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Sample records for aeruginosa clinical isolate

  1. Antibiotic susceptibility of clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Cervantes-Vega, C; Chavez, J; Rodriguez, M G

    1986-01-01

    Three hundred and twenty two clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa collected in Morelia, México, were analyzed for in vitro susceptibility to five antibiotics by agar dilution tests. Antibiotic resistance was shown by 50% of total isolates. Frequencies of resistance were: streptomycin, 47%; gentamicin, 13%; tobramycin, 8%; and carbenicillin, 7%; no amikacin resistance was found. The more common resistance patterns were streptomycin, gentamicin-streptomycin, and tobramycin-gentamicin-streptomycin. Resistance to either tobramycin, gentamicin or carbenicillin was found mainly in pyocin type 10 isolates. The proportion of antibiotic resistant isolates ranged from 37 to 75% in four hospitals, and amounted 24% in three clinical laboratories.

  2. Virulence attributes in Brazilian clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Silva, Lívia V; Galdino, Anna Clara M; Nunes, Ana Paula F; dos Santos, Kátia R N; Moreira, Beatriz M; Cacci, Luciana C; Sodré, Cátia L; Ziccardi, Mariangela; Branquinha, Marta H; Santos, André L S

    2014-11-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen responsible for causing a huge variety of acute and chronic infections with significant levels of morbidity and mortality. Its success as a pathogen comes from its genetic/metabolic plasticity, intrinsic/acquired antimicrobial resistance, capacity to form biofilm and expression of numerous virulence factors. Herein, we have analyzed the genetic variability, antimicrobial susceptibility as well as the production of metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs) and virulence attributes (elastase, pyocyanin and biofilm) in 96 strains of P. aeruginosa isolated from different anatomical sites of patients attended at Brazilian hospitals. Our results revealed a great genetic variability, in which 86 distinct RAPD types (89.6% of polymorphisms) were detected. Regarding the susceptibility profile, 48 strains (50%) were resistant to the antimicrobials, as follows: 22.92% to the three tested antibiotics, 12.5% to both imipenem and meropenem, 11.46% to ceftazidime only, 2.08% to imipenem only and 1.04% to both ceftazidime and meropenem. Out of the 34 clinical strains of P. aeruginosa resistant to both imipenem and meropenem, 25 (73.53%) were MBL producers by phenotypic method while 12 (35.29%) were PCR positive for the MBL gene SPM-1. All P. aeruginosa strains produced pyocyanin, elastase and biofilm, although in different levels. Some associations were demonstrated among the susceptibility and/or production of these virulence traits with the anatomical site of strain isolation. For instance, almost all strains isolated from urine (85.71%) were resistant to the three antibiotics, while the vast majority of strains isolated from rectum (95%) and mouth (66.67%) were susceptible to all tested antibiotics. Urine isolates produced the highest pyocyanin concentration (20.15±5.65 μg/ml), while strains isolated from pleural secretion and mouth produced elevated elastase activity (1441.43±303.08 FAU) and biofilm formation (OD590 0.676±0

  3. Comparison of Flagellin Genes from Clinical and Environmental Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, J. Alun W.; Bellingham, Nessa F.; Winstanley, Craig; Ousley, Margaret A.; Hart, C. Anthony; Saunders, Jon R.

    1999-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an important opportunistic pathogen, was isolated from environmental samples and compared to clinically derived strains. While P. aeruginosa was isolated readily from an experimental mushroom-growing unit, it was found only rarely in other environmental samples. A flagellin gene PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the isolates revealed that environmental and clinical P. aeruginosa strains are not readily distinguishable. The variation in the central regions of the flagellin genes of seven of the isolates was investigated further. The strains used included two strains with type a genes (998 bp), four strains with type b genes (1,258 bp), and one strain, K979, with a novel flagellin gene (2,199 bp). The route by which flagellin gene variation has occurred in P. aeruginosa is discussed. PMID:10049879

  4. A comparative study of coastal and clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Nair, Anusree V; Joseph, Neetha; Krishna, Kiran; Sneha, K G; Tom, Neenu; Jangid, Kamlesh; Nair, Shanta

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a ubiquitous Gram-negative bacterium having a versatile metabolic potential and great ecological and clinical significance. The geographical distribution of P. aeruginosahas revealed the existence of an unbiased genetic arrangement in terrestrial isolates. In contrast, there are very few reports about P. aeruginosa strains from marine environments. The present work was aimed at studying the distribution of P. aeruginosa in coastal waters along the Indian Peninsula and understanding the environmental influence on genotypic, metabolic and phenotypic characteristics by comparing marine and clinical isolates. Of the 785 marine isolates obtained on selective media, only 32 (~4.1%) were identified as P. aeruginosa, based on their fatty acid methyl ester profiles. A low Euclidian distance value (< 2.5) obtained from chemotaxonomic analysis suggested that all the environmental (coastal and marine) isolates originated from a single species. While UPGMA analyses of AP-PCR and phenotypic profiles separated the environmental and clinical isolates, fatty acid biotyping showed overlapping between most clinical and environmental isolates. Our study revealed the genetic diversity among different environmental isolates of P. aeruginosa. While biogeographical separation was not evident based solely on phenotypic and metabolic typing, genomic and metatranscriptomic studies are more likely to show differences between these isolates. Thus, newer and more insightful methods are required to understand the ecological distribution of this complex group of bacteria. PMID:26413053

  5. A comparative study of coastal and clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Anusree V.; Joseph, Neetha; Krishna, Kiran; Sneha, K. G.; Tom, Neenu; Jangid, Kamlesh; Nair, Shanta

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a ubiquitous Gram-negative bacterium having a versatile metabolic potential and great ecological and clinical significance. The geographical distribution of P. aeruginosahas revealed the existence of an unbiased genetic arrangement in terrestrial isolates. In contrast, there are very few reports about P. aeruginosa strains from marine environments. The present work was aimed at studying the distribution of P. aeruginosa in coastal waters along the Indian Peninsula and understanding the environmental influence on genotypic, metabolic and phenotypic characteristics by comparing marine and clinical isolates. Of the 785 marine isolates obtained on selective media, only 32 (~4.1%) were identified as P. aeruginosa, based on their fatty acid methyl ester profiles. A low Euclidian distance value (< 2.5) obtained from chemotaxonomic analysis suggested that all the environmental (coastal and marine) isolates originated from a single species. While UPGMA analyses of AP-PCR and phenotypic profiles separated the environmental and clinical isolates, fatty acid biotyping showed overlapping between most clinical and environmental isolates. Our study revealed the genetic diversity among different environmental isolates of P. aeruginosa. While biogeographical separation was not evident based solely on phenotypic and metabolic typing, genomic and metatranscriptomic studies are more likely to show differences between these isolates. Thus, newer and more insightful methods are required to understand the ecological distribution of this complex group of bacteria. PMID:26413053

  6. Characterization of Toxin-Antitoxin (TA) Systems in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Clinical Isolates in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Savari, Mohammad; Rostami, Soodabeh; Ekrami, Alireza; Bahador, Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is among the most problematic hospital and community-acquired pathogens. Toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems are maintenance regulatory systems in bacteria and have recently been considered new targets for antimicrobial therapy. The prevalence and transcription of these systems in clinical isolates are still unknown. Objectives: The aim of this study was to characterize three types of TA systems (parDE, relBE, and higBA) among P. aeruginosa clinical isolates. Materials and Methods: We typed our clinical isolates by ERIC-PCR (enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus sequence-based polymerase chain reaction) and BOX-PCR. We then investigated 174 P. aeruginosa clinical isolates from three hospitals in Ahvaz, Iran, for the presence of TA system genes, and determined whether these systems were encoded on chromosomes or plasmids by amplification of the flanking regions. Results: Our results showed that in the 174 P. aeruginosa isolates, relBE and higBA were universal, but parDE was less prevalent. Both of the flanking regions of the parDE genes in all positive isolates were amplified. The flanking regions of nearly all relBE genes were amplified. Amplification was observed for the downstream sequence of every higBA locus, as well as for the region upstream of higBA, except in 14 strains. Conclusions: Based on the presence of TA systems in the majority of P. aeruginosa isolates, these could be used as a novel target for antimicrobial therapy. PMID:27099681

  7. Use of the paraffin wax baiting system for identification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Massengale, A R; Ollar, R A; Giordano, S J; Felder, M S; Aronoff, S C

    1999-11-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the primary pathogen among the Pseudomonads and is known for its minimal nutritional requirements, capacity to use paraffin as a sole carbon source, and biofilm formation. Because the ability of Pseudomonads to grow on paraffin is not commonly found among human pathogens and the primary Pseudomonas human pathogen is P. aeruginosa, we studied the adaptation of the paraffin baiting system for the growth and identification of clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa. We also studied the effectiveness of combining a fluorescence assay measuring fluorescein (pyoverdin) production and oxidase test with the paraffin baiting assay for P. aeruginosa speciation. Strains were tested for the capacity to use paraffin as a sole carbon source using the paraffin baiting system with Czapek's minimal salt medium. Of 111 P. aeruginosa clinical isolates tested for using paraffin as a sole carbon source, 45% exhibited growth on paraffin at 24 h and 76.6% exhibited growth on paraffin at 48 h. The ability of the reference strains and clinical isolates were then tested for their ability to associate with the paraffin slide in the presence of an additional carbon source. Of 111 P. aeruginosa clinical isolates tested, 85 strains (76.6%), and 102 (93%) were associated with the paraffin surface at 24 and 48 h. We successfully combined fluorescence and oxidase assays with the paraffin baiting system for identification of P. aeruginosa. The simple and inexpensive paraffin baiting system is a useful method for the identification and study of P. aeruginosa suitable for both the clinical and research laboratory.

  8. Antibiotic Tolerance Induced by Lactoferrin in Clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Andrés, María T.; Viejo-Diaz, Mónica; Pérez, Francisco; Fierro, José F.

    2005-01-01

    Lactoferrin-induced cell depolarization and a delayed tobramycin-killing effect on Pseudomonas aeruginosa cells were correlated. This antibiotic tolerance effect (ATE) reflects the ability of a defense protein to modify the activity of an antibiotic as a result of its modulatory effect on bacterial physiology. P. aeruginosa isolates from cystic fibrosis patients showed higher ATE values (≤6-fold) than other clinical strains. PMID:15793153

  9. Antimicrobial susceptibility survey of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated from clinical sources.

    PubMed Central

    Orrett, Fitzroy A.

    2004-01-01

    A two-year prospective study of 554 Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates was recovered from various clinical sources throughout Trinidad, and their resistance patterns to antipseudomonal antimicrobial agents were determined. Of the 554 P. aeruginosa isolates, 20.6% (114/554) were community isolates, 17.3% (96/554) from the intensive care unit (ICU), 10.1% (56/554) from the nursery, and the remaining 52% (288/554) were from other hospital inpatient services. Respiratory tract infections were the predominant source of P. aeruginosa isolates from the ICU--46.9% (45/96)--and nursery--21.4% (12/56), whereas wounds were the principal source of P. aeruginosa from the surgical services--77.0% (141/183). Community isolates of P. aeruginosa were predominantly from ear--100% (51/51)--and urinary tract infections--35.5%, (33/93). The overall prevalence of resistance was low for both hospital isolates (13.9%) and community isolates (3.8%). All community isolates were fully sensitive to four of the nine antimicrobials tested. Resistance rates among community strains ranged from 2.6% (ciprofloxacin and ceftazidime) to 12.3% for piperacillin. All isolates from hospital were fully sensitive to imipenem, but resistance rates for the other drugs ranged between 2.5% and 27.3%. The study showed that the overall resistance pattern of P. aeruginosa was relatively low. This is an encouraging observation but invites caution since resistance to the newly introduced drug, cefepime, has now emerged within the hospital environment and may present serious therapeutic problems within the near future. Policies governing the use of antimicrobials in many institutions are lacking. Such policies must be instituted in order to limit the spread of resistance and also to reduce the emergence of resistance to newly commissioned drugs within the country. PMID:15303411

  10. Genetic acquisition of NDM gene offers sustainability among clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in clinical settings.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Shweta; Upadhyay, Supriya; Sen, Malay Ranjan; Maurya, Anand Prakash; Choudhury, Debarati; Bhattacharjee, Amitabha

    2015-01-01

    New Delhi metallo β-lactamases are one of the most significant emerging resistance determinants towards carbapenem drugs. Their persistence and adaptability often depends on their genetic environment and linkage. This study reports a unique and novel arrangement of blaNDM-1 gene within clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from a tertiary referral hospital in north India. Three NDM positive clonally unrelated clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa were recovered from hospital patients. Association of integron with blaNDM-1 and presence of gene cassettes were assessed by PCR. Genetic linkage of NDM gene with ISAba125 was determined and in negative cases linkage in upstream region was mapped by inverse PCR. In which only one isolate's NDM gene was linked with ISAba125 for mobility, while other two reveals new genetic arrangement and found to be inserted within DNA directed RNA polymerase gene of the host genome detected by inverse PCR followed by sequencing analysis. In continuation significance of this novel linkage was further analyzed wherein promoter site detected by Softberry BPROM software and activity were assessed by cloning succeeding semi-quantitative RT-PCR indicating the higher expression level of NDM gene. This study concluded out that the unique genetic makeup of NDM gene with DNA-dependent-RNA-polymerase favours adaptability to the host in hospital environment against huge antibiotic pressure. PMID:25635921

  11. Genetic acquisition of NDM gene offers sustainability among clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in clinical settings.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Shweta; Upadhyay, Supriya; Sen, Malay Ranjan; Maurya, Anand Prakash; Choudhury, Debarati; Bhattacharjee, Amitabha

    2015-01-01

    New Delhi metallo β-lactamases are one of the most significant emerging resistance determinants towards carbapenem drugs. Their persistence and adaptability often depends on their genetic environment and linkage. This study reports a unique and novel arrangement of blaNDM-1 gene within clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from a tertiary referral hospital in north India. Three NDM positive clonally unrelated clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa were recovered from hospital patients. Association of integron with blaNDM-1 and presence of gene cassettes were assessed by PCR. Genetic linkage of NDM gene with ISAba125 was determined and in negative cases linkage in upstream region was mapped by inverse PCR. In which only one isolate's NDM gene was linked with ISAba125 for mobility, while other two reveals new genetic arrangement and found to be inserted within DNA directed RNA polymerase gene of the host genome detected by inverse PCR followed by sequencing analysis. In continuation significance of this novel linkage was further analyzed wherein promoter site detected by Softberry BPROM software and activity were assessed by cloning succeeding semi-quantitative RT-PCR indicating the higher expression level of NDM gene. This study concluded out that the unique genetic makeup of NDM gene with DNA-dependent-RNA-polymerase favours adaptability to the host in hospital environment against huge antibiotic pressure.

  12. CSA-131, a ceragenin active against colistin-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Vila-Farrés, Xavier; Callarisa, Anna Elena; Gu, Xiaobo; Savage, Paul B; Giralt, Ernest; Vila, Jordi

    2015-11-01

    In the last decade the number of Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates showing extended drug resistance and pandrug resistance has steadily increased, thereby limiting or eliminating the antibiotics that can be used to treat infections by these micro-organisms. In addition, few antibiotics have been launched in the last decade. The objective of this study was to investigate the in vitro activity of several ceragenins against A. baumannii and P. aeruginosa. Four ceragenins (CSA-138, -13, -131 and -44) were tested both against colistin-susceptible and colistin-resistant A. baumannii and P. aeruginosa clinical isolates using the microdilution method. Time-kill curves of CSA-131 were performed against colistin-resistant A. baumannii and P. aeruginosa strains. The ceragenin CSA-131 showed the best activity against A. baumannii and P. aeruginosa, with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of 2 mg/L and <0.5 mg/L, respectively. MIC(50) and MIC(90) values were determined using 15 epidemiologically unrelated A. baumannii and P. aeruginosa strains, with MIC(50) and MIC(90) values for CSA-131 being 2 mg/L for A. baumannii and 1 mg/L and 2 mg/L, respectively, for P. aeruginosa. The killing curves of CSA-131 showed bactericidal behaviour at all of the concentrations tested, with re-growth at the lowest concentrations both in A. baumannii and P. aeruginosa. The good MICs of CSA-131 both against A. baumannii and P. aeruginosa and its high bactericidal activity may make this ceragenin a potential future agent to treat infections caused by these two pathogens even when the strain is resistant to colistin.

  13. Analysis of quorum sensing-deficient clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Schaber, J Andy; Carty, Nancy L; McDonald, Naomi A; Graham, Eric D; Cheluvappa, Rajkumar; Griswold, John A; Hamood, Abdul N

    2004-09-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces multiple virulence factors and causes different types of infections. Previous clinical studies identified P. aeruginosa isolates that lack individual virulence factors. However, the impact of losing several virulence factors simultaneously on the in vivo virulence of P. aeruginosa is not completely understood. The P. aeruginosa cell-to-cell communication system, or quorum sensing (QS), controls the production of several virulence factors. Animal studies using constructed QS mutants indicated that loss of the QS system severely impacts the virulence of P. aeruginosa. In this study, we tried to determine if deficiency within the QS system compromises the ability of P. aeruginosa to establish infections in humans. We have identified five QS-deficient strains through screening 200 isolates from patients with urinary tract, lower respiratory tract and wound infections. These strains lacked LasB and LasA activities and produced either no or very low levels of the autoinducers N-(3-oxododecanoyl) homoserine lactone and N-butyryl homoserine lactone. PCR analysis revealed that three isolates contained all four QS genes (lasI, lasR, rhlI and rhlR) while two isolates lacked both the lasR and rhlR genes. We also examined the five isolates for other virulence factors. The isolates produced variable levels of exotoxin A and, with one exception, were deficient in pyocyanin production. One isolate produced the type III secretion system (TTSS) effector proteins ExoS and ExoT, two isolates produced ExoT only and two isolates produced no TTSS proteins. The isolates produced weak to moderate biofilms on abiotic surfaces. Analysis of the patients' data revealed that two of the isolates represented a single strain that was isolated twice from the same patient within a 1 month interval. One QS-deficient clinical isolate (CI-1) lacked all tested virulence factors and produced a weak biofilm. These results suggest that naturally occurring QS

  14. Emergence of Carbapenem-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii Clinical Isolates Collected from Some Libyan Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Mathlouthi, Najla; Areig, Zaynab; Al Bayssari, Charbel; Bakour, Sofiane; Ali El Salabi, Allaaeddin; Ben Gwierif, Salha; Zorgani, Abdulaziz A; Ben Slama, Karim; Chouchani, Chedly; Rolain, Jean-Marc

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the molecular mechanism of carbapenem resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolates recovered from Libyan hospitals between April 2013 and April 2014. In total, 49 strains (24 P. aeruginosa and 25 A. baumannii) were isolated, including 21 P. aeruginosa and 22 A. baumannii isolates (87.75%) resistant to imipenem (minimum inhibitory concentrations ≥16 μg/ml). The blaVIM-2 gene was detected in 19 P. aeruginosa isolates. All imipenem-resistant P. aeruginosa isolates showed the presence of OprD mutations. Acquired OXA-carbapenemase-encoding genes were present in all A. baumannii isolates: blaOXA-23 (n=19) and blaOXA-24 (n=3). Finally, a total of 13 and 17 different sequence types were assigned to the 21 P. aeruginosa and the 22 A. baumannii carbapenem-resistant isolates, respectively. This study is the first report describing imipenem-resistant P. aeruginosa and A. baumannii isolated from patients in Libya. We report the first case of co-occurrence of blaVIM-2 with oprD porin loss in identical isolates of P. aeruginosa in Libya and demonstrate that these oprD mutations can be used as a tool to study the clonality in P. aeruginosa isolates. We also report the first identification of multidrug-resistant A. baumannii isolates harboring blaOXA-23-like, blaOXA-24-like, and blaOXA-48-like genes in Libya.

  15. Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical and environmental isolates constitute a single population with high phenotypic diversity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen with a high incidence of hospital infections that represents a threat to immune compromised patients. Genomic studies have shown that, in contrast to other pathogenic bacteria, clinical and environmental isolates do not show particular genomic differences. In addition, genetic variability of all the P. aeruginosa strains whose genomes have been sequenced is extremely low. This low genomic variability might be explained if clinical strains constitute a subpopulation of this bacterial species present in environments that are close to human populations, which preferentially produce virulence associated traits. Results In this work, we sequenced the genomes and performed phenotypic descriptions for four non-human P. aeruginosa isolates collected from a plant, the ocean, a water-spring, and from dolphin stomach. We show that the four strains are phenotypically diverse and that this is not reflected in genomic variability, since their genomes are almost identical. Furthermore, we performed a detailed comparative genomic analysis of the four strains studied in this work with the thirteen previously reported P. aeruginosa genomes by means of describing their core and pan-genomes. Conclusions Contrary to what has been described for other bacteria we have found that the P. aeruginosa core genome is constituted by a high proportion of genes and that its pan-genome is thus relatively small. Considering the high degree of genomic conservation between isolates of P. aeruginosa from diverse environments, including human tissues, some implications for the treatment of infections are discussed. This work also represents a methodological contribution for the genomic study of P. aeruginosa, since we provide a database of the comparison of all the proteins encoded by the seventeen strains analyzed. PMID:24773920

  16. Effect of Tyrosol and Farnesol on Virulence and Antibiotic Resistance of Clinical Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Hassan Abdel-Rhman, Shaymaa; Mostafa El-Mahdy, Areej; El-Mowafy, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Mixed-species biofilms could create a protected environment that allows for survival to external antimicrobials and allows different bacterial-fungal interactions. Pseudomonas aeruginosa-Candida albicans coexistence is an example for such mixed-species community. Numerous reports demonstrated how P. aeruginosa or its metabolites could influence the growth, morphogenesis, and virulence of C. albicans. In this study, we investigated how the C. albicans quorum sensing compounds, tyrosol and farnesol, might affect Egyptian clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa regarding growth, antibiotic sensitivity, and virulence. We could demonstrate that tyrosol possesses an antibacterial activity against P. aeruginosa (10 µM inhibited more than 50% of growth after 16 h cultivation). Moreover, we could show for the first time that tyrosol strongly inhibits the production of the virulence factors hemolysin and protease in P. aeruginosa, whereas farnesol inhibits, to lower extent, hemolysin production in this bacterial pathogen. Cumulatively, tyrosol is expected to strongly affect P. aeruginosa in mixed microbial biofilm. PMID:26844228

  17. Genetic diversity of clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates in a public hospital in Spain

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important nosocomial pathogen that exhibits multiple resistances to antibiotics with increasing frequency, making patient treatment more difficult. The aim of the study is to ascertain the population structure of this clinical pathogen in the Hospital Son Llàtzer, Spain. Results A significant set (56) of randomly selected clinical P. aeruginosa isolates, including multidrug and non-multidrug resistant isolates, were assigned to sequence types (STs) and compared them with their antibiotic susceptibility profile classified as follows: extensively drug resistant (XDR), multidrug resistant (MDR) and non-multidrug resistant (non-MDR). The genetic diversity was assessed by applying the multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme developed by Curran and collaborators, and by the phylogenetic analysis of a concatenated tree. The analysis of seven loci, acsA, aroE, guaA, mutL, nuoD, ppsA and trpE, demonstrated that the prevalent STs were ST-175, ST-235 and ST-253. The majority of the XDR and MDR isolates were included in ST-175 and ST-235. ST-253 is the third in frequency and included non-MDR isolates. The 26 singleton sequence types corresponded mainly to non-MDR isolates. Twenty-two isolates corresponded to new sequence types (not previously defined) of which 12 isolates were non-MDR and 10 isolates were MDR or XDR. Conclusions The population structure of clinical P. aeruginosa present in our hospital indicates the coexistence of nonresistant and resistant isolates with the same sequence type. The multiresistant isolates studied are grouped in the prevalent sequence types found in other Spanish hospitals and at the international level, and the susceptible isolates correspond mainly to singleton sequence types. PMID:23773707

  18. [Performance evaluation of VITEK 2 system in meropenem susceptibility testing of clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates].

    PubMed

    Acuner, Ibrahim Cağatay; Bayramoğlu, Gülçin; Birinci, Asuman; Cekiç Cihan, Ciğdem; Bek, Yüksel; Durupınar, Belma

    2011-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important opportunistic pathogen associated with various community-acquired or nosocomial infections. Multi-drug resistant P.aeruginosa strains increasingly cause epidemics and spread in various hospital wards and geographic regions. Carbapenems are among the most effective antimicrobials in the treatment of multi-drug resistant P.aeruginosa infections, and meropenem is the most successful among alternatives in initial therapy. Particularly in severe infections, inappropriate or inadequate initial antimicrobial therapy is independently associated with adverse clinical and economic outcomes. Availability of accurate and rapid susceptibility testing is a priority. Most of the automated microbiology systems can provide rapid results within 8 to 12 hours. In comparison to standard methods, problems in the antimicrobial susceptibility testing of particular microorganisms and antimicrobial agents have been reported for automated microbiology systems. Failures have been reported previously especially in the susceptibility testing of P.aeruginosa versus carbapenem. Most of these studies are designed according to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA, USA) performance analysis scheme (Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: Antimicrobial Susceptibility Test Systems) in a simplified form. However, there are many lacking issues in the design of most of these studies. Among these, insufficient sample size, use of inappropriate reference method, lack of reproducibility testing, and inadequate distribution of study isolates in interpretative categories are of notice. There are only few studies in the literature that evaluate the performance of automated systems in antimicrobial susceptibility testing of carbapenems in clinical P.aeruginosa isolates with a sufficient sample size (n ? 100). However, most of these studies still have one or more major deficiencies in the study design. Furthermore, none of these studies evaluate the performance of

  19. Diverse Mobilized Class 1 Integrons Are Common in the Chromosomes of Pathogenic Pseudomonas aeruginosa Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Elena; Marquez, Carolina; Ingold, Ana; Merlino, John; Djordjevic, Steven P.; Roy Chowdhury, Piklu

    2012-01-01

    Eleven clinical class 1 integron-containing Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from Australia and Uruguay were investigated for the genomic locations of these elements. Several novel class 1 integrons/transposons were found in at least four distinct locations in the chromosome, including genomic islands. These elements seem to be undergoing successful dispersal by lateral gene transfer since integrons were identified across several lineages and more than one clonal line. PMID:22271862

  20. Diversity of biofilms produced by quorum-sensing-deficient clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Schaber, J Andy; Hammond, Adrienne; Carty, Nancy L; Williams, Simon C; Colmer-Hamood, Jane A; Burrowes, Ben H; Dhevan, Vijian; Griswold, John A; Hamood, Abdul N

    2007-06-01

    The quorum-sensing (QS) systems control several virulence attributes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Five QS-deficient P. aeruginosa clinical isolates (CI) that were obtained from wound (CI-1), tracheal (CI-2, CI-3, CI-4) and urinary tract (CI-5) infections had previously been characterized. In this study, a flow-through continuous-culture system was utilized to examine in detail the biofilms formed by these isolates in comparison with the P. aeruginosa prototrophic strain PAO1. Analysis of the biofilms by confocal laser scanning microscopy and COMSTAT image analysis at 1 and 7 days post-inoculation showed that the isolates produced diverse biofilms. In comparison with PAO1, the CI produced biofilms that scarcely or partially covered the surface at day 1, although CI-1 produced larger microcolonies. At day 7, CI-2 and CI-4 produced mature biofilms denser than that produced by PAO1, while the biofilm formed by CI-1 changed very little from day 1. CI-1 was defective in both swarming and twitching motilities, and immunoblotting analysis confirmed that it produced a reduced level of PilA protein. The twitching-motility defect of CI-1 was not complemented by a plasmid carrying intact pilA. In the 48 h colony biofilm assay, the CI varied in susceptibility to imipenem, gentamicin and piperacillin/tazobactam. These results suggest that: (1) the isolates produced biofilms with different structures and densities from that of PAO1; (2) biofilm formation by the isolates was not influenced by either the isolation site or the QS deficiencies of the isolates; (3) the behaviour of CI-1 in the different biofilm systems may be due to its lack of swarming motility and type IV pilus-related twitching motility.

  1. Characterization of five newly isolated bacteriophages active against Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical strains.

    PubMed

    Kwiatek, Magdalena; Mizak, Lidia; Parasion, Sylwia; Gryko, Romuald; Olender, Alina; Niemcewicz, Marcin

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that causes serious infections, especially in patients with immunodeficiency. It exhibits multiple mechanisms of resistance, including efflux pumps, antibiotic modifying enzymes and limited membrane permeability. The primary reason for the development of novel therapeutics for P. aeruginosa infections is the declining efficacy of conventional antibiotic therapy. These clinical problems caused a revitalization of interest in bacteriophages, which are highly specific and have very effective antibacterial activity as well as several other advantages over traditional antimicrobial agents. Above all, so far, no serious or irreversible side effects of phage therapy have been described. Five newly purified P. aeruginosa phages named vB_PaeM_WP1, vB_PaeM_WP2, vB_PaeM_WP3, vB_PaeM_WP4 and vB_PaeP_WP5 have been characterized as potential candidates for use in phage therapy. They are representatives of the Myoviridae and Podoviridae families. Their host range, genome size, structural proteins and stability in various physical and chemical conditions were tested. The results of these preliminary investigations indicate that the newly isolated bacteriophages may be considered for use in phagotherapy.

  2. Transcription of Quorum-Sensing System Genes in Clinical and Environmental Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Cabrol, Ségolène; Olliver, Anne; Pier, Gerald B.; Andremont, Antoine; Ruimy, Raymond

    2003-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS)-based transcriptional responses in Pseudomonas aeruginosa have been defined on the basis of increases in transcript levels of QS-controlled genes such as lasB and aprA following the hierarchical transcriptional increases of central controllers such as the lasR gene. These increases occur at high bacterial concentrations such as early-stationary-phase growth in vitro. However, the extent to which the increases occur in a variety of clinical and environmental isolates has not been determined nor is there extensive information on allelic variation in lasR genes. An analysis of the sequences of the lasR gene among 66 clinical and environmental isolates showed that 81% have a sequence either identical to that of strain PAO1 or with a silent mutation, 15% have nucleotide changes resulting in amino acid changes, and 5% have an insertion sequence in the lasR gene. Using real-time PCR to quantify transcript levels of lasR, lasB, and aprA in the early log and early stationary phases among 35 isolates from bacteremia and pneumonia cases and the environment, we found most (33 of 35) strains had increases in lasR transcripts in early stationary phase but with a very wide range of final transcript levels per cell. There was a strong correlation (r2 = 0.84) between early-log- and early-stationary-phase transcript levels in all strains, but this finding remained true only for the 50% of strains above the median level of lasR found in early log phase. There were significant (P < 0.05) but weak-to-modest correlations of lasR transcript levels with aprA (r2 = 0.2) and lasB (r2 = 0.5) transcript levels, but again this correlation occurred only in the 50% of P. aeruginosa strains with the highest levels of lasR transcripts in early stationary phase. There were no differences in distribution of lasR alleles among the bacteremia, pneumonia, or environmental isolates. Overall, only about 50% of P. aeruginosa strains from clinical and environmental sources show a las

  3. Identification of outer membrane Porin D as a vitronectin-binding factor in cystic fibrosis clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Paulsson, Magnus; Singh, Birendra; Al-Jubair, Tamim; Su, Yu-Ching; Høiby, Niels; Riesbeck, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a pathogen that frequently colonizes patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Several pathogens are known to bind vitronectin to increase their virulence. Vitronectin has been shown to enhance P. aeruginosa adhesion to host epithelial cells. Methods We screened clinical isolates from the airways of CF patients and from the bloodstream of patients with bacteremia for binding of vitronectin. Two-dimensional SDS-PAGE and a proteomic approach was used to identify vitronectin-receptors in P. aeruginosa. Results P. aeruginosa from the airways of CF patients (n=27) bound more vitronectin than bacteremic isolates (n=15, p=0.025). Porin D (OprD) was identified as a vitronectin-binding protein. A P. aeruginosa oprD transposon insertion mutant had a decreased binding to soluble and immobilized vitronectin (p ≤ 0.001). Conclusions P. aeruginosa isolates obtained from CF patients significantly bound vitronectin. Porin D was defined as a novel P. aeruginosa vitronectin-receptor, and we postulate that the Porin D-dependent interaction with vitronectin may be important for colonization. PMID:26047937

  4. Characterization of N-butanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (C4-HSL) deficient clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Boşgelmez-Tinaz, Gülgün; Ulusoy, Seyhan

    2008-01-01

    In the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the production of several virulence factors such as elastase, rhamnolipids and pyocyanin depends on cell-to-cell signaling or quorum sensing (QS) involving N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) signal molecules. In vitro studies with laboratory strains and virulence studies in animals with these same strains have demonstrated the contribution of QS to the pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa. However, the importance of P. aeruginosa QS systems in the development of human infections is not clearly known. In order to determine if deficiency within the QS system compromises the ability of P. aeruginosa to cause infections in humans, we collected 50 P. aeruginosa clinical isolates. Phenotypic characterization showed that isolates I-457, I-458, I-459 and I-461 were defective in the production of N-butanoyl-l-homoserine lactone (C4-HSL) signaling molecule and virulence factors elastase, protease, pyocyanin and rhamnolipids. Analysis of the sequences of the lasR, lasI, rhlR and rhlI genes of these four isolates showed that two of the four isolates had mutational defects in both rhlR and rhlI genes while other two isolates were only mutated in the rhlI gene. The combination of rhlR and rhlI mutations or only rhlI mutation probably explains their C4-HSL and virulence factors deficiencies. These observations suggest that QS deficient P. aeruginosa clinical isolates are able to cause infections and that in addition to known virulence factors, factors yet unidentified may contribute to the pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa.

  5. Terminal truncations in amp C beta-lactamase from a clinical isolate of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Walther-Rasmussen, J; Johnsen, A H; Høiby, N

    1999-07-01

    AmpC beta-lactamases from strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa have previously been shown to be heterogeneous with respect to their isoelectric point (pI). In order to elucidate the origin of this heterogeneity enzymes were isolated from a clinical isolate of a multiresistant P. aeruginosa strain and biochemically characterized. The purification was accomplished in four chromatographic steps comprising dye-affinity, size-exclusion, hydrophobic interaction chromatography, and chromatofocusing; this resulted in five forms with pI values of 9.1, 8.7, 8.3, 8.2, and 7.6. When analysed by SDS/PAGE and agarose IEF each separated beta-lactamase appeared to be both size- and charge-homogeneous. The specific activities of the variants were very similar. MS of each isolated beta-lactamase form showed minor differences in molecular mass (range 40.0-40.8 kDa). MS of the beta-lactamase with a pI of 8.2 demonstrated the presence of two subforms. The N-terminal sequences of three of the beta-lactamases were identical to the published sequence [Lodge, J.M. , Minchin, S.D., Piddock, L.J.V. & Busby, J.W. (1990) Biochem. J. 272, 627-631], while two variants were truncated by two amino-acid residues, one of which was acidic. The previously published sequence contains an alanine as the ultimate residue, but two of the beta-lactamases showed a substitution of Ala371 for arginine, whereas in the remaining forms C-terminal truncations by one and three residues were found. Our results indicate that the P. aeruginosa strain does not harbour multiple copies of the ampC gene, but rather that the five beta-lactamase isoforms are products of a single structural gene. The combinations of the identified N- and/or C-terminal truncations explained the multiple pI values of the beta-lactamase isoforms. PMID:10406957

  6. Growing Menace of Antibacterial Resistance in Clinical Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Nepal: An Insight of Beta-Lactamase Production

    PubMed Central

    Dhital, Rabindra; Puri, Ram; Chaudhary, Niraj; Khatiwada, Suresh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most frequently isolated organism as it acts as the opportunistic pathogen and can cause infections in immunosuppressed patients. The production of different types of beta-lactamases renders this organism resistant to many commonly used antimicrobials. Therefore, the aim of this study was to document the antibiotic resistance rate in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from different clinical specimens. Methods. Pseudomonas aeruginosa recovered was identified by standard microbiological methods. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed by modified Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method following Clinical and Laboratory Standard Institute (CLSI) guidelines and all the suspected isolates were tested for the production of ESBLs, MBLs, and AmpC. Results. Out of total (178) isolates, 83.1% were recovered from the inpatient department (IPD). Majority of the isolates mediated resistance towards the beta-lactam antibiotics, while nearly half of the isolates were resistant to ciprofloxacin. Most of the aminoglycosides used showed resistance rate up to 75% but amikacin proved to be better option. No resistance to polymyxin was observed. ESBLs, MBLs, and AmpC mediated resistance was seen in 33.1%, 30.9%, and 15.7% isolates, respectively. Conclusions. Antibiotic resistance rate and beta-lactamase mediated resistance were high. Thus, regular surveillance of drug resistance is of utmost importance.

  7. Growing Menace of Antibacterial Resistance in Clinical Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Nepal: An Insight of Beta-Lactamase Production.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Shamshul; Dhital, Rabindra; Shrestha, Sony; Thapa, Sangita; Puri, Ram; Chaudhary, Niraj; Khatiwada, Suresh; Gautam, Rajendra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most frequently isolated organism as it acts as the opportunistic pathogen and can cause infections in immunosuppressed patients. The production of different types of beta-lactamases renders this organism resistant to many commonly used antimicrobials. Therefore, the aim of this study was to document the antibiotic resistance rate in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from different clinical specimens. Methods. Pseudomonas aeruginosa recovered was identified by standard microbiological methods. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed by modified Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method following Clinical and Laboratory Standard Institute (CLSI) guidelines and all the suspected isolates were tested for the production of ESBLs, MBLs, and AmpC. Results. Out of total (178) isolates, 83.1% were recovered from the inpatient department (IPD). Majority of the isolates mediated resistance towards the beta-lactam antibiotics, while nearly half of the isolates were resistant to ciprofloxacin. Most of the aminoglycosides used showed resistance rate up to 75% but amikacin proved to be better option. No resistance to polymyxin was observed. ESBLs, MBLs, and AmpC mediated resistance was seen in 33.1%, 30.9%, and 15.7% isolates, respectively. Conclusions. Antibiotic resistance rate and beta-lactamase mediated resistance were high. Thus, regular surveillance of drug resistance is of utmost importance. PMID:27642599

  8. Growing Menace of Antibacterial Resistance in Clinical Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Nepal: An Insight of Beta-Lactamase Production

    PubMed Central

    Dhital, Rabindra; Puri, Ram; Chaudhary, Niraj; Khatiwada, Suresh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most frequently isolated organism as it acts as the opportunistic pathogen and can cause infections in immunosuppressed patients. The production of different types of beta-lactamases renders this organism resistant to many commonly used antimicrobials. Therefore, the aim of this study was to document the antibiotic resistance rate in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from different clinical specimens. Methods. Pseudomonas aeruginosa recovered was identified by standard microbiological methods. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed by modified Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method following Clinical and Laboratory Standard Institute (CLSI) guidelines and all the suspected isolates were tested for the production of ESBLs, MBLs, and AmpC. Results. Out of total (178) isolates, 83.1% were recovered from the inpatient department (IPD). Majority of the isolates mediated resistance towards the beta-lactam antibiotics, while nearly half of the isolates were resistant to ciprofloxacin. Most of the aminoglycosides used showed resistance rate up to 75% but amikacin proved to be better option. No resistance to polymyxin was observed. ESBLs, MBLs, and AmpC mediated resistance was seen in 33.1%, 30.9%, and 15.7% isolates, respectively. Conclusions. Antibiotic resistance rate and beta-lactamase mediated resistance were high. Thus, regular surveillance of drug resistance is of utmost importance. PMID:27642599

  9. Mutational and acquired carbapenem resistance mechanisms in multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates from Recife, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Cavalcanti, Felipe Lira de Sá; Mirones, Cristina Rodríguez; Paucar, Elena Román; Montes, Laura Álvarez; Leal-Balbino, Tereza Cristina; Morais, Marcia Maria Camargo de; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Ocampo-Sosa, Alain Antonio

    2015-12-01

    An investigation was carried out into the genetic mechanisms responsible for multidrug resistance in nine carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from different hospitals in Recife, Brazil. Susceptibility to antimicrobial agents was determined by broth microdilution. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was employed to detect the presence of genes encoding β-lactamases, aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes (AMEs), 16S rRNA methylases, integron-related genes and OprD. Expression of genes coding for efflux pumps and AmpC cephalosporinase were assessed by quantitative PCR. The outer membrane proteins were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The blaSPM-1, blaKPC-2 and blaGES-1 genes were detected in P. aeruginosa isolates in addition to different AME genes. The loss of OprD in nine isolates was mainly due to frameshift mutations, premature stop codons and point mutations. An association of loss of OprD with the overexpression of MexAB-OprM and MexXY-OprM was observed in most isolates. Hyper-production of AmpC was also observed in three isolates. Clonal relationship of the isolates was determined by repetitive element palindromic-PCR and multilocus sequence typing. Our results show that the loss of OprD along with overexpression of efflux pumps and β-lactamase production were responsible for the multidrug resistance in the isolates analysed.

  10. Potential of Ocimum basilicum L. and Salvia officinalis L. essential oils against biofilms of P. aeruginosa clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Stojanović-Radić, Z; Pejcić, M; Stojanović, N; Sharifi-Rad, J; Stanković, N

    2016-08-29

    Biofilms are complex communities of microorganisms, responsible for more than 60% of the chronic human infections and they represent one of the leading concerns in medicine. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is human pathogenic bacteria which causes numerous diseases and is known for its ability to produce biofilm. Ocimum basilicum L. (basil) and Salvia officinalis L. (sage) are widely used plants in traditional medicine for the treatment of different conditions. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the potential of basil and sage essential oils against P. aeruginosa biofilm producing strains. The efficacy of two essential oils on P. aeruginosa biofilm forming ability was determined using crystal violet method. Out of 15 strains isolated from different clinical biological samples, two were strong, 11 moderate and one weak biofilm producer. Good efficacy of sage essential oil towards strong and weak biofilm producers, but not of basil essential oil, was observed. In the case of moderate biofilm producers, 81.8% showed lower biofilm production after incubation with the sage oil, while 63.6% showed the reduction of biofilm production after basil essential oil treatment. The obtained results showed high potential of both oils for the treatment of persistent infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

  11. In vitro susceptibility of established biofilms composed of a clinical wound isolate of Pseudomonas aeruginosa treated with lactoferrin and xylitol.

    PubMed

    Ammons, Mary Cloud B; Ward, Loren S; Fisher, Steve T; Wolcott, Randall D; James, Garth A

    2009-03-01

    The medical impact of bacterial biofilms has increased with the recognition of biofilms as a major contributor to chronic wounds such as diabetic foot ulcers, venous leg ulcers and pressure ulcers. Traditional methods of treatment have proven ineffective, therefore this article presents in vitro evidence to support the use of novel antimicrobials in the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm. An in vitro biofilm model with a clinical isolate of P. aeruginosa was subjected to treatment with either lactoferrin or xylitol alone or in combination. Combined lactoferrin and xylitol treatment disrupted the structure of the P. aeruginosa biofilm and resulted in a >2log reduction in viability. In situ analysis indicated that while xylitol treatment appeared to disrupt the biofilm structure, lactoferrin treatment resulted in a greater than two-fold increase in the number of permeabilised bacterial cells. The findings presented here indicated that combined treatment with lactoferrin and xylitol significantly decreases the viability of established P. aeruginosa biofilms in vitro and that the antimicrobial mechanism of this treatment includes both biofilm structural disruption and permeablisation of bacterial membranes.

  12. Potential of Ocimum basilicum L. and Salvia officinalis L. essential oils against biofilms of P. aeruginosa clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Stojanović-Radić, Z; Pejcić, M; Stojanović, N; Sharifi-Rad, J; Stanković, N

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms are complex communities of microorganisms, responsible for more than 60% of the chronic human infections and they represent one of the leading concerns in medicine. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is human pathogenic bacteria which causes numerous diseases and is known for its ability to produce biofilm. Ocimum basilicum L. (basil) and Salvia officinalis L. (sage) are widely used plants in traditional medicine for the treatment of different conditions. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the potential of basil and sage essential oils against P. aeruginosa biofilm producing strains. The efficacy of two essential oils on P. aeruginosa biofilm forming ability was determined using crystal violet method. Out of 15 strains isolated from different clinical biological samples, two were strong, 11 moderate and one weak biofilm producer. Good efficacy of sage essential oil towards strong and weak biofilm producers, but not of basil essential oil, was observed. In the case of moderate biofilm producers, 81.8% showed lower biofilm production after incubation with the sage oil, while 63.6% showed the reduction of biofilm production after basil essential oil treatment. The obtained results showed high potential of both oils for the treatment of persistent infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. PMID:27585258

  13. Label-free SRM-based relative quantification of antibiotic resistance mechanisms in Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates

    PubMed Central

    Charretier, Yannick; Köhler, Thilo; Cecchini, Tiphaine; Bardet, Chloé; Cherkaoui, Abdessalam; Llanes, Catherine; Bogaerts, Pierre; Chatellier, Sonia; Charrier, Jean-Philippe; Schrenzel, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Both acquired and intrinsic mechanisms play a crucial role in Pseudomonas aeruginosa antibiotic resistance. Many clinically relevant resistance mechanisms result from changes in gene expression, namely multidrug efflux pump overproduction, AmpC β-lactamase induction or derepression, and inactivation or repression of the carbapenem-specific porin OprD. Changes in gene expression are usually assessed using reverse-transcription quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) assays. Here, we evaluated label-free Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM)-based mass spectrometry to directly quantify proteins involved in antibiotic resistance. We evaluated the label-free SRM using a defined set of P. aeruginosa isolates with known resistance mechanisms and compared it with RT-qPCR. Referring to efflux systems, we found a more robust relative quantification of antibiotic resistance mechanisms by SRM than RT-qPCR. The SRM-based approach was applied to a set of clinical P. aeruginosa isolates to detect antibiotic resistance proteins. This multiplexed SRM-based approach is a rapid and reliable method for the simultaneous detection and quantification of resistance mechanisms and we demonstrate its relevance for antibiotic resistance prediction. PMID:25713571

  14. In vitro activity of fosfomycin in combination with colistin against clinical isolates of carbapenem-resistant Pseudomas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Di, Xiuzhen; Wang, Rui; Liu, Bin; Zhang, Xin; Ni, Wentao; Wang, Jin; Liang, Beibei; Cai, Yun; Liu, Youning

    2015-09-01

    The shortage of effective antibiotics against carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (CRPA) poses a public health threat. Combination treatment may represent a good choice for treating infections caused by CRPA. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro efficacy of fosfomycin in combination with colistin against clinical CRPA isolates. Eighty-seven isolates were collected from three hospitals in China. The checkerboard method and time-kill assay were used to assess the interactions between fosfomycin and colistin. The fosfomycin/colistin combination displayed synergistic and partial synergistic activity against 21.84% and 27.59% of the isolates, respectively. Antagonism was not observed. In combination, the colistin MIC values were ⩽0.5 μg ml(-1) for 91.95% of the isolates. This result differed significantly from those obtained using a single agent treatment (The colistin MIC values were ⩽0.5 μg ml(-1) for only 25.29% of the isolates). In addition, the time-kill assay demonstrated that the fosfomycin/colistin combination treatment exerted bactericidal effects against five isolates and that the regrowth observed after colistin monotherapy was prevented. In summary, the combination of fosfomycin and colistin demonstrated synergistic activity against the CRPA isolates tested in this study. Furthermore, fosfomycin may potentially widen the therapeutic window of colistin, suggesting that this combination could be applied clinically to control infections caused by CRPA.

  15. Fitness Cost of Fluoroquinolone Resistance in Clinical Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Differs by Type III Secretion Genotype

    PubMed Central

    Agnello, Melissa; Finkel, Steven E.; Wong-Beringer, Annie

    2016-01-01

    Fluoroquinolone (FQ) resistance is highly prevalent among clinical strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, limiting treatment options. We have reported previously that highly virulent strains containing the exoU gene of the type III secretion system are more likely to be FQ-resistant than strains containing the exoS gene, as well as more likely to acquire resistance-conferring mutations in gyrA/B and parC/E. We hypothesize that FQ-resistance imposes a lower fitness cost on exoU compared to exoS strains, thus allowing for better adaptation to the FQ-rich clinical environment. We created isogenic mutants containing a common FQ-resistance conferring point mutation in parC from three exoU to three exoS clinical isolates and tested fitness in vitro using head-to-head competition assays. The mutation differentially affected fitness in the exoU and exoS strains tested. While the addition of the parC mutation dramatically increased fitness in one of the exoU strains leaving the other two unaffected, all three exoS strains displayed a general decrease in fitness. In addition, we found that exoU strains may be able to compensate for the fitness costs associated with the mutation through better regulation of supercoiling compared to the exoS strains. These results may provide a biological explanation for the observed predominance of the virulent exoU genotype in FQ-resistant clinical subpopulations and represent the first investigation into potential differences in fitness costs of FQ-resistance that are linked to the virulence genotype of P. aeruginosa. Understanding the fitness costs of antibiotic resistance and possibilities of compensation for these costs is essential for the rational development of strategies to combat the problem of antibiotic resistance. PMID:27757111

  16. Antimicrobial activity of commonly used antibiotics and DNA fingerprint analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa obtained from clinical isolates and unchlorinated drinking water in Korea, 2010.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Rae; Lee, Do Kyung; An, Hyang Mi; Kim, Mi Jin; Lee, Si Won; Cha, Min Kyeong; Lee, Kang Oh; Ha, Nam Joo

    2011-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa exists in various environments, and can cause mild or serious infections resulting in a wide range of symptoms. In this study, we collected bacterial isolates from hospitalized patients and unchlorinated drinking water, in Korea, 2010. The water-borne and clinical isolates were compared using colony morphology, antimicrobial susceptibility testing, and random amplification of polymorphic DNA analysis. We first compared morphological features of the water-borne and clinical isolates. The clearest difference in colony morphology was colony shape; five water-borne isolate colonies (83%) had a smooth, circular morphology, while nine (75%) clinical isolate colonies had a rough, irregular morphology. Minimum inhibitory concentrations analyses were performed to determine antimicrobial resistant patterns; using ceftazidime, gentamicin, tigecycline, chloramphenicol, meropenem, and tobramycin according to Clinical and Laboratory Standard Institute (CLSI, 2009) methodology. All waterborne isolates were not resistant to gentamicin, tobramycin, and meropenem. The clinical isolates were resistant to every antibiotic except chloramphenicol. Genotyping was performed using the repetitive extragenic palindromic polymerase-chain-reaction. The DNA fingerprinting patterns did not reveal genetic similarity between the water-borne and clinical P. aeruginosa isolates. On the contrary, they showed that genetically distinct populations have been established in each of these environments. We have revealed significant morphological, clinical and genetic differences between water-borne and clinical isolates of the same bacterial species.

  17. Detection of KPC Carbapenemase in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated From Clinical Samples Using Modified Hodge Test and Boronic Acid Phenotypic Methods and Their Comparison With the Polymerase Chain Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Falahat, Saeed; Shojapour, Mana; Sadeghi, Abdorrahim

    2016-01-01

    Background Bacterial resistance to antibiotics has become a major source of concern for public health. Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains are important opportunistic pathogens. These bacteria have a high resistance to a wide range of existing antimicrobials and antibiotics. Objectives The present study was performed to evaluate the frequency of KPC in P. aeruginosa isolated from clinical samples of educational hospitals of Arak University of Medical Sciences, using the mentioned phenotypic and genotypic methods. Materials and Methods One hundred and eight non-duplicate clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa were collected from hospitals of Arak University of Medical Sciences, Arak, Iran. Antibacterial susceptibility was determined by the disk diffusion method. KPC production was confirmed by the Modified Hodge Test (MHT), which is a phenotypic test, and combined-disk test with boronic acid and the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). Results In the present study, 13 isolates (12%) of P. aeruginosa were positive for KPC, using PCR. Comparison of the two phenotypic methods used in this study showed that boronic acid is more sensitive than MHT in identification of KPC-producing strains (84.6% vs. 77%). Conclusions Utilization of reliable methods for identifying carbapenemase-producing strains and determining their antibiotic resistance pattern could have a very important role in treatment of infections caused by these strains. A substantial amount of P. aeruginosa isolated from clinical samples of hospitals in Arak (Iran) produce KPC carbapenemase. Due to their low specificity, MHT and boronic acid phenotypic methods could not completely identify KPC-producing P. aeruginosa. However, the sensitivity of boronic acid phenotypic method in detection of KPC was higher than MHT. PMID:27800140

  18. Metallo-β-Lactamase Gene blaIMP-15 in a Class 1 Integron, In95, from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Clinical Isolates from a Hospital in Mexico▿

    PubMed Central

    Garza-Ramos, U.; Morfin-Otero, R.; Sader, H. S.; Jones, R. N.; Hernández, E.; Rodriguez-Noriega, E.; Sanchez, A.; Carrillo, B.; Esparza-Ahumada, S.; Silva-Sanchez, J.

    2008-01-01

    During 2003, 40 carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates collected in a Mexican tertiary-care hospital were screened for metallo-β-lactamase production. Thirteen isolates produced IMP-15, and 12 had a single pulsed-field gel electrophoresis pattern. The blaIMP-15 gene cassette was inserted in a plasmid-borne integron with a unique array of gene cassettes and was named In95. PMID:18490501

  19. Differences between Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a clinical sample and in a colony isolated from it: comparison of virulence capacity and susceptibility of biofilm to inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ramos, A N; Peral, M C; Valdez, J C

    2010-05-01

    We study the differences between Pseudomonas aeruginosa from an infected wound (clinical strain) and a colony isolated from it. We assessed the in vitro inhibition of these P. aeruginosa biofilms by DNase and filtrate of Lactobacillus plantarum cultures (acid=AF and neutralize=NF) with crystal violet technique. Inhibition by AF was greatest than DNase for clinical and isolated strain (p<0.001) and greatest than NF for clinical (p<0.05) and isolated strain (p<0.001). Using a burn model in mice, we compared the infection producing by clinical and isolated strains in planktonic and biofilm form. Deaths were quantified and the infection was assessed by determining CFU/g of tissue in the lesion, spleen and liver. The infections with planktonic bacteria tended to become systemic and more deadly than biofilm infections. All infected wounds required the same healing period (30 days). These findings were independent of the origin of the bacteria (clinical or colony isolated strain).

  20. Mutational and acquired carbapenem resistance mechanisms in multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates from Recife, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Cavalcanti, Felipe Lira de Sá; Mirones, Cristina Rodríguez; Paucar, Elena Román; Montes, Laura Álvarez; Leal-Balbino, Tereza Cristina; de Morais, Marcia Maria Camargo; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Ocampo-Sosa, Alain Antonio

    2015-01-01

    An investigation was carried out into the genetic mechanisms responsible for multidrug resistance in nine carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosaisolates from different hospitals in Recife, Brazil. Susceptibility to antimicrobial agents was determined by broth microdilution. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was employed to detect the presence of genes encoding β-lactamases, aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes (AMEs), 16S rRNA methylases, integron-related genes and OprD. Expression of genes coding for efflux pumps and AmpC cephalosporinase were assessed by quantitative PCR. The outer membrane proteins were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The blaSPM-1, blaKPC-2 and blaGES-1 genes were detected in P. aeruginosaisolates in addition to different AME genes. The loss of OprD in nine isolates was mainly due to frameshift mutations, premature stop codons and point mutations. An association of loss of OprD with the overexpression of MexAB-OprM and MexXY-OprM was observed in most isolates. Hyper-production of AmpC was also observed in three isolates. Clonal relationship of the isolates was determined by repetitive element palindromic-PCR and multilocus sequence typing. Our results show that the loss of OprD along with overexpression of efflux pumps and β-lactamase production were responsible for the multidrug resistance in the isolates analysed. PMID:26676375

  1. Nutritional requirement among Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates recovered from respiratory clinical specimens at a tertiary hospital from South of Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Leandro Reus Rodrigues; de Freitas, Ana Lúcia Peixoto; Barth, Afonso Luís

    2011-01-01

    We screened 349 isolates of P. aeruginosa from cystic fibrosis (CF+) and non-cystic fibrosis (CF-) patients for the auxotrophy. Fourteen (4.0%) were auxotrophic and among them only one was recovered from CF-patient showing that this characteristic is strongly associated with cystic fibrosis. In total, a requirement for 5 different compounds (or combination) was verified and, of these, methionine was the most common single amino acid required. Only one auxotrophic isolate was no able to produce biofilm in vitro. PMID:24031723

  2. d-Amino Acids Enhance the Activity of Antimicrobials against Biofilms of Clinical Wound Isolates of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Akers, Kevin S.; Romano, Desiree R.; Woodbury, Ronald L.; Hardy, Sharanda K.; Murray, Clinton K.; Wenke, Joseph C.

    2014-01-01

    Within wounds, microorganisms predominantly exist as biofilms. Biofilms are associated with chronic infections and represent a tremendous clinical challenge. As antibiotics are often ineffective against biofilms, use of dispersal agents as adjunctive, topical therapies for the treatment of wound infections involving biofilms has gained interest. We evaluated in vitro the dispersive activity of d-amino acids (d-AAs) on biofilms from clinical wound isolates of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa; moreover, we determined whether combinations of d-AAs and antibiotics (clindamycin, cefazolin, oxacillin, rifampin, and vancomycin for S. aureus and amikacin, colistin, ciprofloxacin, imipenem, and ceftazidime for P. aeruginosa) enhance activity against biofilms. d-Met, d-Phe, and d-Trp at concentrations of ≥5 mM effectively dispersed preformed biofilms of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa clinical isolates, an effect that was enhanced when they were combined as an equimolar mixture (d-Met/d-Phe/d-Trp). When combined with d-AAs, the activity of rifampin was significantly enhanced against biofilms of clinical isolates of S. aureus, as indicated by a reduction in the minimum biofilm inhibitory concentration (MBIC) (from 32 to 8 μg/ml) and a >2-log reduction of viable biofilm bacteria compared to treatment with antibiotic alone. The addition of d-AAs was also observed to enhance the activity of colistin and ciprofloxacin against biofilms of P. aeruginosa, reducing the observed MBIC and the number of viable bacteria by >2 logs and 1 log at 64 and 32 μg/ml in contrast to antibiotics alone. These findings indicate that the biofilm dispersal activity of d-AAs may represent an effective strategy, in combination with antimicrobials, to release bacteria from biofilms, subsequently enhancing antimicrobial activity. PMID:24841260

  3. D-amino acids enhance the activity of antimicrobials against biofilms of clinical wound isolates of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Carlos J; Akers, Kevin S; Romano, Desiree R; Woodbury, Ronald L; Hardy, Sharanda K; Murray, Clinton K; Wenke, Joseph C

    2014-08-01

    Within wounds, microorganisms predominantly exist as biofilms. Biofilms are associated with chronic infections and represent a tremendous clinical challenge. As antibiotics are often ineffective against biofilms, use of dispersal agents as adjunctive, topical therapies for the treatment of wound infections involving biofilms has gained interest. We evaluated in vitro the dispersive activity of D-amino acids (D-AAs) on biofilms from clinical wound isolates of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa; moreover, we determined whether combinations of D-AAs and antibiotics (clindamycin, cefazolin, oxacillin, rifampin, and vancomycin for S. aureus and amikacin, colistin, ciprofloxacin, imipenem, and ceftazidime for P. aeruginosa) enhance activity against biofilms. D-Met, D-Phe, and D-Trp at concentrations of ≥ 5 mM effectively dispersed preformed biofilms of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa clinical isolates, an effect that was enhanced when they were combined as an equimolar mixture (D-Met/D-Phe/D-Trp). When combined with D-AAs, the activity of rifampin was significantly enhanced against biofilms of clinical isolates of S. aureus, as indicated by a reduction in the minimum biofilm inhibitory concentration (MBIC) (from 32 to 8 μg/ml) and a >2-log reduction of viable biofilm bacteria compared to treatment with antibiotic alone. The addition of D-AAs was also observed to enhance the activity of colistin and ciprofloxacin against biofilms of P. aeruginosa, reducing the observed MBIC and the number of viable bacteria by >2 logs and 1 log at 64 and 32 μg/ml in contrast to antibiotics alone. These findings indicate that the biofilm dispersal activity of D-AAs may represent an effective strategy, in combination with antimicrobials, to release bacteria from biofilms, subsequently enhancing antimicrobial activity.

  4. Antibiotic Resistance Patterns and Genetic Diversity in Clinical Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated From Patients of a Referral Hospital, Isfahan, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Vaez, Hamid; Faghri, Jamshid; Nasr Esfahani, Bahram; Moghim, Sharareh; Fazeli, Hossein; Sedighi, Mansour; Ghasemian Safaei, Hajieh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a well-known opportunistic pathogen, which affects hospitalized patients in different wards due to its natural resistance to drugs. Objectives: The purpose of the current study was to determine the antibiotic susceptibility profiles and genetic relatedness in P. aeruginosa isolated from patients admitted to a referral hospital in Isfahan, Iran. Materials and Methods: Out of 150 analyzed samples, 54 P. aeruginosa isolates were recovered and were subjected to antibiotic resistance patterns and genetic diversity determination by Kirby-Bauer’s disk diffusion method and RAPD-PCR, respectively. Results: The highest percentage of resistance was observed against ceftazidime and imipenem with 30 (55.6%) isolates; meanwhile all isolates were sensitive to polymyxin B. Twenty-eight (51.8%) isolates revealed resistance to all applied antibiotics. RAPD-PCR (Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA- Polymerase Chain Reaction) results showed 54 unique genotypes, which were divided into 39 clusters. Conclusions: Although different source of P. aeruginosa may involve in patient colonization, genetically related strains were isolated from different wards and or the same ward of the hospital. Our results pointed to the restriction of currently used antibiotics in studied hospital. We hope that our results cast light on the control and transmission of the infection in the investigated hospital. PMID:26468363

  5. Association of overexpression of efflux pump genes with antibiotic resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains clinically isolated from urinary tract infection patients.

    PubMed

    Shigemura, Katsumi; Osawa, Kayo; Kato, Ayaka; Tokimatsu, Issei; Arakawa, Soichi; Shirakawa, Toshiro; Fujisawa, Masato

    2015-09-01

    There are several mechanisms for antibiotic-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The purpose of this study is to investigate the association between the expression of efflux pump-coding genes and antibiotic resistance in P. aeruginosa causing urinary tract infections (UTIs). We extracted the RNA from 105 clinical strains of P. aeruginosa isolated from UTI patients with full data on antibiotic MICs and assayed real-time quantitative reverse-transcription PCR. We investigated the gene expressions of four resistance nodulation cell division-type multi-drug efflux pump systems (MexAB-OprM, MexCD-OprJ, MexEF-OprN and MexXY(-OprA)) and the correlation of the MICs of nine antibiotics, risk factors and antibiotic resistance-related genes with expressions of mexB, mexC, mexE and mexY. Multivariate statistical data demonstrated a significant relationship between increased expression of mexB or mexC and complicated UTI (Odds ratio=8.03, P<0.001 and Odds ratio=8.86, P=0.032, respectively). We also found a significant association between the increased expression of mexC and resistance to levofloxacin (LVFX) (Odds ratio=4.48, P=0.035). In conclusion, increased expression of mexC leads to LVFX resistance in P. aeruginosa causing UTI. These results contribute to our knowledge of the efflux pump system and antibiotic resistance.

  6. A Site-Specific Integrative Plasmid Found in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Clinical Isolate HS87 along with A Plasmid Carrying an Aminoglycoside-Resistant Gene

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Cui; Jiang, Xiaofei; Zhang, Jie; Harrison, Ewan M.; Jia, Shiru; Deng, Zixin; Rajakumar, Kumar; Ou, Hong-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Plasmids play critical roles in bacterial fitness and evolution of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Here two plasmids found in a drug-resistant P. aeruginosa clinical isolate HS87 were completely sequenced. The pHS87b plasmid (11.2 kb) carries phage-related genes and function-unknown genes. Notably, pHS87b encodes an integrase and has an adjacent tRNAThr-associated attachment site. A corresponding integrated form of pHS87b at the tRNAThr locus was identified on the chromosome of P. aeruginosa, showing that pHS87b is able to site-specifically integrate into the 3’-end of the tRNAThr gene. The pHS87a plasmid (26.8 kb) displays a plastic structure containing a putative replication module, stability factors and a variable region. The RepA of pHS87a shows significant similarity to the replication proteins of pPT23A-family plasmids. pHS87a carries a transposon Tn6049, a truncated insertion sequence ΔIS1071 and a Tn402-like class 1 integron which contains an aacA4 cassette that may confer aminoglycoside resistance. Thus, pHS87b is a site-specific integrative plasmid whereas pHS87a is a plastic antibiotic resistance plasmid. The two native plasmids may promote the fitness and evolution of P. aeruginosa. PMID:26841043

  7. Identification of plasmid OXA and other β-lactamase genes among carbapenem-resistant isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from the Clinical University Hospital in northeastern Poland.

    PubMed

    Sacha, Paweł; Michalska, Anna; Ojdana, Dominika; Wieczorek, Piotr; Hauschild, Tomasz; Majewski, Piotr; Tryniszewska, Elżbieta

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the prevalence of OXA and other β-lactamase genes, antibiotic susceptibility, and the genetic relatedness among clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa resistant to carbapenems. The presence of bla- OXA genes was demonstrated in 48% of isolates belonging to four PFGE profiles. Most of them contained the blaOXA-2 gene (88.3%). Other blaOXA genes (Ps1310 with blaOXA-30 and Ps1309 with blaOXA-10) were found in only two isolates. The tested isolates also contained other β-lactamase genes such as blaVIM-2, blaVIM-4, blaSHV-5, and blaTEM-1. All isolates were susceptible only to colistin (100%). PMID:25938753

  8. In vitro activity of ceftolozane/tazobactam against clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacteriaceae recovered in Spanish medical centres: Results of the CENIT study.

    PubMed

    Tato, Marta; García-Castillo, María; Bofarull, Ana Moreno; Cantón, Rafael

    2015-11-01

    Ceftolozane/tazobactam is a novel antimicrobial agent with activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, including drug-resistant strains, and other Gram-negative pathogens, including most extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Enterobacteriaceae. The CENIT study evaluated the in vitro activity of ceftolozane/tazobactam and comparators against clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa (n=500) and Enterobacteriaceae (n=500) collected from patients with complicated intra-abdominal, complicated urinary tract, lower respiratory tract or bloodstream infections in 10 medical centres in Spain (January-September 2013). Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by the ISO broth microdilution method using commercial dry-form panels and results were interpreted per EUCAST and CLSI guidelines and for ceftolozane/tazobactam with FDA criteria. Ceftolozane/tazobactam and ceftolozane alone were the most potent (MIC(50/90), 0.5/4 mg/L) agents tested against all P. aeruginosa isolates. This advantage was maintained regardless of resistance phenotype, even against isolates resistant to multiple antibiotics. Ceftolozane/tazobactam demonstrated excellent overall activity (MIC50/90, 0.25/0.5 mg/L) against all 250 Escherichia coli isolates, including isolates displaying a wild-type (MIC(90), 0.25/0.25 mg/L) or ESBL (MIC(50/90), 0.5/1mg/L) phenotype, and good activity against isolates displaying an AmpC-like phenotype (MIC range 0.25-4 mg/L). Ceftolozane/tazobactam demonstrated good overall activity (MIC(50/90), 0.25/4 mg/L) against all 104 Klebsiella spp. isolates, although activity was lower against those with an ESBL phenotype (MIC(50/90), 4/16 mg/L), and was inactive against the carbapenemase-producing isolates (MIC≥64 mg/L). Ceftolozane/tazobactam demonstrated excellent in vitro activity against most of the P. aeruginosa and Enterobacteriaceae clinical isolates obtained from medical centres in Spain, supporting the potential value of ceftolozane/tazobactam in treating infections due

  9. In vitro activity of ceftolozane/tazobactam against clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacteriaceae recovered in Spanish medical centres: Results of the CENIT study.

    PubMed

    Tato, Marta; García-Castillo, María; Bofarull, Ana Moreno; Cantón, Rafael

    2015-11-01

    Ceftolozane/tazobactam is a novel antimicrobial agent with activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, including drug-resistant strains, and other Gram-negative pathogens, including most extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Enterobacteriaceae. The CENIT study evaluated the in vitro activity of ceftolozane/tazobactam and comparators against clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa (n=500) and Enterobacteriaceae (n=500) collected from patients with complicated intra-abdominal, complicated urinary tract, lower respiratory tract or bloodstream infections in 10 medical centres in Spain (January-September 2013). Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by the ISO broth microdilution method using commercial dry-form panels and results were interpreted per EUCAST and CLSI guidelines and for ceftolozane/tazobactam with FDA criteria. Ceftolozane/tazobactam and ceftolozane alone were the most potent (MIC(50/90), 0.5/4 mg/L) agents tested against all P. aeruginosa isolates. This advantage was maintained regardless of resistance phenotype, even against isolates resistant to multiple antibiotics. Ceftolozane/tazobactam demonstrated excellent overall activity (MIC50/90, 0.25/0.5 mg/L) against all 250 Escherichia coli isolates, including isolates displaying a wild-type (MIC(90), 0.25/0.25 mg/L) or ESBL (MIC(50/90), 0.5/1mg/L) phenotype, and good activity against isolates displaying an AmpC-like phenotype (MIC range 0.25-4 mg/L). Ceftolozane/tazobactam demonstrated good overall activity (MIC(50/90), 0.25/4 mg/L) against all 104 Klebsiella spp. isolates, although activity was lower against those with an ESBL phenotype (MIC(50/90), 4/16 mg/L), and was inactive against the carbapenemase-producing isolates (MIC≥64 mg/L). Ceftolozane/tazobactam demonstrated excellent in vitro activity against most of the P. aeruginosa and Enterobacteriaceae clinical isolates obtained from medical centres in Spain, supporting the potential value of ceftolozane/tazobactam in treating infections due

  10. Cloning and nucleotide sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa DNA gyrase gyrA gene from strain PAO1 and quinolone-resistant clinical isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Kureishi, A; Diver, J M; Beckthold, B; Schollaardt, T; Bryan, L E

    1994-01-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa DNA gyrase gyrA gene was cloned and sequenced from strain PAO1. An open reading frame of 2,769 bp was found; it coded for a protein of 923 amino acids with an estimated molecular mass of 103 kDa. The derived amino acid sequence shared 67% identity with Escherichia coli GyrA and 54% identity with Bacillus subtilis GyrA, although conserved regions were present throughout the sequences, particularly toward the N terminus. Complementation of an E. coli mutant with a temperature-sensitive gyrA gene with the PAO1 gyrA gene showed that the gene is expressed in E. coli and is able to functionally complement the E. coli DNA gyrase B subunit. Expression of PAO1 gyrA in E. coli or P. aeruginosa with mutationally altered gyrA genes caused a reversion to wild-type quinolone susceptibility, indicating that the intrinsic susceptibility of the PAO1 GyrA to quinolones is comparable to that of the E. coli enzyme. PCR was used to amplify 360 bp of P. aeruginosa gyrA encompassing the so-called quinolone resistance-determining region from ciprofloxacin-resistant clinical isolates from patients with cystic fibrosis. Mutations were found in three of nine isolates tested; these mutations caused the following alterations in the sequence of GyrA: Asp at position 87 (Asp-87) to Asn, Asp-87 to Tyr, and Thr-83 to Ile. The resistance mechanisms in the other six isolates are unknown. The results of the study suggested that mechanisms other than a mutational alteration in gyrA are the most common mechanism of ciprofloxacin resistance in P. aeruginosa from the lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis. Images PMID:7811002

  11. CpxR Activates MexAB-OprM Efflux Pump Expression and Enhances Antibiotic Resistance in Both Laboratory and Clinical nalB-Type Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Xue-Xian; O’Gara, Fergal; Wang, Yi-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Resistance-Nodulation-Division (RND) efflux pumps are responsible for multidrug resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In this study, we demonstrate that CpxR, previously identified as a regulator of the cell envelope stress response in Escherichia coli, is directly involved in activation of expression of RND efflux pump MexAB-OprM in P. aeruginosa. A conserved CpxR binding site was identified upstream of the mexA promoter in all genome-sequenced P. aeruginosa strains. CpxR is required to enhance mexAB-oprM expression and drug resistance, in the absence of repressor MexR, in P. aeruginosa strains PA14. As defective mexR is a genetic trait associated with the clinical emergence of nalB-type multidrug resistance in P. aeruginosa during antibiotic treatment, we investigated the involvement of CpxR in regulating multidrug resistance among resistant isolates generated in the laboratory via antibiotic treatment and collected in clinical settings. CpxR is required to activate expression of mexAB-oprM and enhances drug resistance, in the absence or presence of MexR, in ofloxacin-cefsulodin-resistant isolates generated in the laboratory. Furthermore, CpxR was also important in the mexR-defective clinical isolates. The newly identified regulatory linkage between CpxR and the MexAB-OprM efflux pump highlights the presence of a complex regulatory network modulating multidrug resistance in P. aeruginosa. PMID:27736975

  12. Green synthesis of Al2O3 nanoparticles and their bactericidal potential against clinical isolates of multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Mohammad A; Khan, Haris M; Alzohairy, Mohammad A; Jalal, Mohammad; Ali, Syed G; Pal, Ruchita; Musarrat, Javed

    2015-01-01

    The high prevalence of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (76.3 %) and metallo-β-lactamases (7.3 %) amongst the bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a critical problem that has set forth an enormous therapeutic challenge. The suggested role of nanoparticles as next generation antibiotics, and inadequate information on antibacterial activity of aluminium oxide nanoparticles has led us to investigate the green synthesis of aluminium oxide nanoparticles (Al2O3 NPs) using leaf extracts of lemongrass and its antibacterial activity against extended-spectrum β-lactamases and metallo-β-lactamases clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa. The synthesized Al2O3-NPs were characterized by scanning electron microcopy, high resolution-transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Zeta potential, and differential light scattering techniques. The X-ray diffraction data revealed the average size of the spherical Al2O3-NPs as 34.5 nm. The hydrodynamic size in Milli Q water and Zeta potential were determined to be 254 nm and +52.2 mV, respectively. The minimal inhibitory concentration of Al2O3-NPs was found to be in the range of 1,600-3,200 µg/ml. Treatment at concentrations >2,000 µg/ml, resulted in complete growth inhibition of extended-spectrum β-lactamases and metallo-β-lactamases isolates. Scanning electron microcopy analysis revealed the clusters of nanoparticles attached to the bacterial cell surface, causing structural deformities in treated cells. High resolution-transmission electron microscopy analysis confirmed that nanoparticles crossed the cell membrane to become intracellular. The interaction of nanoparticles with the cell membrane eventually triggered the loss of membrane integrity, most likely due to intracellular oxidative stress. The data explicitly suggested that the synthesized Al2O3-NPs can be exploited as an effective bactericidal agent against extended-spectrum β-lactamases, non-extended-spectrum β-lactamases and metallo

  13. gyrA and parC mutations in quinolone-resistant clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from Nini Hospital in north Lebanon.

    PubMed

    Salma, Rayan; Dabboussi, Fouad; Kassaa, Imad; Khudary, Rami; Hamze, Monzer

    2013-02-01

    The problem of Pseudomonas aeruginosa resistance to fluoroquinolones is of growing concern in hospitals. The major mechanism of the resistance of this bacterium to fluoroquinolones is the modification of type II topoisomerases (DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV). In this study, we examined, using the technique of DNA pyrosequencing, mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining regions of the gyrA and parC genes of 38 clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa that were non-susceptible to at least one of the three fluoroquinolones tested. The most common origin of the isolates was sputum (44.7 %), followed by wounds (11 %), urine (5 %), and ear discharge (5 %). Serotypes O:11 (21 %), O:2 (18.4 %), and O:6 (7.8 %), were the most predominant. Among these 38 isolates, 11 were susceptible, 22 were resistant, and 5 were intermediate-resistant to ciprofloxacin. We found that 19 (50 %) of these strains had a mutation in the gyrA gene (Thr 83 Ile), one of them presented a new mutation (His 80 Arg), 8 (21.05 %) strains had an additional mutation in the parC gene (Ser 80 Leu), and one of these strains had two new mutations not previously reported (Gln 84 Asp, Ala 85 Gly). The ciprofloxacin-sensitive strains had no mutations in the sequence area examined. We found that 81.8 % of the isolates that were resistant to ciprofloxacin had a mutation in the gyrA gene. Some of these resistant strains also had a mutation in the parC gene. The results of this study suggest that pyrosequencing is a reliable technique for the determination of the antibiotic resistance pattern of a given bacterial strain. PMID:22821356

  14. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa generalized transducing phage phiPA3 is a new member of the phiKZ-like group of 'jumbo' phages, and infects model laboratory strains and clinical isolates from cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Monson, Rita; Foulds, Ian; Foweraker, Juliet; Welch, Martin; Salmond, George P C

    2011-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important pathogen in cystic fibrosis patients, and a model organism for the study of nosocomially acquired infections, biofilms and intrinsic multidrug resistance. In this study we characterize ϕPA3, a new generalized transducing bacteriophage for P. aeruginosa. ϕPA3 transduced chromosomal mutations between PAO1 strains, and infected multiple P. aeruginosa clinical isolates as well as the P. aeruginosa model laboratory strains PAK and PA14. Electron microscopy imaging was used to classify ϕPA3 in the order Caudovirales and the family Myoviridae. The genome of ϕPA3 was sequenced and found to contain 309,208 bp, the second-largest bacteriophage currently deposited in GenBank. The genome contains 378 ORFs and five tRNAs. Many ORF products in the ϕPA3 genome are similar to proteins encoded by P. aeruginosa phage ϕKZ and Pseudomonas chlororaphis phage 201ϕ2-1, and so ϕPA3 was classified genetically as a member of the ϕKZ-like group of phages. This is the first report of a member of this group of phages acting as a generalized transducer. Given its wide host range, high transduction efficiency and large genome size, the 'jumbo' phage ϕPA3 could be a powerful tool in functional genomic analysis of diverse P. aeruginosa strains of fundamental and clinical importance.

  15. Characterization of the New Metallo-β-Lactamase VIM-13 and Its Integron-Borne Gene from a Pseudomonas aeruginosa Clinical Isolate in Spain▿

    PubMed Central

    Juan, Carlos; Beceiro, Alejandro; Gutiérrez, Olivia; Albertí, Sebastián; Garau, Margalida; Pérez, José L.; Bou, Germán; Oliver, Antonio

    2008-01-01

    During a survey conducted to evaluate the incidence of class B carbapenemase (metallo-β-lactamase [MBL])-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains from hospitals in Majorca, Spain, five clinical isolates showed a positive Etest MBL screening test result. In one of them, strain PA-SL2, the presence of a new blaVIM derivative (blaVIM-13) was detected by PCR amplification with blaVIM-1-specific primers followed by sequencing. The blaVIM-13-producing isolate showed resistance to all β-lactams (except aztreonam), gentamicin, tobramycin, and ciprofloxacin. VIM-13 exhibited 93% and 88% amino acid sequence identities with VIM-1 and VIM-2, respectively. blaVIM-13 was cloned in parallel with blaVIM-1, and the resistance profile conferred was analyzed both in Escherichia coli and in P. aeruginosa backgrounds. Compared to VIM-1, VIM-13 conferred slightly higher levels of resistance to piperacillin and lower levels of resistance to ceftazidime and cefepime. VIM-13 and VIM-1 were purified in parallel as well, and their kinetic parameters were compared. The kcat/Km ratios for the antibiotics mentioned above were in good agreement with the MIC data. Furthermore, EDTA inhibited the activity of VIM-13 approximately 25 times less than it inhibited the activity of VIM-1. VIM-13 was harbored in a class 1 integron, along with a new variant (Ala108Thr) of the aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme encoding gene aacA4, which confers resistance to gentamicin and tobramycin. Finally, the VIM-13 integron was apparently located in the chromosome, since transformation and conjugation experiments consistently yielded negative results and the blaVIM-13 probe hybridized only with the genomic DNA. PMID:18644957

  16. IMP-51, a Novel IMP-Type Metallo-β-Lactamase with Increased Doripenem- and Meropenem-Hydrolyzing Activities, in a Carbapenem-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Clinical Isolate

    PubMed Central

    Tada, Tatsuya; Nhung, Pham Hong; Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru; Shimada, Kayo; Phuong, Doan Mai; Anh, Nguyen Quoc; Ohmagari, Norio

    2015-01-01

    A meropenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolate was obtained from a patient in a medical setting in Hanoi, Vietnam. The isolate was found to have a novel IMP-type metallo-β-lactamase, IMP-51, which differed from IMP-7 by an amino acid substitution (Ser262Gly). Escherichia coli expressing blaIMP-51 showed greater resistance to cefoxitin, meropenem, and moxalactam than E. coli expressing blaIMP-7. The amino acid residue at position 262 was located near the active site, proximal to the H263 Zn(II) ligand. PMID:26282421

  17. Two unusual pilin sequences from different isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Pasloske, B L; Sastry, P A; Finlay, B B; Paranchych, W

    1988-01-01

    The pilin genes of two Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated from two different patients with cystic fibrosis were cloned and sequenced. The predicted protein sequences of these two pilins had several unusual features compared with other published P. aeruginosa pilin sequences. PMID:2841299

  18. Bulgecin A as a β-lactam enhancer for carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa and carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolates containing various resistance mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Skalweit, Marion J; Li, Mei

    2016-01-01

    Genetic screening of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PSDA) and Acinetobacter baumannii (ACB) reveals genes that confer increased susceptibility to β-lactams when disrupted, suggesting novel drug targets. One such target is lytic transglycosylase. Bulgecin A (BlgA) is a natural product of Pseudomonas mesoacidophila and a lytic transglycosolase inhibitor that works synergistically with β-lactams targeting PBP3 for Enterobacteriaceae. BlgA also weakly inhibits di-Zn2+ metallo-β-lactamases like L1 of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. We hypothesized that because of its unique mechanism of action, BlgA could restore susceptibility to carbapenems in carbapenem-resistant PSDA (CR-PSDA) and carbapenem-resistant ACB, as well as ACB resistant to sulbactam. A BlgA-containing extract was prepared using a previously published protocol. CR-PSDA clinical isolates demonstrating a variety of carbapenem resistance mechanisms (VIM-2 carbapenemases, efflux mechanisms, and AmpC producer expression) were characterized with agar dilution minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) testing and polymerase chain reaction. Growth curves using these strains were prepared using meropenem, BlgA extract, and meropenem plus BlgA extract. A concentrated Blg A extract combined with low concentrations of meropenem, was able to inhibit the growth of clinical strains of CR-PSDA for strains that had meropenem MICs ≥8 mg/L by agar dilution, and a clinical strain of an OXA-24 producing ACB that had a meropenem MIC >32 mg/L and intermediate ampicillin/sulbactam susceptibility. Similar experiments were conducted on a TEM-1 producing ACB strain resistant to sulbactam. BlgA with ampicillin/sulbactam inhibited the growth of this organism. As in Enterobacteriaceae, BlgA appears to restore the efficacy of meropenem in suppressing the growth of CR-PSDA and carbapenem-resistant ACB strains with a variety of common carbapenem resistance mechanisms. BlgA extract also inhibits VIM-2 β-lactamase in vitro. BlgA may prove to be

  19. Elastase Deficiency Phenotype of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Canine Otitis Externa Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Petermann, Shana R.; Doetkott, Curt; Rust, Lynn

    2001-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa veterinary isolates were assayed for elastase and total matrix protease activity. The elastase activity of canine ear isolates was much less than that of strain PAO1 and that of all other veterinary isolates (P < 0.0001). The results indicate that canine ear isolates have a distinct elastase phenotype. PMID:11329471

  20. Isolation of oxidase-negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa from sputum culture.

    PubMed Central

    Hampton, K D; Wasilauskas, B L

    1979-01-01

    Two isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa lacking characteristic indophenol oxidase were recovered from a sputum specimen. A discussion of the characteristic biochemical tests and antibiograms along with a possible explanation for this phenomenon is presented. PMID:225349

  1. Genome Diversity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from Cystic Fibrosis Patients and the Hospital Environment

    PubMed Central

    Finnan, Shirley; Morrissey, John P.; O'Gara, Fergal; Boyd, E. Fidelma

    2004-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a gram-negative rod that is ubiquitous in nature. P. aeruginosa is also the quintessential opportunistic pathogen, causing a wide variety of infections in compromised hosts. In cystic fibrosis patients, P. aeruginosa is the leading cause of death. In this study, the evolutionary genetic relationships among 17 P. aeruginosa isolates were examined by comparative sequence analysis of the housekeeping gene encoding malate dehydrogenase and the chaperone groEL. The P. aeruginosa isolates examined included the sequenced strain PAO1, 11 strains recovered from cystic fibrosis patients in Ireland, 4 environmental isolates recovered from a hospital environment, and 1 isolate recovered from a plant rhizosphere. Phylogenetically, clinical and environmental isolates clustered together with one another on the mdh gene tree. At the groEL locus, among the 17 isolates examined, only two polymorphic sites were observed, highlighting the close genetic relationship between isolates from these different environments. Phenotypic analysis of 12 traits among our isolates, however, found that only clinical isolates produced phenazines and elastase. Furthermore, molecular analysis of the distribution of 15 regions associated with virulence showed that two of the environmental isolates examined lacked the majority of regions. Among the clinical isolates examined, the 15 virulence regions were variably present. The distribution of two prophages (Bacto1, Pf1) was also determined, with most isolates encoding both these regions. Of the four genomic islands (the flagellum island and PAGI-1, -2, and -3) examined, only two isolates contained the flagellum island, and PAGI-1, -2, and -3 were absent from all isolates tested. Our data demonstrate the significant role horizontal gene transfer and recombination, together with gene loss, play in the evolution of this important human pathogen. PMID:15583313

  2. Mobile genetic elements of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from hydrotherapy facility and respiratory infections.

    PubMed

    Pereira, S G; Cardoso, O

    2014-03-01

    The content of mobile genetic elements in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates of a pristine natural mineral water system associated with healthcare was compared with clinical isolates from respiratory infections. One isolate, from the therapy pool circuit, presented a class 1 integron, with 100% similarity to a class 1 integron contained in plasmid p4800 of the Klebsiella pneumoniae Kp4800 strain, which is the first time it has been reported in P. aeruginosa. Class 1 integrons were found in 25.6% of the clinical isolates. PAGI1 orf3 was more prevalent in environmental isolates, while PAGI2 c105 and PAGI3 sg100 were more prevalent in clinical isolates. Plasmids were not observed in either population.

  3. Infectious conjunctivitis caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from a bathroom

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The elucidation of the routes of transmission of a pathogen is crucial for the prevention of infectious diseases caused by bacteria that are not a resident in human tissue. The purpose of this report is to describe a case of suture-related conjunctivitis caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa for which we identified the transmission route using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Case presentation A 38-year-old man, who had undergone surgery for glaucoma 2 years ago previously, presented with redness, discomfort, and mucopurulent discharge in the right eye. A 9–0 silk suture had been left on the conjunctiva. A strain of P. aeruginosa was isolated from a culture obtained from the suture, and the patient was therefore diagnosed with suture-related conjunctivitis caused by P. aeruginosa. The conjunctivitis was cured by the application of an antimicrobial ophthalmic solution and removal of the suture. We used PFGE to survey of the indoor and outdoor environments around the patient’s house and office in order to elucidate the route of transmission of the infection. Three strains of P. aeruginosa were isolated from the patient’s indoor environment, and the isolate obtained from the patient’s bathroom was identical to that from the suture. Conclusion The case highlights the fact that an indoor environmental strain of P. aeruginosa can cause ocular infections. PMID:23815865

  4. Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from dental unit waterlines can be divided in two distinct groups, including one displaying phenotypes similar to isolates from cystic fibrosis patients

    PubMed Central

    Ouellet, Myriam M.; Leduc, Annie; Nadeau, Christine; Barbeau, Jean; Charette, Steve J.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa displays broad genetic diversity, giving it an astonishing capacity to adapt to a variety of environments and to infect a wide range of hosts. While many P. aeruginosa isolates of various origins have been analyzed, isolates from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients have received the most attention. Less is known about the genetic and phenotypic diversity of P. aeruginosa isolates that colonize other environments where flourishing biofilms can be found. In the present study, 29 P. aeruginosa isolates from dental unit waterlines and CF patients were collected and their genetic and phenotypes profiles were compared to determine whether environmental and clinical isolates are related. The isolates were first classified using the random amplified polymorphic DNA method. This made it possible to distribute the isolates into one clinical cluster and two environmental clusters. The isolates in the environmental cluster that were genetically closer to the clinical cluster also displayed phenotypes similar to the clinical isolates. The isolates from the second environmental cluster displayed opposite phenotypes, particularly an increased capacity to form biofilms. The isolates in this cluster were also the only ones harboring genes that encoded specific epimerases involved in the synthesis of lipopolysaccharides, which could explain their increased ability to form biofilms. In conclusion, the isolates from the dental unit waterlines could be distributed into two clusters, with some of the environmental isolates resembled the clinical isolates. PMID:25653647

  5. First Detection of Metallo-β-Lactamase VIM-2 in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Villegas, Maria Virginia; Lolans, Karen; del Rosario Olivera, Maria; Suarez, Carlos José; Correa, Adriana; Queenan, Anne Marie; Quinn, John P.

    2006-01-01

    Carbapenem resistance rates in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates in Colombia, as in many South American countries, are high for reasons that remain unclear. From our nationwide network, we describe the first detection of the metallo-β-lactamase VIM-2 in clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa from multiple cities within Colombia. Metallo-β-lactamases were not detected in the two centers with the highest imipenem resistance rates. Clonality was noted in five of the eight centers with strains meeting the criteria for molecular typing. The high carbapenem resistance in P. aeruginosa in Colombia may be attributable to a combination of factors, including the presence of metallo-β-lactamases and nosocomial transmission. PMID:16377690

  6. AMINOGLYCOSIDE RESISTANCE GENES IN Pseudomonas aeruginosa ISOLATES FROM CUMANA, VENEZUELA

    PubMed Central

    TEIXEIRA, Bertinellys; RODULFO, Hectorina; CARREÑO, Numirin; GUZMÁN, Militza; SALAZAR, Elsa; DONATO, Marcos DE

    2016-01-01

    The enzymatic modification of aminoglycosides by aminoglycoside-acetyltransferases (AAC), aminoglycoside-adenyltransferases (AAD), and aminoglycoside-phosphotransferases (APH), is the most common resistance mechanism in P. aeruginosa and these enzymes can be coded on mobile genetic elements that contribute to their dispersion. One hundred and thirty seven P. aeruginosa isolates from the University Hospital, Cumana, Venezuela (HUAPA) were evaluated. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by the disk diffusion method and theaac, aadB and aph genes were detected by PCR. Most of the P. aeruginosa isolates (33/137) were identified from the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), mainly from discharges (96/137). The frequency of resistant P. aeruginosaisolates was found to be higher for the aminoglycosides tobramycin and amikacin (30.7 and 29.9%, respectively). Phenotype VI, resistant to these antibiotics, was the most frequent (14/49), followed by phenotype I, resistant to all the aminoglycosides tested (12/49). The aac(6´)-Ib,aphA1 and aadB genes were the most frequently detected, and the simultaneous presence of several resistance genes in the same isolate was demonstrated. Aminoglycoside resistance in isolates ofP. aeruginosa at the HUAPA is partly due to the presence of the aac(6´)-Ib, aphA1 andaadB genes, but the high rates of antimicrobial resistance suggest the existence of several mechanisms acting together. This is the first report of aminoglycoside resistance genes in Venezuela and one of the few in Latin America. PMID:27007556

  7. AMINOGLYCOSIDE RESISTANCE GENES IN Pseudomonas aeruginosa ISOLATES FROM CUMANA, VENEZUELA.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Bertinellys; Rodulfo, Hectorina; Carreño, Numirin; Guzmán, Militza; Salazar, Elsa; De Donato, Marcos

    2016-01-01

    The enzymatic modification of aminoglycosides by aminoglycoside-acetyltransferases (AAC), aminoglycoside-adenyltransferases (AAD), and aminoglycoside-phosphotransferases (APH), is the most common resistance mechanism in P. aeruginosa and these enzymes can be coded on mobile genetic elements that contribute to their dispersion. One hundred and thirty seven P. aeruginosa isolates from the University Hospital, Cumana, Venezuela (HUAPA) were evaluated. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by the disk diffusion method and theaac, aadB and aph genes were detected by PCR. Most of the P. aeruginosa isolates (33/137) were identified from the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), mainly from discharges (96/137). The frequency of resistant P. aeruginosaisolates was found to be higher for the aminoglycosides tobramycin and amikacin (30.7 and 29.9%, respectively). Phenotype VI, resistant to these antibiotics, was the most frequent (14/49), followed by phenotype I, resistant to all the aminoglycosides tested (12/49). The aac(6´)-Ib,aphA1 and aadB genes were the most frequently detected, and the simultaneous presence of several resistance genes in the same isolate was demonstrated. Aminoglycoside resistance in isolates ofP. aeruginosa at the HUAPA is partly due to the presence of the aac(6´)-Ib, aphA1 andaadB genes, but the high rates of antimicrobial resistance suggest the existence of several mechanisms acting together. This is the first report of aminoglycoside resistance genes in Venezuela and one of the few in Latin America. PMID:27007556

  8. AMINOGLYCOSIDE RESISTANCE GENES IN Pseudomonas aeruginosa ISOLATES FROM CUMANA, VENEZUELA.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Bertinellys; Rodulfo, Hectorina; Carreño, Numirin; Guzmán, Militza; Salazar, Elsa; De Donato, Marcos

    2016-01-01

    The enzymatic modification of aminoglycosides by aminoglycoside-acetyltransferases (AAC), aminoglycoside-adenyltransferases (AAD), and aminoglycoside-phosphotransferases (APH), is the most common resistance mechanism in P. aeruginosa and these enzymes can be coded on mobile genetic elements that contribute to their dispersion. One hundred and thirty seven P. aeruginosa isolates from the University Hospital, Cumana, Venezuela (HUAPA) were evaluated. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by the disk diffusion method and theaac, aadB and aph genes were detected by PCR. Most of the P. aeruginosa isolates (33/137) were identified from the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), mainly from discharges (96/137). The frequency of resistant P. aeruginosaisolates was found to be higher for the aminoglycosides tobramycin and amikacin (30.7 and 29.9%, respectively). Phenotype VI, resistant to these antibiotics, was the most frequent (14/49), followed by phenotype I, resistant to all the aminoglycosides tested (12/49). The aac(6´)-Ib,aphA1 and aadB genes were the most frequently detected, and the simultaneous presence of several resistance genes in the same isolate was demonstrated. Aminoglycoside resistance in isolates ofP. aeruginosa at the HUAPA is partly due to the presence of the aac(6´)-Ib, aphA1 andaadB genes, but the high rates of antimicrobial resistance suggest the existence of several mechanisms acting together. This is the first report of aminoglycoside resistance genes in Venezuela and one of the few in Latin America.

  9. Robustness and Plasticity of Metabolic Pathway Flux among Uropathogenic Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Antje; Dohnt, Katrin; Tielen, Petra; Jahn, Dieter; Becker, Judith; Wittmann, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a human pathogen that frequently causes urinary tract and catheter-associated urinary tract infections. Here, using 13C-metabolic flux analysis, we conducted quantitative analysis of metabolic fluxes in the model strain P. aeruginosa PAO1 and 17 clinical isolates. All P. aeruginosa strains catabolized glucose through the Entner-Doudoroff pathway with fully respiratory metabolism and no overflow. Together with other NADPH supplying reactions, this high-flux pathway provided by far more NADPH than needed for anabolism: a benefit for the pathogen to counteract oxidative stress imposed by the host. P. aeruginosa recruited the pentose phosphate pathway exclusively for biosynthesis. In contrast to glycolytic metabolism, which was conserved among all isolates, the flux through pyruvate metabolism, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and the glyoxylate shunt was highly variable, likely caused by adaptive processes in individual strains during infection. This aspect of metabolism was niche-specific with respect to the corresponding flux because strains isolated from the urinary tract clustered separately from those originating from catheter-associated infections. Interestingly, most glucose-grown strains exhibited significant flux through the glyoxylate shunt. Projection into the theoretical flux space, which was computed using elementary flux-mode analysis, indicated that P. aeruginosa metabolism is optimized for efficient growth and exhibits significant potential for increasing NADPH supply to drive oxidative stress response. PMID:24709961

  10. Diversity of Molecular Mechanisms Conferring Carbapenem Resistance to Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Al-Agamy, Mohamed H; Jeannot, Katy; El-Mahdy, Taghrid S; Samaha, Hassan A; Shibl, Atef M; Plésiat, Patrick; Courvalin, Patrice

    2016-01-01

    Background. This study described various molecular and epidemiological characters determining antibiotic resistance patterns in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates. Methods. A total of 34 carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa clinical isolates were isolated from samples collected at a tertiary hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, from January to December 2011. Susceptibility testing, serotyping, molecular characterization of carbapenem resistance, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) were performed. Results. All isolates were resistant to ceftazidime, and more than half were highly resistant (minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) > 256 mg/L). Fifteen isolates had MIC values ≥64 mg/L for any of the carbapenems examined. Vietnamese extended-spectrum β-lactamase (VEB-1) (n = 16/34) and oxacillinase (OXA-10) (n = 14/34) were the most prevalent extended-spectrum β-lactamase and penicillinase, respectively. Verona imipenemase (VIM-1, VIM-2, VIM-4, VIM-11, and VIM-28) and imipenemase (IMP-7) variants were found in metallo-β-lactamase producers. A decrease in outer membrane porin gene (oprD) expression was seen in nine isolates, and an increase in efflux pump gene (MexAB) expression was detected in five isolates. Six serotypes (O:1, O:4, O:7, O:10, O:11, and O:15) were found among the 34 isolates. The predominant serotype was O:11 (16 isolates), followed by O:15 (nine isolates). PFGE analysis of the 34 carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa isolates revealed 14 different pulsotypes. Conclusions. These results revealed diverse mechanisms conferring carbapenem resistance to P. aeruginosa isolates from Saudi Arabia. PMID:27597874

  11. Diversity of Molecular Mechanisms Conferring Carbapenem Resistance to Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Jeannot, Katy; El-Mahdy, Taghrid S.; Samaha, Hassan A.; Shibl, Atef M.; Plésiat, Patrick; Courvalin, Patrice

    2016-01-01

    Background. This study described various molecular and epidemiological characters determining antibiotic resistance patterns in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates. Methods. A total of 34 carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa clinical isolates were isolated from samples collected at a tertiary hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, from January to December 2011. Susceptibility testing, serotyping, molecular characterization of carbapenem resistance, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) were performed. Results. All isolates were resistant to ceftazidime, and more than half were highly resistant (minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) > 256 mg/L). Fifteen isolates had MIC values ≥64 mg/L for any of the carbapenems examined. Vietnamese extended-spectrum β-lactamase (VEB-1) (n = 16/34) and oxacillinase (OXA-10) (n = 14/34) were the most prevalent extended-spectrum β-lactamase and penicillinase, respectively. Verona imipenemase (VIM-1, VIM-2, VIM-4, VIM-11, and VIM-28) and imipenemase (IMP-7) variants were found in metallo-β-lactamase producers. A decrease in outer membrane porin gene (oprD) expression was seen in nine isolates, and an increase in efflux pump gene (MexAB) expression was detected in five isolates. Six serotypes (O:1, O:4, O:7, O:10, O:11, and O:15) were found among the 34 isolates. The predominant serotype was O:11 (16 isolates), followed by O:15 (nine isolates). PFGE analysis of the 34 carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa isolates revealed 14 different pulsotypes. Conclusions. These results revealed diverse mechanisms conferring carbapenem resistance to P. aeruginosa isolates from Saudi Arabia.

  12. Diversity of Molecular Mechanisms Conferring Carbapenem Resistance to Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Jeannot, Katy; El-Mahdy, Taghrid S.; Samaha, Hassan A.; Shibl, Atef M.; Plésiat, Patrick; Courvalin, Patrice

    2016-01-01

    Background. This study described various molecular and epidemiological characters determining antibiotic resistance patterns in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates. Methods. A total of 34 carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa clinical isolates were isolated from samples collected at a tertiary hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, from January to December 2011. Susceptibility testing, serotyping, molecular characterization of carbapenem resistance, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) were performed. Results. All isolates were resistant to ceftazidime, and more than half were highly resistant (minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) > 256 mg/L). Fifteen isolates had MIC values ≥64 mg/L for any of the carbapenems examined. Vietnamese extended-spectrum β-lactamase (VEB-1) (n = 16/34) and oxacillinase (OXA-10) (n = 14/34) were the most prevalent extended-spectrum β-lactamase and penicillinase, respectively. Verona imipenemase (VIM-1, VIM-2, VIM-4, VIM-11, and VIM-28) and imipenemase (IMP-7) variants were found in metallo-β-lactamase producers. A decrease in outer membrane porin gene (oprD) expression was seen in nine isolates, and an increase in efflux pump gene (MexAB) expression was detected in five isolates. Six serotypes (O:1, O:4, O:7, O:10, O:11, and O:15) were found among the 34 isolates. The predominant serotype was O:11 (16 isolates), followed by O:15 (nine isolates). PFGE analysis of the 34 carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa isolates revealed 14 different pulsotypes. Conclusions. These results revealed diverse mechanisms conferring carbapenem resistance to P. aeruginosa isolates from Saudi Arabia. PMID:27597874

  13. Isolation of an iron-binding compound from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Cox, C D; Graham, R

    1979-01-01

    An iron-binding compound was isolated from ethyl acetate extracts of culture supernatant fluids of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and was purified by successive paper and thin-layer chromatographic procedures. The purified compound was characterized by UV, visible, infrared, and fluorescence spectroscopy. The compound possesses phenolic characteristics, with little or no similarity to dihydroxybenzoates and no indication of a hydroxamate group. P. aeruginosa synthesized the compound during active growth in culture media containing less than 5 X 10(-6) M added FeCl3. When added to iron-poor cultures of P. aeruginosa, the compound promoted the growth of the bacterium and also reversed growth inhibition by the iron chelator ethylenediamine-di-(o-hydroxyphenylacetic acid). PMID:104968

  14. Identification of a genomic island present in the majority of pathogenic isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Liang, X; Pham, X Q; Olson, M V; Lory, S

    2001-02-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a ubiquitous gram-negative bacterium, is capable of colonizing a wide range of environmental niches and can also cause serious infections in humans. In order to understand the genetic makeup of pathogenic P. aeruginosa strains, a method of differential hybridization of arrayed libraries of cloned DNA fragments was developed. An M13 library of DNA from strain X24509, isolated from a patient with a urinary tract infection, was screened using a DNA probe from P. aeruginosa strain PAO1. The genome of PAO1 has been recently sequenced and can be used as a reference for comparisons of genetic organization in different strains. M13 clones that did not react with a DNA probe from PAO1 carried X24509-specific inserts. When a similar array hybridization analysis with DNA probes from different strains was used, a set of M13 clones which carried sequences present in the majority of human P. aeruginosa isolates from a wide range of clinical sources was identified. The inserts of these clones were used to identify cosmids encompassing a contiguous 48.9-kb region of the X24509 chromosome called PAGI-1 (for "P. aeruginosa genomic island 1"). PAGI-1 is incorporated in the X24509 chromosome at a locus that shows a deletion of a 6,729-bp region present in strain PAO1. Survey of the incidence of PAGI-1 revealed that this island is present in 85% of the strains from clinical sources. Approximately half of the PAGI-1-carrying strains show the same deletion as X24509, while the remaining strains contain both the PAGI-1 sequences and the 6,729-bp PAO1 segment. Sequence analysis of PAGI-1 revealed that it contains 51 predicted open reading frames. Several of these genes encoded products with predictable function based on their sequence similarities to known genes, including insertion sequences, determinants of regulatory proteins, a number of dehydrogenase gene homologs, and two for proteins of implicated in detoxification of reactive oxygen species. It is very

  15. High level of resistance to aztreonam and ticarcillin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from soil of different crops in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Pitondo-Silva, André; Martins, Vinicius Vicente; Fernandes, Ana Flavia Tonelli; Stehling, Eliana Guedes

    2014-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa can be found in water, soil, plants and, human and animal fecal samples. It is an important nosocomial pathogenic agent characterized by an intrinsic resistance to multiple antimicrobial agents and the ability to develop high-level (acquired) multidrug resistance through some mechanisms, among them, by the acquisition of plasmids and integrons, which are mobile genetic elements. In this study, 40 isolates from Brazilian soil were analyzed for antibiotic resistance, presence of integrons and plasmidial profile. The results demonstrated that the vast majority of the isolates have shown resistance for aztreonam (92.5%, n=37) and ticarcillin (85%, n=34), four isolates presented plasmids and eight isolates possess the class 1 integron. These results demonstrated that environmental isolates of P. aeruginosa possess surprising antibiotic resistance profile to aztreonam and ticarcillin, two antimicrobial agents for clinical treatment of cystic fibrosis patients and other infections occurred by P. aeruginosa. PMID:24369293

  16. Aloe vera Gel: Effective Therapeutic Agent against Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates Recovered from Burn Wound Infections

    PubMed Central

    Goudarzi, Mehdi; Fazeli, Maryam; Azad, Mehdi; Seyedjavadi, Sima Sadat; Mousavi, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Aloe vera is an herbal medicinal plant with biological activities, such as antimicrobial, anticancer, anti-inflammatory, and antidiabetic ones, and immunomodulatory properties. The purpose of this study was investigation of in vitro antimicrobial activity of A. vera gel against multidrug-resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from patients with burn wound infections. Methods. During a 6-month study, 140 clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa were collected from patients admitted to the burn wards of a hospital in Tehran, Iran. Antimicrobial susceptibility test was carried out against the pathogens using the A. vera gel and antibiotics (imipenem, gentamicin, and ciprofloxacin). Results. The antibiogram revealed that 47 (33.6%) of all isolates were MDR P. aeruginosa. The extract isolated from A. vera has antibacterial activity against all of isolates. Also, 42 (89.4%) isolates were inhibited by A. vera gel extract at minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) ≤ 200 µg/mL. MIC value of A. vera gel for other isolates (10.6%) was 800 µg/mL. All of MDR P. aeruginosa strains were inhibited by A. vera at similar MIC50 and MIC90 200 µg/mL. Conclusion. Based on our results, A. vera gel at various concentrations can be used as an effective antibacterial agent in order to prevent wound infection caused by P. aeruginosa. PMID:26266047

  17. Evaluating synergy between marbofloxacin and gentamicin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated from dogs with otitis externa.

    PubMed

    Jerzsele, Ákos; Pásztiné-Gere, Erzsébet

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine antimicrobial susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains to marbofloxacin and gentamicin, and investigate the possible synergistic, additive, indifferent or antagonistic effects between the two agents. P. aeruginosa strains can develop resistance quickly against certain antibiotics if used alone, thus the need emerges to find synergistic combinations. A total of 68 P. aeruginosa strains isolated from dogs were examined. In order to describe interactions between marbofloxacin and gentamicin the checkerboard microdilution method was utilized. The MICs (minimum inhibitory concentrations) for marbofloxacin and gentamicin were in the range 0.25-64 mg/L and 0.25-32 mg/L, respectively. The combination of marbofloxacin and gentamicin was more effective with a MIC range of 0.031-8 mg/L and a MIC90 of 1 mg/L, compared to 16 mg/L for marbofloxacin alone and 8 mg/L for gentamicin alone. The FIC (fractional inhibitory concentration) indices ranged from 0.0945 (pronounced synergy) to 1.0625 (indifference). Synergy between marbofloxacin and gentamicin was found in 33 isolates. The mean FIC index is 0.546, which represents a partial synergistic/additive effect close to the full synergy threshold. In vitro results indicate that marbofloxacin and gentamicin as partially synergistic agents may prove clinically useful in combination therapy against P. aeruginosa infections. Although marbofloxacin is not used in the human practice, the interactions between fluoroquinolones and aminoglycosides may have importance outside the veterinary field.

  18. Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Dairy Goats: Genotypic and Phenotypic Comparison of Intramammary and Environmental Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Scaccabarozzi, Licia; Leoni, Livia; Ballarini, Annalisa; Barberio, Antonio; Locatelli, Clara; Casula, Antonio; Bronzo, Valerio; Pisoni, Giuliano; Jousson, Olivier; Morandi, Stefano; Rapetti, Luca; García-Fernández, Aurora; Moroni, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Following the identification of a case of severe clinical mastitis in a Saanen dairy goat (goat A), an average of 26 lactating goats in the herd was monitored over a period of 11 months. Milk microbiological analysis revealed the presence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in 7 of the goats. Among these 7 does, only goat A showed clinical signs of mastitis. The 7 P. aeruginosa isolates from the goat milk and 26 P. aeruginosa isolates from environmental samples were clustered by RAPD-PCR and PFGE analyses in 3 genotypes (G1, G2, G3) and 4 clusters (A, B, C, D), respectively. PFGE clusters A and B correlated with the G1 genotype and included the 7 milk isolates. Although it was not possible to identify the infection source, these results strongly suggest a spreading of the infection from goat A. Clusters C and D overlapped with genotypes G2 and G3, respectively, and included only environmental isolates. The outcome of the antimicrobial susceptibility test performed on the isolates revealed 2 main patterns of multiple resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics and macrolides. Virulence related phenotypes were analyzed, such as swarming and swimming motility, production of biofilm and production of secreted virulence factors. The isolates had distinct phenotypic profiles, corresponding to genotypes G1, G2 and G3. Overall, correlation analysis showed a strong correlation between sampling source, RAPD genotype, PFGE clusters, and phenotypic clusters. The comparison of the levels of virulence related phenotypes did not indicate a higher pathogenic potential in the milk isolates as compared to the environmental isolates. PMID:26606430

  19. Ciprofloxacin susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Lomholt, J A; Kilian, M

    2003-01-01

    Aim: To examine the ciprofloxacin susceptibility of 106 Pseudomonas aeruginosa eye isolates from the United Kingdom, Denmark, India, the United States, and Australia, and to determine the molecular mechanisms of resistance. Methods: Ciprofloxacin susceptibility was tested by an agar dilution method; genomic DNA corresponding to the quinolone target genes gyrA and parC, and the regulatory genes mexR and nfxB controlling drug efflux systems, was amplified by PCR and sequenced; multilocus enzyme electrophoresis was performed to examine the genetic relation among resistant strains. Results: Three out of 90 keratitis isolates (3.3%), one from the United Kingdom and two from India, exhibited MIC values of 16 mg/l or 32 mg/l. The UK isolate had a mutation in gyrA (Thr83Ile), whereas the two Indian isolates showed mutations in both gyrA (Thr83Ile) and parC (Ser87Leu). The remaining isolates from keratitis, endophthalmitis, contact lens associated red eye (CLARE), and contact lens storage cases showed MIC values below 1 mg/l. Several allelic forms of gyrA and a single variation in the mexR gene product were detected in 10 ciprofloxacin susceptible strains. Conclusions: The vast majority of eye isolates of P aeruginosa from European countries are fully susceptible to ciprofloxacin and the concentration of ciprofloxacin eye drops used for local treatment (3000 mg/l) exceeds MIC values for strains recorded as resistant. Mutations in more than one target gene were associated with higher MIC values. PMID:14507757

  20. Genetic characterization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa-resistant isolates at the university teaching hospital in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Fazeli, Hossein; Sadighian, Hooman; Esfahani, Bahram Nasr; Pourmand, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that is commonly responsible for nosocomial infections. The aim of this study was to perform a genotyping analysis of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa-resistant isolates by the multilocus sequence typing (MLST) method at the university teaching hospital in Iran. Materials and Methods: Antimicrobial susceptibility was analyzed for P. aeruginosa isolates. Ceftazidime-resistant (CAZres) isolates with a positive double-disc synergy test were screened for the presence of extended-spectrum β-lactamase-encoding genes. Phenotypic tests to detect the metallo-β-lactamase strains of P. aeruginosa were performed on imipenem-resistant (IMPres) isolates. Selected strains were characterized by MLST. Results: Of 35 P. aeruginosa isolates, 71%, 45% and 45% of isolates were CAZres, IMPres and multidrug resistant (MDR), respectively. Fifty-seven percent of the isolates carried the blaOXAgroup-1. All the five typed isolates were ST235. Isolates of ST235 that were MDR showed a unique resistance pattern. Conclusion: This study shows a high rate of MDR P. aeruginosa isolates at the university teaching hospital in Iran. It seems MDR isolates of P. aeruginosa ST235 with unique resistance pattern disseminated in this hospital. PMID:26380241

  1. Virulence Gene Profiles of Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated From Iranian Hospital Infections

    PubMed Central

    Fazeli, Nastaran; Momtaz, Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Background: The most common hospital-acquired pathogen is Pseudomonas aeruginosa. It is a multidrug resistant bacterium causing systemic infections. Objectives: The present study was carried out in order to investigate the distribution of virulence factors and antibiotic resistance properties of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from various types of hospital infections in Iran. Patients and Methods: Two-hundred and seventeen human infection specimens were collected from Baqiyatallah and Payambaran hospitals in Tehran, Iran. The clinical samples were cultured immediately and samples positive for P. aeruginosa were analyzed for the presence of antibiotic resistance and bacterial virulence genes using PCR (polymerase chain reaction). Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed using disk diffusion methodology with Müeller–Hinton agar. Results: Fifty-eight out of 127 (45.66%) male infection specimens and 44 out of 90 (48.88%) female infection specimens harbored P. aeruginosa. Also, 65% (in male specimens) and 21% (in female specimens) of respiratory system infections were positive for P. aeruginosa, which was a high rate. The genes encoding exoenzyme S (67.64%) and phospholipases C (45.09%) were the most common virulence genes found among the strains. The incidences of various β-lactams encoding genes, including blaTEM, blaSHV, blaOXA, blaCTX-M, blaDHA, and blaVEB were 94.11%, 16.66%, 15.68%, 18.62%, 21.56%, and 17.64%, respectively. The most commonly detected fluoroquinolones encoding gene was gyrA (15. 68%). High resistance levels to penicillin (100%), tetracycline (90.19%), streptomycin (64.70%), and erythromycin (43.13%) were observed too. Conclusions: Our findings should raise awareness about antibiotic resistance in hospitalized patients in Iran. Clinicians should exercise caution in prescribing antibiotics, especially in cases of human infections. PMID:25763199

  2. Metallo-β-lactamase-production in meropenem-susceptible Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates: risk for silent spread.

    PubMed

    Picão, Renata Cristina; Carrara-Marroni, Floristher Elaine; Gales, Ana Cristina; Venâncio, Emerson José; Xavier, Danilo Elias; Tognim, Maria Cristina Bronharo; Pelayo, Jacinta Sanchez

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize two metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs)-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates showing meropenem susceptibility. Antimicrobial susceptibility was assessed by automated testing and Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute agar dilution method. MBL production was investigated by phenotypic tests. Molecular typing was determined by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). MBL-encoding genes, as well as their genetic context, were identified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing. The location of blaIMP-16 was determined by plasmid electrophoresis, Southern blot and hybridization. Transcriptional levels of blaIMP-16, mexB, mexD, mexF, mexY, ampC and oprD were determined by semi-quantitative real time PCR. The P. aeruginosa isolates studied, Pa30 and Pa43, showed imipenem and meropenem susceptibility by automated testing. Agar dilution assays confirmed meropenem susceptibility whereas both isolates showed low level of imipenem resistance. Pa30 and Pa43 were phenotypically detected as MBL producers. PFGE revealed their clonal relatedness. blaIMP-16 was identified in both isolates, carried as a single cassette in a class 1 integron that was embedded in a plasmid of about 60-Kb. Pa30 and Pa43 overexpressed MexAB-OprM, MexCD-OprJ and MexXY-OprM efflux systems and showed basal transcriptional levels of ampC and oprD. MBL-producing P. aeruginosa that are not resistant to meropenem may represent a risk for therapeutic failure and act as silent reservoirs of MBL-encoding genes. PMID:22990963

  3. Isolation of a mucoid alginate-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain from the equine guttural pouch.

    PubMed Central

    Govan, J R; Sarasola, P; Taylor, D J; Tatnell, P J; Russell, N J; Gacesa, P

    1992-01-01

    The isolation and characterization of a mucoid, alginate-producing strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from a nonhuman host, namely, in chondroids from an equine guttural pouch, is reported for the first time. Pure cultures of P. aeruginosa 12534 were isolated from a 17-month-old pony mare with a history of chronic bilateral mucopurulent nasal discharge from the right guttural pouch. Transmission electron microscopy of chondroids showed mucoid P. aeruginosa growing as microcolonies within a matrix of extracellular material. On the basis of expression of the mucoid phenotype under different growth conditions, P. aeruginosa 12534 belongs to group 1 and resembles other isolates carrying the muc-23 mutation. The bulk of the extracellular material was characterized as being alginate by chemical and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance analyses, which showed that it had a composition similar to that produced by isolates of P. aeruginosa from human patients with cystic fibrosis. Images PMID:1551975

  4. Pseudomonas aeruginosa inhibits the growth of Scedosporium aurantiacum, an opportunistic fungal pathogen isolated from the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Jashanpreet; Pethani, Bhavin P.; Kumar, Sheemal; Kim, Minkyoung; Sunna, Anwar; Kautto, Liisa; Penesyan, Anahit; Paulsen, Ian T.; Nevalainen, Helena

    2015-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Scedosporium aurantiacum and the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa are opportunistic pathogens isolated from lungs of the cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. P. aeruginosa has been known to suppress the growth of a number of CF related fungi such as Aspergillus fumigatus, Candida albicans, and Cryptococcus neoformans. However, the interactions between P. aeruginosa and S. aurantiacum have not been investigated in depth. Hence we assessed the effect of P. aeruginosa reference strain PAO1 and two clinical isolates PASS1 and PASS2 on the growth of two clinical S. aurantiacum isolates WM 06.482 and WM 08.202 using solid plate assays and liquid cultures, in a synthetic medium mimicking the nutrient condition in the CF sputum. Solid plate assays showed a clear inhibition of growth of both S. aurantiacum strains when cultured with P. aeruginosa strains PASS1 and PAO1. The inhibitory effect was confirmed by confocal microscopy. In addition to using chemical fluorescent stains, strains tagged with yfp (P. aeruginosa PASS1) and mCherry (S. aurantiacum WM 06.482) were created to facilitate detailed microscopic observations on strain interaction. To our knowledge, this is the first study describing successful genetic transformation of S. aurantiacum. Inhibition of growth was observed only in co-cultures of P. aeruginosa and S. aurantiacum; the cell fractions obtained from independent bacterial monocultures failed to initiate a response against the fungus. In the liquid co-cultures, biofilm forming P. aeruginosa strains PASS1 and PAO1 displayed higher inhibition of fungal growth when compared to PASS2. No change was observed in the inhibition pattern when direct cell contact between the bacterial and fungal strains was prevented using a separation membrane suggesting the involvement of extracellular metabolites in the fungal inhibition. However, one of the most commonly described bacterial virulence factors, pyocyanin, had no effect against either of the S

  5. Draft Genome Sequences of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from Wounded Military Personnel.

    PubMed

    Arivett, Brock A; Ream, Dave C; Fiester, Steven E; Kidane, Destaalem; Actis, Luis A

    2016-08-11

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a Gram-negative bacterium that causes severe hospital-acquired infections, is grouped as an ESKAPE (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter species) pathogen because of its extensive drug resistance phenotypes and effects on human health worldwide. Five multidrug resistant P. aeruginosa strains isolated from wounded military personnel were sequenced and annotated in this work.

  6. Draft Genome Sequences of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from Wounded Military Personnel

    PubMed Central

    Arivett, Brock A.; Ream, Dave C.; Fiester, Steven E.; Kidane, Destaalem

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a Gram-negative bacterium that causes severe hospital-acquired infections, is grouped as an ESKAPE (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter species) pathogen because of its extensive drug resistance phenotypes and effects on human health worldwide. Five multidrug resistant P. aeruginosa strains isolated from wounded military personnel were sequenced and annotated in this work. PMID:27516516

  7. Draft Genome Sequences of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from Wounded Military Personnel.

    PubMed

    Arivett, Brock A; Ream, Dave C; Fiester, Steven E; Kidane, Destaalem; Actis, Luis A

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a Gram-negative bacterium that causes severe hospital-acquired infections, is grouped as an ESKAPE (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter species) pathogen because of its extensive drug resistance phenotypes and effects on human health worldwide. Five multidrug resistant P. aeruginosa strains isolated from wounded military personnel were sequenced and annotated in this work. PMID:27516516

  8. Antimicrobial susceptibilities and bacteriological characteristics of bovine Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Serratia marcescens isolates from mastitis.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Mamoru; Sawada, Takuo; Hirose, Kazuhiko; Sato, Reiichiro; Hayashimoto, Mizuki; Hata, Eiji; Yonezawa, Chizuko; Kato, Hajime

    2011-12-29

    The presence of metallo-β-lactamase (MBL)-producing and multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MDRP) strains among bovine isolates of Gram-negative bacilli, and O-serotypes of bovine Serratia marcescens and P. aeruginosa isolates have been reported rarely. The aims of this study were to (1) elucidate antimicrobial susceptibilities and O-serotypes of P. aeruginosa and S. marcescens isolates from bovine mastitis and the presence of MBL-producers and MDRP strains among them and (2) evaluate their relationships to human isolates. We investigated the MICs of 24 antimicrobials and O-serotypes for 116 P. aeruginosa and 55 S. marcescens isolates in Japan, primarily in 2006. A total of 171 isolates exhibited high antimicrobial susceptibilities with the exception of a partial drug. P. aeruginosa isolates exhibited high susceptibilities of ≥ 95.7% to ciprofloxacin, imipenem, meropenem, piperacillin, ceftazidime, cefepime, cefoperazone/sulbactam, amikacin, tobramycin, and gentamicin; however, they exhibited a susceptibility of only 69.8% to aztreonam. They exhibited substantial resistances to ceftriaxone, enrofloxacin, cefotaxime, and moxalactam. S. marcescens isolates exhibited high susceptibilities of ≥ 90.9% to kanamycin, ceftiofur, sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim, and the 15 aforementioned drugs, but exhibited resistance to minocycline. Neither MBL-producers nor MDRP strains were detected among the 171 strains. The dominant serotypes of P. aeruginosa isolates were OG, OA, OB, OI, OF, OE, and OK; those of S. marcescens isolates were O6 and O5. Every S. marcescens isolate was pigmented. These findings suggest that bovine P. aeruginosa and S. marcescens isolates differ from human isolates from both antibiogram and phenotypic perspectives, and could help to evaluate differences in bacteriological characteristics between bovine and human isolates.

  9. An Investigation of Antibacterial Resistance Patterns Among Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates Collected from Intensive Care Units of a University-Affiliated Hospital in Ahvaz, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Izadpour, Farrokh; Ranjbari, Nastaran; Aramesh, Mohammad-Reza; Moosavian, Mojtaba; ShahAli, Shiva; Larki, Farzaneh; Tabesh, Hamed; Morvaridi, Afrooz

    2016-01-01

    Background In recent decades, multidrug-resistant non-fermenting Gram-negative pathogens, particularly Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, have been recognized as a major cause of healthcare-associated and nosocomial infections and outbreaks. Objectives The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and pattern of antibiotic resistance in A. baumannii and P. aeruginosa isolates collected from intensive care units (ICUs). Methods One hundred fifty-five clinical isolates, including 80 (51.6%) isolates of A. baumannii and 75 (48.4%) isolates of P. aeruginosa, from hospitalized patients in the ICUs of a teaching hospital in Ahvaz, Iran, were collected from January 1 to December 30, 2013. The organisms were identified with conventional bacteriological methods, and antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed on all isolates in accordance with clinical laboratory and standards institute (CLSI) guidelines. Results The maximum resistance rates among A. baumannii isolates were observed for ciprofloxacin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (96.9% and 95.2%, respectively). For P. aeruginosa isolates, the maximum resistance rates were reported for ceftriaxone and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (97.2% and 92.4%, respectively). Conclusions The majority of A. baumannii and P. aeruginosa isolates were found to be resistant to commonly recommended antibiotics. Therefore, surveillance of antibiotic consumption and proper antibiotic administration guidelines are essential for preventing major outbreaks in the future. PMID:27800136

  10. Molecular epidemiology and mechanisms of carbapenem resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from Chinese hospitals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Zhou, Jian-ying; Qu, Ting-ting; Shen, Ping; Wei, Ze-qing; Yu, Yun-song; Li, Lan-juan

    2010-05-01

    We investigated the molecular epidemiology and carbapenem resistance mechanisms of 258 non-duplicate carbapenem-resistant clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa collected from 2006 to 2007 at 28 hospitals in China. Up to 88% of the carbapenem-resistant isolates were multidrug-resistant. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) revealed that levels of intrahospital and interhospital dissemination of clones were low. To assess the mechanisms leading to resistance, all 258 carbapenem-resistant isolates were analysed for expression of the chromosomal beta-lactamase (AmpC), the porin important for entry of carbapenems (OprD) and an efflux system (MexAB-OprM) known to extrude some beta-lactams. Carbapenem resistance was driven mainly by mutational inactivation of OprD, accompanied or not by hyperexpression of AmpC or MexAB-OprM. Metallo-beta-lactamase genes were detected in 22 carbapenem-resistant isolates in China, belonging to eight pulsotypes. The bla(OXA-50) gene was detected among all of the carbapenem-resistant isolates, whereas the bla(GES-5) gene was detected in only one carbapenem-resistant isolate.

  11. In-vitro activity of cationic peptides alone and in combination with clinically used antimicrobial agents against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Giacometti, A; Cirioni, O; Barchiesi, F; Fortuna, M; Scalise, G

    1999-11-01

    The in-vitro activity of cecropin P1, indolicidin, magainin II, nisin and ranalexin alone and in combination with nine clinically used antimicrobial agents was investigated against a control strain, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853 and 40 clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa. Antimicrobial activities were measured by MIC, MBC and viable count. In the combination study, the clinically used antibiotics were used at concentrations close to their mean serum level in humans in order to establish the clinical relevance of the results. To select peptide-resistant mutants, P. aeruginosa ATCC 27853 was treated with consecutive cycles of exposure to each peptide at 1 x MIC. The peptides had a varied range of inhibitory values: all isolates were more susceptible to cecropin P1, while ranalexin showed the lowest activity. Nevertheless, synergy was observed when the peptides were combined with polymyxin E and clarithromycin. Consecutive exposures to each peptide at 1 x MIC resulted in the selection of stable resistant mutants. Cationic peptides might be valuable as new antimicrobial agents. Our findings show that they are effective against P. aeruginosa, and that their activity is enhanced when they are combined with clinically used antimicrobial agents, particularly with polymyxin E and clarithromycin. PMID:10552980

  12. Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates in severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: characterization and risk factors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are at increased risk of infection by P. aeruginosa. The specific role of bronchiectasis in both infection and chronic colonization by this microorganism in COPD, however, remains ill defined. To evaluate the prevalence and risk factors for P. aeruginosa recovery from sputum in outpatients with severe COPD, characterizing P. aeruginosa isolates by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and focusing on the influence of bronchiectasis on chronic colonization in these patients. Methods A case-cohort study of 118 patients with severe COPD attended at a Respiratory Day Unit for an acute infectious exacerbation and followed up over one year. High-resolution CT scans were performed during stability for bronchiectasis assessment and sputum cultures were obtained during exacerbation and stability in all patients. P. aeruginosa isolates were genotyped by PFGE. Determinants of the recovery of P. aeruginosa in sputum and chronic colonization by this microorganism were assessed by multivariate analysis. Results P. aeruginosa was isolated from 41 of the 118 patients studied (34.7%). Five of these 41 patients (12.2%) with P. aeruginosa recovery fulfilled criteria for chronic colonization. In the multivariate analysis, the extent of bronchiectasis (OR 9.8, 95% CI: 1.7 to 54.8) and the number of antibiotic courses (OR 1.7, 95% CI: 1.1 to 2.5) were independently associated with an increased risk of P. aeruginosa isolation. Chronic colonization was unrelated to the presence of bronchiectasis (p=0.75). In patients with chronic colonization the isolates of P. aeruginosa retrieved corresponded to the same clones during the follow-up, and most of the multidrug resistant isolates (19/21) were harbored by these patients. Conclusions The main risk factors for P. aeruginosa isolation in severe COPD were the extent of bronchiectasis and exposure to antibiotics. Over 10% of these patients fulfilled criteria for

  13. Detection of Multidrug Resistant (MDR) and Extremely Drug Resistant (XDR) P. Aeruginosa Isolated from Patients in Tehran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Saderi, Horieh; Owlia, Parviz

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study was done to detect multidrug resistant (MDR) and extremely drug resistant (XDR) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa among strains isolated from patients in Tehran, Iran, due to importance of these phenotypes in treatment of human infections. Methods: Eighty eight P. aeruginosa were isolated from patients in Tehran, Iran, and identified by routine methods and PCR for oprL gene. Their antimicrobial susceptibility to 16 antimicrobial agents from 7 antimicrobial categories (aminoglycosides, carbapenems, cephalosporins, fluoroquinolones, penicillins/ß-lactamase inhibitors, monobactams, polymyxins) were determined by disk diffusion method, according to recommendation of Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. Characterization of P. aeruginosa isolates as MDR and XDR was done according to standardized international terminology presented by European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control as well as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in 2011. MDR was defined as acquired non-susceptibility to at least one agent in ≥3 antimicrobial categories and XDR was defined as non-susceptibility to at least one agent in ≥6 antimicrobial categories. Results: The rates of susceptibility to antimicrobials were as follows: gentamicin 27.3%, tobramycin 54.5%, amikacin 56.8%, netilmicin 36.4%, imipenem 55.7%, meropenem 55.7%, doripenem 60.2%, ceftazidime 63.6%, cefepime 56.8%, ciprofloxacin 59.1%, levofloxacin 60.2%, ticarcillin-clavulanic acid 37.5%, piperacillin-tazobactam 63.6%, aztreonam 43.2%, colistin 90.9%, polymyxin 95.5%. Altogether, 48 (54.5%) and 29 (33%) isolates were characterized as MDR and XDR, respectively. Discussion: The high frequency of antibiotic resistance in clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa in Iran makes epidemiological surveillance of susceptibility of this bacterium more essential for the best selection of empirical antibiotics. PMID:26351496

  14. Antimicrobial susceptibility differences among mucoid and non-mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates

    PubMed Central

    Owlia, Parviz; Nosrati, Rahim; Alaghehbandan, Reza; Lari, Abdolaziz Rastegar

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most important opportunistic bacteria, causing a wide variety of infections particularly in immunocompromised patients. The extracellular glycocalyx is produced in copious amounts by mucoid strains of P. aeruginosa. Mucoid and non-mucoid P. aeruginosa strains show some differences in their antimicrobial susceptibility pattern. The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of mucoid and non-mucoid types and their antimicrobial susceptibility patterns isolated from Milad and Mostafa Khomeini Hospital in Tehran, Iran. One hundred P. aeruginosa isolates were collected which all were confirmed by conventional biochemical tests and PCR assay using specific primers for oprI and oprL lipoproteins. Mucoid and non-mucoid types of isolates were determined by culturing isolates on BHI agar containing Congo red and Muir mordant staining method. The susceptibility pattern of isolates against 23 different antibiotics was assessed using MIC sensititre susceptibility plates. Fifty of 100 of isolates were mucoid type, of which 14 isolates were from Mostafa Khomeini Hospital. Frequency of mucoid type of P. aeruginosa in Mostafa Khomeini hospital (70%) was higher than that seen in Milad hospital (45%). The statistical analysis of MICs results showed significant differences in antimicrobial resistance among mucoid and non-mucoid types (non mucoid strains showed more resistance against tested antibiotics). This may be due to the tendency of some antibiotics to attach to extracellular glycocalyx of mucoid strains. PMID:25152858

  15. Antimicrobial susceptibility differences among mucoid and non-mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates.

    PubMed

    Owlia, Parviz; Nosrati, Rahim; Alaghehbandan, Reza; Lari, Abdolaziz Rastegar

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most important opportunistic bacteria, causing a wide variety of infections particularly in immunocompromised patients. The extracellular glycocalyx is produced in copious amounts by mucoid strains of P. aeruginosa. Mucoid and non-mucoid P. aeruginosa strains show some differences in their antimicrobial susceptibility pattern. The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of mucoid and non-mucoid types and their antimicrobial susceptibility patterns isolated from Milad and Mostafa Khomeini Hospital in Tehran, Iran. One hundred P. aeruginosa isolates were collected which all were confirmed by conventional biochemical tests and PCR assay using specific primers for oprI and oprL lipoproteins. Mucoid and non-mucoid types of isolates were determined by culturing isolates on BHI agar containing Congo red and Muir mordant staining method. The susceptibility pattern of isolates against 23 different antibiotics was assessed using MIC sensititre susceptibility plates. Fifty of 100 of isolates were mucoid type, of which 14 isolates were from Mostafa Khomeini Hospital. Frequency of mucoid type of P. aeruginosa in Mostafa Khomeini hospital (70%) was higher than that seen in Milad hospital (45%). The statistical analysis of MICs results showed significant differences in antimicrobial resistance among mucoid and non-mucoid types (non mucoid strains showed more resistance against tested antibiotics). This may be due to the tendency of some antibiotics to attach to extracellular glycocalyx of mucoid strains. PMID:25152858

  16. Random amplified polymorphic DNA typing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates recovered from patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Mahenthiralingam, E; Campbell, M E; Foster, J; Lam, J S; Speert, D P

    1996-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates recovered from chronically colonized patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) are phenotypically different from those collected from other patients or from the environment. To assess whether alterations in motility, mucoidy, and serum susceptibility represented an adaptation to chronic infection or replacement by a new strain, sequential P. aeruginosa isolates of known phenotype collected from 20 CF patients were typed by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis. A total of 35 RAPD strain types were found among 385 isolates from 20 patients, and only two patients had P. aeruginosa strains of the same RAPD fingerprint. Eight strain pairs representative of the first eight RAPD types were also analyzed by SpeI macrorestriction followed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE); the strain types found by both fingerprinting techniques correlated exactly. In 11 of 20 patients, the RAPD types of serial P. aeruginosa isolates remained stable despite alterations in isolate motility, colonial morphology, and lipopolysaccharide phenotype. However, in isolates collected from one CF patient, a single band change in RAPD fingerprint and CeuI PFGE profile correlated with the appearance of an RpoN mutant phenotype, suggesting that the altered phenotype may have been due to a stable genomic rearrangement. Secretion of mucoid exopolysaccharide, loss of expression of RpoN-dependent surface factors, and acquisition of a serum-susceptible phenotype in P. aeruginosa appear to evolve during chronic colonization in CF patients from specific adaptation to infection rather than from acquisition of new bacterial strains. PMID:8727889

  17. Inhibition of quorum sensing-mediated biofilm formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by a locally isolated Bacillus cereus.

    PubMed

    Wahman, Shaimaa; Emara, Mohamed; Shawky, Riham M; El-Domany, Ramadan A; Aboulwafa, Mohammad Mabrouk

    2015-12-01

    Quorum sensing has been shown to play a crucial role in Pseudomonas aeruginosa pathogenesis where it activates expression of myriad genes that regulate the production of important virulence factors such as biofilm formation. Antagonism of quorum sensing is an excellent target for antimicrobial therapy and represents a novel approach to combat drug resistance. In this study, Chromobacterium violaceum biosensor strain was employed as a fast, sensitive, reliable, and easy to use tool for rapid screening of soil samples for Quorum Sensing Inhibitors (QSI) and the optimal conditions for maximal QSI production were scrutinized. Screening of 127 soil isolates showed that 43 isolates were able to breakdown the HHL signal. Out of the 43 isolates, 38 isolates were able to inhibit the violet color of the biosensor and to form easily detectable zones of color inhibition around their growth. A confirmatory bioassay was carried out after concentrating the putative positive cell-free lysates. Three different isolates that belonged to Bacillus cereus group were shown to have QSI activities and their QSI activities were optimized by changing their culture conditions. Further experiments revealed that the cell-free lysates of these isolates were able to inhibit biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa clinical isolates.

  18. Genetic characterization of Microcystis aeruginosa isolates from Portuguese freshwater systems.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Cristiana; Vasconcelos, Vitor; Antunes, Agostinho

    2016-07-01

    Cyanobacteria are microorganisms that pose a serious threat to the aquatic waterways through the production of dense blooms under eutrophic conditions and the release of toxic secondary metabolites-cyanotoxins. Within cyanobacteria, the colonial planktonic Microcystis aeruginosa is widely distributed in both fresh and brackish aquatic environments throughout the world being frequently observed in the Portuguese water systems. Apart from the well-established distribution of M. aeruginosa in Portugal, knowledge of its genetic diversity and population structure is unknown. Therefore, in this study twenty-seven strains were obtained from the North, Centre and South regions of Portugal and were subjected to extensive phylogenetic analyses using simultaneously four distinct genetic markers (16S rRNA, 16S-23S ITS, DNA gyrase subunit ß and cell division protein (ftsZ)) encompassing in total 2834 bp. With this work we characterized the phylogenetic relationship among the Portuguese strains, with the southern strains showing higher genetic structure relatively to the North and Centre strains. A total of fifteen genotypes were determined for M. aeruginosa in Portuguese water systems revealing a high genetic diversity. This is also the first study to report geographic variation on the population structure of the Portuguese M. aeruginosa.

  19. Clonal Relatedness among Imipenem-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated from ICU-Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Vaez, Hamid; Moghim, Sharareh; Nasr Esfahani, Bahram; Ghasemian Safaei, Hajieh

    2015-01-01

    Imipenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) has become an increasingly important problem in healthcare settings worldwide. The aim of the present study was to evaluate clonal spread among imipenem-resistant P. aeruginosa isolated from ICU-hospitalized patients. Totally, 150 wound specimens were analyzed. Antibiotic resistance profiles and clonal diversity were evaluated using Kirby-Bauer's disk diffusion method and Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA- (RAPD-) PCR, respectively. The isolates showed a high frequency of antibiotic resistance against meropenem, and imipenem (100%) followed by ciprofloxacin, and ceftazidime (90%); meanwhile resistance to polymyxin B was not observed. Eighteen (40%) of P. aeruginosa isolates were MBL-positive via ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) combined disk test. Our findings showed high genetic diversity, with 37 different RAPD types detected. RAPD typing results showed cross-acquisition of P. aeruginosa in investigated hospital, suggesting failure in infection control practices. Incidence of MBL-positive isolates is high and should be regarded as a threat to hospitalized patients. PMID:26798509

  20. Photodynamic antimicrobial therapy to inhibit pseudomonas aeruginosa of corneal isolates (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durkee, Heather A.; Relhan, Nidhi; Arboleda, Alejandro; Halili, Francisco; De Freitas, Carolina; Alawa, Karam; Aguilar, Mariela C.; Amescua, Guillermo; Miller, Darlene; Parel, Jean-Marie

    2016-03-01

    Keratitis associated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa is difficult to manage. Treatment includes antibiotic eye drops, however, some strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa are resistant. Current research efforts are focused on finding alternative and adjunct therapies to treat multi-drug resistant bacteria. One promising alternate technique is photodynamic therapy (PDT). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of riboflavin- and rose bengal-mediated PDT on Pseudomonas aeruginosa keratitis isolates in vitro. Two isolates (S+U- and S-U+) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were derived from keratitis patients and exposed to five experimental groups: (1) Control (dark, UV-A irradiation, 525nm irradiation); (2) 0.1% riboflavin (dark, UV-A irradiation); and (3) 0.1% rose bengal, (4) 0.05% rose bengal and (5) 0.01% rose bengal (dark, 525nm irradiation). Three days after treatment, in dark conditions of all concentration of riboflavin and rose bengal showed no inhibition in both S+U- and S-U+ strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In 0.1% and 0.05% rose bengal irradiated groups, for both S+U- and S-U+ strains, there was complete inhibition of bacterial growth in the central 50mm zone corresponding to the diameter of the green light source. These in vitro results suggest that rose bengal photodynamic therapy may be an effective adjunct treatment for Pseudomonas aeruginosa keratitis.

  1. Antimicrobial testing of selected fluoroquinolones against Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from canine otitis.

    PubMed

    McKay, Lindsay; Rose, Crystal D Schuman; Matousek, Jennifer L; Schmeitzel, Lynn S; Gibson, Nicole M; Gaskin, Jack M

    2007-01-01

    A total of 100 Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) isolates were collected over a 1.5-year period from cases of canine otitis. Sensitivities to enrofloxacin, marbofloxacin, and orbifloxacin were determined using minimum inhibitory concentration testing (MICT). Isolates were also tested for sensitivities to enrofloxacin and marbofloxacin using disk-diffusion susceptibility testing (DDST). Isolates were significantly more sensitive to marbofloxacin than to enrofloxacin (z = -4.57; P<0.05) or orbifloxacin (z = -5.02; P<0.05). Agreement was 87% between MICT and DDST for marbofloxacin, with approximately equal numbers of overestimation and underestimation errors. Agreement was 74% between MICT and DDST for enrofloxacin, but DDST tended to overestimate the number of enrofloxacin-susceptible strains. These results suggest that marbofloxacin is more effective against P. aeruginosa than either enrofloxacin or orbifloxacin and that relying on DDST may lead to ineffective enrofloxacin treatment.

  2. Phenotypic Characterization of Clonal and Nonclonal Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strains Isolated from Lungs of Adults with Cystic Fibrosis▿

    PubMed Central

    Tingpej, Pholawat; Smith, Lucas; Rose, Barbara; Zhu, Hua; Conibear, Tim; Al Nassafi, Khaled; Manos, Jim; Elkins, Mark; Bye, Peter; Willcox, Mark; Bell, Scott; Wainwright, Claire; Harbour, Colin

    2007-01-01

    The emergence of virulent Pseudomonas aeruginosa clones is a threat to cystic fibrosis (CF) patients globally. Characterization of clonal P. aeruginosa strains is critical for an understanding of its clinical impact and developing strategies to meet this problem. Two clonal strains (AES-1 and AES-2) are circulating within CF centers in eastern Australia. In this study, phenotypic characteristics of 43 (14 AES-1, 5 AES-2, and 24 nonclonal) P. aeruginosa isolates were compared to gain insight into the properties of clonal strains. All 43 isolates produced bands of the predicted size in PCRs for vfr, rhlI, rhlR, lasA, lasB, aprA, rhlAB, and exoS genes; 42 were positive for lasI and lasR, and none had exoU. Thirty-seven (86%) isolates were positive in total protease assays; on zymography, 24 (56%) produced elastase/staphylolysin and 22 (51%) produced alkaline protease. Clonal isolates were more likely than nonclonal isolates to be positive for total proteases (P = 0.02), to show elastase and alkaline protease activity by zymography (P = 0.04 and P = 0.01, respectively), and to show elastase activity by the elastin-Congo red assay (P = 0.04). There were no other associations with genotype. Overall, increasing patient age was associated with decreasing elastase activity (P = 0.03). Thirty-two (74%) isolates had at least one N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) by thin-layer chromatography. rhl-associated AHL detection was associated with the production and level of total protease and elastase activity (all P < 0.01). Thirty-three (77%) isolates were positive for ExoS by Western blot analysis, 35 (81%) produced rhamnolipids, and 34 (79%) showed chitinase activity. Findings suggest that protease activity during chronic infection may contribute to the transmissibility or virulence of these clonal strains. PMID:17392437

  3. Antimicrobial resistance and molecular typing of pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from surgical wounds in Lagos, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Smith, Stella; Ganiyu, Olaniyi; John, Rachael; Fowora, Muinah; Akinsinde, Kehinde; Odeigah, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the resistance patterns of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates recovered from patients with surgical wounds in hospitals and also to investigate their epidemiological relatedness using molecular typing techniques. Twenty Pseudomonas sp. isolated from surgical wounds were subjected to antibiotic susceptibility testing by disk diffusion, plasmid profile, SDS-PAGE and PCR using the parC, gyr A gene and RAPD using the 1254 primer. The isolates showed resistance to 12 different antibiotics with six being 100% resistant. Plasmids were detected in 16 (80%) of the isolates. The RAPD-PCR using the primer 1254, SDS-PAGE classified the 20 Pseudomonas spp. into 5 and 6 types respectively. Pseudomona aeruginosa strains isolated from surgical wounds were generally resistant to a broad range of antibiotics and this is rather worrisome. The typing techniques classified the 20 isolates into 5 and 6 groups. PMID:22837123

  4. In vitro antimicrobial resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from canine otitis externa in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Penna, B.; Thomé, S.; Martins, R.; Martins, G.; Lilenbaum, W.

    2011-01-01

    Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (167) were obtained from 528 samples of canine otitis externa, identified by biochemical reactions and tested for susceptibility to 10 antimicrobials. The most effective drug was ciprofloxacin. The study reports alarming resistance among P. aeruginosa isolated from canine otitis externa samples in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. PMID:24031774

  5. Initial Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in patients with cystic fibrosis: characteristics of eradicated and persistent isolates.

    PubMed

    Tramper-Stranders, G A; van der Ent, C K; Molin, S; Yang, L; Hansen, S K; Rau, M H; Ciofu, O; Johansen, H K; Wolfs, T F W

    2012-06-01

    Despite intensive eradication therapy, some CF patients with early Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection rapidly develop a chronic infection. To elucidate factors associated with this persistence, bacterial characteristics of early P. aeruginosa isolates were analysed that were either eradicated rapidly or persisted despite multiple antimicrobial treatments. Eighty-six early infection episodes were studied. First P. aeruginosa isolates from patients with eradication (36) or persistent infection (16) were included; isolates from patients with intermittent infection (34) were omitted from the study. Virulence assays, antimicrobial resistance, cytotoxicity and mutation frequencies were analysed in vitro. P. aeruginosa was genotyped by SNP-array. Transcriptomic profiles of two eradicated and two persistent strains were compared. Nineteen per cent of patients developed persistent infection; 42% achieved eradication. Secretion of virulence factors and mutation frequencies were highly variable among both eradicated and persistent isolates and were not different between the groups. Cytotoxicity was present in 57% of eradicated vs. 100% of persistent isolates (p <0.01). None of the isolates were resistant to antibiotics. The isolates were genotypically highly diverse. Multivariate analysis showed that in vitro determined bacterial characteristics could not predict persistence after first P. aeruginosa infection. Preliminary transcriptomic data showed increased expression of some genes related to a metabolic pathway. The early onset of chronic infection was not associated with (in vitro determined) bacterial characteristics only. Although the persistent isolates were more often cytotoxic, for the individual patient it was not possible to predict the risk of persistence based on bacterial characteristics. Unknown factors such as host-pathogen and pathogen-pathogen interactions should be further explored. PMID:21883670

  6. Clusters of genetically similar isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from multiple hospitals in the UK.

    PubMed

    Martin, Kate; Baddal, Buket; Mustafa, Nazim; Perry, Claire; Underwood, Anthony; Constantidou, Chrystala; Loman, Nick; Kenna, Dervla T; Turton, Jane F

    2013-07-01

    Variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) analysis at nine loci of isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa submitted to the national reference laboratory from UK hospitals, from over 2000 patients, between June 2010 and June 2012 revealed four widely found types that collectively were received from approximately a fifth of patients, including from those with cystic fibrosis. These types were also prevalent among related submissions from the clinical environment and were received from up to 54 (out of 143) hospitals. Multi-locus sequence typing and blaOXA-50-like sequencing confirmed the clonal relationship within each cluster, and representatives from multiple centres clustered within about 70 % by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Illumina sequencing of 12 isolates of cluster A of VNTR profile 8, 3, 4, 5, 2, 3, 5, 2, x (where the repeat number at the last, most discriminatory locus is variable) revealed a large number of variably present targets in the accessory genome and seven of these were sought by PCR among a larger set of isolates. Representatives from patients within a single centre mostly had distinct accessory gene profiles, suggesting that these patients acquired the strain independently, while those with clear epidemiological links shared the same profile. Profiles also varied between representatives from different centres. Epidemiological investigations of widely found types such as these require the use of finer-typing methods, which increasingly will be informed by next generation sequencing.

  7. [The experience of implementation of REP-u RAPD-polymerase chain reaction in epidemiologic characteristic of nosocomial isolates Pseudomonas aeruginosa].

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, M V; Maksimova, A V; Karpunina, T I

    2015-03-01

    The article presents comparative evaluation of diagnostic value of technique REP- u RAPD-polymerase chain reaction applied under genetic typing of clinical isolates of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa. The strains are isolated in different hospital departments of medical institutions in adult (8 medical institutions; n = 145) and children (5 medical institutions; n = 151) medical networks. The results of study demonstrated different boundary capacity of three reactions. The Simpson discrimination index made up to 0.993, 0.875 and 0.639 for RAPD-, ERIC- and BOX-polymerase chain reaction correspondingly. The RAPD-polymerase chain reaction makes it possible to detect individual characteristics of strains. Out of two alternatives the REP-polymerase chain reaction demonstrated its advantage, besides only with one primer ERIC2. The BOX-polymerase chain reaction has a least discriminating capacity under typing of isolates P. aeruginosa, detecting only species' characteristics. The clinical strains P. aeruginosa are distributed on 24 genome groups and 52 isolates had individual genotypes. The evaluation of results of genetic typing permitted to point out both similarity of tendencies in propagation of strains of P. aeruginosa among hospitalized adults and adolescents and specificity of detection in neonatal clinics. It is obvious that hospitals of different profiles, including departments of reanimation and intensive therapy represent specific ecological environment significantly different in its level of endogenous and exogenous infection.

  8. Synthesis and electrochemical detection of a thiazolyl-indole natural product isolated from the nosocomial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Buzid, Alyah; Muimhneacháin, Eoin Ó; Reen, F Jerry; Hayes, Phyllis E; Pardo, Leticia M; Shang, Fengjun; O'Gara, Fergal; Sperry, Jonathan; Luong, John H T; Glennon, Jeremy D; McGlacken, Gerard P

    2016-09-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative opportunistic pathogen, capable of surviving in a broad range of natural environments and quickly acquiring resistance. It is associated with hospital-acquired infections, particularly in patients with compromised immunity, and is the primary cause of morbidity and mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. P. aeruginosa is also of nosocomial importance on dairy farms and veterinary hospitals, where it is a key morbidity factor in bovine mastitis. P. aeruginosa uses a cell-cell communication system consisting of signalling molecules to coordinate bacterial secondary metabolites, biofilm formation, and virulence. Simple and sensitive methods for the detection of biomolecules as indicators of P. aeruginosa infection would be of great clinical importance. Here, we report the synthesis of the P. aeruginosa natural product, barakacin, which was recently isolated from the bovine ruminal strain ZIO. A simple and sensitive electrochemical method was used for barakacin detection using a boron-doped diamond (BDD) and glassy carbon (GC) electrodes, based on cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). The influence of electrolyte pH on the peak potential and peak currents was also investigated. At pH 2.0, the peak current was linearly dependent on barakacin concentration (in the range used, 1-10 μM), with correlation coefficients greater than 0.98 on both electrodes. The detection limit (S/N = 3) on the BDD electrode was 100-fold lower than that obtained on the GC electrode. The optimized method using the BDD electrode was extended to bovine (cow feces) and human (sputum of a CF patient) samples. Spiked barakacin was easily detected in these matrices at a limit of 0.5 and 0.05 μM, respectively. Graphical abstract Electrochemical detection of barakacin. PMID:27473426

  9. Pathogenic Phenotype and Genotype of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from Spontaneous Canine Ocular Infections

    PubMed Central

    Ledbetter, Eric C.; Mun, James J.; Kowbel, David; Fleiszig, Suzanne M. J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose This study was designed to determine whether the ability to adversely affect corneal epithelial cell health is a factor common to Pseudomonas aeruginosa keratitis strains and to assess the prevalence of each pathogenic phenotype and genotype in a canine model of naturally-acquired P. aeruginosa ocular infection. Methods P. aeruginosa ocular isolates were collected by sampling 100 dogs without disease (six isolates collected) and by sampling dogs with conjunctivitis (two isolates), endophthalmitis (one isolate), active keratitis (12 isolates), and resolved P. aeruginosa keratitis (four isolates). Phenotype was determined in vitro by quantifying corneal epithelial cell invasion by gentamicin survival assays, and cytotoxic activity by Trypan blue exclusion assays. Genotyping was performed for genes encoding the type III secreted effectors. Results The ratio of invasive to cytotoxic strains with 95% confidence intervals (CI) was 0.83 (CI, 0.42– 0.99) for conjunctival microflora isolates, 0.80 (CI, 0.54 – 0.94) for ocular infection isolates, and 1.0 (CI, 0.45–1.0) for strains isolated post-resolution of keratitis. Among ocular infection isolates, invasive and cytotoxic strains were significantly (P ≤ 0.02) associated with older and younger dogs, respectively. Visible adverse effects on epithelial cells were significantly (P ≤ 0.03) more frequent for keratitis strains (6/12) than other strains (1/13), but only three of these keratitis strains and the single non-keratitis strain possessed ExoU. Conclusions Invasive strains predominated in the dogs of this study. Only keratitis strains had visible adverse effects on epithelial cells without overt cytotoxicity, suggesting virulence strategies affecting live corneal epithelial cell health are selected for among keratitis strains. PMID:18836164

  10. [Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of imipenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated in a Buenos Aires hospital].

    PubMed

    Cejas, D; Almuzara, M; Santella, G; Tuduri, A; Palombarani, S; Figueroa, S; Gutkind, G; Radice, M

    2008-01-01

    From 129 P. aeruginosa isolated at a health care centre located in Buenos Aires (Hospital "Eva Perón"), 14% produced IMP-13. Although 18 isolates were metallo-beta-lactamases (MBL) producers, only those isolates that displayed altered outer membrane protein profiles correlated with the resistant category according to CLSI or even Subcomisión de Antimicrobianos, SADEBAC, AAM. Phenotypic screening of metallo-beta-lactamases proved to be appropriate for detecting MBL producing isolates. IMP-13 producing isolates corresponded to at least five different clonal types, which not only suggests the dissemination of the resistant strain but also of the resistant marker.

  11. A gacS Deletion in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Cystic Fibrosis Isolate CHA Shapes Its Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Sall, Khady Mayebine; Casabona, Maria Guillermina; Bordi, Christophe; Huber, Philippe; de Bentzmann, Sophie; Attrée, Ina; Elsen, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a human opportunistic pathogen, is capable of provoking acute and chronic infections that are associated with defined sets of virulence factors. During chronic infections, the bacterium accumulates mutations that silence some and activate other genes. Here we show that the cystic fibrosis isolate CHA exhibits a unique virulence phenotype featuring a mucoid morphology, an active Type III Secretion System (T3SS, hallmark of acute infections), and no Type VI Secretion System (H1-T6SS). This virulence profile is due to a 426 bp deletion in the 3′ end of the gacS gene encoding an essential regulatory protein. The absence of GacS disturbs the Gac/Rsm pathway leading to depletion of the small regulatory RNAs RsmY/RsmZ and, in consequence, to expression of T3SS, while switching off the expression of H1-T6SS and Pel polysaccharides. The CHA isolate also exhibits full ability to swim and twitch, due to active flagellum and Type IVa pili. Thus, unlike the classical scheme of balance between virulence factors, clinical strains may adapt to a local niche by expressing both alginate exopolysaccharide, a hallmark of membrane stress that protects from antibiotic action, host defences and phagocytosis, and efficient T3S machinery that is considered as an aggressive virulence factor. PMID:24780952

  12. NET formation induced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa cystic fibrosis isolates measured as release of myeloperoxidase-DNA and neutrophil elastase-DNA complexes.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Dae-goon; Floyd, Madison; Winn, Matthew; Moskowitz, Samuel M; Rada, Balázs

    2014-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) airway disease is characterized by Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection and recruitment of neutrophil granulocytes. Neutrophil granule components (myeloperoxidase (MPO), human neutrophil elastase (HNE)), extracellular DNA and P. aeruginosa can all be found in the CF respiratory tract and have all been associated with worsening CF lung function. Pseudomonas-induced formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) offers a likely mechanism for release of MPO, HNE and DNA from neutrophils. NETs are composed of a DNA backbone decorated with granule proteins like MPO and HNE. Here we sought to examine whether CF clinical isolates of Pseudomonas are capable of inducing NET release from human neutrophil granulocytes. We used two methods to quantify NETs. We modified a previously employed ELISA that detects MPO-DNA complexes and established a new HNE-DNA ELISA. We show that these methods reliably quantify MPO-DNA and HNE-DNA complexes, measures of NET formation. We have found that CF isolates of P. aeruginosa stimulate robust respiratory burst and NET release in human neutrophils. By comparing paired "early" and "late" bacterial isolates obtained from the same CF patient we have found that early isolates induced significantly more NET release than late isolates. Our data support that Pseudomonas-induced NET release represents an important mechanism for release of neutrophil-derived CF inflammatory mediators, and confirm that decreased induction of NET formation is required for long-term adaptation of P. aeruginosa to CF airways.

  13. The effects of nickel(II) complexes with imidazole derivatives on pyocyanin and pyoverdine production by Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated from cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Gałczyńska, Katarzyna; Kurdziel, Krystyna; Adamus-Białek, Wioletta; Wąsik, Sławomir; Szary, Karol; Drabik, Marcin; Węgierek-Ciuk, Aneta; Lankoff, Anna; Arabski, Michał

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection is problematic in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). P. aeruginosa secretes a diversity of pigments, such as pyocyanin and pyoverdine. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of complexes of nickel(II) ([Ni(iaa)2(H2O)2]·H2O (iaa = imidazole-4-acetate anion), [Ni(1-allim)6](NO3)2 (1-allim = 1-allylimidazole) and NiCl2 on pyocyanin and pyoverdine production by 23 strains of P. aeruginosa isolated from cystic fibrosis under growth conditions specific for the CF respiratory system. The antibacterial effects and biophysical properties of the tested substances were measured by spectrofluorometric techniques, as well as by laser interferometry, confocal and atomic force microscopy. The cytotoxic properties of all compounds were measured by Annexin/IP assay against A549 cells. All tested compounds have no effect on pyocyanin production and decrease the pyoverdine secretion in about 40% of tested P. aeruginosa strains at non-cytotoxic range of concentrations. Imidazole-4-acetate anion and 1-allylimidazole have good diffusion properties in the mature P. aeruginosa PAO1 biofilm. In conclusion, the tested nickel(II) complexes do not have clinical implications in P. aeruginosa eradication in cystic fibrosis. The diffusion properties of 1-allylimidazole and imidazole-4-acetate and their lack of effect on A549 cells suggest that they might be considered for chemical synthesis with other transition metals. PMID:26645324

  14. ISPa46, a novel insertion sequence in the oprD porin gene of an imipenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolate from a cystic fibrosis patient in Marseille, France.

    PubMed

    Diene, Seydina M; L'homme, Tiphanie; Bellulo, Sophia; Stremler, Nathalie; Dubus, Jean-Christophe; Mely, Laurent; Leroy, Sylvie; Degand, Nicolas; Rolain, Jean-Marc

    2013-09-01

    Clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa exhibiting high-level resistance to carbapenems were recovered from a French patient with cystic fibrosis (CF) who had not received carbapenem therapy. This study was conducted to investigate the molecular mechanism conferring the carbapenem-resistant phenotype in clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa recovered from the same CF patient chronically colonised since 2005. Investigation of imipenem resistance of P. aeruginosa strain_02 isolated in May 2011 showed no carbapenemase activity. However, amplification and sequencing of the oprD porin gene revealed disruption of this gene by an insertion sequence (IS) element of 1337 bp that contained a novel transposase of 1227 bp (ISPa46) bordered by two terminal imperfect inverted repeats of 28 bp, which was associated with carbapenem resistance. Retrospective analysis of five additional strains of P. aeruginosa isolated before May 2011 from the same patient revealed that all isolates were likely to be the same clone by multilocus sequence typing analysis (ST540/551), but one of the five isolates was imipenem-susceptible. Although it was possible to demonstrate the presence of ISPa46 in all strains by PCR, this IS was transposed in the oprD gene only for imipenem-resistant isolates. Therefore, this study reports a novel IS element (ISPa46) in P. aeruginosa clinical isolates of a CF patient in Marseille, France, that was associated with carbapenem resistance and was selected in the absence of carbapenem treatment.

  15. Similar Frequencies of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates Producing KPC and VIM Carbapenemases in Diverse Genetic Clones at Tertiary-Care Hospitals in Medellín, Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Vanegas, Johanna M.; Cienfuegos, Astrid V.; Ocampo, Ana M.; López, Lucelly; del Corral, Helena; Roncancio, Gustavo; Sierra, Patricia; Echeverri-Toro, Lina; Ospina, Sigifredo; Maldonado, Natalia; Robledo, Carlos; Restrepo, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa has become a serious health threat worldwide due to the limited options available for its treatment. Understanding its epidemiology contributes to the control of antibiotic resistance. The aim of this study was to describe the clinical and molecular characteristics of infections caused by carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa isolates in five tertiary-care hospitals in Medellín, Colombia. A cross-sectional study was conducted in five tertiary-care hospitals from June 2012 to March 2014. All hospitalized patients infected by carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa were included. Clinical information was obtained from medical records. Molecular analyses included PCR for detection of blaVIM, blaIMP, blaNDM, blaOXA-48, and blaKPC genes plus pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) for molecular typing. A total of 235 patients were enrolled: 91.1% of them were adults (n = 214), 88.1% (n = 207) had prior antibiotic use, and 14.9% (n = 35) had urinary tract infections. The blaVIM-2 and blaKPC-2 genes were detected in 13.6% (n = 32) and 11.5% (n = 27), respectively, of all isolates. Two isolates harbored both genes simultaneously. For KPC-producing isolates, PFGE revealed closely related strains within each hospital, and sequence types (STs) ST362 and ST235 and two new STs were found by MLST. With PFGE, VIM-producing isolates appeared highly diverse, and MLST revealed ST111 in four hospitals and five new STs. These results show that KPC-producing P. aeruginosa is currently disseminating rapidly and occurring at a frequency similar to that of VIM-producing P. aeruginosa isolates (approximately 1:1 ratio) in Medellín, Colombia. Diverse genetic backgrounds among resistant strains suggest an excessive antibiotic pressure resulting in the selection of resistant strains. PMID:25210071

  16. Antibiotic resistance profiles and virulence markers of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated from composts.

    PubMed

    Kaszab, Edit; Szoboszlay, Sándor; Dobolyi, Csaba; Háhn, Judit; Pék, Nikoletta; Kriszt, Balázs

    2011-01-01

    The aim of our work was to determine the presence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in compost raw materials, immature and mature compost, and compost-treated soil. Twenty-five strains of P. aeruginosa were isolated from a raw material (plant straw), immature and mature compost and compost-treated soil samples. The strains were identified using the PCR method for the detection of species specific variable regions of 16S rDNA. Strains were examined for the presence of five different virulence-related gene sequences (exoA, exoU, exoT, exoS and exoY) and their antibiotic resistance profiles were determined. Based on our results, species P. aeruginosa can reach significant numbers (up to 10(6) MPN/g sample) during composting and 92.0% of the isolated strains carrying at least two gene sequences encoding toxic proteins. Various types of drug resistance were detected among compost originating strains, mainly against third generation Cephalosporins and Carbapenems. Six isolates were able to resist two different classes of antibiotics (third generation Cephalosporins and Carbapenems, wide spectrum Penicillins or Aminoglycosides, respectively). Based on our results, composts can be a source of P. aeruginosa and might be a concern to individuals susceptible to this opportunistic pathogen. PMID:20817443

  17. Bacteriophage can lyse antibiotic-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from canine diseases

    PubMed Central

    FURUSAWA, Takaaki; IWANO, Hidetomo; HIGUCHI, Hidetoshi; YOKOTA, Hiroshi; USUI, Masaru; IWASAKI, Tomohito; TAMURA, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a pathogen frequently identified as the cause of diverse infections or chronic disease. This microbe has natural resistance to several kinds of antibiotics, because of the species’ outer membrane, efflux pumps and growth as a biofilm. This bacterium can acquire increased resistance with specific point mutations. Bacteriophage (phage), however, can lyse these bacteria. Therefore, in the present study, we assessed the host range of phages isolates and their ability to lyse antibiotic-resistant P. aeruginosa. Present phages could lyse many strains of P. aeruginosa (28/39), including strains with high resistance to fluoroquinolones (4/6). In conclusion, application of phages for antibiotic-resistant bacteria is greatly effective. To avoid pervasive antibiotic-resistant bacteria, further development of phage usage for disease treatment is required. PMID:26876365

  18. Type 3 secretion system effector genotype and secretion phenotype of longitudinally collected Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from young children diagnosed with cystic fibrosis following newborn screening.

    PubMed

    Hu, H; Harmer, C; Anuj, S; Wainwright, C E; Manos, J; Cheney, J; Harbour, C; Zablotska, I; Turnbull, L; Whitchurch, C B; Grimwood, K; Rose, B

    2013-03-01

    Studies of the type 3 secretion system (T3SS) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from chronically infected older children and adults with cystic fibrosis (CF) show a predominantly exoS+/exoU- (exoS+) genotype and loss of T3SS effector secretion over time. Relatively little is known about the role of the T3SS in the pathogenesis of early P. aeruginosa infection in the CF airway. In this longitudinal study, 168 P. aeruginosa isolates from 58 children diagnosed with CF following newborn screening and 47 isolates from homes of families with or without children with CF were genotyped by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and T3SS genotype and phenotype determined using multiplex PCR and western blotting. Associations were sought between T3SS data and clinical variables and comparisons made between T3SS data of clinical and environmental PFGE genotypes. Seventy-seven of the 92 clinical strains were exoS+ (71% secretors (ExoS+)) and 15 were exoU+ (93% secretors (ExoU+)). Initial exoS+ strains were five times more likely to secrete ExoS than subsequent exoS+ strains at first isolation. The proportion of ExoS+ strains declined with increasing age at acquisition. No associations were found between T3SS characteristics and gender, site of isolation, exacerbation, a persistent strain or pulmonary outcomes. Fourteen of the 23 environmental strains were exoS+ (79% ExoS+) and nine were exoU+ (33% ExoU+). The exoU+ environmental strains were significantly less likely to secrete ExoU than clinical strains. This study provides new insight into the T3SS characteristics of P. aeruginosa isolated from the CF airway early in life. PMID:22329595

  19. Prevalence of ESBLs-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from different wards in a Chinese teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhilong; Niu, Hui; Chen, Guangyu; Li, Mingcheng; Li, Ming; Zhou, Yuqing

    2015-01-01

    This study was to explore the molecular dissemination of P. aeruginosa producing extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBLs) recovered from the different wards in a teaching hospital, Jilin. Among 240 isolates, 91 strains were isolated from burn wards and 149 strains from surgical wards. A total of 210 strains (87.5%) produced ESBLs, 30 strains (12.5%) didn’t produce ESBLs. All ESBLs isolates showed identical antimicrobial susceptibility profiles. The genotypic prevalence of ESBLs for bla SHV-12, bla TEM-24, bla CTX-M-1, bla CTX-M-2, bla CTX-M-3, bla PER and bla VEB genes was 17.6%, 20.5%, 14.3%, 9.6%, 12.9%, 13.8% and 11.4% respectively. All P. aeruginosa strains producing ESBLs had three to six plasmids and contained class 1 integrons, which transferred resistance to E. coli C 600 by conjuation. The data indicated a high prevalence of ESBL among P. aeruginosa isolates in this region and their enzyme types were diverse. PMID:26770582

  20. Assessment of acrylamide degradation potential of Pseudomonas aeruginosa BAC-6 isolated from industrial effluent.

    PubMed

    Chandrashekar, Vijayashree; Chandrashekar, Chandrika; Shivakumar, Rajath; Bhattacharya, Sourav; Das, Arijit; Gouda, Bhaskar; Rajan, Subbaramiah Sundara

    2014-07-01

    Acrylamide finds diverse industrial applications but is considered an environmental threat because of its neurotoxic, carcinogenic, and teratogenic effects. Certain bacteria enzymatically degrade acrylamide to acrylic acid and ammonia. The present investigation was carried out to isolate and identify an acrylamide-degrading bacterium from industrial effluent. Bacterial growth and extent of acrylamide degradation in the presence of different acrylamide concentrations, nutrients, varied range of pH, and temperature were analyzed. Among the eight acrylamide-degrading isolates, isolate BAC-6 demonstrated the highest degradation, and based upon the partial 16S rDNA sequencing, it was identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. P. aeruginosa BAC-6 grew over a wide range of acrylamide concentrations, but the highest degradation was recorded at 500 mg/L concentration with concomitant cell growth. Among the carbon supplements, mannitol supported the highest growth and degradation. Maximum degradation was reported at neutral pH. A mesophilic temperature range (25-40 °C) facilitated conducive bacterial growth followed by degradation. The highest degradation and bacterial growth were observed at 30 and 35 °C, respectively. Thus, it could be inferred from the present investigation that cultural conditions strongly affected the degradation potential of P. aeruginosa BAC-6 and advocated the utilization of the isolate in bioremediation of sites polluted with acrylamide.

  1. Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing molecules correlate with clinical status in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Barr, Helen L; Halliday, Nigel; Cámara, Miguel; Barrett, David A; Williams, Paul; Forrester, Douglas L; Simms, Rebecca; Smyth, Alan R; Honeybourne, David; Whitehouse, Joanna L; Nash, Edward F; Dewar, Jane; Clayton, Andrew; Knox, Alan J; Fogarty, Andrew W

    2015-10-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces quorum sensing signal molecules that are potential biomarkers for infection.A prospective study of 60 cystic fibrosis patients with chronic P. aeruginosa, who required intravenous antibiotics for pulmonary exacerbations, was undertaken. Clinical measurements and biological samples were obtained at the start and end of the treatment period. Additional data were available for 29 of these patients when they were clinically stable.Cross-sectionally, quorum sensing signal molecules were detectable in the sputum, plasma and urine of 86%, 75% and 83% patients, respectively. They were positively correlated between the three biofluids. Positive correlations were observed for most quorum sensing signal molecules in sputum, plasma and urine, with quantitative measures of pulmonary P. aeruginosa load at the start of a pulmonary exacerbation. Plasma concentrations of 2-nonyl-4-hydroxy-quinoline (NHQ) were significantly higher at the start of a pulmonary exacerbation compared to clinical stability (p<0.01). Following the administration of systemic antibiotics, plasma 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline (p=0.02) and NHQ concentrations (p<0.01) decreased significantly.In conclusion, quorum sensing signal molecules are detectable in cystic fibrosis patients with pulmonary P. aeruginosa infection and are positively correlated with quantitative measures of P. aeruginosa. NHQ correlates with clinical status and has potential as a novel biomarker for P. aeruginosa infection.

  2. Enzymatic Modification of Aminoglycoside Antibiotics: a New 6′-N-Acetylating Enzyme from a Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolate

    PubMed Central

    Haas, M.; Biddlecome, S.; Davies, J.; Luce, C. E.; Daniels, P. J. L.

    1976-01-01

    We describe an aminoglycoside 6′-N-acetyltransferase, isolated from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, that exhibits a novel substrate profile characterized by markedly reduced activity towards butirosin and amikacin. PMID:820249

  3. Genetically and Phenotypically Distinct Pseudomonas aeruginosa Cystic Fibrosis Isolates Share a Core Proteomic Signature

    PubMed Central

    Penesyan, Anahit; Kumar, Sheemal S.; Kamath, Karthik; Shathili, Abdulrahman M.; Venkatakrishnan, Vignesh; Krisp, Christoph; Packer, Nicolle H.; Molloy, Mark P.; Paulsen, Ian T.

    2015-01-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is among the main colonizers of the lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. We have isolated and sequenced several P. aeruginosa isolates from the sputum of CF patients and compared them with each other and with the model strain PAO1. Phenotypic analysis of CF isolates showed significant variability in colonization and virulence-related traits suggesting different strategies for adaptation to the CF lung. Genomic analysis indicated these strains shared a large set of core genes with the standard laboratory strain PAO1, and identified the genetic basis for some of the observed phenotypic differences. Proteomics revealed that in a conventional laboratory medium PAO1 expressed 827 proteins that were absent in the CF isolates while the CF isolates shared a distinctive signature set of 703 proteins not detected in PAO1. PAO1 expressed many transporters for the uptake of organic nutrients and relatively few biosynthetic pathways. Conversely, the CF isolates expressed a narrower range of transporters and a broader set of metabolic pathways for the biosynthesis of amino acids, carbohydrates, nucleotides and polyamines. The proteomic data suggests that in a common laboratory medium PAO1 may transport a diverse set of “ready-made” nutrients from the rich medium, whereas the CF isolates may only utilize a limited number of nutrients from the medium relying mainly on their own metabolism for synthesis of essential nutrients. These variations indicate significant differences between the metabolism and physiology of P. aeruginosa CF isolates and PAO1 that cannot be detected at the genome level alone. The widening gap between the increasing genomic data and the lack of phenotypic data means that researchers are increasingly reliant on extrapolating from genomic comparisons using experimentally characterized model organisms such as PAO1. While comparative genomics can provide valuable information, our data suggests that such

  4. Genetically and Phenotypically Distinct Pseudomonas aeruginosa Cystic Fibrosis Isolates Share a Core Proteomic Signature.

    PubMed

    Penesyan, Anahit; Kumar, Sheemal S; Kamath, Karthik; Shathili, Abdulrahman M; Venkatakrishnan, Vignesh; Krisp, Christoph; Packer, Nicolle H; Molloy, Mark P; Paulsen, Ian T

    2015-01-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is among the main colonizers of the lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. We have isolated and sequenced several P. aeruginosa isolates from the sputum of CF patients and compared them with each other and with the model strain PAO1. Phenotypic analysis of CF isolates showed significant variability in colonization and virulence-related traits suggesting different strategies for adaptation to the CF lung. Genomic analysis indicated these strains shared a large set of core genes with the standard laboratory strain PAO1, and identified the genetic basis for some of the observed phenotypic differences. Proteomics revealed that in a conventional laboratory medium PAO1 expressed 827 proteins that were absent in the CF isolates while the CF isolates shared a distinctive signature set of 703 proteins not detected in PAO1. PAO1 expressed many transporters for the uptake of organic nutrients and relatively few biosynthetic pathways. Conversely, the CF isolates expressed a narrower range of transporters and a broader set of metabolic pathways for the biosynthesis of amino acids, carbohydrates, nucleotides and polyamines. The proteomic data suggests that in a common laboratory medium PAO1 may transport a diverse set of "ready-made" nutrients from the rich medium, whereas the CF isolates may only utilize a limited number of nutrients from the medium relying mainly on their own metabolism for synthesis of essential nutrients. These variations indicate significant differences between the metabolism and physiology of P. aeruginosa CF isolates and PAO1 that cannot be detected at the genome level alone. The widening gap between the increasing genomic data and the lack of phenotypic data means that researchers are increasingly reliant on extrapolating from genomic comparisons using experimentally characterized model organisms such as PAO1. While comparative genomics can provide valuable information, our data suggests that such

  5. Isolation and characterization of gallium resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutants.

    PubMed

    García-Contreras, Rodolfo; Lira-Silva, Elizabeth; Jasso-Chávez, Ricardo; Hernández-González, Ismael L; Maeda, Toshinari; Hashimoto, Takahiro; Boogerd, Fred C; Sheng, Lili; Wood, Thomas K; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael

    2013-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 cells resistant to the novel antimicrobial gallium nitrate (Ga) were developed using transposon mutagenesis and by selecting spontaneous mutants. The mutants showing the highest growth in the presence of Ga were selected for further characterization. These mutants showed 4- to 12-fold higher Ga minimal inhibitory growth concentrations and a greater than 8-fold increase in the minimum biofilm eliminating Ga concentration. Both types of mutants produced Ga resistant biofilms whereas the formation of wild-type biofilms was strongly inhibited by Ga. The gene interrupted in the transposon mutant was hitA, which encodes a periplasmic iron binding protein that delivers Fe³⁺ to the HitB iron permease; complementation of the mutant with the hitA gene restored the Ga sensitivity. This hitA mutant showed a 14-fold decrease in Ga internalization versus the wild-type strain, indicating that the HitAB system is also involved in the Ga uptake. Ga uptake in the spontaneous mutant was also lower, although no mutations were found in the hitAB genes. Instead, this mutant harbored 64 non-silent mutations in several genes including those of the phenazine pyocyanin biosynthesis. The spontaneous mutant produced 2-fold higher pyocyanin basal levels than the wild-type; the addition of this phenazine to wild-type cultures protected them from the Ga bacteriostatic effect. The present data indicate that mutations affecting Ga transport and probably pyocyanin biosynthesis enable cells to develop resistance to Ga.

  6. Resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates to Hydrogel Contact Lens Disinfection Correlates with Cytotoxic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Lakkis, Carol; Fleiszig, Suzanne M. J.

    2001-01-01

    One of the most common pathogens in infection of hydrogel contact lens wearers is Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which can gain access to the eye via contamination of the lens, lens case, and lens care solutions. Only one strain per species is used in current regulatory testing for the marketing of chemical contact lens disinfectants. The aim of this study was to determine whether P. aeruginosa strains vary in their susceptibility to hydrogel contact lens disinfectants. A method for rapidly screening bacterial susceptibility to contact lens disinfectants was developed, based on measurement of the MIC. The susceptibility of 35 P. aeruginosa isolates to two chemical disinfectants was found to vary among strains. MICs ranged from 6.25 to 100% for both disinfectants at 37°C, and a number of strains were not inhibited by a 100% disinfectant concentration in the lens case environment at room temperature (22°C). Resistance to disinfection appeared to be an inherent rather than acquired trait, since some resistant strains had been isolated prior to the introduction of the disinfectants and some susceptible P. aeruginosa strains could not be made more resistant by repeated disinfectant exposure. A number of P. aeruginosa strains which were comparatively more resistant to short-term disinfectant exposure also demonstrated the ability to grow to levels above the initial inoculum in one chemical disinfectant after long-term (24 to 48 h) disinfectant exposure. Resistance was correlated with acute cytotoxic activity toward corneal epithelial cells and with exsA, which encodes a protein that regulates cytotoxicity via a complex type III secretion system. These results suggest that chemical disinfection solutions may select for contamination with cytotoxic strains. Further investigation of the mechanisms and factors responsible for resistance may also lead to strategies for reducing adverse responses to contact lens wear. PMID:11283074

  7. Isolation of a Poterioochromonas capable of feeding on Microcystis aeruginosa and degrading microcystin-LR.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xue; Hu, Hong-Ying; Hong, Yu; Yang, Jia

    2008-11-01

    Algal blooms have become a worldwide issue recently, especially those comprised of toxic cyanobacteria. Grazers' predation of bloom-forming algae plays an important role in water clearing. In this study, a species of golden alga (strain ZX1), capable of feeding on the toxic cyanobacteria Microcystis aeruginosa, was isolated and identified as Poterioochromonas sp. (GenBank accession: EU586184) on the basis of morphological characteristics and 18s rRNA gene sequencing. Feeding experiments showed that ZX1 could clear high densities of M. aeruginosa (7.3 x 10(5)-4.3 x 10(6) cells mL(-1)) in a short time (40 h), with inhibition ratios higher than 99.9%. ZX1 grew during the feeding processes and achieved a maximum density of 10-20% of the initial M. aeruginosa density. Furthermore, this study is the first to report that ZX1 was able to degrade microcystin-LR (MC-LR) in cells of M. aeruginosa while digesting the whole cells, and that the degradation process was determined to be carried out inside the ZX1 cell. For a total MC-LR (intra- and extracellular) concentration of up to 114 microg L(-1), 82.7% was removed in 40 h. This study sheds light on the importance of golden alga in aquatic microbial ecosystems and in the natural transportation/transformation of MC-LR. PMID:18811657

  8. Population Structure of Clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa from West and Central African Countries

    PubMed Central

    Cholley, Pascal; Ka, Roughyatou; Guyeux, Christophe; Thouverez, Michelle; Guessennd, Nathalie; Ghebremedhin, Beniam; Frank, Thierry; Bertrand, Xavier; Hocquet, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) has a non-clonal, epidemic population with a few widely distributed and frequently encountered sequence types (STs) called ‘high-risk clusters’. Clinical P. aeruginosa (clinPA) has been studied in all inhabited continents excepted in Africa, where a very few isolates have been analyzed. Here, we characterized a collection of clinPA isolates from four countries of West and Central Africa. Methodology 184 non-redundant isolates of clinPA from hospitals of Senegal, Ivory Coast, Nigeria, and Central African Republic were genotyped by MLST. We assessed their resistance level to antibiotics by agar diffusion and identified the extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) and metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs) by sequencing. The population structure of the species was determined by a nucleotide-based analysis of the entire PA MLST database and further localized on the phylogenetic tree (i) the sequence types (STs) of the present collection, (ii) the STs by continents, (iii) ESBL- and MBL-producing STs from the MLST database. Principal Findings We found 80 distinct STs, of which 24 had no relationship with any known STs. ‘High-risk’ international clonal complexes (CC155, CC244, CC235) were frequently found in West and Central Africa. The five VIM-2-producing isolates belonged to CC233 and CC244. GES-1 and GES-9 enzymes were produced by one CC235 and one ST1469 isolate, respectively. We showed the spread of ‘high-risk’ international clonal complexes, often described as multidrug-resistant on other continents, with a fully susceptible phenotype. The MBL- and ESBL-producing STs were scattered throughout the phylogenetic tree and our data suggest a poor association between a continent and a specific phylogroup. Conclusions ESBL- and MBL-encoding genes are borne by both successful international clonal complexes and distinct local STs in clinPA of West and Central Africa. Furthermore, our data suggest that the spread of a ST could be

  9. Drug resistance profile and biofilm forming potential of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from contact lenses in Karachi-Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The contaminated contact lens provides Pseudomonas aeruginosa an ideal site for attachment and biofilm production. Continuous contact of the eye to the biofilm-infested lens can lead to serious ocular diseases, such as keratitis (corneal ulcers). The biofilms also prevent effective penetration of the antibiotics, which increase the chances of antibiotic resistance. Methods For this study, 22 Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates were obtained from 36 contact lenses and 14 contact lens protective fluid samples. These isolates were tested against eight commonly used antibiotics using Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. The biofilm forming potential of these isolates was also evaluated using various qualitative and quantitative techniques. Finally, a relationship between biofilm formation and antibiotic resistance was also examined. Results The isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa tested were found resistant to most of the antibiotics tested. Qualitative and quantitative biofilm analysis revealed that most of the isolates exhibited strong biofilm production. The biofilm production was significantly higher in isolates that were multi-drug resistant (p < 0.0001). Conclusion Our study indicates that multi-drug resistant, biofilm forming Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates are mainly involved in contact lens associated infections. This appears to be the first report from Pakistan, which analyzes both antibiotic resistance profile and biofilm forming potential of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from contact lens of the patients with contact lens associated infections. PMID:24134792

  10. Population Structure and Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Both Nonpersistent and Persistent Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates Recovered from Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Olmos, Ana; García-Castillo, María; Alba, José María; Morosini, María Isabel; Lamas, Adelaida; Romero, Beatriz; Galán, Juan Carlos; del Campo, Rosa

    2013-01-01

    Seventy-six Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates recovered from chronically (n = 18) and nonchronically (n = 18) colonized cystic fibrosis (CF) patients (2002 to 2009) were grouped in separate polyclonal populations. International CF epidemic clones were not identified, but the high-risk clone ST274, also found circulating in Spanish hospitals, was present. Persistent isolates were more resistant to antibiotics than nonpersistent isolates. PMID:23761158

  11. Clinical Islet Isolation.

    PubMed

    Hawthorne, Wayne J; Williams, Lindy; Chew, Yi Vee

    2016-01-01

    The overarching success of islet transplantation relies on the success in the laboratory to isolate the islets. This chapter focuses on the processes of human islet cell isolation and the ways to optimally provide islet cells for transplantation. The major improvements in regards to the choice of enzyme type, way the digested pancreas tissue is handled to best separate islets from the acinar and surrounding tissues, the various methods of purification of the islets, their subsequent culture and quality assurance to improve outcomes to culminate in safe and effective islet transplantation will be discussed. After decades of improvements, islet cell isolation and transplantation now clearly offer a safe, effective and feasible therapeutic treatment option for an increasing number of patients suffering from type 1 diabetes specifically for those with severe hypoglycaemic unawareness. PMID:27586424

  12. Isolation and characterization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutants blocked in the synthesis of pyoverdin.

    PubMed Central

    Visca, P; Serino, L; Orsi, N

    1992-01-01

    We have isolated and characterized by chemical and enzymatic analyses three distinct types of pyoverdin-defective (pvd) mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. The pvd-1 mutant is an L-N5-hydroxyornithine (L-N5-OH-Orn) auxotroph unable to hydroxylate L-ornithine (L-Orn) in a cell-free system and requiring L-N5-OH-Orn for pyoverdin production. The other two types of mutants appear to be blocked in further steps of the biosynthetic pathway leading to pyoverdin, namely, the acylation of L-N5-OH-Orn (pvd-2) and chromophore synthesis (pvd-3). The different pvd mutations were all found to be located in the catA1 region at 47 min of the genetic map of P. aeruginosa PAO1. PMID:1512205

  13. Class A and D Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamases in Imipenem Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated From Burn Patients in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Pakbaten Toupkanlou, Sanaz; Najar Peerayeh, Shahin; Pirhajati Mahabadi, Rahim

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pseudomonas aeruginosa remains a leading cause of severe wound infection and mortality in burn patients. Objectives: The current study aimed to determine the prevalence of Ambler class A and D β-lactamases among P. aeruginosa isolated from infected burn injuries in Tehran, Iran. Patients and Methods: Bacteriological samples were taken from burn patients with clinical symptoms of burn infection. Fifty Gram-negative, oxidase-positive, catalase- positive bacilli, grown at 42ºC and production of pigment on Mueller-Hinton agar were identified as P. aeruginosa. All of the 50 isolates were examined for antibiotic susceptibility via disk diffusion method, and production of Ambler class A and and D β-lactamases by phenotypic screening test. The presence of Ambler class A and D β-lactamases was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction technique. Results: The results showed that the majority of isolates (88%) were multi-drug resistant. Out of these 50 imipenem resistant isolates, 7 (14%), 18 (36%), 18 (36%) and 18 (36%) strains were positive for blaPER, blaOXA-10, blaTEM and blaSHV genes alone or in combination, respectively. None of the isolates possessed blaKPC or blaGES genes. Conclusions: The current study highlights that the high level of resistance to many antibacterial agents and a gradual increase in the degree of PER, OXA-10, SHV and TEM ESBLs among the majority of imipenem resistant P. aeruginosa isolated from patients with burn infection is an enormous threat in burn centers in Iran. PMID:26468357

  14. Surveillance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa-isolates in a neonatal intensive care unit over a one year-period.

    PubMed

    Zabel, Lutz Thomas; Heeg, Peter; Goelz, Rangmar

    2004-07-01

    Outbreaks of gram-negative bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa in neonatal intensive care units (NICU) can be life-threatening to pre-term infants, which are highly susceptible to serious infections with bacteria. Forty-two ventilated neonates in the NICU of the University Children's Hospital of Tuebingen were found to be colonized (n = 40) or infected (n = 2) with P. aeruginosa within a sampling period of one year. To investigate the colonization patterns and identify potential outbreak sources, epidemiological investigations, environmental surveillance and typing by serotyping and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of the recovered isolates were performed. The investigation demonstrated a genetically related cluster of P. aeruginosa isolates during the surveillance period in 39 neonates and a second cluster at the end of the period in two neonates. A third strain representing a genetically distinct group was found in only one patient. Environmental investigations demonstrated the presence of P. aeruginosa in the ventilation equipment of 22 patients: binasal prongs (n = 22), water reservoir (n = 9), and heater (n = 1). In one case, P. aeruginosa was found in breast milk. Other environmental investigations revealed no P. aeruginosa. Although no evidence for a unique source was found, a series of intervention steps were initiated by the NICU personnel, medical microbiologists and infection control experts. The intervention steps included reinforced training of health care staff and a change from chemical to thermal disinfection of binasal prongs. Implementation of these measurements successfully stopped the recurrent occurrence of P. aeruginosa colonization.

  15. A type III secretion negative clinical strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa employs a two-partner secreted exolysin to induce hemorrhagic pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Elsen, Sylvie; Huber, Philippe; Bouillot, Stéphanie; Couté, Yohann; Fournier, Pierre; Dubois, Yohann; Timsit, Jean-François; Maurin, Max; Attrée, Ina

    2014-02-12

    Virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is typically attributed to its type III secretion system (T3SS). A taxonomic outlier, the P. aeruginosa PA7 strain, lacks a T3SS locus, and no virulence phenotype is attributed to PA7. We characterized a PA7-related, T3SS-negative P. aeruginosa strain, CLJ1, isolated from a patient with fatal hemorrhagic pneumonia. CLJ1 is highly virulent in mice, leading to lung hemorrhage and septicemia. CLJ1-infected primary endothelial cells display characteristics of membrane damage and permeabilization. Proteomic analysis of CLJ1 culture supernatants identified a hemolysin/hemagglutinin family pore-forming toxin, Exolysin (ExlA), that is exported via ExlB, representing a putative two-partner secretion system. A recombinant P. aeruginosa PAO1ΔpscD::exlBA strain, deficient for T3SS but engineered to express ExlA, gained lytic capacity on endothelial cells and full virulence in mice, demonstrating that ExlA is necessary and sufficient for pathogenicity. This highlights clinically relevant T3SS-independent hypervirulence, isolates, and points to a broader P. aeruginosa pathogenic repertoire.

  16. Heavy metal resistance and virulence profile in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from Brazilian soils.

    PubMed

    Pitondo-Silva, André; Gonçalves, Guilherme Bartolomeu; Stehling, Eliana Guedes

    2016-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen, which can have several virulence factors that confer on it the ability to cause severe, acute and chronic infections. Thus, the simultaneous occurrence of resistance to antibiotics and heavy metals associated with the presence of virulence genes is a potential threat to human health and environmental balance. This study aimed to investigate the resistance profile to heavy metals and the correlation of this phenotype of resistance to antimicrobials and to investigate the pathogenic potential of 46 P. aeruginosa isolates obtained from the soil of five Brazilian regions. The bacteria were evaluating for antimicrobial and heavy metal resistance, as well as the presence of plasmids and virulence genes. The isolates showed resistance to four different antibiotics and the majority (n = 44) had resistance to aztreonam or ticarcillin, furthermore, 32 isolates showed concomitant resistance to both of these antibiotics. A high prevalence of virulence genes was found, which highlights the pathogenic potential of the studied environmental isolates. Moreover, a high frequency of heavy metal resistance genes was also detected, however, the phenotypic results indicated that other genes and/or mechanisms should be related to heavy metal resistance. PMID:27197940

  17. Emerging Carbapenem-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates Carrying blaIMP Among Burn Patients in Isfahan, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Radan, Mohsen; Moniri, Rezvan; Khorshidi, Ahmad; Gilasi, Hamidreza; Norouzi, Zohreh; Beigi, Fahimeh; Dasteh Goli, Yasaman

    2016-01-01

    Background Metallo-β-lactamase (MBL)-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a significant pathogen in burn patients. Objectives The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa isolates, including those resistant to imipenemase (IMP), in a burn unit in Isfahan, Iran. Patients and Methods One hundred and fifty P. aeruginosa isolates from burn patients were tested for antibiotic susceptibility by the disc diffusion method in accordance with CLSI guidelines. Production of MBL was identified with the EDTA disk method. DNA was purified from the MBL-positive isolates, and detection of the blaIMP gene was performed with PCR. Results Fifty-seven out of 150 (38%) isolates were multi-drug resistant (MDR), and 93 (62%) were extensively-drug resistant (XDR). Among all isolates, the resistance rate to ciprofloxacin, tobramycin, imipenem, meropenem, amikacin, ceftazidime, and cefepime was higher than 90%, while the resistance rates to piperacillin/tazobactam and aztreonam were 70.7% and 86%, respectively. Colistin and polymyxin B remained the most effective studied antibiotics. All of the imipenem-resistant P. aeruginosa isolates were MBL-positive, and 107 out of 144 (74.3%) of the MBL isolates were positive for the blaIMP gene. Conclusions The results of this study show that the rate of P. aeruginosa-caused burn wound infections was very high, and many of the isolates were resistant to three or more classes of antimicrobials. Such extensive resistance to antimicrobial classes is important because few treatment options remain for patients with burn wound infections. blaIMP-producing P. aeruginosa isolates are a rising threat in burn-care units, and should be controlled by conducting infection-control assessments. PMID:27800466

  18. Phosphate limitation induces the intergeneric inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by Serratia marcescens isolated from paper machines

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Pei-An; Kuo, Chih-Horng; Lai, Yiu-Kay; Graumann, Peter L; Tu, Jenn

    2013-01-01

    Phosphate is an essential nutrient for heterotrophic bacteria, affecting bacterioplankton in aquatic ecosystems and bacteria in biofilms. However, the influence of phosphate limitation on bacterial competition and biofilm development in multispecies populations has received limited attention in existing studies. To address this issue, we isolated 13 adhesive bacteria from paper machine aggregates. Intergeneric inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa WW5 by Serratia marcescens WW4 was identified under phosphate-limited conditions, but not in Luria–Bertani medium or M9 minimal medium. The viable numbers of the pure S. marcescens WW4 culture decreased over 3 days in the phosphate-limited medium; however, the mortality of S. marcescens WW4 was significantly reduced when it was co-cultured with P. aeruginosa WW5, which appeared to sustain the S. marcescens WW4 biofilm. In contrast, viable P. aeruginosa WW5 cells immediately declined in the phosphate-limited co-culture. To identify the genetic/inhibitory element(s) involved in this process, we inserted a mini-Tn5 mutant of S. marcescens WW4 that lacked inhibitory effect. The results showed that an endonuclease bacteriocin was involved in this intergeneric inhibition by S. marcescens WW4 under phosphate limitation. In conclusion, this study highlights the importance of nutrient limitation in bacterial interactions and provides a strong candidate gene for future functional characterisation. PMID:23398522

  19. Phosphate limitation induces the intergeneric inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by Serratia marcescens isolated from paper machines.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Pei-An; Kuo, Chih-Horng; Lai, Yiu-Kay; Graumann, Peter L; Tu, Jenn

    2013-06-01

    Phosphate is an essential nutrient for heterotrophic bacteria, affecting bacterioplankton in aquatic ecosystems and bacteria in biofilms. However, the influence of phosphate limitation on bacterial competition and biofilm development in multispecies populations has received limited attention in existing studies. To address this issue, we isolated 13 adhesive bacteria from paper machine aggregates. Intergeneric inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa WW5 by Serratia marcescens WW4 was identified under phosphate-limited conditions, but not in Luria-Bertani medium or M9 minimal medium. The viable numbers of the pure S. marcescens WW4 culture decreased over 3 days in the phosphate-limited medium; however, the mortality of S. marcescens WW4 was significantly reduced when it was co-cultured with P. aeruginosa WW5, which appeared to sustain the S. marcescens WW4 biofilm. In contrast, viable P. aeruginosa WW5 cells immediately declined in the phosphate-limited co-culture. To identify the genetic/inhibitory element(s) involved in this process, we inserted a mini-Tn5 mutant of S. marcescens WW4 that lacked inhibitory effect. The results showed that an endonuclease bacteriocin was involved in this intergeneric inhibition by S. marcescens WW4 under phosphate limitation. In conclusion, this study highlights the importance of nutrient limitation in bacterial interactions and provides a strong candidate gene for future functional characterisation.

  20. Antibacterial Activity of Hibicuslide C on Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates.

    PubMed

    Lee, Heejeong; Choi, Hyemin; Lee, Je Chul; Lee, Yoo Chul; Woo, Eun-Rhan; Lee, Dong Gun

    2016-10-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a gram-negative bacterium that is frequently related to natural resistance to many drugs. In this work, the inhibition of growth against P. aeruginosa and multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa (MDRPA) isolated from patients at Kyungpook National University was confirmed for hibicuslide C, essential oil components from Abutilon theophrasti. Hibicuslide C has antifungal activity with membrane disruption and apoptotic response against Candida albicans. However, its antibacterial activity was not reported yet. Cells treated with hibicuslide C was showed that its antipseudomonal activity is related to gDNA fragmentation and damage by TUNEL and gDNA electrophoresis. Furthermore, hibicuslide C worked synergistically with fluoroquinolones and rifampicin against MDRPA regardless of the ATP-associated mechanism. The antibiofilm activity possessed sole-resulting tissue culture plate method; besides that, the antibiofilm activity of other antibiotics was supported in particular MDRPA. The essential oil components like hibicuslide C may have antipseudomonal activity and, furthermore, increase in bacterial antibiotic susceptibility. PMID:27368232

  1. First Identification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates Producing a KPC-Type Carbapenem-Hydrolyzing β-Lactamase▿

    PubMed Central

    Villegas, Maria Virginia; Lolans, Karen; Correa, Adriana; Kattan, Juan Nicolas; Lopez, Jaime A.; Quinn, John P.

    2007-01-01

    In Medellin, Colombia, three Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates with high-level carbapenem resistance (MIC ≥ 256 μg/ml) and an isolate of Citrobacter freundii with reduced susceptibility to imipenem produced the plasmid-mediated class A carbapenemase KPC-2. This is the first report of a KPC-type β-lactamase identified outside of the family Enterobacteriaceae. PMID:17261621

  2. Decolorization of Distillery Spent Wash Using Biopolymer Synthesized by Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated from Tannery Effluent.

    PubMed

    David, Charles; Arivazhagan, M; Balamurali, M N; Shanmugarajan, Dhivya

    2015-01-01

    A bacterial strain was isolated from tannery effluent which can tolerate high concentrations of potassium dichromate up to 1000 ppm. The isolated microorganism was identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa by performing biochemical tests and molecular characterization. In the presence of excess of carbohydrate source, which is a physiological stress, this strain produces Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB). This intracellular polymer, which is synthesized, is primarily a product of carbon assimilation and is employed by microorganisms as an energy storage molecule to be metabolized when other common energy sources are limitedly available. Efforts were taken to check whether the PHB has any positive effect on spent wash decolorization. When a combination of PHB and the isolated bacterial culture was added to spent wash, a maximum color removal of 92.77% was found which was comparatively higher than the color removed when the spent wash was treated individually with the PHB and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. PHB behaved as a support material for the bacteria to bind to it and thus develops biofilm, which is one of the natural physiological growth forms of microorganisms. The bacterial growth in the biofilm and the polymer together acted in synergy, adsorbing and coagulating the pollutants in the form of color pigments.

  3. Decolorization of Distillery Spent Wash Using Biopolymer Synthesized by Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated from Tannery Effluent.

    PubMed

    David, Charles; Arivazhagan, M; Balamurali, M N; Shanmugarajan, Dhivya

    2015-01-01

    A bacterial strain was isolated from tannery effluent which can tolerate high concentrations of potassium dichromate up to 1000 ppm. The isolated microorganism was identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa by performing biochemical tests and molecular characterization. In the presence of excess of carbohydrate source, which is a physiological stress, this strain produces Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB). This intracellular polymer, which is synthesized, is primarily a product of carbon assimilation and is employed by microorganisms as an energy storage molecule to be metabolized when other common energy sources are limitedly available. Efforts were taken to check whether the PHB has any positive effect on spent wash decolorization. When a combination of PHB and the isolated bacterial culture was added to spent wash, a maximum color removal of 92.77% was found which was comparatively higher than the color removed when the spent wash was treated individually with the PHB and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. PHB behaved as a support material for the bacteria to bind to it and thus develops biofilm, which is one of the natural physiological growth forms of microorganisms. The bacterial growth in the biofilm and the polymer together acted in synergy, adsorbing and coagulating the pollutants in the form of color pigments. PMID:26504787

  4. Decolorization of Distillery Spent Wash Using Biopolymer Synthesized by Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated from Tannery Effluent

    PubMed Central

    David, Charles; Arivazhagan, M.; Balamurali, M. N.; Shanmugarajan, Dhivya

    2015-01-01

    A bacterial strain was isolated from tannery effluent which can tolerate high concentrations of potassium dichromate up to 1000 ppm. The isolated microorganism was identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa by performing biochemical tests and molecular characterization. In the presence of excess of carbohydrate source, which is a physiological stress, this strain produces Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB). This intracellular polymer, which is synthesized, is primarily a product of carbon assimilation and is employed by microorganisms as an energy storage molecule to be metabolized when other common energy sources are limitedly available. Efforts were taken to check whether the PHB has any positive effect on spent wash decolorization. When a combination of PHB and the isolated bacterial culture was added to spent wash, a maximum color removal of 92.77% was found which was comparatively higher than the color removed when the spent wash was treated individually with the PHB and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. PHB behaved as a support material for the bacteria to bind to it and thus develops biofilm, which is one of the natural physiological growth forms of microorganisms. The bacterial growth in the biofilm and the polymer together acted in synergy, adsorbing and coagulating the pollutants in the form of color pigments. PMID:26504787

  5. [Molecular typification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated from patients with cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Iglesias, N G; Marengo, J M; Rentería, F; Gatti, B; Segal, E; Semorile, L

    2008-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is the most frequent lethal genetic disease that affects the caucasian population. The main cause of morbidity is the chronic lung infection, being the infection caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa the most difficult to eradicate. This bacteria can be acquired in direct form, by person-to-person transfer, or indirectly, by hospital acquired infection. The Centro Provincial de Referencia de Fibrosis Quistica functioning in the Hospital de Niños "Sor María Ludovica", in La Plata, cares almost 220 patients aged two months to 45 years. The life expectancy depends of factors like the early diagnosis of the disease and the later acquisition of the chronic lung infection. The purpose of this work was the molecular typing of P. aeruginosa isolates obtained from cystic fibrosis patients to evaluate the genomic relationship among them. The study was carried out using RAPD-PCR. The analysis showed a great genetic heterogeneity among the isolates. The separation of the patients in groups in accordance with its bacteriology, that implies the attendance in different days and the implementation of isolation (or segregation) measures had demonstrated to be, in addition to other strategies, effective in the reduction of cross infections. PMID:18669045

  6. Extensively Drug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates Containing blaVIM-2 and Elements of Salmonella Genomic Island 2: a New Genetic Resistance Determinant in Northeast Ohio

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Federico; Hujer, Andrea M.; Marshall, Steven H.; Ray, Amy J.; Rather, Philip N.; Suwantarat, Nuntra; Dumford, Donald; O'Shea, Patrick; Domitrovic, T. Nicholas J.; Salata, Robert A.; Chavda, Kalyan D.; Chen, Liang; Kreiswirth, Barry N.; Vila, Alejandro J.; Haussler, Susanne; Jacobs, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Carbapenems are a mainstay of treatment for infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Carbapenem resistance mediated by metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs) remains uncommon in the United States, despite the worldwide emergence of this group of enzymes. Between March 2012 and May 2013, we detected MBL-producing P. aeruginosa in a university-affiliated health care system in northeast Ohio. We examined the clinical characteristics and outcomes of patients, defined the resistance determinants and structure of the genetic element harboring the blaMBL gene through genome sequencing, and typed MBL-producing P. aeruginosa isolates using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), repetitive sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR), and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Seven patients were affected that were hospitalized at three community hospitals, a long-term-care facility, and a tertiary care center; one of the patients died as a result of infection. Isolates belonged to sequence type 233 (ST233) and were extensively drug resistant (XDR), including resistance to all fluoroquinolones, aminoglycosides, and β-lactams; two isolates were nonsusceptible to colistin. The blaMBL gene was identified as blaVIM-2 contained within a class 1 integron (In559), similar to the cassette array previously detected in isolates from Norway, Russia, Taiwan, and Chicago, IL. Genomic sequencing and assembly revealed that In559 was part of a novel 35-kb region that also included a Tn501-like transposon and Salmonella genomic island 2 (SGI2)-homologous sequences. This analysis of XDR strains producing VIM-2 from northeast Ohio revealed a novel recombination event between Salmonella and P. aeruginosa, heralding a new antibiotic resistance threat in this region's health care system. PMID:25070102

  7. [The comparison of selected virulence factors in Pseudomonas aeruginosa catheter isolates].

    PubMed

    Olejnízková, Katerina; Holá, Veronika

    2012-05-01

    Healthcare quality improvement brings about an increasing number of invasive diagnostic and therapeutic procedures and thus also an increasing number of high-risk patients prone to hospital infections. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most commonly isolated nosocomial species and the treatment of the infection is often long and problematic, with frequent recurrences. The pathogenesis of Pseudomonas infection is associated with a range of virulence factors. In the present study, 93 catheter isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were screened for the biofilm formation, motility and secretion of selected extracellular products. A high rate of the strains tested were producers of hemolysins, LasB elastase, and pyoverdines (> 70%). The biofilm formation was detected in 80% of isolates and formation of aerated biofilm was present in 90% of isolates with a positive correlation found between the two types of biofilm formation (p = 0.00583; gamma = 0.551). All strains showed swarming motility, 95% of strains showed swimming motility, and 75% of strains showed twitching motility. Among the virulence factors studied, only pyocyanin and pyochelin were produced by a lower proportion of isolates (< 25%). A positive correlation was seen between the production of some extracellular molecules (pyochelin and pyocyanin, pyocyanin and LasB elastase, and LasB elastase and haemolysins), between biofilm formation and formation of aerated biofilm, and between formation of aerated biofilm and pigments (pyoverdine and pyocyanin) production. On the other hand, a negative correlation was found between biofilm production and LasB elastase production and between the production of biofilm under immersion and pigments (pyoverdine and pyocyanin) production. All correlations are significant at the level p = 0.05, with the correlation coefficient gamma > 0.50.

  8. [The comparison of selected virulence factors in Pseudomonas aeruginosa catheter isolates].

    PubMed

    Olejnízková, Katerina; Holá, Veronika

    2012-05-01

    Healthcare quality improvement brings about an increasing number of invasive diagnostic and therapeutic procedures and thus also an increasing number of high-risk patients prone to hospital infections. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most commonly isolated nosocomial species and the treatment of the infection is often long and problematic, with frequent recurrences. The pathogenesis of Pseudomonas infection is associated with a range of virulence factors. In the present study, 93 catheter isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were screened for the biofilm formation, motility and secretion of selected extracellular products. A high rate of the strains tested were producers of hemolysins, LasB elastase, and pyoverdines (> 70%). The biofilm formation was detected in 80% of isolates and formation of aerated biofilm was present in 90% of isolates with a positive correlation found between the two types of biofilm formation (p = 0.00583; gamma = 0.551). All strains showed swarming motility, 95% of strains showed swimming motility, and 75% of strains showed twitching motility. Among the virulence factors studied, only pyocyanin and pyochelin were produced by a lower proportion of isolates (< 25%). A positive correlation was seen between the production of some extracellular molecules (pyochelin and pyocyanin, pyocyanin and LasB elastase, and LasB elastase and haemolysins), between biofilm formation and formation of aerated biofilm, and between formation of aerated biofilm and pigments (pyoverdine and pyocyanin) production. On the other hand, a negative correlation was found between biofilm production and LasB elastase production and between the production of biofilm under immersion and pigments (pyoverdine and pyocyanin) production. All correlations are significant at the level p = 0.05, with the correlation coefficient gamma > 0.50. PMID:22880261

  9. LasR Variant Cystic Fibrosis Isolates Reveal an Adaptable Quorum-Sensing Hierarchy in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Feltner, John B.; Wolter, Daniel J.; Pope, Christopher E.; Groleau, Marie-Christine; Smalley, Nicole E.; Greenberg, E. Peter; Mayer-Hamblett, Nicole; Burns, Jane; Hoffman, Lucas R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections cause significant morbidity in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Over years to decades, P. aeruginosa adapts genetically as it establishes chronic lung infections. Nonsynonymous mutations in lasR, the quorum-sensing (QS) master regulator, are common in CF. In laboratory strains of P. aeruginosa, LasR activates transcription of dozens of genes, including that for another QS regulator, RhlR. Despite the frequency with which lasR coding variants have been reported to occur in P. aeruginosa CF isolates, little is known about their consequences for QS. We sequenced lasR from 2,583 P. aeruginosa CF isolates. The lasR sequences of 580 isolates (22%) coded for polypeptides that differed from the conserved LasR polypeptides of well-studied laboratory strains. This collection included 173 unique lasR coding variants, 116 of which were either missense or nonsense mutations. We studied 31 of these variants. About one-sixth of the variant LasR proteins were functional, including 3 with nonsense mutations, and in some LasR-null isolates, genes that are LasR dependent in laboratory strains were nonetheless expressed. Furthermore, about half of the LasR-null isolates retained RhlR activity. Therefore, in some CF isolates the QS hierarchy is altered such that RhlR quorum sensing is independent of LasR regulation. Our analysis challenges the view that QS-silent P. aeruginosa is selected during the course of a chronic CF lung infection. Rather, some lasR sequence variants retain functionality, and many employ an alternate QS strategy involving RhlR. PMID:27703072

  10. Mechanisms of carbapenem resistance in endemic Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates after an SPM-1 metallo-β-lactamase producing strain subsided in an intensive care unit of a teaching hospital in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Cacci, Luciana Camila; Chuster, Stephanie Gomes; Martins, Natacha; do Carmo, Pâmella Rodrigues; Girão, Valéria Brígido de Carvalho; Nouér, Simone Aranha; de Freitas, Wania Vasconcelos; de Matos, Juliana Arruda; Magalhães, Ana Cristina de Gouveia; Ferreira, Adriana Lúcia Pires; Picão, Renata Cristina; Moreira, Beatriz Meurer

    2016-01-01

    Carbapenem-resistance mechanisms are a challenge in the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections. We investigated changes in P. aeruginosa carbapenem-resistance determinants over a time period of eight years after the emergence of São Paulo metallo-β-lactamase in a university hospital in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) were screened for P. aeruginosa colonisation and followed for the occurrence of infections from April 2007 to April 2008. The ICU environment was also sampled. Isolates were typed using random amplified polymorphic DNA, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by disk diffusion and E-test, production of carbapenemases by a modified-CarbaNP test and presence of carbapenemase-encoding genes by polymerase chain reaction. Non-carbapenemase resistance mechanisms studied included efflux and AmpC overexpression by PAβN and cloxacillin susceptibility enhancement, respectively, as well as oprD mutations. From 472 P. aeruginosa clinical isolates (93 patients) and 17 isolates from the ICU environment, high genotypic diversity and several international clones were observed; one environment isolate belonged to the blaSPM-1 P. aeruginosa epidemic genotype. Among isolates from infections, 10 (29%) were carbapenem resistant: none produced carbapenemases, three exhibited all non-carbapenemase mechanisms studied, six presented a combination of two mechanisms, and one exclusively displayed oprD mutations. Carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa displayed a polyclonal profile after the SPM-1 epidemic genotype declined. This phenomenon is connected with blaSPM-1 P. aeruginosa replaced by other carbapenem-resistant pathogens. PMID:27653359

  11. Mechanisms of carbapenem resistance in endemic Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates after an SPM-1 metallo-β-lactamase producing strain subsided in an intensive care unit of a teaching hospital in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Cacci, Luciana Camila; Chuster, Stephanie Gomes; Martins, Natacha; do Carmo, Pâmella Rodrigues; Girão, Valéria Brígido de Carvalho; Nouér, Simone Aranha; de Freitas, Wania Vasconcelos; de Matos, Juliana Arruda; Magalhães, Ana Cristina de Gouveia; Ferreira, Adriana Lúcia Pires; Picão, Renata Cristina; Moreira, Beatriz Meurer

    2016-01-01

    Carbapenem-resistance mechanisms are a challenge in the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections. We investigated changes in P. aeruginosa carbapenem-resistance determinants over a time period of eight years after the emergence of São Paulo metallo-β-lactamase in a university hospital in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) were screened for P. aeruginosa colonisation and followed for the occurrence of infections from April 2007 to April 2008. The ICU environment was also sampled. Isolates were typed using random amplified polymorphic DNA, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by disk diffusion and E-test, production of carbapenemases by a modified-CarbaNP test and presence of carbapenemase-encoding genes by polymerase chain reaction. Non-carbapenemase resistance mechanisms studied included efflux and AmpC overexpression by PAβN and cloxacillin susceptibility enhancement, respectively, as well as oprD mutations. From 472 P. aeruginosa clinical isolates (93 patients) and 17 isolates from the ICU environment, high genotypic diversity and several international clones were observed; one environment isolate belonged to the blaSPM-1 P. aeruginosa epidemic genotype. Among isolates from infections, 10 (29%) were carbapenem resistant: none produced carbapenemases, three exhibited all non-carbapenemase mechanisms studied, six presented a combination of two mechanisms, and one exclusively displayed oprD mutations. Carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa displayed a polyclonal profile after the SPM-1 epidemic genotype declined. This phenomenon is connected with blaSPM-1 P. aeruginosa replaced by other carbapenem-resistant pathogens.

  12. Mechanisms of carbapenem resistance in endemic Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates after an SPM-1 metallo-β-lactamase producing strain subsided in an intensive care unit of a teaching hospital in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Cacci, Luciana Camila; Chuster, Stephanie Gomes; Martins, Natacha; Carmo, Pâmella Rodrigues do; Girão, Valéria Brígido de Carvalho; Nouér, Simone Aranha; Freitas, Wania Vasconcelos de; Matos, Juliana Arruda de; Magalhães, Ana Cristina de Gouveia; Ferreira, Adriana Lúcia Pires; Picão, Renata Cristina; Moreira, Beatriz Meurer

    2016-09-01

    Carbapenem-resistance mechanisms are a challenge in the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections. We investigated changes in P. aeruginosa carbapenem-resistance determinants over a time period of eight years after the emergence of São Paulo metallo-β-lactamase in a university hospital in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) were screened for P. aeruginosa colonisation and followed for the occurrence of infections from April 2007 to April 2008. The ICU environment was also sampled. Isolates were typed using random amplified polymorphic DNA, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by disk diffusion and E-test, production of carbapenemases by a modified-CarbaNP test and presence of carbapenemase-encoding genes by polymerase chain reaction. Non-carbapenemase resistance mechanisms studied included efflux and AmpC overexpression by PAβN and cloxacillin susceptibility enhancement, respectively, as well as oprD mutations. From 472 P. aeruginosa clinical isolates (93 patients) and 17 isolates from the ICU environment, high genotypic diversity and several international clones were observed; one environment isolate belonged to the blaSPM-1 P. aeruginosa epidemic genotype. Among isolates from infections, 10 (29%) were carbapenem resistant: none produced carbapenemases, three exhibited all non-carbapenemase mechanisms studied, six presented a combination of two mechanisms, and one exclusively displayed oprD mutations. Carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa displayed a polyclonal profile after the SPM-1 epidemic genotype declined. This phenomenon is connected with blaSPM-1 P. aeruginosa replaced by other carbapenem-resistant pathogens. PMID:27653359

  13. Whole-Genome Sequence of Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain BAMCPA07-48, Isolated from a Combat Injury Wound.

    PubMed

    Sanjar, Fatemeh; Karna, S L Rajasekhar; Chen, Tsute; Chen, Ping; Abercrombie, Johnathan J; Leung, Kai P

    2016-07-07

    We report here the complete genome sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain BAMCPA07-48, isolated from a combat injury wound. The closed genome sequence of this isolate is a valuable resource for pathogenome characterization of P. aeruginosa associated with wounds, which will aid in the development of a higher-resolution phylogenomic framework for molecular-guided pathogen-surveillance.

  14. Antimicrobial resistance and genetic characterization of fluoroquinolone resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from canine infections.

    PubMed

    Rubin, J; Walker, R D; Blickenstaff, K; Bodeis-Jones, S; Zhao, S

    2008-09-18

    Infections with antimicrobial-resistant bacteria are a great challenge in both human and veterinary medicine. The purpose of this study was to determine antimicrobial susceptibility of 106 strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from dogs with otitis and pyoderma from 2003 to 2006 in the United States. Three antimicrobial panels, including 6 classes and 32 antimicrobial agents, were used. A wide range of susceptibility patterns were noted with some isolates being resistant to between 8 and 28 (mean 16) of the antimicrobials tested. Among the beta-lactams, all isolates were resistant to ampicillin, cefoxitin, cefpodoxime, cephalothin and cefazolin followed by amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (99%), ceftiofur (97%), ceftriaxone (39%), cefotaxime (26%), and cefotaxime/clavulanic acid (20%), whereas less than 7% of isolates were resistant to ceftazidime/clavulanic acid, ceftazidime, piperacillin/tazobactam or cefepime. Two isolates were resistant to the carbapenems. Among the quinolones and fluoroquinolones, the most isolates were resistant to naladixic acid (96%), followed by orbifloxacin (52%), difloxacin (43%), enrofloxacin (31%), marbofloxacin (27%), gatifloxacin (23%), levofloxacin (21%), and ciprofloxacin (16%). Among the aminoglycosides, the most resistance was seen to kanamycin (90%), followed by streptomycin (69%), gentamicin (7%), and amikacin (3%). Of the remaining antimicrobials 100% of the isolates were resistant to chloramphenicol followed by tetracycline (98%), trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (57%), and sulfisoxazole (51%). Point mutations were present in gyrA, gyrB, parC, and/or parE genes among 34 of the 102 naladixic acid-resistant isolates. Two isolates contained class 1 integrons carrying aadA gene conferring streptomycin and spectinomycin resistance. The findings suggest that many antimicrobial agents commonly used in companion animals may not constitute appropriate therapy for canine pseudomonas infections.

  15. [Degradation characteristics of naphthalene with a Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain isolated from soil contaminated by diesel].

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen-Chao; Wu, Bin-Bin; Li, Xiao-Sen; Lu, Dian-Nan; Liu, Yong-Min

    2015-02-01

    Abstract: A naphthalene-degrading bacterium (referred as HD-5) was isolated from the diesel-contaminated soil and was assigned to Pseudomonas aeruginosa according to 16S rDNA sequences analysis. Gene nah, which encodes naphthalene dioxygenase, was identified from strain HD-5 by PCR amplification. Different bioremediation approaches, including nature attenuation, bioaugmentation with strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa, biostimulation, and an integrated degradation by bioaugmentation and biostimulation, were evaluated for their effectiveness in the remediating soil containing 5% naphthalene. The degradation rates of naphthalene in the soil were compared among the different bioremediation approaches, the FDA and dehydrogenase activity in bioremediation process were measured, and the gene copy number of 16S rRNA and nah in soil were dynamically monitored using real-time PCR. It was shown that the naphthalene removal rate reached 71.94%, 62.22% and 83.14% in approaches of bioaugmentation (B), biostimulation(S) and integrated degradation composed of bioaugmentation and biostimulation (BS), respectively. The highest removal rate of naphthalene was achieved by using BS protocol, which also gives the highest FDA and dehydrogenase activity. The gene copy number of 16S rRNA and nah in soil increased by about 2.67 x 10(11) g(-1) and 8.67 x 10(8) g(-1) after 31 days treatment using BS protocol. Above-mentioned results also demonstrated that the screened bacterium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, could grow well in naphthalene-contaminated soil and effectively degrade naphthalene, which is of fundamental importance for bioremediation of naphthalene-contaminated soil.

  16. Antimicrobial resistance pattern and their beta-lactamase encoding genes among Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated from cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Zafer, Mai M; Al-Agamy, Mohamed H; El-Mahallawy, Hadir A; Amin, Magdy A; Ashour, Mohammed Seif El-Din

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the prevalence of metallo-β-lactamases (MBL) and extended-spectrum β -lactamases (ESBL) in P. aeruginosa isolates collected from two different hospitals in Cairo, Egypt. Antibiotic susceptibility testing and phenotypic screening for ESBLs and MBLs were performed on 122 P. aeruginosa isolates collected in the period from January 2011 to March 2012. MICs were determined. ESBLs and MBLs genes were sought by PCR. The resistant rate to imipenem was 39.34%. The resistance rates for P. aeruginosa to cefuroxime, cefoperazone, ceftazidime, aztreonam, and piperacillin/tazobactam were 87.7%, 80.3%, 60.6%, 45.1%, and 25.4%, respectively. Out of 122 P. aeruginosa, 27% and 7.4% were MBL and ESBL, respectively. The prevalence of bla(VIM-2), bla(OXA-10(-)), bla(VEB-1), bla(NDM(-)), and bla(IMP-1)-like genes were found in 58.3%, 41.7%, 10.4%, 4.2%, and 2.1%, respectively. GIM-, SPM-, SIM-, and OXA-2-like genes were not detected in this study. OXA-10-like gene was concomitant with VIM-2 and/or VEB. Twelve isolates harbored both OXA-10 and VIM-2; two isolates carried both OXA-10 and VEB. Only one strain contained OXA-10, VIM-2, and VEB. In conclusion, bla(VIM-2)- and bla(OXA-10)-like genes were the most prevalent genes in P. aeruginosa in Egypt. To our knowledge, this is the first report of bla(VIM-2), bla(IMP-1), bla(NDM), and bla(OXA-10) in P. aeruginosa in Egypt.

  17. A thermo-stable lysine aminopeptidase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Isolation, purification, characterization, and sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yan Tao; Zhou, Nan Di; Zhou, Zhe Min; Gao, Xin Xing; Tian, Ya Ping

    2014-10-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa NJ-814, isolated from garden soil, produced an extracellular aminopeptidase that was purified using ammonium sulfate precipitation and ion exchange chromatography. The purity was confirmed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and the Mr value of the enzyme was estimated to be 55 kDa. The purified enzyme shows maximum activity at pH 9.0 and 80 °C. It exhibits high thermo-stability. Half of the activity can remain after incubation at 80 °C for 119 min. It is stable within pH range of 7.5-10.5. It is strongly activated by Co(2+) and inhibited by Fe(2+) , Cu(2+) , Ni(2+) , Zn(2+) , and ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA). The specificity of the enzyme was investigated. Within several aminoacyl-p-nitroanilines (AA-pNA), Lys-pNA is proven to be the optimal substrate. The Michaelis-Menten constant (Km ) of the enzyme for Lys-pNA and Leu-pNA were 2.32 and 9.41 mM, respectively. Peptide map fingerprinting shows that the sequence of the enzyme is highly similar to aminopeptidase Y from P. aeruginosa 18A. It can be speculated that this enzyme is a Zn(2+) -dependent enzyme and contains two zinc ions in its active site.

  18. Phenazine carboxylic acid production and rhizome protective effect of endophytic Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from Zingiber officinale.

    PubMed

    Jasim, B; Anisha, C; Rohini, Sabu; Kurian, Jacob Manoj; Jyothis, Mathew; Radhakrishnan, E K

    2014-05-01

    Ginger (Zingiber officinale) is cultivated commercially in most parts of the world especially in India for its culinary and medicinal applications. One of the major challenges that limit the yield of ginger is rhizome rot disease caused by organisms including Pythium myriotylum. A feasible ecofriendly method is yet to be devised to prevent the plant from this threatening disease. Recent studies on plant microbiome show the possibility of having endophytic organisms with plant protective characteristics associated with the plants. Because of the uniquely evolved underground nature of the ginger rhizome and its peculiar survival in soil for a long time, many interesting endophytic microbes with plant protective characters can be well expected from it. In the current study, previously isolated endophytic Pseudomonas aeruginosa from ginger was investigated in detail for its effect on Pythium myriotylum. The rhizome protective effect of the organism was also studied by co-inoculation studies, which confirmed that Pseudomonas aeruginosa has very potent inhibitory effect on Pythium myriotylum. On further studies, the active antifungal compound was identified as phenazine 1-carboxylic acid.

  19. Antibiotic and metal resistance in a ST395 Pseudomonas aeruginosa environmental isolate: A genomics approach.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Pedro; Tacão, Marta; Alves, Artur; Henriques, Isabel

    2016-09-15

    We analyzed the resistome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa E67, an epiphytic isolate from a metal-contaminated estuary. The aim was to identify genetic determinants of resistance to antibiotics and metals, assessing possible co-selection mechanisms. Identification was based on phylogenetic analysis and average nucleotide identity value calculation. MLST affiliated E67 to ST395, previously described as a high-risk clone. Genome analysis allowed identifying genes probably involved in resistance to antibiotics (e.g. beta-lactams, aminoglycosides and chloramphenicol) and metals (e.g. mercury and copper), consistent with resistance phenotypes. Several genes associated with efflux systems, as well as genetic determinants contributing to gene motility, were identified. Pseudomonas aeruginosa E67 possesses an arsenal of resistance determinants, probably contributing to adaptation to a polluted ecosystem. Association to mobile structures highlights the role of these platforms in multi-drug resistance. Physical links between metal and antibiotic resistance genes were not identified, suggesting a predominance of cross-resistance associated with multidrug efflux pumps.

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA1, Isolated from a Patient with a Respiratory Tract Infection.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shuguang; Le, Shuai; Li, Gang; Shen, Mengyu; Tan, Yinling; Zhao, Xia; Wang, Jing; Shen, Wei; Guo, Keke; Yang, Yuhui; Zhu, Hongbin; Li, Shu; Li, Ming; Zhu, Junmin; Rao, Xiancai; Hu, Fuquan

    2015-01-01

    We report the 6,498,072-bp complete genome sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA1, which was isolated from a patient with a respiratory tract infection in Chongqing, People's Republic of China. Whole-genome sequencing was performed using single-molecule real-time (SMRT) technology, and de novo assembly revealed a single contig with 396-fold sequence coverage. PMID:26659688

  1. Antibacterial-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Clinical Impact and Complex Regulation of Chromosomally Encoded Resistance Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Lister, Philip D.; Wolter, Daniel J.; Hanson, Nancy D.

    2009-01-01

    Summary: Treatment of infectious diseases becomes more challenging with each passing year. This is especially true for infections caused by the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, with its ability to rapidly develop resistance to multiple classes of antibiotics. Although the import of resistance mechanisms on mobile genetic elements is always a concern, the most difficult challenge we face with P. aeruginosa is its ability to rapidly develop resistance during the course of treating an infection. The chromosomally encoded AmpC cephalosporinase, the outer membrane porin OprD, and the multidrug efflux pumps are particularly relevant to this therapeutic challenge. The discussion presented in this review highlights the clinical significance of these chromosomally encoded resistance mechanisms, as well as the complex mechanisms/pathways by which P. aeruginosa regulates their expression. Although a great deal of knowledge has been gained toward understanding the regulation of AmpC, OprD, and efflux pumps in P. aeruginosa, it is clear that we have much to learn about how this resourceful pathogen coregulates different resistance mechanisms to overcome the antibacterial challenges it faces. PMID:19822890

  2. Evaluation of biofilm production and characterization of genes encoding type III secretion system among Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from burn patients.

    PubMed

    Jabalameli, Fereshteh; Mirsalehian, Akbar; Khoramian, Babak; Aligholi, Marzieh; Khoramrooz, Seyed Sajjad; Asadollahi, Parisa; Taherikalani, Morovat; Emaneini, Mohammad

    2012-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the common pathogenic causes of serious infections in burn patients throughout the world. Type III secretion toxins are thought to promote the dissemination of P. aeruginosa from the site of infection, the bacterial evasion of the host immune response and inhibition of DNA synthesis leading to host cell death. A total of 96 isolates of P. aeruginosa were collected from wound infections of burn patients, from April to July 2010. Antimicrobial susceptibility of the isolates were determined by disk agar diffusion method. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based method was used for targeting the genes encoding the type III secretion toxins. The quantitative determination of biofilm-forming capacity was determined by a colorimetric microtiter plate assay. All the isolates were resistant to cefixime and ceftriaxone. More than 90% of the isolates were resistant to amikacin, carbenicillin, cefepime, cefotaxime, cefpodoxime, gatifloxacin, gentamicin, piperacillin/tazobactam, ticarcillin and tobramycin. All the isolates carried the exoT gene, 95% carried exoY, 64.5% carried exoU and 29% carried the exoS gene. Most of the isolates (58%) carried both exoY and exoU genes while 24% showed the concomitant presence of exoS and exoY and 1% carried both exoS and exoU. Coexistence of exoS, exoY and exoU was seen in 4% of the isolates. Biofilm formation was seen in more than 96% of the isolates among which 47% were strong biofilm producers, 26% were moderate and 22.9% were weak biofilm formers. In conclusion, the findings of this study show that the genes, particularly the exoU gene, encoding the type III secretion toxins, are commonly disseminated among the P. aeruginosa strains isolated from burn patients.

  3. Inhibition of Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntze on Microcystis aeruginosa and isolation of the inhibition factors.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yaping; Wang, Jin; Yu, Yang; Su, Wen; Kong, Fanxiang

    2013-07-01

    Low concentration of tea (Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntze) was shown to inhibit the growth of the toxic cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa. The inhibition efficiency was 40% at 0.1 g dry tea/L and 90% at 0.2 g/L after a 12-day culture. All varieties of tea used in the test could inhibit Microcystis growth, in which the inhibitory effect of green tea was greater than that of black tea. Antialgal allelochemicals were isolated from tea by solvent extraction, gel-chromatography and high performance liquid chromatography. Two algal-inhibition compounds were identified by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry as epigallocatechin-3-gallate, epicatechin-3-gallate respectively. These are the main polyphenols in tea that have inhibitory effects on the growth of cyanobacteria. The combined effect of these polyphenols makes tea a promising source of algicide to inhibit the growth of algal blooms.

  4. Biodegradation of pyrene by a Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain RS1 isolated from refinery sludge.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Indrani; Jasmine, Jublee; Mukherji, Suparna

    2014-08-01

    High molecular weight (HMW) polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) with more than three rings are inherently difficult to degrade. Degradation of HMW PAHs is primarily reported for actinomycetes, such as, Rhodococcus and Mycobacterium. This study reports pyrene degradation by a Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain isolated from tank bottom sludge in a refinery. High cell surface hydrophobicity induced during growth on pyrene facilitated its utilization as sole carbon source. Specific growth rate (μ) in the range of 0.03-0.085 h(-1) could be achieved over the concentration range 25-500 mg/L. The specific growth rate and specific pyrene utilization rate increased linearly with increase in total pyrene concentration. Although various degradation intermediates were identified in the aqueous phase, accumulation of total organic carbon (TOC) in the aqueous phase was only a small fraction of TOC equivalents of pyrene lost from the cultures. The degradation pathway appears to be similar to that reported for Mycobacterium sp. PYR-I.

  5. Serotyping of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated in Bulgaria using the Lányi-Bergan combined scheme.

    PubMed

    Pencheva, P

    1986-01-01

    Two hundred Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated in hospitals in Bulgaria were serotyped according to the combined scheme of Lányi and Bergan, supplemented by Akatova and Smirnova and Homma, using agglutinating O-antisera prepared in the National Institute of Hygiene, Budapest. The most frequently encountered serogroup is O2 (29%) followed by O11 (28.5%), O6, O3, O10 etc. The results were compared with those obtained by using Difco antisera prepared according to Liu et al., and showed 96.5% coincidence. The strains were phage typed according to the scheme of Meitert and tested for antibiotic resistance to aminoglycosides (gentamicin, carbenicillin, tobramycin and amikacin). Phage groups 3 (3a and 3(3)) and 1 (1a) predominated. The strains exhibited sensitivity to amikacin (99%) and frequent resistance to gentamicin (45.8%, carbenicillin (40%) and tobramycin (28%). Subdivision of the serogroups into phage and resisto-types contributes to analysis of nosocomial infections.

  6. A Carbapenem-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolate Harboring Two Copies of blaIMP-34 Encoding a Metallo-β-Lactamase

    PubMed Central

    Tada, Tatsuya; Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru; Shimada, Kayo; Shiroma, Akino; Nakano, Kazuma; Teruya, Kuniko; Satou, Kazuhito; Hirano, Takashi; Shimojima, Masahiro; Kirikae, Teruo

    2016-01-01

    A carbapenem-resistant strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, NCGM1984, was isolated in 2012 from a hospitalized patient in Japan. Immunochromatographic assay showed that the isolate was positive for IMP-type metallo-β-lactamase. Complete genome sequencing revealed that NCGM1984 harbored two copies of blaIMP-34, located at different sites on the chromosome. Each blaIMP-34 was present in the same structures of the class 1 integrons, tnpA(ISPa7)-intI1-qacG-blaIMP-34-aac(6')-Ib-qacEdelta1-sul1-orf5-tniBdelta-tniA. The isolate belonged to multilocus sequence typing ST235, one of the international high-risk clones. IMP-34, with an amino acid substitution (Glu126Gly) compared with IMP-1, hydrolyzed all β-lactamases tested except aztreonam, and its catalytic activities were similar to IMP-1. This is the first report of a clinical isolate of an IMP-34-producing P. aeruginosa harboring two copies of blaIMP-34 on its chromosome. PMID:27055243

  7. Determination of Acquired Resistance Profiles of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates and Characterization of an Effective Bacteriocin-Like Inhibitory Substance (BLIS) Against These Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Shokri, Dariush; Rabbani Khorasgani, Mohammad; Zaghian, Saeideh; Fatemi, Seyed Masih; Mohkam, Milad; Ghasemi, Younes; Taheri-Kafrani, Asghar

    2016-01-01

    Background The emergence of pan-drug resistant strains (PDR) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa has led to renewed efforts to identify alternative agents, such as bacteriocins and bacteriocin-like inhibitory substances (BLISs). Objectives The aims of this study were to determine the acquired resistance profiles of multidrug-resistant (MDR), extensively drug-resistant (XDR), and PDR P. aeruginosa isolates based on the revised definitions of the CDC and ECDC and to screen and characterize effective BLISs against these isolates. Patients and Materials In a cross-sectional study, 96 P. aeruginosa strains were isolated during a 12-month period. The resistance profiles of these isolates were determined as MDR, XDR, and PDR, and the data were analyzed using WHONET5.6 software. A BLIS against the P. aeruginosa strains was characterized based on its physicochemical properties, size, growth curves, and production profiles. Results Among the 96 isolates of P. aeruginosa, 2 (2.1%), 94 (97.9%), and 63 (65.6%) were non-MDR, MDR, and XDR, respectively, and 1 (1.1%) was PDR. The most effective antibiotics against these isolates were polymyxins and fosfomycin. A BLIS isolated from the P. aeruginosa DSH22 strain had potent activity against 92 (95.8%) of the 96 isolates. The BLIS was heat stable, (up to 100°C for 10 min), UV stable, and active within a pH range of 3 - 9. The activity of BLIS disappeared when treated with trypsin, proteinase K, and pepsin, indicating its proteinous nature. Based on its size (25 kDa), the BLIS may belong to the large colicin-like bacteriocin family. BLIS production started in the midexponential phase of growth, and the maximum level (2700 AU/mL) occurred in the late-stationary phase after 25 hours of incubation at 30°C. Conclusions This BLIS with broad-spectrum activity may be a potential agent for the treatment or control of drug-resistant strains of P. aeruginosa infection. PMID:27800131

  8. Antimicrobial Activity of Fosfomycin-Tobramycin Combination against Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates Assessed by Time-Kill Assays and Mutant Prevention Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Díez-Aguilar, María; Tedim, Ana P.; Rodríguez, Irene; Aktaş, Zerrin; Cantón, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    The antibacterial activity of fosfomycin-tobramycin combination was studied by time-kill assay in eight Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates belonging to the fosfomycin wild-type population (MIC = 64 μg/ml) but with different tobramycin susceptibilities (MIC range, 1 to 64 μg/ml). The mutant prevention concentration (MPC) and mutant selection window (MSW) were determined in five of these strains (tobramycin MIC range, 1 to 64 μg/ml) in aerobic and anaerobic conditions simulating environments that are present in biofilm-mediated infections. Fosfomycin-tobramycin was synergistic and bactericidal for the isolates with mutations in the mexZ repressor gene, with a tobramycin MIC of 4 μg/ml. This effect was not observed in strains displaying tobramycin MICs of 1 to 2 μg/ml due to the strong bactericidal effect of tobramycin alone. Fosfomycin presented higher MPC values (range, 2,048 to >2,048 μg/ml) in aerobic and anaerobic conditions than did tobramycin (range, 16 to 256 μg/ml). Interestingly, the association rendered narrow or even null MSWs in the two conditions. However, for isolates with high-level tobramycin resistance that harbored aminoglycoside nucleotidyltransferases, time-kill assays showed no synergy, with wide MSWs in the two environments. glpT gene mutations responsible for fosfomycin resistance in P. aeruginosa were determined in fosfomycin-susceptible wild-type strains and mutant derivatives recovered from MPC studies. All mutant derivatives had changes in the GlpT amino acid sequence, which resulted in a truncated permease responsible for fosfomycin resistance. These results suggest that fosfomycin-tobramycin can be an alternative for infections due to P. aeruginosa since it has demonstrated synergistic and bactericidal activity in susceptible isolates and those with low-level tobramycin resistance. It also prevents the emergence of resistant mutants in either aerobic or anaerobic environments. PMID:26195514

  9. Antimicrobial Activity of Fosfomycin-Tobramycin Combination against Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates Assessed by Time-Kill Assays and Mutant Prevention Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Díez-Aguilar, María; Morosini, María Isabel; Tedim, Ana P; Rodríguez, Irene; Aktaş, Zerrin; Cantón, Rafael

    2015-10-01

    The antibacterial activity of fosfomycin-tobramycin combination was studied by time-kill assay in eight Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates belonging to the fosfomycin wild-type population (MIC = 64 μg/ml) but with different tobramycin susceptibilities (MIC range, 1 to 64 μg/ml). The mutant prevention concentration (MPC) and mutant selection window (MSW) were determined in five of these strains (tobramycin MIC range, 1 to 64 μg/ml) in aerobic and anaerobic conditions simulating environments that are present in biofilm-mediated infections. Fosfomycin-tobramycin was synergistic and bactericidal for the isolates with mutations in the mexZ repressor gene, with a tobramycin MIC of 4 μg/ml. This effect was not observed in strains displaying tobramycin MICs of 1 to 2 μg/ml due to the strong bactericidal effect of tobramycin alone. Fosfomycin presented higher MPC values (range, 2,048 to >2,048 μg/ml) in aerobic and anaerobic conditions than did tobramycin (range, 16 to 256 μg/ml). Interestingly, the association rendered narrow or even null MSWs in the two conditions. However, for isolates with high-level tobramycin resistance that harbored aminoglycoside nucleotidyltransferases, time-kill assays showed no synergy, with wide MSWs in the two environments. glpT gene mutations responsible for fosfomycin resistance in P. aeruginosa were determined in fosfomycin-susceptible wild-type strains and mutant derivatives recovered from MPC studies. All mutant derivatives had changes in the GlpT amino acid sequence, which resulted in a truncated permease responsible for fosfomycin resistance. These results suggest that fosfomycin-tobramycin can be an alternative for infections due to P. aeruginosa since it has demonstrated synergistic and bactericidal activity in susceptible isolates and those with low-level tobramycin resistance. It also prevents the emergence of resistant mutants in either aerobic or anaerobic environments.

  10. Molecular epidemiology provides evidence of genotypic heterogeneity of multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa serotype O:12 outbreak isolates from a pediatric hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Bingen, E; Bonacorsi, S; Rohrlich, P; Duval, M; Lhopital, S; Brahimi, N; Vilmer, E; Goering, R V

    1996-01-01

    Ribotyping randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis were used for the epidemiologic evaluation of eight Pseudomonas aeruginosa O:12 isolates obtained from eight children and two P. aeruginosa O:12 environmental isolates from a hematology ward. Randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis were able to discriminate isolates that were indistinguishable by biochemical typing, O serotyping or ribotyping. PMID:8940479

  11. In Vitro Activity of Ceftazidime-Avibactam against Contemporary Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from U.S. Medical Centers by Census Region, 2014

    PubMed Central

    Castanheira, Mariana; Flamm, Robert K.; Farrell, David J.; Jones, Ronald N.; Sader, Helio S.

    2016-01-01

    The in vitro antibacterial activities of ceftazidime-avibactam and comparator agents were evaluated using reference broth microdilution methods against 1,743 Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates collected in 2014 from 69 U.S. medical centers, representing each of the nine census regions. Ceftazidime-avibactam demonstrated potent activity against P. aeruginosa, including many isolates not susceptible to ceftazidime, meropenem, and piperacillin-tazobactam. In each of the nine census regions, ceftazidime-avibactam demonstrated the highest percentage of susceptible isolates. PMID:26810650

  12. Genome Sequence of a Virulent Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain, 12-4-4(59), Isolated from the Blood Culture of a Burn Patient.

    PubMed

    Karna, S L Rajasekhar; Chen, Tsute; Chen, Ping; Peacock, Trent J; Abercrombie, Johnathan J; Leung, Kai P

    2016-03-03

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that frequently infects wounds, significantly impairs wound healing, and causes morbidity and mortality in burn patients. Here, we report the genome sequence of a virulent strain of P. aeruginosa, 12-4-4(59), isolated from the blood culture of a burn patient.

  13. Genome Sequence of a Virulent Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain, 12-4-4(59), Isolated from the Blood Culture of a Burn Patient

    PubMed Central

    Karna, S. L. Rajasekhar; Chen, Tsute; Chen, Ping; Peacock, Trent J.; Abercrombie, Johnathan J.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that frequently infects wounds, significantly impairs wound healing, and causes morbidity and mortality in burn patients. Here, we report the genome sequence of a virulent strain of P. aeruginosa, 12-4-4(59), isolated from the blood culture of a burn patient. PMID:26941150

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Extremely Drug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ST357) Strain CMC_VB_PA_B22862 Isolated from a Community-Acquired Bloodstream Infection

    PubMed Central

    Pragasam, Agila Kumari; Yesurajan, Francis; Doss C, George Priya; George, Biju; Devanga Ragupathi, Naveen Kumar; Walia, Kamini

    2016-01-01

    Extremely drug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains causing severe infections have become a serious concern across the world. Here, we report draft genome sequence of P. aeruginosa with an extremely drug-resistant profile isolated from a patient with community-acquired bloodstream infection in India. PMID:27795257

  15. Clinical utilization of genomics data produced by the international Pseudomonas aeruginosa consortium.

    PubMed

    Freschi, Luca; Jeukens, Julie; Kukavica-Ibrulj, Irena; Boyle, Brian; Dupont, Marie-Josée; Laroche, Jérôme; Larose, Stéphane; Maaroufi, Halim; Fothergill, Joanne L; Moore, Matthew; Winsor, Geoffrey L; Aaron, Shawn D; Barbeau, Jean; Bell, Scott C; Burns, Jane L; Camara, Miguel; Cantin, André; Charette, Steve J; Dewar, Ken; Déziel, Éric; Grimwood, Keith; Hancock, Robert E W; Harrison, Joe J; Heeb, Stephan; Jelsbak, Lars; Jia, Baofeng; Kenna, Dervla T; Kidd, Timothy J; Klockgether, Jens; Lam, Joseph S; Lamont, Iain L; Lewenza, Shawn; Loman, Nick; Malouin, François; Manos, Jim; McArthur, Andrew G; McKeown, Josie; Milot, Julie; Naghra, Hardeep; Nguyen, Dao; Pereira, Sheldon K; Perron, Gabriel G; Pirnay, Jean-Paul; Rainey, Paul B; Rousseau, Simon; Santos, Pedro M; Stephenson, Anne; Taylor, Véronique; Turton, Jane F; Waglechner, Nicholas; Williams, Paul; Thrane, Sandra W; Wright, Gerard D; Brinkman, Fiona S L; Tucker, Nicholas P; Tümmler, Burkhard; Winstanley, Craig; Levesque, Roger C

    2015-01-01

    The International Pseudomonas aeruginosa Consortium is sequencing over 1000 genomes and building an analysis pipeline for the study of Pseudomonas genome evolution, antibiotic resistance and virulence genes. Metadata, including genomic and phenotypic data for each isolate of the collection, are available through the International Pseudomonas Consortium Database (http://ipcd.ibis.ulaval.ca/). Here, we present our strategy and the results that emerged from the analysis of the first 389 genomes. With as yet unmatched resolution, our results confirm that P. aeruginosa strains can be divided into three major groups that are further divided into subgroups, some not previously reported in the literature. We also provide the first snapshot of P. aeruginosa strain diversity with respect to antibiotic resistance. Our approach will allow us to draw potential links between environmental strains and those implicated in human and animal infections, understand how patients become infected and how the infection evolves over time as well as identify prognostic markers for better evidence-based decisions on patient care. PMID:26483767

  16. Clinical utilization of genomics data produced by the international Pseudomonas aeruginosa consortium

    PubMed Central

    Freschi, Luca; Jeukens, Julie; Kukavica-Ibrulj, Irena; Boyle, Brian; Dupont, Marie-Josée; Laroche, Jérôme; Larose, Stéphane; Maaroufi, Halim; Fothergill, Joanne L.; Moore, Matthew; Winsor, Geoffrey L.; Aaron, Shawn D.; Barbeau, Jean; Bell, Scott C.; Burns, Jane L.; Camara, Miguel; Cantin, André; Charette, Steve J.; Dewar, Ken; Déziel, Éric; Grimwood, Keith; Hancock, Robert E. W.; Harrison, Joe J.; Heeb, Stephan; Jelsbak, Lars; Jia, Baofeng; Kenna, Dervla T.; Kidd, Timothy J.; Klockgether, Jens; Lam, Joseph S.; Lamont, Iain L.; Lewenza, Shawn; Loman, Nick; Malouin, François; Manos, Jim; McArthur, Andrew G.; McKeown, Josie; Milot, Julie; Naghra, Hardeep; Nguyen, Dao; Pereira, Sheldon K.; Perron, Gabriel G.; Pirnay, Jean-Paul; Rainey, Paul B.; Rousseau, Simon; Santos, Pedro M.; Stephenson, Anne; Taylor, Véronique; Turton, Jane F.; Waglechner, Nicholas; Williams, Paul; Thrane, Sandra W.; Wright, Gerard D.; Brinkman, Fiona S. L.; Tucker, Nicholas P.; Tümmler, Burkhard; Winstanley, Craig; Levesque, Roger C.

    2015-01-01

    The International Pseudomonas aeruginosa Consortium is sequencing over 1000 genomes and building an analysis pipeline for the study of Pseudomonas genome evolution, antibiotic resistance and virulence genes. Metadata, including genomic and phenotypic data for each isolate of the collection, are available through the International Pseudomonas Consortium Database (http://ipcd.ibis.ulaval.ca/). Here, we present our strategy and the results that emerged from the analysis of the first 389 genomes. With as yet unmatched resolution, our results confirm that P. aeruginosa strains can be divided into three major groups that are further divided into subgroups, some not previously reported in the literature. We also provide the first snapshot of P. aeruginosa strain diversity with respect to antibiotic resistance. Our approach will allow us to draw potential links between environmental strains and those implicated in human and animal infections, understand how patients become infected and how the infection evolves over time as well as identify prognostic markers for better evidence-based decisions on patient care. PMID:26483767

  17. Characterization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from dogs and cats in Japan: current status of antimicrobial resistance and prevailing resistance mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Harada, Kazuki; Arima, Sayuri; Niina, Ayaka; Kataoka, Yasushi; Takahashi, Toshio

    2012-02-01

    Seventy-three Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates were collected from dogs and cats in Japan to investigate antimicrobial susceptibility and resistance mechanisms to anti-pseudomonal agents. Resistance rates against orbifloxacin, enrofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, cefotaxime, aztreonam and gentamicin were 34.2, 31.5, 20.5, 17.8, 12.3 and 4.1%, respectively. The degree of resistance to cefotaxime, orbifloxacin, and enrofloxacin was greatly affected by efflux pump inhibitors, indicating overexpression of efflux pump contributes to these resistances. Notably, orbifloxacin and enrofloxacin resistance was observed even in isolates without mutations in the target sites. This is the first report on cephalosporin- and fluoroquinolone-resistant isolates of P. aeruginosa from Japanese companion animals.

  18. [The annual changes in antimicrobial susceptibility test results of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from the Kinki district].

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Saori; Komatsu, Masaru; Nakamura, Tatuya; Jikimoto, Takumi; Nishio, Hisaaki; Yamasaki, Katsutoshi; Satoh, Kaori; Toda, Hirofumi; Orita, Tamaki; Sueyoshi, Noriyuki; Kita, Machiko; Nishi, Isao; Akagi, Masahiro; Higuchi, Takeshi; Kofuku, Tomomi; Nakai, Isako; Ono, Tamotsu; Kida, Kaneyuki; Ohama, Masanobu; Watari, Hideo; Shimura, Satoshi; Niki, Makoto; Kuchibiro, Tomokazu; Wada, Yasunao

    2016-04-01

    A study was conducted of the 1,225 Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains that were isolated at 20 medical institutions in the Kinki district between 2011 and 2013 to determine their antimicrobial susceptibility and to characterize the strains of multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MDRP) and the metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) -producing strains. The MIC50/MIC90 values (μg/mL) of the various antimicrobial agents were as follows: imipenem, 2/>8; meropenem, 1/>8; doripenem, 0.5/8; biapenem, 1/>8; tazobactam/piperacillin, 8/>64; piperacillin, 8/>64; sulbactam/cefoperazone, 8/64; cefepime, 4/16; cefozopran, 2/>16; aztreonam, 8/>16; amikacin, 4/16; levofloxacin, 1/>4; and ciprofloxacin, 0.25/>2. From the viewpoint of the annual changes in the susceptibility rates (according to the CLSI guidelines [M100-S22]), the susceptibility to tazobactam/piperacillin, piperacillin, cefepime, cefozopran and aztreonam decreased in 2013. On the other hand, two antimicrobial agents showed high susceptibility rates each year; amikacin (94.0-95.6%) showed the highest rate, followed by doripenem (80.3-82.6%). With the exception of amikacin, there were substantial inter-institutional differences in antimicrobial susceptibility. In comparison to the previous CLSI guidelines (M100-S21), the new CLSI guidelines (M100-S22) on the use of carbapenems and penicillins show that the MIC80 has been affected. The MDRP detection rates in 2011, 2012 and 2013 were 1.8% (8 strains), 1.8% (8 strains), and 2.8% (10 strains), respectively. The MBL detection rates were as follows: bla(VIM-2), 0.2% (1 strain) in 2011; bla(IMP-1), 0.9% (4 strains) in 2012, and 1.7% (6 strains, including bla(IMP-1) [3 strains], bla(IMP-2) [2 strains] and bla(VIM-2) [1 strain]) in 2013. PMID:27544978

  19. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Cell Membrane Protein Expression from Phenotypically Diverse Cystic Fibrosis Isolates Demonstrates Host-Specific Adaptations.

    PubMed

    Kamath, Karthik Shantharam; Pascovici, Dana; Penesyan, Anahit; Goel, Apurv; Venkatakrishnan, Vignesh; Paulsen, Ian T; Packer, Nicolle H; Molloy, Mark P

    2016-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative, nosocomial, highly adaptable opportunistic pathogen especially prevalent in immuno-compromised cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. The bacterial cell surface proteins are important contributors to virulence, yet the membrane subproteomes of phenotypically diverse P. aeruginosa strains are poorly characterized. We carried out mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteome analysis of the membrane proteins of three novel P. aeruginosa strains isolated from the sputum of CF patients and compared protein expression to the widely used laboratory strain, PAO1. Microbes were grown in planktonic growth condition using minimal M9 media, and a defined synthetic lung nutrient mimicking medium (SCFM) limited passaging. Two-dimensional LC-MS/MS using iTRAQ labeling enabled quantitative comparisons among 3171 and 2442 proteins from the minimal M9 medium and in the SCFM, respectively. The CF isolates showed marked differences in membrane protein expression in comparison with PAO1 including up-regulation of drug resistance proteins (MexY, MexB, MexC) and down-regulation of chemotaxis and aerotaxis proteins (PA1561, PctA, PctB) and motility and adhesion proteins (FliK, FlgE, FliD, PilJ). Phenotypic analysis using adhesion, motility, and drug susceptibility assays confirmed the proteomics findings. These results provide evidence of host-specific microevolution of P. aeruginosa in the CF lung and shed light on the adaptation strategies used by CF pathogens. PMID:27246823

  20. Widespread detection of VEB-1-type extended-spectrum beta-lactamases among nosocomial ceftazidime-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates in Sofia, Bulgaria.

    PubMed

    Strateva, T; Ouzounova-Raykova, V; Markova, B; Todorova, A; Marteva-Proevska, Y; Mitov, I

    2007-04-01

    A total of 132 ceftazidime-resistant clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were collected during 2001-2005 from 5 university hospitals in Sofia, Bulgaria to assess the current levels of antimicrobial susceptibility and to evaluate resistance mechanisms to beta-lactams. Antimicrobial susceptibilities were detected by a disk diffusion method and E-test. Polymerase chain reaction amplification and sequencing of bla(VEB-1 )and bla(PER-1 )were performed. The antibiotic resistance rates were: to piperacillin 90.2%, piperacillin/tazobactam 52.3%, ceftazidime 94.7%, cefepime 88.6%, cefpirome 98.5%, aztreonam 85.6%, imipenem 66.6%, meropenem 63.6%, amikacin 81.1%, gentamicin 84.8%, tobramycin 89.4%, netilmicin 57.6%, ciprofloxacin 83.4%. Structural genes for VEB-1 extended-spectrum beta -lactamases (ESBLs) were found in 75 (56.8%) of the isolates. PER-1 ESBLs were not detected. The VEB-1-producing strains were more resistant than VEB-1 non-producers to amikacin, gentamicin, tobramycin and ciprofloxacin ( P<0.001). VEB-1 appears to have a significant presence among ceftazidime-resistant P. aeruginosa isolates from Sofia.

  1. Glutathione-Disrupted Biofilms of Clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strains Exhibit an Enhanced Antibiotic Effect and a Novel Biofilm Transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Klare, William; Das, Theerthankar; Ibugo, Amaye; Buckle, Edwina; Manefield, Mike; Manos, Jim

    2016-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections result in high morbidity and mortality rates for individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF), with premature death often occurring. These infections are complicated by the formation of biofilms in the sputum. Antibiotic therapy is stymied by antibiotic resistance of the biofilm matrix, making novel antibiofilm strategies highly desirable. Within P. aeruginosa biofilms, the redox factor pyocyanin enhances biofilm integrity by intercalating with extracellular DNA. The antioxidant glutathione (GSH) reacts with pyocyanin, disrupting intercalation. This study investigated GSH disruption by assaying the physiological effects of GSH and DNase I on biofilms of clinical CF isolates grown in CF artificial sputum medium (ASMDM+). Confocal scanning laser microscopy showed that 2 mM GSH, alone or combined with DNase I, significantly disrupted immature (24-h) biofilms of Australian epidemic strain (AES) isogens AES-1R and AES-1M. GSH alone greatly disrupted mature (72-h) AES-1R biofilms, resulting in significant differential expression of 587 genes, as indicated by RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis. Upregulated systems included cyclic diguanylate and pyoverdine biosynthesis, the type VI secretion system, nitrate metabolism, and translational machinery. Biofilm disruption with GSH revealed a cellular physiology distinct from those of mature and dispersed biofilms. RNA-seq results were validated by biochemical and quantitative PCR assays. Biofilms of a range of CF isolates disrupted with GSH and DNase I were significantly more susceptible to ciprofloxacin, and increased antibiotic effectiveness was achieved by increasing the GSH concentration. This study demonstrated that GSH, alone or with DNase I, represents an effective antibiofilm treatment when combined with appropriate antibiotics, pending in vivo studies.

  2. Glutathione-Disrupted Biofilms of Clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strains Exhibit an Enhanced Antibiotic Effect and a Novel Biofilm Transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Klare, William; Das, Theerthankar; Ibugo, Amaye; Buckle, Edwina; Manefield, Mike; Manos, Jim

    2016-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections result in high morbidity and mortality rates for individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF), with premature death often occurring. These infections are complicated by the formation of biofilms in the sputum. Antibiotic therapy is stymied by antibiotic resistance of the biofilm matrix, making novel antibiofilm strategies highly desirable. Within P. aeruginosa biofilms, the redox factor pyocyanin enhances biofilm integrity by intercalating with extracellular DNA. The antioxidant glutathione (GSH) reacts with pyocyanin, disrupting intercalation. This study investigated GSH disruption by assaying the physiological effects of GSH and DNase I on biofilms of clinical CF isolates grown in CF artificial sputum medium (ASMDM+). Confocal scanning laser microscopy showed that 2 mM GSH, alone or combined with DNase I, significantly disrupted immature (24-h) biofilms of Australian epidemic strain (AES) isogens AES-1R and AES-1M. GSH alone greatly disrupted mature (72-h) AES-1R biofilms, resulting in significant differential expression of 587 genes, as indicated by RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis. Upregulated systems included cyclic diguanylate and pyoverdine biosynthesis, the type VI secretion system, nitrate metabolism, and translational machinery. Biofilm disruption with GSH revealed a cellular physiology distinct from those of mature and dispersed biofilms. RNA-seq results were validated by biochemical and quantitative PCR assays. Biofilms of a range of CF isolates disrupted with GSH and DNase I were significantly more susceptible to ciprofloxacin, and increased antibiotic effectiveness was achieved by increasing the GSH concentration. This study demonstrated that GSH, alone or with DNase I, represents an effective antibiofilm treatment when combined with appropriate antibiotics, pending in vivo studies. PMID:27161630

  3. Update on clinically isolated syndrome.

    PubMed

    Thouvenot, Éric

    2015-04-01

    Optic neuritis, myelitis and brainstem syndrome accompanied by a symptomatic MRI T2 or FLAIR hyperintensity and T1 hypointensity are highly suggestive of multiple sclerosis (MS) in young adults. They are called "clinically isolated syndrome" (CIS) and correspond to the typical first multiple sclerosis (MS) episode, especially when associated with other asymptomatic demyelinating lesions, without clinical, radiological and immunological sign of differential diagnosis. After a CIS, the delay of apparition of a relapse, which corresponds to the conversion to clinically definite MS (CDMS), varies from several months to more than 10 years (10-15% of cases, generally called benign RRMS). This delay is generally associated with the number and location of demyelinating lesions of the brain and spinal cord and the results of CSF analysis. Several studies comparing different MRI criteria for dissemination in space and dissemination in time of demyelinating lesions, two hallmarks of MS, provided enough substantial data to update diagnostic criteria for MS after a CIS. In the last revision of the McDonald's criteria in 2010, diagnostic criteria were simplified and now the diagnosis can be made by a single initial scan that proves the presence of active asymptomatic lesions (with gadolinium enhancement) and of unenhanced lesions. However, time to conversion remains highly unpredictable for a given patient and CIS can remain isolated, especially for idiopathic unilateral optic neuritis or myelitis. Univariate analyses of clinical, radiological, biological or electrophysiological characteristics of CIS patients in small series identified numerous risk factors of rapid conversion to MS. However, large series of CIS patients analyzing several characteristics of CIS patients and the influence of disease modifying therapies brought important information about the risk of CDMS or RRMS over up to 20 years of follow-up. They confirmed the importance of the initial MRI pattern of

  4. Whole-Genome Sequence of Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain BAMCPA07-48, Isolated from a Combat Injury Wound

    PubMed Central

    Sanjar, Fatemeh; Karna, S. L. Rajasekhar; Chen, Tsute; Chen, Ping; Abercrombie, Johnathan J.

    2016-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain BAMCPA07-48, isolated from a combat injury wound. The closed genome sequence of this isolate is a valuable resource for pathogenome characterization of P. aeruginosa associated with wounds, which will aid in the development of a higher-resolution phylogenomic framework for molecular-guided pathogen-surveillance. PMID:27389262

  5. Molecular typing of Neisseria perflava clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Mechergui, Arij; Achour, Wafa; Giorgini, Dario; Baaboura, Rekaya; Taha, Muhamed-Kheir; Hassen, Assia Ben

    2013-09-01

    Multilocus sequence typing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis were used to type 22 commensal isolates of Neisseria perflava collected by swabbing from neutropenic patients. High genetic diversity was found among our N. perflava clinical isolates.

  6. [Acanthamoeba, naturally intracellularly infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, after their isolation from a microbiologically contaminated drinking water system in a hospital].

    PubMed

    Michel, R; Burghardt, H; Bergmann, H

    1995-03-01

    The drinking water system of a new hospital building that was highly contaminated with bacteria before opening was investigated too for the prevalence of small free living amoebae. Germ counts resulted in > 100 CFU/ml in 100% of the cold water samples, that showed also growth of P. aeruginosa, whereas E. coli and coliforme bacteria could not be identified. The investigation of 37 water samples for protozoa revealed growth of small freeliving amoebae in 20 samples (54%) belonging to 10 species of the genus Acanthamoeba, Naegleria, Hartmannella, Echinamoeba among others. In addition 2 Ciliate- and 2 Microflagellate-species could be observed. While all Naegleria strains isolated belonged to the N. gruberi-complex two of 16 Acanthamoeba-isolates proved to be pathogenic for laboratory mice. From 7 watersamples positive with P. aeruginosa 5 Acanthamoeba- and 2 Echinamoeba strains could be isolated which revealed intracellular multiplication of P. aeruginosa. Because of their well known resistances against chlorine, the amoebae and their cysts are considered to be vectors for these intracellular bacteria. A complete sanitation of the incriminated drinking water system was accomplished by combined chemical and thermic disinfection measures.

  7. Antibiotic resistance pattern of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from urine samples of Urinary Tract Infections patients in Karachi, Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Dania Aijaz; Wasim, Shehnaz; Essa Abdullah, Farhan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibiotic resistance pattern of Psedomonas aeruginosa and its prevalence in patients with urinary tract infections (UTI) for effective treatment in a developing country like Pakistan. Methods: This is an observational study conducted for a period of ten months which ended on December 2013 at the Dr. Essa Laboratory and Diagnostic Centre in Karachi. A total of 4668 urine samples of UTI patients were collected and standard microbiological techniques were performed to identify the organisms in urine cultures. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed by Kirby-Bauer technique for twenty five commonly used antimicrobials and then analyzed on SPSS version 17. Results: P. aeruginosa was isolated in 254 cultures (5.4%). The most resistant drugs included Ceclor(100%) and Cefizox (100%) followed by Amoxil/Ampicillin (99.6%), Ceflixime (99.6%), Doxycycline (99.6%), Cefuroxime (99.2%), Cephradine (99.2%), Cotrimoxazole (99.2%), Nalidixic acid (98.8%), Pipemidic acid (98.6%) and Augmentin (97.6%). Conclusion: Emerging resistant strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa are potentially linked to injudicious use of drugs leading to ineffective empirical therapy and in turn, appearance of even more resistant strains of the bacterium. Therefore, we recommend culture and sensitivity testing to determine the presence of P.aeruginosa prior to specific antimicrobial therapy. PMID:26101487

  8. Revisited distribution of nonfermenting Gram-negative bacilli clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Jacquier, H; Carbonnelle, E; Corvec, S; Illiaquer, M; Le Monnier, A; Bille, E; Zahar, J R; Beretti, J L; Jauréguy, F; Fihman, V; Tankovic, J; Cattoir, V

    2011-12-01

    Nonfermenting Gram-negative bacilli (NF-GNB) are ubiquitous environmental opportunistic bacteria frequently misidentified by conventional phenotypic methods. The aim of this study was to determine the distribution of NF-GNB species by 16 S rRNA gene sequencing (used as reference method) and to compare performances of biochemical tests and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). From nine French hospitals, 188 NF-GNB isolates (except P. aeruginosa and A. baumannii) were prospectively collected from 187 clinical samples between December 2008 and May 2009. By using the genotypic approach, 173 (92%) and 188 (100%) isolates were identified to the species and genus level, respectively. They covered 35 species and 20 genera, with a predominance of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Achromobacter xylosoxidans, and Pseudomonas putida group bacteria. Of the 173 species-level identified strains, concordant identification to the species-level was obtained for 75.1%, 83% and 88.9% of isolates with API 20 NE strip, the VITEK-2 (ID-GN card) system and MALDI-TOF-MS, respectively. By excluding S. maltophilia isolates accurately identified by the three methods, genus-level identification was much higher for MALDI-TOF-MS (92.9%), compared with API 20 NE and VITEK-2 (76.2% and 80.8%, respectively). In conclusion, MALDI-TOF-MS represents a rapid, inexpensive, and accurate tool for routine identification of NF-GNB in human clinical samples.

  9. Enhancement of Rhamnolipid Production in Residual Soybean Oil by an Isolated Strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lima, C. J. B.; França, F. P.; Sérvulo, E. F. C.; Resende, M. M.; Cardoso, V. L.

    In the present work, the production of rhamnolipid from residual soybean oil (RSO) from food frying facilities was studied using a strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa of contaminated lagoon, isolated from a hydrocarbon contaminated soil. The optimization of RSO, amonium nitrate, and brewery residual yeast concentrations was accomplished by a central composite experimental design and surface response analysis. The experiments were performed in 500-mL Erlenmeyer flasks containing 50mL of mineral medium, at 170 rpm and 30±1°C, for a 48-h fermentation period. Rhamnolipid production has been monitored by measurements of surface tension, rhamnose concentration, and emulsifying activity. The best-planned results, located on the central point, have corresponded to 22g/L of RSO, 5.625 g/ L of NH4NO3' and 11.5 g/L of brewery yeast. At the maximum point the values for rhamnose and emulsifying index were 2.2g/L and 100%, respectively.

  10. Uranium biomineralization by a metal resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain isolated from contaminated mine waste.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Sangeeta; Sar, Pinaki

    2011-02-15

    Uranium biomineralization by a metal-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain isolated from uranium mine waste was characterized for its potential in bioremediation. Uranium resistance, its cellular localization and chemical nature of uranium-bacteria interaction were elucidated. Survival and uranium biomineralization from mine water were investigated using microcosm experiments. The selected bacterium showed U resistance and accumulation (maximum of 275 mg U g(-1)cell dry wt.) following incubation in 100 mg U L(-1), pH 4.0, for 6 h. Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analyses revealed that bioaccumulated uranium was deposited within the cell envelope as needle shaped U-phosphate compounds that attain crystallinity only at pH 4.0. A synergistic involvement of deprotonated phosphate and carboxyl moieties in facilitating bioprecipitation of uranium was evident from FTIR analysis. Based on these findings we attribute the localized U sequestration by this bacterium as innocuous complex to its possible mechanism of uranium resistance. Microcosm data confirmed that the strain can remove soluble uranium (99%) and sequester it as U oxide and phosphate minerals while maintaining its viability. The study showed that indigenous bacteria from contaminated site that can survive uranium and other heavy metal toxicity and sequester soluble uranium as biominerals could play important role in uranium bioremediation.

  11. Laser irradiation effect on Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms isolated from venous leg ulcer.

    PubMed

    Baffoni, Marina; Bessa, Lucinda J; Grande, Rossella; Di Giulio, Mara; Mongelli, Matteo; Ciarelli, Antonio; Cellini, Luigina

    2012-10-01

    Chronic wounds, including diabetic foot ulcers, pressure ulcers and venous leg ulcers, represent a significant cause of morbidity in developed countries, predominantly in older patients. The aetiology of these wounds is probably multifactorial, but the role of bacteria in their pathogenesis is still unclear. Moreover, the presence of bacterial biofilms has been considered an important factor responsible for wounds chronicity. We aimed to investigate the laser action as a possible biofilm eradicating strategy, in order to attempt an additional treatment to antibiotic therapy to improve wound healing. In this work, the effect of near-infrared (NIR) laser was evaluated on mono and polymicrobial biofilms produced by two pathogenic bacterial strains, Staphylococcus aureus PECHA10 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa PECHA9, both isolated from a chronic venous leg ulcer. Laser effect was assessed by biomass measurement, colony forming unit count and cell viability assay. It was shown that the laser treatment has not affected the biofilms biomass neither the cell viability, although a small disruptive action was observed in the structure of all biofilms tested. A reduction on cell growth was observed in S. aureus and in polymicrobial biofilms. This work represents an initial in vitro approach to study the influence of NIR laser treatment on bacterial biofilms in order to explain its potentially advantageous effects in the healing process of chronic infected wounds.

  12. [Bactericial activity of chlorhexidine gluconate against recent clinical isolates of various bacterial species in Japan].

    PubMed

    Kanazawa, Katsunori; Ueda, Yutaka

    2004-10-01

    The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and bactericidal activity of chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) were determined for methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA), methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), Escherichia coli, Serratia marcescens, Eterobacter cloacae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cepacia, isolated from patients in medical institutions all over Japan between 2000 and 2002. The following findings were obtained. 1. The MICs of CHG against MSSA, MRSA, E. coli and B. cepacia were 0.002% or less, and those against S. marcescens, E. cloacae and P. aeruginosa were 0.008% or less. 2. Rapid and strong bactericidal effects of CHG were observed against all clinical isolates of E. coli, E. cloacae and P. aeruginosa tested even at relatively low concentrations (0.02 to 0.05%). 3. Relatively high concentration or prolonged treatment time was required to achieve sufficient bactericidal effect of CHG against some isolates of S. aureus, S. marcescens and B. cepacia. These results suggest that CHG is useful antiseptic agent or disinfectant for recent clinical isolates of various bacterial pathogens. In addition, the selection of treatment concentration and treatment time for each organism and purpose was important to obtain sufficient bactericidal effect.

  13. Characterization of exo-s, exo-u, and alg virulence factors and antimicrobial resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from migratory Egyptian vultures from India.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Pradeep; Faridi, Farah; Mir, Irfan A; Sharma, Sandeep K

    2014-01-01

    This study of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in fecal droppings of migratory Egyptian vultures (Neophron p. percnopterus) revealed eight positive samples (n=25) by a 16S rRNA gene-based PCR in two consecutive winter seasons. Disk diffusion sensitivity testing revealed three multiple antimicrobial resistant (MAR) isolates. Genotypic characterization showed mutually exclusive exo-s and exo-u virulence genes in five and three isolates, respectively, while the alg gene was present in all of the isolates. MAR isolates with virulence genes were detected in both seasons. The Egyptian vultures could potentially be vectors of pathogenic and MAR P. aeruginosa, thereby affecting regional control and preventive measures. PMID:25317261

  14. Characterization of exo-s, exo-u, and alg virulence factors and antimicrobial resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from migratory Egyptian vultures from India.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Pradeep; Faridi, Farah; Mir, Irfan A; Sharma, Sandeep K

    2014-01-01

    This study of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in fecal droppings of migratory Egyptian vultures (Neophron p. percnopterus) revealed eight positive samples (n=25) by a 16S rRNA gene-based PCR in two consecutive winter seasons. Disk diffusion sensitivity testing revealed three multiple antimicrobial resistant (MAR) isolates. Genotypic characterization showed mutually exclusive exo-s and exo-u virulence genes in five and three isolates, respectively, while the alg gene was present in all of the isolates. MAR isolates with virulence genes were detected in both seasons. The Egyptian vultures could potentially be vectors of pathogenic and MAR P. aeruginosa, thereby affecting regional control and preventive measures.

  15. Global Pseudomonas aeruginosa biodiversity as reflected in a Belgian river.

    PubMed

    Pirnay, Jean-Paul; Matthijs, Sandra; Colak, Huri; Chablain, Patrice; Bilocq, Florence; Van Eldere, Johan; De Vos, Daniel; Zizi, Martin; Triest, Ludwig; Cornelis, Pierre

    2005-07-01

    The biodiversity of the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa in an aquatic environment (the Woluwe River, Brussels, Belgium) was analysed. Surface water was sampled bimonthly over a 1-year period (2000-2001) at seven sites evenly dispersed over the river. Total bacterial counts were performed and P. aeruginosa strains were isolated on a selective medium. A weighed out sample of 100 randomly chosen presumptive P. aeruginosa isolates was further analysed. A set of data consisting of the nucleotide sequence of the oprL gene, a DNA-based fingerprint (amplified fragment length polymorphism, AFLP), serotype, pyoverdine type and antibiogram (MICs of 21 clinically relevant antibiotics) was assembled. These data were integrated with those previously obtained for 73 P. aeruginosa clinical and environmental isolates collected across the world. The combined results were analysed and compared using biological data analysis software. Our findings indicate a positive relationship between the extent of pollution and the prevalence of P. aeruginosa. Surprisingly, the Woluwe River P. aeruginosa community was almost as diverse as the global P. aeruginosa population. Indeed, the Woluwe River harboured members of nearly all successful clonal complexes. With the exception of one multidrug-resistant (MDR) strain, belonging to a ubiquitous and clinically relevant serotype O11 clone, antibiotic resistance levels were relatively low. These findings illustrate the significance of river water as a reservoir and source of distribution of potentially pathogenic P. aeruginosa strains and could have repercussions on antinosocomial infection strategies.

  16. Bacterial and Clinical Characteristics of Health Care- and Community-Acquired Bloodstream Infections Due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Hattemer, Angela; Hauser, Alan; Diaz, Maureen; Scheetz, Marc; Shah, Nirav; Allen, Jonathan P.; Porhomayon, Jahan

    2013-01-01

    Health care-associated infections, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa bloodstream infection, have been linked to delays in appropriate antibiotic therapy and an increased mortality rate. The objective of this study was to evaluate intrinsic virulence, bacterial resistance, and clinical outcomes of health care-associated bloodstream infections (HCABSIs) in comparison with those of community-acquired bloodstream infections (CABSIs) caused by P. aeruginosa. We conducted a retrospective multicenter study of consecutive P. aeruginosa bacteremia patients at two university-affiliated hospitals. Demographic, clinical, and treatment data were collected. Microbiologic analyses included in vitro susceptibility profiles and type III secretory (TTS) phenotypes. Sixty CABSI and 90 HCABSI episodes were analyzed. Patients with HCABSIs had more organ dysfunction at the time of bacteremia (P = 0.05) and were more likely to have been exposed to antimicrobial therapy (P < 0.001) than those with CABSIs. Ninety-two percent of the carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa infections were characterized as HCABSIs. The 30-day mortality rate for CABSIs was 26% versus 36% for HCABSIs (P = 0.38). The sequential organ failure assessment score at the time of bacteremia (hazard ratio [HR], 1.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1 to 1.3) and the TTS phenotype (HR 2.1; 95% CI, 1.1 to 3.9) were found to be independent predictors of the 30-day mortality rate. No mortality rate difference was observed between CABSIs and HCABSIs caused by P. aeruginosa. Severity of illness and expression of TTS proteins were the strongest predictors of the 30-day mortality rate due to P. aeruginosa bacteremia. Future P. aeruginosa bacteremia trials designed to neutralize TTS proteins are warranted. PMID:23733476

  17. Toxicity of microcystin-LR, isolated from Microcystis aeruginosa, against various insect species.

    PubMed

    Delaney, J M; Wilkins, R M

    1995-06-01

    Microcystin-LR (MC-LR), isolated from the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa Kuetzing emend. Elenkin strain CCAP 1450/4 was tested for biological activity against four species of insect and the invertebrate Artemia salina. The efficacy of pesticidal activity was compared with various insecticides. The 24 hr LD50 value for third instar diamond-backed moth, Plutella xylostella, on ingestion from a treated leaf surface was 1.0 micrograms cm2, compared with a 72 hr LD50 value for rotenone of 2.0 micrograms cm-2. The 24 hr LD50 values of MC-LR and malathion on intrathoracic injection into adult house flies (Musca domestica) were 0.5 and 3.7 mg kg-1, respectively. MC-LR had no effect on M. domestica when applied topically at dosages up to 32 mg kg-1. MC-LR and malathion gave 24 hr LD50 values of 4.7 and 13.1 mg kg-1, respectively when injected into third instar cotton leafworm (Spodoptera littoralis). In fourth instar cabbage white butterfly larvae (Pieris brassicae) MC-LR injected gave 24 and 48 hr LD50 values of 3.9 and 1.9 mg kg-1, respectively, whilst the 24 and 48 hr LD50 values for carbofuran were 0.4 and 0.3 mg kg-1, respectively. An immersion bioassay with 1-day-old brine shrimp larvae (Artemia salina) gave 24 hr LD50 values of 3.8 micrograms ml-1 for MC-LR and 1.8 micrograms ml-1 for carbofuran. MC-LR has appreciable insect toxicity, comparable to the three insecticides tested. The toxin look 24-48 hr to exert its full lethal effect in insects, much longer than the 1-3 hr it takes in mammals. The potential use of MC-LR as an insecticide is discussed. PMID:7676468

  18. Large-insert genome analysis technology detects structural variation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical strains from cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Hayden, Hillary S; Gillett, Will; Saenphimmachak, Channakhone; Lim, Regina; Zhou, Yang; Jacobs, Michael A; Chang, Jean; Rohmer, Laurence; D'Argenio, David A; Palmieri, Anthony; Levy, Ruth; Haugen, Eric; Wong, Gane K S; Brittnacher, Mitch J; Burns, Jane L; Miller, Samuel I; Olson, Maynard V; Kaul, Rajinder

    2008-06-01

    Large-insert genome analysis (LIGAN) is a broadly applicable, high-throughput technology designed to characterize genome-scale structural variation. Fosmid paired-end sequences and DNA fingerprints from a query genome are compared to a reference sequence using the Genomic Variation Analysis (GenVal) suite of software tools to pinpoint locations of insertions, deletions, and rearrangements. Fosmids spanning regions that contain new structural variants can then be sequenced. Clonal pairs of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from four cystic fibrosis patients were used to validate the LIGAN technology. Approximately 1.5 Mb of inserted sequences were identified, including 743 kb containing 615 ORFs that are absent from published P. aeruginosa genomes. Six rearrangement breakpoints and 220 kb of deleted sequences were also identified. Our study expands the "genome universe" of P. aeruginosa and validates a technology that complements emerging, short-read sequencing methods that are better suited to characterizing single-nucleotide polymorphisms than structural variation.

  19. Large-insert genome analysis technology detects structural variation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical strains from cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Hayden, Hillary S; Gillett, Will; Saenphimmachak, Channakhone; Lim, Regina; Zhou, Yang; Jacobs, Michael A; Chang, Jean; Rohmer, Laurence; D'Argenio, David A; Palmieri, Anthony; Levy, Ruth; Haugen, Eric; Wong, Gane K S; Brittnacher, Mitch J; Burns, Jane L; Miller, Samuel I; Olson, Maynard V; Kaul, Rajinder

    2008-06-01

    Large-insert genome analysis (LIGAN) is a broadly applicable, high-throughput technology designed to characterize genome-scale structural variation. Fosmid paired-end sequences and DNA fingerprints from a query genome are compared to a reference sequence using the Genomic Variation Analysis (GenVal) suite of software tools to pinpoint locations of insertions, deletions, and rearrangements. Fosmids spanning regions that contain new structural variants can then be sequenced. Clonal pairs of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from four cystic fibrosis patients were used to validate the LIGAN technology. Approximately 1.5 Mb of inserted sequences were identified, including 743 kb containing 615 ORFs that are absent from published P. aeruginosa genomes. Six rearrangement breakpoints and 220 kb of deleted sequences were also identified. Our study expands the "genome universe" of P. aeruginosa and validates a technology that complements emerging, short-read sequencing methods that are better suited to characterizing single-nucleotide polymorphisms than structural variation. PMID:18445516

  20. Molecular detection of metallo-β-lactamase gene blaVIM-1 in imipenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated from hospitalized patients in the hospitals of Isfahan

    PubMed Central

    Sedighi, Mansour; Vaez, Hamid; Moghoofeie, Mohsen; Hadifar, Shima; Oryan, Golfam; Faghri, Jamshid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen that causes serious problems, especially in people, who have immunodeficiency. In recent times, metallo-β-lactamase (MBLs) resistance in this bacterium has led to some difficulties in treating bacterial infections. The metallo-beta-lactamase family of genes, including blaVIM-1, is being reported with increasing frequency worldwide. The aim of this study is the detection of the metallo-β-lactamase gene blaVIM-1 in imipenem-resistant P. aeruginosa (IRPA) strains isolated from hospitalized patients. Materials and Methods: In this study, 106 P. aeruginosa samples were isolated from various nosocomial infections. The isolates were identified, tested for susceptibility to various antimicrobial agents by the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method, and all the imipenem-resistant isolates were screened for the presence of MBLs by using the combined disk (IMP-EDTA). The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of imipenem was determined by E-test on the Mueller-Hinton agar. To detect the blaVIM-1 gene, the isolates were subjected to a polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results: Of all the P. aeruginosa isolates, 62 (58.5%) were found to be imipenem-resistant P. aeruginosa (MIC ≥32 μg/ml). Twenty-six (42%) of the imipenem-resistant isolates were MBL positive. None of these isolates carried the blaVIM-1 gene using the PCR assay. Conclusion: The results demonstrated the serious therapeutic threat of the MBL-producing P. aeruginosa populations. The rate of imipenem resistance due to MBL was increased dramatically. Early detection and infection-control practices are the best antimicrobial strategies for this organism. None of MBL-producing isolates in this study carry the blaVIM-1 gene; therefore, another gene in the MBL family should be investigated. PMID:25802826

  1. Post-antibiotic effect of orbifloxacin against Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from dogs.

    PubMed

    Harada, Kazuki; Shimizu, Takae; Kataoka, Yasushi; Takahashi, Toshio

    2012-03-20

    Orbifloxacin is a fluoroquinolone drug used widely in companion animal medicine. In this study, we firstly determined post-antibiotic effects (PAEs) and post-antibiotic sub-minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) effects (PA-SMEs) of orbifloxacin for two strains each of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa from dogs, and these parameters were compared with those of enrofloxacin. At twice the MIC, the PAEs of orbifloxacin ranged from -0.28-0.93 h (mean, 0.29 h) for E. coli and -0.18-1.18 h (mean, 0.37 h) for P. aeruginosa. These parameters were not significantly different for E. coli and shorter for P. aeruginosa, compared to enrofloxacin (P < 0.05). Continued exposure to 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3 the MIC of orbifloxacin resulted in average PA-SMEs of 0.55, 1.11, and 2.03 h, respectively, for E. coli, and 1.04, 1.40, and 2.47 h, respectively, for P. aeruginosa. These PA-SMEs, which had no significant differences with those of enrofloxacin, were significantly longer than the corresponding PAEs (P < 0.05). These results suggest that the PA-SME of orbifloxacin for E. coli and P. aeruginosa can be meaningfully prolonged by increase of sub-MICs.

  2. Post-antibiotic effect of orbifloxacin against Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from dogs

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Orbifloxacin is a fluoroquinolone drug used widely in companion animal medicine. In this study, we firstly determined post-antibiotic effects (PAEs) and post-antibiotic sub-minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) effects (PA-SMEs) of orbifloxacin for two strains each of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa from dogs, and these parameters were compared with those of enrofloxacin. At twice the MIC, the PAEs of orbifloxacin ranged from -0.28-0.93 h (mean, 0.29 h) for E. coli and -0.18-1.18 h (mean, 0.37 h) for P. aeruginosa. These parameters were not significantly different for E. coli and shorter for P. aeruginosa, compared to enrofloxacin (P < 0.05). Continued exposure to 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3 the MIC of orbifloxacin resulted in average PA-SMEs of 0.55, 1.11, and 2.03 h, respectively, for E. coli, and 1.04, 1.40, and 2.47 h, respectively, for P. aeruginosa. These PA-SMEs, which had no significant differences with those of enrofloxacin, were significantly longer than the corresponding PAEs (P < 0.05). These results suggest that the PA-SME of orbifloxacin for E. coli and P. aeruginosa can be meaningfully prolonged by increase of sub-MICs. PMID:22433170

  3. Characterization of the Newly Isolated Lytic Bacteriophages KTN6 and KT28 and Their Efficacy against Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Danis-Wlodarczyk, Katarzyna; Olszak, Tomasz; Arabski, Michal; Wasik, Slawomir; Majkowska-Skrobek, Grazyna; Augustyniak, Daria; Gula, Grzegorz; Briers, Yves; Jang, Ho Bin; Vandenheuvel, Dieter; Duda, Katarzyna Anna; Lavigne, Rob; Drulis-Kawa, Zuzanna

    2015-01-01

    We here describe two novel lytic phages, KT28 and KTN6, infecting Pseudomonas aeruginosa, isolated from a sewage sample from an irrigated field near Wroclaw, in Poland. Both viruses show characteristic features of Pbunalikevirus genus within the Myoviridae family with respect to shape and size of head/tail, as well as LPS host receptor recognition. Genome analysis confirmed the similarity to other PB1-related phages, ranging between 48 and 96%. Pseudomonas phage KT28 has a genome size of 66,381 bp and KTN6 of 65,994 bp. The latent period, burst size, stability and host range was determined for both viruses under standard laboratory conditions. Biofilm eradication efficacy was tested on peg-lid plate assay and PET membrane surface. Significant reduction of colony forming units was observed (70-90%) in 24 h to 72 h old Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 biofilm cultures for both phages. Furthermore, a pyocyanin and pyoverdin reduction tests reveal that tested phages lowers the amount of both secreted dyes in 48-72 h old biofilms. Diffusion and goniometry experiments revealed the increase of diffusion rate through the biofilm matrix after phage application. These characteristics indicate these phages could be used to prevent Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections and biofilm formation. It was also shown, that PB1-related phage treatment of biofilm caused the emergence of stable phage-resistant mutants growing as small colony variants. PMID:25996839

  4. Removal of toxic Co-EDTA complex by a halophilic solar-salt-pan isolate Pseudomonas aeruginosa SPB-1.

    PubMed

    Paraneeiswaran, A; Shukla, Sudhir K; Subba Rao, T; Prashanth, K

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a promising bioremediation approach was developed to remove [Co(III)-EDTA](-) complex that is generated during the waste management process. Though several studies have been reported on bioremediation of cobalt, the removal of [Co(III)-EDTA](-) complex has not been tested. A [Co(III)-EDTA](-) resistant bacterium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa SPB-1 was isolated from the solar-salt-pan and physical parameters were optimized for its growth. The various studies showed that the removal of [Co(III)-EDTA](-) from the bulk liquid was due to the adsorption of the complex by the biomass. Using absorption/desorption isotherm over a range of pH (1-8), the maximum adsorption of [Co(III)-EDTA](-) was found to be at pH 7.0 and maximum desorption from the biomass occurred at pH 1.0, thus rendering an ion exchange property to P. aeruginosa SPB-1 biomass. P. aeruginosa SPB-1 biomass could be used as bio-resin that showed 80.4±3.27% adsorption capacity up to fourth cycle and the biomass was viable till the ninth cycle with 10.5±7.3% adsorption. Radiation tolerance potential i.e. D10 value for the strain was found to be ~300 Gy, which suggests the potential use of the bacterium in bioremediation of moderately active nuclear waste.

  5. Susceptibility of adherent organisms from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from burn wounds to antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Trafny, E A

    1998-08-01

    To assess the bactericidal effects of ciprofloxacin, netilymicin, and polymyxin B on adherent Pseudomonas aeruginosa organisms and also the bactericidal effects of ciprofloxacin, vancomycin and teicoplanin on adherent Staphylococcus aureus cells, a simple end-point microplate assay, based on the method described by Miyake et al. was used in the present study. As results of the assay, the minimal inhibitory concentration (MICADH) values are taken, which express the susceptibility of the bacterial cells spontaneously released from the surface of adherent microcolonies to antimicrobial agents. Also, a minimal bactericidal concentration (MBCADH) value was read, which is defined as the lowest antibiotic concentration required to kill the sessile bacterial cells. For twenty P. aeruginosa strains and nineteen S. aureus strains isolated from burn wounds, an enhanced resistance against bactericidal action of the applied antibiotics was observed when bacterial cells were attached to polystyrene surface. The MICADH values were comparable with the conventional MIC values only for ciprofloxacin and netilmicin for P. aeruginosa strains. The MBCADH values exceeded many times the conventional MBC values for the majority of strains. The validity of the assay was estimated in the experiment designed to determine the concentration of ciprofloxacin that should be released topically from the collagen dressing to prevent the biomaterial from microbial colonization and allow the decontamination of the wound.

  6. Characterization of the Newly Isolated Lytic Bacteriophages KTN6 and KT28 and Their Efficacy against Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm.

    PubMed

    Danis-Wlodarczyk, Katarzyna; Olszak, Tomasz; Arabski, Michal; Wasik, Slawomir; Majkowska-Skrobek, Grazyna; Augustyniak, Daria; Gula, Grzegorz; Briers, Yves; Jang, Ho Bin; Vandenheuvel, Dieter; Duda, Katarzyna Anna; Lavigne, Rob; Drulis-Kawa, Zuzanna

    2015-01-01

    We here describe two novel lytic phages, KT28 and KTN6, infecting Pseudomonas aeruginosa, isolated from a sewage sample from an irrigated field near Wroclaw, in Poland. Both viruses show characteristic features of Pbunalikevirus genus within the Myoviridae family with respect to shape and size of head/tail, as well as LPS host receptor recognition. Genome analysis confirmed the similarity to other PB1-related phages, ranging between 48 and 96%. Pseudomonas phage KT28 has a genome size of 66,381 bp and KTN6 of 65,994 bp. The latent period, burst size, stability and host range was determined for both viruses under standard laboratory conditions. Biofilm eradication efficacy was tested on peg-lid plate assay and PET membrane surface. Significant reduction of colony forming units was observed (70-90%) in 24 h to 72 h old Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 biofilm cultures for both phages. Furthermore, a pyocyanin and pyoverdin reduction tests reveal that tested phages lowers the amount of both secreted dyes in 48-72 h old biofilms. Diffusion and goniometry experiments revealed the increase of diffusion rate through the biofilm matrix after phage application. These characteristics indicate these phages could be used to prevent Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections and biofilm formation. It was also shown, that PB1-related phage treatment of biofilm caused the emergence of stable phage-resistant mutants growing as small colony variants. PMID:25996839

  7. Changing the epidemiology of carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a Brazilian teaching hospital: the replacement of São Paulo metallo-β-lactamase-producing isolates.

    PubMed

    Cavalcanti, Felipe Lira de Sá; Almeida, Anna Carolina Soares; Vilela, Marinalda Anselmo; Morais, Marcia Maria Camargo de; Morais Junior, Marcos Antonio de

    2012-05-01

    In Brazil, carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates are closely related to the São Paulo metallo-β-lactamase (SPM) Brazilian clone. In this study, imipenem-resistant isolates were divided in two sets, 2002/2003 and 2008/2009, analysed by pulsed field gel electrophoresis and tested for the Ambler class B metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) genes blaSPM-1, blaIMP and blaVIM. The results show a prevalence of one clone related to the SPM Brazilian clone in 2002/2003. In 2008/2009, P. aeruginosa isolates were mostly MBL negative, genetically diverse and unrelated to those that had been detected earlier. These findings suggest that the resistance to carbapenems by these recent P. aeruginosa isolates was not due to the spread of MBL-positive SPM-related clones, as often observed in Brazilian hospitals.

  8. Genes required for and effects of alginate overproduction induced by growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on Pseudomonas isolation agar supplemented with ammonium metavanadate.

    PubMed

    Damron, F Heath; Barbier, Mariette; McKenney, Elizabeth S; Schurr, Michael J; Goldberg, Joanna B

    2013-09-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that can adapt to changing environments and can secrete an exopolysaccharide known as alginate as a protection response, resulting in a colony morphology and phenotype referred to as mucoid. However, how P. aeruginosa senses its environment and activates alginate overproduction is not fully understood. Previously, we showed that Pseudomonas isolation agar supplemented with ammonium metavanadate (PIAAMV) induces P. aeruginosa to overproduce alginate. Vanadate is a phosphate mimic and causes protein misfolding by disruption of disulfide bonds. Here we used PIAAMV to characterize the pathways involved in inducible alginate production and tested the global effects of P. aeruginosa growth on PIAAMV by a mutant library screen, by transcriptomics, and in a murine acute virulence model. The PA14 nonredundant mutant library was screened on PIAAMV to identify new genes that are required for the inducible alginate stress response. A functionally diverse set of genes encoding products involved in cell envelope biogenesis, peptidoglycan remodeling, uptake of phosphate and iron, phenazine biosynthesis, and other processes were identified as positive regulators of the mucoid phenotype on PIAAMV. Transcriptome analysis of P. aeruginosa cultures growing in the presence of vanadate showed differential expression of genes involved in virulence, envelope biogenesis, and cell stress pathways. In this study, it was observed that growth on PIAAMV attenuates P. aeruginosa in a mouse pneumonia model. Induction of alginate overproduction occurs as a stress response to protect P. aeruginosa, but it may be possible to modulate and inhibit these pathways based on the new genes identified in this study.

  9. Dissemination in Japan of multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates producing IMP-type metallo-β-lactamases and AAC(6')-Iae/AAC(6')-Ib.

    PubMed

    Tojo, Masayoshi; Tada, Tatsuya; Shimojima, Masahiro; Tanaka, Masashi; Narahara, Kenji; Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru; Kirikae, Teruo; Ohmagari, Norio

    2014-09-01

    The spread throughout Japan of antibiotic-resistance factors in multidrug-resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates was investigated epidemiologically, using immunochromatographic assays specific for IMP-type metallo-β-lactamases (IMPs) and aminoglycoside 6'-N-acetyltransferase [AAC(6')]-Iae and -Ib. Three hundred MDR P. aeruginosa isolates were obtained during each of two years, 2011 and 2012, from 190 hospitals in 39 prefectures in Japan. The percentage of P. aeruginosa isolates producing IMPs, AAC(6')-Iae or AAC(6')-Ib increased significantly from 170/300 (56.7%) in 2011 to 230/300 (76.7%) in 2012, with 134/170 (78.8%) in 2011 and 179/230 (77.8%) in 2012 producing both IMP and either AAC(6')-Iae or AAC(6')-Ib. The MICs of antibiotics, including cephalosporins and carbapenems, were markedly higher for isolates that did than did not produce these resistance factors. These results indicated that MDR P. aeruginosa producing IMPs, AAC(6')-Iae or AAC(6')-Ib have spread throughout Japan and that these antibiotic-resistance factors are useful markers for monitoring MDR P. aeruginosa in Japan.

  10. Multiple Mutations Lead to MexXY-OprM-Dependent Aminoglycoside Resistance in Clinical Strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Guénard, Sophie; Muller, Cédric; Monlezun, Laura; Benas, Philippe; Broutin, Isabelle; Jeannot, Katy

    2014-01-01

    Constitutive overproduction of the pump MexXY-OprM is recognized as a major cause of resistance to aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones, and zwitterionic cephalosporins in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In this study, 57 clonally unrelated strains recovered from non-cystic fibrosis patients were analyzed to characterize the mutations resulting in upregulation of the mexXY operon. Forty-four (77.2%) of the strains, classified as agrZ mutants were found to harbor mutations inactivating the local repressor gene (mexZ) of the mexXY operon (n = 33; 57.9%) or introducing amino acid substitutions in its product, MexZ (n = 11; 19.3%). These sequence variations, which mapped in the dimerization domain, the DNA binding domain, or the rest of the MexZ structure, mostly affected amino acid positions conserved in TetR-like regulators. The 13 remaining MexXY-OprM strains (22.8%) contained intact mexZ genes encoding wild-type MexZ proteins. Eight (14.0%) of these isolates, classified as agrW1 mutants, overexpressed the gene PA5471, which codes for the MexZ antirepressor AmrZ, with 5 strains exhibiting growth defects at 37°C and 44°C, consistent with mutations impairing ribosome activity. Interestingly, one agrW1 mutant appeared to harbor a 7-bp deletion in the coding sequence of the leader peptide, PA5471.1, involved in ribosome-dependent, translational attenuation of PA5471 expression. Finally, DNA sequencing and complementation experiments revealed that 5 (8.8%) strains, classified as agrW2 mutants, harbored single amino acid variations in the sensor histidine kinase of ParRS, a two-component system known to positively control mexXY expression. Collectively, these results demonstrate that clinical strains of P. aeruginosa exploit different regulatory circuitries to mutationally overproduce the MexXY-OprM pump and become multidrug resistant, which accounts for the high prevalence of MexXY-OprM mutants in the clinical setting. PMID:24145539

  11. Highly toxic Microcystis aeruginosa strain, isolated from São Paulo-Brazil, produce hepatotoxins and paralytic shellfish poison neurotoxins.

    PubMed

    Sant'Anna, Célia L; de Carvalho, Luciana R; Fiore, Marli F; Silva-Stenico, Maria Estela; Lorenzi, Adriana S; Rios, Fernanda R; Konno, Katsuhiro; Garcia, Carlos; Lagos, Nestor

    2011-04-01

    While evaluating several laboratory-cultured cyanobacteria strains for the presence of paralytic shellfish poison neurotoxins, the hydrophilic extract of Microcystis aeruginosa strain SPC777--isolated from Billings's reservoir, São Paulo, Brazil--was found to exhibit lethal neurotoxic effect in mouse bioassay. The in vivo test showed symptoms that unambiguously were those produced by PSP. In order to identify the presence of neurotoxins, cells were lyophilized, and the extracts were analyzed by HPLC-FLD and HPLC-MS. HPLC-FLD analysis revealed four main Gonyautoxins: GTX4(47.6%), GTX2(29.5%), GTX1(21.9%), and GTX3(1.0%). HPLC-MS analysis, on other hand, confirmed both epimers, with positive Zwitterions M(+) 395.9 m/z for GTX3/GTX2 and M(+) 411 m/z for GTX4/GTX1 epimers.The hepatotoxins (Microcystins) were also evaluated by ELISA and HPLC-MS analyses. Positive immunoreaction was observed by ELISA assay. Alongside, the HPLC-MS analyses revealed the presence of [L: -ser(7)] MCYST-RR. The N-methyltransferase (NMT) domain of the microcystin synthetase gene mcyA was chosen as the target sequence to detect the presence of the mcy gene cluster. PCR amplification of the NMT domain, using the genomic DNA of the SPC777 strain and the MSF/MSR primer set, resulted in the expected 1,369 bp product. The phylogenetic analyses grouped the NMT sequence with the NMT sequences of other known Microcystis with high bootstrap support. The taxonomical position of M. aeruginosa SPC777 was confirmed by a detailed morphological description and a phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequence. Therefore, co-production of PSP neurotoxins and microcystins by an isolated M. aeruginosa strain is hereby reported for the first time.

  12. Effect of Shear Stress on Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated from the Cystic Fibrosis Lung

    PubMed Central

    Dingemans, Jozef; Monsieurs, Pieter; Yu, Sung-Huan; Crabbé, Aurélie; Förstner, Konrad U.; Malfroot, Anne

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chronic colonization of the lungs by Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. To gain insights into the characteristic biofilm phenotype of P. aeruginosa in the CF lungs, mimicking the CF lung environment is critical. We previously showed that growth of the non-CF-adapted P. aeruginosa PAO1 strain in a rotating wall vessel, a device that simulates the low fluid shear (LS) conditions present in the CF lung, leads to the formation of in-suspension, self-aggregating biofilms. In the present study, we determined the phenotypic and transcriptomic changes associated with the growth of a highly adapted, transmissible P. aeruginosa CF strain in artificial sputum medium under LS conditions. Robust self-aggregating biofilms were observed only under LS conditions. Growth under LS conditions resulted in the upregulation of genes involved in stress response, alginate biosynthesis, denitrification, glycine betaine biosynthesis, glycerol metabolism, and cell shape maintenance, while genes involved in phenazine biosynthesis, type VI secretion, and multidrug efflux were downregulated. In addition, a number of small RNAs appeared to be involved in the response to shear stress. Finally, quorum sensing was found to be slightly but significantly affected by shear stress, resulting in higher production of autoinducer molecules during growth under high fluid shear (HS) conditions. In summary, our study revealed a way to modulate the behavior of a highly adapted P. aeruginosa CF strain by means of introducing shear stress, driving it from a biofilm lifestyle to a more planktonic lifestyle. PMID:27486191

  13. Widespread detection of PER-1-type extended-spectrum beta-lactamases among nosocomial Acinetobacter and Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates in Turkey: a nationwide multicenter study.

    PubMed Central

    Vahaboglu, H; Oztürk, R; Aygün, G; Coşkunkan, F; Yaman, A; Kaygusuz, A; Leblebicioglu, H; Balik, I; Aydin, K; Otkun, M

    1997-01-01

    We studied the prevalence and molecular epidemiology of PER-1-type beta-lactamases among Acinetobacter, Klebsiella, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated over a 3-month period in eight university hospitals from distinct regions of Turkey. A total of 72, 92, and 367 Acinetobacter, Klebsiella, and P. aeruginosa isolates were studied, respectively. The presence of blaPER was determined by the colony hybridization method and later confirmed by isoelectric focusing. We detected PER-1-type beta-lactamases in 46% (33/72) of Acinetobacter strains and in 11% (40/367) of P. aeruginosa strains but not in Klebsiella strains. PER-1-type enzyme producers were highly resistant to ceftazidime and gentamicin, intermediately resistant to amikacin, and susceptible or moderately susceptible to imipenem and meropenem. Among PER-1-type-beta-lactamase-positive isolates, five Acinetobacter isolates and six P. aeruginosa isolates from different hospitals were selected for ribosomal DNA fingerprinting with EcoRI and SalI. The EcoRI-digested DNAs were later hybridized with a digoxigenin-labelled PER-1 probe. The ribotypes and the lengths of blaPER-carrying fragments were identical in four Acinetobacter strains. A single isolate (Ac3) harbored a PER gene on a different fragment (approximately 4.2 kbp) than the others (approximately 3.4 kbp) and showed a clearly distinguishable ribotype. Ribotypes of P. aeruginosa strains obtained with EcoRI showed three patterns. Similarly, in Pseudomonas strains two different EcoRI fragments harbored blaPER (approximately 4.2 kbp in five isolates and 3.4 kbp in one isolate). PER-1-type beta-lactamases appear to be restricted to Turkey. However, their clonal diversity and high prevalence indicate a high spreading potential. PMID:9333059

  14. Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in patients with cystic fibrosis: scientific evidence regarding clinical impact, diagnosis, and treatment*

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Luiz Vicente Ribeiro Ferreira; Ferreira, Flavia de Aguiar; Reis, Francisco José Caldeira; de Britto, Murilo Carlos Amorim; Levy, Carlos Emilio; Clark, Otavio; Ribeiro, José Dirceu

    2013-01-01

    Evidence-based techniques have been increasingly used in the creation of clinical guidelines and the development of recommendations for medical practice. The use of levels of evidence allows the reader to identify the quality of scientific information that supports the recommendations made by experts. The objective of this review was to address current concepts related to the clinical impact, diagnosis, and treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in patients with cystic fibrosis. For the preparation of this review, the authors defined a group of questions that would be answered in accordance with the principles of PICO–an acronym based on questions regarding the Patients of interest, Intervention being studied, Comparison of the intervention, and Outcome of interest. For each question, a structured review of the literature was performed using the Medline database in order to identify the studies with the methodological design most appropriate to answering the question. The questions were designed so that each of the authors could write a response. A first draft was prepared and discussed by the group. Recommendations were then made on the basis of the level of scientific evidence, in accordance with the classification system devised by the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine, as well as the level of agreement among the members of the group. PMID:24068273

  15. Influence of cultivation parameters on growth and microcystin production of Microcystis aeruginosa (Cyanophyceae) isolated from Lake Chao (China).

    PubMed

    Krüger, Thomas; Hölzel, Nadine; Luckas, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    Microcystis aeruginosa isolated in 2005 from the shallow eutrophic Lake Chao (Anhui, China) was investigated in terms of growth parameters and microcystin production under varying nutrient concentrations (P, N) and pH values (abiotic factors) as well as under the influence of spent medium of the non-toxic cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. (biotic factors). Stimulating effects on growth were observed at the alkaline pH value (10.5), whereas toxin production was significantly increased under phosphate-P limitation (0.6 mg L(-1) medium). Within a broad range of nitrate-N concentrations (41.2-247.2 mg L(-1) medium), no significant influence on cell growth and microcystin production was observed; however, N-starvation resulted in a typical decrease of growth and toxicity. In addition, cryopreservation of M. aeruginosa evidenced the decrease of toxin production by time-dependent exposure with the cryoprotectant dimethyl sulfoxide under thawing conditions without affecting the growth of the cyanobacterial cells.

  16. Isolation, identification, and algicidal activity of aerobic denitrifying bacterium R11 and its effect on Microcystis aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Su, Jun-feng; Shao, Si-cheng; Huang, Ting-lin; Ma, Fang; Zhang, Kai; Wen, Gang; Zheng, Sheng-chen

    2016-01-01

    Recently, algicidal bacteria have attracted attention as possible agents for the inhibition of algal water blooms. In this study, an aerobic denitrifying bacterium, R11, with high algicidal activity against the toxic Microcystis aeruginosa was isolated from lake sediments. Based on its physiological characteristics and 16S rRNA gene sequence, it was identified as Raoultella, indicating that the bacterium R11 has a good denitrifying ability at 30 °C and can reduce the concentration of nitrate-N completely within 36 h. Additionally, different algicidal characteristics against Microcystis aeruginosa were tested. The results showed that the initial bacterial cell density and algal cell densities strongly influence the removal rates of chlorophyll a. Algicidal activity increased with an increase in the bacterial cell density. With densities of bacterial culture at over 2.4 × 10(5) cell/mL, algicidal activity of up to 80% was obtained in 4 days. We have demonstrated that, with the low initial algal cell density (OD680 less than 0.220), the algicidal activity reached was higher than 90% after 6 days. PMID:27232395

  17. Genomic islands 1 and 2 play key roles in the evolution of extensively drug-resistant ST235 isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Martin; Worden, Paul; Huntington, Peter; Hudson, Bernard; Karagiannis, Thomas; Charles, Ian G.; Djordjevic, Steven P.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa are noscomially acquired, opportunistic pathogens that pose a major threat to the health of burns patients and the immunocompromised. We sequenced the genomes of P. aeruginosa isolates RNS_PA1, RNS_PA46 and RNS_PAE05, which displayed resistance to almost all frontline antibiotics, including gentamicin, piperacillin, timentin, meropenem, ceftazidime and colistin. We provide evidence that the isolates are representatives of P. aeruginosa sequence type (ST) 235 and carry Tn6162 and Tn6163 in genomic islands 1 (GI1) and 2 (GI2), respectively. GI1 disrupts the endA gene at precisely the same chromosomal location as in P. aeruginosa strain VR-143/97, of unknown ST, creating an identical CA direct repeat. The class 1 integron associated with Tn6163 in GI2 carries a blaGES-5–aacA4–gcuE15–aphA15 cassette array conferring resistance to carbapenems and aminoglycosides. GI2 is flanked by a 12 nt direct repeat motif, abuts a tRNA-gly gene, and encodes proteins with putative roles in integration, conjugative transfer as well as integrative conjugative element-specific proteins. This suggests that GI2 may have evolved from a novel integrative conjugative element. Our data provide further support to the hypothesis that genomic islands play an important role in de novo evolution of multiple antibiotic resistance phenotypes in P. aeruginosa. PMID:26962050

  18. Determination of several potential virulence factors in non-o1 Vibrio cholerae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, faecal coliforms and streptococci isolated from Marrakesh groundwater.

    PubMed

    Lamrani Alaoui, Hafsa; Oufdou, Khalid; Mezrioui, Nour-Eddine

    2010-01-01

    The dynamic, hemolytic and hemagglutination activities and the antibiotic resistance of non-O1 Vibrio cholerae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, faecal coliforms (FC) and faecal streptococci (FS), isolated by standard membrane filtration methods from suburban and rural groundwater supplies, were carried out. Detectable non-O1 V. cholerae and P. aeruginosa was present in 81% and 88% of samples. The total occurrence of FC and FS during the period of study was 94%. The annual average densities of non-O1 V. cholerae were 4,903 MPN/100 mL. While, they were 206, 1,891 and 1,246 cfu/100 mL for P. aeruginosa, FC and FS respectively. Non-O1 V. cholerae strains had the highest percentage of hemolytic activities (alpha + beta) (71.29%), whereas 20.71% of FS, 16.88% of FC and 9.13% of P. aeruginosa strains produced hemolysin. Bacterial strains isolated were found to be adhesive, with percentages of 63.09%, 65.09%, 84.06% and 87.98% respectively for non-O1 V. cholerae, FS, FC and P. aeruginosa. As for antibiotic resistance, the overall resistance of non-O1 V. cholerae strains was 79%, whereas it was 100% for the other bacteria. Non-O1 V. cholerae resistance was expressed towards sulfamethoxazole (75%), streptomycin (62%) and cephalothin (60%). Obtained results indicated correlation between bacteriological pollution and their public health implications.

  19. Isolation of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa gene affecting uptake of dibenzothiophene in n-tetradecane.

    PubMed

    Noda, Ken-Ichi; Watanabe, Kimiko; Maruhashi, Kenji

    2003-01-01

    The dsz desulfurization gene cluster from Rhodococcus erythropolis KA2-5-1 was transferred into the chromosomes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain NCIMB9571 using a transposon vector. All of the recombinant strains completely desulfurized 1 mM dibenzothiophene (DBT) in n-tetradecane (n-TD) except one, named strain PARMI. Strain PARMI was unable to desulfurize DBT in n-TD, but was able to desulfurize it in water. The n-alkane utilization ability, the biosurfactant production and the fatty acid composition of cells in strain PARMI were the same level as those of the other recombinants. The transposon insertion area of strain PARMI was analyzed by transposon tagging. We cloned three possible open reading frames (ORFs), designated hcuA, hcuB and hcuC, from the genomic DNA of P. aeruginosa NCIMB9571 using the transposon insertion area of strain PARMI as a DNA probe. Examination of the sequence revealed the transposon was inserted into hcuA. The full length of the hcuABC genes transformed into strain PARMI achieved 87% recovery of the desulfurization activity of DBT in n-TD, but partial hcuABC genes achieved only 0-12%. These results indicate that DBT desulfurization in the oil phase by recombinant P. aeruginosa strain NCIMB9571 requires the full length of the hcuABC gene cluster. The hcuABC gene cluster relates to DBT uptake from the oil phase to inside of the cell, and the uptake ability is independent of the n-alkane utilization ability, the biosurfactant production and the fatty acid composition of cells.

  20. Isolation, purification, and characterization of the major autolysin from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Watt, S R; Clarke, A J

    1997-11-01

    The major (26 kDa) autolysin from Pseudomonas aeruginosa was purified to apparent homogeneity by a combination of preparative electrophoresis, ion-exchange, and dye-ligand chromatographies. This purification was facilitated by the development of a spot-assay that involved the spotting and subsequent incubation of autolysin samples on polyacrylamide gels containing peptidoglycan. The pl of the 26-kDa autolysin was determined to be between 3.5 and 4 and disulfide bonds within the enzyme were essential for activity. The autolysin catalyzed the release of reducing sugars from the peptidoglycans of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli indicating it to be a beta-glycosidase. It was ineffective at hydrolysing the peptidoglycan from Gram-positive bacteria and the O-acetylated peptidoglycans from either Proteus mirabilis or Staphylococcus aureus. The N-terminal sequence of the purified autolysin was determined to be His-Glu-Pro-Pro-Gly. The 26-kDa autolysin together with a 29-kDa autolysin was determined to be secreted into the medium by a mechanism that involves the production and release of surface membrane vesicles during normal growth, but the enzymes were not found free and active in culture broth supernatants. PMID:9436306

  1. Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus directly attacks Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus Cystic fibrosis isolates

    PubMed Central

    Iebba, Valerio; Totino, Valentina; Santangelo, Floriana; Gagliardi, Antonella; Ciotoli, Luana; Virga, Alessandra; Ambrosi, Cecilia; Pompili, Monica; De Biase, Riccardo V.; Selan, Laura; Artini, Marco; Pantanella, Fabrizio; Mura, Francesco; Passariello, Claudio; Nicoletti, Mauro; Nencioni, Lucia; Trancassini, Maria; Quattrucci, Serena; Schippa, Serena

    2014-01-01

    Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus is a predator bacterial species found in the environment and within the human gut, able to attack Gram-negative prey. Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a genetic disease which usually presents lung colonization by Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Staphylococcus aureus biofilms. Here, we investigated the predatory behavior of B. bacteriovorus against these two pathogenic species with: (1) broth culture; (2) “static” biofilms; (3) field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM); (4) “flow” biofilms; (5) zymographic technique. We had the first evidence of B. bacteriovorus survival with a Gram-positive prey, revealing a direct cell-to-cell contact with S. aureus and a new “epibiotic” foraging strategy imaged with FESEM. Mean attaching time of HD100 to S. aureus cells was 185 s, while “static” and “flow” S. aureus biofilms were reduced by 74 (at 24 h) and 46% (at 20 h), respectively. Furthermore, zymograms showed a differential bacteriolytic activity exerted by the B. bacteriovorus lysates on P. aeruginosa and S. aureus. The dual foraging system against Gram-negative (periplasmic) and Gram-positive (epibiotic) prey could suggest the use of B. bacteriovorus as a “living antibiotic” in CF, even if further studies are required to simulate its in vivo predatory behavior. PMID:24926292

  2. Proteomic analysis of keratitis-associated Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Sewell, Abby; Dunmire, Jeffrey; Wehmann, Michael; Rowe, Theresa

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To compare the proteomic profile of a clinical isolate of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) obtained from an infected cornea of a contact lens wearer and the laboratory strain P. aeruginosa ATCC 10145. Methods Antibiotic sensitivity, motility, biofilm formation, and virulence tests were performed using standard methods. Whole protein lysates were analyzed with liquid chromatography/ tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in triplicate, and relative protein abundances were determined with spectral counting. The G test followed by a post hoc Holm-Sidak adjustment was used for the statistical analyses to determine significance in the differential expression of proteins between the two strains. Results A total of 687 proteins were detected. One-hundred thirty-three (133) proteins were significantly different between the two strains. Among these, 13 were upregulated, and 16 were downregulated in the clinical strain compared to ATCC 10145, whereas 57 were detected only in the clinical strain. The upregulated proteins are associated with virulence and pathogenicity. Conclusions Proteins detected at higher levels in the clinical strain of P. aeruginosa were proteins known to be virulence factors. These results confirm that the keratitis-associated P. aeruginosa strain is pathogenic and expresses a higher number of virulence factors compared to the laboratory strain ATCC 10145. Identification of the protein profile of the corneal strain of P. aeruginosa in this study will aid in elucidating novel intervention strategies for reducing the burden of P. aeruginosa infection in keratitis. PMID:25221424

  3. Genetic analyses of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from healthy captive snakes: evidence of high inter- and intrasite dissemination and occurrence of antibiotic resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Colinon, Céline; Jocktane, Dominique; Brothier, Elisabeth; Rossolini, Gian Maria; Cournoyer, Benoit; Nazaret, Sylvie

    2010-03-01

    Faecal carriage of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was investigated by selective plating and PCR identification test, among healthy captive snakes from zoological and private collections from France as well as from wild snakes from Guinea. P. aeruginosa faecal carriage among captive snakes was high (72 out of 83 individuals), but low among wild specimen (3 out of 23 individuals). Genetic diversity analyses of the isolates, based on SpeI-PFGE profiles, evidenced five dominant clones or clonal complexes spreading among snakes within a site and between sites and persisting over time. Similar clones or clonal complexes were detected from mouth swabs of the owners and from water and preys used to feed the snakes, evidencing various sources of snake colonization and the first cases of P. aeruginosa cross-contamination between snakes and owners. These observations led to the conclusion that P. aeruginosa behaves as an opportunistic species within snakes in captivity and that colonization and dissemination occurs consecutively to processes similar to those identified within the hospital. Antibiotic susceptibility testing showed that most isolates had a wild-type resistance profile except for one persistent clone isolated from both snakes and preys that harboured multiple antimicrobial resistance genes mediated by an integron carrying the qacH, aadB, aadA2 and cmlA10 cassettes, and a tetA(C)-carrying transposon. Biocides or antibiotics used in the zoological garden could have led to the acquisition of this integron.

  4. Detection of VEB-1, OXA-10 and PER-1 genotypes in extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated from burn patients.

    PubMed

    Mirsalehian, Akbar; Feizabadi, Mehdi; Nakhjavani, Farrokh A; Jabalameli, Fereshteh; Goli, Hamidreza; Kalantari, Narges

    2010-02-01

    Resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains to the broad-spectrum cephalosporins may be mediated by the extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs). These enzymes are encoded by different genes located on either chromosomes or plasmids. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of ESBLs and antimicrobial susceptibilities of P. aeruginosa isolated from burn patients in Tehran, Iran. Antimicrobial susceptibility of 170 isolates to cefpodoxime, aztreonam, ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin, ceftazidime, cefepime, imipenem, meropenem, cefotaxime, levofloxacin, piperacillin-tazobactam and ceftriaxone was determined by disc agar diffusion test. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of the genes encoding OXA-10, PER-1 and VEB-1 was also performed. All isolates (100%) were resistant to ceftazidime, cefotaxime, cefepime and aztreonam. Imipenem and meropenem were the most effective anti-pseudomonal agents. The results revealed that 148 (87.05%) of the isolates were multidrug resistant and 67 (39.41%) of the isolates were ESBL positive. Fifty (74.62%), 33 (49.25%) and 21 (31.34%) strains among 67 ESBL-producing strains amplified blaOXA-10, blaPER-1 and blaVEB-1 respectively. In conclusion, the high prevalence of multidrug resistance (87.05%) and production of OXA-10, PER-1 and VEB-1 genes in P. aeruginosa isolates in burn patients confirm that protocols considering these issues should be considered in burn hospitals.

  5. Mutations in NalC induce MexAB-OprM overexpression resulting in high level of aztreonam resistance in environmental isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Braz, Vânia S; Furlan, João Pedro R; Fernandes, Ana Flavia T; Stehling, Eliana G

    2016-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen with high resistance to a wide variety of antimicrobials. The multidrug resistance pump MexAB-OprM promotes the efflux of various antibiotics, mostly when mutations accumulate in the transcriptional regulators MexR, NalC and NalD, thereby causing MexAB-OprM overexpression. In this work, a characterization of 50 P. aeruginosa isolates obtained from Brazilian agricultural soils to determine the reasons of their resistance to aztreonam was done. The majority of the isolates showed higher aztreonam resistance than wild-type strain by MIC method. DNA sequence analysis of mexR, nalC and nalD genes from 13 of these isolates showed the amino acid substitution in NalC for all tested isolates, just one mutation was detected in MexR and none in NalD. Furthermore, an increase in the level of mexA expression by real-time RT-PCR analysis in eight isolates harboring mutations in NalC was found. Although there was not a relationship between MIC of aztreonam and the level of mexA expression, on the other hand, the results presented here suggest that novel mutations in NalC, including Arg97-Gly and Ala186-Thr, are related to MexAB-OprM overexpression causing aztreonam resistance in P. aeruginosa environmental isolates. PMID:27412168

  6. Biofilm Filtrates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strains Isolated from Cystic Fibrosis Patients Inhibit Preformed Aspergillus fumigatus Biofilms via Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Shirazi, Fazal; Ferreira, Jose A G; Stevens, David A; Clemons, Karl V; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pa) and Aspergillus fumigatus (Af) colonize cystic fibrosis (CF) patient airways. Pa culture filtrates inhibit Af biofilms, and Pa non-CF, mucoid (Muc-CF) and nonmucoid CF (NMuc-CF) isolates form an ascending inhibitory hierarchy. We hypothesized this activity is mediated through apoptosis induction. One Af and three Pa (non-CF, Muc-CF, NMuc-CF) reference isolates were studied. Af biofilm was formed in 96 well plates for 16 h ± Pa biofilm filtrates. After 24 h, apoptosis was characterized by viability dye DiBAc, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, DNA fragmentation and metacaspase activity. Muc-CF and NMuc-CF filtrates inhibited and damaged Af biofilm (p<0.0001). Intracellular ROS levels were elevated (p<0.001) in NMuc-CF-treated Af biofilms (3.7- fold) compared to treatment with filtrates from Muc-CF- (2.5- fold) or non-CF Pa (1.7- fold). Depolarization of mitochondrial potential was greater upon exposure to NMuc-CF (2.4-fold) compared to Muc-CF (1.8-fold) or non-CF (1.25-fold) (p<0.0001) filtrates. Exposure to filtrates resulted in more DNA fragmentation in Af biofilm, compared to control, mediated by metacaspase activation. In conclusion, filtrates from CF-Pa isolates were more inhibitory against Af biofilms than from non-CF. The apoptotic effect involves mitochondrial membrane damage associated with metacaspase activation.

  7. Biofilm Filtrates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strains Isolated from Cystic Fibrosis Patients Inhibit Preformed Aspergillus fumigatus Biofilms via Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Shirazi, Fazal; Ferreira, Jose A. G.; Stevens, David A.; Clemons, Karl V.; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pa) and Aspergillus fumigatus (Af) colonize cystic fibrosis (CF) patient airways. Pa culture filtrates inhibit Af biofilms, and Pa non-CF, mucoid (Muc-CF) and nonmucoid CF (NMuc-CF) isolates form an ascending inhibitory hierarchy. We hypothesized this activity is mediated through apoptosis induction. One Af and three Pa (non-CF, Muc-CF, NMuc-CF) reference isolates were studied. Af biofilm was formed in 96 well plates for 16 h ± Pa biofilm filtrates. After 24 h, apoptosis was characterized by viability dye DiBAc, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, DNA fragmentation and metacaspase activity. Muc-CF and NMuc-CF filtrates inhibited and damaged Af biofilm (p<0.0001). Intracellular ROS levels were elevated (p<0.001) in NMuc-CF-treated Af biofilms (3.7- fold) compared to treatment with filtrates from Muc-CF- (2.5- fold) or non-CF Pa (1.7- fold). Depolarization of mitochondrial potential was greater upon exposure to NMuc-CF (2.4-fold) compared to Muc-CF (1.8-fold) or non-CF (1.25-fold) (p<0.0001) filtrates. Exposure to filtrates resulted in more DNA fragmentation in Af biofilm, compared to control, mediated by metacaspase activation. In conclusion, filtrates from CF-Pa isolates were more inhibitory against Af biofilms than from non-CF. The apoptotic effect involves mitochondrial membrane damage associated with metacaspase activation. PMID:26930399

  8. Continued transmission of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from a wash hand basin tap in a critical care unit.

    PubMed

    Garvey, M I; Bradley, C W; Tracey, J; Oppenheim, B

    2016-09-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important nosocomial pathogen, colonizing hospital water supplies including taps and sinks. We report a cluster of P. aeruginosa acquisitions during a period of five months from tap water to patients occupying the same burns single room in a critical care unit. Pseudomonas aeruginosa cultured from clinical isolates from four different patients was indistinguishable from water strains by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Water outlets in critical care may be a source of P. aeruginosa despite following the national guidance, and updated guidance and improved control measures are needed to reduce the risks of transmission to patients.

  9. Outbreaks of multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa in community hospitals in Japan.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Jun-Ichiro; Asagi, Tsukasa; Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru; Kasai, Atsushi; Mizuguchi, Yukie; Araake, Minako; Fujino, Tomoko; Kikuchi, Hideko; Sasaki, Satoru; Watari, Hajime; Kojima, Tadashi; Miki, Hiroshi; Kanemitsu, Keiji; Kunishima, Hiroyuki; Kikuchi, Yoshihiro; Kaku, Mitsuo; Yoshikura, Hiroshi; Kuratsuji, Tadatoshi; Kirikae, Teruo

    2007-03-01

    We previously reported an outbreak in a neurosurgery ward of catheter-associated urinary tract infection with multidrug-resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain IMCJ2.S1, carrying the 6'-N-aminoglycoside acetyltransferase gene [aac(6')-Iae]. For further epidemiologic studies, 214 clinical isolates of MDR P. aeruginosa showing resistance to imipenem (MIC >or= 16 microg/ml), amikacin (MIC >or= 64 microg/ml), and ciprofloxacin (MIC >or= 4 microg/ml) were collected from 13 hospitals in the same prefecture in Japan. We also collected 70 clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa that were sensitive to one or more of these antibiotics and compared their characteristics with those of the MDR P. aeruginosa isolates. Of the 214 MDR P. aeruginosa isolates, 212 (99%) were serotype O11. We developed a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay and a slide agglutination test for detection of the aac(6')-Iae gene and the AAC(6')-Iae protein, respectively. Of the 212 MDR P. aeruginosa isolates, 212 (100%) and 207 (98%) were positive in the LAMP assay and in the agglutination test, respectively. Mutations of gyrA and parC genes resulting in amino acid substitutions were detected in 213 of the 214 MDR P. aeruginosa isolates (99%). Of the 214 MDR P. aeruginosa isolates, 212 showed pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns with >or=70% similarity to that of IMCJ2.S1 and 83 showed a pattern identical to that of IMCJ2.S1, indicating that clonal expansion of MDR P. aeruginosa occurred in community hospitals in this area. The methods developed in this study to detect aac(6')-Iae were rapid and effective in diagnosing infections caused by various MDR P. aeruginosa clones.

  10. Adhesive Capabilities of Staphylococcus Aureus and Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Isolated from Tears of HIV/AIDS Patients to Soft Contact Lenses

    PubMed Central

    B. O., Ajayi; F.E., Kio; F.D., Otajevwo

    2012-01-01

    Fifty conjunctival swab samples collected from ELISA confirmed HIV/AIDS seropositive patients who were referred to the HIV/AIDS laboratories of the University of Benin Teaching Hospital and Central Hospital both based in Benin City, Nigeria were aseptically cultured on appropriate media by standard methods. The resulting isolates/strains, after identification by standard methods, were tested for their ability to adhere to two hydrophobic non-ionic daily wear silicone hydrogel soft contact lenses (i.e. lotrafilcon B, WC 33% and polymacon, WC 38%) as well as to two hydrophilic ionic conventional extended wear silicone hydrogel soft contact lenses (i.e. methafilcon A, WC 55% and omafilcon A, WC 60%) by the adhesiveness/slime production modified vortex/Robin device method. Evidence of adhesiveness/slime production was indicated by presence of a visible stained film lining the surface of the contact lens which was measured and recorded as strong or weak according to the density of the adhered bacterial film. Fourteen (28.0%) Staphylococcus aureus strains and 10 (20.0%) Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains were obtained among other organisms. Staphylococcus aureus strains adhered in decreasing order to lotrafilcon B (55.4 ± 4.7), polymacon (46.4 ± 8.4), methfilcon A (46.4 ± 8.4) and omafilcon A (25.0 ± 6.4) with no significant difference in adhesive strengths of individual strains (P > 0.05). Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains also recorded decreasing adhesive strengths to lotrafilcon B (37.5 ± 8.2), polymacon (28.6 ± 6.3), methafilcon A (26.8 ± 5.5) and omafilcon A (23.2 ± 5.5) also with no significant difference in adhesive strengths of individual strains (P > 0.05). Attachment strengths of Staph. aureus strains to all four contact lenses were higher than those of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains. Both organisms adhered most to hydrophobic lotrafilcon B and least to hydrophilic omafilcon A. This invitro adhesion studies revealed that daily wear silicone hydrogel low water

  11. Mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates maintain the biofilm formation capacity and the gene expression profiles during the chronic lung infection of CF patients.

    PubMed

    Lee, Baoleri; Schjerling, Charlotte K; Kirkby, Nikolai; Hoffmann, Nadine; Borup, Rehannah; Molin, Søren; Høiby, Niels; Ciofu, Oana

    2011-04-01

    Phenotypic and genotypic diversifications of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the airways of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) promote long-term survival of bacteria during chronic lung infection. Twelve clonally related, sequential mucoid and non-mucoid paired P. aeruginosa isolates obtained from three Danish CF patients were investigated. The in vitro biofilm formation capacity was studied under static and flow through conditions and the global gene expression profiles were investigated by Affymetrix GeneChip. Regulatory genes of alginate production and quorum sensing (QS) system were sequenced and measurements of the alginate production and the detection of the QS signal molecules were performed. Comparisons of mucoid and non-mucoid isolates from early and late stages of the infection showed that the mucoid phenotype maintained over a decade the capacity to form in vitro biofilm and showed an unaltered transcriptional profile, whereas substantial alterations in the transcriptional profiles and loss of the capacity to form in vitro biofilms were observed in corresponding isolates of the non-mucoid phenotype. The conserved gene expression pattern in the mucoid isolates vs the diversity of changes in non-mucoid isolates observed in this particular P. aeruginosa clone reflects different adaptation strategies used by these two phenotypes in the different niches of the CF lung environment. PMID:21492226

  12. Motility activity, slime production, biofilm formation and genetic typing by ERIC-PCR for Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated from bovine and other sources (human and environment).

    PubMed

    Wolska, K; Szweda, P; Lada, K; Rytel, E; Gucwa, K; Kot, B; Piechota, M

    2014-01-01

    The molecular-typing strategy, ERIC-PCR was used in an attempt to determine the genomic relationship of 28 P. aeruginosa strains isolated from faeces of healthy bovine, bovine mastitis and from faeces of hospital patients as well as from environment. ERIC-PCR fingerprinting revealed large molecular differentiation within this group of isolates. Twenty two out of 28 strains tested generated unique patterns of DNA bands and only three genotypes consisted of two isolates each were identified. We also tested the P. aeruginosa isolates for their ability to form a biofilm on abiotic surfaces including polyvinylchloride and polystyrene. Different biofilm-forming abilities were demonstrated among strains; however, most of them (64.3%) showed moderate-biofilm forming ability. The strains with increased swimming and twitching motility displayed elevated biofilm formation. However, a negative correlation was found between slime and initial biofilm production. On the basis of the results obtained, we suggest that there are no major differences in phenotypic properties between P. aeruginosa strains isolated from different sources.

  13. Evaluation of the Osiris expert system for identification of beta-lactam phenotypes in isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Bert, Frédéric; Ould-Hocine, Zahia; Juvin, Manette; Dubois, Véronique; Loncle-Provot, Véronique; Lefranc, Valérie; Quentin, Claudine; Lambert, Nicole; Arlet, Guillaume

    2003-08-01

    Osiris is a video zone size reader for disk diffusion tests featuring a built-in extended expert system (EES). The efficacy of the EES for the identification of the beta-lactam susceptibility phenotypes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates was evaluated. Thirteen beta-lactams were tested in four laboratories by the disk diffusion test with 53 strains with well-characterized resistance mechanisms, including the production of 12 extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs). The plates were read with the Osiris system and the results were interpreted with the ESS, and then the phenotype identified by the EES was compared to the resistance mechanism. The strains were also screened for the presence of ESBL production by a double-disk synergy test by placing the strains between an extended-spectrum cephalosporin-containing disk and a clavulanic acid-containing disk at distances of 30, 20, 15, and 10 mm from each other. Overall, the EES accurately identified the phenotypes of 88.2% of the strains and indicated an association with several mechanisms for 3.8% of the strains. No phenotype was identified in four strains with low levels of penicillinase production. Misidentifications were observed for two penicillinase-producing strains: one strain with partially derepressed cephalosporinase production and one strain overexpressing the MexA-MexB-OprM efflux system. The production of only four ESBLs was detected by the standard synergy test with a 30-mm distance between the disks. The production of five further ESBLs was identified by reducing the distance to 20 mm, and the production of the last three ESBLs was detected only at a distance of 15 or 10 mm. Our results indicate that the Osiris EES is an effective tool for the identification of P. aeruginosa beta-lactam phenotypes. A specific double-disk synergy test with reduced disk distances is necessary for the detection of ESBL production by this organism.

  14. Increasing resistance rate to carbapenem among blood culture isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a university-affiliated hospital in China, 2004-2011.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoli; Gu, Bing; Mei, Yaning; Wen, Yi; Xia, Wenying

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the profile of antimicrobial resistance of Gram-negative bacteria in blood cultures from 2004-2011. Pathogens from positive blood cultures were subcultured, and identified in the First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University from January 2004 to December 2011. The antibiotic resistance pattern was analyzed by WHONET 5.4. A total of 1224 cases of Gram-negative bacterial isolates were documented, accounting for 38.6% of the total pathogens isolated from positive blood cultures in the 8-year period. The isolation rates of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Acinetobacter baumannii increased nearly three times over the same time span. Most Gram-negative bacteria isolates, except the isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, showed a significantly increased resistance rate to cephalosporins (in particular third/fourth generation cephalosporins). Noteworthy, the antimicrobial resistance of K. pneumoniae, A. baumannii and P. aeruginosa isolates to carbapenem (imipenem and meropenem) was significantly increased and the resistant rate to carbapenem was >80.0% in A. baumannii in 2011. The results from PCR detection for carbapenemases were as follows: 82.8% (24/29) isolates of K. pneumoniae carried the kpc-2 gene; only three metallo-beta-lactamase-positive P. aeruginosa isolates were detected; and 93.1% (67/72) A. baumannii isolates were blaOXA-23 positive. The antimicrobial resistance rate of Gram-negative bacteria isolated from blood cultures significantly increased from 2004 to 2011, with significant resistance to the third/fourth generation cephalosporins and carbapenem.

  15. Silver Nanoparticles: Biosynthesis Using an ATCC Reference Strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Activity as Broad Spectrum Clinical Antibacterial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Quinteros, Melisa A.; Aiassa Martínez, Ivana M.; Dalmasso, Pablo R.; Páez, Paulina L.

    2016-01-01

    Currently, the biosynthesis of silver-based nanomaterials attracts enormous attention owing to the documented antimicrobial properties of these ones. This study reports the extracellular biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) using a Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain from a reference culture collection. A greenish culture supernatant of P. aeruginosa incubated at 37°C with a silver nitrate solution for 24 h changed to a yellowish brown color, indicating the formation of Ag-NPs, which was confirmed by UV-vis spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. TEM analysis showed spherical and pseudospherical nanoparticles with a distributed size mainly between 25 and 45 nm, and the XRD pattern revealed the crystalline nature of Ag-NPs. Also it provides an evaluation of the antimicrobial activity of the biosynthesized Ag-NPs against human pathogenic and opportunistic microorganisms, namely, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Enterococcus faecalis, Proteus mirabilis, Acinetobacter baumannii, Escherichia coli, P. aeruginosa, and Klebsiella pneumonia. Ag-NPs were found to be bioactive at picomolar concentration levels showing bactericidal effects against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains. This work demonstrates the first helpful use of biosynthesized Ag-NPs as broad spectrum bactericidal agents for clinical strains of pathogenic multidrug-resistant bacteria such as methicillin-resistant S. aureus, A. baumannii, and E. coli. In addition, these Ag-NPs showed negligible cytotoxic effect in human neutrophils suggesting low toxicity to the host. PMID:27340405

  16. Microbial interaction between a CTXM-15 -producing Escherichia coli and a susceptible Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from bronchoalveolar lavage: influence of cefotaxime in the dual-species biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Bessa, Lucinda J; Mendes, Ângelo; Gomes, Rita; Curvelo, Sara; Cravo, Sara; Sousa, Emília; Vasconcelos, Vitor; Martins da Costa, Paulo

    2015-06-01

    Two isolates, Escherichia coli ella00 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa ella01, obtained from bronchoalveolar lavage, were found to be closely associated in clusters in agar medium. Escherichia coli ella00 was multidrug resistant and CTXM-15 extended-spectrum β-lactamase producer, while P. aeruginosa ella01 was susceptible to all antimicrobials tested. These observations impelled for further studies aimed to understand their microbial interaction. The P. aeruginosa ella01 biofilm-forming capacity was reduced and not affected when it was co-cultured with E. coli ella00 and E. coli ATCC 25922 respectively. Interestingly, the co-culture of ella isolates in the presence of high concentrations, such as 160 μg ml(-1) , of cefotaxime allowed the formation of more biofilm than in the absence of the antibiotic. As revealed by fluorescence in situ hybridization, in co-culture, P. aeruginosa ella01 survived and subsequently flourished when exposed to this third-generation cephalosporin at a concentration 10 × higher than its minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), and this was mostly due to β-lactamases production by E. coli ella00. In fact, it was demonstrated by high-performance liquid chromatography that cefotaxime was absent for the culture medium 4 h after application. In conclusion, we demonstrate that bacterial species can interact differently depending on the surrounding conditions (favourable or stressing), and that those interactions can switch from unprofitable to beneficial.

  17. Optimal dosing regimen of nitric oxide donor compounds for the reduction of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm and isolates from wastewater membranes.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Robert J; Bandi, Ratnaharika R; Wong, Wee Seng; Barraud, Nicolas; McDougald, Diane; Fane, Anthony; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Rice, Scott A

    2013-01-01

    Membrane fouling by bacterial biofilms remains a key challenge for membrane-based water purification systems. Here, the optimal biofilm dispersal potential of three nitric oxide (NO) donor compounds, viz. sodium nitroprusside, 6-(2-hydroxy-1-methyl-2-nitrosohydrazino)-N-methyl-1-hexanamine (MAHMA NONOate) and 1-(hydroxy-NNO-azoxy)-L-proline, disodium salt, was investigated using Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 as a model organism. Dispersal was quantitatively assessed by confocal microscopy [bacterial cells and the components of the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) (polysaccharides and extracellular DNA)] and colony-forming unit counts. The three NO donor compounds had different optimal exposure times and concentrations, with MAHMA NONOate being the optimal NO donor compound. Biofilm dispersal correlated with a reduction in both bacterial cells and EPS. MAHMA NONOate also reduced single species biofilms formed by bacteria isolated from industrial membrane bioreactor and reverse osmosis membranes, as well as in isolates combined to generate mixed species biofilms. The data present strong evidence for the application of these NO donor compounds for prevention of biofouling in an industrial setting. PMID:23368407

  18. Optimal dosing regimen of nitric oxide donor compounds for the reduction of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm and isolates from wastewater membranes.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Robert J; Bandi, Ratnaharika R; Wong, Wee Seng; Barraud, Nicolas; McDougald, Diane; Fane, Anthony; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Rice, Scott A

    2013-01-01

    Membrane fouling by bacterial biofilms remains a key challenge for membrane-based water purification systems. Here, the optimal biofilm dispersal potential of three nitric oxide (NO) donor compounds, viz. sodium nitroprusside, 6-(2-hydroxy-1-methyl-2-nitrosohydrazino)-N-methyl-1-hexanamine (MAHMA NONOate) and 1-(hydroxy-NNO-azoxy)-L-proline, disodium salt, was investigated using Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 as a model organism. Dispersal was quantitatively assessed by confocal microscopy [bacterial cells and the components of the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) (polysaccharides and extracellular DNA)] and colony-forming unit counts. The three NO donor compounds had different optimal exposure times and concentrations, with MAHMA NONOate being the optimal NO donor compound. Biofilm dispersal correlated with a reduction in both bacterial cells and EPS. MAHMA NONOate also reduced single species biofilms formed by bacteria isolated from industrial membrane bioreactor and reverse osmosis membranes, as well as in isolates combined to generate mixed species biofilms. The data present strong evidence for the application of these NO donor compounds for prevention of biofouling in an industrial setting.

  19. Sodium houttuyfonate inhibits biofilm formation and alginate biosynthesis-associated gene expression in a clinical strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in vitro

    PubMed Central

    WU, DA-QIANG; CHENG, HUIJUAN; DUAN, QIANGJUN; HUANG, WEIFENG

    2015-01-01

    The increasing multidrug resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa has become a serious public-health problem. In the present study, the inhibitory activities of sodium houttuyfonate (SH) against biofilm formation and alginate production in a clinical strain of P. aeruginosa (AH16) were investigated in vitro using crystal violet dying and standard curve methods, respectively. The cellular morphology of P. aeruginosa treated with SH was observed using a scanning electron microscope. Furthermore, reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to identify differences in the expression levels of genes associated with alginate biosynthesis as a result of the SH treatment. The results indicated that SH significantly inhibited biofilm formation, and decreased the levels of the primary biofilm constituent, alginate, in P. aeruginosa AH16 at various stages of biofilm development. In addition, scanning electron microscopy observations demonstrated that SH markedly altered the cellular morphology and biofilm structure of P. aeruginosa. Furthermore, the results from the reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis indicated that SH inhibited biofilm formation by mitigating the expression of the algD and algR genes, which are associated with alginate biosynthesis. Therefore, the present study has provided novel insights into the potent effects and underlying mechanisms of SH-induced inhibition of biofilm formation in a clinical strain of P. aeruginosa. PMID:26622388

  20. In vitro antimicrobial activity of five essential oils on multidrug resistant Gram-negative clinical isolates

    PubMed Central

    Sakkas, Hercules; Gousia, Panagiota; Economou, Vangelis; Sakkas, Vassilios; Petsios, Stefanos; Papadopoulou, Chrissanthy

    2016-01-01

    Aim/Background: The emergence of drug-resistant pathogens has drawn attention on medicinal plants for potential antimicrobial properties. The objective of the present study was the investigation of the antimicrobial activity of five plant essential oils on multidrug resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Materials and Methods: Basil, chamomile blue, origanum, thyme, and tea tree oil were tested against clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii (n = 6), Escherichia coli (n = 4), Klebsiella pneumoniae (n = 7), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n = 5) using the broth macrodilution method. Results: The tested essential oils produced variable antibacterial effect, while Chamomile blue oil demonstrated no antibacterial activity. Origanum, Thyme, and Basil oils were ineffective on P. aeruginosa isolates. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration values ranged from 0.12% to 1.50% (v/v) for tea tree oil, 0.25-4% (v/v) for origanum and thyme oil, 0.50% to >4% for basil oil and >4% for chamomile blue oil. Compared to literature data on reference strains, the reported MIC values were different by 2SD, denoting less successful antimicrobial activity against multidrug resistant isolates. Conclusions: The antimicrobial activities of the essential oils are influenced by the strain origin (wild, reference, drug sensitive, or resistant) and it should be taken into consideration whenever investigating the plants’ potential for developing new antimicrobials. PMID:27366345

  1. The draft genome sequence of multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain CCBH4851, a nosocomial isolate belonging to clone SP (ST277) that is prevalent in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Melise; Albano, Rodolpho; Asensi, Marise; Assef, Ana Paula Carvalho

    2014-12-01

    The high occurrence of nosocomial multidrug-resistant (MDR) microorganisms is considered a global health problem. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of a MDR Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain isolated in Brazil that belongs to the endemic clone ST277. The genome encodes important resistance determinant genes and consists of 6.7 Mb with a G+C content of 66.86% and 6,347 predicted coding regions including 60 RNAs. PMID:25466623

  2. Microbiological activity of ceftolozane/tazobactam, ceftazidime, meropenem, and piperacillin/tazobactam against Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from children with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Kuti, Joseph L; Pettit, Rebecca S; Neu, Natalie; Cies, Jeffrey J; Lapin, Craig; Muhlebach, Marianne S; Novak, Kimberly J; Nguyen, Sean T; Saiman, Lisa; Nicolau, David P

    2015-09-01

    The activity of ceftolozane/tazobactam was tested against 50 nonduplicate Pseudomonas aeruginosa from 18 cystic fibrosis children collected in 2012-2014. These isolates were multidrug resistant with susceptibility to meropenem, ceftazidime, and piperacillin/tazobactam of 46%, 58%, and 50%, respectively. Ceftolozane/tazobactam was the most active with MIC50, MIC90, and percent susceptibility of 2mg/L, 8 mg/L, and 86%.

  3. Isolation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains from dental office environments and units in Barretos, state of São Paulo, Brazil, and analysis of their susceptibility to antimicrobial drugs

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Ana Claudia; Maluta, Renato Pariz; Stella, Ariel Eurides; Rigobelo, Everlon Cid; Marin, José Moacir; de Ávila, Fernando Antonio

    2008-01-01

    A wide variety of opportunistic pathogens has been detected in the tubing supplying water to odontological equipment, in special in the biofilm lining of these tubes. Among these pathogens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, one of the leading causes of nosocomial infections, is frequently found in water lines supplying dental units. In the present work, 160 samples of water, and 200 fomite samples from forty dental units were collected in the city of Barretos, State of São Paulo, Brazil and evaluated between January and July, 2005. Seventy-six P. aeruginosa strains, isolated from the dental environment (5 strains) and water system (71 strains), were tested for susceptibility to six antimicrobial drugs most frequently used against P. aeruginosa infections. Susceptibility to ciprofloxacin, followed by meropenem was the predominant profile. The need for effective means of reducing the microbial burden within dental unit water lines is emphasized, and the risk of exposure and cross-infection in dental practice, in special when caused by opportunistic pathogens like P. aeruginosa, are highlighted. PMID:24031269

  4. Rapid biodegradation and decolorization of Direct Orange 39 (Orange TGLL) by an isolated bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain BCH.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Jyoti P; Phugare, Swapnil S; Dhanve, Rhishikesh S; Jadhav, Shekhar B

    2010-06-01

    A newly isolated novel bacterium from sediments contaminated with dyestuff was identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain BCH by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. The bacterium was extraordinarily active and operative over a wide rage of temperature (10-60 degrees C) and salinity (5-6%), for decolorization of Direct Orange 39 (Orange TGLL) at optimum pH 7. This strain was capable of decolorizing Direct Orange 39; 50 mg l(-1) within 45 +/- 5 min, with 93.06% decolorization, while maximally it could decolorize 1.5 g l(-1) of dye within 48 h with 60% decolorization. Analytical studies as, UV-Vis spectroscopy, FTIR, HPLC were employed to confirm the biodegradation of dye and formation of new metabolites. Induction in the activities of lignin peroxidases, DCIP reductase as well as tyrosinase was observed, indicating the significant role of these enzymes in biodegradation of Direct Orange 39. Toxicity studies with Phaseolus mungo and Triticum aestivum revealed the non-toxic nature of degraded metabolites.

  5. Structural and physicochemical characterization of crude biosurfactant produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa SP4 isolated from petroleum-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Pornsunthorntawee, Orathai; Wongpanit, Panya; Chavadej, Sumaeth; Abe, Masahiko; Rujiravanit, Ratana

    2008-04-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain SP4, isolated from petroleum-contaminated soil in Thailand, was used to produce a biosurfactant from a nutrient broth with palm oil as the carbon source. The key components of the crude biosurfactant were fractionated by using HPLC-ELSD technique. With the use of ATR-FTIR spectroscopy, in combination with (1)H NMR and MS analyses, chemical structures of the fractionated components of the crude biosurfactant were identified as rhamnolipid species. When compared to synthetic surfactants, including Pluronic F-68, which is a triblock nonionic surfactant containing poly(ethylene oxide) and poly(propylene oxide), and sodium dodecyl sulfate, the crude biosurfactant showed comparable physicochemical properties, in terms of the surface activities. The crude biosurfactant reduced the surface tension of pure water to 29.0 mN/m with a critical micelle concentration of approximately 200 mg/l, and it exhibited good thermal and pH stability. The crude biosurfactant also formed stable water-in-oil microemulsions with crude oil and various types of vegetable oils, but not with short-chain hydrocarbons.

  6. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa Transcriptional Landscape Is Shaped by Environmental Heterogeneity and Genetic Variation

    PubMed Central

    Schniederjans, Monika; Khaledi, Ariane; Hornischer, Klaus; Schulz, Sebastian; Bielecka, Agata; Eckweiler, Denitsa; Pohl, Sarah; Häussler, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Phenotypic variability among bacteria depends on gene expression in response to different environments, and it also reflects differences in genomic structure. In this study, we analyzed transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) profiles of 151 Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates under standard laboratory conditions and of one P. aeruginosa type strain under 14 different environmental conditions. Our approach allowed dissection of the impact of the genetic background versus environmental cues on P. aeruginosa gene expression profiles and revealed that phenotypic variation was larger in response to changing environments than between genomically different isolates. We demonstrate that mutations within the global regulator LasR affect more than one trait (pleiotropy) and that the interaction between mutations (epistasis) shapes the P. aeruginosa phenotypic plasticity landscape. Because of pleiotropic and epistatic effects, average genotype and phenotype measures appeared to be uncorrelated in P. aeruginosa. PMID:26126853

  7. Structural basis for effectiveness of siderophore-conjugated monocarbams against clinically relevant strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Seungil; Zaniewski, Richard P.; Marr, Eric S.; Lacey, Brian M.; Tomaras, Andrew P.; Evdokimov, Artem; Miller, J. Richard; Shanmugasundaram, Veerabahu

    2012-02-08

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic Gram-negative pathogen that causes nosocomial infections for which there are limited treatment options. Penicillin-binding protein PBP3, a key therapeutic target, is an essential enzyme responsible for the final steps of peptidoglycan synthesis and is covalently inactivated by {beta}-lactam antibiotics. Here we disclose the first high resolution cocrystal structures of the P. aeruginosa PBP3 with both novel and marketed {beta}-lactams. These structures reveal a conformational rearrangement of Tyr532 and Phe533 and a ligand-induced conformational change of Tyr409 and Arg489. The well-known affinity of the monobactam aztreonam for P. aeruginosa PBP3 is due to a distinct hydrophobic aromatic wall composed of Tyr503, Tyr532, and Phe533 interacting with the gem-dimethyl group. The structure of MC-1, a new siderophore-conjugated monocarbam complexed with PBP3 provides molecular insights for lead optimization. Importantly, we have identified a novel conformation that is distinct to the high-molecular-weight class B PBP subfamily, which is identifiable by common features such as a hydrophobic aromatic wall formed by Tyr503, Tyr532, and Phe533 and the structural flexibility of Tyr409 flanked by two glycine residues. This is also the first example of a siderophore-conjugated triazolone-linked monocarbam complexed with any PBP. Energetic analysis of tightly and loosely held computed hydration sites indicates protein desolvation effects contribute significantly to PBP3 binding, and analysis of hydration site energies allows rank ordering of the second-order acylation rate constants. Taken together, these structural, biochemical, and computational studies provide a molecular basis for recognition of P. aeruginosa PBP3 and open avenues for future design of inhibitors of this class of PBPs.

  8. Structural basis for effectiveness of siderophore-conjugated monocarbams against clinically relevant strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Han, Seungil; Zaniewski, Richard P.; Marr, Eric S.; Lacey, Brian M.; Tomaras, Andrew P.; Evdokimov, Artem; Miller, J. Richard; Shanmugasundaram, Veerabahu

    2010-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic Gram-negative pathogen that causes nosocomial infections for which there are limited treatment options. Penicillin-binding protein PBP3, a key therapeutic target, is an essential enzyme responsible for the final steps of peptidoglycan synthesis and is covalently inactivated by β-lactam antibiotics. Here we disclose the first high resolution cocrystal structures of the P. aeruginosa PBP3 with both novel and marketed β-lactams. These structures reveal a conformational rearrangement of Tyr532 and Phe533 and a ligand-induced conformational change of Tyr409 and Arg489. The well-known affinity of the monobactam aztreonam for P. aeruginosa PBP3 is due to a distinct hydrophobic aromatic wall composed of Tyr503, Tyr532, and Phe533 interacting with the gem-dimethyl group. The structure of MC-1, a new siderophore-conjugated monocarbam complexed with PBP3 provides molecular insights for lead optimization. Importantly, we have identified a novel conformation that is distinct to the high-molecular-weight class B PBP subfamily, which is identifiable by common features such as a hydrophobic aromatic wall formed by Tyr503, Tyr532, and Phe533 and the structural flexibility of Tyr409 flanked by two glycine residues. This is also the first example of a siderophore-conjugated triazolone-linked monocarbam complexed with any PBP. Energetic analysis of tightly and loosely held computed hydration sites indicates protein desolvation effects contribute significantly to PBP3 binding, and analysis of hydration site energies allows rank ordering of the second-order acylation rate constants. Taken together, these structural, biochemical, and computational studies provide a molecular basis for recognition of P. aeruginosa PBP3 and open avenues for future design of inhibitors of this class of PBPs. PMID:21135211

  9. Evaluation of Mannosidase and Trypsin Enzymes Effects on Biofilm Production of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated from Burn Wound Infections

    PubMed Central

    Banar, Maryam; Emaneini, Mohammad; Satarzadeh, Mhboubeh; Abdellahi, Nafiseh; Beigverdi, Reza; van Leeuwen, Willem B.; Jabalameli, Fereshteh

    2016-01-01

    Biofilm is an important virulence factor in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and has a substantial role in antibiotic resistance and chronic burn wound infections. New therapeutic agents against P. aeruginosa, degrading biofilms in burn wounds and improving the efficacy of current antimicrobial agents, are required. In this study, the effects of α-mannosidase, β-mannosidase and trypsin enzymes on the degradation of P. aeruginosa biofilms and on the reduction of ceftazidime minimum biofilm eliminating concentrations (MBEC) were evaluated. All tested enzymes, destroyed the biofilms and reduced the ceftazidime MBECs. However, only trypsin had no cytotoxic effect on A-431 human epidermoid carcinoma cell lines. In conclusion, since trypsin had better features than mannosidase enzymes, it can be a promising agent in combatting P. aeruginosa burn wound infections. PMID:27736961

  10. Whole genome and transcriptome analyses of environmental antibiotic sensitive and multi-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates exposed to waste water and tap water.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Thomas; Armant, Olivier; Bretschneider, Nancy; Hahn, Alexander; Kirchen, Silke; Seifert, Martin; Dötsch, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The fitness of sensitive and resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa in different aquatic environments depends on genetic capacities and transcriptional regulation. Therefore, an antibiotic-sensitive isolate PA30 and a multi-resistant isolate PA49 originating from waste waters were compared via whole genome and transcriptome Illumina sequencing after exposure to municipal waste water and tap water. A number of different genomic islands (e.g. PAGIs, PAPIs) were identified in the two environmental isolates beside the highly conserved core genome. Exposure to tap water and waste water exhibited similar transcriptional impacts on several gene clusters (antibiotic and metal resistance, genetic mobile elements, efflux pumps) in both environmental P. aeruginosa isolates. The MexCD-OprJ efflux pump was overexpressed in PA49 in response to waste water. The expression of resistance genes, genetic mobile elements in PA49 was independent from the water matrix. Consistently, the antibiotic sensitive strain PA30 did not show any difference in expression of the intrinsic resistance determinants and genetic mobile elements. Thus, the exposure of both isolates to polluted waste water and oligotrophic tap water resulted in similar expression profiles of mentioned genes. However, changes in environmental milieus resulted in rather unspecific transcriptional responses than selected and stimuli-specific gene regulation.

  11. Isolation of a non-fermentative bacterium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, using intracellular carbon for denitrification and phosphorus-accumulation and relevant metabolic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Wang, Qin; Sun, Yanfu; Zhou, Kangqun; Liu, Wen; Lu, Qian; Ming, Caibing; Feng, Xidan; Du, Jianjun; Jia, Xiaoshan; Li, Jun

    2016-07-01

    A newly designed pilot-scale system was developed to enrich denitrifying phosphate-accumulating organisms (DNPAOs) for nitrogen and phosphorus nutrient removal synchronously. A strain of DNPAOs was isolated and its biochemical characteristics and metabolic mechanisms of this bacterial strain were analyzed. The results showed that compared with previously reported system, this newly designed system has higher removal rates of nutrients. Removal efficiencies of NH3-N, TN, TP, and COD in actual wastewater were 82.64%, 79.62%, 87.22%, and 90.41%, respectively. Metabolic activity of DNPAOs after anoxic stage in this study even reached 94.64%. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a strain of non-fermentative DNPAOs with strong nitrogen and phosphorus removal abilities. Study on the metabolic mechanisms suggested that intracellular PHB of P. aeruginosa plays dual roles, supplying energy for phosphorus accumulation and serving as a major carbon source for denitrification. PMID:26995616

  12. Comparison of Hemagglutination and Hemolytic Activity of Various Bacterial Clinical Isolates Against Different Human Blood Groups

    PubMed Central

    HRV, Rajkumar; Devaki, Ramakrishna

    2016-01-01

    Among the various pathogenic determinants shown by microorganisms hemagglutination and hemolysin production assume greater significance in terms of laboratory identification. This study evaluated the hemagglutination and hemolytic activity of various bacterial isolates against different blood groups. One hundred and fifty bacterial strains, isolated from clinical specimens like urine, pus, blood, and other body fluids were tested for their hemagglutinating and hemolytic activity against human A, B, AB, and O group red blood cells. Among the 150 isolates 81 were Escherichia coli, 18 were Klebsiella pneumoniae, 19 were Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 10 were Pseudomonas spp, six were Proteus mirabilis, and the rest 16 were Staphylococcus aureus. Nearly 85% of the isolates agglutinated A group cells followed by B and AB group (59.3% and 60.6% respectively). Least number of isolates agglutinated O group cells (38.0%). When the hemolytic activity was tested, out of these 150 isolates 79 (52.6%) hemolyzed A group cells, 61 (40.6%) hemolyzed AB group cells, 46 (30.6%) hemolyzed B group cells, and 57 (38.6%) isolates hemolyzed O group cells. Forty-six percent of the isolates exhibited both hemagglutinating and hemolytic property against A group cells, followed by B and AB group cells (28.6% and 21.3% respectively). Least number of isolates i.e., 32 (21.3%) showed both the properties against O group cells. The isolates showed wide variation in their hemagglutination and hemolytic properties against different combinations of human blood group cells. The study highlights the importance of selection of the type of cells especially when human RBCs are used for studying the hemagglutination and hemolytic activity of bacterial isolates because these two properties are considered as characteristic of pathogenic strains. PMID:27014523

  13. Polymicrobial biofilms by diabetic foot clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Mottola, Carla; Mendes, João J; Cristino, José Melo; Cavaco-Silva, Patrícia; Tavares, Luís; Oliveira, Manuela

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a major chronic disease that continues to increase significantly. One of the most important and costly complications of diabetes is foot ulceration that may be colonized by pathogenic and antimicrobial resistant bacteria, which may express several virulence factors that could impair treatment success. These bacterial communities can be organized in polymicrobial biofilms, which may be responsible for diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) chronicity. We evaluated the influence of polymicrobial communities in the ability of DFU isolates to produce biofilm, using a microtiter plate assay and a multiplex fluorescent in situ hybridization, at three time points (24, 48, 72 h), after evaluating biofilm formation by 95 DFU isolates belonging to several bacterial genera (Staphylococcus, Corynebacterium, Enterococcus, Pseudomonas and Acinetobacter). All isolates were biofilm-positive at 24 h, and the amount of biofilm produced increased with incubation time. Pseudomonas presented the higher biofilm production, followed by Corynebacterium, Acinetobacter, Staphylococcus and Enterococcus. Significant differences were found in biofilm formation between the three time points. Polymicrobial communities produced higher biofilm values than individual species. Pseudomonas + Enterococcus, Acinetobacter + Staphylococcus and Corynebacterium + Staphylococcus produced higher biofilm than the ones formed by E. faecalis + Staphylococcus and E. faecalis + Corynebacterium. Synergy between bacteria present in dual or multispecies biofilms has been described, and this work represents the first report on time course of biofilm formation by polymicrobial communities from DFUs including several species. The biological behavior of different bacterial species in polymicrobial biofilms has important clinical implications for the successful treatment of these infections.

  14. Efficient isolation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa type III secretion translocators and assembly of heteromeric transmembrane pores in model membranes.

    PubMed

    Romano, Fabian B; Rossi, Kyle C; Savva, Christos G; Holzenburg, Andreas; Clerico, Eugenia M; Heuck, Alejandro P

    2011-08-23

    Translocation of bacterial toxins or effectors into host cells using the type III secretion (T3S) system is a conserved mechanism shared by many Gram-negative pathogens. Pseudomonas aeruginosa injects different proteins across the plasma membrane of target cells, altering the normal metabolism of the host. Protein translocation presumably occurs through a proteinaceous transmembrane pore formed by two T3S secreted protein translocators, PopB and PopD. Unfolded translocators are secreted through the T3S needle prior to insertion into the target membrane. Purified PopB and PopD form pores in model membranes. However, their tendency to form heterogeneous aggregates in solution had hampered the analysis of how these proteins undergo the transition from a denatured state to a membrane-inserted state. Translocators were purified as stable complexes with the cognate chaperone PcrH and isolated from the chaperone using 6 M urea. We report here the assembly of stable transmembrane pores by dilution of urea-denatured translocators in the presence of membranes. PopB and PopD spontaneously bound liposomes containing anionic phospholipids and cholesterol in a pH-dependent manner as observed by two independent assays, time-resolved Förster resonance energy transfer and sucrose-step gradient ultracentrifugation. Using Bodipy-labeled proteins, we found that PopB interacts with PopD on the membrane surface as determined by excitation energy migration and fluorescence quenching. Stable transmembrane pores are more efficiently assembled at pH <5.0, suggesting that acidic residues might be involved in the initial membrane binding and/or insertion. Altogether, the experimental setup described here represents an efficient method for the reconstitution and analysis of membrane-inserted translocators.

  15. Toxic effects produced by microcystins from a natural cyanobacterial bloom and a Microcystis aeruginosa isolated strain on the fish cell lines RTG-2 and PLHC-1.

    PubMed

    Pichardo, S; Jos, A; Zurita, J; Salguero, M; Camean, A M; Repetto, G

    2006-07-01

    Toxic cyanobacterial blooms are a worldwide problem, causing serious water pollution and public health hazard to humans and livestock. The intact cells as well as the toxins released after cellular lysis can be responsible for toxic effects in both animals and humans and are actually associated with fish kills. Two fish cell lines-PLHC-1 derived from a hepatocellular carcinoma of the topminnow Poeciliopsis lucida and RTG-2 fibroblast-like cells derived from the gonads of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss were exposed to several concentrations of extracts from a natural cyanobacterial bloom and a Microcystis aeruginosa-isolated strain. After 24 hours, morphologic and biochemical changes (total protein content, lactate dehydrogenase leakage, neutral red uptake, methathiazole tetrazolium salt metabolization, lysosomal function, and succinate dehydrogenase [SDH] activity) were investigated. The most sensitive end point for both cyanobacterial extracts in PLHC-1 cells was SDH activity, with similar EC(50) values (6 microM for the cyanobacterial bloom and 7 microM for the isolated strain). RTG-2 cells were less susceptible according to SDH activity, with their most sensitive end point lysosomal function with an EC(50) of 4 microM for the M. aeruginosa-isolated strain and 72 microM for the cyanobacterial bloom. The lysosomal function was stimulated at low concentrations, although SDH activity increased at high doses, indicating lysosomal and energetic alterations. Increased secretion vesicles, rounding effects, decreased cell numbers and size, hydropic degeneration, esteatosis, and apoptosis were observed in the morphologic study. Similar sensitivity to the M. aeruginosa-isolated strain was observed in both cell lines, whereas the cyanobacterial bloom was more toxic to the PLHC-1 cell line.

  16. Genetic relatedness of Trichomonas vaginalis reference and clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Cornelius, Denise C; Mena, Leandro; Lushbaugh, William B; Meade, John C

    2010-12-01

    We have determined the metronidazole susceptibility status of 20 Trichomonas vaginalis isolates from American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) and assessed the level of genetic relatedness in these isolates using 32 additional T. vaginalis clinical isolates for comparison. These ATCC isolates are commonly used as reference strains in T. vaginalis research and this information provides a rational basis for selection of reference strains for use in comparative studies of T. vaginalis phenotypic and clinical characteristics. PMID:21118935

  17. Efficacy of the Novel Antibiotic POL7001 in Preclinical Models of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Cigana, Cristina; Bernardini, Francesca; Facchini, Marcella; Alcalá-Franco, Beatriz; Riva, Camilla; De Fino, Ida; Rossi, Alice; Ranucci, Serena; Misson, Pauline; Chevalier, Eric; Brodmann, Maj; Schmitt, Michel; Wach, Achim; Dale, Glenn E; Obrecht, Daniel; Bragonzi, Alessandra

    2016-08-01

    The clinical development of antibiotics with a new mode of action combined with efficient pulmonary drug delivery is a priority against untreatable Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections. POL7001 is a macrocycle antibiotic belonging to the novel class of protein epitope mimetic (PEM) molecules with selective and potent activity against P. aeruginosa We investigated ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) and cystic fibrosis (CF) as indications of the clinical potential of POL7001 to treat P. aeruginosa pulmonary infections. MICs of POL7001 and comparators were measured for reference and clinical P. aeruginosa strains. The therapeutic efficacy of POL7001 given by pulmonary administration was evaluated in murine models of P. aeruginosa acute and chronic pneumonia. POL7001 showed potent in vitro activity against a large panel of P. aeruginosa isolates from CF patients, including multidrug-resistant (MDR) isolates with adaptive phenotypes such as mucoid or hypermutable phenotypes. The efficacy of POL7001 was demonstrated in both wild-type and CF mice. In addition to a reduced bacterial burden in the lung, POL7001-treated mice showed progressive body weight recovery and reduced levels of inflammatory markers, indicating an improvement in general condition. Pharmacokinetic studies indicated that POL7001 reached significant concentrations in the lung after pulmonary administration, with low systemic exposure. These results support the further evaluation of POL7001 as a novel therapeutic agent for the treatment of P. aeruginosa pulmonary infections.

  18. Emergence of a mutL mutation causing multilocus sequence typing-pulsed-field gel electrophoresis discrepancy among Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from a cystic fibrosis patient.

    PubMed

    García-Castillo, María; Máiz, Luis; Morosini, María-Isabel; Rodríguez-Baños, Mercedes; Suarez, Lucrecia; Fernández-Olmos, Ana; Baquero, Fernando; Cantón, Rafael; del Campo, Rosa

    2012-05-01

    A multilocus sequence type (MLST) shift (from ST242 to ST996) was detected in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates with a uniform pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) pattern obtained from a chronically colonized patient. MLST mutational change involved the mutL gene with the consequent emergence of a hypermutable phenotype. This observation challenges the required neutrality of mutL as an appropriate marker in MLST and alerts researchers to the limitations of MLST-only-based population studies in chronic infections under constant antibiotic selective pressure. PMID:22322352

  19. Emergence of a mutL mutation causing multilocus sequence typing-pulsed-field gel electrophoresis discrepancy among Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from a cystic fibrosis patient.

    PubMed

    García-Castillo, María; Máiz, Luis; Morosini, María-Isabel; Rodríguez-Baños, Mercedes; Suarez, Lucrecia; Fernández-Olmos, Ana; Baquero, Fernando; Cantón, Rafael; del Campo, Rosa

    2012-05-01

    A multilocus sequence type (MLST) shift (from ST242 to ST996) was detected in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates with a uniform pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) pattern obtained from a chronically colonized patient. MLST mutational change involved the mutL gene with the consequent emergence of a hypermutable phenotype. This observation challenges the required neutrality of mutL as an appropriate marker in MLST and alerts researchers to the limitations of MLST-only-based population studies in chronic infections under constant antibiotic selective pressure.

  20. Emergence of a mutL Mutation Causing Multilocus Sequence Typing–Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis Discrepancy among Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from a Cystic Fibrosis Patient

    PubMed Central

    García-Castillo, María; Máiz, Luis; Morosini, María-Isabel; Rodríguez-Baños, Mercedes; Suarez, Lucrecia; Fernández-Olmos, Ana; Baquero, Fernando; Cantón, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    A multilocus sequence type (MLST) shift (from ST242 to ST996) was detected in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates with a uniform pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) pattern obtained from a chronically colonized patient. MLST mutational change involved the mutL gene with the consequent emergence of a hypermutable phenotype. This observation challenges the required neutrality of mutL as an appropriate marker in MLST and alerts researchers to the limitations of MLST-only-based population studies in chronic infections under constant antibiotic selective pressure. PMID:22322352

  1. Prospective Survey of β-Lactamases Produced by Ceftazidime- Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated in a French Hospital in 2000

    PubMed Central

    De Champs, Christophe; Poirel, Laurent; Bonnet, Richard; Sirot, Danielle; Chanal, Catherine; Sirot, Jacques; Nordmann, Patrice

    2002-01-01

    In 2000, at the Université d'Auvergne teaching hospital in Clermont-Ferrand, France, 44 (6.2%) strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were found to be resistant to ceftazidime. After genotyping, 34 strains were selected. Nine had an additional β-lactamase: OXA-21 (n = 6), PSE-1 (CARB-2) (n = 2), or PER-1 (n = 1). Ceftazidime resistance was related solely to the overproduction of the cephalosporinase in 30 strains. Sequencing of five blaAmpC genes encoding cephalosporinases with different pIs showed 99% identity with the ampC gene of P. aeruginosa PAO1. PMID:12183264

  2. Agricultural plants and soil as a reservoir for Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Green, S K; Schroth, M N; Cho, J J; Kominos, S K; Vitanza-jack, V B

    1974-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa was detected in 24% of the soil samples but in only 0.13% of the vegetable samples from various agricultural areas of California. The distribution of pyocin types of soil and vegetable isolates was similar to that of clinical strains, and three of the soil isolates were resistant to carbenicillin. Pseudomonas aeruginosa multiplied in lettuce and bean under conditions of high temperature and high relative humidity (27 C and 80-95% relative humidity) but declined when the temperature and humidity were lowered (16 C, 55-75% relative humidity). The results suggest that soil is a reservior for P. aeruginosa and that the bacterium has the capacity to colonize plants during favorable conditions of temperature and moisture. PMID:4217591

  3. First Draft Genome Sequence of a Mycobacterium gordonae Clinical Isolate

    PubMed Central

    Smirnova, T.; Blagodatskikh, K.; Varlamov, D.; Sochivko, D.; Larionova, E.; Andreevskaya, S.; Andrievskaya, I.; Chernousova, L.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the first draft genome sequence of the clinically relevant species Mycobacterium gordonae. The clinical isolate Mycobacterium gordonae 14-8773 was obtained from the sputum of a patient with mycobacteriosis. PMID:27365356

  4. First Draft Genome Sequence of a Mycobacterium gordonae Clinical Isolate.

    PubMed

    Ustinova, V; Smirnova, T; Blagodatskikh, K; Varlamov, D; Sochivko, D; Larionova, E; Andreevskaya, S; Andrievskaya, I; Chernousova, L

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the first draft genome sequence of the clinically relevant species Mycobacterium gordonae The clinical isolate Mycobacterium gordonae 14-8773 was obtained from the sputum of a patient with mycobacteriosis. PMID:27365356

  5. VEB-1-like extended-spectrum beta-lactamases in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Kuwait.

    PubMed

    Poirel, L; Rotimi, V O; Mokaddas, E M; Karim, A; Nordmann, P

    2001-01-01

    Two clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from patients in intensive care units in Kuwait were resistant to expanded-spectrum cephalosporins and showed a synergistic effect between ceftazidime and clavulanic acid. This is the first report of extended-spectrum enzymes from nosocomial isolates from the Middle East.

  6. Inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation by 2,2’-bipyridyl, lipoic, kojic and picolinic acids

    PubMed Central

    Çevik, Kübra; Ulusoy, Seyhan

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): The inhibitory effects of iron chelators, and FeCl3 chelation on biofilm formation and swarming motility were investigated against an opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Materials and Methods: The inhibitory activity of 2,2’-bipyridyl, lipoic acid, kojic acid and picolinic acid on biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa strain PAO1 and three clinical isolates (P. aeruginosa PAK01, P. aeruginosa PAK02 and P. aeruginosa PAK03) were investigated, based on crystal violet assay, and swarming motility test. Results: The kojic, lipoic and picolinic acid inhibited biofilm formation by 5-33% in all tested P. aeruginosa isolates. When chelated iron was added, biofilm inhibition rates were determined to be 39-57%. Among the tested chelators against P. aeruginosa, lipoic acid (84%) and kojic acid (68%) presented the highest inhibition of swarming motility. This is the first study to report the inhibitory effect of lipoic acid on biofilm formation and swarming motility of P. aeruginosa. Conclusion: It is considered that lipoic and picolinic acids can serve as alternatives for the treatment of the P. aeruginosa infections by inhibiting biofilm formation. PMID:26557964

  7. Three Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains with different protease profiles.

    PubMed

    Andrejko, Mariola; Zdybicka-Barabas, Agnieszka; Janczarek, Monika; Cytryńska, Małgorzata

    2013-01-01

    The proteolytic activity of three Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains, ATCC 27853 - a reference strain, and two clinical isolates was tested. The activity was examined after culturing the bacteria in two different growth media: the minimal M9 medium and rich Luria-Bertani broth (LB). Based on zymograms and protease activity specific assays, it was concluded that the reference strain produced three proteolytic enzymes in the LB medium: protease IV, elastase B and elastase A, while alkaline protease was only produced in the M9 medium. The clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa produced elastase B and alkaline protease when grown in the LB medium and the minimal M9 medium, respectively. PCR analysis confirmed the presence of both the lasB gene encoding elastase B and aprA coding for alkaline protease in the genomes of the three P. aeruginosa strains analyzed. The expression of these genes coding for two important P. aeruginosa virulence factors was dependent on the growth conditions in all the strains studied. The contribution of the extracellular proteinases to the virulence of P. aeruginosa strains used in this study was investigated using an insect model, the greater wax moth Galleria mellonella.

  8. Successful implementation of infection control strategies prevents P. aeruginosa transmission among cystic fibrosis patients inside the hospital

    PubMed Central

    Matt, Benedikt; Mitteregger, Dieter; Renner, Sabine; Presterl, Elisabeth; Assadian, Ojan; Diab-Elschahawi, Magda

    2014-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to characterise the epidemiology of P. aeruginosa isolated from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients at the Vienna General Hospital (VGH) by molecular genetic fingerprinting in order to understand transmission ways and to evaluate the established infection control protocols. Methods: The outpatient clinic for CF patients at the VGH cares for children and adolescents up to the age of 18 years. Among an average of 139 patients cared for at the clinic, 41 were tested positive for P. aeruginosa during the study period. Fifty P. aeruginosa isolates, obtained between August 2010 and March 2012 from routine examinations of CF patients, were subject to molecular characterization using the DiversiLab® method. Results: 42 distinguishable molecular-biological patterns were identified, 7 of which were found multiple times. 40 out of 42 genotypes were retrieved from single patients only, while two patterns were present in two patients each. Nine patients presented with two or more phenotypically diverse P. aeruginosa isolates. In five of these cases the retrieved isolates belonged to the same genotype. Conclusion: The broad genetic heterogeneity of P. aeruginosa in the studied patient population suggests that the majority of CF patients cared for at the VGH acquire P. aeruginosa from environmental sources. It may be concluded that implemented infection control guidelines have been successful in preventing nosocomial transmission of P. aeruginosa among CF patients within the VGH and patient-to-patient transmission outside the hospital. Chronic polyclonal infection/colonization was rare in the study population. PMID:25285264

  9. MexXY multidrug efflux system of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Morita, Yuji; Tomida, Junko; Kawamura, Yoshiaki

    2012-01-01

    Anti-pseudomonas aminoglycosides, such as amikacin and tobramycin, are used in the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections. However, their use is linked to the development of resistance. During the last decade, the MexXY multidrug efflux system has been comprehensively studied, and numerous reports of laboratory and clinical isolates have been published. This system has been increasingly recognized as one of the primary determinants of aminoglycoside resistance in P. aeruginosa. In P. aeruginosa cystic fibrosis isolates, upregulation of the pump is considered the most common mechanism of aminoglycoside resistance. Non-fermentative Gram-negative pathogens possessing very close MexXY orthologs such as Achromobacter xylosoxidans and various Burkholderia species (e.g., Burkholderia pseudomallei and B. cepacia complexes), but not B. gladioli, are intrinsically resistant to aminoglycosides. Here, we summarize the properties (e.g., discovery, mechanism, gene expression, clinical significance) of the P. aeruginosa MexXY pump and other aminoglycoside efflux pumps such as AcrD of Escherichia coli, AmrAB-OprA of B. pseudomallei, and AdeABC of Acinetobacter baumannii. MexXY inducibility of the PA5471 gene product, which is dependent on ribosome inhibition or oxidative stress, is noteworthy. Moreover, the discovery of the cognate outer membrane component (OprA) of MexXY in the multidrug-resistant clinical isolate PA7, serotype O12 deserves special attention. PMID:23233851

  10. Bacteriological profile and antibiotic susceptibility patterns of clinical isolates in a tertiary care cancer center

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Vivek; Gupta, Sudeep; Kelkar, Rohini; Biswas, Sanjay; Khattry, Navin; Moiyadi, Aliasgar; Bhat, Prashant; Ambulkar, Reshma; Chavan, Preeti; Chiplunkar, Shubadha; Kotekar, Amol; Gupta, Tejpal

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This increased risk of bacterial infections in the cancer patient is further compounded by the rising trends of antibiotic resistance in commonly implicated organisms. In the Indian setting this is particularly true in case of Gram negative bacilli such as Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Acinetobacter spp. Increasing resistance among Gram positive organisms is also a matter of concern. The aim of this study was to document the common organisms isolated from bacterial infections in cancer patients and describe their antibiotic susceptibilities. Methods: We conducted a 6 month study of all isolates from blood, urine, skin/soft tissue and respiratory samples of patients received from medical and surgical oncology units in our hospital. All samples were processed as per standard microbiology laboratory operating procedures. Isolates were identified to species level and susceptibility tests were performed as per Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) guidelines -2012. Results: A total of 285 specimens from medical oncology (114) and surgical oncology services (171) were cultured. Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Acinetobacter spp. were most commonly encountered. More than half of the Acinetobacter strains were resistant to carbapenems. Resistance in Klebsiella pneumoniae to cephalosporins, fluoroquinolones and carbapenems was >50%. Of the Staphylococcus aureus isolates 41.67% were methicillin resistant. Conclusion: There is, in general, a high level of antibiotic resistance among gram negative bacilli, particularly E. coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Acinetobacter spp. Resistance among Gram positives is not as acute, although the MRSA incidence is increasing. PMID:27051152

  11. Antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of aerobic microbial isolates in a clinical laboratory in Karachi - Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Sabir, Rubina; Danish Alvi, S. Faraz; Fawwad, Asher

    2013-01-01

    Backgroun and Objective: Resistance to multiple antimicrobials is the major cause of debility and death due to infectious diseases around the world. Our objective was to determine the frequency and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of aerobic microbial isolates in a clinical laboratory. Methodology: All culture specimens of tissue, pus, urine, bone, blood, fluid, stool, sputum, and high vaginal swab received in the Microbiology Department of Clinical & Research Laboratory, Baqai Institute of Diabetology and Endocrinology from May 2010 to January 2011 were included in the present study. Bacterial isolates were identified and their antimicrobial susceptibility pattern was determined. Results: Out of 312 cultured specimens, 272 (87.17%) were found infected with 437 microbial organisms (412 bacteria and 25 Candida isolates). A total of 90 (20.59%) multi-drug resistant (MDR) isolates were found. MDR Escherichia coli was isolated in 40 (34.19%) out of 117 culture specimens which showed the growth of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa in 17 (22.08%), Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in 13 (11.50%), Klebsiella pneumoniae in 7 (22.58%), Proteus species in 6 (31.58%), Acinetobacter species in 3 (33.33%), Enterobacter species in 2 (28.57%), Coliform (Escherichia coli) in 1 (16.67%) and Enterococcus species were isolated in 1 (50%) culture specimen. Conclusions: High prevalence of multi-drug resistant bacteria was found in the present study. Emergence of antimicrobial resistance has become a major challenge in infectious disease medicine. Antimicrobial resistance may be due to misuse of antimicrobials by physicians and self medication in Pakistan. Further large scale studies are needed to validate our findings. PMID:24353642

  12. Pseudomonas aeruginosa In Vitro Phenotypes Distinguish Cystic Fibrosis Infection Stages and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Rosenfeld, Margaret; Gibson, Ronald L.; Ramsey, Bonnie W.; Kulasekara, Hemantha D.; Retsch-Bogart, George Z.; Morgan, Wayne; Wolter, Daniel J.; Pope, Christopher E.; Houston, Laura S.; Kulasekara, Bridget R.; Khan, Umer; Burns, Jane L.; Miller, Samuel I.; Hoffman, Lucas R.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Pseudomonas aeruginosa undergoes phenotypic changes during cystic fibrosis (CF) lung infection. Although mucoidy is traditionally associated with transition to chronic infection, we hypothesized that additional in vitro phenotypes correlate with this transition and contribute to disease. Objectives: To characterize the relationships between in vitro P. aeruginosa phenotypes, infection stage, and clinical outcomes. Methods: A total of 649 children with CF and newly identified P. aeruginosa were followed for a median 5.4 years during which a total of 2,594 P. aeruginosa isolates were collected. Twenty-six in vitro bacterial phenotypes were assessed among the isolates, including measures of motility, exoproduct production, colony morphology, growth, and metabolism. Measurements and Main Results: P. aeruginosa phenotypes present at the time of culture were associated with both stage of infection (new onset, intermittent, or chronic) and the primary clinical outcome, occurrence of a pulmonary exacerbation (PE) in the subsequent 2 years. Two in vitro P. aeruginosa phenotypes best distinguished infection stages: pyoverdine production (31% of new-onset cultures, 48% of intermittent, 69% of chronic) and reduced protease production (31%, 39%, and 65%, respectively). The best P. aeruginosa phenotypic predictors of subsequent occurrence of a PE were mucoidy (odds ratio, 1.75; 95% confidence interval, 1.19–2.57) and reduced twitching motility (odds ratio, 1.43; 95% confidence interval, 1.11–1.84). Conclusions: In this large epidemiologic study of CF P. aeruginosa adaptation, P. aeruginosa isolates exhibited two in vitro phenotypes that best distinguished early and later infection stages. Among the many phenotypes tested, mucoidy and reduced twitching best predicted subsequent PE. These phenotypes indicate potentially useful prognostic markers of transition to chronic infection and advancing lung disease. PMID:24937177

  13. Effect of biosurfactant and fertilizer on biodegradation of crude oil by marine isolates of Bacillus megaterium, Corynebacterium kutscheri and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Thavasi, Rengathavasi; Jayalakshmi, Singaram; Banat, Ibrahim M

    2011-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of fertilizers and biosurfactants on biodegradation of crude oil by three marine bacterial isolates; Bacillus megaterium, Corynebacterium kutscheri and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Five sets of experiments were carried out in shake flask and microcosm conditions with crude oil as follows: Set 1-only bacterial cells added (no fertilizer and biosurfactant), Set 2-with additional fertilizer only, Set 3-with additional biosurfactant only, Set 4-with added biosurfactant+fertilizer, Set 5-with no bacterial cells added (control), all the above experimental sets were incubated for 168 h. The biosurfactant+fertilizer added Set 4, resulted in maximum crude oil degradation within shake flask and microcosm conditions. Among the three bacterial isolates, P. aeruginosa and biosurfactant produced by this strain resulted in maximum crude oil degradation compared to the other two bacterial strains investigated. Interestingly, when biosurfactant and bacterial cells were used (Set 3), significant oil biodegradation activity occurred and the difference between this treatment and that in Set 4 with added fertilizer+biosurfactant were only 4-5% higher degradation level in shake flask and 3.2-7% in microcosm experiments for all three bacterial strains used. It is concluded that, biosurfactants alone capable of promoting biodegradation to a large extent without added fertilizers, which will reduce the cost of bioremediation process and minimizes the dilution or wash away problems encountered when water soluble fertilizers used during bioremediation of aquatic environments. PMID:20863694

  14. Specific Gene Loci of Clinical Pseudomonas putida Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Lázaro; Udaondo, Zulema; Duque, Estrella; Fernández, Matilde; Bernal, Patricia; Roca, Amalia; de la Torre, Jesús; Ramos, Juan Luis

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida are ubiquitous inhabitants of soils and clinical isolates of this species have been seldom described. Clinical isolates show significant variability in their ability to cause damage to hosts because some of them are able to modulate the host’s immune response. In the current study, comparisons between the genomes of different clinical and environmental strains of P. putida were done to identify genetic clusters shared by clinical isolates that are not present in environmental isolates. We show that in clinical strains specific genes are mostly present on transposons, and that this set of genes exhibit high identity with genes found in pathogens and opportunistic pathogens. The set of genes prevalent in P. putida clinical isolates, and absent in environmental isolates, are related with survival under oxidative stress conditions, resistance against biocides, amino acid metabolism and toxin/antitoxin (TA) systems. This set of functions have influence in colonization and survival within human tissues, since they avoid host immune response or enhance stress resistance. An in depth bioinformatic analysis was also carried out to identify genetic clusters that are exclusive to each of the clinical isolates and that correlate with phenotypical differences between them, a secretion system type III-like was found in one of these clinical strains, a determinant of pathogenicity in Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:26820467

  15. In vitro antimicrobial activity of ten medicinal plants against clinical isolates of oral cancer cases

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Suppression of immune system in treated cancer patients may lead to secondary infections that obviate the need of antibiotics. In the present study, an attempt was made to understand the occurrence of secondary infections in immuno-suppressed patients along with herbal control of these infections with the following objectives to: (a) isolate the microbial species from the treated oral cancer patients along with the estimation of absolute neutrophile counts of patients (b) assess the in vitro antimicrobial activity medicinal plants against the above clinical isolates. Methods Blood and oral swab cultures were taken from 40 oral cancer patients undergoing treatment in the radiotherapy unit of Regional Cancer Institute, Pt. B.D.S. Health University, Rohtak, Haryana. Clinical isolates were identified by following general microbiological, staining and biochemical methods. The absolute neutrophile counts were done by following the standard methods. The medicinal plants selected for antimicrobial activity analysis were Asphodelus tenuifolius Cav., Asparagus racemosus Willd., Balanites aegyptiaca L., Cestrum diurnum L., Cordia dichotoma G. Forst, Eclipta alba L., Murraya koenigii (L.) Spreng. , Pedalium murex L., Ricinus communis L. and Trigonella foenum graecum L. The antimicrobial efficacy of medicinal plants was evaluated by modified Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. MIC and MFC were investigated by serial two fold microbroth dilution method. Results Prevalent bacterial pathogens isolated were Staphylococcus aureus (23.2%), Escherichia coli (15.62%), Staphylococcus epidermidis (12.5%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (9.37%), Klebsiella pneumonia (7.81%), Proteus mirabilis (3.6%), Proteus vulgaris (4.2%) and the fungal pathogens were Candida albicans (14.6%), Aspergillus fumigatus (9.37%). Out of 40 cases, 35 (87.5%) were observed as neutropenic. Eight medicinal plants (A. tenuifolius, A. racemosus, B. aegyptiaca, E. alba, M. koenigii, P. murex R. communis and T

  16. Impact of Plant Extracts and Antibiotics on Biofilm Formation of Clinical Isolates From Otitis Media

    PubMed Central

    Rehman, Saba; Mujtaba Ghauri, Shahbaz; Sabri, Anjum Nasim

    2016-01-01

    Background: Otitis media can lead to severe health consequences, and is the most common reason for antibiotic prescriptions and biofilm-mediated infections. However, the increased pattern of drug resistance in biofilm forming bacteria complicates the treatment of such infections. Objectives: This study was aimed to estimate the biofilm formation potential of the clinical isolates of otitis media, and to evaluate the efficacy of antibiotics and plant extracts as alternative therapeutic agents in biofilm eradication. Materials and Methods: The ear swab samples collected from the otitis media patients visiting the Mayo Hospital in Lahore were processed to isolate the bacteria, which were characterized using morphological, biochemical, and molecular (16S rRNA ribotyping) techniques. Then, the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of the antibiotics and crude plant extracts were measured against the isolates. The cell surface hydrophobicity and biofilm formation potential were determined, both qualitatively and quantitatively, with and without antibiotics. Finally, the molecular characterization of the biofilm forming proteins was done by amplifying the ica operon. Results: Pseudomonas aeruginosa (KC417303-05), Staphylococcus hemolyticus (KC417306), and Staphylococcus hominis (KC417307) were isolated from the otitis media specimens. Among the crude plant extracts, Acacia arabica showed significant antibacterial characteristics (MIC up to 13 mg/ml), while these isolates exhibited sensitivity towards ciprofloxacin (MIC 0.2 µg/mL). All of the bacterial strains had hydrophobic cellular surfaces that helped in their adherence to abiotic surfaces, leading to strong biofilm formation potential (up to 7 days). Furthermore, the icaC gene encoding polysaccharide intercellular adhesion protein was amplified from S. hemolyticus. Conclusions: The bacterial isolates exhibited strong biofilm formation potential, while the extracts of Acacia arabica significantly inhibited biofilm

  17. Use of a Multiplex Transcript Method for Analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Gene Expression Profiles in the Cystic Fibrosis Lung.

    PubMed

    Gifford, Alex H; Willger, Sven D; Dolben, Emily L; Moulton, Lisa A; Dorman, Dana B; Bean, Heather; Hill, Jane E; Hampton, Thomas H; Ashare, Alix; Hogan, Deborah A

    2016-10-01

    The discovery of therapies that modulate Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence or that can eradicate chronic P. aeruginosa lung infections associated with cystic fibrosis (CF) will be advanced by an improved understanding of P. aeruginosa behavior in vivo We demonstrate the use of multiplexed Nanostring technology to monitor relative abundances of P. aeruginosa transcripts across clinical isolates, in serial samples, and for the purposes of comparing microbial physiology in vitro and in vivo The expression of 75 transcripts encoded by genes implicated in CF lung disease was measured in a variety of P. aeruginosa strains as well as RNA serial sputum samples from four P. aeruginosa-colonized subjects with CF collected over 6 months. We present data on reproducibility, the results from different methods of normalization, and demonstrate high concordance between transcript relative abundance data obtained by Nanostring or transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) analysis. Furthermore, we address considerations regarding sequence variation between strains during probe design. Analysis of P. aeruginosa grown in vitro identified transcripts that correlated with the different phenotypes commonly observed in CF clinical isolates. P. aeruginosa transcript profiles in RNA from CF sputum indicated alginate production in vivo, and transcripts involved in quorum-sensing regulation were less abundant in sputum than strains grown in the laboratory. P. aeruginosa gene expression patterns from sputum clustered closely together relative to patterns for laboratory-grown cultures; in contrast, laboratory-grown P. aeruginosa showed much greater transcriptional variation with only loose clustering of strains with different phenotypes. The clustering within and between subjects was surprising in light of differences in inhaled antibiotic and respiratory symptoms, suggesting that the pathways represented by these 75 transcripts are stable in chronic CF P. aeruginosa lung infections. PMID:27481238

  18. Cystic Fibrosis Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Retain Iron-Regulated Antimicrobial Activity against Staphylococcus aureus through the Action of Multiple Alkylquinolones

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Angela T.; Jones, Jace W.; Cámara, Miguel; Williams, Paul; Kane, Maureen A.; Oglesby-Sherrouse, Amanda G.

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a hereditary disease that predisposes individuals to pulmonary dysfunction and chronic infections. Early infection of the CF lung with Staphylococcus aureus is common, while Pseudomonas aeruginosa becomes dominant as disease progresses. Emergence of P. aeruginosa likely depends on the action of multiple 2-alkyl-4-(1H)-quinolones (AQ) secreted by this organism. We recently showed that antimicrobial activity against S. aureus is enhanced by iron depletion and is dependent upon multiple AQ metabolites. Two of these AQs, the Pseudomonas quinolone signal [PQS; 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone] and 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline (HHQ), are quorum sensing molecules that activate the expression of multiple microbicidal factors. Here we show for the first time that HHQ also exhibits innate antimicrobial activity against S. aureus. We further show that iron depletion potentiates the antistaphylococcal activity of HHQ, as well as 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide (HQNO), another AQ that functions as a cytochrome B inhibitor. Notably, we found that deletion of the genes for the terminal biosynthetic steps for either PQS or HQNO results in overproduction of the HHQ intermediate, likely maintaining the ability of these mutants to mediate antimicrobial activity. Compensatory increases in HHQ were also observed in PQS-deficient CF isolates, which also retained the ability to mediate iron-regulated antimicrobial activity against S. aureus. These studies demonstrate that iron-regulated antimicrobial activity of P. aeruginosa against S. aureus is due to the cumulative effects of multiple AQ metabolites, both the production and activity of which are modulated by environmental iron levels. PMID:27512392

  19. Antibiotic resistance pattern and evaluation of metallo-beta lactamase genes (VIM and IMP) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains producing MBL enzyme, isolated from patients with secondary immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Shirani, Kiana; Ataei, Behrouz; Roshandel, Fardad

    2016-01-01

    Background: One of the most common causes of hospital-acquired secondary infections in hospitalized patients is Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The aim of this study is to evaluate the expression of IMP and VIM in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains (carbapenem resistant and producer MBL enzyme) in patients with secondary immunodeficiency. Materials and Methods: In a cross sectional study, 96 patients with secondary immunodeficiency hospitalized in the Al-Zahra hospital were selected. Carbapenem resistant strains isolated and modified Hodge test was performed in order to confirm the presence of the metallo carbapenemase enzyme. Under the standard conditions they were sent to the central laboratory for investigating nosocomial infection Multiplex PCR. Results: Of 96 samples 28.1% were IMP positive, 5.2% VIM positive and 3.1% both VIM and IMP positive. The prevalence of multidrug resistance in the IMP and/or VIM negative samples was 29%, while all 5 VIM positive samples have had multidrug resistance. Also the prevalence of multi-drug resistance in IMP positive samples were 96.3% and in IMP and VIM positive samples were 100%. According to Fisher’s test, the prevalence of multi-drug resistance based on gene expression has significant difference (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Based on the results of this study it can be concluded that, a significant percentage of patients with secondary immunodeficiency that suffer nosocomial infections with multidrug resistance, especially Pseudomonas aeruginosa, are probably MBL-producing gene positive. Therefore the cause of infection should be considered in the hospital care system to identify their features, the presence of genes involved in the development of multi-drug resistance and antibiotic therapy. PMID:27563634

  20. Cystic Fibrosis Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Retain Iron-Regulated Antimicrobial Activity against Staphylococcus aureus through the Action of Multiple Alkylquinolones.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Angela T; Jones, Jace W; Cámara, Miguel; Williams, Paul; Kane, Maureen A; Oglesby-Sherrouse, Amanda G

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a hereditary disease that predisposes individuals to pulmonary dysfunction and chronic infections. Early infection of the CF lung with Staphylococcus aureus is common, while Pseudomonas aeruginosa becomes dominant as disease progresses. Emergence of P. aeruginosa likely depends on the action of multiple 2-alkyl-4-(1H)-quinolones (AQ) secreted by this organism. We recently showed that antimicrobial activity against S. aureus is enhanced by iron depletion and is dependent upon multiple AQ metabolites. Two of these AQs, the Pseudomonas quinolone signal [PQS; 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone] and 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline (HHQ), are quorum sensing molecules that activate the expression of multiple microbicidal factors. Here we show for the first time that HHQ also exhibits innate antimicrobial activity against S. aureus. We further show that iron depletion potentiates the antistaphylococcal activity of HHQ, as well as 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide (HQNO), another AQ that functions as a cytochrome B inhibitor. Notably, we found that deletion of the genes for the terminal biosynthetic steps for either PQS or HQNO results in overproduction of the HHQ intermediate, likely maintaining the ability of these mutants to mediate antimicrobial activity. Compensatory increases in HHQ were also observed in PQS-deficient CF isolates, which also retained the ability to mediate iron-regulated antimicrobial activity against S. aureus. These studies demonstrate that iron-regulated antimicrobial activity of P. aeruginosa against S. aureus is due to the cumulative effects of multiple AQ metabolites, both the production and activity of which are modulated by environmental iron levels. PMID:27512392

  1. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa Lipid A Deacylase: Selection for Expression and Loss within the Cystic Fibrosis Airway

    PubMed Central

    Ernst, Robert K.; Adams, Kristin N.; Moskowitz, Samuel M.; Kraig, Gretchen M.; Kawasaki, Kiyoshi; Stead, Christopher M.; Trent, M. Stephen; Miller, Samuel I.

    2006-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is the major surface component of gram-negative bacteria, and a component of LPS, lipid A, is recognized by the innate immune system through the Toll-like receptor 4/MD-2 complex. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an environmental gram-negative bacterium that opportunistically infects the respiratory tracts of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), can synthesize various structures of lipid A. Lipid A from P. aeruginosa strains isolated from infants with CF has a specific structure that includes the removal of the 3 position 3-OH C10 fatty acid. Here we demonstrate increased expression of the P. aeruginosa lipid A 3-O-deacylase (PagL) in isolates from CF infants compared to that in environmental isolates. PagL activity was increased in environmental isolates by growth in medium limited for magnesium and decreased by growth at low temperature in laboratory-adapted strains of P. aeruginosa. P. aeruginosa PagL was shown to be an outer membrane protein by isopycnic density gradient centrifugation. Heterologous expression of P. aeruginosa pagL in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Escherichia coli resulted in removal of the 3-OH C14 fatty acid from lipid A, indicating that P. aeruginosa PagL recognizes either 3-OH C10 or 3-OH C14. Finally, deacylated lipid A species were not observed in some clinical P. aeruginosa isolates from patients with severe pulmonary disease, suggesting that loss of PagL function can occur during long-term adaptation to the CF airway. PMID:16352835

  2. Viability and growth of clinical isolates of Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Flournoy, D J; Jones, J B

    1985-08-01

    Studies were done on clinical isolates of Haemophilus influenzae to investigate viability and determine the effects of disc-agar diffusion (DAD) medium modification on antimicrobial susceptibility results. Most isolates were viable for two days in distilled water, up to a week on chocolate agar and months when frozen in skim milk at -70 degrees C. Differences in viability were not related to biotype, serotype, beta-lactamase production or site of isolation of isolates. Several medium modifications resulted in better growth of isolates for antimicrobial susceptibility testing by DAD, but the zone sizes of inhibition differed from those of the recommended medium.

  3. Controlled clinical comparison of Isolator and BACTEC 9240 Aerobic/F resin bottle for detection of bloodstream infections.

    PubMed Central

    Pohlman, J K; Kirkley, B A; Easley, K A; Washington, J A

    1995-01-01

    A controlled clinical comparison was carried out with the BACTEC 9240 Aerobic/F resin bottle and the Isolator system with adult patients suspected of having bloodstream infections. A total of 10,500 paired specimens were collected, of which 1,122 from 520 patients were positive. There were 68 false-positive BACTEC bottles; 259 positive cultures that were excluded from analysis because the bottle, the Isolator, or both failed to meet the minimum volume criterion of 8 ml of blood; and 207 positive cultures that were excluded because the isolates were found to be clinically insignificant or of indeterminate clinical significance on the basis of patient assessment. A total of 656 positive cultures from 258 patients formed the basis of the analysis. Significantly more Staphylococcus aureus isolates (P = 0.03), Staphylococcus epidermidis isolates (P = 0.03), members of the family Enterobacteriaceae (P = 0.03), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates (P = 0.04) were recovered from the resin bottle, and there was no category of organism that was recovered significantly more frequently from the Isolator system. With patients receiving antibiotics at the time of blood culture, S. aureus, S. epidermidis, and gram-negative bacilli were recovered significantly more frequently from the resin bottle. No significant differences between systems were found with cultures from patients not receiving antibiotics at the time of blood culture. Only 12 clinically significant organisms were recovered from the bottle on terminal subcultures, and only 1 of these had not been previously isolated from another blood culture set (10 of the 12) or from the companion Isolator (1 of 12).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8567877

  4. Development and evaluation of a new PCR assay for detection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa D genotype.

    PubMed

    Lødeng, A G G; Ahlén, C; Lysvand, H; Mandal, L H; Iversen, O J

    2006-08-01

    This report describes a new PCR-based assay for the detection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa genotype D in occupational saturation diving systems in the North Sea. This genotype has persisted in these systems for 11 years (1993-2003) and represents 18% of isolates from infections analysed during this period. The new PCR assay was based on sequences obtained after randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR analysis of a group of isolates related to diving that had been identified previously by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). The primer set for the D genotype targets a gene that codes for a hypothetical class 4 protein in the P. aeruginosa PAO1 genome. A primer set able to detect P. aeruginosa at the species level was also designed, based on the 23S-5S rDNA spacer region. The two assays produced 382-bp and 192-bp amplicons, respectively. The PCR assay was evaluated by analysing 100 P. aeruginosa isolates related to diving, representing 28 PFGE genotypes, and 38 clinical and community P. aeruginosa isolates and strains from other species. The assay identified all of the genotype D isolates tested. Two additional diving-relevant genotypes (TP2 and TP27) were also identified, as well as three isolates of non-diving origin. It was concluded that the new PCR assay is a useful tool for early detection and prevention of infections with the D genotype. PMID:16842571

  5. Identification and characterization of nine atypical Candida dubliniensis clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Albaina, Olatz; Sahand, Ismail H; Brusca, María I; Sullivan, Derek J; Fernández de Larrinoa, Iñigo; Moragues, María D

    2015-02-01

    Candida dubliniensis is a pathogenic yeast of the genus Candida closely related to Candida albicans. The phenotypic similarity of these two species often leads to misidentification of C. dubliniensis isolates in clinical samples. DNA-based methods continue to be the most effective means of discriminating accurately between the two species. Here, we report on the identification of nine unusual Candida isolates that showed ambiguous identification patterns on the basis of their phenotypic and immunological traits. The isolates were categorized into two groups. Group I isolates were unable to produce germ tubes and chlamydospores, and to agglutinate commercial latex particles coated with a mAb highly specific for C. dubliniensis. Group II isolates grew as pink and white colonies on CHROMagar Candida and ChromID Candida, respectively. Carbohydrate assimilation profiles obtained with API/ID32C together with PCR amplification with specific primers and DNA sequencing allowed reliable identification of the nine unusual clinical isolates as C. dubliniensis. PMID:25480879

  6. Arbekacin activity against contemporary clinical bacteria isolated from patients hospitalized with pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Sader, Helio S; Rhomberg, Paul R; Farrell, David J; Jones, Ronald N

    2015-01-01

    Arbekacin is a broad-spectrum aminoglycoside licensed for systemic use in Japan and under clinical development as an inhalation solution in the United States. We evaluated the occurrence of organisms isolated from pneumonias in U.S. hospitalized patients (PHP), including ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), and the in vitro activity of arbekacin. Organism frequency was evaluated from a collection of 2,203 bacterial isolates (339 from VAP) consecutively collected from 25 medical centers in 2012 through the SENTRY Antimicrobial Surveillance Program. Arbekacin activity was tested against 904 isolates from PHP collected in 2012 from 62 U.S. medical centers and 303 multidrug-resistant (MDR) organisms collected worldwide in 2009 and 2010 from various infection types. Susceptibility to arbekacin and comparator agents was evaluated by the reference broth microdilution method. The four most common organisms from PHP were Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella spp., and Enterobacter spp. The highest arbekacin MIC among S. aureus isolates from PHP (43% methicillin-resistant S. aureus [MRSA]) was 4 μg/ml. Among P. aeruginosa isolates from PHP, only one had an arbekacin MIC of >16 μg/ml (MIC50 and MIC90, 1 and 4 μg/ml), and susceptibility rates for gentamicin, tobramycin, and amikacin were 88.0, 90.0, and 98.0%, respectively. Arbekacin (MIC50, 2 μg/ml) and tobramycin (MIC50, 4 μg/ml) were the most potent aminoglycosides tested against Acinetobacter baumannii. Against Enterobacteriaceae from PHP, arbekacin and gentamicin (MIC50 and MIC90, 0.25 to 1 and 1 to 8 μg/ml for both compounds) were generally more potent than tobramycin (MIC50 and MIC90, 0.25 to 2 and 1 to 32 μg/ml) and amikacin (MIC50 and MIC90, 1 to 2 and 2 to 32 μg/ml). Arbekacin also demonstrated potent in vitro activity against a worldwide collection of well-characterized MDR Gram-negative and MRSA strains.

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of Textile Azo Dye-Decolorizing and -Degrading Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain PFK10, Isolated from the Common Effluent Treatment Plant of the Ankleshwar Industrial Area of Gujarat, India

    PubMed Central

    Faldu, P. R.; Kothari, V. V.; Kothari, C. R.; Rawal, C. M.; Domadia, K. K.; Patel, P. A.; Bhimani, H. D.; Raval, V. H.; Parmar, N. R.; Nathani, N. M.; Koringa, P. G.; Joshi, C. G.

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PFK10, isolated from the common effluent treatment plant (CETP) of the Ankleshwar industrial area of Gujarat, India. The 6.04-Mb draft genome sequence of strain PFK10 provides information about the genes encoding enzymes that enable the strain to decolorize and degrade textile azo dye. PMID:24503984

  8. Seven consecutive successful clinical islet isolations with pancreatic ductal injection.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Shinichi; Noguichi, Hirofumi; Shimoda, Masayuki; Ikemoto, Tetsuya; Naziruddin, Bashoo; Jackson, Andrew; Tamura, Yoshiko; Olson, Greg; Fujita, Yasutaka; Chujo, Daisuke; Takita, Morihito; Kobayashi, Naoya; Onaca, Nicholas; Levy, Marlon

    2010-01-01

    Inconsistent islet isolation is one of the issues of clinical islet transplantation. In the current study, we applied ductal injection to improve the consistency of islet isolation. Seven islet isolations were performed with the ductal injection of ET-Kyoto solution (DI group) and eight islet isolations were performed without the ductal injection (standard group) using brain-dead donor pancreata. Isolated islets were evaluated based on the Edmonton protocol for transplantation. The DI group had significantly higher islet yields (588,566 +/- 64,319 vs. 354,836 +/- 89,649 IE, p < 0.01) and viability (97.3 +/- 1.2% vs. 92.6 +/- 1.2%, p < 0.02) compared with the standard group. All seven isolated islet preparations in the DI group (100%), versus only three out of eight isolated islet preparations (38%) in the standard group met transplantation criteria. The islets from the DI group were transplanted into three type 1 diabetic patients and all three patients became insulin independent. Ductal injection significantly improved quantity and quality of isolated islets and resulted in high success rate of clinical islet transplantation. This simple modification will reduce the risk of failure of clinical islet isolation.

  9. Pre-adapting parasitic phages to a pathogen leads to increased pathogen clearance and lowered resistance evolution with Pseudomonas aeruginosa cystic fibrosis bacterial isolates.

    PubMed

    Friman, V-P; Soanes-Brown, D; Sierocinski, P; Molin, S; Johansen, H K; Merabishvili, M; Pirnay, J-P; De Vos, D; Buckling, A

    2016-01-01

    Recent years have seen renewed interest in phage therapy--the use of viruses to specifically kill disease-causing bacteria--because of the alarming rise in antibiotic resistance. However, a major limitation of phage therapy is the ease at with bacteria can evolve resistance to phages. Here, we determined whether in vitro experimental coevolution can increase the efficiency of phage therapy by limiting the resistance evolution of intermittent and chronic cystic fibrosis Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung isolates to four different phages. We first pre-adapted all phage strains against all bacterial strains and then compared the efficacy of pre-adapted and nonadapted phages against ancestral bacterial strains. We found that evolved phages were more efficient in reducing bacterial densities than ancestral phages. This was primarily because only 50% of bacterial strains were able to evolve resistance to evolved phages, whereas all bacteria were able to evolve some level of resistance to ancestral phages. Although the rate of resistance evolution did not differ between intermittent and chronic isolates, it incurred a relatively higher growth cost for chronic isolates when measured in the absence of phages. This is likely to explain why evolved phages were more effective in reducing the densities of chronic isolates. Our data show that pathogen genotypes respond differently to phage pre-adaptation, and as a result, phage therapies might need to be individually adjusted for different patients.

  10. Evidence for different pyoverdine-mediated iron uptake systems among Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains.

    PubMed Central

    Cornelis, P; Hohnadel, D; Meyer, J M

    1989-01-01

    Fourteen strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa ATCC 15692, P. aeruginosa ATCC 27853, and 12 clinical isolates) were checked for the production of pyoverdine and for pyoverdine-mediated iron uptake. Under iron restriction, two isolates produced undetectable amounts of pyoverdine, but all the other strains produced a compound with physicochemical properties identical or close to those of the pyoverdine of P. aeruginosa ATCC 15692 (strain PAO1). The pyoverdines were purified and tested for their growth-promoting activity and for their ability to facilitate 59Fe uptake in homologous experiments involving each pyoverdine and its producing strain, as well as in heterologous systems involving all the other strains. The results of both types of experiments suggested the existence of three specificity groups. This was confirmed by analysis of the amino acid composition of the pyoverdines, which differed for each group. A partially purified polyclonal antiserum raised against a major 80-kilodalton (kDa) iron-regulated outer membrane protein (IROMP) of P. aeruginosa PAO1 recognized the 80-kDa IROMPs from P. aeruginosa PAO1 and the clinical isolates belonging to the same group, whereas the IROMPs from the strains belonging to the two other groups were not detected. A second antiserum raised against the P. aeruginosa ATCC 27853 80-kDa IROMP gave similar results by reacting specifically with the 80-kDa IROMP from the strains belonging to this group. Thus, together with the already known pyoverdine from P. aeruginosa PAO1, two new types of pyoverdines produced by strains belonging to this species were characterized. Images PMID:2509364

  11. Isolation and purification of the bioactive carotenoid zeaxanthin from the microalga Microcystis aeruginosa by high-speed counter-current chromatography.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feng; Li, Hua-Bin; Wong, Ricky Ngok-Shun; Ji, Bo; Jiang, Yue

    2005-02-01

    High-speed counter-current chromatography was successfully applied for the first time to the isolation and purification of the bioactive carotenoid zeaxanthin from the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa. The crude zeaxanthin was obtained by extraction with organic solvents after the microalgal sample had been saponified. Preparative high-speed counter-current chromatography with a two-phase solvent system composed of n-hexane-ethyl acetate-ethanol-water (8:2:7:3, v/v/v/v) was successfully performed yielding zeaxanthin at 96.2% purity from 150 mg of the crude extract in a one-step separation. The recovery of zeaxanthin was 91.4%. This was also the first report that zeaxanthin was successfully separated and purified from microalgae.

  12. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Phenotypes Associated With Eradication Failure in Children With Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Mayer-Hamblett, Nicole; Ramsey, Bonnie W.; Kulasekara, Hemantha D.; Wolter, Daniel J.; Houston, Laura S.; Pope, Christopher E.; Kulasekara, Bridget R.; Armbruster, Catherine R.; Burns, Jane L.; Retsch-Bogart, George; Rosenfeld, Margaret; Gibson, Ronald L.; Miller, Samuel I.; Khan, Umer; Hoffman, Lucas R.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a key respiratory pathogen in people with cystic fibrosis (CF). Due to its association with lung disease progression, initial detection of P. aeruginosa in CF respiratory cultures usually results in antibiotic treatment with the goal of eradication. Pseudomonas aeruginosa exhibits many different phenotypes in vitro that could serve as useful prognostic markers, but the relative relationships between these phenotypes and failure to eradicate P. aeruginosa have not been well characterized. Methods. We measured 22 easily assayed in vitro phenotypes among the baseline P. aeruginosa isolates collected from 194 participants in the 18-month EPIC clinical trial, which assessed outcomes after antibiotic eradication therapy for newly identified P. aeruginosa. We then evaluated the associations between these baseline isolate phenotypes and subsequent outcomes during the trial, including failure to eradicate after antipseudomonal therapy, emergence of mucoidy, and occurrence of an exacerbation. Results. Baseline P. aeruginosa isolates frequently exhibited phenotypes thought to represent chronic adaptation, including mucoidy. Wrinkly colony surface and irregular colony edges were both associated with increased risk of eradication failure (hazard ratios [95% confidence intervals], 1.99 [1.03–3.83] and 2.14 [1.32–3.47], respectively). Phenotypes reflecting defective quorum sensing were significantly associated with subsequent mucoidy, but no phenotype was significantly associated with subsequent exacerbations during the trial. Conclusions. Pseudomonas aeruginosa phenotypes commonly considered to reflect chronic adaptation were observed frequently among isolates at early detection. We found that 2 easily assayed colony phenotypes were associated with failure to eradicate after antipseudomonal therapy, both of which have been previously associated with altered biofilm formation and defective quorum sensing. PMID:24863401

  13. Chitinase 3-like 1: prognostic biomarker in clinically isolated syndromes.

    PubMed

    Cantó, Ester; Tintoré, Mar; Villar, Luisa M; Costa, Carme; Nurtdinov, Ramil; Álvarez-Cermeño, José C; Arrambide, Georgina; Reverter, Ferran; Deisenhammer, Florian; Hegen, Harald; Khademi, Mohsen; Olsson, Tomas; Tumani, Hayrettin; Rodríguez-Martín, Eulalia; Piehl, Fredrik; Bartos, Ales; Zimova, Denisa; Kotoucova, Jolana; Kuhle, Jens; Kappos, Ludwig; García-Merino, Juan Antonio; Sánchez, Antonio José; Saiz, Albert; Blanco, Yolanda; Hintzen, Rogier; Jafari, Naghmeh; Brassat, David; Lauda, Florian; Roesler, Romy; Rejdak, Konrad; Papuc, Ewa; de Andrés, Clara; Rauch, Stefan; Khalil, Michael; Enzinger, Christian; Galimberti, Daniela; Scarpini, Elio; Teunissen, Charlotte; Sánchez, Alex; Rovira, Alex; Montalban, Xavier; Comabella, Manuel

    2015-04-01

    Chitinase 3-like 1 (CHI3L1) has been proposed as a biomarker associated with the conversion to clinically definite multiple sclerosis in patients with clinically isolated syndromes, based on the finding of increased cerebrospinal fluid CHI3L1 levels in clinically isolated syndrome patients who later converted to multiple sclerosis compared to those who remained as clinically isolated syndrome. Here, we aimed to validate CHI3L1 as a prognostic biomarker in a large cohort of patients with clinically isolated syndrome. This is a longitudinal cohort study of clinically isolated syndrome patients with clinical, magnetic resonance imaging, and cerebrospinal fluid data prospectively acquired. A total of 813 cerebrospinal fluid samples from patients with clinically isolated syndrome were recruited from 15 European multiple sclerosis centres. Cerebrospinal fluid CHI3L1 levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Multivariable Cox regression models were used to investigate the association between cerebrospinal fluid CHI3L1 levels and time to conversion to multiple sclerosis and time to reach Expanded Disability Status Scale 3.0. CHI3L1 levels were higher in patients who converted to clinically definite multiple sclerosis compared to patients who continued as clinically isolated syndrome (P = 8.1 × 10(-11)). In the Cox regression analysis, CHI3L1 levels were a risk factor for conversion to multiple sclerosis (hazard ratio = 1.7; P = 1.1 × 10(-5) using Poser criteria; hazard ratio = 1.6; P = 3.7 × 10(-6) for McDonald criteria) independent of other covariates such as brain magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities and presence of cerebrospinal fluid oligoclonal bands, and were the only significant independent risk factor associated with the development of disability (hazard ratio = 3.8; P = 2.5 × 10(-8)). High CHI3L1 levels were associated with shorter time to multiple sclerosis (P = 3.2 × 10(-9) using Poser criteria; P = 5.6 × 10(-11) for McDonald criteria

  14. Variation of electrophoretic karyotypes among clinical isolates of Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Merz, W G; Connelly, C; Hieter, P

    1988-01-01

    Orthogonal-field-alternation gel electrophoresis was used to compare clinical isolates of Candida albicans by resolving chromosome-sized DNA molecules into an electrophoretic karyotype. Seven to nine bands were observed among isolates recovered from 17 patients. In addition, 14 distinct electrophoretic patterns were noted among the isolates from these patients. In a given individual, isolates were likely to have identical electrophoretic patterns. Therefore, the electrophoretic karyotype patterns demonstrated by orthogonal-field-alternation gel electrophoresis can be used to designate a strain for epidemiologic studies. Images PMID:3290238

  15. Ribotype differences between clinical and environmental isolates of Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    PubMed

    Trakulsomboon, S; Dance, D A; Smith, M D; White, N J; Pitt, T L

    1997-07-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is isolated frequently from the soil in regions where the disease melioidosis occurs. However, recent surveys in Thailand have shown that the frequency of isolation of the organism from soil samples is not directly related to the incidence of melioidosis in an area. To determine whether strain populations of B. pseudomallei prevalent in soil are gentypically related to strains causing clinical disease, rRNA BamHI restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP) of 139 soil environmental isolates and 228 human isolates were compared. Two groups of ribotype patterns were found. Group I comprised 37 different ribotype patterns which were characterised by five to eight hybridisation bands of 2.8- > 23 kb. All of these ribotypes were identified among the clinical isolates, and 18 of them were also found in 59 environmental isolates. Group II was represented by 12 ribotypes found only in environmental strains. These ribotype patterns comprised one to five bands in the size range 9- > 23 kb. All but one of the 73 isolates in this group grew on a minimal medium supplemented with L-arabinose. In contrast, only 3% of the 66 isolates from the environment with group I ribotype patterns could utilise this sugar as their sole energy source. These findings suggest that B. pseudomallei strains that utilise arabinose constitute a population that is genetically distinct from other environmental and clinical strains.

  16. Chromosome length polymorphism in clinical isolates of Candida parapsilosis.

    PubMed

    Fernando, P H; Samaranayake, L P

    1998-10-01

    Chromosome length polymorphism among 24 clinical isolates of Candida parapsilosis obtained from several human sources was analysed using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. The isolates, from both superficial and deep infections, comprised a miscellaneous collection from the oral cavity, blood cultures, ear infections, wound secrete, a venous catheter and peritoneal dialysis fluid. Contour-clamped homogenous field electrophoresis using a hexagonal electrode was used for pulsed field gel electrophoresis. The chromosome numbers varied from seven to nine and their sizes ranged from 0.75 to 2.6 Mb. According to the electrophoretic karyotype patterns the 24 isolates could be divided into 9 profiles. However, the majority (18 isolates) fell into 3 groups comprising 7, 8 and 9 chromosomes, containing 5, 11, and 2 isolates, respectively. The remaining six isolates, all of which were from either an oral or another superficial site of isolation, could be categorized into a further six groups. These data confirm previous observations on the genomic heterogeneity of clinical isolates of C. parapsilosis, and illustrate the possible commonality in strains from related clinical habitats.

  17. The occurrence of multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa on hydrocarbon-contaminated sites.

    PubMed

    Kaszab, Edit; Kriszt, Balázs; Atzél, Béla; Szabó, Gabriella; Szabó, István; Harkai, Péter; Szoboszlay, Sándor

    2010-01-01

    The main aim of this paper was the comprehensive estimation of the occurrence rate and the antibiotic-resistance conditions of opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa in hydrocarbon-contaminated environments. From 2002 to 2007, 26 hydrocarbon-contaminated sites of Hungary were screened for the detection of environmental isolates. Altogether, 156 samples were collected and examined for the determination of appearance, representative cell counts, and antibiotic-resistance features of P. aeruginosa. The detected levels of minimal inhibitory concentrations of ten different drugs against 36 environmental strains were compared to the results of a widely used reference strain ATCC 27853 and four other clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa. Based on our long-term experiment, it can be established that species P. aeruginosa was detectable in case of 61.5% of the investigated hydrocarbon-contaminated sites and 35.2% of the examined samples that shows its widespread occurrence in polluted soil-groundwater systems. In the course of the antibiotic-resistance assay, our results determined that 11 of the examined 36 environmental strains had multiple drug-resistance against several clinically effective antimicrobial classes: cephalosporins, wide spectrum penicillins, carbapenems, fluoroquinolones, and aminoglycosides. The fact that these multiresistant strains were isolated from 8 different hydrocarbon-contaminated sites, mainly from outskirts, confirms that multiple drug-resistance of P. aeruginosa is widespread not only in clinical, but also in natural surroundings as well. PMID:19597862

  18. Isolation of Aeromonas species from clinical sources

    PubMed Central

    McCracken, A. W.; Barkley, R.

    1972-01-01

    In a period of one year, in a general hospital, Aeromonas hydrophila was isolated from 13 patients and Aeromonas shigelloides from one patient. Eight of the patients had superficial infections, two had urinary tract infections, and four had bacteriaemia. The association of Aeromonas bacteriaemia with cirrhosis of the liver and malignant disease, which has been previously reported, was observed in three of the four bacteriaemic patients. The key to laboratory diagnosis of this genus is the routine performance of the oxidase test in bacteriological procedures for the identification of Gram-negative bacilli. PMID:4567553

  19. Isolated right ventricular failure in hyperthyroidism: a clinical dilemma

    PubMed Central

    McDonough, Ryan J.; Moul, Marvin S.; Beckman, Darrick; Slim, Ahmad M.

    2011-01-01

    We present a unique case of a 42-year-old gentleman with newly diagnosed Graves’ disease and isolated right ventricular failure. Extensive evaluation to include echocardiogram and cardiac catheterization were negative for significant pulmonary hypertension or coronary artery disease as potential etiologies. Hyperthyroid induced vasospasm is a rare but reported clinical entity that serves to be a clinical and diagnostic dilemma. PMID:22049310

  20. Molecular characterisation of clinical and environmental isolates of Mycobacterium kansasii isolates from South African gold mines.

    PubMed

    Kwenda, Geoffrey; Churchyard, Gavin J; Thorrold, Catherine; Heron, Ian; Stevenson, Karen; Duse, Adriano G; Marais, Elsé

    2015-03-01

    Mycobacterium kansasii (M. kansasii) is a major cause of non-tuberculous mycobacterial pulmonary disease in the South African gold-mining workforce, but the source of infection and molecular epidemiology are unknown. This study investigated the presence of M. kansasii in gold and coal mine and associated hostel water supplies and compared the genetic diversity of clinical and environmental isolates of M. kansasii. Five M. kansasii and ten other potentially pathogenic mycobacteria were cultured mainly from showerhead biofilms. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction analysis of the hsp65 gene on 196 clinical and environmental M. kansasii isolates revealed 160 subtype I, eight subtype II and six subtype IV strains. Twenty-two isolates did not show the typical M. kansasii restriction patterns, suggesting that these isolates may represent new subtypes of M. kansasii. In contrast to the clonal population structure found amongst the subtype I isolates from studies in other countries, DNA fingerprinting of 114 clinical and three environmental subtype I isolates demonstrated genetic diversity amongst the isolates. This study demonstrated that showerheads are possible sources of M. kansasii and other pathogenic non-tuberculous mycobacterial infection in a gold-mining region, that subtype I is the major clinical isolate of M. kansasii strain and that this subtype exhibits genetic diversity. PMID:25719478

  1. [blaVIM-2 gene detection in metallo-beta-lactamase-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated in an intensive care unit in Ciudad Bolívar, Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Guevara, Armando; de Waard, Jacobus; Araque, María

    2009-08-01

    Ten Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains with resistance to broad-spectrum cephalosporin and carbapenems were studied to determine the presence of genes that mediate the production of metallo-beta-lactamases. These strains were isolated from patients with nosocomial infection at the Intensive Care Unit of the Complejo Hospitalario "Ruiz y Paéz" of Ciudad Bolívar, Bolívar State, Venezuela, from 2003 to 2006. In all isolates a metallo-enzyme activity was detected by using the double disk synergism test. PCR amplification of genes encoding the families IMP, VIM and SPM metallo-beta-lactamases showed the presence of a blaVIM gene in all strains studied. DNA sequencing revealed that all isolates showed the presence of blaVIM-2. These results suggest that it is necessary to keep these strains under epidemiologic surveillance, establish laboratory strategies for opportune detection and the implementation of new policies to ensure the appropriate use of antibiotics in this institution.

  2. Nosocomial outbreak of Pseudomonas aeruginosa associated with a drinking water fountain.

    PubMed

    Costa, D; Bousseau, A; Thevenot, S; Dufour, X; Laland, C; Burucoa, C; Castel, O

    2015-11-01

    Over a four-month period, ten patients were suspected of having acquired nosocomial infection to P. aeruginosa in the ear, nose, and throat department. Environmental and clinical isolates were compared. Only water from a drinking water fountain was contaminated by P. aeruginosa. This isolate and those of three patients had indistinguishable random amplified polymorphic DNA profiles. These patients had serious oncology diseases. The drinking water fountain was used for their alimentation by percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy and was the origin of the outbreak. Another type of drinking fountain with a terminal ultraviolet treatment was installed, following which no new infections linked to drinking water were identified.

  3. MRJP1-containing glycoproteins isolated from honey, a novel antibacterial drug candidate with broad spectrum activity against multi-drug resistant clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Brudzynski, Katrina; Sjaarda, Calvin; Lannigan, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of extended- spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) is the underlying cause of growing antibiotic resistance among Gram-negative bacteria to β-lactam antibiotics. We recently reported the discovery of honey glycoproteins (glps) that exhibited a rapid, concentration-dependent antibacterial activity against both Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis and Gram-negative Escherichia coli that resembled action of cell wall-active β-lactam drugs. Glps showed sequence identity with the Major Royal Jelly Protein 1 (MRJP1) precursor that harbors three antimicrobial peptides: Jelleins 1, 2, and 4. Here, we used semi-quantitative radial diffusion assay and broth microdilution assay to evaluate susceptibility of a number of multi-drug resistant (MDR) clinical isolates to the MRJP1-contaning honey glycoproteins. The MDR bacterial strains comprised three methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), four Pseudomonas aeruginosa, two Klebsiella pneumoniae, two vancomycin-resistant Enterococci (VRE), and five ESBL identified as one Proteus mirabilis, three E. coli, and one E. coli NDM. Their resistance to different classes of antibiotics was confirmed using automated system Vitek 2. MDR isolates differed in their susceptibility to glps with MIC90 values ranging from 4.8 μg/ml against B. subtilis to 14.4 μg/ml against ESBL K. pneumoniae, Klebsiella spp. ESBL and E. coli and up to 33 μg/ml against highly resistant strains of P. aeruginosa. Glps isolated from different honeys showed a similar ability to overcome bacterial resistance to β-lactams suggesting that (a) their mode of action is distinct from other classes of β-lactams and that (b) the common glps structure was the lead structure responsible for the activity. The results of the current study together with our previous evidence of a rapid bactericidal activity of glps demonstrate that glps possess suitable characteristics to be considered a novel antibacterial drug candidate. PMID:26217333

  4. Pseudomonas aeruginosa uses T3SS to inhibit diabetic wound healing.

    PubMed

    Goldufsky, Josef; Wood, Stephen J; Jayaraman, Vijayakumar; Majdobeh, Omar; Chen, Lin; Qin, Shanshan; Zhang, Chunxiang; DiPietro, Luisa A; Shafikhani, Sasha H

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers are responsible for more hospitalizations than any other complication of diabetes. Bacterial infection is recognized as an important factor associated with impaired healing in diabetic ulcers. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most frequently detected Gram-negative pathogen in diabetic ulcers. P. aeruginosa infection has been shown to impair healing in diabetic wounds in a manner that correlates with its ability to form biofilm. While the majority of infections in diabetic ulcers are biofilm associated, 33% of infections are nonbiofilm in nature. P. aeruginosa is the most prevalent Gram-negative pathogen in all diabetic wound types, which suggests that the deleterious impact of P. aeruginosa on healing in diabetic wounds goes beyond its ability to form biofilm and likely involves other factors. The Type III Secretion System (T3SS) virulence structure is required for the pathogenesis of all P. aeruginosa clinical isolates, suggesting that it may also play a role in the inhibition of wound repair in diabetic skin ulcers. We evaluated the role of T3SS in mediating P. aeruginosa-induced tissue damage in the wounds of diabetic mice. Our data demonstrate that P. aeruginosa establishes a robust and persistent infection in diabetic wounds independent of its ability to form biofilm and causes severe wound damage in a manner that primarily depends on its T3SS.

  5. Combination therapy with polymyxin B and netropsin against clinical isolates of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Chung, Joon-Hui; Bhat, Abhayprasad; Kim, Chang-Jin; Yong, Dongeun; Ryu, Choong-Min

    2016-01-01

    Polymyxins are last-resort antibiotics for treating infections of Gram-negative bacteria. The recent emergence of polymyxin-resistant bacteria, however, urgently demands clinical optimisation of polymyxin use to minimise further evolution of resistance. In this study we developed a novel combination therapy using minimal concentrations of polymyxin B. After large-scale screening of Streptomyces secondary metabolites, we identified a reliable polymixin synergist and confirmed as netropsin using high-pressure liquid chromatography, nuclear magnetic resonance, and mass spectrometry followed by in vitro assays using various Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria. To evaluate the effectiveness of combining polymixin B and netropsin in vivo, we performed survival analysis on greater wax moth Galleria mellonella infected with colistin-resistant clinical Acinetobacter baumannii isolates as well as Escherichia coli, Shigella flexineri, Salmonella typhimuruim, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The survival of infected G. mellonella was significantly higher when treated with polymyxin B and netropsin in combination than when treated with polymyxin B or netropsin alone. We propose a netropsin combination therapy that minimises the use of polymyxin B when treating infections with multidrug resistant Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:27306928

  6. Combination therapy with polymyxin B and netropsin against clinical isolates of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Joon-hui; Bhat, Abhayprasad; Kim, Chang-Jin; Yong, Dongeun; Ryu, Choong-Min

    2016-01-01

    Polymyxins are last-resort antibiotics for treating infections of Gram-negative bacteria. The recent emergence of polymyxin-resistant bacteria, however, urgently demands clinical optimisation of polymyxin use to minimise further evolution of resistance. In this study we developed a novel combination therapy using minimal concentrations of polymyxin B. After large-scale screening of Streptomyces secondary metabolites, we identified a reliable polymixin synergist and confirmed as netropsin using high-pressure liquid chromatography, nuclear magnetic resonance, and mass spectrometry followed by in vitro assays using various Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria. To evaluate the effectiveness of combining polymixin B and netropsin in vivo, we performed survival analysis on greater wax moth Galleria mellonella infected with colistin-resistant clinical Acinetobacter baumannii isolates as well as Escherichia coli, Shigella flexineri, Salmonella typhimuruim, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The survival of infected G. mellonella was significantly higher when treated with polymyxin B and netropsin in combination than when treated with polymyxin B or netropsin alone. We propose a netropsin combination therapy that minimises the use of polymyxin B when treating infections with multidrug resistant Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:27306928

  7. Kinetics of nutrient enhanced crude oil degradation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa AKS1 and Bacillus sp. AKS2 isolated from Guwahati refinery, India.

    PubMed

    Chettri, Bobby; Mukherjee, Arghya; Langpoklakpam, James S; Chattopadhyay, Dhrubajyoti; Singh, Arvind K

    2016-09-01

    Bacterial degradation of crude oil in response to nutrient treatments has been vastly studied. But there is a paucity of information on kinetic parameters of crude oil degradation. Here we report the nutrient stimulated kinetic parameters of crude oil degradation assessed in terms of CO2 production and oil removal by Pseudomonas aeruginosa AKS1 and Bacillus sp. AKS2. The hydrocarbon degradation rate of P. aeruginosa AKS1 in oil only amended sediment was 10.75 ± 0.65 μg CO2-C g(-1) sediment day(-1) which was similar to degradation rate in sediments with no oil. In presence of both inorganic N & P, the degradation rate increased to 47.22 ± 1.32 μg CO2-C g(-1) sediment day(-1). The half-saturation constant (Ks) and maximum degradation rate (Vmax) for P. aeruginosa AKS1 under increasing N and saturating P concentration were 13.57 ± 0.53 μg N g(-1) sediment and 39.36 ± 1.42 μg CO2-C g(-1) sediment day(-1) respectively. The corresponding values at increasing P and a constant N concentration were 1.60 ± 0.13 μg P g(-1) sediment and 43.90 ± 1.03 μg CO2-C g(-1) sediment day(-1) respectively. Similarly the degradation rate of Bacillus sp. AKS2 in sediments amended with both inorganic nutrients N & P was seven fold higher than the rates in oil only or nutrient only treated sediments. The Ks and Vmax estimates of Bacillus sp. AKS2 under increasing N and saturating P concentration were 9.96 ± 1.25 μg N g(-1) sediment and 59.96 ± 7.56 μg CO2-C g(-1) sediment day(-1) respectively. The corresponding values for P at saturating N concentration were 0.46 ± 0.24 μg P g(-1) sediment and 63.63 ± 3.54 μg CO2-C g(-1) sediment day(-1) respectively. The rates of CO2 production by both isolates were further stimulated when oil concentration was increased above 12.5 mg g(-1) sediment. However, oil degradation activity declined at oil concentration above 40 mg g(-1) sediment when treated with constant nutrient: oil ratio

  8. Kinetics of nutrient enhanced crude oil degradation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa AKS1 and Bacillus sp. AKS2 isolated from Guwahati refinery, India.

    PubMed

    Chettri, Bobby; Mukherjee, Arghya; Langpoklakpam, James S; Chattopadhyay, Dhrubajyoti; Singh, Arvind K

    2016-09-01

    Bacterial degradation of crude oil in response to nutrient treatments has been vastly studied. But there is a paucity of information on kinetic parameters of crude oil degradation. Here we report the nutrient stimulated kinetic parameters of crude oil degradation assessed in terms of CO2 production and oil removal by Pseudomonas aeruginosa AKS1 and Bacillus sp. AKS2. The hydrocarbon degradation rate of P. aeruginosa AKS1 in oil only amended sediment was 10.75 ± 0.65 μg CO2-C g(-1) sediment day(-1) which was similar to degradation rate in sediments with no oil. In presence of both inorganic N & P, the degradation rate increased to 47.22 ± 1.32 μg CO2-C g(-1) sediment day(-1). The half-saturation constant (Ks) and maximum degradation rate (Vmax) for P. aeruginosa AKS1 under increasing N and saturating P concentration were 13.57 ± 0.53 μg N g(-1) sediment and 39.36 ± 1.42 μg CO2-C g(-1) sediment day(-1) respectively. The corresponding values at increasing P and a constant N concentration were 1.60 ± 0.13 μg P g(-1) sediment and 43.90 ± 1.03 μg CO2-C g(-1) sediment day(-1) respectively. Similarly the degradation rate of Bacillus sp. AKS2 in sediments amended with both inorganic nutrients N & P was seven fold higher than the rates in oil only or nutrient only treated sediments. The Ks and Vmax estimates of Bacillus sp. AKS2 under increasing N and saturating P concentration were 9.96 ± 1.25 μg N g(-1) sediment and 59.96 ± 7.56 μg CO2-C g(-1) sediment day(-1) respectively. The corresponding values for P at saturating N concentration were 0.46 ± 0.24 μg P g(-1) sediment and 63.63 ± 3.54 μg CO2-C g(-1) sediment day(-1) respectively. The rates of CO2 production by both isolates were further stimulated when oil concentration was increased above 12.5 mg g(-1) sediment. However, oil degradation activity declined at oil concentration above 40 mg g(-1) sediment when treated with constant nutrient: oil ratio

  9. Clinical and Molecular Epidemiology of Multidrug-Resistant P. aeruginosa Carrying aac(6')-Ib-cr, qnrS1 and blaSPM Genes in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, Bruna Fuga; Ferreira, Melina Lorraine; de Campos, Paola Amaral; Royer, Sabrina; Batistão, Deivid William da Fonseca; Dantas, Raquel Cristina Cavalcanti; Gonçalves, Iara Rossi; Faria, Ana Luiza Souza; de Brito, Cristiane Silveira; Yokosawa, Jonny; Gontijo-Filho, Paulo Pinto; Ribas, Rosineide Marques

    2016-01-01

    We described a comprehensive analysis of the molecular epidemiology of multidrug-resistant (MDR) P. aeruginosa. Molecular analysis included typing by Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis, identification of genes of interest through PCR-based assays and sequencing of target genes. Case-control study was conducted to better understand the prognostic of patients and the impact of inappropriate therapy in patients with bacteremia, as well as the risk factors of MDR infections. We observed a high rate of MDR isolates (40.7%), and 51.0% of them was independently associated with inappropriate antibiotic therapy. Bacteremia was detected in 66.9% of patients, and prolonged hospital stay was expressive in those resistant to fluoroquinolone. Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes (PMQR), qnrS1 and aac(6’)Ib-cr, were detected in two different nosocomial isolates (5.3%), and the aac(6’)-Ib7 variant was detected at a high frequency (87.5%) in those negative to PMQR. The presence of mutations in gyrA and parC genes was observed in 100% and 85% of selected isolates, respectively. Isolates harboring PMQR genes or mutations in gyrA and parC were not closely related, except in those containing SPM (São Paulo metallo-β-lactamase) clone. In addition, there is no study published in Brazil to date reporting the presence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates harboring both qnrS1 and aac(6’)Ib-cr genes, with alarming frequency of patients with inappropriate therapy. PMID:27219003

  10. Genetic analysis of human clinical isolates of Lactococcus garvieae: Relatedness with isolates from foods.

    PubMed

    Reguera-Brito, Mercedes; Galán-Sánchez, Fátima; Blanco, M Mar; Rodríguez-Iglesias, Manuel; Domínguez, Lucas; Fernández-Garayzábal, José F; Gibello, Alicia

    2016-01-01

    Lactococcus garvieae is a Gram-positive bacterium well-known as an important pathogen in aquaculture, and it is also a human pathogen of increasing clinical significance. Forty-three human L. garvieae isolates from clinical specimens were characterized by Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST). Twenty-six different sequence types (STs) were identified among the human isolates, of which 20 were novel STs. Most human isolates clustered into four clonal complexes, with a predominance of CC3. Within CC3, ST10 was the most common genotype, indicating the existence of a circulating genetic lineage among the human isolates analyzed. The four CCs also grouped L. garvieae strains isolated from meat, dairy and fish, indicating a genetic overlap between isolates from human and these foods. Genetic relatedness among human and food L. garvieae isolates was confirmed by phylogenetic analysis based on the concatenated sequences of the seven MLST genes. These results represent the first evidence of genetic relatedness between isolates of L. garvieae of human and those isolated meat, milk and dairy products and suggest that, in addition to fish and seafood, these foods might represent important sources of human L. garvieae infections.

  11. Staphylococcus aureus alters growth activity, autolysis, and antibiotic tolerance in a human host-adapted Pseudomonas aeruginosa lineage.

    PubMed

    Michelsen, Charlotte Frydenlund; Christensen, Anne-Mette Juel; Bojer, Martin Saxtorph; Høiby, Niels; Ingmer, Hanne; Jelsbak, Lars

    2014-11-01

    Interactions among members of polymicrobial infections or between pathogens and the commensal flora may determine disease outcomes. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus are important opportunistic human pathogens and are both part of the polymicrobial infection communities in human hosts. In this study, we analyzed the in vitro interaction between S. aureus and a collection of P. aeruginosa isolates representing different evolutionary steps of a dominant lineage, DK2, that have evolved through decades of growth in chronically infected patients. While the early adapted P. aeruginosa DK2 strains outcompeted S. aureus during coculture on agar plates, we found that later P. aeruginosa DK2 strains showed a commensal-like interaction, where S. aureus was not inhibited by P. aeruginosa and the growth activity of P. aeruginosa was enhanced in the presence of S. aureus. This effect is mediated by one or more extracellular S. aureus proteins greater than 10 kDa, which also suppressed P. aeruginosa autolysis and prevented killing by clinically relevant antibiotics through promoting small-colony variant (SCV) formation. The commensal interaction was abolished with S. aureus strains mutated in the agr quorum sensing system or in the SarA transcriptional virulence regulator, as well as with strains lacking the proteolytic subunit, ClpP, of the Clp protease. Our results show that during evolution of a dominant cystic fibrosis lineage of P. aeruginosa, a commensal interaction potential with S. aureus has developed.

  12. Detection of blaSPM-1, blaKPC, blaTEM and blaCTX-M genes in isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter spp. and Klebsiella spp. from cancer patients with healthcare-associated infections.

    PubMed

    Jácome, Paula Regina Luna de Araújo; Alves, Lílian Rodrigues; Jácome-Júnior, Agenor Tavares; Silva, Maria Jesuíta Bezerra da; Lima, Jailton Lobo da Costa; Araújo, Paulo Sérgio Ramos; Lopes, Ana Catarina S; Maciel, Maria Amélia Vieira

    2016-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter spp. and Klebsiella spp. are three of the pathogens most frequently involved in infections of cancer patients, and the production of β -lactamases is a major mechanism of resistance due to its wide diversity of existing enzymes. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the microbiological profile and data related to patients and infections, and to search for β -lactamase genes in bacterial isolates from hospitalized cancer patients in a hospital in Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil. A total of 169 isolates were recovered between 2012 and 2014, of which 58 were P. aeruginosa, 36 were Acinetobacter spp. and 75 were Klebsiella spp. A high percentage of carbapenem resistance was observed in P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. Among the carbapenem-resistant bacteria, the blaSPM-1 gene was detected in P. aeruginosa (35.5 %) and Acinetobacter spp. (3.8 %), while blaKPC was detected in P. aeruginosa (25.8 %) only. Among the third- and fourth-generation cephalosporin-resistant strains, in Klebsiella spp. we detected the genes blaTEM (30.6 %), blaCTX-M (58.3 %) and blaKPC (5.6 %), and in Acinetobacter spp. only blaTEM (25.9 %). This the first report of an Acinetobacter baumannii blaSPM-1 gene carrier that has been isolated in Brazil. The most frequent cancer types were bowel tumour [14.8 %; 95 % confidence interval (CI95 %) 9.8-21.1 %], breast cancer (13.6 %; CI95 % 8.8-19.7 %) and prostate cancer (11.2%; CI95 % 6.9-17.0 %). These results therefore provide knowledge of susceptibility profile and resistance mechanisms and thus can contribute to the strategic formulation of hospital infection control plans and the rational use of antimicrobials, reducing mortality from infection levels in cancer patients. PMID:27217349

  13. Quinoline-degrading strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa KDQ4 isolated from coking activated sludge is capable of the simultaneous removal of phenol in a dual substrate system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Panhong; Jia, Rong; Zhang, Yuxiu; Shi, Peili; Chai, Tuanyao

    2016-11-01

    Quinoline is a refractory organic compound in the treatment of coking wastewater. The isolation of high efficiency quinoline-degrading bacteria from activated sludge and the evaluation of their degradation characteristics in the presence of phenol or in the actual coking wastewater are important for the improvement of effluent quality. The novel bacterial strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa KDQ4 was isolated from a quinoline enrichment culture obtained from the activated sludge of a coking wastewater treatment plant. The optimum temperature and initial pH for quinoline degradation were 33-38°C and 8-9, respectively. KDQ4 completely degraded 400 mg/L of quinoline within 24 h and 800 mg/L of phenol within 30 h. In the dual-substrate system, the removal efficiencies of quinoline and phenol at the same initial concentration (200 mg/L) by KDQ4 were 89% and 100% within 24 h, respectively, indicating that KDQ4 could simultaneously and quickly degrade quinoline and phenol in a coexistence system. Moreover, KDQ4 was able to adapt to actual coking wastewater containing high quinoline and phenol concentrations and rapidly remove them. KDQ4 also exhibited heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification potential under aerobic conditions. These results suggested a potential bioaugmentation role for KDQ4 in the removal of nitrogen-heterocyclic compounds and phenolics from coking wastewater. PMID:27458688

  14. Microvirin, a Novel α(1,2)-Mannose-specific Lectin Isolated from Microcystis aeruginosa, Has Anti-HIV-1 Activity Comparable with That of Cyanovirin-N but a Much Higher Safety Profile*

    PubMed Central

    Huskens, Dana; Férir, Geoffrey; Vermeire, Kurt; Kehr, Jan-Christoph; Balzarini, Jan; Dittmann, Elke; Schols, Dominique

    2010-01-01

    Microvirin (MVN), a recently isolated lectin from the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa PCC7806, shares 33% identity with the potent anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) protein cyanovirin-N (CV-N) isolated from Nostoc ellipsosporum, and both lectins bind to similar carbohydrate structures. MVN is able to inhibit infection by a wide variety of HIV-1 laboratory-adapted strains and clinical isolates of different tropisms and subtypes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. MVN also inhibits syncytium formation between persistently HIV-1-infected T cells and uninfected CD4+ T cells and inhibits DC-SIGN-mediated HIV-1 binding and transmission to CD4+ T cells. Long term passaging of HIV-1 exposed to dose-escalating concentrations of MVN resulted in the selection of a mutant virus with four deleted high mannose-type glycans in the envelope gp120. The MVN-resistant virus was still highly sensitive to various other carbohydrate binding lectins (e.g. CV-N, HHA, GNA, and UDA) but not anymore to the carbohydrate-specific 2G12 monoclonal antibody. Importantly, MVN is more than 50-fold less cytotoxic than CV-N. Also in sharp contrast to CV-N, MVN did not increase the level of the activation markers CD25, CD69, and HLA-DR in CD4+ T lymphocytes, and subsequently, MVN did not enhance viral replication in pretreated peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Therefore, MVN may qualify as a useful lectin for potential microbicidal use based on its broad and potent antiviral activity and virtual lack of any stimulatory properties and cellular toxicity. PMID:20507987

  15. Phenotypic and Genotypic Comparison of Epidemic and Non-Epidemic Strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from Individuals with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Duong, Jessica; Booth, Sean C.; McCartney, Nathan K.; Rabin, Harvey R.; Parkins, Michael D.; Storey, Douglas G.

    2015-01-01

    Epidemic strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa have been found worldwide among the cystic fibrosis (CF) patient population. Using pulse-field gel electrophoresis, the Prairie Epidemic Strain (PES) has recently been found in one-third of patients attending the Calgary Adult CF Clinic in Canada. Using multi-locus sequence typing, PES isolates from unrelated patients were found to consistently have ST192. Though most patients acquired PES prior to enrolling in the clinic, some patients were observed to experience strain replacement upon transitioning to the clinic whereby local non-epidemic P. aeruginosa isolates were displaced by PES. Here we genotypically and phenotypically compared PES to other P. aeruginosa epidemic strains (OES) found around the world as well as local non-epidemic CF P. aeruginosa isolates in order to characterize PES. Since some epidemic strains are associated with worse clinical outcomes, we assessed the pathogenic potential of PES to determine if these isolates are virulent, shared properties with OES, and if its phenotypic properties may offer a competitive advantage in displacing local non-epidemic isolates during strain replacement. As such, we conducted a comparative analysis using fourteen phenotypic traits, including virulence factor production, biofilm formation, planktonic growth, mucoidy, and antibiotic susceptibility to characterize PES, OES, and local non-epidemic isolates. We observed that PES and OES could be differentiated from local non-epidemic isolates based on biofilm growth with PES isolates being more mucoid. Pairwise comparisons indicated that PES produced significantly higher levels of proteases and formed better biofilms than OES but were more susceptible to antibiotic treatment. Amongst five patients experiencing strain replacement, we found that super-infecting PES produced lower levels of proteases and elastases but were more resistant to antibiotics compared to the displaced non-epidemic isolates. This comparative

  16. [In vitro susceptibilities to levofloxacin and various antibacterial agents of 12,866 clinical isolates obtained from 72 centers in 2010].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Keizo; Ohno, Akira; Ishii, Yoshikazu; Tateda, Kazuhiro; Iwata, Morihiro

    2012-06-01

    Postmarketing surveillance of levofloxacin (LVFX) has been conducted continuously since 1992. The present survey was performed to investigate in vitro susceptibility of recent clinical isolates in Japan to 30 selected antibacterial agents, focusing on fluoroquinolones (FQs). The common respiratory pathogens Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Moraxella catarrhalis, and Haemophilus influenzae continue to show a high susceptibility to FQs. In contrast, widely-prevailing resistance to macrolides was markedly noted among S pneumoniae and S. pyogenes. Regarding H. influenzae, the prevalence of beta-lactamase-negative ampicillin-resistant isolates has been increasing year by year (25.8% in 2002, 40.0% in 2004, 50.1% in 2007, and 57.9% in 2010). Enterobacteriaceae showed high susceptibility to FQs, however, prevalence of LVFX-resistant Escherichia coli, including intermediate resistance, was 29.3%, showing an increase over time. Nevertheless, the increase in the prevalence of LVFX-resistant E. coli isolates has slowed since 2007 (8.2% in 2000, 11.8% in 2002, 18.8% in 2004, 26.2% in 2007, and 29.3% in 2010), suggesting the influence of LVFX 500 mg tablets since its approval in 2009. Another Enterobacteriaceae member, Klebsiella pneumoniae, showed low resistance to FQs, in contrast with E. coli. In methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), the percentage of FQ-susceptible isolates was low, at 51.6% for susceptibility to sitafloxacin, and at only around 10% for susceptibility to other FQs. However, methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) isolates were highly susceptible to FQs, with the percentage ranging from 88.5% to 99.1%. The prevalence of FQs-resistant isolates in methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci was higher than that in methicillin-susceptible coagulase-negative staphylococci, although it was lower than the prevalence of FQ-resistance in MRSA. The prevalence of FQs-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates derived from

  17. Antibiotic susceptibility pattern and analysis of plasmid profiles of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from human, animal and plant sources.

    PubMed

    Odumosu, Bamidele Tolulope; Ajetunmobi, Olabayo; Dada-Adegbola, Hannah; Odutayo, Idowu

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistant organisms (MDROs) constitute a major public health threat globally. Clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa remains one of the most studied MDROs however there is paucity of information regarding the susceptibility of its animal and plants isolates to antipseudomonas drug in Nigeria. From a total of 252 samples consisting of plants, animals and clinical samples, 54, 24 and 22 P. aeruginosa were isolated from vegetables, animals and clinical sources respectively. All the isolates were identified by standard biochemical methods. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) of the 100 P. aeruginosa isolates against 7 antipseudomonal drugs was carried out by disk diffusion method, the phenotypic detection of ESBL was done by double disk synergy test (DDST) while plasmid extraction on 20 selected isolates based on their resistance to 2 or more classes of antibiotics was carried out by alkaline lysis method and analysed with Lambda DNA/Hind lll marker respectively. The AST results revealed highest resistance of 91 and 55 % to ceftazidime and carbenicillin respectively while highest susceptibilities of 99 % for piperacillin-tazobactam and imipenem were recorded in overall assay. Fifteen out of 100 isolates specifically (10) from vegetables, (3) clinical and (2) poultry isolates showed synergy towards the beta-lactamase inhibitor indicating production of ESBL by DDST method. Detection of plasmids was among vegetable (n = 4), poultry (n = 4), cow (n = 3) and clinical isolates (n = 1). Plasmid profile for the selected isolates revealed 6 of the strains had one plasmids each while 5 strains possessed 2-4 plasmids and 1 strain had 5 plasmids. The sizes of the plasmid range from <1 to ≥23kbp. Detection of ESBL and Plasmids among the investigated isolates is suggestive of multiple interplay of resistance mechanism among the isolates. Plants and animal isolates of P. aeruginosa harbouring multiple mechanisms of resistance is of concern due to the

  18. [Clinical and genetic characterization of FIPA (familial isolated pituitary adenomas)].

    PubMed

    Beckers, A; Apetrii, P; Daly, A; Tichomirova, M; Vanbellingen, J F; Georges, M; Bours, V

    2009-01-01

    Pituitary adenomas are common brain tumours at autopsy and radiological series of unselected population. Historically, few epidemiologic data regarding the prevalence of clinically apparent pituitary adenomas have been available. Recently, a cross-sectional study conducted in Liège, Belgium, noted that clinically-apparent pituitary adenomas occurred with a prevalence of 1:1064 inhabitants, which is 3.5-5 times the previously reported prevalence. Pituitary adenomas occur predominantly as sporadic tumors, but also in a familial setting or associated to some familial/isolated tumoral syndromes. The recent characterization of the novel clinical entity FIPA (Familial Isolated Pituitary Adenomas) increased the prevalence of familial pituitary adenomas which account now for about 5% of pituitary tumors. Distinct genetic mechanisms are continuously identified and increase our understanding of the complex clinical presentation and sometimes unpredictable evolution of pituitary adenomas.

  19. RESPONSES OF OYSTER (CRASSOSTREA VIRGINICA) HEMOCYTES TO NONPATHOGENIC AND CLINICAL ISOLATES OF VIBRIO PARAHAEMOLYTICUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bacterial uptake by oysters (Crassostrea virginica) and bactericidal activity of oyster hemocytes were studied using four environmental isolates and three clinical isolates of Vibrio parahaemolyticus. Clinical isolates (2030, 2062, 2107) were obtained from gastroenteritis patien...

  20. Diversity of clinical isolates of Entamoeba histolytica in Japan.

    PubMed

    Nozaki, Tomoyoshi; Kobayashi, Seiki; Takeuchi, Tsutomu; Haghighi, Ali

    2006-02-01

    In Japan, amebiasis is domestically transmitted by two major populations: male homosexuals and mentally handicapped persons, which is remarkably different from most other developed countries where Entamoeba dispar infection is predominantly observed. Here we briefly summarize epidemiology of amebiasis in Japan. We also review our current understanding of the diversity of Entamoeba histolytica clinical isolates in Japan, based on polymorphic genetic markers, clinical representations, and in vivo virulence, using an animal model.

  1. Could the DiversiLab® semi-automated repetitive-sequence-based PCR be an acceptable technique for typing isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa? An answer from our experience and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Brossier, Florence; Micaelo, Maïté; Luyt, Charles-Edouard; Lu, Qin; Chastre, Jean; Arbelot, Charlotte; Trouillet, Jean-Louis; Combes, Alain; Rouby, Jean-Jacques; Jarlier, Vincent; Aubry, Alexandra

    2015-12-01

    Recently the DiversiLab® (DL) system (bioMérieux) was developed as an automated platform that uses repetitive element polymerase chain reaction (rep-PCR) technology for standardized, reproducible DNA fingerprinting of bacteria. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of DL rep-PCR for typing Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates. The performance of DL rep-PCR was compared with that of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) in a prospective multicenter study of patients with ventilator-associated pneumonia due to P. aeruginosa, conducted in 3 intensive care units over a 31-month period. In total, 203 P. aeruginosa isolates from 66 patients, from whom at least 2 consecutive respiratory samples each were collected more than 48 h apart, were typed using DL rep-PCR. Forty isolates (corresponding to 20 patients) were also typed using PFGE of SpeI-digested DNA. The typeability was 100% with DL rep-PCR and 95% with PFGE. The discriminatory power was close for DL rep-PCR and for PFGE (Simpson's diversity indices of 0.901 and 0.947, respectively). Insufficient agreement between DL rep-PCR and PFGE typing results was observed for the 40 selected isolates (adjusted Rand coefficient of 0.419), mostly due to isolates of the same DL rep-PCR type but of different PFGE types (adjusted Wallace coefficients of 0.306 for DL rep-PCR with PFGE, and of 0.667 for PFGE with DL rep-PCR). Considered together with published data, DL rep-PCR results should be interpreted with caution for the investigation of outbreaks caused by P. aeruginosa and evaluated in conjunction with epidemiological data.

  2. Could the DiversiLab® semi-automated repetitive-sequence-based PCR be an acceptable technique for typing isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa? An answer from our experience and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Brossier, Florence; Micaelo, Maïté; Luyt, Charles-Edouard; Lu, Qin; Chastre, Jean; Arbelot, Charlotte; Trouillet, Jean-Louis; Combes, Alain; Rouby, Jean-Jacques; Jarlier, Vincent; Aubry, Alexandra

    2015-12-01

    Recently the DiversiLab® (DL) system (bioMérieux) was developed as an automated platform that uses repetitive element polymerase chain reaction (rep-PCR) technology for standardized, reproducible DNA fingerprinting of bacteria. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of DL rep-PCR for typing Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates. The performance of DL rep-PCR was compared with that of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) in a prospective multicenter study of patients with ventilator-associated pneumonia due to P. aeruginosa, conducted in 3 intensive care units over a 31-month period. In total, 203 P. aeruginosa isolates from 66 patients, from whom at least 2 consecutive respiratory samples each were collected more than 48 h apart, were typed using DL rep-PCR. Forty isolates (corresponding to 20 patients) were also typed using PFGE of SpeI-digested DNA. The typeability was 100% with DL rep-PCR and 95% with PFGE. The discriminatory power was close for DL rep-PCR and for PFGE (Simpson's diversity indices of 0.901 and 0.947, respectively). Insufficient agreement between DL rep-PCR and PFGE typing results was observed for the 40 selected isolates (adjusted Rand coefficient of 0.419), mostly due to isolates of the same DL rep-PCR type but of different PFGE types (adjusted Wallace coefficients of 0.306 for DL rep-PCR with PFGE, and of 0.667 for PFGE with DL rep-PCR). Considered together with published data, DL rep-PCR results should be interpreted with caution for the investigation of outbreaks caused by P. aeruginosa and evaluated in conjunction with epidemiological data. PMID:26460809

  3. Asperger syndrome, violent thoughts and clinically isolated syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vanderbruggen, N; Van Geit, N; Bissay, V; Zeeuws, D; Santermans, L; Baeken, C

    2010-12-01

    A young man, 23 years old, with a clinically isolated syndrome (CIS), presented violent thoughts during a neurological consultation. He was diagnosed with Asperger Syndrome based on a psychiatric and (neuro)psychological examination. Possible risk factors for acting-out and the implications for treatment, if CIS would evolve to MS, are discussed based on a review of the literature.

  4. Isolation of Bacteroides ureolyticus (B corrodens) from clinical infections.

    PubMed Central

    Duerden, B; Bennet, K W; Faulkner, J

    1982-01-01

    The introduction of an improved anaerobic system resulted in the isolation of Bacteroides ureolyticus (B corrodens) in numbers that suggested a pathogenic role from many more clinical specimens. During a three-year period B ureolyticus was isolated from 103 fairly superficial necrotic or gangrenous lesions all of which showed evidence of active infection. These included 27 perineal or genital infections, 15 perianal abscesses, 15 other soft tissue infections such as pilonidal abscesses and infected sebaceous cysts and 16 ulcers or gangrenous lesions of the lower limb. B ureolyticus was rarely isolated in pure culture but was usually one of the predominant organisms; the other organisms were mostly anaerobes and the combination of B ureolyticus with anaerobic Gram-positive cocci was particularly noticeable. The isolation and identification of B ureolyticus is not difficult but depends upon a reliable anaerobic system and the incubation of primary cultures for at least 72 h. PMID:7068922

  5. Smqnr VARIANTS IN CLINICAL ISOLATES OF Stenotrophomonas maltophilia IN BRAZIL

    PubMed Central

    Gracia-Paez, Jorge Isaac; Ferraz, Juliana Rosa; França E Silva, Ivan Avelino; Rossi, Flávia; Levin, Anna Sara; Costa, Silvia Figueiredo

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Stenotrophomonas maltophilia contains a novel chromosomally-encoded qnr gene named Smqnr that contributes to low intrinsic resistance to quinolone. We described Smqnr in 13 clinical isolates of S. maltophilia from two Brazilian hospitals, over a 2-year period. The strains were identified by API 20 NE (bioMérieux, France). Susceptibility by microdilution method to trimetroprim/sulfamethoxazole, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, minocycline, ceftazidime, chloramphenicol and ticarcillin/clavulanate was performed according to CLSI. PCR detection of Smqnr gene was carried out. The sequence of Smqnr was compared with those deposited in GenBank. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) of all strains was performed. Thirteen Smqnr positives isolates were sequenced and three novel variants of Smqnr were identified. All 13 Smqnr isolates had distinguishable patterns by PFGE. This is the first report of Smqnr in S. maltophilia isolated in Brazil. PMID:24213195

  6. Synthesis and structure of silver complexes with nicotinate-type ligands having antibacterial activities against clinically isolated antibiotic resistant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Abu-Youssef, Morsy A M; Dey, Raja; Gohar, Yousry; Massoud, Alshima'a A; Ohrström, Lars; Langer, Vratislav

    2007-07-23

    The synthesis and low-temperature X-ray crystal structures of five new silver complexes, [Ag(2)-mu-O,O'(2-aminonicotinium)(2)(NO(3))(2)](n) (7), [Ag(isonicotinamide)(2)-mu-O,O'(NO(3))](2) (8), [Ag(ethyl nicotinate)(2)](NO(3)) (9), [Ag(ethyl isonicotinate)(2)(NO(3))] (10), and [Ag(methyl isonicotinate)(2)(H(2)O)](NO(3)) (11), are presented and fully characterized by spectral and elemental analysis. The antimicrobial activities of these complexes were screened using 12 different clinical isolates belonging to four pathogenic bacteria, S. aureus, S. pyogenes, P. mirabilis, and Ps. Aeruginosa, all obtained from diabetic foot ulcers. These tested bacteria were resistant for at least 10 antibiotics commonly used for treatment of diabetic foot ulcers. Compounds 7 and 8 had considerable activity against Ps. Aeruginosa (MIC values 2-8 microg/mL), compound 9 against S. aureus (MIC 4-16 microg/mL) and S. pyogenes (MIC 2-4 microg/mL), and also 9 and 11 against P. mirabilis (MIC 1-16 microg/mL). All complexes were non-toxic for daphnia at concentrations above 512 microg/mL overnight.

  7. Iron Depletion Enhances Production of Antimicrobials by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Angela T.; Jones, Jace W.; Ruge, Max A.; Kane, Maureen A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a heritable disease characterized by chronic, polymicrobial lung infections. While Staphylococcus aureus is the dominant lung pathogen in young CF patients, Pseudomonas aeruginosa becomes predominant by adulthood. P. aeruginosa produces a variety of antimicrobials that likely contribute to this shift in microbial populations. In particular, secretion of 2-alkyl-4(1H)-quinolones (AQs) contributes to lysis of S. aureus in coculture, providing an iron source to P. aeruginosa both in vitro and in vivo. We previously showed that production of one such AQ, the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS), is enhanced by iron depletion and that this induction is dependent upon the iron-responsive PrrF small RNAs (sRNAs). Here, we demonstrate that antimicrobial activity against S. aureus during coculture is also enhanced by iron depletion, and we provide evidence that multiple AQs contribute to this activity. Strikingly, a P. aeruginosa ΔprrF mutant, which produces very little PQS in monoculture, was capable of mediating iron-regulated growth suppression of S. aureus. We show that the presence of S. aureus suppresses the ΔprrF1,2 mutant's defect in iron-regulated PQS production, indicating that a PrrF-independent iron regulatory pathway mediates AQ production in coculture. We further demonstrate that iron-regulated antimicrobial production is conserved in multiple P. aeruginosa strains, including clinical isolates from CF patients. These results demonstrate that iron plays a central role in modulating interactions of P. aeruginosa with S. aureus. Moreover, our studies suggest that established iron regulatory pathways of these pathogens are significantly altered during polymicrobial infections. IMPORTANCE Chronic polymicrobial infections involving Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality, as the interplay between these two organisms exacerbates infection. This is in part due to enhanced

  8. [Assessment of 2 automated microdilution techniques compared to an agar dilution method in determining sensitivity to fosfomycin in strains of carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa].

    PubMed

    Gil-Romero, Yolanda; Regodón-Domínguez, Marta; Wilhelmi de Cal, Isabel; López-Fabal, Fátima; Gómez-Garcés, José Luis

    2016-01-01

    Carbapenems-resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates has been widely reported. Fosfomycin has been shown to act synergistically with other antimicrobials. The agar dilution method was approved for susceptibility testing for fosfomycin and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. However, broth microdilution methods are the basis of systems currently used in clinical microbiology laboratories. The results of this study indicate that these methods are acceptable as susceptibility testing methods for fosfomycin against these organisms.

  9. Salmonella enterica serovar Senftenberg human clinical isolates lacking SPI-1.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qinghua; Coburn, Bryan; Deng, Wanyin; Li, Yuling; Shi, Xiaolu; Lan, Quanxue; Wang, Bing; Coombes, Brian K; Finlay, B Brett

    2008-04-01

    Nontyphoidal Salmonella species cause gastrointestinal disease worldwide. The prevailing theory of Salmonella enteropathogenesis is that bacterial invasion of the intestinal epithelium is essential for virulence and that this requires the virulence-associated genomic region Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1). Recent studies of Salmonella enterica infection models have demonstrated that enterocolitis and diarrhea in mice and cows can occur independently of SPI-1. In this study, we sought to confirm whether two S. enterica serovar Senftenberg clinical isolates lacked genes essential for SPI-1 function. Two clinical strains were isolated and identified as being S. enterica serovar Senftenberg from four stool samples from a food-borne disease outbreak affecting seven individuals in Shenzhen, Guangdong Province, China, using conventional methods, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing. The possibility of coinfection with other potential bacteria or usual viruses was excluded. Two isolates were analyzed for the presence of invA, sipA, ssaR, sifA, and sopE2 by PCR and Southern blotting and were then assayed for the presence of SPI-1 by PCR and long-range PCR for fhlA-hilA, hilA-spaP, and spaP-invH and Southern blot analysis. A long-range PCR fragment from fhlA to mutS covering the 5' and 3' flanks of SPI-1 was also amplified from the two clinical isolates and sequenced. In addition, the two clinical isolates were assayed for enteroinvasiveness in vitro. Murine infection models were also examined. Biochemical tests and serotyping confirmed that the two clinical isolates are S. enterica serovar Senftenberg. However, they lacked genes critical for SPI-1 function but contained SPI-2 genes and were attenuated for the invasion of cultured intestinal epithelial cells. In conclusion, clinical S. enterica serovar Senftenberg strains isolated from a food-borne disease outbreak lack the invasion-associated locus SPI-1, indicating that SPI-1 is not

  10. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Formation and Persistence, along with the Production of Quorum Sensing-Dependent Virulence Factors, Are Disrupted by a Triterpenoid Coumarate Ester Isolated from Dalbergia trichocarpa, a Tropical Legume

    PubMed Central

    Pottier, Laurent; Huet, Joelle; Rabemanantsoa, Christian; Kiendrebeogo, Martin; Andriantsimahavandy, Abel; Rasamindrakotroka, Andry; Stévigny, Caroline; Duez, Pierre; El Jaziri, Mondher

    2015-01-01

    Recently, extracts of Dalbergia trichocarpa bark have been shown to disrupt P. aeruginosa PAO1 quorum sensing (QS) mechanisms, which are key regulators of virulence factor expression and implicated in biofilm formation. One of the active compounds has been isolated and identified as oleanolic aldehyde coumarate (OALC), a novel bioactive compound that inhibits the formation of P. aeruginosa PAO1 biofilm and its maintenance as well as the expression of the las and rhl QS systems. Consequently, the production of QS-controlled virulence factors including, rhamnolipids, pyocyanin, elastase and extracellular polysaccharides as well as twitching and swarming motilities is reduced. Native acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs) production is inhibited by OALC but exogenous supply of AHLs does not restore the production of virulence factors by OALC-treated cultures, indicating that OALC exerts its effect beyond AHLs synthesis in the QS pathways. Further experiments provided a significant inhibition of the global virulence factor activator gacA by OALC. OALC disorganizes established biofilm structure and improves the bactericidal activity of tobramycin against biofilm-encapsulated PAO1 cells. Finally, a significant reduction of Caenorhabditis elegans paralysis was recorded when the worms were infected with OALC-pre-treated P. aeruginosa. Taken together, these results show that triterpenoid coumarate esters are suitable chemical backbones to target P. aeruginosa virulence mechanisms. PMID:26186595

  11. Isolated cardiac sarcoidosis: clinical characteristics, diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Isobe, Mitsuaki; Tezuka, Daisuke

    2015-03-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic disease characterized by the development of noncaseating epithelioid granulomas in multiple organs. Despite extensive investigations over a long period of time, the etiology of this disease remains unknown. Cardiac involvement of this disease is the most ominous complication leading to fatal outcome. Recently, attention has been focused on isolated cardiac sarcoidosis, which exists without clinically apparent sarcoidosis elsewhere. One of the critical issues of isolated cardiac sarcoidosis is difficulty in diagnosis, since existence of the cardiac lesion should be detected from cardiac manifestations alone. Because specificity of biomarkers or sensitivity of histological examination of biopsied sample is very low, diagnosis of isolated cardiac sarcoidosis mainly depends on imaging modalities. In this review article we summarized current knowledge on the pathogenesis of sarcoidosis, clinical features of cardiac sarcoidosis especially that isolated to the heart by showing some typical cases. Utilities and problems of diagnostic imaging tests for this condition including echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, and fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography are discussed. Advances in pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatment for cardiac sarcoidosis have improved the prognosis of cardiac sarcoidosis to a great deal; however, there are many issues that remain to be solved in the management of isolated cardiac sarcoidosis.

  12. Method for microRNA isolation from clinical serum samples.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu; Kowdley, Kris V

    2012-12-01

    MicroRNAs are a group of intracellular noncoding RNA molecules that have been implicated in a variety of human diseases. Because of their high stability in blood, microRNAs released into circulation could be potentially utilized as noninvasive biomarkers for diagnosis or prognosis. Current microRNA isolation protocols are specifically designed for solid tissues and are impractical for biomarker development utilizing small-volume serum samples on a large scale. Thus, a protocol for microRNA isolation from serum is needed to accommodate these conditions in biomarker development. To establish such a protocol, we developed a simplified approach to normalize sample input by using single synthetic spike-in microRNA. We evaluated three commonly used commercial microRNA isolation kits for the best performance by comparing RNA quality and yield. The manufacturer's protocol was further modified to improve the microRNA yield from 200μl of human serum. MicroRNAs isolated from a large set of clinical serum samples were tested on the miRCURY LNA real-time PCR panel and confirmed to be suitable for high-throughput microRNA profiling. In conclusion, we have established a proven method for microRNA isolation from clinical serum samples suitable for microRNA biomarker development.

  13. A microRNA isolation method from clinical samples

    PubMed Central

    Zununi Vahed, Sepideh; Barzegari, Abolfazl; Rahbar Saadat, Yalda; Mohammadi, Somayeh; Samadi, Nasser

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: microRNAs (miRNAs) are considered to be novel molecular biomakers that could be exploited in the diagnosis and treatment of different diseases. The present study aimed to develop an efficient miRNA isolation method from different clinical specimens. Methods: Total RNAs were isolated by Trizol reagent followed by precipitation of the large RNAs with potassium acetate (KCH3COOH), polyethylene glycol (PEG) 4000 and 6000, and lithium chloride (LiCl). Then, small RNAs were enriched and recovered from the supernatants by applying a combination of LiCl and ethanol. The efficiency of the method was evaluated through the quality, quantity, and integrity of the recovered RNAs using the A260/280 absorbance ratio, reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR), and quantitative real-time PCR (q-PCR). Results: Comparison of different RNA isolation methods based on the precipitation of DNA and large RNAs, high miRNA recovery and PCR efficiency revealed that applying potassium acetate with final precipitation of small RNAs using 2.5 M LiCl plus ethanol can provide high yield and quality small RNAs that can be exploited for clinical purposes. Conclusion: The current isolation method can be applied for most clinical samples including cells, formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues and even body fluids with a wide applicability in molecular biology investigations. PMID:27340621

  14. Molecular Screening of Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B Gene in Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Ataee, Ramezan Ali; Karami, Ali; Izadi, Morteza; Aghania, Aref; Ataee, Mohammad Hossein

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The role of staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) in food poisoning is well known, however its role in other diseases remains to be explored. The aim of this study is the molecular screening and characterization of the SEB gene in clinically isolated strains. Materials and Methods: In this experimentally study, 300 Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) strains isolated from clinical samples were assayed. The isolated strains were confirmed by conventional bacteriological methods. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to determine the enterotoxin B (ent B) gene. Assessment of toxin production in all strains that contained the ent B gene was then performed. Finally, using specific antibody against SEB, a Western-blot was applied to confirm detection of enterotoxin B production. Results: Results indicated that only 5% of the 300 clinically isolated S. aureus contained the ent B gene. All strains which contained the ent B gene produced a proteinous enterotoxin B. The results of sequence determination of the PCR product were compared with the gene bank database and 98% similarity was achieved. The results of the Western-blot confirmed that enterotoxin B was produced in strains that contained the ent B gene. Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that 5% of clinically isolated S. aureus strains produce enterotoxin B. Considering that the enterotoxin B is an important superantigen, it is possible that a delay in diagnosis and lack of early proper treatment can cause an incidence of late complications, particularly in staphylococcal chronic infections. For this reason, it is suggested that in addition to detecting bacteria, an enterotoxin B detection test should be performed to control its toxigenicity. PMID:23508641

  15. In vitro activity of ceftazidime, ceftaroline and aztreonam alone and in combination with avibactam against European Gram-negative and Gram-positive clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Testa, Raymond; Cantón, Rafael; Giani, Tommaso; Morosini, María-Isabel; Nichols, Wright W; Seifert, Harald; Stefanik, Danuta; Rossolini, Gian Maria; Nordmann, Patrice

    2015-06-01

    Recent clinical isolates of key Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria were collected in 2012 from hospitalised patients in medical centres in four European countries (France, Germany, Italy and Spain) and were tested using standard broth microdilution methodology to assess the impact of 4 mg/L avibactam on the in vitro activities of ceftazidime, ceftaroline and aztreonam. Against Enterobacteriaceae, addition of avibactam significantly enhanced the level of activity of these antimicrobials. MIC(90) values (minimum inhibitory concentration that inhibits 90% of the isolates) of ceftazidime, ceftaroline and aztreonam for Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter cloacae, Enterobacter aerogenes, Citrobacter freundii and Morganella morganii were reduced up to 128-fold or greater when combined with avibactam. A two-fold reduction in the MIC(90) of ceftazidime to 8 mg/L was noted in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates when combined with avibactam, whereas little effect of avibactam was noted on the MIC values of the test compounds when tested against Acinetobacter baumannii isolates. Avibactam had little effect on the excellent activity of ceftazidime, ceftaroline and aztreonam against Haemophilus influenzae. It had no impact on the in vitro activity of ceftazidime and ceftaroline against staphylococci and streptococci. This study demonstrates that addition of avibactam enhances the activities of ceftazidime, ceftaroline and aztreonam against Enterobacteriaceae and P. aeruginosa but not against A. baumannii.

  16. Pseudomonas aeruginosa cells adapted to benzalkonium chloride show resistance to other membrane-active agents but not to clinically relevant antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Loughlin, M F; Jones, M V; Lambert, P A

    2002-04-01

    Our objective was to determine whether strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa can adapt to growth in increasing concentrations of the disinfectant benzalkonium chloride (BKC), and whether co-resistance to clinically relevant antimicrobial agents occurs. Attempts were made to determine what phenotypic alterations accompanied resistance and whether these explained the mechanism of resistance. Strains were serially passaged in increasing concentrations of BKC in static nutrient broth cultures. Serotyping and genotyping were used to determine purity of the cultures. Two strains were examined for cross-resistance to other disinfectants and antibiotics by broth dilution MIC determination. Alterations in outer membrane proteins and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) expressed were examined by SDS-PAGE. Cell surface hydrophobicity and charge, uptake of disinfectant and proportion of specific fatty acid content of outer and cytoplasmic membranes were determined. Two P. aeruginosa strains showed a stable increase in resistance to BKC. Co-resistance to other quaternary ammonium compounds was observed in both strains; chloramphenicol and polymyxin B resistance were observed in one and a reduction in resistance to tobramycin observed in the other. However, no increased resistance to other biocides (chlorhexidine, triclosan, thymol) or antibiotics (ceftazidime, imipenem, ciprofloxacin, tobramycin) was detected. Characteristics accompanying resistance included alterations in outer membrane proteins, uptake of BKC, cell surface charge and hydrophobicity, and fatty acid content of the cytoplasmic membrane, although no evidence was found for alterations in LPS. Each of the two strains had different alterations in phenotype, indicating that such adaptation is unique to each strain of P. aeruginosa and does not result from a single mechanism shared by the whole species. PMID:11909837

  17. Complete Genome Sequences of a Clinical Isolate and an Environmental Isolate of Vibrio parahaemolyticus.

    PubMed

    Lüdeke, Catharina H M; Kong, Nguyet; Weimer, Bart C; Fischer, Markus; Jones, Jessica L

    2015-03-26

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is the leading cause of seafood-borne infections in the United States. We report complete genome sequences for two V. parahaemolyticus strains isolated in 2007, CDC_K4557 and FDA_R31 of clinical and oyster origin, respectively. These two sequences might assist in the investigation of differential virulence of this organism.

  18. Emergence of colistin resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa at Tabriz hospitals, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Goli, Hamid Reza; Nahaei, Mohammad Reza; Ahangarzadeh Rezaee, Mohammad; Hasani, Alka; Samadi Kafil, Hossein; Aghazadeh, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The prevalence of multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the main reason of new drugs resurgence such as colistin. The main objectives of this study were to determine the antibiotic resistance pattern and the rate of colistin resistance along with its correlation with overexpression of MexAB-OprM and MexXY-OprM efflux pumps among P. aeruginosa isolates. Materials and Methods: Hundred clinical isolates were collected from 100 patients during 6 months in 2014. Susceptibility to the eight antibiotics was investigated using Kirby-Bauer and agar dilution methods. The Quantitative Real-time PCR was used to determine the expression levels of efflux genes. Results: Resistance rates to various antibiotics were as follows: ticarcillin (73%), ciprofloxacin (65%), aztreonam (60%), ceftazidime (55%), gentamicin (55%), imipenem (49%), piperacillin/tazobactam (34%) and colistin (2%). In disk diffusion method, only two isolates were non susceptible to colistin, however in agar dilution method the two isolates were confirmed as resistant and two others were intermediate resistant. Sixty eight (68%) isolates were multi-drug resistant and 10 isolates were susceptible to all tested antibiotics. Both colistin resistant isolates showed overexpression of both efflux pumps, but two intermediate resistant isolates exhibited reduction of efflux genes expression. Conclusions: Emergence of colistin resistance is increasing in P. aeruginosa indicating great challenge in the treatment of infections caused by MDR strains of this organism in Iran. ParRS may promote either induced or constitutive resistance to colistin through the activation of distinct mechanisms such as MDR efflux pumps, and LPS modification. PMID:27092226

  19. Molecular identification of Sporothrix clinical isolates in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ting-ting; Zhang, Ke; Zhou, Xun

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the molecular phylogeny of 64 clinical isolates which were identified as Sporothrix schenckii sensu lato by morphological identification. All of the strains were isolates from patients from several provinces in China. The phylogeny was inferred by DNA sequence analyses based on datasets of the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and a combined ITS and partial β-tubulin region. Reference sequences were retrieved from GenBank. Results showed that all of the isolates were clustered in a distinct clade with a type of Sporothrix globosa. Our analysis showed that S. globosa is the causal agent of the tested sporotrichosis in China, rather than S. schenckii that was generally believed to be the case. The existence of S. schenckii in China remains to be confirmed. This study improved our understanding of the distribution of the species in S. schenckii complex.

  20. Inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Swarming Motility by 1-Naphthol and Other Bicyclic Compounds Bearing Hydroxyl Groups

    PubMed Central

    Oura, Hiromu; Tashiro, Yosuke; Toyofuku, Masanori; Ueda, Kousetsu; Kiyokawa, Tatsunori; Ito, Satoshi; Takahashi, Yurika; Lee, Seunguk; Nojiri, Hideaki; Nakajima-Kambe, Toshiaki; Uchiyama, Hiroo; Futamata, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Many bacteria convert bicyclic compounds, such as indole and naphthalene, to oxidized compounds, including hydroxyindoles and naphthols. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a ubiquitous bacterium that inhabits diverse environments, shows pathogenicity against animals, plants, and other microorganisms, and increasing evidence has shown that several bicyclic compounds alter the virulence-related phenotypes of P. aeruginosa. Here, we revealed that hydroxyindoles (4- and 5-hydroxyindoles) and naphthalene derivatives bearing hydroxyl groups specifically inhibit swarming motility but have minor effects on other motilities, including swimming and twitching, in P. aeruginosa. Further analyses using 1-naphthol showed that this effect is also associated with clinically isolated hyperswarming P. aeruginosa cells. Swarming motility is associated with the dispersion of cells from biofilms, and the addition of 1-naphthol maintained biofilm biomass without cell dispersion. We showed that this 1-naphthol-dependent swarming inhibition is independent of changes of rhamnolipid production and the intracellular level of signaling molecule cyclic-di-GMP (c-di-GMP). Transcriptome analyses revealed that 1-naphthol increases gene expression associated with multidrug efflux and represses gene expression associated with aerotaxis and with pyochelin, flagellar, and pilus synthesis. In the present study, we showed that several bicyclic compounds bearing hydroxyl groups inhibit the swarming motility of P. aeruginosa, and these results provide new insight into the chemical structures that inhibit the specific phenotypes of P. aeruginosa. PMID:25681177

  1. Inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa swarming motility by 1-naphthol and other bicyclic compounds bearing hydroxyl groups.

    PubMed

    Oura, Hiromu; Tashiro, Yosuke; Toyofuku, Masanori; Ueda, Kousetsu; Kiyokawa, Tatsunori; Ito, Satoshi; Takahashi, Yurika; Lee, Seunguk; Nojiri, Hideaki; Nakajima-Kambe, Toshiaki; Uchiyama, Hiroo; Futamata, Hiroyuki; Nomura, Nobuhiko

    2015-04-01

    Many bacteria convert bicyclic compounds, such as indole and naphthalene, to oxidized compounds, including hydroxyindoles and naphthols. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a ubiquitous bacterium that inhabits diverse environments, shows pathogenicity against animals, plants, and other microorganisms, and increasing evidence has shown that several bicyclic compounds alter the virulence-related phenotypes of P. aeruginosa. Here, we revealed that hydroxyindoles (4- and 5-hydroxyindoles) and naphthalene derivatives bearing hydroxyl groups specifically inhibit swarming motility but have minor effects on other motilities, including swimming and twitching, in P. aeruginosa. Further analyses using 1-naphthol showed that this effect is also associated with clinically isolated hyperswarming P. aeruginosa cells. Swarming motility is associated with the dispersion of cells from biofilms, and the addition of 1-naphthol maintained biofilm biomass without cell dispersion. We showed that this 1-naphthol-dependent swarming inhibition is independent of changes of rhamnolipid production and the intracellular level of signaling molecule cyclic-di-GMP (c-di-GMP). Transcriptome analyses revealed that 1-naphthol increases gene expression associated with multidrug efflux and represses gene expression associated with aerotaxis and with pyochelin, flagellar, and pilus synthesis. In the present study, we showed that several bicyclic compounds bearing hydroxyl groups inhibit the swarming motility of P. aeruginosa, and these results provide new insight into the chemical structures that inhibit the specific phenotypes of P. aeruginosa. PMID:25681177

  2. Identification and Pathogenic Potential of Clinical Bacillus and Paenibacillus Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Celandroni, Francesco; Salvetti, Sara; Gueye, Sokhna Aissatou; Mazzantini, Diletta; Lupetti, Antonella; Senesi, Sonia; Ghelardi, Emilia

    2016-01-01

    The soil-related Bacillus and Paenibacillus species have increasingly been implicated in various human diseases. Nevertheless, their identification still poses problems in the clinical microbiology laboratory and, with the exception of Bacillus anthracis and Bacillus cereus, little is known on their pathogenicity for humans. In this study, we evaluated the use of matrix-assisted laser desorption—ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) in the identification of clinical isolates of these genera and conducted genotypic and phenotypic analyses to highlight specific virulence properties. Seventy-five clinical isolates were subjected to biochemical and MALDI-TOF MS identification. 16S rDNA sequencing and supplemental tests were used to solve any discrepancies or failures in the identification results. MALDI-TOF MS significantly outperformed classical biochemical testing for correct species identification and no misidentification was obtained. One third of the collected strains belonged to the B. cereus species, but also Bacillus pumilus and Bacillus subtilis were isolated at high rate. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing showed that all the B. cereus, B. licheniformis, B. simplex, B. mycoides, Paenibacillus glucanolyticus and Paenibacillus lautus isolates are resistant to penicillin. The evaluation of toxin/enzyme secretion, toxin-encoding genes, motility, and biofilm formation revealed that B. cereus displays the highest virulence potential. However, although generally considered nonpathogenic, most of the other species were shown to swim, swarm, produce biofilms, and secrete proteases that can have a role in bacterial virulence. In conclusion, MALDI-TOF MS appears useful for fast and accurate identification of Bacillus and Paenibacillus strains whose virulence properties make them of increasing clinical relevance. PMID:27031639

  3. Identification and Pathogenic Potential of Clinical Bacillus and Paenibacillus Isolates.

    PubMed

    Celandroni, Francesco; Salvetti, Sara; Gueye, Sokhna Aissatou; Mazzantini, Diletta; Lupetti, Antonella; Senesi, Sonia; Ghelardi, Emilia

    2016-01-01

    The soil-related Bacillus and Paenibacillus species have increasingly been implicated in various human diseases. Nevertheless, their identification still poses problems in the clinical microbiology laboratory and, with the exception of Bacillus anthracis and Bacillus cereus, little is known on their pathogenicity for humans. In this study, we evaluated the use of matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) in the identification of clinical isolates of these genera and conducted genotypic and phenotypic analyses to highlight specific virulence properties. Seventy-five clinical isolates were subjected to biochemical and MALDI-TOF MS identification. 16S rDNA sequencing and supplemental tests were used to solve any discrepancies or failures in the identification results. MALDI-TOF MS significantly outperformed classical biochemical testing for correct species identification and no misidentification was obtained. One third of the collected strains belonged to the B. cereus species, but also Bacillus pumilus and Bacillus subtilis were isolated at high rate. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing showed that all the B. cereus, B. licheniformis, B. simplex, B. mycoides, Paenibacillus glucanolyticus and Paenibacillus lautus isolates are resistant to penicillin. The evaluation of toxin/enzyme secretion, toxin-encoding genes, motility, and biofilm formation revealed that B. cereus displays the highest virulence potential. However, although generally considered nonpathogenic, most of the other species were shown to swim, swarm, produce biofilms, and secrete proteases that can have a role in bacterial virulence. In conclusion, MALDI-TOF MS appears useful for fast and accurate identification of Bacillus and Paenibacillus strains whose virulence properties make them of increasing clinical relevance. PMID:27031639

  4. Identification and Pathogenic Potential of Clinical Bacillus and Paenibacillus Isolates.

    PubMed

    Celandroni, Francesco; Salvetti, Sara; Gueye, Sokhna Aissatou; Mazzantini, Diletta; Lupetti, Antonella; Senesi, Sonia; Ghelardi, Emilia

    2016-01-01

    The soil-related Bacillus and Paenibacillus species have increasingly been implicated in various human diseases. Nevertheless, their identification still poses problems in the clinical microbiology laboratory and, with the exception of Bacillus anthracis and Bacillus cereus, little is known on their pathogenicity for humans. In this study, we evaluated the use of matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) in the identification of clinical isolates of these genera and conducted genotypic and phenotypic analyses to highlight specific virulence properties. Seventy-five clinical isolates were subjected to biochemical and MALDI-TOF MS identification. 16S rDNA sequencing and supplemental tests were used to solve any discrepancies or failures in the identification results. MALDI-TOF MS significantly outperformed classical biochemical testing for correct species identification and no misidentification was obtained. One third of the collected strains belonged to the B. cereus species, but also Bacillus pumilus and Bacillus subtilis were isolated at high rate. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing showed that all the B. cereus, B. licheniformis, B. simplex, B. mycoides, Paenibacillus glucanolyticus and Paenibacillus lautus isolates are resistant to penicillin. The evaluation of toxin/enzyme secretion, toxin-encoding genes, motility, and biofilm formation revealed that B. cereus displays the highest virulence potential. However, although generally considered nonpathogenic, most of the other species were shown to swim, swarm, produce biofilms, and secrete proteases that can have a role in bacterial virulence. In conclusion, MALDI-TOF MS appears useful for fast and accurate identification of Bacillus and Paenibacillus strains whose virulence properties make them of increasing clinical relevance.

  5. Pyoverdine as a fluorescent marker of antibiotic sensitivity of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosnin, E. A.; Zhdanova, O. S.; Kashapova, E. R.; Artyukhov, V. Ya.

    2014-12-01

    The electronic structure and physicochemical characteristics of the pyoverdine molecule are studied using the methods of quantum chemistry. The configurations of the absorbing and fluorescing conformers of the pyoverdine molecular fragments are optimized. The time-dependent density-functional theory is used to characterize the electronic-absorption and fluorescence spectra. The absorption and fluorescence spectra of pyoverdine from clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa are experimentally studied. An optical method is proposed to determine the sensitivity of P. aeruginosa to antibiotics using a XeBr excilamp.

  6. Genetic diversity of multidrug resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolated from clinical and non clinical samples in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Bendary, M M; Solyman, S M; Azab, M M; Mahmoud, N F; Hanora, A M

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the increasing incidence of diseases caused by Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) has been noted in the university hospitals of El-Sharkia and Assuit governorates - Egypt. Therefore, we studied the genetic relatedness of multidrug resistant S. aureus isolates from different sources in the above mentioned governorates. One hundred and fifty six S. aureus isolates were divided into 5 different groups, 1 non clinical isolates from different food products and 4 different clinical isolates of human and animal sources in the 2 different governorates. Epidemiological characteristics of 156 S. aureus isolates were determined by phenotypic methods including quantitative antibiogram typing and biofilm production. Genetic typing of 35 multidrug resistant (MDR) isolates (7 from each group) based on 16S rRNA gene sequence, virulence and antimicrobial resistance gene profiles was done. The genetic relatedness of the highest virulent strain from each group was detected based on different single locus sequence typing and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST). S. aureus strains isolated from different sources and geographical areas showed high diversity. The genetic typing revealed different sequence types and different sequences of coa and spa genes. S. aureus isolates were found highly diverse in Egypt. PMID:27609475

  7. Modulation of antibiotic resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by ZnO nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Bayroodi, Elnaz; Jalal, Razieh

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Bacterial resistance to conventional antibiotics has become a widespread public health problem. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) on the antibacterial activity of several conventional antibiotics against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Materials and Methods: ZnO NPs were prepared by solvothermal method and dispersed in glycerol with the help of ammonium citrate as a dispersant. The antibacterial effects of the resulting ZnO nanofluid, ceftazidime, tobramycin, and ciprofloxacin were investigated against two P. aeruginosa strains, including one clinical isolate and P. aeruginosa ATCC 9027 using microdilution method. For the evaluation of the combined effect of ZnO nanofluid and antibiotics, the fractional inhibitory concentration indices were calculated and isobolograms were plotted. Results: Clinical strain in comparison to standard strain of P. aeruginosa showed more resistance to ZnO nanofluid and the antibiotics. ZnO nanofluid acted synergistically with ceftazidime and tobramycin against both strains. Combination of ZnO nanofluid and ciprofloxacin displayed synergistic and partial synergistic activity against clinical and standard strains of P. aeruginosa, respectively. Conclusion: The results suggest that bacterial resistance to antimicrobials could be reduced by the synergistic action of ZnO NPs. PMID:27307973

  8. Performance of the CLSI Carba NP and the Rosco Carb Screen Assays Using North American Carbapenemase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Lauren C; Roundtree, Sylvester S; Lancaster, Diana P; Rudin, Susan D; Bard, Jennifer Dien; Roberts, Amity L; Marshall, Steven H; Bonomo, Robert A; Sullivan, Kaede V

    2015-10-01

    This study compared the performance of the Carba NP assay, published by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute, and the Rosco Rapid Carb Screen kit. Carba NP had superior sensitivity, but both assays required an increased inoculum to detect carbapenemase production in isolates with blaNDM, blaIMP, and blaOXA-48. PMID:26269624

  9. Prevalence of hypermutators among clinical Acinetobacter baumannii isolates

    PubMed Central

    Komp Lindgren, Patricia; Higgins, Paul G.; Seifert, Harald; Cars, Otto

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The objectives of this study were to study the presence of mutators in a set of Acinetobacter baumannii isolates and to explore whether there is a correlation between mutation rates and antibiotic resistance. Methods The variation in mutation rate was evaluated for 237 clinical A. baumannii isolates by determining the frequency of their mutation to rifampicin resistance. For each isolate, the antibiotic resistance profile was determined by disc diffusion and/or Etest. Isolates were divided into susceptible, resistant and MDR groups according to their resistance to five groups of different antibiotics. A comparison between differences in mutation frequency (f) and strain-specific factors was performed. Results Of the 237 isolates 32%, 18% and 50% were classified as susceptible, resistant and MDR, respectively. The f of rifampicin resistance varied between 2.2 × 10−10 and 1.2 × 10−6. Of the strains under investigation, 16% had an ≥2.5- to 166-fold higher f. The presence of mutators (definition ≥2.5-fold increase in f compared with ATCC 19606) in the MDR group (22%) was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than that in the susceptible and resistant groups (11% and 7%, respectively). Furthermore, f was significantly higher in the MDR group compared with that in the susceptible and resistant groups. Conclusions The facts that 26 of 37 mutator isolates (70%) in the population were MDR and that there was a significantly higher general f in isolates exhibiting an MDR profile suggest that hypermutability can be of advantage for the organism in a selective environment with extensive exposure to antimicrobials. PMID:26660878

  10. Role of small colony variants in persistence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in cystic fibrosis lungs

    PubMed Central

    Malone, Jacob G

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that predominates during the later stages of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung infections. Over many years of chronic lung colonization, P. aeruginosa undergoes extensive adaptation to the lung environment, evolving both toward a persistent, low virulence state and simultaneously diversifying to produce a number of phenotypically distinct morphs. These lung-adapted P. aeruginosa strains include the small colony variants (SCVs), small, autoaggregative isolates that show enhanced biofilm formation, strong attachment to surfaces, and increased production of exopolysaccharides. Their appearance in the sputum of CF patients correlates with increased resistance to antibiotics, poor lung function, and prolonged persistence of infection, increasing their relevance as a subject for clinical investigation. The evolution of SCVs in the CF lung is associated with overproduction of the ubiquitous bacterial signaling molecule cyclic-di-GMP, with increased cyclic-di-GMP levels shown to be responsible for the SCV phenotype in a number of different CF lung isolates. Here, we review the current state of research in clinical P. aeruginosa SCVs. We will discuss the phenotypic characteristics underpinning the SCV morphotype, the clinical implications of lung colonization with SCVs, and the molecular basis and clinical evolution of the SCV phenotype in the CF lung environment. PMID:26251621

  11. One pot synthesis and anti-biofilm potential of copper nanoparticles (CuNPs) against clinical strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    LewisOscar, Felix; MubarakAli, Davoodbasha; Nithya, Chari; Priyanka, Rajendran; Gopinath, Venkatraman; Alharbi, Naiyf S; Thajuddin, Nooruddin

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic pathogen frequently associated with nosocomial infections, is emerging as a serious threat due to its resistance to broad spectrum antimicrobials. The biofilm mode of growth confers resistance to antibiotics and novel anti-biofilm agents are urgently needed. Nanoparticle based treatments and therapies have been of recent interest because of their versatile applications. This study investigates the anti-biofilm activity of copper nanoparticles (CuNPs) synthesized by the one pot method against P. aeruginosa. Standard physical techniques including UV-visible and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy were used to characterize the synthesized CuNPs. CuNP treatments at 100 ng ml(-1) resulted in a 94, 89 and 92% reduction in biofilm, cell surface hydrophobicity and exopolysaccharides respectively, without bactericidal activity. Evidence of biofilm inhibition was also seen with light and confocal microscope analysis. This study highlights the anti-biofilm potential of CuNPs, which could be utilized as coating agents on surgical devices and medical implants to manage biofilm associated infections.

  12. Isolation Frequency Characteristics of Candida Species from Clinical Specimens.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ga-Yeon; Jeon, Jae-Sik; Kim, Jae Kyung

    2016-06-01

    Candida spp. is an invasive infectious fungus, a major risk factor that can increase morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients. In this study, 2,508 Candida spp. were isolated from various clinical specimens collected from university hospitals from July 2011 to October 2014. They were identified in order to determine isolation frequencies and characteristics by specimen, gender, age group, year, season, and month. The strain-specific isolation rate of Candida spp. is in the order of Candida albicans (1,218 strains, 48.56%), Candida glabrata (416 strains, 16.59%), Candida utilis (305 strains, 12.16%), Candida tropicalis (304 strains, 12.12%), and Candida parapsilosis (116 strains, 4.63%) and these five species accounted for more than 94% of the total strains. Of the specimens, Candida spp. were most frequently isolated from urine-catheter, followed by urine-voided, blood, sputum, other, open pus, vaginal discharge, Tip, ear discharge, bronchial aspiration and bile, in that order. Looking at the age distribution, the detection rate of patients in their 60s and older was significantly higher at 75.8% (1,900/2,508). The detection rate of patients in their 20s and younger was shown to be very low at 2.55% (64/2,508). By year, the detection rate of non-albicans Candida spp. showed a tendency to gradually increase each year compared with C. albicans. As isolation of Candida spp. from clinical samples at the specie level can vary depending on characteristics of the patient, sample, season, etc., continual studies are required.

  13. Efficacy and safety of liposomal clarithromycin and its effect on Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence factors.

    PubMed

    Alhajlan, Mai; Alhariri, Moayad; Omri, Abdelwahab

    2013-06-01

    We investigated the efficacy and safety of liposomal clarithromycin formulations with different surface charges against clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from the lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. The liposomal clarithromycin formulations were prepared by the dehydration-rehydration method, and their sizes were measured using the dynamic-light-scattering technique. Encapsulation efficiency was determined by microbiological assay, and the stabilities of the formulations in biological fluid were evaluated for a period of 48 h. The MICs and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) of free and liposomal formulations were determined with P. aeruginosa strains isolated from CF patients. Liposomal clarithromycin activity against biofilm-forming P. aeruginosa was compared to that of free antibiotic using the Calgary Biofilm Device (CBD). The effects of subinhibitory concentrations of free and liposomal clarithromycin on bacterial virulence factors and motility on agar were investigated on clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa. The cytotoxicities of the liposome preparations and free drug were evaluated on a pulmonary epithelial cell line (A549). The average diameter of the formulations was >222 nm, with encapsulation efficiencies ranging from 5.7% to 30.4%. The liposomes retained more than 70% of their drug content during the 48-h time period. The highly resistant strains of P. aeruginosa became susceptible to liposome-encapsulated clarithromycin (MIC, 256 mg/liter versus 8 mg/liter; P < 0.001). Liposomal clarithromycin reduced the bacterial growth within the biofilm by 3 to 4 log units (P < 0.001), significantly attenuated virulence factor production, and reduced bacterial twitching, swarming, and swimming motilities. The clarithromycin-entrapped liposomes were less cytotoxic than the free drug (P < 0.001). These data indicate that our novel formulations could be a useful strategy to enhance the efficacy of clarithromycin against resistant P. aeruginosa

  14. Combination of hypothiocyanite and lactoferrin (ALX-109) enhances the ability of tobramycin and aztreonam to eliminate Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms growing on cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Moreau-Marquis, Sophie; Coutermarsh, Bonita; Stanton, Bruce A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Chelating iron may be a promising new therapy to eliminate Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in the lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Here, we investigate whether ALX-109 [a defined combination of an investigational drug containing lactoferrin (an iron-binding glycoprotein) and hypothiocyanite (a bactericidal agent)], alone and in combination with tobramycin or aztreonam, reduces P. aeruginosa biofilms grown on human CF airway epithelial cells. Methods P. aeruginosa (PAO1 and six clinical isolates of Pseudomonas) biofilms grown at the apical surface of confluent monolayers of CF airway epithelial cells were treated with ALX-109, either alone or in combination with tobramycin or aztreonam. Bacterial cfu remaining after treatment were determined by plate counting. Results ALX-109 alone reduced PAO1 biofilm formation, but had no effect on established biofilms. ALX-109 enhanced the ability of tobramycin and aztreonam to inhibit PAO1 biofilm formation and to reduce established PAO1 biofilms. ALX-109 and tobramycin were additive in disrupting established biofilms formed by six clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa obtained from the sputum of CF patients. Mucoid P. aeruginosa isolates were most susceptible to the combination of ALX-109 and tobramycin. In addition, ALX-109 also enhanced the ability of aztreonam to reduce established PAO1 biofilms. Conclusions Inhalation therapy combining hypothiocyanite and lactoferrin with TOBI® (tobramycin) or Cayston® (aztreonam) may be beneficial to CF patients by decreasing the airway bacterial burden of P. aeruginosa. PMID:25213272

  15. Resistance trends among clinical isolates in China reported from CHINET surveillance of bacterial resistance, 2005-2014.

    PubMed

    Hu, F-P; Guo, Y; Zhu, D-M; Wang, F; Jiang, X-F; Xu, Y-C; Zhang, X-J; Zhang, C-X; Ji, P; Xie, Y; Kang, M; Wang, C-Q; Wang, A-M; Xu, Y-H; Shen, J-L; Sun, Z-Y; Chen, Z-J; Ni, Y-X; Sun, J-Y; Chu, Y-Z; Tian, S-F; Hu, Z-D; Li, J; Yu, Y-S; Lin, J; Shan, B; Du, Y; Han, Y; Guo, S; Wei, L-H; Wu, L; Zhang, H; Kong, J; Hu, Y-J; Ai, X-M; Zhuo, C; Su, D-H; Yang, Q; Jia, B; Huang, W

    2016-03-01

    With the aim of gathering temporal trends on bacterial epidemiology and resistance from multiple laboratories in China, the CHINET surveillance system was organized in 2005. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was carried out according to a unified protocol using the Kirby-Bauer method or automated systems. Results were analyzed according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) 2014 definitions. Between 2005 and 2014, the number of bacterial isolates ranged between 22,774 and 84,572 annually. Rates of extended-spectrum β-lactamase production among Escherichia coli isolates were stable, between 51.7 and 55.8%. Resistance of E. coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae to amikacin, ciprofloxacin, piperacillin/tazobactam and cefoperazone/sulbactam decreased with time. Carbapenem resistance among K. pneumoniae isolates increased from 2.4 to 13.4%. Resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains against all of antimicrobial agents tested including imipenem and meropenem decreased with time. On the contrary, resistance of Acinetobacter baumannii strains to carbapenems increased from 31 to 66.7%. A marked decrease of methicillin resistance from 69% in 2005 to 44.6% in 2014 was observed for Staphylococcus aureus. Carbapenem resistance rates in K. pneumoniae and A. baumannii in China are high. Our results indicate the importance of bacterial surveillance studies.

  16. Structural characterization and surface activities of biogenic rhamnolipid surfactants from Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolate MN1 and synergistic effects against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Samadi, Nasrin; Abadian, Neda; Ahmadkhaniha, Reza; Amini, Farzaneh; Dalili, Dina; Rastkari, Noushin; Safaripour, Eliyeh; Mohseni, Farzaneh Aziz

    2012-11-01

    The aim of present work was to study chemical structures and biological activities of rhamnolipid biosurfactants produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa MN1 isolated from oil-contaminated soil. The results of liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis revealed that total rhamnolipids (RLs) contained 16 rhamnolipid homologues. Di-lipid RLs containing C(10)-C(10) moieties were by far the most predominant congeners among mono-rhamnose (53.29 %) and di-rhamnose (23.52 %) homologues. Mono-rhamnolipids form 68.35 % of the total congeners in the RLs. Two major fractions were revealed in the thin layer chromatogram of produced RLs which were then purified by column chromatography. The retardation factors (R (f)) of the two rhamnolipid purple spots were 0.71 for RL1 and 0.46 for RL2. LC-MS/MS analysis proved that RL1 was composed of mono-RLs and RL2 consisted of di-RLs. RL1 was more surface-active with the critical micelle concentration (CMC) value of 15 mg/L and the surface tension of 25 mN/m at CMC. The results of biological assay showed that RL1 is a more potent antibacterial agent than RL2. All methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains were inhibited by RLs that were independent of their antibiotic susceptibility patterns. RLs remarkably enhanced the activity of oxacillin against MRSA strains and lowered the minimum inhibitory concentrations of oxacillin to the range of 3.12-6.25 μg/mL. PMID:22644668

  17. A study of the efficiency of edible oils degraded in alkaline conditions by Pseudomonas aeruginosa SS-219 and Acinetobacter sp. SS-192 bacteria isolated from Japanese soil.

    PubMed

    Sugimori, Daisuke; Utsue, Tomohiro

    2012-03-01

    High lipid concentration contained in wastewater inhibits the activity of microorganisms in biological wastewater treatment systems such as activated sludge and methane fermentation. To reduce the inhibitory effects, microorganisms capable of efficiently degrading edible oils were screened from various environmental sources. From Japanese soil, we isolated 2 bacteria strains with high degradation abilities at an alkaline pH without consumption of biological oxygen demand (BOD) constituents. Acinetobacter sp. strain SS-192 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain SS-219 degraded 77.5 ± 0.6% and 89.5 ± 1.5%, respectively, of 3,000 ppm of mixed oil consisting of salad oil/lard/beef tallow (1/1/1, w/w/w) at 37°C and pH 9.0 in 24 h. Efficient degradation by the two strains occurred at pH 8-9 and 25-40°C. Strain SS-219 degraded lipids even at pH 3. The degradation rate of 3,000 ppm of salad oil, lard, and beef tallow by strain SS-192 was 79.9 ± 2.6%, 63.6 ± 1.9%, and 70.1 ± 1.2%, respectively, during a 24-h cultivation. The degradation rate of 3,000 ppm of salad oil, lard, and beef tallow by strain SS-219 was 82.3 ± 2.1%, 71.9 ± 2.2%, and 71.0 ± 1.1%, respectively, during a 24-h cultivation. After mixed oil degradation by both strains, the BOD value of the cell culture increased from 2,100 ppm to 3,200-4,000 ppm. The fact that neither strain utilizes BOD ingredients will be beneficial to pretreatment of methane fermentation systems such as upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactors. In addition, the growth of usual heterotrophic microorganisms utilizing soluble BOD can be suppressed under alkaline pH. PMID:22805803

  18. Complete sequence of pOZ176, a 500-kilobase IncP-2 plasmid encoding IMP-9-mediated carbapenem resistance, from outbreak isolate Pseudomonas aeruginosa 96.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Jianhui; Alexander, David C; Ma, Jennifer H; Déraspe, Maxime; Low, Donald E; Jamieson, Frances B; Roy, Paul H

    2013-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa 96 (PA96) was isolated during a multicenter surveillance study in Guangzhou, China, in 2000. Whole-genome sequencing of this outbreak strain facilitated analysis of its IncP-2 carbapenem-resistant plasmid, pOZ176. The plasmid had a length of 500,839 bp and an average percent G+C content of 57%. Of the 618 predicted open reading frames, 65% encode hypothetical proteins. The pOZ176 backbone is not closely related to any plasmids thus far sequenced, but some similarity to pQBR103 of Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25 was observed. Two multiresistant class 1 integrons and several insertion sequences were identified. The blaIMP-9-carrying integron contained aacA4 → bla(IMP-9) → aacA4, flanked upstream by Tn21 tnpMRA and downstream by a complete tni operon of Tn402 and a mer module, named Tn6016. The second integron carried aacA4 → catB8a → bla(OXA-10) and was flanked by Tn1403-like tnpRA and a sul1-type 3' conserved sequence (3'-CS), named Tn6217. Other features include three resistance genes similar to those of Tn5, a tellurite resistance operon, and two pil operons. The replication and maintenance systems exhibit similarity to a genomic island of Ralstonia solanacearum GM1000. Codon usage analysis suggests the recent acquisition of bla(IMP-9). The origins of the integrons on pOZ176 indicated separate horizontal gene transfer events driven by antibiotic selection. The novel mosaic structure of pOZ176 suggests that it is derived from environmental bacteria.

  19. Risk factors for mortality in patients with bloodstream infections caused by carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa: clinical impact of bacterial virulence and strains on outcome.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Su Jin; Yoon, Sang Sun; Bae, Il Kwon; Jeong, Seok Hoon; Kim, June Myung; Lee, Kyungwon

    2014-10-01

    The incidence of carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (CRPA) bacteremia has increased in recent years, and infections caused by CRPA result in higher mortality than those caused by susceptible strains. This study was performed to evaluate the risk factors for mortality and to study the impact of virulence factors and bacterial strains on clinical outcomes in patients with CRPA bacteremia. Data on 63 episodes of CRPA bacteremia that have occurred between January 1, 2007, and December 31, 2009, in a teaching hospital (2000 beds) in Seoul, Korea, were analyzed. The Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) score at the time of CRPA bacteremia and the capacity of CRPA to form biofilm were independent predictive factors for mortality in patients with CRPA bacteremia. In addition, the biofilm-forming ability and elastase activity of strains were correlated with APACHE II scores to measure the severity of disease and estimate predicted mortality in the patients.

  20. Flavimonas oryzihabitans bacteremia: clinical features and microbiological characteristics of isolates.

    PubMed

    Lin, R D; Hsueh, P R; Chang, J C; Teng, L J; Chang, S C; Ho, S W; Hsieh, W C; Luh, K T

    1997-05-01

    Flavimonas oryzihabitans is rarely reported as a pathogen in humans. Twelve cases of F. oryzihabitans bacteremia were diagnosed at National Taiwan University Hospital over a 3-year period. The clinical features of these patients were analyzed, and antimicrobial susceptibilities and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) patterns of the 12 isolates were studied. Among these 12 patients, eight (67%) had underlying neoplastic diseases and all acquired F. oryzihabitans bacteremia while hospitalized. The clinical syndromes included primary bacteremia in 5 patients (42%), biliary tract infection in 3 (25%), and peritonitis, subdural empyema, infusion-related bacteremia, and pneumonia in 1 each. Polymicrobial bacteremia or concomitant fungemia was seen in three patients (25%). All the patients survived after antibiotic treatment. All isolates were susceptible to piperacillin, third-generation cephalosporins, aminoglycosides, and quinolones but resistant to cephalothin, cefuroxime, and trimethoprim. Susceptibility to aztreonam was variable (25%). The RAPD patterns differed among the isolates, indicating the epidemiological unrelatedness of these infections. F. oryzihabitans should be included as an etiology of severe nosocomial infection in patients with underlying debilitating diseases.

  1. Flavimonas oryzihabitans bacteremia: clinical features and microbiological characteristics of isolates.

    PubMed

    Lin, R D; Hsueh, P R; Chang, J C; Teng, L J; Chang, S C; Ho, S W; Hsieh, W C; Luh, K T

    1997-05-01

    Flavimonas oryzihabitans is rarely reported as a pathogen in humans. Twelve cases of F. oryzihabitans bacteremia were diagnosed at National Taiwan University Hospital over a 3-year period. The clinical features of these patients were analyzed, and antimicrobial susceptibilities and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) patterns of the 12 isolates were studied. Among these 12 patients, eight (67%) had underlying neoplastic diseases and all acquired F. oryzihabitans bacteremia while hospitalized. The clinical syndromes included primary bacteremia in 5 patients (42%), biliary tract infection in 3 (25%), and peritonitis, subdural empyema, infusion-related bacteremia, and pneumonia in 1 each. Polymicrobial bacteremia or concomitant fungemia was seen in three patients (25%). All the patients survived after antibiotic treatment. All isolates were susceptible to piperacillin, third-generation cephalosporins, aminoglycosides, and quinolones but resistant to cephalothin, cefuroxime, and trimethoprim. Susceptibility to aztreonam was variable (25%). The RAPD patterns differed among the isolates, indicating the epidemiological unrelatedness of these infections. F. oryzihabitans should be included as an etiology of severe nosocomial infection in patients with underlying debilitating diseases. PMID:9142784

  2. Chemical analysis, inhibition of biofilm formation and biofilm eradication potential of Euphorbia hirta L. against clinical isolates and standard strains

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The frequent occurrences of antibiotic-resistant biofilm forming pathogens have become global issue since various measures that had been taken to curb the situation led to failure. Euphorbia hirta, is a well-known ethnomedicinal plant of Malaysia with diverse biological activities. This plant has been used widely in traditional medicine for the treatment of gastrointestinal, bronchial and respiratory ailments caused by infectious agents. Methods In the present study, chemical compositions of methanol extract of E. hirta L. aerial part was analyzed by gas chromatography and gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. A relevant in vitro model was developed to assess the potency of the E. hirta extract to inhibit the bacterial biofilm formation as well as to eradicate the established biofilms. Besides biofilm, E. hirta extract was also evaluated for the inhibition efficacy on planktonic cells using tetrazolium microplate assay. For these purposes, a panel of clinically resistant pathogens and American type culture collection (ATCC) strains were used. Results The methanolic extract of aerial part of E. hirta was predominantly composed of terpenoid (60.5%) which is often regarded as an active entity accountable for the membrane destruction and biofilm cell detachment. The highest antibacterial effect of crude E. hirta extract was observed in the clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) value of 0.062 mg/ml. The extract also displayed potent biofilm inhibition and eradication activity against P. aeruginosa with minimum biofilm inhibition concentration (MBIC) and minimum biofilm eradication concentration (MBEC) values of 0.25 mg/ml and 0.5 mg/ml, respectively. Conclusions The crude methanol extract of E. hirta has proven to have interesting and potential anti-biofilm properties. The findings from this study will also help to establish a very promising anti-infective phytotherapeutical to be exploited in

  3. Pyoverdine and Proteases Affect the Response of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to Gallium in Human Serum

    PubMed Central

    Bonchi, Carlo; Frangipani, Emanuela; Imperi, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Gallium is an iron mimetic which has recently been repurposed as an antibacterial agent due to its capability to disrupt bacterial iron metabolism. In this study, the antibacterial activity of gallium nitrate [Ga(NO3)3] was investigated in complement-free human serum (HS) on 55 Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates from cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis patients. The susceptibility of P. aeruginosa to Ga(NO3)3 in HS was dependent on the bacterial ability to acquire iron from serum binding proteins (i.e., transferrin). The extent of serum protein degradation correlated well with P. aeruginosa growth in HS, while pyoverdine production did not. However, pyoverdine-deficient P. aeruginosa strains were unable to grow in HS and overcome iron restriction, albeit capable of releasing proteases. Predigestion of HS with proteinase K promoted the growth of all strains, irrespective of their ability to produce proteases and/or pyoverdine. The MICs of Ga(NO3)3 were higher in HS than in an iron-poor Casamino Acids medium, where proteolysis does not affect iron availability. Coherently, strains displaying high proteolytic activity were less susceptible to Ga(NO3)3 in HS. Our data support a model in which both pyoverdine and proteases affect the response of P. aeruginosa to Ga(NO3)3 in HS. The relatively high Ga(NO3)3 concentration required to inhibit the growth of highly proteolytic P. aeruginosa isolates in HS poses a limitation to the potential of Ga(NO3)3 in the treatment of P. aeruginosa bloodstream infections. PMID:26149986

  4. Pyoverdine and proteases affect the response of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to gallium in human serum.

    PubMed

    Bonchi, Carlo; Frangipani, Emanuela; Imperi, Francesco; Visca, Paolo

    2015-09-01

    Gallium is an iron mimetic which has recently been repurposed as an antibacterial agent due to its capability to disrupt bacterial iron metabolism. In this study, the antibacterial activity of gallium nitrate [Ga(NO3)3] was investigated in complement-free human serum (HS) on 55 Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates from cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis patients. The susceptibility of P. aeruginosa to Ga(NO3)3 in HS was dependent on the bacterial ability to acquire iron from serum binding proteins (i.e., transferrin). The extent of serum protein degradation correlated well with P. aeruginosa growth in HS, while pyoverdine production did not. However, pyoverdine-deficient P. aeruginosa strains were unable to grow in HS and overcome iron restriction, albeit capable of releasing proteases. Predigestion of HS with proteinase K promoted the growth of all strains, irrespective of their ability to produce proteases and/or pyoverdine. The MICs of Ga(NO3)3 were higher in HS than in an iron-poor Casamino Acids medium, where proteolysis does not affect iron availability. Coherently, strains displaying high proteolytic activity were less susceptible to Ga(NO3)3 in HS. Our data support a model in which both pyoverdine and proteases affect the response of P. aeruginosa to Ga(NO3)3 in HS. The relatively high Ga(NO3)3 concentration required to inhibit the growth of highly proteolytic P. aeruginosa isolates in HS poses a limitation to the potential of Ga(NO3)3 in the treatment of P. aeruginosa bloodstream infections.

  5. Pyoverdine and proteases affect the response of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to gallium in human serum.

    PubMed

    Bonchi, Carlo; Frangipani, Emanuela; Imperi, Francesco; Visca, Paolo

    2015-09-01

    Gallium is an iron mimetic which has recently been repurposed as an antibacterial agent due to its capability to disrupt bacterial iron metabolism. In this study, the antibacterial activity of gallium nitrate [Ga(NO3)3] was investigated in complement-free human serum (HS) on 55 Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates from cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis patients. The susceptibility of P. aeruginosa to Ga(NO3)3 in HS was dependent on the bacterial ability to acquire iron from serum binding proteins (i.e., transferrin). The extent of serum protein degradation correlated well with P. aeruginosa growth in HS, while pyoverdine production did not. However, pyoverdine-deficient P. aeruginosa strains were unable to grow in HS and overcome iron restriction, albeit capable of releasing proteases. Predigestion of HS with proteinase K promoted the growth of all strains, irrespective of their ability to produce proteases and/or pyoverdine. The MICs of Ga(NO3)3 were higher in HS than in an iron-poor Casamino Acids medium, where proteolysis does not affect iron availability. Coherently, strains displaying high proteolytic activity were less susceptible to Ga(NO3)3 in HS. Our data support a model in which both pyoverdine and proteases affect the response of P. aeruginosa to Ga(NO3)3 in HS. The relatively high Ga(NO3)3 concentration required to inhibit the growth of highly proteolytic P. aeruginosa isolates in HS poses a limitation to the potential of Ga(NO3)3 in the treatment of P. aeruginosa bloodstream infections. PMID:26149986

  6. ESBL and MBL in Cefepime Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa: An Update from a Rural Area in Northern India

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Debasis; Kakati, Barnali; Singh, Malvika

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cefepime, a fourth generation cephalosporin, is widely used for the empirical treatment of serious infections in critically ill hospitalized patients. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa), one of the commonest bacteria causing nosocomial infections has a propensity to develop antibiotic resistance quite promptly. Aim We undertook this study to assess the efficacy of cefepime against current clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa and to study existence of different beta-lactamase enzymes among cefepime resistant P. aeruginosa isolates. Materials and Methods Total of 618 isolates of P. aeruginosa recovered consecutively from various clinical samples of a tertiary care hospital were analysed. Their Antimicrobial sensitivity profile against piperacilin (100μg), piperacillin/tazobactam (100μg/10μg), ceftazidime (30μg), cefoperazone (75μg), cefepime (30μg), ciprofloxacin (5μg), gentamycin (10μg), amikacin (30μg) and imipenem (10μg) (Himedia) was tested by Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method (Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines). We further looked for ESBL, MBL and ESBL + MBL co producers among the cefepime resistant isolates by two different methods (combined double disc synergy test, imipenem-EDTA combined disc test and vitek2). Results Among 618 consecutive clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa, we observed resistance to cefepime in 457 (74%) isolates. We observed resistance to ciprofloxacin (n=506, 82%) in maximum number of isolates followed by that to Gentamycin (n=475, 77%), amikacin (n=366, 60%), and cefoperazone (n=350, 56.6%). Among all our cefepime resistant P. aeruginosa isolates only 27(6%) were ESBL producers, 18(4%) MBL producers and 2(0.4%) were ESBL+ MBL co-producers. All the ESBL and MBL isolates were also tested by VITEK 2 advanced expert system (bioMırieux Vitek Systems Inc, Hazelwood, MO, France) which revealed a 100% concordance with the phenotypic method tested. Conclusion This paper highlights the need to

  7. Isolation and characterization of two genes, waaC (rfaC) and waaF (rfaF), involved in Pseudomonas aeruginosa serotype O5 inner-core biosynthesis.

    PubMed Central

    de Kievit, T R; Lam, J S

    1997-01-01

    Recent studies have provided evidence to implicate involvement of the core oligosaccharide region of Pseudomonas aeruginosa lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in adherence to host tissues. To better understand the role played by LPS in the virulence of this organism, the aim of the present study was to clone and characterize genes involved in core biosynthesis. The inner-core regions of P. aeruginosa and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium are structurally very similar; both contain two main chain residues of heptose linked to lipid A-Kdo2 (Kdo is 3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonic acid). By electrotransforming a P. aeruginosa PAO1 library into Salmonella waaC and waaF (formerly known as rfaC and rfaF, respectively) mutants, we were able to isolate the homologous heptosyltransferase I and II genes of P. aeruginosa. Two plasmids, pCOREc1 and pCOREc2, which restored smooth LPS production in the waaC mutant, were isolated. Similarly, plasmid pCOREf1 was able to complement the Salmonella waaF mutant. Sequence analysis of the DNA insert of pCOREc2 revealed one open reading frame (ORF) which could code for a protein of 39.8 kDa. The amino acid sequence of the deduced protein exhibited 53% identity with the sequence of the WaaC protein of S. enterica serovar Typhimurium. pCOREf1 contained one ORF capable of encoding a 38.4-kDa protein. The sequence of the predicted protein was 49% identical to the sequence of the Salmonella WaaF protein. Protein expression by the Maxicell system confirmed that a 40-kDa protein was encoded by pCOREc2 and a 38-kDa protein was encoded by pCOREf1. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis was used to determine the map locations of the cloned waaC and waaF genes, which were found to lie between 0.9 and 6.6 min on the PAO1 chromosome. Using a gene-replacement strategy, we attempted to generate P. aeruginosa waaC and waaF null mutants. Despite multiple attempts to isolate true knockout mutants, all transconjugants were identified as merodiploids. PMID:9171387

  8. Nationwide Investigation of Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamases, Metallo-β-Lactamases, and Extended-Spectrum Oxacillinases Produced by Ceftazidime-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strains in France ▿

    PubMed Central

    Hocquet, Didier; Plésiat, Patrick; Dehecq, Barbara; Mariotte, Pierre; Talon, Daniel; Bertrand, Xavier

    2010-01-01

    A nationwide study aimed to identify the extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs), metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs), and extended-spectrum oxacillinases (ES-OXAs) in a French collection of 140 clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates highly resistant to ceftazidime. Six ESBLs (PER-1, n = 3; SHV-2a, n = 2; VEB-1a, n = 1), four MBLs (VIM-2, n = 3; IMP-18, n = 1), and five ES-OXAs (OXA-19, n = 4; OXA-28, n = 1) were identified in 13 isolates (9.3% of the collection). The prevalence of these enzymes is still low in French clinical P. aeruginosa isolates but deserves to be closely monitored. PMID:20547814

  9. Combined Biochemical and Serological Typing of Clinical Isolates of Klebsiella

    PubMed Central

    Rennie, R. P.; Duncan, I. B. R.

    1974-01-01

    In a series of 640 strains of Klebsiella isolated from clinical specimens over a 7-month period, there were sufficient biochemical differences between strains to allow a biochemical typing system to be established. Biochemical tests were done in solid media inoculated with a modified Steers inocula replicator. Biotypes were designated by a numerical coding system; 29 distinct biotypes were found among the 640 strains of Klebsiella. Serotyping of 270 of the strains was done by the Quellung reaction, and 40 capsular types were identified. Numerical biotypes and serotypes of strains appeared to vary independently. When used in conjunction, the two methods subdivided the strains into many more distinct types than either used alone. With the combined method over 100 types of Klebsiella were distinguished among the 270 isolates. PMID:4608362

  10. [Taxonomic study of clinic isolates of Trichophyton in Rosario, Argentina].

    PubMed

    Tartabini, Mirta L; Bonino, Guillermo S; Racca, Liliana; Luque, Alicia G

    2013-01-01

    Due to the pleomorphism and cultural variability displayed by species of the genus Trichophyton, the identification methods based solely on morphological features are usually insufficient for their classification. The goal of the present work was to test a set of phenotypic methods in order to identify fungal isolates that belong to the aforementioned genus. These methods were based on a molecular taxonomic technique used as standard. Clinical isolates (56) were used as samples along with 6 reference strains. Macro and micromorphological studies were performed as well as biochemical and physiological tests such as in vitro hair perforation, nutritional requirements in Trichophyton agar media, urease production and growth on bromocresol purple-milk. solids-glucose (BCP-MS-G) agar. Additionally, PCR fingerprinting using the (GACA)4 primer was employed. As a result of the PCR method, specific profiles were observed for Microsporum canis, Epidermophyton floccosum, Trichophyton rubrum and Trichophyton interdigitale. Identical profiles were obtained for Arthroderma benhamiae y Trichophyton erinacei. Of the total number of clinical isolates, 39 matched the T. rubrum profile while 13 corresponded to A. benhamiae and 4 to T. interdigitale. The most useful phenotypic test to differentiate between T. rubrum and T. mentagrophytes complex strains was alkalinization of the BCP-MS-G medium. Phenotypic tests did not allow differentiation among the T. mentagrophytes complex species. On the other hand, the molecular technique allowed characterization of T. rubrum isolates as well as of those observed in our study and included in the T. mentagrophytes complex: T. interdigitale and Trichophyton sp., the anamorph of A. benhamiae.

  11. Evolutionary genomics of epidemic and nonepidemic strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Dettman, Jeremy R.; Rodrigue, Nicolas; Aaron, Shawn D.; Kassen, Rees

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen of humans and is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Prolonged infection of the respiratory tract can lead to adaptation of the pathogen to the CF lung environment. To examine the general patterns of adaptation associated with chronic infection, we obtained genome sequences from a collection of P. aeruginosa isolated from airways of patients with CF. Our analyses support a nonclonal epidemic population structure, with a background of unique, recombining genotypes, and the rare occurrence of successful epidemic clones. We present unique genome sequence evidence for the intercontinental spread of an epidemic strain shared between CF clinics in the United Kingdom and North America. Analyses of core and accessory genomes identified candidate genes and important functional pathways associated with adaptive evolution. Many genes of interest were involved in biological functions with obvious roles in this pathosystem, such as biofilm formation, antibiotic metabolism, pathogenesis, transport, reduction/oxidation, and secretion. Key factors driving the adaptive evolution of this pathogen within the host appear to be the presence of oxidative stressors and antibiotics. Regions of the accessory genome unique to the epidemic strain were enriched for genes in transporter families that efflux heavy metals and antibiotics. The epidemic strain was significantly more resistant than nonepidemic strains to three different antibiotics. Multiple lines of evidence suggest that selection imposed by the CF lung environment has a major influence on genomic evolution and the genetic characteristics of P. aeruginosa isolates causing contemporary infection. PMID:24324153

  12. In vitro antibacterial potency of Butea monosperma Lam. against 12 clinically isolated multidrug resistant bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Mahesh Chandra; Padhy, Rabindra Nath

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the antibacterial activity, using cold and hot extraction procedures with five solvents, petroleum ether, acetone, ethanol, methanol and water to validate medicinal uses of Butea monosperma Lam (B. monosperma) in controlling infections; and to qualitatively estimate phytochemical constituents of leaf-extracts of the plant. Methods The antibacterial activity of leaf-extracts was evaluated by the agar-well diffusion method against clinically isolated 12 Gram-positive and -negative multidrug resistant (MDR) pathogenic bacteria in vitro. Values of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of leaf-extracts against each bacterium were obtained in a 96-well micro-titre plate, by broth dilution micro-titre plate technique. Results The presence of tannins, flavonoids, starch, glycosides and carbohydrates in different leaf extracts was established. Pathogenic bacteria used were, Acinetobacter sp., Chromobacterium violaceum, Citrobacter freundii, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhi, Shigella sp., Enterococcus sp., Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), methicillin resistant S. aureus and vancomycin resistant S. aureus, along with standard bacterial strains. These MDR bacteria had been recorded to have significant inhibitions by leaf extracts, obtained by cold and hot extraction procedures with five solvents. In addition, the hot aqueous extract against Enterococcus sp. had the highest inhibition zone-size (21 mm). Ciprofloxacin 30 µg/disc was the positive/reference control and the diluting solvent, 10% dimethyl sulphoxide was the negative control. Recorded MIC values of different extracts ranged between 0.23 and 13.30 mg/mL, and MBC values were 0.52 to 30.00 mg/mL, for these bacteria. Conclusions Leaf-extracts with hot water and ethanol had shown significant antibacterial activity against all bacteria. B. monosperma leaf-extract could be used in treating infectious

  13. Zingerone silences quorum sensing and attenuates virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Lokender; Chhibber, Sanjay; Kumar, Rajnish; Kumar, Manoj; Harjai, Kusum

    2015-04-01

    Quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa plays an imperative role in virulence factor, biofilm formation and antimicrobial resistance. Blocking quorum sensing pathways are viewed as viable anti-virulent therapy in association with traditional antimicrobial therapy. Anti-quorum sensing dietary phytochemicals with may prove to be a safe and viable choice as anti-virulent drug candidates. Previously, our lab proved zingerone as potent anti-biofilm agent hence; further its anti-virulent and anti-quorum activities were evaluated. Zingerone, besides decreasing swimming, swarming and twitching phenotypes of P. aeruginosa PAO1, reduced biofilm forming capacity and production of virulence factors including rhamnolipid, elastase, protease, pyocyanin, cell free and cell bound hemolysin (p<0.001) indicating anti-virulent property attributing towards attenuation of virulence of P. aeruginosa. Further zingerone not only had marked effect on the production of quorum sensing signal molecules by clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa but also showed significant interference with the activation of QS reporter strains. To study the mechanism of blocking quorum sensing cascade, in silico analysis was carried out. Anti-QS activity was attributed to interference with the ligand receptor interaction of zingerone with QS receptors (TraR, LasR, RhlR and PqsR). Zingerone showed a good comparative docking score to respective autoinducer molecules which was even higher than that of vanillin, a proven anti-quorum sensing phytochemical. The results of the present study revealed the anti-quorum sensing activity of zingerone targeting ligand-receptor interaction, hence proposing zingerone as a suitable anti-virulent drug candidate against P. aeruginosa infections. PMID:25704369

  14. Zingerone silences quorum sensing and attenuates virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Lokender; Chhibber, Sanjay; Kumar, Rajnish; Kumar, Manoj; Harjai, Kusum

    2015-04-01

    Quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa plays an imperative role in virulence factor, biofilm formation and antimicrobial resistance. Blocking quorum sensing pathways are viewed as viable anti-virulent therapy in association with traditional antimicrobial therapy. Anti-quorum sensing dietary phytochemicals with may prove to be a safe and viable choice as anti-virulent drug candidates. Previously, our lab proved zingerone as potent anti-biofilm agent hence; further its anti-virulent and anti-quorum activities were evaluated. Zingerone, besides decreasing swimming, swarming and twitching phenotypes of P. aeruginosa PAO1, reduced biofilm forming capacity and production of virulence factors including rhamnolipid, elastase, protease, pyocyanin, cell free and cell bound hemolysin (p<0.001) indicating anti-virulent property attributing towards attenuation of virulence of P. aeruginosa. Further zingerone not only had marked effect on the production of quorum sensing signal molecules by clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa but also showed significant interference with the activation of QS reporter strains. To study the mechanism of blocking quorum sensing cascade, in silico analysis was carried out. Anti-QS activity was attributed to interference with the ligand receptor interaction of zingerone with QS receptors (TraR, LasR, RhlR and PqsR). Zingerone showed a good comparative docking score to respective autoinducer molecules which was even higher than that of vanillin, a proven anti-quorum sensing phytochemical. The results of the present study revealed the anti-quorum sensing activity of zingerone targeting ligand-receptor interaction, hence proposing zingerone as a suitable anti-virulent drug candidate against P. aeruginosa infections.

  15. Acute isolated capsular stroke. A clinical study of 148 cases.

    PubMed

    Arboix, Adrià; Martínez-Rebollar, María; Oliveres, Montserrat; García-Eroles, Luis; Massons, Joan; Targa, Cecilia

    2005-02-01

    The objectives of the study were to assess differential features between capsular stroke of ischemic and hemorrhagic origin, and to compare capsular strokes with all other (non-capsular) strokes. Data of 148 patients with isolated capsular stroke were collected from a prospective hospital-based stroke registry in which 2000 consecutive acute stroke patients were included. Isolated capsular stroke accounted for 8.4% of strokes included in the registry (8.4% of ischemic strokes and 10.5% of intracerebral hemorrhages). Capsular stroke of hemorrhagic origin (n = 24) was more severe than ischemic capsular stroke (n = 124) as determined by a significantly higher in-hospital mortality, length of stay, and lower number of patients free of functional deficit at discharge. After multivariate analysis, limb weakness, sudden onset, and sensory symptoms were independently associated with capsular hemorrhage, whereas pure motor hemiparesis appeared to be associated with capsular infarction. In summary, one of each 12 patients with acute ischemic stroke and one of each 10 patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhage had an isolated capsular stroke. Lacunar syndrome was the most frequent clinical presentation being more common (particularly pure motor hemiparesis) in ischemic than in hemorrhagic capsular stroke. Capsular hemorrhage and capsular infarction showed identical risk factor profiles suggesting the same underlying vascular pathology for both conditions.

  16. Relation between Resistance to Antipseudomonal β-Lactams and ampC and mexC Genes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Rezaei, Fatemeh; Saderi, Horieh; Boroumandi, Shahrsam; Faghihzadeh, Soghrat

    2016-01-01

    Background: In order to select a better antibiotic choice for treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections, this study was conducted to determine the frequency of resistance to some antipseudomonal β-lactams in P. aeruginosa isolates from patients in Tehran, Iran. In addition, the relation between presence of genes known to be responsible for resistance to β-lactams (ampC, mexC1,2, and mexC3,4 genes) and resistance phenotype among P. aeroginosa isolates was evaluated. Methods: P. aeruginosa strains were isolated and identified by routine methods and PCR for oprL gene. Disk diffusion method was employed to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility pattern according to CLSI recommendations. PCR was used to detect the resistance genes. Results: Among 100 isolates of P. aeruginosa, 82% had ampC, 86% mexC1,2 and 89% mexC3,4 genes and combinations of these genes were seen in most of isolates and only 3% of isolates had none of these genes. Resistance to mezlocillin, cefepime, ceftazidime and piperacillin/ tazobactam was seen in 46%, 41%, 36% and 29% of isolates, respectively. Significant relation (P value ≤0.05 by Chi-square or Fisher Exact test) was observed between the presence of ampC gene and resistance to all the studied β-lactams in this study. No relation was observed for mexC genes, although many of isolates containing these two genes were phenotypically resistant. Discussion: This study had shown for the first time, the presence of ampC and mexC genes in significant percent of clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa in Tehran, Iran, and relation between presence of ampC gene and resistance to β-lactams. PMID:26870143

  17. Investigation of biofilm formation in clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Cassat, James E; Smeltzer, Mark S; Lee, Chia Y

    2014-01-01

    Invasive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections are often characterized by recalcitrance to antimicrobial therapy, which is a function not only of widespread antimicrobial resistance among clinical isolates, but also the capacity to form biofilms. Biofilms consist of ordered populations of bacterial colonies encased in a polysaccharide and/or proteinaceous matrix. This unique physiologic adaptation limits penetration of antimicrobial molecules and innate immune effectors to the infectious focus, increasing the likelihood of treatment failure and progression to chronic infection. Investigation of mechanisms of biofilm formation and dispersal, as well as the physiologic adaptations to the biofilm lifestyle, is therefore critical to developing new therapies to combat MRSA infections. In this chapter, we describe two in vitro methods for the investigation of staphylococcal biofilm formation, a microtiter plate-based assay of biofilm formation under static conditions and a flow cell-based assay of biofilm formation under fluid shear. We also detail an in vivo murine model of catheter-associated biofilm formation that is amenable to imaging and microbiologic analyses. Special consideration is given to the conditions necessary to support biofilm formation by clinical isolates of S. aureus. PMID:24085698

  18. Generation and characterization of murine antiflagellum monoclonal antibodies that are protective against lethal challenge with Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Rosok, M J; Stebbins, M R; Connelly, K; Lostrom, M E; Siadak, A W

    1990-01-01

    Two murine monoclonal antibodies, IIG5 (IgG3) and IVE8 (IgG2a), that bind to Pseudomonas aeruginosa type a flagella and type b flagella, respectively, were prepared by conventional hybridoma methodology. Specificity of each monoclonal antibody for type a or type b flagella was demonstrated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, indirect immunofluorescence, and immunoblotting. The percentage of P. aeruginosa isolates recognized by each monoclonal antibody was analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Among a panel of 257 flagellated P. aeruginosa clinical isolates, IIG5 bound to 67.7% of the isolates and IVE8 bound to another 30.7%, for a combined coverage of 98.4%. Inhibition of motility of P. aeruginosa by the monoclonal antibodies was observed in vitro in a soft agar assay and was dose dependent. The protective efficacy of IIG5 and IVE8 was examined in a mouse burn wound sepsis model. The antiflagellum monoclonal antibodies provided specific and significant prophylactic and therapeutic protection against lethal challenge with P. aeruginosa strains. Images PMID:2123821

  19. Molecular characterization of clinical multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Klebsiella pneumoniae is a frequent nosocomial pathogen, with the multidrug-resistant (MDR) K. pneumoniae being a major public health concern, frequently causing difficult-to-treat infections worldwide. The aim of this study was to investigate the molecular characterization of clinical MDR Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates. Methods A total of 27 non-duplicate MDR K. pneumoniae isolates with a CTX-CIP-AK resistance pattern were investigated for the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance genes including extended spectrum β-lactamase genes (ESBLs), plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes, 16S rRNA methylase (16S-RMTase) genes, and integrons by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification and DNA sequencing. Plasmid replicons were typed by PCR-based replicon typing (PBRT). Multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) were carried out to characterize the strain relatedness. Results All the isolates co-harbored 3 or more resistance determinants. OqxAB, CTX-M-type ESBLs and RmtB were the most frequent determinants, distributed among19 (70.4%),18 (66.7%) and 8 (29.6%) strains. Fourteen isolates harbored class 1 integrons, with orfD-aacA4 being the most frequent gene cassette array. Class 3 integrons were less frequently identified and contained the gene cassette array of blaGES-1-blaOXA-10-aac(6′)-Ib. IncFII replicon was most commonly found in this collection. One cluster was observed with ≥80% similarity among profiles obtained by PFGE, and one sequence type (ST) by MLST, namely ST11, was observed in the cluster. Conclusion K. pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC)–producing ST11 was the main clone detected. Of particular concern was the high prevalence of multiple resistance determinants, classs I integrons and IncFII plasmid replicon among these MDR strains, which provide advantages for the rapid development of MDR strains. PMID:24884610

  20. Clinical resistance and decreased susceptibility in Streptococcus suis isolates from clinically healthy fattening pigs.

    PubMed

    Callens, Bénédicte F; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Maes, Dominiek; Butaye, Patrick; Dewulf, Jeroen; Boyen, Filip

    2013-04-01

    Streptococcus suis (S. suis) has often been reported as an important swine pathogen and is considered as a new emerging zoonotic agent. Consequently, it is important to be informed on its susceptibility to antimicrobial agents. In the current study, the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) population distribution of nine antimicrobial agents has been determined for nasal S. suis strains, isolated from healthy pigs at the end of the fattening period from 50 closed or semiclosed pig herds. The aim of the study was to report resistance based on both clinical breakpoints (clinical resistance percentage) and epidemiological cutoff values (non-wild-type percentage). Non-wild-type percentages were high for tetracycline (98%), lincomycin (92%), tilmicosin (72%), erythromycin (70%), tylosin (66%), and low for florfenicol (0%) and enrofloxacin (0.3%). Clinical resistance percentages were high for tetracycline (95%), erythromycin (66%), tylosin (66%), and low for florfenicol (0.3%) and enrofloxacin (0.3%). For tiamulin, for which no clinical breakpoint is available, 57% of the isolates did not belong to the wild-type population. Clinical resistance and non-wild-type percentages differed substantially for penicillin. Only 1% of the tested S. suis strains was considered as clinically resistant, whereas 47% of the strains showed acquired resistance when epidemiological cutoff values were used. In conclusion, MIC values for penicillin are gradually increasing, compared to previous reports, although pigs infected with strains showing higher MICs may still respond to treatment with penicillin. The high rate of acquired resistance against tiamulin has not been reported before. Results from this study clearly demonstrate that the use of different interpretive criteria contributes to the extent of differences in reported antimicrobial resistance results. The early detection of small changes in the MIC population distribution of isolates, while clinical failure may not yet be

  1. Glycerol metabolism promotes biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Scoffield, Jessica; Silo-Suh, Laura

    2016-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes persistent infections in the airways of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Airway sputum contains various host-derived nutrients that can be utilized by P. aeruginosa, including phosphotidylcholine, a major component of host cell membranes. Phosphotidylcholine can be degraded by P. aeruginosa to glycerol and fatty acids to increase the availability of glycerol in the CF lung. In this study, we explored the role that glycerol metabolism plays in biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa. We report that glycerol metabolism promotes biofilm formation by both a chronic CF isolate (FRD1) and a wound isolate (PAO1) of P. aeruginosa. Moreover, loss of the GlpR regulator, which represses the expression of genes involved in glycerol metabolism, enhances biofilm formation in FRD1 through the upregulation of Pel polysaccharide. Taken together, our results suggest that glycerol metabolism may be a key factor that contributes to P. aeruginosa persistence by promoting biofilm formation.

  2. Glycerol metabolism promotes biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Scoffield, Jessica; Silo-Suh, Laura

    2016-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes persistent infections in the airways of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Airway sputum contains various host-derived nutrients that can be utilized by P. aeruginosa, including phosphotidylcholine, a major component of host cell membranes. Phosphotidylcholine can be degraded by P. aeruginosa to glycerol and fatty acids to increase the availability of glycerol in the CF lung. In this study, we explored the role that glycerol metabolism plays in biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa. We report that glycerol metabolism promotes biofilm formation by both a chronic CF isolate (FRD1) and a wound isolate (PAO1) of P. aeruginosa. Moreover, loss of the GlpR regulator, which represses the expression of genes involved in glycerol metabolism, enhances biofilm formation in FRD1 through the upregulation of Pel polysaccharide. Taken together, our results suggest that glycerol metabolism may be a key factor that contributes to P. aeruginosa persistence by promoting biofilm formation. PMID:27392247

  3. Sewage as a rich source of phage study against Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO.

    PubMed

    Azizian, Reza; Nasser, Ahmad; Askari, Hasan; Taheri Kalani, Morovat; Sadeghifard, Nourkhoda; Pakzad, Iraj; Amini, Razieh; Mozaffari Nejad, Amir Sasan; Azizi Jalilian, Farid

    2015-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a ubiquitous organism which has emerged as a major public health threat in hospital environments. Overuse of antibiotics has significantly exacerbated the emergence of multi-drug resistant bacteria such as P. aeruginosa. Phages are currently being utilized successfully for aquaculture, agriculture and veterinary applications. The aim of this study was to isolate and characterize of lytic P. aeruginosa phage from sewage of Ilam, Iran. Phage was isolated from sewage that was added to the enrichment along with the host and subsequently filtered. Plaque assay was done by using an overlay method (also called the double agar layer method). Purified plaques were then amplified for characterization. Finally, RAPD-PCR method was conducted for genotyping and Transition electron micrograph (TEM) recruited to determine the morphology and phage family. The phage had high concentration and tremendous effects against a variety of clinical and general laboratory strains (ATCC15693) of P. aeruginosa. Among a set of primers in RAPD panel, only P2 and RAPD5 primers, were useful in differentiating the phages. TEM images revealed that the isolated phages were members of the Siphoviridae family. The phage effectiveness and specificity towards target bacteria and potential to control biofilm formations will be investigate in our further studies.

  4. A novel bacteriophage cocktail reduces and disperses Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms under static and flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Alves, Diana R; Perez-Esteban, P; Kot, W; Bean, J E; Arnot, T; Hansen, L H; Enright, Mark C; Jenkins, A Tobias A

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen that forms highly stable communities - biofilms, which contribute to the establishment and maintenance of infections. The biofilm state and intrinsic/acquired bacterial resistance mechanisms contribute to resistance/tolerance to antibiotics that is frequently observed in P. aeruginosa isolates. Here we describe the isolation and characterization of six novel lytic bacteriophages: viruses that infect bacteria, which together efficiently infect and kill a wide range of P. aeruginosa clinical isolates. The phages were used to formulate a cocktail with the potential to eliminate P. aeruginosa PAO1 planktonic cultures. Two biofilm models were studied, one static and one dynamic, and the phage cocktail was assessed for its ability to reduce and disperse the biofilm biomass. For the static model, after 4 h of contact with the phage suspension (MOI 10) more than 95% of biofilm biomass was eliminated. In the flow biofilm model, a slower rate of activity by the phage was observed, but 48 h after addition of the phage cocktail the biofilm was dispersed, with most cells eliminated (> 4 logs) comparing with the control. This cocktail has the potential for development as a therapeutic to control P. aeruginosa infections, which are predominantly biofilm centred. PMID:26347362

  5. [In vitro susceptibilities to levofloxacin and various antibacterial agents of 12,919 clinical isolates obtained from 72 centers in 2007].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Keizo; Ohno, Akira; Ishii, Yoshikazu; Tateda, Kazuhiro; Iwata, Morihiro; Kanda, Makoto; Akizawa, Kouji; Shimizu, Chikara; Kon, Shinichirou; Nakamura, Kastushi; Matsuda, Keiko; Tominaga, Makoto; Nakagawa, Takuo; Sugita, Akihiro; Ito, Tatsumi; Kato, Jun; Suwabe, Akira; Yamahata, Kumiko; Kawamura, Chizuko; Tashiro, Hiromi; Horiuchi, Hiroko; Katayama, Yosei; Kondou, Shigemi; Misawa, Shigeki; Murata, Misturu; Kobayashi, Yoshio; Okamoto, Hideyuki; Yamazaki, Kenichiro; Okada, Motoi; Haruki, Kosuke; Kanno, Harushige; Aihara, Masanori; Maesaki, Shigefumi; Hashikita, Giichi; Miyajima, Eiji; Sumitomo, Midori; Saito, Takefumi; Yamane, Nobuo; Kawashima, Chieko; Akiyama, Takahisa; Ieiri, Tamio; Yamamoto, Yoshitaka; Okamoto, Yuki; Okabe, Hidetoshi; Moro, Kunihiko; Shigeta, Masayo; Yoshida, Haruyoshi; Yamashita, Masanobu; Hida, Yukio; Takubo, Takayuki; Kusakabe, Tadashi; Masaki, Hiroya; Heijyou, Hitoshi; Nakaya, Hideo; Kawahara, Kunimitsu; Sano, Reiko; Matsuo, Syuji; Kono, Hisashi; Yuzuki, Yosuke; Ikeda, Norio; Idomuki, Masayo; Soma, Masayuki; Yamamoto, Go; Kinoshita, Syohiro; Kawano, Seiji; Oka, Mikio; Kusano, Nobuchika; Kang, Dongchon; Ono, Junko; Yasujima, Minoru; Miki, Makoto; Hayashi, Masato; Okubo, Syunji; Toyoshima, Syunkou; Kaku, Mitsuo; Sekine, Imao; Shiotani, Joji; Horiuchi, Hajime; Tazawa, Yoko; Yoneyama, Akiko; Kumasaka, Kazunari; Koike, Kazuhiko; Taniguchi, Nobuyuki; Ozaki, Yukio; Uchida, Takashi; Murakami, Masami; Inuzuka, Kazuhisa; Gonda, Hideo; Yamaguchi, Ikuo; fujimoto, Yoshinori; Iriyama, Junji; Asano, Yuko; Genma, Hitoshi; Maekawa, Masato; Yoshimura, Hitoshi; Nakatani, Kaname; Baba, Hisashi; Ichiyama, Satoshi; Fujita, Shinichi; Kuwabara, Masao; Okazaki, Toshiro; Fujiwara, Hiromitsu; Ota, Hiromi; Nagai, Astushi; Fujita, Jun; Negayama, Kiyoshi; Sugiura, Tetsuro; Kamioka, Mikio; Murase, Mitsuharu; Yamane, Nobuhisa; Nakasone, Isamu; Okayama, Akihiko; Aoki, Yosuke; Kusaba, Koji; Nakashima, Yukari; Miyanohara, Hiroaki; Hiramatsu, Kazufumi; Saikawa, Tetsunori; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Matsuda, Junichi; Kohno, Shigeru; Mashiba, Koichi

    2009-08-01

    We have reported in this journal in vitro susceptibilities of clinical isolates to antibiotics every year since 1992. In this paper, we report the results of an analysis of in vitro susceptibilities of 12,919 clinical isolates from 72 centers in Japan to selected antibiotics in 2007 compared with the results from previous years. The common respiratory pathogens, Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Moraxella catarrhalis and Haemophilus influenzae maintained a high susceptibility to fluoroquinolones (FQs). The resistance of S. pyogenes to macrolides has been increasing every year and this was especially clear this year. Most strains of Enterobacteriaceae except for Escherichia coli showed a high susceptibility to FQs. Almost 30% of E. coli strains were resistant to FQs and the resistance increased further this year. FQs resistance of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) was approximately 95% with the exception of 45% for sitafloxacin (STFX). FQs resistance of methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) was low at about 10%. FQs resistance of methicillin-resistant coagulase negative Staphylococci (MRCNS) was higher than that of methicillin-susceptible coagulase negative Staphylococci (MSCNS), but it was lower than that of MRSA. However, FQs resistance of MSCNS was higher than that of MSSA. FQs resistance of Enterococcus faecalis was 22.5% to 29.6%, while that of Enterococcusfaecium was more than 85% except for STFX (58.3%). In clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa derived from urinary tract infections, FQs resistance was 21-27%, which was higher than that of P. aeruginosa from respiratory tract infections at 13-21%, which was the same trend as in past years. Multidrug resistant strains accounted for 5.6% in the urinary tract and 1.8% in the respiratory tract. Acinetobacter spp. showed high susceptibility to FQs. The carbapenem resistant strains, which present a problem at present, accounted for 2.7%. Neisseria gonorrhoeae showed high

  6. [In vitro susceptibilities to levofloxacin and various antibacterial agents of 12,919 clinical isolates obtained from 72 centers in 2007].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Keizo; Ohno, Akira; Ishii, Yoshikazu; Tateda, Kazuhiro; Iwata, Morihiro; Kanda, Makoto; Akizawa, Kouji; Shimizu, Chikara; Kon, Shinichirou; Nakamura, Kastushi; Matsuda, Keiko; Tominaga, Makoto; Nakagawa, Takuo; Sugita, Akihiro; Ito, Tatsumi; Kato, Jun; Suwabe, Akira; Yamahata, Kumiko; Kawamura, Chizuko; Tashiro, Hiromi; Horiuchi, Hiroko; Katayama, Yosei; Kondou, Shigemi; Misawa, Shigeki; Murata, Misturu; Kobayashi, Yoshio; Okamoto, Hideyuki; Yamazaki, Kenichiro; Okada, Motoi; Haruki, Kosuke; Kanno, Harushige; Aihara, Masanori; Maesaki, Shigefumi; Hashikita, Giichi; Miyajima, Eiji; Sumitomo, Midori; Saito, Takefumi; Yamane, Nobuo; Kawashima, Chieko; Akiyama, Takahisa; Ieiri, Tamio; Yamamoto, Yoshitaka; Okamoto, Yuki; Okabe, Hidetoshi; Moro, Kunihiko; Shigeta, Masayo; Yoshida, Haruyoshi; Yamashita, Masanobu; Hida, Yukio; Takubo, Takayuki; Kusakabe, Tadashi; Masaki, Hiroya; Heijyou, Hitoshi; Nakaya, Hideo; Kawahara, Kunimitsu; Sano, Reiko; Matsuo, Syuji; Kono, Hisashi; Yuzuki, Yosuke; Ikeda, Norio; Idomuki, Masayo; Soma, Masayuki; Yamamoto, Go; Kinoshita, Syohiro; Kawano, Seiji; Oka, Mikio; Kusano, Nobuchika; Kang, Dongchon; Ono, Junko; Yasujima, Minoru; Miki, Makoto; Hayashi, Masato; Okubo, Syunji; Toyoshima, Syunkou; Kaku, Mitsuo; Sekine, Imao; Shiotani, Joji; Horiuchi, Hajime; Tazawa, Yoko; Yoneyama, Akiko; Kumasaka, Kazunari; Koike, Kazuhiko; Taniguchi, Nobuyuki; Ozaki, Yukio; Uchida, Takashi; Murakami, Masami; Inuzuka, Kazuhisa; Gonda, Hideo; Yamaguchi, Ikuo; fujimoto, Yoshinori; Iriyama, Junji; Asano, Yuko; Genma, Hitoshi; Maekawa, Masato; Yoshimura, Hitoshi; Nakatani, Kaname; Baba, Hisashi; Ichiyama, Satoshi; Fujita, Shinichi; Kuwabara, Masao; Okazaki, Toshiro; Fujiwara, Hiromitsu; Ota, Hiromi; Nagai, Astushi; Fujita, Jun; Negayama, Kiyoshi; Sugiura, Tetsuro; Kamioka, Mikio; Murase, Mitsuharu; Yamane, Nobuhisa; Nakasone, Isamu; Okayama, Akihiko; Aoki, Yosuke; Kusaba, Koji; Nakashima, Yukari; Miyanohara, Hiroaki; Hiramatsu, Kazufumi; Saikawa, Tetsunori; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Matsuda, Junichi; Kohno, Shigeru; Mashiba, Koichi

    2009-08-01

    We have reported in this journal in vitro susceptibilities of clinical isolates to antibiotics every year since 1992. In this paper, we report the results of an analysis of in vitro susceptibilities of 12,919 clinical isolates from 72 centers in Japan to selected antibiotics in 2007 compared with the results from previous years. The common respiratory pathogens, Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Moraxella catarrhalis and Haemophilus influenzae maintained a high susceptibility to fluoroquinolones (FQs). The resistance of S. pyogenes to macrolides has been increasing every year and this was especially clear this year. Most strains of Enterobacteriaceae except for Escherichia coli showed a high susceptibility to FQs. Almost 30% of E. coli strains were resistant to FQs and the resistance increased further this year. FQs resistance of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) was approximately 95% with the exception of 45% for sitafloxacin (STFX). FQs resistance of methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) was low at about 10%. FQs resistance of methicillin-resistant coagulase negative Staphylococci (MRCNS) was higher than that of methicillin-susceptible coagulase negative Staphylococci (MSCNS), but it was lower than that of MRSA. However, FQs resistance of MSCNS was higher than that of MSSA. FQs resistance of Enterococcus faecalis was 22.5% to 29.6%, while that of Enterococcusfaecium was more than 85% except for STFX (58.3%). In clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa derived from urinary tract infections, FQs resistance was 21-27%, which was higher than that of P. aeruginosa from respiratory tract infections at 13-21%, which was the same trend as in past years. Multidrug resistant strains accounted for 5.6% in the urinary tract and 1.8% in the respiratory tract. Acinetobacter spp. showed high susceptibility to FQs. The carbapenem resistant strains, which present a problem at present, accounted for 2.7%. Neisseria gonorrhoeae showed high

  7. RESPONSES OF OYSTERS AND THEIR HEMOCYTES TO CLINICAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ISOLATES OF VIBRIO PARAHAEMOLYTICUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Interactions of Vibrio parahaemolyticus with oysters and oyster hemocytes were studied using three environmental isolates (1094, 1163 and ATCC 17802) and three clinical isolates (2030, 2062, 2107). Clinical isolates were from patients who became ill during the June 1998 food pois...

  8. Serotyping of Cryptococcus neoformans Isolates from Clinical and Environmental Sources in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Baró, Teresa; Torres-Rodríguez, Josep M.; Morera, Yolanda; Alía, Concepción; López, Olga; Méndez, Raul

    1999-01-01

    We determined biovars and serotypes of 154 isolates of Cryptococcus neoformans from clinical and environmental sources from different areas of Spain. All clinical isolates belonged to C. neoformans var. neoformans. Serotypes showed an irregular distribution. C. neoformans var. gattii serotype B was isolated from necropsy specimens from goats with pulmonary disease. PMID:10074545

  9. Recurrent pyelonephritis due to NDM-1 metallo-beta-lactamase producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a patient returning from Serbia, France, 2012.

    PubMed

    Flateau, C; Janvier, F; Delacour, H; Males, S; Ficko, C; Andriamanantena, D; Jeannot, K; Merens, A; Rapp, C

    2012-01-01

    We describe the first isolation in France of a New-Delhi metallo-beta-lactamase-1 (NDM-1) producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In March 2012, a patient with history of prior hospitalisation in Serbia was diagnosed in France with acute pyelonephritis due to NDM-1 producing P. aeruginosa. Clinical and microbiological cure was obtained under appropriate antibiotic treatment. Two months later, she presented with a recurrence due to the same bacteria, with a favourable evolution. During both hospitalisations, contact isolation precautions were implemented and no cross-transmission was observed.

  10. Therapeutic potential of the antimicrobial peptide OH-CATH30 for antibiotic-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa keratitis.

    PubMed

    Li, Sheng-An; Liu, Jie; Xiang, Yang; Wang, Yan-Jie; Lee, Wen-Hui; Zhang, Yun

    2014-06-01

    The therapeutic potential of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) has been evaluated in many infectious diseases. However, the topical application of AMPs for ocular bacterial infection has not been well investigated. The AMP OH-CATH30, which was identified in the king cobra, exhibits potent antimicrobial activity. In this study, we investigated the therapeutic potential of OH-CATH30 for Pseudomonas aeruginosa keratitis. Ten isolates of P. aeruginosa from individuals with keratitis were susceptible to OH-CATH30 but not to cefoperazone, ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, and levofloxacin. The microdilution checkerboard assay showed that OH-CATH30 exhibited synergistic activity with ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin against antibiotic-resistant P. aeruginosa. Meanwhile, P. aeruginosa did not develop resistance to OH-CATH30, even after exposure at 0.5× the MIC for up to 25 subcultures. Furthermore, treatment with OH-CATH30, alone or in combination with levofloxacin, significantly improved the clinical outcomes of rabbit keratitis induced by antibiotic-resistant P. aeruginosa. Taken together, our data indicate that the topical application of OH-CATH30 is efficacious against drug-resistant P. aeruginosa keratitis. In addition, our study highlights the potential application of AMPs in treating ocular bacterial infections. PMID:24637683

  11. [New Virulent Bacteriophages Active against Multiresistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strains].

    PubMed

    Balarjishvili, N Sh; Kvachadze, L I; Kutateladze, M I; Meskhi, T Sh; Pataridze, T K; Berishvili, T A; Tevdoradze, E Sh

    2015-01-01

    The sensitivity of 512 newly isolated Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical strains to six classes of anti-microbial preparations has been studied. Antibiotic-resistant strains were selected and genotyped. Three new virulent bacteriophages of the families Myoviridae and Podoviridae were isolated against these strains. The parameters of the intracellular phage development cycle were established, and the influence of inactivating factors (temperature, pH, and UV exposure) on phage viability was studied. The molecular weight of the phage genome was determined. Phage DNA restriction analysis and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of envelope protein SDS were carried out. The plating efficacy of phages on 28 genetically distant antibiotic-resistant P. aeruginosa strains was studied. It was established that 26 of them were lysed by phages with a high efficacy. The range of antibacterial action of the studied phages and their mixtures on 427 multi-drug-resistant clinical isolates was assessed. It is shown that including these phages in one multicomponent preparation enhanced their lytic activity. PMID:26859962

  12. Survival dynamics of cystic fibrosis-related Gram-negative bacterial pathogens (Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cenocepacia) in Dead Sea and Atlantic Ocean waters.

    PubMed

    Shteinberg, Michal; Kis-Papo, Tamar; Millar, Beverley C; Rendall, Jacqueline C; Downey, Damian G; Elborn, J Stuart; Moore, John E

    2015-09-01

    Clinical cystic fibrosis (CF) Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n=6) and Burkholderia cenocepacia (n=4) were inoculated in marine brines from the Dead Sea and the Atlantic Ocean and their survival was monitored over a 1 month duration. In Dead Sea samples, all P. aeruginosa and B. cenocepacia isolates were non-detectable by culture following 24 h incubation, including the non-selective enrichment samples. In the Atlantic Ocean brine, over a 1 month period, mean P. aeruginosa counts decreased by only 0.25 log10 units and mean B. cenocepacia counts decreased by approximately 4 log10 units (10,000 cfu/ml). This study demonstrated that Dead Sea brine exerted a lethal effect within 24 h on planktonic P. aeruginosa and B. cenocepacia. Thus, the Dead Sea effectively purges these organisms from its environment on a daily basis.

  13. Survival dynamics of cystic fibrosis-related Gram-negative bacterial pathogens (Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cenocepacia) in Dead Sea and Atlantic Ocean waters.

    PubMed

    Shteinberg, Michal; Kis-Papo, Tamar; Millar, Beverley C; Rendall, Jacqueline C; Downey, Damian G; Elborn, J Stuart; Moore, John E

    2015-09-01

    Clinical cystic fibrosis (CF) Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n=6) and Burkholderia cenocepacia (n=4) were inoculated in marine brines from the Dead Sea and the Atlantic Ocean and their survival was monitored over a 1 month duration. In Dead Sea samples, all P. aeruginosa and B. cenocepacia isolates were non-detectable by culture following 24 h incubation, including the non-selective enrichment samples. In the Atlantic Ocean brine, over a 1 month period, mean P. aeruginosa counts decreased by only 0.25 log10 units and mean B. cenocepacia counts decreased by approximately 4 log10 units (10,000 cfu/ml). This study demonstrated that Dead Sea brine exerted a lethal effect within 24 h on planktonic P. aeruginosa and B. cenocepacia. Thus, the Dead Sea effectively purges these organisms from its environment on a daily basis. PMID:26322762

  14. Genomes of Two Clinical Isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from Odisha, India

    PubMed Central

    Majid, Mohammad; Qureshi, Asifa; Yerra, Priyadarshini; Kumar, Ashutosh; Kumar, Mandala Kiran; Tiruvayipati, Suma; Baddam, Ramani; Shaik, Sabiha; Srikantam, Aparna

    2014-01-01

    We report whole-genome sequences of two clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolated from patients in Odisha, India. The sequence analysis revealed that these isolates are of an ancestral type and might represent some of the “pristine” isolates in India that have not admixed with other lineages. PMID:24652981

  15. [Post-marketing surveillance of antibacterial activities of cefozopran against various clinical isolates--II. Gram-negative bacteria].

    PubMed

    Igari, Jun; Oguri, Toyoko; Hiramatsu, Nobuyoshi; Akiyama, Kazumitsu; Koyama, Tsuneo

    2002-02-01

    As a post-marketing surveillance, the in vitro antibacterial activities of cefozopran (CZOP), an agent of cephems, against various clinical isolates were yearly evaluated and compared with those of other cephems, oxacephems, penicillins, monobactams, and carbapenems. Changes in CZOP susceptibility for the bacteria were also evaluated with the bacterial resistance ratio calculated with the breakpoint MIC. Twenty-five species (3,362 strains) of Gram-negative bacteria were isolated from the clinical materials annually collected from 1996 to 2000, and consisted of Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis (n = 136), Haemophilus influenzae (n = 289), Escherichia coli (n = 276), Klebsiella pneumoniae (n = 192), Klebsiella oxytoca (n = 157), Enterobacter cloacae (n = 189), Enterobacter aerogenes (n = 93), Serratia marcescens (n = 172), Serratia liquefaciens (n = 24), Citrobacter freundii (n = 177), Citrobacter koseri (n = 70), Proteus mirabilis (n = 113), Proteus vulgaris (n = 89), Morganella morganii (n = 116), Providencia spp. (n = 41), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n = 290), Pseudomonas fluorescens (n = 56), Pseudomonas putida (n = 63), Acinetobacter baumannii (n = 146), Acinetobacter lwoffii (n = 34), Burkholderia cepacia (n = 101), Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (n = 169), Bacteroides fragilis group (n = 196), and Prevotella/Porphyromonas (n = 173). An antibacterial activity of CZOP against E. coli, K. pneumoniae, K. oxytoca, and S. marcescens was potent and consistent with or more preferable than the study results obtained until the new drug application approval. MIC90 of CZOP against M.(B.) catarrhalis, C. koseri, and P. aeruginosa was not considerably changed and consistent with the study results obtained until the new drug application approval. MIC90 of CZOP against E. cloacae, E. aerogenes, and P. mirabilis increased year by year. The increase in MIC90 of CZOP against E. aerogenes and P. mirabilis, however, was not considered to be an obvious decline in susceptibility. In

  16. A simple test for the detection of KPC and metallo-β-lactamase carbapenemase-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates with the use of meropenem disks supplemented with aminophenylboronic acid, dipicolinic acid and cloxacillin.

    PubMed

    Pasteran, F; Veliz, O; Faccone, D; Guerriero, L; Rapoport, M; Mendez, T; Corso, A

    2011-09-01

    We evaluated the ability of the combination disk test (CDT) and the Modified Hodge Test (MHT) to discriminate between various carbapenemase-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates (KPC, n = 36; metallo-β-lactamase (MBL), n = 38) and carbapenemase non-producers (n = 75). For the CDT, the optimal inhibitor concentrations and cut-off values were: 600 μg of 3-aminophenylboronic acid (APB) per disk (an increment of ≥4 mm), 1000 μg of dipicolinic acid (DPA) per disk (an increment of ≥5 mm) and 3000 μg of cloxacillin per disk (an increment of ≥3 mm). APB had excellent sensitivity (97%) and specificity (97%) for the detection of KPC enzymes. DPA detected MBL enzymes with a sensitivity and specificity of 97% and 81%, respectively. The MHT resulted in a low sensitivity (78%) and specificity (57%). The CDT could be very useful in daily practice to provide fast and reliable detection of KPC and MBL carbapenemases among P. aeruginosa isolates.

  17. Antibiotic resistance and virulence traits in clinical and environmental Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium isolates.

    PubMed

    Rathnayake, I U; Hargreaves, M; Huygens, F

    2012-07-01

    This study compared virulence and antibiotic resistance traits in clinical and environmental Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium isolates. E. faecalis isolates harboured a broader spectrum of virulence determinants compared to E. faecium isolates. The virulence traits Cyl-A, Cyl-B, Cyl-M, gel-E, esp and acm were tested and environmental isolates predominantly harboured gel-E (80% of E. faecalis and 31.9% of E. faecium) whereas esp was more prevalent in clinical isolates (67.8% of E. faecalis and 70.4% of E. faecium). E. faecalis and E. faecium isolated from water had different antibiotic resistance patterns compared to those isolated from clinical samples. Linezolid resistance was not observed in any isolates tested and vancomycin resistance was observed only in clinical isolates. Resistance to other antibiotics (tetracycline, gentamicin, ciprofloxacin and ampicillin) was detected in both clinical and water isolates. Clinical isolates were more resistant to all the antibiotics tested compared to water isolates. Multi-drug resistance was more prevalent in clinical isolates (71.2% of E. faecalis and 70.3% of E. faecium) compared to water isolates (only 5.7% E. faecium). tet L and tet M genes were predominantly identified in tetracycline-resistant isolates. All water and clinical isolates resistant to ciprofloxacin and ampicillin contained mutations in the gyrA, parC and pbp5 genes. A significant correlation was found between the presence of virulence determinants and antibiotic resistance in all the isolates tested in this study (p<0.05). The presence of antibiotic resistant enterococci, together with associated virulence traits, in surface recreational water could be a public health risk.

  18. Lactonase-expressing Lactobacillus plantarum NC8 attenuates the virulence factors of multiple drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa in co-culturing environment.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Sudha; Kaur, Amanjot; Sharma, Prince; Harjai, Kusum; Capalash, Neena

    2014-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa possesses an arcade of both cell-associated and extracellular cytotoxic virulence factors which are regulated by a multi-component quorum sensing system. Many research studies report success of lactonase in combating the pathogenicity of P. aeruginosa but delivery of lactonase remains a challenge. The present study aims at developing a delivery vehicle for lactonase. Lactobacillus plantarum NC8 was used as host for aiiA (Bacillus thuringiensis 4A3 lactonase gene) using pSIP409 expression vector. pSIP409: aiiA construct was stably maintained in L. plantarum NC8. Co-culturing of multi-drug resistant (MDR) clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa and PAO1 with recombinant L. plantarum NC8 led to significant reduction (p < 0.001) in extracellular virulence factors like pyocyanin, protease, elastase and rhamnolipids in P. aeruginosa and also showed significant reduction in adhesion of P. aeruginosa strains to uroepithelial cells in vitro. This study shows the heterologous expression of AiiA lactonase in L. plantarum NC8. Co-culturing of lactonase expressing L. plantarum NC8 with MDR P. aeruginosa strains led to attenuation of their virulence significantly. These results underscore the potential application of recombinant L. plantarum NC8 with anti-quorum sensing properties to control infections caused by multidrug resistant P. aeruginosa.

  19. Nontuberculous mycobacteria: Reports of clinical laboratory isolation in a three county area, North Carolina, 2006 -2010

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Laboratory reports of mycobacteria isolation and identification are created during the clinical diagnostic process to differentiate Mycobacterium tuberculosis from nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM). NTM isolation rates are expected to exceed rates of true NTM infectio...

  20. Designer antibacterial peptides kill fluoroquinolone-resistant clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Otvos, Laszlo; Wade, John D; Lin, Feng; Condie, Barry A; Hanrieder, Joerg; Hoffmann, Ralf

    2005-08-11

    A significant number of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae bacterial strains in urinary tract infections are resistant to fluoroquinolones. Peptide antibiotics are viable alternatives although these are usually either toxic or insufficiently active. By applying multiple alignment and sequence optimization steps, we designed multifunctional proline-rich antibacterial peptides that maintained their DnaK-binding ability in bacteria and low toxicity in eukaryotes, but entered bacterial cells much more avidly than earlier peptide derivatives. The resulting chimeric and statistical analogues exhibited 8-32 microg/mL minimal inhibitory concentration efficacies in Muller-Hinton broth against a series of clinical pathogens. Significantly, the best peptide, compound 5, A3-APO, retained full antibacterial activity in the presence of mouse serum. Across a set of eight fluoroquinolone-resistant clinical isolates, peptide 5 was 4 times more potent than ciprofloxacin. On the basis of the in vitro efficacy, toxicity, and pharmacokinetics data, we estimate that peptide 5 will be suitable for treating infections in the 3-5 mg/kg dose range.

  1. Identification of VIM-2-Producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa from Tanzania Is Associated with Sequence Types 244 and 640 and the Location of blaVIM-2 in a TniC Integron

    PubMed Central

    Moyo, Sabrina; Haldorsen, Bjørg; Aboud, Said; Blomberg, Bjørn; Maselle, Samuel Y.; Sundsfjord, Arnfinn; Langeland, Nina

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological data on carbapenemase-producing Gram-negative bacteria on the African continent are limited. Here, we report the identification of VIM-2-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates in Tanzania. Eight out of 90 clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa from a tertiary care hospital in Dar es Salaam were shown to harbor blaVIM-2. The blaVIM-2-positive isolates belonged to two different sequence types (ST), ST244 and ST640, with blaVIM-2 located in an unusual integron structure lacking the 3′ conserved region of qacΔE1-sul1. PMID:25331700

  2. A clinical study of photodynamic therapy for chronic skin ulcers in lower limbs infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Lei, Xia; Liu, Bo; Huang, Zheng; Wu, Jinjin

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the antimicrobial activity and healing-promoting effect of topical photodynamic therapy (ALA-PDT) on chronic skin ulcers infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA). A total of 26 patients with chronic skin ulcers in lower limbs infected with PA were enrolled. The surface areas of the ulcers were treated with either δ-aminolevulinic acid (ALA)-mediated PDT (20% ALA solution, 1.5 h incubation, 630 nm red light, 80 J/cm(2)) or red light alone, both once a week for two weeks. Before treatment, the wound areas and the bacteria levels in these two groups were comparable (p > 0.05). Results indicated that the bacteria levels in the skin ulcers of the light only group of 24 h post-treatment (3.4 × 10(7) ± 7.1 × 10(7) CFU/cm(2)) and pre-treatment (5.5 × 10(7) ± 1.6 × 10(8) CFU/cm(2)) were not significantly different. In contrast, the bacteria levels on the surfaces of the ulcers in the PDT group of 24 h post-treatment (6.3 × 10(5) ± 1.7 × 10(6) CFU/cm(2)) and pre-treatment (8.9 × 10(7) ± 1.7 × 10(8) CFU/cm(2)) were significantly different (p < 0.01). At seven days post treatment, the mean ulcer area in the red light group was reduced from 11.85 ± 6.83 to 7.8 ± 4.9 cm(2) (p < 0.01), that of PDT group from 12.72 ± 8.58 to 3.4 ± 3.4 cm(2) (p < 0.01). Better healing was seen in PDT group (p < 0.01). In conclusion, ALA-PDT is a potential modality to control PA infection and promote healing of chronic skin ulcers in lower limbs.

  3. Subinhibitory concentration of ciprofloxacin targets quorum sensing system of Pseudomonas aeruginosa causing inhibition of biofilm formation & reduction of virulence

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Parul; Chhibber, Sanjay; Harjai, Kusum

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Biofilms formed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa lead to persistent infections. Use of antibiotics for the treatment of biofilm induced infection poses a threat towards development of resistance. Therefore, the research is directed towards exploring the property of antibiotics which may alter the virulence of an organism besides altering its growth. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of subinhibitory concentration of ciprofloxacin (CIP) in inhibiting biofilm formation and virulence of P. aeruginosa. Methods: Antibiofilm potential of subinhibitory concentration of CIP was evaluated in terms of log reduction, biofilm forming capacity and coverslip assay. P. aeruginosa isolates (grown in the presence and absence of sub-MIC of CIP) were also evaluated for inhibition in motility, virulence factor production and quorum sensing (QS) signal production. Results: Sub-minimum inhibitory concentration (sub-MIC) of CIP significantly reduced the motility of P. aeruginosa stand and strain and clinical isolates and affected biofilm forming capacity. Production of protease, elastase, siderophore, alginate, and rhamnolipid was also significantly reduced by CIP. Interpretation & conclusions: Reduction in virulence factors and biofilm formation was due to inhibition of QS mechanism which was indicated by reduced production of QS signal molecules by P. aeruginosa in presence of subinhibitory concentration of CIP. PMID:27488009

  4. Genomic Features of Environmental and Clinical Vibrio parahaemolyticus Isolates Lacking Recognized Virulence Factors Are Dissimilar.

    PubMed

    Ronholm, J; Petronella, N; Chew Leung, C; Pightling, A W; Banerjee, S K

    2015-12-04

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a bacterial pathogen that can cause illness after the consumption or handling of contaminated seafood. The primary virulence factors associated with V. parahaemolyticus illness are thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) and Tdh-related hemolysin (TRH). However, clinical strains lacking tdh and trh have recently been isolated, and these clinical isolates are poorly understood. To help understand the emergence of clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolates, a genomic approach was used to comprehensively compare 4 clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolates with 16 environmental tdh- and trh-negative isolates and 34 clinical isolates positive for tdh or trh, or both, with the objective of identifying genomic features that are unique to clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolates. The prevalence of pathogenicity islands (PAIs) common to clinical isolates was thoroughly examined in each of the clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolates. The tdh PAI was not present in any clinical or environmental tdh- and trh-negative isolates. The trh PAI was not present in any environmental isolates; however, in clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolate 10-4238, the majority of the trh PAI including a partial trh1 gene was present, which resulted in reclassification of this isolate as a tdh-negative and trh-positive isolate. In the other clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolates, neither the trh gene nor the trh PAI was present. We identified 862 genes in clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolates but not in environmental tdh- and trh-negative isolates. Many of these genes are highly homologous to genes found in common enteric bacteria and included genes encoding a number of chemotaxis proteins and a novel putative type VI secretion system (T6SS) effector and immunity protein (T6SS1). The availability of genome sequences from clinical V. parahaemolyticus tdh- and trh-negative isolates and the comparative analysis may help provide an understanding of how this pathotype is able to

  5. Establishing quality control ranges for antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus: a cornerstone to develop reference strains for Korean clinical microbiology laboratories.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sung Kuk; Choi, Seung Jun; Shin, Saeam; Lee, Wonmok; Pinto, Naina; Shin, Nari; Lee, Kwangjun; Hong, Seong Geun; Kim, Young Ah; Lee, Hyukmin; Kim, Heejung; Song, Wonkeun; Lee, Sun Hwa; Yong, Dongeun; Lee, Kyungwon; Chong, Yunsop

    2015-11-01

    Quality control (QC) processes are being performed in the majority of clinical microbiology laboratories to ensure the performance of microbial identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing by using ATCC strains. To obtain these ATCC strains, some inconveniences are encountered concerning the purchase cost of the strains and the shipping time required. This study was focused on constructing a database of reference strains for QC processes using domestic bacterial strains, concentrating primarily on antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Three strains (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus) that showed legible results in preliminary testing were selected. The minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and zone diameters (ZDs) of eight antimicrobials for each strain were determined according to the CLSI M23. All resulting MIC and ZD ranges included at least 95% of the data. The ZD QC ranges obtained by using the CLSI method were less than 12 mm, and the MIC QC ranges extended no more than five dilutions. This study is a preliminary attempt to construct a bank of Korean QC strains. With further studies, a positive outcome toward cost and time reduction can be anticipated. PMID:26354353

  6. Gallium induces the production of virulence factors in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    García-Contreras, Rodolfo; Pérez-Eretza, Berenice; Lira-Silva, Elizabeth; Jasso-Chávez, Ricardo; Coria-Jiménez, Rafael; Rangel-Vega, Adrián; Maeda, Toshinari; Wood, Thomas K

    2014-02-01

    The novel antimicrobial gallium is a nonredox iron III analogue with bacteriostatic and bactericidal properties, effective for the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in vitro and in vivo in mouse and rabbit infection models. It interferes with iron metabolism, transport, and presumably its homeostasis. As gallium exerts its antimicrobial effects by competing with iron, we hypothesized that it ultimately will lead cells to an iron deficiency status. As iron deficiency promotes the expression of virulence factors in vitro and promotes the pathogenicity of P. aeruginosa in animal models, it is anticipated that treatment with gallium will also promote the production of virulence factors. To test this hypothesis, the reference strain PA14 and two clinical isolates from patients with cystic fibrosis were exposed to gallium, and their production of pyocyanin, rhamnolipids, elastase, alkaline protease, alginate, pyoverdine, and biofilm was determined. Gallium treatment induced the production of all the virulence factors tested in the three strains except for pyoverdine. In addition, as the Ga-induced virulence factors are quorum sensing controlled, co-administration of Ga and the quorum quencher brominated furanone C-30 was assayed, and it was found that C-30 alleviated growth inhibition from gallium. Hence, adding both C-30 and gallium may be more effective in the treatment of P. aeruginosa infections.

  7. Biofilm-forming Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria undergo lipopolysaccharide structural modifications and induce enhanced inflammatory cytokine response in human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Ciornei, Cristina D; Novikov, Alexey; Beloin, Christophe; Fitting, Catherine; Caroff, Martine; Ghigo, Jean-Marc; Cavaillon, Jean-Marc; Adib-Conquy, Minou

    2010-10-01

    To determine whether growth of bacteria in biofilms triggers a specific immune response, we compared cytokine induction in human monocytes and mouse macrophages by planktonic and biofilm bacteria. We compared Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus, two bacteria often colonizing the airways of cystic fibrosis patients. Planktonic and biofilm S. aureus induced equivalent amounts of cytokine in human monocytes. In contrast, biofilm-forming P. aeruginosa induced a higher production of tumor necrosis factor and interleukin-6 than their planktonic counterpart, both for clinical isolates and laboratory strains. This increased cytokine production was partly dependent on phagocytosis. In contrast, no difference in cytokine induction was observed with mouse macrophages. We investigated the structures of the lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) of these Gram-negative bacteria in biofilm and planktonic cultures of P. aeruginosa. Switch between the two life-styles was shown to cause several reversible LPS structure modifications affecting the lipid A and polysaccharide moieties of both clinical isolates and laboratory strains. In addition, LPS isolated from biofilm-grown bacteria induced slightly more inflammatory cytokines than that extracted from its planktonic counterpart. Our results, therefore, show that P. aeruginosa biofilm LPS undergoes structural modifications that only partially contribute to an increased inflammatory response from human monocytes. PMID:19710099

  8. Response of gonococcal clinical isolates to acidic conditions.

    PubMed

    Pettit, R K; McAllister, S C; Hamer, T A

    1999-02-01

    This study examined the response to acidic conditions of four gonococcal isolates -NRL38874 (Proto/IB-2), NRL38884 (Pro/IA-2), NRL38953 (Proto/IB-3) and NRL39029 (Pro/IA-3) - obtained from various sites in patients in whom a diagnosis of pelvic inflammatory disease had been made by laparoscopic examination. Acid tolerance of the clinical isolates was strain and growth phase dependent. Growth of the four strains on solid media was undetectable below pH 5.8. In liquid culture, strain NRL38884 did not survive below pH 5.2; strains NRL38874, NRL38953 and NRL39029 survived to pH 4.5. Between pH 4.2 and pH 5.1, the latter three strains exhibited a peak in survival at pH 4.6-4.7 during log phase, suggesting that there may be a distinct acid tolerance system operating at this pH. SDS-PAGE of whole-cell, total membrane and outer-membrane fractions of the four strains prepared from pH 7.2 and pH 6.1 plate cultures revealed numerous differences in protein composition. Acidic conditions reduced the expression of the reduction modifiable outer-membrane protein Rmp, and induced the expression of many membrane proteins, including gonococcal hsp63. Immunoblotting studies with matched serum samples and strains from patients with pelvic inflammatory disease indicated that IgG recognition of outer-membrane components from strains cultured in acidic and neutral conditions was quite different. The results suggest that the immune system interacts with unique outer-membrane constituents on gonococci colonising sites at different pH.

  9. In vitro prevention of Pseudomonas aeruginosa early biofilm formation with antibiotics used in cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Olmos, Ana; García-Castillo, María; Maiz, Luis; Lamas, Adelaida; Baquero, Fernando; Cantón, Rafael

    2012-08-01

    The ability of antibiotics used in bronchopulmonary infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients to prevent Pseudomonas aeruginosa early biofilm formation was studied using a biofilm microtitre assay with 57 non-mucoid P. aeruginosa isolates (44 first colonisers and 13 recovered during the initial intermittent colonisation stage) obtained from 35 CF patients. Minimum biofilm inhibitory concentrations (BICs) of levofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, imipenem, ceftazidime, tobramycin, colistin and azithromycin were determined by placing a peg lid with a formed biofilm onto microplates containing antibiotics. A modification of this protocol consisting of antibiotic challenge during biofilm formation was implemented in order to determine the biofilm prevention concentration (BPC), i.e. the minimum concentration able to prevent biofilm formation. The lowest BPCs were for fluoroquinolones, tobramycin and colistin and the highest for ceftazidime and imipenem. The former antibiotics had BPCs identical to or only slightly higher than their minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) determined by standard Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) microdilution and were also active on formed biofilms as reflected by their low BIC values. In contrast, ceftazidime and imipenem were less effective for prevention of biofilm formation and on formed biofilms. In conclusion, the new BPC parameter determined in non-mucoid P. aeruginosa isolates recovered during early colonisation stages in CF patients supports early aggressive antimicrobial treatment guidelines in first P. aeruginosa-colonised CF patients. PMID:22727530

  10. Loss of social behaviours in populations of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infecting lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Jiricny, Natalie; Molin, Søren; Foster, Kevin; Diggle, Stephen P; Scanlan, Pauline D; Ghoul, Melanie; Johansen, Helle Krogh; Santorelli, Lorenzo A; Popat, Roman; West, Stuart A; Griffin, Ashleigh S

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, is an opportunistic, bacterial pathogen causing persistent and frequently fatal infections of the lung in patients with cystic fibrosis. Isolates from chronic infections differ from laboratory and environmental strains in a range of traits and this is widely interpreted as the result of adaptation to the lung environment. Typically, chronic strains carry mutations in global regulation factors that could effect reduced expression of social traits, raising the possibility that competitive dynamics between cooperative and selfish, cheating strains could also drive changes in P. aeruginosa infections. We compared the expression of cooperative traits - biofilm formation, secretion of exo-products and quorum sensing (QS) - in P. aeruginosa isolates that were estimated to have spent different lengths of time in the lung based on clinical information. All three exo-products involved in nutrient acquisition were produced in significantly smaller quantities with increased duration of infection, and patterns across four QS signal molecules were consistent with accumulation over time of mutations in lasR, which are known to disrupt the ability of cells to respond to QS signal. Pyocyanin production, and the proportion of cells in biofilm relative to motile, free-living cells in liquid culture, did not change. Overall, our results confirm that the loss of social behaviour is a consistent trend with time spent in the lung and suggest that social dynamics are potentially relevant to understanding the behaviour of P. aeruginosa in lung infections. PMID:24454693

  11. Evaluation of Risk Factors for Antibiotic Resistance in Patients with Nosocomial Infections Caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Sonmezer, Meliha Cagla; Ertem, Gunay; Erdinc, Fatma Sebnem; Kaya Kilic, Esra; Tulek, Necla; Adiloglu, Ali; Hatipoglu, Cigdem

    2016-01-01

    Background. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) is resistant to various antibiotics and can cause serious nosocomial infections with high morbidity and mortality. In this clinical study, we investigated the risk factors in patients who were diagnosed with P. aeruginosa-related nosocomial infection. Methods. A retrospective case control study including patients with P. aeruginosa-related nosocomial infection. Patients who were resistant to any of the six antibiotics (imipenem, meropenem, piperacillin-tazobactam, ciprofloxacin, amikacin, and ceftazidime) constituted the study group. Results. One hundred and twenty isolates were isolated. Various risk factors were detected for each antibiotic in the univariate analysis. In the multivariate analysis, previous cefazolin use was found as an independent risk factor for the development of imipenem resistance (OR = 3.33; CI 95% [1.11-10.0]; p = 0.03), whereas previous cerebrovascular attack (OR = 3.57; CI 95% [1.31-9.76]; p = 0.01) and previous meropenem use (OR = 4.13; CI 95% [1.21-14.07]; p = 0.02) were independent factors for the development of meropenem resistance. For the development of resistance to ciprofloxacin, hospitalization in the neurology intensive care unit (OR = 4.24; CI 95% [1.5-11.98]; p = 0.006) and mechanical ventilator application (OR = 11.7; CI 95% [2.24-61.45]; p = 0.004) were independent risk factors. Conclusion. The meticulous application of contact measures can decrease the rate of nosocomial infections. PMID:27656220

  12. In vitro prevention of Pseudomonas aeruginosa early biofilm formation with antibiotics used in cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Olmos, Ana; García-Castillo, María; Maiz, Luis; Lamas, Adelaida; Baquero, Fernando; Cantón, Rafael

    2012-08-01

    The ability of antibiotics used in bronchopulmonary infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients to prevent Pseudomonas aeruginosa early biofilm formation was studied using a biofilm microtitre assay with 57 non-mucoid P. aeruginosa isolates (44 first colonisers and 13 recovered during the initial intermittent colonisation stage) obtained from 35 CF patients. Minimum biofilm inhibitory concentrations (BICs) of levofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, imipenem, ceftazidime, tobramycin, colistin and azithromycin were determined by placing a peg lid with a formed biofilm onto microplates containing antibiotics. A modification of this protocol consisting of antibiotic challenge during biofilm formation was implemented in order to determine the biofilm prevention concentration (BPC), i.e. the minimum concentration able to prevent biofilm formation. The lowest BPCs were for fluoroquinolones, tobramycin and colistin and the highest for ceftazidime and imipenem. The former antibiotics had BPCs identical to or only slightly higher than their minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) determined by standard Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) microdilution and were also active on formed biofilms as reflected by their low BIC values. In contrast, ceftazidime and imipenem were less effective for prevention of biofilm formation and on formed biofilms. In conclusion, the new BPC parameter determined in non-mucoid P. aeruginosa isolates recovered during early colonisation stages in CF patients supports early aggressive antimicrobial treatment guidelines in first P. aeruginosa-colonised CF patients.

  13. Phenotypic diversity within a Pseudomonas aeruginosa population infecting an adult with cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Shawn T.; Diaz Caballero, Julio; Cheang, Mary; Coburn, Bryan; Wang, Pauline W.; Donaldson, Sylva L.; Zhang, Yu; Liu, Mingyao; Keshavjee, Shaf; Yau, Yvonne C.W.; Waters, Valerie J.; Elizabeth Tullis, D.; Guttman, David S.; Hwang, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic airway infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa contribute to the progression of pulmonary disease in individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF). In the setting of CF, within-patient adaptation of a P. aeruginosa strain generates phenotypic diversity that can complicate microbiological analysis of patient samples. We investigated within- and between- sample diversity of 34 phenotypes among 235 P. aeruginosa isolates cultured from sputum samples collected from a single CF patient over the span of one year, and assessed colony morphology as a screening tool for predicting phenotypes, including antimicrobial susceptibilities. We identified 15 distinct colony morphotypes that varied significantly in abundance both within and between sputum samples. Substantial within sample phenotypic heterogeneity was also noted in other phenotypes, with morphotypes being unreliable predictors of antimicrobial susceptibility and other phenotypes. Emergence of isolates with reduced susceptibility to β-lactams was observed during periods of clinical therapy with aztreonam. Our findings confirm that the P. aeruginosa population in chronic CF lung infections is highly dynamic, and that intra-sample phenotypic diversity is underestimated if only one or few colonies are analyzed per sample. PMID:26047320

  14. Loss of social behaviours in populations of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infecting lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Jiricny, Natalie; Molin, Søren; Foster, Kevin; Diggle, Stephen P; Scanlan, Pauline D; Ghoul, Melanie; Johansen, Helle Krogh; Santorelli, Lorenzo A; Popat, Roman; West, Stuart A; Griffin, Ashleigh S

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, is an opportunistic, bacterial pathogen causing persistent and frequently fatal infections of the lung in patients with cystic fibrosis. Isolates from chronic infections differ from laboratory and environmental strains in a range of traits and this is widely interpreted as the result of adaptation to the lung environment. Typically, chronic strains carry mutations in global regulation factors that could effect reduced expression of social traits, raising the possibility that competitive dynamics between cooperative and selfish, cheating strains could also drive changes in P. aeruginosa infections. We compared the expression of cooperative traits - biofilm formation, secretion of exo-products and quorum sensing (QS) - in P. aeruginosa isolates that were estimated to have spent different lengths of time in the lung based on clinical information. All three exo-products involved in nutrient acquisition were produced in significantly smaller quantities with increased duration of infection, and patterns across four QS signal molecules were consistent with accumulation over time of mutations in lasR, which are known to disrupt the ability of cells to respond to QS signal. Pyocyanin production, and the proportion of cells in biofilm relative to motile, free-living cells in liquid culture, did not change. Overall, our results confirm that the loss of social behaviour is a consistent trend with time spent in the lung and suggest that social dynamics are potentially relevant to understanding the behaviour of P. aeruginosa in lung infections.

  15. Characterization of Listeria monocytogenes isolated from Ganges water, human clinical and milk samples at Varanasi, India.

    PubMed

    Soni, Dharmendra K; Singh, Rakesh K; Singh, Durg V; Dubey, Suresh K

    2013-03-01

    Listeria monocytogenes isolated from Ganges water, human clinical and milk samples were characterized by antibiotic susceptibility, serotype identification, detection of virulence genes and ERIC- and REP-PCR fingerprint analyses. All isolates were uniformly resistant to ampicillin, except two isolates, and showed variable resistance to gentamicin, cotrimoxazole, ofloxacin, rifampicin and tetracycline. Of the 20 isolates found positive for pathogens, seven (four human and three water isolates) belong to serogroups 4b, 4d and 4e; six (one human and five water isolates) belong to serogroups 1/2c and 3c; four milk isolates belong to serogroups 1/2b and 3b; and three milk isolates belong to serogroups 1/2a and 3a. Two water isolates, all human isolates, except one (Pb1) lacking inlJ gene, and three milk isolates possess inlA, inlC, plcA, prfA, actA, hlyA and iap genes. The remaining water and milk isolates showed variable presence of inlJ, plcA, prfA, and iap genes. ERIC- and REP-PCR based analyses collectively indicated that isolates of human clinical samples belong to identical or similar clone and isolates of water and milk samples belong to different clones. Overall study demonstrates the prevalence of pathogenic L. monocytogenes species in the environmental and clinical samples. Most of the isolates were resistant to commonly used antibiotics. PMID:23201044

  16. Assessment of the Phoenix™ automated system and EUCAST breakpoints for antimicrobial susceptibility testing against isolates expressing clinically relevant resistance mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Giani, T; Morosini, M I; D'Andrea, M M; García-Castillo, M; Rossolini, G M; Cantón, R

    2012-11-01

    EUCAST breakpoint criteria are being adopted by automatic antimicrobial susceptibility testing systems. The accuracy of the Phoenix Automated System in combination with 2012 EUCAST breakpoints against recent clinical isolates was evaluated. A total of 697 isolates (349 Enterobacteriaceae, 113 Pseudomonas spp., 25 Acinetobacter baumannii, 11 Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, 95 Staphylococcus aureus, 6 coagulase negative staphylococci, 77 enterococci and 21 Streptococcus pneumoniae) with defined resistance phenotypes and well-characterized resistance mechanisms recovered in Spain (n = 343) and Italy (n = 354) were tested. Comparator antimicrobial susceptibility testing data were obtained following CLSI guidelines. Experimental agreement (EA), defined as MIC agreement ±1 log(2) dilution, category agreement (CA) and relative discrepancies (minor (mD), major (MD) and very major discrepancies (VMD)) were determined. The overall EA and CA for all organism-antimicrobial agent combinations (n = 6.294) were 97.3% and 95.2%, respectively. mD, MD and VMD were 4.7%, 1.3% and 2.7%, all of them in agreement with the ISO (ISO20776-2:2007) acceptance criteria for assessment of susceptibility testing devices. VMD were mainly observed in amoxicillin-clavulanate and cefuroxime in Enterobacteriaceae and gentamicin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, whereas MD were mainly observed in amoxicillin-clavulante in Enterobacteriaceae. mD were mainly observed in Enterobacteriaceae but distributed in different antimicrobials. For S. aureus and enterococci relative discrepancies were low. The Phoenix system showed accuracy assessment in accordance with the ISO standards when using EUCAST breakpoints. Inclusion of EUCAST criteria in automatic antimicrobial susceptibility testing systems will facilitate the implementation of EUCAST breakpoints in clinical microbiology laboratories.

  17. Japanese nationwide surveillance in 2011 of antibacterial susceptibility patterns of clinical isolates from complicated urinary tract infection cases.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Kiyohito; Hamasuna, Ryoichi; Uehara, Shinya; Yasuda, Mitsuru; Yamamoto, Shingo; Hayami, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Satoshi; Matsumoto, Tetsuro; Minamitani, Shinichi; Kadota, Jun-ichi; Iwata, Satoshi; Kaku, Mitsuo; Watanabe, Akira; Sunakawa, Keisuke; Sato, Junko; Hanaki, Hideaki; Tsukamoto, Taiji; Kiyota, Hiroshi; Egawa, Shin; Deguchi, Takashi; Matsumoto, Minori; Tanaka, Kazushi; Arakawa, Soichi; Fujisawa, Masato; Kumon, Hiromi; Kobayashi, Kanao; Matsubara, Akio; Wakeda, Hironobu; Amemoto, Yoshinosuke; Onodera, Shoichi; Goto, Hirokazu; Komeda, Hisao; Yamashita, Masuo; Takenaka, Tadasu; Fujimoto, Yoshinori; Tsugawa, Masaya; Takahashi, Yoshito; Maeda, Hiroshi; Onishi, Hiroyuki; Ishitoya, Satoshi; Nishimura, Kazuo; Mitsumori, Kenji; Ito, Toru; Togo, Yoshikazu; Nakamura, Ichiro; Ito, Noriyuki; Kanamaru, Sojun; Hirose, Takaoki; Muranaka, Takashi; Yamada, Daisuke; Ishihara, Satoshi; Oka, Hiroya; Inatomi, Hisato; Matsui, Takashi; Kobuke, Makoto; Kunishima, Yasuharu; Kimura, Takahiro; Ichikawa, Takaharu; Kagara, Ichiro; Matsukawa, Masanori; Takahashi, Koichi; Mita, Koji; Kato, Masao; Okumura, Kazuhiro; Kawanishi, Hiroaki; Hashimura, Takayuki; Aoyama, Teruyoshi; Shigeta, Masanobu; Koda, Shuntaro; Taguchi, Keisuke; Matsuda, Yohei

    2015-09-01

    To investigate antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of various bacterial pathogens isolated from complicated urinary tract infection (UTI) cases, the Japanese Society of Chemotherapy, the Japanese Association of Infectious Disease, and the Japanese Society of Clinical Microbiology conducted the second nationwide surveillance from January to September 2011. With the cooperation of 42 medical institutions throughout Japan, 1036 strains belonging to 8 clinically relevant bacterial species were collected. Among methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strain, the vancomycin (VCM) MIC for 5.5% (3/55) of the strains was 2 μg/mL. Ampicillin, VCM, and linezolid were relatively active against 209 Enterococcus faecalis strains. The proportion of fluoroquinolone (FQ)-resistant strains was >20%. The MIC90 of FQs against the 382 Escherichia coli strains was 2-64 mg/L and the proportion resistant to FQs was approximately 30%. However, susceptibility of E. coli to sitafloxacin was still high (MIC90 = 2 mg/L). Fifty-eight (15.2%) of 382 E. coli, 6 (4.5%) of 132 Klebsiella pneumoniae, 1 (2.4%) of 41 Klebsiella oxytoca and 4 (6.8%) of 59 Proteus mirabilis strains were suspected of producing extended-spectrum beta-lactamase. Of 93 Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains, the proportions resistant to imipenem, amikacin, and ciprofloxacin were 21.5%, 4.3%, and 20.4%, respectively. Four strains (4.3%) were found to be multidrug-resistant. In complicated UTI cases, all of MRSA and E. faecalis were susceptible to all anti-MRSA agents. Sitafloxacin was active against other FQ-resistant E. coli strains. The isolation of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing and multidrug-resistant strains increased. PMID:26166322

  18. Characterization of Pathogenic Vibrio parahaemolyticus Isolates from Clinical Sources in Spain and Comparison with Asian and North American Pandemic Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Urtaza, Jaime; Lozano-Leon, Antonio; DePaola, Angelo; Ishibashi, Masanori; Shimada, Kanae; Nishibuchi, Mitsuaki; Liebana, Ernesto

    2004-01-01

    In spite of the potential risk involved with contamination of seafood with Vibrio parahaemolyticus, there is a lack of information on the occurrence of pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus in Europe. This organism was isolated in 1999 from a large outbreak (64 cases admitted to a single hospital) associated with raw oyster consumption in Galicia, Spain, one of the most important regions in shellfish production worldwide. Two V. parahaemolyticus isolates from the 1999 Galicia outbreak, three additional clinical isolates obtained in the same period from hospitals in Spain, two reference strains from clinical sources, and five Spanish environmental isolates were examined. Seventeen isolates belonging to the pandemic clone isolated in Asia and North America were included in the study for comparison. All isolates were characterized by serotyping, PCR for virulence-related genes, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and plasmid analysis. Four of the five clinical isolates from hospitals in Spain belonged to serotype O4:K11; the remaining isolate was O4:K untypeable (KUT). All five isolates were positive for V. parahaemolyticus toxR and tlh (species-specific genes) and tdh and negative for trh and group-specific PCR (a PCR method for detection of the pandemic clone). PFGE analysis with NotI and SfiI discriminated the European isolates in two closely related PFGE types included in a homogeneous cluster, clearly differentiated from the Asian and North American isolates. The five environmental isolates belonged to serotypes O2:K28, O2:KUT, O3:K53, O4:KUT, and O8:K22 and were negative for all virulence genes. The five isolates were discriminated into five different PFGE types unrelated to any other isolate included in the study. While the virulence characteristics (tdh positive, trh negative) of the Spanish clinical isolates matched those of the O3:K6 clone from Asia and North America, they were clearly excluded from this clone by group-specific PCR, PFGE, and serotyping. The

  19. Microwave Accelerated Green Synthesis of Stable Silver Nanoparticles with Eucalyptus globulus Leaf Extract and Their Antibacterial and Antibiofilm Activity on Clinical Isolates.

    PubMed

    Ali, Khursheed; Ahmed, Bilal; Dwivedi, Sourabh; Saquib, Quaiser; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A; Musarrat, Javed

    2015-01-01

    A simple and rapid microwave assisted method of green synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) was developed using aqueous leaf extract of Eucalyptus globulus(ELE), and their antibacterial and antibiofilm potential investigated. With this aim, the aqueous solutions of ELE and AgNO3(1 mM) were mixed (1:4 v/v), and microwave irradiated at 2450 Mhz, for 30 sec. The instant color change of the ELE-AgNO3 mixture from pale yellow to dark brown indicated ELE-AgNPs synthesis. The intensity of peak at 428 nm in UV-Vis spectra, due to the surface plasmon resonance of AgNPs, varied with the amount of ELE, AgNO3 concentration, pH and time of incubation. The biosynthesized ELE-AgNPs were characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy, XRD, TEM, SEM-EDX, FTIR and TGA analyses. The size of ELE-AgNPs was determined to be in range of 1.9-4.3 nm and 5-25 nm, with and without microwave treatment, respectively. SEM exhibited the capping of AgNPs with the ELE constituents, and validated by FTIR analysis. The FTIR data revealed the presence of plant organic constituents and metabolites bound to ELE-AgNPs, which contributes for their stability. The antimicrobial activity of ELE-AgNPs was assessed by growth and biofilm inhibition of extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) clinical bacterial isolates. The results demonstrated that S. aureus were more sensitive to ELE-AgNPs than E. coli and P. aeruginosa. MRSA exhibited higher sensitive than MSSA, whereas P. aeruginosa were more sensitive than E. coli to ELE-AgNPs treatment. Also, significant (83 ± 3% and 84 ± 5%) biofilm inhibition was observed in case of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa, respectively. The results elucidated environmentally friendly, economical and quick method for production of colloidal bio-functionalized ELE-AgNPs, for effectual clinical applications, as broad spectrum

  20. Microwave Accelerated Green Synthesis of Stable Silver Nanoparticles with Eucalyptus globulus Leaf Extract and Their Antibacterial and Antibiofilm Activity on Clinical Isolates.

    PubMed

    Ali, Khursheed; Ahmed, Bilal; Dwivedi, Sourabh; Saquib, Quaiser; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A; Musarrat, Javed

    2015-01-01

    A simple and rapid microwave assisted method of green synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) was developed using aqueous leaf extract of Eucalyptus globulus(ELE), and their antibacterial and antibiofilm potential investigated. With this aim, the aqueous solutions of ELE and AgNO3(1 mM) were mixed (1:4 v/v), and microwave irradiated at 2450 Mhz, for 30 sec. The instant color change of the ELE-AgNO3 mixture from pale yellow to dark brown indicated ELE-AgNPs synthesis. The intensity of peak at 428 nm in UV-Vis spectra, due to the surface plasmon resonance of AgNPs, varied with the amount of ELE, AgNO3 concentration, pH and time of incubation. The biosynthesized ELE-AgNPs were characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy, XRD, TEM, SEM-EDX, FTIR and TGA analyses. The size of ELE-AgNPs was determined to be in range of 1.9-4.3 nm and 5-25 nm, with and without microwave treatment, respectively. SEM exhibited the capping of AgNPs with the ELE constituents, and validated by FTIR analysis. The FTIR data revealed the presence of plant organic constituents and metabolites bound to ELE-AgNPs, which contributes for their stability. The antimicrobial activity of ELE-AgNPs was assessed by growth and biofilm inhibition of extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) clinical bacterial isolates. The results demonstrated that S. aureus were more sensitive to ELE-AgNPs than E. coli and P. aeruginosa. MRSA exhibited higher sensitive than MSSA, whereas P. aeruginosa were more sensitive than E. coli to ELE-AgNPs treatment. Also, significant (83 ± 3% and 84 ± 5%) biofilm inhibition was observed in case of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa, respectively. The results elucidated environmentally friendly, economical and quick method for production of colloidal bio-functionalized ELE-AgNPs, for effectual clinical applications, as broad spectrum

  1. Microwave Accelerated Green Synthesis of Stable Silver Nanoparticles with Eucalyptus globulus Leaf Extract and Their Antibacterial and Antibiofilm Activity on Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Khursheed; Ahmed, Bilal; Dwivedi, Sourabh; Saquib, Quaiser; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A.; Musarrat, Javed

    2015-01-01

    A simple and rapid microwave assisted method of green synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) was developed using aqueous leaf extract of Eucalyptus globulus(ELE), and their antibacterial and antibiofilm potential investigated. With this aim, the aqueous solutions of ELE and AgNO3(1 mM) were mixed (1:4 v/v), and microwave irradiated at 2450 Mhz, for 30 sec. The instant color change of the ELE-AgNO3 mixture from pale yellow to dark brown indicated ELE-AgNPs synthesis. The intensity of peak at 428 nm in UV-Vis spectra, due to the surface plasmon resonance of AgNPs, varied with the amount of ELE, AgNO3 concentration, pH and time of incubation. The biosynthesized ELE-AgNPs were characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy, XRD, TEM, SEM-EDX, FTIR and TGA analyses. The size of ELE-AgNPs was determined to be in range of 1.9–4.3 nm and 5-25 nm, with and without microwave treatment, respectively. SEM exhibited the capping of AgNPs with the ELE constituents, and validated by FTIR analysis. The FTIR data revealed the presence of plant organic constituents and metabolites bound to ELE-AgNPs, which contributes for their stability. The antimicrobial activity of ELE-AgNPs was assessed by growth and biofilm inhibition of extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) clinical bacterial isolates. The results demonstrated that S. aureus were more sensitive to ELE-AgNPs than E. coli and P. aeruginosa. MRSA exhibited higher sensitive than MSSA, whereas P. aeruginosa were more sensitive than E. coli to ELE-AgNPs treatment. Also, significant (83 ± 3% and 84 ± 5%) biofilm inhibition was observed in case of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa, respectively. The results elucidated environmentally friendly, economical and quick method for production of colloidal bio-functionalized ELE-AgNPs, for effectual clinical applications, as broad spectrum

  2. DIFFERENTIAL EFFECTS OF OYSTER (CRASSOSTREA VIRGINICA) DEFENSES ON CLINICAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ISOLATES OF VIBRIO PARAHEMOLYTICUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three clinical (2030, 2062, and 2107) and three environmental (1094, 1163, and ATCC 17802) isolates of Vibrio parahaemolyticus were exposed to hemocytes and plasma collected from oysters (Crassostrea virginica) to determine their susceptibility to putative oyster defenses. Clinic...

  3. [Surveillance of in vitro susceptibilities to levofloxacin and various antibacterial agents for 11,762 clinical isolates obtained from 69 centers in 2013].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Keizo; Tateda, Kazuhiro; Ohno, Akira; Ishii, Yoshikazu; Murakami, Hinako

    2016-02-01

    Antimicrobial susceptibility testing has been conducted continuously as postmarketing surveillance of levofloxacin (LVFX) since 1994. The present survey was undertaken to investigate in vitro susceptibilities of bacteria to 33 selected antibacterial agents, focusing on fluoroquinolones (FQs), using 11,762 clinical isolates for 19 species collected from 69 centers during 2013 in Japan. The common respiratory pathogens Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Moraxella catarrhalis, and Haemophilus influenzae continue to show a high susceptibility to FQs, while the percentage of macrolide-resistant S. pneumoniae was markedly increased to around 80%. With H. influenzae, the percentage of β-lactamase-negative ampicillin-resistant isolates had been increasing continuously from 2002, but no increase was observed from 2010 to 2013 (25.8% in 2002, 40.0% in 2004, 50.1% in 2007, 57.9% in 2010, and 57.1% in 2013). Most strains of Enterobacteriaceae showed a high susceptibility to FQs, but the isolation frequency of levofloxacin-resistant Escherichia coli including intermediate resistance was 34.4%, showing a continuous increase. Another Enterobacteriaceae member, Klebsiella pneumoniae, showed low resistance to FQs in contrast with E. coli. Regarding methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), the percentage of FQ-susceptible isolates was low at 15.8-18.0%, with the exception of 55.3% susceptibility to sitafloxacin. On the other hand, methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) isolates showed high susceptibility to FQs, at 87.0-99.3%. With Enterococcusfaecium, the percentage of FQ-susceptible isolates was 6.8-24.7%. The percentage of FQ-susceptible Pseudomonas aeruginosa was 83.4-89.3% among isolates derived from urinary tract infections (UTIs), while that from respiratory tract infections (RTIs) was 88.1-93.7%. This was summarized as susceptibility to FQs over 80% in both infections. A continuous decrease in FQ-resistant P. aeruginosa was noted, especially

  4. Aloe vera extract functionalized zinc oxide nanoparticles as nanoantibiotics against multi-drug resistant clinical bacterial isolates.

    PubMed

    Ali, Khursheed; Dwivedi, Sourabh; Azam, Ameer; Saquib, Quaiser; Al-Said, Mansour S; Alkhedhairy, Abdulaziz A; Musarrat, Javed

    2016-06-15

    ZnO nanoparticles (ZnONPs) were synthesised through a simple and efficient biogenic synthesis approach, exploiting the reducing and capping potential of Aloe barbadensis Miller (A. vera) leaf extract (ALE). ALE-capped ZnO nanoparticles (ALE-ZnONPs) were characterized using UV-Vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses. XRD analysis provided the average size of ZnONPs as 15 nm. FTIR spectral analysis suggested the role of phenolic compounds, terpenoids and proteins present in ALE, in nucleation and stability of ZnONPs. Flow cytometry and atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS) data analyses revealed the surface binding and internalization of ZnONPs in Gram +ve (Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram -ve (Escherichia coli) cells, respectively. Significant antibacterial activity of ALE-ZnONPs was observed against extended spectrum beta lactamases (ESBL) positive E. coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA) clinical isolates exhibiting the MIC and MBC values of 2200, 2400 μg/ml and 2300, 2700 μg/ml, respectively. Substantial inhibitory effects of ALE-ZnONPs on bacterial growth kinetics, exopolysaccharides and biofilm formation, unequivocally suggested the antibiotic and anti-biofilm potential. Overall, the results elucidated a rapid, environmentally benign, cost-effective, and convenient method for ALE-ZnONPs synthesis, for possible applications as nanoantibiotics or drug carriers. PMID:27031596

  5. In Vitro Antibacterial Activity of Rhodanine Derivatives against Pathogenic Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    AbdelKhalek, Ahmed; Ashby, Charles R.; Patel, Bhargav A.; Talele, Tanaji T.; Seleem, Mohamed N.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial infections present a serious challenge to healthcare practitioners due to the emergence of resistance to numerous conventional antibacterial drugs. Therefore, new bacterial targets and new antimicrobials are unmet medical needs. Rhodanine derivatives have been shown to possess potent antimicrobial activity via a novel mechanism. However, their potential use as antibacterials has not been fully examined. In this study, we determined the spectrum of activity of seven rhodanine derivatives (compounds Rh 1–7) against clinical isolates of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains and Candida albicans. We also synthesized and tested three additional compounds, ethyl ester and amide of rhodanine 2 (Rh 8 and Rh 10, respectively) and ethyl ester of rhodanine 3 (Rh 9) to determine the significance of the carboxyl group modification towards antibacterial activity and human serum albumin binding. A broth microdilution assay confirmed Rh 1–7 exhibit bactericidal activity against Gram-positive pathogens. Rh 2 had significant activity against various vancomycin-resistant (MIC90 = 4 μM) and methicillin-resistant (MIC90 = 4 μM) Staphylococcus aureus (VRSA and MRSA), Staphylococcus epidermidis (MIC = 4 μM) and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) strains (MIC90 = 8 μM). The rhodanine compounds exhibited potent activity against Bacillus spp., including Bacillus anthracis, with MIC range of 2–8 μM. In addition, they had potent activity against Clostridium difficile. The most potent compound, Rh 2, at 4 and 8 times its MIC, significantly decreased S. epidermidis biofilm mass by more than 35% and 45%, respectively. None of the rhodanine compounds showed antimicrobial activity (MIC > 128 μM) against various 1) Gram-negative pathogens (Acinetobacter baumannii, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumonia, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Salmonella Typhimurium) or 2) strains of Candida albicans (MIC > 64 μM). The MTS assay confirmed that rhodanines were not toxic to

  6. Emergence of carbapenem resistance due to the novel insertion sequence ISPa8 in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Randal C; Hanson, Nancy D

    2014-01-01

    Chronic lung infections due to the persistence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis patients are typically associated with the emergence of antibiotic resistance. The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanisms responsible for the emergence of carbapenem resistance when a clinical isolate of P. aeruginosa collected from a patient with cystic fibrosis was challenged with meropenem. Nine carbapenem-resistant mutants were selected with subinhibitory concentrations of meropenem from a clinical isolate of P. aeruginosa and characterized for carbapenem resistance. Increased carbapenem MICs were associated with the identification of the novel insertion sequence ISPa8 within oprD or its promoter region in all the mutants. The position of ISPa8 was different for each of the mutants evaluated. In addition, Southern blot analyses identified multiple copies of ISPa8 within the genomes of the mutants and their parent isolate. These data demonstrate that transposition of IS elements within the Pseudomonas genome can influence antibiotic susceptibility. Understanding the selective pressures associated with the emergence of antibiotic resistance is critical for the judicious use of antimicrobial chemotherapy and the successful treatment of bacterial infections.

  7. RELATIVE EXPRESSION OF EFFLUX PUMPS IN MULTI DRUG RESISTANT PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA.

    PubMed

    Azimi, Leila; Namvar, Amirmorteza Ebrahimzadeh; Jamali, Sadaf; Lari, Aida Rastegar; Bijari, Aslan; Lari, Abdolaziz Rastegar

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is known as an important opportunistic pathogen, resistant to a high number of antibiotics. Efflux pumps are one of the main intrinsic antibiotics resistance mechanisms in P. aeruginosa. MexAB-OprM, MexCD-OprJ, and MexXY-OprM are the main efflux pumps involved in beta-lactam resistant strains which may cause cross resistance to different antimicrobial classes. The aim of this study was to detect relative gene expression in betalactam-resistant clinical P. aeruginosa strains. One hundred fourteen clinical strains of P. aeruginosa were identified by phenotypic and genotypic methods. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was conducted according to CLSI guideline. Carbonyl cyanide 3-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) was used as an efflux pump inhibitor for phenotypic detection of efflux pump mechanism and q-RT PCR was conducted for relative gene expression detection. The highest rate of resistance was observed against cefotaxime and various relative gene expressions levels were observed in all isolates with positive phenotypic test results. PMID:27328522

  8. Aspergillus pragensis sp. nov. discovered during molecular reidentification of clinical isolates belonging to Aspergillus section Candidi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The identity of nine clinical isolates from Czech patients presumably belonging to Aspergillus section Candidi based on morphology of colonies was revised using sequences of ß-tubulin, calmodulin, and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) rDNA. The set of isolates included six isolates from suspected (n...

  9. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Methicillin-Resistant Clinical Staphylococcus aureus Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Kidon; Iram, Saira; Nawaz, Mohamed; Xu, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequences of two methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clinical isolates, hospital-associated perirectal isolate 32S (ST 239) from a colitis tracheostomy patient and community-associated MRSA isolate 42S (ST 772) from a hepatic-splenomegaly patient in Rawalpindi, Pakistan. PMID:26868381

  10. The genetic diversity of clinical isolates of Malassezia pachydermatis from dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Aizawa, T; Kano, R; Nakamura, Y; Watanabe, S; Hasegawa, A

    2001-08-01

    Molecular investigation of 110 clinical isolates of non-lipid-dependent Malassezia pachydermatis from dogs and cats was carried out by random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and chitin synthase 2 (CHS2) gene sequence analyses. The RAPD analysis indicated that the clinical isolates of M. pachydermatis constituted four distinct genetic types (A, B, C and D). Moreover, the results from CHS2 gene analysis completely agreed with those from the RAPD analyses. The clinical isolates of M. pachydermatis were obtained from normal external ears, lesions of atopic dermatitis, flea allergic dermatitis, otitis externa, pyoderma and seborrheic dermatitidis in dogs and cats. Type A consisted of 93 clinical isolates as well as the ex-neotype strain of M. pachydermatis. The isolates of type A M. pachydermatis originated from lesions of all kinds of diseases. They were predominant on dog and cat skin. The other types, B, C, and D were isolated mainly from otitis externa. PMID:11556762

  11. Pseudomonas aeruginosa AmpR: an acute–chronic switch regulator

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramanian, Deepak; Kumari, Hansi; Mathee, Kalai

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most intractable human pathogens that pose serious clinical challenge due to extensive prevalence of multidrug-resistant clinical isolates. Armed with abundant virulence and antibiotic resistance mechanisms, it is a major etiologic agent in a number of acute and chronic infections. A complex and intricate network of regulators dictates the expression of pathogenicity factors in P. aeruginosa. Some proteins within the network play key roles and control multiple pathways. This review discusses the role of one such protein, AmpR, which was initially recognized for its role in antibiotic resistance by regulating AmpC β-lactamase. Recent genomic, proteomic and phenotypic analyses demonstrate that AmpR regulates expression of hundreds of genes that are involved in diverse pathways such as β-lactam and non-β-lactam resistance, quorum sensing and associated virulence phenotypes, protein phosphorylation, and physiological processes. Finally, ampR mutations in clinical isolates are reviewed to shed light on important residues required for its function in antibiotic resistance. The prevalence and evolutionary implications of AmpR in pathogenic and nonpathogenic proteobacteria are also discussed. A comprehensive understanding of proteins at nodal positions in the P. aeruginosa regulatory network is crucial in understanding, and ultimately targeting, the pathogenic stratagems of this organism. PMID:25066236

  12. Prevalence of Toxin Genes among the Clinical Isolates of Staphylococcus aureus and its Clinical Impact

    PubMed Central

    Deodhar, Divya; Varghese, George; Balaji, Veeraraghavan; John, James; Rebekah, Grace; Janardhanan, Jeshina; Jeyaraman, Ranjith; Jasmine, Sudha; Mathews, Prasad

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) causes a variety of infections, ranging from a mild skin infection to blood stream infections and deep seated infections. As Stapylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) has the tendency to cause endovascular and metastatic infections, complications can occur at almost all sites of the body. Hence, SAB is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in spite of appropriate antimicrobial treatment. The virulence in S. aureus is determined by the presence of adhesins and toxins, which behave like superantigens (SAgs) and leads to a massive release of proinflammatory cytokines causing overwhelming inflammatory response leading to endothelial leakage, hemodynamic shock, multiorgan failure, and possibly death. Materials and Methods: One year prospective study conducted in a tertiary care hospital in southern part of India included all patients with SAB. Clinical details were filled according to. All isolates were subjected to polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for enterotoxin profiling. Results: A total of 101 patients of SAB were identified which comprises of 61 (60.4%) patients with methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) and 40 (39.6%) patients with methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Most common predictors of mortality were prior hospitalization and antibiotic intake, severe organ dysfunction, shock, tachycardia, and leukocytosis. Two-third of the isolates had at least one enterotoxin, most prevalent was sea; 28% and 27% (P - value = 0.001) MSSA isolates had seg and sei; whereas, 38.6% (P - value < 0.001) of MRSA isolates were found to have sea. The most common enterotoxin associated with mortality was sei, which comprised of 38% of all mortality. Conclusion: In SAB, the significant predictors of mortality were prior hospitalization and antibiotic intake, presence of multiorgan dysfunction, and shock. Although overall significance between the enterotoxin and shock could not be demonstrated, it successfully demonstrated

  13. Biochemical, serological, and virulence characterization of clinical and oyster Vibrio parahaemolyticus isolates.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jessica L; Lüdeke, Catharina H M; Bowers, John C; Garrett, Nancy; Fischer, Markus; Parsons, Michele B; Bopp, Cheryl A; DePaola, Angelo

    2012-07-01

    In this study, 77 clinical and 67 oyster Vibrio parahaemolyticus isolates from North America were examined for biochemical profiles, serotype, and the presence of potential virulence factors (tdh, trh, and type III secretion system [T3SS] genes). All isolates were positive for oxidase, indole, and glucose fermentation, consistent with previous reports. The isolates represented 35 different serotypes, 9 of which were shared by clinical and oyster isolates. Serotypes associated with pandemic strains (O1:KUT, O1:K25, O3:K6, and O4:K68) were observed for clinical isolates, and 7 (9%) oyster isolates belonged to serotype O1:KUT. Of the clinical isolates, 27% were negative for tdh and trh, while 45% contained both genes. Oyster isolates were preferentially selected for the presence of tdh and/or trh; 34% contained both genes, 42% had trh but not tdh, and 3% had tdh but not trh. All but 1 isolate (143/144) had at least three of the four T3SS1 genes examined. The isolates lacking both tdh and trh contained no T3SS2α or T3SS2β genes. All clinical isolates positive for tdh and negative for trh possessed all T3SS2α genes, and all isolates negative for tdh and positive for trh possessed all T3SS2β genes. The two oyster isolates containing tdh but not trh possessed all but the vopB2 gene of T3SS2α, as reported previously. In contrast to the findings of previous studies, all strains examined that were positive for both tdh and trh also carried T3SS2β genes. This report identifies the serotype as the most distinguishing feature between clinical and oyster isolates. Our findings raise concerns about the reliability of the tdh, trh, and T3SS genes as virulence markers and highlight the need for more-detailed pathogenicity investigations of V. parahaemolyticus.

  14. Oral Contraceptives and Multiple Sclerosis/Clinically Isolated Syndrome Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Hellwig, Kerstin; Chen, Lie H.; Stancyzk, Frank Z.; Langer-Gould, Annette M.

    2016-01-01

    Background The incidence of multiple sclerosis (MS) is rising in women. Objective To determine whether the use of combined oral contraceptives (COCs) are associated with MS risk and whether this varies by progestin content. Methods We conducted a nested case-control study of females ages 14–48 years with incident MS or clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) 2008–2011 from the membership of Kaiser Permanente Southern California. Controls were matched on age, race/ethnicity and membership characteristics. COC use up to ten years prior to symptom onset was obtained from the complete electronic health record. Results We identified 400 women with incident MS/CIS and 3904 matched controls. Forty- percent of cases and 32% of controls had used COCs prior to symptom onset. The use of COCs was associated with a slightly increased risk of MS/CIS (adjusted OR = 1.52, 95%CI = 1.21–1.91; p<0.001). This risk did not vary by duration of COC use. The association varied by progestin content being more pronounced for levenorgestrol (adjusted OR = 1.75, 95%CI = 1.29–2.37; p<0.001) than norethindrone (adjusted OR = 1.57, 95%CI = 1.16–2.12; p = 0.003) and absent for the newest progestin, drospirenone (p = 0.95). Conclusions Our findings should be interpreted cautiously. While the use of some combination oral contraceptives may contribute to the rising incidence of MS in women, an unmeasured confounder associated with the modern woman’s lifestyle is a more likely explanation for this weak association. PMID:26950301

  15. Developing an international Pseudomonas aeruginosa reference panel

    PubMed Central

    De Soyza, Anthony; Hall, Amanda J; Mahenthiralingam, Eshwar; Drevinek, Pavel; Kaca, Wieslaw; Drulis-Kawa, Zuzanna; Stoitsova, Stoyanka R; Toth, Veronika; Coenye, Tom; Zlosnik, James E A; Burns, Jane L; Sá-Correia, Isabel; De Vos, Daniel; Pirnay, Jean-Paul; Kidd, Timothy J; Reid, David; Manos, Jim; Klockgether, Jens; Wiehlmann, Lutz; Tümmler, Burkhard; McClean, Siobhán; Winstanley, Craig

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major opportunistic pathogen in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and causes a wide range of infections among other susceptible populations. Its inherent resistance to many antimicrobials also makes it difficult to treat infections with this pathogen. Recent evidence has highlighted the diversity of this species, yet despite this, the majority of studies on virulence and pathogenesis focus on a small number of strains. There is a pressing need for a P. aeruginosa reference panel to harmonize and coordinate the collective efforts of the P. aeruginosa research community. We have collated a panel of 43 P. aeruginosa strains that reflects the organism's diversity. In addition to the commonly studied clones, this panel includes transmissible strains, sequential CF isolates, strains with specific virulence characteristics, and strains that represent serotype, genotype or geographic diversity. This focussed panel of P. aeruginosa isolates will help accelerate and consolidate the discovery of virulence determinants, improve our understanding of the pathogenesis of infections caused by this pathogen, and provide the community with a valuable resource for the testing of novel therapeutic agents. PMID:24214409

  16. Laboratory and clinical evaluation of conjugate vaccines composed of Staphylococcus aureus type 5 and type 8 capsular polysaccharides bound to Pseudomonas aeruginosa recombinant exoprotein A.

    PubMed Central

    Fattom, A; Schneerson, R; Watson, D C; Karakawa, W W; Fitzgerald, D; Pastan, I; Li, X; Shiloach, J; Bryla, D A; Robbins, J B

    1993-01-01

    The synthesis, standardization, and immunogenicity in young outbred mice and clinical evaluation in adult volunteers of investigational vaccines designed to induce serum antibodies to the type 5 and type 8 capsular polysaccharides (CPs) of Staphylococcus aureus are described. Conjugates composed of the type 5 CP and a sonicated preparation of a high-molecular-weight type 8 CP bound to a nontoxic recombinant protein derived from Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A (rEPA) were synthesized. The conjugates were nontoxic and elicited serum CP antibodies after two subcutaneous injections into young outbred mice; a third injection elicited a booster response. The lower-molecular-weight type 8 CP was not immunogenic in the mice, and the high-molecular-weight type 8 CP elicited low levels of antibodies without a booster effect. In the volunteers, neither the conjugates nor the type 8 CP alone caused significant local reactions or fever. The conjugates elicited type-specific antibodies of both the immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG classes after the first injection; a second injection 6 weeks later did not stimulate a booster effect. The high-molecular-weight type 8 CP alone, injected once only, elicited levels of IgG and IgM type-specific antibodies similar to those of the conjugate. The vaccine-induced CP antibodies were mostly of the IgG1 and IgG2 subclasses and had opsonophagocytic activity. The conjugates elicited IgG antibodies to the native exotoxin A with neutralizing activity. In summary, the type 5 and type 8 conjugates were safe and elicited biologically active antibodies to both the CP and rEPA components. PMID:8432585

  17. Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Population Divergence and Resistance to Oxidative Stress in Clinical, Domesticated and Wild Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Diezmann, Stephanie; Dietrich, Fred S.

    2009-01-01

    Background Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been associated with human life for millennia in the brewery and bakery. Recently it has been recognized as an emerging opportunistic pathogen. To study the evolutionary history of S. cerevisiae, the origin of clinical isolates and the importance of a virulence-associated trait, population genetics and phenotypic assays have been applied to an ecologically diverse set of 103 strains isolated from clinics, breweries, vineyards, fruits, soil, commercial supplements and insect guts. Methodology/Principal Findings DNA sequence data from five nuclear DNA loci were analyzed for population structure and haplotype distribution. Additionally, all strains were tested for survival of oxidative stress, a trait associated with microbial pathogenicity. DNA sequence analyses identified three genetic subgroups within the recombining S. cerevisiae strains that are associated with ecology, geography and virulence. Shared alleles suggest that the clinical isolates contain genetic contribution from the fruit isolates. Clinical and fruit isolates exhibit high levels of recombination, unlike the genetically homogenous soil isolates in which no recombination was detected. However, clinical and soil isolates were more resistant to oxidative stress than any other population, suggesting a correlation between survival in oxidative stress and yeast pathogenicity. Conclusions/Significance Population genetic analyses of S. cerevisiae delineated three distinct groups, comprising primarily the (i) human-associated brewery and vineyard strains, (ii) clinical and fruit isolates (iii) and wild soil isolates from eastern U.S. The interactions between S. cerevisiae and humans potentiate yeast evolution and the development of genetically, ecologically and geographically divergent groups. PMID:19390633

  18. Antibiotic Resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Pneumonia at a Single University Hospital Center in Germany over a 10-Year Period

    PubMed Central

    Yayan, Josef; Ghebremedhin, Beniam; Rasche, Kurt

    2015-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common cause of community-acquired and nosocomial-acquired pneumonia. The development of resistance of P. aeruginosa to antibiotics is increasing globally due to the overuse of antibiotics. This article examines, retrospectively, the antibiotic resistance in patients with community-acquired versus nosocomial-acquired pneumonia caused by P. aeruginosa or multidrug-resistant (MDR) P. aeruginosa. Methods Data from patients with community-acquired and nosocomial-acquired pneumonia caused by P. aeruginosa and MDR P. aeruginosa were collected from the hospital charts at the HELIOS Clinic, Witten/Herdecke University, Wuppertal, Germany, between January 2004 and August 2014. An antibiogram was created from all study patients with community-acquired and nosocomial-acquired pneumonia caused by P. aeruginosa or MDR P. aeruginosa. Results A total of 168 patients with mean age 68.1 ± 12.8 (113 [67.3% males and 55 [32.7%] females) were identified; 91 (54.2%) had community-acquired and 77 (45.8%) had nosocomial-acquired pneumonia caused by P. aeruginosa. Patients with community-acquired versus nosocomial-acquired pneumonia had a mean age of 66.4 ± 13.8 vs. 70.1 ± 11.4 years [59 vs. 54 (64.8% vs. 70.1%) males and 32 vs. 23 (35.2% vs. 29.9%) females]. They included 41 (24.4%) patients with pneumonia due to MDR P. aeruginosa: 27 (65.9%) community-acquired and 14 (34.1%) nosocomial-acquired cases. P. aeruginosa and MDR P. aeruginosa showed a very high resistance to fosfomycin (community-acquired vs. nosocomial-acquired) (81.0% vs. 84.2%; 0 vs. 85.7%). A similar resistance pattern was seen with ciprofloxacin (35.2% vs. 24.0%; 70.4% vs. 61.5%), levofloxacin (34.6% vs. 24.5%; 66.7% vs. 64.3%), ceftazidime (15.9% vs. 30.9; 33.3% vs. 61.5%), piperacillin (24.2% vs. 29.9%; 44.4% vs. 57.1%), imipenem (28.6% vs. 27.3%; 55.6% vs. 50.0%), piperacillin and tazobactam (23.1% vs. 28.6%; 44.4% vs. 50.0%), tobramycin (28.0% vs. 17.2%; 52.0% vs. 27

  19. Isolation of nuc mutant isolates of Staphylococcus aureus from bovine clinical mastitis.

    PubMed

    Zastempowska, E; Orczykowska-Kotyna, M; Lassa, H

    2014-06-01

    Isolates of Staphylococcus aureus with a mutation in the nuclease (nuc) gene were recovered from cases of bovine mastitis in Poland. Three S. aureus isolates from cows in one herd had a 42 base pair duplication in the nuc gene. These isolates belonged to sequence type 97 (ST97) and clonal complex 97 (CC97). They had a different spa type and multi