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Sample records for aerothermal performance constraint

  1. Aerothermal Performance Constraints for Hypervelocity Small Radius Unswept Leading Edges and Nosetips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolodziej, Paul

    1997-01-01

    Small radius leading edges and nosetips were utilized to minimize wave drag in early hypervelocity vehicle concepts until further analysis demonstrated that extreme aerothermodynamic heating would cause severe ablation or blunting of the available thermal protection system materials. Recent studies indicate that ultrahigh temperature ceramic (UHTC) materials are shape stable at temperatures approaching 3033 K and will be available for use as sharp UHTC leading edge components in the near future. Aerothermal performance constraints for sharp components made from these materials are presented in this work to demonstrate the effects of convective blocking, surface catalycity, surface emissivity, and rarefied flow effects on steady state operation at altitudes from sea level to 90 km. These components are capable of steady state operation at velocities up to 7.9 km/s at attitudes near 90 km.

  2. Aerothermal Performance Constraints for Small Radius Leading Edges Operating at Hypervelocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolodziej, Paul; Bull, Jeffrey D.; Milos, Frank S.; Squire, Thomas H.

    1997-01-01

    Small radius leading edges and nosetips were used to minimize wave drag in early hypervelocity vehicle concepts until further analysis demonstrated that extreme aerothermodynamic heating blunted the available thermal protection system materials. Recent studies indicate that ultra-high temperature composite (UHTC) materials are shape stable at temperatures approaching 3033 K and will be available for use as sharp leading edge components in the near future. Steady-state aerothermal performance constraints for UHTC components are presented in this paper to identify their non-ablating operational capability at altitudes from sea level to 90 km. An integrated design tool was developed to estimate these constraints. The tool couples aerothermodynamic heating with material response using commercial finite element analysis software and is capable of both steady-state and transient analysis. Performance during entry is analyzed by transient thermal analysis along the trajectory. The thermal load condition from the transient thermal analysis is used to estimate thermal stress. Applying the tool to UHTC materials shows that steady-state, non-ablating operation of a HfB2/SiC(A-7) (A-7) component is possible at velocities approaching Earth's circular orbital velocity of 7.9 km/s at altitudes approaching 70 km.

  3. Performance of Conformable Ablators in Aerothermal Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, J.; Fan, W.; Skokova, K.; Stackpoole, M.; Beck, R.; Chavez-Garcia, J.

    2012-01-01

    Conformable Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator, a cousin of Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA), was developed at NASA Ames Research Center as a lightweight thermal protection system under the Fundamental Aeronautics Program. PICA is made using a brittle carbon substrate, which has a very low strain to failure. Conformable PICA is made using a flexible carbon substrate, a felt in this case. The flexible felt significantly increases the strain to failure of the ablator. PICA is limited by its thermal mechanical properties. Future NASA missions will require heatshields that are more fracture resistant than PICA and, as a result, NASA Ames is working to improve PICAs performance by developing conformable PICA to meet these needs. Research efforts include tailoring the chemistry of conformable PICA with varying amounts of additives to enhance mechanical properties and testing them in aerothermal environments. This poster shows the performance of conformable PICA variants in arc jets tests. Some mechanical and thermal properties will also be presented.

  4. Performance of Conformable Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator in Aerothermal Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, Jeremy; Fan, Wendy; Stackpoole, Mairead; Kao, David; Skokova, Kristina; Chavez-Garcia, Jose

    2012-01-01

    Conformable Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator, a cousin of Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA), was developed at NASA Ames Research Center as a lightweight thermal protection system under the Fundamental Aeronautics Program. PICA is made using a brittle carbon substrate, which has a very low strain to failure. Conformable PICA is made using a flexible carbon substrate, a felt in this case. The flexible felt significantly increases the strain to failure of the ablator. PICA is limited by its thermal mechanical properties. Future NASA missions will require heatshields that are more fracture resistant than PICA and, as a result, NASA Ames is working to improve PICA's performance by developing conformable PICA to meet these needs. Research efforts include tailoring the chemistry of conformable PICA with varying amounts of additives to enhance mechanical properties and testing them in aerothermal environments. This poster shows the performance of conformable PICA variants in arc jets tests. Some mechanical and thermal properties will also be presented.

  5. Aerothermal and structural performance of a cobalt-base superalloy thermal protection system at Mach 6.6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawyer, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    A flightweight, metallic thermal protection system (TPS) applicable to reentry and hypersonic vehicles was subjected to multiple cycles of both radiant and aerothermal heating in order to evaluate its aerothermal performance and structural integrity. Good structural integrity and thermal performance were demonstrated by the TPS under both a radiant and aerothermal heating environment typical of a shuttle entry. The shingle-slip joints effectively allowed for thermal expansion of the panel without allowing any appreciable hot gas flow into the TPS cavity. The TPS also demonstrated good structural ruggedness.

  6. Aerothermal performance and damage tolerance of a Rene 41 metallic standoff thermal protection system at Mach 6.7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avery, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    A flight-weight, metallic thermal protection system (TPS) model applicable to Earth-entry and hypersonic-cruise vehicles was subjected to multiple cycles of both radiant and aerothermal heating in order to evaluate its aerothermal performance, structural integrity, and damage tolerance. The TPS was designed for a maximum operating temperature of 2060 R and featured a shingled, corrugation-stiffened corrugated-skin heat shield of Rene 41, a nickel-base alloy. The model was subjected to 10 radiant heating tests and to 3 radiant preheat/aerothermal tests. Under radiant-heating conditions with a maximum surface temperature of 2050 R, the TPS performed as designed and limited the primary structure away from the support ribs to temperatures below 780 R. During the first attempt at aerothermal exposure, a failure in the panel-holder test fixture severely damaged the model. However, two radiant preheat/aerothermal tests were made with the damaged model to test its damage tolerance. During these tests, the damaged area did not enlarge; however, the rapidly increasing structural temperature measuring during these tests indicates that had the damaged area been exposed to aerodynamic heating for the entire trajectory, an aluminum burn-through would have occurred.

  7. Aerothermal Performance Envelopes for Hypersonic Small Radius Unswept Leading Edges and Nosetips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolodziej, Paul; Rasky, Daniel J. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Small radius leading edges and nosetips were utilized to minimize wave drag in early hypersonic vehicle concepts until further analysis demonstrated that extreme aerothermodynamic heating would cause severe ablation or blunting of the available thermal protection system materials. Recent studies indicate that diboride composite materials are shape stable under extreme aerothermodynamic heating at ultra high temperatures. Aerothermal performance envelopes for sharp components made from these materials are presented in this work to demonstrate the effects of convective blocking, surface catalycity, surface emissivity, and rarefied flow effects on steady state operation at altitudes from sea level to 90 km. These components are capable of steady state operation at velocities up to 7.9 km/s at altitudes near 90 km.

  8. Turbine Aerothermal Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-01

    AFRL-RZ-WP-TM-2012-0192 TURBINE AEROTHERMAL RESEARCH Rolf Sondergaard, Shichuan Ou, and Richard Rivir Turbomachinery Branch Turbine...SONDERGAARD CHARLES W. STEVENS Project Engineer Branch Chief Turbomachinery Branch Turbomachinery Branch Turbine Engine Division Turbine Engine...WORK UNIT NUMBER Q0EE 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION Turbomachinery Branch (AFRL/RQTT

  9. Acoustic and Aerothermal Performance Test of the Axisymmetric Coannular Ejector Nozzle. Volume 2; Acoustic Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herkes, William

    2000-01-01

    Acoustic and propulsion performance testing of a model-scale Axisymmetric Coannular Ejector nozzle was conducted in the Boeing Low-speed Aeroacoustic Facility. This nozzle is a plug nozzle with an ejector design to provide aspiration of about 20% of the engine flow. A variety of mixing enhancers were designed to promote mixing of the engine and the aspirated flows. These included delta tabs, tone-injection rods, and wheeler ramps. This report addresses the acoustic aspects of the testing. The spectral characteristics of the various configurations of the nozzle are examined on a model-scale basis. This includes indentifying particular noise sources contributing to the spectra and the data are projected to full-scale flyover conditions to evaluate the effectiveness of the nozzle, and of the various mixing enhancers, on reducing the Effective Perceived Noise Levels.

  10. Aerothermal modeling. Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenworthy, M. K.; Correa, S. M.; Burrus, D. L.

    1983-01-01

    One of the significant ways in which the performance level of aircraft turbine engines has been improved is by the use of advanced materials and cooling concepts that allow a significant increase in turbine inlet temperature level, with attendant thermodynamic cycle benefits. Further cycle improvements have been achieved with higher pressure ratio compressors. The higher turbine inlet temperatures and compressor pressure ratios with corresponding higher temperature cooling air has created a very hostile environment for the hot section components. To provide the technology needed to reduce the hot section maintenance costs, NASA has initiated the Hot Section Technology (HOST) program. One key element of this overall program is the Aerothermal Modeling Program. The overall objective of his program is to evolve and validate improved analysis methods for use in the design of aircraft turbine engine combustors. The use of such combustor analysis capabilities can be expected to provide significant improvement in the life and durability characteristics of both combustor and turbine components.

  11. Aero-thermal performances of leakage flows injection from the endwall slot in linear cascade of high-pressure turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghopa, Wan Aizon W.; Harun, Zambri; Funazaki, Ken-ichi; Miura, Takemitsu

    2015-02-01

    The existence of a gap between combustor and turbine endwall in the real gas turbine induces to the leakages phenomenon. However, the leakages could be used as a coolant to protect the endwall surfaces from the hot gas since it could not be completely prevented. Thus, present study investigated the potential of leakage flows as a function of film cooling. In present study, the flow field at the downstream of high-pressure turbine blade has been investigated by 5-holes pitot tube. This is to reveal the aerodynamic performances under the influenced of leakage flows while the temperature measurement was conducted by thermochromic liquid crystal (TLC). Experimental has significantly captured theaerodynamics effect of leakage flows near the blade downstream. Furthermore, TLC measurement illustrated that the film cooling effectiveness contours were strongly influenced by the secondary flows behavior on the endwall region. Aero-thermal results were validated by the numerical simulation adopted by commercial software, ANSYS CFX 13. Both experimental and numerical simulation indicated almost similar trendinaero and also thermal behavior as the amount of leakage flows increases.

  12. Transient aero-thermal simulations for TMT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogiatzis, Konstantinos

    2014-08-01

    Aero-thermal simulations are an integral part of the design process for the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT). These simulations utilize Computational Solid-Fluid Dynamics (CSFD) to estimate wind jitter and blur, dome and mirror seeing, telescope pointing error due to thermal drift, and to predict thermal effects on performance of components such as the primary mirror segments. Design guidance obtained from these simulations is provided to the Telescope, Enclosure, Facilities and Adaptive Optics groups. Computational advances allow for model enhancements and inclusion of phenomena not previously resolved, such as transient effects on wind loading and thermal seeing due to vent operation while observing or long exposure effects, with potentially different flow patterns corresponding to the beginning and end of observation. Accurate knowledge of the Observatory aero-thermal environment will result in developing reliable look-up tables for effective open loop correction of key active optics system elements, and cost efficient operation of the Observatory.

  13. Aerothermal modeling program, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, R.; Reynolds, R.; Ball, I.; Berry, R.; Johnson, K.; Mongia, H.

    1983-01-01

    Aerothermal submodels used in analytical combustor models are analyzed. The models described include turbulence and scalar transport, gaseous full combustion, spray evaporation/combustion, soot formation and oxidation, and radiation. The computational scheme is discussed in relation to boundary conditions and convergence criteria. Also presented is the data base for benchmark quality test cases and an analysis of simple flows.

  14. Aero-thermal modeling framework for TMT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogiatzis, Konstantinos

    2011-09-01

    The Performance Error Budget of the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) suggests that nearly one third of the total image degradation is due to aero-thermal disturbances (mirror and dome seeing, dynamic wind loading and thermal deformations of the optics, telescope structure and enclosure). An update of the current status of aero-thermal modeling and Computational Fluid-Solid Dynamics (CFSD) simulations for TMT is presented. A fast three-dimensional transient conduction-convection-radiation bulk-air-volume model has also been developed for the enclosure and selected telescope components in order to track the temperature variations of the surfaces, structure and interstitial air over a period of three years using measured environmental conditions. It is used for Observatory Heat Budget analysis and also provides estimates of thermal boundary conditions required by the CFD/FEA models and guidance to the design. Detailed transient CFSD conjugate heat transfer simulations of the mirror support assemblies determine the direction of heat flow from important heat sources and provide guidance to the design. Finally, improved CFD modeling is used to calculate wind forces and temperature fields. Wind loading simulations are demonstrated through TMT aperture deflector forcing. Temperature fields are transformed into refractive index ones and the resulting Optical Path Differences (OPDs) are fed into an updated thermal seeing model to estimate seeing performance metrics. Keck II simulations are the demonstrator for the latter type of modeling.

  15. Aerothermal Considerations for Entry, Descent, and Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Chun

    2015-01-01

    Aerothermal modeling is inherently entwined with TPS design. Aerothermal, radiation, and TPS material response are coupled so it's important to check modeling assumptions. Validation of numerical models using ground and flight tests is important to quantify uncertainties. A margin policy based on statistical methods may provide greater insight in the key drivers and overall reliability of the design

  16. Aero-Thermal Calibration of the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel (2012 Test)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pastor-Barsi, Christine M.; Arrington, E. Allen; VanZante, Judith Foss

    2012-01-01

    A major modification of the refrigeration plant and heat exchanger at the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) occurred in autumn of 2011. It is standard practice at NASA Glenn to perform a full aero-thermal calibration of the test section of a wind tunnel facility upon completion of major modifications. This paper will discuss the tools and techniques used to complete an aero-thermal calibration of the IRT and the results that were acquired. The goal of this test entry was to complete a flow quality survey and aero-thermal calibration measurements in the test section of the IRT. Test hardware that was used includes the 2D Resistive Temperature Detector (RTD) array, 9-ft pressure survey rake, hot wire survey rake, and the quick check survey rake. This test hardware provides a map of the velocity, Mach number, total and static pressure, total temperature, flow angle and turbulence intensity. The data acquired were then reduced to examine pressure, temperature, velocity, flow angle, and turbulence intensity. Reduced data has been evaluated to assess how the facility meets flow quality goals. No icing conditions were tested as part of the aero-thermal calibration. However, the effects of the spray bar air injections on the flow quality and aero-thermal calibration measurements were examined as part of this calibration.

  17. Aerothermal Heating Predictions for Mars Microprobe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitcheltree, R. A.; DiFulvio, M.; Horvath, T. J.; Braun, R. D.

    1998-01-01

    A combination of computational predictions and experimental measurements of the aerothermal heating expected on the two Mars Microprobes during their entry to Mars are presented. The maximum, non-ablating, heating rate at the vehicle's stagnation point (at alpha = 0 degrees) is predicted for an undershoot trajectory to be 194 Watts per square centimeters with associated stagnation point pressure of 0.064 atm. Maximum stagnation point pressure occurs later during the undershoot trajectory and is 0.094 atm. From computations at seven overshoot-trajectory points, the maximum heat load expected at the stagnation point is near 8800 Joules per square centimeter. Heat rates and heat loads on the vehicle's afterbody are much lower than the forebody. At zero degree angle-of-attack, heating over much of the hemi-spherical afterbody is predicted to be less than 2 percent of the stagnation point value. Good qualitative agreement is demonstrated for forebody and afterbody heating between CFD calculations at Mars entry conditions and experimental thermographic phosphor measurements from the Langley 20-Inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel. A novel approach which incorporates six degree-of-freedom trajectory simulations to perform a statistical estimate of the effect of angle-of-attack, and other off-nominal conditions, on heating is included.

  18. Development of a Sheathed Miniature Aerothermal Reentry Thermocouple for Thermal Protection System Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Edward R.; Weber, Carissa Tudryn; Oishi, Tomo; Santos, Jose; Mach, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    The Sheathed Miniature Aerothermal Reentry Thermocouple is a micro-miniature thermocouple for high temperature measurement in extreme environments. It is available for use in Thermal Protection System materials for ground testing and flight. This paper discusses the heritage, and design of the instrument. Experimental and analytical methods used to verify its performance and limitations are described.

  19. Turbulence Models for Accurate Aerothermal Prediction in Hypersonic Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiang-Hong; Wu, Yi-Zao; Wang, Jiang-Feng

    Accurate description of the aerodynamic and aerothermal environment is crucial to the integrated design and optimization for high performance hypersonic vehicles. In the simulation of aerothermal environment, the effect of viscosity is crucial. The turbulence modeling remains a major source of uncertainty in the computational prediction of aerodynamic forces and heating. In this paper, three turbulent models were studied: the one-equation eddy viscosity transport model of Spalart-Allmaras, the Wilcox k-ω model and the Menter SST model. For the k-ω model and SST model, the compressibility correction, press dilatation and low Reynolds number correction were considered. The influence of these corrections for flow properties were discussed by comparing with the results without corrections. In this paper the emphasis is on the assessment and evaluation of the turbulence models in prediction of heat transfer as applied to a range of hypersonic flows with comparison to experimental data. This will enable establishing factor of safety for the design of thermal protection systems of hypersonic vehicle.

  20. EFT-1 Heatshield Aerothermal Environment Reconstruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliver, A. Brandon; Amar, Adam J.; Droba, Justin; Lessard, Victor; Mahzari, Milad

    2016-01-01

    The EFT-1 Avcoat heatshield was instrumented with 34 plugs containing multiple thermocouples in-depth with an objective being to measure the flight aerothermal environment. This paper presents a discussion of the instrumentation and the techniques used to reconstruct the heating environment from the measured in-depth temperatures. The inverse heat transfer problem algorithms, models and assumptions will be outlined, and available results will be presented.

  1. Exploration Flight Test 1 Afterbody Aerothermal Environment Reconstruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyatt, Andrew J.; Oliver, Brandon; Amar, Adam; Lessard, Victor

    2016-01-01

    The Exploration Flight Test 1 vehicle included roughly 100 near surface thermocouples on the after body of the vehicle. The temperature traces at each of these instruments have been used to perform inverse environment reconstruction to determine the aerothermal environment experienced during re-entry of the vehicle. This paper provides an overview of the reconstructed environments and identifies critical aspects of the environment. These critical aspects include transition and reaction control system jet influence. A blind test of the process and reconstruction tool was also performed to build confidence in the reconstructed environments. Finally, an uncertainty quantification analysis was also performed to identify the impact of each of the uncertainties on the reconstructed environments.

  2. Statistical Methods for Rapid Aerothermal Analysis and Design Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Carolyn; DePriest, Douglas; Thompson, Richard (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The cost and safety goals for NASA's next generation of reusable launch vehicle (RLV) will require that rapid high-fidelity aerothermodynamic design tools be used early in the design cycle. To meet these requirements, it is desirable to establish statistical models that quantify and improve the accuracy, extend the applicability, and enable combined analyses using existing prediction tools. The research work was focused on establishing the suitable mathematical/statistical models for these purposes. It is anticipated that the resulting models can be incorporated into a software tool to provide rapid, variable-fidelity, aerothermal environments to predict heating along an arbitrary trajectory. This work will support development of an integrated design tool to perform automated thermal protection system (TPS) sizing and material selection.

  3. Performance constraints and compensation for teleoperation with delay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclaughlin, J. S.; Staunton, B. D.

    1989-01-01

    A classical control perspective is used to characterize performance constraints and evaluate compensation techniques for teleoperation with delay. Use of control concepts such as open and closed loop performance, stability, and bandwidth yield insight to the delay problem. Teleoperator performance constraints are viewed as an open loop time delay lag and as a delay-induced closed loop bandwidth constraint. These constraints are illustrated with a simple analytical tracking example which is corroborated by a real time, 'man-in-the-loop' tracking experiment. The experiment also provides insight to those controller characteristics which are unique to a human operator. Predictive displays and feedforward commands are shown to provide open loop compensation for delay lag. Low pass filtering of telemetry or feedback signals is interpreted as closed loop compensation used to maintain a sufficiently low bandwidth for stability. A new closed loop compensation approach is proposed that uses a reactive (or force feedback) hand controller to restrict system bandwidth by impeding operator inputs.

  4. Aerothermal modeling program, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, R.; Reynolds, R.; Ball, I.; Berry, R.; Johnson, K.; Mongia, H.

    1983-01-01

    The combustor performance submodels for complex flows are evaluated. The benchmark test cases for complex nonswirling flows are identified and analyzed. The introduction of swirl into the flow creates much faster mixing, caused by radial pressure gradients and increase in turbulence generation. These phenomena are more difficult to predict than the effects due to geometrical streamline curvatures, like the curved duct, and sudden expansion. Flow fields with swirl, both confined and unconfined are studied. The role of the dilution zone to achieve the turbine inlet radial profile plays an important part, therefore temperature field measurements were made in several idealized dilution zone configurations.

  5. Aerothermal Test of Metallic TPS for X-33 Reusable Launch Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawyer, James Wayne; Hodge, Jefferson; Moore, Brad

    1998-01-01

    An array of metallic Thermal Protection System (TPS) panels including the seals developed for the windward surface of the X-33 vehicle is being tested in the Eight Foot High Temperature Tunnel at the NASA Langley Research Center. These tests are the first aerothermal tests of an X-33 TPS array and will be used to validate the TPS for the X-33 flight program. Specifically, the tests will be used to evaluate the structural and thermal performance of the TPS, the effectiveness of the high temperature seals between adjacent tiles and the durability of the TPS under realistic aerothermal flight conditions. The effect of varying step heights, damage to the seals between adjacent panels, and the use of secondary seals will also be investigated during the test program. The metallic TPS developed for the windward surface of the X-33 and the test program in the Eight Foot High Temperature Tunnel is presented and discussed.

  6. Constraints influencing sports wheelchair propulsion performance and injury risk

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The Paralympic Games are the pinnacle of sport for many athletes with a disability. A potential issue for many wheelchair athletes is how to train hard to maximise performance while also reducing the risk of injuries, particularly to the shoulder due to the accumulation of stress placed on this joint during activities of daily living, training and competition. The overall purpose of this narrative review was to use the constraints-led approach of dynamical systems theory to examine how various constraints acting upon the wheelchair-user interface may alter hand rim wheelchair performance during sporting activities, and to a lesser extent, their injury risk. As we found no studies involving Paralympic athletes that have directly utilised the dynamical systems approach to interpret their data, we have used this approach to select some potential constraints and discussed how they may alter wheelchair performance and/or injury risk. Organism constraints examined included player classifications, wheelchair setup, training and intrinsic injury risk factors. Task constraints examined the influence of velocity and types of locomotion (court sports vs racing) in wheelchair propulsion, while environmental constraints focused on forces that tend to oppose motion such as friction and surface inclination. Finally, the ecological validity of the research studies assessing wheelchair propulsion was critiqued prior to recommendations for practice and future research being given. PMID:23557065

  7. Performance Constraints in Early Language: The Case of Subjectless Sentences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerken, LouAnn

    A discussion of English-speaking children's use of subjectless sentences contrasts the competence and performance explanations for the phenomenon. In particular, it reviews evidence indicating that the phenomenon does not reflect linguistic competence, but rather performance constraints. A tentative model of children's production is presented…

  8. Aerodynamic and Aerothermal TPS Instrumentation Reference Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woollard, Bryce A.; Braun, Robert D.; Bose, Deepack

    2016-01-01

    The hypersonic regime of planetary entry combines the most severe environments that an entry vehicle will encounter with the greatest amount of uncertainty as to the events unfolding during that time period. This combination generally leads to conservatism in the design of an entry vehicle, specifically that of the thermal protection system (TPS). Each planetary entry provides a valuable aerodynamic and aerothermal testing opportunity; the utilization of this opportunity is paramount in better understanding how a specific entry vehicle responds to the demands of the hypersonic entry environment. Previous efforts have been made to instrument entry vehicles in order to collect data during the entry period and reconstruct the corresponding vehicle response. The purpose of this paper is to cumulatively document past TPS instrumentation designs for applicable planetary missions, as well as to list pertinent results and any explainable shortcomings.

  9. Application of CFD to aerothermal heating problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macaraeg, M. G.

    1986-01-01

    Numerical solutions of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations by an alternating direction implicit scheme, applied to two experimental investigations are presented. The first is cooling by injection of a gas jet through the nose of an ogive-cone, and the second is the aerothermal environment in the gap formed by the wing and elevon section of a test model of the space shuttle. The simulations demonstrate that accurate pressure calculations are easily obtained on a coarse grid, while convergence is obtained after the residual reduces by four orders of magnitude. Accurate heating rates, however, require a fine grid solution, with convergence requiring at least a reduction of six orders of magnitude in the residual. The effect of artificial dissipation on numerical results is also assessed.

  10. Adaptive computational methods for aerothermal heating analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, John M.; Oden, J. Tinsley

    1988-01-01

    The development of adaptive gridding techniques for finite-element analysis of fluid dynamics equations is described. The developmental work was done with the Euler equations with concentration on shock and inviscid flow field capturing. Ultimately this methodology is to be applied to a viscous analysis for the purpose of predicting accurate aerothermal loads on complex shapes subjected to high speed flow environments. The development of local error estimate strategies as a basis for refinement strategies is discussed, as well as the refinement strategies themselves. The application of the strategies to triangular elements and a finite-element flux-corrected-transport numerical scheme are presented. The implementation of these strategies in the GIM/PAGE code for 2-D and 3-D applications is documented and demonstrated.

  11. Shuttle Return-to-Flight IH-108 Aerothermal Test at CUBRC - Flow Field Calibration and CFD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, Kei Y.; Holden, Michael

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses one specific aspect of the Shuttle Retrun-To-Flight IH-108 Aerothermal Test at CUBRC, the test flow field calibration. It showed the versatility of the CUBRC LENS II wind tunnel for an aerothermal test with unique and demanding requirements. CFD analyses were used effectively to extend the test range at the low end of the Mach range. It demonstrated how ground test facility and CFD synergy can be utilitzed iteratively to enhance the confidence in the fedility of both tools. It addressed the lingering concerns of the aerothermal community on use of inpulse facility and CFD analysis. At the conclusion of the test program, members from the NASA Marshall (MSFC), CUBRC and USA (United Space Alliance) Consultants (The Grey Beards) were asked to independently verify the flight scaling data generated by Boeing for flight certification of the re-designed external tank (ET) components. The blind test comparison showed very good results. A more comprehensive discussion of the topics in this paper can be found in Chapter 6 of Reference [1]. The overall aspect of the test program has been discussed in an AIAA paper by Tim Wadhams [2]. The Shuttle Ascent Stack performance and related issues discussed in the Report [1] are not included in this paper. No ITAR data is included in this paper.

  12. The Efficacy of Multidimensional Constraint Keys in Database Query Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardwell, Leslie K.

    2012-01-01

    This work is intended to introduce a database design method to resolve the two-dimensional complexities inherent in the relational data model and its resulting performance challenges through abstract multidimensional constructs. A multidimensional constraint is derived and utilized to implement an indexed Multidimensional Key (MK) to abstract a…

  13. On the precision of aero-thermal simulations for TMT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogiatzis, Konstantinos; Thompson, Hugh

    2016-08-01

    Environmental effects on the Image Quality (IQ) of the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) are estimated by aero-thermal numerical simulations. These simulations utilize Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to estimate, among others, thermal (dome and mirror) seeing as well as wind jitter and blur. As the design matures, guidance obtained from these numerical experiments can influence significant cost-performance trade-offs and even component survivability. The stochastic nature of environmental conditions results in the generation of a large computational solution matrix in order to statistically predict Observatory Performance. Moreover, the relative contribution of selected key subcomponents to IQ increases the parameter space and thus computational cost, while dictating a reduced prediction error bar. The current study presents the strategy followed to minimize prediction time and computational resources, the subsequent physical and numerical limitations and finally the approach to mitigate the issues experienced. In particular, the paper describes a mesh-independence study, the effect of interpolation of CFD results on the TMT IQ metric, and an analysis of the sensitivity of IQ to certain important heat sources and geometric features.

  14. Spacecraft Orbital Debris Reentry: Aerothermal Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rochelle, Wm. C.; Kinsey, Robin E.; Reid, Ethan A.; Reynolds, Robert C.; Johnson, Nicholas L.

    1997-01-01

    In the past 40 years, thousands of objects have been placed in Earth orbit and are being tracked. Space hardware reentry survivability must be evaluated to assess risks to human life and property on the ground. The objective of this paper is to present results of a study to determine altitude of demise (burn-up) or survivability of reentering objects. Two NASA/JSC computer codes - Object Reentry Survival Analysis Tool (ORSAT) and Miniature ORSAT (MORSAT) were used to determine trajectories, aerodynamic aerothermal environment, and thermal response of selected spacecraft components. The methodology of the two codes is presented, along with results of a parametric study of reentering objects modeled as spheres and cylinders. Parameters varied included mass, diameter, wall thickness, ballistic coefficient, length, type of material, and mode of tumbling/spinning. Two fragments of a spent Delta second stage undergoing orbital decay, stainless steel cylindrical propellant tank and titanium pressurization sphere, were evaluated with ORSAT and found to survive entry, as did the actual objects. Also, orbital decay reentry predictions of the Japanese Advanced Earth Observing Satellite (ADEOS) aluminum and nickel box-type components and the Russian COSMOS 954 satellite beryllium cylinders were made with MORSAT. These objects were also shown to survive reentry.

  15. Overview of CFD methods and comparison with flight aerothermal data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, Kenneth; Zoby, Ernest V.; Hamilton, H. Harris

    1988-01-01

    An overview of previously published aerothermal investigations which demonstrate the capabilities of detailed computational fluid dynamics and engineering codes to predict the aerothermal environment about an entry vehicle is presented. The overview consists of a brief discussion of the computational methods and experimental data and includes comparisons between the computed results and data. The overview focuses primarily on analyses of flight data since these data provide the unique capability to assess the real-gas chemistry options in the codes. The computed results are based on a series of codes which are employed by the Aerothermodynamics Branch of the Space System Division at the Langley Research Center. The flight data, which were measured on the Reentry F, the Space Shuttle, and the Fire II vehicles, represent a wide range of vehicle configurations and freestream conditions. Also, results of one recent set of ground tests are included since the tests provide data on a model of a pending flight project. The comparisons of the predicted results and data demonstrate the adequacy of the present computational fluid dynamics capabilities and indicate the potential to predict the aerothermal environment about future flight vehicles.

  16. SDI performance and START constraints: Modeling Phase-1 defense engagements

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, C.

    1991-03-20

    My interest has been the performance of near-term Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) systems rather than the kinds of questions discussed at this Workshop (e.g., implications of US force structure). It is clear, though, that the two issues are closely related. Arms control along with treaties that impact the force structure of the Soviet Union will greatly affect the performance of SDI systems. Similarly, the US intention to pursue SDI will be a driver in arms control negotiations, as well it should be. Indeed, the implications of SDI for Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (START)-constrained Soviet forces are the focus of my discussion. To put this in some context, I will begin with the premises underlying my results: the United States and the Soviet Union reach an arms control agreement limiting strategic forces below current levels. The United States decides to pursue defense deployments to limit damage to the US and, eventually, to provide robust protection against ballistic missile attack. The Soviet Union responds by improving its forces within the numerical bounds of the treaty. My basic calculations are: Under START and in the absence of defenses, the offenses has sufficient weapons to attack 10,000 targets with strong value contrast. START constraints are severely limiting against an adaptive preferential defense, even with adaptive targeting. The adaptive preferential defense may contain a random-subtractive SBI tier. PBV redesign alone is insufficient to stress the SBI. Offload penalties to defeat endoatmospheric interceptors appear significant. Despite increased flexibility to modernize, a small attacking force is vulnerable to a small defense. 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Orbital flight test Shuttle External Tank flowfield and aerothermal analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Praharaj, S. C.; Foster, L. D.

    1984-01-01

    This paper discusses the evaluation of aerothermal flight measurements made on the orbital flight test Space Shuttle External Tanks (ET). These ETs were instrumented to measure various quantities during flight including heat transfer, pressure and structural temperature. The flight data were reduced and analyzed against math models established from an extensive wind tunnel data base and empirical heat-transfer relationships. This analysis has supported the validity of the current aeroheating methodology and existing data base, but has also identified some problem areas which require methodology modifications.

  18. Post-flight Analysis of Mars Science Laboratory Entry Aerothermal Environment and Thermal Protection System Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Todd Richard; Mahazari, Milad; Bose, Deepak; Santos, Jose Antonio

    2013-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory successfully landed on the Martian surface on August 5th, 2012. The rover was protected from the extreme heating environments of atmospheric entry by an ablative heatshield. This Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator heatshield was instrumented with a suite of embedded thermocouples, isotherm sensors, and pressure transducers. The sensors monitored the in-depth ablator response, as well as the surface pressure at discrete locations throughout the hypersonic deceleration. This paper presents a comparison of the flight data with post-entry estimates. An assessment of the aerothermal environments, as well as the in-depth response of the heatshield material is made, and conclusions regarding the overall performance of the ablator at the suite locations are presented.

  19. Post-Flight Aerodynamic and Aerothermal Model Validation of a Supersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Chun; Muppidi, Suman; Bose, Deepak; Van Norman, John W.; Tanimoto, Rebekah; Clark, Ian

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Low Density Supersonic Decelerator Program is developing new technologies that will enable the landing of heavier payloads in low density environments, such as Mars. A recent flight experiment conducted high above the Hawaiian Islands has demonstrated the performance of several decelerator technologies. In particular, the deployment of the Robotic class Supersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (SIAD-R) was highly successful, and valuable data were collected during the test flight. This paper outlines the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis used to estimate the aerodynamic and aerothermal characteristics of the SIAD-R. Pre-flight and post-flight predictions are compared with the flight data, and a very good agreement in aerodynamic force and moment coefficients is observed between the CFD solutions and the reconstructed flight data.

  20. Methodology for the Assessment of 3D Conduction Effects in an Aerothermal Wind Tunnel Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliver, Anthony Brandon

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews a method for the assessment of three-dimensional conduction effects during test in a Aerothermal Wind Tunnel. The test objectives were to duplicate and extend tests that were performed during the 1960's on thermal conduction on proturberance on a flat plate. Slides review the 1D versus 3D conduction data reduction error, the analysis process, CFD-based analysis, loose coupling method that simulates a wind tunnel test run, verification of the CFD solution, Grid convergence, Mach number trend, size trends, and a Sumary of the CFD conduction analysis. Other slides show comparisons to pretest CFD at Mach 1.5 and 2.16 and the geometries of the models and grids.

  1. Assessment, development, and application of combustor aerothermal models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdeman, J. D.; Mongia, H. C.; Mularz, E. J.

    1988-01-01

    The gas turbine combustion system design and development effort is an engineering exercise to obtain an acceptable solution to the conflicting design trade-offs between combustion efficiency, gaseous emissions, smoke, ignition, restart, lean blowout, burner exit temperature quality, structural durability, and life cycle cost. For many years, these combustor design trade-offs have been carried out with the help of fundamental reasoning and extensive component and bench testing, backed by empirical and experience correlations. Recent advances in the capability of computational fluid dynamcis codes have led to their application to complex 3-D flows such as those in the gas turbine combustor. A number of U.S. Government and industry sponsored programs have made significant contributions to the formulation, development, and verification of an analytical combustor design methodology which will better define the aerothermal loads in a combustor, and be a valuable tool for design of future combustion systems. The contributions made by NASA Hot Section Technology (HOST) sponsored Aerothermal Modeling and supporting programs are described.

  2. Assessment, development, and application of combustor aerothermal models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdeman, J. D.; Mongia, H. C.; Mularz, E. J.

    1989-01-01

    The gas turbine combustion system design and development effort is an engineering exercise to obtain an acceptable solution to the conflicting design trade-offs between combustion efficiency, gaseous emissions, smoke, ignition, restart, lean blowout, burner exit temperature quality, structural durability, and life cycle cost. For many years, these combustor design trade-offs have been carried out with the help of fundamental reasoning and extensive component and bench testing, backed by empirical and experience correlations. Recent advances in the capability of computational fluid dynamics codes have led to their application to complex 3-D flows such as those in the gas turbine combustor. A number of U.S. Government and industry sponsored programs have made significant contributions to the formulation, development, and verification of an analytical combustor design methodology which will better define the aerothermal loads in a combustor, and be a valuable tool for design of future combustion systems. The contributions made by NASA Hot Section Technology (HOST) sponsored Aerothermal Modeling and supporting programs are described.

  3. A Review of Aerothermal Modeling for Mars Entry Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Michael J; Tang, Chun Y.; Edquist, Karl T.; Hollis, Brian R.; Krasa, Paul

    2009-01-01

    The current status of aerothermal analysis for Mars entry missions is reviewed. The aeroheating environment of all Mars missions to date has been dominated by convective heating. Two primary uncertainties in our ability to predict forebody convective heating are turbulence on a blunt lifting cone and surface catalysis in a predominantly CO2 environment. Future missions, particularly crewed vehicles, will encounter additional heating from shock-layer radiation due to a combination of larger size and faster entry velocity. Localized heating due to penetrations or other singularities on the aeroshell must also be taken into account. The physical models employed to predict these phenomena are reviewed, and key uncertainties or deficiencies inherent in these models are explored. Capabilities of existing ground test facilities to support aeroheating validation are also summarized. Engineering flight data from the Viking and Pathfinder missions, which may be useful for aerothermal model validation, are discussed, and an argument is presented for obtaining additional flight data. Examples are taken from past, present, and future Mars entry missions, including the twin Mars Exploration Rovers and the Mars Science Laboratory, scheduled for launch by NASA in 2011.

  4. Assessment, development and application of combustor aerothermal models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdeman, J. D.; Mongia, H. C.; Mularz, E. J.

    1988-01-01

    The gas turbine combustion system design and development effort is an engineering exercise to obtain an acceptable solution to the conflicting design trade-offs between combustion efficiency, gaseous emissions, smoke, ignition, restart, lean blowout, burner exit temperature quality, structural durability, and life cycle cost. For many years, these combustor design trade-offs have been carried out with the help of fundamental reasoning and extensive component and bench testing, backed by empirical and experience correlations. Recent advances in the capability of computational fluid dynamics codes have led to their application to complex 3-D flows such as those in the gas turbine combustor. A number of U.S. Government and industry sponsored programs have made significant contributions to the formulation, development, and verification of an analytical combustor design methodology which will better define the aerothermal loads in a combustor, and be a valuable tool for design of future combustion systems. The contributions made by NASA Hot Section Technology (HOST) sponsored Aerothermal Modeling and supporting programs are described.

  5. Aerothermal experiments in turbine rim seals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittman, Lionel Obadiah, Jr.

    Purge flows are necessary for ensuring that hot gasses do not penetrate the thermally sensitive rim seal and disk cavity regions of turbines. The temperature and mass flow rate of the purge air can affect the component life and aerodynamic performance of a turbine stage. Therefore it is of interest to understand the basic mechanisms that govern this complex flow problem. The present work focuses on two turbine rim seal investigations. The first focused on temperature measurements in the rim cavity region of a rotating, high-speed, low-pressure turbine as means to quantify a rim seal's effectiveness. The seal had a realistic geometry with a small axial overlap between the stationary and rotating components. The purge flow rate was varied from 0 to 1 percent of the core mass flow rate. The results will describe the temperatures as well as the seal's effectiveness as a function of the purge flow rate, and turbine operating point. The second was a study on the effect of purge flow on the aerodynamic performance of a turbine stage. Exit flow field surveys were taken in both a low pressure turbine stage and a high pressure turbine stage. Also a computational study was done on the low pressure turbine stage to add insight into the effect of purge flow on turbine stage performance. In addition, the computation results provide insight into the effect of purge flow on the low pressure turbine blade passage flow field.

  6. Aerothermal Testing of Woven TPS Ablative Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stackpoole, Mairead; Feldman, Jay; Olson, Michael; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj

    2012-01-01

    Woven Thermal Protection Systems (WTPS) is a new TPS concept that is funded by NASAs Office of the Chief Technologist (OCT) Game Changing Division. The WTPS project demonstrates the potential for manufacturing a variety of TPS materials capable of wide ranging performances demanded by a spectrum of solar system exploration missions. Currently, missions anticipated to encounter heat fluxes in the range of 1500 4000 Watts per square centimeter are limited to using one proven material fully dense Carbon Phenolic. However, fully dense carbon phenolic is only mass efficient at heat fluxes greater than 4000 Watts per square centimeter, and current mission designs suffer this mass inefficiency for lack of an alternative mid-density TPS. WTPS not only bridges this gap but also offers a replacement for carbon phenolic, which itself requires a significant and costly redevelopment effort to re-establish its capability for use in the high heat flux missions recently prioritized in the NRC Decadal survey, including probe missions to Venus, Saturn and Neptune. This poster will summarize some recent arc jet testing to evaluate the performance of WTPS. Both mid density and fully dense WTPS test results will be presented and results compared to heritage carbon phenolic where applicable.

  7. Gender performativity in physics: affordances or only constraints?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danielsson, Anna T.; Lundin, Mattias

    2014-06-01

    In this forum we engage in a dialogue with Allison Gonsalves's paper `"Physics and the girly girl—there is a contradiction somewhere": Doctoral students' positioning around discourses of gender and competence in physics'. In her paper Gonsalves uses a sociocultural approach to examine women doctoral students' stories about becoming physicists. In doing so her paper focuses on how discourses of masculinity and femininity can create available and unavailable positions for the women students. In this dialogue we do a parallel reading of two of the student narratives presented by Gonsalves, using Judith Butler's (1990) concept of discursive agency as a means to more explicitly bring the affordances for women identity constitution offered by their localized physicist context to the fore, rather focusing on its, often more visible, constraints.

  8. Aero-Thermal Calibration of the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel (2012 Tests)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pastor-Barsi, Christine; Allen, Arrington E.

    2013-01-01

    A full aero-thermal calibration of the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) was completed in 2012 following the major modifications to the facility that included replacement of the refrigeration plant and heat exchanger. The calibration test provided data used to fully document the aero-thermal flow quality in the IRT test section and to construct calibration curves for the operation of the IRT.

  9. Effect of Task Constraint on Reaching Performance in Children with Spastic Diplegic Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ju, Yun-Huei; You, Jia-Yuan; Cherng, Rong-Ju

    2010-01-01

    The purposes of the study were to examine the effect of task constraint on the reaching performance in children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP) and to examine the correlations between the reaching performance and postural control. Eight children with CP and 16 typically developing (TD) children participated in the study. They performed a…

  10. Do evolutionary constraints on thermal performance manifest at different organizational scales?

    PubMed

    Phillips, B L; Llewelyn, J; Hatcher, A; Macdonald, S; Moritz, C

    2014-12-01

    The two foremost hypotheses on the evolutionary constraints on an organism's thermal sensitivity—the hotter-is-better expectation, and the specialist-generalist trade-off—have received mixed support from empirical studies testing for their existence. Could these conflicting results reflect confusion regarding the organizational level (i.e. species > population > individual) at which these constraints should manifest? We propose that these evolutionary constraints should manifest at different organizational levels because of differences in their underlying causes and requirements. The hotter-is-better expectation should only manifest across separate evolutionary units (e.g. species, populations), and not within populations. The specialist-generalist trade-off, by contrast, should manifest within as well as between separate evolutionary units. We measured the thermal sensitivity of sprint performance for 440 rainforest sun skinks (Lampropholis coggeri) representing 10 populations, and used the resulting performance curves to test for evidence for the hypothesized constraints at two organizational levels: (i) across populations and (ii) within populations. As predicted, the hotter-is-better expectation was evident only at the across-population level, whereas the specialist-generalist trade-off was evident within, as well as across, populations. Our results suggest that, depending on the processes that drive them, evolutionary constraints can manifest at different organizational levels. Consideration of these underlying processes, and the organizational level at which a constraint should manifest, may help resolve conflicting empirical results.

  11. Aerothermal Ground Testing of Flexible Thermal Protection Systems for Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruce, Walter E., III; Mesick, Nathaniel J.; Ferlemann, Paul G.; Siemers, Paul M., III; DelCorso, Joseph A.; Hughes, Stephen J.; Tobin, Steven A.; Kardell, Matthew P.

    2012-01-01

    Flexible TPS development involves ground testing and analysis necessary to characterize performance of the FTPS candidates prior to flight testing. This paper provides an overview of the analysis and ground testing efforts performed over the last year at the NASA Langley Research Center and in the Boeing Large-Core Arc Tunnel (LCAT). In the LCAT test series, material layups were subjected to aerothermal loads commensurate with peak re-entry conditions enveloping a range of HIAD mission trajectories. The FTPS layups were tested over a heat flux range from 20 to 50 W/cm with associated surface pressures of 3 to 8 kPa. To support the testing effort a significant redesign of the existing shear (wedge) model holder from previous testing efforts was undertaken to develop a new test technique for supporting and evaluating the FTPS in the high-temperature, arc jet flow. Since the FTPS test samples typically experience a geometry change during testing, computational fluid dynamic (CFD) models of the arc jet flow field and test model were developed to support the testing effort. The CFD results were used to help determine the test conditions experienced by the test samples as the surface geometry changes. This paper includes an overview of the Boeing LCAT facility, the general approach for testing FTPS, CFD analysis methodology and results, model holder design and test methodology, and selected thermal results of several FTPS layups.

  12. Engineering Aerothermal Analysis for X-34 Thermal Protection System Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wurster, Kathryn E.; Riley, Christopher J.; Zoby, E. Vincent

    1998-01-01

    Design of the thermal protection system for any hypersonic flight vehicle requires determination of both the peak temperatures over the surface and the heating-rate history along the flight profile. In this paper, the process used to generate the aerothermal environments required for the X-34 Testbed Technology Demonstrator thermal protection system design is described as it has evolved from a relatively simplistic approach based on engineering methods applied to critical areas to one of detailed analyses over the entire vehicle. A brief description of the trajectory development leading to the selection of the thermal protection system design trajectory is included. Comparisons of engineering heating predictions with wind-tunnel test data and with results obtained using a Navier-Stokes flowfield code and an inviscid/boundary layer method are shown. Good agreement is demonstrated among all these methods for both the ground-test condition and the peak heating flight condition. Finally, the detailed analysis using engineering methods to interpolate the surface-heating-rate results from the inviscid/boundary layer method to predict the required thermal environments is described and results presented.

  13. Engineering Aerothermal Analysis for X-34 Thermal Protection System Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wurster, Kathryn E.; Riley, Christopher J.; Zoby, E. Vincent

    1998-01-01

    Design of the thermal protection system for any hypersonic flight vehicle requires determination of both the peak temperatures over the surface and the heating-rate history along the flight profile. In this paper, the process used to generate the aerothermal environments required for the X-34 Testbed Technology Demonstrator thermal protection system design is described as it has evolved from a relatively simplistic approach based on engineering methods applied to critical areas to one of detailed analyses over the entire vehicle. A brief description of the trajectory development leading to the selection of the thermal protection system design trajectory is included. Comparisons of engineering heating predictions with wind-tunnel test data and with results obtained using a Navier- Stokes flowfield code and an inviscid/boundary layer method are shown. Good agreement is demonstrated among all these methods for both the ground-test condition and the peak heating flight condition. Finally, the detailed analysis using engineering methods to interpolate the surface-heating-rate results from the inviscid/boundary layer method to predict the required thermal environments is described and results presented.

  14. Interaction between intention and environmental constraints on the fractal dynamics of human performance.

    PubMed

    Washburn, Auriel; Coey, Charles A; Romero, Veronica; Malone, MaryLauren; Richardson, Michael J

    2015-11-01

    The current study investigated whether the influence of available task constraints on power-law scaling might be moderated by a participant's task intention. Participants performed a simple rhythmic movement task with the intention of controlling either movement period or amplitude, either with or without an experimental stimulus designed to constrain period. In the absence of the stimulus, differences in intention did not produce any changes in power-law scaling. When the stimulus was present, however, a shift toward more random fluctuations occurred in the corresponding task dimension, regardless of participants' intentions. More importantly, participants' intentions interacted with available task constraints to produce an even greater shift toward random variation when the task dimension constrained by the stimulus was also the dimension the participant intended to control. Together, the results suggest that intentions serve to more tightly constrain behavior to existing environmental constraints, evidenced by changes in the fractal scaling of task performance.

  15. Aero-thermal analysis of lifting body configurations in hypersonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sachin; Mahulikar, Shripad P.

    2016-09-01

    The aero-thermal analysis of a hypersonic vehicle is of fundamental interest for designing its thermal protection system. The aero-thermal environment predictions over several critical regions of the hypothesized lifting body vehicle, including the stagnation region of the nose-cap, cylindrically swept leading edges, fuselage-upper, and fuselage-lower surfaces, are discussed. The drag (Λ=70°) and temperature (Λ=80°) minimized sweepback angles are considered in the configuration design of the two hypothesized lifting body shape hypersonic vehicles. The main aim of the present study is to analyze and compare the aero-thermal characteristics of these two lifting body configurations at same heat capacity. Accordingly, a Computational Fluid Dynamics simulation has been carried out at Mach number (M∞=7), H=35 km altitude with zero Angle of Attack. Finally, the material selection for thermal protection system based on these predictions and current methodology is described.

  16. Aero-thermal Calibration of the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel (2000 Tests)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonsalez, Jose C.; Arrington, E. Allen; Curry, Monroe R., III

    2001-01-01

    Aerothermal calibration measurements and flow quality surveys were made in the test section of the Icing Research Tunnel at the NASA Glenn Research Center. These surveys were made following major facility modifications including widening of the heat exchanger tunnel section, replacement of the heat exchanger, installation of new turning vanes, and installation of new fan exit guide vanes. Standard practice at NASA Glenn requires that test section calibration and flow quality surveys be performed following such major facility modifications. A single horizontally oriented rake was used to survey the flow field at several vertical positions within a single cross-sectional plane of the test section. These surveys provided a detailed mapping of the total and static pressure, total temperature, Mach number, velocity, flow angle and turbulence intensity. Data were acquired over the entire velocity and total temperature range of the facility. No icing conditions were tested; however, the effects of air sprayed through the water injecting spray bars were assessed. All data indicate good flow quality. Mach number standard deviations were less than 0.0017, flow angle standard deviations were between 0.3 deg and 0.8 deg, total temperature standard deviations were between 0.5 and 1.8 F for subfreezing conditions, axial turbulence intensities varied between 0.3 and 1.0 percent, and transverse turbulence intensities varied between 0.3 and 1.5 percent. Measurement uncertainties were also quantified.

  17. Intensity non-uniformity correction of aerothermal images via ℓp-regularized minimization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Zhang, Tianxu

    2016-11-01

    Aerothermal-induced intensity non-uniformity (NU) effects severely influence the effective performance of infrared (IR) imaging systems in high-speed flight. In this paper we propose a ℓp-regularized minimization method to remove intensity NU in IR images. Different from the existing NU correction methods, we consider and study important priors from the NU noise and the IR image, respectively. We assume spatial smoothness of the NU noise and piecewise continuity of the IR image, where the ℓp regularization term is employed in the correction model. A computationally efficient numerical algorithm based on half-quadratic regularization is adopted to solve the optimization problem. To tackle the non-convex ℓp-norm minimization sub-problem in this scheme, a generalized iterated shrinkage algorithm is used. Significant improvement on the image quality is obtained on both simulation and experimental studies. Both quantitative and qualitative comparisons to specialized state-of-the-art algorithms demonstrate its superiority.

  18. Aerothermal environment induced by mismatch at the SSME main combustion chamber-nozzle joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcconnaughey, H. V.; O'Farrell, J. M.; Olive, T. A.; Brown, G. B.; Holt, J. B.

    1990-01-01

    The computational study reported here is motivated by a Space Shuttle main engine hardware problem detected in post-flight and post-test inspections. Of interest are the potential for hot gas ingestion into the joint (G15) at the main combustion chamber-to-nozzle interface and the effect of particular goemetric nonuniformities on that gas ingestion. The flowfield in the G15 region involves supersonic flow past a rounded forward facing step preceded by a deep narrow cavity. This paper describes the physical problem associated with joint G15 and computational investigations of the G15 aerothermal environment. The associated flowfield was simulated in two and three space dimensions using the United Solutions Algorithm (USA) computational fluid dynamics code series. A benchmark calculation of experimentally measured supersonic flow over of a square cavity was performed to demonstrate the accuracy of the USA code in analyzing flows similar to the G15 computational flowfield. The G15 results demonstrate the mechanism for hot gas ingestion into the joint and reveal the sensitivity to salient geometric nonuniformities.

  19. Temporal Constraints of the Word Blindness Posthypnotic Suggestion on Stroop Task Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parris, Benjamin A.; Dienes, Zoltan; Hodgson, Timothy L.

    2012-01-01

    The present work investigated possible temporal constraints on the posthypnotic word blindness suggestion effect. In a completely within-subjects and counterbalanced design 19 highly suggestible individuals performed the Stroop task both with and without a posthypnotic suggestion that they would be unable to read the word dimension of the Stroop…

  20. OPTIMAL CONFIGURATION OF A COMMAND AND CONTROL NETWORK: BALANCING PERFORMANCE AND RECONFIGURATION CONSTRAINTS

    SciTech Connect

    L. DOWELL

    1999-08-01

    The optimization of the configuration of communications and control networks is important for assuring the reliability and performance of the networks. This paper presents techniques for determining the optimal configuration for such a network in the presence of communication and connectivity constraints. reconfiguration to restore connectivity to a data-fusion network following the failure of a network component.

  1. Aero-Thermal Calibration of the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel (2004 and 2005 Tests)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arrington, E. Allen; Pastor, Christine M.; Gonsalez, Jose C.; Curry, Monroe R., III

    2010-01-01

    A full aero-thermal calibration of the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel was completed in 2004 following the replacement of the inlet guide vanes upstream of the tunnel drive system and improvement to the facility total temperature instrumentation. This calibration test provided data used to fully document the aero-thermal flow quality in the IRT test section and to construct calibration curves for the operation of the IRT. The 2004 test was also the first to use the 2-D RTD array, an improved total temperature calibration measurement platform.

  2. Effect of leading-edge load constraints on the design and performance of supersonic wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darden, C. M.

    1985-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental investigation was conducted to assess the effect of leading-edge load constraints on supersonic wing design and performance. In the effort to delay flow separation and the formation of leading-edge vortices, two constrained, linear-theory optimization approaches were used to limit the loadings on the leading edge of a variable-sweep planform design. Experimental force and moment tests were made on two constrained camber wings, a flat uncambered wing, and an optimum design with no constraints. Results indicate that vortex strength and separation regions were mildest on the severely and moderately constrained wings.

  3. Effects of different instructional constraints on task performance and emergence of coordination in children.

    PubMed

    Chow, Jia Yi; Koh, Michael; Davids, Keith; Button, Chris; Rein, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the impact of different instructional constraints on standing board jump (sbj) performance in children and understand the underlying changes in emergent movement patterns. Two groups of novice participants were provided with either externally or internally focused attentional instructions during an intervention phase. Pre- and post-test sessions were undertaken to determine changes to performance and movement patterns. Thirty-six primary fourth-grade male students were recruited for this study and randomly assigned to either an external, internal focus or control group. Different instructional constraints with either an external focus (image of the achievement) or an internal focus (image of the act) were provided to the participants. Performance scores (jump distances), and data from key kinematic (joint range of motion, ROM) and kinetic variables (jump impulses) were collected. Instructional constraints with an emphasis on an external focus of attention were generally more effective in assisting learners to improve jump distances. Intra-individual analyses highlighted how enhanced jump distances for successful participants may be concomitant with specific changes to kinematic and kinetic variables. Larger joint ROM and adjustment to a comparatively larger horizontal impulse to a vertical impulse were observed for more successful participants at post-test performance. From a constraints-led perspective, the inclusion of instructional constraints encouraging self-adjustments in the control of movements (i.e., image of achievement) had a beneficial effect on individuals performing the standing broad jump task. However, the advantage of using an external focus of attentional instructions could be task- and individual-specific.

  4. Optimal modified tracking performance for MIMO networked control systems with communication constraints.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jie; Zhou, Zhu-Jun; Zhan, Xi-Sheng; Yan, Huai-Cheng; Ge, Ming-Feng

    2017-02-16

    This paper investigates the optimal modified tracking performance of multi-input multi-output (MIMO) networked control systems (NCSs) with packet dropouts and bandwidth constraints. Some explicit expressions are obtained by using co-prime factorization and the spectral decomposition technique. The obtained results show that the optimal modified tracking performance is related to the intrinsic properties of a given plant such as non-minimum phase (NMP) zeros, unstable poles, and their directions. Furthermore, the modified factor, packet dropouts probability and bandwidth also impact the optimal modified tracking performance of the NCSs. The optimal modified tracking performance with channel input power constraint is obtained by searching through all stabilizing two-parameter compensator. Finally, some typical examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the theoretical results.

  5. Effects of Target Arrival Rate on Mission Performance of Cooperatively Controlled UAVs with Comunication Constraints

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-12-17

    cooperatively controlled uninhabited aerial vehicles with task allocation per- formed by iterative network flow. Specifically, we quantify the effect of arrival...2004 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Effects of Target Arrival Rate on Mission Performance of Cooperatively Controlled UAVs with Comunication Constraints 5a...missions. The maximum mission time is tf = 220 s for each arrival model. III. MODELS A. Task Allocation: Iterative Network Flow Task allocation is performed

  6. Constraints on muscular performance: trade-offs between power output and fatigue resistance.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Robbie S; James, Rob S

    2004-01-01

    An important functional and evolutionary constraint on the physical performance of vertebrates is believed to be the trade-off between speed and endurance capacity. However, despite the pervasiveness of physiological arguments, most studies have found no evidence of the trade-off when tested at the whole-animal level. We investigated the existence of this trade-off at the whole-muscle level, the presumed site of this physiological conflict, by examining inter-individual variation in both maximum power output and fatigue resistance for mouse extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle using the work-loop technique. We found negative correlations between several measures of in vitro maximum power output and force production with fatigue resistance for individual mouse EDL muscles, indicating functional trade-offs between these performance parameters. We suggest that this trade-off detected at the whole-muscle level has imposed an important constraint on the evolution of vertebrate physical performance. PMID:15252990

  7. Constraint lines and performance envelopes in behavioral physiology: the case of the aerobic dive limit.

    PubMed

    Horning, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Constraint lines-the boundaries that delimit point clouds in bivariate scattergrams-have been applied in macro-ecology to quantify the effects of limiting factors on response variables, but have not been applied to the behavioral performance and physiological ecology of individual vertebrates. I propose that behavioral scattergrams of air-breathing, diving vertebrates contain informative edges that convey insights into physiological constraints that shape the performance envelopes of divers. In the classic example of repeated cycles of apnea and eupnea in diving, air-breathing vertebrates, the need to balance oxygen consumption, and intake should differentially constrain recovery for dives within or exceeding the aerobic dive limit (ADL). However, the bulk of variance observed in recovery versus dive duration scattergrams originates from undetermined behavioral variables, and deviations from overall stasis may become increasingly apparent at progressively smaller scales of observation. As shown on dive records from 79 Galápagos fur seals, the selection of appropriate time scales of integration yields two distinct recovery boundaries for dive series within and beyond the estimated ADL. An analysis of the corresponding constraint lines is independent of central tendencies in data and avoids violating parametric assumptions for large data sets where variables of interest account for only a small portion of observed variance. I hypothesize that the intercept between these constraint lines represents the effective ADL, and present physiological and ecological considerations to support this hypothesis.

  8. Aerothermal modeling program, Phase 2, Element C: Fuel injector-air swirl characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mostafa, A. A.; Mongia, H. C.; Mcdonnel, V. G.; Samuelsen, G. S.

    1987-01-01

    The main objectives of the NASA sponsored Aerothermal Modeling Program, Phase 2, Element C, are to collect benchmark quality data to quantify the fuel spray interaction with the turbulent swirling flows and to validate current and advanced two phase flow models. The technical tasks involved in this effort are discussed.

  9. Sensitivity of the optimal preliminary design of a transport to operational constraints and performance index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliwa, S. M.

    1980-01-01

    Constrained parameter optimization was used to perform the optimal preliminary design of a medium range transport configuration. The impact of choosing a performance index was studied and the required fare for a 15 percent return-on-investment was proposed as a figure-of-merit. A number of design constants and constraint functions were systematically varied to document the sensitivities of the optimal design to a variety of economic and technological assumptions. Additionally, a comparison is made for each of the parameter variations between the baseline configuration and the optimally redesigned configuration.

  10. Performance of advanced automotive fuel cell systems with heat rejection constraint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahluwalia, R. K.; Wang, X.; Steinbach, A. J.

    2016-03-01

    Although maintaining polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFC) at temperatures below 80 °C is desirable for extended durability and enhanced performance, the automotive application also requires the PEFC stacks to operate at elevated temperatures and meet the heat rejection constraint, stated as Q/ΔT < 1.45 kW/°C, where Q is the stack heat load for an 80-kWe net power PEFC system and ΔT is the difference between the stack coolant temperature and 40 °C ambient temperature. We have developed a method to determine the optimum design and operating conditions for an automotive stack subject to this Q/ΔT constraint, and illustrate it by applying it to a state-of-the-art stack with nano-structured thin film ternary catalysts in the membrane electrode assemblies. In the illustrative example, stack coolant temperatures >90 °C, stack inlet pressures >2 atm, and cathode stoichiometries <2 are needed to satisfy the Q/ΔT constraint in a cost effective manner. The reference PEFC stack with 0.1 mg/cm2 Pt loading in the cathode achieves 753 mW cm-2 power density at the optimum conditions for heat rejection, compared to 964 mW cm-2 in the laboratory cell at the same cell voltage (663 mV) and pressure (2.5 atm) but lower temperature (85 °C), higher cathode stoichiometry (2), and 100% relative humidity.

  11. Optimal performance of networked control systems with bandwidth and coding constraints.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Xi-Sheng; Sun, Xin-xiang; Li, Tao; Wu, Jie; Jiang, Xiao-Wei

    2015-11-01

    The optimal tracking performance of multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) discrete-time networked control systems with bandwidth and coding constraints is studied in this paper. The optimal tracking performance of networked control system is obtained by using spectral factorization technique and partial fraction. The obtained results demonstrate that the optimal performance is influenced by the directions and locations of the nonminimum phase zeros and unstable poles of the given plant. In addition to that, the characters of the reference signal, encoding, the bandwidth and additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) of the communication channel are also closely influenced by the optimal tracking performance. Some typical examples are given to illustrate the theoretical results.

  12. Optimal modified tracking performance for networked control systems with QoS constraint.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Xi-Sheng; Sun, Xin-Xiang; Wu, Jie; Han, Tao

    2016-11-01

    This paper investigates the optimal modified tracking performance of networked control systems with a constraint on quality of service (QoS). The QoS is characterized by two parameters of the system, viz. data dropout and the additive white Gaussian noise. The proposed modified tracking performance index prevents the probability of invalid data arising from the variations in the tracking error in the absence of an integrator in the plant. The derived optimal filter eliminates the influence of channel noise in the feedback channel. The optimal modified tracking performance expression is obtained by using the co-prime factorization. Results indicate that the optimal modified tracking performance is influenced by the non-minimum phase zeros, modification factor, packet dropout probability, and the characteristics of the reference signals. The obtained results will give some guidance for the design of networked control systems. The efficiency of the model is verified using some typical examples.

  13. Aerothermal evaluation of a spherically blunted body with a trapezoidal cross section in the Langley 8-foot high-temperature tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albertson, Cindy W.

    1987-01-01

    A model to be used in the flow studies and curved Thermal Protection System (TPS) evaluations was tested in the Langley 8 Foot High-Temperature Tunnel at a nominal Mach number of 6.8. The purpose of the study was to define the surface pressure and heating rates at high angles of attack (in support of curved metallic TPS studies) and to determine the conditions for which the model would be suitable as a test bed for aerothermal load studies. The present study was conducted at a nominal total temperature of 2400 and 3300 R, dynamic pressures from 2.3 to 10.9 psia, and free-stream Reynolds numbers from 4000,000 to 1,700,000/ft. The measurements consisted primarily of surface pressure and cold-wall (530 R) heating rates. Qualitative comparisons between predictions and data show that for this configuration, aerothermal tests should be limited to angles of attack between 10 and -10 degrees. Outside this range, the effects of free-stream flow nonuniformity appear in the data, as a result of the long length of the model. However, for TPS testing, this is not a concern and tests can be performed at angles of attack ranging from 20 to -20 degrees. Laminar and naturally turbulent boundary layers are available over limited ranges of conditions.

  14. GPS measurements of regional deformation in southern California - Some constraints on performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dixon, T.; Blewitt, G.; Larson, K.; Agnew, D.; Hager, B.; Kroger, P.; Krumega, L.; Strange, W.

    1990-01-01

    Results from the first major survey of southern California with GPS equipment are presented along with some limited results from late experiments assessing GPS performance by analysis of day-to-day and longer-term repeatability, as well as comparisons with VLBI. GPS performance on longer (50-500 km or longer) baselines, a length range useful for measurement of regional deformation and fault block velocities, is emphasized. The implications of this level of performance for meeting longer-term scientific objectives is addressed. It is concluded that GPS techniques and yield results comparable to those achieved with mobile VLBI techniques in California, assuming that appropriate network design and analysis techniques are used. GPS can thus provide important constraints on regional deformation in California with five yrs or less of measurements.

  15. GPS measurements of regional deformation in southern California - Some constraints on performance

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, T.; Blewitt, G.; Larson, K.; Agnew, D.; Hager, B.; Kroger, P.; Krumega, L.; Strange, W. Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA MIT, Cambridge, MA National Geodetic Survey, Rockville, MD )

    1990-08-01

    Results from the first major survey of southern California with GPS equipment are presented along with some limited results from late experiments assessing GPS performance by analysis of day-to-day and longer-term repeatability, as well as comparisons with VLBI. GPS performance on longer (50-500 km or longer) baselines, a length range useful for measurement of regional deformation and fault block velocities, is emphasized. The implications of this level of performance for meeting longer-term scientific objectives is addressed. It is concluded that GPS techniques and yield results comparable to those achieved with mobile VLBI techniques in California, assuming that appropriate network design and analysis techniques are used. GPS can thus provide important constraints on regional deformation in California with five yrs or less of measurements. 30 refs.

  16. A new finite element approach for prediction of aerothermal loads - Progress in inviscid flow computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bey, K. S.; Thornton, E. A.; Dechaumphai, P.; Ramakrishnan, R.

    1985-01-01

    Recent progress in the development of finite element methodology for the prediction of aerothermal loads is described. Two dimensional, inviscid computations are presented, but emphasis is placed on development of an approach extendable to three dimensional viscous flows. Research progress is described for: (1) utilization of a commercially available program to construct flow solution domains and display computational results, (2) development of an explicit Taylor-Galerkin solution algorithm, (3) closed form evaluation of finite element matrices, (4) vector computer programming strategies, and (5) validation of solutions. Two test problems of interest to NASA Langley aerothermal research are studied. Comparisons of finite element solutions for Mach 6 flow with other solution methods and experimental data validate fundamental capabilities of the approach for analyzing high speed inviscid compressible flows.

  17. A New Finite Element Approach for Prediction of Aerothermal Loads: Progress in Inviscid Flow Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bey, K. S.; Thornton, E. A.; Dechaumphai, P.; Ramakrishnan, R.

    1985-01-01

    Recent progress in the development of finite element methodology for the prediction of aerothermal loads is described. Two dimensional, inviscid computations are presented, but emphasis is placed on development of an approach extendable to three dimensional viscous flows. Research progress is described for: (1) utilization of a commerically available program to construct flow solution domains and display computational results, (2) development of an explicit Taylor-Galerkin solution algorithm, (3) closed form evaluation of finite element matrices, (4) vector computer programming strategies, and (5) validation of solutions. Two test problems of interest to NASA Langley aerothermal research are studied. Comparisons of finite element solutions for Mach 6 flow with other solution methods and experimental data validate fundamental capabilities of the approach for analyzing high speed inviscid compressible flows.

  18. A Risk-Based Approach for Aerothermal/TPS Analysis and Testing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-01

    vehicle will be subjected to significant aerothermal heating as it dissipates its kinetic energy at the destination planet (or moon). The primary purpose...reduces the velocity of the stream – energy locked in chemical nonequilibrium is unavailable as kinetic energy . The dissociated free stream reduces the...altering the amount of chemical energy available for surface recombination. Therefore, matching total enthalpy and surface pressure in flight and arc jet

  19. Aerothermal modeling program, phase 2. Element C: Fuel injector-air swirl characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mostafa, A. A.; Mongia, H. C.; Mcdonnell, V. G.; Samuelsen, G. S.

    1986-01-01

    The main objectives of the NASA-sponsored Aerothermal Modeling Program, Phase 2--Element C, are experimental evaluation of the air swirler interaction with a fuel injector in a simulated combustor chamber, assessment of the current two-phase models, and verification of the improved spray evaporation/dispersion models. This experimental and numerical program consists of five major tasks. Brief descriptions of the five tasks are given.

  20. Conceptual Design Optimization of an Augmented Stability Aircraft Incorporating Dynamic Response Performance Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welstead, Jason

    2014-01-01

    This research focused on incorporating stability and control into a multidisciplinary de- sign optimization on a Boeing 737-class advanced concept called the D8.2b. A new method of evaluating the aircraft handling performance using quantitative evaluation of the sys- tem to disturbances, including perturbations, continuous turbulence, and discrete gusts, is presented. A multidisciplinary design optimization was performed using the D8.2b transport air- craft concept. The con guration was optimized for minimum fuel burn using a design range of 3,000 nautical miles. Optimization cases were run using xed tail volume coecients, static trim constraints, and static trim and dynamic response constraints. A Cessna 182T model was used to test the various dynamic analysis components, ensuring the analysis was behaving as expected. Results of the optimizations show that including stability and con- trol in the design process drastically alters the optimal design, indicating that stability and control should be included in conceptual design to avoid system level penalties later in the design process.

  1. Shuttle Return-to-Flight IH-108 Aerothermal Test at CUBRC - Flow Field Calibration and CFD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, Kei Y.; Holden, M. S.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses one specific aspect of the Shuttle Retrun-To-Flight IH-108 Aerothermal Test at Calspan-University of Buffalo Research Center (CUBRC), the test flow field calibration. It showed the versatility of the CUBRC Large Energy National Shock Tunnel (LENS) II wind tunnel for an aerothermal test with unique and demanding requirements. CFD analyses were used effectively to extend the test range at the low end of the Mach range. It demonstrated how ground test facility and CFD synergy can be utilitzed iteratively to enhance the confidence in the fedility of both tools. It addressed the lingering concerns of the aerothermal community on use of inpulse facility and CFD analysis. At the conclusion of the test program, members from the NASA Marshall (MSFC), CUBRC and USA (United Space Alliance) Consultants (The Grey Beards) were asked to independently verify the flight scaling data generated by Boeing for flight certification of the re-designed external tank (ET) components. The blind test comparison showed very good results.

  2. Analysis report for WIPP colloid model constraints and performance assessment parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Mariner, Paul E.; Sassani, David Carl

    2014-03-01

    An analysis of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) colloid model constraints and parameter values was performed. The focus of this work was primarily on intrinsic colloids, mineral fragment colloids, and humic substance colloids, with a lesser focus on microbial colloids. Comments by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) concerning intrinsic Th(IV) colloids and Mg-Cl-OH mineral fragment colloids were addressed in detail, assumptions and data used to constrain colloid model calculations were evaluated, and inconsistencies between data and model parameter values were identified. This work resulted in a list of specific conclusions regarding model integrity, model conservatism, and opportunities for improvement related to each of the four colloid types included in the WIPP performance assessment.

  3. Theoretical and experimental comparative analysis of beamforming methods for loudspeaker arrays under given performance constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivieri, Ferdinando; Fazi, Filippo Maria; Nelson, Philip A.; Shin, Mincheol; Fontana, Simone; Yue, Lang

    2016-07-01

    Methods for beamforming are available that provide the signals used to drive an array of sources for the implementation of systems for the so-called personal audio. In this work, performance of the delay-and-sum (DAS) method and of three widely used methods for optimal beamforming are compared by means of computer simulations and experiments in an anechoic environment using a linear array of sources with given constraints on quality of the reproduced field at the listener's position and limit to input energy to the array. Using the DAS method as a benchmark for performance, the frequency domain responses of the loudspeaker filters can be characterized in three regions. In the first region, at low frequencies, input signals designed with the optimal methods are identical and provide higher directivity performance than that of the DAS. In the second region, performance of the optimal methods are similar to the DAS method. The third region starts above the limit due to spatial aliasing. A method is presented to estimate the boundaries of these regions.

  4. Balancing cognitive control: how observed movements influence motor performance in a task with balance constraints.

    PubMed

    Verrel, Julius; Lisofsky, Nina; Kühn, Simone

    2014-07-01

    We investigated the influence of observed movements on executed movements in a task requiring lifting one foot from the floor while maintaining whole-body balance. Sixteen young participants (20-30 years) performed foot lift movements, which were either cued symbolically by a letter (L/R, indicating to lift the left/right foot) or by a short movie showing a foot lift movement. In the symbol cue condition, stimuli from the movie cue condition were used as distractors, and vice versa. Anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) and actual foot lifts were recorded using force plates and optical motion capture. Foot lift responses were generally faster in response to the movie compared to the symbol cue condition. Moreover, incongruent movement distractors interfered with performance in the symbol cue condition, as shown by longer response times and increased number of APAs. Latencies of the first (potentially wrong) APA in a trial were shorter for movie compared to symbol cues but were not affected by cue-distractor congruency. Amplitude of the first APA was smaller when it was followed by additional APAs compared to trials with a single APA. Our results show that automatic imitation tendencies are integrated with postural control in a task with balance constraints. Analysis of the number, timing and amplitude of APAs indicates that conflicts between intended and observed movements are not resolved at a purely cognitive level but directly influence overt motor performance, emphasizing the intimate link between perception, cognition and action.

  5. Aerothermal tests of quilted dome models on a flat plate at a Mach number of 6.5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, Christopher E.; Hunt, L. Roane

    1988-01-01

    Aerothermal tests were conducted in the NASA Langley 8 Foot High Temperature Tunnel (8'HTT) at a Mach number of 6.5 on simulated arrays of thermally bowed metallic thermal protection system (TPS) tiles at an angle of attack of 5 deg. Detailed surface pressures and heating rates were obtained for arrays aligned with the flow and skewed 45 deg diagonally to the flow with nominal bowed heights of 0.1, 0.2, and 0.4 inch submerged in both laminar and turbulent boundary layers. Aerothermal tests were made at a nominal total temperature of 3300 R, a total pressure of 400 psia, a total enthalpy of 950 Btu/lbm, a dynamic pressure of 2.7 psi, and a unit Reynolds number of 400,000 per foot. The experimental results form a data base that can be used to help protect aerothermal load increases from bowed arrays of TPS tiles.

  6. Effect of Auditory Constraints on Motor Performance Depends on Stage of Recovery Post-Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Aluru, Viswanath; Lu, Ying; Leung, Alan; Verghese, Joe; Raghavan, Preeti

    2014-01-01

    In order to develop evidence-based rehabilitation protocols post-stroke, one must first reconcile the vast heterogeneity in the post-stroke population and develop protocols to facilitate motor learning in the various subgroups. The main purpose of this study is to show that auditory constraints interact with the stage of recovery post-stroke to influence motor learning. We characterized the stages of upper limb recovery using task-based kinematic measures in 20 subjects with chronic hemiparesis. We used a bimanual wrist extension task, performed with a custom-made wrist trainer, to facilitate learning of wrist extension in the paretic hand under four auditory conditions: (1) without auditory cueing; (2) to non-musical happy sounds; (3) to self-selected music; and (4) to a metronome beat set at a comfortable tempo. Two bimanual trials (15 s each) were followed by one unimanual trial with the paretic hand over six cycles under each condition. Clinical metrics, wrist and arm kinematics, and electromyographic activity were recorded. Hierarchical cluster analysis with the Mahalanobis metric based on baseline speed and extent of wrist movement stratified subjects into three distinct groups, which reflected their stage of recovery: spastic paresis, spastic co-contraction, and minimal paresis. In spastic paresis, the metronome beat increased wrist extension, but also increased muscle co-activation across the wrist. In contrast, in spastic co-contraction, no auditory stimulation increased wrist extension and reduced co-activation. In minimal paresis, wrist extension did not improve under any condition. The results suggest that auditory task constraints interact with stage of recovery during motor learning after stroke, perhaps due to recruitment of distinct neural substrates over the course of recovery. The findings advance our understanding of the mechanisms of progression of motor recovery and lay the foundation for personalized treatment algorithms post-stroke. PMID

  7. A new laboratory-scale experimental facility for detailed aerothermal characterizations of volumetric absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Garcia, Fabrisio; Santiago, Sergio; Luque, Salvador; Romero, Manuel; Gonzalez-Aguilar, Jose

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes a new modular laboratory-scale experimental facility that was designed to conduct detailed aerothermal characterizations of volumetric absorbers for use in concentrating solar power plants. Absorbers are generally considered to be the element with the highest potential for efficiency gains in solar thermal energy systems. The configu-ration of volumetric absorbers enables concentrated solar radiation to penetrate deep into their solid structure, where it is progressively absorbed, prior to being transferred by convection to a working fluid flowing through the structure. Current design trends towards higher absorber outlet temperatures have led to the use of complex intricate geometries in novel ceramic and metallic elements to maximize the temperature deep inside the structure (thus reducing thermal emission losses at the front surface and increasing efficiency). Although numerical models simulate the conjugate heat transfer mechanisms along volumetric absorbers, they lack, in many cases, the accuracy that is required for precise aerothermal validations. The present work aims to aid this objective by the design, development, commissioning and operation of a new experimental facility which consists of a 7 kWe (1.2 kWth) high flux solar simulator, a radiation homogenizer, inlet and outlet collector modules and a working section that can accommodate volumetric absorbers up to 80 mm × 80 mm in cross-sectional area. Experimental measurements conducted in the facility include absorber solid temperature distributions along its depth, inlet and outlet air temperatures, air mass flow rate and pressure drop, incident radiative heat flux, and overall thermal efficiency. In addition, two windows allow for the direct visualization of the front and rear absorber surfaces, thus enabling full-coverage surface temperature measurements by thermal imaging cameras. This paper presents the results from the aerothermal characterization of a siliconized silicon

  8. Inverse Heat Conduction Methods in the CHAR Code for Aerothermal Flight Data Reconstruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliver, A. Brandon; Amar, Adam J.

    2016-01-01

    Reconstruction of flight aerothermal environments often requires the solution of an inverse heat transfer problem, which is an ill-posed problem of determining boundary conditions from discrete measurements in the interior of the domain. This paper will present the algorithms implemented in the CHAR code for use in reconstruction of EFT-1 flight data and future testing activities. Implementation details will be discussed, and alternative hybrid-methods that are permitted by the implementation will be described. Results will be presented for a number of problems.

  9. Inverse Heat Conduction Methods in the CHAR Code for Aerothermal Flight Data Reconstruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliver, A Brandon; Amar, Adam J.

    2016-01-01

    Reconstruction of flight aerothermal environments often requires the solution of an inverse heat transfer problem, which is an ill-posed problem of specifying boundary conditions from discrete measurements in the interior of the domain. This paper will present the algorithms implemented in the CHAR code for use in reconstruction of EFT-1 flight data and future testing activities. Implementation nuances will be discussed, and alternative hybrid-methods that are permitted by the implementation will be described. Results will be presented for a number of one-dimensional and multi-dimensional problems

  10. Orbiter fuel cell performance constraints. STS/OPS Pratt Whitney fuel cells. Operating limits for mission planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolkhorst, H. E.

    1980-01-01

    The orbiter fuel cell powerplant (FCP) performance constraints listed in the Shuttle Operational Data Book (SODB) were analyzed using the shuttle environmental control requirements evaluation tool. The effects of FCP lifetime, coolant loops, and FCP voltage output were considered. Results indicate that the FCP limits defined in the SODB are not valid.

  11. Orbital flight test shuttle external tank aerothermal flight evaluation, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Praharaj, Sarat C.; Engel, Carl D.; Warmbrod, John D.

    1986-01-01

    This 3-volume report discusses the evaluation of aerothermal flight measurements made on the orbital flight test Space Shuttle External Tanks (ETs). Six ETs were instrumented to measure various quantities during flight; including heat transfer, pressure, and structural temperature. The flight data was reduced and analyzed against math models established from an extensive wind tunnel data base and empirical heat-transfer relationships. This analysis has supported the validity of the current aeroheating methodology and existing data base; and, has also identified some problem areas which require methodology modifications. This is Volume 1, an Executive Summary. Volume 2 contains Appendices A (Aerothermal Comparisons) and B (Flight Derived h sub 1/h sub u vs. M sub inf. Plots), and Volume 3 contains Appendix C (Comparison of Interference Factors among OFT Flight, Prediction and 1H-97A Data), Appendix D (Freestream Stanton Number and Reynolds Number Correlation for Flight and Tunnel Data), and Appendix E (Flight-Derived h sub i/h sub u Tables).

  12. Orbital flight test shuttle external tank aerothermal flight evaluation, volume 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Praharaj, Sarat C.; Engel, Carl D.; Warmbrod, John D.

    1986-01-01

    This 3-volume report discusses the evaluation of aerothermal flight measurements made on the orbital flight test Space Shuttle External Tanks (ETs). Six ETs were instrumented to measure various quantities during flight; including heat transfer, pressure, and structural temperature. The flight data was reduced and analyzed against math models established from an extensive wind tunnel data base and empirical heat-transfer relationships. This analysis has supported the validity of the current aeroheating methodology and existing data base; and, has also identified some problem areas which require methodology modifications. Volume 1 is the Executive Summary. Volume 2 contains Appendix A (Aerothermal Comparisons), and Appendix B (Flight-Derived h sub 1/h sub u vs. M sub inf. Plots). This is Volume 3, containing Appendix C (Comparison of Interference Factors between OFT Flight, Prediction and 1H-97A Data), Appendix D (Freestream Stanton Number and Reynolds Number Correlation for Flight and Tunnel Data), and Appendix E (Flight-Derived h sub i/h sub u Tables).

  13. Orbital flight test shuttle external tank aerothermal flight evaluation, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Praharaj, Sarat C.; Engel, Carl D.; Warmbrod, John D.

    1986-01-01

    This 3-volume report discusses the evaluation of aerothermal flight measurements made on the orbital flight test Space Shuttle External Tanks (ETs). Six ETs were instrumented to measure various quantities during flight; including heat transfer, pressure, and structural temperature. The flight data was reduced and analyzed against math models established from an extensive wind tunnel data base and empirical heat-transfer relationships. This analysis has supported the validity of the current aeroheating methodology and existing data base; and, has also identified some problem areas which require methodology modifications. Volume 1 is the Executive Summary. This is volume 2, containing Appendix A (Aerothermal Comparisons), and Appendix B (Flight-Derived h sub i/h sub u vs. M sub inf. Plots). Volume 3 contains Appendix C (Comparison of Interference Factors between OFT Flight, Prediction and 1H-97A Data), Appendix D (Freestream Stanton Number and Reynolds Number Correlation for Flight and Tunnel Data), and Appendix E (Flight-Derived h sub i/h sub u Tables).

  14. Studies of aerothermal loads generated in regions of shock/shock interaction in hypersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holden, Michael S.; Moselle, John R.; Lee, Jinho

    1991-01-01

    Experimental studies were conducted to examine the aerothermal characteristics of shock/shock/boundary layer interaction regions generated by single and multiple incident shocks. The presented experimental studies were conducted over a Mach number range from 6 to 19 for a range of Reynolds numbers to obtain both laminar and turbulent interaction regions. Detailed heat transfer and pressure measurements were made for a range of interaction types and incident shock strengths over a transverse cylinder, with emphasis on the 3 and 4 type interaction regions. The measurements were compared with the simple Edney, Keyes, and Hains models for a range of interaction configurations and freestream conditions. The complex flowfields and aerothermal loads generated by multiple-shock impingement, while not generating as large peak loads, provide important test cases for code prediction. The detailed heat transfer and pressure measurements proved a good basis for evaluating the accuracy of simple prediction methods and detailed numerical solutions for laminar and transitional regions or shock/shock interactions.

  15. Static and aerothermal tests of a superalloy honeycomb prepackaged thermal protection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorton, Mark P.; Shideler, John L.; Webb, Granville L.

    1993-01-01

    A reusable metallic thermal protection system has been developed for vehicles with maximum surface temperatures of up to 2000 F. An array of two 12- by 12-in. panels was subjected to radiant heating tests that simulated Space Shuttle entry temperature and pressure histories. Results indicate that this thermal protection system, with a mass of 2.201 lbm/ft(exp 2), can successfully prevent typical aluminum primary structure of an entry vehicle like the Space Shuttle from exceeding temperatures greater than 350 F at a location on the vehicle where the maximum surface temperature is 1900 F. A flat array of 20 panels was exposed to aerothermal flow conditions, at a Mach number of 6.75. The panels were installed in a worst-case orientation with the gaps between panels parallel to the flow. Results from the aerothermal tests indicated that convective heating occurred from hot gas flow in the gaps between the panels. Proposed design changes to prevent gap heating occurred from hot gas flow in the gaps between the panels. Proposed design changes to prevent gap heating include orienting panels so that gaps are not parallel to the flow and using a packaged, compressible gap-filler material between panels to block hot gas flow in the gaps.

  16. Generation of an Aerothermal Data Base for the X33 Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Cathy; Huynh, Loc

    1998-01-01

    The X-33 experimental program is a cooperative program between industry and NASA, managed by Lockheed-Martin Skunk Works to develop an experimental vehicle to demonstrate new technologies for a single-stage-to-orbit, fully reusable launch vehicle (RLV). One of the new technologies to be demonstrated is an advanced Thermal Protection System (TPS) being designed by BF Goodrich (formerly Rohr, Inc.) with support from NASA. The calculation of an aerothermal database is crucial to identifying the critical design environment data for the TPS. The NASA Ames X-33 team has generated such a database using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analyses, engineering analysis methods and various programs to compare and interpolate the results from the CFD and the engineering analyses. This database, along with a program used to query the database, is used extensively by several X-33 team members to help them in designing the X-33. This paper will describe the methods used to generate this database, the program used to query the database, and will show some of the aerothermal analysis results for the X-33 aircraft.

  17. Statistical Methods for Rapid Aerothermal Analysis and Design Technology: Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DePriest, Douglas; Morgan, Carolyn

    2003-01-01

    The cost and safety goals for NASA s next generation of reusable launch vehicle (RLV) will require that rapid high-fidelity aerothermodynamic design tools be used early in the design cycle. To meet these requirements, it is desirable to identify adequate statistical models that quantify and improve the accuracy, extend the applicability, and enable combined analyses using existing prediction tools. The initial research work focused on establishing suitable candidate models for these purposes. The second phase is focused on assessing the performance of these models to accurately predict the heat rate for a given candidate data set. This validation work compared models and methods that may be useful in predicting the heat rate.

  18. Thermal Protection System Aerothermal Screening Tests in HYMETS Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szalai, Christine E.; Beck, Robin A. S.; Gasch, Matthew J.; Alumni, Antonella I.; Chavez-Garcia, Jose F.; Splinter, Scott C.; Gragg, Jeffrey G.; Brewer, Amy

    2011-01-01

    The Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) Technology Development Project has been tasked to develop Thermal Protection System (TPS) materials for insertion into future Mars Entry Systems. A screening arc jet test of seven rigid ablative TPS material candidates was performed in the Hypersonic Materials Environmental Test System (HYMETS) facility at NASA Langley Research Center, in both an air and carbon dioxide test environment. Recession, mass loss, surface temperature, and backface thermal response were measured for each test specimen. All material candidates survived the Mars aerocapture relevant heating condition, and some materials showed a clear increase in recession rate in the carbon dioxide test environment. These test results supported subsequent down-selection of the most promising material candidates for further development.

  19. Flow interaction experiment. Volume 1: Aerothermal modeling, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikjooy, M.; Mongia, H. C.; Sullivan, J. P.; Murthy, S. N. B.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental and computational study is reported for the flow of a turbulent jet discharging into a rectangular enclosure. The experimental configurations consisting of primary jets only, annular jets only, and a combination of annular and primary jets are investigated to provide a better understanding of the flow field in an annular combustor. A laser Doppler velocimeter is used to measure mean velocity and Reynolds stress components. Major features of the flow field include recirculation, primary and annular jet interaction, and high turbulence. A significant result from this study is the effect the primary jets have on the flow field. The primary jets are seen to create statistically larger recirculation zones and higher turbulence levels. In addition, a technique called marker nephelometry is used to provide mean concentration values in the model combustor. Computations are performed using three levels of turbulence closures, namely k-epsilon model, algebraic second moment (ASM), and differential second moment (DSM) closure. Two different numerical schemes are applied. One is the lower-order power-law differencing scheme (PLDS) and the other is the higher-order flux-spline differencing scheme (FSDS). A comparison is made of the performance of these schemes. The numerical results are compared with experimental data. For the cases considered in this study, the FSDS is more accurate than the PLDS. For a prescribed accuracy, the flux-spline scheme requires a far fewer number of grid points. Thus, it has the potential for providing a numerical error-free solution, especially for three-dimensional flows, without requiring an excessively fine grid. Although qualitatively good comparison with data was obtained, the deficiencies regarding the modeled dissipation rate (epsilon) equation, pressure-strain correlation model, and the inlet epsilon profile and other critical closure issues need to be resolved before one can achieve the degree of accuracy required to

  20. Flow interaction experiment. Volume 2: Aerothermal modeling, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikjooy, M.; Mongia, H. C.; Sullivan, J. P.; Murthy, S. N. B.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental and computational study is reported for the flow of a turbulent jet discharging into a rectangular enclosure. The experimental configurations consisting of primary jets only, annular jets only, and a combination of annular and primary jets are investigated to provide a better understanding of the flow field in an annular combustor. A laser Doppler velocimeter is used to measure mean velocity and Reynolds stress components. Major features of the flow field include recirculation, primary and annular jet interaction, and high turbulence. A significant result from this study is the effect the primary jets have on the flow field. The primary jets are seen to create statistically larger recirculation zones and higher turbulence levels. In addition, a technique called marker nephelometry is used to provide mean concentration values in the model combustor. Computations are performed using three levels of turbulence closures, namely k-epsilon model, algebraic second moment (ASM), and differential second moment (DSM) closure. Two different numerical schemes are applied. One is the lower-order power-law differencing scheme (PLDS) and the other is the higher-order flux-spline differencing scheme (FSDS). A comparison is made of the performance of these schemes. The numerical results are compared with experimental data. For the cases considered in this study, the FSDS is more accurate than the PLDS. For a prescribed accuracy, the flux-spline scheme requires a far fewer number of grid points. Thus, it has the potential for providing a numerical error-free solution, especially for three-dimensional flows, without requiring an excessively fine grid. Although qualitatively good comparison with data was obtained, the deficiencies regarding the modeled dissipation rate (epsilon) equation, pressure-strain correlation model, and the inlet epsilon profile and other critical closure issues need to be resolved before one can achieve the degree of accuracy required to

  1. An evaluation of computer codes for simulating the Galileo Probe aerothermal entry environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menees, G. P.

    1981-01-01

    The approaches of three computer flow field codes (HYVIS, COLTS, and RASLE), used to determine the Galileo Probe aerothermal environment and its effect on the design of the thermal protection system, are analyzed in order to resolve differences in their predicted results. All three codes account for the hypersonic, massively blown, radiation shock layers, characteristic of Jupiter entry. Significant differences, however, are evident in their solution procedures: the governing conservation equations, the numerical differencing methods, the governing physics (chemical, radiation, diffusion, and turbulence models), and the basic physical data (thermodynamic, transport, chemical, and spectral properties for atomic and molecular species). Solutions are compared for two near peak heating entry conditions for a Galileo Probe baseline configuration, having an initial mass of 242 kg and simulating entry into the Orton nominal atmosphere. The modern numerical methodology of COLTS and RASLE appear to provide an improved capability for coupled flow-field solutions.

  2. Grid Generation Issues and CFD Simulation Accuracy for the X33 Aerothermal Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polsky, Susan; Papadopoulos, Periklis; Davies, Carol; Loomis, Mark; Prabhu, Dinesh; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Grid generation issues relating to the simulation of the X33 aerothermal environment using the GASP code are explored. Required grid densities and normal grid stretching are discussed with regards to predicting the fluid dynamic and heating environments with the desired accuracy. The generation of volume grids is explored and includes discussions of structured grid generation packages such as GRIDGEN, GRIDPRO and HYPGEN. Volume grid manipulation techniques for obtaining desired outer boundary and grid clustering using the OUTBOUND code are examined. The generation of the surface grid with the required surface grid with the required surface grid topology is also discussed. Utilizing grids without singular axes is explored as a method of avoiding numerical difficulties at the singular line.

  3. Design of high-performing hybrid meta-heuristics for unrelated parallel machine scheduling with machine eligibility and precedence constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afzalirad, Mojtaba; Rezaeian, Javad

    2016-04-01

    This study involves an unrelated parallel machine scheduling problem in which sequence-dependent set-up times, different release dates, machine eligibility and precedence constraints are considered to minimize total late works. A new mixed-integer programming model is presented and two efficient hybrid meta-heuristics, genetic algorithm and ant colony optimization, combined with the acceptance strategy of the simulated annealing algorithm (Metropolis acceptance rule), are proposed to solve this problem. Manifestly, the precedence constraints greatly increase the complexity of the scheduling problem to generate feasible solutions, especially in a parallel machine environment. In this research, a new corrective algorithm is proposed to obtain the feasibility in all stages of the algorithms. The performance of the proposed algorithms is evaluated in numerical examples. The results indicate that the suggested hybrid ant colony optimization statistically outperformed the proposed hybrid genetic algorithm in solving large-size test problems.

  4. Ecological constraints on the ability of precision agriculture to improve the environmental performance of agricultural production systems.

    PubMed

    Groffman, P M

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, I address three topics relevant to the ability of precision agriculture to improve the environmental performance of agricultural production systems. First, I describe the fundamental ecological factors that influence the environmental performance of these systems and address how precision agriculture practices can or cannot interact with these factors. Second, I review the magnitude of the ecological processes that we hope to manage with precision agriculture relative to agricultural inputs to determine whether managing these processes can significantly affect system environmental performance. Finally, I address scale incongruencies between ecological processes and precision agriculture techniques that could limit the ability of these techniques to manage variability in these processes. The analysis suggests that there are significant ecological constraints on the ability of precision agriculture techniques to improve the environmental performance of agricultural production systems. The primary constraint is that these techniques do not address many of the key factors that cause poor environmental performance in these systems. Further, the magnitude of the ecological processes that we hope to manage with precision agriculture are quite small relative to agricultural inputs and, finally, these processes vary on scales that are incongruent with precision management techniques.

  5. The evolution of armament strength: evidence for a constraint on the biting performance of claws of durophagous decapods.

    PubMed

    Taylor, G M

    2001-03-01

    Performance data for the claws of six sympatric species of Cancer crabs confirmed a puzzling pattern reported previously for two other decapod crustaceans (stone crabs, Menippe mercenaria, and lobsters, Homarus americanus): Although biting forces increased, maximum muscle stresses (force per unit area) declined with increasing claw size. The negative allometry of muscle stress and the stress at a given claw size were fairly consistent within and among Cancer species despite significant differences in adult body size and relative claw size, but were not consistent among decapod genera. Therefore, claw height can be used as a reliable predictor of maximum biting force for the genus Cancer, but must be used with caution as a predictor of maximum biting force in wider evolutionary and biogeographical comparisons of decapods. The decline in maximum muscle stress with increasing claw size in Cancer crabs contrasts with the pattern in several other claw traits. Significantly, three traits that affect maximal biting force increased intraspecifically with increasing claw size: relative claw size, mechanical advantage, and sarcomere length of the closer muscle. Closer apodeme area and angle of pinnation of the closer muscle fibers varied isometrically with claw size. The concordant behavior of these traits suggests selection for higher biting forces in larger crabs. The contrast between the size dependence of muscle stress (negative allometry) and the remaining claw traits (isometry or positive allometry) strongly suggests that an as yet unidentified constraint impairs muscle performance in larger claws. The negative allometry of muscle stress in two distantly related taxa (stone crabs and lobsters) further suggests this constraint may be widespread in decapod crustaceans. The implications of this performance constraint for the evolution of claw size and the "arms-race" between decapod predators and their hard-shelled prey is discussed.

  6. Theoretical peak performance and optical constraints for the deflection of an S-type asteroid with a continuous wave laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiry, Nicolas; Vasile, Massimiliano

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents a theoretical model to evaluate the thrust generated by a continuous wave (CW) laser, operating at moderate intensity (<100 GW/m2), ablating an S-type asteroid made of Forsterite. The key metric to assess the performance of the laser system is the thrust coupling coefficient which is given by the ratio between thrust and associated optical power. Three different models are developed in the paper: a one dimensional steady state model, a full 3D steady state model and a one dimensional model accounting for transient effects resulting from the tumbling motion of the asteroid. The results obtained with these models are used to derive key requirements and constraints on the laser system that allow approaching the ideal performance in a realistic case.

  7. Coupled heat transfer model and experiment study of semitransparent barrier materials in aerothermal environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Da-Lin; Qi, Hong

    Semi-transparent materials (such as IR optical windows) are widely used for heat protection or transfer, temperature and image measurement, and safety in energy , space, military, and information technology applications. They are used, for instance, ceramic coatings for thermal barriers of spacecrafts or gas turbine blades, and thermal image observation under extreme or some dangerous environments. In this paper, the coupled conduction and radiation heat transfer model is established to describe temperature distribution of semitransparent thermal barrier medium within the aerothermal environment. In order to investigate this numerical model, one semi-transparent sample with black coating was considered, and photothermal properties were measured. At last, Finite Volume Method (FVM) was used to solve the coupled model, and the temperature responses from the sample surfaces were obtained. In addition, experiment study was also taken into account. In the present experiment, aerodynamic heat flux was simulated by one electrical heater, and two experiment cases were designed in terms of the duration of aerodynamic heating. One case is that the heater irradiates one surface of the sample continually until the other surface temperature up to constant, and the other case is that the heater works only 130 s. The surface temperature responses of these two cases were recorded. Finally, FVM model of the coupling conduction-radiation heat transfer was validated based on the experiment study with relative error less than 5%.

  8. Characterization of the Aerothermal Environment of the IXV Experimental Vehicle by Means of WTT and CFD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosson, E.; Soler, J.; Pierre, V.; Binetti, P.; Walloschek, T.

    2009-01-01

    This paper deals with all the aerothermodynamic (ATD) activities carried out so far in the framework of the IXV project, in order to characterize the aerothermal environment experienced by the Intermediate eXperimental Vehicle (IXV) during its atmospheric re- entry. The ATD synthesis activity is led by EADS Astrium, with support from DLR (tests in HEG and H2K facilities, CFD), VKI (tests in the Long-Shot facility, survey on IXV Thermal Protection System (TPS) materials properties), CIRA (CFD), University of Roma (CFD) and CFS Engineering (CFD). During the Phases A and B1 of the project (before SRR), only Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) was used to build the IXV aerothermodynamic database and specify the sizing heat fluxes over the vehicle; in Phase B2/C1, both wind tunnel tests (WTT) - HEG, H2K and Long- Shot - and CFD have been used in order to reach Preliminary Design Review maturity. This paper presents: how wind tunnel test results have allowed improving the criterion of natural laminar-to-turbulent transition in the body-flap flow separation (flap heating being one critical aspect on IXV); a methodology for the ground-to-flight transposition based on dedicated WTT rebuilding CFD; the improvement of ATD margin policy thanks to wind tunnel data; the investigation of the sensitivities to chemical and physical models with some flight-condition CFD.

  9. A database of aerothermal measurements in hypersonic flow for CFD validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holden, M. S.; Moselle, J. R.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental database selected and compiled from aerothermal measurements obtained on basic model configurations on which fundamental flow phenomena could be most easily examined. The experimental studies were conducted in hypersonic flows in 48-inch, 96-inch, and 6-foot shock tunnels. A special computer program was constructed to provide easy access to the measurements in the database as well as the means to plot the measurements and compare them with imported data. The database contains tabulations of model configurations, freestream conditions, and measurements of heat transfer, pressure, and skin friction for each of the studies selected for inclusion. The first segment contains measurements in laminar flow emphasizing shock-wave boundary-layer interaction. In the second segment, measurements in transitional flows over flat plates and cones are given. The third segment comprises measurements in regions of shock-wave/turbulent-boundary-layer interactions. Studies of the effects of surface roughness of nosetips and conical afterbodies are presented in the fourth segment of the database. Detailed measurements in regions of shock/shock boundary layer interaction are contained in the fifth segment. Measurements in regions of wall jet and transpiration cooling are presented in the final two segments.

  10. Development of a Tool to Recreate the Mars Science Laboratory Aerothermal Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beerman, A. F.; Lewis, M. J.; Santos, J. A.; White, T. R.

    2010-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory will enter the Martian atmosphere in 2012 with multiple char depth sensors and in-depth thermocouples in its heatshield. The aerothermal environment experienced by MSL may be computationally recreated using the data from the sensors and a material response program, such as the Fully Implicit Ablation and Thermal (FIAT) response program, through the matching of the char depth and thermocouple predictions of the material response program to the sensor data. A tool, CHanging Inputs from the Environment of FIAT (CHIEF), was developed to iteratively change different environmental conditions such that FIAT predictions match within certain criteria applied to an external data set. The computational environment is changed by iterating on the enthalpy, pressure, or heat transfer coefficient at certain times in the trajectory. CHIEF was initially compared against arc-jet test data from the development of the MSL heatshield and then against simulated sensor data derived from design trajectories for MSL. CHIEF was able to match char depth and in-depth thermocouple temperatures within the bounds placed upon it for these cases. Further refinement of CHIEF to compare multiple time points and assign convergence criteria may improve accuracy.

  11. The effect of time constraints and running phases on combined event pistol shooting performance.

    PubMed

    Dadswell, Clare; Payton, Carl; Holmes, Paul; Burden, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    The combined event is a crucial aspect of the modern pentathlon competition, but little is known about how shooting performance changes through the event. This study aimed to identify (i) how performance-related variables changed within each shooting series and (ii) how performance-related variables changed between each shooting series. Seventeen modern pentathletes completed combined event trials. An optoelectronic shooting system recorded score and pistol movement, and force platforms recorded centre of pressure movement 1 s prior to every shot. Heart rate and blood lactate values were recorded throughout the event. Whilst heart rate and blood lactate significantly increased between series (P < 0.05), there were no accompanying changes in the time period that participants spent aiming at the target, shot score, pistol movement or centre of pressure movement (P > 0.05). Thus, combined event shooting performance following each running phase appears similar to shooting performance following only 20 m of running. This finding has potential implications for the way in which modern pentathletes train for combined event shooting, and highlights the need for modern pentathletes to establish new methods with which to enhance shooting accuracy.

  12. Aerothermal Performance of a Radiatively and Actively Cooled Panel at Mach 66

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    Space Administration db~buuabU& Scie ~k ntUcn Tswh~ca Infamaltion Bran•h 1979 . .7 5 -, ’ WNW*" - --- sUrMMRY A flight-weight radiative and actively... ence 7. The panel holder has a sharp leading edge and a rectangular planform 141 cm (55.4 in.) wide by 300 cm (118 in.) long. The depth of the panel

  13. Calibration and Performance of the AEDC/VKF Tunnel C, Mach Number 4, Aerothermal Wind Tunnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-01

    Beattie - Bridgeman equation of state for air is shown in the figures included in this appendix. Real-Gas Enthalpy General Forms The following... Beattie - Bridgeman equation of state for air. 106 AEDC-TR-82-6 P(Rea1 Gas) R(P/PT)(P/PT)Idea1 8 PT1. 02 Sym 0 Computed Real-Gas Values Curve Fit TT, oR ~600...chamber properties; then the results were adjusted to include the real-gas effects. The real-gas properties are based on the Beattie - Bridgeman equation

  14. Measuring "Progress": Performativity as Both Driver and Constraint in School Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Yvette; Lewin, Cathy

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we describe one secondary school's radical attempt to rethink the shape and purpose of education for its pupils, and its subsequent return to more traditional methods in the face of pressures of performativity and accountability. Framing our analysis within activity theory and its emphasis on contradiction as a driver for change, we…

  15. Finite-temperature properties of nonmagnetic transition metals: Comparison of the performance of constraint-based semilocal and nonlocal functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharaee, Leili; Erhart, Paul; Hyldgaard, Per

    2017-02-01

    We assess the performance of nonempirical, truly nonlocal, and semilocal functionals with regard to structural and thermal properties of 3 d ,4 d , and 5 d nonmagnetic transition metals. We focus on constraint- based functionals and consider the consistent-exchange van der Waals density-functional version vdW-DF-cx [Phys. Rev. B 89, 035412 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevB.89.035412], the semilocal PBE functional [Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 3865 (1996), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.77.3865], and the PBEsol functional [Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 136406 (2008), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.100.136406], as well as the AM05 metafunctional [Phys. Rev. B 72, 085108 (2005), 10.1103/PhysRevB.72.085108]. Using the quasiharmonic approximation, the structural parameters, elastic response, and thermal expansion at finite temperatures are computed and compared to experimental data. We also compute cohesive energies explicitly including zero-point vibrations. It is shown that overall vdW-DF-cx provides an accurate description of thermal properties and retains a level of transferability and accuracy that is comparable to or better than some of the best constraint-based semilocal functionals. Especially, with regard to the cohesive energies, the consistent inclusion of spin-polarization effects in the atoms turns out to be crucial, and it is important to use the rigorous spin-vdW-DF-cx formulation [Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 136402 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.115.136402]. This demonstrates that vdW-DF-cx has general-purpose character and can be used to study systems that have both sparse and dense electron distributions.

  16. Performance model incorporating weather related constraints for fields of unattended ground sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, David C.

    1999-07-01

    Tactical sensing on the battlefield involves real-time information processing of acoustic, seismic, electromagnetic, and environmental sensor data to obtain and exploit an automated situational awareness. The value-added of tactical sensing is to give the war-fighter real-time situational information without requiring human interpretation of the underlying scientific data. For example, acoustic, seismic, and magnetic signatures of a ground vehicle can be used in a pattern recognition algorithm to identify a tank, truck, or TEL, but all the war-fighter wants to know is how many of each vehicle type are present and which way are they going. However, the confidences of this automated information processing are dependent on environmental conditions and background interference. A key feature of tactical ground sensing is the ability to integrate objective statistical confidences into the process to intelligently suppress false alarms, thus allowing the war-fighter to concentrate on war fighting. This paper presents how the situation confidence metric is generated starting with the sensor SNR going all the way through to the target classification and track confidences. This technique also allows modeling of ground sensor performance in hypothetical environments such as bad weather.

  17. Aerothermal Analysis and Design of the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazanek, Daniel D.; Kumar, Renjith R.; Qu, Min; Seywald, Hans

    2000-01-01

    The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) primary mission will be performed by making measurements of the inter-satellite range change between two co-planar, low altitude near-polar orbiting satellites. Understanding the uncertainties in the disturbance environment, particularly the aerodynamic drag and torques, is critical in several mission areas. These include an accurate estimate of the spacecraft orbital lifetime, evaluation of spacecraft attitude control requirements, and estimation of the orbital maintenance maneuver frequency necessitated by differences in the drag forces acting on both satellites. The FREEMOL simulation software has been developed and utilized to analyze and suggest design modifications to the GRACE spacecraft. Aerodynamic accommodation bounding analyses were performed and worst-case envelopes were obtained for the aerodynamic torques and the differential ballistic coefficients between the leading and trailing GRACE spacecraft. These analyses demonstrate how spacecraft aerodynamic design and analysis can benefit from a better understanding of spacecraft surface accommodation properties, and the implications for mission design constraints such as formation spacing control.

  18. A Multidisciplinary Performance Analysis of a Lifting-Body Single-Stage-to-Orbit Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tartabini, Paul V.; Lepsch, Roger A.; Korte, J. J.; Wurster, Kathryn E.

    2000-01-01

    Lockheed Martin Skunk Works (LMSW) is currently developing a single-stage-to-orbit reusable launch vehicle called VentureStar(TM) A team at NASA Langley Research Center participated with LMSW in the screening and evaluation of a number of early VentureStar(TM) configurations. The performance analyses that supported these initial studies were conducted to assess the effect of a lifting body shape, linear aerospike engine and metallic thermal protection system (TPS) on the weight and performance of the vehicle. These performance studies were performed in a multidisciplinary fashion that indirectly linked the trajectory optimization with weight estimation and aerothermal analysis tools. This approach was necessary to develop optimized ascent and entry trajectories that met all vehicle design constraints. Significant improvements in ascent performance were achieved when the vehicle flew a lifting trajectory and varied the engine mixture ratio during flight. Also, a considerable reduction in empty weight was possible by adjusting the total oxidizer-to-fuel and liftoff thrust-to-weight ratios. However, the optimal ascent flight profile had to be altered to ensure that the vehicle could be trimmed in pitch using only the flow diverting capability of the aerospike engine. Likewise, the optimal entry trajectory had to be tailored to meet TPS heating rate and transition constraints while satisfying a crossrange requirement.

  19. Aerothermal and aeroelastic response prediction of aerospace structures in high-speed flows using direct numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostoich, Christopher Mark

    Future high-speed air vehicles will be lightweight, flexible, and reusable. Ve- hicles fitting this description are subject to severe thermal and fluid dynamic loading from multiple sources such as aerothermal heating, propulsion sys- tem exhaust, and high dynamic pressures. The combination of low-margin design requirements and extreme environmental conditions emphasizes the occurrence of fluid-thermal-structural coupling. Numerous attempts to field such vehicles have been unsuccessful over the past half-century due par- tially to the inability of traditional design and analysis practices to predict the structural response in this flight regime. In this thesis, a high-fidelity computational approach is used to examine the fluid-structural response of aerospace structures in high-speed flows. The method is applied to two cases: one involving a fluid-thermal interaction problem in a hypersonic flow and the other a fluid-structure interaction study involving a turbulent boundary layer and a compliant panel. The coupled fluid-thermal investigation features a nominally rigid alu- minum spherical dome fixed to a ceramic panel holder placed in a Mach 6.59 laminar boundary layer. The problem was originally studied by Glass and Hunt in a 1988 wind tunnel experiment in the NASA Langley 8-Foot High Temperature Tunnel and is motivated by thermally bowed body panels designed for the National Aerospace Plane. In this work, the compressible Navier-Stokes equations for a thermally perfect gas and the transient heat equation in the structure are solved simultaneously using two high-fidelity solvers coupled at the solid-fluid interface. Predicted surface heat fluxes are within 10% of the measured values in the dome interior with greater differ- ences found near the dome edges where uncertainties concerning the exper- imental model's construction likely influence the thermal dynamics. On the flat panel holder, the local surface heat fluxes approach those on the wind- ward dome face

  20. Constraint satisfaction using a hybrid evolutionary hill-climbing algorithm that performs opportunistic arc and path revision

    SciTech Connect

    Bowen, J.; Dozier, G.

    1996-12-31

    This paper introduces a hybrid evolutionary hill-climbing algorithm that quickly solves (Constraint Satisfaction Problems (CSPs)). This hybrid uses opportunistic arc and path revision in an interleaved fashion to reduce the size of the search space and to realize when to quit if a CSP is based on an inconsistent constraint network. This hybrid outperforms a well known hill-climbing algorithm, the Iterative Descent Method, on a test suite of 750 randomly generated CSPs.

  1. Creating Positive Task Constraints

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mally, Kristi K.

    2006-01-01

    Constraints are characteristics of the individual, the task, or the environment that mold and shape movement choices and performances. Constraints can be positive--encouraging proficient movements or negative--discouraging movement or promoting ineffective movements. Physical educators must analyze, evaluate, and determine the effect various…

  2. In-situ growth of MnO2 crystals under nanopore-constraint in carbon nanofibers and their electrochemical performance.

    PubMed

    Le, TrungHieu; Yang, Ying; Yu, Liu; Huang, Zheng-Hong; Kang, Feiyu

    2016-11-21

    Growing MnO2 nanocrystals in the bulk of porous carbon nanofibers is conducted in a KMnO4 aqueous solution aimed to enhance the electrochemical performance of MnO2. The rate of redox reaction between KMnO4 and carbon was controlled by the concentration of KMnO4 in a neutral solution. The MnO2 nanoparticles grow along with (211) crystal faces when the redox reaction happens on the surface of fibers under 1D constraint, while the nanoparticles grow along with (200) crystal faces when the redox reaction happens in the bulk of fibers under 3D constraint. The composite, where MnO2 nanoparticles are formed in the bulk under a constraint, yields an electrode material for supercapacitors showing good electron transport, rapid ion penetration, fast and reversible Faradaic reaction, and excellent rate performance. The capacitance of the composite electrode could be 1282 F g(-1) under a current density of 0.2 A g(-1) in 1 M Na2SO4 electrolyte. A symmetric supercapacitor delivers energy density of 36 Wh kg(-1) with power density of 39 W kg(-1), and can maintain 7.5 Wh kg(-1) at 10.3 kW kg(-1). It exhibits an excellent electrochemical cycling stability with 101% initial capacitance and 95% columbic efficiency even after 1000 cycles of charge/discharge.

  3. In-situ growth of MnO2 crystals under nanopore-constraint in carbon nanofibers and their electrochemical performance

    PubMed Central

    Le, TrungHieu; Yang, Ying; Yu, Liu; Huang, Zheng-hong; Kang, Feiyu

    2016-01-01

    Growing MnO2 nanocrystals in the bulk of porous carbon nanofibers is conducted in a KMnO4 aqueous solution aimed to enhance the electrochemical performance of MnO2. The rate of redox reaction between KMnO4 and carbon was controlled by the concentration of KMnO4 in a neutral solution. The MnO2 nanoparticles grow along with (211) crystal faces when the redox reaction happens on the surface of fibers under 1D constraint, while the nanoparticles grow along with (200) crystal faces when the redox reaction happens in the bulk of fibers under 3D constraint. The composite, where MnO2 nanoparticles are formed in the bulk under a constraint, yields an electrode material for supercapacitors showing good electron transport, rapid ion penetration, fast and reversible Faradaic reaction, and excellent rate performance. The capacitance of the composite electrode could be 1282 F g−1 under a current density of 0.2 A g−1 in 1 M Na2SO4 electrolyte. A symmetric supercapacitor delivers energy density of 36 Wh kg−1 with power density of 39 W kg−1, and can maintain 7.5 Wh kg−1 at 10.3 kW kg−1. It exhibits an excellent electrochemical cycling stability with 101% initial capacitance and 95% columbic efficiency even after 1000 cycles of charge/discharge. PMID:27869184

  4. Aerothermal tests of spherical dome protuberances on a flat plate at a Mach number of 6.5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, C. E.; Hunt, L. R.

    1986-01-01

    Aerothermal tests were conducted in the Langley 8-Foot High-Temperature Tunnel at a Mach number of 6.5 on a series of spherical dome protuberances mounted on a flat-plate test apparatus. Detailed surface pressure and heating-rate distributions were obtained for various dome heights and diameters submerged in both laminar and turbulent boundary layers including a baseline geometric condition representing a thermally bowed metallic thermal protection system (TPS) tile. The present results indicated that the surface pressures on the domes were increased on the windward surface and reduced on the leeward surface as predicted by linearized small-perturbation theory, and the distributions were only moderately affected by boundary-layer variations. Surface heating rates for turbulent flow increased on the windward surface and decreased on the leeward surface similar to the pressure; but for laminar boundary layers, the heating rates remained high on the leeward surface, probably due to local transition. Transitional flow effects cause heat load augmentation to increase by 30 percent for the maximum dome height in a laminar boundary layer. However, the corresponding augmentation for a dome with a height of 0.1 in. and a diameter of 14 in. representative of a bowed TPS tile was 14 percent or less for either a laminar or turbulent boundary layer.

  5. Advanced Models for Prediction of High Altitude Aero-Thermal Loads of a Space Re-entry Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Votta, R.; Schettino, A.; Bonfiglioli, A.

    2011-05-01

    The analysis of the rarefaction effects in predicting the main aero-thermal loads of a Space re-entry vehicle is presented. It is well known that the Navier-Stokes equations fail in rarefied regimes and other approaches must be used. In the present paper different configurations have been simulated by using the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo method. Moreover, slip flow boundary conditions have been implemented in a Navier-Stokes code in order to extend the validity of the continuum approach to the transitional flow regime. Finally, bridging formulas for high altitude aerodynamics of winged bodies have been used. Firstly, two simple geometries have been analysed, specifically designed to study the phenomenon of shock wave boundary layer interaction: a hollow cylinder flare, for which some experiments are available; and a blunt-nosed flat plate/flap model designed and tested at the Italian Aerospace Research Centre. The other configurations taken into account are, respectively, an experimental winged re-entry vehicle and a capsule, for which global aerodynamic coefficients and local wall heating have been determined with different approaches. The Navier-Stokes code with slip flow boundary conditions has shown good predicting capabilities compared with experiments in the hollow cylinder flare case; however, for the winged vehicle and capsule cases, the CFD results are not fully satisfactory and the Monte Carlo method remains the most reliable approach, together with the bridging formula, that provides good results for the aerodynamic coefficients.

  6. Quality of obstetric care in public-sector facilities and constraints to implementing emergency obstetric care services: evidence from high- and low-performing districts of Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Anwar, Iqbal; Kalim, Nahid; Koblinsky, Marge

    2009-04-01

    This study explored the quality of obstetric care in public-sector facilities and the constraints to programming comprehensive essential obstetric care (EOC) services in rural areas of Khulna and Sylhet divisions, relatively high- and low-performing areas of Bangladesh respectively. Quality was explored by physically inspecting all public-sector EOC facilities and the constraints through in-depth interviews with public-sector programme managers and service providers. Distribution of the functional EOC facilities satisfied the United Nation's minimum criteria of at least one comprehensive EOC and four basic EOC facilities for every 500,000 people in Khulna but not in Sylhet region. Human-resource constraints were the major barrier for maternal health. Sanctioned posts for nurses were inadequate in rural areas of both the divisions; however, deployment and retention of trained human resources were more problematic in rural areas of Sylhet. Other problems also plagued care, including unavailability of blood in rural settings and lack of use of evidence-based techniques. The overall quality of care was better in the EOC facilities of Khulna division than in Sylhet. 'Context' of care was also different in these two areas: the population in Sylhet is less literate, more conservative, and faces more geographical and sociocultural barriers in accessing services. As a consequence of both care delivered and the context, more normal vaginal and caesarian-section deliveries were carried out in the public-sector EOC facilities in the Khulna region, with the exception of the medical college hospitals. To improve maternal healthcare, there is a need for a human-resource plan that increases the number of posts in rural areas and ensures availability. All categories of maternal healthcare providers also need training on evidence-based techniques. While the centralized push system of management has its strengths, special strategies for improving the response in the low-performing

  7. Decreased nocturnal awakenings in young adults performing bikram yoga: a low-constraint home sleep monitoring study.

    PubMed

    Kudesia, Ravi S; Bianchi, Matt T

    2012-01-01

    This pilot study evaluated the impact of Bikram Yoga on subjective and objective sleep parameters. We compared subjective (diary) and objective (headband sleep monitor) sleep measures on yoga versus nonyoga days during a 14-day period. Subjects (n = 13) were not constrained regarding yoga-practice days, other exercise, caffeine, alcohol, or naps. These activities did not segregate by choice of yoga days. Standard sleep metrics were unaffected by yoga, including sleep latency, total sleep time, and percentage of time spent in rapid eye movement (REM), light non-REM, deep non-REM, or wake after sleep onset (WASO). Consistent with prior work, transition probability analysis was a more sensitive index of sleep architecture changes than standard metrics. Specifically, Bikram Yoga was associated with significantly faster return to sleep after nocturnal awakenings. We conclude that objective home sleep monitoring is feasible in a low-constraint, real-world study design. Further studies on patients with insomnia will determine whether the results generalize or not.

  8. Constraints to Senior Management's Capacity to Implement the Performance Management System in Senior Secondary Schools in Botswana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bulawa, Philip

    2013-01-01

    The performance management system in different forms has been in existence in many countries for some years. In 1999 Botswana like other countries decided to implement a performance management system (PMS) across the entire public service including schools. At its introduction, the government explained the purpose for which this reform was being…

  9. Accountability under Constraint: The Relationship between Collective Bargaining Agreements and California Schools' and Districts' Performance under No Child Left Behind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strunk, Katharine O.; McEachin, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The authors examine how the collective bargaining agreement (CBA) negotiated between teachers' unions and districts is associated with schools' and districts' performance under accountability pressures in California. They find that CBA restrictiveness is associated with the increased likelihood that districts will be in Program Improvement (PI)…

  10. Aerothermal performance and structural integrity of a Rene 41 thermal protection system at Mach 6.6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deveikis, W. D.; Miserentino, R.; Weinstein, I.; Shideler, J. L.

    1975-01-01

    A flightweight panel based on a metallic thermal-protection-system concept for hypersonic and reentry vehicles was subjected repeatedly to thermal cycling by quartz-lamp radiant heating using a thermal history representative of a reentry heat pulse and to aerodynamic heating at heating rates required to sustain a surface temperature of 1089 K (1960 R). The panel consisted of a corrugated heat shield and support members of 0.05-cm (0.02-in.) thick Rene 41 of riveted construction and 5.08-cm (2-in.) thick silica fibrous insulation packages covered by Rene 41 foil and inconel screening. All tests were conducted in the Langley 8-foot high-temperature structures tunnel with the heat shield corrugations alined in the stream direction. The panel sustained 5.33 hr of intermittent radiant heating and 6.5 min of intermittent aerodynamic heating of up to 1-min duration for differential pressures up to 6.2 kPa (0.9 psi) with no apparent degradation of thermal or structural integrity, as indicated by temperature distributions and results from load deflection tests and vibration surveys of natural frequencies.

  11. On-Orbit Constraints Test - Performing Pre-Flight Tests with Flight Hardware, Astronauts and Ground Support Equipment to Assure On-Orbit Success

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haddad, Michael E.

    2008-01-01

    On-Orbit Constraints Test (OOCT's) refers to mating flight hardware together on the ground before they will be mated on-orbit. The concept seems simple but it can be difficult to perform operations like this on the ground when the flight hardware is being designed to be mated on-orbit in a zero-g and/or vacuum environment of space. Also some of the items are manufactured years apart so how are mating tasks performed on these components if one piece is on-orbit before its mating piece is planned to be built. Both the Internal Vehicular Activity (IVA) and Extra-Vehicular Activity (EVA) OOCT's performed at Kennedy Space Center will be presented in this paper. Details include how OOCT's should mimic on-orbit operational scenarios, a series of photographs will be shown that were taken during OOCT's performed on International Space Station (ISS) flight elements, lessons learned as a result of the OOCT's will be presented and the paper will conclude with possible applications to Moon and Mars Surface operations planned for the Constellation Program.

  12. Research on the aero-thermal effects by 3D analysis model of the optical window of the infrared imaging guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Bo; Li, Lin; Zhu, Ying

    2014-11-01

    Researches on hypersonic vehicles have been a hotspot in the field of aerospace because of the pursuits for higher speed by human being. Infrared imaging guidance is playing a very important role in modern warfare. When an Infrared Ray(IR) imaging guided missile is flying in the air at high speed, its optical dome suffers from serious aero-optic effects because of air flow. The turbulence around the dome and the thermal effects of the optical window would cause disturbance to the wavefront from the target. Therefore, detected images will be biased, dithered and blurred, and the capabilities of the seeker for detecting, tracking and recognizing are weakened. In this paper, methods for thermal and structural analysis with Heat Transfer and Elastic Mechanics are introduced. By studying the aero-thermal effects and aero-thermal radiation effects of the optical window, a 3D analysis model of the optical window is established by using finite element method. The direct coupling analysis is employed as a solving strategy. The variation regularity of the temperature field is obtained. For light with different incident angles, the influence on the ray propagation caused by window deformation is analyzed with theoretical calculation and optical/thermal/structural integrated analysis method respectively.

  13. Post-Flight Analysis of the Guidance, Navigation, and Control Performance During Orion Exploration Flight Test 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Andrew; Mamich, Harvey; Hoelscher, Brian

    2015-01-01

    The first test flight of the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle presented additional challenges for guidance, navigation and control as compared to a typical re-entry from the International Space Station or other Low Earth Orbit. An elevated re-entry velocity and steeper flight path angle were chosen to achieve aero-thermal flight test objectives. New IMU's, a GPS receiver, and baro altimeters were flight qualified to provide the redundant navigation needed for human space flight. The guidance and control systems must manage the vehicle lift vector in order to deliver the vehicle to a precision, coastal, water landing, while operating within aerodynamic load, reaction control system, and propellant constraints. Extensive pre-flight six degree-of-freedom analysis was performed that showed mission success for the nominal mission as well as in the presence of sensor and effector failures. Post-flight reconstruction analysis of the test flight is presented in this paper to show whether that all performance metrics were met and establish how well the pre-flight analysis predicted the in-flight performance.

  14. Constraints on adaptive evolution: the functional trade-off between reproduction and fast-start swimming performance in the Trinidadian guppy (Poecilia reticulata).

    PubMed

    Ghalambor, Cameron K; Reznick, David N; Walker, Jeffrey A

    2004-07-01

    The empirical study of natural selection reveals that adaptations often involve trade-offs between competing functions. Because natural selection acts on whole organisms rather than isolated traits, adaptive evolution may be constrained by the interaction between traits that are functionally integrated. Yet, few attempts have been made to characterize how and when such constraints are manifested or whether they limit the adaptive divergence of populations. Here we examine the consequences of adaptive life-history evolution on locomotor performance in the live-bearing guppy. In response to increased predation from piscivorous fish, Trinidadian guppies evolve an increased allocation of resources toward reproduction. These populations are also under strong selection for rapid fast-start swimming performance to evade predators. Because embryo development increases a female's wet mass as she approaches parturition, an increased investment in reproductive allocation should impede fast-start performance. We find evidence for adaptive but constrained evolution of fast-start swimming performance in laboratory trials conducted on second-generation lab-reared fish. Female guppies from high-predation localities attain a faster acceleration and velocity and travel a greater distance during fast-start swimming trials. However, velocity and distance traveled decline more rapidly over the course of pregnancy in these same females, thus reducing the magnitude of divergence in swimming performance between high- and low-predation populations. This functional trade-off between reproduction and swimming performance reveals how different aspects of the phenotype are integrated and highlights the complexity of adaptation at the whole-organism level.

  15. Improved numerical methods for turbulent viscous flows aerothermal modeling program, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karki, K. C.; Patankar, S. V.; Runchal, A. K.; Mongia, H. C.

    1988-01-01

    The details of a study to develop accurate and efficient numerical schemes to predict complex flows are described. In this program, several discretization schemes were evaluated using simple test cases. This assessment led to the selection of three schemes for an in-depth evaluation based on two-dimensional flows. The scheme with the superior overall performance was incorporated in a computer program for three-dimensional flows. To improve the computational efficiency, the selected discretization scheme was combined with a direct solution approach in which the fluid flow equations are solved simultaneously rather than sequentially.

  16. Techniques for aerothermal tests of large, flightweight thermal protection panels in a Mach 7 wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deveikis, W. D.; Bruce, W. E., Jr.; Karns, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    Thermal performance and structural integrity are experimentally evaluated in the Langley 8-ft high temperature structures tunnel, which uses a combustion products test medium to provide realistic combinations of aerodynamic heating and loading. Recently developed techniques provide independent control of rate and magnitude of surface heating and differential pressure, protection against adverse acoustics buffeting during facility starting and stopping, programed radiant heating before exposing test panels to the high energy stream, and infrared radiometry for detailed surface temperatures. These techniques were verified repeatedly by return of useful data on metallic and nonmetallic panel concepts of reusable surface insulation.

  17. The Performance Analysis of AN Akf Based Tightly-Coupled Ins/gps Integrated Positioning and Orientation Scheme with Odometer and Non-Holonomic Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, K.-Y.; Lin, C.-A.; Chiang, K.-W.

    2012-08-01

    INS/GPS integration scheme can overcome the shortcoming of GPS or INS alone to provide superior performance, thus this study implements a tightly-coupled INS/GPS integration scheme using AKF as the core estimator by tuning the measurement noise matrix R adaptively. The AKF is based on the maximum likelihood criterion for choosing the most appropriate weight and thus the Kalman gain factors. The conventional EKF implementation suffers uncertain results while the update measurement noise matrix R and/or the process noise matrix Q does not meet the case. The primary advantage of AKF is that the filter has less relationship with the priori statistical information because R and/or Q vary with time. The innovation sequence is used to derive the measurement weights through the covariance matrices, innovation-based adaptive estimation (IAE) in this study. The covariance matrices R are adapted in the study when measurements update with time. A window based approach is implemented to update the quality of GPS pseudo-range measurements by adaptively replace the measurement weights through the latest estimated covariance matrices R. The use of odometer is particularly recommended when a low cost and precise vehicle localization system has to be implemented and there is the risk of GPS coverage failure, which is prone to happen when the vehicle enters a tunnel or cross deep valleys. Odometers are applied in land-vehicle navigation to provide augmented host velocity observations for standalone INS system in this study. There are two non-holonomic constraints (NHC) available for land vehicles. Land vehicles will not jump off the ground or slid on the ground under normal condition. Using these constraints, the velocity of the vehicle in the plane perpendicular to the forward direction is almost zero. EKF and AKF based tightly-coupled scheme with NHC is implemented in the study. To validate the performance of AKF based tightly-coupled INS/GPS integration scheme with odometer and

  18. Assessment of Aerothermal Heating Augmentation Attributed to Surface Catalysis in High Enthalpy Shock Tunnel Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLean, M.; Holden, M.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of gas/surface interaction in making CFD predictions of convective heating has been considered with application to ground tests performed in high enthalpy shock tunnels where additional heating augmentation attributable to surface recombination has been observed for nitrogen, air and carbon dioxide flows. For test articles constructed of stainless steel and aluminum, measurements have been made with several types of heat transfer instrumentation including thin- film, calorimeter, and coaxial thermocouple sensors. These experiments have been modeled by computations made with the high quality, chemically reacting, Navier- Stokes solver, DPLR and the heating results compared. Some typical cases considered include results on an axisymmetric sphere-cone, axisymmetric spherical capsule, spherical capsule at angle of attack, and two- dimensional cylinder. In nitrogen flows, cases considered show a recombination probability on the order of 10-3, which agrees with published data. In many cases in air and CO2, measurements exceeding the predicted level of convective heating have been observed which are consistent with approximately complete recombination (to O2/N2 or CO2) on the surface of the model (sometimes called a super-catalytic wall). It has been recognized that the conclusion that this behavior is tied to an excessively high degree of catalytic efficiency is dependent on the current understanding of the freestream and shock-layer state of the gas.

  19. Influence of nonequilibrium radiation and shape change on aerothermal environment of a Jovian entry body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. N.; Subramanian, S. V.

    1981-01-01

    The influence of nonequilibrium radiative energy transfer and the effect of probe configuration changes on the flow phenomena around a Jovian entry body are investigated. The radiating shock layer flow is assumed to be axisymmetric, viscous, laminar and in chemical equilibrium. The radiative transfer equations are derived under nonequilibrium conditions which include multilevel energy transitions. The equilibrium radiative transfer analysis is performed with an existing nongray radiation model which accounts for molecular band, atomic line, and continuum transitions. The nonequilibrium results are obtained with and without ablation injection in the shock layer. The nonequilibrium results are found to be greatly influenced by the temperature distribution in the shock layer. In the absence of ablative products, the convective and radiative heating to the entry body are reduced under nonequilibrium conditions. The influence of nonequilibrium is found to be greater at higher entry altitudes. With coupled ablation and carbon phenolic injection, 16 chemical species are used in the ablation layer for radiation absorption. Equilibrium and nonequilibrium results are compared under peak heating conditions.

  20. Logistic regression analyses for predicting clinically important differences in motor capacity, motor performance, and functional independence after constraint-induced therapy in children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tien-ni; Wu, Ching-yi; Chen, Chia-ling; Shieh, Jeng-yi; Lu, Lu; Lin, Keh-chung

    2013-03-01

    Given the growing evidence for the effects of constraint-induced therapy (CIT) in children with cerebral palsy (CP), there is a need for investigating the characteristics of potential participants who may benefit most from this intervention. This study aimed to establish predictive models for the effects of pediatric CIT on motor and functional outcomes. Therapists administered CIT to 49 children (aged 3-11 years) with CP. Sessions were 1-3.5h a day, twice a week, for 3-4 weeks. Parents were asked to document the number of restraint hours outside of the therapy sessions. Domains of treatment outcomes included motor capacity (measured by the Peabody Developmental Motor Scales II), motor performance (measured by the Pediatric Motor Activity Log), and functional independence (measured by the Pediatric Functional Independence Measure). Potential predictors included age, affected side, compliance (measured by time of restraint), and the initial level of motor impairment severity. Tests were administered before, immediately after, and 3 months after the intervention. Logistic regression analyses showed that total amount of restraint time was the only significant predictor for improved motor capacity immediately after CIT. Younger children who restrained the less affected arm for a longer time had a greater chance to achieve clinically significant improvements in motor performance. For outcomes of functional independence in daily life, younger age was associated with clinically meaningful improvement in the self-care domain. Baseline motor abilities were significantly predictive of better improvement in mobility and cognition. Significant predictors varied according to the aspects of motor outcomes after 3 months of follow-up. The potential predictors identified in this study allow clinicians to target those children who may benefit most from CIT.

  1. Turbine Aerothermal Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    layer velocity profiles without and with plasma discharge forcing. Figure 6: Global hawk Cascade Blades Figure 7: Dimpled HPT vanes for Turbine...Research Facility Figure 8: Wake traverse of dimples on roughened vanes . 1 SUMMARY The objectives of this task are to increase turbine engine...Hot wire anemometers and pitot -static pressure instrumentation were used to quantify the boundary layer and external flow fluid mechanical properties

  2. Energy Efficient Engine: Combustor component performance program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubiel, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    The results of the Combustor Component Performance analysis as developed under the Energy Efficient Engine (EEE) program are presented. This study was conducted to demonstrate the aerothermal and environmental goals established for the EEE program and to identify areas where refinements might be made to meet future combustor requirements. In this study, a full annular combustor test rig was used to establish emission levels and combustor performance for comparison with those indicated by the supporting technology program. In addition, a combustor sector test rig was employed to examine differences in emissions and liner temperatures obtained during the full annular performance and supporting technology tests.

  3. Dynamic Constraint Satisfaction with Reasonable Global Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, Jeremy

    2003-01-01

    Previously studied theoretical frameworks for dynamic constraint satisfaction problems (DCSPs) employ a small set of primitive operators to modify a problem instance. They do not address the desire to model problems using sophisticated global constraints, and do not address efficiency questions related to incremental constraint enforcement. In this paper, we extend a DCSP framework to incorporate global constraints with flexible scope. A simple approach to incremental propagation after scope modification can be inefficient under some circumstances. We characterize the cases when this inefficiency can occur, and discuss two ways to alleviate this problem: adding rejection variables to the scope of flexible constraints, and adding new features to constraints that permit increased control over incremental propagation.

  4. Logistic Regression Analyses for Predicting Clinically Important Differences in Motor Capacity, Motor Performance, and Functional Independence after Constraint-Induced Therapy in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Tien-ni; Wu, Ching-yi; Chen, Chia-ling; Shieh, Jeng-yi; Lu, Lu; Lin, Keh-chung

    2013-01-01

    Given the growing evidence for the effects of constraint-induced therapy (CIT) in children with cerebral palsy (CP), there is a need for investigating the characteristics of potential participants who may benefit most from this intervention. This study aimed to establish predictive models for the effects of pediatric CIT on motor and functional…

  5. Constraint monitoring in TOSCA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, Howard

    1992-01-01

    The Job-Shop Scheduling Problem (JSSP) deals with the allocation of resources over time to factory operations. Allocations are subject to various constraints (e.g., production precedence relationships, factory capacity constraints, and limits on the allowable number of machine setups) which must be satisfied for a schedule to be valid. The identification of constraint violations and the monitoring of constraint threats plays a vital role in schedule generation in terms of the following: (1) directing the scheduling process; and (2) informing scheduling decisions. This paper describes a general mechanism for identifying constraint violations and monitoring threats to the satisfaction of constraints throughout schedule generation.

  6. On Random Betweenness Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goerdt, Andreas

    Ordering constraints are analogous to instances of the satisfiability problem in conjunctive normalform, but instead of a boolean assignment we consider a linear ordering of the variables in question. A clause becomes true given a linear ordering iff the relative ordering of its variables obeys the constraint considered.

  7. Credit Constraints in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lochner, Lance; Monge-Naranjo, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    We review studies of the impact of credit constraints on the accumulation of human capital. Evidence suggests that credit constraints have recently become important for schooling and other aspects of households' behavior. We highlight the importance of early childhood investments, as their response largely determines the impact of credit…

  8. Constraint Reasoning Over Strings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koga, Dennis (Technical Monitor); Golden, Keith; Pang, Wanlin

    2003-01-01

    This paper discusses an approach to representing and reasoning about constraints over strings. We discuss how many string domains can often be concisely represented using regular languages, and how constraints over strings, and domain operations on sets of strings, can be carried out using this representation.

  9. Tuning the Morphologies of MnO/C Hybrids by Space Constraint Assembly of Mn-MOFs for High Performance Li Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Sun, Dan; Tang, Yougen; Ye, Delai; Yan, Jun; Zhou, Haoshen; Wang, Haiyan

    2017-02-15

    Morphology controllable fabrication of electrode materials is of great significance but is still a major challenge for constructing advanced Li ion batteries. Herein, we propose a novel space constraint assembly approach to tune the morphology of Mn(terephthalic acid) (PTA)-MOF, in which benzonic acid was employed as a modulator to adjust the available MOF assembly directions. As a result, Mn(PTA)-MOFs with microquadrangulars, microflakes, and spindle-like microrods morphologies have been achieved. MnO/C hybrids with preserved morphologies were further obtained by self-sacrificial and thermal transformation of Mn(PTA)-MOFs. As anodes for Li ion batteries, these morphologies showed great influence on the electrochemical properties. Owing to the abundant porous structure and unique architecture, the MnO/C spindle-like microrods demonstrated superior electrochemical properties with a high reversible capacity of 1165 mAh g(-1) at 0.3 A g(-1), excellent rate capability of 580 mAh g(-1) at 3 A g(-1), and no considerable capacity loss after 200 cycles at 1 A g(-1). This strategy could be extended to engineering the morphology of other MOF-derived functional materials in various structure-dependent applications.

  10. Linear predictive control with state variable constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bdirina, K.; Djoudi, D.; Lagoun, M.

    2012-11-01

    While linear model predictive control is popular since the 70s of the past century, the 90s have witnessed a steadily increasing attention from control theoretists as well as control practitioners in the area of model predictive control (MPC). The practical interest is driven by the fact that today's processes need to be operated under tighter performance specifications. At the same time more and more constraints, stemming for example from environmental and safety considerations, need to besatisfied. Often these demands can only be met when process constraints are explicitly considered in the controller. Predictive control with constraints appears to be a well suited approach for this kind of problems. In this paper the basic principle of MPC with constraints is reviewed and some of the theoretical, computational, and implementation aspects of MPC are discussed. Furthermore the MPC with constraints was applied to linear example.

  11. Pre-X Experimental Re-Entry Lifting Body: Design of Flight Test Experiments for Critical Aerothermal Phenomena

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    hypersonic domain has never been explored with a controlled glider . BOR 4 BOR 5 The hypersonic glider HYFLEX The main concrete...the most critical phenomena concerning the design and sizing of a re- entry vehicle. Pre-X hypersonic glider • Improving the flight measurement...laws of a gliding body with body flaps. • Performing the first design and development end to end of the hypersonic glider . • To reduce risk for

  12. Laminar and turbulent flow computations of Type 4 shock-shock interference aerothermal loads using unstructured grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vemaganti, Gururaja R.

    1994-01-01

    This report presents computations for the Type 4 shock-shock interference flow under laminar and turbulent conditions using unstructured grids. Mesh adaptation was accomplished by remeshing, refinement, and mesh movement. Two two-equation turbulence models were used to analyze turbulent flows. The mean flow governing equations and the turbulence governing equations are solved in a coupled manner. The solution algorithm and the details pertaining to its implementation on unstructured grids are described. Computations were performed at two different freestream Reynolds numbers at a freestream Mach number of 11. Effects of the variation in the impinging shock location are studied. The comparison of the results in terms of wall heat flux and wall pressure distributions is presented.

  13. Constraint programming based biomarker optimization.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Manli; Luo, Youxi; Sun, Guoquan; Mai, Guoqin; Zhou, Fengfeng

    2015-01-01

    Efficient and intuitive characterization of biological big data is becoming a major challenge for modern bio-OMIC based scientists. Interactive visualization and exploration of big data is proven to be one of the successful solutions. Most of the existing feature selection algorithms do not allow the interactive inputs from users in the optimizing process of feature selection. This study investigates this question as fixing a few user-input features in the finally selected feature subset and formulates these user-input features as constraints for a programming model. The proposed algorithm, fsCoP (feature selection based on constrained programming), performs well similar to or much better than the existing feature selection algorithms, even with the constraints from both literature and the existing algorithms. An fsCoP biomarker may be intriguing for further wet lab validation, since it satisfies both the classification optimization function and the biomedical knowledge. fsCoP may also be used for the interactive exploration of bio-OMIC big data by interactively adding user-defined constraints for modeling.

  14. Learning and Applying Contextual Constraints in Sentence Comprehension

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-08

    learns to perform these tasks through practice on Processing example sentence/event pairs. The learning procedure allows the model’to take a long...and to anticipate additional constituents. The network learns to perform these tasks through practice on processing example sentence/event pairs. The...constraints. Together, the constraints lead to a coherent interpretation of the sentence (MacWhinney, 1987). These constraints are not typically all

  15. Constraints in Genetic Programming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janikow, Cezary Z.

    1996-01-01

    Genetic programming refers to a class of genetic algorithms utilizing generic representation in the form of program trees. For a particular application, one needs to provide the set of functions, whose compositions determine the space of program structures being evolved, and the set of terminals, which determine the space of specific instances of those programs. The algorithm searches the space for the best program for a given problem, applying evolutionary mechanisms borrowed from nature. Genetic algorithms have shown great capabilities in approximately solving optimization problems which could not be approximated or solved with other methods. Genetic programming extends their capabilities to deal with a broader variety of problems. However, it also extends the size of the search space, which often becomes too large to be effectively searched even by evolutionary methods. Therefore, our objective is to utilize problem constraints, if such can be identified, to restrict this space. In this publication, we propose a generic constraint specification language, powerful enough for a broad class of problem constraints. This language has two elements -- one reduces only the number of program instances, the other reduces both the space of program structures as well as their instances. With this language, we define the minimal set of complete constraints, and a set of operators guaranteeing offspring validity from valid parents. We also show that these operators are not less efficient than the standard genetic programming operators if one preprocesses the constraints - the necessary mechanisms are identified.

  16. H-P adaptive methods for finite element analysis of aerothermal loads in high-speed flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, H. J.; Bass, J. M.; Tworzydlo, W.; Oden, J. T.

    1993-01-01

    The commitment to develop the National Aerospace Plane and Maneuvering Reentry Vehicles has generated resurgent interest in the technology required to design structures for hypersonic flight. The principal objective of this research and development effort has been to formulate and implement a new class of computational methodologies for accurately predicting fine scale phenomena associated with this class of problems. The initial focus of this effort was to develop optimal h-refinement and p-enrichment adaptive finite element methods which utilize a-posteriori estimates of the local errors to drive the adaptive methodology. Over the past year this work has specifically focused on two issues which are related to overall performance of a flow solver. These issues include the formulation and implementation (in two dimensions) of an implicit/explicit flow solver compatible with the hp-adaptive methodology, and the design and implementation of computational algorithm for automatically selecting optimal directions in which to enrich the mesh. These concepts and algorithms have been implemented in a two-dimensional finite element code and used to solve three hypersonic flow benchmark problems (Holden Mach 14.1, Edney shock on shock interaction Mach 8.03, and the viscous backstep Mach 4.08).

  17. Experimental Studies of the Aerothermal Characteristics of the Project Orion CEV heat Shield in High Speed Transitional and Turbulent Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wadhams, T.P.; MacLean, M.; Holden, M.S.; Cassady, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    An experimental program has been completed by CUBRC exploring laminar, transitional, and turbulent flows over a 7.0% scale model of the Project ORION CEV geometry. This program was executed primarily to answer questions concerning the increase in heat transfer on the windward, or "hot shoulder" of the CEV heat shield from laminar to turbulent flow. To answer these questions CUBRC constructed and instrumented a 14.0 inch diameter Project ORION CEV model and ran a range of Reynolds numbers based on diameter from 1.0 to over 40 million at a Mach number of 8.0. These Reynolds numbers were selected to cover laminar to turbulent heating data on the "hot shoulder". Data obtained during these runs will be used to guide design decisions as they apply to heat shield thickness and extent. Several experiments at higher enthalpies were achieved to obtain data for code validation with real gas effects and transition. CUBRC also performed computation studies of these experiments to aid in the data reduction process and study turbulence modeling.

  18. Site-condition map for Portugal, Western Iberia: methodology and constraints on the performance of Vs30 proxies for stable continental regions in Europe.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilanova, S. P.; Narciso, J.; Carvalho, J. P.; Cancela, C.; Lopes, I.; Nemser, E. S.; Borges, J.

    2014-12-01

    Information on the amplification characteristics of the near-surface formations in a regional sense is essential to adequately represent both seismic hazard maps and ground shaking maps. Due to the scarceness of shear-wave velocity data in most regions, several methods have been proposed in order to obtain first order representations of Vs30. These include the surface geology method and the topographic slope method. The latter method has become the standard way for incorporating site effects into regional studies worldwide given the convenience provided by the global Vs30 Internet server. In the framework of project SCENE we developed a shear wave velocity database for Portugal. The database consists of 87 shear-wave velocity depth profiles from a variety of lithological and geological formations. We used an iterative three-step procedure to develop the Vs30 based site-condition map: 1) to define a preliminary set of geologically defined units based on the literature; 2) to calculate the distribution of Vs30 for each unit; and 3) to perform statistical tests in order to estimate the significance of the difference in the Vs30 distribution characteristics between the units. The units were merged according to the results of the statistical tests and the procedure was repeated. We started by classifying the sites into six generalized geological units. The final set consists of three units only: F1 (igneous, metamorphic and old sedimentary rocks); F2 (Neogene and Pleistocene formations); and F3 (Holocene deposits). We used the database to evaluate the performance of Vs30 proxies. The use of proxies based either on geological units or on correlations with the topographic slope shows relatively unbiased total residual distributions of the logarithm of Vs30. However, the performance of the methods varies significantly with the generalized geological unit analyzed. Both methods are biased towards lower values of Vs30 for rock formations. The topographic-slope method is

  19. Reinforcement, Behavior Constraint, and the Overjustification Effect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Bruce W.

    1980-01-01

    Four levels of the behavior constraint-reinforcement variable were manipulated: attractive reward, unattractive reward, request to perform, and a no-reward control. Only the unattractive reward and request groups showed the performance decrements that suggest the overjustification effect. It is concluded that reinforcement does not cause the…

  20. Constraints on relaxion windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Kiwoon; Im, Sang Hui

    2016-12-01

    We examine the low energy phenomenology of the relaxion solution to the weak scale hierarchy problem. Assuming that the Hubble friction is responsible for a dissipation of the relaxion energy, we identify the cosmological relaxion window which corresponds to the parameter region compatible with a given value of the acceptable number of inflationary e-foldings. We then discuss a variety of observational constraints on the relaxion window, including those from astrophysical and cosmological considerations. We find that majority of the parameter space with a relaxion mass m ϕ ≳ 100 eV or a relaxion decay constant f ≲107GeV is excluded by existing constraints. There is an interesting parameter region with m ϕ ˜ 0 .2 - 10 GeV and f ˜ few - 200 TeV, which is allowed by existing constraints, but can be probed soon by future beam dump experiments such as the SHiP experiment, or by improved EDM experiments.

  1. Measuring Constraint-Set Utility for Partitional Clustering Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Ian; Wagstaff, Kiri L.; Basu, Sugato

    2006-01-01

    Clustering with constraints is an active area of machine learning and data mining research. Previous empirical work has convincingly shown that adding constraints to clustering improves the performance of a variety of algorithms. However, in most of these experiments, results are averaged over different randomly chosen constraint sets from a given set of labels, thereby masking interesting properties of individual sets. We demonstrate that constraint sets vary significantly in how useful they are for constrained clustering; some constraint sets can actually decrease algorithm performance. We create two quantitative measures, informativeness and coherence, that can be used to identify useful constraint sets. We show that these measures can also help explain differences in performance for four particular constrained clustering algorithms.

  2. Atlas F entry aerothermic study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The feasibility of obtaining heat transfer data on an expended Atlas F booster launch vehicle was investigated in the altitude range of 300,000 to 200,000 feet during entry conditions, with a velocity in the range of 20,000 to 25,000 feet per second, and through a range of vehicle attitudes of plus or minus 90 degrees. These data are desired for correlation with turbulent heat transfer and boundary layer transition data obtained from wind tunnel test facilities. The data would also be valuable in assessing rarified gas and surface catalicity effects in a real gas environment.

  3. Aerothermal modeling program, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturgess, G. J.

    1983-01-01

    The physical modeling embodied in the computational fluid dynamics codes is discussed. The objectives were to identify shortcomings in the models and to provide a program plan to improve the quantitative accuracy. The physical models studied were for: turbulent mass and momentum transport, heat release, liquid fuel spray, and gaseous radiation. The approach adopted was to test the models against appropriate benchmark-quality test cases from experiments in the literature for the constituent flows that together make up the combustor real flow.

  4. Modified constraint-induced movement therapy or bimanual occupational therapy following injection of Botulinum toxin-A to improve bimanual performance in young children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy: a randomised controlled trial methods paper

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Use of Botulinum toxin-A (BoNT-A) for treatment of upper limb spasticity in children with cerebral palsy has become routine clinical practice in many paediatric treatment centres worldwide. There is now high-level evidence that upper limb BoNT-A injection, in combination with occupational therapy, improves outcomes in children with cerebral palsy at both the body function/structure and activity level domains of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. Investigation is now required to establish what amount and specific type of occupational therapy will further enhance functional outcomes and prolong the beneficial effects of BoNT-A. Methods/Design A randomised, controlled, evaluator blinded, prospective parallel-group trial. Eligible participants were children aged 18 months to 6 years, diagnosed with spastic hemiplegic cerebral palsy and who were able to demonstrate selective motor control of the affected upper limb. Both groups received upper limb injections of BoNT-A. Children were randomised to either the modified constraint-induced movement therapy group (experimental) or bimanual occupational therapy group (control). Outcome assessments were undertaken at pre-injection and 1, 3 and 6 months following injection of BoNT-A. The primary outcome measure was the Assisting Hand Assessment. Secondary outcomes included: the Quality of Upper Extremity Skills Test; Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory; Canadian Occupational Performance Measure; Goal Attainment Scaling; Pediatric Motor Activity Log; modified Ashworth Scale and; the modified Tardieu Scale. Discussion The aim of this paper is to describe the methodology of a randomised controlled trial comparing the effects of modified constraint-induced movement therapy (a uni-manual therapy) versus bimanual occupational therapy (a bimanual therapy) on improving bimanual upper limb performance of children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy following upper limb injection of Bo

  5. A constraint algorithm for singular Lagrangians subjected to nonholonomic constraints

    SciTech Connect

    de Leon, M.; de Diego, D.M.

    1997-06-01

    We construct a constraint algorithm for singular Lagrangian systems subjected to nonholonomic constraints which generalizes that of Dirac for constrained Hamiltonian systems. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. A Framework for Dynamic Constraint Reasoning Using Procedural Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jonsson, Ari K.; Frank, Jeremy D.

    1999-01-01

    Many complex real-world decision and control problems contain an underlying constraint reasoning problem. This is particularly evident in a recently developed approach to planning, where almost all planning decisions are represented by constrained variables. This translates a significant part of the planning problem into a constraint network whose consistency determines the validity of the plan candidate. Since higher-level choices about control actions can add or remove variables and constraints, the underlying constraint network is invariably highly dynamic. Arbitrary domain-dependent constraints may be added to the constraint network and the constraint reasoning mechanism must be able to handle such constraints effectively. Additionally, real problems often require handling constraints over continuous variables. These requirements present a number of significant challenges for a constraint reasoning mechanism. In this paper, we introduce a general framework for handling dynamic constraint networks with real-valued variables, by using procedures to represent and effectively reason about general constraints. The framework is based on a sound theoretical foundation, and can be proven to be sound and complete under well-defined conditions. Furthermore, the framework provides hybrid reasoning capabilities, as alternative solution methods like mathematical programming can be incorporated into the framework, in the form of procedures.

  7. (non) Emergent Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, C. S.; Hattab, M. W.; Huerta, G.

    2014-12-01

    Emergent constraints are observable quantities that provide some physical basis for testing or predicting how a climate model will respond to greenhouse gas forcing. Very few such constraints have been identified for the multi-model CMIP archive. Here we explore the question of whether constraints that apply to a single model, a perturbed parameter ensemble (PPE) of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM3.1), can be applied to predicting the climate sensitivities of models within the CMIP archive. In particular we construct our predictive patterns from multivariate EOFs of the CAM3.1 ensemble control climate. Multiple regressive statistical models were created that do an excellent job of predicting CAM3.1 sensitivity to greenhouse gas forcing. However, these same patterns fail spectacularly to predict sensitivities of models within the CMIP archive. We attribute this failure to several factors. First, and perhaps the most important, is that the structures affecting climate sensitivity in CAM3.1 have a unique signature in the space of our multivariate EOF patterns that are unlike any other climate model. That is to say, we should not expect CAM3.1 to represent the way another models within CMIP archive respond to greenhouse gas forcing. The second, perhaps related, reason is that the CAM3.1 PPE does a poor job of spanning the range of climates and responses found within the CMIP archive. We shall discuss the implications of these results for the prospect of finding emergent constraints within the CMIP archive. We will also discuss what this may mean for establishing uncertainties in climate projections.

  8. Constraint-based scheduling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zweben, Monte

    1991-01-01

    The GERRY scheduling system developed by NASA Ames with assistance from the Lockheed Space Operations Company, and the Lockheed Artificial Intelligence Center, uses a method called constraint based iterative repair. Using this technique, one encodes both hard rules and preference criteria into data structures called constraints. GERRY repeatedly attempts to improve schedules by seeking repairs for violated constraints. The system provides a general scheduling framework which is being tested on two NASA applications. The larger of the two is the Space Shuttle Ground Processing problem which entails the scheduling of all inspection, repair, and maintenance tasks required to prepare the orbiter for flight. The other application involves power allocations for the NASA Ames wind tunnels. Here the system will be used to schedule wind tunnel tests with the goal of minimizing power costs. In this paper, we describe the GERRY system and its applications to the Space Shuttle problem. We also speculate as to how the system would be used for manufacturing, transportation, and military problems.

  9. Constraint-based scheduling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zweben, Monte

    1991-01-01

    The GERRY scheduling system developed by NASA Ames with assistance from the Lockheed Space Operations Company, and the Lockheed Artificial Intelligence Center, uses a method called constraint-based iterative repair. Using this technique, one encodes both hard rules and preference criteria into data structures called constraints. GERRY repeatedly attempts to improve schedules by seeking repairs for violated constraints. The system provides a general scheduling framework which is being tested on two NASA applications. The larger of the two is the Space Shuttle Ground Processing problem which entails the scheduling of all the inspection, repair, and maintenance tasks required to prepare the orbiter for flight. The other application involves power allocation for the NASA Ames wind tunnels. Here the system will be used to schedule wind tunnel tests with the goal of minimizing power costs. In this paper, we describe the GERRY system and its application to the Space Shuttle problem. We also speculate as to how the system would be used for manufacturing, transportation, and military problems.

  10. Constraint-based scheduling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zweben, Monte

    1993-01-01

    The GERRY scheduling system developed by NASA Ames with assistance from the Lockheed Space Operations Company, and the Lockheed Artificial Intelligence Center, uses a method called constraint-based iterative repair. Using this technique, one encodes both hard rules and preference criteria into data structures called constraints. GERRY repeatedly attempts to improve schedules by seeking repairs for violated constraints. The system provides a general scheduling framework which is being tested on two NASA applications. The larger of the two is the Space Shuttle Ground Processing problem which entails the scheduling of all the inspection, repair, and maintenance tasks required to prepare the orbiter for flight. The other application involves power allocation for the NASA Ames wind tunnels. Here the system will be used to schedule wind tunnel tests with the goal of minimizing power costs. In this paper, we describe the GERRY system and its application to the Space Shuttle problem. We also speculate as to how the system would be used for manufacturing, transportation, and military problems.

  11. Structure Constraints in a Constraint-Based Planner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pang, Wan-Lin; Golden, Keith

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we report our work on a new constraint domain, where variables can take structured values. Earth-science data processing (ESDP) is a planning domain that requires the ability to represent and reason about complex constraints over structured data, such as satellite images. This paper reports on a constraint-based planner for ESDP and similar domains. We discuss our approach for translating a planning problem into a constraint satisfaction problem (CSP) and for representing and reasoning about structured objects and constraints over structures.

  12. Updated galactic radio constraints on Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Cirelli, Marco; Taoso, Marco

    2016-07-25

    We perform a detailed analysis of the synchrotron signals produced by dark matter annihilations and decays. We consider different set-ups for the propagation of electrons and positrons, the galactic magnetic field and dark matter properties. We then confront these signals with radio and microwave maps, including PLANCK measurements, from a frequency of 22 MHz up to 70 GHz. We derive two sets of constraints: conservative and progressive, the latter based on a modeling of the astrophysical emission. Radio and microwave constraints are complementary to those obtained with other indirect detection methods, especially for dark matter annihilating into leptonic channels.

  13. Forces Associated with Nonlinear Nonholonomic Constraint Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roithmayr, Carlos M.; Hodges, Dewey H.

    2010-01-01

    A concise method has been formulated for identifying a set of forces needed to constrain the behavior of a mechanical system, modeled as a set of particles and rigid bodies, when it is subject to motion constraints described by nonholonomic equations that are inherently nonlinear in velocity. An expression in vector form is obtained for each force; a direction is determined, together with the point of application. This result is a consequence of expressing constraint equations in terms of dot products of vectors rather than in the usual way, which is entirely in terms of scalars and matrices. The constraint forces in vector form are used together with two new analytical approaches for deriving equations governing motion of a system subject to such constraints. If constraint forces are of interest they can be brought into evidence in explicit dynamical equations by employing the well-known nonholonomic partial velocities associated with Kane's method; if they are not of interest, equations can be formed instead with the aid of vectors introduced here as nonholonomic partial accelerations. When the analyst requires only the latter, smaller set of equations, they can be formed directly; it is not necessary to expend the labor to form the former, larger set first and subsequently perform matrix multiplications.

  14. Topological Constraints in Directed Polymer Melts.

    PubMed

    Serna, Pablo; Bunin, Guy; Nahum, Adam

    2015-11-27

    Polymers in a melt may be subject to topological constraints, as in the example of unlinked polymer rings. How to do statistical mechanics in the presence of such constraints remains a fundamental open problem. We study the effect of topological constraints on a melt of directed polymers, using simulations of a simple quasi-2D model. We find that fixing the global topology of the melt to be trivial changes the polymer conformations drastically. Polymers of length L wander in the transverse direction only by a distance of order (lnL)^{ζ} with ζ≃1.5. This is strongly suppressed in comparison with the Brownian L^{1/2} scaling which holds in the absence of the topological constraint. It is also much smaller than the predictions of standard heuristic approaches-in particular the L^{1/4} of a mean-field-like "array of obstacles" model-so our results present a sharp challenge to theory. Dynamics are also strongly affected by the constraints, and a tagged monomer in an infinite system performs logarithmically slow subdiffusion in the transverse direction. To cast light on the suppression of the strands' wandering, we analyze the topological complexity of subregions of the melt: the complexity is also logarithmically small, and is related to the wandering by a power law. We comment on insights the results give for 3D melts, directed and nondirected.

  15. Two new constraints for the cumulant matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Ramos-Cordoba, Eloy; Salvador, Pedro; Matito, Eduard; Piris, Mario

    2014-12-21

    We suggest new strict constraints that the two-particle cumulant matrix should fulfill. The constraints are obtained from the decomposition of 〈S-^{sup 2}〉, previously developed in our laboratory, and the vanishing number of electrons shared by two non-interacting fragments. The conditions impose stringent constraints into the cumulant structure without any need to perform an orbital optimization procedure thus carrying very small or no computational effort. These constraints are tested on the series of Piris natural orbital functionals (PNOF), which are among the most accurate ones available in the literature. Interestingly, even though all PNOF cumulants ensure correct overall 〈S{sup ^2}〉 values, none of them is consistent with the local spin structure of systems that dissociate more than one pair of electrons. A careful analysis of the local spin components reveals the most important missing contributions in the cumulant expression thus suggesting a means to improve PNOF5. The constraints provide an inexpensive tool for the construction and testing of cumulant structures that complement previously known conditions such as the N-representability or the square of the total spin angular momentum, 〈S{sup ^2}〉.

  16. Asteroseismic constraints for Gaia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creevey, O. L.; Thévenin, F.

    2012-12-01

    Distances from the Gaia mission will no doubt improve our understanding of stellar physics by providing an excellent constraint on the luminosity of the star. However, it is also clear that high precision stellar properties from, for example, asteroseismology, will also provide a needed input constraint in order to calibrate the methods that Gaia will use, e.g. stellar models or GSP_Phot. For solar-like stars (F, G, K IV/V), asteroseismic data delivers at the least two very important quantities: (1) the average large frequency separation < Δ ν > and (2) the frequency corresponding to the maximum of the modulated-amplitude spectrum ν_{max}. Both of these quantities are related directly to stellar parameters (radius and mass) and in particular their combination (gravity and density). We show how the precision in < Δ ν >, ν_{max}, and atmospheric parameters T_{eff} and [Fe/H] affect the determination of gravity (log g) for a sample of well-known stars. We find that log g can be determined within less than 0.02 dex accuracy for our sample while considering precisions in the data expected for V˜12 stars from Kepler data. We also derive masses and radii which are accurate to within 1σ of the accepted values. This study validates the subsequent use of all of the available asteroseismic data on solar-like stars from the Kepler field (>500 IV/V stars) in order to provide a very important constraint for Gaia calibration of GSP_Phot} through the use of log g. We note that while we concentrate on IV/V stars, both the CoRoT and Kepler fields contain asteroseismic data on thousands of giant stars which will also provide useful calibration measures.

  17. Atom mapping with constraint programming.

    PubMed

    Mann, Martin; Nahar, Feras; Schnorr, Norah; Backofen, Rolf; Stadler, Peter F; Flamm, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Chemical reactions are rearrangements of chemical bonds. Each atom in an educt molecule thus appears again in a specific position of one of the reaction products. This bijection between educt and product atoms is not reported by chemical reaction databases, however, so that the "Atom Mapping Problem" of finding this bijection is left as an important computational task for many practical applications in computational chemistry and systems biology. Elementary chemical reactions feature a cyclic imaginary transition state (ITS) that imposes additional restrictions on the bijection between educt and product atoms that are not taken into account by previous approaches. We demonstrate that Constraint Programming is well-suited to solving the Atom Mapping Problem in this setting. The performance of our approach is evaluated for a manually curated subset of chemical reactions from the KEGG database featuring various ITS cycle layouts and reaction mechanisms.

  18. Neural constraints on learning.

    PubMed

    Sadtler, Patrick T; Quick, Kristin M; Golub, Matthew D; Chase, Steven M; Ryu, Stephen I; Tyler-Kabara, Elizabeth C; Yu, Byron M; Batista, Aaron P

    2014-08-28

    Learning, whether motor, sensory or cognitive, requires networks of neurons to generate new activity patterns. As some behaviours are easier to learn than others, we asked if some neural activity patterns are easier to generate than others. Here we investigate whether an existing network constrains the patterns that a subset of its neurons is capable of exhibiting, and if so, what principles define this constraint. We employed a closed-loop intracortical brain-computer interface learning paradigm in which Rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) controlled a computer cursor by modulating neural activity patterns in the primary motor cortex. Using the brain-computer interface paradigm, we could specify and alter how neural activity mapped to cursor velocity. At the start of each session, we observed the characteristic activity patterns of the recorded neural population. The activity of a neural population can be represented in a high-dimensional space (termed the neural space), wherein each dimension corresponds to the activity of one neuron. These characteristic activity patterns comprise a low-dimensional subspace (termed the intrinsic manifold) within the neural space. The intrinsic manifold presumably reflects constraints imposed by the underlying neural circuitry. Here we show that the animals could readily learn to proficiently control the cursor using neural activity patterns that were within the intrinsic manifold. However, animals were less able to learn to proficiently control the cursor using activity patterns that were outside of the intrinsic manifold. These results suggest that the existing structure of a network can shape learning. On a timescale of hours, it seems to be difficult to learn to generate neural activity patterns that are not consistent with the existing network structure. These findings offer a network-level explanation for the observation that we are more readily able to learn new skills when they are related to the skills that we already

  19. Patterns of thermal constraint on ectotherm activity.

    PubMed

    Gunderson, Alex R; Leal, Manuel

    2015-05-01

    Thermal activity constraints play a major role in many aspects of ectotherm ecology, including vulnerability to climate change. Therefore, there is strong interest in developing general models of the temperature dependence of activity. Several models have been put forth (explicitly or implicitly) to describe such constraints; nonetheless, tests of the predictive abilities of these models are lacking. In addition, most models consider activity as a threshold trait instead of considering continuous changes in the vigor of activity among individuals. Using field data for a tropical lizard (Anolis cristatellus) and simulations parameterized by our observations, we determine how well various threshold and continuous-activity models match observed activity patterns. No models accurately predicted activity under all of the thermal conditions that we considered. In addition, simulations showed that the performance of threshold models decreased as temperatures increased, which is a troubling finding given the threat of global climate change. We also find that activity rates are more sensitive to temperature than are the physiological traits often used as a proxy for fitness. We present a model of thermal constraint on activity that integrates aspects of both the threshold model and the continuous-activity model, the general features of which are supported by activity data from other species. Overall, our results demonstrate that greater attention should be given to fine-scale patterns of thermal constraint on activity.

  20. Geochemical constraints on Earth's core composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebert, Julien

    2016-04-01

    The density of the core as measured from seismic-wave velocities is lower (by 10-15%) than that of pure iron, and therefore the core must also contain some light elements. Geophysical and cosmochemical constraints indicate that obvious candidates for these light elements include silicon, oxygen, and sulfur. These elements have been studied extensively for the past 30 years but a joint solution fulfilling all the requirements imposed by cosmochemistry and geochemistry, seismology, and models of Earth's accretion and core formation is still a highly controversial subject. Here are presented new experimental data in geochemistry used to place constraints on Earth's core composition. Metal-silicate partitioning experiments were performed at pressures and temperatures directly similar to those that prevailed in a deep magma ocean in the early Earth. The results show that core formation can reconcile the observed concentrations of siderophile elements in the silicate mantle with geophysical constraints on light elements in the core. Partitioning results also lead to a core containing less than 1 wt.% of sulfur, inconsistent with a S-rich layer to account for the observed structure of the outer core. Additionally, isotopic fractionations in core formation experiments are presented. This experimental tool merging the fields of experimental petrology and isotope geochemistry represents a promising approach, providing new independent constraints on the nature of light elements in the core.

  1. Credit Constraints for Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solis, Alex

    2012-01-01

    This paper exploits a natural experiment that produces exogenous variation on credit access to determine the effect on college enrollment. The paper assess how important are credit constraints to explain the gap in college enrollment by family income, and what would be the gap if credit constraints are eliminated. Progress in college and dropout…

  2. On Constraints in Assembly Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Calton, T.L.; Jones, R.E.; Wilson, R.H.

    1998-12-17

    Constraints on assembly plans vary depending on product, assembly facility, assembly volume, and many other factors. Assembly costs and other measures to optimize vary just as widely. To be effective, computer-aided assembly planning systems must allow users to express the plan selection criteria that appIy to their products and production environments. We begin this article by surveying the types of user criteria, both constraints and quality measures, that have been accepted by assembly planning systems to date. The survey is organized along several dimensions, including strategic vs. tactical criteria; manufacturing requirements VS. requirements of the automated planning process itself and the information needed to assess compliance with each criterion. The latter strongly influences the efficiency of planning. We then focus on constraints. We describe a framework to support a wide variety of user constraints for intuitive and efficient assembly planning. Our framework expresses all constraints on a sequencing level, specifying orders and conditions on part mating operations in a number of ways. Constraints are implemented as simple procedures that either accept or reject assembly operations proposed by the planner. For efficiency, some constraints are supplemented with special-purpose modifications to the planner's algorithms. Fast replanning enables an interactive plan-view-constrain-replan cycle that aids in constraint discovery and documentation. We describe an implementation of the framework in a computer-aided assembly planning system and experiments applying the system to a number of complex assemblies, including one with 472 parts.

  3. Fixed Costs and Hours Constraints

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, William R.

    2011-01-01

    Hours constraints are typically identified by worker responses to questions asking whether they would prefer a job with more hours and more pay or fewer hours and less pay. Because jobs with different hours but the same rate of pay may be infeasible when there are fixed costs of employment or mandatory overtime premia, the constraint in those…

  4. The constraints to learning in birdsong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trevisan, M. A.; Mindlin, G. B.

    2007-07-01

    In this work we explore the constraints that the structure of the neural motor program imposes to the possible songs learned by oscine birds. We carry out this program by translating anatomical information on the structure of these nuclei into a computational model. We investigate with analytical and numeral tools this model, and use its solutions to generate synthetic songs. This allows us to perform specific predictions on the simultaneous measurement of acoustic features and the physiological variables during the song.

  5. Generalizing Atoms in Constraint Logic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Page, C. David, Jr.; Frisch, Alan M.

    1991-01-01

    This paper studies the generalization of atomic formulas, or atoms, that are augmented with constraints on or among their terms. The atoms may also be viewed as definite clauses whose antecedents express the constraints. Atoms are generalized relative to a body of background information about the constraints. This paper first examines generalization of atoms with only monadic constraints. The paper develops an algorithm for the generalization task and discusses algorithm complexity. It then extends the algorithm to apply to atoms with constraints of arbitrary arity. The paper also presents semantic properties of the generalizations computed by the algorithms, making the algorithms applicable to such problems as abduction, induction, and knowledge base verification. The paper emphasizes the application to induction and presents a pac-learning result for constrained atoms.

  6. Fidelity of the protein structure reconstruction from inter-residue proximity constraints.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yiwen; Ding, Feng; Dokholyan, Nikolay V

    2007-06-28

    Inter-residue proximity constraints obtained in such experiments as cross-linking/mass spectrometry are important sources of information for protein structure determination. A central question in structure determination using these constraints is, What is the minimal number of inter-residue constraints needed to determine the fold of a protein? It is also unknown how the different structural aspects of constraints differentiate their ability in determining the native fold and whether there is a rational strategy for selecting constraints that feature higher fidelity in structure determination. To shed light on these questions, we study the fidelity of protein fold determination using theoretical inter-residue proximity constraints derived from protein native structures and the effect of various subsets of such constraints on fold determination. We show that approximately 70% randomly selected constraints are sufficient for determining the fold of a domain (with an average root-mean-square deviation of constraint selection often outperforms the rational strategy that predominantly favors the constraints representing global structural features. To uncover a strategy for constraint selection for the optimal structure determination, we study the role of the topological properties of these constraints. Interestingly, we do not observe any correlation between various simple topological properties of the selected constraints, emphasizing different global and local structural features, and the performance of these constraints, suggesting that accurate protein structure determination relies on a composite of global and local structural information.

  7. A Hybrid Constraint Representation and Reasoning Framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, Keith; Pang, Wan-Lin

    2003-01-01

    This paper introduces JNET, a novel constraint representation and reasoning framework that supports procedural constraints and constraint attachments, providing a flexible way of integrating the constraint reasoner with a run- time software environment. Attachments in JNET are constraints over arbitrary Java objects, which are defined using Java code, at runtime, with no changes to the JNET source code.

  8. Evolutionary constraints or opportunities?

    PubMed Central

    Sharov, Alexei A.

    2014-01-01

    Natural selection is traditionally viewed as a leading factor of evolution, whereas variation is assumed to be random and non-directional. Any order in variation is attributed to epigenetic or developmental constraints that can hinder the action of natural selection. In contrast I consider the positive role of epigenetic mechanisms in evolution because they provide organisms with opportunities for rapid adaptive change. Because the term “constraint” has negative connotations, I use the term “regulated variation” to emphasize the adaptive nature of phenotypic variation, which helps populations and species to survive and evolve in changing environments. The capacity to produce regulated variation is a phenotypic property, which is not described in the genome. Instead, the genome acts as a switchboard, where mostly random mutations switch “on” or “off” preexisting functional capacities of organism components. Thus, there are two channels of heredity: informational (genomic) and structure-functional (phenotypic). Functional capacities of organisms most likely emerged in a chain of modifications and combinations of more simple ancestral functions. The role of DNA has been to keep records of these changes (without describing the result) so that they can be reproduced in the following generations. Evolutionary opportunities include adjustments of individual functions, multitasking, connection between various components of an organism, and interaction between organisms. The adaptive nature of regulated variation can be explained by the differential success of lineages in macro-evolution. Lineages with more advantageous patterns of regulated variation are likely to produce more species and secure more resources (i.e., long-term lineage selection). PMID:24769155

  9. Infrared Kuiper Belt Constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Teplitz, V.L.; Stern, S.A.; Anderson, J.D.; Rosenbaum, D.; Scalise, R.J.; Wentzler, P.

    1999-05-01

    We compute the temperature and IR signal of particles of radius {ital a} and albedo {alpha} at heliocentric distance {ital R}, taking into account the emissivity effect, and give an interpolating formula for the result. We compare with analyses of {ital COBE} DIRBE data by others (including recent detection of the cosmic IR background) for various values of heliocentric distance {ital R}, particle radius {ital a}, and particle albedo {alpha}. We then apply these results to a recently developed picture of the Kuiper belt as a two-sector disk with a nearby, low-density sector (40{lt}R{lt}50{endash}90 AU) and a more distant sector with a higher density. We consider the case in which passage through a molecular cloud essentially cleans the solar system of dust. We apply a simple model of dust production by comet collisions and removal by the Poynting-Robertson effect to find limits on total and dust masses in the near and far sectors as a function of time since such a passage. Finally, we compare Kuiper belt IR spectra for various parameter values. Results of this work include: (1) numerical limits on Kuiper belt dust as a function of ({ital R}, {ital a}, {alpha}) on the basis of four alternative sets of constraints, including those following from recent discovery of the cosmic IR background by Hauser et al.; (2) application to the two-sector Kuiper belt model, finding mass limits and spectrum shape for different values of relevant parameters including dependence on time elapsed since last passage through a molecular cloud cleared the outer solar system of dust; and (3) potential use of spectral information to determine time since last passage of the Sun through a giant molecular cloud. {copyright} {ital {copyright} 1999.} {ital The American Astronomical Society}

  10. Dual MIMU Pedestrian Navigation by Inequality Constraint Kalman Filtering

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Wei; Wang, Yang; Wu, Yuanxin

    2017-01-01

    The foot-mounted inertial navigation system is an important method of pedestrian navigation as it, in principle, does not rely any external assistance. A real-time range decomposition constraint method is proposed in this paper to combine the information of dual foot-mounted inertial navigation systems. It is well known that low-cost inertial pedestrian navigation aided with both ZUPT (zero velocity update) and the range decomposition constraint performs better than those in their own respective methods. This paper recommends that the separation distance between the position estimates of the two foot-mounted inertial navigation systems be restricted by an ellipsoidal constraint that relates to the maximum step length and the leg height. The performance of the proposed method is studied by utilizing experimental data, and the results indicate that the method can effectively correct the dual navigation systems’ position over the traditional spherical constraint. PMID:28241448

  11. Dual MIMU Pedestrian Navigation by Inequality Constraint Kalman Filtering.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wei; Wang, Yang; Wu, Yuanxin

    2017-02-22

    The foot-mounted inertial navigation system is an important method of pedestrian navigation as it, in principle, does not rely any external assistance. A real-time range decomposition constraint method is proposed in this paper to combine the information of dual foot-mounted inertial navigation systems. It is well known that low-cost inertial pedestrian navigation aided with both ZUPT (zero velocity update) and the range decomposition constraint performs better than those in their own respective methods. This paper recommends that the separation distance between the position estimates of the two foot-mounted inertial navigation systems be restricted by an ellipsoidal constraint that relates to the maximum step length and the leg height. The performance of the proposed method is studied by utilizing experimental data, and the results indicate that the method can effectively correct the dual navigation systems' position over the traditional spherical constraint.

  12. Constraint-based stereo matching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuan, D. T.

    1987-01-01

    The major difficulty in stereo vision is the correspondence problem that requires matching features in two stereo images. Researchers describe a constraint-based stereo matching technique using local geometric constraints among edge segments to limit the search space and to resolve matching ambiguity. Edge segments are used as image features for stereo matching. Epipolar constraint and individual edge properties are used to determine possible initial matches between edge segments in a stereo image pair. Local edge geometric attributes such as continuity, junction structure, and edge neighborhood relations are used as constraints to guide the stereo matching process. The result is a locally consistent set of edge segment correspondences between stereo images. These locally consistent matches are used to generate higher-level hypotheses on extended edge segments and junctions to form more global contexts to achieve global consistency.

  13. Weighted constraints in generative linguistics.

    PubMed

    Pater, Joe

    2009-08-01

    Harmonic Grammar (HG) and Optimality Theory (OT) are closely related formal frameworks for the study of language. In both, the structure of a given language is determined by the relative strengths of a set of constraints. They differ in how these strengths are represented: as numerical weights (HG) or as ranks (OT). Weighted constraints have advantages for the construction of accounts of language learning and other cognitive processes, partly because they allow for the adaptation of connectionist and statistical models. HG has been little studied in generative linguistics, however, largely due to influential claims that weighted constraints make incorrect predictions about the typology of natural languages, predictions that are not shared by the more popular OT. This paper makes the case that HG is in fact a promising framework for typological research, and reviews and extends the existing arguments for weighted over ranked constraints.

  14. Foundations of support constraint machines.

    PubMed

    Gnecco, Giorgio; Gori, Marco; Melacci, Stefano; Sanguineti, Marcello

    2015-02-01

    The mathematical foundations of a new theory for the design of intelligent agents are presented. The proposed learning paradigm is centered around the concept of constraint, representing the interactions with the environment, and the parsimony principle. The classical regularization framework of kernel machines is naturally extended to the case in which the agents interact with a richer environment, where abstract granules of knowledge, compactly described by different linguistic formalisms, can be translated into the unified notion of constraint for defining the hypothesis set. Constrained variational calculus is exploited to derive general representation theorems that provide a description of the optimal body of the agent (i.e., the functional structure of the optimal solution to the learning problem), which is the basis for devising new learning algorithms. We show that regardless of the kind of constraints, the optimal body of the agent is a support constraint machine (SCM) based on representer theorems that extend classical results for kernel machines and provide new representations. In a sense, the expressiveness of constraints yields a semantic-based regularization theory, which strongly restricts the hypothesis set of classical regularization. Some guidelines to unify continuous and discrete computational mechanisms are given so as to accommodate in the same framework various kinds of stimuli, for example, supervised examples and logic predicates. The proposed view of learning from constraints incorporates classical learning from examples and extends naturally to the case in which the examples are subsets of the input space, which is related to learning propositional logic clauses.

  15. Thermodynamic constraints for biochemical networks.

    PubMed

    Beard, Daniel A; Babson, Eric; Curtis, Edward; Qian, Hong

    2004-06-07

    The constraint-based approach to analysis of biochemical systems has emerged as a useful tool for rational metabolic engineering. Flux balance analysis (FBA) is based on the constraint of mass conservation; energy balance analysis (EBA) is based on non-equilibrium thermodynamics. The power of these approaches lies in the fact that the constraints are based on physical laws, and do not make use of unknown parameters. Here, we show that the network structure (i.e. the stoichiometric matrix) alone provides a system of constraints on the fluxes in a biochemical network which are feasible according to both mass balance and the laws of thermodynamics. A realistic example shows that these constraints can be sufficient for deriving unambiguous, biologically meaningful results. The thermodynamic constraints are obtained by comparing of the sign pattern of the flux vector to the sign patterns of the cycles of the internal cycle space via connection between stoichiometric network theory (SNT) and the mathematical theory of oriented matroids.

  16. Shuttle Performance: Lessons Learned, Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arrington, J. P. (Compiler); Jones, J. J. (Compiler)

    1983-01-01

    Several areas of Space Shuttle technology were addressed including aerothermal environment, thermal protection, measurement and analysis, Shuttle carrier aerodynamics, entry analysis of the STS-3, and an overview of each section.

  17. Movement constraints on interpersonal coordination and communication.

    PubMed

    Tolston, Michael T; Shockley, Kevin; Riley, Michael A; Richardson, Michael J

    2014-10-01

    The present study investigated how constraining movement affects interpersonal coordination and joint cognitive performance. Pairs of participants worked cooperatively to solve picture-puzzle tasks in which they conversed to identify differences between pictures in 3 degree-of-constraint conditions: both participants were free to move their hands (free-free; FF); both participants' hands were restrained (restrained-restrained; RR); and the hands of 1 participant were free while the hands of the other participant were restrained (free-restrained; FR). Eye tracking data were collected, and movement was measured at the waist, hand, and head. Data were analyzed using Cross-Recurrence Quantification Analysis (CRQ). Postural sway coordination, gaze coordination, and task performance were predicted to be highest in FF, followed by RR, and then by FR. Results showed the asymmetric FR condition generally exhibited lesser degrees of coordination than the symmetric Conditions FF and RR, and that the patterning of coordination in the symmetric conditions varied across the measured body segments. These results demonstrate that movement restraints affect not only interpersonal postural coordination, but also joint attention. Additionally, significant positive relationships were found between task performance and total amount of anterior-posterior movement measured at the head, hand and waist; number of utterances; and number of differences pairs found in the puzzles. These findings indicate a relationship between movement and task performance consistent with the hypotheses that both interpersonal coordination and cognitive performance are sensitive to local action constraints.

  18. On handling ephemeral resource constraints in evolutionary search.

    PubMed

    Allmendinger, Richard; Knowles, Joshua

    2013-01-01

    We consider optimization problems where the set of solutions available for evaluation at any given time t during optimization is some subset of the feasible space. This model is appropriate to describe many closed-loop optimization settings (i.e., where physical processes or experiments are used to evaluate solutions) where, due to resource limitations, it may be impossible to evaluate particular solutions at particular times (despite the solutions being part of the feasible space). We call the constraints determining which solutions are non-evaluable ephemeral resource constraints (ERCs). In this paper, we investigate two specific types of ERC: one encodes periodic resource availabilities, the other models commitment constraints that make the evaluable part of the space a function of earlier evaluations conducted. In an experimental study, both types of constraint are seen to impact the performance of an evolutionary algorithm significantly. To deal with the effects of the ERCs, we propose and test five different constraint-handling policies (adapted from those used to handle standard constraints), using a number of different test functions including a fitness landscape from a real closed-loop problem. We show that knowing information about the type of resource constraint in advance may be sufficient to select an effective policy for dealing with it, even when advance knowledge of the fitness landscape is limited.

  19. Kalman Filtering with Inequality Constraints for Turbofan Engine Health Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Dan; Simon, Donald L.

    2003-01-01

    Kalman filters are often used to estimate the state variables of a dynamic system. However, in the application of Kalman filters some known signal information is often either ignored or dealt with heuristically. For instance, state variable constraints (which may be based on physical considerations) are often neglected because they do not fit easily into the structure of the Kalman filter. This paper develops two analytic methods of incorporating state variable inequality constraints in the Kalman filter. The first method is a general technique of using hard constraints to enforce inequalities on the state variable estimates. The resultant filter is a combination of a standard Kalman filter and a quadratic programming problem. The second method uses soft constraints to estimate state variables that are known to vary slowly with time. (Soft constraints are constraints that are required to be approximately satisfied rather than exactly satisfied.) The incorporation of state variable constraints increases the computational effort of the filter but significantly improves its estimation accuracy. The improvement is proven theoretically and shown via simulation results. The use of the algorithm is demonstrated on a linearized simulation of a turbofan engine to estimate health parameters. The turbofan engine model contains 16 state variables, 12 measurements, and 8 component health parameters. It is shown that the new algorithms provide improved performance in this example over unconstrained Kalman filtering.

  20. Flexible formation configuration for terrain following flight: Formation keeping constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latyshev, Simon

    This work suggests a control method for the terrain-following formation motion of a group of communicating autonomous agents. The presented approach centers on defining a suitable set of constraints for formation keeping task that shall be fulfilled while agents are negotiating an unknown terrain toward the predefined goal location. It allows agents to maintain a general geometric formation shape, while allowing each individual formation member freedom of maneuver, required for terrain collision free motion. Formation structure is defined with the use of virtual leader. Formation keeping constraints are defined with plane surfaces, specified relative to position and navigation vector of the virtual leader. Formation navigation and guidance constraints are defined using navigation vectors of formation members and the virtual leader. Alternative designs for the constraints derived with parabolic, cone, and cylindrical surfaces are considered. Formation control is derived using the Udwadia-Kalaba equation, following corresponding approach to the development of control methods for constraint based dynamical systems, including leader-follower systems defined using geometric constraints. Approach to terrain following motion requiring agents to stay within bounds of cylindrical corridor volumes built around their respective navigation vectors is assumed. Individual formation primitives and multi-level, hierarchical, formation structures are considered. Simulations, based on three degrees of freedom nonlinear model of an agent, performed using Mathematica and specifically developed combined Maya-Mathematica modeling and simulation system, demonstrate that a flexible terrain following formation motion is achieved with the presented sets of constraints.

  1. Architecture in Mission Integration, Choreographing Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Rod

    2000-01-01

    In any building project the Architect's role and skill is to balance the client's requirements with the available technology, a site and budget. Time, place and resources set the boundaries and constraints of the project. If these boundaries are correctly understood and respected by the Architect they can be choreographed into producing a facility that abides by those constraints and successfully meets the clients needs. The design and assembly of large scale space facilities whether in orbit around or on the surface of a planet require and employs these same skills. In this case the site is the International Space Station (ISS) which operates at a nominal rendezvous altitude of 220 nautical miles. With supplies to support a 7 day mission the Shuttle nominally has a cargo capacity of 35,000 pounds to that altitude. Through the Mission Integration process the Launch Package Management Team choreographs the constraints of ascent performance, hardware design, cargo, rendezvous, mission duration and assembly time in order to meet the mission objective.

  2. Developmental constraints on behavioural flexibility.

    PubMed

    Holekamp, Kay E; Swanson, Eli M; Van Meter, Page E

    2013-05-19

    We suggest that variation in mammalian behavioural flexibility not accounted for by current socioecological models may be explained in part by developmental constraints. From our own work, we provide examples of constraints affecting variation in behavioural flexibility, not only among individuals, but also among species and higher taxonomic units. We first implicate organizational maternal effects of androgens in shaping individual differences in aggressive behaviour emitted by female spotted hyaenas throughout the lifespan. We then compare carnivores and primates with respect to their locomotor and craniofacial adaptations. We inquire whether antagonistic selection pressures on the skull might impose differential functional constraints on evolvability of skulls and brains in these two orders, thus ultimately affecting behavioural flexibility in each group. We suggest that, even when carnivores and primates would theoretically benefit from the same adaptations with respect to behavioural flexibility, carnivores may nevertheless exhibit less behavioural flexibility than primates because of constraints imposed by past adaptations in the morphology of the limbs and skull. Phylogenetic analysis consistent with this idea suggests greater evolutionary lability in relative brain size within families of primates than carnivores. Thus, consideration of developmental constraints may help elucidate variation in mammalian behavioural flexibility.

  3. Analytical screening of low emissions, high performance duct burners for supersonic cruise aircraft engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lohmann, R. A.; Riecke, G. T.

    1977-01-01

    An analytical screening study was conducted to identify duct burner concepts capable of providing low emissions and high performance in advanced supersonic engines. Duct burner configurations ranging from current augmenter technology to advanced concepts such as premix-prevaporized burners were defined. Aerothermal and mechanical design studies provided the basis for screening these configurations using the criteria of emissions, performance, engine compatibility, cost, weight and relative risk. Technology levels derived from recently defined experimental low emissions main burners are required to achieve both low emissions and high performance goals. A configuration based on the Vorbix (Vortex burning and mixing) combustor concept was analytically determined to meet the performance goals and is consistent with the fan duct envelope of a variable cycle engine. The duct burner configuration has a moderate risk level compatible with the schedule of anticipated experimental programs.

  4. Mars Rover Sample Return aerocapture configuration design and packaging constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Shelby J.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses the aerodynamics requirements, volume and mass constraints that lead to a biconic aeroshell vehicle design that protects the Mars Rover Sample Return (MRSR) mission elements from launch to Mars landing. The aerodynamic requirements for Mars aerocapture and entry and packaging constraints for the MRSR elements result in a symmetric biconic aeroshell that develops a L/D of 1.0 at 27.0 deg angle of attack. A significant problem in the study is obtaining a cg that provides adequate aerodynamic stability and performance within the mission imposed constraints. Packaging methods that relieve the cg problems include forward placement of aeroshell propellant tanks and incorporating aeroshell structure as lander structure. The MRSR missions developed during the pre-phase A study are discussed with dimensional and mass data included. Further study is needed for some missions to minimize MRSR element volume so that launch mass constraints can be met.

  5. Motor abundance contributes to resolving multiple kinematic task constraints

    PubMed Central

    G, Gera; SMSF, Freitas; ML, Latash; K, Monahan; G, Schöner; JP, Scholz

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the use of motor abundance during the transport and placing of objects that required either precise or minimal orientation to the target. Analyses across repetitions of the structure of joint configuration variance relative to the position and orientation constraints were performed using the Uncontrolled Manifold (UCM) approach. Results indicated that the orientation constraint did not affect stability of the hand's spatial trajectory. Orientation was weakly stabilized during the late transport phase independent of the orientation constraint, indicating no default synergy stabilizing orientation. Stabilization of orientation for conditions most requiring it for successful insertion of the object was present primarily during the adjustment phase. The results support the hypothesis that a major advantage of a control scheme that utilizes motor abundance is the ability to resolve multiple task constraints simultaneously without undue interference among them. PMID:20237405

  6. Symmetry constraint for foreground extraction.

    PubMed

    Fu, Huazhu; Cao, Xiaochun; Tu, Zhuowen; Lin, Dongdai

    2014-05-01

    Symmetry as an intrinsic shape property is often observed in natural objects. In this paper, we discuss how explicitly taking into account the symmetry constraint can enhance the quality of foreground object extraction. In our method, a symmetry foreground map is used to represent the symmetry structure of the image, which includes the symmetry matching magnitude and the foreground location prior. Then, the symmetry constraint model is built by introducing this symmetry structure into the graph-based segmentation function. Finally, the segmentation result is obtained via graph cuts. Our method encourages objects with symmetric parts to be consistently extracted. Moreover, our symmetry constraint model is applicable to weak symmetric objects under the part-based framework. Quantitative and qualitative experimental results on benchmark datasets demonstrate the advantages of our approach in extracting the foreground. Our method also shows improved results in segmenting objects with weak, complex symmetry properties.

  7. Genetic map construction with constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.A.; Rawlings, C.J.; Soursenot, S.

    1994-12-31

    A pilot program, CME, is described for generating a physical genetic map from hybridization fingerprinting data. CME is implemented in the parallel constraint logic programming language ElipSys. The features of constraint logic programming are used to enable the integration of preexisting mapping information (partial probe orders from cytogenetic maps and local physical maps) into the global map generation process, while parallelism enables the search space to be traversed more efficiently. CME was tested using data from chromosome 2 of Schizosaccharomyces pombe and was found able to generate maps as well as (and sometimes better than) a more traditional method. This paper illustrates the practical benefits of using a symbolic logic programming language and shows that the features of constraint handling and parallel execution bring the development of practical systems based on Al programming technologies nearer to being a reality.

  8. Large-Constraint-Length, Fast Viterbi Decoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, O.; Dolinar, S.; Hsu, In-Shek; Pollara, F.; Olson, E.; Statman, J.; Zimmerman, G.

    1990-01-01

    Scheme for efficient interconnection makes VLSI design feasible. Concept for fast Viterbi decoder provides for processing of convolutional codes of constraint length K up to 15 and rates of 1/2 to 1/6. Fully parallel (but bit-serial) architecture developed for decoder of K = 7 implemented in single dedicated VLSI circuit chip. Contains six major functional blocks. VLSI circuits perform branch metric computations, add-compare-select operations, and then store decisions in traceback memory. Traceback processor reads appropriate memory locations and puts out decoded bits. Used as building block for decoders of larger K.

  9. How Do Severe Constraints Affect the Search Ability of Multiobjective Evolutionary Algorithms in Water Resources?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarkin, T. J.; Kasprzyk, J. R.; Raseman, W. J.; Herman, J. D.

    2015-12-01

    This study contributes a diagnostic assessment of multiobjective evolutionary algorithm (MOEA) search on a set of water resources problem formulations with different configurations of constraints. Unlike constraints in classical optimization modeling, constraints within MOEA simulation-optimization represent limits on acceptable performance that delineate whether solutions within the search problem are feasible. Constraints are relevant because of the emergent pressures on water resources systems: increasing public awareness of their sustainability, coupled with regulatory pressures on water management agencies. In this study, we test several state-of-the-art MOEAs that utilize restricted tournament selection for constraint handling on varying configurations of water resources planning problems. For example, a problem that has no constraints on performance levels will be compared with a problem with several severe constraints, and a problem with constraints that have less severe values on the constraint thresholds. One such problem, Lower Rio Grande Valley (LRGV) portfolio planning, has been solved with a suite of constraints that ensure high reliability, low cost variability, and acceptable performance in a single year severe drought. But to date, it is unclear whether or not the constraints are negatively affecting MOEAs' ability to solve the problem effectively. Two categories of results are explored. The first category uses control maps of algorithm performance to determine if the algorithm's performance is sensitive to user-defined parameters. The second category uses run-time performance metrics to determine the time required for the algorithm to reach sufficient levels of convergence and diversity on the solution sets. Our work exploring the effect of constraints will better enable practitioners to define MOEA problem formulations for real-world systems, especially when stakeholders are concerned with achieving fixed levels of performance according to one or

  10. Magnetotail dynamics under isobaric constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birn, Joachim; Schindler, Karl; Janicke, Lutz; Hesse, Michael

    1994-01-01

    Using linear theory and nonlinear MHD simulations, we investigate the resistive and ideal MHD stability of two-dimensional plasma configurations under the isobaric constraint dP/dt = 0, which in ideal MHD is equivalent to conserving the pressure function P = P(A), where A denotes the magnetic flux. This constraint is satisfied for incompressible modes, such as Alfven waves, and for systems undergoing energy losses. The linear stability analysis leads to a Schroedinger equation, which can be investigated by standard quantum mechanics procedures. We present an application to a typical stretched magnetotail configuration. For a one-dimensional sheet equilibrium characteristic properties of tearing instability are rediscovered. However, the maximum growth rate scales with the 1/7 power of the resistivity, which implies much faster growth than for the standard tearing mode (assuming that the resistivity is small). The same basic eigen-mode is found also for weakly two-dimensional equilibria, even in the ideal MHD limit. In this case the growth rate scales with the 1/4 power of the normal magnetic field. The results of the linear stability analysis are confirmed qualitatively by nonlinear dynamic MHD simulations. These results suggest the interesting possibility that substorm onset, or the thinning in the late growth phase, is caused by the release of a thermodynamic constraint without the (immediate) necessity of releasing the ideal MHD constraint. In the nonlinear regime the resistive and ideal developments differ in that the ideal mode does not lead to neutral line formation without the further release of the ideal MHD constraint; instead a thin current sheet forms. The isobaric constraint is critically discussed. Under perhaps more realistic adiabatic conditions the ideal mode appears to be stable but could be driven by external perturbations and thus generate the thin current sheet in the late growth phase, before a nonideal instability sets in.

  11. Greenstone belt tectonics: Thermal constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bickle, M. J.; Nisbet, E. G.

    1986-01-01

    Archaean rocks provide a record of the early stages of planetary evolution. The interpretation is frustrated by the probable unrepresentative nature of the preserved crust and by the well known ambiguities of tectonic geological synthesis. Broad constraints can be placed on the tectonic processes in the early Earth from global scale modeling of thermal and chemical evolution of the Earth and its hydrosphere and atmosphere. The Archean record is the main test of such models. Available general model constraints are outlined based on the global tectonic setting within which Archaean crust evolved and on the direct evidence the Archaean record provides, particularly the thermal state of the early Earth.

  12. Multisensory constraints on awareness.

    PubMed

    Deroy, Ophelia; Chen, Yi-Chuan; Spence, Charles

    2014-05-05

    Given that multiple senses are often stimulated at the same time, perceptual awareness is most likely to take place in multisensory situations. However, theories of awareness are based on studies and models established for a single sense (mostly vision). Here, we consider the methodological and theoretical challenges raised by taking a multisensory perspective on perceptual awareness. First, we consider how well tasks designed to study unisensory awareness perform when used in multisensory settings, stressing that studies using binocular rivalry, bistable figure perception, continuous flash suppression, the attentional blink, repetition blindness and backward masking can demonstrate multisensory influences on unisensory awareness, but fall short of tackling multisensory awareness directly. Studies interested in the latter phenomenon rely on a method of subjective contrast and can, at best, delineate conditions under which individuals report experiencing a multisensory object or two unisensory objects. As there is not a perfect match between these conditions and those in which multisensory integration and binding occur, the link between awareness and binding advocated for visual information processing needs to be revised for multisensory cases. These challenges point at the need to question the very idea of multisensory awareness.

  13. [Niger: development under constraints].

    PubMed

    Chippaux, J P

    1998-01-01

    Several nonvenereal treponematoses are or were present in Niger while syphilis has been reported in only the northern, arid zones (Bejel) of the country. While their presence is known in Niger, endemic nonvenereal treponematoses are no longer reported by the country¿s health centers. Results are presented from a serological study using randomized Treponema pallidum Hemagglutination Assay (TPHA) upon a sample of 183 children under age 5 years old living in three areas of Niamey. No clinical exam was performed before testing. In the overall sample, 12% of tests were positive, ranging from 8% to 17% depending upon the neighborhood studied. The differences observed were insignificant according to both place of residence and age. All age groups were affected, although only 3 seropositive cases were identified among the 37 children under age 12 months. The relative levels were too high to be dismissed as serological artifacts. The most likely explanation for the high levels of antitreponemic antibodies is endemic syphilis, which is increasing in the region. Endemic syphilis is re-emerging, while penicillin is being used less systematically. Moreover, economic problems constrain access to health care. Results in children under age 12 months suggest that congenital syphilis is uncommon.

  14. Constraint-Based Scheduling System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zweben, Monte; Eskey, Megan; Stock, Todd; Taylor, Will; Kanefsky, Bob; Drascher, Ellen; Deale, Michael; Daun, Brian; Davis, Gene

    1995-01-01

    Report describes continuing development of software for constraint-based scheduling system implemented eventually on massively parallel computer. Based on machine learning as means of improving scheduling. Designed to learn when to change search strategy by analyzing search progress and learning general conditions under which resource bottleneck occurs.

  15. Temporal Constraint Reasoning With Preferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khatib, Lina; Morris, Paul; Morris, Robert; Rossi, Francesca

    2001-01-01

    A number of reasoning problems involving the manipulation of temporal information can naturally be viewed as implicitly inducing an ordering of potential local decisions involving time (specifically, associated with durations or orderings of events) on the basis of preferences. For example. a pair of events might be constrained to occur in a certain order, and, in addition. it might be preferable that the delay between them be as large, or as small, as possible. This paper explores problems in which a set of temporal constraints is specified, where each constraint is associated with preference criteria for making local decisions about the events involved in the constraint, and a reasoner must infer a complete solution to the problem such that, to the extent possible, these local preferences are met in the best way. A constraint framework for reasoning about time is generalized to allow for preferences over event distances and durations, and we study the complexity of solving problems in the resulting formalism. It is shown that while in general such problems are NP-hard, some restrictions on the shape of the preference functions, and on the structure of the preference set, can be enforced to achieve tractability. In these cases, a simple generalization of a single-source shortest path algorithm can be used to compute a globally preferred solution in polynomial time.

  16. Constraint elimination in dynamical systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, R. P.; Likins, P. W.

    1989-01-01

    Large space structures (LSSs) and other dynamical systems of current interest are often extremely complex assemblies of rigid and flexible bodies subjected to kinematical constraints. A formulation is presented for the governing equations of constrained multibody systems via the application of singular value decomposition (SVD). The resulting equations of motion are shown to be of minimum dimension.

  17. Frequency domain quantum optimal control under multiple constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Chuan-Cun; Ho, Tak-San; Xing, Xi; Rabitz, Herschel

    2016-03-01

    Optimal control of quantum systems with complex constrained external fields is one of the longstanding theoretical and numerical challenges at the frontier of quantum control research. Here, we present a theoretical method that can be utilized to optimize the control fields subject to multiple constraints while guaranteeing monotonic convergence towards desired physical objectives. This optimization method is formulated in the frequency domain in line with the current ultrafast pulse shaping technique, providing the possibility for performing quantum optimal control simulations and experiments in a unified fashion. For illustrations, this method is successfully employed to perform multiple constraint spectral-phase-only optimization for maximizing resonant multiphoton transitions with desired pulses.

  18. Constraints on global fire activity vary across a resource gradient.

    PubMed

    Krawchuk, Meg A; Moritz, Max A

    2011-01-01

    We provide an empirical, global test of the varying constraints hypothesis, which predicts systematic heterogeneity in the relative importance of biomass resources to burn and atmospheric conditions suitable to burning (weather/climate) across a spatial gradient of long-term resource availability. Analyses were based on relationships between monthly global wildfire activity, soil moisture, and mid-tropospheric circulation data from 2001 to 2007, synthesized across a gradient of long-term averages in resources (net primary productivity), annual temperature, and terrestrial biome. We demonstrate support for the varying constraints hypothesis, showing that, while key biophysical factors must coincide for wildfires to occur, the relative influence of resources to burn and moisture/weather conditions on fire activity shows predictable spatial patterns. In areas where resources are always available for burning during the fire season, such as subtropical/tropical biomes with mid-high annual long-term net primary productivity, fuel moisture conditions exert their strongest constraint on fire activity. In areas where resources are more limiting or variable, such as deserts, xeric shrublands, or grasslands/savannas, fuel moisture has a diminished constraint on wildfire, and metrics indicating availability of burnable fuels produced during the antecedent wet growing seasons reflect a more pronounced constraint on wildfire. This macro-scaled evidence for spatially varying constraints provides a synthesis with studies performed at local and regional scales, enhances our understanding of fire as a global process, and indicates how sensitivity to future changes in temperature and precipitation may differ across the world.

  19. The Large Genome Constraint Hypothesis: Evolution, Ecology and Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    KNIGHT, CHARLES A.; MOLINARI, NICOLE A.; PETROV, DMITRI A.

    2005-01-01

    • Background and Aims If large genomes are truly saturated with unnecessary ‘junk’ DNA, it would seem natural that there would be costs associated with accumulation and replication of this excess DNA. Here we examine the available evidence to support this hypothesis, which we term the ‘large genome constraint’. We examine the large genome constraint at three scales: evolution, ecology, and the plant phenotype. • Scope In evolution, we tested the hypothesis that plant lineages with large genomes are diversifying more slowly. We found that genera with large genomes are less likely to be highly specious – suggesting a large genome constraint on speciation. In ecology, we found that species with large genomes are under-represented in extreme environments – again suggesting a large genome constraint for the distribution and abundance of species. Ultimately, if these ecological and evolutionary constraints are real, the genome size effect must be expressed in the phenotype and confer selective disadvantages. Therefore, in phenotype, we review data on the physiological correlates of genome size, and present new analyses involving maximum photosynthetic rate and specific leaf area. Most notably, we found that species with large genomes have reduced maximum photosynthetic rates – again suggesting a large genome constraint on plant performance. Finally, we discuss whether these phenotypic correlations may help explain why species with large genomes are trimmed from the evolutionary tree and have restricted ecological distributions. • Conclusion Our review tentatively supports the large genome constraint hypothesis. PMID:15596465

  20. Constraint-based Temporal Reasoning with Preferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khatib, Lina; Morris, Paul; Morris, Robert; Rossi, Francesca; Sperduti, Alessandro; Venable, K. Brent

    2005-01-01

    Often we need to work in scenarios where events happen over time and preferences are associated to event distances and durations. Soft temporal constraints allow one to describe in a natural way problems arising in such scenarios. In general, solving soft temporal problems require exponential time in the worst case, but there are interesting subclasses of problems which are polynomially solvable. In this paper we identify one of such subclasses giving tractability results. Moreover, we describe two solvers for this class of soft temporal problems, and we show some experimental results. The random generator used to build the problems on which tests are performed is also described. We also compare the two solvers highlighting the tradeoff between performance and robustness. Sometimes, however, temporal local preferences are difficult to set, and it may be easier instead to associate preferences to some complete solutions of the problem. To model everything in a uniform way via local preferences only, and also to take advantage of the existing constraint solvers which exploit only local preferences, we show that machine learning techniques can be useful in this respect. In particular, we present a learning module based on a gradient descent technique which induces local temporal preferences from global ones. We also show the behavior of the learning module on randomly-generated examples.

  1. Constraint Theory and Roken Bond Bending Constraints in Oxide Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Min

    The molecular structure of sodium tellurate glasses was established using ^{125}Te absorption and ^{129}I emission Mossbauer spectroscopies, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), molar volume measurements and powder x-ray diffraction (XRD). The local atomic arrangement in these glasses is found to be different from that in corresponding crystals. This picture does not follow the usual thinking (Ioffe-Regel rule) about glass structure. The experimental evidence for this conclusion derives not only from Mossbauer spectroscopy but also from time-temperature -transformation curve and powder XRD measurements used to examine the crystallization of the bulk glasses. The TTT -curve exhibits both nucleation and growth branches, while XRD scans reveal growth of metastable phases before forming the stable crystalline phases. These results are in harmony with ^{23}Na solid state NMR results that reveal that sodium local environment in a x = 0.20 glass differs qualitatively from that of the crystalline counterpart. Results from DCS and XRD measurements reveal that at x = 0.18 several observables such as, dT_{g}/dx, activation energy for enthalpy relaxation, molar volume and Lamb-Mossbauer f factor, each display a threshold behavior. We believe that the physical origin of this threshold behavior comes from the rigidity percolation threshold. The constraint theory has recently been extended to include one-fold coordinated species and broken bond bending (beta) constraints. The latter was developed and has been applied successfully to many glass systems including the oxides, as we did for the first time in our Science paper, but also to chalcogenides and chalcohalides, etc.. In the experiments, the observed threshold apparently shifts to the over-constrained regime, i.e. > 2.4 in many glass systems. This shift is largely due to broken beta -constraint at some two-fold coordinated atoms, e.g. Se/S in chain segments and oxygen atoms. An example is g-Ge _{x}Se_{1-x } where one

  2. Applying Motion Constraints Based on Test Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlone, Michael

    2014-01-01

    MSC ADAMS is a simulation software that is used to analyze multibody dynamics. Using user subroutines, it is possible to apply motion constraints to the rigid bodies so that they match the motion profile collected from test data. This presentation describes the process of taking test data and passing it to ADAMS using user subroutines, and uses the Morpheus free-flight 4 test as an example of motion data used for this purpose. Morpheus is the name of a prototype lander vehicle built by NASA that serves as a test bed for various experimental technologies (see backup slides for details) MSC.ADAMS"TM" is used to play back telemetry data (vehicle orientation and position) from each test as the inputs to a 6-DoF general motion constraint (details in backup slides) The MSC.ADAMS"TM" playback simulations allow engineers to examine and analyze flight trajectory as well as observe vehicle motion from any angle and at any playback speed. This facilitates the development of robust and stable control algorithms, increasing reliability and reducing development costs of this developmental engine The simulation also incorporates a 3D model of the artificial hazard field, allowing engineers to visualize and measure performance of the developmental autonomous landing and hazard avoidance technology ADAMS is a multibody dynamics solver. It uses forces, constraints, and mass properties to numerically integrate equations of motion. The ADAMS solver will ask the motion subroutine for position, velocity, and acceleration values at various time steps. Those values must be continuous over the whole time domain. Each degree of freedom in the telemetry data can be examined separately; however, linear interpolation of the telemetry data is invalid, since there will be discontinuities in velocity and acceleration.

  3. Observational constraints on exponential gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Louis; Lee, Chung-Chi; Luo, Ling-Wei; Geng, Chao-Qiang

    2010-11-15

    We study the observational constraints on the exponential gravity model of f(R)=-{beta}R{sub s}(1-e{sup -R/R}{sub s}). We use the latest observational data including Supernova Cosmology Project Union2 compilation, Two-Degree Field Galaxy Redshift Survey, Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7, and Seven-Year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe in our analysis. From these observations, we obtain a lower bound on the model parameter {beta} at 1.27 (95% C.L.) but no appreciable upper bound. The constraint on the present matter density parameter is 0.245<{Omega}{sub m}{sup 0}<0.311 (95% C.L.). We also find out the best-fit value of model parameters on several cases.

  4. Functional constraints on phenomenological coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klika, Václav; Pavelka, Michal; Benziger, Jay B.

    2017-02-01

    Thermodynamic fluxes (diffusion fluxes, heat flux, etc.) are often proportional to thermodynamic forces (gradients of chemical potentials, temperature, etc.) via the matrix of phenomenological coefficients. Onsager's relations imply that the matrix is symmetric, which reduces the number of unknown coefficients is reduced. In this article we demonstrate that for a class of nonequilibrium thermodynamic models in addition to Onsager's relations the phenomenological coefficients must share the same functional dependence on the local thermodynamic state variables. Thermodynamic models and experimental data should be validated through consistency with the functional constraint. We present examples of coupled heat and mass transport (thermodiffusion) and coupled charge and mass transport (electro-osmotic drag). Additionally, these newly identified constraints further reduce the number of experiments needed to describe the phenomenological coefficient.

  5. Constraint checking during error recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lutz, Robyn R.; Wong, Johnny S. K.

    1993-01-01

    The system-level software onboard a spacecraft is responsible for recovery from communication, power, thermal, and computer-health anomalies that may occur. The recovery must occur without disrupting any critical scientific or engineering activity that is executing at the time of the error. Thus, the error-recovery software may have to execute concurrently with the ongoing acquisition of scientific data or with spacecraft maneuvers. This work provides a technique by which the rules that constrain the concurrent execution of these processes can be modeled in a graph. An algorithm is described that uses this model to validate that the constraints hold for all concurrent executions of the error-recovery software with the software that controls the science and engineering activities of the spacecraft. The results are applicable to a variety of control systems with critical constraints on the timing and ordering of the events they control.

  6. A compendium of chameleon constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrage, Clare; Sakstein, Jeremy

    2016-11-01

    The chameleon model is a scalar field theory with a screening mechanism that explains how a cosmologically relevant light scalar can avoid the constraints of intra-solar-system searches for fifth-forces. The chameleon is a popular dark energy candidate and also arises in f(R) theories of gravity. Whilst the chameleon is designed to avoid historical searches for fifth-forces it is not unobservable and much effort has gone into identifying the best observables and experiments to detect it. These results are not always presented for the same models or in the same language, a particular problem when comparing astrophysical and laboratory searches making it difficult to understand what regions of parameter space remain. Here we present combined constraints on the chameleon model from astrophysical and laboratory searches for the first time and identify the remaining windows of parameter space. We discuss the implications for cosmological chameleon searches and future small-scale probes.

  7. Integral Constraints and MHD Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, T. H.

    2003-10-01

    Determining stability of a plasma in MHD equilibrium, energetically isolated by a conducting wall, requires an assumption on what governs the dynamics of the plasma. One example is the assumption that the plasma obeys ideal MHD, leading to the well known ``δ W" criteria [I. Bernstein, et al., Proc. Roy. Soc. London A244, 17 (1958)]. A radically different approach was used by Taylor [J.B. Taylor, Rev. Mod. Phys. 58, 741 (1986)] in assuming that the dynamics of the plasma is restricted only by the requirement that helicity, an integral constant associated with the plasma, is conserved. The relevancy of Taylor's assumption is supported by the agreement between resulting theoretical results and experimental observations. Another integral constraint involves the canonical angular momentum of the plasma particles. One consequence of using this constraint is that tokamak plasmas have no poloidal current in agreement with some current hole tokamak observations [T.H. Jensen, Phys. Lett. A 305, 183 (2002)].

  8. Design and performance analysis of an aero-maneuvering orbital-transfer vehicle concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menees, G. P.

    1985-01-01

    Systems requirements for design-optimized, lateral-turn performance were determined for reusable, space-based applications and low-Earth orbits involving large multiple plane-inclination changes. The aerothermodynamic analysis is the most advanced available for rarefield-hypersonic flow over lifting surfaces at incidence. The effects of leading-edge bluntness, low-density viscous phenomena, and finite-rate flow-field chemistry and surface catalysis are accounted for. The predicted aerothermal heating characteristics are correlated with thermal-control and flight-performance capabilities. The mission payload capacity for delivery, retrieval, and combined operations was determined for round-trip sorties extending to polar orbits. Recommendations are given for future design refinements. The results help to identify technology issues required to develop prototype operational vehicles.

  9. Managing Restaurant Tables using Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidotto, Alfio; Brown, Kenneth N.; Beck, J. Christopher

    Restaurant table management can have significant impact on both profitability and the customer experience. The core of the issue is a complex dynamic combinatorial problem. We show how to model the problem as constraint satisfaction, with extensions which generate flexible seating plans and which maintain stability when changes occur. We describe an implemented system which provides advice to users in real time. The system is currently being evaluated in a restaurant environment.

  10. Macroscopic constraints on string unification

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, T.R.

    1989-03-01

    The comparison of sting theory with experiment requires a huge extrapolation from the microscopic distances, of order of the Planck length, up to the macroscopic laboratory distances. The quantum effects give rise to large corrections to the macroscopic predictions of sting unification. I discus the model-independent constraints on the gravitational sector of string theory due to the inevitable existence of universal Fradkin-Tseytlin dilatons. 9 refs.

  11. Adaptive Search through Constraint Violations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    ZIP Code) 3939 O’Hara Street 800 North Quincy Street Pittsburgh, PA 15260 Arlington, VA 22217-5000 8a NAME OF FUNDING/SPONSORING Bb OFFICE SYMBOL 9...Pittsburgh, PA . Smith, D. A., Greeno, J. G., & Vitolo, T. M., (in press). A model of competence for counting. Cognitive Science. VanLehn, K. (in press...1990). Adaptive search through constraint violations (Technical Report No. KUL-90-01). Pittsburgh, PA : Learning Research and Development Center

  12. Counting Heron Triangles with Constraints

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-25

    A3 INTEGERS 13 (2013) COUNTING HERON TRIANGLES WITH CONSTRAINTS Pantelimon Stănică Applied Mathematics, Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey...12, Revised: 10/12/12, Accepted: 1/13/13, Published: 1/25/13 Abstract Heron triangles have the property that all three of their sides as well as their...area are positive integers. In this paper, we give some estimates for the number of Heron triangles with two of their sides fixed. We provide a

  13. Infrared Constraint on Ultraviolet Theories

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Yuhsin

    2012-08-01

    While our current paradigm of particle physics, the Standard Model (SM), has been extremely successful at explaining experiments, it is theoretically incomplete and must be embedded into a larger framework. In this thesis, we review the main motivations for theories beyond the SM (BSM) and the ways such theories can be constrained using low energy physics. The hierarchy problem, neutrino mass and the existence of dark matter (DM) are the main reasons why the SM is incomplete . Two of the most plausible theories that may solve the hierarchy problem are the Randall-Sundrum (RS) models and supersymmetry (SUSY). RS models usually suffer from strong flavor constraints, while SUSY models produce extra degrees of freedom that need to be hidden from current experiments. To show the importance of infrared (IR) physics constraints, we discuss the flavor bounds on the anarchic RS model in both the lepton and quark sectors. For SUSY models, we discuss the difficulties in obtaining a phenomenologically allowed gaugino mass, its relation to R-symmetry breaking, and how to build a model that avoids this problem. For the neutrino mass problem, we discuss the idea of generating small neutrino masses using compositeness. By requiring successful leptogenesis and the existence of warm dark matter (WDM), we can set various constraints on the hidden composite sector. Finally, to give an example of model independent bounds from collider experiments, we show how to constrain the DM–SM particle interactions using collider results with an effective coupling description.

  14. Infrared constraints on ultraviolet theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Yuhsin

    2012-01-01

    While our current paradigm of particle physics, the Standard Model (SM), has been extremely successful at explaining experiments, it is theoretically incomplete and must be embedded into a larger framework. In this thesis, we review the main motivations for theories beyond the SM (BSM) and the ways such theories can be constrained using low energy physics. The hierarchy problem, neutrino mass and the existence of dark matter (DM) are the main reasons why the SM is incomplete . Two of the most plausible theories that may solve the hierarchy problem are the Randall-Sundrum (RS) models and supersymmetry (SUSY). RS models usually suffer from strong flavor constraints, while SUSY models produce extra degrees of freedom that need to be hidden from current experiments. To show the importance of infrared (IR) physics constraints, we discuss the flavor bounds on the anarchic RS model in both the lepton and quark sectors. For SUSY models, we discuss the difficulties in obtaining a phenomenologically allowed gaugino mass, its relation to R-symmetry breaking, and how to build a model that avoids this problem. For the neutrino mass problem, we discuss the idea of generating small neutrino masses using compositeness. By requiring successful leptogenesis and the existence of warm dark matter (WDM), we can set various constraints on the hidden composite sector. Finally, to give an example of model independent bounds from collider experiments, we show how to constrain the DM-SM particle interactions using collider results with an effective coupling description.

  15. A Hybrid Constraint Representation and Reasoning Framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, Keith; Pang, Wanlin

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce JNET, a novel constraint representation and reasoning framework that supports procedural constraints and constraint attachments, providing a flexible way of integrating the constraint system with a runtime software environment and improving its applicability. We describe how JNET is applied to a real-world problem - NASA's Earth-science data processing domain, and demonstrate how JNET can be extended, without any knowledge of how it is implemented, to meet the growing demands of real-world applications.

  16. Learning and Parallelization Boost Constraint Search

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yun, Xi

    2013-01-01

    Constraint satisfaction problems are a powerful way to abstract and represent academic and real-world problems from both artificial intelligence and operations research. A constraint satisfaction problem is typically addressed by a sequential constraint solver running on a single processor. Rather than construct a new, parallel solver, this work…

  17. Resource Allocation in Cooperative OFDMA Systems with Fairness Constraint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hongxing; Luo, Hanwen; Wang, Xinbing; Ding, Ming; Chen, Wen

    This letter investigates a subchannel and power allocation (SPA) algorithm which maximizes the throughput of a user under the constraints of total transmit power and fair subchannel occupation among relay nodes. The proposed algorithm reduces computational complexity from exponential to linear in the number of subchannels at the expense of a small performance loss.

  18. PARSEC: A Constraint-based Framework for Spoken Language Understanding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zoltowski, Carla B.; And Others

    This paper describes how a constraint dependency grammar (CDG) parser performs a syntactic analysis of a single sentence (as part of a speech recognition system). The paper extends an existing CDG (developed by H. Maruyama) to process a lattice or graph of sentence hypotheses instead of separate text strings. The paper also describes how the CDG…

  19. Solving Constraint-Satisfaction Problems In Prolog Language

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nachtsheim, Philip R.

    1991-01-01

    Technique for solution of constraint-satisfaction problems uses definite-clause grammars of Prolog computer language. Exploits fact that grammar-rule notation viewed as "state-change notation". Facilitates development of dynamic representation performing informed as well as blind searches. Applicable to design, scheduling, and planning problems.

  20. Constraints on the Professional Service of Education Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawson, Hal A.

    1990-01-01

    Increases in external services performed by faculty are integral to K-12 school, college, and department of education reform agendas, but there are limiting constraints, including the quest for prestige; tenure, promotion, and reward systems; and faculty recruitment, education, and role orientations. Changing these factors appropriately may help…

  1. Trajectory optimization in the presence of constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McQuade, Timothy E.

    1989-06-01

    In many aerospace problems, it is necessary to determine vehicle trajectories that satisfy constraints. Typically two types of constraints are of interest. First, it may be desirable to satisfy a set of boundary conditions. Second, it may be necessary to limit the motion of the vehicle so that physical limits and hardware limits are not exceeded. In addition to these requirements, it may be necessary to optimize some measure of vehicle performance. In this thesis, the square root sweep method is used to solve a discrete-time linear quadratic optimal control problem. The optimal control problem arises from a Mayer form continuous-time nonlinear optimization problem. A method for solving the optimal control problem is derived. Called the square root sweep algorithm, the solution consists of a set of backward recursions for a set of square root parameters. The square root sweep algorithm is shown to be capable of treating Mayer form optimization problems. Heuristics for obtaining solutions are discussed. The square root sweep algorithm is used to solve several example optimization problems.

  2. Quantum reading under a local energy constraint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spedalieri, Gaetana; Lupo, Cosmo; Mancini, Stefano; Braunstein, Samuel L.; Pirandola, Stefano

    2012-07-01

    Nonclassical states of light play a central role in many quantum information protocols. Very recently, their quantum features have been exploited to improve the readout of information from digital memories, modeled as arrays of microscopic beam splitters [Pirandola, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.106.090504 106, 090504 (2011)]. In this model of “quantum reading,” a nonclassical source of light with Einstein-Podolski-Rosen correlations has been proven to retrieve more information than any classical source. In particular, the quantum-classical comparison has been performed under a global energy constraint, i.e., by fixing the mean total number of photons irradiated over each memory cell. In this paper we provide an alternative analysis which is based on a local energy constraint, meaning that we fix the mean number of photons per signal mode irradiated over the memory cell. Under this assumption, we investigate the critical number of signal modes after which a nonclassical source of light is able to beat any classical source irradiating the same number of signals.

  3. New nucleosynthesis constraint on the variation of G.

    PubMed

    Copi, Craig J; Davis, Adam N; Krauss, Lawrence M

    2004-04-30

    Big bang nucleosynthesis can provide, via constraints on the expansion rate at that time, limits on possible variations in Newton's constant, G. The original analyses were performed before an independent measurement of the baryon-to-photon ratio from the cosmic microwave background was available. Combining this with recent measurements of the primordial deuterium abundance in quasar absorption systems now allows one to derive a new tighter constraint on G without recourse to considerations of helium or lithium abundances. We find that, compared to today's value, G0, G(BBN)/G(0)=1.01(+0.20)(-0.16) at the 68% confidence level.

  4. Applying the theory of constraints in health care: Part 1--The philosophy.

    PubMed

    Breen, Anne M; Burton-Houle, Tracey; Aron, David C

    2002-01-01

    The imperative to improve both technical and service quality while simultaneously reducing costs is quite clear. The Theory of Constraints (TOC) is an emerging philosophy that rests on two assumptions: (1) systems thinking and (2) if a constraint "is anything that limits a system from achieving higher performance versus its goal," then every system must have at least one (and at most no more than a few) constraints or limiting factors. A constraint is neither good nor bad in itself. Rather, it just is. In fact, recognition of the existence of constraints represents an excellent opportunity for improvement because it allows one to focus ones efforts in the most productive area--identifying and managing the constraints. This is accomplished by using the five focusing steps of TOC: (1) identify the system's constraint; (2) decide how to exploit it; (3) subordinate/synchronize everything else to the above decisions; (4) elevate the system's constraint; and (5) if the constraint has shifted in the above steps, go back to step 1. Do not allow inertia to become the system's constraint. TOC also refers to a series of tools termed "thinking processes" and the sequence in which they are used.

  5. Chance-Constrained Guidance With Non-Convex Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ono, Masahiro

    2011-01-01

    Missions to small bodies, such as comets or asteroids, require autonomous guidance for descent to these small bodies. Such guidance is made challenging by uncertainty in the position and velocity of the spacecraft, as well as the uncertainty in the gravitational field around the small body. In addition, the requirement to avoid collision with the asteroid represents a non-convex constraint that means finding the optimal guidance trajectory, in general, is intractable. In this innovation, a new approach is proposed for chance-constrained optimal guidance with non-convex constraints. Chance-constrained guidance takes into account uncertainty so that the probability of collision is below a specified threshold. In this approach, a new bounding method has been developed to obtain a set of decomposed chance constraints that is a sufficient condition of the original chance constraint. The decomposition of the chance constraint enables its efficient evaluation, as well as the application of the branch and bound method. Branch and bound enables non-convex problems to be solved efficiently to global optimality. Considering the problem of finite-horizon robust optimal control of dynamic systems under Gaussian-distributed stochastic uncertainty, with state and control constraints, a discrete-time, continuous-state linear dynamics model is assumed. Gaussian-distributed stochastic uncertainty is a more natural model for exogenous disturbances such as wind gusts and turbulence than the previously studied set-bounded models. However, with stochastic uncertainty, it is often impossible to guarantee that state constraints are satisfied, because there is typically a non-zero probability of having a disturbance that is large enough to push the state out of the feasible region. An effective framework to address robustness with stochastic uncertainty is optimization with chance constraints. These require that the probability of violating the state constraints (i.e., the probability of

  6. Optical mechanical analogy and nonlinear nonholonomic constraints.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Anthony M; Rojo, Alberto G

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we establish a connection between particle trajectories subject to a nonholonomic constraint and light ray trajectories in a variable index of refraction. In particular, we extend the analysis of systems with linear nonholonomic constraints to the dynamics of particles in a potential subject to nonlinear velocity constraints. We contrast the long time behavior of particles subject to a constant kinetic energy constraint (a thermostat) to particles with the constraint of parallel velocities. We show that, while in the former case the velocities of each particle equalize in the limit, in the latter case all the kinetic energies of each particle remain the same.

  7. Resolving manipulator redundancy under inequality constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, F.T.; Chen, T.H.; Sun, Y.Y. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1994-02-01

    Due to hardware limitations, physical constraints such as joint rate bounds, joint angle limits, and joint torque constraints always exist. In this paper, these constraints are considered into the general formulation of the redundant inverse kinematic problem. To take these physical constraints into account, the computationally efficient Compact Quadratic Programming (QP) method is formed to resolve the constrained kinematic redundancy problem. In addition, the Compact-Inverse QP method is also formulated to remedy the unescapable singularity problem with inequality constraints. Two examples are given to demonstrate the generality and superiority of these two methods: to eliminate the drift phenomenon caused by self motion and to remedy saturation-type nonlinearity problem.

  8. Planck constraints on holographic dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Miao; Zhang, Zhenhui; Li, Xiao-Dong; Ma, Yin-Zhe; Zhang, Xin E-mail: xiaodongli@kias.re.kr E-mail: zhangxin@mail.neu.edu.cn

    2013-09-01

    We perform a detailed investigation on the cosmological constraints on the holographic dark energy (HDE) model by using the Plank data. We find that HDE can provide a good fit to the Plank high-l (l ∼> 40) temperature power spectrum, while the discrepancy at l ≅ 20-40 found in the ΛCDM model remains unsolved in the HDE model. The Plank data alone can lead to strong and reliable constraint on the HDE parameter c. At the 68% confidence level (CL), we obtain c = 0.508 ± 0.207 with Plank+WP+lensing, favoring the present phantom behavior of HDE at the more than 2σ CL. By combining Plank+WP with the external astrophysical data sets, i.e. the BAO measurements from 6dFGS+SDSS DR7(R)+BOSS DR9, the direct Hubble constant measurement result (H{sub 0} = 73.8 ± 2.4 kms{sup −1}Mpc{sup −1}) from the HST, the SNLS3 supernovae data set, and Union2.1 supernovae data set, we get the 68% CL constraint results c = 0.484 ± 0.070, 0.474 ± 0.049, 0.594 ± 0.051, and 0.642 ± 0.066, respectively. The constraints can be improved by 2%-15% if we further add the Plank lensing data into the analysis. Compared with the WMAP-9 results, the Plank results reduce the error by 30%-60%, and prefer a phantom-like HDE at higher significant level. We also investigate the tension between different data sets. We find no evident tension when we combine Plank data with BAO and HST. Especially, we find that the strong correlation between Ω{sub m}h{sup 3} and dark energy parameters is helpful in relieving the tension between the Plank and HST measurements. The residual value of χ{sup 2}{sub Plank+WP+HST}−χ{sup 2}{sub Plank+WP} is 7.8 in the ΛCDM model, and is reduced to 1.0 or 0.3 if we switch the dark energy to w model or the holographic model. When we introduce supernovae data sets into the analysis, some tension appears. We find that the SNLS3 data set is in tension with all other data sets; for example, for the Plank+WP, WMAP-9 and BAO+HST, the corresponding Δχ{sup 2} is equal to 6

  9. Planck constraints on holographic dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Miao; Li, Xiao-Dong; Ma, Yin-Zhe; Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Zhenhui

    2013-09-01

    We perform a detailed investigation on the cosmological constraints on the holographic dark energy (HDE) model by using the Plank data. We find that HDE can provide a good fit to the Plank high-l (l gtrsim 40) temperature power spectrum, while the discrepancy at l simeq 20-40 found in the ΛCDM model remains unsolved in the HDE model. The Plank data alone can lead to strong and reliable constraint on the HDE parameter c. At the 68% confidence level (CL), we obtain c = 0.508 ± 0.207 with Plank+WP+lensing, favoring the present phantom behavior of HDE at the more than 2σ CL. By combining Plank+WP with the external astrophysical data sets, i.e. the BAO measurements from 6dFGS+SDSS DR7(R)+BOSS DR9, the direct Hubble constant measurement result (H0 = 73.8 ± 2.4 kms-1Mpc-1) from the HST, the SNLS3 supernovae data set, and Union2.1 supernovae data set, we get the 68% CL constraint results c = 0.484 ± 0.070, 0.474 ± 0.049, 0.594 ± 0.051, and 0.642 ± 0.066, respectively. The constraints can be improved by 2%-15% if we further add the Plank lensing data into the analysis. Compared with the WMAP-9 results, the Plank results reduce the error by 30%-60%, and prefer a phantom-like HDE at higher significant level. We also investigate the tension between different data sets. We find no evident tension when we combine Plank data with BAO and HST. Especially, we find that the strong correlation between Ωmh3 and dark energy parameters is helpful in relieving the tension between the Plank and HST measurements. The residual value of χ2Plank+WP+HST-χ2Plank+WP is 7.8 in the ΛCDM model, and is reduced to 1.0 or 0.3 if we switch the dark energy to w model or the holographic model. When we introduce supernovae data sets into the analysis, some tension appears. We find that the SNLS3 data set is in tension with all other data sets; for example, for the Plank+WP, WMAP-9 and BAO+HST, the corresponding Δχ2 is equal to 6.4, 3.5 and 4.1, respectively. As a comparison, the Union2

  10. Multiple candidates and multiple constraints based accurate depth estimation for multi-view stereo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chao; Zhou, Fugen; Xue, Bindang

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we propose a depth estimation method for multi-view image sequence. To enhance the accuracy of dense matching and reduce the inaccurate matching which is produced by inaccurate feature description, we select multiple matching points to build candidate matching sets. Then we compute an optimal depth from a candidate matching set which satisfies multiple constraints (epipolar constraint, similarity constraint and depth consistency constraint). To further increase the accuracy of depth estimation, depth consistency constraint of neighbor pixels is used to filter the inaccurate matching. On this basis, in order to get more complete depth map, depth diffusion is performed by neighbor pixels' depth consistency constraint. Through experiments on the benchmark datasets for multiple view stereo, we demonstrate the superiority of proposed method over the state-of-the-art method in terms of accuracy.

  11. Collider constraints on tuning in composite Higgs models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, James; White, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Two potential sources of tuning exist in composite Higgs models: one comes from keeping the Higgs VEV below the compositeness scale and one comes from keeping the Higgs light after constraints on the top partner masses are applied. We construct a measure that determines whether these tunings are independent or not and combines them appropriately. We perform a comprehensive scan of the parameter space for three explicit models and report the minimum tuning values compatible with existing collider constraints. Tuning values are given as functions of resonance masses and deviations to the Higgs couplings so the effect of future constraints can easily be quantified. The current minimum tuning in the minimal model is 2.5-5% and will be decreased to around 0.8-3.3% if no top partners are observed over the lifetime of the LHC

  12. Transition redshift in f (T ) cosmology and observational constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capozziello, Salvatore; Luongo, Orlando; Saridakis, Emmanuel N.

    2015-06-01

    We extract constraints on the transition redshift ztr , determining the onset of cosmic acceleration, predicted by an effective cosmographic construction, in the framework of f (T ) gravity. In particular, employing cosmography we obtain bounds on the viable f (T ) forms and their derivatives. Since this procedure is model independent, as long as the scalar curvature is fixed, we are able to determine intervals for ztr . In this way we guarantee that the Solar-System constraints are preserved and, moreover, we extract bounds on the transition time and the free parameters of the scenario. We find that the transition redshifts predicted by f (T ) cosmology, although compatible with the standard Λ CDM predictions, are slightly smaller. Finally, in order to obtain observational constraints on f (T ) cosmology, we perform a Monte Carlo fitting using supernova data, involving the most recent Union 2.1 data set.

  13. Automatic Constraint Detection for 2D Layout Regularization.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Haiyong; Nan, Liangliang; Yan, Dong-Ming; Dong, Weiming; Zhang, Xiaopeng; Wonka, Peter

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we address the problem of constraint detection for layout regularization. The layout we consider is a set of two-dimensional elements where each element is represented by its bounding box. Layout regularization is important in digitizing plans or images, such as floor plans and facade images, and in the improvement of user-created contents, such as architectural drawings and slide layouts. To regularize a layout, we aim to improve the input by detecting and subsequently enforcing alignment, size, and distance constraints between layout elements. Similar to previous work, we formulate layout regularization as a quadratic programming problem. In addition, we propose a novel optimization algorithm that automatically detects constraints. We evaluate the proposed framework using a variety of input layouts from different applications. Our results demonstrate that our method has superior performance to the state of the art.

  14. Variational stereo imaging of oceanic waves with statistical constraints.

    PubMed

    Gallego, Guillermo; Yezzi, Anthony; Fedele, Francesco; Benetazzo, Alvise

    2013-11-01

    An image processing observational technique for the stereoscopic reconstruction of the waveform of oceanic sea states is developed. The technique incorporates the enforcement of any given statistical wave law modeling the quasi-Gaussianity of oceanic waves observed in nature. The problem is posed in a variational optimization framework, where the desired waveform is obtained as the minimizer of a cost functional that combines image observations, smoothness priors and a weak statistical constraint. The minimizer is obtained by combining gradient descent and multigrid methods on the necessary optimality equations of the cost functional. Robust photometric error criteria and a spatial intensity compensation model are also developed to improve the performance of the presented image matching strategy. The weak statistical constraint is thoroughly evaluated in combination with other elements presented to reconstruct and enforce constraints on experimental stereo data, demonstrating the improvement in the estimation of the observed ocean surface.

  15. Effect of spatial constraints on Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yi-Shin; Su, Yi-Cheng; Pan, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Panmixia is a key issue in maintaining genetic diversity, which facilitates evolutionary potential during environmental changes. Additionally, conservation biologists suggest the importance of avoiding small or subdivided populations, which are prone to losing genetic diversity. In this paper, computer simulations were performed to the genetic drift of neutral alleles in random mating populations with or without spatial constraints by randomly choosing a mate among the closest neighbours. The results demonstrated that the number of generations required for the neutral allele to become homozygous (Th) varied proportionally to the population size and also strongly correlated with spatial constraints. The average Th for populations of the same size with spatial constraints was approximately one-and-a-half times longer than without constraints. With spatial constraints, homozygous population clusters formed, which reduced local diversity but preserved global diversity. Therefore, panmixia might be harmful in preserving the genetic diversity of an entire population. The results also suggested that the gene flow or gene exchange among the subdivided populations must be carefully processed to restrict diseases transmission or death during transportation and to monitor the genetic diversity. The application of this concept to similar systems, such as information transfer among peers, is also discussed.

  16. Effect of spatial constraints on Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Shin; Su, Yi-Cheng; Pan, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Panmixia is a key issue in maintaining genetic diversity, which facilitates evolutionary potential during environmental changes. Additionally, conservation biologists suggest the importance of avoiding small or subdivided populations, which are prone to losing genetic diversity. In this paper, computer simulations were performed to the genetic drift of neutral alleles in random mating populations with or without spatial constraints by randomly choosing a mate among the closest neighbours. The results demonstrated that the number of generations required for the neutral allele to become homozygous (Th) varied proportionally to the population size and also strongly correlated with spatial constraints. The average Th for populations of the same size with spatial constraints was approximately one-and-a-half times longer than without constraints. With spatial constraints, homozygous population clusters formed, which reduced local diversity but preserved global diversity. Therefore, panmixia might be harmful in preserving the genetic diversity of an entire population. The results also suggested that the gene flow or gene exchange among the subdivided populations must be carefully processed to restrict diseases transmission or death during transportation and to monitor the genetic diversity. The application of this concept to similar systems, such as information transfer among peers, is also discussed. PMID:26771073

  17. Airborne Management of Traffic Conflicts in Descent With Arrival Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doble, Nathan A.; Barhydt, Richard; Krishnamurthy, Karthik

    2005-01-01

    NASA is studying far-term air traffic management concepts that may increase operational efficiency through a redistribution of decisionmaking authority among airborne and ground-based elements of the air transportation system. One component of this research, En Route Free Maneuvering, allows trained pilots of equipped autonomous aircraft to assume responsibility for traffic separation. Ground-based air traffic controllers would continue to separate traffic unequipped for autonomous operations and would issue flow management constraints to all aircraft. To evaluate En Route Free Maneuvering operations, a human-in-the-loop experiment was jointly conducted by the NASA Ames and Langley Research Centers. In this experiment, test subject pilots used desktop flight simulators to resolve conflicts in cruise and descent, and to adhere to air traffic flow constraints issued by test subject controllers. Simulators at NASA Langley were equipped with a prototype Autonomous Operations Planner (AOP) flight deck toolset to assist pilots with conflict management and constraint compliance tasks. Results from the experiment are presented, focusing specifically on operations during the initial descent into the terminal area. Airborne conflict resolution performance in descent, conformance to traffic flow management constraints, and the effects of conflicting traffic on constraint conformance are all presented. Subjective data from subject pilots are also presented, showing perceived levels of workload, safety, and acceptability of autonomous arrival operations. Finally, potential AOP functionality enhancements are discussed along with suggestions to improve arrival procedures.

  18. Trajectory constraints in qualitative simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Brajnik, G.; Clancy, D.J.

    1996-12-31

    We present a method for specifying temporal constraints on trajectories of dynamical systems and enforcing them during qualitative simulation. This capability can be used to focus a simulation, simulate non-autonomous and piecewise-continuous systems, reason about boundary condition problems and incorporate observations into the simulation. The method has been implemented in TeQSIM, a qualitative simulator that combines the expressive power of qualitative differential equations with temporal logic. It interleaves temporal logic model checking with the simulation to constrain and refine the resulting predicted behaviors and to inject discontinuous changes into the simulation.

  19. Constraints on the timeon model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araki, Takeshi; Geng, C. Q.

    2009-04-01

    The timeon model recently proposed by Friedberg and Lee has a potential problem of flavor changing neutral currents (FCNCs) if the mass of the timeon is small. In order to avoid, we introduce a small dimensionless parameter to suppress FCNCs. Even in this case, we find that the timeon mass must be larger than 151 GeV to satisfy all the constraints from processes involving FCNCs in the quark sectors. We also extend the timeon model to the lepton sector and examine the leptonic processes.

  20. Closure constraints for hyperbolic tetrahedra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, Christoph; Livine, Etera R.

    2015-07-01

    We investigate the generalization of loop gravity's twisted geometries to a q-deformed gauge group. In the standard undeformed case, loop gravity is a formulation of general relativity as a diffeomorphism-invariant SU(2) gauge theory. Its classical states are graphs provided with algebraic data. In particular, closure constraints at every node of the graph ensure their interpretation as twisted geometries. Dual to each node, one has a polyhedron embedded in flat space {{{R}}3}. One then glues them, allowing for both curvature and torsion. It was recently conjectured that q-deforming the gauge group SU(2) would allow us to account for a non-vanishing cosmological constant Λ \

  1. Constraints on the wing morphology of pterosaurs.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Colin; Dyke, Gareth

    2012-03-22

    Animals that fly must be able to do so over a huge range of aerodynamic conditions, determined by weather, wind speed and the nature of their environment. No single parameter can be used to determine-let alone measure-optimum flight performance as it relates to wing shape. Reconstructing the wings of the extinct pterosaurs has therefore proved especially problematic: these Mesozoic flying reptiles had a soft-tissue membranous flight surface that is rarely preserved in the fossil record. Here, we review basic mechanical and aerodynamic constraints that influenced the wing shape of pterosaurs, and, building on this, present a series of theoretical modelling results. These results allow us to predict the most likely wing shapes that could have been employed by these ancient reptiles, and further show that a combination of anterior sweep and a reflexed proximal wing section provides an aerodynamically balanced and efficient theoretical pterosaur wing shape, with clear benefits for their flight stability.

  2. Constraints on the wing morphology of pterosaurs

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Colin; Dyke, Gareth

    2012-01-01

    Animals that fly must be able to do so over a huge range of aerodynamic conditions, determined by weather, wind speed and the nature of their environment. No single parameter can be used to determine—let alone measure—optimum flight performance as it relates to wing shape. Reconstructing the wings of the extinct pterosaurs has therefore proved especially problematic: these Mesozoic flying reptiles had a soft-tissue membranous flight surface that is rarely preserved in the fossil record. Here, we review basic mechanical and aerodynamic constraints that influenced the wing shape of pterosaurs, and, building on this, present a series of theoretical modelling results. These results allow us to predict the most likely wing shapes that could have been employed by these ancient reptiles, and further show that a combination of anterior sweep and a reflexed proximal wing section provides an aerodynamically balanced and efficient theoretical pterosaur wing shape, with clear benefits for their flight stability. PMID:21957137

  3. Executive summary, aerothermal modeling program, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, R.; Reynolds, R.; Bail, I.; Berry, R.; Johnson, K.; Mongia, H.

    1983-01-01

    Submodels used in the combustor analytical models that were successfully used in designing advanced technology combustors were assessed. Specific recommendations for further improvement of model accuracy for combustor design purposes were made. Based upon an exhaustive literature survey, a number of test cases were selected to assess accuracy of submodels of turbulence, turbulence/chemistry interaction, spray combustion, and dilution jet mixing processes within a confined cross-stream. These test cases included simple flows and complex flows with and without swirl. Nonrecirculating and recirculating, and nonreactive and reactive flows were investigated. It was concluded that the current models give qualitative trends for the recirculating secondary flows (as encountered in a gas turbine combustor primary zone), but the predictions are good for the dilution zone.

  4. Evaluation of aerothermal modeling computer programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsieh, K. C.; Yu, S. T.

    1987-01-01

    Various computer programs based upon the SIMPLE or SIMPLER algorithm were studied and compared for numerical accuracy, efficiency, and grid dependency. Four two-dimensional and one three-dimensional code originally developed by a number of research groups were considered. In general, the accuracy and computational efficieny of these TEACH type programs were improved by modifying the differencing schemes and their solvers. A brief description of each program is given. Error reduction, spline flux and second upwind differencing programs are covered.

  5. Semi-Supervised Nonnegative Matrix Factorization via Constraint Propagation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Di; Gao, Xinbo; Wang, Xiumei

    2016-01-01

    As is well known, nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) is a popular nonnegative dimensionality reduction method which has been widely used in computer vision, document clustering, and image analysis. However, traditional NMF is an unsupervised learning mode which cannot fully utilize the priori or supervised information. To this end, semi-supervised NMF methods have been proposed by incorporating the given supervised information. Nevertheless, when little supervised information is available, the improved performance will be limited. To effectively utilize the limited supervised information, this paper proposed a novel semi-supervised NMF method (CPSNMF) with pairwise constraints. The method propagates both the must-link and cannot-link constraints from the constrained samples to unconstrained samples, so that we can get the constraint information of the entire data set. Then, this information is reflected to the adjustment of data weight matrix. Finally, the weight matrix is incorporated as a regularization term to the NMF objective function. Therefore, the proposed method can fully utilize the constraint information to keep the geometry of the data distribution. Furthermore, the proposed CPSNMF is explored with two formulations and corresponding update rules are provided to solve the optimization problems. Thorough experiments on standard databases show the superior performance of the proposed method.

  6. Constraint Maintenance with Preferences and Underlying Flexible Solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bresina, John; Jonsson, Ari; Morris, Paul; Rajan, Kanna

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes an aspect of the constraint reasoning mechanism. that is part of a ground planning system slated to be used for the Mars Exploration Rovers mission, where two rovers are scheduled to land on Mars in January of 2003. The planning system combines manual planning software from JPL with an automatic planning/scheduling system from NASA Ames Research Center, and is designed to be used in a mixed-initiative mode. Among other things, this means that after a plan has been produced, the human operator can perform extensive modifications under the supervision of the automated. system. For each modification to an activity, the automated system must adjust other activities as needed to ensure that constraints continue to be satisfied. Thus, the system must accommodate change in an interactive setting. Performance is of critical importance for interactive use. This is achieved by maintaining an underlying flexible solution to the temporal constraints, while the system presents a fixed schedule to the user. Adjustments are then a matter of constraint propagation rather than completely re-solving the problem. However, this begs the important question of which fixed schedule (among the ones sanctioned by the underlying flexible solution) should be presented to the user.Our approach uses least-change and other preferences as a prism through which the user views the flexible solution.

  7. Theory of constraints for publicly funded health systems.

    PubMed

    Sadat, Somayeh; Carter, Michael W; Golden, Brian

    2013-03-01

    Originally developed in the context of publicly traded for-profit companies, theory of constraints (TOC) improves system performance through leveraging the constraint(s). While the theory seems to be a natural fit for resource-constrained publicly funded health systems, there is a lack of literature addressing the modifications required to adopt TOC and define the goal and performance measures. This paper develops a system dynamics representation of the classical TOC's system-wide goal and performance measures for publicly traded for-profit companies, which forms the basis for developing a similar model for publicly funded health systems. The model is then expanded to include some of the factors that affect system performance, providing a framework to apply TOC's process of ongoing improvement in publicly funded health systems. Future research is required to more accurately define the factors affecting system performance and populate the model with evidence-based estimates for various parameters in order to use the model to guide TOC's process of ongoing improvement.

  8. Adaptive laser link reconfiguration using constraint propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crone, M. S.; Julich, P. M.; Cook, L. M.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes Harris AI research performed on the Adaptive Link Reconfiguration (ALR) study for Rome Lab, and focuses on the application of constraint propagation to the problem of link reconfiguration for the proposed space based Strategic Defense System (SDS) Brilliant Pebbles (BP) communications system. According to the concept of operations at the time of the study, laser communications will exist between BP's and to ground entry points. Long-term links typical of RF transmission will not exist. This study addressed an initial implementation of BP's based on the Global Protection Against Limited Strikes (GPALS) SDI mission. The number of satellites and rings studied was representative of this problem. An orbital dynamics program was used to generate line-of-site data for the modeled architecture. This was input into a discrete event simulation implemented in the Harris developed COnstraint Propagation Expert System (COPES) Shell, developed initially on the Rome Lab BM/C3 study. Using a model of the network and several heuristics, the COPES shell was used to develop the Heuristic Adaptive Link Ordering (HALO) Algorithm to rank and order potential laser links according to probability of communication. A reduced set of links based on this ranking would then be used by a routing algorithm to select the next hop. This paper includes an overview of Constraint Propagation as an Artificial Intelligence technique and its embodiment in the COPES shell. It describes the design and implementation of both the simulation of the GPALS BP network and the HALO algorithm in COPES. This is described using a 59 Data Flow Diagram, State Transition Diagrams, and Structured English PDL. It describes a laser communications model and the heuristics involved in rank-ordering the potential communication links. The generation of simulation data is described along with its interface via COPES to the Harris developed View Net graphical tool for visual analysis of communications

  9. Causality constraints in conformal field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, Thomas; Jain, Sachin; Kundu, Sandipan

    2016-05-17

    Causality places nontrivial constraints on QFT in Lorentzian signature, for example fixing the signs of certain terms in the low energy Lagrangian. In d dimensional conformal field theory, we show how such constraints are encoded in crossing symmetry of Euclidean correlators, and derive analogous constraints directly from the conformal bootstrap (analytically). The bootstrap setup is a Lorentzian four-point function corresponding to propagation through a shockwave. Crossing symmetry fixes the signs of certain log terms that appear in the conformal block expansion, which constrains the interactions of low-lying operators. As an application, we use the bootstrap to rederive the well known sign constraint on the (Φ)4 coupling in effective field theory, from a dual CFT. We also find constraints on theories with higher spin conserved currents. As a result, our analysis is restricted to scalar correlators, but we argue that similar methods should also impose nontrivial constraints on the interactions of spinning operators

  10. Causality constraints in conformal field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, Thomas; Jain, Sachin; Kundu, Sandipan

    2016-05-01

    Causality places nontrivial constraints on QFT in Lorentzian signature, for example fixing the signs of certain terms in the low energy Lagrangian. In d dimensional conformal field theory, we show how such constraints are encoded in crossing symmetry of Euclidean correlators, and derive analogous constraints directly from the conformal bootstrap (analytically). The bootstrap setup is a Lorentzian four-point function corresponding to propagation through a shockwave. Crossing symmetry fixes the signs of certain log terms that appear in the conformal block expansion, which constrains the interactions of low-lying operators. As an application, we use the bootstrap to rederive the well known sign constraint on the (∂ ϕ)4 coupling in effective field theory, from a dual CFT. We also find constraints on theories with higher spin conserved currents. Our analysis is restricted to scalar correlators, but we argue that similar methods should also impose nontrivial constraints on the interactions of spinning operators.

  11. Constraint-based interactive assembly planning

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.E.; Wilson, R.H.; Calton, T.L.

    1997-03-01

    The constraints on assembly plans vary depending on the product, assembly facility, assembly volume, and many other factors. This paper describes the principles and implementation of a framework that supports a wide variety of user-specified constraints for interactive assembly planning. Constraints from many sources can be expressed on a sequencing level, specifying orders and conditions on part mating operations in a number of ways. All constraints are implemented as filters that either accept or reject assembly operations proposed by the planner. For efficiency, some constraints are supplemented with special-purpose modifications to the planner`s algorithms. Replanning is fast enough to enable a natural plan-view-constrain-replan cycle that aids in constraint discovery and documentation. We describe an implementation of the framework in a computer-aided assembly planning system and experiments applying the system to several complex assemblies. 12 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Rate-gyro-integral constraint for ambiguity resolution in GNSS attitude determination applications.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jiancheng; Li, Tao; Wang, Jinling; Hu, Xiaoping; Wu, Meiping

    2013-06-21

    In the field of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) attitude determination, the constraints usually play a critical role in resolving the unknown ambiguities quickly and correctly. Many constraints such as the baseline length, the geometry of multi-baselines and the horizontal attitude angles have been used extensively to improve the performance of ambiguity resolution. In the GNSS/Inertial Navigation System (INS) integrated attitude determination systems using low grade Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU), the initial heading parameters of the vehicle are usually worked out by the GNSS subsystem instead of by the IMU sensors independently. However, when a rotation occurs, the angle at which vehicle has turned within a short time span can be measured accurately by the IMU. This measurement will be treated as a constraint, namely the rate-gyro-integral constraint, which can aid the GNSS ambiguity resolution. We will use this constraint to filter the candidates in the ambiguity search stage. The ambiguity search space shrinks significantly with this constraint imposed during the rotation, thus it is helpful to speeding up the initialization of attitude parameters under dynamic circumstances. This paper will only study the applications of this new constraint to land vehicles. The impacts of measurement errors on the effect of this new constraint will be assessed for different grades of IMU and current average precision level of GNSS receivers. Simulations and experiments in urban areas have demonstrated the validity and efficacy of the new constraint in aiding GNSS attitude determinations.

  13. Background error covariance with balance constraints for aerosol species and applications in variational data assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zang, Zengliang; Hao, Zilong; Li, Yi; Pan, Xiaobin; You, Wei; Li, Zhijin; Chen, Dan

    2016-08-01

    Balance constraints are important for background error covariance (BEC) in data assimilation to spread information between different variables and produce balance analysis fields. Using statistical regression, we develop a balance constraint for the BEC of aerosol variables and apply it to a three-dimensional variational data assimilation system in the WRF/Chem model; 1-month forecasts from the WRF/Chem model are employed for BEC statistics. The cross-correlations between the different species are generally high. The largest correlation occurs between elemental carbon and organic carbon with as large as 0.9. After using the balance constraints, the correlations between the unbalanced variables reduce to less than 0.2. A set of data assimilation and forecasting experiments is performed. In these experiments, surface PM2.5 concentrations and speciated concentrations along aircraft flight tracks are assimilated. The analysis increments with the balance constraints show spatial distributions more complex than those without the balance constraints, which is a consequence of the spreading of observation information across variables due to the balance constraints. The forecast skills with the balance constraints show substantial and durable improvements from the 2nd hour to the 16th hour compared with the forecast skills without the balance constraints. The results suggest that the developed balance constraints are important for the aerosol assimilation and forecasting.

  14. Rate-Gyro-Integral Constraint for Ambiguity Resolution in GNSS Attitude Determination Applications

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jiancheng; Li, Tao; Wang, Jinling; Hu, Xiaoping; Wu, Meiping

    2013-01-01

    In the field of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) attitude determination, the constraints usually play a critical role in resolving the unknown ambiguities quickly and correctly. Many constraints such as the baseline length, the geometry of multi-baselines and the horizontal attitude angles have been used extensively to improve the performance of ambiguity resolution. In the GNSS/Inertial Navigation System (INS) integrated attitude determination systems using low grade Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU), the initial heading parameters of the vehicle are usually worked out by the GNSS subsystem instead of by the IMU sensors independently. However, when a rotation occurs, the angle at which vehicle has turned within a short time span can be measured accurately by the IMU. This measurement will be treated as a constraint, namely the rate-gyro-integral constraint, which can aid the GNSS ambiguity resolution. We will use this constraint to filter the candidates in the ambiguity search stage. The ambiguity search space shrinks significantly with this constraint imposed during the rotation, thus it is helpful to speeding up the initialization of attitude parameters under dynamic circumstances. This paper will only study the applications of this new constraint to land vehicles. The impacts of measurement errors on the effect of this new constraint will be assessed for different grades of IMU and current average precision level of GNSS receivers. Simulations and experiments in urban areas have demonstrated the validity and efficacy of the new constraint in aiding GNSS attitude determinations. PMID:23793044

  15. Physical constraints for pathogen movement.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Ulrich S

    2015-10-01

    In this pedagogical review, we discuss the physical constraints that pathogens experience when they move in their host environment. Due to their small size, pathogens are living in a low Reynolds number world dominated by viscosity. For swimming pathogens, the so-called scallop theorem determines which kinds of shape changes can lead to productive motility. For crawling or gliding cells, the main resistance to movement comes from protein friction at the cell-environment interface. Viruses and pathogenic bacteria can also exploit intracellular host processes such as actin polymerization and motor-based transport, if they present the appropriate factors on their surfaces. Similar to cancer cells that also tend to cross various barriers, pathogens often combine several of these strategies in order to increase their motility and therefore their chances to replicate and spread.

  16. Thermodynamic constraints on fluctuation phenomena.

    PubMed

    Maroney, O J E

    2009-12-01

    The relationships among reversible Carnot cycles, the absence of perpetual motion machines, and the existence of a nondecreasing globally unique entropy function form the starting point of many textbook presentations of the foundations of thermodynamics. However, the thermal fluctuation phenomena associated with statistical mechanics has been argued to restrict the domain of validity of this basis of the second law of thermodynamics. Here we demonstrate that fluctuation phenomena can be incorporated into the traditional presentation, extending rather than restricting the domain of validity of the phenomenologically motivated second law. Consistency conditions lead to constraints upon the possible spectrum of thermal fluctuations. In a special case this uniquely selects the Gibbs canonical distribution and more generally incorporates the Tsallis distributions. No particular model of microscopic dynamics need be assumed.

  17. Thermodynamic constraints on fluctuation phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maroney, O. J. E.

    2009-12-01

    The relationships among reversible Carnot cycles, the absence of perpetual motion machines, and the existence of a nondecreasing globally unique entropy function form the starting point of many textbook presentations of the foundations of thermodynamics. However, the thermal fluctuation phenomena associated with statistical mechanics has been argued to restrict the domain of validity of this basis of the second law of thermodynamics. Here we demonstrate that fluctuation phenomena can be incorporated into the traditional presentation, extending rather than restricting the domain of validity of the phenomenologically motivated second law. Consistency conditions lead to constraints upon the possible spectrum of thermal fluctuations. In a special case this uniquely selects the Gibbs canonical distribution and more generally incorporates the Tsallis distributions. No particular model of microscopic dynamics need be assumed.

  18. Simpler way of imposing simplicity constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banburski, Andrzej; Chen, Lin-Qing

    2016-11-01

    We investigate a way of imposing simplicity constraints in a holomorphic spin foam model that we recently introduced. Rather than imposing the constraints on the boundary spin network, as is usually done, one can impose the constraints directly on the spin foam propagator. We find that the two approaches have the same leading asymptotic behavior, with differences appearing at higher order. This allows us to obtain a model that greatly simplifies calculations, but still has Regge calculus as its semiclassical limit.

  19. Initial value constraints with tensor matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, Ted

    2011-12-01

    In generally covariant metric gravity theories with tensor matter fields, the initial value constraint equations, unlike in general relativity, are in general not just the 0μ components of the metric field equation. This happens because higher derivatives can occur in the matter stress tensor. A universal form for these constraints is derived here from a generalized Bianchi identity that includes matter fields. As an application, the constraints for Einstein-aether theory are found.

  20. Geomagnetic main field modeling using magnetohydrodynamic constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of physical constraints are investigated which may be approximately satisfied by the Earth's liquid core on models of the geomagnetic main field and its secular variation. A previous report describes the methodology used to incorporate nonlinear equations of constraint into the main field model. The application of that methodology to the GSFC 12/83 field model to test the frozen-flux hypothesis and the usefulness of incorporating magnetohydrodynamic constraints for obtaining improved geomagnetic field models is described.

  1. Planetary quarantine: Space research and technology. [satellite quarantine constraints on outer planet mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The impact of satisfying satellite quarantine constraints on current outer planet mission and spacecraft designs is considered. Tools required to perform trajectory and navigation analyses for determining satellite impact probabilities are developed.

  2. Protein threading with profiles and distance constraints using clique based algorithms.

    PubMed

    Dukka, Bahadur K C; Tomita, Etsuji; Suzuki, Jun'ichi; Horimoto, Katsuhisa; Akutsu, Tatsuya

    2006-02-01

    With the advent of experimental technologies like chemical cross-linking, it has become possible to obtain distances between specific residues of a newly sequenced protein. These types of experiments usually are less time consuming than X-ray crystallography or NMR. Consequently, it is highly desired to develop a method that incorporates this distance information to improve the performance of protein threading methods. However, protein threading with profiles in which constraints on distances between residues are given is known to be NP-hard. By using the notion of a maximum edge-weight clique finding algorithm, we introduce a more efficient method called FTHREAD for profile threading with distance constraints that is 18 times faster than its predecessor CLIQUETHREAD. Moreover, we also present a novel practical algorithm NTHREAD for profile threading with Non-strict constraints. The overall performance of FTHREAD on a data set shows that although our algorithm uses a simple threading function, our algorithm performs equally well as some of the existing methods. Particularly, when there are some unsatisfied constraints, NTHREAD (Non-strict constraints threading algorithm) performs better than threading with FTHREAD (Strict constraints threading algorithm). We have also analyzed the effects of using a number of distance constraints. This algorithm helps the enhancement of alignment quality between the query sequence and template structure, once the corresponding template structure is determined for the target sequence.

  3. Genetic programming over context-free languages with linear constraints for the knapsack problem: first results.

    PubMed

    Bruhn, Peter; Geyer-Schulz, Andreas

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce genetic programming over context-free languages with linear constraints for combinatorial optimization, apply this method to several variants of the multidimensional knapsack problem, and discuss its performance relative to Michalewicz's genetic algorithm with penalty functions. With respect to Michalewicz's approach, we demonstrate that genetic programming over context-free languages with linear constraints improves convergence. A final result is that genetic programming over context-free languages with linear constraints is ideally suited to modeling complementarities between items in a knapsack problem: The more complementarities in the problem, the stronger the performance in comparison to its competitors.

  4. Composable communication constraint-based control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Mong-ying A.; Srivastava, Pranav; Kumar, Vijay; Taylor, Camillo J.

    2004-12-01

    We describe a framework for multi-vehicle control which explicitly incorporates the state of the communication network and the constraints imposed by specifications on the quality of the communications links available to each robot. In a multi-robot adhoc setting, the need for guaranteed communications is essential for cooperative behavior. We propose a control methodology that ensures local connectivity in multi-robot navigation. Specifically, given an initial and final configuration of robots in which the quality of each communication link is above some specified threshold, we synthesize controllers that guarantee each robot goes to its goal destination while maintaining the quality of the communication links above the given threshold. For the sake of simplicity, we assume each robot has a pre-assigned "base unit" with which the robot tries to maintain connectivity while performing the assigned task. The proposed control methodology allows the robot's velocity to align with the tangent of a critical communication surface such that it might be possible for the robot to move on the surface. No assumptions are made regarding the critical surface, which might be arbitrarily complex for cluttered urban environments. The stability of such technique is shown and three-dimensional simulations with a small team of robots are presented. The paper demonstrates the performance of the control scheme in various three-dimensional settings with proofs of guarantees in simple scenarios.

  5. Material constraints on high-speed design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucur, Diana; Militaru, Nicolae

    2015-02-01

    Current high-speed circuit designs with signal rates up to 100Gbps and above are implying constraints for dielectric and conductive materials and their dependence of frequency, for component elements and for production processes. The purpose of this paper is to highlight through various simulation results the frequency dependence of specific parameters like insertion and return loss, eye diagrams, group delay that are part of signal integrity analyses type. In low-power environment designs become more complex as the operation frequency increases. The need for new materials with spatial uniformity for dielectric constant is a need for higher data rates circuits. The fiber weave effect (FWE) will be analyzed through the eye diagram results for various dielectric materials in a differential signaling scheme given the fact that the FWE is a phenomenon that affects randomly the performance of the circuit on balanced/differential transmission lines which are typically characterized through the above mentioned approaches. Crosstalk between traces is also of concern due to propagated signals that have tight rise and fall times or due to high density of the boards. Criteria should be considered to achieve maximum performance of the designed system requiring critical electronic properties.

  6. Phonological Constraint Induction in a Connectionist Network: Learning OCP-Place Constraints from Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alderete, John; Tupper, Paul; Frisch, Stefan A.

    2013-01-01

    A significant problem in computational language learning is that of inferring the content of well-formedness constraints from input data. In this article, we approach the constraint induction problem as the gradual adjustment of subsymbolic constraints in a connectionist network. In particular, we develop a multi-layer feed-forward network that…

  7. Learning Artificial Phonotactic Constraints: Time Course, Durability, and Relationship to Natural Constraints

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Conrad F.; Houghton, George

    2005-01-01

    G. S. Dell, K. D. Reed, D. R. Adams, and A. S. Meyer (2000) proposed a "breadth-of-constraint" continuum on phoneme errors, using artificial experiment-wide constraints to investigate a putative middle ground between local and language-wide constraints. The authors report 5 experiments that test the idea of the continuum and the location of the…

  8. A constraint solving approach to model reduction by tropical equilibration.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Sylvain; Fages, François; Radulescu, Ovidiu

    2014-01-01

    Model reduction is a central topic in systems biology and dynamical systems theory, for reducing the complexity of detailed models, finding important parameters, and developing multi-scale models for instance. While singular perturbation theory is a standard mathematical tool to analyze the different time scales of a dynamical system and decompose the system accordingly, tropical methods provide a simple algebraic framework to perform these analyses systematically in polynomial systems. The crux of these methods is in the computation of tropical equilibrations. In this paper we show that constraint-based methods, using reified constraints for expressing the equilibration conditions, make it possible to numerically solve non-linear tropical equilibration problems, out of reach of standard computation methods. We illustrate this approach first with the detailed reduction of a simple biochemical mechanism, the Michaelis-Menten enzymatic reaction model, and second, with large-scale performance figures obtained on the http://biomodels.net repository.

  9. Constraint and loneliness in agoraphobia: an empirical investigation.

    PubMed

    Pehlivanidis, A; Koulis, S; Papakostas, Y

    2014-01-01

    While progress in the aetiopathology and treatment of panic disorder is indisputable, research regarding agoraphobia lacks behind. One significant-yet untested- theory by Guidano and Liotti, suggests the existence of inner representations of fear of "constraint" and fear of "loneliness" as two major schemata, important in the pathogenesis and manifestation of agoraphobia. Activation of these schemata may occur in situations in which the patient: (a) feels as in an inescapable trap (constraint) or (b) alone, unprotected and helpless (loneliness). Upon activation, the "constraint" schema elicits such symptoms as asphyxiation, chest pain, difficult breathing, motor agitation and muscular tension, while the "loneliness" schema elicits such symptoms as sensation of tachycardia, weakness of limbs, trembling or fainting. Activation of these schemata by content-compatible stimuli is expected to trigger various, yet distinct, response patterns, both of which are indiscriminately described within the term "agoraphobia". In order to investigate this hypothesis and its possible clinical applications, several mental and physical probes were applied to 20 patients suffering primarily from agoraphobia, and their responses and performance were recorded. Subjects also completed the "10-item Agoraphobia Questionnaire" prepared by our team aiming at assessing cognitions related to Guidano and Liotti's notion of "loneliness" and "constraint". Breath holding (BH) and Hyperventilation (HV) were selected as physical probes. BH was selected as an easily administered hypercapnea - induced clinical procedure, because of its apparent resemblance to the concept of "constraint". Subjects were instructed to hold their breath for as long as they could and stop at will. Similarly, it was hypothesized that HV might represent a physical "loneliness" probe, since it can elicit such symptoms as dizziness, paraesthesias, stiff muscles, cold hands or feet and trembling, reminiscent of a "collapsing

  10. Constraints on cosmological parameters in power-law cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rani, Sarita; Altaibayeva, A.; Shahalam, M.; Singh, J. K.; Myrzakulov, R.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we examine observational constraints on the power law cosmology; essentially dependent on two parameters H0 (Hubble constant) and q (deceleration parameter). We investigate the constraints on these parameters using the latest 28 points of H(z) data and 580 points of Union2.1 compilation data and, compare the results with the results of ΛCDM . We also forecast constraints using a simulated data set for the future JDEM, supernovae survey. Our studies give better insight into power law cosmology than the earlier done analysis by Kumar [arXiv:1109.6924] indicating it tuning well with Union2.1 compilation data but not with H(z) data. However, the constraints obtained on and i.e. H0 average and q average using the simulated data set for the future JDEM, supernovae survey are found to be inconsistent with the values obtained from the H(z) and Union2.1 compilation data. We also perform the statefinder analysis and find that the power-law cosmological models approach the standard ΛCDM model as q → -1. Finally, we observe that although the power law cosmology explains several prominent features of evolution of the Universe, it fails in details.

  11. Statistical learning of novel graphotactic constraints in children and adults.

    PubMed

    Samara, Anna; Caravolas, Markéta

    2014-05-01

    The current study explored statistical learning processes in the acquisition of orthographic knowledge in school-aged children and skilled adults. Learning of novel graphotactic constraints on the position and context of letter distributions was induced by means of a two-phase learning task adapted from Onishi, Chambers, and Fisher (Cognition, 83 (2002) B13-B23). Following incidental exposure to pattern-embedding stimuli in Phase 1, participants' learning generalization was tested in Phase 2 with legality judgments about novel conforming/nonconforming word-like strings. Test phase performance was above chance, suggesting that both types of constraints were reliably learned even after relatively brief exposure. As hypothesized, signal detection theory d' analyses confirmed that learning permissible letter positions (d'=0.97) was easier than permissible neighboring letter contexts (d'=0.19). Adults were more accurate than children in all but a strict analysis of the contextual constraints condition. Consistent with the statistical learning perspective in literacy, our results suggest that statistical learning mechanisms contribute to children's and adults' acquisition of knowledge about graphotactic constraints similar to those existing in their orthography.

  12. Constraints on cosmological parameters in power-law cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Rani, Sarita; Singh, J.K.; Altaibayeva, A.; Myrzakulov, R.; Shahalam, M. E-mail: aziza.bibol@mail.ru E-mail: jainendrrakumar@rediffmail.com

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we examine observational constraints on the power law cosmology; essentially dependent on two parameters H{sub 0} (Hubble constant) and q (deceleration parameter). We investigate the constraints on these parameters using the latest 28 points of H(z) data and 580 points of Union2.1 compilation data and, compare the results with the results of ΛCDM . We also forecast constraints using a simulated data set for the future JDEM, supernovae survey. Our studies give better insight into power law cosmology than the earlier done analysis by Kumar [arXiv:1109.6924] indicating it tuning well with Union2.1 compilation data but not with H(z) data. However, the constraints obtained on and i.e. H{sub 0} average and q average using the simulated data set for the future JDEM, supernovae survey are found to be inconsistent with the values obtained from the H(z) and Union2.1 compilation data. We also perform the statefinder analysis and find that the power-law cosmological models approach the standard ΛCDM model as q → −1. Finally, we observe that although the power law cosmology explains several prominent features of evolution of the Universe, it fails in details.

  13. Training Neural Networks with Weight Constraints

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-03-01

    Hardware implementation of artificial neural networks imposes a variety of constraints. Finite weight magnitudes exist in both digital and analog...optimizing a network with weight constraints. Comparisons are made to the backpropagation training algorithm for networks with both unconstrained and hard-limited weight magnitudes. Neural networks , Analog, Digital, Stochastic

  14. COSMOLOGICAL CONSTRAINTS FROM GRAVITATIONAL LENS TIME DELAYS

    SciTech Connect

    Coe, Dan; Moustakas, Leonidas A.

    2009-11-20

    Future large ensembles of time delay (TD) lenses have the potential to provide interesting cosmological constraints complementary to those of other methods. In a flat universe with constant w including a Planck prior, The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope TD measurements for approx4000 lenses should constrain the local Hubble constant h to approx0.007 (approx1%), OMEGA{sub de} to approx0.005, and w to approx0.026 (all 1sigma precisions). Similar constraints could be obtained by a dedicated gravitational lens observatory (OMEGA) which would obtain precise TD and mass model measurements for approx100 well-studied lenses. We compare these constraints (as well as those for a more general cosmology) to the 'optimistic Stage IV' constraints expected from weak lensing, supernovae, baryon acoustic oscillations, and cluster counts, as calculated by the Dark Energy Task Force. TDs yield a modest constraint on a time-varying w(z), with the best constraint on w(z) at the 'pivot redshift' of z approx 0.31. Our Fisher matrix calculation is provided to allow TD constraints to be easily compared to and combined with constraints from other experiments. We also show how cosmological constraining power varies as a function of numbers of lenses, lens model uncertainty, TD precision, redshift precision, and the ratio of four-image to two-image lenses.

  15. Trimodal interpretation of constraints for planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krieger, David; Brown, Richard

    1987-01-01

    Constraints are used in the CAMPS knowledge based planning system to represent those propositions that must be true for a plan to be acceptable. CAMPS introduces the make-mode for interpreting a constraint. Given an unsatisfied constraint, make evaluation mode suggests planning actions which, if taken, would result in a modified plan in which the constraint in question may be satisfied. These suggested planning actions, termed delta-tuples, are the raw material of intelligent plan repair. They are used both in debugging an almost-right plan and in replanning due to changing situations. Given a defective plan in which some set of constraints are violated, a problem solving strategy selects one or more constraints as a focus of attention. These selected constraints are evaluated in the make-mode to produce delta-tuples. The problem solving strategy then reviews the delta-tuples according to its application and problem-specific criteria to find the most acceptable change in terms of success likelihood and plan disruption. Finally, the problem solving strategy makes the suggested alteration to the plan and then rechecks constraints to find any unexpected consequences.

  16. On Noisy Extensions of Nonholonomic Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gay-Balmaz, François; Putkaradze, Vakhtang

    2016-12-01

    We propose several stochastic extensions of nonholonomic constraints for mechanical systems and study the effects on the dynamics and on the conservation laws. Our approach relies on a stochastic extension of the Lagrange-d'Alembert framework. The mechanical system we focus on is the example of a Routh sphere, i.e., a rolling unbalanced ball on the plane. We interpret the noise in the constraint as either a stochastic motion of the plane, random slip or roughness of the surface. Without the noise, this system possesses three integrals of motion: energy, Jellet and Routh. Depending on the nature of noise in the constraint, we show that either energy, or Jellet, or both integrals can be conserved, with probability 1. We also present some exact solutions for particular types of motion in terms of stochastic integrals. Next, for an arbitrary nonholonomic system, we consider two different ways of including stochasticity in the constraints. We show that when the noise preserves the linearity of the constraints, then energy is preserved. For other types of noise in the constraint, e.g., in the case of an affine noise, the energy is not conserved. We study in detail a class of Lagrangian mechanical systems on semidirect products of Lie groups, with "rolling ball type" constraints. We conclude with numerical simulations illustrating our theories, and some pedagogical examples of noise in constraints for other nonholonomic systems popular in the literature, such as the nonholonomic particle, the rolling disk and the Chaplygin sleigh.

  17. The "No Crossing Constraint" in Autosegmental Phonology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, John; Local, John

    A discussion of autosegmental phonology (AP), a theory of phonological representation that uses graphs rather than strings as the central data structure, considers its principal constraint, the "No Crossing Constraint" (NCC). The NCC is the statement that in a well-formed autosegmental diagram, lines of association may not cross. After…

  18. Domain General Constraints on Statistical Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thiessen, Erik D.

    2011-01-01

    All theories of language development suggest that learning is constrained. However, theories differ on whether these constraints arise from language-specific processes or have domain-general origins such as the characteristics of human perception and information processing. The current experiments explored constraints on statistical learning of…

  19. Constraint-based evaluation of sequential procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barry, Matthew R.

    1990-01-01

    Constraining the operation of an agent requires knowledge of the restrictions to physical and temporal capabilities of that agent, as well as an inherent understanding of the desires being processed by that agent. Usually a set of constraints are available that must be adhered to in order to foster safe operations. In the worst case, violation of a constraint may be cause to terminate operation. If the agent is carrying out a plan, then a method for predicting the agent's desires, and therefore possible constraint violations, is required. The conceptualization of constraint-based reasoning used herein assumes that a system knows how to select a constraint for application as well as how to apply that constraint once it is selected. The application of constraint-based reasoning for evaluating certain kinds of plans known as sequential procedures is discussed. By decomposing these plans, it is possible to apply context dependent constraints in production system fashion without incorporating knowledge of the original planning process.

  20. Linear determining equations for differential constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Kaptsov, O V

    1998-12-31

    A construction of differential constraints compatible with partial differential equations is considered. Certain linear determining equations with parameters are used to find such differential constraints. They generalize the classical determining equations used in the search for admissible Lie operators. As applications of this approach equations of an ideal incompressible fluid and non-linear heat equations are discussed.

  1. Benchmark Production Scheduling Problems for Job Shops with Interactive Constraints

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-01

    proposed TOC as an alternative for managing a job shop operation . Goldratt’s scheduling software package, DISASTERTM, produces schedules based on the...impossible to simultaneously optimize all 13 performance measures, thus management must decide upon a desirable objective and schedule operations ...belief that an operation should be managed by controlling its constraints. Transfer Batch: A certain number of parts (batch) which must be produced

  2. Solar system constraints on disformal gravity theories

    SciTech Connect

    Ip, Hiu Yan; Schmidt, Fabian; Sakstein, Jeremy E-mail: jeremy.sakstein@port.ac.uk

    2015-10-01

    Disformal theories of gravity are scalar-tensor theories where the scalar couples derivatively to matter via the Jordan frame metric. These models have recently attracted interest in the cosmological context since they admit accelerating solutions. We derive the solution for a static isolated mass in generic disformal gravity theories and transform it into the parameterised post-Newtonian form. This allows us to investigate constraints placed on such theories by local tests of gravity. The tightest constraints come from preferred-frame effects due to the motion of the Solar System with respect to the evolving cosmological background field. The constraints we obtain improve upon the previous solar system constraints by two orders of magnitude, and constrain the scale of the disformal coupling for generic models to ℳ ∼> 100 eV. These constraints render all disformal effects irrelevant for cosmology.

  3. Volcanological constraints of Archaean tectonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thurston, P. C.; Ayres, L. D.

    1986-01-01

    Volcanological and trace element geochemical data can be integrated to place some constraints upon the size, character and evolutionary history of Archean volcanic plumbing, and hence indirectly, Archean tectonics. The earliest volcanism in any greenhouse belt is almost universally tholeitic basalt. Archean mafic magma chambers were usually the site of low pressure fractionation of olivine, plagioclase and later Cpx + or - an oxide phase during evolution of tholeitic liquids. Several models suggest basalt becoming more contaminated by sial with time. Data in the Uchi Subprovince shows early felsic volcanics to have fractionated REE patterns followed by flat REE pattern rhyolites. This is interpreted as initial felsic liquids produced by melting of a garnetiferous mafic source followed by large scale melting of LIL-rich sial. Rare andesites in the Uchi Subprovince are produced by basalt fractionation, direct mantle melts and mixing of basaltic and tonalitic liquids. Composite dikes in the Abitibi Subprovince have a basaltic edge with a chill margin, a rhyolitic interior with no basalt-rhyolite chill margin and partially melted sialic inclusions. Ignimbrites in the Uchi and Abitibi Subprovinces have mafic pumice toward the top. Integration of these data suggest initial mantle-derived basaltic liquids pond in a sialic crust, fractionate and melt sial. The inirial melts low in heavy REE are melts of mafic material, subsequently melting of adjacent sial produces a chamber with a felsic upper part underlain by mafic magma.

  4. Optimal Stopping with Information Constraint

    SciTech Connect

    Lempa, Jukka

    2012-10-15

    We study the optimal stopping problem proposed by Dupuis and Wang (Adv. Appl. Probab. 34:141-157, 2002). In this maximization problem of the expected present value of the exercise payoff, the underlying dynamics follow a linear diffusion. The decision maker is not allowed to stop at any time she chooses but rather on the jump times of an independent Poisson process. Dupuis and Wang (Adv. Appl. Probab. 34:141-157, 2002), solve this problem in the case where the underlying is a geometric Brownian motion and the payoff function is of American call option type. In the current study, we propose a mild set of conditions (covering the setup of Dupuis and Wang in Adv. Appl. Probab. 34:141-157, 2002) on both the underlying and the payoff and build and use a Markovian apparatus based on the Bellman principle of optimality to solve the problem under these conditions. We also discuss the interpretation of this model as optimal timing of an irreversible investment decision under an exogenous information constraint.

  5. Experimental Matching of Instances to Heuristics for Constraint Satisfaction Problems

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Scott, Jorge Humberto; Ortiz-Bayliss, José Carlos; Terashima-Marín, Hugo; Conant-Pablos, Santiago Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Constraint satisfaction problems are of special interest for the artificial intelligence and operations research community due to their many applications. Although heuristics involved in solving these problems have largely been studied in the past, little is known about the relation between instances and the respective performance of the heuristics used to solve them. This paper focuses on both the exploration of the instance space to identify relations between instances and good performing heuristics and how to use such relations to improve the search. Firstly, the document describes a methodology to explore the instance space of constraint satisfaction problems and evaluate the corresponding performance of six variable ordering heuristics for such instances in order to find regions on the instance space where some heuristics outperform the others. Analyzing such regions favors the understanding of how these heuristics work and contribute to their improvement. Secondly, we use the information gathered from the first stage to predict the most suitable heuristic to use according to the features of the instance currently being solved. This approach proved to be competitive when compared against the heuristics applied in isolation on both randomly generated and structured instances of constraint satisfaction problems. PMID:26949383

  6. Experimental Matching of Instances to Heuristics for Constraint Satisfaction Problems.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Scott, Jorge Humberto; Ortiz-Bayliss, José Carlos; Terashima-Marín, Hugo; Conant-Pablos, Santiago Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Constraint satisfaction problems are of special interest for the artificial intelligence and operations research community due to their many applications. Although heuristics involved in solving these problems have largely been studied in the past, little is known about the relation between instances and the respective performance of the heuristics used to solve them. This paper focuses on both the exploration of the instance space to identify relations between instances and good performing heuristics and how to use such relations to improve the search. Firstly, the document describes a methodology to explore the instance space of constraint satisfaction problems and evaluate the corresponding performance of six variable ordering heuristics for such instances in order to find regions on the instance space where some heuristics outperform the others. Analyzing such regions favors the understanding of how these heuristics work and contribute to their improvement. Secondly, we use the information gathered from the first stage to predict the most suitable heuristic to use according to the features of the instance currently being solved. This approach proved to be competitive when compared against the heuristics applied in isolation on both randomly generated and structured instances of constraint satisfaction problems.

  7. Reconstruction of dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the breast with temporal constraints

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liyong; Schabel, Matthias C.; DiBella, Edward V.R.

    2010-01-01

    A number of methods using temporal and spatial constraints have been proposed for reconstruction of undersampled dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data. The complex data can be constrained or regularized in a number of different ways, for example, the time derivative of the magnitude and phase image voxels can be constrained separately or jointly. Intuitively, the performance of different regularizations will depend on both the data and the chosen temporal constraints. Here, a complex temporal total variation (TV) constraint was compared to the use of separate real and imaginary constraints, and to a magnitude constraint alone. Projection onto Convex Sets (POCS) with a gradient descent method was used to implement the diverse temporal constraints in reconstructions of DCE MRI data. For breast DCE data, serial POCS with separate real and imaginary TV constraints was found to give relatively poor results while serial/parallel POCS with a complex temporal TV constraint and serial POCS with a magnitude-only temporal TV constraint performed well with an acceleration factor as large as R=6. In the tumor area, the best method was found to be parallel POCS with complex temporal TV constraint. This method resulted in estimates for the pharmacokinetic parameters that were linearly correlated to those estimated from the fully-sampled data, with Ktrans,R=6=0.97 Ktrans,R=1+0.00 with correlation coefficient r=0.98, kep,R=6=0.95 kep,R=1+0.00 (r=0.85). These results suggest that it is possible to acquire highly undersampled breast DCE-MRI data with improved spatial and/or temporal resolution with minimal loss of image quality. PMID:20392585

  8. Gender Performativity in Physics: Affordances or Only Constraints?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danielsson, Anna T.; Lundin, Mattias

    2014-01-01

    In this forum we engage in a dialogue with Allison Gonsalves's paper '"Physics and the girly girl--there is a contradiction somewhere": Doctoral students' positioning around discourses of gender and competence in physics'. In her paper Gonsalves uses a sociocultural approach to examine women doctoral students'…

  9. Human feeding biomechanics: performance, variation, and functional constraints

    PubMed Central

    Dechow, Paul C.; Wang, Qian; Gharpure, Poorva H.; Baab, Karen L.; Smith, Amanda L.; Weber, Gerhard W.; Grosse, Ian R.; Ross, Callum F.; Richmond, Brian G.; Wright, Barth W.; Byron, Craig; Wroe, Stephen; Strait, David S.

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of the modern human (Homo sapiens) cranium is characterized by a reduction in the size of the feeding system, including reductions in the size of the facial skeleton, postcanine teeth, and the muscles involved in biting and chewing. The conventional view hypothesizes that gracilization of the human feeding system is related to a shift toward eating foods that were less mechanically challenging to consume and/or foods that were processed using tools before being ingested. This hypothesis predicts that human feeding systems should not be well-configured to produce forceful bites and that the cranium should be structurally weak. An alternate hypothesis, based on the observation that humans have mechanically efficient jaw adductors, states that the modern human face is adapted to generate and withstand high biting forces. We used finite element analysis (FEA) to test two opposing mechanical hypotheses: that compared to our closest living relative, chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), the modern human craniofacial skeleton is (1) less well configured, or (2) better configured to generate and withstand high magnitude bite forces. We considered intraspecific variation in our examination of human feeding biomechanics by examining a sample of geographically diverse crania that differed notably in shape. We found that our biomechanical models of human crania had broadly similar mechanical behavior despite their shape variation and were, on average, less structurally stiff than the crania of chimpanzees during unilateral biting when loaded with physiologically-scaled muscle loads. Our results also show that modern humans are efficient producers of bite force, consistent with previous analyses. However, highly tensile reaction forces were generated at the working (biting) side jaw joint during unilateral molar bites in which the chewing muscles were recruited with bilateral symmetry. In life, such a configuration would have increased the risk of joint dislocation and constrained the maximum recruitment levels of the masticatory muscles on the balancing (non-biting) side of the head. Our results do not necessarily conflict with the hypothesis that anterior tooth (incisors, canines, premolars) biting could have been selectively important in humans, although the reduced size of the premolars in humans has been shown to increase the risk of tooth crown fracture. We interpret our results to suggest that human craniofacial evolution was probably not driven by selection for high magnitude unilateral biting, and that increased masticatory muscle efficiency in humans is likely to be a secondary byproduct of selection for some function unrelated to forceful biting behaviors. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that a shift to softer foods and/or the innovation of pre-oral food processing techniques relaxed selective pressures maintaining craniofacial features that favor forceful biting and chewing behaviors, leading to the characteristically small and gracile faces of modern humans. PMID:27547550

  10. Human feeding biomechanics: performance, variation, and functional constraints.

    PubMed

    Ledogar, Justin A; Dechow, Paul C; Wang, Qian; Gharpure, Poorva H; Gordon, Adam D; Baab, Karen L; Smith, Amanda L; Weber, Gerhard W; Grosse, Ian R; Ross, Callum F; Richmond, Brian G; Wright, Barth W; Byron, Craig; Wroe, Stephen; Strait, David S

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of the modern human (Homo sapiens) cranium is characterized by a reduction in the size of the feeding system, including reductions in the size of the facial skeleton, postcanine teeth, and the muscles involved in biting and chewing. The conventional view hypothesizes that gracilization of the human feeding system is related to a shift toward eating foods that were less mechanically challenging to consume and/or foods that were processed using tools before being ingested. This hypothesis predicts that human feeding systems should not be well-configured to produce forceful bites and that the cranium should be structurally weak. An alternate hypothesis, based on the observation that humans have mechanically efficient jaw adductors, states that the modern human face is adapted to generate and withstand high biting forces. We used finite element analysis (FEA) to test two opposing mechanical hypotheses: that compared to our closest living relative, chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), the modern human craniofacial skeleton is (1) less well configured, or (2) better configured to generate and withstand high magnitude bite forces. We considered intraspecific variation in our examination of human feeding biomechanics by examining a sample of geographically diverse crania that differed notably in shape. We found that our biomechanical models of human crania had broadly similar mechanical behavior despite their shape variation and were, on average, less structurally stiff than the crania of chimpanzees during unilateral biting when loaded with physiologically-scaled muscle loads. Our results also show that modern humans are efficient producers of bite force, consistent with previous analyses. However, highly tensile reaction forces were generated at the working (biting) side jaw joint during unilateral molar bites in which the chewing muscles were recruited with bilateral symmetry. In life, such a configuration would have increased the risk of joint dislocation and constrained the maximum recruitment levels of the masticatory muscles on the balancing (non-biting) side of the head. Our results do not necessarily conflict with the hypothesis that anterior tooth (incisors, canines, premolars) biting could have been selectively important in humans, although the reduced size of the premolars in humans has been shown to increase the risk of tooth crown fracture. We interpret our results to suggest that human craniofacial evolution was probably not driven by selection for high magnitude unilateral biting, and that increased masticatory muscle efficiency in humans is likely to be a secondary byproduct of selection for some function unrelated to forceful biting behaviors. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that a shift to softer foods and/or the innovation of pre-oral food processing techniques relaxed selective pressures maintaining craniofacial features that favor forceful biting and chewing behaviors, leading to the characteristically small and gracile faces of modern humans.

  11. Performance of Wireless Networks Subject to Constraints and Failures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    in the Graduate College of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2008 Urbana, Illinois Doctoral Committee: Professor Nitin H. Vaidya, Chair...to my advisor Prof. Nitin Vaidya. As his student, I have had the freedom to seek my trajectory, while always having access to his advice. My frequent...computing and networking, pages 216–230. ACM Press, 2004. [5] Vartika Bhandari and Nitin H. Vaidya. On reliable broadcast in a radio network. In PODC ’05

  12. PMBC: pattern mining from biological sequences with wildcard constraints.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xindong; Zhu, Xingquan; He, Yu; Arslan, Abdullah N

    2013-06-01

    Patterns/subsequences frequently appearing in sequences provide essential knowledge for domain experts, such as molecular biologists, to discover rules or patterns hidden behind the data. Due to the inherent complex nature of the biological data, patterns rarely exactly reproduce and repeat themselves, but rather appear with a slightly different form in each of its appearances. A gap constraint (In this paper, a gap constraint (also referred to as a wildcard) is a character that can be substituted for any character predefined in an alphabet.) provides flexibility for users to capture useful patterns even if their appearances vary in the sequences. In order to find patterns, existing tools require users to explicitly specify gap constraints beforehand. In reality, it is often nontrivial or time-consuming for users to provide proper gap constraint values. In addition, a change made to the gap values may give completely different results, and require a separate time-consuming re-mining procedure. Therefore, it is desirable to automatically and efficiently find patterns without involving user-specified gap requirements. In this paper, we study the problem of frequent pattern mining without user-specified gap constraints and propose PMBC (namely P̲atternM̲ining from B̲iological sequences with wildcard C onstraints) to solve the problem. Given a sequence and a support threshold value (i.e. pattern frequency threshold), PMBC intends to discover all subsequences with their support values equal to or greater than the given threshold value. The frequent subsequences then form patterns later on. Two heuristic methods (one-way vs. two-way scans) are proposed to discover frequent subsequences and estimate their frequency in the sequences. Experimental results on both synthetic and real-world DNA sequences demonstrate the performance of both methods for frequent pattern mining and pattern frequency estimation.

  13. Hydrogeologic Constraints on Yucatan's Development.

    PubMed

    Doehring, D O; Butler, J H

    1974-11-15

    The Republic of Mexico has an ambitious and effective national water program. The Secretaria de Recursos Hidraulicos (SRH), whose director has cabinet rank in the federal government, is one of the most professionally distinguished government agencies of its kind in the Americas. Resources for the Future, Inc., has been assisting the World Bank with a water planning study which the Bank is undertaking jointly with the Mexican government. The study is intended to provide guidelines for the development of government policies and projects designed to bring about the most efficient use of Mexico's water resources. However, to date, their study has not been directed toward the growing problems of the northern Yucatáan Peninsula which are discussed here. LeGrand (13) suggested that man has inherited a harsh environment in carbonate terranes. In the case of the northern Yucatán Peninsula, the physical environment creates a set of hydrogeologic constraints to future economic and social development. Planning for intermediate and long-range land use on the peninsula must be related directly to the limited and fragile groundwater source. Continued contamination will make future aquifer management a difficult challenge for federal, state, and territorial agencies. We conclude that any strategy for long-range land use in the study area should include establishment of a regional aquifermonitoring network for long-term measurements of key hydrogeologic parameters, including precipitation, evapotranspiration, water table elevations, and water quality. Information from this network would flow into a central facility for storage, interpretation, and analysis. At present the SRH is collecting some of these data. Expansion of the existing program to provide sound information for regional planning will greatly benefit present as well as future generations. If such a program is implemented, it will represent a model for regional planning in other tropical and subtropical karstic

  14. Natural Constraints to Species Diversification

    PubMed Central

    Lewitus, Eric; Morlon, Hélène

    2016-01-01

    Identifying modes of species diversification is fundamental to our understanding of how biodiversity changes over evolutionary time. Diversification modes are captured in species phylogenies, but characterizing the landscape of diversification has been limited by the analytical tools available for directly comparing phylogenetic trees of groups of organisms. Here, we use a novel, non-parametric approach and 214 family-level phylogenies of vertebrates representing over 500 million years of evolution to identify major diversification modes, to characterize phylogenetic space, and to evaluate the bounds and central tendencies of species diversification. We identify five principal patterns of diversification to which all vertebrate families hold. These patterns, mapped onto multidimensional space, constitute a phylogenetic space with distinct properties. Firstly, phylogenetic space occupies only a portion of all possible tree space, showing family-level phylogenies to be constrained to a limited range of diversification patterns. Secondly, the geometry of phylogenetic space is delimited by quantifiable trade-offs in tree size and the heterogeneity and stem-to-tip distribution of branching events. These trade-offs are indicative of the instability of certain diversification patterns and effectively bound speciation rates (for successful clades) within upper and lower limits. Finally, both the constrained range and geometry of phylogenetic space are established by the differential effects of macroevolutionary processes on patterns of diversification. Given these properties, we show that the average path through phylogenetic space over evolutionary time traverses several diversification stages, each of which is defined by a different principal pattern of diversification and directed by a different macroevolutionary process. The identification of universal patterns and natural constraints to diversification provides a foundation for understanding the deep-time evolution of

  15. Cluster and constraint analysis in tetrahedron packings.

    PubMed

    Jin, Weiwei; Lu, Peng; Liu, Lufeng; Li, Shuixiang

    2015-04-01

    The disordered packings of tetrahedra often show no obvious macroscopic orientational or positional order for a wide range of packing densities, and it has been found that the local order in particle clusters is the main order form of tetrahedron packings. Therefore, a cluster analysis is carried out to investigate the local structures and properties of tetrahedron packings in this work. We obtain a cluster distribution of differently sized clusters, and peaks are observed at two special clusters, i.e., dimer and wagon wheel. We then calculate the amounts of dimers and wagon wheels, which are observed to have linear or approximate linear correlations with packing density. Following our previous work, the amount of particles participating in dimers is used as an order metric to evaluate the order degree of the hierarchical packing structure of tetrahedra, and an order map is consequently depicted. Furthermore, a constraint analysis is performed to determine the isostatic or hyperstatic region in the order map. We employ a Monte Carlo algorithm to test jamming and then suggest a new maximally random jammed packing of hard tetrahedra from the order map with a packing density of 0.6337.

  16. Designing a Constraint Based Parser for Sanskrit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Amba; Pokar, Sheetal; Shukl, Devanand

    Verbal understanding (śā bdabodha) of any utterance requires the knowledge of how words in that utterance are related to each other. Such knowledge is usually available in the form of cognition of grammatical relations. Generative grammars describe how a language codes these relations. Thus the knowledge of what information various grammatical relations convey is available from the generation point of view and not the analysis point of view. In order to develop a parser based on any grammar one should then know precisely the semantic content of the grammatical relations expressed in a language string, the clues for extracting these relations and finally whether these relations are expressed explicitly or implicitly. Based on the design principles that emerge from this knowledge, we model the parser as finding a directed Tree, given a graph with nodes representing the words and edges representing the possible relations between them. Further, we also use the Mīmā ṃsā constraint of ākā ṅkṣā (expectancy) to rule out non-solutions and sannidhi (proximity) to prioritize the solutions. We have implemented a parser based on these principles and its performance was found to be satisfactory giving us a confidence to extend its functionality to handle the complex sentences.

  17. Electrical neuroimaging based on biophysical constraints.

    PubMed

    Grave de Peralta Menendez, Rolando; Murray, Micah M; Michel, Christoph M; Martuzzi, Roberto; Gonzalez Andino, Sara L

    2004-02-01

    This paper proposes and implements biophysical constraints to select a unique solution to the bioelectromagnetic inverse problem. It first shows that the brain's electric fields and potentials are predominantly due to ohmic currents. This serves to reformulate the inverse problem in terms of a restricted source model permitting noninvasive estimations of Local Field Potentials (LFPs) in depth from scalp-recorded data. Uniqueness in the solution is achieved by a physically derived regularization strategy that imposes a spatial structure on the solution based upon the physical laws that describe electromagnetic fields in biological media. The regularization strategy and the source model emulate the properties of brain activity's actual generators. This added information is independent of both the recorded data and head model and suffices for obtaining a unique solution compatible with and aimed at analyzing experimental data. The inverse solution's features are evaluated with event-related potentials (ERPs) from a healthy subject performing a visuo-motor task. Two aspects are addressed: the concordance between available neurophysiological evidence and inverse solution results, and the functional localization provided by fMRI data from the same subject under identical experimental conditions. The localization results are spatially and temporally concordant with experimental evidence, and the areas detected as functionally activated in both imaging modalities are similar, providing indices of localization accuracy. We conclude that biophysically driven inverse solutions offer a novel and reliable possibility for studying brain function with the temporal resolution required to advance our understanding of the brain's functional networks.

  18. Effect of biomechanical constraints in the hand laterality judgment task: where does it come from?

    PubMed Central

    Vannuscorps, Gilles; Pillon, Agnesa; Andres, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Several studies have reported that, when subjects have to judge the laterality of rotated hand drawings, their judgment is automatically influenced by the biomechanical constraints of the upper limbs. The prominent account for this effect is that, in order to perform the task, subjects mentally rotate their upper limbs toward the position of the displayed stimulus in a way that is consistent with the biomechanical constraints underlying the actual movement. However, the effect of such biomechanical constraints was also found in the responses of motor-impaired individuals performing the hand laterality judgment (HLJ) task, which seems at odds with the “motor imagery” account for this effect. In this study, we further explored the source of the biomechanical constraint effect by assessing the ability of an individual (DC) with a congenital absence of upper limbs to judge the laterality of rotated hand or foot drawings. We found that DC was as accurate and fast as control participants in judging the laterality of both hand and foot drawings, without any disadvantage for hands when compared to feet. Furthermore, DC's response latencies (RLs) for hand drawings were influenced by the biomechanical constraints of hand movements in the same way as control participants' RLs. These results suggest that the effect of biomechanical constraints in the HLJ task is not strictly dependent on “motor imagery” and can arise from the visual processing of body parts being sensitive to such constraints. PMID:23125830

  19. CONSTRAINT EFFECT IN FRACTURE WHAT IS IT

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, P; Prof. Yuh J. Chao, P

    2008-10-29

    The meaning of the phrase 'constraint effect in fracture' has changed in the past two decades from 'contained plasticity' to a broader description of 'dependence of fracture toughness value on geometry of test specimen or structure'. This paper will first elucidate the fundamental mechanics reasons for the apparent 'constraint effects in fracture', followed by outlining a straightforward approach to overcoming this problem in both brittle (elastic) and ductile (elastic-plastic) fracture. It is concluded by discussing the major difference in constraint effect on fracture event in elastic and elastic-plastic materials.

  20. Astrophysical and cosmological constraints to neutrino properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolb, Edward W.; Schramm, David N.; Turner, Michael S.

    1989-01-01

    The astrophysical and cosmological constraints on neutrino properties (masses, lifetimes, numbers of flavors, etc.) are reviewed. The freeze out of neutrinos in the early Universe are discussed and then the cosmological limits on masses for stable neutrinos are derived. The freeze out argument coupled with observational limits is then used to constrain decaying neutrinos as well. The limits to neutrino properties which follow from SN1987A are then reviewed. The constraint from the big bang nucleosynthesis on the number of neutrino flavors is also considered. Astrophysical constraints on neutrino-mixing as well as future observations of relevance to neutrino physics are briefly discussed.

  1. Support vector machine with hypergraph-based pairwise constraints.

    PubMed

    Hou, Qiuling; Lv, Meng; Zhen, Ling; Jing, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Although support vector machine (SVM) has become a powerful tool for pattern classification and regression, a major disadvantage is it fails to exploit the underlying correlation between any pair of data points as much as possible. Inspired by the modified pairwise constraints trick, in this paper, we propose a novel classifier termed as support vector machine with hypergraph-based pairwise constraints to improve the performance of the classical SVM by introducing a new regularization term with hypergraph-based pairwise constraints (HPC). The new classifier is expected to not only learn the structural information of each point itself, but also acquire the prior distribution knowledge about each constrained pair by combining the discrimination metric and hypergraph learning together. Three major contributions of this paper can be summarized as follows: (1) acquiring the high-order relationships between different samples by hypergraph learning; (2) presenting a more reasonable discriminative regularization term by combining the discrimination metric and hypergraph learning; (3) improving the performance of the existing SVM classifier by introducing HPC regularization term. And the comprehensive experimental results on twenty-five datasets demonstrate the validity and advantage of our approach.

  2. Distance and slope constraints: adaptation and variability in golf putting.

    PubMed

    Dias, Gonçalo; Couceiro, Micael S; Barreiros, João; Clemente, Filipe M; Mendes, Rui; Martins, Fernando M

    2014-07-01

    The main objective of this study is to understand the adaptation to external constraints and the effects of variability in a golf putting task. We describe the adaptation of relevant variables of golf putting to the distance to the hole and to the addition of a slope. The sample consisted of 10 adult male (33.80 ± 11.89 years), volunteers, right handed and highly skilled golfers with an average handicap of 10.82. Each player performed 30 putts at distances of 2, 3 and 4 meters (90 trials in Condition 1). The participants also performed 90 trials, at the same distances, with a constraint imposed by a slope (Condition 2). The results indicate that the players change some parameters to adjust to the task constraints, namely the duration of the backswing phase, the speed of the club head and the acceleration at the moment of impact with the ball. The effects of different golf putting distances in the no-slope condition on different kinematic variables suggest a linear adjustment to distance variation that was not observed when in the slope condition.

  3. A combined view of sterile-neutrino constraints from CMB and neutrino oscillation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridle, Sarah; Elvin-Poole, Jack; Evans, Justin; Fernandez, Susana; Guzowski, Pawel; Söldner-Rembold, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    We perform a comparative analysis of constraints on sterile neutrinos from the Planck experiment and from current and future neutrino oscillation experiments (MINOS, IceCube, SBN). For the first time, we express joint constraints on Neff and meffsterile from the CMB in the Δm2, sin2 ⁡ 2 θ parameter space used by oscillation experiments. We also show constraints from oscillation experiments in the Neff, meffsterile cosmology parameter space. In a model with a single sterile neutrino species and using standard assumptions, we find that the Planck 2015 data and the oscillation experiments measuring muon-neutrino (νμ) disappearance have similar sensitivity.

  4. Quantized Feedback Stabilization of Linear Discrete-Time Systems with Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanma, Tadanao; Yamamoto, Yusuke; Ishida, Muneaki

    This paper addresses quantization of control systems. The state of the system is quantized via a quantizer. In addition, constraints on input and/or state are considered explicitly. For a linear system with no constraint, some quantized feedback control methods have been proposed. In this paper, a control methodology for the constrained system is proposed. Specifically, an idea of a positively invariant set is introduced so that the performance is improved while the constraints are satisfied. The effectiveness of the proposed method is verified through both simulation and experiment.

  5. A Stochastic Approach to Diffeomorphic Point Set Registration With Landmark Constraints

    PubMed Central

    Kolesov, Ivan; Lee, Jehoon; Sharp, Gregory; Vela, Patricio; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2016-01-01

    This work presents a deformable point set registration algorithm that seeks an optimal set of radial basis functions to describe the registration. A novel, global optimization approach is introduced composed of simulated annealing with a particle filter based generator function to perform the registration. It is shown how constraints can be incorporated into this framework. A constraint on the deformation is enforced whose role is to ensure physically meaningful fields (i.e., invertible). Further, examples in which landmark constraints serve to guide the registration are shown. Results on 2D and 3D data demonstrate the algorithm’s robustness to noise and missing information. PMID:26761731

  6. Democratic constraints on demographic policy.

    PubMed

    Grigsby, J S

    1984-01-01

    The discussion compares the population policies adopted in Sweden during the 1930s to raise fertiity and the policies considered in the US during the 1970s in response to the high fertility experienced in the 1950s. Both sets of policies recommended increased availability of birth control, more liberal abortion laws, and greater employment opportunities for women. It becomes evident that the constraints imposed by a democratic system of government translate into policy recommendations that place individual freedom of choice and equal opportunity for all citizens as higher goals than any specific demographic target. Consequently, the population commissions of Sweden and the US made similar suggestions on how to resolve their opposite demographic problems. The demographic situations in the 2 nations were antipodal, and the countries also had very different social climates. This additional disparity was insufficient to counterbalance the apparently overwhelming influence of the democratic political systems in making virtually identical policy recommendations. Yet, the contrasting social climates of Sweden in 1935 and the US in 1970-72 may explain the different reactions each commission received. In terms of the responses by both citizens and government officials to the commissions' reports, the Swedish commission was more successful. Practically all of their recommendations were enthusiastically received and quickly adopted by the Swedish Riksdag. Yet, when the criterion for success becomes whether or not a demographic target was met, it increased in the 1940s and then dropped again while the same social policies were in effect. Even before the US commission began its study, fertility in the US had fallen and continues to remain low. These findings suggest that commissions in democratic countries will most likely never recommend dramatic measures in population policy. Thus, it is questionable whether such commissions in democratic nations will totally fulfill the

  7. A modified multilevel scheme for internal and external constraints in virtual environments.

    PubMed

    Arikatla, Venkata S; De, Suvranu

    2013-01-01

    Multigrid algorithms are gaining popularity in virtual reality simulations as they have a theoretically optimal performance that scales linearly with the number of degrees of freedom of the simulation system. We propose a multilevel approach that combines the efficiency of the multigrid algorithms with the ability to resolve multi-body constraints during interactive simulations. First, we develop a single level modified block Gauss-Seidel (MBGS) smoother that can incorporate constraints. This is subsequently incorporated in a standard multigrid V-cycle with corrections for constraints to form the modified multigrid V-cycle (MMgV). Numerical results show that the solver can resolve constraints while achieving the theoretical performance of multigrid schemes.

  8. An event-based architecture for solving constraint satisfaction problems

    PubMed Central

    Mostafa, Hesham; Müller, Lorenz K.; Indiveri, Giacomo

    2015-01-01

    Constraint satisfaction problems are ubiquitous in many domains. They are typically solved using conventional digital computing architectures that do not reflect the distributed nature of many of these problems, and are thus ill-suited for solving them. Here we present a parallel analogue/digital hardware architecture specifically designed to solve such problems. We cast constraint satisfaction problems as networks of stereotyped nodes that communicate using digital pulses, or events. Each node contains an oscillator implemented using analogue circuits. The non-repeating phase relations among the oscillators drive the exploration of the solution space. We show that this hardware architecture can yield state-of-the-art performance on random SAT problems under reasonable assumptions on the implementation. We present measurements from a prototype electronic chip to demonstrate that a physical implementation of the proposed architecture is robust to practical non-idealities and to validate the theory proposed. PMID:26642827

  9. Future CMB cosmological constraints in a dark coupled universe

    SciTech Connect

    Martinelli, Matteo; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Honorez, Laura Lopez

    2010-05-15

    Cosmic microwave background satellite missions as the ongoing Planck experiment are expected to provide the strongest constraints on a wide set of cosmological parameters. Those constraints, however, could be weakened when the assumption of a cosmological constant as the dark energy component is removed. Here we show that it will indeed be the case when there exists a coupling among the dark energy and the dark matter fluids. In particular, the expected errors on key parameters as the cold dark matter density and the angular diameter distance at decoupling are significantly larger when a dark coupling is introduced. We show that it will be the case also for future satellite missions as EPIC, unless CMB lensing extraction is performed.

  10. Causal Discovery from Subsampled Time Series Data by Constraint Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Hyttinen, Antti; Plis, Sergey; Järvisalo, Matti; Eberhardt, Frederick; Danks, David

    2017-01-01

    This paper focuses on causal structure estimation from time series data in which measurements are obtained at a coarser timescale than the causal timescale of the underlying system. Previous work has shown that such subsampling can lead to significant errors about the system’s causal structure if not properly taken into account. In this paper, we first consider the search for the system timescale causal structures that correspond to a given measurement timescale structure. We provide a constraint satisfaction procedure whose computational performance is several orders of magnitude better than previous approaches. We then consider finite-sample data as input, and propose the first constraint optimization approach for recovering the system timescale causal structure. This algorithm optimally recovers from possible conflicts due to statistical errors. More generally, these advances allow for a robust and non-parametric estimation of system timescale causal structures from subsampled time series data. PMID:28203316

  11. Causal Discovery from Subsampled Time Series Data by Constraint Optimization.

    PubMed

    Hyttinen, Antti; Plis, Sergey; Järvisalo, Matti; Eberhardt, Frederick; Danks, David

    2016-08-01

    This paper focuses on causal structure estimation from time series data in which measurements are obtained at a coarser timescale than the causal timescale of the underlying system. Previous work has shown that such subsampling can lead to significant errors about the system's causal structure if not properly taken into account. In this paper, we first consider the search for the system timescale causal structures that correspond to a given measurement timescale structure. We provide a constraint satisfaction procedure whose computational performance is several orders of magnitude better than previous approaches. We then consider finite-sample data as input, and propose the first constraint optimization approach for recovering the system timescale causal structure. This algorithm optimally recovers from possible conflicts due to statistical errors. More generally, these advances allow for a robust and non-parametric estimation of system timescale causal structures from subsampled time series data.

  12. A multilinear constraint on dichromatic planes for illumination estimation.

    PubMed

    Toro, Javier; Funt, Brian

    2007-01-01

    A new multilinear constraint on the color of the scene illuminant based on the dichromatic reflection model is proposed. The formulation avoids the problem, common to previous dichromatic methods, of having to first identify pixels corresponding to the same surface material. Once pixels from two or more materials have been identified, their corresponding dichromatic planes can be intersected to yield the illuminant color. However, it is not always easy to determine which pixels from an arbitrary region of an image belong to which dichromatic plane. The image region may cover an area of the scene encompassing several different materials and, hence, pixels from several different dichromatic planes. The new multilinear constraint accounts for this multiplicity of materials and provides a mechanism for choosing the most plausible illuminant from a finite set of candidate illuminants. The performance of this new method is tested on a database of real images.

  13. Updated Kinematic Constraints on a Dark Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, Eric David; Randall, Lisa

    2016-06-01

    We update the method of the Holmberg & Flynn study, including an updated model of the Milky Way’s interstellar gas, radial velocities, an updated reddening map, and a careful statistical analysis, to bound the allowed surface density and scale height of a dark disk. We pay careful attention to the self-consistency of the model, including the gravitational influence of the dark disk on other disk components, and to the net velocity of the tracer stars. We find that the data set exhibits a non-zero bulk velocity in the vertical direction as well as a displacement from the expected location at the Galactic midplane. If not properly accounted for, these features would bias the bound toward low dark disk mass. We therefore perform our analysis two ways. In the first, using the traditional method, we subtract the mean velocity and displacement from the tracers’ phase space distributions. In the second method, we perform a non-equilibrium version of the HF method to derive a bound on the dark disk parameters for an oscillating tracer distribution. Despite updates in the mass model and reddening map, the traditional method results remain consistent with those of HF2000. The second, non-equilibrium technique, however, allows a surface density as large as 14 {M}⊙ {{{pc}}}-2 (and as small as 0 {M}⊙ {{{pc}}}-2), demonstrating much weaker constraints. For both techniques, the bound on surface density is weaker for larger scale height. In future analyses of Gaia data it will be important to verify whether the tracer populations are in equilibrium.

  14. Constraint-based Attribute and Interval Planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jonsson, Ari; Frank, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we describe Constraint-based Attribute and Interval Planning (CAIP), a paradigm for representing and reasoning about plans. The paradigm enables the description of planning domains with time, resources, concurrent activities, mutual exclusions among sets of activities, disjunctive preconditions and conditional effects. We provide a theoretical foundation for the paradigm, based on temporal intervals and attributes. We then show how the plans are naturally expressed by networks of constraints, and show that the process of planning maps directly to dynamic constraint reasoning. In addition, we de ne compatibilities, a compact mechanism for describing planning domains. We describe how this framework can incorporate the use of constraint reasoning technology to improve planning. Finally, we describe EUROPA, an implementation of the CAIP framework.

  15. Biological constraints do not entail cognitive closure.

    PubMed

    Vlerick, Michael

    2014-12-01

    From the premise that our biology imposes cognitive constraints on our epistemic activities, a series of prominent authors--most notably Fodor, Chomsky and McGinn--have argued that we are cognitively closed to certain aspects and properties of the world. Cognitive constraints, they argue, entail cognitive closure. I argue that this is not the case. More precisely, I detect two unwarranted conflations at the core of arguments deriving closure from constraints. The first is a conflation of what I will refer to as 'representation' and 'object of representation'. The second confuses the cognitive scope of the assisted mind for that of the unassisted mind. Cognitive closure, I conclude, cannot be established from pointing out the (uncontroversial) existence of cognitive constraints.

  16. Ligand-based virtual screening under partial shape constraints.

    PubMed

    von Behren, Mathias M; Rarey, Matthias

    2017-04-01

    Ligand-based virtual screening has proven to be a viable technology during the search for new lead structures in drug discovery. Despite the rapidly increasing number of published methods, meaningful shape matching as well as ligand and target flexibility still remain open challenges. In this work, we analyze the influence of knowledge-based sterical constraints on the performance of the recently published ligand-based virtual screening method mRAISE. We introduce the concept of partial shape matching enabling a more differentiated view on chemical structure. The new method is integrated into the LBVS tool mRAISE providing multiple options for such constraints. The applied constraints can either be derived automatically from a protein-ligand complex structure or by manual selection of ligand atoms. In this way, the descriptor directly encodes the fit of a ligand into the binding site. Furthermore, the conservation of close contacts between the binding site surface and the query ligand can be enforced. We validated our new method on the DUD and DUD-E datasets. Although the statistical performance remains on the same level, detailed analysis reveal that for certain and especially very flexible targets a significant improvement can be achieved. This is further highlighted looking at the quality of calculated molecular alignments using the recently introduced mRAISE dataset. The new partial shape constraints improved the overall quality of molecular alignments especially for difficult targets with highly flexible or different sized molecules. The software tool mRAISE is freely available on Linux operating systems for evaluation purposes and academic use (see http://www.zbh.uni-hamburg.de/raise ).

  17. Ligand-based virtual screening under partial shape constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Behren, Mathias M.; Rarey, Matthias

    2017-03-01

    Ligand-based virtual screening has proven to be a viable technology during the search for new lead structures in drug discovery. Despite the rapidly increasing number of published methods, meaningful shape matching as well as ligand and target flexibility still remain open challenges. In this work, we analyze the influence of knowledge-based sterical constraints on the performance of the recently published ligand-based virtual screening method mRAISE. We introduce the concept of partial shape matching enabling a more differentiated view on chemical structure. The new method is integrated into the LBVS tool mRAISE providing multiple options for such constraints. The applied constraints can either be derived automatically from a protein-ligand complex structure or by manual selection of ligand atoms. In this way, the descriptor directly encodes the fit of a ligand into the binding site. Furthermore, the conservation of close contacts between the binding site surface and the query ligand can be enforced. We validated our new method on the DUD and DUD-E datasets. Although the statistical performance remains on the same level, detailed analysis reveal that for certain and especially very flexible targets a significant improvement can be achieved. This is further highlighted looking at the quality of calculated molecular alignments using the recently introduced mRAISE dataset. The new partial shape constraints improved the overall quality of molecular alignments especially for difficult targets with highly flexible or different sized molecules. The software tool mRAISE is freely available on Linux operating systems for evaluation purposes and academic use (see http://www.zbh.uni-hamburg.de/raise).

  18. Fast Deconvolution with Color Constraints on Gradients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    deconvolution approach for color images that combines a sparse regularization cost on the magnitudes of gradients with constraints on their direction in color...Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 15. SUBJECT TERMS computer vision, deblurring, spatio-spectral image model Ayan...approach for color images that combines a sparse regularization cost on the magnitudes of gradients with constraints on their direction in color space. We

  19. A Utility Accrual Scheduling Algorithm for Real-Time Activities With Mutual Exclusion Resource Constraints

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    system. Our simulation studies and implementation measurements reveal that GUS performs close to, if not better than, the existing algorithms for the...satisfying application time con­ straints. The most widely studied time constraint is the deadline. A deadline time con­ straint for an application...optimality criteria, such as resource dependencies and precedence 3 constraints. Scheduling tasks with non-step TUF’s has been studied in the past

  20. Causality constraints in conformal field theory

    DOE PAGES

    Hartman, Thomas; Jain, Sachin; Kundu, Sandipan

    2016-05-17

    Causality places nontrivial constraints on QFT in Lorentzian signature, for example fixing the signs of certain terms in the low energy Lagrangian. In d dimensional conformal field theory, we show how such constraints are encoded in crossing symmetry of Euclidean correlators, and derive analogous constraints directly from the conformal bootstrap (analytically). The bootstrap setup is a Lorentzian four-point function corresponding to propagation through a shockwave. Crossing symmetry fixes the signs of certain log terms that appear in the conformal block expansion, which constrains the interactions of low-lying operators. As an application, we use the bootstrap to rederive the well knownmore » sign constraint on the (Φ)4 coupling in effective field theory, from a dual CFT. We also find constraints on theories with higher spin conserved currents. As a result, our analysis is restricted to scalar correlators, but we argue that similar methods should also impose nontrivial constraints on the interactions of spinning operators« less

  1. On the relation between operator constraint, master constraint, reduced phase space and path integral quantization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Muxin; Thiemann, T.

    2010-11-01

    Path integral formulations for gauge theories must start from the canonical formulation in order to obtain the correct measure. A possible avenue to derive it is to start from the reduced phase space formulation. In this paper we review this rather involved procedure in full generality. Moreover, we demonstrate that the reduced phase space path integral formulation formally agrees with the Dirac's operator constraint quantization and, more specifically, with the master constraint quantization for first-class constraints. For first-class constraints with nontrivial structure functions the equivalence can only be established by passing to Abelian(ized) constraints which is always possible locally in phase space. Generically, the correct configuration space path integral measure deviates from the exponential of the Lagrangian action. The corrections are especially severe if the theory suffers from second-class secondary constraints. In a companion paper we compute these corrections for the Holst and Plebanski formulations of GR on which current spin foam models are based.

  2. Using LDPC Code Constraints to Aid Recovery of Symbol Timing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Christopher; Villasnor, John; Lee, Dong-U; Vales, Esteban

    2008-01-01

    A method of utilizing information available in the constraints imposed by a low-density parity-check (LDPC) code has been proposed as a means of aiding the recovery of symbol timing in the reception of a binary-phase-shift-keying (BPSK) signal representing such a code in the presence of noise, timing error, and/or Doppler shift between the transmitter and the receiver. This method and the receiver architecture in which it would be implemented belong to a class of timing-recovery methods and corresponding receiver architectures characterized as pilotless in that they do not require transmission and reception of pilot signals. Acquisition and tracking of a signal of the type described above have traditionally been performed upstream of, and independently of, decoding and have typically involved utilization of a phase-locked loop (PLL). However, the LDPC decoding process, which is iterative, provides information that can be fed back to the timing-recovery receiver circuits to improve performance significantly over that attainable in the absence of such feedback. Prior methods of coupling LDPC decoding with timing recovery had focused on the use of output code words produced as the iterations progress. In contrast, in the present method, one exploits the information available from the metrics computed for the constraint nodes of an LDPC code during the decoding process. In addition, the method involves the use of a waveform model that captures, better than do the waveform models of the prior methods, distortions introduced by receiver timing errors and transmitter/ receiver motions. An LDPC code is commonly represented by use of a bipartite graph containing two sets of nodes. In the graph corresponding to an (n,k) code, the n variable nodes correspond to the code word symbols and the n-k constraint nodes represent the constraints that the code places on the variable nodes in order for them to form a valid code word. The decoding procedure involves iterative computation

  3. Constraint-Muse: A Soft-Constraint Based System for Music Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hölzl, Matthias; Denker, Grit; Meier, Max; Wirsing, Martin

    Monoidal soft constraints are a versatile formalism for specifying and solving multi-criteria optimization problems with dynamically changing user preferences. We have developed a prototype tool for interactive music creation, called Constraint Muse, that uses monoidal soft constraints to ensure that a dynamically generated melody harmonizes with input from other sources. Constraint Muse provides an easy to use interface based on Nintendo Wii controllers and is intended to be used in music therapy for people with Parkinson’s disease and for children with high-functioning autism or Asperger’s syndrome.

  4. Imposing Constraints from the Source Tree on ITG Constraints for SMT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Hirofumi; Okuma, Hideo; Sumita, Eiichiro

    In the current statistical machine translation (SMT), erroneous word reordering is one of the most serious problems. To resolve this problem, many word-reordering constraint techniques have been proposed. Inversion transduction grammar (ITG) is one of these constraints. In ITG constraints, target-side word order is obtained by rotating nodes of the source-side binary tree. In these node rotations, the source binary tree instance is not considered. Therefore, stronger constraints for word reordering can be obtained by imposing further constraints derived from the source tree on the ITG constraints. For example, for the source word sequence { a b c d }, ITG constraints allow a total of twenty-two target word orderings. However, when the source binary tree instance ((a b) (c d)) is given, our proposed “imposing source tree on ITG” (IST-ITG) constraints allow only eight word orderings. The reduction in the number of word-order permutations by our proposed stronger constraints efficiently suppresses erroneous word orderings. In our experiments with IST-ITG using the NIST MT08 English-to-Chinese translation track's data, the proposed method resulted in a 1.8-points improvement in character BLEU-4 (35.2 to 37.0) and a 6.2% lower CER (74.1 to 67.9%) compared with our baseline condition.

  5. A Resource Constrained Distributed Constraint Optimization Method using Resource Constraint Free Pseudo-tree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, Toshihiro; Silaghi, Marius C.; Hirayama, Katsutoshi; Yokoo, Makoto; Matsuo, Hiroshi

    Cooperative problem solving with shared resources is important in practical multi-agent systems. Resource constraints are necessary to handle practical problems such as distributed task scheduling with limited resource availability. As a fundamental formalism for multi-agent cooperation, the Distributed Constraint Optimization Problem (DCOP) has been investigated. With DCOPs, the agent states and the relationships between agents are formalized into a constraint optimization problem. However, in the original DCOP framework, constraints for resources that are consumed by teams of agents are not well supported. A framework called Resource Constrained Distributed Constraint Optimization Problem (RCDCOP) has recently been proposed. In RCDCOPs, a limit on resource usage is represented as an n-ary constraint. Previous research addressing RCDCOPs employ a pseudo-tree based solver. The pseudo-tree is an important graph structure for constraint networks. A pseudo-tree implies a partial ordering of variables. However, n-ary constrained variables, which are placed on a single path of the pseudo-tree, decrease efficiency of the solver. We propose another method using (i) a pseudo-tree that is generated ignoring resource constraints and (ii) virtual variables representing the usage of resources. However the virtual variables increase search space. To improve pruning efficiency of search, (iii) we apply a set of upper/lower bounds that are inferred from resource constraints. The efficiency of the proposed method is evaluated by experiment.

  6. Quantitative assessment of thermodynamic constraints on the solution space of genome-scale metabolic models.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Joshua J; Dwivedi, Vivek; Reed, Jennifer L

    2013-07-16

    Constraint-based methods provide powerful computational techniques to allow understanding and prediction of cellular behavior. These methods rely on physiochemical constraints to eliminate infeasible behaviors from the space of available behaviors. One such constraint is thermodynamic feasibility, the requirement that intracellular flux distributions obey the laws of thermodynamics. The past decade has seen several constraint-based methods that interpret this constraint in different ways, including those that are limited to small networks, rely on predefined reaction directions, and/or neglect the relationship between reaction free energies and metabolite concentrations. In this work, we utilize one such approach, thermodynamics-based metabolic flux analysis (TMFA), to make genome-scale, quantitative predictions about metabolite concentrations and reaction free energies in the absence of prior knowledge of reaction directions, while accounting for uncertainties in thermodynamic estimates. We applied TMFA to a genome-scale network reconstruction of Escherichia coli and examined the effect of thermodynamic constraints on the flux space. We also assessed the predictive performance of TMFA against gene essentiality and quantitative metabolomics data, under both aerobic and anaerobic, and optimal and suboptimal growth conditions. Based on these results, we propose that TMFA is a useful tool for validating phenotypes and generating hypotheses, and that additional types of data and constraints can improve predictions of metabolite concentrations.

  7. Efficient Semisupervised MEDLINE Document Clustering With MeSH-Semantic and Global-Content Constraints.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jun; Feng, Wei; Zeng, Jia; Mamitsuka, Hiroshi; Zhu, Shanfeng

    2013-08-01

    For clustering biomedical documents, we can consider three different types of information: the local-content (LC) information from documents, the global-content (GC) information from the whole MEDLINE collections, and the medical subject heading (MeSH)-semantic (MS) information. Previous methods for clustering biomedical documents are not necessarily effective for integrating different types of information, by which only one or two types of information have been used. Recently, the performance of MEDLINE document clustering has been enhanced by linearly combining both the LC and MS information. However, the simple linear combination could be ineffective because of the limitation of the representation space for combining different types of information (similarities) with different reliability. To overcome the limitation, we propose a new semisupervised spectral clustering method, i.e., SSNCut, for clustering over the LC similarities, with two types of constraints: must-link (ML) constraints on document pairs with high MS (or GC) similarities and cannot-link (CL) constraints on those with low similarities. We empirically demonstrate the performance of SSNCut on MEDLINE document clustering, by using 100 data sets of MEDLINE records. Experimental results show that SSNCut outperformed a linear combination method and several well-known semisupervised clustering methods, being statistically significant. Furthermore, the performance of SSNCut with constraints from both MS and GC similarities outperformed that from only one type of similarities. Another interesting finding was that ML constraints more effectively worked than CL constraints, since CL constraints include around 10% incorrect ones, whereas this number was only 1% for ML constraints.

  8. Strict Constraint Feasibility in Analysis and Design of Uncertain Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crespo, Luis G.; Giesy, Daniel P.; Kenny, Sean P.

    2006-01-01

    This paper proposes a methodology for the analysis and design optimization of models subject to parametric uncertainty, where hard inequality constraints are present. Hard constraints are those that must be satisfied for all parameter realizations prescribed by the uncertainty model. Emphasis is given to uncertainty models prescribed by norm-bounded perturbations from a nominal parameter value, i.e., hyper-spheres, and by sets of independently bounded uncertain variables, i.e., hyper-rectangles. These models make it possible to consider sets of parameters having comparable as well as dissimilar levels of uncertainty. Two alternative formulations for hyper-rectangular sets are proposed, one based on a transformation of variables and another based on an infinity norm approach. The suite of tools developed enable us to determine if the satisfaction of hard constraints is feasible by identifying critical combinations of uncertain parameters. Since this practice is performed without sampling or partitioning the parameter space, the resulting assessments of robustness are analytically verifiable. Strategies that enable the comparison of the robustness of competing design alternatives, the approximation of the robust design space, and the systematic search for designs with improved robustness characteristics are also proposed. Since the problem formulation is generic and the solution methods only require standard optimization algorithms for their implementation, the tools developed are applicable to a broad range of problems in several disciplines.

  9. Balancing Science Objectives and Operational Constraints: A Mission Planner's Challenge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weldy, Michelle

    1996-01-01

    The Air Force minute sensor technology integration (MSTI-3) satellite's primary mission is to characterize Earth's atmospheric background clutter. MSTI-3 will use three cameras for data collection, a mid-wave infrared imager, a short wave infrared imager, and a visible imaging spectrometer. Mission science objectives call for the collection of over 2 million images within the one year mission life. In addition, operational constraints limit camera usage to four operations of twenty minutes per day, with no more than 10,000 data and calibrating images collected per day. To balance the operational constraints and science objectives, the mission planning team has designed a planning process to e event schedules and sensor operation timelines. Each set of constraints, including spacecraft performance capabilities, the camera filters, the geographical regions, and the spacecraft-Sun-Earth geometries of interest, and remote tracking station deconflictions has been accounted for in this methodology. To aid in this process, the mission planning team is building a series of tools from commercial off-the-shelf software. These include the mission manifest which builds a daily schedule of events, and the MSTI Scene Simulator which helps build geometrically correct scans. These tools provide an efficient, responsive, and highly flexible architecture that maximizes data collection while minimizing mission planning time.

  10. Constraints on mixed dark matter from anomalous strong lens systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamada, Ayuki; Inoue, Kaiki Taro; Takahashi, Tomo

    2016-07-01

    Recently it has been claimed that the warm dark matter (WDM) model cannot at the same time reproduce the observed Lyman-α forests in distant quasar spectra and solve the small-scale issues in the cold dark matter (CDM) model. As an alternative candidate, it was shown that the mixed dark matter (MDM) model that consists of WDM and CDM can satisfy the constraint from Lyman-α forests and account for the "missing satellite problem" as well as the reported 3.5 keV anomalous x-ray line. We investigate observational constraints on the MDM model using strong gravitational lenses. We first develop a fitting formula for the nonlinear power spectra in the MDM model by performing N -body simulations and estimate the expected perturbations caused by line-of-sight structures in four quadruply lensed quasars that show anomaly in the flux ratios. Our analysis indicates that the MDM model is compatible with the observed anomaly if the mass fraction of the warm component is smaller than 0.47 at the 95% confidence level. The MDM explanation to the anomalous x-ray line and the small-scale issues is still viable even after this constraint is taken into account.

  11. Implicit Active Constraints for Robot-Assisted Arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Edoardo; Kwok, Ka-Wai; Payne, Christopher J.; Giataganas, Petros; Yang, Guang-Zhong

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an Implicit Active Constraints control framework for robot-assisted minimally invasive surgery. It extends on current frameworks by prescribing the external constraints implicitly from the operator motion, forgoing the need for pre-operative imaging; the constraints are defined in situ so as to avoid the use of invasive fiducial markers. A hands-on cooperatively-controlled robotic platform, comprising of a surgical instrument and a compliant manipulator, has been designed for an arthroscopic procedure. The surgical platform is capable of constraining the pose of the instrument so as to ensure it passes through the incision point and does not cause trauma to the surrounding tissue. A flexible arthroscopic instrument is designed and its use is investigated to enlarge reachable and dexterous workspace, increasing the accessibility to the target anatomy. The behaviour of the flexible instrument is analysed. A detailed performance analysis is conducted on a group of subjects for validating the control framework, simulating a minimally invasive arthroscopic procedure. Results demonstrate a statistically significant enhancement in the control ergonomics as well as the accuracy and safety of the procedure. PMID:24748994

  12. Mechanisms and constraints shaping the evolution of body plan segmentation.

    PubMed

    Ten Tusscher, K H W J

    2013-05-01

    Segmentation of the major body axis into repeating units is arguably one of the major inventions in the evolution of animal body plan pattering. It is found in current day vertebrates, annelids and arthropods. Most segmented animals seem to use a clock-and-wavefront type mechanism in which oscillations emanating from a posterior growth zone become transformed into an anterior posterior sequence of segments. In contrast, few animals such as Drosophila use a complex gene regulatory hierarchy to simultaneously subdivide their entire body axis into segments. Here I discuss how in silico models simulating the evolution of developmental patterning can be used to investigate the forces and constraints that helped shape these two developmental modes. I perform an analysis of a series of previous simulation studies, exploiting the similarities and differences in their outcomes in relation to model characteristics to elucidate the circumstances and constraints likely to have been important for the evolution of sequential and simultaneous segmentation modes. The analysis suggests that constraints arising from the involved growth process and spatial patterning signal--posterior elongation producing a propagating wavefront versus a tissue wide morphogen gradient--and the evolutionary history--ancestral versus derived segmentation mode--strongly shaped both segmentation mechanisms. Furthermore, this implies that these patterning types are to be expected rather than random evolutionary outcomes and supports the likelihood of multiple parallel evolutionary origins.

  13. Right ventricle segmentation with probability product kernel constraints.

    PubMed

    Nambakhsh, Cyrus M S; Peters, Terry M; Islam, Ali; Ayed, Ismail Ben

    2013-01-01

    We propose a fast algorithm for 3D segmentation of the right ventricle (RV) in MRI using shape and appearance constraints based on probability product kernels (PPK). The proposed constraints remove the need for large, manually-segmented training sets and costly pose estimation (or registration) procedures, as is the case of the existing algorithms. We report comprehensive experiments, which demonstrate that the proposed algorithm (i) requires only a single subject for training; and (ii) yields a performance that is not significantly affected by the choice of the training data. Our PPK constraints are non-linear (high-order) functionals, which are not directly amenable to standard optimizers. We split the problem into several surrogate-functional optimizations, each solved via an efficient convex relaxation that is amenable to parallel implementations. We further introduce a scale variable that we optimize with fast fixed-point computations, thereby achieving pose invariance in real-time. Our parallelized implementation on a graphics processing unit (GPU) demonstrates that the proposed algorithm can yield a real-time solution for typical cardiac MRI volumes, with a speed-up of more than 20 times compared to the CPU version. We report a comprehensive experimental validations over 400 volumes acquired from 20 subjects, and demonstrate that the obtained 3D surfaces correlate with independent manual delineations.

  14. Magnetohydrodynamic Augmented Propulsion Experiment: I. Performance Analysis and Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, R. J.; Cole, J. W.; Lineberry, J. T.; Chapman, J. N.; Schmidt, H. J.; Lineberry, C. W.

    2003-01-01

    The performance of conventional thermal propulsion systems is fundamentally constrained by the specific energy limitations associated with chemical fuels and the thermal limits of available materials. Electromagnetic thrust augmentation represents one intriguing possibility for improving the fuel composition of thermal propulsion systems, thereby increasing overall specific energy characteristics; however, realization of such a system requires an extremely high-energy-density electrical power source as well as an efficient plasma acceleration device. This Technical Publication describes the development of an experimental research facility for investigating the use of cross-field magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) accelerators as a possible thrust augmentation device for thermal propulsion systems. In this experiment,a 1.5-MW(sub e) Aerotherm arc heater is used to drive a 2-MW(sub e) MHD accelerator. The heatsink MHD accelerator is configured as an externally diagonalized, segmented channel, which is inserted into a large-bore, 2-T electromagnet. The performance analysis and engineering design of the flow path are described as well as the parameter measurements and flow diagnostics planned for the initial series of test runs.

  15. Physical Constraints on Microbially Enhanced Oil Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, S. L.

    2007-12-01

    Secondary and tertiary oil recovery from mature or depleted reservoirs usually involves modification of fluid properties (especially the oil-water interfacial tension), or increasing the efficiency of water flooding by selective permeability reduction. The use of microbes for both of these strategies - through production of biosurfactants and extracellular polymeric material, respectively - is the subject of considerable current interest, but as pointed out by Bryant and Lockhart [SPE paper 79719, 2002] is constrained by chemical reaction kinetics. Continuing in the spirit of the engineering analysis presented by these authors, the purpose of this paper is to consider, on the basis of simplified physical models, the constraints that apply to the injection of microbes as a concentrated slurry and their subsequent dispersion through the pores of the formation. This involves solution of the advection-dispersion equation in conjunction with the Newtonian flow distribution between an injection well and a production well, and a more general flow distribution based on a non-Newtonian (power-law) constitutive equation used to describe the rheological properties of concentrated suspensions. By analogy with the better-known example of blood flow through capillaries, such deviations from Newtonian flow behavior are expected to become more significant in flow through media of low permeabilities, where the diameters of the suspended particles are non-negligible in relation to the mean diameters of the flow channels. The nature and extent of these deviations from Newtonian behavior are examined by calculating the pressure drops corresponding to a given flow rate in one dimension at different suspension concentrations, and the nonlinearities resulting from retention or `filtration' of bacteria by the porous medium are investigated by performing a population-balance analysis to determine the evolving profiles of retained bacteria as a function of distance and time. These

  16. Diffusion Processes Satisfying a Conservation Law Constraint

    DOE PAGES

    Bakosi, J.; Ristorcelli, J. R.

    2014-03-04

    We investigate coupled stochastic differential equations governing N non-negative continuous random variables that satisfy a conservation principle. In various fields a conservation law requires that a set of fluctuating variables be non-negative and (if appropriately normalized) sum to one. As a result, any stochastic differential equation model to be realizable must not produce events outside of the allowed sample space. We develop a set of constraints on the drift and diffusion terms of such stochastic models to ensure that both the non-negativity and the unit-sum conservation law constraint are satisfied as the variables evolve in time. We investigate the consequencesmore » of the developed constraints on the Fokker-Planck equation, the associated system of stochastic differential equations, and the evolution equations of the first four moments of the probability density function. We show that random variables, satisfying a conservation law constraint, represented by stochastic diffusion processes, must have diffusion terms that are coupled and nonlinear. The set of constraints developed enables the development of statistical representations of fluctuating variables satisfying a conservation law. We exemplify the results with the bivariate beta process and the multivariate Wright-Fisher, Dirichlet, and Lochner’s generalized Dirichlet processes.« less

  17. Diffusion Processes Satisfying a Conservation Law Constraint

    SciTech Connect

    Bakosi, J.; Ristorcelli, J. R.

    2014-03-04

    We investigate coupled stochastic differential equations governing N non-negative continuous random variables that satisfy a conservation principle. In various fields a conservation law requires that a set of fluctuating variables be non-negative and (if appropriately normalized) sum to one. As a result, any stochastic differential equation model to be realizable must not produce events outside of the allowed sample space. We develop a set of constraints on the drift and diffusion terms of such stochastic models to ensure that both the non-negativity and the unit-sum conservation law constraint are satisfied as the variables evolve in time. We investigate the consequences of the developed constraints on the Fokker-Planck equation, the associated system of stochastic differential equations, and the evolution equations of the first four moments of the probability density function. We show that random variables, satisfying a conservation law constraint, represented by stochastic diffusion processes, must have diffusion terms that are coupled and nonlinear. The set of constraints developed enables the development of statistical representations of fluctuating variables satisfying a conservation law. We exemplify the results with the bivariate beta process and the multivariate Wright-Fisher, Dirichlet, and Lochner’s generalized Dirichlet processes.

  18. NMR Constraints Analyser: a web-server for the graphical analysis of NMR experimental constraints

    PubMed Central

    Heller, Davide Martin; Giorgetti, Alejandro

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy together with X-ray crystallography, are the main techniques used for the determination of high-resolution 3D structures of biological molecules. The output of an NMR experiment includes a set of lower and upper limits for the distances (constraints) between pairs of atoms. If the number of constraints is high enough, there will be a finite number of possible conformations (models) of the macromolecule satisfying the data. Thus, the more constraints are measured, the better defined these structures will be. The availability of a user-friendly tool able to help in the analysis and interpretation of the number of experimental constraints per residue, is thus of valuable importance when assessing the levels of structure definition of NMR solved biological macromolecules, in particular, when high-quality structures are needed in techniques such as, computational biology approaches, site-directed mutagenesis experiments and/or drug design. Here, we present a free publicly available web-server, i.e. NMR Constraints Analyser, which is aimed at providing an automatic graphical analysis of the NMR experimental constraints atom by atom. The NMR Constraints Analyser server is available from the web-page http://molsim.sci.univr.it/constraint PMID:20513646

  19. NMR Constraints Analyser: a web-server for the graphical analysis of NMR experimental constraints.

    PubMed

    Heller, Davide Martin; Giorgetti, Alejandro

    2010-07-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy together with X-ray crystallography, are the main techniques used for the determination of high-resolution 3D structures of biological molecules. The output of an NMR experiment includes a set of lower and upper limits for the distances (constraints) between pairs of atoms. If the number of constraints is high enough, there will be a finite number of possible conformations (models) of the macromolecule satisfying the data. Thus, the more constraints are measured, the better defined these structures will be. The availability of a user-friendly tool able to help in the analysis and interpretation of the number of experimental constraints per residue, is thus of valuable importance when assessing the levels of structure definition of NMR solved biological macromolecules, in particular, when high-quality structures are needed in techniques such as, computational biology approaches, site-directed mutagenesis experiments and/or drug design. Here, we present a free publicly available web-server, i.e. NMR Constraints Analyser, which is aimed at providing an automatic graphical analysis of the NMR experimental constraints atom by atom. The NMR Constraints Analyser server is available from the web-page http://molsim.sci.univr.it/constraint.

  20. The Role of Motivation, Perceived Constraints, and Constraint Negotiation Strategies in Students' Internship Selection Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batty, Kimberly A.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to document the factors (i.e., motivation and perceived constraints) and processes (i.e., constraint negotiation) that influence students' selection of and satisfaction with their internship choice. The study was conducted using a quantitative approach, which included a focus group, a pilot study, and a…

  1. Sport science for salmon and other species: ecological consequences of metabolic power constraints.

    PubMed

    Martin, B T; Nisbet, R M; Pike, A; Michel, C J; Danner, E M

    2015-06-01

    For metabolically demanding behaviours, power supply (ATP resynthesis per unit time) is an important constraint on performance. Yet ecology as a discipline lacks a framework to account for these power constraints. We developed such a framework (borrowing concepts from sports science) and applied it to the upriver migration of anadromous fish. Our models demonstrate how metabolic power constraints alters optimal migratory behaviour; in response to strong counter flows, fish minimise cost of transport by alternating between rapid, anaerobically fuelled swimming and holding to restore spent fuels. Models ignoring power constraints underestimated the effect of elevated water temperature on migration speed and costs (by up to 60%). These differences were primarily due to a temperature-mediated reduction in aerobic scope that impairs the ability of fish to rapidly migrate through warm waters. Our framework provides a mechanistic link between temperature-induced reductions in aerobic scope and their ecological consequences for individuals, populations and communities.

  2. Generalizing Backtrack-Free Search: A Framework for Search-Free Constraint Satisfaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jonsson, Ari K.; Frank, Jeremy

    2000-01-01

    Tractable classes of constraint satisfaction problems are of great importance in artificial intelligence. Identifying and taking advantage of such classes can significantly speed up constraint problem solving. In addition, tractable classes are utilized in applications where strict worst-case performance guarantees are required, such as constraint-based plan execution. In this work, we present a formal framework for search-free (backtrack-free) constraint satisfaction. The framework is based on general procedures, rather than specific propagation techniques, and thus generalizes existing techniques in this area. We also relate search-free problem solving to the notion of decision sets and use the result to provide a constructive criterion that is sufficient to guarantee search-free problem solving.

  3. The Application of the Monte Carlo Approach to Cognitive Diagnostic Computerized Adaptive Testing With Content Constraints

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mao, Xiuzhen; Xin, Tao

    2013-01-01

    The Monte Carlo approach which has previously been implemented in traditional computerized adaptive testing (CAT) is applied here to cognitive diagnostic CAT to test the ability of this approach to address multiple content constraints. The performance of the Monte Carlo approach is compared with the performance of the modified maximum global…

  4. A Theory and Model of Conflict Detection in Air Traffic Control: Incorporating Environmental Constraints

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loft, Shayne; Bolland, Scott; Humphreys, Michael S.; Neal, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    A performance theory for conflict detection in air traffic control is presented that specifies how controllers adapt decisions to compensate for environmental constraints. This theory is then used as a framework for a model that can fit controller intervention decisions. The performance theory proposes that controllers apply safety margins to…

  5. Applying Soft Arc Consistency to Distributed Constraint Optimization Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, Toshihiro; Silaghi, Marius C.; Hirayama, Katsutoshi; Yokoo, Makot; Matsuo, Hiroshi

    The Distributed Constraint Optimization Problem (DCOP) is a fundamental framework of multi-agent systems. With DCOPs a multi-agent system is represented as a set of variables and a set of constraints/cost functions. Distributed task scheduling and distributed resource allocation can be formalized as DCOPs. In this paper, we propose an efficient method that applies directed soft arc consistency to a DCOP. In particular, we focus on DCOP solvers that employ pseudo-trees. A pseudo-tree is a graph structure for a constraint network that represents a partial ordering of variables. Some pseudo-tree-based search algorithms perform optimistic searches using explicit/implicit backtracking in parallel. However, for cost functions taking a wide range of cost values, such exact algorithms require many search iterations. Therefore additional improvements are necessary to reduce the number of search iterations. A previous study used a dynamic programming-based preprocessing technique that estimates the lower bound values of costs. However, there are opportunities for further improvements of efficiency. In addition, modifications of the search algorithm are necessary to use the estimated lower bounds. The proposed method applies soft arc consistency (soft AC) enforcement to DCOP. In the proposed method, directed soft AC is performed based on a pseudo-tree in a bottom up manner. Using the directed soft AC, the global lower bound value of cost functions is passed up to the root node of the pseudo-tree. It also totally reduces values of binary cost functions. As a result, the original problem is converted to an equivalent problem. The equivalent problem is efficiently solved using common search algorithms. Therefore, no major modifications are necessary in search algorithms. The performance of the proposed method is evaluated by experimentation. The results show that it is more efficient than previous methods.

  6. Quantum telescope: feasibility and constraints.

    PubMed

    Kurek, A R; Pięta, T; Stebel, T; Pollo, A; Popowicz, A

    2016-03-15

    The quantum telescope is a recent idea aimed at beating the diffraction limit of spaceborne telescopes and possibly other distant target imaging systems. There is no agreement yet on the best setup of such devices, but some configurations have already been proposed. In this Letter we characterize the predicted performance of quantum telescopes and their possible limitations. Our extensive simulations confirm that the presented model of such instruments is feasible and the device can provide considerable gains in the angular resolution of imaging in the UV, optical, and infrared bands. We argue that it is generally possible to construct and manufacture such instruments using the latest or soon to be available technology. We refer to the latest literature to discuss the feasibility of the proposed QT system design.

  7. Cognitive dissonance reduction as constraint satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Shultz, T R; Lepper, M R

    1996-04-01

    A constraint satisfaction neural network model (the consonance model) simulated data from the two major cognitive dissonance paradigms of insufficient justification and free choice. In several cases, the model fit the human data better than did cognitive dissonance theory. Superior fits were due to the inclusion of constraints that were not part of dissonance theory and to the increased precision inherent to this computational approach. Predictions generated by the model for a free choice between undesirable alternatives were confirmed in a new psychological experiment. The success of the consonance model underscores important, unforeseen similarities between what had been formerly regarded as the rather exotic process of dissonance reduction and a variety of other, more mundane psychological processes. Many of these processes can be understood as the progressive application of constraints supplied by beliefs and attitudes.

  8. Inference-based constraint satisfaction supports explanation

    SciTech Connect

    Sqalli, M.H.; Freuder, E.C.

    1996-12-31

    Constraint satisfaction problems are typically solved using search, augmented by general purpose consistency inference methods. This paper proposes a paradigm shift in which inference is used as the primary problem solving method, and attention is focused on special purpose, domain specific inference methods. While we expect this approach to have computational advantages, we emphasize here the advantages of a solution method that is more congenial to human thought processes. Specifically we use inference-based constraint satisfaction to support explanations of the problem solving behavior that are considerably more meaningful than a trace of a search process would be. Logic puzzles are used as a case study. Inference-based constraint satisfaction proves surprisingly powerful and easily extensible in this domain. Problems drawn from commercial logic puzzle booklets are used for evaluation. Explanations are produced that compare well with the explanations provided by these booklets.

  9. Constraints and spandrels of interareal connectomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubinov, Mikail

    2016-12-01

    Interareal connectomes are whole-brain wiring diagrams of white-matter pathways. Recent studies have identified modules, hubs, module hierarchies and rich clubs as structural hallmarks of these wiring diagrams. An influential current theory postulates that connectome modules are adequately explained by evolutionary pressures for wiring economy, but that the other hallmarks are not explained by such pressures and are therefore less trivial. Here, we use constraint network models to test these postulates in current gold-standard vertebrate and invertebrate interareal-connectome reconstructions. We show that empirical wiring-cost constraints inadequately explain connectome module organization, and that simultaneous module and hub constraints induce the structural byproducts of hierarchies and rich clubs. These byproducts, known as spandrels in evolutionary biology, include the structural substrate of the default-mode network. Our results imply that currently standard connectome characterizations are based on circular analyses or double dipping, and we emphasize an integrative approach to future connectome analyses for avoiding such pitfalls.

  10. Propagating Resource Constraints Using Mutual Exclusion Reasoning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, Jeremy; Sanchez, Romeo; Do, Minh B.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    One of the most recent techniques for propagating resource constraints in Constraint Based scheduling is Energy Constraint. This technique focuses in precedence based scheduling, where precedence relations are taken into account rather than the absolute position of activities. Although, this particular technique proved to be efficient on discrete unary resources, it provides only loose bounds for jobs using discrete multi-capacity resources. In this paper we show how mutual exclusion reasoning can be used to propagate time bounds for activities using discrete resources. We show that our technique based on critical path analysis and mutex reasoning is just as effective on unary resources, and also shows that it is more effective on multi-capacity resources, through both examples and empirical study.

  11. Conditions and constraints of food processing in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, B.; Nelson, P. E.; Mitchell, C. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    Requirements and constraints of food processing in space include a balanced diet, food variety, stability for storage, hardware weight and volume, plant performance, build-up of microorganisms, and waste processing. Lunar, Martian, and space station environmental conditions include variations in atmosphere, day length, temperature, gravity, magnetic field, and radiation environment. Weightlessness affects fluid behavior, heat transfer, and mass transfer. Concerns about microbial behavior include survival on Martian and lunar surfaces and in enclosed environments. Many present technologies can be adapted to meet space conditions.

  12. Bayesian Stereo Matching Method Based on Edge Constraints.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Shi, Wenxuan; Deng, Dexiang; Jia, Wenyan; Sun, Mingui

    2012-12-01

    A new global stereo matching method is presented that focuses on the handling of disparity, discontinuity and occlusion. The Bayesian approach is utilized for dense stereo matching problem formulated as a maximum a posteriori Markov Random Field (MAP-MRF) problem. In order to improve stereo matching performance, edges are incorporated into the Bayesian model as a soft constraint. Accelerated belief propagation is applied to obtain the maximum a posteriori estimates in the Markov random field. The proposed algorithm is evaluated using the Middlebury stereo benchmark. Our experimental results comparing with some state-of-the-art stereo matching methods demonstrate that the proposed method provides superior disparity maps with a subpixel precision.

  13. Some Physics Constraints on Ultimate Achievement in Track and Field

    SciTech Connect

    Frohlich, Cliff

    2009-02-06

    World records in track and field have improved remarkably throughout the last 100 years; however, in several events physics places quite strict limitations on ultimate performance. For example, analysis suggests that records in broad jump and pole vault have approached their optimum possible values. Physical constraints are more subtle for events such as javelin, high jump, and the distance races, and thus there may be opportunities for “breakthroughs” in current records. Considering that there is enormous cultural interest and economic expenditure on sports, for most events the level of scientific analysis isn’t very high. This presents a research opportunity for fans who are engineers or physicists.

  14. A Constraint-Based Planner for Data Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pang, Wanlin; Golden, Keith

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a graph-based backtracking algorithm designed to support constrain-tbased planning in data production domains. This algorithm performs backtracking at two nested levels: the outer- backtracking following the structure of the planning graph to select planner subgoals and actions to achieve them and the inner-backtracking inside a subproblem associated with a selected action to find action parameter values. We show this algorithm works well in a planner applied to automating data production in an ecological forecasting system. We also discuss how the idea of multi-level backtracking may improve efficiency of solving semi-structured constraint problems.

  15. Hierarchical constraint processes for shape analysis.

    PubMed

    Davis, L S; Henderson, T C

    1981-03-01

    A major application of syntactic pattern recognition is the analysis of two-dimensional shape. This paper describes a new syntactic shape analysis technique which combines the constraint propagation techniques which have been so successful in computer vision with the syntactic representation techniques which have been successfully applied to a wide variety of shape analysis problems. Shapes are modeled by stratified shape grammars. These grammars are designed so that local constraints can be compiled from the grammar describing the appearance of pieces of shape at various levels of description. Applications to the analysis of airplane shapes are presented.

  16. Quantum bit commitment under Gaussian constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandilara, Aikaterini; Cerf, Nicolas J.

    2012-06-01

    Quantum bit commitment has long been known to be impossible. Nevertheless, just as in the classical case, imposing certain constraints on the power of the parties may enable the construction of asymptotically secure protocols. Here, we introduce a quantum bit commitment protocol and prove that it is asymptotically secure if cheating is restricted to Gaussian operations. This protocol exploits continuous-variable quantum optical carriers, for which such a Gaussian constraint is experimentally relevant as the high optical nonlinearity needed to effect deterministic non-Gaussian cheating is inaccessible.

  17. Constraint algebra for interacting quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fubini, S.; Roncadelli, M.

    1988-04-01

    We consider relativistic constrained systems interacting with external fields. We provide physical arguments to support the idea that the quantum constraint algebra should be the same as in the free quantum case. For systems with ordering ambiguities this principle is essential to obtain a unique quantization. This is shown explicitly in the case of a relativistic spinning particle, where our assumption about the constraint algebra plus invariance under general coordinate transformations leads to a unique S-matrix. On leave from Dipartimento di Fisica Nucleare e Teorica, Università di Pavia and INFN, I-27100 Pavia, Italy.

  18. Constraints on hadronically decaying dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Garny, Mathias; Ibarra, Alejandro; Tran, David E-mail: alejandro.ibarra@ph.tum.de

    2012-08-01

    We present general constraints on dark matter stability in hadronic decay channels derived from measurements of cosmic-ray antiprotons. We analyze various hadronic decay modes in a model-independent manner by examining the lowest-order decays allowed by gauge and Lorentz invariance for scalar and fermionic dark matter particles and present the corresponding lower bounds on the partial decay lifetimes in those channels. We also investigate the complementarity between hadronic and gamma-ray constraints derived from searches for monochromatic lines in the sky, which can be produced at the quantum level if the dark matter decays into quark-antiquark pairs at leading order.

  19. On the evolutionary constraint surface of hydra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slobodkin, L. B.; Dunn, K.

    1983-01-01

    Food consumption, body size, and budding rate were measured simultaneously in isolated individual hydra of six strains. For each individual hydra the three measurements define a point in the three dimensional space with axes: food consumption, budding rate, and body size. These points lie on a single surface, regardless of species. Floating rate and incidence of sexuality map onto this surface. It is suggested that this surface is an example of a general class of evolutionary constraint surfaces derived from the conjunction of evolutinary theory and the theory of ecological resource budgets. These constraint surfaces correspond to microevolutionary domains.

  20. On Reformulating Planning as Dynamic Constraint Satisfaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, Jeremy; Jonsson, Ari K.; Morris, Paul; Koga, Dennis (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    In recent years, researchers have reformulated STRIPS planning problems as SAT problems or CSPs. In this paper, we discuss the Constraint-Based Interval Planning (CBIP) paradigm, which can represent planning problems incorporating interval time and resources. We describe how to reformulate mutual exclusion constraints for a CBIP-based system, the Extendible Uniform Remote Operations Planner Architecture (EUROPA). We show that reformulations involving dynamic variable domains restrict the algorithms which can be used to solve the resulting DCSP. We present an alternative formulation which does not employ dynamic domains, and describe the relative merits of the different reformulations.

  1. q-Virasoro constraints in matrix models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedelin, Anton; Zabzine, Maxim

    2017-03-01

    The Virasoro constraints play the important role in the study of matrix models and in understanding of the relation between matrix models and CFTs. Recently the localization calculations in supersymmetric gauge theories produced new families of matrix models and we have very limited knowledge about these matrix models. We concentrate on elliptic generalization of hermitian matrix model which corresponds to calculation of partition function on S 3 × S 1 for vector multiplet. We derive the q-Virasoro constraints for this matrix model. We also observe some interesting algebraic properties of the q-Virasoro algebra.

  2. Constraints on extra dimensions from atomic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahia, F.; Lemos, A. S.

    2016-10-01

    We consider a hydrogen atom confined in a thick brane embedded in a higher-dimensional space. Due to effects of the extra dimensions, the gravitational potential is amplified in distances smaller than the size of the supplementary space, in comparison with the Newtonian potential. Studying the influence of the gravitational interaction modified by the extra dimensions on the energy levels of the hydrogen atom, we find independent constraints for the higher-dimensional Planck mass in terms of the thickness of the brane by using accurate measurements of atomic transition frequencies. The constraints are very stringent for narrow branes.

  3. Non-rigid Face Tracking with Local Appearance Consistency Constraint

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Lucey, Simon; Cohn, Jeffrey F.; Saragih, Jason

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present a new discriminative approach to achieve consistent and efficient tracking of non-rigid object motion, such as facial expressions. By utilizing both spatial and temporal appearance coherence at the patch level, the proposed approach can reduce ambiguity and increase accuracy. Recent research demonstrates that feature based approaches, such as constrained local models (CLMs), can achieve good performance in non-rigid object alignment/tracking using local region descriptors and a non-rigid shape prior. However, the matching performance of the learned generic patch experts is susceptible to local appearance ambiguity. Since there is no motion continuity constraint between neighboring frames of the same sequence, the resultant object alignment might not be consistent from frame to frame and the motion field is not temporally smooth. In this paper, we extend the CLM method into the spatio-temporal domain by enforcing the appearance consistency constraint of each local patch between neighboring frames. More importantly, we show that the global warp update can be optimized jointly in an efficient manner using convex quadratic fitting. Finally, we demonstrate that our approach receives improved performance for the task of non-rigid facial motion tracking on the videos of clinical patients. PMID:25242852

  4. Rheology of welding: experimental constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quane, S. L.; Russell, J. K.; Kennedy, L. A.

    2003-04-01

    The rheological behavior of pyroclastic deposits during welding is incompletely understood and is based on a surprisingly small number of experimental studies. Previous pioneering experimental studies were done on small (1 cm thick) samples of ash/crystal mixtures under constant load. They established minimum welding temperatures between 600 and 700^oC under loads of 0.7 MPa (˜40 m of ignimbrite) to 3.6 MPa (˜250 m depth of ignimbrite). However, these data are neither sufficiently comprehensive nor coherent enough to fully describe the rheology of pyroclastic mixtures. In addition, previous studies did not examine the microstructural and geometric changes associated with welding compaction. Our goal is to provide accurate and comprehensive constitutive relationships between material properties, temperature, load and strain rate for pyroclastic material undergoing welding. Here we present results from a newly designed experimental apparatus. The experimental apparatus consists of a LoadTrac II fully automated uniaxial compression load frame manufactured by Geocomp Corporation. The load frame has a built in displacement transducer and can run both constant strain rate (10-6 to 0.25 cm/s) and constant load (up to 1150 kg) tests to a maximum displacement of 7.5 cm. The sample assembly comprises 5 cm diameter cylindrical upper and lower pistons (insulating ceramic with steel conductive ends) housed in a copper jacket. Samples are 5 cm diameter cores and can vary in length from 1 to 15 cm depending on experimental needs. A fiber insulated tube furnace capable of reaching temperatures ≈1000^oC surrounds the sample assembly. Temperature is measured using a thermocouple located inside the sample through the bottom piston; the furnace controller is capable of maintaining temperature fluctuations to <5^oC. Deformation experiments are performed on pre-fabricated cylinders of soda-lime glass beads and rhyolitic volcanic ash, as well as, cores of pumiceous rhyodacite

  5. Recognizing Constraints to Local Economic Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Joan; Meyer, Peter B.

    1986-01-01

    Drawing on Kaufman's distinction between development in the community and development of the community, this paper discusses the constraints on local economic development associated with increased concentration of capital. The likelihood of successfully employing "import substitution" and other localization strategies without confronting issues of…

  6. Precision constraints on extra fermion generations.

    PubMed

    Erler, Jens; Langacker, Paul

    2010-07-16

    There has been recent renewed interest in the possibility of additional fermion generations. At the same time there have been significant changes in the relevant electroweak precision constraints, in particular, in the interpretation of several of the low energy experiments. We summarize the various motivations for extra families and analyze them in view of the latest electroweak precision data.

  7. Cognitive Dissonance Reduction as Constraint Satisfaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shultz, Thomas R.; Lepper, Mark R.

    1996-01-01

    It is argued that the reduction of cognitive dissonance can be viewed as a constraint satisfaction problem, and a computational model of the process of consonance seeking is proposed. Simulations from this model matched psychological findings from the insufficient justification and free-choice paradigms of cognitive dissonance theory. (SLD)

  8. Constraints for transonic black hole accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abramowicz, Marek A.; Kato, Shoji

    1989-01-01

    Regularity conditions and global topological constraints leave some forbidden regions in the parameter space of the transonic isothermal, rotating matter onto black holes. Unstable flows occupy regions touching the boundaries of the forbidden regions. The astrophysical consequences of these results are discussed.

  9. Robust Utility Maximization Under Convex Portfolio Constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Matoussi, Anis; Mezghani, Hanen Mnif, Mohamed

    2015-04-15

    We study a robust maximization problem from terminal wealth and consumption under a convex constraints on the portfolio. We state the existence and the uniqueness of the consumption–investment strategy by studying the associated quadratic backward stochastic differential equation. We characterize the optimal control by using the duality method and deriving a dynamic maximum principle.

  10. CMB constraints on cosmic strings and superstrings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charnock, Tom; Avgoustidis, Anastasios; Copeland, Edmund J.; Moss, Adam

    2016-06-01

    We present the first complete Markov chain Monte Carlo analysis of cosmological models with evolving cosmic (super)string networks, using the unconnected segment model in the unequal-time correlator formalism. For ordinary cosmic string networks, we derive joint constraints on Λ cold dark matter (CDM) and string network parameters, namely the string tension G μ , the loop-chopping efficiency cr, and the string wiggliness α . For cosmic superstrings, we obtain joint constraints on the fundamental string tension G μF, the string coupling gs, the self-interaction coefficient cs, and the volume of compact extra dimensions w . This constitutes the most comprehensive CMB analysis of Λ CDM cosmology+strings to date. For ordinary cosmic string networks our updated constraint on the string tension, obtained using Planck2015 temperature and polarization data, is G μ <1.1 ×10-7 in relativistic units, while for cosmic superstrings our constraint on the fundamental string tension after marginalizing over gs, cs, and w is G μF<2.8 ×10-8.

  11. Constraint analysis for variational discrete systems

    SciTech Connect

    Dittrich, Bianca; Höhn, Philipp A.

    2013-09-15

    A canonical formalism and constraint analysis for discrete systems subject to a variational action principle are devised. The formalism is equivalent to the covariant formulation, encompasses global and local discrete time evolution moves and naturally incorporates both constant and evolving phase spaces, the latter of which is necessary for a time varying discretization. The different roles of constraints in the discrete and the conditions under which they are first or second class and/or symmetry generators are clarified. The (non-) preservation of constraints and the symplectic structure is discussed; on evolving phase spaces the number of constraints at a fixed time step depends on the initial and final time step of evolution. Moreover, the definition of observables and a reduced phase space is provided; again, on evolving phase spaces the notion of an observable as a propagating degree of freedom requires specification of an initial and final step and crucially depends on this choice, in contrast to the continuum. However, upon restriction to translation invariant systems, one regains the usual time step independence of canonical concepts. This analysis applies, e.g., to discrete mechanics, lattice field theory, quantum gravity models, and numerical analysis.

  12. Adult Metacomprehension: Judgment Processes and Accuracy Constraints

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhao, Qin; Linderholm, Tracy

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to review and synthesize two interrelated topics in the adult metacomprehension literature: the bases of metacomprehension judgment and the constraints on metacomprehension accuracy. Our review shows that adult readers base their metacomprehension judgments on different types of information, including experiences…

  13. The Cognitive Constraints of Lifelong Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morais, Jose; Kolinsky, Regine

    1996-01-01

    Acquisition of linguistic and perceptual abilities takes place at a very early age, and later learning involves knowledge and information processing strategies. Aging has greater impact on retention of the latter. Lifelong learning must accommodate the constraints of aging on cognitive abilities. (SK)

  14. Constraint-Referenced Analytics of Algebra Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, Scot M.; White, Tobin F.

    2016-01-01

    The development of the constraint-referenced analytics tool for monitoring algebra learning activities presented here came from the desire to firstly, take a more quantitative look at student responses in collaborative algebra activities, and secondly, to situate those activities in a more traditional introductory algebra setting focusing on…

  15. Language-Universal Constraints on Speech Segmentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norris, Dennis; McQueen, James M.; Cutler, Anne; Butterfield, Sally; Kearns, Ruth

    2001-01-01

    Two word-spotting experiments are reported that examine whether the Possible-Word Constraint (PWC) is a language-specific or language-universal strategy for the segmentation of continuous speech. Examined cases where the residue was either a CVC syllable with a Schwa or a CV syllable with a lax vowel. Showed that the word-spotting results…

  16. Constraints on Children's Judgments of Magical Causality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolley, Jacqueline D.; Browne, Cheryl A.; Boerger, Elizabeth A.

    2006-01-01

    In 3 studies we addressed the operation of constraints on children's causal judgments. Our primary focus was whether children's beliefs about magical causality, specifically wishing, are constrained by features that govern the attribution of ordinary causality. In Experiment 1, children witnessed situations in which a confederate's wish appeared…

  17. UCMS - A new signal parameter measurement system using digital signal processing techniques. [User Constraint Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, H. J.; Su, Y. T.

    1986-01-01

    The User Constraint Measurement System (UCMS) is a hardware/software package developed by NASA Goddard to measure the signal parameter constraints of the user transponder in the TDRSS environment by means of an all-digital signal sampling technique. An account is presently given of the features of UCMS design and of its performance capabilities and applications; attention is given to such important aspects of the system as RF interface parameter definitions, hardware minimization, the emphasis on offline software signal processing, and end-to-end link performance. Applications to the measurement of other signal parameters are also discussed.

  18. Constraint Embedding Technique for Multibody System Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, Simon S.; Cheng, Michael K.

    2011-01-01

    Multibody dynamics play a critical role in simulation testbeds for space missions. There has been a considerable interest in the development of efficient computational algorithms for solving the dynamics of multibody systems. Mass matrix factorization and inversion techniques and the O(N) class of forward dynamics algorithms developed using a spatial operator algebra stand out as important breakthrough on this front. Techniques such as these provide the efficient algorithms and methods for the application and implementation of such multibody dynamics models. However, these methods are limited only to tree-topology multibody systems. Closed-chain topology systems require different techniques that are not as efficient or as broad as those for tree-topology systems. The closed-chain forward dynamics approach consists of treating the closed-chain topology as a tree-topology system subject to additional closure constraints. The resulting forward dynamics solution consists of: (a) ignoring the closure constraints and using the O(N) algorithm to solve for the free unconstrained accelerations for the system; (b) using the tree-topology solution to compute a correction force to enforce the closure constraints; and (c) correcting the unconstrained accelerations with correction accelerations resulting from the correction forces. This constraint-embedding technique shows how to use direct embedding to eliminate local closure-loops in the system and effectively convert the system back to a tree-topology system. At this point, standard tree-topology techniques can be brought to bear on the problem. The approach uses a spatial operator algebra approach to formulating the equations of motion. The operators are block-partitioned around the local body subgroups to convert them into aggregate bodies. Mass matrix operator factorization and inversion techniques are applied to the reformulated tree-topology system. Thus in essence, the new technique allows conversion of a system with

  19. Theoretical constraints in the design of multivariable control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rynaski, E. G.; Mook, D. Joseph; Depena, Juan

    1991-01-01

    The research being performed under NASA Grant NAG1-1361 involves a more clear understanding and definition of the constraints involved in the pole-zero placement or assignment process for multiple input, multiple output systems. Complete state feedback to more than a single controller under conditions of complete controllability and observability is redundant if pole placement alone is the design objective. The additional feedback gains, above and beyond those required for pole placement can be used for eignevalue assignment or zero placement of individual closed loop transfer functions. Because both poles and zeros of individual closed loop transfer functions strongly affect the dynamic response to a pilot command input, the pole-zero placement problem is important. When fewer controllers than degrees of freedom of motion are available, complete design freedom is not possible, the transmission zeros constrain the regions of possible pole-zero placement. The effect of transmission zero constraints on the design possibilities, selection of transmission zeros and the avoidance of producing non-minimum phase transfer functions is the subject of the research being performed under this grant.

  20. Conformational Analysis of Stiff Chiral Polymers with End-Constraints.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Seob; Chirikjian, Gregory S

    2006-01-01

    We present a Lie-group-theoretic method for the kinematic and dynamic analysis of chiral semi-flexible polymers with end constraints. The first is to determine the minimum energy conformations of semi-flexible polymers with end constraints, and the second is to perform normal mode analysis based on the determined minimum energy conformations. In this paper, we use concepts from the theory of Lie groups and principles of variational calculus to model such polymers as inextensible or extensible chiral elastic rods with coupling between twisting and bending stiffnesses, and/or between twisting and extension stiffnesses. This method is general enough to include any stiffness and chirality parameters in the context of elastic filament models with the quadratic elastic potential energy function. As an application of this formulation, the analysis of DNA conformations is discussed. We demonstrate our method with examples of DNA conformations in which topological properties such as writhe, twist, and linking number are calculated from the results of the proposed method. Given these minimum energy conformations, we describe how to perform the normal mode analysis. The results presented here build both on recent experimental work in which DNA mechanical properties have been measured, and theoretical work in which the mechanics of non-chiral elastic rods has been studied.

  1. Conformational Analysis of Stiff Chiral Polymers with End-Constraints

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Seob; Chirikjian, Gregory S.

    2010-01-01

    We present a Lie-group-theoretic method for the kinematic and dynamic analysis of chiral semi-flexible polymers with end constraints. The first is to determine the minimum energy conformations of semi-flexible polymers with end constraints, and the second is to perform normal mode analysis based on the determined minimum energy conformations. In this paper, we use concepts from the theory of Lie groups and principles of variational calculus to model such polymers as inextensible or extensible chiral elastic rods with coupling between twisting and bending stiffnesses, and/or between twisting and extension stiffnesses. This method is general enough to include any stiffness and chirality parameters in the context of elastic filament models with the quadratic elastic potential energy function. As an application of this formulation, the analysis of DNA conformations is discussed. We demonstrate our method with examples of DNA conformations in which topological properties such as writhe, twist, and linking number are calculated from the results of the proposed method. Given these minimum energy conformations, we describe how to perform the normal mode analysis. The results presented here build both on recent experimental work in which DNA mechanical properties have been measured, and theoretical work in which the mechanics of non-chiral elastic rods has been studied. PMID:20198114

  2. Learning in stochastic neural networks for constraint satisfaction problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Mark D.; Adorf, Hans-Martin

    1989-01-01

    Researchers describe a newly-developed artificial neural network algorithm for solving constraint satisfaction problems (CSPs) which includes a learning component that can significantly improve the performance of the network from run to run. The network, referred to as the Guarded Discrete Stochastic (GDS) network, is based on the discrete Hopfield network but differs from it primarily in that auxiliary networks (guards) are asymmetrically coupled to the main network to enforce certain types of constraints. Although the presence of asymmetric connections implies that the network may not converge, it was found that, for certain classes of problems, the network often quickly converges to find satisfactory solutions when they exist. The network can run efficiently on serial machines and can find solutions to very large problems (e.g., N-queens for N as large as 1024). One advantage of the network architecture is that network connection strengths need not be instantiated when the network is established: they are needed only when a participating neural element transitions from off to on. They have exploited this feature to devise a learning algorithm, based on consistency techniques for discrete CSPs, that updates the network biases and connection strengths and thus improves the network performance.

  3. Approximation of Engine Casing Temperature Constraints for Casing Mounted Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kratz, Jonathan; Culley, Dennis; Chapman, Jeffryes

    2016-01-01

    The performance of propulsion engine systems is sensitive to weight and volume considerations. This can severely constrain the configuration and complexity of the control system hardware. Distributed Engine Control technology is a response to these concerns by providing more flexibility in designing the control system, and by extension, more functionality leading to higher performing engine systems. Consequently, there can be a weight benefit to mounting modular electronic hardware on the engine core casing in a high temperature environment. This paper attempts to quantify the in-flight temperature constraints for engine casing mounted electronics. In addition, an attempt is made at studying heat soak back effects. The Commercial Modular Aero Propulsion System Simulation 40k (C-MAPSS40k) software is leveraged with real flight data as the inputs to the simulation. A two-dimensional (2-D) heat transfer model is integrated with the engine simulation to approximate the temperature along the length of the engine casing. This modification to the existing C-MAPSS40k software will provide tools and methodologies to develop a better understanding of the requirements for the embedded electronics hardware in future engine systems. Results of the simulations are presented and their implications on temperature constraints for engine casing mounted electronics is discussed.

  4. Strictest (0,G/I) constraints achieved by high-rate block codes for class-IV PRML channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Ghaffar, Khaled A. S.; Weber, Jos H.

    1995-12-01

    Significant improvements in magnetic storage densities have been made feasible recently by the application of partial response signaling combined with maximum-likelihood sequence estimation (PRML). To enhance the performance of this technique when applied to the class- IV partial response channel, which is recognized as being appropriate to model the magnetic recording channel, it is often required to bound the number of consecutive zeros in the recorded data sequence by some positive integer G and the number of consecutive zeros in each of the odd and the even subsequences of the recorded data sequence by some positive integer I. Such a constraint is referred to as a (0, G/I) constraint. Codes are used to map arbitrary unconstrained sequences to (0, G/I) constrained sequences. We investigate the strictest possible constraints that can be achieved by block codes of high rates and compare between these constraints and the strictest possible constraints that can be achieved by arbitrary coding schemes.

  5. Importance of parametrizing constraints in quantum-mechanical variational calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Kwong T.; Bhatia, A. K.

    1992-01-01

    In variational calculations of quantum mechanics, constraints are sometimes imposed explicitly on the wave function. These constraints, which are deduced by physical arguments, are often not uniquely defined. In this work, the advantage of parametrizing constraints and letting the variational principle determine the best possible constraint for the problem is pointed out. Examples are carried out to show the surprising effectiveness of the variational method if constraints are parameterized. It is also shown that misleading results may be obtained if a constraint is not parameterized.

  6. A Strategy to Revise the Constraints of the Mediated Schema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casanova, Marco A.; Lauschner, Tanara; Leme, Luiz André P. Paes; Breitman, Karin K.; Furtado, Antonio L.; Vidal, Vânia M. P.

    In this paper, we address the problem of changing the constraints of a mediated schema M to accommodate the constraints of a new export schema E 0. We first show how to translate the constraints of E 0 to the vocabulary of M, creating a set of constraints C 0 in such a way that the schema mapping for E 0 is correct. Then, we show how to compute the new version of the constraints of M to accommodate C 0 so that all schema mappings, including that for E 0, are correct. We solve both problems for subset and cardinality constraints and specific families of schema mappings.

  7. Optimum vibrating beams with stress and deflection constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamat, M. P.

    1976-01-01

    The fundamental frequency of vibration of an Euler-Bernoulli or a Timoshenko beam of a specified constant volume is maximized subject to the constraint that under a prescribed loading the maximum stress or maximum deflection at any point along the beam axis will not exceed a specified value. In contrast with the inequality constraint which controls the minimum cross-section, the present inequality constraints lead to more meaningful designs. The inequality constraint on stresses is as easily implemented as the minimum cross-section constraint but the inequality constraint on deflection uses a treatment which is an extension of the matrix partitioning technique of prescribing displacements in finite element analysis.

  8. Momentum constraints as integrability conditions for the Hamiltonian constraint in general relativity.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moncrief, V.; Teitelboim, C.

    1972-01-01

    It is shown that if the Hamiltonian constraint of general relativity is imposed as a restriction on the Hamilton principal functional in the classical theory, or on the state functional in the quantum theory, then the momentum constraints are automatically satisfied. This result holds both for closed and open spaces and it means that the full content of the theory is summarized by a single functional equation of the Tomonaga-Schwinger type.

  9. Environmental constraints upon locomotion and predator-prey interactions in aquatic organisms: an introduction.

    PubMed

    Domenici, P; Claireaux, G; McKenzie, D J

    2007-11-29

    Environmental constraints in aquatic habitats have become topics of concern to both the scientific community and the public at large. In particular, coastal and freshwater habitats are subject to dramatic variability in various environmental factors, as a result of both natural and anthropogenic processes. The protection and sustainable management of all aquatic habitats requires greater understanding of how environmental constraints influence aquatic organisms. Locomotion and predator-prey interactions are intimately linked and fundamental to the survival of mobile aquatic organisms. This paper summarizes the main points from the review and research articles which comprise the theme issue 'Environmental constraints upon locomotion and predator-prey interactions in aquatic organisms'. The articles explore how natural and anthropogenic factors can constrain these two fundamental activities in a diverse range of organisms from phytoplankton to marine mammals. Some major environmental constraints derive from the intrinsic properties of the fluid and are mechanical in nature, such as viscosity and flow regime. Other constraints derive from direct effects of factors, such as temperature, oxygen content of the water or turbidity, upon the mechanisms underlying the performance of locomotion and predator-prey interactions. The effect of these factors on performance at the tissue and organ level is reflected in constraints upon performance of the whole organism. All these constraints can influence behaviour. Ultimately, they can have an impact on ecological performance. One issue that requires particular attention is how factors such as temperature and oxygen can exert different constraints on the physiology and behaviour of different taxa and the ecological implications of this. Given the multiplicity of constraints, the complexity of their interactions, and the variety of biological levels at which they can act, there is a clear need for integration between the fields of

  10. A mathematical formulation for interface-based modular product design with geometric and weight constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung-Woon Yoo, John

    2016-06-01

    Since customer preferences change rapidly, there is a need for design processes with shorter product development cycles. Modularization plays a key role in achieving mass customization, which is crucial in today's competitive global market environments. Standardized interfaces among modularized parts have facilitated computational product design. To incorporate product size and weight constraints during computational design procedures, a mixed integer programming formulation is presented in this article. Product size and weight are two of the most important design parameters, as evidenced by recent smart-phone products. This article focuses on the integration of geometric, weight and interface constraints into the proposed mathematical formulation. The formulation generates the optimal selection of components for a target product, which satisfies geometric, weight and interface constraints. The formulation is verified through a case study and experiments are performed to demonstrate the performance of the formulation.

  11. Solving and Learning Soft Temporal Constraints: Experimental Setting and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossi, F.; Sperduti, A.; Venable, K. B.; Khatib, L.; Morris, P.; Morris, R.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Soft temporal constraints problems allow to describe in a natural way scenarios where events happen over time and preferences are associated to event distances and durations. However, sometimes such local preferences are difficult to set, and it may be easier instead to associate preferences to some complete solutions of the problem. Machine learning techniques can be useful in this respect. In this paper we describe two solvers (one more general and the other one more efficient) for tractable subclasses of soft temporal problems, and we show some experimental results. The random generator used to build the problems on which tests are performed is also described. We also compare the two solvers highlighting the tradeoff between performance and representational power. Finally, we present a learning module and we show its behavior on randomly-generated examples.

  12. Leaf Sequencing Algorithm Based on MLC Shape Constraint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Jia; Pei, Xi; Wang, Dong; Cao, Ruifen; Lin, Hui

    2012-06-01

    Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) requires the determination of the appropriate multileaf collimator settings to deliver an intensity map. The purpose of this work was to attempt to regulate the shape between adjacent multileaf collimator apertures by a leaf sequencing algorithm. To qualify and validate this algorithm, the integral test for the segment of the multileaf collimator of ARTS was performed with clinical intensity map experiments. By comparisons and analyses of the total number of monitor units and number of segments with benchmark results, the proposed algorithm performed well while the segment shape constraint produced segments with more compact shapes when delivering the planned intensity maps, which may help to reduce the multileaf collimator's specific effects.

  13. Two Solvers for Tractable Temporal Constraints with Preferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossi, F.; Khatib,L.; Morris, P.; Morris, R.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A number of reasoning problems involving the manipulation of temporal information can naturally be viewed as implicitly inducing an ordering of potential local decisions involving time on the basis of preferences. Soft temporal constraints problems allow to describe in a natural way scenarios where events happen over time and preferences are associated to event distances and durations. In general, solving soft temporal problems require exponential time in the worst case, but there are interesting subclasses of problems which are polynomially solvable. We describe two solvers based on two different approaches for solving the same tractable subclass. For each solver we present the theoretical results it stands on, a description of the algorithm and some experimental results. The random generator used to build the problems on which tests are performed is also described. Finally, we compare the two solvers highlighting the tradeoff between performance and representational power.

  14. LOCO with Constraints and Improved Fitting Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xiaobiao; Safranek, James; Portmann, Greg; /LBL, Berkeley

    2009-06-18

    LOCO has been a powerful beam-based diagnostics and optics control method for storage rings and synchrotrons worldwide ever since it was established at NSLS by J. Safranek. This method measures the orbit response matrix and optionally the dispersion function of the machine. The data are then fitted to a lattice model by adjusting parameters such as quadrupole and skew quadrupole strengths in the model, BPM gains and rolls, corrector gains and rolls of the measurement system. Any abnormality of the machine that affects the machine optics can then be identified. The resulting lattice model is equivalent to the real machine lattice as seen by the BPMs. Since there are usually two or more BPMs per betatron period in modern circular accelerators, the model is often a very accurate representation of the real machine. According to the fitting result, one can correct the machine lattice to the design lattice by changing the quadrupole and skew quadrupole strengths. LOCO is so important that it is routinely performed at many electron storage rings to guarantee machine performance, especially after the Matlab-based LOCO code became available. However, for some machines, LOCO is not easy to carry out. In some cases, LOCO fitting converges to an unrealistic solution with large changes to the quadrupole strengths {Delta}K. The quadrupole gradient changes can be so large that the resulting lattice model fails to find a closed orbit and subsequent iterations become impossible. In cases when LOCO converges, the solution can have {Delta}K that is larger than realistic and often along with a spurious zigzag pattern between adjacent quadrupoles. This degeneracy behavior of LOCO is due to the correlation between the fitting parameters - usually between neighboring quadrupoles. The fitting scheme is therefore less restrictive over certain patterns of changes to these quadrupoles with which the correlated quadrupoles fight each other and the net effect is very inefficient {chi}{sup 2

  15. Geodetic constraints from multi-beam laser altimeter crossovers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazarico, Erwan; Neumann, G. A.; Rowlands, D. D.; Smith, D. E.

    2010-06-01

    The round-trip travel time measurements made by spacecraft laser altimeters are primarily used to construct topographic maps of the target body. The accuracy of the calculated bounce point locations of the laser pulses depends on the quality of the spacecraft trajectory reconstruction. The trajectory constraints from Doppler and range radio tracking data can be supplemented by altimetric “crossovers”, to greatly improve the reconstruction of the spacecraft trajectory. Crossovers have been used successfully in the past (e.g., Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter on Mars Global Surveyor), but only with single-beam altimeters. The same algorithms can be used with a multi-beam laser altimeter, but we present a method using the unique cross-track topographic information present in the multi-beam data. Those crossovers are especially adapted to shallow (small angle) intersections, as the overlapping area is large, reducing the inherent ambiguities of single-beam data in that situation. We call those “swath crossovers”. They prove particularly useful in the case of polar-orbiting spacecraft over slowly rotating bodies, because all the non-polar crossovers have small intersection angles. To demonstrate this method, we perform a simplified simulation based on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) and its five-beam Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter. We show that swath crossovers over one lunar month can independently, from geometry alone, recover the imposed orbital perturbations with great accuracy (5 m horizontal, < 1 m vertical, about one order of magnitude smaller than the imposed perturbations). We also present new types of constraints that can be derived from the swath crossovers, and designed to be used in a precision orbit determination setup. In future work, we will use such multi-beam altimetric constraints with data from LRO.

  16. A multiagent evolutionary algorithm for constraint satisfaction problems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Zhong, Weicai; Jiao, Licheng

    2006-02-01

    With the intrinsic properties of constraint satisfaction problems (CSPs) in mind, we divide CSPs into two types, namely, permutation CSPs and nonpermutation CSPs. According to their characteristics, several behaviors are designed for agents by making use of the ability of agents to sense and act on the environment. These behaviors are controlled by means of evolution, so that the multiagent evolutionary algorithm for constraint satisfaction problems (MAEA-CSPs) results. To overcome the disadvantages of the general encoding methods, the minimum conflict encoding is also proposed. Theoretical analyzes show that MAEA-CSPs has a linear space complexity and converges to the global optimum. The first part of the experiments uses 250 benchmark binary CSPs and 79 graph coloring problems from the DIMACS challenge to test the performance of MAEA-CSPs for nonpermutation CSPs. MAEA-CSPs is compared with six well-defined algorithms and the effect of the parameters is analyzed systematically. The second part of the experiments uses a classical CSP, n-queen problems, and a more practical case, job-shop scheduling problems (JSPs), to test the performance of MAEA-CSPs for permutation CSPs. The scalability of MAEA-CSPs along n for n-queen problems is studied with great care. The results show that MAEA-CSPs achieves good performance when n increases from 10(4) to 10(7), and has a linear time complexity. Even for 10(7)-queen problems, MAEA-CSPs finds the solutions by only 150 seconds. For JSPs, 59 benchmark problems are used, and good performance is also obtained.

  17. Dark matter constraints from stellar evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayala, A.; Domínguez, I.; Straniero, O.

    2016-01-01

    The study of dark matter constraints from its effect on star evolution has been discussed in recent years. We propose a star evolution simulation approach to determine those costraints from properties related to star evolutionary stages and propose globular cluster observables in order to check those constraints. My work in progress (my PhD project research) employs FRANEC code to simulate complete star evolution from pre-main sequence to AGB phase, and regards several DM candidates like axions or WIMPs, motivated by different unsolved physical problems. Detailed energy production or energy loss due to DM particles are included, taking into account the expected interaction between dark matter particles and stellar plasma within different models.

  18. Modeling Regular Replacement for String Constraint Solving

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, Xiang; Li, Chung-Chih

    2010-01-01

    Bugs in user input sanitation of software systems often lead to vulnerabilities. Among them many are caused by improper use of regular replacement. This paper presents a precise modeling of various semantics of regular substitution, such as the declarative, finite, greedy, and reluctant, using finite state transducers (FST). By projecting an FST to its input/output tapes, we are able to solve atomic string constraints, which can be applied to both the forward and backward image computation in model checking and symbolic execution of text processing programs. We report several interesting discoveries, e.g., certain fragments of the general problem can be handled using less expressive deterministic FST. A compact representation of FST is implemented in SUSHI, a string constraint solver. It is applied to detecting vulnerabilities in web applications

  19. Unitarity constraints on dimension-six operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbett, Tyler; Éboli, O. J. P.; Gonzalez-Garcia, M. C.

    2015-02-01

    We obtain the partial-wave unitarity constraints on dimension-six operators stemming from the analyses of vector boson and Higgs scattering processes as well as the inelastic scattering of standard model fermions into electroweak gauge bosons. We take into account all coupled channels, all possible helicity amplitudes, and explore a six-dimensional parameter space of anomalous couplings. Our analysis shows that for those operators affecting the Higgs couplings, present 90% confidence level constraints from global data analysis of Higgs and electroweak data are such that unitarity is not violated if √{s }≤3.2 TeV . For the purely gauge-boson operator OW W W, the present bounds from triple-gauge-boson analysis indicate that within its presently allowed 90% confidence level range unitarity can be violated in f f¯'→V V' at center-of-mass energy √{s }≥2.4 TeV .

  20. Decoupling Coupled Constraints Through Utility Design

    SciTech Connect

    Li, N; Marden, JR

    2014-08-01

    Several multiagent systems exemplify the need for establishing distributed control laws that ensure the resulting agents' collective behavior satisfies a given coupled constraint. This technical note focuses on the design of such control laws through a game-theoretic framework. In particular, this technical note provides two systematic methodologies for the design of local agent objective functions that guarantee all resulting Nash equilibria optimize the system level objective while also satisfying a given coupled constraint. Furthermore, the designed local agent objective functions fit into the framework of state based potential games. Consequently, one can appeal to existing results in game-theoretic learning to derive a distributed process that guarantees the agents will reach such an equilibrium.

  1. The evolution of mimicry under constraints.

    PubMed

    Holen, Øistein Haugsten; Johnstone, Rufus A

    2004-11-01

    The resemblance between mimetic organisms and their models varies from near perfect to very crude. One possible explanation, which has received surprisingly little attention, is that evolution can improve mimicry only at some cost to the mimetic organism. In this article, an evolutionary game theory model of mimicry is presented that incorporates such constraints. The model generates novel and testable predictions. First, Batesian mimics that are very common and/or mimic very weakly defended models should evolve either inaccurate mimicry (by stabilizing selection) or mimetic polymorphism. Second, Batesian mimics that are very common and/or mimic very weakly defended models are more likely to evolve mimetic polymorphism if they encounter predators at high rates and/or are bad at evading predator attacks. The model also examines how cognitive constraints acting on signal receivers may help determine evolutionarily stable levels of mimicry. Surprisingly, improved discrimination abilities among signal receivers may sometimes select for less accurate mimicry.

  2. Atom-Interferometry Constraints on Dark Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Holger

    2016-03-01

    If dark energy is a light scalar field, it might interact with normal matter. The interactions, however, are suppressed in some leading models, which are thus compatible with current cosmological observations as well as solar-system and laboratory studies. Such suppression typically relies on the scalar's interaction with macroscopic amounts of ordinary matter, but can be bypassed by studying the interaction with individual particles. Using an atom interferometer, we have placed tight constraints on so-called chameleon models, ruling out interaction parameters βM > 4 ×104 . This limit is improved by 2.5 orders of magnitude relative to previous experiments. We have already increased the sensitivity of our interferometer hundredfold and are expecting a new constraint soon. Purpose-built experiments in the lab or on the international space station will completely close the gap and rule out out chameleons and other theories, such as axions, dark photons, symmetrons or f (R) gravity.

  3. Constraints on Neutrino Mass from Galaxy Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuesta, A. J.; Niro, V.; Verde, L.

    2017-03-01

    Modern large-scale galaxy surveys, combined with measurements of the cosmic microwave background, have managed to constrain the sum of neutrino masses to an order of magnitude below the limit placed by laboratory experiments. We discuss the signature of massive neutrinos in the distribution of galaxies and the current state of the art of neutrino mass constraints, focusing on parameter degeneracies that reveal how we can improve current constraints with next-generation galaxy surveys. We also comment on how the near future cosmology experiments are an opportunity for the first measurement of the value of the sum of neutrino masses, or alternatively, to find profound implications for neutrino physics extensions beyond the Standard Model.

  4. Microbial diversity arising from thermodynamic constraints

    PubMed Central

    Großkopf, Tobias; Soyer, Orkun S

    2016-01-01

    The microbial world displays an immense taxonomic diversity. This diversity is manifested also in a multitude of metabolic pathways that can utilise different substrates and produce different products. Here, we propose that these observations directly link to thermodynamic constraints that inherently arise from the metabolic basis of microbial growth. We show that thermodynamic constraints can enable coexistence of microbes that utilise the same substrate but produce different end products. We find that this thermodynamics-driven emergence of diversity is most relevant for metabolic conversions with low free energy as seen for example under anaerobic conditions, where population dynamics is governed by thermodynamic effects rather than kinetic factors such as substrate uptake rates. These findings provide a general understanding of the microbial diversity based on the first principles of thermodynamics. As such they provide a thermodynamics-based framework for explaining the observed microbial diversity in different natural and synthetic environments. PMID:27035705

  5. Constraint-Free Theories of Gravitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estabrook, Frank B.; Robinson, R. Steve; Wahlquist, Hugo D.

    1998-01-01

    Lovelock actions (more precisely, extended Gauss-Bonnet forms) when varied as Cartan forms on subspaces of higher dimensional flat Riemannian manifolds, generate well set, causal exterior differential systems. In particular, the Einstein- Hilbert action 4-form, varied on a 4 dimensional subspace of E(sub 10) yields a well set generalized theory of gravity having no constraints. Rcci-flat solutions are selected by initial conditions on a bounding 3-space.

  6. Varying alpha: New constraints from seasonal variations

    SciTech Connect

    Barrow, John D.; Shaw, Douglas J.

    2008-09-15

    We analyze the constraints obtained from new atomic clock data on the possible time variation of the fine structure 'constant' and the electron-proton mass ratio, and show how they are strengthened when the seasonal variation of the Sun's gravitational field at the Earth's surface is taken into account. We compare these bounds with those obtainable from tests of the weak equivalence principle and high redshift observations of quasar absorption spectra.

  7. Optimal design of structures with buckling constraints.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiusalaas, J.

    1973-01-01

    The paper presents an iterative, finite element method for minimum weight design of structures with respect to buckling constraints. The redesign equation is derived from the optimality criterion, as opposed to a numerical search procedure, and can handle problems that are characterized by the existence of two fundamental buckling modes at the optimal design. Application of the method is illustrated by beam and orthogonal frame design problems.

  8. Generating Natural Language Under Pragmatic Constraints.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-01

    THIS PAGIE (When Dae deureel Due to the flexibility of language , speakers can communicate far more than Just the literal content of tile words they use...flexibility of language , speakers can communicate far more than just the literal content of the words they use; the additional information usually serves...each of three domains, various paragraphs that differ in slant, content , and style. Generating Natural Language Under Pragmatic Constraints A

  9. Astrophysical constraints on extended gravity models

    SciTech Connect

    Lambiase, Gaetano; Stabile, Antonio; Sakellariadou, Mairi; Stabile, Arturo E-mail: mairi.sakellariadou@kcl.ac.uk E-mail: arturo.stabile@gmail.com

    2015-07-01

    We investigate the propagation of gravitational waves in the context of fourth order gravity nonminimally coupled to a massive scalar field. Using the damping of the orbital period of coalescing stellar binary systems, we impose constraints on the free parameters of extended gravity models. In particular, we find that the variation of the orbital period is a function of three mass scales which depend on the free parameters of the model under consideration; we can constrain these mass scales from current observational data.

  10. The Probabilistic Admissible Region with Additional Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roscoe, C.; Hussein, I.; Wilkins, M.; Schumacher, P.

    The admissible region, in the space surveillance field, is defined as the set of physically acceptable orbits (e.g., orbits with negative energies) consistent with one or more observations of a space object. Given additional constraints on orbital semimajor axis, eccentricity, etc., the admissible region can be constrained, resulting in the constrained admissible region (CAR). Based on known statistics of the measurement process, one can replace hard constraints with a probabilistic representation of the admissible region. This results in the probabilistic admissible region (PAR), which can be used for orbit initiation in Bayesian tracking and prioritization of tracks in a multiple hypothesis tracking framework. The PAR concept was introduced by the authors at the 2014 AMOS conference. In that paper, a Monte Carlo approach was used to show how to construct the PAR in the range/range-rate space based on known statistics of the measurement, semimajor axis, and eccentricity. An expectation-maximization algorithm was proposed to convert the particle cloud into a Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM) representation of the PAR. This GMM can be used to initialize a Bayesian filter. The PAR was found to be significantly non-uniform, invalidating an assumption frequently made in CAR-based filtering approaches. Using the GMM or particle cloud representations of the PAR, orbits can be prioritized for propagation in a multiple hypothesis tracking (MHT) framework. In this paper, the authors focus on expanding the PAR methodology to allow additional constraints, such as a constraint on perigee altitude, to be modeled in the PAR. This requires re-expressing the joint probability density function for the attributable vector as well as the (constrained) orbital parameters and range and range-rate. The final PAR is derived by accounting for any interdependencies between the parameters. Noting that the concepts presented are general and can be applied to any measurement scenario, the idea

  11. Congruent Melting Kinetics: Constraints on Chondrule Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenwood, James P.; Hess, Paul C.

    1995-01-01

    The processes and mechanisms of melting and their applications to chondrule formation are discussed A model for the kinetics of congruent melting is developed and used to place constraints on the duration and maximum temperature experienced by the interiors of relict-bearing chondrules. Specifically, chondrules containing relict forsteritic olivine or enstatitic pyroxene cannot have been heated in excess of 1901 C or 1577 C, respectively, for more than a few seconds.

  12. Redshift drift constraints on holographic dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Dong-Ze; Zhang, Jing-Fei; Zhang, Xin

    2017-03-01

    The Sandage-Loeb (SL) test is a promising method for probing dark energy because it measures the redshift drift in the spectra of Lyman- α forest of distant quasars, covering the "redshift desert" of 2 ≲ z ≲ 5, which is not covered by existing cosmological observations. Therefore, it could provide an important supplement to current cosmological observations. In this paper, we explore the impact of SL test on the precision of cosmological constraints for two typical holographic dark energy models, i.e., the original holographic dark energy (HDE) model and the Ricci holographic dark energy (RDE) model. To avoid data inconsistency, we use the best-fit models based on current combined observational data as the fiducial models to simulate 30 mock SL test data. The results show that SL test can effectively break the existing strong degeneracy between the present-day matter density Ωm0 and the Hubble constant H 0 in other cosmological observations. For the considered two typical dark energy models, not only can a 30-year observation of SL test improve the constraint precision of Ωm0 and h dramatically, but can also enhance the constraint precision of the model parameters c and α significantly.

  13. Breaking evolutionary constraint with a tradeoff ratchet

    PubMed Central

    de Vos, Marjon G. J.; Dawid, Alexandre; Sunderlikova, Vanda; Tans, Sander J.

    2015-01-01

    Epistatic interactions can frustrate and shape evolutionary change. Indeed, phenotypes may fail to evolve when essential mutations are only accessible through positive selection if they are fixed simultaneously. How environmental variability affects such constraints is poorly understood. Here, we studied genetic constraints in fixed and fluctuating environments using the Escherichia coli lac operon as a model system for genotype–environment interactions. We found that, in different fixed environments, all trajectories that were reconstructed by applying point mutations within the transcription factor–operator interface became trapped at suboptima, where no additional improvements were possible. Paradoxically, repeated switching between these same environments allows unconstrained adaptation by continuous improvements. This evolutionary mode is explained by pervasive cross-environmental tradeoffs that reposition the peaks in such a way that trapped genotypes can repeatedly climb ascending slopes and hence, escape adaptive stasis. Using a Markov approach, we developed a mathematical framework to quantify the landscape-crossing rates and show that this ratchet-like adaptive mechanism is robust in a wide spectrum of fluctuating environments. Overall, this study shows that genetic constraints can be overcome by environmental change and that cross-environmental tradeoffs do not necessarily impede but also, can facilitate adaptive evolution. Because tradeoffs and environmental variability are ubiquitous in nature, we speculate this evolutionary mode to be of general relevance. PMID:26567153

  14. Do constructional constraints influence cichlid craniofacial diversification?

    PubMed Central

    Hulsey, C.D; Mims, M.C; Streelman, J.T

    2007-01-01

    Constraints on form should determine how organisms diversify. Owing to competition for the limited space within the body, investment in adjacent structures may frequently represent an evolutionary compromise. For example, evolutionary trade-offs between eye size and jaw muscles in cichlid fish of the African great lakes are thought to represent a constructional constraint that influenced the diversification of these assemblages. To test the evolutionary independence of these structures in Lake Malawi cichlid fish, we measured the mass of the three major adductor mandibulae (AM) muscles and determined the eye volume in 41 species. Using both traditional and novel methodologies to control for resolved and unresolved phylogenetic relationships, we tested the evolutionary independence of these four structures. We found that evolutionary change in the AM muscles was positively correlated, suggesting that competition for space in the head has not influenced diversification among these jaw muscles. Furthermore, there was no negative relationship between change in total AM muscle mass and eye volume, indicating that there has been little effect of the evolution of eye size on AM evolution in Lake Malawi cichlids. The comparative approach used here should provide a robust method to test whether constructional constraints frequently limit phenotypic change in adaptive radiations. PMID:17519189

  15. Hard Constraints in Optimization Under Uncertainty

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crespo, Luis G.; Giesy, Daniel P.; Kenny, Sean P.

    2008-01-01

    This paper proposes a methodology for the analysis and design of systems subject to parametric uncertainty where design requirements are specified via hard inequality constraints. Hard constraints are those that must be satisfied for all parameter realizations within a given uncertainty model. Uncertainty models given by norm-bounded perturbations from a nominal parameter value, i.e., hyper-spheres, and by sets of independently bounded uncertain variables, i.e., hyper-rectangles, are the focus of this paper. These models, which are also quite practical, allow for a rigorous mathematical treatment within the proposed framework. Hard constraint feasibility is determined by sizing the largest uncertainty set for which the design requirements are satisfied. Analytically verifiable assessments of robustness are attained by comparing this set with the actual uncertainty model. Strategies that enable the comparison of the robustness characteristics of competing design alternatives, the description and approximation of the robust design space, and the systematic search for designs with improved robustness are also proposed. Since the problem formulation is generic and the tools derived only require standard optimization algorithms for their implementation, this methodology is applicable to a broad range of engineering problems.

  16. Cosmological constraints on a decomposed Chaplygin gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuting; Wands, David; Xu, Lixin; De-Santiago, Josue; Hojjati, Alireza

    2013-04-01

    Any unified dark matter cosmology can be decomposed into dark matter interacting with vacuum energy, without introducing any additional degrees of freedom. We present observational constraints on an interacting vacuum plus dark energy corresponding to a generalized Chaplygin gas cosmology. We consider two distinct models for the interaction leading to either a barotropic equation of state or dark matter that follows geodesics, corresponding to a rest-frame sound speed equal to the adiabatic sound speed or zero sound speed, respectively. For the barotropic model, the most stringent constraint on α comes from the combination of CMB+SNIa+LSS(m) gives α<5.66×10-6 at the 95% confidence level, which indicates that the barotropic model must be extremely close to the ΛCDM cosmology. For the case where the dark matter follows geodesics, perturbations have zero sound speed, and CMB+SNIa+gISW then gives the much weaker constraint -0.15<α<0.26 at the 95% confidence level.

  17. HUBBLE PARAMETER MEASUREMENT CONSTRAINTS ON DARK ENERGY

    SciTech Connect

    Farooq, Omer; Mania, Data; Ratra, Bharat E-mail: mania@phys.ksu.edu

    2013-02-20

    We use 21 Hubble parameter versus redshift data points from Simon et al., Gaztanaga et al., Stern et al., and Moresco et al. to place constraints on model parameters of constant and time-evolving dark energy cosmologies. The inclusion of the eight new measurements results in H(z) constraints more restrictive than those derived by Chen and Ratra. These constraints are now almost as restrictive as those that follow from current Type Ia supernova (SNIa) apparent magnitude versus redshift data, which now more carefully account for systematic uncertainties. This is a remarkable result. We emphasize, however, that SNIa data have been studied for a longer time than the H(z) data, possibly resulting in a better estimate of potential systematic errors in the SNIa case. A joint analysis of the H(z), baryon acoustic oscillation peak length scale, and SNIa data favors a spatially flat cosmological model currently dominated by a time-independent cosmological constant but does not exclude slowly evolving dark energy.

  18. Constraints based analysis of extended cybernetic models.

    PubMed

    Mandli, Aravinda R; Venkatesh, Kareenhalli V; Modak, Jayant M

    2015-11-01

    The cybernetic modeling framework provides an interesting approach to model the regulatory phenomena occurring in microorganisms. In the present work, we adopt a constraints based approach to analyze the nonlinear behavior of the extended equations of the cybernetic model. We first show that the cybernetic model exhibits linear growth behavior under the constraint of no resource allocation for the induction of the key enzyme. We then quantify the maximum achievable specific growth rate of microorganisms on mixtures of substitutable substrates under various kinds of regulation and show its use in gaining an understanding of the regulatory strategies of microorganisms. Finally, we show that Saccharomyces cerevisiae exhibits suboptimal dynamic growth with a long diauxic lag phase when growing on a mixture of glucose and galactose and discuss on its potential to achieve optimal growth with a significantly reduced diauxic lag period. The analysis carried out in the present study illustrates the utility of adopting a constraints based approach to understand the dynamic growth strategies of microorganisms.

  19. Constraints on children's color term acquisition.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Anna

    2006-08-01

    Kowalski and Zimiles (2006) and O'Hanlon and Roberson (2006) address an age-old question: Why do children find it difficult to learn color terms? Here these articles are reflected on, providing a focused examination of the issues central to this question. First, the criteria by which children are said to find color naming difficult are considered. Although the age of color term acquisition is decreasing, and color naming might not be more difficult than other abstract attributes, several stages of difficulty are identified. Second, it is argued that there are potentially multiple constraints (e.g., conceptual, attentional, and linguistic) for these multiple stages of difficulty with color term acquisition. Third, it is argued that the validity and reliability of techniques for identifying constraints need to be considered and that converging evidence for the constraints should be provided. Finally, a series of new questions that need to be asked to provide a well-rounded explanation of the difficulties children face when learning color terms is outlined.

  20. Constraints and spandrels of interareal connectomes

    PubMed Central

    Rubinov, Mikail

    2016-01-01

    Interareal connectomes are whole-brain wiring diagrams of white-matter pathways. Recent studies have identified modules, hubs, module hierarchies and rich clubs as structural hallmarks of these wiring diagrams. An influential current theory postulates that connectome modules are adequately explained by evolutionary pressures for wiring economy, but that the other hallmarks are not explained by such pressures and are therefore less trivial. Here, we use constraint network models to test these postulates in current gold-standard vertebrate and invertebrate interareal-connectome reconstructions. We show that empirical wiring-cost constraints inadequately explain connectome module organization, and that simultaneous module and hub constraints induce the structural byproducts of hierarchies and rich clubs. These byproducts, known as spandrels in evolutionary biology, include the structural substrate of the default-mode network. Our results imply that currently standard connectome characterizations are based on circular analyses or double dipping, and we emphasize an integrative approach to future connectome analyses for avoiding such pitfalls. PMID:27924867

  1. Generalized arc consistency for global cardinality constraint

    SciTech Connect

    Regin, J.C.

    1996-12-31

    A global cardinality constraint (gcc) is specified in terms of a set of variables X = (x{sub 1},..., x{sub p}) which take their values in a subset of V = (v{sub 1},...,v{sub d}). It constrains the number of times a value v{sub i} {epsilon} V is assigned to a variable in X to be in an interval [l{sub i}, c{sub i}]. Cardinality constraints have proved very useful in many real-life problems, such as scheduling, timetabling, or resource allocation. A gcc is more general than a constraint of difference, which requires each interval to be. In this paper, we present an efficient way of implementing generalized arc consistency for a gcc. The algorithm we propose is based on a new theorem of flow theory. Its space complexity is O({vert_bar}X{vert_bar} {times} {vert_bar}V{vert_bar}) and its time complexity is O({vert_bar}X{vert_bar}{sup 2} {times} {vert_bar}V{vert_bar}). We also show how this algorithm can efficiently be combined with other filtering techniques.

  2. Universal Quantification in a Constraint-Based Planner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, Keith; Frank, Jeremy; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Constraints and universal quantification are both useful in planning, but handling universally quantified constraints presents some novel challenges. We present a general approach to proving the validity of universally quantified constraints. The approach essentially consists of checking that the constraint is not violated for all members of the universe. We show that this approach can sometimes be applied even when variable domains are infinite, and we present some useful special cases where this can be done efficiently.

  3. Limits on Learning Phonotactic Constraints from Recent Production Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warker, Jill A.; Dell, Gary S.; Whalen, Christine A.; Gereg, Samantha

    2008-01-01

    Adults can learn new artificial phonotactic constraints by producing syllables that exhibit the constraints. The experiments presented here tested the limits of phonotactic learning in production using speech errors as an implicit measure of learning. Experiment 1 tested a constraint in which the placement of a consonant as an onset or coda…

  4. Strategic Planning under Severe Constraints in a State College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geisler, Jerry L.; Gilliard, Debbie J.

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the difficulties of strategic planning under severe constraints in a state college. Constraints include the planning models available, the governance structure of the college and other externalities, and a not-for-profit model of constraints by Newman and Wallender. After presenting the planning challenges, we discuss…

  5. Use of Justified Constraints in Coherent Diffractive Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.; McNulty, I.; Chen, Y. K.; Putkunz, C. T.; Dunand, D. C.

    2011-09-09

    We demonstrate the use of physically justified object constraints in x-ray Fresnel coherent diffractive imaging on a sample of nanoporous gold prepared by dealloying. Use of these constraints in the reconstruction algorithm enabled highly reliable imaging of the sample's shape and quantification of the 23- to 52-nm pore structure within it without use of a tight object support constraint.

  6. Grip Force Control Is Dependent on Task Constraints in Children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Law, Sui-Heung; Lo, Sing Kai; Chow, Susanna; Cheing, Gladys L.Y.

    2011-01-01

    Excessive grip force (GF) is often found in children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD). However, their GF control may vary when task constraints are imposed upon their motor performance. This study aimed to investigate how their GF control changes in response to task demands, and to examine their tactile sensitivity. Twenty-one…

  7. Syntactic Constraints on the Code Switching of Arabic-English Bilinguals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hussein, Riyad Fayez; Shorrab, Ghazi A.

    1993-01-01

    The notion of code-switching among Arabic-English bilinguals is examined. Various syntactic constraints are delineated that govern this phenomenon, the susceptibility of particular sentence constituents to switching, and the determination of the matrix language in their linguistic performance. (Contains 10 references.) (Author/LB)

  8. Game-Based Approaches, Pedagogical Principles and Tactical Constraints: Examining Games Modification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serra-Olivares, Jaime; García-López, Luis M.; Calderón, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the effect of modification strategies based on the pedagogical principles of the Teaching Games for Understanding approach on tactical constraints of four 3v3 soccer small-sided games. The Game performance of 21 U-10 players was analyzed in a game similar to the adult game; one based on keeping-the-ball;…

  9. Achieving Quality within Funding Constraints: The Potential Contribution of Institutional Research. AIR 1995 Annual Forum Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmer, Bruce

    How institutional research can improve the quality of institutional performance of colleges and universities in the face of funding constraints is discussed. An example of the use of instructional research to assist in documenting institutional quality in Australia is noted. Institutional research uses data collection, analysis, and interpretation…

  10. Modeling and Measurement Constraints in Fault Diagnostics for HVAC Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Najafi, Massieh; Auslander, David M.; Bartlett, Peter L.; Haves, Philip; Sohn, Michael D.

    2010-05-30

    Many studies have shown that energy savings of five to fifteen percent are achievable in commercial buildings by detecting and correcting building faults, and optimizing building control systems. However, in spite of good progress in developing tools for determining HVAC diagnostics, methods to detect faults in HVAC systems are still generally undeveloped. Most approaches use numerical filtering or parameter estimation methods to compare data from energy meters and building sensors to predictions from mathematical or statistical models. They are effective when models are relatively accurate and data contain few errors. In this paper, we address the case where models are imperfect and data are variable, uncertain, and can contain error. We apply a Bayesian updating approach that is systematic in managing and accounting for most forms of model and data errors. The proposed method uses both knowledge of first principle modeling and empirical results to analyze the system performance within the boundaries defined by practical constraints. We demonstrate the approach by detecting faults in commercial building air handling units. We find that the limitations that exist in air handling unit diagnostics due to practical constraints can generally be effectively addressed through the proposed approach.

  11. Fundamental Constraints on the Abundances of Chemotaxis Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitbol, Anne-Florence; Wingreen, Ned S.

    2015-03-01

    Flagellated bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, perform directed motion in gradients of concentration of attractants and repellents in a process called chemotaxis. The E. coli chemotaxis signaling pathway is a model for signal transduction, but it has unique features. We demonstrate that the need for fast signaling necessitates high abundances of the proteins involved in this pathway. We show that further constraints on the abundances of chemotaxis proteins arise from the requirements of self-assembly, both of flagellar motors and of chemoreceptor arrays. All these constraints are specific to chemotaxis, and published data confirm that chemotaxis proteins tend to be more highly expressed than their homologs in other pathways. Employing a chemotaxis pathway model, we show that the gain of the pathway at the level of the response regulator CheY increases with overall chemotaxis protein abundances. This may explain why, at least in one E. coli strain, the abundance of all chemotaxis proteins is higher in media with lower nutrient content. We also demonstrate that the E. coli chemotaxis pathway is particularly robust to abundance variations of the motor protein FliM.

  12. Accelerating Parameter Mapping with a Locally Low Rank Constraint

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tao; Pauly, John M.; Levesque, Ives R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To accelerate MR parameter mapping (MRPM) using a locally low rank (LLR) constraint, and the combination of parallel imaging (PI) and the LLR constraint. Theory and Methods An LLR method is developed for MRPM and compared with a globally low rank (GLR) method in a multi-echo spin-echo T2 mapping experiment. For acquisition with coil arrays, a combined LLR and PI method is proposed. The proposed method is evaluated in a variable flip angle T1 mapping experiment and compared with the LLR method and PI alone. Results In the multi-echo spin-echo T2 mapping experiment, the LLR method is more accurate than the GLR method for acceleration factors 2 and 3, especially for tissues with high T2 values. Variable flip angle T1 mapping is achieved by acquiring datasets with 10 flip angles, each dataset accelerated by a factor of 6, and reconstructed by the proposed method with a small normalized root mean square error of 0.025. Conclusion The LLR method is likely superior to the GLR method for MRPM. The proposed combined LLR and PI method has better performance than the two methods alone, especially with highly accelerated acquisition. PMID:24500817

  13. Real Time Computation of Kinetic Constraints to Support Equilibrium Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggert, W. J.; Kolemen, E.; Eldon, D.

    2016-10-01

    A new method for quickly and automatically applying kinetic constraints to EFIT equilibrium reconstructions using readily available data is presented. The ultimate goal is to produce kinetic equilibrium reconstructions in real time and use them to constrain the DCON stability code as part of a disruption avoidance scheme. A first effort presented here replaces CPU-time expensive modules, such as the fast ion pressure profile calculation, with a simplified model. We show with a DIII-D database analysis that we can achieve reasonable predictions for selected applications by modeling the fast ion pressure profile and determining the fit parameters as functions of easily measured quantities including neutron rate and electron temperature on axis. Secondly, we present a strategy for treating Thomson scattering and Charge Exchange Recombination data to automatically form constraints for a kinetic equilibrium reconstruction, a process that historically was performed by hand. Work supported by US DOE DE-AC02-09CH11466 and DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  14. Automated Derivation of Complex System Constraints from User Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foshee, Mark; Murey, Kim; Marsh, Angela

    2010-01-01

    The Payload Operations Integration Center (POIC) located at the Marshall Space Flight Center has the responsibility of integrating US payload science requirements for the International Space Station (ISS). All payload operations must request ISS system resources so that the resource usage will be included in the ISS on-board execution timelines. The scheduling of resources and building of the timeline is performed using the Consolidated Planning System (CPS). The ISS resources are quite complex due to the large number of components that must be accounted for. The planners at the POIC simplify the process for Payload Developers (PD) by providing the PDs with a application that has the basic functionality PDs need as well as list of simplified resources in the User Requirements Collection (URC) application. The planners maintained a mapping of the URC resources to the CPS resources. The process of manually converting PD's science requirements from a simplified representation to a more complex CPS representation is a time-consuming and tedious process. The goal is to provide a software solution to allow the planners to build a mapping of the complex CPS constraints to the basic URC constraints and automatically convert the PD's requirements into systems requirements during export to CPS.

  15. Parallel transmission RF pulse design with strict temperature constraints.

    PubMed

    Deniz, Cem M; Carluccio, Giuseppe; Collins, Christopher

    2017-02-10

    RF safety in parallel transmission (pTx) is generally ensured by imposing specific absorption rate (SAR) limits during pTx RF pulse design. There is increasing interest in using temperature to ensure safety in MRI. In this work, we present a local temperature correlation matrix formalism and apply it to impose strict constraints on maximum absolute temperature in pTx RF pulse design for head and hip regions. Electromagnetic field simulations were performed on the head and hip of virtual body models. Temperature correlation matrices were calculated for four different exposure durations ranging between 6 and 24 min using simulated fields and body-specific constants. Parallel transmission RF pulses were designed using either SAR or temperature constraints, and compared with each other and unconstrained RF pulse design in terms of excitation fidelity and safety. The use of temperature correlation matrices resulted in better excitation fidelity compared with the use of SAR in parallel transmission RF pulse design (for the 6 min exposure period, 8.8% versus 21.0% for the head and 28.0% versus 32.2% for the hip region). As RF exposure duration increases (from 6 min to 24 min), the benefit of using temperature correlation matrices on RF pulse design diminishes. However, the safety of the subject is always guaranteed (the maximum temperature was equal to 39°C). This trend was observed in both head and hip regions, where the perfusion rates are very different.

  16. Model predictive control with constraints for a nonlinear adaptive cruise control vehicle model in transition manoeuvres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Zeeshan; Popov, Atanas A.; Charles, Guy

    2013-06-01

    A vehicle following control law, based on the model predictive control method, to perform transition manoeuvres (TMs) for a nonlinear adaptive cruise control (ACC) vehicle is presented in this paper. The TM controller ultimately establishes a steady-state following distance behind a preceding vehicle to avoid collision, keeping account of acceleration limits, safe distance, and state constraints. The vehicle dynamics model is for continuous-time domain and captures the real dynamics of the sub-vehicle models for steady-state and transient operations. The ACC vehicle can execute the TM successfully and achieves a steady-state in the presence of complex dynamics within the constraint boundaries.

  17. Impact mitigation using kinematic constraints and the full space parameterization method

    SciTech Connect

    Morgansen, K.A.; Pin, F.G.

    1996-02-01

    A new method for mitigating unexpected impact of a redundant manipulator with an object in its environment is presented. Kinematic constraints are utilized with the recently developed method known as Full Space Parameterization (FSP). System performance criterion and constraints are changed at impact to return the end effector to the point of impact and halt the arm. Since large joint accelerations could occur as the manipulator is halted, joint acceleration bounds are imposed to simulate physical actuator limitations. Simulation results are presented for the case of a simple redundant planar manipulator.

  18. Collapsing and reswelling kinetics of thermoresponsive polymers on surfaces: a matter of confinement and constraints.

    PubMed

    Willet, Nicolas; Gabriel, Sabine; Jérôme, Christine; Du Prez, Filip E; Duwez, Anne-Sophie

    2014-10-07

    We report on the collapsing and reswelling ability of grafted poly(methyl vinyl ether) chains of different molecular architectures. In order to study the influence of constraints and confinement of the chains, the polymer was grafted onto AFM tips, as a model of a curved nano-sized surface, and onto macroscopic silicon substrates for comparison purposes. AFM-based force spectroscopy experiments were performed to characterise at the nanoscale the temperature-dependent collapsing process and the reversibility to the swollen state on both substrates. The reversible character of the thermoresponsive transition and its kinetics were shown to greatly depend on the polymer architecture and the constraints encountered by the chains.

  19. An interior point method for state estimation with current magnitude measurements and inequality constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Handschin, E.; Langer, M.; Kliokys, E.

    1995-12-31

    The possibility of power system state estimation with non-traditional measurement configuration is investigated. It is assumed that some substations are equipped with current magnitude measurements. Unique state estimation is possible, in such a situation, if currents are combined with voltage or power measurements and inequality constraints on node power injections are taken into account. The state estimation algorithm facilitating the efficient incorporation of inequality constraints is developed using an interior point optimization method. Simulation results showing the performance of the algorithm are presented. The method can be used for state estimation in medium voltage subtransmission and distribution networks.

  20. Near-optimal, asymptotic tracking in control problems involving state-variable inequality constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markopoulos, N.; Calise, A. J.

    1993-01-01

    The class of all piecewise time-continuous controllers tracking a given hypersurface in the state space of a dynamical system can be split by the present transformation technique into two disjoint classes; while the first of these contains all controllers which track the hypersurface in finite time, the second contains all controllers that track the hypersurface asymptotically. On this basis, a reformulation is presented for optimal control problems involving state-variable inequality constraints. If the state constraint is regarded as 'soft', there may exist controllers which are asymptotic, two-sided, and able to yield the optimal value of the performance index.

  1. Closure of the algebra of constraints for a nonprojectable Horava model

    SciTech Connect

    Bellorin, Jorge; Restuccia, Alvaro

    2011-02-15

    We perform the Hamiltonian analysis for a nonprojectable Horava model whose potential is composed of R and R{sup 2} terms. We show that Dirac's algorithm for the preservation of the constraints can be done in a closed way, hence the algebra of constraints for this model is consistent. The model has an extra, odd, scalar mode whose decoupling limit can be seen in a linear-order perturbative analysis on weakly varying backgrounds. Although our results for this model point in favor of the consistency of the Horava theory, the validity of the full nonprojectable theory still remains unanswered.

  2. Nonlinear Model Predictive Control with Constraint Satisfactions for a Quadcopter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ye; Ramirez-Jaime, Andres; Xu, Feng; Puig, Vicenç

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a nonlinear model predictive control (NMPC) strategy combined with constraint satisfactions for a quadcopter. The full dynamics of the quadcopter describing the attitude and position are nonlinear, which are quite sensitive to changes of inputs and disturbances. By means of constraint satisfactions, partial nonlinearities and modeling errors of the control-oriented model of full dynamics can be transformed into the inequality constraints. Subsequently, the quadcopter can be controlled by an NMPC controller with the updated constraints generated by constraint satisfactions. Finally, the simulation results applied to a quadcopter simulator are provided to show the effectiveness of the proposed strategy.

  3. Relativistic mean-field hadronic models under nuclear matter constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutra, M.; Lourenço, O.; Avancini, S. S.; Carlson, B. V.; Delfino, A.; Menezes, D. P.; Providência, C.; Typel, S.; Stone, J. R.

    2014-11-01

    Background: The microscopic composition and properties of infinite hadronic matter at a wide range of densities and temperatures have been subjects of intense investigation for decades. The equation of state (EoS) relating pressure, energy density, and temperature at a given particle number density is essential for modeling compact astrophysical objects such as neutron stars, core-collapse supernovae, and related phenomena, including the creation of chemical elements in the universe. The EoS depends not only on the particles present in the matter, but, more importantly, also on the forces acting among them. Because a realistic and quantitative description of infinite hadronic matter and nuclei from first principles in not available at present, a large variety of phenomenological models has been developed in the past several decades, but the scarcity of experimental and observational data does not allow a unique determination of the adjustable parameters. Purpose: It is essential for further development of the field to determine the most realistic parameter sets and to use them consistently. Recently, a set of constraints on properties of nuclear matter was formed and the performance of 240 nonrelativistic Skyrme parametrizations was assessed [M. Dutra et al., Phys. Rev. C 85, 035201 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevC.85.035201] in describing nuclear matter up to about three times nuclear saturation density. In the present work we examine 263 relativistic-mean-field (RMF) models in a comparable approach. These models have been widely used because of several important aspects not always present in nonrelativistic models, such as intrinsic Lorentz covariance, automatic inclusion of spin, appropriate saturation mechanism for nuclear matter, causality, and, therefore, no problems related to superluminal speed of sound in medium. Method: Three different sets of constraints related to symmetric nuclear matter, pure neutron matter, symmetry energy, and its derivatives were used. The

  4. Adaptive neural control for an uncertain robotic manipulator with joint space constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Zhong-Liang; Ge, Shuzhi Sam; Tee, Keng Peng; He, Wei

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, adaptive neural tracking control is proposed for a robotic manipulator with uncertainties in both manipulator dynamics and joint actuator dynamics. The manipulator joints are subject to inequality constraints, i.e., the joint angles are required to remain in some compact sets. Integral barrier Lyapunov functionals (iBLFs) are employed to address the joint space constraints directly without performing an additional mapping to the error space. Neural networks (NNs) are utilised to compensate for the unknown robot dynamics and external force. Adapting parameters are developed to estimate the unknown bounds on NN approximations. By the Lyapunov synthesis, the proposed control can guarantee the semi-global uniform ultimate boundedness of the closed-loop system, and the practical tracking of joint reference trajectory is achieved without the violation of predefined joint space constraints. Simulation results are given to validate the effectiveness of the proposed control scheme.

  5. Leakage-based precoding for MU-MIMO VLC systems under optical power constraint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiaxuan; Wang, Qi; Wang, Zhaocheng

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate a multiuser multiple-input multiple-output (MU-MIMO) system for indoor visible light communication (VLC), in which precoding is conducted under optical power constraint rather than electrical power constraint. Leakage-based precoding designed by maximizing signal-to-leakage-plus-noise ratio (SLNR) is adopted to suppress the multiuser interference under optical power constraint and power allocation is proposed to maximize the throughput of the system. Simulations demonstrate the performance gain of optimal power allocation and indicate that the leakage-based precoding scheme outperforms zero forcing counterpart when the channel is highly correlated and still works well when the number of transmitters is less than that of receivers.

  6. Dynamical consequences of a constraint on the Langevin thermostat in molecular cluster simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Stinson, Jake L.; Kathmann, Shawn M.; Ford, Ian J.

    2014-11-17

    We investigate some unusual behaviour observed while performing molecular dynamics simulations with the DL_POLY_4.03 code. Under the standard Langevin thermostat, atoms appear to be thermalised to different temperatures, depending on their mass and on the total number of particles in the system. We find that an imposed constraint whereby no thermal noise acts on the centre of mass of the system is the cause of the unexpected behaviour. This is demonstrated by solving the stochastic dynamics for the constrained thermostat and comparing the results with simulation data. The effect of the constraint can be considerable for small systems with disparate masses. By removing the constraint the Langevin thermostat may be restored to its intended behaviour and this has been implemented as an option in DL_POLY_4.05. SMK was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences.

  7. Walking to the Beat of Their Own Drum: How Children and Adults Meet Timing Constraints

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Simone V.

    2015-01-01

    Walking requires adapting to meet task constraints. Between 5- and 7-years old, children’s walking approximates adult walking without constraints. To examine how children and adults adapt to meet timing constraints, 57 5- to 7-year olds and 20 adults walked to slow and fast audio metronome paces. Both children and adults modified their walking. However, at the slow pace, children had more trouble matching the metronome compared to adults. The youngest children’s walking patterns deviated most from the slow metronome pace, and practice improved their performance. Five-year olds were the only group that did not display carryover effects to the metronome paces. Findings are discussed in relation to what contributes to the development of adaptation in children. PMID:26011538

  8. Real-time video coding under power constraint based on H.264 codec

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Li; Lu, Yan; Wu, Feng; Li, Shipeng; Gao, Wen

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a joint power-distortion optimization scheme for real-time H.264 video encoding under the power constraint. Firstly, the power constraint is translated to the complexity constraint based on DVS technology. Secondly, a computation allocation model (CAM) with virtual buffers is proposed to facilitate the optimal allocation of constrained computational resource for each frame. Thirdly, the complexity adjustable encoder based on optimal motion estimation and mode decision is proposed to meet the allocated resource. The proposed scheme takes the advantage of some new features of H.264/AVC video coding tools such as early termination strategy in fast ME. Moreover, it can avoid suffering from the high overhead of the parametric power control algorithms and achieve fine complexity scalability in a wide range with stable rate-distortion performance. The proposed scheme also shows the potential of a further reduction of computation and power consumption in the decoding without any change on the existing decoders.

  9. Integrated Analysis of Airport Capacity and Environmental Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasan, Shahab; Long, Dou; Hart, George; Eckhause, Jeremy; Hemm, Robert; Busick, Andrew; Graham, Michael; Thompson, Terry; Murphy, Charles; Poage, James

    2010-01-01

    LMI conducted an integrated analysis of airport capacity and environmental constraints. identifying and ranking the key factors limiting achievement of NextGen capacity goals. The primary metric used was projected throughput, which was estimated for the years 2015 and 2025 based on the unconstrained demand forecast from the Federal Aviation Administration, and planned improvements including those proposed in the NextGen plan. A set of 310 critical airports was identified.. collectively accounting for more than 99 percent of domestic air traffic volume; a one-off analytical approach was used to isolate the constraint being assessed. The study considered three capacity constraints (runway.. taxiway, and gate) and three environmental constraints (fuel, NO(x) emissions, and noise). For the ten busiest airports, runway and noise are the primary and secondary constraints in both 2015 and 2025. For the OEP 35 airports and overall for the remaining airports, the most binding constraint is noise. Six of the 10 busiest airports, will face runway constraints in 2025, and 95 will face gate constraints. Nearly every airport will be subject to constraints due to emissions and NOx. Runway and taxi constraints are more concentrated in the large airports: environmental constraints are present at almost every airport regardless of size.

  10. Motion planning of mobile multi-limb robotic systems subject to force and friction constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madhani, Akhil; Dubowsky, Steven

    1992-01-01

    A method is presented to generate motions for a class of multilimb robotic systems enabling them to apply large static forces over large ranges of motion without saturating actuator effort limits, system-environment friction constraints, kinematic joint limits, or geometric workspace obstacles. The approach, termed the force-workspace (FW) approach, maps these constraints into the system C-space to form constraint obstacles using a recursive subdivision process. To generate motions along which actuator efforts can be specified without violating system constraints, paths are planned that avoid these constraint obstacles. The method permits the shape of the paths to be controlled using any configuration-dependent performance criterion. The FW approach was applied to a proposed three-limb planar climbing robot whose task is to climb upwards between two vertical walls by pushing outwards to generate frictional support. Motions were planned automatically within the system FW, enabling it to lift itself upwards using two limbs at a time, and a gait was planned to enable it to switch limbs and climb continuously.

  11. Balancing antagonistic time and resource utilization constraints in over-subscribed scheduling problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Stephen F.; Pathak, Dhiraj K.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper, we report work aimed at applying concepts of constraint-based problem structuring and multi-perspective scheduling to an over-subscribed scheduling problem. Previous research has demonstrated the utility of these concepts as a means for effectively balancing conflicting objectives in constraint-relaxable scheduling problems, and our goal here is to provide evidence of their similar potential in the context of HST observation scheduling. To this end, we define and experimentally assess the performance of two time-bounded heuristic scheduling strategies in balancing the tradeoff between resource setup time minimization and satisfaction of absolute time constraints. The first strategy considered is motivated by dispatch-based manufacturing scheduling research, and employs a problem decomposition that concentrates local search on minimizing resource idle time due to setup activities. The second is motivated by research in opportunistic scheduling and advocates a problem decomposition that focuses attention on the goal activities that have the tightest temporal constraints. Analysis of experimental results gives evidence of differential superiority on the part of each strategy in different problem solving circumstances. A composite strategy based on recognition of characteristics of the current problem solving state is then defined and tested to illustrate the potential benefits of constraint-based problem structuring and multi-perspective scheduling in over-subscribe scheduling problems.

  12. Linear Quadratic Tracking Design for a Generic Transport Aircraft with Structural Load Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burken, John J.; Frost, Susan A.; Taylor, Brian R.

    2011-01-01

    When designing control laws for systems with constraints added to the tracking performance, control allocation methods can be utilized. Control allocations methods are used when there are more command inputs than controlled variables. Constraints that require allocators are such task as; surface saturation limits, structural load limits, drag reduction constraints or actuator failures. Most transport aircraft have many actuated surfaces compared to the three controlled variables (such as angle of attack, roll rate & angle of side slip). To distribute the control effort among the redundant set of actuators a fixed mixer approach can be utilized or online control allocation techniques. The benefit of an online allocator is that constraints can be considered in the design whereas the fixed mixer cannot. However, an online control allocator mixer has a disadvantage of not guaranteeing a surface schedule, which can then produce ill defined loads on the aircraft. The load uncertainty and complexity has prevented some controller designs from using advanced allocation techniques. This paper considers actuator redundancy management for a class of over actuated systems with real-time structural load limits using linear quadratic tracking applied to the generic transport model. A roll maneuver example of an artificial load limit constraint is shown and compared to the same no load limitation maneuver.

  13. Constraint therapy versus intensive training: implications for motor control and brain plasticity after stroke.

    PubMed

    Medée, Béatrice; Bellaiche, Soline; Revol, Patrice; Jacquin-Courtois, Sophie; Arsenault, Lisette; Guichard-Mayel, Audrey; Delporte, Ludovic; Rode, Gilles; Rossetti, Yves; Boisson, Dominique; Luauté, Jacques

    2010-12-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that constraint induced movement therapy (CIMT) improves upper limb motor impairment following stroke. This rehabilitation method combines constraint of the less-affected upperlimb with intensive training of the paretic limb. The aim of the present study was to evaluate, in a single case study, the respective effects of each of these two therapeutic interventions. The patient selected was a 32-year-old right-handed woman. Three and a half years prior to inclusion, she suffered a left capsular infarct responsible for a right hemiparesis. Several assessments were carried out before and after constraint therapy and then after intensive training. Each assessment included measures of hand function as well as a three-dimensional (3D) analysis of prehension. Results showed a significant improvement of motor performance after the constraint period and an additional amelioration after the intensive training period. Kinematic analysis showed that the transport phase of movement (movement time and velocity peaks) was improved after the constraint period, whereas the grasping phase (maximum grip aperture) was modified after intensive training. These data could reflect a specific effect of treatment on each phase of the prehension task, or a more general proximal-to-distal gradient of recovery. Although firm conclusions are not warranted on the basis of this single case study, we confirm the utility of 3D motion analysis to evaluate objectively the effectiveness of a therapeutic intervention. We also discuss the implications of our findings for understanding processes of motor control reorganisation.

  14. Optimal, impulsive, time-fixed orbital rendezvous and interception with path constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taur, Der-Ren

    Minimum-fuel, impulsive, time-fixed extremal solutions are obtained for the problem of orbital rendezvous and interception with path constraints. The coplanar case and a restricted class of path constraints are analyzed. A theory based on the extended problem of Bolza in the calculus of variations was established to determine optimal impulsive trajectories with state variable inequality constraints. According to this newly developed theory, all the necessary conditions including the optimal corner conditions were obtained for both constrained and unconstrained arcs. The constrained extremal solutions, including the optimal number of impulses, their times and positions were studied under a conjecture proposed for the minimization process on the constrained arc. The fundamental problems such as the existence of boundary arcs or boundary points, absorbing boundaries or non-absorbing boundaries, and the continuity of the Hamiltonian function with a scleronomic constraint in infinite control problems were studied and answered. A bifurcation phenomenon and the non-uniqueness of the extremal solutions having the same cost were found during the research. The extended principles of dynamical reversibility and reflectability of the impulsive solution were developed to obtain the conjugate solutions belonging to the same cost function. In addition, the local-optimal time-fixed solutions obtained can be used to perform time versus fuel trade-offs for missions which have time constraints.

  15. Automated Derivation of Complex System Constraints from User Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muery, Kim; Foshee, Mark; Marsh, Angela

    2006-01-01

    International Space Station (ISS) payload developers submit their payload science requirements for the development of on-board execution timelines. The ISS systems required to execute the payload science operations must be represented as constraints for the execution timeline. Payload developers use a software application, User Requirements Collection (URC), to submit their requirements by selecting a simplified representation of ISS system constraints. To fully represent the complex ISS systems, the constraints require a level of detail that is beyond the insight of the payload developer. To provide the complex representation of the ISS system constraints, HOSC operations personnel, specifically the Payload Activity Requirements Coordinators (PARC), manually translate the payload developers simplified constraints into detailed ISS system constraints used for scheduling the payload activities in the Consolidated Planning System (CPS). This paper describes the implementation for a software application, User Requirements Integration (URI), developed to automate the manual ISS constraint translation process.

  16. Molecular and cellular constraints on proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kortemme, Tanja

    Engineering proteins with new sequences, structures and functions has many exciting practical applications, and provides new ways to dissect design principles for function. Recent successes in computational protein design provide a cause for optimism. Yet many functions are currently too complex to engineer predictively, and successful design of new biological activities also requires an understanding of the functional pressures acting on proteins in the context of cells and organisms. I will present two vignettes describing our progress with dissecting both molecular and cellular constraints on protein function. In the first, we characterized the cost and benefit of protein production upon sequence perturbations in a classic system for gene regulation, the lac operon. Our results were unexpected in light of the common assumption that the dominant fitness costs are due to protein expression. Instead, we discovered a direct linear relationship between cost and lacpermease activity, not protein or mRNA production. The magnitude of the cost of permease activity, relative to protein production, has consequences for regulation. Our model predicts an advantage of direct regulation of protein activity (not just expression), providing a new explanation for the long-known mechanism of ``inducer exclusion'' that inhibits transport through the permease. Similar pressures and cost/benefit tradeoffs may be key to engineering synthetic systems with improved fitness. In the second vignette, I will describe our recent efforts to develop computational approaches that predict protein sequences consistent with multiple functional conformations. We expect such ``multi-constraint'' models to improve predictions of functional sequences determined by deep mutational scanning in bacteria, to provide insights into how the balance between functional conformations shapes sequence space, and to highlight molecular and cellular constraints that cannot be captured by the model.

  17. Design of helicopter rotors to noise constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaeffer, E. G.; Sternfeld, H., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Results of the initial phase of a research project to study the design constraints on helicopter noise are presented. These include the calculation of nonimpulsive rotor harmonic and broadband hover noise spectra, over a wide range of rotor design variables and the sensitivity of perceived noise level (PNL) to changes in rotor design parameters. The prediction methodology used correlated well with measured whirl tower data. Application of the predictions to variations in rotor design showed tip speed and thrust as having the most effect on changing PNL.

  18. Chemical Constraints on the Early Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyckoff, Susan

    2004-01-01

    Chemical abundances of comets and star-forming regions provide p o w d clues to the conditions which prevailed in the outer solar nebula. Hence comparative spectroscopic studies of cometary and molecular cloud gases provide vital insights into conditions in the solar protoplanetary disk at heliocentric distances beyond 5 AU 4.6 Gyr ago. We proposed a research program which combined optical and sub-millimeter techniques with laboratory spectroscopy, and sought to determine key diagnostic constraints on single-star protoplanetary disk models.

  19. Pregalactic black holes - A new constraint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrow, J. D.; Silk, J.

    1979-01-01

    Pregalactic black holes accrete matter in the early universe and produce copious amounts of X radiation. By using observations of the background radiation in the X and gamma wavebands, a strong constraint is imposed upon their possible abundance. If pregalactic black holes are actually present, several outstanding problems of cosmogony can be resolved with typical pregalactic black hole masses of 100 solar masses. Significantly more massive holes cannot constitute an appreciable mass fraction of the universe and are limited by a specific mass-density bound.

  20. Sparse Covariance Matrix Estimation With Eigenvalue Constraints.

    PubMed

    Liu, Han; Wang, Lie; Zhao, Tuo

    2014-04-01

    We propose a new approach for estimating high-dimensional, positive-definite covariance matrices. Our method extends the generalized thresholding operator by adding an explicit eigenvalue constraint. The estimated covariance matrix simultaneously achieves sparsity and positive definiteness. The estimator is rate optimal in the minimax sense and we develop an efficient iterative soft-thresholding and projection algorithm based on the alternating direction method of multipliers. Empirically, we conduct thorough numerical experiments on simulated datasets as well as real data examples to illustrate the usefulness of our method. Supplementary materials for the article are available online.

  1. Mission Implementation Constraints on Planetary Muon Radiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Cathleen E.; Kedar, Sharon; Naudet, Charles; Webb, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Cost: Use heritage hardware, especially use a tested landing system to reduce cost (Phoenix or MSL EDL stage). The sky crane technology delivers higher mass to the surface and enables reaching targets at higher elevation, but at a higher mission cost. Rover vs. Stationary Lander: Rover-mounted instrument enables tomography, but the increased weight of the rover reduces the allowable payload weight. Mass is the critical design constraint for an instrument for a planetary mission. Many factors that are minor factors or do not enter into design considerations for terrestrial operation are important for a planetary application. (Landing site, diurnal temperature variation, instrument portability, shock/vibration)

  2. Variational calculus with constraints on general algebroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabowska, Katarzyna; Grabowski, Janusz

    2008-05-01

    Variational calculus on a vector bundle E equipped with a structure of a general algebroid is developed, together with the corresponding analogs of Euler-Lagrange equations. Constrained systems are introduced in the variational and geometrical settings. The constrained Euler-Lagrange equations are derived for analogs of holonomic, vakonomic and nonholonomic constraints. This general model covers the majority of first-order Lagrangian systems which are present in the literature and reduces to the standard variational calculus and the Euler-Lagrange equations in classical mechanics for E = TM.

  3. Total-variation regularization with bound constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Chartrand, Rick; Wohlberg, Brendt

    2009-01-01

    We present a new algorithm for bound-constrained total-variation (TV) regularization that in comparison with its predecessors is simple, fast, and flexible. We use a splitting approach to decouple TV minimization from enforcing the constraints. Consequently, existing TV solvers can be employed with minimal alteration. This also makes the approach straightforward to generalize to any situation where TV can be applied. We consider deblurring of images with Gaussian or salt-and-pepper noise, as well as Abel inversion of radiographs with Poisson noise. We incorporate previous iterative reweighting algorithms to solve the TV portion.

  4. Expected Constraints on Rhea's Interior from Cassini

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castillo, J. C.

    2005-01-01

    We model the interior of Rhea based on observational constraints and the results from geodynamical models available in the literature. Ten main types of models are defined, depending on the presence or absence of a high-pressure ice layer (ice II), and the extent of separation of the rock component from the volatiles. We present degree-two gravity components computed for each of these models in order to assess which properties of the interior are likely to be inferred from Cassini radio science measurements scheduled on November 26, 2005.

  5. Intelligence Constraints on Terrorist Network Plots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Gordon

    Since 9/11, the western intelligence and law enforcement services have managed to interdict the great majority of planned attacks against their home countries. Network analysis shows that there are important intelligence constraints on the number and complexity of terrorist plots. If two many terrorists are involved in plots at a given time, a tipping point is reached whereby it becomes progressively easier for the dots to be joined and for the conspirators to be arrested, and for the aggregate evidence to secure convictions. Implications of this analysis are presented for the campaign to win hearts and minds.

  6. Codon Constraints on Closed 2D Shapes,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    19843$ CODON CONSTRAINTS ON CLOSED 2D SHAPES Go Whitman Richards "I Donald D. Hoffman’ D T 18 Abstract: Codons are simple primitives for describing plane...RSONAL AUT"ORtIS) Richards, Whitman & Hoffman, Donald D. 13&. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED N/A P8 AT F RRrT t~r. Ago..D,) is, PlE COUNT Reprint...outlines, if figure and ground are ignored. Later, we will address the problem of indexing identical codon descriptors that have different figure

  7. Quintessence reconstructed: New constraints and tracker viability

    SciTech Connect

    Sahlen, Martin; Liddle, Andrew R.; Parkinson, David

    2007-01-15

    We update and extend our previous work reconstructing the potential of a quintessence field from current observational data. We extend the cosmological data set to include new supernova data, plus information from the cosmic microwave background and from baryon acoustic oscillations. We extend the modeling by considering Pade approximant expansions as well as Taylor series, and by using observations to assess the viability of the tracker hypothesis. We find that parameter constraints have improved by a factor of 2, with a strengthening of the preference of the cosmological constant over evolving quintessence models. Present data show some signs, though inconclusive, of favoring tracker models over nontracker models under our assumptions.

  8. Effects of anatomical constraints on tumor growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capogrosso Sansone, B.; Delsanto, P. P.; Magnano, M.; Scalerandi, M.

    2001-08-01

    Competition for available nutrients and the presence of anatomical barriers are major determinants of tumor growth in vivo. We extend a model recently proposed to simulate the growth of neoplasms in real tissues to include geometrical constraints mimicking pressure effects on the tumor surface induced by the presence of rigid or semirigid structures. Different tissues have different diffusivities for nutrients and cells. Despite the simplicity of the approach, based on a few inherently local mechanisms, the numerical results agree qualitatively with clinical data (computed tomography scans of neoplasms) for the larynx and the oral cavity.

  9. Extracting vascular networks under physiological constraints via integer programming.

    PubMed

    Rempfler, Markus; Schneider, Matthias; Ielacqua, Giovanna D; Xiao, Xianghui; Stock, Stuart R; Klohs, Jan; Székely, Gábor; Andres, Bjoern; Menze, Bjoern H

    2014-01-01

    We introduce an integer programming-based approach to vessel network extraction that enforces global physiological constraints on the vessel structure and learn this prior from a high-resolution reference network. The method accounts for both image evidence and geometric relationships between vessels by formulating and solving an integer programming problem. Starting from an over-connected network, it is pruning vessel stumps and spurious connections by evaluating bifurcation angle and connectivity of the graph. We utilize a high-resolution micro computed tomography (μCT) dataset of a cerebrovascular corrosion cast to obtain a reference network, perform experiments on micro magnetic resonance angiography (μMRA) images of mouse brains and discuss properties of the networks obtained under different tracking and pruning approaches.

  10. Reconstructing cerebrovascular networks under local physiological constraints by integer programming.

    PubMed

    Rempfler, Markus; Schneider, Matthias; Ielacqua, Giovanna D; Xiao, Xianghui; Stock, Stuart R; Klohs, Jan; Székely, Gábor; Andres, Bjoern; Menze, Bjoern H

    2015-10-01

    We introduce a probabilistic approach to vessel network extraction that enforces physiological constraints on the vessel structure. The method accounts for both image evidence and geometric relationships between vessels by solving an integer program, which is shown to yield the maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimate to a probabilistic model. Starting from an overconnected network, it is pruning vessel stumps and spurious connections by evaluating the local geometry and the global connectivity of the graph. We utilize a high-resolution micro computed tomography (μCT) dataset of a cerebrovascular corrosion cast to obtain a reference network and learn the prior distributions of our probabilistic model and we perform experiments on in-vivo magnetic resonance microangiography (μMRA) images of mouse brains. We finally discuss properties of the networks obtained under different tracking and pruning approaches.

  11. International Space Station Noise Constraints Flight Rule Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Limardo, Jose G.; Allen, Christopher S.; Danielson, Richard W.

    2014-01-01

    Crewmembers onboard the International Space Station (ISS) live in a unique workplace environment for as long as 6 -12 months. During these long-duration ISS missions, noise exposures from onboard equipment are posing concerns for human factors and crewmember health risks, such as possible reductions in hearing sensitivity, disruptions of crew sleep, interference with speech intelligibility and voice communications, interference with crew task performance, and reduced alarm audibility. The purpose of this poster is to describe how a recently-updated noise constraints flight rule is being used to implement a NASA-created Noise Exposure Estimation Tool and Noise Hazard Inventory to predict crew noise exposures and recommend when hearing protection devices are needed.

  12. Model-independent constraints on the cosmic opacity

    SciTech Connect

    Holanda, R.F.L.; Carvalho, J.C.; Alcaniz, J.S. E-mail: carvalho@dfte.ufrn.br

    2013-04-01

    We use current measurements of the expansion rate H(z) and cosmic background radiation bounds on the spatial curvature of the Universe to impose cosmological model-independent constraints on cosmic opacity. To perform our analyses, we compare opacity-free distance modulus from H(z) data with those from two type Ia supernovae compilations, namely, the Union2.1 plus the most distant spectroscopically confirmed SNe Ia (SCP-0401 at z = 1.713) and two Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) subsamples. We find that a completely transparent universe is in full agreement with the Union 2.1 + SNe Ia SCP-0401 sample. For the SDSS compilations, such universe is compatible with observations at < 1.5σ level regardless the SNe Ia light-curve fitting used.

  13. Reconstructing cerebrovascular networks under local physiological constraints by integer programming

    DOE PAGES

    Rempfler, Markus; Schneider, Matthias; Ielacqua, Giovanna D.; ...

    2015-04-23

    We introduce a probabilistic approach to vessel network extraction that enforces physiological constraints on the vessel structure. The method accounts for both image evidence and geometric relationships between vessels by solving an integer program, which is shown to yield the maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimate to the probabilistic model. Starting from an over-connected network, it is pruning vessel stumps and spurious connections by evaluating the local geometry and the global connectivity of the graph. We utilize a high-resolution micro computed tomography (µCT) dataset of a cerebrovascular corrosion cast to obtain a reference network and learn the prior distributions of ourmore » probabilistic model. As a result, we perform experiments on micro magnetic resonance angiography (µMRA) images of mouse brains and discuss properties of the networks obtained under different tracking and pruning approaches.« less

  14. Reconstructing cerebrovascular networks under local physiological constraints by integer programming

    SciTech Connect

    Rempfler, Markus; Schneider, Matthias; Ielacqua, Giovanna D.; Xiao, Xianghui; Stock, Stuart R.; Klohs, Jan; Szekely, Gabor; Andres, Bjoern; Menze, Bjoern H.

    2015-04-23

    We introduce a probabilistic approach to vessel network extraction that enforces physiological constraints on the vessel structure. The method accounts for both image evidence and geometric relationships between vessels by solving an integer program, which is shown to yield the maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimate to the probabilistic model. Starting from an over-connected network, it is pruning vessel stumps and spurious connections by evaluating the local geometry and the global connectivity of the graph. We utilize a high-resolution micro computed tomography (µCT) dataset of a cerebrovascular corrosion cast to obtain a reference network and learn the prior distributions of our probabilistic model. As a result, we perform experiments on micro magnetic resonance angiography (µMRA) images of mouse brains and discuss properties of the networks obtained under different tracking and pruning approaches.

  15. Low level constraints on dynamic contour path integration.

    PubMed

    Hall, Sophie; Bourke, Patrick; Guo, Kun

    2014-01-01

    Contour integration is a fundamental visual process. The constraints on integrating discrete contour elements and the associated neural mechanisms have typically been investigated using static contour paths. However, in our dynamic natural environment objects and scenes vary over space and time. With the aim of investigating the parameters affecting spatiotemporal contour path integration, we measured human contrast detection performance of a briefly presented foveal target embedded in dynamic collinear stimulus sequences (comprising five short 'predictor' bars appearing consecutively towards the fovea, followed by the 'target' bar) in four experiments. The data showed that participants' target detection performance was relatively unchanged when individual contour elements were separated by up to 2° spatial gap or 200 ms temporal gap. Randomising the luminance contrast or colour of the predictors, on the other hand, had similar detrimental effect on grouping dynamic contour path and subsequent target detection performance. Randomising the orientation of the predictors reduced target detection performance greater than introducing misalignment relative to the contour path. The results suggest that the visual system integrates dynamic path elements to bias target detection even when the continuity of path is disrupted in terms of spatial (2°), temporal (200 ms), colour (over 10 colours) and luminance (-25% to 25%) information. We discuss how the findings can be largely reconciled within the functioning of V1 horizontal connections.

  16. Design constraints on Cherenkov telescopes with Davies-Cotton reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretz, T.; Ribordy, M.

    2013-05-01

    This paper discusses the construction of high-performance ground-based gamma-ray Cherenkov telescopes with a Davies-Cotton reflector. For the design of such telescopes, usually physics constrains the field-of-view, while the photo-sensor size is defined by limited options. Including the effect of light-concentrators, it is demonstrated that these constraints are enough to mutually constrain all other design parameters. The dependability of the various design parameters naturally arises once a relationship between the value of the point-spread functions at the edge of the field-of-view and the pixel field-of-view is introduced. To be able to include this constraint into a system of equations, an analytical description for the point-spread function of a tessellated Davies-Cotton reflector is derived from Taylor developments and ray-tracing simulations. Including higher order terms renders the result precise on the percent level. Design curves are provided within the typical phase space of Cherenkov telescopes. The impact of all design parameters on the overall design is discussed. Allowing an immediate comparison of several options with identical physics performance allows the determination of the most cost efficient solution. Emphasis is given on the possible application of solid light concentrators with their typically about two times better concentration compared with hollow cones which allows the use of small photo sensors such as Geiger-mode avalanche photo diodes. This is discussed in more details in the context of possible design options for the Cherenkov Telescope Array. In particular, a solution for a 60 mm2 photo sensor with hollow cone is compared to a 36 mm2 with solid cone.

  17. Domestication changes innate constraints for birdsong learning.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, Hiroko; Suzuki, Kenta; Takahasi, Miki; Okanoya, Kazuo

    2014-07-01

    Birdsongs are acquired by imitating the sounds produced by conspecifics. Within a species, songs diverge by cultural transmission, but the range of species-specific features is restricted by innate constraints. Bengalese finches (Lonchura striata var. domestica) are a domesticated strain of the wild White-rumped munia (Lonchura striata). The songs of the domesticated strain have more tonal sounds and more variable sequences than those of the wild strain. We compared the features of songs that were produced by normal birds, isolation-reared birds, and cross-fostered birds in both White-rumped munias and Bengalese finches to identify differences in the genetic and environmental factors of their songs. Factor analyses were conducted based on 17 song measurements. We found that isolated songs differed from normal and cross-fostered songs, especially in unstable prosodic features. In addition, there were significant differences in sound property of mean frequency between the two strains regardless of the rearing conditions. Thus, innate constraints that partially determine birdsong phenotypes may be altered through domestication.

  18. Energetic Constraints on Species Coexistence in Birds

    PubMed Central

    Pigot, Alexander L.

    2016-01-01

    The association between species richness and ecosystem energy availability is one of the major geographic trends in biodiversity. It is often explained in terms of energetic constraints, such that coexistence among competing species is limited in low productivity environments. However, it has proven challenging to reject alternative views, including the null hypothesis that species richness has simply had more time to accumulate in productive regions, and thus the role of energetic constraints in limiting coexistence remains largely unknown. We use the phylogenetic relationships and geographic ranges of sister species (pairs of lineages who are each other’s closest extant relatives) to examine the association between energy availability and coexistence across an entire vertebrate class (Aves). We show that the incidence of coexistence among sister species increases with overall species richness and is elevated in more productive ecosystems, even when accounting for differences in the evolutionary time available for coexistence to occur. Our results indicate that energy availability promotes species coexistence in closely related lineages, providing a key step toward a more mechanistic understanding of the productivity–richness relationship underlying global gradients in biodiversity. PMID:26974194

  19. Observational constraints on assisted k-inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Ohashi, Junko; Tsujikawa, Shinji

    2011-05-15

    We study observational constraints on the assisted k-inflation models in which multiple scalar fields join an attractor characterized by an effective single field {phi}. This effective single-field system is described by the Lagrangian P=Xg(Y), where X is the kinetic energy of {phi}, {lambda} is a constant, and g is an arbitrary function in terms of Y=Xe{sup {lambda}{phi}}. Our analysis covers a wide variety of k-inflation models such as dilatonic ghost condensate, Dirac-Born-Infeld field, and tachyon, as well as the canonical field with an exponential potential. We place observational bounds on the parameters of each model from the WMAP 7yr data combined with baryon acoustic oscillations and the Hubble constant measurement. Using the observational constraints of the equilateral non-Gaussianity parameter f{sub NL}{sup equil}, we further restrict the allowed parameter space of dilatonic ghost condensate and Dirac-Born-Infeld models. We extend the analysis to more general models with several different choices of g(Y) and show that the models such as g(Y)=c{sub 0}+c{sub p}Y{sup p} (p{>=}3) are excluded by the joint data analysis of the scalar/tensor spectra and primordial non-Gaussianities.

  20. Complete reionization constraints from Planck 2015 polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, Chen He; Miranda, Vinicius; Hu, Wayne

    2017-01-01

    We conduct an analysis of the Planck 2015 data that is complete in reionization observables from the large angle polarization E -mode spectrum in the redshift range 6 constraints on any model for reionization in the same range; we develop an effective likelihood approach for applying these constraints to models. By allowing for an arbitrary ionization history, this technique tests the robustness of inferences on the total optical depth from the usual steplike transition assumption, which is important for the interpretation of many other cosmological parameters such as the dark energy and neutrino mass. The Planck 2015 data not only allow a high redshift z >15 component to the optical depth but prefer it at the 2 σ level. This preference is associated with excess power in the multipole range 10 ≲ℓ≲20 and may indicate high redshift ionization sources or unaccounted for systematics and foregrounds in the 2015 data.