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Sample records for aeruginosa isolates collected

  1. An Investigation of Antibacterial Resistance Patterns Among Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates Collected from Intensive Care Units of a University-Affiliated Hospital in Ahvaz, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Izadpour, Farrokh; Ranjbari, Nastaran; Aramesh, Mohammad-Reza; Moosavian, Mojtaba; ShahAli, Shiva; Larki, Farzaneh; Tabesh, Hamed; Morvaridi, Afrooz

    2016-01-01

    Background In recent decades, multidrug-resistant non-fermenting Gram-negative pathogens, particularly Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, have been recognized as a major cause of healthcare-associated and nosocomial infections and outbreaks. Objectives The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and pattern of antibiotic resistance in A. baumannii and P. aeruginosa isolates collected from intensive care units (ICUs). Methods One hundred fifty-five clinical isolates, including 80 (51.6%) isolates of A. baumannii and 75 (48.4%) isolates of P. aeruginosa, from hospitalized patients in the ICUs of a teaching hospital in Ahvaz, Iran, were collected from January 1 to December 30, 2013. The organisms were identified with conventional bacteriological methods, and antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed on all isolates in accordance with clinical laboratory and standards institute (CLSI) guidelines. Results The maximum resistance rates among A. baumannii isolates were observed for ciprofloxacin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (96.9% and 95.2%, respectively). For P. aeruginosa isolates, the maximum resistance rates were reported for ceftriaxone and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (97.2% and 92.4%, respectively). Conclusions The majority of A. baumannii and P. aeruginosa isolates were found to be resistant to commonly recommended antibiotics. Therefore, surveillance of antibiotic consumption and proper antibiotic administration guidelines are essential for preventing major outbreaks in the future. PMID:27800136

  2. In Vitro Activity of Fosfomycin against a Collection of Clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from 16 Spanish Hospitals: Establishing the Validity of Standard Broth Microdilution as Susceptibility Testing Method

    PubMed Central

    Díez-Aguilar, María; del Campo, Rosa; García-Castillo, María; Zamora, Javier; Cantón, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    The broth microdilution method for fosfomycin and Pseudomonas aeruginosa was assessed and compared with the approved agar dilution method in 206 genetically unrelated P. aeruginosa clinical isolates. Essential agreement between the two methods was 84%, and categorical agreement was 89.3%. Additionally, Etest and disk diffusion assays were performed. Results validate broth microdilution as a reliable susceptibility testing method for fosfomycin against P. aeruginosa. Conversely, unacceptable concordance was established between Etest and disk diffusion results with agar dilution results. PMID:23939889

  3. Carbapenem Susceptibility and Multidrug-Resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Hashem, Hany; Hanora, Amro; Abdalla, Salah; Shawky, Alaa; Saad, Alaa

    2016-01-01

    Background Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a serious concern for antimicrobial therapy, as the common isolates exhibit variable grades of resistance, involving beta-lactamase enzymes, beside native defense mechanisms. Objectives The present study was designed to determine the occurrence of Metallo-β- Lactamases (MBL) and Amp C harboring P. aeruginosa isolates from Suez Canal university hospital in Ismailia, Egypt. Methods A total of 147 P. aeruginosa isolates, recovered from 311 patients during a 10-month period, were collected between May 2013 and February 2014; the isolates were collected from urine, wound and sputum. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) determined by agar dilution methods was ≥2 μg/mL for meropenem and imipenem. Identification of P. aeruginosa was confirmed using API 20NE. Metallo-β- Lactamases and Amp C were detected based on different phenotypic methods. Results Overall, 26.5% of P. aeruginosa isolates (39/147) were carbapenem resistant isolates. Furthermore, 64.1% (25/39) were MBL producers, these isolates were screened by the combined disc and disc diffusion methods to determine the ability of MBL production. Both MBL and Amp C harbored P. aeruginosa isolates were 28% (7/25). Sixty-four percent of P. aeruginosa isolates were multidrug resistant (MDR) (16/25). The sensitivity toward polymyxin, imipenem, norfloxacin, piperacillin-tazobactam and gentamicin was 99%, 91%, 88%, 82% and 78%, respectively. The resistance rate towards cefotaxime, ceftazidime, cefepime, aztreonam and meropenem was 98.6%, 86%, 71.4%, 34% and 30%, respectively. Conclusions Multidrug resistance was significantly associated with MBL production in P. aeruginosa. Early detection of MBL-producing P. aeruginosa and hospital antibiotic policy prescription helps proper antimicrobial therapy and avoidance of dissemination of these multidrug resistance isolates. PMID:28138370

  4. Isolation of oxidase-negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa from sputum culture.

    PubMed

    Hampton, K D; Wasilauskas, B L

    1979-05-01

    Two isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa lacking characteristic indophenol oxidase were recovered from a sputum specimen. A discussion of the characteristic biochemical tests and antibiograms along with a possible explanation for this phenomenon is presented.

  5. Drug Resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacter cloacae Isolated from ICU, Babol, Northern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Bayani, Masoomeh; Siadati, Sepideh; Rajabnia, Ramzan; Taher, Ali Asghar

    2013-01-01

    Multidrug resistant (MDR) bacteria are spread throughout the world which causes nosocomial infections, especially in Intensive Care Unit (ICU). This study aimed to investigate the resistance pattern of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacter cloacae isolated from patients in the ICU. During 2011-2012, 30 isolates for each P. aeruginosa and E. cloacae were collected from the patients who acquired nosocomial infection after admition to the ICU at the hospitals affiliated to Babol University of Medical Sciences, Babol, northern Iran. Antimicrobial susceptibility test was performed for five category antibiotics by microdilution method. The data were analyzed by SPSS version 20 and p<0.05 was considered statistically significant. The highest resistance rate of P. aeruginosa was seen to amikacin (53.3%) followed by ceftazidime (43.3%). Also, 16.7% of E. cloacae was resistant to ceftazidime. Among P. aeruginosa isolates,18 (60%) were MDR while no E. cloacae isolates were MDR. The significant correlation was only demonstrated between MDR P. aeruginosa and the reason of hospitalization (P=0.004). In conclusion, there was alarming amount of P. aeruginosa MDR in patients in the ICU which could lead to a hazardous outcome for the patients. Therefore, new prevention policies regarding to hospital infection should be established. Also, the periodical assessment of bacterial resistance pattern particularly in ICUs should be performed. PMID:24551814

  6. AMINOGLYCOSIDE RESISTANCE GENES IN Pseudomonas aeruginosa ISOLATES FROM CUMANA, VENEZUELA.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Bertinellys; Rodulfo, Hectorina; Carreño, Numirin; Guzmán, Militza; Salazar, Elsa; De Donato, Marcos

    2016-01-01

    The enzymatic modification of aminoglycosides by aminoglycoside-acetyltransferases (AAC), aminoglycoside-adenyltransferases (AAD), and aminoglycoside-phosphotransferases (APH), is the most common resistance mechanism in P. aeruginosa and these enzymes can be coded on mobile genetic elements that contribute to their dispersion. One hundred and thirty seven P. aeruginosa isolates from the University Hospital, Cumana, Venezuela (HUAPA) were evaluated. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by the disk diffusion method and theaac, aadB and aph genes were detected by PCR. Most of the P. aeruginosa isolates (33/137) were identified from the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), mainly from discharges (96/137). The frequency of resistant P. aeruginosaisolates was found to be higher for the aminoglycosides tobramycin and amikacin (30.7 and 29.9%, respectively). Phenotype VI, resistant to these antibiotics, was the most frequent (14/49), followed by phenotype I, resistant to all the aminoglycosides tested (12/49). The aac(6´)-Ib,aphA1 and aadB genes were the most frequently detected, and the simultaneous presence of several resistance genes in the same isolate was demonstrated. Aminoglycoside resistance in isolates ofP. aeruginosa at the HUAPA is partly due to the presence of the aac(6´)-Ib, aphA1 andaadB genes, but the high rates of antimicrobial resistance suggest the existence of several mechanisms acting together. This is the first report of aminoglycoside resistance genes in Venezuela and one of the few in Latin America.

  7. AMINOGLYCOSIDE RESISTANCE GENES IN Pseudomonas aeruginosa ISOLATES FROM CUMANA, VENEZUELA

    PubMed Central

    TEIXEIRA, Bertinellys; RODULFO, Hectorina; CARREÑO, Numirin; GUZMÁN, Militza; SALAZAR, Elsa; DONATO, Marcos DE

    2016-01-01

    The enzymatic modification of aminoglycosides by aminoglycoside-acetyltransferases (AAC), aminoglycoside-adenyltransferases (AAD), and aminoglycoside-phosphotransferases (APH), is the most common resistance mechanism in P. aeruginosa and these enzymes can be coded on mobile genetic elements that contribute to their dispersion. One hundred and thirty seven P. aeruginosa isolates from the University Hospital, Cumana, Venezuela (HUAPA) were evaluated. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by the disk diffusion method and theaac, aadB and aph genes were detected by PCR. Most of the P. aeruginosa isolates (33/137) were identified from the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), mainly from discharges (96/137). The frequency of resistant P. aeruginosaisolates was found to be higher for the aminoglycosides tobramycin and amikacin (30.7 and 29.9%, respectively). Phenotype VI, resistant to these antibiotics, was the most frequent (14/49), followed by phenotype I, resistant to all the aminoglycosides tested (12/49). The aac(6´)-Ib,aphA1 and aadB genes were the most frequently detected, and the simultaneous presence of several resistance genes in the same isolate was demonstrated. Aminoglycoside resistance in isolates ofP. aeruginosa at the HUAPA is partly due to the presence of the aac(6´)-Ib, aphA1 andaadB genes, but the high rates of antimicrobial resistance suggest the existence of several mechanisms acting together. This is the first report of aminoglycoside resistance genes in Venezuela and one of the few in Latin America. PMID:27007556

  8. Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical and environmental isolates constitute a single population with high phenotypic diversity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen with a high incidence of hospital infections that represents a threat to immune compromised patients. Genomic studies have shown that, in contrast to other pathogenic bacteria, clinical and environmental isolates do not show particular genomic differences. In addition, genetic variability of all the P. aeruginosa strains whose genomes have been sequenced is extremely low. This low genomic variability might be explained if clinical strains constitute a subpopulation of this bacterial species present in environments that are close to human populations, which preferentially produce virulence associated traits. Results In this work, we sequenced the genomes and performed phenotypic descriptions for four non-human P. aeruginosa isolates collected from a plant, the ocean, a water-spring, and from dolphin stomach. We show that the four strains are phenotypically diverse and that this is not reflected in genomic variability, since their genomes are almost identical. Furthermore, we performed a detailed comparative genomic analysis of the four strains studied in this work with the thirteen previously reported P. aeruginosa genomes by means of describing their core and pan-genomes. Conclusions Contrary to what has been described for other bacteria we have found that the P. aeruginosa core genome is constituted by a high proportion of genes and that its pan-genome is thus relatively small. Considering the high degree of genomic conservation between isolates of P. aeruginosa from diverse environments, including human tissues, some implications for the treatment of infections are discussed. This work also represents a methodological contribution for the genomic study of P. aeruginosa, since we provide a database of the comparison of all the proteins encoded by the seventeen strains analyzed. PMID:24773920

  9. Diversity of Molecular Mechanisms Conferring Carbapenem Resistance to Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Jeannot, Katy; El-Mahdy, Taghrid S.; Samaha, Hassan A.; Shibl, Atef M.; Plésiat, Patrick; Courvalin, Patrice

    2016-01-01

    Background. This study described various molecular and epidemiological characters determining antibiotic resistance patterns in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates. Methods. A total of 34 carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa clinical isolates were isolated from samples collected at a tertiary hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, from January to December 2011. Susceptibility testing, serotyping, molecular characterization of carbapenem resistance, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) were performed. Results. All isolates were resistant to ceftazidime, and more than half were highly resistant (minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) > 256 mg/L). Fifteen isolates had MIC values ≥64 mg/L for any of the carbapenems examined. Vietnamese extended-spectrum β-lactamase (VEB-1) (n = 16/34) and oxacillinase (OXA-10) (n = 14/34) were the most prevalent extended-spectrum β-lactamase and penicillinase, respectively. Verona imipenemase (VIM-1, VIM-2, VIM-4, VIM-11, and VIM-28) and imipenemase (IMP-7) variants were found in metallo-β-lactamase producers. A decrease in outer membrane porin gene (oprD) expression was seen in nine isolates, and an increase in efflux pump gene (MexAB) expression was detected in five isolates. Six serotypes (O:1, O:4, O:7, O:10, O:11, and O:15) were found among the 34 isolates. The predominant serotype was O:11 (16 isolates), followed by O:15 (nine isolates). PFGE analysis of the 34 carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa isolates revealed 14 different pulsotypes. Conclusions. These results revealed diverse mechanisms conferring carbapenem resistance to P. aeruginosa isolates from Saudi Arabia. PMID:27597874

  10. Characterization of colony morphology variants isolated from Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    PubMed

    Kirisits, Mary Jo; Prost, Lynne; Starkey, Melissa; Parsek, Matthew R

    2005-08-01

    In this study, we report the isolation of small, rough, strongly cohesive colony morphology variants from aging Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 biofilms. Similar to many of the P. aeruginosa colony morphology variants previously described in the literature, these variants autoaggregate in liquid culture and hyperadhere to solid surfaces. They also exhibit increased hydrophobicity and reduced motility compared to the wild-type parent strain. Despite the similarities in appearance of our colony morphology variant isolates on solid medium, the isolates showed a range of responses in various phenotypic assays. These variants form biofilms with significant three-dimensional structure and more biomass than the wild-type parent. To further explore the nature of the variants, their transcriptional profiles were evaluated. The variants generally showed increased expression of the psl and pel loci, which have been previously implicated in the adherence of P. aeruginosa to solid surfaces. When a mutation in the psl locus was introduced into a colony morphology variant, the colony morphology was only partially affected, but hyperadherence and autoaggregation were lost. Finally, similar colony morphology variants were found in isolates from cystic fibrosis patients. These variants displayed many of the same characteristics as the laboratory variants, suggesting a link between laboratory and cystic fibrosis biofilms.

  11. Biofilm Formation and Virulence Factors Among Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated From Burn Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ghanbarzadeh Corehtash, Zahra; Khorshidi, Ahmad; Firoozeh, Farzaneh; Akbari, Hosein; Mahmoudi Aznaveh, Azam

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pseudomonas aeruginosa possesses a variety of virulence factors and infections caused by multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa (MDRPA) in burn patients are a public health problem. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the antibiotic resistance pattern, the biofilm formation, the prevalence of MDRPA and two virulence genes (nan1 and exoA) among P. aeruginosa isolated from burn patients. Patients and Methods: A total of 144 isolates of P. aeruginosa were collected from burn patient at the Burn Centre of Tehran, Iran, between March 2013 and July 2013. Antibiotic susceptibility test was performed via agar disk diffusion method. The ability of producing biofilm was examined by crystal violet microtiter plate assay and the prevalence of the exoA and nan1 genes among the isolates was determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results: A high rate of resistance was seen against ciprofloxacin (93.7%), aztreonam (86.8%), piperacillin (85.4%), ceftazidime (82.6%), amikacin (82%) and imipenem (79.2%). In total, 93.1% of the isolates were characterized as MDRPA. Biofilm formation was seen in 92.4% of the isolates. The prevalence of the exoA and nan1 genes were 75% and 11.8% among the isolates, respectively. Conclusions: The high rate of MDRPA and its ability to produce biofilm is an alarm for public health. The statistical analysis showed that biofilm production in the MDRPA isolates was significantly higher than that in the non–MDRPA isolates (P < 0.001). PMID:26587205

  12. Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from dental unit waterlines can be divided in two distinct groups, including one displaying phenotypes similar to isolates from cystic fibrosis patients

    PubMed Central

    Ouellet, Myriam M.; Leduc, Annie; Nadeau, Christine; Barbeau, Jean; Charette, Steve J.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa displays broad genetic diversity, giving it an astonishing capacity to adapt to a variety of environments and to infect a wide range of hosts. While many P. aeruginosa isolates of various origins have been analyzed, isolates from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients have received the most attention. Less is known about the genetic and phenotypic diversity of P. aeruginosa isolates that colonize other environments where flourishing biofilms can be found. In the present study, 29 P. aeruginosa isolates from dental unit waterlines and CF patients were collected and their genetic and phenotypes profiles were compared to determine whether environmental and clinical isolates are related. The isolates were first classified using the random amplified polymorphic DNA method. This made it possible to distribute the isolates into one clinical cluster and two environmental clusters. The isolates in the environmental cluster that were genetically closer to the clinical cluster also displayed phenotypes similar to the clinical isolates. The isolates from the second environmental cluster displayed opposite phenotypes, particularly an increased capacity to form biofilms. The isolates in this cluster were also the only ones harboring genes that encoded specific epimerases involved in the synthesis of lipopolysaccharides, which could explain their increased ability to form biofilms. In conclusion, the isolates from the dental unit waterlines could be distributed into two clusters, with some of the environmental isolates resembled the clinical isolates. PMID:25653647

  13. [Performance evaluation of VITEK 2 system in meropenem susceptibility testing of clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates].

    PubMed

    Acuner, Ibrahim Cağatay; Bayramoğlu, Gülçin; Birinci, Asuman; Cekiç Cihan, Ciğdem; Bek, Yüksel; Durupınar, Belma

    2011-07-01

    VITEK 2 system without a major deficiency in study design. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the performance of VITEK 2 system (bioMérieux, France) in antimicrobial susceptibility testing of carbapenems in clinical P.aeruginosa isolates in a well-designed study. The study was conducted on nonrepetitive P.aeruginosa isolates (n= 142) of clinical origin. Isolates were selected from the isolate collections of Culture Collection Unit of the Medical Laboratories at Ondokuz Mayis University Hospital. The study collection was characterized with conventional tests and the VITEK 2 automated microbiology system. Broth microdilution method standardized by Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute was used as the reference method. P.aeruginosa ATCC 27853 was used as the quality control strain in all experimental steps. Twofold dilutions of meropenem (AstraZeneca, USA) concentrations between 64 mg/L and 0.125 mg/L were tested. In compliance with FDA recommendations, minimum inhibitory concentrations of study isolates were shown to be on-scale and distributed within the range of five sequential dilutions in both methods. In reproducibility testing, 15 organisms were tested with VITEK 2 system in triplicate. Results of the reproducibility tests were evaluated in comparison to the test mode (the most frequent test result for the isolate) as a reference. Overall reproducibility was 100%. Essential and categorical agreements of the VITEK 2 system in comparison to the reference method were 83.8% and 96.5%, respectively. Very major and minor discrepancy rates were 1.4% and 2.8%, respectively. There was no major discrepancy. While the results of the essential agreement was not acceptable, categorical agreement was acceptable according to the FDA performance criteria. There was very good agreement between methods as shown by the kappa value (?= 0.938). In conclusion, VITEK 2 system exhibited acceptable performance in the meropenem susceptibility testing of clinical P.aeruginosa isolates. As

  14. Aloe vera Gel: Effective Therapeutic Agent against Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates Recovered from Burn Wound Infections.

    PubMed

    Goudarzi, Mehdi; Fazeli, Maryam; Azad, Mehdi; Seyedjavadi, Sima Sadat; Mousavi, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Aloe vera is an herbal medicinal plant with biological activities, such as antimicrobial, anticancer, anti-inflammatory, and antidiabetic ones, and immunomodulatory properties. The purpose of this study was investigation of in vitro antimicrobial activity of A. vera gel against multidrug-resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from patients with burn wound infections. Methods. During a 6-month study, 140 clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa were collected from patients admitted to the burn wards of a hospital in Tehran, Iran. Antimicrobial susceptibility test was carried out against the pathogens using the A. vera gel and antibiotics (imipenem, gentamicin, and ciprofloxacin). Results. The antibiogram revealed that 47 (33.6%) of all isolates were MDR P. aeruginosa. The extract isolated from A. vera has antibacterial activity against all of isolates. Also, 42 (89.4%) isolates were inhibited by A. vera gel extract at minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) ≤ 200 µg/mL. MIC value of A. vera gel for other isolates (10.6%) was 800 µg/mL. All of MDR P. aeruginosa strains were inhibited by A. vera at similar MIC50 and MIC90 200 µg/mL. Conclusion. Based on our results, A. vera gel at various concentrations can be used as an effective antibacterial agent in order to prevent wound infection caused by P. aeruginosa.

  15. Carbapenem inactivation: a very affordable and highly specific method for phenotypic detection of carbapenemase-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates compared with other methods.

    PubMed

    Akhi, Mohammad Taghi; Khalili, Younes; Ghotaslou, Reza; Kafil, Hossein Samadi; Yousefi, Saber; Nagili, Behroz; Goli, Hamid Reza

    2016-07-22

    This investigation was undertaken to compare phenotypic and molecular methods for detection of carbapenemase-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa. A total of 245 non-duplicated isolates of P. aeruginosa were collected from hospitalized patients. Disc diffusion method was used to identify carbapenem-resistant bacteria. Three phenotypic methods, including Modified Hodge Test (MHT), Modified Carba NP (MCNP) test and Carbapenem Inactivation Method (CIM) were used for investigation of carbapenemase production. In addition, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to detect carbapenemase encoding genes. Of 245 P. aeruginosa isolates investigated, 121 isolates were carbapenem-resistant. Among carbapenem-resistant isolates, 40, 39 and 35 isolates exhibited positive results using MHT, MCNP test and CIM, respectively. PCR indicated the presence of carbapenemase genes in 35 of carbapenem-resistant isolates. MHT showed low sensitivity and specificity for carbapenemase detection among P. aeruginosa isolates in comparison to PCR. CIM was most affordable and highly specific than MCNP test compared with the molecular method.

  16. Prevalence, conservation and functional analysis of Yersinia and Escherichia CRISPR regions in clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates.

    PubMed

    Cady, K C; White, A S; Hammond, J H; Abendroth, M D; Karthikeyan, R S G; Lalitha, P; Zegans, M E; O'Toole, G A

    2011-02-01

    Here, we report the characterization of 122 Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates from three distinct geographical locations: Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center in New Hampshire, USA, the Charles T. Campbell Eye Microbiology Lab at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, USA, and the Aravind Eye Hospital in Madurai, India. We identified and located clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) in 45/122 clinical isolates and sequenced these CRISPR, finding that Yersinia subtype CRISPR regions (33 %) were more prevalent than the Escherichia CRISPR region subtype (6 %) in these P. aeruginosa clinical isolates. Further, we observed 132 unique spacers from these 45 CRISPR that are 100 % identical to prophages or sequenced temperate bacteriophage capable of becoming prophages. Most intriguingly, all of these 132 viral spacers matched to temperate bacteriophage/prophages capable of inserting into the host chromosome, but not to extrachromosomally replicating lytic P. aeruginosa bacteriophage. We next assessed the ability of the more prevalent Yersinia subtype CRISPR regions to mediate resistance to bacteriophage infection or lysogeny by deleting the entire CRISPR region from sequenced strain UCBPP-PA14 and six clinical isolates. We found no change in CRISPR-mediated resistance to bacteriophage infection or lysogeny rate even for CRISPR with spacers 100 % identical to a region of the infecting bacteriophage. Lastly, to show these CRISPR and cas genes were expressed and functional, we demonstrated production of small CRISPR RNAs. This work provides both the first examination to our knowledge of CRISPR regions within clinical P. aeruginosa isolates and a collection of defined CRISPR-positive and -negative strains for further CRISPR and cas gene studies.

  17. Genotyping of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from cockroaches and human urine.

    PubMed

    Saitou, Keiko; Furuhata, Katsunori; Fukuyama, Masafumi

    2010-10-01

    Molecular-epidemiological analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from cockroaches captured in hospitals and from patient urine was performed, employing randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis to investigate the usefulness of RAPD analysis. Four specific bands at positions of 993, 875, 521, and 402 bp were commonly detected using primer 272 in 16 of 45 cockroach-derived strains (35.6%), but not in 21 urine-derived strains. On analysis using primer 208, 4 specific bands at positions of 1,235, 1,138, 1,068, and 303 bp were commonly detected in 15 of the 45 cockroach-derived (33.3%) and 10 of the 21 patient urine-derived (47.6%) strains, in a total of 25 of 66 strains (37.8%). On cluster analysis, 12 (48.5%) and 16 (66.7%) clusters were grouped based on a homology of 89% or greater, using primer 272 and primer 208, respectively, showing that primer 208 was suitable for the confirmation of diversity. Seven patterns were clustered based on 100% homology using either primer, and 6 of these consisted of only cockroach-derived strains. In the individual groups with 100% homology, all strains in the group were isolated at an identical site during the same period. P. aeruginosa isolated from cockroaches showed diverse genotypes suggesting several sources of contamination, indicating the necessity for investigating infection control targeting cockroaches inhabiting hospitals.

  18. Virulence Gene Profiles of Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated From Iranian Hospital Infections

    PubMed Central

    Fazeli, Nastaran; Momtaz, Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Background: The most common hospital-acquired pathogen is Pseudomonas aeruginosa. It is a multidrug resistant bacterium causing systemic infections. Objectives: The present study was carried out in order to investigate the distribution of virulence factors and antibiotic resistance properties of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from various types of hospital infections in Iran. Patients and Methods: Two-hundred and seventeen human infection specimens were collected from Baqiyatallah and Payambaran hospitals in Tehran, Iran. The clinical samples were cultured immediately and samples positive for P. aeruginosa were analyzed for the presence of antibiotic resistance and bacterial virulence genes using PCR (polymerase chain reaction). Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed using disk diffusion methodology with Müeller–Hinton agar. Results: Fifty-eight out of 127 (45.66%) male infection specimens and 44 out of 90 (48.88%) female infection specimens harbored P. aeruginosa. Also, 65% (in male specimens) and 21% (in female specimens) of respiratory system infections were positive for P. aeruginosa, which was a high rate. The genes encoding exoenzyme S (67.64%) and phospholipases C (45.09%) were the most common virulence genes found among the strains. The incidences of various β-lactams encoding genes, including blaTEM, blaSHV, blaOXA, blaCTX-M, blaDHA, and blaVEB were 94.11%, 16.66%, 15.68%, 18.62%, 21.56%, and 17.64%, respectively. The most commonly detected fluoroquinolones encoding gene was gyrA (15. 68%). High resistance levels to penicillin (100%), tetracycline (90.19%), streptomycin (64.70%), and erythromycin (43.13%) were observed too. Conclusions: Our findings should raise awareness about antibiotic resistance in hospitalized patients in Iran. Clinicians should exercise caution in prescribing antibiotics, especially in cases of human infections. PMID:25763199

  19. LasR Variant Cystic Fibrosis Isolates Reveal an Adaptable Quorum-Sensing Hierarchy in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Feltner, John B; Wolter, Daniel J; Pope, Christopher E; Groleau, Marie-Christine; Smalley, Nicole E; Greenberg, E Peter; Mayer-Hamblett, Nicole; Burns, Jane; Déziel, Eric; Hoffman, Lucas R; Dandekar, Ajai A

    2016-10-04

    Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections cause significant morbidity in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Over years to decades, P. aeruginosa adapts genetically as it establishes chronic lung infections. Nonsynonymous mutations in lasR, the quorum-sensing (QS) master regulator, are common in CF. In laboratory strains of P. aeruginosa, LasR activates transcription of dozens of genes, including that for another QS regulator, RhlR. Despite the frequency with which lasR coding variants have been reported to occur in P. aeruginosa CF isolates, little is known about their consequences for QS. We sequenced lasR from 2,583 P. aeruginosa CF isolates. The lasR sequences of 580 isolates (22%) coded for polypeptides that differed from the conserved LasR polypeptides of well-studied laboratory strains. This collection included 173 unique lasR coding variants, 116 of which were either missense or nonsense mutations. We studied 31 of these variants. About one-sixth of the variant LasR proteins were functional, including 3 with nonsense mutations, and in some LasR-null isolates, genes that are LasR dependent in laboratory strains were nonetheless expressed. Furthermore, about half of the LasR-null isolates retained RhlR activity. Therefore, in some CF isolates the QS hierarchy is altered such that RhlR quorum sensing is independent of LasR regulation. Our analysis challenges the view that QS-silent P. aeruginosa is selected during the course of a chronic CF lung infection. Rather, some lasR sequence variants retain functionality, and many employ an alternate QS strategy involving RhlR.

  20. LasR Variant Cystic Fibrosis Isolates Reveal an Adaptable Quorum-Sensing Hierarchy in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Feltner, John B.; Wolter, Daniel J.; Pope, Christopher E.; Groleau, Marie-Christine; Smalley, Nicole E.; Greenberg, E. Peter; Mayer-Hamblett, Nicole; Burns, Jane; Hoffman, Lucas R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections cause significant morbidity in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Over years to decades, P. aeruginosa adapts genetically as it establishes chronic lung infections. Nonsynonymous mutations in lasR, the quorum-sensing (QS) master regulator, are common in CF. In laboratory strains of P. aeruginosa, LasR activates transcription of dozens of genes, including that for another QS regulator, RhlR. Despite the frequency with which lasR coding variants have been reported to occur in P. aeruginosa CF isolates, little is known about their consequences for QS. We sequenced lasR from 2,583 P. aeruginosa CF isolates. The lasR sequences of 580 isolates (22%) coded for polypeptides that differed from the conserved LasR polypeptides of well-studied laboratory strains. This collection included 173 unique lasR coding variants, 116 of which were either missense or nonsense mutations. We studied 31 of these variants. About one-sixth of the variant LasR proteins were functional, including 3 with nonsense mutations, and in some LasR-null isolates, genes that are LasR dependent in laboratory strains were nonetheless expressed. Furthermore, about half of the LasR-null isolates retained RhlR activity. Therefore, in some CF isolates the QS hierarchy is altered such that RhlR quorum sensing is independent of LasR regulation. Our analysis challenges the view that QS-silent P. aeruginosa is selected during the course of a chronic CF lung infection. Rather, some lasR sequence variants retain functionality, and many employ an alternate QS strategy involving RhlR. PMID:27703072

  1. Draft Genome Sequences of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from Wounded Military Personnel.

    PubMed

    Arivett, Brock A; Ream, Dave C; Fiester, Steven E; Kidane, Destaalem; Actis, Luis A

    2016-08-11

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a Gram-negative bacterium that causes severe hospital-acquired infections, is grouped as an ESKAPE (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter species) pathogen because of its extensive drug resistance phenotypes and effects on human health worldwide. Five multidrug resistant P. aeruginosa strains isolated from wounded military personnel were sequenced and annotated in this work.

  2. Distribution of Pseudomonas-Derived Cephalosporinase and Metallo-β-Lactamases in Carbapenem-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from Korea.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hye Hyun; Kwon, Gye Cheol; Kim, Semi; Koo, Sun Hoe

    2015-07-01

    The emergence of carbapenem resistance among Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an increasing problem in many parts of the world. In particular, metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs) and AmpC β- lactamases are responsible for high-level resistance to carbapenem and cephalosporin. We studied the diversity and frequency of β-lactamases and characterized chromosomal AmpC β- lactamase from carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa isolates. Sixty-one carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa isolates were collected from patients in a tertiary hospital in Daejeon, Korea, from January 2011 to June 2014. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of four antimicrobial agents were determined using the agar-dilution method. Polymerase chain reaction and sequencing were used to identify the various β-lactamase genes, class 1 integrons, and chromosomally encoded and plasmid-mediated ampC genes. In addition, the epidemiological relationship was investigated by multilocus sequence typing. Among 61 carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa isolates, 25 isolates (41.0%) were MBL producers. Additionally, 30 isolates producing PDC (Pseudomonas-derived cephalosporinase)-2 were highly resistant to ceftazidime (MIC50 = 256 μg/ml) and cefepime (MIC50 = 256 μg/ml). Of all the PDC variants, 25 isolates harboring MBL genes showed high levels of cephalosporin and carbapenem resistance, whereas 36 isolates that did not harbor MBL genes revealed relatively low-level resistance (ceftazidime, p < 0.001; cefepime, p < 0.001; imipenem, p = 0.003; meropenem, p < 0.001). The coexistence of MBLs and AmpC β-lactamases suggests that these may be important contributing factors for cephalosporin and carbapenem resistance. Therefore, efficient detection and intervention to control drug resistance are necessary to prevent the emergence of P. aeruginosa possessing this combination of β-lactamases.

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of Beneficial Rice Rhizosphere Isolate Pseudomonas aeruginosa PUPa3

    PubMed Central

    Uzelac, Gordana; Bertani, Iris; Kojic, Milan; Paszkiewicz, Konrad H.; Studholme, David J.; Passos da Silva, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PUPa3 is a rhizosphere-colonizing and plant growth-promoting strain isolated from the rhizosphere of rice. This strain has, however, been shown to be pathogenic in two nonmammalian infection models. Here we report the draft genome sequence of P. aeruginosa PUPa3. PMID:24994800

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of Beneficial Rice Rhizosphere Isolate Pseudomonas aeruginosa PUPa3.

    PubMed

    Uzelac, Gordana; Bertani, Iris; Kojic, Milan; Paszkiewicz, Konrad H; Studholme, David J; Passos da Silva, Daniel; Venturi, Vittorio

    2014-07-03

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PUPa3 is a rhizosphere-colonizing and plant growth-promoting strain isolated from the rhizosphere of rice. This strain has, however, been shown to be pathogenic in two nonmammalian infection models. Here we report the draft genome sequence of P. aeruginosa PUPa3.

  5. Effect of Tyrosol and Farnesol on Virulence and Antibiotic Resistance of Clinical Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Rhman, Shaymaa Hassan; El-Mahdy, Areej Mostafa; El-Mowafy, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Mixed-species biofilms could create a protected environment that allows for survival to external antimicrobials and allows different bacterial-fungal interactions. Pseudomonas aeruginosa-Candida albicans coexistence is an example for such mixed-species community. Numerous reports demonstrated how P. aeruginosa or its metabolites could influence the growth, morphogenesis, and virulence of C. albicans. In this study, we investigated how the C. albicans quorum sensing compounds, tyrosol and farnesol, might affect Egyptian clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa regarding growth, antibiotic sensitivity, and virulence. We could demonstrate that tyrosol possesses an antibacterial activity against P. aeruginosa (10 µM inhibited more than 50% of growth after 16 h cultivation). Moreover, we could show for the first time that tyrosol strongly inhibits the production of the virulence factors hemolysin and protease in P. aeruginosa, whereas farnesol inhibits, to lower extent, hemolysin production in this bacterial pathogen. Cumulatively, tyrosol is expected to strongly affect P. aeruginosa in mixed microbial biofilm.

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of Microcystis aeruginosa CACIAM 03, a Cyanobacterium Isolated from an Amazonian Freshwater Environment

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Wendel Oliveira; Lima, Alex Ranieri Jerônimo; Moraes, Pablo Henrique Gonçalves; Siqueira, Andrei Santos; Aguiar, Délia Cristina Figueira; Baraúna, Anna Rafaella Ferreira; Martins, Luisa Carício; Fuzii, Hellen Thais; de Lima, Clayton Pereira Silva; Vianez-Júnior, João Lídio Silva Gonçalves; Nunes, Márcio Roberto Teixeira; Dall'Agnol, Leonardo Teixeira

    2016-01-01

    Given its toxigenic potential, Microcystis aeruginosa is an important bloom-forming cyanobacterium. Here, we present a draft genome and annotation of the strain CACIAM 03, which was isolated from an Amazonian freshwater environment. PMID:27856592

  7. Evaluate the Relationship Between Class 1 Integrons and Drug Resistance Genes in Clinical Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Seyed Mohammad Javad; Naeini, Niloofar Shoaee; Khaledi, Azad; Daymad, Seyede Fatemeh; Esmaeili, Davoud

    2016-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates is increasing and it is considered as one of the major public health concerns in the world. The association between integrons and drug resistance has been proven and evidences suggest that integrons are coding and responsible for dissemination of antibiotic resistance among P. aeruginosa isolates. Objective: This study is aimed to evaluate the relationship between class 1 integrons and drug resistance genes in clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa from burn patients. Methods: 100 isolates of P. aeruginosa were collected from burn patients hospitalized in the skin ward of Shahid Motahari hospital and susceptibility testing was performed by disk diffusion method (Kirby-Bauer). Then DNA was extracted and PCR technique was performed for the detection of class 1 integrons and drug resistance genes. Then data was analyzed using SPSS software. Results: The most effective antibiotic was polymyxin B with sensitivity 100%, and the most resistance was observed to the ciprofloxacin (93%) and amikacin (67%), respectively. The maximum and lowest frequencies of drug resistance genes belonged to the aac (6 ') - 1, VEB-1 with prevalence rate 93% and 10%, respectively. The statistical Chi-square test did not find any significant correlation between class 1 integrons and drug resistance genes (p˃ 0.05). Conclusion: Although no significant correlation between class 1 integrons and drug resistance was observed, but the resistance rate to antibiotics tested among P. aeruginosa isolates was high. So, surveillance, optimization and strict consideration of antimicrobial use and control of infection are necessary. PMID:28077975

  8. SERS detection of the biomarker hydrogen cyanide from Pseudomonas aeruginosa cultures isolated from cystic fibrosis patients

    PubMed Central

    Lauridsen, Rikke Kragh; Sommer, Lea M.; Johansen, Helle Krogh; Rindzevicius, Tomas; Molin, Søren; Jelsbak, Lars; Engelsen, Søren Balling; Boisen, Anja

    2017-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the primary cause of chronic airway infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Persistent infections are seen from the first P. aeruginosa culture in about 75% of young CF patients, and it is important to discover new ways to detect P. aeruginosa at an earlier stage. The P. aeruginosa biomarker hydrogen cyanide (HCN) contains a triple bond, which is utilized in this study because of the resulting characteristic C≡N peak at 2135 cm−1 in a Raman spectrum. The Raman signal was enhanced by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) on a Au-coated SERS substrate. After long-term infection, a mutation in the patho-adaptive lasR gene can alter the expression of HCN, which is why it is sometimes not possible to detect HCN in the breath of chronically infected patients. Four P. aeruginosa reference strains and 12 clinical P. aeruginosa strains isolated from CF children were evaluated, and HCN was clearly detected from overnight cultures of all wild type-like isolates and half of the later isolates from the same patients. The clinical impact could be that P. aeruginosa infections could be detected at an earlier stage, because daily breath sampling with an immediate output could be possible with a point-of-care SERS device. PMID:28349938

  9. Comparative analysis of the volatile metabolomes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Bean, Heather D; Rees, Christiaan A; Hill, Jane E

    2016-11-21

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a nearly ubiquitous Gram-negative organism, well known to occupy a multitude of environmental niches and cause human infections at a variety of bodily sites, due to its metabolic flexibility, secondary to extensive genetic heterogeneity at the species level. Because of its dynamic metabolism and clinical importance, we sought to perform a comparative analysis on the volatile metabolome (the 'volatilome') produced by P. aeruginosa clinical isolates. In this study, we analyzed the headspace volatile molecules of 24 P. aeruginosa clinical isolates grown in vitro, using 2D gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC  ×  GC-TOFMS). We identified 391 non-redundant compounds that we associate with the growth and metabolism of P. aeruginosa (the 'pan-volatilome'). Of these, 70 were produced by all 24 isolates (the 'core volatilome'), 52 by only a single isolate, and the remaining 269 volatile molecules by a subset. Sixty-five of the detected compounds could be assigned putative compound identifications, of which 43 had not previously been associated with P. aeruginosa. Using the accessory volatile molecules, we determined the inter-strain variation in the metabolomes of these isolates, clustering strains by their metabotypes. Assessing the extent of metabolomic diversity in P. aeruginosa through an analysis of the volatile molecules that it produces is a critical next step in the identification of novel diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers.

  10. Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates in severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: characterization and risk factors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are at increased risk of infection by P. aeruginosa. The specific role of bronchiectasis in both infection and chronic colonization by this microorganism in COPD, however, remains ill defined. To evaluate the prevalence and risk factors for P. aeruginosa recovery from sputum in outpatients with severe COPD, characterizing P. aeruginosa isolates by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and focusing on the influence of bronchiectasis on chronic colonization in these patients. Methods A case-cohort study of 118 patients with severe COPD attended at a Respiratory Day Unit for an acute infectious exacerbation and followed up over one year. High-resolution CT scans were performed during stability for bronchiectasis assessment and sputum cultures were obtained during exacerbation and stability in all patients. P. aeruginosa isolates were genotyped by PFGE. Determinants of the recovery of P. aeruginosa in sputum and chronic colonization by this microorganism were assessed by multivariate analysis. Results P. aeruginosa was isolated from 41 of the 118 patients studied (34.7%). Five of these 41 patients (12.2%) with P. aeruginosa recovery fulfilled criteria for chronic colonization. In the multivariate analysis, the extent of bronchiectasis (OR 9.8, 95% CI: 1.7 to 54.8) and the number of antibiotic courses (OR 1.7, 95% CI: 1.1 to 2.5) were independently associated with an increased risk of P. aeruginosa isolation. Chronic colonization was unrelated to the presence of bronchiectasis (p=0.75). In patients with chronic colonization the isolates of P. aeruginosa retrieved corresponded to the same clones during the follow-up, and most of the multidrug resistant isolates (19/21) were harbored by these patients. Conclusions The main risk factors for P. aeruginosa isolation in severe COPD were the extent of bronchiectasis and exposure to antibiotics. Over 10% of these patients fulfilled criteria for

  11. Characterization of Toxin-Antitoxin (TA) Systems in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Clinical Isolates in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Savari, Mohammad; Rostami, Soodabeh; Ekrami, Alireza; Bahador, Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is among the most problematic hospital and community-acquired pathogens. Toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems are maintenance regulatory systems in bacteria and have recently been considered new targets for antimicrobial therapy. The prevalence and transcription of these systems in clinical isolates are still unknown. Objectives: The aim of this study was to characterize three types of TA systems (parDE, relBE, and higBA) among P. aeruginosa clinical isolates. Materials and Methods: We typed our clinical isolates by ERIC-PCR (enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus sequence-based polymerase chain reaction) and BOX-PCR. We then investigated 174 P. aeruginosa clinical isolates from three hospitals in Ahvaz, Iran, for the presence of TA system genes, and determined whether these systems were encoded on chromosomes or plasmids by amplification of the flanking regions. Results: Our results showed that in the 174 P. aeruginosa isolates, relBE and higBA were universal, but parDE was less prevalent. Both of the flanking regions of the parDE genes in all positive isolates were amplified. The flanking regions of nearly all relBE genes were amplified. Amplification was observed for the downstream sequence of every higBA locus, as well as for the region upstream of higBA, except in 14 strains. Conclusions: Based on the presence of TA systems in the majority of P. aeruginosa isolates, these could be used as a novel target for antimicrobial therapy. PMID:27099681

  12. Honey as an Antimicrobial Agent Against Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Isolated from Infected Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy, Vishnu Prasad; Ballal, Mamatha; Shivananda, PG; Bairy, Indira

    2012-01-01

    Background: As natural products garner attention in the medical field due to emergence of antibiotic resistant strains of bacteria, honey is valued for its antibacterial activity. Objective: Fifty strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from infected wounds were evaluated for their antibacterial action using honey in comparison with different antibiotics and Dettol. Methodology and Results: All the strains were found to be sensitive to honey at a minimum inhibitory concentration of 20% in comparison with Dettol at 10% using agar dilution method. In the second step, the time kill assay was performed on five isolates of P. aeruginosa to demonstrate the bactericidal activity of honey at different dilutions of honey ranging from 20% to 100% at regular time intervals. All the isolates of P. aeruginosa tested were killed in 12-24 h depending on the dilutions of the honey tested. Thus, honey could prevent the growth of P. aeruginosa even if it was diluted by deionized water by fivefolds in vitro. Honey had almost uniform bactericidal activity against P. aeruginosa irrespective of their susceptibility to different classes of antibiotics. Conclusion: Honey which is a natural, non-toxic, and an inexpensive product has activity against the P. aeruginosa isolated from infected wounds may make it an alternative topical choice in the treatment of wound infections. PMID:22754244

  13. Use of the paraffin wax baiting system for identification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Massengale, A R; Ollar, R A; Giordano, S J; Felder, M S; Aronoff, S C

    1999-11-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the primary pathogen among the Pseudomonads and is known for its minimal nutritional requirements, capacity to use paraffin as a sole carbon source, and biofilm formation. Because the ability of Pseudomonads to grow on paraffin is not commonly found among human pathogens and the primary Pseudomonas human pathogen is P. aeruginosa, we studied the adaptation of the paraffin baiting system for the growth and identification of clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa. We also studied the effectiveness of combining a fluorescence assay measuring fluorescein (pyoverdin) production and oxidase test with the paraffin baiting assay for P. aeruginosa speciation. Strains were tested for the capacity to use paraffin as a sole carbon source using the paraffin baiting system with Czapek's minimal salt medium. Of 111 P. aeruginosa clinical isolates tested for using paraffin as a sole carbon source, 45% exhibited growth on paraffin at 24 h and 76.6% exhibited growth on paraffin at 48 h. The ability of the reference strains and clinical isolates were then tested for their ability to associate with the paraffin slide in the presence of an additional carbon source. Of 111 P. aeruginosa clinical isolates tested, 85 strains (76.6%), and 102 (93%) were associated with the paraffin surface at 24 and 48 h. We successfully combined fluorescence and oxidase assays with the paraffin baiting system for identification of P. aeruginosa. The simple and inexpensive paraffin baiting system is a useful method for the identification and study of P. aeruginosa suitable for both the clinical and research laboratory.

  14. Antibiotic Tolerance Induced by Lactoferrin in Clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Andrés, María T.; Viejo-Diaz, Mónica; Pérez, Francisco; Fierro, José F.

    2005-01-01

    Lactoferrin-induced cell depolarization and a delayed tobramycin-killing effect on Pseudomonas aeruginosa cells were correlated. This antibiotic tolerance effect (ATE) reflects the ability of a defense protein to modify the activity of an antibiotic as a result of its modulatory effect on bacterial physiology. P. aeruginosa isolates from cystic fibrosis patients showed higher ATE values (≤6-fold) than other clinical strains. PMID:15793153

  15. Molecular detection of virulence genes as markers in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Sabharwal, Neha; Dhall, Shriya; Chhibber, Sanjay; Harjai, Kusum

    2014-01-01

    Catheter associated urinary tract infections by P. aeruginosa are related to variety of complications. Quorum sensing and related circuitry guard its virulence potential. Though P. aeruginosa accounts for an appreciable amount of virulence factors, this organism is highly unstable phenotypically. Thus, genotyping of clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa is of utmost importance for understanding the epidemiology of infection. This may contribute towards development of immunotherapeutic approaches against this multi drug resistant pathogen. Moreover, no epidemiological study has been reported yet on uroisolates of P. aeruginosa. Thus this study was planned to obtain information regarding presence, distribution and rate of occurrence of quorum sensing and some associated virulence genes at genetic level. The profiling of quorum sensing genes lasI, lasR, rhlI, rhlR and virulence genes like toxA, aprA, rhlAB, plcH, lasB and fliC of twelve strains of P. aeruginosa isolated from patients with UTIs was done by direct PCR. The results showed variable distribution of quorum sensing genes and virulence genes. Their percentage occurrence may be specifically associated with different levels of intrinsic virulence and pathogenicity in urinary tract. Such information can help in identifying these virulence genes as useful diagnostic markers for clinical P. aeruginosa strains isolated from UTIs.

  16. Genetic characterization of Microcystis aeruginosa isolates from Portuguese freshwater systems.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Cristiana; Vasconcelos, Vitor; Antunes, Agostinho

    2016-07-01

    Cyanobacteria are microorganisms that pose a serious threat to the aquatic waterways through the production of dense blooms under eutrophic conditions and the release of toxic secondary metabolites-cyanotoxins. Within cyanobacteria, the colonial planktonic Microcystis aeruginosa is widely distributed in both fresh and brackish aquatic environments throughout the world being frequently observed in the Portuguese water systems. Apart from the well-established distribution of M. aeruginosa in Portugal, knowledge of its genetic diversity and population structure is unknown. Therefore, in this study twenty-seven strains were obtained from the North, Centre and South regions of Portugal and were subjected to extensive phylogenetic analyses using simultaneously four distinct genetic markers (16S rRNA, 16S-23S ITS, DNA gyrase subunit ß and cell division protein (ftsZ)) encompassing in total 2834 bp. With this work we characterized the phylogenetic relationship among the Portuguese strains, with the southern strains showing higher genetic structure relatively to the North and Centre strains. A total of fifteen genotypes were determined for M. aeruginosa in Portuguese water systems revealing a high genetic diversity. This is also the first study to report geographic variation on the population structure of the Portuguese M. aeruginosa.

  17. Photodynamic antimicrobial therapy to inhibit pseudomonas aeruginosa of corneal isolates (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durkee, Heather A.; Relhan, Nidhi; Arboleda, Alejandro; Halili, Francisco; De Freitas, Carolina; Alawa, Karam; Aguilar, Mariela C.; Amescua, Guillermo; Miller, Darlene; Parel, Jean-Marie

    2016-03-01

    Keratitis associated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa is difficult to manage. Treatment includes antibiotic eye drops, however, some strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa are resistant. Current research efforts are focused on finding alternative and adjunct therapies to treat multi-drug resistant bacteria. One promising alternate technique is photodynamic therapy (PDT). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of riboflavin- and rose bengal-mediated PDT on Pseudomonas aeruginosa keratitis isolates in vitro. Two isolates (S+U- and S-U+) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were derived from keratitis patients and exposed to five experimental groups: (1) Control (dark, UV-A irradiation, 525nm irradiation); (2) 0.1% riboflavin (dark, UV-A irradiation); and (3) 0.1% rose bengal, (4) 0.05% rose bengal and (5) 0.01% rose bengal (dark, 525nm irradiation). Three days after treatment, in dark conditions of all concentration of riboflavin and rose bengal showed no inhibition in both S+U- and S-U+ strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In 0.1% and 0.05% rose bengal irradiated groups, for both S+U- and S-U+ strains, there was complete inhibition of bacterial growth in the central 50mm zone corresponding to the diameter of the green light source. These in vitro results suggest that rose bengal photodynamic therapy may be an effective adjunct treatment for Pseudomonas aeruginosa keratitis.

  18. Tracking down antibiotic-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates in a wastewater network.

    PubMed

    Slekovec, Céline; Plantin, Julie; Cholley, Pascal; Thouverez, Michelle; Talon, Daniel; Bertrand, Xavier; Hocquet, Didier

    2012-01-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa-containing wastewater released by hospitals is treated by wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), generating sludge, which is used as a fertilizer, and effluent, which is discharged into rivers. We evaluated the risk of dissemination of antibiotic-resistant P. aeruginosa (AR-PA) from the hospital to the environment via the wastewater network. Over a 10-week period, we sampled weekly 11 points (hospital and urban wastewater, untreated and treated water, sludge) of the wastewater network and the river upstream and downstream of the WWTP of a city in eastern France. We quantified the P. aeruginosa load by colony counting. We determined the susceptibility to 16 antibiotics of 225 isolates, which we sorted into three categories (wild-type, antibiotic-resistant and multidrug-resistant). Extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) and metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs) were identified by gene sequencing. All non-wild-type isolates (n = 56) and a similar number of wild-type isolates (n = 54) were genotyped by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing. Almost all the samples (105/110, 95.5%) contained P. aeruginosa, with high loads in hospital wastewater and sludge (≥3×10(6) CFU/l or/kg). Most of the multidrug-resistant isolates belonged to ST235, CC111 and ST395. They were found in hospital wastewater and some produced ESBLs such as PER-1 and MBLs such as IMP-29. The WWTP greatly reduced P. aeruginosa counts in effluent, but the P. aeruginosa load in the river was nonetheless higher downstream than upstream from the WWTP. We conclude that the antibiotic-resistant P. aeruginosa released by hospitals is found in the water downstream from the WWTP and in sludge, constituting a potential risk of environmental contamination.

  19. blaVIM-2 Cassette-Containing Novel Integrons in Metallo-β-Lactamase-Producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida Isolates Disseminated in a Korean Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyungwon; Lim, Jong Back; Yum, Jong Hwa; Yong, Dongeun; Chong, Yunsop; Kim, June Myung; Livermore, David M.

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the phenotypic and genetic properties of metallo-β-lactamase-producing Pseudomonas isolates collected at a tertiary-care hospital in Korea since 1995. The prevalence of imipenem resistance among Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates reached 16% in 1997, when 9% of the resistant organisms were found to produce VIM-2 β-lactamase, a class B enzyme previously found only in P. aeruginosa isolates from Europe. VIM-2-producing isolates of Pseudomonas putida were also detected. Resistance was transferable from both these species to P. aeruginosa PAO4089Rp by filter mating, although the resistance determinant could not be found on any detectable plasmid. Serotyping showed that many of the VIM-2-producing P. aeruginosa isolates belonged to serotypes O:11 and O:12, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of XbaI-digested genomic DNA revealed that many had identical profiles, whereas the P. putida isolates were diverse. Sequencing showed that the blaVIM-2 genes resided as cassettes in class 1 integrons. In contrast to previous VIM-encoding integrons, the integron sequenced from a P. aeruginosa isolate had blaVIM located downstream of a variant of aacA4. blaVIM also lay in a class 1 integron in a representative P. putida strain, but the organization of this integron was different from that sequenced from the P. aeruginosa strain. In conclusion, the metallo-β-lactamase produced by these imipenem-resistant Pseudomonas isolates was VIM-2, and the accumulation of producers reflected clonal dissemination as well as horizontal spread. Strict measures are required in order to control a further spread of resistance. PMID:11897589

  20. Emergence of KPC-2-Producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa Sequence Type 463 Isolates in Hangzhou, China

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yan-yan; Gu, Dan-xia; Cai, Jia-chang; Zhou, Hong-wei

    2015-01-01

    Thirty-nine Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC)-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates, all exhibiting high-level resistance to carbapenems and other β-lactam antibiotics, were isolated in Hangzhou, China. Molecular epidemiology analysis indicated the presence of two dominant clones, namely, clones A and B, both of which belong to sequence type 463 (ST463). A genetic environment analysis demonstrated that both clones harbor an ISKpn8 transposase, blaKPC-2, and an ISKpn6-like transposase. These findings depict the features of clonal expansion and transmission of KPC-2-producing P. aeruginosa strains in Hangzhou, China. PMID:25691651

  1. Investigation of a Large Collection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Bacteriophages Collected from a Single Environmental Source in Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire

    PubMed Central

    Essoh, Christiane; Latino, Libera; Midoux, Cédric; Blouin, Yann; Loukou, Guillaume; Nguetta, Simon-Pierre A.; Lathro, Serge; Cablanmian, Arsher; Kouassi, Athanase K.; Vergnaud, Gilles; Pourcel, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Twenty two distinct bacteriophages were isolated from sewage water from five locations in the city of Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire over a two-year period, using a collection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains with diverse genotypes. The phages were characterized by their virulence spectrum on a panel of selected P. aeruginosa strains from cystic fibrosis patients and by whole genome sequencing. Twelve virions representing the observed diversity were visualised by electron microscopy. The combined observations showed that 17 phages, distributed into seven genera, were virulent, and that five phages were related to temperate phages belonging to three genera. Some showed similarity with known phages only at the protein level. The vast majority of the genetic variations among virulent phages from the same genus resulted from seemingly non-random horizontal transfer events, inside a population of P. aeruginosa phages with limited diversity. This suggests the existence of a single environmental reservoir or ecotype in which continuous selection is taking place. In contrast, mostly point mutations were observed among phages potentially capable of lysogenisation. This is the first study of P. aeruginosa phage diversity in an African city and it shows that a large variety of phage species can be recovered in a limited geographical site at least when different bacterial strains are used. The relative temporal and spatial stability of the Abidjan phage population might reflect equilibrium in the microbial community from which they are released. PMID:26115051

  2. In vitro antimicrobial resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from canine otitis externa in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Penna, B.; Thomé, S.; Martins, R.; Martins, G.; Lilenbaum, W.

    2011-01-01

    Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (167) were obtained from 528 samples of canine otitis externa, identified by biochemical reactions and tested for susceptibility to 10 antimicrobials. The most effective drug was ciprofloxacin. The study reports alarming resistance among P. aeruginosa isolated from canine otitis externa samples in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. PMID:24031774

  3. Isolation and characterization of quorum-sensing signalling molecules in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates recovered from nosocomial infections.

    PubMed

    Lakshmana Gowda, Krishnappa; John, James; Marie, Mohammed A M; Sangeetha, Gopalkrishnan; Bindurani, Shanta Range

    2013-09-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most common pathogens in nosocomial infections. Many studies have documented the role of quorum-sensing (QS) systems in antibiotic tolerance of P. aeruginosa. N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) serve as QS signalling molecules and can be a target for modulating bacterial pathogenicity. In this study, nosocomial isolates of P. aeruginosa were characterized for the presence of different types of QS signalling molecules. AHLs were solvent extracted and quantified by determination of β-galactosidase activity using the Escherichia coli MG4 reporter strain. Further characterization was performed by analytical thin layer chromatography coupled with detection using the Agrobacterium tumefaciens A136 biosensor strain. All P. aeruginosa isolates produced AHLs, but there were differences in the quantity and nature of AHLs. We identified AHLs belonging to C4-homoserine lactone (HSL), C6-HSL, C8-HSL, C10-HSL and C12-HSL. AHL profiling of P. aeruginosa isolates showed differences in the amounts and types of AHLs, suggesting differences in the virulence factors and the potential for infection. Our results may be investigated further using animal model systems.

  4. Effect of Tyrosol and Farnesol on Virulence and Antibiotic Resistance of Clinical Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Hassan Abdel-Rhman, Shaymaa; Mostafa El-Mahdy, Areej; El-Mowafy, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Mixed-species biofilms could create a protected environment that allows for survival to external antimicrobials and allows different bacterial-fungal interactions. Pseudomonas aeruginosa-Candida albicans coexistence is an example for such mixed-species community. Numerous reports demonstrated how P. aeruginosa or its metabolites could influence the growth, morphogenesis, and virulence of C. albicans. In this study, we investigated how the C. albicans quorum sensing compounds, tyrosol and farnesol, might affect Egyptian clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa regarding growth, antibiotic sensitivity, and virulence. We could demonstrate that tyrosol possesses an antibacterial activity against P. aeruginosa (10 µM inhibited more than 50% of growth after 16 h cultivation). Moreover, we could show for the first time that tyrosol strongly inhibits the production of the virulence factors hemolysin and protease in P. aeruginosa, whereas farnesol inhibits, to lower extent, hemolysin production in this bacterial pathogen. Cumulatively, tyrosol is expected to strongly affect P. aeruginosa in mixed microbial biofilm. PMID:26844228

  5. Characterization of Virulence Potential of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Isolated from Bovine Meat, Fresh Fish, and Smoked Fish

    PubMed Central

    Benie, Comoé Koffi Donatien; Dadié, Adjéhi; Guessennd, Nathalie; N’gbesso-Kouadio, Nadège Ahou; Kouame, N’zebo Désiré; N’golo, David Coulibaly; Aka, Solange; Dako, Etienne; Dje, Koffi Marcellin; Dosso, Mireille

    2017-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa owns a variability of virulence factors. These factors can increase bacterial pathogenicity and infection severity. Despite the importance of knowledge about them, these factors are not more characterized at level of strains derived from local food products. This study aimed to characterize the virulence potential of P. aeruginosa isolated from various animal products. Several structural and virulence genes of P. aeruginosa including lasB, exoS, algD, plcH, pilB, exoU, and nan1 were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on 204 strains of P. aeruginosa. They were isolated from bovine meat (122), fresh fish (49), and smoked fish (33). The 16S rRNA gene was detected on 91.1% of the presumptive strains as Pseudomonas. The rpoB gene showed that 99.5% of the strains were P. aeruginosa. The lasB gene (89.2%) was the most frequently detected (p < 0.05). In decreasing importance order, exoS (86.8%), algD (72.1%), plcH (72.1%), pilB (40.2%), and exoU (2.5%) were detected. The lasB gene was detected in all strains of P. aeruginosa serogroups O11 and O16. The prevalence of algD, exoS, and exoU genes in these strains varied from 51.2% to 87.4%. The simultaneous determination of serogroups and virulence factors is of interest for the efficacy of surveillance of infections associated with P. aeruginosa. PMID:28386471

  6. Screening of Molecular Virulence Markers in Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strains Isolated from Clinical Infections

    PubMed Central

    Cotar, Ani-Ioana; Chifiriuc, Mariana-Carmen; Dinu, Sorin; Bucur, Marcela; Iordache, Carmen; Banu, Otilia; Dracea, Olguta; Larion, Cristina; Lazar, Veronica

    2010-01-01

    Staphylococcus (S.) aureus and Pseudomonas (Ps.) aeruginosa are two of the most frequently opportunistic pathogens isolated in nosocomial infections, responsible for severe infections in immunocompromised hosts. The frequent emergence of antibiotic-resistant S. aureus and Ps. aeruginosa strains has determined the development of new strategies in order to elucidate the different mechanisms used by these bacteria at different stages of the infectious process, providing the scientists with new procedures for preventing, or at least improving, the control of S. aureus and Ps. aeruginosa infections. The purpose of this study was to characterize the molecular markers of virulence in S. aureus and Ps. aeruginosa strains isolated from different clinical specimens. We used multiplex and uniplex PCR assays to detect the genes encoding different cell-wall associated and extracellular virulence factors, in order to evaluate potential associations between the presence of putative virulence genes and the outcome of infections caused by these bacteria. Our results demonstrate that all the studied S. aureus and Ps. aeruginosa strains synthesize the majority of the investigated virulence determinants, probably responsible for different types of infections. PMID:21614207

  7. Clonal Dissemination of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates Producing Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase SHV-2a

    PubMed Central

    Jeannot, Katy; Fournier, Damien; Müller, Emeline; Cholley, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    From January to December 2011, 24 Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains producing the extended-spectrum β-lactamase SHV-2a were identified in 13 hospitals in France. With one exception, all the strains belonged to the same clone. Double-disk synergy tests with cefepime and clavulanate were able to detect all the SHV-2a-positive isolates. PMID:23241379

  8. Clonal dissemination of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates producing extended-spectrum β-lactamase SHV-2a.

    PubMed

    Jeannot, Katy; Fournier, Damien; Müller, Emeline; Cholley, Pascal; Plésiat, Patrick

    2013-02-01

    From January to December 2011, 24 Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains producing the extended-spectrum β-lactamase SHV-2a were identified in 13 hospitals in France. With one exception, all the strains belonged to the same clone. Double-disk synergy tests with cefepime and clavulanate were able to detect all the SHV-2a-positive isolates.

  9. [Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of imipenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated in a Buenos Aires hospital].

    PubMed

    Cejas, D; Almuzara, M; Santella, G; Tuduri, A; Palombarani, S; Figueroa, S; Gutkind, G; Radice, M

    2008-01-01

    From 129 P. aeruginosa isolated at a health care centre located in Buenos Aires (Hospital "Eva Perón"), 14% produced IMP-13. Although 18 isolates were metallo-beta-lactamases (MBL) producers, only those isolates that displayed altered outer membrane protein profiles correlated with the resistant category according to CLSI or even Subcomisión de Antimicrobianos, SADEBAC, AAM. Phenotypic screening of metallo-beta-lactamases proved to be appropriate for detecting MBL producing isolates. IMP-13 producing isolates corresponded to at least five different clonal types, which not only suggests the dissemination of the resistant strain but also of the resistant marker.

  10. Mechanisms of intrinsic resistance and acquired susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from cystic fibrosis patients to temocillin, a revived antibiotic

    PubMed Central

    Chalhoub, Hussein; Pletzer, Daniel; Weingart, Helge; Braun, Yvonne; Tunney, Michael M.; Elborn, J. Stuart; Rodriguez-Villalobos, Hector; Plésiat, Patrick; Kahl, Barbara C.; Denis, Olivier; Winterhalter, Mathias; Tulkens, Paul M.; Van Bambeke, Françoise

    2017-01-01

    The β-lactam antibiotic temocillin (6-α-methoxy-ticarcillin) shows stability to most extended spectrum β-lactamases, but is considered inactive against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Mutations in the MexAB-OprM efflux system, naturally occurring in cystic fibrosis (CF) isolates, have been previously shown to reverse this intrinsic resistance. In the present study, we measured temocillin activity in a large collection (n = 333) of P. aeruginosa CF isolates. 29% of the isolates had MICs ≤ 16 mg/L (proposed clinical breakpoint for temocillin). Mutations were observed in mexA or mexB in isolates for which temocillin MIC was ≤512 mg/L (nucleotide insertions or deletions, premature termination, tandem repeat, nonstop, and missense mutations). A correlation was observed between temocillin MICs and efflux rate of N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine (MexAB-OprM fluorescent substrate) and extracellular exopolysaccharide abundance (contributing to a mucoid phenotype). OpdK or OpdF anion-specific porins expression decreased temocillin MIC by ~1 two-fold dilution only. Contrarily to the common assumption that temocillin is inactive on P. aeruginosa, we show here clinically-exploitable MICs on a non-negligible proportion of CF isolates, explained by a wide diversity of mutations in mexA and/or mexB. In a broader context, this work contributes to increase our understanding of MexAB-OprM functionality and help delineating how antibiotics interact with MexA and MexB. PMID:28091521

  11. In Vitro Activity of Ceftazidime-Avibactam against Contemporary Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from U.S. Medical Centers by Census Region, 2014.

    PubMed

    Huband, Michael D; Castanheira, Mariana; Flamm, Robert K; Farrell, David J; Jones, Ronald N; Sader, Helio S

    2016-04-01

    Thein vitroantibacterial activities of ceftazidime-avibactam and comparator agents were evaluated using reference broth microdilution methods against 1,743Pseudomonas aeruginosaisolates collected in 2014 from 69 U.S. medical centers, representing each of the nine census regions. Ceftazidime-avibactam demonstrated potent activity againstP. aeruginosa, including many isolates not susceptible to ceftazidime, meropenem, and piperacillin-tazobactam. In each of the nine census regions, ceftazidime-avibactam demonstrated the highest percentage of susceptible isolates.

  12. Metallo-β-Lactamase Gene blaIMP-15 in a Class 1 Integron, In95, from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Clinical Isolates from a Hospital in Mexico▿

    PubMed Central

    Garza-Ramos, U.; Morfin-Otero, R.; Sader, H. S.; Jones, R. N.; Hernández, E.; Rodriguez-Noriega, E.; Sanchez, A.; Carrillo, B.; Esparza-Ahumada, S.; Silva-Sanchez, J.

    2008-01-01

    During 2003, 40 carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates collected in a Mexican tertiary-care hospital were screened for metallo-β-lactamase production. Thirteen isolates produced IMP-15, and 12 had a single pulsed-field gel electrophoresis pattern. The blaIMP-15 gene cassette was inserted in a plasmid-borne integron with a unique array of gene cassettes and was named In95. PMID:18490501

  13. Further Increases in Carbapenem-, Amikacin-, and Fluoroquinolone-Resistant Isolates of Acinetobacter spp. and P. aeruginosa in Korea: KONSAR Study 2009

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyungwon; Kim, Mi-Na; Kim, Jae-Seok; Hong, Hye Lim; Kang, Jung Oak; Shin, Jong Hee; Park, Yeon-Joon; Yong, Dongeun; Jeong, Seok Hoon

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The increasing prevalence of antimicrobial resistant bacteria has become a serious worldwide problem. The aim of this study was to analyze antimicrobial resistance data generated in 2009 by hospitals and commercial laboratories participating in the Korean Nationwide Surveillance of Antimicrobial Resistance program. Materials and Methods Susceptibility data were collected from 24 hospitals and two commercial laboratories. In the analysis, resistance did not include intermediate susceptibility. Duplicate isolates were excluded from the analysis of hospital isolates, but not from the commercial laboratory isolates. Results Among the hospital isolates, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, penicillin G-non-susceptible Streptococcus pneumoniae based on meningitis breakpoint, and ampicillin-resistant Enterococcus faecium remained highly prevalent. The proportion of vancomycin-resistant E. faecium gradually increased to 29%. Ceftazidime-resistant Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae increased to 17% and 33%, respectively, and fluoroquinolone-resistant K. pneumoniae, Acinetobacter spp. and Pseudomonas aeruginosa increased to 33%, 67% and 39%, respectively. Amikacin-resistant Acinetobacter spp. increased to 48%. Imipenem-resistant Acinetobacter spp. and P. aeruginosa increased to 51% and 26%, respectively. Higher resistance rates were observed in intensive care unit (ICU) isolates than in non-ICU isolates among the isolates from hospitals. Resistance rates were higher in hospital isolates than in clinic isolates among the isolates from commercial laboratories. Conclusion Among the hospital isolates, ceftazidime-resistant K. pneumoniae and fluoroquinolone-resistant K. pneumoniae, Acinetobacter spp., and P. aeruginosa further increased. The increase in imipenem resistance was slight in P. aeruginosa, but drastic in Acinetobacter spp. The problematic antimicrobial-organism combinations were much more prevalent among ICU isolates. PMID:21786445

  14. Isolation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from cockroaches Captured in hospitals in Japan, and their antibiotic susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Saitou, Keiko; Furuhata, Katsunori; Kawakami, Yasushi; Fukuyama, Masafumi

    2009-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains were isolated from 45 of 370 (12.2%) cockroaches captured in hospitals. By cockroach species, the bacterial strains were isolated from 39 of 181 (21.5%) Periplaneta fuliginosa and 6 of 183 (3.3%) Blattella germanica, showing a significant difference (p<0.01). Many P. aeruginosa-carrying cockroaches inhabited locker rooms (66.7%) and kitchens (17.8%). In terms of serotyping, many isolates were typed into groups A, G, and B. In drug sensitivity tests, strains showed the highest sensitivity to ciprofloxacin with an MIC90 of 0.25 microg/ml, followed by 2 microg/ml meropenem, and 4 microg/ml ceftazidime, gentamicin, and ofloxacin. In contrast, many strains were resistant to cefotaxime and minocycline, accounting for 86.7% of all resistant strains. However, there was no multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa strain, and all strains were negative for the metallo-beta-lactamase gene (IMP-1 and VIM-2). These findings suggested that cockroach-derived P. aeruginosa may contaminate hospital environments, for which the control of disease-carrying insects in hospitals is important.

  15. First report of VIM-2 metallo-β-lactamases producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates in Morocco.

    PubMed

    Maroui, Itto; Barguigua, Abouddihaj; Aboulkacem, Asmae; Ouarrak, Khadija; Sbiti, Mohammed; Louzi, Housssain; Timinouni, Mohammed; Belhaj, Abdelhaq

    2016-03-01

    The emergence and the rapid spread of Pseudomonas aeruginosa carrying carbapenemases represent a serious threat to public health due to their delicate therapy. This work was performed to establish the resistance profile and to detect carbapenemases producing in 123 P. aeruginosa isolates. Among these 55 are environmental isolates and 68 are from the two major hospitals of Meknes-Tafilalet region in Morocco. All strains were tested against 14 antipseudomonal drugs by disc diffusion method. On carbapenem resistant strains minimum inhibitory concentrations of imipenem were determined by the E-test method. The modified Hodge test and EDTA tests were used for the detection of carbapenemases and metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs), respectively. PCR and DNA sequencing were conducted to detect carbapenemase-encoding genes and the enzyme types. 12% of isolates was susceptible to all antibiotics tested and Carbapenem resistance was observed in 33 P. aeruginosa isolates, 33.3% of them were multi-drug resistant. Among carbapenem resistant strains only two (6.1%) were positive for carbapenemases and also for MBLs. In addition to their resistance to almost all β-lactams tested, the MBLs producing strains were resistant to aminoglycosides. Molecular biology techniques confirmed the phenotypic results obtained for the two strains carbapenemase producers and demonstrated that each one of them carried blaVIM-2. The present study reports the first isolation of blaVIM genes in clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa in Morocco. Such isolates represent a serious emerging threat requiring strict hygiene measures to better control their spread.

  16. Two copies of blaNDM-1 gene are present in NDM-1 producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from Serbia.

    PubMed

    Jovčić, Branko; Lepšanović, Zorica; Begović, Jelena; Filipić, Brankica; Kojić, Milan

    2014-03-01

    New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates are of special interest since P. aeruginosa is a major cause of nosocomial infections, the treatment of which could now be jeopardized, especially in developing countries. Six additional NDM-1 positive P. aeruginosa clinical isolates belonging to two different genotypes were shown to be plasmid-free. PFGE-hybridization experiments revealed the chromosomal location of the blaNDM-1 gene. Restriction analysis and hybridization revealed that two copies of the blaNDM-1 gene are present in the genomes of all tested isolates, as in previously characterized P. aeruginosa MMA83. Moreover, it was shown that increasing imipenem concentration did not have the effect on copy number of the blaNDM-1 gene in the genome of P. aeruginosa MMA83.

  17. Genetic diversity of clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates in a public hospital in Spain

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important nosocomial pathogen that exhibits multiple resistances to antibiotics with increasing frequency, making patient treatment more difficult. The aim of the study is to ascertain the population structure of this clinical pathogen in the Hospital Son Llàtzer, Spain. Results A significant set (56) of randomly selected clinical P. aeruginosa isolates, including multidrug and non-multidrug resistant isolates, were assigned to sequence types (STs) and compared them with their antibiotic susceptibility profile classified as follows: extensively drug resistant (XDR), multidrug resistant (MDR) and non-multidrug resistant (non-MDR). The genetic diversity was assessed by applying the multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme developed by Curran and collaborators, and by the phylogenetic analysis of a concatenated tree. The analysis of seven loci, acsA, aroE, guaA, mutL, nuoD, ppsA and trpE, demonstrated that the prevalent STs were ST-175, ST-235 and ST-253. The majority of the XDR and MDR isolates were included in ST-175 and ST-235. ST-253 is the third in frequency and included non-MDR isolates. The 26 singleton sequence types corresponded mainly to non-MDR isolates. Twenty-two isolates corresponded to new sequence types (not previously defined) of which 12 isolates were non-MDR and 10 isolates were MDR or XDR. Conclusions The population structure of clinical P. aeruginosa present in our hospital indicates the coexistence of nonresistant and resistant isolates with the same sequence type. The multiresistant isolates studied are grouped in the prevalent sequence types found in other Spanish hospitals and at the international level, and the susceptible isolates correspond mainly to singleton sequence types. PMID:23773707

  18. Changing susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from cystic fibrosis patients with the clinical use of newer antibiotics.

    PubMed Central

    Bosso, J A; Allen, J E; Matsen, J M

    1989-01-01

    To detect a change in antibiotic susceptibility patterns in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates upon the introduction and clinical use of ciprofloxacin, aztreonam, and ceftazidime, MICs for clinical isolates collected before introduction of the antibiotics, during early clinical use, and later were determined for these and seven other antipseudomonal antibiotics. Concomitant resistance to two or more antibiotics was also studied. Over the three study periods, rates of susceptibility to 9 of the 10 antibiotics decreased. The largest decrease occurred with ceftazidime. Analysis of subsets of isolates from patients treated with ciprofloxacin or aztreonam also showed declining susceptibility to the latter but a stabilization of susceptibility to the former after an initial decline. Concomitant resistance within and among antibiotic classes was common. PMID:2499252

  19. Detection of KPC Carbapenemase in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated From Clinical Samples Using Modified Hodge Test and Boronic Acid Phenotypic Methods and Their Comparison With the Polymerase Chain Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Falahat, Saeed; Shojapour, Mana; Sadeghi, Abdorrahim

    2016-01-01

    Background Bacterial resistance to antibiotics has become a major source of concern for public health. Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains are important opportunistic pathogens. These bacteria have a high resistance to a wide range of existing antimicrobials and antibiotics. Objectives The present study was performed to evaluate the frequency of KPC in P. aeruginosa isolated from clinical samples of educational hospitals of Arak University of Medical Sciences, using the mentioned phenotypic and genotypic methods. Materials and Methods One hundred and eight non-duplicate clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa were collected from hospitals of Arak University of Medical Sciences, Arak, Iran. Antibacterial susceptibility was determined by the disk diffusion method. KPC production was confirmed by the Modified Hodge Test (MHT), which is a phenotypic test, and combined-disk test with boronic acid and the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). Results In the present study, 13 isolates (12%) of P. aeruginosa were positive for KPC, using PCR. Comparison of the two phenotypic methods used in this study showed that boronic acid is more sensitive than MHT in identification of KPC-producing strains (84.6% vs. 77%). Conclusions Utilization of reliable methods for identifying carbapenemase-producing strains and determining their antibiotic resistance pattern could have a very important role in treatment of infections caused by these strains. A substantial amount of P. aeruginosa isolated from clinical samples of hospitals in Arak (Iran) produce KPC carbapenemase. Due to their low specificity, MHT and boronic acid phenotypic methods could not completely identify KPC-producing P. aeruginosa. However, the sensitivity of boronic acid phenotypic method in detection of KPC was higher than MHT. PMID:27800140

  20. Emergence of NDM – 1 in the Clinical Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in India

    PubMed Central

    Khajuria, Atul; Praharaj, Ashok Kumar; Kumar, Mahadevan; Grover, Naveen

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The present study was undertaken to detect the prevalence of the blaNDM-1 metallo beta lactamases (MBLs) in the isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which were recovered from various clinical samples from hospitalized patients in a tertiary care centre in Pune, India. Methods: A total of 200 isolates of P. aeruginosa which were obtained from various clinical samples were subjected to antibiotic susceptibility testing by the disc-diffusion method and their MICs were determined by the Vitek – 2 Automated Antimicrobial Identification and Susceptibility Testing System against imipenem, meropenem, ticarcillin, amikacin, gentamicin, tobramycin, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, tigecycline, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, ampicillin/sulbactam, piperacillin/tazobactam, cefoperazone/sulbactam, cefepime, tetracycline, ceftazidime, ceftriaxone and colistin. Their MICs were also determined by the Etest method against imipenem, meropenem, piperacillin, tobramycin, ceftazidime, tigecycline and colistin. The presence of blaNDM-1 was detected by PCR and it was confirmed by sequencing the gene which was present in the isolates which exhibited carbapenem resistance. The experimental transferability of the plasmids which carried blaNDM-1 was determined by using E. coli J53 as the recipient. Result: In the present study, four isolates of P. aeruginosa, which carried the blaNDM-1 gene, were resistant to imipenem and meropenem. These blaNDM-1 carrying isolates remained susceptible to colistin. The plasmid carrying blaNDM-1 was successfully transferred from the four isolates to E. coli J53 recipients. Conclusions: We are reporting the emergence of the P. aeruginosa carrying NDM-1gene, which exhibited resistance to imipenem and meropenem, for the first time from India. PMID:23998058

  1. Evaluating synergy between marbofloxacin and gentamicin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated from dogs with otitis externa.

    PubMed

    Jerzsele, Ákos; Pásztiné-Gere, Erzsébet

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine antimicrobial susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains to marbofloxacin and gentamicin, and investigate the possible synergistic, additive, indifferent or antagonistic effects between the two agents. P. aeruginosa strains can develop resistance quickly against certain antibiotics if used alone, thus the need emerges to find synergistic combinations. A total of 68 P. aeruginosa strains isolated from dogs were examined. In order to describe interactions between marbofloxacin and gentamicin the checkerboard microdilution method was utilized. The MICs (minimum inhibitory concentrations) for marbofloxacin and gentamicin were in the range 0.25-64 mg/L and 0.25-32 mg/L, respectively. The combination of marbofloxacin and gentamicin was more effective with a MIC range of 0.031-8 mg/L and a MIC90 of 1 mg/L, compared to 16 mg/L for marbofloxacin alone and 8 mg/L for gentamicin alone. The FIC (fractional inhibitory concentration) indices ranged from 0.0945 (pronounced synergy) to 1.0625 (indifference). Synergy between marbofloxacin and gentamicin was found in 33 isolates. The mean FIC index is 0.546, which represents a partial synergistic/additive effect close to the full synergy threshold. In vitro results indicate that marbofloxacin and gentamicin as partially synergistic agents may prove clinically useful in combination therapy against P. aeruginosa infections. Although marbofloxacin is not used in the human practice, the interactions between fluoroquinolones and aminoglycosides may have importance outside the veterinary field.

  2. Genetic features of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from cystic fibrosis patients compared with those of isolates from other origins.

    PubMed

    Lanotte, Philippe; Watt, Stephane; Mereghetti, Laurent; Dartiguelongue, Nathalie; Rastegar-Lari, Aziz; Goudeau, Alain; Quentin, Roland

    2004-01-01

    In order to improve our understanding of the colonization of the pulmonary tract of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 162 isolates from five different ecological origins were studied. The genetic features of each isolate were determined by random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and by searching for eight virulence genes (six known virulence genes, algD, lasB, toxA, plcH, plcN and exoS, and two genes encoding putative neuraminidases, nan1 and nan2). Five RAPD groups were identified. Most of the CF isolates were distributed equally in three of these groups (RA, RB and RC). The CF isolates in RB were related to isolates from a wide variety of origins. The CF isolates in RA were related to a population composed of 65 % of the non-CF isolates from pulmonary tract infections. RC was mainly composed of CF isolates that were related to 30 % of isolates from plants. All genes except exoS and nan1 were present in all isolates. The exoS and nan1 virulence factor genes were most prevalent in CF isolates. exoS, which encodes exoenzyme S, was present in 94 % of CF isolates but also in 80 % of non-CF isolates from pulmonary tract infections. nan1, which encodes a putative neuraminidase, was found in 82.5 % of the isolates from group RC, which was composed largely of CF isolates. In conclusion, three major genogroups of P. aeruginosa isolates, each of which exhibits peculiar genetic features, are able to colonize CF patients. This may have different consequences on the outcome of pulmonary disease.

  3. Carbapenem-resistant and cephalosporin-susceptible: a worrisome phenotype among Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Campana, Eloiza Helena; Xavier, Danilo Elias; Petrolini, Fernanda Villas-Boas; Cordeiro-Moura, Jhonatha Rodrigo; Araujo, Maria Rita Elmor de; Gales, Ana Cristina

    The mechanisms involved in the uncommon resistance phenotype, carbapenem resistance and broad-spectrum cephalosporin susceptibility, were investigated in 25 Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates that exhibited this phenotype, which were recovered from three different hospitals located in São Paulo, Brazil. The antimicrobial susceptibility profile was determined by CLSI broth microdilution. β-lactamase-encoding genes were investigated by PCR followed by DNA sequencing. Carbapenem hydrolysis activity was investigated by spectrophotometer and MALDI-TOF assays. The mRNA transcription level of oprD was assessed by qRT-PCR and the outer membrane proteins profile was evaluated by SDS-PAGE. Genetic relationship among P. aeruginosa isolates was assessed by PFGE. Carbapenems hydrolysis was not detected by carbapenemase assay in the carbapenem-resistant and cephalosporin-susceptible P. aueruginosa clinical isolates. OprD decreased expression was observed in all P. aeruginosa isolates by qRT-PCR. The outer membrane protein profile by SDS-PAGE suggested a change in the expression of the 46kDa porin that could correspond to OprD porin. The isolates were clustered into 17 genotypes without predominance of a specific PFGE pattern. These results emphasize the involvement of multiple chromosomal mechanisms in carbapenem-resistance among clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa, alert for adaptation of P. aeruginosa clinical isolates under antimicrobial selective pressure and make aware of the emergence of an uncommon phenotype among P. aeruginosa clinical isolates.

  4. Colistin susceptibility testing: evaluation of reliability for cystic fibrosis isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia

    PubMed Central

    Moskowitz, Samuel M.; Garber, Elizabeth; Chen, Yunhua; Clock, Sarah A.; Tabibi, Setareh; Miller, Amanda K.; Doctor, Michael; Saiman, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Antibiotic susceptibility methods that are commonly used to test bacterial isolates from patients with cystic fibrosis are of uncertain reliability for the polymyxins. To assess the reliability of four standard testing methods, this pilot study used a challenge set that included polymyxin-resistant isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. Methods Twenty-five P. aeruginosa and 12 S. maltophilia isolates were tested for susceptibility to colistin (polymyxin E). Repeatability (concordance of replicates performed concurrently), reproducibility (concordance of replicates performed over time) and comparability (concordance of different methods) of agar dilution, broth microdilution, Etest and disc diffusion were assessed through the use of descriptive statistics and scatterplot analyses. Results All four methods displayed excellent repeatability (overall concordance rate of 99%). However, analysis of reproducibility revealed substantially lower rates of concordance (74% for agar dilution, 84% for broth microdilution and Etest, and 91% for disc diffusion). In addition, comparability to agar dilution of the three other methods was generally poor, with overall rates of very major error ranging from 12% for broth microdilution to 18% for Etest and disc diffusion. Conclusions Compared with agar dilution, other susceptibility testing methods give high rates of apparent false polymyxin susceptibility for cystic fibrosis isolates of P. aeruginosa and S. maltophilia. Prospective study of the correlation between in vitro susceptibility and clinical response is needed to clarify whether these discrepancies reflect oversensitivity of the agar dilution method or insensitivity of the other methods. PMID:20430789

  5. Antimicrobial Activity of Ceftolozane-Tazobactam Tested against Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa with Various Resistance Patterns Isolated in U.S. Hospitals (2011-2012)

    PubMed Central

    Flamm, Robert K.; Sader, Helio S.; Jones, Ronald N.

    2013-01-01

    Ceftolozane/tazobactam, a novel antimicrobial agent with activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa (including drug-resistant strains) and other common Gram-negative pathogens (including most extended-spectrum-β-lactamase [ESBL]-producing Enterobacteriaceae strains), and comparator agents were susceptibility tested by a reference broth microdilution method against 7,071 Enterobacteriaceae and 1,971 P. aeruginosa isolates. Isolates were collected consecutively from patients in 32 medical centers across the United States during 2011 to 2012. Overall, 15.7% and 8.9% of P. aeruginosa isolates were classified as multidrug resistant (MDR) and extensively drug resistant (XDR), and 8.4% and 1.2% of Enterobacteriaceae were classified as MDR and XDR. No pandrug-resistant (PDR) Enterobacteriaceae isolates and only one PDR P. aeruginosa isolate were detected. Ceftolozane/tazobactam was the most potent (MIC50/90, 0.5/2 μg/ml) agent tested against P. aeruginosa and demonstrated good activity against 310 MDR strains (MIC50/90, 2/8 μg/ml) and 175 XDR strains (MIC50/90, 4/16 μg/ml). Ceftolozane/tazobactam exhibited high overall activity (MIC50/90, 0.25/1 μg/ml) against Enterobacteriaceae and retained activity (MIC50/90, 4/>32 μg/ml) against many 601 MDR strains but not against the 86 XDR strains (MIC50, >32 μg/ml). Ceftolozane/tazobactam was highly potent (MIC50/90, 0.25/0.5 μg/ml) against 2,691 Escherichia coli isolates and retained good activity against most ESBL-phenotype E. coli isolates (MIC50/90, 0.5/4 μg/ml), but activity was low against ESBL-phenotype Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates (MIC50/90, 32/>32 μg/ml), explained by the high rate (39.8%) of meropenem coresistance observed in this species phenotype. In summary, ceftolozane/tazobactam demonstrated high potency and broad-spectrum activity against many contemporary Enterobacteriaceae and P. aeruginosa isolates collected in U.S. medical centers. Importantly, ceftolozane/tazobactam retained potency against many MDR and

  6. Isolation and characterization of gallium resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutants.

    PubMed

    García-Contreras, Rodolfo; Lira-Silva, Elizabeth; Jasso-Chávez, Ricardo; Hernández-González, Ismael L; Maeda, Toshinari; Hashimoto, Takahiro; Boogerd, Fred C; Sheng, Lili; Wood, Thomas K; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael

    2013-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 cells resistant to the novel antimicrobial gallium nitrate (Ga) were developed using transposon mutagenesis and by selecting spontaneous mutants. The mutants showing the highest growth in the presence of Ga were selected for further characterization. These mutants showed 4- to 12-fold higher Ga minimal inhibitory growth concentrations and a greater than 8-fold increase in the minimum biofilm eliminating Ga concentration. Both types of mutants produced Ga resistant biofilms whereas the formation of wild-type biofilms was strongly inhibited by Ga. The gene interrupted in the transposon mutant was hitA, which encodes a periplasmic iron binding protein that delivers Fe³⁺ to the HitB iron permease; complementation of the mutant with the hitA gene restored the Ga sensitivity. This hitA mutant showed a 14-fold decrease in Ga internalization versus the wild-type strain, indicating that the HitAB system is also involved in the Ga uptake. Ga uptake in the spontaneous mutant was also lower, although no mutations were found in the hitAB genes. Instead, this mutant harbored 64 non-silent mutations in several genes including those of the phenazine pyocyanin biosynthesis. The spontaneous mutant produced 2-fold higher pyocyanin basal levels than the wild-type; the addition of this phenazine to wild-type cultures protected them from the Ga bacteriostatic effect. The present data indicate that mutations affecting Ga transport and probably pyocyanin biosynthesis enable cells to develop resistance to Ga.

  7. Genetically and Phenotypically Distinct Pseudomonas aeruginosa Cystic Fibrosis Isolates Share a Core Proteomic Signature

    PubMed Central

    Penesyan, Anahit; Kumar, Sheemal S.; Kamath, Karthik; Shathili, Abdulrahman M.; Venkatakrishnan, Vignesh; Krisp, Christoph; Packer, Nicolle H.; Molloy, Mark P.; Paulsen, Ian T.

    2015-01-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is among the main colonizers of the lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. We have isolated and sequenced several P. aeruginosa isolates from the sputum of CF patients and compared them with each other and with the model strain PAO1. Phenotypic analysis of CF isolates showed significant variability in colonization and virulence-related traits suggesting different strategies for adaptation to the CF lung. Genomic analysis indicated these strains shared a large set of core genes with the standard laboratory strain PAO1, and identified the genetic basis for some of the observed phenotypic differences. Proteomics revealed that in a conventional laboratory medium PAO1 expressed 827 proteins that were absent in the CF isolates while the CF isolates shared a distinctive signature set of 703 proteins not detected in PAO1. PAO1 expressed many transporters for the uptake of organic nutrients and relatively few biosynthetic pathways. Conversely, the CF isolates expressed a narrower range of transporters and a broader set of metabolic pathways for the biosynthesis of amino acids, carbohydrates, nucleotides and polyamines. The proteomic data suggests that in a common laboratory medium PAO1 may transport a diverse set of “ready-made” nutrients from the rich medium, whereas the CF isolates may only utilize a limited number of nutrients from the medium relying mainly on their own metabolism for synthesis of essential nutrients. These variations indicate significant differences between the metabolism and physiology of P. aeruginosa CF isolates and PAO1 that cannot be detected at the genome level alone. The widening gap between the increasing genomic data and the lack of phenotypic data means that researchers are increasingly reliant on extrapolating from genomic comparisons using experimentally characterized model organisms such as PAO1. While comparative genomics can provide valuable information, our data suggests that such

  8. Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Dairy Goats: Genotypic and Phenotypic Comparison of Intramammary and Environmental Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Scaccabarozzi, Licia; Leoni, Livia; Ballarini, Annalisa; Barberio, Antonio; Locatelli, Clara; Casula, Antonio; Bronzo, Valerio; Pisoni, Giuliano; Jousson, Olivier; Morandi, Stefano; Rapetti, Luca; García-Fernández, Aurora; Moroni, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Following the identification of a case of severe clinical mastitis in a Saanen dairy goat (goat A), an average of 26 lactating goats in the herd was monitored over a period of 11 months. Milk microbiological analysis revealed the presence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in 7 of the goats. Among these 7 does, only goat A showed clinical signs of mastitis. The 7 P. aeruginosa isolates from the goat milk and 26 P. aeruginosa isolates from environmental samples were clustered by RAPD-PCR and PFGE analyses in 3 genotypes (G1, G2, G3) and 4 clusters (A, B, C, D), respectively. PFGE clusters A and B correlated with the G1 genotype and included the 7 milk isolates. Although it was not possible to identify the infection source, these results strongly suggest a spreading of the infection from goat A. Clusters C and D overlapped with genotypes G2 and G3, respectively, and included only environmental isolates. The outcome of the antimicrobial susceptibility test performed on the isolates revealed 2 main patterns of multiple resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics and macrolides. Virulence related phenotypes were analyzed, such as swarming and swimming motility, production of biofilm and production of secreted virulence factors. The isolates had distinct phenotypic profiles, corresponding to genotypes G1, G2 and G3. Overall, correlation analysis showed a strong correlation between sampling source, RAPD genotype, PFGE clusters, and phenotypic clusters. The comparison of the levels of virulence related phenotypes did not indicate a higher pathogenic potential in the milk isolates as compared to the environmental isolates. PMID:26606430

  9. Resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates to Hydrogel Contact Lens Disinfection Correlates with Cytotoxic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Lakkis, Carol; Fleiszig, Suzanne M. J.

    2001-01-01

    One of the most common pathogens in infection of hydrogel contact lens wearers is Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which can gain access to the eye via contamination of the lens, lens case, and lens care solutions. Only one strain per species is used in current regulatory testing for the marketing of chemical contact lens disinfectants. The aim of this study was to determine whether P. aeruginosa strains vary in their susceptibility to hydrogel contact lens disinfectants. A method for rapidly screening bacterial susceptibility to contact lens disinfectants was developed, based on measurement of the MIC. The susceptibility of 35 P. aeruginosa isolates to two chemical disinfectants was found to vary among strains. MICs ranged from 6.25 to 100% for both disinfectants at 37°C, and a number of strains were not inhibited by a 100% disinfectant concentration in the lens case environment at room temperature (22°C). Resistance to disinfection appeared to be an inherent rather than acquired trait, since some resistant strains had been isolated prior to the introduction of the disinfectants and some susceptible P. aeruginosa strains could not be made more resistant by repeated disinfectant exposure. A number of P. aeruginosa strains which were comparatively more resistant to short-term disinfectant exposure also demonstrated the ability to grow to levels above the initial inoculum in one chemical disinfectant after long-term (24 to 48 h) disinfectant exposure. Resistance was correlated with acute cytotoxic activity toward corneal epithelial cells and with exsA, which encodes a protein that regulates cytotoxicity via a complex type III secretion system. These results suggest that chemical disinfection solutions may select for contamination with cytotoxic strains. Further investigation of the mechanisms and factors responsible for resistance may also lead to strategies for reducing adverse responses to contact lens wear. PMID:11283074

  10. Host inflammatory responses to first isolation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from sputum in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Elborn, J S; Cordon, S M; Shale, D J

    1993-05-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection of the respiratory tract in patients with cystic fibrosis is a major determinant of morbidity and mortality. However, it has been postulated that the earliest phase of colonization is not associated with injury. To test this hypothesis we determined the association of the first recorded isolation of P. aeruginosa from the sputum on circulating markers of the inflammatory response in 6 patients with cystic fibrosis. At this time circulating C-reactive protein was increased in all 6 and neutrophil elastase alpha 1-antitrypsin complex (elastase-complex) was increased in 5 patients compared with healthy controls. This inflammatory response was associated with a reduction in the FEV1 and FVC of all patients [FEV1, 1.42 +/- 0.87 L (mean +/- SD) at first isolation vs. 2.08 +/- 0.74 L before isolation; P < 0.05; FVC, 1.94 +/- 0.93 L vs. 2.87 +/- 1.01 L, P < 0.05]. At a median interval of 10 months, 5 patients had raised titres of positive IgG antibody to P. aeruginosa, indicating significant exposure to this organism. At this time, lung function had returned to preinfection levels, whilst 3 patients showed continuing features of an inflammatory response, and the group mean value for elastase-complex was raised. Our findings demonstrate that at the time of first isolation of P. aeruginosa from the sputum of patients with cystic fibrosis, there is a concomitant systemic host response and an acute deterioration of pulmonary function.

  11. Evaluation of efflux pumps gene expression in resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates in an Iranian referral hospital

    PubMed Central

    Pourakbari, Babak; Yaslianifard, Sahar; Yaslianifard, Somaye; Mahmoudi, Shima; Keshavarz-Valian, Sepideh; Mamishi, Setareh

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) is one of the most important causes of nosocomial infections and has an intrinsic resistance to many antibiotics. Among all the resistance-nodulation-division (RND) pumps of P. aeruginosa, MexAB-OprM is the first efflux pump found to target multiple classes of antibiotics. This study was aimed to evaluate the expression level of genes expressing MexAB-OprM in clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa. Materials and Methods: In this study, 45 P. aeruginosa strains were isolated from patients admitted to Children’s Medical Center Hospital, an Iranian referral hospital. Disk diffusion and Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) methods were used for determination of the patterns of resistance to antibiotics. Real-time PCR was used to investigate the expression level of genes of MexAB-OprM efflux pump. Results: Among 45 resistant PA isolates, the frequency of genes overexpression was as follows: MexA (n=25, 55.5%), MexB (n=24, 53.3%) and OprM (n=16, 35.5%). In addition, in 28 strains (62%) overexpression was observed in one of the studied three genes of MexAB-OprM efflux pump. Conclusion: In our study 28 isolates (62%) had increased expression level of efflux pumps genes, MexAB-OprM. Although the efflux pumps play important roles in increasing the resistance towards different antibiotics but the role of other agents and mechanisms in evolution of resistance should not be ignored. Since the concomitant overproduction of other Mex efflux systems might have additive effects on antibiotic resistance, the co-expressing of a multicomponent efflux pump is recommended. On the other hand, the concomitant overproduction of two Mex pumps might have additive effects on resistance to antibiotic. Therefore co-expressing of Mex efflux systems is recommended. PMID:28210464

  12. Mutational and acquired carbapenem resistance mechanisms in multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates from Recife, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Cavalcanti, Felipe Lira de Sá; Mirones, Cristina Rodríguez; Paucar, Elena Román; Montes, Laura Álvarez; Leal-Balbino, Tereza Cristina; Morais, Marcia Maria Camargo de; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Ocampo-Sosa, Alain Antonio

    2015-12-01

    An investigation was carried out into the genetic mechanisms responsible for multidrug resistance in nine carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from different hospitals in Recife, Brazil. Susceptibility to antimicrobial agents was determined by broth microdilution. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was employed to detect the presence of genes encoding β-lactamases, aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes (AMEs), 16S rRNA methylases, integron-related genes and OprD. Expression of genes coding for efflux pumps and AmpC cephalosporinase were assessed by quantitative PCR. The outer membrane proteins were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The blaSPM-1, blaKPC-2 and blaGES-1 genes were detected in P. aeruginosa isolates in addition to different AME genes. The loss of OprD in nine isolates was mainly due to frameshift mutations, premature stop codons and point mutations. An association of loss of OprD with the overexpression of MexAB-OprM and MexXY-OprM was observed in most isolates. Hyper-production of AmpC was also observed in three isolates. Clonal relationship of the isolates was determined by repetitive element palindromic-PCR and multilocus sequence typing. Our results show that the loss of OprD along with overexpression of efflux pumps and β-lactamase production were responsible for the multidrug resistance in the isolates analysed.

  13. Intraclonal genetic diversity amongst cystic fibrosis and keratitis isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Hall, Amanda J; Fothergill, Joanne L; Kaye, Stephen B; Neal, Timothy J; McNamara, Paul S; Southern, Kevin W; Winstanley, Craig

    2013-02-01

    Given the emergence of transmissible strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, such as the Liverpool epidemic strain (LES), in cystic fibrosis (CF) centres, it is important to carry out regular surveillance of isolates. In a survey of 22 P. aeruginosa isolates, each from a different CF patient identified as negative for LES in a paediatric centre in Liverpool, six (23 %) were identified as being the same clone type (clone D) using array-tube genotyping. Using a series of alternative genotyping approaches [PFGE, random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD), variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST)], the six CF clone D isolates and eight previously identified clone D isolates associated with infections leading to keratitis were compared. All but two of the clone D isolates (both keratitis-associated) were assigned by MLST to sequence type 235 and were highly similar using VNTR analysis. However, there was considerable variation found among the isolates when using PFGE or RAPD, highlighting the limitations of these methods. The discordance with respect to two of the isolates identified by array-tube genotyping as clone D, when using all the other typing methods, emphasizes the need to use more than one method for reliable identification of strains.

  14. Genetic analyses of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from healthy captive snakes: evidence of high inter- and intrasite dissemination and occurrence of antibiotic resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Colinon, Céline; Jocktane, Dominique; Brothier, Elisabeth; Rossolini, Gian Maria; Cournoyer, Benoit; Nazaret, Sylvie

    2010-03-01

    Faecal carriage of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was investigated by selective plating and PCR identification test, among healthy captive snakes from zoological and private collections from France as well as from wild snakes from Guinea. P. aeruginosa faecal carriage among captive snakes was high (72 out of 83 individuals), but low among wild specimen (3 out of 23 individuals). Genetic diversity analyses of the isolates, based on SpeI-PFGE profiles, evidenced five dominant clones or clonal complexes spreading among snakes within a site and between sites and persisting over time. Similar clones or clonal complexes were detected from mouth swabs of the owners and from water and preys used to feed the snakes, evidencing various sources of snake colonization and the first cases of P. aeruginosa cross-contamination between snakes and owners. These observations led to the conclusion that P. aeruginosa behaves as an opportunistic species within snakes in captivity and that colonization and dissemination occurs consecutively to processes similar to those identified within the hospital. Antibiotic susceptibility testing showed that most isolates had a wild-type resistance profile except for one persistent clone isolated from both snakes and preys that harboured multiple antimicrobial resistance genes mediated by an integron carrying the qacH, aadB, aadA2 and cmlA10 cassettes, and a tetA(C)-carrying transposon. Biocides or antibiotics used in the zoological garden could have led to the acquisition of this integron.

  15. Epidemiological investigation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa nosocomial bacteraemia isolates by PCR-based DNA fingerprinting analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Davin-Regli, A; Bosi, C; Charrel, R N; Bollet, C

    1996-11-01

    Between July 1994 and March 1995, 64 isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were implicated in bacteraemia in 25 cancer patients in five wards of two hospitals. These, together with 24 environmental isolates and one isolate from a bacteraemia in a non-cancer patient were examined by three PCR-based DNA fingerprinting methods: random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), enterobacterial-repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC)-PCR, and 16S-23S spacer region-based RAPD. These methods were reproducible, discriminatory and showed close agreement; all indicated that 47 isolates that had caused bacteraemia in 19 cancer patients were indistinguishable. Seventeen other isolates that had caused bacteraemia in 10 cancer patients were discriminated into eight further groups, and the 24 environmental and non-cancer patient isolates into further distinct groups. No environmental source of the epidemic strain was found, but it was suspected that the outbreak was related to infusion implants.

  16. Genetic Analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from the Sputa of Australian Adult Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Anthony, Mario; Rose, Barbara; Pegler, Mary Beard; Elkins, Mark; Service, Helen; Thamotharampillai, Keerthi; Watson, Jason; Robinson, Michael; Bye, Peter; Merlino, John; Harbour, Colin

    2002-01-01

    Genetic investigations were carried out with 50 phenotypically selected strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from 18 patients attending an Australian cystic fibrosis (CF) center. The isolates were analyzed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Phylogenetic analysis of the macrorestriction patterns showed rates of genetic similarity ranging from 76 to 100%; 24 (48%) of the strains from 11 patients had greater than 90% similarity. A dominant strain emerged: 15 isolates from seven patients had identical PFGE patterns, and 4 other isolates were very closely related. The 50 isolates were grouped into 21 pulsotypes on the basis of visual delineation of a three-band difference. Ten of the 18 (56%) patients were infected with clonal or subclonal strains. Sequence analysis of PCR products derived from the mucA gene showed 20 mutations, with the number of mutations in individual isolates ranging from 1 to 4; 19 of these changes are reported here for the first time. Potentially functional changes were found in 22 (44%) isolates. Eight changes (five transversions and three single base deletions) led to premature stop codons, providing support for the presence of mucA mutations as one pathway to mucoidy. There was a trend toward an association between the dominant strain and lack of potentially functional mucA mutations (P = 0.09 by the χ2 test) but no relationship between genotype and phenotype. This is the first study of genetic variation in P. aeruginosa isolates from adult Australian CF patients. The findings highlight the need for further investigations on the transmissibility of P. aeruginosa in CF patients. PMID:12149328

  17. Multilocus sequence typing analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from pet Chinese stripe-necked turtles (Ocadia sinensis)

    PubMed Central

    Wendt, Mitchell

    2016-01-01

    Our research sought to characterize the phylogeny of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from pet Chinese stripe-necked turtles (Ocadia sinensis) to better understand its evolutionary relation to other isolates and increase understanding of a potential zoonotic pathogen transmitted through direct contact with pet turtles. Thirty-one Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates were obtained from both immature and adult turtles sold in pet shops in Korea. To characterize the phylogenic position of Chinese stripe-necked turtle-borne P. aeruginosa relative to other strains, multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analysis was performed due to the accessibility and breadth of MLST databases. Seven housekeeping genes (acsA, aroE, guaA, mutL, nuoD, ppsA, and trpE) were sequenced and the results were compared with data from the MLST database. The genes were further used for phylogenetic analysis of P. aeruginosa using concatenated gene fragments. Both rooted and unrooted phylogenetic trees were generated. Eleven distinct sequence types were present within the isolates among which seven were new. Expanding an unrooted phylogenetic tree to include P. aeruginosa MLST sequences isolated from various other geographic locations and sources revealed a divergent cluster containing the majority of isolates obtained from turtles. This suggests that P. aeruginosa strains particularly well-adapted for inhabiting turtles occupy a distinct phylogenetic position. PMID:28053614

  18. Biofilm Formation and β-Lactamase Production in Burn Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Heydari, Samira; Eftekhar, Fereshteh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important nosocomial pathogen characterized by its innate resistance to multiple antimicrobial agents. Plasmid-mediated drug resistance also occurs by the production of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBL), metallo β-lactamases (MBL), and AmpC β-lactamases. Another important factor for establishment of chronic infections by P. aeruginosa is biofilm formation mediated by the psl gene cluster. Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate biofilm formation and presence of the pslA gene in burn isolates of P. aeruginosa as well as the association of antibiotic resistance, MBL, ESBL and AmpC β-lactamase production with biofilm formation among the isolates. Materials and Methods: Sixty-two burn isolates of P. aeruginosa were obtained from Shahid Motahari Hospital in Tehran from August to October 2011. Antibiotic susceptibility was determined by the disc diffusion assay. MBL, AmpC and ESBL production were screened using the double disc synergy test, AmpC disc test and combined disc diffusion assay, respectively. The potential to form biofilm was measured using the microtiter plate assay and pslA gene was detected using specific primers and PCR. Results: Biofilm formation was observed in 43.5% of the isolates, of which 66.7% produced strong and 33.3% formed weak biofilms. All biofilm-positive and 14.2% of biofilm-negative isolates harbored the pslA gene. MBL, AmpC and ESBL production were significantly higher in the biofilm-positive isolates (70.3%, 62.9% and 33.3%, respectively) compared to the biofilm-negative strains (31.4%, 34.2% and 20%, respectively). Overall, 19 isolates (30.6%) co-produced MBL and AmpC, among which the majority were biofilm-positive (63.1%). Finally, four isolates (6.4%) had all three enzymes, of which 3 (75%) produced biofilm. Conclusions: Biofilm formation (both strong and weak) strongly correlated with pslA gene carriage. Biofilm formation also correlated with MBL and AmpC

  19. Population structure and antimicrobial susceptibility of both nonpersistent and persistent Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates recovered from cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Olmos, Ana; García-Castillo, María; Alba, José María; Morosini, María Isabel; Lamas, Adelaida; Romero, Beatriz; Galán, Juan Carlos; del Campo, Rosa; Cantón, Rafael

    2013-08-01

    Seventy-six Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates recovered from chronically (n=18) and nonchronically (n=18) colonized cystic fibrosis (CF) patients (2002 to 2009) were grouped in separate polyclonal populations. International CF epidemic clones were not identified, but the high-risk clone ST274, also found circulating in Spanish hospitals, was present. Persistent isolates were more resistant to antibiotics than nonpersistent isolates.

  20. Population Structure and Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Both Nonpersistent and Persistent Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates Recovered from Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Olmos, Ana; García-Castillo, María; Alba, José María; Morosini, María Isabel; Lamas, Adelaida; Romero, Beatriz; Galán, Juan Carlos; del Campo, Rosa

    2013-01-01

    Seventy-six Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates recovered from chronically (n = 18) and nonchronically (n = 18) colonized cystic fibrosis (CF) patients (2002 to 2009) were grouped in separate polyclonal populations. International CF epidemic clones were not identified, but the high-risk clone ST274, also found circulating in Spanish hospitals, was present. Persistent isolates were more resistant to antibiotics than nonpersistent isolates. PMID:23761158

  1. First Report of OXA-4, an ESBL Isolated from Pseudomonas aeruginosa a South Indian Strain.

    PubMed

    Kingsley, S A Jemima; Verghese, Susan

    2013-09-01

    The OXA-type β-lactamases are so named because of their oxacillin-hydrolyzing abilities. In this study we characterize an extended spectrum β-lactamase, designated OXA-4, produced by a clinical isolate of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. ESBL production was detected by double disk synergy test. The P. aeruginosa isolate was obtained from endotracheal suction tip of 84 years old male patient diagnosed with CVA and hypertension. ESBL producing OXA β-lactamases was detected by PCR with primers specific to the conserved regions of the coding genes. Iso electric focusing was done to confirm the significance, sequencing the amplified product was also done. In the phenotypic identification, the strain was highly resistant to third generation cephalosporins and also to imipenem. The PCR amplified product for OXA β-lactamase was viewed at 919 bp. The pI point for the same was identified at 7.2. With the help of sequencing the amplified OXA β-lactamase was identified as OXA-4 gene. Here we report P. aeruginosa producing OXA-4 ESBL for the first time in the Indian subcontinent.

  2. Co-Carriage of blaKPC-2 and blaNDM-1 in Clinical Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Associated with Hospital Infections from India.

    PubMed

    Paul, Deepjyoti; Dhar Chanda, Debadatta; Maurya, Anand Prakash; Mishra, Shweta; Chakravarty, Atanu; Sharma, Gauri Dutt; Bhattacharjee, Amitabha

    2015-01-01

    Global spread of KPC poses to be a serious threat complicating treatment options in hospital settings. The present study investigates the genetic environment of blaKPC-2 among clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from a tertiary referral hospital of India. The study isolates were collected from different wards and clinics of Silchar Medical College and Hospital, India, from 2012-2013. The presence of blaKPC was confirmed by genotypic characterization followed by sequencing. Cloning of the blaKPC-2 gene was performed and the genetic environment of this gene was characterized as well. Transferability of the resistance gene was determined by transformation assay and Southern hybridization. Additionally, restriction mapping was also carried out. Two isolates of P. aeruginosa were found to harbor blaKPC-2, were resistant towards aminoglycosides, quinolone and β-lactam-β-lactamase inhibitor combination. In both the isolates, the resistance determinant was associated with class 1 integron and horizontally transferable. Both the isolates were co-harboring blaNDM-1. The first detection of this integron mediated blaKPC-2 coexisting with blaNDM-1 in P. aeruginosa from India is worrisome, and further investigation is required to track the gene cassette mediated blaKPC-2 in terms of infection control and to prevent the spread of this gene in hospitals as well as in the community.

  3. Optimisation of AP-PCR fingerprinting discriminatory power for clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Dabrowski, Waldemar; Czekajlo-Kolodziej, Urszula; Medrala, Dagmara; Giedrys-Kalemba, Stefania

    2003-01-21

    Recently methods based on analysis of arbitrarily amplified target sites of microorganism genomes have been extensively applied in microbiological studies. The range of their applications is limited by problems with discrimination and reproducibility resulting from lack of standardised and reliable methods of optimisation. By orthogonal-array optimisation most advantageous and optimal parameters for highly discriminatory primers (CagA2+CMVin2) were selected and efficient AP-PCR (arbitrarily primed-polymerase chain reaction) fingerprinting conditions for Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates were set up. Stable and multiplex amplicon profiles obtained in this study revealed high level of intraspecies DNA polymorphism among 20 analysed clinical strains of P. aeruginosa proving optimised AP-PCR fingerprinting to be useful in epidemiological typing of the species.

  4. ISOLATION AND PRELIMINARY CHARACTERISTICS OF THREE BACTERIOPHAGES ASSOCIATED WITH A LYSOGENIC STRAIN OF PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA, 12

    PubMed Central

    Feary, Thomas W.; Fisher, Earl; Fisher, Thelma N.

    1964-01-01

    Feary, Thomas W. (Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, La.), Earl Fisher, Jr., and Thelma N. Fisher. Isolation and preliminary characteristics of three bacteriophages associated with a lysogenic strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. J. Bacteriol. 87:196–208. 1964.—Three bacteriophages designated 7v, 7m, and 7s were isolated from a lysogenic strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa designated Ps-7. The three viruses were found to be completely unrelated on the basis of plaque morphology, host range, serology, ultraviolet induction, sensitivity to heat, and particle morphology as revealed by electron microscopy. In addition, it was shown that the three phages were incapable of plaque formation on bacteria other than various strains of P. aeruginosa. Of the three phages, only phage 7v was capable of plaque formation on strain Ps-7. The growth of phage 7v on strain Ps-7 exhibited properties which suggest that this virus arises as the result of mutation in a temperate phage for which strain Ps-7 is lysogenic. Phages 7m and 7s are incapable of plaque formation on strain Ps-7, but are adsorbed at characteristic rates to cell suspensions of strain Ps-7. The relationship between phage 7m and strain Ps-7 was shown to meet the classical criteria for lysogeny. Because phage 7s contains ribonucleic acid as its nucleic acid component, it was concluded that its production by strain Ps-7 and the demonstration of immunity of strain Ps-7 to infection by phage 7s were not sufficient evidence to define the nature of the relationship between phage 7s and P. aeruginosa strain Ps-7. It was observed that under certain conditions the infectious titer of phage 7s preparations are markedly reduced in the presence of ribonuclease. Images PMID:14102854

  5. High level of resistance to aztreonam and ticarcillin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from soil of different crops in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Pitondo-Silva, André; Martins, Vinicius Vicente; Fernandes, Ana Flavia Tonelli; Stehling, Eliana Guedes

    2014-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa can be found in water, soil, plants and, human and animal fecal samples. It is an important nosocomial pathogenic agent characterized by an intrinsic resistance to multiple antimicrobial agents and the ability to develop high-level (acquired) multidrug resistance through some mechanisms, among them, by the acquisition of plasmids and integrons, which are mobile genetic elements. In this study, 40 isolates from Brazilian soil were analyzed for antibiotic resistance, presence of integrons and plasmidial profile. The results demonstrated that the vast majority of the isolates have shown resistance for aztreonam (92.5%, n=37) and ticarcillin (85%, n=34), four isolates presented plasmids and eight isolates possess the class 1 integron. These results demonstrated that environmental isolates of P. aeruginosa possess surprising antibiotic resistance profile to aztreonam and ticarcillin, two antimicrobial agents for clinical treatment of cystic fibrosis patients and other infections occurred by P. aeruginosa.

  6. Characterization of five newly isolated bacteriophages active against Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical strains.

    PubMed

    Kwiatek, Magdalena; Mizak, Lidia; Parasion, Sylwia; Gryko, Romuald; Olender, Alina; Niemcewicz, Marcin

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that causes serious infections, especially in patients with immunodeficiency. It exhibits multiple mechanisms of resistance, including efflux pumps, antibiotic modifying enzymes and limited membrane permeability. The primary reason for the development of novel therapeutics for P. aeruginosa infections is the declining efficacy of conventional antibiotic therapy. These clinical problems caused a revitalization of interest in bacteriophages, which are highly specific and have very effective antibacterial activity as well as several other advantages over traditional antimicrobial agents. Above all, so far, no serious or irreversible side effects of phage therapy have been described. Five newly purified P. aeruginosa phages named vB_PaeM_WP1, vB_PaeM_WP2, vB_PaeM_WP3, vB_PaeM_WP4 and vB_PaeP_WP5 have been characterized as potential candidates for use in phage therapy. They are representatives of the Myoviridae and Podoviridae families. Their host range, genome size, structural proteins and stability in various physical and chemical conditions were tested. The results of these preliminary investigations indicate that the newly isolated bacteriophages may be considered for use in phagotherapy.

  7. Crataeva nurvala nanoparticles inhibit virulence factors and biofilm formation in clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Ali, Syed Ghazanfar; Ansari, Mohammad Azam; Khan, Haris M; Jalal, Mohammad; Mahdi, Abbas Ali; Cameotra, Swaranjit Singh

    2017-03-01

    Green synthesized nanoparticles have gained great attention due to their non-toxic and non-hazardous nature. In the present study, bark extract of the medicinal plant in Ayurveda Crataeva nurvala (Buch-Ham) (CN) was chosen for the biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). These NPs were characterized by Ultra violet visible spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infra Red, Atomic Force Microscopy, and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). The average particle size of green synthesized CN-AgNPs was 15.2 ± 1.01 nm. Gas chromatography- mass spectrometry analysis of methanolic bark extract involved in the formation of CN-AgNPs revealed lupeol as a major active component. In this study, CN-AgNPs (15 μg ml(-1) ) efficiently suppressed the production of quorum sensing mediated virulence factors viz. pyocyanin, protease, hemolysin, and biofilm formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The pyocyanin production was strongly inhibited (74.64%) followed by proteolysis (47.3%) and hemolysin production (47.7%). However, the biofilm forming ability was maximally reduced up to 79.70%. Moreover, the Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopic Analysis showed that CN-AgNPs inhibit colonization of P. aeruginosa on to the surface. Furthermore, TEM analysis revealed internalization of CN-AgNPs inside the bacterial cell. It is concluded that green synthesized AgNPs have great potential to inhibit virulence factors and biofilm forming ability of drug-resistant clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa.

  8. Crystallization, diffraction data collection and preliminary crystallographic analysis of hexagonal crystals of Pseudomonas aeruginosa amidase

    SciTech Connect

    Andrade, Jorge; Karmali, Amin; Carrondo, Maria A.; Frazão, Carlos

    2007-03-01

    Crystals of aliphatic amidase (acylamide amidohydrolase; EC 3.5.1.4) from P. aeruginosa were obtained in space group P6{sub 3}22 and diffracted to 1.25 Å resolution. The aliphatic amidase (acylamide amidohydrolase; EC 3.5.1.4) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a hexameric enzyme composed of six identical subunits with a molecular weight of ∼38 kDa. Since microbial amidases are very important enzymes in industrial biocatalysis, the structural characterization of this enzyme will help in the design of novel catalytic activities of commercial interest. The present study reports the successful crystallization of the wild-type amidase from P. aeruginosa. Native crystals were obtained and a complete data set was collected at 1.4 Å resolution, although the crystals showed diffraction to 1.25 Å resolution. The crystals were found to belong to space group P6{sub 3}22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 102.60, c = 151.71 Å, and contain one molecule in the asymmetric unit.

  9. CpxR Activates MexAB-OprM Efflux Pump Expression and Enhances Antibiotic Resistance in Both Laboratory and Clinical nalB-Type Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Xue-Xian; O’Gara, Fergal; Wang, Yi-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Resistance-Nodulation-Division (RND) efflux pumps are responsible for multidrug resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In this study, we demonstrate that CpxR, previously identified as a regulator of the cell envelope stress response in Escherichia coli, is directly involved in activation of expression of RND efflux pump MexAB-OprM in P. aeruginosa. A conserved CpxR binding site was identified upstream of the mexA promoter in all genome-sequenced P. aeruginosa strains. CpxR is required to enhance mexAB-oprM expression and drug resistance, in the absence of repressor MexR, in P. aeruginosa strains PA14. As defective mexR is a genetic trait associated with the clinical emergence of nalB-type multidrug resistance in P. aeruginosa during antibiotic treatment, we investigated the involvement of CpxR in regulating multidrug resistance among resistant isolates generated in the laboratory via antibiotic treatment and collected in clinical settings. CpxR is required to activate expression of mexAB-oprM and enhances drug resistance, in the absence or presence of MexR, in ofloxacin-cefsulodin-resistant isolates generated in the laboratory. Furthermore, CpxR was also important in the mexR-defective clinical isolates. The newly identified regulatory linkage between CpxR and the MexAB-OprM efflux pump highlights the presence of a complex regulatory network modulating multidrug resistance in P. aeruginosa. PMID:27736975

  10. The isolation and characterization of lipopolysaccharides from Microcystis aeruginosa, a prominent toxic water bloom forming cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Bláhová, Lucie; Adamovský, Ondřej; Kubala, Lukáš; Švihálková Šindlerová, Lenka; Zounková, Radka; Bláha, Luděk

    2013-12-15

    Massive toxic blooms of cyanobacteria represent a major threat to water supplies worldwide, yet serious gaps exist in understanding their complex toxic effects, including the role of lipopolysaccharides (LPS). The present comparative study focused on the levels and biological activities of LPS isolated from Microcystis aeruginosa, which is one of the most globally distributed toxic species. Using hot phenol extraction, LPS was isolated from 3 laboratory cultures and 11 natural water blooms. It formed 0.2-0.7% of the original dry biomass of the cyanobacteria, based on gravimetry. Additional analyses by commercial anti-LPS ELISA were correlated with gravimetry but showed concentrations that were about 7-times lower, which indicated either impurities in isolated LPS or the poor cross-reactivity of the antibodies used. LPS isolates from M. aeruginosa were potent pyrogens in the traditional Limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL)-test, but comparison with the PyroGene test demonstrated the limited selectivity of LAL with several interferences. The determined pyrogenicity (endotoxin units, EU) ranged from very low values in laboratory cultures (less than 0.003 up to 0.008-EU per 100 pg LPS) to higher values in complex bloom samples (0.01-0.078 EU per 100 pg of LPS), which suggested the role of bloom-associated bacteria in the overall effects. Potent pro-inflammatory effects of the studied LPS from both cultures and bloom samples were observed in a highly-relevant ex vivo human blood model by studying reactive oxygen species production in phagocytes as well as increased productions of interleukin 8, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor α, TNF-α. LPS from M. aeruginosa seem to modulate several pathways involved in the regulation of both innate immunity and specific responses. In comparison to the standard pathogenic bacterial LPS (World Health Organization Escherichia coli O113:10 endotoxin; activity 1 EU per 100 pg), the studied cyanobacterial samples had pyrogenicity potencies

  11. Decolorization of Distillery Spent Wash Using Biopolymer Synthesized by Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated from Tannery Effluent.

    PubMed

    David, Charles; Arivazhagan, M; Balamurali, M N; Shanmugarajan, Dhivya

    2015-01-01

    A bacterial strain was isolated from tannery effluent which can tolerate high concentrations of potassium dichromate up to 1000 ppm. The isolated microorganism was identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa by performing biochemical tests and molecular characterization. In the presence of excess of carbohydrate source, which is a physiological stress, this strain produces Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB). This intracellular polymer, which is synthesized, is primarily a product of carbon assimilation and is employed by microorganisms as an energy storage molecule to be metabolized when other common energy sources are limitedly available. Efforts were taken to check whether the PHB has any positive effect on spent wash decolorization. When a combination of PHB and the isolated bacterial culture was added to spent wash, a maximum color removal of 92.77% was found which was comparatively higher than the color removed when the spent wash was treated individually with the PHB and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. PHB behaved as a support material for the bacteria to bind to it and thus develops biofilm, which is one of the natural physiological growth forms of microorganisms. The bacterial growth in the biofilm and the polymer together acted in synergy, adsorbing and coagulating the pollutants in the form of color pigments.

  12. [Molecular typification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated from patients with cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Iglesias, N G; Marengo, J M; Rentería, F; Gatti, B; Segal, E; Semorile, L

    2008-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is the most frequent lethal genetic disease that affects the caucasian population. The main cause of morbidity is the chronic lung infection, being the infection caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa the most difficult to eradicate. This bacteria can be acquired in direct form, by person-to-person transfer, or indirectly, by hospital acquired infection. The Centro Provincial de Referencia de Fibrosis Quistica functioning in the Hospital de Niños "Sor María Ludovica", in La Plata, cares almost 220 patients aged two months to 45 years. The life expectancy depends of factors like the early diagnosis of the disease and the later acquisition of the chronic lung infection. The purpose of this work was the molecular typing of P. aeruginosa isolates obtained from cystic fibrosis patients to evaluate the genomic relationship among them. The study was carried out using RAPD-PCR. The analysis showed a great genetic heterogeneity among the isolates. The separation of the patients in groups in accordance with its bacteriology, that implies the attendance in different days and the implementation of isolation (or segregation) measures had demonstrated to be, in addition to other strategies, effective in the reduction of cross infections.

  13. The Effects of Berberine and Palmatine on Efflux Pumps Inhibition with Different Gene Patterns in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated from Burn Infections

    PubMed Central

    Aghayan, Seyed Sajjad; Kalalian Mogadam, Hamidreza; Fazli, Mozhgan; Darban-Sarokhalil, Davood; Khoramrooz, Seyed Sajjad; Jabalameli, Fereshteh; Yaslianifard, Somayeh; Mirzaii, Mehdi

    2017-01-01

    Background: Related Multidrug Resistance (MDR) to efflux pumps is a significant problem in treating infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa). Plant compounds have been identified as Pump Inhibitors (EPIs). In the current study, the potential effect of Berberine and Palmatine as EPIs were investigated on efflux pump inhibition through focusing on different gene patterns in P. aeruginosa isolated from burn infections. Methods: All isolates were collected and identified using the standard biochemical tests. Antimicrobial sensitivity was performed based on disk agar diffusion method for 12 antibiotics. MIC-MBC tests were also performed based on the broth microdilution method to detect synergistic relationship between ciprofloxacin, Berberine and Palmatine. Detection of mexA, mexB, mexC, mexD, mexE, mexF and mexX was conducted by PCR assay. Fisher’s Exact test and Logistic Regression were used as statistical tools. Results: A total of 60 P. aeruginosa isolates were collected. The highest and lowest levels of resistance were found to be respectively against clindamycin and tigecycline. Comparing the MIC with MBC distribution, it was found that Berberine and Palmatine lower the MIC-MBC level of ciprofloxacin. The PCR results indicated that the highest frequency is about MexAB-OprM operon. The statistical analysis among different gene patterns of efflux pumps showed that there were no significant relationships between the effectiveness of Berberine and Palmatine (p>0.05). Conclusion: It can be speculated that Berberine and Palmatine both act as EPIs and can be used as auxiliary treatments with the purpose of increasing the effect of available antibiotics as well as decreasing the emergence of MDR bacteria. The efficiency of these combinations should be studied further under in vivo conditions to have a more comprehensive conclusion regarding this issue. PMID:28090273

  14. Isolation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains from dental office environments and units in Barretos, state of São Paulo, Brazil, and analysis of their susceptibility to antimicrobial drugs

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Ana Claudia; Maluta, Renato Pariz; Stella, Ariel Eurides; Rigobelo, Everlon Cid; Marin, José Moacir; de Ávila, Fernando Antonio

    2008-01-01

    A wide variety of opportunistic pathogens has been detected in the tubing supplying water to odontological equipment, in special in the biofilm lining of these tubes. Among these pathogens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, one of the leading causes of nosocomial infections, is frequently found in water lines supplying dental units. In the present work, 160 samples of water, and 200 fomite samples from forty dental units were collected in the city of Barretos, State of São Paulo, Brazil and evaluated between January and July, 2005. Seventy-six P. aeruginosa strains, isolated from the dental environment (5 strains) and water system (71 strains), were tested for susceptibility to six antimicrobial drugs most frequently used against P. aeruginosa infections. Susceptibility to ciprofloxacin, followed by meropenem was the predominant profile. The need for effective means of reducing the microbial burden within dental unit water lines is emphasized, and the risk of exposure and cross-infection in dental practice, in special when caused by opportunistic pathogens like P. aeruginosa, are highlighted. PMID:24031269

  15. Molecular characterization of carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated from patients with urinary tract infections in Southern Poland.

    PubMed

    Pobiega, Monika; Maciąg, Joanna; Chmielarczyk, Agnieszka; Romaniszyn, Dorota; Pomorska-Wesolowska, Monika; Ziolkowski, Grzegorz; Heczko, Piotr B; Bulanda, Malgorzata; Wojkowska-Mach, Jadwiga

    2015-11-01

    Due to the clinical threat posed by multidrug-resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa and importance of virulence factors produced in infection, 21 carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa were analyzed. 42.8% metallo-beta-lactamases-positive strains were identified. 85.7% of strains were meropenem resistant. 14.2% of strains were MDR; 38%, extensively drug-resistant (XDR). ExoY was present in all strains; exoT, in 95.2%; exoS, in 90.5%; exoU, in 47.6%. Eight XDR strains were typed using multilocus sequence typing: 4 as ST235, 2 as ST260, 2 as ST654 and ST234. MDR P. aeruginosa were isolated from hospitalized patients and among those from the community. Our study demonstrates the serious clinical issues posed by MDR P. aeruginosa and underscores the need for new treatment.

  16. [The comparison of selected virulence factors in Pseudomonas aeruginosa catheter isolates].

    PubMed

    Olejnízková, Katerina; Holá, Veronika

    2012-05-01

    Healthcare quality improvement brings about an increasing number of invasive diagnostic and therapeutic procedures and thus also an increasing number of high-risk patients prone to hospital infections. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most commonly isolated nosocomial species and the treatment of the infection is often long and problematic, with frequent recurrences. The pathogenesis of Pseudomonas infection is associated with a range of virulence factors. In the present study, 93 catheter isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were screened for the biofilm formation, motility and secretion of selected extracellular products. A high rate of the strains tested were producers of hemolysins, LasB elastase, and pyoverdines (> 70%). The biofilm formation was detected in 80% of isolates and formation of aerated biofilm was present in 90% of isolates with a positive correlation found between the two types of biofilm formation (p = 0.00583; gamma = 0.551). All strains showed swarming motility, 95% of strains showed swimming motility, and 75% of strains showed twitching motility. Among the virulence factors studied, only pyocyanin and pyochelin were produced by a lower proportion of isolates (< 25%). A positive correlation was seen between the production of some extracellular molecules (pyochelin and pyocyanin, pyocyanin and LasB elastase, and LasB elastase and haemolysins), between biofilm formation and formation of aerated biofilm, and between formation of aerated biofilm and pigments (pyoverdine and pyocyanin) production. On the other hand, a negative correlation was found between biofilm production and LasB elastase production and between the production of biofilm under immersion and pigments (pyoverdine and pyocyanin) production. All correlations are significant at the level p = 0.05, with the correlation coefficient gamma > 0.50.

  17. Pseudomonas aeruginosa inhibits the growth of Scedosporium aurantiacum, an opportunistic fungal pathogen isolated from the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Jashanpreet; Pethani, Bhavin P.; Kumar, Sheemal; Kim, Minkyoung; Sunna, Anwar; Kautto, Liisa; Penesyan, Anahit; Paulsen, Ian T.; Nevalainen, Helena

    2015-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Scedosporium aurantiacum and the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa are opportunistic pathogens isolated from lungs of the cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. P. aeruginosa has been known to suppress the growth of a number of CF related fungi such as Aspergillus fumigatus, Candida albicans, and Cryptococcus neoformans. However, the interactions between P. aeruginosa and S. aurantiacum have not been investigated in depth. Hence we assessed the effect of P. aeruginosa reference strain PAO1 and two clinical isolates PASS1 and PASS2 on the growth of two clinical S. aurantiacum isolates WM 06.482 and WM 08.202 using solid plate assays and liquid cultures, in a synthetic medium mimicking the nutrient condition in the CF sputum. Solid plate assays showed a clear inhibition of growth of both S. aurantiacum strains when cultured with P. aeruginosa strains PASS1 and PAO1. The inhibitory effect was confirmed by confocal microscopy. In addition to using chemical fluorescent stains, strains tagged with yfp (P. aeruginosa PASS1) and mCherry (S. aurantiacum WM 06.482) were created to facilitate detailed microscopic observations on strain interaction. To our knowledge, this is the first study describing successful genetic transformation of S. aurantiacum. Inhibition of growth was observed only in co-cultures of P. aeruginosa and S. aurantiacum; the cell fractions obtained from independent bacterial monocultures failed to initiate a response against the fungus. In the liquid co-cultures, biofilm forming P. aeruginosa strains PASS1 and PAO1 displayed higher inhibition of fungal growth when compared to PASS2. No change was observed in the inhibition pattern when direct cell contact between the bacterial and fungal strains was prevented using a separation membrane suggesting the involvement of extracellular metabolites in the fungal inhibition. However, one of the most commonly described bacterial virulence factors, pyocyanin, had no effect against either of the S

  18. Pseudomonas aeruginosa inhibits the growth of Scedosporium aurantiacum, an opportunistic fungal pathogen isolated from the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Jashanpreet; Pethani, Bhavin P; Kumar, Sheemal; Kim, Minkyoung; Sunna, Anwar; Kautto, Liisa; Penesyan, Anahit; Paulsen, Ian T; Nevalainen, Helena

    2015-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Scedosporium aurantiacum and the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa are opportunistic pathogens isolated from lungs of the cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. P. aeruginosa has been known to suppress the growth of a number of CF related fungi such as Aspergillus fumigatus, Candida albicans, and Cryptococcus neoformans. However, the interactions between P. aeruginosa and S. aurantiacum have not been investigated in depth. Hence we assessed the effect of P. aeruginosa reference strain PAO1 and two clinical isolates PASS1 and PASS2 on the growth of two clinical S. aurantiacum isolates WM 06.482 and WM 08.202 using solid plate assays and liquid cultures, in a synthetic medium mimicking the nutrient condition in the CF sputum. Solid plate assays showed a clear inhibition of growth of both S. aurantiacum strains when cultured with P. aeruginosa strains PASS1 and PAO1. The inhibitory effect was confirmed by confocal microscopy. In addition to using chemical fluorescent stains, strains tagged with yfp (P. aeruginosa PASS1) and mCherry (S. aurantiacum WM 06.482) were created to facilitate detailed microscopic observations on strain interaction. To our knowledge, this is the first study describing successful genetic transformation of S. aurantiacum. Inhibition of growth was observed only in co-cultures of P. aeruginosa and S. aurantiacum; the cell fractions obtained from independent bacterial monocultures failed to initiate a response against the fungus. In the liquid co-cultures, biofilm forming P. aeruginosa strains PASS1 and PAO1 displayed higher inhibition of fungal growth when compared to PASS2. No change was observed in the inhibition pattern when direct cell contact between the bacterial and fungal strains was prevented using a separation membrane suggesting the involvement of extracellular metabolites in the fungal inhibition. However, one of the most commonly described bacterial virulence factors, pyocyanin, had no effect against either of the S

  19. Isolation of the Autoinducer-Quenching Strain that Inhibits LasR in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Lixing; Zhang, Yuqian; Yang, Yuxiang; Wang, Lianhui

    2014-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) has been recognized as a general phenomenon in microorganisms and plays an important role in many pathogenic bacteria. In this report, we used the Agrobacterium tumefaciens biosensor strain NT1 to rapidly screen for autoinducer-quenching inhibitors from bacteria. After initial screening 5389 isolates obtained from land and beach soil, 53 putative positive strains were identified. A confirmatory bioassay was carried out after concentrating the putative positive culture supernatant, and 22 strains were confirmed to have anti-LasR activity. Finally, we determined the strain JM2, which could completely inhibit biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1, belonged to the genus Pseudomonas by analysis of 16S rDNA. Partially purified inhibitor factor(s) F5 derived from culture supernatants specifically inhibited LasR-controlled elastase and protease in wild type P. aeruginosa PAO1 by 68% and 73%, respectively, without significantly affecting growth; the rhl-controlled pyocyanin and rhamnolipids were inhibited by 54% and 52% in the presence of 100 μg/mL of F5. The swarming motility and biofilm of PAO1 were also inhibited by F5. Real time RT-PCR on samples from 100 μg/mL F5-treated P. aeruginosa showed downregulation of autoinducer synthase (LasRI and rhlI) and cognate receptor (lasR and rhlR) genes by 50%, 28%, 48%, and 29%, respectively. These results provide compelling evidence that the F5 inhibitor(s) interferes with the las system and significantly inhibits biofilm formation. PMID:24736783

  20. Collection, Isolation and Culture of Marine Algae.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Daniel E.

    1984-01-01

    Methods of collecting, isolating, and culturing microscopic and macroscopic marine algae are described. Three different culture media list of chemicals needed and procedures for preparing Erdschreiber's and Provasoli's E. S. media. (BC)

  1. Biofilm formation abilities and disinfectant-resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from cockroaches captured in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Saitou, Keiko; Furuhata, Katsunori; Kawakami, Yasushi; Fukuyama, Masafumi

    2009-06-01

    Forty-five strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from cockroaches captured in hospitals were investigated with regard to their biofilm-forming ability and resistance to various disinfectants in various cellular states. The hydrophobicity value varied among the test strains from 0.001 to 0.241, and the mean +/- standard deviation (SD) was 0.101 +/- 0.074. The relative viscosity of the extracellular product was measured. All test strains produced a mucous substance, and the value was 1.05-1.30 (mean +/- SD: 1.11 +/- 0.06), showing that all test strains had a biofilm-forming ability. Bactericidal experiments were performed using 6 disinfectants: ethanol, Hibitane, Isojin, Osvan, Tego 51, and Welpas. When bacteria in suspension were exposed to the disinfectants for 1 min (suspension test), 5 of the 6 disinfectants excluding Tego 51 completely killed all test strains, showing high bactericidal effects. In contrast, when adherent bacteria were exposed to the disinfectants for 1 min (adhesion test), the killing rate by Welpas was 100%, but those by Isojin and ethanol were lower (88.9 and 60.0%, respectively), that by Osvan was only 4.4%, and no bacteria were killed by Hibitane or Tego 51. These findings showed that the bactericidal effects markedly decreased in the case of adherent P. aeruginosa.

  2. A thermo-stable lysine aminopeptidase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Isolation, purification, characterization, and sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yan Tao; Zhou, Nan Di; Zhou, Zhe Min; Gao, Xin Xing; Tian, Ya Ping

    2014-10-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa NJ-814, isolated from garden soil, produced an extracellular aminopeptidase that was purified using ammonium sulfate precipitation and ion exchange chromatography. The purity was confirmed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and the Mr value of the enzyme was estimated to be 55 kDa. The purified enzyme shows maximum activity at pH 9.0 and 80 °C. It exhibits high thermo-stability. Half of the activity can remain after incubation at 80 °C for 119 min. It is stable within pH range of 7.5-10.5. It is strongly activated by Co(2+) and inhibited by Fe(2+) , Cu(2+) , Ni(2+) , Zn(2+) , and ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA). The specificity of the enzyme was investigated. Within several aminoacyl-p-nitroanilines (AA-pNA), Lys-pNA is proven to be the optimal substrate. The Michaelis-Menten constant (Km ) of the enzyme for Lys-pNA and Leu-pNA were 2.32 and 9.41 mM, respectively. Peptide map fingerprinting shows that the sequence of the enzyme is highly similar to aminopeptidase Y from P. aeruginosa 18A. It can be speculated that this enzyme is a Zn(2+) -dependent enzyme and contains two zinc ions in its active site.

  3. Effect of airway Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolation and infection on steady-state bronchiectasis in Guangzhou, China

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Wei-Jie; Gao, Yong-Hua; Xu, Gang; Lin, Zhi-Ya; Tang, Yan; Li, Hui-Min; Li, Zhi-Min; Zheng, Jin-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Background Current status of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) infection in clinically stable bronchiectasis in mainland China remains unclear. Objective To compare the inflammation and lung function impairment in bronchiectasis patients isolated or infected with PA, potentially pathogenic microorganisms (PPMs) and commensals, and to identify factors associated with PA isolation and infection. Methods Patients with steady-state bronchiectasis and healthy subjects were recruited. Peripheral blood and sputum were sampled to determine inflammatory markers and bacterial loads in steady-state bronchiectasis and health. Spirometry and diffusing capacity were also measured. Results We enrolled 144 bronchiectasis patients and 23 healthy subjects. PA isolation and infection accounted for 44 and 39 patients, who demonstrated significant inflammatory responses and markedly impaired spirometry, but not diffusing capacity, compared with healthy subjects and patients isolated with other PPMs and commensals (all P<0.05). Except for heightened sputum inflammatory responses, there were no notable differences in serum inflammation and lung function as with the increased density of PA. Female gender [odds ratio (OR): 3.10 for PA isolation; OR: 3.74 for PA infection], 4 or more exacerbations within 2 years (OR: 3.74 for PA isolation, OR: 2.95 for PA infection) and cystic bronchiectasis (OR: 3.63 for PA isolation, OR: 4.47 for PA infection) were the factors consistently associated with PA isolation and infection. Conclusions PA elicits intense inflammation and lung function impairment in steady-state bronchiectasis. The density of PA does not correlate with most clinical indices. PA infection is associated with females, frequent exacerbations and cystic bronchiectasis. PMID:25973228

  4. Epidemiology and virulence of VIM-4 metallo-beta-lactamase-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from burn patients in eastern Algeria.

    PubMed

    Meradji, Samah; Barguigua, Abouddihaj; Bentakouk, Mohamed Cherif; Nayme, Kaotar; Zerouali, Khalid; Mazouz, Dekhil; Chettibi, Houria; Timinouni, Mohammed

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we investigated the prevalence of carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (CRPA) in burn patients from eastern Algeria, CRPA virulence factors and the molecular epidemiology of CRPA. The overall prevalence of CRPA was 48.38%. Seven (46.66%) isolates were metallo-β-lactamases (MBL) producers and contained the MBL genes blaVIM-4 (n=6) and blaVIM-2 (n=1). Risk factors for CRPA infection were urinary catheter use and intubation (p=0.008). A high percentage of virulence factors (86.6% of these isolates were able to produce protease; 73.3% of isolates has DNase; and 66.6% were haemolysin positive) was observed in CRPA isolates. Among the seven MBL-producing isolates, four had the same clonal profile. The class 1 integrons, which contained the aadA7 gene cassette, were detected in six isolates. The 16SrRNA methylase gene, rmtB, was detected in one strain. All CRPA isolates were biofilm formers. A study on the kinetics of biofilm production revealed that biofilm production increased when the concentration of imipenem or ciprofloxacin and the incubation time increased. This is the first study to report the presence of VIM-4-producing P. aeruginosa from North Africa and also of the high prevalence of CRPA isolates. Based on our study of burn unit patients, the high percentage of P. aeruginosa with virulence factors and multi-drug resistance is alarming.

  5. Pseudomonas aeruginosa variants isolated from patients with cystic fibrosis are killed by a bactericidal protein from human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Siefferman, C M; Regelmann, W E; Gray, B H

    1991-01-01

    The susceptibility of paired mucoid and nonmucoid variants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from 13 patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) to killing by a 55,000-Da bactericidal protein (BP55) from human polymorphonuclear leukocytes was studied. Mucoid and nonmucoid variants were equally sensitive to killing by BP55 at both pH 5.6 and pH 7.2. Eleven of the isolates were resistant to the bactericidal activity of 10% normal human serum but were as sensitive as the serum-sensitive isolates to BP55. Similarly, the 15 isolates with lipopolysaccharides (LPS) containing O-polysaccharide side chains (smooth LPS) were as sensitive to BP55 as those isolates with rough LPS.P. aeruginosa isolates from patients in poor clinical condition were more likely to have LPS of the smooth type and to be resistant to killing by 10% human serum than the isolates from patients in good clinical condition. We have concluded that the susceptibility of the P. aeruginosa isolates from patients with CF to killing by BP55 does not correlate with mucoid or nonmucoid variations, with the presence or absence of smooth LPS, or with the sensitivity or resistance to killing by normal human serum. Images PMID:1903774

  6. Evaluation of Metallo-β-Lactamase-Production and Carriage of bla-VIM Genes in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated from Burn Wound Infections in Isfahan

    PubMed Central

    Saffari, Mahmood; Firoozeh, Farzaneh; Pourbabaee, Mohammad; Zibaei, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background Metallo-β-lactamase-production among Gram-negative bacteria, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa, has become a challenge for treatment of infections due to these resistant bacteria. Objectives The aim of the current study was to evaluate the metallo-β-lactamase-production and carriage of bla-VIM genes among carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa isolated from burn wound infections. Patients and Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted from September 2014 to July 2015. One hundred and fifty P. aeruginosa isolates were recovered from 600 patients with burn wound infections treated at Imam-Musa-Kazem Hospital in Isfahan city, Iran. Carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa isolates were screened by disk diffusion using CLSI guidelines. Metallo-β-lactamase-producing P. aeruginosa isolates were identified using an imipenem-EDTA double disk synergy test (EDTA-IMP DDST). For detection of MBL genes including bla-VIM-1 and bla-VIM-2, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods and sequencing were used. Results Among the 150 P. aeruginosa isolates, 144 (96%) were resistant to imipenem by the disk diffusion method, all of which were identified as metallo-β-lactamase-producing P. aeruginosa isolates by EDTA-IMP DDST. Twenty-seven (18%) and 8 (5.5%) MBL-producing P. aeruginosa isolates harbored bla-VIM-1 and bla-VIM-2 genes, respectively. Conclusions Our findings showed a high occurrence of metallo-β-lactamase production among P. aeruginosa isolates in burn patient infections in our region. Also, there are P. aeruginosa isolates carrying the bla-VIM-1 and bla-VIM-2 genes in Isfahan province. PMID:28144604

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain N002, Isolated from Crude Oil-Contaminated Soil from Geleky, Assam, India

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Abhjit Sarma; Baruah, Reshita; Gogoi, Dhrubajyoti; Borah, Maina

    2013-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of crude oil-degrading Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain N002, isolated from a crude oil-polluted soil sample from Geleky, Assam, India. Multiple genes potentially involved in crude oil degradation were identified. PMID:23405324

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain Hex1T Isolated from Soils Contaminated with Used Lubricating Oil in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Luján, Adela M.; Feliziani, Sofía

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pseudomonas aeruginosa Hex1T was isolated from soils contaminated with used lubricating oil from a garage in Córdoba, Argentina. This strain is capable of utilizing this pollutant as the sole carbon and energy source. Here, we present the 6.9-Mb draft genome sequence of Hex1T, which contains many heavy metal-resistance genes. PMID:28082504

  9. Growing Menace of Antibacterial Resistance in Clinical Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Nepal: An Insight of Beta-Lactamase Production

    PubMed Central

    Dhital, Rabindra; Puri, Ram; Chaudhary, Niraj; Khatiwada, Suresh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most frequently isolated organism as it acts as the opportunistic pathogen and can cause infections in immunosuppressed patients. The production of different types of beta-lactamases renders this organism resistant to many commonly used antimicrobials. Therefore, the aim of this study was to document the antibiotic resistance rate in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from different clinical specimens. Methods. Pseudomonas aeruginosa recovered was identified by standard microbiological methods. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed by modified Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method following Clinical and Laboratory Standard Institute (CLSI) guidelines and all the suspected isolates were tested for the production of ESBLs, MBLs, and AmpC. Results. Out of total (178) isolates, 83.1% were recovered from the inpatient department (IPD). Majority of the isolates mediated resistance towards the beta-lactam antibiotics, while nearly half of the isolates were resistant to ciprofloxacin. Most of the aminoglycosides used showed resistance rate up to 75% but amikacin proved to be better option. No resistance to polymyxin was observed. ESBLs, MBLs, and AmpC mediated resistance was seen in 33.1%, 30.9%, and 15.7% isolates, respectively. Conclusions. Antibiotic resistance rate and beta-lactamase mediated resistance were high. Thus, regular surveillance of drug resistance is of utmost importance. PMID:27642599

  10. Isolation and characterization of mutants defective in the cyanide-insensitive respiratory pathway of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, L; Williams, H D

    1995-01-01

    The branched respiratory chain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa contains at least two terminal oxidases which are active under normal physiological conditions. One of these, cytochrome co, is a cytochrome c oxidase which is completely inhibited by concentrations of the respiratory inhibitor potassium cyanide as low as 100 microM. The second oxidase, the cyanide-insensitive oxidase, is resistant to cyanide concentrations in excess of 1 mM as well as to sodium azide. In this work, we describe the isolation and characterization of a mutant of P. aeruginosa defective in cyanide-insensitive respiration. This insertion mutant was isolated with mini-D171 (a replication-defective derivative of the P. aeruginosa phage D3112) as a mutagen and by screening the resulting tetracycline-resistant transductants for the loss of ability to grow in the presence of 1 mM sodium azide. Polarographic studies on the NADH-mediated respiration rate of the mutant indicated an approximate 50% loss of activity, and titration of this activity against increasing cyanide concentrations gave a monophasic curve clearly showing the complete loss of cyanide-insensitive respiration. The mutated gene for a mutant affected in the cyanide-insensitive, oxidase-terminated respiratory pathway has been designated cio. We have complemented the azide-sensitive phenotype of this mutant with a wild-type copy of the gene by in vivo cloning with another mini-D element, mini-D386, carried on plasmid pADD386. The complemented cio mutant regained the ability to grow on medium containing 1 mM azide, titration of its NADH oxidase activity with cyanide gave a biphasic curve similar to that of the wild-type organism, and the respiration rate returned to normal levels. Spectral analysis of the cytochrome contents of the membranes of the wild type, the cio mutant, and the complemented mutant suggests that the cio mutant is not defective in any membrane-bound cytochromes and that the complementing gene does not encode a heme

  11. Adhesive Capabilities of Staphylococcus Aureus and Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Isolated from Tears of HIV/AIDS Patients to Soft Contact Lenses

    PubMed Central

    B. O., Ajayi; F.E., Kio; F.D., Otajevwo

    2012-01-01

    Fifty conjunctival swab samples collected from ELISA confirmed HIV/AIDS seropositive patients who were referred to the HIV/AIDS laboratories of the University of Benin Teaching Hospital and Central Hospital both based in Benin City, Nigeria were aseptically cultured on appropriate media by standard methods. The resulting isolates/strains, after identification by standard methods, were tested for their ability to adhere to two hydrophobic non-ionic daily wear silicone hydrogel soft contact lenses (i.e. lotrafilcon B, WC 33% and polymacon, WC 38%) as well as to two hydrophilic ionic conventional extended wear silicone hydrogel soft contact lenses (i.e. methafilcon A, WC 55% and omafilcon A, WC 60%) by the adhesiveness/slime production modified vortex/Robin device method. Evidence of adhesiveness/slime production was indicated by presence of a visible stained film lining the surface of the contact lens which was measured and recorded as strong or weak according to the density of the adhered bacterial film. Fourteen (28.0%) Staphylococcus aureus strains and 10 (20.0%) Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains were obtained among other organisms. Staphylococcus aureus strains adhered in decreasing order to lotrafilcon B (55.4 ± 4.7), polymacon (46.4 ± 8.4), methfilcon A (46.4 ± 8.4) and omafilcon A (25.0 ± 6.4) with no significant difference in adhesive strengths of individual strains (P > 0.05). Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains also recorded decreasing adhesive strengths to lotrafilcon B (37.5 ± 8.2), polymacon (28.6 ± 6.3), methafilcon A (26.8 ± 5.5) and omafilcon A (23.2 ± 5.5) also with no significant difference in adhesive strengths of individual strains (P > 0.05). Attachment strengths of Staph. aureus strains to all four contact lenses were higher than those of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains. Both organisms adhered most to hydrophobic lotrafilcon B and least to hydrophilic omafilcon A. This invitro adhesion studies revealed that daily wear silicone hydrogel low water

  12. Biofilm formation, antibiotic susceptibility and RAPD genotypes in Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical strains isolated from single centre intensive care unit patients.

    PubMed

    Vaněrková, Martina; Mališová, Barbora; Kotásková, Iva; Holá, Veronika; Růžička, Filip; Freiberger, Tomáš

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse genotypes, antimicrobial susceptibility patterns and serotypes in Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical strains, including the clonal dissemination of particular strains throughout various intensive care units in one medical centre. Using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD-PCR) and P. aeruginosa antisera, 22 different genotypes and 8 serotypes were defined among 103 isolates from 48 patients. No direct association between P. aeruginosa strain genotypes and serotypes was observed. RAPD typing in strains with the same serotype revealed different genotypes and, on the contrary, most strains with a different serotype displayed the same amplification pattern. The resulting banding patterns showed a high degree of genetic heterogeneity among all isolates from the patients examined, suggesting a non-clonal relationship between isolates from these patients. A higher degree of antibiotic resistance and stronger biofilm production in common genotypes compared to rare ones and genetic homogeneity of the most resistant strains indicated the role of antibiotic pressure in acquiring resistant and more virulent strains in our hospital. In conclusion, genetic characterisation of P. aeruginosa strains using RAPD method was shown to be more accurate in epidemiological analyses than phenotyping.

  13. Determination of Acquired Resistance Profiles of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates and Characterization of an Effective Bacteriocin-Like Inhibitory Substance (BLIS) Against These Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Shokri, Dariush; Rabbani Khorasgani, Mohammad; Zaghian, Saeideh; Fatemi, Seyed Masih; Mohkam, Milad; Ghasemi, Younes; Taheri-Kafrani, Asghar

    2016-01-01

    Background The emergence of pan-drug resistant strains (PDR) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa has led to renewed efforts to identify alternative agents, such as bacteriocins and bacteriocin-like inhibitory substances (BLISs). Objectives The aims of this study were to determine the acquired resistance profiles of multidrug-resistant (MDR), extensively drug-resistant (XDR), and PDR P. aeruginosa isolates based on the revised definitions of the CDC and ECDC and to screen and characterize effective BLISs against these isolates. Patients and Materials In a cross-sectional study, 96 P. aeruginosa strains were isolated during a 12-month period. The resistance profiles of these isolates were determined as MDR, XDR, and PDR, and the data were analyzed using WHONET5.6 software. A BLIS against the P. aeruginosa strains was characterized based on its physicochemical properties, size, growth curves, and production profiles. Results Among the 96 isolates of P. aeruginosa, 2 (2.1%), 94 (97.9%), and 63 (65.6%) were non-MDR, MDR, and XDR, respectively, and 1 (1.1%) was PDR. The most effective antibiotics against these isolates were polymyxins and fosfomycin. A BLIS isolated from the P. aeruginosa DSH22 strain had potent activity against 92 (95.8%) of the 96 isolates. The BLIS was heat stable, (up to 100°C for 10 min), UV stable, and active within a pH range of 3 - 9. The activity of BLIS disappeared when treated with trypsin, proteinase K, and pepsin, indicating its proteinous nature. Based on its size (25 kDa), the BLIS may belong to the large colicin-like bacteriocin family. BLIS production started in the midexponential phase of growth, and the maximum level (2700 AU/mL) occurred in the late-stationary phase after 25 hours of incubation at 30°C. Conclusions This BLIS with broad-spectrum activity may be a potential agent for the treatment or control of drug-resistant strains of P. aeruginosa infection. PMID:27800131

  14. Molecular epidemiology provides evidence of genotypic heterogeneity of multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa serotype O:12 outbreak isolates from a pediatric hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Bingen, E; Bonacorsi, S; Rohrlich, P; Duval, M; Lhopital, S; Brahimi, N; Vilmer, E; Goering, R V

    1996-01-01

    Ribotyping randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis were used for the epidemiologic evaluation of eight Pseudomonas aeruginosa O:12 isolates obtained from eight children and two P. aeruginosa O:12 environmental isolates from a hematology ward. Randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis were able to discriminate isolates that were indistinguishable by biochemical typing, O serotyping or ribotyping. PMID:8940479

  15. Isolation and identification of a novel, lipase-producing bacterium, Pseudomnas aeruginosa KM110

    PubMed Central

    Mobarak-Qamsari, E; Kasra-Kermanshahi, R; Moosavi-nejad, Z

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objectives Lipases are particularly important due to the fact that they specifically hydrolyze acyl glycerol, oils and greases, which is of great interest for different industrial applications. Materialst and Methods In this study, several lipase-producing bacteria were isolated from wastewater of an oil processing plant. The strain possessing the highest lipase activity was identified both biochemically and sequencing of 16S rRNA gene. Then we increase lipase activity by improving conditions of production medium. Also, lipase from this strain was preliminarily characterized for use in industrial application. Results The 16S rRNA sequensing revealed it as a new strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the type strain was KM110. An overall 3-fold enhanced lipase production (0.76 U mL−1) was achieved after improving conditions of production medium. The olive oil and peptone was found to be the most suitable substrate for maximum enzyme production. Also the enzyme exhibited maximum lipolytic activity at 45°C where it was also stably maintained. At pH 8.0, the lipase had the highest stability but no activity. It was active over a pH range of 7.0–10.0. The lipase activity was inhibited by Zn2+ & Cu2+ (32 and 27%, respectively) at 1mM. The enzyme lost 29% of its initial activity in 1.0% SDS concentration, whereas, Triton X-100, Tween-80 & DMSO did not significantly inhibit lipase activity. Conclusions Based on the findings of present study, lipase of P. aeruginosa KM110 is a potential alkaline lipase and a candidate for industrial applications such as detergent, leather and fine chemical industries. PMID:22347589

  16. Overexpression of AmpC and Efflux Pumps in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from Bloodstream Infections: Prevalence and Impact on Resistance in a Spanish Multicenter Study▿

    PubMed Central

    Cabot, Gabriel; Ocampo-Sosa, Alain A.; Tubau, Fe; Macia, María D.; Rodríguez, Cristina; Moya, Bartolomé; Zamorano, Laura; Suárez, Cristina; Peña, Carmen; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Oliver, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence and impact of the overexpression of AmpC and efflux pumps were evaluated with a collection of 190 Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates recovered from bloodstream infections in a 2008 multicenter study (10 hospitals) in Spain. The MICs of a panel of 13 antipseudomonal agents were determined by microdilution, and the expressions of ampC, mexB, mexY, mexD, and mexF were determined by real-time reverse transcription (RT)-PCR. Up to 39% of the isolates overexpressed at least one of the mechanisms. ampC overexpression (24.2%) was the most prevalent mechanism, followed by mexY (13.2%), mexB (12.6%), mexF (4.2%), and mexD (2.2%). The overexpression of mexB plus mexY, documented for 5.3% of the isolates, was the only combination showing a significantly (P = 0.02) higher prevalence than expected from the frequencies of the individual mechanisms (1.6%). Additionally, all imipenem-resistant isolates studied (25 representative isolates) showed inactivating mutations in oprD. Most of the isolates nonsusceptible to piperacillin-tazobactam (96%) and ceftazidime (84%) overexpressed ampC, while mexB (25%) and mexY (29%) overexpressions gained relevance among cefepime-nonsusceptible isolates. Nevertheless, the prevalence of mexY overexpression was highest among tobramycin-nonsusceptible isolates (37%), and that of mexB was highest among meropenem-nonsusceptible isolates (33%). Regarding ciprofloxacin-resistant isolates, besides the expected increased prevalence of efflux pump overexpression, a highly significant link to ampC overexpression was documented for the first time: up to 52% of ciprofloxacin-nonsusceptible isolates overexpressed ampC, sharply contrasting with the 24% documented for the complete collection (P < 0.001). In summary, mutation-driven resistance was frequent in P. aeruginosa isolates from bloodstream infections, whereas metallo-β-lactamases, detected in 2 isolates (1%) producing VIM-2, although with increasing prevalences, were still uncommon. PMID

  17. A gacS Deletion in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Cystic Fibrosis Isolate CHA Shapes Its Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Sall, Khady Mayebine; Casabona, Maria Guillermina; Bordi, Christophe; Huber, Philippe; de Bentzmann, Sophie; Attrée, Ina; Elsen, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a human opportunistic pathogen, is capable of provoking acute and chronic infections that are associated with defined sets of virulence factors. During chronic infections, the bacterium accumulates mutations that silence some and activate other genes. Here we show that the cystic fibrosis isolate CHA exhibits a unique virulence phenotype featuring a mucoid morphology, an active Type III Secretion System (T3SS, hallmark of acute infections), and no Type VI Secretion System (H1-T6SS). This virulence profile is due to a 426 bp deletion in the 3′ end of the gacS gene encoding an essential regulatory protein. The absence of GacS disturbs the Gac/Rsm pathway leading to depletion of the small regulatory RNAs RsmY/RsmZ and, in consequence, to expression of T3SS, while switching off the expression of H1-T6SS and Pel polysaccharides. The CHA isolate also exhibits full ability to swim and twitch, due to active flagellum and Type IVa pili. Thus, unlike the classical scheme of balance between virulence factors, clinical strains may adapt to a local niche by expressing both alginate exopolysaccharide, a hallmark of membrane stress that protects from antibiotic action, host defences and phagocytosis, and efficient T3S machinery that is considered as an aggressive virulence factor. PMID:24780952

  18. Centrifugal partition chromatography: A preparative tool for isolation and purification of xylindein from Chlorociboria aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Boonloed, Anukul; Weber, Genevieve L; Ramzy, Kelly M; Dias, Veronica R; Remcho, Vincent T

    2016-12-23

    A centrifugal partition chromatography (CPC) method was developed for the preparative-scale isolation and purification of xylindein from the wood-staining fungi, Chlorociboria aeruginosa. Xylindein, a blue-green pigment naturally secreted from the hyphae and fruiting bodies of the fungus, has great value in the decorative wood industry and textile coloration. Xylindein has great potential for use as a fluorescent labeling agent as well as in organic semiconductor applications. However, a primary limitation of xylindein is its poor solubility in most common HPLC solvents. Consequently, it is arduous to purify using preparative liquid chromatography or solid-phase extraction (SPE). Support-free, liquid-liquid chromatographic methods, including CPC, where solutes are separated based on their different distribution coefficients (KD) between two immiscible solvent systems, are promising alternatives for the purification of the compound on a preparative scale. In this work, a new biphasic solvent system suitable for CPC separation of xylindein was developed. Various groups of solvents were assessed for their suitability as xylindein extractants. A new solvent system suitable for CPC separation of xylindein, composed of heptane/THF/MEK/acetonitrile/acetic acid/water, was developed. This solvent system yielded a KD value for xylindein of 1.54±0.04, as determined by HPLC (n=3). The compositions of the upper phase and lower phase of the solvent system were determined by Heteronuclear Single Quantum Correlation (HSQC) NMR and proton NMR. A CPC system, equipped with a fraction collector, was used for the isolation of xylindein from crude extracts. The xylindein fractions isolated by the CPC were then analyzed using HPLC and presented as a fractogram. Based on the CPC fractogram, the purified xylindein fractions were achieved after 30min CPC separation time, yielding 71% extraction efficiency. The developed CPC method allowed for isolation of this naturally sourced xylindein

  19. Common antimicrobial resistance patterns, biotypes and serotypes found among Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from patient's stools and drinking water sources in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Shehabi, A A; Masoud, H; Maslamani, F A Balkam

    2005-04-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa was isolated in low rates from stool specimens of outpatients and inpatients (7% versus 12%) but in higher rates from chlorinated and nonchlorinated water sources (15% versus 44%), respectively in Jordan. The same biotype was recognized among 90% of P. aeruginosa isolates from patient's stools and water sources using specific biochemical profiles. Three serogroups belonging to 01, 06 and 011 accounted for the majority of these isolates in water (66%) and stools (78%), respectively. All P. aeruginosa isolates from water were highly susceptible (87%-100%) to piperacillin-tazobactam, amikacin, gentamicin, imipenem, aztreonam, ceftazidime and ciprofloxacin, whereas the isolates from stool were slightly less susceptible (81%-98%) to these antimicrobials. P. aeruginosa isolates from water and stool sources were almost equally highly resistant to tetracycline (86%-89%) and carbenicillin (88%-89%), respectively. One common small plasmid (15.4 kb) was detected in 14/25 (56%) of multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa isolates from both water and stool. This study demonstrates certain common epidemiological characteristics including antimicrobial resistance pattern, biotypes and serotypes among P. aeruginosa isolates from patient's stools and drinking water sources in Jordan.

  20. Detection of Multidrug Resistant (MDR) and Extremely Drug Resistant (XDR) P. Aeruginosa Isolated from Patients in Tehran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Saderi, Horieh; Owlia, Parviz

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study was done to detect multidrug resistant (MDR) and extremely drug resistant (XDR) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa among strains isolated from patients in Tehran, Iran, due to importance of these phenotypes in treatment of human infections. Methods: Eighty eight P. aeruginosa were isolated from patients in Tehran, Iran, and identified by routine methods and PCR for oprL gene. Their antimicrobial susceptibility to 16 antimicrobial agents from 7 antimicrobial categories (aminoglycosides, carbapenems, cephalosporins, fluoroquinolones, penicillins/ß-lactamase inhibitors, monobactams, polymyxins) were determined by disk diffusion method, according to recommendation of Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. Characterization of P. aeruginosa isolates as MDR and XDR was done according to standardized international terminology presented by European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control as well as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in 2011. MDR was defined as acquired non-susceptibility to at least one agent in ≥3 antimicrobial categories and XDR was defined as non-susceptibility to at least one agent in ≥6 antimicrobial categories. Results: The rates of susceptibility to antimicrobials were as follows: gentamicin 27.3%, tobramycin 54.5%, amikacin 56.8%, netilmicin 36.4%, imipenem 55.7%, meropenem 55.7%, doripenem 60.2%, ceftazidime 63.6%, cefepime 56.8%, ciprofloxacin 59.1%, levofloxacin 60.2%, ticarcillin-clavulanic acid 37.5%, piperacillin-tazobactam 63.6%, aztreonam 43.2%, colistin 90.9%, polymyxin 95.5%. Altogether, 48 (54.5%) and 29 (33%) isolates were characterized as MDR and XDR, respectively. Discussion: The high frequency of antibiotic resistance in clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa in Iran makes epidemiological surveillance of susceptibility of this bacterium more essential for the best selection of empirical antibiotics. PMID:26351496

  1. [Morphologic, cultural, and biochemical properties of cultures of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from patients, animals, and the environment].

    PubMed

    Litovchenko, P P; Zabotina, I V

    1981-05-01

    The properties of 279 Ps. aeruginosa strains were studied in 70 tests. The use of a synthetic peptone-free mineral medium for the determination of sugar oxidation was shown to have advantages over the use of liquid Giess' media. Ps. aeruginosa cultures isolated from human patients, animals, soil and water were characterized by a number of common signs, irrespective of their origin. The strains isolated from human patients were resistant practically to all antibiotics widely used in clinical practice; the cultures isolated from soil and water retained their sensitivity to antibiotics; the strains isolated from animals retained sensitivity to some antibiotics. To identify Ps. aeruginosa in practical bacteriological laboratories, the following parameters should be determined: mobility; the character of growth in Levine's and Ploskirev's media; ability to grow at 42 degrees C and 4 degrees C; the fermentation of carbohydrates in Olkenitsky's medium and their oxidation in a mineral medium; indole and hydroxide sulfide production; the methyl red and Voges--Proskauer reaction; the presence of pigments, oxidase, catalase, gelatinase, nitrate reductase and arginine dehydrolase, urease; resistance to antibiotics.

  2. [Detection of metallo-beta-lactamase in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from hospitalized patients in Goiânia, State of Goiás].

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Diana Christina Pereira Santos; Lima, Ana Beatriz Mori; Leão, Lara Stefania Netto de Oliveira; Filho, José Rodrigues do Carmo; Pimenta, Fabiana Cristina; Vieira, José Daniel Gonçalves

    2009-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a bacterium frequently isolated from hospital environments. This study had the aims of evaluating the susceptibility profile of Pseudomonas aeruginosa previously isolated from patients in a hospital in Goiânia (Goiás, Brazil), performing phenotypic screening for metallo-beta-lactamase production and detecting its genes using the polymerase chain reaction technique. Seventy-five 75 Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates were evaluated between January 2005 and January 2007. Biochemical identification was performed using the API 20E system and an antibiogram was produced using the Kirby-Bauer method. Among the 62 isolates that were resistant to imipenem and ceftazidime, 35 (56.4%) produced metallo-beta-lactamase, while 26 (74.3%) showed the bla(SPM-1) gene. The frequency of Pseudomonas aeruginosa that produces metallo-beta-lactamase suggests that greater control over the dissemination of resistance in hospital environments is needed.

  3. Isolation and characterization of a bacteriophage specific for the lipopolysaccharide of rough derivatives of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PAO.

    PubMed Central

    Jarrell, K F; Kropinski, A M

    1981-01-01

    A lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-defective (rough) mutant of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO was isolated by selection for resistance to the LPS-specific phage E79. The LPS of this mutant, AK-1012, lacked the O-antigenic side chain-specific amino sugar fucosamine as well as the core-specific sugars glucose and rhamnose. Using this strain, we isolated and characterized a phage, phi PLS27, which is specifically inactivated upon incubation with LPS extracted from rough mutants of P. aeruginosa PAO. phi PLS27 was found to be a Bradley type C phage and was very similar to coliphage T7 in a number of properties, including size, buoyant density, mass, and the number of structural proteins. Images PMID:6787214

  4. Biosurfactant-producing bacterium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa MA01 isolated from spoiled apples: physicochemical and structural characteristics of isolated biosurfactant.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Habib; Hamedi, Mir Manochehr; Lotfabad, Tayebe Bagheri; Zahiri, Hossein Shahbani; Sharafi, Hakimeh; Masoomi, Fatemeh; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar; Ortiz, Antonio; Amanlou, Massoud; Noghabi, Kambiz Akbari

    2012-02-01

    An extensive investigation was conducted to isolate indigenous bacterial strains with outstanding performance for biosurfactant production from different types of spoiled fruits, food-related products and food processing industries. An isolate was selected from 800 by the highest biosurfactant yield in soybean oil medium and it was identified by 16S rRNA and the two most relevant hypervariable regions of this gene; V3 and V6 as Pseudomonas aeruginosa MA01. The isolate was able to produce 12 g/l of a glycolipid-type biosurfactant and generally less efficient to emulsify vegetable oils compared to hydrocarbons and could emulsify corn and coconut oils more than 50%. However, emulsification index (E(24)) of different hydrocarbons including hexane, toluene, xylene, brake oil, kerosene and hexadecane was between 55.8% and 100%. The surface tension of pure water decreased gradually with increasing biosurfactant concentration to 32.5 mNm(-1) with critical micelle concentration (CMC) value of 10.1mg/l. Among all carbon substrates examined, vegetable oils were the most effective on biosurfactant production. Two glycolipid fractions were purified from the biosurfactant crude extracts, and FTIR and ES-MS were used to determine the structure of these compounds. The analysis indicated the presence of three major monorhamnolipid species: R(1)C(10)C(10), R(1)C(10)C(12:1), and R(1)C(10)C(12); as well as another three major dirhamnolipid species: R(2)C(10)C(10), R(2)C(10)C(12:1), and R(2)C(10)C(12). The strain sweep experiment for measuring the linear viscoelastic of biosurfactant showed that typical behavior characteristics of a weak viscoelastic gel, with storage modulus greater than loss modulus at all frequencies examined, both showing some frequency dependence.

  5. In vitro comparison of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates with various susceptibilities to aminoglycosides and ten beta-lactam antibiotics.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, D H; Baltch, A L; Smith, R P

    1984-01-01

    Susceptibilities of 98 clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, including 33 strains with known mechanisms of amikacin resistance, were tested by the agar dilution method against 10 beta-lactam drugs. Ceftazidime, imipenem, and cefsulodin had the greatest activity, regardless of the aminoglycoside susceptibilities. The strains which were highly resistant to amikacin appeared to be less susceptible to some beta-lactam drugs, especially if their resistance was related to amikacin-inactivating enzymes; statistical significance, however, was observed for aztreonam only. PMID:6428308

  6. Antimicrobial susceptibility and minimal inhibitory concentration of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from septic ocular surface disease in different animal species

    PubMed Central

    Leigue, L.; Montiani-Ferreira, F.; Moore, B.A.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antibiotic susceptibility profile of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from different animal species with septic ocular surface disease. Sixteen strains of P. aeruginosa were isolated from different species of animals (dog, cat, horse, penguin and brown bear) with ocular surface diseases such as conjunctivitis, keratocojnuctivits sicca and ulcerative keratitis. These isolates were tested against 11 different antimicrobials agents using the Kirby-Bauer disk-diffusion method. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined using E-tests for two antibiotics (tobramycin and ciprofloxacin) commonly used in veterinary ophthalmology practice. Imipenem was the most effective antibiotic, with 100% of the strains being susceptible, followed by amikacin (87.5%), gentamicin, norfloxacin, gatifloxacin and polymyxin (both with 81.5%of susceptibility). MIC90 of ciprofloxacin was 2 µg/ml and the values found ranged from 0.094 µg/ml to 32 µg/ml. For tobramycin, MIC90 was 32 µg/ml and ranged from 0.25 µg/ml to 256 µg/ml. The most effective in vitro antibiotic tested against P. aeruginosa in this study was imipenem, followed by amikacin. The 3 mg/ml eye drops commercially available ciprofloxacin presentations were in vitro effective against all strains tested in this study if applied up to 4 hours after instillation. Whereas for tobramycin the 3 mg/ml eye drops commercial presentations were not in vitro effective against some strains isolated in this study. Thus for ocular infections with P. aeruginosa when using tobramycin the ideal recommendation would be to either use eye drops with higher concentrations or decrease the frequency intervals from four to a minimum of every two hours. PMID:27928519

  7. Whole-Genome Sequence of Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain BAMCPA07-48, Isolated from a Combat Injury Wound

    PubMed Central

    Sanjar, Fatemeh; Karna, S. L. Rajasekhar; Chen, Tsute; Chen, Ping; Abercrombie, Johnathan J.

    2016-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain BAMCPA07-48, isolated from a combat injury wound. The closed genome sequence of this isolate is a valuable resource for pathogenome characterization of P. aeruginosa associated with wounds, which will aid in the development of a higher-resolution phylogenomic framework for molecular-guided pathogen-surveillance. PMID:27389262

  8. Widespread of ESBL- and carbapenemase GES-type genes on carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates: a multicenter study in Mexican hospitals.

    PubMed

    Garza-Ramos, Ulises; Barrios, Humberto; Reyna-Flores, Fernando; Tamayo-Legorreta, Elsa; Catalan-Najera, Juan C; Morfin-Otero, Rayo; Rodríguez-Noriega, Eduardo; Volkow, Patricia; Cornejo-Juarez, Patricia; González, Alejandra; Gaytan-Martinez, Jesus; Del Rocío Gónzalez-Martínez, Marisela; Vazquez-Farias, Maria; Silva-Sanchez, Jesus

    2015-02-01

    The present work describes a prevalence of 36.2% of carbapenemases IMP-, VIM-, and GES-type on 124 imipenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates. The ESBL GES-19 and carbapenemase GES-20 genes were the most prevalent (84.4%) β-lactamases among imipenem-resistant P. aeruginosa clinical isolates in Mexico. These genes are chromosomal encoded on embedded class 1 integron arrays.

  9. Inhibition of quorum sensing-mediated biofilm formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by a locally isolated Bacillus cereus.

    PubMed

    Wahman, Shaimaa; Emara, Mohamed; Shawky, Riham M; El-Domany, Ramadan A; Aboulwafa, Mohammad Mabrouk

    2015-12-01

    Quorum sensing has been shown to play a crucial role in Pseudomonas aeruginosa pathogenesis where it activates expression of myriad genes that regulate the production of important virulence factors such as biofilm formation. Antagonism of quorum sensing is an excellent target for antimicrobial therapy and represents a novel approach to combat drug resistance. In this study, Chromobacterium violaceum biosensor strain was employed as a fast, sensitive, reliable, and easy to use tool for rapid screening of soil samples for Quorum Sensing Inhibitors (QSI) and the optimal conditions for maximal QSI production were scrutinized. Screening of 127 soil isolates showed that 43 isolates were able to breakdown the HHL signal. Out of the 43 isolates, 38 isolates were able to inhibit the violet color of the biosensor and to form easily detectable zones of color inhibition around their growth. A confirmatory bioassay was carried out after concentrating the putative positive cell-free lysates. Three different isolates that belonged to Bacillus cereus group were shown to have QSI activities and their QSI activities were optimized by changing their culture conditions. Further experiments revealed that the cell-free lysates of these isolates were able to inhibit biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa clinical isolates.

  10. Detection of blaPER-1 & blaOxa10 among imipenem resistant isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from burn patients hospitalized in Shiraz Burn Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Emami, Amir; Bazargani, Abdollah; Mohammadi, Ali Akbar; Zardosht, Mitra; Seyed Jafari, Seyed Morteza

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most important Gram negative opportunistic bacteria which causes infection among burn patients. Resistance to the antibiotics in this group of bacteria is increased due to the activity of extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBLs) genes. In the current study, we investigated the prevalence of two genes (blaPER-1 & blaOxa10) related β-lactamase genes among imipenem resistance clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa in hospitalized patients. Materials and Methods: From May 2010 to March 2011, 270 P. aeruginosa isolated from hospitalized burned patients’ wounds in Shiraz Burn Hospital, were tested for Imipenem resistance by disk diffusion method. Presence of ESBLs exo-enzyme, blaPER-1 and blaOxa10 genes were also evaluated in the resistant isolate. Results: 210 (77.7%) of 270 P. aeruginosa isolates were resistant to imipenem. blaPER-1 and blaOxa10 were detected among 168 (80.0%) of imipenem resistant isolates. Furthermore, 160 (76.2%) of them had blaOxa10 gene and 84 (40.0%) of them had blaPER-1 while 63 (30.0%) resistant isolates contained both genes simultaneously. Conclusion: This study showed a high prevalence of blaPER-1 and blaOxa10 genes in hospitalized burn patients in south west of Iran. Therefore, it’s highly recommended to perform such tests routinely to evaluate the resistance pattern in order to better antibiotic selection in the burned patients. PMID:26644867

  11. Potential of Ocimum basilicum L. and Salvia officinalis L. essential oils against biofilms of P. aeruginosa clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Stojanović-Radić, Z; Pejcić, M; Stojanović, N; Sharifi-Rad, J; Stanković, N

    2016-08-29

    Biofilms are complex communities of microorganisms, responsible for more than 60% of the chronic human infections and they represent one of the leading concerns in medicine. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is human pathogenic bacteria which causes numerous diseases and is known for its ability to produce biofilm. Ocimum basilicum L. (basil) and Salvia officinalis L. (sage) are widely used plants in traditional medicine for the treatment of different conditions. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the potential of basil and sage essential oils against P. aeruginosa biofilm producing strains. The efficacy of two essential oils on P. aeruginosa biofilm forming ability was determined using crystal violet method. Out of 15 strains isolated from different clinical biological samples, two were strong, 11 moderate and one weak biofilm producer. Good efficacy of sage essential oil towards strong and weak biofilm producers, but not of basil essential oil, was observed. In the case of moderate biofilm producers, 81.8% showed lower biofilm production after incubation with the sage oil, while 63.6% showed the reduction of biofilm production after basil essential oil treatment. The obtained results showed high potential of both oils for the treatment of persistent infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

  12. Isolation and engineering of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa for enhanced cadmium bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Junli; Liu, Zhaobing; Li, Shiyu; Xu, Bo; Gong, Yahui; Yang, Yan; Sun, Hanxiao

    2016-11-25

    Although many bacteria are tolerant to heavy metals and play important roles in the immobilization of heavy metals, they cannot always be dependably reproduced under field conditions. In this work, a cadmium (Cd)-resistant bacterium was isolated from a Cd-contaminated oil field and identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pse-w). We then determined various plant growth promoting features such as the solubilization of phosphate, and the production of indole-3-acetic acid and siderophores. Lastly, we engineered the strain Pse-w-MT by targeting metallothioneins to the cell surface of Pse-w to immobilize Cd(2+) and promote plant growth. Our data revealed that Pse-w exhibited high levels of resistance to Cd(2+) (4 mM) and showed various plant growth promoting features. The engineered strain Pse-w-MT was found to adsorb Cd(2+) mainly via extracellular deposition, and had an enhanced ability for immobilizing Cd(2+) ions from the external media. Furthermore, the inoculation of Cd-polluted soil with Pse-w-MT significantly elevated the shoot and root biomass and leaf chlorophyll content. Similarly, plants inoculated with Pse-w-MT demonstrated markedly lower Cd(2+) accumulation in the root and shoot system. It was concluded that plant growth promoting rhizobacteria with a high Cd(2+) tolerance was an ideal candidate to be engineered for bioremediation and plant growth promotion against Cd-induced stress.

  13. Isolation of dicarboxylic acid- and glucose-binding proteins from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Stinson, M W; Cohen, M A; Merrick, J M

    1976-01-01

    Inducible binding proteins for C4-dicarboxylic acids (DBP) and glucose (GBP) were isolated from Pseudomonas aeruginosa by extraction of exponential-phase cells with 0.2 M MgC12 (pH 8.5) and by an osmotic shock procedure without affecting cell viability. DBP synthesis was induced by growth on aspartate, alpha-ketoglutarate, succinate, fumarate, malate, and malonate but not by growth on acetate, citrate, pyruvate, or glucose. Binding of succinate by DBP was competitively inhibited by 10-fold concentrations of fumarate and malate but not by a variety of related substances. GBP synthesis and transport of methyl alpha-glucoside by whole cells were induced by growth on glucose or pyruvate plus galactose, 2-deoxyglucose, or methyl alpha-glucoside but not by growth on gluconate, succinate, acetate, or pyruvate. The binding of radioactive glucose by GBP was significantly inhibited by 10-fold concentrations of glucose, galactose, and glucose-1-phosphate but not by the other carbohydrates tested. The binding of glucose by GBP or succinate by DBP did not result in any chemical alteration of the substrates. PMID:824281

  14. Enhancement of Rhamnolipid Production in Residual Soybean Oil by an Isolated Strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lima, C. J. B.; França, F. P.; Sérvulo, E. F. C.; Resende, M. M.; Cardoso, V. L.

    In the present work, the production of rhamnolipid from residual soybean oil (RSO) from food frying facilities was studied using a strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa of contaminated lagoon, isolated from a hydrocarbon contaminated soil. The optimization of RSO, amonium nitrate, and brewery residual yeast concentrations was accomplished by a central composite experimental design and surface response analysis. The experiments were performed in 500-mL Erlenmeyer flasks containing 50mL of mineral medium, at 170 rpm and 30±1°C, for a 48-h fermentation period. Rhamnolipid production has been monitored by measurements of surface tension, rhamnose concentration, and emulsifying activity. The best-planned results, located on the central point, have corresponded to 22g/L of RSO, 5.625 g/ L of NH4NO3' and 11.5 g/L of brewery yeast. At the maximum point the values for rhamnose and emulsifying index were 2.2g/L and 100%, respectively.

  15. Evaluation of the In Vitro Activity of Ceftazidime-Avibactam and Ceftolozane-Tazobactam against Meropenem-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Buehrle, Deanna J.; Shields, Ryan K.; Chen, Liang; Hao, Binghua; Press, Ellen G.; Alkrouk, Ammar; Potoski, Brian A.; Kreiswirth, Barry N.; Nguyen, M. Hong

    2016-01-01

    We compared ceftazidime-avibactam, ceftolozane-tazobactam, ceftazidime, cefepime, and piperacillin-tazobactam MICs for 38 meropenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates. No isolates harbored carbapenemases; 74% were oprD mutants. Ceftazidime-avibactam and ceftolozane-tazobactam were active against 92% of the isolates, including 80% that were resistant to all three β-lactams. Forty-three percent of ceftazidime-avibactam-susceptible isolates and 6% of ceftolozane-tazobactam-susceptible isolates exhibited MICs at the respective breakpoints. Ceftolozane-tazobactam and ceftazidime-avibactam are therapeutic options for meropenem-resistant P. aeruginosa infections that should be used judiciously to preserve activity. PMID:26976862

  16. Synthesis and electrochemical detection of a thiazolyl-indole natural product isolated from the nosocomial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Buzid, Alyah; Muimhneacháin, Eoin Ó; Reen, F Jerry; Hayes, Phyllis E; Pardo, Leticia M; Shang, Fengjun; O'Gara, Fergal; Sperry, Jonathan; Luong, John H T; Glennon, Jeremy D; McGlacken, Gerard P

    2016-09-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative opportunistic pathogen, capable of surviving in a broad range of natural environments and quickly acquiring resistance. It is associated with hospital-acquired infections, particularly in patients with compromised immunity, and is the primary cause of morbidity and mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. P. aeruginosa is also of nosocomial importance on dairy farms and veterinary hospitals, where it is a key morbidity factor in bovine mastitis. P. aeruginosa uses a cell-cell communication system consisting of signalling molecules to coordinate bacterial secondary metabolites, biofilm formation, and virulence. Simple and sensitive methods for the detection of biomolecules as indicators of P. aeruginosa infection would be of great clinical importance. Here, we report the synthesis of the P. aeruginosa natural product, barakacin, which was recently isolated from the bovine ruminal strain ZIO. A simple and sensitive electrochemical method was used for barakacin detection using a boron-doped diamond (BDD) and glassy carbon (GC) electrodes, based on cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). The influence of electrolyte pH on the peak potential and peak currents was also investigated. At pH 2.0, the peak current was linearly dependent on barakacin concentration (in the range used, 1-10 μM), with correlation coefficients greater than 0.98 on both electrodes. The detection limit (S/N = 3) on the BDD electrode was 100-fold lower than that obtained on the GC electrode. The optimized method using the BDD electrode was extended to bovine (cow feces) and human (sputum of a CF patient) samples. Spiked barakacin was easily detected in these matrices at a limit of 0.5 and 0.05 μM, respectively. Graphical abstract Electrochemical detection of barakacin.

  17. Sequence Types 235, 111, and 132 Predominate among Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Clinical Isolates in Croatia

    PubMed Central

    Izdebski, Radosław; Butic, Iva; Jelic, Marko; Abram, Maja; Koscak, Iva; Baraniak, Anna; Hryniewicz, Waleria; Gniadkowski, Marek; Tambic Andrasevic, Arjana

    2014-01-01

    A population analysis of 103 multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from Croatian hospitals was performed. Twelve sequence types (STs) were identified, with a predominance of international clones ST235 (serotype O11 [41%]), ST111 (serotype O12 [15%]), and ST132 (serotype O6 [11%]). Overexpression of the natural AmpC cephalosporinase was common (42%), but only a few ST235 or ST111 isolates produced VIM-1 or VIM-2 metallo-β-lactamases or PER-1 or GES-7 extended-spectrum β-lactamases. PMID:25070098

  18. Nutritional requirement among Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates recovered from respiratory clinical specimens at a tertiary hospital from South of Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Leandro Reus Rodrigues; de Freitas, Ana Lúcia Peixoto; Barth, Afonso Luís

    2011-01-01

    We screened 349 isolates of P. aeruginosa from cystic fibrosis (CF+) and non-cystic fibrosis (CF-) patients for the auxotrophy. Fourteen (4.0%) were auxotrophic and among them only one was recovered from CF-patient showing that this characteristic is strongly associated with cystic fibrosis. In total, a requirement for 5 different compounds (or combination) was verified and, of these, methionine was the most common single amino acid required. Only one auxotrophic isolate was no able to produce biofilm in vitro. PMID:24031723

  19. Label-free SRM-based relative quantification of antibiotic resistance mechanisms in Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Charretier, Yannick; Köhler, Thilo; Cecchini, Tiphaine; Bardet, Chloé; Cherkaoui, Abdessalam; Llanes, Catherine; Bogaerts, Pierre; Chatellier, Sonia; Charrier, Jean-Philippe; Schrenzel, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Both acquired and intrinsic mechanisms play a crucial role in Pseudomonas aeruginosa antibiotic resistance. Many clinically relevant resistance mechanisms result from changes in gene expression, namely multidrug efflux pump overproduction, AmpC β-lactamase induction or derepression, and inactivation or repression of the carbapenem-specific porin OprD. Changes in gene expression are usually assessed using reverse-transcription quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) assays. Here, we evaluated label-free Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM)-based mass spectrometry to directly quantify proteins involved in antibiotic resistance. We evaluated the label-free SRM using a defined set of P. aeruginosa isolates with known resistance mechanisms and compared it with RT-qPCR. Referring to efflux systems, we found a more robust relative quantification of antibiotic resistance mechanisms by SRM than RT-qPCR. The SRM-based approach was applied to a set of clinical P. aeruginosa isolates to detect antibiotic resistance proteins. This multiplexed SRM-based approach is a rapid and reliable method for the simultaneous detection and quantification of resistance mechanisms and we demonstrate its relevance for antibiotic resistance prediction.

  20. Label-free SRM-based relative quantification of antibiotic resistance mechanisms in Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates

    PubMed Central

    Charretier, Yannick; Köhler, Thilo; Cecchini, Tiphaine; Bardet, Chloé; Cherkaoui, Abdessalam; Llanes, Catherine; Bogaerts, Pierre; Chatellier, Sonia; Charrier, Jean-Philippe; Schrenzel, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Both acquired and intrinsic mechanisms play a crucial role in Pseudomonas aeruginosa antibiotic resistance. Many clinically relevant resistance mechanisms result from changes in gene expression, namely multidrug efflux pump overproduction, AmpC β-lactamase induction or derepression, and inactivation or repression of the carbapenem-specific porin OprD. Changes in gene expression are usually assessed using reverse-transcription quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) assays. Here, we evaluated label-free Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM)-based mass spectrometry to directly quantify proteins involved in antibiotic resistance. We evaluated the label-free SRM using a defined set of P. aeruginosa isolates with known resistance mechanisms and compared it with RT-qPCR. Referring to efflux systems, we found a more robust relative quantification of antibiotic resistance mechanisms by SRM than RT-qPCR. The SRM-based approach was applied to a set of clinical P. aeruginosa isolates to detect antibiotic resistance proteins. This multiplexed SRM-based approach is a rapid and reliable method for the simultaneous detection and quantification of resistance mechanisms and we demonstrate its relevance for antibiotic resistance prediction. PMID:25713571

  1. Detection of Quorum Sensing Activity in the Multidrug-Resistant Clinical Isolate Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain GB11

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Huey Jia; Ee, Robson; Cheong, Yuet Meng; Tan, Wen-Si; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2014-01-01

    A multidrug-resistant clinical bacteria strain GB11 was isolated from a wound swab on the leg of a patient. Identity of stain GB11 as Pseudomonas aeruginosa was validated by using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Detection of the production of signaling molecules, N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs), was conducted using three different bacterial biosensors. A total of four different AHLs were found to be produced by strain GB11, namely N-butyryl homoserine lactone (C4-HSL), N-hexanoylhomoserine lactone (C6-HSL), N-octanoyl homoserine lactone (C8-HSL) and N-3-oxo-dodecanoylhomoserine lactone (3-oxo-C12-HSL) using high resolution liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Of these detected AHLs, 3-oxo-C12-HSL was found to be the most abundant AHL produced by P. aeruginosa GB11. PMID:25019635

  2. Characterization of exo-s, exo-u, and alg virulence factors and antimicrobial resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from migratory Egyptian vultures from India.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Pradeep; Faridi, Farah; Mir, Irfan A; Sharma, Sandeep K

    2014-01-01

    This study of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in fecal droppings of migratory Egyptian vultures (Neophron p. percnopterus) revealed eight positive samples (n=25) by a 16S rRNA gene-based PCR in two consecutive winter seasons. Disk diffusion sensitivity testing revealed three multiple antimicrobial resistant (MAR) isolates. Genotypic characterization showed mutually exclusive exo-s and exo-u virulence genes in five and three isolates, respectively, while the alg gene was present in all of the isolates. MAR isolates with virulence genes were detected in both seasons. The Egyptian vultures could potentially be vectors of pathogenic and MAR P. aeruginosa, thereby affecting regional control and preventive measures.

  3. Plasmid Profile Analysis and bla VIM Gene Detection of Metalo β-lactamase (MBL) Producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from Clinical Samples

    PubMed Central

    M, Jeya

    2014-01-01

    Introduction:Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a frequent colonizer of hospitalized patients. They are responsible for serious infections such as meningitis, urological infections, septicemia and pneumonia. Carbapenem resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is currently increasingly reported which is often mediated by production of metallo-β-lactamase (MBL). Multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates may involve reduced cell wall permeability, production of chromosomal and plasmid mediated β lactamases, aminoglycosides modifying enzymes and an active multidrug efflux mechanism. Objective: This study is aimed to detect the presence and the nature of plasmids among metallo-β-lactamase producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates. Also to detect the presence of bla VIM gene from these isolates. Materials and Methods: Clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa showing the metalo-β-lactamase enzyme (MBL) production were isolated. The MBL production was confirmed by three different methods. From the MBL producing isolates plasmid extraction was done by alkaline lysis method. Plasmid positive isolates were subjected for blaVIM gene detection by PCR method. Results: Two thousand seventy six clinical samples yielded 316 (15.22%) Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates, out of which 141 (44.62%) were multidrug resistant. Among them 25 (17.73%) were metallo-β-lactamase enzyme producers. Plasmids were extracted from 18 out of 25 isolates tested. Five out of 18 isolates were positive for the blaVIM gene detection by the PCR amplification. Conclusion: The MBL producers were susceptible to polymyxin /colistin with MIC ranging from 0.5 – 2μg/ml. Molecular detection of specific genes bla VIM were positive among the carbapenem resistant isolates. PMID:25120980

  4. Isolation and Characterization of a Cyanophage Infecting the Toxic Cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Takashi; Takashima, Yukari; Tomaru, Yuji; Shirai, Yoko; Takao, Yoshitake; Hiroishi, Shingo; Nagasaki, Keizo

    2006-01-01

    We isolated a cyanophage (Ma-LMM01) that specifically infects a toxic strain of the bloom-forming cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa. Transmission electron microscopy showed that the virion is composed of anisometric head and a tail complex consisting of a central tube and a contractile sheath with helical symmetry. The morphological features and the host specificity suggest that Ma-LMM01 is a member of the cyanomyovirus group. Using semi-one-step growth experiments, the latent period and burst size were estimated to be 6 to 12 h and 50 to 120 infectious units per cell, respectively. The size of the phage genome was estimated to be ca. 160 kbp using pulse-field gel electrophoresis; the nucleic acid was sensitive to DNase I, Bal31, and all 14 restriction enzymes tested, suggesting that it is a linear double-stranded DNA having a low level of methylation. Phylogenetic analyses based on the deduced amino acid sequences of two open reading frames coding for ribonucleotide reductase alpha- and beta-subunits showed that Ma-LMM01 forms a sister group with marine and freshwater cyanobacteria and is apparently distinct from T4-like phages. Phylogenetic analysis of the deduced amino acid sequence of the putative sheath protein showed that Ma-LMM01 does not form a monophyletic group with either the T4-like phages or prophages, suggesting that Ma-LMM01 is distinct from other T4-like phages that have been described despite morphological similarity. The host-phage system which we studied is expected to contribute to our understanding of the ecology of Microcystis blooms and the genetics of cyanophages, and our results suggest the phages could be used to control toxic cyanobacterial blooms. PMID:16461672

  5. Environmental Pseudomonads Inhibit Cystic Fibrosis Patient-Derived Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Payel; Davis, Elizabeth; Yu, Fengan; James, Sarah; Wildschutte, Julia H; Wiegmann, Daniel D; Sherman, David H; McKay, Robert M; LiPuma, John J; Wildschutte, Hans

    2017-01-15

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen which is evolving resistance to many currently used antibiotics. While much research has been devoted to the roles of pathogenic P. aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, less is known of its ecological properties. P. aeruginosa dominates the lungs during chronic infection in CF patients, yet its abundance in some environments is less than that of other diverse groups of pseudomonads. Here, we sought to determine if clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa are vulnerable to environmental pseudomonads that dominate soil and water habitats in one-to-one competitions which may provide a source of inhibitory factors. We isolated a total of 330 pseudomonads from diverse habitats of soil and freshwater ecosystems and competed these strains against one another to determine their capacity for antagonistic activity. Over 900 individual inhibitory events were observed. Extending the analysis to P. aeruginosa isolates revealed that clinical isolates, including ones with increased alginate production, were susceptible to competition by multiple environmental strains. We performed transposon mutagenesis on one isolate and identified an ∼14.8-kb locus involved in antagonistic activity. Only two other environmental isolates were observed to carry the locus, suggesting the presence of additional unique compounds or interactions among other isolates involved in outcompeting P. aeruginosa This collection of strains represents a source of compounds that are active against multiple pathogenic strains. With the evolution of resistance of P. aeruginosa to currently used antibiotics, these environmental strains provide opportunities for novel compound discovery against drug-resistant clinical strains.

  6. Post-antibiotic effect of orbifloxacin against Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from dogs.

    PubMed

    Harada, Kazuki; Shimizu, Takae; Kataoka, Yasushi; Takahashi, Toshio

    2012-03-20

    Orbifloxacin is a fluoroquinolone drug used widely in companion animal medicine. In this study, we firstly determined post-antibiotic effects (PAEs) and post-antibiotic sub-minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) effects (PA-SMEs) of orbifloxacin for two strains each of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa from dogs, and these parameters were compared with those of enrofloxacin. At twice the MIC, the PAEs of orbifloxacin ranged from -0.28-0.93 h (mean, 0.29 h) for E. coli and -0.18-1.18 h (mean, 0.37 h) for P. aeruginosa. These parameters were not significantly different for E. coli and shorter for P. aeruginosa, compared to enrofloxacin (P < 0.05). Continued exposure to 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3 the MIC of orbifloxacin resulted in average PA-SMEs of 0.55, 1.11, and 2.03 h, respectively, for E. coli, and 1.04, 1.40, and 2.47 h, respectively, for P. aeruginosa. These PA-SMEs, which had no significant differences with those of enrofloxacin, were significantly longer than the corresponding PAEs (P < 0.05). These results suggest that the PA-SME of orbifloxacin for E. coli and P. aeruginosa can be meaningfully prolonged by increase of sub-MICs.

  7. Molecular detection of metallo-β-lactamase gene blaVIM-1 in imipenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated from hospitalized patients in the hospitals of Isfahan

    PubMed Central

    Sedighi, Mansour; Vaez, Hamid; Moghoofeie, Mohsen; Hadifar, Shima; Oryan, Golfam; Faghri, Jamshid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen that causes serious problems, especially in people, who have immunodeficiency. In recent times, metallo-β-lactamase (MBLs) resistance in this bacterium has led to some difficulties in treating bacterial infections. The metallo-beta-lactamase family of genes, including blaVIM-1, is being reported with increasing frequency worldwide. The aim of this study is the detection of the metallo-β-lactamase gene blaVIM-1 in imipenem-resistant P. aeruginosa (IRPA) strains isolated from hospitalized patients. Materials and Methods: In this study, 106 P. aeruginosa samples were isolated from various nosocomial infections. The isolates were identified, tested for susceptibility to various antimicrobial agents by the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method, and all the imipenem-resistant isolates were screened for the presence of MBLs by using the combined disk (IMP-EDTA). The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of imipenem was determined by E-test on the Mueller-Hinton agar. To detect the blaVIM-1 gene, the isolates were subjected to a polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results: Of all the P. aeruginosa isolates, 62 (58.5%) were found to be imipenem-resistant P. aeruginosa (MIC ≥32 μg/ml). Twenty-six (42%) of the imipenem-resistant isolates were MBL positive. None of these isolates carried the blaVIM-1 gene using the PCR assay. Conclusion: The results demonstrated the serious therapeutic threat of the MBL-producing P. aeruginosa populations. The rate of imipenem resistance due to MBL was increased dramatically. Early detection and infection-control practices are the best antimicrobial strategies for this organism. None of MBL-producing isolates in this study carry the blaVIM-1 gene; therefore, another gene in the MBL family should be investigated. PMID:25802826

  8. Characterization of the Newly Isolated Lytic Bacteriophages KTN6 and KT28 and Their Efficacy against Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm.

    PubMed

    Danis-Wlodarczyk, Katarzyna; Olszak, Tomasz; Arabski, Michal; Wasik, Slawomir; Majkowska-Skrobek, Grazyna; Augustyniak, Daria; Gula, Grzegorz; Briers, Yves; Jang, Ho Bin; Vandenheuvel, Dieter; Duda, Katarzyna Anna; Lavigne, Rob; Drulis-Kawa, Zuzanna

    2015-01-01

    We here describe two novel lytic phages, KT28 and KTN6, infecting Pseudomonas aeruginosa, isolated from a sewage sample from an irrigated field near Wroclaw, in Poland. Both viruses show characteristic features of Pbunalikevirus genus within the Myoviridae family with respect to shape and size of head/tail, as well as LPS host receptor recognition. Genome analysis confirmed the similarity to other PB1-related phages, ranging between 48 and 96%. Pseudomonas phage KT28 has a genome size of 66,381 bp and KTN6 of 65,994 bp. The latent period, burst size, stability and host range was determined for both viruses under standard laboratory conditions. Biofilm eradication efficacy was tested on peg-lid plate assay and PET membrane surface. Significant reduction of colony forming units was observed (70-90%) in 24 h to 72 h old Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 biofilm cultures for both phages. Furthermore, a pyocyanin and pyoverdin reduction tests reveal that tested phages lowers the amount of both secreted dyes in 48-72 h old biofilms. Diffusion and goniometry experiments revealed the increase of diffusion rate through the biofilm matrix after phage application. These characteristics indicate these phages could be used to prevent Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections and biofilm formation. It was also shown, that PB1-related phage treatment of biofilm caused the emergence of stable phage-resistant mutants growing as small colony variants.

  9. Effect of Quorum Quenching Lactonase in Clinical Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Comparison with Quorum Sensing Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Guendouze, Assia; Plener, Laure; Bzdrenga, Janek; Jacquet, Pauline; Rémy, Benjamin; Elias, Mikael; Lavigne, Jean-Philippe; Daudé, David; Chabrière, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram negative pathogenic bacterium involved in many human infections including otitis, keratitis, pneumonia, and diabetic foot ulcers. P. aeruginosa uses a communication system, referred to as quorum sensing (QS), to adopt a group behavior by synchronizing the expression of certain genes. Among the regulated traits, secretion of proteases or siderophores, motility and biofilm formation are mainly involved in the pathogenicity. Many efforts have been dedicated to the development of quorum sensing inhibitors (QSI) and quorum quenching (QQ) agents to disrupt QS. QQ enzymes have been particularly considered as they may act in a catalytic way without entering the cell. Here we focus on the lactonase SsoPox which was previously investigated for its ability to degrade the signaling molecules, acyl-homoserine lactones, in particular on the engineered variant SsoPox-W263I. We highlight the potential of SsoPox-W263I to inhibit the virulence of 51 clinical P. aeruginosa isolates from diabetic foot ulcers by decreasing the secretion of two virulence factors, proteases and pyocyanin, as well as biofilm formation. We further compared the effect of SsoPox-W263I to the comprehensively described QSI, 5-fluorouracil and C-30. We found the lactonase SsoPox-W263I to be significantly more effective than the tested QSI at their respective concentration optimum and to retain its activity after immobilization steps, paving the way for future therapeutic applications.

  10. Removal of toxic Co-EDTA complex by a halophilic solar-salt-pan isolate Pseudomonas aeruginosa SPB-1.

    PubMed

    Paraneeiswaran, A; Shukla, Sudhir K; Subba Rao, T; Prashanth, K

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a promising bioremediation approach was developed to remove [Co(III)-EDTA](-) complex that is generated during the waste management process. Though several studies have been reported on bioremediation of cobalt, the removal of [Co(III)-EDTA](-) complex has not been tested. A [Co(III)-EDTA](-) resistant bacterium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa SPB-1 was isolated from the solar-salt-pan and physical parameters were optimized for its growth. The various studies showed that the removal of [Co(III)-EDTA](-) from the bulk liquid was due to the adsorption of the complex by the biomass. Using absorption/desorption isotherm over a range of pH (1-8), the maximum adsorption of [Co(III)-EDTA](-) was found to be at pH 7.0 and maximum desorption from the biomass occurred at pH 1.0, thus rendering an ion exchange property to P. aeruginosa SPB-1 biomass. P. aeruginosa SPB-1 biomass could be used as bio-resin that showed 80.4±3.27% adsorption capacity up to fourth cycle and the biomass was viable till the ninth cycle with 10.5±7.3% adsorption. Radiation tolerance potential i.e. D10 value for the strain was found to be ~300 Gy, which suggests the potential use of the bacterium in bioremediation of moderately active nuclear waste.

  11. Characterization of the Newly Isolated Lytic Bacteriophages KTN6 and KT28 and Their Efficacy against Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Danis-Wlodarczyk, Katarzyna; Olszak, Tomasz; Arabski, Michal; Wasik, Slawomir; Majkowska-Skrobek, Grazyna; Augustyniak, Daria; Gula, Grzegorz; Briers, Yves; Jang, Ho Bin; Vandenheuvel, Dieter; Duda, Katarzyna Anna; Lavigne, Rob; Drulis-Kawa, Zuzanna

    2015-01-01

    We here describe two novel lytic phages, KT28 and KTN6, infecting Pseudomonas aeruginosa, isolated from a sewage sample from an irrigated field near Wroclaw, in Poland. Both viruses show characteristic features of Pbunalikevirus genus within the Myoviridae family with respect to shape and size of head/tail, as well as LPS host receptor recognition. Genome analysis confirmed the similarity to other PB1-related phages, ranging between 48 and 96%. Pseudomonas phage KT28 has a genome size of 66,381 bp and KTN6 of 65,994 bp. The latent period, burst size, stability and host range was determined for both viruses under standard laboratory conditions. Biofilm eradication efficacy was tested on peg-lid plate assay and PET membrane surface. Significant reduction of colony forming units was observed (70-90%) in 24 h to 72 h old Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 biofilm cultures for both phages. Furthermore, a pyocyanin and pyoverdin reduction tests reveal that tested phages lowers the amount of both secreted dyes in 48-72 h old biofilms. Diffusion and goniometry experiments revealed the increase of diffusion rate through the biofilm matrix after phage application. These characteristics indicate these phages could be used to prevent Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections and biofilm formation. It was also shown, that PB1-related phage treatment of biofilm caused the emergence of stable phage-resistant mutants growing as small colony variants. PMID:25996839

  12. Effect of Quorum Quenching Lactonase in Clinical Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Comparison with Quorum Sensing Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Guendouze, Assia; Plener, Laure; Bzdrenga, Janek; Jacquet, Pauline; Rémy, Benjamin; Elias, Mikael; Lavigne, Jean-Philippe; Daudé, David; Chabrière, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram negative pathogenic bacterium involved in many human infections including otitis, keratitis, pneumonia, and diabetic foot ulcers. P. aeruginosa uses a communication system, referred to as quorum sensing (QS), to adopt a group behavior by synchronizing the expression of certain genes. Among the regulated traits, secretion of proteases or siderophores, motility and biofilm formation are mainly involved in the pathogenicity. Many efforts have been dedicated to the development of quorum sensing inhibitors (QSI) and quorum quenching (QQ) agents to disrupt QS. QQ enzymes have been particularly considered as they may act in a catalytic way without entering the cell. Here we focus on the lactonase SsoPox which was previously investigated for its ability to degrade the signaling molecules, acyl-homoserine lactones, in particular on the engineered variant SsoPox-W263I. We highlight the potential of SsoPox-W263I to inhibit the virulence of 51 clinical P. aeruginosa isolates from diabetic foot ulcers by decreasing the secretion of two virulence factors, proteases and pyocyanin, as well as biofilm formation. We further compared the effect of SsoPox-W263I to the comprehensively described QSI, 5-fluorouracil and C-30. We found the lactonase SsoPox-W263I to be significantly more effective than the tested QSI at their respective concentration optimum and to retain its activity after immobilization steps, paving the way for future therapeutic applications. PMID:28261183

  13. Two Novel Class I Integron Arrays Containing IMP-18 Metallo-β-Lactamase Gene in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Clinical Isolates from Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, T.; Vazquez, G. J.; Aquino, E. E.; Goering, R. V.

    2012-01-01

    During a β-lactam resistance surveillance study, 12 IMP-18-positive Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates belonging to 9 different pulsed-field gel electrophoresis groups were identified. In nine isolates, a class I integron with a novel gene array was identified that contained blaIMP-18 and blaOXA-224, while in two isolates the class I integron contained blaIMP-18 and blaOXA-2 but in a new arrangement. Our findings show the dissemination of two novel class I integrons in P. aeruginosa from different regions of Puerto Rico. PMID:22290962

  14. Genes required for and effects of alginate overproduction induced by growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on Pseudomonas isolation agar supplemented with ammonium metavanadate.

    PubMed

    Damron, F Heath; Barbier, Mariette; McKenney, Elizabeth S; Schurr, Michael J; Goldberg, Joanna B

    2013-09-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that can adapt to changing environments and can secrete an exopolysaccharide known as alginate as a protection response, resulting in a colony morphology and phenotype referred to as mucoid. However, how P. aeruginosa senses its environment and activates alginate overproduction is not fully understood. Previously, we showed that Pseudomonas isolation agar supplemented with ammonium metavanadate (PIAAMV) induces P. aeruginosa to overproduce alginate. Vanadate is a phosphate mimic and causes protein misfolding by disruption of disulfide bonds. Here we used PIAAMV to characterize the pathways involved in inducible alginate production and tested the global effects of P. aeruginosa growth on PIAAMV by a mutant library screen, by transcriptomics, and in a murine acute virulence model. The PA14 nonredundant mutant library was screened on PIAAMV to identify new genes that are required for the inducible alginate stress response. A functionally diverse set of genes encoding products involved in cell envelope biogenesis, peptidoglycan remodeling, uptake of phosphate and iron, phenazine biosynthesis, and other processes were identified as positive regulators of the mucoid phenotype on PIAAMV. Transcriptome analysis of P. aeruginosa cultures growing in the presence of vanadate showed differential expression of genes involved in virulence, envelope biogenesis, and cell stress pathways. In this study, it was observed that growth on PIAAMV attenuates P. aeruginosa in a mouse pneumonia model. Induction of alginate overproduction occurs as a stress response to protect P. aeruginosa, but it may be possible to modulate and inhibit these pathways based on the new genes identified in this study.

  15. Presence of exoY, exoS, exoU and exoT genes, antibiotic resistance and biofilm production among Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates in Northwest Iran.

    PubMed

    Azimi, Somayeh; Kafil, Hossein Samadi; Baghi, Hossein Bannazadeh; Shokrian, Saeed; Najaf, Khadijeh; Asgharzadeh, Mohammad; Yousefi, Mehdi; Shahrivar, Firooz; Aghazadeh, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Hintergrund:Pseudomonas aeruginosa, ein Gram-negatives Stäbchenbakterium, besitzt eine wichtige Rolle als Krankheitserreger. Daher untersuchten wir Pseudomonas aeruginosa-Isolate im Nordwestiran auf das Vorkommen von exo-Genen und Biofilmbildnern. Material und Methode: 160 P. aeruginosa-Isolate wurden biochemisch identifiziert und die Antibiotikaresistenz charakterisiert. Die Fähigkeit zur Biofilmbildung wurde im Mikrotiterplatten-Assay, das Vorkommen von exo-Genen mit Allel-spezifischer PCR (Polymerase-Kettenreaktion) analysiert. Zur statistischen Analyse wurde der Chi-Quadrat-Test eingesetzt.Ergebnisse: Als effektivste Antibiotika erwiesen sich Colistin und Polymyxin B. 87% der Isolate waren Biofilmbildner, davon 69% mit massiver Biofilmbildung. In 55% der Isolate wurden exoY, in 52% exoU, in 26,3% exoS und in 5% exoT nachgewiesen. Schlussfolgerung: Die Analyse ergab eine unterschiedliche Verteilung der exo-Gene bei klinischen Isolaten von P. aeruginosa im Nordwestiran. ExoS und exoU kamen häufiger bei nicht biofilmbildenen Isolaten, exoY häufiger bei Biofilmbildnern vor. Die Ergebnisse können ein Hinweis auf die Bedeutung von exoY bei Biofilm bildenden Pseudomonas aeruginosa-Isolaten sein.

  16. Effect of Shear Stress on Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated from the Cystic Fibrosis Lung

    PubMed Central

    Dingemans, Jozef; Monsieurs, Pieter; Yu, Sung-Huan; Crabbé, Aurélie; Förstner, Konrad U.; Malfroot, Anne

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chronic colonization of the lungs by Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. To gain insights into the characteristic biofilm phenotype of P. aeruginosa in the CF lungs, mimicking the CF lung environment is critical. We previously showed that growth of the non-CF-adapted P. aeruginosa PAO1 strain in a rotating wall vessel, a device that simulates the low fluid shear (LS) conditions present in the CF lung, leads to the formation of in-suspension, self-aggregating biofilms. In the present study, we determined the phenotypic and transcriptomic changes associated with the growth of a highly adapted, transmissible P. aeruginosa CF strain in artificial sputum medium under LS conditions. Robust self-aggregating biofilms were observed only under LS conditions. Growth under LS conditions resulted in the upregulation of genes involved in stress response, alginate biosynthesis, denitrification, glycine betaine biosynthesis, glycerol metabolism, and cell shape maintenance, while genes involved in phenazine biosynthesis, type VI secretion, and multidrug efflux were downregulated. In addition, a number of small RNAs appeared to be involved in the response to shear stress. Finally, quorum sensing was found to be slightly but significantly affected by shear stress, resulting in higher production of autoinducer molecules during growth under high fluid shear (HS) conditions. In summary, our study revealed a way to modulate the behavior of a highly adapted P. aeruginosa CF strain by means of introducing shear stress, driving it from a biofilm lifestyle to a more planktonic lifestyle. PMID:27486191

  17. Predominance of carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates carrying blaIMP and blaVIM metallo-β-lactamases in a major hospital in Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Toval, Francisco; Guzmán-Marte, Anel; Madriz, Vivian; Somogyi, Teresita; Rodríguez, César; García, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the molecular basis of the resistance to carbapenems in clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa recovered from a tertiary-level health facility in San José, Costa Rica. A total of 198 non-duplicated isolates were evaluated for their susceptibility to β-lactams, aminoglycosides and fluoroquinolones. The production of metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs), the presence of MBL encoding genes (blaIMP, blaVIM and blaGIM-1) and the occurrence of these genes within class 1 integrons were investigated. In addition, an ERIC2 PCR fingerprinting method was used to elucidate the distribution of the detected MBL genes within the strain collection. Of the 198 isolates tested, 125 (63.1 %) were categorized as carbapenem-resistant. The majority (88.8 %) of the carbapemen-resistant isolates also showed resistance to ceftazidime, cefepime, aztreonam, ticarcillin/clavulanic acid, amikacin, gentamicin, tobramycin, ciprofloxacin and gatifloxacin. Among the carbapenem-resistant isolates, 102 (81.6 %) showed MBL activity. Strikingly, both blaIMP and blaVIM genes were simultaneously detected in most (94.1 %) of the 102 MBL producers. Five carbapenem-resistant MBL producers were positive only for blaIMP genes. Almost 70 % of the isolates examined harboured the intI1 gene, accompanied by the sul1 and qacEΔ1 genes in 136 (99 %) and 122 (89 %) isolates, respectively. The majority (94.4 %) of the carbapenem-resistant isolates carried the intI1 gene, in contrast to 26 % of the carbapenem-susceptible isolates. Ninety-three out of 96 (96.9 %) isolates carrying both blaIMP and blaVIM genes also harboured the intI1, sul1 and qacEΔ1 genes. Gene cassettes from carbapenem-susceptible and MBL-negative carbapenem-resistant isolates encoded aminoglycoside-resistance enzymes (aadA2, aadA4 and aadA6) as well as orfD and qacF genes. RAPD analysis distributed 126 of the isolates in 29 clusters. Eighty of the 90 blaIMP (+) blaVIM (+) isolates were sorted into 16

  18. Unraveling genomic and phenotypic nature of multidrug-resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa VRFPA04 isolated from keratitis patient.

    PubMed

    N, Murugan; J, Malathi; V, Umashankar; H N, Madhavan

    2016-12-01

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa VRFPA04, obtained from a keratitis patient was found to exhibit resistance to betalactam (Penicillins, cephalosporins, including carbapenems, except aztreonam), aminoglycosides, quinolone group of drugs and susceptible to colistin. The complete genome sequencing of the ocular isolate to measure and ascertain the degree of multidrug resistance in VRFPA04 strain resulted in 6,818,030bp (6.8Mb) genome sizes, which happen to be the third largest genome available in the Genbank to date. Two chromosomally integrated class I integrons carrying blaVIM-2 carbapenemase gene, multiple secretory systems consisting of types I-VI and VIII proteins and ocular virulence factors exo-T, Y, U and exotoxin A, a gene that inhibits protein synthesis which could have caused corneal cell death and Phytohormone auxin biosynthetic protein were detected in the genome of VRFPA04 Genome. In addition, 58 Regions of Genomic Plasticity (RGPs) regions, multiple phage genomes, genomic islands, CRISPR genes and RND family efflux pumps, such as MexCD-OprJ and MexEF-OprN and its regulators, MexT and MexR, were unraveled in VRFPA04. Thus, the current study reveals the virulence factors and resistome nature of an ocular isolate P aeruginosa VRFPA04 genome.

  19. Isolation and characterization of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa from a virgin Brazilian Amazon region with potential to degrade atrazine.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Ana Flavia Tonelli; da Silva, Michelle Barbosa Partata; Martins, Vinicius Vicente; Miranda, Carlos Eduardo Saraiva; Stehling, Eliana Guedes

    2014-12-01

    The use of pesticides to increase agricultural production can result in the contamination of the environment, causing changes in the genetic structure of organisms and in the loss of biodiversity. This practice is also inducing changes in the rainforest ecosystem. In this work, a Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from a preservation soil area of the Brazilian Amazon Forest, without usage of any pesticide, was evaluated for its potential to degrade atrazine. This isolate presented all responsible genes (atzA, atzB, atzC, atzD, atzE, and atzF) for atrazine mineralization and demonstrated capacity to use atrazine as a nitrogen source, having achieved a reduction of 44 % of the initial concentration of atrazine after 24 h. These results confirm gene dispersion and/or a possible contamination of the area with the herbicide, which reinforces global concern of the increase and intensive use of pesticides worldwide.

  20. Mutations in β-Lactamase AmpC Increase Resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates to Antipseudomonal Cephalosporins

    PubMed Central

    Berrazeg, M.; Jeannot, K.; Ntsogo Enguéné, Véronique Yvette; Broutin, I.; Loeffert, S.; Fournier, D.

    2015-01-01

    Mutation-dependent overproduction of intrinsic β-lactamase AmpC is considered the main cause of resistance of clinical strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to antipseudomonal penicillins and cephalosporins. Analysis of 31 AmpC-overproducing clinical isolates exhibiting a greater resistance to ceftazidime than to piperacillin-tazobactam revealed the presence of 17 mutations in the β-lactamase, combined with various polymorphic amino acid substitutions. When overexpressed in AmpC-deficient P. aeruginosa 4098, the genes coding for 20/23 of these AmpC variants were found to confer a higher (2-fold to >64-fold) resistance to ceftazidime and ceftolozane-tazobactam than did the gene from reference strain PAO1. The mutations had variable effects on the MICs of ticarcillin, piperacillin-tazobactam, aztreonam, and cefepime. Depending on their location in the AmpC structure and their impact on β-lactam MICs, they could be assigned to 4 distinct groups. Most of the mutations affecting the omega loop, the R2 domain, and the C-terminal end of the protein were shared with extended-spectrum AmpCs (ESACs) from other Gram-negative species. Interestingly, two new mutations (F121L and P154L) were predicted to enlarge the substrate binding pocket by disrupting the stacking between residues F121 and P154. We also found that the reported ESACs emerged locally in a variety of clones, some of which are epidemic and did not require hypermutability. Taken together, our results show that P. aeruginosa is able to adapt to efficacious β-lactams, including the newer cephalosporin ceftolozane, through a variety of mutations affecting its intrinsic β-lactamase, AmpC. Data suggest that the rates of ESAC-producing mutants are ≥1.5% in the clinical setting. PMID:26248364

  1. NET formation induced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa cystic fibrosis isolates measured as release of myeloperoxidase-DNA and neutrophil elastase-DNA complexes.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Dae-goon; Floyd, Madison; Winn, Matthew; Moskowitz, Samuel M; Rada, Balázs

    2014-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) airway disease is characterized by Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection and recruitment of neutrophil granulocytes. Neutrophil granule components (myeloperoxidase (MPO), human neutrophil elastase (HNE)), extracellular DNA and P. aeruginosa can all be found in the CF respiratory tract and have all been associated with worsening CF lung function. Pseudomonas-induced formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) offers a likely mechanism for release of MPO, HNE and DNA from neutrophils. NETs are composed of a DNA backbone decorated with granule proteins like MPO and HNE. Here we sought to examine whether CF clinical isolates of Pseudomonas are capable of inducing NET release from human neutrophil granulocytes. We used two methods to quantify NETs. We modified a previously employed ELISA that detects MPO-DNA complexes and established a new HNE-DNA ELISA. We show that these methods reliably quantify MPO-DNA and HNE-DNA complexes, measures of NET formation. We have found that CF isolates of P. aeruginosa stimulate robust respiratory burst and NET release in human neutrophils. By comparing paired "early" and "late" bacterial isolates obtained from the same CF patient we have found that early isolates induced significantly more NET release than late isolates. Our data support that Pseudomonas-induced NET release represents an important mechanism for release of neutrophil-derived CF inflammatory mediators, and confirm that decreased induction of NET formation is required for long-term adaptation of P. aeruginosa to CF airways.

  2. Characterization of stress-responsive behavior in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO: isolation of Tn3-lacZYA fusions with novel damage-inducible (din) promoters.

    PubMed

    Warner-Bartnicki, A L; Miller, R V

    1992-03-01

    Although the pervasive soil and water microorganism Pseudomonas aeruginosa demonstrates heightened sensitivity to UV radiation, this species possesses a recA gene that, based on structural and functional properties, could mediate a DNA damage-responsive regulon similar to the SOS regulon of Escherichia coli. To determine whether P. aeruginosa encodes such stress-inducible genes, the response of P. aeruginosa to DNA-damaging agents including far-UV radiation (UVC) and the quinolone antimicrobial agent norfloxacin was investigated by monitoring the expression of fusions linking P. aeruginosa promoters to a beta-galactosidase reporter gene. These fusions were obtained by Tn3-HoHoI insertional mutagenesis of a P. aeruginosa genomic library. Eight different damage-inducible (din) gene fusions were isolated which lack homology to the P. aeruginosa recA gene. Expression of the three gene fusions studied, dinA::lacZYA, dinB::lacZYA, and dinC::lacZYA, increased following UVC and quinolone exposure but not following heat shock. Similar to E. coli SOS genes, the din genes were induced to different extents and with dissimilar kinetics following UVC irradiation.

  3. Characterization of stress-responsive behavior in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO: isolation of Tn3-lacZYA fusions with novel damage-inducible (din) promoters.

    PubMed Central

    Warner-Bartnicki, A L; Miller, R V

    1992-01-01

    Although the pervasive soil and water microorganism Pseudomonas aeruginosa demonstrates heightened sensitivity to UV radiation, this species possesses a recA gene that, based on structural and functional properties, could mediate a DNA damage-responsive regulon similar to the SOS regulon of Escherichia coli. To determine whether P. aeruginosa encodes such stress-inducible genes, the response of P. aeruginosa to DNA-damaging agents including far-UV radiation (UVC) and the quinolone antimicrobial agent norfloxacin was investigated by monitoring the expression of fusions linking P. aeruginosa promoters to a beta-galactosidase reporter gene. These fusions were obtained by Tn3-HoHoI insertional mutagenesis of a P. aeruginosa genomic library. Eight different damage-inducible (din) gene fusions were isolated which lack homology to the P. aeruginosa recA gene. Expression of the three gene fusions studied, dinA::lacZYA, dinB::lacZYA, and dinC::lacZYA, increased following UVC and quinolone exposure but not following heat shock. Similar to E. coli SOS genes, the din genes were induced to different extents and with dissimilar kinetics following UVC irradiation. PMID:1312530

  4. Similar frequencies of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates producing KPC and VIM carbapenemases in diverse genetic clones at tertiary-care hospitals in Medellín, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Vanegas, Johanna M; Cienfuegos, Astrid V; Ocampo, Ana M; López, Lucelly; del Corral, Helena; Roncancio, Gustavo; Sierra, Patricia; Echeverri-Toro, Lina; Ospina, Sigifredo; Maldonado, Natalia; Robledo, Carlos; Restrepo, Andrea; Jiménez, J Natalia

    2014-11-01

    Carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa has become a serious health threat worldwide due to the limited options available for its treatment. Understanding its epidemiology contributes to the control of antibiotic resistance. The aim of this study was to describe the clinical and molecular characteristics of infections caused by carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa isolates in five tertiary-care hospitals in Medellín, Colombia. A cross-sectional study was conducted in five tertiary-care hospitals from June 2012 to March 2014. All hospitalized patients infected by carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa were included. Clinical information was obtained from medical records. Molecular analyses included PCR for detection of bla(VIM), bla(IMP), bla(NDM), bla(OXA-48), and bla(KPC) genes plus pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) for molecular typing. A total of 235 patients were enrolled: 91.1% of them were adults (n = 214), 88.1% (n = 207) had prior antibiotic use, and 14.9% (n = 35) had urinary tract infections. The bla(VIM-2) and bla(KPC-2) genes were detected in 13.6% (n = 32) and 11.5% (n = 27), respectively, of all isolates. Two isolates harbored both genes simultaneously. For KPC-producing isolates, PFGE revealed closely related strains within each hospital, and sequence types (STs) ST362 and ST235 and two new STs were found by MLST. With PFGE, VIM-producing isolates appeared highly diverse, and MLST revealed ST111 in four hospitals and five new STs. These results show that KPC-producing P. aeruginosa is currently disseminating rapidly and occurring at a frequency similar to that of VIM-producing P. aeruginosa isolates (approximately 1:1 ratio) in Medellín, Colombia. Diverse genetic backgrounds among resistant strains suggest an excessive antibiotic pressure resulting in the selection of resistant strains.

  5. Similar Frequencies of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates Producing KPC and VIM Carbapenemases in Diverse Genetic Clones at Tertiary-Care Hospitals in Medellín, Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Vanegas, Johanna M.; Cienfuegos, Astrid V.; Ocampo, Ana M.; López, Lucelly; del Corral, Helena; Roncancio, Gustavo; Sierra, Patricia; Echeverri-Toro, Lina; Ospina, Sigifredo; Maldonado, Natalia; Robledo, Carlos; Restrepo, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa has become a serious health threat worldwide due to the limited options available for its treatment. Understanding its epidemiology contributes to the control of antibiotic resistance. The aim of this study was to describe the clinical and molecular characteristics of infections caused by carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa isolates in five tertiary-care hospitals in Medellín, Colombia. A cross-sectional study was conducted in five tertiary-care hospitals from June 2012 to March 2014. All hospitalized patients infected by carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa were included. Clinical information was obtained from medical records. Molecular analyses included PCR for detection of blaVIM, blaIMP, blaNDM, blaOXA-48, and blaKPC genes plus pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) for molecular typing. A total of 235 patients were enrolled: 91.1% of them were adults (n = 214), 88.1% (n = 207) had prior antibiotic use, and 14.9% (n = 35) had urinary tract infections. The blaVIM-2 and blaKPC-2 genes were detected in 13.6% (n = 32) and 11.5% (n = 27), respectively, of all isolates. Two isolates harbored both genes simultaneously. For KPC-producing isolates, PFGE revealed closely related strains within each hospital, and sequence types (STs) ST362 and ST235 and two new STs were found by MLST. With PFGE, VIM-producing isolates appeared highly diverse, and MLST revealed ST111 in four hospitals and five new STs. These results show that KPC-producing P. aeruginosa is currently disseminating rapidly and occurring at a frequency similar to that of VIM-producing P. aeruginosa isolates (approximately 1:1 ratio) in Medellín, Colombia. Diverse genetic backgrounds among resistant strains suggest an excessive antibiotic pressure resulting in the selection of resistant strains. PMID:25210071

  6. Application of Whole-Genome Sequencing Data for O-Specific Antigen Analysis and In Silico Serotyping of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Thrane, Sandra Wingaard; Taylor, Véronique L.; Lund, Ole

    2016-01-01

    Accurate typing methods are required for efficient infection control. The emergence of whole-genome sequencing (WGS) technologies has enabled the development of genome-based methods applicable for routine typing and surveillance of bacterial pathogens. In this study, we developed the Pseudomonas aeruginosa serotyper (PAst) program, which enabled in silico serotyping of P. aeruginosa isolates using WGS data. PAst has been made publically available as a web service and aptly facilitates high-throughput serotyping analysis. The program overcomes critical issues such as the loss of in vitro typeability often associated with P. aeruginosa isolates from chronic infections and quickly determines the serogroup of an isolate based on the sequence of the O-specific antigen (OSA) gene cluster. Here, PAst analysis of 1,649 genomes resulted in successful serogroup assignments in 99.27% of the cases. This frequency is rarely achievable by conventional serotyping methods. The limited number of nontypeable isolates found using PAst was the result of either a complete absence of OSA genes in the genomes or the artifact of genomic misassembly. With PAst, P. aeruginosa serotype data can be obtained from WGS information alone. PAst is a highly efficient alternative to conventional serotyping methods in relation to outbreak surveillance of serotype O12 and other high-risk clones, while maintaining backward compatibility to historical serotype data. PMID:27098958

  7. [The experience of implementation of REP-u RAPD-polymerase chain reaction in epidemiologic characteristic of nosocomial isolates Pseudomonas aeruginosa].

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, M V; Maksimova, A V; Karpunina, T I

    2015-03-01

    The article presents comparative evaluation of diagnostic value of technique REP- u RAPD-polymerase chain reaction applied under genetic typing of clinical isolates of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa. The strains are isolated in different hospital departments of medical institutions in adult (8 medical institutions; n = 145) and children (5 medical institutions; n = 151) medical networks. The results of study demonstrated different boundary capacity of three reactions. The Simpson discrimination index made up to 0.993, 0.875 and 0.639 for RAPD-, ERIC- and BOX-polymerase chain reaction correspondingly. The RAPD-polymerase chain reaction makes it possible to detect individual characteristics of strains. Out of two alternatives the REP-polymerase chain reaction demonstrated its advantage, besides only with one primer ERIC2. The BOX-polymerase chain reaction has a least discriminating capacity under typing of isolates P. aeruginosa, detecting only species' characteristics. The clinical strains P. aeruginosa are distributed on 24 genome groups and 52 isolates had individual genotypes. The evaluation of results of genetic typing permitted to point out both similarity of tendencies in propagation of strains of P. aeruginosa among hospitalized adults and adolescents and specificity of detection in neonatal clinics. It is obvious that hospitals of different profiles, including departments of reanimation and intensive therapy represent specific ecological environment significantly different in its level of endogenous and exogenous infection.

  8. Phenol degrading ability of Rhodococcus pyrinidivorans and Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from activated sludge plants in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Sheena; Chetty, Dereshen; Ramdhani, Nishani; Bux, Faizal

    2013-01-01

    Phenol, a common constituent in many industrial wastewaters is a major pollutant and has several adverse effects on the environment. The potential of various microorganisms to utilize phenol for their metabolic activity has been observed to be an effective means of remediating this toxic compound from the environment particularly wastewater. Five indigenous bacterial isolates (PD1-PD5) were obtained from phenol bearing industrial wastewater using the mineral salts medium. The isolates were further characterized based on their morphology, biochemical reactions and 16S rRNA phylogeny. The 16S rRNA sequence analysis using universal primers (27f/1492r) revealed that PD1, PD2, PD3 and PD4 were closely related to the actinomycete Rhodococcus pyrinidivorans (99%) and PD5 to Pseudomonas aeruginosa (99%). Growth kinetic patterns and phenol degradation abilities of the two representative isolates (PD1 and PD5) were also evaluated. Both the species were effective in utilizing phenol as the sole carbon source and could tolerate phenol concentrations of up to 500 to 600 mg/L. The ability of these isolates to utilize higher concentrations of phenol as their sole carbon source makes them potential candidates and better competitors in the bioremediation process.

  9. Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus directly attacks Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus Cystic fibrosis isolates.

    PubMed

    Iebba, Valerio; Totino, Valentina; Santangelo, Floriana; Gagliardi, Antonella; Ciotoli, Luana; Virga, Alessandra; Ambrosi, Cecilia; Pompili, Monica; De Biase, Riccardo V; Selan, Laura; Artini, Marco; Pantanella, Fabrizio; Mura, Francesco; Passariello, Claudio; Nicoletti, Mauro; Nencioni, Lucia; Trancassini, Maria; Quattrucci, Serena; Schippa, Serena

    2014-01-01

    Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus is a predator bacterial species found in the environment and within the human gut, able to attack Gram-negative prey. Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a genetic disease which usually presents lung colonization by Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Staphylococcus aureus biofilms. Here, we investigated the predatory behavior of B. bacteriovorus against these two pathogenic species with: (1) broth culture; (2) "static" biofilms; (3) field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM); (4) "flow" biofilms; (5) zymographic technique. We had the first evidence of B. bacteriovorus survival with a Gram-positive prey, revealing a direct cell-to-cell contact with S. aureus and a new "epibiotic" foraging strategy imaged with FESEM. Mean attaching time of HD100 to S. aureus cells was 185 s, while "static" and "flow" S. aureus biofilms were reduced by 74 (at 24 h) and 46% (at 20 h), respectively. Furthermore, zymograms showed a differential bacteriolytic activity exerted by the B. bacteriovorus lysates on P. aeruginosa and S. aureus. The dual foraging system against Gram-negative (periplasmic) and Gram-positive (epibiotic) prey could suggest the use of B. bacteriovorus as a "living antibiotic" in CF, even if further studies are required to simulate its in vivo predatory behavior.

  10. Biofilm Filtrates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strains Isolated from Cystic Fibrosis Patients Inhibit Preformed Aspergillus fumigatus Biofilms via Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Shirazi, Fazal; Ferreira, Jose A. G.; Stevens, David A.; Clemons, Karl V.; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pa) and Aspergillus fumigatus (Af) colonize cystic fibrosis (CF) patient airways. Pa culture filtrates inhibit Af biofilms, and Pa non-CF, mucoid (Muc-CF) and nonmucoid CF (NMuc-CF) isolates form an ascending inhibitory hierarchy. We hypothesized this activity is mediated through apoptosis induction. One Af and three Pa (non-CF, Muc-CF, NMuc-CF) reference isolates were studied. Af biofilm was formed in 96 well plates for 16 h ± Pa biofilm filtrates. After 24 h, apoptosis was characterized by viability dye DiBAc, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, DNA fragmentation and metacaspase activity. Muc-CF and NMuc-CF filtrates inhibited and damaged Af biofilm (p<0.0001). Intracellular ROS levels were elevated (p<0.001) in NMuc-CF-treated Af biofilms (3.7- fold) compared to treatment with filtrates from Muc-CF- (2.5- fold) or non-CF Pa (1.7- fold). Depolarization of mitochondrial potential was greater upon exposure to NMuc-CF (2.4-fold) compared to Muc-CF (1.8-fold) or non-CF (1.25-fold) (p<0.0001) filtrates. Exposure to filtrates resulted in more DNA fragmentation in Af biofilm, compared to control, mediated by metacaspase activation. In conclusion, filtrates from CF-Pa isolates were more inhibitory against Af biofilms than from non-CF. The apoptotic effect involves mitochondrial membrane damage associated with metacaspase activation. PMID:26930399

  11. Biofilm Filtrates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strains Isolated from Cystic Fibrosis Patients Inhibit Preformed Aspergillus fumigatus Biofilms via Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Shirazi, Fazal; Ferreira, Jose A G; Stevens, David A; Clemons, Karl V; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pa) and Aspergillus fumigatus (Af) colonize cystic fibrosis (CF) patient airways. Pa culture filtrates inhibit Af biofilms, and Pa non-CF, mucoid (Muc-CF) and nonmucoid CF (NMuc-CF) isolates form an ascending inhibitory hierarchy. We hypothesized this activity is mediated through apoptosis induction. One Af and three Pa (non-CF, Muc-CF, NMuc-CF) reference isolates were studied. Af biofilm was formed in 96 well plates for 16 h ± Pa biofilm filtrates. After 24 h, apoptosis was characterized by viability dye DiBAc, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, DNA fragmentation and metacaspase activity. Muc-CF and NMuc-CF filtrates inhibited and damaged Af biofilm (p<0.0001). Intracellular ROS levels were elevated (p<0.001) in NMuc-CF-treated Af biofilms (3.7- fold) compared to treatment with filtrates from Muc-CF- (2.5- fold) or non-CF Pa (1.7- fold). Depolarization of mitochondrial potential was greater upon exposure to NMuc-CF (2.4-fold) compared to Muc-CF (1.8-fold) or non-CF (1.25-fold) (p<0.0001) filtrates. Exposure to filtrates resulted in more DNA fragmentation in Af biofilm, compared to control, mediated by metacaspase activation. In conclusion, filtrates from CF-Pa isolates were more inhibitory against Af biofilms than from non-CF. The apoptotic effect involves mitochondrial membrane damage associated with metacaspase activation.

  12. [Prevalence of Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates resistant to imipenem by production of metallo-β-lactamases in Rabat Military Teaching Hospital Mohammed V].

    PubMed

    Gildas Comlan Zohoun, Alban; Moket, Danièle; El Hamzaoui, Sakina

    2013-01-01

    We studied the production of metallo-β-lactamases (MBL) in Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains resistant to imipenem at the Rabat Mohammed V military teaching hospital, according to Yong et al.'s method, using a sterilized solution of EDTA 0.5 M pH 8. One hundred and five bacterial strains (48 A. baumannii and 57 P. aeruginosa) were identified. 45 (42.9%) with 34 A. baumannii and 11 P. aeruginosa were resistant to imipenem. The prevalence of MBL producing strains was 22.2% (10/45). The existence of this isolates resistant to imipenem by producing metallo-β-lactamases is an emerging public health problem. It is necessary to implemente infection control programs to avoid spreading of multidrug resistant bacteria.

  13. Chemical alterations in cell envelopes of polymyxin-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Gilleland, H E; Lyle, R D

    1979-01-01

    Cell envelopes from Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains resistant to polymyxin were compared with cell envelopes from polymyxin-sensitive strains as to their content of total protein, carbohydrate, and 2-keto-3-deoxyoctonate and as to their protein composition as determined by slab polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The cell envelopes of the polymyxin-resistant strains had reduced amounts of lipopolysaccharide, as indicated a reduction in both carbohydrate and 2-keto-3-deoxyoctonate concentrations, and a greatly altered protein composition as shown by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. There was a quantitative increase in total cell envelop protein in these strains. However, those protein bands identified as being major outer membrane proteins upon polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of separated outer and cytoplasmic membranes were reduced greatly in concentration in the polymyxin-resistant cell envelopes. Thus, it appears that polymyxin resistance in these strains is associated with the alteration of the outer membrane through a loss of lipopolysaccharide and outer membrane proteins. Images PMID:222726

  14. Isolation and characterization of an alginase from mucoid strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Linker, A; Evans, L R

    1984-09-01

    Strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa which produce an alginate-like slime polysaccharide were shown to also synthesize an intracellular enzyme which can degrade these polysaccharides and the seaweed alginic acids. The enzyme acts as an eliminase introducing delta 4,5 unsaturation into the uronic acid moiety. It appears to be a polymannuronide lyase which degrades the polysaccharides, depending on their uronic acid composition, to a series of oligosaccharides, the smallest of which is a disaccharide. L-Guluronic acid linkages are not split. The Pseudomonas alginase resembles other bacterial alginases and enzymes from molluscs but differs in some important properties, such as extent of degradation and linkage preference. Nonmucoid forms of the organism produce detectable but much lower amounts of enzyme.

  15. Sensitivity to Antimicrobial Drugs of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Extreme-Resistant Strains Isolated in the Major Hospitals of Central Kazakhstan

    PubMed Central

    Azizov, Ilya S.; Lavrinenko, Alyona V.; Belyaev, Ilya A.; Babenko, Dmitry B.; Shambilova, Natalya A.; Bissenova, Nelya M.

    2017-01-01

    AIM: The article presents the current data on the sensitivity of the main 37 strains of eXtremaly Drugs Resistance (XDR) category to anti-pseudomonas drugs. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The strains were collected during the prospective multicenter study in large multidisciplinary hospitals of Central Kazakhstan. Susceptibility to antimicrobial drugs was carried out by disk method and the serial dilution method with the interpretation of the results according to EUCAST criteria. Detection of carbapenemases gene of VIM, IMP, NDM and GES classes was carried out by PCR method using the commercial kits. RESULTS: All identified carbapenemases were sorted to VIM class and accounted for 63.64%. Resistance to aminoglycoside drugs exceeded 80%. All the strains were susceptible to polymyxin. CONCLUSION: Thus, at the present stage the circulation of P. aeruginosa strains of XDR category continues in major hospitals in Kazakhstan. The strains remain sensitiveness only to polymyxin. PMID:28293307

  16. Antimicrobial potentials of Helicteres isora silver nanoparticles against extensively drug-resistant (XDR) clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Mapara, Nikunj; Sharma, Mansi; Shriram, Varsha; Bharadwaj, Renu; Mohite, K C; Kumar, Vinay

    2015-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a leading opportunistic pathogen and its expanding drug resistance is a growing menace to public health. Its ubiquitous nature and multiple resistance mechanisms make it a difficult target for antimicrobial chemotherapy and require a fresh approach for developing new antimicrobial agents against it. The broad-spectrum antibacterial effects of silver nanoparticles (SNPs) make them an excellent candidate for use in the medical field. However, attempts made to check their potency against extensively drug-resistant (XDR) microbes are meager. This study describes the biosynthesis and biostabilization of SNPs by Helicteres isora aqueous fruit extract and their characterization by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Majority of SNPs synthesized were of 8--20-nm size. SNPs exhibited dose-dependent antibacterial activities against four XDR P. aeruginosa (XDR-PA) clinical isolates as revealed by growth curves, with a minimum inhibitory concentration of 300 μg/ml. The SNPs exhibited antimicrobial activity against all strains, with maximum zone of inhibition (16.4 mm) in XRD-PA-2 at 1000 μg/ml. Amongst four strains, their susceptibilities to SNPs were in the following order: XDR-PA-2 > XDR-PA-4 > XDR-PA-3 > XDR-PA-1. The exposure of bacterial cells to 300 μg/ml SNPs resulted into a substantial leakage of reducing sugars and proteins, inactivation of respiratory chain dehydrogenases, and eventual cell death. SNPs also induced lipid peroxidation, a possible underlying factor to membrane porosity. The effects were more pronounced in XDR-PA-2 which may be correlated with its higher susceptibility to SNPs. These results are indicative of SNP-induced turbulence of membranous permeability as an important causal factor in XDR-PA growth inhibition and death.

  17. Fitness Cost of Fluoroquinolone Resistance in Clinical Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Differs by Type III Secretion Genotype

    PubMed Central

    Agnello, Melissa; Finkel, Steven E.; Wong-Beringer, Annie

    2016-01-01

    Fluoroquinolone (FQ) resistance is highly prevalent among clinical strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, limiting treatment options. We have reported previously that highly virulent strains containing the exoU gene of the type III secretion system are more likely to be FQ-resistant than strains containing the exoS gene, as well as more likely to acquire resistance-conferring mutations in gyrA/B and parC/E. We hypothesize that FQ-resistance imposes a lower fitness cost on exoU compared to exoS strains, thus allowing for better adaptation to the FQ-rich clinical environment. We created isogenic mutants containing a common FQ-resistance conferring point mutation in parC from three exoU to three exoS clinical isolates and tested fitness in vitro using head-to-head competition assays. The mutation differentially affected fitness in the exoU and exoS strains tested. While the addition of the parC mutation dramatically increased fitness in one of the exoU strains leaving the other two unaffected, all three exoS strains displayed a general decrease in fitness. In addition, we found that exoU strains may be able to compensate for the fitness costs associated with the mutation through better regulation of supercoiling compared to the exoS strains. These results may provide a biological explanation for the observed predominance of the virulent exoU genotype in FQ-resistant clinical subpopulations and represent the first investigation into potential differences in fitness costs of FQ-resistance that are linked to the virulence genotype of P. aeruginosa. Understanding the fitness costs of antibiotic resistance and possibilities of compensation for these costs is essential for the rational development of strategies to combat the problem of antibiotic resistance. PMID:27757111

  18. Fitness Cost of Fluoroquinolone Resistance in Clinical Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Differs by Type III Secretion Genotype.

    PubMed

    Agnello, Melissa; Finkel, Steven E; Wong-Beringer, Annie

    2016-01-01

    Fluoroquinolone (FQ) resistance is highly prevalent among clinical strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, limiting treatment options. We have reported previously that highly virulent strains containing the exoU gene of the type III secretion system are more likely to be FQ-resistant than strains containing the exoS gene, as well as more likely to acquire resistance-conferring mutations in gyrA/B and parC/E. We hypothesize that FQ-resistance imposes a lower fitness cost on exoU compared to exoS strains, thus allowing for better adaptation to the FQ-rich clinical environment. We created isogenic mutants containing a common FQ-resistance conferring point mutation in parC from three exoU to three exoS clinical isolates and tested fitness in vitro using head-to-head competition assays. The mutation differentially affected fitness in the exoU and exoS strains tested. While the addition of the parC mutation dramatically increased fitness in one of the exoU strains leaving the other two unaffected, all three exoS strains displayed a general decrease in fitness. In addition, we found that exoU strains may be able to compensate for the fitness costs associated with the mutation through better regulation of supercoiling compared to the exoS strains. These results may provide a biological explanation for the observed predominance of the virulent exoU genotype in FQ-resistant clinical subpopulations and represent the first investigation into potential differences in fitness costs of FQ-resistance that are linked to the virulence genotype of P. aeruginosa. Understanding the fitness costs of antibiotic resistance and possibilities of compensation for these costs is essential for the rational development of strategies to combat the problem of antibiotic resistance.

  19. Developing an international Pseudomonas aeruginosa reference panel.

    PubMed

    De Soyza, Anthony; Hall, Amanda J; Mahenthiralingam, Eshwar; Drevinek, Pavel; Kaca, Wieslaw; Drulis-Kawa, Zuzanna; Stoitsova, Stoyanka R; Toth, Veronika; Coenye, Tom; Zlosnik, James E A; Burns, Jane L; Sá-Correia, Isabel; De Vos, Daniel; Pirnay, Jean-Paul; Kidd, Timothy J; Reid, David; Manos, Jim; Klockgether, Jens; Wiehlmann, Lutz; Tümmler, Burkhard; McClean, Siobhán; Winstanley, Craig

    2013-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major opportunistic pathogen in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and causes a wide range of infections among other susceptible populations. Its inherent resistance to many antimicrobials also makes it difficult to treat infections with this pathogen. Recent evidence has highlighted the diversity of this species, yet despite this, the majority of studies on virulence and pathogenesis focus on a small number of strains. There is a pressing need for a P. aeruginosa reference panel to harmonize and coordinate the collective efforts of the P. aeruginosa research community. We have collated a panel of 43 P. aeruginosa strains that reflects the organism's diversity. In addition to the commonly studied clones, this panel includes transmissible strains, sequential CF isolates, strains with specific virulence characteristics, and strains that represent serotype, genotype or geographic diversity. This focussed panel of P. aeruginosa isolates will help accelerate and consolidate the discovery of virulence determinants, improve our understanding of the pathogenesis of infections caused by this pathogen, and provide the community with a valuable resource for the testing of novel therapeutic agents.

  20. Antibiotic Resistance Pattern and Evaluation of Metallo-Beta Lactamase Genes Including bla- IMP and bla- VIM Types in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated from Patients in Tehran Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Aghamiri, Samira; Amirmozafari, Nour; Fallah Mehrabadi, Jalil; Fouladtan, Babak; Samadi Kafil, Hossein

    2014-01-01

    Beta-lactamase producing strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa are important etiological agents of hospital infections. Carbapenems are among the most effective antibiotics used against Pseudomonas infections, but they can be rendered infective by group B β -lactamase, commonly called metallo-beta lactamase. In this study, the antimicrobial sensitivity patterns of P. aeruginosa strains isolated from 9 different hospitals in Tehran, Iran, as well as the prevalence of MBLs genes (bla- VIM and bla- IMP ) were determined. A total of 212 strains of P. aeruginosa recovered from patients in hospitals in Tehran were confirmed by both biochemical methods and PCR. Their antimicrobial sensitivity patterns were determined by Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. Following MIC determination, imipenem resistant strains were selected by DDST method which was followed by PCR tests for determination of MBLs genes: bla- IMP and bla- VIM . The results indicated that, in the DDST phenotypic method, among the 100 imipenem resistant isolates, 75 strains were MBLs positive. The PCR test indicated that 70 strains (33%) carried bla- VIM gene and 20 strains (9%) harbored bla- IMP . The results indicated that the extent of antibiotic resistance among Pseudomonas aeruginosa is on the rise. This may be due to production of MBLs enzymes. Therefore, determination of antibiotic sensitivity patterns and MBLs production by these bacteria, can be important in control of clinical Pseudomonas infection.

  1. Hospital Isolates of Serratia marcescens Transferring Ampicillin, Carbenicillin, and Gentamicin Resistance to Other Gram-Negative Bacteria Including Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Olexy, Vera M.; Bird, Thomas J.; Grieble, Hans G.; Farrand, Stephen K.

    1979-01-01

    Thirteen independent isolates of Serratia marcescens associated with nosocomial urinary tract infections were obtained from the clinical microbiology laboratory at Hines Veterans Administration Hospital. The isolates were resistant to at least ampicillin, carbenicillin, gentamicin, and tobramycin. They could be divided into two groups on the basis of their antibiotypes. Group I (9 strains) showed resistance to 13 antibiotics, including 3 beta-lactams, 6 aminoglycosides, tetracycline, sulfonamide, trimethoprim, and polymyxin B. Group II (4 strains) was resistant to 11 antibiotics, including 3 beta-lactams, 5 aminoglycosides, sulfonamide, trimethoprim, and polymyxin B. Donors from both groups transferred resistance traits to Escherichia coli. Transconjugants from matings with group II donors all acquired resistance to nine antibiotics, including the three beta-lactams, five aminoglycosides, and sulfonamide. Transconjugants from matings with group I donors were of varied antibiotypes, inheriting resistance to up to 11 of the 13 antibiotics. Resistances to trimethoprim and polymyxin B were never observed to transfer. E. coli transconjugants of each group were capable of transferring multiple-antibiotic resistance to several other members of the family Enterobacteriaceae. All group II S. marcescens and E. coli donors and all group I S. marcescens donors transferred carbenicillin, streptomycin, kanamycin, gentamicin, tobramycin, and sisomicin resistance to Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The results suggest that these S. marcescens strains harbor R factors of a broader host range than previously reported. PMID:106772

  2. Detection of extended spectrum beta lactamases, ampc beta lactamases and metallobetalactamases in clinical isolates of ceftazidime resistant Pseudomonas Aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Umadevi, Sivaraman; Joseph, Noyal M; Kumari, Kandha; Easow, Joshy M; Kumar, Shailesh; Stephen, Selvaraj; Srirangaraj, Sreenivasan; Raj, Sruthi

    2011-10-01

    We studied the prevalence of ceftazidime resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the rates of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL), AmpC β-lactamase (AmpC) and metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) production among the ceftazidime resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. A very high rate of MBL production was observed, which suggested it to be an important contributing factor for ceftazidime resistance among Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

  3. SCL-LCL-PHA copolymer production by a local isolate, Pseudomonas aeruginosa MTCC 7925.

    PubMed

    Singh, Akhilesh Kumar; Mallick, Nirupama

    2009-05-01

    A five-level-four-factor central composite rotary design (CCRD) was employed in combination with response surface methodology (RSM) to optimize the process variables for the production of a novel copolymer consisting of short-chain-length (SCL) and long-chain-length (LCL) PHA units, i.e., P(3HB-3HV-3HHD-3HOD) copolymer in Pseudomonas aeruginosa MTCC 7925. The four variables involved in this study were ethanol, glucose, ammonium nitrate (NH(4)NO(3)), and potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KH(2)PO(4)). A second-order polynomial equation was obtained by multiple regression analysis using RSM. The statistical analyses of the results showed that all the four variables had significant impact on the copolymer yield. The model predicted a maximum yield of 81.1% of dry cell weight (dcw) on setting the concentrations of ethanol and glucose at 1.5 and 1.1%, and KH(2)PO(4) and NH(4)NO(3) at 2.79 and 1.86 g/L, respectively. Verification of the predicted value resulted into a yield of 77.6% (dcw). This novel copolymer exhibited comparable material properties with polypropylene (PP) and low density polyethylene (LDPE), thus advocating its potential applications in various fields.

  4. Prevalence of Extended-Spectrum and Metallo β-Lactamase Production in AmpC β-Lactamase Producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates From Burns

    PubMed Central

    Rafiee, Roya; Eftekhar, Fereshteh; Tabatabaei, Seyyed Ahmad; Minaee Tehrani, Dariush

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most common causes of nosocomial infections. Resistance of P. aeruginosa to β-lactam antibiotics may be the result of acquired resistance through mutation and over production of various antibiotic inactivating enzymes. This research aimed to determine the prevalence of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBL) and metallo β-lactamase (MBL) production as well as the presence of their related genes among AmpC β-lactamase producing P. aeruginosa isolated from burns. Objectives: The current study aimed to determine the prevalence of class A ESBL and MBL production in relation to the presence of their related genes among AmpC β-lactamase producing P. aeruginosa isolated from burns. Materials and Methods: The antimicrobial susceptibility of 51 P. aeruginosa isolates from patients with burns was examined against 13 antibiotics by the disc diffusion method. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) for imipenem and ceftazidime were measured by the microdilution method. AmpC production was detected by AmpC disc and the modified three-dimensional extract tests. ESBL phenotype was confirmed by the double disc synergy test (DDST). Presence of β-lactamase genes was detected by specific primers and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results: All isolates were multidrug resistant. AmpC, ESBL and MBL production were observed in 35 (68.6%), 20 (39.2%) and 19 (37.3%) isolates, respectively. Overall, 43 isolates (84.3%) carried β-lactamase genes, out of which 31 (60.8%) harbored blaAmpC, 20 (39.2%) had blaTEM and 11 (21.6%) carried blaPER-1 genes. Among the AmpC producers, two isolates (6.5%) carried blaAmpC + blaESBL, 13 (41.9%) had blaAmpC + blaMBL and six (19.4%) produced the three enzymes. Conclusions: A high prevalence of multiple β-lactamase production was observed among the AmpC producers (60%), of which the majority co-produced AmpC and MBL. The current study results showed correlation between β-lactamase production and the

  5. In vitro fungicide sensitivity of Rhizoctonia isolates collected from turfgrasses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Different Rhizoctonia species and anastomosis groups (AGs) have been reported to show variable sensitivity to various commercial fungicides. Thirty–six isolates of Rhizoctonia collected from turfgrasses were tested in vitro for sensitivity to commercial formulations of iprodione, triticonazole, and ...

  6. Environmental Pseudomonads Inhibit Cystic Fibrosis Patient-Derived Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Payel; Davis, Elizabeth; Yu, Fengan; James, Sarah; Wildschutte, Julia H.; Wiegmann, Daniel D.; Sherman, David H.; McKay, Robert M.; LiPuma, John J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen which is evolving resistance to many currently used antibiotics. While much research has been devoted to the roles of pathogenic P. aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, less is known of its ecological properties. P. aeruginosa dominates the lungs during chronic infection in CF patients, yet its abundance in some environments is less than that of other diverse groups of pseudomonads. Here, we sought to determine if clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa are vulnerable to environmental pseudomonads that dominate soil and water habitats in one-to-one competitions which may provide a source of inhibitory factors. We isolated a total of 330 pseudomonads from diverse habitats of soil and freshwater ecosystems and competed these strains against one another to determine their capacity for antagonistic activity. Over 900 individual inhibitory events were observed. Extending the analysis to P. aeruginosa isolates revealed that clinical isolates, including ones with increased alginate production, were susceptible to competition by multiple environmental strains. We performed transposon mutagenesis on one isolate and identified an ∼14.8-kb locus involved in antagonistic activity. Only two other environmental isolates were observed to carry the locus, suggesting the presence of additional unique compounds or interactions among other isolates involved in outcompeting P. aeruginosa. This collection of strains represents a source of compounds that are active against multiple pathogenic strains. With the evolution of resistance of P. aeruginosa to currently used antibiotics, these environmental strains provide opportunities for novel compound discovery against drug-resistant clinical strains. IMPORTANCE We demonstrate that clinical CF-derived isolates of P. aeruginosa are susceptible to competition in the presence of environmental pseudomonads. We observed that many diverse environmental strains exhibited varied

  7. Pharmacodynamics of Aerosolized Fosfomycin and Amikacin against Resistant Clinical Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae in a Hollow-Fiber Infection Model: Experimental Basis for Combination Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sime, Fekade Bruck; Johnson, Adam; Whalley, Sarah; Santoyo-Castelazo, Anahi; Montgomery, A. Bruce; Walters, Kathie Ann; Lipman, Jeffrey; Hope, William W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT There has been a resurgence of interest in aerosolization of antibiotics for treatment of patients with severe pneumonia caused by multidrug-resistant pathogens. A combination formulation of amikacin-fosfomycin is currently undergoing clinical testing although the exposure-response relationships of these drugs have not been fully characterized. The aim of this study was to describe the individual and combined antibacterial effects of simulated epithelial lining fluid exposures of aerosolized amikacin and fosfomycin against resistant clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MICs of 16 mg/liter and 64 mg/liter) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (MICs of 2 mg/liter and 64 mg/liter) using a dynamic hollow-fiber infection model over 7 days. Targeted peak concentrations of 300 mg/liter amikacin and/or 1,200 mg/liter fosfomycin as a 12-hourly dosing regimens were used. Quantitative cultures were performed to describe changes in concentrations of the total and resistant bacterial populations. The targeted starting inoculum was 108 CFU/ml for both strains. We observed that neither amikacin nor fosfomycin monotherapy was bactericidal against P. aeruginosa while both were associated with rapid amplification of resistant P. aeruginosa strains (about 108 to 109 CFU/ml within 24 to 48 h). For K. pneumoniae, amikacin but not fosfomycin was bactericidal. When both drugs were combined, a rapid killing was observed for P. aeruginosa and K. pneumoniae (6-log kill within 24 h). Furthermore, the combination of amikacin and fosfomycin effectively suppressed growth of resistant strains of P. aeruginosa and K. pneumoniae. In conclusion, the combination of amikacin and fosfomycin was effective at maximizing bacterial killing and suppressing emergence of resistance against these clinical isolates. PMID:27795380

  8. Mutational and acquired carbapenem resistance mechanisms in multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates from Recife, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Cavalcanti, Felipe Lira de Sá; Mirones, Cristina Rodríguez; Paucar, Elena Román; Montes, Laura Álvarez; Leal-Balbino, Tereza Cristina; de Morais, Marcia Maria Camargo; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Ocampo-Sosa, Alain Antonio

    2015-01-01

    An investigation was carried out into the genetic mechanisms responsible for multidrug resistance in nine carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosaisolates from different hospitals in Recife, Brazil. Susceptibility to antimicrobial agents was determined by broth microdilution. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was employed to detect the presence of genes encoding β-lactamases, aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes (AMEs), 16S rRNA methylases, integron-related genes and OprD. Expression of genes coding for efflux pumps and AmpC cephalosporinase were assessed by quantitative PCR. The outer membrane proteins were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The blaSPM-1, blaKPC-2 and blaGES-1 genes were detected in P. aeruginosaisolates in addition to different AME genes. The loss of OprD in nine isolates was mainly due to frameshift mutations, premature stop codons and point mutations. An association of loss of OprD with the overexpression of MexAB-OprM and MexXY-OprM was observed in most isolates. Hyper-production of AmpC was also observed in three isolates. Clonal relationship of the isolates was determined by repetitive element palindromic-PCR and multilocus sequence typing. Our results show that the loss of OprD along with overexpression of efflux pumps and β-lactamase production were responsible for the multidrug resistance in the isolates analysed. PMID:26676375

  9. Extensively drug-resistant pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates containing blaVIM-2 and elements of Salmonella genomic island 2: a new genetic resistance determinant in Northeast Ohio.

    PubMed

    Perez, Federico; Hujer, Andrea M; Marshall, Steven H; Ray, Amy J; Rather, Philip N; Suwantarat, Nuntra; Dumford, Donald; O'Shea, Patrick; Domitrovic, T Nicholas J; Salata, Robert A; Chavda, Kalyan D; Chen, Liang; Kreiswirth, Barry N; Vila, Alejandro J; Haussler, Susanne; Jacobs, Michael R; Bonomo, Robert A

    2014-10-01

    Carbapenems are a mainstay of treatment for infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Carbapenem resistance mediated by metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs) remains uncommon in the United States, despite the worldwide emergence of this group of enzymes. Between March 2012 and May 2013, we detected MBL-producing P. aeruginosa in a university-affiliated health care system in northeast Ohio. We examined the clinical characteristics and outcomes of patients, defined the resistance determinants and structure of the genetic element harboring the blaMBL gene through genome sequencing, and typed MBL-producing P. aeruginosa isolates using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), repetitive sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR), and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Seven patients were affected that were hospitalized at three community hospitals, a long-term-care facility, and a tertiary care center; one of the patients died as a result of infection. Isolates belonged to sequence type 233 (ST233) and were extensively drug resistant (XDR), including resistance to all fluoroquinolones, aminoglycosides, and β-lactams; two isolates were nonsusceptible to colistin. The blaMBL gene was identified as blaVIM-2 contained within a class 1 integron (In559), similar to the cassette array previously detected in isolates from Norway, Russia, Taiwan, and Chicago, IL. Genomic sequencing and assembly revealed that In559 was part of a novel 35-kb region that also included a Tn501-like transposon and Salmonella genomic island 2 (SGI2)-homologous sequences. This analysis of XDR strains producing VIM-2 from northeast Ohio revealed a novel recombination event between Salmonella and P. aeruginosa, heralding a new antibiotic resistance threat in this region's health care system.

  10. Synergistic activities of macrolide antibiotics against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Burkholderia cepacia, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, and Alcaligenes xylosoxidans isolated from patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Saiman, Lisa; Chen, Yunhua; Gabriel, Pablo San; Knirsch, Charles

    2002-04-01

    Azithromycin and clarithromycin were paired with other antibiotics to test synergistic activity against 300 multidrug-resistant pathogens isolated from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Clarithromycin-tobramycin was most active against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and inhibited 58% of strains. Azithromycin-trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, azithromycin-ceftazidime, and azithromycin-doxycycline or azithromycin-trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole inhibited 40, 20, and 22% of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Burkholderia cepacia complex, and Achromobacter (Alcaligenes) xylosoxidans strains, respectively.

  11. Anti-biofilm activity of biogenic selenium nanoparticles and selenium dioxide against clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Shakibaie, Mojtaba; Forootanfar, Hamid; Golkari, Yaser; Mohammadi-Khorsand, Tayebe; Shakibaie, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the anti-biofilm activity of biologically synthesized selenium nanoparticles (Se NPs) against the biofilm produced by clinically isolated bacterial strains compared to that of selenium dioxide. Thirty strains of Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Proteus mirabilis were isolated from various specimens of the patients hospitalized in different hospitals (Kerman, Iran). Quantification of the biofilm using microtiter plate assay method introduced 30% of S. aureus, 13% of P. aeruginosa and 17% of P. mirabilis isolates as severely adherent strains. Transmission electron micrograph (TEM) of the purified Se NPs (produced by Bacillus sp. MSh-1) showed individual and spherical nano-structure in the size range of 80-220nm. Obtained results of the biofilm formation revealed that selenium nanoparticles inhibited the biofilm of S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, and P. mirabilis by 42%, 34.3%, and 53.4%, respectively, compared to that of the non-treated samples. Effect of temperature and pH on the biofilm formation in the presence of Se NPs and SeO2 was also evaluated.

  12. Antibacterial compound produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain UICC B-40, an endophytic bacterium isolated from Neesia altissima.

    PubMed

    Pratiwi, Rina Hidayati; Hidayat, Iman; Hanafi, Muhammad; Mangunwardoyo, Wibowo

    2017-04-01

    This study's aim was to determine the identity of antibacterial compounds produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain UICC B-40 and describe the antibacterial compounds' mechanisms of action for damaging pathogenic bacteria cells. Isolation and identification of the compounds were carried out using thin layer chromatography (TLC), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analyses. Antibacterial activity was assayed via minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and the antibacterial compound mechanism was observed morphologically through scanning electron microscopy (SEM). This study successfully identified the (2E,5E)-phenyltetradeca-2,5-dienoate antibacterial compound (molecular weight 300 g/mol), composed of a phenolic ester, fatty acid and long chain of aliphatic group structures. MIC values for this compound were determined at 62.5 μg/ml against Staphylococcus aureus strain ATCC 25923. The mechanism of the compound involved breaking down the bacterial cell walls through the lysis process. The (2E,5E)-phenyltetradeca-2,5-dienoate compound exhibited inhibitory activity on the growth of Gram-positive bacteria.

  13. Structural and physicochemical characterization of crude biosurfactant produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa SP4 isolated from petroleum-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Pornsunthorntawee, Orathai; Wongpanit, Panya; Chavadej, Sumaeth; Abe, Masahiko; Rujiravanit, Ratana

    2008-04-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain SP4, isolated from petroleum-contaminated soil in Thailand, was used to produce a biosurfactant from a nutrient broth with palm oil as the carbon source. The key components of the crude biosurfactant were fractionated by using HPLC-ELSD technique. With the use of ATR-FTIR spectroscopy, in combination with (1)H NMR and MS analyses, chemical structures of the fractionated components of the crude biosurfactant were identified as rhamnolipid species. When compared to synthetic surfactants, including Pluronic F-68, which is a triblock nonionic surfactant containing poly(ethylene oxide) and poly(propylene oxide), and sodium dodecyl sulfate, the crude biosurfactant showed comparable physicochemical properties, in terms of the surface activities. The crude biosurfactant reduced the surface tension of pure water to 29.0 mN/m with a critical micelle concentration of approximately 200 mg/l, and it exhibited good thermal and pH stability. The crude biosurfactant also formed stable water-in-oil microemulsions with crude oil and various types of vegetable oils, but not with short-chain hydrocarbons.

  14. Collection & Processing of Medically Important Arthropods for Arbovirus Isolation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sudia, W. Daniel; Chamberlain, Roy W.

    The methods given for collecting, preserving, and processing mosquitoes and other archropods for isolation of arboviruses are those used by the National Communicable Disease Center. Techniques of collecting mosquitoes as they bite, using light or bait traps, and from their daytime resting sites are described and illustrated. Details of subsequent…

  15. Eliciting antibiotics active against the ESKAPE pathogens in a collection of actinomycetes isolated from mountain soils.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hua; Swierstra, Jasper; Wu, Changsheng; Girard, Geneviève; Choi, Young Hae; van Wamel, Willem; Sandiford, Stephanie K; van Wezel, Gilles P

    2014-08-01

    The rapid emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacterial pathogens poses a major threat for human health. In recent years, genome sequencing has unveiled many poorly expressed antibiotic clusters in actinomycetes. Here, we report a well-defined ecological collection of >800 actinomycetes obtained from sites in the Himalaya and Qinling mountains, and we used these in a concept study to see how efficiently antibiotics can be elicited against MDR pathogens isolated recently from the clinic. Using 40 different growth conditions, 96 actinomycetes were identified - predominantly Streptomyces - that produced antibiotics with efficacy against the MDR clinical isolates referred to as ESKAPE pathogens: Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and/or Enterobacter cloacae. Antimicrobial activities that fluctuated strongly with growth conditions were correlated with specific compounds, including borrelidin, resistomycin, carbomethoxy-phenazine, and 6,7,8- and 5,6,8-trimethoxy-3-methylisocoumarin, of which the latter was not described previously. Our work provided insights into the potential of actinomycetes as producers of drugs with efficacy against clinical isolates that have emerged recently and also underlined the importance of targeting a specific pathogen.

  16. D-amino acids enhance the activity of antimicrobials against biofilms of clinical wound isolates of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Carlos J; Akers, Kevin S; Romano, Desiree R; Woodbury, Ronald L; Hardy, Sharanda K; Murray, Clinton K; Wenke, Joseph C

    2014-08-01

    Within wounds, microorganisms predominantly exist as biofilms. Biofilms are associated with chronic infections and represent a tremendous clinical challenge. As antibiotics are often ineffective against biofilms, use of dispersal agents as adjunctive, topical therapies for the treatment of wound infections involving biofilms has gained interest. We evaluated in vitro the dispersive activity of D-amino acids (D-AAs) on biofilms from clinical wound isolates of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa; moreover, we determined whether combinations of D-AAs and antibiotics (clindamycin, cefazolin, oxacillin, rifampin, and vancomycin for S. aureus and amikacin, colistin, ciprofloxacin, imipenem, and ceftazidime for P. aeruginosa) enhance activity against biofilms. D-Met, D-Phe, and D-Trp at concentrations of ≥ 5 mM effectively dispersed preformed biofilms of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa clinical isolates, an effect that was enhanced when they were combined as an equimolar mixture (D-Met/D-Phe/D-Trp). When combined with D-AAs, the activity of rifampin was significantly enhanced against biofilms of clinical isolates of S. aureus, as indicated by a reduction in the minimum biofilm inhibitory concentration (MBIC) (from 32 to 8 μg/ml) and a >2-log reduction of viable biofilm bacteria compared to treatment with antibiotic alone. The addition of D-AAs was also observed to enhance the activity of colistin and ciprofloxacin against biofilms of P. aeruginosa, reducing the observed MBIC and the number of viable bacteria by >2 logs and 1 log at 64 and 32 μg/ml in contrast to antibiotics alone. These findings indicate that the biofilm dispersal activity of D-AAs may represent an effective strategy, in combination with antimicrobials, to release bacteria from biofilms, subsequently enhancing antimicrobial activity.

  17. d-Amino Acids Enhance the Activity of Antimicrobials against Biofilms of Clinical Wound Isolates of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Akers, Kevin S.; Romano, Desiree R.; Woodbury, Ronald L.; Hardy, Sharanda K.; Murray, Clinton K.; Wenke, Joseph C.

    2014-01-01

    Within wounds, microorganisms predominantly exist as biofilms. Biofilms are associated with chronic infections and represent a tremendous clinical challenge. As antibiotics are often ineffective against biofilms, use of dispersal agents as adjunctive, topical therapies for the treatment of wound infections involving biofilms has gained interest. We evaluated in vitro the dispersive activity of d-amino acids (d-AAs) on biofilms from clinical wound isolates of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa; moreover, we determined whether combinations of d-AAs and antibiotics (clindamycin, cefazolin, oxacillin, rifampin, and vancomycin for S. aureus and amikacin, colistin, ciprofloxacin, imipenem, and ceftazidime for P. aeruginosa) enhance activity against biofilms. d-Met, d-Phe, and d-Trp at concentrations of ≥5 mM effectively dispersed preformed biofilms of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa clinical isolates, an effect that was enhanced when they were combined as an equimolar mixture (d-Met/d-Phe/d-Trp). When combined with d-AAs, the activity of rifampin was significantly enhanced against biofilms of clinical isolates of S. aureus, as indicated by a reduction in the minimum biofilm inhibitory concentration (MBIC) (from 32 to 8 μg/ml) and a >2-log reduction of viable biofilm bacteria compared to treatment with antibiotic alone. The addition of d-AAs was also observed to enhance the activity of colistin and ciprofloxacin against biofilms of P. aeruginosa, reducing the observed MBIC and the number of viable bacteria by >2 logs and 1 log at 64 and 32 μg/ml in contrast to antibiotics alone. These findings indicate that the biofilm dispersal activity of d-AAs may represent an effective strategy, in combination with antimicrobials, to release bacteria from biofilms, subsequently enhancing antimicrobial activity. PMID:24841260

  18. Responses of enzymatic antioxidants and non-enzymatic antioxidants in the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa to the allelochemical ethyl 2-methyl acetoacetate (EMA) isolated from reed (Phragmites communis).

    PubMed

    Hong, Yu; Hu, Hong-Ying; Xie, Xing; Li, Feng-Min

    2008-08-25

    Macrophytic allelochemicals are considered an environment-friendly and promising alternative to control algal bloom. However, studies examining the potential mechanisms of inhibitory allelochemicals on algae are few. The allelochemical ethyl 2-methyl acetoacetate (EMA), isolated from reed (Phragmites communis), was a strong allelopathic inhibitor on the growth of Microcystis aeruginosa. EMA-induced antioxidant responses were investigated in the cyanobacterium M. aeruginosa to understand the mechanism of EMA inhibition on algal growth. The activities of enzymatic antioxidants superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT), and the contents of non-enzymatic antioxidants reduced glutathione (GSH) and ascorbic acid (AsA) of M. aeruginosa cells were analyzed after treatments with different concentrations of EMA. Exposure of M. aeruginosa to EMA caused changes in enzyme activities and contents of non-enzymatic antioxidants in different manners. The decrease in SOD activity occurred first after 4 h of EMA exposure, and more markedly after 40 h. CAT activity did not change after 4 h of EMA exposure, but increased obviously after 40 h. The contents of AsA and GSH were increased greatly by EMA after 4 h. After 60 h, low EMA concentrations still increased the CAT activity and the contents of AsA and GSH, but high EMA concentrations started to impose a marked suppression on them. EMA increased dehydroascorbate (DHAsA) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) contents during all exposure times. After 60 h, the regeneration rates of AsA and GSH (represented by the AsA/DHAsA ratio and GSH/GSSG ratio, respectively) were reduced by high EMA concentrations. These results suggest that the activation of CAT and the availability of AsA and GSH at early exposure are important to counteract the oxidative stress induced by EMA, and the inactivation of SOD may be crucial to the growth inhibition of M. aeruginosa by EMA.

  19. ISPa46, a novel insertion sequence in the oprD porin gene of an imipenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolate from a cystic fibrosis patient in Marseille, France.

    PubMed

    Diene, Seydina M; L'homme, Tiphanie; Bellulo, Sophia; Stremler, Nathalie; Dubus, Jean-Christophe; Mely, Laurent; Leroy, Sylvie; Degand, Nicolas; Rolain, Jean-Marc

    2013-09-01

    Clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa exhibiting high-level resistance to carbapenems were recovered from a French patient with cystic fibrosis (CF) who had not received carbapenem therapy. This study was conducted to investigate the molecular mechanism conferring the carbapenem-resistant phenotype in clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa recovered from the same CF patient chronically colonised since 2005. Investigation of imipenem resistance of P. aeruginosa strain_02 isolated in May 2011 showed no carbapenemase activity. However, amplification and sequencing of the oprD porin gene revealed disruption of this gene by an insertion sequence (IS) element of 1337 bp that contained a novel transposase of 1227 bp (ISPa46) bordered by two terminal imperfect inverted repeats of 28 bp, which was associated with carbapenem resistance. Retrospective analysis of five additional strains of P. aeruginosa isolated before May 2011 from the same patient revealed that all isolates were likely to be the same clone by multilocus sequence typing analysis (ST540/551), but one of the five isolates was imipenem-susceptible. Although it was possible to demonstrate the presence of ISPa46 in all strains by PCR, this IS was transposed in the oprD gene only for imipenem-resistant isolates. Therefore, this study reports a novel IS element (ISPa46) in P. aeruginosa clinical isolates of a CF patient in Marseille, France, that was associated with carbapenem resistance and was selected in the absence of carbapenem treatment.

  20. Pharmacodynamic comparisons of antimicrobials against nosocomial isolates of escherichia coli, klebsiella pneumoniae, acinetobacter baumannii and pseudomonas aeruginosa from the MYSTIC surveillance program: the OPTAMA Program, South America 2002.

    PubMed

    Kiffer, Carlos R V; Mendes, Caio; Kuti, Joseph L; Nicolau, David P

    2004-06-01

    The OPTAMA (Optimizing Pharmacodynamic Target Attainment using the MYSTIC [Meropenem Yearly Susceptibility Test Information Collection] Antibiogram) Program provides insight into the appropriate antibiotic options for empiric therapy for common nosocomial pathogens. In this report, South America is represented by Brazil, Colombia, Peru, and Venezuela. A 5000-subject Monte Carlo Simulation estimated pharmacodynamic target attainment for meropenem, imipenem, ceftazidime, cefepime, piperacillin/tazobactam, and ciprofloxacin against Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Pharmacokinetic parameter variability was derived from existing healthy volunteer data, and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) data came from the 2002 MYSTIC program. Piperacillin/tazobactam and ciprofloxacin displayed the lowest target attainment against all bacterial species (14% to 24% for A. baumannii, 26% to 37% for P. aeruginosa, and 48% to 66% for the Enterobacteriaceae). Overall, the carbapenems had the highest probabilities of attainment against the Enterobacteriaceae (98% to 100%) and A. baumannii (73% to 74%), whereas cefepime obtained the greatest target attainment against P. aeruginosa (65%). Because no single regimen had high target attainment against A. baumannii and P. aeruginosa, the use of combination therapy to treat these pathogens in South America may be justified. Because of the lack of agreement with percent susceptibility for certain antimicrobial regimens, the use of pharmacodynamic target attainment may be a more accurate predictor of microbiologic success.

  1. Identification of plasmid OXA and other β-lactamase genes among carbapenem-resistant isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from the Clinical University Hospital in northeastern Poland.

    PubMed

    Sacha, Paweł; Michalska, Anna; Ojdana, Dominika; Wieczorek, Piotr; Hauschild, Tomasz; Majewski, Piotr; Tryniszewska, Elżbieta

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the prevalence of OXA and other β-lactamase genes, antibiotic susceptibility, and the genetic relatedness among clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa resistant to carbapenems. The presence of bla- OXA genes was demonstrated in 48% of isolates belonging to four PFGE profiles. Most of them contained the blaOXA-2 gene (88.3%). Other blaOXA genes (Ps1310 with blaOXA-30 and Ps1309 with blaOXA-10) were found in only two isolates. The tested isolates also contained other β-lactamase genes such as blaVIM-2, blaVIM-4, blaSHV-5, and blaTEM-1. All isolates were susceptible only to colistin (100%).

  2. Evaluation of Mannosidase and Trypsin Enzymes Effects on Biofilm Production of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated from Burn Wound Infections

    PubMed Central

    Banar, Maryam; Emaneini, Mohammad; Satarzadeh, Mhboubeh; Abdellahi, Nafiseh; Beigverdi, Reza; van Leeuwen, Willem B.; Jabalameli, Fereshteh

    2016-01-01

    Biofilm is an important virulence factor in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and has a substantial role in antibiotic resistance and chronic burn wound infections. New therapeutic agents against P. aeruginosa, degrading biofilms in burn wounds and improving the efficacy of current antimicrobial agents, are required. In this study, the effects of α-mannosidase, β-mannosidase and trypsin enzymes on the degradation of P. aeruginosa biofilms and on the reduction of ceftazidime minimum biofilm eliminating concentrations (MBEC) were evaluated. All tested enzymes, destroyed the biofilms and reduced the ceftazidime MBECs. However, only trypsin had no cytotoxic effect on A-431 human epidermoid carcinoma cell lines. In conclusion, since trypsin had better features than mannosidase enzymes, it can be a promising agent in combatting P. aeruginosa burn wound infections. PMID:27736961

  3. Whole genome and transcriptome analyses of environmental antibiotic sensitive and multi-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates exposed to waste water and tap water.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Thomas; Armant, Olivier; Bretschneider, Nancy; Hahn, Alexander; Kirchen, Silke; Seifert, Martin; Dötsch, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The fitness of sensitive and resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa in different aquatic environments depends on genetic capacities and transcriptional regulation. Therefore, an antibiotic-sensitive isolate PA30 and a multi-resistant isolate PA49 originating from waste waters were compared via whole genome and transcriptome Illumina sequencing after exposure to municipal waste water and tap water. A number of different genomic islands (e.g. PAGIs, PAPIs) were identified in the two environmental isolates beside the highly conserved core genome. Exposure to tap water and waste water exhibited similar transcriptional impacts on several gene clusters (antibiotic and metal resistance, genetic mobile elements, efflux pumps) in both environmental P. aeruginosa isolates. The MexCD-OprJ efflux pump was overexpressed in PA49 in response to waste water. The expression of resistance genes, genetic mobile elements in PA49 was independent from the water matrix. Consistently, the antibiotic sensitive strain PA30 did not show any difference in expression of the intrinsic resistance determinants and genetic mobile elements. Thus, the exposure of both isolates to polluted waste water and oligotrophic tap water resulted in similar expression profiles of mentioned genes. However, changes in environmental milieus resulted in rather unspecific transcriptional responses than selected and stimuli-specific gene regulation.

  4. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Population Structure Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Pirnay, Jean-Paul; Bilocq, Florence; Pot, Bruno; Cornelis, Pierre; Zizi, Martin; Van Eldere, Johan; Deschaght, Pieter; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Jennes, Serge; Pitt, Tyrone; De Vos, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    At present there are strong indications that Pseudomonas aeruginosa exhibits an epidemic population structure; clinical isolates are indistinguishable from environmental isolates, and they do not exhibit a specific (disease) habitat selection. However, some important issues, such as the worldwide emergence of highly transmissible P. aeruginosa clones among cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and the spread and persistence of multidrug resistant (MDR) strains in hospital wards with high antibiotic pressure, remain contentious. To further investigate the population structure of P. aeruginosa, eight parameters were analyzed and combined for 328 unrelated isolates, collected over the last 125 years from 69 localities in 30 countries on five continents, from diverse clinical (human and animal) and environmental habitats. The analysed parameters were: i) O serotype, ii) Fluorescent Amplified-Fragment Length Polymorphism (FALFP) pattern, nucleotide sequences of outer membrane protein genes, iii) oprI, iv) oprL, v) oprD, vi) pyoverdine receptor gene profile (fpvA type and fpvB prevalence), and prevalence of vii) exoenzyme genes exoS and exoU and viii) group I pilin glycosyltransferase gene tfpO. These traits were combined and analysed using biological data analysis software and visualized in the form of a minimum spanning tree (MST). We revealed a network of relationships between all analyzed parameters and non-congruence between experiments. At the same time we observed several conserved clones, characterized by an almost identical data set. These observations confirm the nonclonal epidemic population structure of P. aeruginosa, a superficially clonal structure with frequent recombinations, in which occasionally highly successful epidemic clones arise. One of these clones is the renown and widespread MDR serotype O12 clone. On the other hand, we found no evidence for a widespread CF transmissible clone. All but one of the 43 analysed CF strains belonged to a ubiquitous P

  5. Antimicrobial Activity of Fosfomycin-Tobramycin Combination against Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates Assessed by Time-Kill Assays and Mutant Prevention Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Díez-Aguilar, María; Morosini, María Isabel; Tedim, Ana P; Rodríguez, Irene; Aktaş, Zerrin; Cantón, Rafael

    2015-10-01

    The antibacterial activity of fosfomycin-tobramycin combination was studied by time-kill assay in eight Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates belonging to the fosfomycin wild-type population (MIC = 64 μg/ml) but with different tobramycin susceptibilities (MIC range, 1 to 64 μg/ml). The mutant prevention concentration (MPC) and mutant selection window (MSW) were determined in five of these strains (tobramycin MIC range, 1 to 64 μg/ml) in aerobic and anaerobic conditions simulating environments that are present in biofilm-mediated infections. Fosfomycin-tobramycin was synergistic and bactericidal for the isolates with mutations in the mexZ repressor gene, with a tobramycin MIC of 4 μg/ml. This effect was not observed in strains displaying tobramycin MICs of 1 to 2 μg/ml due to the strong bactericidal effect of tobramycin alone. Fosfomycin presented higher MPC values (range, 2,048 to >2,048 μg/ml) in aerobic and anaerobic conditions than did tobramycin (range, 16 to 256 μg/ml). Interestingly, the association rendered narrow or even null MSWs in the two conditions. However, for isolates with high-level tobramycin resistance that harbored aminoglycoside nucleotidyltransferases, time-kill assays showed no synergy, with wide MSWs in the two environments. glpT gene mutations responsible for fosfomycin resistance in P. aeruginosa were determined in fosfomycin-susceptible wild-type strains and mutant derivatives recovered from MPC studies. All mutant derivatives had changes in the GlpT amino acid sequence, which resulted in a truncated permease responsible for fosfomycin resistance. These results suggest that fosfomycin-tobramycin can be an alternative for infections due to P. aeruginosa since it has demonstrated synergistic and bactericidal activity in susceptible isolates and those with low-level tobramycin resistance. It also prevents the emergence of resistant mutants in either aerobic or anaerobic environments.

  6. Antimicrobial Activity of Fosfomycin-Tobramycin Combination against Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates Assessed by Time-Kill Assays and Mutant Prevention Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Díez-Aguilar, María; Tedim, Ana P.; Rodríguez, Irene; Aktaş, Zerrin; Cantón, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    The antibacterial activity of fosfomycin-tobramycin combination was studied by time-kill assay in eight Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates belonging to the fosfomycin wild-type population (MIC = 64 μg/ml) but with different tobramycin susceptibilities (MIC range, 1 to 64 μg/ml). The mutant prevention concentration (MPC) and mutant selection window (MSW) were determined in five of these strains (tobramycin MIC range, 1 to 64 μg/ml) in aerobic and anaerobic conditions simulating environments that are present in biofilm-mediated infections. Fosfomycin-tobramycin was synergistic and bactericidal for the isolates with mutations in the mexZ repressor gene, with a tobramycin MIC of 4 μg/ml. This effect was not observed in strains displaying tobramycin MICs of 1 to 2 μg/ml due to the strong bactericidal effect of tobramycin alone. Fosfomycin presented higher MPC values (range, 2,048 to >2,048 μg/ml) in aerobic and anaerobic conditions than did tobramycin (range, 16 to 256 μg/ml). Interestingly, the association rendered narrow or even null MSWs in the two conditions. However, for isolates with high-level tobramycin resistance that harbored aminoglycoside nucleotidyltransferases, time-kill assays showed no synergy, with wide MSWs in the two environments. glpT gene mutations responsible for fosfomycin resistance in P. aeruginosa were determined in fosfomycin-susceptible wild-type strains and mutant derivatives recovered from MPC studies. All mutant derivatives had changes in the GlpT amino acid sequence, which resulted in a truncated permease responsible for fosfomycin resistance. These results suggest that fosfomycin-tobramycin can be an alternative for infections due to P. aeruginosa since it has demonstrated synergistic and bactericidal activity in susceptible isolates and those with low-level tobramycin resistance. It also prevents the emergence of resistant mutants in either aerobic or anaerobic environments. PMID:26195514

  7. Correlation between cytotoxicity induced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates from acute infections and IL-1β secretion in a model of human THP-1 monocytes.

    PubMed

    Anantharajah, Ahalieyah; Buyck, Julien M; Faure, Emmanuel; Glupczynski, Youri; Rodriguez-Villalobos, Hector; De Vos, Daniel; Pirnay, Jean-Paul; Bilocq, Florence; Guery, Benoît; Tulkens, Paul M; Mingeot-Leclercq, Marie-Paule; Van Bambeke, Françoise

    2015-10-01

    Type III secretion system (T3SS) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa is associated with poor clinical outcome in acute infections. T3SS allows for injection of bacterial exotoxins (e.g. ExoU or ExoS) into the host cell, causing cytotoxicity. It also activates the cytosolic NLRC4 inflammasome, activating caspase-1, inducing cytotoxicity and release of mature IL-1β, which impairs bacterial clearance. In addition, flagellum-mediated motility has been suggested to also modulate inflammasome response and IL-1β release. Yet the capacity of clinical isolates to induce IL-1β release and its relation with cytotoxicity have never been investigated. Using 20 clinical isolates from acute infections with variable T3SS expression levels and human monocytes, our aim was to correlate IL-1β release with toxin expression, flagellar motility and cytotoxicity. ExoU-producing isolates caused massive cell death but minimal release of IL-1β, while those expressing T3SS but not ExoU (i.e. expressing ExoS or no toxins) induced caspase-1 activation and IL-1β release, the level of which was correlated with cytotoxicity. Both effects were prevented by a specific caspase-1 inhibitor. Flagellar motility was not correlated with cytotoxicity or IL-1β release. No apoptosis was detected. Thus, T3SS cytotoxicity is accompanied by a modification in cytokine balance for P. aeruginosa clinical isolates that do not express ExoU.

  8. Novel Combinations of Synthesized ZnO NPs and Ceftazidime: Evaluation of their Activity against Standards and New Clinically Isolated Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Isaei, Elham; Mansouri, Shahla; Mohammadi, Fereshteh; Taheritarigh, Sadegh; Mohammadi, Zohreh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Antibiotic resistant bacteria can be considered as a main problem in infection management. Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs), individually or in combination with antibiotics, can be considered as good candidates for struggling against drug resistant bacteria. Methods: In this study, Zinc oxide nanoparticles were synthesized using sol-gel method in low temperature as a cost effective procedure and characterized by X-ray diffraction and Scanning Electron Microscopy. Antibacterial activity of 9 new combinations of Zinc oxide nanoparticles and ceftazidime was assessed against standards and new clinically isolated multi drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa), in order to evaluate enhancement effect of synthesized Zinc oxide nanoparticles on antibacterial activity of ceftazidime. Results: The results indicated that desirable effects can be seen at 6 and 7 mM of Zinc oxide nanoparticles (60 to 100% inhibition). Moreover, after evaluation of 9 new combinations with various concentrations of both components, it was demonstrated that Zinc oxide nanoparticles can enhance the antibacterial activity of ceftazidime, against some bacterial strains of P. aeruginosa. The highest activity was observed with the concentration of 20 μg/ml ceftazidime in the presence of 5, 6 or 7 mM of Zinc oxide nanoparticles. Conclusion: Zinc oxide nanoparticles in appropriate concentrations can be proposed as new and promising candidates for overcoming bacterial resistance. PMID:27920884

  9. Effects of fertilizer-urea on growth, photosynthetic activity and microcystins production of Microcystis aeruginosa isolated from Dianchi Lake.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wenmin; Bi, Yonghong; Hu, Zhengyu

    2014-05-01

    Urea is the most frequently applied nitrogen (N) fertilizer in agriculture, while its loss is assumed triggering algal blooms in adjacent water bodies. In this context the present study assessed the growth, photosynthetic activity as well as toxin production of Microcystis aeruginosa at different urea concentrations (0.125, 1.25, 12.5, 250 and 2,500 mg/L) using BG11 (containing 250 mg/L NO3(-)-N) as control. The results showed for all endpoints that M. aeruginosa is capable of using urea as N source: the two highest urea treatments delivered comparable values like the control. Low urea concentrations (0.125 and 1.25 mg/L), which were comparable to environmental urea levels, did not sustainably promote the growth, photosynthesis and toxin production of the test species. While, in certain microenvironments urea might potentially reach the concentrations that may affect M. aeruginosa.

  10. Effects of mucoid and non-mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from cystic fibrosis patients on inflammatory mediator release from human polymorphonuclear granulocytes and rat mast cells.

    PubMed Central

    Friedl, P; König, B; König, W

    1992-01-01

    Mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa causing chronic bronchopulmonary infection in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients may interfere with host defence mechanisms. We investigated 13 P. aeruginosa strains isolated from sputa of CF patients with regard to the induction or modulation of inflammatory mediator release from human neutrophils (PMN) and rat mast cells. The effects of mucoid as compared to non-mucoid bacteria were studied using a mucoid strain and its non-mucoid revertant. The release of leukotrienes (LT) and histamine in response to the majority of the CF strains was insignificant. However, preincubation of PMN with P. aeruginosa caused a dose-dependent decrease (50-95%) of LTB4 and LTC4 generation and LTB4 metabolism induced by the Ca(2+)-ionophore A23187 or opsonized zymosan (ZX) (P less than 0.001). The mucoid strains caused a three- to 10-fold higher impairment of LTB4 release (P less than 0.05) and a concomitant down-regulation of LTB4 receptors on neutrophils. Inhibitory effects were also obtained for mucoid and non-mucoid bacteria when the phorbol-ester or the Ca(2+)-ionophore induced luminol enhanced chemiluminescence response (P less than 0.001) or the histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells (P less than 0.01) was studied. The bacteria-cell contact with non-mucoid strains was associated with an increased Ca2+ influx into PMN, whereas mucoid bacteria had no effect. In addition, a protein kinase C-dependent decrease of the C3bi receptor was suppressed by the mucoid--and less effectively--by the non-mucoid strain. The results suggest that the impairment of the phagocytic and inflammatory system may contribute to the pathogenesis and persistence of mucoid P. aeruginosa infection in CF. PMID:1321094

  11. Heterogeneity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Brazilian Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Silbert, Suzane; Barth, Afonso Luis; Sader, Hélio S.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the diversity and genomic variability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients being treated at a university hospital in Brazil. Ninety-seven isolates of P. aeruginosa from 43 CF patients were characterized by macrorestriction analysis of chromosomal DNA by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and tested for susceptibility to 20 antimicrobial agents by broth microdilution. It was possible to evaluate single isolates from 20 patients and multiple isolates (two to seven) from 23 patients collected during a 22-month period. Among all of the unrelated patients, we detected only one pair of patients sharing a common strain. Among the 77 isolates from 23 patients who had multiple isolates analyzed, we identified 37 major types by PFGE, and five different colonization patterns were recognized. The isolates were susceptible to several antimicrobial agents, although consecutive isolates from the same patient may display differences in their susceptibilities. Mucoid isolates were more resistant (P < 0.001) than nonmucoid isolates to five antibiotics. Our results indicate that CF patients remain colonized by more than one strain of P. aeruginosa for long periods of time. In addition, the finding of several different genotypes in the same patient suggests that the colonizing strain may occasionally be replaced. PMID:11682517

  12. Assessment of biofilm formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by antisense mazE-PNA.

    PubMed

    Valadbeigi, Hassan; Sadeghifard, Nourkhoda; Salehi, Majid Baseri

    2017-03-01

    The hallmark patogenicity in Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) is biofilm formation that is not easy to eradicate, because it has variety mechanisms for antibiotic resistance. In addition, toxin-antitoxin (TA) system may play role in biofilm formation. The current study aimed to evaluate the role of TA loci in biofilm formation. Therefore, 18 P. aeruginosa clinical isolates were collected and evaluated for specific biofilm and TA genes. The analysis by RT-qPCR demonstrated that expression of mazE antitoxin in biofilm formation was increase. On the other hand, mazE antitoxin TA system was used as target for antisense PNA. mazE-PNA was able to influence in biofilm formation and was inhibit at 5,10 and 15 μM concentrations biofilm formation in P. aeruginosa. Therefore, it could be highlighted target for anti-biofilm target to eradicate P. aeruginosa biofilm producer.

  13. Emergence of a mutL mutation causing multilocus sequence typing-pulsed-field gel electrophoresis discrepancy among Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from a cystic fibrosis patient.

    PubMed

    García-Castillo, María; Máiz, Luis; Morosini, María-Isabel; Rodríguez-Baños, Mercedes; Suarez, Lucrecia; Fernández-Olmos, Ana; Baquero, Fernando; Cantón, Rafael; del Campo, Rosa

    2012-05-01

    A multilocus sequence type (MLST) shift (from ST242 to ST996) was detected in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates with a uniform pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) pattern obtained from a chronically colonized patient. MLST mutational change involved the mutL gene with the consequent emergence of a hypermutable phenotype. This observation challenges the required neutrality of mutL as an appropriate marker in MLST and alerts researchers to the limitations of MLST-only-based population studies in chronic infections under constant antibiotic selective pressure.

  14. Emergence of a mutL Mutation Causing Multilocus Sequence Typing–Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis Discrepancy among Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from a Cystic Fibrosis Patient

    PubMed Central

    García-Castillo, María; Máiz, Luis; Morosini, María-Isabel; Rodríguez-Baños, Mercedes; Suarez, Lucrecia; Fernández-Olmos, Ana; Baquero, Fernando; Cantón, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    A multilocus sequence type (MLST) shift (from ST242 to ST996) was detected in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates with a uniform pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) pattern obtained from a chronically colonized patient. MLST mutational change involved the mutL gene with the consequent emergence of a hypermutable phenotype. This observation challenges the required neutrality of mutL as an appropriate marker in MLST and alerts researchers to the limitations of MLST-only-based population studies in chronic infections under constant antibiotic selective pressure. PMID:22322352

  15. Nosocomial Spread of Colistin-Only-Sensitive Sequence Type 235 Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates Producing the Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamases GES-1 and GES-5 in Spain▿

    PubMed Central

    Viedma, Esther; Juan, Carlos; Acosta, Joshi; Zamorano, Laura; Otero, Joaquín R.; Sanz, Francisca; Chaves, Fernando; Oliver, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    The mechanisms responsible for the increasing prevalence of colistin-only-sensitive (COS) Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates in a Spanish hospital were investigated. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis revealed that 24 (50%) of the studied isolates belonged to the same clone, identified as the internationally spread sequence type 235 (ST235) through multilocus sequence typing. In addition to several mutational resistance mechanisms, an integron containing seven resistance determinants was detected. Remarkably, the extended-spectrum β-lactamase GES-1 and its Gly170Ser carbapenem-hydrolyzing derivative GES-5 were first documented to be encoded in a single integron. This work is the first to describe GES enzymes in Spain and adds them to the growing list of β-lactamases of concern (PER, VIM, and OXA) detected in ST235 clone isolates. PMID:19738007

  16. [Resistance to antibiotics in Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Colombian hospitals].

    PubMed

    Villa, Lina M; Cortés, Jorge A; Leal, Aura L; Meneses, Andrés; Meléndez, Martha P

    2013-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections cause high morbidity and mortality. We performed a descriptive analysis of the rates of antibiotic resistance in isolates of P. aeruginosa in 33 hospitals enrolled in a surveillance network in Colombia. The study was conducted between January 2005 and December 2009 .9905 isolates of P. aeruginosa were identified, (4.9% of all strains). In intensive care units (ICU) P. aeruginosa showed an overall resistance to aztreonam, cefepime , ceftazidime, imipenem, meropenem , and piperacillin / tazobactam of 31.8% , 23.9% , 24.8%, 22.5%, 20.3% and 22.3%, respectively. Resistance rates increased for piperacillin/tazobactam, cefepime, and imipenem; remained unchanged for meropenem; and decreased for aminoglycosides, quinolones and ceftazidime. Resistance to one, two and three or more families of antibiotics was found in 17%, 12.5%, and 32.1%, respectively. In samples collected from the wards, the resistance rate was lower but usually over 10%. Antibiotic resistance in P. aeruginosa isolates in hospitalized patients and particularly in those admitted to ICUs in Colombia is high.

  17. Mechanisms of carbapenem resistance in endemic Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates after an SPM-1 metallo-β-lactamase producing strain subsided in an intensive care unit of a teaching hospital in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Cacci, Luciana Camila; Chuster, Stephanie Gomes; Martins, Natacha; do Carmo, Pâmella Rodrigues; Girão, Valéria Brígido de Carvalho; Nouér, Simone Aranha; de Freitas, Wania Vasconcelos; de Matos, Juliana Arruda; Magalhães, Ana Cristina de Gouveia; Ferreira, Adriana Lúcia Pires; Picão, Renata Cristina; Moreira, Beatriz Meurer

    2016-01-01

    Carbapenem-resistance mechanisms are a challenge in the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections. We investigated changes in P. aeruginosa carbapenem-resistance determinants over a time period of eight years after the emergence of São Paulo metallo-β-lactamase in a university hospital in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) were screened for P. aeruginosa colonisation and followed for the occurrence of infections from April 2007 to April 2008. The ICU environment was also sampled. Isolates were typed using random amplified polymorphic DNA, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by disk diffusion and E-test, production of carbapenemases by a modified-CarbaNP test and presence of carbapenemase-encoding genes by polymerase chain reaction. Non-carbapenemase resistance mechanisms studied included efflux and AmpC overexpression by PAβN and cloxacillin susceptibility enhancement, respectively, as well as oprD mutations. From 472 P. aeruginosa clinical isolates (93 patients) and 17 isolates from the ICU environment, high genotypic diversity and several international clones were observed; one environment isolate belonged to the blaSPM-1 P. aeruginosa epidemic genotype. Among isolates from infections, 10 (29%) were carbapenem resistant: none produced carbapenemases, three exhibited all non-carbapenemase mechanisms studied, six presented a combination of two mechanisms, and one exclusively displayed oprD mutations. Carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa displayed a polyclonal profile after the SPM-1 epidemic genotype declined. This phenomenon is connected with blaSPM-1 P. aeruginosa replaced by other carbapenem-resistant pathogens. PMID:27653359

  18. Mechanisms of carbapenem resistance in endemic Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates after an SPM-1 metallo-β-lactamase producing strain subsided in an intensive care unit of a teaching hospital in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Cacci, Luciana Camila; Chuster, Stephanie Gomes; Martins, Natacha; Carmo, Pâmella Rodrigues do; Girão, Valéria Brígido de Carvalho; Nouér, Simone Aranha; Freitas, Wania Vasconcelos de; Matos, Juliana Arruda de; Magalhães, Ana Cristina de Gouveia; Ferreira, Adriana Lúcia Pires; Picão, Renata Cristina; Moreira, Beatriz Meurer

    2016-09-01

    Carbapenem-resistance mechanisms are a challenge in the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections. We investigated changes in P. aeruginosa carbapenem-resistance determinants over a time period of eight years after the emergence of São Paulo metallo-β-lactamase in a university hospital in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) were screened for P. aeruginosa colonisation and followed for the occurrence of infections from April 2007 to April 2008. The ICU environment was also sampled. Isolates were typed using random amplified polymorphic DNA, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by disk diffusion and E-test, production of carbapenemases by a modified-CarbaNP test and presence of carbapenemase-encoding genes by polymerase chain reaction. Non-carbapenemase resistance mechanisms studied included efflux and AmpC overexpression by PAβN and cloxacillin susceptibility enhancement, respectively, as well as oprD mutations. From 472 P. aeruginosa clinical isolates (93 patients) and 17 isolates from the ICU environment, high genotypic diversity and several international clones were observed; one environment isolate belonged to the blaSPM-1 P. aeruginosa epidemic genotype. Among isolates from infections, 10 (29%) were carbapenem resistant: none produced carbapenemases, three exhibited all non-carbapenemase mechanisms studied, six presented a combination of two mechanisms, and one exclusively displayed oprD mutations. Carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa displayed a polyclonal profile after the SPM-1 epidemic genotype declined. This phenomenon is connected with blaSPM-1 P. aeruginosa replaced by other carbapenem-resistant pathogens.

  19. Complete Genome Sequence of the Triclosan- and Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain B10W Isolated from Municipal Wastewater

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Chuanqing; Nelson, Matthew; Cao, Guangxiang

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Here, we report the complete genome sequence of the triclosan- and multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain B10W, obtained from municipal wastewater in Hawaii. The bacterium has a 6.7-Mb genome, contains 6,391 coding sequences and 78 RNAs, with an average G+C content of 66.2 mol%. PMID:28104659

  20. Alterations of OprD in Carbapenem-Intermediate and -Susceptible Strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated from Patients with Bacteremia in a Spanish Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Cabot, Gabriel; Rodríguez, Cristina; Roman, Elena; Tubau, Fe; Macia, María D.; Moya, Bartolomé; Zamorano, Laura; Suárez, Cristina; Peña, Carmen; Domínguez, María A.; Moncalián, Gabriel; Oliver, Antonio; Martínez-Martínez, Luis

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the presence of OprD mutations in 60 strains of metallo-ß-lactamase-negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa intermediately susceptible (IS [n = 12]; MIC = 8 μg/ml) or susceptible (S [n = 48]; MICs ≤ 1 to 4 μg/ml) to imipenem and/or meropenem that were isolated from patients with bacteremia in order to evaluate their impact on carbapenem susceptibility profiles. The presence of mutations in oprD was detected by sequencing analysis. OprD expression was assessed by both outer membrane protein (OMP) analysis and real-time PCR (RT-PCR). Fourteen (23%) isolates had an OprD identical to that of PAO1, and OprD modifications were detected in 46 isolates (77%). Isolates were classified as OprD “full-length types” (T1 [n = 40, including both wild-type OprD and variants showing several polymorphisms]) and OprD “deficient types” (T2 [n = 3 for OprD frameshift mutations] and T3 [n = 17 for premature stop codons in oprD]). RT-PCR showed that 5 OprD type T1 isolates presented reduced transcription of oprD (0.1- to 0.4-fold compared to PAO1), while oprD levels increased more than 2-fold over that seen with PAO1 in 4 OprD type T1 isolates. A total of 50% of the isolates belonging to OprD “deficient types” were susceptible to both carbapenems, and 40% were susceptible to meropenem and intermediately susceptible to imipenem. Only one isolate (5%) within this group was intermediately susceptible to both carbapenems, and one (5%) was susceptible to imipenem and intermediately susceptible to meropenem. We concluded that OprD inactivating mutations in clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa are not restricted only to carbapenem-resistant isolates but are also found in isolates with imipenem or meropenem MICs of only 0.06 to 4 μg/ml. PMID:22290967

  1. Fingerprint Analysis and Identification of Strains ST309 as a Potential High Risk Clone in a Pseudomonas aeruginosa Population Isolated from Children with Bacteremia in Mexico City

    PubMed Central

    Morales-Espinosa, Rosario; Delgado, Gabriela; Espinosa, Luis F.; Isselo, Dassaev; Méndez, José L.; Rodriguez, Cristina; Miranda, Guadalupe; Cravioto, Alejandro

    2017-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen and is associated with nosocomial infections. Its ability to thrive in a broad range of environments is due to a large and diverse genome of which its accessory genome is part. The objective of this study was to characterize P. aeruginosa strains isolated from children who developed bacteremia, using pulse-field gel electrophoresis, and in terms of its genomic islands, virulence genes, multilocus sequence type, and antimicrobial susceptibility. Our results showed that P. aeruginosa strains presented the seven virulence genes: toxA, lasB, lecA, algR, plcH, phzA1, and toxR, a type IV pilin alleles (TFP) group I or II. Additionally, we detected a novel pilin and accessory gene, expanding the number of TFP alleles to group VI. All strains presented the PAPI-2 Island and the majority were exoU+ and exoS+ genotype. Ten percent of the strains were multi-drug resistant phenotype, 18% extensively drug-resistant, 68% moderately resistant and only 3% were susceptible to all the antimicrobial tested. The most prevalent acquired β-Lactamase was KPC. We identified a group of ST309 strains, as a potential high risk clone. Our finding also showed that the strains isolated from patients with bacteremia have important virulence factors involved in colonization and dissemination as: a TFP group I or II; the presence of the exoU gene within the PAPI-2 island and the presence of the exoS gene. PMID:28298909

  2. Fingerprint Analysis and Identification of Strains ST309 as a Potential High Risk Clone in a Pseudomonas aeruginosa Population Isolated from Children with Bacteremia in Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Morales-Espinosa, Rosario; Delgado, Gabriela; Espinosa, Luis F; Isselo, Dassaev; Méndez, José L; Rodriguez, Cristina; Miranda, Guadalupe; Cravioto, Alejandro

    2017-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen and is associated with nosocomial infections. Its ability to thrive in a broad range of environments is due to a large and diverse genome of which its accessory genome is part. The objective of this study was to characterize P. aeruginosa strains isolated from children who developed bacteremia, using pulse-field gel electrophoresis, and in terms of its genomic islands, virulence genes, multilocus sequence type, and antimicrobial susceptibility. Our results showed that P. aeruginosa strains presented the seven virulence genes: toxA, lasB, lecA, algR, plcH, phzA1, and toxR, a type IV pilin alleles (TFP) group I or II. Additionally, we detected a novel pilin and accessory gene, expanding the number of TFP alleles to group VI. All strains presented the PAPI-2 Island and the majority were exoU+ and exoS+ genotype. Ten percent of the strains were multi-drug resistant phenotype, 18% extensively drug-resistant, 68% moderately resistant and only 3% were susceptible to all the antimicrobial tested. The most prevalent acquired β-Lactamase was KPC. We identified a group of ST309 strains, as a potential high risk clone. Our finding also showed that the strains isolated from patients with bacteremia have important virulence factors involved in colonization and dissemination as: a TFP group I or II; the presence of the exoU gene within the PAPI-2 island and the presence of the exoS gene.

  3. Effect of biosurfactant and fertilizer on biodegradation of crude oil by marine isolates of Bacillus megaterium, Corynebacterium kutscheri and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Thavasi, Rengathavasi; Jayalakshmi, Singaram; Banat, Ibrahim M

    2011-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of fertilizers and biosurfactants on biodegradation of crude oil by three marine bacterial isolates; Bacillus megaterium, Corynebacterium kutscheri and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Five sets of experiments were carried out in shake flask and microcosm conditions with crude oil as follows: Set 1-only bacterial cells added (no fertilizer and biosurfactant), Set 2-with additional fertilizer only, Set 3-with additional biosurfactant only, Set 4-with added biosurfactant+fertilizer, Set 5-with no bacterial cells added (control), all the above experimental sets were incubated for 168 h. The biosurfactant+fertilizer added Set 4, resulted in maximum crude oil degradation within shake flask and microcosm conditions. Among the three bacterial isolates, P. aeruginosa and biosurfactant produced by this strain resulted in maximum crude oil degradation compared to the other two bacterial strains investigated. Interestingly, when biosurfactant and bacterial cells were used (Set 3), significant oil biodegradation activity occurred and the difference between this treatment and that in Set 4 with added fertilizer+biosurfactant were only 4-5% higher degradation level in shake flask and 3.2-7% in microcosm experiments for all three bacterial strains used. It is concluded that, biosurfactants alone capable of promoting biodegradation to a large extent without added fertilizers, which will reduce the cost of bioremediation process and minimizes the dilution or wash away problems encountered when water soluble fertilizers used during bioremediation of aquatic environments.

  4. Detection of Metallo-Beta Lactamases Among Carbapenem-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Farajzadeh Sheikh, Ahmad; Rostami, Soodabeh; Jolodar, Abbas; Tabatabaiefar, Mohammad Amin; Khorvash, Farzin; Saki, Azadeh; Shoja, Saeed; Sheikhi, Raheleh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Carbapenems are important drugs used for the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections, however metallo-β-lactamases (MBL) are able to efficiently hydrolyze these classes of drugs. Immediate detection of the MBL-producing P. aeruginosa is necessary in order to accurately treat infections caused by this organism. Objectives: To determine the prevalence of MBL producing P. aeruginosa in burn and non-burn patients by two phenotypic tests and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and to compare phenotypic tests with PCR. Materials and Methods: A total of 223 non-duplicate strains of P. aeruginosa were collected from three teaching hospitals of Ahvaz, Iran. Antimicrobial susceptibility and minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of carbapenems (imipenem, meropenem, doripenem and ertapenem) were determined by the Kirby-Bauer and E-test methods. Combined disk (CD) test, MBL E-test and PCR were performed for carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa isolates. Results: Amongst all the P. aeruginosa isolates, 58.7% were resistant to imipenem while 31.8%, 13.5% and 74.4% were resistant to meropenem, doripenem and ertapenem, respectively. Amongst all the P. aeruginosa isolates, 44.4% were multidrug resistant and 13.45% were resistant to all of the carbapenems. The CD test with doripenem disk / 750 μg ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid (EDTA) had the highest efficiency compared to the other phenotypic tests. blaIMP and blaVIM genes were detected in 11.7% and 0.4% of isolates, respectively. blaSPM and blaNDM genes were not observed. Conclusions: Epidemiological and regional evaluation of MBL-producing P. aeruginosa through simple and inexpensive methods should be considered for effective treatment of carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa infections. PMID:25774271

  5. Quality Control for β-Lactam Susceptibility Testing with a Well-Defined Collection of Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strains in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Cantón, Rafael; Loza, Elena; Del Carmen Conejo, María; Baquero, Fernando; Martínez-Martínez, Luis

    2003-01-01

    Eighteen Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains, 16 of them with well-defined β-lactam re sistance mechanisms, were sent to 52 Spanish microbiology laboratories. Interpretative categories for 8 extended-spectrum β-lactams were collected. Participating laboratories used their own routine susceptibility testing procedures (88% automatic systems, 10% disk diffusion, and 2% agar dilution). Control results were established by two independent reference laboratories by applying the NCCLS microdilution method and interpretative criteria. Interpretative discrepancies were observed in 16% of the results (4.4% for cefepime, 3.0% for aztreonam, 2.8% for piperacillin-tazobactam, 1.7% for cefotaxime [CTX] and ceftazidime, 1.1% for ceftriaxone, 0.9% for meropenem, and 0.3% for imipenem). High consistency with reference values (<5% of major plus very major errors) was observed with (i) American Type Culture Collection quality control strains; (ii) strains with low-efficiency mechanisms inactivating extended-spectrum β-lactams, such as OXA-1-producing Escherichiacoli or SHV-1-hyperproducing Klebsiella pneumoniae; (iii) strains with highly efficient mechanisms, such as SHV-5 porin-deficient K. pneumoniae, CTX-M-10 in Enterobacter cloacae hyperproducing AmpC, and P. aeruginosa with the MexAB OprM efflux phenotype or hyperproducing AmpC. Low consistency (>30% major plus very major errors) was detected in K1-producing Klebsiella oxytoca, CTX-M-9-producing E. coli, and in OprD− P. aeruginosa strains. Extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing strains accounted for 86% of very major errors. Recognition of the ESBL phenotype was particularly low in Enterobacter cloacae strains (<35%), due to the lack of NCCLS-specific rules in this genus. A K1-producing K. oxytoca was misidentified by 10% of laboratories as an ESBL producer. The use of well-defined resistant strains is useful for improving proficiency in susceptibility testing in clinical laboratories. PMID

  6. Matrix isolation apparatus with extended sample collection capability

    DOEpatents

    Reedy, Gerald T.

    1987-01-01

    A gas-sample collection device provides for the matrix isolation of increased amounts of a sample material for spectrographic analysis from a gas chromatographic separation. The device includes an evacuated sample collection chamber containing a disc-like specular carousel having a generally circular lateral surface upon which the sample is deposited in an inert gas matrix for infrared (IR) spectral analysis. The evacuated sample chamber is mounted in a fixed manner and is coupled to and supports a rotating cryostatic coupler which, in turn, supports the specular carousel within the collection chamber. A rotational drive system connected to the cryostatic coupler provides for its rotational displacement as well as that of the sample collecting carousel. In addition, rotation of the cryostatic coupler effects vertical displacement of the carousel to permit the collection of an extended sample band in a helical configuration on the entire lateral surface of the carousel. The various components of the carousel's angular/linear displacement drive system are located exterior to the cryostatic coupler for easy access and improved operation. The cryostatic coupler includes a 360.degree. rotary union assembly for permitting the delivery of a high pressure working fluid to the cryostatic coupler in a continuous flow manner for maintaining the specular carousel at a low temperature, e.g., 10.degree.-20.degree. K., for improved uninterrupted gas sample collection and analysis.

  7. Efflux-mediated fluoroquinolone resistance in the multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolate PA7: identification of a novel MexS variant involved in upregulation of the mexEF-oprN multidrug efflux operon

    PubMed Central

    Morita, Yuji; Tomida, Junko; Kawamura, Yoshiaki

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa has become a serious problem in medical settings. P. aeruginosa clinical isolate PA7 is resistant to fluoroquinolones, aminoglycosides, and most β-lactams but not imipenem. In this study, enhanced efflux-mediated fluoroquinolone resistance of PA7 was shown to reflect increased expression of two resistance nodulation cell division (RND) -type multidrug efflux operons, mexEF-oprN and mexXY-oprA. Such a clinical isolate has rarely been reported because MexEF-OprN-overproducing mutants often increase susceptibility to aminoglycosides apparently owing to impairment of the MexXY system. A mutant of PA7 lacking three RND-type multidrug efflux operons (mexAB-oprM, mexEF-oprN, and mexXY-oprA) was susceptible to all anti-pseudomonas agents we tested, supporting an idea that these RND-type multidrug efflux transporters are molecular targets to overcome multidrug resistance in P. aeruginosa. mexEF-oprN-upregulation in P. aeruginosa PA7 was shown due to a MexS variant harboring the Valine-155 amino acid residue. This is the first genetic evidence shown that a MexS variant causes mexEF-oprN-upregulation in P. aeruginosa clinical isolates. PMID:25653649

  8. The prevalence and resistance patterns of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a tertiary care hospital in Kosovo.

    PubMed

    Lila, Greta; Mulliqi-Osmani, Gjyle; Bajrami, Rrezarta; Kurti, Arsim; Azizi, Elvir; Raka, Lul

    2017-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative bacterium that continues to a leading cause of opportunistic nosocomial infections. The rapid increase in drug resistance in clinical isolates of this pathogen is a worldwide concern. The aim of this study was to investigate the distribution rate, prevalence and resistance patterns of P. aeruginosa in clinical specimens from the University Clinical Centre of Kosovo (UCCK). During a three-year period, 553 P. aeruginosa isolates were collected from patients admitted to a variety of UCCK units. The P. aeruginosa isolates were identified using standard laboratory procedures, and the susceptibility of the isolates to antimicrobial agents was investigated using the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion assay according to European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) (2013-2015) guidelines. P. aeruginosa was the second most frequently isolated pathogen. The isolation rate of P. aeruginosa was 7.6%, 10.1% and 8.6% in 2013, 2014 and 2015, respectively. Most clinical samples were from ICU (380, 68.7%). There was a statistically significant difference between ICU and non-ICU (p<0.05). P. aeruginosa isolates were most frequently isolated from the respiratory tract (323, 58.4%). The rate of resistance against most of the tested antimicrobials has increased, especially for carbapenems. Imipenem resistance was 25.2%, 26.5%, and 37.7% and meropenem resistance was 20.1%, 23.4%, and 36% in 2013, 2014 and 2015, respectively. This study provides important data on current antimicrobial resistance, and the results demonstrate that the resistance rates are progressively increasing. There is an urgent need to emphasise the prudent use of antibiotics and strictly adhere to the concept of "reserve drugs" to minimise the misuse of available antimicrobials. The acquisition and analysis of prevalence and resistance data will be an important tool to identify targets for quality improvement in Kosovo and will support the preparation of

  9. Cystic Fibrosis Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Retain Iron-Regulated Antimicrobial Activity against Staphylococcus aureus through the Action of Multiple Alkylquinolones.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Angela T; Jones, Jace W; Cámara, Miguel; Williams, Paul; Kane, Maureen A; Oglesby-Sherrouse, Amanda G

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a hereditary disease that predisposes individuals to pulmonary dysfunction and chronic infections. Early infection of the CF lung with Staphylococcus aureus is common, while Pseudomonas aeruginosa becomes dominant as disease progresses. Emergence of P. aeruginosa likely depends on the action of multiple 2-alkyl-4-(1H)-quinolones (AQ) secreted by this organism. We recently showed that antimicrobial activity against S. aureus is enhanced by iron depletion and is dependent upon multiple AQ metabolites. Two of these AQs, the Pseudomonas quinolone signal [PQS; 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone] and 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline (HHQ), are quorum sensing molecules that activate the expression of multiple microbicidal factors. Here we show for the first time that HHQ also exhibits innate antimicrobial activity against S. aureus. We further show that iron depletion potentiates the antistaphylococcal activity of HHQ, as well as 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide (HQNO), another AQ that functions as a cytochrome B inhibitor. Notably, we found that deletion of the genes for the terminal biosynthetic steps for either PQS or HQNO results in overproduction of the HHQ intermediate, likely maintaining the ability of these mutants to mediate antimicrobial activity. Compensatory increases in HHQ were also observed in PQS-deficient CF isolates, which also retained the ability to mediate iron-regulated antimicrobial activity against S. aureus. These studies demonstrate that iron-regulated antimicrobial activity of P. aeruginosa against S. aureus is due to the cumulative effects of multiple AQ metabolites, both the production and activity of which are modulated by environmental iron levels.

  10. Cystic Fibrosis Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Retain Iron-Regulated Antimicrobial Activity against Staphylococcus aureus through the Action of Multiple Alkylquinolones

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Angela T.; Jones, Jace W.; Cámara, Miguel; Williams, Paul; Kane, Maureen A.; Oglesby-Sherrouse, Amanda G.

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a hereditary disease that predisposes individuals to pulmonary dysfunction and chronic infections. Early infection of the CF lung with Staphylococcus aureus is common, while Pseudomonas aeruginosa becomes dominant as disease progresses. Emergence of P. aeruginosa likely depends on the action of multiple 2-alkyl-4-(1H)-quinolones (AQ) secreted by this organism. We recently showed that antimicrobial activity against S. aureus is enhanced by iron depletion and is dependent upon multiple AQ metabolites. Two of these AQs, the Pseudomonas quinolone signal [PQS; 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone] and 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline (HHQ), are quorum sensing molecules that activate the expression of multiple microbicidal factors. Here we show for the first time that HHQ also exhibits innate antimicrobial activity against S. aureus. We further show that iron depletion potentiates the antistaphylococcal activity of HHQ, as well as 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide (HQNO), another AQ that functions as a cytochrome B inhibitor. Notably, we found that deletion of the genes for the terminal biosynthetic steps for either PQS or HQNO results in overproduction of the HHQ intermediate, likely maintaining the ability of these mutants to mediate antimicrobial activity. Compensatory increases in HHQ were also observed in PQS-deficient CF isolates, which also retained the ability to mediate iron-regulated antimicrobial activity against S. aureus. These studies demonstrate that iron-regulated antimicrobial activity of P. aeruginosa against S. aureus is due to the cumulative effects of multiple AQ metabolites, both the production and activity of which are modulated by environmental iron levels. PMID:27512392

  11. Antibiotic resistance pattern and evaluation of metallo-beta lactamase genes (VIM and IMP) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains producing MBL enzyme, isolated from patients with secondary immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Shirani, Kiana; Ataei, Behrouz; Roshandel, Fardad

    2016-01-01

    Background: One of the most common causes of hospital-acquired secondary infections in hospitalized patients is Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The aim of this study is to evaluate the expression of IMP and VIM in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains (carbapenem resistant and producer MBL enzyme) in patients with secondary immunodeficiency. Materials and Methods: In a cross sectional study, 96 patients with secondary immunodeficiency hospitalized in the Al-Zahra hospital were selected. Carbapenem resistant strains isolated and modified Hodge test was performed in order to confirm the presence of the metallo carbapenemase enzyme. Under the standard conditions they were sent to the central laboratory for investigating nosocomial infection Multiplex PCR. Results: Of 96 samples 28.1% were IMP positive, 5.2% VIM positive and 3.1% both VIM and IMP positive. The prevalence of multidrug resistance in the IMP and/or VIM negative samples was 29%, while all 5 VIM positive samples have had multidrug resistance. Also the prevalence of multi-drug resistance in IMP positive samples were 96.3% and in IMP and VIM positive samples were 100%. According to Fisher’s test, the prevalence of multi-drug resistance based on gene expression has significant difference (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Based on the results of this study it can be concluded that, a significant percentage of patients with secondary immunodeficiency that suffer nosocomial infections with multidrug resistance, especially Pseudomonas aeruginosa, are probably MBL-producing gene positive. Therefore the cause of infection should be considered in the hospital care system to identify their features, the presence of genes involved in the development of multi-drug resistance and antibiotic therapy. PMID:27563634

  12. Collection of pedigree data for genetic analysis in isolate populations.

    PubMed

    Williams-Blangero, Sarah; Blangero, John

    2006-02-01

    Pedigree data are useful for a wealth of research purposes in human population biology and genetics. The collection of extended pedigrees represents the most powerful sampling design for quantitative genetic and linkage studies of both normal and disease-related quantitative traits. In this paper we outline an approach for collecting pedigree data in stable isolate populations. As an example, the pedigree for the Jirel population, which was obtained using the methods presented, is described. The Jirel pedigree contains 2,000 study participants and more than 62,000 pairwise relationships that are informative for genetic analysis. Once such pedigrees are genetically characterized by a genome scan for a given trait, they become an invaluable resource for future genetic studies of any quantitative trait.

  13. In vitro potentiation of carbapenems with ME1071, a novel metallo-beta-lactamase inhibitor, against metallo-beta-lactamase- producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Yoshikazu; Eto, Maki; Mano, Yoko; Tateda, Kazuhiro; Yamaguchi, Keizo

    2010-09-01

    ME1071, a maleic acid derivative, is a novel specific inhibitor for metallo-beta-lactamases (MBL). In this study, the potentiation of ME1071 in combination with several beta-lactams was evaluated using MBL-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates. The rates of susceptibility of MBL producers to carbapenems (imipenem, biapenem, and doripenem) and ceftazidime were increased by 8 to 27% in the presence of 32 microg/ml of ME1071. The corresponding resistance rates were decreased by 13 to 46%, respectively. On the other hand, ME1071 showed weaker or no potentiation with non-MBL producers. The K(i) value of ME1071 for IMP-1 was 0.4 microM, significantly lower than the K(m) values of carbapenems for the IMP-1 enzyme. On the other hand, the K(i) value of ME1071 for VIM-2 was 120 microM, higher than the K(m) values of carbapenems for the VIM-2 enzyme. Results of this study indicate that ME1071 can potentiate the activity of ceftazidime and carbapenems against MBL-producing strains of P. aeruginosa.

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Textile Azo Dye-Decolorizing and -Degrading Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain PFK10, Isolated from the Common Effluent Treatment Plant of the Ankleshwar Industrial Area of Gujarat, India.

    PubMed

    Faldu, P R; Kothari, V V; Kothari, C R; Rawal, C M; Domadia, K K; Patel, P A; Bhimani, H D; Raval, V H; Parmar, N R; Nathani, N M; Koringa, P G; Joshi, C G; Kothari, R K

    2014-02-06

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PFK10, isolated from the common effluent treatment plant (CETP) of the Ankleshwar industrial area of Gujarat, India. The 6.04-Mb draft genome sequence of strain PFK10 provides information about the genes encoding enzymes that enable the strain to decolorize and degrade textile azo dye.

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of Textile Azo Dye-Decolorizing and -Degrading Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain PFK10, Isolated from the Common Effluent Treatment Plant of the Ankleshwar Industrial Area of Gujarat, India

    PubMed Central

    Faldu, P. R.; Kothari, V. V.; Kothari, C. R.; Rawal, C. M.; Domadia, K. K.; Patel, P. A.; Bhimani, H. D.; Raval, V. H.; Parmar, N. R.; Nathani, N. M.; Koringa, P. G.; Joshi, C. G.

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PFK10, isolated from the common effluent treatment plant (CETP) of the Ankleshwar industrial area of Gujarat, India. The 6.04-Mb draft genome sequence of strain PFK10 provides information about the genes encoding enzymes that enable the strain to decolorize and degrade textile azo dye. PMID:24503984

  16. Pre-adapting parasitic phages to a pathogen leads to increased pathogen clearance and lowered resistance evolution with Pseudomonas aeruginosa cystic fibrosis bacterial isolates.

    PubMed

    Friman, V-P; Soanes-Brown, D; Sierocinski, P; Molin, S; Johansen, H K; Merabishvili, M; Pirnay, J-P; De Vos, D; Buckling, A

    2016-01-01

    Recent years have seen renewed interest in phage therapy--the use of viruses to specifically kill disease-causing bacteria--because of the alarming rise in antibiotic resistance. However, a major limitation of phage therapy is the ease at with bacteria can evolve resistance to phages. Here, we determined whether in vitro experimental coevolution can increase the efficiency of phage therapy by limiting the resistance evolution of intermittent and chronic cystic fibrosis Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung isolates to four different phages. We first pre-adapted all phage strains against all bacterial strains and then compared the efficacy of pre-adapted and nonadapted phages against ancestral bacterial strains. We found that evolved phages were more efficient in reducing bacterial densities than ancestral phages. This was primarily because only 50% of bacterial strains were able to evolve resistance to evolved phages, whereas all bacteria were able to evolve some level of resistance to ancestral phages. Although the rate of resistance evolution did not differ between intermittent and chronic isolates, it incurred a relatively higher growth cost for chronic isolates when measured in the absence of phages. This is likely to explain why evolved phages were more effective in reducing the densities of chronic isolates. Our data show that pathogen genotypes respond differently to phage pre-adaptation, and as a result, phage therapies might need to be individually adjusted for different patients.

  17. Use of a Multiplex Transcript Method for Analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Gene Expression Profiles in the Cystic Fibrosis Lung.

    PubMed

    Gifford, Alex H; Willger, Sven D; Dolben, Emily L; Moulton, Lisa A; Dorman, Dana B; Bean, Heather; Hill, Jane E; Hampton, Thomas H; Ashare, Alix; Hogan, Deborah A

    2016-10-01

    The discovery of therapies that modulate Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence or that can eradicate chronic P. aeruginosa lung infections associated with cystic fibrosis (CF) will be advanced by an improved understanding of P. aeruginosa behavior in vivo We demonstrate the use of multiplexed Nanostring technology to monitor relative abundances of P. aeruginosa transcripts across clinical isolates, in serial samples, and for the purposes of comparing microbial physiology in vitro and in vivo The expression of 75 transcripts encoded by genes implicated in CF lung disease was measured in a variety of P. aeruginosa strains as well as RNA serial sputum samples from four P. aeruginosa-colonized subjects with CF collected over 6 months. We present data on reproducibility, the results from different methods of normalization, and demonstrate high concordance between transcript relative abundance data obtained by Nanostring or transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) analysis. Furthermore, we address considerations regarding sequence variation between strains during probe design. Analysis of P. aeruginosa grown in vitro identified transcripts that correlated with the different phenotypes commonly observed in CF clinical isolates. P. aeruginosa transcript profiles in RNA from CF sputum indicated alginate production in vivo, and transcripts involved in quorum-sensing regulation were less abundant in sputum than strains grown in the laboratory. P. aeruginosa gene expression patterns from sputum clustered closely together relative to patterns for laboratory-grown cultures; in contrast, laboratory-grown P. aeruginosa showed much greater transcriptional variation with only loose clustering of strains with different phenotypes. The clustering within and between subjects was surprising in light of differences in inhaled antibiotic and respiratory symptoms, suggesting that the pathways represented by these 75 transcripts are stable in chronic CF P. aeruginosa lung infections.

  18. Use of a Multiplex Transcript Method for Analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Gene Expression Profiles in the Cystic Fibrosis Lung

    PubMed Central

    Willger, Sven D.; Dolben, Emily L.; Moulton, Lisa A.; Dorman, Dana B.; Bean, Heather; Hill, Jane E.; Hampton, Thomas H.; Ashare, Alix

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of therapies that modulate Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence or that can eradicate chronic P. aeruginosa lung infections associated with cystic fibrosis (CF) will be advanced by an improved understanding of P. aeruginosa behavior in vivo. We demonstrate the use of multiplexed Nanostring technology to monitor relative abundances of P. aeruginosa transcripts across clinical isolates, in serial samples, and for the purposes of comparing microbial physiology in vitro and in vivo. The expression of 75 transcripts encoded by genes implicated in CF lung disease was measured in a variety of P. aeruginosa strains as well as RNA serial sputum samples from four P. aeruginosa-colonized subjects with CF collected over 6 months. We present data on reproducibility, the results from different methods of normalization, and demonstrate high concordance between transcript relative abundance data obtained by Nanostring or transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) analysis. Furthermore, we address considerations regarding sequence variation between strains during probe design. Analysis of P. aeruginosa grown in vitro identified transcripts that correlated with the different phenotypes commonly observed in CF clinical isolates. P. aeruginosa transcript profiles in RNA from CF sputum indicated alginate production in vivo, and transcripts involved in quorum-sensing regulation were less abundant in sputum than strains grown in the laboratory. P. aeruginosa gene expression patterns from sputum clustered closely together relative to patterns for laboratory-grown cultures; in contrast, laboratory-grown P. aeruginosa showed much greater transcriptional variation with only loose clustering of strains with different phenotypes. The clustering within and between subjects was surprising in light of differences in inhaled antibiotic and respiratory symptoms, suggesting that the pathways represented by these 75 transcripts are stable in chronic CF P. aeruginosa lung infections. PMID:27481238

  19. In vitro activity of tigecycline against patient isolates collected during phase 3 clinical trials for diabetic foot infections.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Peter J; Ruzin, Alexey; Tuckman, Margareta; Jones, C Hal

    2010-04-01

    The in vitro activity of tigecycline and comparative antimicrobial agents was evaluated against 1828 primary baseline pathogens isolated from 844 patients enrolled in the phase 3 clinical trials investigating the efficacy of tigecycline in diabetic foot infection (DFI). The trials were global, enrolling patients in 30 countries. Tigecycline was active against the most prevalent pathogens in DFI, including Gram-positive and Gram-negative isolates of both aerobic and anaerobic bacteria with 95% of MICs < or =2 microg/mL for the entire collection. The spectrum of activity of tigecycline included important pathogens for DFI, such as Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Streptococcus agalactiae, Escherichia coli, Enterobacter cloacae, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Bacteroides fragilis. As reported previously, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and several pathogens in the Proteeae group were generally less susceptible to tigecycline by comparison to other Gram-negative pathogens. The excellent in vitro expanded broad-spectrum activity of tigecycline in the clinical isolates confirmed the potential utility of tigecycline for pathogens associated with DFIs.

  20. A major Pseudomonas aeruginosa clone common to patients and aquatic habitats.

    PubMed Central

    Römling, U; Wingender, J; Müller, H; Tümmler, B

    1994-01-01

    The genomic relatedness of 573 Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains from environmental and clinical habitats was examined by digesting the genome with the rare-cutting enzyme SpeI. Thirty-nine strains were collected from environmental habitats mainly of aquatic origin, like rivers, lakes, or sanitary facilities. Four hundred fifty strains were collected from 76 patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) treated at four different centers, and 25 additional clinical isolates were collected from patients suffering from other diseases. Twenty-nine P. aeruginosa isolates were collected from the environment of one CF clinic. Thirty strains from culture collections were of environmental and clinic origin. A common macrorestriction fingerprint pattern was found in 13 of 46 CF patients, 5 of 29 environmental isolates from the same hospital, in a single ear infection isolate from another hospital, and 8 of 38 isolates from aquatic habitats about 300 km away from the CF clinic. The data indicate that closely related variants of one major clone (called clone C) persisted in various spatially and temporally separated habitats. Southern analysis of the clonal variants with six gene probes and two probes for genes coding for rRNA revealed almost the same hybridization patterns. With the exception of the phenotypically rapidly evolving CF isolates, the close relatedness of the strains of the clone was also shown by their identical responses in pyocin typing, phage typing, and serotyping. Besides clone C, three other P. aeruginosa clones were isolated from more than one clinical or environmental source. Images PMID:8031075

  1. Annona glabra Flavonoids Act As Antimicrobials by Binding to Pseudomonas aeruginosa Cell Walls

    PubMed Central

    Galvão, Stanley de S. L.; Monteiro, Andrea de S.; Siqueira, Ezequias P.; Bomfim, Maria Rosa Q.; Dias-Souza, Marcus Vinícius; Ferreira, Gabriella F.; Denadai, Angelo Márcio L.; Santos, Áquila R. C.; Lúcia dos Santos, Vera; de Souza-Fagundes, Elaine M.; Fernandes, Elizabeth S.; Monteiro-Neto, Valério

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important pathogen in opportunistic infections in humans. The increased incidence of antimicrobial-resistant P. aeruginosa isolates has highlighted the need for novel and more potent therapies against this microorganism. Annona glabra is known for presenting different compounds with diverse biological activities, such as anti-tumor and immunomodulatory activities. Although other species of the family display antimicrobial actions, this has not yet been reported for A. glabra. Here, we investigated the antimicrobial activity of the ethyl acetate fraction (EAF) obtained from the leaf hydroalcoholic extract of A. glabra. EAF was bactericidal against different strains of P. aeruginosa. EAF also presented with a time- and concentration-dependent effect on P. aeruginosa viability. Testing of different EAF sub-fractions showed that the sub-fraction 32-33 (SF32-33) was the most effective against P. aeruginosa. Analysis of the chemical constituents of SF32-33 demonstrated a high content of flavonoids. Incubation of this active sub-fraction with P. aeruginosa ATCC 27983 triggered an endothermic reaction, which was accompanied by an increased electric charge, suggesting a high binding of SF32-33 compounds to bacterial cell walls. Collectively, our results suggest that A. glabra-derived compounds, especially flavonoids, may be useful for treating infections caused by P. aeruginosa. PMID:28066374

  2. Kinetics of nutrient enhanced crude oil degradation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa AKS1 and Bacillus sp. AKS2 isolated from Guwahati refinery, India.

    PubMed

    Chettri, Bobby; Mukherjee, Arghya; Langpoklakpam, James S; Chattopadhyay, Dhrubajyoti; Singh, Arvind K

    2016-09-01

    Bacterial degradation of crude oil in response to nutrient treatments has been vastly studied. But there is a paucity of information on kinetic parameters of crude oil degradation. Here we report the nutrient stimulated kinetic parameters of crude oil degradation assessed in terms of CO2 production and oil removal by Pseudomonas aeruginosa AKS1 and Bacillus sp. AKS2. The hydrocarbon degradation rate of P. aeruginosa AKS1 in oil only amended sediment was 10.75 ± 0.65 μg CO2-C g(-1) sediment day(-1) which was similar to degradation rate in sediments with no oil. In presence of both inorganic N & P, the degradation rate increased to 47.22 ± 1.32 μg CO2-C g(-1) sediment day(-1). The half-saturation constant (Ks) and maximum degradation rate (Vmax) for P. aeruginosa AKS1 under increasing N and saturating P concentration were 13.57 ± 0.53 μg N g(-1) sediment and 39.36 ± 1.42 μg CO2-C g(-1) sediment day(-1) respectively. The corresponding values at increasing P and a constant N concentration were 1.60 ± 0.13 μg P g(-1) sediment and 43.90 ± 1.03 μg CO2-C g(-1) sediment day(-1) respectively. Similarly the degradation rate of Bacillus sp. AKS2 in sediments amended with both inorganic nutrients N & P was seven fold higher than the rates in oil only or nutrient only treated sediments. The Ks and Vmax estimates of Bacillus sp. AKS2 under increasing N and saturating P concentration were 9.96 ± 1.25 μg N g(-1) sediment and 59.96 ± 7.56 μg CO2-C g(-1) sediment day(-1) respectively. The corresponding values for P at saturating N concentration were 0.46 ± 0.24 μg P g(-1) sediment and 63.63 ± 3.54 μg CO2-C g(-1) sediment day(-1) respectively. The rates of CO2 production by both isolates were further stimulated when oil concentration was increased above 12.5 mg g(-1) sediment. However, oil degradation activity declined at oil concentration above 40 mg g(-1) sediment when treated with constant nutrient: oil ratio

  3. Detection of blaSPM-1, blaKPC, blaTEM and blaCTX-M genes in isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter spp. and Klebsiella spp. from cancer patients with healthcare-associated infections.

    PubMed

    Jácome, Paula Regina Luna de Araújo; Alves, Lílian Rodrigues; Jácome-Júnior, Agenor Tavares; Silva, Maria Jesuíta Bezerra da; Lima, Jailton Lobo da Costa; Araújo, Paulo Sérgio Ramos; Lopes, Ana Catarina S; Maciel, Maria Amélia Vieira

    2016-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter spp. and Klebsiella spp. are three of the pathogens most frequently involved in infections of cancer patients, and the production of β -lactamases is a major mechanism of resistance due to its wide diversity of existing enzymes. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the microbiological profile and data related to patients and infections, and to search for β -lactamase genes in bacterial isolates from hospitalized cancer patients in a hospital in Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil. A total of 169 isolates were recovered between 2012 and 2014, of which 58 were P. aeruginosa, 36 were Acinetobacter spp. and 75 were Klebsiella spp. A high percentage of carbapenem resistance was observed in P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. Among the carbapenem-resistant bacteria, the blaSPM-1 gene was detected in P. aeruginosa (35.5 %) and Acinetobacter spp. (3.8 %), while blaKPC was detected in P. aeruginosa (25.8 %) only. Among the third- and fourth-generation cephalosporin-resistant strains, in Klebsiella spp. we detected the genes blaTEM (30.6 %), blaCTX-M (58.3 %) and blaKPC (5.6 %), and in Acinetobacter spp. only blaTEM (25.9 %). This the first report of an Acinetobacter baumannii blaSPM-1 gene carrier that has been isolated in Brazil. The most frequent cancer types were bowel tumour [14.8 %; 95 % confidence interval (CI95 %) 9.8-21.1 %], breast cancer (13.6 %; CI95 % 8.8-19.7 %) and prostate cancer (11.2%; CI95 % 6.9-17.0 %). These results therefore provide knowledge of susceptibility profile and resistance mechanisms and thus can contribute to the strategic formulation of hospital infection control plans and the rational use of antimicrobials, reducing mortality from infection levels in cancer patients.

  4. In vitro activity of tigecycline against patient isolates collected during phase 3 clinical trials for hospital acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Peter J; Tuckman, Margareta; Jones, C Hal

    2010-02-03

    The in vitro activity of tigecycline was evaluated against 819 baseline pathogens isolated from 383 patients enrolled in the phase 3 clinical trial investigating the efficacy of tigecycline in hospital acquired pneumonia (HAP). The trials were global, enrolling patients in 27 countries. Tigecycline was active against the most prevalent pathogens in HAP, including gram-positive and gram-negative strains (90% of MICs ≤2 µg/mL for the entire collection). The spectrum of activity of tigecycline included important pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus (including methicillin-resistant S. aureus), Enterococcus faecalis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii/calcoaceticus complex, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumonia, and Enterobacter cloacae. As reported previously, a few genera, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the Proteeae, were generally less susceptible to tigecycline by comparison to other gram-negative pathogens. The excellent in vitro, expanded, broad-spectrum activity of tigecycline in the clinical isolates confirmed the potential utility of tigecycline for pathogens associated with with hospital acquired pneumonia infections.

  5. In vitro activity of tigecycline against patient isolates collected during phase 3 clinical trials for hospital acquired pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Peter J.; Tuckman, Margareta; Jones, C. Hal

    2010-01-01

    The in vitro activity of tigecycline was evaluated against 819 baseline pathogens isolated from 383 patients enrolled in the phase 3 clinical trial investigating the efficacy of tigecycline in hospital acquired pneumonia (HAP). The trials were global, enrolling patients in 27 countries. Tigecycline was active against the most prevalent pathogens in HAP, including gram-positive and gram-negative strains (90% of MICs ≤2 µg/mL for the entire collection). The spectrum of activity of tigecycline included important pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus (including methicillin-resistant S. aureus), Enterococcus faecalis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii/calcoaceticus complex, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumonia, and Enterobacter cloacae. As reported previously, a few genera, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the Proteeae, were generally less susceptible to tigecycline by comparison to other gram-negative pathogens. The excellent in vitro, expanded, broad-spectrum activity of tigecycline in the clinical isolates confirmed the potential utility of tigecycline for pathogens associated with with hospital acquired pneumonia infections. PMID:24470884

  6. Device for collecting and analyzing matrix-isolated samples

    DOEpatents

    Reedy, Gerald T.

    1979-01-01

    A gas-sample collection device is disclosed for matrix isolation of individual gas bands from a gas chromatographic separation and for presenting these distinct samples for spectrometric examination. The device includes a vacuum chamber containing a rotatably supported, specular carrousel having a number of external, reflecting surfaces around its axis of rotation for holding samples. A gas inlet is provided for depositing sample and matrix material on the individual reflecting surfaces maintained at a sufficiently low temperature to cause solidification. Two optical windows or lenses are installed in the vacuum chamber walls for transmitting a beam of electromagnetic radiation, for instance infrared light, through a selected sample. Positioned within the chamber are two concave mirrors, the first aligned to receive the light beam from one of the lenses and focus it to the sample on one of the reflecting surfaces of the carrousel. The second mirror is aligned to receive reflected light from that carrousel surface and to focus it outwardly through the second lens. The light beam transmitted from the sample is received by a spectrometer for determining absorption spectra.

  7. Anti-Pseudomonas aeruginosa antibody detection in patients with bronchiectasis without cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Caballero, E; Drobnic, M; Perez, M; Manresa, J; Ferrer, A; Orriols, R

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a frequent cause of infection in patients with bronchiectasis. Differentiation between non-infected patients and those with different degrees of P aeruginosa infection could influence the management and prognosis of these patients. The diagnostic usefulness of serum IgG antibodies against P aeruginosa outer membrane proteins was determined in patients with bronchiectasis without cystic fibrosis.
METHODS—Fifty six patients were classified according to sputum culture into three groups: group A (n=18) with no P aeruginosa in any sample; group B (n=18) with P aeruginosa alternating with other microorganisms; and group C (n=20) with P aeruginosa in all sputum samples. Each patient had at least three sputum cultures in the 6 months prior to serum collection. Detection of antibodies was performed by Western blot and their presence against 20 protein bands (10-121 kd) was assessed.
RESULTS—Antibodies to more than four bands in total or to five individual bands (36, 26, 22, 20 or 18 kd) differentiated group B from group A, while antibodies to a total of more than eight bands or to 10 individual bands (104, 69, 63, 56, 50, 44, 30, 25, 22,13 kd) differentiated group C from group B. When discordant results between the total number of bands and the frequency of P aeruginosa isolation were obtained, the follow up of patients suggested that the former, in most cases, predicted chronic P aeruginosa colonisation.
CONCLUSION—In patients with bronchiectasis the degree of P aeruginosa infection can be determined by the number and type of outer membrane protein bands indicating which serum antibodies are present.

 PMID:11514685

  8. [Determination of associated antimicrobial resistance in clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a public hospital in Goiânia, State of Goiás].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Cláudia Castelo Branco Artiaga; Sadoyama, Geraldo; Vieira, José Daniel Gonçalves

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated the associated antimicrobial resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus in relation to an antimicrobial agent with other drugs. The associated antimicrobial resistance was calculated by means of the relative risk. There was an obvious relationship between oxacillin resistance and resistance to other antimicrobial agents among isolates of oxacillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (68.5%), greater than 32%, except for linezolid (6.7%). Pronounced associated resistance among drugs was observed for Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates, particularly for ciprofloxacin and carbapenems (59.6% to 60.7%) and for aminoglycosides and carbapenems (66.3 % to 67.7 %) and other beta-lactam antibiotics (52.3% to 85.8%). The present study emphasizes the importance of diagnostic cultures and susceptibility testing for selecting the correct antimicrobial agent, with regard to the clinical impact of increased multiresistance and selection of associated antimicrobial resistance.

  9. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Formation and Persistence, along with the Production of Quorum Sensing-Dependent Virulence Factors, Are Disrupted by a Triterpenoid Coumarate Ester Isolated from Dalbergia trichocarpa, a Tropical Legume.

    PubMed

    Rasamiravaka, Tsiry; Vandeputte, Olivier M; Pottier, Laurent; Huet, Joelle; Rabemanantsoa, Christian; Kiendrebeogo, Martin; Andriantsimahavandy, Abel; Rasamindrakotroka, Andry; Stévigny, Caroline; Duez, Pierre; El Jaziri, Mondher

    2015-01-01

    Recently, extracts of Dalbergia trichocarpa bark have been shown to disrupt P. aeruginosa PAO1 quorum sensing (QS) mechanisms, which are key regulators of virulence factor expression and implicated in biofilm formation. One of the active compounds has been isolated and identified as oleanolic aldehyde coumarate (OALC), a novel bioactive compound that inhibits the formation of P. aeruginosa PAO1 biofilm and its maintenance as well as the expression of the las and rhl QS systems. Consequently, the production of QS-controlled virulence factors including, rhamnolipids, pyocyanin, elastase and extracellular polysaccharides as well as twitching and swarming motilities is reduced. Native acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs) production is inhibited by OALC but exogenous supply of AHLs does not restore the production of virulence factors by OALC-treated cultures, indicating that OALC exerts its effect beyond AHLs synthesis in the QS pathways. Further experiments provided a significant inhibition of the global virulence factor activator gacA by OALC. OALC disorganizes established biofilm structure and improves the bactericidal activity of tobramycin against biofilm-encapsulated PAO1 cells. Finally, a significant reduction of Caenorhabditis elegans paralysis was recorded when the worms were infected with OALC-pre-treated P. aeruginosa. Taken together, these results show that triterpenoid coumarate esters are suitable chemical backbones to target P. aeruginosa virulence mechanisms.

  10. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Formation and Persistence, along with the Production of Quorum Sensing-Dependent Virulence Factors, Are Disrupted by a Triterpenoid Coumarate Ester Isolated from Dalbergia trichocarpa, a Tropical Legume

    PubMed Central

    Pottier, Laurent; Huet, Joelle; Rabemanantsoa, Christian; Kiendrebeogo, Martin; Andriantsimahavandy, Abel; Rasamindrakotroka, Andry; Stévigny, Caroline; Duez, Pierre; El Jaziri, Mondher

    2015-01-01

    Recently, extracts of Dalbergia trichocarpa bark have been shown to disrupt P. aeruginosa PAO1 quorum sensing (QS) mechanisms, which are key regulators of virulence factor expression and implicated in biofilm formation. One of the active compounds has been isolated and identified as oleanolic aldehyde coumarate (OALC), a novel bioactive compound that inhibits the formation of P. aeruginosa PAO1 biofilm and its maintenance as well as the expression of the las and rhl QS systems. Consequently, the production of QS-controlled virulence factors including, rhamnolipids, pyocyanin, elastase and extracellular polysaccharides as well as twitching and swarming motilities is reduced. Native acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs) production is inhibited by OALC but exogenous supply of AHLs does not restore the production of virulence factors by OALC-treated cultures, indicating that OALC exerts its effect beyond AHLs synthesis in the QS pathways. Further experiments provided a significant inhibition of the global virulence factor activator gacA by OALC. OALC disorganizes established biofilm structure and improves the bactericidal activity of tobramycin against biofilm-encapsulated PAO1 cells. Finally, a significant reduction of Caenorhabditis elegans paralysis was recorded when the worms were infected with OALC-pre-treated P. aeruginosa. Taken together, these results show that triterpenoid coumarate esters are suitable chemical backbones to target P. aeruginosa virulence mechanisms. PMID:26186595

  11. Differences in antimicrobial susceptibility breakpoints for Pseudomonas aeruginosa, isolated from blood cultures, set by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) and the Japanese Society of Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Tatsuya; Shimizu, Chihiro; Kasahara, Mayumi; Nakata, Chiyo; Munakata, Machiko; Takahashi, Hakuo

    2007-02-01

    A study was made of the antimicrobial susceptibility to and efficacy of various kinds of antimicrobial agents against 179 strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa that were isolated from blood cultures at Kansai Medical University Hospital from 1990 through 2004. The annual detection rate was highest in 1994, at 22 strains (6.5%). There were 9 multidrug resistant strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (5.0%). Among 14 antimicrobial agents tested for measurements, ciprofloxacin (CPFX) showed the best minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) 50 value, of 0.25 microg/ml, followed by pazufloxacin (PZFX) and biapenem (BIPM), each at 0.5 microg/ml. When the period of 15 years was divided into three stages, the MIC50 value for each antimicrobial agent was highest in the middle stage (1995 to 1999). Assuming that the percentage of sensitive strains according to the breakpoints set by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) represents the antimicrobial susceptibility rate, amikacin (AMK) showed the best value, of 85.5%. According to the sepsis breakpoint set by the Japanese Society of Chemotherapy (JSC), the efficacy of CPFX showed the highest rate (77.1%) of all the antimicrobial agents tested. Among beta-lactams, BIPM showed the highest efficacy rate, of 67.0%. When the efficacy rates were compared with each other, the difference in efficacy rate between the breakpoint set by the CLSI and the sepsis breakpoint set by the JSC was large for beta-lactams. Comparisons made based on the CLSI criteria showed no difference in cross-resistance rates between CPFX, meropenem (MEPM), and BIPM. However, when comparisons were made using the JSC sepsis breakpoint, MEPM showed a cross-resistance rate of 87.8%, while the rate for BIPM was lower, at 56.1%, with the chi2 test showing a significant difference, at P = 0.0014. In accordance with the pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics theory that has been advocated, breakpoints which are more suitable for the clinical setting in Japan should

  12. Swimming Motility in a Longitudinal Collection of Clinical Isolates of Burkholderia cepacia Complex Bacteria from People with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Zlosnik, James E. A.; Mori, Paul Y.; To, Derek; Leung, James; Hird, Trevor J.; Speert, David P.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic bacterial lung infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality. While a range of bacteria are known to be capable of establishing residence in the CF lung, only a small number have a clearly established link to deteriorating clinical status. The two bacteria with the clearest roles in CF lung disease are Pseudomonas aeruginosa and bacteria belonging to the Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC). A number of common adaptations by P. aeruginosa strains to chronic lung infection in CF have been well described. Typically, initial isolates of P. aeruginosa are nonmucoid and display a range of putative virulence determinants. Upon establishment of chronic infection, subsequent isolates ultimately show a reduction in putative virulence determinants, including swimming motility, along with an acquisition of the mucoid phenotype and increased levels of antimicrobial resistance. Infections by BCC are marked by an unpredictable, but typically worse, clinical outcome. However, in contrast to P. aeruginosa infections in CF, studies describing adaptive changes in BCC bacterial phenotype during chronic lung infections are far more limited. To further enhance our understanding of chronic lung infections by BCC bacteria in CF, we assessed the swimming motility phenotype in 551 isolates of BCC bacteria from cystic fibrosis (CF) lung infections between 1981 and 2007. These data suggest that swimming motility is not typically lost by BCC during chronic infection, unlike as seen in P. aeruginosa infections. Furthermore, while we observed a statistically significant link between mucoidy and motility, we did not detect any link between motility phenotype and clinical outcome. These studies highlight the need for further work to understand the adaptive changes of BCC bacteria during chronic infection in the CF lung. PMID:25203161

  13. Profile of Virulence Factors in the Multi-Drug Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strains of Human Urinary Tract Infections (UTI)

    PubMed Central

    Habibi, Asghar; Honarmand, Ramin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Putative virulence factors are responsible for the pathogenicity of UTIs caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa). Resistance of P. aeruginosa to commonly used antibiotics is caused by the extreme overprescription of those antibiotics. Objectives: The goal of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of virulence factors and the antibiotic resistance patterns of P. aeruginosa isolates in UTI cases in Iran. Patients and Methods: Two hundred and fifty urine samples were collected from patients who suffered from UTIs. Samples were cultured immediately, and those that were P. aeruginosa-positive were analyzed for the presence of virulence genes using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) was performed using the disk diffusion method. Results: Of the 250 urine samples analyzed, 8 samples (3.2%) were positive for P. aeruginosa. The prevalence of P. aeruginosa in male and female patients was 2.7% and 3.5%, respectively, (P = 0.035). In patients less than 10 years old, it was 4.2%, and in patients more than 55 years old, it was 4.2%. These were the most commonly infected groups. The highest levels of resistance were seen against ampicillin (87.5%), norfloxacin (62.5%), gentamycin (62.5%), amikacin (62.5%), and aztreonam (62.5%), while the lowest were seen for meropenem (0%), imipenem (12.5%), and polymyxin B (12.5%). LasB (87.5%), pclH (75%), pilB (75%), and exoS (75%) were the most commonly detected virulence factors in the P. aeruginosa isolates. Conclusions: It is logical to first prescribe meropenem, imipenem, and polymyxin B in cases of UTIs caused by P. aeruginosa. Medical practitioners should be aware of the presence of levels of antibiotic resistance in hospitalized UTI patients in Iran. PMID:26756017

  14. Emergence of colistin resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa at Tabriz hospitals, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Goli, Hamid Reza; Nahaei, Mohammad Reza; Ahangarzadeh Rezaee, Mohammad; Hasani, Alka; Samadi Kafil, Hossein; Aghazadeh, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The prevalence of multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the main reason of new drugs resurgence such as colistin. The main objectives of this study were to determine the antibiotic resistance pattern and the rate of colistin resistance along with its correlation with overexpression of MexAB-OprM and MexXY-OprM efflux pumps among P. aeruginosa isolates. Materials and Methods: Hundred clinical isolates were collected from 100 patients during 6 months in 2014. Susceptibility to the eight antibiotics was investigated using Kirby-Bauer and agar dilution methods. The Quantitative Real-time PCR was used to determine the expression levels of efflux genes. Results: Resistance rates to various antibiotics were as follows: ticarcillin (73%), ciprofloxacin (65%), aztreonam (60%), ceftazidime (55%), gentamicin (55%), imipenem (49%), piperacillin/tazobactam (34%) and colistin (2%). In disk diffusion method, only two isolates were non susceptible to colistin, however in agar dilution method the two isolates were confirmed as resistant and two others were intermediate resistant. Sixty eight (68%) isolates were multi-drug resistant and 10 isolates were susceptible to all tested antibiotics. Both colistin resistant isolates showed overexpression of both efflux pumps, but two intermediate resistant isolates exhibited reduction of efflux genes expression. Conclusions: Emergence of colistin resistance is increasing in P. aeruginosa indicating great challenge in the treatment of infections caused by MDR strains of this organism in Iran. ParRS may promote either induced or constitutive resistance to colistin through the activation of distinct mechanisms such as MDR efflux pumps, and LPS modification. PMID:27092226

  15. Prevalence and Clonal Dissemination of Metallo-Beta-Lactamase-Producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Kermanshah

    PubMed Central

    Akya, Alisha; Salimi, Afsaneh; Nomanpour, Bizhan; Ahmadi, Kamal

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen associated with nosocomial infections. The emergence and dissemination of metallo-beta-lactamases (MBLs) has contributed to the high rate of resistance among P. aeruginosa isolates. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to describe the prevalence and the clonal dissemination of MBL- producing P. aeruginosa isolates collected from major hospitals in Kermanshah. Materials and Methods: Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed using the minimal inhibitory concentrations. The MBLs were investigated using the Double-Disk Synergy Test (DDST) and Polymerase Chain Reaction. Molecular typing was performed by Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE). Results: Of the 60 P. aeruginosa isolates included in this study, 30 (50%) were resistant to Gentamicin, 38 (63.3%) to Piperacillin, 42 (70%) to Ceftazidime, and 45 (75%) to Cefepime. Twenty-nine (48.3%) isolates were MBL producers in the DDST test. Five (8.3%) isolates were positive for the VIM gene. PFGE analysis among the MBL producers revealed 12 distinct clonal patterns. Conclusions: The inter- and intra-hospital dissemination of resistant clones is a matter of concern and is an indicator of the level of the improvement and surveillance of standard hygiene, particularly disinfection and hand washing before and after contact with patients. Given the emergence of MBL-producing strains, surveillance has become an important procedure to control the transmission of resistant strains. PMID:26421137

  16. Efflux pumps expression and its association with porin down-regulation and β-lactamase production among Pseudomonas aeruginosa causing bloodstream infections in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Multi-drug efflux pumps have been increasingly recognized as a major component of resistance in P. aeruginosa. We have investigated the expression level of efflux systems among clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa, regardless of their antimicrobial susceptibility profile. Results Aztreonam exhibited the highest in vitro activity against the P. aeruginosa isolates studied (64.4% susceptibility), whereas susceptibility rates of imipenem and meropenem were both 47.5%. The MexXY-OprM and MexAB-OprM efflux systems were overexpressed in 50.8% and 27.1% of isolates studied, respectively. Overexpression of the MexEF-OprN and MexCD-OprJ systems was not observed. AmpC β-lactamase was overexpressed in 11.9% of P. aeruginosa isolates. In addition, decreased oprD expression was also observed in 69.5% of the whole collection, and in 87.1% of the imipenem non-susceptible P. aeruginosa clinical isolates. The MBL-encoding genes blaSPM-1 and blaIMP-1 were detected in 23.7% and 1.7% P. aeruginosa isolates, respectively. The blaGES-1 was detected in 5.1% of the isolates, while blaGES-5 and blaCTX-M-2 were observed in 1.7% of the isolates evaluated. In the present study, we have observed that efflux systems represent an adjuvant mechanism for antimicrobial resistance. Conclusions Efflux systems in association of distinct mechanisms such as the porin down-regulation, AmpC overproduction and secondary β-lactamases play also an important role in the multi-drug resistance phenotype among P. aeruginosa clinical isolates. PMID:20704733

  17. Exhaled breath hydrogen cyanide as a marker of early Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in children with cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Belcher, John; Jones, Andrew M.; Smith, David; Smyth, Alan R.; Southern, Kevin W.; Španěl, Patrik; Webb, A. Kevin; Lenney, Warren

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen cyanide is readily detected in the headspace above Pseudomonas aeruginosa cultures and in the breath of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with chronic (P. aeruginosa) infection. We investigated if exhaled breath HCN is an early marker of P. aeruginosa infection. 233 children with CF who were free from P. aeruginosa infection were followed for 2 years. Their median (interquartile range) age was 8.0 (5.0–12.2) years. At each study visit, an exhaled breath sample was collected for hydrogen cyanide analysis. In total, 2055 breath samples were analysed. At the end of the study, the hydrogen cyanide concentrations were compared to the results of routine microbiology surveillance. P. aeruginosa was isolated from 71 children during the study with an incidence (95% CI) of 0.19 (0.15–0.23) cases per patient-year. Using a random-effects logistic model, the estimated odds ratio (95% CI) was 3.1 (2.6–3.6), which showed that for a 1- ppbv increase in exhaled breath hydrogen cyanide, we expected a 212% increase in the odds of P. aeruginosa infection. The sensitivity and specificity were estimated at 33% and 99%, respectively. Exhaled breath hydrogen cyanide is a specific biomarker of new P. aeruginosa infection in children with CF. Its low sensitivity means that at present, hydrogen cyanide cannot be used as a screening test for this infection. PMID:27730156

  18. The susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains from cystic fibrosis patients to bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Essoh, Christiane; Blouin, Yann; Loukou, Guillaume; Cablanmian, Arsher; Lathro, Serge; Kutter, Elizabeth; Thien, Hoang Vu; Vergnaud, Gilles; Pourcel, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Phage therapy may become a complement to antibiotics in the treatment of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. To design efficient therapeutic cocktails, the genetic diversity of the species and the spectrum of susceptibility to bacteriophages must be investigated. Bacterial strains showing high levels of phage resistance need to be identified in order to decipher the underlying mechanisms. Here we have selected genetically diverse P. aeruginosa strains from cystic fibrosis patients and tested their susceptibility to a large collection of phages. Based on plaque morphology and restriction profiles, six different phages were purified from "pyophage", a commercial cocktail directed against five different bacterial species, including P. aeruginosa. Characterization of these phages by electron microscopy and sequencing of genome fragments showed that they belong to 4 different genera. Among 47 P. aeruginosa strains, 13 were not lysed by any of the isolated phages individually or by pyophage. We isolated two new phages that could lyse some of these strains, and their genomes were sequenced. The presence/absence of a CRISPR-Cas system (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats and Crisper associated genes) was investigated to evaluate the role of the system in phage resistance. Altogether, the results show that some P. aeruginosa strains cannot support the growth of any of the tested phages belonging to 5 different genera, and suggest that the CRISPR-Cas system is not a major defence mechanism against these lytic phages.

  19. Glycerol metabolism promotes biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Scoffield, Jessica; Silo-Suh, Laura

    2016-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes persistent infections in the airways of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Airway sputum contains various host-derived nutrients that can be utilized by P. aeruginosa, including phosphotidylcholine, a major component of host cell membranes. Phosphotidylcholine can be degraded by P. aeruginosa to glycerol and fatty acids to increase the availability of glycerol in the CF lung. In this study, we explored the role that glycerol metabolism plays in biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa. We report that glycerol metabolism promotes biofilm formation by both a chronic CF isolate (FRD1) and a wound isolate (PAO1) of P. aeruginosa. Moreover, loss of the GlpR regulator, which represses the expression of genes involved in glycerol metabolism, enhances biofilm formation in FRD1 through the upregulation of Pel polysaccharide. Taken together, our results suggest that glycerol metabolism may be a key factor that contributes to P. aeruginosa persistence by promoting biofilm formation.

  20. Bulgecin A as a β-lactam enhancer for carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa and carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolates containing various resistance mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Skalweit, Marion J; Li, Mei

    2016-01-01

    Genetic screening of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PSDA) and Acinetobacter baumannii (ACB) reveals genes that confer increased susceptibility to β-lactams when disrupted, suggesting novel drug targets. One such target is lytic transglycosylase. Bulgecin A (BlgA) is a natural product of Pseudomonas mesoacidophila and a lytic transglycosolase inhibitor that works synergistically with β-lactams targeting PBP3 for Enterobacteriaceae. BlgA also weakly inhibits di-Zn2+ metallo-β-lactamases like L1 of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. We hypothesized that because of its unique mechanism of action, BlgA could restore susceptibility to carbapenems in carbapenem-resistant PSDA (CR-PSDA) and carbapenem-resistant ACB, as well as ACB resistant to sulbactam. A BlgA-containing extract was prepared using a previously published protocol. CR-PSDA clinical isolates demonstrating a variety of carbapenem resistance mechanisms (VIM-2 carbapenemases, efflux mechanisms, and AmpC producer expression) were characterized with agar dilution minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) testing and polymerase chain reaction. Growth curves using these strains were prepared using meropenem, BlgA extract, and meropenem plus BlgA extract. A concentrated Blg A extract combined with low concentrations of meropenem, was able to inhibit the growth of clinical strains of CR-PSDA for strains that had meropenem MICs ≥8 mg/L by agar dilution, and a clinical strain of an OXA-24 producing ACB that had a meropenem MIC >32 mg/L and intermediate ampicillin/sulbactam susceptibility. Similar experiments were conducted on a TEM-1 producing ACB strain resistant to sulbactam. BlgA with ampicillin/sulbactam inhibited the growth of this organism. As in Enterobacteriaceae, BlgA appears to restore the efficacy of meropenem in suppressing the growth of CR-PSDA and carbapenem-resistant ACB strains with a variety of common carbapenem resistance mechanisms. BlgA extract also inhibits VIM-2 β-lactamase in vitro. BlgA may prove to be

  1. Carbenicillin resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Tebar, A; Rojo, F; Dámaso, D; Vázquez, D

    1982-01-01

    Four strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa obtained from clinical isolates which are carbenicillin resistant were studied to find the cause(s) of resistance to this beta-lactam antibiotic. The electrophoresis patterns of the four strains (PH20610, PH20815, PH4011, and PH4301) were found to be different from those of a wild-type strain, P. aeruginosa NCTC 10662, and appeared to lack penicillin-binding protein 2. Affinity of other penicillin-binding proteins from strains PH20610 and PH20815 for carbenicillin seemed to be normal or slightly diminished. Electrophoretic patterns of penicillin-binding proteins from strains PH4011 and PH4301 had more profound differences, since the affinities of their penicillin-binding proteins 1a, 1b, and 4 for carbenicillin were decreased by nearly two orders of magnitude relative to the preparations from the wild-type strain. Kinetic studies on binding of carbenicillin to penicillin-binding proteins both in isolated membrane preparations and in intact cells revealed that carbenicillin penetration into resistant cells was a much slower process than in susceptible cells, suggesting that the outer envelope structures serve as an efficient barrier against carbenicillin entry into our P. aeruginosa strains from clinical isolates. PMID:6821456

  2. Clonal Diversity among Streptogramin A-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Isolates Collected in French Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Haroche, Julien; Morvan, Anne; Davi, Marilyne; Allignet, Jeanine; Bimet, François; El Solh, Névine

    2003-01-01

    We analyzed 62 clinical isolates of streptogramin A-resistant (SGAr) Staphylococcus aureus collected between 1981 and 2001 in 14 hospitals located in seven French cities. These isolates, including five with decreased susceptibility to glycopeptides, were distributed into 45 antibiotypes and 38 SmaI genotypes. Each of these genotypes included between 1 and 11 isolates, the SmaI patterns of which differed by no more than three bands. Although numerous clones were identified, we observed the spread of monoclonal isolates either within the same hospital or within hospitals in distinct cities and at large time intervals. Hybridization with probes directed against 10 SGAr genes (vatA, vatB, vatC, vatD, vatE, vgaA, vgaB, vgaAv, vgbA, and vgbB) revealed six patterns: vgaAv (21 isolates), vatA-vgbA (24 isolates), vgaAv-vatB-vgaB (14 isolates), vgaAv-vatA-vgbA (1 isolate), vgaAv-vatA-vgbA-vatB-vgaB (1 isolate), and vgaA (1 isolate). We detected at least one SGAr determinant in all of the tested isolates. vgaAv, which is part of the recently characterized transposon Tn5406, was found in 59.7% of the tested isolates. Of the 16 streptogramin B-susceptible isolates, 14 carried vgaAv alone and were susceptible to the mixtures of streptogramins, whereas the 2 isolates carrying vgaAv-vatB-vgaB were resistant to these mixtures. vatA-vgbA was found on plasmids of the same apparent size in 26 (42%) of the tested clinical isolates from 18 unrelated SmaI genotypes. The possible dissemination of some of the multiple clones characterized in the present study with an expected increased selective pressure of streptogramins following the recent licensing of Synercid (quinupristin-dalfopristin) must be carefully monitored. PMID:12574251

  3. Quorum quenching activity in cell-free lysate of endophytic bacteria isolated from Pterocarpus santalinus Linn., and its effect on quorum sensing regulated biofilm in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    PubMed

    Rajesh, P S; Ravishankar Rai, V

    2014-01-01

    Quorum sensing mechanism allows the microorganisms to resist the antibiotic treatment by forming biofilms. Quorum quenching is one of the mechanisms to control the development of drug resistance in microbes. Endophyte bacteria are beneficial to plant growth as they support the immune system against the pathogen attack. The endophytic bacteria present in Pterocarpus santalinus were screened for the presence of N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) degrading bacteria using biosensor strains and further confirmed by quantifying the violacein production. Cell-free lysate of endophytic bacteria, Bacillus firmus PT18 and Enterobacter asburiae PT39 exhibited potent AHL degrading ability by inhibiting about 80% violacein production in biosensor strain. Furthermore, when the cell-free lysate was applied to Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and PAO1-JP2 biofilm it resulted in significant (p<0.01) inhibition of biofilm formation. The biofilm inhibition was confirmed by visualization of biofilm slides under fluorescence microscopy, which showed decrease in total biomass formation in treated slides. Isolation and amplification of the gene (aiiA) indicated that the presence of AHL lactonase in cell-free lysate and sequence alignment indicated that AiiA contains a "HXHXDH" zinc-binding motif that is being conserved in several groups of metallohydrolases. Therefore, the study shows the potential of AHLs degradation by AHL lactonase present in cell-free lysate of isolated endophytic bacteria and inhibition of quorum sensing regulated biofilm formation in P. aeruginosa PAO1.

  4. A simple test for the detection of KPC and metallo-β-lactamase carbapenemase-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates with the use of meropenem disks supplemented with aminophenylboronic acid, dipicolinic acid and cloxacillin.

    PubMed

    Pasteran, F; Veliz, O; Faccone, D; Guerriero, L; Rapoport, M; Mendez, T; Corso, A

    2011-09-01

    We evaluated the ability of the combination disk test (CDT) and the Modified Hodge Test (MHT) to discriminate between various carbapenemase-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates (KPC, n = 36; metallo-β-lactamase (MBL), n = 38) and carbapenemase non-producers (n = 75). For the CDT, the optimal inhibitor concentrations and cut-off values were: 600 μg of 3-aminophenylboronic acid (APB) per disk (an increment of ≥4 mm), 1000 μg of dipicolinic acid (DPA) per disk (an increment of ≥5 mm) and 3000 μg of cloxacillin per disk (an increment of ≥3 mm). APB had excellent sensitivity (97%) and specificity (97%) for the detection of KPC enzymes. DPA detected MBL enzymes with a sensitivity and specificity of 97% and 81%, respectively. The MHT resulted in a low sensitivity (78%) and specificity (57%). The CDT could be very useful in daily practice to provide fast and reliable detection of KPC and MBL carbapenemases among P. aeruginosa isolates.

  5. Prevalence and Molecular Genetics of Macrolide Resistance among Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolates Collected in Finland in 2002

    PubMed Central

    Rantala, M.; Huikko, S.; Huovinen, P.; Jalava, J.

    2005-01-01

    The prevalence and mechanisms of macrolide resistance among 1,007 clinical pneumococcal isolates collected in Finland were investigated. Of these, 217 (21.5%) were resistant to erythromycin and 11% to clindamycin. Among the erythromycin-resistant isolates, mef(E) was present in 95 isolates (44%), mef(A) was present in 12 isolates (6%), and erm(B) was present in 90 isolates (41%). A double mechanism, mef(E) and erm(B), was detected in five isolates (2%). Ribosomal mutation was detected in 14 (6%) macrolide-resistant isolates in which no other determinant was found. Based on the telithromycin MICs, two groups of isolates were formed: 83.3% of the isolates belonged to a major group for which the telithromycin MIC range was ≤0.008 to 0.063 μg/ml, and 16.7% belonged to a minor group for which the telithromycin MIC range was 0.125 to 8 μg/ml. All except three isolates in the minor population carried a macrolide resistance gene. PMID:16189096

  6. In Vitro Activity of Fusidic Acid (CEM-102, Sodium Fusidate) against Staphylococcus aureus Isolates from Cystic Fibrosis Patients and Its Effect on the Activities of Tobramycin and Amikacin against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cepacia▿

    PubMed Central

    McGhee, Pamela; Clark, Catherine; Credito, Kim; Beachel, Linda; Pankuch, Glenn A.; Appelbaum, Peter C.; Kosowska-Shick, Klaudia

    2011-01-01

    We tested the MICs of fusidic acid (CEM-102) plus other agents against 40 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates from cystic fibrosis patients and the activities of fusidic acid with or without tobramycin or amikacin against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, MRSA, and Burkholderia cepacia isolates from cystic fibrosis patients in a 24-h time-kill study. Fusidic acid was potent (MICs, 0.125 to 0.5 μg/ml; a single 500-mg dose of fusidic acid at 8 h averaged 8 to 12. 5 μg/ml with 91 to 97% protein binding) against all MRSA strains. No antagonism was observed; synergy occurred for one MRSA strain treated with fusidic acid plus tobramycin. PMID:21343445

  7. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Achromobacter sp. Clonal Selection Leads to Successive Waves of Contamination of Water in Dental Care Units

    PubMed Central

    Abdouchakour, Fatima; Dupont, Chloé; Grau, Delphine; Aujoulat, Fabien; Mournetas, Patricia; Marchandin, Hélène; Parer, Sylvie; Gibert, Philippe; Valcarcel, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Dental care unit waterlines (DCUWs) consist of complex networks of thin tubes that facilitate the formation of microbial biofilms. Due to the predilection toward a wet environment, strong adhesion, biofilm formation, and resistance to biocides, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a major human opportunistic pathogen, is adapted to DCUW colonization. Other nonfermentative Gram-negative bacilli, such as members of the genus Achromobacter, are emerging pathogens found in water networks. We reported the 6.5-year dynamics of bacterial contamination of waterlines in a dental health care center with 61 dental care units (DCUs) connected to the same water supply system. The conditions allowed the selection and the emergence of clones of Achromobacter sp. and P. aeruginosa characterized by multilocus sequence typing, multiplex repetitive elements-based PCR, and restriction fragment length polymorphism in pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, biofilm formation, and antimicrobial susceptibility. One clone of P. aeruginosa and 2 clones of Achromobacter sp. colonized successively all of the DCUWs: the last colonization by P. aeruginosa ST309 led to the closing of the dental care center. Successive dominance of species and clones was linked to biocide treatments. Achromobacter strains were weak biofilm producers compared to P. aeruginosa ST309, but the coculture of P. aeruginosa and Achromobacter enhanced P. aeruginosa ST309 biofilm formation. Intraclonal genomic microevolution was observed in the isolates of P. aeruginosa ST309 collected chronologically and in Achromobacter sp. clone A. The contamination control was achieved by a complete reorganization of the dental health care center by removing the connecting tubes between DCUs. PMID:26296724

  8. Osteomyelitis due to multiple carbapenemase-producing Gram-negative bacteria: The first case report of a GES-13-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolate in Canada.

    PubMed

    Sepehri, Shadi; Poliquin, Guillaume; Alfattoh, Nora; Boyd, David; Mulvey, Michael; Denisuik, Andrew; Fanella, Sergio; Karlowsky, James; Walkty, Andrew

    2014-07-01

    A case of osteomyelitis in an infant following a burn injury sustained in Pakistan caused by a GES-13-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa (the first reported in Canada) and an OXA-48 producing Klebsiella pneumoniae is described. The present case serves to highlight the importance of international travel as a risk factor for infection with carbapenemase-producing bacteria and the challenges in the laboratory detection of these organisms.

  9. Virtual Global Transplant Laboratory Standard Operating Procedures for Blood Collection, PBMC Isolation, and Storage

    PubMed Central

    Higdon, Lauren E.; Lee, Karim; Tang, Qizhi; Maltzman, Jonathan S.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Research on human immune responses frequently involves the use of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) immediately, or at significantly delayed timepoints, after collection. This requires PBMC isolation from whole blood and cryopreservation for some applications. It is important to standardize protocols for blood collection, PBMC isolation, cryopreservation, and thawing that maximize survival and functionality of PBMC at the time of analysis. This resource includes detailed protocols describing blood collection tubes, isolation of PBMC using a density gradient, cryopreservation of PBMC, and thawing of cells as well as preparation for functional assays. For each protocol, we include important considerations, such as timing, storage temperatures, and freezing rate. In addition, we provide alternatives so that researchers can make informed decisions in determining the optimal protocol for their application. PMID:27795993

  10. Virtual Global Transplant Laboratory Standard Operating Procedures for Blood Collection, PBMC Isolation, and Storage.

    PubMed

    Higdon, Lauren E; Lee, Karim; Tang, Qizhi; Maltzman, Jonathan S

    2016-09-01

    Research on human immune responses frequently involves the use of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) immediately, or at significantly delayed timepoints, after collection. This requires PBMC isolation from whole blood and cryopreservation for some applications. It is important to standardize protocols for blood collection, PBMC isolation, cryopreservation, and thawing that maximize survival and functionality of PBMC at the time of analysis. This resource includes detailed protocols describing blood collection tubes, isolation of PBMC using a density gradient, cryopreservation of PBMC, and thawing of cells as well as preparation for functional assays. For each protocol, we include important considerations, such as timing, storage temperatures, and freezing rate. In addition, we provide alternatives so that researchers can make informed decisions in determining the optimal protocol for their application.

  11. Antibacterial Activities of Actinomycete Isolates Collected from Soils of Rajshahi, Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Md. Ajijur; Islam, Mohammad Zahidul; Islam, Md. Anwar Ul

    2011-01-01

    This study was performed to isolate actinomycete colonies having antibacterial activity from soil samples collected from different places around Rajshahi, Bangladesh. Thirty actinomycete colonies were isolated in pure culture from five soil samples using Starch-casein-nitrate-agar medium. The isolates were grouped in five color series based on their aerial mycelia color and screened for their antibacterial activity against a range of test bacteria. Sixteen isolates (53.3%) were found to have moderate to high activity against four gram-positive and four gram-negative bacteria. Since many isolates showed inhibitory activity against indicator bacteria, it is suggestive that Bangladeshi soil could be an interesting source to explore for antibacterial secondary metabolites. PMID:21904683

  12. Accurate mass analysis of N-acyl-homoserine-lactones and cognate lactone-opened compounds in bacterial isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 by LC-ESI-LTQ-FTICR-MS.

    PubMed

    Cataldi, Tommaso R I; Bianco, Giuliana; Abate, Salvatore

    2009-02-01

    N-acyl-homoserine-lactones (AHSLs) are widely conserved signal molecules present in quorum sensing systems of Gram-negative bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We present here the results obtained with a hybrid linear trap/Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (LTQ-FTICR) mass spectrometer used to investigate the occurrence of AHSLs and cognate N-acyl-homoserines (AHSs) in bacterial isolates of P. aeruginosa (strain PAO1). Two hydrolysed AHSs were found in significant amounts, most likely formed through the lactone opening of N-3-oxo-decanoyl-L-homoserine-lactone (3OC10-HSL) and N-3-oxo-dodecanoyl-L-homoserine-lactone (3OC12-HSL). Structure elucidation of these ring-opened molecules, i.e. N-3-oxo-decanoyl-L-homoserine (3OC10-HS), and N-3-oxo-dodecanoyl-L-homoserine (3OC12-HS), which are not detected by bacterial biosensors, was performed by high-resolution and accurate mass measurements upon liquid chromatography (LC) and confirmed by tandem MS in the LTQ analyser. Assignment of chemical formula, with mass spectra in the form of [M+H]+, was significantly expedited by extracted ion chromatograms (XICs) because the number of potentially plausible formulae for each protonated signalling molecule was considerably reduced a priori by the LC behaviour, the high mass measurement accuracy available in FTICR mass spectra and the isotopic patterns. At least two concentration levels were observed in spent culture supernatants of P. aeruginosa: compounds at a relatively high content (5-15 microM) that is C4-HSL, 3OC10-HS, and 3OC12-HS and those occurring at a lower content (<0.2 microM) that is C6-HSL and C8-HSL. The implications of this work extend to a great variety of Gram-negative bacteria.

  13. Isolations of Potosi virus from mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) collected in Connecticut.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Philip M; Andreadis, Theodore G; Anderson, John F; Main, Andrew J

    2005-09-01

    Potosi virus (POTV) (Bunyaviridae: Orthobunyavirus) was first isolated from Aedes albopictus (Skuse) collected in Potosi, MO, in 1989, and subsequent isolations were reported from Illinois, Michigan, Ohio, and the Carolinas. To determine whether the distribution of this virus extends into the northeastern United States, we analyzed arboviruses acquired from mosquitoes collected in Connecticut from 1998 to 2004. In 2001, a bunyavirus was isolated from Aedes vexans (Meigen) that was different from other arboviruses known to occur in Connecticut by cross-neutralization and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assays. Nucleotide and encoded amino acid sequences of a portion of the G2 envelope gene were 99 and 100% similar to POTV, respectively, yet distinct from indigenous strains of Jamestown Canyon (JCV), Cache Valley (CVV), and Trivittatus virus (TVTV). Viral isolates obtained from the statewide surveillance program were retested by RT-PCR coupled with restriction enzyme analysis to distinguish POTV from other bunyaviruses. POTV isolates, previously typed by neutralization, were correctly identified by RT-PCR; however, many isolates classified as JCV or CVV by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay proved to be POTV by molecular assays. In total, 92 strains of POTV were isolated from 12 mosquito species in 2000, 2001, and 2003, whereas POTV was not detected in mosquitoes sampled during 1998, 1999, 2002, and 2004. Viral isolation rates were highest for Anopheles punctipennis (Say) (3.2-11.3 infection rate per 1,000 mosquitoes), whereas the greatest number of isolates came from Ochlerotatus trivittatus (Coquillett) (8-16 isolates). This finding represents the first detection of POTV in the northeastern United States where it infects a diverse array of mosquito species.

  14. Prevalence of Multidrug-resistant, Extensively Drug-resistant, and Pandrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa from a Tertiary Level Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Gill, JS; Arora, Sunil; Khanna, SP; Kumar, KVS Hari

    2016-01-01

    Background: Infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa is common in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), leading to increased morbidity and mortality. The organism is classified into various phenotypes based on the drug resistance pattern, namely, drug-resistant (DR), multi-DR (MDR), extensively DR (XDR), and pan-DR (PDR). We aim to study the incidence of P. aeruginosa phenotypes in a tertiary level ICU. Materials and Methods: We conducted this prospective, observational study for 2 years (January 2014-December 2015) and collected appropriate clinical samples (blood, urine, wound discharge, etc.,) from all the patients admitted to ICU. We excluded patients with known septicemia and P. aeruginosa infection. Group 1 comprised a total 1915 patient samples and Group 2 comprised 100 active surveillance samples, collected from the medical staff and the hospital environment. The data were analyzed using appropriate statistical methods, and a P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: We isolated 597 pathogenic bacteria out of 1915 specimens, giving a culture positivity rate of 31.2%. Klebsiella (43%), Acinetobacter (22%), and P. aeruginosa (15%) were the top three isolated bacteria. None of the surveillance samples grew P. aeruginosa. Antibiotic resistance studies revealed that 47.7% of P. aeruginosa isolates were DR, 50% were MDR, and 2.3% were XDR phenotype. None of the strains showed PDR phenotype. Conclusion: Our data revealed a high prevalence of DR phenotypes of P. aeruginosa in the ICU. Judicious use of antibiotics and strict infection control measures are essential to reduce the prevalence of drug resistance. PMID:27942195

  15. Enrichment and isolation of crude oil degrading bacteria from some mussels collected from the Persian Gulf.

    PubMed

    Bayat, Zeynab; Hassanshahian, Mehdi; Hesni, Majid Askari

    2015-12-15

    To date, little is known about existing relationships between mussels and bacteria in hydrocarbon-contaminated marine environments. The aim of this study is to find crude oil degrading bacteria in some mussels at the Persian Gulf. Twenty eight crude oil degrading bacteria were isolated from three mussels species collected from oil contaminated area at Persian Gulf. According to high growth and degradation of crude oil four strains were selected between 28 isolated strains for more study. Determination the nucleotide sequence of the gene encoding for 16S rRNA show that these isolated strains belong to: Shewanella algae isolate BHA1, Micrococcus luteus isolate BHA7, Pseudoalteromonas sp. isolate BHA8 and Shewanella haliotis isolate BHA35. The residual crude oil in culture medium was analysis by Gas Chromatography (GC). The results confirmed that these strains can degrade: 47.24%, 66.08%, 27.13% and 69.17% of crude oil respectively. These strains had high emulsification activity and biosurfactant production. Also, the effects of some factors on crude oil degradation by isolated strains were studied. The results show that the optimum concentration of crude oil was 2.5% and the best degradation take place at 12% of salinity. This research is the first reports on characterization of crude oil degrading bacteria from mussels at Persian Gulf and by using of these bacteria in the field the effect of oil pollution can be reduce on this marine environment.

  16. Genome Sequence of the Listeria monocytogenes Food Isolate HPB913, Collected in Canada in 1993

    PubMed Central

    Pightling, Arthur W.; Rand, Hugh; Strain, Errol

    2016-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a pathogenic bacterium of importance to public health and food safety agencies. We present the genome sequence of the serotype 1/2a L. monocytogenes food isolate HPB913, which was collected in Canada in 1993 as part of an investigation into a sporadic case of foodborne illness. PMID:27634991

  17. Imported PER-1 producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa, PER-1 producing Acinetobacter baumanii and VIM-2-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains in Hungary

    PubMed Central

    Szabó, Dora; Szentandrássy, Julia; Juhász, Zsuzsa; Katona, Katalin; Nagy, Károly; Rókusz, László

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumanii are important nosocomial pathogens with wide intrinsic resistance. However, due to the dissemination of the acquired resistance mechanisms, such as extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) and metallo beta-lactamase (MBL) production, multidrug resistant strains have been isolated more often. Case presentation We report a case of a Hungarian tourist, who was initially hospitalized in Egypt and later transferred to Hungary. On the day of admission PER-1-producing P. aeruginosa, PER-1 producing A. baumannii, SHV-5-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae and VIM-2-producing P. aeruginosa isolates were subcultured from the patient's samples in Hungary. Comparing the pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns of the P. aeruginosa strains from the patient to the P. aeruginosa strains occurring in this hospital, we can state that the PER-1-producing P. aeruginosa and VIM-2-producing P. aeruginosa had external origin. Conclusion This is the first report of PER-1-producing P. aeruginosa,and PER-1-producing A. baumanii strains in Hungary. This case highlights the importance of spreading of the beta-lactamase-mediated resistance mechanisms between countries and continents, showing the importance of careful screening and the isolation of patients arriving from a different country. PMID:18513394

  18. Guidance Regarding Sample Collection and Refinement of Fecal Flotation Exam for the Isolation of Aspiculuris tetraptera.

    PubMed

    Goodroe, Anna E; Baxter, Victoria K; Watson, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Aspiculuris tetraptera continues to be a problem in rodent vivaria, in part due to difficulties in parasite detection. Although PCR testing is highly sensitive, it is expensive and does not always provide immediate results. Consequently, many institutions rely on passive fecal flotation as a quick inhouse exam for diagnosing A. tetraptera infections. To increase the sensitivity of this test, we examined multiple parameters to determine the optimal test protocol. A 30-min soaking period prior to fecal flotation for 15 min allowed fecal pellets to soften and facilitated efficient egg isolation. We also evaluated the effect of time of day, sample size, age, sex, and housing status on egg isolation. No evidence of cyclical egg shedding was found, and although larger fecal sample sizes did not result in more eggs isolated, their use reduced the incidence of false-negative exams. The most eggs were isolated from 8- and 12-wk-old mice, and as mice aged, the number of eggs isolated declined. Overall, neither sex nor housing status influenced the number of eggs isolated. Finally, examination of multiple diagnostic tests (fecal flotation exam, direct examination of cecal and colonic contents, and fecal PCR) revealed that no single test was definitive, thus indicating that multiple tests might be required to successfully screen mice with low pinworm burdens. These findings provide guidance regarding sample selection, collection, and processing to efficiently detect A. tetraptera.

  19. Guidance Regarding Sample Collection and Refinement of Fecal Flotation Exam for the Isolation of Aspiculuris tetraptera

    PubMed Central

    Goodroe, Anna E; Baxter, Victoria K; Watson, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Aspiculuris tetraptera continues to be a problem in rodent vivaria, in part due to difficulties in parasite detection. Although PCR testing is highly sensitive, it is expensive and does not always provide immediate results. Consequently, many institutions rely on passive fecal flotation as a quick inhouse exam for diagnosing A. tetraptera infections. To increase the sensitivity of this test, we examined multiple parameters to determine the optimal test protocol. A 30-min soaking period prior to fecal flotation for 15 min allowed fecal pellets to soften and facilitated efficient egg isolation. We also evaluated the effect of time of day, sample size, age, sex, and housing status on egg isolation. No evidence of cyclical egg shedding was found, and although larger fecal sample sizes did not result in more eggs isolated, their use reduced the incidence of false-negative exams. The most eggs were isolated from 8- and 12-wk-old mice, and as mice aged, the number of eggs isolated declined. Overall, neither sex nor housing status influenced the number of eggs isolated. Finally, examination of multiple diagnostic tests (fecal flotation exam, direct examination of cecal and colonic contents, and fecal PCR) revealed that no single test was definitive, thus indicating that multiple tests might be required to successfully screen mice with low pinworm burdens. These findings provide guidance regarding sample selection, collection, and processing to efficiently detect A. tetraptera. PMID:27657708

  20. Human Tear Fluid Protects against Pseudomonas aeruginosa Keratitis in a Murine Experimental Model▿

    PubMed Central

    Kwong, Mary S. F.; Evans, David J.; Ni, Minjian; Cowell, Brigitte A.; Fleiszig, Suzanne M. J.

    2007-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa keratitis is an acute sight-threatening infection. We previously reported that human tear fluid could protect individual human corneal epithelial cells in vitro against invasion by and cytotoxicity due to clinical and laboratory isolates of P. aeruginosa and that the protective mechanism was independent of bacteriostatic activity. In the present study, we examined the effects of human tear fluid in vivo. Tears were collected from healthy human volunteers and were studied in vivo in mice. The effects on the virulence of both invasive and cytotoxic clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa were examined. Tear fluid was found to reduce the severity of disease when corneas were challenged with cytotoxic bacteria immediately after scratch injury, and it completely protected against susceptibility to infection by a cytotoxic strain in a model in which corneas were infected during the healing process 6 h after scratching. Visible protection correlated with the inhibition of bacterial colonization 1, 4, and 48 h postinoculation. Tear fluid also significantly reduced the severity of infections caused by invasive P. aeruginosa in the 6-h-healing model. This result also coincided with significantly reduced bacterial colonization at 48 h. In vitro, human tear fluid significantly reduced the ability of invasive and cytotoxic bacteria to translocate across corneal epithelia and increased transepithelial resistance with or without bacterial inoculation. These data show that human tear fluid can protect against P. aeruginosa corneal infection in vivo and that the mechanism likely involves enhanced epithelial barrier function in addition to protection of individual epithelial cells against bacterial internalization and cytotoxicity. PMID:17325054

  1. Laboratory bioassays and field-cage trials of Metarhizium spp. isolates with field-collected Mormon crickets (Anabrus simplex)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Mormon cricket, Anabrus simplex, is an important pest in the western United States. This study evaluates the virulence of 32 isolates of Metarhizium towards field-collected Mormon crickets. Additionally, several isolates were tested in outdoor field-cage studies. All 32 Metarhizium isolates were...

  2. Metallo-β-Lactamase-Producing Pseudomonas spp. in Korea: High Prevalence of Isolates with VIM-2 Type and Emergence of Isolates with IMP-1 Type

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyungwon; Park, Ae Ja; Kim, Moon Yeun; Lee, Hee Joo; Cho, Ji-Hyun; Kang, Jung Oak; Yong, Dongeun

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Two Korean nationwide studies showed that metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs)-producing-Pseudomonas spp. are not rare. The aim of this study was to assess the trends of MBL-producing isolates among imipenem-resistant isolates of Pseudomonas spp. Materials and Methods Imipenem-resistant clinical isolates were collected from 23 hospitals and one commercial laboratory participating in the KONSAR program in 2005. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to detect MBL genes. Results Alleles of MBL genes were detected in 10.8% of 415 Pseudomonas aeruginosa and 66.7% of 12 P. putida isolates from 18 of 24 hospitals/laboratory. Among the 14 IMP-1-like and 39 VIM-2-like MBLs, emergence of IMP-6 was detected for the first time. Conclusion Prevalence of MBL-producing P. aeruginosa has not significantly increased, but IMP-6 emerged in P. aeruginosa. PMID:19568593

  3. ISOLATION OF Cryptococcus neoformans FROM ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES COLLECTED IN SOUTHEASTERN NIGERIA

    PubMed Central

    NWEZE, Emeka I.; KECHIA, Fred A.; DIBUA, Uju E.; EZE, Charles; ONOJA, Uwakwe S.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Cryptococcosis caused by Cryptococcus neoformans is the second most common fungal opportunistic pathogen and a lifethreatening infection with serious clinical manifestations especially in HIV/AIDS and other immunocompromised patients. In Nigeria, HIV/AIDS infection has reached an alarming level. Despite this, information on the presence of this fungus in clinical and environmental samples is very scanty in Nigeria and many other parts of Africa. We set out to evaluate the presence of Cryptococcus neoformans or C. gattii in pigeon droppings obtained from Southeastern Nigeria. One hundred and seventy-seven samples of pigeon droppings from six sample types were collected. The area covered comprised of ten cities and other locations spanning across five States in Nigeria. Using established techniques, Cryptococcus neoformans was isolated from 39 of the 177 (22.0%) samples overall. No C. gattiiwas isolated. Most of the isolates (32.4%) were recovered from dovecotes (11 of 34) followed closely by samples taken from markets (31.8%; seven of 22) and least from the church (4.0%; one of 25). The highest isolation rate (38.9%) was found in samples from Enugu-Ezike(seven of 23) while the least came from Afikpoand the other locations each with 9.1% isolation rate. This is the first large-scale screening of Cryptococcus neoformans from pigeon droppings in Nigeria. The ecological and epidemiological significance of these findings are discussed. PMID:26422152

  4. Isolation, identification, and characterization of gut microflora of Perionyx excavatus collected from Midnapore, West Bengal.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Tanushree Tulsian; Das, Ankita

    2016-03-01

    Agriculture is an important part of the economy of the undivided Midnapore district. Agricultural land is its asset and most importantly its means of sustenance as well as survival. Earthworms are invertebrates that play a key role in recycling organic matters in soils. Since the intestines of earthworms harbor wide ranges of microorganisms, enzymes, hormones etc., these half digested materials decompose rapidly and are transformed into a stabilized material called vermicompost which is very useful for increasing the soil fertility. One has to look for these characters before recommending any species for vermiculture. In the present study, Perionyx excavatus specimens were collected from the undivided Midnapore district and from the Earthworms gut, bacteria, fungus, actinobacteria, and yeast were isolated and identified using various morphological and biochemical tests. All the bacterial isolates were identified using morphological study, staining techniques, and different biochemical tests such as catalase test, KOH test, H2 SO4 test, Starch hydrolysis test, oxidase test, and sucrose hydrolysis test. All the fungal, actinobacteria, and yeast isolates were subjected to staining and morphological characterization (color and texture of fungal colony). Bacterial isolates of genus Bacillus sp., Staphylococcus sp., Enterococci, Micrococcus sp., Enterobacter sp., and Citrobacter sp. were identified. Among the fungal isolates Aspergilus sp., and P. boydii were identified. Streptomyces sp., Nocardia sp. among the actinobacteria and Candida sp. among yeast were also found to be present in earthworm gut and these might play an important role along with the earthworm to increase the quality and fertility of soil.

  5. Epinecidin-1 Has Immunomodulatory Effects, Facilitating Its Therapeutic Use in a Mouse Model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Chieh-Yu; Chen, Jian-Chyi; Sheen, Jenn-Feng; Lin, Tai-Lang

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are garnering attention as possible alternatives to antibiotics. Here, we describe the antimicrobial properties of epinecidin-1 against a multidrug-resistant clinical isolate of P. aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa R) and a P. aeruginosa strain from ATCC (P. aeruginosa ATCC 19660) in vivo. The MICs of epinecidin-1 against P. aeruginosa R and P. aeruginosa ATCC 19660 were determined and compared with those of imipenem. Epinecidin-1 was found to be highly effective at combating peritonitis infection caused by P. aeruginosa R or P. aeruginosa ATCC 19660 in mouse models, without inducing adverse behavioral effects or liver or kidney toxicity. Taken together, our results indicate that epinecidin-1 enhances the rate of survival of mice infected with the bacterial pathogen P. aeruginosa through both antimicrobial and immunomodulatory effects. PMID:24820078

  6. Molecular epidemiology of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in an intensive care unit.

    PubMed Central

    Döring, G.; Hörz, M.; Ortelt, J.; Grupp, H.; Wolz, C.

    1993-01-01

    Genotyping was used to analyse Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from sink drains and 15 intubated patients as part of a 3-month prospective study of strain transmission in a medical-surgical intensive care unit. Ninety percent of all washbasin drains were persistently contaminated with several P. aeruginosa genotypes. In 60% (9/15) of the patients, P. aeruginosa colonization or infection was hospital-acquired: P. aeruginosa strains isolated from these patients were present in hospital sinks or in other patients before their admission. Since all patients were immobile, personnel were the probable route of transmission of P. aeruginosa in the hospital. The mechanism of strain transmission from sinks to hands during hand washing was investigated in a children's hospital. When P. aeruginosa was present at densities of > 10(5)/c.f.u. per ml in sink drains, hand washing resulted in hand contamination with P. aeruginosa via aerosol generation in the majority of experiments or P. aeruginosa was detected using an air sampler above the washing basin. High P. aeruginosa cfu were present at 4.30 h in the eight sinks (5.4 x 10(5)-7.0 x 10(10) c.f.u./ml), whereas at 13.00 h P. aeruginosa c.f.u. were significantly lower (3.1 x 10(2)-8.0 x 10(5) c.f.u./ml). These data reveal that the danger of bacterial contamination of hands during hand washing is highest in the morning. The identified transmission routes demand more effective hygienic measures in hospital settings particularly concerning personnel hands and sink drains. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8519308

  7. Intraclonal genome diversity of the major Pseudomonas aeruginosa clones C and PA14

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Sebastian; Klockgether, Jens; Morán Losada, Patricia; Chouvarine, Philippe; Cramer, Nina; Davenport, Colin F.; Dethlefsen, Sarah; Dorda, Marie; Goesmann, Alexander; Hilker, Rolf; Mielke, Samira; Schönfelder, Torben; Suerbaum, Sebastian; Türk, Oliver; Woltemate, Sabrina; Wiehlmann, Lutz

    2016-01-01

    Summary Bacterial populations differentiate at the subspecies level into clonal complexes. Intraclonal genome diversity was studied in 100 isolates of the two dominant P seudomonas aeruginosa clones C and PA14 collected from the inanimate environment, acute and chronic infections. The core genome was highly conserved among clone members with a median pairwise within‐clone single nucleotide sequence diversity of 8 × 10−6 for clone C and 2 × 10−5 for clone PA14. The composition of the accessory genome was, on the other hand, as variable within the clone as between unrelated clones. Each strain carried a large cargo of unique genes. The two dominant worldwide distributed P. aeruginosa clones combine an almost invariant core with the flexible gain and loss of genetic elements that spread by horizontal transfer. PMID:26711897

  8. Phenotypic and Genotypic Characterization of Canadian Clinical Isolates of Vibrio parahaemolyticus Collected from 2000 to 2009

    PubMed Central

    Kearney, Ashley K.; Nadon, Celine A.; Peterson, Christy-Lynn; Tyler, Kevin; Bakouche, Laurene; Clark, Clifford G.; Hoang, Linda; Gilmour, Matthew W.; Farber, Jeffrey M.

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is the leading bacterial cause of food-borne illness due to the consumption of contaminated seafood. The aim of the present study was to determine the population of its subtypes and establish a better understanding of the various types of V. parahaemolyticus strains that are causing human illness in Canada. The subtypes for 100 human clinical isolates of V. parahaemolyticus collected between 2000 and 2009 were determined by performing serotyping, ribotyping, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and multilocus sequence typing. Within this panel of strains, there was a high level of diversity (between 22 and 53 subtypes per method), but the presence of predominant clones with congruent subtypes between the various methods was also observed. For example, all 32 isolates belonging to sequence type 36 (ST36) were from serogroup O4, while 31 of them were ribotype EcoVib235-287, and 24 of the 32 were SfiI pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) pattern VPSF1.0001. With regard to the presence of known virulence genes, 74 of the 100 isolates were PCR positive for the presence of the thermostable direct hemolysin (tdh); and 59 of these 74 strains also contained the second virulence marker, the tdh-related hemolysin (trh). The detection of trh was more predominant (81%) among the clinical isolates, and only four (4%) of the clinical isolates tested negative for the presence of both tdh and trh. This database, comprising 100 clinical isolates of V. parahaemolyticus strains from Canada, forms a baseline understanding of subtype diversity for future source attribution and other epidemiologic studies. PMID:24452166

  9. Efficient isolation of multiphoton processes and detection of collective resonances in dilute samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruder, Lukas; Binz, Marcel; Stienkemeier, Frank

    2015-11-01

    A phase modulation technique to sensitively and selectively isolate multiple-quantum coherences in a femtosecond pump-probe setup is presented. By detecting incoherent observables and incorporating lock-in amplification, even weak signals of highly dilute samples can be acquired. Applying this method, efficient isolation of one- and two-photon quantum beats in a rubidium-doped helium droplet beam experiment is demonstrated and collective resonances are observed in a potassium vapor for the first time up to fourth order. Our approach provides promising perspectives for coherent time-resolved experiments in the deep UV and multidimensional spectroscopy schemes, in particular when mass-selective detection of particles in dilute gas-phase targets is possible.

  10. Molecular epidemiological investigation of an outbreak of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in an SCT unit.

    PubMed

    Fanci, R; Bartolozzi, B; Sergi, S; Casalone, E; Pecile, P; Cecconi, D; Mannino, R; Donnarumma, F; Leon, A G; Guidi, S; Nicoletti, P; Mastromei, G; Bosi, A

    2009-02-01

    From May to October 2006, six severe Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections were diagnosed in patients undergoing SCT in the SCT unit of the Careggi hospital (Florence, Italy). Four of the infected patients were treated consecutively in the same room (room N). On the hypothesis of a possible environmental source of infection, samples were collected from different sites that had potential for cross-contamination throughout the SCT unit, including the electrolytic chloroxidant disinfectant used for hand washing (Irgasan) and the disinfectant used for facilities cleaning. Four of the environmental samples were positive for P. aeruginosa: three Irgansan soap samples and a tap swab sample from the staff cleaning and dressing room. The AFLP (amplified fragment length polymorphism) typing method employed to evaluate strain clonality showed that the isolates from the patients who had shared the same room and an isolate from Irgasan soap had a significant molecular similarity (dice index higher than 0.93). After adequate control measures, no subsequent environmental sample proved positive for P. aeruginosa. These data strongly support the hypothesis of the clonal origin of the infective strains and suggest an environmental source of infection. The AFLP method was fast enough to allow a 'real-time' monitoring of the outbreak, permitting additional preventive measures.

  11. Genomic Characterization of Two KPC-Producing Klebsiella Isolates Collected in 1997 in New York City.

    PubMed

    Eilertson, Brandon; Chen, Liang; Chavda, Kalyan D; Kreiswirth, Barry N

    2017-04-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC)-producing Enterobacteriaceae have now become a global public health threat. However, the origin of this pandemic and the characterization of pre-2003 blaKPC-harboring plasmids remain unknown. Here we used next-generation sequencing to characterize two KPC-2-producing K. pneumoniae and Kmichiganensis isolates collected from a New York City hospital in 1997. Although identified in two different Klebsiella species, the blaKPC-2 gene was harbored by Tn4401b transposons on two highly similar IncN plasmids.

  12. Efficient isolation of Swine influenza viruses by age-targeted specimen collection.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Makoto; Matsuu, Aya; Yonezawa, Kouki; Igarashi, Manabu; Okuya, Kosuke; Kawabata, Toshiko; Ito, Kimihito; Tsukiyama-Kohara, Kyoko; Taneno, Akira; Deguchi, Eisaburo

    2015-04-01

    The control of swine influenza virus (SIV) infection is paramount for increasing the productivity of pig farming and minimizing the threat of pandemic outbreaks. Thus, SIV surveillance should be conducted by region and on a regular basis. Here, we established a microneutralization assay specific for SIV seroprevalence surveillance by using reporter gene-expressing recombinant influenza viruses. Growth-based SIV seroprevalence revealed that most sows and piglets were positive for neutralizing antibodies against influenza viruses. In contrast, the 90-day-old growing pigs exhibited limited neutralizing activity in their sera, suggesting that this particular age of population is most susceptible to SIV infection and thus is an ideal age group for SIV isolation. From nasal swab specimens of healthy pigs in this age population, we were able to isolate SIVs at a higher incidence (5.3%) than those of previous reports. Nucleotide sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of the hemagglutinin (HA) genes revealed that the isolated SIVs have circulated and evolved in pigs but not have been recently introduced from humans, implying that a large number of SIV lineages may remain "undiscovered" in the global porcine populations. We propose that the 90-day-old growing pig-targeted nasal swab collection presented in this study facilitates global SIV surveillance and contributes to the detection and control of SIV infection.

  13. Isolation of Tibet orbivirus, TIBOV, from Culicoides Collected in Yunnan, China.

    PubMed

    Lei, Wenwen; Guo, Xiaofang; Fu, Shihong; Feng, Yun; Nie, Kai; Song, Jingdong; Li, Yang; Ma, Xuejun; Liang, Guodong; Zhou, Hongning

    2015-01-01

    We isolated a novel virus strain (YN12246) from Culicoides spp. specimens collected at the China-Laos-Myanmar border in southern Yunnan Province. This virus had a cytopathic effect (CPE) on both insect cells (C6/36) and mammalian cells (BHK-21). Electron microscopy revealed the structure of the virions to be spherical with a diameter of 75 nm. Polyacrylamide gel analysis demonstrated that the viral genome consisted of 10 segments of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), with a distribution pattern of 3-3-3-1. The coding sequences of 9 genome segments of YN12246 (Seg1, Seg3-Seg10) were obtained by high-throughput sequencing and Sanger sequencing. Comparisons of conserved genome segments 1 and 3 (Seg1 and Seg3), encoding the polymerase-VP1 and sub-core T2 protein, respectively, showed that YN12246 groups with the Culicoides-borne orbiviruses. The highest levels of sequence identity were detected between YN12246 and Tibet orbivirus (TIBOV), indicating that they belong to the same virus species (with amino acid identity of 98.8% and 96.4% for the polymerase and T2 protein, respectively). The data presented here confirm that YN12246 is a member of the TIBOV species, which was first isolated from mosquitoes in 2009. This is the first report of the isolation of TIBOV from Culicoides.

  14. Isolation of Tibet orbivirus, TIBOV, from Culicoides Collected in Yunnan, China

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yun; Nie, Kai; Song, Jingdong; Li, Yang; Ma, Xuejun; Liang, Guodong; Zhou, Hongning

    2015-01-01

    We isolated a novel virus strain (YN12246) from Culicoides spp. specimens collected at the China-Laos-Myanmar border in southern Yunnan Province. This virus had a cytopathic effect (CPE) on both insect cells (C6/36) and mammalian cells (BHK-21). Electron microscopy revealed the structure of the virions to be spherical with a diameter of 75 nm. Polyacrylamide gel analysis demonstrated that the viral genome consisted of 10 segments of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), with a distribution pattern of 3-3-3-1. The coding sequences of 9 genome segments of YN12246 (Seg1, Seg3-Seg10) were obtained by high-throughput sequencing and Sanger sequencing. Comparisons of conserved genome segments 1 and 3 (Seg1 and Seg3), encoding the polymerase-VP1 and sub-core T2 protein, respectively, showed that YN12246 groups with the Culicoides-borne orbiviruses. The highest levels of sequence identity were detected between YN12246 and Tibet orbivirus (TIBOV), indicating that they belong to the same virus species (with amino acid identity of 98.8% and 96.4% for the polymerase and T2 protein, respectively). The data presented here confirm that YN12246 is a member of the TIBOV species, which was first isolated from mosquitoes in 2009. This is the first report of the isolation of TIBOV from Culicoides. PMID:26295700

  15. Multiyear, Multinational Survey of the Incidence and Global Distribution of Metallo-β-Lactamase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Rabine, Sharon; Hackel, Meredith; McLaughlin, Robert E.; Biedenbach, Douglas J.; Bouchillon, Samuel K.; Sahm, Daniel F.; Bradford, Patricia A.

    2015-01-01

    Metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs) hydrolyze all classes of β-lactams except monobactams and are not inhibited by classic serine β-lactamase inhibitors. Gram-negative pathogens isolated from patient infections were collected from 202 medical centers in 40 countries as part of a global surveillance study from 2012 to 2014. Carbapenem-nonsusceptible Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were characterized for bla genes encoding VIM, IMP, NDM, SPM, and GIM variants using PCR and sequencing. A total of 471 MBL-positive isolates included the following species (numbers of isolates are in parentheses): P. aeruginosa (308), Klebsiella spp. (85), Enterobacter spp. (39), Proteeae (16), Citrobacter freundii (12), Escherichia coli (6), and Serratia marcescens (5) and were submitted by sites from 34 countries. Of these, 69.6% were collected in 9 countries (numbers of isolates are in parentheses): Russia (72), Greece (61), Philippines (54), Venezuela (29), and Kuwait, Nigeria, Romania, South Africa, and Thailand (20 to 25 isolates each). Thirty-two different MBL variants were detected (14 VIM, 14 IMP, and 4 NDM enzymes). Seven novel MBL variants were encountered in the study, each differing from a previously reported variant by one amino acid substitution: VIM-42 (VIM-1 [V223I]), VIM-43 (VIM-4 [A24V]), VIM-44 (VIM-2 [K257N]), VIM-45 (VIM-2 [T35I]), IMP-48 (IMP-14 [I69T]), IMP-49 (IMP-18 [V49F]), and NDM-16 (NDM-1 [R264H]). The in vitro activities of all tested antibiotics against MBL-positive Enterobacteriaceae were significantly reduced with the exception of that of aztreonam-avibactam (MIC90, 0.5 to 1 μg/ml), whereas colistin was the most effective agent against MBL-positive P. aeruginosa isolates (>97% susceptible). Although the global percentage of isolates encoding MBLs remains relatively low, their detection in 12 species, 34 countries, and all regions participating in this surveillance study is concerning. PMID:26643349

  16. Multiyear, Multinational Survey of the Incidence and Global Distribution of Metallo-β-Lactamase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Kazmierczak, Krystyna M; Rabine, Sharon; Hackel, Meredith; McLaughlin, Robert E; Biedenbach, Douglas J; Bouchillon, Samuel K; Sahm, Daniel F; Bradford, Patricia A

    2016-02-01

    Metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs) hydrolyze all classes of β-lactams except monobactams and are not inhibited by classic serine β-lactamase inhibitors. Gram-negative pathogens isolated from patient infections were collected from 202 medical centers in 40 countries as part of a global surveillance study from 2012 to 2014. Carbapenem-nonsusceptible Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were characterized for bla genes encoding VIM, IMP, NDM, SPM, and GIM variants using PCR and sequencing. A total of 471 MBL-positive isolates included the following species (numbers of isolates are in parentheses): P. aeruginosa (308), Klebsiella spp. (85), Enterobacter spp. (39), Proteeae (16), Citrobacter freundii (12), Escherichia coli (6), and Serratia marcescens (5) and were submitted by sites from 34 countries. Of these, 69.6% were collected in 9 countries (numbers of isolates are in parentheses): Russia (72), Greece (61), Philippines (54), Venezuela (29), and Kuwait, Nigeria, Romania, South Africa, and Thailand (20 to 25 isolates each). Thirty-two different MBL variants were detected (14 VIM, 14 IMP, and 4 NDM enzymes). Seven novel MBL variants were encountered in the study, each differing from a previously reported variant by one amino acid substitution: VIM-42 (VIM-1 [V223I]), VIM-43 (VIM-4 [A24V]), VIM-44 (VIM-2 [K257N]), VIM-45 (VIM-2 [T35I]), IMP-48 (IMP-14 [I69T]), IMP-49 (IMP-18 [V49F]), and NDM-16 (NDM-1 [R264H]). The in vitro activities of all tested antibiotics against MBL-positive Enterobacteriaceae were significantly reduced with the exception of that of aztreonam-avibactam (MIC90, 0.5 to 1 μg/ml), whereas colistin was the most effective agent against MBL-positive P. aeruginosa isolates (>97% susceptible). Although the global percentage of isolates encoding MBLs remains relatively low, their detection in 12 species, 34 countries, and all regions participating in this surveillance study is concerning.

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of Geobacillus sp. Isolate T6, a Thermophilic Bacterium Collected from a Thermal Spring in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Elio M.; Berretta, Marcelo F.; Benintende, Graciela B.; Zandomeni, Rubén O.

    2015-01-01

    Geobacillus sp. isolate T6 was collected from a thermal spring in Salta, Argentina. The draft genome sequence (3,767,773 bp) of this isolate is represented by one major scaffold of 3,46 Mbp, a second one of 207 kbp, and 20 scaffolds of <13 kbp. The assembled sequences revealed 3,919 protein-coding genes. PMID:26184933

  18. Performance of the CLSI Carba NP and the Rosco Carb Screen Assays Using North American Carbapenemase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Lauren C.; Roundtree, Sylvester S.; Lancaster, Diana P.; Rudin, Susan D.; Bard, Jennifer Dien; Roberts, Amity L.; Marshall, Steven H.; Bonomo, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    This study compared the performance of the Carba NP assay, published by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute, and the Rosco Rapid Carb Screen kit. Carba NP had superior sensitivity, but both assays required an increased inoculum to detect carbapenemase production in isolates with blaNDM, blaIMP, and blaOXA-48. PMID:26269624

  19. Performance of the CLSI Carba NP and the Rosco Carb Screen Assays Using North American Carbapenemase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Lauren C; Roundtree, Sylvester S; Lancaster, Diana P; Rudin, Susan D; Bard, Jennifer Dien; Roberts, Amity L; Marshall, Steven H; Bonomo, Robert A; Sullivan, Kaede V

    2015-10-01

    This study compared the performance of the Carba NP assay, published by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute, and the Rosco Rapid Carb Screen kit. Carba NP had superior sensitivity, but both assays required an increased inoculum to detect carbapenemase production in isolates with blaNDM, blaIMP, and blaOXA-48.

  20. Pseudomonas Aeruginosa: Resistance to the Max

    PubMed Central

    Poole, Keith

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is intrinsically resistant to a variety of antimicrobials and can develop resistance during anti-pseudomonal chemotherapy both of which compromise treatment of infections caused by this organism. Resistance to multiple classes of antimicrobials (multidrug resistance) in particular is increasingly common in P. aeruginosa, with a number of reports of pan-resistant isolates treatable with a single agent, colistin. Acquired resistance in this organism is multifactorial and attributable to chromosomal mutations and the acquisition of resistance genes via horizontal gene transfer. Mutational changes impacting resistance include upregulation of multidrug efflux systems to promote antimicrobial expulsion, derepression of ampC, AmpC alterations that expand the enzyme's substrate specificity (i.e., extended-spectrum AmpC), alterations to outer membrane permeability to limit antimicrobial entry and alterations to antimicrobial targets. Acquired mechanisms contributing to resistance in P. aeruginosa include β-lactamases, notably the extended-spectrum β-lactamases and the carbapenemases that hydrolyze most β-lactams, aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes, and 16S rRNA methylases that provide high-level pan-aminoglycoside resistance. The organism's propensity to grow in vivo as antimicrobial-tolerant biofilms and the occurrence of hypermutator strains that yield antimicrobial resistant mutants at higher frequency also compromise anti-pseudomonal chemotherapy. With limited therapeutic options and increasing resistance will the untreatable P. aeruginosa infection soon be upon us? PMID:21747788

  1. Apical endosomes isolated from kidney collecting duct principal cells lack subunits of the proton pumping ATPase

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Endocytic vesicles that are involved in the vasopressin-stimulated recycling of water channels to and from the apical membrane of kidney collecting duct principal cells were isolated from rat renal papilla by differential and Percoll density gradient centrifugation. Fluorescence quenching measurements showed that the isolated vesicles maintained a high, HgCl2-sensitive water permeability, consistent with the presence of vasopressin-sensitive water channels. They did not, however, exhibit ATP-dependent luminal acidification, nor any N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive ATPase activity, properties that are characteristic of most acidic endosomal compartments. Western blotting with specific antibodies showed that the 31- and 70-kD cytoplasmically oriented subunits of the vacuolar proton pump were not detectable in these apical endosomes from the papilla, whereas they were present in endosomes prepared in parallel from the cortex. In contrast, the 56-kD subunit of the proton pump was abundant in papillary endosomes, and was localized at the apical pole of principal cells by immunocytochemistry. Finally, an antibody that recognizes the 16-kD transmembrane subunit of oat tonoplast ATPase cross-reacted with a distinct 16-kD band in cortical endosomes, but no 16-kD band was detectable in endosomes from the papilla. This antibody also recognized a 16-kD band in affinity- purified H+ ATPase preparations from bovine kidney medulla. Therefore, early endosomes derived from the apical plasma membrane of collecting duct principal cells fail to acidify because they lack functionally important subunits of a vacuolar-type proton pumping ATPase, including the 16-kD transmembrane domain that serves as the proton-conducting channel, and the 70-kD cytoplasmic subunit that contains the ATPase catalytic site. This specialized, non-acidic early endosomal compartment appears to be involved primarily in the hormonally induced recycling of water channels to and from the apical plasma membrane of

  2. Characterization of CCN and IN activity of bacterial isolates collected in Atlanta, GA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purdue, Sara; Waters, Samantha; Karthikeyan, Smruthi; Konstantinidis, Kostas; Nenes, Athanasios

    2016-04-01

    Characterization of CCN activity of bacteria, other than a few select types such as Pseudomonas syringae, is limited, especially when looked at in conjunction with corresponding IN activity. The link between these two points is especially important for bacteria as those that have high CCN activity are likely to form an aqueous phase required for immersion freezing. Given the high ice nucleation temperature of bacterial cells, especially in immersion mode, it is important to characterize the CCN and IN activity of many different bacterial strains. To this effect, we developed a droplet freezing assay (DFA) which consists of an aluminum cold plate, cooled by a continuous flow of an ethylene glycol-water mixture, in order to observe immersion freezing of the collected bacteria. Here, we present the initial results on the CCN and IN activities of bacterial samples we have collected in Atlanta, GA. Bacterial strains were collected and isolated from rainwater samples taken from different storms throughout the year. We then characterized the CCN activity of each strain using a DMT Continuous Flow Streamwise Thermal Gradient CCN Counter by exposing the aerosolized bacteria to supersaturations ranging from 0.05% to 0.6%. Additionally, using our new DFA, we characterized the IN activity of each bacterial strain at temperatures ranging from -20oC to 0oC. The combined CCN and IN activity gives us valuable information on how some uncharacterized bacteria contribute to warm and mixed-phase cloud formation in the atmosphere.

  3. Fast and specific detection of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa from other pseudomonas species by PCR

    PubMed Central

    Jami Al-Ahmadi, G.; Zahmatkesh Roodsari, R.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important life-threatening nosocomial pathogen that plays a prominent role in wound infections of burned patients. We designed this study to identify the isolates of P. aeruginosa recovered from burned patients at the genus and species level through primers targeting oprI and oprL genes, and analyzed their antimicrobial resistance pattern. Over a 2-month period, wound samples were taken from burned patients and plated on MacConkey agar. All suspected colonies were primarily screened for P. aeruginosa by a combination of phenotypic tests. Molecular identifications of colonies were done using specific primers for oprI and oprL genes. Bacterial isolates were recovered from burn wound infections. Based on phenotypical identification tests, 138 (34%) P. aeruginosa isolates were identified; whereas by molecular techniques, just 128 P. aeruginosa yielded amplicon of oprL gene using species-specific primers, verifying the identity of P. aeruginosa; the others yielded amplicon of oprI gene using genus-specific primers, confirming the identity of fluorescent pseudomonads. This study indicates that molecular detection of P. aeruginosa in burn patients employing the OprL gene target is a useful technique for the early and precise detection of P. aeruginosa. PCR detection should be carried out as well as phenotypic testing for the best aggressive antibiotic treatment of P. aeruginosa strains at an earlier stage. It also has significant benefits on clinical outcomes. PMID:28289359

  4. The Characterization of Chlorophyll-A and Microalgae Isolation Process of Wastewater Collected at Sembrong Dam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wellson, R.; Othman, N.; Matias-Peralta, H. M.

    2016-07-01

    Recently, there has been an increasing number of river water quality deterioration that has brought into water quality disruptions that entering dams including in Johor and one of them is occurred in Sembrong Dam in Johor. Sembrong Dam is a major water source for some 120,000 people in the districts of Kluang and parts of Batu Pahat. The quality of water in Sembrong should be well-monitored in ensuring the continuous distribution of clean and safe water supply to peoples. Based on the news reported by The Star news dated on 11 May 2015, the water bodies in Sembrong Dam are polluted by the algae blooms which has started to cause problems in treating water phase by clogging up the filters and causing the production to be reduced and finally resulting in frequent water disruptions to residents. Therefore, there is a need to study the water quality of the dam water prior to further water treatment. One of important characterizations is by measuring chlorophyll-a and the isolation of the dominant microalgae species in the water body in which they are able to indicate the level of water pollution. This paper presents the determination of chlorophyll-a and the isolation of microalgae strains collected from Sembrong Dam. Chlorophyll-a is a photosynthetic pigment present in all species of phytoplankton, including algae and in some photosynthetic bacteria, known as cyanobacteria. The method used in measuring the chlorophyll-a is based on the standard method of IS0 10 260. The average chlorophyll-a concentration measured at Sembrong Dam is 175.9 µg L-1 and it is responsible for the appearance of green color in the sample and it is categorized into hypereutrophic state which is highly polluted. The technique used for isolation of microalgae strains is traditional method which is by spreading the sample on agar. The pure isolate indicated that the genus Botryococcus is the dominant algae species which is characterized morphologically. Both chlorophyll-a and microalgae

  5. Deposition of extreme-tolerant bacterial strains isolated during different phases of phoenix spacecraft assembly in a public culture collection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Extreme-tolerant bacteria (82 strains; 67 species) isolated during various assembly phases of the Phoenix spacecraft were permanently archived within the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural Research Service Culture Collection in Peoria, Illinois. This represents the first microbial collect...

  6. The Type a and Type b Polysaccharide Capsules Predominate in an International Collection of Invasive Kingella kingae Isolates.

    PubMed

    Porsch, Eric A; Starr, Kimberly F; Yagupsky, Pablo; St Geme, Joseph W

    2017-01-01

    Kingella kingae is an encapsulated Gram-negative bacterium and an important etiology of osteoarticular infections in young children. A recent study examining a diverse collection of carrier and invasive K. kingae isolates from Israel revealed four distinct polysaccharide capsule types. In this study, to obtain a global view of K. kingae capsule type diversity, we examined an international collection of isolates using a multiplex PCR approach. The collection contained all four previously identified capsule types and no new capsule types. Over 95% of invasive isolates in the collection were type a or type b, similar to the findings in Israel. These results suggest that the type a and type b polysaccharide capsules may have enhanced pathogenic properties or may mark clonal groups of strains with specific virulence genes. In addition, they raise the possibility that a vaccine containing the type a and type b capsules might be an effective approach to preventing K. kingae disease. IMPORTANCEKingella kingae has emerged as a significant cause of septic arthritis, osteomyelitis, and bacteremia in young children. A recent study examining a diverse collection of K. kingae isolates from Israel revealed four different polysaccharide capsule types in this species, designated types a to d. To determine the global distribution of K. kingae capsule types, we assembled and capsule typed an international collection of K. kingae isolates. The findings reported here show that the type a and type b capsules represent >95% of the invasive isolates, similar to the Israeli isolate collection, suggesting that a polysaccharide-based vaccine targeting these two capsules could be an attractive approach to prevent K. kingae disease.

  7. The Type a and Type b Polysaccharide Capsules Predominate in an International Collection of Invasive Kingella kingae Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Porsch, Eric A.; Starr, Kimberly F.; Yagupsky, Pablo

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Kingella kingae is an encapsulated Gram-negative bacterium and an important etiology of osteoarticular infections in young children. A recent study examining a diverse collection of carrier and invasive K. kingae isolates from Israel revealed four distinct polysaccharide capsule types. In this study, to obtain a global view of K. kingae capsule type diversity, we examined an international collection of isolates using a multiplex PCR approach. The collection contained all four previously identified capsule types and no new capsule types. Over 95% of invasive isolates in the collection were type a or type b, similar to the findings in Israel. These results suggest that the type a and type b polysaccharide capsules may have enhanced pathogenic properties or may mark clonal groups of strains with specific virulence genes. In addition, they raise the possibility that a vaccine containing the type a and type b capsules might be an effective approach to preventing K. kingae disease. IMPORTANCE Kingella kingae has emerged as a significant cause of septic arthritis, osteomyelitis, and bacteremia in young children. A recent study examining a diverse collection of K. kingae isolates from Israel revealed four different polysaccharide capsule types in this species, designated types a to d. To determine the global distribution of K. kingae capsule types, we assembled and capsule typed an international collection of K. kingae isolates. The findings reported here show that the type a and type b capsules represent >95% of the invasive isolates, similar to the Israeli isolate collection, suggesting that a polysaccharide-based vaccine targeting these two capsules could be an attractive approach to prevent K. kingae disease. PMID:28317027

  8. Detection of class 1 integron in Acinetobacter baumannii isolates collected from nine hospitals in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    ÇİÇek, Ayşegül Çopur; Düzgün, Azer Özad; Saral, Ayşegül; Kayman, Tuba; Çİzmecİ, Zeynep; Balcı, Pervin Özlem; Dal, Tuba; Fırat, Mehmet; Tosun, İsmail; Alıtntop, Yasemin Ay; Çalışkan, Ahmet; Yazıcı, Yelda; Sandallı, Cemal

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the antibiotic resistance genes inserted into class 1 and class 2 integrons in Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii) isolates obtained from nine different cities in Turkey. Methods A collection of 281 A. baumannii clinical isolates were collected from nine diferent state hospitals in Turkey and were confirmed as A. baumannii by conventional biochemical, API testing and bla-OXA-51 specific PCR. The isolates were examined by PCR for existence of class 1 and 2 integron gene cassettes. Results They were characterized by antimicrobial susceptibility testing and the highest resistance rates were determined for piperacillin (90.03%), ciprofloxacin (87.54%), cefepime and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (81.13%). The lowest resistance rates was for cefotaxime (3.55%). class I integrons were detected in 6.4% (18/281) of A. baumannii strains and no class 2 integron was detected. The gene cassettes of class 1 integrons AacC1-AAC(3)I-aadA1, AacC1-aadA1, AAC(3)-I, AAC(3)-I -AAC(3)-I -aadA1, TEM-1, AAC(3)-I-aadA1 - AAC(3)-I -AAC(3)-I, AAC(3)-I -AAC(3)-I -AAC(3)-I -aadA1, AAC(3)-I - aadA1, AAC(3)-I-AAC(3)-I, AAC(3)-I-aadA1- AAC(3)-I-aadA1, AAC(3)-I- AAC(3)-I- aadA1-AAC(3)-I-aadA1 were detected in eighteen strains. The aac genes family were most frequently found integrated into the class 1 integrons and it was followed by aadA genes and TEM-1 genes. Conclusions This is an extensive study on the distribution of class 1 integron among A. baumannii in Turkey. In addition to these, two new alleles were observed. Their percentage rates of similarity to other cassettes are 95% aadA1 ( TKA18) and 89% aadA1 (ANKA3). PMID:23998017

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain RB, a Bacterium Capable of Synthesizing Cadmium Selenide Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ayano, Hiroyuki; Kuroda, Masashi; Soda, Satoshi; Ike, Michihiko

    2014-05-15

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain RB is a bacterium capable of synthesizing cadmium selenide (CdSe) nanoparticles and was isolated from a soil sample. Here, we present the draft genome sequence of P. aeruginosa strain RB. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a draft genome of a CdSe-synthesizing bacterium.

  10. Risk assessment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in water.

    PubMed

    Mena, Kristina D; Gerba, Charles P

    2009-01-01

    enhances its growth. The organism is usually found in whirlpools when the chlorine concentrations are low, but it has been isolated even in the presence of 3.00 ppm residual free chlorine (Price and Ahearn 1988). Many outbreaks of folliculitis and ear infections have been reportedly associated with the use of whirlpools and hot tubs that contain P. aeruginosa (Ratnam et al. 1986). Outbreaks have also been reported from exposure to P. aeruginosa in swimming pools and water slides. Although P. aeruginosa has a reputation for being resistant to disinfection, most studies show that it does not exhibit any marked resistance to the disinfectants used to treat drinking water such as chlorine, chloramines, ozone, or iodine. One author, however, did find it to be slightly more resistant to UV disinfection than most other bacteria (Wolfe 1990). Although much has been written about biofilms in the drinking water industry, very little has been reported regarding the role of P. aeruginosa in biofilms. Tap water appears to be a significant route of transmission in hospitals, from colonization of plumbing fixtures. It is still not clear if the colonization results from the water in the distribution system, or personnel use within the hospital. Infections and colonization can be significantly reduced by placement of filters on the water taps. The oral dose of P. aeruginosa required to establish colonization in a healthy subject is high (George et al. 1989a). During dose-response studies, even when subjects (mice or humans) were colonized via ingestion, there was no evidence of disease. P. aeruginosa administered by the aerosol route at levels of 10(7) cells did cause disease symptoms in mice, and was lethal in aerosolized doses of 10(9) cells. Aerosol dose-response studies have not been undertaken with human subjects. Human health risks associated with exposure to P. aeruginosa via drinking water ingestion were estimated using a four-step risk assessment approach. The risk of colonization

  11. [Molecular characterization of carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa from four hospitals of Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Guevara, Armando; Sierra R, Carmen I; de Waard, Jacobus

    2012-12-01

    We analyzed 17 strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa resistant to carbapenems isolated in four hospitals in eastern and southern Venezuela collected between 2007 and 2010. Combined disk method showed production of metallo־β־lactamases (MBLs) in all strains. PCR and sequencing of genes encoding IMP, VIM and SPM metallo־β־lactamase families confirmed the presence of VIM-2 MMBL in all strains. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis classified the strains into three similarity groups. The largest group, group A included 13 strains with over 83% similarity between them and was found in four hospitals. Two strains of Cumana hospital formed the group B and other two the Group C with similitary of 73% and 65% respectively with Group A. These results confirmed that hospitals in eastern and southern Venezuela, circulating strains of P. aeruginosa producing VIM-2 type MBLs with a common clonal origin. On the other hand, carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa circulating in Cumana city hospital had polyclonal origin.

  12. Clinical utilization of genomics data produced by the international Pseudomonas aeruginosa consortium

    PubMed Central

    Freschi, Luca; Jeukens, Julie; Kukavica-Ibrulj, Irena; Boyle, Brian; Dupont, Marie-Josée; Laroche, Jérôme; Larose, Stéphane; Maaroufi, Halim; Fothergill, Joanne L.; Moore, Matthew; Winsor, Geoffrey L.; Aaron, Shawn D.; Barbeau, Jean; Bell, Scott C.; Burns, Jane L.; Camara, Miguel; Cantin, André; Charette, Steve J.; Dewar, Ken; Déziel, Éric; Grimwood, Keith; Hancock, Robert E. W.; Harrison, Joe J.; Heeb, Stephan; Jelsbak, Lars; Jia, Baofeng; Kenna, Dervla T.; Kidd, Timothy J.; Klockgether, Jens; Lam, Joseph S.; Lamont, Iain L.; Lewenza, Shawn; Loman, Nick; Malouin, François; Manos, Jim; McArthur, Andrew G.; McKeown, Josie; Milot, Julie; Naghra, Hardeep; Nguyen, Dao; Pereira, Sheldon K.; Perron, Gabriel G.; Pirnay, Jean-Paul; Rainey, Paul B.; Rousseau, Simon; Santos, Pedro M.; Stephenson, Anne; Taylor, Véronique; Turton, Jane F.; Waglechner, Nicholas; Williams, Paul; Thrane, Sandra W.; Wright, Gerard D.; Brinkman, Fiona S. L.; Tucker, Nicholas P.; Tümmler, Burkhard; Winstanley, Craig; Levesque, Roger C.

    2015-01-01

    The International Pseudomonas aeruginosa Consortium is sequencing over 1000 genomes and building an analysis pipeline for the study of Pseudomonas genome evolution, antibiotic resistance and virulence genes. Metadata, including genomic and phenotypic data for each isolate of the collection, are available through the International Pseudomonas Consortium Database (http://ipcd.ibis.ulaval.ca/). Here, we present our strategy and the results that emerged from the analysis of the first 389 genomes. With as yet unmatched resolution, our results confirm that P. aeruginosa strains can be divided into three major groups that are further divided into subgroups, some not previously reported in the literature. We also provide the first snapshot of P. aeruginosa strain diversity with respect to antibiotic resistance. Our approach will allow us to draw potential links between environmental strains and those implicated in human and animal infections, understand how patients become infected and how the infection evolves over time as well as identify prognostic markers for better evidence-based decisions on patient care. PMID:26483767

  13. Determinants for persistence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in hospitals: interplay between resistance, virulence and biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, S J; Mutters, N T; DeRosa, A; Ewers, C; Frank, U; Günther, F

    2017-02-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pa) is one of the major bacterial pathogens causing nosocomial infections. During the past few decades, multidrug-resistant (MDR) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) lineages of Pa have emerged in hospital settings with increasing numbers. However, it remains unclear which determinants of Pa facilitated this spread. A total of 211 clinical XDR and 38 susceptible clinical Pa isolates (nonXDR), as well as 47 environmental isolates (EI), were collected at the Heidelberg University Hospital. We used RAPD PCR to identify genetic clusters. Carriage of carbapenamases (CPM) and virulence genes were analyzed by PCR, biofilm formation capacity was assessed, in vitro fitness was evaluated using competitive growth assays, and interaction with the host's immune system was analyzed using serum killing and neutrophil killing assays. XDR isolates showed significantly elevated biofilm formation (p < 0.05) and higher competitive fitness compared to nonXDR and EI isolates. Thirty percent (62/205) of the XDR isolates carried a CPM. Similarities in distribution of virulence factors, as well as biofilm formation properties, between CPM+ Pa isolates and EI and between CPM- and nonXDR isolates were detected. Molecular typing revealed two distinct genetic clusters within the XDR population, which were characterized by even higher biofilm formation. In contrast, XDR isolates were more susceptible to the immune response than nonXDR isolates. Our study provides evidence that the ability to form biofilms is an outstanding determinant for persistence and endemic spread of Pa in the hospital setting.

  14. [Antibacterial activities of combination uses of cefpirome with various antibiotics in vitro against clinically isolated glucose non-fermentative gram-negative rods: part 1. the results against Pseudomonas aeruginosa].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Y; Koguchi, M; Fukayama, S; Ishihara, R; Oda, S; Deguchi, K

    1996-01-01

    In order to evaluate antibacterial activities of combination uses of cefpirome (CPR) and various antibiotics in vitro, minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of CPR alone and combinations of CPR+other drugs against freshly isolated clinical strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The results are summarized as follows; 1. Combined effects of CPR+beta-lactams, piperacillin (PIPC), aztreonam (AZT), imipenem (IPM) showed wider antibacterial spectra and stronger antibacterial activities than CPR alone with drugs concentrations of CPR and other drugs at sub-MIC levels. At concentrations of sub-MIC levels, antibacterial effects of CPR+PIPC and CPR+AZT combination were strong but CPR+IPM was weaker than those of the former two combinations. It appeared that stronger effects were demonstrated by some combinations against strains that were susceptible to both drugs of combination, but little additive effects were shown against strains that were resistant to both drugs. Antibacterial effect of CPR+fosfomycin combination was the same as those of CPR+PIPC and CPR+AZT combinations. 2. Combined effects of CPR+aminoglycosides (AGs), gentamicin, tobramycin, amikacin showed wider antibacterial spectra and stronger antibacterial activities at sub-MIC levels of CPR or ATs. The effect against CPR-resistant strains was same. But the combined effect was weak against AGs-resistant strains. 3. Effectiveness of combinations of CPR+beta-lactams and CPR+AGs depended on drug susceptibilities of strains tested. We cannot estimate effects of those combinations without investigating drug susceptibility of bacteria being tested. 4. In none of the combinations tested, antagonism was observed.

  15. Strong incidence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on bacterial rrs and ITS genetic structures of cystic fibrosis sputa

    PubMed Central

    Pages-Monteiro, Laurence; Marti, Romain; Commun, Carine; Alliot, Nolwenn; Bardel, Claire; Meugnier, Helene; Perouse-de-Montclos, Michele; Reix, Philippe; Durieu, Isabelle; Durupt, Stephane; Vandenesch, Francois; Freney, Jean; Cournoyer, Benoit; Doleans-Jordheim, Anne

    2017-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) lungs harbor a complex community of interacting microbes, including pathogens like Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Meta-taxogenomic analysis based on V5-V6 rrs PCR products of 52 P. aeruginosa-positive (Pp) and 52 P. aeruginosa-negative (Pn) pooled DNA extracts from CF sputa suggested positive associations between P. aeruginosa and Stenotrophomonas and Prevotella, but negative ones with Haemophilus, Neisseria and Burkholderia. Internal Transcribed Spacer analyses (RISA) from individual DNA extracts identified three significant genetic structures within the CF cohorts, and indicated an impact of P. aeruginosa. RISA clusters Ip and IIIp contained CF sputa with a P. aeruginosa prevalence above 93%, and of 24.2% in cluster IIp. Clusters Ip and IIIp showed lower RISA genetic diversity and richness than IIp. Highly similar cluster IIp RISA profiles were obtained from two patients harboring isolates of a same P. aeruginosa clone, suggesting convergent evolution in the structure of their microbiota. CF patients of cluster IIp had received significantly less antibiotics than patients of clusters Ip and IIIp but harbored the most resistant P. aeruginosa strains. Patients of cluster IIIp were older than those of Ip. The effects of P. aeruginosa on the RISA structures could not be fully dissociated from the above two confounding factors but several trends in these datasets support the conclusion of a strong incidence of P. aeruginosa on the genetic structure of CF lung microbiota. PMID:28282386

  16. Influence of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa on Exacerbation in Patients with Bronchiectasis

    PubMed Central

    Chawla, Kiran; Vishwanath, Shashidhar; Manu, Mohan K; Lazer, Bernaitis

    2015-01-01

    Background: A majority of the studies done on the western population have shown that Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes many severe infections in patients with bronchiectasis as compared to other pathogens. There is scarcity of similar data from the Asian population. Materials and Methods: A prospective study was undertaken to identify the various pathogens isolated from the respiratory samples of 117 patients with bronchiectasis from south India and to compare the clinicomicrobiological profile of infections caused by P. aeruginosa and other respiratory pathogens. Results: The respiratory pathogens were isolated from 63 (53.8%) patients. P. aeruginosa was the most common isolate (46.0%) followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae (14.3%) and other pathogenic bacteria. Patients included in the P. aeruginosa group had a higher number of exacerbations (p: 0.008), greater number of hospital admissions (p: 0.007), a prolonged hospital stay (p: 0.03), and poor lung function, compared to the patients infected with the non-Pseudomonas group. Conclusion: It is necessary to investigate the etiology of respiratory tract infections among bronchiectasis patients followed by the prompt management of cases diagnosed with P. aeruginosa infections, so as to lower the morbidity and have a better prognosis. PMID:25722615

  17. Pseudomonas aeruginosa on vinyl-canvas inflatables and foam teaching aids in swimming pools.

    PubMed

    Schets, F M; van den Berg, H H J L; Baan, R; Lynch, G; de Roda Husman, A M

    2014-12-01

    Swimming pool-related Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections mainly result in folliculitis and otitis externa. P. aeruginosa forms biofilms on surfaces in the swimming pool environment. The presence of P. aeruginosa on inflatables and foam teaching aids in 24 public swimming pools in the Netherlands was studied. Samples (n = 230) were taken from 175 objects and analysed for P. aeruginosa by culture. Isolated P. aeruginosa were tested for antibiotic resistance by disk diffusion. P. aeruginosa was detected in 63 samples (27%), from 47 objects (27%) in 19 (79%) swimming pools. More vinyl-canvas objects (44%) than foam objects (20%) were contaminated, as were wet objects (43%) compared to dry objects (13%). Concentrations were variable, and on average higher on vinyl-canvas than on foam objects. Forty of 193 (21%) P. aeruginosa isolates from 11 different objects were (intermediate) resistant to one or more of 12 clinically relevant antibiotics, mostly to imipenem and aztreonam. The immediate risk of a P. aeruginosa infection from exposure to swimming pool objects seems limited, but the presence of P. aeruginosa on pool objects is unwanted and requires attention of pool managers and responsible authorities. Strict drying and cleaning policies are needed for infrequently used vinyl-canvas objects.

  18. Antibiotic resistance among bacteria isolated from seawater and penguin fecal samples collected near Palmer Station, Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Miller, Robert V; Gammon, Katharine; Day, Martin J

    2009-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance in aquatic bacteria has increased steadily as a consequence of the widespread use of antibiotics, but practice and international treaty should have limited antibiotic contamination in Antarctica. We estimated antibiotic resistance in microorganisms isolated from the Antarctic marine waters and a penguin rookery, for 2 reasons: (i) as a measure of human impact and (ii) as a potential "snapshot" of the preantibiotic world. Samples were taken at 4 established sampling sites near Palmer Station, which is situated at the southern end of the Palmer Archipelago (64 degrees 10'S, 61 degrees 50'W). Sites were chosen to provide different potentials for human contamination. Forty 50 mL samples of seawater were collected and colony-forming units (CFU)/mL were determined at 6 and 20 degrees C. For this study, presumed psychrophiles (growth at 6 degrees C) were assumed to be native to Antarctic waters, whereas presumed mesophiles (growth at 20 degrees C but not at 6 degrees C) were taken to represent introduced organisms. The 20-6 degrees C CFU/mL ratio was used as a measure of the relative impact to the ecosystem of presumably introduced organisms. This ratio was highest at the site nearest to Palmer Station and decreased with distance from it, suggesting that human presence has impacted the natural microbial flora of the site. The frequency of resistance to 5 common antibiotics was determined in each group of isolates. Overall drug resistance was higher among the presumed mesophiles than the presumed psychrophiles and increased with proximity to Palmer Station, with the presumed mesophiles showing higher frequencies of single and multiple drug resistance than the psychrophile population. The frequency of multidrug resistance followed the same pattern. It appears that multidrug resistance is low among native Antarctic bacteria but is increased by human habitation.

  19. Acquisition and Role of Molybdate in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Pederick, Victoria G.; Eijkelkamp, Bart A.; Ween, Miranda P.; Begg, Stephanie L.; Paton, James C.

    2014-01-01

    In microaerophilic or anaerobic environments, Pseudomonas aeruginosa utilizes nitrate reduction for energy production, a process dependent on the availability of the oxyanionic form of molybdenum, molybdate (MoO42−). Here, we show that molybdate acquisition in P. aeruginosa occurs via a high-affinity ATP-binding cassette permease (ModABC). ModA is a cluster D-III solute binding protein capable of interacting with molybdate or tungstate oxyanions. Deletion of the modA gene reduces cellular molybdate concentrations and results in inhibition of anaerobic growth and nitrate reduction. Further, we show that conditions that permit nitrate reduction also cause inhibition of biofilm formation and an alteration in fatty acid composition of P. aeruginosa. Collectively, these data highlight the importance of molybdate for anaerobic growth of P. aeruginosa and reveal novel consequences of nitrate reduction on biofilm formation and cell membrane composition. PMID:25172858

  20. Acquisition and role of molybdate in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Pederick, Victoria G; Eijkelkamp, Bart A; Ween, Miranda P; Begg, Stephanie L; Paton, James C; McDevitt, Christopher A

    2014-11-01

    In microaerophilic or anaerobic environments, Pseudomonas aeruginosa utilizes nitrate reduction for energy production, a process dependent on the availability of the oxyanionic form of molybdenum, molybdate (MoO4 (2-)). Here, we show that molybdate acquisition in P. aeruginosa occurs via a high-affinity ATP-binding cassette permease (ModABC). ModA is a cluster D-III solute binding protein capable of interacting with molybdate or tungstate oxyanions. Deletion of the modA gene reduces cellular molybdate concentrations and results in inhibition of anaerobic growth and nitrate reduction. Further, we show that conditions that permit nitrate reduction also cause inhibition of biofilm formation and an alteration in fatty acid composition of P. aeruginosa. Collectively, these data highlight the importance of molybdate for anaerobic growth of P. aeruginosa and reveal novel consequences of nitrate reduction on biofilm formation and cell membrane composition.

  1. 16S Ribosomal DNA Sequence Analysis of a Large Collection of Environmental and Clinical Unidentifiable Bacterial Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Drancourt, Michel; Bollet, Claude; Carlioz, Antoine; Martelin, Rolland; Gayral, Jean-Pierre; Raoult, Didier

    2000-01-01

    Some bacteria are difficult to identify with phenotypic identification schemes commonly used outside reference laboratories. 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA)-based identification of bacteria potentially offers a useful alternative when phenotypic characterization methods fail. However, as yet, the usefulness of 16S rDNA sequence analysis in the identification of conventionally unidentifiable isolates has not been evaluated with a large collection of isolates. In this study, we evaluated the utility of 16S rDNA sequencing as a means to identify a collection of 177 such isolates obtained from environmental, veterinary, and clinical sources. For 159 isolates (89.8%) there was at least one sequence in GenBank that yielded a similarity score of ≥97%, and for 139 isolates (78.5%) there was at least one sequence in GenBank that yielded a similarity score of ≥99%. These similarity score values were used to defined identification at the genus and species levels, respectively. For isolates identified to the species level, conventional identification failed to produce accurate results because of inappropriate biochemical profile determination in 76 isolates (58.7%), Gram staining in 16 isolates (11.6%), oxidase and catalase activity determination in 5 isolates (3.6%) and growth requirement determination in 2 isolates (1.5%). Eighteen isolates (10.2%) remained unidentifiable by 16S rDNA sequence analysis but were probably prototype isolates of new species. These isolates originated mainly from environmental sources (P = 0.07). The 16S rDNA approach failed to identify Enterobacter and Pantoea isolates to the species level (P = 0.04; odds ratio = 0.32 [95% confidence interval, 0.10 to 1.14]). Elsewhere, the usefulness of 16S rDNA sequencing was compromised by the presence of 16S rDNA sequences with >1% undetermined positions in the databases. Unlike phenotypic identification, which can be modified by the variability of expression of characters, 16S rDNA sequencing provides

  2. Morphological and molecular characterisation of Gyrodactylus salmonis (Platyhelminthes, Monogenea) isolates collected in Mexico from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss Walbaum).

    PubMed

    Rubio-Godoy, Miguel; Paladini, Giuseppe; Freeman, Mark A; García-Vásquez, Adriana; Shinn, Andrew P

    2012-05-25

    Gyrodactylus salmonis (Yin et Sproston, 1948) isolates collected from feral rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum) in Veracruz, southeastern Mexico are described. Morphological and molecular variation of these isolates to G. salmonis collected in Canada and the U.S.A. is characterised. Morphologically, the marginal hook sickles of Mexican isolates of G. salmonis closely resemble those of Canadian specimens - their shaft and hook regions align closely with one another; only features of the sickle base and a prominent bridge to the toe permit their separation. The 18S sequence determined from the Mexican specimens was identical to two variable regions of SSU rDNA obtained from a Canadian population of G. salmonis. Internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions (spanning ITS1, 5.8S and ITS2) of Mexican isolates of G. salmonis are identical to ITS sequences of an American population of G. salmonis and to Gyrodactylus salvelini Kuusela, Ziętara et Lumme, 2008 from Finland. Analyses of the ribosomal RNA gene of Mexican isolates of G. salmonis show 98-99% similarity to those of Gyrodactylus gobiensis Gläser, 1974, Gyrodactylus salaris Malmberg, 1957, and Gyrodactylus rutilensis Gläser, 1974. Mexican and American isolates of G. salmonis are 98% identical, as assessed by sequencing the mitochondrial cox1 gene. Oncorhynchus mykiss is one of the most widely-dispersed fish species in the world and has been shown to be an important vector for parasite/disease transmission. Considering that Mexican isolates of G. salmonis were collected well outside the native distribution range of all salmonid fish, we discuss the possibility that the parasites were translocated with their host through the aquacultural trade. In addition, this study includes a morphological review of Gyrodactylus species collected from rainbow trout and from other salmonid fish of the genus Oncorhynchus which occur throughout North America.

  3. Loss of diversity within Mycoplasma bovis isolates collected in France from bovines with respiratory diseases over the last 35 years.

    PubMed

    Becker, Claire A M; Thibault, François M; Arcangioli, Marie-Anne; Tardy, Florence

    2015-07-01

    Mycoplasma (M.) bovis has recently emerged as a major, worldwide etiological agent of bovine respiratory diseases leading to huge economic losses mainly due to high morbidity and mortality as well as poor growth rates. The spread of M. bovis infections between different animals, herds, regions or countries has been often reported to be connected to the movement of animals. However, despite recent considerable efforts, no universal subtyping method is yet available to trace M. bovis isolates circulation at an international scale. Moreover in France, the overall population diversity of M. bovis isolates has not been assessed since the early 1990s. This study was conducted to fill in these gaps. The genotypic diversity between sixty isolates collected in France over the last 35 years was assessed using two molecular subtyping methods that addressed either the long-term epidemiological relationships (Multi Locus Sequence Typing, MLST) or the genetic microvariations (Multiple Locus VNTR Analysis, MLVA) between isolates. Phenotypic diversity was also analyzed by using Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) to compare the main protein patterns of isolates. All proposed subtyping approaches were optimized and led to the same pattern in the French M. bovis population that consisted of two clusters, the first one comprising isolates collected before 2000 and the second, those collected after 2000. Recent strains were further shown to be more homogeneous than older ones, which is consistent with the spread of a single clone throughout the country. Because this spread was concomitant with the emergence of multiresistant M. bovis isolates, several hypotheses are discussed to explain the homogeneity of M. bovis isolates in France, even though the M. bovis species is fully equipped to generate diversity.

  4. Molecular Epidemiology of Macrolide-Resistant Isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae Collected from Blood and Respiratory Specimens in Norway

    PubMed Central

    Littauer, P.; Sangvik, M.; Caugant, D. A.; Høiby, E. A.; Simonsen, G. S.; Sundsfjord, A.

    2005-01-01

    Norway has a low prevalence of antimicrobial resistance, including macrolide-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae (MRSP). In a nationwide surveillance program, a total of 2,200 S. pneumoniae isolates were collected from blood cultures and respiratory tract specimens. Macrolide resistance was detected in 2.7%. M-type macrolide resistance was found in 60% of resistant isolates, and these were mainly mef(A)-positive, serotype-14 invasive isolates. The erm(B)-encoded macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (MLSB) type dominated among the noninvasive isolates. One strain had an A2058G mutation in the 23S rRNA gene. Coresistance to other antibiotics was seen in 96% of the MLSB-type isolates, whereas 92% of the M-type isolates were susceptible to other commonly used antimicrobial agents. Serotypes 14, 6B, and 19F accounted for 84% of the macrolide-resistant isolates, with serotype 14 alone accounting for 67% of the invasive isolates. A total of 29 different sequence types (STs) were detected by multilocus sequence typing. Twelve STs were previously reported international resistant clones, and 75% of the macrolide-resistant isolates had STs identical or closely related to these clones. Eleven isolates displayed 10 novel STs, and 7/11 of these “Norwegian strains” coexpressed MLSB and tetracycline resistance, indicating the presence of Tn1545. The invasive serotype-14 isolates were all classified as ST9 or single-locus variants of this clone. ST9 is a mef-positive M-type clone, commonly known as England14-9, reported from several European countries. These observations suggest that the import of major international MRSP clones and the local spread of Tn1545 are the major mechanisms involved in the evolution and dissemination of MRSP in Norway. PMID:15872231

  5. Botrytis cinerea isolates collected from grapes present different requirements for conidia germination.

    PubMed

    Cotoras, Milena; García, Carolina; Mendoza, Leonora

    2009-01-01

    Botrytis cinerea presents high variability in several biological traits, which can be explained by the high degree of genotypic diversity among isolates. Because this genetic variability might be related to phenotypic differences the requirements for conidia germination of three natural isolates (G1, G5 and G11) obtained from grapes and belonging to the same genetic group were analyzed. The results showed that contact with a solid surface was a common requisite for conidia germination of the isolates but they differed in their nutritional requirements to germinate. Isolate G11 was able to germinate in the absence of a carbon or nitrogen source. G1 and G5 required the presence of a carbon source such as glucose, fructose or sucrose. In G11 and G5 isolates a much higher rate of germination was obtained in the presence of sucrose. It was shown with a pharmacological approach that the cAMP stimulated the germination only in those isolates requiring a carbon source. Conidia germination of G1 and G5 was inhibited by EGTA, a calcium chelator. Isolate G11 germinated in the presence of this compound. On the other hand the germination of three B. cinerea isolates required protein synthesis and did not require RNA synthesis. To explain the ability of isolate G11 to germinate in water the content of total and reducing sugars, mannitol/L-arabitol, trehalose, and proteins in the nongerminated conidia of the three isolates was compared. The isolates presented similar amounts of total and reducing sugars. In the three isolates the amount of mannitol/L-arabitol was higher than that of trehalose. In isolate G11 total protein content was twice higher than in the other isolates.

  6. [Shall we report the carbapenem resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii strains detected by BD Phoenix system?].

    PubMed

    Oğünç, Dilara; Ongüt, Gözde; Ozen, Nevgün Sepin; Baysan, Betil Ozhak; Günseren, Filiz; Dağlar, Duygu; Demirbakan, Hadiye; Gültekin, Meral

    2010-04-01

    Imipenem and meropenem are broad spectrum antimicrobial agents that are especially useful in the treatment of nosocomially acquired Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. infections. Previous reports have noted that susceptibility tests could show false resistance to imipenem. For this reason, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has recommended that all carbapenem resistant or intermediate resistant isolates should be tested with an additional method to verify the results. This study was aimed to evaluate the imipenem and meropenem susceptibilities by disk diffusion, E-test and broth microdilution in P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii strains found to be resistant or intermediate to imipenem-meropenem by BD Phoenix automated susceptibility testing system. Between January 2006-January 2007, 85 non-duplicate isolates of A. baumannii and 51 non-duplicate isolates of P. aeruginosa which were determined as resistant or intermediate resistant to imipenem and/or meropenem by BD Phoenix automated identification and susceptibility system (Becton Dickinson, Sparks, MD, USA) were collected in Akdeniz University Hospital Central Laboratory. All strains were tested by E-test (AB Biodisk, Sweden), disk diffusion and reference broth microdilution (BMD) method following CLSI recommendations. All 51 isolates of P. aeruginosa determined as imipenem and/or meropenem resistant or intermediate resistant by BD Phoenix, were found to be imipenem and/or meropenem resistant or intermediate resistant by the reference BMD method. Minor error rates were same for all testing systems (1.9%) except for the meropenem results of BD Phoenix system (5.9%). No major errors were produced by any system. For A. baumannii, only one very major error was detected for meropenem by BD Phoenix system. Number of minor errors determined for meropenem by all testing systems compared to the reference test, ranged from 2 (2.4%) to 3 (3.5%). It was concluded that carbapenem susceptibility test

  7. Taxonomic evaluation of unidentified Streptomyces isolates in the ARS Culture Collection (NRRL) using multi-locus sequence analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ARS Culture Collection (NRRL) currently contains 7569 strains within the family Streptomycetaceae but 4368 of them have not been characterized to the species level. A gene sequence database using the Bacterial Isolate Genomic Sequence Database package (BIGSdb) (Jolley & Maiden, 2010) is availabl...

  8. Molecular characterization of DHA-1-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates collected during a 4-year period in an intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Compain, Fabrice; Decré, Dominique; Fulgencio, Jean-Pierre; Berraho, Sfia; Arlet, Guillaume; Verdet, Charlotte

    2014-10-01

    Seventeen Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates producing DHA-1 β-lactamase were collected in an intensive care unit between 2006 and 2010. Molecular analysis revealed the predominance of ST48 and ST1263 clones of K. pneumoniae and the spread of DHA-1-encoding plasmids belonging to incompatibility group IncL/M or IncHI2.

  9. Coexistence and Within-Host Evolution of Diversified Lineages of Hypermutable Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Long-term Cystic Fibrosis Infections

    PubMed Central

    Feliziani, Sofía; Moyano, Alejandro J.; Di Rienzo, Julio A.; Krogh Johansen, Helle; Molin, Søren; Smania, Andrea M.

    2014-01-01

    The advent of high-throughput sequencing techniques has made it possible to follow the genomic evolution of pathogenic bacteria by comparing longitudinally collected bacteria sampled from human hosts. Such studies in the context of chronic airway infections by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients have indicated high bacterial population diversity. Such diversity may be driven by hypermutability resulting from DNA mismatch repair system (MRS) deficiency, a common trait evolved by P. aeruginosa strains in CF infections. No studies to date have utilized whole-genome sequencing to investigate within-host population diversity or long-term evolution of mutators in CF airways. We sequenced the genomes of 13 and 14 isolates of P. aeruginosa mutator populations from an Argentinian and a Danish CF patient, respectively. Our collection of isolates spanned 6 and 20 years of patient infection history, respectively. We sequenced 11 isolates from a single sample from each patient to allow in-depth analysis of population diversity. Each patient was infected by clonal populations of bacteria that were dominated by mutators. The in vivo mutation rate of the populations was ∼100 SNPs/year–∼40-fold higher than rates in normo-mutable populations. Comparison of the genomes of 11 isolates from the same sample showed extensive within-patient genomic diversification; the populations were composed of different sub-lineages that had coexisted for many years since the initial colonization of the patient. Analysis of the mutations identified genes that underwent convergent evolution across lineages and sub-lineages, suggesting that the genes were targeted by mutation to optimize pathogenic fitness. Parallel evolution was observed in reduction of overall catabolic capacity of the populations. These findings are useful for understanding the evolution of pathogen populations and identifying new targets for control of chronic infections. PMID:25330091

  10. Detection and Genetic Characterization of Metallo-β-Lactamase IMP-1 and VIM-2 in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strains From Different Hospitals in Kermanshah, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Abiri, Ramin; Mohammadi, Pantea; Shavani, Navid; Rezaei, Mansour

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pseudomonas aeruginosais a frequent nosocomial pathogen that causes severe diseases in many settings. Carbapenems, including meropenem and imipenem, are effective antibiotics against this organism. However, the use of carbapenems has been hampered by the emergence of strains resistant to carbapenemsvia different mechanisms such as the production of metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs), which hydrolyze all carbapenems. Several kinds of MBLs have been reported, among them VIM and IMP types being the most clinically significant carbapenemases. Objectives: We aimed to determine the distribution of blaVIM-2 and blaIMP-1 transferable genes encoding MBLs in P. aeruginosa isolated from three academic hospitals in Kermanshah. Patients and Methods: From 22nd June to 22nd September 2012, 225 isolates of P. aeruginosa were collected. These isolates were tested for antibiotic susceptibility with the Kirby-Bauer disk-diffusion method, and the MBLs were assessed using the imipenem-EDTA double-disk synergy test. The isolates were investigated for blaVIM-2 and blaIMP-1 genes using polymerase chain reaction. Results: Among the 225 isolates, 33.7% (76/225) and 18.1% (41/225) were resistant to imipenem and meropenem, respectively. Of the 76 imipenem-resistant P. aeruginosa strains, 45 (59.2%) were positive for MBLs, 34 (75%) strains carried the blaIMP-1 gene, and 1 (2.2%) strain carried the blaVIM-2 gene. Conclusions: Our results showed that there was a high frequency of IMP-1 positive P. aeruginosa in the different wards of the hospitals. PMID:26495110

  11. Pseudomonas aeruginosa sepsis in stem cell transplantation patients.

    PubMed

    Fanci, Rosa; Pecile, Patrizia; Casalone, Enrico; Mengoni, Alessio; Tamburini, Elena; Guidi, Stefano; Cecconi, Daniela; Bosi, Alberto; Nicoletti, Pierluigi; Mastromei, Giorgio

    2006-07-01

    We report the epidemiological investigation of an outbreak of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in 6 patients who shared, during different periods, the same 2 rooms of a bone marrow transplantation unit. Phenotypic and molecular analysis of isolates from patients and from the environment strongly suggested a single, environmental source of infection.

  12. Microchannel-free collection and single-cell isolation of yeast cells in a suspension using liquid standing wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsutani, Akihiro; Takada, Ayako

    2016-11-01

    We demonstrate a microchannel-free collection method at nodes of liquid standing waves by the vertical vibration of a suspension including yeast cells. The pattern formation of the collection of cells using standing waves in a suspension was investigated by varying the frequency and waveform of vibrations. The single-cell isolation of yeast cells was achieved using a microenclosure array set at the nodes. In addition, we succeeded in the microchannel-free collection of yeast cells in a suspension, where patterns were formed by tapping vibration. The proposed technique is very simple and we believe that it will be useful for single-cell analysis and investigation.

  13. Cryptic transposable phages of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Krylov, V.N.; Mit`kina, L.N.; Pleteneva, E.A.; Aleshin, V.V.

    1995-11-01

    Frequencies of nucleotide sequences homologous to phage transposons (PT) of two species, D3112 and B3, were assessed in genomes of natural Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains by the dot-blot hybridization method. These strains were incapable of liberating viable phages on a lawn of the PA01 standard indicator strain of P. aeruginosa. It was shown that the homologies detected belong to two groups, high and intermediate, with respect to homology level. Homology patterns were classified as high when they provided signals comparable to those for hybridization in a positive control; patterns were classified as intermediate when the hybridization level was higher than the background level, but lower than in the positive control. Homologous PT sequences were designated as cryptic PT. Intact cryptic PT prophages were shown to exist in genomes of particular natural strains manifesting a higher level of hybridization. However, the growth of these phages was limited by the restriction system of strain PA01. It is possible to isolate strains maintaining the growth of some cryptic PT. These strains differed from P. aeruginosa with respect to the specificity of the restriction and modification system. Nevertheless, in most cases, the attempt to identify a novel host capable of maintaining growth of a cryptic PT failed. Natural strains often carry cryptic PT related to both known PT species, D3112 and B3. The frequency of cryptic PT is extremely high, reaching 30% in strains with a high level of homology only and up to 50% in all strains exhibiting homology. This high PT frequency is assumed to be associated with the considerable variation of P. aeruginosa. 15 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  14. Antibiotic resistance of Shewanella putrefaciens isolated from shellfish collected from the West Sea in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kang, Chang-Ho; Shin, YuJin; Jeon, HanEul; Choi, Jae-Ho; Jeong, SuYeon; So, Jae-Seong

    2013-11-15

    In this study, we isolated and characterized Shewanella putrefaciens from shellfish harvested from the West Sea in Korea. For the initial isolation of S. putrefaciens, LB agar plates supplemented with ferrous sulfate and sodium thiosulfate were inoculated with shellfish homogenates, incubated for 24h, and then black colonies were selected. Gram-negative and catalase-positive colonies were subsequently confirmed by PCR assays and API 20E kit test system. The Shewanella-specific 16S rRNA and gyrB genes were used to design S. putrefaciens-specific PCR primers. From 6 species of shellfish tested, 24 S. putrefaciens strains were isolated. These 24 isolates had the following profiles of resistance against 16 antibiotics: all the isolates were resistant to cephalothin and vancomycin and 95.8% were resistant to ampicillin. Here, we report the isolation of S. putrefaciens from shellfish and our results point to a new possible route for exposing healthy individuals to S. putrefaciens.

  15. Brevibacillus halotolerans sp. nov., isolated from saline soil sample collected from paddy field.

    PubMed

    Song, Jinlong; Wang, Yanwei; Song, Yi; Zhao, Bingqiang; Wang, Huimin; Zhou, Shan; Kong, Delong; Guo, Xiang; Li, Yanting; He, Mingxiong; Ma, Kedong; Ruan, Zhiyong; Yan, Yanchun

    2016-10-17

    Two novel aerobic bacteria, designated strains LAM0312T and LAM0313, were isolated from saline soil sample collected from paddy field in Dezhou city, Shandong Province in China. The Cells of these strains were Gram-stain positive, sporogenous, rod-shaped and motile with peritrichous flagella. The optimal growth temperature and pH were 30 ºC and pH 7.0-8.0, repesctively. Strain LAM0312T was found to be able to grow in the presence of 12 % (w/v) NaCl. The major fatty acids of strains were identified as anteiso-C15:0 and iso-C15:0. The dominant polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, glycolipids, five unidentitied lipids and phosphatidylmonomethylethanolamine. The cell wall peptidoglycan was found to contain meso-diaminopimelic acid. The predominant menaquinone was identified as menaquinone-7. The G+C content of genomic DNA of strains LAM0312T and LAM0313 were 45.0 mol% and 46.0 mol%, respectively as determined by the Tm method. The 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity analysis indicated that the strains were closely related to Brevibacillus laterosporus DSM 25T and Brevibacillus fluminis JCM 15716T with 98.5 % and 96.4 % sequence similarity, respectively. The DNA-DNA hybridization values between strain LAM0312T and LAM0313 was 92 ± 0.6 % (reciprocal 90 ± 0.2 %)and the value between LAM0312T andBrevibacillus laterosporus DSM 25T was 48 ± 0.5 % (reciprocal 40 ± 0.4 %). On the basis of the phenotypic, phylogenetic and chemotaxonomic characteristics, the strains are proposed to represent a novel species of the genus Brevibacillus, for which the name Brevibacillus halotolerans sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is LAM0312T (=ACCC 06527T =JCM 30849T).

  16. Increasing Incidence of Multidrug Resistance Among Cystic Fibrosis Respiratory Bacterial Isolates.

    PubMed

    Rutter, W Cliff; Burgess, Donna R; Burgess, David S

    2017-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus are common pathogens in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with increasing multidrug resistance (MDR). This study characterized antimicrobial susceptibility trends among organisms isolated from the respiratory tract of CF patients. Microbiological culture and sensitivity results for all CF patients were collected from January 2010 through December 2014. Minimum inhibitory concentrations were obtained using Phoenix(®) and Etest(®) methods. Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines were used to remove duplicate isolates and develop antimicrobial susceptibility reports. MDR was defined as resistance to one agent in three or more antibiotic classes or oxacillin resistance in S. aureus. Overall, 542 bacterial isolates from 376 cultures were analyzed for trends. P. aeruginosa (41%), S. aureus (40%), and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (8%) were the most commonly isolated organisms. Multidrug-resistant organism isolation increased from 39% to 49% (r = 0.76, p = 0.13), while representing 47.6% of all isolates. Multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa incidence increased each year from 26% to 43% (r = 0.89, p = 0.046), while P. aeruginosa isolation decreased from 47% to 38% over the study period (r = -0.93, p = 0.02). MRSA accounted for 62.6% of all S. aureus isolated, while overall multidrug-resistant S. aureus incidence was 73.1% in all cultures. MDR among common pathogens in CF continues to increase. Empiric therapy for CF exacerbations should be targeted to previous antimicrobial susceptibility, and P. aeruginosa and S. aureus should be empirically covered.

  17. Field collection and genetic classification of tick-borne Rickettsiae and Rickettsiae-like pathogens from South Texas: Coxiella burnetii isolated from field-collected Amblyomma cajennense.

    PubMed

    Sanders, David M; Parker, Jill E; Walker, Wes W; Buchholz, Matt W; Blount, Keith; Kiel, Johnathan L

    2008-12-01

    We are reporting the first known isolation of the Q-fever agent Coxiella burnetii from field-collected cayenne ticks Amblyomma cajennense in North America. Q-fever affects a number of domestic ungulates where it can lead to abortion in sheep and goats. There is far less known about the disease's effects on wild species, primarily because of the tendency of the disease to self resolve and to provide long-term immunity to subsequent infections. The first recovery of C. burnetii in North America was from the tick species Dermacentor andersoni. Since the original isolation C. burnetii has been recovered from five other North American tick species. The currently accepted mode for the majority of human infections is inhalation. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Viral and Rickettsial Diseases, Rickettsial Zoonoses Branch asserts the Q-fever agent as requiring as few as one organism to cause disease via inhalation in susceptible humans. However, with more and more isolations from ticks, evidence linking C. burnetii and ticks is mounting. The true role of tick species as competent vectors is still unconfirmed. Preemptive field collections of possible vector arthropods, hosts, and reservoirs can provide invaluable baseline environmental data that will prove supportive in follow-up studies and abatement efforts.

  18. Prognostic significance of differentiating necrosis from fluid collection on endoscopic ultrasound in patients with presumed isolated extrapancreatic necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Surinder S.; Chhabra, Puneet; Sharma, Ravi; Sharma, Vishal; Gupta, Rajesh; Bhasin, Deepak K.

    2017-01-01

    Background Extrapancreatic necrosis is diagnosed on computed tomography (CT) as extrapancreatic changes that are more than fat stranding; both fluid collections and necrosis would have a similar appearance. The aim of this study was to determine the prognostic significance of differentiating peripancreatic necrosis from fluid collection on endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) in patients with presumed isolated extrapancreatic necrosis. Methods We carried out a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data from 36 patients (25 males; age range 19-65 years) with acute pancreatitis (AP) and isolated extrapancreatic necrosis. On EUS, peripancreatic anechoic areas were labeled as peripancreatic fluid collections and peripancreatic heterogeneously echotextured areas as peripancreatic necrosis. Results The etiology of AP was alcohol in 16 (44.4%) patients, gallstone disease in 13 (36.1%), and other in 7 (19.4%). On EUS, 25 (69.4%) patients had peripancreatic necrosis and 11 (30.6%) patients had peripancreatic fluid collections. Compared with patients who had peripancreatic fluid collections, patients with peripancreatic necrosis had a significantly higher frequency of pleural effusion (88% vs. 55%; P=0.04), organ failure (OF) (68% vs. 27%; P=0.03), and persistent OF (48% vs. 9%; P=0.03). The patients with peripancreatic necrosis also had a higher frequency of ascites (20% vs. 9%), need for intervention (20% vs. nil), surgery (8% vs. nil) and mortality (8% vs. nil), but these differences were not statistically significant. Conclusion Isolated extrapancreatic necrosis on contrast-enhanced CT comprises a heterogeneous group, with patients who show peripancreatic fluid collections on EUS having a less severe disease course compared to patients with peripancreatic necrosis. PMID:28243045

  19. Environmentally Endemic Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strains with Mutations in lasR Are Associated with Increased Disease Severity in Corneal Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, John H.; Hebert, Wesley P.; Naimie, Amanda; Ray, Kathryn; Van Gelder, Rachel D.; DiGiandomenico, Antonio; Lalitha, Prajna; Srinivasan, Muthiah; Acharya, Nisha R.; Lietman, Thomas; Hogan, Deborah A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Steroids for Corneal Ulcers Trial (SCUT) was a multicenter, international study of bacterial keratitis in which 101 Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections were treated. Twenty-two of 101 P. aeruginosa isolates collected had a colony morphology characteristic of a loss-of-function mutation in lasR, the gene encoding a quorum-sensing master regulator. Ulcers caused by these 22 strains were associated with larger areas of corneal opacification, worse vision, and a lower rate of vision recovery in response to treatment than ulcers caused by the other isolates. The lasR sequences from these isolates each contained one of three nonsynonymous substitutions, and these strains were deficient in production of LasR-regulated protease and rhamnolipids. Replacement of lasR with either of the two most common lasR alleles from the SCUT isolates was sufficient to decrease protease and rhamnolipid production in PA14. Loss of LasR function is associated with increased production of CupA fimbriae, and the LasR-defective isolates exhibited higher production of CupA fimbriae than LasR-intact isolates. Strains with the same lasR mutation were of the same multilocus sequence type, suggesting that LasR-deficient, environmental P. aeruginosa strains were endemic to the area, and infections caused by these strains were associated with worse patient outcomes in the SCUT study. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT00324168.) IMPORTANCE The LasR transcription factor is an important regulator of quorum sensing in P. aeruginosa and positively controls multiple virulence-associated pathways. The emergence of strains with lasR loss-of-function alleles in chronic disease is well described and is thought to represent a specific adaptation to the host environment. However, the prevalence and virulence of these strains in acute infections remain unclear. This report describes observations revealing that lasR mutants were common among isolates from

  20. Comparative Antibacterial Activity of Honey and Gentamicin Against Escherichia Coli and Pseudomonas Aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Adeleke, O.E.; Olaitan, J.O.; Okpekpe, E.L.

    2006-01-01

    Summary The clinical significance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli is a strong factor for regular monitoring of their sensitivity to both established and novel antimicrobial compounds. Human isolates of these organisms were collected from different pathological sources and tested for their sensitivity to gentamicin - an established aminoglycoside antibiotic - and to honey, a natural product that is generating renewed interest for its therapeutic application. In an agar-cup diffusion method, three undiluted different samples of honey and their 1:2 to 1:6 aq. dilutions showed activity on 100% and 96.4% respectively of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates compared with 95.4% of Escherichia coli using either of the undiluted or 1:2 aq. dilutions of the honey samples. Gentamicin used in concentrations of 8.0 and 4.0 µg/ml varied in its activity against both organisms but was generally lower than the antibacterial activity of each undiluted honey and its 1:2 aq. dilution. In the event of therapeutic failure with gentamicin or any other related antibiotics, honey offers a suitable and better alternative in managing infected burn wounds and other forms of infected wounds as well as prophylaxis in trauma wounds. PMID:21991052

  1. Comparative antibacterial activity of honey and gentamicin against Escherichia coli and pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Adeleke, O E; Olaitan, J O; Okpekpe, E L

    2006-12-31

    The clinical significance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli is a strong factor for regular monitoring of their sensitivity to both established and novel antimicrobial compounds. Human isolates of these organisms were collected from different pathological sources and tested for their sensitivity to gentamicin - an established aminoglycoside antibiotic - and to honey, a natural product that is generating renewed interest for its therapeutic application. In an agar-cup diffusion method, three undiluted different samples of honey and their 1:2 to 1:6 aq. dilutions showed activity on 100% and 96.4% respectively of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates compared with 95.4% of Escherichia coli using either of the undiluted or 1:2 aq. dilutions of the honey samples. Gentamicin used in concentrations of 8.0 and 4.0 µg/ml varied in its activity against both organisms but was generally lower than the antibacterial activity of each undiluted honey and its 1:2 aq. dilution. In the event of therapeutic failure with gentamicin or any other related antibiotics, honey offers a suitable and better alternative in managing infected burn wounds and other forms of infected wounds as well as prophylaxis in trauma wounds.

  2. Evaluation of flagella and flagellin of Pseudomonas aeruginosa as vaccines.

    PubMed

    Campodónico, Victoria L; Llosa, Nicolás J; Grout, Martha; Döring, Gerd; Maira-Litrán, Tomás; Pier, Gerald B

    2010-02-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a serious pathogen in hospitalized, immunocompromised, and cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. P. aeruginosa is motile via a single polar flagellum made of polymerized flagellin proteins differentiated into two major serotypes: a and b. Antibodies to flagella delay onset of infection in CF patients, but whether immunity to polymeric flagella and that to monomeric flagellin are comparable has not been addressed, nor has the question of whether such antibodies might negatively impact Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5) activation, an important component of innate immunity to P. aeruginosa. We compared immunization with flagella and that with flagellin for in vitro effects on motility, opsonic killing, and protective efficacy using a mouse pneumonia model. Antibodies to flagella were superior to antibodies to flagellin at inhibiting motility, promoting opsonic killing, and mediating protection against P. aeruginosa pneumonia in mice. Protection against the flagellar type strains PAK and PA01 was maximal, but it was only marginal against motile clinical isolates from flagellum-immunized CF patients who nonetheless became colonized with P. aeruginosa. Purified flagellin was a more potent activator of TLR5 than were flagella and also elicited higher TLR5-neutralizing antibodies than did immunization with flagella. Antibody to type a but not type b flagella or flagellin inhibited TLR5 activation by whole bacterial cells. Overall, intact flagella appear to be superior for generating immunity to P. aeruginosa, and flagellin monomers might induce antibodies capable of neutralizing innate immunity due to TLR5 activation, but solid immunity to P. aeruginosa based on flagellar antigens may require additional components beyond type a and type b proteins from prototype strains.

  3. Genotyping and characterisation of the secretory lipolytic enzymes of Malassezia pachydermatis isolates collected from dogs

    PubMed Central

    Teramoto, Hideshi; Kumeda, Yuko; Yokoigawa, Kumio; Hosomi, Koji; Kozaki, Shunji; Mukamoto, Masafumi; Kohda, Tomoko

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Malassezia species are commensals of normal skin microbial flora of humans and animals. These may become pathogenic under certain conditions such as those associated with atopic dermatitis or otitis externa in dogs. Material and methods Isolates of Malassezia pachydermatis were obtained from 27 dogs with healthy external ears and 32 dogs with otitis externa. Isolates were characterised on the basis of their first internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and internal spacer 1 (IGS1) sequences. Their extracellular lipase and phospholipase activity were also analysed. Three types of phospholipase inhibitor were used to identify the subclasses of phospholipase associated with otitis externa. Results The clinical isolates were classified into three ITS and three IGS1 sequence types. No significant differences in pathogenicity were detected among the ITS or IGS1 genotypes, and all of the isolates exhibited similar levels of lipase activity. The isolates derived from the dogs with otitis externa showed significantly higher phospholipase activity than those obtained from the dogs with healthy external ears. A phospholipase D inhibitor reduced the phospholipase activity of the isolates obtained from the dogs with otitis externa. Conclusions This study did not show any significant differences in pathogenicity among the ITS or IGS1 genotypes but does suggest that phospholipase D might be one of the virulence factors involved in the inflammation of the external ear caused by M. pachydermatis. PMID:26392911

  4. Human clinical isolates of Corynebacterium diphtheriae and Corynebacterium ulcerans collected in Canada from 1999 to 2003 but not fitting reporting criteria for cases of diphtheria.

    PubMed

    Dewinter, Leanne M; Bernard, Kathryn A; Romney, Marc G

    2005-07-01

    A 5-year collection of Corynebacterium diphtheriae and Corynebacterium ulcerans human clinical isolates yielded nine isolates from blood cultures of patients with invasive infections, stressing the importance of C. diphtheriae as a serious blood-borne pathogen. Seven percent of C. diphtheriae and 100% of C. ulcerans isolates produced diphtheria toxin, demonstrating that toxigenic corynebacteria continue to circulate.

  5. Changes in qnr prevalence and fluoroquinolone resistance in clinical isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Enterobacter spp. collected from 1990 to 2005.

    PubMed

    Strahilevitz, Jacob; Engelstein, Dalia; Adler, Amos; Temper, Violeta; Moses, Allon E; Block, Colin; Robicsek, Ari

    2007-08-01

    Clinical isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Enterobacter spp. collected from 1990 through 2005 at a tertiary care center were studied for qnr genes. Isolates bearing these genes emerged in the mid-1990s, coinciding with the time of a rapid increase in fluoroquinolone resistance. Sixty percent of these isolates were ciprofloxacin susceptible by CLSI breakpoints.

  6. Gold-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles restrict growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Niemirowicz, Katarzyna; Swiecicka, Izabela; Wilczewska, Agnieszka Z; Misztalewska, Iwona; Kalska-Szostko, Beata; Bienias, Kamil; Bucki, Robert; Car, Halina

    2014-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) and their derivatives (aminosilane and gold-coated) have been widely investigated in numerous medical applications, including their potential to act as antibacterial drug carriers that may penetrate into bacteria cells and biofilm mass. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a frequent cause of infection in hospitalized patients, and significant numbers of currently isolated clinical strains are resistant to standard antibiotic therapy. Here we describe the impact of three types of SPIONs on the growth of P. aeruginosa during long-term bacterial culture. Their size, structure, and physicochemical properties were determined using transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. We observed significant inhibition of P. aeruginosa growth in bacterial cultures continued over 96 hours in the presence of gold-functionalized nanoparticles (Fe₃O₄@Au). At the 48-hour time point, growth of P. aeruginosa, as assessed by the number of colonies grown from treated samples, showed the highest inhibition (decreased by 40%). These data provide strong evidence that Fe₃O₄@Au can dramatically reduce growth of P. aeruginosa and provide a platform for further study of the antibacterial activity of this nanomaterial.

  7. Antibiotic Susceptibility Patterns of Bacterial Isolates from Pus Samples in a Tertiary Care Hospital of Punjab, India

    PubMed Central

    Trojan, Rugira; Razdan, Lovely

    2016-01-01

    We determined the prevalence and antibiotic susceptibilities patterns of bacterial isolates from pus samples collected from patients in a tertiary care hospital of Punjab, India. E. coli was the most prevalent pathogen (51.2%) followed by Staphylococcus aureus (21%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (11.6%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (5.8%), Citrobacter spp. (3.5%), Acinetobacter baumannii (2.3%), Proteus mirabilis (2.3%), and Streptococcus spp. (2.3%). E. coli, K. pneumoniae, A. baumannii, and Citrobacter isolates were resistant to multiple antibiotics including higher generation cephalosporins. S. aureus and Streptococcus isolates were sensitive to cloxacillin and vancomycin. However, P. aeruginosa, P. mirabilis, and Streptococcus isolates were found to be less resistant to the spectrum of antibiotics tested. Overall, our findings indicate the prevalence of resistance to different classes of antibiotics in bacterial isolates from pus infections and hence highlight the need for effective surveillance, regulator reporting, and antibiogram-guided antibiotic prescription. PMID:27872643

  8. [Pneumonia due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa].

    PubMed

    Vallés, Jordi; Mariscal, Dolors

    2005-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the leading causes of Gram-negative nosocomial pneumonia. It is the most common cause of ventilator-associated pneumonia and carries the highest mortality among hospital-acquired infections. P. aeruginosa produces a large number of toxins and surface components that make it especially virulent compared with other microorganisms. These include pili, flagella, membrane bound lipopolysaccharide, and secreted products such as exotoxins A, S and U, elastase, alkaline protease, cytotoxins and phospholipases. The most common mechanism of infection in mechanically ventilated patients is through aspiration of upper respiratory tract secretions previously colonized in the process of routine nursing care or via contaminated hands of hospital personnel. Intravenous therapy with an antipseudomonal regimen should be started immediately when P. aeruginosa pneumonia is suspected or confirmed. Empiric therapy with drugs active against P. aeruginosa should be started, especially in patients who have received previous antibiotics or present late-onset pneumonia.

  9. Temporal abundance, parity, survival rates, and arbovirus isolation of field-collected container-inhabiting mosquitoes in eastern Tennessee.

    PubMed

    Gottfried, Kristy L; Gerhardt, Reid R; Nasci, Roger S; Crabtree, Mary B; Karabatsos, Nick; Burkhalter, Kristen L; Davis, Brent S; Panella, Nicholas A; Paulson, Dave J

    2002-09-01

    Surveillance of container-inhabiting mosquitoes was conducted from June 17 through November 9, 1998, at 2 1997 La Crosse virus (LAC) human case sites (Knox and Cocke counties, Tennessee). Mosquitoes were collected weekly with 2 dry ice-baited Centers for Disease Control miniature light traps, 2 omnidirectional Fay traps, and 40 oviposition traps at each site. A total of 8,408 mosquitoes, composed of Ochlerotatus triseriatus (n = 2,095) and Aedes albopictus (n = 6,313), were reared or collected and assayed for virus. The majority of host-seeking Ae. albopictus (n = 567) collected from July through October from both sites were dissected to determine parity status. Monthly parity rates ranged from 0.78 to 0.85 and 0.79 to 0.92 in Knox and Cocke counties, respectively. The high parity rates indicate that this population of Ae. albopictus has a high daily survival rate and may have a high vector potential. The temporal patterns in Ae. albopictus and Oc. triseriatus egg collections from both of the human case sites were significantly correlated, suggesting that the populations fluctuate in a similar manner across the eastern Tennessee region. Although LAC was not isolated from either species, one isolation of a California serogroup virus, most likely a subtype of Jamestown Canyon virus (JC), was recovered from a pool of 50 male Ae. albopictus reared from eggs collected at the Knox County site (minimum field infection rate of 1.89 per 1,000). This is the 1st report of a very closely related JC-like virus in Ae. albopictus and from Tennessee, as well as the 1st time this potential human pathogen has been isolated from transovarially infected field populations of Ae. albopictus.

  10. Dissemination of Carbapenemase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Romania

    PubMed Central

    Flonta, Mirela; Boudehen, Yves-Marie; Creton, Elodie; Bernabeu, Sandrine; Vogel, Anaïs; Naas, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Fifteen carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae isolates and 12 carbapenemase-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates were recovered from patients hospitalized between August 2011 and March 2013 at the Hospital of Infectious Disease, Cluj-Napoca, Romania. One KPC-, nine NDM-1-, four OXA-48-, and one VIM-4-producing Enterobacteriaceae isolates along with 11 VIM-2-producing and one IMP-13-producing P. aeruginosa isolates were recovered from clinical samples. All carbapenemase genes were located on self-conjugative plasmids and were associated with other resistance determinants, including extended-spectrum β-lactamases and RmtC methylases. PMID:26303798

  11. Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa cervical osteomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Meher, Sujeet Kumar; Jain, Harsh; Tripathy, Laxmi Narayan; Basu, Sunandan

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a rare cause of osteomyelitis of the cervical spine and is usually seen in the background of intravenous drug use and immunocompromised state. Very few cases of osteomyelitis of the cervical spine caused by pseudomonas aeruginosa have been reported in otherwise healthy patients. This is a case presentation of a young female, who in the absence of known risk factors for cervical osteomyelitis presented with progressively worsening neurological signs and symptoms. PMID:27891039

  12. 9 CFR 147.12 - Procedures for collection, isolation, and identification of Salmonella from environmental samples...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... premises. Disposable caps should be provided and discarded after use on each premises. After collection... retaining the upper half for future disposal. Replace the cap on the inoculated tube and continue the... transport them, on ice or otherwise refrigerated, to a laboratory within 48 hours of collection. The...

  13. 9 CFR 147.12 - Procedures for collection, isolation, and identification of Salmonella from environmental samples...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... premises. Disposable caps should be provided and discarded after use on each premises. After collection... retaining the upper half for future disposal. Replace the cap on the inoculated tube and continue the... transport them, on ice or otherwise refrigerated, to a laboratory within 48 hours of collection. The...

  14. 9 CFR 147.12 - Procedures for collection, isolation, and identification of Salmonella from environmental samples...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... premises. Disposable caps should be provided and discarded after use on each premises. After collection... retaining the upper half for future disposal. Replace the cap on the inoculated tube and continue the... transport them, on ice or otherwise refrigerated, to a laboratory within 48 hours of collection. The...

  15. 9 CFR 147.12 - Procedures for collection, isolation, and identification of Salmonella from environmental samples...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... premises. Disposable caps should be provided and discarded after use on each premises. After collection... retaining the upper half for future disposal. Replace the cap on the inoculated tube and continue the... transport them, on ice or otherwise refrigerated, to a laboratory within 48 hours of collection. The...

  16. 9 CFR 147.12 - Procedures for collection, isolation, and identification of Salmonella from environmental samples...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... premises. Disposable caps should be provided and discarded after use on each premises. After collection... retaining the upper half for future disposal. Replace the cap on the inoculated tube and continue the... transport them, on ice or otherwise refrigerated, to a laboratory within 48 hours of collection. The...

  17. Inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation by 2,2’-bipyridyl, lipoic, kojic and picolinic acids

    PubMed Central

    Çevik, Kübra; Ulusoy, Seyhan

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): The inhibitory effects of iron chelators, and FeCl3 chelation on biofilm formation and swarming motility were investigated against an opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Materials and Methods: The inhibitory activity of 2,2’-bipyridyl, lipoic acid, kojic acid and picolinic acid on biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa strain PAO1 and three clinical isolates (P. aeruginosa PAK01, P. aeruginosa PAK02 and P. aeruginosa PAK03) were investigated, based on crystal violet assay, and swarming motility test. Results: The kojic, lipoic and picolinic acid inhibited biofilm formation by 5-33% in all tested P. aeruginosa isolates. When chelated iron was added, biofilm inhibition rates were determined to be 39-57%. Among the tested chelators against P. aeruginosa, lipoic acid (84%) and kojic acid (68%) presented the highest inhibition of swarming motility. This is the first study to report the inhibitory effect of lipoic acid on biofilm formation and swarming motility of P. aeruginosa. Conclusion: It is considered that lipoic and picolinic acids can serve as alternatives for the treatment of the P. aeruginosa infections by inhibiting biofilm formation. PMID:26557964

  18. New diphtheria toxin repressor types depicted in a Romanian collection of Corynebacterium diphtheriae isolates.

    PubMed

    Dinu, Sorin; Damian, Maria; Badell, Edgar; Dragomirescu, Cristiana Cerasella; Guiso, Nicole

    2014-10-01

    Corynebacterium diphtheriae is the etiological agent of diphtheria, a potential fatal disease caused by a corynephage toxin. The expression of this diphtheria toxin is controlled via an iron-dependent repressor with various functions (DtxR). Some mutations in the dtxR gene are associated with diminished activity or even with total loss of DtxR function. We conducted a molecular study to characterize the dtxR alleles harbored by 34 isolates of C. diphtheriae recovered from Romanian patients between 1961 and 2007. Three of the seven alleles identified in this study have not previously been described. Two new DtxR types were identified, one of which has an unusual polypeptide length. All the new DtxR types were found in toxigenic isolates, suggesting that they effectively regulate the expression of diphtheria toxin. Furthermore, one of the new DtxR identified was also found in a non-toxigenic isolate, making it a potential source of toxigenic isolates after lysogenic conversion.

  19. Iron Depletion Enhances Production of Antimicrobials by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Angela T.; Jones, Jace W.; Ruge, Max A.; Kane, Maureen A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a heritable disease characterized by chronic, polymicrobial lung infections. While Staphylococcus aureus is the dominant lung pathogen in young CF patients, Pseudomonas aeruginosa becomes predominant by adulthood. P. aeruginosa produces a variety of antimicrobials that likely contribute to this shift in microbial populations. In particular, secretion of 2-alkyl-4(1H)-quinolones (AQs) contributes to lysis of S. aureus in coculture, providing an iron source to P. aeruginosa both in vitro and in vivo. We previously showed that production of one such AQ, the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS), is enhanced by iron depletion and that this induction is dependent upon the iron-responsive PrrF small RNAs (sRNAs). Here, we demonstrate that antimicrobial activity against S. aureus during coculture is also enhanced by iron depletion, and we provide evidence that multiple AQs contribute to this activity. Strikingly, a P. aeruginosa ΔprrF mutant, which produces very little PQS in monoculture, was capable of mediating iron-regulated growth suppression of S. aureus. We show that the presence of S. aureus suppresses the ΔprrF1,2 mutant's defect in iron-regulated PQS production, indicating that a PrrF-independent iron regulatory pathway mediates AQ production in coculture. We further demonstrate that iron-regulated antimicrobial production is conserved in multiple P. aeruginosa strains, including clinical isolates from CF patients. These results demonstrate that iron plays a central role in modulating interactions of P. aeruginosa with S. aureus. Moreover, our studies suggest that established iron regulatory pathways of these pathogens are significantly altered during polymicrobial infections. IMPORTANCE Chronic polymicrobial infections involving Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality, as the interplay between these two organisms exacerbates infection. This is in part due to enhanced

  20. Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Swimming Pool Water: Evidences and Perspectives for a New Control Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Guida, Marco; Di Onofrio, Valeria; Gallè, Francesca; Gesuele, Renato; Valeriani, Federica; Liguori, Renato; Romano Spica, Vincenzo; Liguori, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is frequently isolated in swimming pool settings. Nine recreational and rehabilitative swimming pools were monitored according to the local legislation. The presence of P. aeruginosa was correlated to chlorine concentration. The ability of the isolates to form a biofilm on plastic materials was also investigated. In 59.5% of the samples, microbial contamination exceeded the threshold values. P. aeruginosa was isolated in 50.8% of these samples. The presence of P. aeruginosa was not correlated with free or total chlorine amount (R2 < 0.1). All the isolates were moderate- to strong-forming biofilm (Optical Density O.D.570 range 0.7–1.2). To control biofilm formation and P. aeruginosa colonization, Quantum FreeBioEnergy© (QFBE, FreeBioEnergy, Brisighella, Italy), has been applied with encouraging preliminary results. It is a new, promising control strategy based on the change of an electromagnetic field which is responsible for the proliferation of some microorganisms involved in biofilm formation, such as P. aeruginosa. PMID:27649225

  1. Molecular typing of clinical Cryptococcus neoformans isolates collected in Germany from 2004 to 2010.

    PubMed

    Sanchini, Andrea; Smith, Ilka McCormick; Sedlacek, Ludwig; Schwarz, Roman; Tintelnot, Kathrin; Rickerts, Volker

    2014-10-01

    Cryptococcosis is a fungal infection mostly caused by Cryptococcus neoformans. We identified agents of cryptococcosis diagnosed in Germany from 2004 to 2010. We used multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) to understand the molecular epidemiology of cryptococcosis. Sero- and mating types of individual patient isolates were determined by PCR. MLST was performed using the seven-locus scheme. Allele and nucleotide diversity was calculated for each locus of C. neoformans var. grubii and C. neoformans var. neoformans. Phylogenetic relations were assessed by dendrograms. Clinical data were compared between infections caused by the two variants. We studied 101 isolates. Eight were identified as hybrids (8%). All non-hybrids were of the α mating type. Among 78 C. neoformans var. grubii (77%), 16 sequence types (STs) were identified including three novel STs. They clustered in four groups, previously isolated in Asia, Europe or worldwide. Among 15 C. neoformans var. neoformans (15%), 10 STs were identified, without clustering. These isolates showed higher allele, and nucleotide diversity compared with C. neoformans var. grubii. C. neoformans var. neoformans was more likely to cause soft-tissue infections (3/9, 33 vs. 1/63, 2%, p = 0.005) and to affect non-AIDS patients (7/14, 50 vs. 15/76, 20%, p = 0.036). C. neoformans var. grubii is the predominant agent of cryptococcosis in Germany. MLST suggests that a part of these cases are acquired abroad by immigrants or tourists. C. neoformans var. neoformans isolates represent a greater genetic diversity and are associated with more variable clinical presentations.

  2. In Vitro Activity of RX-P873 against Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Rhomberg, Paul R.; Jones, Ronald N.; Farrell, David J.

    2015-01-01

    RX-P873 is a novel antibiotic from the pyrrolocytosine series which exhibits high binding affinity for the bacterial ribosome and broad-spectrum antibiotic properties. The pyrrolocytosines have shown in vitro activity against multidrug-resistant Gram-negative and Gram-positive strains of bacteria known to cause complicated urinary tract, skin, and lung infections, as well as sepsis. Enterobacteriaceae (657), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (200), and Acinetobacter baumannii (202) isolates from North America and Europe collected in 2012 as part of a worldwide surveillance program were tested in vitro by broth microdilution using Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) methodology. RX-P873 (MIC90, 0.5 μg/ml) was >32-fold more active than ceftazidime and inhibited 97.1% and 99.5% of Enterobacteriaceae isolates at MIC values of ≤1 and ≤4 μg/ml, respectively. There were only three isolates with an MIC value of >4 μg/ml (all were indole-positive Protea). RX-P873 (MIC50/90, 2/4 μg/ml) was highly active against Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates, including isolates which were nonsusceptible to ceftazidime or meropenem. RX-P873 was 2-fold less active against P. aeruginosa than tobramycin (MIC90, 2 μg/ml; 91.0% susceptible) and colistin (MIC90, 2 μg/ml; 99.5% susceptible) and 2-fold more potent than amikacin (MIC90, 8 μg/ml; 93.5% susceptible) and meropenem (MIC90, 8 μg/ml; 76.0% susceptible). RX-P873, the most active agent against Acinetobacter baumannii (MIC90, 1 μg/ml), was 2-fold more active than colistin (MIC90, 2 μg/ml; 97.0% susceptible) and 4-fold more active than tigecycline (MIC90, 4 μg/ml). This novel agent merits further exploration of its potential against multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:25645834

  3. Efficacy of the Novel Antibiotic POL7001 in Preclinical Models of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Cigana, Cristina; Bernardini, Francesca; Facchini, Marcella; Alcalá-Franco, Beatriz; Riva, Camilla; De Fino, Ida; Rossi, Alice; Ranucci, Serena; Misson, Pauline; Chevalier, Eric; Brodmann, Maj; Schmitt, Michel; Wach, Achim; Dale, Glenn E.

    2016-01-01

    The clinical development of antibiotics with a new mode of action combined with efficient pulmonary drug delivery is a priority against untreatable Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections. POL7001 is a macrocycle antibiotic belonging to the novel class of protein epitope mimetic (PEM) molecules with selective and potent activity against P. aeruginosa. We investigated ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) and cystic fibrosis (CF) as indications of the clinical potential of POL7001 to treat P. aeruginosa pulmonary infections. MICs of POL7001 and comparators were measured for reference and clinical P. aeruginosa strains. The therapeutic efficacy of POL7001 given by pulmonary administration was evaluated in murine models of P. aeruginosa acute and chronic pneumonia. POL7001 showed potent in vitro activity against a large panel of P. aeruginosa isolates from CF patients, including multidrug-resistant (MDR) isolates with adaptive phenotypes such as mucoid or hypermutable phenotypes. The efficacy of POL7001 was demonstrated in both wild-type and CF mice. In addition to a reduced bacterial burden in the lung, POL7001-treated mice showed progressive body weight recovery and reduced levels of inflammatory markers, indicating an improvement in general condition. Pharmacokinetic studies indicated that POL7001 reached significant concentrations in the lung after pulmonary administration, with low systemic exposure. These results support the further evaluation of POL7001 as a novel therapeutic agent for the treatment of P. aeruginosa pulmonary infections. PMID:27297477

  4. Antipseudomonal agents exhibit differential pharmacodynamic interactions with human polymorphonuclear leukocytes against established biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Chatzimoschou, Athanasios; Simitsopoulou, Maria; Antachopoulos, Charalampos; Walsh, Thomas J; Roilides, Emmanuel

    2015-04-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most common pathogen infecting the lower respiratory tract of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, where it forms tracheobronchial biofilms. Pseudomonas biofilms are refractory to antibacterials and to phagocytic cells with innate immunity, leading to refractory infection. Little is known about the interaction between antipseudomonal agents and phagocytic cells in eradication of P. aeruginosa biofilms. Herein, we investigated the capacity of three antipseudomonal agents, amikacin (AMK), ceftazidime (CAZ), and ciprofloxacin (CIP), to interact with human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) against biofilms and planktonic cells of P. aeruginosa isolates recovered from sputa of CF patients. Three of the isolates were resistant and three were susceptible to each of these antibiotics. The concentrations studied (2, 8, and 32 mg/liter) were subinhibitory for biofilms of resistant isolates, whereas for biofilms of susceptible isolates, they ranged between sub-MIC and 2 × MIC values. The activity of each antibiotic alone or in combination with human PMNs against 48-h mature biofilms or planktonic cells was determined by XTT [2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide] assay. All combinations of AMK with PMNs resulted in synergistic or additive effects against planktonic cells and biofilms of P. aeruginosa isolates compared to each component alone. More than 75% of CAZ combinations exhibited additive interactions against biofilms of P. aeruginosa isolates, whereas CIP had mostly antagonistic interaction or no interaction with PMNs against biofilms of P. aeruginosa. Our findings demonstrate a greater positive interaction between AMK with PMNs than that observed for CAZ and especially CIP against isolates of P. aeruginosa from the respiratory tract of CF patients.

  5. Social cheating in Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing.

    PubMed

    Sandoz, Kelsi M; Mitzimberg, Shelby M; Schuster, Martin

    2007-10-02

    In a process termed quorum sensing, bacteria use diffusible chemical signals to coordinate cell density-dependent gene expression. In the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, quorum sensing controls hundreds of genes, many of which encode extracellular virulence factors. Quorum sensing is required for P. aeruginosa virulence in animal models. Curiously, quorum sensing-deficient variants, most of which carry a mutation in the gene encoding the central quorum sensing regulator lasR, are frequently isolated from acute and chronic infections. The mechanism for their emergence is not known. Here we provide experimental evidence suggesting that these lasR mutants are social cheaters that cease production of quorum-controlled factors and take advantage of their production by the group. We detected an emerging subpopulation of lasR mutants after approximately 100 generations of in vitro evolution of the P. aeruginosa wild-type strain under culture conditions that require quorum sensing for growth. Under such conditions, quorum sensing appears to impose a metabolic burden on the proliferating bacterial cell, because quorum-controlled genes not normally induced until cessation of growth were highly expressed early in growth, and a defined lasR mutant showed a growth advantage when cocultured with the parent strain. The emergence of quorum-sensing-deficient variants in certain environments is therefore an indicator of high quorum sensing activity of the bacterial population as a whole. It does not necessarily indicate that quorum sensing is insignificant, as has previously been suggested. Thus, novel antivirulence strategies aimed at disrupting bacterial communication may be particularly effective in such clinical settings.

  6. Seeking the source of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in a recently opened hospital: an observational study using whole-genome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Quick, Joshua; Cumley, Nicola; Wearn, Christopher M; Niebel, Marc; Constantinidou, Chrystala; Thomas, Chris M; Pallen, Mark J; Moiemen, Naiem S; Bamford, Amy; Oppenheim, Beryl; Loman, Nicholas J

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common nosocomial pathogen responsible for significant morbidity and mortality internationally. Patients may become colonised or infected with P. aeruginosa after exposure to contaminated sources within the hospital environment. The aim of this study was to determine whether whole-genome sequencing (WGS) can be used to determine the source in a cohort of burns patients at high risk of P. aeruginosa acquisition. Study design An observational prospective cohort study. Setting Burns care ward and critical care ward in the UK. Participants Patients with >7% total burns by surface area were recruited into the study. Methods All patients were screened for P. aeruginosa on admission and samples taken from their immediate environment, including water. Screening patients who subsequently developed a positive P. aeruginosa microbiology result were subject to enhanced environmental surveillance. All isolates of P. aeruginosa were genome sequenced. Sequence analysis looked at similarity and relatedness between isolates. Results WGS for 141 P. aeruginosa isolates were obtained from patients, hospital water and the ward environment. Phylogenetic analysis revealed eight distinct clades, with a single clade representing the majority of environmental isolates in the burns unit. Isolates from three patients had identical genotypes compared with water isolates from the same room. There was clear clustering of water isolates by room and outlet, allowing the source of acquisitions to be unambiguously identified. Whole-genome shotgun sequencing of biofilm DNA extracted from a thermostatic mixer valve revealed this was the source of a P. aeruginosa subpopulation previously detected in water. In the remaining two cases there was no clear link to the hospital environment. Conclusions This study reveals that WGS can be used for source tracking of P. aeruginosa in a hospital setting, and that acquisitions can be traced to a specific source within a

  7. Genomic and Transcriptional Mapping of PaMx41, Archetype of a New Lineage of Bacteriophages Infecting Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Plancarte, Indira; Cazares, Adrián; Guarneros, Gabriel

    2016-11-15

    Previously, a collection of virulent phages infecting Pseudomonas aeruginosa was isolated from open water reservoirs and residual waters. Here, we described the comparative genomics of a set of five related phages from the collection, the physical structure of the genome, the structural proteomics of the virion, and the transcriptional program of archetypal phage PaMx41. The phage genomes were closely associated with each other and with those of two other P. aeruginosa phages, 119X and PaP2, which were previously filed in the databases. Overall, the genomes were approximately 43 kb, harboring 53 conserved open reading frames (ORFs) and three short ORFs in indel regions and containing 45% GC content. The genome of PaMx41 was further characterized as a linear, terminally redundant DNA molecule. A total of 16 ORFs were associated with putative functions, including nucleic acid metabolism, morphogenesis, and lysis, and eight virion proteins were identified through mass spectrometry. However, the coding sequences without assigned functions represent 70% of the ORFs. The PaMx41 transcription program was organized in early, middle, and late expressed genomic modules, which correlated with regions containing functionally related genes. The high genomic conservation among these distantly isolated phages suggests that these viruses undergo selective pressure to remain unchanged. The 119X lineage represents a unique set of phages that corresponds to a novel phage group. The features recognized in the genomes and the broad host range of clinical strains suggest that these phages are candidates for therapy applications.

  8. Planococcus rifietensis sp. nov, isolated from algal mat collected from a sulfurous spring in Campania (Italy).

    PubMed

    Romano, Ida; Giordano, Assunta; Lama, Licia; Nicolaus, Barbara; Gambacorta, Agata

    2003-09-01

    The taxomony of strain M8, isolated from algal mat formed at the origin of a sulfurous spring in Rifieto (Savignano Irpino, Campania, Italy), was investigated in a polyphasic approach. The morphological, physiological and genetic characteristics were compared with of Planococcus and Planomicrobium species. The isolate grew optimally at pH 9.0, 1.8 M NaCl at 37 degrees C. The cells were Gram-positive cocci that form pairs, tetrads and aggregates of several cells. The isolate was aerobic/microaerophilic and accumulated glycine-betaine, as a major osmolyte, with minor components glutamate and an unknown compound. M8 was able to hydrolyse X-Glc (5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indoyl beta-d-glucopyranoside). The polar lipid profile consisted of phosphatidylglycerol and diphosphatidylglycerol as major components, and phosphocholine as a minor compound. MK8 was the only quinone found and the fatty acid composition was dominated by branched acids, mainly aiC15:0. The G+C content of DNA was 47.9% and its phylogenetic position was established by 16S rRNA gene sequencing as a member of the genus Planococcus. The DNA/DNA similarity of M8 to the type species Planococcus citreus was less than 55%. For this reason and for physiological and chemotaxonomic features, it is proposed to create a new species Planococcus rifietensis sp. nov.

  9. [Studies on hyperspectral characteristics of Microcystis aeruginosa under the cultivation conditions with different phosphorus concentrations].

    PubMed

    Qin, Zhao-Yang; Liu, Xue-Hua; Zhao, Jin-Bo

    2013-02-01

    Microcystis aeruginosa is one of the most common species in the algae-bloom events of domestic lakes. Illumination incubator was used to cultivate M. aeruginosa under conditions of different phosphorus concentrations in the laboratory. Spectroscopic data of culture solutions were collected by GER1500 spectrometer under the sunlight. The study focused on the growth rhythm of M. aeruginosa and the characteristics of spectral variation in the culture solutions. The results showed that low phosphorus concentration (< or =10 microg x L(-1)) is a restricting factor for the growth and reproduction of M. aeruginosa. Moreover, the reflections of spectrum from culture solutions of M. aeruginosa showed significant changes along with cultivation period, such as at the wavelengths of 550, 610, 660, 700-710 and 760 nm.

  10. Genetic Markers of Widespread Extensively Drug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa High-Risk Clones

    PubMed Central

    Cabot, Gabriel; Ocampo-Sosa, Alain A.; Domínguez, M. Angeles; Gago, Juan F.; Juan, Carlos; Tubau, Fe; Rodríguez, Cristina; Moyà, Bartolomé; Peña, Carmen; Martínez-Martínez, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Recent reports have revealed the existence of widespread extensively drug-resistant (XDR) P. aeruginosa high-risk clones in health care settings, but there is still scarce information on their specific chromosomal (mutational) and acquired resistance mechanisms. Up to 20 (10.5%) of 190 bloodstream isolates collected from 10 Spanish hospitals met the XDR criteria. A representative number (15 per group) of isolates classified as multidrug-resistant (MDR) (22.6%), resistant to 1 to 2 classes (moderately resistant [modR]) (23.7%), or susceptible to all antibiotics (multiS) (43.2%) were investigated in parallel. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analysis revealed that all XDR isolates belonged to sequence type 175 (ST175) (n = 19) or ST111 (n = 1), both recognized as international high-risk clones. Clonal diversity was higher among the 15 MDR isolates (4 ST175, 2 ST111, and 8 additional STs) and especially high among the 15 modR (13 different STs) and multiS (14 STs) isolates. The XDR/MDR pattern in ST111 isolates correlated with the production of VIM-2, but none of the ST175 isolates produced acquired β-lactamases. In contrast, the analysis of resistance markers in 12 representative isolates (from 7 hospitals) of ST175 revealed that the XDR pattern was driven by the combination of AmpC hyperproduction, OprD inactivation (Q142X), 3 mutations conferring high-level fluoroquinolone resistance (GyrA T83I and D87N and ParC S87W), a G195E mutation in MexZ (involved in MexXY-OprM overexpression), and the production of a class 1 integron harboring the aadB gene (gentamicin and tobramycin resistance). Of particular interest, in nearly all the ST175 isolates, AmpC hyperproduction was driven by a novel AmpR-activating mutation (G154R), as demonstrated by complementation studies using an ampR mutant of PAO1. This work is the first to describe the specific resistance markers of widespread P. aeruginosa XDR high-risk clones producing invasive infections. PMID:23045355

  11. Antibiotic and heavy metal resistance in Shewanella putrefaciens strains isolated from shellfishes collected from West Sea, Korea.

    PubMed

    Kang, Chang-Ho; So, Jae-Seong

    2016-11-15

    The aim of the present study was to determine the antibiotic resistance patterns and distribution of heavy-metal resistance in Shewanella putrefaciens strains isolated from shellfishes collected from West Sea; and to determine the relationship, if any, between antibiotic and heavy-metal resistance in these strains. Among the 15 strains isolated, two strains, SY1 and SY2, showed heavy-metal resistance in addition to high resistance to seven antibiotics: cephalothin, gentamicin, erythromycin, vancomycin, ampicillin, rifampicin, and streptomycin. We conclude that heavy-metal contamination imposes long-term, widespread, and recalcitrant selection pressure, which potentially contributes to the maintenance and spread of antibiotic resistance factors in bacteria. Moreover, this fact holds both environmental and clinical importance.

  12. Isolation of Buggy Creek virus (Togaviridae: Alphavirus) from field-collected eggs of Oeciacus vicarius (Hemiptera: Cimicidae).

    PubMed

    Brown, Charles R; Moore, Amy T; Young, Ginger R; Padhi, Abinash; Komar, Nicholas

    2009-03-01

    Alphaviruses (Togaviridae) rarely have been found to be vertically transmitted from female arthropods to their progeny. We report two isolations of Buggy Creek virus (BCRV), an ecologically unusual alphavirus related to western equine encephalomyelitis virus, from field-collected eggs of cimicid swallow bugs (Oeciacus vicarius Horvath), the principal vector for BCRV. Ten percent of egg pools were positive for BCRV, and we estimated minimum infection rates to be 1.03 infected eggs per 1,000 tested. The results show potential vertical transmission of BCRV, represent one of the few isolations of any alphavirus from eggs or larvae of insects in the field, and are the first report of any virus in the eggs of cimicid bedbugs. The specialized ecological niche of BCRV in swallow bugs and at cliff swallow (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota Vieillot) nesting sites may promote vertical transmission of this virus.

  13. Nosocomial Infections with IMP-19−Producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa Linked to Contaminated Sinks, France

    PubMed Central

    Amoureux, Lucie; Riedweg, Karena; Chapuis, Angélique; Bador, Julien; Siebor, Eliane; Péchinot, André; Chrétien, Marie-Lorraine; de Curraize, Claire

    2017-01-01

    We isolated IMP-19–producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa from 7 patients with nosocomial infections linked to contaminated sinks in France. We showed that blaIMP-19 was located on various class 1 integrons among 8 species of gram-negative bacilli detected in sinks: P. aeruginosa, Achromobacter xylosoxidans, A. aegrifaciens, P. putida, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, P. mendocina, Comamonas testosteroni, and Sphingomonas sp. PMID:28098548

  14. In vitro activity of tigecycline and comparators against Gram-positive and Gram-negative isolates collected from the Middle East and Africa between 2004 and 2011.

    PubMed

    Kanj, Souha S; Whitelaw, Andrew; Dowzicky, Michael J

    2014-02-01

    The Tigecycline Evaluation and Surveillance Trial (T.E.S.T.) was established in 2004 to monitor longitudinal changes in bacterial susceptibility to numerous antimicrobial agents, specifically tigecycline. In this study, susceptibility among Gram-positive and Gram-negative isolates between 2004 and 2011 from the Middle East and Africa was examined. Antimicrobial susceptibilities were determined using Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) interpretive criteria, and minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined by broth microdilution methods. US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved breakpoints were used for tigecycline. In total, 2967 Gram-positive and 6322 Gram-negative isolates were examined from 33 participating centres. All Staphylococcus aureus isolates, including meticillin-resistant S. aureus, were susceptible to tigecycline, linezolid and vancomycin. Vancomycin, linezolid, tigecycline and levofloxacin were highly active (>97.6% susceptibility) against Streptococcus pneumoniae, including penicillin-non-susceptible strains. All Enterococcus faecium isolates were susceptible to tigecycline and linezolid, including 32 vancomycin-resistant isolates. Extended-spectrum β-lactamases were produced by 16.6% of Escherichia coli and 32.9% of Klebsiella pneumoniae. More than 95% of E. coli and Enterobacter spp. were susceptible to amikacin, tigecycline, imipenem and meropenem. The most active agents against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii were amikacin (88.0% susceptible) and minocycline (64.2% susceptible), respectively; the MIC90 (MIC required to inhibit 90% of the isolates) of tigecycline against A. baumannii was low at 2mg/L. Tigecycline and carbapenem agents were highly active against most Gram-negative pathogens. Tigecycline, linezolid and vancomycin showed good activity against most Gram-positive pathogens from the Middle East and Africa.

  15. Rapid and Sensitive Detection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Chlorinated Water and Aerosols targeting gyrB gene using Real-time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang Soo; Wetzel, Kaedra; Buckley, Timothy; Wozniak, Daniel; Lee, Jiyoung

    2011-01-01

    Aims For the rapid detection of P. aeruginosa from chlorinated water and aerosols, gyrB gene-based real-time PCR assay was developed and investigated. Methods and Results Two novel primer sets (pa722F/746MGB/899R and pa722F/746MGB/788R) were designed using the most updated 611 Pseudomonas and 748 other bacterial gyrB genes for achieving high specificity. Their specificity showed 100% accuracy when tested with various strains including clinical isolates from cystic fibrosis patients. The assay was tested with P. aeruginosa-containing chlorinated water and aerosols to simulate the waterborne and airborne transmission routes (detection limit 3.3 × 102 CFU·PCR−1 − 2.3 × 103 CFU·PCR−1). No chlorine interference in real-time PCR was observed at drinking water level (~ 1 mg·L−1), but high level of chorine (12 mg·L−1) interfered the assay, thus neutralization was needed. P. aeruginosa in aerosol was successfully detected after capturing with gelatin filters with minimum 2 min of sampling time when the initial concentration of 104 CFU·mL−1 bacteria existed in the nebulizer. Conclusions A highly specific and rapid assay (2–3 hrs) was developed by targeting gyrB gene for the detection of P. aeruginosa in chlorinated water and aerosols, combined with optimized sample collection methods and sample processing, so the direct DNA extraction from either water or aerosol was possible while achieving the desired sensitivity of the method. Significance and Impact The new assay can provide timely and accurate risk assessment to prevent P. aeruginosa exposure from water and aerosol, resulting in reduced disease burden, especially among immune-compromised and susceptible individuals. This approach can be easily utilized as a platform technology for the detection of other types of microorganisms, especially for those that are transmitted via water and aerosol routes, such as Legionella pneumophila. PMID:21794031

  16. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Antimicrobial Susceptibility Results from Four Years (2012 to 2015) of the International Network for Optimal Resistance Monitoring Program in the United States.

    PubMed

    Sader, Helio S; Huband, Michael D; Castanheira, Mariana; Flamm, Robert K

    2017-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa represents a major cause of health care-associated infections, and inappropriate initial antimicrobial therapy is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The International Network for Optimal Resistance Monitoring (INFORM) program monitors the in vitro activity of ceftazidime-avibactam and many comparator agents. We evaluated the antimicrobial susceptibility of 7,452 P. aeruginosa isolates collected from 79 U.S. medical centers in 2012 to 2015. The isolates were collected and tested consecutively for susceptibility by broth microdilution method. Infection types included mainly pneumonia (50.5%), skin and skin structure (24.0%), urinary tract (7.8%), and bloodstream (7.7%) infections. The only compounds with >90% susceptibility rates were colistin (MIC50/90, 1/2 mg/liter, respectively; 99.4% susceptible), ceftazidime-avibactam (MIC50/90, 2/4 mg/liter, respectively; 97.0% susceptible), and amikacin (MIC50/90, 2/8 mg/liter, respectively; 97.0/93.0% susceptible [CLSI/EUCAST, respectively]). The addition of avibactam to ceftazidime increased the percentage of susceptible P. aeruginosa isolates from 84.3% to 97.0%. Multidrug resistance (MDR) and extensive drug resistance (XDR) phenotypes were observed among 1,151 (15.4%) and 698 (9.4%) isolates, respectively, and ceftazidime-avibactam inhibited 82.1 and 75.8% of these isolates at ≤8 mg/liter, respectively. High rates of cross-resistance were observed with ceftazidime, meropenem, and piperacillin-tazobactam, whereas ceftazidime-avibactam retained activity against isolates nonsusceptible to ceftazidime (81.0% susceptible), meropenem (86.2% susceptible), and piperacillin-tazobactam (85.4% susceptible), as well as isolates nonsusceptible to these three β-lactams (71.2% susceptible). The only antimicrobial combinations that provided a better overall anti-Pseudomonas coverage than ceftazidime-avibactam (97.0% susceptibility rate) were those including amikacin (97.0 to 98.4% coverage

  17. Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a neonatal intensive care unit: molecular epidemiology and infection control measures

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a non-fermentative, gram-negative rod, is responsible for a wide variety of clinical syndromes in NICU patients, including sepsis, pneumonia, meningitis, diarrhea, conjunctivitis and skin infections. An increased number of infections and colonisations by P. aeruginosa has been observed in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) of our university hospital between 2005 and 2007. Methods Hand disinfection compliance before and after an educational programme on hand hygiene was evaluated. Identification of microrganisms was performed using conventional methods. Antibiotic susceptibility was evaluated by MIC microdilution. Genotyping was performed by PFGE analysis. Results The molecular epidemiology of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the NICU of the Federico II University hospital (Naples, Italy) and the infection control measures adopted to stop the spreading of P. aeruginosa in the ward were described. From July 2005 to June 2007, P. aeruginosa was isolated from 135 neonates and caused severe infections in 11 of them. Macrorestriction analysis of clinical isolates from 90 neonates identified 20 distinct genotypes, one major PFGE type (A) being isolated from 48 patients and responsible for 4 infections in 4 of them, four other distinct recurrent genotypes being isolated in 6 to 4 patients. Seven environmental strains were isolated from the hand of a nurse and from three sinks on two occasions, two of these showing PFGE profiles A and G identical to two clinical isolates responsible for infection. The successful control of the outbreak was achieved through implementation of active surveillance of healthcare-associated infections in the ward together with environmental microbiological sampling and an intense educational programme on hand disinfection among the staff members. Conclusion P. aeruginosa infections in the NICU were caused by the cross-transmission of an epidemic clone in 4 neonates, and by the selection of sporadic clones in 7

  18. Standardization of sample collection, isolation and analysis methods in extracellular vesicle research

    PubMed Central

    Witwer, Kenneth W.; Buzás, Edit I.; Bemis, Lynne T.; Bora, Adriana; Lässer, Cecilia; Lötvall, Jan; Nolte-‘t Hoen, Esther N.; Piper, Melissa G.; Sivaraman, Sarada; Skog, Johan; Théry, Clotilde; Wauben, Marca H.; Hochberg, Fred

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of publications on extracellular RNA (exRNA) and extracellular vesicles (EV) has highlighted the potential of these molecules and vehicles as biomarkers of disease and therapeutic targets. These findings have created a paradigm shift, most prominently in the field of oncology, prompting expanded interest in the field and dedication of funds for EV research. At the same time, understanding of EV subtypes, biogenesis, cargo and mechanisms of shuttling remains incomplete. The techniques that can be harnessed to address the many gaps in our current knowledge were the subject of a special workshop of the International Society for Extracellular Vesicles (ISEV) in New York City in October 2012. As part of the “ISEV Research Seminar: Analysis and Function of RNA in Extracellular Vesicles (evRNA)”, 6 round-table discussions were held to provide an evidence-based framework for isolation and analysis of EV, purification and analysis of associated RNA molecules, and molecular engineering of EV for therapeutic intervention. This article arises from the discussion of EV isolation and analysis at that meeting. The conclusions of the round table are supplemented with a review of published materials and our experience. Controversies and outstanding questions are identified that may inform future research and funding priorities. While we emphasize the need for standardization of specimen handling, appropriate normative controls, and isolation and analysis techniques to facilitate comparison of results, we also recognize that continual development and evaluation of techniques will be necessary as new knowledge is amassed. On many points, consensus has not yet been achieved and must be built through the reporting of well-controlled experiments. PMID:24009894

  19. Suboptimal chlorine treatment of drinking water leads to selection of multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, Richa; Upreti, R K; Jain, S R; Prasad, K N; Seth, P K; Chaturvedi, U C

    2004-06-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the spectrum of bacteria present in the River Gomti water before and after chlorination for drinking purposes. We observed that the strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa that survived chlorination on three out of seven occasions were resistant to almost all the antibiotics tested. The chlorine-resistant bacteria had mucoid colonies and grew better at 24 degrees C. All attempts to isolate the plasmid responsible for chlorine resistance were unsuccessful. Laboratory experiments using different strains of the P. aeruginosa in distilled water showed that only the resistant strain survived chlorine treatment at a dose of < or =500 microg/L. Similar results were obtained when water collected from seven different sites on the River Gomti was treated with graded doses of chlorine. At the higher dose of chlorine, all the bacteria died in 30 min, whereas with lower doses all the bacteria survived. The present study underscores the importance of measuring water chlorine concentrations to assure they are sufficiently high to remove pathogenic bacteria from drinking water. To our knowledge, this is the first report in the literature of the selection of multidrug-resistant bacteria by suboptimal chlorine treatment of water.

  20. Bioremediation of crystal violet using air bubble bioreactor packed with Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    El-Naggar, Manal A; El-Aasar, Samy A; Barakat, Khlood I

    2004-12-01

    Seven water and sediment samples were collected and tested for decolorizing crystal violet. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the most effective isolate for dye decolorization. The LC(50) of the crystal violet (115 mg/l) was measured using Artemia salina as a biomarker. The effect of different heavy metals on crystal violet decolorization was investigated. Cd(2+) and Fe(3+) ions showed marginal enhancement of the decolorization process, the rate was 1.35 mg/l/h compared to 1.25 mg/l/h for the control. Phenol and m-cresol showed no effect on crystal violet decolorization, meanwhile p-cresol and p-nitrophenol reduced the decolorization rate to 1.07 and 0.01 mg/l/h, respectively. P. aeruginosa cells were immobilized by entrapment in agar-alginate beads. The beads were cultivated and reused in Erlenmeyer flask and in an air bubble column bioreactor and they enhanced the crystal violet decolorization rate to 3.33 and 7.5 mg/l/h, respectively.

  1. VIM-2–producing Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa ST175 Clone, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Viedma, Esther; Juan, Carlos; Villa, Jennifer; Barrado, Laura; Orellana, M. Ángeles; Sanz, Francisca; Otero, Joaquín R.; Oliver, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    A total of 183 patients were colonized or infected with multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates at a hospital in Spain during 2007–2010; prevalence increased over this period from 2.8% to 15.3%. To characterize these isolates, we performed molecular epidemiologic and drug resistance analysis. Genotyping showed that 104 (56.8%) isolates belonged to a single major clone (clone B), which was identified by multilocus sequence typing as sequence type (ST) 175. This clone was initially isolated from 5 patients in 2008, and then isolated from 23 patients in 2009 and 76 patients in 2010. PCR analysis of clone B isolates identified the blaVIM-2 gene in all but 1 isolate, which harbored blaIMP-22. ST175 isolates were susceptible to only amikacin (75%) and colistin (100%). Emergence of the ST175 clone represents a major health problem because it compromises therapy for treatment of P. aeruginosa nosocomial infections. PMID:22840969

  2. Effectiveness of Antipseudomonal Antibiotics and Mechanisms of Multidrug Resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    El ZOWALATYl, Mohamed E; Gyetvaii, Bpla

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a leading human pathogen that causes serious infections at various tissues and organs leading to life threatening health problems and possible deadly outcomes. Resistance patterns vary widely whether it is from hospitals or community acquired infections. Reporting resistance profiles to a certain antibiotics provide valuable information in a given setting, but may be extrapolated outside the sampling location. In the present study, P. aeruginosa isolates were screened to determine their susceptibilities against anti-pseudomonal antimicrobial agents and possible existing mechanisms of resistance were determined. Eighty-six isolates of P. aeruginosa were recovered. Isolates representing different resistance profiles were screened for the existence of three different resistance mechanisms including drug inactivation due to metallo-β-lactamases, drug impermeability by outer membrane proteins and drug efflux. All tested isolates showed uniform susceptibility (100%, n = 86/86) to piperacillin, meropenem, amikacin, and polymyxin B. A single isolate was found to be imipenem resistant (99%, n = 85/86). The possible mechanisms of resistance of P. aeruginosa to imipenem involve active drug efflux pumps, outer membrane impermeability as well as drug inactivating enzymes. These findings demonstrate the fundamental importance of the in vitro susceptibility testing of antibiotics prior to antipseudomonal therapy and highlight the need for a continuous antimicrobial resistance surveillance programs to monitor the changing resistance patterns so that clinicians and health care officials are updated as to the most effective therapeutic agents to combat the serious outcomes of P. aeruginosa infections.

  3. Successful implementation of infection control strategies prevents P. aeruginosa transmission among cystic fibrosis patients inside the hospital

    PubMed Central

    Matt, Benedikt; Mitteregger, Dieter; Renner, Sabine; Presterl, Elisabeth; Assadian, Ojan; Diab-Elschahawi, Magda

    2014-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to characterise the epidemiology of P. aeruginosa isolated from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients at the Vienna General Hospital (VGH) by molecular genetic fingerprinting in order to understand transmission ways and to evaluate the established infection control protocols. Methods: The outpatient clinic for CF patients at the VGH cares for children and adolescents up to the age of 18 years. Among an average of 139 patients cared for at the clinic, 41 were tested positive for P. aeruginosa during the study period. Fifty P. aeruginosa isolates, obtained between August 2010 and March 2012 from routine examinations of CF patients, were subject to molecular characterization using the DiversiLab® method. Results: 42 distinguishable molecular-biological patterns were identified, 7 of which were found multiple times. 40 out of 42 genotypes were retrieved from single patients only, while two patterns were present in two patients each. Nine patients presented with two or more phenotypically diverse P. aeruginosa isolates. In five of these cases the retrieved isolates belonged to the same genotype. Conclusion: The broad genetic heterogeneity of P. aeruginosa in the studied patient population suggests that the majority of CF patients cared for at the VGH acquire P. aeruginosa from environmental sources. It may be concluded that implemented infection control guidelines have been successful in preventing nosocomial transmission of P. aeruginosa among CF patients within the VGH and patient-to-patient transmission outside the hospital. Chronic polyclonal infection/colonization was rare in the study population. PMID:25285264

  4. [Properties of a nitrite reductase inhibitor protein from Pseudomonas aeruginosa].

    PubMed

    Karapetian, A V; Nalbandian, R M

    1993-08-01

    The amino acid composition and major physico-chemical properties of the "nonblue" copper protein isolated earlier from Pseudomonas aeruginosa have been determined. It has been found that the azurin oxidase, cytochrome c551 oxidase and superoxide dismutase activities of the enzyme are inhibited by this protein. The inhibition seems to be due to the protein interaction with the electron-accepting center of nitrite reductase.

  5. In Vitro Activities of Eight Antifungal Drugs against a Global Collection of Genotyped Exserohilum Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Curfs-Breuker, Ilse; Madrid, Hugo; de Hoog, G. Sybren

    2015-01-01

    The in vitro susceptibilities of 24 worldwide Exserohilum isolates belonging to 10 species from human and environmental sources were determined for eight antifungal drugs. The strains were characterized by internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequencing and amplified fragment length polymorphism fingerprinting. Posaconazole had the lowest geometric mean MIC (0.16 μg/ml), followed by micafungin (0.21 μg/ml), amphotericin B (0.24 μg/ml), itraconazole (0.33 μg/ml), voriconazole (0.8 μg/ml), caspofungin (1.05 μg/ml), isavuconazole (1.38 μg/ml), and fluconazole (15.6 μg/ml). PMID:26239995

  6. Isolation of Elaeagnus-compatible Frankia from soils collected in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Gtari, Maher; Brusetti, Lorenzo; Skander, Gharbi; Mora, Diego; Boudabous, Abdellatif; Daffonchio, Daniele

    2004-05-15

    The occurrence and diversity of Frankia nodulating Elaeagnus angustifolia in Tunisia were evaluated in 30 soils from different regions by a Frankia-capturing assay. Despite the absence of actinorhizal plants in 24 of the 30 soils, nodules were captured from all the samples. Eight pure strains were isolated from single colonies grown in agar medium. On the basis of 16S rRNA and GlnII sequences, seven strains were clustered with Frankia, colonizing Elaeagnaceae and Rhamnaceae in two different phylogenetic groups while one strain described a new lineage in the Frankia assemblage, indicating that Frankia strains genetically diverse from previously known Elaeagnus-infective strains are present in tunisian soils. Genomic fingerprinting determined by rep-PCR, and tDNA-PCR-SSCP, confirmed the wide genetic diversity of the strains.

  7. Molecular characterization of a collection of Neisseria meningitidis isolates from Croatia, June 2009 to January 2014.

    PubMed

    Bukovski, Suzana; Vacca, Paola; Anselmo, Anna; Knezovic, Ivica; Fazio, Cecilia; Neri, Arianna; Ciammaruconi, Andrea; Fortunato, Antonella; Palozzi, Anna Maria; Fillo, Silvia; Lista, Florigio; Stefanelli, Paola

    2016-09-01

    In the last decade, the incidence of invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) in Croatia remained stable at approximately 1 case per 100 000 inhabitants, affecting mainly children aged ≤5 years. We report the molecular characterization of meningococci causing IMD occurring from June 2009 to January 2014 in Croatia. Genomic DNA from 50 clinical isolates was analysed for serogroup, multilocus sequence typing and allele type of the two outer membrane protein genes, porA and the iron-regulated fetA. Furthermore, 22 of them were characterized by using whole-genome sequencing to define the meningococcal vaccine four-component meningococcal serogroup B (4CMenB) antigen genes factor H-binding protein (fHbp), Neisseria heparin-binding antigen (nhba) and Neisseria adhesin A (nadA) and the antimicrobial target resistance genes for penicillin (penicillin binding protein 2, penA), ciprofloxacin (DNA gyrase subunit A, gyrA) and rifampicin (β-subunit of RNA polymerase, rpoB). The Etest was used to phenotypically determine the antimicrobial susceptibility of isolated meningococci. The main serogroup/clonal complex combinations were MenB cc41/44, MenC/cc11, MenW/cc174 and MenY/cc23. PorA P1.7-2, FetA F5-5 and F1-5 were the most represented through the serogroups. Meningococci with decreased susceptibility to penicillin (38.9 %) and one strain resistant to ciprofloxacin were identified. Forty-two percent of MenB showed the presence of at least one of the 4CMenB vaccine antigens (fHbp, NHBA, NadA and PorA). Our findings highlight the genetic variability of meningococci causing IMD in Croatia, especially for the serogroup B. Molecular-based characterization of meningococci is crucial to enhance IMD surveillance and to better plan national immunization programmes.

  8. Low occurrence of the new species Staphylococcus argenteus in a Staphylococcus aureus collection of human isolates from Belgium.

    PubMed

    Argudín, M A; Dodémont, M; Vandendriessche, S; Rottiers, S; Tribes, C; Roisin, S; de Mendonça, R; Nonhoff, C; Deplano, A; Denis, O

    2016-06-01

    Staphylococcus argenteus is a novel Staphylococcus species closely related to Staphylococcus aureus that has been recently described. In this study, we investigated the proportion and the characteristics of S. argenteus recovered from humans in Belgium. S. aureus. human isolates collected in Belgium from 2006 to 2015 (n = 1,903) were retrospectively characterised via the presence of non-pigmented colonies on chocolate agar, spa typing and rpoB sequencing to determine if some of them were in fact S. argenteus. Out of 73 strains non-pigmented on chocolate plates, 3 isolates (0.16 %) showed rpoB sequences, in addition to spa and sequence types (ST2250/t5787, ST2250/t6675, ST3240/t6675), related to S. argenteus. Two of them were methicillin-resistant, harbouring a SCCmec type IV. The three S. argenteus isolates carried genes (sak, scn) of the immune evasion cluster. This first Belgian nationwide analysis showed a low occurrence of S. argenteus. Further studies should be conducted to identify the distribution range and the clinical impact of this new species.

  9. [Hospital infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Significance in intensive therapy].

    PubMed

    Sidorenko, S V; Gel'fand, E B; Mamontova, O A

    1999-01-01

    The significance of P. aeruginosa as an agent of hospital infections in intensive care departments is determined by high prevalence of this microorganism, its natural and acquired resistance to antibiotics of various groups, and severity of the infection it induces. The resistance of P. aeruginosa to antibiotics is different in different regions. Among the strains isolated in Moscow in intensive care wards for newborns 9% were resistant to meropenem, 10% to amicacine, 15% to imipramine, 16% to cefepime, 37% to ceftasidime, 45% to piperacylline/tasobactam, 45% to ciprofloxacine, and 60% to gentamicin; 1.5% of these strains were resistant to all tested antibiotics. High prevalence of antibiotic resistance among P. aeruginosa impedes the choice of drugs for empirical antibiotic therapy and increases the significance of microbiological diagnosis. Even if an agent is sensitive to such antibiotics as semisynthetic penicillines and aminoglycosides, their use as monotherapy in infections caused by P. aeruginosa is ineffective. Carbapenemes, III- IV generations cefalosporines, and fluoroquinolones can be used as mono therapy.

  10. Second harmonic generation imaging of corneal stroma after infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Danielle M.; Rogers, Nathan A.; Petroll, W. Matthew; Zhu, Meifang

    2017-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a pathogenic gram-negative organism that has the ability to cause blinding corneal infections following trauma and during contact lens wear. In this study, we investigated the directional movement and orientation of an invasive corneal isolate of P. aeruginosa in the corneal stroma during infection of ex vivo and in vivo rabbit corneas using multiphoton fluorescence and second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging. Ex vivo, rabbit corneas were subject to three partial thickness wounds prior to inoculation. In vivo, New Zealand white rabbits were fit with P. aeruginosa laden contact lenses in the absence of a penetrating wound. At all time points tested, infiltration of the corneal stroma by P. aeruginosa revealed a high degree of alignment between the bacteria and collagen lamellae ex vivo (p < 0.001). In vivo, P. aeruginosa traveled throughout the stroma in discrete regions or bands. Within each region, the bacteria showed good alignment with collagen lamellae (P = 0.002). Interestingly, in both the in vitro and in vivo models, P. aeruginosa did not appear to cross the corneal limbus. Taken together, our findings suggest that P. aeruginosa exploits the precise spacing of collagen lamellae in the central cornea to facilitate spread throughout the stroma.

  11. Collective concerted motion in a molecular adlayer visualized through the surface diffusion of isolated vacancies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, Christian; Otero, Roberto; Écija, David; Trelka, Marta; Martín, Nazario; Gallego, José M.; Miranda, Rodolfo

    2016-10-01

    We have measured STM movies to study the diffusion of individual vacancies in a self-assembled layer of a tetrathiafulvalene derivative (exTTF) on Au(111) at room temperature. The diffusion is anisotropic, being faster along the compact direction of the molecular lattice. A detailed analysis of the anisotropic displacement distribution of the single vacancies shows that the relative abundance of double jumps (that is, the collective motion of molecular dimers) with respect to single jumps is rather large, the number of double jumps being more than 20% of the diffusion events. We conjecture that the relative abundances of long jumps might be related to the strength of the intermolecular bonding and the misfit of the molecular overlayer with the substrate lattice.

  12. Pseudomonas aeruginosa: breaking down barriers.

    PubMed

    Berube, Bryan J; Rangel, Stephanie M; Hauser, Alan R

    2016-02-01

    Many bacterial pathogens have evolved ingenious ways to escape from the lung during pneumonia to cause bacteremia. Unfortunately, the clinical consequences of this spread to the bloodstream are frequently dire. It is therefore important to understand the molecular mechanisms used by pathogens to breach the lung barrier. We have recently shown that Pseudomonas aeruginosa, one of the leading causes of hospital-acquired pneumonia, utilizes the type III secretion system effector ExoS to intoxicate pulmonary epithelial cells. Injection of these cells leads to localized disruption of the pulmonary-vascular barrier and dissemination of P. aeruginosa to the bloodstream. We put these data in the context of previous studies to provide a holistic model of P. aeruginosa dissemination from the lung. Finally, we compare P. aeruginosa dissemination to that of other bacteria to highlight the complexity of bacterial pneumonia. Although respiratory pathogens use distinct and intricate strategies to escape from the lungs, a thorough understanding of these processes can lay the foundation for new therapeutic approaches for bacterial pneumonia.

  13. Carbapenem resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii in the nosocomial setting in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Labarca, Jaime A; Salles, Mauro José Costa; Seas, Carlos; Guzmán-Blanco, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Increasing prevalence of carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii strains in the nosocomial setting in Latin America represents an emerging challenge to public health, as the range of therapeutic agents active against these pathogens becomes increasingly constrained. We review published reports from 2002 to 2013, compiling data from throughout the region on prevalence, mechanisms of resistance and molecular epidemiology of carbapenem-resistant strains of P. aeruginosa and A. baumannii. We find rates of carbapenem resistance up to 66% for P. aeruginosa and as high as 90% for A. baumannii isolates across the different countries of Latin America, with the resistance rate of A. baumannii isolates greater than 50% in many countries. An outbreak of the SPM-1 carbapenemase is a chief cause of resistance in P. aeruginosa strains in Brazil. Elsewhere in Latin America, members of the VIM family are the most important carbapenemases among P. aeruginosa strains. Carbapenem resistance in A. baumannii in Latin America is predominantly due to the oxacillinases OXA-23, OXA-58 and (in Brazil) OXA-143. Susceptibility of P. aeruginosa and A. baumannii to colistin remains high, however, development of resistance has already been detected in some countries. Better epidemiological data are needed to design effective infection control interventions.

  14. Occurrence and antibacterial susceptibility pattern of bacterial pathogens isolated from diarrheal patients in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Rasool, Muhammad H.; Siddique, Abu B.; Saqalein, Muhammad; Asghar, Muhammad J.; Zahoor, Muhammad A.; Aslam, Bilal; Shafiq, Humerah B.; Nisar, Muhammad A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the occurrence of bacterial pathogens responsible for diarrhea and to engender information regarding the effectiveness of commonly used antibiotic against diarrhea. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted between April and July 2014. Samples were collected from the Divisional Headquarter and Allied Hospital, Faisalabad, Pakistan. The differential and selective media were used to isolate bacterial pathogens, which were identified through cultural characteristics, microscopy, and biochemical tests. Disc diffusion assay was carried out using Muller Hinton agar medium, and minimum inhibitory concentration was determined using broth dilution method against isolated pathogens. Results: One hundred and forty-one (100%) samples were positive for some bacteria. Frequency of occurrence was Bacillus cereus (B. cereus) (66%), Escherichia coli (E. coli) (48.5%), Salmonella typhi (S. Typhi) (27.7%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) (8.5%), and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) (4.3%). Single pathogen was detected in 20 (14.2%) samples whereas combinations were found in 121 (85.8%) samples. Bacillus cereus and E. coli were the most frequently detected pathogens followed by the S. Typhi, P. aeruginosa, and Staph. aureus. The percentage occurrence of isolated pathogens was 31% in B. cereus, 31% in E. coli, 18% in S. Typhi, 5% in P. aeruginosa, and 3% in Staph. aureus. Conclusion: Pseudomonas aeruginosa showed resistance against Amoxicillin and Cefotaxime, whereas S. aureus was found resistant against Cefotaxime. Statistical analysis using one way Analysis of Variance revealed that Ofloxacin and Gentamicin had significant (p<0.05) differences against all isolates as compared with other antibiotics used in this study. PMID:26905349

  15. Mechanisms responsible for the emergence of carbapenem resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Meletis, G; Exindari, M; Vavatsi, N; Sofianou, D; Diza, E

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) is an opportunistic pathogen associated with a range of nosocomial infections. This microorganism is noted for its intrinsic resistance to antibiotics and for its ability to acquire genes encoding resistance determinants. Among the beta-lactam antibiotics, carbapenems with antipseudomonal activity are important agents for the therapy of infections due to P. aeruginosa. The development of carbapenem resistance among P. aeruginosa strains is multifactorial. Plasmid or integron-mediated carbapenemases, increased expression of efflux systems, reduced porin expression and increased chromosomal cephalosporinase activity have all been defined as contributory factors. Phenotypic tests and molecular techniques are used for the characterization of the resistance determinants. The isolation of carbapenem resistant strains is alarming and requires the implementation of strict infection control measures in order to prevent the spread of carbapenemase encoding genes to unrelated clones or to other bacterial species. PMID:23935307

  16. Diverse effects of Galleria mellonella infection with entomopathogenic and clinical strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Andrejko, Mariola; Zdybicka-Barabas, Agnieszka; Cytryńska, Małgorzata

    2014-01-01

    In numerous studies, the greater wax moth Galleria mellonella has been exploited as an alternative model host for investigating virulence factors of different pathogenic bacteria. In the present paper, we provide evidence that G. mellonella constitutes a useful and convenient model for analysis of the pathogenicity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical strains. In this in vivo study on the G. mellonella–P. aeruginosa interaction, a bidirectional analysis comprising evaluation of humoral immune response of the bacteria-infected larvae and determination of P. aeruginosa proteinases synthesized during the infection was performed. The effects of G. mellonella infection by two clinical strains (PA C124/9 and PA 02/18) and one entomopathogenic strain (ATCC 27853) cultured in a rich LB and minimal M9 medium, known to induce synthesis of different sets of extracellular proteinases, were evaluated. Both clinical isolates were able to establish infection in G. mellonella caterpillars after intrahemocelic injection. However, although the final effect of the larvae infection by each P. aeruginosa strain was their death within ca. 48 h, considerable strain and medium-dependent differences in the immune response of the insects were detected. The results indicated that G. mellonella larvae distinguished between the three P. aeruginosa strains, which was well reflected by the diverse humoral immune response. The significant differences concerned, among others, the level of phenoloxidase, lysozyme, and antibacterial activity in the hemolymph of the infected insects. An analysis of proteinases performed using specific activity tests, zymography and immunoblotting, revealed that elastase B and alkaline protease were synthesized by each P. aeruginosa strain during the infection. In contrast, a high level of elastase A activity was detected only in the larvae infected by the P. aeruginosa ATCC 27853 strain. It can be postulated that the three P. aeruginosa strains exploit different

  17. Population Structure of Clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa from West and Central African Countries

    PubMed Central

    Cholley, Pascal; Ka, Roughyatou; Guyeux, Christophe; Thouverez, Michelle; Guessennd, Nathalie; Ghebremedhin, Beniam; Frank, Thierry; Bertrand, Xavier; Hocquet, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) has a non-clonal, epidemic population with a few widely distributed and frequently encountered sequence types (STs) called ‘high-risk clusters’. Clinical P. aeruginosa (clinPA) has been studied in all inhabited continents excepted in Africa, where a very few isolates have been analyzed. Here, we characterized a collection of clinPA isolates from four countries of West and Central Africa. Methodology 184 non-redundant isolates of clinPA from hospitals of Senegal, Ivory Coast, Nigeria, and Central African Republic were genotyped by MLST. We assessed their resistance level to antibiotics by agar diffusion and identified the extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) and metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs) by sequencing. The population structure of the species was determined by a nucleotide-based analysis of the entire PA MLST database and further localized on the phylogenetic tree (i) the sequence types (STs) of the present collection, (ii) the STs by continents, (iii) ESBL- and MBL-producing STs from the MLST database. Principal Findings We found 80 distinct STs, of which 24 had no relationship with any known STs. ‘High-risk’ international clonal complexes (CC155, CC244, CC235) were frequently found in West and Central Africa. The five VIM-2-producing isolates belonged to CC233 and CC244. GES-1 and GES-9 enzymes were produced by one CC235 and one ST1469 isolate, respectively. We showed the spread of ‘high-risk’ international clonal complexes, often described as multidrug-resistant on other continents, with a fully susceptible phenotype. The MBL- and ESBL-producing STs were scattered throughout the phylogenetic tree and our data suggest a poor association between a continent and a specific phylogroup. Conclusions ESBL- and MBL-encoding genes are borne by both successful international clonal complexes and distinct local STs in clinPA of West and Central Africa. Furthermore, our data suggest that the spread of a ST could be

  18. Zingerone silences quorum sensing and attenuates virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Lokender; Chhibber, Sanjay; Kumar, Rajnish; Kumar, Manoj; Harjai, Kusum

    2015-04-01

    Quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa plays an imperative role in virulence factor, biofilm formation and antimicrobial resistance. Blocking quorum sensing pathways are viewed as viable anti-virulent therapy in association with traditional antimicrobial therapy. Anti-quorum sensing dietary phytochemicals with may prove to be a safe and viable choice as anti-virulent drug candidates. Previously, our lab proved zingerone as potent anti-biofilm agent hence; further its anti-virulent and anti-quorum activities were evaluated. Zingerone, besides decreasing swimming, swarming and twitching phenotypes of P. aeruginosa PAO1, reduced biofilm forming capacity and production of virulence factors including rhamnolipid, elastase, protease, pyocyanin, cell free and cell bound hemolysin (p<0.001) indicating anti-virulent property attributing towards attenuation of virulence of P. aeruginosa. Further zingerone not only had marked effect on the production of quorum sensing signal molecules by clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa but also showed significant interference with the activation of QS reporter strains. To study the mechanism of blocking quorum sensing cascade, in silico analysis was carried out. Anti-QS activity was attributed to interference with the ligand receptor interaction of zingerone with QS receptors (TraR, LasR, RhlR and PqsR). Zingerone showed a good comparative docking score to respective autoinducer molecules which was even higher than that of vanillin, a proven anti-quorum sensing phytochemical. The results of the present study revealed the anti-quorum sensing activity of zingerone targeting ligand-receptor interaction, hence proposing zingerone as a suitable anti-virulent drug candidate against P. aeruginosa infections.

  19. Anti-Pseudomonas aeruginosa IgY antibodies promote bacterial opsonization and augment the phagocytic activity of polymorphonuclear neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Thomsen, Kim; Christophersen, Lars; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Moser, Claus; Høiby, Niels

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Moderation of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) as part of a critical defense against invading pathogens may offer a promising therapeutic approach to supplement the antibiotic eradication of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in non-chronically infected cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. We have observed that egg yolk antibodies (IgY) harvested from White leghorn chickens that target P. aeruginosa opsonize the pathogen and enhance the PMN-mediated respiratory burst and subsequent bacterial killing in vitro. The effects on PMN phagocytic activity were observed in different Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains, including clinical isolates from non-chronically infected CF patients. Thus, oral prophylaxis with anti-Pseudomonas aeruginosa IgY may boost the innate immunity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the CF setting by facilitating a rapid and prompt bacterial clearance by PMNs. PMID:26901841

  20. COMPARATIVE TAXONOMY OF CRYSTALLOGENIC STRAINS OF PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA AND PSEUDOMONAS CHLORORAPHIS

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, William C.; Rhodes, Lenora J.

    1962-01-01

    Haynes, William C. (Northern Utilization Research and Development Division, Peoria, Ill.) and Lenora J. Rhodes. Comparative taxonomy of crystallogenic strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas chlororaphis. J. Bacteriol. 84:1080–1084. 1962.—Only 11 of 39 strains received in the Agricultural Research Service Culture Collection under the designation Pseudonomas chlororaphis proved to be authentic; 28 were typical, pyocyanogenic strains of P. aeruginosa. The reason for this disproportionately high rate of misidentification apparently arises from an erroneous belief that the ability to produce green and yellow crystals of chlororaphin and oxychlororaphin is confined to P. chlororaphis. The ability of many strains of P. aeruginosa to do likewise is not well known. Inasmuch as the characteristic is not unique to P. chlororaphis, other criteria are required to distinguish crystallogenic strains of these species. After a taxonomic comparison of 18 strains of P. chlororaphis and 47 crystallogenic strains of P. aeruginosa, it was determined that there are three main distinctions: (i) P. aeruginosa grows well at 42 C but fails to grow upon serial transfer at 5 C, whereas P. chlororaphis fails to grow at 42 C, but grows well at 5 C: (ii) most strains of P. aeruginosa produce pyocyanin, whereas P. chlororaphis strains do not; (iii) P. aeruginosa cells possess only one or two polar flagella, whereas P. chlororaphis usually has at least four, sometimes as many as eight, polar flagella. PMID:13963593

  1. Metabolic profile of sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) biodegradation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MTCC 10311).

    PubMed

    Ambily, P S; Jisha, M S

    2014-09-01

    Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) is one of the main components in the detergent and cosmetic industries. Its bioremediation by suitable microorganism has received greater attention. Pseudomonas aeruginosa MTCC 10311 was isolated from detergent contaminated soil which had degraded 96% of SDS in 48 hrs. Attempts were made to study the metabolic byproducts of SDS degradation using GC-MS analysis. Analysis of ether extracts of surfactant established the sequential production of Dodecanol, Dodecanal and Decanoic acid. At this point, the pathway diverged into the formation of acid residues through beta oxidation. This SDS degrading isolate, Pseudomonas aeruginosa can be exploited for decontamination of detergent contaminated waste water.

  2. Nosocomial outbreak of Pseudomonas aeruginosa associated with a drinking water fountain.

    PubMed

    Costa, D; Bousseau, A; Thevenot, S; Dufour, X; Laland, C; Burucoa, C; Castel, O

    2015-11-01

    Over a four-month period, ten patients were suspected of having acquired nosocomial infection to P. aeruginosa in the ear, nose, and throat department. Environmental and clinical isolates were compared. Only water from a drinking water fountain was contaminated by P. aeruginosa. This isolate and those of three patients had indistinguishable random amplified polymorphic DNA profiles. These patients had serious oncology diseases. The drinking water fountain was used for their alimentation by percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy and was the origin of the outbreak. Another type of drinking fountain with a terminal ultraviolet treatment was installed, following which no new infections linked to drinking water were identified.

  3. Wide Dissemination of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Producing β-Lactamase blaKPC-2 Gene in Colombia▿

    PubMed Central

    Cuzon, Gaelle; Naas, Thierry; Villegas, Maria-Virginia; Correa, Adriana; Quinn, John P.; Nordmann, Patrice

    2011-01-01

    Ten blaKPC-2-harboring Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from hospitals located in five different Colombian cities have been characterized. Isolates were multidrug resistant, belonged to five different pulsotypes, and possessed naturally chromosome-encoded blaAmpC and blaOXA-50 genes and the acquired blaKPC-2 gene. In most cases, the blaKPC-2 genes were carried by plasmids of different sizes and were associated with Tn4401b or a new structure containing only part of the Tn4401 sequence. This study revealed that several clones of P. aeruginosa producing blaKPC-2 are disseminating in Colombia. PMID:21844315

  4. Wide dissemination of Pseudomonas aeruginosa producing beta-lactamase blaKPC-2 gene in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Cuzon, Gaelle; Naas, Thierry; Villegas, Maria-Virginia; Correa, Adriana; Quinn, John P; Nordmann, Patrice

    2011-11-01

    Ten bla(KPC-2)-harboring Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from hospitals located in five different Colombian cities have been characterized. Isolates were multidrug resistant, belonged to five different pulsotypes, and possessed naturally chromosome-encoded bla(AmpC) and bla(OXA-50) genes and the acquired bla(KPC-2) gene. In most cases, the bla(KPC-2) genes were carried by plasmids of different sizes and were associated with Tn4401b or a new structure containing only part of the Tn4401 sequence. This study revealed that several clones of P. aeruginosa producing bla(KPC-2) are disseminating in Colombia.

  5. Flagellin induces myeloid-derived suppressor cells: implications for Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in cystic fibrosis lung disease.

    PubMed

    Rieber, Nikolaus; Brand, Alina; Hector, Andreas; Graepler-Mainka, Ute; Ost, Michael; Schäfer, Iris; Wecker, Irene; Neri, Davide; Wirth, Andreas; Mays, Lauren; Zundel, Sabine; Fuchs, Jörg; Handgretinger, Rupert; Stern, Martin; Hogardt, Michael; Döring, Gerd; Riethmüller, Joachim; Kormann, Michael; Hartl, Dominik

    2013-02-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa persists in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and drives CF lung disease progression. P. aeruginosa potently activates the innate immune system, mainly mediated through pathogen-associated molecular patterns, such as flagellin. However, the host is unable to eradicate this flagellated bacterium efficiently. The underlying immunological mechanisms are incompletely understood. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are innate immune cells generated in cancer and proinflammatory microenvironments and are capable of suppressing T cell responses. We hypothesized that P. aeruginosa induces MDSCs to escape T cell immunity. In this article, we demonstrate that granulocytic MDSCs accumulate in CF patients chronically infected with P. aeruginosa and correlate with CF lung disease activity. Flagellated P. aeruginosa culture supernatants induced the generation of MDSCs, an effect that was 1) dose-dependently mimicked by purified flagellin protein, 2) significantly reduced using flagellin-deficient P. aeruginosa bacteria, and 3) corresponded to TLR5 expression on MDSCs in vitro and in vivo. Both purified flagellin and flagellated P. aeruginosa induced an MDSC phenotype distinct from that of the previously described MDSC-inducing cytokine GM-CSF, characterized by an upregulation of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 on the surface of MDSCs. Functionally, P. aeruginosa-infected CF patient ex vivo-isolated as well as flagellin or P. aeruginosa in vitro-generated MDSCs efficiently suppressed polyclonal T cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner and modulated Th17 responses. These studies demonstrate that flagellin induces the generation of MDSCs and suggest that P. aeruginosa uses this mechanism to undermine T cell-mediated host defense in CF and other P. aeruginosa-associated chronic lung diseases.

  6. Transport of Aromatic Amino Acids by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Kay, W. W.; Gronlund, Audrey F.

    1971-01-01

    Kinetic studies of the transport of aromatic amino acids by Pseudomonas aeruginosa revealed the existence of two high-affinity transport systems which recognized the three aromatic amino acids. From competition data and studies on the exchange of preformed aromatic amino acid pools, the first transport system was found to be functional with phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan (in order of decreasing activity), whereas the second system was active with tryptophan, phenylalanine, and tyrosine. The two systems also transported a number of aromatic amino acid analogues but not other amino acids. Mutants defective in each of the two and in both transport systems were isolated and described. When the amino acids were added at low external concentrations to cells growing logarithmically in glucose minimal medium, the tryptophan pool very quickly became saturated. Under identical conditions, phenylalanine and tyrosine each accumulated in the intracellular pool of P. aeruginosa at a concentration which was 10 times greater than that of tryptophan. PMID:4994029

  7. Production and characterization of the slime polysaccharide of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Evans, L R; Linker, A

    1973-11-01

    The slime polysaccharides produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from a variety of human infections were investigated. Slime production in culture seemed optimal when adequate amounts of carbohydrate were present and under conditions of either high osmotic pressure or inadequate protein supply. The polysaccharides produced by the organisms were similar to each other, to the slime of Azotobacter vinelandii, and to seaweed alginic acids. They were composed of beta-1,4-linked d-mannuronic acid residues and variable amounts of its 5-epimer l-guluronic acid. All bacterial polymers contained o-acetyl groups which are absent in the alginates. The polysaccharides differed considerably in the ratio of mannuronic to guluronic acid content and in the number of o-acetyl groups. The particular composition of the slime was not found to be characteristic for the disease process from which the mucoid variants of P. aeruginosa were obtained.

  8. Ambroxol interferes with Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qi; Yu, Jialin; Yang, Xiqiang; Wang, Jiarong; Wang, Lijia; Lin, Yayin; Lin, Lihua

    2010-09-01

    The mucolytic agent ambroxol has been reported to interfere with the formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa-derived biofilms in addition to reducing alginate production by undefined mechanisms. Since quorum sensing is a key regulator of virulence and biofilm formation, we examined the effects of ambroxol on P. aeruginosa PAO1 wild-type bacterial clearance rates, adhesion profiles and biofilm formation compared with the quorum sensing-deficient, double-mutant strains DeltalasR DeltarhlR and DeltalasI DeltarhlI. Data presented in this report demonstrated that ambroxol treatment reduced survival rates of the double-mutant strains compared with the wild-type strain in a dose-dependent manner even though the double-mutants had increased adhesion in the presence of ambroxol compared with the wild-type strain. The PAO1 wild-type strain produced a significantly thicker biofilm (21.64+/-0.57 microm) compared with the biofilms produced by the DeltalasR DeltarhlR (7.36+/-0.2 microm) and DeltalasI DeltarhlI (6.62+/-0.31 microm) isolates. Ambroxol treatment reduced biofilm thickness, increased areal porosity, and decreased the average diffusion distance and textual entropy of wild-type and double-mutant strains. However, compared with the double-mutant strains, the changes observed for the wild-type strain were more clearly defined. Finally, ambroxol exhibited significant antagonistic quorum-sensing properties, suggesting that it could be adapted for use clinically in the treatment of cystic fibrosis and to reduce biofilm formation and in the colonisation of indwelling devices.

  9. Co-incubation of Acanthamoeba castellanii with strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa alters the survival of amoeba.

    PubMed

    Cengiz, A M; Harmis, N; Stapleton, F

    2000-06-01

    Enhanced survival of Acanthamoeba castellanii has previously been reported following co-incubation with a single strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of different strains of P. aeruginosa on amoebae survival. Four contact lens solutions were challenged with A. castellanii for between 6 and 24 h, and survival rates of amoeba were calculated. Subsequently, A. castellanii was co-incubated with different strains of P. aeruginosa (strain 6294, an invasive isolate; 6206, a cytotoxic isolate; and Paer 001, a null isolate). Differences in amoeba survival over time between solutions for each bacterial strain were analysed. Non-neutralized hydrogen peroxide was the most effective system against A. castellani at all time points (P<0.05). Survival rates were not different between multipurpose solutions and neutralized hydrogen peroxide. Co-incubation with P. aeruginosa altered amoeba survival, and maximum survival occurred in the presence of the invasive strain of P. aeruginosa. Enhanced amoeba survival may occur in the presence of certain strains of Gram-negative bacteria, and with certain types of contact lens disinfection systems.

  10. Analysis of S-adenosylmethionine and related sulfur metabolites in bacterial isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (BAA-47) by liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization coupled to a hybrid linear quadrupole ion trap and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cataldi, Tommaso R I; Bianco, Giuliana; Abate, Salvatore; Mattia, Daniela

    2009-11-01

    A comprehensive and highly selective method for detecting in bacterial supernatants a modified sulfur nucleoside, S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM), and its metabolites, i.e., S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH), adenosine (Ado), 5'-deoxy-5'-methylthioadenosine (MTA), adenine (Ade), S-adenosyl-methioninamine (dcSAM), homocysteine (Hcy) and methionine (Met), was developed. The method is based on reversed-phase liquid chromatography with positive electrospray ionization (ESI+) coupled to a hybrid linear quadrupole ion trap (LTQ) and 7-T Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICRMS). A gradient elution was employed with a binary solvent of 0.05 M ammonium formate at pH 4 and acetonitrile. The assay involves a simultaneous cleanup of cell-free bacterial broths by solid-phase extraction and trace enrichment of metabolites with a 50-fold concentration factor by using immobilized phenylboronic and anion-exchange cartridges. While the quantitative determination of SAM was performed using stable-isotope-labeled SAM-d3 as an internal standard, in the case of Met and Ade, Met-13C and Ade-15N2 were employed as isotope-labeled internal standards, respectively. This method enabled the identification of SAM and its metabolites in cell-free culture of Pseudomonas aeruginosa grown in Davis minimal broth (formulation without sulphur organic compounds), with routine sub-ppm mass accuracies (-0.27 +/- 0.68 ppm). The resulting contents of S(C)S(S)-SAM, S(S)-dcSAM, MTA, Ado and Met in the free-cell supernatant of P. aeruginosa was 56.4 +/- 2.1 nM, 32.2 +/- 2.2 nM, 0.91 +/- 0.10 nM, 19.6 +/- 1.2 nM and 1.93 +/- 0.02 microM (mean +/- SD, n = 4 extractions), respectively. We report also the baseline separation (Rs > or = 1.5) of both diastereoisomeric forms of SAM (S(C)S(S) and S(C)R(S)) and dcSAM (S(S) and R(S)), which can be very useful to establish the relationship between the biologically active versus the inactive species, S(C)S(S)/S(C)R(S) and S(S)/R(S) of SAM and dc

  11. Molecular epidemiology of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in adult patients with cystic fibrosis in Northern Ireland.

    PubMed

    Clarke, L; Moore, J E; Millar, B C; Crowe, M; Xu, J; Goldsmith, C E; Murphy, R G; Dooley, J S G; Rendall, J; Elborn, J S

    2008-01-01

    Isolates (n = 51) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa obtained from the sputa of 29 adult patients attending the Regional Cystic Fibrosis Centre in Northern Ireland were compared using an enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus sequence (ERIC2) primer in a random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. Resulting banding patterns showed a high degree of genetic heterogeneity among all isolates from the patients examined, suggesting a non-clonal relationship between isolates from these patients, when employing this genotyping technique.

  12. Resistance to pefloxacin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Michea-Hamzehpour, M; Lucain, C; Pechere, J C

    1991-01-01

    Mechanisms of resistance to pefloxacin were investigated in four isogenic Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains: S (parent isolate; MIC, 2 micrograms/ml), PT1 and PT2 (posttherapy isolates obtained in animals; MICs, 32 and 128 micrograms/ml, respectively), and PT2-r (posttherapy isolate obtained after six in vitro subpassages of PT2; MIC, 32 micrograms/ml). [2-3H]adenine incorporation (indirect evidence of DNA gyrase activity) in EDTA-permeabilized cells was less affected by pefloxacin in PT2 and PT2-r (50% inhibitory concentration, 0.27 and 0.26 microgram/ml, respectively) than it was in S and PT1 (50% inhibitory concentration, 0.04 and 0.05 microgram/ml, respectively). Reduced [14C]pefloxacin labeling of intact cells in strains PT1 and PT2 correlated with more susceptibility to EDTA and the presence of more calcium (P less than 0.05) and phosphorus in the outer membrane fractions. Outer membrane protein analysis showed reduced expression of protein D2 (47 kDa) in strains PT1 and PT2. Other proteins were apparently similar in all strains. The addition of calcium chloride (2 mM) to the sodium dodecyl sulfate-solubilized samples of outer membrane proteins, before heating and Western blotting, probed with monoclonal antibody anti-OmpF showed electrophoretic mobility changes of OmpF in strains PT1 and PT2 which were not seen in strain S. Calcium-induced changes were reversed with ethyleneglycoltetraacetate. Decreased [14C]pefloxacin labeling was further correlated with an altered lipopolysaccharide pattern and increased 3-deoxy-D-mannooctulosonic acid concentration (P less than 0.01). These findings suggested that resistance to pefloxacin is associated with altered DNA gyrase in strain PT2-r, with altered permeability in PT1, and with both mechanisms in PT2. The decreased expression of protein D2 and the higher calcium and lipopolysaccharide contents of the outer membrane could be responsible for the permeability deficiency in P. aeruginosa. Images PMID:1645509

  13. Phosphate taxis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Kato, J; Ito, A; Nikata, T; Ohtake, H

    1992-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa was shown to be attracted to phosphate. The chemotactic response was induced by phosphate starvation. The specificity of chemoreceptors for phosphate was high so that no other tested phosphorus compounds elicited a chemotactic response as strong as that elicited by phosphate. Competition experiments showed that the chemoreceptors for phosphate appeared to be different from those for the common amino acids. Mutants constitutive for alkaline phosphatase showed the chemotactic response to phosphate regardless of whether the cells were starved for phosphate.

  14. A study on the effect of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in semen on bovine fertility.

    PubMed Central

    Eaglesome, M D; Garcia, M M; Bielanski, A B

    1995-01-01

    Two experiments were done to demonstrate whether the presence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in bovine semen could affect fertilization and/or early embryonic development. In the first experiment, superovulated heifers were inseminated with semen naturally contaminated with P. aeruginosa (ADRI 102) or clean semen and seven day-old embryos were collected nonsurgically. The endometrium of treated heifers appeared more sensitive to the flush procedures. In experiment 2, heifers were inseminated at synchronized estrus with semen experimentally contaminated with P. aeruginosa (ADRI 102) and processed in the same way as commercial semen with antibiotics (gentamicin, lincomycin, spectinomycin and tylosin) or processed without antibiotics added. Embryos were recovered at slaughter seven days later. In general, there was no significant reduction in fertility or development of embryos in vitro as a result of relatively high numbers of P. aeruginosa in bovine semen. PMID:7704848

  15. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Airway Infection Recruits and Modulates Neutrophilic Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Öz, Hasan H.; Zhou, Benyuan; Voss, Pina; Carevic, Melanie; Schroth, Carolin; Frey, Nina; Rieber, Nikolaus; Hector, Andreas; Hartl, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that causes infections mainly in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. Despite innate and adaptive immune responses upon infection, P. aeruginosa is capable of efficiently escaping host defenses, but the underlying immune mechanisms remain poorly understood. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are innate immune cells that are functionally characterized by their potential to suppress T- and natural killer (NK)-cell responses. Here we demonstrate, using an airway in vivo infection model, that P. aeruginosa recruits and activates neutrophilic MDSCs, which functionally suppress T-cell responses. We further show that the CF gene defect (CF transmembrane conductance regulator, CFTR) modulates the functionality, but not the recruitment or generation of neutrophilic MDSCs. Collectively, we define a mechanism by which P. aeruginosa airway infection undermines host immunity by modulating neutrophilic MDSCs in vivo. PMID:27965936

  16. Mutations of β-tubulin codon 198 or 200 indicate thiabendazole resistance among isolates of Penicillium digitatum collected from citrus in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lee, Miin-Huey; Pan, Shiah-Mei; Ngu, Thieng Wui; Ng, Tieng-Wui; Chen, Po-Sheng; Wang, Li-Yuan; Chung, Kuang-Ren

    2011-11-01

    Penicillium digitatum causes green mold on citrus, resulting in severe postharvest fruit decay and economic losses in many citrus-producing areas of the world. Forty isolates of P. digitatum were cultured from citrus groves, packinghouses, and local markets in Taiwan, and assessed quantitatively for their sensitivity to thiabendazole (TBZ) fungicide. Sensitivity assays using a 96-well microtiter plate revealed that, of 40 isolates examined, only one isolate collected from fruit produced in Taiwan and two isolates from Florida-imported citrus fruit were sensitive to TBZ. The concentration of TBZ causing a 50% growth reduction (EC(50)) was less than 1 μg/mL. The remaining 37 isolates could tolerate high concentrations of TBZ, with an EC(50) greater than 80 μg/mL. Overall, more than 97% of P. digitatum isolates tested in Taiwan were found to be resistant to TBZ. In vitro assays also revealed the ineffectiveness of TBZ for controlling a TBZ-resistant isolate on sweet oranges. A sequence analysis of β-tubulin genes revealed that all TBZ-resistant isolates displayed a single transversion point mutation, resulting in a change at either amino acid 198 (glutamic acid→glutamine) or 200 (phenylalanine→tyrosine). The repetitive use of a single fungicide over several decades has favored the selection and dominance of TBZ-resistant isolates of P. digitatum.

  17. Inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Swarming Motility by 1-Naphthol and Other Bicyclic Compounds Bearing Hydroxyl Groups

    PubMed Central

    Oura, Hiromu; Tashiro, Yosuke; Toyofuku, Masanori; Ueda, Kousetsu; Kiyokawa, Tatsunori; Ito, Satoshi; Takahashi, Yurika; Lee, Seunguk; Nojiri, Hideaki; Nakajima-Kambe, Toshiaki; Uchiyama, Hiroo; Futamata, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Many bacteria convert bicyclic compounds, such as indole and naphthalene, to oxidized compounds, including hydroxyindoles and naphthols. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a ubiquitous bacterium that inhabits diverse environments, shows pathogenicity against animals, plants, and other microorganisms, and increasing evidence has shown that several bicyclic compounds alter the virulence-related phenotypes of P. aeruginosa. Here, we revealed that hydroxyindoles (4- and 5-hydroxyindoles) and naphthalene derivatives bearing hydroxyl groups specifically inhibit swarming motility but have minor effects on other motilities, including swimming and twitching, in P. aeruginosa. Further analyses using 1-naphthol showed that this effect is also associated with clinically isolated hyperswarming P. aeruginosa cells. Swarming motility is associated with the dispersion of cells from biofilms, and the addition of 1-naphthol maintained biofilm biomass without cell dispersion. We showed that this 1-naphthol-dependent swarming inhibition is independent of changes of rhamnolipid production and the intracellular level of signaling molecule cyclic-di-GMP (c-di-GMP). Transcriptome analyses revealed that 1-naphthol increases gene expression associated with multidrug efflux and represses gene expression associated with aerotaxis and with pyochelin, flagellar, and pilus synthesis. In the present study, we showed that several bicyclic compounds bearing hydroxyl groups inhibit the swarming motility of P. aeruginosa, and these results provide new insight into the chemical structures that inhibit the specific phenotypes of P. aeruginosa. PMID:25681177

  18. Exopolysaccharide-repressing small molecules with antibiofilm and antivirulence activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    van Tilburg Bernardes, Erik; Charron-Mazenod, Laetitia; Reading, David J; Reckseidler-Zenteno, Shauna L; Lewenza, Shawn

    2017-02-21

    Biofilm formation is a universal virulence strategy in which bacteria grow in dense microbial communities enmeshed within a polymeric extracellular matrix that protects them from antibiotic exposure and the immune system. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an archetypal biofilm-forming organism that utilizes a biofilm growth strategy to cause chronic lung infections in Cystic Fibrosis (CF) patients. The extracellular matrix of P. aeruginosa biofilms is comprised mainly of exopolysaccharides (EPS) and DNA. Both mucoid and non-mucoid isolates of P. aeruginosa produces the Pel and Psl EPS, each of which have important roles in antibiotic resistance, biofilm formation and immune evasion. Given the central importance of the EPS for biofilms, they are attractive targets for novel anti-infective compounds. In this study we used a high throughput gene expression screen to identify compounds that repress expression of the pel genes. The pel repressors demonstrated antibiofilm activity against microplate and flow chamber biofilms formed by wild type and hyperbiofilm forming strains. To determine the potential role of EPS in virulence, mutants in pel/psl were shown to have reduced virulence in the feeding behavior and slow killing virulence assays in Caenorhabditis elegans The antibiofilm molecules also reduced P. aeruginosa PAO1 virulence in the nematode slow killing model. Importantly, the combination of antibiotics and antibiofilm compounds increased killing of P. aeruginosa biofilms. These small molecules represent a novel anti-infective strategy for the possible treatment of chronic P. aeruginosa infections.

  19. Evaluating the influence of light intensity in mcyA gene expression and microcystin production in toxic strains of Planktothrix agardhii and Microcystis aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Salvador, Daniel; Churro, Catarina; Valério, Elisabete

    2016-04-01

    Cyanobacteria are phytoplanktonic organisms widely occurring in freshwaters, being frequently associated with the production of toxins, namely microcystins (MCs). MCs are produced non-ribosomally by a multienzyme complex (mcy genes). It has been reported that environmental factors, such as light intensity, can influence toxin production. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of light intensity in the transcription of the mcyA gene and corresponding production of microcystins in toxic isolates of Planktothrix agardhii, where little is known, and compare them to Microcystis aeruginosa. For that purpose, cultures were exposed to three different light intensities (4, 20 and 30 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1)) for 18 days at 20 ± 1 °C. The growth was followed daily using absorbance readings. Samples were collected at each growth stage for cell counting, microcystins quantification and RNA extraction. The level of transcripts was quantified by RT-qPCR and the relative expression determined using 16S rDNA, gltA and rpoC1 as reference genes. The most stable reference genes in M. aeruginosa were rpoC1 and gltA, whereas in P. agardhii were 16S rDNA and gltA. There was a correspondence between the growth rate and light intensity in M. aeruginosa and P. agardhii. The growth rates for both species were lower at 4 and higher at 30 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1). Microcystin concentration per cell was similar between light intensities in M. aeruginosa and over time, while in P. agardhii it was higher in the stationary phase at 4 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1). There were differences in the expression of mcyA between the two species. In M. aeruginosa, the highest levels of expression occurred at 4 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1) in the adaptation phase, whereas for P. agardhii it was at 4μmol photons m(-2) s(-1) in the exponential growth phase. Our results indicate that the light intensities tested had distinct influences on the growth, microcystin production and mcyA expression levels

  20. Adherence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to tracheal cells injured by influenza infection or by endotracheal intubation.

    PubMed

    Ramphal, R; Small, P M; Shands, J W; Fischlschweiger, W; Small, P A

    1980-02-01

    Adherence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to normal, injured, and regenerating tracheal mucosa was examined by scanning electron microscopy. Uninfected and influenza-infected murine tracheas were exposed to six strains of P. aeruginosa isolated from human sources and one strain of platn origin. All of the strains tested adhered to desquamating cells of the infected tracheas, but not to normal mucosa, the basal cell layer, or the regenerating epithelium. Adherence increased when the incubation time of the bacteria with the trachea was prolonged. Strains isolated from human tracheas appeared to adhere better than strains derived from the urinary tract. After endotracheal intubation of ferrets, P. aeruginosa adhered only to the injured cells and to areas of exposed basement membrane. We call this phenomenon "opportunistic adherence" and propose that alteration of the cell surfaces or cell injury facilitates the adherence of this bacterium and that adherence to injured cells may be a key to the pathogenesis of opportunistic Pseudomonas infections.

  1. Multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in children undergoing chemotherapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Caselli, Désirée; Cesaro, Simone; Ziino, Ottavio; Zanazzo, Giulio; Manicone, Rosaria; Livadiotti, Susanna; Cellini, Monica; Frenos, Stefano; Milano, Giuseppe M.; Cappelli, Barbara; Licciardello, Maria; Beretta, Chiara; Aricò, Maurizio; Castagnola, Elio

    2010-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one leading gram-negative organism associated with nosocomial infections. Bacteremia is life-threatening in the immunocompromised host. Increasing frequency of multi-drug-resistant (MDRPA) strains is concerning. We started a retrospective survey in the pediatric hematology oncology Italian network. Between 2000 and 2008, 127 patients with Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteremia were reported from 12 centers; 31.4% of isolates were MDRPA. Death within 30 days of a positive blood culture occurred in 19.6% (25/127) of total patients; in patients with MDRPA infection it occurred in 35.8% (14/39). In the multivariate analysis, only MDRPA had significant association with infection-related death. This is the largest series of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteremia cases from pediatric hematology oncology centers. Monitoring local bacterial isolates epidemiology is mandatory and will allow empiric antibiotic therapy to be tailored to reduce fatalities. PMID:20305140

  2. Drug-susceptibility of isolates of Brachyspira hyodysenteriae isolated from colonic mucosal specimens of pigs collected from slaughter houses in Japan in 2009

    PubMed Central

    KAJIWARA, Keita; KOZAWA, Midori; KANAZAWA, Takuya; UETSUKA, Kouji; NAKAJIMA, Hiromi; ADACHI, Yoshikazu

    2015-01-01

    Twenty nine isolates identified as Brachyspira hyodysenteriae were most susceptible to carbadox and metronidazole, whereas they were resistant to macrolides. The isolates showed intermediate susceptibility to tiamulin, lincomycin, penicillin G, ampicillin, chloramphenicol, tetracycline, enrofloxacin and valnemulin, with MIC50 values ranging from 0.39 to 3.13. PMID:26596637

  3. Physiological and biochemical effects of allelochemical ethyl 2-methyl acetoacetate (EMA) on cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yu; Hu, Hong-Ying; Li, Feng-Min

    2008-10-01

    The physiological and biochemical effects of an allelochemical ethyl 2-methyl acetoacetate (EMA) isolated from reed (Phragmites communis) on bloom-forming cyanobacterium, Microcystis aeruginosa, were investigated. EMA significantly inhibited the growth of M. aeruginosa in a concentration-dependent way. The metabolic indices (represented by esterase and total dehydrogenase activities), the cellular redox status (represented by the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS)), and the oxidative damage index (represented by the content of malondialdehyde (MDA), the product of membrane lipid peroxidation) were used to evaluate the physiological and biochemical changes in M. aeruginosa after EMA exposure. Esterase activity in M. aeruginosa did not change (P>0.05) after 2 h of exposure to EMA, but increased greatly after 24 and 48 h (P<0.05). EMA exposure (>0.5 mg L(-1)) resulted in a remarkable loss of total dehydrogenase activity in M. aeruginosa after 4 h (P<0.01), but an increase after 40 h (P<0.05). EMA caused a great increase in ROS level of the algal cells. At high EMA concentration (4 mg L(-1)), the ROS level was remarkably elevated to 1.91 times as much as that in the controls after 2 h. Increases in the ROS level also occurred after 24 and 48 h. The increase in lipid peroxidation of M. aeruginosa was dependent upon EMA concentration and the exposure time. After 40 h of exposure, the MDA content at 4 mg L(-1) of EMA reached approximately 3.5 times (P<0.01) versus the controls. These results suggest that the cellular structure and metabolic activity of M. aeruginosa are influenced by EMA; the increased metabolic activity perhaps reflects the fact that the resistance of cellular response system to the stress from EMA is initiated during EMA exposure, and the oxidative damage induced by EMA via the oxidation of ROS may be an important factor responsible for the inhibition of EMA on the growth of M. aeruginosa.

  4. Inhibition of Biofilm Formation by Esomeprazole in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vandana; Arora, Vaneet; Alam, M. Jahangir

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are common nosocomial pathogens responsible for biofilm-associated infections. Proton pump inhibitors (PPI), such as esomeprazole, may have novel antimicrobial properties. The objective of this study was to assess whether esomeprazole prevents sessile bacterial growth and biofilm formation and whether it may have synergistic killing effects with standard antibiotics. The antibiofilm activity of esomeprazole at 0.25 mM was tested against two strains each of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa. Bacterial biofilms were prepared using a commercially available 96-peg-plate Calgary biofilm device. Sessile bacterial CFU counts and biomass were assessed during 72 hours of esomeprazole exposure. The killing activities after an additional 24 hours of vancomycin (against S. aureus) and meropenem (against P. aeruginosa) treatment with or without preexposure to esomeprazole were also assessed by CFU and biomass analyses. P. aeruginosa and S. aureus strains exposed to esomeprazole displayed decreased sessile bacterial growth and biomass (P < 0.001, each parameter). After 72 h of exposure, there was a 1-log10 decrease in the CFU/ml of esomeprazole-exposed P. aeruginosa and S. aureus strains compared to controls (P < 0.001). After 72 h of exposure, measured absorbance was 100% greater in P. aeruginosa control strains than in esomeprazole-exposed strains (P < 0.001). Increased killing and decreased biomass were observed for esomeprazole-treated bacteria compared to untreated controls exposed to conventional antibiotics (P < 0.001, each parameter). Reduced biofilm growth after 24 h was visibly apparent by light micrographs for P. aeruginosa and S. aureus isolates exposed to esomeprazole compared to untreated controls. In conclusion, esomeprazole demonstrated an antibiofilm effect against biofilm-producing S. aureus and P. aeruginosa. PMID:22664967

  5. Reproductive isolation revealed in preliminary crossbreeding experiments using field collected Triatoma dimidiata (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) from three ITS–2 defined groups

    PubMed Central

    García, Mauricio; Menes, Marianela; Dorn, Patricia L.; Monroy, Carlota; Richards, Bethany; Panzera, Francisco; Bustamante, Dulce María

    2013-01-01

    Triatoma dimidiata, a Chagas disease vector distributed in Mexico, Central America, Colombia, Venezuela, Peru and Ecuador, has been studied using genetic markers and four groups have been defined by ITS–2 sequences: 1A, 1B, 2 and 3. To gather evidence on the divergence and reproductive isolation among T. dimidiata ITS–2 groups, we carried out 15 crossbreeding experiments with field–collected sylvan and domestic T. dimidiata from Guatemala where three groups are found: 1A, 2 and 3. Reciprocal crosses between individuals from groups 1A and 2, and a cross between group 2 individuals from different habitats, produced an average 129.78±42.29 eggs with hatching success ranging from 31.6% to 90.1%. The offspring of these crosses reached the adult stage, and crosses between F1 insects produced eggs. These results suggest that there are no pre– or post– zygotic reproductive barriers between groups 1A and 2, or within group 2. Crosses between group 3 females and males from groups 1A or 2 produced on average 85.67±30.26 eggs and none of them hatched. These results support the existence of pre– zygotic barriers between T. dimidiata group 3 and groups 1A and 2. The group 3 individuals were collected in sylvatic environments in Yaxha, Peten, Guatemala. Previously, distinct chromosomal characteristics (cytotype 3) were described in individuals from this population. Based on this evidence we suggest that this population is divergent at the species level from other T. dimidiata populations. PMID:24041592

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of Microcystis aeruginosa NIES-98, a Non-Microcystin-Producing Cyanobacterium from Lake Kasumigaura, Japan

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Shigekatsu; Sano, Tomoharu; Tanabe, Yuuhiko; Nakajima, Nobuyoshi; Kawachi, Masanobu

    2016-01-01

    Microcystis aeruginosa is a well-known bloom-forming cyanobacterium. We newly sequenced the whole genome of M. aeruginosa NIES-98, which is a non-microcystin-producing strain isolated from Lake Kasumigaura, Japan. The genome contains approximately 5.0 Mbp, with an average G+C content of 42.41% and 5,140 predicted protein-coding genes. PMID:27834696

  7. Comprehensive transposon mutant library of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Michael A.; Alwood, Ashley; Thaipisuttikul, Iyarit; Spencer, David; Haugen, Eric; Ernst, Stephen; Will, Oliver; Kaul, Rajinder; Raymond, Christopher; Levy, Ruth; Chun-Rong, Liu; Guenthner, Donald; Bovee, Donald; Olson, Maynard V.; Manoil, Colin

    2003-01-01

    We have developed technologies for creating saturating libraries of sequence-defined transposon insertion mutants in which each strain is maintained. Phenotypic analysis of such libraries should provide a virtually complete identification of nonessential genes required for any process for which a suitable screen can be devised. The approach was applied to Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic pathogen with a 6.3-Mbp genome. The library that was generated consists of 30,100 sequence-defined mutants, corresponding to an average of five insertions per gene. About 12% of the predicted genes of this organism lacked insertions; many of these genes are likely to be essential for growth on rich media. Based on statistical analyses and bioinformatic comparison to known essential genes in E. coli, we estimate that the actual number of essential genes is 300-400. Screening the collection for strains defective in two defined multigenic processes (twitching motility and prototrophic growth) identified mutants corresponding to nearly all genes expected from earlier studies. Thus, phenotypic analysis of the collection may produce essentially complete lists of genes required for diverse biological activities. The transposons used to generate the mutant collection have added features that should facilitate downstream studies of gene expression, protein localization, epistasis, and chromosome engineering. PMID:14617778

  8. Comprehensive transposon mutant library of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Michael A; Alwood, Ashley; Thaipisuttikul, Iyarit; Spencer, David; Haugen, Eric; Ernst, Stephen; Will, Oliver; Kaul, Rajinder; Raymond, Christopher; Levy, Ruth; Chun-Rong, Liu; Guenthner, Donald; Bovee, Donald; Olson, Maynard V; Manoil, Colin

    2003-11-25

    We have developed technologies for creating saturating libraries of sequence-defined transposon insertion mutants in which each strain is maintained. Phenotypic analysis of such libraries should provide a virtually complete identification of nonessential genes required for any process for which a suitable screen can be devised. The approach was applied to Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic pathogen with a 6.3-Mbp genome. The library that was generated consists of 30,100 sequence-defined mutants, corresponding to an average of five insertions per gene. About 12% of the predicted genes of this organism lacked insertions; many of these genes are likely to be essential for growth on rich media. Based on statistical analyses and bioinformatic comparison to known essential genes in E. coli, we estimate that the actual number of essential genes is 300-400. Screening the collection for strains defective in two defined multigenic processes (twitching motility and prototrophic growth) identified mutants corresponding to nearly all genes expected from earlier studies. Thus, phenotypic analysis of the collection may produce essentially complete lists of genes required for diverse biological activities. The transposons used to generate the mutant collection have added features that should facilitate downstream studies of gene expression, protein localization, epistasis, and chromosome engineering.

  9. The effects of group 1 versus group 2 carbapenems on imipenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa: an ecological study.

    PubMed

    Carmeli, Yehuda; Lidji, Shiri Klarfeld; Shabtai, Esther; Navon-Venezia, Shiri; Schwaber, Mitchell J

    2011-07-01

    Use of the group 2 carbapenems, imipenem and meropenem, may lead to emergence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa resistance. The group 1 carbapenem ertapenem has limited activity against P. aeruginosa and is not associated with imipenem-resistant P. aeruginosa (IMP-R PA) in vitro. This retrospective, group-level, longitudinal study collected patient, antibiotic use, and resistance data from 2001 to 2005 using a hospital database containing information on 9 medical wards. A longitudinal data time series analysis was done to evaluate the association between carbapenem use (defined daily doses, or DDDs) and IMP-R PA. A total of 139 185 patient admissions were included, with 541 150 antibiotics DDDs prescribed: 4637 DDDs of group 2 carbapenems and 2130 DDDs of ertapenem. A total of 779 IMP-R PA were isolated (5.6 cases/1000 admissions). Univariate analysis found a higher incidence of IMP-R PA with group 2 carbapenems (P < 0.001), aminoglycosides (P = 0.034), and penicillins (P = 0.05), but not with ertapenem. Multivariate analysis showed a yearly increase in incidence of IMP-R-PA (3.8%, P < 0.001). Group 2 carbapenem use was highly associated with IMP-R PA, with a 20% increase in incidence (P = 0.0014) for each 100 DDDs. Group 2 carbapenem use tended to be associated with an increased proportion of IMP-R PA (P = 0.0625) in multivariate analysis. Ertapenem was not associated with IMP-R PA. These data would support preferentially prescribing ertapenem rather than group 2 carbapenems where clinically appropriate.

  10. Characterization of a collection of plasmid-containing bacteria isolated from an on-farm biopurification system used for pesticide removal.

    PubMed

    Martini, María Carla; Albicoro, Francisco Javier; Nour, Eman; Schlüter, Andreas; van Elsas, Jan Dirk; Springael, Dirk; Smalla, Kornelia; Pistorio, Mariano; Lagares, Antonio; Del Papa, María Florencia

    2015-07-01

    Biopurification systems (BPS) are complex soil-related and artificially-generated environments usually designed for the removal of toxic compounds from contaminated wastewaters. The present study has been conducted to isolate and characterize a collection of cultivable plasmid-carrying bacterial isolates recovered from a BPS established for the decontamination of wastewater generated in a farmyard. Out of 1400 isolates, a collection of 75 plasmid-containing bacteria was obtained, of which 35 representative isolates comprising in total at least 50 plasmids were chosen for further characterization. Bacterial hosts were taxonomically assigned by 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing and phenotypically characterized according to their ability to grow in presence of different antibiotics and heavy metals. The study demonstrated that a high proportion of the isolates was tolerant to antibiotics and/or heavy metals, highlighting the on-farm BPS enrichment in such genetic traits. Several plasmids conferring such resistances in the bacterial collection were detected to be either mobilizable or selftransmissible. Occurrence of broad host range plasmids of the incompatibility groups IncP, IncQ, IncN and IncW was examined with positive results only for the first group. Presence of the IS1071 insertion sequence, frequently associated with xenobiotics degradation genes, was detected in DNA obtained from 24 of these isolates, strongly suggesting the presence of yet-hidden catabolic activities in the collection of isolates. The results showed a remarkable diversity in the plasmid mobilome of cultivable bacteria in the BPS with the presence of abundant resistance markers of different types, thus providing a suitable environment to investigate the genetic structure of the mobile genetic pool in a model on-farm biofilter for wastewater decontamination in intensive agricultural production.

  11. Pyoverdine and proteases affect the response of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to gallium in human serum.

    PubMed

    Bonchi, Carlo; Frangipani, Emanuela; Imperi, Francesco; Visca, Paolo

    2015-09-01

    Gallium is an iron mimetic which has recently been repurposed as an antibacterial agent due to its capability to disrupt bacterial iron metabolism. In this study, the antibacterial activity of gallium nitrate [Ga(NO3)3] was investigated in complement-free human serum (HS) on 55 Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates from cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis patients. The susceptibility of P. aeruginosa to Ga(NO3)3 in HS was dependent on the bacterial ability to acquire iron from serum binding proteins (i.e., transferrin). The extent of serum protein degradation correlated well with P. aeruginosa growth in HS, while pyoverdine production did not. However, pyoverdine-deficient P. aeruginosa strains were unable to grow in HS and overcome iron restriction, albeit capable of releasing proteases. Predigestion of HS with proteinase K promoted the growth of all strains, irrespective of their ability to produce proteases and/or pyoverdine. The MICs of Ga(NO3)3 were higher in HS than in an iron-poor Casamino Acids medium, where proteolysis does not affect iron availability. Coherently, strains displaying high proteolytic activity were less susceptible to Ga(NO3)3 in HS. Our data support a model in which both pyoverdine and proteases affect the response of P. aeruginosa to Ga(NO3)3 in HS. The relatively high Ga(NO3)3 concentration required to inhibit the growth of highly proteolytic P. aeruginosa isolates in HS poses a limitation to the potential of Ga(NO3)3 in the treatment of P. aeruginosa bloodstream infections.

  12. Light intensity adaptation and phycobilisome composition of Microcystis aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Raps, S.; Kycia, J.H.; Ledbetter, M.C.; Siegelman, H.W.

    1985-12-01

    Phycobilisomes isolated from Microcystis aeruginosa grown to midlog at high light (270 microeinsteins per square meter per second) or at low light intensities (40 microeinsteins per square meter per second) were found to be identical. Electron micrographs established that they have a triangular central core apparently consisting of three allophycocyanin trimers surrounded by six rods, each composed of two hexameric phycocyanin molecules. The apparent mass of a phycobilisome obtained by gel filtration is 2.96 x 10/sup 6/ daltons. The molar ratio of the phycobiliproteins per phycobilisome is 12 phycocyanin hexamers:9 allophycocyanin trimers. The electron microscopic observations combined with the phycobilisome apparent mass and the phycobiliprotein stoichiometry data indicate that M. aeruginosa phycobilisomes are composed of a triangular central core of three stacks of three allophycocyanin trimers and six rods each containing two phycocyanin hexamers. Adaptation of M. aeruginosa to high light intensity results in a decrease in the number of phycobilisomes per cell with no alteration in phycobilisome composition or structure.

  13. Gallium induces the production of virulence factors in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    García-Contreras, Rodolfo; Pérez-Eretza, Berenice; Lira-Silva, Elizabeth; Jasso-Chávez, Ricardo; Coria-Jiménez, Rafael; Rangel-Vega, Adrián; Maeda, Toshinari; Wood, Thomas K

    2014-02-01

    The novel antimicrobial gallium is a nonredox iron III analogue with bacteriostatic and bactericidal properties, effective for the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in vitro and in vivo in mouse and rabbit infection models. It interferes with iron metabolism, transport, and presumably its homeostasis. As gallium exerts its antimicrobial effects by competing with iron, we hypothesized that it ultimately will lead cells to an iron deficiency status. As iron deficiency promotes the expression of virulence factors in vitro and promotes the pathogenicity of P. aeruginosa in animal models, it is anticipated that treatment with gallium will also promote the production of virulence factors. To test this hypothesis, the reference strain PA14 and two clinical isolates from patients with cystic fibrosis were exposed to gallium, and their production of pyocyanin, rhamnolipids, elastase, alkaline protease, alginate, pyoverdine, and biofilm was determined. Gallium treatment induced the production of all the virulence factors tested in the three strains except for pyoverdine. In addition, as the Ga-induced virulence factors are quorum sensing controlled, co-administration of Ga and the quorum quencher brominated furanone C-30 was assayed, and it was found that C-30 alleviated growth inhibition from gallium. Hence, adding both C-30 and gallium may be more effective in the treatment of P. aeruginosa infections.

  14. Role of pili in the adherence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to mouse epidermal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Sato, H; Okinaga, K

    1987-01-01

    Pili have been demonstrated to be the adhesins of Pseudomonas aeruginosa for mouse epidermal cells. The mechanisms of adhesion of P. aeruginosa to mouse epidermal cells was studied by using four mutants derived from a single strain: flagellated and piliated (F+P+), flagellated and nonpiliated (F+P-), nonflagellated and piliated (F-P+), and nonflagellated and nonpiliated (F-P-) mutants. F+P+ and F-P+ bacteria efficiently adhered to mouse epidermal cells, while F+P- and F-P- bacteria hardly adhered to mouse epidermal cells. The number of F+P+ bacteria that adhered to mouse epidermal cells was almost the same as that of F-P+ bacteria. The number of F+P- bacteria that adhered to mouse epidermal cells was almost the same as that of F-P- bacteria. The adhesion of P+ (F+P+ and F-P+) bacteria was inhibited by antipilus serum, while that of P- (F+P- and F-P-) bacteria was not inhibited by antipilus serum. There were no significant differences between the number of bacteria adhering to mouse epidermal cells isolated from normal skin and those adhering to cells isolated from burned skin. Heating of the mouse epidermal cell suspension had no effect on the adhesion of P. aeruginosa. These results suggest that pili mediate the adhesion of P. aeruginosa to mouse epidermal cells and that P. aeruginosa adheres efficiently to mouse epidermal cells despite the loss of cell viability caused by burning. PMID:2886430

  15. O serotype-independent susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to lectin-like pyocins

    PubMed Central

    Ghequire, Maarten G K; Dingemans, Jozef; Pirnay, Jean-Paul; De Vos, Daniel; Cornelis, Pierre; De Mot, René

    2014-01-01

    Lectin-like bacteriocins of the LlpA family, originally identified in plant-associated bacteria, are narrow-spectrum antibacterial proteins composed of two tandemly organized monocot mannose-binding lectin (MMBL) domains. The LlpA-like bacteriocin of Pseudomonas aeruginosa C1433, pyocin L1, lacks any similarity to known P. aeruginosa bacteriocins. The initial interaction of pyocin L1 with target cells is mediated by binding to d-rhamnose, present in the common polysaccharide antigen of lipopolysaccharides (LPS), but the actual cytotoxic mechanism is unknown. In this study, we characterized the activity range of pyocin L1 and two additional L pyocins revealed by genome mining, representing two highly diverged LlpA groups in P. aeruginosa. The recombinant proteins exhibit species-specific antagonistic activities down to nanomolar concentrations against clinical and environmental P. aeruginosa strains, including several multidrug-resistant isolates. The overlap in target strain spectrum between two close homologues of the pyocin L1 group is only minimal, contrasting with the considerable spectral redundancy of LlpA proteins reported for other Pseudomonas species. No correlation was found between L pyocin susceptibility and phylogenetic relatedness of P. aeruginosa isolates. Sensitive strains were retrieved in 13 out of 15 O serotypes tested, excluding the possibility that the highly variable and immunogenic O serotype antigen of the LPS coating would represent a dominant susceptibility-discriminating factor. PMID:25224846

  16. Growth inhibition and microcystin degradation effects of Acinetobacter guillouiae A2 on Microcystis aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Yi, Yang-Lei; Yu, Xiao-Bo; Zhang, Chao; Wang, Gao-Xue

    2015-01-01

    Strain A2 with algicidal activity against Microcystis aeruginosa was isolated and identified with the genus Acinetobacter on the basis of phenotypic tests and 16S rRNA gene analysis. It was identified with the species Acinetobactor guillouiae by partial rpoB sequence analysis. When 10% (v/v) of the bacterial culture was co-incubated with M. aeruginosa culture, algicidal efficiency reached 91.6% after 7 days. Supernatant of A2 culture showed similar algicidal activity, while the cell pellet had little activity, suggesting that Acinetobacter guillouiae A2 indirectly attacked M. aeruginosa cells by secreting an extracellular algicidal compound, which was characterized as heat-stable. A significant decrease in the microcystin (microcystin-LR) concentration was observed after 10% (v/v) addition of A2 culture. Transcription of three microcystin-related genes (mcyA, mcyD and mcyH) was also found to be inhibited. The algicidal compound 4-hydroxyphenethylamine was obtained by further isolation and purification using various chromatographic techniques. The EC50, 3d and EC50, 7d values of 4-hydroxyphenethylamine against M. aeruginosa were 22.5 and 10.3 mgL(-1), respectively. These results indicate that A. guillouiae strain A2 inhibits growth of M. aeruginosa and degrades microcystin production. The identified compound, 4-hydroxyphenethylamine, has potential for development as a new algicidal formulation or product.

  17. Emergence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa with KPC-type carbapenemase in a teaching hospital: an 8-year study.

    PubMed

    García Ramírez, Dolores; Nicola, Federico; Zarate, Soledad; Relloso, Silvia; Smayevsky, Jorgelina; Arduino, Sonia

    2013-10-01

    An outbreak of Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenamase (KPC)-producing K. pneumoniae occurred at our institution. Multiresistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa could have acquired this transmissible resistance mechanism, going unnoticed because its phenotypic detection in this species is difficult. We compared P. aeruginosa isolates obtained before and after the KPC-producing K. pneumoniae outbreak. No bla(KPC) genes were detected in the isolates obtained before the outbreak, whereas 33/76 (43%) of the isolates obtained after the outbreak harboured the bla(KPC) gene. P. aeruginosa may thus become a reservoir of this transmissible resistance mechanism. It is very important to understand the epidemiology of these multiresistant isolates, in order to achieve early implementation of adequate control measures to contain and reduce their dissemination in the hospital environment.

  18. Multicentric study in five African countries of antibiotic susceptibility for three main pathogens: Streptococcus pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Zerouali, Khalid; Ramdani-Bouguessa, Nadjia; Boye, Cheikh; Hammami, Adnane

    2016-08-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a growing clinical and epidemiological problem. We report on the antibiotic susceptibility of three pathogens isolated from patients in Algeria, Egypt, Morocco, Senegal, and Tunisia during 2010-2011. In total, 218 Streptococcus pneumoniae, 428 Staphylococcus aureus, and 414 Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains were collected. S. pneumoniae resistance was noted against penicillin (30.2%), erythromycin (27.4%), cefpodoxime (19.1%), amoxicillin (12.0%), cefotaxime (7.4%), and levofloxacin (3.2%). All the strains were teicoplanin susceptible. Staphylococcus aureus methicillin resistance differed between countries, from 5.0% in Senegal to 62.7% in Egypt. Levofloxacin resistance was low in all countries, and the highest rate (in Egypt) was still only 13.6% for intermediate and resistant strains combined. Most strains were susceptible to fosfomycin (99.3%) and pristinamycin (94.2%). P. aeruginosa resistance was found against levofloxacin (30.4%), ciprofloxacin (29.9%), tobramycin (19.7%), ceftazidime (19.2%), and imipenem (17.9%), but not colistin. Antibiotic susceptibility varied widely between countries, with resistance typically most prevalent in Egypt.

  19. Influence of a Putative ECF Sigma Factor on Expression of the Major Outer Membrane Protein, OprF, in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas fluorescens

    PubMed Central

    Brinkman, Fiona S. L.; Schoofs, Geert; Hancock, Robert E. W.; De Mot, René

    1999-01-01

    The gene encoding OprF, a major outer membrane protein in Pseudomonas species (formerly known as type 1 pseudomonads), was thought to be constitutively transcribed from a single sigma 70 promoter immediately upstream of the gene. We now report the identification of a novel putative ECF (extracytoplasmic function) sigma factor gene, sigX, located immediately upstream of oprF in both Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and Pseudomonas fluorescens OE 28.3 and show that disruption of this gene significantly reduces OprF expression. In P. aeruginosa, Northern analysis demonstrated that this reduction was a result of an effect on transcription of monocistronic oprF combined with a polar effect due to termination of a transcript containing sigX and oprF. Comparison of sigX-disrupted and wild-type cell transcripts by primer extension indicated that monocistronic transcription of oprF occurs from two overlapping promoters, one that is SigX-dependent and resembles ECF sigma factor promoters in its minus-35 region and another promoter that is independent of SigX and is analogous to the sigma 70-type promoter previously reported. Complementation of the P. aeruginosa sigX-disrupted mutant with plasmid-encoded OprF did not resolve the phenotypes associated with this mutant, which included a markedly reduced logarithmic-phase growth rate in rich medium (compared to that in minimal medium), further reduction of the growth rate in a low-osmolarity environment, secretion of an unidentified pigment, and increased sensitivity to the antibiotic imipenem. This indicates that SigX is involved in the regulation of other genes in P. aeruginosa. Disruption of the sigX gene in P. fluorescens also had an effect on the logarithmic-phase growth rate in rich medium. A conserved sigX gene was also identified in a Pseudomonas syringae isolate and six P. aeruginosa clinical isolates. Collectively, these data indicate that an ECF sigma factor plays a role in the regulation and expression of OprF and also