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Sample records for aeruginosa clinical isolate

  1. Effect of Tyrosol and Farnesol on Virulence and Antibiotic Resistance of Clinical Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Rhman, Shaymaa Hassan; El-Mahdy, Areej Mostafa; El-Mowafy, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Mixed-species biofilms could create a protected environment that allows for survival to external antimicrobials and allows different bacterial-fungal interactions. Pseudomonas aeruginosa-Candida albicans coexistence is an example for such mixed-species community. Numerous reports demonstrated how P. aeruginosa or its metabolites could influence the growth, morphogenesis, and virulence of C. albicans. In this study, we investigated how the C. albicans quorum sensing compounds, tyrosol and farnesol, might affect Egyptian clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa regarding growth, antibiotic sensitivity, and virulence. We could demonstrate that tyrosol possesses an antibacterial activity against P. aeruginosa (10 µM inhibited more than 50% of growth after 16 h cultivation). Moreover, we could show for the first time that tyrosol strongly inhibits the production of the virulence factors hemolysin and protease in P. aeruginosa, whereas farnesol inhibits, to lower extent, hemolysin production in this bacterial pathogen. Cumulatively, tyrosol is expected to strongly affect P. aeruginosa in mixed microbial biofilm.

  2. Characterization of Toxin-Antitoxin (TA) Systems in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Clinical Isolates in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Savari, Mohammad; Rostami, Soodabeh; Ekrami, Alireza; Bahador, Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is among the most problematic hospital and community-acquired pathogens. Toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems are maintenance regulatory systems in bacteria and have recently been considered new targets for antimicrobial therapy. The prevalence and transcription of these systems in clinical isolates are still unknown. Objectives: The aim of this study was to characterize three types of TA systems (parDE, relBE, and higBA) among P. aeruginosa clinical isolates. Materials and Methods: We typed our clinical isolates by ERIC-PCR (enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus sequence-based polymerase chain reaction) and BOX-PCR. We then investigated 174 P. aeruginosa clinical isolates from three hospitals in Ahvaz, Iran, for the presence of TA system genes, and determined whether these systems were encoded on chromosomes or plasmids by amplification of the flanking regions. Results: Our results showed that in the 174 P. aeruginosa isolates, relBE and higBA were universal, but parDE was less prevalent. Both of the flanking regions of the parDE genes in all positive isolates were amplified. The flanking regions of nearly all relBE genes were amplified. Amplification was observed for the downstream sequence of every higBA locus, as well as for the region upstream of higBA, except in 14 strains. Conclusions: Based on the presence of TA systems in the majority of P. aeruginosa isolates, these could be used as a novel target for antimicrobial therapy. PMID:27099681

  3. Comparative analysis of the volatile metabolomes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Bean, Heather D; Rees, Christiaan A; Hill, Jane E

    2016-11-21

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a nearly ubiquitous Gram-negative organism, well known to occupy a multitude of environmental niches and cause human infections at a variety of bodily sites, due to its metabolic flexibility, secondary to extensive genetic heterogeneity at the species level. Because of its dynamic metabolism and clinical importance, we sought to perform a comparative analysis on the volatile metabolome (the 'volatilome') produced by P. aeruginosa clinical isolates. In this study, we analyzed the headspace volatile molecules of 24 P. aeruginosa clinical isolates grown in vitro, using 2D gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC  ×  GC-TOFMS). We identified 391 non-redundant compounds that we associate with the growth and metabolism of P. aeruginosa (the 'pan-volatilome'). Of these, 70 were produced by all 24 isolates (the 'core volatilome'), 52 by only a single isolate, and the remaining 269 volatile molecules by a subset. Sixty-five of the detected compounds could be assigned putative compound identifications, of which 43 had not previously been associated with P. aeruginosa. Using the accessory volatile molecules, we determined the inter-strain variation in the metabolomes of these isolates, clustering strains by their metabotypes. Assessing the extent of metabolomic diversity in P. aeruginosa through an analysis of the volatile molecules that it produces is a critical next step in the identification of novel diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers.

  4. Use of the paraffin wax baiting system for identification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Massengale, A R; Ollar, R A; Giordano, S J; Felder, M S; Aronoff, S C

    1999-11-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the primary pathogen among the Pseudomonads and is known for its minimal nutritional requirements, capacity to use paraffin as a sole carbon source, and biofilm formation. Because the ability of Pseudomonads to grow on paraffin is not commonly found among human pathogens and the primary Pseudomonas human pathogen is P. aeruginosa, we studied the adaptation of the paraffin baiting system for the growth and identification of clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa. We also studied the effectiveness of combining a fluorescence assay measuring fluorescein (pyoverdin) production and oxidase test with the paraffin baiting assay for P. aeruginosa speciation. Strains were tested for the capacity to use paraffin as a sole carbon source using the paraffin baiting system with Czapek's minimal salt medium. Of 111 P. aeruginosa clinical isolates tested for using paraffin as a sole carbon source, 45% exhibited growth on paraffin at 24 h and 76.6% exhibited growth on paraffin at 48 h. The ability of the reference strains and clinical isolates were then tested for their ability to associate with the paraffin slide in the presence of an additional carbon source. Of 111 P. aeruginosa clinical isolates tested, 85 strains (76.6%), and 102 (93%) were associated with the paraffin surface at 24 and 48 h. We successfully combined fluorescence and oxidase assays with the paraffin baiting system for identification of P. aeruginosa. The simple and inexpensive paraffin baiting system is a useful method for the identification and study of P. aeruginosa suitable for both the clinical and research laboratory.

  5. Antibiotic Tolerance Induced by Lactoferrin in Clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Andrés, María T.; Viejo-Diaz, Mónica; Pérez, Francisco; Fierro, José F.

    2005-01-01

    Lactoferrin-induced cell depolarization and a delayed tobramycin-killing effect on Pseudomonas aeruginosa cells were correlated. This antibiotic tolerance effect (ATE) reflects the ability of a defense protein to modify the activity of an antibiotic as a result of its modulatory effect on bacterial physiology. P. aeruginosa isolates from cystic fibrosis patients showed higher ATE values (≤6-fold) than other clinical strains. PMID:15793153

  6. Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical and environmental isolates constitute a single population with high phenotypic diversity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen with a high incidence of hospital infections that represents a threat to immune compromised patients. Genomic studies have shown that, in contrast to other pathogenic bacteria, clinical and environmental isolates do not show particular genomic differences. In addition, genetic variability of all the P. aeruginosa strains whose genomes have been sequenced is extremely low. This low genomic variability might be explained if clinical strains constitute a subpopulation of this bacterial species present in environments that are close to human populations, which preferentially produce virulence associated traits. Results In this work, we sequenced the genomes and performed phenotypic descriptions for four non-human P. aeruginosa isolates collected from a plant, the ocean, a water-spring, and from dolphin stomach. We show that the four strains are phenotypically diverse and that this is not reflected in genomic variability, since their genomes are almost identical. Furthermore, we performed a detailed comparative genomic analysis of the four strains studied in this work with the thirteen previously reported P. aeruginosa genomes by means of describing their core and pan-genomes. Conclusions Contrary to what has been described for other bacteria we have found that the P. aeruginosa core genome is constituted by a high proportion of genes and that its pan-genome is thus relatively small. Considering the high degree of genomic conservation between isolates of P. aeruginosa from diverse environments, including human tissues, some implications for the treatment of infections are discussed. This work also represents a methodological contribution for the genomic study of P. aeruginosa, since we provide a database of the comparison of all the proteins encoded by the seventeen strains analyzed. PMID:24773920

  7. Effect of Tyrosol and Farnesol on Virulence and Antibiotic Resistance of Clinical Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Hassan Abdel-Rhman, Shaymaa; Mostafa El-Mahdy, Areej; El-Mowafy, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Mixed-species biofilms could create a protected environment that allows for survival to external antimicrobials and allows different bacterial-fungal interactions. Pseudomonas aeruginosa-Candida albicans coexistence is an example for such mixed-species community. Numerous reports demonstrated how P. aeruginosa or its metabolites could influence the growth, morphogenesis, and virulence of C. albicans. In this study, we investigated how the C. albicans quorum sensing compounds, tyrosol and farnesol, might affect Egyptian clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa regarding growth, antibiotic sensitivity, and virulence. We could demonstrate that tyrosol possesses an antibacterial activity against P. aeruginosa (10 µM inhibited more than 50% of growth after 16 h cultivation). Moreover, we could show for the first time that tyrosol strongly inhibits the production of the virulence factors hemolysin and protease in P. aeruginosa, whereas farnesol inhibits, to lower extent, hemolysin production in this bacterial pathogen. Cumulatively, tyrosol is expected to strongly affect P. aeruginosa in mixed microbial biofilm. PMID:26844228

  8. Screening of Molecular Virulence Markers in Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strains Isolated from Clinical Infections

    PubMed Central

    Cotar, Ani-Ioana; Chifiriuc, Mariana-Carmen; Dinu, Sorin; Bucur, Marcela; Iordache, Carmen; Banu, Otilia; Dracea, Olguta; Larion, Cristina; Lazar, Veronica

    2010-01-01

    Staphylococcus (S.) aureus and Pseudomonas (Ps.) aeruginosa are two of the most frequently opportunistic pathogens isolated in nosocomial infections, responsible for severe infections in immunocompromised hosts. The frequent emergence of antibiotic-resistant S. aureus and Ps. aeruginosa strains has determined the development of new strategies in order to elucidate the different mechanisms used by these bacteria at different stages of the infectious process, providing the scientists with new procedures for preventing, or at least improving, the control of S. aureus and Ps. aeruginosa infections. The purpose of this study was to characterize the molecular markers of virulence in S. aureus and Ps. aeruginosa strains isolated from different clinical specimens. We used multiplex and uniplex PCR assays to detect the genes encoding different cell-wall associated and extracellular virulence factors, in order to evaluate potential associations between the presence of putative virulence genes and the outcome of infections caused by these bacteria. Our results demonstrate that all the studied S. aureus and Ps. aeruginosa strains synthesize the majority of the investigated virulence determinants, probably responsible for different types of infections. PMID:21614207

  9. Prevalence, conservation and functional analysis of Yersinia and Escherichia CRISPR regions in clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates.

    PubMed

    Cady, K C; White, A S; Hammond, J H; Abendroth, M D; Karthikeyan, R S G; Lalitha, P; Zegans, M E; O'Toole, G A

    2011-02-01

    Here, we report the characterization of 122 Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates from three distinct geographical locations: Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center in New Hampshire, USA, the Charles T. Campbell Eye Microbiology Lab at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, USA, and the Aravind Eye Hospital in Madurai, India. We identified and located clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) in 45/122 clinical isolates and sequenced these CRISPR, finding that Yersinia subtype CRISPR regions (33 %) were more prevalent than the Escherichia CRISPR region subtype (6 %) in these P. aeruginosa clinical isolates. Further, we observed 132 unique spacers from these 45 CRISPR that are 100 % identical to prophages or sequenced temperate bacteriophage capable of becoming prophages. Most intriguingly, all of these 132 viral spacers matched to temperate bacteriophage/prophages capable of inserting into the host chromosome, but not to extrachromosomally replicating lytic P. aeruginosa bacteriophage. We next assessed the ability of the more prevalent Yersinia subtype CRISPR regions to mediate resistance to bacteriophage infection or lysogeny by deleting the entire CRISPR region from sequenced strain UCBPP-PA14 and six clinical isolates. We found no change in CRISPR-mediated resistance to bacteriophage infection or lysogeny rate even for CRISPR with spacers 100 % identical to a region of the infecting bacteriophage. Lastly, to show these CRISPR and cas genes were expressed and functional, we demonstrated production of small CRISPR RNAs. This work provides both the first examination to our knowledge of CRISPR regions within clinical P. aeruginosa isolates and a collection of defined CRISPR-positive and -negative strains for further CRISPR and cas gene studies.

  10. Genetic diversity of clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates in a public hospital in Spain

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important nosocomial pathogen that exhibits multiple resistances to antibiotics with increasing frequency, making patient treatment more difficult. The aim of the study is to ascertain the population structure of this clinical pathogen in the Hospital Son Llàtzer, Spain. Results A significant set (56) of randomly selected clinical P. aeruginosa isolates, including multidrug and non-multidrug resistant isolates, were assigned to sequence types (STs) and compared them with their antibiotic susceptibility profile classified as follows: extensively drug resistant (XDR), multidrug resistant (MDR) and non-multidrug resistant (non-MDR). The genetic diversity was assessed by applying the multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme developed by Curran and collaborators, and by the phylogenetic analysis of a concatenated tree. The analysis of seven loci, acsA, aroE, guaA, mutL, nuoD, ppsA and trpE, demonstrated that the prevalent STs were ST-175, ST-235 and ST-253. The majority of the XDR and MDR isolates were included in ST-175 and ST-235. ST-253 is the third in frequency and included non-MDR isolates. The 26 singleton sequence types corresponded mainly to non-MDR isolates. Twenty-two isolates corresponded to new sequence types (not previously defined) of which 12 isolates were non-MDR and 10 isolates were MDR or XDR. Conclusions The population structure of clinical P. aeruginosa present in our hospital indicates the coexistence of nonresistant and resistant isolates with the same sequence type. The multiresistant isolates studied are grouped in the prevalent sequence types found in other Spanish hospitals and at the international level, and the susceptible isolates correspond mainly to singleton sequence types. PMID:23773707

  11. [Performance evaluation of VITEK 2 system in meropenem susceptibility testing of clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates].

    PubMed

    Acuner, Ibrahim Cağatay; Bayramoğlu, Gülçin; Birinci, Asuman; Cekiç Cihan, Ciğdem; Bek, Yüksel; Durupınar, Belma

    2011-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important opportunistic pathogen associated with various community-acquired or nosocomial infections. Multi-drug resistant P.aeruginosa strains increasingly cause epidemics and spread in various hospital wards and geographic regions. Carbapenems are among the most effective antimicrobials in the treatment of multi-drug resistant P.aeruginosa infections, and meropenem is the most successful among alternatives in initial therapy. Particularly in severe infections, inappropriate or inadequate initial antimicrobial therapy is independently associated with adverse clinical and economic outcomes. Availability of accurate and rapid susceptibility testing is a priority. Most of the automated microbiology systems can provide rapid results within 8 to 12 hours. In comparison to standard methods, problems in the antimicrobial susceptibility testing of particular microorganisms and antimicrobial agents have been reported for automated microbiology systems. Failures have been reported previously especially in the susceptibility testing of P.aeruginosa versus carbapenem. Most of these studies are designed according to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA, USA) performance analysis scheme (Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: Antimicrobial Susceptibility Test Systems) in a simplified form. However, there are many lacking issues in the design of most of these studies. Among these, insufficient sample size, use of inappropriate reference method, lack of reproducibility testing, and inadequate distribution of study isolates in interpretative categories are of notice. There are only few studies in the literature that evaluate the performance of automated systems in antimicrobial susceptibility testing of carbapenems in clinical P.aeruginosa isolates with a sufficient sample size (n ? 100). However, most of these studies still have one or more major deficiencies in the study design. Furthermore, none of these studies evaluate the performance of

  12. Emergence of NDM – 1 in the Clinical Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in India

    PubMed Central

    Khajuria, Atul; Praharaj, Ashok Kumar; Kumar, Mahadevan; Grover, Naveen

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The present study was undertaken to detect the prevalence of the blaNDM-1 metallo beta lactamases (MBLs) in the isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which were recovered from various clinical samples from hospitalized patients in a tertiary care centre in Pune, India. Methods: A total of 200 isolates of P. aeruginosa which were obtained from various clinical samples were subjected to antibiotic susceptibility testing by the disc-diffusion method and their MICs were determined by the Vitek – 2 Automated Antimicrobial Identification and Susceptibility Testing System against imipenem, meropenem, ticarcillin, amikacin, gentamicin, tobramycin, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, tigecycline, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, ampicillin/sulbactam, piperacillin/tazobactam, cefoperazone/sulbactam, cefepime, tetracycline, ceftazidime, ceftriaxone and colistin. Their MICs were also determined by the Etest method against imipenem, meropenem, piperacillin, tobramycin, ceftazidime, tigecycline and colistin. The presence of blaNDM-1 was detected by PCR and it was confirmed by sequencing the gene which was present in the isolates which exhibited carbapenem resistance. The experimental transferability of the plasmids which carried blaNDM-1 was determined by using E. coli J53 as the recipient. Result: In the present study, four isolates of P. aeruginosa, which carried the blaNDM-1 gene, were resistant to imipenem and meropenem. These blaNDM-1 carrying isolates remained susceptible to colistin. The plasmid carrying blaNDM-1 was successfully transferred from the four isolates to E. coli J53 recipients. Conclusions: We are reporting the emergence of the P. aeruginosa carrying NDM-1gene, which exhibited resistance to imipenem and meropenem, for the first time from India. PMID:23998058

  13. Carbapenem-resistant and cephalosporin-susceptible: a worrisome phenotype among Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Campana, Eloiza Helena; Xavier, Danilo Elias; Petrolini, Fernanda Villas-Boas; Cordeiro-Moura, Jhonatha Rodrigo; Araujo, Maria Rita Elmor de; Gales, Ana Cristina

    The mechanisms involved in the uncommon resistance phenotype, carbapenem resistance and broad-spectrum cephalosporin susceptibility, were investigated in 25 Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates that exhibited this phenotype, which were recovered from three different hospitals located in São Paulo, Brazil. The antimicrobial susceptibility profile was determined by CLSI broth microdilution. β-lactamase-encoding genes were investigated by PCR followed by DNA sequencing. Carbapenem hydrolysis activity was investigated by spectrophotometer and MALDI-TOF assays. The mRNA transcription level of oprD was assessed by qRT-PCR and the outer membrane proteins profile was evaluated by SDS-PAGE. Genetic relationship among P. aeruginosa isolates was assessed by PFGE. Carbapenems hydrolysis was not detected by carbapenemase assay in the carbapenem-resistant and cephalosporin-susceptible P. aueruginosa clinical isolates. OprD decreased expression was observed in all P. aeruginosa isolates by qRT-PCR. The outer membrane protein profile by SDS-PAGE suggested a change in the expression of the 46kDa porin that could correspond to OprD porin. The isolates were clustered into 17 genotypes without predominance of a specific PFGE pattern. These results emphasize the involvement of multiple chromosomal mechanisms in carbapenem-resistance among clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa, alert for adaptation of P. aeruginosa clinical isolates under antimicrobial selective pressure and make aware of the emergence of an uncommon phenotype among P. aeruginosa clinical isolates.

  14. Optimisation of AP-PCR fingerprinting discriminatory power for clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Dabrowski, Waldemar; Czekajlo-Kolodziej, Urszula; Medrala, Dagmara; Giedrys-Kalemba, Stefania

    2003-01-21

    Recently methods based on analysis of arbitrarily amplified target sites of microorganism genomes have been extensively applied in microbiological studies. The range of their applications is limited by problems with discrimination and reproducibility resulting from lack of standardised and reliable methods of optimisation. By orthogonal-array optimisation most advantageous and optimal parameters for highly discriminatory primers (CagA2+CMVin2) were selected and efficient AP-PCR (arbitrarily primed-polymerase chain reaction) fingerprinting conditions for Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates were set up. Stable and multiplex amplicon profiles obtained in this study revealed high level of intraspecies DNA polymorphism among 20 analysed clinical strains of P. aeruginosa proving optimised AP-PCR fingerprinting to be useful in epidemiological typing of the species.

  15. Characterization of five newly isolated bacteriophages active against Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical strains.

    PubMed

    Kwiatek, Magdalena; Mizak, Lidia; Parasion, Sylwia; Gryko, Romuald; Olender, Alina; Niemcewicz, Marcin

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that causes serious infections, especially in patients with immunodeficiency. It exhibits multiple mechanisms of resistance, including efflux pumps, antibiotic modifying enzymes and limited membrane permeability. The primary reason for the development of novel therapeutics for P. aeruginosa infections is the declining efficacy of conventional antibiotic therapy. These clinical problems caused a revitalization of interest in bacteriophages, which are highly specific and have very effective antibacterial activity as well as several other advantages over traditional antimicrobial agents. Above all, so far, no serious or irreversible side effects of phage therapy have been described. Five newly purified P. aeruginosa phages named vB_PaeM_WP1, vB_PaeM_WP2, vB_PaeM_WP3, vB_PaeM_WP4 and vB_PaeP_WP5 have been characterized as potential candidates for use in phage therapy. They are representatives of the Myoviridae and Podoviridae families. Their host range, genome size, structural proteins and stability in various physical and chemical conditions were tested. The results of these preliminary investigations indicate that the newly isolated bacteriophages may be considered for use in phagotherapy.

  16. Crataeva nurvala nanoparticles inhibit virulence factors and biofilm formation in clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Ali, Syed Ghazanfar; Ansari, Mohammad Azam; Khan, Haris M; Jalal, Mohammad; Mahdi, Abbas Ali; Cameotra, Swaranjit Singh

    2017-03-01

    Green synthesized nanoparticles have gained great attention due to their non-toxic and non-hazardous nature. In the present study, bark extract of the medicinal plant in Ayurveda Crataeva nurvala (Buch-Ham) (CN) was chosen for the biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). These NPs were characterized by Ultra violet visible spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infra Red, Atomic Force Microscopy, and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). The average particle size of green synthesized CN-AgNPs was 15.2 ± 1.01 nm. Gas chromatography- mass spectrometry analysis of methanolic bark extract involved in the formation of CN-AgNPs revealed lupeol as a major active component. In this study, CN-AgNPs (15 μg ml(-1) ) efficiently suppressed the production of quorum sensing mediated virulence factors viz. pyocyanin, protease, hemolysin, and biofilm formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The pyocyanin production was strongly inhibited (74.64%) followed by proteolysis (47.3%) and hemolysin production (47.7%). However, the biofilm forming ability was maximally reduced up to 79.70%. Moreover, the Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopic Analysis showed that CN-AgNPs inhibit colonization of P. aeruginosa on to the surface. Furthermore, TEM analysis revealed internalization of CN-AgNPs inside the bacterial cell. It is concluded that green synthesized AgNPs have great potential to inhibit virulence factors and biofilm forming ability of drug-resistant clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa.

  17. Growing Menace of Antibacterial Resistance in Clinical Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Nepal: An Insight of Beta-Lactamase Production

    PubMed Central

    Dhital, Rabindra; Puri, Ram; Chaudhary, Niraj; Khatiwada, Suresh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most frequently isolated organism as it acts as the opportunistic pathogen and can cause infections in immunosuppressed patients. The production of different types of beta-lactamases renders this organism resistant to many commonly used antimicrobials. Therefore, the aim of this study was to document the antibiotic resistance rate in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from different clinical specimens. Methods. Pseudomonas aeruginosa recovered was identified by standard microbiological methods. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed by modified Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method following Clinical and Laboratory Standard Institute (CLSI) guidelines and all the suspected isolates were tested for the production of ESBLs, MBLs, and AmpC. Results. Out of total (178) isolates, 83.1% were recovered from the inpatient department (IPD). Majority of the isolates mediated resistance towards the beta-lactam antibiotics, while nearly half of the isolates were resistant to ciprofloxacin. Most of the aminoglycosides used showed resistance rate up to 75% but amikacin proved to be better option. No resistance to polymyxin was observed. ESBLs, MBLs, and AmpC mediated resistance was seen in 33.1%, 30.9%, and 15.7% isolates, respectively. Conclusions. Antibiotic resistance rate and beta-lactamase mediated resistance were high. Thus, regular surveillance of drug resistance is of utmost importance. PMID:27642599

  18. Evaluate the Relationship Between Class 1 Integrons and Drug Resistance Genes in Clinical Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Seyed Mohammad Javad; Naeini, Niloofar Shoaee; Khaledi, Azad; Daymad, Seyede Fatemeh; Esmaeili, Davoud

    2016-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates is increasing and it is considered as one of the major public health concerns in the world. The association between integrons and drug resistance has been proven and evidences suggest that integrons are coding and responsible for dissemination of antibiotic resistance among P. aeruginosa isolates. Objective: This study is aimed to evaluate the relationship between class 1 integrons and drug resistance genes in clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa from burn patients. Methods: 100 isolates of P. aeruginosa were collected from burn patients hospitalized in the skin ward of Shahid Motahari hospital and susceptibility testing was performed by disk diffusion method (Kirby-Bauer). Then DNA was extracted and PCR technique was performed for the detection of class 1 integrons and drug resistance genes. Then data was analyzed using SPSS software. Results: The most effective antibiotic was polymyxin B with sensitivity 100%, and the most resistance was observed to the ciprofloxacin (93%) and amikacin (67%), respectively. The maximum and lowest frequencies of drug resistance genes belonged to the aac (6 ') - 1, VEB-1 with prevalence rate 93% and 10%, respectively. The statistical Chi-square test did not find any significant correlation between class 1 integrons and drug resistance genes (p˃ 0.05). Conclusion: Although no significant correlation between class 1 integrons and drug resistance was observed, but the resistance rate to antibiotics tested among P. aeruginosa isolates was high. So, surveillance, optimization and strict consideration of antimicrobial use and control of infection are necessary. PMID:28077975

  19. Biofilm formation, antibiotic susceptibility and RAPD genotypes in Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical strains isolated from single centre intensive care unit patients.

    PubMed

    Vaněrková, Martina; Mališová, Barbora; Kotásková, Iva; Holá, Veronika; Růžička, Filip; Freiberger, Tomáš

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse genotypes, antimicrobial susceptibility patterns and serotypes in Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical strains, including the clonal dissemination of particular strains throughout various intensive care units in one medical centre. Using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD-PCR) and P. aeruginosa antisera, 22 different genotypes and 8 serotypes were defined among 103 isolates from 48 patients. No direct association between P. aeruginosa strain genotypes and serotypes was observed. RAPD typing in strains with the same serotype revealed different genotypes and, on the contrary, most strains with a different serotype displayed the same amplification pattern. The resulting banding patterns showed a high degree of genetic heterogeneity among all isolates from the patients examined, suggesting a non-clonal relationship between isolates from these patients. A higher degree of antibiotic resistance and stronger biofilm production in common genotypes compared to rare ones and genetic homogeneity of the most resistant strains indicated the role of antibiotic pressure in acquiring resistant and more virulent strains in our hospital. In conclusion, genetic characterisation of P. aeruginosa strains using RAPD method was shown to be more accurate in epidemiological analyses than phenotyping.

  20. In Vitro Activity of Fosfomycin against a Collection of Clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from 16 Spanish Hospitals: Establishing the Validity of Standard Broth Microdilution as Susceptibility Testing Method

    PubMed Central

    Díez-Aguilar, María; del Campo, Rosa; García-Castillo, María; Zamora, Javier; Cantón, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    The broth microdilution method for fosfomycin and Pseudomonas aeruginosa was assessed and compared with the approved agar dilution method in 206 genetically unrelated P. aeruginosa clinical isolates. Essential agreement between the two methods was 84%, and categorical agreement was 89.3%. Additionally, Etest and disk diffusion assays were performed. Results validate broth microdilution as a reliable susceptibility testing method for fosfomycin against P. aeruginosa. Conversely, unacceptable concordance was established between Etest and disk diffusion results with agar dilution results. PMID:23939889

  1. Mutational and acquired carbapenem resistance mechanisms in multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates from Recife, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Cavalcanti, Felipe Lira de Sá; Mirones, Cristina Rodríguez; Paucar, Elena Román; Montes, Laura Álvarez; Leal-Balbino, Tereza Cristina; Morais, Marcia Maria Camargo de; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Ocampo-Sosa, Alain Antonio

    2015-12-01

    An investigation was carried out into the genetic mechanisms responsible for multidrug resistance in nine carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from different hospitals in Recife, Brazil. Susceptibility to antimicrobial agents was determined by broth microdilution. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was employed to detect the presence of genes encoding β-lactamases, aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes (AMEs), 16S rRNA methylases, integron-related genes and OprD. Expression of genes coding for efflux pumps and AmpC cephalosporinase were assessed by quantitative PCR. The outer membrane proteins were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The blaSPM-1, blaKPC-2 and blaGES-1 genes were detected in P. aeruginosa isolates in addition to different AME genes. The loss of OprD in nine isolates was mainly due to frameshift mutations, premature stop codons and point mutations. An association of loss of OprD with the overexpression of MexAB-OprM and MexXY-OprM was observed in most isolates. Hyper-production of AmpC was also observed in three isolates. Clonal relationship of the isolates was determined by repetitive element palindromic-PCR and multilocus sequence typing. Our results show that the loss of OprD along with overexpression of efflux pumps and β-lactamase production were responsible for the multidrug resistance in the isolates analysed.

  2. Widespread of ESBL- and carbapenemase GES-type genes on carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates: a multicenter study in Mexican hospitals.

    PubMed

    Garza-Ramos, Ulises; Barrios, Humberto; Reyna-Flores, Fernando; Tamayo-Legorreta, Elsa; Catalan-Najera, Juan C; Morfin-Otero, Rayo; Rodríguez-Noriega, Eduardo; Volkow, Patricia; Cornejo-Juarez, Patricia; González, Alejandra; Gaytan-Martinez, Jesus; Del Rocío Gónzalez-Martínez, Marisela; Vazquez-Farias, Maria; Silva-Sanchez, Jesus

    2015-02-01

    The present work describes a prevalence of 36.2% of carbapenemases IMP-, VIM-, and GES-type on 124 imipenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates. The ESBL GES-19 and carbapenemase GES-20 genes were the most prevalent (84.4%) β-lactamases among imipenem-resistant P. aeruginosa clinical isolates in Mexico. These genes are chromosomal encoded on embedded class 1 integron arrays.

  3. Potential of Ocimum basilicum L. and Salvia officinalis L. essential oils against biofilms of P. aeruginosa clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Stojanović-Radić, Z; Pejcić, M; Stojanović, N; Sharifi-Rad, J; Stanković, N

    2016-08-29

    Biofilms are complex communities of microorganisms, responsible for more than 60% of the chronic human infections and they represent one of the leading concerns in medicine. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is human pathogenic bacteria which causes numerous diseases and is known for its ability to produce biofilm. Ocimum basilicum L. (basil) and Salvia officinalis L. (sage) are widely used plants in traditional medicine for the treatment of different conditions. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the potential of basil and sage essential oils against P. aeruginosa biofilm producing strains. The efficacy of two essential oils on P. aeruginosa biofilm forming ability was determined using crystal violet method. Out of 15 strains isolated from different clinical biological samples, two were strong, 11 moderate and one weak biofilm producer. Good efficacy of sage essential oil towards strong and weak biofilm producers, but not of basil essential oil, was observed. In the case of moderate biofilm producers, 81.8% showed lower biofilm production after incubation with the sage oil, while 63.6% showed the reduction of biofilm production after basil essential oil treatment. The obtained results showed high potential of both oils for the treatment of persistent infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

  4. Label-free SRM-based relative quantification of antibiotic resistance mechanisms in Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Charretier, Yannick; Köhler, Thilo; Cecchini, Tiphaine; Bardet, Chloé; Cherkaoui, Abdessalam; Llanes, Catherine; Bogaerts, Pierre; Chatellier, Sonia; Charrier, Jean-Philippe; Schrenzel, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Both acquired and intrinsic mechanisms play a crucial role in Pseudomonas aeruginosa antibiotic resistance. Many clinically relevant resistance mechanisms result from changes in gene expression, namely multidrug efflux pump overproduction, AmpC β-lactamase induction or derepression, and inactivation or repression of the carbapenem-specific porin OprD. Changes in gene expression are usually assessed using reverse-transcription quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) assays. Here, we evaluated label-free Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM)-based mass spectrometry to directly quantify proteins involved in antibiotic resistance. We evaluated the label-free SRM using a defined set of P. aeruginosa isolates with known resistance mechanisms and compared it with RT-qPCR. Referring to efflux systems, we found a more robust relative quantification of antibiotic resistance mechanisms by SRM than RT-qPCR. The SRM-based approach was applied to a set of clinical P. aeruginosa isolates to detect antibiotic resistance proteins. This multiplexed SRM-based approach is a rapid and reliable method for the simultaneous detection and quantification of resistance mechanisms and we demonstrate its relevance for antibiotic resistance prediction.

  5. Label-free SRM-based relative quantification of antibiotic resistance mechanisms in Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates

    PubMed Central

    Charretier, Yannick; Köhler, Thilo; Cecchini, Tiphaine; Bardet, Chloé; Cherkaoui, Abdessalam; Llanes, Catherine; Bogaerts, Pierre; Chatellier, Sonia; Charrier, Jean-Philippe; Schrenzel, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Both acquired and intrinsic mechanisms play a crucial role in Pseudomonas aeruginosa antibiotic resistance. Many clinically relevant resistance mechanisms result from changes in gene expression, namely multidrug efflux pump overproduction, AmpC β-lactamase induction or derepression, and inactivation or repression of the carbapenem-specific porin OprD. Changes in gene expression are usually assessed using reverse-transcription quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) assays. Here, we evaluated label-free Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM)-based mass spectrometry to directly quantify proteins involved in antibiotic resistance. We evaluated the label-free SRM using a defined set of P. aeruginosa isolates with known resistance mechanisms and compared it with RT-qPCR. Referring to efflux systems, we found a more robust relative quantification of antibiotic resistance mechanisms by SRM than RT-qPCR. The SRM-based approach was applied to a set of clinical P. aeruginosa isolates to detect antibiotic resistance proteins. This multiplexed SRM-based approach is a rapid and reliable method for the simultaneous detection and quantification of resistance mechanisms and we demonstrate its relevance for antibiotic resistance prediction. PMID:25713571

  6. Changing susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from cystic fibrosis patients with the clinical use of newer antibiotics.

    PubMed Central

    Bosso, J A; Allen, J E; Matsen, J M

    1989-01-01

    To detect a change in antibiotic susceptibility patterns in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates upon the introduction and clinical use of ciprofloxacin, aztreonam, and ceftazidime, MICs for clinical isolates collected before introduction of the antibiotics, during early clinical use, and later were determined for these and seven other antipseudomonal antibiotics. Concomitant resistance to two or more antibiotics was also studied. Over the three study periods, rates of susceptibility to 9 of the 10 antibiotics decreased. The largest decrease occurred with ceftazidime. Analysis of subsets of isolates from patients treated with ciprofloxacin or aztreonam also showed declining susceptibility to the latter but a stabilization of susceptibility to the former after an initial decline. Concomitant resistance within and among antibiotic classes was common. PMID:2499252

  7. Detection of Quorum Sensing Activity in the Multidrug-Resistant Clinical Isolate Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain GB11

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Huey Jia; Ee, Robson; Cheong, Yuet Meng; Tan, Wen-Si; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2014-01-01

    A multidrug-resistant clinical bacteria strain GB11 was isolated from a wound swab on the leg of a patient. Identity of stain GB11 as Pseudomonas aeruginosa was validated by using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Detection of the production of signaling molecules, N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs), was conducted using three different bacterial biosensors. A total of four different AHLs were found to be produced by strain GB11, namely N-butyryl homoserine lactone (C4-HSL), N-hexanoylhomoserine lactone (C6-HSL), N-octanoyl homoserine lactone (C8-HSL) and N-3-oxo-dodecanoylhomoserine lactone (3-oxo-C12-HSL) using high resolution liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Of these detected AHLs, 3-oxo-C12-HSL was found to be the most abundant AHL produced by P. aeruginosa GB11. PMID:25019635

  8. Effect of Quorum Quenching Lactonase in Clinical Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Comparison with Quorum Sensing Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Guendouze, Assia; Plener, Laure; Bzdrenga, Janek; Jacquet, Pauline; Rémy, Benjamin; Elias, Mikael; Lavigne, Jean-Philippe; Daudé, David; Chabrière, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram negative pathogenic bacterium involved in many human infections including otitis, keratitis, pneumonia, and diabetic foot ulcers. P. aeruginosa uses a communication system, referred to as quorum sensing (QS), to adopt a group behavior by synchronizing the expression of certain genes. Among the regulated traits, secretion of proteases or siderophores, motility and biofilm formation are mainly involved in the pathogenicity. Many efforts have been dedicated to the development of quorum sensing inhibitors (QSI) and quorum quenching (QQ) agents to disrupt QS. QQ enzymes have been particularly considered as they may act in a catalytic way without entering the cell. Here we focus on the lactonase SsoPox which was previously investigated for its ability to degrade the signaling molecules, acyl-homoserine lactones, in particular on the engineered variant SsoPox-W263I. We highlight the potential of SsoPox-W263I to inhibit the virulence of 51 clinical P. aeruginosa isolates from diabetic foot ulcers by decreasing the secretion of two virulence factors, proteases and pyocyanin, as well as biofilm formation. We further compared the effect of SsoPox-W263I to the comprehensively described QSI, 5-fluorouracil and C-30. We found the lactonase SsoPox-W263I to be significantly more effective than the tested QSI at their respective concentration optimum and to retain its activity after immobilization steps, paving the way for future therapeutic applications.

  9. Effect of Quorum Quenching Lactonase in Clinical Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Comparison with Quorum Sensing Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Guendouze, Assia; Plener, Laure; Bzdrenga, Janek; Jacquet, Pauline; Rémy, Benjamin; Elias, Mikael; Lavigne, Jean-Philippe; Daudé, David; Chabrière, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram negative pathogenic bacterium involved in many human infections including otitis, keratitis, pneumonia, and diabetic foot ulcers. P. aeruginosa uses a communication system, referred to as quorum sensing (QS), to adopt a group behavior by synchronizing the expression of certain genes. Among the regulated traits, secretion of proteases or siderophores, motility and biofilm formation are mainly involved in the pathogenicity. Many efforts have been dedicated to the development of quorum sensing inhibitors (QSI) and quorum quenching (QQ) agents to disrupt QS. QQ enzymes have been particularly considered as they may act in a catalytic way without entering the cell. Here we focus on the lactonase SsoPox which was previously investigated for its ability to degrade the signaling molecules, acyl-homoserine lactones, in particular on the engineered variant SsoPox-W263I. We highlight the potential of SsoPox-W263I to inhibit the virulence of 51 clinical P. aeruginosa isolates from diabetic foot ulcers by decreasing the secretion of two virulence factors, proteases and pyocyanin, as well as biofilm formation. We further compared the effect of SsoPox-W263I to the comprehensively described QSI, 5-fluorouracil and C-30. We found the lactonase SsoPox-W263I to be significantly more effective than the tested QSI at their respective concentration optimum and to retain its activity after immobilization steps, paving the way for future therapeutic applications. PMID:28261183

  10. Plasmid Profile Analysis and bla VIM Gene Detection of Metalo β-lactamase (MBL) Producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from Clinical Samples

    PubMed Central

    M, Jeya

    2014-01-01

    Introduction:Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a frequent colonizer of hospitalized patients. They are responsible for serious infections such as meningitis, urological infections, septicemia and pneumonia. Carbapenem resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is currently increasingly reported which is often mediated by production of metallo-β-lactamase (MBL). Multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates may involve reduced cell wall permeability, production of chromosomal and plasmid mediated β lactamases, aminoglycosides modifying enzymes and an active multidrug efflux mechanism. Objective: This study is aimed to detect the presence and the nature of plasmids among metallo-β-lactamase producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates. Also to detect the presence of bla VIM gene from these isolates. Materials and Methods: Clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa showing the metalo-β-lactamase enzyme (MBL) production were isolated. The MBL production was confirmed by three different methods. From the MBL producing isolates plasmid extraction was done by alkaline lysis method. Plasmid positive isolates were subjected for blaVIM gene detection by PCR method. Results: Two thousand seventy six clinical samples yielded 316 (15.22%) Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates, out of which 141 (44.62%) were multidrug resistant. Among them 25 (17.73%) were metallo-β-lactamase enzyme producers. Plasmids were extracted from 18 out of 25 isolates tested. Five out of 18 isolates were positive for the blaVIM gene detection by the PCR amplification. Conclusion: The MBL producers were susceptible to polymyxin /colistin with MIC ranging from 0.5 – 2μg/ml. Molecular detection of specific genes bla VIM were positive among the carbapenem resistant isolates. PMID:25120980

  11. Fitness Cost of Fluoroquinolone Resistance in Clinical Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Differs by Type III Secretion Genotype

    PubMed Central

    Agnello, Melissa; Finkel, Steven E.; Wong-Beringer, Annie

    2016-01-01

    Fluoroquinolone (FQ) resistance is highly prevalent among clinical strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, limiting treatment options. We have reported previously that highly virulent strains containing the exoU gene of the type III secretion system are more likely to be FQ-resistant than strains containing the exoS gene, as well as more likely to acquire resistance-conferring mutations in gyrA/B and parC/E. We hypothesize that FQ-resistance imposes a lower fitness cost on exoU compared to exoS strains, thus allowing for better adaptation to the FQ-rich clinical environment. We created isogenic mutants containing a common FQ-resistance conferring point mutation in parC from three exoU to three exoS clinical isolates and tested fitness in vitro using head-to-head competition assays. The mutation differentially affected fitness in the exoU and exoS strains tested. While the addition of the parC mutation dramatically increased fitness in one of the exoU strains leaving the other two unaffected, all three exoS strains displayed a general decrease in fitness. In addition, we found that exoU strains may be able to compensate for the fitness costs associated with the mutation through better regulation of supercoiling compared to the exoS strains. These results may provide a biological explanation for the observed predominance of the virulent exoU genotype in FQ-resistant clinical subpopulations and represent the first investigation into potential differences in fitness costs of FQ-resistance that are linked to the virulence genotype of P. aeruginosa. Understanding the fitness costs of antibiotic resistance and possibilities of compensation for these costs is essential for the rational development of strategies to combat the problem of antibiotic resistance. PMID:27757111

  12. Fitness Cost of Fluoroquinolone Resistance in Clinical Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Differs by Type III Secretion Genotype.

    PubMed

    Agnello, Melissa; Finkel, Steven E; Wong-Beringer, Annie

    2016-01-01

    Fluoroquinolone (FQ) resistance is highly prevalent among clinical strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, limiting treatment options. We have reported previously that highly virulent strains containing the exoU gene of the type III secretion system are more likely to be FQ-resistant than strains containing the exoS gene, as well as more likely to acquire resistance-conferring mutations in gyrA/B and parC/E. We hypothesize that FQ-resistance imposes a lower fitness cost on exoU compared to exoS strains, thus allowing for better adaptation to the FQ-rich clinical environment. We created isogenic mutants containing a common FQ-resistance conferring point mutation in parC from three exoU to three exoS clinical isolates and tested fitness in vitro using head-to-head competition assays. The mutation differentially affected fitness in the exoU and exoS strains tested. While the addition of the parC mutation dramatically increased fitness in one of the exoU strains leaving the other two unaffected, all three exoS strains displayed a general decrease in fitness. In addition, we found that exoU strains may be able to compensate for the fitness costs associated with the mutation through better regulation of supercoiling compared to the exoS strains. These results may provide a biological explanation for the observed predominance of the virulent exoU genotype in FQ-resistant clinical subpopulations and represent the first investigation into potential differences in fitness costs of FQ-resistance that are linked to the virulence genotype of P. aeruginosa. Understanding the fitness costs of antibiotic resistance and possibilities of compensation for these costs is essential for the rational development of strategies to combat the problem of antibiotic resistance.

  13. Detection of KPC Carbapenemase in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated From Clinical Samples Using Modified Hodge Test and Boronic Acid Phenotypic Methods and Their Comparison With the Polymerase Chain Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Falahat, Saeed; Shojapour, Mana; Sadeghi, Abdorrahim

    2016-01-01

    Background Bacterial resistance to antibiotics has become a major source of concern for public health. Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains are important opportunistic pathogens. These bacteria have a high resistance to a wide range of existing antimicrobials and antibiotics. Objectives The present study was performed to evaluate the frequency of KPC in P. aeruginosa isolated from clinical samples of educational hospitals of Arak University of Medical Sciences, using the mentioned phenotypic and genotypic methods. Materials and Methods One hundred and eight non-duplicate clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa were collected from hospitals of Arak University of Medical Sciences, Arak, Iran. Antibacterial susceptibility was determined by the disk diffusion method. KPC production was confirmed by the Modified Hodge Test (MHT), which is a phenotypic test, and combined-disk test with boronic acid and the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). Results In the present study, 13 isolates (12%) of P. aeruginosa were positive for KPC, using PCR. Comparison of the two phenotypic methods used in this study showed that boronic acid is more sensitive than MHT in identification of KPC-producing strains (84.6% vs. 77%). Conclusions Utilization of reliable methods for identifying carbapenemase-producing strains and determining their antibiotic resistance pattern could have a very important role in treatment of infections caused by these strains. A substantial amount of P. aeruginosa isolated from clinical samples of hospitals in Arak (Iran) produce KPC carbapenemase. Due to their low specificity, MHT and boronic acid phenotypic methods could not completely identify KPC-producing P. aeruginosa. However, the sensitivity of boronic acid phenotypic method in detection of KPC was higher than MHT. PMID:27800140

  14. Metallo-β-Lactamase Gene blaIMP-15 in a Class 1 Integron, In95, from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Clinical Isolates from a Hospital in Mexico▿

    PubMed Central

    Garza-Ramos, U.; Morfin-Otero, R.; Sader, H. S.; Jones, R. N.; Hernández, E.; Rodriguez-Noriega, E.; Sanchez, A.; Carrillo, B.; Esparza-Ahumada, S.; Silva-Sanchez, J.

    2008-01-01

    During 2003, 40 carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates collected in a Mexican tertiary-care hospital were screened for metallo-β-lactamase production. Thirteen isolates produced IMP-15, and 12 had a single pulsed-field gel electrophoresis pattern. The blaIMP-15 gene cassette was inserted in a plasmid-borne integron with a unique array of gene cassettes and was named In95. PMID:18490501

  15. Antimicrobial potentials of Helicteres isora silver nanoparticles against extensively drug-resistant (XDR) clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Mapara, Nikunj; Sharma, Mansi; Shriram, Varsha; Bharadwaj, Renu; Mohite, K C; Kumar, Vinay

    2015-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a leading opportunistic pathogen and its expanding drug resistance is a growing menace to public health. Its ubiquitous nature and multiple resistance mechanisms make it a difficult target for antimicrobial chemotherapy and require a fresh approach for developing new antimicrobial agents against it. The broad-spectrum antibacterial effects of silver nanoparticles (SNPs) make them an excellent candidate for use in the medical field. However, attempts made to check their potency against extensively drug-resistant (XDR) microbes are meager. This study describes the biosynthesis and biostabilization of SNPs by Helicteres isora aqueous fruit extract and their characterization by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Majority of SNPs synthesized were of 8--20-nm size. SNPs exhibited dose-dependent antibacterial activities against four XDR P. aeruginosa (XDR-PA) clinical isolates as revealed by growth curves, with a minimum inhibitory concentration of 300 μg/ml. The SNPs exhibited antimicrobial activity against all strains, with maximum zone of inhibition (16.4 mm) in XRD-PA-2 at 1000 μg/ml. Amongst four strains, their susceptibilities to SNPs were in the following order: XDR-PA-2 > XDR-PA-4 > XDR-PA-3 > XDR-PA-1. The exposure of bacterial cells to 300 μg/ml SNPs resulted into a substantial leakage of reducing sugars and proteins, inactivation of respiratory chain dehydrogenases, and eventual cell death. SNPs also induced lipid peroxidation, a possible underlying factor to membrane porosity. The effects were more pronounced in XDR-PA-2 which may be correlated with its higher susceptibility to SNPs. These results are indicative of SNP-induced turbulence of membranous permeability as an important causal factor in XDR-PA growth inhibition and death.

  16. Co-Carriage of blaKPC-2 and blaNDM-1 in Clinical Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Associated with Hospital Infections from India.

    PubMed

    Paul, Deepjyoti; Dhar Chanda, Debadatta; Maurya, Anand Prakash; Mishra, Shweta; Chakravarty, Atanu; Sharma, Gauri Dutt; Bhattacharjee, Amitabha

    2015-01-01

    Global spread of KPC poses to be a serious threat complicating treatment options in hospital settings. The present study investigates the genetic environment of blaKPC-2 among clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from a tertiary referral hospital of India. The study isolates were collected from different wards and clinics of Silchar Medical College and Hospital, India, from 2012-2013. The presence of blaKPC was confirmed by genotypic characterization followed by sequencing. Cloning of the blaKPC-2 gene was performed and the genetic environment of this gene was characterized as well. Transferability of the resistance gene was determined by transformation assay and Southern hybridization. Additionally, restriction mapping was also carried out. Two isolates of P. aeruginosa were found to harbor blaKPC-2, were resistant towards aminoglycosides, quinolone and β-lactam-β-lactamase inhibitor combination. In both the isolates, the resistance determinant was associated with class 1 integron and horizontally transferable. Both the isolates were co-harboring blaNDM-1. The first detection of this integron mediated blaKPC-2 coexisting with blaNDM-1 in P. aeruginosa from India is worrisome, and further investigation is required to track the gene cassette mediated blaKPC-2 in terms of infection control and to prevent the spread of this gene in hospitals as well as in the community.

  17. Pharmacodynamics of Aerosolized Fosfomycin and Amikacin against Resistant Clinical Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae in a Hollow-Fiber Infection Model: Experimental Basis for Combination Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sime, Fekade Bruck; Johnson, Adam; Whalley, Sarah; Santoyo-Castelazo, Anahi; Montgomery, A. Bruce; Walters, Kathie Ann; Lipman, Jeffrey; Hope, William W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT There has been a resurgence of interest in aerosolization of antibiotics for treatment of patients with severe pneumonia caused by multidrug-resistant pathogens. A combination formulation of amikacin-fosfomycin is currently undergoing clinical testing although the exposure-response relationships of these drugs have not been fully characterized. The aim of this study was to describe the individual and combined antibacterial effects of simulated epithelial lining fluid exposures of aerosolized amikacin and fosfomycin against resistant clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MICs of 16 mg/liter and 64 mg/liter) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (MICs of 2 mg/liter and 64 mg/liter) using a dynamic hollow-fiber infection model over 7 days. Targeted peak concentrations of 300 mg/liter amikacin and/or 1,200 mg/liter fosfomycin as a 12-hourly dosing regimens were used. Quantitative cultures were performed to describe changes in concentrations of the total and resistant bacterial populations. The targeted starting inoculum was 108 CFU/ml for both strains. We observed that neither amikacin nor fosfomycin monotherapy was bactericidal against P. aeruginosa while both were associated with rapid amplification of resistant P. aeruginosa strains (about 108 to 109 CFU/ml within 24 to 48 h). For K. pneumoniae, amikacin but not fosfomycin was bactericidal. When both drugs were combined, a rapid killing was observed for P. aeruginosa and K. pneumoniae (6-log kill within 24 h). Furthermore, the combination of amikacin and fosfomycin effectively suppressed growth of resistant strains of P. aeruginosa and K. pneumoniae. In conclusion, the combination of amikacin and fosfomycin was effective at maximizing bacterial killing and suppressing emergence of resistance against these clinical isolates. PMID:27795380

  18. Mutational and acquired carbapenem resistance mechanisms in multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates from Recife, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Cavalcanti, Felipe Lira de Sá; Mirones, Cristina Rodríguez; Paucar, Elena Román; Montes, Laura Álvarez; Leal-Balbino, Tereza Cristina; de Morais, Marcia Maria Camargo; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Ocampo-Sosa, Alain Antonio

    2015-01-01

    An investigation was carried out into the genetic mechanisms responsible for multidrug resistance in nine carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosaisolates from different hospitals in Recife, Brazil. Susceptibility to antimicrobial agents was determined by broth microdilution. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was employed to detect the presence of genes encoding β-lactamases, aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes (AMEs), 16S rRNA methylases, integron-related genes and OprD. Expression of genes coding for efflux pumps and AmpC cephalosporinase were assessed by quantitative PCR. The outer membrane proteins were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The blaSPM-1, blaKPC-2 and blaGES-1 genes were detected in P. aeruginosaisolates in addition to different AME genes. The loss of OprD in nine isolates was mainly due to frameshift mutations, premature stop codons and point mutations. An association of loss of OprD with the overexpression of MexAB-OprM and MexXY-OprM was observed in most isolates. Hyper-production of AmpC was also observed in three isolates. Clonal relationship of the isolates was determined by repetitive element palindromic-PCR and multilocus sequence typing. Our results show that the loss of OprD along with overexpression of efflux pumps and β-lactamase production were responsible for the multidrug resistance in the isolates analysed. PMID:26676375

  19. Sequence Types 235, 111, and 132 Predominate among Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Clinical Isolates in Croatia

    PubMed Central

    Izdebski, Radosław; Butic, Iva; Jelic, Marko; Abram, Maja; Koscak, Iva; Baraniak, Anna; Hryniewicz, Waleria; Gniadkowski, Marek; Tambic Andrasevic, Arjana

    2014-01-01

    A population analysis of 103 multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from Croatian hospitals was performed. Twelve sequence types (STs) were identified, with a predominance of international clones ST235 (serotype O11 [41%]), ST111 (serotype O12 [15%]), and ST132 (serotype O6 [11%]). Overexpression of the natural AmpC cephalosporinase was common (42%), but only a few ST235 or ST111 isolates produced VIM-1 or VIM-2 metallo-β-lactamases or PER-1 or GES-7 extended-spectrum β-lactamases. PMID:25070098

  20. Nutritional requirement among Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates recovered from respiratory clinical specimens at a tertiary hospital from South of Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Leandro Reus Rodrigues; de Freitas, Ana Lúcia Peixoto; Barth, Afonso Luís

    2011-01-01

    We screened 349 isolates of P. aeruginosa from cystic fibrosis (CF+) and non-cystic fibrosis (CF-) patients for the auxotrophy. Fourteen (4.0%) were auxotrophic and among them only one was recovered from CF-patient showing that this characteristic is strongly associated with cystic fibrosis. In total, a requirement for 5 different compounds (or combination) was verified and, of these, methionine was the most common single amino acid required. Only one auxotrophic isolate was no able to produce biofilm in vitro. PMID:24031723

  1. D-amino acids enhance the activity of antimicrobials against biofilms of clinical wound isolates of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Carlos J; Akers, Kevin S; Romano, Desiree R; Woodbury, Ronald L; Hardy, Sharanda K; Murray, Clinton K; Wenke, Joseph C

    2014-08-01

    Within wounds, microorganisms predominantly exist as biofilms. Biofilms are associated with chronic infections and represent a tremendous clinical challenge. As antibiotics are often ineffective against biofilms, use of dispersal agents as adjunctive, topical therapies for the treatment of wound infections involving biofilms has gained interest. We evaluated in vitro the dispersive activity of D-amino acids (D-AAs) on biofilms from clinical wound isolates of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa; moreover, we determined whether combinations of D-AAs and antibiotics (clindamycin, cefazolin, oxacillin, rifampin, and vancomycin for S. aureus and amikacin, colistin, ciprofloxacin, imipenem, and ceftazidime for P. aeruginosa) enhance activity against biofilms. D-Met, D-Phe, and D-Trp at concentrations of ≥ 5 mM effectively dispersed preformed biofilms of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa clinical isolates, an effect that was enhanced when they were combined as an equimolar mixture (D-Met/D-Phe/D-Trp). When combined with D-AAs, the activity of rifampin was significantly enhanced against biofilms of clinical isolates of S. aureus, as indicated by a reduction in the minimum biofilm inhibitory concentration (MBIC) (from 32 to 8 μg/ml) and a >2-log reduction of viable biofilm bacteria compared to treatment with antibiotic alone. The addition of D-AAs was also observed to enhance the activity of colistin and ciprofloxacin against biofilms of P. aeruginosa, reducing the observed MBIC and the number of viable bacteria by >2 logs and 1 log at 64 and 32 μg/ml in contrast to antibiotics alone. These findings indicate that the biofilm dispersal activity of D-AAs may represent an effective strategy, in combination with antimicrobials, to release bacteria from biofilms, subsequently enhancing antimicrobial activity.

  2. d-Amino Acids Enhance the Activity of Antimicrobials against Biofilms of Clinical Wound Isolates of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Akers, Kevin S.; Romano, Desiree R.; Woodbury, Ronald L.; Hardy, Sharanda K.; Murray, Clinton K.; Wenke, Joseph C.

    2014-01-01

    Within wounds, microorganisms predominantly exist as biofilms. Biofilms are associated with chronic infections and represent a tremendous clinical challenge. As antibiotics are often ineffective against biofilms, use of dispersal agents as adjunctive, topical therapies for the treatment of wound infections involving biofilms has gained interest. We evaluated in vitro the dispersive activity of d-amino acids (d-AAs) on biofilms from clinical wound isolates of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa; moreover, we determined whether combinations of d-AAs and antibiotics (clindamycin, cefazolin, oxacillin, rifampin, and vancomycin for S. aureus and amikacin, colistin, ciprofloxacin, imipenem, and ceftazidime for P. aeruginosa) enhance activity against biofilms. d-Met, d-Phe, and d-Trp at concentrations of ≥5 mM effectively dispersed preformed biofilms of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa clinical isolates, an effect that was enhanced when they were combined as an equimolar mixture (d-Met/d-Phe/d-Trp). When combined with d-AAs, the activity of rifampin was significantly enhanced against biofilms of clinical isolates of S. aureus, as indicated by a reduction in the minimum biofilm inhibitory concentration (MBIC) (from 32 to 8 μg/ml) and a >2-log reduction of viable biofilm bacteria compared to treatment with antibiotic alone. The addition of d-AAs was also observed to enhance the activity of colistin and ciprofloxacin against biofilms of P. aeruginosa, reducing the observed MBIC and the number of viable bacteria by >2 logs and 1 log at 64 and 32 μg/ml in contrast to antibiotics alone. These findings indicate that the biofilm dispersal activity of d-AAs may represent an effective strategy, in combination with antimicrobials, to release bacteria from biofilms, subsequently enhancing antimicrobial activity. PMID:24841260

  3. Correlation between cytotoxicity induced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates from acute infections and IL-1β secretion in a model of human THP-1 monocytes.

    PubMed

    Anantharajah, Ahalieyah; Buyck, Julien M; Faure, Emmanuel; Glupczynski, Youri; Rodriguez-Villalobos, Hector; De Vos, Daniel; Pirnay, Jean-Paul; Bilocq, Florence; Guery, Benoît; Tulkens, Paul M; Mingeot-Leclercq, Marie-Paule; Van Bambeke, Françoise

    2015-10-01

    Type III secretion system (T3SS) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa is associated with poor clinical outcome in acute infections. T3SS allows for injection of bacterial exotoxins (e.g. ExoU or ExoS) into the host cell, causing cytotoxicity. It also activates the cytosolic NLRC4 inflammasome, activating caspase-1, inducing cytotoxicity and release of mature IL-1β, which impairs bacterial clearance. In addition, flagellum-mediated motility has been suggested to also modulate inflammasome response and IL-1β release. Yet the capacity of clinical isolates to induce IL-1β release and its relation with cytotoxicity have never been investigated. Using 20 clinical isolates from acute infections with variable T3SS expression levels and human monocytes, our aim was to correlate IL-1β release with toxin expression, flagellar motility and cytotoxicity. ExoU-producing isolates caused massive cell death but minimal release of IL-1β, while those expressing T3SS but not ExoU (i.e. expressing ExoS or no toxins) induced caspase-1 activation and IL-1β release, the level of which was correlated with cytotoxicity. Both effects were prevented by a specific caspase-1 inhibitor. Flagellar motility was not correlated with cytotoxicity or IL-1β release. No apoptosis was detected. Thus, T3SS cytotoxicity is accompanied by a modification in cytokine balance for P. aeruginosa clinical isolates that do not express ExoU.

  4. Anti-biofilm activity of biogenic selenium nanoparticles and selenium dioxide against clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Shakibaie, Mojtaba; Forootanfar, Hamid; Golkari, Yaser; Mohammadi-Khorsand, Tayebe; Shakibaie, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the anti-biofilm activity of biologically synthesized selenium nanoparticles (Se NPs) against the biofilm produced by clinically isolated bacterial strains compared to that of selenium dioxide. Thirty strains of Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Proteus mirabilis were isolated from various specimens of the patients hospitalized in different hospitals (Kerman, Iran). Quantification of the biofilm using microtiter plate assay method introduced 30% of S. aureus, 13% of P. aeruginosa and 17% of P. mirabilis isolates as severely adherent strains. Transmission electron micrograph (TEM) of the purified Se NPs (produced by Bacillus sp. MSh-1) showed individual and spherical nano-structure in the size range of 80-220nm. Obtained results of the biofilm formation revealed that selenium nanoparticles inhibited the biofilm of S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, and P. mirabilis by 42%, 34.3%, and 53.4%, respectively, compared to that of the non-treated samples. Effect of temperature and pH on the biofilm formation in the presence of Se NPs and SeO2 was also evaluated.

  5. Identification of plasmid OXA and other β-lactamase genes among carbapenem-resistant isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from the Clinical University Hospital in northeastern Poland.

    PubMed

    Sacha, Paweł; Michalska, Anna; Ojdana, Dominika; Wieczorek, Piotr; Hauschild, Tomasz; Majewski, Piotr; Tryniszewska, Elżbieta

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the prevalence of OXA and other β-lactamase genes, antibiotic susceptibility, and the genetic relatedness among clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa resistant to carbapenems. The presence of bla- OXA genes was demonstrated in 48% of isolates belonging to four PFGE profiles. Most of them contained the blaOXA-2 gene (88.3%). Other blaOXA genes (Ps1310 with blaOXA-30 and Ps1309 with blaOXA-10) were found in only two isolates. The tested isolates also contained other β-lactamase genes such as blaVIM-2, blaVIM-4, blaSHV-5, and blaTEM-1. All isolates were susceptible only to colistin (100%).

  6. Novel Combinations of Synthesized ZnO NPs and Ceftazidime: Evaluation of their Activity against Standards and New Clinically Isolated Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Isaei, Elham; Mansouri, Shahla; Mohammadi, Fereshteh; Taheritarigh, Sadegh; Mohammadi, Zohreh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Antibiotic resistant bacteria can be considered as a main problem in infection management. Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs), individually or in combination with antibiotics, can be considered as good candidates for struggling against drug resistant bacteria. Methods: In this study, Zinc oxide nanoparticles were synthesized using sol-gel method in low temperature as a cost effective procedure and characterized by X-ray diffraction and Scanning Electron Microscopy. Antibacterial activity of 9 new combinations of Zinc oxide nanoparticles and ceftazidime was assessed against standards and new clinically isolated multi drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa), in order to evaluate enhancement effect of synthesized Zinc oxide nanoparticles on antibacterial activity of ceftazidime. Results: The results indicated that desirable effects can be seen at 6 and 7 mM of Zinc oxide nanoparticles (60 to 100% inhibition). Moreover, after evaluation of 9 new combinations with various concentrations of both components, it was demonstrated that Zinc oxide nanoparticles can enhance the antibacterial activity of ceftazidime, against some bacterial strains of P. aeruginosa. The highest activity was observed with the concentration of 20 μg/ml ceftazidime in the presence of 5, 6 or 7 mM of Zinc oxide nanoparticles. Conclusion: Zinc oxide nanoparticles in appropriate concentrations can be proposed as new and promising candidates for overcoming bacterial resistance. PMID:27920884

  7. CpxR Activates MexAB-OprM Efflux Pump Expression and Enhances Antibiotic Resistance in Both Laboratory and Clinical nalB-Type Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Xue-Xian; O’Gara, Fergal; Wang, Yi-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Resistance-Nodulation-Division (RND) efflux pumps are responsible for multidrug resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In this study, we demonstrate that CpxR, previously identified as a regulator of the cell envelope stress response in Escherichia coli, is directly involved in activation of expression of RND efflux pump MexAB-OprM in P. aeruginosa. A conserved CpxR binding site was identified upstream of the mexA promoter in all genome-sequenced P. aeruginosa strains. CpxR is required to enhance mexAB-oprM expression and drug resistance, in the absence of repressor MexR, in P. aeruginosa strains PA14. As defective mexR is a genetic trait associated with the clinical emergence of nalB-type multidrug resistance in P. aeruginosa during antibiotic treatment, we investigated the involvement of CpxR in regulating multidrug resistance among resistant isolates generated in the laboratory via antibiotic treatment and collected in clinical settings. CpxR is required to activate expression of mexAB-oprM and enhances drug resistance, in the absence or presence of MexR, in ofloxacin-cefsulodin-resistant isolates generated in the laboratory. Furthermore, CpxR was also important in the mexR-defective clinical isolates. The newly identified regulatory linkage between CpxR and the MexAB-OprM efflux pump highlights the presence of a complex regulatory network modulating multidrug resistance in P. aeruginosa. PMID:27736975

  8. Detection of extended spectrum beta lactamases, ampc beta lactamases and metallobetalactamases in clinical isolates of ceftazidime resistant Pseudomonas Aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Umadevi, Sivaraman; Joseph, Noyal M; Kumari, Kandha; Easow, Joshy M; Kumar, Shailesh; Stephen, Selvaraj; Srirangaraj, Sreenivasan; Raj, Sruthi

    2011-10-01

    We studied the prevalence of ceftazidime resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the rates of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL), AmpC β-lactamase (AmpC) and metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) production among the ceftazidime resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. A very high rate of MBL production was observed, which suggested it to be an important contributing factor for ceftazidime resistance among Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

  9. Efflux-mediated fluoroquinolone resistance in the multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolate PA7: identification of a novel MexS variant involved in upregulation of the mexEF-oprN multidrug efflux operon

    PubMed Central

    Morita, Yuji; Tomida, Junko; Kawamura, Yoshiaki

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa has become a serious problem in medical settings. P. aeruginosa clinical isolate PA7 is resistant to fluoroquinolones, aminoglycosides, and most β-lactams but not imipenem. In this study, enhanced efflux-mediated fluoroquinolone resistance of PA7 was shown to reflect increased expression of two resistance nodulation cell division (RND) -type multidrug efflux operons, mexEF-oprN and mexXY-oprA. Such a clinical isolate has rarely been reported because MexEF-OprN-overproducing mutants often increase susceptibility to aminoglycosides apparently owing to impairment of the MexXY system. A mutant of PA7 lacking three RND-type multidrug efflux operons (mexAB-oprM, mexEF-oprN, and mexXY-oprA) was susceptible to all anti-pseudomonas agents we tested, supporting an idea that these RND-type multidrug efflux transporters are molecular targets to overcome multidrug resistance in P. aeruginosa. mexEF-oprN-upregulation in P. aeruginosa PA7 was shown due to a MexS variant harboring the Valine-155 amino acid residue. This is the first genetic evidence shown that a MexS variant causes mexEF-oprN-upregulation in P. aeruginosa clinical isolates. PMID:25653649

  10. Two Novel Class I Integron Arrays Containing IMP-18 Metallo-β-Lactamase Gene in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Clinical Isolates from Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, T.; Vazquez, G. J.; Aquino, E. E.; Goering, R. V.

    2012-01-01

    During a β-lactam resistance surveillance study, 12 IMP-18-positive Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates belonging to 9 different pulsed-field gel electrophoresis groups were identified. In nine isolates, a class I integron with a novel gene array was identified that contained blaIMP-18 and blaOXA-224, while in two isolates the class I integron contained blaIMP-18 and blaOXA-2 but in a new arrangement. Our findings show the dissemination of two novel class I integrons in P. aeruginosa from different regions of Puerto Rico. PMID:22290962

  11. Differences in antimicrobial susceptibility breakpoints for Pseudomonas aeruginosa, isolated from blood cultures, set by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) and the Japanese Society of Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Tatsuya; Shimizu, Chihiro; Kasahara, Mayumi; Nakata, Chiyo; Munakata, Machiko; Takahashi, Hakuo

    2007-02-01

    A study was made of the antimicrobial susceptibility to and efficacy of various kinds of antimicrobial agents against 179 strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa that were isolated from blood cultures at Kansai Medical University Hospital from 1990 through 2004. The annual detection rate was highest in 1994, at 22 strains (6.5%). There were 9 multidrug resistant strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (5.0%). Among 14 antimicrobial agents tested for measurements, ciprofloxacin (CPFX) showed the best minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) 50 value, of 0.25 microg/ml, followed by pazufloxacin (PZFX) and biapenem (BIPM), each at 0.5 microg/ml. When the period of 15 years was divided into three stages, the MIC50 value for each antimicrobial agent was highest in the middle stage (1995 to 1999). Assuming that the percentage of sensitive strains according to the breakpoints set by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) represents the antimicrobial susceptibility rate, amikacin (AMK) showed the best value, of 85.5%. According to the sepsis breakpoint set by the Japanese Society of Chemotherapy (JSC), the efficacy of CPFX showed the highest rate (77.1%) of all the antimicrobial agents tested. Among beta-lactams, BIPM showed the highest efficacy rate, of 67.0%. When the efficacy rates were compared with each other, the difference in efficacy rate between the breakpoint set by the CLSI and the sepsis breakpoint set by the JSC was large for beta-lactams. Comparisons made based on the CLSI criteria showed no difference in cross-resistance rates between CPFX, meropenem (MEPM), and BIPM. However, when comparisons were made using the JSC sepsis breakpoint, MEPM showed a cross-resistance rate of 87.8%, while the rate for BIPM was lower, at 56.1%, with the chi2 test showing a significant difference, at P = 0.0014. In accordance with the pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics theory that has been advocated, breakpoints which are more suitable for the clinical setting in Japan should

  12. [Determination of associated antimicrobial resistance in clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a public hospital in Goiânia, State of Goiás].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Cláudia Castelo Branco Artiaga; Sadoyama, Geraldo; Vieira, José Daniel Gonçalves

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated the associated antimicrobial resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus in relation to an antimicrobial agent with other drugs. The associated antimicrobial resistance was calculated by means of the relative risk. There was an obvious relationship between oxacillin resistance and resistance to other antimicrobial agents among isolates of oxacillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (68.5%), greater than 32%, except for linezolid (6.7%). Pronounced associated resistance among drugs was observed for Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates, particularly for ciprofloxacin and carbapenems (59.6% to 60.7%) and for aminoglycosides and carbapenems (66.3 % to 67.7 %) and other beta-lactam antibiotics (52.3% to 85.8%). The present study emphasizes the importance of diagnostic cultures and susceptibility testing for selecting the correct antimicrobial agent, with regard to the clinical impact of increased multiresistance and selection of associated antimicrobial resistance.

  13. SERS detection of the biomarker hydrogen cyanide from Pseudomonas aeruginosa cultures isolated from cystic fibrosis patients

    PubMed Central

    Lauridsen, Rikke Kragh; Sommer, Lea M.; Johansen, Helle Krogh; Rindzevicius, Tomas; Molin, Søren; Jelsbak, Lars; Engelsen, Søren Balling; Boisen, Anja

    2017-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the primary cause of chronic airway infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Persistent infections are seen from the first P. aeruginosa culture in about 75% of young CF patients, and it is important to discover new ways to detect P. aeruginosa at an earlier stage. The P. aeruginosa biomarker hydrogen cyanide (HCN) contains a triple bond, which is utilized in this study because of the resulting characteristic C≡N peak at 2135 cm−1 in a Raman spectrum. The Raman signal was enhanced by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) on a Au-coated SERS substrate. After long-term infection, a mutation in the patho-adaptive lasR gene can alter the expression of HCN, which is why it is sometimes not possible to detect HCN in the breath of chronically infected patients. Four P. aeruginosa reference strains and 12 clinical P. aeruginosa strains isolated from CF children were evaluated, and HCN was clearly detected from overnight cultures of all wild type-like isolates and half of the later isolates from the same patients. The clinical impact could be that P. aeruginosa infections could be detected at an earlier stage, because daily breath sampling with an immediate output could be possible with a point-of-care SERS device. PMID:28349938

  14. Bulgecin A as a β-lactam enhancer for carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa and carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolates containing various resistance mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Skalweit, Marion J; Li, Mei

    2016-01-01

    Genetic screening of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PSDA) and Acinetobacter baumannii (ACB) reveals genes that confer increased susceptibility to β-lactams when disrupted, suggesting novel drug targets. One such target is lytic transglycosylase. Bulgecin A (BlgA) is a natural product of Pseudomonas mesoacidophila and a lytic transglycosolase inhibitor that works synergistically with β-lactams targeting PBP3 for Enterobacteriaceae. BlgA also weakly inhibits di-Zn2+ metallo-β-lactamases like L1 of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. We hypothesized that because of its unique mechanism of action, BlgA could restore susceptibility to carbapenems in carbapenem-resistant PSDA (CR-PSDA) and carbapenem-resistant ACB, as well as ACB resistant to sulbactam. A BlgA-containing extract was prepared using a previously published protocol. CR-PSDA clinical isolates demonstrating a variety of carbapenem resistance mechanisms (VIM-2 carbapenemases, efflux mechanisms, and AmpC producer expression) were characterized with agar dilution minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) testing and polymerase chain reaction. Growth curves using these strains were prepared using meropenem, BlgA extract, and meropenem plus BlgA extract. A concentrated Blg A extract combined with low concentrations of meropenem, was able to inhibit the growth of clinical strains of CR-PSDA for strains that had meropenem MICs ≥8 mg/L by agar dilution, and a clinical strain of an OXA-24 producing ACB that had a meropenem MIC >32 mg/L and intermediate ampicillin/sulbactam susceptibility. Similar experiments were conducted on a TEM-1 producing ACB strain resistant to sulbactam. BlgA with ampicillin/sulbactam inhibited the growth of this organism. As in Enterobacteriaceae, BlgA appears to restore the efficacy of meropenem in suppressing the growth of CR-PSDA and carbapenem-resistant ACB strains with a variety of common carbapenem resistance mechanisms. BlgA extract also inhibits VIM-2 β-lactamase in vitro. BlgA may prove to be

  15. Isolation of oxidase-negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa from sputum culture.

    PubMed

    Hampton, K D; Wasilauskas, B L

    1979-05-01

    Two isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa lacking characteristic indophenol oxidase were recovered from a sputum specimen. A discussion of the characteristic biochemical tests and antibiograms along with a possible explanation for this phenomenon is presented.

  16. Molecular detection of virulence genes as markers in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Sabharwal, Neha; Dhall, Shriya; Chhibber, Sanjay; Harjai, Kusum

    2014-01-01

    Catheter associated urinary tract infections by P. aeruginosa are related to variety of complications. Quorum sensing and related circuitry guard its virulence potential. Though P. aeruginosa accounts for an appreciable amount of virulence factors, this organism is highly unstable phenotypically. Thus, genotyping of clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa is of utmost importance for understanding the epidemiology of infection. This may contribute towards development of immunotherapeutic approaches against this multi drug resistant pathogen. Moreover, no epidemiological study has been reported yet on uroisolates of P. aeruginosa. Thus this study was planned to obtain information regarding presence, distribution and rate of occurrence of quorum sensing and some associated virulence genes at genetic level. The profiling of quorum sensing genes lasI, lasR, rhlI, rhlR and virulence genes like toxA, aprA, rhlAB, plcH, lasB and fliC of twelve strains of P. aeruginosa isolated from patients with UTIs was done by direct PCR. The results showed variable distribution of quorum sensing genes and virulence genes. Their percentage occurrence may be specifically associated with different levels of intrinsic virulence and pathogenicity in urinary tract. Such information can help in identifying these virulence genes as useful diagnostic markers for clinical P. aeruginosa strains isolated from UTIs.

  17. In vitro potentiation of carbapenems with ME1071, a novel metallo-beta-lactamase inhibitor, against metallo-beta-lactamase- producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Yoshikazu; Eto, Maki; Mano, Yoko; Tateda, Kazuhiro; Yamaguchi, Keizo

    2010-09-01

    ME1071, a maleic acid derivative, is a novel specific inhibitor for metallo-beta-lactamases (MBL). In this study, the potentiation of ME1071 in combination with several beta-lactams was evaluated using MBL-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates. The rates of susceptibility of MBL producers to carbapenems (imipenem, biapenem, and doripenem) and ceftazidime were increased by 8 to 27% in the presence of 32 microg/ml of ME1071. The corresponding resistance rates were decreased by 13 to 46%, respectively. On the other hand, ME1071 showed weaker or no potentiation with non-MBL producers. The K(i) value of ME1071 for IMP-1 was 0.4 microM, significantly lower than the K(m) values of carbapenems for the IMP-1 enzyme. On the other hand, the K(i) value of ME1071 for VIM-2 was 120 microM, higher than the K(m) values of carbapenems for the VIM-2 enzyme. Results of this study indicate that ME1071 can potentiate the activity of ceftazidime and carbapenems against MBL-producing strains of P. aeruginosa.

  18. Two copies of blaNDM-1 gene are present in NDM-1 producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from Serbia.

    PubMed

    Jovčić, Branko; Lepšanović, Zorica; Begović, Jelena; Filipić, Brankica; Kojić, Milan

    2014-03-01

    New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates are of special interest since P. aeruginosa is a major cause of nosocomial infections, the treatment of which could now be jeopardized, especially in developing countries. Six additional NDM-1 positive P. aeruginosa clinical isolates belonging to two different genotypes were shown to be plasmid-free. PFGE-hybridization experiments revealed the chromosomal location of the blaNDM-1 gene. Restriction analysis and hybridization revealed that two copies of the blaNDM-1 gene are present in the genomes of all tested isolates, as in previously characterized P. aeruginosa MMA83. Moreover, it was shown that increasing imipenem concentration did not have the effect on copy number of the blaNDM-1 gene in the genome of P. aeruginosa MMA83.

  19. Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from dental unit waterlines can be divided in two distinct groups, including one displaying phenotypes similar to isolates from cystic fibrosis patients

    PubMed Central

    Ouellet, Myriam M.; Leduc, Annie; Nadeau, Christine; Barbeau, Jean; Charette, Steve J.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa displays broad genetic diversity, giving it an astonishing capacity to adapt to a variety of environments and to infect a wide range of hosts. While many P. aeruginosa isolates of various origins have been analyzed, isolates from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients have received the most attention. Less is known about the genetic and phenotypic diversity of P. aeruginosa isolates that colonize other environments where flourishing biofilms can be found. In the present study, 29 P. aeruginosa isolates from dental unit waterlines and CF patients were collected and their genetic and phenotypes profiles were compared to determine whether environmental and clinical isolates are related. The isolates were first classified using the random amplified polymorphic DNA method. This made it possible to distribute the isolates into one clinical cluster and two environmental clusters. The isolates in the environmental cluster that were genetically closer to the clinical cluster also displayed phenotypes similar to the clinical isolates. The isolates from the second environmental cluster displayed opposite phenotypes, particularly an increased capacity to form biofilms. The isolates in this cluster were also the only ones harboring genes that encoded specific epimerases involved in the synthesis of lipopolysaccharides, which could explain their increased ability to form biofilms. In conclusion, the isolates from the dental unit waterlines could be distributed into two clusters, with some of the environmental isolates resembled the clinical isolates. PMID:25653647

  20. AMINOGLYCOSIDE RESISTANCE GENES IN Pseudomonas aeruginosa ISOLATES FROM CUMANA, VENEZUELA.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Bertinellys; Rodulfo, Hectorina; Carreño, Numirin; Guzmán, Militza; Salazar, Elsa; De Donato, Marcos

    2016-01-01

    The enzymatic modification of aminoglycosides by aminoglycoside-acetyltransferases (AAC), aminoglycoside-adenyltransferases (AAD), and aminoglycoside-phosphotransferases (APH), is the most common resistance mechanism in P. aeruginosa and these enzymes can be coded on mobile genetic elements that contribute to their dispersion. One hundred and thirty seven P. aeruginosa isolates from the University Hospital, Cumana, Venezuela (HUAPA) were evaluated. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by the disk diffusion method and theaac, aadB and aph genes were detected by PCR. Most of the P. aeruginosa isolates (33/137) were identified from the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), mainly from discharges (96/137). The frequency of resistant P. aeruginosaisolates was found to be higher for the aminoglycosides tobramycin and amikacin (30.7 and 29.9%, respectively). Phenotype VI, resistant to these antibiotics, was the most frequent (14/49), followed by phenotype I, resistant to all the aminoglycosides tested (12/49). The aac(6´)-Ib,aphA1 and aadB genes were the most frequently detected, and the simultaneous presence of several resistance genes in the same isolate was demonstrated. Aminoglycoside resistance in isolates ofP. aeruginosa at the HUAPA is partly due to the presence of the aac(6´)-Ib, aphA1 andaadB genes, but the high rates of antimicrobial resistance suggest the existence of several mechanisms acting together. This is the first report of aminoglycoside resistance genes in Venezuela and one of the few in Latin America.

  1. AMINOGLYCOSIDE RESISTANCE GENES IN Pseudomonas aeruginosa ISOLATES FROM CUMANA, VENEZUELA

    PubMed Central

    TEIXEIRA, Bertinellys; RODULFO, Hectorina; CARREÑO, Numirin; GUZMÁN, Militza; SALAZAR, Elsa; DONATO, Marcos DE

    2016-01-01

    The enzymatic modification of aminoglycosides by aminoglycoside-acetyltransferases (AAC), aminoglycoside-adenyltransferases (AAD), and aminoglycoside-phosphotransferases (APH), is the most common resistance mechanism in P. aeruginosa and these enzymes can be coded on mobile genetic elements that contribute to their dispersion. One hundred and thirty seven P. aeruginosa isolates from the University Hospital, Cumana, Venezuela (HUAPA) were evaluated. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by the disk diffusion method and theaac, aadB and aph genes were detected by PCR. Most of the P. aeruginosa isolates (33/137) were identified from the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), mainly from discharges (96/137). The frequency of resistant P. aeruginosaisolates was found to be higher for the aminoglycosides tobramycin and amikacin (30.7 and 29.9%, respectively). Phenotype VI, resistant to these antibiotics, was the most frequent (14/49), followed by phenotype I, resistant to all the aminoglycosides tested (12/49). The aac(6´)-Ib,aphA1 and aadB genes were the most frequently detected, and the simultaneous presence of several resistance genes in the same isolate was demonstrated. Aminoglycoside resistance in isolates ofP. aeruginosa at the HUAPA is partly due to the presence of the aac(6´)-Ib, aphA1 andaadB genes, but the high rates of antimicrobial resistance suggest the existence of several mechanisms acting together. This is the first report of aminoglycoside resistance genes in Venezuela and one of the few in Latin America. PMID:27007556

  2. Diversity of Molecular Mechanisms Conferring Carbapenem Resistance to Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Jeannot, Katy; El-Mahdy, Taghrid S.; Samaha, Hassan A.; Shibl, Atef M.; Plésiat, Patrick; Courvalin, Patrice

    2016-01-01

    Background. This study described various molecular and epidemiological characters determining antibiotic resistance patterns in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates. Methods. A total of 34 carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa clinical isolates were isolated from samples collected at a tertiary hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, from January to December 2011. Susceptibility testing, serotyping, molecular characterization of carbapenem resistance, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) were performed. Results. All isolates were resistant to ceftazidime, and more than half were highly resistant (minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) > 256 mg/L). Fifteen isolates had MIC values ≥64 mg/L for any of the carbapenems examined. Vietnamese extended-spectrum β-lactamase (VEB-1) (n = 16/34) and oxacillinase (OXA-10) (n = 14/34) were the most prevalent extended-spectrum β-lactamase and penicillinase, respectively. Verona imipenemase (VIM-1, VIM-2, VIM-4, VIM-11, and VIM-28) and imipenemase (IMP-7) variants were found in metallo-β-lactamase producers. A decrease in outer membrane porin gene (oprD) expression was seen in nine isolates, and an increase in efflux pump gene (MexAB) expression was detected in five isolates. Six serotypes (O:1, O:4, O:7, O:10, O:11, and O:15) were found among the 34 isolates. The predominant serotype was O:11 (16 isolates), followed by O:15 (nine isolates). PFGE analysis of the 34 carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa isolates revealed 14 different pulsotypes. Conclusions. These results revealed diverse mechanisms conferring carbapenem resistance to P. aeruginosa isolates from Saudi Arabia. PMID:27597874

  3. Characterization of colony morphology variants isolated from Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    PubMed

    Kirisits, Mary Jo; Prost, Lynne; Starkey, Melissa; Parsek, Matthew R

    2005-08-01

    In this study, we report the isolation of small, rough, strongly cohesive colony morphology variants from aging Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 biofilms. Similar to many of the P. aeruginosa colony morphology variants previously described in the literature, these variants autoaggregate in liquid culture and hyperadhere to solid surfaces. They also exhibit increased hydrophobicity and reduced motility compared to the wild-type parent strain. Despite the similarities in appearance of our colony morphology variant isolates on solid medium, the isolates showed a range of responses in various phenotypic assays. These variants form biofilms with significant three-dimensional structure and more biomass than the wild-type parent. To further explore the nature of the variants, their transcriptional profiles were evaluated. The variants generally showed increased expression of the psl and pel loci, which have been previously implicated in the adherence of P. aeruginosa to solid surfaces. When a mutation in the psl locus was introduced into a colony morphology variant, the colony morphology was only partially affected, but hyperadherence and autoaggregation were lost. Finally, similar colony morphology variants were found in isolates from cystic fibrosis patients. These variants displayed many of the same characteristics as the laboratory variants, suggesting a link between laboratory and cystic fibrosis biofilms.

  4. Diverse effects of Galleria mellonella infection with entomopathogenic and clinical strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Andrejko, Mariola; Zdybicka-Barabas, Agnieszka; Cytryńska, Małgorzata

    2014-01-01

    In numerous studies, the greater wax moth Galleria mellonella has been exploited as an alternative model host for investigating virulence factors of different pathogenic bacteria. In the present paper, we provide evidence that G. mellonella constitutes a useful and convenient model for analysis of the pathogenicity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical strains. In this in vivo study on the G. mellonella–P. aeruginosa interaction, a bidirectional analysis comprising evaluation of humoral immune response of the bacteria-infected larvae and determination of P. aeruginosa proteinases synthesized during the infection was performed. The effects of G. mellonella infection by two clinical strains (PA C124/9 and PA 02/18) and one entomopathogenic strain (ATCC 27853) cultured in a rich LB and minimal M9 medium, known to induce synthesis of different sets of extracellular proteinases, were evaluated. Both clinical isolates were able to establish infection in G. mellonella caterpillars after intrahemocelic injection. However, although the final effect of the larvae infection by each P. aeruginosa strain was their death within ca. 48 h, considerable strain and medium-dependent differences in the immune response of the insects were detected. The results indicated that G. mellonella larvae distinguished between the three P. aeruginosa strains, which was well reflected by the diverse humoral immune response. The significant differences concerned, among others, the level of phenoloxidase, lysozyme, and antibacterial activity in the hemolymph of the infected insects. An analysis of proteinases performed using specific activity tests, zymography and immunoblotting, revealed that elastase B and alkaline protease were synthesized by each P. aeruginosa strain during the infection. In contrast, a high level of elastase A activity was detected only in the larvae infected by the P. aeruginosa ATCC 27853 strain. It can be postulated that the three P. aeruginosa strains exploit different

  5. High level of resistance to aztreonam and ticarcillin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from soil of different crops in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Pitondo-Silva, André; Martins, Vinicius Vicente; Fernandes, Ana Flavia Tonelli; Stehling, Eliana Guedes

    2014-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa can be found in water, soil, plants and, human and animal fecal samples. It is an important nosocomial pathogenic agent characterized by an intrinsic resistance to multiple antimicrobial agents and the ability to develop high-level (acquired) multidrug resistance through some mechanisms, among them, by the acquisition of plasmids and integrons, which are mobile genetic elements. In this study, 40 isolates from Brazilian soil were analyzed for antibiotic resistance, presence of integrons and plasmidial profile. The results demonstrated that the vast majority of the isolates have shown resistance for aztreonam (92.5%, n=37) and ticarcillin (85%, n=34), four isolates presented plasmids and eight isolates possess the class 1 integron. These results demonstrated that environmental isolates of P. aeruginosa possess surprising antibiotic resistance profile to aztreonam and ticarcillin, two antimicrobial agents for clinical treatment of cystic fibrosis patients and other infections occurred by P. aeruginosa.

  6. First report of VIM-2 metallo-β-lactamases producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates in Morocco.

    PubMed

    Maroui, Itto; Barguigua, Abouddihaj; Aboulkacem, Asmae; Ouarrak, Khadija; Sbiti, Mohammed; Louzi, Housssain; Timinouni, Mohammed; Belhaj, Abdelhaq

    2016-03-01

    The emergence and the rapid spread of Pseudomonas aeruginosa carrying carbapenemases represent a serious threat to public health due to their delicate therapy. This work was performed to establish the resistance profile and to detect carbapenemases producing in 123 P. aeruginosa isolates. Among these 55 are environmental isolates and 68 are from the two major hospitals of Meknes-Tafilalet region in Morocco. All strains were tested against 14 antipseudomonal drugs by disc diffusion method. On carbapenem resistant strains minimum inhibitory concentrations of imipenem were determined by the E-test method. The modified Hodge test and EDTA tests were used for the detection of carbapenemases and metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs), respectively. PCR and DNA sequencing were conducted to detect carbapenemase-encoding genes and the enzyme types. 12% of isolates was susceptible to all antibiotics tested and Carbapenem resistance was observed in 33 P. aeruginosa isolates, 33.3% of them were multi-drug resistant. Among carbapenem resistant strains only two (6.1%) were positive for carbapenemases and also for MBLs. In addition to their resistance to almost all β-lactams tested, the MBLs producing strains were resistant to aminoglycosides. Molecular biology techniques confirmed the phenotypic results obtained for the two strains carbapenemase producers and demonstrated that each one of them carried blaVIM-2. The present study reports the first isolation of blaVIM genes in clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa in Morocco. Such isolates represent a serious emerging threat requiring strict hygiene measures to better control their spread.

  7. Aloe vera Gel: Effective Therapeutic Agent against Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates Recovered from Burn Wound Infections.

    PubMed

    Goudarzi, Mehdi; Fazeli, Maryam; Azad, Mehdi; Seyedjavadi, Sima Sadat; Mousavi, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Aloe vera is an herbal medicinal plant with biological activities, such as antimicrobial, anticancer, anti-inflammatory, and antidiabetic ones, and immunomodulatory properties. The purpose of this study was investigation of in vitro antimicrobial activity of A. vera gel against multidrug-resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from patients with burn wound infections. Methods. During a 6-month study, 140 clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa were collected from patients admitted to the burn wards of a hospital in Tehran, Iran. Antimicrobial susceptibility test was carried out against the pathogens using the A. vera gel and antibiotics (imipenem, gentamicin, and ciprofloxacin). Results. The antibiogram revealed that 47 (33.6%) of all isolates were MDR P. aeruginosa. The extract isolated from A. vera has antibacterial activity against all of isolates. Also, 42 (89.4%) isolates were inhibited by A. vera gel extract at minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) ≤ 200 µg/mL. MIC value of A. vera gel for other isolates (10.6%) was 800 µg/mL. All of MDR P. aeruginosa strains were inhibited by A. vera at similar MIC50 and MIC90 200 µg/mL. Conclusion. Based on our results, A. vera gel at various concentrations can be used as an effective antibacterial agent in order to prevent wound infection caused by P. aeruginosa.

  8. Evaluating synergy between marbofloxacin and gentamicin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated from dogs with otitis externa.

    PubMed

    Jerzsele, Ákos; Pásztiné-Gere, Erzsébet

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine antimicrobial susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains to marbofloxacin and gentamicin, and investigate the possible synergistic, additive, indifferent or antagonistic effects between the two agents. P. aeruginosa strains can develop resistance quickly against certain antibiotics if used alone, thus the need emerges to find synergistic combinations. A total of 68 P. aeruginosa strains isolated from dogs were examined. In order to describe interactions between marbofloxacin and gentamicin the checkerboard microdilution method was utilized. The MICs (minimum inhibitory concentrations) for marbofloxacin and gentamicin were in the range 0.25-64 mg/L and 0.25-32 mg/L, respectively. The combination of marbofloxacin and gentamicin was more effective with a MIC range of 0.031-8 mg/L and a MIC90 of 1 mg/L, compared to 16 mg/L for marbofloxacin alone and 8 mg/L for gentamicin alone. The FIC (fractional inhibitory concentration) indices ranged from 0.0945 (pronounced synergy) to 1.0625 (indifference). Synergy between marbofloxacin and gentamicin was found in 33 isolates. The mean FIC index is 0.546, which represents a partial synergistic/additive effect close to the full synergy threshold. In vitro results indicate that marbofloxacin and gentamicin as partially synergistic agents may prove clinically useful in combination therapy against P. aeruginosa infections. Although marbofloxacin is not used in the human practice, the interactions between fluoroquinolones and aminoglycosides may have importance outside the veterinary field.

  9. Molecular characterization of carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated from patients with urinary tract infections in Southern Poland.

    PubMed

    Pobiega, Monika; Maciąg, Joanna; Chmielarczyk, Agnieszka; Romaniszyn, Dorota; Pomorska-Wesolowska, Monika; Ziolkowski, Grzegorz; Heczko, Piotr B; Bulanda, Malgorzata; Wojkowska-Mach, Jadwiga

    2015-11-01

    Due to the clinical threat posed by multidrug-resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa and importance of virulence factors produced in infection, 21 carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa were analyzed. 42.8% metallo-beta-lactamases-positive strains were identified. 85.7% of strains were meropenem resistant. 14.2% of strains were MDR; 38%, extensively drug-resistant (XDR). ExoY was present in all strains; exoT, in 95.2%; exoS, in 90.5%; exoU, in 47.6%. Eight XDR strains were typed using multilocus sequence typing: 4 as ST235, 2 as ST260, 2 as ST654 and ST234. MDR P. aeruginosa were isolated from hospitalized patients and among those from the community. Our study demonstrates the serious clinical issues posed by MDR P. aeruginosa and underscores the need for new treatment.

  10. Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Dairy Goats: Genotypic and Phenotypic Comparison of Intramammary and Environmental Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Scaccabarozzi, Licia; Leoni, Livia; Ballarini, Annalisa; Barberio, Antonio; Locatelli, Clara; Casula, Antonio; Bronzo, Valerio; Pisoni, Giuliano; Jousson, Olivier; Morandi, Stefano; Rapetti, Luca; García-Fernández, Aurora; Moroni, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Following the identification of a case of severe clinical mastitis in a Saanen dairy goat (goat A), an average of 26 lactating goats in the herd was monitored over a period of 11 months. Milk microbiological analysis revealed the presence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in 7 of the goats. Among these 7 does, only goat A showed clinical signs of mastitis. The 7 P. aeruginosa isolates from the goat milk and 26 P. aeruginosa isolates from environmental samples were clustered by RAPD-PCR and PFGE analyses in 3 genotypes (G1, G2, G3) and 4 clusters (A, B, C, D), respectively. PFGE clusters A and B correlated with the G1 genotype and included the 7 milk isolates. Although it was not possible to identify the infection source, these results strongly suggest a spreading of the infection from goat A. Clusters C and D overlapped with genotypes G2 and G3, respectively, and included only environmental isolates. The outcome of the antimicrobial susceptibility test performed on the isolates revealed 2 main patterns of multiple resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics and macrolides. Virulence related phenotypes were analyzed, such as swarming and swimming motility, production of biofilm and production of secreted virulence factors. The isolates had distinct phenotypic profiles, corresponding to genotypes G1, G2 and G3. Overall, correlation analysis showed a strong correlation between sampling source, RAPD genotype, PFGE clusters, and phenotypic clusters. The comparison of the levels of virulence related phenotypes did not indicate a higher pathogenic potential in the milk isolates as compared to the environmental isolates. PMID:26606430

  11. Colistin susceptibility testing: evaluation of reliability for cystic fibrosis isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia

    PubMed Central

    Moskowitz, Samuel M.; Garber, Elizabeth; Chen, Yunhua; Clock, Sarah A.; Tabibi, Setareh; Miller, Amanda K.; Doctor, Michael; Saiman, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Antibiotic susceptibility methods that are commonly used to test bacterial isolates from patients with cystic fibrosis are of uncertain reliability for the polymyxins. To assess the reliability of four standard testing methods, this pilot study used a challenge set that included polymyxin-resistant isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. Methods Twenty-five P. aeruginosa and 12 S. maltophilia isolates were tested for susceptibility to colistin (polymyxin E). Repeatability (concordance of replicates performed concurrently), reproducibility (concordance of replicates performed over time) and comparability (concordance of different methods) of agar dilution, broth microdilution, Etest and disc diffusion were assessed through the use of descriptive statistics and scatterplot analyses. Results All four methods displayed excellent repeatability (overall concordance rate of 99%). However, analysis of reproducibility revealed substantially lower rates of concordance (74% for agar dilution, 84% for broth microdilution and Etest, and 91% for disc diffusion). In addition, comparability to agar dilution of the three other methods was generally poor, with overall rates of very major error ranging from 12% for broth microdilution to 18% for Etest and disc diffusion. Conclusions Compared with agar dilution, other susceptibility testing methods give high rates of apparent false polymyxin susceptibility for cystic fibrosis isolates of P. aeruginosa and S. maltophilia. Prospective study of the correlation between in vitro susceptibility and clinical response is needed to clarify whether these discrepancies reflect oversensitivity of the agar dilution method or insensitivity of the other methods. PMID:20430789

  12. Genotyping of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from cockroaches and human urine.

    PubMed

    Saitou, Keiko; Furuhata, Katsunori; Fukuyama, Masafumi

    2010-10-01

    Molecular-epidemiological analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from cockroaches captured in hospitals and from patient urine was performed, employing randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis to investigate the usefulness of RAPD analysis. Four specific bands at positions of 993, 875, 521, and 402 bp were commonly detected using primer 272 in 16 of 45 cockroach-derived strains (35.6%), but not in 21 urine-derived strains. On analysis using primer 208, 4 specific bands at positions of 1,235, 1,138, 1,068, and 303 bp were commonly detected in 15 of the 45 cockroach-derived (33.3%) and 10 of the 21 patient urine-derived (47.6%) strains, in a total of 25 of 66 strains (37.8%). On cluster analysis, 12 (48.5%) and 16 (66.7%) clusters were grouped based on a homology of 89% or greater, using primer 272 and primer 208, respectively, showing that primer 208 was suitable for the confirmation of diversity. Seven patterns were clustered based on 100% homology using either primer, and 6 of these consisted of only cockroach-derived strains. In the individual groups with 100% homology, all strains in the group were isolated at an identical site during the same period. P. aeruginosa isolated from cockroaches showed diverse genotypes suggesting several sources of contamination, indicating the necessity for investigating infection control targeting cockroaches inhabiting hospitals.

  13. Evaluation of efflux pumps gene expression in resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates in an Iranian referral hospital

    PubMed Central

    Pourakbari, Babak; Yaslianifard, Sahar; Yaslianifard, Somaye; Mahmoudi, Shima; Keshavarz-Valian, Sepideh; Mamishi, Setareh

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) is one of the most important causes of nosocomial infections and has an intrinsic resistance to many antibiotics. Among all the resistance-nodulation-division (RND) pumps of P. aeruginosa, MexAB-OprM is the first efflux pump found to target multiple classes of antibiotics. This study was aimed to evaluate the expression level of genes expressing MexAB-OprM in clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa. Materials and Methods: In this study, 45 P. aeruginosa strains were isolated from patients admitted to Children’s Medical Center Hospital, an Iranian referral hospital. Disk diffusion and Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) methods were used for determination of the patterns of resistance to antibiotics. Real-time PCR was used to investigate the expression level of genes of MexAB-OprM efflux pump. Results: Among 45 resistant PA isolates, the frequency of genes overexpression was as follows: MexA (n=25, 55.5%), MexB (n=24, 53.3%) and OprM (n=16, 35.5%). In addition, in 28 strains (62%) overexpression was observed in one of the studied three genes of MexAB-OprM efflux pump. Conclusion: In our study 28 isolates (62%) had increased expression level of efflux pumps genes, MexAB-OprM. Although the efflux pumps play important roles in increasing the resistance towards different antibiotics but the role of other agents and mechanisms in evolution of resistance should not be ignored. Since the concomitant overproduction of other Mex efflux systems might have additive effects on antibiotic resistance, the co-expressing of a multicomponent efflux pump is recommended. On the other hand, the concomitant overproduction of two Mex pumps might have additive effects on resistance to antibiotic. Therefore co-expressing of Mex efflux systems is recommended. PMID:28210464

  14. First Report of OXA-4, an ESBL Isolated from Pseudomonas aeruginosa a South Indian Strain.

    PubMed

    Kingsley, S A Jemima; Verghese, Susan

    2013-09-01

    The OXA-type β-lactamases are so named because of their oxacillin-hydrolyzing abilities. In this study we characterize an extended spectrum β-lactamase, designated OXA-4, produced by a clinical isolate of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. ESBL production was detected by double disk synergy test. The P. aeruginosa isolate was obtained from endotracheal suction tip of 84 years old male patient diagnosed with CVA and hypertension. ESBL producing OXA β-lactamases was detected by PCR with primers specific to the conserved regions of the coding genes. Iso electric focusing was done to confirm the significance, sequencing the amplified product was also done. In the phenotypic identification, the strain was highly resistant to third generation cephalosporins and also to imipenem. The PCR amplified product for OXA β-lactamase was viewed at 919 bp. The pI point for the same was identified at 7.2. With the help of sequencing the amplified OXA β-lactamase was identified as OXA-4 gene. Here we report P. aeruginosa producing OXA-4 ESBL for the first time in the Indian subcontinent.

  15. Virulence Gene Profiles of Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated From Iranian Hospital Infections

    PubMed Central

    Fazeli, Nastaran; Momtaz, Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Background: The most common hospital-acquired pathogen is Pseudomonas aeruginosa. It is a multidrug resistant bacterium causing systemic infections. Objectives: The present study was carried out in order to investigate the distribution of virulence factors and antibiotic resistance properties of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from various types of hospital infections in Iran. Patients and Methods: Two-hundred and seventeen human infection specimens were collected from Baqiyatallah and Payambaran hospitals in Tehran, Iran. The clinical samples were cultured immediately and samples positive for P. aeruginosa were analyzed for the presence of antibiotic resistance and bacterial virulence genes using PCR (polymerase chain reaction). Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed using disk diffusion methodology with Müeller–Hinton agar. Results: Fifty-eight out of 127 (45.66%) male infection specimens and 44 out of 90 (48.88%) female infection specimens harbored P. aeruginosa. Also, 65% (in male specimens) and 21% (in female specimens) of respiratory system infections were positive for P. aeruginosa, which was a high rate. The genes encoding exoenzyme S (67.64%) and phospholipases C (45.09%) were the most common virulence genes found among the strains. The incidences of various β-lactams encoding genes, including blaTEM, blaSHV, blaOXA, blaCTX-M, blaDHA, and blaVEB were 94.11%, 16.66%, 15.68%, 18.62%, 21.56%, and 17.64%, respectively. The most commonly detected fluoroquinolones encoding gene was gyrA (15. 68%). High resistance levels to penicillin (100%), tetracycline (90.19%), streptomycin (64.70%), and erythromycin (43.13%) were observed too. Conclusions: Our findings should raise awareness about antibiotic resistance in hospitalized patients in Iran. Clinicians should exercise caution in prescribing antibiotics, especially in cases of human infections. PMID:25763199

  16. Pseudomonas aeruginosa variants isolated from patients with cystic fibrosis are killed by a bactericidal protein from human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Siefferman, C M; Regelmann, W E; Gray, B H

    1991-01-01

    The susceptibility of paired mucoid and nonmucoid variants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from 13 patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) to killing by a 55,000-Da bactericidal protein (BP55) from human polymorphonuclear leukocytes was studied. Mucoid and nonmucoid variants were equally sensitive to killing by BP55 at both pH 5.6 and pH 7.2. Eleven of the isolates were resistant to the bactericidal activity of 10% normal human serum but were as sensitive as the serum-sensitive isolates to BP55. Similarly, the 15 isolates with lipopolysaccharides (LPS) containing O-polysaccharide side chains (smooth LPS) were as sensitive to BP55 as those isolates with rough LPS.P. aeruginosa isolates from patients in poor clinical condition were more likely to have LPS of the smooth type and to be resistant to killing by 10% human serum than the isolates from patients in good clinical condition. We have concluded that the susceptibility of the P. aeruginosa isolates from patients with CF to killing by BP55 does not correlate with mucoid or nonmucoid variations, with the presence or absence of smooth LPS, or with the sensitivity or resistance to killing by normal human serum. Images PMID:1903774

  17. Pseudomonas aeruginosa inhibits the growth of Scedosporium aurantiacum, an opportunistic fungal pathogen isolated from the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Jashanpreet; Pethani, Bhavin P.; Kumar, Sheemal; Kim, Minkyoung; Sunna, Anwar; Kautto, Liisa; Penesyan, Anahit; Paulsen, Ian T.; Nevalainen, Helena

    2015-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Scedosporium aurantiacum and the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa are opportunistic pathogens isolated from lungs of the cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. P. aeruginosa has been known to suppress the growth of a number of CF related fungi such as Aspergillus fumigatus, Candida albicans, and Cryptococcus neoformans. However, the interactions between P. aeruginosa and S. aurantiacum have not been investigated in depth. Hence we assessed the effect of P. aeruginosa reference strain PAO1 and two clinical isolates PASS1 and PASS2 on the growth of two clinical S. aurantiacum isolates WM 06.482 and WM 08.202 using solid plate assays and liquid cultures, in a synthetic medium mimicking the nutrient condition in the CF sputum. Solid plate assays showed a clear inhibition of growth of both S. aurantiacum strains when cultured with P. aeruginosa strains PASS1 and PAO1. The inhibitory effect was confirmed by confocal microscopy. In addition to using chemical fluorescent stains, strains tagged with yfp (P. aeruginosa PASS1) and mCherry (S. aurantiacum WM 06.482) were created to facilitate detailed microscopic observations on strain interaction. To our knowledge, this is the first study describing successful genetic transformation of S. aurantiacum. Inhibition of growth was observed only in co-cultures of P. aeruginosa and S. aurantiacum; the cell fractions obtained from independent bacterial monocultures failed to initiate a response against the fungus. In the liquid co-cultures, biofilm forming P. aeruginosa strains PASS1 and PAO1 displayed higher inhibition of fungal growth when compared to PASS2. No change was observed in the inhibition pattern when direct cell contact between the bacterial and fungal strains was prevented using a separation membrane suggesting the involvement of extracellular metabolites in the fungal inhibition. However, one of the most commonly described bacterial virulence factors, pyocyanin, had no effect against either of the S

  18. Pseudomonas aeruginosa inhibits the growth of Scedosporium aurantiacum, an opportunistic fungal pathogen isolated from the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Jashanpreet; Pethani, Bhavin P; Kumar, Sheemal; Kim, Minkyoung; Sunna, Anwar; Kautto, Liisa; Penesyan, Anahit; Paulsen, Ian T; Nevalainen, Helena

    2015-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Scedosporium aurantiacum and the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa are opportunistic pathogens isolated from lungs of the cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. P. aeruginosa has been known to suppress the growth of a number of CF related fungi such as Aspergillus fumigatus, Candida albicans, and Cryptococcus neoformans. However, the interactions between P. aeruginosa and S. aurantiacum have not been investigated in depth. Hence we assessed the effect of P. aeruginosa reference strain PAO1 and two clinical isolates PASS1 and PASS2 on the growth of two clinical S. aurantiacum isolates WM 06.482 and WM 08.202 using solid plate assays and liquid cultures, in a synthetic medium mimicking the nutrient condition in the CF sputum. Solid plate assays showed a clear inhibition of growth of both S. aurantiacum strains when cultured with P. aeruginosa strains PASS1 and PAO1. The inhibitory effect was confirmed by confocal microscopy. In addition to using chemical fluorescent stains, strains tagged with yfp (P. aeruginosa PASS1) and mCherry (S. aurantiacum WM 06.482) were created to facilitate detailed microscopic observations on strain interaction. To our knowledge, this is the first study describing successful genetic transformation of S. aurantiacum. Inhibition of growth was observed only in co-cultures of P. aeruginosa and S. aurantiacum; the cell fractions obtained from independent bacterial monocultures failed to initiate a response against the fungus. In the liquid co-cultures, biofilm forming P. aeruginosa strains PASS1 and PAO1 displayed higher inhibition of fungal growth when compared to PASS2. No change was observed in the inhibition pattern when direct cell contact between the bacterial and fungal strains was prevented using a separation membrane suggesting the involvement of extracellular metabolites in the fungal inhibition. However, one of the most commonly described bacterial virulence factors, pyocyanin, had no effect against either of the S

  19. Draft Genome Sequences of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from Wounded Military Personnel.

    PubMed

    Arivett, Brock A; Ream, Dave C; Fiester, Steven E; Kidane, Destaalem; Actis, Luis A

    2016-08-11

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a Gram-negative bacterium that causes severe hospital-acquired infections, is grouped as an ESKAPE (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter species) pathogen because of its extensive drug resistance phenotypes and effects on human health worldwide. Five multidrug resistant P. aeruginosa strains isolated from wounded military personnel were sequenced and annotated in this work.

  20. Carbapenem Susceptibility and Multidrug-Resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Hashem, Hany; Hanora, Amro; Abdalla, Salah; Shawky, Alaa; Saad, Alaa

    2016-01-01

    Background Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a serious concern for antimicrobial therapy, as the common isolates exhibit variable grades of resistance, involving beta-lactamase enzymes, beside native defense mechanisms. Objectives The present study was designed to determine the occurrence of Metallo-β- Lactamases (MBL) and Amp C harboring P. aeruginosa isolates from Suez Canal university hospital in Ismailia, Egypt. Methods A total of 147 P. aeruginosa isolates, recovered from 311 patients during a 10-month period, were collected between May 2013 and February 2014; the isolates were collected from urine, wound and sputum. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) determined by agar dilution methods was ≥2 μg/mL for meropenem and imipenem. Identification of P. aeruginosa was confirmed using API 20NE. Metallo-β- Lactamases and Amp C were detected based on different phenotypic methods. Results Overall, 26.5% of P. aeruginosa isolates (39/147) were carbapenem resistant isolates. Furthermore, 64.1% (25/39) were MBL producers, these isolates were screened by the combined disc and disc diffusion methods to determine the ability of MBL production. Both MBL and Amp C harbored P. aeruginosa isolates were 28% (7/25). Sixty-four percent of P. aeruginosa isolates were multidrug resistant (MDR) (16/25). The sensitivity toward polymyxin, imipenem, norfloxacin, piperacillin-tazobactam and gentamicin was 99%, 91%, 88%, 82% and 78%, respectively. The resistance rate towards cefotaxime, ceftazidime, cefepime, aztreonam and meropenem was 98.6%, 86%, 71.4%, 34% and 30%, respectively. Conclusions Multidrug resistance was significantly associated with MBL production in P. aeruginosa. Early detection of MBL-producing P. aeruginosa and hospital antibiotic policy prescription helps proper antimicrobial therapy and avoidance of dissemination of these multidrug resistance isolates. PMID:28138370

  1. [Antibacterial activities of combination uses of cefpirome with various antibiotics in vitro against clinically isolated glucose non-fermentative gram-negative rods: part 1. the results against Pseudomonas aeruginosa].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Y; Koguchi, M; Fukayama, S; Ishihara, R; Oda, S; Deguchi, K

    1996-01-01

    In order to evaluate antibacterial activities of combination uses of cefpirome (CPR) and various antibiotics in vitro, minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of CPR alone and combinations of CPR+other drugs against freshly isolated clinical strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The results are summarized as follows; 1. Combined effects of CPR+beta-lactams, piperacillin (PIPC), aztreonam (AZT), imipenem (IPM) showed wider antibacterial spectra and stronger antibacterial activities than CPR alone with drugs concentrations of CPR and other drugs at sub-MIC levels. At concentrations of sub-MIC levels, antibacterial effects of CPR+PIPC and CPR+AZT combination were strong but CPR+IPM was weaker than those of the former two combinations. It appeared that stronger effects were demonstrated by some combinations against strains that were susceptible to both drugs of combination, but little additive effects were shown against strains that were resistant to both drugs. Antibacterial effect of CPR+fosfomycin combination was the same as those of CPR+PIPC and CPR+AZT combinations. 2. Combined effects of CPR+aminoglycosides (AGs), gentamicin, tobramycin, amikacin showed wider antibacterial spectra and stronger antibacterial activities at sub-MIC levels of CPR or ATs. The effect against CPR-resistant strains was same. But the combined effect was weak against AGs-resistant strains. 3. Effectiveness of combinations of CPR+beta-lactams and CPR+AGs depended on drug susceptibilities of strains tested. We cannot estimate effects of those combinations without investigating drug susceptibility of bacteria being tested. 4. In none of the combinations tested, antagonism was observed.

  2. Antibacterial Honey (Medihoney™): in-vitro Activity Against Clinical Isolates of MRSA, VRE, and Other Multiresistant Gram-negative Organisms Including Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    George, Narelle May; Cutting, Keith F

    2007-09-01

    The clinical use of honey has received increasing interest in recent years, particularly its use as a topical antibacterial dressing. Results thus far are extremely encouraging, and demonstrate that honey is effective against a broad range of microorganisms, including multiresistant strains. This in-vitro study complements the work of others and focuses on the impact that a standardized honey can have on multiresistant bacteria that are regularly found in wounds and are responsible for increased morbidity.

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of Beneficial Rice Rhizosphere Isolate Pseudomonas aeruginosa PUPa3

    PubMed Central

    Uzelac, Gordana; Bertani, Iris; Kojic, Milan; Paszkiewicz, Konrad H.; Studholme, David J.; Passos da Silva, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PUPa3 is a rhizosphere-colonizing and plant growth-promoting strain isolated from the rhizosphere of rice. This strain has, however, been shown to be pathogenic in two nonmammalian infection models. Here we report the draft genome sequence of P. aeruginosa PUPa3. PMID:24994800

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of Beneficial Rice Rhizosphere Isolate Pseudomonas aeruginosa PUPa3.

    PubMed

    Uzelac, Gordana; Bertani, Iris; Kojic, Milan; Paszkiewicz, Konrad H; Studholme, David J; Passos da Silva, Daniel; Venturi, Vittorio

    2014-07-03

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PUPa3 is a rhizosphere-colonizing and plant growth-promoting strain isolated from the rhizosphere of rice. This strain has, however, been shown to be pathogenic in two nonmammalian infection models. Here we report the draft genome sequence of P. aeruginosa PUPa3.

  5. An Investigation of Antibacterial Resistance Patterns Among Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates Collected from Intensive Care Units of a University-Affiliated Hospital in Ahvaz, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Izadpour, Farrokh; Ranjbari, Nastaran; Aramesh, Mohammad-Reza; Moosavian, Mojtaba; ShahAli, Shiva; Larki, Farzaneh; Tabesh, Hamed; Morvaridi, Afrooz

    2016-01-01

    Background In recent decades, multidrug-resistant non-fermenting Gram-negative pathogens, particularly Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, have been recognized as a major cause of healthcare-associated and nosocomial infections and outbreaks. Objectives The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and pattern of antibiotic resistance in A. baumannii and P. aeruginosa isolates collected from intensive care units (ICUs). Methods One hundred fifty-five clinical isolates, including 80 (51.6%) isolates of A. baumannii and 75 (48.4%) isolates of P. aeruginosa, from hospitalized patients in the ICUs of a teaching hospital in Ahvaz, Iran, were collected from January 1 to December 30, 2013. The organisms were identified with conventional bacteriological methods, and antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed on all isolates in accordance with clinical laboratory and standards institute (CLSI) guidelines. Results The maximum resistance rates among A. baumannii isolates were observed for ciprofloxacin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (96.9% and 95.2%, respectively). For P. aeruginosa isolates, the maximum resistance rates were reported for ceftriaxone and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (97.2% and 92.4%, respectively). Conclusions The majority of A. baumannii and P. aeruginosa isolates were found to be resistant to commonly recommended antibiotics. Therefore, surveillance of antibiotic consumption and proper antibiotic administration guidelines are essential for preventing major outbreaks in the future. PMID:27800136

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of Microcystis aeruginosa CACIAM 03, a Cyanobacterium Isolated from an Amazonian Freshwater Environment

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Wendel Oliveira; Lima, Alex Ranieri Jerônimo; Moraes, Pablo Henrique Gonçalves; Siqueira, Andrei Santos; Aguiar, Délia Cristina Figueira; Baraúna, Anna Rafaella Ferreira; Martins, Luisa Carício; Fuzii, Hellen Thais; de Lima, Clayton Pereira Silva; Vianez-Júnior, João Lídio Silva Gonçalves; Nunes, Márcio Roberto Teixeira; Dall'Agnol, Leonardo Teixeira

    2016-01-01

    Given its toxigenic potential, Microcystis aeruginosa is an important bloom-forming cyanobacterium. Here, we present a draft genome and annotation of the strain CACIAM 03, which was isolated from an Amazonian freshwater environment. PMID:27856592

  7. In vitro comparison of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates with various susceptibilities to aminoglycosides and ten beta-lactam antibiotics.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, D H; Baltch, A L; Smith, R P

    1984-01-01

    Susceptibilities of 98 clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, including 33 strains with known mechanisms of amikacin resistance, were tested by the agar dilution method against 10 beta-lactam drugs. Ceftazidime, imipenem, and cefsulodin had the greatest activity, regardless of the aminoglycoside susceptibilities. The strains which were highly resistant to amikacin appeared to be less susceptible to some beta-lactam drugs, especially if their resistance was related to amikacin-inactivating enzymes; statistical significance, however, was observed for aztreonam only. PMID:6428308

  8. Anticandidal activity of medicinal plants and Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains of clinical specimens.

    PubMed

    Bora, Limpon

    2016-04-01

    This study was designed to investigate the in vitro anticandidal activity of some medicinal plants and Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains against Candida species. The antifungal activity of methanolic extracts of five medicinal plants, namely, Cinnamomum porrectum, Lippia nudiflora, Cestrum nocturnum, Trachyspermum ammi, and Sida carpinifolia were studied. The medicinal characteristics of these plants were compared with commercially used antibiotics. The antimicrobial assay was done by agar well diffusion and the broth dilution method. Among the plants used, T. ammi and C. nocturnum were found to be more potent than the others. Twenty P. aeruginosa strains were isolated from various clinical specimens. The total inhibitions obtained were found to be 47%, 38%, and 36% in blood agar, whereas in Sabouraud dextrose agar (SDA) the inhibitions were 57%, 48%, and 37%, respectively.

  9. Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates in severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: characterization and risk factors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are at increased risk of infection by P. aeruginosa. The specific role of bronchiectasis in both infection and chronic colonization by this microorganism in COPD, however, remains ill defined. To evaluate the prevalence and risk factors for P. aeruginosa recovery from sputum in outpatients with severe COPD, characterizing P. aeruginosa isolates by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and focusing on the influence of bronchiectasis on chronic colonization in these patients. Methods A case-cohort study of 118 patients with severe COPD attended at a Respiratory Day Unit for an acute infectious exacerbation and followed up over one year. High-resolution CT scans were performed during stability for bronchiectasis assessment and sputum cultures were obtained during exacerbation and stability in all patients. P. aeruginosa isolates were genotyped by PFGE. Determinants of the recovery of P. aeruginosa in sputum and chronic colonization by this microorganism were assessed by multivariate analysis. Results P. aeruginosa was isolated from 41 of the 118 patients studied (34.7%). Five of these 41 patients (12.2%) with P. aeruginosa recovery fulfilled criteria for chronic colonization. In the multivariate analysis, the extent of bronchiectasis (OR 9.8, 95% CI: 1.7 to 54.8) and the number of antibiotic courses (OR 1.7, 95% CI: 1.1 to 2.5) were independently associated with an increased risk of P. aeruginosa isolation. Chronic colonization was unrelated to the presence of bronchiectasis (p=0.75). In patients with chronic colonization the isolates of P. aeruginosa retrieved corresponded to the same clones during the follow-up, and most of the multidrug resistant isolates (19/21) were harbored by these patients. Conclusions The main risk factors for P. aeruginosa isolation in severe COPD were the extent of bronchiectasis and exposure to antibiotics. Over 10% of these patients fulfilled criteria for

  10. Detection of Multidrug Resistant (MDR) and Extremely Drug Resistant (XDR) P. Aeruginosa Isolated from Patients in Tehran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Saderi, Horieh; Owlia, Parviz

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study was done to detect multidrug resistant (MDR) and extremely drug resistant (XDR) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa among strains isolated from patients in Tehran, Iran, due to importance of these phenotypes in treatment of human infections. Methods: Eighty eight P. aeruginosa were isolated from patients in Tehran, Iran, and identified by routine methods and PCR for oprL gene. Their antimicrobial susceptibility to 16 antimicrobial agents from 7 antimicrobial categories (aminoglycosides, carbapenems, cephalosporins, fluoroquinolones, penicillins/ß-lactamase inhibitors, monobactams, polymyxins) were determined by disk diffusion method, according to recommendation of Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. Characterization of P. aeruginosa isolates as MDR and XDR was done according to standardized international terminology presented by European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control as well as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in 2011. MDR was defined as acquired non-susceptibility to at least one agent in ≥3 antimicrobial categories and XDR was defined as non-susceptibility to at least one agent in ≥6 antimicrobial categories. Results: The rates of susceptibility to antimicrobials were as follows: gentamicin 27.3%, tobramycin 54.5%, amikacin 56.8%, netilmicin 36.4%, imipenem 55.7%, meropenem 55.7%, doripenem 60.2%, ceftazidime 63.6%, cefepime 56.8%, ciprofloxacin 59.1%, levofloxacin 60.2%, ticarcillin-clavulanic acid 37.5%, piperacillin-tazobactam 63.6%, aztreonam 43.2%, colistin 90.9%, polymyxin 95.5%. Altogether, 48 (54.5%) and 29 (33%) isolates were characterized as MDR and XDR, respectively. Discussion: The high frequency of antibiotic resistance in clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa in Iran makes epidemiological surveillance of susceptibility of this bacterium more essential for the best selection of empirical antibiotics. PMID:26351496

  11. Drug Resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacter cloacae Isolated from ICU, Babol, Northern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Bayani, Masoomeh; Siadati, Sepideh; Rajabnia, Ramzan; Taher, Ali Asghar

    2013-01-01

    Multidrug resistant (MDR) bacteria are spread throughout the world which causes nosocomial infections, especially in Intensive Care Unit (ICU). This study aimed to investigate the resistance pattern of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacter cloacae isolated from patients in the ICU. During 2011-2012, 30 isolates for each P. aeruginosa and E. cloacae were collected from the patients who acquired nosocomial infection after admition to the ICU at the hospitals affiliated to Babol University of Medical Sciences, Babol, northern Iran. Antimicrobial susceptibility test was performed for five category antibiotics by microdilution method. The data were analyzed by SPSS version 20 and p<0.05 was considered statistically significant. The highest resistance rate of P. aeruginosa was seen to amikacin (53.3%) followed by ceftazidime (43.3%). Also, 16.7% of E. cloacae was resistant to ceftazidime. Among P. aeruginosa isolates,18 (60%) were MDR while no E. cloacae isolates were MDR. The significant correlation was only demonstrated between MDR P. aeruginosa and the reason of hospitalization (P=0.004). In conclusion, there was alarming amount of P. aeruginosa MDR in patients in the ICU which could lead to a hazardous outcome for the patients. Therefore, new prevention policies regarding to hospital infection should be established. Also, the periodical assessment of bacterial resistance pattern particularly in ICUs should be performed. PMID:24551814

  12. Honey as an Antimicrobial Agent Against Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Isolated from Infected Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy, Vishnu Prasad; Ballal, Mamatha; Shivananda, PG; Bairy, Indira

    2012-01-01

    Background: As natural products garner attention in the medical field due to emergence of antibiotic resistant strains of bacteria, honey is valued for its antibacterial activity. Objective: Fifty strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from infected wounds were evaluated for their antibacterial action using honey in comparison with different antibiotics and Dettol. Methodology and Results: All the strains were found to be sensitive to honey at a minimum inhibitory concentration of 20% in comparison with Dettol at 10% using agar dilution method. In the second step, the time kill assay was performed on five isolates of P. aeruginosa to demonstrate the bactericidal activity of honey at different dilutions of honey ranging from 20% to 100% at regular time intervals. All the isolates of P. aeruginosa tested were killed in 12-24 h depending on the dilutions of the honey tested. Thus, honey could prevent the growth of P. aeruginosa even if it was diluted by deionized water by fivefolds in vitro. Honey had almost uniform bactericidal activity against P. aeruginosa irrespective of their susceptibility to different classes of antibiotics. Conclusion: Honey which is a natural, non-toxic, and an inexpensive product has activity against the P. aeruginosa isolated from infected wounds may make it an alternative topical choice in the treatment of wound infections. PMID:22754244

  13. Effect of airway Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolation and infection on steady-state bronchiectasis in Guangzhou, China

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Wei-Jie; Gao, Yong-Hua; Xu, Gang; Lin, Zhi-Ya; Tang, Yan; Li, Hui-Min; Li, Zhi-Min; Zheng, Jin-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Background Current status of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) infection in clinically stable bronchiectasis in mainland China remains unclear. Objective To compare the inflammation and lung function impairment in bronchiectasis patients isolated or infected with PA, potentially pathogenic microorganisms (PPMs) and commensals, and to identify factors associated with PA isolation and infection. Methods Patients with steady-state bronchiectasis and healthy subjects were recruited. Peripheral blood and sputum were sampled to determine inflammatory markers and bacterial loads in steady-state bronchiectasis and health. Spirometry and diffusing capacity were also measured. Results We enrolled 144 bronchiectasis patients and 23 healthy subjects. PA isolation and infection accounted for 44 and 39 patients, who demonstrated significant inflammatory responses and markedly impaired spirometry, but not diffusing capacity, compared with healthy subjects and patients isolated with other PPMs and commensals (all P<0.05). Except for heightened sputum inflammatory responses, there were no notable differences in serum inflammation and lung function as with the increased density of PA. Female gender [odds ratio (OR): 3.10 for PA isolation; OR: 3.74 for PA infection], 4 or more exacerbations within 2 years (OR: 3.74 for PA isolation, OR: 2.95 for PA infection) and cystic bronchiectasis (OR: 3.63 for PA isolation, OR: 4.47 for PA infection) were the factors consistently associated with PA isolation and infection. Conclusions PA elicits intense inflammation and lung function impairment in steady-state bronchiectasis. The density of PA does not correlate with most clinical indices. PA infection is associated with females, frequent exacerbations and cystic bronchiectasis. PMID:25973228

  14. [Morphologic, cultural, and biochemical properties of cultures of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from patients, animals, and the environment].

    PubMed

    Litovchenko, P P; Zabotina, I V

    1981-05-01

    The properties of 279 Ps. aeruginosa strains were studied in 70 tests. The use of a synthetic peptone-free mineral medium for the determination of sugar oxidation was shown to have advantages over the use of liquid Giess' media. Ps. aeruginosa cultures isolated from human patients, animals, soil and water were characterized by a number of common signs, irrespective of their origin. The strains isolated from human patients were resistant practically to all antibiotics widely used in clinical practice; the cultures isolated from soil and water retained their sensitivity to antibiotics; the strains isolated from animals retained sensitivity to some antibiotics. To identify Ps. aeruginosa in practical bacteriological laboratories, the following parameters should be determined: mobility; the character of growth in Levine's and Ploskirev's media; ability to grow at 42 degrees C and 4 degrees C; the fermentation of carbohydrates in Olkenitsky's medium and their oxidation in a mineral medium; indole and hydroxide sulfide production; the methyl red and Voges--Proskauer reaction; the presence of pigments, oxidase, catalase, gelatinase, nitrate reductase and arginine dehydrolase, urease; resistance to antibiotics.

  15. Detection of blaPER-1 & blaOxa10 among imipenem resistant isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from burn patients hospitalized in Shiraz Burn Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Emami, Amir; Bazargani, Abdollah; Mohammadi, Ali Akbar; Zardosht, Mitra; Seyed Jafari, Seyed Morteza

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most important Gram negative opportunistic bacteria which causes infection among burn patients. Resistance to the antibiotics in this group of bacteria is increased due to the activity of extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBLs) genes. In the current study, we investigated the prevalence of two genes (blaPER-1 & blaOxa10) related β-lactamase genes among imipenem resistance clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa in hospitalized patients. Materials and Methods: From May 2010 to March 2011, 270 P. aeruginosa isolated from hospitalized burned patients’ wounds in Shiraz Burn Hospital, were tested for Imipenem resistance by disk diffusion method. Presence of ESBLs exo-enzyme, blaPER-1 and blaOxa10 genes were also evaluated in the resistant isolate. Results: 210 (77.7%) of 270 P. aeruginosa isolates were resistant to imipenem. blaPER-1 and blaOxa10 were detected among 168 (80.0%) of imipenem resistant isolates. Furthermore, 160 (76.2%) of them had blaOxa10 gene and 84 (40.0%) of them had blaPER-1 while 63 (30.0%) resistant isolates contained both genes simultaneously. Conclusion: This study showed a high prevalence of blaPER-1 and blaOxa10 genes in hospitalized burn patients in south west of Iran. Therefore, it’s highly recommended to perform such tests routinely to evaluate the resistance pattern in order to better antibiotic selection in the burned patients. PMID:26644867

  16. Genetic characterization of Microcystis aeruginosa isolates from Portuguese freshwater systems.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Cristiana; Vasconcelos, Vitor; Antunes, Agostinho

    2016-07-01

    Cyanobacteria are microorganisms that pose a serious threat to the aquatic waterways through the production of dense blooms under eutrophic conditions and the release of toxic secondary metabolites-cyanotoxins. Within cyanobacteria, the colonial planktonic Microcystis aeruginosa is widely distributed in both fresh and brackish aquatic environments throughout the world being frequently observed in the Portuguese water systems. Apart from the well-established distribution of M. aeruginosa in Portugal, knowledge of its genetic diversity and population structure is unknown. Therefore, in this study twenty-seven strains were obtained from the North, Centre and South regions of Portugal and were subjected to extensive phylogenetic analyses using simultaneously four distinct genetic markers (16S rRNA, 16S-23S ITS, DNA gyrase subunit ß and cell division protein (ftsZ)) encompassing in total 2834 bp. With this work we characterized the phylogenetic relationship among the Portuguese strains, with the southern strains showing higher genetic structure relatively to the North and Centre strains. A total of fifteen genotypes were determined for M. aeruginosa in Portuguese water systems revealing a high genetic diversity. This is also the first study to report geographic variation on the population structure of the Portuguese M. aeruginosa.

  17. Inhibition of quorum sensing-mediated biofilm formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by a locally isolated Bacillus cereus.

    PubMed

    Wahman, Shaimaa; Emara, Mohamed; Shawky, Riham M; El-Domany, Ramadan A; Aboulwafa, Mohammad Mabrouk

    2015-12-01

    Quorum sensing has been shown to play a crucial role in Pseudomonas aeruginosa pathogenesis where it activates expression of myriad genes that regulate the production of important virulence factors such as biofilm formation. Antagonism of quorum sensing is an excellent target for antimicrobial therapy and represents a novel approach to combat drug resistance. In this study, Chromobacterium violaceum biosensor strain was employed as a fast, sensitive, reliable, and easy to use tool for rapid screening of soil samples for Quorum Sensing Inhibitors (QSI) and the optimal conditions for maximal QSI production were scrutinized. Screening of 127 soil isolates showed that 43 isolates were able to breakdown the HHL signal. Out of the 43 isolates, 38 isolates were able to inhibit the violet color of the biosensor and to form easily detectable zones of color inhibition around their growth. A confirmatory bioassay was carried out after concentrating the putative positive cell-free lysates. Three different isolates that belonged to Bacillus cereus group were shown to have QSI activities and their QSI activities were optimized by changing their culture conditions. Further experiments revealed that the cell-free lysates of these isolates were able to inhibit biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa clinical isolates.

  18. Photodynamic antimicrobial therapy to inhibit pseudomonas aeruginosa of corneal isolates (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durkee, Heather A.; Relhan, Nidhi; Arboleda, Alejandro; Halili, Francisco; De Freitas, Carolina; Alawa, Karam; Aguilar, Mariela C.; Amescua, Guillermo; Miller, Darlene; Parel, Jean-Marie

    2016-03-01

    Keratitis associated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa is difficult to manage. Treatment includes antibiotic eye drops, however, some strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa are resistant. Current research efforts are focused on finding alternative and adjunct therapies to treat multi-drug resistant bacteria. One promising alternate technique is photodynamic therapy (PDT). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of riboflavin- and rose bengal-mediated PDT on Pseudomonas aeruginosa keratitis isolates in vitro. Two isolates (S+U- and S-U+) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were derived from keratitis patients and exposed to five experimental groups: (1) Control (dark, UV-A irradiation, 525nm irradiation); (2) 0.1% riboflavin (dark, UV-A irradiation); and (3) 0.1% rose bengal, (4) 0.05% rose bengal and (5) 0.01% rose bengal (dark, 525nm irradiation). Three days after treatment, in dark conditions of all concentration of riboflavin and rose bengal showed no inhibition in both S+U- and S-U+ strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In 0.1% and 0.05% rose bengal irradiated groups, for both S+U- and S-U+ strains, there was complete inhibition of bacterial growth in the central 50mm zone corresponding to the diameter of the green light source. These in vitro results suggest that rose bengal photodynamic therapy may be an effective adjunct treatment for Pseudomonas aeruginosa keratitis.

  19. Tracking down antibiotic-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates in a wastewater network.

    PubMed

    Slekovec, Céline; Plantin, Julie; Cholley, Pascal; Thouverez, Michelle; Talon, Daniel; Bertrand, Xavier; Hocquet, Didier

    2012-01-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa-containing wastewater released by hospitals is treated by wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), generating sludge, which is used as a fertilizer, and effluent, which is discharged into rivers. We evaluated the risk of dissemination of antibiotic-resistant P. aeruginosa (AR-PA) from the hospital to the environment via the wastewater network. Over a 10-week period, we sampled weekly 11 points (hospital and urban wastewater, untreated and treated water, sludge) of the wastewater network and the river upstream and downstream of the WWTP of a city in eastern France. We quantified the P. aeruginosa load by colony counting. We determined the susceptibility to 16 antibiotics of 225 isolates, which we sorted into three categories (wild-type, antibiotic-resistant and multidrug-resistant). Extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) and metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs) were identified by gene sequencing. All non-wild-type isolates (n = 56) and a similar number of wild-type isolates (n = 54) were genotyped by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing. Almost all the samples (105/110, 95.5%) contained P. aeruginosa, with high loads in hospital wastewater and sludge (≥3×10(6) CFU/l or/kg). Most of the multidrug-resistant isolates belonged to ST235, CC111 and ST395. They were found in hospital wastewater and some produced ESBLs such as PER-1 and MBLs such as IMP-29. The WWTP greatly reduced P. aeruginosa counts in effluent, but the P. aeruginosa load in the river was nonetheless higher downstream than upstream from the WWTP. We conclude that the antibiotic-resistant P. aeruginosa released by hospitals is found in the water downstream from the WWTP and in sludge, constituting a potential risk of environmental contamination.

  20. Emergence of KPC-2-Producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa Sequence Type 463 Isolates in Hangzhou, China

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yan-yan; Gu, Dan-xia; Cai, Jia-chang; Zhou, Hong-wei

    2015-01-01

    Thirty-nine Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC)-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates, all exhibiting high-level resistance to carbapenems and other β-lactam antibiotics, were isolated in Hangzhou, China. Molecular epidemiology analysis indicated the presence of two dominant clones, namely, clones A and B, both of which belong to sequence type 463 (ST463). A genetic environment analysis demonstrated that both clones harbor an ISKpn8 transposase, blaKPC-2, and an ISKpn6-like transposase. These findings depict the features of clonal expansion and transmission of KPC-2-producing P. aeruginosa strains in Hangzhou, China. PMID:25691651

  1. In vitro antimicrobial resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from canine otitis externa in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Penna, B.; Thomé, S.; Martins, R.; Martins, G.; Lilenbaum, W.

    2011-01-01

    Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (167) were obtained from 528 samples of canine otitis externa, identified by biochemical reactions and tested for susceptibility to 10 antimicrobials. The most effective drug was ciprofloxacin. The study reports alarming resistance among P. aeruginosa isolated from canine otitis externa samples in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. PMID:24031774

  2. Isolation and characterization of quorum-sensing signalling molecules in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates recovered from nosocomial infections.

    PubMed

    Lakshmana Gowda, Krishnappa; John, James; Marie, Mohammed A M; Sangeetha, Gopalkrishnan; Bindurani, Shanta Range

    2013-09-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most common pathogens in nosocomial infections. Many studies have documented the role of quorum-sensing (QS) systems in antibiotic tolerance of P. aeruginosa. N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) serve as QS signalling molecules and can be a target for modulating bacterial pathogenicity. In this study, nosocomial isolates of P. aeruginosa were characterized for the presence of different types of QS signalling molecules. AHLs were solvent extracted and quantified by determination of β-galactosidase activity using the Escherichia coli MG4 reporter strain. Further characterization was performed by analytical thin layer chromatography coupled with detection using the Agrobacterium tumefaciens A136 biosensor strain. All P. aeruginosa isolates produced AHLs, but there were differences in the quantity and nature of AHLs. We identified AHLs belonging to C4-homoserine lactone (HSL), C6-HSL, C8-HSL, C10-HSL and C12-HSL. AHL profiling of P. aeruginosa isolates showed differences in the amounts and types of AHLs, suggesting differences in the virulence factors and the potential for infection. Our results may be investigated further using animal model systems.

  3. Mechanisms of intrinsic resistance and acquired susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from cystic fibrosis patients to temocillin, a revived antibiotic

    PubMed Central

    Chalhoub, Hussein; Pletzer, Daniel; Weingart, Helge; Braun, Yvonne; Tunney, Michael M.; Elborn, J. Stuart; Rodriguez-Villalobos, Hector; Plésiat, Patrick; Kahl, Barbara C.; Denis, Olivier; Winterhalter, Mathias; Tulkens, Paul M.; Van Bambeke, Françoise

    2017-01-01

    The β-lactam antibiotic temocillin (6-α-methoxy-ticarcillin) shows stability to most extended spectrum β-lactamases, but is considered inactive against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Mutations in the MexAB-OprM efflux system, naturally occurring in cystic fibrosis (CF) isolates, have been previously shown to reverse this intrinsic resistance. In the present study, we measured temocillin activity in a large collection (n = 333) of P. aeruginosa CF isolates. 29% of the isolates had MICs ≤ 16 mg/L (proposed clinical breakpoint for temocillin). Mutations were observed in mexA or mexB in isolates for which temocillin MIC was ≤512 mg/L (nucleotide insertions or deletions, premature termination, tandem repeat, nonstop, and missense mutations). A correlation was observed between temocillin MICs and efflux rate of N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine (MexAB-OprM fluorescent substrate) and extracellular exopolysaccharide abundance (contributing to a mucoid phenotype). OpdK or OpdF anion-specific porins expression decreased temocillin MIC by ~1 two-fold dilution only. Contrarily to the common assumption that temocillin is inactive on P. aeruginosa, we show here clinically-exploitable MICs on a non-negligible proportion of CF isolates, explained by a wide diversity of mutations in mexA and/or mexB. In a broader context, this work contributes to increase our understanding of MexAB-OprM functionality and help delineating how antibiotics interact with MexA and MexB. PMID:28091521

  4. [The experience of implementation of REP-u RAPD-polymerase chain reaction in epidemiologic characteristic of nosocomial isolates Pseudomonas aeruginosa].

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, M V; Maksimova, A V; Karpunina, T I

    2015-03-01

    The article presents comparative evaluation of diagnostic value of technique REP- u RAPD-polymerase chain reaction applied under genetic typing of clinical isolates of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa. The strains are isolated in different hospital departments of medical institutions in adult (8 medical institutions; n = 145) and children (5 medical institutions; n = 151) medical networks. The results of study demonstrated different boundary capacity of three reactions. The Simpson discrimination index made up to 0.993, 0.875 and 0.639 for RAPD-, ERIC- and BOX-polymerase chain reaction correspondingly. The RAPD-polymerase chain reaction makes it possible to detect individual characteristics of strains. Out of two alternatives the REP-polymerase chain reaction demonstrated its advantage, besides only with one primer ERIC2. The BOX-polymerase chain reaction has a least discriminating capacity under typing of isolates P. aeruginosa, detecting only species' characteristics. The clinical strains P. aeruginosa are distributed on 24 genome groups and 52 isolates had individual genotypes. The evaluation of results of genetic typing permitted to point out both similarity of tendencies in propagation of strains of P. aeruginosa among hospitalized adults and adolescents and specificity of detection in neonatal clinics. It is obvious that hospitals of different profiles, including departments of reanimation and intensive therapy represent specific ecological environment significantly different in its level of endogenous and exogenous infection.

  5. Characterization of Virulence Potential of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Isolated from Bovine Meat, Fresh Fish, and Smoked Fish

    PubMed Central

    Benie, Comoé Koffi Donatien; Dadié, Adjéhi; Guessennd, Nathalie; N’gbesso-Kouadio, Nadège Ahou; Kouame, N’zebo Désiré; N’golo, David Coulibaly; Aka, Solange; Dako, Etienne; Dje, Koffi Marcellin; Dosso, Mireille

    2017-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa owns a variability of virulence factors. These factors can increase bacterial pathogenicity and infection severity. Despite the importance of knowledge about them, these factors are not more characterized at level of strains derived from local food products. This study aimed to characterize the virulence potential of P. aeruginosa isolated from various animal products. Several structural and virulence genes of P. aeruginosa including lasB, exoS, algD, plcH, pilB, exoU, and nan1 were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on 204 strains of P. aeruginosa. They were isolated from bovine meat (122), fresh fish (49), and smoked fish (33). The 16S rRNA gene was detected on 91.1% of the presumptive strains as Pseudomonas. The rpoB gene showed that 99.5% of the strains were P. aeruginosa. The lasB gene (89.2%) was the most frequently detected (p < 0.05). In decreasing importance order, exoS (86.8%), algD (72.1%), plcH (72.1%), pilB (40.2%), and exoU (2.5%) were detected. The lasB gene was detected in all strains of P. aeruginosa serogroups O11 and O16. The prevalence of algD, exoS, and exoU genes in these strains varied from 51.2% to 87.4%. The simultaneous determination of serogroups and virulence factors is of interest for the efficacy of surveillance of infections associated with P. aeruginosa. PMID:28386471

  6. Synthesis and electrochemical detection of a thiazolyl-indole natural product isolated from the nosocomial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Buzid, Alyah; Muimhneacháin, Eoin Ó; Reen, F Jerry; Hayes, Phyllis E; Pardo, Leticia M; Shang, Fengjun; O'Gara, Fergal; Sperry, Jonathan; Luong, John H T; Glennon, Jeremy D; McGlacken, Gerard P

    2016-09-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative opportunistic pathogen, capable of surviving in a broad range of natural environments and quickly acquiring resistance. It is associated with hospital-acquired infections, particularly in patients with compromised immunity, and is the primary cause of morbidity and mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. P. aeruginosa is also of nosocomial importance on dairy farms and veterinary hospitals, where it is a key morbidity factor in bovine mastitis. P. aeruginosa uses a cell-cell communication system consisting of signalling molecules to coordinate bacterial secondary metabolites, biofilm formation, and virulence. Simple and sensitive methods for the detection of biomolecules as indicators of P. aeruginosa infection would be of great clinical importance. Here, we report the synthesis of the P. aeruginosa natural product, barakacin, which was recently isolated from the bovine ruminal strain ZIO. A simple and sensitive electrochemical method was used for barakacin detection using a boron-doped diamond (BDD) and glassy carbon (GC) electrodes, based on cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). The influence of electrolyte pH on the peak potential and peak currents was also investigated. At pH 2.0, the peak current was linearly dependent on barakacin concentration (in the range used, 1-10 μM), with correlation coefficients greater than 0.98 on both electrodes. The detection limit (S/N = 3) on the BDD electrode was 100-fold lower than that obtained on the GC electrode. The optimized method using the BDD electrode was extended to bovine (cow feces) and human (sputum of a CF patient) samples. Spiked barakacin was easily detected in these matrices at a limit of 0.5 and 0.05 μM, respectively. Graphical abstract Electrochemical detection of barakacin.

  7. Clonal Dissemination of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates Producing Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase SHV-2a

    PubMed Central

    Jeannot, Katy; Fournier, Damien; Müller, Emeline; Cholley, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    From January to December 2011, 24 Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains producing the extended-spectrum β-lactamase SHV-2a were identified in 13 hospitals in France. With one exception, all the strains belonged to the same clone. Double-disk synergy tests with cefepime and clavulanate were able to detect all the SHV-2a-positive isolates. PMID:23241379

  8. Clonal dissemination of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates producing extended-spectrum β-lactamase SHV-2a.

    PubMed

    Jeannot, Katy; Fournier, Damien; Müller, Emeline; Cholley, Pascal; Plésiat, Patrick

    2013-02-01

    From January to December 2011, 24 Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains producing the extended-spectrum β-lactamase SHV-2a were identified in 13 hospitals in France. With one exception, all the strains belonged to the same clone. Double-disk synergy tests with cefepime and clavulanate were able to detect all the SHV-2a-positive isolates.

  9. [Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of imipenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated in a Buenos Aires hospital].

    PubMed

    Cejas, D; Almuzara, M; Santella, G; Tuduri, A; Palombarani, S; Figueroa, S; Gutkind, G; Radice, M

    2008-01-01

    From 129 P. aeruginosa isolated at a health care centre located in Buenos Aires (Hospital "Eva Perón"), 14% produced IMP-13. Although 18 isolates were metallo-beta-lactamases (MBL) producers, only those isolates that displayed altered outer membrane protein profiles correlated with the resistant category according to CLSI or even Subcomisión de Antimicrobianos, SADEBAC, AAM. Phenotypic screening of metallo-beta-lactamases proved to be appropriate for detecting MBL producing isolates. IMP-13 producing isolates corresponded to at least five different clonal types, which not only suggests the dissemination of the resistant strain but also of the resistant marker.

  10. A gacS Deletion in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Cystic Fibrosis Isolate CHA Shapes Its Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Sall, Khady Mayebine; Casabona, Maria Guillermina; Bordi, Christophe; Huber, Philippe; de Bentzmann, Sophie; Attrée, Ina; Elsen, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a human opportunistic pathogen, is capable of provoking acute and chronic infections that are associated with defined sets of virulence factors. During chronic infections, the bacterium accumulates mutations that silence some and activate other genes. Here we show that the cystic fibrosis isolate CHA exhibits a unique virulence phenotype featuring a mucoid morphology, an active Type III Secretion System (T3SS, hallmark of acute infections), and no Type VI Secretion System (H1-T6SS). This virulence profile is due to a 426 bp deletion in the 3′ end of the gacS gene encoding an essential regulatory protein. The absence of GacS disturbs the Gac/Rsm pathway leading to depletion of the small regulatory RNAs RsmY/RsmZ and, in consequence, to expression of T3SS, while switching off the expression of H1-T6SS and Pel polysaccharides. The CHA isolate also exhibits full ability to swim and twitch, due to active flagellum and Type IVa pili. Thus, unlike the classical scheme of balance between virulence factors, clinical strains may adapt to a local niche by expressing both alginate exopolysaccharide, a hallmark of membrane stress that protects from antibiotic action, host defences and phagocytosis, and efficient T3S machinery that is considered as an aggressive virulence factor. PMID:24780952

  11. Biofilm Formation and Virulence Factors Among Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated From Burn Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ghanbarzadeh Corehtash, Zahra; Khorshidi, Ahmad; Firoozeh, Farzaneh; Akbari, Hosein; Mahmoudi Aznaveh, Azam

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pseudomonas aeruginosa possesses a variety of virulence factors and infections caused by multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa (MDRPA) in burn patients are a public health problem. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the antibiotic resistance pattern, the biofilm formation, the prevalence of MDRPA and two virulence genes (nan1 and exoA) among P. aeruginosa isolated from burn patients. Patients and Methods: A total of 144 isolates of P. aeruginosa were collected from burn patient at the Burn Centre of Tehran, Iran, between March 2013 and July 2013. Antibiotic susceptibility test was performed via agar disk diffusion method. The ability of producing biofilm was examined by crystal violet microtiter plate assay and the prevalence of the exoA and nan1 genes among the isolates was determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results: A high rate of resistance was seen against ciprofloxacin (93.7%), aztreonam (86.8%), piperacillin (85.4%), ceftazidime (82.6%), amikacin (82%) and imipenem (79.2%). In total, 93.1% of the isolates were characterized as MDRPA. Biofilm formation was seen in 92.4% of the isolates. The prevalence of the exoA and nan1 genes were 75% and 11.8% among the isolates, respectively. Conclusions: The high rate of MDRPA and its ability to produce biofilm is an alarm for public health. The statistical analysis showed that biofilm production in the MDRPA isolates was significantly higher than that in the non–MDRPA isolates (P < 0.001). PMID:26587205

  12. Further Increases in Carbapenem-, Amikacin-, and Fluoroquinolone-Resistant Isolates of Acinetobacter spp. and P. aeruginosa in Korea: KONSAR Study 2009

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyungwon; Kim, Mi-Na; Kim, Jae-Seok; Hong, Hye Lim; Kang, Jung Oak; Shin, Jong Hee; Park, Yeon-Joon; Yong, Dongeun; Jeong, Seok Hoon

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The increasing prevalence of antimicrobial resistant bacteria has become a serious worldwide problem. The aim of this study was to analyze antimicrobial resistance data generated in 2009 by hospitals and commercial laboratories participating in the Korean Nationwide Surveillance of Antimicrobial Resistance program. Materials and Methods Susceptibility data were collected from 24 hospitals and two commercial laboratories. In the analysis, resistance did not include intermediate susceptibility. Duplicate isolates were excluded from the analysis of hospital isolates, but not from the commercial laboratory isolates. Results Among the hospital isolates, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, penicillin G-non-susceptible Streptococcus pneumoniae based on meningitis breakpoint, and ampicillin-resistant Enterococcus faecium remained highly prevalent. The proportion of vancomycin-resistant E. faecium gradually increased to 29%. Ceftazidime-resistant Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae increased to 17% and 33%, respectively, and fluoroquinolone-resistant K. pneumoniae, Acinetobacter spp. and Pseudomonas aeruginosa increased to 33%, 67% and 39%, respectively. Amikacin-resistant Acinetobacter spp. increased to 48%. Imipenem-resistant Acinetobacter spp. and P. aeruginosa increased to 51% and 26%, respectively. Higher resistance rates were observed in intensive care unit (ICU) isolates than in non-ICU isolates among the isolates from hospitals. Resistance rates were higher in hospital isolates than in clinic isolates among the isolates from commercial laboratories. Conclusion Among the hospital isolates, ceftazidime-resistant K. pneumoniae and fluoroquinolone-resistant K. pneumoniae, Acinetobacter spp., and P. aeruginosa further increased. The increase in imipenem resistance was slight in P. aeruginosa, but drastic in Acinetobacter spp. The problematic antimicrobial-organism combinations were much more prevalent among ICU isolates. PMID:21786445

  13. Isolation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from cockroaches Captured in hospitals in Japan, and their antibiotic susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Saitou, Keiko; Furuhata, Katsunori; Kawakami, Yasushi; Fukuyama, Masafumi

    2009-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains were isolated from 45 of 370 (12.2%) cockroaches captured in hospitals. By cockroach species, the bacterial strains were isolated from 39 of 181 (21.5%) Periplaneta fuliginosa and 6 of 183 (3.3%) Blattella germanica, showing a significant difference (p<0.01). Many P. aeruginosa-carrying cockroaches inhabited locker rooms (66.7%) and kitchens (17.8%). In terms of serotyping, many isolates were typed into groups A, G, and B. In drug sensitivity tests, strains showed the highest sensitivity to ciprofloxacin with an MIC90 of 0.25 microg/ml, followed by 2 microg/ml meropenem, and 4 microg/ml ceftazidime, gentamicin, and ofloxacin. In contrast, many strains were resistant to cefotaxime and minocycline, accounting for 86.7% of all resistant strains. However, there was no multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa strain, and all strains were negative for the metallo-beta-lactamase gene (IMP-1 and VIM-2). These findings suggested that cockroach-derived P. aeruginosa may contaminate hospital environments, for which the control of disease-carrying insects in hospitals is important.

  14. NET formation induced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa cystic fibrosis isolates measured as release of myeloperoxidase-DNA and neutrophil elastase-DNA complexes.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Dae-goon; Floyd, Madison; Winn, Matthew; Moskowitz, Samuel M; Rada, Balázs

    2014-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) airway disease is characterized by Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection and recruitment of neutrophil granulocytes. Neutrophil granule components (myeloperoxidase (MPO), human neutrophil elastase (HNE)), extracellular DNA and P. aeruginosa can all be found in the CF respiratory tract and have all been associated with worsening CF lung function. Pseudomonas-induced formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) offers a likely mechanism for release of MPO, HNE and DNA from neutrophils. NETs are composed of a DNA backbone decorated with granule proteins like MPO and HNE. Here we sought to examine whether CF clinical isolates of Pseudomonas are capable of inducing NET release from human neutrophil granulocytes. We used two methods to quantify NETs. We modified a previously employed ELISA that detects MPO-DNA complexes and established a new HNE-DNA ELISA. We show that these methods reliably quantify MPO-DNA and HNE-DNA complexes, measures of NET formation. We have found that CF isolates of P. aeruginosa stimulate robust respiratory burst and NET release in human neutrophils. By comparing paired "early" and "late" bacterial isolates obtained from the same CF patient we have found that early isolates induced significantly more NET release than late isolates. Our data support that Pseudomonas-induced NET release represents an important mechanism for release of neutrophil-derived CF inflammatory mediators, and confirm that decreased induction of NET formation is required for long-term adaptation of P. aeruginosa to CF airways.

  15. Similar frequencies of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates producing KPC and VIM carbapenemases in diverse genetic clones at tertiary-care hospitals in Medellín, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Vanegas, Johanna M; Cienfuegos, Astrid V; Ocampo, Ana M; López, Lucelly; del Corral, Helena; Roncancio, Gustavo; Sierra, Patricia; Echeverri-Toro, Lina; Ospina, Sigifredo; Maldonado, Natalia; Robledo, Carlos; Restrepo, Andrea; Jiménez, J Natalia

    2014-11-01

    Carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa has become a serious health threat worldwide due to the limited options available for its treatment. Understanding its epidemiology contributes to the control of antibiotic resistance. The aim of this study was to describe the clinical and molecular characteristics of infections caused by carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa isolates in five tertiary-care hospitals in Medellín, Colombia. A cross-sectional study was conducted in five tertiary-care hospitals from June 2012 to March 2014. All hospitalized patients infected by carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa were included. Clinical information was obtained from medical records. Molecular analyses included PCR for detection of bla(VIM), bla(IMP), bla(NDM), bla(OXA-48), and bla(KPC) genes plus pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) for molecular typing. A total of 235 patients were enrolled: 91.1% of them were adults (n = 214), 88.1% (n = 207) had prior antibiotic use, and 14.9% (n = 35) had urinary tract infections. The bla(VIM-2) and bla(KPC-2) genes were detected in 13.6% (n = 32) and 11.5% (n = 27), respectively, of all isolates. Two isolates harbored both genes simultaneously. For KPC-producing isolates, PFGE revealed closely related strains within each hospital, and sequence types (STs) ST362 and ST235 and two new STs were found by MLST. With PFGE, VIM-producing isolates appeared highly diverse, and MLST revealed ST111 in four hospitals and five new STs. These results show that KPC-producing P. aeruginosa is currently disseminating rapidly and occurring at a frequency similar to that of VIM-producing P. aeruginosa isolates (approximately 1:1 ratio) in Medellín, Colombia. Diverse genetic backgrounds among resistant strains suggest an excessive antibiotic pressure resulting in the selection of resistant strains.

  16. Similar Frequencies of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates Producing KPC and VIM Carbapenemases in Diverse Genetic Clones at Tertiary-Care Hospitals in Medellín, Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Vanegas, Johanna M.; Cienfuegos, Astrid V.; Ocampo, Ana M.; López, Lucelly; del Corral, Helena; Roncancio, Gustavo; Sierra, Patricia; Echeverri-Toro, Lina; Ospina, Sigifredo; Maldonado, Natalia; Robledo, Carlos; Restrepo, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa has become a serious health threat worldwide due to the limited options available for its treatment. Understanding its epidemiology contributes to the control of antibiotic resistance. The aim of this study was to describe the clinical and molecular characteristics of infections caused by carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa isolates in five tertiary-care hospitals in Medellín, Colombia. A cross-sectional study was conducted in five tertiary-care hospitals from June 2012 to March 2014. All hospitalized patients infected by carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa were included. Clinical information was obtained from medical records. Molecular analyses included PCR for detection of blaVIM, blaIMP, blaNDM, blaOXA-48, and blaKPC genes plus pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) for molecular typing. A total of 235 patients were enrolled: 91.1% of them were adults (n = 214), 88.1% (n = 207) had prior antibiotic use, and 14.9% (n = 35) had urinary tract infections. The blaVIM-2 and blaKPC-2 genes were detected in 13.6% (n = 32) and 11.5% (n = 27), respectively, of all isolates. Two isolates harbored both genes simultaneously. For KPC-producing isolates, PFGE revealed closely related strains within each hospital, and sequence types (STs) ST362 and ST235 and two new STs were found by MLST. With PFGE, VIM-producing isolates appeared highly diverse, and MLST revealed ST111 in four hospitals and five new STs. These results show that KPC-producing P. aeruginosa is currently disseminating rapidly and occurring at a frequency similar to that of VIM-producing P. aeruginosa isolates (approximately 1:1 ratio) in Medellín, Colombia. Diverse genetic backgrounds among resistant strains suggest an excessive antibiotic pressure resulting in the selection of resistant strains. PMID:25210071

  17. ISPa46, a novel insertion sequence in the oprD porin gene of an imipenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolate from a cystic fibrosis patient in Marseille, France.

    PubMed

    Diene, Seydina M; L'homme, Tiphanie; Bellulo, Sophia; Stremler, Nathalie; Dubus, Jean-Christophe; Mely, Laurent; Leroy, Sylvie; Degand, Nicolas; Rolain, Jean-Marc

    2013-09-01

    Clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa exhibiting high-level resistance to carbapenems were recovered from a French patient with cystic fibrosis (CF) who had not received carbapenem therapy. This study was conducted to investigate the molecular mechanism conferring the carbapenem-resistant phenotype in clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa recovered from the same CF patient chronically colonised since 2005. Investigation of imipenem resistance of P. aeruginosa strain_02 isolated in May 2011 showed no carbapenemase activity. However, amplification and sequencing of the oprD porin gene revealed disruption of this gene by an insertion sequence (IS) element of 1337 bp that contained a novel transposase of 1227 bp (ISPa46) bordered by two terminal imperfect inverted repeats of 28 bp, which was associated with carbapenem resistance. Retrospective analysis of five additional strains of P. aeruginosa isolated before May 2011 from the same patient revealed that all isolates were likely to be the same clone by multilocus sequence typing analysis (ST540/551), but one of the five isolates was imipenem-susceptible. Although it was possible to demonstrate the presence of ISPa46 in all strains by PCR, this IS was transposed in the oprD gene only for imipenem-resistant isolates. Therefore, this study reports a novel IS element (ISPa46) in P. aeruginosa clinical isolates of a CF patient in Marseille, France, that was associated with carbapenem resistance and was selected in the absence of carbapenem treatment.

  18. In vitro susceptibility of multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa and extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae isolated from clinical specimens at Bugando Medical Centre, Tanzania to Piperacillin-Tazobactam.

    PubMed

    Petro, Daudi; Mushi, Martha F; Moremi, Nyambura; Iddi, Shabani; Mirambo, Mariam; Seni, Jeremiah; Mshana, Stephen E

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas spp. and Klebsiella pneumoniae are common causes of serious health care associated infections (HCAIs) worldwide. The treatment options for infections caused by multi-drug resistant (MDR) organisms are limited to tigecycline and carbapenems. A total of 172 isolates of multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas. spp and extended-spectrum β- (ESBL) producing Klebsiella pneumoniae isolated from clinical specimens at the Bugando Medical Centre were tested for their in vitro susceptibility to piperacillin-tazobactam 100/10μg using disc diffusion test as recommended by Clinical Laboratory Standard Institute (CLSI). Out of 59 multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas spp, 54 (92.0%) were susceptible to piperacillin-tazobactam while of 113 ESBL producing Klebsiella pneumoniae, 55 (48.7%) were susceptible to piperacillin-tazobactam 100/10μg. Also, 20 (34.0%) of the Pseudomonas spp were both ESBL producers and susceptible to piperacillin-tazobactam 100/10μg. A significant proportion of Pseudomonas spp isolates from clinical specimens in our setting are susceptible to piperacillin/tazobactam. This study shows that piperacillin-tazobactam offer a better option to clinicians for the treatment of health care associated infections due to Pseudomonas spp. and ESBL producing Klebsiella pneumoniae in our setting and other health facilities where these organisms are of significance.

  19. Genetic features of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from cystic fibrosis patients compared with those of isolates from other origins.

    PubMed

    Lanotte, Philippe; Watt, Stephane; Mereghetti, Laurent; Dartiguelongue, Nathalie; Rastegar-Lari, Aziz; Goudeau, Alain; Quentin, Roland

    2004-01-01

    In order to improve our understanding of the colonization of the pulmonary tract of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 162 isolates from five different ecological origins were studied. The genetic features of each isolate were determined by random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and by searching for eight virulence genes (six known virulence genes, algD, lasB, toxA, plcH, plcN and exoS, and two genes encoding putative neuraminidases, nan1 and nan2). Five RAPD groups were identified. Most of the CF isolates were distributed equally in three of these groups (RA, RB and RC). The CF isolates in RB were related to isolates from a wide variety of origins. The CF isolates in RA were related to a population composed of 65 % of the non-CF isolates from pulmonary tract infections. RC was mainly composed of CF isolates that were related to 30 % of isolates from plants. All genes except exoS and nan1 were present in all isolates. The exoS and nan1 virulence factor genes were most prevalent in CF isolates. exoS, which encodes exoenzyme S, was present in 94 % of CF isolates but also in 80 % of non-CF isolates from pulmonary tract infections. nan1, which encodes a putative neuraminidase, was found in 82.5 % of the isolates from group RC, which was composed largely of CF isolates. In conclusion, three major genogroups of P. aeruginosa isolates, each of which exhibits peculiar genetic features, are able to colonize CF patients. This may have different consequences on the outcome of pulmonary disease.

  20. Antagonistic interactions peak at intermediate genetic distance in clinical and laboratory strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Bacteria excrete costly toxins to defend their ecological niche. The evolution of such antagonistic interactions between individuals is expected to depend on both the social environment and the strength of resource competition. Antagonism is expected to be weak among highly similar genotypes because most individuals are immune to antagonistic agents and among dissimilar genotypes because these are unlikely to be competing for the same resources and antagonism should not yield much benefit. The strength of antagonism is therefore expected to peak at intermediate genetic distance. Results We studied the ability of laboratory strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to prevent growth of 55 different clinical P. aeruginosa isolates derived from cystic fibrosis patients. Genetic distance was determined using genetic fingerprints. We found that the strength of antagonism was maximal among genotypes of intermediate genetic distance and we show that genetic distance and resource use are linked. Conclusions Our results suggest that the importance of social interactions like antagonism may be modulated by the strength of resource competition. PMID:22439760

  1. Isolation and characterization of gallium resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutants.

    PubMed

    García-Contreras, Rodolfo; Lira-Silva, Elizabeth; Jasso-Chávez, Ricardo; Hernández-González, Ismael L; Maeda, Toshinari; Hashimoto, Takahiro; Boogerd, Fred C; Sheng, Lili; Wood, Thomas K; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael

    2013-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 cells resistant to the novel antimicrobial gallium nitrate (Ga) were developed using transposon mutagenesis and by selecting spontaneous mutants. The mutants showing the highest growth in the presence of Ga were selected for further characterization. These mutants showed 4- to 12-fold higher Ga minimal inhibitory growth concentrations and a greater than 8-fold increase in the minimum biofilm eliminating Ga concentration. Both types of mutants produced Ga resistant biofilms whereas the formation of wild-type biofilms was strongly inhibited by Ga. The gene interrupted in the transposon mutant was hitA, which encodes a periplasmic iron binding protein that delivers Fe³⁺ to the HitB iron permease; complementation of the mutant with the hitA gene restored the Ga sensitivity. This hitA mutant showed a 14-fold decrease in Ga internalization versus the wild-type strain, indicating that the HitAB system is also involved in the Ga uptake. Ga uptake in the spontaneous mutant was also lower, although no mutations were found in the hitAB genes. Instead, this mutant harbored 64 non-silent mutations in several genes including those of the phenazine pyocyanin biosynthesis. The spontaneous mutant produced 2-fold higher pyocyanin basal levels than the wild-type; the addition of this phenazine to wild-type cultures protected them from the Ga bacteriostatic effect. The present data indicate that mutations affecting Ga transport and probably pyocyanin biosynthesis enable cells to develop resistance to Ga.

  2. Genetically and Phenotypically Distinct Pseudomonas aeruginosa Cystic Fibrosis Isolates Share a Core Proteomic Signature

    PubMed Central

    Penesyan, Anahit; Kumar, Sheemal S.; Kamath, Karthik; Shathili, Abdulrahman M.; Venkatakrishnan, Vignesh; Krisp, Christoph; Packer, Nicolle H.; Molloy, Mark P.; Paulsen, Ian T.

    2015-01-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is among the main colonizers of the lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. We have isolated and sequenced several P. aeruginosa isolates from the sputum of CF patients and compared them with each other and with the model strain PAO1. Phenotypic analysis of CF isolates showed significant variability in colonization and virulence-related traits suggesting different strategies for adaptation to the CF lung. Genomic analysis indicated these strains shared a large set of core genes with the standard laboratory strain PAO1, and identified the genetic basis for some of the observed phenotypic differences. Proteomics revealed that in a conventional laboratory medium PAO1 expressed 827 proteins that were absent in the CF isolates while the CF isolates shared a distinctive signature set of 703 proteins not detected in PAO1. PAO1 expressed many transporters for the uptake of organic nutrients and relatively few biosynthetic pathways. Conversely, the CF isolates expressed a narrower range of transporters and a broader set of metabolic pathways for the biosynthesis of amino acids, carbohydrates, nucleotides and polyamines. The proteomic data suggests that in a common laboratory medium PAO1 may transport a diverse set of “ready-made” nutrients from the rich medium, whereas the CF isolates may only utilize a limited number of nutrients from the medium relying mainly on their own metabolism for synthesis of essential nutrients. These variations indicate significant differences between the metabolism and physiology of P. aeruginosa CF isolates and PAO1 that cannot be detected at the genome level alone. The widening gap between the increasing genomic data and the lack of phenotypic data means that researchers are increasingly reliant on extrapolating from genomic comparisons using experimentally characterized model organisms such as PAO1. While comparative genomics can provide valuable information, our data suggests that such

  3. Resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates to Hydrogel Contact Lens Disinfection Correlates with Cytotoxic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Lakkis, Carol; Fleiszig, Suzanne M. J.

    2001-01-01

    One of the most common pathogens in infection of hydrogel contact lens wearers is Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which can gain access to the eye via contamination of the lens, lens case, and lens care solutions. Only one strain per species is used in current regulatory testing for the marketing of chemical contact lens disinfectants. The aim of this study was to determine whether P. aeruginosa strains vary in their susceptibility to hydrogel contact lens disinfectants. A method for rapidly screening bacterial susceptibility to contact lens disinfectants was developed, based on measurement of the MIC. The susceptibility of 35 P. aeruginosa isolates to two chemical disinfectants was found to vary among strains. MICs ranged from 6.25 to 100% for both disinfectants at 37°C, and a number of strains were not inhibited by a 100% disinfectant concentration in the lens case environment at room temperature (22°C). Resistance to disinfection appeared to be an inherent rather than acquired trait, since some resistant strains had been isolated prior to the introduction of the disinfectants and some susceptible P. aeruginosa strains could not be made more resistant by repeated disinfectant exposure. A number of P. aeruginosa strains which were comparatively more resistant to short-term disinfectant exposure also demonstrated the ability to grow to levels above the initial inoculum in one chemical disinfectant after long-term (24 to 48 h) disinfectant exposure. Resistance was correlated with acute cytotoxic activity toward corneal epithelial cells and with exsA, which encodes a protein that regulates cytotoxicity via a complex type III secretion system. These results suggest that chemical disinfection solutions may select for contamination with cytotoxic strains. Further investigation of the mechanisms and factors responsible for resistance may also lead to strategies for reducing adverse responses to contact lens wear. PMID:11283074

  4. Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing molecules correlate with clinical status in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Barr, Helen L; Halliday, Nigel; Cámara, Miguel; Barrett, David A; Williams, Paul; Forrester, Douglas L; Simms, Rebecca; Smyth, Alan R; Honeybourne, David; Whitehouse, Joanna L; Nash, Edward F; Dewar, Jane; Clayton, Andrew; Knox, Alan J; Fogarty, Andrew W

    2015-10-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces quorum sensing signal molecules that are potential biomarkers for infection.A prospective study of 60 cystic fibrosis patients with chronic P. aeruginosa, who required intravenous antibiotics for pulmonary exacerbations, was undertaken. Clinical measurements and biological samples were obtained at the start and end of the treatment period. Additional data were available for 29 of these patients when they were clinically stable.Cross-sectionally, quorum sensing signal molecules were detectable in the sputum, plasma and urine of 86%, 75% and 83% patients, respectively. They were positively correlated between the three biofluids. Positive correlations were observed for most quorum sensing signal molecules in sputum, plasma and urine, with quantitative measures of pulmonary P. aeruginosa load at the start of a pulmonary exacerbation. Plasma concentrations of 2-nonyl-4-hydroxy-quinoline (NHQ) were significantly higher at the start of a pulmonary exacerbation compared to clinical stability (p<0.01). Following the administration of systemic antibiotics, plasma 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline (p=0.02) and NHQ concentrations (p<0.01) decreased significantly.In conclusion, quorum sensing signal molecules are detectable in cystic fibrosis patients with pulmonary P. aeruginosa infection and are positively correlated with quantitative measures of P. aeruginosa. NHQ correlates with clinical status and has potential as a novel biomarker for P. aeruginosa infection.

  5. Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing molecules correlate with clinical status in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Halliday, Nigel; Cámara, Miguel; Barrett, David A.; Williams, Paul; Forrester, Douglas L.; Simms, Rebecca; Smyth, Alan R.; Honeybourne, David; Whitehouse, Joanna L.; Nash, Edward F.; Dewar, Jane; Clayton, Andrew; Knox, Alan J.; Fogarty, Andrew W.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces quorum sensing signal molecules that are potential biomarkers for infection. A prospective study of 60 cystic fibrosis patients with chronic P. aeruginosa, who required intravenous antibiotics for pulmonary exacerbations, was undertaken. Clinical measurements and biological samples were obtained at the start and end of the treatment period. Additional data were available for 29 of these patients when they were clinically stable. Cross-sectionally, quorum sensing signal molecules were detectable in the sputum, plasma and urine of 86%, 75% and 83% patients, respectively. They were positively correlated between the three biofluids. Positive correlations were observed for most quorum sensing signal molecules in sputum, plasma and urine, with quantitative measures of pulmonary P. aeruginosa load at the start of a pulmonary exacerbation. Plasma concentrations of 2-nonyl-4-hydroxy-quinoline (NHQ) were significantly higher at the start of a pulmonary exacerbation compared to clinical stability (p<0.01). Following the administration of systemic antibiotics, plasma 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline (p=0.02) and NHQ concentrations (p<0.01) decreased significantly. In conclusion, quorum sensing signal molecules are detectable in cystic fibrosis patients with pulmonary P. aeruginosa infection and are positively correlated with quantitative measures of P. aeruginosa. NHQ correlates with clinical status and has potential as a novel biomarker for P. aeruginosa infection. PMID:26022946

  6. Host inflammatory responses to first isolation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from sputum in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Elborn, J S; Cordon, S M; Shale, D J

    1993-05-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection of the respiratory tract in patients with cystic fibrosis is a major determinant of morbidity and mortality. However, it has been postulated that the earliest phase of colonization is not associated with injury. To test this hypothesis we determined the association of the first recorded isolation of P. aeruginosa from the sputum on circulating markers of the inflammatory response in 6 patients with cystic fibrosis. At this time circulating C-reactive protein was increased in all 6 and neutrophil elastase alpha 1-antitrypsin complex (elastase-complex) was increased in 5 patients compared with healthy controls. This inflammatory response was associated with a reduction in the FEV1 and FVC of all patients [FEV1, 1.42 +/- 0.87 L (mean +/- SD) at first isolation vs. 2.08 +/- 0.74 L before isolation; P < 0.05; FVC, 1.94 +/- 0.93 L vs. 2.87 +/- 1.01 L, P < 0.05]. At a median interval of 10 months, 5 patients had raised titres of positive IgG antibody to P. aeruginosa, indicating significant exposure to this organism. At this time, lung function had returned to preinfection levels, whilst 3 patients showed continuing features of an inflammatory response, and the group mean value for elastase-complex was raised. Our findings demonstrate that at the time of first isolation of P. aeruginosa from the sputum of patients with cystic fibrosis, there is a concomitant systemic host response and an acute deterioration of pulmonary function.

  7. Intraclonal genetic diversity amongst cystic fibrosis and keratitis isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Hall, Amanda J; Fothergill, Joanne L; Kaye, Stephen B; Neal, Timothy J; McNamara, Paul S; Southern, Kevin W; Winstanley, Craig

    2013-02-01

    Given the emergence of transmissible strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, such as the Liverpool epidemic strain (LES), in cystic fibrosis (CF) centres, it is important to carry out regular surveillance of isolates. In a survey of 22 P. aeruginosa isolates, each from a different CF patient identified as negative for LES in a paediatric centre in Liverpool, six (23 %) were identified as being the same clone type (clone D) using array-tube genotyping. Using a series of alternative genotyping approaches [PFGE, random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD), variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST)], the six CF clone D isolates and eight previously identified clone D isolates associated with infections leading to keratitis were compared. All but two of the clone D isolates (both keratitis-associated) were assigned by MLST to sequence type 235 and were highly similar using VNTR analysis. However, there was considerable variation found among the isolates when using PFGE or RAPD, highlighting the limitations of these methods. The discordance with respect to two of the isolates identified by array-tube genotyping as clone D, when using all the other typing methods, emphasizes the need to use more than one method for reliable identification of strains.

  8. Epidemiological investigation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa nosocomial bacteraemia isolates by PCR-based DNA fingerprinting analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Davin-Regli, A; Bosi, C; Charrel, R N; Bollet, C

    1996-11-01

    Between July 1994 and March 1995, 64 isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were implicated in bacteraemia in 25 cancer patients in five wards of two hospitals. These, together with 24 environmental isolates and one isolate from a bacteraemia in a non-cancer patient were examined by three PCR-based DNA fingerprinting methods: random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), enterobacterial-repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC)-PCR, and 16S-23S spacer region-based RAPD. These methods were reproducible, discriminatory and showed close agreement; all indicated that 47 isolates that had caused bacteraemia in 19 cancer patients were indistinguishable. Seventeen other isolates that had caused bacteraemia in 10 cancer patients were discriminated into eight further groups, and the 24 environmental and non-cancer patient isolates into further distinct groups. No environmental source of the epidemic strain was found, but it was suspected that the outbreak was related to infusion implants.

  9. Genetic Analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from the Sputa of Australian Adult Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Anthony, Mario; Rose, Barbara; Pegler, Mary Beard; Elkins, Mark; Service, Helen; Thamotharampillai, Keerthi; Watson, Jason; Robinson, Michael; Bye, Peter; Merlino, John; Harbour, Colin

    2002-01-01

    Genetic investigations were carried out with 50 phenotypically selected strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from 18 patients attending an Australian cystic fibrosis (CF) center. The isolates were analyzed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Phylogenetic analysis of the macrorestriction patterns showed rates of genetic similarity ranging from 76 to 100%; 24 (48%) of the strains from 11 patients had greater than 90% similarity. A dominant strain emerged: 15 isolates from seven patients had identical PFGE patterns, and 4 other isolates were very closely related. The 50 isolates were grouped into 21 pulsotypes on the basis of visual delineation of a three-band difference. Ten of the 18 (56%) patients were infected with clonal or subclonal strains. Sequence analysis of PCR products derived from the mucA gene showed 20 mutations, with the number of mutations in individual isolates ranging from 1 to 4; 19 of these changes are reported here for the first time. Potentially functional changes were found in 22 (44%) isolates. Eight changes (five transversions and three single base deletions) led to premature stop codons, providing support for the presence of mucA mutations as one pathway to mucoidy. There was a trend toward an association between the dominant strain and lack of potentially functional mucA mutations (P = 0.09 by the χ2 test) but no relationship between genotype and phenotype. This is the first study of genetic variation in P. aeruginosa isolates from adult Australian CF patients. The findings highlight the need for further investigations on the transmissibility of P. aeruginosa in CF patients. PMID:12149328

  10. Multilocus sequence typing analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from pet Chinese stripe-necked turtles (Ocadia sinensis)

    PubMed Central

    Wendt, Mitchell

    2016-01-01

    Our research sought to characterize the phylogeny of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from pet Chinese stripe-necked turtles (Ocadia sinensis) to better understand its evolutionary relation to other isolates and increase understanding of a potential zoonotic pathogen transmitted through direct contact with pet turtles. Thirty-one Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates were obtained from both immature and adult turtles sold in pet shops in Korea. To characterize the phylogenic position of Chinese stripe-necked turtle-borne P. aeruginosa relative to other strains, multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analysis was performed due to the accessibility and breadth of MLST databases. Seven housekeeping genes (acsA, aroE, guaA, mutL, nuoD, ppsA, and trpE) were sequenced and the results were compared with data from the MLST database. The genes were further used for phylogenetic analysis of P. aeruginosa using concatenated gene fragments. Both rooted and unrooted phylogenetic trees were generated. Eleven distinct sequence types were present within the isolates among which seven were new. Expanding an unrooted phylogenetic tree to include P. aeruginosa MLST sequences isolated from various other geographic locations and sources revealed a divergent cluster containing the majority of isolates obtained from turtles. This suggests that P. aeruginosa strains particularly well-adapted for inhabiting turtles occupy a distinct phylogenetic position. PMID:28053614

  11. Mutations in β-Lactamase AmpC Increase Resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates to Antipseudomonal Cephalosporins

    PubMed Central

    Berrazeg, M.; Jeannot, K.; Ntsogo Enguéné, Véronique Yvette; Broutin, I.; Loeffert, S.; Fournier, D.

    2015-01-01

    Mutation-dependent overproduction of intrinsic β-lactamase AmpC is considered the main cause of resistance of clinical strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to antipseudomonal penicillins and cephalosporins. Analysis of 31 AmpC-overproducing clinical isolates exhibiting a greater resistance to ceftazidime than to piperacillin-tazobactam revealed the presence of 17 mutations in the β-lactamase, combined with various polymorphic amino acid substitutions. When overexpressed in AmpC-deficient P. aeruginosa 4098, the genes coding for 20/23 of these AmpC variants were found to confer a higher (2-fold to >64-fold) resistance to ceftazidime and ceftolozane-tazobactam than did the gene from reference strain PAO1. The mutations had variable effects on the MICs of ticarcillin, piperacillin-tazobactam, aztreonam, and cefepime. Depending on their location in the AmpC structure and their impact on β-lactam MICs, they could be assigned to 4 distinct groups. Most of the mutations affecting the omega loop, the R2 domain, and the C-terminal end of the protein were shared with extended-spectrum AmpCs (ESACs) from other Gram-negative species. Interestingly, two new mutations (F121L and P154L) were predicted to enlarge the substrate binding pocket by disrupting the stacking between residues F121 and P154. We also found that the reported ESACs emerged locally in a variety of clones, some of which are epidemic and did not require hypermutability. Taken together, our results show that P. aeruginosa is able to adapt to efficacious β-lactams, including the newer cephalosporin ceftolozane, through a variety of mutations affecting its intrinsic β-lactamase, AmpC. Data suggest that the rates of ESAC-producing mutants are ≥1.5% in the clinical setting. PMID:26248364

  12. Emergence of Metallo-β-Lactamase GIM-1 in a Clinical Isolate of Serratia marcescens

    PubMed Central

    Frontzek, Andre; Pfeifer, Yvonne

    2012-01-01

    The metallo-β-lactamase GIM-1 (German imipenemase) has been found so far only in clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from Germany. Here we report the detection of blaGIM-1 in a clinical strain of Serratia marcescens that was isolated from urine, blood, and wound samples over a period of 20 months. The strain was repeatedly isolated from one patient in two German hospitals and an outpatient department located in the region in which all previously described GIM-1-producing P. aeruginosa strains were identified. PMID:22710114

  13. Biofilm Formation and β-Lactamase Production in Burn Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Heydari, Samira; Eftekhar, Fereshteh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important nosocomial pathogen characterized by its innate resistance to multiple antimicrobial agents. Plasmid-mediated drug resistance also occurs by the production of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBL), metallo β-lactamases (MBL), and AmpC β-lactamases. Another important factor for establishment of chronic infections by P. aeruginosa is biofilm formation mediated by the psl gene cluster. Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate biofilm formation and presence of the pslA gene in burn isolates of P. aeruginosa as well as the association of antibiotic resistance, MBL, ESBL and AmpC β-lactamase production with biofilm formation among the isolates. Materials and Methods: Sixty-two burn isolates of P. aeruginosa were obtained from Shahid Motahari Hospital in Tehran from August to October 2011. Antibiotic susceptibility was determined by the disc diffusion assay. MBL, AmpC and ESBL production were screened using the double disc synergy test, AmpC disc test and combined disc diffusion assay, respectively. The potential to form biofilm was measured using the microtiter plate assay and pslA gene was detected using specific primers and PCR. Results: Biofilm formation was observed in 43.5% of the isolates, of which 66.7% produced strong and 33.3% formed weak biofilms. All biofilm-positive and 14.2% of biofilm-negative isolates harbored the pslA gene. MBL, AmpC and ESBL production were significantly higher in the biofilm-positive isolates (70.3%, 62.9% and 33.3%, respectively) compared to the biofilm-negative strains (31.4%, 34.2% and 20%, respectively). Overall, 19 isolates (30.6%) co-produced MBL and AmpC, among which the majority were biofilm-positive (63.1%). Finally, four isolates (6.4%) had all three enzymes, of which 3 (75%) produced biofilm. Conclusions: Biofilm formation (both strong and weak) strongly correlated with pslA gene carriage. Biofilm formation also correlated with MBL and AmpC

  14. Population structure and antimicrobial susceptibility of both nonpersistent and persistent Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates recovered from cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Olmos, Ana; García-Castillo, María; Alba, José María; Morosini, María Isabel; Lamas, Adelaida; Romero, Beatriz; Galán, Juan Carlos; del Campo, Rosa; Cantón, Rafael

    2013-08-01

    Seventy-six Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates recovered from chronically (n=18) and nonchronically (n=18) colonized cystic fibrosis (CF) patients (2002 to 2009) were grouped in separate polyclonal populations. International CF epidemic clones were not identified, but the high-risk clone ST274, also found circulating in Spanish hospitals, was present. Persistent isolates were more resistant to antibiotics than nonpersistent isolates.

  15. Population Structure and Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Both Nonpersistent and Persistent Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates Recovered from Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Olmos, Ana; García-Castillo, María; Alba, José María; Morosini, María Isabel; Lamas, Adelaida; Romero, Beatriz; Galán, Juan Carlos; del Campo, Rosa

    2013-01-01

    Seventy-six Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates recovered from chronically (n = 18) and nonchronically (n = 18) colonized cystic fibrosis (CF) patients (2002 to 2009) were grouped in separate polyclonal populations. International CF epidemic clones were not identified, but the high-risk clone ST274, also found circulating in Spanish hospitals, was present. Persistent isolates were more resistant to antibiotics than nonpersistent isolates. PMID:23761158

  16. Restriction endonuclease analysis of clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains: useful epidemiologic data from a simple and rapid method.

    PubMed Central

    Maher, W E; Kobe, M; Fass, R J

    1993-01-01

    Newer genetic techniques have replaced phenotypic methods of subtyping Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains. Widespread application of newer methodologies, however, may be limited by technologic complexity and the cost of equipment. We conducted restriction endonuclease analysis (REA) of sheared genomic DNAs from 48 clinical P. aeruginosa strains using the enzyme SalI and electrophoresis in horizontal, low-concentration (0.3 to 0.6%) agarose gels. Each REA profile consisted of a smear of lower-molecular-mass bands as well as a countable number of well-resolved bands in the 8.3- to 48.5-kbp range which could easily be compared when isolates were run side-by-side on the same gel. In general, the REA patterns of strains recovered from different patients differed by at least seven bands, and those of serial isolates from individual patients were identical or differed by, at most, two bands over this 8.3- to 48.5-kbp range. REA of strains already subtyped by field inversion gel electrophoresis revealed that the two techniques generally paralleled each other. Overall, some unrelated strains had similar REA profiles, but the relative simplicity and low cost of the approach coupled with the ability to demonstrate differences between most unrelated strains should make this type of REA an attractive first step in the investigation of institutional P. aeruginosa problems. Images PMID:8391021

  17. Population Structure of Clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa from West and Central African Countries

    PubMed Central

    Cholley, Pascal; Ka, Roughyatou; Guyeux, Christophe; Thouverez, Michelle; Guessennd, Nathalie; Ghebremedhin, Beniam; Frank, Thierry; Bertrand, Xavier; Hocquet, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) has a non-clonal, epidemic population with a few widely distributed and frequently encountered sequence types (STs) called ‘high-risk clusters’. Clinical P. aeruginosa (clinPA) has been studied in all inhabited continents excepted in Africa, where a very few isolates have been analyzed. Here, we characterized a collection of clinPA isolates from four countries of West and Central Africa. Methodology 184 non-redundant isolates of clinPA from hospitals of Senegal, Ivory Coast, Nigeria, and Central African Republic were genotyped by MLST. We assessed their resistance level to antibiotics by agar diffusion and identified the extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) and metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs) by sequencing. The population structure of the species was determined by a nucleotide-based analysis of the entire PA MLST database and further localized on the phylogenetic tree (i) the sequence types (STs) of the present collection, (ii) the STs by continents, (iii) ESBL- and MBL-producing STs from the MLST database. Principal Findings We found 80 distinct STs, of which 24 had no relationship with any known STs. ‘High-risk’ international clonal complexes (CC155, CC244, CC235) were frequently found in West and Central Africa. The five VIM-2-producing isolates belonged to CC233 and CC244. GES-1 and GES-9 enzymes were produced by one CC235 and one ST1469 isolate, respectively. We showed the spread of ‘high-risk’ international clonal complexes, often described as multidrug-resistant on other continents, with a fully susceptible phenotype. The MBL- and ESBL-producing STs were scattered throughout the phylogenetic tree and our data suggest a poor association between a continent and a specific phylogroup. Conclusions ESBL- and MBL-encoding genes are borne by both successful international clonal complexes and distinct local STs in clinPA of West and Central Africa. Furthermore, our data suggest that the spread of a ST could be

  18. Clinical impact of a highly prevalent Pseudomonas aeruginosa clone in Dutch cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    de Vrankrijker, A M M; Brimicombe, R W; Wolfs, T F W; Heijerman, H G M; van Mansfeld, R; van Berkhout, F T; Willems, R J L; Bonten, M J M; van der Ent, C K

    2011-03-01

    Studies suggest that infection with highly prevalent Pseudomonas aeruginosa clones in cystic fibrosis (CF) is associated with an unfavourable clinical outcome. We studied the clinical characteristics of patients infected with a recently described, highly prevalent P. aeruginosa clone (ST406) in two CF centres in The Netherlands. Multilocus sequence typing data were available for 219 patients, of whom 40 (18.3%) were infected with ST406 and 179 with other sequence types. ST406 infection was independently associated with age, having a sibling with ST406 infection and use of inhaled antibiotics, but not with unfavourable clinical outcome, suggesting that high transmissibility is not necessarily associated with high virulence.

  19. ISOLATION AND PRELIMINARY CHARACTERISTICS OF THREE BACTERIOPHAGES ASSOCIATED WITH A LYSOGENIC STRAIN OF PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA, 12

    PubMed Central

    Feary, Thomas W.; Fisher, Earl; Fisher, Thelma N.

    1964-01-01

    Feary, Thomas W. (Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, La.), Earl Fisher, Jr., and Thelma N. Fisher. Isolation and preliminary characteristics of three bacteriophages associated with a lysogenic strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. J. Bacteriol. 87:196–208. 1964.—Three bacteriophages designated 7v, 7m, and 7s were isolated from a lysogenic strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa designated Ps-7. The three viruses were found to be completely unrelated on the basis of plaque morphology, host range, serology, ultraviolet induction, sensitivity to heat, and particle morphology as revealed by electron microscopy. In addition, it was shown that the three phages were incapable of plaque formation on bacteria other than various strains of P. aeruginosa. Of the three phages, only phage 7v was capable of plaque formation on strain Ps-7. The growth of phage 7v on strain Ps-7 exhibited properties which suggest that this virus arises as the result of mutation in a temperate phage for which strain Ps-7 is lysogenic. Phages 7m and 7s are incapable of plaque formation on strain Ps-7, but are adsorbed at characteristic rates to cell suspensions of strain Ps-7. The relationship between phage 7m and strain Ps-7 was shown to meet the classical criteria for lysogeny. Because phage 7s contains ribonucleic acid as its nucleic acid component, it was concluded that its production by strain Ps-7 and the demonstration of immunity of strain Ps-7 to infection by phage 7s were not sufficient evidence to define the nature of the relationship between phage 7s and P. aeruginosa strain Ps-7. It was observed that under certain conditions the infectious titer of phage 7s preparations are markedly reduced in the presence of ribonuclease. Images PMID:14102854

  20. Antibiotic Resistance Pattern and Evaluation of Metallo-Beta Lactamase Genes Including bla- IMP and bla- VIM Types in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated from Patients in Tehran Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Aghamiri, Samira; Amirmozafari, Nour; Fallah Mehrabadi, Jalil; Fouladtan, Babak; Samadi Kafil, Hossein

    2014-01-01

    Beta-lactamase producing strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa are important etiological agents of hospital infections. Carbapenems are among the most effective antibiotics used against Pseudomonas infections, but they can be rendered infective by group B β -lactamase, commonly called metallo-beta lactamase. In this study, the antimicrobial sensitivity patterns of P. aeruginosa strains isolated from 9 different hospitals in Tehran, Iran, as well as the prevalence of MBLs genes (bla- VIM and bla- IMP ) were determined. A total of 212 strains of P. aeruginosa recovered from patients in hospitals in Tehran were confirmed by both biochemical methods and PCR. Their antimicrobial sensitivity patterns were determined by Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. Following MIC determination, imipenem resistant strains were selected by DDST method which was followed by PCR tests for determination of MBLs genes: bla- IMP and bla- VIM . The results indicated that, in the DDST phenotypic method, among the 100 imipenem resistant isolates, 75 strains were MBLs positive. The PCR test indicated that 70 strains (33%) carried bla- VIM gene and 20 strains (9%) harbored bla- IMP . The results indicated that the extent of antibiotic resistance among Pseudomonas aeruginosa is on the rise. This may be due to production of MBLs enzymes. Therefore, determination of antibiotic sensitivity patterns and MBLs production by these bacteria, can be important in control of clinical Pseudomonas infection.

  1. The isolation and characterization of lipopolysaccharides from Microcystis aeruginosa, a prominent toxic water bloom forming cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Bláhová, Lucie; Adamovský, Ondřej; Kubala, Lukáš; Švihálková Šindlerová, Lenka; Zounková, Radka; Bláha, Luděk

    2013-12-15

    Massive toxic blooms of cyanobacteria represent a major threat to water supplies worldwide, yet serious gaps exist in understanding their complex toxic effects, including the role of lipopolysaccharides (LPS). The present comparative study focused on the levels and biological activities of LPS isolated from Microcystis aeruginosa, which is one of the most globally distributed toxic species. Using hot phenol extraction, LPS was isolated from 3 laboratory cultures and 11 natural water blooms. It formed 0.2-0.7% of the original dry biomass of the cyanobacteria, based on gravimetry. Additional analyses by commercial anti-LPS ELISA were correlated with gravimetry but showed concentrations that were about 7-times lower, which indicated either impurities in isolated LPS or the poor cross-reactivity of the antibodies used. LPS isolates from M. aeruginosa were potent pyrogens in the traditional Limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL)-test, but comparison with the PyroGene test demonstrated the limited selectivity of LAL with several interferences. The determined pyrogenicity (endotoxin units, EU) ranged from very low values in laboratory cultures (less than 0.003 up to 0.008-EU per 100 pg LPS) to higher values in complex bloom samples (0.01-0.078 EU per 100 pg of LPS), which suggested the role of bloom-associated bacteria in the overall effects. Potent pro-inflammatory effects of the studied LPS from both cultures and bloom samples were observed in a highly-relevant ex vivo human blood model by studying reactive oxygen species production in phagocytes as well as increased productions of interleukin 8, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor α, TNF-α. LPS from M. aeruginosa seem to modulate several pathways involved in the regulation of both innate immunity and specific responses. In comparison to the standard pathogenic bacterial LPS (World Health Organization Escherichia coli O113:10 endotoxin; activity 1 EU per 100 pg), the studied cyanobacterial samples had pyrogenicity potencies

  2. Decolorization of Distillery Spent Wash Using Biopolymer Synthesized by Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated from Tannery Effluent.

    PubMed

    David, Charles; Arivazhagan, M; Balamurali, M N; Shanmugarajan, Dhivya

    2015-01-01

    A bacterial strain was isolated from tannery effluent which can tolerate high concentrations of potassium dichromate up to 1000 ppm. The isolated microorganism was identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa by performing biochemical tests and molecular characterization. In the presence of excess of carbohydrate source, which is a physiological stress, this strain produces Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB). This intracellular polymer, which is synthesized, is primarily a product of carbon assimilation and is employed by microorganisms as an energy storage molecule to be metabolized when other common energy sources are limitedly available. Efforts were taken to check whether the PHB has any positive effect on spent wash decolorization. When a combination of PHB and the isolated bacterial culture was added to spent wash, a maximum color removal of 92.77% was found which was comparatively higher than the color removed when the spent wash was treated individually with the PHB and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. PHB behaved as a support material for the bacteria to bind to it and thus develops biofilm, which is one of the natural physiological growth forms of microorganisms. The bacterial growth in the biofilm and the polymer together acted in synergy, adsorbing and coagulating the pollutants in the form of color pigments.

  3. [Molecular typification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated from patients with cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Iglesias, N G; Marengo, J M; Rentería, F; Gatti, B; Segal, E; Semorile, L

    2008-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is the most frequent lethal genetic disease that affects the caucasian population. The main cause of morbidity is the chronic lung infection, being the infection caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa the most difficult to eradicate. This bacteria can be acquired in direct form, by person-to-person transfer, or indirectly, by hospital acquired infection. The Centro Provincial de Referencia de Fibrosis Quistica functioning in the Hospital de Niños "Sor María Ludovica", in La Plata, cares almost 220 patients aged two months to 45 years. The life expectancy depends of factors like the early diagnosis of the disease and the later acquisition of the chronic lung infection. The purpose of this work was the molecular typing of P. aeruginosa isolates obtained from cystic fibrosis patients to evaluate the genomic relationship among them. The study was carried out using RAPD-PCR. The analysis showed a great genetic heterogeneity among the isolates. The separation of the patients in groups in accordance with its bacteriology, that implies the attendance in different days and the implementation of isolation (or segregation) measures had demonstrated to be, in addition to other strategies, effective in the reduction of cross infections.

  4. [Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteriaemia: new clinical and therapeutic aspects ].

    PubMed

    Janbon, F; Despaux, E; Lepeu, G; Jonquet, O; Santoni, A; Balmayer, B; Bertrand, A

    1982-06-01

    Fifty one cases of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteriaemia observed during the last 12 years are reported. Thirty five patients were over fifty years old; 92 p. cent were admitted for several days and about 50 p. cent were in post-operative period. A previous antibiotherapy and an impaired status are promotive factors. The respiratory or peritoneal origins are the most frequent. All patients were feverish; 24 have had an infectious shock which was inaugural in 12 cases. Seven pneumonitis, 3 endocarditis, one pericarditis and 2 osteitis were observed. An ecthyma gangrenosum was noted in three patients. Mortality was 70 p. cent. Comparison between recovered and died patients improved bad prognosis of old age, post operative period, neoplasic, previous organica weakness and pulmonary or peritoneal origins. Used alone, colimycin has seemed to be more effective than aminosid antibiotics; but their association with betalactamins was better. An in vitro study of the susceptibility of 100 Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains has proved the interest of piperacillin and cefsulodin; azlocillin, cefoperazone and ceftriaxone are just less effective.

  5. [The comparison of selected virulence factors in Pseudomonas aeruginosa catheter isolates].

    PubMed

    Olejnízková, Katerina; Holá, Veronika

    2012-05-01

    Healthcare quality improvement brings about an increasing number of invasive diagnostic and therapeutic procedures and thus also an increasing number of high-risk patients prone to hospital infections. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most commonly isolated nosocomial species and the treatment of the infection is often long and problematic, with frequent recurrences. The pathogenesis of Pseudomonas infection is associated with a range of virulence factors. In the present study, 93 catheter isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were screened for the biofilm formation, motility and secretion of selected extracellular products. A high rate of the strains tested were producers of hemolysins, LasB elastase, and pyoverdines (> 70%). The biofilm formation was detected in 80% of isolates and formation of aerated biofilm was present in 90% of isolates with a positive correlation found between the two types of biofilm formation (p = 0.00583; gamma = 0.551). All strains showed swarming motility, 95% of strains showed swimming motility, and 75% of strains showed twitching motility. Among the virulence factors studied, only pyocyanin and pyochelin were produced by a lower proportion of isolates (< 25%). A positive correlation was seen between the production of some extracellular molecules (pyochelin and pyocyanin, pyocyanin and LasB elastase, and LasB elastase and haemolysins), between biofilm formation and formation of aerated biofilm, and between formation of aerated biofilm and pigments (pyoverdine and pyocyanin) production. On the other hand, a negative correlation was found between biofilm production and LasB elastase production and between the production of biofilm under immersion and pigments (pyoverdine and pyocyanin) production. All correlations are significant at the level p = 0.05, with the correlation coefficient gamma > 0.50.

  6. Extensively drug-resistant pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates containing blaVIM-2 and elements of Salmonella genomic island 2: a new genetic resistance determinant in Northeast Ohio.

    PubMed

    Perez, Federico; Hujer, Andrea M; Marshall, Steven H; Ray, Amy J; Rather, Philip N; Suwantarat, Nuntra; Dumford, Donald; O'Shea, Patrick; Domitrovic, T Nicholas J; Salata, Robert A; Chavda, Kalyan D; Chen, Liang; Kreiswirth, Barry N; Vila, Alejandro J; Haussler, Susanne; Jacobs, Michael R; Bonomo, Robert A

    2014-10-01

    Carbapenems are a mainstay of treatment for infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Carbapenem resistance mediated by metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs) remains uncommon in the United States, despite the worldwide emergence of this group of enzymes. Between March 2012 and May 2013, we detected MBL-producing P. aeruginosa in a university-affiliated health care system in northeast Ohio. We examined the clinical characteristics and outcomes of patients, defined the resistance determinants and structure of the genetic element harboring the blaMBL gene through genome sequencing, and typed MBL-producing P. aeruginosa isolates using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), repetitive sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR), and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Seven patients were affected that were hospitalized at three community hospitals, a long-term-care facility, and a tertiary care center; one of the patients died as a result of infection. Isolates belonged to sequence type 233 (ST233) and were extensively drug resistant (XDR), including resistance to all fluoroquinolones, aminoglycosides, and β-lactams; two isolates were nonsusceptible to colistin. The blaMBL gene was identified as blaVIM-2 contained within a class 1 integron (In559), similar to the cassette array previously detected in isolates from Norway, Russia, Taiwan, and Chicago, IL. Genomic sequencing and assembly revealed that In559 was part of a novel 35-kb region that also included a Tn501-like transposon and Salmonella genomic island 2 (SGI2)-homologous sequences. This analysis of XDR strains producing VIM-2 from northeast Ohio revealed a novel recombination event between Salmonella and P. aeruginosa, heralding a new antibiotic resistance threat in this region's health care system.

  7. LasR Variant Cystic Fibrosis Isolates Reveal an Adaptable Quorum-Sensing Hierarchy in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Feltner, John B; Wolter, Daniel J; Pope, Christopher E; Groleau, Marie-Christine; Smalley, Nicole E; Greenberg, E Peter; Mayer-Hamblett, Nicole; Burns, Jane; Déziel, Eric; Hoffman, Lucas R; Dandekar, Ajai A

    2016-10-04

    Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections cause significant morbidity in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Over years to decades, P. aeruginosa adapts genetically as it establishes chronic lung infections. Nonsynonymous mutations in lasR, the quorum-sensing (QS) master regulator, are common in CF. In laboratory strains of P. aeruginosa, LasR activates transcription of dozens of genes, including that for another QS regulator, RhlR. Despite the frequency with which lasR coding variants have been reported to occur in P. aeruginosa CF isolates, little is known about their consequences for QS. We sequenced lasR from 2,583 P. aeruginosa CF isolates. The lasR sequences of 580 isolates (22%) coded for polypeptides that differed from the conserved LasR polypeptides of well-studied laboratory strains. This collection included 173 unique lasR coding variants, 116 of which were either missense or nonsense mutations. We studied 31 of these variants. About one-sixth of the variant LasR proteins were functional, including 3 with nonsense mutations, and in some LasR-null isolates, genes that are LasR dependent in laboratory strains were nonetheless expressed. Furthermore, about half of the LasR-null isolates retained RhlR activity. Therefore, in some CF isolates the QS hierarchy is altered such that RhlR quorum sensing is independent of LasR regulation. Our analysis challenges the view that QS-silent P. aeruginosa is selected during the course of a chronic CF lung infection. Rather, some lasR sequence variants retain functionality, and many employ an alternate QS strategy involving RhlR.

  8. LasR Variant Cystic Fibrosis Isolates Reveal an Adaptable Quorum-Sensing Hierarchy in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Feltner, John B.; Wolter, Daniel J.; Pope, Christopher E.; Groleau, Marie-Christine; Smalley, Nicole E.; Greenberg, E. Peter; Mayer-Hamblett, Nicole; Burns, Jane; Hoffman, Lucas R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections cause significant morbidity in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Over years to decades, P. aeruginosa adapts genetically as it establishes chronic lung infections. Nonsynonymous mutations in lasR, the quorum-sensing (QS) master regulator, are common in CF. In laboratory strains of P. aeruginosa, LasR activates transcription of dozens of genes, including that for another QS regulator, RhlR. Despite the frequency with which lasR coding variants have been reported to occur in P. aeruginosa CF isolates, little is known about their consequences for QS. We sequenced lasR from 2,583 P. aeruginosa CF isolates. The lasR sequences of 580 isolates (22%) coded for polypeptides that differed from the conserved LasR polypeptides of well-studied laboratory strains. This collection included 173 unique lasR coding variants, 116 of which were either missense or nonsense mutations. We studied 31 of these variants. About one-sixth of the variant LasR proteins were functional, including 3 with nonsense mutations, and in some LasR-null isolates, genes that are LasR dependent in laboratory strains were nonetheless expressed. Furthermore, about half of the LasR-null isolates retained RhlR activity. Therefore, in some CF isolates the QS hierarchy is altered such that RhlR quorum sensing is independent of LasR regulation. Our analysis challenges the view that QS-silent P. aeruginosa is selected during the course of a chronic CF lung infection. Rather, some lasR sequence variants retain functionality, and many employ an alternate QS strategy involving RhlR. PMID:27703072

  9. Mechanisms of carbapenem resistance in endemic Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates after an SPM-1 metallo-β-lactamase producing strain subsided in an intensive care unit of a teaching hospital in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Cacci, Luciana Camila; Chuster, Stephanie Gomes; Martins, Natacha; do Carmo, Pâmella Rodrigues; Girão, Valéria Brígido de Carvalho; Nouér, Simone Aranha; de Freitas, Wania Vasconcelos; de Matos, Juliana Arruda; Magalhães, Ana Cristina de Gouveia; Ferreira, Adriana Lúcia Pires; Picão, Renata Cristina; Moreira, Beatriz Meurer

    2016-01-01

    Carbapenem-resistance mechanisms are a challenge in the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections. We investigated changes in P. aeruginosa carbapenem-resistance determinants over a time period of eight years after the emergence of São Paulo metallo-β-lactamase in a university hospital in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) were screened for P. aeruginosa colonisation and followed for the occurrence of infections from April 2007 to April 2008. The ICU environment was also sampled. Isolates were typed using random amplified polymorphic DNA, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by disk diffusion and E-test, production of carbapenemases by a modified-CarbaNP test and presence of carbapenemase-encoding genes by polymerase chain reaction. Non-carbapenemase resistance mechanisms studied included efflux and AmpC overexpression by PAβN and cloxacillin susceptibility enhancement, respectively, as well as oprD mutations. From 472 P. aeruginosa clinical isolates (93 patients) and 17 isolates from the ICU environment, high genotypic diversity and several international clones were observed; one environment isolate belonged to the blaSPM-1 P. aeruginosa epidemic genotype. Among isolates from infections, 10 (29%) were carbapenem resistant: none produced carbapenemases, three exhibited all non-carbapenemase mechanisms studied, six presented a combination of two mechanisms, and one exclusively displayed oprD mutations. Carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa displayed a polyclonal profile after the SPM-1 epidemic genotype declined. This phenomenon is connected with blaSPM-1 P. aeruginosa replaced by other carbapenem-resistant pathogens. PMID:27653359

  10. Mechanisms of carbapenem resistance in endemic Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates after an SPM-1 metallo-β-lactamase producing strain subsided in an intensive care unit of a teaching hospital in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Cacci, Luciana Camila; Chuster, Stephanie Gomes; Martins, Natacha; Carmo, Pâmella Rodrigues do; Girão, Valéria Brígido de Carvalho; Nouér, Simone Aranha; Freitas, Wania Vasconcelos de; Matos, Juliana Arruda de; Magalhães, Ana Cristina de Gouveia; Ferreira, Adriana Lúcia Pires; Picão, Renata Cristina; Moreira, Beatriz Meurer

    2016-09-01

    Carbapenem-resistance mechanisms are a challenge in the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections. We investigated changes in P. aeruginosa carbapenem-resistance determinants over a time period of eight years after the emergence of São Paulo metallo-β-lactamase in a university hospital in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) were screened for P. aeruginosa colonisation and followed for the occurrence of infections from April 2007 to April 2008. The ICU environment was also sampled. Isolates were typed using random amplified polymorphic DNA, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by disk diffusion and E-test, production of carbapenemases by a modified-CarbaNP test and presence of carbapenemase-encoding genes by polymerase chain reaction. Non-carbapenemase resistance mechanisms studied included efflux and AmpC overexpression by PAβN and cloxacillin susceptibility enhancement, respectively, as well as oprD mutations. From 472 P. aeruginosa clinical isolates (93 patients) and 17 isolates from the ICU environment, high genotypic diversity and several international clones were observed; one environment isolate belonged to the blaSPM-1 P. aeruginosa epidemic genotype. Among isolates from infections, 10 (29%) were carbapenem resistant: none produced carbapenemases, three exhibited all non-carbapenemase mechanisms studied, six presented a combination of two mechanisms, and one exclusively displayed oprD mutations. Carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa displayed a polyclonal profile after the SPM-1 epidemic genotype declined. This phenomenon is connected with blaSPM-1 P. aeruginosa replaced by other carbapenem-resistant pathogens.

  11. Wide Dispersion of ST175 Clone despite High Genetic Diversity of Carbapenem-Nonsusceptible Pseudomonas aeruginosa Clinical Strains in 16 Spanish Hospitals▿

    PubMed Central

    García-Castillo, María; del Campo, Rosa; Morosini, María Isabel; Riera, Elena; Cabot, Gabriel; Willems, Rob; van Mansfeld, Rosa; Oliver, Antonio; Cantón, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    During the COMParative Activity of Carbapenems Testing (COMPACT) surveillance study, 448 Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates were obtained from 16 Spanish hospitals. Nonsusceptibility (EUCAST breakpoints) to imipenem (35%), meropenem (33%), and/or doripenem (33%) was observed with 175 isolates (39%). Simultaneous resistance to these three drugs was observed with 126 of the 175 isolates (72%). Except for colistin, high resistance rates were observed among noncarbapenem antibiotics. Clonal relatedness was investigated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) with SpeI, discriminating 68 patterns. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) was performed on 84 isolates representing different PFGE types and all participating hospitals. Thirty-nine sequence types (STs) could be distinguished, and of these, ST175 (48 isolates, 10 hospitals), ST646 (16 isolates, 4 hospitals), ST532 (13 isolates, 3 hospitals), and ST111 (13 isolates, 7 hospitals) were the most frequently encountered. Minimum-spanning tree analysis confirmed a wide dissemination of different clones among participant hospitals, particularly ST175. PFGE pattern comparison within the four most frequent STs revealed that ST175 isolates were relatively uniform, while ST646, ST532, and ST111 isolates were highly diverse, with almost every isolate belonging to a unique pulsotype, even when originating from the same center. The population of carbapenem-nonsusceptible P. aeruginosa isolates from 16 hospitals is highly diverse, with one ST (ST175) representing a highly conserved clone disseminated in 10 of the 16 participant hospitals. This ST175 clone should be added to the list of P. aeruginosa clones at high risk for epidemic spread, such as the Liverpool, Manchester, and Melbourne clones previously found in cystic fibrosis patients and ST235 in the nosocomial setting. PMID:21697331

  12. Isolation of the Autoinducer-Quenching Strain that Inhibits LasR in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Lixing; Zhang, Yuqian; Yang, Yuxiang; Wang, Lianhui

    2014-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) has been recognized as a general phenomenon in microorganisms and plays an important role in many pathogenic bacteria. In this report, we used the Agrobacterium tumefaciens biosensor strain NT1 to rapidly screen for autoinducer-quenching inhibitors from bacteria. After initial screening 5389 isolates obtained from land and beach soil, 53 putative positive strains were identified. A confirmatory bioassay was carried out after concentrating the putative positive culture supernatant, and 22 strains were confirmed to have anti-LasR activity. Finally, we determined the strain JM2, which could completely inhibit biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1, belonged to the genus Pseudomonas by analysis of 16S rDNA. Partially purified inhibitor factor(s) F5 derived from culture supernatants specifically inhibited LasR-controlled elastase and protease in wild type P. aeruginosa PAO1 by 68% and 73%, respectively, without significantly affecting growth; the rhl-controlled pyocyanin and rhamnolipids were inhibited by 54% and 52% in the presence of 100 μg/mL of F5. The swarming motility and biofilm of PAO1 were also inhibited by F5. Real time RT-PCR on samples from 100 μg/mL F5-treated P. aeruginosa showed downregulation of autoinducer synthase (LasRI and rhlI) and cognate receptor (lasR and rhlR) genes by 50%, 28%, 48%, and 29%, respectively. These results provide compelling evidence that the F5 inhibitor(s) interferes with the las system and significantly inhibits biofilm formation. PMID:24736783

  13. Distribution of Pseudomonas-Derived Cephalosporinase and Metallo-β-Lactamases in Carbapenem-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from Korea.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hye Hyun; Kwon, Gye Cheol; Kim, Semi; Koo, Sun Hoe

    2015-07-01

    The emergence of carbapenem resistance among Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an increasing problem in many parts of the world. In particular, metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs) and AmpC β- lactamases are responsible for high-level resistance to carbapenem and cephalosporin. We studied the diversity and frequency of β-lactamases and characterized chromosomal AmpC β- lactamase from carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa isolates. Sixty-one carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa isolates were collected from patients in a tertiary hospital in Daejeon, Korea, from January 2011 to June 2014. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of four antimicrobial agents were determined using the agar-dilution method. Polymerase chain reaction and sequencing were used to identify the various β-lactamase genes, class 1 integrons, and chromosomally encoded and plasmid-mediated ampC genes. In addition, the epidemiological relationship was investigated by multilocus sequence typing. Among 61 carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa isolates, 25 isolates (41.0%) were MBL producers. Additionally, 30 isolates producing PDC (Pseudomonas-derived cephalosporinase)-2 were highly resistant to ceftazidime (MIC50 = 256 μg/ml) and cefepime (MIC50 = 256 μg/ml). Of all the PDC variants, 25 isolates harboring MBL genes showed high levels of cephalosporin and carbapenem resistance, whereas 36 isolates that did not harbor MBL genes revealed relatively low-level resistance (ceftazidime, p < 0.001; cefepime, p < 0.001; imipenem, p = 0.003; meropenem, p < 0.001). The coexistence of MBLs and AmpC β-lactamases suggests that these may be important contributing factors for cephalosporin and carbapenem resistance. Therefore, efficient detection and intervention to control drug resistance are necessary to prevent the emergence of P. aeruginosa possessing this combination of β-lactamases.

  14. Biofilm formation abilities and disinfectant-resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from cockroaches captured in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Saitou, Keiko; Furuhata, Katsunori; Kawakami, Yasushi; Fukuyama, Masafumi

    2009-06-01

    Forty-five strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from cockroaches captured in hospitals were investigated with regard to their biofilm-forming ability and resistance to various disinfectants in various cellular states. The hydrophobicity value varied among the test strains from 0.001 to 0.241, and the mean +/- standard deviation (SD) was 0.101 +/- 0.074. The relative viscosity of the extracellular product was measured. All test strains produced a mucous substance, and the value was 1.05-1.30 (mean +/- SD: 1.11 +/- 0.06), showing that all test strains had a biofilm-forming ability. Bactericidal experiments were performed using 6 disinfectants: ethanol, Hibitane, Isojin, Osvan, Tego 51, and Welpas. When bacteria in suspension were exposed to the disinfectants for 1 min (suspension test), 5 of the 6 disinfectants excluding Tego 51 completely killed all test strains, showing high bactericidal effects. In contrast, when adherent bacteria were exposed to the disinfectants for 1 min (adhesion test), the killing rate by Welpas was 100%, but those by Isojin and ethanol were lower (88.9 and 60.0%, respectively), that by Osvan was only 4.4%, and no bacteria were killed by Hibitane or Tego 51. These findings showed that the bactericidal effects markedly decreased in the case of adherent P. aeruginosa.

  15. A thermo-stable lysine aminopeptidase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Isolation, purification, characterization, and sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yan Tao; Zhou, Nan Di; Zhou, Zhe Min; Gao, Xin Xing; Tian, Ya Ping

    2014-10-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa NJ-814, isolated from garden soil, produced an extracellular aminopeptidase that was purified using ammonium sulfate precipitation and ion exchange chromatography. The purity was confirmed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and the Mr value of the enzyme was estimated to be 55 kDa. The purified enzyme shows maximum activity at pH 9.0 and 80 °C. It exhibits high thermo-stability. Half of the activity can remain after incubation at 80 °C for 119 min. It is stable within pH range of 7.5-10.5. It is strongly activated by Co(2+) and inhibited by Fe(2+) , Cu(2+) , Ni(2+) , Zn(2+) , and ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA). The specificity of the enzyme was investigated. Within several aminoacyl-p-nitroanilines (AA-pNA), Lys-pNA is proven to be the optimal substrate. The Michaelis-Menten constant (Km ) of the enzyme for Lys-pNA and Leu-pNA were 2.32 and 9.41 mM, respectively. Peptide map fingerprinting shows that the sequence of the enzyme is highly similar to aminopeptidase Y from P. aeruginosa 18A. It can be speculated that this enzyme is a Zn(2+) -dependent enzyme and contains two zinc ions in its active site.

  16. Epidemiology and virulence of VIM-4 metallo-beta-lactamase-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from burn patients in eastern Algeria.

    PubMed

    Meradji, Samah; Barguigua, Abouddihaj; Bentakouk, Mohamed Cherif; Nayme, Kaotar; Zerouali, Khalid; Mazouz, Dekhil; Chettibi, Houria; Timinouni, Mohammed

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we investigated the prevalence of carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (CRPA) in burn patients from eastern Algeria, CRPA virulence factors and the molecular epidemiology of CRPA. The overall prevalence of CRPA was 48.38%. Seven (46.66%) isolates were metallo-β-lactamases (MBL) producers and contained the MBL genes blaVIM-4 (n=6) and blaVIM-2 (n=1). Risk factors for CRPA infection were urinary catheter use and intubation (p=0.008). A high percentage of virulence factors (86.6% of these isolates were able to produce protease; 73.3% of isolates has DNase; and 66.6% were haemolysin positive) was observed in CRPA isolates. Among the seven MBL-producing isolates, four had the same clonal profile. The class 1 integrons, which contained the aadA7 gene cassette, were detected in six isolates. The 16SrRNA methylase gene, rmtB, was detected in one strain. All CRPA isolates were biofilm formers. A study on the kinetics of biofilm production revealed that biofilm production increased when the concentration of imipenem or ciprofloxacin and the incubation time increased. This is the first study to report the presence of VIM-4-producing P. aeruginosa from North Africa and also of the high prevalence of CRPA isolates. Based on our study of burn unit patients, the high percentage of P. aeruginosa with virulence factors and multi-drug resistance is alarming.

  17. Evaluation of Metallo-β-Lactamase-Production and Carriage of bla-VIM Genes in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated from Burn Wound Infections in Isfahan

    PubMed Central

    Saffari, Mahmood; Firoozeh, Farzaneh; Pourbabaee, Mohammad; Zibaei, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background Metallo-β-lactamase-production among Gram-negative bacteria, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa, has become a challenge for treatment of infections due to these resistant bacteria. Objectives The aim of the current study was to evaluate the metallo-β-lactamase-production and carriage of bla-VIM genes among carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa isolated from burn wound infections. Patients and Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted from September 2014 to July 2015. One hundred and fifty P. aeruginosa isolates were recovered from 600 patients with burn wound infections treated at Imam-Musa-Kazem Hospital in Isfahan city, Iran. Carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa isolates were screened by disk diffusion using CLSI guidelines. Metallo-β-lactamase-producing P. aeruginosa isolates were identified using an imipenem-EDTA double disk synergy test (EDTA-IMP DDST). For detection of MBL genes including bla-VIM-1 and bla-VIM-2, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods and sequencing were used. Results Among the 150 P. aeruginosa isolates, 144 (96%) were resistant to imipenem by the disk diffusion method, all of which were identified as metallo-β-lactamase-producing P. aeruginosa isolates by EDTA-IMP DDST. Twenty-seven (18%) and 8 (5.5%) MBL-producing P. aeruginosa isolates harbored bla-VIM-1 and bla-VIM-2 genes, respectively. Conclusions Our findings showed a high occurrence of metallo-β-lactamase production among P. aeruginosa isolates in burn patient infections in our region. Also, there are P. aeruginosa isolates carrying the bla-VIM-1 and bla-VIM-2 genes in Isfahan province. PMID:28144604

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain N002, Isolated from Crude Oil-Contaminated Soil from Geleky, Assam, India

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Abhjit Sarma; Baruah, Reshita; Gogoi, Dhrubajyoti; Borah, Maina

    2013-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of crude oil-degrading Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain N002, isolated from a crude oil-polluted soil sample from Geleky, Assam, India. Multiple genes potentially involved in crude oil degradation were identified. PMID:23405324

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain Hex1T Isolated from Soils Contaminated with Used Lubricating Oil in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Luján, Adela M.; Feliziani, Sofía

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pseudomonas aeruginosa Hex1T was isolated from soils contaminated with used lubricating oil from a garage in Córdoba, Argentina. This strain is capable of utilizing this pollutant as the sole carbon and energy source. Here, we present the 6.9-Mb draft genome sequence of Hex1T, which contains many heavy metal-resistance genes. PMID:28082504

  20. Carbapenem inactivation: a very affordable and highly specific method for phenotypic detection of carbapenemase-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates compared with other methods.

    PubMed

    Akhi, Mohammad Taghi; Khalili, Younes; Ghotaslou, Reza; Kafil, Hossein Samadi; Yousefi, Saber; Nagili, Behroz; Goli, Hamid Reza

    2016-07-22

    This investigation was undertaken to compare phenotypic and molecular methods for detection of carbapenemase-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa. A total of 245 non-duplicated isolates of P. aeruginosa were collected from hospitalized patients. Disc diffusion method was used to identify carbapenem-resistant bacteria. Three phenotypic methods, including Modified Hodge Test (MHT), Modified Carba NP (MCNP) test and Carbapenem Inactivation Method (CIM) were used for investigation of carbapenemase production. In addition, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to detect carbapenemase encoding genes. Of 245 P. aeruginosa isolates investigated, 121 isolates were carbapenem-resistant. Among carbapenem-resistant isolates, 40, 39 and 35 isolates exhibited positive results using MHT, MCNP test and CIM, respectively. PCR indicated the presence of carbapenemase genes in 35 of carbapenem-resistant isolates. MHT showed low sensitivity and specificity for carbapenemase detection among P. aeruginosa isolates in comparison to PCR. CIM was most affordable and highly specific than MCNP test compared with the molecular method.

  1. AmpG Inactivation Restores Susceptibility of Pan-β-Lactam-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Clinical Strains▿

    PubMed Central

    Zamorano, Laura; Reeve, Thomas M.; Juan, Carlos; Moyá, Bartolomé; Cabot, Gabriel; Vocadlo, David J.; Mark, Brian L.; Oliver, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Constitutive AmpC hyperproduction is the most frequent mechanism of resistance to the weak AmpC inducers antipseudomonal penicillins and cephalosporins. Previously, we demonstrated that inhibition of the β-N-acetylglucosaminidase NagZ prevents and reverts this mechanism of resistance, which is caused by ampD and/or dacB (PBP4) mutations in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In this work, we compared NagZ with a second candidate target, the AmpG permease for GlcNAc-1,6-anhydromuropeptides, for their ability to block AmpC expression pathways. Inactivation of nagZ or ampG fully restored the susceptibility and basal ampC expression of ampD or dacB laboratory mutants and impaired the emergence of one-step ceftazidime-resistant mutants in population analysis experiments. Nevertheless, only ampG inactivation fully blocked ampC induction, reducing the MICs of the potent AmpC inducer imipenem from 2 to 0.38 μg/ml. Moreover, through population analysis and characterization of laboratory mutants, we showed that ampG inactivation minimized the impact on resistance of the carbapenem porin OprD, reducing the MIC of imipenem for a PAO1 OprD mutant from >32 to 0.5 μg/ml. AmpG and NagZ targets were additionally evaluated in three clinical isolates that are pan-β-lactam resistant due to AmpC hyperproduction, OprD inactivation, and overexpression of several efflux pumps. A marked increase in susceptibility to ceftazidime and piperacillin-tazobactam was observed in both cases, while only ampG inactivation fully restored wild-type imipenem susceptibility. Susceptibility to meropenem, cefepime, and aztreonam was also enhanced, although to a lower extent due to the high impact of efflux pumps on the activity of these antibiotics. Thus, our results suggest that development of small-molecule inhibitors of AmpG could provide an excellent strategy to overcome the relevant mechanisms of resistance (OprD inactivation plus AmpC induction) to imipenem, the only currently available β-lactam not

  2. Isolation and characterization of mutants defective in the cyanide-insensitive respiratory pathway of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, L; Williams, H D

    1995-01-01

    The branched respiratory chain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa contains at least two terminal oxidases which are active under normal physiological conditions. One of these, cytochrome co, is a cytochrome c oxidase which is completely inhibited by concentrations of the respiratory inhibitor potassium cyanide as low as 100 microM. The second oxidase, the cyanide-insensitive oxidase, is resistant to cyanide concentrations in excess of 1 mM as well as to sodium azide. In this work, we describe the isolation and characterization of a mutant of P. aeruginosa defective in cyanide-insensitive respiration. This insertion mutant was isolated with mini-D171 (a replication-defective derivative of the P. aeruginosa phage D3112) as a mutagen and by screening the resulting tetracycline-resistant transductants for the loss of ability to grow in the presence of 1 mM sodium azide. Polarographic studies on the NADH-mediated respiration rate of the mutant indicated an approximate 50% loss of activity, and titration of this activity against increasing cyanide concentrations gave a monophasic curve clearly showing the complete loss of cyanide-insensitive respiration. The mutated gene for a mutant affected in the cyanide-insensitive, oxidase-terminated respiratory pathway has been designated cio. We have complemented the azide-sensitive phenotype of this mutant with a wild-type copy of the gene by in vivo cloning with another mini-D element, mini-D386, carried on plasmid pADD386. The complemented cio mutant regained the ability to grow on medium containing 1 mM azide, titration of its NADH oxidase activity with cyanide gave a biphasic curve similar to that of the wild-type organism, and the respiration rate returned to normal levels. Spectral analysis of the cytochrome contents of the membranes of the wild type, the cio mutant, and the complemented mutant suggests that the cio mutant is not defective in any membrane-bound cytochromes and that the complementing gene does not encode a heme

  3. Hospital Isolates of Serratia marcescens Transferring Ampicillin, Carbenicillin, and Gentamicin Resistance to Other Gram-Negative Bacteria Including Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Olexy, Vera M.; Bird, Thomas J.; Grieble, Hans G.; Farrand, Stephen K.

    1979-01-01

    Thirteen independent isolates of Serratia marcescens associated with nosocomial urinary tract infections were obtained from the clinical microbiology laboratory at Hines Veterans Administration Hospital. The isolates were resistant to at least ampicillin, carbenicillin, gentamicin, and tobramycin. They could be divided into two groups on the basis of their antibiotypes. Group I (9 strains) showed resistance to 13 antibiotics, including 3 beta-lactams, 6 aminoglycosides, tetracycline, sulfonamide, trimethoprim, and polymyxin B. Group II (4 strains) was resistant to 11 antibiotics, including 3 beta-lactams, 5 aminoglycosides, sulfonamide, trimethoprim, and polymyxin B. Donors from both groups transferred resistance traits to Escherichia coli. Transconjugants from matings with group II donors all acquired resistance to nine antibiotics, including the three beta-lactams, five aminoglycosides, and sulfonamide. Transconjugants from matings with group I donors were of varied antibiotypes, inheriting resistance to up to 11 of the 13 antibiotics. Resistances to trimethoprim and polymyxin B were never observed to transfer. E. coli transconjugants of each group were capable of transferring multiple-antibiotic resistance to several other members of the family Enterobacteriaceae. All group II S. marcescens and E. coli donors and all group I S. marcescens donors transferred carbenicillin, streptomycin, kanamycin, gentamicin, tobramycin, and sisomicin resistance to Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The results suggest that these S. marcescens strains harbor R factors of a broader host range than previously reported. PMID:106772

  4. Determination of Acquired Resistance Profiles of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates and Characterization of an Effective Bacteriocin-Like Inhibitory Substance (BLIS) Against These Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Shokri, Dariush; Rabbani Khorasgani, Mohammad; Zaghian, Saeideh; Fatemi, Seyed Masih; Mohkam, Milad; Ghasemi, Younes; Taheri-Kafrani, Asghar

    2016-01-01

    Background The emergence of pan-drug resistant strains (PDR) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa has led to renewed efforts to identify alternative agents, such as bacteriocins and bacteriocin-like inhibitory substances (BLISs). Objectives The aims of this study were to determine the acquired resistance profiles of multidrug-resistant (MDR), extensively drug-resistant (XDR), and PDR P. aeruginosa isolates based on the revised definitions of the CDC and ECDC and to screen and characterize effective BLISs against these isolates. Patients and Materials In a cross-sectional study, 96 P. aeruginosa strains were isolated during a 12-month period. The resistance profiles of these isolates were determined as MDR, XDR, and PDR, and the data were analyzed using WHONET5.6 software. A BLIS against the P. aeruginosa strains was characterized based on its physicochemical properties, size, growth curves, and production profiles. Results Among the 96 isolates of P. aeruginosa, 2 (2.1%), 94 (97.9%), and 63 (65.6%) were non-MDR, MDR, and XDR, respectively, and 1 (1.1%) was PDR. The most effective antibiotics against these isolates were polymyxins and fosfomycin. A BLIS isolated from the P. aeruginosa DSH22 strain had potent activity against 92 (95.8%) of the 96 isolates. The BLIS was heat stable, (up to 100°C for 10 min), UV stable, and active within a pH range of 3 - 9. The activity of BLIS disappeared when treated with trypsin, proteinase K, and pepsin, indicating its proteinous nature. Based on its size (25 kDa), the BLIS may belong to the large colicin-like bacteriocin family. BLIS production started in the midexponential phase of growth, and the maximum level (2700 AU/mL) occurred in the late-stationary phase after 25 hours of incubation at 30°C. Conclusions This BLIS with broad-spectrum activity may be a potential agent for the treatment or control of drug-resistant strains of P. aeruginosa infection. PMID:27800131

  5. Molecular epidemiology provides evidence of genotypic heterogeneity of multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa serotype O:12 outbreak isolates from a pediatric hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Bingen, E; Bonacorsi, S; Rohrlich, P; Duval, M; Lhopital, S; Brahimi, N; Vilmer, E; Goering, R V

    1996-01-01

    Ribotyping randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis were used for the epidemiologic evaluation of eight Pseudomonas aeruginosa O:12 isolates obtained from eight children and two P. aeruginosa O:12 environmental isolates from a hematology ward. Randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis were able to discriminate isolates that were indistinguishable by biochemical typing, O serotyping or ribotyping. PMID:8940479

  6. Antimicrobial Activity of Fosfomycin-Tobramycin Combination against Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates Assessed by Time-Kill Assays and Mutant Prevention Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Díez-Aguilar, María; Morosini, María Isabel; Tedim, Ana P; Rodríguez, Irene; Aktaş, Zerrin; Cantón, Rafael

    2015-10-01

    The antibacterial activity of fosfomycin-tobramycin combination was studied by time-kill assay in eight Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates belonging to the fosfomycin wild-type population (MIC = 64 μg/ml) but with different tobramycin susceptibilities (MIC range, 1 to 64 μg/ml). The mutant prevention concentration (MPC) and mutant selection window (MSW) were determined in five of these strains (tobramycin MIC range, 1 to 64 μg/ml) in aerobic and anaerobic conditions simulating environments that are present in biofilm-mediated infections. Fosfomycin-tobramycin was synergistic and bactericidal for the isolates with mutations in the mexZ repressor gene, with a tobramycin MIC of 4 μg/ml. This effect was not observed in strains displaying tobramycin MICs of 1 to 2 μg/ml due to the strong bactericidal effect of tobramycin alone. Fosfomycin presented higher MPC values (range, 2,048 to >2,048 μg/ml) in aerobic and anaerobic conditions than did tobramycin (range, 16 to 256 μg/ml). Interestingly, the association rendered narrow or even null MSWs in the two conditions. However, for isolates with high-level tobramycin resistance that harbored aminoglycoside nucleotidyltransferases, time-kill assays showed no synergy, with wide MSWs in the two environments. glpT gene mutations responsible for fosfomycin resistance in P. aeruginosa were determined in fosfomycin-susceptible wild-type strains and mutant derivatives recovered from MPC studies. All mutant derivatives had changes in the GlpT amino acid sequence, which resulted in a truncated permease responsible for fosfomycin resistance. These results suggest that fosfomycin-tobramycin can be an alternative for infections due to P. aeruginosa since it has demonstrated synergistic and bactericidal activity in susceptible isolates and those with low-level tobramycin resistance. It also prevents the emergence of resistant mutants in either aerobic or anaerobic environments.

  7. Antimicrobial Activity of Fosfomycin-Tobramycin Combination against Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates Assessed by Time-Kill Assays and Mutant Prevention Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Díez-Aguilar, María; Tedim, Ana P.; Rodríguez, Irene; Aktaş, Zerrin; Cantón, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    The antibacterial activity of fosfomycin-tobramycin combination was studied by time-kill assay in eight Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates belonging to the fosfomycin wild-type population (MIC = 64 μg/ml) but with different tobramycin susceptibilities (MIC range, 1 to 64 μg/ml). The mutant prevention concentration (MPC) and mutant selection window (MSW) were determined in five of these strains (tobramycin MIC range, 1 to 64 μg/ml) in aerobic and anaerobic conditions simulating environments that are present in biofilm-mediated infections. Fosfomycin-tobramycin was synergistic and bactericidal for the isolates with mutations in the mexZ repressor gene, with a tobramycin MIC of 4 μg/ml. This effect was not observed in strains displaying tobramycin MICs of 1 to 2 μg/ml due to the strong bactericidal effect of tobramycin alone. Fosfomycin presented higher MPC values (range, 2,048 to >2,048 μg/ml) in aerobic and anaerobic conditions than did tobramycin (range, 16 to 256 μg/ml). Interestingly, the association rendered narrow or even null MSWs in the two conditions. However, for isolates with high-level tobramycin resistance that harbored aminoglycoside nucleotidyltransferases, time-kill assays showed no synergy, with wide MSWs in the two environments. glpT gene mutations responsible for fosfomycin resistance in P. aeruginosa were determined in fosfomycin-susceptible wild-type strains and mutant derivatives recovered from MPC studies. All mutant derivatives had changes in the GlpT amino acid sequence, which resulted in a truncated permease responsible for fosfomycin resistance. These results suggest that fosfomycin-tobramycin can be an alternative for infections due to P. aeruginosa since it has demonstrated synergistic and bactericidal activity in susceptible isolates and those with low-level tobramycin resistance. It also prevents the emergence of resistant mutants in either aerobic or anaerobic environments. PMID:26195514

  8. Isolation and identification of a novel, lipase-producing bacterium, Pseudomnas aeruginosa KM110

    PubMed Central

    Mobarak-Qamsari, E; Kasra-Kermanshahi, R; Moosavi-nejad, Z

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objectives Lipases are particularly important due to the fact that they specifically hydrolyze acyl glycerol, oils and greases, which is of great interest for different industrial applications. Materialst and Methods In this study, several lipase-producing bacteria were isolated from wastewater of an oil processing plant. The strain possessing the highest lipase activity was identified both biochemically and sequencing of 16S rRNA gene. Then we increase lipase activity by improving conditions of production medium. Also, lipase from this strain was preliminarily characterized for use in industrial application. Results The 16S rRNA sequensing revealed it as a new strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the type strain was KM110. An overall 3-fold enhanced lipase production (0.76 U mL−1) was achieved after improving conditions of production medium. The olive oil and peptone was found to be the most suitable substrate for maximum enzyme production. Also the enzyme exhibited maximum lipolytic activity at 45°C where it was also stably maintained. At pH 8.0, the lipase had the highest stability but no activity. It was active over a pH range of 7.0–10.0. The lipase activity was inhibited by Zn2+ & Cu2+ (32 and 27%, respectively) at 1mM. The enzyme lost 29% of its initial activity in 1.0% SDS concentration, whereas, Triton X-100, Tween-80 & DMSO did not significantly inhibit lipase activity. Conclusions Based on the findings of present study, lipase of P. aeruginosa KM110 is a potential alkaline lipase and a candidate for industrial applications such as detergent, leather and fine chemical industries. PMID:22347589

  9. Clinical utilization of genomics data produced by the international Pseudomonas aeruginosa consortium

    PubMed Central

    Freschi, Luca; Jeukens, Julie; Kukavica-Ibrulj, Irena; Boyle, Brian; Dupont, Marie-Josée; Laroche, Jérôme; Larose, Stéphane; Maaroufi, Halim; Fothergill, Joanne L.; Moore, Matthew; Winsor, Geoffrey L.; Aaron, Shawn D.; Barbeau, Jean; Bell, Scott C.; Burns, Jane L.; Camara, Miguel; Cantin, André; Charette, Steve J.; Dewar, Ken; Déziel, Éric; Grimwood, Keith; Hancock, Robert E. W.; Harrison, Joe J.; Heeb, Stephan; Jelsbak, Lars; Jia, Baofeng; Kenna, Dervla T.; Kidd, Timothy J.; Klockgether, Jens; Lam, Joseph S.; Lamont, Iain L.; Lewenza, Shawn; Loman, Nick; Malouin, François; Manos, Jim; McArthur, Andrew G.; McKeown, Josie; Milot, Julie; Naghra, Hardeep; Nguyen, Dao; Pereira, Sheldon K.; Perron, Gabriel G.; Pirnay, Jean-Paul; Rainey, Paul B.; Rousseau, Simon; Santos, Pedro M.; Stephenson, Anne; Taylor, Véronique; Turton, Jane F.; Waglechner, Nicholas; Williams, Paul; Thrane, Sandra W.; Wright, Gerard D.; Brinkman, Fiona S. L.; Tucker, Nicholas P.; Tümmler, Burkhard; Winstanley, Craig; Levesque, Roger C.

    2015-01-01

    The International Pseudomonas aeruginosa Consortium is sequencing over 1000 genomes and building an analysis pipeline for the study of Pseudomonas genome evolution, antibiotic resistance and virulence genes. Metadata, including genomic and phenotypic data for each isolate of the collection, are available through the International Pseudomonas Consortium Database (http://ipcd.ibis.ulaval.ca/). Here, we present our strategy and the results that emerged from the analysis of the first 389 genomes. With as yet unmatched resolution, our results confirm that P. aeruginosa strains can be divided into three major groups that are further divided into subgroups, some not previously reported in the literature. We also provide the first snapshot of P. aeruginosa strain diversity with respect to antibiotic resistance. Our approach will allow us to draw potential links between environmental strains and those implicated in human and animal infections, understand how patients become infected and how the infection evolves over time as well as identify prognostic markers for better evidence-based decisions on patient care. PMID:26483767

  10. Centrifugal partition chromatography: A preparative tool for isolation and purification of xylindein from Chlorociboria aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Boonloed, Anukul; Weber, Genevieve L; Ramzy, Kelly M; Dias, Veronica R; Remcho, Vincent T

    2016-12-23

    A centrifugal partition chromatography (CPC) method was developed for the preparative-scale isolation and purification of xylindein from the wood-staining fungi, Chlorociboria aeruginosa. Xylindein, a blue-green pigment naturally secreted from the hyphae and fruiting bodies of the fungus, has great value in the decorative wood industry and textile coloration. Xylindein has great potential for use as a fluorescent labeling agent as well as in organic semiconductor applications. However, a primary limitation of xylindein is its poor solubility in most common HPLC solvents. Consequently, it is arduous to purify using preparative liquid chromatography or solid-phase extraction (SPE). Support-free, liquid-liquid chromatographic methods, including CPC, where solutes are separated based on their different distribution coefficients (KD) between two immiscible solvent systems, are promising alternatives for the purification of the compound on a preparative scale. In this work, a new biphasic solvent system suitable for CPC separation of xylindein was developed. Various groups of solvents were assessed for their suitability as xylindein extractants. A new solvent system suitable for CPC separation of xylindein, composed of heptane/THF/MEK/acetonitrile/acetic acid/water, was developed. This solvent system yielded a KD value for xylindein of 1.54±0.04, as determined by HPLC (n=3). The compositions of the upper phase and lower phase of the solvent system were determined by Heteronuclear Single Quantum Correlation (HSQC) NMR and proton NMR. A CPC system, equipped with a fraction collector, was used for the isolation of xylindein from crude extracts. The xylindein fractions isolated by the CPC were then analyzed using HPLC and presented as a fractogram. Based on the CPC fractogram, the purified xylindein fractions were achieved after 30min CPC separation time, yielding 71% extraction efficiency. The developed CPC method allowed for isolation of this naturally sourced xylindein

  11. Common antimicrobial resistance patterns, biotypes and serotypes found among Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from patient's stools and drinking water sources in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Shehabi, A A; Masoud, H; Maslamani, F A Balkam

    2005-04-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa was isolated in low rates from stool specimens of outpatients and inpatients (7% versus 12%) but in higher rates from chlorinated and nonchlorinated water sources (15% versus 44%), respectively in Jordan. The same biotype was recognized among 90% of P. aeruginosa isolates from patient's stools and water sources using specific biochemical profiles. Three serogroups belonging to 01, 06 and 011 accounted for the majority of these isolates in water (66%) and stools (78%), respectively. All P. aeruginosa isolates from water were highly susceptible (87%-100%) to piperacillin-tazobactam, amikacin, gentamicin, imipenem, aztreonam, ceftazidime and ciprofloxacin, whereas the isolates from stool were slightly less susceptible (81%-98%) to these antimicrobials. P. aeruginosa isolates from water and stool sources were almost equally highly resistant to tetracycline (86%-89%) and carbenicillin (88%-89%), respectively. One common small plasmid (15.4 kb) was detected in 14/25 (56%) of multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa isolates from both water and stool. This study demonstrates certain common epidemiological characteristics including antimicrobial resistance pattern, biotypes and serotypes among P. aeruginosa isolates from patient's stools and drinking water sources in Jordan.

  12. Environmental Pseudomonads Inhibit Cystic Fibrosis Patient-Derived Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Payel; Davis, Elizabeth; Yu, Fengan; James, Sarah; Wildschutte, Julia H; Wiegmann, Daniel D; Sherman, David H; McKay, Robert M; LiPuma, John J; Wildschutte, Hans

    2017-01-15

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen which is evolving resistance to many currently used antibiotics. While much research has been devoted to the roles of pathogenic P. aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, less is known of its ecological properties. P. aeruginosa dominates the lungs during chronic infection in CF patients, yet its abundance in some environments is less than that of other diverse groups of pseudomonads. Here, we sought to determine if clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa are vulnerable to environmental pseudomonads that dominate soil and water habitats in one-to-one competitions which may provide a source of inhibitory factors. We isolated a total of 330 pseudomonads from diverse habitats of soil and freshwater ecosystems and competed these strains against one another to determine their capacity for antagonistic activity. Over 900 individual inhibitory events were observed. Extending the analysis to P. aeruginosa isolates revealed that clinical isolates, including ones with increased alginate production, were susceptible to competition by multiple environmental strains. We performed transposon mutagenesis on one isolate and identified an ∼14.8-kb locus involved in antagonistic activity. Only two other environmental isolates were observed to carry the locus, suggesting the presence of additional unique compounds or interactions among other isolates involved in outcompeting P. aeruginosa This collection of strains represents a source of compounds that are active against multiple pathogenic strains. With the evolution of resistance of P. aeruginosa to currently used antibiotics, these environmental strains provide opportunities for novel compound discovery against drug-resistant clinical strains.

  13. [Detection of metallo-beta-lactamase in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from hospitalized patients in Goiânia, State of Goiás].

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Diana Christina Pereira Santos; Lima, Ana Beatriz Mori; Leão, Lara Stefania Netto de Oliveira; Filho, José Rodrigues do Carmo; Pimenta, Fabiana Cristina; Vieira, José Daniel Gonçalves

    2009-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a bacterium frequently isolated from hospital environments. This study had the aims of evaluating the susceptibility profile of Pseudomonas aeruginosa previously isolated from patients in a hospital in Goiânia (Goiás, Brazil), performing phenotypic screening for metallo-beta-lactamase production and detecting its genes using the polymerase chain reaction technique. Seventy-five 75 Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates were evaluated between January 2005 and January 2007. Biochemical identification was performed using the API 20E system and an antibiogram was produced using the Kirby-Bauer method. Among the 62 isolates that were resistant to imipenem and ceftazidime, 35 (56.4%) produced metallo-beta-lactamase, while 26 (74.3%) showed the bla(SPM-1) gene. The frequency of Pseudomonas aeruginosa that produces metallo-beta-lactamase suggests that greater control over the dissemination of resistance in hospital environments is needed.

  14. Isolation and characterization of a bacteriophage specific for the lipopolysaccharide of rough derivatives of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PAO.

    PubMed Central

    Jarrell, K F; Kropinski, A M

    1981-01-01

    A lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-defective (rough) mutant of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO was isolated by selection for resistance to the LPS-specific phage E79. The LPS of this mutant, AK-1012, lacked the O-antigenic side chain-specific amino sugar fucosamine as well as the core-specific sugars glucose and rhamnose. Using this strain, we isolated and characterized a phage, phi PLS27, which is specifically inactivated upon incubation with LPS extracted from rough mutants of P. aeruginosa PAO. phi PLS27 was found to be a Bradley type C phage and was very similar to coliphage T7 in a number of properties, including size, buoyant density, mass, and the number of structural proteins. Images PMID:6787214

  15. Biosurfactant-producing bacterium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa MA01 isolated from spoiled apples: physicochemical and structural characteristics of isolated biosurfactant.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Habib; Hamedi, Mir Manochehr; Lotfabad, Tayebe Bagheri; Zahiri, Hossein Shahbani; Sharafi, Hakimeh; Masoomi, Fatemeh; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar; Ortiz, Antonio; Amanlou, Massoud; Noghabi, Kambiz Akbari

    2012-02-01

    An extensive investigation was conducted to isolate indigenous bacterial strains with outstanding performance for biosurfactant production from different types of spoiled fruits, food-related products and food processing industries. An isolate was selected from 800 by the highest biosurfactant yield in soybean oil medium and it was identified by 16S rRNA and the two most relevant hypervariable regions of this gene; V3 and V6 as Pseudomonas aeruginosa MA01. The isolate was able to produce 12 g/l of a glycolipid-type biosurfactant and generally less efficient to emulsify vegetable oils compared to hydrocarbons and could emulsify corn and coconut oils more than 50%. However, emulsification index (E(24)) of different hydrocarbons including hexane, toluene, xylene, brake oil, kerosene and hexadecane was between 55.8% and 100%. The surface tension of pure water decreased gradually with increasing biosurfactant concentration to 32.5 mNm(-1) with critical micelle concentration (CMC) value of 10.1mg/l. Among all carbon substrates examined, vegetable oils were the most effective on biosurfactant production. Two glycolipid fractions were purified from the biosurfactant crude extracts, and FTIR and ES-MS were used to determine the structure of these compounds. The analysis indicated the presence of three major monorhamnolipid species: R(1)C(10)C(10), R(1)C(10)C(12:1), and R(1)C(10)C(12); as well as another three major dirhamnolipid species: R(2)C(10)C(10), R(2)C(10)C(12:1), and R(2)C(10)C(12). The strain sweep experiment for measuring the linear viscoelastic of biosurfactant showed that typical behavior characteristics of a weak viscoelastic gel, with storage modulus greater than loss modulus at all frequencies examined, both showing some frequency dependence.

  16. Antimicrobial susceptibility and minimal inhibitory concentration of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from septic ocular surface disease in different animal species

    PubMed Central

    Leigue, L.; Montiani-Ferreira, F.; Moore, B.A.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antibiotic susceptibility profile of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from different animal species with septic ocular surface disease. Sixteen strains of P. aeruginosa were isolated from different species of animals (dog, cat, horse, penguin and brown bear) with ocular surface diseases such as conjunctivitis, keratocojnuctivits sicca and ulcerative keratitis. These isolates were tested against 11 different antimicrobials agents using the Kirby-Bauer disk-diffusion method. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined using E-tests for two antibiotics (tobramycin and ciprofloxacin) commonly used in veterinary ophthalmology practice. Imipenem was the most effective antibiotic, with 100% of the strains being susceptible, followed by amikacin (87.5%), gentamicin, norfloxacin, gatifloxacin and polymyxin (both with 81.5%of susceptibility). MIC90 of ciprofloxacin was 2 µg/ml and the values found ranged from 0.094 µg/ml to 32 µg/ml. For tobramycin, MIC90 was 32 µg/ml and ranged from 0.25 µg/ml to 256 µg/ml. The most effective in vitro antibiotic tested against P. aeruginosa in this study was imipenem, followed by amikacin. The 3 mg/ml eye drops commercially available ciprofloxacin presentations were in vitro effective against all strains tested in this study if applied up to 4 hours after instillation. Whereas for tobramycin the 3 mg/ml eye drops commercial presentations were not in vitro effective against some strains isolated in this study. Thus for ocular infections with P. aeruginosa when using tobramycin the ideal recommendation would be to either use eye drops with higher concentrations or decrease the frequency intervals from four to a minimum of every two hours. PMID:27928519

  17. Whole-Genome Sequence of Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain BAMCPA07-48, Isolated from a Combat Injury Wound

    PubMed Central

    Sanjar, Fatemeh; Karna, S. L. Rajasekhar; Chen, Tsute; Chen, Ping; Abercrombie, Johnathan J.

    2016-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain BAMCPA07-48, isolated from a combat injury wound. The closed genome sequence of this isolate is a valuable resource for pathogenome characterization of P. aeruginosa associated with wounds, which will aid in the development of a higher-resolution phylogenomic framework for molecular-guided pathogen-surveillance. PMID:27389262

  18. Glutathione-Disrupted Biofilms of Clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strains Exhibit an Enhanced Antibiotic Effect and a Novel Biofilm Transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Das, Theerthankar; Ibugo, Amaye; Buckle, Edwina; Manefield, Mike; Manos, Jim

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections result in high morbidity and mortality rates for individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF), with premature death often occurring. These infections are complicated by the formation of biofilms in the sputum. Antibiotic therapy is stymied by antibiotic resistance of the biofilm matrix, making novel antibiofilm strategies highly desirable. Within P. aeruginosa biofilms, the redox factor pyocyanin enhances biofilm integrity by intercalating with extracellular DNA. The antioxidant glutathione (GSH) reacts with pyocyanin, disrupting intercalation. This study investigated GSH disruption by assaying the physiological effects of GSH and DNase I on biofilms of clinical CF isolates grown in CF artificial sputum medium (ASMDM+). Confocal scanning laser microscopy showed that 2 mM GSH, alone or combined with DNase I, significantly disrupted immature (24-h) biofilms of Australian epidemic strain (AES) isogens AES-1R and AES-1M. GSH alone greatly disrupted mature (72-h) AES-1R biofilms, resulting in significant differential expression of 587 genes, as indicated by RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis. Upregulated systems included cyclic diguanylate and pyoverdine biosynthesis, the type VI secretion system, nitrate metabolism, and translational machinery. Biofilm disruption with GSH revealed a cellular physiology distinct from those of mature and dispersed biofilms. RNA-seq results were validated by biochemical and quantitative PCR assays. Biofilms of a range of CF isolates disrupted with GSH and DNase I were significantly more susceptible to ciprofloxacin, and increased antibiotic effectiveness was achieved by increasing the GSH concentration. This study demonstrated that GSH, alone or with DNase I, represents an effective antibiofilm treatment when combined with appropriate antibiotics, pending in vivo studies. PMID:27161630

  19. Isolation and engineering of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa for enhanced cadmium bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Junli; Liu, Zhaobing; Li, Shiyu; Xu, Bo; Gong, Yahui; Yang, Yan; Sun, Hanxiao

    2016-11-25

    Although many bacteria are tolerant to heavy metals and play important roles in the immobilization of heavy metals, they cannot always be dependably reproduced under field conditions. In this work, a cadmium (Cd)-resistant bacterium was isolated from a Cd-contaminated oil field and identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pse-w). We then determined various plant growth promoting features such as the solubilization of phosphate, and the production of indole-3-acetic acid and siderophores. Lastly, we engineered the strain Pse-w-MT by targeting metallothioneins to the cell surface of Pse-w to immobilize Cd(2+) and promote plant growth. Our data revealed that Pse-w exhibited high levels of resistance to Cd(2+) (4 mM) and showed various plant growth promoting features. The engineered strain Pse-w-MT was found to adsorb Cd(2+) mainly via extracellular deposition, and had an enhanced ability for immobilizing Cd(2+) ions from the external media. Furthermore, the inoculation of Cd-polluted soil with Pse-w-MT significantly elevated the shoot and root biomass and leaf chlorophyll content. Similarly, plants inoculated with Pse-w-MT demonstrated markedly lower Cd(2+) accumulation in the root and shoot system. It was concluded that plant growth promoting rhizobacteria with a high Cd(2+) tolerance was an ideal candidate to be engineered for bioremediation and plant growth promotion against Cd-induced stress.

  20. Isolation of dicarboxylic acid- and glucose-binding proteins from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Stinson, M W; Cohen, M A; Merrick, J M

    1976-01-01

    Inducible binding proteins for C4-dicarboxylic acids (DBP) and glucose (GBP) were isolated from Pseudomonas aeruginosa by extraction of exponential-phase cells with 0.2 M MgC12 (pH 8.5) and by an osmotic shock procedure without affecting cell viability. DBP synthesis was induced by growth on aspartate, alpha-ketoglutarate, succinate, fumarate, malate, and malonate but not by growth on acetate, citrate, pyruvate, or glucose. Binding of succinate by DBP was competitively inhibited by 10-fold concentrations of fumarate and malate but not by a variety of related substances. GBP synthesis and transport of methyl alpha-glucoside by whole cells were induced by growth on glucose or pyruvate plus galactose, 2-deoxyglucose, or methyl alpha-glucoside but not by growth on gluconate, succinate, acetate, or pyruvate. The binding of radioactive glucose by GBP was significantly inhibited by 10-fold concentrations of glucose, galactose, and glucose-1-phosphate but not by the other carbohydrates tested. The binding of glucose by GBP or succinate by DBP did not result in any chemical alteration of the substrates. PMID:824281

  1. Enhancement of Rhamnolipid Production in Residual Soybean Oil by an Isolated Strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lima, C. J. B.; França, F. P.; Sérvulo, E. F. C.; Resende, M. M.; Cardoso, V. L.

    In the present work, the production of rhamnolipid from residual soybean oil (RSO) from food frying facilities was studied using a strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa of contaminated lagoon, isolated from a hydrocarbon contaminated soil. The optimization of RSO, amonium nitrate, and brewery residual yeast concentrations was accomplished by a central composite experimental design and surface response analysis. The experiments were performed in 500-mL Erlenmeyer flasks containing 50mL of mineral medium, at 170 rpm and 30±1°C, for a 48-h fermentation period. Rhamnolipid production has been monitored by measurements of surface tension, rhamnose concentration, and emulsifying activity. The best-planned results, located on the central point, have corresponded to 22g/L of RSO, 5.625 g/ L of NH4NO3' and 11.5 g/L of brewery yeast. At the maximum point the values for rhamnose and emulsifying index were 2.2g/L and 100%, respectively.

  2. Evaluation of the In Vitro Activity of Ceftazidime-Avibactam and Ceftolozane-Tazobactam against Meropenem-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Buehrle, Deanna J.; Shields, Ryan K.; Chen, Liang; Hao, Binghua; Press, Ellen G.; Alkrouk, Ammar; Potoski, Brian A.; Kreiswirth, Barry N.; Nguyen, M. Hong

    2016-01-01

    We compared ceftazidime-avibactam, ceftolozane-tazobactam, ceftazidime, cefepime, and piperacillin-tazobactam MICs for 38 meropenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates. No isolates harbored carbapenemases; 74% were oprD mutants. Ceftazidime-avibactam and ceftolozane-tazobactam were active against 92% of the isolates, including 80% that were resistant to all three β-lactams. Forty-three percent of ceftazidime-avibactam-susceptible isolates and 6% of ceftolozane-tazobactam-susceptible isolates exhibited MICs at the respective breakpoints. Ceftolozane-tazobactam and ceftazidime-avibactam are therapeutic options for meropenem-resistant P. aeruginosa infections that should be used judiciously to preserve activity. PMID:26976862

  3. Alterations of OprD in Carbapenem-Intermediate and -Susceptible Strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated from Patients with Bacteremia in a Spanish Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Cabot, Gabriel; Rodríguez, Cristina; Roman, Elena; Tubau, Fe; Macia, María D.; Moya, Bartolomé; Zamorano, Laura; Suárez, Cristina; Peña, Carmen; Domínguez, María A.; Moncalián, Gabriel; Oliver, Antonio; Martínez-Martínez, Luis

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the presence of OprD mutations in 60 strains of metallo-ß-lactamase-negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa intermediately susceptible (IS [n = 12]; MIC = 8 μg/ml) or susceptible (S [n = 48]; MICs ≤ 1 to 4 μg/ml) to imipenem and/or meropenem that were isolated from patients with bacteremia in order to evaluate their impact on carbapenem susceptibility profiles. The presence of mutations in oprD was detected by sequencing analysis. OprD expression was assessed by both outer membrane protein (OMP) analysis and real-time PCR (RT-PCR). Fourteen (23%) isolates had an OprD identical to that of PAO1, and OprD modifications were detected in 46 isolates (77%). Isolates were classified as OprD “full-length types” (T1 [n = 40, including both wild-type OprD and variants showing several polymorphisms]) and OprD “deficient types” (T2 [n = 3 for OprD frameshift mutations] and T3 [n = 17 for premature stop codons in oprD]). RT-PCR showed that 5 OprD type T1 isolates presented reduced transcription of oprD (0.1- to 0.4-fold compared to PAO1), while oprD levels increased more than 2-fold over that seen with PAO1 in 4 OprD type T1 isolates. A total of 50% of the isolates belonging to OprD “deficient types” were susceptible to both carbapenems, and 40% were susceptible to meropenem and intermediately susceptible to imipenem. Only one isolate (5%) within this group was intermediately susceptible to both carbapenems, and one (5%) was susceptible to imipenem and intermediately susceptible to meropenem. We concluded that OprD inactivating mutations in clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa are not restricted only to carbapenem-resistant isolates but are also found in isolates with imipenem or meropenem MICs of only 0.06 to 4 μg/ml. PMID:22290967

  4. Characterization of exo-s, exo-u, and alg virulence factors and antimicrobial resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from migratory Egyptian vultures from India.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Pradeep; Faridi, Farah; Mir, Irfan A; Sharma, Sandeep K

    2014-01-01

    This study of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in fecal droppings of migratory Egyptian vultures (Neophron p. percnopterus) revealed eight positive samples (n=25) by a 16S rRNA gene-based PCR in two consecutive winter seasons. Disk diffusion sensitivity testing revealed three multiple antimicrobial resistant (MAR) isolates. Genotypic characterization showed mutually exclusive exo-s and exo-u virulence genes in five and three isolates, respectively, while the alg gene was present in all of the isolates. MAR isolates with virulence genes were detected in both seasons. The Egyptian vultures could potentially be vectors of pathogenic and MAR P. aeruginosa, thereby affecting regional control and preventive measures.

  5. Detection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from clinical and environmental samples by amplification of the exotoxin A gene using PCR.

    PubMed Central

    Khan, A A; Cerniglia, C E

    1994-01-01

    PCR was used to detect Pseudomonas aeruginosa from water samples by amplifying a 396-bp region of the exotoxin A (ETA) structural gene sequence. The identify of the amplified 396-bp fragment was confirmed by digesting it with PvuI restriction endonuclease, which produced the predicted 246- and 150-bp fragments. Specific primers amplified ETA-positive P. aeruginosa DNA, whereas other species of Pseudomonas and GC-rich bacteria did not yield any 396-bp fragment. The specificity and sensitivity of the assay were 100 and 96%, respectively, which confirms the assay's reliability for diagnostic and epidemiological studies. The assay can detect as few as 5 to 10 cells in a 10-ml water sample or 0.1 pg of P. aeruginosa DNA per reaction mixture (5 microliters) by ethidium bromide staining of an agarose gel. Ten-times-lower concentrations were detected by hybridization with a digoxigenin-labeled oligonucleotide probe internal to the PCR product. With this PCR method, ETA-positive P. aeruginosa was detected in animal cage water samples at a level of 40 cells per ml. This method is rapid and less cumbersome than other diagnostic methods for the identification of P. aeruginosa strains. The method described can be used to detect a low level of P. aeruginosa from environmental and clinical samples without the use of selective media or additional biochemical tests. Images PMID:7986047

  6. Isolation and Characterization of a Cyanophage Infecting the Toxic Cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Takashi; Takashima, Yukari; Tomaru, Yuji; Shirai, Yoko; Takao, Yoshitake; Hiroishi, Shingo; Nagasaki, Keizo

    2006-01-01

    We isolated a cyanophage (Ma-LMM01) that specifically infects a toxic strain of the bloom-forming cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa. Transmission electron microscopy showed that the virion is composed of anisometric head and a tail complex consisting of a central tube and a contractile sheath with helical symmetry. The morphological features and the host specificity suggest that Ma-LMM01 is a member of the cyanomyovirus group. Using semi-one-step growth experiments, the latent period and burst size were estimated to be 6 to 12 h and 50 to 120 infectious units per cell, respectively. The size of the phage genome was estimated to be ca. 160 kbp using pulse-field gel electrophoresis; the nucleic acid was sensitive to DNase I, Bal31, and all 14 restriction enzymes tested, suggesting that it is a linear double-stranded DNA having a low level of methylation. Phylogenetic analyses based on the deduced amino acid sequences of two open reading frames coding for ribonucleotide reductase alpha- and beta-subunits showed that Ma-LMM01 forms a sister group with marine and freshwater cyanobacteria and is apparently distinct from T4-like phages. Phylogenetic analysis of the deduced amino acid sequence of the putative sheath protein showed that Ma-LMM01 does not form a monophyletic group with either the T4-like phages or prophages, suggesting that Ma-LMM01 is distinct from other T4-like phages that have been described despite morphological similarity. The host-phage system which we studied is expected to contribute to our understanding of the ecology of Microcystis blooms and the genetics of cyanophages, and our results suggest the phages could be used to control toxic cyanobacterial blooms. PMID:16461672

  7. Epinecidin-1 Has Immunomodulatory Effects, Facilitating Its Therapeutic Use in a Mouse Model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Chieh-Yu; Chen, Jian-Chyi; Sheen, Jenn-Feng; Lin, Tai-Lang

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are garnering attention as possible alternatives to antibiotics. Here, we describe the antimicrobial properties of epinecidin-1 against a multidrug-resistant clinical isolate of P. aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa R) and a P. aeruginosa strain from ATCC (P. aeruginosa ATCC 19660) in vivo. The MICs of epinecidin-1 against P. aeruginosa R and P. aeruginosa ATCC 19660 were determined and compared with those of imipenem. Epinecidin-1 was found to be highly effective at combating peritonitis infection caused by P. aeruginosa R or P. aeruginosa ATCC 19660 in mouse models, without inducing adverse behavioral effects or liver or kidney toxicity. Taken together, our results indicate that epinecidin-1 enhances the rate of survival of mice infected with the bacterial pathogen P. aeruginosa through both antimicrobial and immunomodulatory effects. PMID:24820078

  8. Large-insert genome analysis technology detects structural variation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical strains from cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Hayden, Hillary S; Gillett, Will; Saenphimmachak, Channakhone; Lim, Regina; Zhou, Yang; Jacobs, Michael A; Chang, Jean; Rohmer, Laurence; D'Argenio, David A; Palmieri, Anthony; Levy, Ruth; Haugen, Eric; Wong, Gane K S; Brittnacher, Mitch J; Burns, Jane L; Miller, Samuel I; Olson, Maynard V; Kaul, Rajinder

    2008-06-01

    Large-insert genome analysis (LIGAN) is a broadly applicable, high-throughput technology designed to characterize genome-scale structural variation. Fosmid paired-end sequences and DNA fingerprints from a query genome are compared to a reference sequence using the Genomic Variation Analysis (GenVal) suite of software tools to pinpoint locations of insertions, deletions, and rearrangements. Fosmids spanning regions that contain new structural variants can then be sequenced. Clonal pairs of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from four cystic fibrosis patients were used to validate the LIGAN technology. Approximately 1.5 Mb of inserted sequences were identified, including 743 kb containing 615 ORFs that are absent from published P. aeruginosa genomes. Six rearrangement breakpoints and 220 kb of deleted sequences were also identified. Our study expands the "genome universe" of P. aeruginosa and validates a technology that complements emerging, short-read sequencing methods that are better suited to characterizing single-nucleotide polymorphisms than structural variation.

  9. Post-antibiotic effect of orbifloxacin against Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from dogs.

    PubMed

    Harada, Kazuki; Shimizu, Takae; Kataoka, Yasushi; Takahashi, Toshio

    2012-03-20

    Orbifloxacin is a fluoroquinolone drug used widely in companion animal medicine. In this study, we firstly determined post-antibiotic effects (PAEs) and post-antibiotic sub-minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) effects (PA-SMEs) of orbifloxacin for two strains each of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa from dogs, and these parameters were compared with those of enrofloxacin. At twice the MIC, the PAEs of orbifloxacin ranged from -0.28-0.93 h (mean, 0.29 h) for E. coli and -0.18-1.18 h (mean, 0.37 h) for P. aeruginosa. These parameters were not significantly different for E. coli and shorter for P. aeruginosa, compared to enrofloxacin (P < 0.05). Continued exposure to 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3 the MIC of orbifloxacin resulted in average PA-SMEs of 0.55, 1.11, and 2.03 h, respectively, for E. coli, and 1.04, 1.40, and 2.47 h, respectively, for P. aeruginosa. These PA-SMEs, which had no significant differences with those of enrofloxacin, were significantly longer than the corresponding PAEs (P < 0.05). These results suggest that the PA-SME of orbifloxacin for E. coli and P. aeruginosa can be meaningfully prolonged by increase of sub-MICs.

  10. Molecular detection of metallo-β-lactamase gene blaVIM-1 in imipenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated from hospitalized patients in the hospitals of Isfahan

    PubMed Central

    Sedighi, Mansour; Vaez, Hamid; Moghoofeie, Mohsen; Hadifar, Shima; Oryan, Golfam; Faghri, Jamshid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen that causes serious problems, especially in people, who have immunodeficiency. In recent times, metallo-β-lactamase (MBLs) resistance in this bacterium has led to some difficulties in treating bacterial infections. The metallo-beta-lactamase family of genes, including blaVIM-1, is being reported with increasing frequency worldwide. The aim of this study is the detection of the metallo-β-lactamase gene blaVIM-1 in imipenem-resistant P. aeruginosa (IRPA) strains isolated from hospitalized patients. Materials and Methods: In this study, 106 P. aeruginosa samples were isolated from various nosocomial infections. The isolates were identified, tested for susceptibility to various antimicrobial agents by the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method, and all the imipenem-resistant isolates were screened for the presence of MBLs by using the combined disk (IMP-EDTA). The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of imipenem was determined by E-test on the Mueller-Hinton agar. To detect the blaVIM-1 gene, the isolates were subjected to a polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results: Of all the P. aeruginosa isolates, 62 (58.5%) were found to be imipenem-resistant P. aeruginosa (MIC ≥32 μg/ml). Twenty-six (42%) of the imipenem-resistant isolates were MBL positive. None of these isolates carried the blaVIM-1 gene using the PCR assay. Conclusion: The results demonstrated the serious therapeutic threat of the MBL-producing P. aeruginosa populations. The rate of imipenem resistance due to MBL was increased dramatically. Early detection and infection-control practices are the best antimicrobial strategies for this organism. None of MBL-producing isolates in this study carry the blaVIM-1 gene; therefore, another gene in the MBL family should be investigated. PMID:25802826

  11. Characterization of the Newly Isolated Lytic Bacteriophages KTN6 and KT28 and Their Efficacy against Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm.

    PubMed

    Danis-Wlodarczyk, Katarzyna; Olszak, Tomasz; Arabski, Michal; Wasik, Slawomir; Majkowska-Skrobek, Grazyna; Augustyniak, Daria; Gula, Grzegorz; Briers, Yves; Jang, Ho Bin; Vandenheuvel, Dieter; Duda, Katarzyna Anna; Lavigne, Rob; Drulis-Kawa, Zuzanna

    2015-01-01

    We here describe two novel lytic phages, KT28 and KTN6, infecting Pseudomonas aeruginosa, isolated from a sewage sample from an irrigated field near Wroclaw, in Poland. Both viruses show characteristic features of Pbunalikevirus genus within the Myoviridae family with respect to shape and size of head/tail, as well as LPS host receptor recognition. Genome analysis confirmed the similarity to other PB1-related phages, ranging between 48 and 96%. Pseudomonas phage KT28 has a genome size of 66,381 bp and KTN6 of 65,994 bp. The latent period, burst size, stability and host range was determined for both viruses under standard laboratory conditions. Biofilm eradication efficacy was tested on peg-lid plate assay and PET membrane surface. Significant reduction of colony forming units was observed (70-90%) in 24 h to 72 h old Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 biofilm cultures for both phages. Furthermore, a pyocyanin and pyoverdin reduction tests reveal that tested phages lowers the amount of both secreted dyes in 48-72 h old biofilms. Diffusion and goniometry experiments revealed the increase of diffusion rate through the biofilm matrix after phage application. These characteristics indicate these phages could be used to prevent Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections and biofilm formation. It was also shown, that PB1-related phage treatment of biofilm caused the emergence of stable phage-resistant mutants growing as small colony variants.

  12. Removal of toxic Co-EDTA complex by a halophilic solar-salt-pan isolate Pseudomonas aeruginosa SPB-1.

    PubMed

    Paraneeiswaran, A; Shukla, Sudhir K; Subba Rao, T; Prashanth, K

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a promising bioremediation approach was developed to remove [Co(III)-EDTA](-) complex that is generated during the waste management process. Though several studies have been reported on bioremediation of cobalt, the removal of [Co(III)-EDTA](-) complex has not been tested. A [Co(III)-EDTA](-) resistant bacterium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa SPB-1 was isolated from the solar-salt-pan and physical parameters were optimized for its growth. The various studies showed that the removal of [Co(III)-EDTA](-) from the bulk liquid was due to the adsorption of the complex by the biomass. Using absorption/desorption isotherm over a range of pH (1-8), the maximum adsorption of [Co(III)-EDTA](-) was found to be at pH 7.0 and maximum desorption from the biomass occurred at pH 1.0, thus rendering an ion exchange property to P. aeruginosa SPB-1 biomass. P. aeruginosa SPB-1 biomass could be used as bio-resin that showed 80.4±3.27% adsorption capacity up to fourth cycle and the biomass was viable till the ninth cycle with 10.5±7.3% adsorption. Radiation tolerance potential i.e. D10 value for the strain was found to be ~300 Gy, which suggests the potential use of the bacterium in bioremediation of moderately active nuclear waste.

  13. Characterization of the Newly Isolated Lytic Bacteriophages KTN6 and KT28 and Their Efficacy against Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Danis-Wlodarczyk, Katarzyna; Olszak, Tomasz; Arabski, Michal; Wasik, Slawomir; Majkowska-Skrobek, Grazyna; Augustyniak, Daria; Gula, Grzegorz; Briers, Yves; Jang, Ho Bin; Vandenheuvel, Dieter; Duda, Katarzyna Anna; Lavigne, Rob; Drulis-Kawa, Zuzanna

    2015-01-01

    We here describe two novel lytic phages, KT28 and KTN6, infecting Pseudomonas aeruginosa, isolated from a sewage sample from an irrigated field near Wroclaw, in Poland. Both viruses show characteristic features of Pbunalikevirus genus within the Myoviridae family with respect to shape and size of head/tail, as well as LPS host receptor recognition. Genome analysis confirmed the similarity to other PB1-related phages, ranging between 48 and 96%. Pseudomonas phage KT28 has a genome size of 66,381 bp and KTN6 of 65,994 bp. The latent period, burst size, stability and host range was determined for both viruses under standard laboratory conditions. Biofilm eradication efficacy was tested on peg-lid plate assay and PET membrane surface. Significant reduction of colony forming units was observed (70-90%) in 24 h to 72 h old Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 biofilm cultures for both phages. Furthermore, a pyocyanin and pyoverdin reduction tests reveal that tested phages lowers the amount of both secreted dyes in 48-72 h old biofilms. Diffusion and goniometry experiments revealed the increase of diffusion rate through the biofilm matrix after phage application. These characteristics indicate these phages could be used to prevent Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections and biofilm formation. It was also shown, that PB1-related phage treatment of biofilm caused the emergence of stable phage-resistant mutants growing as small colony variants. PMID:25996839

  14. blaVIM-2 Cassette-Containing Novel Integrons in Metallo-β-Lactamase-Producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida Isolates Disseminated in a Korean Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyungwon; Lim, Jong Back; Yum, Jong Hwa; Yong, Dongeun; Chong, Yunsop; Kim, June Myung; Livermore, David M.

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the phenotypic and genetic properties of metallo-β-lactamase-producing Pseudomonas isolates collected at a tertiary-care hospital in Korea since 1995. The prevalence of imipenem resistance among Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates reached 16% in 1997, when 9% of the resistant organisms were found to produce VIM-2 β-lactamase, a class B enzyme previously found only in P. aeruginosa isolates from Europe. VIM-2-producing isolates of Pseudomonas putida were also detected. Resistance was transferable from both these species to P. aeruginosa PAO4089Rp by filter mating, although the resistance determinant could not be found on any detectable plasmid. Serotyping showed that many of the VIM-2-producing P. aeruginosa isolates belonged to serotypes O:11 and O:12, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of XbaI-digested genomic DNA revealed that many had identical profiles, whereas the P. putida isolates were diverse. Sequencing showed that the blaVIM-2 genes resided as cassettes in class 1 integrons. In contrast to previous VIM-encoding integrons, the integron sequenced from a P. aeruginosa isolate had blaVIM located downstream of a variant of aacA4. blaVIM also lay in a class 1 integron in a representative P. putida strain, but the organization of this integron was different from that sequenced from the P. aeruginosa strain. In conclusion, the metallo-β-lactamase produced by these imipenem-resistant Pseudomonas isolates was VIM-2, and the accumulation of producers reflected clonal dissemination as well as horizontal spread. Strict measures are required in order to control a further spread of resistance. PMID:11897589

  15. Genes required for and effects of alginate overproduction induced by growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on Pseudomonas isolation agar supplemented with ammonium metavanadate.

    PubMed

    Damron, F Heath; Barbier, Mariette; McKenney, Elizabeth S; Schurr, Michael J; Goldberg, Joanna B

    2013-09-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that can adapt to changing environments and can secrete an exopolysaccharide known as alginate as a protection response, resulting in a colony morphology and phenotype referred to as mucoid. However, how P. aeruginosa senses its environment and activates alginate overproduction is not fully understood. Previously, we showed that Pseudomonas isolation agar supplemented with ammonium metavanadate (PIAAMV) induces P. aeruginosa to overproduce alginate. Vanadate is a phosphate mimic and causes protein misfolding by disruption of disulfide bonds. Here we used PIAAMV to characterize the pathways involved in inducible alginate production and tested the global effects of P. aeruginosa growth on PIAAMV by a mutant library screen, by transcriptomics, and in a murine acute virulence model. The PA14 nonredundant mutant library was screened on PIAAMV to identify new genes that are required for the inducible alginate stress response. A functionally diverse set of genes encoding products involved in cell envelope biogenesis, peptidoglycan remodeling, uptake of phosphate and iron, phenazine biosynthesis, and other processes were identified as positive regulators of the mucoid phenotype on PIAAMV. Transcriptome analysis of P. aeruginosa cultures growing in the presence of vanadate showed differential expression of genes involved in virulence, envelope biogenesis, and cell stress pathways. In this study, it was observed that growth on PIAAMV attenuates P. aeruginosa in a mouse pneumonia model. Induction of alginate overproduction occurs as a stress response to protect P. aeruginosa, but it may be possible to modulate and inhibit these pathways based on the new genes identified in this study.

  16. Difficult-to-detect carbapenem-resistant IMP13-producing P. aeruginosa: experience feedback concerning a cluster of urinary tract infections at a surgical clinic in France

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We report a carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa clone responsible for a cluster of urinary tract infections in elderly surgery patients, diagnosed during a three-month period in a 59-bed surgical clinic. Findings The clonal nature of the cluster was established by molecular study of the P. aeruginosa isolates (PFGE and MLST). Despite an MIC of imipenem in the susceptibility range for two isolates, all were metallo-β-lactamase-producers (IMP13-type, clone ST621). We conducted a review of the medical and surgical procedures. We tested water delivered into the clinic and urological devices for the presence of the epidemic strain. The hygiene nurse observed hygiene practices. A week after the implementation of barrier precautions around the fourth infected patient, we studied the extent to which the patients hospitalised were colonised to assess whether the spread of the epidemic strain had been controlled. Conclusions 1/ Our findings indicate the difficulties in the detection of the metallo-β-lactamase in this clone, that resulted in the alert being delayed. 2/ Unlike most investigations of UTI outbreaks described in urology wards, we did not detect any contaminated urological devices or water colonisation. 3/ Consistent with outbreaks involving the IMP-13 clone in critical care units, the observation of inadequate application of standard precautions argued for patient-to-patient transmission during urinary management of the urology patients. 4/ The implementation of barrier precautions around infected patients resulted in control of the spread of the epidemic clone. This report serves as an alert concerning a difficult-to-detect multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa clone in elderly urology patients. PMID:23557539

  17. Presence of exoY, exoS, exoU and exoT genes, antibiotic resistance and biofilm production among Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates in Northwest Iran.

    PubMed

    Azimi, Somayeh; Kafil, Hossein Samadi; Baghi, Hossein Bannazadeh; Shokrian, Saeed; Najaf, Khadijeh; Asgharzadeh, Mohammad; Yousefi, Mehdi; Shahrivar, Firooz; Aghazadeh, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Hintergrund:Pseudomonas aeruginosa, ein Gram-negatives Stäbchenbakterium, besitzt eine wichtige Rolle als Krankheitserreger. Daher untersuchten wir Pseudomonas aeruginosa-Isolate im Nordwestiran auf das Vorkommen von exo-Genen und Biofilmbildnern. Material und Methode: 160 P. aeruginosa-Isolate wurden biochemisch identifiziert und die Antibiotikaresistenz charakterisiert. Die Fähigkeit zur Biofilmbildung wurde im Mikrotiterplatten-Assay, das Vorkommen von exo-Genen mit Allel-spezifischer PCR (Polymerase-Kettenreaktion) analysiert. Zur statistischen Analyse wurde der Chi-Quadrat-Test eingesetzt.Ergebnisse: Als effektivste Antibiotika erwiesen sich Colistin und Polymyxin B. 87% der Isolate waren Biofilmbildner, davon 69% mit massiver Biofilmbildung. In 55% der Isolate wurden exoY, in 52% exoU, in 26,3% exoS und in 5% exoT nachgewiesen. Schlussfolgerung: Die Analyse ergab eine unterschiedliche Verteilung der exo-Gene bei klinischen Isolaten von P. aeruginosa im Nordwestiran. ExoS und exoU kamen häufiger bei nicht biofilmbildenen Isolaten, exoY häufiger bei Biofilmbildnern vor. Die Ergebnisse können ein Hinweis auf die Bedeutung von exoY bei Biofilm bildenden Pseudomonas aeruginosa-Isolaten sein.

  18. Effect of Shear Stress on Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated from the Cystic Fibrosis Lung

    PubMed Central

    Dingemans, Jozef; Monsieurs, Pieter; Yu, Sung-Huan; Crabbé, Aurélie; Förstner, Konrad U.; Malfroot, Anne

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chronic colonization of the lungs by Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. To gain insights into the characteristic biofilm phenotype of P. aeruginosa in the CF lungs, mimicking the CF lung environment is critical. We previously showed that growth of the non-CF-adapted P. aeruginosa PAO1 strain in a rotating wall vessel, a device that simulates the low fluid shear (LS) conditions present in the CF lung, leads to the formation of in-suspension, self-aggregating biofilms. In the present study, we determined the phenotypic and transcriptomic changes associated with the growth of a highly adapted, transmissible P. aeruginosa CF strain in artificial sputum medium under LS conditions. Robust self-aggregating biofilms were observed only under LS conditions. Growth under LS conditions resulted in the upregulation of genes involved in stress response, alginate biosynthesis, denitrification, glycine betaine biosynthesis, glycerol metabolism, and cell shape maintenance, while genes involved in phenazine biosynthesis, type VI secretion, and multidrug efflux were downregulated. In addition, a number of small RNAs appeared to be involved in the response to shear stress. Finally, quorum sensing was found to be slightly but significantly affected by shear stress, resulting in higher production of autoinducer molecules during growth under high fluid shear (HS) conditions. In summary, our study revealed a way to modulate the behavior of a highly adapted P. aeruginosa CF strain by means of introducing shear stress, driving it from a biofilm lifestyle to a more planktonic lifestyle. PMID:27486191

  19. Predominance of carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates carrying blaIMP and blaVIM metallo-β-lactamases in a major hospital in Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Toval, Francisco; Guzmán-Marte, Anel; Madriz, Vivian; Somogyi, Teresita; Rodríguez, César; García, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the molecular basis of the resistance to carbapenems in clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa recovered from a tertiary-level health facility in San José, Costa Rica. A total of 198 non-duplicated isolates were evaluated for their susceptibility to β-lactams, aminoglycosides and fluoroquinolones. The production of metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs), the presence of MBL encoding genes (blaIMP, blaVIM and blaGIM-1) and the occurrence of these genes within class 1 integrons were investigated. In addition, an ERIC2 PCR fingerprinting method was used to elucidate the distribution of the detected MBL genes within the strain collection. Of the 198 isolates tested, 125 (63.1 %) were categorized as carbapenem-resistant. The majority (88.8 %) of the carbapemen-resistant isolates also showed resistance to ceftazidime, cefepime, aztreonam, ticarcillin/clavulanic acid, amikacin, gentamicin, tobramycin, ciprofloxacin and gatifloxacin. Among the carbapenem-resistant isolates, 102 (81.6 %) showed MBL activity. Strikingly, both blaIMP and blaVIM genes were simultaneously detected in most (94.1 %) of the 102 MBL producers. Five carbapenem-resistant MBL producers were positive only for blaIMP genes. Almost 70 % of the isolates examined harboured the intI1 gene, accompanied by the sul1 and qacEΔ1 genes in 136 (99 %) and 122 (89 %) isolates, respectively. The majority (94.4 %) of the carbapenem-resistant isolates carried the intI1 gene, in contrast to 26 % of the carbapenem-susceptible isolates. Ninety-three out of 96 (96.9 %) isolates carrying both blaIMP and blaVIM genes also harboured the intI1, sul1 and qacEΔ1 genes. Gene cassettes from carbapenem-susceptible and MBL-negative carbapenem-resistant isolates encoded aminoglycoside-resistance enzymes (aadA2, aadA4 and aadA6) as well as orfD and qacF genes. RAPD analysis distributed 126 of the isolates in 29 clusters. Eighty of the 90 blaIMP (+) blaVIM (+) isolates were sorted into 16

  20. Unraveling genomic and phenotypic nature of multidrug-resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa VRFPA04 isolated from keratitis patient.

    PubMed

    N, Murugan; J, Malathi; V, Umashankar; H N, Madhavan

    2016-12-01

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa VRFPA04, obtained from a keratitis patient was found to exhibit resistance to betalactam (Penicillins, cephalosporins, including carbapenems, except aztreonam), aminoglycosides, quinolone group of drugs and susceptible to colistin. The complete genome sequencing of the ocular isolate to measure and ascertain the degree of multidrug resistance in VRFPA04 strain resulted in 6,818,030bp (6.8Mb) genome sizes, which happen to be the third largest genome available in the Genbank to date. Two chromosomally integrated class I integrons carrying blaVIM-2 carbapenemase gene, multiple secretory systems consisting of types I-VI and VIII proteins and ocular virulence factors exo-T, Y, U and exotoxin A, a gene that inhibits protein synthesis which could have caused corneal cell death and Phytohormone auxin biosynthetic protein were detected in the genome of VRFPA04 Genome. In addition, 58 Regions of Genomic Plasticity (RGPs) regions, multiple phage genomes, genomic islands, CRISPR genes and RND family efflux pumps, such as MexCD-OprJ and MexEF-OprN and its regulators, MexT and MexR, were unraveled in VRFPA04. Thus, the current study reveals the virulence factors and resistome nature of an ocular isolate P aeruginosa VRFPA04 genome.

  1. Isolation and characterization of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa from a virgin Brazilian Amazon region with potential to degrade atrazine.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Ana Flavia Tonelli; da Silva, Michelle Barbosa Partata; Martins, Vinicius Vicente; Miranda, Carlos Eduardo Saraiva; Stehling, Eliana Guedes

    2014-12-01

    The use of pesticides to increase agricultural production can result in the contamination of the environment, causing changes in the genetic structure of organisms and in the loss of biodiversity. This practice is also inducing changes in the rainforest ecosystem. In this work, a Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from a preservation soil area of the Brazilian Amazon Forest, without usage of any pesticide, was evaluated for its potential to degrade atrazine. This isolate presented all responsible genes (atzA, atzB, atzC, atzD, atzE, and atzF) for atrazine mineralization and demonstrated capacity to use atrazine as a nitrogen source, having achieved a reduction of 44 % of the initial concentration of atrazine after 24 h. These results confirm gene dispersion and/or a possible contamination of the area with the herbicide, which reinforces global concern of the increase and intensive use of pesticides worldwide.

  2. Characterization of stress-responsive behavior in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO: isolation of Tn3-lacZYA fusions with novel damage-inducible (din) promoters.

    PubMed

    Warner-Bartnicki, A L; Miller, R V

    1992-03-01

    Although the pervasive soil and water microorganism Pseudomonas aeruginosa demonstrates heightened sensitivity to UV radiation, this species possesses a recA gene that, based on structural and functional properties, could mediate a DNA damage-responsive regulon similar to the SOS regulon of Escherichia coli. To determine whether P. aeruginosa encodes such stress-inducible genes, the response of P. aeruginosa to DNA-damaging agents including far-UV radiation (UVC) and the quinolone antimicrobial agent norfloxacin was investigated by monitoring the expression of fusions linking P. aeruginosa promoters to a beta-galactosidase reporter gene. These fusions were obtained by Tn3-HoHoI insertional mutagenesis of a P. aeruginosa genomic library. Eight different damage-inducible (din) gene fusions were isolated which lack homology to the P. aeruginosa recA gene. Expression of the three gene fusions studied, dinA::lacZYA, dinB::lacZYA, and dinC::lacZYA, increased following UVC and quinolone exposure but not following heat shock. Similar to E. coli SOS genes, the din genes were induced to different extents and with dissimilar kinetics following UVC irradiation.

  3. Characterization of stress-responsive behavior in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO: isolation of Tn3-lacZYA fusions with novel damage-inducible (din) promoters.

    PubMed Central

    Warner-Bartnicki, A L; Miller, R V

    1992-01-01

    Although the pervasive soil and water microorganism Pseudomonas aeruginosa demonstrates heightened sensitivity to UV radiation, this species possesses a recA gene that, based on structural and functional properties, could mediate a DNA damage-responsive regulon similar to the SOS regulon of Escherichia coli. To determine whether P. aeruginosa encodes such stress-inducible genes, the response of P. aeruginosa to DNA-damaging agents including far-UV radiation (UVC) and the quinolone antimicrobial agent norfloxacin was investigated by monitoring the expression of fusions linking P. aeruginosa promoters to a beta-galactosidase reporter gene. These fusions were obtained by Tn3-HoHoI insertional mutagenesis of a P. aeruginosa genomic library. Eight different damage-inducible (din) gene fusions were isolated which lack homology to the P. aeruginosa recA gene. Expression of the three gene fusions studied, dinA::lacZYA, dinB::lacZYA, and dinC::lacZYA, increased following UVC and quinolone exposure but not following heat shock. Similar to E. coli SOS genes, the din genes were induced to different extents and with dissimilar kinetics following UVC irradiation. PMID:1312530

  4. Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in patients with cystic fibrosis: scientific evidence regarding clinical impact, diagnosis, and treatment*

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Luiz Vicente Ribeiro Ferreira; Ferreira, Flavia de Aguiar; Reis, Francisco José Caldeira; de Britto, Murilo Carlos Amorim; Levy, Carlos Emilio; Clark, Otavio; Ribeiro, José Dirceu

    2013-01-01

    Evidence-based techniques have been increasingly used in the creation of clinical guidelines and the development of recommendations for medical practice. The use of levels of evidence allows the reader to identify the quality of scientific information that supports the recommendations made by experts. The objective of this review was to address current concepts related to the clinical impact, diagnosis, and treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in patients with cystic fibrosis. For the preparation of this review, the authors defined a group of questions that would be answered in accordance with the principles of PICO–an acronym based on questions regarding the Patients of interest, Intervention being studied, Comparison of the intervention, and Outcome of interest. For each question, a structured review of the literature was performed using the Medline database in order to identify the studies with the methodological design most appropriate to answering the question. The questions were designed so that each of the authors could write a response. A first draft was prepared and discussed by the group. Recommendations were then made on the basis of the level of scientific evidence, in accordance with the classification system devised by the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine, as well as the level of agreement among the members of the group. PMID:24068273

  5. Environmental Pseudomonads Inhibit Cystic Fibrosis Patient-Derived Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Payel; Davis, Elizabeth; Yu, Fengan; James, Sarah; Wildschutte, Julia H.; Wiegmann, Daniel D.; Sherman, David H.; McKay, Robert M.; LiPuma, John J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen which is evolving resistance to many currently used antibiotics. While much research has been devoted to the roles of pathogenic P. aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, less is known of its ecological properties. P. aeruginosa dominates the lungs during chronic infection in CF patients, yet its abundance in some environments is less than that of other diverse groups of pseudomonads. Here, we sought to determine if clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa are vulnerable to environmental pseudomonads that dominate soil and water habitats in one-to-one competitions which may provide a source of inhibitory factors. We isolated a total of 330 pseudomonads from diverse habitats of soil and freshwater ecosystems and competed these strains against one another to determine their capacity for antagonistic activity. Over 900 individual inhibitory events were observed. Extending the analysis to P. aeruginosa isolates revealed that clinical isolates, including ones with increased alginate production, were susceptible to competition by multiple environmental strains. We performed transposon mutagenesis on one isolate and identified an ∼14.8-kb locus involved in antagonistic activity. Only two other environmental isolates were observed to carry the locus, suggesting the presence of additional unique compounds or interactions among other isolates involved in outcompeting P. aeruginosa. This collection of strains represents a source of compounds that are active against multiple pathogenic strains. With the evolution of resistance of P. aeruginosa to currently used antibiotics, these environmental strains provide opportunities for novel compound discovery against drug-resistant clinical strains. IMPORTANCE We demonstrate that clinical CF-derived isolates of P. aeruginosa are susceptible to competition in the presence of environmental pseudomonads. We observed that many diverse environmental strains exhibited varied

  6. In vitro activity of U-63196E, a new cephalosporin, against clinical bacterial isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Eliopoulos, G M; Gardella, A; DeGirolami, P; Moellering, R C

    1984-01-01

    The in vitro activity of U-63196E, a new cephalosporin, was compared with those of other extended-spectrum cephalosporins and penicillins against clinical bacterial isolates. Against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the activity of U-63196E was comparable to those of cefoperazone and piperacillin, each of which inhibited 90% of strains at concentrations of less than or equal to 16 micrograms/ml. The new drug also demonstrated activity against a variety of other bacterial species, but it was generally less active than cefotaxime, moxalactam, and cefoperazone against members of the family Enterobacteriaceae and staphylococci. The presence of any 1 of 10 plasmid-mediated beta-lactamases in a series of otherwise isogenic laboratory strains of P. aeruginosa resulted in a significant reduction in the activity of U-63196E in comparison with its activity against the parent strain, which lacks these enzymes. Combinations of U-63196E with tobramycin demonstrated bacteriostatic synergism against 11 of 20 clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa. PMID:6610385

  7. Carbenicillin resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Tebar, A; Rojo, F; Dámaso, D; Vázquez, D

    1982-01-01

    Four strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa obtained from clinical isolates which are carbenicillin resistant were studied to find the cause(s) of resistance to this beta-lactam antibiotic. The electrophoresis patterns of the four strains (PH20610, PH20815, PH4011, and PH4301) were found to be different from those of a wild-type strain, P. aeruginosa NCTC 10662, and appeared to lack penicillin-binding protein 2. Affinity of other penicillin-binding proteins from strains PH20610 and PH20815 for carbenicillin seemed to be normal or slightly diminished. Electrophoretic patterns of penicillin-binding proteins from strains PH4011 and PH4301 had more profound differences, since the affinities of their penicillin-binding proteins 1a, 1b, and 4 for carbenicillin were decreased by nearly two orders of magnitude relative to the preparations from the wild-type strain. Kinetic studies on binding of carbenicillin to penicillin-binding proteins both in isolated membrane preparations and in intact cells revealed that carbenicillin penetration into resistant cells was a much slower process than in susceptible cells, suggesting that the outer envelope structures serve as an efficient barrier against carbenicillin entry into our P. aeruginosa strains from clinical isolates. PMID:6821456

  8. Application of Whole-Genome Sequencing Data for O-Specific Antigen Analysis and In Silico Serotyping of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Thrane, Sandra Wingaard; Taylor, Véronique L.; Lund, Ole

    2016-01-01

    Accurate typing methods are required for efficient infection control. The emergence of whole-genome sequencing (WGS) technologies has enabled the development of genome-based methods applicable for routine typing and surveillance of bacterial pathogens. In this study, we developed the Pseudomonas aeruginosa serotyper (PAst) program, which enabled in silico serotyping of P. aeruginosa isolates using WGS data. PAst has been made publically available as a web service and aptly facilitates high-throughput serotyping analysis. The program overcomes critical issues such as the loss of in vitro typeability often associated with P. aeruginosa isolates from chronic infections and quickly determines the serogroup of an isolate based on the sequence of the O-specific antigen (OSA) gene cluster. Here, PAst analysis of 1,649 genomes resulted in successful serogroup assignments in 99.27% of the cases. This frequency is rarely achievable by conventional serotyping methods. The limited number of nontypeable isolates found using PAst was the result of either a complete absence of OSA genes in the genomes or the artifact of genomic misassembly. With PAst, P. aeruginosa serotype data can be obtained from WGS information alone. PAst is a highly efficient alternative to conventional serotyping methods in relation to outbreak surveillance of serotype O12 and other high-risk clones, while maintaining backward compatibility to historical serotype data. PMID:27098958

  9. Phenol degrading ability of Rhodococcus pyrinidivorans and Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from activated sludge plants in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Sheena; Chetty, Dereshen; Ramdhani, Nishani; Bux, Faizal

    2013-01-01

    Phenol, a common constituent in many industrial wastewaters is a major pollutant and has several adverse effects on the environment. The potential of various microorganisms to utilize phenol for their metabolic activity has been observed to be an effective means of remediating this toxic compound from the environment particularly wastewater. Five indigenous bacterial isolates (PD1-PD5) were obtained from phenol bearing industrial wastewater using the mineral salts medium. The isolates were further characterized based on their morphology, biochemical reactions and 16S rRNA phylogeny. The 16S rRNA sequence analysis using universal primers (27f/1492r) revealed that PD1, PD2, PD3 and PD4 were closely related to the actinomycete Rhodococcus pyrinidivorans (99%) and PD5 to Pseudomonas aeruginosa (99%). Growth kinetic patterns and phenol degradation abilities of the two representative isolates (PD1 and PD5) were also evaluated. Both the species were effective in utilizing phenol as the sole carbon source and could tolerate phenol concentrations of up to 500 to 600 mg/L. The ability of these isolates to utilize higher concentrations of phenol as their sole carbon source makes them potential candidates and better competitors in the bioremediation process.

  10. Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus directly attacks Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus Cystic fibrosis isolates.

    PubMed

    Iebba, Valerio; Totino, Valentina; Santangelo, Floriana; Gagliardi, Antonella; Ciotoli, Luana; Virga, Alessandra; Ambrosi, Cecilia; Pompili, Monica; De Biase, Riccardo V; Selan, Laura; Artini, Marco; Pantanella, Fabrizio; Mura, Francesco; Passariello, Claudio; Nicoletti, Mauro; Nencioni, Lucia; Trancassini, Maria; Quattrucci, Serena; Schippa, Serena

    2014-01-01

    Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus is a predator bacterial species found in the environment and within the human gut, able to attack Gram-negative prey. Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a genetic disease which usually presents lung colonization by Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Staphylococcus aureus biofilms. Here, we investigated the predatory behavior of B. bacteriovorus against these two pathogenic species with: (1) broth culture; (2) "static" biofilms; (3) field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM); (4) "flow" biofilms; (5) zymographic technique. We had the first evidence of B. bacteriovorus survival with a Gram-positive prey, revealing a direct cell-to-cell contact with S. aureus and a new "epibiotic" foraging strategy imaged with FESEM. Mean attaching time of HD100 to S. aureus cells was 185 s, while "static" and "flow" S. aureus biofilms were reduced by 74 (at 24 h) and 46% (at 20 h), respectively. Furthermore, zymograms showed a differential bacteriolytic activity exerted by the B. bacteriovorus lysates on P. aeruginosa and S. aureus. The dual foraging system against Gram-negative (periplasmic) and Gram-positive (epibiotic) prey could suggest the use of B. bacteriovorus as a "living antibiotic" in CF, even if further studies are required to simulate its in vivo predatory behavior.

  11. Antimicrobial Activity of Ceftolozane-Tazobactam Tested against Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa with Various Resistance Patterns Isolated in U.S. Hospitals (2011-2012)

    PubMed Central

    Flamm, Robert K.; Sader, Helio S.; Jones, Ronald N.

    2013-01-01

    Ceftolozane/tazobactam, a novel antimicrobial agent with activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa (including drug-resistant strains) and other common Gram-negative pathogens (including most extended-spectrum-β-lactamase [ESBL]-producing Enterobacteriaceae strains), and comparator agents were susceptibility tested by a reference broth microdilution method against 7,071 Enterobacteriaceae and 1,971 P. aeruginosa isolates. Isolates were collected consecutively from patients in 32 medical centers across the United States during 2011 to 2012. Overall, 15.7% and 8.9% of P. aeruginosa isolates were classified as multidrug resistant (MDR) and extensively drug resistant (XDR), and 8.4% and 1.2% of Enterobacteriaceae were classified as MDR and XDR. No pandrug-resistant (PDR) Enterobacteriaceae isolates and only one PDR P. aeruginosa isolate were detected. Ceftolozane/tazobactam was the most potent (MIC50/90, 0.5/2 μg/ml) agent tested against P. aeruginosa and demonstrated good activity against 310 MDR strains (MIC50/90, 2/8 μg/ml) and 175 XDR strains (MIC50/90, 4/16 μg/ml). Ceftolozane/tazobactam exhibited high overall activity (MIC50/90, 0.25/1 μg/ml) against Enterobacteriaceae and retained activity (MIC50/90, 4/>32 μg/ml) against many 601 MDR strains but not against the 86 XDR strains (MIC50, >32 μg/ml). Ceftolozane/tazobactam was highly potent (MIC50/90, 0.25/0.5 μg/ml) against 2,691 Escherichia coli isolates and retained good activity against most ESBL-phenotype E. coli isolates (MIC50/90, 0.5/4 μg/ml), but activity was low against ESBL-phenotype Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates (MIC50/90, 32/>32 μg/ml), explained by the high rate (39.8%) of meropenem coresistance observed in this species phenotype. In summary, ceftolozane/tazobactam demonstrated high potency and broad-spectrum activity against many contemporary Enterobacteriaceae and P. aeruginosa isolates collected in U.S. medical centers. Importantly, ceftolozane/tazobactam retained potency against many MDR and

  12. In Vitro Activity of Ceftazidime-Avibactam against Contemporary Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from U.S. Medical Centers by Census Region, 2014.

    PubMed

    Huband, Michael D; Castanheira, Mariana; Flamm, Robert K; Farrell, David J; Jones, Ronald N; Sader, Helio S

    2016-04-01

    Thein vitroantibacterial activities of ceftazidime-avibactam and comparator agents were evaluated using reference broth microdilution methods against 1,743Pseudomonas aeruginosaisolates collected in 2014 from 69 U.S. medical centers, representing each of the nine census regions. Ceftazidime-avibactam demonstrated potent activity againstP. aeruginosa, including many isolates not susceptible to ceftazidime, meropenem, and piperacillin-tazobactam. In each of the nine census regions, ceftazidime-avibactam demonstrated the highest percentage of susceptible isolates.

  13. Genetic analyses of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from healthy captive snakes: evidence of high inter- and intrasite dissemination and occurrence of antibiotic resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Colinon, Céline; Jocktane, Dominique; Brothier, Elisabeth; Rossolini, Gian Maria; Cournoyer, Benoit; Nazaret, Sylvie

    2010-03-01

    Faecal carriage of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was investigated by selective plating and PCR identification test, among healthy captive snakes from zoological and private collections from France as well as from wild snakes from Guinea. P. aeruginosa faecal carriage among captive snakes was high (72 out of 83 individuals), but low among wild specimen (3 out of 23 individuals). Genetic diversity analyses of the isolates, based on SpeI-PFGE profiles, evidenced five dominant clones or clonal complexes spreading among snakes within a site and between sites and persisting over time. Similar clones or clonal complexes were detected from mouth swabs of the owners and from water and preys used to feed the snakes, evidencing various sources of snake colonization and the first cases of P. aeruginosa cross-contamination between snakes and owners. These observations led to the conclusion that P. aeruginosa behaves as an opportunistic species within snakes in captivity and that colonization and dissemination occurs consecutively to processes similar to those identified within the hospital. Antibiotic susceptibility testing showed that most isolates had a wild-type resistance profile except for one persistent clone isolated from both snakes and preys that harboured multiple antimicrobial resistance genes mediated by an integron carrying the qacH, aadB, aadA2 and cmlA10 cassettes, and a tetA(C)-carrying transposon. Biocides or antibiotics used in the zoological garden could have led to the acquisition of this integron.

  14. Biofilm Filtrates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strains Isolated from Cystic Fibrosis Patients Inhibit Preformed Aspergillus fumigatus Biofilms via Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Shirazi, Fazal; Ferreira, Jose A. G.; Stevens, David A.; Clemons, Karl V.; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pa) and Aspergillus fumigatus (Af) colonize cystic fibrosis (CF) patient airways. Pa culture filtrates inhibit Af biofilms, and Pa non-CF, mucoid (Muc-CF) and nonmucoid CF (NMuc-CF) isolates form an ascending inhibitory hierarchy. We hypothesized this activity is mediated through apoptosis induction. One Af and three Pa (non-CF, Muc-CF, NMuc-CF) reference isolates were studied. Af biofilm was formed in 96 well plates for 16 h ± Pa biofilm filtrates. After 24 h, apoptosis was characterized by viability dye DiBAc, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, DNA fragmentation and metacaspase activity. Muc-CF and NMuc-CF filtrates inhibited and damaged Af biofilm (p<0.0001). Intracellular ROS levels were elevated (p<0.001) in NMuc-CF-treated Af biofilms (3.7- fold) compared to treatment with filtrates from Muc-CF- (2.5- fold) or non-CF Pa (1.7- fold). Depolarization of mitochondrial potential was greater upon exposure to NMuc-CF (2.4-fold) compared to Muc-CF (1.8-fold) or non-CF (1.25-fold) (p<0.0001) filtrates. Exposure to filtrates resulted in more DNA fragmentation in Af biofilm, compared to control, mediated by metacaspase activation. In conclusion, filtrates from CF-Pa isolates were more inhibitory against Af biofilms than from non-CF. The apoptotic effect involves mitochondrial membrane damage associated with metacaspase activation. PMID:26930399

  15. Biofilm Filtrates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strains Isolated from Cystic Fibrosis Patients Inhibit Preformed Aspergillus fumigatus Biofilms via Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Shirazi, Fazal; Ferreira, Jose A G; Stevens, David A; Clemons, Karl V; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pa) and Aspergillus fumigatus (Af) colonize cystic fibrosis (CF) patient airways. Pa culture filtrates inhibit Af biofilms, and Pa non-CF, mucoid (Muc-CF) and nonmucoid CF (NMuc-CF) isolates form an ascending inhibitory hierarchy. We hypothesized this activity is mediated through apoptosis induction. One Af and three Pa (non-CF, Muc-CF, NMuc-CF) reference isolates were studied. Af biofilm was formed in 96 well plates for 16 h ± Pa biofilm filtrates. After 24 h, apoptosis was characterized by viability dye DiBAc, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, DNA fragmentation and metacaspase activity. Muc-CF and NMuc-CF filtrates inhibited and damaged Af biofilm (p<0.0001). Intracellular ROS levels were elevated (p<0.001) in NMuc-CF-treated Af biofilms (3.7- fold) compared to treatment with filtrates from Muc-CF- (2.5- fold) or non-CF Pa (1.7- fold). Depolarization of mitochondrial potential was greater upon exposure to NMuc-CF (2.4-fold) compared to Muc-CF (1.8-fold) or non-CF (1.25-fold) (p<0.0001) filtrates. Exposure to filtrates resulted in more DNA fragmentation in Af biofilm, compared to control, mediated by metacaspase activation. In conclusion, filtrates from CF-Pa isolates were more inhibitory against Af biofilms than from non-CF. The apoptotic effect involves mitochondrial membrane damage associated with metacaspase activation.

  16. [Prevalence of Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates resistant to imipenem by production of metallo-β-lactamases in Rabat Military Teaching Hospital Mohammed V].

    PubMed

    Gildas Comlan Zohoun, Alban; Moket, Danièle; El Hamzaoui, Sakina

    2013-01-01

    We studied the production of metallo-β-lactamases (MBL) in Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains resistant to imipenem at the Rabat Mohammed V military teaching hospital, according to Yong et al.'s method, using a sterilized solution of EDTA 0.5 M pH 8. One hundred and five bacterial strains (48 A. baumannii and 57 P. aeruginosa) were identified. 45 (42.9%) with 34 A. baumannii and 11 P. aeruginosa were resistant to imipenem. The prevalence of MBL producing strains was 22.2% (10/45). The existence of this isolates resistant to imipenem by producing metallo-β-lactamases is an emerging public health problem. It is necessary to implemente infection control programs to avoid spreading of multidrug resistant bacteria.

  17. Chemical alterations in cell envelopes of polymyxin-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Gilleland, H E; Lyle, R D

    1979-01-01

    Cell envelopes from Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains resistant to polymyxin were compared with cell envelopes from polymyxin-sensitive strains as to their content of total protein, carbohydrate, and 2-keto-3-deoxyoctonate and as to their protein composition as determined by slab polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The cell envelopes of the polymyxin-resistant strains had reduced amounts of lipopolysaccharide, as indicated a reduction in both carbohydrate and 2-keto-3-deoxyoctonate concentrations, and a greatly altered protein composition as shown by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. There was a quantitative increase in total cell envelop protein in these strains. However, those protein bands identified as being major outer membrane proteins upon polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of separated outer and cytoplasmic membranes were reduced greatly in concentration in the polymyxin-resistant cell envelopes. Thus, it appears that polymyxin resistance in these strains is associated with the alteration of the outer membrane through a loss of lipopolysaccharide and outer membrane proteins. Images PMID:222726

  18. Isolation and characterization of an alginase from mucoid strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Linker, A; Evans, L R

    1984-09-01

    Strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa which produce an alginate-like slime polysaccharide were shown to also synthesize an intracellular enzyme which can degrade these polysaccharides and the seaweed alginic acids. The enzyme acts as an eliminase introducing delta 4,5 unsaturation into the uronic acid moiety. It appears to be a polymannuronide lyase which degrades the polysaccharides, depending on their uronic acid composition, to a series of oligosaccharides, the smallest of which is a disaccharide. L-Guluronic acid linkages are not split. The Pseudomonas alginase resembles other bacterial alginases and enzymes from molluscs but differs in some important properties, such as extent of degradation and linkage preference. Nonmucoid forms of the organism produce detectable but much lower amounts of enzyme.

  19. Swimming Motility in a Longitudinal Collection of Clinical Isolates of Burkholderia cepacia Complex Bacteria from People with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Zlosnik, James E. A.; Mori, Paul Y.; To, Derek; Leung, James; Hird, Trevor J.; Speert, David P.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic bacterial lung infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality. While a range of bacteria are known to be capable of establishing residence in the CF lung, only a small number have a clearly established link to deteriorating clinical status. The two bacteria with the clearest roles in CF lung disease are Pseudomonas aeruginosa and bacteria belonging to the Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC). A number of common adaptations by P. aeruginosa strains to chronic lung infection in CF have been well described. Typically, initial isolates of P. aeruginosa are nonmucoid and display a range of putative virulence determinants. Upon establishment of chronic infection, subsequent isolates ultimately show a reduction in putative virulence determinants, including swimming motility, along with an acquisition of the mucoid phenotype and increased levels of antimicrobial resistance. Infections by BCC are marked by an unpredictable, but typically worse, clinical outcome. However, in contrast to P. aeruginosa infections in CF, studies describing adaptive changes in BCC bacterial phenotype during chronic lung infections are far more limited. To further enhance our understanding of chronic lung infections by BCC bacteria in CF, we assessed the swimming motility phenotype in 551 isolates of BCC bacteria from cystic fibrosis (CF) lung infections between 1981 and 2007. These data suggest that swimming motility is not typically lost by BCC during chronic infection, unlike as seen in P. aeruginosa infections. Furthermore, while we observed a statistically significant link between mucoidy and motility, we did not detect any link between motility phenotype and clinical outcome. These studies highlight the need for further work to understand the adaptive changes of BCC bacteria during chronic infection in the CF lung. PMID:25203161

  20. Adhesive Capabilities of Staphylococcus Aureus and Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Isolated from Tears of HIV/AIDS Patients to Soft Contact Lenses

    PubMed Central

    B. O., Ajayi; F.E., Kio; F.D., Otajevwo

    2012-01-01

    Fifty conjunctival swab samples collected from ELISA confirmed HIV/AIDS seropositive patients who were referred to the HIV/AIDS laboratories of the University of Benin Teaching Hospital and Central Hospital both based in Benin City, Nigeria were aseptically cultured on appropriate media by standard methods. The resulting isolates/strains, after identification by standard methods, were tested for their ability to adhere to two hydrophobic non-ionic daily wear silicone hydrogel soft contact lenses (i.e. lotrafilcon B, WC 33% and polymacon, WC 38%) as well as to two hydrophilic ionic conventional extended wear silicone hydrogel soft contact lenses (i.e. methafilcon A, WC 55% and omafilcon A, WC 60%) by the adhesiveness/slime production modified vortex/Robin device method. Evidence of adhesiveness/slime production was indicated by presence of a visible stained film lining the surface of the contact lens which was measured and recorded as strong or weak according to the density of the adhered bacterial film. Fourteen (28.0%) Staphylococcus aureus strains and 10 (20.0%) Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains were obtained among other organisms. Staphylococcus aureus strains adhered in decreasing order to lotrafilcon B (55.4 ± 4.7), polymacon (46.4 ± 8.4), methfilcon A (46.4 ± 8.4) and omafilcon A (25.0 ± 6.4) with no significant difference in adhesive strengths of individual strains (P > 0.05). Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains also recorded decreasing adhesive strengths to lotrafilcon B (37.5 ± 8.2), polymacon (28.6 ± 6.3), methafilcon A (26.8 ± 5.5) and omafilcon A (23.2 ± 5.5) also with no significant difference in adhesive strengths of individual strains (P > 0.05). Attachment strengths of Staph. aureus strains to all four contact lenses were higher than those of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains. Both organisms adhered most to hydrophobic lotrafilcon B and least to hydrophilic omafilcon A. This invitro adhesion studies revealed that daily wear silicone hydrogel low water

  1. Fast and specific detection of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa from other pseudomonas species by PCR

    PubMed Central

    Jami Al-Ahmadi, G.; Zahmatkesh Roodsari, R.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important life-threatening nosocomial pathogen that plays a prominent role in wound infections of burned patients. We designed this study to identify the isolates of P. aeruginosa recovered from burned patients at the genus and species level through primers targeting oprI and oprL genes, and analyzed their antimicrobial resistance pattern. Over a 2-month period, wound samples were taken from burned patients and plated on MacConkey agar. All suspected colonies were primarily screened for P. aeruginosa by a combination of phenotypic tests. Molecular identifications of colonies were done using specific primers for oprI and oprL genes. Bacterial isolates were recovered from burn wound infections. Based on phenotypical identification tests, 138 (34%) P. aeruginosa isolates were identified; whereas by molecular techniques, just 128 P. aeruginosa yielded amplicon of oprL gene using species-specific primers, verifying the identity of P. aeruginosa; the others yielded amplicon of oprI gene using genus-specific primers, confirming the identity of fluorescent pseudomonads. This study indicates that molecular detection of P. aeruginosa in burn patients employing the OprL gene target is a useful technique for the early and precise detection of P. aeruginosa. PCR detection should be carried out as well as phenotypic testing for the best aggressive antibiotic treatment of P. aeruginosa strains at an earlier stage. It also has significant benefits on clinical outcomes. PMID:28289359

  2. SCL-LCL-PHA copolymer production by a local isolate, Pseudomonas aeruginosa MTCC 7925.

    PubMed

    Singh, Akhilesh Kumar; Mallick, Nirupama

    2009-05-01

    A five-level-four-factor central composite rotary design (CCRD) was employed in combination with response surface methodology (RSM) to optimize the process variables for the production of a novel copolymer consisting of short-chain-length (SCL) and long-chain-length (LCL) PHA units, i.e., P(3HB-3HV-3HHD-3HOD) copolymer in Pseudomonas aeruginosa MTCC 7925. The four variables involved in this study were ethanol, glucose, ammonium nitrate (NH(4)NO(3)), and potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KH(2)PO(4)). A second-order polynomial equation was obtained by multiple regression analysis using RSM. The statistical analyses of the results showed that all the four variables had significant impact on the copolymer yield. The model predicted a maximum yield of 81.1% of dry cell weight (dcw) on setting the concentrations of ethanol and glucose at 1.5 and 1.1%, and KH(2)PO(4) and NH(4)NO(3) at 2.79 and 1.86 g/L, respectively. Verification of the predicted value resulted into a yield of 77.6% (dcw). This novel copolymer exhibited comparable material properties with polypropylene (PP) and low density polyethylene (LDPE), thus advocating its potential applications in various fields.

  3. Silver Nanoparticles: Biosynthesis Using an ATCC Reference Strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Activity as Broad Spectrum Clinical Antibacterial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Quinteros, Melisa A.; Aiassa Martínez, Ivana M.; Dalmasso, Pablo R.; Páez, Paulina L.

    2016-01-01

    Currently, the biosynthesis of silver-based nanomaterials attracts enormous attention owing to the documented antimicrobial properties of these ones. This study reports the extracellular biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) using a Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain from a reference culture collection. A greenish culture supernatant of P. aeruginosa incubated at 37°C with a silver nitrate solution for 24 h changed to a yellowish brown color, indicating the formation of Ag-NPs, which was confirmed by UV-vis spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. TEM analysis showed spherical and pseudospherical nanoparticles with a distributed size mainly between 25 and 45 nm, and the XRD pattern revealed the crystalline nature of Ag-NPs. Also it provides an evaluation of the antimicrobial activity of the biosynthesized Ag-NPs against human pathogenic and opportunistic microorganisms, namely, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Enterococcus faecalis, Proteus mirabilis, Acinetobacter baumannii, Escherichia coli, P. aeruginosa, and Klebsiella pneumonia. Ag-NPs were found to be bioactive at picomolar concentration levels showing bactericidal effects against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains. This work demonstrates the first helpful use of biosynthesized Ag-NPs as broad spectrum bactericidal agents for clinical strains of pathogenic multidrug-resistant bacteria such as methicillin-resistant S. aureus, A. baumannii, and E. coli. In addition, these Ag-NPs showed negligible cytotoxic effect in human neutrophils suggesting low toxicity to the host. PMID:27340405

  4. Prevalence of Extended-Spectrum and Metallo β-Lactamase Production in AmpC β-Lactamase Producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates From Burns

    PubMed Central

    Rafiee, Roya; Eftekhar, Fereshteh; Tabatabaei, Seyyed Ahmad; Minaee Tehrani, Dariush

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most common causes of nosocomial infections. Resistance of P. aeruginosa to β-lactam antibiotics may be the result of acquired resistance through mutation and over production of various antibiotic inactivating enzymes. This research aimed to determine the prevalence of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBL) and metallo β-lactamase (MBL) production as well as the presence of their related genes among AmpC β-lactamase producing P. aeruginosa isolated from burns. Objectives: The current study aimed to determine the prevalence of class A ESBL and MBL production in relation to the presence of their related genes among AmpC β-lactamase producing P. aeruginosa isolated from burns. Materials and Methods: The antimicrobial susceptibility of 51 P. aeruginosa isolates from patients with burns was examined against 13 antibiotics by the disc diffusion method. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) for imipenem and ceftazidime were measured by the microdilution method. AmpC production was detected by AmpC disc and the modified three-dimensional extract tests. ESBL phenotype was confirmed by the double disc synergy test (DDST). Presence of β-lactamase genes was detected by specific primers and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results: All isolates were multidrug resistant. AmpC, ESBL and MBL production were observed in 35 (68.6%), 20 (39.2%) and 19 (37.3%) isolates, respectively. Overall, 43 isolates (84.3%) carried β-lactamase genes, out of which 31 (60.8%) harbored blaAmpC, 20 (39.2%) had blaTEM and 11 (21.6%) carried blaPER-1 genes. Among the AmpC producers, two isolates (6.5%) carried blaAmpC + blaESBL, 13 (41.9%) had blaAmpC + blaMBL and six (19.4%) produced the three enzymes. Conclusions: A high prevalence of multiple β-lactamase production was observed among the AmpC producers (60%), of which the majority co-produced AmpC and MBL. The current study results showed correlation between β-lactamase production and the

  5. In vitro killing of Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus pseudintermedius and Pseudomonas aeruginosa by enrofloxacin in combination with its active metabolite ciprofloxacin using clinically relevant drug concentrations in the dog and cat.

    PubMed

    Blondeau, J M; Borsos, S; Blondeau, L D; Blondeau, B J

    2012-03-23

    Enrofloxacin is a fluoroquinolone antibacterial agent used to treat infections in companion animals. Enrofloxacin's antimicrobial spectrum includes Gram positive and Gram-negative bacteria and demonstrates concentration-dependent bacteriocidal activity. In dogs and cats, enrofloxacin is partially metabolized to ciprofloxacin and both active agents circulate simultaneously in treated animals at ratios of approximately 60-70% enrofloxacin to 30-40% ciprofloxacin. We were interested in determining the killing of companion animal isolates of Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus pseudintermedius and Pseudomonas aeruginosa by enrofloxacin and ciprofloxacin combined using clinically relevant drug concentrations and ratios. For E. coli isolates exposed to 2.1 and 4.1μg/ml of enrofloxacin/ciprofloxacin at 50:50, 60:40 and 70:30 ratios, a 1.7-2.5log(10) reduction (94-99% kill) was seen following 20min of drug exposure; 0.89-1.7log(10) (92-99% kill) of S. pseudintermedius following 180min of drug exposure; 0.85-3.4log(10) (98-99% kill) of P. aeruginosa following 15min of drug exposure. Killing of S. pseudintermedius was enhanced in the presence of enrofloxacin whereas killing of P. aeruginosa was enhanced in the presence of ciprofloxacin. Antagonism was not seen when enrofloxacin and ciprofloxacin were used in kill assays. The unique feature of partial metabolism of enrofloxacin to ciprofloxacin expands the spectrum of enhanced killing of common companion animal pathogens.

  6. Synergistic activities of macrolide antibiotics against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Burkholderia cepacia, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, and Alcaligenes xylosoxidans isolated from patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Saiman, Lisa; Chen, Yunhua; Gabriel, Pablo San; Knirsch, Charles

    2002-04-01

    Azithromycin and clarithromycin were paired with other antibiotics to test synergistic activity against 300 multidrug-resistant pathogens isolated from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Clarithromycin-tobramycin was most active against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and inhibited 58% of strains. Azithromycin-trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, azithromycin-ceftazidime, and azithromycin-doxycycline or azithromycin-trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole inhibited 40, 20, and 22% of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Burkholderia cepacia complex, and Achromobacter (Alcaligenes) xylosoxidans strains, respectively.

  7. Sodium houttuyfonate inhibits biofilm formation and alginate biosynthesis-associated gene expression in a clinical strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in vitro

    PubMed Central

    WU, DA-QIANG; CHENG, HUIJUAN; DUAN, QIANGJUN; HUANG, WEIFENG

    2015-01-01

    The increasing multidrug resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa has become a serious public-health problem. In the present study, the inhibitory activities of sodium houttuyfonate (SH) against biofilm formation and alginate production in a clinical strain of P. aeruginosa (AH16) were investigated in vitro using crystal violet dying and standard curve methods, respectively. The cellular morphology of P. aeruginosa treated with SH was observed using a scanning electron microscope. Furthermore, reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to identify differences in the expression levels of genes associated with alginate biosynthesis as a result of the SH treatment. The results indicated that SH significantly inhibited biofilm formation, and decreased the levels of the primary biofilm constituent, alginate, in P. aeruginosa AH16 at various stages of biofilm development. In addition, scanning electron microscopy observations demonstrated that SH markedly altered the cellular morphology and biofilm structure of P. aeruginosa. Furthermore, the results from the reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis indicated that SH inhibited biofilm formation by mitigating the expression of the algD and algR genes, which are associated with alginate biosynthesis. Therefore, the present study has provided novel insights into the potent effects and underlying mechanisms of SH-induced inhibition of biofilm formation in a clinical strain of P. aeruginosa. PMID:26622388

  8. Sodium houttuyfonate inhibits biofilm formation and alginate biosynthesis-associated gene expression in a clinical strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wu, DA-Qiang; Cheng, Huijuan; Duan, Qiangjun; Huang, Weifeng

    2015-08-01

    The increasing multidrug resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa has become a serious public-health problem. In the present study, the inhibitory activities of sodium houttuyfonate (SH) against biofilm formation and alginate production in a clinical strain of P.aeruginosa (AH16) were investigated in vitro using crystal violet dying and standard curve methods, respectively. The cellular morphology of P. aeruginosa treated with SH was observed using a scanning electron microscope. Furthermore, reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to identify differences in the expression levels of genes associated with alginate biosynthesis as a result of the SH treatment. The results indicated that SH significantly inhibited biofilm formation, and decreased the levels of the primary biofilm constituent, alginate, in P. aeruginosa AH16 at various stages of biofilm development. In addition, scanning electron microscopy observations demonstrated that SH markedly altered the cellular morphology and biofilm structure of P. aeruginosa. Furthermore, the results from the reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis indicated that SH inhibited biofilm formation by mitigating the expression of the algD and algR genes, which are associated with alginate biosynthesis. Therefore, the present study has provided novel insights into the potent effects and underlying mechanisms of SH-induced inhibition of biofilm formation in a clinical strain of P. aeruginosa.

  9. Isolation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains from dental office environments and units in Barretos, state of São Paulo, Brazil, and analysis of their susceptibility to antimicrobial drugs

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Ana Claudia; Maluta, Renato Pariz; Stella, Ariel Eurides; Rigobelo, Everlon Cid; Marin, José Moacir; de Ávila, Fernando Antonio

    2008-01-01

    A wide variety of opportunistic pathogens has been detected in the tubing supplying water to odontological equipment, in special in the biofilm lining of these tubes. Among these pathogens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, one of the leading causes of nosocomial infections, is frequently found in water lines supplying dental units. In the present work, 160 samples of water, and 200 fomite samples from forty dental units were collected in the city of Barretos, State of São Paulo, Brazil and evaluated between January and July, 2005. Seventy-six P. aeruginosa strains, isolated from the dental environment (5 strains) and water system (71 strains), were tested for susceptibility to six antimicrobial drugs most frequently used against P. aeruginosa infections. Susceptibility to ciprofloxacin, followed by meropenem was the predominant profile. The need for effective means of reducing the microbial burden within dental unit water lines is emphasized, and the risk of exposure and cross-infection in dental practice, in special when caused by opportunistic pathogens like P. aeruginosa, are highlighted. PMID:24031269

  10. Antibacterial compound produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain UICC B-40, an endophytic bacterium isolated from Neesia altissima.

    PubMed

    Pratiwi, Rina Hidayati; Hidayat, Iman; Hanafi, Muhammad; Mangunwardoyo, Wibowo

    2017-04-01

    This study's aim was to determine the identity of antibacterial compounds produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain UICC B-40 and describe the antibacterial compounds' mechanisms of action for damaging pathogenic bacteria cells. Isolation and identification of the compounds were carried out using thin layer chromatography (TLC), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analyses. Antibacterial activity was assayed via minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and the antibacterial compound mechanism was observed morphologically through scanning electron microscopy (SEM). This study successfully identified the (2E,5E)-phenyltetradeca-2,5-dienoate antibacterial compound (molecular weight 300 g/mol), composed of a phenolic ester, fatty acid and long chain of aliphatic group structures. MIC values for this compound were determined at 62.5 μg/ml against Staphylococcus aureus strain ATCC 25923. The mechanism of the compound involved breaking down the bacterial cell walls through the lysis process. The (2E,5E)-phenyltetradeca-2,5-dienoate compound exhibited inhibitory activity on the growth of Gram-positive bacteria.

  11. Structural and physicochemical characterization of crude biosurfactant produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa SP4 isolated from petroleum-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Pornsunthorntawee, Orathai; Wongpanit, Panya; Chavadej, Sumaeth; Abe, Masahiko; Rujiravanit, Ratana

    2008-04-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain SP4, isolated from petroleum-contaminated soil in Thailand, was used to produce a biosurfactant from a nutrient broth with palm oil as the carbon source. The key components of the crude biosurfactant were fractionated by using HPLC-ELSD technique. With the use of ATR-FTIR spectroscopy, in combination with (1)H NMR and MS analyses, chemical structures of the fractionated components of the crude biosurfactant were identified as rhamnolipid species. When compared to synthetic surfactants, including Pluronic F-68, which is a triblock nonionic surfactant containing poly(ethylene oxide) and poly(propylene oxide), and sodium dodecyl sulfate, the crude biosurfactant showed comparable physicochemical properties, in terms of the surface activities. The crude biosurfactant reduced the surface tension of pure water to 29.0 mN/m with a critical micelle concentration of approximately 200 mg/l, and it exhibited good thermal and pH stability. The crude biosurfactant also formed stable water-in-oil microemulsions with crude oil and various types of vegetable oils, but not with short-chain hydrocarbons.

  12. First detection in Europe of the metallo-β-lactamase IMP-15 in clinical strains of Pseudomonas putida and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Gilarranz, R; Juan, C; Castillo-Vera, J; Chamizo, F J; Artiles, F; Álamo, I; Oliver, A

    2013-09-01

    In a prospective study (2009-2011) in healthcare institutions from the Canary Islands (Spain), 6 out of 298 carbapenem non-susceptible Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates produced a metallo-β-lactamase: four IMP-15, two VIM-2 (including one IMP-15-positive isolate) and one VIM-1. Multilocus sequence typing identified the single VIM-1-producing isolate as clone ST111 and two IMP-15-producing isolates as ST606, but, strikingly, bacterial re-identification revealed that the other three isolates (producing IMP-15 and/or VIM-2) were actually Pseudomonas putida. Further retrospective analysis revealed a very high prevalence (close to 50%) of carbapenem resistance in this environmental species. Hence, we report the simultaneous emergence in hospitals on the Canary Islands of P. putida and P. aeruginosa strains producing IMP-15, a metallo-β-lactamase not previously detected in Europe, and suggest an underestimated role of P. putida as a nosocomial reservoir of worrying transferable resistance determinants.

  13. Pseudomonas aeruginosa on vinyl-canvas inflatables and foam teaching aids in swimming pools.

    PubMed

    Schets, F M; van den Berg, H H J L; Baan, R; Lynch, G; de Roda Husman, A M

    2014-12-01

    Swimming pool-related Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections mainly result in folliculitis and otitis externa. P. aeruginosa forms biofilms on surfaces in the swimming pool environment. The presence of P. aeruginosa on inflatables and foam teaching aids in 24 public swimming pools in the Netherlands was studied. Samples (n = 230) were taken from 175 objects and analysed for P. aeruginosa by culture. Isolated P. aeruginosa were tested for antibiotic resistance by disk diffusion. P. aeruginosa was detected in 63 samples (27%), from 47 objects (27%) in 19 (79%) swimming pools. More vinyl-canvas objects (44%) than foam objects (20%) were contaminated, as were wet objects (43%) compared to dry objects (13%). Concentrations were variable, and on average higher on vinyl-canvas than on foam objects. Forty of 193 (21%) P. aeruginosa isolates from 11 different objects were (intermediate) resistant to one or more of 12 clinically relevant antibiotics, mostly to imipenem and aztreonam. The immediate risk of a P. aeruginosa infection from exposure to swimming pool objects seems limited, but the presence of P. aeruginosa on pool objects is unwanted and requires attention of pool managers and responsible authorities. Strict drying and cleaning policies are needed for infrequently used vinyl-canvas objects.

  14. Characterization of Micrococcaceae Isolated from Clinical Sources

    PubMed Central

    Person, Donald A.; Yu, Pauline K. W.; Washington, John A.

    1969-01-01

    The characterization of 556 Micrococcaceae isolates from various clinical sources has been presented. The incidence of coagulase-negative mannitol-positive staphylococci was 3.2% and that of coagulase-positive mannitol-negative staphylococci was 1.6%. There appears to be insufficient justification for the routine reporting of staphylococcal variants from a general bacteriology laboratory, and biotyping should be reserved for special circumstances. PMID:5803634

  15. The Effects of Berberine and Palmatine on Efflux Pumps Inhibition with Different Gene Patterns in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated from Burn Infections

    PubMed Central

    Aghayan, Seyed Sajjad; Kalalian Mogadam, Hamidreza; Fazli, Mozhgan; Darban-Sarokhalil, Davood; Khoramrooz, Seyed Sajjad; Jabalameli, Fereshteh; Yaslianifard, Somayeh; Mirzaii, Mehdi

    2017-01-01

    Background: Related Multidrug Resistance (MDR) to efflux pumps is a significant problem in treating infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa). Plant compounds have been identified as Pump Inhibitors (EPIs). In the current study, the potential effect of Berberine and Palmatine as EPIs were investigated on efflux pump inhibition through focusing on different gene patterns in P. aeruginosa isolated from burn infections. Methods: All isolates were collected and identified using the standard biochemical tests. Antimicrobial sensitivity was performed based on disk agar diffusion method for 12 antibiotics. MIC-MBC tests were also performed based on the broth microdilution method to detect synergistic relationship between ciprofloxacin, Berberine and Palmatine. Detection of mexA, mexB, mexC, mexD, mexE, mexF and mexX was conducted by PCR assay. Fisher’s Exact test and Logistic Regression were used as statistical tools. Results: A total of 60 P. aeruginosa isolates were collected. The highest and lowest levels of resistance were found to be respectively against clindamycin and tigecycline. Comparing the MIC with MBC distribution, it was found that Berberine and Palmatine lower the MIC-MBC level of ciprofloxacin. The PCR results indicated that the highest frequency is about MexAB-OprM operon. The statistical analysis among different gene patterns of efflux pumps showed that there were no significant relationships between the effectiveness of Berberine and Palmatine (p>0.05). Conclusion: It can be speculated that Berberine and Palmatine both act as EPIs and can be used as auxiliary treatments with the purpose of increasing the effect of available antibiotics as well as decreasing the emergence of MDR bacteria. The efficiency of these combinations should be studied further under in vivo conditions to have a more comprehensive conclusion regarding this issue. PMID:28090273

  16. [Distribution and changes in the susceptibility of bacteria isolated from clinical samples. III].

    PubMed

    Deguchi, K; Fukayama, S; Nishimura, Y; Nishike, A; Oda, S; Sato, S; Matsumoto, Y; Ikegami, R; Yokota, N; Tanaka, S

    1985-06-01

    This report presents data concerning in vitro activity of antimicrobial agents against Citrobacter freundii, Enterobacter spp., Serratia marcescens and Proteus vulgaris isolated from patients with complicated urinary tract infections and against Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from surgical wounds with postoperative infection and exudate from superficial abscesses. There was a marked increase of resistant strains of C. freundii, Enterobacter spp. and S. marcescens to penicillins, CEPs or GM. The isolates of these species obtained in 1983 showed MIC values of 100 micrograms/ml or more for the so-called new CEPs (CTX, CMX, CZX, LMOX and CPZ). The P. vulgaris isolates exhibited an increasing incidence of strains resistant to penicillins, and data on P. vulgaris isolates in 1983 indicated increase of strains resistant to CEPs. GM-resistant organisms were also noted to be increasing among the isolate of this species. The analysis did not reveal any appreciable change with calendar years among P. aeruginosa in respect of frequency of strains resistant to SBPC or CEPs (except CPZ). The data obtained in 1983, however, showed an indication of increasing incidence of organisms resistant to CPZ and GM. The increasing tendency of emergence of organisms resistant to new CEPs designed to expand activity against C. freundii, Enterobacter spp., S. marcescens and P. vulgaris, observed among the isolates of these species is considered probably to be the consequence of bacterial selective acquisition of R plasmid that carry drug resistant genes against CEPs. These are exactly reflected in the present data obtained in studies initiated in 1981 when the new CEPs became commonly prescribed in the daily clinics. It is concluded, accordingly, that organisms of these species resistant to CEPs have been increasing throughout the country.

  17. In vitro antimicrobial activity of five essential oils on multidrug resistant Gram-negative clinical isolates

    PubMed Central

    Sakkas, Hercules; Gousia, Panagiota; Economou, Vangelis; Sakkas, Vassilios; Petsios, Stefanos; Papadopoulou, Chrissanthy

    2016-01-01

    Aim/Background: The emergence of drug-resistant pathogens has drawn attention on medicinal plants for potential antimicrobial properties. The objective of the present study was the investigation of the antimicrobial activity of five plant essential oils on multidrug resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Materials and Methods: Basil, chamomile blue, origanum, thyme, and tea tree oil were tested against clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii (n = 6), Escherichia coli (n = 4), Klebsiella pneumoniae (n = 7), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n = 5) using the broth macrodilution method. Results: The tested essential oils produced variable antibacterial effect, while Chamomile blue oil demonstrated no antibacterial activity. Origanum, Thyme, and Basil oils were ineffective on P. aeruginosa isolates. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration values ranged from 0.12% to 1.50% (v/v) for tea tree oil, 0.25-4% (v/v) for origanum and thyme oil, 0.50% to >4% for basil oil and >4% for chamomile blue oil. Compared to literature data on reference strains, the reported MIC values were different by 2SD, denoting less successful antimicrobial activity against multidrug resistant isolates. Conclusions: The antimicrobial activities of the essential oils are influenced by the strain origin (wild, reference, drug sensitive, or resistant) and it should be taken into consideration whenever investigating the plants’ potential for developing new antimicrobials. PMID:27366345

  18. Structural basis for effectiveness of siderophore-conjugated monocarbams against clinically relevant strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Seungil; Zaniewski, Richard P.; Marr, Eric S.; Lacey, Brian M.; Tomaras, Andrew P.; Evdokimov, Artem; Miller, J. Richard; Shanmugasundaram, Veerabahu

    2012-02-08

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic Gram-negative pathogen that causes nosocomial infections for which there are limited treatment options. Penicillin-binding protein PBP3, a key therapeutic target, is an essential enzyme responsible for the final steps of peptidoglycan synthesis and is covalently inactivated by {beta}-lactam antibiotics. Here we disclose the first high resolution cocrystal structures of the P. aeruginosa PBP3 with both novel and marketed {beta}-lactams. These structures reveal a conformational rearrangement of Tyr532 and Phe533 and a ligand-induced conformational change of Tyr409 and Arg489. The well-known affinity of the monobactam aztreonam for P. aeruginosa PBP3 is due to a distinct hydrophobic aromatic wall composed of Tyr503, Tyr532, and Phe533 interacting with the gem-dimethyl group. The structure of MC-1, a new siderophore-conjugated monocarbam complexed with PBP3 provides molecular insights for lead optimization. Importantly, we have identified a novel conformation that is distinct to the high-molecular-weight class B PBP subfamily, which is identifiable by common features such as a hydrophobic aromatic wall formed by Tyr503, Tyr532, and Phe533 and the structural flexibility of Tyr409 flanked by two glycine residues. This is also the first example of a siderophore-conjugated triazolone-linked monocarbam complexed with any PBP. Energetic analysis of tightly and loosely held computed hydration sites indicates protein desolvation effects contribute significantly to PBP3 binding, and analysis of hydration site energies allows rank ordering of the second-order acylation rate constants. Taken together, these structural, biochemical, and computational studies provide a molecular basis for recognition of P. aeruginosa PBP3 and open avenues for future design of inhibitors of this class of PBPs.

  19. Clinical and pathologic findings of blue-green algae (Microcystis aeruginosa) intoxication in a dog.

    PubMed

    DeVries, S E; Galey, F D; Namikoshi, M; Woo, J C

    1993-07-01

    A healthy dog developed signs of lethargy and vomiting after ingesting water from a tide pool containing blue-green algae. Fulminant hepatic failure occurred, and the dog was euthanized 52 hours later. At necropsy, the liver was large, friable, and discolored a dark red. Histopathology showed hepatocyte dissociation, degeneration, and necrosis. The alga was identified as Microcystis aeruginosa, a known hepatotoxin. The intraperitoneal administration of lyophilized cell material from the bloom caused hepatic necrosis in mice.

  20. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Population Structure Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Pirnay, Jean-Paul; Bilocq, Florence; Pot, Bruno; Cornelis, Pierre; Zizi, Martin; Van Eldere, Johan; Deschaght, Pieter; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Jennes, Serge; Pitt, Tyrone; De Vos, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    At present there are strong indications that Pseudomonas aeruginosa exhibits an epidemic population structure; clinical isolates are indistinguishable from environmental isolates, and they do not exhibit a specific (disease) habitat selection. However, some important issues, such as the worldwide emergence of highly transmissible P. aeruginosa clones among cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and the spread and persistence of multidrug resistant (MDR) strains in hospital wards with high antibiotic pressure, remain contentious. To further investigate the population structure of P. aeruginosa, eight parameters were analyzed and combined for 328 unrelated isolates, collected over the last 125 years from 69 localities in 30 countries on five continents, from diverse clinical (human and animal) and environmental habitats. The analysed parameters were: i) O serotype, ii) Fluorescent Amplified-Fragment Length Polymorphism (FALFP) pattern, nucleotide sequences of outer membrane protein genes, iii) oprI, iv) oprL, v) oprD, vi) pyoverdine receptor gene profile (fpvA type and fpvB prevalence), and prevalence of vii) exoenzyme genes exoS and exoU and viii) group I pilin glycosyltransferase gene tfpO. These traits were combined and analysed using biological data analysis software and visualized in the form of a minimum spanning tree (MST). We revealed a network of relationships between all analyzed parameters and non-congruence between experiments. At the same time we observed several conserved clones, characterized by an almost identical data set. These observations confirm the nonclonal epidemic population structure of P. aeruginosa, a superficially clonal structure with frequent recombinations, in which occasionally highly successful epidemic clones arise. One of these clones is the renown and widespread MDR serotype O12 clone. On the other hand, we found no evidence for a widespread CF transmissible clone. All but one of the 43 analysed CF strains belonged to a ubiquitous P

  1. Responses of enzymatic antioxidants and non-enzymatic antioxidants in the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa to the allelochemical ethyl 2-methyl acetoacetate (EMA) isolated from reed (Phragmites communis).

    PubMed

    Hong, Yu; Hu, Hong-Ying; Xie, Xing; Li, Feng-Min

    2008-08-25

    Macrophytic allelochemicals are considered an environment-friendly and promising alternative to control algal bloom. However, studies examining the potential mechanisms of inhibitory allelochemicals on algae are few. The allelochemical ethyl 2-methyl acetoacetate (EMA), isolated from reed (Phragmites communis), was a strong allelopathic inhibitor on the growth of Microcystis aeruginosa. EMA-induced antioxidant responses were investigated in the cyanobacterium M. aeruginosa to understand the mechanism of EMA inhibition on algal growth. The activities of enzymatic antioxidants superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT), and the contents of non-enzymatic antioxidants reduced glutathione (GSH) and ascorbic acid (AsA) of M. aeruginosa cells were analyzed after treatments with different concentrations of EMA. Exposure of M. aeruginosa to EMA caused changes in enzyme activities and contents of non-enzymatic antioxidants in different manners. The decrease in SOD activity occurred first after 4 h of EMA exposure, and more markedly after 40 h. CAT activity did not change after 4 h of EMA exposure, but increased obviously after 40 h. The contents of AsA and GSH were increased greatly by EMA after 4 h. After 60 h, low EMA concentrations still increased the CAT activity and the contents of AsA and GSH, but high EMA concentrations started to impose a marked suppression on them. EMA increased dehydroascorbate (DHAsA) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) contents during all exposure times. After 60 h, the regeneration rates of AsA and GSH (represented by the AsA/DHAsA ratio and GSH/GSSG ratio, respectively) were reduced by high EMA concentrations. These results suggest that the activation of CAT and the availability of AsA and GSH at early exposure are important to counteract the oxidative stress induced by EMA, and the inactivation of SOD may be crucial to the growth inhibition of M. aeruginosa by EMA.

  2. Detection of biofilm production and antibiotic resistance pattern in clinical isolates from indwelling medical devices.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Shyam Kumar; Basukala, Prashant; Basukala, Om; Parajuli, Keshab; Pokhrel, Bharat Mani; Rijal, Basista Prasad

    2015-01-01

    Microbial biofilms pose great threat for patients requiring indwelling medical devices (IMDs) as it is difficult to remove them. It is, therefore, crucial to follow an appropriate method for the detection of biofilms. The present study focuses on detection of biofilm formation among the isolates from IMDs. We also aimed to explore the antibiogram of biofilm producers. This prospective analysis included 65 prosthetic samples. After isolation and identification of bacteria following standard methodology, antibiogram of the isolates were produced following Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. Detection of biofilms was done by tube adherence (TA), Congo red agar and tissue culture plate (TCP) methods. Out of 67 clinical isolates from IMDs, TCP detected 31 (46.3 %) biofilm producers and 36 (53.7 %) biofilm non-producers. Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cepacia complex were found to be the most frequent biofilm producers. The TA method correlated well with the TCP method for biofilm detection. Higher antibiotic resistance was observed in biofilm producers than in biofilm non-producers. The most effective antibiotics for biofilm producing Gram-positive isolates were Vancomycin and Tigecycline, and that for biofilm producing Gram-negative isolates were Polymyxin-B, Colistin Sulphate and Tigecycline. Nearly 46 % of the isolates were found to be biofilm producers. The antibiotic susceptibility pattern in the present study showed Amoxicillin to be an ineffective drug for isolates from the IMDs. For the detection of biofilm production, TA method can be an economical and effective alternative to TCP method.

  3. Evaluation of Mannosidase and Trypsin Enzymes Effects on Biofilm Production of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated from Burn Wound Infections

    PubMed Central

    Banar, Maryam; Emaneini, Mohammad; Satarzadeh, Mhboubeh; Abdellahi, Nafiseh; Beigverdi, Reza; van Leeuwen, Willem B.; Jabalameli, Fereshteh

    2016-01-01

    Biofilm is an important virulence factor in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and has a substantial role in antibiotic resistance and chronic burn wound infections. New therapeutic agents against P. aeruginosa, degrading biofilms in burn wounds and improving the efficacy of current antimicrobial agents, are required. In this study, the effects of α-mannosidase, β-mannosidase and trypsin enzymes on the degradation of P. aeruginosa biofilms and on the reduction of ceftazidime minimum biofilm eliminating concentrations (MBEC) were evaluated. All tested enzymes, destroyed the biofilms and reduced the ceftazidime MBECs. However, only trypsin had no cytotoxic effect on A-431 human epidermoid carcinoma cell lines. In conclusion, since trypsin had better features than mannosidase enzymes, it can be a promising agent in combatting P. aeruginosa burn wound infections. PMID:27736961

  4. Iron Uptake Analysis in a Set of Clinical Isolates of Pseudomonas putida

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Lázaro; Geoffroy, Valérie A.; Segura, Ana; Udaondo, Zulema; Ramos, Juan-Luis

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida strains are frequent inhabitants of soil and aquatic niches and they are occasionally isolated from hospital environments. As the available iron sources in human tissues, edaphic, and aquatic niches are different, we have analyzed iron-uptake related genes in different P. putida strains that were isolated from all these environments. We found that these isolates can be grouped into different clades according to the genetics of siderophore biosynthesis and recycling. The pyoverdine locus of the six P. putida clinical isolates that have so far been completely sequenced, are not closely related; three strains (P. putida HB13667, HB3267, and NBRC14164T) are grouped in Clade I and the other three in Clade II, suggesting possible different origins and evolution. In one clinical strain, P. putida HB4184, the production of siderophores is induced under high osmolarity conditions. The pyoverdine locus in this strain is closely related to that of strain P. putida HB001 which was isolated from sandy shore soil of the Yellow Sea in Korean marine sand, suggesting their possible origin, and evolution. The acquisition of two unique TonB-dependent transporters for xenosiderophore acquisition, similar to those existing in the opportunistic pathogen P. aeruginosa PAO, is an interesting adaptation trait of the clinical strain P. putida H8234 that may confer adaptive advantages under low iron availability conditions. PMID:28082966

  5. Whole genome and transcriptome analyses of environmental antibiotic sensitive and multi-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates exposed to waste water and tap water.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Thomas; Armant, Olivier; Bretschneider, Nancy; Hahn, Alexander; Kirchen, Silke; Seifert, Martin; Dötsch, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The fitness of sensitive and resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa in different aquatic environments depends on genetic capacities and transcriptional regulation. Therefore, an antibiotic-sensitive isolate PA30 and a multi-resistant isolate PA49 originating from waste waters were compared via whole genome and transcriptome Illumina sequencing after exposure to municipal waste water and tap water. A number of different genomic islands (e.g. PAGIs, PAPIs) were identified in the two environmental isolates beside the highly conserved core genome. Exposure to tap water and waste water exhibited similar transcriptional impacts on several gene clusters (antibiotic and metal resistance, genetic mobile elements, efflux pumps) in both environmental P. aeruginosa isolates. The MexCD-OprJ efflux pump was overexpressed in PA49 in response to waste water. The expression of resistance genes, genetic mobile elements in PA49 was independent from the water matrix. Consistently, the antibiotic sensitive strain PA30 did not show any difference in expression of the intrinsic resistance determinants and genetic mobile elements. Thus, the exposure of both isolates to polluted waste water and oligotrophic tap water resulted in similar expression profiles of mentioned genes. However, changes in environmental milieus resulted in rather unspecific transcriptional responses than selected and stimuli-specific gene regulation.

  6. In vitro activity of Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree) oil against bacterial and Candida spp. isolates from clinical specimens.

    PubMed

    Banes-Marshall, L; Cawley, P; Phillips, C A

    2001-01-01

    This study investigates the in vitro activity of tea tree oil (TTO) against a range of wild strains of microorganisms isolated from clinical specimens of leg ulcers and pressure sores. The antimicrobial effectiveness of TTO is determined in terms of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) or minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC). The isolates include methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), S. aureus, faecal streptococci, beta-haemolytic streptococci, coagulase-negative staphylococci, Pseudomonas spp. and coliform bacilli. Eleven Candida spp. isolates from skin and vaginal swabs also are tested. Using an agar dilution assay, the MICs of TTO in 88 out of 90 isolates was 0.5-1.0% (v/v), whilst with P. aeruginosa it was >2% (v/v). A broth microdilution method was used to determine MIC and minimum cidal concentration (MCC) of 80 isolates. In 64 isolates, TTO produced an inhibitory and cidal effect at 3% and 4% (v/v), respectively. S. aureus and Candida spp. were the most susceptible to TTO, with MICs and MBCs of 0.5% and 1%, respectively. P. aeruginosa and the faecal streptococci isolates, with MICs and MBCs of >8%, were resistant to TTO.

  7. The prevalence and resistance patterns of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a tertiary care hospital in Kosovo.

    PubMed

    Lila, Greta; Mulliqi-Osmani, Gjyle; Bajrami, Rrezarta; Kurti, Arsim; Azizi, Elvir; Raka, Lul

    2017-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative bacterium that continues to a leading cause of opportunistic nosocomial infections. The rapid increase in drug resistance in clinical isolates of this pathogen is a worldwide concern. The aim of this study was to investigate the distribution rate, prevalence and resistance patterns of P. aeruginosa in clinical specimens from the University Clinical Centre of Kosovo (UCCK). During a three-year period, 553 P. aeruginosa isolates were collected from patients admitted to a variety of UCCK units. The P. aeruginosa isolates were identified using standard laboratory procedures, and the susceptibility of the isolates to antimicrobial agents was investigated using the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion assay according to European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) (2013-2015) guidelines. P. aeruginosa was the second most frequently isolated pathogen. The isolation rate of P. aeruginosa was 7.6%, 10.1% and 8.6% in 2013, 2014 and 2015, respectively. Most clinical samples were from ICU (380, 68.7%). There was a statistically significant difference between ICU and non-ICU (p<0.05). P. aeruginosa isolates were most frequently isolated from the respiratory tract (323, 58.4%). The rate of resistance against most of the tested antimicrobials has increased, especially for carbapenems. Imipenem resistance was 25.2%, 26.5%, and 37.7% and meropenem resistance was 20.1%, 23.4%, and 36% in 2013, 2014 and 2015, respectively. This study provides important data on current antimicrobial resistance, and the results demonstrate that the resistance rates are progressively increasing. There is an urgent need to emphasise the prudent use of antibiotics and strictly adhere to the concept of "reserve drugs" to minimise the misuse of available antimicrobials. The acquisition and analysis of prevalence and resistance data will be an important tool to identify targets for quality improvement in Kosovo and will support the preparation of

  8. Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa co-infection is associated with cystic fibrosis-related diabetes and poor clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Limoli, D H; Yang, J; Khansaheb, M K; Helfman, B; Peng, L; Stecenko, A A; Goldberg, J B

    2016-06-01

    Cystic fibrosis-related diabetes (CFRD) patients suffer from accelerated rates of pulmonary decline compared to cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with normal glucose tolerance (NGT). However, the mechanisms underlying this difference are unknown. While CFRD is associated with increased respiratory infections, a link between infection and enhanced pulmonary dysfunction remains unclear. The development of glucose intolerance is spectral, resulting in impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) prior to the diagnosis of CFRD. Inclusion of IGT patients within the NGT group may diminish the ability to identify correlations with CFRD. With this in mind, this study aimed to determine if the association between CFRD and respiratory infections is correlated with pulmonary decline. Respiratory cultures from 234 CF patients with confirmed diagnosis of NGT or CFRD were analyzed to measure rates of infection, focusing on the two most prevalent bacteria in CF, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Infection status was correlated with pulmonary function and confounding clinical variables including age, gender, blood glucose levels, and CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) phenotype were considered in multivariate analyses. CFRD patients, particularly those with extremely high blood glucose levels, were more likely than NGT patients to be co-infected with S. aureus and P. aeruginosa, compared to infection with only one pathogen. Co-infection was associated with decreased lung function and increased frequency of pulmonary exacerbations, even after adjustment for confounding variables. Alterations in the microbial community composition, as opposed to the presence of a single pathogen, may account for greater pulmonary decline in CFRD patients.

  9. Clinically isolated neurosarcoidosis: a recommended diagnostic path.

    PubMed

    Wegener, Susanne; Linnebank, Michael; Martin, Roland; Valavanis, Anton; Weller, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The involvement of the central nervous system in sarcoidosis can manifest with a variety of neurological symptoms, most of them nonspecific. We identified 13 patients with neurosarcoidosis diagnosed at our clinic. Six of 13 patients presented with clinically isolated neurosarcoidosis (CINS) without signs or symptoms of systemic disease. CINS patients were not different with respect to age, as well as imaging and spinal fluid findings, or disease course. However, we found spinal cord involvement in neurosarcoidosis patients much more common than previously described (in 8 out of 13 patients). Spinal cord affection was associated with older age at diagnosis and a less favorable response to therapy. Based on our findings, we propose a diagnostic path for neurosarcoidosis, including spinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a mandatory and early step during diagnostic workup.

  10. Clinically Isolated Syndromes: Clinical Characteristics, Differential Diagnosis, and Management

    PubMed Central

    EFENDİ, Hüsnü

    2015-01-01

    Clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) is a term that describes the first clinical onset of potential multiple sclerosis (MS). The term CIS is typically applied to young adults with episodes of acute or subacute onset, which reaches a peak quite rapidly within 2–3 weeks. In 85% of young adults who develop MS, onset occurs with an acute, CIS of the optic nerves, brainstem, or spinal cord. When clinically silent brain lesions are seen on MRI, the likelihood of developing MS is high. Because no single clinical feature or diagnostic test is sufficient for the diagnosis of CIS, diagnostic criteria have included a combination of both clinical and paraclinical studies. Diagnostic criteria from the International Panel of McDonald and colleagues incorporate MRI evidence of dissemination in time and space to allow a diagnosis of definite MS in patients with CIS. As CIS is typically the earliest clinical expression of MS, research on patients with CIS may provide new insights into early pathological changes and pathogenetic mechanisms that might affect the course of the disorder. With recent improvements in diagnosis and the advent of disease-modifying treatments for MS, there has been growing interest and research in patients with CIS.

  11. Efficacy of the Novel Antibiotic POL7001 in Preclinical Models of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Cigana, Cristina; Bernardini, Francesca; Facchini, Marcella; Alcalá-Franco, Beatriz; Riva, Camilla; De Fino, Ida; Rossi, Alice; Ranucci, Serena; Misson, Pauline; Chevalier, Eric; Brodmann, Maj; Schmitt, Michel; Wach, Achim; Dale, Glenn E.

    2016-01-01

    The clinical development of antibiotics with a new mode of action combined with efficient pulmonary drug delivery is a priority against untreatable Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections. POL7001 is a macrocycle antibiotic belonging to the novel class of protein epitope mimetic (PEM) molecules with selective and potent activity against P. aeruginosa. We investigated ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) and cystic fibrosis (CF) as indications of the clinical potential of POL7001 to treat P. aeruginosa pulmonary infections. MICs of POL7001 and comparators were measured for reference and clinical P. aeruginosa strains. The therapeutic efficacy of POL7001 given by pulmonary administration was evaluated in murine models of P. aeruginosa acute and chronic pneumonia. POL7001 showed potent in vitro activity against a large panel of P. aeruginosa isolates from CF patients, including multidrug-resistant (MDR) isolates with adaptive phenotypes such as mucoid or hypermutable phenotypes. The efficacy of POL7001 was demonstrated in both wild-type and CF mice. In addition to a reduced bacterial burden in the lung, POL7001-treated mice showed progressive body weight recovery and reduced levels of inflammatory markers, indicating an improvement in general condition. Pharmacokinetic studies indicated that POL7001 reached significant concentrations in the lung after pulmonary administration, with low systemic exposure. These results support the further evaluation of POL7001 as a novel therapeutic agent for the treatment of P. aeruginosa pulmonary infections. PMID:27297477

  12. Dissemination of Carbapenemase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Romania

    PubMed Central

    Flonta, Mirela; Boudehen, Yves-Marie; Creton, Elodie; Bernabeu, Sandrine; Vogel, Anaïs; Naas, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Fifteen carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae isolates and 12 carbapenemase-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates were recovered from patients hospitalized between August 2011 and March 2013 at the Hospital of Infectious Disease, Cluj-Napoca, Romania. One KPC-, nine NDM-1-, four OXA-48-, and one VIM-4-producing Enterobacteriaceae isolates along with 11 VIM-2-producing and one IMP-13-producing P. aeruginosa isolates were recovered from clinical samples. All carbapenemase genes were located on self-conjugative plasmids and were associated with other resistance determinants, including extended-spectrum β-lactamases and RmtC methylases. PMID:26303798

  13. Effects of fertilizer-urea on growth, photosynthetic activity and microcystins production of Microcystis aeruginosa isolated from Dianchi Lake.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wenmin; Bi, Yonghong; Hu, Zhengyu

    2014-05-01

    Urea is the most frequently applied nitrogen (N) fertilizer in agriculture, while its loss is assumed triggering algal blooms in adjacent water bodies. In this context the present study assessed the growth, photosynthetic activity as well as toxin production of Microcystis aeruginosa at different urea concentrations (0.125, 1.25, 12.5, 250 and 2,500 mg/L) using BG11 (containing 250 mg/L NO3(-)-N) as control. The results showed for all endpoints that M. aeruginosa is capable of using urea as N source: the two highest urea treatments delivered comparable values like the control. Low urea concentrations (0.125 and 1.25 mg/L), which were comparable to environmental urea levels, did not sustainably promote the growth, photosynthesis and toxin production of the test species. While, in certain microenvironments urea might potentially reach the concentrations that may affect M. aeruginosa.

  14. Effects of mucoid and non-mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from cystic fibrosis patients on inflammatory mediator release from human polymorphonuclear granulocytes and rat mast cells.

    PubMed Central

    Friedl, P; König, B; König, W

    1992-01-01

    Mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa causing chronic bronchopulmonary infection in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients may interfere with host defence mechanisms. We investigated 13 P. aeruginosa strains isolated from sputa of CF patients with regard to the induction or modulation of inflammatory mediator release from human neutrophils (PMN) and rat mast cells. The effects of mucoid as compared to non-mucoid bacteria were studied using a mucoid strain and its non-mucoid revertant. The release of leukotrienes (LT) and histamine in response to the majority of the CF strains was insignificant. However, preincubation of PMN with P. aeruginosa caused a dose-dependent decrease (50-95%) of LTB4 and LTC4 generation and LTB4 metabolism induced by the Ca(2+)-ionophore A23187 or opsonized zymosan (ZX) (P less than 0.001). The mucoid strains caused a three- to 10-fold higher impairment of LTB4 release (P less than 0.05) and a concomitant down-regulation of LTB4 receptors on neutrophils. Inhibitory effects were also obtained for mucoid and non-mucoid bacteria when the phorbol-ester or the Ca(2+)-ionophore induced luminol enhanced chemiluminescence response (P less than 0.001) or the histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells (P less than 0.01) was studied. The bacteria-cell contact with non-mucoid strains was associated with an increased Ca2+ influx into PMN, whereas mucoid bacteria had no effect. In addition, a protein kinase C-dependent decrease of the C3bi receptor was suppressed by the mucoid--and less effectively--by the non-mucoid strain. The results suggest that the impairment of the phagocytic and inflammatory system may contribute to the pathogenesis and persistence of mucoid P. aeruginosa infection in CF. PMID:1321094

  15. Overexpression of AmpC and Efflux Pumps in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from Bloodstream Infections: Prevalence and Impact on Resistance in a Spanish Multicenter Study▿

    PubMed Central

    Cabot, Gabriel; Ocampo-Sosa, Alain A.; Tubau, Fe; Macia, María D.; Rodríguez, Cristina; Moya, Bartolomé; Zamorano, Laura; Suárez, Cristina; Peña, Carmen; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Oliver, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence and impact of the overexpression of AmpC and efflux pumps were evaluated with a collection of 190 Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates recovered from bloodstream infections in a 2008 multicenter study (10 hospitals) in Spain. The MICs of a panel of 13 antipseudomonal agents were determined by microdilution, and the expressions of ampC, mexB, mexY, mexD, and mexF were determined by real-time reverse transcription (RT)-PCR. Up to 39% of the isolates overexpressed at least one of the mechanisms. ampC overexpression (24.2%) was the most prevalent mechanism, followed by mexY (13.2%), mexB (12.6%), mexF (4.2%), and mexD (2.2%). The overexpression of mexB plus mexY, documented for 5.3% of the isolates, was the only combination showing a significantly (P = 0.02) higher prevalence than expected from the frequencies of the individual mechanisms (1.6%). Additionally, all imipenem-resistant isolates studied (25 representative isolates) showed inactivating mutations in oprD. Most of the isolates nonsusceptible to piperacillin-tazobactam (96%) and ceftazidime (84%) overexpressed ampC, while mexB (25%) and mexY (29%) overexpressions gained relevance among cefepime-nonsusceptible isolates. Nevertheless, the prevalence of mexY overexpression was highest among tobramycin-nonsusceptible isolates (37%), and that of mexB was highest among meropenem-nonsusceptible isolates (33%). Regarding ciprofloxacin-resistant isolates, besides the expected increased prevalence of efflux pump overexpression, a highly significant link to ampC overexpression was documented for the first time: up to 52% of ciprofloxacin-nonsusceptible isolates overexpressed ampC, sharply contrasting with the 24% documented for the complete collection (P < 0.001). In summary, mutation-driven resistance was frequent in P. aeruginosa isolates from bloodstream infections, whereas metallo-β-lactamases, detected in 2 isolates (1%) producing VIM-2, although with increasing prevalences, were still uncommon. PMID

  16. Emergence of a mutL mutation causing multilocus sequence typing-pulsed-field gel electrophoresis discrepancy among Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from a cystic fibrosis patient.

    PubMed

    García-Castillo, María; Máiz, Luis; Morosini, María-Isabel; Rodríguez-Baños, Mercedes; Suarez, Lucrecia; Fernández-Olmos, Ana; Baquero, Fernando; Cantón, Rafael; del Campo, Rosa

    2012-05-01

    A multilocus sequence type (MLST) shift (from ST242 to ST996) was detected in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates with a uniform pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) pattern obtained from a chronically colonized patient. MLST mutational change involved the mutL gene with the consequent emergence of a hypermutable phenotype. This observation challenges the required neutrality of mutL as an appropriate marker in MLST and alerts researchers to the limitations of MLST-only-based population studies in chronic infections under constant antibiotic selective pressure.

  17. Emergence of a mutL Mutation Causing Multilocus Sequence Typing–Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis Discrepancy among Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from a Cystic Fibrosis Patient

    PubMed Central

    García-Castillo, María; Máiz, Luis; Morosini, María-Isabel; Rodríguez-Baños, Mercedes; Suarez, Lucrecia; Fernández-Olmos, Ana; Baquero, Fernando; Cantón, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    A multilocus sequence type (MLST) shift (from ST242 to ST996) was detected in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates with a uniform pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) pattern obtained from a chronically colonized patient. MLST mutational change involved the mutL gene with the consequent emergence of a hypermutable phenotype. This observation challenges the required neutrality of mutL as an appropriate marker in MLST and alerts researchers to the limitations of MLST-only-based population studies in chronic infections under constant antibiotic selective pressure. PMID:22322352

  18. Nosocomial Spread of Colistin-Only-Sensitive Sequence Type 235 Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates Producing the Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamases GES-1 and GES-5 in Spain▿

    PubMed Central

    Viedma, Esther; Juan, Carlos; Acosta, Joshi; Zamorano, Laura; Otero, Joaquín R.; Sanz, Francisca; Chaves, Fernando; Oliver, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    The mechanisms responsible for the increasing prevalence of colistin-only-sensitive (COS) Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates in a Spanish hospital were investigated. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis revealed that 24 (50%) of the studied isolates belonged to the same clone, identified as the internationally spread sequence type 235 (ST235) through multilocus sequence typing. In addition to several mutational resistance mechanisms, an integron containing seven resistance determinants was detected. Remarkably, the extended-spectrum β-lactamase GES-1 and its Gly170Ser carbapenem-hydrolyzing derivative GES-5 were first documented to be encoded in a single integron. This work is the first to describe GES enzymes in Spain and adds them to the growing list of β-lactamases of concern (PER, VIM, and OXA) detected in ST235 clone isolates. PMID:19738007

  19. Assessment of biofilm formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by antisense mazE-PNA.

    PubMed

    Valadbeigi, Hassan; Sadeghifard, Nourkhoda; Salehi, Majid Baseri

    2017-03-01

    The hallmark patogenicity in Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) is biofilm formation that is not easy to eradicate, because it has variety mechanisms for antibiotic resistance. In addition, toxin-antitoxin (TA) system may play role in biofilm formation. The current study aimed to evaluate the role of TA loci in biofilm formation. Therefore, 18 P. aeruginosa clinical isolates were collected and evaluated for specific biofilm and TA genes. The analysis by RT-qPCR demonstrated that expression of mazE antitoxin in biofilm formation was increase. On the other hand, mazE antitoxin TA system was used as target for antisense PNA. mazE-PNA was able to influence in biofilm formation and was inhibit at 5,10 and 15 μM concentrations biofilm formation in P. aeruginosa. Therefore, it could be highlighted target for anti-biofilm target to eradicate P. aeruginosa biofilm producer.

  20. Inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation by 2,2’-bipyridyl, lipoic, kojic and picolinic acids

    PubMed Central

    Çevik, Kübra; Ulusoy, Seyhan

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): The inhibitory effects of iron chelators, and FeCl3 chelation on biofilm formation and swarming motility were investigated against an opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Materials and Methods: The inhibitory activity of 2,2’-bipyridyl, lipoic acid, kojic acid and picolinic acid on biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa strain PAO1 and three clinical isolates (P. aeruginosa PAK01, P. aeruginosa PAK02 and P. aeruginosa PAK03) were investigated, based on crystal violet assay, and swarming motility test. Results: The kojic, lipoic and picolinic acid inhibited biofilm formation by 5-33% in all tested P. aeruginosa isolates. When chelated iron was added, biofilm inhibition rates were determined to be 39-57%. Among the tested chelators against P. aeruginosa, lipoic acid (84%) and kojic acid (68%) presented the highest inhibition of swarming motility. This is the first study to report the inhibitory effect of lipoic acid on biofilm formation and swarming motility of P. aeruginosa. Conclusion: It is considered that lipoic and picolinic acids can serve as alternatives for the treatment of the P. aeruginosa infections by inhibiting biofilm formation. PMID:26557964

  1. Antibacterial effect of NSAIDS on clinical isolates of urinary tract infection and diabetic foot infection.

    PubMed

    Akhter, Tasneem; Baqai, Rakhshanda; Aziz, Mubashar

    2010-01-01

    Non Steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDS) are a group of chemically dissimilar agents that have primary effect of inhibition of prostaglandin's synthesis. Aspirin (Acetyl Salicylic Acid) is used as an analgesic, anti pyretic, anti-inflammatory agent and also have an anticoagulant effect. Tylenol (acetaminophen) is used as pain reliever. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of Aspirin and Tylenol against clinical isolates of urinary tract infection (UTI) and diabetic foot infections. A total of 100 clinical isolates were analyzed. Out of these 50 were urine samples from diabetic patients with UTI and 50 pus samples from diabetic foot infection. Bacteriological study was done by inoculating urine samples on Cysteine Lactose Electrolyte deficient (CLED) media. Pus samples were inoculated on Blood agar and MacConkey's agar. Identification was done by colony characteristics, gram staining and standard biochemical tests and Quick Test Strip (QTS-20) DESTO Laboratories, Karachi. Antibacterial effect of Aspirin and Tylenol were tested against 100 clinical isolates by Replica plate method, Agar well diffusion method and tube dilution method. Concentrations of Aspirin and Tylenol (10 microg, 50 microg, 100 microg, 500 microg, 1000 microg) were made in Muller Hinton media. Bacteria isolated from urine samples were Escherichia coli 30%, Staphylococcus aureus 20%, Enterococcus faecalis 10%, S. saprophyticus 10%, Proteus spp. 6%, Pseudomonas spp. 6%, S. pyogenes 6%, S. agalactiae 6%, S. epidermidis 4%, and Klebsiella spp. 2%. Bacteria isolated from pus samples were S. aureus 30%, Pseudomonas aeruginosa 18%, S. epidermidis 14%, Klebsiella pneumonia 12%, Proteus mirabilis 12%, E. coli 10%, P. vulgaris 4%. Aspirin was effective at 100-500 microg concentration against all isolates. Tylenol has marked effect on pathogens at 100 microg concentration. Aspirin and Tylenol along with analgesic, anti-pyretic, anti-inflammatory properties also have marked anti

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of the Triclosan- and Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain B10W Isolated from Municipal Wastewater

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Chuanqing; Nelson, Matthew; Cao, Guangxiang

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Here, we report the complete genome sequence of the triclosan- and multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain B10W, obtained from municipal wastewater in Hawaii. The bacterium has a 6.7-Mb genome, contains 6,391 coding sequences and 78 RNAs, with an average G+C content of 66.2 mol%. PMID:28104659

  3. Fingerprint Analysis and Identification of Strains ST309 as a Potential High Risk Clone in a Pseudomonas aeruginosa Population Isolated from Children with Bacteremia in Mexico City

    PubMed Central

    Morales-Espinosa, Rosario; Delgado, Gabriela; Espinosa, Luis F.; Isselo, Dassaev; Méndez, José L.; Rodriguez, Cristina; Miranda, Guadalupe; Cravioto, Alejandro

    2017-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen and is associated with nosocomial infections. Its ability to thrive in a broad range of environments is due to a large and diverse genome of which its accessory genome is part. The objective of this study was to characterize P. aeruginosa strains isolated from children who developed bacteremia, using pulse-field gel electrophoresis, and in terms of its genomic islands, virulence genes, multilocus sequence type, and antimicrobial susceptibility. Our results showed that P. aeruginosa strains presented the seven virulence genes: toxA, lasB, lecA, algR, plcH, phzA1, and toxR, a type IV pilin alleles (TFP) group I or II. Additionally, we detected a novel pilin and accessory gene, expanding the number of TFP alleles to group VI. All strains presented the PAPI-2 Island and the majority were exoU+ and exoS+ genotype. Ten percent of the strains were multi-drug resistant phenotype, 18% extensively drug-resistant, 68% moderately resistant and only 3% were susceptible to all the antimicrobial tested. The most prevalent acquired β-Lactamase was KPC. We identified a group of ST309 strains, as a potential high risk clone. Our finding also showed that the strains isolated from patients with bacteremia have important virulence factors involved in colonization and dissemination as: a TFP group I or II; the presence of the exoU gene within the PAPI-2 island and the presence of the exoS gene. PMID:28298909

  4. Fingerprint Analysis and Identification of Strains ST309 as a Potential High Risk Clone in a Pseudomonas aeruginosa Population Isolated from Children with Bacteremia in Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Morales-Espinosa, Rosario; Delgado, Gabriela; Espinosa, Luis F; Isselo, Dassaev; Méndez, José L; Rodriguez, Cristina; Miranda, Guadalupe; Cravioto, Alejandro

    2017-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen and is associated with nosocomial infections. Its ability to thrive in a broad range of environments is due to a large and diverse genome of which its accessory genome is part. The objective of this study was to characterize P. aeruginosa strains isolated from children who developed bacteremia, using pulse-field gel electrophoresis, and in terms of its genomic islands, virulence genes, multilocus sequence type, and antimicrobial susceptibility. Our results showed that P. aeruginosa strains presented the seven virulence genes: toxA, lasB, lecA, algR, plcH, phzA1, and toxR, a type IV pilin alleles (TFP) group I or II. Additionally, we detected a novel pilin and accessory gene, expanding the number of TFP alleles to group VI. All strains presented the PAPI-2 Island and the majority were exoU+ and exoS+ genotype. Ten percent of the strains were multi-drug resistant phenotype, 18% extensively drug-resistant, 68% moderately resistant and only 3% were susceptible to all the antimicrobial tested. The most prevalent acquired β-Lactamase was KPC. We identified a group of ST309 strains, as a potential high risk clone. Our finding also showed that the strains isolated from patients with bacteremia have important virulence factors involved in colonization and dissemination as: a TFP group I or II; the presence of the exoU gene within the PAPI-2 island and the presence of the exoS gene.

  5. Successful implementation of infection control strategies prevents P. aeruginosa transmission among cystic fibrosis patients inside the hospital

    PubMed Central

    Matt, Benedikt; Mitteregger, Dieter; Renner, Sabine; Presterl, Elisabeth; Assadian, Ojan; Diab-Elschahawi, Magda

    2014-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to characterise the epidemiology of P. aeruginosa isolated from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients at the Vienna General Hospital (VGH) by molecular genetic fingerprinting in order to understand transmission ways and to evaluate the established infection control protocols. Methods: The outpatient clinic for CF patients at the VGH cares for children and adolescents up to the age of 18 years. Among an average of 139 patients cared for at the clinic, 41 were tested positive for P. aeruginosa during the study period. Fifty P. aeruginosa isolates, obtained between August 2010 and March 2012 from routine examinations of CF patients, were subject to molecular characterization using the DiversiLab® method. Results: 42 distinguishable molecular-biological patterns were identified, 7 of which were found multiple times. 40 out of 42 genotypes were retrieved from single patients only, while two patterns were present in two patients each. Nine patients presented with two or more phenotypically diverse P. aeruginosa isolates. In five of these cases the retrieved isolates belonged to the same genotype. Conclusion: The broad genetic heterogeneity of P. aeruginosa in the studied patient population suggests that the majority of CF patients cared for at the VGH acquire P. aeruginosa from environmental sources. It may be concluded that implemented infection control guidelines have been successful in preventing nosocomial transmission of P. aeruginosa among CF patients within the VGH and patient-to-patient transmission outside the hospital. Chronic polyclonal infection/colonization was rare in the study population. PMID:25285264

  6. Effect of biosurfactant and fertilizer on biodegradation of crude oil by marine isolates of Bacillus megaterium, Corynebacterium kutscheri and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Thavasi, Rengathavasi; Jayalakshmi, Singaram; Banat, Ibrahim M

    2011-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of fertilizers and biosurfactants on biodegradation of crude oil by three marine bacterial isolates; Bacillus megaterium, Corynebacterium kutscheri and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Five sets of experiments were carried out in shake flask and microcosm conditions with crude oil as follows: Set 1-only bacterial cells added (no fertilizer and biosurfactant), Set 2-with additional fertilizer only, Set 3-with additional biosurfactant only, Set 4-with added biosurfactant+fertilizer, Set 5-with no bacterial cells added (control), all the above experimental sets were incubated for 168 h. The biosurfactant+fertilizer added Set 4, resulted in maximum crude oil degradation within shake flask and microcosm conditions. Among the three bacterial isolates, P. aeruginosa and biosurfactant produced by this strain resulted in maximum crude oil degradation compared to the other two bacterial strains investigated. Interestingly, when biosurfactant and bacterial cells were used (Set 3), significant oil biodegradation activity occurred and the difference between this treatment and that in Set 4 with added fertilizer+biosurfactant were only 4-5% higher degradation level in shake flask and 3.2-7% in microcosm experiments for all three bacterial strains used. It is concluded that, biosurfactants alone capable of promoting biodegradation to a large extent without added fertilizers, which will reduce the cost of bioremediation process and minimizes the dilution or wash away problems encountered when water soluble fertilizers used during bioremediation of aquatic environments.

  7. An in-vitro study of carbapenem-induced morphological changes and endotoxin release in clinical isolates of gram-negative bacilli.

    PubMed

    Horii, T; Kobayashi, M; Sato, K; Ichiyama, S; Ohta, M

    1998-04-01

    One hundred clinical isolates, including Escherichia coli, Serratia marcescens, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus vulgaris and Proteus mirabilis, were exposed to carbapenems (imipenem, panipenem, meropenem and biapenem) at 0.5 x MIC for 3 h, then their morphology was examined and endotoxin release determined. Ceftazidime, which induces filament formation, was used as a control. Scanning electron microscopy showed that these carbapenems induced formation of spherical or ovoid cells, except for P. aeruginosa treated with meropenem and biapenem; these latter cells had a 'bulge' midway along them and we have termed them 'oval-centred'. There was a relationship between morphology and the amount of endotoxin released following exposure to carbapenems or ceftazidime. Of all the species investigated, P. aeruginosa showed the most variable morphological changes. P. aeruginosa exposed to biapenem were longer oval-centred in shape, and released significantly more endotoxin than those exposed to imipenem, panipenem (spherical) or meropenem (shorter oval-centred cells) (P=0.030, 0.017 and 0.002, respectively). In all strains except P. aeruginosa, carbapenems induced significantly less endotoxin release than ceftazidime (P < 0.05).

  8. Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a neonatal intensive care unit: molecular epidemiology and infection control measures

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a non-fermentative, gram-negative rod, is responsible for a wide variety of clinical syndromes in NICU patients, including sepsis, pneumonia, meningitis, diarrhea, conjunctivitis and skin infections. An increased number of infections and colonisations by P. aeruginosa has been observed in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) of our university hospital between 2005 and 2007. Methods Hand disinfection compliance before and after an educational programme on hand hygiene was evaluated. Identification of microrganisms was performed using conventional methods. Antibiotic susceptibility was evaluated by MIC microdilution. Genotyping was performed by PFGE analysis. Results The molecular epidemiology of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the NICU of the Federico II University hospital (Naples, Italy) and the infection control measures adopted to stop the spreading of P. aeruginosa in the ward were described. From July 2005 to June 2007, P. aeruginosa was isolated from 135 neonates and caused severe infections in 11 of them. Macrorestriction analysis of clinical isolates from 90 neonates identified 20 distinct genotypes, one major PFGE type (A) being isolated from 48 patients and responsible for 4 infections in 4 of them, four other distinct recurrent genotypes being isolated in 6 to 4 patients. Seven environmental strains were isolated from the hand of a nurse and from three sinks on two occasions, two of these showing PFGE profiles A and G identical to two clinical isolates responsible for infection. The successful control of the outbreak was achieved through implementation of active surveillance of healthcare-associated infections in the ward together with environmental microbiological sampling and an intense educational programme on hand disinfection among the staff members. Conclusion P. aeruginosa infections in the NICU were caused by the cross-transmission of an epidemic clone in 4 neonates, and by the selection of sporadic clones in 7

  9. Antibacterial activities of crude extract of Aloe barbadensis to clinically isolated bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Ruchi; Mishra, Avinash

    2010-03-01

    The antibacterial activity of Aloe barbadensis was tested on clinically isolated bacterial pathogens i.e. Enterococcus bovis, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Proteus vulgaris, Proteus mirabilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Morganella morganii, and Klebsiella pneumoniae causing infection in human being. Ethanolic and aqueous extracts were used for the antibacterial effect, which was measured by the appearance of zone of inhibition. Relatively higher MIC concentrations were obtained for gram negative bacteria E. coli and K. pneumoniae, with ethanol extract; however, no inhibitory effect was noted for aqueous extract. Ethanolic extract possesses great inhibitory activity for gram positive bacteria, E. bovis followed by S. aureus. Among gram negative bacteria, highest inhibitory effect was observed with P. aeruginosa, followed by M. morganii, P. mirabilis, and P. vulgaris, which was significant (p < 0.01) than E. coli and K. pneumoniae. Antimicrobial activity tests of crude extract of A. barbadensis were carried out to validate the use of traditional medicinal herbal and results of this study tend to give credence to the common use of A. barbadensis gel and leaf.

  10. Use of a Multiplex Transcript Method for Analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Gene Expression Profiles in the Cystic Fibrosis Lung.

    PubMed

    Gifford, Alex H; Willger, Sven D; Dolben, Emily L; Moulton, Lisa A; Dorman, Dana B; Bean, Heather; Hill, Jane E; Hampton, Thomas H; Ashare, Alix; Hogan, Deborah A

    2016-10-01

    The discovery of therapies that modulate Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence or that can eradicate chronic P. aeruginosa lung infections associated with cystic fibrosis (CF) will be advanced by an improved understanding of P. aeruginosa behavior in vivo We demonstrate the use of multiplexed Nanostring technology to monitor relative abundances of P. aeruginosa transcripts across clinical isolates, in serial samples, and for the purposes of comparing microbial physiology in vitro and in vivo The expression of 75 transcripts encoded by genes implicated in CF lung disease was measured in a variety of P. aeruginosa strains as well as RNA serial sputum samples from four P. aeruginosa-colonized subjects with CF collected over 6 months. We present data on reproducibility, the results from different methods of normalization, and demonstrate high concordance between transcript relative abundance data obtained by Nanostring or transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) analysis. Furthermore, we address considerations regarding sequence variation between strains during probe design. Analysis of P. aeruginosa grown in vitro identified transcripts that correlated with the different phenotypes commonly observed in CF clinical isolates. P. aeruginosa transcript profiles in RNA from CF sputum indicated alginate production in vivo, and transcripts involved in quorum-sensing regulation were less abundant in sputum than strains grown in the laboratory. P. aeruginosa gene expression patterns from sputum clustered closely together relative to patterns for laboratory-grown cultures; in contrast, laboratory-grown P. aeruginosa showed much greater transcriptional variation with only loose clustering of strains with different phenotypes. The clustering within and between subjects was surprising in light of differences in inhaled antibiotic and respiratory symptoms, suggesting that the pathways represented by these 75 transcripts are stable in chronic CF P. aeruginosa lung infections.

  11. Use of a Multiplex Transcript Method for Analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Gene Expression Profiles in the Cystic Fibrosis Lung

    PubMed Central

    Willger, Sven D.; Dolben, Emily L.; Moulton, Lisa A.; Dorman, Dana B.; Bean, Heather; Hill, Jane E.; Hampton, Thomas H.; Ashare, Alix

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of therapies that modulate Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence or that can eradicate chronic P. aeruginosa lung infections associated with cystic fibrosis (CF) will be advanced by an improved understanding of P. aeruginosa behavior in vivo. We demonstrate the use of multiplexed Nanostring technology to monitor relative abundances of P. aeruginosa transcripts across clinical isolates, in serial samples, and for the purposes of comparing microbial physiology in vitro and in vivo. The expression of 75 transcripts encoded by genes implicated in CF lung disease was measured in a variety of P. aeruginosa strains as well as RNA serial sputum samples from four P. aeruginosa-colonized subjects with CF collected over 6 months. We present data on reproducibility, the results from different methods of normalization, and demonstrate high concordance between transcript relative abundance data obtained by Nanostring or transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) analysis. Furthermore, we address considerations regarding sequence variation between strains during probe design. Analysis of P. aeruginosa grown in vitro identified transcripts that correlated with the different phenotypes commonly observed in CF clinical isolates. P. aeruginosa transcript profiles in RNA from CF sputum indicated alginate production in vivo, and transcripts involved in quorum-sensing regulation were less abundant in sputum than strains grown in the laboratory. P. aeruginosa gene expression patterns from sputum clustered closely together relative to patterns for laboratory-grown cultures; in contrast, laboratory-grown P. aeruginosa showed much greater transcriptional variation with only loose clustering of strains with different phenotypes. The clustering within and between subjects was surprising in light of differences in inhaled antibiotic and respiratory symptoms, suggesting that the pathways represented by these 75 transcripts are stable in chronic CF P. aeruginosa lung infections. PMID:27481238

  12. Metallo-β-Lactamases in Clinical Pseudomonas Isolates in Taiwan and Identification of VIM-3, a Novel Variant of the VIM-2 Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jing-Jou; Hsueh, Po-Ren; Ko, Wen-Chien; Luh, Kwen-Tay; Tsai, Shu-Huei; Wu, Hsiu-Mei; Wu, Jiunn-Jong

    2001-01-01

    A total of 209 clinical isolates of Pseudomonas (193 Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 10 P. putida, 4 P. stutzeri, and 2 P. fluorescens isolates) with reduced susceptibilities to imipenem and/or ceftazidime were subjected to PCR assays with primers specific for blaIMP-1, blaIMP-2, blaVIM-1, and blaVIM-2 and sequence analysis to identify the metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs) prevalent among these organisms in Taiwan; and 21 isolates gave positive results. Five isolates including two P. putida and three P. stutzeri isolates were found to carry blaIMP-1, and six isolates including five P. putida and one P. stutzeri isolates harbored blaVIM-2. The remaining 10 isolates were P. aeruginosa, and all were found to carry a novel variant of blaVIM-2, designated blaVIM-3. There are only two nucleotide differences between blaVIM-2 and blaVIM-3, leading to two amino acid alterations. Our findings indicate that VIM-2 and its variant have become the most prevalent metalloenzymes in Pseudomonas in Taiwan. Southern hybridization with the blaVIM-2-, blaVIM-3-, and blaIMP-1 -specific probes revealed that only two VIM-2-producing P. putida isolates appeared to carry the MBL gene on plasmids. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis showed that six VIM-3-producing P. aeruginosa isolates and two IMP-1-producing P. stutzeri isolates were genetically related, suggesting that the spread of these MBL genes in Taiwan could be due to clonal dissemination as well as genetic exchange between different clones. PMID:11451678

  13. Cystic Fibrosis Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Retain Iron-Regulated Antimicrobial Activity against Staphylococcus aureus through the Action of Multiple Alkylquinolones.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Angela T; Jones, Jace W; Cámara, Miguel; Williams, Paul; Kane, Maureen A; Oglesby-Sherrouse, Amanda G

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a hereditary disease that predisposes individuals to pulmonary dysfunction and chronic infections. Early infection of the CF lung with Staphylococcus aureus is common, while Pseudomonas aeruginosa becomes dominant as disease progresses. Emergence of P. aeruginosa likely depends on the action of multiple 2-alkyl-4-(1H)-quinolones (AQ) secreted by this organism. We recently showed that antimicrobial activity against S. aureus is enhanced by iron depletion and is dependent upon multiple AQ metabolites. Two of these AQs, the Pseudomonas quinolone signal [PQS; 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone] and 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline (HHQ), are quorum sensing molecules that activate the expression of multiple microbicidal factors. Here we show for the first time that HHQ also exhibits innate antimicrobial activity against S. aureus. We further show that iron depletion potentiates the antistaphylococcal activity of HHQ, as well as 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide (HQNO), another AQ that functions as a cytochrome B inhibitor. Notably, we found that deletion of the genes for the terminal biosynthetic steps for either PQS or HQNO results in overproduction of the HHQ intermediate, likely maintaining the ability of these mutants to mediate antimicrobial activity. Compensatory increases in HHQ were also observed in PQS-deficient CF isolates, which also retained the ability to mediate iron-regulated antimicrobial activity against S. aureus. These studies demonstrate that iron-regulated antimicrobial activity of P. aeruginosa against S. aureus is due to the cumulative effects of multiple AQ metabolites, both the production and activity of which are modulated by environmental iron levels.

  14. Cystic Fibrosis Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Retain Iron-Regulated Antimicrobial Activity against Staphylococcus aureus through the Action of Multiple Alkylquinolones

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Angela T.; Jones, Jace W.; Cámara, Miguel; Williams, Paul; Kane, Maureen A.; Oglesby-Sherrouse, Amanda G.

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a hereditary disease that predisposes individuals to pulmonary dysfunction and chronic infections. Early infection of the CF lung with Staphylococcus aureus is common, while Pseudomonas aeruginosa becomes dominant as disease progresses. Emergence of P. aeruginosa likely depends on the action of multiple 2-alkyl-4-(1H)-quinolones (AQ) secreted by this organism. We recently showed that antimicrobial activity against S. aureus is enhanced by iron depletion and is dependent upon multiple AQ metabolites. Two of these AQs, the Pseudomonas quinolone signal [PQS; 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone] and 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline (HHQ), are quorum sensing molecules that activate the expression of multiple microbicidal factors. Here we show for the first time that HHQ also exhibits innate antimicrobial activity against S. aureus. We further show that iron depletion potentiates the antistaphylococcal activity of HHQ, as well as 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide (HQNO), another AQ that functions as a cytochrome B inhibitor. Notably, we found that deletion of the genes for the terminal biosynthetic steps for either PQS or HQNO results in overproduction of the HHQ intermediate, likely maintaining the ability of these mutants to mediate antimicrobial activity. Compensatory increases in HHQ were also observed in PQS-deficient CF isolates, which also retained the ability to mediate iron-regulated antimicrobial activity against S. aureus. These studies demonstrate that iron-regulated antimicrobial activity of P. aeruginosa against S. aureus is due to the cumulative effects of multiple AQ metabolites, both the production and activity of which are modulated by environmental iron levels. PMID:27512392

  15. Antibiotic resistance pattern and evaluation of metallo-beta lactamase genes (VIM and IMP) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains producing MBL enzyme, isolated from patients with secondary immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Shirani, Kiana; Ataei, Behrouz; Roshandel, Fardad

    2016-01-01

    Background: One of the most common causes of hospital-acquired secondary infections in hospitalized patients is Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The aim of this study is to evaluate the expression of IMP and VIM in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains (carbapenem resistant and producer MBL enzyme) in patients with secondary immunodeficiency. Materials and Methods: In a cross sectional study, 96 patients with secondary immunodeficiency hospitalized in the Al-Zahra hospital were selected. Carbapenem resistant strains isolated and modified Hodge test was performed in order to confirm the presence of the metallo carbapenemase enzyme. Under the standard conditions they were sent to the central laboratory for investigating nosocomial infection Multiplex PCR. Results: Of 96 samples 28.1% were IMP positive, 5.2% VIM positive and 3.1% both VIM and IMP positive. The prevalence of multidrug resistance in the IMP and/or VIM negative samples was 29%, while all 5 VIM positive samples have had multidrug resistance. Also the prevalence of multi-drug resistance in IMP positive samples were 96.3% and in IMP and VIM positive samples were 100%. According to Fisher’s test, the prevalence of multi-drug resistance based on gene expression has significant difference (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Based on the results of this study it can be concluded that, a significant percentage of patients with secondary immunodeficiency that suffer nosocomial infections with multidrug resistance, especially Pseudomonas aeruginosa, are probably MBL-producing gene positive. Therefore the cause of infection should be considered in the hospital care system to identify their features, the presence of genes involved in the development of multi-drug resistance and antibiotic therapy. PMID:27563634

  16. Isolation of VIM-2-Producing Pseudomonas monteilii Clinical Strains Disseminated in a Tertiary Hospital in Northern Spain

    PubMed Central

    Guzmán-Gómez, Laura P.; Fernández-Martínez, Marta; Román, Elena; Rodríguez, Cristina; Marco, Francesc; Vila, Jordi; Martínez-Martínez, Luis

    2014-01-01

    We describe here the occurrence of blaVIM-2 in 10 carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas monteilii strains isolated from different clinical samples from patients at the University Hospital Marqués de Valdecilla in northern Spain. All the blaVIM-2-harboring P. monteilii isolates possessed a class 1 integron, with the cassette array [intI1_blaVIM-2_aac(6′)-Ib_qacEΔ1_sul1]. Our results show the emergence of VIM-2-producing multidrug-resistant species other than Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Pseudomonas putida in a Spanish hospital. P. monteilii, although sporadically isolated, should also be considered an important metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) reservoir. PMID:25421471

  17. In vitro antimicrobial activity of ten medicinal plants against clinical isolates of oral cancer cases

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Suppression of immune system in treated cancer patients may lead to secondary infections that obviate the need of antibiotics. In the present study, an attempt was made to understand the occurrence of secondary infections in immuno-suppressed patients along with herbal control of these infections with the following objectives to: (a) isolate the microbial species from the treated oral cancer patients along with the estimation of absolute neutrophile counts of patients (b) assess the in vitro antimicrobial activity medicinal plants against the above clinical isolates. Methods Blood and oral swab cultures were taken from 40 oral cancer patients undergoing treatment in the radiotherapy unit of Regional Cancer Institute, Pt. B.D.S. Health University, Rohtak, Haryana. Clinical isolates were identified by following general microbiological, staining and biochemical methods. The absolute neutrophile counts were done by following the standard methods. The medicinal plants selected for antimicrobial activity analysis were Asphodelus tenuifolius Cav., Asparagus racemosus Willd., Balanites aegyptiaca L., Cestrum diurnum L., Cordia dichotoma G. Forst, Eclipta alba L., Murraya koenigii (L.) Spreng. , Pedalium murex L., Ricinus communis L. and Trigonella foenum graecum L. The antimicrobial efficacy of medicinal plants was evaluated by modified Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. MIC and MFC were investigated by serial two fold microbroth dilution method. Results Prevalent bacterial pathogens isolated were Staphylococcus aureus (23.2%), Escherichia coli (15.62%), Staphylococcus epidermidis (12.5%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (9.37%), Klebsiella pneumonia (7.81%), Proteus mirabilis (3.6%), Proteus vulgaris (4.2%) and the fungal pathogens were Candida albicans (14.6%), Aspergillus fumigatus (9.37%). Out of 40 cases, 35 (87.5%) were observed as neutropenic. Eight medicinal plants (A. tenuifolius, A. racemosus, B. aegyptiaca, E. alba, M. koenigii, P. murex R. communis and T

  18. Impact of Plant Extracts and Antibiotics on Biofilm Formation of Clinical Isolates From Otitis Media

    PubMed Central

    Rehman, Saba; Mujtaba Ghauri, Shahbaz; Sabri, Anjum Nasim

    2016-01-01

    Background: Otitis media can lead to severe health consequences, and is the most common reason for antibiotic prescriptions and biofilm-mediated infections. However, the increased pattern of drug resistance in biofilm forming bacteria complicates the treatment of such infections. Objectives: This study was aimed to estimate the biofilm formation potential of the clinical isolates of otitis media, and to evaluate the efficacy of antibiotics and plant extracts as alternative therapeutic agents in biofilm eradication. Materials and Methods: The ear swab samples collected from the otitis media patients visiting the Mayo Hospital in Lahore were processed to isolate the bacteria, which were characterized using morphological, biochemical, and molecular (16S rRNA ribotyping) techniques. Then, the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of the antibiotics and crude plant extracts were measured against the isolates. The cell surface hydrophobicity and biofilm formation potential were determined, both qualitatively and quantitatively, with and without antibiotics. Finally, the molecular characterization of the biofilm forming proteins was done by amplifying the ica operon. Results: Pseudomonas aeruginosa (KC417303-05), Staphylococcus hemolyticus (KC417306), and Staphylococcus hominis (KC417307) were isolated from the otitis media specimens. Among the crude plant extracts, Acacia arabica showed significant antibacterial characteristics (MIC up to 13 mg/ml), while these isolates exhibited sensitivity towards ciprofloxacin (MIC 0.2 µg/mL). All of the bacterial strains had hydrophobic cellular surfaces that helped in their adherence to abiotic surfaces, leading to strong biofilm formation potential (up to 7 days). Furthermore, the icaC gene encoding polysaccharide intercellular adhesion protein was amplified from S. hemolyticus. Conclusions: The bacterial isolates exhibited strong biofilm formation potential, while the extracts of Acacia arabica significantly inhibited biofilm

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of Textile Azo Dye-Decolorizing and -Degrading Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain PFK10, Isolated from the Common Effluent Treatment Plant of the Ankleshwar Industrial Area of Gujarat, India.

    PubMed

    Faldu, P R; Kothari, V V; Kothari, C R; Rawal, C M; Domadia, K K; Patel, P A; Bhimani, H D; Raval, V H; Parmar, N R; Nathani, N M; Koringa, P G; Joshi, C G; Kothari, R K

    2014-02-06

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PFK10, isolated from the common effluent treatment plant (CETP) of the Ankleshwar industrial area of Gujarat, India. The 6.04-Mb draft genome sequence of strain PFK10 provides information about the genes encoding enzymes that enable the strain to decolorize and degrade textile azo dye.

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of Textile Azo Dye-Decolorizing and -Degrading Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain PFK10, Isolated from the Common Effluent Treatment Plant of the Ankleshwar Industrial Area of Gujarat, India

    PubMed Central

    Faldu, P. R.; Kothari, V. V.; Kothari, C. R.; Rawal, C. M.; Domadia, K. K.; Patel, P. A.; Bhimani, H. D.; Raval, V. H.; Parmar, N. R.; Nathani, N. M.; Koringa, P. G.; Joshi, C. G.

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PFK10, isolated from the common effluent treatment plant (CETP) of the Ankleshwar industrial area of Gujarat, India. The 6.04-Mb draft genome sequence of strain PFK10 provides information about the genes encoding enzymes that enable the strain to decolorize and degrade textile azo dye. PMID:24503984

  1. Specific Gene Loci of Clinical Pseudomonas putida Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Lázaro; Udaondo, Zulema; Duque, Estrella; Fernández, Matilde; Bernal, Patricia; Roca, Amalia; de la Torre, Jesús; Ramos, Juan Luis

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida are ubiquitous inhabitants of soils and clinical isolates of this species have been seldom described. Clinical isolates show significant variability in their ability to cause damage to hosts because some of them are able to modulate the host’s immune response. In the current study, comparisons between the genomes of different clinical and environmental strains of P. putida were done to identify genetic clusters shared by clinical isolates that are not present in environmental isolates. We show that in clinical strains specific genes are mostly present on transposons, and that this set of genes exhibit high identity with genes found in pathogens and opportunistic pathogens. The set of genes prevalent in P. putida clinical isolates, and absent in environmental isolates, are related with survival under oxidative stress conditions, resistance against biocides, amino acid metabolism and toxin/antitoxin (TA) systems. This set of functions have influence in colonization and survival within human tissues, since they avoid host immune response or enhance stress resistance. An in depth bioinformatic analysis was also carried out to identify genetic clusters that are exclusive to each of the clinical isolates and that correlate with phenotypical differences between them, a secretion system type III-like was found in one of these clinical strains, a determinant of pathogenicity in Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:26820467

  2. Pre-adapting parasitic phages to a pathogen leads to increased pathogen clearance and lowered resistance evolution with Pseudomonas aeruginosa cystic fibrosis bacterial isolates.

    PubMed

    Friman, V-P; Soanes-Brown, D; Sierocinski, P; Molin, S; Johansen, H K; Merabishvili, M; Pirnay, J-P; De Vos, D; Buckling, A

    2016-01-01

    Recent years have seen renewed interest in phage therapy--the use of viruses to specifically kill disease-causing bacteria--because of the alarming rise in antibiotic resistance. However, a major limitation of phage therapy is the ease at with bacteria can evolve resistance to phages. Here, we determined whether in vitro experimental coevolution can increase the efficiency of phage therapy by limiting the resistance evolution of intermittent and chronic cystic fibrosis Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung isolates to four different phages. We first pre-adapted all phage strains against all bacterial strains and then compared the efficacy of pre-adapted and nonadapted phages against ancestral bacterial strains. We found that evolved phages were more efficient in reducing bacterial densities than ancestral phages. This was primarily because only 50% of bacterial strains were able to evolve resistance to evolved phages, whereas all bacteria were able to evolve some level of resistance to ancestral phages. Although the rate of resistance evolution did not differ between intermittent and chronic isolates, it incurred a relatively higher growth cost for chronic isolates when measured in the absence of phages. This is likely to explain why evolved phages were more effective in reducing the densities of chronic isolates. Our data show that pathogen genotypes respond differently to phage pre-adaptation, and as a result, phage therapies might need to be individually adjusted for different patients.

  3. Anti-Pseudomonas aeruginosa IgY antibodies promote bacterial opsonization and augment the phagocytic activity of polymorphonuclear neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Thomsen, Kim; Christophersen, Lars; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Moser, Claus; Høiby, Niels

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Moderation of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) as part of a critical defense against invading pathogens may offer a promising therapeutic approach to supplement the antibiotic eradication of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in non-chronically infected cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. We have observed that egg yolk antibodies (IgY) harvested from White leghorn chickens that target P. aeruginosa opsonize the pathogen and enhance the PMN-mediated respiratory burst and subsequent bacterial killing in vitro. The effects on PMN phagocytic activity were observed in different Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains, including clinical isolates from non-chronically infected CF patients. Thus, oral prophylaxis with anti-Pseudomonas aeruginosa IgY may boost the innate immunity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the CF setting by facilitating a rapid and prompt bacterial clearance by PMNs. PMID:26901841

  4. Clinical significance of Bacillus species isolated from blood cultures.

    PubMed

    Weber, D J; Saviteer, S M; Rutala, W A; Thomann, C A

    1989-06-01

    To determine the clinical significance of blood isolates of Bacillus, we reviewed all blood cultures obtained at North Carolina Memorial Hospital between 1981 and 1985. Over the five-year study period the number of patients (incidence per 10,000 hospital admissions) from whom Bacillus was isolated increased from 4.97 in 1981 to 12.5 in 1985. The incidence per 1,000 blood cultures also increased from 1.12 in 1981 to 2.33 in 1985. Review of the medical records of 78 of the 95 patients (82%) with positive cultures allowed retrospective classification of five isolates (6.4%) as clinically significant, 33 isolates (42.3%) as possibly significant, and 40 isolates (51.3%) as nonsignificant. Underlying diseases in patients with clinically significant Bacillus bacteremia included burn trauma in two, leukemia in one, carcinoma in one, and gastrointestinal hemorrhage in one. All isolates judged to be clinically significant and the majority of possibly significant isolates were B cereus. We conclude that the isolation of Bacillus species from blood cultures is clinically significant in 5% to 10% of cases, that the incidence of Bacillus bacteremia is increasing, and that burn trauma should be added to the list of conditions known to predispose to clinically significant Bacillus bacteremia.

  5. A major Pseudomonas aeruginosa clone common to patients and aquatic habitats.

    PubMed Central

    Römling, U; Wingender, J; Müller, H; Tümmler, B

    1994-01-01

    The genomic relatedness of 573 Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains from environmental and clinical habitats was examined by digesting the genome with the rare-cutting enzyme SpeI. Thirty-nine strains were collected from environmental habitats mainly of aquatic origin, like rivers, lakes, or sanitary facilities. Four hundred fifty strains were collected from 76 patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) treated at four different centers, and 25 additional clinical isolates were collected from patients suffering from other diseases. Twenty-nine P. aeruginosa isolates were collected from the environment of one CF clinic. Thirty strains from culture collections were of environmental and clinic origin. A common macrorestriction fingerprint pattern was found in 13 of 46 CF patients, 5 of 29 environmental isolates from the same hospital, in a single ear infection isolate from another hospital, and 8 of 38 isolates from aquatic habitats about 300 km away from the CF clinic. The data indicate that closely related variants of one major clone (called clone C) persisted in various spatially and temporally separated habitats. Southern analysis of the clonal variants with six gene probes and two probes for genes coding for rRNA revealed almost the same hybridization patterns. With the exception of the phenotypically rapidly evolving CF isolates, the close relatedness of the strains of the clone was also shown by their identical responses in pyocin typing, phage typing, and serotyping. Besides clone C, three other P. aeruginosa clones were isolated from more than one clinical or environmental source. Images PMID:8031075

  6. Variability of the bla(IMP-15)-containing integrons, highly related to In95, on an endemic clone of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Garza-Ramos, Jesus Ulises; Sanchez-Martinez, Guillermina; Barajas, Juan Manuel; Suarez, Sandra; Sanchez-Perez, Alejandro; Rojas-Moreno, Teresa; Carrillo-Quiroz, Berta; Silva-Sanchez, Jesus

    2010-09-01

    The acquisition of β-lactamases, such as class B metallo-β-lactamases, in Pseudomonas aeruginosa is detrimental to antimicrobial therapy in hospitalized patients. In Mexico, metallo-β-lactamase IMP-15 has been found to be encoded on the In95 class 1 integron in a major clone of P. aeruginosa. In this work, we describe the variability of this class 1 integron in an epidemic clone of carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa clinical isolates highly related to isolates previously described in Mexico.

  7. Arbekacin Activity against Contemporary Clinical Bacteria Isolated from Patients Hospitalized with Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Rhomberg, Paul R.; Farrell, David J.; Jones, Ronald N.

    2015-01-01

    Arbekacin is a broad-spectrum aminoglycoside licensed for systemic use in Japan and under clinical development as an inhalation solution in the United States. We evaluated the occurrence of organisms isolated from pneumonias in U.S. hospitalized patients (PHP), including ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), and the in vitro activity of arbekacin. Organism frequency was evaluated from a collection of 2,203 bacterial isolates (339 from VAP) consecutively collected from 25 medical centers in 2012 through the SENTRY Antimicrobial Surveillance Program. Arbekacin activity was tested against 904 isolates from PHP collected in 2012 from 62 U.S. medical centers and 303 multidrug-resistant (MDR) organisms collected worldwide in 2009 and 2010 from various infection types. Susceptibility to arbekacin and comparator agents was evaluated by the reference broth microdilution method. The four most common organisms from PHP were Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella spp., and Enterobacter spp. The highest arbekacin MIC among S. aureus isolates from PHP (43% methicillin-resistant S. aureus [MRSA]) was 4 μg/ml. Among P. aeruginosa isolates from PHP, only one had an arbekacin MIC of >16 μg/ml (MIC50 and MIC90, 1 and 4 μg/ml), and susceptibility rates for gentamicin, tobramycin, and amikacin were 88.0, 90.0, and 98.0%, respectively. Arbekacin (MIC50, 2 μg/ml) and tobramycin (MIC50, 4 μg/ml) were the most potent aminoglycosides tested against Acinetobacter baumannii. Against Enterobacteriaceae from PHP, arbekacin and gentamicin (MIC50 and MIC90, 0.25 to 1 and 1 to 8 μg/ml for both compounds) were generally more potent than tobramycin (MIC50 and MIC90, 0.25 to 2 and 1 to 32 μg/ml) and amikacin (MIC50 and MIC90, 1 to 2 and 2 to 32 μg/ml). Arbekacin also demonstrated potent in vitro activity against a worldwide collection of well-characterized MDR Gram-negative and MRSA strains. PMID:25801559

  8. Evaluation of flagella and flagellin of Pseudomonas aeruginosa as vaccines.

    PubMed

    Campodónico, Victoria L; Llosa, Nicolás J; Grout, Martha; Döring, Gerd; Maira-Litrán, Tomás; Pier, Gerald B

    2010-02-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a serious pathogen in hospitalized, immunocompromised, and cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. P. aeruginosa is motile via a single polar flagellum made of polymerized flagellin proteins differentiated into two major serotypes: a and b. Antibodies to flagella delay onset of infection in CF patients, but whether immunity to polymeric flagella and that to monomeric flagellin are comparable has not been addressed, nor has the question of whether such antibodies might negatively impact Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5) activation, an important component of innate immunity to P. aeruginosa. We compared immunization with flagella and that with flagellin for in vitro effects on motility, opsonic killing, and protective efficacy using a mouse pneumonia model. Antibodies to flagella were superior to antibodies to flagellin at inhibiting motility, promoting opsonic killing, and mediating protection against P. aeruginosa pneumonia in mice. Protection against the flagellar type strains PAK and PA01 was maximal, but it was only marginal against motile clinical isolates from flagellum-immunized CF patients who nonetheless became colonized with P. aeruginosa. Purified flagellin was a more potent activator of TLR5 than were flagella and also elicited higher TLR5-neutralizing antibodies than did immunization with flagella. Antibody to type a but not type b flagella or flagellin inhibited TLR5 activation by whole bacterial cells. Overall, intact flagella appear to be superior for generating immunity to P. aeruginosa, and flagellin monomers might induce antibodies capable of neutralizing innate immunity due to TLR5 activation, but solid immunity to P. aeruginosa based on flagellar antigens may require additional components beyond type a and type b proteins from prototype strains.

  9. Gold-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles restrict growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Niemirowicz, Katarzyna; Swiecicka, Izabela; Wilczewska, Agnieszka Z; Misztalewska, Iwona; Kalska-Szostko, Beata; Bienias, Kamil; Bucki, Robert; Car, Halina

    2014-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) and their derivatives (aminosilane and gold-coated) have been widely investigated in numerous medical applications, including their potential to act as antibacterial drug carriers that may penetrate into bacteria cells and biofilm mass. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a frequent cause of infection in hospitalized patients, and significant numbers of currently isolated clinical strains are resistant to standard antibiotic therapy. Here we describe the impact of three types of SPIONs on the growth of P. aeruginosa during long-term bacterial culture. Their size, structure, and physicochemical properties were determined using transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. We observed significant inhibition of P. aeruginosa growth in bacterial cultures continued over 96 hours in the presence of gold-functionalized nanoparticles (Fe₃O₄@Au). At the 48-hour time point, growth of P. aeruginosa, as assessed by the number of colonies grown from treated samples, showed the highest inhibition (decreased by 40%). These data provide strong evidence that Fe₃O₄@Au can dramatically reduce growth of P. aeruginosa and provide a platform for further study of the antibacterial activity of this nanomaterial.

  10. Sensitivity to Antimicrobial Drugs of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Extreme-Resistant Strains Isolated in the Major Hospitals of Central Kazakhstan

    PubMed Central

    Azizov, Ilya S.; Lavrinenko, Alyona V.; Belyaev, Ilya A.; Babenko, Dmitry B.; Shambilova, Natalya A.; Bissenova, Nelya M.

    2017-01-01

    AIM: The article presents the current data on the sensitivity of the main 37 strains of eXtremaly Drugs Resistance (XDR) category to anti-pseudomonas drugs. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The strains were collected during the prospective multicenter study in large multidisciplinary hospitals of Central Kazakhstan. Susceptibility to antimicrobial drugs was carried out by disk method and the serial dilution method with the interpretation of the results according to EUCAST criteria. Detection of carbapenemases gene of VIM, IMP, NDM and GES classes was carried out by PCR method using the commercial kits. RESULTS: All identified carbapenemases were sorted to VIM class and accounted for 63.64%. Resistance to aminoglycoside drugs exceeded 80%. All the strains were susceptible to polymyxin. CONCLUSION: Thus, at the present stage the circulation of P. aeruginosa strains of XDR category continues in major hospitals in Kazakhstan. The strains remain sensitiveness only to polymyxin. PMID:28293307

  11. Identification and characterization of nine atypical Candida dubliniensis clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Albaina, Olatz; Sahand, Ismail H; Brusca, María I; Sullivan, Derek J; Fernández de Larrinoa, Iñigo; Moragues, María D

    2015-02-01

    Candida dubliniensis is a pathogenic yeast of the genus Candida closely related to Candida albicans. The phenotypic similarity of these two species often leads to misidentification of C. dubliniensis isolates in clinical samples. DNA-based methods continue to be the most effective means of discriminating accurately between the two species. Here, we report on the identification of nine unusual Candida isolates that showed ambiguous identification patterns on the basis of their phenotypic and immunological traits. The isolates were categorized into two groups. Group I isolates were unable to produce germ tubes and chlamydospores, and to agglutinate commercial latex particles coated with a mAb highly specific for C. dubliniensis. Group II isolates grew as pink and white colonies on CHROMagar Candida and ChromID Candida, respectively. Carbohydrate assimilation profiles obtained with API/ID32C together with PCR amplification with specific primers and DNA sequencing allowed reliable identification of the nine unusual clinical isolates as C. dubliniensis.

  12. Nosocomial outbreak of Pseudomonas aeruginosa associated with a drinking water fountain.

    PubMed

    Costa, D; Bousseau, A; Thevenot, S; Dufour, X; Laland, C; Burucoa, C; Castel, O

    2015-11-01

    Over a four-month period, ten patients were suspected of having acquired nosocomial infection to P. aeruginosa in the ear, nose, and throat department. Environmental and clinical isolates were compared. Only water from a drinking water fountain was contaminated by P. aeruginosa. This isolate and those of three patients had indistinguishable random amplified polymorphic DNA profiles. These patients had serious oncology diseases. The drinking water fountain was used for their alimentation by percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy and was the origin of the outbreak. Another type of drinking fountain with a terminal ultraviolet treatment was installed, following which no new infections linked to drinking water were identified.

  13. Kinetics of nutrient enhanced crude oil degradation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa AKS1 and Bacillus sp. AKS2 isolated from Guwahati refinery, India.

    PubMed

    Chettri, Bobby; Mukherjee, Arghya; Langpoklakpam, James S; Chattopadhyay, Dhrubajyoti; Singh, Arvind K

    2016-09-01

    Bacterial degradation of crude oil in response to nutrient treatments has been vastly studied. But there is a paucity of information on kinetic parameters of crude oil degradation. Here we report the nutrient stimulated kinetic parameters of crude oil degradation assessed in terms of CO2 production and oil removal by Pseudomonas aeruginosa AKS1 and Bacillus sp. AKS2. The hydrocarbon degradation rate of P. aeruginosa AKS1 in oil only amended sediment was 10.75 ± 0.65 μg CO2-C g(-1) sediment day(-1) which was similar to degradation rate in sediments with no oil. In presence of both inorganic N & P, the degradation rate increased to 47.22 ± 1.32 μg CO2-C g(-1) sediment day(-1). The half-saturation constant (Ks) and maximum degradation rate (Vmax) for P. aeruginosa AKS1 under increasing N and saturating P concentration were 13.57 ± 0.53 μg N g(-1) sediment and 39.36 ± 1.42 μg CO2-C g(-1) sediment day(-1) respectively. The corresponding values at increasing P and a constant N concentration were 1.60 ± 0.13 μg P g(-1) sediment and 43.90 ± 1.03 μg CO2-C g(-1) sediment day(-1) respectively. Similarly the degradation rate of Bacillus sp. AKS2 in sediments amended with both inorganic nutrients N & P was seven fold higher than the rates in oil only or nutrient only treated sediments. The Ks and Vmax estimates of Bacillus sp. AKS2 under increasing N and saturating P concentration were 9.96 ± 1.25 μg N g(-1) sediment and 59.96 ± 7.56 μg CO2-C g(-1) sediment day(-1) respectively. The corresponding values for P at saturating N concentration were 0.46 ± 0.24 μg P g(-1) sediment and 63.63 ± 3.54 μg CO2-C g(-1) sediment day(-1) respectively. The rates of CO2 production by both isolates were further stimulated when oil concentration was increased above 12.5 mg g(-1) sediment. However, oil degradation activity declined at oil concentration above 40 mg g(-1) sediment when treated with constant nutrient: oil ratio

  14. Candida biotypes isolated from clinical specimens in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Ng, K P; Madasamy, M; Saw, T L; Baki, A; He, J; Soo-Hoo, T S

    The distribution of Candida species was examined using 1114 yeasts isolated from various clinical specimens. The isolates were identified by germ tube test, hyphal/pseudohyphae and chlamydoconidia production and carbohydrate assimilation test using ten carbohydrates (glucose, sucrose, trehalose, cellobiose, arabinose, galactose, mannitol, raffinose, lactose and maltose). Among the 1114 isolates studied, 9 species of Candida were identified and the relative frequency of isolation was C. albicans (44.2%), C. parapsilosis (26.0%), C. tropicalis (17.7%), C. glabrata (9.6%), C. krusei (1.2%), C. rugosa (0.6%), C. guilliermondii (0.2%), C. lusitaniae (0.08%) and C. kefyr (0.08%). Non-C. albicans was the most common Candida species isolated from blood, respiratory system, urine and skin. The isolate from vaginal swabs was predominantly C. albicans. 82.2% of C. glabrata and 64.2% of C. krusei isolated in this study were from vaginal swabs.

  15. Chitinase 3-like 1: prognostic biomarker in clinically isolated syndromes.

    PubMed

    Cantó, Ester; Tintoré, Mar; Villar, Luisa M; Costa, Carme; Nurtdinov, Ramil; Álvarez-Cermeño, José C; Arrambide, Georgina; Reverter, Ferran; Deisenhammer, Florian; Hegen, Harald; Khademi, Mohsen; Olsson, Tomas; Tumani, Hayrettin; Rodríguez-Martín, Eulalia; Piehl, Fredrik; Bartos, Ales; Zimova, Denisa; Kotoucova, Jolana; Kuhle, Jens; Kappos, Ludwig; García-Merino, Juan Antonio; Sánchez, Antonio José; Saiz, Albert; Blanco, Yolanda; Hintzen, Rogier; Jafari, Naghmeh; Brassat, David; Lauda, Florian; Roesler, Romy; Rejdak, Konrad; Papuc, Ewa; de Andrés, Clara; Rauch, Stefan; Khalil, Michael; Enzinger, Christian; Galimberti, Daniela; Scarpini, Elio; Teunissen, Charlotte; Sánchez, Alex; Rovira, Alex; Montalban, Xavier; Comabella, Manuel

    2015-04-01

    Chitinase 3-like 1 (CHI3L1) has been proposed as a biomarker associated with the conversion to clinically definite multiple sclerosis in patients with clinically isolated syndromes, based on the finding of increased cerebrospinal fluid CHI3L1 levels in clinically isolated syndrome patients who later converted to multiple sclerosis compared to those who remained as clinically isolated syndrome. Here, we aimed to validate CHI3L1 as a prognostic biomarker in a large cohort of patients with clinically isolated syndrome. This is a longitudinal cohort study of clinically isolated syndrome patients with clinical, magnetic resonance imaging, and cerebrospinal fluid data prospectively acquired. A total of 813 cerebrospinal fluid samples from patients with clinically isolated syndrome were recruited from 15 European multiple sclerosis centres. Cerebrospinal fluid CHI3L1 levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Multivariable Cox regression models were used to investigate the association between cerebrospinal fluid CHI3L1 levels and time to conversion to multiple sclerosis and time to reach Expanded Disability Status Scale 3.0. CHI3L1 levels were higher in patients who converted to clinically definite multiple sclerosis compared to patients who continued as clinically isolated syndrome (P = 8.1 × 10(-11)). In the Cox regression analysis, CHI3L1 levels were a risk factor for conversion to multiple sclerosis (hazard ratio = 1.7; P = 1.1 × 10(-5) using Poser criteria; hazard ratio = 1.6; P = 3.7 × 10(-6) for McDonald criteria) independent of other covariates such as brain magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities and presence of cerebrospinal fluid oligoclonal bands, and were the only significant independent risk factor associated with the development of disability (hazard ratio = 3.8; P = 2.5 × 10(-8)). High CHI3L1 levels were associated with shorter time to multiple sclerosis (P = 3.2 × 10(-9) using Poser criteria; P = 5.6 × 10(-11) for McDonald criteria

  16. Detection of blaSPM-1, blaKPC, blaTEM and blaCTX-M genes in isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter spp. and Klebsiella spp. from cancer patients with healthcare-associated infections.

    PubMed

    Jácome, Paula Regina Luna de Araújo; Alves, Lílian Rodrigues; Jácome-Júnior, Agenor Tavares; Silva, Maria Jesuíta Bezerra da; Lima, Jailton Lobo da Costa; Araújo, Paulo Sérgio Ramos; Lopes, Ana Catarina S; Maciel, Maria Amélia Vieira

    2016-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter spp. and Klebsiella spp. are three of the pathogens most frequently involved in infections of cancer patients, and the production of β -lactamases is a major mechanism of resistance due to its wide diversity of existing enzymes. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the microbiological profile and data related to patients and infections, and to search for β -lactamase genes in bacterial isolates from hospitalized cancer patients in a hospital in Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil. A total of 169 isolates were recovered between 2012 and 2014, of which 58 were P. aeruginosa, 36 were Acinetobacter spp. and 75 were Klebsiella spp. A high percentage of carbapenem resistance was observed in P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. Among the carbapenem-resistant bacteria, the blaSPM-1 gene was detected in P. aeruginosa (35.5 %) and Acinetobacter spp. (3.8 %), while blaKPC was detected in P. aeruginosa (25.8 %) only. Among the third- and fourth-generation cephalosporin-resistant strains, in Klebsiella spp. we detected the genes blaTEM (30.6 %), blaCTX-M (58.3 %) and blaKPC (5.6 %), and in Acinetobacter spp. only blaTEM (25.9 %). This the first report of an Acinetobacter baumannii blaSPM-1 gene carrier that has been isolated in Brazil. The most frequent cancer types were bowel tumour [14.8 %; 95 % confidence interval (CI95 %) 9.8-21.1 %], breast cancer (13.6 %; CI95 % 8.8-19.7 %) and prostate cancer (11.2%; CI95 % 6.9-17.0 %). These results therefore provide knowledge of susceptibility profile and resistance mechanisms and thus can contribute to the strategic formulation of hospital infection control plans and the rational use of antimicrobials, reducing mortality from infection levels in cancer patients.

  17. Efflux pumps expression and its association with porin down-regulation and β-lactamase production among Pseudomonas aeruginosa causing bloodstream infections in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Multi-drug efflux pumps have been increasingly recognized as a major component of resistance in P. aeruginosa. We have investigated the expression level of efflux systems among clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa, regardless of their antimicrobial susceptibility profile. Results Aztreonam exhibited the highest in vitro activity against the P. aeruginosa isolates studied (64.4% susceptibility), whereas susceptibility rates of imipenem and meropenem were both 47.5%. The MexXY-OprM and MexAB-OprM efflux systems were overexpressed in 50.8% and 27.1% of isolates studied, respectively. Overexpression of the MexEF-OprN and MexCD-OprJ systems was not observed. AmpC β-lactamase was overexpressed in 11.9% of P. aeruginosa isolates. In addition, decreased oprD expression was also observed in 69.5% of the whole collection, and in 87.1% of the imipenem non-susceptible P. aeruginosa clinical isolates. The MBL-encoding genes blaSPM-1 and blaIMP-1 were detected in 23.7% and 1.7% P. aeruginosa isolates, respectively. The blaGES-1 was detected in 5.1% of the isolates, while blaGES-5 and blaCTX-M-2 were observed in 1.7% of the isolates evaluated. In the present study, we have observed that efflux systems represent an adjuvant mechanism for antimicrobial resistance. Conclusions Efflux systems in association of distinct mechanisms such as the porin down-regulation, AmpC overproduction and secondary β-lactamases play also an important role in the multi-drug resistance phenotype among P. aeruginosa clinical isolates. PMID:20704733

  18. MRJP1-containing glycoproteins isolated from honey, a novel antibacterial drug candidate with broad spectrum activity against multi-drug resistant clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Brudzynski, Katrina; Sjaarda, Calvin; Lannigan, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of extended- spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) is the underlying cause of growing antibiotic resistance among Gram-negative bacteria to β-lactam antibiotics. We recently reported the discovery of honey glycoproteins (glps) that exhibited a rapid, concentration-dependent antibacterial activity against both Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis and Gram-negative Escherichia coli that resembled action of cell wall-active β-lactam drugs. Glps showed sequence identity with the Major Royal Jelly Protein 1 (MRJP1) precursor that harbors three antimicrobial peptides: Jelleins 1, 2, and 4. Here, we used semi-quantitative radial diffusion assay and broth microdilution assay to evaluate susceptibility of a number of multi-drug resistant (MDR) clinical isolates to the MRJP1-contaning honey glycoproteins. The MDR bacterial strains comprised three methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), four Pseudomonas aeruginosa, two Klebsiella pneumoniae, two vancomycin-resistant Enterococci (VRE), and five ESBL identified as one Proteus mirabilis, three E. coli, and one E. coli NDM. Their resistance to different classes of antibiotics was confirmed using automated system Vitek 2. MDR isolates differed in their susceptibility to glps with MIC90 values ranging from 4.8 μg/ml against B. subtilis to 14.4 μg/ml against ESBL K. pneumoniae, Klebsiella spp. ESBL and E. coli and up to 33 μg/ml against highly resistant strains of P. aeruginosa. Glps isolated from different honeys showed a similar ability to overcome bacterial resistance to β-lactams suggesting that (a) their mode of action is distinct from other classes of β-lactams and that (b) the common glps structure was the lead structure responsible for the activity. The results of the current study together with our previous evidence of a rapid bactericidal activity of glps demonstrate that glps possess suitable characteristics to be considered a novel antibacterial drug candidate.

  19. MRJP1-containing glycoproteins isolated from honey, a novel antibacterial drug candidate with broad spectrum activity against multi-drug resistant clinical isolates

    PubMed Central

    Brudzynski, Katrina; Sjaarda, Calvin; Lannigan, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of extended- spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) is the underlying cause of growing antibiotic resistance among Gram-negative bacteria to β-lactam antibiotics. We recently reported the discovery of honey glycoproteins (glps) that exhibited a rapid, concentration-dependent antibacterial activity against both Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis and Gram-negative Escherichia coli that resembled action of cell wall-active β-lactam drugs. Glps showed sequence identity with the Major Royal Jelly Protein 1 (MRJP1) precursor that harbors three antimicrobial peptides: Jelleins 1, 2, and 4. Here, we used semi-quantitative radial diffusion assay and broth microdilution assay to evaluate susceptibility of a number of multi-drug resistant (MDR) clinical isolates to the MRJP1-contaning honey glycoproteins. The MDR bacterial strains comprised three methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), four Pseudomonas aeruginosa, two Klebsiella pneumoniae, two vancomycin-resistant Enterococci (VRE), and five ESBL identified as one Proteus mirabilis, three E. coli, and one E. coli NDM. Their resistance to different classes of antibiotics was confirmed using automated system Vitek 2. MDR isolates differed in their susceptibility to glps with MIC90 values ranging from 4.8 μg/ml against B. subtilis to 14.4 μg/ml against ESBL K. pneumoniae, Klebsiella spp. ESBL and E. coli and up to 33 μg/ml against highly resistant strains of P. aeruginosa. Glps isolated from different honeys showed a similar ability to overcome bacterial resistance to β-lactams suggesting that (a) their mode of action is distinct from other classes of β-lactams and that (b) the common glps structure was the lead structure responsible for the activity. The results of the current study together with our previous evidence of a rapid bactericidal activity of glps demonstrate that glps possess suitable characteristics to be considered a novel antibacterial drug candidate. PMID:26217333

  20. Uncommonly isolated clinical Pseudomonas: identification and phylogenetic assignation.

    PubMed

    Mulet, M; Gomila, M; Ramírez, A; Cardew, S; Moore, E R B; Lalucat, J; García-Valdés, E

    2017-02-01

    Fifty-two Pseudomonas strains that were difficult to identify at the species level in the phenotypic routine characterizations employed by clinical microbiology laboratories were selected for genotypic-based analysis. Species level identifications were done initially by partial sequencing of the DNA dependent RNA polymerase sub-unit D gene (rpoD). Two other gene sequences, for the small sub-unit ribosonal RNA (16S rRNA) and for DNA gyrase sub-unit B (gyrB) were added in a multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) study to confirm the species identifications. These sequences were analyzed with a collection of reference sequences from the type strains of 161 Pseudomonas species within an in-house multi-locus sequence analysis database. Whole-cell matrix-assisted laser-desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) analyses of these strains complemented the DNA sequenced-based phylogenetic analyses and were observed to be in accordance with the results of the sequence data. Twenty-three out of 52 strains were assigned to 12 recognized species not commonly detected in clinical specimens and 29 (56 %) were considered representatives of at least ten putative new species. Most strains were distributed within the P. fluorescens and P. aeruginosa lineages. The value of rpoD sequences in species-level identifications for Pseudomonas is emphasized. The correct species identifications of clinical strains is essential for establishing the intrinsic antibiotic resistance patterns and improved treatment plans.

  1. Analysis on antimicrobial resistance of clinical bacteria isolated from county hospitals and a teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ziyong; Li, Li; Zhu, Xuhui; Ma, Yue; Li, Jingyun; Shen, Zhengyi; Jin, Shaohong

    2006-01-01

    The distinction of antimicrobial resistance of clinical bacteria isolated from county hospitals and a teaching hospital was investigated. Disc diffusion test was used to study the antimicrobial resistance of isolates collected from county hospitals and a teaching hospital. The data was analyzed by WHONET5 and SPSS statistic software. A total of 655 strains and 1682 strains were collected from county hospitals and a teaching hospital, respectively, in the year of 2003. The top ten pathogens were Coagulase negative staphylococci (CNS), E. coli, Klebsiella spp., S. areus, P. aeruginosa, Enterococcus spp., Enterobacter spp., otherwise Salmonella spp., Proteus spp., Shigella spp. in county hospitals and Streptococcus spp., Acinetobacter spp., X. maltophilia in the teaching hospital. The prevalence of multi-drug resistant bacteria was 5% (4/86) of methicillin-resistant S. areus (MRSA), 12% (16/133) and 15.8% (9/57) of extended-spectrum beta-lactamases producing strains of E. coli and Klebsiella spp., respectively, in county hospitals. All of the three rates were lower than that in the teaching hospital and the difference was statistically significant (P < 0. 01). However, the incidence of methicillin-resistant CNS (MRCNS) reached to 70% (109/156) in the two classes of hospitals. Generally, the antimicrobial resistant rates in the county hospitals were lower than those in the teaching hospital, except the resistant rates of ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, clindamycin, SMZco which were similar in the two classes of hospitals. There were differences between county hospitals and the teaching hospital in the distribution of clinical isolates and prevalence of antimicrobial resistance. It was the basis of rational use of antimicrobial agents to monitor antimicrobial resistance by each hospital.

  2. Combination therapy with polymyxin B and netropsin against clinical isolates of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Joon-hui; Bhat, Abhayprasad; Kim, Chang-Jin; Yong, Dongeun; Ryu, Choong-Min

    2016-01-01

    Polymyxins are last-resort antibiotics for treating infections of Gram-negative bacteria. The recent emergence of polymyxin-resistant bacteria, however, urgently demands clinical optimisation of polymyxin use to minimise further evolution of resistance. In this study we developed a novel combination therapy using minimal concentrations of polymyxin B. After large-scale screening of Streptomyces secondary metabolites, we identified a reliable polymixin synergist and confirmed as netropsin using high-pressure liquid chromatography, nuclear magnetic resonance, and mass spectrometry followed by in vitro assays using various Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria. To evaluate the effectiveness of combining polymixin B and netropsin in vivo, we performed survival analysis on greater wax moth Galleria mellonella infected with colistin-resistant clinical Acinetobacter baumannii isolates as well as Escherichia coli, Shigella flexineri, Salmonella typhimuruim, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The survival of infected G. mellonella was significantly higher when treated with polymyxin B and netropsin in combination than when treated with polymyxin B or netropsin alone. We propose a netropsin combination therapy that minimises the use of polymyxin B when treating infections with multidrug resistant Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:27306928

  3. Detection of the KPC Gene in Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii during a PCR-Based Nosocomial Surveillance Study in Puerto Rico▿

    PubMed Central

    Robledo, Iraida E.; Aquino, Edna E.; Vázquez, Guillermo J.

    2011-01-01

    A 6-month, PCR-based, island-wide hospital surveillance study of beta-lactam resistance in Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii was conducted in Puerto Rico. Of 10,507 isolates, 1,239 (12%) unique, multi-beta-lactam-resistant isolates from all geographical regions were identified. The KPC gene was detected in 61 E. coli, 333 K. pneumoniae, 99 P. aeruginosa, and 41 A. baumannii isolates, indicating the widespread dissemination of the KPC gene in clinically significant nosocomial isolates. PMID:21444702

  4. Iron Depletion Enhances Production of Antimicrobials by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Angela T.; Jones, Jace W.; Ruge, Max A.; Kane, Maureen A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a heritable disease characterized by chronic, polymicrobial lung infections. While Staphylococcus aureus is the dominant lung pathogen in young CF patients, Pseudomonas aeruginosa becomes predominant by adulthood. P. aeruginosa produces a variety of antimicrobials that likely contribute to this shift in microbial populations. In particular, secretion of 2-alkyl-4(1H)-quinolones (AQs) contributes to lysis of S. aureus in coculture, providing an iron source to P. aeruginosa both in vitro and in vivo. We previously showed that production of one such AQ, the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS), is enhanced by iron depletion and that this induction is dependent upon the iron-responsive PrrF small RNAs (sRNAs). Here, we demonstrate that antimicrobial activity against S. aureus during coculture is also enhanced by iron depletion, and we provide evidence that multiple AQs contribute to this activity. Strikingly, a P. aeruginosa ΔprrF mutant, which produces very little PQS in monoculture, was capable of mediating iron-regulated growth suppression of S. aureus. We show that the presence of S. aureus suppresses the ΔprrF1,2 mutant's defect in iron-regulated PQS production, indicating that a PrrF-independent iron regulatory pathway mediates AQ production in coculture. We further demonstrate that iron-regulated antimicrobial production is conserved in multiple P. aeruginosa strains, including clinical isolates from CF patients. These results demonstrate that iron plays a central role in modulating interactions of P. aeruginosa with S. aureus. Moreover, our studies suggest that established iron regulatory pathways of these pathogens are significantly altered during polymicrobial infections. IMPORTANCE Chronic polymicrobial infections involving Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality, as the interplay between these two organisms exacerbates infection. This is in part due to enhanced

  5. [In vitro susceptibilities to levofloxacin and various antibacterial agents of 12,866 clinical isolates obtained from 72 centers in 2010].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Keizo; Ohno, Akira; Ishii, Yoshikazu; Tateda, Kazuhiro; Iwata, Morihiro

    2012-06-01

    Postmarketing surveillance of levofloxacin (LVFX) has been conducted continuously since 1992. The present survey was performed to investigate in vitro susceptibility of recent clinical isolates in Japan to 30 selected antibacterial agents, focusing on fluoroquinolones (FQs). The common respiratory pathogens Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Moraxella catarrhalis, and Haemophilus influenzae continue to show a high susceptibility to FQs. In contrast, widely-prevailing resistance to macrolides was markedly noted among S pneumoniae and S. pyogenes. Regarding H. influenzae, the prevalence of beta-lactamase-negative ampicillin-resistant isolates has been increasing year by year (25.8% in 2002, 40.0% in 2004, 50.1% in 2007, and 57.9% in 2010). Enterobacteriaceae showed high susceptibility to FQs, however, prevalence of LVFX-resistant Escherichia coli, including intermediate resistance, was 29.3%, showing an increase over time. Nevertheless, the increase in the prevalence of LVFX-resistant E. coli isolates has slowed since 2007 (8.2% in 2000, 11.8% in 2002, 18.8% in 2004, 26.2% in 2007, and 29.3% in 2010), suggesting the influence of LVFX 500 mg tablets since its approval in 2009. Another Enterobacteriaceae member, Klebsiella pneumoniae, showed low resistance to FQs, in contrast with E. coli. In methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), the percentage of FQ-susceptible isolates was low, at 51.6% for susceptibility to sitafloxacin, and at only around 10% for susceptibility to other FQs. However, methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) isolates were highly susceptible to FQs, with the percentage ranging from 88.5% to 99.1%. The prevalence of FQs-resistant isolates in methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci was higher than that in methicillin-susceptible coagulase-negative staphylococci, although it was lower than the prevalence of FQ-resistance in MRSA. The prevalence of FQs-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates derived from

  6. Antibiotic resistance among Helicobacter pylori clinical isolates in Lima, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Boehnke, Kevin F; Valdivieso, Manuel; Bussalleu, Alejandro; Sexton, Rachael; Thompson, Kathryn C; Osorio, Soledad; Reyes, Italo Novoa; Crowley, John J; Baker, Laurence H; Xi, Chuanwu

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Gastric carcinoma is the most common cancer and cause of cancer mortality in Peru. Helicobacter pylori, a bacterium that colonizes the human stomach, is a Group 1 carcinogen due to its causal relationship to gastric carcinoma. While eradication of H. pylori can help prevent gastric cancer, characterizing regional antibiotic resistance patterns is necessary to determine targeted treatment for each region. Thus, we examined primary antibiotic resistance in clinical isolates of H. pylori in Lima, Peru. Materials and methods H. pylori strains were isolated from gastric biopsies of patients with histologically proven H. pylori infection. Primary antibiotic resistance among isolates was examined using E-test strips. Isolates were examined for the presence of the cagA pathogenicity island and the vacA m1/m2 alleles via polymerase chain reaction. Results Seventy-six isolates were recovered from gastric biopsies. Clinical isolates showed evidence of antibiotic resistance to 1 (27.6%, n=21/76), 2 (28.9%, n=22/76), or ≥3 antibiotics (40.8%). Of 76 isolates, eight (10.5%) were resistant to amoxicillin and clarithromycin, which are part of the standard triple therapy for H. pylori infection. No trends were seen between the presence of cagA, vacA m1, or vacA m2 and antibiotic resistance. Conclusion The rate of antibiotic resistance among H. pylori isolates in Lima, Peru, is higher than expected and presents cause for concern. To develop more targeted eradication therapies for H. pylori in Peru, more research is needed to better characterize antibiotic resistance among a larger number of clinical isolates prospectively. PMID:28331349

  7. Molecular mechanism of fluoroquinolones resistance in Mycoplasma hominis clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Meng, Dong-Ya; Sun, Chang-Jian; Yu, Jing-Bo; Ma, Jun; Xue, Wen-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the molecular mechanism of fluoroquinolones resistance in Mycoplasma hominis (MH) clinical strains isolated from urogenital specimens. 15 MH clinical isolates with different phenotypes of resistance to fluoroquinolones antibiotics were screened for mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs) of DNA gyrase (gyrA and gyrB) and topoisomerase IV (parC and parE) in comparison with the reference strain PG21, which is susceptible to fluoroquinolones antibiotics. 15 MH isolates with three kinds of quinolone resistance phenotypes were obtained. Thirteen out of these quinolone-resistant isolates were found to carry nucleotide substitutions in either gyrA or parC. There were no alterations in gyrB and no mutations were found in the isolates with a phenotype of resistance to Ofloxacin (OFX), intermediate resistant to Levofloxacin (LVX) and Sparfloxacin (SFX), and those susceptible to all three tested antibiotics. The molecular mechanism of fluoroquinolone resistance in clinical isolates of MH was reported in this study. The single amino acid mutation in ParC of MH may relate to the resistance to OFX and LVX and the high-level resistance to fluoroquinolones for MH is likely associated with mutations in both DNA gyrase and the ParC subunit of topoisomerase IV.

  8. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Formation and Persistence, along with the Production of Quorum Sensing-Dependent Virulence Factors, Are Disrupted by a Triterpenoid Coumarate Ester Isolated from Dalbergia trichocarpa, a Tropical Legume.

    PubMed

    Rasamiravaka, Tsiry; Vandeputte, Olivier M; Pottier, Laurent; Huet, Joelle; Rabemanantsoa, Christian; Kiendrebeogo, Martin; Andriantsimahavandy, Abel; Rasamindrakotroka, Andry; Stévigny, Caroline; Duez, Pierre; El Jaziri, Mondher

    2015-01-01

    Recently, extracts of Dalbergia trichocarpa bark have been shown to disrupt P. aeruginosa PAO1 quorum sensing (QS) mechanisms, which are key regulators of virulence factor expression and implicated in biofilm formation. One of the active compounds has been isolated and identified as oleanolic aldehyde coumarate (OALC), a novel bioactive compound that inhibits the formation of P. aeruginosa PAO1 biofilm and its maintenance as well as the expression of the las and rhl QS systems. Consequently, the production of QS-controlled virulence factors including, rhamnolipids, pyocyanin, elastase and extracellular polysaccharides as well as twitching and swarming motilities is reduced. Native acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs) production is inhibited by OALC but exogenous supply of AHLs does not restore the production of virulence factors by OALC-treated cultures, indicating that OALC exerts its effect beyond AHLs synthesis in the QS pathways. Further experiments provided a significant inhibition of the global virulence factor activator gacA by OALC. OALC disorganizes established biofilm structure and improves the bactericidal activity of tobramycin against biofilm-encapsulated PAO1 cells. Finally, a significant reduction of Caenorhabditis elegans paralysis was recorded when the worms were infected with OALC-pre-treated P. aeruginosa. Taken together, these results show that triterpenoid coumarate esters are suitable chemical backbones to target P. aeruginosa virulence mechanisms.

  9. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Formation and Persistence, along with the Production of Quorum Sensing-Dependent Virulence Factors, Are Disrupted by a Triterpenoid Coumarate Ester Isolated from Dalbergia trichocarpa, a Tropical Legume

    PubMed Central

    Pottier, Laurent; Huet, Joelle; Rabemanantsoa, Christian; Kiendrebeogo, Martin; Andriantsimahavandy, Abel; Rasamindrakotroka, Andry; Stévigny, Caroline; Duez, Pierre; El Jaziri, Mondher

    2015-01-01

    Recently, extracts of Dalbergia trichocarpa bark have been shown to disrupt P. aeruginosa PAO1 quorum sensing (QS) mechanisms, which are key regulators of virulence factor expression and implicated in biofilm formation. One of the active compounds has been isolated and identified as oleanolic aldehyde coumarate (OALC), a novel bioactive compound that inhibits the formation of P. aeruginosa PAO1 biofilm and its maintenance as well as the expression of the las and rhl QS systems. Consequently, the production of QS-controlled virulence factors including, rhamnolipids, pyocyanin, elastase and extracellular polysaccharides as well as twitching and swarming motilities is reduced. Native acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs) production is inhibited by OALC but exogenous supply of AHLs does not restore the production of virulence factors by OALC-treated cultures, indicating that OALC exerts its effect beyond AHLs synthesis in the QS pathways. Further experiments provided a significant inhibition of the global virulence factor activator gacA by OALC. OALC disorganizes established biofilm structure and improves the bactericidal activity of tobramycin against biofilm-encapsulated PAO1 cells. Finally, a significant reduction of Caenorhabditis elegans paralysis was recorded when the worms were infected with OALC-pre-treated P. aeruginosa. Taken together, these results show that triterpenoid coumarate esters are suitable chemical backbones to target P. aeruginosa virulence mechanisms. PMID:26186595

  10. Nocardia isolation from clinical samples with the paraffin baiting technique

    PubMed Central

    Bafghi, Mehdi Fatahi; Heidarieh, Parvin; Soori, Tahereh; Saber, Sasan; Meysamie, Alipasha; Gheitoli, Khavar; Habibnia, Shadi; Rasouli Nasab, Masoumeh; Eshraghi, Seyyed Saeed

    2015-01-01

    Background The genus Nocardia is a cause of infection in the lungs, skin, brain, cerebrospinal fluid, eyes, joints and kidneys. Nocardia isolation from polymicrobial specimens is difficult due to its slow growth. Several methods have been reported for Nocardia isolation from clinical samples. In the current study, we used three methods: paraffin baiting technique, paraffin agar, and conventional media for Nocardia isolation from various clinical specimens from Iranian patients. Methods In this study, we examined 517 samples from various clinical specimens such as: sputum of patients with suspected tuberculosis, bronchoalveolar lavage, sputum of patients with cystic fibrosis, tracheal aspirate, cutaneous and subcutaneous abscesses, cerebrospinal fluid, dental abscess, mycetoma, wound, bone marrow biopsy, and gastric lavage. All collected specimens were cultured on carbon-free broth tubes (paraffin baiting technique), paraffin agar, Sabouraud dextrose agar, and Sabouraud dextrose agar with cycloheximide and were incubated at 35°C for one month. Results Seven Nocardia spp. were isolated with paraffin baiting technique, compared with 5 positive results with the paraffin agar technique and 3 positive results with Sabouraud dextrose agar with and without cycloheximide. The prevalence of nocardial infections in our specimens was 5.28%. Conclusion In the present study, the use of the paraffin baiting technique appeared to be more effective than other methods for Nocardia isolation from various clinical specimens. PMID:25763363

  11. RESPONSES OF OYSTER (CRASSOSTREA VIRGINICA) HEMOCYTES TO NONPATHOGENIC AND CLINICAL ISOLATES OF VIBRIO PARAHAEMOLYTICUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bacterial uptake by oysters (Crassostrea virginica) and bactericidal activity of oyster hemocytes were studied using four environmental isolates and three clinical isolates of Vibrio parahaemolyticus. Clinical isolates (2030, 2062, 2107) were obtained from gastroenteritis patien...

  12. Molecular mechanisms of carbapenem resistance in Enterobacter cloacae clinical isolates from Korea and clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yangsoon; Choi, Heekyeong; Yum, Jong Hwa; Kang, Girung; Bae, Il Kwon; Jeong, Seok Hoon; Lee, Kyungwon

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the molecular mechanisms of carbapenem resistance in clinical isolates of Enterobacter cloacae and their clinical characteristics. Nonreplicable E. cloacae isolates were recovered from six cancer patients and one patient with liver cirrhosis at a tertiary-care hospital in Korea between 2002 and 2009. Two patients who were considered to have a true infection caused by these microorganisms have died. All isolates produced AmpC β-lactamases, including ACT-1, ACT-2, MIR-3 and DHA-1, and CTX-M- or SHV-type extended-spectrum β-lactamase. Two isolates produced plasmid-borne VIM-2 carbapenemase. All probes specific for bla(AmpC) genes hybridized with I-CeuI chromosomal fragments were also recognized by a probe specific for 16S rDNA, suggesting a chromosomal location. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that a major outer membrane protein, OmpF, was absent in all isolates. PFGE of XbaI-digested DNA were considered to be unrelated. The results of our study suggest that the chromosomal AmpC β-lactamase with impermeability in E. cloacae clinical isolates implicated in reduced carbapenem susceptibility. Although carbapenem-resistant E. cloacae isolates were isolated in a few patients in our study, the clinical outcomes were grave. Therefore, the patients colonized or infected by carbapenem-resistant E. cloacae isolates should gain attention of antibiotic therapy.

  13. Intraclonal Genome Stability of the Metallo-β-lactamase SPM-1-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa ST277, an Endemic Clone Disseminated in Brazilian Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, Ana P. B.; Ortiz, Mauro F.; Martins, Willames M. B. S.; Morais, Guilherme L.; Fehlberg, Lorena C. C.; Almeida, Luiz G. P.; Ciapina, Luciane P.; Gales, Ana C.; Vasconcelos, Ana T. R.

    2016-01-01

    Carbapenems represent the mainstay therapy for the treatment of serious P. aeruginosa infections. However, the emergence of carbapenem resistance has jeopardized the clinical use of this important class of compounds. The production of SPM-1 metallo-β-lactamase has been the most common mechanism of carbapenem resistance identified in P. aeruginosa isolated from Brazilian medical centers. Interestingly, a single SPM-1-producing P. aeruginosa clone belonging to the ST277 has been widely spread within the Brazilian territory. In the current study, we performed a next-generation sequencing of six SPM-1-producing P. aeruginosa ST277 isolates. The core genome contains 5899 coding genes relative to the reference strain P. aeruginosa PAO1. A total of 26 genomic islands were detected in these isolates. We identified remarkable elements inside these genomic islands, such as copies of the blaSPM−1 gene conferring resistance to carbapenems and a type I-C CRISPR-Cas system, which is involved in protection of the chromosome against foreign DNA. In addition, we identified single nucleotide polymorphisms causing amino acid changes in antimicrobial resistance and virulence-related genes. Together, these factors could contribute to the marked resistance and persistence of the SPM-1-producing P. aeruginosa ST277 clone. A comparison of the SPM-1-producing P. aeruginosa ST277 genomes showed that their core genome has a high level nucleotide similarity and synteny conservation. The variability observed was mainly due to acquisition of genomic islands carrying several antibiotic resistance genes. PMID:27994579

  14. Intraclonal Genome Stability of the Metallo-β-lactamase SPM-1-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa ST277, an Endemic Clone Disseminated in Brazilian Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Ana P B; Ortiz, Mauro F; Martins, Willames M B S; Morais, Guilherme L; Fehlberg, Lorena C C; Almeida, Luiz G P; Ciapina, Luciane P; Gales, Ana C; Vasconcelos, Ana T R

    2016-01-01

    Carbapenems represent the mainstay therapy for the treatment of serious P. aeruginosa infections. However, the emergence of carbapenem resistance has jeopardized the clinical use of this important class of compounds. The production of SPM-1 metallo-β-lactamase has been the most common mechanism of carbapenem resistance identified in P. aeruginosa isolated from Brazilian medical centers. Interestingly, a single SPM-1-producing P. aeruginosa clone belonging to the ST277 has been widely spread within the Brazilian territory. In the current study, we performed a next-generation sequencing of six SPM-1-producing P. aeruginosa ST277 isolates. The core genome contains 5899 coding genes relative to the reference strain P. aeruginosa PAO1. A total of 26 genomic islands were detected in these isolates. We identified remarkable elements inside these genomic islands, such as copies of the blaSPM-1 gene conferring resistance to carbapenems and a type I-C CRISPR-Cas system, which is involved in protection of the chromosome against foreign DNA. In addition, we identified single nucleotide polymorphisms causing amino acid changes in antimicrobial resistance and virulence-related genes. Together, these factors could contribute to the marked resistance and persistence of the SPM-1-producing P. aeruginosa ST277 clone. A comparison of the SPM-1-producing P. aeruginosa ST277 genomes showed that their core genome has a high level nucleotide similarity and synteny conservation. The variability observed was mainly due to acquisition of genomic islands carrying several antibiotic resistance genes.

  15. Whole genome sequencing of clinical isolates of Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed

    Hanevik, K; Bakken, R; Brattbakk, H R; Saghaug, C S; Langeland, N

    2015-02-01

    Clinical isolates from protozoan parasites such as Giardia lamblia are at present practically impossible to culture. By using simple cyst purification methods, we show that Giardia whole genome sequencing of clinical stool samples is possible. Immunomagnetic separation after sucrose gradient flotation gave superior results compared to sucrose gradient flotation alone. The method enables detailed analysis of a wide range of genes of interest for genotyping, virulence and drug resistance.

  16. Emergence of colistin resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa at Tabriz hospitals, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Goli, Hamid Reza; Nahaei, Mohammad Reza; Ahangarzadeh Rezaee, Mohammad; Hasani, Alka; Samadi Kafil, Hossein; Aghazadeh, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The prevalence of multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the main reason of new drugs resurgence such as colistin. The main objectives of this study were to determine the antibiotic resistance pattern and the rate of colistin resistance along with its correlation with overexpression of MexAB-OprM and MexXY-OprM efflux pumps among P. aeruginosa isolates. Materials and Methods: Hundred clinical isolates were collected from 100 patients during 6 months in 2014. Susceptibility to the eight antibiotics was investigated using Kirby-Bauer and agar dilution methods. The Quantitative Real-time PCR was used to determine the expression levels of efflux genes. Results: Resistance rates to various antibiotics were as follows: ticarcillin (73%), ciprofloxacin (65%), aztreonam (60%), ceftazidime (55%), gentamicin (55%), imipenem (49%), piperacillin/tazobactam (34%) and colistin (2%). In disk diffusion method, only two isolates were non susceptible to colistin, however in agar dilution method the two isolates were confirmed as resistant and two others were intermediate resistant. Sixty eight (68%) isolates were multi-drug resistant and 10 isolates were susceptible to all tested antibiotics. Both colistin resistant isolates showed overexpression of both efflux pumps, but two intermediate resistant isolates exhibited reduction of efflux genes expression. Conclusions: Emergence of colistin resistance is increasing in P. aeruginosa indicating great challenge in the treatment of infections caused by MDR strains of this organism in Iran. ParRS may promote either induced or constitutive resistance to colistin through the activation of distinct mechanisms such as MDR efflux pumps, and LPS modification. PMID:27092226

  17. Inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Swarming Motility by 1-Naphthol and Other Bicyclic Compounds Bearing Hydroxyl Groups

    PubMed Central

    Oura, Hiromu; Tashiro, Yosuke; Toyofuku, Masanori; Ueda, Kousetsu; Kiyokawa, Tatsunori; Ito, Satoshi; Takahashi, Yurika; Lee, Seunguk; Nojiri, Hideaki; Nakajima-Kambe, Toshiaki; Uchiyama, Hiroo; Futamata, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Many bacteria convert bicyclic compounds, such as indole and naphthalene, to oxidized compounds, including hydroxyindoles and naphthols. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a ubiquitous bacterium that inhabits diverse environments, shows pathogenicity against animals, plants, and other microorganisms, and increasing evidence has shown that several bicyclic compounds alter the virulence-related phenotypes of P. aeruginosa. Here, we revealed that hydroxyindoles (4- and 5-hydroxyindoles) and naphthalene derivatives bearing hydroxyl groups specifically inhibit swarming motility but have minor effects on other motilities, including swimming and twitching, in P. aeruginosa. Further analyses using 1-naphthol showed that this effect is also associated with clinically isolated hyperswarming P. aeruginosa cells. Swarming motility is associated with the dispersion of cells from biofilms, and the addition of 1-naphthol maintained biofilm biomass without cell dispersion. We showed that this 1-naphthol-dependent swarming inhibition is independent of changes of rhamnolipid production and the intracellular level of signaling molecule cyclic-di-GMP (c-di-GMP). Transcriptome analyses revealed that 1-naphthol increases gene expression associated with multidrug efflux and represses gene expression associated with aerotaxis and with pyochelin, flagellar, and pilus synthesis. In the present study, we showed that several bicyclic compounds bearing hydroxyl groups inhibit the swarming motility of P. aeruginosa, and these results provide new insight into the chemical structures that inhibit the specific phenotypes of P. aeruginosa. PMID:25681177

  18. Asperger syndrome, violent thoughts and clinically isolated syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vanderbruggen, N; Van Geit, N; Bissay, V; Zeeuws, D; Santermans, L; Baeken, C

    2010-12-01

    A young man, 23 years old, with a clinically isolated syndrome (CIS), presented violent thoughts during a neurological consultation. He was diagnosed with Asperger Syndrome based on a psychiatric and (neuro)psychological examination. Possible risk factors for acting-out and the implications for treatment, if CIS would evolve to MS, are discussed based on a review of the literature.

  19. Complete genome sequence of Providencia stuartii clinical isolate MRSN 2154.

    PubMed

    Clifford, Robert J; Hang, Jun; Riley, Matthew C; Onmus-Leone, Fatma; Kuschner, Robert A; Lesho, Emil P; Waterman, Paige E

    2012-07-01

    Here we present the complete genome sequence of Providencia stuartii MRSN 2154, isolated from an Afghan national. P. stuartii is a Gram-negative bacillus capable of causing infections in a wide variety of human tissues. Because Providencia readily acquires plasmids bearing drug resistance loci, it is of growing clinical significance.

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of Tannerella forsythia Clinical Isolate 9610

    PubMed Central

    Hanson-Drury, Sesha; Liu, Quanhui; Vo, Anh T.; Kim, Michelle; Watling, Michael; Bumgarner, Roger S.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We present here the draft genome sequence of Tannerella forsythia 9610, a clinical isolate obtained from a periodontitis patient. The genome is composed of 79 scaffolds with 82 contigs, for a length of 3,201,941 bp and a G+C of 47.3%. PMID:28336586

  1. Time-kill studies of tea tree oils on clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    May, J; Chan, C H; King, A; Williams, L; French, G L

    2000-05-01

    Tea tree oil has recently emerged as an effective topical antimicrobial agent active against a wide range of organisms. Tea tree oil may have a clinical application in both the hospital and community, especially for clearance of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) carriage or as a hand disinfectant to prevent cross-infection with Gram-positive and Gramnegative epidemic organisms. Our study, based on the time-kill approach, determined the kill rate of tea tree oil against several multidrug-resistant organisms, including MRSA, glycopeptide-resistant enterococci, aminoglycoside-resistant klebsiellae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, and also against sensitive microorganisms. The study was performed with two chemically different tea tree oils. One was a standard oil and the other was Clone 88 extracted from a specially bred tree, which has been selected and bred for increased activity and decreased skin irritation. Our results confirm that the cloned oil had increased antimicrobial activity when compared with the standard oil. Most results indicated that the susceptibility pattern and Gram reaction of the organism did not influence the kill rate. A rapid killing time (less than 60 min) was achieved with both tea tree oils with most isolates, but MRSA was killed more slowly than other organisms.

  2. Carbapenem susceptibilities and non-susceptibility concordance to different carbapenems amongst clinically important Gram-negative bacteria isolated from intensive care units in Taiwan: results from the Surveillance of Multicentre Antimicrobial Resistance in Taiwan (SMART) in 2009.

    PubMed

    Jean, Shio-Shin; Hsueh, Po-Ren; Lee, Wen-Sen; Yu, Kwok-Woon; Liao, Chun-Hsing; Chang, Feng-Yi; Ko, Wen-Chien; Wu, Jiunn-Jong; Chen, Yen-Hsu; Chen, Yao-Shen; Liu, Jien-Wei; Lu, Min-Chi; Liu, Cheng-Yi; Lam, Carlos; Chen, Ray-Jade

    2013-05-01

    To investigate the in vitro susceptibilities to various carbapenems amongst clinical Gram-negative bacteria isolated from patients in intensive care units of ten major teaching hospitals in Taiwan in 2009, a survey was conducted to determine the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of ertapenem, imipenem, meropenem and doripenem against isolates of Enterobacteriaceae (n = 594), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n = 185), Acinetobacter baumannii (n = 192) and Burkholderia cepacia (n = 23) using the agar dilution method. Susceptibilities were determined according to 2009, 2011 and 2012 MIC breakpoints recommended by the CLSI as well as 2012 MIC breakpoints recommended by EUCAST. Based on CLSI 2012 criteria, the ertapenem susceptible rate was 93%, 81%, 68% and 92% for Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter cloacae and Serratia marcescens, respectively. All Proteus mirabilis and Morganella morganii isolates were susceptible to ertapenem; however, 64% of P. mirabilis and all M. morganii isolates were non-susceptible to imipenem. Meropenem and doripenem had better activities than imipenem against ertapenem-non-susceptible Enterobacteriaceae isolates. E. coli, K. pneumoniae and E. cloacae with ertapenem MICs≥4 mg/L were synchronously not susceptible to imipenem, meropenem and doripenem. Imipenem susceptibility was 65% and 29% for P. aeruginosa and A. baumannii, respectively. Additionally, P. aeruginosa and A. baumannii isolates with imipenem MICs≥8 mg/L were also not susceptible to meropenem and doripenem. These data provide a better understanding of choosing appropriate carbapenem agents to treat infections caused by ertapenem-non-susceptible Enterobacteriaceae as well as P. aeruginosa and A. baumannii isolates with imipenem MICs≥4 mg/L.

  3. Activity of coumermycin against clinical isolates of staphylococci.

    PubMed Central

    Guillemin, M N; Miles, H M; McDonald, M I

    1986-01-01

    Staphylococci, particularly methicillin-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus, are major nosocomial pathogens in large hospitals in eastern Australia. At present vancomycin is the drug of choice for the treatment of life-threatening methicillin-resistant S. aureus infections. A possible alternative drug is coumermycin, a bis-hydroxy coumarin which inhibits DNA gyrase. Coumermycin activity was determined against clinical isolates from the Royal Melbourne Hospital. MICs of 639 staphylococcal isolates were determined by agar dilution. MICs and MBCs of 100 staphylococcal isolates were also determined by microdilution methods. The results showed that coumermycin was bactericidal, with MBCs of less than or equal to 4 micrograms/ml against all isolates tested. The results indicate that coumermycin is a potential alternative to vancomycin in the treatment of severe staphylococcal infections. PMID:3707109

  4. Performance of the CLSI Carba NP and the Rosco Carb Screen Assays Using North American Carbapenemase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Lauren C.; Roundtree, Sylvester S.; Lancaster, Diana P.; Rudin, Susan D.; Bard, Jennifer Dien; Roberts, Amity L.; Marshall, Steven H.; Bonomo, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    This study compared the performance of the Carba NP assay, published by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute, and the Rosco Rapid Carb Screen kit. Carba NP had superior sensitivity, but both assays required an increased inoculum to detect carbapenemase production in isolates with blaNDM, blaIMP, and blaOXA-48. PMID:26269624

  5. Performance of the CLSI Carba NP and the Rosco Carb Screen Assays Using North American Carbapenemase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Lauren C; Roundtree, Sylvester S; Lancaster, Diana P; Rudin, Susan D; Bard, Jennifer Dien; Roberts, Amity L; Marshall, Steven H; Bonomo, Robert A; Sullivan, Kaede V

    2015-10-01

    This study compared the performance of the Carba NP assay, published by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute, and the Rosco Rapid Carb Screen kit. Carba NP had superior sensitivity, but both assays required an increased inoculum to detect carbapenemase production in isolates with blaNDM, blaIMP, and blaOXA-48.

  6. Modulation of antibiotic resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by ZnO nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Bayroodi, Elnaz; Jalal, Razieh

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Bacterial resistance to conventional antibiotics has become a widespread public health problem. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) on the antibacterial activity of several conventional antibiotics against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Materials and Methods: ZnO NPs were prepared by solvothermal method and dispersed in glycerol with the help of ammonium citrate as a dispersant. The antibacterial effects of the resulting ZnO nanofluid, ceftazidime, tobramycin, and ciprofloxacin were investigated against two P. aeruginosa strains, including one clinical isolate and P. aeruginosa ATCC 9027 using microdilution method. For the evaluation of the combined effect of ZnO nanofluid and antibiotics, the fractional inhibitory concentration indices were calculated and isobolograms were plotted. Results: Clinical strain in comparison to standard strain of P. aeruginosa showed more resistance to ZnO nanofluid and the antibiotics. ZnO nanofluid acted synergistically with ceftazidime and tobramycin against both strains. Combination of ZnO nanofluid and ciprofloxacin displayed synergistic and partial synergistic activity against clinical and standard strains of P. aeruginosa, respectively. Conclusion: The results suggest that bacterial resistance to antimicrobials could be reduced by the synergistic action of ZnO NPs. PMID:27307973

  7. In vitro activity of ceftazidime, ceftaroline and aztreonam alone and in combination with avibactam against European Gram-negative and Gram-positive clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Testa, Raymond; Cantón, Rafael; Giani, Tommaso; Morosini, María-Isabel; Nichols, Wright W; Seifert, Harald; Stefanik, Danuta; Rossolini, Gian Maria; Nordmann, Patrice

    2015-06-01

    Recent clinical isolates of key Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria were collected in 2012 from hospitalised patients in medical centres in four European countries (France, Germany, Italy and Spain) and were tested using standard broth microdilution methodology to assess the impact of 4 mg/L avibactam on the in vitro activities of ceftazidime, ceftaroline and aztreonam. Against Enterobacteriaceae, addition of avibactam significantly enhanced the level of activity of these antimicrobials. MIC(90) values (minimum inhibitory concentration that inhibits 90% of the isolates) of ceftazidime, ceftaroline and aztreonam for Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter cloacae, Enterobacter aerogenes, Citrobacter freundii and Morganella morganii were reduced up to 128-fold or greater when combined with avibactam. A two-fold reduction in the MIC(90) of ceftazidime to 8 mg/L was noted in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates when combined with avibactam, whereas little effect of avibactam was noted on the MIC values of the test compounds when tested against Acinetobacter baumannii isolates. Avibactam had little effect on the excellent activity of ceftazidime, ceftaroline and aztreonam against Haemophilus influenzae. It had no impact on the in vitro activity of ceftazidime and ceftaroline against staphylococci and streptococci. This study demonstrates that addition of avibactam enhances the activities of ceftazidime, ceftaroline and aztreonam against Enterobacteriaceae and P. aeruginosa but not against A. baumannii.

  8. MIC score, a new tool to compare bacterial susceptibility to antibiotics application to the comparison of susceptibility to different penems of clinical strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Bretonnière, Cédric; Maitte, Adeline; Caillon, Jocelyne; Potel, Gilles; Boutoille, David; Jacqueline, Cédric; Guitton, Christophe

    2016-11-01

    This study aimed to compare the susceptibility to carbapenems (imipenem, meropenem and doripenem) of clinical strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. It also studied whether susceptibility to imipenem or meropenem could predict, reliably, susceptibility to doripenem. Pseudomonal strains were collected from respiratory specimens, half of them from cystic fibrosis patients. MICs were determined according to European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing recommendations. Carbapenems were compared according to the susceptible, intermediate or resistant categories. A new approach also allowed comparing these carbapenems in a 'MIC score' taking into account the differences in breakpoints between drugs. One hundred thirty-nine strains were studied. They were found to be statistically more susceptible to meropenem than to the two other drugs. However, this difference was small: less than one dilution between the agents. This study also highlighted a significant correlation between susceptibility to penems taken in pairs. However, susceptibility to imipenem or meropenem did not reliably predict susceptibility to doripenem. Despite potential differences in resistance mechanisms, the Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains showed close susceptibility to three carbapenems. This was true for both cystic fibrosis patients and others. However, there were variations between strains. That justifies MICs to be determined for each of the three penems. This might be useful in case of elevated MICs and/or for potentially difficult-to-treat infections such as pneumonia in patients with cystic fibrosis patients.

  9. In vitro activity of tigecycline against patient isolates collected during phase 3 clinical trials for diabetic foot infections.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Peter J; Ruzin, Alexey; Tuckman, Margareta; Jones, C Hal

    2010-04-01

    The in vitro activity of tigecycline and comparative antimicrobial agents was evaluated against 1828 primary baseline pathogens isolated from 844 patients enrolled in the phase 3 clinical trials investigating the efficacy of tigecycline in diabetic foot infection (DFI). The trials were global, enrolling patients in 30 countries. Tigecycline was active against the most prevalent pathogens in DFI, including Gram-positive and Gram-negative isolates of both aerobic and anaerobic bacteria with 95% of MICs < or =2 microg/mL for the entire collection. The spectrum of activity of tigecycline included important pathogens for DFI, such as Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Streptococcus agalactiae, Escherichia coli, Enterobacter cloacae, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Bacteroides fragilis. As reported previously, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and several pathogens in the Proteeae group were generally less susceptible to tigecycline by comparison to other Gram-negative pathogens. The excellent in vitro expanded broad-spectrum activity of tigecycline in the clinical isolates confirmed the potential utility of tigecycline for pathogens associated with DFIs.

  10. Role of small colony variants in persistence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in cystic fibrosis lungs

    PubMed Central

    Malone, Jacob G

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that predominates during the later stages of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung infections. Over many years of chronic lung colonization, P. aeruginosa undergoes extensive adaptation to the lung environment, evolving both toward a persistent, low virulence state and simultaneously diversifying to produce a number of phenotypically distinct morphs. These lung-adapted P. aeruginosa strains include the small colony variants (SCVs), small, autoaggregative isolates that show enhanced biofilm formation, strong attachment to surfaces, and increased production of exopolysaccharides. Their appearance in the sputum of CF patients correlates with increased resistance to antibiotics, poor lung function, and prolonged persistence of infection, increasing their relevance as a subject for clinical investigation. The evolution of SCVs in the CF lung is associated with overproduction of the ubiquitous bacterial signaling molecule cyclic-di-GMP, with increased cyclic-di-GMP levels shown to be responsible for the SCV phenotype in a number of different CF lung isolates. Here, we review the current state of research in clinical P. aeruginosa SCVs. We will discuss the phenotypic characteristics underpinning the SCV morphotype, the clinical implications of lung colonization with SCVs, and the molecular basis and clinical evolution of the SCV phenotype in the CF lung environment. PMID:26251621

  11. Antibacterial activity of carbapenems against clinical isolates of respiratory bacterial pathogens in the northeastern region of Japan in 2007.

    PubMed

    Gomi, Kazunori; Fujimura, Shigeru; Fuse, Katsuhiro; Takane, Hidenari; Nakano, Yoshihisa; Kariya, Yasuko; Kikuchi, Toshiaki; Kurokawa, Iku; Tokue, Yutaka; Watanabe, Akira

    2011-04-01

    As the increasing prevalence of resistant strains of respiratory bacterial pathogens has recently been reported, continuous monitoring of the susceptibility of clinical isolates to antibacterial agents is important. We performed a surveillance study focusing on the susceptibility of major respiratory bacterial pathogens in the northeastern region of Japan to carbapenems and control drugs. A total of 168 bacterial strains isolated from patients with respiratory tract infections in 2007 were collected and the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) determined. MIC data were subjected to pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic analysis with Monte Carlo simulation to calculate the probability of achieving the target of time above MIC with each carbapenem. All Moraxella catarrhalis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus isolates were susceptible to carbapenems. Despite the increasing prevalence of β-lactamase-nonproducing ampicillin-resistant strains, all Haemophilus influenzae isolates were susceptible to meropenem. For Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the susceptibility rates for meropenem and biapenem were 76.7%, and the highest probability of achieving pharmacodynamic target (40% of the time above MIC) was obtained with meropenem 0.5 g three times daily as a 4-h infusion (89.4%), followed by meropenem 0.5 g four times daily as a 1-h infusion (88.4%). Carbapenems have retained their position as key drugs for severe respiratory tract infections.

  12. Homogeneity of Danish environmental and clinical isolates of Shewanella algae.

    PubMed

    Vogel, B F; Holt, H M; Gerner-Smidt, P; Bundvad, A; Sogaard, P; Gram, L

    2000-01-01

    Danish isolates of Shewanella algae constituted by whole-cell protein profiling a very homogeneous group, and no clear distinction was seen between strains from the marine environment and strains of clinical origin. Although variation between all strains was observed by ribotyping and random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis, no clonal relationship between infective strains was found. From several patients, clonally identical strains of S. algae were reisolated up to 8 months after the primary isolation, indicating that the same strain may be able to maintain the infection.

  13. Efficacy of 1% acetic acid in the treatment of chronic wounds infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa: prospective randomised controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Madhusudhan, V L

    2016-12-01

    Chronic wounds are those wounds that are persistent and do not respond to any sort of treatment. The concept of using topical antiseptics on open wounds is to prevent and treat infections. They also help to shorten the time taken to heal the wounds. The use of topical agents on wounds to prevent infection is a minimal ability to develop resistance to the microorganisms. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative opportunistic pathogen with innate resistance to many antibiotics. In places that are economically backward, these problems get compounded by the inability of patients to afford newer expensive drugs. Topically applied dilute acetic acid, which is cheap and easily available, has been found to be effective in such chronic wounds. In the present study, an attempt has been made to use 1% acetic acid as the sole antimicrobial agent for the treatment of pseudomonal wound infections. A control limb was used in which the wounds were treated with normal saline. Our objective was to evaluate the efficacy of acetic acid in low concentration of 1% in chronic wounds infected with P. aeruginosa. This was a prospective study conducted over a period of 6 months.

  14. O serotype-independent susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to lectin-like pyocins

    PubMed Central

    Ghequire, Maarten G K; Dingemans, Jozef; Pirnay, Jean-Paul; De Vos, Daniel; Cornelis, Pierre; De Mot, René

    2014-01-01

    Lectin-like bacteriocins of the LlpA family, originally identified in plant-associated bacteria, are narrow-spectrum antibacterial proteins composed of two tandemly organized monocot mannose-binding lectin (MMBL) domains. The LlpA-like bacteriocin of Pseudomonas aeruginosa C1433, pyocin L1, lacks any similarity to known P. aeruginosa bacteriocins. The initial interaction of pyocin L1 with target cells is mediated by binding to d-rhamnose, present in the common polysaccharide antigen of lipopolysaccharides (LPS), but the actual cytotoxic mechanism is unknown. In this study, we characterized the activity range of pyocin L1 and two additional L pyocins revealed by genome mining, representing two highly diverged LlpA groups in P. aeruginosa. The recombinant proteins exhibit species-specific antagonistic activities down to nanomolar concentrations against clinical and environmental P. aeruginosa strains, including several multidrug-resistant isolates. The overlap in target strain spectrum between two close homologues of the pyocin L1 group is only minimal, contrasting with the considerable spectral redundancy of LlpA proteins reported for other Pseudomonas species. No correlation was found between L pyocin susceptibility and phylogenetic relatedness of P. aeruginosa isolates. Sensitive strains were retrieved in 13 out of 15 O serotypes tested, excluding the possibility that the highly variable and immunogenic O serotype antigen of the LPS coating would represent a dominant susceptibility-discriminating factor. PMID:25224846

  15. Characterization of the first double-stranded RNA bacteriophage infecting Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yuhui; Lu, Shuguang; Shen, Wei; Zhao, Xia; Shen, Mengyu; Tan, Yinling; Li, Gang; Li, Ming; Wang, Jing; Hu, Fuquan; Le, Shuai

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages (phages) are widely distributed in the biosphere and play a key role in modulating microbial ecology in the soil, ocean, and humans. Although the role of DNA bacteriophages is well described, the biology of RNA bacteriophages is poorly understood. More than 1900 phage genomes are currently deposited in NCBI, but only 6 dsRNA bacteriophages and 12 ssRNA bacteriophages genome sequences are reported. The 6 dsRNA bacteriophages were isolated from legume samples or lakes with Pseudomonas syringae as the host. Here, we report the first Pseudomonas aeruginosa phage phiYY with a three-segmented dsRNA genome. phiYY was isolated from hospital sewage in China with the clinical P. aeruginosa strain, PAO38, as a host. Moreover, the dsRNA phage phiYY has a broad host range, which infects 99 out of 233 clinical P. aeruginosa strains isolated from four provinces in China. This work presented a detailed characterization of the dsRNA bacteriophage infecting P. aeruginosa. PMID:27934909

  16. Pyoverdine and proteases affect the response of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to gallium in human serum.

    PubMed

    Bonchi, Carlo; Frangipani, Emanuela; Imperi, Francesco; Visca, Paolo

    2015-09-01

    Gallium is an iron mimetic which has recently been repurposed as an antibacterial agent due to its capability to disrupt bacterial iron metabolism. In this study, the antibacterial activity of gallium nitrate [Ga(NO3)3] was investigated in complement-free human serum (HS) on 55 Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates from cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis patients. The susceptibility of P. aeruginosa to Ga(NO3)3 in HS was dependent on the bacterial ability to acquire iron from serum binding proteins (i.e., transferrin). The extent of serum protein degradation correlated well with P. aeruginosa growth in HS, while pyoverdine production did not. However, pyoverdine-deficient P. aeruginosa strains were unable to grow in HS and overcome iron restriction, albeit capable of releasing proteases. Predigestion of HS with proteinase K promoted the growth of all strains, irrespective of their ability to produce proteases and/or pyoverdine. The MICs of Ga(NO3)3 were higher in HS than in an iron-poor Casamino Acids medium, where proteolysis does not affect iron availability. Coherently, strains displaying high proteolytic activity were less susceptible to Ga(NO3)3 in HS. Our data support a model in which both pyoverdine and proteases affect the response of P. aeruginosa to Ga(NO3)3 in HS. The relatively high Ga(NO3)3 concentration required to inhibit the growth of highly proteolytic P. aeruginosa isolates in HS poses a limitation to the potential of Ga(NO3)3 in the treatment of P. aeruginosa bloodstream infections.

  17. Susceptibility to levofloxacin of clinical isolates of bacteria from intensive care and haematology/oncology patients in Switzerland: a multicentre study.

    PubMed

    Siegrist, H H; Nepa, M C; Jacquet, A

    1999-06-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the susceptibility of clinical isolates to levofloxacin, a fluoroquinolone with extended activity against Gram-positive bacteria, and other antibiotics in 12 Swiss clinical microbiology laboratories using the NCCLS disc diffusion technique. Isolates were prospectively collected from intensive care units (ICUs (59%), oncology wards (7%) and other units with haematology/oncology patients (34%) from June 1995 to March 1996. The levofloxacin breakpoints used were as recommended by the manufacturer. A total of 310 Gram-positive and 580 Gram-negative isolates from the respiratory tract (36%), skin/wounds (12%), blood (16%), urine (17%) and other sources (19%) were tested. The percentage of isolates susceptible to levofloxacin was 100% for Enterococcus spp. (38 strains), Streptococcus agalactiae (13), Streptococcus pneumoniae (65), Acinetobacter spp. (11), Citrobacter diversus (6), Citrobacter freundii (17), Klebsiella oxytoca (39), Morganella morganii (16), Proteus mirabilis (20), Proteus vulgaris (23), Serratia spp. (19), Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (10) and Haemophilus influenzae (41). The percentage of isolates susceptible to levofloxacin for Staphylococcus aureus (95 strains, including 2% MRSA) was 94%, coagulase-negative staphylococci (85) 65%, Enterobacter spp. (75) 99%, Escherichia coli (111) 97%, Klebsiella pneumoniae (45) 98% and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (124) 87%. In conclusion, levofloxacin is a new fluoroquinolone to which the most common clinical isolates in Switzerland are susceptible. The susceptibility of Enterococcus spp. and S. pneumoniae to levofloxacin was particularly remarkable. This compound appears to be a promising therapeutic alternative for the treatment of Gram-positive infections.

  18. Molecular distinctions among clinical isolates of Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Su, C J; Dallo, S F; Baseman, J B

    1990-01-01

    Restriction enzyme fingerprinting of genomic DNA and Southern blots probed with subclones of the Mycoplasma pneumoniae cytadhesin P1 gene were used to characterize clinical isolates of M. pneumoniae. On the basis of the examination of 29 individual M. pneumoniae isolates, two distinct groups were established. Group 1, which displayed a 12-kilobase band following DNA digestion with HindIII, consisted of strain M129-B16 and three others obtained in the state of Washington during the 1960s. The remaining M. pneumoniae strains belonged to group 2, which lacked the 12-kilobase band and included samples from the 1940s, 1970s, and 1980s. This category also included the only M. pneumoniae strain isolated from the synovial fluid of an arthritic patient. Images PMID:2166088

  19. Polysorbate 80 Inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Formation and Its Cleavage by the Secreted Lipase LipA▿

    PubMed Central

    Toutain-Kidd, Christine M.; Kadivar, Samoneh C.; Bramante, Carolyn T.; Bobin, Stephen A.; Zegans, Michael E.

    2009-01-01

    Surface-associated bacterial communities known as biofilms are an important source of nosocomial infections. Microorganisms such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa can colonize the abiotic surfaces of medical implants, leading to chronic infections that are difficult to eradicate. Our study demonstrates that polysorbate 80 (PS80), a surfactant commonly added to food and medicines, is able to inhibit biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa on a variety of surfaces, including contact lenses. Many clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa, as well as gram-negative and gram-positive clinical isolates, were also inhibited in their ability to form biofilms in the presence of PS80. A P. aeruginosa mutant able to form biofilms in the presence of this surfactant was identified and characterized, and it was revealed that this mutant overexpresses a lipase, LipA. Surfactants such as PS80 can be cleaved by lipases, and we demonstrate that PS80 is cleaved by LipA at its ester bond. Finally, polyethoxylated(20) oleyl alcohol, a chemical with a structure that is similar to that of PS80 but that lacks the ester bond of PS80, can inhibit the biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa strains, including the mutant overexpressing LipA. Our results demonstrate that surfactants such as PS80 can inhibit bacterial biofilm formation on medically relevant materials at concentrations demonstrated to be safe in humans and suggest that the understanding of the mechanisms of bacterial resistance to such surfactants will be important in developing clinically effective derivatives. PMID:18955535

  20. [Antibiotic susceptibility and identification of clinical Pseudomonas fulva isolates].

    PubMed

    Sivolodsky, E P; Gorelova, G V; Bogoslovskaya, S P; Zueva, E V

    2014-01-01

    The earliest eight clinical strains of Pseudomonas fulva were identified in the culture collection of pseudomonads isolated in St. Petersburg in 1995-2005, that confirmed the medical importance of the species. A high level of the species identification of all the strains of P. fulva by MALDI-TOF mass-spectrometry with the use of Microflex device with database MALDI Biotyper (Bruker Daltonics Inc.) was shown. Tests for routine studies providing identification of P. fulva without the use of genetic methods were approved. The profile of the antibiotic susceptibility of the clinical strains of P. fulva was described. Acquired resistance of two P. fulva isolates to the 3rd generation cephalosporins and chloramphenicol was detected.

  1. Chemotaxonomy and molecular taxonomy of some coryneform clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Carlotti, A; Meugnier, H; Pommier, M T; Villard, J; Freney, J

    1993-02-01

    Six reference strains of the genus Brevibacterium as well as fifteen clinical isolates tentatively assigned to the genus using conventional biochemical methods, were the subject of chemotaxonomic and DNA similarity studies. Five of these clinical isolates were assigned either to the genera Aureobacterium, Mycobacterium, Gordona or to Rhodococcus on the basis of their DNA mol% G+C, mycolic acid, amino-acid, sugar and menaquinone contents. Among the ten remaining strains, six were not brevibacteria and only four conformed to the description of the genus Brevibacterium sensu stricto. These strains showed low values of DNA relatedness with Brevibacterium epidermidis ATCC 35514T and Brevibacterium linens ATCC 9174, and could only be described as Brevibacterium spp. The results indicate that studies of chemical markers are essential for the correct identification of brevibacteria.

  2. Identification and Pathogenic Potential of Clinical Bacillus and Paenibacillus Isolates.

    PubMed

    Celandroni, Francesco; Salvetti, Sara; Gueye, Sokhna Aissatou; Mazzantini, Diletta; Lupetti, Antonella; Senesi, Sonia; Ghelardi, Emilia

    2016-01-01

    The soil-related Bacillus and Paenibacillus species have increasingly been implicated in various human diseases. Nevertheless, their identification still poses problems in the clinical microbiology laboratory and, with the exception of Bacillus anthracis and Bacillus cereus, little is known on their pathogenicity for humans. In this study, we evaluated the use of matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) in the identification of clinical isolates of these genera and conducted genotypic and phenotypic analyses to highlight specific virulence properties. Seventy-five clinical isolates were subjected to biochemical and MALDI-TOF MS identification. 16S rDNA sequencing and supplemental tests were used to solve any discrepancies or failures in the identification results. MALDI-TOF MS significantly outperformed classical biochemical testing for correct species identification and no misidentification was obtained. One third of the collected strains belonged to the B. cereus species, but also Bacillus pumilus and Bacillus subtilis were isolated at high rate. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing showed that all the B. cereus, B. licheniformis, B. simplex, B. mycoides, Paenibacillus glucanolyticus and Paenibacillus lautus isolates are resistant to penicillin. The evaluation of toxin/enzyme secretion, toxin-encoding genes, motility, and biofilm formation revealed that B. cereus displays the highest virulence potential. However, although generally considered nonpathogenic, most of the other species were shown to swim, swarm, produce biofilms, and secrete proteases that can have a role in bacterial virulence. In conclusion, MALDI-TOF MS appears useful for fast and accurate identification of Bacillus and Paenibacillus strains whose virulence properties make them of increasing clinical relevance.

  3. A clinical Acanthamoeba isolate harboring two distinct bacterial endosymbionts.

    PubMed

    Müller, Anneliese; Walochnik, Julia; Wagner, Martin; Schmitz-Esser, Stephan

    2016-10-01

    Acanthamoebae feed on bacteria but are also frequent hosts of bacterial symbionts. Here, we describe the stable co-occurrence of two symbionts, one affiliated to the genus Parachlamydia and the other to the candidate genus Paracaedibacter (Alphaproteobacteria), within a clinical isolate of Acanthamoeba hatchetti genotype T4. We performed fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to describe this symbiosis. Our study adds to other reports of simultaneous co-occurrence of two symbionts within one Acanthamoeba cell.

  4. Identification and Pathogenic Potential of Clinical Bacillus and Paenibacillus Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Celandroni, Francesco; Salvetti, Sara; Gueye, Sokhna Aissatou; Mazzantini, Diletta; Lupetti, Antonella; Senesi, Sonia; Ghelardi, Emilia

    2016-01-01

    The soil-related Bacillus and Paenibacillus species have increasingly been implicated in various human diseases. Nevertheless, their identification still poses problems in the clinical microbiology laboratory and, with the exception of Bacillus anthracis and Bacillus cereus, little is known on their pathogenicity for humans. In this study, we evaluated the use of matrix-assisted laser desorption—ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) in the identification of clinical isolates of these genera and conducted genotypic and phenotypic analyses to highlight specific virulence properties. Seventy-five clinical isolates were subjected to biochemical and MALDI-TOF MS identification. 16S rDNA sequencing and supplemental tests were used to solve any discrepancies or failures in the identification results. MALDI-TOF MS significantly outperformed classical biochemical testing for correct species identification and no misidentification was obtained. One third of the collected strains belonged to the B. cereus species, but also Bacillus pumilus and Bacillus subtilis were isolated at high rate. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing showed that all the B. cereus, B. licheniformis, B. simplex, B. mycoides, Paenibacillus glucanolyticus and Paenibacillus lautus isolates are resistant to penicillin. The evaluation of toxin/enzyme secretion, toxin-encoding genes, motility, and biofilm formation revealed that B. cereus displays the highest virulence potential. However, although generally considered nonpathogenic, most of the other species were shown to swim, swarm, produce biofilms, and secrete proteases that can have a role in bacterial virulence. In conclusion, MALDI-TOF MS appears useful for fast and accurate identification of Bacillus and Paenibacillus strains whose virulence properties make them of increasing clinical relevance. PMID:27031639

  5. Genetic diversity of multidrug resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolated from clinical and non clinical samples in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Bendary, M M; Solyman, S M; Azab, M M; Mahmoud, N F; Hanora, A M

    2016-08-31

    In recent years, the increasing incidence of diseases caused by Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) has been noted in the university hospitals of El-Sharkia and Assuit governorates - Egypt. Therefore, we studied the genetic relatedness of multidrug resistant S. aureus isolates from different sources in the above mentioned governorates. One hundred and fifty six S. aureus isolates were divided into 5 different groups, 1 non clinical isolates from different food products and 4 different clinical isolates of human and animal sources in the 2 different governorates. Epidemiological characteristics of 156 S. aureus isolates were determined by phenotypic methods including quantitative antibiogram typing and biofilm production. Genetic typing of 35 multidrug resistant (MDR) isolates (7 from each group) based on 16S rRNA gene sequence, virulence and antimicrobial resistance gene profiles was done. The genetic relatedness of the highest virulent strain from each group was detected based on different single locus sequence typing and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST). S. aureus strains isolated from different sources and geographical areas showed high diversity. The genetic typing revealed different sequence types and different sequences of coa and spa genes. S. aureus isolates were found highly diverse in Egypt.

  6. Investigation of biofilm formation in clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Cassat, James E; Lee, Chia Y; Smeltzer, Mark S

    2007-01-01

    As with many other bacterial species, the most commonly used method to assess staphylococcal biofilm formation in vitro is the microtiter plate assay. This assay is particularly useful for comparison of multiple strains including large-scale screens of mutant libraries. When such screens are applied to the coagulase-negative staphylococci in general, and Staphylococcus epidermidis in particular, they are relatively straightforward by comparison with microtiter plate assays used to assess biofilm formation in other bacterial species. However, in the case of clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus, we have found it necessary to employ specific modifications including precoating of the wells of the microtiter plate with plasma proteins and supplementation of the medium with both salt and glucose. In this chapter, we describe the microtiter plate assay in the specific context of clinical isolates of S. aureus and the use of these modifications. A second in vitro method, which also is generally dependent on coating with plasma proteins and supplementation of the growth medium, is the use of flow cells. In this method, bacteria are allowed to attach to a surface and then monitored with respect to their ability to remain attached to the substrate and differentiate into mature biofilms under the constant pressure of fluid shear force. Although flow cells are not applicable to large-scale screens, we have found that they provide a more reproducible and accurate assessment of the capacity of S. aureus clinical isolates to form a biofilm. They also provide a means of analyzing structural differences in biofilm architecture and isolating bacteria and/or spent media for analysis of physiological and metabolic changes associated with the adaptive response to growth in a biofilm. While a primary focus of this chapter is on the use of in vitro assays to assess biofilm formation in clinical isolates of S. aureus, it is important to

  7. Zingerone silences quorum sensing and attenuates virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Lokender; Chhibber, Sanjay; Kumar, Rajnish; Kumar, Manoj; Harjai, Kusum

    2015-04-01

    Quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa plays an imperative role in virulence factor, biofilm formation and antimicrobial resistance. Blocking quorum sensing pathways are viewed as viable anti-virulent therapy in association with traditional antimicrobial therapy. Anti-quorum sensing dietary phytochemicals with may prove to be a safe and viable choice as anti-virulent drug candidates. Previously, our lab proved zingerone as potent anti-biofilm agent hence; further its anti-virulent and anti-quorum activities were evaluated. Zingerone, besides decreasing swimming, swarming and twitching phenotypes of P. aeruginosa PAO1, reduced biofilm forming capacity and production of virulence factors including rhamnolipid, elastase, protease, pyocyanin, cell free and cell bound hemolysin (p<0.001) indicating anti-virulent property attributing towards attenuation of virulence of P. aeruginosa. Further zingerone not only had marked effect on the production of quorum sensing signal molecules by clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa but also showed significant interference with the activation of QS reporter strains. To study the mechanism of blocking quorum sensing cascade, in silico analysis was carried out. Anti-QS activity was attributed to interference with the ligand receptor interaction of zingerone with QS receptors (TraR, LasR, RhlR and PqsR). Zingerone showed a good comparative docking score to respective autoinducer molecules which was even higher than that of vanillin, a proven anti-quorum sensing phytochemical. The results of the present study revealed the anti-quorum sensing activity of zingerone targeting ligand-receptor interaction, hence proposing zingerone as a suitable anti-virulent drug candidate against P. aeruginosa infections.

  8. Social cheating in Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing.

    PubMed

    Sandoz, Kelsi M; Mitzimberg, Shelby M; Schuster, Martin

    2007-10-02

    In a process termed quorum sensing, bacteria use diffusible chemical signals to coordinate cell density-dependent gene expression. In the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, quorum sensing controls hundreds of genes, many of which encode extracellular virulence factors. Quorum sensing is required for P. aeruginosa virulence in animal models. Curiously, quorum sensing-deficient variants, most of which carry a mutation in the gene encoding the central quorum sensing regulator lasR, are frequently isolated from acute and chronic infections. The mechanism for their emergence is not known. Here we provide experimental evidence suggesting that these lasR mutants are social cheaters that cease production of quorum-controlled factors and take advantage of their production by the group. We detected an emerging subpopulation of lasR mutants after approximately 100 generations of in vitro evolution of the P. aeruginosa wild-type strain under culture conditions that require quorum sensing for growth. Under such conditions, quorum sensing appears to impose a metabolic burden on the proliferating bacterial cell, because quorum-controlled genes not normally induced until cessation of growth were highly expressed early in growth, and a defined lasR mutant showed a growth advantage when cocultured with the parent strain. The emergence of quorum-sensing-deficient variants in certain environments is therefore an indicator of high quorum sensing activity of the bacterial population as a whole. It does not necessarily indicate that quorum sensing is insignificant, as has previously been suggested. Thus, novel antivirulence strategies aimed at disrupting bacterial communication may be particularly effective in such clinical settings.

  9. Resistance trends among clinical isolates in China reported from CHINET surveillance of bacterial resistance, 2005-2014.

    PubMed

    Hu, F-P; Guo, Y; Zhu, D-M; Wang, F; Jiang, X-F; Xu, Y-C; Zhang, X-J; Zhang, C-X; Ji, P; Xie, Y; Kang, M; Wang, C-Q; Wang, A-M; Xu, Y-H; Shen, J-L; Sun, Z-Y; Chen, Z-J; Ni, Y-X; Sun, J-Y; Chu, Y-Z; Tian, S-F; Hu, Z-D; Li, J; Yu, Y-S; Lin, J; Shan, B; Du, Y; Han, Y; Guo, S; Wei, L-H; Wu, L; Zhang, H; Kong, J; Hu, Y-J; Ai, X-M; Zhuo, C; Su, D-H; Yang, Q; Jia, B; Huang, W

    2016-03-01

    With the aim of gathering temporal trends on bacterial epidemiology and resistance from multiple laboratories in China, the CHINET surveillance system was organized in 2005. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was carried out according to a unified protocol using the Kirby-Bauer method or automated systems. Results were analyzed according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) 2014 definitions. Between 2005 and 2014, the number of bacterial isolates ranged between 22,774 and 84,572 annually. Rates of extended-spectrum β-lactamase production among Escherichia coli isolates were stable, between 51.7 and 55.8%. Resistance of E. coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae to amikacin, ciprofloxacin, piperacillin/tazobactam and cefoperazone/sulbactam decreased with time. Carbapenem resistance among K. pneumoniae isolates increased from 2.4 to 13.4%. Resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains against all of antimicrobial agents tested including imipenem and meropenem decreased with time. On the contrary, resistance of Acinetobacter baumannii strains to carbapenems increased from 31 to 66.7%. A marked decrease of methicillin resistance from 69% in 2005 to 44.6% in 2014 was observed for Staphylococcus aureus. Carbapenem resistance rates in K. pneumoniae and A. baumannii in China are high. Our results indicate the importance of bacterial surveillance studies.

  10. In vitro activity of tigecycline against patient isolates collected during phase 3 clinical trials for hospital acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Peter J; Tuckman, Margareta; Jones, C Hal

    2010-02-03

    The in vitro activity of tigecycline was evaluated against 819 baseline pathogens isolated from 383 patients enrolled in the phase 3 clinical trial investigating the efficacy of tigecycline in hospital acquired pneumonia (HAP). The trials were global, enrolling patients in 27 countries. Tigecycline was active against the most prevalent pathogens in HAP, including gram-positive and gram-negative strains (90% of MICs ≤2 µg/mL for the entire collection). The spectrum of activity of tigecycline included important pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus (including methicillin-resistant S. aureus), Enterococcus faecalis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii/calcoaceticus complex, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumonia, and Enterobacter cloacae. As reported previously, a few genera, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the Proteeae, were generally less susceptible to tigecycline by comparison to other gram-negative pathogens. The excellent in vitro, expanded, broad-spectrum activity of tigecycline in the clinical isolates confirmed the potential utility of tigecycline for pathogens associated with with hospital acquired pneumonia infections.

  11. In vitro activity of tigecycline against patient isolates collected during phase 3 clinical trials for hospital acquired pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Peter J.; Tuckman, Margareta; Jones, C. Hal

    2010-01-01

    The in vitro activity of tigecycline was evaluated against 819 baseline pathogens isolated from 383 patients enrolled in the phase 3 clinical trial investigating the efficacy of tigecycline in hospital acquired pneumonia (HAP). The trials were global, enrolling patients in 27 countries. Tigecycline was active against the most prevalent pathogens in HAP, including gram-positive and gram-negative strains (90% of MICs ≤2 µg/mL for the entire collection). The spectrum of activity of tigecycline included important pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus (including methicillin-resistant S. aureus), Enterococcus faecalis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii/calcoaceticus complex, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumonia, and Enterobacter cloacae. As reported previously, a few genera, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the Proteeae, were generally less susceptible to tigecycline by comparison to other gram-negative pathogens. The excellent in vitro, expanded, broad-spectrum activity of tigecycline in the clinical isolates confirmed the potential utility of tigecycline for pathogens associated with with hospital acquired pneumonia infections. PMID:24470884

  12. Chemical analysis, inhibition of biofilm formation and biofilm eradication potential of Euphorbia hirta L. against clinical isolates and standard strains

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The frequent occurrences of antibiotic-resistant biofilm forming pathogens have become global issue since various measures that had been taken to curb the situation led to failure. Euphorbia hirta, is a well-known ethnomedicinal plant of Malaysia with diverse biological activities. This plant has been used widely in traditional medicine for the treatment of gastrointestinal, bronchial and respiratory ailments caused by infectious agents. Methods In the present study, chemical compositions of methanol extract of E. hirta L. aerial part was analyzed by gas chromatography and gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. A relevant in vitro model was developed to assess the potency of the E. hirta extract to inhibit the bacterial biofilm formation as well as to eradicate the established biofilms. Besides biofilm, E. hirta extract was also evaluated for the inhibition efficacy on planktonic cells using tetrazolium microplate assay. For these purposes, a panel of clinically resistant pathogens and American type culture collection (ATCC) strains were used. Results The methanolic extract of aerial part of E. hirta was predominantly composed of terpenoid (60.5%) which is often regarded as an active entity accountable for the membrane destruction and biofilm cell detachment. The highest antibacterial effect of crude E. hirta extract was observed in the clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) value of 0.062 mg/ml. The extract also displayed potent biofilm inhibition and eradication activity against P. aeruginosa with minimum biofilm inhibition concentration (MBIC) and minimum biofilm eradication concentration (MBEC) values of 0.25 mg/ml and 0.5 mg/ml, respectively. Conclusions The crude methanol extract of E. hirta has proven to have interesting and potential anti-biofilm properties. The findings from this study will also help to establish a very promising anti-infective phytotherapeutical to be exploited in

  13. Molecular epidemiology of Italian clinical Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii isolates.

    PubMed

    Cogliati, Massimo; Zamfirova, Ralika R; Tortorano, Anna Maria; Viviani, Maria Anna

    2013-07-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans variety grubii is the major etiological agent of cryptococcal meningitis in both immunocompromised and immunocompetent patients. The current PCR-based molecular methods are not sufficient to discriminate among the different populations of this yeast. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the genotypes of the Italian clinical C. neoformans var. grubii isolates by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). A total of 53 isolates, each representative of a single case, were studied. Genotyping was performed using the ISHAM Cryptococcus MLST consensus scheme and the results were compared to the publically available global C. neoformans var. grubii MLST dataset. A total of 16 genotypes were identified; 14 were new genotypes, one was identical to sequence type (ST) ST81, which had been previously reported from Thailand, and one to ST23 already identified in Uganda, the USA and Korea. Sequence type ST61 was the most numerous, including 16 isolates. Network phylogenetic analysis showed that the Italian isolates could be divided into at least three clusters with similarities with those recovered in Africa, Asia and Americas. Distribution of the STs among the isolates could not be correlated to the hospital in which they were recovered or to the HIV status of the patients. The majority of the isolates belonged to the molecular type VNI; three belonged to the rare molecular type VNII and one to the VNB group, which until now had not been described in Europe. The results reveal that the Italian C. neoformans var. grubii population presents a distinct variability, displaying a high number of new genotypes, and probably recombines sexually.

  14. Glycerol metabolism promotes biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Scoffield, Jessica; Silo-Suh, Laura

    2016-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes persistent infections in the airways of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Airway sputum contains various host-derived nutrients that can be utilized by P. aeruginosa, including phosphotidylcholine, a major component of host cell membranes. Phosphotidylcholine can be degraded by P. aeruginosa to glycerol and fatty acids to increase the availability of glycerol in the CF lung. In this study, we explored the role that glycerol metabolism plays in biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa. We report that glycerol metabolism promotes biofilm formation by both a chronic CF isolate (FRD1) and a wound isolate (PAO1) of P. aeruginosa. Moreover, loss of the GlpR regulator, which represses the expression of genes involved in glycerol metabolism, enhances biofilm formation in FRD1 through the upregulation of Pel polysaccharide. Taken together, our results suggest that glycerol metabolism may be a key factor that contributes to P. aeruginosa persistence by promoting biofilm formation.

  15. Genotyping of clinical isolates of Acanthamoeba genus in Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Carolina; Reyes-Batlle, María; Ysea, María Alejandra Vethencourt; Pérez, Mónica V Galindo; de Rondón, Carmen Guzmán; Paduani, Anaibeth J Nessi; Pérez, Angelyseb Dorta; López-Arencibia, Atteneri; Sifaoui, Ines; de Galindo, María Virginia Pérez; de Suárez, Eva Pérez; Martínez-Carretero, Enrique; Valladares, Basilio; Piñero, José E; Lorenzo-Morales, Jacob

    2016-12-01

    Free-living amoebae of Acanthamoeba genus are opportunistic pathogens distributed worldwide. Strains included in this genus are causative agents of a fatal encephalitis and a sight-threating keratitis in humans and other animals. In this study, 550 clinical samples which were collected between 1984 and 2014 from different patients with suspected infections due to Acanthamoeba were initially screened for the presence of this amoebic genus at the Laboratorio de Amibiasis-Escuela de Bioanálisis at the Universidad Central de Venezuela. Samples were cultured in 2% Non-Nutrient agar plates seeded with a layer of heat killed Escherichia coli. From the 550 clinical samples included in this study, 18 of them were positive for Acanthamoeba genus after culture identification. Moreover, positive samples were confirmed after amplification of the Diagnostic Fragment 3 (DF3) of the Acanthamoeba18S rDNA genus and sequencing was carried out in order to genotype the isolated strains of Acanthamoeba. Furthermore, the pathogenic potential of the strains was checked by performing thermotolerance and osmotolerance assays. Sequencing of the DF3 region resulted in the identification of genotype T4 in all the isolated strains. Moreover, most isolates were thermotolerant or both thermotolerant and osmotolerant and thus were classified as potentially pathogenic strains. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the molecular characterization at the genotype level of Acanthamoeba strains in Venezuela.

  16. Clinical significance of Aeromonas species isolated from patients with diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Moyer, N P

    1987-11-01

    A total of 248 strains of Aeromonas spp. were isolated from 3,334 human fecal specimens submitted to a state public health laboratory over a 2-year period to be cultured for enteric pathogens. Cary-Blair transport medium, blood ampicillin agar, and alkaline peptone water enrichment provided optimal recovery of Aeromonas spp. A questionnaire requesting clinical and epidemiological information was sent to physicians, who submitted stool samples for testing, with each laboratory report for 107 consecutive stool isolates of Aeromonas spp. The 56 questionnaires which were completed and returned were analyzed to determine the seasonal distribution of illness and the age and sex distribution of patients; characteristic symptoms; and predisposing factors for gastrointestinal disease caused by Aeromonas spp. It was concluded that some A. hydrophila, A. sobria, and A. caviae strains are capable of causing diarrhea and that antibiotic therapy and the drinking of untreated water are significant risk factors for susceptible hosts.

  17. Clinical significance of Aeromonas species isolated from patients with diarrhea.

    PubMed Central

    Moyer, N P

    1987-01-01

    A total of 248 strains of Aeromonas spp. were isolated from 3,334 human fecal specimens submitted to a state public health laboratory over a 2-year period to be cultured for enteric pathogens. Cary-Blair transport medium, blood ampicillin agar, and alkaline peptone water enrichment provided optimal recovery of Aeromonas spp. A questionnaire requesting clinical and epidemiological information was sent to physicians, who submitted stool samples for testing, with each laboratory report for 107 consecutive stool isolates of Aeromonas spp. The 56 questionnaires which were completed and returned were analyzed to determine the seasonal distribution of illness and the age and sex distribution of patients; characteristic symptoms; and predisposing factors for gastrointestinal disease caused by Aeromonas spp. It was concluded that some A. hydrophila, A. sobria, and A. caviae strains are capable of causing diarrhea and that antibiotic therapy and the drinking of untreated water are significant risk factors for susceptible hosts. PMID:3693537

  18. Pharmacodynamic comparisons of antimicrobials against nosocomial isolates of escherichia coli, klebsiella pneumoniae, acinetobacter baumannii and pseudomonas aeruginosa from the MYSTIC surveillance program: the OPTAMA Program, South America 2002.

    PubMed

    Kiffer, Carlos R V; Mendes, Caio; Kuti, Joseph L; Nicolau, David P

    2004-06-01

    The OPTAMA (Optimizing Pharmacodynamic Target Attainment using the MYSTIC [Meropenem Yearly Susceptibility Test Information Collection] Antibiogram) Program provides insight into the appropriate antibiotic options for empiric therapy for common nosocomial pathogens. In this report, South America is represented by Brazil, Colombia, Peru, and Venezuela. A 5000-subject Monte Carlo Simulation estimated pharmacodynamic target attainment for meropenem, imipenem, ceftazidime, cefepime, piperacillin/tazobactam, and ciprofloxacin against Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Pharmacokinetic parameter variability was derived from existing healthy volunteer data, and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) data came from the 2002 MYSTIC program. Piperacillin/tazobactam and ciprofloxacin displayed the lowest target attainment against all bacterial species (14% to 24% for A. baumannii, 26% to 37% for P. aeruginosa, and 48% to 66% for the Enterobacteriaceae). Overall, the carbapenems had the highest probabilities of attainment against the Enterobacteriaceae (98% to 100%) and A. baumannii (73% to 74%), whereas cefepime obtained the greatest target attainment against P. aeruginosa (65%). Because no single regimen had high target attainment against A. baumannii and P. aeruginosa, the use of combination therapy to treat these pathogens in South America may be justified. Because of the lack of agreement with percent susceptibility for certain antimicrobial regimens, the use of pharmacodynamic target attainment may be a more accurate predictor of microbiologic success.

  19. Pseudomonas aeruginosa population structure revisited under environmental focus: impact of water quality and phage pressure.

    PubMed

    Selezska, Katherina; Kazmierczak, Marlon; Müsken, Mathias; Garbe, Julia; Schobert, Max; Häussler, Susanne; Wiehlmann, Lutz; Rohde, Christine; Sikorski, Johannes

    2012-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa attracts research attention as a common opportunistic nosocomial pathogen causing severe health problems in humans. Nevertheless, its primary habitat is the natural environment. Here, we relate the genetic diversity of 381 environmental isolates from rivers in northern Germany to ecological factors such as river system, season of sampling and different levels of water quality. From representatives of 99 environmental clones, also in comparison with 91 clinical isolates, we determined motility phenotypes, virulence factors, biofilm formation, serotype and the resistance to seven environmental P.aeruginosa phages. The integration of genetic, ecological and phenotypic data showed (i) the presence of several extended clonal complexes (ecc) which are non-uniformly distributed across different water qualities, and (ii) a correlation of the hosts' serotype composition with susceptibility towards distinct groups of environmental phages. For at least one ecc (eccB), we assumed the ecophysiological differences on environmental water adaptation and phage resistance to be so distinct as to reinforce an environmentally driven cladogenic split from the remainder of P.aeruginosa. In summary, we conclude that the majority of the microevolutionary population dynamics of P.aeruginosa were shaped by the natural environment and not by the clinical habitat.

  20. The impact of anaerobiosis on strain-dependent phenotypic variations in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Fang, Hao; Toyofuku, Masanori; Kiyokawa, Tatsunori; Ichihashi, Akihiro; Tateda, Kazuhiro; Nomura, Nobuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria participate in social behaviors by communicating with each other and forming surface-associated biofilms. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, such social behaviors are affected greatly by the environment. Although P. aeruginosa survive under anaerobic conditions, previous studies indicate that quorum sensing is attenuated under such conditions, and that this leads to decreased activity of extracellular virulence factors as compared to aerobic conditions. Hence it has come into question whether P. aeruginosa are virulent under anaerobic conditions. Here, we compared various phenotypes between PAO1 and clinical isolates under anaerobic conditions. Our data revealed that when grown anaerobically, growth and cell morphology greatly differed among the strains. One of the clinical isolates produced comparable amounts of quorum-sensing signaling molecules and extracellular virulence factors under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, while the other strains showed low production under anaerobic conditions. Biofilm formation also exhibited strain-dependent variations, suggesting that there are several mechanisms that lead to biofilm formation under anaerobic conditions. Taken together, these results indicate that the impact of anaerobiosis on the social interactions of P. aeruginosa is strain dependent, and suggest that multiple regulatory mechanisms are involved in the regulation of quorum sensing and biofilm formation under anaerobic conditions.

  1. [Taxonomic study of clinic isolates of Trichophyton in Rosario, Argentina].

    PubMed

    Tartabini, Mirta L; Bonino, Guillermo S; Racca, Liliana; Luque, Alicia G

    2013-01-01

    Due to the pleomorphism and cultural variability displayed by species of the genus Trichophyton, the identification methods based solely on morphological features are usually insufficient for their classification. The goal of the present work was to test a set of phenotypic methods in order to identify fungal isolates that belong to the aforementioned genus. These methods were based on a molecular taxonomic technique used as standard. Clinical isolates (56) were used as samples along with 6 reference strains. Macro and micromorphological studies were performed as well as biochemical and physiological tests such as in vitro hair perforation, nutritional requirements in Trichophyton agar media, urease production and growth on bromocresol purple-milk. solids-glucose (BCP-MS-G) agar. Additionally, PCR fingerprinting using the (GACA)4 primer was employed. As a result of the PCR method, specific profiles were observed for Microsporum canis, Epidermophyton floccosum, Trichophyton rubrum and Trichophyton interdigitale. Identical profiles were obtained for Arthroderma benhamiae y Trichophyton erinacei. Of the total number of clinical isolates, 39 matched the T. rubrum profile while 13 corresponded to A. benhamiae and 4 to T. interdigitale. The most useful phenotypic test to differentiate between T. rubrum and T. mentagrophytes complex strains was alkalinization of the BCP-MS-G medium. Phenotypic tests did not allow differentiation among the T. mentagrophytes complex species. On the other hand, the molecular technique allowed characterization of T. rubrum isolates as well as of those observed in our study and included in the T. mentagrophytes complex: T. interdigitale and Trichophyton sp., the anamorph of A. benhamiae.

  2. Experience of isolated sleep paralysis in clinical practice in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ohaeri, J U

    1992-06-01

    The supernatural fears associated with the experience of isolated sleep paralysis in the culture of developing countries is sometimes associated with the evolution of somatic symptoms of psychological origin in patients predisposed to neurotic illness. Patients rarely spontaneously volunteer these fears and doctors pay them scant attention. Illustrative case histories that demonstrate the dynamics of the clinical presentation, as well as the treatment approach, are highlighted. It is hoped that doctors in general medical practice and in psychological medicine in developing countries where belief in supernatural causation of illness is rife will consider these factors in order to provide more effective treatment.

  3. In vitro antibacterial potency of Butea monosperma Lam. against 12 clinically isolated multidrug resistant bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Mahesh Chandra; Padhy, Rabindra Nath

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the antibacterial activity, using cold and hot extraction procedures with five solvents, petroleum ether, acetone, ethanol, methanol and water to validate medicinal uses of Butea monosperma Lam (B. monosperma) in controlling infections; and to qualitatively estimate phytochemical constituents of leaf-extracts of the plant. Methods The antibacterial activity of leaf-extracts was evaluated by the agar-well diffusion method against clinically isolated 12 Gram-positive and -negative multidrug resistant (MDR) pathogenic bacteria in vitro. Values of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of leaf-extracts against each bacterium were obtained in a 96-well micro-titre plate, by broth dilution micro-titre plate technique. Results The presence of tannins, flavonoids, starch, glycosides and carbohydrates in different leaf extracts was established. Pathogenic bacteria used were, Acinetobacter sp., Chromobacterium violaceum, Citrobacter freundii, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhi, Shigella sp., Enterococcus sp., Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), methicillin resistant S. aureus and vancomycin resistant S. aureus, along with standard bacterial strains. These MDR bacteria had been recorded to have significant inhibitions by leaf extracts, obtained by cold and hot extraction procedures with five solvents. In addition, the hot aqueous extract against Enterococcus sp. had the highest inhibition zone-size (21 mm). Ciprofloxacin 30 µg/disc was the positive/reference control and the diluting solvent, 10% dimethyl sulphoxide was the negative control. Recorded MIC values of different extracts ranged between 0.23 and 13.30 mg/mL, and MBC values were 0.52 to 30.00 mg/mL, for these bacteria. Conclusions Leaf-extracts with hot water and ethanol had shown significant antibacterial activity against all bacteria. B. monosperma leaf-extract could be used in treating infectious

  4. Characterization and interstrain transfer of prophage pp3 of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gang; Lu, Shuguang; Shen, Mengyu; Le, Shuai; Shen, Wei; Tan, Yinling; Wang, Jing; Zhao, Xia; Zhao, Yan; Gong, Yali; Yang, Yuhui; Zhu, Hongbin; Hu, Fuquan

    2017-01-01

    Prophages are major contributors to horizontal gene transfer and drive the evolution and diversification of bacteria. Here, we describe the characterization of a prophage element designated pp3 in the clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolate PA1. pp3 spontaneously excises from the PA1 genome and circularizes at a very high frequency of 25%. pp3 is likely to be a defective prophage due to its inability to form plaques on P. aeruginosa indicator strains, and no phage particles could be detected in PA1 supernatants. The pp3-encoded integrase is essential for excision by mediating site-specific recombination at the 26-bp attachment sequence. Using a filter mating experiment, we demonstrated that pp3 can transfer into P. aeruginosa recipient strains that do not possess this element naturally. Upon transfer, pp3 integrates into the same attachment site as in PA1 and maintains the ability to excise and circularize. Furthermore, pp3 significantly promotes biofilm formation in the recipient. Sequence alignment reveals that the 26-bp attachment site recognized by pp3 is conserved in all P. aeruginosa strains sequenced to date, making it possible that pp3 could be extensively disseminated in P. aeruginosa. This work improves our understanding of the ways in which prophages influence bacterial behavior and evolution. PMID:28346467

  5. Quorum quenching activity in cell-free lysate of endophytic bacteria isolated from Pterocarpus santalinus Linn., and its effect on quorum sensing regulated biofilm in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    PubMed

    Rajesh, P S; Ravishankar Rai, V

    2014-01-01

    Quorum sensing mechanism allows the microorganisms to resist the antibiotic treatment by forming biofilms. Quorum quenching is one of the mechanisms to control the development of drug resistance in microbes. Endophyte bacteria are beneficial to plant growth as they support the immune system against the pathogen attack. The endophytic bacteria present in Pterocarpus santalinus were screened for the presence of N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) degrading bacteria using biosensor strains and further confirmed by quantifying the violacein production. Cell-free lysate of endophytic bacteria, Bacillus firmus PT18 and Enterobacter asburiae PT39 exhibited potent AHL degrading ability by inhibiting about 80% violacein production in biosensor strain. Furthermore, when the cell-free lysate was applied to Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and PAO1-JP2 biofilm it resulted in significant (p<0.01) inhibition of biofilm formation. The biofilm inhibition was confirmed by visualization of biofilm slides under fluorescence microscopy, which showed decrease in total biomass formation in treated slides. Isolation and amplification of the gene (aiiA) indicated that the presence of AHL lactonase in cell-free lysate and sequence alignment indicated that AiiA contains a "HXHXDH" zinc-binding motif that is being conserved in several groups of metallohydrolases. Therefore, the study shows the potential of AHLs degradation by AHL lactonase present in cell-free lysate of isolated endophytic bacteria and inhibition of quorum sensing regulated biofilm formation in P. aeruginosa PAO1.

  6. A simple test for the detection of KPC and metallo-β-lactamase carbapenemase-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates with the use of meropenem disks supplemented with aminophenylboronic acid, dipicolinic acid and cloxacillin.

    PubMed

    Pasteran, F; Veliz, O; Faccone, D; Guerriero, L; Rapoport, M; Mendez, T; Corso, A

    2011-09-01

    We evaluated the ability of the combination disk test (CDT) and the Modified Hodge Test (MHT) to discriminate between various carbapenemase-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates (KPC, n = 36; metallo-β-lactamase (MBL), n = 38) and carbapenemase non-producers (n = 75). For the CDT, the optimal inhibitor concentrations and cut-off values were: 600 μg of 3-aminophenylboronic acid (APB) per disk (an increment of ≥4 mm), 1000 μg of dipicolinic acid (DPA) per disk (an increment of ≥5 mm) and 3000 μg of cloxacillin per disk (an increment of ≥3 mm). APB had excellent sensitivity (97%) and specificity (97%) for the detection of KPC enzymes. DPA detected MBL enzymes with a sensitivity and specificity of 97% and 81%, respectively. The MHT resulted in a low sensitivity (78%) and specificity (57%). The CDT could be very useful in daily practice to provide fast and reliable detection of KPC and MBL carbapenemases among P. aeruginosa isolates.

  7. Survival dynamics of cystic fibrosis-related Gram-negative bacterial pathogens (Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cenocepacia) in Dead Sea and Atlantic Ocean waters.

    PubMed

    Shteinberg, Michal; Kis-Papo, Tamar; Millar, Beverley C; Rendall, Jacqueline C; Downey, Damian G; Elborn, J Stuart; Moore, John E

    2015-09-01

    Clinical cystic fibrosis (CF) Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n=6) and Burkholderia cenocepacia (n=4) were inoculated in marine brines from the Dead Sea and the Atlantic Ocean and their survival was monitored over a 1 month duration. In Dead Sea samples, all P. aeruginosa and B. cenocepacia isolates were non-detectable by culture following 24 h incubation, including the non-selective enrichment samples. In the Atlantic Ocean brine, over a 1 month period, mean P. aeruginosa counts decreased by only 0.25 log10 units and mean B. cenocepacia counts decreased by approximately 4 log10 units (10,000 cfu/ml). This study demonstrated that Dead Sea brine exerted a lethal effect within 24 h on planktonic P. aeruginosa and B. cenocepacia. Thus, the Dead Sea effectively purges these organisms from its environment on a daily basis.

  8. Pseudomonas aeruginosa: breaking down barriers.

    PubMed

    Berube, Bryan J; Rangel, Stephanie M; Hauser, Alan R

    2016-02-01

    Many bacterial pathogens have evolved ingenious ways to escape from the lung during pneumonia to cause bacteremia. Unfortunately, the clinical consequences of this spread to the bloodstream are frequently dire. It is therefore important to understand the molecular mechanisms used by pathogens to breach the lung barrier. We have recently shown that Pseudomonas aeruginosa, one of the leading causes of hospital-acquired pneumonia, utilizes the type III secretion system effector ExoS to intoxicate pulmonary epithelial cells. Injection of these cells leads to localized disruption of the pulmonary-vascular barrier and dissemination of P. aeruginosa to the bloodstream. We put these data in the context of previous studies to provide a holistic model of P. aeruginosa dissemination from the lung. Finally, we compare P. aeruginosa dissemination to that of other bacteria to highlight the complexity of bacterial pneumonia. Although respiratory pathogens use distinct and intricate strategies to escape from the lungs, a thorough understanding of these processes can lay the foundation for new therapeutic approaches for bacterial pneumonia.

  9. In Vitro Activity of Fusidic Acid (CEM-102, Sodium Fusidate) against Staphylococcus aureus Isolates from Cystic Fibrosis Patients and Its Effect on the Activities of Tobramycin and Amikacin against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cepacia▿

    PubMed Central

    McGhee, Pamela; Clark, Catherine; Credito, Kim; Beachel, Linda; Pankuch, Glenn A.; Appelbaum, Peter C.; Kosowska-Shick, Klaudia

    2011-01-01

    We tested the MICs of fusidic acid (CEM-102) plus other agents against 40 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates from cystic fibrosis patients and the activities of fusidic acid with or without tobramycin or amikacin against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, MRSA, and Burkholderia cepacia isolates from cystic fibrosis patients in a 24-h time-kill study. Fusidic acid was potent (MICs, 0.125 to 0.5 μg/ml; a single 500-mg dose of fusidic acid at 8 h averaged 8 to 12. 5 μg/ml with 91 to 97% protein binding) against all MRSA strains. No antagonism was observed; synergy occurred for one MRSA strain treated with fusidic acid plus tobramycin. PMID:21343445

  10. Molecular characterization of Acanthamoeba isolated in water treatment plants and comparison with clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Magnet, A; Galván, A L; Fenoy, S; Izquierdo, F; Rueda, C; Fernandez Vadillo, C; Pérez-Irezábal, J; Bandyopadhyay, K; Visvesvara, G S; da Silva, A J; del Aguila, C

    2012-07-01

    A total of 116 samples (44 clinical specimens and 72 environmental samples) have been analyzed for the presence of Acanthamoeba. The environmental samples (ESs) were collected from four drinking water treatment plants (DWTP, n=32), seven wastewater treatment plants (n=28), and six locations of influence (n=12) on four river basins from the central area of Spain (winter-spring 2008). Water samples were concentrated by using the IDEXX Filta-Max(®) system. Acanthamoeba was identified in 65 of the 72 ESs by culture isolation (90.3%) and 63 by real-time PCR (87.5%), resulting in all sampling points (100%) positive for Acanthamoeba when considering both techniques and all the time period analyzed. Nine of the 44 clinical specimens were positive for Acanthamoeba. Seventeen Acanthamoeba strains (eight from four DWTP and nine from clinical samples) were also established in axenic-PYG medium. Twenty-four of the ESs and the 17 Acanthamoeba sp. strains were genotyped as T4/1, T4/8, and T4/9. The eight strains isolated from the DWTP samples were inoculated in nude mouse to ascertain their potential pathogenicity in this model. Animals that were inoculated died or showed central nervous system symptoms 9 days post-inoculation. Examination of immunofluorescence-stained brain and lung tissue sections showed multiple organisms invading both tissues, and re-isolation of throphozoites was successful in these tissues of all infected animals. For the first time, potentially pathogenic Acanthamoeba T4 has been detected in 100% of different types of water samples including tap water and sewage effluents in the central area of Spain suggesting a potential health threat for humans especially for the contact lens wearers.

  11. Hypermutable Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Cystic Fibrosis Patients from Two Brazilian Cities

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, Larissa; Leão, Robson Souza; Ferreira, Alex Guerra; Pereira, Dariane Castro; Raupp, Caroline; Pitt, Tyrone; Marques, Elizabeth Andrade

    2013-01-01

    Hypermutable (HPM) strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa have been found at high frequencies in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients in Europe. We report the results of testing for HPM frequencies, mutator genotype, and antimicrobial resistance of P. aeruginosa strains from Brazilian CF patients. A modified disk diffusion technique was used to quantify antibiotic-resistant subpopulations of an isolate, and estimations of the frequency of mutation to rifampin resistance were determined for 705 isolates from 149 patients attending clinics in two Brazilian cities. Mutations in the mutS gene were detected by sequencing assays. We found 194 (27.5%) HPM isolates in samples from 99 (66.4%) patients. Thirty-five HPM isolates (18.0%) from 31 (31.3%) patients exhibited a high increased spontaneous mutation rate compared with controls, and eight isolates from six patients displayed a defective mutS gene. The dominant HPM population was associated with very low antibiotic resistance levels, while HPM subpopulations were generally more resistant to antimicrobials. A relatively high prevalence of HPM P. aeruginosa in CF patients was associated with surprisingly low antibiotic resistance levels, in contrast to some earlier studies. PMID:23303495

  12. Ribotyping of Pseudomonas aeruginosa: discriminatory power and usefulness as a tool for epidemiological studies.

    PubMed Central

    Blanc, D S; Siegrist, H H; Sahli, R; Francioli, P

    1993-01-01

    Restriction fragment length polymorphism of ribosomal DNA regions (ribotyping) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was evaluated as a tool for epidemiological purposes. Fifty-five epidemiologically unrelated isolates from three geographic areas of Switzerland and 11 isolates obtained during an outbreak of P. aeruginosa infections in a burn unit were typed by this method. Typeability and reproducibility of the method reached 100%. With four selected restriction enzymes (BamHI, ClaI, EcoRI, and PstI), the 55 unrelated isolates could be classified into 33 ribotypes. To assess the value of this method for the interpretation of epidemiological data, we calculated an index of discrimination (ID) which takes into consideration both the number of types defined by the typing method and their relative frequencies. Our ribotyping system obtained a high ID of 0.958 with only four restriction enzymes, comparing well with other different typing schemes for which ID values could be calculated from published data. All clinical isolates of the outbreak belonged to the same ribotype, whereas environmental isolates, initially thought to be the source of the epidemic, belonged to a different ribotype. Thus, the typeability, reproducibility, and discriminatory power of our method as well as its value established in an epidemiological investigation were found to be appropriate for further epidemiological studies of P. aeruginosa. Images PMID:8093252

  13. [In vitro susceptibilities to levofloxacin and various antibacterial agents of 12,919 clinical isolates obtained from 72 centers in 2007].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Keizo; Ohno, Akira; Ishii, Yoshikazu; Tateda, Kazuhiro; Iwata, Morihiro; Kanda, Makoto; Akizawa, Kouji; Shimizu, Chikara; Kon, Shinichirou; Nakamura, Kastushi; Matsuda, Keiko; Tominaga, Makoto; Nakagawa, Takuo; Sugita, Akihiro; Ito, Tatsumi; Kato, Jun; Suwabe, Akira; Yamahata, Kumiko; Kawamura, Chizuko; Tashiro, Hiromi; Horiuchi, Hiroko; Katayama, Yosei; Kondou, Shigemi; Misawa, Shigeki; Murata, Misturu; Kobayashi, Yoshio; Okamoto, Hideyuki; Yamazaki, Kenichiro; Okada, Motoi; Haruki, Kosuke; Kanno, Harushige; Aihara, Masanori; Maesaki, Shigefumi; Hashikita, Giichi; Miyajima, Eiji; Sumitomo, Midori; Saito, Takefumi; Yamane, Nobuo; Kawashima, Chieko; Akiyama, Takahisa; Ieiri, Tamio; Yamamoto, Yoshitaka; Okamoto, Yuki; Okabe, Hidetoshi; Moro, Kunihiko; Shigeta, Masayo; Yoshida, Haruyoshi; Yamashita, Masanobu; Hida, Yukio; Takubo, Takayuki; Kusakabe, Tadashi; Masaki, Hiroya; Heijyou, Hitoshi; Nakaya, Hideo; Kawahara, Kunimitsu; Sano, Reiko; Matsuo, Syuji; Kono, Hisashi; Yuzuki, Yosuke; Ikeda, Norio; Idomuki, Masayo; Soma, Masayuki; Yamamoto, Go; Kinoshita, Syohiro; Kawano, Seiji; Oka, Mikio; Kusano, Nobuchika; Kang, Dongchon; Ono, Junko; Yasujima, Minoru; Miki, Makoto; Hayashi, Masato; Okubo, Syunji; Toyoshima, Syunkou; Kaku, Mitsuo; Sekine, Imao; Shiotani, Joji; Horiuchi, Hajime; Tazawa, Yoko; Yoneyama, Akiko; Kumasaka, Kazunari; Koike, Kazuhiko; Taniguchi, Nobuyuki; Ozaki, Yukio; Uchida, Takashi; Murakami, Masami; Inuzuka, Kazuhisa; Gonda, Hideo; Yamaguchi, Ikuo; fujimoto, Yoshinori; Iriyama, Junji; Asano, Yuko; Genma, Hitoshi; Maekawa, Masato; Yoshimura, Hitoshi; Nakatani, Kaname; Baba, Hisashi; Ichiyama, Satoshi; Fujita, Shinichi; Kuwabara, Masao; Okazaki, Toshiro; Fujiwara, Hiromitsu; Ota, Hiromi; Nagai, Astushi; Fujita, Jun; Negayama, Kiyoshi; Sugiura, Tetsuro; Kamioka, Mikio; Murase, Mitsuharu; Yamane, Nobuhisa; Nakasone, Isamu; Okayama, Akihiko; Aoki, Yosuke; Kusaba, Koji; Nakashima, Yukari; Miyanohara, Hiroaki; Hiramatsu, Kazufumi; Saikawa, Tetsunori; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Matsuda, Junichi; Kohno, Shigeru; Mashiba, Koichi

    2009-08-01

    We have reported in this journal in vitro susceptibilities of clinical isolates to antibiotics every year since 1992. In this paper, we report the results of an analysis of in vitro susceptibilities of 12,919 clinical isolates from 72 centers in Japan to selected antibiotics in 2007 compared with the results from previous years. The common respiratory pathogens, Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Moraxella catarrhalis and Haemophilus influenzae maintained a high susceptibility to fluoroquinolones (FQs). The resistance of S. pyogenes to macrolides has been increasing every year and this was especially clear this year. Most strains of Enterobacteriaceae except for Escherichia coli showed a high susceptibility to FQs. Almost 30% of E. coli strains were resistant to FQs and the resistance increased further this year. FQs resistance of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) was approximately 95% with the exception of 45% for sitafloxacin (STFX). FQs resistance of methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) was low at about 10%. FQs resistance of methicillin-resistant coagulase negative Staphylococci (MRCNS) was higher than that of methicillin-susceptible coagulase negative Staphylococci (MSCNS), but it was lower than that of MRSA. However, FQs resistance of MSCNS was higher than that of MSSA. FQs resistance of Enterococcus faecalis was 22.5% to 29.6%, while that of Enterococcusfaecium was more than 85% except for STFX (58.3%). In clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa derived from urinary tract infections, FQs resistance was 21-27%, which was higher than that of P. aeruginosa from respiratory tract infections at 13-21%, which was the same trend as in past years. Multidrug resistant strains accounted for 5.6% in the urinary tract and 1.8% in the respiratory tract. Acinetobacter spp. showed high susceptibility to FQs. The carbapenem resistant strains, which present a problem at present, accounted for 2.7%. Neisseria gonorrhoeae showed high

  14. Osteomyelitis due to multiple carbapenemase-producing Gram-negative bacteria: The first case report of a GES-13-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolate in Canada.

    PubMed

    Sepehri, Shadi; Poliquin, Guillaume; Alfattoh, Nora; Boyd, David; Mulvey, Michael; Denisuik, Andrew; Fanella, Sergio; Karlowsky, James; Walkty, Andrew

    2014-07-01

    A case of osteomyelitis in an infant following a burn injury sustained in Pakistan caused by a GES-13-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa (the first reported in Canada) and an OXA-48 producing Klebsiella pneumoniae is described. The present case serves to highlight the importance of international travel as a risk factor for infection with carbapenemase-producing bacteria and the challenges in the laboratory detection of these organisms.

  15. Gallium induces the production of virulence factors in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    García-Contreras, Rodolfo; Pérez-Eretza, Berenice; Lira-Silva, Elizabeth; Jasso-Chávez, Ricardo; Coria-Jiménez, Rafael; Rangel-Vega, Adrián; Maeda, Toshinari; Wood, Thomas K

    2014-02-01

    The novel antimicrobial gallium is a nonredox iron III analogue with bacteriostatic and bactericidal properties, effective for the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in vitro and in vivo in mouse and rabbit infection models. It interferes with iron metabolism, transport, and presumably its homeostasis. As gallium exerts its antimicrobial effects by competing with iron, we hypothesized that it ultimately will lead cells to an iron deficiency status. As iron deficiency promotes the expression of virulence factors in vitro and promotes the pathogenicity of P. aeruginosa in animal models, it is anticipated that treatment with gallium will also promote the production of virulence factors. To test this hypothesis, the reference strain PA14 and two clinical isolates from patients with cystic fibrosis were exposed to gallium, and their production of pyocyanin, rhamnolipids, elastase, alkaline protease, alginate, pyoverdine, and biofilm was determined. Gallium treatment induced the production of all the virulence factors tested in the three strains except for pyoverdine. In addition, as the Ga-induced virulence factors are quorum sensing controlled, co-administration of Ga and the quorum quencher brominated furanone C-30 was assayed, and it was found that C-30 alleviated growth inhibition from gallium. Hence, adding both C-30 and gallium may be more effective in the treatment of P. aeruginosa infections.

  16. Clinical resistance and decreased susceptibility in Streptococcus suis isolates from clinically healthy fattening pigs.

    PubMed

    Callens, Bénédicte F; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Maes, Dominiek; Butaye, Patrick; Dewulf, Jeroen; Boyen, Filip

    2013-04-01

    Streptococcus suis (S. suis) has often been reported as an important swine pathogen and is considered as a new emerging zoonotic agent. Consequently, it is important to be informed on its susceptibility to antimicrobial agents. In the current study, the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) population distribution of nine antimicrobial agents has been determined for nasal S. suis strains, isolated from healthy pigs at the end of the fattening period from 50 closed or semiclosed pig herds. The aim of the study was to report resistance based on both clinical breakpoints (clinical resistance percentage) and epidemiological cutoff values (non-wild-type percentage). Non-wild-type percentages were high for tetracycline (98%), lincomycin (92%), tilmicosin (72%), erythromycin (70%), tylosin (66%), and low for florfenicol (0%) and enrofloxacin (0.3%). Clinical resistance percentages were high for tetracycline (95%), erythromycin (66%), tylosin (66%), and low for florfenicol (0.3%) and enrofloxacin (0.3%). For tiamulin, for which no clinical breakpoint is available, 57% of the isolates did not belong to the wild-type population. Clinical resistance and non-wild-type percentages differed substantially for penicillin. Only 1% of the tested S. suis strains was considered as clinically resistant, whereas 47% of the strains showed acquired resistance when epidemiological cutoff values were used. In conclusion, MIC values for penicillin are gradually increasing, compared to previous reports, although pigs infected with strains showing higher MICs may still respond to treatment with penicillin. The high rate of acquired resistance against tiamulin has not been reported before. Results from this study clearly demonstrate that the use of different interpretive criteria contributes to the extent of differences in reported antimicrobial resistance results. The early detection of small changes in the MIC population distribution of isolates, while clinical failure may not yet be

  17. Subinhibitory concentration of ciprofloxacin targets quorum sensing system of Pseudomonas aeruginosa causing inhibition of biofilm formation & reduction of virulence

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Parul; Chhibber, Sanjay; Harjai, Kusum

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Biofilms formed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa lead to persistent infections. Use of antibiotics for the treatment of biofilm induced infection poses a threat towards development of resistance. Therefore, the research is directed towards exploring the property of antibiotics which may alter the virulence of an organism besides altering its growth. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of subinhibitory concentration of ciprofloxacin (CIP) in inhibiting biofilm formation and virulence of P. aeruginosa. Methods: Antibiofilm potential of subinhibitory concentration of CIP was evaluated in terms of log reduction, biofilm forming capacity and coverslip assay. P. aeruginosa isolates (grown in the presence and absence of sub-MIC of CIP) were also evaluated for inhibition in motility, virulence factor production and quorum sensing (QS) signal production. Results: Sub-minimum inhibitory concentration (sub-MIC) of CIP significantly reduced the motility of P. aeruginosa stand and strain and clinical isolates and affected biofilm forming capacity. Production of protease, elastase, siderophore, alginate, and rhamnolipid was also significantly reduced by CIP. Interpretation & conclusions: Reduction in virulence factors and biofilm formation was due to inhibition of QS mechanism which was indicated by reduced production of QS signal molecules by P. aeruginosa in presence of subinhibitory concentration of CIP. PMID:27488009

  18. Accurate mass analysis of N-acyl-homoserine-lactones and cognate lactone-opened compounds in bacterial isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 by LC-ESI-LTQ-FTICR-MS.

    PubMed

    Cataldi, Tommaso R I; Bianco, Giuliana; Abate, Salvatore

    2009-02-01

    N-acyl-homoserine-lactones (AHSLs) are widely conserved signal molecules present in quorum sensing systems of Gram-negative bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We present here the results obtained with a hybrid linear trap/Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (LTQ-FTICR) mass spectrometer used to investigate the occurrence of AHSLs and cognate N-acyl-homoserines (AHSs) in bacterial isolates of P. aeruginosa (strain PAO1). Two hydrolysed AHSs were found in significant amounts, most likely formed through the lactone opening of N-3-oxo-decanoyl-L-homoserine-lactone (3OC10-HSL) and N-3-oxo-dodecanoyl-L-homoserine-lactone (3OC12-HSL). Structure elucidation of these ring-opened molecules, i.e. N-3-oxo-decanoyl-L-homoserine (3OC10-HS), and N-3-oxo-dodecanoyl-L-homoserine (3OC12-HS), which are not detected by bacterial biosensors, was performed by high-resolution and accurate mass measurements upon liquid chromatography (LC) and confirmed by tandem MS in the LTQ analyser. Assignment of chemical formula, with mass spectra in the form of [M+H]+, was significantly expedited by extracted ion chromatograms (XICs) because the number of potentially plausible formulae for each protonated signalling molecule was considerably reduced a priori by the LC behaviour, the high mass measurement accuracy available in FTICR mass spectra and the isotopic patterns. At least two concentration levels were observed in spent culture supernatants of P. aeruginosa: compounds at a relatively high content (5-15 microM) that is C4-HSL, 3OC10-HS, and 3OC12-HS and those occurring at a lower content (<0.2 microM) that is C6-HSL and C8-HSL. The implications of this work extend to a great variety of Gram-negative bacteria.

  19. In vitro prevention of Pseudomonas aeruginosa early biofilm formation with antibiotics used in cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Olmos, Ana; García-Castillo, María; Maiz, Luis; Lamas, Adelaida; Baquero, Fernando; Cantón, Rafael

    2012-08-01

    The ability of antibiotics used in bronchopulmonary infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients to prevent Pseudomonas aeruginosa early biofilm formation was studied using a biofilm microtitre assay with 57 non-mucoid P. aeruginosa isolates (44 first colonisers and 13 recovered during the initial intermittent colonisation stage) obtained from 35 CF patients. Minimum biofilm inhibitory concentrations (BICs) of levofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, imipenem, ceftazidime, tobramycin, colistin and azithromycin were determined by placing a peg lid with a formed biofilm onto microplates containing antibiotics. A modification of this protocol consisting of antibiotic challenge during biofilm formation was implemented in order to determine the biofilm prevention concentration (BPC), i.e. the minimum concentration able to prevent biofilm formation. The lowest BPCs were for fluoroquinolones, tobramycin and colistin and the highest for ceftazidime and imipenem. The former antibiotics had BPCs identical to or only slightly higher than their minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) determined by standard Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) microdilution and were also active on formed biofilms as reflected by their low BIC values. In contrast, ceftazidime and imipenem were less effective for prevention of biofilm formation and on formed biofilms. In conclusion, the new BPC parameter determined in non-mucoid P. aeruginosa isolates recovered during early colonisation stages in CF patients supports early aggressive antimicrobial treatment guidelines in first P. aeruginosa-colonised CF patients.

  20. Loss of Social Behaviours in Populations of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infecting Lungs of Patients with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Jiricny, Natalie; Molin, Søren; Foster, Kevin; Diggle, Stephen P.; Scanlan, Pauline D.; Ghoul, Melanie; Johansen, Helle Krogh; Santorelli, Lorenzo A.; Popat, Roman; West, Stuart A.; Griffin, Ashleigh S.

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, is an opportunistic, bacterial pathogen causing persistent and frequently fatal infections of the lung in patients with cystic fibrosis. Isolates from chronic infections differ from laboratory and environmental strains in a range of traits and this is widely interpreted as the result of adaptation to the lung environment. Typically, chronic strains carry mutations in global regulation factors that could effect reduced expression of social traits, raising the possibility that competitive dynamics between cooperative and selfish, cheating strains could also drive changes in P. aeruginosa infections. We compared the expression of cooperative traits - biofilm formation, secretion of exo-products and quorum sensing (QS) - in P. aeruginosa isolates that were estimated to have spent different lengths of time in the lung based on clinical information. All three exo-products involved in nutrient acquisition were produced in significantly smaller quantities with increased duration of infection, and patterns across four QS signal molecules were consistent with accumulation over time of mutations in lasR, which are known to disrupt the ability of cells to respond to QS signal. Pyocyanin production, and the proportion of cells in biofilm relative to motile, free-living cells in liquid culture, did not change. Overall, our results confirm that the loss of social behaviour is a consistent trend with time spent in the lung and suggest that social dynamics are potentially relevant to understanding the behaviour of P. aeruginosa in lung infections. PMID:24454693

  1. Loss of social behaviours in populations of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infecting lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Jiricny, Natalie; Molin, Søren; Foster, Kevin; Diggle, Stephen P; Scanlan, Pauline D; Ghoul, Melanie; Johansen, Helle Krogh; Santorelli, Lorenzo A; Popat, Roman; West, Stuart A; Griffin, Ashleigh S

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, is an opportunistic, bacterial pathogen causing persistent and frequently fatal infections of the lung in patients with cystic fibrosis. Isolates from chronic infections differ from laboratory and environmental strains in a range of traits and this is widely interpreted as the result of adaptation to the lung environment. Typically, chronic strains carry mutations in global regulation factors that could effect reduced expression of social traits, raising the possibility that competitive dynamics between cooperative and selfish, cheating strains could also drive changes in P. aeruginosa infections. We compared the expression of cooperative traits - biofilm formation, secretion of exo-products and quorum sensing (QS) - in P. aeruginosa isolates that were estimated to have spent different lengths of time in the lung based on clinical information. All three exo-products involved in nutrient acquisition were produced in significantly smaller quantities with increased duration of infection, and patterns across four QS signal molecules were consistent with accumulation over time of mutations in lasR, which are known to disrupt the ability of cells to respond to QS signal. Pyocyanin production, and the proportion of cells in biofilm relative to motile, free-living cells in liquid culture, did not change. Overall, our results confirm that the loss of social behaviour is a consistent trend with time spent in the lung and suggest that social dynamics are potentially relevant to understanding the behaviour of P. aeruginosa in lung infections.

  2. RESPONSES OF OYSTERS AND THEIR HEMOCYTES TO CLINICAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ISOLATES OF VIBRIO PARAHAEMOLYTICUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Interactions of Vibrio parahaemolyticus with oysters and oyster hemocytes were studied using three environmental isolates (1094, 1163 and ATCC 17802) and three clinical isolates (2030, 2062, 2107). Clinical isolates were from patients who became ill during the June 1998 food pois...

  3. [Post-marketing surveillance of antibacterial activities of cefozopran against various clinical isolates--II. Gram-negative bacteria].

    PubMed

    Igari, Jun; Oguri, Toyoko; Hiramatsu, Nobuyoshi; Akiyama, Kazumitsu; Koyama, Tsuneo

    2002-02-01

    As a post-marketing surveillance, the in vitro antibacterial activities of cefozopran (CZOP), an agent of cephems, against various clinical isolates were yearly evaluated and compared with those of other cephems, oxacephems, penicillins, monobactams, and carbapenems. Changes in CZOP susceptibility for the bacteria were also evaluated with the bacterial resistance ratio calculated with the breakpoint MIC. Twenty-five species (3,362 strains) of Gram-negative bacteria were isolated from the clinical materials annually collected from 1996 to 2000, and consisted of Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis (n = 136), Haemophilus influenzae (n = 289), Escherichia coli (n = 276), Klebsiella pneumoniae (n = 192), Klebsiella oxytoca (n = 157), Enterobacter cloacae (n = 189), Enterobacter aerogenes (n = 93), Serratia marcescens (n = 172), Serratia liquefaciens (n = 24), Citrobacter freundii (n = 177), Citrobacter koseri (n = 70), Proteus mirabilis (n = 113), Proteus vulgaris (n = 89), Morganella morganii (n = 116), Providencia spp. (n = 41), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n = 290), Pseudomonas fluorescens (n = 56), Pseudomonas putida (n = 63), Acinetobacter baumannii (n = 146), Acinetobacter lwoffii (n = 34), Burkholderia cepacia (n = 101), Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (n = 169), Bacteroides fragilis group (n = 196), and Prevotella/Porphyromonas (n = 173). An antibacterial activity of CZOP against E. coli, K. pneumoniae, K. oxytoca, and S. marcescens was potent and consistent with or more preferable than the study results obtained until the new drug application approval. MIC90 of CZOP against M.(B.) catarrhalis, C. koseri, and P. aeruginosa was not considerably changed and consistent with the study results obtained until the new drug application approval. MIC90 of CZOP against E. cloacae, E. aerogenes, and P. mirabilis increased year by year. The increase in MIC90 of CZOP against E. aerogenes and P. mirabilis, however, was not considered to be an obvious decline in susceptibility. In

  4. The Clinical Spectrum of Isolated Peripheral Motor Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Sanderson, Alan B.; Arnold, W. David; Elsheikh, Bakri; Kissel, John T.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Isolated peripheral motor dysfunction due to lower motor neuron or peripheral nerve disorders presents an interesting challenge to clinicians because of the diverse differential diagnosis with a broad range of prognoses. Methods We retrospectively reviewed clinical data of adults who presented over 12 years with muscle weakness, atrophy, or fasciculations, but without hyperreflexia or sensory involvement. Results In 119 patients, 52% had a motor neuron disease (MND), 13% had immune neuropathies, 11% had genetic neuronopathies, 10% had residual or post-polio syndrome, 5% had benign fasciculation, 1% had an infectious etiology, and 8% were not given a final diagnosis. Only MND patients had cognitive dysfunction or frontal release signs. Bulbar and respiratory symptoms virtually excluded consideration of immune neuropathy. Conclusions Only half of the patients were diagnosed with MND. A significant minority have treatable conditions. Cognitive involvement, frontal release signs, and bulbar or respiratory symptoms are strongly suggestive of MND. PMID:25042002

  5. Diversity of polymyxin resistance mechanisms among Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Girardello, Raquel; Visconde, Marina; Cayô, Rodrigo; Figueiredo, Regina Célia Bressan Queiroz de; Mori, Marcelo Alves da Silva; Lincopan, Nilton; Gales, Ana Cristina

    2017-01-01

    Polymyxins have become drugs of last resort for treatment of multi-drug resistant (MDR) Gram-negative infections. However, the mechanisms of resistance to this compound have not been completely elucidated. In this study, we evaluated the mechanisms of resistance to this antimicrobial in two A. baumannii clinical isolates, respectively, susceptible (A027) and resistant (A009) to polymyxin B before and after polymyxin B exposure (A027(ind) and A009(ind)). The pmrAB and lpxACD were sequenced and their transcriptional levels were analyzed by qRT-PCR. The bacterial cell morphology was evaluated by transmission electronic microscopy (TEM) and the membrane potential was measured using Zeta-potential analyzer. The virulence of strains was studied using a Caenorhabditis elegans model. Both clinical isolates exhibited an elevation of the polymyxin B MIC after exposure to this compound. On the other hand, A027(ind) showed decreased values of MIC for β-lactams, aminoglycosides, vancomycin, teicoplanin, oxacillin and erythromycin. A027(ind) harbored two mutations in pmrB and the ISAba125 disrupting the lpxA. In contrast, A009(ind) strain exhibited increase of pmrB transcriptional level, after polymyxin B exposure, despite the absence of mutations in the pmrAB genes. The TEM images revealed a thicker and more electron-dense peptidoglycan layer for A009 than that of A027. The exposure to polymyxin B induced a strong condensation and darkening of intracellular material, mainly in A009(ind). In addition, the surface charge of A009 was significantly less negative than the one of A027. Using the C. elegans model, only A027(ind) strain showed a reduction on virulence. The diversity of polymyxin B resistance mechanisms among A. baumannii strains evaluated in this study confirms the complexity of these mechanisms, which may vary depending of the background of each strain.

  6. Ecto-ATPases of clinical and non-clinical isolates of Acanthamoeba.

    PubMed

    Sissons, James; Alsam, Selwa; Jayasekera, Samantha; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2004-11-01

    Acanthamoeba are opportunistic protozoan parasites that can cause fatal granulomatous amoebic encephalitis and eye keratitis, however the pathogenic mechanisms of Acanthamoeba remain unclear. In this study, we described the ability of live Acanthamoeba to hydrolyse extracellular ATP. Both clinical and non-clinical isolates belonging to genotypes, T1, T2, T3, T4 and T7 exhibited ecto-ATPase activities in vitro. Using non-denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, ecto-ATPases were further characterized. All Acanthamoeba isolates tested, exhibited a single ecto-ATPase band (approximate molecular weight of 272 kDa). However, clinical isolates exhibited additional bands suggesting that ecto-ATPases may play a role in the pathogenesis of Acanthamoeba. This was supported using suramin (ecto-ATPase inhibitor), which inhibited Acanthamoeba-induced host cell cytotoxicity. Previously, we and others have shown that Acanthamoeba binds to host cells using their mannose-binding protein and binding can be blocked using exogenous alpha-mannose. In this study, we observed that alpha-mannose significantly increased ecto-ATPase activities of pathogenic Acanthamoeba belonging to T1, T2, T3 and T4 genotypes but had no effect on non-pathogenic Acanthamoeba (belonging to T7 genotype). Overall, we have shown, for the first time, that Acanthamoeba exhibit ecto-ATPase activities, which may play a role in the pathogenesis of Acanthamoeba as well as their potential role in the differentiation of pathogenic Acanthamoeba.

  7. In Vitro Activity of Ceftazidime-Avibactam against Isolates in a Phase 3 Open-Label Clinical Trial for Complicated Intra-Abdominal and Urinary Tract Infections Caused by Ceftazidime-Nonsusceptible Gram-Negative Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Stone, Gregory G; Bradford, Patricia A; Newell, Paul; Wardman, Angela

    2017-02-01

    The in vitro activity of ceftazidime-avibactam was evaluated against 341 Gram-negative isolates from 333 patients in a randomized, phase 3 clinical trial of patients with complicated urinary tract or intra-abdominal infections caused by ceftazidime-nonsusceptible pathogens (NCT01644643). Ceftazidime-avibactam MIC90 values against Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (including several class B or D enzyme producers that avibactam does not inhibit) were 1 and 64 μg/ml, respectively. Overall, the ceftazidime-avibactam activity against ceftazidime-nonsusceptible isolates was comparable to the activity of ceftazidime-avibactam previously reported against ceftazidime-susceptible isolates. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under identifier NCT01644643.).

  8. [In-vitro susceptibilites to levofloxacin and various antibacterial agents of 18,639 clinical isolates obtained from 77 centers in 2004].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Keizo; Ohno, Akira; Ishii, Yoshikazu; Tateda, Kazuhiro; Iwata, Morihiro; Kanda, Makoto; Tsujio, Yoshiko; Kimoto, Hiroya; Kaimori, Mitsuomi; Nakamura, Toshihiko; Kawamura, Chizuko; Nishimura, Masaharu; Akizawa, Koji; Katayama, Yosei; Matsuda, Keiko; Hayashi, Tasuku; Yasujima, Minoru; Kasai, Takeshi; Kimura, Masahiko; Tominaga, Makoto; Miki, Makoto; Nakanowatari, Susumu; Nakagawa, Takuo; Kaku, Mitsuo; Kanemitsu, Keiji; Kunishima, Hiroyuki; Toyoshima, Shunkoh; Sakurai, Masanori; Shiotani, Joji; Sugita, Akihiro; Ito, Tatsumi; Okada, Jun; Suwabe, Akira; Yamahata, Kumiko; Yoneyama, Akiko; Kumasaka, Kazunari; Yamane, Nobuo; Koike, Kazuhiko; Ieiri, Tamio; Kominami, Hidenori; Yamada, Toshiyuki; Oguri, Toyoko; Itoh, Kouichi; Watanabe, Kiyoaki; Kobayashi, Yoshio; Ohtake, Teruko; Uchida, Takashi; Totsuka, Kyoichi; Murakami, Masami; Yomoda, Sachie; Takahashi, Ayako; Okamoto, Hideyuki; Inuzuka, Kazuhisa; Yamazaki, Kenichiro; Gonda, Hideo; Yamashita, Takanori; Yamaguchi, Ikuo; Okada, Motoi; Ikari, Hiromi; Kurosawa, Naomi; Fujimoto, Yoshinori; Ishigo, Shiomi; Asano, Yuko; Mikio, Mori; Kano, Ichino; Nagano, Eiko; Kageyama, Fumio; Shaku, Etsuko; Kanno, Harushige; Aihara, Masanori; Gemma, Hitoshi; Uemura, Keiichi; Miyajima, Eiji; Maesaki, Shighefumi; Hashikita, Giichi; Horii, Toshinobu; Sumitomo, Midori; Yoshimura, Hitoshi; Hiraoka, Minoru; Wada, Hideo; Yuzuki, Yosuke; Ikeda, Norio; Baba, Hisashi; Soma, Masayuki; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Ichiyama, Satoshi; Kinosita, Syohiro; Kawano, Seiji; Fujita, Shinichi; Kageoka, Takeshi; Hongo, Toshiharu; Okabe, Hidetoshi; Tatewaki, Kenichi; Moro, Kunihiko; Oka, Mikio; Niki, Yoshihito; Yoshida, Haruyoshi; Yamashita, Masanobu; Kusano, Nobuchika; Mihara, Eiichiro; Nose, Motoko; Fushiwaki, Takeshi; Kuwabara, Masao; Fujiue, Yoshihiro; Shimuzu, Akira; Takubo, Takayuki; Kusakabe, Tadashi; Hinoda, Yuji; Tanaka, Nobuaki; Takahashi, Hakuo; Heijyou, Hitoshi; Okazaki, Toshiro; Asai, Koji; Kawahara, Kunimitsu; Masuda, Junichi; Sano, Reiko; Taminato, Tomohiko; Negayama, Kiyoshi; Matsuo, Syuji; Komatsu, Masaru; Sugiura, Tetsuro; Murase, Mitsuharu; Hiramatsu, Kazufumi; Yamane, Nobuhisa; Nakasone, Isao; Hirakata, Yoichi; Kohno, Shigeru; Aizawa, Hisamichi; Honda, Junichi; Hamazaki, Naotaka; Okayama, Akihiko; Ono, Junko; Aoki, Yosuke; Okada, Kaoru; Miyanohara, Hiroaki

    2006-12-01

    A total of 18,639 clinical isolates in 19 species collected from 77 centers during 2004 in Japan were tested for their susceptibility to fluoroquinolones (FQs) and other selected antibiotics. The common respiratory pathogens, Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Moraxella catarrhalis and Haemophilus influenzae showed a high susceptible rate against FQs. The isolation rate of beta lactamase non-producing ampicillin-resistant H. influenzae was approximately three times as large as those of western countries. Most strains of Enterobacteriaceae were also susceptible to FQs. The resistance rate of Escherichia coli against FQs has however been rapidly increasing so far as we surveyed since 1994. The FQs-resistant rate in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) showed approximately 90% except for 36%. of sitafloxacin while FQs-resistant rate in methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) was around 5%. The FQs-resistant rate of methicillin-resistant coagulase negative Staphylococci (MRCNS) was also higher than that of methicillin-susceptible coagulase negative Staphylococci (MSCNS), however, it was lower than that of MRSA. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates, 32-34% from UTI and 15-19% of from RTI was resistant to FQs. Acinetobacter spp. showed a high susceptibility to FQs. Although FQs-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae have not been increased in western countries, it is remarkably high in Japan. In this survey, isolates of approximately 85% was resistant to FQs.

  9. First Draft Genome Sequences of Malaysian Clinical Isolates of Corynebacterium diphtheriae

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Norazah; Mohd Khalid, Mohd Khairul Nizam; Abd Wahab, Muhammad Adib; Hashim, Rohaidah; Tang, Soo Nee; Liow, Yii Ling; Hamzah, Hazwani; Dahalan, Nurul Ain; Seradja, Valentinus

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Corynebacterium diphtheriae has caused multiple isolated diphtheria cases in Malaysia over the years. Here, we report the first draft genome sequences of 15 Malaysia C. diphtheriae clinical isolates collected from the years 1981 to 2016. PMID:28254972

  10. First Draft Genome Sequences of Malaysian Clinical Isolates of Corynebacterium diphtheriae.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Norazah; Hii, Shirley Yi Fen; Mohd Khalid, Mohd Khairul Nizam; Abd Wahab, Muhammad Adib; Hashim, Rohaidah; Tang, Soo Nee; Liow, Yii Ling; Hamzah, Hazwani; Dahalan, Nurul Ain; Seradja, Valentinus

    2017-03-02

    Corynebacterium diphtheriae has caused multiple isolated diphtheria cases in Malaysia over the years. Here, we report the first draft genome sequences of 15 Malaysia C. diphtheriae clinical isolates collected from the years 1981 to 2016.

  11. Nontuberculous mycobacteria: Reports of clinical laboratory isolation in a three county area, North Carolina, 2006 -2010

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Laboratory reports of mycobacteria isolation and identification are created during the clinical diagnostic process to differentiate Mycobacterium tuberculosis from nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM). NTM isolation rates are expected to exceed rates of true NTM infectio...

  12. Resistance Pattern of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a Tertiary Care Hospital of Kanchipuram, Tamilnadu, India

    PubMed Central

    Reddy A., Suneel Kumar; S., Sivasankari; C., Anitha; V., Somasunder; MS., Kumudhavathi; SK., Amshavathani; V., Venugopal

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This study was undertaken to analyze the extended spectrum of β lactamase (ESBL), metallo β lactamase (MBL) & AmpC production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa in various clinical samples. Materials & Methods: One hundred four non repetitive clinical specimens were inoculated onto nutrient agar, blood agar and incubated at 37oC overnight. The colonies were tested for oxidase test and other biochemical tests and antibiogram. ESBL screening was done using 3rd generation cephalosporins and confirmatory combined double disc test, imipenem-EDTA double disc synergy test for MBL enzyme and AmpC test using Cefoxitin disc. Results & Analysis: Out of 104 P.aeruginosa isolates, 42.30% were ESBL producer, 15.38 % MBL producer and none were AmpC producer. Imipenem, Ofloxacin, and aminoglycosides (amikacin (29.8%) tobramycin (29.8%) and netilmycin (13.46%) has got the better antipseudomonal activity in this study. 43 (41.35%) P.aeruginosa was found to be Multi Drug Resistant (MDR). Conclusion: This study highlights the prevalence of ESBL, MBL and MDR P.aeruginosa. Carbapenems and aminoglycosides are promising drugs with antipseudomonal activity in our study. PMID:24995180

  13. Friend or foe: genetic and functional characterization of plant endophytic Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Kumar, A; Munder, A; Aravind, R; Eapen, S J; Tümmler, B; Raaijmakers, J M

    2013-03-01

    Endophytic Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain BP35 was originally isolated from black pepper grown in the rain forest in Kerala, India. Strain PaBP35 was shown to provide significant protection to black pepper against infections by Phytophthora capsici and Radopholus similis. For registration and implementation in disease management programmes, several traits of PaBP35 were investigated including its endophytic behaviour, biocontrol activity, phylogeny and toxicity to mammals. The results showed that PaBP35 efficiently colonized black pepper shoots and displayed a typical spatiotemporal pattern in its endophytic movement with concomitant suppression of Phytophthora rot. Confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed high populations of PaBP35::gfp2 inside tomato plantlets, supporting its endophytic behaviour in other plant species. Polyphasic approaches to genotype PaBP35, including BOX-PCR, recN sequence analysis, multilocus sequence typing and comparative genome hybridization analysis, revealed its uniqueness among P. aeruginosa strains representing clinical habitats. However, like other P. aeruginosa strains, PaBP35 exhibited resistance to antibiotics, grew at 25-41°C and produced rhamnolipids and phenazines. PaBP35 displayed strong type II secretion effectors-mediated cytotoxicity on mammalian A549 cells. Coupled with pathogenicity in a murine airway infection model, we conclude that this plant endophytic strain is as virulent as clinical P. aeruginosa strains. Safety issues related to the selection of plant endophytic bacteria for crop protection are discussed.

  14. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an emerging pathogen among burn patients in Kurdistan Province, Iran.

    PubMed

    Kalantar, Enayat; Taherzadeh, Shadi; Ghadimi, Tayeb; Soheili, Fariborz; Salimizand, Heiman; Hedayatnejad, Alireza

    2012-05-01

    This study was conducted to determine the incidence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections among burn patients at Tohid Hospital, Iran. A total of 176 clinical specimens were obtained from 145 burn patients admitted to the burn unit of Tohid Hospital to detect the presence of P. aeruginosa. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was conducted to detect extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producing P. aeruginiosa using Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines with the double disc synergy test (DDST). A polymerase chain reaction was used to detect PER-1 and OXA-10 among the isolates. The mean age, total body surface area and length of hospital stay among patients were 29 years, 37.7%, and 10 days, respectively. Kerosene was the commonest cause of burn (60%), followed by gas (30%). During the study, P. aeruginosa was detected in 100 isolates. The antibiotics they were most commonly resistant to were cefotaxime, ceftriaxone and ciprofloxacin. Of the 100 P. aeroginusa isolates, 28% were positive for ESBL production with the DDST, 48% and 52% were PER-1 and OXA-10 producers, respectively. The high frequency of PER-1 and OXA-10 producers at this hospital is of concern considering their potential spread among burn patients.

  15. [Evolution of antimicrobial susceptibility of Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolates].

    PubMed

    López-Hernández, S; Alarcón, T; López-Brea, M

    2000-12-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a microorganism frequently implicated in colonization and infection in hospitalized patients. An increase of resistance has been observed in recent years making these infections difficult to treat. The in vitro activity of 24 antibiotics, 15 betalactam agents and nine nonbetalactams, was studied in 156 A. baumannii clinical isolates. The strains were collected from different clinical samples obtained from inpatients (92%) and 8% were from outpatients. Evolution of susceptibility from January 1995 to December 1997 was studied. MIC of the following antibiotics was determined by the agar dilution method: ampicillin, ticarcillin, piperacillin, ampicillin-sulbactam, amoxicillin- clavulanic acid, ticarcillin-clavulanic acid, piperacillin-tazobactam, cefotaxime, ceftazidime, cefepime, imipenem, meropenem, clavulanic acid, sulbactam, tazobactam, amikacin, gentamicin, tobramycin, ofloxacin, doxycycline, fosfomycin, rifampin, azithromycin and colistin. Low antimicrobial susceptibility was observed in most A. baumannii strains. Colistin, imipenem, meropenem and ampicillin-sulbactam showed the greatest susceptibility (100, 88.4, 88.4 and 84.6%, respectively). A. baumannii strains from inpatients showed a lower antimicrobial susceptibility than strains from outpatients, who showed a high percentage of susceptibility to most antibiotics. Rifampin and azithromycin showed certain in vitro activity against the most susceptible A. baumannii strains. A progressive decrease in susceptibility to most antibiotics was observed during the period studied. Carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii emerged in 1996 and increased in 1997.

  16. Human Tear Fluid Protects against Pseudomonas aeruginosa Keratitis in a Murine Experimental Model▿

    PubMed Central

    Kwong, Mary S. F.; Evans, David J.; Ni, Minjian; Cowell, Brigitte A.; Fleiszig, Suzanne M. J.

    2007-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa keratitis is an acute sight-threatening infection. We previously reported that human tear fluid could protect individual human corneal epithelial cells in vitro against invasion by and cytotoxicity due to clinical and laboratory isolates of P. aeruginosa and that the protective mechanism was independent of bacteriostatic activity. In the present study, we examined the effects of human tear fluid in vivo. Tears were collected from healthy human volunteers and were studied in vivo in mice. The effects on the virulence of both invasive and cytotoxic clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa were examined. Tear fluid was found to reduce the severity of disease when corneas were challenged with cytotoxic bacteria immediately after scratch injury, and it completely protected against susceptibility to infection by a cytotoxic strain in a model in which corneas were infected during the healing process 6 h after scratching. Visible protection correlated with the inhibition of bacterial colonization 1, 4, and 48 h postinoculation. Tear fluid also significantly reduced the severity of infections caused by invasive P. aeruginosa in the 6-h-healing model. This result also coincided with significantly reduced bacterial colonization at 48 h. In vitro, human tear fluid significantly reduced the ability of invasive and cytotoxic bacteria to translocate across corneal epithelia and increased transepithelial resistance with or without bacterial inoculation. These data show that human tear fluid can protect against P. aeruginosa corneal infection in vivo and that the mechanism likely involves enhanced epithelial barrier function in addition to protection of individual epithelial cells against bacterial internalization and cytotoxicity. PMID:17325054

  17. Imported PER-1 producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa, PER-1 producing Acinetobacter baumanii and VIM-2-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains in Hungary

    PubMed Central

    Szabó, Dora; Szentandrássy, Julia; Juhász, Zsuzsa; Katona, Katalin; Nagy, Károly; Rókusz, László

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumanii are important nosocomial pathogens with wide intrinsic resistance. However, due to the dissemination of the acquired resistance mechanisms, such as extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) and metallo beta-lactamase (MBL) production, multidrug resistant strains have been isolated more often. Case presentation We report a case of a Hungarian tourist, who was initially hospitalized in Egypt and later transferred to Hungary. On the day of admission PER-1-producing P. aeruginosa, PER-1 producing A. baumannii, SHV-5-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae and VIM-2-producing P. aeruginosa isolates were subcultured from the patient's samples in Hungary. Comparing the pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns of the P. aeruginosa strains from the patient to the P. aeruginosa strains occurring in this hospital, we can state that the PER-1-producing P. aeruginosa and VIM-2-producing P. aeruginosa had external origin. Conclusion This is the first report of PER-1-producing P. aeruginosa,and PER-1-producing A. baumanii strains in Hungary. This case highlights the importance of spreading of the beta-lactamase-mediated resistance mechanisms between countries and continents, showing the importance of careful screening and the isolation of patients arriving from a different country. PMID:18513394

  18. Evaluation of the in vitro colistin susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii strains at a tertiary care centre in Western Turkey.

    PubMed

    Ece, Gulfem; Samlioglu, Pinar; Atalay, Sabri; Kose, Sukran

    2014-03-01

    Multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacteria are an important issue in intensive care units worldwide. Colistin, one of the earliest polymyxin antibiotics, was once widely used for the treatment of gram-negative bacterial infections. However, its use is now limited due to concerns over nephrotoxicity. The appearance of multidrug-resistant species, including A. baumannii and P. aeruginosa, has led to the re-emergence of this class of drugs. The aim of this study was to evaluate the susceptibility of A. baumannii and P. aeruginosa isolates to colistin and other antibiotics. The antimicrobial susceptibility of A. baumannii and P. aeruginosa isolates to colistin and other antibiotics was evaluated between January 2011 and October 2012 at Tepecik Education and Research Hospital in Izmir, Turkey. Clinical isolates were identified using an automatized Vitek 2.0 system. Colistin susceptibility was measured by E-test; the susceptibility profiles of other antibiotics were evaluated using the Kirby Bauer disk-diffusion method. A total of 149 isolates were included in the study, consisting of 98 A. baumannii and 51 P. aeruginosa isolates. The MICs of colistin against A. baumannii were 0.125-2.0 mcg/mL, and 0.25-2.0 mcg/mL against P. aeruginosa; all multidrug-resistant strains examined in this study were susceptible to colistin. Recently, colistin has re-emerged as an effective treatment for infections due to multidrug-resistant A. baumannii, P. aeruginosa, and Klebsiella pneumoniae. All isolates examined in this study were susceptible to colistin, suggesting it could be a viable alternative for the treatment of infections with multidrug-resistant strains.

  19. Developing an international Pseudomonas aeruginosa reference panel.

    PubMed

    De Soyza, Anthony; Hall, Amanda J; Mahenthiralingam, Eshwar; Drevinek, Pavel; Kaca, Wieslaw; Drulis-Kawa, Zuzanna; Stoitsova, Stoyanka R; Toth, Veronika; Coenye, Tom; Zlosnik, James E A; Burns, Jane L; Sá-Correia, Isabel; De Vos, Daniel; Pirnay, Jean-Paul; Kidd, Timothy J; Reid, David; Manos, Jim; Klockgether, Jens; Wiehlmann, Lutz; Tümmler, Burkhard; McClean, Siobhán; Winstanley, Craig

    2013-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major opportunistic pathogen in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and causes a wide range of infections among other susceptible populations. Its inherent resistance to many antimicrobials also makes it difficult to treat infections with this pathogen. Recent evidence has highlighted the diversity of this species, yet despite this, the majority of studies on virulence and pathogenesis focus on a small number of strains. There is a pressing need for a P. aeruginosa reference panel to harmonize and coordinate the collective efforts of the P. aeruginosa research community. We have collated a panel of 43 P. aeruginosa strains that reflects the organism's diversity. In addition to the commonly studied clones, this panel includes transmissible strains, sequential CF isolates, strains with specific virulence characteristics, and strains that represent serotype, genotype or geographic diversity. This focussed panel of P. aeruginosa isolates will help accelerate and consolidate the discovery of virulence determinants, improve our understanding of the pathogenesis of infections caused by this pathogen, and provide the community with a valuable resource for the testing of novel therapeutic agents.

  20. Genomic Features of Environmental and Clinical Vibrio parahaemolyticus Isolates Lacking Recognized Virulence Factors Are Dissimilar.

    PubMed

    Ronholm, J; Petronella, N; Chew Leung, C; Pightling, A W; Banerjee, S K

    2015-12-04

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a bacterial pathogen that can cause illness after the consumption or handling of contaminated seafood. The primary virulence factors associated with V. parahaemolyticus illness are thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) and Tdh-related hemolysin (TRH). However, clinical strains lacking tdh and trh have recently been isolated, and these clinical isolates are poorly understood. To help understand the emergence of clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolates, a genomic approach was used to comprehensively compare 4 clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolates with 16 environmental tdh- and trh-negative isolates and 34 clinical isolates positive for tdh or trh, or both, with the objective of identifying genomic features that are unique to clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolates. The prevalence of pathogenicity islands (PAIs) common to clinical isolates was thoroughly examined in each of the clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolates. The tdh PAI was not present in any clinical or environmental tdh- and trh-negative isolates. The trh PAI was not present in any environmental isolates; however, in clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolate 10-4238, the majority of the trh PAI including a partial trh1 gene was present, which resulted in reclassification of this isolate as a tdh-negative and trh-positive isolate. In the other clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolates, neither the trh gene nor the trh PAI was present. We identified 862 genes in clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolates but not in environmental tdh- and trh-negative isolates. Many of these genes are highly homologous to genes found in common enteric bacteria and included genes encoding a number of chemotaxis proteins and a novel putative type VI secretion system (T6SS) effector and immunity protein (T6SS1). The availability of genome sequences from clinical V. parahaemolyticus tdh- and trh-negative isolates and the comparative analysis may help provide an understanding of how this pathotype is able to

  1. Genomic Features of Environmental and Clinical Vibrio parahaemolyticus Isolates Lacking Recognized Virulence Factors Are Dissimilar

    PubMed Central

    Petronella, N.; Chew Leung, C.; Pightling, A. W.; Banerjee, S. K.

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a bacterial pathogen that can cause illness after the consumption or handling of contaminated seafood. The primary virulence factors associated with V. parahaemolyticus illness are thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) and Tdh-related hemolysin (TRH). However, clinical strains lacking tdh and trh have recently been isolated, and these clinical isolates are poorly understood. To help understand the emergence of clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolates, a genomic approach was used to comprehensively compare 4 clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolates with 16 environmental tdh- and trh-negative isolates and 34 clinical isolates positive for tdh or trh, or both, with the objective of identifying genomic features that are unique to clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolates. The prevalence of pathogenicity islands (PAIs) common to clinical isolates was thoroughly examined in each of the clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolates. The tdh PAI was not present in any clinical or environmental tdh- and trh-negative isolates. The trh PAI was not present in any environmental isolates; however, in clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolate 10-4238, the majority of the trh PAI including a partial trh1 gene was present, which resulted in reclassification of this isolate as a tdh-negative and trh-positive isolate. In the other clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolates, neither the trh gene nor the trh PAI was present. We identified 862 genes in clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolates but not in environmental tdh- and trh-negative isolates. Many of these genes are highly homologous to genes found in common enteric bacteria and included genes encoding a number of chemotaxis proteins and a novel putative type VI secretion system (T6SS) effector and immunity protein (T6SS1). The availability of genome sequences from clinical V. parahaemolyticus tdh- and trh-negative isolates and the comparative analysis may help provide an understanding of how this pathotype is able to

  2. Pseudomonas aeruginosa AmpR: an acute–chronic switch regulator

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramanian, Deepak; Kumari, Hansi; Mathee, Kalai

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most intractable human pathogens that pose serious clinical challenge due to extensive prevalence of multidrug-resistant clinical isolates. Armed with abundant virulence and antibiotic resistance mechanisms, it is a major etiologic agent in a number of acute and chronic infections. A complex and intricate network of regulators dictates the expression of pathogenicity factors in P. aeruginosa. Some proteins within the network play key roles and control multiple pathways. This review discusses the role of one such protein, AmpR, which was initially recognized for its role in antibiotic resistance by regulating AmpC β-lactamase. Recent genomic, proteomic and phenotypic analyses demonstrate that AmpR regulates expression of hundreds of genes that are involved in diverse pathways such as β-lactam and non-β-lactam resistance, quorum sensing and associated virulence phenotypes, protein phosphorylation, and physiological processes. Finally, ampR mutations in clinical isolates are reviewed to shed light on important residues required for its function in antibiotic resistance. The prevalence and evolutionary implications of AmpR in pathogenic and nonpathogenic proteobacteria are also discussed. A comprehensive understanding of proteins at nodal positions in the P. aeruginosa regulatory network is crucial in understanding, and ultimately targeting, the pathogenic stratagems of this organism. PMID:25066236

  3. Pseudomonas aeruginosa essentials: an update on investigation of essential genes.

    PubMed

    Juhas, Mario

    2015-11-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the leading cause of nosocomial infections, particularly in immunocompromised, cancer, burn and cystic fibrosis patients. Development of novel antimicrobials against P. aeruginosa is therefore of the highest importance. Although the first reports on P. aeruginosa essential genes date back to the early 2000s, a number of more sensitive genomic approaches have been used recently to better define essential genes in this organism. These analyses highlight the evolution of the definition of an 'essential' gene from the traditional to the context-dependent. Essential genes, particularly those indispensable under the clinically relevant conditions, are considered to be promising targets of novel antibiotics against P. aeruginosa. This review provides an update on the investigation of P. aeruginosa essential genes. Special focus is on recently identified P. aeruginosa essential genes and their exploitation for the development of antimicrobials.

  4. [Clinical consideration of coagulase negative Staphylococci isolated in blood culture].

    PubMed

    Oshitani, Yohei; Ishikawa, Tomoyuki; Murata, Ken; Aoyagi, Yoshiki; Yabe, Yasuyo; Aoshima, Masahiro

    2012-01-01

    Despite blood culture's usefulness in antimicrobial therapy, fewer blood cultures and the infrequency of more than 1 set in cultures appear to be problems in Japan. Since June 2007 infection control team (ICT) recommended more than 1 set in blood sampling and intervention in positive blood culture, coagulase negative Staphylococci (CNS) has frequently been isolated from blood culture and its clinical significance is often difficult to judge. To determine the effect of ICT intervention, we evaluated the number of blood culture specimens, the frequency of more than 1 set in all blood culture specimens, and decision-making on antimicrobial treatment for CNS isolated retrospectively from blood. The study was divided into term I in August 2007 to July 2008, term II in August 2008 to July 2009, and term III in August 2009 to February 2010. We also analyzed how physicians treated infection or its suspicion after CNS and its drug susceptibility. The monthly number of blood culture specimens increased from 40.3 to 51.6 between terms I and III. The frequency of more than 1 set in a single blood culture session rose significantly from 67% to 89% between these terms (p < 0.001). The number of indeterminate also dropped cases significantly during these 2 terms from 27% to 6% (p = 0.017). Infection or suspected infection cases--45 of 49--had central vein catheter implantation. Inappropriate treatment by physicians in these cases also dropped significantly from 85% (11/13) to 45% (5/11) (p = 0.043) during the same 2 terms. ICT Intervention may thus increase the number of blood culture specimens, enable more than 1 set in blood sampling, make it easier to judge the presence of infection, and increase appropriate treatment by physicians. We thus believe that the quality of antimicrobial treatment could be improved through education such as ICT action.

  5. Microwave Accelerated Green Synthesis of Stable Silver Nanoparticles with Eucalyptus globulus Leaf Extract and Their Antibacterial and Antibiofilm Activity on Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Khursheed; Ahmed, Bilal; Dwivedi, Sourabh; Saquib, Quaiser; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A.; Musarrat, Javed

    2015-01-01

    A simple and rapid microwave assisted method of green synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) was developed using aqueous leaf extract of Eucalyptus globulus(ELE), and their antibacterial and antibiofilm potential investigated. With this aim, the aqueous solutions of ELE and AgNO3(1 mM) were mixed (1:4 v/v), and microwave irradiated at 2450 Mhz, for 30 sec. The instant color change of the ELE-AgNO3 mixture from pale yellow to dark brown indicated ELE-AgNPs synthesis. The intensity of peak at 428 nm in UV-Vis spectra, due to the surface plasmon resonance of AgNPs, varied with the amount of ELE, AgNO3 concentration, pH and time of incubation. The biosynthesized ELE-AgNPs were characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy, XRD, TEM, SEM-EDX, FTIR and TGA analyses. The size of ELE-AgNPs was determined to be in range of 1.9–4.3 nm and 5-25 nm, with and without microwave treatment, respectively. SEM exhibited the capping of AgNPs with the ELE constituents, and validated by FTIR analysis. The FTIR data revealed the presence of plant organic constituents and metabolites bound to ELE-AgNPs, which contributes for their stability. The antimicrobial activity of ELE-AgNPs was assessed by growth and biofilm inhibition of extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) clinical bacterial isolates. The results demonstrated that S. aureus were more sensitive to ELE-AgNPs than E. coli and P. aeruginosa. MRSA exhibited higher sensitive than MSSA, whereas P. aeruginosa were more sensitive than E. coli to ELE-AgNPs treatment. Also, significant (83 ± 3% and 84 ± 5%) biofilm inhibition was observed in case of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa, respectively. The results elucidated environmentally friendly, economical and quick method for production of colloidal bio-functionalized ELE-AgNPs, for effectual clinical applications, as broad spectrum

  6. Microwave Accelerated Green Synthesis of Stable Silver Nanoparticles with Eucalyptus globulus Leaf Extract and Their Antibacterial and Antibiofilm Activity on Clinical Isolates.

    PubMed

    Ali, Khursheed; Ahmed, Bilal; Dwivedi, Sourabh; Saquib, Quaiser; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A; Musarrat, Javed

    2015-01-01

    A simple and rapid microwave assisted method of green synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) was developed using aqueous leaf extract of Eucalyptus globulus(ELE), and their antibacterial and antibiofilm potential investigated. With this aim, the aqueous solutions of ELE and AgNO3(1 mM) were mixed (1:4 v/v), and microwave irradiated at 2450 Mhz, for 30 sec. The instant color change of the ELE-AgNO3 mixture from pale yellow to dark brown indicated ELE-AgNPs synthesis. The intensity of peak at 428 nm in UV-Vis spectra, due to the surface plasmon resonance of AgNPs, varied with the amount of ELE, AgNO3 concentration, pH and time of incubation. The biosynthesized ELE-AgNPs were characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy, XRD, TEM, SEM-EDX, FTIR and TGA analyses. The size of ELE-AgNPs was determined to be in range of 1.9-4.3 nm and 5-25 nm, with and without microwave treatment, respectively. SEM exhibited the capping of AgNPs with the ELE constituents, and validated by FTIR analysis. The FTIR data revealed the presence of plant organic constituents and metabolites bound to ELE-AgNPs, which contributes for their stability. The antimicrobial activity of ELE-AgNPs was assessed by growth and biofilm inhibition of extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) clinical bacterial isolates. The results demonstrated that S. aureus were more sensitive to ELE-AgNPs than E. coli and P. aeruginosa. MRSA exhibited higher sensitive than MSSA, whereas P. aeruginosa were more sensitive than E. coli to ELE-AgNPs treatment. Also, significant (83 ± 3% and 84 ± 5%) biofilm inhibition was observed in case of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa, respectively. The results elucidated environmentally friendly, economical and quick method for production of colloidal bio-functionalized ELE-AgNPs, for effectual clinical applications, as broad spectrum

  7. Computerized restriction endonuclease analysis compared with O-serotype and phage type in the epidemiologic fingerprinting of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains.

    PubMed

    Garaizar, Javier; Latorre, Mikel; López-Molina, Nuria; Laconcha, Idoia; Alberdi, Leire; Rementeria, Aitor; Audicana, Ana; Uliarte, Rosario; Cisterna, Ramón

    1997-04-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess restriction endonuclease analysis (REA) of chromosomal DNA using SalI enzyme, low-concentration (0.4%) agarose gels and digitalized data management of the REA patterns obtained for the typing of clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates. METHODS: A group of 67 clinical unrelated isolates from 10 Spanish hospitals was used to study the discriminatory power, reproducibility and typeability of REA typing. RESULTS: A SalI REA pattern consisted of a variety (1--10) of restriction bands in the range between 12.2 and 48.5 kb and an unresolvable smear of low-molecular-weight bands. Forty different SalI REA patterns with an index of discrimination of 0.979 were obtained. Low typeability (91.04%) was the major limitation of REA typing. Analysis of blinded subcultures of eight Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains showed the reproducibility of REA typing to be 87.5%. Combined phenotypic typing (O-serotyping and phage typing) performed on the same group of strains showed comparable discrimination but much lower reproducibility. Isolates selected from five clusters of nosocomial infections in hospitals in the UK were typed by REA typing, and the results show high agreement when compared with conventional phenotypic typing methods in distinguishing between strains. CONCLUSIONS: These data underline the usefulness of REA typing enhanced with digitalized data management for the epidemiologic subtyping of clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates.

  8. Japanese nationwide surveillance in 2011 of antibacterial susceptibility patterns of clinical isolates from complicated urinary tract infection cases.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Kiyohito; Hamasuna, Ryoichi; Uehara, Shinya; Yasuda, Mitsuru; Yamamoto, Shingo; Hayami, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Satoshi; Matsumoto, Tetsuro; Minamitani, Shinichi; Kadota, Jun-ichi; Iwata, Satoshi; Kaku, Mitsuo; Watanabe, Akira; Sunakawa, Keisuke; Sato, Junko; Hanaki, Hideaki; Tsukamoto, Taiji; Kiyota, Hiroshi; Egawa, Shin; Deguchi, Takashi; Matsumoto, Minori; Tanaka, Kazushi; Arakawa, Soichi; Fujisawa, Masato; Kumon, Hiromi; Kobayashi, Kanao; Matsubara, Akio; Wakeda, Hironobu; Amemoto, Yoshinosuke; Onodera, Shoichi; Goto, Hirokazu; Komeda, Hisao; Yamashita, Masuo; Takenaka, Tadasu; Fujimoto, Yoshinori; Tsugawa, Masaya; Takahashi, Yoshito; Maeda, Hiroshi; Onishi, Hiroyuki; Ishitoya, Satoshi; Nishimura, Kazuo; Mitsumori, Kenji; Ito, Toru; Togo, Yoshikazu; Nakamura, Ichiro; Ito, Noriyuki; Kanamaru, Sojun; Hirose, Takaoki; Muranaka, Takashi; Yamada, Daisuke; Ishihara, Satoshi; Oka, Hiroya; Inatomi, Hisato; Matsui, Takashi; Kobuke, Makoto; Kunishima, Yasuharu; Kimura, Takahiro; Ichikawa, Takaharu; Kagara, Ichiro; Matsukawa, Masanori; Takahashi, Koichi; Mita, Koji; Kato, Masao; Okumura, Kazuhiro; Kawanishi, Hiroaki; Hashimura, Takayuki; Aoyama, Teruyoshi; Shigeta, Masanobu; Koda, Shuntaro; Taguchi, Keisuke; Matsuda, Yohei

    2015-09-01

    To investigate antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of various bacterial pathogens isolated from complicated urinary tract infection (UTI) cases, the Japanese Society of Chemotherapy, the Japanese Association of Infectious Disease, and the Japanese Society of Clinical Microbiology conducted the second nationwide surveillance from January to September 2011. With the cooperation of 42 medical institutions throughout Japan, 1036 strains belonging to 8 clinically relevant bacterial species were collected. Among methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strain, the vancomycin (VCM) MIC for 5.5% (3/55) of the strains was 2 μg/mL. Ampicillin, VCM, and linezolid were relatively active against 209 Enterococcus faecalis strains. The proportion of fluoroquinolone (FQ)-resistant strains was >20%. The MIC90 of FQs against the 382 Escherichia coli strains was 2-64 mg/L and the proportion resistant to FQs was approximately 30%. However, susceptibility of E. coli to sitafloxacin was still high (MIC90 = 2 mg/L). Fifty-eight (15.2%) of 382 E. coli, 6 (4.5%) of 132 Klebsiella pneumoniae, 1 (2.4%) of 41 Klebsiella oxytoca and 4 (6.8%) of 59 Proteus mirabilis strains were suspected of producing extended-spectrum beta-lactamase. Of 93 Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains, the proportions resistant to imipenem, amikacin, and ciprofloxacin were 21.5%, 4.3%, and 20.4%, respectively. Four strains (4.3%) were found to be multidrug-resistant. In complicated UTI cases, all of MRSA and E. faecalis were susceptible to all anti-MRSA agents. Sitafloxacin was active against other FQ-resistant E. coli strains. The isolation of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing and multidrug-resistant strains increased.

  9. Successful Management of Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Pneumonia after Kidney Transplantation in a Dog

    PubMed Central

    PARK, Kyung-Mee; NAM, Hyun-Suk; WOO, Heung-Myong

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT An 8-year-old male mongrel dog that had undergone renal transplantation was presented 25 days later with an acute cough, anorexia and exercise intolerance. During the investigation, neutrophilic leukocytosis was noted, and thoracic radiographs revealed caudal lung lobe infiltration. While being treated with two broad-spectrum antibiotics, clinical signs worsened. Pneumonia due to infection with multidrug-resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas (P.) aeruginosa, sensitive only to imipenem and amikacin, was confirmed by bacteria isolation. After treatment with imipenem-cilastatin without reducing the immunosuppressant dose, clinical signs completely resolved. During the 2-year follow-up period, no recurrence was observed. To the best of authors’ knowledge, this is the first report of pneumonia caused by MDR P. aeruginosa in a renal recipient dog and successful management of this disease. PMID:23842146

  10. Pseudomonas aeruginosa displays an altered phenotype in vitro when grown in the presence of mannitol.

    PubMed

    Moore, J E; Rendall, J C; Downey, D G

    2015-01-01

    D-mannitol has been approved in dry powder formulation as an effective antimucolytic agent in patients with cystic fibrosis. What is not known is the effect of adding a metabolisable sugar on the biology of chronic bacterial pathogens in the CF lung. Therefore, a series of simple in vitro experiments were performed to examine the effect of adding D-mannitol on the phenotype of the CF respiratory pathogens Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cenocepacia. Clinical isolates (n = 86) consisting of P. aeruginosa (n = 51), B. cenocepacia (n = 26), P. putida (n = 4), Stenotrophomonas maltophila (n = 3) and Pseudomonas spp. (n = 2) were examined by supplementing basal nutrient agar with varying concentrations of D-mannitol (0-20% [w/v]) and subsequently examining for any change in microbial phenotype. The effect of supplementation with mannitol was four-fold, namely i) To increase the proliferation and increase in cell density of all CF organisms examined, with an optimal concentration of 2-4% (w/v) D-mannitol. No such increase in cell proliferation was observed when mannitol was substituted with sodium chloride. ii) Enhanced pigment production was observed in 2/51 (3.9%) of the P. aeruginosa isolates examined, in one of the P. putida isolates, and in 3/26 (11.5%) of the B. cenocepacia isolates examined. iii). When examined at 4.0% (w/v) supplementation with mannitol, 11/51 (21.6%) P. aeruginosa isolates and 3/26 (11.5%) B. cenocepacia isolates were seen to exhibit the altered adhesion phenotype. iv). With respect to the altered mucoid phenotype, 5/51 (9.8%) P. aeruginosa produced this phenotype when grown at 4% mannitol. Mucoid production was greatest at 4%, was poor at 10% and absent at 20% (w/v) mannitol. The altered mucoid phenotype was not observed in the B. cenocepacia isolates or any of the other clinical taxa examined. Due consideration therefore needs to be given, where there is altered physiology within the small airways, leading to a potentially altered

  11. Predictors of disability worsening in clinically isolated syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jokubaitis, Vilija G; Spelman, Tim; Kalincik, Tomas; Izquierdo, Guillermo; Grand'Maison, François; Duquette, Pierre; Girard, Marc; Lugaresi, Alessandra; Grammond, Pierre; Hupperts, Raymond; Cabrera-Gomez, José; Oreja-Guevara, Celia; Boz, Cavit; Giuliani, Giorgio; Fernández-Bolaños, Ricardo; Iuliano, Gerardo; Lechner-Scott, Jeannette; Verheul, Freek; van Pesch, Vincent; Petkovska-Boskova, Tatjana; Fiol, Marcela; Moore, Fraser; Cristiano, Edgardo; Alroughani, Raed; Bergamaschi, Roberto; Barnett, Michael; Slee, Mark; Vella, Norbert; Herbert, Joseph; Shaw, Cameron; Saladino, Maria Laura; Amato, Maria Pia; Liew, Danny; Paolicelli, Damiano; Butzkueven, Helmut; Trojano, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess demographic, clinical, magnetic resonance imaging, and treatment exposure predictors of time to 3 or 12-month confirmed disability worsening in clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) and early multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods We utilized the MSBase Incident Study (MSBasis), a prospective cohort study of outcome after CIS. Predictors of time to first 3 and 12-month confirmed expanded disability status scale worsening were analyzed using Cox proportional hazards regression. Results About 1989 patients were analyzed, the largest seen-from-onset cohort reported to-date. A total of 391 patients had a first 3-month confirmed disability worsening event, of which 307 were sustained for 12 months. Older age at CIS onset (adjusted hazard ratio: aHR 1.17, 95% 1.06, 1.30), pyramidal (aHR 1.45, 95% CI 1.13, 1.89) and ambulation (HR 1.60, 95% CI 1.09, 2.34) system dysfunction, annualized relapse rate (aHR 1.20, 95% CI 1.18, 1.22), and lower proportion of observation time on treatment were associated with 3-month confirmed worsening. Predictors of time to 12-month sustained worsening included pyramidal system dysfunction (Hazard ratio: aHR 1.38, 95% CI 1.05, 1.83), and older age at CIS onset (aHR 1.17, 95% CI 1.04, 1.31). Greater proportion of follow-up time exposed to treatment was associated with greater reductions in the rate of worsening. Interpretation This study provides class IV evidence for a strong protective effect of disease-modifying treatment to reduce disability worsening events in patients with CIS and early MS, and confirms age and pyramidal dysfunction at onset as risk factors. PMID:26000321

  12. Aloe vera extract functionalized zinc oxide nanoparticles as nanoantibiotics against multi-drug resistant clinical bacterial isolates.

    PubMed

    Ali, Khursheed; Dwivedi, Sourabh; Azam, Ameer; Saquib, Quaiser; Al-Said, Mansour S; Alkhedhairy, Abdulaziz A; Musarrat, Javed

    2016-06-15

    ZnO nanoparticles (ZnONPs) were synthesised through a simple and efficient biogenic synthesis approach, exploiting the reducing and capping potential of Aloe barbadensis Miller (A. vera) leaf extract (ALE). ALE-capped ZnO nanoparticles (ALE-ZnONPs) were characterized using UV-Vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses. XRD analysis provided the average size of ZnONPs as 15 nm. FTIR spectral analysis suggested the role of phenolic compounds, terpenoids and proteins present in ALE, in nucleation and stability of ZnONPs. Flow cytometry and atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS) data analyses revealed the surface binding and internalization of ZnONPs in Gram +ve (Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram -ve (Escherichia coli) cells, respectively. Significant antibacterial activity of ALE-ZnONPs was observed against extended spectrum beta lactamases (ESBL) positive E. coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA) clinical isolates exhibiting the MIC and MBC values of 2200, 2400 μg/ml and 2300, 2700 μg/ml, respectively. Substantial inhibitory effects of ALE-ZnONPs on bacterial growth kinetics, exopolysaccharides and biofilm formation, unequivocally suggested the antibiotic and anti-biofilm potential. Overall, the results elucidated a rapid, environmentally benign, cost-effective, and convenient method for ALE-ZnONPs synthesis, for possible applications as nanoantibiotics or drug carriers.

  13. DIFFERENTIAL EFFECTS OF OYSTER (CRASSOSTREA VIRGINICA) DEFENSES ON CLINICAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ISOLATES OF VIBRIO PARAHEMOLYTICUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three clinical (2030, 2062, and 2107) and three environmental (1094, 1163, and ATCC 17802) isolates of Vibrio parahaemolyticus were exposed to hemocytes and plasma collected from oysters (Crassostrea virginica) to determine their susceptibility to putative oyster defenses. Clinic...

  14. In Vitro Antibacterial Activity of Rhodanine Derivatives against Pathogenic Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    AbdelKhalek, Ahmed; Ashby, Charles R.; Patel, Bhargav A.; Talele, Tanaji T.; Seleem, Mohamed N.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial infections present a serious challenge to healthcare practitioners due to the emergence of resistance to numerous conventional antibacterial drugs. Therefore, new bacterial targets and new antimicrobials are unmet medical needs. Rhodanine derivatives have been shown to possess potent antimicrobial activity via a novel mechanism. However, their potential use as antibacterials has not been fully examined. In this study, we determined the spectrum of activity of seven rhodanine derivatives (compounds Rh 1–7) against clinical isolates of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains and Candida albicans. We also synthesized and tested three additional compounds, ethyl ester and amide of rhodanine 2 (Rh 8 and Rh 10, respectively) and ethyl ester of rhodanine 3 (Rh 9) to determine the significance of the carboxyl group modification towards antibacterial activity and human serum albumin binding. A broth microdilution assay confirmed Rh 1–7 exhibit bactericidal activity against Gram-positive pathogens. Rh 2 had significant activity against various vancomycin-resistant (MIC90 = 4 μM) and methicillin-resistant (MIC90 = 4 μM) Staphylococcus aureus (VRSA and MRSA), Staphylococcus epidermidis (MIC = 4 μM) and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) strains (MIC90 = 8 μM). The rhodanine compounds exhibited potent activity against Bacillus spp., including Bacillus anthracis, with MIC range of 2–8 μM. In addition, they had potent activity against Clostridium difficile. The most potent compound, Rh 2, at 4 and 8 times its MIC, significantly decreased S. epidermidis biofilm mass by more than 35% and 45%, respectively. None of the rhodanine compounds showed antimicrobial activity (MIC > 128 μM) against various 1) Gram-negative pathogens (Acinetobacter baumannii, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumonia, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Salmonella Typhimurium) or 2) strains of Candida albicans (MIC > 64 μM). The MTS assay confirmed that rhodanines were not toxic to

  15. Molecular characterisation of clinical Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii isolates from Sichuan province, China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Si-Ying; Lei, Yao; Kang, Mei; Xiao, Yu-Ling; Chen, Zhi-Xing

    2015-05-01

    Previous reports on the molecular characteristics of clinical isolates of Cryptococcus species in China have focused on isolates from southeast China. To obtain a more detailed molecular epidemiology, a total of 92 cryptococcal isolates were collected from Sichuan province. A total of 24 isolates from 12 other provinces were collected for comparative study. Genotypes and mating types of 116 Cryptococcus isolates were determined. Among the 116 isolates, 43 isolates (19 isolates from Sichuan and 24 isolates outside of Sichuan) were analysed by multi-locus sequence typing (MLST). All 116 clinical isolates were mating type α. Most isolates (114/116) were molecular type VNI and the remaining two isolates were VGI and VGII respectively. MLST results revealed five sequence types (STs) of C. neoformans including two novel STs, with most isolates identified as ST5. The two C. gattii isolates identified in our study were ST44 and ST159. Based on our report and previous studies, there are 15 C. neoformans STs in China which can be divided into three subgroups. The C. gattii isolate from Sichuan could be a scattered subtype of VGII (ST44). Our findings demonstrated that C. neoformans isolates in Sichuan are genetically homogeneous, and ST5 is the epidemic clone of C. neoformans in China.

  16. Ambroxol interferes with Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qi; Yu, Jialin; Yang, Xiqiang; Wang, Jiarong; Wang, Lijia; Lin, Yayin; Lin, Lihua

    2010-09-01

    The mucolytic agent ambroxol has been reported to interfere with the formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa-derived biofilms in addition to reducing alginate production by undefined mechanisms. Since quorum sensing is a key regulator of virulence and biofilm formation, we examined the effects of ambroxol on P. aeruginosa PAO1 wild-type bacterial clearance rates, adhesion profiles and biofilm formation compared with the quorum sensing-deficient, double-mutant strains DeltalasR DeltarhlR and DeltalasI DeltarhlI. Data presented in this report demonstrated that ambroxol treatment reduced survival rates of the double-mutant strains compared with the wild-type strain in a dose-dependent manner even though the double-mutants had increased adhesion in the presence of ambroxol compared with the wild-type strain. The PAO1 wild-type strain produced a significantly thicker biofilm (21.64+/-0.57 microm) compared with the biofilms produced by the DeltalasR DeltarhlR (7.36+/-0.2 microm) and DeltalasI DeltarhlI (6.62+/-0.31 microm) isolates. Ambroxol treatment reduced biofilm thickness, increased areal porosity, and decreased the average diffusion distance and textual entropy of wild-type and double-mutant strains. However, compared with the double-mutant strains, the changes observed for the wild-type strain were more clearly defined. Finally, ambroxol exhibited significant antagonistic quorum-sensing properties, suggesting that it could be adapted for use clinically in the treatment of cystic fibrosis and to reduce biofilm formation and in the colonisation of indwelling devices.

  17. MRI criteria for MS in patients with clinically isolated syndromes.

    PubMed

    Montalban, X; Tintoré, M; Swanton, J; Barkhof, F; Fazekas, F; Filippi, M; Frederiksen, J; Kappos, L; Palace, J; Polman, C; Rovaris, M; de Stefano, N; Thompson, A; Yousry, T; Rovira, A; Miller, D H

    2010-02-02

    In recent years, criteria for the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) have changed, mainly due to the incorporation of new MRI criteria. While the new criteria are a logical step forward, they are complex and-not surprisingly-a good working knowledge of them is not always evident among neurologists and neuroradiologists. In some circumstances, several MRI examinations are needed to achieve an accurate and prompt diagnosis. This provides an incentive for continued efforts to refine the incorporation of MRI-derived information into the diagnostic workup of patients presenting with a clinically isolated syndrome. Within the European multicenter collaborative research network that studies MRI in MS (MAGNIMS), a workshop was held in London in November 2007 to review information that may simplify the existing MS diagnostic criteria, while maintaining a high specificity that is essential to minimize false positive diagnoses. New data that are now published were reviewed and discussed and together with a new proposal are integrated in this position paper.

  18. Prevalence of Multidrug-resistant, Extensively Drug-resistant, and Pandrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa from a Tertiary Level Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Gill, JS; Arora, Sunil; Khanna, SP; Kumar, KVS Hari

    2016-01-01

    Background: Infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa is common in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), leading to increased morbidity and mortality. The organism is classified into various phenotypes based on the drug resistance pattern, namely, drug-resistant (DR), multi-DR (MDR), extensively DR (XDR), and pan-DR (PDR). We aim to study the incidence of P. aeruginosa phenotypes in a tertiary level ICU. Materials and Methods: We conducted this prospective, observational study for 2 years (January 2014-December 2015) and collected appropriate clinical samples (blood, urine, wound discharge, etc.,) from all the patients admitted to ICU. We excluded patients with known septicemia and P. aeruginosa infection. Group 1 comprised a total 1915 patient samples and Group 2 comprised 100 active surveillance samples, collected from the medical staff and the hospital environment. The data were analyzed using appropriate statistical methods, and a P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: We isolated 597 pathogenic bacteria out of 1915 specimens, giving a culture positivity rate of 31.2%. Klebsiella (43%), Acinetobacter (22%), and P. aeruginosa (15%) were the top three isolated bacteria. None of the surveillance samples grew P. aeruginosa. Antibiotic resistance studies revealed that 47.7% of P. aeruginosa isolates were DR, 50% were MDR, and 2.3% were XDR phenotype. None of the strains showed PDR phenotype. Conclusion: Our data revealed a high prevalence of DR phenotypes of P. aeruginosa in the ICU. Judicious use of antibiotics and strict infection control measures are essential to reduce the prevalence of drug resistance. PMID:27942195

  19. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Can Be Detected in a Polymicrobial Competition Model Using Impedance Spectroscopy with a Novel Biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Andrew C.; Connolly, Patricia; Tucker, Nicholas P.

    2014-01-01

    Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) is a powerful technique that can be used to elicit information about an electrode interface. In this article, we highlight six principal processes by which the presence of microorganisms can affect impedance and show how one of these - the production of electroactive metabolites - changes the impedance signature of culture media containing Pseudomonas aeruginosa. EIS, was used in conjunction with a low cost screen printed carbon sensor to detect the presence of P. aeruginosa when grown in isolation or as part of a polymicrobial infection with Staphylococcus aureus. By comparing the electrode to a starting measurement, we were able to identify an impedance signature characteristic of P. aeruginosa. Furthermore, we are able to show that one of the changes in the impedance signature is due to pyocyanin and associated phenazine compounds. The findings of this study indicate that it might be possible to develop a low cost sensor for the detection of P. aeruginosa in important point of care diagnostic applications. In particular, we suggest that a development of the device described here could be used in a polymicrobial clinical sample such as sputum from a CF patient to detect P. aeruginosa. PMID:24614411

  20. Computational discovery of putative quorum sensing inhibitors against LasR and RhlR receptor proteins of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annapoorani, Angusamy; Umamageswaran, Venugopal; Parameswari, Radhakrishnan; Pandian, Shunmugiah Karutha; Ravi, Arumugam Veera

    2012-09-01

    Drugs have been discovered in the past mainly either by identification of active components from traditional remedies or by unpredicted discovery. A key motivation for the study of structure based virtual screening is the exploitation of such information to design targeted drugs. In this study, structure based virtual screening was used in search for putative quorum sensing inhibitors (QSI) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The virtual screening programme Glide version 5.5 was applied to screen 1,920 natural compounds/drugs against LasR and RhlR receptor proteins of P. aeruginosa. Based on the results of in silico docking analysis, five top ranking compounds namely rosmarinic acid, naringin, chlorogenic acid, morin and mangiferin were subjected to in vitro bioassays against laboratory strain PAO1 and two more antibiotic resistant clinical isolates, P. aeruginosa AS1 (GU447237) and P. aeruginosa AS2 (GU447238). Among the five compounds studied, except mangiferin other four compounds showed significant inhibition in the production of protease, elastase and hemolysin. Further, all the five compounds potentially inhibited the biofilm related behaviours. This interaction study provided promising ligands to inhibit the quorum sensing (QS) mediated virulence factors production in P. aeruginosa.

  1. The effects of D-Tyrosine combined with amikacin on the biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    She, Pengfei; Chen, Lihua; Liu, Hongbo; Zou, Yaru; Luo, Zhen; Koronfel, Asmaa; Wu, Yong

    2015-09-01

    The biofilm formation of microorganisms causes persistent tissue infections resistant to treatment with antimicrobial agents. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is commonly isolated from the airways of patients with chronic fibrosis (CF) and often forms biofilms, which are extremely hard to eradicate and a major cause of mortality and morbidity. Recent studies have shown that D-amino acids (D-AAs) inhibited and disrupted biofilm formation by causing the release of the protein component of the polymeric matrix. However, the effects of D-AAs combined with common antibiotics on biofilms have rarely been studied. The current study first determined whether D-AAs disrupted the biofilms of PAO1 and the clinical airway isolates of P. aeruginosa. It was then determined whether combinations of D-Tyr (the most effective one) and the antibiotic amikacin (AMK) enhanced the activity against these biofilms. The results of the current study showed that D-Tyr is the most effective among those that disassemble the D-amino acids (D-leucine, D-methionine, D-Tyrptophan, and D-tryptophan), and D-Tyr at concentrations higher than 5 mM significantly reduced the biofilm biomass of P. aeruginosa (p < 0.05) without influencing bacterial growth. It was also revealed that D-Tyr improved the efficacy of AMK to combat P. aeruginosa biofilms, as indicated by a reduction in the minimal biofilm-inhibiting concentration (MBIC50 and MBIC90) without a change in the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of planktonic bacteria. Thus, the findings indicated that D-Tyr supplementation overcame the resistance of P. aeruginosa biofilms to AMK, which might be helpful for preventing AMK overuse when this specific D-Tyr is recommended for combatting these biofilms. Also, toxicity of the liver and kidney from AMK could be potentially mitigated by co-delivery with D-Tyr.

  2. Whole-Genome Sequences of 80 Environmental and Clinical Isolates of Burkholderia pseudomallei

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Anthony L.; Chain, Patrick S.; Currie, Bart J.; Daligault, Hajnalka E.; Davenport, Karen W.; Davis, Christopher B.; Inglis, Timothy J. J.; Kaestli, Mirjam; Koren, Sergey; Mayo, Mark; Merritt, Adam J.; Sarovich, Derek S.; Warner, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Here, we present the draft genome sequences of 80 isolates of Burkholderia pseudomallei. The isolates represent clinical cases of melioidosis and environmental isolates from regions in Australia and Papua New Guinea where B. pseudomallei is endemic. The genomes provide further context for the diversity of the pathogen. PMID:25676747

  3. Whole-Genome Sequences of 80 Environmental and Clinical Isolates of Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Shannon L; Baker, Anthony L; Chain, Patrick S; Currie, Bart J; Daligault, Hajnalka E; Davenport, Karen W; Davis, Christopher B; Inglis, Timothy J J; Kaestli, Mirjam; Koren, Sergey; Mayo, Mark; Merritt, Adam J; Price, Erin P; Sarovich, Derek S; Warner, Jeffrey; Rosovitz, M J

    2015-02-12

    Here, we present the draft genome sequences of 80 isolates of Burkholderia pseudomallei. The isolates represent clinical cases of melioidosis and environmental isolates from regions in Australia and Papua New Guinea where B. pseudomallei is endemic. The genomes provide further context for the diversity of the pathogen.

  4. Evaluation of Vitek MS for rapid classification of clinical isolates belonging to Mycobacterium avium complex.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Daniel P; Zembower, Teresa R; Qi, Chao

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the ability of the Vitek MS system to classify clinical pulmonary Mycobacterium avium complex isolates compared to multilocus sequence analysis. Vitek MS accurately identified 55% of the isolates as M. avium and 18% as M. intracellulare, but misidentified 24 (27%) Mycobacterium chimaera isolates as Mycobacterium intracellulare.

  5. Invitro Apramycin Activity against multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Kang, Anthony D; Smith, Kenneth P; Eliopoulos, George M; Berg, Anders H; McCoy, Christopher; Kirby, James E

    2017-03-16

    The in vitro activity of apramycin was compared to that of amikacin, gentamicin, and tobramycin against multidrug-resistant, extensively drug-resistant,