transient structural thermal calculations, extensive NASTRAN computer modeling, and structural optimization. After geometry was established for the total wing, part of the wing (85 sq ft) was designed, fabricated, and assembled into a test structure to experimentally verify the structural adequacy of the beaded panel design concept.

  8. Design, realization and structural testing of a compliant adaptable wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinari, G.; Quack, M.; Arrieta, A. F.; Morari, M.; Ermanni, P.

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents the design, optimization, realization and testing of a novel wing morphing concept, based on distributed compliance structures, and actuated by piezoelectric elements. The adaptive wing features ribs with a selectively compliant inner structure, numerically optimized to achieve aerodynamically efficient shape changes while simultaneously withstanding aeroelastic loads. The static and dynamic aeroelastic behavior of the wing, and the effect of activating the actuators, is assessed by means of coupled 3D aerodynamic and structural simulations. To demonstrate the capabilities of the proposed morphing concept and optimization procedure, the wings of a model airplane are designed and manufactured according to the presented approach. The goal is to replace conventional ailerons, thus to achieve controllability in roll purely by morphing. The mechanical properties of the manufactured components are characterized experimentally, and used to create a refined and correlated finite element model. The overall stiffness, strength, and actuation capabilities are experimentally tested and successfully compared with the numerical prediction. To counteract the nonlinear hysteretic behavior of the piezoelectric actuators, a closed-loop controller is implemented, and its capability of accurately achieving the desired shape adaptation is evaluated experimentally. Using the correlated finite element model, the aeroelastic behavior of the manufactured wing is simulated, showing that the morphing concept can provide sufficient roll authority to allow controllability of the flight. The additional degrees of freedom offered by morphing can be also used to vary the plane lift coefficient, similarly to conventional flaps. The efficiency improvements offered by this technique are evaluated numerically, and compared to the performance of a rigid wing.

  9. Analysis of a Hybrid Wing Body Center Section Test Article

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Hsi-Yung T.; Shaw, Peter; Przekop, Adam

    2013-01-01

    The hybrid wing body center section test article is an all-composite structure made of crown, floor, keel, bulkhead, and rib panels utilizing the Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) design concept. The primary goal of this test article is to prove that PRSEUS components are capable of carrying combined loads that are representative of a hybrid wing body pressure cabin design regime. This paper summarizes the analytical approach, analysis results, and failure predictions of the test article. A global finite element model of composite panels, metallic fittings, mechanical fasteners, and the Combined Loads Test System (COLTS) test fixture was used to conduct linear structural strength and stability analyses to validate the specimen under the most critical combination of bending and pressure loading conditions found in the hybrid wing body pressure cabin. Local detail analyses were also performed at locations with high stress concentrations, at Tee-cap noodle interfaces with surrounding laminates, and at fastener locations with high bearing/bypass loads. Failure predictions for different composite and metallic failure modes were made, and nonlinear analyses were also performed to study the structural response of the test article under combined bending and pressure loading. This large-scale specimen test will be conducted at the COLTS facility at the NASA Langley Research Center.

  10. Thermal analysis of a hypersonic wing test structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandlin, Doral R.; Swanson, Neil J., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The three-dimensional finite element modeling techniques developed for the thermal analysis of a hypersonic wing test structure (HWTS) are described. The computed results are compared to measured test data. In addition, the results of a NASA two-dimensional parameter finite difference local thermal model and the results of a contractor two-dimensional lumped parameter finite difference local thermal model will be presented.

  11. The active flexible wing aeroservoelastic wind-tunnel test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noll, Thomas; Perry, Boyd

    1989-01-01

    For a specific application of aeroservoelastic technology, Rockwell International Corporation developed a concept known as the Active Flexible Wing (AFW). The concept incorporates multiple active leading-and trailing-edge control surfaces with a very flexible wing such that wing shape is varied in an optimum manner resulting in improved performance and reduced weight. As a result of a cooperative program between the AFWAL's Flight Dynamics Laboratory, Rockwell, and NASA LaRC, a scaled aeroelastic wind-tunnel model of an advanced fighter was designed, fabricated, and tested in the NASA LaRC Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) to validate the AFW concept. Besides conducting the wind-tunnel tests NASA provided a design of an Active Roll Control (ARC) System that was implemented and evaluated during the tests. The ARC system used a concept referred to as Control Law Parameterization which involves maintaining constant performance, robustness, and stability while using different combinations of multiple control surface displacements. Since the ARC system used measured control surface stability derivatives during the design, the predicted performance and stability results correlated very well with test measurements.

  12. Free-spinning Wind-tunnel Tests of a Low-wing Monoplane with Systemic Changes in Wings and Tails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidman, Oscar; Neihouse, A I

    1937-01-01

    A series of tests was made at the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) free-spinning tunnel to determine the effect of systematic changes in wing and tail arrangement upon steady-spinning and recovery characteristics of a conventional low-wing monoplane model for a basic loading condition. Eight wings and three tails, covering a wide range of aerodynamic characteristics, were independently ballasted so as to be interchangeable with no change in mass distribution. For each of the 24 wing-tail combinations, observations were made of steady spins for four control settings and of recoveries for five control manipulators. The results are presented in the form of charts comparing the spin characteristics. The results showed that, with a poor tail arrangement, wing plan form and tip shape had a considerable effect on the spinning characteristics.

  13. Hybrid Wing Body Aircraft Acoustic Test Preparations and Facility Upgrades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heath, Stephanie L.; Brooks, Thomas F.; Hutcheson, Florence V.; Doty, Michael J.; Haskin, Henry H.; Spalt, Taylor B.; Bahr, Christopher J.; Burley, Casey L.; Bartram, Scott M.; Humphreys, William M.; Lunsford, Charles B.; Popenack, Thomas G.; Colbert, Scott E.; Hoad, Danny; Becker, Lawrence; Stead, Dan; Kuchta, Dennis; Yeh, Les

    2013-01-01

    NASA is investigating the potential of acoustic shielding as a means to reduce the noise footprint at airport communities. A subsonic transport aircraft and Langley's 14- by 22-foot Subsonic Wind Tunnel were chosen to test the proposed "low noise" technology. The present experiment studies the basic components of propulsion-airframe shielding in a representative flow regime. To this end, a 5.8-percent scale hybrid wing body model was built with dual state-of-the-art engine noise simulators. The results will provide benchmark shielding data and key hybrid wing body aircraft noise data. The test matrix for the experiment contains both aerodynamic and acoustic test configurations, broadband turbomachinery and hot jet engine noise simulators, and various airframe configurations which include landing gear, cruise and drooped wing leading edges, trailing edge elevons and vertical tail options. To aid in this study, two major facility upgrades have occurred. First, a propane delivery system has been installed to provide the acoustic characteristics with realistic temperature conditions for a hot gas engine; and second, a traversing microphone array and side towers have been added to gain full spectral and directivity noise characteristics.

  14. Test results from large wing and fuselage panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madan, Ram C.; Voldman, Mike

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents the first results in an assessment of the strength, stiffness, and damage tolerance of stiffened wing and fuselage subcomponents. Under this NASA funded program, 10 large wing and fuselage panels, variously fabricated by automated tow placement and dry-stitched preform/resin transfer molding, are to be tested. The first test of an automated tow placement six-longeron fuselage panel under shear load was completed successfully. Using NASTRAN finite-element analysis the stiffness of the panel in the linear range prior to buckling was predicted within 3.5 percent. A nonlinear analysis predicted the buckling load within 10 percent and final failure load within 6 percent. The first test of a resin transfer molding six-stringer wing panel under compression was also completed. The panel failed unexpectedly in buckling because of inadequate supporting structure. The average strain was 0.43 percent with a line load of 20.3 kips per inch of width. This strain still exceeds the design allowable strains. Also, the stringers did not debond before failure, which is in contrast to the general behavior of unstitched panels.

  15. Hypersonic wing test structure design, analysis, and fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plank, P. P.; Penning, F. A.

    1973-01-01

    An investigation to provide the analyses, data, and hardware required to experimentally validate the beaded panel concept and demonstrate its usefulness as a basis for design of a Hypersonic Research Airplane (HRA) wing is reported. Combinations of the beaded panel structure, heat shields, channel caps and corrugated webs for ribs and spars were analyzed for the wing of a specified HRA to operate at Mach 8 with a lifespan of 150 flights. Detailed analyses were conducted in accordance with established design criteria and included aerodynamic heating and load predictions, transient structural thermal calculations, extensive NASTRAN computer modeling, and structural optimization. Optimum beaded panel tests at 922 K (1200 F) were performed to verify panel performance. Close agreement of predicted and actual critical loads permitted use of design procedures and equations for the beaded panel concept without modification.

  16. Flight test of passive wing/store flutter suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cazier, F. W., Jr.; Kehoe, M. W.

    1986-01-01

    Flight tests were performed on an F-16 airplane carrying on each wing an AIM-9J wingtip missile, a GBU-8 bomb near midspan, and an external fuel tank. Baseline flights with the GBU-8 mounted on a standard pylon established that this configuration is characterized by an antisymmetric limited amplitude flutter oscillation within the operational envelope. The airplane was then flown with GBU-8 mounted on the decoupler pylon. The decoupler pylon is a NASA concept of passive wing-store flutter suppression achieved by providing a low store-pylon pitch frequency. The decoupler pylon successfully suppressed wing-store flutter throughout the flight envelope. A 37 percent increase in flutter velocity over the standard pylon was demonstrated. Maneuvers with load factors to 4g were performed. Although the static store displacements during maneuvers were not sufficiently large to be of concern, a store pitch alignment system was tested and performed successfully. One GBU-8 was ejected demonstrating that weapon separation from the decoupler pylon is normal.

  17. Pegasus Rocket Wing and PHYSX Glove Undergoes Stress Loads Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The Pegasus Hypersonic Experiment (PHYSX) Project's Pegasus rocket wing with attached PHYSX glove rests after load-tests at Scaled Composites, Inc., in Mojave, California, in January 1997. Technicians slowly filled water bags beneath the wing, to create the pressure, or 'wing-loading,' required to determine whether the wing could withstand its design limit for stress. The wing sits in a wooden triangular frame which serves as the test-rig, mounted to the floor atop the waterbags. Pegasus is an air-launched space booster produced by Orbital Sciences Corporation and Hercules Aerospace Company (initially; later, Alliant Tech Systems) to provide small satellite users with a cost-effective, flexible, and reliable method for placing payloads into low earth orbit. Pegasus has been used to launch a number of satellites and the PHYSX experiment. That experiment consisted of a smooth glove installed on the first-stage delta wing of the Pegasus. The glove was used to gather data at speeds of up to Mach 8 and at altitudes approaching 200,000 feet. The flight took place on October 22, 1998. The PHYSX experiment focused on determining where boundary-layer transition occurs on the glove and on identifying the flow mechanism causing transition over the glove. Data from this flight-research effort included temperature, heat transfer, pressure measurements, airflow, and trajectory reconstruction. Hypersonic flight-research programs are an approach to validate design methods for hypersonic vehicles (those that fly more than five times the speed of sound, or Mach 5). Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, provided overall management of the glove experiment, glove design, and buildup. Dryden also was responsible for conducting the flight tests. Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia, was responsible for the design of the aerodynamic glove as well as development of sensor and instrumentation systems for the glove. Other participating NASA centers included Ames Research

  18. Sensitivity Analysis for Coupled Aero-structural Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giunta, Anthony A.

    1999-01-01

    A novel method has been developed for calculating gradients of aerodynamic force and moment coefficients for an aeroelastic aircraft model. This method uses the Global Sensitivity Equations (GSE) to account for the aero-structural coupling, and a reduced-order modal analysis approach to condense the coupling bandwidth between the aerodynamic and structural models. Parallel computing is applied to reduce the computational expense of the numerous high fidelity aerodynamic analyses needed for the coupled aero-structural system. Good agreement is obtained between aerodynamic force and moment gradients computed with the GSE/modal analysis approach and the same quantities computed using brute-force, computationally expensive, finite difference approximations. A comparison between the computational expense of the GSE/modal analysis method and a pure finite difference approach is presented. These results show that the GSE/modal analysis approach is the more computationally efficient technique if sensitivity analysis is to be performed for two or more aircraft design parameters.

  19. Design and test of a prototype scale ejector wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mefferd, L. A.; Alden, R. E.; Bevilacqua, P. M.

    1979-01-01

    A two dimensional momentum integral analysis was used to examine the effect of changing inlet area ratio, diffuser area ratio, and the ratio of ejector length to width. A relatively wide range of these parameters was considered. It was found that for constant inlet area ratio the augmentation increases with the ejector length, and for constant length: width ratio the augmentation increases with inlet area ratio. Scale model tests were used to verify these trends and to examine th effect of aspect ratio. On the basis of these results, an ejector configuration was selected for fabrication and testing at a scale representative of an ejector wing aircraft. The test ejector was powered by a Pratt-Whitney F401 engine developing approximately 12,000 pounds of thrust. The results of preliminary tests indicate that the ejector develops a thrust augmentation ratio better than 1.65.

  20. Wind Tunnel Analysis And Flight Test of A Wing Fence On A T-38

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-26

    WIND TUNNEL ANALYSIS AND FLIGHT TEST OF A WING FENCE ON A T-38 THESIS Michael D...GAE/ENY/09-M20 WIND TUNNEL ANALYSIS AND FLIGHT TEST OF A WING FENCE ON A T-38 THESIS Presented to the Faculty Department of...study and flight tests were performed to examine the effects of a wing fence on the T-38A. Wind tunnel results were based upon force and moment

  1. Atmospheric reentry flight test of winged space vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inatani, Yoshifumi; Akiba, Ryojiro; Hinada, Motoki; Nagatomo, Makoto

    A summary of the atmospheric reentry flight experiment of winged space vehicle is presented. The test was conducted and carried out by the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS) in Feb. 1992 in Kagoshima Space Center. It is the first Japanese atmospheric reentry flight of the controlled lifting vehicle. A prime objective of the flight is to demonstrate a high speed atmospheric entry flight capability and high-angle-of-attack flight capability in terms of aerodynamics, flight dynamics and flight control of these kind of vehicles. The launch of the winged vehicle was made by balloon and solid propellant rocket booster which was also the first trial in Japan. The vehicle accomplishes the lfight from space-equivalent condition to the atmospheric flight condition where reaction control system (RCS) attitude stabilization and aerodynamic control was used, respectively. In the flight, the vehicle's attitude was measured by both an inertial measurement unit (IMU) and an air data sensor (ADS) which were employed into an auto-pilot flight control loop. After completion of the entry transient flight, the vehicle experienced unexpected instability during the atmospheric decelerating flight; however, it recovered the attitude orientation and completed the transonic flight after that. The latest analysis shows that it is due to the ADS measurement error and the flight control gain scheduling; what happened was all understood. Some details of the test and the brief summary of the current status of the post flight analysis are presented.

  2. Dynamic tests of composite panels of an aircraft wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Splichal, Jan; Pistek, Antonin; Hlinka, Jiri

    2015-10-01

    The paper describes the analysis of aerospace composite structures under dynamic loading. Today, it is common to use design procedures based on assumption of static loading only, and dynamic loading is rarely assumed and applied in design and certification of aerospace structures. The paper describes the application of dynamic loading for the design of aircraft structures, and the validation of the procedure on a selected structure. The goal is to verify the possibility of reducing the weight through improved design/modelling processes using dynamic loading instead of static loading. The research activity focuses on the modelling and testing of a composite panel representing a local segment of an aircraft wing section, investigating in particular the buckling behavior under dynamic loading. Finite Elements simulation tools are discussed, as well as the advantages of using a digital optical measurement system for the evaluation of the tests. The comparison of the finite element simulations with the results of the tests is presented.

  3. NASA Hybrid Wing Aircraft Aeroacoustic Test Documentation Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heath, Stephanie L.; Brooks, Thomas F.; Hutcheson, Florence V.; Doty, Michael J.; Bahr, Christopher J.; Hoad, Danny; Becker, Lawrence; Humphreys, William M.; Burley, Casey L.; Stead, Dan; Pope, Dennis S.; Spalt, Taylor B.; Kuchta, Dennis H.; Plassman, Gerald E.; Moen, Jaye A.

    2016-01-01

    This report summarizes results of the Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) N2A-EXTE model aeroacoustic test. The N2A-EXTE model was tested in the NASA Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel (14x22 Tunnel) from September 12, 2012 until January 28, 2013 and was designated as test T598. This document contains the following main sections: Section 1 - Introduction, Section 2 - Main Personnel, Section 3 - Test Equipment, Section 4 - Data Acquisition Systems, Section 5 - Instrumentation and Calibration, Section 6 - Test Matrix, Section 7 - Data Processing, and Section 8 - Summary. Due to the amount of material to be documented, this HWB test documentation report does not cover analysis of acquired data, which is to be presented separately by the principal investigators. Also, no attempt was made to include preliminary risk reduction tests (such as Broadband Engine Noise Simulator and Compact Jet Engine Simulator characterization tests, shielding measurement technique studies, and speaker calibration method studies), which were performed in support of this HWB test. Separate reports containing these preliminary tests are referenced where applicable.

  4. Transonic Semispan Aerodynamic Testing of the Hybrid Wing Body with Over Wing Nacelles in the National Transonic Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, David T.; Hooker, John R.; Wick, Andrew; Plumley, Ryan W.; Zeune, Cale H.; Ol, Michael V.; DeMoss, Joshua A.

    2017-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation of a 0.04-scale model of the Lockheed Martin Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) with Over Wing Nacelles (OWN) air mobility transport configuration was conducted in the National Transonic Facility at the NASA Langley Research Center under a collaborative partnership between NASA, the Air Force Research Laboratory, and Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company. The wind tunnel test sought to validate the transonic aerodynamic performance of the HWB and to validate the efficiency benefits of the OWN installation as compared to the traditional under-wing installation. The semispan HWB model was tested in a clean wing configuration and also tested with two different nacelles representative of a modern turbofan engine and a future advanced high bypass ratio engine. The nacelles were installed in three different locations with two over-wing positions and one under-wing position. Five-component force and moment data, surface static pressure data, and aeroelastic deformation data were acquired. For the cruise configuration, the model was tested in an angle-of-attack range between -2 and 10 degrees at free-stream Mach numbers from 0.3 to 0.9 and at unit Reynolds numbers between 8 and 39 million per foot, achieving a maximum of 80% of flight Reynolds numbers across the Mach number range. The test results validated pretest computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations of the HWB performance including the OWN benefit and the results also exhibited excellent transonic drag data repeatability to within +/-1 drag count. This paper details the experimental setup and model overview, presents some sample data results, and describes the facility improvements that led to the success of the test.

  5. Wind-tunnel Tests at Low Speed of Swept and Yawed Wings Having Various Plan Forms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purser, Paul E; Spearman, M Leroy

    1951-01-01

    Results are presented of wind-tunnel tests made at low speed of various small-scale models of sweptback, sweptforward, and yawed wings. The tests covered changes in aspect ratio, taper ratio, and tip shape. Some data were obtained with high-lift devices on sweptback wings and with ailerons on sweptforward wings. The data have been briefly analyzed and some comparisons have been made with the available theory.

  6. Finite Element Analysis and Test Results Comparison for the Hybrid Wing Body Center Section Test Article

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Przekop, Adam; Jegley, Dawn C.; Rouse, Marshall; Lovejoy, Andrew E.

    2016-01-01

    This report documents the comparison of test measurements and predictive finite element analysis results for a hybrid wing body center section test article. The testing and analysis efforts were part of the Airframe Technology subproject within the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation project. Test results include full field displacement measurements obtained from digital image correlation systems and discrete strain measurements obtained using both unidirectional and rosette resistive gauges. Most significant results are presented for the critical five load cases exercised during the test. Final test to failure after inflicting severe damage to the test article is also documented. Overall, good comparison between predicted and actual behavior of the test article is found.

  7. Robotic abrasive water jet cutting of aerostructure components

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, D.C.

    1989-01-01

    To reduce tooling and labor costs associated with net trimming of aerostructure components, a system has been designed and implemented which combines the flexibility and accuracy of robotics with the productivity of abrasive water jet cutting. The system is comprised of a large, six-axis gantry robot which uses specially developed abrasive water jet end effectors to trim the edge-of-panel (EOP) and integral stiffener blades. These end effectors employ compact catchers to contain the spent stream, and thereby eliminate the need for large catcher tanks commonly used in abrasive water jet cutting. The robot is offline programmed to perform trimming on large, complex contoured panels.

  8. Genotoxicity testing of five herbicides in the Drosophila wing spot test.

    PubMed

    Kaya, B; Yanikoglu, A; Creus, A; Marcos, R

    2000-02-16

    Four triazine herbicides: amitrole, metribuzin, prometryn and terbutryn, and the bipyridal compound diquat dibromide have been evaluated for genotoxicity in the wing somatic mutation and recombination test of Drosophila melanogaster, following standard procedures. Third-instar larvae trans-heterozygous for the third chromosome recessive markers multiple wing hairs (mwh) and flare-3 (flr(3)) were chronically fed with different concentrations of the test compounds. Feeding ended with pupation of the surviving larvae. Genetic changes induced in somatic cells of the wing's imaginal discs lead to the formation of mutant clones on the wing blade. Point mutation, chromosome breakage and mitotic recombination produce single spots; while twin spots are produced only by mitotic recombination. Exposure to 0.5 mM and 1 mM of amitrole clearly increased the frequency of small single, large single and total spots. Terbutryn, at the concentration of 5 mM, induced a slight increase in the frequency of small single and total spots, but this result could be false positive. The other three herbicides tested did not show any genotoxic effect. When heterozygous larvae for mwh and the multiple inverted TM3 balancer chromosomes were treated, significant increases in the frequency of mutant spots were only detected for amitrole. The observed spot frequencies were lower than those found in mwh/flr(3)50%) of the total spot induction was due to mitotic recombination.

  9. Nonlinear Analysis and Preliminary Testing Results of a Hybrid Wing Body Center Section Test Article

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Przekop, Adam; Jegley, Dawn C.; Rouse, Marshall; Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Wu, Hsi-Yung T.

    2015-01-01

    A large test article was recently designed, analyzed, fabricated, and successfully tested up to the representative design ultimate loads to demonstrate that stiffened composite panels with through-the-thickness reinforcement are a viable option for the next generation large transport category aircraft, including non-conventional configurations such as the hybrid wing body. This paper focuses on finite element analysis and test data correlation of the hybrid wing body center section test article under mechanical, pressure and combined load conditions. Good agreement between predictive nonlinear finite element analysis and test data is found. Results indicate that a geometrically nonlinear analysis is needed to accurately capture the behavior of the non-circular pressurized and highly-stressed structure when the design approach permits local buckling.

  10. Wind-tunnel Tests of the Fowler Variable-area Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weick, Fred E; Platt, Robert C

    1932-01-01

    The lift, drag, and center of pressure characteristics of a model of the Fowler variable-area wing were measured in the NACA 7 by 10 foot wind tunnel. The Fowler wing consists of a combination of a main wing and an extension surface, also of airfoil section. The extension surface can be entirely retracted within the lower rear portion of the main wing or it can be moved to the rear and downward. The tests were made with the nose of the extension airfoil in various positions near the trailing edge of the main wing and with the surface at various angular deflections. The highest lift coefficient obtained was C(sub L) = 3.17 as compared with 1.27 for the main wing alone.

  11. A coupled-adjoint method for high-fidelity aero-structural optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Joaquim Rafael Rost A.

    A new integrated aero-structural design method for aerospace vehicles is presented. The approach combines an aero-structural analysis solver, a coupled aero-structural adjoint solver, a geometry engine, and an efficient gradient-based optimization algorithm. The aero-structural solver ensures accurate solutions by using high-fidelity models for the aerodynamics, structures, and coupling procedure. The coupled aero-structural adjoint solver is used to calculate the sensitivities of aerodynamic and structural cost functions with respect to both aerodynamic shape and structural variables. The aero-structural adjoint sensitivities are compared with those given by the complex-step derivative approximation and finite differences. The proposed method is shown to be both accurate and efficient, exhibiting a significant cost advantage when the gradient of a small number of functions with respect to a large number of design variables is needed. The optimization of a supersonic business jet configuration demonstrates the usefulness and importance of computing aero-structural sensitivities using the coupled-adjoint method.

  12. TESTING OF INDOOR RADON REDUCTION TECHNIQUES IN BASEMENT HOUSES HAVING ADJOINING WINGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of tests of indoor radon reduction techniques in 12 existing Maryland houses, with the objective of determining when basement houses with adjoining wings require active soil depressurization (ASD) treatment of both wings, and when treatment of the basemen...

  13. Flight Test of the F/A-18 Active Aeroelastic Wing Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Robert; Allen, Michael J.; Dibley, Ryan P.; Gera, Joseph; Hodgkinson, John

    2005-01-01

    Successful flight-testing of the Active Aeroelastic Wing airplane was completed in March 2005. This program, which started in 1996, was a joint activity sponsored by NASA, Air Force Research Laboratory, and industry contractors. The test program contained two flight test phases conducted in early 2003 and early 2005. During the first phase of flight test, aerodynamic models and load models of the wing control surfaces and wing structure were developed. Design teams built new research control laws for the Active Aeroelastic Wing airplane using these flight-validated models; and throughout the final phase of flight test, these new control laws were demonstrated. The control laws were designed to optimize strategies for moving the wing control surfaces to maximize roll rates in the transonic and supersonic flight regimes. Control surface hinge moments and wing loads were constrained to remain within hydraulic and load limits. This paper describes briefly the flight control system architecture as well as the design approach used by Active Aeroelastic Wing project engineers to develop flight control system gains. Additionally, this paper presents flight test techniques and comparison between flight test results and predictions.

  14. Celebrating 100 Years of Flight: Testing Wing Designs in Aircraft

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pugalee, David K.; Nusinov, Chuck; Giersch, Chris; Royster, David; Pinelli, Thomas E.

    2005-01-01

    This article describes an investigation involving several designs of airplane wings in trial flight simulations based on a NASA CONNECT program. Students' experiences with data collection and interpretation are highlighted. (Contains 5 figures.)

  15. Development and flight tests of a gyro-less wing leveler and directional autopilot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garner, H. D.; Poole, H. E.

    1974-01-01

    A gyro-less wing leveler and directional autopilot were developed and flight tested in a single-engine light airplane. The primary purpose of the project was to develop a simple, reliable, low-cost stability augmentation and autopilot system for light aircraft. The wing leveler used a fluidic inertial rate sensor, electronic signal processing circuitry, and vacuum operated servos. A strap-down magnetic heading reference of simple design provided the wing leveler with directional autopilot capability. Flight tests indicated that the performance of the gyro-less wing leveler was equal to that of a commercial wing leveler using a gyroscopic rate sensor. Drift-free, long-term, heading-hold capability of the magnetic heading reference was demonstrated.

  16. Flight test and numerical simulation of transonic flow around YAV-8B Harrier II wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gea, Lie-Mine; Chyu, Wei J.; Stortz, Michael W.; Roberts, Andrew C.; Chow, Chuen-Yen

    1991-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method is used to study the aerodynamics of the YAV-8B Harrier II wing in the transonic region. A numerical procedure is developed to compute the flow field around the complicated wing-pylon-fairing geometry. The surface definition of the wing and pylons were obtained from direct measurement using theodolite triangulation. A thin-layer Navier-Stokes code with the Chimera technique is used to compute flow solutions. The computed pressure distributions at several span stations are compared with flight test data and show good agreement. Computed results are correlated with flight test data that show the flow is severely separated in the vicinity of the wing-pylon junction. Analysis shows that shock waves are induced by pylon swaybrace fairings, that the flow separation is much stronger at the outboard pylon and that the separation is caused mainly by the crossflow passing the geometry of wing-pylon junction.

  17. Status and future plans of the Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing (DAST) program. [Aeroelastic Research Wing (ARW)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murrow, H. N.

    1981-01-01

    Results from flight tests of the ARW-1 research wing are presented. Preliminary loads data and experiences with the active control system for flutter suppression are included along with comparative results of test and prediction for the flutter boundary of the supercritical research wing and on performance of the flutter suppression system. The status of the ARW-2 research wing is given.

  18. Transonic wind tunnel test of a 14 percent thick oblique wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennelly, Robert A., Jr.; Kroo, Ilan M.; Strong, James M.; Carmichael, Ralph L.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted at the ARC 11- by 11-Foot Transonic Wind Tunnel as part of the Oblique Wing Research Aircraft Program to study the aerodynamic performance and stability characteristics of a 0.087-scale model of an F-8 airplane fitted with an oblique wing designed by Rockwell International. The 10.3 aspect ratio, straight-tapered wing of 0.14 thickness/chord ratio was tested at two different mounting heights above the fuselage. Additional tests were conducted to assess low-speed behavior with and without flaps, aileron effectiveness at representative flight conditions, and transonic drag divergence with 0 degree wing sweep. Longitudinal stability data were obtained at sweep angles of 0, 30, 45, 60, and 65 degrees, at Mach numbers ranging from 0.25 to 1.40. Test Reynolds numbers varied from 3.2 to 6.6 x 10 exp 6/ft. and angle of attack ranged from -5 to +18 degrees. Most data were taken at zero sideslip, but a few runs were at sideslip angles of +/- 5 degrees. The raised wing position proved detrimental overall, although side force and yawing moment were reduced at some conditions. Maximum lift coefficient with the flaps deflected was found to fall short of the value predicted in the preliminary design document. The performance and trim characteristics of the present wing are generally inferior to those obtained for a previously tested wing designed at ARC.

  19. A swept wing panel in a low speed flexible walled test section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodyer, M. J.

    1987-01-01

    The testing of two-dimensional airfoil sections in adaptive wall tunnels is relatively widespread and has become routine at all speeds up to transonic. In contrast, the experience with the three-dimensional testing of swept panels in adaptive wall test sections is very limited, except for some activity in the 1940's at NPL, London. The current interest in testing swept wing panels led to the work covered by this report, which describes the design of an adaptive-wall swept-wing test section for a low speed wind tunnel and gives test results for a wing panel swept at 40 deg. The test section has rigid flat sidewalls supporting the panel, and features flexible top and bottom wall with ribs swept at the same angle as the wing. When streamlined, the walls form waves swept at the same angle as the wing. The C sub L (-) curve for the swept wing, determined from its pressure distributions taken with the walls streamlined, compare well with reference data which was taken on the same model, unswept, in a test section deep enough to avoid wall interference.

  20. Wing pressure distributions from subsonic tests of a high-wing transport model. [in the Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Applin, Zachary T.; Gentry, Garl L., Jr.; Takallu, M. A.

    1995-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation was conducted on a generic, high-wing transport model in the Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel. This report contains pressure data that document effects of various model configurations and free-stream conditions on wing pressure distributions. The untwisted wing incorporated a full-span, leading-edge Krueger flap and a part-span, double-slotted trailing-edge flap system. The trailing-edge flap was tested at four different deflection angles (20 deg, 30 deg, 40 deg, and 60 deg). Four wing configurations were tested: cruise, flaps only, Krueger flap only, and high lift (Krueger flap and flaps deployed). Tests were conducted at free-stream dynamic pressures of 20 psf to 60 psf with corresponding chord Reynolds numbers of 1.22 x 10(exp 6) to 2.11 x 10(exp 6) and Mach numbers of 0.12 to 0.20. The angles of attack presented range from 0 deg to 20 deg and were determined by wing configuration. The angle of sideslip ranged from minus 20 deg to 20 deg. In general, pressure distributions were relatively insensitive to free-stream speed with exceptions primarily at high angles of attack or high flap deflections. Increasing trailing-edge Krueger flap significantly reduced peak suction pressures and steep gradients on the wing at high angles of attack. Installation of the empennage had no effect on wing pressure distributions. Unpowered engine nacelles reduced suction pressures on the wing and the flaps.

  1. Design, testing, and damage tolerance study of bonded stiffened composite wing cover panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madan, Ram C.; Sutton, Jason O.

    1988-01-01

    Results are presented from the application of damage tolerance criteria for composite panels to multistringer composite wing cover panels developed under NASA's Composite Transport Wing Technology Development contract. This conceptual wing design integrated aeroelastic stiffness constraints with an enhanced damage tolerance material system, in order to yield optimized producibility and structural performance. Damage tolerance was demonstrated in a test program using full-sized cover panel subcomponents; panel skins were impacted at midbay between stiffeners, directly over a stiffener, and over the stiffener flange edge. None of the impacts produced visible damage. NASTRAN analyses were performed to simulate NDI-detected invisible damage.

  2. Local Environment and Ground Simulating Test of Parachute Module Cap with Stabilizing Wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Guoting

    2002-01-01

    Local Environment and Ground Simulating Test of Parachute Module Cap with Stabilizing Wing protuberances on the windward surface of the return module, some conflict appeared during the design of the thermal protection cover for parachute modules. In this paper, an approach validated the thermal protection cover for parachute modules by carrying out simulating test of the stabilizing wing is developed, the test parameters and simulating principle are selected, and the simulating tests were conducted on large scale gas-dynamic arc heater facility. The result of ground simulating test is identical with the result of flying test very well.

  3. Flight control system development and flight test experience with the F-111 mission adaptive wing aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, R. R.

    1986-01-01

    The wing on the NASA F-111 transonic aircraft technology airplane was modified to provide flexible leading and trailing edge flaps. This wing is known as the mission adaptive wing (MAW) because aerodynamic efficiency can be maintained at all speeds. Unlike a conventional wing, the MAW has no spoilers, external flap hinges, or fairings to break the smooth contour. The leading edge flaps and three-segment trailing edge flaps are controlled by a redundant fly-by-wire control system that features a dual digital primary system architecture providing roll and symmetric commands to the MAW control surfaces. A segregated analog backup system is provided in the event of a primary system failure. This paper discusses the design, development, testing, qualification, and flight test experience of the MAW primary and backup flight control systems.

  4. Structural Testing of a Stitched/Resin Film Infused Graphite-Epoxy Wing Box

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jegley, Dawn C.; Bush, Harold G.

    2001-01-01

    The results of a series of tests conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center to evaluate the behavior of an all-composite full-scale wing box are presented. The wing box is representative of a section of a 220-passenger commercial transport aircraft wing box and was designed and constructed by The Boeing Company as part of the NASA Advanced Subsonics Technology (AST) program. The semi-span wing was fabricated from a graphite-epoxy material system with cover panels and spars held together using Kevlar stitches through the thickness. No mechanical fasteners were used to hold the stiffeners to the skin of the cover panels. Tests were conducted with and without low-speed impact damage, discrete source damage and repairs. Up-bending, down-bending and brake roll loading conditions were applied. The structure with non-visible impact damage carried 97% of Design Ultimate Load prior to failure through a lower cover panel access hole.

  5. Pressure Distributions from Subsonic Tests of a NACA 0012 Semispan Wing Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Applin, Zachary T.

    1995-01-01

    An unswept, semispan wing model incorporating a NACA 0012 airfoil section was tested in the Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel. This report contains pressure data which document effects of wing configuration and free-stream conditions on wing pressure distributions. The untwisted wing incorporated a full-span, leading-edge Krueger flap and a full-span, single-slotted trailing-edge flap. The trailing-edge flap was tested at a deflection angle of 40 degrees and the Krueger flap at a deflection of 55 degrees. Three wing configurations were tested: cruise, trailing-edge flap only, and Knueger flap and trailing-edge flap deployed. Tests were conducted at free-stream dynamic pressures of 15, 30 and 60 psf, with corresponding chord Reynolds numbers of 1.22 to 2.11 million and Mach numbers of 0.12 to 0.20. Angles of attack presented range from 0 to 20 degrees, depending on wing configuration. The data are presented without analysis.

  6. Tests of a Gust-Alleviating Wing in the Gust Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shufflebarger, C C

    1941-01-01

    Tests were made in the NACA gust tunnel to determine the effectiveness of a torsionally flexible wing with the torsion axis ahead of the locus of the section aerodynamic centers in reducing airplane accelerations due to atmospheric gusts. For three gust shapes, a series of flights was made with the airplane model equipped with either a torsionally flexible or a rigid wing. The results indicated that the torsionally flexible wing reduced the maximum acceleration increment 5 percent for the sharp-edge gust and about 17 percent for gust shapes with gradient distances of 6.8 and 15 chord lengths. The analysis indicated that the effectiveness of this method of gust alleviation was independent of the gust velocity and that, for the same total load increment, the torsionally flexible wing would have 10 percent less bending-moment increment at the root section of the wing than a rigid wing in all but the sharpest gusts. The results also indicated that the torsionally flexible wing slightly increased the longitudinal stability of the airplane model in a gust.

  7. Development and Testing of Control Laws for the Active Aeroelastic Wing Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dibley, Ryan P.; Allen, Michael J.; Clarke, Robert; Gera, Joseph; Hodgkinson, John

    2005-01-01

    The Active Aeroelastic Wing research program was a joint program between the U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory and NASA established to investigate the characteristics of an aeroelastic wing and the technique of using wing twist for roll control. The flight test program employed the use of an F/A-18 aircraft modified by reducing the wing torsional stiffness and adding a custom research flight control system. The research flight control system was optimized to maximize roll rate using only wing surfaces to twist the wing while simultaneously maintaining design load limits, stability margins, and handling qualities. NASA Dryden Flight Research Center developed control laws using the software design tool called CONDUIT, which employs a multi-objective function optimization to tune selected control system design parameters. Modifications were made to the Active Aeroelastic Wing implementation in this new software design tool to incorporate the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center nonlinear F/A-18 simulation for time history analysis. This paper describes the design process, including how the control law requirements were incorporated into constraints for the optimization of this specific software design tool. Predicted performance is also compared to results from flight.

  8. Design, Fabrication and Testing of a Passively Morphing Ornithopter Wing for Increased Lift and Agility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-13

    wings reduced the overall negative center of mass acceleration during one flapping cycle by 22 %. The negative acceleration reduction may translate ...design optimization algorithms for compliant spine.  Fabricated and integrated compliant spine into test ornithopters.  Measured the performance of...spar. Precedents set include largest flapping wing vehicle to fly in the facility with the most number of reflective markers.  Measured the

  9. Tests of Nacelle-Propeller Combinations in Various Positions with Reference to Wings II : Thick Wing - Various Radial-Engine Cowlings - Tractor Propeller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Donald H

    1932-01-01

    This report is the second of a series giving the results obtained in the 20-foot wind tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics on the interference drag and propulsive efficiency of nacelle-propeller-wing combinations. The first report gave the results of the test of a N.A.C.A. cowled air-cooled engine nacelle located in 21 positions with reference to a thick wing. The present report gives results of tests of a normal engine nacelle with several types of cowling and fairings in four of the positions with reference to the same wing. (author)

  10. Design and wind tunnel tests of winglets on a DC-10 wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilkey, R. D.

    1979-01-01

    Results are presented of a wind tunnel test utilizing a 4.7 percent scale semi-span model in the Langley Research Center 8-foot transonic pressure wind tunnel to establish the cruise drag improvement potential of winglets as applied to the DC-10 wide body transport aircraft. Winglets were investigated on both the DC-10 Series 10 (domestic) and 30/40 (intercontinental) configurations and compared with the Series 30/40 configuration. The results of the investigation confirm that for the DC-10 winglets provide approximately twice the cruise drag reduction of wing-tip extensions for about the same increase in bending moment at the wing fuselage juncture. Furthermore, the winglet configurations achieved drag improvements which were in close agreement to analytical estimates. It was observed that relatively small changes in wing-winglet tailoring effected large improvements in drag and visual flow characteristics. All final winglet configurations exhibited visual flow characteristics on the wing and winglets

  11. Computational design of low aspect ratio wing-winglets for transonic wind-tunnel testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhlman, John M.; Brown, Christopher K.

    1989-01-01

    A computational design has been performed for three different low aspect ratio wing planforms fitted with nonplanar winglets; one of the three planforms has been selected to be constructed as a wind tunnel model for testing in the NASA LaRC 7 x 10 High Speed Wind Tunnel. A design point of M = 0.8, CL approx = 0.3 was selected, for wings of aspect ratio equal to 2.2, and leading edge sweep angles of 45 and 50 deg. Winglet length is 15 percent of the wing semispan, with a cant angle of 15 deg, and a leading edge sweep of 50 deg. Winglet total area equals 2.25 percent of the wing reference area. This report summarizes the design process and the predicted transonic performance for each configuration.

  12. Computational design of low aspect ratio wing-winglet configurations for transonic wind-tunnel tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhlman, John M.; Brown, Christopher K.

    1988-01-01

    A computational design has been performed for three different low aspect ratio wing planforms fitted with nonplanar winglets; one of the three planforms has been selected to be constructed as a wind tunnel model for testing in the NASA LaRC 7 x 10 High Speed Wind Tunnel. A design point of M = 0.8, CL approx = 0.3 was selected, for wings of aspect ratio equal to 2.2, and leading edge sweep angles of 45 and 50 deg. Winglet length is 15 percent of the wing semispan, with a cant angle of 15 deg, and a leading edge sweep of 50 deg. Winglet total area equals 2.25 percent of the wing reference area. This report summarizes the design process and the predicted transonic performance for each configuration.

  13. Test and analysis results for composite transport fuselage and wing structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deaton, Jerry W.; Kullerd, Susan M.; Madan, Ram C.; Chen, Victor L.

    1992-01-01

    Automated tow placement (ATP) and stitching of dry textile composite preforms followed by resin transfer molding (RTM) are being studied as cost effective manufacturing processes for obtaining damage tolerant fuselage and wing structures for transport aircraft. Data are presented to assess the damage tolerance of ATP and RTM fuselage elements with stitched-on stiffeners from compression tests of impacted three J-stiffened panels and from stiffener pull-off tests. Data are also presented to assess the damage tolerance of RTM wing elements which had stitched skin and stiffeners from impacted single stiffener and three blade stiffened compression tests and stiffener pull-off tests.

  14. Test results at transonic speeds on a contoured over-the-wing propfan model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levin, Alan D.; Smeltzer, Donald B.; Smith, Ronald C.

    1986-01-01

    A semispan wing/body model with a powered highly loaded propeller has been tested to provide data on the propulsion installation drag of advanced propfan-powered aircraft. The model had a supercritical wing with a contoured over-the-wing nacelle. It was tested in the Ames Research Center's (ARC) 14-foot Transonic Wind Tunnel at a total pressure of 1 atm. The test was conducted at angles of attack from -0.5 to 4 deg at Mach numbers ranging from 0.6 to 0.8. The test objectives were to determine propeller performance, exhaust jet effects, propeller slipstream interference drag, and total powerplant installation drag. Test results indicated a total powerplant installation drag of 82 counts (0.0082) at a Mach number of 0.8 and a lift coefficient of 0.5, which is approximately 29 percent of a typical airplane cruise drag.

  15. Design, Development, and Testing of a Compound Wing V/TOL small UAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, Michael J.; Vranas, Thomas L.

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the development and testing of an innovative small UAS (Unmanned Aircraft System). The design of the vehicle was driven by the need to both have long endurance yet still have the convenience of V/TOL (Vertical Take-Off and Landing) operation. The paper discusses some of the design considerations and configurations evaluated in searching for a configuration that met the demanding mission requirements. The paper also discusses some aspects of the compound wing and experimental testing conducted to discern the optimum parameters for the wing's design. The paper discusses the results of the preliminary flight testing and outlines further research to be conducted.

  16. Strain Gage Loads Calibration Testing of the Active Aeroelastic Wing F/A-18 Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lokos, William A.; Olney, Candida D.; Chen, Tony; Crawford, Natalie D.; Stauf, Rick; Reichenbach, Eric Y.; Bessette, Denis (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This report describes strain-gage calibration loading through the application of known loads of the Active Aeroelastic Wing F/A-18 airplane. The primary goal of this test is to produce a database suitable for deriving load equations for left and right wing root and fold shear; bending moment; torque; and all eight wing control-surface hinge moments. A secondary goal is to produce a database of wing deflections measured by string potentiometers and the onboard flight deflection measurement system. Another goal is to produce strain-gage data through both the laboratory data acquisition system and the onboard aircraft data system as a check of the aircraft system. Thirty-two hydraulic jacks have applied loads through whiffletrees to 104 tension-compression load pads bonded to the lower wing surfaces. The load pads covered approximately 60 percent of the lower wing surface. A series of 72 load cases has been performed, including single-point, double-point, and distributed load cases. Applied loads have reached 70 percent of the flight limit load. Maximum wingtip deflection has reached nearly 16 in.

  17. Tests of Nacelle-Propeller Combinations in Various Positions with Reference to Wings III : Clark Y Wing - Various Radial-engine Cowlings - Tractor Propeller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Donald H

    1933-01-01

    This report is the third of a series giving the results obtained in the 20-foot wind tunnel on the interference drag, and propulsive efficiency of nacelle-propeller-wing combinations. The first report gave the results of the tests of an NACA cowled air-cooled engine nacelle with tractor propeller located in 21 positions with reference to a thick wing. The second report gave the results for several engine cowlings and nacelles with tractor propeller located in four positions with reference to same wing. The present report gives results of tests of the same nacelles and cowlings in the same positions with reference to a smaller wing of Clark y section. The lift, drag, and propulsive efficiency were determined at several angles of attack for each cowling and in each nacelle location.

  18. NASA rotor systems research aircraft: Fixed-wing configuration flight-test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, R. E.; Cross, J. L.; Kufeld, R. M.; Acree, C. W.; Nguyen, D.; Hodge, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    The fixed-wing, airplane configuration flight-test results of the Rotor System Research Aircraft (RSRA), NASA 740, at Ames/Dryden Flight Research Center are documented. Fourteen taxi and flight tests were performed from December 1983 to October 1984. This was the first time the RSRA was flown with the main rotor removed; the tail rotor was installed. These tests confirmed that the RSRA is operable as a fixed-wing aircraft. Data were obtained for various takeoff and landing distances, control sensitivity, trim and dynamics stability characteristics, performance rotor-hub drag, and acoustics signature. Stability data were obtained with the rotor hub both installed and removed. The speed envelope was developed to 261 knots true airspeed (KTAS), 226 knots calibrated airspeed (KCAS) at 10,000 ft density altitude. The airplane was configured at 5 deg. wing incidence with 5 deg. wing flaps as a normal configuration. Level-flight data were acquired at 167 KCAS for wing incidence from 0 to 10 deg. Step inputs and doublet inputs of various magnitudes were utilized to acquire dynamic stability and control sensitivity data. Sine-wave inputs of constantly increasing frequency were used to generate parameter identification data. The maximum load factor attained was 2.34 g at 206 KCAS.

  19. Generation of Fullspan Leading-Edge 3D Ice Shapes for Swept-Wing Aerodynamic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camello, Stephanie C.; Lee, Sam; Lum, Christopher; Bragg, Michael B.

    2016-01-01

    The deleterious effect of ice accretion on aircraft is often assessed through dry-air flight and wind tunnel testing with artificial ice shapes. This paper describes a method to create fullspan swept-wing artificial ice shapes from partial span ice segments acquired in the NASA Glenn Icing Reserch Tunnel for aerodynamic wind-tunnel testing. Full-scale ice accretion segments were laser scanned from the Inboard, Midspan, and Outboard wing station models of the 65% scale Common Research Model (CRM65) aircraft configuration. These were interpolated and extrapolated using a weighted averaging method to generate fullspan ice shapes from the root to the tip of the CRM65 wing. The results showed that this interpolation method was able to preserve many of the highly three dimensional features typically found on swept-wing ice accretions. The interpolated fullspan ice shapes were then scaled to fit the leading edge of a 8.9% scale version of the CRM65 wing for aerodynamic wind-tunnel testing. Reduced fidelity versions of the fullspan ice shapes were also created where most of the local three-dimensional features were removed. The fullspan artificial ice shapes and the reduced fidelity versions were manufactured using stereolithography.

  20. Pressure Distribution on a Wing Section with Slotted Flap in Free Flight Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiel, Georg

    1937-01-01

    The pressure distribution was measured in flight on a wing section with a slotted flap for several flap deflections, and the results obtained are presented. The test apparatus and the procedure employed in obtaining the results are also described. A Fieseler type F 5 R airplane was used for the tests.

  1. Results of design studies and wind tunnel tests of high-aspect-ratio supercritical wings for an energy efficient transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steckel, D. K.; Dahlin, J. A.; Henne, P. A.

    1980-01-01

    These basic characteristics of critical wings included wing area, aspect ratio, average thickness, and sweep as well as practical constraints on the planform and thickness near the wing root to allow for the landing gear. Within these constraints, a large matrix of wing designs was studied with spanwise variations in the types of airfoils and distribution of lift as well as some small planform changes. The criteria by which the five candidate wings were chosen for testing were the cruise and buffet characteristics in the transonic regime and the compatibility of the design with low speed (high-lift) requirements. Five wing-wide-body configurations were tested in the NASA Ames 11-foot transonic wind tunnel. Nacelles and pylons, flap support fairings, tail surfaces, and an outboard aileron were also tested on selected configurations.

  2. DARPA/AFRL Smart Wing Phase 2 wind tunnel test results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherer, Lewis B.; Martin, C. A.; Sanders, Brian P.; West, Mark N.; Pinkerton-Florance, Jennifer L.; Wieseman, Carol D.; Burner, Alpheus W.; Fleming, Gary A.

    2002-07-01

    Northrop Grumman Corporation built and twice tested a 30 percent scale wind tunnel model of a proposed uninhabited combat air vehicle under the DARPA/AFRL Smart Materials and Structures Development - Smart Wing Phase 2 program to demonstrate the applicability of smart control surfaces on advanced aircraft configurations. The model constructed was a full span, sting mounted model with smart leading and trailing edge control surfaces on the right wing and conventional, hinged trailing edge control surfaces on the left wing. Among the performance benefits that were quantified were increased pitching moment, increased rolling moment and improved pressure distribution of the smart wing over the conventional wing. This paper present an overview of the result from the wind tunnel test performed at NASA Langley Research Center's Transonic Dynamic Tunnel in March 2000 and May 2001. Successful results included: (1) improved aileron effectiveness at high dynamic pressures, (2) demonstrated improvements in lateral and longitudinal effectiveness with smooth contoured smart trailing edge over conventional hinged control surfaces, (3) chordwise and spanwise shape control of the smart trailing edge control surface, and (4) smart trailing edge control surface deflection rates over 80 deg/sec.

  3. Apex wing section undergoing loading test preparation by Mark Nunnelee and Eliseo Sanchez

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Mark Nunnelee and Eliseo Sanchez prepare an Apex wing section for load tests. The Apex High-Altitude Flight Experiment is expected to explore the aerodynamics of controlled flight at very high altitudes near 100,000 feet. The Apex will be hoisted aloft tail-first from Dryden by a large high-altitude balloon and released at about 110,000-feet altitude. As it gradually descends, its instrumentation will collect aerodynamic data. The remotely-piloted, semi-autonomous Apex will combine a modified ASC sailplane fuselage design with a new wing designed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The wing will have a special airfoil designed for high subsonic speeds at extreme altitudes. A device extending behind the right wing is a 'wake rake,' which will measure aerodynamic drag behind a test section of the wing, while a rocket pack mounted beneath the fuselage will assist the Apex in transitioning to horizontal flight. Research flights were expected to begin in mid-1998, but a series of technical problems delayed them. In the spring of 1999, Apex entered mothball status. This continued for a year, and in the spring of 2000 NASA selected Apex as part of phase 1 of the Revolutionary Concepts effort.

  4. Free-Spinning Wind-Tunnel Tests of a Low-Wing Monoplane with Systematic Changes in Wings and Tails IV : Effect of Center-of-Gravity Location

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidman, Oscar; Neihouse, A I

    1939-01-01

    Eight wings and three tails, covering a wide range of aerodynamic characteristics, were independently ballasted so as to be interchangeable with no change in mass distribution. For each of the 24 resulting wing-tail combinations, observations were made of the steady spin for four control settings and of recoveries for five control manipulations. The results are presented in the form of charts comparing the spin characteristics. The tests are part of a general investigation being made in the NACA free-spinning tunnel to determine the effects of systematic changes in wing and tail arrangement upon the steady-spin and the recovery characteristics of a conventional low-wing monoplane for various load distributions.

  5. Fiber Optic Wing Shape Sensing on NASA's Ikhana UAV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, Lance; Parker, Allen R.; Ko, William L.; Piazza, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    This document discusses the development of fiber optic wing shape sensing on NASA's Ikhana vehicle. The Dryden Flight Research Center's Aerostructures Branch initiated fiber-optic instrumentation development efforts in the mid-1990s. Motivated by a failure to control wing dihedral resulting in a mishap with the Helios aircraft, new wing displacement techniques were developed. Research objectives for Ikhana included validating fiber optic sensor measurements and real-time wing shape sensing predictions; the validation of fiber optic mathematical models and design tools; assessing technical viability and, if applicable, developing methodology and approaches to incorporate wing shape measurements within the vehicle flight control system; and, developing and flight validating approaches to perform active wing shape control using conventional control surfaces and active material concepts.

  6. Composite transport wing technology development: Design development tests and advanced structural concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Charles F.; Harvill, William E.

    1988-01-01

    Numerous design concepts, materials, and manufacturing methods were investigated for the covers and spars of a transport box wing. Cover panels and spar segments were fabricated and tested to verify the structural integrity of design concepts and fabrication techniques. Compression tests on stiffened panels demonstrated the ability of graphite/epoxy wing upper cover designs to achieve a 35 percent weight savings compared to the aluminum baseline. The impact damage tolerance of the designs and materials used for these panels limits the allowable compression strain and therefore the maximum achievable weight savings. Bending and shear tests on various spar designs verified an average weight savings of 37 percent compared to the aluminum baseline. Impact damage to spar webs did not significantly degrade structural performance. Predictions of spar web shear instability correlated well with measured performance. The structural integrity of spars manufactured by filament winding equalled or exceeded those fabricated by hand lay-up. The information obtained will be applied to the design, fabrication, and test of a full-scale section of a wing box. When completed, the tests on the technology integration box beam will demonstrate the structural integrity of an advanced composite wing design which is 25 percent lighter than the metal baseline.

  7. Performance and loads data from a hover test of a 0.658-scale V-22 rotor and wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felker, Fort F.; Signor, David B.; Young, Larry A.; Betzina, Mark D.

    1987-01-01

    A hover test of a 0.658-scale model of a V-22 rotor and wing was conducted at the Outdoor Aerodynamic Research Facility at Ames Research Center. The primary objectives of the test were to obtain accurate measurements of the hover performance of the rotor system, and to measure the aerodynamic interactions between the rotor and wing. Data were acquired for rotor tip Mach numbers ranging from 0.1 to 0.73. This report presents data on rotor performance, rotor-wake downwash velocities, rotor system loads, wing forces and moments, and wing surface pressures.

  8. Construction, wind tunnel testing and data analysis for a 1/5 scale ultra-light wing model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Michael D.; Smith, Howard W.

    1993-01-01

    This report documents the construction, wind tunnel testing, and data analysis of a 1/5 scale ultra-light wing section. Wind tunnel testing provided accurate and meaningful lift, drag, and pitching moment data. This data was processed and graphically presented as follows: C(sub L) vs. gamma; C(sub D) vs. gamma; C(sub M) vs. gamma; and C(sub L) vs. C(sub D). The wing fabric flexure was found to be significant and its possible effects on aerodynamic data was discussed. The fabric flexure is directly related to wing angle of attack and airspeed. Different wing section shapes created by fabric flexure are presented with explanations of the types of pressures that act upon the wing surface. This report provides conclusive aerodynamic data for ultra-light wings.

  9. Free-Spinning Wind-Tunnel Tests of a Low-Wing Monoplane with Systematic Changes in Wings and Tails V : Effect of Airplane Relative Density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidman, Oscar; Neihouse, A I

    1940-01-01

    The reported tests are a continuation of an NACA investigation being made in the free-spinning wind tunnel to determine the effects of independent variations in load distribution, wing and tail arrangement, and control disposition on the spin characteristics of airplanes. The standard series of tests was repeated to determine the effect of airplane relative density. Tests were made at values of the relative-density parameter of 6.8, 8.4 (basic), and 12.0; and the results were analyzed. The tested variations in the relative-density parameter may be considered either as variations in the wing loading of an airplane spun at a given altitude, with the radii of gyration kept constant, or as a variation of the altitude at which the spin takes place for a given airplane. The lower values of the relative-density parameter correspond to the lower wing loadings or to the lower altitudes of the spin.

  10. Computational design of low aspect ratio wing-winglet configurations for transonic wind-tunnel tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhlman, John M.; Brown, Christopher K.

    1989-01-01

    Computational designs were performed for three different low aspect ratio wing planforms fitted with nonplanar winglets; one of the three configurations was selected to be constructed as a wind tunnel model for testing in the NASA LaRC 8-foot transonic pressure tunnel. A design point of M = 0.8, C(sub L) is approximate or = to 0.3 was selected, for wings of aspect ratio equal to 2.2, and leading edge sweep angles of 45 deg and 50 deg. Winglet length is 15 percent of the wing semispan, with a cant angle of 15 deg, and a leading edge sweep of 50 deg. Winglet total area equals 2.25 percent of the wing reference area. The design process and the predicted transonic performance are summarized for each configuration. In addition, a companion low-speed design study was conducted, using one of the transonic design wing-winglet planforms but with different camber and thickness distributions. A low-speed wind tunnel model was constructed to match this low-speed design geometry, and force coefficient data were obtained for the model at speeds of 100 to 150 ft/sec. Measured drag coefficient reductions were of the same order of magnitude as those predicted by numerical subsonic performance predictions.

  11. Flutter analysis and testing of pairs of aerodynamically interfering delta wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chipman, R. R.; Rauch, F. J.

    1973-01-01

    To examine the effect on flutter of the aerodynamic interference between pairs of closely spaced delta wings, several structurally uncoupled 1/80th-scale models were studied by experiment and analysis. Flutter test boundaries run in a 26-in transonic blowdown wind tunnel were compared with subsonic analytical results generated using the doublet lattice method. Trends for several combinations of vertical and longitudinal wing separation showed that flutter speeds can be significantly lowered in closely spaced configurations. For some configurations, a new flutter mechanism, characterized by coupling of the flexible modes from both surfaces at a distinctive flutter frequency, was predicted and observed.

  12. Ground simulation and tunnel blockage for a swept, jet-flapped wing tested to very high lift coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hackett, J. E.; Boles, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    Ground effects experiments and large/small tunnel interference studies were carried out on a model with a 20 inch (50.8 cm) 25 degree swept wing. The wing is slatted, has a 60 degree knee-blown flap and can be fitted with unflapped tips. A tail rake of pitch-yaw probes can be fitted to the fuselage. Certain check tests were also made with a very similar straight-wing model.

  13. Residual strength and crack propagation tests on C-130 airplane center wings with service-imposed fatigue damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snider, H. L.; Reeder, F. L.; Dirkin, W. J.

    1972-01-01

    Fourteen C-130 airplane center wings, each containing service-imposed fatigue damage resulting from 4000 to 13,000 accumulated flight hours, were tested to determine their fatigue crack propagation and static residual strength characteristics. Eight wings were subjected to a two-step constant amplitude fatigue test prior to static testing. Cracks up to 30 inches long were generated in these tests. Residual static strengths of these wings ranged from 56 to 87 percent of limit load. The remaining six wings containing cracks up to 4 inches long were statically tested as received from field service. Residual static strengths of these wings ranged from 98 to 117 percent of limit load. Damage-tolerant structural design features such as fastener holes, stringers, doublers around door cutouts, and spanwise panel splices proved to be effective in retarding crack propagation.

  14. High-Speed Tests of a Model Twin-Engine Low-Wing Transport Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, John V; LEONARD LLOYD H

    1942-01-01

    Report presents the results of force tests made of a 1/8-scale model of a twin-engine low-wing transport airplane in the NACA 8-foot high-speed tunnel to investigate compressibility and interference effects of speeds up to 450 miles per hour. In addition to tests of the standard arrangement of the model, tests were made with several modifications designed to reduce the drag and to increase the critical speed.

  15. Structural tests and development of a laminar flow control wing surface composite chordwise joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lineberger, L. B.

    1984-01-01

    The dramatic increases in fuel costs and the potential for periods of limited fuel availability provided the impetus to explore technologies to reduce transport aircraft fuel consumption. NASA sponsored the Aircraft Energy Efficiency (ACEE) program beginning in 1976 to develop technologies to improve fuel efficiency. The Lockheed-Georgia Company accomplished under NAS1-16235 Laminar-Flow-Control (LFC) Wing Panel Structural Design and Development (WSSD); design, manufacturing, and testing activities. An in-depth preliminary design of the baseline 1993 LFC wing was accomplished. A surface panel using the Lockheed graphite/epoxy integrated LFC wing box structural concept was designed. The concept was shown by analysis to be structurally efficient and cost effective. Critical details of the surface and surface joint was demonstrated by fabricating and testing complex, concept selection specimens. The Lockheed-Georgia Company accomplishments, Development of LFC Wind Surface Composite Structures (WSCS), are documented. Tests were conducted on two CV2 panels to verify the static tension and fatigue strength of LFC wing surface chordwise joints.

  16. Lightning protection design and testing of an all composite wet wing for the Egrett

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burrows, B. J. C.; Haigh, S. J.; Chessum, C.; Dunkley, V. P.

    1991-01-01

    The Egrett aircraft has an all composite wing comprising CFC(carbon fiber composite)/Nomex sandwich skins, full length CFC main spar caps, and GFRP (glass fiber reinforced plastics) main and auxiliary spar webs. It also has short inboard CFC auxiliary spar caps. It has fine aluminum wires woven into the surface for protection. It has an integral fuel tank using the CFC/Nomex skins as the upper and lower tank walls, and lies between the forward auxiliary spar and the forward of the two main spar webs. The fuel tank is not bagged, i.e., it is in effect a wet wing tank. It has conventional capacitive type fuel gauging. The aircraft was cleared to IFR standards and so required full lightning protection and demonstration that it would survive the lightning environment. The lightning protection was designed for the wing (and also for the remainder of the aircraft). An inner wing test samples (which included a part of the fuel tank) were tested as part of the proving program. The protection design and the testing process are described. The intrinsic structural features are indicated that improve lightning protection design and which therefore minimize the weight and cost of any added lightning protection components.

  17. Structural loads testing on the Active Aeroelastic Wing F-18 in the Flight Loads Laboratory at NASA'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Structural loads testing on the Active Aeroelastic Wing F-18 in the Flight Loads Laboratory at NASA's Dryden flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The heavily modified and instrumented F-18A entered the Loads Lab in mid-March, 2001, for fit checks of loads hardware and instrumentation checkout prior to initiation of actual structural loads testing. The F-18A underwent loads testing on its modified wings for almost six months, followed by extensive systems tests and simulation before flight tests began.

  18. Convergent Aeronautics Solutions (CAS) Showcase Presentation on Mission Adaptive Digital Composite Aerostructure Technologies (MADCAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swei, Sean; Cheung, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    This project is to develop a novel aerostructure concept that takes advantage of emerging digital composite materials and manufacturing methods to build high stiffness-to-density ratio, ultra-light structures that can provide mission adaptive and aerodynamically efficient future N+3N+4 air vehicles.

  19. A Coupled-Adjoint Method for High-Fidelity Aero-Structural Optimization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-10-01

    geometry engine, and an efficient gradient-based optimization algorithm. The aero-structural solver ensures accurate solutions by using high-fidelity...22 2.3.1 Geometry Engine and Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 2.3.2 Displacement Transfer...86 5-6 Airfoil geometry at the root. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 5-7 Airfoil geometry at mid semi-span

  20. Test and analysis results for composite transport fuselage and wing structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deaton, Jerry W.; Kullerd, Susan M.; Madan, Ram C.; Chen, Victor L.

    1992-01-01

    Automated tow placement (ATP) and stitching of dry textile composite preforms followed by resin transfer molding (RTM) are being investigated by researchers at NASA LaRC and Douglas Aircraft Company as cost-effective manufacturing processes for obtaining damage tolerant fuselage and wing structures for transport aircraft. The Douglas work is being performed under a NASA contract entitled 'Innovative Composites Aircraft Primary Structures (ICAPS)'. Data are presented in this paper to assess the damage tolerance of ATP and RTM fuselage elements with stitched-on stiffeners from compression tests of impacted three-J-stiffened panels and from stiffener pull-off tests. Data are also presented to assess the damage tolerance of RTM wing elements which had stitched skin and stiffeners from impacted single stiffener and three blade-stiffened compression tests and stiffener pull-off tests.

  1. Configuration design studies and wind tunnel tests of an energy efficient transport with a high-aspect-ratio supercritical wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henne, P. A.; Dahlin, J. A.; Peavey, C. C.; Gerren, D. S.

    1982-01-01

    The results of design studies and wind tunnel tests of high aspect ratio supercritical wings suitable for a medium range, narrow body transport aircraft flying near M=0.80 were presented. The basic characteristics of the wing design were derived from system studies of advanced transport aircraft where detailed structural and aerodynamic tradeoffs were used to determine the most optimum design from the standpoint of fuel usage and direct operating cost. These basic characteristics included wing area, aspect ratio, average thickness, and sweep. The detailed wing design was accomplished through application of previous test results and advanced computational transonic flow procedures. In addition to the basic wing/body development, considerable attention was directed to nacelle/plyon location effects, horizontal tail effects, and boundary layer transition effects. Results of these tests showed that the basic cruise performance objectives were met or exceeded.

  2. Multi-objective optimization of aerostructures inspired by nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearney, Adam C.

    The focus of this doctoral work is on the optimization of aircraft wing structures. The optimization was performed against the shape, size and topology of simple aircraft wing designs. A simple morphing wing actuator optimization is performed as well as a wing panel buckling topology optimization. This is done with biologically-inspired mathematical systems including a map L-system, a multi-objective genetic algorithm, and cellular structures represented by Voronoi diagrams. As with most aircraft optimizations, both studies aim to minimize the total weight of a wing while simultaneously meeting stiffness and strength requirements. Optimization is performed with the scripts developed in MATLAB as well as through the use of finite element codes, NASTRAN and LS-Dyna. The intent of this methodology is to develop unique designs inspired by nature and optimized through natural selection. The optimal designs are those with minimal weight as well as additional requirements specific to the problems. The designs and methodology have the potential to be of use in determining minimum weight designs in aircraft structures. A literature review of optimization techniques, methodology and method validation, and optimization comparisons is presented. The buckling panel optimization considered here also includes composite buckling failure and manufacturing assumptions for composite panels. The panels are optimized for mass and strength by controlling the laminate stacking sequence, stiffener size, and topology. The morphing wing is optimized for actuator loading and redundancy.

  3. Interference of Wing and Fuselage from Tests of 209 Combinations in the NACA Variable-Density Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, Eastman N; Ward, Kenneth E

    1936-01-01

    This report presents the results of tests of 209 simple wing-fuselage combinations made in the NACA variable-density wind tunnel to provide information regarding the effects of aerodynamic interference between wings and fuselages at a large value of Reynolds number.

  4. Analysis and testing of the Diamond One wing anti-icing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeoman, K. E.

    1985-01-01

    The Diamond One wing leading edge is protected against ice accretions by a bleed air anti-icing system. Three cross-sections selected for computer modeling considered the thermal mechanisms of convection, conduction, evaporation and sensible heating of impinged and runback water. With an instrumented aircraft, the model was refined using dry air and above freezing cloud flight test data. The refined model was exercised for wing surface temperature predictions for six critical icing conditions and found safe for natural icing flight testing. Measured natural icing test data was then inserted into the model to compare predicted vs. measured temperatures. Correlation was achieved and the system was accepted by FAA as safe for flight into known icing conditions.

  5. Design and fabrication of an augmentor wing model for acoustic tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, J.; Schedin, R. W.; Campbell, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    The design and fabrication of a full-scale section of an augmentor wing to be used for acoustic testing at the Lewis Research Center are discussed. This hardware will be used primarily to investigate scaling effects of acoustic data obtained during the Boeing-run model tests. Typical model test data is shown in the report, together with predictions on both performance and acoustics that can be expected from the full-scale section to be built. Areas covered include: the aerodynamic and acoustic criteria of the flap system and nozzles, detailed discussion of the hardware, test system operation procedure, and stress analysis of the entire test system.

  6. Interacting stress concentration factors and their effect on fatigue of metallic aerostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitley, David Warren

    During fabrication of certain aerostructure components, a situation can arise where a hole is mislocated so that it interferes with a radius, chem-mill step, machined step, or some other similar detail. The interaction of stress concentration effects between a hole and step are not well understood and the resulting impact on fatigue performance is difficult to predict. There exists a need for fatigue data that can be used to determine the analysis methods for evaluation of the interaction of machined steps and fastener holes. In this dissertation, the effect of stress concentrations placed in close proximity to each other and their impact on fatigue performance is studied. Unique cases of interaction between a hole and radius are analyzed. Physical testing and finite element analysis methods are used to derive thestress concentration factor (SCF, Kt) modification factors (Ktf ) for open hole and joint assembly structures. The most conservative factors derived are recommended for use in fatigue analysis for these instances of holes located at or near radii. The SCF mod factors increase as distance between the hole and radius tangent decreased. For associated geometry, loading and materials similar to those presented within this research, a Ktf value of 1.22 is suggested for use in fatigue analysis of these situations of holes intersecting a radius.Kt and Ktf values have a significant effect on fatigue lifetimes and resulting fatigue margins of safety. Based on a pass/fail experiment, the corrosion specimen passed the test as no fatigue cracking failures associated with the bolt in radius condition were observed.

  7. Ground and Flight Test Structural Excitation Using Piezoelectric Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voracek, David F.; Reaves, Mercedes C.; Horta, Lucas G.; Potter, Starr; Richwine, David (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A flight flutter experiment at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, used an 18-inch half-span composite model called the Aerostructures Test Wing (ATW). The ATW was mounted on a centerline flight test fixture on the NASA F-15B and used distributed piezoelectric strain actuators for in-flight structural excitation. The main focus of this paper is to investigate the performance of the piezoelectric actuators and test their ability to excite the first-bending and first-torsion modes of the ATW on the ground and in-flight. On the ground, wing response resulting from piezoelectric and impact excitation was recorded and compared. The comparison shows less than a 1-percent difference in modal frequency and a 3-percent increase in damping. A comparison of in-flight response resulting from piezoelectric excitation and atmospheric turbulence shows that the piezoelectric excitation consistently created an increased response in the wing throughout the flight envelope tested. The data also showed that to obtain a good correlation between the piezoelectric input and the wing accelerometer response, the input had to be nearly 3.5 times greater than the turbulence excitation on the wing.

  8. NASA Langley Distributed Propulsion VTOL Tilt-Wing Aircraft Testing, Modeling, Simulation, Control, and Flight Test Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothhaar, Paul M.; Murphy, Patrick C.; Bacon, Barton J.; Gregory, Irene M.; Grauer, Jared A.; Busan, Ronald C.; Croom, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Control of complex Vertical Take-Off and Landing (VTOL) aircraft traversing from hovering to wing born flight mode and back poses notoriously difficult modeling, simulation, control, and flight-testing challenges. This paper provides an overview of the techniques and advances required to develop the GL-10 tilt-wing, tilt-tail, long endurance, VTOL aircraft control system. The GL-10 prototype's unusual and complex configuration requires application of state-of-the-art techniques and some significant advances in wind tunnel infrastructure automation, efficient Design Of Experiments (DOE) tunnel test techniques, modeling, multi-body equations of motion, multi-body actuator models, simulation, control algorithm design, and flight test avionics, testing, and analysis. The following compendium surveys key disciplines required to develop an effective control system for this challenging vehicle in this on-going effort.

  9. Low-speed wind tunnel test results of the Canard Rotor/Wing concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bass, Steven M.; Thompson, Thomas L.; Rutherford, John W.; Swanson, Stephen

    1993-01-01

    The Canard Rotor/Wing (CRW), a high-speed rotorcraft concept, was tested at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Ames Research Center's 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel in Mountain View, California. The 1/5-scale model was tested to identify certain low-speed, fixed-wing, aerodynamic characteristics of the configuration and investigate the effectiveness of two empennages, an H-Tail and a T-Tail. The paper addresses the principal test objectives and the results achieved in the wind tunnel test. These are summarized as: i) drag build-up and differences between the H-Tail and T-Tail configuration, ii) longitudinal stability of the H-Tail and T-Tail configurations in the conversion and cruise modes, iii) control derivatives for the canard and elevator in the conversion and cruise modes, iv) aerodynamic characteristics of varying the rotor/wing azimuth position, and v) canard and tail lift/trim capability for conversion conditions.

  10. Static performance and noise tests on a thrust reverser for an augmentor wing aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harkonen, D. L.; Marrs, C. C.; Okeefe, J. V.

    1974-01-01

    A 1/3 scale model static test program was conducted to measure the noise levels and reverse thrust performance characteristics of wing-mounted thrust reverser that could be used on an advanced augmentor wing airplane. The configuration tested represents only the most fundamental designs where installation and packaging restraints are not considered. The thrust reverser performance is presented in terms of horizontal, vertical, and resultant effectiveness ratios and the reverser noise is compared on the basis of peak perceived noise level (PNL) and one-third octave band data (OASPL). From an analysis of the model force and acoustic data, an assessment is made on the stopping distance versus noise for a 90,900 kg (200,000 lb) airplane using this type of thrust reverser.

  11. Designing and Testing a Blended Wing Body with Boundary Layer Ingestion Nacelles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Melissa B.; Campbell, Richard L.; Pendergraft, Odis C.; Underwood, Pamela J.; Friedman, Douglas M.; Serrano, Leonel

    2006-01-01

    A knowledge-based aerodynamic design method coupled with an unstructured grid Navier-Stokes flow solver was used to improve the propulsion/airframe integration for a Blended Wing Body with boundary-layer ingestion nacelles. A new zonal design capability was used that significantly reduced the time required to achieve a successful design for each nacelle and the elevon between them. A wind tunnel model was built with interchangeable parts reflecting the baseline and redesigned configurations and tested in the National Transonic Facility (NTF). Most of the testing was done at the cruise design conditions (Mach number = 0.85, Reynolds number = 75 million). In general, the predicted improvements in forces and moments as well as the changes in wing pressures between the baseline and redesign were confirmed by the wind tunnel results. The effectiveness of elevons between the nacelles was also predicted surprisingly well considering the crudeness in the modeling of the control surfaces in the flow code.

  12. Computational Test Cases for a Rectangular Supercritical Wing Undergoing Pitching Oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Robert M.; Walker, Charlotte E.

    1999-01-01

    Proposed computational test cases have been selected from the data set for a rectangular wing of panel aspect ratio two with a twelve-percent-thick supercritical airfoil section that was tested in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel. The test cases include parametric variation of static angle of attack, pitching oscillation frequency, and Mach numbers from subsonic to transonic with strong shocks. Tables and plots of the measured pressures are presented for each case. This report provides an early release of test cases that have been proposed for a document that supplements the cases presented in AGARD Report 702.

  13. Development of Environmental Profiles for Testing Equipment Installed in Naval Aircraft (Fixed Wing).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-02-01

    Ideetlip by Week usMinAe) This study was undertaken to provide supplementary documentation to assist users when applying MIL- STD -781C requirements for...modification of Appendix B, MIL- STD -781C to assure compati- 46 bility with naval aircraft applications; a sample test profile derived from each mission...MIL- STD -781C requirements for electronic equipment installed in naval fixed- wing aircraft. This standard adopted the concept of "mission analog

  14. Blended-Wing-Body Low-Speed Flight Dynamics: Summary of Ground Tests and Sample Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vicroy, Dan D.

    2009-01-01

    A series of low-speed wind tunnel tests of a Blended-Wing-Body tri-jet configuration to evaluate the low-speed static and dynamic stability and control characteristics over the full envelope of angle of attack and sideslip are summarized. These data were collected for use in simulation studies of the edge-of-the-envelope and potential out-of-control flight characteristics. Some selected results with lessons learned are presented.

  15. Low speed wind tunnel test of a propulsive wing/canard concept in the STOL configuration. Volume 2: Test data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, V. R.

    1987-01-01

    A propulsive wind/canard model was tested at STOL operating conditions in the NASA Langley Research Center 4 x 7 meter wind tunnel. Longitudinal and lateral/directional aerodynamic characteristics were measured for various flap deflections, angles of attack and sideslip, and blowing coefficients. Testing was conducted for several model heights to determine ground proximity effects on the aerodynamic characteristics. Flow field surveys of local flow angles and velocities were performed behind both the canard and the wing. This is volume 2 of a 2 volume report. All of the test data in three appendices are presented. Appendix A presented tabulated six component force and moment data, Appendix B presents tabulated wing pressure coefficients, and Appendix C presents the flow field data.

  16. Tests of Round and Flat Spoilers on a Tapered Wing in the NACA 19-Foot Pressure Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzinger, Carl J; Bowen, John D

    1941-01-01

    Several arrangements of round and flat spanwise spoilers attached to the upper surface of a tapered wing were tested in the NACA 19-foot pressure wind tunnel to determine the most effective type, location, and size of spoiler necessary to reduce greatly the lift on the wings of large flying boats when moored. The effect of the various spoilers on the lift, the drag, and the pitching-moment characteristics of the tapered wing was measured over a range of angles of attack from zero to maximum lift. The most effective type of spoiler was found to be the flat type with no space between it and the wing surface. The chordwise location of such a spoiler was not critical within the range investigated, from 5 to 20 percent of the wing chord from the leading edge.

  17. Structural Test Documentation and Results for the McDonnell Douglas All-Composite Wing Stub Box

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jegley, Dawn C.; Bush, Harold G.

    1997-01-01

    The results of a series of tests conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center to evaluate the behavior of an all-composite full-scale wing box are presented. The wing stub box is representative of a section of a commercial transport aircraft wing box and was designed and constructed by McDonnell Douglas Aerospace Company as part of the NASA Advanced Composites Technology (ACT) program. Tests were conducted with and without low-speed impact damage and repairs. The structure with nonvisible impact damage carried 140 percent of Design Limit Load prior to failure through an impact site.

  18. Test and Analysis Correlation of Form Impact onto Space Shuttle Wing Leading Edge RCC Panel 8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasanella, Edwin L.; Lyle, Karen H.; Gabrys, Jonathan; Melis, Matthew; Carney, Kelly

    2004-01-01

    Soon after the Columbia Accident Investigation Board (CAIB) began their study of the space shuttle Columbia accident, "physics-based" analyses using LS-DYNA were applied to characterize the expected damage to the Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) leading edge from high-speed foam impacts. Forensic evidence quickly led CAIB investigators to concentrate on the left wing leading edge RCC panels. This paper will concentrate on the test of the left-wing RCC panel 8 conducted at Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) and the correlation with an LS-DYNA analysis. The successful correlation of the LS-DYNA model has resulted in the use of LS-DYNA as a predictive tool for characterizing the threshold of damage for impacts of various debris such as foam, ice, and ablators onto the RCC leading edge for shuttle return-to-flight.

  19. Natural laminar flow wing for supersonic conditions: Wind tunnel experiments, flight test and stability computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeersch, Olivier; Yoshida, Kenji; Ueda, Yoshine; Arnal, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    In the framework of next supersonic transport airplane generation, the Japan Aerospace eXploration Agency (JAXA) has developed a new natural laminar flow highly swept wing. The design has been experimentally validated firstly in a supersonic wind tunnel and secondly accomplishing flight test. These experimental data were then analyzed and completed by numerical stability analyses in a joint research program between Onera and JAXA. At the design condition, for a Mach number M=2 at an altitude of h=18 km, results have confirmed the laminar design of the wing due to a strong attenuation of cross-flow instabilities ensuring an extended laminar zone. As the amplification of disturbances inside the boundary layer and transition process is very sensitive to external parameters, the impact of wall roughness of the models and the influence of Reynolds number on transition process have been carefully analyzed.

  20. DARPA/ARFL/NASA Smart Wing second wind tunnel test results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherer, Lewis B.; Martin, Christopher A.; West, Mark N.; Florance, Jennifer P.; Wieseman, Carol D.; Burner, Alpheus W.; Fleming, Gary A.

    1999-07-01

    To quantify the benefits of smart materials and structures adaptive wing technology. Northrop Grumman Corp. built and tested two 16 percent scale wind tunnel models of a fighter/attach aircraft under the DARPA/AFRL/NASA Smart Materials and Structures Development - Smart Wing Phase 1. Performance gains quantified included increased pitching moment, increased rolling moment and improved pressure distribution. The benefits were obtained for hingeless, contoured trailing edge control surfaces with embedded shape memory alloy wires and spanwise wing twist effected by SMA torque tube mechanism, compared to convention hinged control surfaces. This paper presents an overview of the results from the second wind tunnel test performed at the NASA Langley Research Center's 16 ft Transonic Dynamic Tunnel in June 1998. Successful results obtained were: 1) 5 degrees of spanwise twist and 8-12 percent increase in rolling moment utilizing a single SMA torque tube, 2) 12 degrees of deflection, and 10 percent increase in rolling moment due to hingeless, contoured aileron, and 3) demonstration of optical techniques for measuring spanwise twist and deflected shape.

  1. Flight test of a decoupler pylon for wing/store flutter suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cazier, F. W., Jr.; Kehoe, M. W.

    1986-01-01

    The decoupler pylon is a NASA concept of passive wing-store flutter suppression achieved by providing a low store-pylon pitch frequency. Flight tests where performed on an F-16 airplane carrying on each wing an AIM-9J wingtip missile, a GBU-8 bomb near midspan, and an external fuel tank. Baseline flights with the GBU-8 mounted on a standard pylon established that this configuration is characterized by an antisymmetric limited amplitude flutter oscillation within the operational envelope. The airplane was then flown with the GBU-8 mounted on the decoupler pylon. The decoupler pylon successfully suppressed wing-store flutter thoughout the flight envelope. A 37-percent increase in flutter velocity over the standard pylon was demonstrated. Maneuvers with load factors to 4g were performed. Although the static store displacements during maneuvers were not sufficiently large to be of concern, a store pitch alignment system was tested and performed successfully. One GBU-8 was ejected demonstrating that weapon separation from the decoupler pylon is normal. Experience with the present decoupler pylon design indicated that friction in the pivoting mechanism could affect its proper functioning as a flutter suppressor.

  2. Flight test of a decoupler pylon for wing/store flutter suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cazier, F. W., Jr.; Kehoe, M. W.

    1986-01-01

    The decoupler pylon is a NASA concept of passive wing-store flutter suppression achieved by providing a low store-pylon pitch frequency. Flight tests were performed on an F-16 aircraft carrying on each wing an AIM-9J wingtip missile, a GBU-8 bomb near midspan, and an external fuel tank. Baseline flights with the GBU-8 mounted on a standard pylon established that this configuration is characterized by an antisymmetric limited amplitude flutter oscillation within the operational envelope. The airplane was then flown with the GBU-8 mounted on the decoupler pylon. The decoupler pylon successfully suppressed wing-store flutter throughout the flight envelope. A 37-percent increase in flutter velocity over the standard pylon was demonstrated. Maneuvers with load factors to 4g were performed. Although the static store displacements during maneuvers were not sufficiently large to be of concern, a store pitch alignment system was tested and performed successfully. One GBU-8 was ejected demonstrating that weapon separation from the decoupler pylon is normal. Experience with the present decoupler pylon design indicated that friction in the pivoting mechanism could affect its proper functioning as a flutter suppressor.

  3. Comparison of data correction methods for blockage effects in semispan wing model testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haque, Anwar U.; Asrar, Waqar; Omar, Ashraf A.; Sulaeman, Erwin; J. S Ali, Mohamed

    2016-03-01

    Wing alone models are usually tested in wind tunnels for aerospace applications like aircraft and hybrid buoyant aircraft. Raw data obtained from such testing is subject to different corrections such as wall interference, blockage, offset in angle of attack, dynamic pressure and free stream velocity etc. Since the flow is constrained by wind tunnel walls, therefore special emphasis is required to deliberate the limitation of correction methods for blockage correction. In the present research work, different aspects of existing correction methods are explored with the help of an example of a straight semi-span wing. Based on the results of analytical relationships of standard methods, it was found that although multiple variables are involved in the standard methods for the estimation of blockage, they are based on linearized flow theory such as source sink method and potential flow assumption etc, which have intrinsic limitations. Based on the computed and estimated experimental results, it is recommended to obtain the corrections by adding the difference in results of solid walls and far-field condition in the wind tunnel data. Computational Fluid Dynamics technique is found to be useful to determine the correction factors for a wing installed at zero spacer height/gap, with and without the tunnel wall.

  4. DARPA/AFRL/NASA Smart Wing Second Wind Tunnel Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherer, L. B.; Martin, C. A.; West, M.; Florance, J. P.; Wieseman, C. D.; Burner, A. W.; Fleming, G. A.

    2001-01-01

    To quantify the benefits of smart materials and structures adaptive wing technology, Northrop Grumman Corp. (NGC) built and tested two 16% scale wind tunnel models (a conventional and a "smart" model) of a fighter/attack aircraft under the DARPA/AFRL/NASA Smart Materials and Structures Development - Smart Wing Phase 1. Performance gains quantified included increased pitching moment (C(sub M)), increased rolling moment (C(subl)) and improved pressure distribution. The benefits were obtained for hingeless, contoured trailing edge control surfaces with embedded shape memory alloy (SMA) wires and spanwise wing twist effected by SMA torque tube mechanisms, compared to conventional hinged control surfaces. This paper presents an overview of the results from the second wind tunnel test performed at the NASA Langley Research Center s (LaRC) 16ft Transonic Dynamic Tunnel (TDT) in June 1998. Successful results obtained were: 1) 5 degrees of spanwise twist and 8-12% increase in rolling moment utilizing a single SMA torque tube, 2) 12 degrees of deflection, and 10% increase in rolling moment due to hingeless, contoured aileron, and 3) demonstration of optical techniques for measuring spanwise twist and deflected shape.

  5. Test-to-Test Repeatability of Results From a Subsonic Wing-Body Configuration in the National Transonic Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mineck, Raymond E.; Pendergraft, Odis C., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    Results from three wind tunnel tests in the National Transonic Facility of a model of an advanced-technology, subsonic-transport wing-body configuration have been analyzed to assess the test-to-test repeatability of several aerodynamic parameters. The scatter, as measured by the prediction interval, in the longitudinal force and moment coefficients increases as the Mach number increases. Residual errors with and without the ESP tubes installed suggest a bias leading to lower drag with the tubes installed. Residual errors as well as average values of the longitudinal force and moment coefficients show that there are small bias errors between the different tests.

  6. Crash tests of three identical low-wing single-engine airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castle, C. B.; Alfaro-Bou, E.

    1983-01-01

    Three identical four place, low wing single engine airplane specimens with nominal masses of 1043 kg were crash tested under controlled free flight conditions. The tests were conducted at the same nominal velocity of 25 m/sec along the flight path. Two airplanes were crashed on a concrete surface (at 10 and 30 deg pitch angles), and one was crashed on soil (at a -30 deg pitch angle). The three tests revealed that the specimen in the -30 deg test on soil sustained massive structural damage in the engine compartment and fire wall. Also, the highest longitudinal cabin floor accelerations occurred in this test. Severe damage, but of lesser magnitude, occurred in the -30 deg test on concrete. The highest normal cabin floor accelerations occurred in this test. The least structural damage and lowest accelerations occurred in the 10 deg test on concrete.

  7. Wind Tunnel Test of a Risk-Reduction Wing/Fuselage Model to Examine Juncture-Flow Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kegerise, Michael A.; Neuhart, Dan H.

    2016-01-01

    A wing/fuselage wind-tunnel model was tested in the Langley 14- by 22-foot Subsonic Wind Tunnel in preparation for a highly-instrumented Juncture Flow Experiment to be conducted in the same facility. This test, which was sponsored by the NASA Transformational Tool and Technologies Project, is part of a comprehensive set of experimental and computational research activities to develop revolutionary, physics-based aeronautics analysis and design capability. The objectives of this particular test were to examine the surface and off-body flow on a generic wing/body combination to: 1) choose a final wing for a future, highly instrumented model, 2) use the results to facilitate unsteady pressure sensor placement on the model, 3) determine the area to be surveyed with an embedded laser-doppler velocimetry (LDV) system, 4) investigate the primary juncture corner- flow separation region using particle image velocimetry (PIV) to see if the particle seeding is adequately entrained and to examine the structure in the separated region, and 5) to determine the similarity of observed flow features with those predicted by computational fluid dynamics (CFD). This report documents the results of the above experiment that specifically address the first three goals. Multiple wing configurations were tested at a chord Reynolds number of 2.4 million. Flow patterns on the surface of the wings and in the region of the wing/fuselage juncture were examined using oil- flow visualization and infrared thermography. A limited number of unsteady pressure sensors on the fuselage around the wing leading and trailing edges were used to identify any dynamic effects of the horseshoe vortex on the flow field. The area of separated flow in the wing/fuselage juncture near the wing trailing edge was observed for all wing configurations at various angles of attack. All of the test objectives were met. The staff of the 14- by 22-foot Subsonic Wind Tunnel provided outstanding support and delivered

  8. Reflection-plane tests of spoilers on an advanced technology wing with a large Fowler flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wentz, W. H., Jr.; Volk, C. G., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Wind tunnel experiments were conducted to determine the effectiveness of spoilers applied to a finite-span wing which utilizes the GA(W)-1 airfoil section and a 30% chord full-span Fowler flap. A series of spoiler cross sectioned shapes were tested utilizing a reflection-plane model. Five-component force characteristics and hinge moment measurements were obtained. Results confirm earlier two-dimensional tests which showed that spoilers could provide large lift increments at any flap setting, and that spoiler control reversal tendencies could be eliminated by providing a vent path from lower surface to upper surface. Performance penalties due to spoiler leakage airflow were measured.

  9. Pegasus Rocket Wing and PHYSX Glove Being Prepared for Stress Loads Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A technician adjusts the Pegasus Hypersonic Experiment (PHYSX) Project's Pegasus rocket wing with attached PHYSX glove before a loads-test at Scaled Composites, Inc., in Mojave, California, in January 1997. For the test, technicians slowly filled water bags beneath the wing to create the pressure, or 'wing-loading,' required to determine whether the wing could withstand its design limit for stress. The wing sits in a wooden triangular frame which serves as the test-rig, mounted to the floor atop the waterbags. PHYSX was launched aboard a Pegasus rocket on October 22, 1998. Pegasus is an air-launched space booster produced by Orbital Sciences Corporation and Hercules Aerospace Company (initially; later, Alliant Tech Systems) to provide small satellite users with a cost-effective, flexible, and reliable method for placing payloads into low earth orbit. Pegasus has been used to launch a number of satellites and the PHYSX experiment. That experiment consisted of a smooth glove installed on the first-stage delta wing of the Pegasus. The glove was used to gather data at speeds of up to Mach 8 and at altitudes approaching 200,000 feet. The flight took place on October 22, 1998. The PHYSX experiment focused on determining where boundary-layer transition occurs on the glove and on identifying the flow mechanism causing transition over the glove. Data from this flight-research effort included temperature, heat transfer, pressure measurements, airflow, and trajectory reconstruction. Hypersonic flight-research programs are an approach to validate design methods for hypersonic vehicles (those that fly more than five times the speed of sound, or Mach 5). Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, provided overall management of the glove experiment, glove design, and buildup. Dryden also was responsible for conducting the flight tests. Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia, was responsible for the design of the aerodynamic glove as well as development of sensor and

  10. The Interference Effects of a Body on the Spanwise Load Distributions of Two 45 Degree Sweptback Wings of Aspect Ratio 8.02 from Low-Speed Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martina, Albert P.

    1956-01-01

    Tests of two wing-body combinations have been conducted in the Langley 19-foot pressure tunnel at a Reynolds number of 4 x 10(exp 6) and a Mach number of 0.19 to determine the effects of the bodies on the wing span load distributions. The wings had 45 degrees sweepback of the quarter-chord line, aspect ratio 8.02, taper ratio 0.45, and incorporated 12-percent-thick airfoil sections streamwise. One wing was untwisted and uncambered whereas the second wing incorporated both twist and camber. Identical bodies of revolution, of 10:1 fineness ratio, having diameter-to-span ratios of 0.10, were mounted in mid-high-wing arrangements. The effects of wind incidence, wing fences, and flap deflection were determined for the plane uncambered wing. The addition of the body to the plane wing increased the exposed wing loading at a given lift coefficient as much as 10 percent with the body at 0 degrees incidence and 4 percent at 4 degrees incidence. The bending-moment coefficients at the wing-body juncture were increased about 2 percent with the body at 0 degrees incidence, whereas the increases were as much as 10 percent with the body at 4 degrees incidence. The spanwise load distributions due to the body on the plane wing as calculated by using a swept-wing method employing 19 spanwise lifting elements and control points generally showed satisfactory agreement with experiment. The spanwise load distributions due to body on the flapped plane wing and on the twisted and cambered wing were dissimilar to those obtained on the plane wing. Neither of the methods of calculation which were employed yielded distributions that agreed consistently with experiment for either the flapped plane wing or the twisted and cambered wing.

  11. Wind-tunnel tests on combinations of a wing with fixed auxiliary airfoils having various chords and profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weick, Fred E; Sanders, Robert

    1934-01-01

    This report presents the results of wind tunnel tests on various auxiliary airfoils having three different airfoil sections and several different chord lengths in combination with a Clark y model wing in a sufficient number of relative positions to determine the optimum with regard to certain criterions of aerodynamic performance. The airfoil sections included a symmetrical profile, one of medium camber, and a highly cambered one. The chord sizes of the auxiliary airfoils ranged from 7.5 to 25 percent of the chord of the main wing, and the span was equal to that of the main wing.

  12. Study of the feasibility aspects of flight testing an aeroelastically tailored forward swept research wing on a BQM-34F drone vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mourey, D. J.

    1979-01-01

    The aspects of flight testing an aeroelastically tailored forward swept research wing on a BQM-34F drone vehicle are examined. The geometry of a forward swept wing, which is incorporated into the BQM-34F to maintain satisfactory flight performance, stability, and control is defined. A preliminary design of the aeroelastically tailored forward swept wing is presented.

  13. Analytical impact models and experimental test validation for the Columbia shuttle wing leading edge panels.

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Wei-Yang; Metzinger, Kurt Evan; Gwinn, Kenneth West; Antoun, Bonnie R.; Korellis, John S.

    2004-10-01

    This paper describes the analyses and the experimental mechanics program to support the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) investigation of the Shuttle Columbia accident. A synergism of the analysis and experimental effort is required to insure that the final analysis is valid - the experimental program provides both the material behavior and a basis for validation, while the analysis is required to insure the experimental effort provides behavior in the correct loading regime. Preliminary scoping calculations of foam impact onto the Shuttle Columbia's wing leading edge determined if enough energy was available to damage the leading edge panel. These analyses also determined the strain-rate regimes for various materials to provide the material test conditions. Experimental testing of the reinforced carbon-carbon wing panels then proceeded to provide the material behavior in a variety of configurations and strain-rates for flown or conditioned samples of the material. After determination of the important failure mechanisms of the material, validation experiments were designed to provide a basis of comparison for the analytical effort. Using this basis, the final analyses were used for test configuration, instrumentation location, and calibration definition in support of full-scale testing of the panels in June 2003. These tests subsequently confirmed the accident cause.

  14. Static noise tests on augmentor wing jet STOL research aircraft (C8A Buffalo)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marrs, C. C.; Harkonen, D. L.; Okeefe, J. V.

    1974-01-01

    Results are presented for full scale ground static acoustic tests of over-area conical nozzles and a lobe nozzle installed on the Augmentor Wing Jet STOL Research Aircraft, a modified C8A Buffalo. The noise levels and spectrums of the test nozzles are compared against those of the standard conical nozzle now in use on the aircraft. Acoustic evaluations at 152 m (500 ft), 304 m (1000 ft), and 1216 m (4000 ft) are made at various engine power settings with the emphasis on approach and takeoff power. Appendix A contains the test log and propulsion calculations. Appendix B gives the original test plan, which was closely adhered to during the test. Appendix C describes the acoustic data recording and reduction systems, with calibration details.

  15. Turbine Powered Simulator Calibration and Testing for Hybrid Wing Body Powered Airframe Integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shea, Patrick R.; Flamm, Jeffrey D.; Long, Kurtis R.; James, Kevin D.; Tompkins, Daniel M.; Beyar, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Propulsion airframe integration testing on a 5.75% scale hybrid wing body model us- ing turbine powered simulators was completed at the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex 40- by 80-foot test section. Four rear control surface con gurations including a no control surface de ection con guration were tested with the turbine powered simulator units to investigate how the jet exhaust in uenced the control surface performance as re- lated to the resultant forces and moments on the model. Compared to ow-through nacelle testing on the same hybrid wing body model, the control surface e ectiveness was found to increase with the turbine powered simulator units operating. This was true for pitching moment, lift, and drag although pitching moment was the parameter of greatest interest for this project. With the turbine powered simulator units operating, the model pitching moment was seen to increase when compared to the ow-through nacelle con guration indicating that the center elevon and vertical tail control authority increased with the jet exhaust from the turbine powered simulator units.

  16. Developing Uncertainty Models for Robust Flutter Analysis Using Ground Vibration Test Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, Starr; Lind, Rick; Kehoe, Michael W. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A ground vibration test can be used to obtain information about structural dynamics that is important for flutter analysis. Traditionally, this information#such as natural frequencies of modes#is used to update analytical models used to predict flutter speeds. The ground vibration test can also be used to obtain uncertainty models, such as natural frequencies and their associated variations, that can update analytical models for the purpose of predicting robust flutter speeds. Analyzing test data using the -norm, rather than the traditional 2-norm, is shown to lead to a minimum-size uncertainty description and, consequently, a least-conservative robust flutter speed. This approach is demonstrated using ground vibration test data for the Aerostructures Test Wing. Different norms are used to formulate uncertainty models and their associated robust flutter speeds to evaluate which norm is least conservative.

  17. AMELIA CESTOL Test: Acoustic Characteristics of Circulation Control Wing with Leading- and Trailing-Edge Slot Blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, William C.; Burnside, Nathan J.

    2013-01-01

    The AMELIA Cruise-Efficient Short Take-off and Landing (CESTOL) configuration concept was developed to meet future requirements of reduced field length, noise, and fuel burn by researchers at Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo and Georgia Tech Research Institute under sponsorship by the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program (FAP), Subsonic Fixed Wing Project. The novel configuration includes leading- and trailing-edge circulation control wing (CCW), over-wing podded turbine propulsion simulation (TPS). Extensive aerodynamic measurements of forces, surfaces pressures, and wing surface skin friction measurements were recently measured over a wide range of test conditions in the Arnold Engineering Development Center(AEDC) National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex (NFAC) 40- by 80-Ft Wind Tunnel. Acoustic measurements of the model were also acquired for each configuration with 7 fixed microphones on a line under the left wing, and with a 48-element, 40-inch diameter phased microphone array under the right wing. This presentation will discuss acoustic characteristics of the CCW system for a variety of tunnel speeds (0 to 120 kts), model configurations (leading edge(LE) and/or trailing-edge(TE) slot blowing, and orientations (incidence and yaw) based on acoustic measurements acquired concurrently with the aerodynamic measurements. The flow coefficient, Cmu= mVSLOT/qSW varied from 0 to 0.88 at 40 kts, and from 0 to 0.15 at 120 kts. Here m is the slot mass flow rate, VSLOT is the slot exit velocity, q is dynamic pressure, and SW is wing surface area. Directivities at selected 1/3 octave bands will be compared with comparable measurements of a 2-D wing at GTRI, as will as microphone array near-field measurements of the right wing at maximum flow rate. The presentation will include discussion of acoustic sensor calibrations as well as characterization of the wind tunnel background noise environment.

  18. Design integration and noise studies for jet STOL aircraft. Task 7C: Augmentor wing cruise blowing valveless system. Volume 2: Small-scale development testing of augmentor wing critical ducting components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runnels, J. N.; Gupfa, A.

    1973-01-01

    Augmentor wing ducting system studies conducted on a valveless system configuration that provides cruise thrust from the augmentor nozzles have shown that most of the duct system pressure loss would occur in the strut-wing duct y-junction and the wing duct-augmentor lobe nozzles. These components were selected for development testing over a range of duct Mach numbers and pressure ratios to provide a technical basis for predicting installed wing thrust loading and for evaluating design wing loading of a particular wing aspect ratios. The flow characteristics of ducting components with relatively high pressure loss coefficients were investigated. The turbulent pressure fluctuations associated with flows at high Mach numbers were analyzed to evaluate potential duct fatigue problems.

  19. A study of facilities and fixtures for testing of a high speed civil transport wing component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cerro, J. A.; Vause, R. F.; Bowman, L. M.; Jensen, J. K.; Martin, C. J., Jr.; Stockwell, A. E.; Waters, W. A., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    A study was performed to determine the feasibility of testing a large-scale High Speed Civil Transport wing component in the Structures and Materials Testing Laboratory in Building 1148 at NASA Langley Research Center. The report includes a survey of the electrical and hydraulic resources and identifies the backing structure and floor hard points which would be available for reacting the test loads. The backing structure analysis uses a new finite element model of the floor and backstop support system in the Structures Laboratory. Information on the data acquisition system and the thermal power requirements is also presented. The study identified the hardware that would be required to test a typical component, including the number and arrangement of hydraulic actuators required to simulate expected flight loads. Load introduction and reaction structure concepts were analyzed to investigate the effects of experimentally induced boundary conditions.

  20. Results of Flight Test of an Automatically Stabilized Model C (Swept Back) Four-Wing Tiamat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seacord, Charles L., Jr.; Teitelbaum, J. M.

    1947-01-01

    The results of the first flight test of a swept-back four-wing version of Tiamat (MX-570 model C) which was launched at the NACA Pilotless Aircraft Research Station at W4110PB Island, Va. are presented. In general, the flight behavior was close to that predicted by calculations based an stability theory and oscillating table tests of the autopilot. The flight test thus indicates that the techniques employed to predict automatic stability are valid and practical from an operational viewpoint. The limitations of the method used to predict flight behavior arise from the fact that the calculations assume no coupling among roll, pitch, and yaw, while in actual flight some such coupling does exist.

  1. Flight Test of Orthogonal Square Wave Inputs for Hybrid-Wing-Body Parameter Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Brian R.; Ratnayake, Nalin A.

    2011-01-01

    As part of an effort to improve emissions, noise, and performance of next generation aircraft, it is expected that future aircraft will use distributed, multi-objective control effectors in a closed-loop flight control system. Correlation challenges associated with parameter estimation will arise with this expected aircraft configuration. The research presented in this paper focuses on addressing the correlation problem with an appropriate input design technique in order to determine individual control surface effectiveness. This technique was validated through flight-testing an 8.5-percent-scale hybrid-wing-body aircraft demonstrator at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center (Edwards, California). An input design technique that uses mutually orthogonal square wave inputs for de-correlation of control surfaces is proposed. Flight-test results are compared with prior flight-test results for a different maneuver style.

  2. Aeroservoelastic Wind-Tunnel Test of the SUGAR Truss Braced Wing Wind-Tunnel Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Robert C.; Allen, Timothy J.; Funk, Christie J.; Castelluccio, Mark A.; Sexton, Bradley W.; Claggett, Scott; Dykman, John; Coulson, David A.; Bartels, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    The Subsonic Ultra Green Aircraft Research (SUGAR) Truss-Braced Wing (TBW) aeroservoelastic (ASE) wind-tunnel test was conducted in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) and was completed in April, 2014. The primary goals of the test were to identify the open-loop flutter boundary and then demonstrate flutter suppression. A secondary goal was to demonstrate gust load alleviation (GLA). Open-loop flutter and limit cycle oscillation onset boundaries were identified for a range of Mach numbers and various angles of attack. Two sets of control laws were designed for the model and both sets of control laws were successful in suppressing flutter. Control laws optimized for GLA were not designed; however, the flutter suppression control laws were assessed using the TDT Airstream Oscillation System. This paper describes the experimental apparatus, procedures, and results of the TBW wind-tunnel test. Acquired system ID data used to generate ASE models is also discussed.2 study.

  3. Tests of Aluminum-alloy Stiffened-sheet Specimens Cut from an Airplane Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, Marshall

    1943-01-01

    The specimens used in the present tests were cut from an actual airplane wing of the stressed-skin type. The specimens thus obtained were not representative of the usual type of laboratory specimens because the stiffeners were not exactly parallel nor evenly spaced and, in one case, the skin consisted of pieces of sheet of different thicknesses. The test data obtained indicate that the buckling strain of stiffened curved sheet can be computed with reasonable accuracy by the equation given by Wenzek. The ultimate loads of the specimens when tested as flat sheet were within +/-11 percent of the product of the compressive yield strength and the cross-sectional area of the stiffeners. A rivet spacing equal to 98 times the sheet thickness was a source of weakness, and rivet spacings up to 36 times the sheet thickness appeared satisfactory.

  4. Design and testing of an oblique all-wing supersonic transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Christopher A.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes the preliminary design of an Oblique All-Wing (OAW) supersonic transport and a corresponding wind-tunnel model that was tested in the NASA Ames 9- by 7-Foot supersonic wind tunnel. The main goal was the determination of the cruise performance (lift/drag ratio) of a realistically configured OAW. To achieve an acceptable level of realism, it was necessary to consider many issues of design practicality such as the need for a viable propulsion system, adequate control surfaces, landing gear, provisions for 450 passengers, and fuel to fly 5,000 nautical miles. The aircraft had to be stable, structurally sound, and needed to fit into airports across the world. Support was directed primarily towards integration of the propulsion system, however, there were notable contributions to many aspects of the configuration design, wind tunnel model, and wind tunnel test.

  5. Experimental Data from the Benchmark SuperCritical Wing Wind Tunnel Test on an Oscillating Turntable

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heeg, Jennifer; Piatak, David J.

    2013-01-01

    The Benchmark SuperCritical Wing (BSCW) wind tunnel model served as a semi-blind testcase for the 2012 AIAA Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop (AePW). The BSCW was chosen as a testcase due to its geometric simplicity and flow physics complexity. The data sets examined include unforced system information and forced pitching oscillations. The aerodynamic challenges presented by this AePW testcase include a strong shock that was observed to be unsteady for even the unforced system cases, shock-induced separation and trailing edge separation. The current paper quantifies these characteristics at the AePW test condition and at a suggested benchmarking test condition. General characteristics of the model's behavior are examined for the entire available data set.

  6. Genotoxicity of lapachol evaluated by wing spot test of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the genotoxicity of Lapachol (LAP) evaluated by wing spot test of Drosophila melanogaster in the descendants from standard (ST) and high bioactivation (HB) crosses. This assay detects the loss of heterozygosity of marker genes expressed phenotypically on the fly's wings. Drosophila has extensive genetic homology to mammals, which makes it a suitable model organism for genotoxic investigations. Three-day-old larvae from ST crosses (females flr3/TM3, Bds x males mwh/mwh), with basal levels of the cytochrome P450 and larvae of high metabolic bioactivity capacity (HB cross) (females ORR; flr3/TM3, Bds x males mwh/mwh), were used. The results showed that LAP is a promutagen, exhibiting genotoxic activity in larvae from the HB cross. In other words, an increase in the frequency of spots is exclusive of individuals with a high level of the cytochrome P450. The results also indicate that recombinogenicity is the main genotoxic event induced by LAP. PMID:21637432

  7. Deformed Shape Calculation of a Full-Scale Wing Using Fiber Optic Strain Data from a Ground Loads Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jutte, Christine V.; Ko, William L.; Stephens, Craig A.; Bakalyar, John A.; Richards, W. Lance

    2011-01-01

    A ground loads test of a full-scale wing (175-ft span) was conducted using a fiber optic strain-sensing system to obtain distributed surface strain data. These data were input into previously developed deformed shape equations to calculate the wing s bending and twist deformation. A photogrammetry system measured actual shape deformation. The wing deflections reached 100 percent of the positive design limit load (equivalent to 3 g) and 97 percent of the negative design limit load (equivalent to -1 g). The calculated wing bending results were in excellent agreement with the actual bending; tip deflections were within +/- 2.7 in. (out of 155-in. max deflection) for 91 percent of the load steps. Experimental testing revealed valuable opportunities for improving the deformed shape equations robustness to real world (not perfect) strain data, which previous analytical testing did not detect. These improvements, which include filtering methods developed in this work, minimize errors due to numerical anomalies discovered in the remaining 9 percent of the load steps. As a result, all load steps attained +/- 2.7 in. accuracy. Wing twist results were very sensitive to errors in bending and require further development. A sensitivity analysis and recommendations for fiber implementation practices, along with, effective filtering methods are included

  8. Structural Risk Assessment of RAAF B707 Lower Wing Stringers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    of Aerospace Engineering with Honours in 1998. He worked for Aerostructures Technologies on the F/A-18 IFOSTP fatigue test in 1998 and 1999. Since...joining DSTO in 2002, he has worked in the risk and reliability field, primarily on the B707 and F/A-18 tasks. He is presently the test engineer for a... program that involves the teardown and testing of ex-service F/A-18 centre barrels. Contents 1. INTRODUCTION

  9. Strain Gage Load Calibration of the Wing Interface Fittings for the Adaptive Compliant Trailing Edge Flap Flight Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Eric J.; Holguin, Andrew C.; Cruz, Josue; Lokos, William A.

    2014-01-01

    This is the presentation to follow conference paper of the same name. The adaptive compliant trailing edge (ACTE) flap experiment safety of flight requires that the flap to wing interface loads be sensed and monitored in real time to ensure that the wing structural load limits are not exceeded. This paper discusses the strain gage load calibration testing and load equation derivation methodology for the ACTE interface fittings. Both the left and right wing flap interfaces will be monitored and each contains four uniquely designed and instrumented flap interface fittings. The interface hardware design and instrumentation layout are discussed. Twenty one applied test load cases were developed using the predicted in-flight loads for the ACTE experiment.

  10. Analysis of Limit Cycle Oscillation Data from the Aeroelastic Test of the SUGAR Truss-Braced Wing Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartels, Robert E.; Funk, Christie; Scott, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Research focus in recent years has been given to the design of aircraft that provide significant reductions in emissions, noise and fuel usage. Increases in fuel efficiency have also generally been attended by overall increased wing flexibility. The truss-braced wing (TBW) configuration has been forwarded as one that increases fuel efficiency. The Boeing company recently tested the Subsonic Ultra Green Aircraft Research (SUGAR) Truss-Braced Wing (TBW) wind-tunnel model in the NASA Langley Research Center Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT). This test resulted in a wealth of accelerometer data. Other publications have presented details of the construction of that model, the test itself, and a few of the results of the test. This paper aims to provide a much more detailed look at what the accelerometer data says about the onset of aeroelastic instability, usually known as flutter onset. Every flight vehicle has a location in the flight envelope of flutter onset, and the TBW vehicle is not different. For the TBW model test, the flutter onset generally occurred at the conditions that the Boeing company analysis said it should. What was not known until the test is that, over a large area of the Mach number dynamic pressure map, the model displayed wing/engine nacelle aeroelastic limit cycle oscillation (LCO). This paper dissects that LCO data in order to provide additional insights into the aeroelastic behavior of the model.

  11. Subsonic Ultra Green Aircraft Research: Phase II- Volume III-Truss Braced Wing Aeroelastic Test Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Marty K.; Allen, Timothy J.; Droney, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    This Test Report summarizes the Truss Braced Wing (TBW) Aeroelastic Test (Task 3.1) work accomplished by the Boeing Subsonic Ultra Green Aircraft Research (SUGAR) team, which includes the time period of February 2012 through June 2014. The team consisted of Boeing Research and Technology, Boeing Commercial Airplanes, Virginia Tech, and NextGen Aeronautics. The model was fabricated by NextGen Aeronautics and designed to meet dynamically scaled requirements from the sized full scale TBW FEM. The test of the dynamically scaled SUGAR TBW half model was broken up into open loop testing in December 2013 and closed loop testing from January 2014 to April 2014. Results showed the flutter mechanism to primarily be a coalescence of 2nd bending mode and 1st torsion mode around 10 Hz, as predicted by analysis. Results also showed significant change in flutter speed as angle of attack was varied. This nonlinear behavior can be explained by including preload and large displacement changes to the structural stiffness and mass matrices in the flutter analysis. Control laws derived from both test system ID and FEM19 state space models were successful in suppressing flutter. The control laws were robust and suppressed flutter for a variety of Mach, dynamic pressures, and angle of attacks investigated.

  12. Water tunnel results of leading-edge vortex flap tests on a delta wing vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delfrate, J. H.

    1986-01-01

    A water tunnel flow visualization test on leading edge vortex flaps was conducted at the flow visualization facility of the NASA Ames Research Center's Dryden Flight Research Facility. The purpose of the test was to visually examine the vortex structures caused by various leading edge vortex flaps on the delta wing of an F-106 model. The vortex flaps tested were designed analytically and empirically at the NASA Langley Research Center. The three flap designs were designated as full-span gothic flap, full-span untapered flap, and part-span flap. The test was conducted at a Reynolds number of 76,000/m (25,000/ft). This low Reynolds number was used because of the 0.076-m/s (0.25-ft/s) test section flow speed necessary for high quality flow visualization. However, this low Reynolds number may have influenced the results. Of the three vortex flaps tested, the part-span flap produced what appeared to be the strongest vortex structure over the flap area. The full-span gothic flap provided the next best performance.

  13. Aeroelastic Modeling of X-56A Stiff-Wing Configuration Flight Test Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grauer, Jared A.; Boucher, Matthew J.

    2017-01-01

    Aeroelastic stability and control derivatives for the X-56A Multi-Utility Technology Testbed (MUTT), in the stiff-wing configuration, were estimated from flight test data using the output-error method. Practical aspects of the analysis are discussed. The orthogonal phase-optimized multisine inputs provided excellent data information for aeroelastic modeling. Consistent parameter estimates were determined using output error in both the frequency and time domains. The frequency domain analysis converged faster and was less sensitive to starting values for the model parameters, which was useful for determining the aeroelastic model structure and obtaining starting values for the time domain analysis. Including a modal description of the structure from a finite element model reduced the complexity of the estimation problem and improved the modeling results. Effects of reducing the model order on the short period stability and control derivatives were investigated.

  14. Model tests of gliding with different hindwing configurations in the four-winged dromaeosaurid Microraptor gui

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, David E.; Gong, Enpu; Martin, Larry D.; Burnham, David A.; Falk, Amanda R.

    2010-01-01

    Fossils of the remarkable dromaeosaurid Microraptor gui and relatives clearly show well-developed flight feathers on the hind limbs as well as the front limbs. No modern vertebrate has hind limbs functioning as independent, fully developed wings; so, lacking a living example, little agreement exists on the functional morphology or likely flight configuration of the hindwing. Using a detailed reconstruction based on the actual skeleton of one individual, cast in the round, we developed light-weight, three-dimensional physical models and performed glide tests with anatomically reasonable hindwing configurations. Models were tested with hindwings abducted and extended laterally, as well as with a previously described biplane configuration. Although the hip joint requires the hindwing to have at least 20° of negative dihedral (anhedral), all configurations were quite stable gliders. Glide angles ranged from 3° to 21° with a mean estimated equilibrium angle of 13.7°, giving a lift to drag ratio of 4.1:1 and a lift coefficient of 0.64. The abducted hindwing model’s equilibrium glide speed corresponds to a glide speed in the living animal of 10.6 m·s−1. Although the biplane model glided almost as well as the other models, it was structurally deficient and required an unlikely weight distribution (very heavy head) for stable gliding. Our model with laterally abducted hindwings represents a biologically and aerodynamically reasonable configuration for this four-winged gliding animal. M. gui’s feathered hindwings, although effective for gliding, would have seriously hampered terrestrial locomotion. PMID:20133792

  15. Flow visualization of leading-edge vortex enhancement by spanwise blowing. [swept wings - wind tunnel stability tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, G. E.; Campbell, J. F.

    1975-01-01

    Flow visualization studies were conducted in a small pilot wind tunnel to determine qualitative effects of blowing a discrete jet essentially parallel to the leading edge of a 45 deg-swept trapezoidal wing featuring leading- and trailing-edge flaps. Test parameters included wing angle-of-attack, jet momentum coefficient, leading- and trailing-edge flap deflections, and nozzle chordwise displacement. Results of this study indicate that blowing from a reflection plane over the wing enhances the leading-edge vortex and delays vortex bursting to higher angles-of-attack and greater span distances. Increased blowing rates decrease vortex size, growth rate, and vertical displacement above the wing surface at a given span station and also extend the spanwise effectiveness of lateral blowing. Deflection of a leading-edge flap delays the beneficial effects of spanwise blowing to higher angles-of-attack. Nozzle chordwise locations investigated for the wing with and without leading-edge flap deflection appear equally effective in enhancing the separated leading-edge flow.

  16. Pretest Report for the Full Span Propulsive Wing/Canard Model Test in the NASA Langley 4 x 7 Meter Low Speed Wind Tunnel Second Series Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, V. R.

    1986-01-01

    A full span propulsive wing/canard model is to be tested in the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) 4 x 7 meter low speed wind tunnel. These tests are a continuation of the tests conducted in Feb. 1984, NASA test No.290, and are being conducted under NASA Contract NAS1-17171. The purpose of these tests is to obtain extensive lateral-directional data with a revised fuselage concept. The wings, canards, and vertical tail of this second test series model are the same as tested in the previous test period. The fuselage and internal flow path have been modified to better reflect an external configuration suitable for a fighter airplane. Internal ducting and structure were changed as required to provide test efficiency and blowing control. The model fuselage tested during the 1984 tests was fabricated with flat sides to provide multiple wing and canard placement variations. The locations of the wing and canard are important variables in configuration development. With the establishment of the desired relative placement of the lifting surfaces, a typically shaped fuselage has been fabricated for these tests. This report provides the information necessary for the second series tests of the propulsive wing/canard model. The discussion in this report is limited to that affected by the model changes and to the second series test program. The pretest report information for test 290 which is valid for the second series test was published in Rockwell report NR 83H-79. This report is presented as Appendix 1 and the modified fuselage stress report is presented as Appendix 2 to this pretest report.

  17. Ice Accretion Test Results for Three Large-Scale Swept-Wing Models in the NASA Icing Research Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broeren, Andy; Potapczuk, Mark; Lee, Sam; Malone, Adam; Paul, Ben; Woodard, Brian

    2016-01-01

    The design and certification of modern transport airplanes for flight in icing conditions increasing relies on three-dimensional numerical simulation tools for ice accretion prediction. There is currently no publically available, high-quality, ice accretion database upon which to evaluate the performance of icing simulation tools for large-scale swept wings that are representative of modern commercial transport airplanes. The purpose of this presentation is to present the results of a series of icing wind tunnel test campaigns whose aim was to provide an ice accretion database for large-scale, swept wings.

  18. The development of a capability for aerodynamic testing of large-scale wing sections in a simulated natural rain environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bezos, Gaudy M.; Cambell, Bryan A.; Melson, W. Edward

    1989-01-01

    A research technique to obtain large-scale aerodynamic data in a simulated natural rain environment has been developed. A 10-ft chord NACA 64-210 wing section wing section equipped with leading-edge and trailing-edge high-lift devices was tested as part of a program to determine the effect of highly-concentrated, short-duration rainfall on airplane performance. Preliminary dry aerodynamic data are presented for the high-lift configuration at a velocity of 100 knots and an angle of attack of 18 deg. Also, data are presented on rainfield uniformity and rainfall concentration intensity levels obtained during the calibration of the rain simulation system.

  19. Analysis and testing of stability augmentation systems. [for supersonic transport aircraft wing and B-52 aircraft control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sevart, F. D.; Patel, S. M.; Wattman, W. J.

    1972-01-01

    Testing and evaluation of stability augmentation systems for aircraft flight control were conducted. The flutter suppression system analysis of a scale supersonic transport wing model is described. Mechanization of the flutter suppression system is reported. The ride control synthesis for the B-52 aeroelastic model is discussed. Model analyses were conducted using equations of motion generated from generalized mass and stiffness data.

  20. Wind Tunnel Testing of Powered Lift, All-Wing STOL Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Scott W.; Westra, Bryan W.; Lin, John C.; Jones, Gregory S.; Zeune, Cal H.

    2008-01-01

    Short take-off and landing (STOL) systems can offer significant capabilities to warfighters and, for civil operators thriving on maximizing efficiencies they can improve airspace use while containing noise within airport environments. In order to provide data for next generation systems, a wind tunnel test of an all-wing cruise efficient, short take-off and landing (CE STOL) configuration was conducted in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center (LaRC) 14- by 22-foot Subsonic Wind Tunnel. The test s purpose was to mature the aerodynamic aspects of an integrated powered lift system within an advanced mobility configuration capable of CE STOL. The full-span model made use of steady flap blowing and a lifting centerbody to achieve high lift coefficients. The test occurred during April through June of 2007 and included objectives for advancing the state-of-the-art of powered lift testing through gathering force and moment data, on-body pressure data, and off-body flow field measurements during automatically controlled blowing conditions. Data were obtained for variations in model configuration, angles of attack and sideslip, blowing coefficient, and height above ground. The database produced by this effort is being used to advance design techniques and computational tools for developing systems with integrated powered lift technologies.

  1. Blended-Wing-Body Transonic Aerodynamics: Summary of Ground Tests and Sample Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Melissa B.; Vicroy, Dan D.; Patel, Dharmendra

    2009-01-01

    The Blended-Wing-Body (BWB) concept has shown substantial performance benefits over conventional aircraft configuration with part of the benefit being derived from the absence of a conventional empennage arrangement. The configuration instead relies upon a bank of trailing edge devices to provide control authority and augment stability. To determine the aerodynamic characteristics of the aircraft, several wind tunnel tests were conducted with a 2% model of Boeing's BWB-450-1L configuration. The tests were conducted in the NASA Langley Research Center's National Transonic Facility and the Arnold Engineering Development Center s 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel. Characteristics of the configuration and the effectiveness of the elevons, drag rudders and winglet rudders were measured at various angles of attack, yaw angles, and Mach numbers (subsonic to transonic speeds). The data from these tests will be used to develop a high fidelity simulation model for flight dynamics analysis and also serve as a reference for CFD comparisons. This paper provides an overview of the wind tunnel tests and examines the effects of Reynolds number, Mach number, pitch-pause versus continuous sweep data acquisition and compares the data from the two wind tunnels.

  2. Tests of spatial and temporal factors influencing extra-pair paternity in red-winged blackbirds.

    PubMed

    Westneat, David F; Mays, Herman L

    2005-06-01

    Extra-pair paternity (EPP) is a widespread and highly variable reproductive phenomenon in birds. We tested the effects of habitat, spatial factors, and timing of breeding on the occurrence of EPP in red-winged blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus). We used PCR-amplified microsatellites to assess the paternity of 1479 nestlings from 537 broods on 235 territories over four breeding seasons. Over 4 years, 40% of nestlings were extra-pair. At least 27% of actual sires were non-neighbours, suggesting that males or females interacted over longer distances than in other populations of red-winged blackbirds. The level of EPP was significantly clumped within broods and males but not within females across broods. EPP was negatively related to the area of a male's territory. The spatial proximity of a female's nest to the territory boundary had no effect on total EPP, but tended to increase the probability of an EPP by a nearby male. We found no influence on EPP of the type of habitat on the territory or the level of nesting activity nearby. The time in the season when a nest was started and the synchrony of breeding also had no significant effect on the level of EPP. The age of the male, the age of his neighbours, and the interaction between the two had no effect on total EPP. However, older males were less likely to have an offspring sired by a neighbour on their territory. Males with older neighbours were also less likely to have offspring sired by a neighbour, particularly if they were new territory owners. The high variability in who gained and lost paternity, and the limited impact of spatial and temporal factors influencing it, have some interesting implications for theories seeking to explain mating patterns.

  3. Wind-Tunnel Tests of an NACA 44R-Series Tapered Wing with a Straight Trailing Edge and a Constant-Chord Center Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neely, Robert H.

    1943-01-01

    As part of a general investigation in the NACA 19-foot pressure tunnel to determine stall characteristics and effectiveness of high-lift devices on wings of various sections, tests were made of a tapered. wing having NACA 44R-series airfoil sections. Lift, drag, pitching-moment, and stall characteristics were determined at a Reynolds number of 4,850,000 for the plain wing and for the wing with partial-and with full-span split flaps. The stall progressed slowly over The plain wing; a gradual loss of lift for angles of attack up to and beyond that for the maximum lift coefficient resulted. As Compared with the stall of the plain wing, the initial stall of the wing with either partial-span or full-span flaps deflected occurred at a higher angle of attack and the stall progressed much more rapidly. The maximum lift coefficients at a Reynolds number of 4,850,000 were 1.35 for the plain wing, 2.25 for the wing with partial-span flaps at 60 deg, and 2.67 for the wing with full-span flaps at 60 deg. The positions of the aerodynamic center, in terms of mean chords back of the leading edge of the root section, were approximately 0.458 with no flaps, 0.483 with partial-span flaps at 60 deg, and 0.498 with full-span flaps at 60 deg.

  4. Success for Ohio: MathWings Schools in Ohio Gain on Ohio Proficiency Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Success for All Foundation, 2004

    2004-01-01

    MathWings is the mathematics program of the Success for All Foundation, a non-profit organization that develops and disseminates school reform programs originally developed at Johns Hopkins University. MathWings, based on NCTM standards, emphasizes the use of cooperative learning, problem solving, and metacognitive strategies to help all children …

  5. Tests of a Triangular Wing of Aspect Ratio 2 in the Ames 12-foot Pressure Wind Tunnel III : the Effectiveness and Hinge Moments of a Skewed Wing-tip Flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolbe, Carl D; Tinling, Bruce E

    1948-01-01

    Results of wind-tunnel tests of a semispan model of a triangular wing of aspect ratio 2 with a skewed wing-tip flap are presented. Lift, drag, pitching-moment, and hinge-moment data are included for subsonic Mach numbers up to 0.95. The flap showed extremely high hinge moments and low effectiveness as a longitudinal control. Although less affected by compressibility, this flap is indicated to be inferior to a constant-chord flap when applied to this triangular wing.

  6. Crash tests of four identical high-wing single-engine airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, V. L., Jr.; Hayduk, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    Four identical four place, high wing, single engine airplane specimens with nominal masses of 1043 kg were crash tested at the Langley Impact Dynamics Research Facility under controlled free flight conditions. These tests were conducted with nominal velocities of 25 m/sec along the flight path angles, ground contact pitch angles, and roll angles. Three of the airplane specimens were crashed on a concrete surface; one was crashed on soil. Crash tests revealed that on a hard landing, the main landing gear absorbed about twice the energy for which the gear was designed but sprang back, tending to tip the airplane up to its nose. On concrete surfaces, the airplane impacted and remained in the impact attitude. On soil, the airplane flipped over on its back. The crash impact on the nose of the airplane, whether on soil or concrete, caused massive structural crushing of the forward fuselage. The liveable volume was maintained in both the hard landing and the nose down specimens but was not maintained in the roll impact and nose down on soil specimens.

  7. Experimental Results from the Active Aeroelastic Wing Wind Tunnel Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heeg, Jennifer; Spain, Charles V.; Florance, James R.; Wieseman, Carol D.; Ivanco, Thomas G.; DeMoss, Joshua; Silva, Walter A.; Panetta, Andrew; Lively, Peter; Tumwa, Vic

    2005-01-01

    The Active Aeroelastic Wing (AAW) program is a cooperative effort among NASA, the Air Force Research Laboratory and the Boeing Company, encompassing flight testing, wind tunnel testing and analyses. The objective of the AAW program is to investigate the improvements that can be realized by exploiting aeroelastic characteristics, rather than viewing them as a detriment to vehicle performance and stability. To meet this objective, a wind tunnel model was crafted to duplicate the static aeroelastic behavior of the AAW flight vehicle. The model was tested in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel in July and August 2004. The wind tunnel investigation served the program goal in three ways. First, the wind tunnel provided a benchmark for comparison with the flight vehicle and various levels of theoretical analyses. Second, it provided detailed insight highlighting the effects of individual parameters upon the aeroelastic response of the AAW vehicle. This parameter identification can then be used for future aeroelastic vehicle design guidance. Third, it provided data to validate scaling laws and their applicability with respect to statically scaled aeroelastic models.

  8. Acoustic Prediction Methodology and Test Validation for an Efficient Low-Noise Hybrid Wing Body Subsonic Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawai, Ronald T. (Compiler)

    2011-01-01

    This investigation was conducted to: (1) Develop a hybrid wing body subsonic transport configuration with noise prediction methods to meet the circa 2007 NASA Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) N+2 noise goal of -52 dB cum relative to FAR 36 Stage 3 (-42 dB cum re: Stage 4) while achieving a -25% fuel burned compared to current transports (re :B737/B767); (2) Develop improved noise prediction methods for ANOPP2 for use in predicting FAR 36 noise; (3) Design and fabricate a wind tunnel model for testing in the LaRC 14 x 22 ft low speed wind tunnel to validate noise predictions and determine low speed aero characteristics for an efficient low noise Hybrid Wing Body configuration. A medium wide body cargo freighter was selected to represent a logical need for an initial operational capability in the 2020 time frame. The Efficient Low Noise Hybrid Wing Body (ELNHWB) configuration N2A-EXTE was evolved meeting the circa 2007 NRA N+2 fuel burn and noise goals. The noise estimates were made using improvements in jet noise shielding and noise shielding prediction methods developed by UC Irvine and MIT. From this the Quiet Ultra Integrated Efficient Test Research Aircraft #1 (QUIET-R1) 5.8% wind tunnel model was designed and fabricated.

  9. Flight Testing of Novel Compliant Spines for Passive Wing Morphing on Ornithopters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wissa, Aimy; Guerreiro, Nelson; Grauer, Jared; Altenbuchner, Cornelia; Hubbard, James E., Jr.; Tummala, Yashwanth; Frecker, Mary; Roberts, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) are proliferating in both the civil and military markets. Flapping wing UAVs, or ornithopters, have the potential to combine the agility and maneuverability of rotary wing aircraft with excellent performance in low Reynolds number flight regimes. The purpose of this paper is to present new free flight experimental results for an ornithopter equipped with one degree of freedom (1DOF) compliant spines that were designed and optimized in terms of mass, maximum von-Mises stress, and desired wing bending deflections. The spines were inserted in an experimental ornithopter wing spar in order to achieve a set of desired kinematics during the up and down strokes of a flapping cycle. The ornithopter was flown at Wright Patterson Air Force Base in the Air Force Research Laboratory Small Unmanned Air Systems (SUAS) indoor flight facility. Vicon motion tracking cameras were used to track the motion of the vehicle for five different wing configurations. The effect of the presence of the compliant spine on wing kinematics and leading edge spar deflection during flight is presented. Results show that the ornithopter with the compliant spine inserted in its wing reduced the body acceleration during the upstroke which translates into overall lift gains.

  10. Structural analysis and testing of a carbon-composite wing using fiber Bragg gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, Matthew James

    The objective of this study was to determine the deflected wing shape and the out-of-plane loads of a large-scale carbon-composite wing of an ultralight aerial vehicle using Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) technology. The composite wing was instrumented with an optical fiber on its top and bottom surfaces positioned over the main spar, resulting in approximately 780 strain sensors bonded to the wings. The strain data from the FBGs was compared to that obtained from four conventional strain gages, and was used to obtain the out-of-plane loads as well as the wing shape at various load levels using NASA-developed real-time load and displacement algorithms. The composite wing measured 5.5 meters and was fabricated from laminated carbon uniaxial and biaxial prepreg fabric with varying laminate ply patterns and wall thickness dimensions. A three-tier whiffletree system was used to load the wing in a manner consistent with an in-flight loading condition.

  11. Wind tunnel test results of a 1/8-scale fan-in-wing model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John C.; Gentry, Garl L.; Gorton, Susan A.

    1996-01-01

    A 1/8-scale model of a fan-in-wing concept considered for development by Grumman Aerospace Corporation for the U.S. Army was tested in the Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel. Hover testing, which included height above a pressure-instrumented ground plane, angle of pitch, and angle of roll for a range of fan thrust, was conducted in a model preparation area near the tunnel. The air loads and surface pressures on the model were measured for several configurations in the model preparation area and in the tunnel. The major hover configuration change was varying the angles of the vanes attached to the exit of the fans for producing propulsive force. As the model height above the ground was decreased, there was a significant variation of thrust-removed normal force with constant fan speed. The greatest variation was generally for the height-to-fan exit diameter ratio of less than 2.5; the variation was reduced by deflecting fan exit flow outboard with the vanes. In the tunnel angles of pitch and sideslip, height above the tunnel floor, and wind speed were varied for a range of fan thrust and different vane angle configurations. Other configuration features such as flap deflections and tail incidence were evaluated as well. Though the V-tail empennage provided an increase in static longitudinal stability, the total model configuration remained unstable.

  12. Analysis and testing of aeroelastic model stability augmentation systems. [for supersonic transport aircraft wing and B-52 aircraft control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sevart, F. D.; Patel, S. M.

    1973-01-01

    Testing and evaluation of a stability augmentation system for aircraft flight control were performed. The flutter suppression system and synthesis conducted on a scale model of a supersonic wing for a transport aircraft are discussed. Mechanization and testing of the leading and trailing edge surface actuation systems are described. The ride control system analyses for a 375,000 pound gross weight B-52E aircraft are presented. Analyses of the B-52E aircraft maneuver load control system are included.

  13. Wind tunnel tests of high-lift systems for advanced transports using high-aspect-ratio supercritical wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, J. B.; Oliver, W. R.; Spacht, L. A.

    1982-01-01

    The wind tunnel testing of an advanced technology high lift system for a wide body and a narrow body transport incorporating high aspect ratio supercritical wings is described. This testing has added to the very limited low speed high Reynolds number data base for this class or aircraft. The experimental results include the effects on low speed aerodynamic characteristics of various leading and trailing edge devices, nacelles and pylons, ailerons, and spoilers, and the effects of Mach and Reynolds numbers.

  14. Overview of Low-Speed Aerodynamic Tests on a 5.75% Scale Blended-Wing-Body Twin Jet Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vicroy, Dan D.; Dickey, Eric; Princen, Norman; Beyar, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Project sponsored a series of computational and experimental investigations of the propulsion and airframe integration issues associated with Hybrid-Wing-Body (HWB) or Blended-Wing-Body (BWB) configurations. NASA collaborated with Boeing Research and Technology (BR&T) to conduct this research on a new twin-engine Boeing BWB transport configuration. The experimental investigations involved a series of wind tunnel tests with a 5.75-percent scale model conducted in two low-speed wind tunnels. This testing focused on the basic aerodynamics of the configuration and selection of the leading edge Krueger slat position for takeoff and landing. This paper reviews the results and analysis of these low-speed wind tunnel tests.

  15. Pressure data for four analytically defined arrow wings in supersonic flow. [Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    In order to provide experimental data for comparison with newly developed finite difference methods for computing supersonic flows over aircraft configurations, wind tunnel tests were conducted on four arrow wing models. The models were machined under numeric control to precisely duplicate analytically defined shapes. They were heavily instrumented with pressure orifices at several cross sections ahead of and in the region where there is a gap between the body and the wing trailing edge. The test Mach numbers were 2.36, 2.96, and 4.63. Tabulated pressure data for the complete test series are presented along with selected oil flow photographs. Comparisons of some preliminary numerical results at zero angle of attack show good to excellent agreement with the experimental pressure distributions.

  16. Design and testing of low sonic boom configurations and an oblique all-wing supersonic transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Christopher A.

    1995-01-01

    From December 1991 to June 1992, applied aerodynamic research support was given to the team working on Low Sonic Boom configurations in the RAC branch at NASA Ames Research Center. This team developed two different configurations: a conventional wing-tail and a canard wing, in an effort to reduce the overpressure of shock waves and the accompanying noise which are projected to the ground from supersonic civil transport aircraft. A generic description of this sensitive technology is given.

  17. Wind-tunnel tests on model wing with Fowler flap and specially developed leading-edge slot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weick, Fred E; Platt, Robert C

    1933-01-01

    An investigation was made in the NACA 7 by 10 foot wind tunnel to find the increase in maximum lift coefficient which could be obtained by providing a model wing with both a Fowler trailing-edge extension flap and a Handley Page type leading-edge slot. A conventional Handley page slot proportioned to operate on the plain wing without a flap gave but a slight increase with the flap; so a special form of slot was developed to work more effectively with the flap. With the best combined arrangement the maximum lift coefficient based on the original area was increased from 3.17, for the Fowler wing, to 3.62. The minimum drag coefficient with both devices retracted was increased in approximately the same proportion. Tests were also made with the special-type slot on the plain wing without the flap. The special slot, used either with or without the Fowler flap, gave definitely higher values of the maximum lift coefficient than the slots of conventional form, with an increase of the same order in the minimum drag coefficient.

  18. Quantitative structure-activity relationships for toxicity and genotoxicity of halogenated aliphatic compounds: wing spot test of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Chroust, Karel; Pavlová, Martina; Prokop, Zbynek; Mendel, Jan; Bozková, Katerina; Kubát, Zdenek; Zajícková, Veronika; Damborský, Jiri

    2007-02-01

    Halogenated aliphatic compounds were evaluated for toxic and genotoxic effects in the somatic mutation and recombination test employing Drosophila melanogaster. The tested chemicals included chlorinated, brominated and iodinated; mono-, di- and tri-substituted; saturated and unsaturated alkanes: 1,2-dibromoethane, 1-bromo-2-chloroethane, 1-iodopropane, 2,3-dichloropropene, 3-bromo-1-propene, epibromohydrin, 2-iodobutane, 3-chloro-2-methylpropene, 1,2,3-trichloropropane, 1,2-dichloroethane, 1,2-dichlorobutane, 1-chloro-2-methylpropane, 1,3-dichloropropane, 1,2-dichloropropane, 2-chloroethymethylether, 1-bromo-2-methylpropane and 1-chloropentane. N-methyl-N-nitrosourea served as the positive and distilled water as the negative control. The set of chemicals for the toxicological testing was selected by the use of statistical experiment design. Group of unsaturated aliphatic hydrocarbons were generally more toxic than saturated analogues. The genotoxic effect was observed with 14 compounds in the wing spot test, while 3 substances did not show any genotoxicity by using the wing spot test at 50% lethal concentration. The highest number of wing spots was observed in genotoxicity assay with 1-bromo-2-chloroethane, 1,2-dichloroethane, 1,2-dibromoethane and 1-iodopropane. Nucleophilic superdelocalizability calculated by quantum mechanics appears to be a good parameter for prediction of both toxicity and genotoxicity effects of halogenated aliphatic compounds.

  19. Flight test results from a supercritical mission adaptive wing with smooth variable camber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, Sheryll Goecke; Webb, Lannie D.; Friend, Edward L.; Lokos, William A.

    1992-01-01

    The mission adaptive wing (MAW) consisted of leading- and trailing-edge variable-camber surfaces that could be deflected in flight to provide a near-ideal wing camber shape for any flight condition. These surfaces featured smooth, flexible upper surfaces and fully enclosed lower surfaces, distinguishing them from conventional flaps that have discontinuous surfaces and exposed or semiexposed mechanisms. Camber shape was controlled by either a manual or automatic flight control system. The wing and aircraft were extensively instrumented to evaluate the local flow characteristics and the total aircraft performance. This paper discusses the interrelationships between the wing pressure, buffet, boundary-layer and flight deflection measurement system analyses and describes the flight maneuvers used to obtain the data. The results are for a wing sweep of 26 deg, a Mach number of 0.85, leading and trailing-edge cambers (delta(sub LE/TE)) of 0/2 and 5/10, and angles of attack from 3.0 deg to 14.0 deg. For the well-behaved flow of the delta(sub LE/TE) = 0/2 camber, a typical cruise camber shape, the local and global data are in good agreement with respect to the flow properties of the wing. For the delta(sub LE/TE) = 5/10 camber, a maneuvering camber shape, the local and global data have similar trends and conclusions, but not the clear-cut agreement observed for cruise camber.

  20. Full-scale semi-span tests of an advanced NLF business jet wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahne, David E.; Jordan, Frank L., Jr.; Davis, Patrick J.; Muchmore, C. Byram

    1987-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted in the NASA Langley Research Center's 30- by 60-Foot Wind Tunnel on a full-scale semispan model to evaluate and document the low-speed, high-lift characteristics of a business-jet class wing utilizing the HSNLF(1)-0213 airfoil section and a single slotted flap system. In addition to the high-lift studies, evaluations of boundary layer transition effects, the effectiveness of a segmented leading-edge droop for improved stall/spin resistance, and roll control effectiveness with and without flap deflection were made. The wind-tunnel investigation showed that deployment of a single-slotted trailing-edge flap provided substantial increments in lift. Fixed transition studies indicated no adverse effects on lift and pitching-moment characteristics for either the cruise or landing configuration. Subscale roll damping tests also indicated that stall/spin resistance could be enhanced through the use of a properly designed leading-edge droop.

  1. Aeroservoelastic Model Validation and Test Data Analysis of the F/A-18 Active Aeroelastic Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brenner, Martin J.; Prazenica, Richard J.

    2003-01-01

    Model validation and flight test data analysis require careful consideration of the effects of uncertainty, noise, and nonlinearity. Uncertainty prevails in the data analysis techniques and results in a composite model uncertainty from unmodeled dynamics, assumptions and mechanics of the estimation procedures, noise, and nonlinearity. A fundamental requirement for reliable and robust model development is an attempt to account for each of these sources of error, in particular, for model validation, robust stability prediction, and flight control system development. This paper is concerned with data processing procedures for uncertainty reduction in model validation for stability estimation and nonlinear identification. F/A-18 Active Aeroelastic Wing (AAW) aircraft data is used to demonstrate signal representation effects on uncertain model development, stability estimation, and nonlinear identification. Data is decomposed using adaptive orthonormal best-basis and wavelet-basis signal decompositions for signal denoising into linear and nonlinear identification algorithms. Nonlinear identification from a wavelet-based Volterra kernel procedure is used to extract nonlinear dynamics from aeroelastic responses, and to assist model development and uncertainty reduction for model validation and stability prediction by removing a class of nonlinearity from the uncertainty.

  2. Aero-Structural Optimization of HSCT Configurations in Transonic and Supersonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alonso, Juan J.

    1999-01-01

    This document outlines the progress made under NASA Cooperative Research Agreement NCC2- 5226 for the period 10/01/97-09/30/98. The work statement originally proposed was meant to extend over the period of two complete years of which only one was funded. Consequently, only a portion of the goals were achieved. Similar work will continue in our group under different sponsorship and will be available in the form of conference and journal publications. The following sections summarize the technical accomplishments obtained during the last year. Details of these accomplishments can be found in the accompanying paper that was presented at the AIAA 37th Aerospace Sciences and Exhibit Meeting which was held in Reno, NV in January of this year. The original proposal outlined a research program meant to lay down the foundation for the development of high-fidelity, fully-coupled aerodynamic/structural optimization methods applicable to a variety of aerospace applications including the design optimization of High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) configurations. The necessary research and development work was divided into two main efforts which addressed the necessities of the long term goal. Initially, our experience in the simulation of unsteady aeroelastic flows was directly applied to existing aerodynamic optimization techniques in order to provide insight into the effects of aeroelastic deformations on the performance of aircraft which have been designed based on purely aerodynamic cost functions. The intention was to follow up this work with a detailed investigation into the basic research work that has to be completed for the development of an optimization framework which efficiently allows the truly coupled design of aero-structural systems. This follow-up effort was not funded. The outcome of our efforts during the past year was the development of a coupled aero-structural analysis and design environment that was applied to the design of a complete aircraft configuration.

  3. Some steady and oscillating airfoil test results, including the effects of sweep, from the tunnel spanning wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carta, F. O.; St.hilaire, A. O.; Rorke, J. B.; Jepson, W. D.

    1979-01-01

    A large scale tunnel spanning wing was built and tested. The model can be operated as either a swept or unswept wing and can be tested in steady state or oscillated sinusoidally in pitch about its quarter chord. Data is taken at mid-span with an internal 6-component balance and is also obtained from miniature pressure transducers distributed near the center span region. A description is given of the system and a brief discussion of some of the steady and unsteady results obtained to date. These are the steady load behavior to Mach numbers of approximately 1.1 and unsteady loads, including drag, at a reduced frequency of approximately 0.1.

  4. Quiet Clean Short-haul Experimental Engine (QCSEE) under-the-wing engine composite fan blade: Preliminary design test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Results of tests conducted on preliminary design polymeric-composite fan blade for the under the wing (UTW) OCSEE engine are presented. During this phase of the program a total of 17preliminary OCSEE UTW composite fan blades were manufactured for various component tests including frequency characteristics, strain distribution, bench fatigue, dovetail pull, whirligig overspeed and whirligig impact. All tests were successfully completed with the exception of whirligig impact tests. Improvements in local impact capability are being evaluated for the OCSEE blade under other NASA and related programs.

  5. Computational Test Cases for a Clipped Delta Wing with Pitching and Trailing-Edge Control Surface Oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Robert M.; Walker, Charlotte E.

    1999-01-01

    Computational test cases have been selected from the data set for a clipped delta wing with a six-percent-thick circular-arc airfoil section that was tested in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel. The test cases include parametric variation of static angle of attack, pitching oscillation frequency, trailing-edge control surface oscillation frequency, and Mach numbers from subsonic to low supersonic values. Tables and plots of the measured pressures are presented for each case. This report provides an early release of test cases that have been proposed for a document that supplements the cases presented in AGARD Report 702.

  6. Low-speed aerodynamic characteristics from wind-tunnel tests of a large-scale advanced arrow-wing supersonic-cruise transport concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, P. M.

    1978-01-01

    Tests have been conducted to extend the existing low speed aerodynamic data base of advanced supersonic-cruise arrow wing configurations. Principle configuration variables included wing leading-edge flap deflection, wing trailing-edge flap deflection, horizontal tail effectiveness, and fuselage forebody strakes. A limited investigation was also conducted to determine the low speed aerodynamic effects due to slotted training-edge flaps. Results of this investigation demonstrate that deflecting the wing leading-edge flaps downward to suppress the wing apex vortices provides improved static longitudinal stability; however, it also results in significantly reduced static directional stability. The use of a selected fuselage forebody strakes is found to be effective in increasing the level of positive static directional stability. Drooping the fuselage nose, which is required for low-speed pilot vision, significantly improves the later-directional trim characteristics.

  7. Ice-Accretion Test Results for Three Large-Scale Swept-Wing Models in the NASA Icing Research Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broeren, Andy P.; Potapczuk, Mark G.; Lee, Sam; Malone, Adam M.; Paul, Bernard P., Jr.; Woodard, Brian S.

    2016-01-01

    Icing simulation tools and computational fluid dynamics codes are reaching levels of maturity such that they are being proposed by manufacturers for use in certification of aircraft for flight in icing conditions with increasingly less reliance on natural-icing flight testing and icing-wind-tunnel testing. Sufficient high-quality data to evaluate the performance of these tools is not currently available. The objective of this work was to generate a database of ice-accretion geometry that can be used for development and validation of icing simulation tools as well as for aerodynamic testing. Three large-scale swept wing models were built and tested at the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel (IRT). The models represented the Inboard (20 percent semispan), Midspan (64 percent semispan) and Outboard stations (83 percent semispan) of a wing based upon a 65 percent scale version of the Common Research Model (CRM). The IRT models utilized a hybrid design that maintained the full-scale leading-edge geometry with a truncated afterbody and flap. The models were instrumented with surface pressure taps in order to acquire sufficient aerodynamic data to verify the hybrid model design capability to simulate the full-scale wing section. A series of ice-accretion tests were conducted over a range of total temperatures from -23.8 to -1.4 C with all other conditions held constant. The results showed the changing ice-accretion morphology from rime ice at the colder temperatures to highly 3-D scallop ice in the range of -11.2 to -6.3 C. Warmer temperatures generated highly 3-D ice accretion with glaze ice characteristics. The results indicated that the general scallop ice morphology was similar for all three models. Icing results were documented for limited parametric variations in angle of attack, drop size and cloud liquid-water content (LWC). The effect of velocity on ice accretion was documented for the Midspan and Outboard models for a limited number of test cases. The data suggest

  8. Ice-Accretion Test Results for Three Large-Scale Swept-Wing Models in the NASA Icing Research Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broeren, Andy P.; Potapczuk, Mark G.; Lee, Sam; Malone, Adam M.; Paul, Benard P., Jr.; Woodard, Brian S.

    2016-01-01

    Icing simulation tools and computational fluid dynamics codes are reaching levels of maturity such that they are being proposed by manufacturers for use in certification of aircraft for flight in icing conditions with increasingly less reliance on natural-icing flight testing and icing-wind-tunnel testing. Sufficient high-quality data to evaluate the performance of these tools is not currently available. The objective of this work was to generate a database of ice-accretion geometry that can be used for development and validation of icing simulation tools as well as for aerodynamic testing. Three large-scale swept wing models were built and tested at the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel (IRT). The models represented the Inboard (20% semispan), Midspan (64% semispan) and Outboard stations (83% semispan) of a wing based upon a 65% scale version of the Common Research Model (CRM). The IRT models utilized a hybrid design that maintained the full-scale leading-edge geometry with a truncated afterbody and flap. The models were instrumented with surface pressure taps in order to acquire sufficient aerodynamic data to verify the hybrid model design capability to simulate the full-scale wing section. A series of ice-accretion tests were conducted over a range of total temperatures from -23.8 deg C to -1.4 deg C with all other conditions held constant. The results showed the changing ice-accretion morphology from rime ice at the colder temperatures to highly 3-D scallop ice in the range of -11.2 deg C to -6.3 deg C. Warmer temperatures generated highly 3-D ice accretion with glaze ice characteristics. The results indicated that the general scallop ice morphology was similar for all three models. Icing results were documented for limited parametric variations in angle of attack, drop size and cloud liquid-water content (LWC). The effect of velocity on ice accretion was documented for the Midspan and Outboard models for a limited number of test cases. The data suggest that

  9. Transonic and Supersonic Wind-Tunnel Tests of Wing-Body Combinations Designed for High Efficiency at a Mach Number of 1.41

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, Frederick C.; Sevier, John R., Jr.

    1960-01-01

    Wind-tunnel force tests of a number of wing-body combinations designed for high lift-drag ratio at a Mach number of 1.41 are reported. Five wings and six bodies were used in making up the various wing-body combinations investigated. All the wings had the same highly swept dis- continuously tapered plan form with NACA 65A-series airfoil sections 4 percent thick at the root tapering linearly to 3 percent thick at the tip. The bodies were based on the area distribution of a Sears-Haack body of revolution for minimum drag with a given length and volume. These wings and bodies were used to determine the effects of wing twist., wing twist and camber, wing leading-edge droop, a change from circular to elliptical body cross-sectional shape, and body indentation by the area-rule and streamline methods. The supersonic test Mach numbers were 1.41 and 2.01. The transonic test Mach number range was from 0.6 to 1.2. For the transition-fixed condition and at a Reynolds number of 2.7 x 10(exp 6) based on the mean aerodynamic chord, the maximum value of lift- drag ratio at a Mach number of 1.41 was 9.6 for a combination with a twisted wing and an indented body of elliptical cross section. The tests indicated that the transonic rise in minimum drag was low and did not change appreciably up to the highest test Mach number of 2.01. The lower values of lift-drag ratio obtained at a Mach number of 2.01 can be attributed to the increase of drag due to lift with Mach number.

  10. Thermographic testing used on the X-33 space launch vehicle program by BFGoodrich Aerospace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burleigh, Douglas D.

    1999-03-01

    The X-33 program is a team effort sponsored by NASA under Cooperative Agreement NCC8-115, and led by the Lockheed Martin Corporation. Team member BFGoodrich Aerospace Aerostructures Group (formerly Rohr) is responsible for design, manufacture, and integration of the Thermal Protection System (TPS) of the X-33 launch vehicle. The X-33 is a half-scale, experimental prototype of a vehicle called RLV (Reusable Launch Vehicle) or VentureStarTM, an SSTO (single stage to orbit) vehicle, which is a proposed successor to the aging Space Shuttle. Thermographic testing has been employed by BFGoodrich Aerospace Aerostructures Group for a wide variety of uses in the testing of components of the X-33. Thermographic NDT (TNDT) has been used for inspecting large graphite- epoxy/aluminum honeycomb sandwich panels used on the Leeward Aeroshell structure of the X-33. And TNDT is being evaluated for use in inspecting carbon-carbon composite parts such as the nosecap and wing leading edge components. Pulsed Infrared Testing (PIRT), a special form of TNDT, is used for the routine inspection of sandwich panels made of brazed inconel honeycomb and facesheets. In the developmental and qualification testing of sub-elements of the X-33, thermography has been used to monitor (1) Arc Jet tests at NASA Ames Research Center in Mountain view, CA and NASA Johnson Space Center in Houston, TX, (2) High Temperature (wind) Tunnel Tests (HTT) at Nasa Langley Research Center in Langley, VA, and (3) Hot Gas Tests at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL.

  11. Thermographic Testing Using on the X-33 Space Launch Vehicle Program by BFGoodrich Aerospace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burleigh, Douglas

    1999-01-01

    The X-33 program is a team effort sponsored by NASA, under Cooperative Agreement NCC8-115, and led by the Lockheed Martin Corporation. Team member BFGoodrich Aerospace Aerostructures Group (formerly Rohr) is responsible for design, manufacture, and integration of the Thermal Protection System (TPS) of the X-33 launch vehicle. The X-33 is a half-scale, experimental prototype of a vehicle called RLV (Reusable Launch Vehicle) or VentureStar(Trademark), an SSTO (single stage to orbit) vehicle, which is a proposed successor to the aging Space Shuttle. Thermographic testing has been employed by BFGoodrich Aerospace Aerostructures Group for a wide variety of uses in the testing of components of the X-33. Thermographic NDT (TNDT) has been used for inspecting large graphite-epoxy/aluminum honeycomb sandwich panels used on the Leeward Aeroshell structure of the X-33. And TNDT is being evaluated for use in inspecting carbon-carbon composite parts such as the nosecap and wing leading edge components. Pulsed Infrared Testing (PIRT), a special form of TNDT, is used for the routine inspection of sandwich panels made of brazed inconel honeycomb and facesheets. In the developmental and qualification testing of sub-elements of the X-33, thermography has been used to monitor 1) Arc Jet tests at NASA Ames Research Center in Mountainview, CA and NASA Johnson Space Center in Houston, TX, 2) High Temperature (wind) Tunnel Tests (HTT) at NASA Langley Research Center in Langley, VA, and 3) Hot Gas Tests at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL.

  12. Development of a thermal and structural model for a NASTRAN finite-element analysis of a hypersonic wing test structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lameris, J.

    1984-01-01

    The development of a thermal and structural model for a hypersonic wing test structure using the NASTRAN finite-element method as its primary analytical tool is described. A detailed analysis was defined to obtain the temperature and thermal stress distribution in the whole wing as well as the five upper and lower root panels. During the development of the models, it was found that the thermal application of NASTRAN and the VIEW program, used for the generation of the radiation exchange coefficients, were definicent. Although for most of these deficiencies solutions could be found, the existence of one particular deficiency in the current thermal model prevented the final computation of the temperature distributions. A SPAR analysis of a single bay of the wing, using data converted from the original NASTRAN model, indicates that local temperature-time distributions can be obtained with good agreement with the test data. The conversion of the NASTRAN thermal model into a SPAR model is recommended to meet the immediate goal of obtaining an accurate thermal stress distribution.

  13. Low subsonic aerodynamic characteristics of five irregular planform wings with systematically varying wing fillet geometry tested in the NASA/Ames 12 foot pressure tunnel (LA65)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ball, J. W.; Watson, D. B.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental and analytical aerodynamic program to develop predesign guides for irregular planform wings (also referred to as cranked leading edge or double delta wings is reported; the benefits are linearization of subsonic lift curve slope to high angles of attack and avoidance of subsonic pitch instabilities at high lift by proper tailoring of the planform-fillet-wing combination while providing the desired hypersonic trim angle and stability. Because subsonic and hypersonic conditions were the two prime areas of concern in the initial application of this program to optimize shuttle orbiter landing and entry characteristics, the study was designated the Subsonic/Hypersonic Irregular Planforms Study (SHIPS).

  14. Wind tunnel pressure distribution tests on a series of biplane wing models Part II : effects of changes in decalage, dihedral, sweepback and overhang

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Montgomery; Noyes, Richard W

    1929-01-01

    This preliminary report furnishes information on the changes in the forces on each wing of a biplane cellule when the decalage, dihedral, sweepback and overhang are separately varied. The data were obtained from pressure distribution tests made in the Atmospheric Wind Tunnel of the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory. Since each test was carried up to 90 degree angle of attack, the results may be used in the study of stalled flight and of spinning and in the structural design of biplane wings.

  15. Design and Testing of a Morphing Wing for an Experimental UAV

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-01

    line through the use of conformal flaps [6]. Variable cant angle winglets [7] and variable span wing [8] research has also been made. RTO-MP-AVT...A.Gatto and M.I. Friswell, “The Application of Variable Cant Angle Winglets for Morphing Aircraft Control”, University of Bristol, AIAA2006-3660, 2006

  16. Quiet Clean Short-Haul Experimental Engine (QCSEE) Over-The-Wing (OTW) propulsion system test report. Volume 1: Summary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Sea level, static, ground testing of the over-the-wing engine and boilerplate nacelle components was performed. The equipment tested and the test facility are described. Summaries of the instrumentations, the chronological history of the tests, and the test results are presented.

  17. Strain Gage Load Calibration of the Wing Interface Fittings for the Adaptive Compliant Trailing Edge Flap Flight Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Eric J.; Holguin, Andrew C.; Cruz, Josue; Lokos, William A.

    2014-01-01

    The safety-of-flight parameters for the Adaptive Compliant Trailing Edge (ACTE) flap experiment require that flap-to-wing interface loads be sensed and monitored in real time to ensure that the structural load limits of the wing are not exceeded. This paper discusses the strain gage load calibration testing and load equation derivation methodology for the ACTE interface fittings. Both the left and right wing flap interfaces were monitored; each contained four uniquely designed and instrumented flap interface fittings. The interface hardware design and instrumentation layout are discussed. Twenty-one applied test load cases were developed using the predicted in-flight loads. Pre-test predictions of strain gage responses were produced using finite element method models of the interface fittings. Predicted and measured test strains are presented. A load testing rig and three hydraulic jacks were used to apply combinations of shear, bending, and axial loads to the interface fittings. Hardware deflections under load were measured using photogrammetry and transducers. Due to deflections in the interface fitting hardware and test rig, finite element model techniques were used to calculate the reaction loads throughout the applied load range, taking into account the elastically-deformed geometry. The primary load equations were selected based on multiple calibration metrics. An independent set of validation cases was used to validate each derived equation. The 2-sigma residual errors for the shear loads were less than eight percent of the full-scale calibration load; the 2-sigma residual errors for the bending moment loads were less than three percent of the full-scale calibration load. The derived load equations for shear, bending, and axial loads are presented, with the calculated errors for both the calibration cases and the independent validation load cases.

  18. Transonic pressure measurements and comparison of theory to experiment for an arrow-wing configuration. Volume 1: Experimental data report, base configuration and effects of wing twist and leading-edge configuration. [wind tunnel tests, aircraft models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manro, M. E.; Manning, K. J. R.; Hallstaff, T. H.; Rogers, J. T.

    1975-01-01

    A wind tunnel test of an arrow-wing-body configuration consisting of flat and twisted wings, as well as a variety of leading- and trailing-edge control surface deflections, was conducted at Mach numbers from 0.4 to 1.1 to provide an experimental pressure data base for comparison with theoretical methods. Theory-to-experiment comparisons of detailed pressure distributions were made using current state-of-the-art attached and separated flow methods. The purpose of these comparisons was to delineate conditions under which these theories are valid for both flat and twisted wings and to explore the use of empirical methods to correct the theoretical methods where theory is deficient.

  19. Wind-Tunnel Tests on a Series of Wing Models Through a Large Angle of Attack Range. Part I : Force Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Montgomery; Wenzinger, Carl J

    1930-01-01

    This investigation covers force tests through a large range of angle of attack on a series of monoplane and biplane wing models. The tests were conducted in the atmospheric wind tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. The models were arranged in such a manner as to make possible a determination of the effects of variations in tip shape, aspect ratio, flap setting, stagger, gap, decalage, sweep back, and airfoil profile. The arrangements represented most of the types of wing systems in use on modern airplanes. The effect of each variable is illustrated by means of groups of curves. In addition, there are included approximate autorotational characteristics in the form of calculated ranges of "rotary instability." a correction for blocking in this tunnel which applies to monoplanes at large angles of attack has been developed, and is given in an appendix. (author)

  20. Correlation of Structural Analysis and Test Results for the McDonnell Douglas Stitched/RFI All-Composite Wing Stub Box

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, John T.; Jegley, Dawn C.; Bush, Harold G.; Hinrichs, Stephen C.

    1996-01-01

    The analytical and experimental results of an all-composite wing stub box are presented in this report. The wing stub box, which is representative of an inboard portion of a commercial transport high-aspect-ratio wing, was fabricated from stitched graphite-epoxy material with a Resin Film Infusion manufacturing process. The wing stub box was designed and constructed by the McDonnell Douglas Aerospace Company as part of the NASA Advanced Composites Technology program. The test article contained metallic load-introduction structures on the inboard and outboard ends of the graphite-epoxy wing stub box. The root end of the inboard load introduction structure was attached to a vertical reaction structure, and an upward load was applied to the outermost tip of the outboard load introduction structure to induce bending of the wing stub box. A finite element model was created in which the center portion of the wing-stub-box upper cover panel was modeled with a refined mesh. The refined mesh was required to represent properly the geometrically nonlinear structural behavior of the upper cover panel and to predict accurately the strains in the stringer webs of the stiffened upper cover panel. The analytical and experimental results for deflections and strains are in good agreement.

  1. Ground Vibration and Flight Flutter Tests of the Single-seat F-16XL Aircraft with a Modified Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voracek, David F.

    1993-01-01

    The NASA single-seat F-16XL aircraft was modified by the addition of a glove to the left wing. Vibration tests were conducted on the ground to assess the changes to the aircraft caused by the glove. Flight Luther testing was conducted on the aircraft with the glove installed to ensure that the flight envelope was free of aeroelastic or aeroservoelastic instabilities. The ground vibration tests showed that above 20 Hz, several modes that involved the control surfaces were significantly changed. Flight test data showed that modal damping levels and trends were satisfactory where obtainable. The data presented in this report include estimated modal parameters from the ground vibration and flight flutter test.

  2. Prediction of in-depth gap heating ratios from wing glove model test data. [space shuttle orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    In-depth gap heating ratios were predicted down RSI tile sidewalls based on temperature measurements obtained from the JSC arc-jet Wing Glove model tests in order to develop gap heating ratios which resulted in the best possible fit of test data and to produce a set of engineering verification heating ratios similar in shape to one another which could be used at various body points on the Orbiter during reentry. The Rockwell TPS Multidimensional heat conduction program was used to perform 3-D thermal analyses using a 3.0 in. thick section of a curved RSI tile with 283 nodal points. Correlation with test data shows that the predicted heating ratios were significantly higher down in the gap than the zero pressure values for T/C stacks 39 and 38 on the Wing Glove model. For stack 37 (in a low pressure region), the baseline heating ratio overpredicted the temperature data. This analysis, which showed that the heating ratios were a strong function of the product of pressure and pressure gradient, will be used to compare with recent Gap/Step and Ames Double Wedge test/analysis results in the effort to identify the Orbiter gap response to high delta P flight environment.

  3. Survey of wing and flap lower-surface temperatures and pressures during full-scale ground tests of an externally blown flap system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, D. L.

    1972-01-01

    Full-scale ground tests of an externally blown flap system were made using the wing of an F-111B airplane and a CF700 engine. Pressure and temperature distributions were determined on the undersurface of the wing, vane, and flap for two engine exhaust nozzles (conical and daisy) at several engine power and engine/wing positions. The tests were made with no airflow over the wing. The leading-edge wing sweep angle was fixed at 26 deg, the angle of incidence between the engine and the wing was fixed at 3 deg, and the tests were conducted with the flap retracted, extended and deflected 35 deg, and extended and deflected 60 deg. The integrated local pressures on the undersurface of the flap produced loads approximately three times as great at the 60 deg flap position as at the 35 deg flap position. With both nozzle configurations, more than 90 percent of the integrated pressure loads were contained within plus or minus 20 percent of the flap span centered around the engine exhaust centerline. The maximum temperature recorded on the flaps was 218 C (424 F) for the conical nozzle and 180 C (356 F) for the daisy nozzle.

  4. Tests of Nacelle-propeller Combinations in Various Positions with Reference to Wings. Part I : Thick Wing-N.A.C.A. Cowled Nacelle-Tractor Propeller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Donald H

    1933-01-01

    This report gives the results in the 20-foot propeller research tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics on the interference drag and propulsive efficiency of a nacelle-propeller combination located in 21 positions with reference to a thick wing. The lift, drag, and propulsive efficiency were obtained at several angles of attack for each of the 21 locations. A net efficiency was derived for determining the over-all effectiveness of each nacelle location. Best results were obtained with the propeller about 25 per cent of the chord directly ahead of the leading edge. A location immediately above or below the wing near the leading edge was very poor.

  5. Design and Testing of a Blended Wing Body With Boundary Layer Ingestion Nacelles at High Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Richard L.; Carter, Melissa B.; Pendergraft, Odis C., Jr.; Friedman, Douglas M.; Serrano, Leonel

    2005-01-01

    A knowledge-based aerodynamic design method coupled with an unstructured grid Navier-Stokes flow solver was used to improve the propulsion/airframe integration for a Blended Wing Body with boundary-layer ingestion nacelles. A new zonal design capability was used that significantly reduced the time required to achieve a successful design for each nacelle and the elevon between them. A wind tunnel model was built with interchangeable parts reflecting the baseline and redesigned configurations and tested in the National Transonic Facility (NTF). Most of the testing was done at the cruise design conditions (Mach number = 0.85, Reynolds number = 75 million). In general, the predicted improvements in forces and moments as well as the changes in wing pressures between the baseline and redesign were confirmed by the wind tunnel results. The effectiveness of elevons between the nacelles was also predicted surprisingly well considering the crudeness in the modeling of the control surfaces in the flow code. A novel flow visualization technique involving pressure sensitive paint in the cryogenic nitrogen environment used in high-Reynolds number testing in the NTF was also investigated.

  6. Incorporation of Half-Cycle Theory Into Ko Aging Theory for Aerostructural Flight-Life Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Tran, Van T.; Chen, Tony

    2007-01-01

    The half-cycle crack growth theory was incorporated into the Ko closed-form aging theory to improve accuracy in the predictions of operational flight life of failure-critical aerostructural components. A new crack growth computer program was written for reading the maximum and minimum loads of each half-cycle from the random loading spectra for crack growth calculations and generation of in-flight crack growth curves. The unified theories were then applied to calculate the number of flights (operational life) permitted for B-52B pylon hooks and Pegasus adapter pylon hooks to carry the Hyper-X launching vehicle that air launches the X-43 Hyper-X research vehicle. A crack growth curve for each hook was generated for visual observation of the crack growth behavior during the entire air-launching or captive flight. It was found that taxiing and the takeoff run induced a major portion of the total crack growth per flight. The operational life theory presented can be applied to estimate the service life of any failure-critical structural components.

  7. Constrained simultaneous multi-state reconfigurable wing structure configuration optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Matthew

    A reconfigurable aircraft is capable of in-flight shape change to increase mission performance or provide multi-mission capability. Reconfigurability has always been a consideration in aircraft design, from the Wright Flyer, to the F-14, and most recently the Lockheed-Martin folding wing concept. The Wright Flyer used wing-warping for roll control, the F-14 had a variable-sweep wing to improve supersonic flight capabilities, and the Lockheed-Martin folding wing demonstrated radical in-flight shape change. This dissertation will examine two questions that aircraft reconfigurability raises, especially as reconfiguration increases in complexity. First, is there an efficient method to develop a light weight structure which supports all the loads generated by each configuration? Second, can this method include the capability to propose a sub-structure topology that weighs less than other considered designs? The first question requires a method that will design and optimize multiple configurations of a reconfigurable aerostructure. Three options exist, this dissertation will show one is better than the others. Simultaneous optimization considers all configurations and their respective load cases and constraints at the same time. Another method is sequential optimization which considers each configuration of the vehicle one after the other - with the optimum design variable values from the first configuration becoming the lower bounds for subsequent configurations. This process repeats for each considered configuration and the lower bounds update as necessary. The third approach is aggregate combination — this method keeps the thickness or area of each member for the most critical configuration, the configuration that requires the largest cross-section. This research will show that simultaneous optimization produces a lower weight and different topology for the considered structures when compared to the sequential and aggregate techniques. To answer the second question

  8. Design Considerations for a UCAV Wing for Subsonic and Transonic Aeroelastic and Flight Mechanic Wind Tunnel Tests

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-01

    actuation device in the wing will increase the model complexity considerably and very probably stiffen the wing considerably. Figure 6: Desing ...7] http://www.denel.co.za/Aerospace/UAV.asp [8] http://www.aoe.vt.edu/ research /groups/ucav/ [9] Kudva, J.N.: Overview of the DARPA Smart Wing

  9. Biomimetic Micro Air Vehicle Testing Development and Small Scale Flapping-Wing Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    Gautam, J ., and Massey, K ., “The Development of a Miniature Flexible Flapping Wing Mechanism for Use in a Robotic Air Vehicle,” 45th AIAA Aerospace...Air Vehicles in the Service of Air Force Missions”’ Occasional Paper No. 29, Air War College, Jul. 2002. Isaac, K ., Colozza, A., Rolwes, J ., “Force...358, No. 1437, 29 Sept. 2003, pp. 1577-1587. PA, 1997. Noonan, K ., Yeager, W., Singleton, J ., Wilbur, M., Mirick, Paul H., “Wind Tunnel Evaluation

  10. Antimutagenic Effect of Dioscorea Pentaphylla on Genotoxic Effect Induced By Methyl Methanesulfonate in the Drosophila Wing Spot Test

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, G.; Hosetti, B. B.; Dhananjaya, B. L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Plants as dietary sources are known to have several chemoprotective agents. Dioscorea pentaphylla is an important medicinal plant, which is often used as edible food. This study was undertaken to evaluate the antigenotoxic potential of D. pentaphylla extracts on the genotoxic effect induced by methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) in the Drosophila wing spot test. Materials and Methods: The somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART) was carried out in Drosophila melanogaster. In transheterogyous larvae, multiple wing hair (mwh 3-0.3) and flare (flr3-38.8) genes were used as markers of the extent of mutagenicity. Results: It was observed thatall the three extracts (petroleum ether, choloroform, and ethyl alcohol) in the combined treatment had significantly inhibited the effect of MMS-induced genotoxic effects. When compared to others, the ethanol extract showed a very significant antimutagenic activity. Conclusion: The compounds that are present in the extracts may directly interact with the methyl radical groups of MMS and inactivate them by chemical reaction. It is also possible that the compounds in the extract compete to interact with the nucleophilic sites in deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), thus altering the binding of the mutagen to these sites. Although our results indicate that the compounds present in the extracts may directly interact with the methyl radical groups of MMS and inactivate them by chemical reaction, it may also be quite interesting to investigate through the other different mechanisms by which D. pentaphylla could interfere in vivo on the effect of genotoxic agents. PMID:25948963

  11. Analysis and Test Correlation of Proof of Concept Box for Blended Wing Body-Low Speed Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spellman, Regina L.

    2003-01-01

    The Low Speed Vehicle (LSV) is a 14.2% scale remotely piloted vehicle of the revolutionary Blended Wing Body concept. The design of the LSV includes an all composite airframe. Due to internal manufacturing capability restrictions, room temperature layups were necessary. An extensive materials testing and manufacturing process development effort was underwent to establish a process that would achieve the high modulus/low weight properties required to meet the design requirements. The analysis process involved a loads development effort that incorporated aero loads to determine internal forces that could be applied to a traditional FEM of the vehicle and to conduct detailed component analyses. A new tool, Hypersizer, was added to the design process to address various composite failure modes and to optimize the skin panel thickness of the upper and lower skins for the vehicle. The analysis required an iterative approach as material properties were continually changing. As a part of the material characterization effort, test articles, including a proof of concept wing box and a full-scale wing, were fabricated. The proof of concept box was fabricated based on very preliminary material studies and tested in bending, torsion, and shear. The box was then tested to failure under shear. The proof of concept box was also analyzed using Nastran and Hypersizer. The results of both analyses were scaled to determine the predicted failure load. The test results were compared to both the Nastran and Hypersizer analytical predictions. The actual failure occurred at 899 lbs. The failure was predicted at 1167 lbs based on the Nastran analysis. The Hypersizer analysis predicted a lower failure load of 960 lbs. The Nastran analysis alone was not sufficient to predict the failure load because it does not identify local composite failure modes. This analysis has traditionally been done using closed form solutions. Although Hypersizer is typically used as an optimizer for the design

  12. Avian Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Tianshu; Kuykendoll, K.; Rhew, R.; Jones, S.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the avian wing geometry (Seagull, Merganser, Teal and Owl) extracted from non-contact surface measurements using a three-dimensional laser scanner. The geometric quantities, including the camber line and thickness distribution of airfoil, wing planform, chord distribution, and twist distribution, are given in convenient analytical expressions. Thus, the avian wing surfaces can be generated and the wing kinematics can be simulated. The aerodynamic characteristics of avian airfoils in steady inviscid flows are briefly discussed. The avian wing kinematics is recovered from videos of three level-flying birds (Crane, Seagull and Goose) based on a two-jointed arm model. A flapping seagull wing in the 3D physical space is re-constructed from the extracted wing geometry and kinematics.

  13. Program for establishing long-time flight service performance of composite materials in the center wing structure of C-130 aircraft. Phase 4: Ground/flight acceptance tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvill, W. E.; Kizer, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    The advantageous structural uses of advanced filamentary composites are demonstrated by design, fabrication, and test of three boron-epoxy reinforced C-130 center wing boxes. The advanced development work necessary to support detailed design of a composite reinforced C-130 center wing box was conducted. Activities included the development of a basis for structural design, selection and verification of materials and processes, manufacturing and tooling development, and fabrication and test of full-scale portions of the center wing box. Detailed design drawings, and necessary analytical structural substantiation including static strength, fatigue endurance, flutter, and weight analyses are considered. Some additional component testing was conducted to verify the design for panel buckling, and to evaluate specific local design areas. Development of the cool tool restraint concept was completed, and bonding capabilities were evaluated using full-length skin panel and stringer specimens.

  14. Test-Analysis Correlation for Space Shuttle External Tank Foam Impacting RCC Wing Leading Edge Component Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyle, Karen H.

    2008-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Columbia Accident Investigation Board recommended that NASA develop, validate, and maintain a modeling tool capable of predicting the damage threshold for debris impacts on the Space Shuttle Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) wing leading edge and nosecap assembly. The results presented in this paper are one part of a multi-level approach that supported the development of the predictive tool used to recertify the shuttle for flight following the Columbia Accident. The assessment of predictive capability was largely based on test analysis comparisons for simpler component structures. This paper provides comparisons of finite element simulations with test data for external tank foam debris impacts onto 6-in. square RCC flat panels. Both quantitative displacement and qualitative damage assessment correlations are provided. The comparisons show good agreement and provided the Space Shuttle Program with confidence in the predictive tool.

  15. Low-Speed Wind-Tunnel Tests of a Pilotless Aircraft Having Horizontal and Vertical Wings and Cruciform Tail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mastrocola, N; Assadourian, A

    1947-01-01

    Low-speed tests of a pilotless aircraft were conducted in the Langley propeller-research tunnel to provide information for the estimation of the longitudinal stability and. control, to measure the aileron effectiveness, and to calibrate the radome and the Machmeter pitot-static orifices. It was found that the model possessed a stEb.le variation of elevator angle required for trim throughout the speed range at the design angle of attack. A comparison of the airplane with and without JATO units and with an alternate rocket booster showed that a large loss in longitudinal stability and control resulting from the addition of the rocket booster to the aircraft was sufficient to make the rocket-booster assembly unsatisfactory as an alternate for the JATO units. Reversal of the aileron effectiveness was evident at positive deflections of the vertical wing flap indicating that the roll-stabilization system would produce roiling moments in a tight right turn contrary to its design purpose. Vertical-wing-flap deflections caused large errors in the static-pressure reading obtained by the original static-tube installation. A practical installation point on the fuselage was located which should yield reliable measurement of the free-stream static pressure.

  16. Tests of Nacelle-Propeller Combinations in Various Positions with Reference to Wings V : Clark Y Biplane Cellule - NACA Cowled Nacelle - Tractor Propeller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valentine, E Floyd

    1935-01-01

    This report is the fifth of a series giving the results obtained from wind tunnel tests on the interference drag and propulsive efficiency of nacelle-propeller-wing combinations. This report gives results of tests of an NACA cowled air-cooled engine nacelle with tractor propeller located in 12 positions with reference to a Clark Y biplane cellule.

  17. Quiet Clean Short-haul Experimental Engine (QCSEE) Under-The-Wing (UTW) engine composite nacelle test report. Volume 1: Summary, aerodynamic and mechanical performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The performance test results of the final under-the-wing engine configuration are presented. One hundred and six hours of engine operation were completed, including mechanical and performance checkout, baseline acoustic testing with a bellmouth inlet, reverse thrust testing, acoustic technology tests, and limited controls testing. The engine includes a variable pitch fan having advanced composite fan blades and using a ball-spline pitch actuation system.

  18. Antigenotoxic effects of Citrus aurentium L. fruit peel oil on mutagenicity of two alkylating agents and two metals in the Drosophila wing spot test.

    PubMed

    Demir, Eşref; Kocaoğlu, Serap; Cetin, Huseyin; Kaya, Bülent

    2009-07-01

    Antigenotoxic effects of Citrus aurentium L. (Rutaceae) fruit peel oil (CPO) in combination with mutagenic metals and alkylating agents were studied using the wing spot test of D. melanogaster. The four reference mutagens, potassium dichromate (K2Cr2O7), cobalt chloride (CoCl2), ethylmethanesulfonate (EMS), and N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) were clearly genotoxic. CPO alone at doses from 0.1 to 0.5% in Tween 80 was not mutagenic and did not enhance the mutagenic effect of the reference mutagens. However, antigenotoxic effects of CPO were clearly demonstrated in chronic cotreatments with mutagens and oil, by a significant decrease in wing spots induced by all four mutagens. The D. melanogaster wing spot test was found to be a suitable assay for detecting antigenotoxic effects in vivo.

  19. Crash tests of four low-wing twin-engine airplanes with truss-reinforced fuselage structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, M. S.; Fasanella, E. L.

    1982-01-01

    Four six-place, low-wing, twin-engine, general aviation airplane test specimens were crash tested under controlled free flight conditions. All airplanes were impacted on a concrete test surface at a nomial flight path velocity of 27 m/sec. Two tests were conducted at a -15 deg flight path angle (0 deg pitch angle and 15 deg pitch angle), and two were conducted at a -30 deg flight path angle (-30 deg pitch angle). The average acceleration time histories (crash pulses) in the cabin area for each principal direction were calculated for each crash test. In addition, the peak floor accelerations were calculated for each test as a function of aircraft fuselage longitudinal station number. Anthropomorphic dummy accelerations were analyzed using the dynamic response index and severity index (SI) models. Parameters affecting the dummy restraint system were studied; these parameters included the effect of no upper torso restraint, measurement of the amount of inertia-reel strap pullout before locking, measurement of dummy chest forward motion, and loads in the restraints. With the SI model, the dummies with no shoulder harness received head impacts above the concussive threshold.

  20. Full-scale semispan tests of a business-jet wing with a natural laminar flow airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahne, David E.; Jordan, Frank L., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    A full-scale semispan model was investigated to evaluate and document the low-speed, high-lift characteristics of a business-jet class wing that utilized the HSNLF(1)-0213 airfoil section and a single-slotted flap system. Also, boundary-layer transition effects were examined, a segmented leading-edge droop for improved stall/spin resistance was studied, and two roll-controlled devices were evaluated. The wind-tunnel investigation showed that deployment of single-slotted, trailing-edge flap was effective in providing substantial increments in lift required for takeoff and landing performance. Fixed-transition studies to investigate premature tripping of the boundary layer indicated no adverse effects in lift and pitching-moment characteristics for either the cruise or landing configuration. The full-scale results also suggested the need to further optimize the leading-edge droop design that was developed in the subscale tests.

  1. SMA actuators for morphing wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brailovski, V.; Terriault, P.; Georges, T.; Coutu, D.

    An experimental morphing laminar wing was developed to prove the feasibility of aircraft fuel consumption reduction through enhancement of the laminar flow regime over the wing extrados. The morphing wing prototype designed for subsonic cruise flight conditions (Mach 0.2 … 0.3; angle of attack - 1 … +2∘), combines three principal subsystems: (1) flexible extrados, (2) rigid intrados and (3) an actuator group located inside the wing box. The morphing capability of the wing relies on controlled deformation of the wing extrados under the action of shape memory alloys (SMA) actuators. A coupled fluid-structure model of the morphing wing was used to evaluate its mechanical and aerodynamic performances in different flight conditions. A 0.5 m chord and 1 m span prototype of the morphing wing was tested in a subsonic wind tunnel. In this work, SMA actuators for morphing wings were modeled using a coupled thermo-mechanical finite element model and they were windtunnel validated. If the thermo-mechanical model of SMA actuators presented in this work is coupled with the previously developed structureaerodynamic model of the morphing wing, it could serve for the optimization of the entire morphing wing system.

  2. Effect of camber on the trimmed lift capability of a close-coupled canard-wing configuration. [test in the Langley high speed 7- by 10-foot tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gloss, B. B.

    1978-01-01

    A close-coupled canard-wing configuration was tested in the Langely high-speed 7 by 10 foot tunnel at a Mach number of 0.30 to determine the effect of changing wing camber on the trimmed lift capability. Trimmed lift coefficients of near 2.0 were attained; however, the data indicated that the highest buffet-free trimmed lift coefficient attainable was approximately 1.30. The buffet used in this investigation were qualitative in nature and gave no indication of buffet intensity. Thus, the trimmed lift coefficient of near 2.0 might be attainable if the buffet intensity was not too high. The data showed that there was approximately a 10 percent variation in drag coefficient, for different model configurations, at a given trimmed lift coefficient. Large increases in wing lift had only small effects on canard lift.

  3. Quiet Clean Short-haul Experimental Engine (QCSEE). Under-The-Wing (UTW) engine boilerplate nacelle test report. Volume 3: Mechanical performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Results of initial tests of the under the wing experimental engine and boilerplate nacelle are presented. The mechanical performance of the engine is reported with emphasis on the advanced technology components. Technology elements of the propulsion system covered include: system dynamics, composite fan blades, reduction gear, lube and accessory drive system, fan frame, inlet, core cowl cooling, fan exhaust nozzle, and digital control system.

  4. Icing tunnel tests of Electro-Impulse De-Icing of an engine inlet and high-speed wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zumwalt, G. W.

    1985-01-01

    A brief review is given of four earlier tests in the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel and of flight tests in NASA's Icing Research Aircraft and in a Cessna 206 airplane. Details are given of recent icing tunnel tests of thicker-skinned wings, a Gates Learjet, a composite leading edge, and a Boeing 767, and of a Falcon Fanjet engine inlet. These were tested at speeds from 87 to 220 knots, air temperatures from -2 to -15 C, LWC values of 0.6 to 2.4 grams/cu meter, and median droplet diameters from 12 to 20 microns. Energy requirements are reported, as well as conclusions from comparisons of several Electro-Impulse De-Icing coil system designs. Fundamental studies of the structural dynamics and ice shedding of a 12.7 cm (5 inch) diameter semicylinder are described. Some potential problem areas are discussed: fatigue of skin and coil mountings, system weight and cost, electro-magnetic interference and noise.

  5. Quiet Clean Short-haul Experimental Engine (QCSEE) Under-The-Wing (UTW) composite nacelle subsystem test report. [to verify strength of selected composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stotler, C. L., Jr.; Johnston, E. A.; Freeman, D. S.

    1977-01-01

    The element and subcomponent testing conducted to verify the under the wing composite nacelle design is reported. This composite nacelle consists of an inlet, outer cowl doors, inner cowl doors, and a variable fan nozzle. The element tests provided the mechanical properties used in the nacelle design. The subcomponent tests verified that the critical panel and joint areas of the nacelle had adequate structural integrity.

  6. Preliminary Wind-Tunnel Tests of the Effect of Nacelles on the Characteristics of a Twin-Engine Bomber Model with Low-Drag Wing, Special Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzinger, Carl J.; Sivells, James C.

    1942-01-01

    Tests were made in the NACA 19-foot pressure tunnel of a simplified twin-engine bomber model with an NACA low-drag wing primarily to obtain an indication of the effects of engine nacelles on the characteristics of the model both with and without simple split trailing-edge flaps. Nacelles with conventional-type cowlings representative of those used on an existing high-performance airplane and with NACA high-speed type E cowlings were tested. The tests were made without propeller slipstream. The aerodynamic effects of adding the nacelles to the low-drag wing were similar to the effects commonly obtained by adding similar nacelles to conventional wings. The maximum lift coefficient without flaps was slightly increased, but the increment in maximum lift due to deflecting the flaps was somewhat decreased. The stalling characteristics were improved by the presence of the nacelles. Addition of the nacelles had a destabilizing effect on the pitching moments, as is usual for nacelles that project forward of the wing. The drag increments due to the nacelles were of the usual order of magnitude, with the increment due to the nacelles with NACA type E cowlings approximately one-third less than that of the nacelles with conventional cowlings with built-in air scoops.

  7. Static Wind-Tunnel and Radio-Controlled Flight Test Investigation of a Remotely Piloted Vehicle Having a Delta Wing Planform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yip, Long P.; Fratello, David J.; Robelen, David B.; Makowiec, George M.

    1990-01-01

    At the request of the United States Marine Corps, an exploratory wind-tunnel and flight test investigation was conducted by the Flight Dynamics Branch at the NASA Langley Research Center to improve the stability, controllability, and general flight characteristics of the Marine Corps Exdrone RPV (Remotely Piloted Vehicle) configuration. Static wind tunnel tests were conducted in the Langley 12 foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel to identify and improve the stability and control characteristics of the vehicle. The wind tunnel test resulted in several configuration modifications which included increased elevator size, increased vertical tail size and tail moment arm, increased rudder size and aileron size, the addition of vertical wing tip fins, and the addition of leading-edge droops on the outboard wing panel to improve stall departure resistance. Flight tests of the modified configuration were conducted at the NASA Plum Tree Test Site to provide a qualitative evaluation of the flight characteristics of the modified configuration.

  8. Projection Moire Interferometry Measurements of Micro Air Vehicle Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, Gary A.; Bartram, Scott M.; Waszak, Martin R.; Jenkins, Luther N.

    2001-01-01

    Projection Moire Interferometry (PMI) has been used to measure the structural deformation of micro air vehicle (MAV) wings during a series of wind tunnel tests. The MAV wings had a highly flexible wing structure, generically reminiscent of a bat s wing, which resulted in significant changes in wing shape as a function of MAV angle-of-attack and simulated flight speed. This flow-adaptable wing deformation is thought to provide enhanced vehicle stability and wind gust alleviation compared to rigid wing designs. Investigation of the potential aerodynamic benefits of a flexible MAV wing required measurement of the wing shape under aerodynamic loads. PMI was used to quantify the aerodynamically induced changes in wing shape for three MAV wings having different structural designs and stiffness characteristics. This paper describes the PMI technique, its application to MAV testing, and presents a portion of the PMI data acquired for the three different MAV wings tested.

  9. Genotoxic and Antigenotoxic Assessment of Chios Mastic Oil by the In Vitro Micronucleus Test on Human Lymphocytes and the In Vivo Wing Somatic Test on Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Vlastos, Dimitris; Drosopoulou, Elena; Efthimiou, Ioanna; Gavriilidis, Maximos; Panagaki, Dimitra; Mpatziou, Krystalenia; Kalamara, Paraskevi; Mademtzoglou, Despoina; Mavragani-Tsipidou, Penelope

    2015-01-01

    Chios mastic oil (CMO), the essential oil derived from Pistacia lentiscus (L.) var. chia (Duham), has generated considerable interest because of its antimicrobial, anticancer, antioxidant and other beneficial properties. In the present study, the potential genotoxic activity of CMO as well as its antigenotoxic properties against the mutagenic agent mitomycin-C (MMC) were evaluated by employing the in vitro Cytokinesis Block MicroNucleus (CBMN) assay and the in vivo Somatic Mutation And Recombination Test (SMART). In the in vitro experiments, lymphocytes were treated with 0.01, 0.05 and 0.10% (v/v) of CMO with or without 0.05 μg/ml MMC, while in the in vivo assay Drosophila larvae were fed with 0.05, 0.10, 0.50 and 1.00% (v/v) of CMO with or without 2.50 μg/ml MMC. CMO did not significantly increase the frequency of micronuclei (MN) or total wing spots, indicating lack of mutagenic or recombinogenic activity. However, the in vitro analysis suggested cytotoxic activity of CMO. The simultaneous administration of MMC with CMO did not alter considerably the frequencies of MMC-induced MN and wing spots showing that CMO doesn’t exert antigenotoxic or antirecombinogenic action. Therefore, CMO could be considered as a safe product in terms of genotoxic potential. Even though it could not afford any protection against DNA damage, at least under our experimental conditions, its cytotoxic potential could be of interest. PMID:26110900

  10. Genotoxic and Antigenotoxic Assessment of Chios Mastic Oil by the In Vitro Micronucleus Test on Human Lymphocytes and the In Vivo Wing Somatic Test on Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Vlastos, Dimitris; Drosopoulou, Elena; Efthimiou, Ioanna; Gavriilidis, Maximos; Panagaki, Dimitra; Mpatziou, Krystalenia; Kalamara, Paraskevi; Mademtzoglou, Despoina; Mavragani-Tsipidou, Penelope

    2015-01-01

    Chios mastic oil (CMO), the essential oil derived from Pistacia lentiscus (L.) var. chia (Duham), has generated considerable interest because of its antimicrobial, anticancer, antioxidant and other beneficial properties. In the present study, the potential genotoxic activity of CMO as well as its antigenotoxic properties against the mutagenic agent mitomycin-C (MMC) were evaluated by employing the in vitro Cytokinesis Block MicroNucleus (CBMN) assay and the in vivo Somatic Mutation And Recombination Test (SMART). In the in vitro experiments, lymphocytes were treated with 0.01, 0.05 and 0.10% (v/v) of CMO with or without 0.05 μg/ml MMC, while in the in vivo assay Drosophila larvae were fed with 0.05, 0.10, 0.50 and 1.00% (v/v) of CMO with or without 2.50 μg/ml MMC. CMO did not significantly increase the frequency of micronuclei (MN) or total wing spots, indicating lack of mutagenic or recombinogenic activity. However, the in vitro analysis suggested cytotoxic activity of CMO. The simultaneous administration of MMC with CMO did not alter considerably the frequencies of MMC-induced MN and wing spots showing that CMO doesn't exert antigenotoxic or antirecombinogenic action. Therefore, CMO could be considered as a safe product in terms of genotoxic potential. Even though it could not afford any protection against DNA damage, at least under our experimental conditions, its cytotoxic potential could be of interest.

  11. Testing the 2.2% HSR Reference H Model with a Modified Wing Planform in the NTF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, Lewis R., Jr.; Wahls, Richard A.; Hamner, Marvine P.

    1999-01-01

    The HSR program moved into phase two with the selection of a new airplane configuration, the Technology Concept Airplane (TCA). The TCA was designed based on the experiences gained while investigating both the Reference H and the Arrow Wing configurations in different wind tunnels and CFD studies. Part of that investigation included performing extensive high Reynolds number testing on the Reference H configuration in the NTF to provide data for predicting full-scale flight performance, as well as developing techniques for testing these types of configurations in the NTF. With the selection of the TCA configuration, a smaller investigation was designed to examine whether or not the scaling characteristics of the TCA configuration are similar to those observed for the Reference H configuration. This presentation will include a description of the 2.2% Modified Reference H model used in this investigation (highlighting the similarities and the differences when compared to the TCA configuration), the testing objectives, and some preliminary findings that are relevant to the current high-lift system.

  12. High-Reynolds-Number Test of a 5-Percent-Thick Low-Aspect-Ratio Semispan Wing in the Langley 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel: Wing Pressure Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Julio; Lawing, Pierce L.

    1990-01-01

    A high Reynolds number test of a 5 percent thick low aspect ratio semispan wing was conducted in the adaptive wall test section of the Langley 0.3 m Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel. The model tested had a planform and a NACA 64A-105 airfoil section that is similar to that of the pressure instrumented canard on the X-29 experimental aircraft. Chordwise pressure data for Mach numbers of 0.3, 0.7, and 0.9 were measured for an angle-of-attack range of -4 to 15 deg. The associated Reynolds numbers, based on the geometric mean chord, encompass most of the flight regime of the canard. This test was a free transition investigation. A summary of the wing pressures are presented without analysis as well as adapted test section top and bottom wall pressure signatures. However, the presented graphical data indicate Reynolds number dependent complex leading edge separation phenomena. This data set supplements the existing high Reynolds number database and are useful for computational codes comparison.

  13. Military Potential Test of the Model PA23-250B Fixed-Wing Instrument Trainer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1964-11-30

    personnel representing the US Army Aviation Center and the US Army Aviation School were conducted during the test period. It was found that the Model...Army Aviation School (USAAVNS). Final approval of the plan ar.d re- port of test is tht responsibility of the US Army Aviation Matcricl, Command...the US Army Aviation Center (USAJXVNC) and the US Army Aviation School (USAAVNS) were conducted during the test period. 2.1. PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS

  14. AMELIA CESTOL Test: Acoustic Characteristics of Circulation Control Wing with Leading-and Trailing-Edge Slot Blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, Clifton; Burnside, Nathan J.

    2013-01-01

    Aeroacoustic measurements of the 11 % scale full-span AMELIA CESTOL model with leading- and trailing-edge slot blowing circulation control (CCW) wing were obtained during a recent test in the Arnold Engineering Development Center 40- by 80-Ft. Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center, Sound levels and spectra were acquired with seven in-flow microphones and a 48-element phased microphone array for a variety of vehicle configurations, CCW slot flow rates, and forward speeds, Corrections to the measurements and processing are in progress, however the data from selected configurations presented in this report confirm good measurement quality and dynamic range over the test conditions, Array beamform maps at 40 kts tunnel speed show that the trailing edge flap source is dominant for most frequencies at flap angles of 0deg and 60deg, The overall sound level for the 60deg flap was similar to the 0deg flap for most slot blowing rates forward of 90deg incidence, but was louder by up to 6 dB for downstream angles, At 100 kts, the in-flow microphone levels were louder than the sensor self-noise for the higher blowing rates, while passive and active background noise suppression methods for the microphone array revealed source levels as much as 20 dB lower than observed with the in-flow microphones,

  15. Drag measurements on a Junkers wing section : application of the Betz Method to the results of comparative tests made on a model and on an airplane in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidinger, Hanns

    1927-01-01

    The comparison of model tests in flight can be based on the result of such measurements. They are very important from the aerodynamical point of view, as they lead to useful conclusions regarding the behavior of the wing, its best shape and the conformity of theoretical and actual flow. Although there still remains a certain prejudice against such measurements, I have still attempted to make these comparative tests in order to inspire confidence in their reliability.

  16. Vertical drop test of a transport fuselage section located aft of the wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasanella, E. L.; Alfaro-Bou, E.

    1986-01-01

    A 12-foot long Boeing 707 aft fuselage section with a tapering cross section was drop tested at the NASA Langley Research Center to measure structural, seat, and occupant response to vertical crash laods and to provide data for nonlinear finite element modeling. This was the final test in a series of three different transport fuselage sections tested under identical conditions. The test parameters at impact were: 20 ft/s velocity, and zero pitch, roll, and yaw. In addition, the test was an operational shock test of the data acquisition system used for the Controlled Impact Demonstration (CID) of a remotely piloted Boeing 720 that was crash tested at NASA Ames Dryden Flight Research Facility on December 1, 1984. Post-test measurements of the crush showed that the front of the section (with larger diameter) crushed vertically approximately 14 inches while the rear crushed 18 inches. Analysis of the data traces indicate the maximum peak normal (vertical) accelerations at the bottom of the frames were approximately 109 G at body station 1040 and 64 G at body station 1120. The peak floor acceleration varied from 14 G near the wall to 25 G near the center where high frequency oscillations of the floor were evident. The peak anthropomorphic dummy pelvis normal (vertical) acceleration was 19 G's.

  17. Design, Fabrication and Testing of a Passively Morphing Ornithopter Wing for Increased Lift and Agility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-13

    negative center of mass acceleration during one flapping cycle by 22 %. The negative acceleration reduction may translate into overall lift gains. Thus...negative center of mass acceleration during one flapping cycle by 22 %. The negative acceleration reduction may translate into overall lift gains. Thus the...for compliant spine.  Fabricated and integrated compliant spine into test ornithopters.  Measured the performance of test ornithopters with and

  18. Vertical drop test of a transport fuselage section located forward of the wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, M. S.; Hayduk, R. J.

    1983-01-01

    A Boeing 707 fuselage section was drop tested at the NASA Langley Research Center to measure structural, seat, and occupant response to vertical crack loads. Post-test inspection showed that the section bottom collapsed inward approximately 2 ft. Preliminary data traces indicated maximum normal accelerations of 20 g on the fuselage bottom, 10 to 12 g on the cabin floor, and 6.5 to 8 g in the pelvises of the anthropomorphic dummies.

  19. Design and Testing of a 30-Degree Sweep Laminar Flow Wing for a High-Altitude Long-Endurance Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-10-01

    Center Room 342 Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Box 87-6106 Tempe, Arizona 85287-6106 USA Email: william.solomon@ngc.com /aaron.drake@ngc.com...wing laminar flow, which is the focus of this paper. 1.2 General Relationships Between Instability Mechanisms and Wing Sweep Angles Boundary-layer...transition in 3-D flows is a complicated process involving complex flow structures, multiple instability mechanisms , and nonlinear interactions. Four

  20. Air Force Tests of Sperry Messenger Model with Six Sets of Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoemaker, James M

    1928-01-01

    The purpose of this test was to compare six well-known airfoils, the R.A.F 15, U.S.A. 5, U.S.A. 27, U.S.A. 35-B, Clark Y, and Gottingen 387, fitted to the Sperry Messenger model, at full scale Reynolds number as obtained in the variable density wind tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics; and to determine the scale effect on the model equipped with all the details of the actual airplane. The results show a large decrease in minimum drag coefficient upon increasing the Reynolds number from about one-twentieth scale to full scale. Maximum lift coefficient was increased with increasing scale for all the airfoils except the Gottingen 387, for which it was slightly decreased. A comparison is made between the results of these tests and those obtained from tests made in this tunnel on airfoils alone. (author)

  1. Flight-Test Evaluation of the Longitudinal Stability and Control Characteristics of 0.5-Scale Models of the Fairchild Lark Pilotless-Aircraft Configuration: Standard Configuration with Wing Flaps Deflected 60 Degrees and Model having Tail in Line with Wings, TED No. NACA 2387

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, David G.

    1947-01-01

    Flight tests were conducted at the Flight Test Station of the Pilotless Aircraft Research Division at Wallop Island, Va., to determine the longitudinal control and stability characteristics of 0.5-scale models of the Fairchild Lark pilotless aircraft with the tail in line with the wings a d with the horizontal wing flaps deflected 60 deg. The data were obtained by the use of a telemeter and by radar tracking.

  2. A Comparison of Metallic, Composite and Nanocomposite Optimal Transonic Transport Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, Graeme J.; Kenway, Gaetan K. W.; Martins, Joaquim R. R.

    2014-01-01

    Current and future composite material technologies have the potential to greatly improve the performance of large transport aircraft. However, the coupling between aerodynamics and structures makes it challenging to design optimal flexible wings, and the transonic flight regime requires high fidelity computational models. We address these challenges by solving a series of high-fidelity aerostructural optimization problems that explore the design space for the wing of a large transport aircraft. We consider three different materials: aluminum, carbon-fiber reinforced composites and an hypothetical composite based on carbon nanotubes. The design variables consist of both aerodynamic shape (including span), structural sizing, and ply angle fractions in the case of composites. Pareto fronts with respect to structural weight and fuel burn are generated. The wing performance in each case is optimized subject to stress and buckling constraints. We found that composite wings consistently resulted in lower fuel burn and lower structural weight, and that the carbon nanotube composite did not yield the increase in performance one would expect from a material with such outstanding properties. This indicates that there might be diminishing returns when it comes to the application of advanced materials to wing design, requiring further investigation.

  3. Full-Scale Crash Tests and Analyses of Three High-Wing Single

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Annett, Martin S.; Littell, Justin D.; Stimson, Chad M.; Jackson, Karen E.; Mason, Brian H.

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Emergency Locator Transmitter Survivability and Reliability (ELTSAR) project was initiated in 2014 to assess the crash performance standards for the next generation of ELT systems. Three Cessna 172 aircraft have been acquired to conduct crash testing at NASA Langley Research Center's Landing and Impact Research Facility. Testing is scheduled for the summer of 2015 and will simulate three crash conditions; a flare to stall while emergency landing, and two controlled flight into terrain scenarios. Instrumentation and video coverage, both onboard and external, will also provide valuable data of airframe response. Full-scale finite element analyses will be performed using two separate commercial explicit solvers. Calibration and validation of the models will be based on the airframe response under these varying crash conditions.

  4. Quiet Clean Short-Haul Experimental Engine (QCSEE) acoustic and aerodynamic tests on a scale model over-the-wing thrust reverser and forward thrust nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stimpert, D. L.

    1978-01-01

    An acoustic and aerodynamic test program was conducted on a 1/6.25 scale model of the Quiet, Clean, Short-Haul Experimental Engine (QCSEE) forward thrust over-the-wing (OTW) nozzle and OTW thrust reverser. In reverse thrust, the effect of reverser geometry was studied by parametric variations in blocker spacing, blocker height, lip angle, and lip length. Forward thrust nozzle tests determined the jet noise levels of the cruise and takeoff nozzles, the effect of opening side doors to achieve takeoff thrust, and scrubbing noise of the cruise and takeoff jet on a simulated wing surface. Velocity profiles are presented for both forward and reverse thrust nozzles. An estimate of the reverse thrust was made utilizing the measured centerline turning angle.

  5. Low-Speed Wind-Tunnel Test of an Unpowered High-Speed Stoppable Rotor Concept in Fixed-Wing Mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lance, Michael B.; Sung, Daniel Y.; Stroub, Robert H.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the M85, a High Speed Rotor Concept, was conducted at the NASA Langley 14 x 22 foot Subsonic Tunnel, assisted by NASA-Ames. An unpowered 1/5 scale model of the XH-59A helicopter fuselage with a large circular hub fairing, two rotor blades, and a shaft fairing was used as a baseline configuration. The M85 is a rotor wing hybrid aircraft design, and the model was tested with the rotor blade in the fixed wing mode. Assessments were made of the aerodynamic characteristics of various model rotor configurations. Variation in configurations were produced by changing the rotor blade sweep angle and the blade chord length. The most favorable M85 configuration tested included wide chord blades at 0 deg sweep, and it attained a system lift to drag ratio of 8.4.

  6. Ground vibration test results for Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing (DAST)/Aeroelastic Research Wing (ARW-1R) aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, T. H.; Gilyard, G. B.

    1986-01-01

    The drones for aerodynamic and structural testing (DAST) project was designed to control flutter actively at high subsonic speeds. Accurate knowledge of the structural model was critical for the successful design of the control system. A ground vibration test was conducted on the DAST vehicle to determine the structural model characteristics. This report presents and discusses the vibration and test equipment, the test setup and procedures, and the antisymmetric and symmetric mode shape results. The modal characteristics were subsequently used to update the structural model employed in the control law design process.

  7. AST Composite Wing Program: Executive Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karal, Michael

    2001-01-01

    The Boeing Company demonstrated the application of stitched/resin infused (S/RFI) composite materials on commercial transport aircraft primary wing structures under the Advanced Subsonic technology (AST) Composite Wing contract. This report describes a weight trade study utilizing a wing torque box design applicable to a 220-passenger commercial aircraft and was used to verify the weight savings a S/RFI structure would offer compared to an identical aluminum wing box design. This trade study was performed in the AST Composite Wing program, and the overall weight savings are reported. Previous program work involved the design of a S/RFI-base-line wing box structural test component and its associated testing hardware. This detail structural design effort which is known as the "semi-span" in this report, was completed under a previous NASA contract. The full-scale wing design was based on a configuration for a MD-90-40X airplane, and the objective of this structural test component was to demonstrate the maturity of the S/RFI technology through the evaluation of a full-scale wing box/fuselage section structural test. However, scope reductions of the AST Composite Wing Program pre-vented the fabrication and evaluation of this wing box structure. Results obtained from the weight trade study, the full-scale test component design effort, fabrication, design development testing, and full-scale testing of the semi-span wing box are reported.

  8. Wind-Tunnel Tests of Several Model Tractor-Propeller and Pusher-Propeller Wing Extension-Shaft Arrangements, Special Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harmon, Hubert N.

    1941-01-01

    Tests were made in the 20-foot propeller-research tunnel to investigate the possibility of obtaining increased net efficiencies of propeller-nacelle units by enclosing the engines in the wings and by using extension shafts. A wing of 5-foot chord was fitted with a propeller drive assembly providing for several axial locations of tractor propellers and pusher propellers. A three-blade 4-foot propeller and a three-blade 3 1/2-foot propeller of special design were tested in this wing with spinners and fairings ranging in diameter from 6 to 16 inches. A 16-inch NACA cowling was tested for comparative purposes. Two types of cuffs were also employed. It was found that the net efficiency of a conventional round-shank propeller mounted on an extension shaft in front of or behind a wing increased with an increase in the diameter of the spinner and the shaft housing within the scope of the tests. The largest spinner used had a diameter that might favorably compare with that of a radial engine cowling. The efficiencies for the pusher position appeared to be more critically affected by spinner size than those for the tractor position. The spinners with large diameters for the pusher position resulted in a higher efficiency than those for the corresponding tractor arrangements; the reverse was true for the small spinners. The use of propeller cuffs in combination with a spinner of small diameter generally resulted in net efficiencies that were comparable with those found for the large-spinner combinations.

  9. Paresev 1-C with inflatable wing testbed aboard a truck in preparation for flight tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    Aboard a truck and ready for a test flight is the Paresev 1-C on the ramp at the NASA Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The half-scale version of the inflatable Gemini parawing was pre-flighted by being carried across the Rosamond dry lakebed on the back of a truck before a tow behind a International Harvester Carry-All. The inflatable center spar ran fore and aft and measured 191 inches, two other inflatable spars formed the leading edges. The three compartments were filled with nitrogen under pressure to make them rigid. The Paresev 1-C was very unstable in flight with this configuration.

  10. Planform, aero-structural, and flight control optimization for tailless morphing aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinari, Giulio; Arrieta, Andres F.; Ermanni, Paolo

    2015-04-01

    Tailless airplanes with swept wings rely on variations of the spanwise lift distribution to provide controllability in roll, pitch and yaw. Conventionally, this is achieved utilizing multiple control surfaces, such as elevons, on the wing trailing edge. As every flight condition requires different control moments (e.g. to provide pitching moment equilibrium), these surfaces are practically permanently displaced. Due to their nature, causing discontinuities, corners and gaps, they bear aerodynamic penalties, mostly in terms of shape drag. Shape adaptation, by means of chordwise morphing, has the potential of varying the lift of a wing section by deforming its profile in a way that minimizes the resulting drag. Furthermore, as the shape can be varied differently along the wingspan, the lift distribution can be tailored to each specific flight condition. For this reason, tailless aircraft appear as a prime choice to apply morphing techniques, as the attainable benefits are potentially significant. In this work, we present a methodology to determine the optimal planform, profile shape, and morphing structure for a tailless aircraft. The employed morphing concept is based on a distributed compliance structure, actuated by Macro Fiber Composite (MFC) piezoelectric elements. The multidisciplinary optimization is performed considering the static and dynamic aeroelastic behavior of the resulting structure. The goal is the maximization of the aerodynamic efficiency while guaranteeing the controllability of the plane, by means of morphing, in a set of flight conditions.

  11. Thermal stress analysis of the NASA Dryden hypersonic wing test structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Glenn

    1990-01-01

    Present interest in hypersonic vehicles has resulted in a renewed interest in thermal stress analysis of airframe structures. While there are numerous texts and papers on thermal stress analysis, practical examples and experience on light gage aircraft structures are fairly limited. A research program has been undertaken at General Dynamics to demonstrate the present state of the art, verify methods of analysis, gain experience in their use, and develop engineering judgement in thermal stress analysis. The approach for this project has been to conduct a series of analyses of this sample problem and compare analysis results with test data. This comparison will give an idea of how to use our present methods of thermal stress analysis, and how accurate we can expect them to be.

  12. Wind Tunnel Testing of the NASA-DFRC Flutterometer using a Two DOF Wing Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strganac, Thomas W.

    2001-01-01

    Flutter of an aeroelastic structure is potentially destructive aeroelastic instability. This phenomenon has motivated research within the aeroelastic community to develop methods that can accurately predict aeroelastic instabilities. The Flutterometer method used herein, and as developed by NASA DFRC, is based upon the mu method which has been coupled with wavelet filtering processes in estimating aeroelastic models from flight data. The approach leads to a methodology to predict the occurrence of flutter boundaries, and may prove to reliably predict flutter boundaries during flight tests. An analytical model is used as the first estimate of the aeroelastic structural dynamics, and uncertainty operators are introduced into the system to model variations between the theoretical system and the physical system. The modelling uncertainties are then updated from experimental data. Although the model used did not work well with this particular experiment, a sensitivity analysis was additionally performed and improvements suggested.

  13. Annular wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, H. J. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    An annular wing particularly suited for use in supporting in flight an aircraft characterized by the absence of directional stabilizing surfaces is described. The wing comprises a rigid annular body of a substantially uniformly symmetrical configuration characterized by an annular positive lifting surface and cord line coincident with the segment of a line radiating along the surface of an inverted truncated cone. A decalage is established for the leading and trailing semicircular portions of the body, relative to instantaneous line of flight, and a dihedral for the laterally opposed semicircular portions of the body, relative to the line of flight. The direction of flight and climb angle or glide slope angle are established by selectively positioning the center of gravity of the wing ahead of the aerodynamic center along the radius coincident with an axis for a selected line of flight.

  14. Antimutagenic effect of sage tea in the wing spot test of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Patenkovic, Aleksandra; Stamenkovic-Radak, Marina; Banjanac, Tijana; Andjelkovic, Marko

    2009-01-01

    The present study assayed the antimutagenic potential of Salvia officinalis (sage) in the form of tea infusion, by the somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART) on Drosophila melanogaster. The use of herbal infusions is much common in the human diet, so the aim of the present study was to estimate the antimutagenic effects of the S. officinalis tea rather than essential oils. Methyl methanesulphonate (MMS) was used as the mutagen and positive control. Several types of treatment were performed: short acute treatment with sage infusion or MMS, longer (chronic) treatment with sage solution or MMS, and two combined treatments, i.e. short treatment with sage followed by a longer treatment with MMS and vice versa. Sage infusion used in our experiments showed a clear antimutagenic effect, reducing the frequency of mutations induced by MMS. The inhibition effect of sage tea is obtained and confirmed when pre- or post-treatments with mutagen were used. The results indicate that although sage in this regime decreases the number of mutation events, it is not efficient enough in case of the 2 h sage pre-treatment. Antioxidant activity, suppression of metabolic activation, could be mechanisms through which sage or some of its components act as desmutagen.

  15. Homologous recombination induced by doxazosin mesylate and saw palmetto in the Drosophila wing-spot test.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Katiane Cella; Dihl, Rafael Rodrigues; Lehmann, Mauricio; Reguly, Maria Luiza; Richter, Marc François; Andrade, Heloisa Helena Rodrigues de

    2013-03-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is the most common tumor in men over 40 years of age. Acute urinary retention (AUR) is regarded as the most serious hazard of untreated BPH. α-Blockers, such as doxazosin mesylate, and 5-α reductase inhibitors, such as finasteride, are frequently used because they decrease both AUR and the need for BPH-related surgery. An extract of the fruit from American saw palmetto plant has also been used as an alternative treatment for BPH. The paucity of information available concerning the genotoxic action of these compounds led us to assess their activity as inducers of different types of DNA lesions using the somatic mutation and recombination test in Drosophila melanogaster. Finasteride did not induce gene mutation, chromosomal mutation or mitotic recombination, which means it was nongenotoxic in our experimental conditions. On the other hand, doxazosin mesylate and saw palmetto induced significant increases in spot frequencies in trans-heterozygous flies. In order to establish the actual role played by mitotic recombination and by mutation in the genotoxicity observed, the balancer-heterozygous flies were also analyzed, showing no increment in the total spot frequencies in relation to the negative control, for both drugs. Doxazosin mesylate and saw palmetto were classified as specific inducers of homologous recombination in Drosophila proliferative cells, an event linked to the loss of heterozygosity.

  16. Noise tests of a model engine-over-the-wing STOL configuration using a multijet nozzle with deflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, W. A.; Friedman, R.

    1973-01-01

    Noise data were obtained with a small scale model stationary STOL configuration that used an eight lobe mixer nozzle with deflector mounted above a 32-cm-chord wing section. The factors varied to determine their effect upon the noise were wing flap angle, nozzle shape, nozzle location, deflector configuration, and jet velocity. The noise from the mixer nozzle model was compared to the noise from a model using a circular nozzle of the same area. The mixer nozzle model was quieter at the low to middle frequencies, while the circular nozzle was quieter at high frequencies. The perceived noise level (PNL) was calculated for an aircraft 10 times larger than the model. The PNL at 500 feet for the mixer nozzle turned out to be within 1 db of the PNL for the circular nozzle. For some configurations at highly directional broadband noise, which could be eliminated by changes in nozzle and/or deflector location, occurred below the wing.

  17. A flight-test and simulation evaluation of the longitudinal final approach and landing performance of an automatic system for a light wing loading STOL aircraft equipped with wing spoilers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, S. C.; Hardy, G. H.; Hindson, W. S.

    1984-01-01

    As part of a comprehensive flight-test investigation of short takeoff and landing (STOL) operating systems for the terminal systems for the terminal area, an automatic landing system has been developed and evaluated for a light wing-loading turboprop-powered aircraft. An advanced digital avionics system performed display, navigation, guidance, and control functions for the test aircraft. Control signals were generated in order to command powered actuators for all conventional controls and for a set of symmetrically driven wing spoilers. This report describes effects of the spoiler control on longitudinal autoland (automatic landing) performance. Flight-test results, with and without spoiler control, are presented and compared with available (basically, conventional takeoff and landing) performance criteria. These comparisons are augmented by results from a comprehensive simulation of the controlled aircraft that included representations of the microwave landing system navigation errors that were encountered in flight as well as expected variations in atmospheric turbulence and wind shear. Flight-test results show that the addition of spoiler control improves the touchdown performance of the automatic landing system. Spoilers improve longitudinal touchdown and landing pitch-attitude performance, particularly in tailwind conditions. Furthermore, simulation results indicate that performance would probably be satisfactory for a wider range of atmospheric disturbances than those encountered in flight. Flight results also indicate that the addition of spoiler control during the final approach does not result in any measurable change in glidepath track performance, and results in a very small deterioration in airspeed tracking. This difference contrasts with simulations results, which indicate some improvement in glidepath tracking and no appreciable change in airspeed tracking. The modeling problem in the simulation that contributed to this discrepancy with flight was

  18. Quiet Clean Short-Haul Experimental Engine (QCSEE) Over-The-Wing (OTW) propulsion system test report. Volume 2: Aerodynamics and performance. [engine performance tests to define propulsion system performance on turbofan engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The design and testing of the over the wing engine, a high bypass, geared turbofan engine, are discussed. The propulsion system performance is examined for uninstalled performance and installed performance. The fan aerodynamic performance and the D nozzle and reverser thrust performance are evaluated.

  19. Rotor/wing aerodynamic interactions in hover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felker, F. F.; Light, J. S.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical investigation of rotor/wing aerodynamic interactions in hover is described. The experimental investigation consisted of both a large-scale and small-scale test. A 0.658-scale, V-22 rotor and wing was used in the large-scale test. Wind download, wing surface pressure, rotor performance, and rotor downwash data from the large-scale test are presented. A small-scale experiment was conducted to determine how changes in the rotor/wing geometry affected the aerodynamic interactions. These geometry variations included the distance between the rotor and wing, wing incidence angle, and configurations both with the rotor axis at the tip of the wing (tilt rotor configuration) and with the rotor axis at the center of the wing (compound helicopter configuration). A wing with boundary-layer control was also tested to evaluate the effect of leading and trailing edge upper surface blowing on the wing download. A computationally efficient, semi-empirical theory was developed to predict the download on the wing. Finally, correlations between the theoretical predictions and test data are presented.

  20. Genotoxic and Antigenotoxic Potential of Momordica charantia Linn (Cucurbitaceae) in the Wing Spot Test of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Guterres, Zaira Rosa; Zanetti, Thalita Alves; Sennes-Lopes, Tiago Felipe; da Silva, Ana Francisca Gomes

    2015-10-01

    Momordica charantia, popularly known as bitter melon, is a plant widely used in ethnobotanical medicine. It has antibacterial, antifungal, anthelmintic, antidiabetic, antiviral, and antimalarial activities, among others. The goal of this study was to evaluate the genotoxic and/or antigenotoxic activity of the aqueous extracts obtained from the aerial parts and fruit of this plant by means of the Drosophila melanogaster wing spot test. Third-stage larvae that obtained standard (ST) cross and high bioactivation (HB) cross were treated with aqueous extracts of the aerial parts (IQA) and fruit (IQF) of M. charantia, following two protocols (genotoxicity and antigenotoxicity). The aqueous extracts are not genotoxic in lower concentrations. The frequencies of mutant spots observed in the descendants of the ST and HB crosses treated with doxorubicin (DXR) alone were 8.65 and 9.25, respectively, whereas in those cotreated with IQA and DXR, the frequencies ranged from 15.90 to 29 in the ST cross and from 15.05 to 24.78 in the HB cross. In cotreatment with IQF, the frequencies ranged from 30.10 to 30.65 in the ST cross and from 13.60 to 14.50 in the HB cross, whereas the frequencies obtained with DXR were 32.50 in the ST cross and 26.00 in the HB cross. In conclusion, the IQA has a synergistic effect, enhancing the genotoxicity of DXR in the ST cross and the HB cross, whereas the IQF has antigenotoxic effects in the HB cross.

  1. A CFD/CSD Interaction Methodology for Aircraft Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhardwaj, Manoj K.

    1997-01-01

    With advanced subsonic transports and military aircraft operating in the transonic regime, it is becoming important to determine the effects of the coupling between aerodynamic loads and elastic forces. Since aeroelastic effects can contribute significantly to the design of these aircraft, there is a strong need in the aerospace industry to predict these aero-structure interactions computationally. To perform static aeroelastic analysis in the transonic regime, high fidelity computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis tools must be used in conjunction with high fidelity computational structural fluid dynamics (CSD) analysis tools due to the nonlinear behavior of the aerodynamics in the transonic regime. There is also a need to be able to use a wide variety of CFD and CSD tools to predict these aeroelastic effects in the transonic regime. Because source codes are not always available, it is necessary to couple the CFD and CSD codes without alteration of the source codes. In this study, an aeroelastic coupling procedure is developed which will perform static aeroelastic analysis using any CFD and CSD code with little code integration. The aeroelastic coupling procedure is demonstrated on an F/A-18 Stabilator using NASTD (an in-house McDonnell Douglas CFD code) and NASTRAN. In addition, the Aeroelastic Research Wing (ARW-2) is used for demonstration of the aeroelastic coupling procedure by using ENSAERO (NASA Ames Research Center CFD code) and a finite element wing-box code (developed as part of this research).

  2. Scapular Winging

    PubMed Central

    Gooding, Benjamin W. T.; Geoghegan, John M.; Wallace, W. Angus; Manning, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    This review explores the causes of scapula winging, with overview of the relevant anatomy, proposed aetiology and treatment. Particular focus is given to lesions of the long thoracic nerve, which is reported to be the most common aetiological factor. PMID:27582902

  3. Origin Story: Blended Wing Body

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA is partnering with the Boeing Company, among others, to develop and test the blended wing body aircraft. The BWB has the potential to significantly reduce fuel use and noise. In this video, Bo...

  4. An Application of CFD to Guide Forced Boundary-Layer Transition for Low-Speed Tests of a Hybrid Wing-Body Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luckring, James M.; Deere, Karen A.; Childs, Robert E.; Stremel, Paul M.; Long, Kurtis R.

    2016-01-01

    A hybrid transition trip-dot sizing and placement test technique was developed in support of recent experimental research on a hybrid wing-body configuration under study for the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation project. The approach combines traditional methods with Computational Fluid Dynamics. The application had three-dimensional boundary layers that were simulated with either fully turbulent or transitional flow models using established Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes methods. Trip strip effectiveness was verified experimentally using infrared thermography during a low-speed wind tunnel test. Although the work was performed on one specific configuration, the process was based on fundamental flow physics and could be applicable to other configurations.

  5. Simultaneous Aerodynamic Analysis and Design Optimization (SAADO) for a 3-D Flexible Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gumbert, Clyde R.; Hou, Gene J.-W.

    2001-01-01

    The formulation and implementation of an optimization method called Simultaneous Aerodynamic Analysis and Design Optimization (SAADO) are extended from single discipline analysis (aerodynamics only) to multidisciplinary analysis - in this case, static aero-structural analysis - and applied to a simple 3-D wing problem. The method aims to reduce the computational expense incurred in performing shape optimization using state-of-the-art Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) flow analysis, Finite Element Method (FEM) structural analysis and sensitivity analysis tools. Results for this small problem show that the method reaches the same local optimum as conventional optimization. However, unlike its application to the win,, (single discipline analysis), the method. as I implemented here, may not show significant reduction in the computational cost. Similar reductions were seen in the two-design-variable (DV) problem results but not in the 8-DV results given here.

  6. Aerostructural Vortical Flow Interactions with Applications to F/A-18 and F-117 Tail Buffet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandil, Osama A.; Massey, Steven J.; Sheta, Essam F.

    1996-01-01

    The buffet response of the flexible twin-tail configuration of the F/A-18 and a generic F-111 aircraft are computationally simulated and experimentally validated. The problem is a multidisciplinary one which requires the sequential solution of three sets of equations on a multi-block grid structure. The first set is the unsteady, compressible, full Navier-Stokes equations. The second set is the aeroelastic equations for bending and torsional twin-tail responses. The third set is the grid-displacement equations which are used to update the grid coordinates due to the tail deflections. The computational models consist of a 76 deg. swept back, sharp edged delta wing of aspect ratio of one and a swept-back F/A-18 or F-117 twin-tail. The configuration is pitched at 30 deg. angle-of-attack. The problem is solved for the initial flow conditions with the twin tails kept rigid. Next, the aeroelastic equations of the tails are turned on along with the grid-displacement equations to solve for the bending and torsional tails responses due to the unsteady loads produced by the vortex breakdown flow of the leading-edge vortex cores of the delta wing. Several spanwise locations of the twin tails are investigated. The computational results are validated using several existing experimental data.

  7. Inflatable wing

    DOEpatents

    Priddy, Tommy G.

    1988-01-01

    An inflatable wing is formed from a pair of tapered, conical inflatable tubes in bonded tangential contact with each other. The tubes are further connected together by means of top and bottom reinforcement boards having corresponding longitudinal edges lying in the same central diametral plane passing through the associated tube. The reinforcement boards are made of a stiff reinforcement material, such as Kevlar, collapsible in a direction parallel to the spanwise wing axis upon deflation of the tubes. The stiff reinforcement material cooperates with the inflated tubes to impart structural I-beam characteristics to the composite structure for transferring inflation pressure-induced tensile stress from the tubes to the reinforcement boards. A plurality of rigid hoops shaped to provide airfoil definition are spaced from each other along the spanwise axis and are connected to the top and bottom reinforcement boards. Tension lines are employed for stabilizing the hoops along the trailing and leading edges thereof.

  8. Wing design for spin resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stough, H. P., III; Dicarlo, D. J.; Glover, K. E.; Stewart, E. C.

    1984-01-01

    Use of a discontinuous outboard wing leading edge to improve stall/spin characteristics has been evaluated through wind-tunnel and flight tests. Addition of such a discontinuous outboard wing leading-edge droop design to three light airplanes having NACA 6-series airfoil sections produced significant improvements in stall characteristics and spin resistance. The increased spin resistance of the modified airplanes has been related to the difference in angle of attack between the outer wing panel stall and the maximum attainable angle of attack.

  9. Preliminary Tests of Blowers of Three Designs Operating in Conjunction with a Wing-Duct Cooling System for Radial Engines, Special Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biermann, David; Valentine, E. Floyd

    1939-01-01

    This paper is one of several dealing with methods intended to reduce the drag of present-day radial engine installations and improve the cooling at zero and low air speeds, The present paper describes model wind-tunnel tests of blowers of three designs tested in conjunction with a wing-nacelle combination. The principle of operation involved consists of drawing cooling air into ducts located in the wing root at the point of maximum slipstream velocity, passing the air through the engine baffles from rear to front, and exhausting the air through an annular slot located between the propeller and the engine with the aid of a blower mounted on the spinner. The test apparatus consisted essentially of a stub wing having a 5-foot chord and a 15-foot span, an engine nacelle of 20 inches diameter enclosing a 25-horsepower electric motor, and three blowers mounted on propeller spinners. Two of the blowers utilize centrifugal force while the other uses the lift from airfoils to force the air out radially through the exit slot. Maximum efficiencies of over 70 percent were obtained for the system as a whole. Pressures were measured over the entire flight range which were in excess of those necessary to cool present-day engines, The results indicated that blowers mounted on propeller spinners could be built sufficiently powerful and efficient to warrant their use as the only, or chief, means of forcing air through the cooling system, so that cooling would be independent of the speed of the airplane.

  10. Low-speed tests of a high-aspect-ratio, supercritical-wing transport model equipped with a high-lift flap system in the Langley 4- by 7-meter and Ames 12-foot pressure tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, H. L., Jr.; Kjelgaard, S. O.

    1983-01-01

    The Ames 12-Foot Pressure Tunnel was used to determine the effects of Reynolds number on the static longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of an advanced, high-aspect-ratio, supercritical wing transport model equipped with a full span, leading edge slat and part span, double slotted, trailing edge flaps. The model had a wing span of 7.5 ft and was tested through a free stream Reynolds number range from 1.3 to 6.0 x 10 to 6th power per foot at a Mach number of 0.20. Prior to the Ames tests, an investigation was also conducted in the Langley 4 by 7 Meter Tunnel at a Reynolds number of 1.3 x 10 to 6th power per foot with the model mounted on an Ames strut support system and on the Langley sting support system to determine strut interference corrections. The data obtained from the Langley tests were also used to compare the aerodynamic charactertistics of the rather stiff, 7.5-ft-span steel wing model tested during this investigation and the larger, and rather flexible, 12-ft-span aluminum-wing model tested during a previous investigation. During the tests in both the Langley and Ames tunnels, the model was tested with six basic wing configurations: (1) cruise; (2) climb (slats only extended); (3) 15 deg take-off flaps; (4) 30 deg take-off flaps; (5) 45 deg landing flaps; and (6) 60 deg landing flaps.

  11. Aerodynamic characteristics of a fixed arrow-wing supersonic cruise aircraft at Mach numbers of 2.30, 2.70, and 2.95. [Langley Unitary Plan wind tunnel tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, O. A.; Fuller, D. E.; Watson, C. B.

    1978-01-01

    Tests were conducted in the Langley Unitary Plan wind tunnel at Mach numbers of 2.30. 2.70, and 2.95 to determine the performance, static stability, and control characteristics of a model of a fixed-wing supersonic cruise aircraft with a design Mach Number of 2.70 (SCAT 15-F-9898). The configuration had a 74 deg swept warped wing with a reflexed trailing edge and four engine nacelles mounted below the reflexed portion of the wing. A number of variations in the basic configuration were investigated; they included the effect of wing leading edge radius, the effect of various model components, and the effect of model control deflections.

  12. Static force tests of a sharp leading edge delta-wing model at ambient and cryogenic temperatures with a description of the apparatus employed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilgore, R. A.; Davenport, E. E.

    1976-01-01

    A sharp leading edge delta-wing model was tested through an angle-of-attack range at Mach numbers of 0.75, 0.80, and 0.85 at both ambient and cryogenic temperatures in the Langley 1/3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel. Total pressure was varied with total temperature in order to hold test Reynolds number constant at a given Mach number. Agreement between the aerodynamic data obtained at ambient and cryogenic temperatures indicates that flows with leading-edge vortex effects are duplicated properly at cryogenic temperatures. The test results demonstrate that accurate aerodynamic data can be obtained by using conventional force-testing techniques if suitable measures are taken to minimize temperature gradients across the balance and to keep the balance at ambient (warm) temperatures during cryogenic operation of the tunnel.

  13. Head and neck response of a finite element anthropomorphic test device and human body model during a simulated rotary-wing aircraft impact.

    PubMed

    White, Nicholas A; Danelson, Kerry A; Gayzik, F Scott; Stitzel, Joel D

    2014-11-01

    A finite element (FE) simulation environment has been developed to investigate aviator head and neck response during a simulated rotary-wing aircraft impact using both an FE anthropomorphic test device (ATD) and an FE human body model. The head and neck response of the ATD simulation was successfully validated against an experimental sled test. The majority of the head and neck transducer time histories received a CORrelation and analysis (CORA) rating of 0.7 or higher, indicating good overall correlation. The human body model simulation produced a more biofidelic head and neck response than the ATD experimental test and simulation, including change in neck curvature. While only the upper and lower neck loading can be measured in the ATD, the shear force, axial force, and bending moment were reported for each level of the cervical spine in the human body model using a novel technique involving cross sections. This loading distribution provides further insight into the biomechanical response of the neck during a rotary-wing aircraft impact.

  14. ACTE Wing Loads Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horn, Nicholas R.

    2015-01-01

    The Adaptive Compliant Trailing Edge (ACTE) project modified a Gulfstream III (GIII) aircraft with a new flexible flap that creates a seamless transition between the flap and the wing. As with any new modification, it is crucial to ensure that the aircraft will not become overstressed in flight. To test this, Star CCM a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software program was used to calculate aerodynamic data for the aircraft at given flight conditions.

  15. A flight-test and simulation evaluation of the longitudinal final approach and landing performance of an automatic system for a light wing loading STOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, S. C.; Hardy, G. H.; Hindson, W. S.

    1983-01-01

    As part of a comprehensive flight-test program of STOL operating systems for the terminal area, an automatic landing system was developed and evaluated for a light wing loading turboprop aircraft. The aircraft utilized an onboard advanced digital avionics system. Flight tests were conducted at a facility that included a STOL runway site with a microwave landing system. Longitudinal flight-test results were presented and compared with available (basically CTOL) criteria. These comparisons were augmented by results from a comprehensive simulation of the controlled aircraft which included representations of navigation errors that were encountered in flight and atmospheric disturbances. Acceptable performance on final approach and at touchdown was achieved by the autoland (automatic landing) system for the moderate winds and turbulence conditions encountered in flight. However, some touchdown performance goals were marginally achieved, and simulation results suggested that difficulties could be encountered in the presence of more extreme atmospheric conditions. Suggestions were made for improving performance under those more extreme conditions.

  16. Tests with three-dimensional adjustments in the rectangular working section of the French T2 wind tunnel with an AS 07-type swept-back wing model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, A.; Payry, M. J.; Breil, J. F.

    1986-01-01

    The results obtained on the AS 07 wing and the working section walls for three types of configurations are reported. The first, called non-adapted, corresponds to the divergent upper and lower rectilinear walls which compensate for limit layer thickening. It can serve as a basis for complete flow calculations. The second configuration corresponds to wall shapes determined from calculations which tend to minimize interference at the level of the fuselage. Finally, the third configuration, called two-dimensional adaptation, uses the standard method for T2 profile tests. This case was tested to determine the influence of wall shape and error magnitude. These results are not sufficient to validate the three-dimensional adaptation; they must be coordinated with calculations or with unlimited atmosphere tests.

  17. Lessons Learned in the Selection and Development of Test Cases for the Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop: Rectangular Supercritical Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heeg, Jennifer; Chwalowski, Pawel; Wieseman, Carol D.; Florance, Jennifer P.; Schuster, David M.

    2013-01-01

    The Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop brought together an international community of computational fluid dynamicists as a step in defining the state of the art in computational aeroelasticity. The Rectangular Supercritical Wing (RSW) was chosen as the first configuration to study due to its geometric simplicity, perceived simple flow field at transonic conditions and availability of an experimental data set containing forced oscillation response data. Six teams performed analyses of the RSW; they used Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes flow solvers exercised assuming that the wing had a rigid structure. Both steady-state and forced oscillation computations were performed by each team. The results of these calculations were compared with each other and with the experimental data. The steady-state results from the computations capture many of the flow features of a classical supercritical airfoil pressure distribution. The most dominant feature of the oscillatory results is the upper surface shock dynamics. Substantial variations were observed among the computational solutions as well as differences relative to the experimental data. Contributing issues to these differences include substantial wind tunnel wall effects and diverse choices in the analysis parameters.

  18. High supersonic aerodynamic characteristics of five irregular planform wings with systematically varying wing fillet geometry tested in the NASA/LaRC 4-foot UPWT (LEG 2) (LA45A/B)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    An experimental and analytical aerodynamic program to develop predesign guides for irregular planform wings is reported. The benefits are linearization of subsonic lift curve slope to high angles of attack and avoidance of subsonic pitch instabilities at high lift by proper tailoring of the planform fillet wing combination while providing the desired hypersonic trim angle and stability. The two prime areas of concern are to optimize shuttle orbiter landing and entry characteristics. Basic longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics at high supersonic speeds are developed.

  19. Quiet Clean Short-haul Experimental Engine (QCSEE) Over-The-Wing (OTW) propulsion systems test report. Volume 4: Acoustic performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stimpert, D. L.

    1979-01-01

    A series of acoustic tests were conducted on the over the wing engine. These tests evaluated the fully suppressed noise levels in forward and reverse thrust operation and provided insight into the component noise sources of the engine plus the suppression achieved by various components. System noise levels using the contract specified calculation procedure indicate that the in-flight noise level on a 152 m sideline at takeoff and approach are 97.2 and 94.6 EPNdB, respectively, compared to a goal of 95.0 EPNdB. In reverse thrust, the system noise level was 106.1 PNdB compared to a goal of 100 PNdB. Baseline source noise levels agreed very well with pretest predictions. Inlet-radiated noise suppression of 14 PNdB was demonstrated with the high throat Mach number inlet at 0.79 throat Mach number.

  20. Aeroservoelastic Wind-Tunnel Tests of a Free-Flying, Joined-Wing SensorCraft Model for Gust Load Alleviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Robert C.; Castelluccio, Mark A.; Coulson, David A.; Heeg, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    A team comprised of the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), Boeing, and the NASA Langley Research Center conducted three aeroservoelastic wind-tunnel tests in the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel to demonstrate active control technologies relevant to large, exible vehicles. In the first of these three tests, a full-span, aeroelastically scaled, wind-tunnel model of a joined-wing SensorCraft vehicle was mounted to a force balance to acquire a basic aerodynamic data set. In the second and third tests, the same wind-tunnel model was mated to a new, two-degree-of-freedom, beam mount. This mount allowed the full-span model to translate vertically and pitch. Trimmed flight at -10% static margin and gust load alleviation were successfully demonstrated. The rigid body degrees of freedom required that the model be own in the wind tunnel using an active control system. This risky mode of testing necessitated that a model arrestment system be integrated into the new mount. The safe and successful completion of these free-flying tests required the development and integration of custom hardware and software. This paper describes the many systems, software, and procedures that were developed as part of this effort. The balance and free ying wind-tunnel tests will be summarized. The design of the trim and gust load alleviation control laws along with the associated results will also be discussed.

  1. Quasi-Static 3-Point Reinforced Carbon-Carbon Bend Test and Analysis for Shuttle Orbiter Wing Leading Edge Impact Damage Thresholds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasanella, Edwin L.; Sotiris, Kellas

    2006-01-01

    Static 3-point bend tests of Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) were conducted to failure to provide data for additional validation of an LS-DYNA RCC model suitable for predicting the threshold of impact damage to shuttle orbiter wing leading edges. LS-DYNA predictions correlated well with the average RCC failure load, and were good in matching the load vs. deflection. However, correlating the detectable damage using NDE methods with the cumulative damage parameter in LS-DYNA material model 58 was not readily achievable. The difficulty of finding internal RCC damage with NDE and the high sensitivity of the mat58 damage parameter to the load near failure made the task very challenging. In addition, damage mechanisms for RCC due to dynamic impact of debris such as foam and ice and damage mechanisms due to a static loading were, as expected, not equivalent.

  2. Wing extensions for improving climb performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicks, O. W.

    1983-01-01

    Recent wind tunnel studies have shown that significant improvements in wing efficiency and climb performance can be achieved using wing extensions having sharp edges and unmodified upper airfoil contours. Based on tests of six configurations, a simple tip shape provided the best wing efficiency at high lift conditions without penalty during cruise conditions. The best configuration tested exhibited more than 20 percent improvement in the maximum rate of climb, plus a reduction in stall speed and a slight improvement in cruise performance over a baseline tip with a round edge. In addition to measurements that were used to determine performance, flow visualization studies provided insight into reasons for improved wing efficiency. Tests were conducted using a high performance general aviation aircraft model with a tapered, cantilevered wing.

  3. Experimental effects of wing location on wing-body pressures at supersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Jerry M.; Watson, Carolyn B.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental study was performed at supersonic speeds to measure wing and body spanwise pressure distributions on an axisymmetric-body delta wing model on which the wing vertical location on the body was systematically varied from low- to high-mounted positions. In addition, for two of these positions both horizontal and radial wing angular orientations relative to the body were tested, and roll angle effects were investigated for one of the positions. Seven different wing-body configurations and a body-alone configuration were studied. The test was conducted at Mach numbers from 1.70 to 2.86 at angles of attack from about -4 deg to 24 deg. Pressure orifices were located at three longitudinal stations on each wing-body model, and at each station the orifices were located completely around the body, along the lower surface of the right wing (looking upstream), and along the upper surface of the left wing. All pressure coefficient data are tabulated and selected samples are shown graphically to illustrate the effects of the test variables. The effects of angle of attack, roll angle, Mach number, longitudinal station, wing vertical location, wing angular orientation, and wing-body juncture are analyzed. The vertical location of the wing on the body had a very strong effect on the body pressures. For a given angle of attack at a roll angle of 0 deg, the pressures were virtually constant in the spanwise direction across the windward surfaces of the wing-body combination. Pressure-relieving, channeling, and vortex effects were noted in the data.

  4. Detection of Subsurface Material Separation in Shuttle Orbiter Slip-Side Joggle Region of the Wing Leading Edge using Infrared Imaging Data from Arc Jet Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daryabeigi, Kamran; Walker, Sandra P.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine whether infrared imaging (IR) surface temperature data obtained during arc-jet tests of Space Shuttle Orbiter s reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) wing leading edge panel slip-side joggle region could be used to detect presence of subsurface material separation, and if so, to determine when separation occurs during the simulated entry profile. Recent thermostructural studies have indicated thermally induced interlaminar normal stress concentrations at the substrate/coating interface in the curved joggle region can result in local subsurface material separation, with the separation predicted to occur during approach to peak heating during reentry. The present study was an attempt to determine experimentally when subsurface material separations occur. A simplified thermal model of a flat RCC panel with subsurface material separation was developed and used to infer general surface temperature trends due to the presence of subsurface material separation. IR data from previously conducted arc-jet tests on three test specimens were analyzed: one without subsurface material separation either pre or post test, one with pre test separation, and one with separation developing during test. The simplified thermal model trend predictions along with comparison of experimental IR data of the three test specimens were used to successfully infer material separation from the arc-jet test data. Furthermore, for the test specimen that had developed subsurface material separation during the arc-jet tests, the initiation of separation appeared to occur during the ramp up to the peak heating condition, where test specimen temperature went from 2500 to 2800 F.

  5. View east, showing Northwest Wing (Wing 5) and rear elevations ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View east, showing Northwest Wing (Wing 5) and rear elevations of facade and tis flaking wings (Wings 1 and 2) - Hospital for Sick Children, 1731 Bunker Hill Road, Northeast, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  6. Real-time testing of titanium sheet and extrusion coupon specimens subjected to Mach 2.7 supersonic cruise aircraft wing stresses and temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lunde, T.

    1977-01-01

    The accuracy of three accelerated flight-by-flight test methods for material selection, and fatigue substantiation of supersonic cruise aircraft structure was studied. The real time stresses and temperatures applied to the specimens were representative of the service conditions in the lower surface of a Mach 2.7 supersonic cruise aircraft wing root structure. Each real time flight lasted about 65 minutes, including about one hour at (500 F) in the cruise condition. Center notched coupon specimens from six titanium materials were tested: mill-annealed, duplex-annealed, and triplex-annealed Ti-8Al-1Mo-1V sheets; mill-annealed Ti-8Al-1Mo-1V extrusion; mill-annealed Ti-6Al-4V sheet; and solution-treated and aged Ti-6Al-4V extrusion. For duplex-annealed Ti-8Al-1Mo-1V sheet, specimens with single spotweld were also tested. The test results were studied in conjunction with other related data from the literature for: material selection, structural fabrication, fatigue resistance of supersonic cruise aircraft structure, and fatigue test acceleration procedures for supersonic cruise aircraft.

  7. Comparison of wind tunnel test results at free stream Mach 0.7 with results from the Boeing TEA-230 subsonic flow method. [wing flow method tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohn, L. W.

    1975-01-01

    The use of the Boeing TEA-230 Subsonic Flow Analysis method as a primary design tool in the development of cruise overwing nacelle configurations is presented. Surface pressure characteristics at 0.7 Mach number were determined by the TEA-230 method for a selected overwing flow-through nacelle configuration. Results of this analysis show excellent overall agreement with corresponding wind tunnel data. Effects of the presence of the nacelle on the wing pressure field were predicted accurately by the theoretical method. Evidence is provided that differences between theoretical and experimental pressure distributions in the present study would not result in significant discrepancies in the nacelle lines or nacelle drag estimates.

  8. Freight Wing Trailer Aerodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, Sean; Bigatel, Patrick

    2004-10-17

    Freight Wing Incorporated utilized the opportunity presented by this DOE category one Inventions and Innovations grant to successfully research, develop, test, patent, market, and sell innovative fuel and emissions saving aerodynamic attachments for the trucking industry. A great deal of past scientific research has demonstrated that streamlining box shaped semi-trailers can significantly reduce a truck's fuel consumption. However, significant design challenges have prevented past concepts from meeting industry needs. Market research early in this project revealed the demands of truck fleet operators regarding aerodynamic attachments. Products must not only save fuel, but cannot interfere with the operation of the truck, require significant maintenance, add significant weight, and must be extremely durable. Furthermore, SAE/TMC J1321 tests performed by a respected independent laboratory are necessary for large fleets to even consider purchase. Freight Wing used this information to create a system of three practical aerodynamic attachments for the front, rear and undercarriage of standard semi trailers. SAE/TMC J1321 Type II tests preformed by the Transportation Research Center (TRC) demonstrated a 7% improvement to fuel economy with all three products. If Freight Wing is successful in its continued efforts to gain market penetration, the energy and environmental savings would be considerable. Each truck outfitted saves approximately 1,100 gallons of fuel every 100,000 miles, which prevents over 12 tons of CO2 from entering the atmosphere. If all applicable trailers used the technology, the country could save approximately 1.8 billion gallons of diesel fuel, 18 million tons of emissions and 3.6 billion dollars annually.

  9. The effect of over-the-wing nacelles on wing-body aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reubush, D. E.

    1978-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Langley 16-foot transonic tunnel to further study benefits in climb and cruise performance due to blowing the jet over the wing for a transport-type wing-body configuration. In this investigation a wing-body model/powered-nacelle test rig combination was tested at Mach numbers of 0.5 and 0.8 at angles of attack from -2 to 4 deg and jet total-pressure ratios from jet off to 3 or 4 (depending on Mach number) for a variety of nacelle locations relative to the wing. Results from this investigation show that positioning of the nacelles can have very large effects on the wing-body drag (nacelles were nonmetric). Some positions yielded much higher drag than the baseline wing-body while others yielded drag which was somewhat lower than the baseline.

  10. Titanium honeycomb structure. [for supersonic aircraft wing structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, R. A.; Elrod, S. D.; Lovell, D. T.

    1972-01-01

    A brazed titanium honeycomb sandwich system for supersonic transport wing cover panels provides the most efficient structure spanwise, chordwise, and loadwise. Flutter testing shows that high wing stiffness is most efficient in a sandwich structure. This structure also provides good thermal insulation if liquid fuel is carried in direct contact with the wing structure in integral fuel tanks.

  11. Nonlinear aerodynamic wing design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonner, Ellwood

    1985-01-01

    The applicability of new nonlinear theoretical techniques is demonstrated for supersonic wing design. The new technology was utilized to define outboard panels for an existing advanced tactical fighter model. Mach 1.6 maneuver point design and multi-operating point compromise surfaces were developed and tested. High aerodynamic efficiency was achieved at the design conditions. A corollary result was that only modest supersonic penalties were incurred to meet multiple aerodynamic requirements. The nonlinear potential analysis of a practical configuration arrangement correlated well with experimental data.

  12. View east, showing Northwest Wing (Wing 5), west wall of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View east, showing Northwest Wing (Wing 5), west wall of the North Wing (Wing 2) and rear elevations of the facade and its flanking wings (Wings 1 and 2) - Hospital for Sick Children, 1731 Bunker Hill Road, Northeast, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  13. Full-scale-wind-tunnel Tests of a 35 Degree Sweptback Wing Airplane with High-velocity Blowing over the Training-edge Flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, Mark W; Tolhurst, William H JR

    1955-01-01

    A wind-tunnel investigation was made to determine the effects of ejecting high-velocity air near the leading edge of plain trailing-edge flaps on a 35 degree sweptback wing. The tests were made with flap deflections from 45 degrees to 85 degrees and with pressure ratios across the flap nozzles from sub-critical up to 2.9. A limited study of the effects of nozzle location and configuration on the efficiency of the flap was made. Measurements of the lift, drag, and pitching moment were made for Reynolds numbers from 5.8 to 10.1x10(6). Measurements were also made of the weight rate of flow, pressure, and temperature of the air supplied to the flap nozzles.The results show that blowing on the deflected flap produced large flap lift increments. The amount of air required to prevent flow separation on the flap was significantly less than that estimated from published two-dimensional data. When the amount of air ejected over the flap was just sufficient to prevent flow separation, the lift increment obtained agreed well with linear inviscid fluid theory up to flap deflections of 60 degrees. The flap lift increment at 85 degrees flap deflection was about 80 percent of that predicted theoretically.With larger amounts of air blown over the flap, these lift increments could be significantly increased. It was found that the performance of the flap was relatively insensitive to the location of the flap nozzle, to spacers in the nozzle, and to flow disturbances such as those caused by leading-edge slats or discontinuities on the wing or flap surfaces. Analysis of the results indicated that installation of this system on an F-86 airplane is feasible.

  14. Results of flutter test OS6 obtained using the 0.14-scale wing/elevon model (54-0) in the NASA LaRC 16-foot transonic dynamics wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berthold, C. L.

    1977-01-01

    A 0.14-scale dynamically scaled model of the space shuttle orbiter wing was tested in the Langley Research Center 16-Foot Transonic Dynamics Wind Tunnel to determine flutter, buffet, and elevon buzz boundaries. Mach numbers between 0.3 and 1.1 were investigated. Rockwell shuttle model 54-0 was utilized for this investigation. A description of the test procedure, hardware, and results of this test is presented.

  15. Measurements of Blast Pressures on a Rigid 35 deg Sweptback Wing at Mach 0.76 from Rocket Propelled Sled Tests.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-31

    inches Root Chord (at model centerline) 15.091 Wing Section (streamwise) 64A010 Thickness Ratio (at model centerline) 17% (at tip) 10% Pressure Stations...Theoretical Symmetric Span Loading at Subsonic Speeds for Wings Having Arbitrary Planforms, NACA , Report No. 921, 1948. 95 APPENDIX A PRESSURE

  16. Wind-Tunnel Tests of the 1/25-Scale Powered Model of the Martin JRM-1 Airplane. IV - Tests with Ground Board and with Modified Wing and Hull - TED No. NACA 232. Part 4; Tests with Ground Board and with Modified Wing and Hull, TED No. NACA 232

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockwood, Vernard E.; Smith, Bernard J.

    1947-01-01

    Wind-tunnel tests were made of a 1/25 scale model of the Martin JRM-1 airplane to determine: (1) The longitudinal stability and control characteristics of the JRM-1 model near the water and lateral and directional stability characteristics with power while moving on the surface of the water, the latter being useful for the design of tip floats; (2) The stability and stalling characteristics of the wing with a modified airfoil contour; (3) Stability characteristics of a hull of larger design gross weight; The test results indicated that the elevator was powerful enough to trim the original model in a landing configuration at any lift coefficient within the specified range of centers of gravity. The ground-board tests for evaluating the aerodynamic forces and moments on an airplane in a simulated cross wind indicate a high dihedral effect in the presence of the ground board and, consequently, during low-speed taxying and take-off, large overturning moments would result which would have to be overcome by the tip floats.

  17. Longitudinal Stability and Control Characteristics of a Semispan Wind-Tunnel Model of the XF7U-1 Airplane and a Comparison with Complete-Model Wind-Tunnel Tests and Semispan-Model Wing-Flow Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodson, Kenneth W.; King, Thomas J., Jr.

    1949-01-01

    An investigation was conducted on an 0.08-scale semispan model of the Chance Vought XF7U-1 airplane in the Langley high-speed 7- by 10-foot tunnel in the Mach number range from 0.40 to 0.97. The results are compared with those obtained with an 0.08-scale sting-mounted complete model tested in the same tunnel and with an 0.026-scale semispan model tested by the wing-flow method. The lift-curve slopes obtained for the 0.08-scale semispan model and the 0.026-scale wing-flow model were in good agreement but both were generally lower than the values obtained for the sting model. The results of an unpublished investigation have shown that tunnel-wall boundary-layer and strut-leakage effects can came the difference noted between the lift-curve slopes of the sting and the semispan data. Fair agreement was obtained among the data of the three models as regard the variation of pitching-moment coefficients with lift coefficient. The agreement between the complete and the semispan models was more favorable with the vertical fine on, because the wall-boundary-layer and strut leakage effects were less severe. In the Mach number range between 0.94 and 0.97, ailavator-control reversal was indicated in the wing-flow data near zero lift; Whereas, these same trends were indicated in the larger scale semispan data at somewhat higher lift coefficients.

  18. Theory of wing rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, C.-H.; Lan, C. E.

    1985-01-01

    Wing rock is one type of lateral-directional instabilities at high angles of attack. To predict wing rock characteristics and to design airplanes to avoid wing rock, parameters affecting wing rock characteristics must be known. A new nonlinear aerodynamic model is developed to investigate the main aerodynamic nonlinearities causing wing rock. In the present theory, the Beecham-Titchener asymptotic method is used to derive expressions for the limit-cycle amplitude and frequency of wing rock from nonlinear flight dynamics equations. The resulting expressions are capable of explaining the existence of wing rock for all types of aircraft. Wing rock is developed by negative or weakly positive roll damping, and sustained by nonlinear aerodynamic roll damping. Good agreement between theoretical and experimental results is obtained.

  19. Quiet Clean Short-haul Experimental Engine (QCSEE). Under-The-Wing (UTW) engine boilerplate nacelle test report, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The design and testing of high bypass geared turbofan engines with nacelles forming the propulsion systems for short haul passenger aircraft are considered. The test results demonstrate the technology required for externally blown flap aircraft for introduction into passenger service in the 1980's. The equipment tested is described along with the test facility and instrumentation. A chronological history of the test and a summary of results are given.

  20. Carbon nanotube epoxy modified CFRPs: toward improved mechanical and sensing for multifunctional aerostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostopoulos, Vassilis; Vavouliotis, Antonios; Karapappas, Petros

    2008-03-01

    In aerospace structures, the increase of mechanical performance of materials such as Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymers (CFRPs) is always a key goal. In parallel, there is a constant demand for multi-functional solutions that provide continuous, integrated damage monitoring in an efficient and cost affordable way. Structural Health Monitoring systems are crucial for a variety of aerospace applications where safety, operational cost and the maintenance have increased significantly. The Electrical Resistance Technique (ERT) as a promising damage monitoring technique uses the CFRP materials themselves as inherent damage sensors. Currently method's medium sensitivity does not allow the identification of early damage stages requested for a potential application. By using highly conductive carbon-nanotubes as filler material into the epoxy matrix of CFRP is expected to increase the sensitivity of the method, allowing for wider field of applications. In addition, it is expected that the introduction of CNTs into the polymer matrix of CFRP laminates will increase the overall mechanical and electrical performance of the composite. This double role of the CNTs is investigated in the present study. Quasi-static tensile, cyclic loading-unloading-reloading with increase load level at each loading cycle and tension-tension fatigue tests with parallel monitoring of the longitudinal resistance performed on CFRP laminates with various contents of CNTs in the epoxy matrix showed that matrix cracking and fiber breakage caused resistance to increase irreversibly. Although the individual damage mechanisms could not be easily distinguished the overall damage state can be reliably characterized. Moreover significant increase in the fracture resistance was shown, for both Mode I and Mode II tests in the case of CNT doped laminates, compared against the reference laminate where neat epoxy matrix was used. Finally, low velocity impact tests showed that the CNT doped laminates appear to have

  1. Experimental and numerical analysis of the wing rock characteristics of a 'wing-body-tail' configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suarez, Carlos J.; Smith, Brooke C.; Malcolm, Gerald N.

    1993-01-01

    Free-to-roll wind tunnel tests were conducted and a computer simulation exercise was performed in an effort to investigate in detail the mechanism of wing rock on a configuration that consisted of a highly-slender forebody and a 78 deg swept delta wing. In the wind tunnel test, the roll angle and wing surface pressures were measured during the wing rock motion. A limit cycle oscillation was observed for angles of attack between 22 deg and 30 deg. In general, the wind tunnel test confirmed that the main flow phenomena responsible for the wing-body-tail wing rock are the interactions between the forebody and the wing vortices. The variation of roll acceleration (determined from the second derivative of the roll angle time history) with roll angle clearly showed the energy balance necessary to sustain the limit cycle oscillation. Pressure measurements on the wing revealed the hysteresis of the wing rock process. First, second and nth order models for the aerodynamic damping were developed and examined with a one degree of freedom computer simulation. Very good agreement with the observed behavior from the wind tunnel was obtained.

  2. Wing flexibility enhances load-lifting capacity in bumblebees.

    PubMed

    Mountcastle, Andrew M; Combes, Stacey A

    2013-05-22

    The effect of wing flexibility on aerodynamic force production has emerged as a central question in insect flight research. However, physical and computational models have yielded conflicting results regarding whether wing deformations enhance or diminish flight forces. By experimentally stiffening the wings of live bumblebees, we demonstrate that wing flexibility affects aerodynamic force production in a natural behavioural context. Bumblebee wings were artificially stiffened in vivo by applying a micro-splint to a single flexible vein joint, and the bees were subjected to load-lifting tests. Bees with stiffened wings showed an 8.6 per cent reduction in maximum vertical aerodynamic force production, which cannot be accounted for by changes in gross wing kinematics, as stroke amplitude and flapping frequency were unchanged. Our results reveal that flexible wing design and the resulting passive deformations enhance vertical force production and load-lifting capacity in bumblebees, locomotory traits with important ecological implications.

  3. A CFD/CSD interaction methodology for aircraft wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhardwaj, Manoj Kumar

    With advanced subsonic transports and military aircraft operating in the transonic regime, it is becoming important to determine the effects of the coupling between aerodynamic loads and elastic forces. Since aeroelastic effects can contribute significantly to the design of these aircraft, there is a strong need in the aerospace industry to predict these aero-structure interactions computationally. To perform static aeroelastic analysis in the transonic regime, high fidelity computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis tools must be used in conjunction with high fidelity computational structural dynamics (CSD) analysis tools due to the nonlinear behavior of the aerodynamics in the transonic regime. There is also a need to be able to use a wide variety of CFD and CSD tools to predict these aeroelastic effects in the transonic regime. Because source codes are not always available, it is necessary to couple the CFD and CSD codes without alteration of the source codes. In this study, an aeroelastic coupling procedure is developed which will perform static aeroelastic analysis using any CFD and CSD code with little code integration. The aeroelastic coupling procedure is demonstrated on an F/A-18 Stabilator using NASTD (an in-house McDonnell Douglas CFD code) and NASTRAN. In addition, the Aeroelastic Research Wing (ARW-2) is used for demonstration of the aeroelastic coupling procedure by using ENSAERO (NASA Ames Research Center CFD code) and a finite element wing-box code (developed as a part of this research). The results obtained from the present study are compared with those available from an experimental study conducted at NASA Langley Research Center and a study conducted at NASA Ames Research Center using ENSAERO and modal superposition. The results compare well with experimental data. Parallel computing power is used to investigate parallel static aeroelastic analysis because obtaining an aeroelastic solution using CFD/CSD methods is computationally intensive. A

  4. Flight-Test Evaluation of the Longitudinal Stability and Control Characteristics of 0.5-Scale Models of the Fairchild Lark Pilotless-Aircraft Configuration. Model with Wing Flaps Deflected 15 Degrees, TED No. NACA 2387

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, David G.

    1946-01-01

    A flight test was conducted at the Flight Test Station of the Pilotless Aircraft Research Division at Wallops Island, Va., to determine the longitudinal control and stability characteristics of a 0.5-scale model of the Fairchild Lerk Pilotless aircraft with the horizontal wing flaps deflected 15 degrees. The data were obtained by the use of a telemeter and also by radar tracking. The results show an increase of effectiveness of the longitudinal control in producing normal accelerations up to a Mach number of 0.75 where this effectiveness gradually decreased becoming negative at a Mach number of 0.89. Previous tests with wing flaps undeflected an increase in effectiveness up to Mach number of 0.93 where a sudden loss of control occurred. The model was dynamically stable throughout the speed range. The data confirmed the drag increase at the critical Mach number for large angles of attack is indicated in high-speed wind-tunnel tests.

  5. Spinning Characteristics of Wings III : a Rectangular and Tapered Clark Y Monoplane Wing with Rounded Tips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bamber, M J; House, R O

    1937-01-01

    An investigation was made to determine the spinning characteristics of Clark Y monoplane wings with different plan forms. A rectangular wing and a wing tapered 5:2, both with rounded tips, were tested on the N.A.C.A. spinning balance in the 5-foot vertical wind tunnel. The aerodynamic characteristics of the models and a prediction of the angles of sideslip for steady spins are given. Also included is an estimate of the yawning moment that must be furnished by the parts of the airplane to balance the inertia couples and wing yawing moment for spinning equilibrium. The effects on the spin of changes in plan form and of variations of some of the important parameters are discussed and the results are compared with those for a rectangular wing with square tips. It is concluded that for a conventional monoplane using Clark Y wing the sideslip will be algebraically larger for the wing with the rounded tip than for the wing with the square tip and will be largest for the tapered wing. The effect of plan form on the spin will vary with the type of airplane; and the provision of a yawing-moment coefficient of -0.025 (i.e., opposing the spin) by the tail, fuselage, and interference effects will insure against the attainment of equilibrium on a steady spin for any of the plan forms tested and for any of the parameters used in the analysis.

  6. Wing rock suppression using forebody vortex control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, T. T.; Ong, L. Y.; Suarez, C. J.; Malcolm, G. N.

    1991-01-01

    Static and free-to-roll tests were conducted in a water tunnel with a configuration that consisted of a highly-slender forebody and 78-deg sweep delta wings. Flow visualization was performed and the roll angle histories were obtained. The fluid mechanisms governing the wing rock of this configuration were identified. Different means of suppressing wing rock by controlling the forebody vortices using small blowing jets were also explored. Steady blowing was found to be capable of suppressing wing rock, but significant vortex asymmetries had to be induced at the same time. On the other hand, alternating pulsed blowing on the left and right sides of the forebody was demonstrated to be potentially an effective means of suppressing wing rock and eliminating large asymmetric moments at high angles of attack.

  7. Ultrawideband Electromagnetic Interference to Aircraft Radios: Results of Limited Functional Testing With United Airlines and Eagles Wings Incorporated, in Victorville, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ely, Jay J.; Shaver, Timothy W.; Fuller, Gerald L.

    2002-01-01

    On February 14, 2002, the FCC adopted a FIRST REPORT AND ORDER, released it on April 22, 2002, and on May 16, 2002 published in the Federal Register a Final Rule, permitting marketing and operation of new products incorporating UWB technology. Wireless product developers are working to rapidly bring this versatile, powerful and expectedly inexpensive technology into numerous consumer wireless devices. Past studies addressing the potential for passenger-carried portable electronic devices (PEDs) to interfere with aircraft electronic systems suggest that UWB transmitters may pose a significant threat to aircraft communication and navigation radio receivers. NASA, United Airlines and Eagles Wings Incorporated have performed preliminary testing that clearly shows the potential for handheld UWB transmitters to cause cockpit failure indications for the air traffic control radio beacon system (ATCRBS), blanking of aircraft on the traffic alert and collision avoidance system (TCAS) displays, and cause erratic motion and failure of instrument landing system (ILS) localizer and glideslope pointers on the pilot horizontal situation and attitude director displays. This report provides details of the preliminary testing and recommends further assessment of aircraft systems for susceptibility to UWB electromagnetic interference.

  8. HWMA/RCRA CLOSURE PLAN FOR THE MATERIALS TEST REACTOR WING (TRA-604) LABORATORY COMPONENTS VOLUNTARY CONSENT ORDER ACTION PLAN VCO-5.8 D REVISION2

    SciTech Connect

    KIRK WINTERHOLLER

    2008-02-25

    This Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure plan was developed for the laboratory components of the Test Reactor Area Catch Tank System (TRA-630) that are located in the Materials Test Reactor Wing (TRA-604) at the Reactor Technology Complex, Idaho National Laboratory Site, to meet a further milestone established under Voluntary Consent Order Action Plan VCO-5.8.d. The TRA-604 laboratory components addressed in this closure plan were deferred from the TRA-630 Catch Tank System closure plan due to ongoing laboratory operations in the areas requiring closure actions. The TRA-604 laboratory components include the TRA-604 laboratory warm wastewater drain piping, undersink drains, subheaders, and the east TRA-604 laboratory drain header. Potentially contaminated surfaces located beneath the TRA-604 laboratory warm wastewater drain piping and beneath the island sinks located in Laboratories 126 and 128 (located in TRA-661) are also addressed in this closure plan. The TRA-604 laboratory components will be closed in accordance with the interim status requirements of the Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act as implemented by the Idaho Administrative Procedures Act 58.01.05.009 and 40 Code of Federal Regulations 265, Subparts G and J. This closure plan presents the closure performance standards and the methods for achieving those standards.

  9. Genotoxicity studies in the ST cross of the Drosophila wing spot test of sunflower and soybean oils before and after frying and boiling procedures.

    PubMed

    Demir, Eşref; Marcos, Ricard; Kaya, Bülent

    2012-10-01

    Sunflower and soybean oils were tested for genotoxicity in the Drosophila wing somatic mutation and recombination assay. Results indicate that both oils produce genotoxic effects when tested without any previous frying or boiling processes. Boiling sunflower oil during fifteen, thirty and sixty minutes significantly increased its genotoxic response; nevertheless, after frying potatoes this oil showed a significant decrease in the genotoxic activity. On the other hand, boiling and frying soybean oil in the same conditions results in a decrease of its genotoxic potential. We have also detected that the amount of total polar materials increases significantly in oils submitted to frying or boiling process. Nevertheless, in oils obtained after frying potatoes, the amount of TPM was higher than after boiling. It is suggested that this effect is probably due to the amount of non-volatile TPM, the fatty acid composition of the oils, the types of frying oil, the high frying temperature and time, and the number of boiling and frying. This is the first study reporting genotoxicity data in Drosophila for the boiling and frying of both sunflower and soybean oils.

  10. Pressure distribution on a vectored-thrust V/STOL fighter in the transition-speed range. [wind tunnel tests to measure pressure distribution on body and wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mineck, R. E.; Margason, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    A wind-tunnel investigation has been conducted in the Langley V/STOL tunnel with a vectored-thrust V/STOL fighter configuration to obtain detailed pressure measurements on the body and on the wing in the transition-speed range. The vectored-thrust jet exhaust induced a region of negative pressure coefficients on the lower surface of the wing and on the bottom of the fuselage. The location of the jet exhaust relative to the wing was a major factor in determining the extent of the region of negative pressure coefficients.

  11. Numerical investigation of insect wing fracture behaviour.

    PubMed

    Rajabi, H; Darvizeh, A; Shafiei, A; Taylor, D; Dirks, J-H

    2015-01-02

    The wings of insects are extremely light-weight biological composites with exceptional biomechanical properties. In the recent years, numerical simulations have become a very powerful tool to answer experimentally inaccessible questions on the biomechanics of insect flight. However, many of the presented models require a sophisticated balance of biomechanical material parameters, many of which are not yet available. In this article we show the first numerical simulations of crack propagation in insect wings. We have used a combination of the maximum-principal stress theory, the traction separation law and basic biomechanical properties of cuticle to develop simple yet accurate finite element (FE) models of locust wings. The numerical results of simulated tensile tests on wing samples are in very good qualitative, and interestingly, also in excellent quantitative agreement with previously obtained experimental data. Our study further supports the idea that the cross-veins in insect wings act as barriers against crack propagation and consequently play a dominant role in toughening the whole wing structure. The use of numerical simulations also allowed us to combine experimental data with previously inaccessible data, such as the distribution of the first principal stress through the wing membrane and the veins. A closer look at the stress-distribution within the wings might help to better understand fracture-toughening mechanisms and also to design more durable biomimetic micro-air vehicles.

  12. The Realization and Study of Optical Wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artusio-Glimpse, Alexandra Brae

    Consider the airfoil: a carefully designed structure capable of stable lift in a uniform air flow. It so happens that air pressure and radiation (light) pressure are similar phenomena because each transfer momentum to flow-disturbing objects. This, then, begs the question: does an optical analogue to the airfoil exist? Though an exceedingly small effect, scientists harness radiation pressure in a wide gamut of applications from micromanipulation of single biological particles to the propulsion of large spacecrafts called solar sails. We introduce a cambered, refractive rod that is subjected to optical forces analogous to those seen in aerodynamics, and I call this analogue the optical wing. Flight characteristics of optical wings are determined by wing shape and material in a uniform radiation field. Theory predicts the lift force and axial torque are functions of the wing's angle of attack with stable and unstable orientations. These structures can operate as intensity-dependent, parametrically driven oscillators. In two-dimensions, the wings exhibit bistability when analyzed in an accelerating frame. In three-dimensions, the motion of axially symmetric spinning hemispherical wings is analogous to a spinning top. Experiments on semi-buoyant wings in water found semicylindrically shaped, refractive microparticles traversed a laser beam and rotated to an illumination-dependent stable orientation. Preliminary tests aid in the development of a calibrated force measurement experiment to directly evaluate the optical forces and torque on these samples. A foundational study of the optical wing, this work contributes to future advancements of flight-by-light.

  13. Flapping of Insectile Wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yangyang; Kanso, Eva

    2015-11-01

    Insects use flight muscles attached at the base of the wings to produce impressive wing flapping frequencies. Yet the effects of muscle stiffness on the performance of insect wings remain unclear. Here, we construct an insectile wing model, consisting of two rigid wings connected at their base by an elastic torsional spring and submerged in an oscillatory flow. The wing system is free to rotate and flap. We first explore the extent to which the flyer can withstand roll perturbations, then study its flapping behavior and performance as a function of spring stiffness. We find an optimal range of spring stiffness that results in large flapping amplitudes, high force generation and good storage of elastic energy. We conclude by conjecturing that insects may select and adjust the muscle spring stiffness to achieve desired movement. These findings may have significant implications on the design principles of wings in micro air-vehicles.

  14. The winged scapula.

    PubMed

    Fiddian, N J; King, R J

    1984-05-01

    Twenty-five patients with 23 different types of winging of the scapula are described. A simple clinical and etiologic classification of the winged scapula is proposed based on the study of these patients in conjunction with a review of the literature. Winging of the scapula is either static or dynamic. Static winging is due to fixed deformity in the shoulder girdle, spine, or ribs. Dynamic winging is due to a neuromuscular disorder. The great variety of lesions that produce winging of the scapula may be classified anatomically into four types: Type I, nerve; Type II, muscle; Type III, bone; and Type IV, joint. Winging of the scapula is a surprisingly common physical sign, but because it is often asymptomatic it receives little attention. However, symptoms of pain, weakness, or cosmetic deformity may demand attention, and it is hoped that this classification will help in the diagnosis and assessment of these patients.

  15. Analysis of an Artificial Tailplane Icing Flight Test of a High-Wing, Twin-Engine Aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaikh, Shehzad M.

    The US Air Force Flight Test Center (AFFTC) conducted a civilian, Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) sponsored, evaluation of tailplane icing of a twin-turboprop business transport at Edwards Air Force Base. The flight test was conducted to evaluate ice shape growth and extent of ice on the tailplane for specific weather conditions of Liquid Water Content (LWC), droplet size, and ambient temperature. This work analyzes the flight test data comparing the drag for various tailplane icing conditions with respect to a flight test verified calibrated aircraft model. Although less than a third of the test aircraft was involved in the icing environment, the results of this analysis shows a significant increase in the aircraft drag with respect to the LWC, droplet size, and ambient temperature.

  16. Fundamental Aeronautics Program. Subsonic Rotary Wing Project: SRW Aeromechanics Overview/UH-60 Airloads Wind Tunnel Test Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, Thomas R.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: a) Advance the understanding of phenomena in aerodynamics, dynamics, and active control of rotorcraft. b) Develop and validate first-principles tools. c) Acquire data for tool validation from small and large-scale testing of existing and novel rotorcraft configurations. Recent Accomplishments include: (CFD) - Made significant improvements in structured and unstructured rotorcraft CFD methods (OVERFLOW and FUN3D). (Icing) - a) Continued development of high-fidelity icing analysis tools. b) Completed test of oscillating airfoil in Icing Research Tunnel (IRT). c) Developed plans and began detailed preparations for subscale rotor test in IRT.

  17. Advanced Jet Noise Exhaust Concepts in NASA's N+2 Supersonics Validation Study and the Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project's Upcoming Hybrid Wing Body Acoustics Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Brenda S.; Doty, Mike

    2012-01-01

    Acoustic and flow-field experiments were conducted on exhaust concepts for the next generation supersonic, commercial aircraft. The concepts were developed by Lockheed Martin (LM), Rolls-Royce Liberty Works (RRLW), and General Electric Global Research (GEGR) as part of an N+2 (next generation forward) aircraft system study initiated by the Supersonics Project in NASA s Fundamental Aeronautics Program. The experiments were conducted in the Aero-Acoustic Propulsion Laboratory at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The exhaust concepts presented here utilized lobed-mixers and ejectors. A powered third-stream was implemented to improve ejector acoustic performance. One concept was found to produce stagnant flow within the ejector and the other produced discrete-frequency tones (due to flow separations within the model) that degraded the acoustic performance of the exhaust concept. NASA's Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Project has been investigating a Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) aircraft as a possible configuration for meeting N+2 system level goals for noise, emissions, and fuel burn. A recently completed NRA led by Boeing Research and Technology resulted in a full-scale aircraft design and wind tunnel model. This model will be tested acoustically in NASA Langley's 14-by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel and will include dual jet engine simulators and broadband engine noise simulators as part of the test campaign. The objectives of the test are to characterize the system level noise, quantify the effects of shielding, and generate a valuable database for prediction method development. Further details of the test and various component preparations are described.

  18. Acquisition and Application of Transonic Wing and Far-Field Test Data for Three-Dimensional Computational Method Evaluation. Volume I.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

    ACCESSION NO. 3. RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER TITLE (and Subtitle) .ORT a PERID COVERED ACQUISITION AND APPLICATION OF TRANSONIC W NG Final e,_;. AND FAR...the FLO-22 analysis. The difference between viscous and inviscid solutions was small. iii TABLE OF CONTENTS Page SYMBOLS...computational methods for analyzing the transonic flow about isolated wings and simple wing-body combinations. Table 1 lists some of the methods which are readily

  19. Aerostructural safety factor criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verderaime, V.

    1992-01-01

    The present modification of the conventional safety factor method for aircraft structures evaluation involves the expression of deterministic safety factors in probabilistic tolerance limit ratios; these are found to involve a total of three factors that control the interference of applied and resistive stress distributions. The deterministic expression is extended so that it may furnish a 'relative ultimate safety' index that encompasses all three distribution factors. Operational reliability is developed on the basis of the applied and the yield stress distribution interferences. Industry standards are suggested to be derivable from factor selections that are based on the consequences of failure.

  20. Resilin in dragonfly and damselfly wings and its implications for wing flexibility.

    PubMed

    Donoughe, Seth; Crall, James D; Merz, Rachel A; Combes, Stacey A

    2011-12-01

    Although there is mounting evidence that passive mechanical dynamics of insect wings play an integral role in insect flight, our understanding of the structural details underlying insect wing flexibility remains incomplete. Here, we use comparative morphological and mechanical techniques to illuminate the function and diversity of two mechanisms within Odonata wings presumed to affect dynamic wing deformations: flexible resilin vein-joints and cuticular spikes. Mechanical tests show that joints with more resilin have lower rotational stiffness and deform more in response to a load applied to an intact wing. Morphological studies of 12 species of Odonata reveal that resilin joints and cuticular spikes are widespread taxonomically, yet both traits display a striking degree of morphological and functional diversity that follows taxonomically distinct patterns. Interestingly, damselfly wings (suborder Zygoptera) are mainly characterized by vein-joints that are double-sided (containing resilin both dorsally and ventrally), whereas dragonfly wings (suborder Epiprocta) are largely characterized by single-sided vein-joints (containing resilin either ventrally or dorsally, but not both). The functional significance and diversity of resilin joints and cuticular spikes could yield insight into the evolutionary relationship between form and function of wings, as well as revealing basic principles of insect wing mechanical design.

  1. Lead acetate does not inhibit dimethylnitrosamine activation and interacts with phenobarbital which is genotoxic in the ST cross of the Drosophila wing spot test.

    PubMed

    Castañeda-Partida, Laura; Heres-Pulido, Ma Eugenia; Guzmán-Rincón, Judith; Hernández-Portilla, Luis Barbo; Dueñas-García, Irma Elena; Durán-Díaz, Angel; Delfín-Alcalá, Irma

    2011-09-01

    Lead acetate (PbAc) is known to inhibit the synthesis of the heme group, needed for hemeproteins like Cytochromes P450 (CYP450s). Dimethylnitrosamine (DMN) requires metabolic activation by CYP450s. The Drosophila wing spot test was performed to establish whether PbAc inhibits DMN activation in the standard (ST) and high bioactivation (HB) crosses, with different levels of CYP450s. Phenobarbital (PH) was used as an antagonist for its ability to induce CYP450s synthesis. PbAc (0.01, 0.1, 1.0mM) produced significant small spots frequencies in the ST cross, indicating a possible genotoxic activity, however, the total spots frequency was negative at all concentrations. DMN (0.076 mM) was genotoxic in both crosses; surprisingly, PH (12 mM) was genotoxic and the PH-DMN treatment resulted synergic in the ST cross. Interestingly, the PbAc-PH pre-co-treatments showed a possible interaction in the ST cross. The GC-MS analysis showed a drop in the PH content as the PbAc concentration increased. PbAc also seemed to inhibit the genotoxic activity of PH, except at 0.01 mM. It is concluded that PbAc does not inhibit DMN activation by CYP450s in both crosses since it exerted a clear genotoxicity and that PH is genotoxic and interacts with PbAc in the ST but not the HB cross.

  2. Natural flow wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M. (Inventor); Bauer, Steven X. S. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    The invention is a natural flow wing and a method for constructing the same. The method comprises contouring a three-dimensional upper surface and a three-dimensional lower surface of the natural flow wing independently of one another into a prescribed shape. Experimental data and theoretical analysis show that flow and pressure-loading over an upper surface of a wing tend to be conical about an apex of the wing, producing favorable and unfavorable regions of performance based on drag. The method reduces these unfavorable regions by shaping the upper surface such that the maximum thickness near a tip of the natural flow wing moves aft, thereby, contouring the wing to coincide more closely with the conical nature of the flow on the upper surface. Nearly constant compressive loading characterizes the flow field over a lower surface of the conventional wing. Magnitude of these compressive pressures on the lower surface depends on angle of attack and on a streamwise curvature of the lower surface of the wing and not on a cross-sectional spanwise curvature. The method, thereby, shapes the lower surface to create an area as large as possible with negative slopes. Any type of swept wing may be used to obtain the final, shaped geometry of the upper and lower surfaces of the natural flow wing.

  3. Evaluation of titanium dioxide nanocrystal-induced genotoxicity by the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay and the Drosophila wing spot test.

    PubMed

    Reis, Érica de Melo; Rezende, Alexandre Azenha Alves de; Oliveira, Pollyanna Francielli de; Nicolella, Heloiza Diniz; Tavares, Denise Crispim; Silva, Anielle Christine Almeida; Dantas, Noelio Oliveira; Spanó, Mário Antônio

    2016-10-01

    Titanium dioxide nanocrystals (TiO2 NCs) crystalline structures include anatase, rutile and brookite. This study evaluated the genotoxic effects of 3.4 and 6.2 nm anatase TiO2 NCs and 78.0 nm predominantly rutile TiO2 NCs through an in vitro micronucleus (MN) assay using V79 cells and an in vivo somatic mutation and recombination test in Drosophila wings. The MN assay was performed with nontoxic concentrations of TiO2 NCs. Only anatase (3.4 nm) at the highest concentration (120 μM) induced genotoxicity in V79 cells. In the in vivo test, Drosophila melanogaster larvae obtained from standard (ST) or high bioactivation (HB) crosses were treated with TiO2 NCs. In the ST cross, no mutagenic effects were observed. However, in the HB cross, TiO2 NCs (3.4 nm) were mutagenic at 1.5625 and 3.125 mM, while 78.0 nm NCs increased mutant spots at all concentrations tested except 3.125 mM. Only the smallest anatase TiO2 NCs induced mutagenic effects in vitro and in vivo. For rutile TiO2 NCs, no clastogenic/aneugenic effects were observed in the MN assay. However, they were mutagenic in Drosophila. Therefore, both anatase and rutile TiO2 NCs induced mutagenicity. Further research is necessary to clarify the TiO2 NCs genotoxic/mutagenic action mechanisms.

  4. Transonic flow theory of airfoils and wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garabedian, P. R.

    1976-01-01

    There are plans to use the supercritical wing on the next generation of commercial aircraft so as to economize on fuel consumption by reducing drag. Computer codes have served well in meeting the consequent demand for new wing sections. The possibility of replacing wind tunnel tests by computational fluid dynamics is discussed. Another approach to the supercritical wing is through shockless airfoils. A novel boundary value problem in the hodograph plane is studied that enables one to design a shockless airfoil so that its pressure distribution very nearly takes on data that are prescribed.

  5. Winging of the scapula.

    PubMed

    Saeed, M A; Gatens, P F; Singh, S

    1981-10-01

    Common neurogenic causes of scapular winging are serratus anterior, trapezius and rhomboid palsy. Deformity is minimal in serratus anterior palsy (long thoracic nerve); winging is accentuated by forward elevation and pushing with outstretched arms. In trapezius palsy (spinal accessory nerve), the shoulder droops and winging is accentuated by arm abduction at the shoulder level. Rhomboid weakness (dorsal scapular nerve or C5 root) is best demonstrated by slowly lowering the arms from the forward elevated position.

  6. Slotted Aircraft Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLean, James D. (Inventor); Witkowski, David P. (Inventor); Campbell, Richard L. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A swept aircraft wing includes a leading airfoil element and a trailing airfoil element. At least one full-span slot is defined by the wing during at least one transonic condition of the wing. The full-span slot allows a portion of the air flowing along the lower surface of the leading airfoil element to split and flow over the upper surface of the trailing airfoil element so as to achieve a performance improvement in the transonic condition.

  7. Operational considerations for aerodynamic testing of large-scale wing sections in a simulated natural rain environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Bryan A.; Bezos, Gaudy M.; Dunham, R. Earl, Jr.; Melson, W. Edward, Jr.

    1990-01-01

    One of the necessary areas of consideration for outdoor heavy rain testing is the effect of wind on both the simulated rain field and the quality and repeatability of the aerodynamic data. This paper discusses the data acquisition and subsequent reduction to nondimensional coefficients of lift and drag, with the appropriate correction for wind and rain field. Sample force data showing these effects are presented, along with estimates for accuracy and repeatability. The capability to produce high-quality data for rain drop size distribution using photographic and computerized image processing techniques was developed. Sample photographs depicting rain drop size are shown.

  8. Design, implementation, simulation, and testing of digital flutter suppression systems for the active flexible wing wind-tunnel model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Boyd, III; Mukhopadhyay, Vivek; Hoadley, Sherwood Tiffany; Cole, Stanley R.; Buttrill, Carey S.; Houck, Jacob A.

    1990-01-01

    Active flutter suppression control laws were designed, implemented, and tested on an aeroelastically-scaled wind-tunnel model in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel. One of the control laws was successful in stabilizing the model while the dynamic pressure was increased to 24 percent greater than the measured open-loop flutter boundary. Other accomplishments included the design, implementation, and successful operation of a one-of-a-kind digital controller, the design and use of two simulation methods to support the projet, and the development and successful use of a methodology for online controller performance evaluation.

  9. The Design of Airplane Wing Ribs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newlin, J A; Trayer, George W

    1931-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to obtain information for use in the design of truss and plywood forms, particularly with reference to wing ribs. Tests were made on many designs of wing ribs, comparing different types in various sizes. Many tests were also made on parallel-chord specimens of truss and plywood forms in place of the actual ribs and on parts of wing ribs, such as truss diagonals and sections of cap strips. It was found that for ribs of any size or proportions, when they were designed to obtain a well-balanced construction and were carefully manufactured, distinct types are of various efficiencies; the efficiency is based on the strength per unit of weight. In all types of ribs the heavier are the stronger per unit of weight. Reductions in the weight of wing ribs are accompanied even in efficient designs by a much greater proportional reduction in strength.

  10. Acoustic Data Processing and Transient Signal Analysis for the Hybrid Wing Body 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Wind Tunnel Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahr, Christopher J.; Brooks, Thomas F.; Humphreys, William M.; Spalt, Taylor B.; Stead, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    An advanced vehicle concept, the HWB N2A-EXTE aircraft design, was tested in NASA Langley's 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Wind Tunnel to study its acoustic characteristics for var- ious propulsion system installation and airframe con gurations. A signi cant upgrade to existing data processing systems was implemented, with a focus on portability and a re- duction in turnaround time. These requirements were met by updating codes originally written for a cluster environment and transferring them to a local workstation while en- abling GPU computing. Post-test, additional processing of the time series was required to remove transient hydrodynamic gusts from some of the microphone time series. A novel automated procedure was developed to analyze and reject contaminated blocks of data, under the assumption that the desired acoustic signal of interest was a band-limited sta- tionary random process, and of lower variance than the hydrodynamic contamination. The procedure is shown to successfully identify and remove contaminated blocks of data and retain the desired acoustic signal. Additional corrections to the data, mainly background subtraction, shear layer refraction calculations, atmospheric attenuation and microphone directivity corrections, were all necessary for initial analysis and noise assessments. These were implemented for the post-processing of spectral data, and are shown to behave as expected.

  11. Propeller/wing interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witkowski, David P.; Johnston, Robert T.; Sullivan, John P.

    1989-01-01

    The present experimental investigation of the steady-state and unsteady-state effects due to the interaction between a tractor propeller's wake and a wing employs, in the steady case, wind tunnel measurements at low subsonic speed; results are obtained which demonstrate wing performance response to variations in configuration geometry. Other steady-state results involve the propeller-hub lift and side-force due to the wing's influence on the propeller. The unsteady effects of interaction were studied through flow visualization of propeller-tip vortex distortion over a wing, again using a tractor-propeller configuration.

  12. MTR OFFICE WINGS AT WEST SIDE OF MTR HIGH BAY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR OFFICE WINGS AT WEST SIDE OF MTR HIGH BAY REACTOR BUILDING. CONTEXTUAL VIEW. CAMERA FACING NORTHEAST. FROM LEFT TO RIGHT, TRA-652 (OFFICE WING), TRA-661 (SOUTH WING EXTENSION), SECOND/THIRD FLOOR (BALCONIES) OF MTR-603, MTR HIGH-BAY. AT RIGHT EDGE OF VIEW IS REACTOR SERVICES BUILDING (TRA-635). INL NEGATIVE NO. HD46-44-1. Mike Crane, Photographer, 4/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  13. Kinematics and dynamics of sphenisciform wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noca, Flavio; Crisinel, Fabien; Munier, Pierre

    2011-11-01

    Three-dimensional scans of three different species of taxidermied penguins (Aptenodytes patagonicus, Pygoscelis papua, and Spheniscus magellanicus) have been performed. A three-dimensional reproduction of an African penguin (Sphenicus demersus) wing was manufactured and tested in a hydrodynamic channel. A six-degree-of-freedom robot was programmed to perform the three dimensional kinematics, obtained from actual footage. A six-component force balance was used to retrieve the dynamics of the wing motion. Results will be presented and discussed.

  14. Body and canard effects on an attached-flow maneuver wing at Mach 1.62

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pittman, J. L.; Miller, D. S.; Mason, W. H.

    1984-01-01

    A wing-body-canard configuration was tested at a Mach number of 1.62 by using both a cambered and an uncambered wing. The cambered wing was designed to produce efficient high lift by using attached supercritical crossflow and was originally tested as an isolated wing. The uncambered wing has the same planform and essentially the same thickness distribution as the cambered wing. The experiment determined the effects of a body and canards on both wings. The experimental data showed that both the body and the canards influenced the wing pressure levels, but that the attached supercritical crossflow, which was achieved in the isolated cambered-wing test, was maintained in the presence of a body and canards. Tables of experimental pressure, force, and moment data are included, as well as photographs of oil flow patterns on the upper surface.

  15. Aerodynamic characteristics of a large-scale semispan model with a swept wing and an augmented jet flap with hypermixing nozzles. [Ames 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel and Static Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aiken, T. N.; Falarski, M. D.; Koenin, D. G.

    1979-01-01

    The aerodynamic characteristics of the augmentor wing concept with hypermixing primary nozzles were investigated. A large-scale semispan model in the Ames 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel and Static Test Facility was used. The trailing edge, augmentor flap system occupied 65% of the span and consisted of two fixed pivot flaps. The nozzle system consisted of hypermixing, lobe primary nozzles, and BLC slot nozzles at the forward inlet, both sides and ends of the throat, and at the aft flap. The entire wing leading edge was fitted with a 10% chord slat and a blowing slot. Outboard of the flap was a blown aileron. The model was tested statically and at forward speed. Primary parameters and their ranges included angle of attack from -12 to 32 degrees, flap angles of 20, 30, 45, 60 and 70 degrees, and deflection and diffuser area ratios from 1.16 to 2.22. Thrust coefficients ranged from 0 to 2.73, while nozzle pressure ratios varied from 1.0 to 2.34. Reynolds number per foot varied from 0 to 1.4 million. Analysis of the data indicated a maximum static, gross augmentation of 1.53 at a flap angle of 45 degrees. Analysis also indicated that the configuration was an efficient powered lift device and that the net thrust was comparable with augmentor wings of similar static performance. Performance at forward speed was best at a diffuser area ratio of 1.37.

  16. Effects of wing leading-edge flap deflections on subsonic longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of a wing-fuselage configuration with a 44 deg swept wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, W. P.

    1978-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the effects of wing leading-edge flap deflections on the subsonic longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of a wing-fuselage configuration with a 44 deg swept wing. The tests were conducted at Mach numbers from 0.40 to 0.85, corresponding to Reynolds numbers (based on wing mean geometric chord) of 2.37 x 1,000,000 to 4.59 x 1,000,000 and at angles of attack from -3 deg to 22 deg. The configurations under study included a wing-fuselage configuration and a wing-fuselage-strake configuration. Each configuration had multisegmented, constant-chord leading-edge flaps which could be deflected independently or in various combinations.

  17. An Investigation of the Aerodynamic Characteristics of an 0.08-Scale Model of the Chance Vought XF7U-1 Airplane in the Langley High-Speed 7- by 10-Foot Tunnel. Part V - Wing-Alone Tests and Effect of Modifications to the Vertical Fins, Speed Brakes, and Fuselage TED No. NACA DE308. Part V; Wing-Alone Tests and Effect of Modifications to the Vertical Fins, Speed Brakes, and Fuselage, TED No. NACA DE308

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhri, Richard E.; Myers, Boyd C., II

    1947-01-01

    Tests have been conducted in the Langley high-speed 7- by 10-foot tunnel over a Mach number range from 0.40 to 0.91 to determine the stability and control characteristics of an 0.08-scale model of the Chance Vought XF7U-1 airplane. The wing-alone tests and the effect of the various vertical-fin modifications, speed-brake modifications, and fuselage modifications on the aerodynamic characteristics in pitch and yaw are presented in the present paper with a limited analysis of the results. Also included are tuft studies of the flow for some of the modifications tested.

  18. Flexible flapping wings with self-organized microwrinkles.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hiroto; Okada, Hiroyuki; Shimasue, Yosuke; Liu, Hao

    2015-06-29

    Bio-inspired flapping wings with a wrinkled wing membrane were designed and fabricated. The wings consist of carbon fibre-reinforced plastic frames and a polymer film with microscale wrinkles inspired by bird feathers and the corrugations of insect wings. The flexural and tensile stiffness of the wrinkled film can be controlled by modifying the orientations and waveforms of the wrinkles, thereby expanding the design space of flexible wings for micro flapping-wing aerial robots. A self-organization phenomenon was exploited in the fabrication of the microwrinkles such that microscale wrinkles spanning a broad wing area were spontaneously created. The wavy shape of these self-organized wrinkles was used as a mould, and a Parylene film was deposited onto the mould to form a wrinkled wing film. The effect of the waveforms of the wrinkles on the film stiffness was investigated theoretically, computationally and experimentally. Compared with a flat film, the flexural stiffness was increased by two orders of magnitude, and the tensile stiffness was reduced by two orders of magnitude. To demonstrate the effect of the wrinkles on the actual deformation of the flapping wings and the resulting aerodynamic forces, the fabricated wrinkled wings were tested using a tethered electric flapping mechanism. Chordwise unidirectional wrinkles were found to prevent fluttering near the trailing edge and to produce a greater aerodynamic lift compared with a flat wing or a wing with spanwise wrinkles. Our results suggest that the fine stiffness control of the wing film that can be achieved by tuning the microwrinkles can improve the aerodynamic performance of future flapping-wing aerial robots.

  19. Spinning Characteristics of Wings I : Rectangular Clark Y Monoplane Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bamber, M J; Zimmerman, C H

    1936-01-01

    A series of wind tunnel tests of a rectangular Clark Y wing was made with the NACA spinning balance as part of a general program of research on airplane spinning. All six components of the aerodynamic force and moment were measured throughout the range of angles of attack, angles of sideslip, and values omega b/2v likely to be attained by a spinning airplane; the results were reduced to coefficient form. It is concluded that a conventional monoplane with a rectangular Clark y wing can be made to attain spinning equilibrium throughout a wide range of angles of attack but that provision of a yawing moment coefficient of -0.02 (against the spin) by the tail, fuselage, and interferences will insure against attainment of equilibrium in a steady spin.

  20. Mallard age and sex determination from wings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carney, S.M.; Geis, A.D.

    1960-01-01

    This paper describes characters on the wing plumage of the mallard that indicate age and sex. A key outlines a logical order in which to check age and sex characters on wings. This method was tested and found to be more than 95 percent reliable, although it was found that considerable practice and training with known-age specimens was required to achieve this level of accuracy....The implications of this technique and the sampling procedure it permits are discussed. Wing collections could provide information on production, and, if coupled with a banding program could permit seasonal population estimates to be calculated. In addition, representative samples of wings would provide data to check the reliability of several other waterfowl surveys.

  1. Oblique Wing Research Aircraft on ramp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    This 1976 photograph of the Oblique Wing Research Aircraft was taken in front of the NASA Flight Research Center hangar, located at Edwards Air Force Base, California. In the photograph the noseboom, pitot-static probe, and angles-of-attack and sideslip flow vanes(covered-up) are attached to the front of the vehicle. The clear nose dome for the television camera, and the shrouded propellor for the 90 horsepower engine are clearly seen. The Oblique Wing Research Aircraft was a small, remotely piloted, research craft designed and flight tested to look at the aerodynamic characteristics of an oblique wing and the control laws necessary to achieve acceptable handling qualities. NASA Dryden Flight Research Center and the NASA Ames Research Center conducted research with this aircraft in the mid-1970s to investigate the feasibility of flying an oblique wing aircraft.

  2. Strake-wing analysis and design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamar, J. E.

    1978-01-01

    The technology is still evolving for improving the transonic maneuver capability of strake-wing configurations. Much of the work to date has been of an experimental nature; whereas, the theories that are available to handle vortex-flow aerodynamics have mostly treated wings of constant sweep. Hence, two efforts were undertaken. They are: (1) to extend the suction analogy to more general configurations and evaluate the method by using selected critical planforms; and (2) to develop a procedure for strake planform shaping and test the resulting shape in conjunction with a wing-body. The conclusions from this study are that (1) some improvement has been made in estimating high-angle-of-attack longitudinal aerodynamics, and (2) the gothic strake designed with the developed procedure does produce a stable vortex system in the presence of a wing body and flat post-maximum-lift characteristics.

  3. A Miniature Controllable Flapping Wing Robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arabagi, Veaceslav Gheorghe

    The agility and miniature size of nature's flapping wing fliers has long baffled researchers, inspiring biological studies, aerodynamic simulations, and attempts to engineer their robotic replicas. Flapping wing flight is characterized by complex reciprocating wing kinematics, transient aerodynamic effects, and very small body lengths. These characteristics render robotic flapping wing aerial vehicles ideal for surveillance and defense applications, search and rescue missions, and environment monitoring, where their ability to hover and high maneuverability is immensely beneficial. One of the many difficulties in creating flapping wing based miniature robotic aerial vehicles lies in generating a proper wing trajectory that would result in sufficient lift forces for hovering and maneuvering. Since design of a flapping wing system is a balance between overall weight and the number of actuated inputs, we take the approach of having minimal controlled inputs, allowing passive behavior wherever possible. Hence, we propose a completely passive wing pitch reversal design that relies on wing inertial dynamics, an elastic energy storage mechanism, and low Reynolds number aerodynamic effects. Theoretical models, compiling previous research on piezoelectric actuators, four-bar transmissions, and aerodynamics effects, are developed and used as basis for a complete numerical simulation. Limitations of the model are discussed in comparison to experimental results obtained from a working prototype of the proposed passive pitch reversal flapping wing mechanism. Given that the mechanism is under-actuated, methods to control lift force generation by actively varying system parameters are proposed, discussed, and tested experimentally. A dual wing aerial platform is developed based on the passive pitch reversal wing concept. Design considerations are presented, favoring controllability and structural rigidity of the final platform. Finite element analysis and experimental

  4. Steady pressure measurements on an Aeroelastic Research Wing (ARW-2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, Maynard C.; Seidel, David A.; Eckstrom, Clinton V.

    1994-01-01

    Transonic steady and unsteady pressure tests have been conducted in the Langley transonic dynamics tunnel on a large elastic wing known as the DAST ARW-2. The wing has a supercritical airfoil, an aspect ratio of 10.3, a leading-edge sweep back angle of 28.8 degrees, and two inboard and one outboard trailing-edge control surfaces. Only the outboard control surface was deflected to generate steady and unsteady flow over the wing during this study. Only the steady surface pressure, control-surface hinge moment, wing-tip deflection, and wing-root bending moment measurements are presented. The results from this elastic wing test are in tabulated form to assist in calibrating advanced computational fluid dynamics (CFD) algorithms.

  5. Comparisons of wing pressure distribution from flight tests of flush and external orifices for Mach numbers from 0.50 to 0.97

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montoya, L. C.; Lux, D. P.

    1975-01-01

    Wing pressure distributions obtained in flight with flush orifice and external tubing orifice installations for Mach numbers from 0.50 to 0.97 are compared. The procedure used to install the external tubing orifice is discussed. The results indicate that external tubing orifice installations can give useful results.

  6. Aerodynamic tailoring of the Learjet Model 60 wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandrasekharan, Reuben M.; Hawke, Veronica M.; Hinson, Michael L.; Kennelly, Robert A., Jr.; Madson, Michael D.

    1993-01-01

    The wing of the Learjet Model 60 was tailored for improved aerodynamic characteristics using the TRANAIR transonic full-potential computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. A root leading edge glove and wing tip fairing were shaped to reduce shock strength, improve cruise drag and extend the buffet limit. The aerodynamic design was validated by wind tunnel test and flight test data.

  7. Static Performance of a Wing-Mounted Thrust Reverser Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asbury, Scott C.; Yetter, Jeffrey A.

    1998-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted in the Jet-Exit Test Facility at NASA Langley Research Center to study the static aerodynamic performance of a wing-mounted thrust reverser concept applicable to subsonic transport aircraft. This innovative engine powered thrust reverser system is designed to utilize wing-mounted flow deflectors to produce aircraft deceleration forces. Testing was conducted using a 7.9%-scale exhaust system model with a fan-to-core bypass ratio of approximately 9.0, a supercritical left-hand wing section attached via a pylon, and wing-mounted flow deflectors attached to the wing section. Geometric variations of key design parameters investigated for the wing-mounted thrust reverser concept included flow deflector angle and chord length, deflector edge fences, and the yaw mount angle of the deflector system (normal to the engine centerline or parallel to the wing trailing edge). All tests were conducted with no external flow and high pressure air was used to simulate core and fan engine exhaust flows. Test results indicate that the wing-mounted thrust reverser concept can achieve overall thrust reverser effectiveness levels competitive with (parallel mount), or better than (normal mount) a conventional cascade thrust reverser system. By removing the thrust reverser system from the nacelle, the wing-mounted concept offers the nacelle designer more options for improving nacelle aero dynamics and propulsion-airframe integration, simplifying nacelle structural designs, reducing nacelle weight, and improving engine maintenance access.

  8. Fatigue Testing of Vampire Wings,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-06-01

    conditions the nominal stress in the lower spar boom was estimated to be 27.56 MPa (4000 psi) per g--the corresponding stress for the lighter English ...structure. Never- theless, four out of the 55 used did fail during tesi , and the remainder were found to be cracked on removal. A number of the cracked

  9. Winging of scapula due to serratus anterior tear.

    PubMed

    Singh, Varun Kumar; Vargaonkar, Gauresh Shantaram

    2014-01-01

    Winging of scapula occurs most commonly due to injury to long thoracic nerve supplying serratus anterior muscle. Traumatic injury to serratus anterior muscle itself is very rare. We reported a case of traumatic winging of scapula due to tear of serratus anterior muscle in a 19-year-old male. Winging was present in neutral position and in extension of right shoulder joint but not on "push on wall" test. Patient was managed conservatively and achieved satisfactory result.

  10. Mission adaptive wing soars at NASA Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahn, D.; Reinertson, L.

    1986-01-01

    Research pilots have flown the Mission Adaptive Wing (MAW) aircraft, a highly modified F-111 jet fighter, from subsonic speeds up to Mach 1.4 in initial flight tests. The inital test flights are clearing the envelope with the wings flexed at various curvatures. This process allows further research data to be safely gathered so that designers of future variable camber wing aircraft have the best information possible. The altitude envelope was cleared from 27,500 down to 7,500 feet where denser air can cause more stress on the aircraft. Testing with the aircraft was conducted with wing sweep angles of 26 and 58 degrees. At the conclusion of the performance tests in the manual configuration, the system will be reconfigured for automatic mode tests. The limited automatic modes include maneuver camber control where the wings are deflected automatically to the best lift versus drag combination for a particular speed; cruise camber control which can help protect the aircraft from high G stresses; and maneuver enhancement/gust alleviation which is designed to improve the aircraft's up and down movement response to pilot commands and reduce the aircraft response to turbulence.

  11. Absence of mutagenic and recombinagenic activity of multi-walled carbon nanotubes in the Drosophila wing-spot test and Allium cepa test.

    PubMed

    de Andrade, Laise Rodrigues; Brito, Arian Sandin; Melero, Anna Maria Gouvea de Souza; Zanin, Hudson; Ceragioli, Helder José; Baranauskas, Vitor; Cunha, Kênya Silva; Irazusta, Silvia Pierre

    2014-01-01

    In order to assess the safety of the carbon nanotubes to human health and the environment, we investigated the potential toxicity and ability of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (NT), to induce DNA damage by employing the Allium cepa genotoxicity/mutagenicity test and the Somatic Mutation and Recombination Test (SMART) in the fruitfly, Drosophila melanogaster. The results demonstrated that NT did not significantly induce genotoxic or mutagenic effects in the Allium cepa test. All concentrations evaluated in the SMART assay showed survival rates higher than 90percent, indicating the absence of chronic toxicity for NT. Furthermore, the various treatments showed no significant increase in the NT mutation and recombination frequencies in mwh/flr(3) genotype compared to respective negative controls, demonstrating the absence of DNA damage caused by NT.

  12. MTR WING A, TRA604. NORTH SIDE. CAMERA FACING SOUTH. OFFICE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR WING A, TRA-604. NORTH SIDE. CAMERA FACING SOUTH. OFFICE WING IS CONNECTED TO TRA-603 SECOND/THIRD FLOOR AT LEFT. PROJECTION AT RIGHT IS TRA-668, MTR NORTH WING EXTENSION. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD47-44-2. Mike Crane, Photographer, 4/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  13. Flying wings / flying fuselages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Bauer, Steven X. S.

    2001-01-01

    The present paper has documented the historical relationships between various classes of all lifting vehicles, which includes the flying wing, all wing, tailless, lifting body, and lifting fuselage. The diversity in vehicle focus was to ensure that all vehicle types that map have contributed to or been influenced by the development of the classical flying wing concept was investigated. The paper has provided context and perspective for present and future aircraft design studies that may employ the all lifting vehicle concept. The paper also demonstrated the benefit of developing an understanding of the past in order to obtain the required knowledge to create future concepts with significantly improved aerodynamic performance.

  14. Slotted Aircraft Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vassberg, John C. (Inventor); Gea, Lie-Mine (Inventor); McLean, James D. (Inventor); Witowski, David P. (Inventor); Krist, Steven E. (Inventor); Campbell, Richard L. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    An aircraft wing includes a leading airfoil element and a trailing airfoil element. At least one slot is defined by the wing during at least one transonic condition of the wing. The slot may either extend spanwise along only a portion of the wingspan, or it may extend spanwise along the entire wingspan. In either case, the slot allows a portion of the air flowing along the lower surface of the leading airfoil element to split and flow over the upper surface of the trailing airfoil element so as to achieve a performance improvement in the transonic condition.

  15. Multidisciplinary Design Optimization of A Highly Flexible Aeroservoelastic Wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghighat, Sohrab

    A multidisciplinary design optimization framework is developed that integrates control system design with aerostructural design for a highly-deformable wing. The objective of this framework is to surpass the existing aircraft endurance limits through the use of an active load alleviation system designed concurrently with the rest of the aircraft. The novelty of this work is two fold. First, a unified dynamics framework is developed to represent the full six-degree-of-freedom rigid-body along with the structural dynamics. It allows for an integrated control design to account for both manoeuvrability (flying quality) and aeroelasticity criteria simultaneously. Secondly, by synthesizing the aircraft control system along with the structural sizing and aerodynamic shape design, the final design has the potential to exploit synergies among the three disciplines and yield higher performing aircraft. A co-rotational structural framework featuring Euler--Bernoulli beam elements is developed to capture the wing's nonlinear deformations under the effect of aerodynamic and inertial loadings. In this work, a three-dimensional aerodynamic panel code, capable of calculating both steady and unsteady loadings is used. Two different control methods, a model predictive controller (MPC) and a 2-DOF mixed-norm robust controller, are considered in this work to control a highly flexible aircraft. Both control techniques offer unique advantages that make them promising for controlling a highly flexible aircraft. The control system works towards executing time-dependent manoeuvres along with performing gust/manoeuvre load alleviation. The developed framework is investigated for demonstration in two design cases: one in which the control system simply worked towards achieving or maintaining a target altitude, and another where the control system is also performing load alleviation. The use of the active load alleviation system results in a significant improvement in the aircraft performance

  16. Smithornis broadbills produce loud wing song by aeroelastic flutter of medial primary wing feathers.

    PubMed

    Clark, Christopher J; Kirschel, Alexander N G; Hadjioannou, Louis; Prum, Richard O

    2016-04-01

    Broadbills in the genus Smithornis produce a loud brreeeeet during a distinctive flight display. It has been posited that this klaxon-like sound is generated non-vocally with the outer wing feathers (P9, P10), but no scientific studies have previously addressed this hypothesis. Although most birds that make non-vocal communication sounds have feathers with a shape distinctively modified for sound production, Smithornis broadbills do not. We investigated whether this song is produced vocally or with the wings in rufous-sided broadbill (S. rufolateralis) and African broad bill (S. capensis). In support of the wing song hypothesis, synchronized high-speed video and sound recordings of displays demonstrated that sound pulses were produced during the downstroke, subtle gaps sometimes appeared between the outer primary feathers P6-P10, and wing tip speed reached 16 m s(-1) Tests of a spread wing in a wind tunnel demonstrated that at a specific orientation, P6 and P7 flutter and produce sound. Wind tunnel tests on individual feathers P5-P10 from a male of each species revealed that while all of these feathers can produce sound via aeroelastic flutter, P6 and P7 produce the loudest sounds, which are similar in frequency to the wing song, at airspeeds achievable by the wing tip during display flight. Consistent with the wind tunnel experiments, field manipulations of P6, P7 and P8 changed the timbre of the wing song, and reduced its tonality, demonstrating that P6 and P7 are together the sound source, and not P9 or P10. The resultant wing song appears to have functionally replaced vocal song.

  17. Analysis of Mach number 0.8 turboprop slipstream wing/nacelle interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welge, H. R.; Neuhart, D. H.; Dahlin, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    Data from wind tunnel tests of a powered propeller and nacelle mounted on a supercritical wing are analyzed. Installation of the nacelle significantly affected the wing flow and the flow on the upper surface of the wing is separated near the leading edge under powered conditions. Comparisons of various theories with the data indicated that the Neumann surface panel solution and the Jameson transonic solution gave results adequate for design purposes. A modified wing design was developed (Mod 3) which reduces the wing upper surface pressure coefficients and section lift coefficients at powered conditions to levels below those of the original wing without nacelle or power. A contoured over the wing nacelle that can be installed on the original wing without any appreciable interference to the wing upper surface pressure is described.

  18. Inviscid transonic wing design using inverse methods in curvilinear coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gally, Thomas A.; Carlson, Leland A.

    1987-01-01

    An inverse wing design method has been developed around an existing transonic wing analysis code. The original analysis code, TAWFIVE, has as its core the numerical potential flow solver, FLO30, developed by Jameson and Caughey. Features of the analysis code include a finite-volume formulation; wing and fuselage fitted, curvilinear grid mesh; and a viscous boundary layer correction that also accounts for viscous wake thickness and curvature. The development of the inverse methods as an extension of previous methods existing for design in Cartesian coordinates is presented. Results are shown for inviscid wing design cases in super-critical flow regimes. The test cases selected also demonstrate the versatility of the design method in designing an entire wing or discontinuous sections of a wing.

  19. Buffet characteristics of the F-8 supercritical wing airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deangelis, V. M.; Monaghan, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    The buffet characteristics of the F-8 supercritical wing airplane were investigated. Wing structural response was used to determine the buffet characteristics of the wing and these characteristics are compared with wind tunnel model data and the wing flow characteristics at transonic speeds. The wingtip accelerometer was used to determine the buffet onset boundary and to measure the buffet intensity characteristics of the airplane. The effects of moderate trailing edge flap deflections on the buffet onset boundary are presented. The supercritical wing flow characteristics were determined from wind tunnel and flight static pressure measurements and from a dynamic pressure sensor mounted on the flight test airplane in the vicinity of the shock wave that formed on the upper surface of the wing at transonic speeds. The comparison of the airplane's structural response data to the supercritical flow characteristics includes the effects of a leading edge vortex generator.

  20. A Feasibility Study of Oscillating-Wing Power Generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsey, Keon

    2002-09-01

    Mankind is continually searching for new sources of energy or methods to harness known sources. Recently, renewable and zero-pollution energy supplies are of great interest. Consequently, power generation from a fluttering wing is studied numerically and experimentally. Previous studies have suggested that an oscillating-wing used to extract energy from a fluid flow could deliver power comparable to windmills. Several studies are examined. An oscillating-wing power generator is designed and tested. The experimental results are compared with numerical predictions. Finally, commercial applications of the "environmentally friendly" oscillating-wing generator are investigated.

  1. Effects of spanwise blowing on the pressure field and vortex-lift characteristics of a 44 deg swept trapezoidal wing. [wind tunnel stability tests - aircraft models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, J. F.

    1975-01-01

    Wind-tunnel data were obtained at a free-stream Mach number of 0.26 for a range of model angle of attack, jet thrust coefficient, and jet location. Results of this study show that the sectional effects to spanwise blowing are strongly dependent on angle of attack, jet thrust coefficient, and span location; the largest effects occur at the highest angles of attack and thrust coefficients and on the inboard portion of the wing. Full vortex lift was achieved at the inboard span station with a small blowing rate, but successively higher blowing rates were necessary to achieve full vortex lift at increased span distances. It is shown that spanwise blowing increases lift throughout the angle-of-attack range, delays wing stall to higher angles of attack, and improves the induced-drag polars. The leading-edge suction analogy can be used to estimate the section and total lifts resulting from spanwise blowing.

  2. A two-degree-of-freedom flutter mount system with low damping for testing rigid wings at different angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, M. G.

    1982-01-01

    A wind tunnel model mount system for conducting flutter research using a rigid wing was developed. The wing is attached to a splitter plate so that the two move as one rigid body. The splitter plate is supported away from the tunnel wall by a system of rods with fixed fixed and conditions. The rods flex in such a way that only pitch and plunge oscillations are permitted. At the tunnel wall the rods are attached to a remotely controlled turntable so that angle of attack can be varied. Wind tunnel data obtained by using the mount system are presented for a supercritical and a conventional airfoil. Both classical flutter and stall flutter data are presented.

  3. Experimental investigations of the functional morphology of dragonfly wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajabi, H.; Darvizeh, A.

    2013-08-01

    Nowadays, the importance of identifying the flight mechanisms of the dragonfly, as an inspiration for designing flapping wing vehicles, is well known. An experimental approach to understanding the complexities of insect wings as organs of flight could provide significant outcomes for design purposes. In this paper, a comprehensive investigation is carried out on the morphological and microstructural features of dragonfly wings. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and tensile testing are used to experimentally verify the functional roles of different parts of the wings. A number of SEM images of the elements of the wings, such as the nodus, leading edge, trailing edge, and vein sections, which play dominant roles in strengthening the whole structure, are presented. The results from the tensile tests indicate that the nodus might be the critical region of the wing that is subjected to high tensile stresses. Considering the patterns of the longitudinal corrugations of the wings obtained in this paper, it can be supposed that they increase the load-bearing capacity, giving the wings an ability to tolerate dynamic loading conditions. In addition, it is suggested that the longitudinal veins, along with the leading and trailing edges, are structural mechanisms that further improve fatigue resistance by providing higher fracture toughness, preventing crack propagation, and allowing the wings to sustain a significant amount of damage without loss of strength.

  4. Lightplane Wing Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Venture, a kit airplane designed and manufactured by Questair, is a high performance lightplane with excellent low speed characteristics and enhanced safety due to NASA technology incorporated in its unusual wing design. In 1987, North Carolina State graduate students and Langley Research Center spent seven months researching and analyzing the Venture. The result was a wing modification, improving control and providing more usable lift. The plane subsequently set 10 world speed records.

  5. The effect of wing stroke and aspect ratio on the force generation a compliant membrane flapping wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schunk, Cosima; Swartz, Sharon M.; Breuer, Kenneth S.

    2015-11-01

    Aspect ratio is one parameter used in efforts to predict a bat species' flight performance based on wing shape. Bats with high aspect ratio wings are expected to have superior lift-to-drag ratios and therefore to fly faster or be able to sustain longer flights. In contrast, bats with lower aspect ratio wings are usually thought to exhibit higher maneuverability. These assumptions are often based on fixed-wing aerodynamic theory, and do not take the wide variation in flapping kinematics observed in bats into account. To examine the influence of different stroke patterns, we measure lift and drag of highly compliant membrane wings with different bat-relevant aspect ratios. A two degree of freedom shoulder joint allows for independent control of flapping amplitude and wing sweep. We test five models with the same variations of stroke patterns, flapping frequencies, and wind speeds.

  6. Preservation of wing leading edge suction at the plane of symmetry as a factor in wing-fuselage design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larrabee, E. E.

    1975-01-01

    Most fuselage geometries cover a portion of the wing leading edge near the plane of symmetry, and it seems reasonable to expect that a large fraction of the leading edge suction which would be developed by the covered wing at high angles of attack is not developed on the fuselage. This is one of the reasons that the Oswald span efficiency factor for the wing body combination fails to approach the value predicted by lifting line theory for the isolated wing. Some traditional and recent literature on wing-body interference is discussed and high Reynolds number data on wing-body-nacelle drag are reviewed. An exposed central leading edge geometry has been developed for a sailplane configuration. Low Reynolds number tests have not validated the design concept.

  7. Low-speed wind-tunnel tests of a 1/10-scale model of an advanced arrow-wing supersonic cruise configuration designed for cruise at Mach 2.2. [Langley Full Scale Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yip, L. P.

    1979-01-01

    The low-speed longitudinal and lateral-directional characteristics of a scale model of an advanced arrow-wing supersonic cruise configuration were investigated in tests conducted at a Reynolds number of 4.19 x 10 to the 6th power based on the mean aerodynamic chord, with an angle of attack range from - 6 deg to 23 deg and sideslip angle range from -15 deg to 20 deg. The effects of segmented leading-edge flaps, slotted trailing-edge flaps, horizontal and vertical tails, and ailerons and spoilers were determined. Extensive pressure data and flow visualization pictures with non-intrusive fluorescent mini-tufts were obtained.

  8. Assessment of the genotoxic potential of two zinc oxide sources (amorphous and nanoparticles) using the in vitro micronucleus test and the in vivo wing somatic mutation and recombination test.

    PubMed

    Reis, Érica de Melo; de Rezende, Alexandre Azenha Alves; Santos, Diego Vilela; de Oliveria, Pollyanna Francielli; Nicolella, Heloisa Diniz; Tavares, Denise Crispim; Silva, Anielle Christine Almeida; Dantas, Noelio Oliveira; Spanó, Mário Antônio

    2015-10-01

    In this study, we evaluated the toxic and genotoxic potential of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) of 20 nm and the mutagenic potential of these ZnO NPs as well as that of an amorphous ZnO. Toxicity was assessed by XTT colorimetric assay. ZnO NPs were toxic at concentrations equal to or higher than 240.0 μM. Genotoxicity was assessed by in vitro Cytokinesis Block Micronucleus Assay (CBMN) in V79 cells. ZnO NPs were genotoxic at 120.0 μM. The mutagenic potential of amorphous ZnO and the ZnO NPs was assayed using the wing Somatic Mutation and Recombination Test (SMART) of Drosophila melanogaster. In the Standard cross, the amorphous ZnO and ZnO NPs were not mutagenic. Nevertheless, Marker trans-heterozygous individuals from the High bioactivation cross treated with amorphous ZnO (6.25 mM) and ZnO NPs (12.50 mM) displayed a significant increased number of mutant spots when compared with the negative control. In conclusion, the results were not dose related and indicate that only higher concentrations of ZnO NPs were toxic and able to induce genotoxicity in V79 cells. The increase in mutant spots observed in D. melanogaster was generated due to mitotic recombination, rather than mutational events.

  9. Analysis of Low Speed Stall Aerodynamics of a Swept Wing with Laminar Flow Glove

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bui, Trong T.

    2014-01-01

    Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was conducted to study the low-speed stall aerodynamics of a GIII aircraft's swept wing modified with a laminar-flow wing glove. The stall aerodynamics of the gloved wing were analyzed and compared with the unmodified wing for the flight speed of 120 knots and altitude of 2300 ft above mean sea level (MSL). The Star-CCM+ polyhedral unstructured CFD code was first validated for wing stall predictions using the wing-body geometry from the First American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) CFD High-Lift Prediction Workshop. It was found that the Star-CCM+ CFD code can produce results that are within the scattering of other CFD codes considered at the workshop. In particular, the Star-CCM+ CFD code was able to predict wing stall for the AIAA wing-body geometry to within 1 degree of angle of attack as compared to benchmark wind-tunnel test data. Current results show that the addition of the laminar-flow wing glove causes the gloved wing to stall much earlier than the unmodified wing. Furthermore, the gloved wing has a different stall characteristic than the clean wing, with no sharp lift drop-off at stall for the gloved wing.

  10. Analysis of Low-Speed Stall Aerodynamics of a Swept Wing with Laminar-Flow Glove

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bui, Trong T.

    2014-01-01

    Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was conducted to study the low-speed stall aerodynamics of a GIII aircraft's swept wing modified with a laminar-flow wing glove. The stall aerodynamics of the gloved wing were analyzed and compared with the unmodified wing for the flight speed of 120 knots and altitude of 2300 ft above mean sea level (MSL). The Star-CCM+ polyhedral unstructured CFD code was first validated for wing stall predictions using the wing-body geometry from the First American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) CFD High-Lift Prediction Workshop. It was found that the Star-CCM+ CFD code can produce results that are within the scattering of other CFD codes considered at the workshop. In particular, the Star-CCM+ CFD code was able to predict wing stall for the AIAA wing-body geometry to within 1 degree of angle of attack as compared to benchmark wind-tunnel test data. Current results show that the addition of the laminar-flow wing glove causes the gloved wing to stall much earlier than the unmodified wing. Furthermore, the gloved wing has a different stall characteristic than the clean wing, with no sharp lift drop-off at stall for the gloved wing.

  11. Analysis of Low-Speed Stall Aerodynamics of a Swept Wing with Laminar-Flow Glove

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bui, Trong

    2013-01-01

    Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was conducted to study the low-speed stall aerodynamics of a GIII aircraft s swept wing modified with a laminar-flow wing glove. The stall aerodynamics of the gloved wing were analyzed and compared with the unmodified wing for the flight speed of 120 knots and altitude of 2300 ft above mean sea level (MSL). The Star-CCM+ polyhedral unstructured CFD code was first validated for wing stall predictions using the wing-body geometry from the First AIAA CFD High-Lift Prediction Workshop. It was found that the Star-CCM+ CFD code can produce results that are within the scattering of other CFD codes considered at the workshop. In particular, the Star-CCM+ CFD code was able to predict wing stall for the AIAA wing-body geometry to within 1 degree of angle of attack as compared to benchmark wind-tunnel test data. Current results show that the addition of the laminar-flow wing glove causes the gloved wing to stall much earlier than the unmodified wing. Furthermore, the gloved wing has a different stall characteristic than the clean wing, with no sharp lift drop-off at stall for the gloved wing.

  12. Wind-tunnel research comparing lateral control devices, particularly at high angles of attack IX : tapered wings with ordinary ailerons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weick, Fred E; Wenzinger, Carl J

    1933-01-01

    Tests were made with ordinary flap-type ailerons on two wings with different amounts of taper, one medium and the other extreme. On each wing both medium sized tapered ailerons and short wide tapered ailerons were tested.

  13. Physical properties of the benchmark models program supercritical wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dansberry, Bryan E.; Durham, Michael H.; Bennett, Robert M.; Turnock, David L.; Silva, Walter A.; Rivera, Jose A., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The goal of the Benchmark Models Program is to provide data useful in the development and evaluation of aeroelastic computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes. To that end, a series of three similar wing models are being flutter tested in the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel. These models are designed to simultaneously acquire model response data and unsteady surface pressure data during wing flutter conditions. The supercritical wing is the second model of this series. It is a rigid semispan model with a rectangular planform and a NASA SC(2)-0414 supercritical airfoil shape. The supercritical wing model was flutter tested on a flexible mount, called the Pitch and Plunge Apparatus, that provides a well-defined, two-degree-of-freedom dynamic system. The supercritical wing model and associated flutter test apparatus is described and experimentally determined wind-off structural dynamic characteristics of the combined rigid model and flexible mount system are included.

  14. Effect of Fuselage and Tail Surfaces on Low-speed Yawing Characteristics of a Swept-wing Model as Determined in Curved-flow Test Section of Langley Stability Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bird, John D; Jaquet, Byron M; Cowan, John W

    1951-01-01

    Results are presented of a wind-tunnel investigation made to determine the influence of the fuselage and tail surfaces on the rotary derivatives in yawing flight of a transonic-airplane configuration having 45 degrees sweptback wing and tail surfaces. The tests were run in the curved-flow test section of the Langley stability tunnel at a Reynolds number of 1.07 X 10 to the sixth power and consisted of balance measurements throughout the angle-of-attack range for several flight-path radii of curvature. The results are compared with data from forced-oscillation and free-oscillation tests, and a description of testing techniques used is included.

  15. Measured and predicted structural behavior of the HiMAT tailored composite wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Lawrence H.

    1987-01-01

    A series of load tests was conducted on the HiMAT tailored composite wing. Coupon tests were also run on a series of unbalanced laminates, including the ply configuration of the wing, the purpose of which was to compare the measured and predicted behavior of unbalanced laminates, including - in the case of the wing - a comparison between the behavior of the full scale structure and coupon tests. Both linear and nonlinear finite element (NASTRAN) analyses were carried out on the wing. Both linear and nonlinear point-stress analyses were performed on the coupons. All test articles were instrumented with strain gages, and wing deflections measured. The leading and trailing edges were found to have no effect on the response of the wing to applied loads. A decrease in the stiffness of the wing box was evident over the 27-test program. The measured load-strain behavior of the wing was found to be linear, in contrast to coupon tests of the same laminate, which were nonlinear. A linear NASTRAN analysis of the wing generally correlated more favorably with measurements than did a nonlinear analysis. An examination of the predicted deflections in the wing root region revealed an anomalous behavior of the structural model that cannot be explained. Both hysteresis and creep appear to be less significant in the wing tests than in the corresponding laminate coupon tests.

  16. The 247-foot length of the Helios prototype wing is in evidence as the solar-powered flying wing res

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The 247-foot length of the Helios prototype wing is in evidence as the high-altitude, solar-powered flying wing rests on its ground dolly during pre-flight tests at the U.S. Navy's Pacific Missile Range Facility on Kaua'i, Hawaii.

  17. Computational wing optimization and comparisons with experiment for a semi-span wing model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waggoner, E. G.; Haney, H. P.; Ballhaus, W. F.

    1978-01-01

    A computational wing optimization procedure was developed and verified by an experimental investigation of a semi-span variable camber wing model in the NASA Ames Research Center 14 foot transonic wind tunnel. The Bailey-Ballhaus transonic potential flow analysis and Woodward-Carmichael linear theory codes were linked to Vanderplaats constrained minimization routine to optimize model configurations at several subsonic and transonic design points. The 35 deg swept wing is characterized by multi-segmented leading and trailing edge flaps whose hinge lines are swept relative to the leading and trailing edges of the wing. By varying deflection angles of the flap segments, camber and twist distribution can be optimized for different design conditions. Results indicate that numerical optimization can be both an effective and efficient design tool. The optimized configurations had as good or better lift to drag ratios at the design points as the best designs previously tested during an extensive parametric study.

  18. Damage tolerant composite wing panels for transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Peter J.; Wilson, Robert D.; Gibbins, M. N.

    1985-01-01

    Commercial aircraft advanced composite wing surface panels were tested for durability and damage tolerance. The wing of a fuel-efficient, 200-passenger airplane for 1990 delivery was sized using grahite-epoxy materials. The damage tolerance program was structured to allow a systematic progression from material evaluations to the optimized large panel verification tests. The program included coupon testing to evaluate toughened material systems, static and fatigue tests of compression coupons with varying amounts of impact damage, element tests of three-stiffener panels to evaluate upper wing panel design concepts, and the wing structure damage environment was studied. A series of technology demonstration tests of large compression panels is performed. A repair investigation is included in the final large panel test.

  19. Forebody vortex control for suppressing wing rock on a highly-swept wing configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suarez, Carlos J.; Kramer, Brian R.; Ayers, Bert; Malcolm, Gerald N.

    1992-01-01

    Free-to-roll tests were conducted in a wind tunnel with a configuration that consisted of a highly-slender forebody and a 78 deg swept delta wing. A limit cycle oscillation was observed for angles of attack between 22 and 30 deg. In general, the main flow phenomena responsible for the wing-body-tail wing rock are the interactions between the forebody and the wing vortices. Various blowing techniques were evaluated as means of wing rock suppression. Blowing tangentially aft from leeward side nozzles near the forebody tip can damp the roll motion at low blowing rates and stop it completely at higher blowing rates. At the high rates, significant vortex asymmetries are created, causing the model to stop at a non-zero roll angle. Forward blowing and alternating right/left pulsed blowing appear to be more efficient techniques for suppressing wing rock. The oscillations can be damped almost completely at lower blowing coefficients, and, apparently, no major vortex asymmetries are induced. Good agreement is observed between this study and previous water tunnel tests on the same configuration.

  20. Comparison of stability and control parameters for a light, single-engine, high-winged aircraft using different flight test and parameter estimation techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suit, W. T.; Cannaday, R. L.

    1979-01-01

    The longitudinal and lateral stability and control parameters for a high wing, general aviation, airplane are examined. Estimations using flight data obtained at various flight conditions within the normal range of the aircraft are presented. The estimations techniques, an output error technique (maximum likelihood) and an equation error technique (linear regression), are presented. The longitudinal static parameters are estimated from climbing, descending, and quasi steady state flight data. The lateral excitations involve a combination of rudder and ailerons. The sensitivity of the aircraft modes of motion to variations in the parameter estimates are discussed.

  1. [A winged scapula].

    PubMed

    Faber, C G; Klaver, M M; Wokke, J H J

    2002-09-14

    Three patients, one woman aged 22 and two men aged 54 and 28, presented with scapular winging. In the first patient amyotrophic plexus neuralgia was diagnosed. The second patient most probably suffered from a stretch injury of the long thoracic nerve. The third patient had scapular winging due to an isolated paresis of the trapezius muscle, which was caused by an idiopathic lesion of the accessory nerve. In the first and second patient an improvement was noticeable after 9 months and 1.5 years respectively. There was no improvement in the third patient after 11 years. Paresis of the M. serratus anterior occurs due to paralysis of the N. thoracicus longus, as a result of direct compression, stump trauma, interventions such as thoracic operations, (repeated) stretch injuries or neuralgic brachial plexus amyotrophy; in these cases the scapular winging increases as the arm is lifted forwards. Paresis of the M. trapezius occurs due to the paralysis of the N. accessorius, due to trauma, interventions such as in the neck area, a space-occupying abnormality or an idiopathic abnormality; in these cases the scapular winging increases upon the arm being lifted sideways. Another possible cause of scapular winging is muscular dystrophy, especially fascioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). Usually the prognosis for recovery from a neuropraxia and an idiopathic lesion of the N. thoracicus longus within a two-year period is good. The prognosis for an isolated lesion of the N. accessorius is much less favourable. An EMG is essential for establishing a diagnosis.

  2. Effects of flow separation and cove leakage on pressure and heat-transfer distributions along a wing-cove-elevon configuration at Mach 6.9. [Langley 8-ft high temperature tunnel test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deveikis, W. D.

    1983-01-01

    External and internal pressure and cold-wall heating-rate distributions were obtained in hypersonic flow on a full-scale heat-sink representation of the space shuttle orbiter wing-elevon-cove configuration in an effort to define effects of flow separation on cove aerothermal environment as a function of cove seal leak area, ramp angle, and free-stream unit Reynolds number. Average free-stream Mach number from all tests was 6.9; average total temperature from all tests was 3360 R; free-stream dynamic pressure ranged from about 2 to 9 psi; and wing angle of attack was 5 deg (flow compression). For transitional and turbulent flow separation, increasing cove leakage progressively increased heating rates in the cove. When ingested mass flow was sufficient to force large reductions in extent of separation, increasing cove leakage reduced heating rates in the cove to those for laminar attached flow. Cove heating-rate distributions calculated with a method that assumed laminar developing channel flow agreed with experimentally obtained distributions within root-mean-square differences that varied between 11 and 36 percent where cove walls were parallel for leak areas of 50 and 100 percent.

  3. Antifatigue properties of dragonfly Pantala flavescens wings.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiu-Juan; Zhang, Zhi-Hui; Liang, Yun-Hong; Ren, Lu-Quan; Jie, Meng; Yang, Zhi-Gang

    2014-05-01

    The wing of a dragonfly is thin and light, but can bear high frequent alternating stress and present excellent antifatigue properties. The surface morphology and microstructure of the wings of dragonfly Pantala flavescens were observed using SEM in this study. Based on the biological analysis method, the configuration, morphology, and structure of the vein were studied, and the antifatigue properties of the wings were investigated. The analytical results indicated that the longitudinal veins, cross veins, and membrane of dragonfly wing form a optimized network morphology and spacially truss-like structure which can restrain the formation and propagation of the fatigue cracks. The veins with multilayer structure present high strength, flexibility, and toughness, which are beneficial to bear alternating load during the flight of dragonfly. Through tensile-tensile fatigue failure tests, the results were verified and indicate that the wings of dragonfly P. flavescens have excellent antifatigue properties which are the results of the biological coupling and synergistic effect of morphological and structural factors.

  4. Theory of wing rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, C. H.; Lan, C. E.

    1984-01-01

    A theory is developed for predicting wing rock characteristics. From available data, it can be concluded that wing rock is triggered by flow asymmetries, developed by negative or weakly positive roll damping, and sustained by nonlinear aerodynamic roll damping. A new nonlinear aerodynamic model that includes all essential aerodynamic nonlinearities is developed. The Beecham-Titchener method is applied to obtain approximate analytic solutions for the amplitude and frequency of the limit cycle based on the three degree-of-freedom equations of motion. An iterative scheme is developed to calculate the average aerodynamic derivatives and dynamic characteristics at limit cycle conditions. Good agreement between theoretical and experimental results is obtained.

  5. Downwash measurements behind wings with detached float

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersohn, E

    1931-01-01

    This investigation, which was made in the small wind tunnel having a diameter of 1.2 m (3.94 feet), embraced three wing models, behind which, at various angles of attack between 0 and 60 degrees, the static pressure and the total pressure along vertical lines (perpendicular to the direction of the undisturbed wind and to the wing span) were measured. The location of these vertical lines are indicated in Figure 1. Moreover, the wing polars were determined by the customary three-component measurements. For testing the pressure field, a Pitot tube and a static probe, both of 2 mm (0.08 in.) in diameter, were mounted 40 mm (1.57 in.) apart on the end of a shaft 1 m (39.37 in.) long.

  6. Evaluation of the genotoxic and antigenotoxic effects of Chios mastic water by the in vitro micronucleus test on human lymphocytes and the in vivo wing somatic test on Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Vlastos, Dimitris; Mademtzoglou, Despoina; Drosopoulou, Elena; Efthimiou, Ioanna; Chartomatsidou, Tatiana; Pandelidou, Christina; Astyrakaki, Melina; Chalatsi, Eleftheria; Mavragani-Tsipidou, Penelope

    2013-01-01

    Chios mastic gum, a plant-derived product obtained by the Mediterranean bush Pistacia lentiscus (L.) var. chia (Duham), has generated considerable interest because of its antimicrobial, anticancer, antioxidant and other beneficial properties. Its aqueous extract, called Chios mastic water (CMW), contains the authentic mastic scent and all the water soluble components of mastic. In the present study, the potential genotoxic activity of CMW, as well as its antigenotoxic properties against the mutagenic agent mitomycin-C (MMC), was evaluated by employing the in vitro Cytokinesis Block MicroNucleus (CBMN) assay and the in vivo Somatic Mutation And Recombination Test (SMART). In the former assay, lymphocytes were treated with 1, 2 and 5% (v/v) of CMW with or without MMC at concentrations 0.05 and 0.50 µg/ml. No significant micronucleus induction was observed by CMW, while co-treatment with MMC led to a decrease of the MMC-induced micronuclei, which ranged between 22.8 and 44.7%. For SMART, larvae were treated with 50 and 100% (v/v) CMW with or without MMC at concentrations 1.00, 2.50 and 5.00 µg/ml. It was shown that CMW alone did not modify the spontaneous frequencies of spots indicating lack of genotoxic activity. Τhe simultaneous administration of MMC with 100% CMW led to considerable alterations of the frequencies of MMC-induced wing spots with the total mutant clones showing reduction between 53.5 and 74.4%. Our data clearly show a protective role of CMW against the MMC-induced genotoxicity and further research on the beneficial properties of this product is suggested.

  7. Test of Two Custer Channel Wings Having a Diameter of 37.2 Inches and Lengths of 43 and 17.5 Inches (Five-Foot Wind Tunnel Test Number 545)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    8.11 8.2 .856 2494 50 9.4 .37 25.4 .039 950 18.5 1.09 17.0 .115 1313 26.7 2.02 12.7 .224 1605 5568 -21 - TABLE NW. 11 CUSTER CHANNEL WING FIVE-FOOT...resultant force* "The second group of conditions, 7, 5, 9, 10 and 11 , plotted on graphs 5, 6, 7 and S shows the effect of a simple auxiliary wing mounted aft...of the channel at various positions and angles of incidence. 5568 -9- The third group of conditions, 13, 14, 15 and 16, plotted on graphs 9, 10, 11

  8. The evolution of wing color: male mate choice opposes adaptive wing color divergence in Colias butterflies.

    PubMed

    Ellers, Jacintha; Boggs, Carol L

    2003-05-01

    Correlated evolution of mate signals and mate preference may be constrained if selection pressures acting on mate preference differ from those acting on mate signals. In particular, opposing selection pressures may act on mate preference and signals when traits have sexual as well as nonsexual functions. In the butterfly Colias philodice eriphyle, divergent selection on wing color across an elevational gradient in response to the thermal environment has led to increasing wing melanization at higher elevations. Wing color is also a long-range signal used by males in mate searching. We conducted experiments to test whether sexual selection on wing melanization via male mate choice acts in the same direction as natural selection on mate signals due to the thermal environment. We performed controlled mate choice experiments in the field over an elevational range of 1500 meters using decoy butterflies with different melanization levels. Also, we obtained a more direct estimate of the relation between wing color and sexual selection by measuring mating success in wild-caught females. Both our experiments showed that wing melanization is an important determinant of female mating success in C. p. eriphyle. However, a lack of elevational variation in male mate preference prevents coevolution of mate signals and mate preference, as males at all elevations prefer less-melanized females. We suggest that this apparently maladaptive mate choice may be maintained by differences in detectability between the morphs or by preservation of species recognition.

  9. Experiments on a Slotted Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruden, P

    1939-01-01

    The results of pressure distribution measurements that were made on a model wing section of a Fieseler F 5 R type airplane are presented. Comparison of those model tests with the corresponding flight tests indicates the limitations and also the advantages of wind tunnel investigations, the advantages being particularly that through the variety of measuring methods employed the more complicated flow conditions may also be clarified. A fact brought out in these tests is that even in the case of "well rounded" slots it is possible for a vortex to be set up at the slot entrance and this vortex is responsible for certain irregularities in the pressure distribution and in the efficiency of the slot.

  10. Large-Scale Wind-Tunnel Tests and Evaluation of the Low-Speed Performance of a 35 deg Sweptback Wing Jet Transport Model Equipped with a Blowing Boundary-Layer-Control Flap and Leading-Edge Slat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickey, David H.; Aoyagi, Kiyoshi

    1960-01-01

    A wind-tunnel investigation was conducted to determine the effect of trailing-edge flaps with blowing-type boundary-layer control and leading-edge slats on the low-speed performance of a large-scale jet transport model with four engines and a 35 deg. sweptback wing of aspect ratio 7. Two spanwise extents and several deflections of the trailing-edge flap were tested. Results were obtained with a normal leading-edge and with full-span leading-edge slats. Three-component longitudinal force and moment data and boundary-layer-control flow requirements are presented. The test results are analyzed in terms of possible improvements in low-speed performance. The effect on performance of the source of boundary-layer-control air flow is considered in the analysis.

  11. Determination of the Profile Drag of an Airplane Wing in Flight at High Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bicknell, Joseph

    1939-01-01

    Flight tests were made to determine the profile-drag coefficients of a portion of the original wing surface of an all-metal airplane and of a portion of the wing made aerodynamically smooth and more nearly fair than the original section. The wing section was approximately the NACA 2414.5. The tests were carried out over a range of airplane speeds giving a maximum Reynolds number of 15,000,000. Tests were also carried out to locate the point of transition from laminar to turbulent boundary layer and to determine the velocity distribution along the upper surface of the wing. The profile-drag coefficients of the original and of the smooth wing portions at a Reynolds number of 15,000,000 were 0.0102 and 0.0068, respectively; i.e., the surface irregularities on the original wing increased the profile-drag coefficient 50 percent above that of the smooth wing.

  12. The aerodynamic forces and pressure distribution of a revolving pigeon wing.

    PubMed

    Usherwood, James R

    2009-05-01

    The aerodynamic forces acting on a revolving dried pigeon wing and a flat card replica were measured with a propeller rig, effectively simulating a wing in continual downstroke. Two methods were adopted: direct measurement of the reaction vertical force and torque via a forceplate, and a map of the pressures along and across the wing measured with differential pressure sensors. Wings were tested at Reynolds numbers up to 108,000, typical for slow-flying pigeons, and considerably above previous similar measurements applied to insect and hummingbird wing and wing models. The pigeon wing out-performed the flat card replica, reaching lift coefficients of 1.64 compared with 1.44. Both real and model wings achieved much higher maximum lift coefficients, and at much higher geometric angles of attack (43°), than would be expected from wings tested in a windtunnel simulating translating flight. It therefore appears that some high-lift mechanisms, possibly analogous to those of slow-flying insects, may be available for birds flapping with wings at high angles of attack. The net magnitude and orientation of aerodynamic forces acting on a revolving pigeon wing can be determined from the differential pressure maps with a moderate degree of precision. With increasing angle of attack, variability in the pressure signals suddenly increases at an angle of attack between 33° and 38°, close to the angle of highest vertical force coefficient or lift coefficient; stall appears to be delayed compared with measurements from wings in windtunnels.

  13. The aerodynamic forces and pressure distribution of a revolving pigeon wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usherwood, James R.

    The aerodynamic forces acting on a revolving dried pigeon wing and a flat card replica were measured with a propeller rig, effectively simulating a wing in continual downstroke. Two methods were adopted: direct measurement of the reaction vertical force and torque via a forceplate, and a map of the pressures along and across the wing measured with differential pressure sensors. Wings were tested at Reynolds numbers up to 108,000, typical for slow-flying pigeons, and considerably above previous similar measurements applied to insect and hummingbird wing and wing models. The pigeon wing out-performed the flat card replica, reaching lift coefficients of 1.64 compared with 1.44. Both real and model wings achieved much higher maximum lift coefficients, and at much higher geometric angles of attack (43°), than would be expected from wings tested in a windtunnel simulating translating flight. It therefore appears that some high-lift mechanisms, possibly analogous to those of slow-flying insects, may be available for birds flapping with wings at high angles of attack. The net magnitude and orientation of aerodynamic forces acting on a revolving pigeon wing can be determined from the differential pressure maps with a moderate degree of precision. With increasing angle of attack, variability in the pressure signals suddenly increases at an angle of attack between 33° and 38°, close to the angle of highest vertical force coefficient or lift coefficient; stall appears to be delayed compared with measurements from wings in windtunnels.

  14. The aerodynamic forces and pressure distribution of a revolving pigeon wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usherwood, James R.

    2009-05-01

    The aerodynamic forces acting on a revolving dried pigeon wing and a flat card replica were measured with a propeller rig, effectively simulating a wing in continual downstroke. Two methods were adopted: direct measurement of the reaction vertical force and torque via a forceplate, and a map of the pressures along and across the wing measured with differential pressure sensors. Wings were tested at Reynolds numbers up to 108,000, typical for slow-flying pigeons, and considerably above previous similar measurements applied to insect and hummingbird wing and wing models. The pigeon wing out-performed the flat card replica, reaching lift coefficients of 1.64 compared with 1.44. Both real and model wings achieved much higher maximum lift coefficients, and at much higher geometric angles of attack (43°), than would be expected from wings tested in a windtunnel simulating translating flight. It therefore appears that some high-lift mechanisms, possibly analogous to those of slow-flying insects, may be available for birds flapping with wings at high angles of attack. The net magnitude and orientation of aerodynamic forces acting on a revolving pigeon wing can be determined from the differential pressure maps with a moderate degree of precision. With increasing angle of attack, variability in the pressure signals suddenly increases at an angle of attack between 33° and 38°, close to the angle of highest vertical force coefficient or lift coefficient; stall appears to be delayed compared with measurements from wings in windtunnels.

  15. The aerodynamic forces and pressure distribution of a revolving pigeon wing

    PubMed Central

    Usherwood, James R.

    2012-01-01

    The aerodynamic forces acting on a revolving dried pigeon wing and a flat card replica were measured with a propeller rig, effectively simulating a wing in continual downstroke. Two methods were adopted: direct measurement of the reaction vertical force and torque via a forceplate, and a map of the pressures along and across the wing measured with differential pressure sensors. Wings were tested at Reynolds numbers up to 108,000, typical for slow-flying pigeons, and considerably above previous similar measurements applied to insect and hummingbird wing and wing models. The pigeon wing out-performed the flat card replica, reaching lift coefficients of 1.64 compared with 1.44. Both real and model wings achieved much higher maximum lift coefficients, and at much higher geometric angles of attack (43°), than would be expected from wings tested in a windtunnel simulating translating flight. It therefore appears that some high-lift mechanisms, possibly analogous to those of slow-flying insects, may be available for birds flapping with wings at high angles of attack. The net magnitude and orientation of aerodynamic forces acting on a revolving pigeon wing can be determined from the differential pressure maps with a moderate degree of precision. With increasing angle of attack, variability in the pressure signals suddenly increases at an angle of attack between 33° and 38°, close to the angle of highest vertical force coefficient or lift coefficient; stall appears to be delayed compared with measurements from wings in windtunnels. PMID:22736891

  16. [Dynamic winged scapula].

    PubMed

    Perjés, K

    1990-01-01

    Author describes the paralysis of the serratus muscle in consequence of the paralysis of the long thoracic nerve. The form of appearance is the winged of "flying" scapula. Beside the presentation of the literary and anatomical data the own cases are described. Only conservative therapy was made, an operation was in no case necessary.

  17. Interference of Tail Surfaces and Wing and Fuselage from Tests of 17 Combinations in the N.A.C.A. Variable-Density Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherman, Albert

    1939-01-01

    An investigation of the interference associated with tail surfaces added to wing-fuselage combinations was included in the interference program in progress in the NACA variable-density tunnel. The results indicate that, in aerodynamically clean combinations, the increment of the high-speed drag can be estimated from section characteristics within useful limits of accuracy. The interference appears mainly as effects on the downwash angle and as losses in the tail effectiveness and varies with the geometry of the combination. An interference burble, which markedly increases the glide-path angle and the stability in pitch before the actual stall, may be considered a means of obtaining satisfactory stalling characteristics for complete combination.

  18. Fiber-optically sensorized composite wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Joannes M.; Black, Richard J.; Moslehi, Behzad; Oblea, Levy; Patel, Rona; Sotoudeh, Vahid; Abouzeida, Essam; Quinones, Vladimir; Gowayed, Yasser; Soobramaney, Paul; Flowers, George

    2014-04-01

    Electromagnetic interference (EMI) immune and light-weight, fiber-optic sensor based Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) will find increasing application in aerospace structures ranging from aircraft wings to jet engine vanes. Intelligent Fiber Optic Systems Corporation (IFOS) has been developing multi-functional fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor systems including parallel processing FBG interrogators combined with advanced signal processing for SHM, structural state sensing and load monitoring applications. This paper reports work with Auburn University on embedding and testing FBG sensor arrays in a quarter scale model of a T38 composite wing. The wing was designed and manufactured using fabric reinforced polymer matrix composites. FBG sensors were embedded under the top layer of the composite. Their positions were chosen based on strain maps determined by finite element analysis. Static and dynamic testing confirmed expected response from the FBGs. The demonstrated technology has the potential to be further developed into an autonomous onboard system to perform load monitoring, SHM and Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) of composite aerospace structures (wings and rotorcraft blades). This platform technology could also be applied to flight testing of morphing and aero-elastic control surfaces.

  19. F15B-Quiet Spike Aeroservoelastic Flight Test Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brenner, Martin J.

    2007-01-01

    Airframe structural morphing technologies designed to mitigate sonic boom strength are being developed by Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation (GAC). Among these technologies is a concept in which an aircraft's frontend would be extended prior to supersonic acceleration. This morphing would effectively lengthen the vehicle, reducing peak sonic boom amplitude, but is also expected to partition the otherwise strong bow shock into a series of reduced-strength, non-coalescing shocklets. This combination of boom shaping techniques is predicted to transform the classic, high-impulse N-wave pattern typically generated by an aircraft traveling at supersonic speed into a signature more closely resembling a sinusoidal wave with a greatly reduced perceived loudness. 'QuietSpike' is GAC's nomenclature for its recently patented front-end vehicle morphing arrangement. The ability of Quiet Spike to effectively shape a vehicle's far- field sonic boom signature is highly dependent on the area distribution characteristics of the aircraft. The full aeroacoustic benefits of front-end morphing at farfield are only possible when the QuietSpike article and vehicle configuration are designed in consideration of each other. Adding QuietSpike technology to the airframe of an existing, non-boom-optimized supersonic vehicle is unlikely to result in an improved far-field signature due to the generally over-powering influence of wing- and inlet-generated shocks. Therefore, it is generally recognized within NASA and the industry that a clean-sheet vehicle design is required to demonstrate the theoretically predicted far-field aeroacoustic benefits of QuietSpike type morphing and other boom- mitigating concepts. NASA's Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) Supersonics Division has placed increased priority on near-term development and flight-testing of such a vehicle. To help achieve this objective, static and dynamic aerostructural proof-of-concept testing was considered a prudent step

  20. When wings touch wakes: understanding locomotor force control by wake wing interference in insect wings.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Fritz-Olaf

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the fluid dynamics of force control in flying insects requires the exploration of how oscillating wings interact with the surrounding fluid. The production of vorticity and the shedding of vortical structures within the stroke cycle thus depend on two factors: the temporal structure of the flow induced by the wing's own instantaneous motion and the flow components resulting from both the force production in previous wing strokes and the motion of other wings flapping in close proximity. These wake-wing interactions may change on a stroke-by-stroke basis, confronting the neuro-muscular system of the animal with a complex problem for force control. In a single oscillating wing, the flow induced by the preceding half stroke may lower the wing's effective angle of attack but permits the recycling of kinetic energy from the wake via the wake capture mechanism. In two-winged insects, the acceleration fields produced by each wing may strongly interact via the clap-and-fling mechanism during the dorsal stroke reversal. Four-winged insects must cope with the fact that the flow over their hindwings is affected by the presence of the forewings. In these animals, a phase-shift between the stroke cycles of fore- and hindwing modulates aerodynamic performance of the hindwing via leading edge vortex destruction and changes in local flow condition including wake capture. Moreover, robotic wings demonstrate that phase-lag during peak performance and the strength of force modulation depend on the vertical spacing between the two stroke planes and the size ratio between fore- and hindwing. This study broadly summarizes the most prominent mechanisms of wake-wing and wing-wing interactions found in flapping insect wings and evaluates the consequences of these processes for the control of locomotor forces in the behaving animal.

  1. Birds' tails do act like delta wings but delta-wing theory does not always predict the forces they generate.

    PubMed

    Evans, Matthew R

    2003-07-07

    Delta-wing theory, which predicts the aerodynamics of aircraft like the Concorde, is the conventional explanation for the way in which a bird's tail operates in flight. Recently, doubt has been cast on the validity of applying a theory devised for supersonic aircraft to the small tails of slow-flying birds. By testing delta-wing models and birds' tails behind bodies with wings, I empirically show that the tails of birds produce lift in a very similar way to conventional delta-wing models. Both Perspex and birds' tail models produce lift similar to that predicted by delta-wing theory when narrowly spread and at low angles of attack. However, when widely spread and at high angles of attack, both tails and Perspex models produce much less lift than predicted, owing to vortex breakdown after which the assumptions of delta-wing theory are violated. These results indicate that birds' tails can be regarded as delta wings but that the theory predicting the forces produced by delta wings can only be applied within acceptable limits (i.e. tails spread less than 60 degrees and at angles of attack of less than 20 degrees).

  2. An experimental investigation of the subcritical and supercritical flow about a swept semispan wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockman, W. K.; Seegmiller, H. L.

    1983-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the turbulent, subcritical and supercritical flow over a swept, semispan wing in a solid wall wind tunnel is described. The program was conducted over a range of Mach numbers, Reynolds numbers, and angles of attack to provide a variety of test cases for assessment of wing computer codes and tunnel wall interference effects. Wing flows both without and with three dimensional flow separation are included. Data include mean surface pressures for both the wing and tunnel walls; surface oil flow patterns on the wing; and mean velocity, flow field surveys. The results are given in tabular form and presented graphically to illustrate some of the effects of the test parameters. Comparisons of the wing pressure data with the results from two inviscid wing codes are also shown to assess the importance of viscous flow and tunnel wall effects.

  3. Fluid-Structure Interaction of Oscillating Low Aspect Ratio Wings at Low Reynolds Numbers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    collaborators (Miguel Visbal), two wings were tested , a rectangular wing with aspect ratio of AR = 2 (a chord length of c = 68.8 mm) and a delta wing...increased frequency, even so, no thrust is produced within the frequency range tested . The phase-averaged vorticity and velocity magnitude, at the...same graph are the locations of the first and second time-averaged lift peaks for the three angles of attack that have been tested in the present

  4. Tabulated pressure measurements on an executive-type jet transport model with a supercritical wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, D. W.

    1975-01-01

    A 1/9 scale model of an existing executive type jet transport refitted with a supercritical wing was tested on in the 8 foot transonic pressure tunnel. The supercritical wing had the same sweep as the original airplane wing but had maximum thickness chord ratios 33 percent larger at the mean geometric chord and almost 50 percent larger at the wing-fuselage juncture. Wing pressure distributions and fuselage pressure distributions in the vicinity of the left nacelle were measured at Mach numbers from 0.25 to 0.90 at angles of attack that generally varied from -2 deg to 10 deg. Results are presented in tabular form without analysis.

  5. Measured unsteady transonic aerodynamic characteristics of an elastic supercritical wing with an oscillating control surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidel, D. A.; Sandford, M. C.; Eckstrom, C. V.

    1985-01-01

    Transonic steady and unsteady aerodynamic data were measured on a large elastic wing in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel. The wing had a supercritical airfoil shape and a leading-edge sweepback of 28.8 deg. The wing was heavily instrumented to measure both static and dynamic pressures and deflections. A hydraulically driven outboard control surface was oscillated to generate unsteady airloads on the wing. Representative results from the wind tunnel tests are presented and discussed, and the unexpected occurrence of an unusual dynamic wing instability, which was sensitive to angle of attack, is reported.

  6. Petiolate wings: effects on the leading-edge vortex in flapping flight

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The wings of many insect species including crane flies and damselflies are petiolate (on stalks), with the wing planform beginning some distance away from the wing hinge, rather than at the hinge. The aerodynamic impact of flapping petiolate wings is relatively unknown, particularly on the formation of the lift-augmenting leading-edge vortex (LEV): a key flow structure exploited by many insects, birds and bats to enhance their lift coefficient. We investigated the aerodynamic implications of petiolation P using particle image velocimetry flow field measurements on an array of rectangular wings of aspect ratio 3 and petiolation values of P = 1–3. The wings were driven using a mechanical device, the ‘Flapperatus’, to produce highly repeatable insect-like kinematics. The wings maintained a constant Reynolds number of 1400 and dimensionless stroke amplitude Λ* (number of chords traversed by the wingtip) of 6.5 across all test cases. Our results showed that for more petiolate wings the LEV is generally larger, stronger in circulation, and covers a greater area of the wing surface, particularly at the mid-span and inboard locations early in the wing stroke cycle. In each case, the LEV was initially arch-like in form with its outboard end terminating in a focus-sink on the wing surface, before transitioning to become continuous with the tip vortex thereafter. In the second half of the wing stroke, more petiolate wings exhibit a more detached LEV, with detachment initiating at approximately 70% and 50% span for P = 1 and 3, respectively. As a consequence, lift coefficients based on the LEV are higher in the first half of the wing stroke for petiolate wings, but more comparable in the second half. Time-averaged LEV lift coefficients show a general rise with petiolation over the range tested. PMID:28163876

  7. Petiolate wings: effects on the leading-edge vortex in flapping flight.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Nathan; Knowles, Kevin; Bomphrey, Richard J

    2017-02-06

    The wings of many insect species including crane flies and damselflies are petiolate (on stalks), with the wing planform beginning some distance away from the wing hinge, rather than at the hinge. The aerodynamic impact of flapping petiolate wings is relatively unknown, particularly on the formation of the lift-augmenting leading-edge vortex (LEV): a key flow structure exploited by many insects, birds and bats to enhance their lift coefficient. We investigated the aerodynamic implications of petiolation P using particle image velocimetry flow field measurements on an array of rectangular wings of aspect ratio 3 and petiolation values of P = 1-3. The wings were driven using a mechanical device, the 'Flapperatus', to produce highly repeatable insect-like kinematics. The wings maintained a constant Reynolds number of 1400 and dimensionless stroke amplitude Λ* (number of chords traversed by the wingtip) of 6.5 across all test cases. Our results showed that for more petiolate wings the LEV is generally larger, stronger in circulation, and covers a greater area of the wing surface, particularly at the mid-span and inboard locations early in the wing stroke cycle. In each case, the LEV was initially arch-like in form with its outboard end terminating in a focus-sink on the wing surface, before transitioning to become continuous with the tip vortex thereafter. In the second half of the wing stroke, more petiolate wings exhibit a more detached LEV, with detachment initiating at approximately 70% and 50% span for P = 1 and 3, respectively. As a consequence, lift coefficients based on the LEV are higher in the first half of the wing stroke for petiolate wings, but more comparable in the second half. Time-averaged LEV lift coefficients show a general rise with petiolation over the range tested.

  8. An Estimation of the Flying Qualities of the Kaiser Fleetwing All-Wing Airplane from Tests of a 1/7-Scale Model, TED No. NACA 2340

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, Gerald W.

    1946-01-01

    An investigation of a 1/7-scale powered model of the Kaiser Fleetwing all-wing airplane was made in the Langley full-scale tunnel to provide data for an estimation of the flying qualities of the airplane. The analysis of the stability and control characteristics of the airplane has been made as closely as possible in accordance with the requirements of the Bureau of Aeronautics, Navy Department's specifications, and a summary of the more significant conclusions is presented as follows. With the normal center of gravity located at 20 percent of the mean aerodynamic chord, the airplane will have adequate static longitudinal stability, elevator fixed, for all flight conditions except for low-power operation at low speeds where the stability will be about neutral. There will not be sufficient down-elevator deflection available for trim above speeds of about 130 miles per hour. It is probable that the reduction in the up-elevator deflections required for trim will be accompanied by reduced elevator hinge moments for low-power operation at low flight speeds. The static directional stability for this airplane will be low for all rudder-fixed or rudder-free flight conditions. The maximum rudder deflection of 30 deg will trim only about 15 deg yaw for most flight conditions and only 10 deg yaw for the condition with low power at low speeds. Also, at low powers and low speeds, it is estimated that the rudders will not trim the total adverse yaw resulting from an abrupt aileron roll using maximum aileron deflection. The airplane will meet the requirements for stability and control for asymmetric power operation with one outboard engine inoperative. The airplane would have no tendency for directional divergence but would probably be spirally unstable, with rudders fixed. The static lateral stability of the airplane will probably be about neutral for the high-speed flight conditions and will be only slightly increased for the low-power operation in low-speed flight. The

  9. Fractal dimension in butterflies' wings: a novel approach to understanding wing patterns?

    PubMed

    Castrejón-Pita, A A; Sarmiento-Galán, A; Castrejón-Pita, J R; Castrejón-García, R

    2005-05-01

    The geometrical complexity in the wings of several, taxonomically different butterflies, is analyzed in terms of their fractal dimension. Preliminary results provide some evidence on important questions about the (dis)similarity of the wing patterns in terms of their fractal dimension. The analysis is restricted to two groups which are widely used in the literature as typical examples of mimicry, and a small number of unrelated species, thus implying the consideration of only a fraction of the wing pattern diversity. The members of the first mimicry ring, composed by the species Danaus plexippus (better known as the monarch butterfly), and the two subspecies Basilarchia archippus obsoleta (or northern viceroy) and Basilarchia archippus hoffmanni (or tropical viceroy), are found to have a very similar value for the fractal dimension of their wing patterns, even though they do not look very similar at first sight. It is also found that the female of another species (Neophasia terlootii), which looks similar to the members of the previous group, does not share the same feature, while the Lycorea ilione albescens does share it. For the members of the second group of mimicry related butterflies, the Greta nero nero and the Hypoleria cassotis, it is shown that they also have very close values for the fractal dimension of their wing patterns. Finally, it is shown that other species, which apparently have very similar wing patterns, do not have the same fractal dimension. A possible, not completely tested hypothesis is then conjectured: the formation of groups by individuals whose wing patterns have an almost equal fractal dimension may be due to the fact that they do share the same developmental raw material, and that this common feature is posteriorly modified by natural selection, possibly through predation.

  10. Wing design for a civil tiltrotor transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rais-Rohani, Masoud

    1994-01-01

    The goal of this research is the proper tailoring of the civil tiltrotor's composite wing-box structure leading to a minimum-weight wing design. With focus on the structural design, the wing's aerodynamic shape and the rotor-pylon system are held fixed. The initial design requirement on drag reduction set the airfoil maximum thickness-to-chord ratio to 18 percent. The airfoil section is the scaled down version of the 23 percent-thick airfoil used in V-22's wing. With the project goal in mind, the research activities began with an investigation of the structural dynamic and aeroelastic characteristics of the tiltrotor configuration, and the identification of proper procedures to analyze and account for these characteristics in the wing design. This investigation led to a collection of more than thirty technical papers on the subject, some of which have been referenced here. The review of literature on the tiltrotor revealed the complexity of the system in terms of wing-rotor-pylon interactions. The aeroelastic instability or whirl flutter stemming from wing-rotor-pylon interactions is found to be the most critical mode of instability demanding careful consideration in the preliminary wing design. The placement of wing fundamental natural frequencies in bending and torsion relative to each other and relative to the rotor 1/rev frequencies is found to have a strong influence on the whirl flutter. The frequency placement guide based on a Bell Helicopter Textron study is used in the formulation of frequency constraints. The analysis and design studies are based on two different finite-element computer codes: (1) MSC/NASATRAN and (2) WIDOWAC. These programs are used in parallel with the motivation to eventually, upon necessary modifications and validation, use the simpler WIDOWAC code in the structural tailoring of the tiltrotor wing. Several test cases were studied for the preliminary comparison of the two codes. The results obtained so far indicate a good overall

  11. Geometric design of the best performing auto-rotating wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yucen; Vincent, Lionel; Kanso, Eva

    2016-11-01

    Many plants use gravity and aerodynamics to disperse their seeds away from the parent plant. Various seed designs result in different dispersal modes from gliding to auto-rotating. Here, we are interested in understanding the effect of geometric design of auto-rotating seedpods on their aerodynamic performance. As an experimentally tractable surrogate to real seedpods, we investigate auto-rotating paper wings of various shape designs. We compare these designs to a control case consisting of the canonical rectangular wing. Inspired by aerodynamics, we begin by considering the benefit of an elliptical planform, and test the effect of aspect ratio on flight range and descent angle. We find the elliptical planform improves the tumbling rate and the aspect ratio has a positive effect on the flight performance of the wings. We then test two families of more complex shapes: one of tapered planform and one of a planform with sharp tips. We look for an optimal flight performance while constraining either the mass or the maximum length and width of the wing. We find that wings with sharper tips and larger length have higher auto-rotation rates and improved performance. The results imply that both the planform and length of the wing contribute to the wing's flight performance.

  12. On Celestial Wings,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-11-01

    warning at headquarters of Japanese planes approaching Clark Field. Despite all our warning systems and all the reconnaissance missions we had flown, the...late January 1942. 49 ON CELESTIAL WINGS Davao on 3 January 1942. They staged through Samarinda, Bomeo , and flew the 730 nautical miles to find the...knocking out our hydraulic system , our brakes, landing gear and bomb release mechanism. We kicked the bombs out manually over Bali and returned to Java

  13. Wing on a String

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Mike; Brand, Lance

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the authors present an activity that shows students how flight occurs. The "wing on a string" is a simple teacher-made frame that consists of PVC pipe, fishing line, and rubber bands--all readily available hardware store items. The only other materials/tools involved are a sheet of paper, some pieces of a soda straw, a stapler,…

  14. Variable Camber Morphing Wings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-02

    exploring smart materials , aiming at achieving more efficient morphing capability in terms of control authority and energy consump- tion. Other specific...collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ORGANIZATION. 1. REPORT...methodology of variable camber morphing wings based on the use of active materials , namely piezoelectric materials and shape memory alloys. The research work

  15. Static measurements of slender delta wing rolling moment hysteresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Joseph; Levin, Daniel

    1991-01-01

    Slender delta wing planforms are susceptible to self-induced roll oscillations due to aerodynamic hysteresis during the limit cycle roll oscillation. Test results are presented which clearly establish that the static rolling moment hysteresis has a damping character; hysteresis tends to be greater when, due to either wing roll or side slip, the vortex burst moves back and forth over the wing trailing edge. These data are an indirect indication of the damping role of the vortex burst during limit cycle roll oscillations.

  16. Comparison of supercritical and conventional wing flutter characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, M. G.; Hanson, P. W.; Wynne, E. C.

    1976-01-01

    A wind-tunnel study was undertaken to directly compare the measured flutter boundaries of two dynamically similar aeroelastic models which had the same planform, maximum thickness-to-chord ratio, and as nearly identical stiffness and mass distributions as possible, with one wing having a supercritical airfoil and the other a conventional airfoil. The considerations and problems associated with flutter testing supercritical wing models at or near design lift coefficients are discussed, and the measured transonic boundaries of the two wings are compared with boundaries calculated with a subsonic lifting surface theory.

  17. Structural Health Monitoring Analysis for the Orbiter Wing Leading Edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yap, Keng C.

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews Structural Health Monitoring Analysis for the Orbiter Wing Leading Edge. The Wing Leading Edge Impact Detection System (WLE IDS) and the Impact Analysis Process are also described to monitor WLE debris threats. The contents include: 1) Risk Management via SHM; 2) Hardware Overview; 3) Instrumentation; 4) Sensor Configuration; 5) Debris Hazard Monitoring; 6) Ascent Response Summary; 7) Response Signal; 8) Distribution of Flight Indications; 9) Probabilistic Risk Analysis (PRA); 10) Model Correlation; 11) Impact Tests; 12) Wing Leading Edge Modeling; 13) Ascent Debris PRA Results; and 14) MM/OD PRA Results.

  18. Fog spontaneously folds mosquito wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickerson, Andrew K.; Liu, Xing; Zhu, Ting; Hu, David L.

    2015-02-01

    The flexibility of insect wings confers aerodynamic benefits, but can also present a hazard if exposed to fog or dew. Fog can cause water to accumulate on wings, bending them into tight taco shapes and rendering them useless for flight. In this combined experimental and theoretical study, we use high-speed video to film the spontaneous folding of isolated mosquito wings due to the evaporation of a water drop. We predict shapes of the deformed wing using two-dimensional elastica theory, considering both surface tension and Laplace pressure. We also recommend fold-resistant geometries for the wings of flapping micro-aerial vehicles. Our work reveals the mechanism of insect wing folding and provides a framework for further study of capillarity-driven folding in both natural and biomimetic systems at small scales.

  19. Aerodynamic control of NASP-type vehicles through vortex manipulation. Volume 3: Wing rock experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suarez, Carlos J.; Smith, Brooke C.; Kramer, Brian R.; Ng, T. Terry; Ong, Lih-Yenn; Malcolm, Gerald N.

    1993-01-01

    Free-to-roll tests were conducted in water and wind tunnels in an effort to investigate the mechanisms of wing rock on a NASP-type vehicle. The configuration tested consisted of a highly-slender forebody and a 78 deg swept delta wing. In the water tunnel test, extensive flow visualization was performed and roll angle histories were obtained. In the wind tunnel test, the roll angle, forces and moments, and limited forebody and wing surface pressures were measured during the wing rock motion. A limit cycle oscillation was observed for angles of attack between 22 deg and 30 deg. In general, the experiments confirmed that the main flow phenomena responsible for the wing-body-tail wing rock are the interactions between the forebody and the wing vortices. The variation of roll acceleration (determined from the second derivative of the roll angle time history) with roll angle clearly slowed the energy balance necessary to sustain the limit cycle oscillation. Different means of suppressing wing rock by controlling the forebody vortices using small blowing jets were also explored. Steady blowing was found to be capable of suppressing wing rock, but significant vortex asymmetrices are created, causing the model to stop at a non-zero roll angle. On the other hand, alternating pulsed blowing on the left and right sides of the fore body was demonstrated to be a potentially effective means of suppressing wing rock and eliminating large asymmetric moments at high angles of attack.

  20. Supersonic aerodynamics of delta wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.

    1988-01-01

    Through the empirical correlation of experimental data and theoretical analysis, a set of graphs has been developed which summarize the inviscid aerodynamics of delta wings at supersonic speeds. The various graphs which detail the aerodynamic performance of delta wings at both zero-lift and lifting conditions were then employed to define a preliminary wing design approach in which both the low-lift and high-lift design criteria were combined to define a feasible design space.

  1. Experimental trim drag values for conventional and supercritical wings. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, P. F.

    1981-01-01

    Supercritical wings were studied to determine whether they incur higher trim drag values at cruise conditions than wide body technology wings. Relative trim drag increments were measured in an experimental wind tunnel investigation. The tests utilized high aspect ratio supercritical wing and a wide body wing in conjunction with five different horizontal tail configurations, mounted on a representative wide body fuselage. The three low tail configurations and two T tail configurations were chosen to measure the effects on horizontal tail size, location, and camber on the trim drag increments for the two wings. The increase in performance (lift to drag ratio) for supercritical wing over the wide body wing was 11 percent for both the optimum low tail and T tail configurations.

  2. Simulation of iced wing aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potapczuk, M. G.; Bragg, M. B.; Kwon, O. J.; Sankar, L. N.

    1991-01-01

    The sectional and total aerodynamic load characteristics of moderate aspect ratio wings with and without simulated glaze leading edge ice were studied both computationally, using a three dimensional, compressible Navier-Stokes solver, and experimentally. The wing has an untwisted, untapered planform shape with NACA 0012 airfoil section. The wing has an unswept and swept configuration with aspect ratios of 4.06 and 5.0. Comparisons of computed surface pressures and sectional loads with experimental data for identical configurations are given. The abrupt decrease in stall angle of attack for the wing, as a result of the leading edge ice formation, was demonstrated numerically and experimentally.

  3. Drag measurements of two thin wing sections at different index values

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackeret, J

    1927-01-01

    It is stated that the index value 6000, as found in normal tests of wing sections with a 20 cm chord, falls in the same region where the transition of laminar to turbulent flow takes place on thin flat plates. It is to be expected that slightly cambered, thin wing sections will behave similarly. The following test of two such wing sections were made for the purpose of verifying this supposition.

  4. Wind-tunnel investigation of aerodynamic characteristics and wing pressure distributions of an airplane with variable-sweep wings modified for laminar flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallissy, James B.; Phillips, Pamela S.

    1989-01-01

    A wind tunnel test was conducted to evaluate the aerodynamic characteristics and wing pressure distributions of a variable wing sweep aircraft having wing panels that are modified to promote laminar flow. The modified wing section shapes were incorporated over most of the exposed outer wing panel span and were obtained by extending the leading edge and adding thickness to the existing wing upper surface forward of 60 percent chord. Two different wing configurations, one each for Mach numbers 0.7 and 0.8, were tested on the model simultaneously, with one wing configuration on the left side and the other on the right. The tests were conducted at Mach numbers 0.20 to 0.90 for wing sweep angles of 20, 25, 30, and 35 degrees. Longitudinal, lateral and directional aerodynamic characteristics of the modified and baseline configurations, and selected pressure distributions for the modified configurations, are presented in graphical form without analysis. A tabulation of the pressure data for the modified configuration is available as microfiche.

  5. CFD Analysis of a T-38 Wing Fence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    or making major adjustments to the existing airframe. The answer lies in flow control. Flow control devices like vortex generators, winglets , and wing...proposed by the Air Force Test Pilot School. The driving force for considering a wing fence as opposed to vane vortex generators or winglets 3 was a row of...devices are vortex generators, fences, high lift flaps, and winglets . Active flow control injects the boundary layer with energy from small jets of

  6. Ground and Flight Evaluation of a Small-Scale Inflatable-Winged Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, James E.; Pahle, Joseph W.; Thornton, Stephen V.; Vogus, Shannon; Frackowiak, Tony; Mello, Joe; Norton, Brook; Bauer, Jeff (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A small-scale, instrumented research aircraft was flown to investigate the night characteristics of innersole wings. Ground tests measured the static structural characteristics of the wing at different inflation pressures, and these results compared favorably with analytical predictions. A research-quality instrumentation system was assembled, largely from commercial off-the-shelf components, and installed in the aircraft. Initial flight operations were conducted with a conventional rigid wing having the same dimensions as the inflatable wing. Subsequent flights were conducted with the inflatable wing. Research maneuvers were executed to identify the trim, aerodynamic performance, and longitudinal stability and control characteristics of the vehicle in its different wing configurations. For the angle-of-attack range spanned in this flight program, measured flight data demonstrated that the rigid wing was an effective simulator of the lift-generating capability of the inflatable wing. In-flight inflation of the wing was demonstrated in three flight operations, and measured flight data illustrated the dynamic characteristics during wing inflation and transition to controlled lifting flight. Wing inflation was rapid and the vehicle dynamics during inflation and transition were benign. The resulting angles of attack and of sideslip ere small, and the dynamic response was limited to roll and heave motions.

  7. Application of winglets and/or wing tip extensions with active load control on the Boeing 747

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, R. L.; Perkin, B. R.; Schoenman, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    The application of wing tip modifications and active control technology to the Boeing 747 airplane for the purpose of improving fuel efficiency is considered. Wing tip extensions, wing tip winglets, and the use of the outboard ailerons for active wing load alleviation are described. Modest performance improvements are indicated. A costs versus benefits approach is taken to decide which, if any, of the concepts warrant further development and flight test leading to possible incorporation into production airplanes.

  8. Charge Capacity of Piezoelectric Membrane Wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grybas, Matthew; Hubner, J. Paul

    2015-11-01

    Micro air vehicles (MAVs) have small wings often fabricated with flexible frames and membranes. These membranes flex and vibrate. Piezoelectric films have the ability to convert induced stress or strain into electrical energy. Thus, it is of interest to investigate if piezoelectric films can be used as a structural member of an MAV wing and generate both lift and energy through passive vibrations. Both a shaker test and a wind tunnel test have been conducted to characterize and assess energy production and aerodynamic characteristics including lift, drag and efficiency. The piezoelectric film has been successful as a lifting surface and produces a measurable charge. This work was supported by NSF REU Site Award 1358991.

  9. Experimental Investigation of Ice Accretion Effects on a Swept Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadakis, M.; Yeong, H. W.; Wong, S. C.; Vargas, M.; Potapczuk, M.

    2005-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to study the effects of 2-, 5-, 10-, and 22.5-min ice accretions on the aerodynamic performance of a swept finite wing. The ice shapes tested included castings of ice accretions obtained from icing tests at the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) and simulated ice shapes obtained with the LEWICE 2.0 ice accretion code. The conditions used for the icing tests were selected to provide five glaze ice shapes with complete and incomplete scallop features and a small rime ice shape. The LEWICE ice shapes were defined for the same conditions as those used in the icing tests. All aerodynamic performance tests were conducted in the 7- x 10-ft Low-Speed Wind Tunnel Facility at Wichita State University. Six component force and moment measurements, aileron hinge moments, and surface pressures were obtained for a Reynolds number of 1.8 million based on mean aerodynamic chord and aileron deflections in the range of -15o to 20o. Tests were performed with the clean wing, six IRT ice shape castings, seven smooth LEWICE ice shapes, and seven rough LEWICE ice shapes. Roughness for the LEWICE ice shapes was simulated with 36-size grit. The experiments conducted showed that the glaze ice castings reduced the maximum lift coefficient of the clean wing by 11.5% to 93.6%, while the 5-min rime ice casting increased maximum lift by 3.4%. Minimum iced wing drag was 133% to 3533% greater with respect to the clean case. The drag of the iced wing near the clean wing stall angle of attack was 17% to 104% higher than that of the clean case. In general, the aileron remained effective in changing the lift of the clean and iced wings for all angles of attack and aileron deflections tested. Aileron hinge moments for the iced wing cases remained within the maximum and minimum limits defined by the clean wing hinge moments. Tests conducted with the LEWICE ice shapes showed that in general the trends in aerodynamic performance degradation of the wing with

  10. KC-135 wing and winglet flight pressure distributions, loads, and wing deflection results with some wind tunnel comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montoya, L. C.; Jacobs, P.; Flechner, S.; Sims, R.

    1982-01-01

    A full-scale winglet flight test on a KC-135 airplane with an upper winglet was conducted. Data were taken at Mach numbers from 0.70 to 0.82 at altitudes from 34,000 feet to 39,000 feet at stabilized flight conditions for wing/winglet configurations of basic wing tip, 15/-4 deg, 15/-2 deg, and 0/-4 deg winglet cant/incidence. An analysis of selected pressure distribution and data showed that with the basic wing tip, the flight and wind tunnel wing pressure distribution data showed good agreement. With winglets installed, the effects on the wing pressure distribution were mainly near the tip. Also, the flight and wind tunnel winglet pressure distributions had some significant differences primarily due to the oilcanning in flight. However, in general, the agreement was good. For the winglet cant and incidence configuration presented, the incidence had the largest effect on the winglet pressure distributions. The incremental flight wing deflection data showed that the semispan wind tunnel model did a reasonable job of simulating the aeroelastic effects at the wing tip. The flight loads data showed good agreement with predictions at the design point and also substantiated the predicted structural penalty (load increase) of the 15 deg cant/-2 deg incidence winglet configuration.

  11. The natural flow wing-design concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Bauer, Steven X. S.

    1992-01-01

    A wing-design study was conducted on a 65 degree swept leading-edge delta wing in which the wing geometry was modified to take advantage of the naturally occurring flow that forms over a slender wing in a supersonic flow field. Three-dimensional nonlinear analysis methods were used in the study which was divided into three parts: preliminary design, initial design, and final design. In the preliminary design, the wing planform, the design conditions, and the near-conical wing-design concept were derived, and a baseline standard wing (conventional airfoil distribution) and a baseline near-conical wing were chosen. During the initial analysis, a full-potential flow solver was employed to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of the baseline standard delta wing and to investigate modifications to the airfoil thickness, leading-edge radius, airfoil maximum-thickness position, and wing upper to lower surface asymmetry on the baseline near-conical wing. The final design employed an Euler solver to analyze the best wing configurations found in the initial design and to extend the study of wing asymmetry to develop a more refined wing. Benefits resulting from each modification are discussed, and a final 'natural flow' wing geometry was designed that provides an improvement in aerodynamic performance compared with that of a baseline conventional uncambered wing, linear-theory cambered wing, and near-conical wing.

  12. Comparative Analysis of Uninhibited and Constrained Avian Wing Aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Jordan A.

    The flight of birds has intrigued and motivated man for many years. Bird flight served as the primary inspiration of flying machines developed by Leonardo Da Vinci, Otto Lilienthal, and even the Wright brothers. Avian flight has once again drawn the attention of the scientific community as unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) are not only becoming more popular, but smaller. Birds are once again influencing the designs of aircraft. Small UAVs operating within flight conditions and low Reynolds numbers common to birds are not yet capable of the high levels of control and agility that birds display with ease. Many researchers believe the potential to improve small UAV performance can be obtained by applying features common to birds such as feathers and flapping flight to small UAVs. Although the effects of feathers on a wing have received some attention, the effects of localized transient feather motion and surface geometry on the flight performance of a wing have been largely overlooked. In this research, the effects of freely moving feathers on a preserved red tailed hawk wing were studied. A series of experiments were conducted to measure the aerodynamic forces on a hawk wing with varying levels of feather movement permitted. Angle of attack and air speed were varied within the natural flight envelope of the hawk. Subsequent identical tests were performed with the feather motion constrained through the use of externally-applied surface treatments. Additional tests involved the study of an absolutely fixed geometry mold-and-cast wing model of the original bird wing. Final tests were also performed after applying surface coatings to the cast wing. High speed videos taken during tests revealed the extent of the feather movement between wing models. Images of the microscopic surface structure of each wing model were analyzed to establish variations in surface geometry between models. Recorded aerodynamic forces were then compared to the known feather motion and surface

  13. Effect of wing planform and canard location and geometry on the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of a close-coupled canard wing model at subsonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gloss, B. B.

    1975-01-01

    A generalized wind-tunnel model with canard and wing planforms typical of highly maneuverable aircraft was tested in the Langley 7- by 10-foot high-speed tunnel at a Mach number of 0.30 to determine the effect of canard location, canard size, wing sweep, and canard strake on canard-wing interference to high angles of attack. The major results of this investigation may be summarized as follows: the high-canard configuration (excluding the canard strake and canard flap), for both the 60 deg and 44 deg swept leading-edge wings, produced the highest maximum lift coefficient and the most linear pitching-moment curves; substantially larger gains in the canard lift and total lift were obtained by adding a strake to the canard located below the wing chord plane rather than by adding a strake to the canard located above the wing chord plane.

  14. Beetle wings are inflatable origami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Rui; Ren, Jing; Ge, Siqin; Hu, David

    2015-11-01

    Beetles keep their wings folded and protected under a hard shell. In times of danger, they must unfold them rapidly in order for them to fly to escape. Moreover, they must do so across a range of body mass, from 1 mg to 10 grams. How can they unfold their wings so quickly? We use high-speed videography to record wing unfolding times, which we relate to the geometry of the network of blood vessels in the wing. Larger beetles have longer unfolding times. Modeling of the flow of blood through the veins successfully accounts for the wing unfolding speed of large beetles. However, smaller beetles have anomalously short unfolding times, suggesting they have lower blood viscosity or higher driving pressure. The use of hydraulics to unfold complex objects may have implications in the design of micro-flying air vehicles.

  15. X-31 wing removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    U.S. and German personnel of the X-31 Enhanced Fighter Maneuverability Technology Demonstrator aircraft program removing the right wing of the aircraft, which was ferried from Edwards Air Force Base, California, to Europe on May 22, 1995 aboard an Air Force Reserve C-5 transport. The X-31, based at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center was ferried to Europe and flown in the Paris Air Show in June. The wing of the X-31 was removed on May 18, 1995, to allow the aircraft to fit inside the C-5 fuselage. Officials of the X-31 project used Manching, Germany, as a staging base to prepare the aircraft for the flight demonstration. At the air show, the X-31 demonstrated the value of using thrust vectoring (directing engine exhaust flow) coupled with advanced flight control systems to provide controlled flight at very high angles of attack. The aircraft arrived back at Edwards in a Air Force Reserve C-5 on June 25, 1995 and off loaded at Dryden June 27. The X-31 aircraft was developed jointly by Rockwell International's North American Aircraft Division (now part of Boeing) and Daimler-Benz Aerospace (formerly Messerschmitt-Bolkow-Blohm), under sponsorship by the U.S. Department of Defense and The German Federal Ministry of Defense.

  16. Recent developments in equivalent plate modeling for wing shape optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livne, Eli

    1993-01-01

    A new technique for structural modeling of airplane wings is presented taking transverse shear effects into account. The kinematic assumptions of first order shear deformation plate theory in combination with numerical analysis based on simple polynomials which define geometry, construction and displacement approximations lead to analytical expressions for elements of the stiffness and mass matrices and load vector. Contributions from the cover skins, spar and rib caps and spar and rib webs are included as well as concentrated springs and concentrated masses. Limitations of current equivalent plate wing modeling techniques based on classical plate theory are discussed, and the improved accuracy of the new equivalent plate technique is demonstrated through comparison to finite element analysis and test results. Analytical derivatives of stiffness, mass and load terms with respect to wing shape lead to analytic sensitivities of displacements, stresses and natural modes with respect to planform shape and depth distribution. This makes the new capability an effective structural tool for wing shape optimization.

  17. Unsteady transition measurements on a pitching three-dimensional wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorber, Peter F.; Carta, Franklin O.

    1992-01-01

    Boundary layer transition measurements were made during an experimental study of the aerodynamics of a rectangular wing undergoing unsteady pitching motions. The wing was tested at chordwise Mach numbers between 0.2 and 0.6, at sweep angles of 0, 15, and 30 deg, and for steady state, sinusoidal, and constant pitch rate motions. The model was scaled to represent a full size helicopter rotor blade, with chord Reynolds numbers between 2 and 6 x 10(exp 6). Sixteen surface hot-film gages were located along three spanwise stations: 0.08, 0.27, and 0.70 chords from the wing tip. Qualitative heat transfer information was obtained to identify the unsteady motion of the point of transition to turbulence. In combination with simultaneous measurements of the unsteady surface pressure distributions, the results illustrate the effects of compressibility, sweep, pitch rate, and proximity to the wing tip on the transition and relaminarization locations.

  18. QCSEE Over-the-Wing Engine Acoustic Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomer, H. E.; Loeffler, I. J.

    1982-01-01

    The over the wing (OTW) Quiet, Clean, Short Haul Experimental Engine (QCSEE) was tested at the NASA Lewis Engine Noise Test Facility. A boilerplate (nonflight weight), high throat Mach number, acoustically treated inlet and a D shaped OTW exhaust nozzle with variable position side doors were used in the tests along with wing and flap segments to simulate an installation on a short haul transport aircraft. All of the acoustic test data from 10 configurations are documented in tabular form. Some selected narrowband and 1/3 octave band plots of sound pressure level are presented.

  19. Verbascoside is not genotoxic in the ST and HB crosses of the Drosophila wing spot test, and its constituent, caffeic acid, decreases the spontaneous mutation rate in the ST cross.

    PubMed

    Santos-Cruz, Luis Felipe; Ávila-Acevedo, José Guillermo; Ortega-Capitaine, Diego; Ojeda-Duplancher, Jesús Clemente; Perdigón-Moya, Juana Laura; Hernández-Portilla, Luis Barbo; López-Dionicio, Héctor; Durán-Díaz, Angel; Dueñas-García, Irma Elena; Castañeda-Partida, Laura; García-Bores, Ana María; Heres-Pulido, María Eugenia

    2012-03-01

    Verbascoside (VB) is a phenylpropanoid isolated from Buddleja species, some of which originate in Mexico, and was first described in the sixteenth century in the codices of Mexican traditional medicine. VB is present in alcohol extracts and is widely used in the north of Mexico as a sunscreen. VB absorbs UV-A and UV-B radiation and has high antioxidant and anti-inflammatory capacities. VB and its constituent caffeic acid (CA) were screened to determine their genotoxic activity using the Drosophila wing spot test. Third instar larvae (72±4 h) of the standard (ST) and high bioactivation (HB) crosses, with regulated and high levels of cytochrome P450s (Cyp450s), respectively, were exposed to VB or CA (0, 27, 57, 81, 135, and 173 mM). VB was not genotoxic at any of the concentrations tested in both crosses. The amount of VB residue as determined by HPLC in the adult flies that were fed with VB indicated a low metabolism of this compound, which explains the absence of genotoxicity. CA decreased the spontaneous frequencies of small and total spots and showed putative toxicity in the ST cross.

  20. Application of Piezoelectrics to Flapping-Wing MAVs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widstrand, Alex; Hubner, J. Paul

    2015-11-01

    Micro air vehicles (MAVs) are a class of unmanned aerial vehicles that are size-restricted and operate at low velocities and low Reynolds numbers. An ongoing challenge with MAVs is that their flight-related operations are highly constrained by their size and weight, which limits battery size and, therefore, available power. One type of MAV called an ornithopter flies using flapping wings to create both lift and thrust, much like birds and insects do. Further bio-inspiration from bats led to the design of membrane wings for these vehicles, which provide aerodynamic benefits through passive vibration. In an attempt to capitalize on this vibration, a piezoelectric film, which generates a voltage when stressed, was investigated as the wing surface. Two wing planforms with constant area were designed and fabricated. The goal was to measure the wings' flight characteristics and output energy in freestream conditions. Complications with the flapper arose which prevented wind tunnel tests from being performed; however, energy data was obtained from table-top shaker tests. Preliminary results indicate that wing shape affects the magnitude of the charge generated, with a quarter-elliptic planform outperforming a rectangular planform. Funding provided by NSF REU Site Award number 1358991.

  1. The Distribution of Lift Over Wing Tips and Ailerons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, David L

    1924-01-01

    This investigation was carried out in the 5-foot wind tunnel of the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory for the purpose of obtaining more complete information on the distribution of lift between the ends of wing spars, the stresses in ailerons, and the general subject of airflow near the tip of a wing. It includes one series of tests on four models without ailerons, having square, elliptical, and raked tips respectively, and a second series of positively and negatively raked wings with ailerons adjusted to different settings. The results show that negatively raked tips give a more uniform distribution of air pressure than any of the other three arrangements, because the tip vortex does not disturb the flow at the trailing edge. Aileron loads are found to be less severe on wings with negative application to the calculation of aileron and wing stresses and also to facilitate the proper distribution of load in sand testing. Contour charts show in great detail the complex distribution lift over the wing.

  2. Design of a composite wing extension for a general aviation aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adney, P. S.; Horn, W. J.

    1984-01-01

    A composite wing extension was designed for a typical general aviation aircraft to improve lift curve slope, dihedral effect, and lift to drag ratio. Advanced composite materials were used in the design to evaluate their use as primary structural components in general aviation aircraft. Extensive wind tunnel tests were used to evaluate six extension shapes. The extension shape chosen as the best choice was 28 inches long with a total area of 17 square feet. Subsequent flight tests showed the wing extension's predicted aerodynamic improvements to be correct. The structural design of the wing extension consisted of a hybrid laminate carbon core with outer layers of Kevlar - layed up over a foam interior which acted as an internal support. The laminate skin of the wing extension was designed from strength requirements, and the foam core was included to prevent buckling. A joint lap was recommended to attach the wing extension to the main wing structure.

  3. QCSEE under-the-wing engine-wing-flap aerodynamic profile characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomer, H. E.; Samanich, N. E.

    1982-01-01

    As part of a broad-based NASA program to provide a technology base for future propulsion requirements for powered-lift aircraft, the Quiet, Clean, Short-Haul, Experimental Engine (QCSEE) program was begun by the Lewis Research Center in 1974. The initial buildup of the under-the-wing (UTW) engine was tested by the contractor at his test site. The UTW engine was delivered to Lewis in 1978 for further testing with wing and flap segments simulating an installation on a short-haul transport aircraft. The engine was also tested alone as an aid in identifying the various noise sources and their levels. As part of these tests the aerodynamic profiles at the exhaust nozzle and on the surfaces and in the wake of the wing-flap system were measured. This report documents, in plots and tabular form, the significant results from those tests. The results are presented as tabulations of aerodynamic data for all of the test points and as profiles of pressure, temperature, velocity, and normalized velocity and pressure for selected conditions. One of the main conclusions was that the measured flap surface temperatures were surprisingly low for both approach and takeoff flap settings.

  4. SOUTH WING, TRA661. WEST SIDE. CAMERA FACING EAST. COVERED STAIRWAY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SOUTH WING, TRA-661. WEST SIDE. CAMERA FACING EAST. COVERED STAIRWAY AND BUILDING END AT LEFT OF VIEW IS TRA-652, ANOTHER MTR OFFICE WING. WEST SIDE OF MTR HIGH BAY BEYOND. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD46-45-2. Mike Crane, Photographer, 4/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  5. The mean aerodynamic chord and the aerodynamic center of a tapered wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diehl, Walter S

    1942-01-01

    A preliminary study of pitching-moment data on tapered wings indicated that excellent agreement with test data was obtained by locating the quarter-chord point of the average chord on the average quarter-chord point of the semispan. The study was therefore extended to include most of the available data on tapered-wing models tested by the NACA.

  6. MTR WING A, TRA604. SOUTH SIDE, LARGELY HIDDEN BY TEMPORARY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR WING A, TRA-604. SOUTH SIDE, LARGELY HIDDEN BY TEMPORARY STORAGE STRUCTURE. CAMERA FACING NORTHWEST. EAST SIDE OF TRA-661, MTR SOUTH WING IS AT LEFT OF VIEW. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD47-44-4. Mike Crane, Photographer, 4/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  7. SOUTH WING, MTR661, SOUTHWING EXTENSION OF MTR BUILDING. INTERIOR DETAIL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SOUTH WING, MTR-661, SOUTH-WING EXTENSION OF MTR BUILDING. INTERIOR DETAIL INSIDE LAB ROOM 130. CAMERA FACING NORTHEAST. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD46-7-1. Mike Crane, Photographer, 2/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  8. MTR WING A, TRA604, INTERIOR, MAIN FLOOR. DETAIL VIEW OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR WING A, TRA-604, INTERIOR, MAIN FLOOR. DETAIL VIEW OF MACHINE SHOP AT SOUTHWEST CORNER OF WING. CAMERA FACING WEST TOWARDS WINDOW IN WEST WALL. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD46-31-1. Mike Crane, Photographer, 2/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  9. Aerodynamic characteristics of a high-wing transport configuration with a over-the-wing nacelle-pylon arrangement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, W. P.; Abeyounis, W. K.

    1985-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted in the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel to determine the effects on the aerodynamic characteristics of a high-wing transport configuration of installing an over-the-wing nacelle-pylon arrangement. The tests are conducted at Mach numbers from 0.70 to 0.82 and at angles of attack from -2 deg to 4 deg. The configurational variables under study include symmetrical and contoured nacelles and pylons, pylon size, and wing leading-edge extensions. The symmetrical nacelles and pylons reduce the lift coefficient, increase the drag coefficient, and cause a nose-up pitching-moment coefficient. The contoured nacelles significantly reduce the interference drag, though it is still excessive. Increasing the pylon size reduces the drag, whereas adding wing leading-edge extension does not affect the aerodynamic characteristics significantly.

  10. Aerodynamic performance and particle image velocimetery of piezo actuated biomimetic manduca sexta engineered wings towards the design and application of a flapping wing flight vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeLuca, Anthony M.

    Considerable research and investigation has been conducted on the aerodynamic performance, and the predominate flow physics of the Manduca Sexta size of biomimetically designed and fabricated wings as part of the AFIT FWMAV design project. Despite a burgeoning interest and research into the diverse field of flapping wing flight and biomimicry, the aerodynamics of flapping wing flight remains a nebulous field of science with considerable variance into the theoretical abstractions surrounding aerodynamic mechanisms responsible for aerial performance. Traditional FWMAV flight models assume a form of a quasi-steady approximation of wing aerodynamics based on an infinite wing blade element model (BEM). An accurate estimation of the lift, drag, and side force coefficients is a critical component of autonomous stability and control models. This research focused on two separate experimental avenues into the aerodynamics of AFIT's engineered hawkmoth wings|forces and flow visualization. 1. Six degree of freedom force balance testing, and high speed video analysis was conducted on 30°, 45°, and 60° angle stop wings. A novel, non-intrusive optical tracking algorithm was developed utilizing a combination of a Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM) and ComputerVision (OpenCV) tools to track the wing in motion from multiple cameras. A complete mapping of the wing's kinematic angles as a function of driving amplitude was performed. The stroke angle, elevation angle, and angle of attack were tabulated for all three wings at driving amplitudes ranging from A=0.3 to A=0.6. The wing kinematics together with the force balance data was used to develop several aerodynamic force coefficient models. A combined translational and rotational aerodynamic model predicted lift forces within 10%, and vertical forces within 6%. The total power consumption was calculated for each of the three wings, and a Figure of Merit was calculated for each wing as a general expression of the overall efficiency of

  11. Investigation of aerodynamic characteristics of subsonic wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejarnette, F. R.; Frink, N. T.

    1979-01-01

    An analytical strake design procedure is investigated. A numerical solution to the governing strake design equation is used to generate a series of strakes which are tested in a water tunnel to study their vortex breakdown characteristics. The strakes are scaled for use on a half-scale model of the NASA-LaRC general research fuselage with a 44 degrees trapezoidal wing. An analytical solution to the governing design equation is obtained. The strake design procedure relates the potential-flow leading-edge suction and pressure distributions to vortex stability. Several suction distributions are studied and those which are more triangular and peak near the tip generate strakes that reach higher angles of attack before vortex breakdown occurs at the wing trailing edge. For the same suction distribution, a conical rather than three dimensional pressure specification results in a better strake shape as judged from its vortex breakdown characteristics.

  12. Wing Shape Sensing from Measured Strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pak, Chan-Gi

    2015-01-01

    A new two step theory is investigated for predicting the deflection and slope of an entire structure using strain measurements at discrete locations. In the first step, a measured strain is fitted using a piecewise least squares curve fitting method together with the cubic spline technique. These fitted strains are integrated twice to obtain deflection data along the fibers. In the second step, computed deflection along the fibers are combined with a finite element model of the structure in order to extrapolate the deflection and slope of the entire structure through the use of System Equivalent Reduction and Expansion Process. The theory is first validated on a computational model, a cantilevered rectangular wing. It is then applied to test data from a cantilevered swept wing model.

  13. Advanced composites wing study program, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, S. T.; Michaelson, G. L.

    1978-01-01

    The study on utilization of advanced composites in commercial aircraft wing structures was conducted as a part of the NASA Aircraft Energy Efficiency Program to establish, by the mid-1980s, the technology for the design of a subsonic commercial transport aircraft leading to a 40% fuel savings. The study objective was to develop a plan to define the effort needed to support a production commitment for the extensive use of composite materials in wings of new generation aircraft that will enter service in the 1985-1990 time period. Identification and analysis of what was needed to meet the above plan requirements resulted in a program plan consisting of three key development areas: (1) technology development; (2) production capability development; and (3) integration and validation by designing, building, and testing major development hardware.

  14. Finite wing aerodynamics with simulated glaze ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khodadoust, A.; Bragg, M. B.; Kerho, M.; Wells, S.; Soltani, M. R.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of a simulated glaze ice accretion on the aerodynamic performance of a three-dimensional wing is studied experimentally. The model used for these tests was a semi-span wing of effective aspect ratio five, mounted from the sidewall of the UIUC subsonic wind tunnel. The model has an NACA 0012 airfoil section on a rectangular, untwisted planform with interchangeable leading edges to allow for testing both the baseline and the iced wing geometry. A three-component sidewall balance was used to measure lift, drag and pitching moment on the clean and iced model. A four-beam two-color fiberoptic laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) was used to map the flowfield along several spanwise cuts on the model. Preliminary results from LDV scans, which will be the bulk of this paper, are presented following the force balance measurement results. Initial comparison of LDV surveys compare favorably with inviscid theory results and 2D split hot-film measurements near the model surface.

  15. Effect of flap deflection on the lift coefficient of wings operating in a biplane configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stasiak, J.

    1977-01-01

    Biplane models with a lift flap were tested in a wind tunnel to study the effect of flap deflection on the aerodynamic coefficient of the biplane as well as of the individual wings. Optimization of the position flap was carried out, and the effect of changes in the chord length of the lower wing was determined for the aerodynamic structure of a biplane with a lift flap on the upper wing.

  16. The Effects of a Highly Cambered Low-Drag Wing and of Auxiliary Flaps on the High-Speed Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Twin-Engine Pursuit Airplane Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganzer, Victor M

    1944-01-01

    Results are presented for tests of two wings, an NACA 230-series wing and a highly-cambered NACA 66-series wing on a twin-engine pursuit airplane. Auxiliary control flaps were tested in combinations with each wing. Data showing comparison of high-speed aerodynamic characteristics of the model when equipped with each wing, the effect of the auxiliary control flaps on aerodynamic characteristics, and elevator effectiveness for the model with the 66-series wing are presented. High-speed aerodynamic characteristics of the model were improved with the 66-series wing.

  17. The development of an augmentor wing jet STOL research aircraft (modified C-8A). Volume 2: Analysis of contractor's flight test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skavdahl, H.; Patterson, D. H.

    1972-01-01

    The initial flight test phase of the modified C-8A airplane was conducted. The primary objective of the testing was to establish the basic airworthiness of the research vehicle. This included verification of the structural design and evaluation of the aircraft's systems. Only a minimum amount of performance testing was scheduled; this has been used to provide a preliminary indication of the airplane's performance and flight characteristics for future flight planning. The testing included flutter and loads investigations up to the maximum design speed. The operational characteristics of all systems were assessed including hydraulics, environmental control system, air ducts, the vectoring conical nozzles, and the stability augmentation system (SAS). Approaches to stall were made at three primary flap settings: up, 30 deg and 65 deg, but full stalls were not scheduled. Minimum control speeds and maneuver margins were checked. All takeoffs and landings were conventional, and STOL performance was not scheduled during this phase of the evaluation.

  18. Cyclic tests of P-bulb end-seal designs for a shuttle-type wing-elevon cove membrane seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, L. R.

    1979-01-01

    Four P-bulb end seal designs were tested at room temperature in a cyclic seal test apparatus. Test results show that all the P-bulb end seals have the durability required for a 100 mission life (neglecting possible elevated-temperature effects) and three of the four P-bulbs provide an adequate seal against a 7.0-kPa air pressure differential. Antifriction material attached to the P-bulb rub surface reduced friction slightly but could degrade the sealing effectiveness. A flat rub surface molded into the P-bulb discouraged wrinkling and rolling and thereby reduced leakage. However, the P-bulbs lacked resilience, as indicated by increased leakage when P-bulb compression was reduced. The best P-bulb design tested included an antifriction interface bonded to a flat surface molded into the P-bulb.

  19. Assembly modes of dragonfly wings.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hong-Xiao; Yin, Ya-Jun; Zhong, Zheng

    2011-12-01

    The assembly modes of dragonfly wings are observed through FEG-ESEM. Different from airplane wings, dragonfly wings are found to be assembled through smooth transition mode and global package mode. First, at the vein/membrane conjunctive site, the membrane is divided into upper and lower portions from the center layer and transited smoothly to the vein. Then the two portions pack the vein around and form the outer surface of the vein. Second, at the vein/spike conjunctive site, the vein and spike are connected smoothly into a triplet. Last, at the vein/membrane/spike conjunctive site, the membrane (i.e., the outer layer of the vein) transits smoothly to the spike, packs it around, and forms its outer layer. In short, the membrane looks like a closed coat packing the wing as a whole. The smooth transition mode and the global package mode are universal assembly modes in dragonfly wings. They provide us the references for better understanding of the functions of dragonfly wings and the bionic manufactures of the wings of flights with mini sizes.

  20. Aeroelastic and Flight Dynamics Analysis of Folding Wing Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ivan

    This dissertation explores the aeroelastic stability of a folding wing using both theoretical and experimental methods. The theoretical model is based on the existing clamped-wing aeroelastic model that uses beam theory structural dynamics and strip theory aerodynamics. A higher-fidelity theoretical model was created by adding several improvements to the existing model, namely a structural model that uses ANSYS for individual wing segment modes and an unsteady vortex lattice aerodynamic model. The comparison with the lower-fidelity model shows that the higher-fidelity model typical provides better agreement between theory and experiment, but the predicted system behavior in general does not change, reinforcing the effectiveness of the low-fidelity model for preliminary design of folding wings. The present work also conducted more detailed aeroelastic analyses of three-segment folding wings, and in particular considers the Lockheed-type configurations to understand the existence of sudden changes in predicted aeroelastic behavior with varying fold angle for certain configurations. These phenomena were observed in carefully conducted experiments, and nonlinearities---structural and geometry---were shown to suppress the phenomena. Next, new experimental models with better manufacturing tolerances are designed to be tested in the Duke University Wind Tunnel. The testing focused on various configurations of three-segment folding wings in order to obtain higher quality data. Next, the theoretical model was further improved by adding aircraft longitudinal degrees of freedom such that the aeroelastic model may predict the instabilities for the entire aircraft and not just a clamped wing. The theoretical results show that the flutter instabilities typically occur at a higher air speed due to greater frequency separation between modes for the aircraft system than a clamped wing system, but the divergence instabilities occur at a lower air speed. Lastly, additional

  1. Finite Span Wings in Compressible Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krasilschchikova, E A

    1956-01-01

    Equations are developed using the source distribution method for the velocity potential function and pressure on thin wings in steady and unsteady motion. Closed form solutions are given for harmonically oscillating wings of general plan form including the effect of the wing wake. Some useful examples are presented in an appendix for arrow, semielliptical, and hexagonal plan form wings.

  2. Overview of the ARPA/WL Smart Structures and Materials Development-Smart Wing contract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudva, Jayanth N.; Jardine, A. Peter; Martin, Christopher A.; Appa, Kari

    1996-05-01

    While the concept of an adaptive aircraft wing, i.e., a wing whose shape parameters such as camber, wing twist, and thickness can be varied to optimize the wing shape for various flight conditions, has been extensively studied, the complexity and weight penalty of the actuation mechanisms have precluded their practical implementation. Recent development of sensors and actuators using smart materials could potentially alleviate the shortcomings of prior designs, paving the way for a practical, `smart' adaptive wing which responds to changes in flight and environmental conditions by modifying its shape to provide optimal performance. This paper presents a summary of recent work done on adaptive wing designs under an on-going ARPA/WL contract entitled `Smart Structures and Materials Development--Smart Wing.' Specifically, the design, development and planned wind tunnel testing of a 16% model representative of a fighter aircraft wing and incorporating the following features, are discussed: (1) a composite wing torque box whose span-wise twist can be varied by activating built-in shape memory alloy (SMA) torque tubes to provide increased lift and enhanced maneuverability at multiple flight conditions, (2) trailing edge control surfaces deployed using composite SMA actuators to provide smooth, hingeless aerodynamic surfaces, and (3) a suite of fiber optic sensors integrated into the wing skin which provide real-time strain and pressure data to a feedback control system.

  3. Effect of outer wing separation on lift and thrust generation in a flapping wing system.

    PubMed

    Mahardika, Nanang; Viet, Nguyen Quoc; Park, Hoon Cheol

    2011-09-01

    We explore the implementation of wing feather separation and lead-lagging motion to a flapping wing. A biomimetic flapping wing system with separated outer wings is designed and demonstrated. The artificial wing feather separation is implemented in the biomimetic wing by dividing the wing into inner and outer wings. The features of flapping, lead-lagging, and outer wing separation of the flapping wing system are captured by a high-speed camera for evaluation. The performance of the flapping wing system with separated outer wings is compared to that of a flapping wing system with closed outer wings in terms of forward force and downward force production. For a low flapping frequency ranging from 2.47 to 3.90 Hz, the proposed biomimetic flapping wing system shows a higher thrust and lift generation capability as demonstrated by a series of experiments. For 1.6 V application (lower frequency operation), the flapping wing system with separated wings could generate about 56% higher forward force and about 61% less downward force compared to that with closed wings, which is enough to demonstrate larger thrust and lift production capability of the separated outer wings. The experiments show that the outer parts of the separated wings are able to deform, resulting in a smaller amount of drag production during the upstroke, while still producing relatively greater lift and thrust during the downstroke.

  4. Genotoxicity studies of organically grown broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica) and its interactions with urethane, methyl methanesulfonate and 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide genotoxicity in the wing spot test of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Heres-Pulido, María Eugenia; Dueñas-García, Irma; Castañeda-Partida, Laura; Santos-Cruz, Luis Felipe; Vega-Contreras, Viridiana; Rebollar-Vega, Rosa; Gómez-Luna, Juan Carlos; Durán-Díaz, Angel

    2010-01-01

    Broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica) has been defined as a cancer preventive food. Nevertheless, broccoli contains potentially genotoxic compounds as well. We performed the wing spot test of Drosophila melanogaster in treatments with organically grown broccoli (OGB) and co-treatments with the promutagen urethane (URE), the direct alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and the carcinogen 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4-NQO) in the standard (ST) and high bioactivation (HB) crosses with inducible and high levels of cytochrome P450s (CYPs), respectively. Larvae of both crosses were chronically fed with OGB or fresh market broccoli (FMB) as a non-organically grown control, added with solvents or mutagens solutions. In both crosses, the OGB added with Tween-ethanol yielded the expected reduction in the genotoxicity spontaneous rate. OGB co-treatments did not affect the URE effect, MMS showed synergy and 4-NQO damage was modulated in both crosses. In contrast, FMB controls produced damage increase; co-treatments modulated URE genotoxicity, diminished MMS damage, and did not change the 4-NQO damage. The high dietary consumption of both types of broccoli and its protective effects in D. melanogaster are discussed.

  5. STOL Characteristics of a Propeller-Driven, Aspect-Ratio-10, Straight-Wing Airplane with Boundary-Layer Control Flaps, as Estimated from Large-Scale Wind-Tunnel Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiberg, James A; Holzhauser, Curt A.

    1961-01-01

    A study is presented of the improvements in take-off and landing distances possible with a conventional propeller-driven transport-type airplane when the available lift is increased by propeller slipstream effects and by very effective trailing-edge flaps and ailerons. This study is based on wind-tunnel tests of a 45-foot span, powered model, with BLC on the trailing-edge flaps and controls. The data were applied to an assumed airplane with four propellers and a wing loading of 50 pounds per square foot. Also included is an examination of the stability and control problems that may result in the landing and take-off speed range of such a vehicle. The results indicated that the landing and take-off distances could be more than halved by the use of highly effective flaps in combination with large amounts of engine power to augment lift (STOL). At the lowest speeds considered (about 50 knots), adequate longitudinal stability was obtained but the lateral and directional stability were unsatisfactory. At these low speeds, the conventional aerodynamic control surfaces may not be able to cope with the forces and moments produced by symmetric, as well as asymmetric, engine operation. This problem was alleviated by BLC applied to the control surfaces.

  6. Conical Euler solution for a highly-swept delta wing undergoing wing-rock motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Elizabeth M.; Batina, John T.

    1990-01-01

    Modifications to an unsteady conical Euler code for the free-to-roll analysis of highly-swept delta wings are described. The modifications involve the addition of the rolling rigid-body equation of motion for its simultaneous time-integration with the governing flow equations. The flow solver utilized in the Euler code includes a multistage Runge-Kutta time-stepping scheme which uses a finite-volume spatial discretization on an unstructured mesh made up of triangles. Steady and unsteady results are presented for a 75 deg swept delta wing at a freestream Mach number of 1.2 and an angle of attack of 30 deg. The unsteady results consist of forced harmonic and free-to-roll calculations. The free-to-roll case exhibits a wing rock response produced by unsteady aerodynamics consistent with the aerodynamics of the forced harmonic results. Similarities are shown with a wing-rock time history from a low-speed wind tunnel test.

  7. Decanalization of wing development accompanied the evolution of large wings in high-altitude Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Lack, Justin B.; Monette, Matthew J.; Johanning, Evan J.; Sprengelmeyer, Quentin D.; Pool, John E.

    2016-01-01

    In higher organisms, the phenotypic impacts of potentially harmful or beneficial mutations are often modulated by complex developmental networks. Stabilizing selection may favor the evolution of developmental canalization—that is, robustness despite perturbation—to insulate development against environmental and genetic variability. In contrast, directional selection acts to alter the developmental process, possibly undermining the molecular mechanisms that buffer a trait’s development, but this scenario has not been shown in nature. Here, we examined the developmental consequences of size increase in highland Ethiopian Drosophila melanogaster. Ethiopian inbred strains exhibited much higher frequencies of wing abnormalities than lowland populations, consistent with an elevated susceptibility to the genetic perturbation of inbreeding. We then used mutagenesis to test whether Ethiopian wing development is, indeed, decanalized. Ethiopian strains were far more susceptible to this genetic disruption of development, yielding 26 times more novel wing abnormalities than lowland strains in F2 males. Wing size and developmental perturbability cosegregated in the offspring of between-population crosses, suggesting that genes conferring size differences had undermined developmental buffering mechanisms. Our findings represent the first observation, to our knowledge, of morphological evolution associated with decanalization in the same tissue, underscoring the sensitivity of development to adaptive change. PMID:26755605

  8. Time-varying wing-twist improves aerodynamic efficiency of forward flight in butterflies.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lingxiao; Hedrick, Tyson L; Mittal, Rajat

    2013-01-01

    Insect wings can undergo significant chordwise (camber) as well as spanwise (twist) deformation during flapping flight but the effect of these deformations is not well understood. The shape and size of butterfly wings leads to particularly large wing deformations, making them an ideal test case for investigation of these effects. Here we use computational models derived from experiments on free-flying butterflies to understand the effect of time-varying twist and camber on the aerodynamic performance of these insects. High-speed videogrammetry is used to capture the wing kinematics, including deformation, of a Painted Lady butterfly (Vanessa cardui) in untethered, forward flight. These experimental results are then analyzed computationally using a high-fidelity, three-dimensional, unsteady Navier-Stokes flow solver. For comparison to this case, a set of non-deforming, flat-plate wing (FPW) models of wing motion are synthesized and subjected to the same analysis along with a wing model that matches the time-varying wing-twist observed for the butterfly, but has no deformation in camber. The simulations show that the observed butterfly wing (OBW) outperforms all the flat-plate wings in terms of usable force production as well as the ratio of lift to power by at least 29% and 46%, respectively. This increase in efficiency of lift production is at least three-fold greater than reported for other insects. Interestingly, we also find that the twist-only-wing (TOW) model recovers much of the performance of the OBW, demonstrating that wing-twist, and not camber is key to forward flight in these insects. The implications of this on the design of flapping wing micro-aerial vehicles are discussed.

  9. Utilization of Optimization for Design of Morphing Wing Structures for Enhanced Flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detrick, Matthew Scott

    Conventional aircraft control surfaces constrain maneuverability. This work is a comprehensive study that looks at both smart material and conventional actuation methods to achieve wing twist to potentially improve flight capability using minimal actuation energy while allowing minimal wing deformation under aerodynamic loading. A continuous wing is used in order to reduce drag while allowing the aircraft to more closely approximate the wing deformation used by birds while loitering. The morphing wing for this work consists of a skin supported by an underlying truss structure whose goal is to achieve a given roll moment using less actuation energy than conventional control surfaces. A structural optimization code has been written in order to achieve minimal wing deformation under aerodynamic loading while allowing wing twist under actuation. The multi-objective cost function for the optimization consists of terms that ensure small deformation under aerodynamic loading, small change in airfoil shape during wing twist, a linear variation of wing twist along the length of the wing, small deviation from the desired wing twist, minimal number of truss members, minimal wing weight, and minimal actuation energy. Hydraulic cylinders and a two member linkage driven by a DC motor are tested separately to provide actuation. Since the goal of the current work is simply to provide a roll moment, only one actuator is implemented along the wing span. Optimization is also used to find the best location within the truss structure for the actuator. The active structure produced by optimization is then compared to simulated and experimental results from other researchers as well as characteristics of conventional aircraft.

  10. A Compilation of Static Stability and Fin Loads Data for Slender Body Missile Models with and without Tail Fins and Wings. Volume 3. Appendix F. Test Number 6

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-03-01

    BY 10 FUOT TRANSONIC WIND TUNNEL FACILITY PAGE 1 LF 3...MARTIN MISSILE TAILS EFFECTS DATA SHEET 1 UF 2 TEST PART MACh RXlO-b PHI CONF L...UfcLl UEL2 OELJ 0EL4 TRANSITION 6 1 0.85 1.7 0.0 U2W0F16 0.0 0

  11. Aerodynamic characteristics of a propulsive wing-canard concept at STOL speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, V. R.

    1985-01-01

    A full span model of a wing/canard concept representing a fighter configuration has been tested at STOL conditions in the NASA Langley 4 x 7 meter tunnel. The results of this test are presented, and comparisons are made to previous data of the same configuration tested as a semispan model. The potential of the propulsive wing/canard to develop very high lift coefficients was investigated with several nozzle spans (nozzle aspect ratios). Although longitudinal trim was not accomplished with the blowing distributions and configurations tested, the propulsive wing/canard appears to offer an approach to managing the large negative pitching moments associated with trailing edge flap blowing. Also presented are data showing the effects of large flap deflections and relative wing/canard positions. Presented in the appendix to the report are limited lateral-directional and ground effects data, as well as wing downwash measurements.

  12. F-16XL ship #1 - CAWAP boundary layer rakes and hot film on left wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This photo shows the boundary layer hot film and the boundary layer rakes on the left wing of NASA's single-seat F-16XL (ship #1) used for the Cranked-Arrow Wing Aerodynamic Project (CAWAP) at Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The modified airplane features a delta 'cranked-arrow' wing with strips of tubing along the leading edge to the trailing edge to sense static on the wing and obtain pressure distribution data. The right wing receives data on pressure distribution and the left wing has three types of instrumentation - preston tubes to measure local skin friction, boundary layer rakes to measure boundary layer profiles (the layer where the air interacts with the surfaces of a moving aircraft), and hot films to determine boundary layer transition locations. The first flight of CAWAP occurred on November 21, 1995, and the test program ended in April 1996.

  13. Development of direct-inverse 3-D methods for applied transonic aerodynamic wing design and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Leland A.

    1989-01-01

    An inverse wing design method was developed around an existing transonic wing analysis code. The original analysis code, TAWFIVE, has as its core the numerical potential flow solver, FLO30, developed by Jameson and Caughey. Features of the analysis code include a finite-volume formulation; wing and fuselage fitted, curvilinear grid mesh; and a viscous boundary layer correction that also accounts for viscous wake thickness and curvature. The development of the inverse methods as an extension of previous methods existing for design in Cartesian coordinates is presented. Results are shown for inviscid wing design cases in super-critical flow regimes. The test cases selected also demonstrate the versatility of the design method in designing an entire wing or discontinuous sections of a wing.

  14. Unsteady-Pressure and Dynamic-Deflection Measurements on an Aeroelastic Supercritical Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidel, David A.; Sandford, Maynard C.; Eckstrom, Clinton V.

    1991-01-01

    Transonic steady and unsteady pressure tests were conducted on a large elastic wing. The wing has a supercritical airfoil, a full span aspect ratio of 10.3, a leading edge sweepback angle of 28.8 degrees, and two inboard and one outboard trailing edge control surfaces. Only the outboard control surface was deflected statically and dynamically to generate steady and unsteady flow over the wing. The unsteady surface pressure and dynamic deflection measurements of this elastic wing are presented to permit correlations of the experimental data with theoretical predictions.

  15. Effect of leading-edge load constraints on the design and performance of supersonic wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darden, C. M.

    1985-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental investigation was conducted to assess the effect of leading-edge load constraints on supersonic wing design and performance. In the effort to delay flow separation and the formation of leading-edge vortices, two constrained, linear-theory optimization approaches were used to limit the loadings on the leading edge of a variable-sweep planform design. Experimental force and moment tests were made on two constrained camber wings, a flat uncambered wing, and an optimum design with no constraints. Results indicate that vortex strength and separation regions were mildest on the severely and moderately constrained wings.

  16. A direct-inverse transonic wing-design method in curvilinear coordinates including viscous-interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratcliff, Robert R.; Carlson, Leland A.

    1989-01-01

    Progress in the direct-inverse wing design method in curvilinear coordinates has been made. A spanwise oscillation problem and proposed remedies are discussed. Test cases are presented which reveal the approximate limits on the wing's aspect ratio and leading edge wing sweep angle for a successful design, and which show the significance of spanwise grid skewness, grid refinement, viscous interaction, the initial airfoil section and Mach number-pressure distribution compatibility on the final design. Furthermore, preliminary results are shown which indicate that it is feasible to successfully design a region of the wing which begins aft of the leading edge and terminates prior to the trailing edge.

  17. A flutter investigation of all-moveable NASP-like wings at hypersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spain, Charles V.; Zeiler, Thomas A.; Bullock, Ellen P.; Hodge, Jeffrey S.

    1993-01-01

    Six alternative all-moving wing configurations applicable to the NASP hypersonic/transatmospheric vehicle have undergone aeroelasticity testing in NASA-Langley's Mach-20-capable Helium Tunnel that yielded data for such parametric variations as airfoil profile and wing planform, wing-pivot flexure stiffness, and mass imbalance. While all wings fluttered at dynamic pressures lower than predicted by second-order piston-theory aerodynamics, this was of limited amplitude, suggesting nonlinear external-flow behavior. Slab airfoils were more stable than diamond-shaped ones; blunt leading edges enhance stability relative to sharp ones, and stiffer pivolts extert a stabilizing influence.

  18. Embedded Wing Propulsion Conceptual Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Hyun D.; Saunders, John D.

    2003-01-01

    As a part of distributed propulsion work under NASA's Revolutionary Aeropropulsion Concepts or RAC project, a new propulsion-airframe integrated vehicle concept called Embedded Wing Propulsion (EWP) is developed and examined through system and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) studies. The idea behind the concept is to fully integrate a propulsion system within a wing structure so that the aircraft takes full benefits of coupling of wing aerodynamics and the propulsion thrust stream. The objective of this study is to assess the feasibility of the EWP concept applied to large transport aircraft such as the Blended-Wing-Body aircraft. In this paper, some of early analysis and current status of the study are presented. In addition, other current activities of distributed propulsion under the RAC project are briefly discussed.

  19. Innovative Concept for a Heavy-Load Aircraft Utilizing a Two-Dimensional Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spearman, M. Leroy

    2007-01-01

    Heavy-load aircraft of conventional wing-body-tail design have become very large. Excessive size of such aircraft may present problems in the manufacturing process. In addition, large wing spans may cause some difficulties in ground handling. Increasing lift loads on large span cantilever wings will also increase the strength of the wing tip vortex. The concept presented herein proposes a means for substantially increasing the lift load capability of an aircraft without increasing the overall length and span of the configuration. The concept has a rectangular wing with a relatively low span and a large chord to provide the area required for high lift. Large fuselages are attached at each wing tip to provide the volume required for heavy loading. The fuselages serve as endplates for the wing and should preclude tip flow so that two-dimensional flow might be established on the wing. Elimination of the wing tip flow should prevent the formation of a tip vortex and eliminate the tip vortex hazard to trailing aircraft. Exploratory wind tunnel tests of such an aircraft concept have been conducted. Lessons learned from these tests are discussed herein in an effort to determine the validity of the concept.

  20. Modulation of leading edge vorticity and aerodynamic forces in flexible flapping wings.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liang; Deng, Xinyan; Sane, Sanjay P

    2011-09-01

    In diverse biological flight systems, the leading edge vortex has been implicated as a flow feature of key importance in the generation of flight forces. Unlike fixed wings, flapping wings can translate at higher angles of attack without stalling because their leading edge vorticity is more stable than the corresponding fixed wing case. Hence, the leading edge vorticity has often been suggested as the primary determinant of the high forces generated by flapping wings. To test this hypothesis, it is necessary to modulate the size and strength of the leading edge vorticity independently of the gross kinematics while simultaneously monitoring the forces generated by the wing. In a recent study, we observed that forces generated by wings with flexible trailing margins showed a direct dependence on the flexural stiffness of the wing. Based on that study, we hypothesized that trailing edge flexion directly influences leading edge vorticity, and thereby the magnitude of aerodynamic forces on the flexible flapping wings. To test this hypothesis, we visualized the flows on wings of varying flexural stiffness using a custom 2D digital particle image velocimetry system, while simultaneously monitoring the magnitude of the aerodynamic forces. Our data show that as flexion decreases, the magnitude of the leading edge vorticity increases and enhances aerodynamic forces, thus confirming that the leading edge vortex is indeed a key feature for aerodynamic force generation in flapping flight. The data shown here thus support the hypothesis that camber influences instantaneous aerodynamic forces through modulation of the leading edge vorticity.

  1. Oblique-wing supersonic aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. T. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An aircraft including a single fuselage having a main wing and a horizontal stabilizer airfoil pivotally attached at their centers to the fuselage is described. The pivotal attachments allow the airfoils to be yawed relative to the fuselage for high speed flight, and to be positioned at right angles with respect to the fuselage during takeoff, landing, and low speed flight. The main wing and the horizontal stabilizer are upwardly curved from their center pivotal connections towards their ends to form curvilinear dihedrals.

  2. The effect of phase angle and wing spacing on tandem flapping wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broering, Timothy M.; Lian, Yong-Sheng

    2012-12-01

    In a tandem wing configuration, the hindwing often operates in the wake of the forewing and, hence, its performance is affected by the vortices shed by the forewing. Changes in the phase angle between the flapping motions of the fore and the hind wings, as well as the spacing between them, can affect the resulting vortex/wing and vortex/vortex interactions. This study uses 2D numerical simulations to investigate how these changes affect the leading dege vortexes (LEV) generated by the hindwing and the resulting effect on the lift and thrust coefficients as well as the efficiencies. The tandem wing configuration was simulated using an incompressible Navier-Stokes solver at a chord-based Reynolds number of 5 000. A harmonic single frequency sinusoidal oscillation consisting of a combined pitch and plunge motion was used for the flapping wing kinematics at a Strouhal number of 0.3. Four different spacings ranging from 0.1 chords to 1 chord were tested at three different phase angles, 0°, 90° and 180°. It was found that changes in the spacing and phase angle affected the timing of the interaction between the vortex shed from the forewing and the hindwing. Such an interaction affects the LEV formation on the hindwing and results in changes in aerodynamic force production and efficiencies of the hindwing. It is also observed that changing the phase angle has a similar effect as changing the spacing. The results further show that at different spacings the peak force generation occurs at different phase angles, as do the peak efficiencies.

  3. Design integration and noise studies for jet STOL aircraft. Task 7C: Augmentor wing cruise blowing valveless system. Volume 1: Static testing of augmentor noise and performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, J. M.; Harkonen, D. L.; Okeefe, J. V.

    1973-01-01

    Static performance and acoustic tests were conducted on a two-dimensional one-third-scale augmentor flap model that simulated a cruise blowing augmentor system designed for a scale augmentor flap model that simulated a cruise blowing augmentor, which offers a degree of 150-passenger STOL airplane. The cruise blowing augmentor, which offers a degree of simplicity by requiring no fan air diverter valves, was simulated by fitting existing lobe suppressor nozzles with new nozzle fairings. Flow turning performance of the cruise blowing augmentor was measured through a large range of flap deflection angles. The noise suppression characteristics of a multilayer acoustic lining installed in the augmentor were also measured.

  4. Quiet Clean Short-haul Experimental Engine (QCSEE) Under-The-Wing (UTW) composite Nacelle test report. Volume 2: Acoustic performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stimpert, D. L.

    1979-01-01

    High bypass geared turbofan engines with nacelles forming the propulsion system for short-haul passenger aircraft were tested for use in externally blown flap-type aircraft. System noise levels for a four-engine, UTW-powered aircraft operating in the powered lift mode were calculated to be 97.2 and 95.7 EPNdB at takeoff and approach, respectively, on a 152.4 m (500 ft) sideline compared to a goal of 95.0 EPNdB.

  5. Swept-Wing Ice Accretion Characterization and Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broeren, Andy P.; Potapczuk, Mark G.; Riley, James T.; Villedieu, Philippe; Moens, Frederic; Bragg, Michael B.

    2013-01-01

    NASA, FAA, ONERA, the University of Illinois and Boeing have embarked on a significant, collaborative research effort to address the technical challenges associated with icing on large-scale, three-dimensional swept wings. The overall goal is to improve the fidelity of experimental and computational simulation methods for swept-wing ice accretion formation and resulting aerodynamic effect. A seven-phase research effort has been designed that incorporates ice-accretion and aerodynamic experiments and computational simulations. As the baseline, full-scale, swept-wing-reference geometry, this research will utilize the 65 percent scale Common Research Model configuration. Ice-accretion testing will be conducted in the NASA Icing Research Tunnel for three hybrid swept-wing models representing the 20, 64 and 83 percent semispan stations of the baseline-reference wing. Threedimensional measurement techniques are being developed and validated to document the experimental ice-accretion geometries. Artificial ice shapes of varying geometric fidelity will be developed for aerodynamic testing over a large Reynolds number range in the ONERA F1 pressurized wind tunnel and in a smaller-scale atmospheric wind tunnel. Concurrent research will be conducted to explore and further develop the use of computational simulation tools for ice accretion and aerodynamics on swept wings. The combined results of this research effort will result in an improved understanding of the ice formation and aerodynamic effects on swept wings. The purpose of this paper is to describe this research effort in more detail and report on the current results and status to date.

  6. Swept-Wing Ice Accretion Characterization and Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broeren, Andy P.; Potapczuk, Mark G.; Riley, James T.; Villedieu, Philippe; Moens, Frederic; Bragg, Michael B.

    2013-01-01

    NASA, FAA, ONERA, the University of Illinois and Boeing have embarked on a significant, collaborative research effort to address the technical challenges associated with icing on large-scale, three-dimensional swept wings. The overall goal is to improve the fidelity of experimental and computational simulation methods for swept-wing ice accretion formation and resulting aerodynamic effect. A seven-phase research effort has been designed that incorporates ice-accretion and aerodynamic experiments and computational simulations. As the baseline, full-scale, swept-wing-reference geometry, this research will utilize the 65% scale Common Research Model configuration. Ice-accretion testing will be conducted in the NASA Icing Research Tunnel for three hybrid swept-wing models representing the 20%, 64% and 83% semispan stations of the baseline-reference wing. Three-dimensional measurement techniques are being developed and validated to document the experimental ice-accretion geometries. Artificial ice shapes of varying geometric fidelity will be developed for aerodynamic testing over a large Reynolds number range in the ONERA F1 pressurized wind tunnel and in a smaller-scale atmospheric wind tunnel. Concurrent research will be conducted to explore and further develop the use of computational simulation tools for ice accretion and aerodynamics on swept wings. The combined results of this research effort will result in an improved understanding of the ice formation and aerodynamic effects on swept wings. The purpose of this paper is to describe this research effort in more detail and report on the current results and status to date. 1

  7. Fan and wing force data from wind tunnel investigation of a 0.38 meter (15 inch) diameter VTOL model lift fan installed in a two dimensional wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuska, J. A.; Diedrich, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    Test data are presented for a 38-cm (15-in.) diameter, 1.28 pressure ratio model VTOL lift fan installed in a two-dimensional wing and tested in a 2.74-by 4.58-meter (9-by 15-ft)V/STOL wind tunnel. Tests were run with and without exit louvers over a wide range of crossflow velocities and wing angle of attack. Tests were also performed with annular-inlet vanes, inlet bell-mouth surface disconuities, and fences to induce fan windmilling. Data are presented on the axial force of the fan assembly and overall wing forces and moments as measured on force balances for various static and crossflow test conditions. Midspan wing surface pressure coefficient data are also given.

  8. Factors affecting the sticking of insects on modified aircraft wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yi, O.; Chan, R.; Eiss, N. S.; Pingali, U.; Wightman, J. P.

    1988-01-01

    The adhesion of insects to aircraft wings is studied. Insects were collected in road tests in past studies and a large experimental error was introduced caused by the variability of insect flux. The presence of such errors has been detected by studying the insect distribution across an aluminum-strip covered half-cylinder mounted on the top of a car. After a nonuniform insect distribution (insect flux) was found from three road tests, a new arrangement of samples was developed. The feasibility of coating aircraft wing surfaces with polymers to reduce the number of insects sticking onto the surfaces was studied using fluorocarbon elastomers, styrene butadiene rubbers, and Teflon.

  9. Effect of a simulated engine jet blowing above an arrow wing at Mach 2.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shrout, B. L.; Hayes, C.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of a gas jet simulating a turbojet engine exhaust blowing above a cambered and twisted arrow wing were investigated. Tests were conducted in the Langley 4-foot supersonic pressure tunnel at a Mach number of 2.0. Nozzle pressure ratios from 1 to 64 were tested with both helium and air used as jet gases. The tests were conducted at angles of attack from -2 deg to 8 deg at a Reynolds number of 9,840,000 per meter. Only the forces and moments on the wing were measured. Results of the investigation indicated that the jet blowing over the wing caused reductions in maximum lift-drag ratio of about 4 percent for helium and 6 percent for air at their respective design nozzle pressure ratios, relative to jet-off data. Moderate changes in the longitudinal, vertical, or angular positions of the jet relative to the wing had little effect on the wing aerodynamic characteristics.

  10. Close-Range Photogrammetric Measurement of Static Deflections for an Aeroelastic Supercritical Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrdsong, Thomas A.; Adams, Richard R.; Sandford, Maynard C.

    1990-01-01

    Close range photogrammetric measurements were made for the lower wing surface of a full span aspect ratio 10.3 aeroelastic supercritical research wing. The measurements were made during wind tunnel tests for quasi-steady pressure distributions on the wing. The tests were conducted in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel at Mach numbers up to 0.90 and dynamic pressures up to 300 pounds per square foot. Deflection data were obtained for 57 locations on the wing lower surface using dual non-metric cameras. Representative data are presented as graphical overview to show variations and trends of spar deflection with test variables. Comparative data are presented for photogrammetric and cathetometric results of measurements for the wing tip deflections. A tabulation of the basic measurements is presented in a supplement to this report.

  11. Development of a Low-Order Model of an X-Wing Aircraft by System Identification.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-02-01

    The original purpose of this contract was to prepare a flight test plan for the proposed X-wing demonstrator using system identification to extract...demonstration of the feasibility of using system identification techniques to extract low-order math models from time history data from a detailed X-wing rotor simulation (REXOR).

  12. Effects of air breathing engine plumes on SSV orbiter subsonic wing pressure distribution, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soard, T.

    1974-01-01

    Data presented were obtained during wind tunnel tests of a 0.0405-scale model of the -89B ferry configuration of the space shuttle vehicle orbiter. These tests were conducted in the Rockwell International low speed wind tunnel (NAAL). The primary test objective was to investigate orbiter wing pressure distributions resulting from nacelle plumes above and below the wing. Three six-engine nacelle configurations were tested. One configuration has a twin-podded nacelle mounted above each wing and the others had one mounted below each wing. Both had a centerline twin-podded nacelle mounted below the wing. Wing pressure distribution was determined by locating static pressure bugs on the upper and lower surfaces of the left wing. Pressure bugs were also located on the upper and lower surfaces of the body flap and on the B12 afterbody fairing when it was installed. Base and balance cavity pressures were recorded and a strain gage instrumented beam in the right wing measured elevon hinge moments and normal forces.

  13. Quiet Clean Short-haul Experimental Engine (QCSEE) Over The Wing (OTW) design report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and testing of two experimental high bypass geared turbofan engines and propulsion systems for short haul passenger aircraft are described. The propulsion technology required for future externally blown flap aircraft with engines located both under the wing and over the wing is demonstrated. Composite structures and digital engine controls are among the topics included.

  14. Wing Twist Measurements at the National Transonic Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burner, Alpheus W.; Wahls, Richard A.; Goad, William K.

    1996-01-01

    A technique for measuring wing twist currently in use at the National Transonic Facility is described. The technique is based upon a single camera photogrammetric determination of two dimensional coordinates with a fixed (and known) third dimensional coordinate. The wing twist is found from a conformal transformation between wind-on and wind-off 2-D coordinates in the plane of rotation. The advantages and limitations of the technique as well as the rationale for selection of this particular technique are discussed. Examples are presented to illustrate run-to-run and test-to-test repeatability of the technique in air mode. Examples of wing twist in cryogenic nitrogen mode are also presented.

  15. Pressure and force data for a flat wing and a warped conical wing having a shockless recompression at Mach 1.62

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, D. S.; Landrum, E. J.; Townsend, J. C.; Mason, W. H.

    1981-01-01

    A conical nonlinear flow computer code was used to design a warped (cambered) wing which would produce a supercritical expansion and shockless recompression of the crossflow at a lift coefficient of 0.457, an angle of attack of 10 deg, and a Mach number of 1.62. This cambered wing and a flat wing the same thickness distribution were tested over a range of Mach numbers from 1.6 to 2.0. For both models the forward 60 percent is purely conical geometry. Results obtained with the cambered wing demonstrated the design features of a supercritical expansion and a shockless recompression, whereas results obtained with the flat wing indicated the presence of crossflow shocks. Tables of experimental pressure, force, and moment data are included, as well as selected oil flow photographs.

  16. Some observations of separated flow on finite wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winkelmann, A. E.; Ngo, H. T.; De Seife, R. C.

    1982-01-01

    Wind tunnel test results for aspects of flow over airfoils exhibiting single and multiple trailing edge stall 'mushroom' cells are reported. Rectangular wings with aspect ratios of 4.0 and 9.0 were tested at Reynolds numbers of 480,000 and 257,000, respectively. Surface flow patterns were visualized by means of a fluorescent oil flow technique, separated flow was observed with a tuft wand and a water probe, spanwise flow was studied with hot-wire anemometry, smoke flow and an Ar laser illuminated the centerplane flow, and photographs were made of the oil flow patterns. Swirl patterns on partially and fully stalled wings suggested vortex flow attachments in those regions, and a saddle point on the fully stalled AR=4.0 wing indicated a secondary vortex flow at the forward region of the separation bubble. The separation wake decayed downstream, while the tip vortex interacted with the separation bubble on the fully stalled wing. Three mushroom cells were observed on the AR=9.0 wing.

  17. Recent Loads Calibration Experience With a Delta Wing Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Jerald M.; Kuhl, Albert E.

    1977-01-01

    Aircraft which are designed for supersonic and hypersonic flight are evolving with delta wing configurations. An integral part of the evolution of all new aircraft is the flight test phase. Included in the flight test phase is an effort to identify and evaluate the loads environment of the aircraft. The most effective way of examining the loads environment is to utilize calibrated strain gages to provide load magnitudes. Using strain gage data to accomplish this has turned out to be anything but a straightforward task. The delta wing configuration has turned out to be a very difficult type of wing structure to calibrate. Elevated structural temperatures result in thermal effects which contaminate strain gage data being used to deduce flight loads. The concept of thermally calibrating a strain gage system is an approach to solving this problem. This paper will address how these problems were approached on a program directed toward measuring loads on the wing of a large, flexible supersonic aircraft. Structural configurations typical of high-speed delta wing aircraft will be examined. The temperature environment will be examined to see how it induces thermal stresses which subsequently cause errors in loads equations used to deduce the flight loads.

  18. Vortex wake alleviation studies with a variable twist wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holbrook, G. T.; Dunham, D. M.; Greene, G. C.

    1985-01-01

    Vortex wake alleviation studies were conducted in a wind tunnel and a water towing tank using a multisegmented wing model which provided controlled and measured variations in span load. Fourteen model configurations are tested at a Reynolds number of one million and a lift coefficient of 0.6 in the Langley 4- by 7-Meter Tunnel and the Hydronautics Ship Model Basin water tank at Hydronautics, Inc., Laurel, Md. Detailed measurements of span load and wake velocities at one semispan downstream correlate well with each other, with inviscid predictions of span load and wake roll up, and with peak trailing-wing rolling moments measured in the far wake. Average trailing-wing rolling moments are found to be an unreliable indicator of vortex wake intensity because vortex meander does not scale between test facilities and free-air conditions. A tapered-span-load configuration, which exhibits little or no drag penalty, is shown to offer significant downstream wake alleviation to a small trailing wing. The greater downstream wake alleviation achieved with the addition of spoilers to a flapped-wing configuration is shown to result directly from the high incremental drag and turbulence associated with the spoilers and not from the span load alteration they cause.

  19. Laminar flow control perforated wing panel development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischler, J. E.

    1986-01-01

    Many structural concepts for a wing leading edge laminar flow control hybrid panel were analytically investigated. After many small, medium, and large tests, the selected design was verified. New analytic methods were developed to combine porous titanium sheet bonded to a substructure of fiberglass and carbon/epoxy cloth. At -65 and +160 F test conditions, the critical bond of the porous titanium to the composite failed at lower than anticipated test loads. New cure cycles, design improvements, and test improvements significantly improved the strength and reduced the deflections from thermal and lateral loadings. The wave tolerance limits for turbulence were not exceeded. Consideration of the beam column midbay deflections from the combinations of the axial and lateral loadings and thermal bowing at -65 F, room temperature, and +160 F were included. Many lap shear tests were performed at several cure cycles. Results indicate that sufficient verification was obtained to fabricate a demonstration vehicle.

  20. Pulsed eddy current inspection of CF-188 inner wing spar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horan, Peter Francis

    Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) CF-188 Hornet aircraft engineering authorities have stated a requirement for a Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) technique to detect Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) in the inner wing spars without fastener or composite wing skin removal. Current radiographic inspections involve significant aircraft downtime, and Pulsed Eddy Current (PEC) inspection is proposed as a solution. The aluminum inner wing spars of CF-188 Hornet aircraft may undergo stress corrosion cracking (SCC) along the spar between the fasteners that secure carbon-fiber/ epoxy composite skin to the wing. Inspection of the spar through the wing skin is required to avoid wing disassembly. The thickness of the wing skin varies between 8 and 20 mm (0.3 to 0.8 inch) and fasteners may be either titanium or ferrous. PEC generated by a probe centered over a fastener, demonstrates capability of detecting simulated cracks within spars with the wing skin present. Comparison of signals from separate sensors, mounted to either side of the excitation coil, is used to detect differences in induced eddy current fields, which arise in the presence of cracks. To overcome variability in PEC signal response due to variation in 1) skin thickness, 2) fastener material and size, and 3) centering over fasteners, a large calibration data set is acquired. Multi-dimensional scores from a Modified Principal Components Analysis (PCA) of the data are reduced to one dimension (1D) using a Discriminant Analysis method. Under inspection conditions, calibrated PCA scores combined with discriminant analysis permit rapid real time go/no-go PEC detection of cracks in CF-188 inner wing spar. Probe designs using both pickup coils and Giant Magnetoresistive (GMR) sensors were tested on samples with the same ferrous and titanium fasteners found on the CF-188. Flaws were correctly detected at lift-offs of up to 21mm utilizing a variety of insulating skin materials simulating the carbon-fibre reinforced polymer