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Sample records for aeruginosa pr3 converts

  1. Production of Biologically Active Hydroxy Fatty Acids from Vegetable Oils by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PR3

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hydroxy fatty acids have gained industrial attention because of their special properties such as higher viscosity and reactivity compared with other non-hydroxy fatty acids. The bacterial isolate Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PR3) had been reported to produce mono-, di-, and tri-hydroxy fatty acids from ...

  2. Antimicrobial potential of bioconverted products of omega-3 fatty acids by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PR3

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bioconverted omega-3 fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid (bEPA) and docosahexanoic acid (bDHA), obtained from the microbial conversion of non-bioconverted eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PR3 were evaluated for their antimicrobial potential. bEPA and bDHA at 5 µl/...

  3. Production of Biologically Active Hydroxy Fatty Acids by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PR3

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hydroxy fatty acids (HFA) have gained important attentions because of their special properties such as higher viscosity and reactivity compared with other non-hydroxy fatty acids. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PR3) had been reported to produce mono-, di-, and tri-hydroxy fatty acids from different unsatu...

  4. Converting visible light into UVC: microbial inactivation by Pr(3+)-activated upconversion materials.

    PubMed

    Cates, Ezra L; Cho, Min; Kim, Jae-Hong

    2011-04-15

    Herein we report the synthesis and properties of light-activated antimicrobial surfaces composed of lanthanide-doped upconversion luminescent nano- and microcrystalline Y(2)SiO(5). Unlike photocatalytic surfaces, which convert light energy into reactive chemical species, this work describes surfaces that inactivate microorganisms through purely optical mechanisms, wherein incident visible light is partially converted into germicidal UVC radiation. Upconversion phosphors utilizing a Pr(3+) activator ion were synthesized and their visible-to-ultraviolet conversion capabilities were confirmed via photoluminescence spectroscopy. Polycrystalline films were prepared on glass substrates, and the extent of surface microbial inactivation and biofilm inhibition under visible light excitation were investigated. Results show that, under normal visible fluorescent lamp exposure, a sufficient amount of UVC radiation was emitted to inhibit Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation and to inactivate Bacillus subtilis spores on the dry surfaces. This new application of upconversion luminescence shows for the first time its ability to deter microbial contamination and could potentially lead to new material strategies for disinfection of surfaces and water. PMID:21428395

  5. Production of 7, 10-dihydroxy-8(E)-octadecenoic acid from triolein via lipase induction by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PR3

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hydroxy fatty acids have gained important attentions because of their special properties such as higher viscosity and reactivity compared with other non-hydroxy fatty acids. The new bacterial isolate Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PR3) had been reported to produce mono-, di-, and tri-hydroxy fatty acids f...

  6. Lipase-induced Production of 7, 10-dihydroxy-8(E)-octadecenoic Acid from Triolein by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PR3

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hydroxy fatty acids have gained attention because of their special properties such as higher viscosity and reactivity compared with other non-hydroxy fatty acids. The bacterial isolate Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PR3) had been reported to produce mono-, di-, and tri-hydroxy fatty acids from different f...

  7. Production of a novel 9,12-dihydroxy-10(E)-eicosenoic acid from eicosenoic acid by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PR3

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microbial conversions of unsaturated fatty acids often generate polyhydroxy fatty acids rendering them to have new properties such as higher viscosity and reactivity. A bacterial strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PR3) has been intensively studied to produce mono-, di-, and tri-hydroxy fatty acids from...

  8. Environmental optimization for production of 7, 10-dihydroxy-8(E)-octadecenoic acid from olive oil by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PR3

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microbial conversions of free unsaturated fatty acids often generate novel hydroxy fatty acids (HFA), which are known to have special properties such as higher viscosity and reactivity. Among microbial strains known to produce HFAs, Pseudomonas aeruginosa PR3 has been well studied to produce 7,10-d...

  9. Production of 7,10-dihydroxy-8(E)-octadecenoic Acid from Triolein via Lipase Induction by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PR3

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hydroxy fatty acids (HFA) have gained important attention due to special properties such as higher viscosity and reactivity compared with other non-hydroxy fatty acids. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PR3 has been previously reported to produce mono-, di-, and tri-hydroxy fatty acids from different unsatura...

  10. Efficient near-infrared quantum cutting and downshift in Ce3+-Pr3+ codoped SrLaGa3S6O suitable for solar spectral converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Gongguo; Cui, Qiuyu; Liu, Guodong

    2016-03-01

    A novel solar spectral converter SrLaGa3S6O:Ce3+, Pr3+ for Si solar cells is developed. The luminescence spectra and the decay curves were investigated. The results show that through dual-mode NIR downconversions mechanism (quantum cutting and downshift), it can almost convert UV-blue-red (250-625 nm) photons into an intense NIR emission (930-1060 nm), perfectly matching the maximum spectral response of Si solar cells. The solar utilization of Si solar cell has been greatly broadening and enhancing. We believe this phosphor may open a new route for designing an advanced solar spectral converter for Si solar cells.

  11. Upconversion under polychromatic excitation: Y2SiO5:Pr3+, Li+ converts violet, cyan, green, and yellow light into UVC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cates, Ezra L.; Kim, Jae-Hong

    2013-10-01

    Due to their unique ability to amplify photon energies, upconversion (UC) materials are being studied for numerous potential applications to light-utilizing technologies. Many such uses of UC demand adequate conversion efficiency under low-power, broad spectrum irradiation; however, spectroscopic studies of UC phosphors have been most commonly conducted using monochromatic laser excitation that is resonant with the desired electronic transitions. In this study, we sought to elucidate the behavior of UC materials under polychromatic excitation by initiating visible-to-UV UC in a Pr3+-doped phosphor under multiple combined two-color excitation beams. Several wavelengths of light, which were not capable of producing UC emission when used alone, were found to contribute to UC when combined with other colors, indicating that polychromatic UC mechanisms warrant consideration in applications involving broad band excitation.

  12. Making red emitting phosphors with Pr 3+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutinaud, Philippe; Pinel, Eric; Oubaha, Mohamed; Mahiou, Rachid; Cavalli, Enrico; Bettinelli, Marco

    2006-01-01

    UV-excited red-emitting phosphors are obtained using Pr 3+ as the luminescent activator and host lattices containing closed-shell transition metal ions (especially titanates, vanadates and niobates). In these oxidant lattices, the quenching of the otherwise greenish-blue emitting 3P 0 level is induced by a low-lying Pr-to-metal intervalence charge transfer state (IVCT). A simple criterion based on the optical electronegativities of the d 0 lattice cations (M n+) and average Pr 3+ - M n+ distances is proposed to predict 3P 0 quenching in these lattices.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of physical properties of Gd2O2S:Pr3+ semi-nanoflower phosphor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagheri, A.; Rezaee Ebrahim Saraee, Kh.; Shakur, H. R.; Zamani Zeinali, H.

    2016-05-01

    Pure gadolinium oxysulfide phosphor (Gd2O2S) and trivalent praseodymium-doped gadolinium oxysulfide phosphor (Gd2O2S:Pr3+) scintillators with semi-nanoflower crystalline structures were successfully synthesized through a precipitation method and subsequent calcination treatment as a converter for X-ray imaging detectors. The characterization such as the crystal structures and nanostructure of Gd2O2S:Pr3+ scintillator measured by XRD and FeE-SEM experiment. The optical properties of Gd2O2S:Pr3+ scintillator were studied. Luminescence spectra of Gd2O2S:Pr3+ under 320 nm UV excitation show a green emission at near 511 nm corresponding to the 3P0-3H4 of Pr ions. After scintillation properties of synthesized Gd2O2S:Pr3+ scintillator investigated, Gd2O2S:Pr3+ scintillating film fabricated on a glass substrate by a sedimentation method. X-ray imaging of the fabricated scintillators confirmed that the Gd2O2S:Pr3+ scintillator could be used for radiography applications in which good spatial resolution is needed.

  14. Transfer of Excitation Energy from Pr3+ to Gd3+ in YF3:Pr3+,Gd3+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirai, Takeshi; Yoshida, Hisashi; Sakuragi, Shiro; Hashimoto, Satoshi; Ohno, Nobuhito

    2007-02-01

    Luminescence and excitation spectra for YF3:Gd3+, YF3:Pr3+, and YF3:Pr3+,Gd3+ have been studied in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) spectral region at room temperature. In YF3:Gd3+, Gd3+ ions absorb VUV light ranging from 150 to 200 nm due to 4 f-4 f transitions, yielding an ultraviolet (UV) luminescence line at 311 nm originating from the 4 f-4 f transition (6P7/2→8S7/2 state). In YF3:Pr3+,Gd3+, Pr3+ ions absorb the VUV light (150-200 nm) due to 4 f-5d transitions, and the absorption gives rise to the UV luminescence of Gd3+ ions that is much stronger than that of YF3:Gd3+. In this paper, we discuss the energy transfer process from Pr3+ to Gd3+ ions in YF3:Pr3+,Gd3+ excited by VUV light.

  15. A proportion of proteinase 3 (PR3)-specific anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) only react with PR3 after cleavage of its N-terminal activation dipeptide

    PubMed Central

    Sun, J; Fass, D N; Viss, M A; Hummel, A M; Tang, H; Homburger, H A; Specks, U

    1998-01-01

    ANCA directed against PR3 are highly specific for Wegener's granulomatosis and microscopic polyangiitis, and have been implicated in the pathogenesis of small vessel vasculitis. Most PR3-ANCA are directed against conformational epitopes on PR3. This study was designed to determine whether the cleavage of the N-terminal activation dipeptide of PR3 is required for the binding of PR3-ANCA. Recombinant PR3 (rPR3) variants were expressed in the epithelial cell line, 293. As confirmed by radiosequencing, the rPR3 secreted into the 293 cell culture supernatant is N-terminally unprocessed. Two enzymatically inactive rPR3 mutants were expressed in 293 cells: rPR3-S176A and δ-rPR3-S176A. rPR3-S176A contains the N-propetide Ala-2-Glu-1, δ-rPR3-S176A does not. Culture supernatants of rPR3-S176A and δ-rPR3-S176A expressing 293 cells were used as sources of target antigen for PR3-ANCA testing by capture ELISA. Forty unselected consecutive PR3-ANCA+ sera were tested. With δ-rPR3-S176A as antigen all 40 were recognized, compared with only 34 of 40 when rPR3-S176A served as target antigen. The majority of the serum samples contained a mixture of antibodies reacting with epitopes accessible on the mature and on the proform of PR3. In conclusion, the cleavage of the N-terminal activation dipeptide of PR3 is not an absolute requirement for recognition by all PR3-ANCA. However, a substantial proportion of PR3-ANCA recognize (a) target antigen(s) exposed only after the conformational change of PR3 associated with the N-terminal processing. In 15% of sera this PR3-ANCA subset occurred exclusively. PR3-ANCA subtypes can be differentiated using specifically designed rPR3 variants as target antigens, and non-haematopoietic mammalian cells without regulated secretory pathway can be used for their expression. PMID:9822293

  16. Upconversion luminescence in BaMoO4:Pr3+ phosphor for display devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soni, Abhishek Kumar; Rai, Vineet Kumar

    2015-08-01

    The frequency upconversion is an important nonlinear optical property by which near infrared light is converted into the visible light. The BaMoO4:Pr3+ powder phosphor has been synthesized by solid state reaction method. The upconversion emission bands are recorded under the excitation of 808 nm diode laser. The phase formation of the prepared phosphor has been identified by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique. The upconversion emission mechanism and colour coordinate have been explained by using energy level and CIE (International Commission on Illumination) chromaticity diagram study, respectively.

  17. Selective recognition of Pr3+ based on fluorescence enhancement sensor.

    PubMed

    Ganjali, M R; Hosseini, M; Ghafarloo, A; Khoobi, M; Faridbod, F; Shafiee, A; Norouzi, P

    2013-10-01

    (E)-2-(1-(4-hydroxy-2-oxo-2H-chromen-3-yl)ethylidene)hydrazinecarbothioamide (L) has been used to detect trace amounts of praseodymium ion in acetonitrile-water solution (MeCN/H2O) by fluorescence spectroscopy. The fluorescent probe undergoes fluorescent emission intensity enhancement upon binding to Pr(3+) ions in MeCN/H2O (9/1:v/v) solution. The fluorescence enhancement of L is attributed to a 1:1 complex formation between L and Pr(3+), which has been utilized as the basis for selective detection of Pr(3+). The sensor can be applied to the quantification of praseodymium ion with a linear range of 1.6×10(-7) to 1.0×10(-5) M. The limit of detection was 8.3×10(-8) M. The sensor exhibits high selectivity toward praseodymium ions in comparison with common metal ions. The proposed fluorescent sensor was successfully used for determination of Pr(3+) in water samples. PMID:23910325

  18. Heterogeneity of anti-PR3 associated disease in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Lee, S; Lawton, J W

    2000-05-01

    Thirty seven patients tested positive for antibody against proteinase 3 (anti-PR3) using either one of the two in-house ELISA methods at the Immunology Laboratory, University of Hong Kong. All except three were Chinese. Systemic vasculitis was diagnosed in 13 patients. However, the positive predictive value of anti-PR3 for Wegener's granulomatosus was low (22%). The commonest presenting feature was respiratory (32%). Both respiratory and renal symptoms were commonly reported in anti-PR3 positive patients as in previous studies. In this largely Chinese population, there is marked variability in the spectrum of diseases associated with anti-PR3; though many had vasculitic diseases, some were diagnosed with other conditions such as inflammatory bowel diseases and respiratory infection. In contrast with series in white people, antimyeloperoxidase rather than anti-PR3 associated disease is more prevalent in Chinese patients. PMID:10775281

  19. Amphoteric doping of praseodymium Pr3+ in SrTiO3 grain boundaries

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yang, H.; Lee, H. S.; Kotula, P. G.; Sato, Y.; Ikuhara, Y.; Browning, N. D.

    2015-03-26

    Charge Compensation in rare-earth Praseodymium (Pr3+) doped SrTiO3 plays an important role in determining the overall photoluminescence properties of the system. Here, the Pr3+ doping behavior in SrTiO3 grain boundaries (GBs) is analyzed using aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). The presence of Pr3+ induces structure variations and changes the statistical prevalence of GB structures. In contrast to the assumption that Pr3+ substitutes for A site as expected in the bulk, Pr3+ is found to substitute both Sr and Ti sites inside GBs with the highest concentration in the Ti sites. As a result, this amphoteric doping behavior inmore » the boundary plane is further confirmed by first principles theoretical calculations.« less

  20. Amphoteric Doping of Praseodymium Pr3+ in SrTiO3 Grain Boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Hao; Lee, H. S.; Kotula, Paul G.; Sato, Yukio; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Browning, Nigel D.

    2015-03-23

    Charge Compensation in rare-earth Praseodymium (Pr3+) doped SrTiO3 plays an important role in determining the overall photoluminescence properties of the system. Here, the Pr3+ doping behavior in SrTiO3 grain boundaries (GBs) is analyzed using aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). The presence of Pr3+ induces structure variations and changes the statistical prevalence of GB structures. In contrast to the assumption that Pr3+ substitutes for A site as expected in the bulk, Pr3+ is found to substitute both Sr and Ti sites inside GBs with the highest concentration in the Ti sites. This amphoteric doping behavior in the boundary plane is further confirmed by first principles theoretical calculations.

  1. Amphoteric doping of praseodymium Pr3+ in SrTiO3 grain boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, H.; Lee, H. S.; Kotula, P. G.; Sato, Y.; Ikuhara, Y.; Browning, N. D.

    2015-03-01

    Charge compensation in rare-earth Praseodymium (Pr3+) doped SrTiO3 plays an important role in determining the overall photoluminescence properties of the system. Here, the Pr3+ doping behavior in SrTiO3 grain boundaries (GBs) is analyzed using aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy. The presence of Pr3+ induces structural variations and changes the statistical prevalence of the GB structures. In contrast to the assumption that Pr3+ substitutes on the Sr site in the bulk, Pr3+ is found to substitute on both Sr and Ti sites inside the GBs, with the highest concentration at the Ti sites. This amphoteric doping behavior in the boundary plane is further confirmed by first principles theoretical calculations.

  2. Effect of Trace Fe3+ on Luminescent Properties of CaWO4: Pr3+ Phosphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ke; Feng, Xu; Feng, Wenlin; Shi, Shasha; Li, Yao; Zhang, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Fe3+ undoped and doped CaWO4: Pr3+ phosphors have been successfully synthesised by using the solid-state reaction method. The products were characterised by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), photoluminescence (PL) and fluorescence lifetime testing techniques, respectively. The mean crystallite size (50.7 nm) of CaWO4: Pr3+ is obtained from powder XRD data. PL spectra of both Fe3+ undoped and doped CaWO4: Pr3+ phosphors exhibit excitation peaks at 214, 449, 474, and 487 nm under monitor wavelength at 651 nm, and emission peaks at 532, 558, 605, 621, 651, 691, 712, and 736 nm under blue light (λem=487 nm) excitation. The effect of trace Fe3+ on luminescence properties of CaWO4: Pr3+ phosphor is studied by controlling the doping concentration of Fe3+. The results show that radioactive energy transfers from luminescence centre Pr3+ to quenching centre Fe3+ occurred in Fe3+ doped CaWO4: Pr3+ phosphors. With the increasing concentration of Fe3+, the energy transfer from Pr3+ to Fe3+ is enhanced, and the emission intensity of CaWO4: Pr3+ will be lower. The decay times (5.22 and 4.99 μs) are obtained for typical samples Ca0.995WO4: Pr3+0.005 and Ca0.99275WO4: Pr3+0.005, Fe3+0.00225, respectively. This work shows that nonferrous phosphors can improve the luminescent intensity of the phosphors.

  3. Optimal Production of 7,10-dihydroxy-8(E)-hexadecenoic Acid from Palmitoleic Acid by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PR3

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The hydroxylation of unsaturated fatty acids by bacterial strains is one type of value-adding bioconversion process. This process generates new hydroxy fatty acids (HFA) carrying special properties such as higher viscosity and reactivity compared with normal fatty acids. Among microbial strains te...

  4. Lipoxygenase, a key enzyme in bioconversion of linoleic acid into trihydroxy-octadecenoic acid by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PR3

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lipoxygenases catalyze the oxidation of unsaturated fatty acids with a (1Z,4Z)-pentadiene structure leading to the formation of conjugated (Z,E)-hydroperoxydienoic acids, which in turn result in production of hydroxy lipid. These enzymes are widely distributed in plants, animals, and microorganisms...

  5. Thermostable lipoxygenase, a key enzyme in bioconversion of linoleic acid to trihycroxy-octadecenoic acid by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PR3

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lipoxygenases, enzymes that contain non-heme iron, catalyze the oxidation of unsaturated fatty acids with a (1Z,4Z)-pentadiene moiety leading to conjugated (Z,E)-hydroperoxydienoic acids. These enzymes are widely distributed in plants and animals, and a few microorganisms are reported as well. It ...

  6. Production of 7,10-dihydroxy-8(E)-octadecenoic acid from olive oil by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PR3

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microbial modification of naturally occurring materials is one of the efficient ways to add new values to them. Hydroxylation of free unsaturated fatty acids by microorganism is a good example of those modifications. Among microbial strains studied for that purpose, a new bacterial isolate Pseudom...

  7. Spectroscopic properties of Pr3+ ions embedded in lithium borate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramteke, D. D.; Swart, H. C.; Gedam, R. S.

    2016-01-01

    A series of lithium borate glasses with different Pr3+ contents were prepared by the melt quench technique to explore the new material for solid state light applications. We found that the addition of Pr3+ ions in the glass matrix has a profound effect on the properties of the glasses. The presence of Pr3+ ions in the glass matrix created various absorption bands compared to the base glass. These bands were due to the ground state (3H4) of the Pr3+ to the various excited states. Optical energy band gap was calculated by Tauc's method which showed a decreasing trend with an increase in the Pr3+ content. This might be due to structural changes when the glass structure became rigid due to the Pr3+ ions and this was confirmed by the density results. Rigidity of the glass structure was further confirmed by the Fourier transformed infrared results. The excitation spectra showed bands at 3H4→3P2, 3P1 and 3P0 nm. The 3H4→3P2 band was used to study the unresolved 1D2→3H4 and 3P0→3H6 transitions of the Pr3+ ions.

  8. Judd Ofelt analysis and energy transfer mechanism in Pr3+ doped Mg2SiO4 nanophosphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naik, Ramachandra; Prashantha, S. C.; Nagabhushana, H.; Sharma, S. C.; Jnaneshwara, D. M.; Ananthraju, K. S.; Nagaswarupa, H. P.; Premkumar, H. B.; Chandrasekhar, M.

    2016-05-01

    Pr3+ (1-11 mol%) rare earth doped Mg2SiO4 (Forsterite) nanophosphors were analyzed using Judd-Ofelt theory for the electronic transitions of Pr3+ ions to evaluate various intensity parameters (Ω2, Ω4). The variations in radiative transition probability (AT) and calculated radiative lifetime (τrad) have been discussed. Further, energy transfer from the host to Pr3+ ions was studied. The critical energy transfer distance (Rc) between Pr3+ ions in Mg2SiO4:Pr3+ phosphor is calculated to be 16.3 Å. The interaction between the Pr3+ ions is found to be dipole-dipole interaction.

  9. Superbroadband near-IR photoluminescence from Pr3+-doped fluorotellurite glasses.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bo; Tao, Lili; Tsang, Yuen H; Jin, Wei; Pun, Edwin Yue-Bun

    2012-02-13

    Praseodymium(Pr3+)-doped fluorotellurite glasses were synthesized and broadband photoluminescence (PL) covering a wavelength range from 1.30 to 1.67 μm was observed under both 488 and 590 nm wavelength excitations. The broadband PL emission is mainly due to the radiative transition from the manifolds Pr3+: 1D2 to 1G4. The PL line-shape, band width, and lifetime were modified by the Pr3+ dopant concentration, and a quantum efficiency as high as 73.7% was achieved with Pr3+ dopant in a low concentration of 0.05 mol%. The good spectroscopic properties were also predicted by the Judd-Ofelt analysis, which indicates a stronger asymmetry and covalent bonding between the Pr3+ sites and the matrix lifgand field. The large stimulated emission cross-section, long measured lifetime, and broad emission bandwidth confirm the potential of the Pr3+-singly doped fluorotellurite glass as broadband luminescence sources for the broadband near-infrared optical amplifications and tunable lasers. PMID:22418137

  10. Microstructure and optical properties of Pr3+-doped hafnium silicate films

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we report on the evolution of the microstructure and photoluminescence properties of Pr3+-doped hafnium silicate thin films as a function of annealing temperature (TA). The composition and microstructure of the films were characterized by means of Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, spectroscopic ellipsometry, Fourier transform infrared absorption, and X-ray diffraction, while the emission properties have been studied by means of photoluminescence (PL) and PL excitation (PLE) spectroscopies. It was observed that a post-annealing treatment favors the phase separation in hafnium silicate matrix being more evident at 950°C. The HfO2 phase demonstrates a pronounced crystallization in tetragonal phase upon 950°C annealing. Pr3+ emission appeared at TA = 950°C, and the highest efficiency of Pr3+ ion emission was detected upon a thermal treatment at 1,000°C. Analysis of the PLE spectra reveals an efficient energy transfer from matrix defects towards Pr3+ ions. It is considered that oxygen vacancies act as effective Pr3+ sensitizer. Finally, a PL study of undoped HfO2 and HfSiOx matrices is performed to evidence the energy transfer. PMID:23336520

  11. Optical spectroscopy of Pr3+-doped γ-BiB3O6 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yelisseyev, A.; Isaenko, L.; Korolev, V.; Stoyanovsky, V.; Gets, V.; Naumov, D.; Ilyina, O.

    2013-12-01

    Single crystals of Pr3+-doped γ-BiB3O6 of optical quality were grown. Band gap is 4.16 eV at 80 K, which differs only slightly from that for undoped samples. Pr concentration is 2 × 1020 cm-3 and the dopant is distributed uniformly along the crystal. Absorption cross-section for Pr3+ was estimated to be ˜1 × 10-20 cm2. At X-ray and UV, band-to-band excitation the Pr:γ-BiB3O6 crystals demonstrate an intense emission in the 450 nm broad band, which is related mainly to recombination of self-trapped excitons (STE). A part of energy is transferred radiatively to Pr3+ ions. The STE emission quenches as temperature increases to 250 K with simultaneous decrease of the decay time from 11 μs to 17 ns. Intensity and decay time of the Pr3+ intracenter luminescence with τ ˜ 50 μs at 450 nm excitation do not depend on temperature. Intensity of thermoluminescence in the 150-400 K range quenches 2 orders at Pr doping, and parameters of the traps were estimated. As a result of relatively narrow band gap in γ-BiB3O6:Pr3+, there is no cascade luminescence typical of many wide-band-gap matrices.

  12. A hydrothermal synthesis of Pr3+ doped mesoporous TiO2 for UV light photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Chen, Guihua; Shen, Qianhong; Yang, Hui; Li, Liquan; Song, Yanjiang

    2014-07-01

    Pr3+ doped mesoporous TiO2 photocatalysts with a different molar ratio of Pr to Ti were prepared by a hydrothermal method using triblock copolymer as the template. The as-prepared samples were systematically characterized by X-ray diffraction, N2 adsorption-desorption, X-ray photoelectron spectra, transmission electron microscopy and UV-visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. The characterizations indicated all the samples had mesoporous structure and narrow pore size distribution. Pr3+ doping enlarged the surface area and decreased the crystallite size. The surface area of the samples varied from 136 to 170 m2/g, and the average crystallite size ranged between 5.04 and 7.60 nm. The effect of Pr3+ doping amount on the photocatalytic activity of mesoporous TiO2 was evaluated by the degradation of methyl orange under UV light irradiation. The results showed that the suitable amount of Pr3+ doped samples exhibited the higher photocatalytic activity than mesoporous TiO2. Among the samples, 1 at.% Pr3+ doped mesoporous TiO2 showed the highest photocatalytic activity. PMID:24757971

  13. Silver nanoparticles enhanced multichannel transition luminescence of Pr3+ in heavy metal germanium tellurite glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Y. Y.; Chen, B. J.; Pun, E. Y. B.; Wang, Z. Q.; Zhao, X.; Lin, H.

    2015-01-01

    Enhanced luminescence of Pr3+ was observed in heavy metal germanium tellurite (NZPGT) glasses containing silver nanoparticles. Long-time annealing at 300 °C yield spherical and well-dispersed Ag nanoparticles with ~4 nm diameter as evidenced by transmission electron microscope (TEM). Multichannel transition luminescence intensity of Pr3+ in Ag nanoparticles embedded glasses grows by ~36% in comparison with the glasses without silver doping, which provides a new approach to improve energy conversion efficiency of GaAsAl solar cells. Hypersensitive probe Eu3+ reveals that electric field around rare-earth ions is remarkably enhanced due to the presence of Ag nanoparticles in the glass matrix, resulting in the luminescence intensification of Pr3+ in NZPGT glasses embedded with Ag nanoparticles.

  14. Ground-state measurement of Pr3+ in Y2O3 by photoconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Dongdong; Wang, Xiao-Jun; Yen, W. M.

    2008-09-01

    1 at % Pr3+-doped Y2O3 single-crystal fibers were prepared using a laser-heated pedestal growth method. The emission and excitation spectra of the fibers were measured. The emissions of 4 f-4 f transitions from 1 D 2 to the 3 H 4 and 3 H 5 states are found at 620 and 720 nm, respectively. The 3 P 2, 3 P 1, 1 I 6, and 3 P 0 4 f-4 f absorptions are observed at 456, 472, 482, and 492 nm, respectively. A 4 f-5 d absorption band is detected at 288 nm. Photoconductivity measurements show that the 4 f-5 f transition of Pr3+ around 285 nm produces a direct photocurrent. Taking the onset of photocurrent to be at 320 nm, the ground state of Pr3+ is determined at 1.7 eV above the valence band of the host.

  15. Synthesis and photoluminescence of novel red-emitting ZnWO4: Pr3 +, Li+ phosphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ke; Feng, Wenlin; Feng, Xu; Li, Yao; Mi, Peng; Shi, Shasha

    2016-02-01

    Zn0.997WO4: Pr3 +0.003 and different concentrations (0.1 mol% to 0.9 mol%) of Pr, Li co-doped ZnWO4 red phosphors were prepared by means of solid-state reaction process. The crystalline, surface morphology and luminescent properties of Zn0.997WO4: Pr3 +0.003 and Zn1 - x - yWO4: xPr3 +, yLi+ phosphors were investigated by the X-ray diffraction patterns (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and fluorescent measurements. From powder XRD analysis, the formation of monoclinic structure with C2/h point-group symmetry and P2/c space group of the as-synthesized samples is confirmed. The SEM image showed that surface morphology of the phosphor powder is irregular cylindricality. The luminescent spectra are dominated by the red emission peaks at 607, 621 and 643 nm, respectively, radiated from the 1D2 → 3H4, 3P0 → 3H6 and 3P0 → 3F2 transitions of Pr3 + ions. The concentrations of the highest luminescent intensity is determined at 0.3 mol% Pr3 + and 0.3 mol% Li co-doped ZnWO4 powder crystal, and the peak intensity is improved more than 3 times in comparison with that of 0.3 mol% Pr3 + single-doped ZnWO4. The enhanced luminescence comes from the improved crystalline and from the charge compensation of Li+ ions. The decay curve and CIE chromaticity coordinates of as-prepared samples are also studied in detail.

  16. Diode pumped Pr3+:LiYF4-BBO ultraviolet laser at 320 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J. H.; Liu, X. H.; Wu, J. B.; Zhang, X.; Li, Y. L.

    2012-03-01

    A diode pumped Pr3+:LiYF4 laser at 639.5 nm has been demonstrated. With an incident pump power of 920 mW, the maximum red output power was 272 mW. Moreover, intracavity second-harmonic generation (SHG) has also been achieved with a maximum ultraviolet power of 23 mW by using a β-BaB2O4 (BBO) nonlinear crystal. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on continuous-wave ultraviolet generation by intracavity frequency doubling Pr3+:LiYF4 laser.

  17. Luminescence properties of Pr3+-doped Cs4PbBr6 single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velázquez, Matias; Ferrier, Alban; Péchev, Stanislas; Gravereau, Pierre; Chaminade, Jean-Pierre; Portier, Xavier; Moncorgé, Richard

    2009-08-01

    Centimeter-sized single crystals of pure and Pr3+-doped Cs4PbBr6 were successfully grown using a high-temperature solution (HTS)-based vertical Bridgman-Stockbarger method in silica ampoules sealed under Ar gas. The single crystals are bright orange transparent, non hygroscopic, with a low phonon energy and a wide transparency in the middle infrared (MIR) region. Pr3+ ions can be dissolved into Cs4PbBr6 crystals, resulting in broad MIR absorption bands. We present the characterization of the single crystals by means of Raman, visible, Fourier-transform infrared (FT IR) and emission spectroscopies.

  18. Comparison of PR3-ANCA and MPO-ANCA Epitope Specificity upon Disease Relapse

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND Relapse is a major clinical problem in ANCA vasculitis that causes increased morbidity and mortality. Compared to MPO-ANCA patients, patients with PR3-ANCA run a significantly increased risk of experiencing relapses. We hypothesized that a relapsing patient is produ...

  19. Reddish-orange emission from Pr3+ doped zinc alumino bismuth borate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahamuda, Sk.; Swapna, K.; Srinivasa Rao, A.; Sasikala, T.; Rama Moorthy, L.

    2013-11-01

    Praseodymium doped Zinc Alumino Bismuth Borate (ZnAlBiB) glasses were prepared by melt quenching technique and characterized by optical absorption and emission studies. The glassy nature of these glasses has been confirmed through XRD spectral measurements. From the absorption spectra, the Judd-Ofelt intensity parameters Ωλ (λ=2, 4 and 6) and other radiative properties like transition probability (AR), radiative lifetimes (τR) and branching ratios (βR) have been evaluated. Emission spectra were measured for different concentrations of Pr3+ ions doped glasses by exciting the glasses at 445 nm. The intensity of Pr3+ emission spectra increases from 0.1 to 1 mol% and beyond 1 mol% concentration quenching is observed. The suitable concentration of Pr3+ ions in ZnAlBiB glasses to act as a good lasing material at reddish-orange wavelength (604 nm) region has been discussed by measuring the emission cross-sections for the intense emission transition 1D2→3H4. The CIE chromaticity co-ordinates were also evaluated from the emission spectra for all the glasses to understand the suitability of these materials for reddish-orange emission. From the measured emission cross-sections and CIE chromaticity co-ordinates, it was found that 1 mol% of Pr3+ is aptly suitable for the development of visible reddish-orange lasers.

  20. 40 CFR 180.1316 - Pasteuria spp. (Rotylenchulus reniformis nematode)-Pr3; exemption from the requirement of a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... reniformis nematode)-Pr3; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1316 Section 180.1316 Protection.... (Rotylenchulus reniformis nematode)—Pr3; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An exemption from the requirement of a tolerance is established for residues of Pasteuria spp. (Rotylenchulus reniformis...

  1. 40 CFR 180.1316 - Pasteuria spp. (Rotylenchulus reniformis nematode)-Pr3; exemption from the requirement of a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... reniformis nematode)-Pr3; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1316 Section 180.1316 Protection.... (Rotylenchulus reniformis nematode)—Pr3; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An exemption from the requirement of a tolerance is established for residues of Pasteuria spp. (Rotylenchulus reniformis...

  2. Isolation and functional analysis of the pathogenicity-related gene VdPR3 from Verticillium dahliae on cotton.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ya-Lin; Li, Zhi-Fang; Feng, Zi-Li; Feng, Hong-Jie; Zhao, Li-Hong; Shi, Yong-Qiang; Hu, Xiao-Ping; Zhu, He-Qin

    2015-11-01

    The fungal plant pathogen Verticillium dahliae is the causal agent of vascular wilt, a disease that can seriously diminish cotton fiber yield. The pathogenicity mechanism and the identity of the genes that interact with cotton during the infection process still remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the low-pathogenic, non-microsclerotium-producing mutant vdpr3 obtained in a previous study from the screening of a T-DNA insertional library of the highly virulent isolate Vd080; the pathogenicity-related gene (VdPR3) in wild-type strain Vd080 was cloned. Knockout mutants (ΔVdPR3) showed lower mycelium growth and obvious reduction in sporulation ability without microsclerotium formation. An evaluation of carbon utilization in mutants and wild-type isolate Vd080 demonstrated that mutants-lacking VdPR3 exhibited decreased cellulase and amylase activities, which was restored in the complementary mutants (ΔVdPR3-C) to levels similar to those of Vd080. ΔVdPR3 postponed infectious events in cotton and showed a significant reduction in pathogenicity. Reintroduction of a functional VdPR3 copy into ΔVdPR3-C restored the ability to infect cotton plants. These results suggest that VdPR3 is a multifunctional gene involved in growth development, extracellular enzyme activity, and virulence of V. dahliae on cotton. PMID:25652159

  3. XTL Converter

    SciTech Connect

    Spurgeon, Steven R

    2015-10-07

    "XTL Converter" is a short Python script for electron microscopy simulation. The program takes an input crystal file in the VESTA *.XTL format and converts it to a text format readable by the multislice simulation program ìSTEM. The process of converting a crystal *.XTL file to the format used by the ìSTEM simulation program is quite tedious; it generally requires the user to select dozens or hundreds of atoms, rearranging and reformatting their position. Header information must also be reformatted to a specific style to be read by ìSTEM. "XTL Converter" simplifies this process, saving the user time and allowing for easy batch processing of crystals.

  4. XTL Converter

    2015-10-07

    "XTL Converter" is a short Python script for electron microscopy simulation. The program takes an input crystal file in the VESTA *.XTL format and converts it to a text format readable by the multislice simulation program ìSTEM. The process of converting a crystal *.XTL file to the format used by the ìSTEM simulation program is quite tedious; it generally requires the user to select dozens or hundreds of atoms, rearranging and reformatting their position. Headermore » information must also be reformatted to a specific style to be read by ìSTEM. "XTL Converter" simplifies this process, saving the user time and allowing for easy batch processing of crystals.« less

  5. Development of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa Agmatine Biosensor.

    PubMed

    Gilbertsen, Adam; Williams, Bryan

    2014-12-01

    Agmatine, decarboxylated arginine, is an important intermediary in polyamine production for many prokaryotes, but serves higher functions in eukaryotes such as nitric oxide inhibition and roles in neurotransmission. Pseudomonas aeruginosa relies on the arginine decarboxylase and agmatine deiminase pathways to convert arginine into putrescine. One of the two known agmatine deiminase operons, aguBA, contains an agmatine sensitive TetR promoter controlled by AguR. We have discovered that this promoter element can produce a titratable induction of its gene products in response to agmatine, and utilized this discovery to make a luminescent agmatine biosensor in P. aeruginosa. The genome of the P. aeruginosa lab strain UCBPP-PA14 was altered to remove both its ability to synthesize or destroy agmatine, and insertion of the luminescent reporter construct allows it to produce light in proportion to the amount of exogenous agmatine applied from ~100 nM to 1mM. Furthermore it does not respond to related compounds including arginine or putrescine. To demonstrate potential applications the biosensor was used to detect agmatine in spent supernatants, to monitor the development of arginine decarboxylase over time, and to detect agmatine in the spinal cords of live mice. PMID:25587430

  6. Optical processes in (Y,Bi)VO4 doped with Eu3+ or Pr3+.

    PubMed

    Boutinaud, Philippe

    2014-10-01

    Zircon and fergusonite-type vanadates either undoped or doped with Eu(3+) or Pr(3+) are synthesized in the system (Y,Bi)2O3-V2O5 by solid state and coprecipitation procedures. Their optical properties are investigated at 300 and 77 K and the luminescence mechanisms are discussed on the basis of energy level schemes that combine the host and the dopant states. Fergusonite BiVO4 is shown to glow in the deep red region at 77 K upon excitation at 450 nm and shorter wavelengths. Host sensitization is demonstrated in Eu(3+)-doped fergusonite BiVO4 and zircon BiVO4 at 77 K, but lost as temperature is raised to 300 K. The origin of this effect is addressed by considering the nature of the host-band edge states and self-quenching processes. The near-UV excited luminescence in the system (Y, Bi)VO4:Pr(3+) (zircon) consists of the yellow bandlike emission of the zircon host and of the characteristic red (1)D2 → (3)H4 emission lines of Pr(3+) in vanadates. The relative contribution of these features can be fine-tuned at room temperature by adjusting the composition of the materials or the excitation wavelength. PMID:25219414

  7. White up-conversion luminescence of NaYF4:Yb3+,Pr3+,Er3+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hölsä, Jorma; Laamanen, Taneli; Laihinen, Tero; Lastusaari, Mika; Pihlgren, Laura; Rodrigues, Lucas C. V.

    2014-08-01

    Photon up-conversion which yields higher energy emission by stacking lower energy photons is possible only with specific rare earth ions. Despite this, it has several potential applications. NaYF4 with Yb3+,Er3+ co-doping has been recognized as one of the most feasible materials for efficient up-conversion luminescence. In this work, the up-conversion luminescence of the Pr3+-Er3+ combination was studied using sensitization by Yb3+. Emission was observed in the visible including blue, green, yellow, orange and red. These are due to the 3P0,1 → 3H4-6,3F2-4 and 1D2 → 3H4 (Pr3+) as well as 2H11/2,4S3/2,4F9/2 → 4I15/2 (Er3+) transitions. Concentration quenching of the Pr3+ luminescence was observed already with 1 mol-% due to many cross-relaxation processes. With naked eye, the up-conversion luminescence was seen as white light. The CIE chromaticity coordinates are close to those of the standard illuminant F4 which represents warm white.

  8. Magnetorheological converters

    SciTech Connect

    Zal'tsgendler, E.A.; Kolomentsev, A.V.; Kordonskii, V.I.; Madorskii, L.S.

    1986-04-01

    The authors study the problems of constructing an electrohydraulic converter functioning based on the magnetoheological effect: the magnetorheological throttle (MR throttle). Requirements are listed that must be taken into account in developing the MR throttle. The paper attempts to calculate the flow-rate characteristics of the MR throttle. The rheological equation which describes sufficiently the mechanical properties of the magnetoheological suspensions is presented. The paper examines the calculation of the magnetic inductor for the example of a toroidal core with a gap, which simultaneously functions as the slot throttling channel. The use of the designs described enabled the development of bridge converters, which have a flat amplitude-frequency characteristic in the range 200-250 Hz and which have good energy indicators. Typical experimental logarithmic amplitude-frequency and phase-frequency characteristics of a bridge converter are shown.

  9. Low Serum Alpha-Antitrypsin Associated with Anti-PR-3 ANCA in Autistic Children with GI Disease

    PubMed Central

    Russo, AJ; Krigsman, A; Jepson, B; Wakefield, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Aim To assess the possible relationship between serum alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) levels and anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) in autistic children with severe GI disease and to test the hypothesis that there is an association between low serum AAT levels, the presence of ANCA and inflammatory GI disease seen in some autistic children. Subjects and Methods Serum from 40 autistic children with chronic digestive disease (many with ileo-colonic lymphoid nodular hyperplasia (LNH) and inflammation of the colorectum, small bowel and/or stomach), and 41 controls (21 age matched autistic children with no GI disease and 20 age matched children without autism or GI disease) were tested using ELISAs designed to quantitate ANCA (anti-PR3), AAT and PR3 levels. Results We found that a significant number of autistic children with chronic digestive disease had anti-PR3 ANCA, high serum PR3 and high severity of disease when compared to controls. This same group of autistic children had low serum levels of AAT compared to controls, which also correlated with the presence of anti-PR3 ANCA, high serum PR3, as well as the severity of intestinal disease, particularly LNH and severe erythema. Discussion These results suggest a relationship between low AAT levels, ANCA and severity of GI disease seen in a subpopulation of ASD individuals. We suggest that low AAT levels may result in high levels of PR3, which may, in turn be associated with the presence of ANCA. PMID:26244018

  10. Nd3+ sensitized upconversion luminescence of Nd3+/Pr3+ codoped KPb2Cl5 low phonon crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balda, R.; Al-Saleh, M.; Arriandiaga, M. A.; Garcia-Revilla, S.; Fernández, J.

    2011-03-01

    In this work, we report the upconversion emission from Pr3+ and Nd3+ ions in potassium lead chloride crystal KPb2Cl5after excitation in the 4F5/2,3/2 levels of Nd3+ ions. We have observed violet, blue, green, orange, and red emissions at room temperature. Blue emission from Pr3+ ions is induced by near infrared laser excitation of Nd3+ through energy transfer from Nd3+ to Pr3+ ions. The mechanisms leading to the visible emissions have been investigated by studying the dependence of the upconversion luminescence on the excitation wavelength and intensity of the IR pump light.

  11. Involvement of Pseudomonas aeruginosa rhodanese in protection from cyanide toxicity.

    PubMed

    Cipollone, Rita; Frangipani, Emanuela; Tiburzi, Federica; Imperi, Francesco; Ascenzi, Paolo; Visca, Paolo

    2007-01-01

    Cyanide is a serious environmental pollutant and a biocontrol metabolite in plant growth-promoting Pseudomonas species. Here we report on the presence of multiple sulfurtransferases in the cyanogenic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and investigate in detail RhdA, a thiosulfate:cyanide sulfurtransferase (rhodanese) which converts cyanide to less toxic thiocyanate. RhdA is a cytoplasmic enzyme acting as the principal rhodanese in P. aeruginosa. The rhdA gene forms a transcriptional unit with the PA4955 and psd genes and is controlled by two promoters located upstream of PA4955 and rhdA. Both promoters direct constitutive RhdA expression and show similar patterns of activity, involving moderate down-regulation at the stationary phase or in the presence of exogenous cyanide. We previously observed that RhdA overproduction protects Escherichia coli against cyanide toxicity, and here we show that physiological RhdA levels contribute to P. aeruginosa survival under cyanogenic conditions. The growth of a DeltarhdA mutant is impaired under cyanogenic conditions and fully restored upon complementation with rhdA. Wild-type P. aeruginosa outcompetes the DeltarhdA mutant in cyanogenic coculture assays. Hence, RhdA could be regarded as an effector of P. aeruginosa intrinsic resistance to cyanide, insofar as it provides the bacterium with a defense mechanism against endogenous cyanide toxicity, in addition to cyanide-resistant respiration. PMID:17098912

  12. Spectroscopic characteristics of praseodymium-doped cubic double sodium-yttrium fluoride crystals Na0.4Y0.6F2.2:Pr3+. Intensities of optical transitions and luminescence kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkachuk, A. M.; Ivanova, S. E.; Mirzaeva, A. A.; Joubert, M.-F.; Guyot, Y.

    2014-03-01

    Using the Bridgman-Stockbarger technique, we have grown a series of cubic crystals Na0.4Y0.6F2.2:Pr3+ (NYF:Pr3+) with a content of praseodymium in the range of 0.04-9 at %. We have determined the composition of crystals, evaluated their optical quality, and found the incorporation coefficient of Pr3+ ions into the Na0.4Y0.6F2.2 matrix ( K Pr ˜ 0.9). We have examined optical spectra of NaYF:Pr3+ crystals at room and low (7 K) temperatures in the range of 200-2500 nm. The low-temperature absorption spectra of NYF:Pr3+ crystals have been shown to consist of broad weakly structured bands. Based on the analysis of low-temperature absorption spectra, the structure of the Stark splitting of praseodymium levels has been represented in terms of a model of "quasi-centers," which are characterized by an inhomogeneous broadening of Stark components. From experimental absorption cross-section spectra at T = 300 K, we have calculated oscillator strengths for transitions from the ground state 3 H 4 to excited multiplets 3 H 5, 3 H 6, 3 F j ( j = 2, 3, 4), 1 G 4, 1 D 2, and (3 P j ,1 I 6) ( j = 0, 1, 2). Using the Judd-Ofelt method, we have determined intensity parameters Ω t and found that Ω2 = 0, Ω4 = 4.4 × 10-20, and Ω6 = 2.28 × 10-20 cm2. With these values, we have calculated the probabilities of radiative transitions, the branching coefficients, and the lifetimes of the radiative levels 1 D 2 and 3 P 0. The probabilities of multiphonon nonradiative transitions in NYF:Pr3+ crystals have been estimated. Using the method of kinetic spectroscopy with selective excitation, we have investigated the luminescence decay kinetics of praseodymium from the 3 P 0 and 1 D 2 levels upon their selective resonant excitation by nanosecond laser pulses. The inference has been made that Na0.4Y0.6F2.2:Pr3+ crystals are processable; admit doping by praseodymium in high concentrations; and, with respect to all their radiative characteristics, can be potentially considered as active media for

  13. Synthesis and luminescent properties of CaTiO3: Pr3+ microfibers prepared by electrospinning method.

    PubMed

    Peng, Chong; Hou, Zhiyao; Zhang, Cuimiao; Li, Guogang; Lian, Hongzhou; Cheng, Ziyong; Lin, Jun

    2010-03-29

    One-dimensional Pr(3+)-doped CaTiO(3) microfibers were fabricated by a simple and cost-effective electronspinning process. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), thermogravimetric and differential analysis (TG-DTA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectrum (EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), photoluminescence (PL), quantum efficiency (QE), and cathodoluminescence (CL) spectra as well as kinetic decays were used to characterize the samples. Under ultraviolet excitation and low-voltage electron beams (1-3 kV) excitation, the CaTiO(3):x Pr(3+) samples show the red emission at 612 nm, corresponding to (1)D(2)-(3)H(4) transition of Pr(3+). The luminescence intensity, quantum efficiency, and the lifetime have been studied as a function of the doping concentration of Pr(3+) in the CaTiO(3) samples. PMID:20389776

  14. Tandem ammonia borane dehydrogenation/alkene hydrogenation mediated by [Pd(NHC)(PR3)] (NHC = N-heterocyclic carbene) catalysts.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Caroline E; Jurčík, Václav; Songis, Olivier; Cazin, Catherine S J

    2013-02-01

    [Pd(NHC)(PR(3))] complexes were shown to be active catalysts in the dehydrogenation of ammonia borane and the subsequent hydrogenation of unsaturated compounds at very low catalyst loadings (0.05 mol% for some substrates). PMID:23254388

  15. Optical spectra and Judd-Ofelt analysis of Pr3+ and Er3+ in different phosphate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seshadri, M.; Venkata Rao, K.; Hemantha Kumar, G. N.; Ratnakaram, Y. C.

    2009-07-01

    Optical absorption and emission spectra of Pr3+ and Er3+ ions in different (Li, Na, K, Ca, LiNa, LiK and NaK) phosphate glasses are presented. Judd-Ofelt analysis has been carried out for the absorption spectra and studied variation of Judd-Ofelt intensity parameters (Ωλ, λ=2, 4, 6) with the variation of glass matrix. From the variation of peak wavelengths of the hypersensitive transition and Ω2 parameter structural details are obtained for both Pr3+ and Er3+ ions in these glass matrices. Radiative transition rates (AT), radiative lifetimes (τxR), branching ratios (βR) and integrated absorption cross-sections (Σ) for certain excited states of Pr3+ and Er3+ ions are obtained. The stimulated emission cross-sections (σP) have been determined from the line shape of the emission spectra of Pr3+ and Er3+ in these phosphate glass matrices.

  16. Phosphor in glass with Eu3+ and Pr3+-doped silicate glasses for LED color conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyun-A.; Lee, Yl Kwon; Im, Won Bin; Heo, Jong; Chung, Woon Jin

    2015-03-01

    Phosphor-in-glasses (PiGs) with rare earth (RE) doped SiO2-B2O3-RO glasses were prepared by embedding YAG:Ce3+ as the yellow phosphor. Eu3+ and Pr3+ were used to dope the glass, varying their concentrations in order to provide red emissions for possible chromaticity-control of white-light emitting diodes (WLEDs). The glass-to-phosphor mixing ratio was also varied to find the proper combination for color-controlled white LEDs. PiGs with RE-doped glasses were sintered at 750 °C and polished to 250 μm in thickness for blue LED color conversion. The photoluminescence spectra of the PiGs were monitored after they were mounted on commercial blue LED chips. Variation of color coordination, color rendering index and correlated color temperature were observed due to red emissions from the doped RE-ions. The spectral contribution of Eu3+ and Pr3+ ions to white LEDs under 450 nm LED excitation was discussed. The spatial distribution of phosphors within the glass matrix, and their possible interaction, was inspected by SEM. The thermal quenching effect was also investigated.

  17. Concentration quenching, surface and spectral analyses of SrF2:Pr3+ prepared by different synthesis techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagoub, M. Y. A.; Swart, H. C.; Coetsee, E.

    2015-04-01

    Pr3+ doped strontium fluoride (SrF2) was prepared by hydrothermal and combustion methods. The phosphors were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. XRD patterns indicated that the samples were completely crystallized with a pure face-centred cubic (space group: Fm3m) structure. SEM images showed different morphologies which is an indication that the morphology of the SrF2:Pr3+ phosphor strongly depends on the synthesis procedure. Both the SrF2:Pr3+ samples exhibit blue-red emission centred at 488 nm under a 439 nm excitation wavelength (λexc) at room temperature. The emission intensity of Pr3+ was also found to be dependent on the synthesis procedure. The blue-red emission has decreased with an increase in the Pr3+ concentration. The optimum Pr3+ doping level for maximum emission intensity was 0.4 and 0.2 mol% for the hydrothermal and combustion samples, respectively. The reduction in the intensity for higher concentrations was found to be due to dipole-dipole interaction induced concentration quenching effects.

  18. Chemotaxis by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Moulton, R C; Montie, T C

    1979-01-01

    Chemotaxis by Pseudomonas aeruginosa RM46 has been studied, and conditions required for chemotaxis have been defined, by using the Adler capillary assay technique. Several amino acids, organic acids, and glucose were shown to be attractants of varying effectiveness for this organism. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid was absolutely required for chemotaxis, and magnesium was also necessary for a maximum response. Serine taxis was greatest when the chemotaxis medium contained 1.5 X 10(-5) M ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and 0.005 M magnesium chloride. It was not necessary to include methionine in the chemotaxis medium. The strength of the chemotactic responses to glucose and to citrate was dependent on prior growth of the bacteria on glucose and citrate, respectively. Accumulation in response to serine was inhibited by the addition of succinate, citrate, malate, glucose, pyruvate, or methionine to the chemotaxis medium. Inhibition by succinate was not dependent on the concentration of attractant in the capillary. However, the degree to which glucose and citrate inhibited serine taxis was dependent on the carbon source utilized for growth. Further investigation of this inhibition may provide information about the mechanisms of chemotaxis in P. aeruginosa. PMID:104961

  19. Green, orange, and red Pr(3+)∶YLiF(4) epitaxial waveguide lasers.

    PubMed

    Bolaños, Western; Brasse, Gurvan; Starecki, Florent; Braud, Alain; Doualan, Jean-Louis; Moncorgé, Richard; Camy, Patrice

    2014-08-01

    Efficient guided laser oscillation in the visible spectral region is demonstrated with praseodymium-doped YLiF(4) layers grown by liquid phase epitaxy. By exciting Pr(3+) ions at 479.2 nm with an optically pumped semiconductor laser, maximum slope efficiencies of 40% at 639 nm and 32% at 604 nm are obtained in a cw regime. Green laser oscillation at 522.5 nm, in a quasi-cw regime, with an average output power of 66 mW, is demonstrated for the first time, to our knowledge, in a crystalline fluoride epitaxial waveguide. Furthermore, a record efficiency of 60% at 639 nm in the quasi-cw regime is reported. PMID:25078200

  20. The avidity of PR3-ANCA in patients with granulomatosis with polyangiitis during follow-up.

    PubMed

    Kemna, M J; Schlumberger, W; van Paassen, P; Dähnrich, C; Damoiseaux, J G M C; Cohen Tervaert, J W

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate whether the avidity of proteinase-3-anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (PR3-ANCA) changes during follow-up in different subgroups of patients with granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA). We selected 10 patients with renal relapsing GPA, 10 patients with renal non-relapsing GPA and 10 patients with non-renal relapsing GPA. In all patients, an ANCA rise occurred during remission. The avidity was measured using a chaotropic approach at the time of an ANCA rise and at the time of a relapse in relapsing patients or time-matched during remission in non-relapsing patients. No difference was observed in the avidity at the ANCA rise between renal relapsing patients [26·2% (15·5-47·5)], renal patients without a relapse [39·6% (21·2-63·4)] and non-renal relapsing patients [34·2% (21·6-59·5)]. In renal relapsing patients, the avidity increased significantly from the moment of the ANCA rise to the relapse [difference 6·4% (0·0-17·1), P = 0·0273]. The avidity did not increase after an ANCA rise in renal non-relapsing patients [difference 3·5 (-6·0 to 10·1), P = 0·6250] or in non-renal relapsing patients [difference -3·1% (-8·0 to 5·0), P = 0·5703]. The avidity of PR3-ANCA increases after an ANCA rise during follow-up in renal relapsing patients, but not after an ANCA rise in renal patients who remain in remission or in non-renal relapsing patients. PMID:27009928

  1. Power converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, J. M. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A dc-to-dc converter employs four transistor switches in a bridge to chop dc power from a source, and a voltage multiplying diode rectifying ladder network to rectify and filter the chopped dc power for delivery to a load. The bridge switches are cross coupled in order for diagonally opposite pairs to turn on and off together using RC networks for the cross coupling to achieve the mode of operation of a free running multivibrator, and the diode rectifying ladder is configured to operate in a push-pull mode driven from opposite sides of the multivibrator outputs of the ridge switches. The four transistor switches provide a square-wave output voltage which as a peak-to-peak amplitude that is twice the input dc voltage, and is thus useful as a dc-to-ac inverter.

  2. The properties of a novel green long afterglow phosphor Zn2GeO4:Mn2+, Pr3+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Minhua; Wang, Yinhai; Wang, Xiansheng; Zhao, Hui; Hu, Zhengfa

    2014-01-01

    Novel Zn2GeO4:Mn2+, Pr3+ long afterglow phosphor was successfully synthesized by the high temperature solid state reaction. Long afterglow properties of the sample has been investigated in detail by measuring the X-ray diffraction (XRD), excitation spectrum, emission spectrum, afterglow spectrum, decay curve and thermoluminescence curve. The X-ray diffraction phases indicate that the co-doped Mn2+, Pr3+ have little influence on the crystal structure of Zn2GeO4. According to the emission spectra, we found that the Zn2GeO4:Mn2+, Pr3+ exhibit a narrow band emission with the peak at 532 nm, which could be ascribed to Mn2+ transition between 4T1 and 6A1 electron configurations. The green long afterglow of Zn2GeO4:Mn2+, Pr3+ could be observed for three hours by naked eyes at room temperature under 254 nm UV excitation. The thermoluminescence (TL) curve is employed for the discussion of the origin of the traps and the mechanism of the persistent luminescence. The results suggest that Zn2GeO4 may be an excellent host material for Mn2+-based long afterglow. Furthermore, the function of co-doped Pr3+ ions is confirmed as trap center, which can greatly postpone the afterglow emission properties of Mn2+.

  3. Interference with Pseudomonas quinolone signal synthesis inhibits virulence factor expression by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Calfee, M. Worth; Coleman, James P.; Pesci, Everett C.

    2001-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that controls numerous virulence factors through intercellular signals. This bacterium has two quorum-sensing systems (las and rhl), which act through the intercellular signals N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C12-HSL) and N-butyryl-l-homoserine lactone (C4-HSL), respectively. P. aeruginosa also produces a third intercellular signal that is involved in virulence factor regulation. This signal, 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4-quinolone [referred to as the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS)], is a secondary metabolite that is part of the P. aeruginosa quorum-sensing hierarchy. PQS can induce both lasB (encodes LasB elastase) and rhlI (encodes the C4-HSL synthase) in P. aeruginosa and is produced maximally during the late stationary phase of growth. Because PQS is an intercellular signal that is part of the quorum-sensing hierarchy and controls multiple virulence factors, we began basic studies designed to elucidate its biosynthetic pathway. First, we present data that strongly suggest that anthranilate is a precursor for PQS. P. aeruginosa converted radiolabeled anthranilate into radioactive PQS, which was bioactive. We also found that an anthranilate analog (methyl anthranilate) would inhibit the production of PQS. This analog was then shown to have a major negative effect on elastase production by P. aeruginosa. These data provide evidence that precursors of intercellular signals may provide viable targets for the development of therapeutic treatments that will reduce P. aeruginosa virulence. PMID:11573001

  4. Pr3+/Yb3+ co-doped beta-phase NaYF4 microprisms: controlled synthesis and upconversion luminescence.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wei; Zheng, Hairong; Gao, Dangli; He, Enjie; Li, Jiao; Tu, Yinxun

    2014-06-01

    Pr3+/Yb3+ co-doped hexagonal NaYF4(beta-NaYF4) microprisms were synthesized by the hydrothermal method, and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) was introduced to control the size of the microcrystal samples. Bright upconverted fluorescence emission was observed when the samples were excited with an infrared (IR) laser at 976.4 nm. The emission was found to originate from the transitions of 3P0-3F2, 3P0-3H6 or 1G4-3H4, 3P1-3H6, 3P0-3H5, 3P1-3H5, and 3P0-3H4 of Pr3+ ions. Possible mechanisms for upconversion fluorescence and concentration dependence as well as the crystal structure and its formation of NaYF4:Yb3+/Pr3+ microprisms were explored and discussed based on the experimental observations. PMID:24738388

  5. Pr3+-sensitized Er3+-doped bismuthate glass for generating high inversion rates at 2.7 µm wavelength.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yanyan; Tian, Ying; Zhang, Liyan; Hu, Lili; Chen, Nan-Kuang; Zhang, Junjie

    2012-08-15

    With a 980 nm laser diode pumping, the 2.7 µm emission and energy transfer processes of Er3+/Pr3+ codoped germanium-gallium-bismuthate glasses have been investigated. For Er3+ (1 mol. %) and Pr3+ (1 mol. %) molar concentrations, an intense 2.7 µm emission was obtained based on the high excited-state absorption of Er3+ ions and energy transfer (ET) between Er3+ and Pr3+ ions codopant (ET). The intrinsic lifetime of Er3+:4I(13/2) level is quenched effectively (from 6.85 ms down to 0.24 ms) and the population inversions between Er3+:4I(11/2) and 4I(13/2) levels are enhanced to achieve a four-level energy system at 2.7 µm. PMID:23381266

  6. Production of a value-added hydroxy fatty acid, 7,10-dihydroxy-8(E)-octadecenoic acid from high oleic safflower oil by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PR3

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hydroxy fatty acids (HFA), originally found in small amount mainly from plant systems, are good examples of the structurally modified lipids, rendering special properties such as higher viscosity and reactivity compared to normal fatty acids. Based on these properties, HFAs possess high industrial ...

  7. Environmental optimization for bioconversion of triolein into 7,10-dihydroxy-8(E)-octadecenoic acid by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PR3

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hydroxy fatty acids (HFA), originally found in small amounts mainly from plant systems, are well known to have special properties such as higher viscosity and reactivity compared with other normal fatty acids. These special properties make HFAs have high industrial potentials in a wide range of app...

  8. Production of Biologically Active 7,10-dihydroxy-8(E)-octadecenoic Acid from Korean Pine Seed Oil by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PR3.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hydroxyl group of hydroxyl fatty acid (HFA) cause HFA to carry special properties such as higher viscosity and reactivity compared with other non-hydroxy fatty acids. Microbial conversion of oleic acid into 7,10-dihydroxy-8(E)-octadecenoic acid (DOD) caused DOD to carry strong antibacterial activit...

  9. Thermostable Lipoxygenase, a Key Enzyme in the Conversion of Linoleic Acid into Thrihydroxy-octadecenoic Acid by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PR3

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lipoxygenases (LOX) constitute a family of lipid-peroxidizing enzymes catalyzing the oxidation of unsaturated fatty acid with (1Z,4Z)-pentadiene structural unit, leading to formation of the conjugated (Z,E)-hydroperoxydienoic acid. LOXs have been known to be widely distributed in plants and animals...

  10. Convertible Stadium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Air flotation technology used in NASA's Apollo program has found an interesting application in Hawaii's Aloha Stadium near Honolulu. The stadium's configuration can be changed, by moving entire 7,000-seat sections on a cushion of air, for best accommodation of spectators and participants at different types of events. In most stadiums, only a few hundred seats can be moved, by rolling sections on wheels or rails. At Aloha Stadium, 28,000 of the 50,000 seats can be repositioned for better spectator viewing and, additionally, for improved playing conditions. For example, a stadium designed primarily for football may compromise the baseball diamond by providing only a shallow outfield. Aloha's convertibility allows a full-size baseball field as well as optimum configurations for many other types of sports and special events. The photos show examples. The stadium owes its versatility to air flotation technology developed by General Motors. Its first large-scale application was movement of huge segments of the mammoth Saturn V moonbooster during assembly operations at Marshall Space Flight Center.

  11. Thermionic converter

    DOEpatents

    Rasor, Ned S.; Britt, Edward J.

    1976-01-01

    A gas-filled thermionic converter is provided with a collector and an emitter having a main emitter region and an auxiliary emitter region in electrical contact with the main emitter region. The main emitter region is so positioned with respect to the collector that a main gap is formed therebetween and the auxiliary emitter region is so positioned with respect to the collector that an auxiliary gap is formed therebetween partially separated from the main gap with access allowed between the gaps to allow ionizable gas in each gap to migrate therebetween. With heat applied to the emitter the work function of the auxiliary emitter region is sufficiently greater than the work function of the collector so that an ignited discharge occurs in the auxiliary gap and the work function of the main emitter region is so related to the work function of the collector that an unignited discharge occurs in the main gap sustained by the ions generated in the auxiliary gap. A current flows through a load coupled across the emitter and collector due to the unignited discharge in the main gap.

  12. Glycosylation of proteinase 3 (PR3) is not required for its reactivity with antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) in Wegener’s granulomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Finkielman, J.D.; Merkel, P.A.; Schroeder, D.; Hoffman, G.S.; Spiera, R.; St. Clair, E.W.; Davis, J.C.; McCune, W.J.; Lears, A.; Ytterberg, S.R.; Hummel, A.M.; Viss, M.A.; Peikert, T.; Stone, J.H.; Specks, U.

    2011-01-01

    Objective The glycosylation status of autoantigens appears to be crucial for the pathogenesis of some autoimmune diseases, since carbohydrates play a crucial role in the distinction of self from non-self. Proteinase 3 (PR3), the main target antigen for anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) in patients with Wegener’s granulomatosis (WG), contains two Asn-linked glycosylation sites. The present study explores the influence of the glycosylation status of PR3 on the PR3 recognition by ANCA in a well characterized population of patients with WG. Methods Forty-four patients with WG (459 serum samples) who participated in a multicenter randomized trial, were tested by capture ELISA for ANCA against PR3 and deglycosylated recombinant variants of PR3. Results The patients were followed for a median of 27 months, and the median number of serum samples per patient was 10. At baseline, the correlation between the levels of ANCA against PR3 and against all the deglycosylated recombinant variants of PR3 were greater than 0.94 (ρ<0.001 for all the comparisons). Longitudinal analyses comparing the levels of ANCA against PR3 versus all the deglycosylated recombinant variants of PR3, using linear mixed models, showed no significant statistical differences (ρ≥0.90 in all cases). Conclusions The glycosylation status of PR3 has no impact on its recognition by ANCA in WG. PMID:19646346

  13. The Effect of Natural Organic Matter on Mercury Methylation by Desulfobulbus propionicus 1pr3

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, John W.; Gionfriddo, Caitlin M.; Krabbenhoft, David P.; Ogorek, Jacob M.; DeWild, John F.; Aiken, George R.; Roden, Eric E.

    2015-01-01

    Methylation of tracer and ambient mercury (200Hg and 202Hg, respectively) equilibrated with four different natural organic matter (NOM) isolates was investigated in vivo using the Hg-methylating sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfobulbus propionicus 1pr3. Desulfobulbus cultures grown fermentatively with environmentally representative concentrations of dissolved NOM isolates, Hg[II], and HS− were assayed for absolute methylmercury (MeHg) concentration and conversion of Hg(II) to MeHg relative to total unfiltered Hg(II). Results showed the 200Hg tracer was methylated more efficiently in the presence of hydrophobic NOM isolates than in the presence of transphilic NOM, or in the absence of NOM. Different NOM isolates were associated with variable methylation efficiencies for either the 202Hg tracer or ambient 200Hg. One hydrophobic NOM, F1 HpoA derived from dissolved organic matter from the Florida Everglades, was equilibrated for different times with Hg tracer, which resulted in different methylation rates. A 5 day equilibration with F1 HpoA resulted in more MeHg production than either the 4 h or 30 day equilibration periods, suggesting a time dependence for NOM-enhanced Hg bioavailability for methylation. PMID:26733947

  14. The Effect of Natural Organic Matter on Mercury Methylation by Desulfobulbus propionicus 1pr3.

    PubMed

    Moreau, John W; Gionfriddo, Caitlin M; Krabbenhoft, David P; Ogorek, Jacob M; DeWild, John F; Aiken, George R; Roden, Eric E

    2015-01-01

    Methylation of tracer and ambient mercury ((200)Hg and (202)Hg, respectively) equilibrated with four different natural organic matter (NOM) isolates was investigated in vivo using the Hg-methylating sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfobulbus propionicus 1pr3. Desulfobulbus cultures grown fermentatively with environmentally representative concentrations of dissolved NOM isolates, Hg[II], and HS(-) were assayed for absolute methylmercury (MeHg) concentration and conversion of Hg(II) to MeHg relative to total unfiltered Hg(II). Results showed the (200)Hg tracer was methylated more efficiently in the presence of hydrophobic NOM isolates than in the presence of transphilic NOM, or in the absence of NOM. Different NOM isolates were associated with variable methylation efficiencies for either the (202)Hg tracer or ambient (200)Hg. One hydrophobic NOM, F1 HpoA derived from dissolved organic matter from the Florida Everglades, was equilibrated for different times with Hg tracer, which resulted in different methylation rates. A 5 day equilibration with F1 HpoA resulted in more MeHg production than either the 4 h or 30 day equilibration periods, suggesting a time dependence for NOM-enhanced Hg bioavailability for methylation. PMID:26733947

  15. Highly efficient cascaded amplification using Pr(3+)-doped mid-infrared chalcogenide fiber amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jonathan; Menyuk, Curtis R; Wei, Chengli; Brandon Shaw, L; Sanghera, Jasbinder S; Aggarwal, Ishwar D

    2015-08-15

    We computationally investigate cascaded amplification in a three-level mid-infrared (IR) Pr(3+)-doped chalcogenide fiber amplifier. The overlap of the cross-sections in the transitions (3)H(6)→(3)H(5) and (3)H(5)→(3)H(4) enable both transitions to simultaneously amplify a single wavelength in the range between 4.25 μm and 4.55 μm. High gain and low noise are achieved simultaneously if the signal is at 4.5 μm. We show that 45% of pump power that is injected at 2 μm can be shifted to 4.5 μm. The efficiency of using a mid-IR fiber amplifier is higher than what can be achieved by using mid-IR supercontinuum generation, which has been estimated at 25%. This mid-IR fiber amplifier can be used in conjunction with quantum cascade lasers to obtain a tunable, high-power mid-IR source. PMID:26274635

  16. Optical properties and spectroscopic study of different modifier based Pr(3+):LiFB glasses as optical amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Balakrishna, A; Babu, S; Kumar, Vinod; Ntwaeaborwa, O M; Ratnakaram, Y C

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we report the preparation and optical characterization of Pr(3+) doped lithium fluoro borate (LiFB) glasses for six different chemical compositions of Li2B4O7-BaF2-NaF-MO (where M=Mg, Ca, Cd and Pb), Li2B4O7-BaF2-NaF-MgO-CaO and Li2B4O7-BaF2-NaF-CdO-PbO. The structural and optical properties of these glasses were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), optical absorption and photoluminescence techniques. The optical absorption spectra of Pr(3+) ions in LiFB glasses have been recorded in the UV-VIS-NIR region. The optical absorption data are used to calculate various spectroscopic parameters such as Racah (E(1), E(2), E(3)) and spin-orbit interaction (ξ4f) parameters. Judd-Ofelt (J-O) (Ωλ where λ=2, 4 and 6) intensity parameters were determined by applying J-O theory, which in turn used to calculate the radiative properties such as radiative transition probabilities (A), radiative lifetimes (τR), integrated absorption cross-sections (Σ) and branching ratios (βr) for all emission levels of Pr(3+) ion in different LiFB glass matrices. By using the J-O theory and luminescence parameters, stimulated emission cross sections (σp) of prominent transitions, (3)P0→(3)H4 and (1)D2→(3)H4 of Pr(3+) ion in all LiFB glasses were calculated. (3)P0→(3)H4 possesses higher branching ratios and stimulated emission cross-sections for the Pr(3+):LiFB(Mg-Ca) glass, which can be used as a best laser excitation. The optical gain parameter (σpxτR) was noticed higher in Pr(3+):LiFB(Mg-Ca) and Pr(3+):LiFB(Cd-Pb) glasses for the transition (3)P0→(3)H4 transition, and these glasses have potential for optical amplification at 488 nm wavelength. PMID:27434876

  17. Capsule production by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn, A.R.

    1984-01-01

    Mucoid strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, associated almost exclusively with chronic respiratory infections in patients with cystic fibrosis, possess a capsule composed of alginic acid similar to one produced by Azotobacter vinelandii. Recent reports have provided evidence that the biosynthetic pathway for alginate in P. aeruginosa may differ from the pathway proposed for A. vinelandii in that synthesis in P. aeruginosa may occur by way of the Entner-Doudoroff pathway. Incorporation of isotope from (6-/sup 14/C)glucose into alginate by both P. aueroginosa and A. vinelandii was 10-fold greater than that from either (1-/sup 14/C)/sup -/ or (2-/sup 14/C)glucose, indicating preferential utilization of the bottom half of the glucose molecule for alginate biosynthesis. These data strongly suggest that the Entner-Doudoroff pathway plays a major role in alginate synthesis in both P. aeruginosa and A. vinelandii. The enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism in mucoid strains of P. aeruginosa appear to be unchanged whether alignate is actively produced or not and activities do not differ significantly from nonmucoid strain PAO.

  18. Inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Swarming Motility by 1-Naphthol and Other Bicyclic Compounds Bearing Hydroxyl Groups

    PubMed Central

    Oura, Hiromu; Tashiro, Yosuke; Toyofuku, Masanori; Ueda, Kousetsu; Kiyokawa, Tatsunori; Ito, Satoshi; Takahashi, Yurika; Lee, Seunguk; Nojiri, Hideaki; Nakajima-Kambe, Toshiaki; Uchiyama, Hiroo; Futamata, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Many bacteria convert bicyclic compounds, such as indole and naphthalene, to oxidized compounds, including hydroxyindoles and naphthols. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a ubiquitous bacterium that inhabits diverse environments, shows pathogenicity against animals, plants, and other microorganisms, and increasing evidence has shown that several bicyclic compounds alter the virulence-related phenotypes of P. aeruginosa. Here, we revealed that hydroxyindoles (4- and 5-hydroxyindoles) and naphthalene derivatives bearing hydroxyl groups specifically inhibit swarming motility but have minor effects on other motilities, including swimming and twitching, in P. aeruginosa. Further analyses using 1-naphthol showed that this effect is also associated with clinically isolated hyperswarming P. aeruginosa cells. Swarming motility is associated with the dispersion of cells from biofilms, and the addition of 1-naphthol maintained biofilm biomass without cell dispersion. We showed that this 1-naphthol-dependent swarming inhibition is independent of changes of rhamnolipid production and the intracellular level of signaling molecule cyclic-di-GMP (c-di-GMP). Transcriptome analyses revealed that 1-naphthol increases gene expression associated with multidrug efflux and represses gene expression associated with aerotaxis and with pyochelin, flagellar, and pilus synthesis. In the present study, we showed that several bicyclic compounds bearing hydroxyl groups inhibit the swarming motility of P. aeruginosa, and these results provide new insight into the chemical structures that inhibit the specific phenotypes of P. aeruginosa. PMID:25681177

  19. Inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa swarming motility by 1-naphthol and other bicyclic compounds bearing hydroxyl groups.

    PubMed

    Oura, Hiromu; Tashiro, Yosuke; Toyofuku, Masanori; Ueda, Kousetsu; Kiyokawa, Tatsunori; Ito, Satoshi; Takahashi, Yurika; Lee, Seunguk; Nojiri, Hideaki; Nakajima-Kambe, Toshiaki; Uchiyama, Hiroo; Futamata, Hiroyuki; Nomura, Nobuhiko

    2015-04-01

    Many bacteria convert bicyclic compounds, such as indole and naphthalene, to oxidized compounds, including hydroxyindoles and naphthols. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a ubiquitous bacterium that inhabits diverse environments, shows pathogenicity against animals, plants, and other microorganisms, and increasing evidence has shown that several bicyclic compounds alter the virulence-related phenotypes of P. aeruginosa. Here, we revealed that hydroxyindoles (4- and 5-hydroxyindoles) and naphthalene derivatives bearing hydroxyl groups specifically inhibit swarming motility but have minor effects on other motilities, including swimming and twitching, in P. aeruginosa. Further analyses using 1-naphthol showed that this effect is also associated with clinically isolated hyperswarming P. aeruginosa cells. Swarming motility is associated with the dispersion of cells from biofilms, and the addition of 1-naphthol maintained biofilm biomass without cell dispersion. We showed that this 1-naphthol-dependent swarming inhibition is independent of changes of rhamnolipid production and the intracellular level of signaling molecule cyclic-di-GMP (c-di-GMP). Transcriptome analyses revealed that 1-naphthol increases gene expression associated with multidrug efflux and represses gene expression associated with aerotaxis and with pyochelin, flagellar, and pilus synthesis. In the present study, we showed that several bicyclic compounds bearing hydroxyl groups inhibit the swarming motility of P. aeruginosa, and these results provide new insight into the chemical structures that inhibit the specific phenotypes of P. aeruginosa. PMID:25681177

  20. Energy transfer based photoluminescence properties of co-doped (Er3+ + Pr3+): PEO + PVP blended polymer composites for photonic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naveen Kumar, K.; Kang, Misook; Bhaskar Kumar, G.; Ratnakaram, Y. C.

    2016-04-01

    Er3+, Pr3+ singly doped and co-doped PEO + PVP polymer composites have been synthesized by conventional solution casting method. The structural analysis has been carried out for all these polymer composites from XRD analysis. Raman spectral studies confirm the ion-polymer interactions and polymer complex formation. Thermal properties of pure polymer film has also been clearly elucidated by TG/DTA profiles. Well defined optical absorption bands pertaining to Er3+ and Pr3+ are observed in the absorption spectral profile and these bands are assigned with corresponding electronic transitions. The polymer films containing singly doped Er3+ and Pr3+ ions have displayed green and red emissions at 510 nm (2H11/2 → 4I15/2) and 688 nm (3P0 → 3F3) respectively under UV excitation source. Comparing the emission spectra of singly Er3+ and co-doped Er3+ + Pr3+: PEO + PVP polymer films, a significant red emission pertaining to Pr3+ions is remarkably enhanced in co-doped polymer system. This could be ascribed to possible energy transfer from Er3+ to Pr3+ in co-doped polymer system. The energy transfer mechanism is clearly demonstrated using their emission performances, overlapped spectral profiles and also life time decay dynamics. Thus, it could be suggested that Er3+: PEO + PVP, Pr3+: PEO + PVP and (Er3+ + Pr3+): PEO + PVP blended polymer films are potential materials for several photonic applications.

  1. Actively Q-switched 2.9 μm Ho(3+)Pr(3+)-doped fluoride fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Hu, Tomonori; Hudson, Darren D; Jackson, Stuart D

    2012-06-01

    We report an efficient Q-switched Ho(3+)Pr(3+)-doped fluoride fiber laser, producing a peak power of 77 W, with pulse width of 78 ns. A slope efficiency of 20% with respect to the launched pump power was achieved. A TeO(2) acousto-optic modulator allowed continuous tunability of the pulse repetition frequency from 40 to 300 kHz. PMID:22660149

  2. Pr3+-doped heavy metal germanium tellurite glasses for irradiative light source in minimally invasive photodynamic therapy surgery.

    PubMed

    Yang, J; Chen, B J; Pun, E Y B; Zhai, B; Lin, H

    2013-01-14

    Pr3+-doped medium-low phonon energy heavy metal germanium tellurite (NZPGT) glasses have been fabricated and the intense multi-peak red fluorescence emissions of Pr3+ are exhibited. Judd-Ofelt parameters Ω2 = 3.14 × 10(-20)cm(2), Ω4 = 10.67 × 10(-20)cm(2) and Ω6 = 3.95 × 10(-20)cm(2) indicate a high asymmetrical and covalent environment in the optical glasses. The spontaneous emission probabilities A(ij) corresponding to the 1D2→3H4, 3P0→3H6, and 3P0→3F2 transitions are derived to be 1859.6, 6270.1 and 17276.3s(-1), respectively, and the relevant stimulated emission cross-sections σ(em) are 5.20 × 10(-21), 14.14 × 10(-21) and 126.77 × 10(-21)cm(2), confirming that the effectiveness of the red luminescence in Pr3+-doped NZPGT glasses. Under the commercial blue LED excitation, the radiant flux and the quantum yield for the red fluorescence of Pr3+ are solved to be 219μW and 11.80%, respectively. 85.24% photons of the fluorescence in the visible region are demonstrated to be located in 600-720nm wavelength range, which matches the excitation band of the most photosensitizers (PS), holding great promise for photodynamic therapy (PDT) treatment and clinical trials. PMID:23388997

  3. Indole and 7-hydroxyindole diminish Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jintae; Attila, Can; Cirillo, Suat L G; Cirillo, Jeffrey D; Wood, Thomas K

    2009-01-01

    Indole is an extracellular biofilm signal for Escherichia coli, and many bacterial oxygenases readily convert indole to various oxidized compounds including 7-hydroxyindole (7HI). Here we investigate the impact of indole and 7HI on Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 virulence and quorum sensing (QS)-regulated phenotypes; this strain does not synthesize these compounds but degrades them rapidly. Indole and 7HI both altered extensively gene expression in a manner opposite that of acylhomoserine lactones; the most repressed genes encode the mexGHI-opmD multidrug efflux pump and genes involved in the synthesis of QS-regulated virulence factors including pyocyanin (phz operon), 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone (PQS) signal (pqs operon), pyochelin (pch operon) and pyoverdine (pvd operon). Corroborating these microarray results, indole and 7HI decreased production of pyocyanin, rhamnolipid, PQS and pyoverdine and enhanced antibiotic resistance. In addition, indole affected the utilization of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus, and 7HI abolished swarming motility. Furthermore, 7HI reduced pulmonary colonization of P. aeruginosa in guinea pigs and increased clearance in lungs. Hence, indole-related compounds have potential as a novel antivirulence approach for the recalcitrant pathogen P. aeruginosa. PMID:21261883

  4. Several features of emission spectra of Pr+3 ions incorporated into Li2B4O7 glass matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majchrowski, A.; Kityk, I. V.; Mandowska, E.; Mandowski, A.; Ebothé, Jean; Lukasiewicz, T.

    2006-09-01

    Influence of lithium tetraborate (Li2B4O7, TBL) glass matrix on the luminescent properties of the Pr+3 ions emission was investigated. It was demonstrated that the decrease of matrix long-range ordering leads to substantial widening of corresponding peaks in the emission spectra in comparison with crystalline Ca4GdO(BO3)3 matrices. During the decrease of temperature from 292 down to 82K a distinct low-energy spectral shift of the principal red luminescent band from 607to610nm is observed, which is a consequence of a coexistence of several structural borate fragments. Simulations of incorporation the Pr3+ ions into the TBL glasslike matrix were carried out using the Langevin molecular dynamics simulations and quantum chemical simulations. Possibility of partial substitution of boron ions by Pr3+ ions is demonstrated. The contribution of the electron-phonon subsystems to the spectral broadening of the corresponding emission red lines was evaluated. It was shown that the main contribution to the emission bands gives harmonic electron-phonon interactions contrary to the generally adopted model assuming prevailing role of anharmonic electron-phonon interactions.

  5. Spectroscopy of single Pr3+ ion in LaF3 crystal at 1.5 K

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Ippei; Yoshihiro, Tatsuya; Inagawa, Hironori; Fujiyoshi, Satoru; Matsushita, Michio

    2014-01-01

    Optical read-out and manipulation of the nuclear spin state of single rare-earth ions doped in a crystal enable the large-scale storage and the transport of quantum information. Here, we report the photo-luminescence excitation spectroscopy results of single Pr3+ ions in a bulk crystal of LaF3 at 1.5 K. In a bulk sample, the signal from a single ion at the focus is often hidden under the background signal originating from numerous out-of-focus ions in the entire sample. To combine with a homemade cryogenic confocal microscope, we developed a reflecting objective that works in superfluid helium with a numerical aperture of 0.99, which increases the signal by increasing the solid angle of collection to 1.16π and reduces the background by decreasing the focal volume. The photo-luminescence excitation spectrum of single Pr3+ was measured at a wing of the spectral line of the 3H4 → 3P0 transition at 627.33 THz (477.89 nm). The spectrum of individual Pr3+ ions appears on top of the background of 60 cps as isolated peaks with intensities of 20–30 cps and full-width at half-maximum widths of approximately 3 MHz at an excitation intensity of 80 W cm−2. PMID:25482137

  6. Feasibility study for convertible engine torque converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The feasibility study has shown that a dump/fill type torque converter has excellent potential for the convertible fan/shaft engine. The torque converter space requirement permits internal housing within the normal flow path of a turbofan engine at acceptable engine weight. The unit permits operating the engine in the turboshaft mode by decoupling the fan. To convert to turbofan mode, the torque converter overdrive capability bring the fan speed up to the power turbine speed to permit engagement of a mechanical lockup device when the shaft speed are synchronized. The conversion to turbofan mode can be made without drop of power turbine speed in less than 10 sec. Total thrust delivered to the aircraft by the proprotor, fan, and engine during tansient can be controlled to prevent loss of air speed or altitude. Heat rejection to the oil is low, and additional oil cooling capacity is not required. The turbofan engine aerodynamic design is basically uncompromised by convertibility and allows proper fan design for quiet and efficient cruise operation. Although the results of the feasibility study are exceedingly encouraging, it must be noted that they are based on extrapolation of limited existing data on torque converters. A component test program with three trial torque converter designs and concurrent computer modeling for fluid flow, stress, and dynamics, updated with test results from each unit, is recommended.

  7. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in disease.

    PubMed

    Mulcahy, Lawrence R; Isabella, Vincent M; Lewis, Kim

    2014-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a ubiquitous organism that is the focus of intense research because of its prominent role in disease. Due to its relatively large genome and flexible metabolic capabilities, this organism exploits numerous environmental niches. It is an opportunistic pathogen that sets upon the human host when the normal immune defenses are disabled. Its deadliness is most apparent in cystic fibrosis patients, but it also is a major problem in burn wounds, chronic wounds, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder, surface growth on implanted biomaterials, and within hospital surface and water supplies, where it poses a host of threats to vulnerable patients (Peleg and Hooper, N Engl J Med 362:1804-1813, 2010; Breathnach et al., J Hosp Infect 82:19-24, 2012). Once established in the patient, P. aeruginosa can be especially difficult to treat. The genome encodes a host of resistance genes, including multidrug efflux pumps (Poole, J Mol Microbiol Biotechnol 3:255-264, 2001) and enzymes conferring resistance to beta-lactam and aminoglycoside antibotics (Vahdani et al., Annal Burns Fire Disast 25:78-81, 2012), making therapy against this gram-negative pathogen particularly challenging due to the lack of novel antimicrobial therapeutics (Lewis, Nature 485: 439-440, 2012). This challenge is compounded by the ability of P. aeruginosa to grow in a biofilm, which may enhance its ability to cause infections by protecting bacteria from host defenses and chemotherapy. Here, we review recent studies of P. aeruginosa biofilms with a focus on how this unique mode of growth contributes to its ability to cause recalcitrant infections. PMID:24096885

  8. Tryptophan Inhibits Biofilm Formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Brandenburg, Kenneth S.; Rodriguez, Karien J.; McAnulty, Jonathan F.; Murphy, Christopher J.; Abbott, Nicholas L.; Schurr, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been implicated in the pathology of chronic wounds. Both the d and l isoforms of tryptophan inhibited P. aeruginosa biofilm formation on tissue culture plates, with an equimolar ratio of d and l isoforms producing the greatest inhibitory effect. Addition of d-/l-tryptophan to existing biofilms inhibited further biofilm growth and caused partial biofilm disassembly. Tryptophan significantly increased swimming motility, which may be responsible in part for diminished biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa. PMID:23318791

  9. Theoretical study on mechanism of the photochemical ligand substitution of fac-[Re(I)(bpy)(CO)3(PR3)](+) complex.

    PubMed

    Saita, Kenichiro; Harabuchi, Yu; Taketsugu, Tetsuya; Ishitani, Osamu; Maeda, Satoshi

    2016-07-14

    The mechanism of the CO ligand dissociation of fac-[Re(I)(bpy)(CO)3P(OMe)3](+) has theoretically been investigated, as the dominant process of the photochemical ligand substitution (PLS) reactions of fac-[Re(I)(bpy)(CO)3PR3](+), by using the (TD-)DFT method. The PLS reactivity can be determined by the topology of the T1 potential energy surface because the photoexcited complex is able to decay into the T1 state by internal conversions (through conical intersections) and intersystem crossings (via crossing seams) with sufficiently low energy barriers. The T1 state has a character of the metal-to-ligand charge-transfer ((3)MLCT) around the Franck-Condon region, and it changes to the metal-centered ((3)MC) state as the Re-CO bond is elongated and bent. The equatorial CO ligand has a much higher energy barrier to leave than that of the axial CO, so that the axial CO ligand selectively dissociates in the PLS reaction. The single-component artificial force induced reaction (SC-AFIR) search reveals the CO dissociation pathway in photostable fac-[Re(I)(bpy)(CO)3Cl]; however, the dissociation barrier on the T1 state is substantially higher than that in fac-[Re(I)(bpy)(CO)3PR3](+) and the minimum-energy seams of crossings (MESXs) are located before and below the barrier. The MESXs have also been searched in fac-[Re(I)(bpy)(CO)3PR3](+) and no MESXs were found before and below the barrier. PMID:27306043

  10. Optical properties of AlF(3)-based glasses doped with Pr(3+), Yb(3+) and Lu(3+).

    PubMed

    Iqbal, T; Shahriari, M R; Hajcak, P; Sigel, G H; Copeland, L R; Reed, W A

    1994-02-20

    Rare-earth ions can easily be incorporated into fluoride glasses in moderate to large concentrations. Because these glasses possess low fundamental frequencies, they appear to have many advantages over oxide glasses as hosts for rare-earth ions used in optical amplifiers and lasers. We have investigated the optical properties (fluorescence, absorption, and excited-state lifetimes) of AlF(3)-based glass doped with Pr(3+), Yb(3+) and Lu(3+). The effects of different dopant levels on the optical properties of this glass system have also been investigated. These results are compared to those obtained for the same ions in other glass hosts. PMID:20862098

  11. Stopped Light at High Storage Efficiency in a Pr3 + :Y2SiO5 Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schraft, Daniel; Hain, Marcel; Lorenz, Nikolaus; Halfmann, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrate efficient storage and retrieval of light pulses by electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in a Pr3 +:Y2SiO5 crystal. Using a ring-type multipass configuration, we increase the optical depth (OD) of the medium up to a factor of 16 towards OD ≈96 . Combining the large optical depth with optimized conditions for EIT, we reach a light storage efficiency of (76.3 ±3.5 )% . In addition, we perform extended systematic measurements of the storage efficiency versus optical depth, control Rabi frequency, and probe pulse duration. The data confirm the theoretically expected behavior of an EIT-driven solid-state memory.

  12. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Population Structure Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Pirnay, Jean-Paul; Bilocq, Florence; Pot, Bruno; Cornelis, Pierre; Zizi, Martin; Van Eldere, Johan; Deschaght, Pieter; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Jennes, Serge; Pitt, Tyrone; De Vos, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    At present there are strong indications that Pseudomonas aeruginosa exhibits an epidemic population structure; clinical isolates are indistinguishable from environmental isolates, and they do not exhibit a specific (disease) habitat selection. However, some important issues, such as the worldwide emergence of highly transmissible P. aeruginosa clones among cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and the spread and persistence of multidrug resistant (MDR) strains in hospital wards with high antibiotic pressure, remain contentious. To further investigate the population structure of P. aeruginosa, eight parameters were analyzed and combined for 328 unrelated isolates, collected over the last 125 years from 69 localities in 30 countries on five continents, from diverse clinical (human and animal) and environmental habitats. The analysed parameters were: i) O serotype, ii) Fluorescent Amplified-Fragment Length Polymorphism (FALFP) pattern, nucleotide sequences of outer membrane protein genes, iii) oprI, iv) oprL, v) oprD, vi) pyoverdine receptor gene profile (fpvA type and fpvB prevalence), and prevalence of vii) exoenzyme genes exoS and exoU and viii) group I pilin glycosyltransferase gene tfpO. These traits were combined and analysed using biological data analysis software and visualized in the form of a minimum spanning tree (MST). We revealed a network of relationships between all analyzed parameters and non-congruence between experiments. At the same time we observed several conserved clones, characterized by an almost identical data set. These observations confirm the nonclonal epidemic population structure of P. aeruginosa, a superficially clonal structure with frequent recombinations, in which occasionally highly successful epidemic clones arise. One of these clones is the renown and widespread MDR serotype O12 clone. On the other hand, we found no evidence for a widespread CF transmissible clone. All but one of the 43 analysed CF strains belonged to a ubiquitous P

  13. Effect of sintering temperature on the luminescence properties of Ca0.8Ba0.2TiO3:Pr(3+) red-emitting phosphor.

    PubMed

    Mu, Yannan; Qiu, Min; Zhou, Xiaoming; Li, Qian; Sun, Meiling; Yang, Haibin; Fu, Wuyou; Yang, Lihua; Ma, Jinwen

    2015-08-01

    Nanoparticles with the nominal composition Ca0.8Ba0.2Ti03:Pr(3+) were prepared using the sol-gel process. Barium nitrate, 4-hydrated calcium nitrate and praseodymium oxide were used as raw materials. The structural evolution and decomposition processes of the precursors were investigated by powder X-ray diffraction, differential thermal analysis and thermogravimetric analysis. Crystalline Ca0.8Ba0.2Ti03:Pr(3+) could be obtained at 700°C. The photoluminescence properties of the samples were investigated using excitation and emission spectra. Ca0.8Ba0.2Ti03:Pr(3+) nanoparticles showed strong red emission, which could be assigned to the typical (1) D2 →(3) H4 transition of Pr(3+). Furthermore, the study found that sintering temperature and the introduction of Ba(2+) influence the decay time of persistent luminescence. PMID:25209628

  14. Study on optical properties of rare-earth ions in nanocrystalline monoclinic SrAl2O4: Ln (Ln = Ce3+, Pr3+, Tb3+).

    PubMed

    Fu, Zuoling; Zhou, Shihong; Zhang, Siyuan

    2005-08-01

    SrAl(2)O(4): Ln (Ln = Ce(3+), Pr(3+), Tb(3+)) nanocrystals have been synthesized by the combustion method. The results of XRD indicated that the resulting SrAl(2)O(4): Ln (Ln = Ce(3+), Pr(3+), Tb(3+)) nanocrystals have a reduced and distorted monoclinic lattice compared with bulk materials. The spectral properties are measured, and it is found that the excitation peaks of 5d energy levels red shift in nanocrystals in contrast to that in bulk crystals. The mechanism of spectra and energy changes is investigated. The order of the degree of red shift for nano SrAl(2)O(4): Ln (Ln = Ce(3+), Pr(3+), Tb(3+)) crystals is Pr(3+) > Ce(3+) > Tb(3+), which is in good agreement with our predicted results. PMID:16852811

  15. Synthesis and luminescence characterization of Pr(3+) doped Sr1.5Ca0.5SiO4 phosphor.

    PubMed

    Vidyadharan, Viji; Mani, Kamal P; Sajna, M S; Joseph, Cyriac; Unnikrishnan, N V; Biju, P R

    2014-12-10

    Luminescence properties of Pr(3+) activated Sr1.5Ca0.5SiO4 phosphors synthesized by solid state reaction method are reported in this work. Blue, orange red and red emissions were observed in the Pr(3+) doped sample under 444nm excitation and these emissions are assigned as (3)P0→(3)H4, (3)P0→(3)H6 and (3)P0→(3)F4 transitions. The emission intensity shows a maximum corresponding to the 0.5wt% Pr(3+) ion. The decay analysis was done for 0.05 and 0.5wt% Pr(3+) doped samples for the transition (3)P0→(3)H6. The life times of 0.05 and 0.5wt% Pr(3+) doped samples were calculated by fitting to exponential and non-exponential curve respectively, and are found to be 156 and 105μs respectively. The non-exponential behaviour arises due to the statistical distribution of the distances between the ground state Pr(3+) ions and excited state Pr(3+) ions, which cause the inhomogeneous energy transfer rate. The XRD spectrum confirmed the triclinic phase of the prepared phosphors. The compositions of the samples were determined by the energy dispersive X-ray spectra. From the SEM images it is observed that the particles are agglomerated and are irregularly shaped. IR absorption bands were assigned to different vibrational modes. The well resolved peaks shown in the absorption spectra are identical to the excitation spectra of the phosphor samples. Pr(3+) activated Sr1.5Ca0.5SiO4 phosphors can be efficiently excited with 444nm irradiation and emit multicolour visible emissions. From the CIE diagram it can be seen that the prepared phosphor samples give yellowish-green emission. PMID:24998683

  16. Evaluation of spectroscopic properties of Er3+/Yb3+/Pr3+: SrGdGa3O7 crystal for use in mid-infrared lasers

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Houping; Feng, Jianghe; Wang, Yan; Li, Jianfu; Jia, Zhitai; Tu, Chaoyang

    2015-01-01

    Er3+/Yb3+/Pr3+: SrGdGa3O7 crystal was firstly grown by Czochralski method. Detailed spectroscopic analyses of Er3+/Yb3+/Pr3+: SrGdGa3O7 were carried out. Besides better absorption characteristic, the spectra of Er3+/Yb3+/Pr3+: SrGdGa3O7 show weaker up-conversion and near-infrared emissions as well as superior mid-infrared emission in comparison to Er3+: SrGdGa3O7 and Er3+/Yb3+: SrGdGa3O7 crystals. Furthermore, the self-termination effect for Er3+ 2.7 μm laser is suppressed successfully because the fluorescence lifetime of the 4I13/2 lower level of Er3+ decreases markedly while that of the upper 4I11/2 level changes slightly in Er3+/Yb3+/Pr3+: SrGdGa3O7 crystal. The sensitization effect of Yb3+ and deactivation effect of Pr3+ ions as well as the energy transfer mechanism in Er3+/Yb3+/Pr3+: SrGdGa3O7 crystal were also studied in this work. The introduction of Yb3+ and Pr3+ is favorable for achieving an enhanced 2.7 μm emission in Er3+/Yb3+/Pr3+: SrGdGa3O7 crystal which can act as a promising candidate for mid-infrared lasers. PMID:26369289

  17. Concentration quenching of praseodymium ions Pr(3+) in BaGd2(MoO4)4 crystals.

    PubMed

    Guan, Ying; Tsuboi, Taiju; Huang, Yanlin; Huang, Wei

    2014-03-01

    The concentration effect on the photoluminescence (PL) of the praseodymium Pr(3+) ion is studied at 298-12 K for barium gadolinium molybdate (BaGd2(MoO4)4, called BGM) crystals with a wide Pr(3+) concentration range of 0.05-25.0 mol%. Three types of concentration dependences are observed for the emissions although all types show PL quenching at high concentrations. The first type (Type A) has the maximum PL intensity at about 10 mol% with a non-zero intensity at high concentrations, which is observed for the (3)P0 emissions except for emission at 621 nm. The second and third types (Type B-1 and B-2) have the maximum at about 1 mol% with a finite residual intensity and nearly zero intensity at high concentrations, respectively, which are observed for the 621 nm emission and all the (1)D2 emissions. It is suggested that the energy migration mechanism is responsible for Type A, while the non-resonant cross-relaxation is responsible for Type B-1 and the resonant cross-relaxation for Type B-2. PMID:24429706

  18. Rotorcraft convertible engine study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gill, J. C.; Earle, R. V.; Mar, H. M.

    1982-01-01

    The objective of the Rotorcraft Convertible Engine Study was to define future research and technology effort required for commercial development by 1988 of convertible fan/shaft gas turbine engines for unconventional rotorcraft transports. Two rotorcraft and their respective missions were defined: a Fold Tilt Rotor aircraft and an Advancing Blade Concept (ABC) rotorcraft. Sensitivity studies were conducted with these rotorcraft to determine parametrically the influence of propulsion characteristics on aircraft size, mission fuel requirements, and direct operating costs (DOC). The two rotorcraft were flown with conventional propulsion systems (separate lift/cruise engines) and with convertible propulsion systems to determine the benefits to be derived from convertible engines. Trade-off studies were conducted to determine the optimum engine cycle and staging arrangement for a convertible engine. Advanced technology options applicable to convertible engines were studied. Research and technology programs were identified which would ensure technology readiness for commercial development of convertible engines by 1988.

  19. The Accessory Genome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Kung, Vanderlene L.; Ozer, Egon A.; Hauser, Alan R.

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains exhibit significant variability in pathogenicity and ecological flexibility. Such interstrain differences reflect the dynamic nature of the P. aeruginosa genome, which is composed of a relatively invariable “core genome” and a highly variable “accessory genome.” Here we review the major classes of genetic elements comprising the P. aeruginosa accessory genome and highlight emerging themes in the acquisition and functional importance of these elements. Although the precise phenotypes endowed by the majority of the P. aeruginosa accessory genome have yet to be determined, rapid progress is being made, and a clearer understanding of the role of the P. aeruginosa accessory genome in ecology and infection is emerging. PMID:21119020

  20. Physiological responses of Microcystis aeruginosa against the algicidal bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Su; Yin, Hua; Tang, Shaoyu; Peng, Hui; Yin, Donggao; Yang, Yixuan; Liu, Zehua; Dang, Zhi

    2016-05-01

    Proliferation of cyanobacteria in aquatic ecosystems has caused water security problems throughout the world. Our preliminary study has showed that Pseudomonas aeruginosa can inhibit the growth of cyanobacterium, Microcystis aeruginosa. In order to explore the inhibitory mechanism of P. aeruginosa on the cell growth and synthesis of intracellular substances of M. aeruginosa, concentrations of Chlorophyll-a, intracellular protein, carbohydrate, enzyme activities and ion metabolism of M. aeruginosa, were investigated. The results indicated that 83.84% algicidal efficiency of P. aeruginosa was achieved after treatment for 7 days. The strain inhibited the reproduction of M. aeruginosa by impeding the synthesis of intracellular protein and carbohydrate of cyanobacterium, and only a very small part of intracellular protein and carbohydrate was detected after exposure to P. aeruginosa for 5 days. P. aeruginosa caused the alteration of intracellular antioxidant enzyme activity of M. aeruginosa, such as catalase, peroxidase. The accumulation of malondialdehyde aggravated membrane injury after treatment for 3 days. P. aeruginosa also affected the ion metabolism of cyanobacteria. The release of Na(+) and Cl(-) was significantly enhanced while the uptake of K(+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+), NO3(-) and SO4(2)(-) decreased. Surface morphology and intracellular structure of cyanobacteria and bacterial cells changed dramatically over time as evidenced by electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) analysis. These results revealed that the algicidal activity of P. aeruginosa was primarily due to the fermentation liquid of P. aeruginosa that impeded the synthesis of intracellular protein and carbohydrate, and damaged the cell membrane through membrane lipid peroxidation. PMID:26866757

  1. The effect of the depth of single longitudinal mode modulation in Q-switching pre-Pr3+:YLF laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qing-Song, Li; Ling-Xi, Zhu; Xi-He, Zhang; Yuan, Dong; Yong-Ji, Yu; Guang-Yong, Jin

    2016-08-01

    The single longitudinal mode (SLM) can be obtained under the condition of Q-switching pre-lase. In this paper, the model of Q-switching pre-lase is firstly established. Taking the Pr3+:YLF laser as an example, the process of Q-switching pre-lase is simulated and optimized, then the optimized parameters and best output characteristics under different depth of SLM modulation are obtained. Comparing with the normal Q-switching laser, the SLM pulse energy can reach to 79.29%, the pulse width exceeds 16.45% and the depth of SLM modulation get to be 20. The results show that the Q-switching pre-lase output characteristics can be effected obviously by the SLM modulation depth, and the pulse energy and pulse width can be close to the normal Q-switching laser as long as the depth of SLM modulation is optimized.

  2. Nitration is exclusive to defense-related PR-1, PR-3 and PR-5 proteins in tobacco leaves.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Misa; Shigeto, Jun; Izumi, Shunsuke; Yoshizato, Katsutoshi; Morikawa, Hiromichi

    2016-07-01

    Protein tyrosine nitration is an important post-translational modification. A variety of nitrated proteins are reported in Arabidopsis leaves and seedlings, sunflower hypocotyls, and pea roots. The identities of nitrated proteins are species-/organ-specific, and chloroplast proteins are most nitratable in leaves. However, precise mechanism is unclear. Here, we investigated nitroproteome in tobacco leaves following exposure to nitrogen dioxide. Proteins were extracted, electrophoresed and immunoblotted using an anti-3-nitrotyrosine antibody. Mass spectrometry and FASTA search identified for the first time an exclusive nitration of pathogenesis-related proteins, PR-1, PR-3 and PR-5, which are reportedly located in the apoplast or the vacuole. Furthermore, Tyr(36) of thaumatin-like protein E2 was identfied as a nitration site. The underlying mechanism and physiological relevance are discussed. PMID:27301959

  3. Interleaved power converter

    DOEpatents

    Zhu, Lizhi

    2007-11-13

    A power converter architecture interleaves full bridge converters to alleviate thermal management problems in high current applications, and may, for example, double the output power capability while reducing parts count and costs. For example, one phase of a three phase inverter is shared between two transformers, which provide power to a rectifier such as a current doubler rectifier to provide two full bridge DC/DC converters with three rather than four high voltage inverter legs.

  4. ITER convertible blanket evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, C.P.C.; Cheng, E.

    1995-09-01

    Proposed International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) convertible blankets were reviewed. Key design difficulties were identified. A new particle filter concept is introduced and key performance parameters estimated. Results show that this particle filter concept can satisfy all of the convertible blanket design requirements except the generic issue of Be blanket lifetime. If the convertible blanket is an acceptable approach for ITER operation, this particle filter option should be a strong candidate.

  5. The photoelectric displacement converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragoner, Valeriu V.

    2005-02-01

    In the article are examined questions of constructing photoelectric displacement converter satisfying demands that are stated above. Converter has channels of approximate and precise readings. The approximate reading may be accomplished either by the method of reading from a code mask or by the method of the consecutive calculation of optical scale gaps number. Phase interpolator of mouar strips" gaps is determined as a precise measuring. It is shown mathematical model of converter that allow evaluating errors and operating speed of conversion.

  6. Glycosylation Substrate Specificity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa 1244 Pilin*S

    PubMed Central

    Horzempa, Joseph; Comer, Jason E.; Davis, Sheila A.; Castric, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The β-carbon of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa 1244 pilin C-terminal Ser is a site of glycosylation. The present study was conducted to determine the pilin structures necessary for glycosylation. It was found that although Thr could be tolerated at the pilin C terminus, the blocking of the Ser carboxyl group with the addition of an Ala prevented glycosylation. Pilin from strain PA103 was not glycosylated by P. aeruginosa 1244, even when the C-terminal residue was converted to Ser. Substituting the disulfide loop region of strain PA103 pilin with that of strain 1244 allowed glycosylation to take place. Neither conversion of 1244 pilin disulfide loop Cys residues to Ala nor the deletion of segments of this structure prevented glycosylation. It was noted that the PA103 pilin disulfide loop environment was electronegative, whereas that of strain 1244 pilin had an overall positive charge. Insertion of a positive charge into the PA103 pilin disulfide loop of a mutant containing Ser at the C terminus allowed glycosylation to take place. Extending the “tail” region of the PA103 mutant pilin containing Ser at its terminus resulted in robust glycosylation. These results suggest that the terminal Ser is the major pilin glycosylation recognition feature and that this residue cannot be substituted at its carboxyl group. Although no other specific recognition features are present, the pilin surface must be compatible with the reaction apparatus for glycosylation to occur. PMID:16286455

  7. Burn sepsis: bacterial interference with Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Levenson, S M; Gruber, D K; Gruber, C; Watford, A; Seifter, E

    1981-05-01

    The pathogenicity of several strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa for burned rats (3 degrees scald burns, 20% body surface) following topical application of the bacteria to the burn within 1 hour after burning was established. Following this, it was demonstrated that purposeful infection of such 3 degrees scald burns of rats by a strain of Ps. aeruginosa of low virulence (JB-77) protects the rats from the lethal effect of subsequent (48-hour) topical contamination of the burn by a highly virulent strain of Ps. aeruginosa (VA-134) (p less than 0.001). This finding was confirmed in a similar experiment beginning with germfree rats. When the challenge with the highly virulent Ps. aeruginosa strain was 24 hours (rather than 48 hours) after the burning and topical contamination of the burn with the low virulence strain of Ps. aeruginosa, there was little protection (p N.S.). When burned rats were given the low virulence strain of Ps. aeruginosa by gavage right after burning, there was not protection to subsequent (48 hours) challenge by topical application of the highly virulent strain of Ps. aeruginosa to the burn (11/12 vs 12/12 dying). Our finding that purposeful infection of a 3 degrees burn of rats (conventional and also germfree) by a strain of Ps. aeruginosa of low virulence protects from the lethal effect of subsequent (48-hour) topical contamination of the burn by a highly virulent strain of Ps. aeruginosa is due, we believe, to direct bacterial interference between the two strains of pseudomonas. PMID:6785444

  8. Crystal growth and near infrared optical properties of Pr 3+ doped lead halide materials for resonantly pumped eye safe laser applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Ivy Krystal

    In this dissertation the material development and optical spectroscopy of Pr3+ activated low phonon energy halide crystals is presented for possible applications in resonantly pumped eye-safe solid-state laser gain media. In the last twenty years, the developments in fiber and diode lasers have enabled highly efficient resonant pumping of Pr3+ doped crystals for possible lasing in the 1.6--1.7 microm region. In this work, the results of the purification, crystal growth, and near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopic characterization of Pr3+ doped lead (II) chloride, PbCl2 and lead (II) bromide, PbBr2 are presented. The investigated PbCl2 and PbBr2 crystals are non-hygroscopic with maximum phonon energies between ~180--200 cm-1, which enable efficient emission in the NIR spectral region (~ 1.6 microm) from the 3F3/3F4 → 3H4 transition of Pr3+ ions. The commercial available starting materials were purchased as ultra dry, high purity (~ 99.999 %) beads and purified through a combination of zone-refinement and halogenation. The crystal growth of Pr3+ doped PbCl 2 and PbBr2 was performed via vertical Bridgman technique using a two-zone furnace. The resulting Pr3+ doped PbCl 2 and PbBr2 crystals exhibited characteristic IR absorption bands in the 1.5--1.7 microm region (3H4 → 3F3/3F4), which allow for resonant pumping using commercial diode lasers. A broad IR emission band centered at ~1.6 microm was observed under ~1445 nm diode laser excitation from both Pr3+ doped halides. This dissertation presents comparative spectroscopic results for Pr 3+:PbCl2 and Pr3+:PbBr2 including NIR absorption and emission studies, lifetime measurements, modelling of radiative and non-radiative decay rates, determination of transition cross-section, and the net effective gain cross sections.

  9. Transposon mutagenesis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa exoprotease genes.

    PubMed Central

    Stapleton, M J; Jagger, K S; Warren, R L

    1984-01-01

    Transposon Tn5 was used to generate protease-deficient insertion mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The presence of Tn5 in the chromosome of P. aeruginosa was demonstrated by transduction and DNA-DNA hybridization. The altered protease production and kanamycin resistance were cotransduced into a wild-type P. aeruginosa strain. A radiolabeled probe of Tn5 DNA hybridized to specific BamHI fragments isolated from the insertion mutants. Two independently isolated Tn5 insertion mutants had reduced protease production, partially impaired elastase activity, and no immunologically reactive alkaline protease. Images PMID:6317657

  10. Reversible addition of water to the high-hydride-content cluster [Rh6(PiPr3)6H12][BArF4]2. Synthesis and Structure of [Rh6PiPr3)6H11(OH)][BArF4]2.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Thomas M; Brayshaw, Simon K; Raithby, Paul R; Weller, Andrew S

    2008-02-01

    The hydroxyhydrido salt [Rh(6)(P(i)Pr(3))(6)H(11)(OH)][BArF(4)](2) results from the addition of water to [Rh(6)(P(i)Pr(3))(6)H(12)][BArF(4)](2). This reaction is reversible, and the addition of dihydrogen to [Rh(6)(P(i)Pr(3))(6)H(11)(OH)][BArF(4)](2) results in the elimination of water and the regeneration of the hydride cluster. PMID:18181618

  11. Enhanced emission at 2.85 μm of Ho3+/Pr3+ co-doped α-NaYF4 single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cheng; Xia, Hai-ping; Feng, Zhi-gang; Zhang, Zhi-xiong; Jiang, Dong-sheng; Zhang, Jian; Sheng, Qi-guo; Tang, Qing-yang; He, Shi-nan; Jiang, Hao-chuan; Chen, Bao-jiu

    2016-01-01

    The Ho3+/Pr3+ co-doped NaYF4 single crystals with various Pr3+ concentrations and constant Ho3+ molar percentage of ~1% were grown by an improved Bridgman method. Compared with the Ho3+ single-doped NaYF4 crystal, an obviously enhanced emission band at 2.85 μm is observed under 640 nm excitation. The Judd-Ofelt strength parameters ( Ω 2, Ω 4 and Ω 6) are calculated, the radiative transition probabilities ( A), the fluorescence branching ratios ( β) and the radiative lifetime ( τ rad) are obtained in the meantime. The energy transfer from Pr3+ to Ho3+ and the optimum fluorescence emission of Ho3+ ions around 2.85 μm are investigated. Moreover, the maximum emission cross section of above samples at 2.85 μm is calculated to be 0.72×10-20 cm2 for the NaYF4 single crystal with Ho3+ molar percentage of 1% and Pr3+ molar percentage of 0.5% according to the measured absorption spectrum. All results suggest that the Ho3+/Pr3+ co-doped NaYF4 single crystal may have potential applications in mid-infrared lasers.

  12. Photocapacitive image converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, W. E.; Sher, A.; Tsuo, Y. H. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    An apparatus for converting a radiant energy image into corresponding electrical signals including an image converter is described. The image converter includes a substrate of semiconductor material, an insulating layer on the front surface of the substrate, and an electrical contact on the back surface of the substrate. A first series of parallel transparent conductive stripes is on the insulating layer with a processing circuit connected to each of the conductive stripes for detecting the modulated voltages generated thereon. In a first embodiment of the invention, a modulated light stripe perpendicular to the conductive stripes scans the image converter. In a second embodiment a second insulating layer is deposited over the conductive stripes and a second series of parallel transparent conductive stripes perpendicular to the first series is on the second insulating layer. A different frequency current signal is applied to each of the second series of conductive stripes and a modulated image is applied to the image converter.

  13. Cascaded resonant bridge converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuart, Thomas A. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A converter for converting a low voltage direct current power source to a higher voltage, high frequency alternating current output for use in an electrical system where it is desired to use low weight cables and other circuit elements. The converter has a first stage series resonant (Schwarz) converter which converts the direct current power source to an alternating current by means of switching elements that are operated by a variable frequency voltage regulator, a transformer to step up the voltage of the alternating current, and a rectifier bridge to convert the alternating current to a direct current first stage output. The converter further has a second stage series resonant (Schwarz) converter which is connected in series to the first stage converter to receive its direct current output and convert it to a second stage high frequency alternating current output by means of switching elements that are operated by a fixed frequency oscillator. The voltage of the second stage output is controlled at a relatively constant value by controlling the first stage output voltage, which is accomplished by controlling the frequency of the first stage variable frequency voltage controller in response to second stage voltage. Fault tolerance in the event of a load short circuit is provided by making the operation of the first stage variable frequency voltage controller responsive to first and second stage current limiting devices. The second stage output is connected to a rectifier bridge whose output is connected to the input of the second stage to provide good regulation of output voltage wave form at low system loads.

  14. Effects of pyrogallic acid on Microcystis aeruginosa: oxidative stress related toxicity.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhiying; Zhang, Yongyuan; Gao, Yunni; Liu, Biyun; Sun, Xuemei; He, Feng; Zhou, Qiaohong; Wu, Zhenbin

    2016-10-01

    Pyrogallic acid (PA) is used in various industrial and consumer products. The molecular mechanisms underlying PA's toxicity was not fully understood. In this study, toxicity of PA on Microcystis aeruginosa with reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation as an end point was investigated. The results showed an increase in the percentage of cells with loss of membrane integrity and enhanced intracellular ROS production. Exposure to 50mgL(-1) PA for 48h caused the highest percentage of loss of membrane integrity (56.7%), and a 2.54-fold higher intracellular ROS level compared to control. Further investigation revealed that PA caused a dose-dependent increase in DNA strand breaks (DSB) of M. aeruginosa at exposure concentration from 2 to 50mgL(-1). The incubation of cells with ROS scavengers ascorbic acid, N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) and tocopherol markedly alleviated the level of PA-induced DSB. Analysis of PA autoxidized products in culture solution showed that PA was quickly converted to purpurogallin (PG), and PG was further autoxidized to other polyphenolic compounds. PA and PG might participate a futile redox cycle, which mediated ROS production in M. aeruginosa. These results suggested DNA strands and cell membrane were two targets of ROS induced by PA, and oxidative damage was an important mechanism for the toxicity of PA against M. aeruginosa. PMID:27400421

  15. N2-Succinylated intermediates in an arginine catabolic pathway of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Jann, Alfred; Stalon, Victor; Wauven, Corinne Vander; Leisinger, Thomas; Haas, Dieter

    1986-01-01

    Arginine-nonutilizing (aru) mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PAO converted L-arginine to N2-succinylarginine or N-succinylglutamate, which were identified by high-voltage electrophoresis and HPLC. Addition of aminooxyacetate, an inhibitor of pyridoxal phosphate-dependent enzymes, to resting cells of the wild-type PAO1 in arginine medium led to the accumulation of N2-succinylornithine. Enzyme assays with crude P. aeruginosa extracts established the following pathway: L-arginine + succinyl-CoA → N2-succinylarginine → N2-succinylornithine → N_succinylglutamate 5-semialdehyde → N-succinylglutamate → succinate + glutamate. Succinyl-CoA may be regenerated from glutamate via 2-ketoglutarate. L-Arginine induced the enzymes of the pathway, and succinate caused catabolite repression. Purified N2-acetylornithine 5-aminotransferase (N2-acetyl-L-ornithine: 2-oxoglutarate aminotransferase, EC 2.6.1.11), an arginine biosynthetic enzyme, efficiently transaminated N2-succinylornithine; this explains the enzyme's dual role in arginine biosynthesis and catabolism. The succinylarginine pathway enables P. aeruginosa to utilize arginine efficiently as a carbon source under aerobic conditions, whereas the other three arginine catabolic pathways previously established in P. aeruginosa fulfill different functions. Images PMID:16593724

  16. Influence of BaF2 and activator concentration on broadband near-infrared luminescence of Pr3+ ions in gallo-germanate glasses.

    PubMed

    Pisarska, Joanna; Kowal, Martyna; Kochanowicz, Marcin; Zmojda, Jacek; Dorosz, Jan; Dorosz, Dominik; Pisarski, Wojciech A

    2016-02-01

    Thermal stability and broadband NIR luminescence of Pr(3+) doped gallo-germanate glasses with BaF2 have been studied. The thermal factors are larger for glass samples with low BaF2 content exhibiting good thermal stability against devitrification. Luminescence due to (1)D2 → (1)G4 transition of Pr(3+) was measured under 450 nm excitation. The (1)D2 measured lifetimes depend critically on activator concentration, but remain nearly unchanged with BaF2 content. The emission linewidth, the emission cross-section, the figure of merit (FOM) and the σem x FWHM product are relatively large, suggesting that Pr(3+)-doped gallo-germanate glasses with presence of BaF2 are promising as gain media for broadband near-infrared amplifiers. PMID:26906818

  17. Room temperature synthesis of NaGd(MoO4)2:Pr3+ nanophosphor with blue excitation for WLED applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, R.; Thirumalai, J.; Mahalingam, V.; Peter, A. John

    2015-06-01

    The nanostructured NaGd(MoO4)2:Pr3+ phosphor was rapidly synthesized at room temperature by mechanochemically assisted solid state meta-thesis reaction method. The as-synthesized nanophosphor possess scheelite tetragonal crystal structure with space group I41/a. Photoluminescent studies revealed that under the excitation of blue light (448 nm), a strong emission in the red region was observed at 647 nm due to the transition from populated 3P0 level to the 3F3 lower level of Pr3+ ions. The nanostructured NaGd(MoO4)2:Pr3+ material could serve as excellent red phosphor candidate for solid state lighting applications.

  18. Occurrence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Kuwait soil.

    PubMed

    Al-Saleh, Esmaeil; Akbar, Abrar

    2015-02-01

    Environmentally ubiquitous bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa evolved mechanisms to adapt and prevail under diverse conditions. In the current investigation, strains of P. aeruginosa demonstrating high rates of crude oil utilization and tolerance to high concentrations of heavy metals were found in both crude oil-contaminated and uncontaminated sites in Kuwait, and were dominant in the contaminated sites. The incidence of P. aeruginosa in tested soils implies the definitive pattern of crude oil contamination in the selection of the bacterial population in petroleum-contaminated sites in Kuwait. Surprisingly, the unculturable P. aeruginosa in different soil samples showed significant high similarity coefficients based on 16S-RFLP analyses, implying that the unculturable fraction of existing bacterial population in environmental samples is more stable and, hence, reliable for phylogenetic studies compared to the culturable bacteria. PMID:25014900

  19. Antibiotic Conditioned Growth Medium of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benathen, Isaiah A.; Cazeau, Barbara; Joseph, Njeri

    2004-01-01

    A simple method to study the consequences of bacterial antibiosis after interspecific competition between microorganisms is presented. Common microorganisms are used as the test organisms and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are used as the source of the inhibitor agents.

  20. Luminescent properties of Pr3+-sensitized LaPO4:Gd3+ ultraviolet-B phosphor under vacuum-ultraviolet light excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Shinji; Uchino, Rika; Kobayashi, Keisuke; Yamamoto, Hajime

    2009-07-01

    Luminescent properties of Pr3+-sensitized LaPO4:Gd3+ under vacuum-ultraviolet (vuv) light excitation have been investigated. The energy transfer probably occurs from the 5d levels in Pr3+ ions to Gd3+ ions under 172nm light excitation. LaPO4:Gd3+,Pr3+ shows efficient ultraviolet-B (uv-B) emission at 312nm, whose peak intensity reaches its maximum at Gd =35mol% and Pr =5mol%. (La0.65Gd0.35)0.95Pr0.05PO4 is about 1.6 times higher than a typical uv-B phosphor for vuv lamp, Y0.75Gd0.25Al3(BO3)4, in Gd3+-emission intensity under 172nm light excitation. This result implies that the Pr3+-sensitized LaPO4:Gd3+ is a candidate of uv-B phosphors for xenon-excimer discharge vuv lamps. In order to evaluate the effect of the narrow-band uv-B emission by LaPO4:Gd3+,Pr3+ phosphor, irradiation test on DNA was performed. The irradiation damage of pUC 18 DNA by the narrow-band uv-B light from the LaPO4:Gd3+,Pr3+ phosphor is in the same magnitude as that by uv-A light from a filtered Hg lamp, even though the uv-B lamp is higher than the uv-A lamp in power density and photon energy.

  1. Vaccination against respiratory Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection

    PubMed Central

    Grimwood, Keith; Kyd, Jennelle M; Owen, Suzzanne J; Massa, Helen M; Cripps, Allan W

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa are a major clinical problem globally, particularly for patients with chronic pulmonary disorders, such as those with cystic fibrosis (CF), non-CF bronchiectasis (nCFB) and severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In addition, critically ill and immunocompromised patients are also at significant risk of P. aeruginosa infection. For almost half a century, research efforts have focused toward development of a vaccine against infections caused by P. aeruginosa, but a licensed vaccine is not yet available. Significant advances in identifying potential vaccine antigens have been made. Immunisations via both the mucosal and systemic routes have been trialled in animal models and their effectiveness in clearing acute infections demonstrated. The challenge for translation of this research to human applications remains, since P. aeruginosa infections in the human respiratory tract can present both as an acute or chronic infection. In addition, immunisation prior to infection may not be possible for many patients with CF, nCFB or COPD. Therefore, development of a therapeutic vaccine provides an alternative approach for treatment of chronic infection. Preliminary animal and human studies suggest that mucosal immunisation may be effective as a therapeutic vaccine against P. aeruginosa respiratory infections. Nevertheless, more research is needed to improve our understanding of the basic biology of P. aeruginosa and the mechanisms needed to upregulate the induction of host immune pathways to prevent infection. Recognition of variability in the host immune responses for a range of patient health conditions at risk from P. aeruginosa infection is also required to support development of a successful vaccine delivery strategy and vaccine. Activation of mucosal immune responses may provide improved efficacy of vaccination for P. aeruginosa during both acute exacerbations and chronic infection. PMID:25483510

  2. Microminiature thermionic converters

    SciTech Connect

    King, Donald B.; Sadwick, Laurence P.; Wernsman, Bernard R.

    2001-09-25

    Microminiature thermionic converts (MTCs) having high energy-conversion efficiencies and variable operating temperatures. Methods of manufacturing those converters using semiconductor integrated circuit fabrication and micromachine manufacturing techniques are also disclosed. The MTCs of the invention incorporate cathode to anode spacing of about 1 micron or less and use cathode and anode materials having work functions ranging from about 1 eV to about 3 eV. Existing prior art thermionic converter technology has energy conversion efficiencies ranging from 5-15%. The MTCs of the present invention have maximum efficiencies of just under 30%, and thousands of the devices can be fabricated at modest costs.

  3. Converting Nonclassicality into Entanglement.

    PubMed

    Killoran, N; Steinhoff, F E S; Plenio, M B

    2016-02-26

    Quantum mechanics exhibits a wide range of nonclassical features, of which entanglement in multipartite systems takes a central place. In several specific settings, it is well known that nonclassicality (e.g., squeezing, spin squeezing, coherence) can be converted into entanglement. In this work, we present a general framework, based on superposition, for structurally connecting and converting nonclassicality to entanglement. In addition to capturing the previously known results, this framework also allows us to uncover new entanglement convertibility theorems in two broad scenarios, one which is discrete and one which is continuous. In the discrete setting, the classical states can be any finite linearly independent set. For the continuous setting, the pertinent classical states are "symmetric coherent states," connected with symmetric representations of the group SU(K). These results generalize and link convertibility properties from the resource theory of coherence, spin coherent states, and optical coherent states, while also revealing important connections between local and nonlocal pictures of nonclassicality. PMID:26967398

  4. Digital scale converter

    DOEpatents

    Upton, Richard G.

    1978-01-01

    A digital scale converter is provided for binary coded decimal (BCD) conversion. The converter may be programmed to convert a BCD value of a first scale to the equivalent value of a second scale according to a known ratio. The value to be converted is loaded into a first BCD counter and counted down to zero while a second BCD counter registers counts from zero or an offset value depending upon the conversion. Programmable rate multipliers are used to generate pulses at selected rates to the counters for the proper conversion ratio. The value present in the second counter at the time the first counter is counted to the zero count is the equivalent value of the second scale. This value may be read out and displayed on a conventional seven-segment digital display.

  5. Thermionic photovoltaic energy converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, D. L. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A thermionic photovoltaic energy conversion device comprises a thermionic diode mounted within a hollow tubular photovoltaic converter. The thermionic diode maintains a cesium discharge for producing excited atoms that emit line radiation in the wavelength region of 850 nm to 890 nm. The photovoltaic converter is a silicon or gallium arsenide photovoltaic cell having bandgap energies in this same wavelength region for optimum cell efficiency.

  6. Enhancing the Feasibility of Microcystis aeruginosa as a Feedstock for Bioethanol Production under the Influence of Various Factors.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Imran; Lee, Moon Geon; Seo, Hyo Jin; Shin, Jin Hyuk; Shin, Tai Sun; Yoon, Yang Ho; Kim, Min Yong; Choi, Jong Il; Kim, Jong Deog

    2016-01-01

    Microcystis aeruginosa, a freshwater microalga, is capable of producing and accumulating different types of sugars in its biomass which make it a good feedstock for bioethanol production. Present study aims to investigate the effect of different factors increasing growth rate and carbohydrates productivity of M. aeruginosa. MF media (modified BG11 media) and additional ingredients such as aminolevulinic acid (2 mM), lysine (2.28 mM), alanine (1 mM), and Naphthalene acetic acid (1 mM) as cytokine promoted M. aeruginosa growth and sugar contents. Salmonella showed growth-assisting effect on M. aeruginosa. Enhanced growth rate and carbohydrates contents were observed in M. aeruginosa culture grown at 25°C under red LED light of 90 μmolm(-2)s(-1) intensity. More greenish and carbohydrates rich M. aeruginosa biomass was prepared (final OD660 nm = 2.21 and sugar contents 10.39 mM/mL) as compared to control (maximum OD660 nm = 1.4 and sugar contents 3 mM/mL). The final algae biomass was converted to algae juice through a specific pretreatment method. The resulted algae Juice was used as a substrate in fermentation process. Highest yield of bioethanol (50 mM/mL) was detected when Brettanomyces custersainus, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Pichia stipitis were used in combinations for fermentation process as compared to their individual fermentation. The results indicated the influence of different factors on the growth rate and carbohydrates productivity of M. aeruginosa and its feasibility as a feedstock for fermentative ethanol production. PMID:27556034

  7. Enhancing the Feasibility of Microcystis aeruginosa as a Feedstock for Bioethanol Production under the Influence of Various Factors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Moon Geon; Seo, Hyo Jin; Shin, Jin Hyuk; Shin, Tai Sun; Kim, Min Yong; Choi, Jong Il

    2016-01-01

    Microcystis aeruginosa, a freshwater microalga, is capable of producing and accumulating different types of sugars in its biomass which make it a good feedstock for bioethanol production. Present study aims to investigate the effect of different factors increasing growth rate and carbohydrates productivity of M. aeruginosa. MF media (modified BG11 media) and additional ingredients such as aminolevulinic acid (2 mM), lysine (2.28 mM), alanine (1 mM), and Naphthalene acetic acid (1 mM) as cytokine promoted M. aeruginosa growth and sugar contents. Salmonella showed growth-assisting effect on M. aeruginosa. Enhanced growth rate and carbohydrates contents were observed in M. aeruginosa culture grown at 25°C under red LED light of 90 μmolm−2s−1 intensity. More greenish and carbohydrates rich M. aeruginosa biomass was prepared (final OD660 nm = 2.21 and sugar contents 10.39 mM/mL) as compared to control (maximum OD660 nm = 1.4 and sugar contents 3 mM/mL). The final algae biomass was converted to algae juice through a specific pretreatment method. The resulted algae Juice was used as a substrate in fermentation process. Highest yield of bioethanol (50 mM/mL) was detected when Brettanomyces custersainus, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Pichia stipitis were used in combinations for fermentation process as compared to their individual fermentation. The results indicated the influence of different factors on the growth rate and carbohydrates productivity of M. aeruginosa and its feasibility as a feedstock for fermentative ethanol production. PMID:27556034

  8. Responses of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to antimicrobials

    PubMed Central

    Morita, Yuji; Tomida, Junko; Kawamura, Yoshiaki

    2014-01-01

    Infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa often are hard to treat; inappropriate chemotherapy readily selects multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa. This organism can be exposed to a wide range of concentrations of antimicrobials during treatment; learning more about the responses of P. aeruginosa to antimicrobials is therefore important. We review here responses of the bacterium P. aeruginosa upon exposure to antimicrobials at levels below the inhibitory concentration. Carbapenems (e.g., imipenem) have been shown to induce the formation of thicker and more robust biofilms, while fluoroquinolones (e.g., ciprofloxacin) and aminoglycosides (e.g., tobramycin) have been shown to induce biofilm formation. Ciprofloxacin also has been demonstrated to enhance the frequency of mutation to carbapenem resistance. Conversely, although macrolides (e.g., azithromycin) typically are not effective against P. aeruginosa because of the pseudomonal outer-membrane impermeability and efflux, macrolides do lead to a reduction in virulence factor production. Similarly, tetracycline is not very effective against this organism, but is known to induce the type-III secretion system and consequently enhance cytotoxicity of P. aeruginosa in vivo. Of special note are the effects of antibacterials and disinfectants on pseudomonal efflux systems. Sub-inhibitory concentrations of protein synthesis inhibitors (aminoglycosides, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, etc.) induce the MexXY multidrug efflux system. This response is known to be mediated by interference with the translation of the leader peptide PA5471.1, with consequent effects on expression of the PA5471 gene product. Additionally, induction of the MexCD-OprJ multidrug efflux system is observed upon exposure to sub-inhibitory concentrations of disinfectants such as chlorhexidine and benzalkonium. This response is known to be dependent upon the AlgU stress response factor. Altogether, these biological responses of P. aeruginosa provide useful

  9. Responses of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to antimicrobials.

    PubMed

    Morita, Yuji; Tomida, Junko; Kawamura, Yoshiaki

    2014-01-01

    Infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa often are hard to treat; inappropriate chemotherapy readily selects multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa. This organism can be exposed to a wide range of concentrations of antimicrobials during treatment; learning more about the responses of P. aeruginosa to antimicrobials is therefore important. We review here responses of the bacterium P. aeruginosa upon exposure to antimicrobials at levels below the inhibitory concentration. Carbapenems (e.g., imipenem) have been shown to induce the formation of thicker and more robust biofilms, while fluoroquinolones (e.g., ciprofloxacin) and aminoglycosides (e.g., tobramycin) have been shown to induce biofilm formation. Ciprofloxacin also has been demonstrated to enhance the frequency of mutation to carbapenem resistance. Conversely, although macrolides (e.g., azithromycin) typically are not effective against P. aeruginosa because of the pseudomonal outer-membrane impermeability and efflux, macrolides do lead to a reduction in virulence factor production. Similarly, tetracycline is not very effective against this organism, but is known to induce the type-III secretion system and consequently enhance cytotoxicity of P. aeruginosa in vivo. Of special note are the effects of antibacterials and disinfectants on pseudomonal efflux systems. Sub-inhibitory concentrations of protein synthesis inhibitors (aminoglycosides, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, etc.) induce the MexXY multidrug efflux system. This response is known to be mediated by interference with the translation of the leader peptide PA5471.1, with consequent effects on expression of the PA5471 gene product. Additionally, induction of the MexCD-OprJ multidrug efflux system is observed upon exposure to sub-inhibitory concentrations of disinfectants such as chlorhexidine and benzalkonium. This response is known to be dependent upon the AlgU stress response factor. Altogether, these biological responses of P. aeruginosa provide useful

  10. Efficacy of VIP as Treatment for Bacteria-Induced Keratitis Against Multiple Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strains

    PubMed Central

    Carion, Thomas W.; McWhirter, Cody R.; Grewal, Daiyajot K.; Berger, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Previous studies have demonstrated the efficacy of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) treatment in regulating inflammation following bacterial keratitis induced by the P. aeruginosa strain 19660. However, in the current study we assessed whether disease outcome is specific to 19660 or if VIP treatment is effective against multiple P. aeruginosa strains. Methods B6 mice received daily IP injections of VIP from −1 through 5 days post injection (p.i.). Control mice were similarly injected with PBS. Corneal infection was induced using PA 19660, PAO1 or KEI 1025. Disease response was documented and bacterial plate counts and myeloperoxidase assays were performed. Expression of select inflammatory mediators as well as enzymes associated with lipid mediator production was assessed after VIP treatment. KEI 1025 was characterized by cytotoxicity and invasion assays and then confirmed for ExoS/ExoU expression. Results VIP treatment converted the susceptible response to resistant for the three P. aeruginosa strains tested. Disease response was significantly reduced with no corneal perforation. Anti-inflammatory mediators were enhanced after VIP treatment, while pro-inflammatory molecules were reduced compared to controls. Furthermore, VIP reduced inflammatory cell persistence in the cornea after infection with each of the P. aeruginosa strains. Conclusions VIP treatment is effective at ameliorating disease pathogenesis for multiple P. aeruginosa strains, both cytotoxic and invasive. This study is also the first to indicate a possible role for VIP regarding lipid mediator expression in the eye. In addition, the clinical isolate, KEI 1025, was characterized as an invasive strain. Overall, this study strengthens the preclinical development of VIP as a therapeutic agent for ocular infectious disease. PMID:26513498

  11. Studies on optimizing sesquioxide contents to enhance luminescence efficiency of Pr3+ ions in PbO-PbF2-B2O3 glass system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajeswara Rao, D.; Sahaya Baskaran, G.; Ramesh Babu, P.; Gandhi, Y.; Veeraiah, N.

    2014-09-01

    Pr3+ doped lead oxy fluoro borate glasses mixed with three sesquioxides (M2O3) viz. Y2O3, Sc2O3, Al2O3 of different concentrations (0-10 mol%) have been synthesized. The preliminary understanding over the structural modifications due to the insertion of the sesquioxides in the glass network could be obtained by IR spectral investigations. The optical absorption, luminescence spectra and fluorescence decay curves of these glasses were studied as functions of concentration of M2O3. The luminescence spectra of these glasses have exhibited the bands due to 3P0 → 3F2, 3F3, 3H6, 3H4, 3H5 transitions of Pr3+ ions. From these spectra, the radiative parameters viz., spontaneous emission probability A, the total emission probability AT, the radiative lifetime τ, the fluorescent branching ratio β of different transitions originated from 3P0 level of Pr3+ ions have been evaluated. A considerable enhancement in the luminescence emission corresponding to 3P0 → 3H6, 3F2 transitions has been observed with increase in the concentraion of M2O3 up to 8.0 mol%. The increase has been attributed to the possible declusterization of Pr3+ ions by M3+ ions in the glass network. The comparison of emissive characteristics of the glasses mixed with three sesquioxides indicated the highest luminescence efficiency for Y2O3 mixed glasses among the three series glasses studied and this has been explained in terms of different degrees of variations in the structural modifications in the vicinity of Pr3+ ion in the glass network.

  12. Design, Preparation, and Characterization of a Novel Red Long-Persistent Perovskite Phosphor: Ca3Ti2O7:Pr3+.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Lin, Hang; Xu, Ju; Chen, Hui; Lin, Zebin; Huang, Feng; Wang, Yuansheng

    2015-12-01

    Currently, the development of efficient red-emitting persistent phosphor is still an ongoing challenge. Herein, a novel red-emitting LPL phosphor Ca3Ti2O7:Pr(3+) is successfully prepared by a high-temperature solid-state method. XRD Rietveld refinement analyses demonstrate the high phase purity of the sample which crystallizes in an orthorhombic Ccm21 space group with lattice parameters of a = 5.7702(5) Å, b = 19.4829(7) Å, and c = 5.1214(2) Å. Electronic structure of the host matrix is analyzed by the first-principle calculation using CASTEP code. The calculation results show that Ca3Ti2O7 has a direct band gap with CB and VB mainly composed of the Ti-3d and O-2p states, respectively. On the basis of the DR spectrum, the band gap is determined to be 3.6 eV. It is demonstrated that the 612 nm red-emitting persistent luminescence of Ca3Ti2O7:Pr(3+) can be either activated by Ti(4+)-O(2-) → Ti(3+)-O(-) host absorption and Pr(3+)-O-Ti(4+) → Pr(4+)-O-Ti(3+) IVCT in the UV region, or Pr(3+):(3)H4 → (3)PJ transition in the blue region. The red afterglow can last for ∼ 5 min observed by the naked eyes in the dark after ceasing the irradiation source. On the basis of the TL analyses, the trap is found exponentially distributed in the host with the depth of 0.69-0.92 eV. Finally, a possible LPL mechanism for Ca3Ti2O7:Pr(3+) is proposed. PMID:26561233

  13. ANCA-Positive Patients: The Influence of PR3 and MPO Antibodies on Survival Rate and The Association with Clinical and Laboratory Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Drooger, J.C; Dees, A; Swaak, A.J.G

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the survival rate, and the clinical and laboratory characteristics in patients, characterized by the presence of certain anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic auto-antibodies (ANCAs). Methods: In a retrospective observational study, we analyzed the data of all patients with a positive ANCA test between 1995 and 2005 at our hospital. Based on serology patients were divided in three subgroups (ANCA-Proteinase 3 (PR3), ANCA-Myeloperoxidase (MPO) and atypical ANCA), irrespective of the diagnosis. Patient survival was compared by Kaplan Meier survival analysis. Differences in clinical and laboratory characteristics between the groups of specific ANCAs were determined. Results: Fifty-four ANCA-positive patients were analyzed. Eighteen of these patients were ANCA-PR3-positive, 17 were ANCA-MPO-positive and 19 had a atypical ANCA. A random control group was created of matched ANCA negative patients. Average follow-up time was 52 months. The calculated five year survival rate in respectively the ANCA-PR3- positive group, the ANCA-MPO-positive group, the atypical ANCA group and the ANCA-negative group was 45%, 81%, 90% and 100%. (P = 0.012, Wilcoxon test). A higher mean leukocyte count, a higher mean erythrocyte sedimentation rate and more fever was observed in the ANCA-PR3-positive group compared to the ANCA-MPO-positive group. Conclusions: A remarkable lower survival rate was observed in ANCA-PR3-positive patients compared to ANCA-MPO-positive patients. We also demonstrated that patients characterized by the presence of a defined ANCA differ in clinical and laboratory characteristics. PMID:19461938

  14. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Dose-Response and Bathing Water Infection

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most commonly identified opportunistic pathogen associated with pool acquired bather disease. To better understand why this microorganism poses this protracted problem we recently appraised P. aeruginosa pool risk management. Much is known about the ...

  15. Developing an international Pseudomonas aeruginosa reference panel

    PubMed Central

    De Soyza, Anthony; Hall, Amanda J; Mahenthiralingam, Eshwar; Drevinek, Pavel; Kaca, Wieslaw; Drulis-Kawa, Zuzanna; Stoitsova, Stoyanka R; Toth, Veronika; Coenye, Tom; Zlosnik, James E A; Burns, Jane L; Sá-Correia, Isabel; De Vos, Daniel; Pirnay, Jean-Paul; Kidd, Timothy J; Reid, David; Manos, Jim; Klockgether, Jens; Wiehlmann, Lutz; Tümmler, Burkhard; McClean, Siobhán; Winstanley, Craig

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major opportunistic pathogen in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and causes a wide range of infections among other susceptible populations. Its inherent resistance to many antimicrobials also makes it difficult to treat infections with this pathogen. Recent evidence has highlighted the diversity of this species, yet despite this, the majority of studies on virulence and pathogenesis focus on a small number of strains. There is a pressing need for a P. aeruginosa reference panel to harmonize and coordinate the collective efforts of the P. aeruginosa research community. We have collated a panel of 43 P. aeruginosa strains that reflects the organism's diversity. In addition to the commonly studied clones, this panel includes transmissible strains, sequential CF isolates, strains with specific virulence characteristics, and strains that represent serotype, genotype or geographic diversity. This focussed panel of P. aeruginosa isolates will help accelerate and consolidate the discovery of virulence determinants, improve our understanding of the pathogenesis of infections caused by this pathogen, and provide the community with a valuable resource for the testing of novel therapeutic agents. PMID:24214409

  16. Clonal complex Pseudomonas aeruginosa in horses.

    PubMed

    Kidd, Timothy J; Gibson, Justine S; Moss, Susan; Greer, Ristan M; Cobbold, Rowland N; Wright, John D; Ramsay, Kay A; Grimwood, Keith; Bell, Scott C

    2011-05-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is associated with infectious endometritis in horses. Although infectious endometritis is often considered a venereal infection, there is relatively limited genotypic-based evidence to support this mode of transmission. The study sought to determine the relatedness between genital P. aeruginosa isolates collected from a limited geographical region using molecular strain typing. Enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus PCR typing was performed on 93 isolates collected between 2005 and 2009 from 2058 thoroughbred horses (including 18 stallions) at 66 studs. While P. aeruginosa was not detected in the stallions, 53/93 (57%) mares harbouring P. aeruginosa had clonally related strains, which included a single dominant genotype detected in 42 (45%) mares from 13 different studs. These novel findings suggest that most equine genital P. aeruginosa infections in this region may have been acquired from mechanisms other than direct horse to horse transmission. Instead, other potential acquisition pathways, as well as strain specific adaptation to the equine genital tract, should be investigated. PMID:21183294

  17. Rotorcraft convertible engine study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, D. N.; Hirschkron, R.; Smith, C. E.

    1983-01-01

    Convertible propulsion systems for advanced rotorcraft are evaluated in terms of their impact on aircraft operating economics and fuel consumption. A variety of propulsion system concepts, including separate thrust and power producing engines, convertible fan/shaft engines, and auxiliary propeller configurations are presented. The merits of each are evaluated in two different rotorcraft missions: an intercity, commercial transport of the ABC(TM) type, and an offshore oil ring supply ship of the X-wing type. The variable inlet guide vane fan/shaft converting engine and auxiliary propeller configurations are shown to offer significant advantages over all the other systems evaluated, in terms of both direct operating cost and fuel consumption.

  18. Vector generator scan converter

    DOEpatents

    Moore, J.M.; Leighton, J.F.

    1988-02-05

    High printing speeds for graphics data are achieved with a laser printer by transmitting compressed graphics data from a main processor over an I/O channel to a vector generator scan converter which reconstructs a full graphics image for input to the laser printer through a raster data input port. The vector generator scan converter includes a microprocessor with associated microcode memory containing a microcode instruction set, a working memory for storing compressed data, vector generator hardware for drawing a full graphic image from vector parameters calculated by the microprocessor, image buffer memory for storing the reconstructed graphics image and an output scanner for reading the graphics image data and inputting the data to the printer. The vector generator scan converter eliminates the bottleneck created by the I/O channel for transmitting graphics data from the main processor to the laser printer, and increases printer speed up to thirty fold. 7 figs.

  19. Vector generator scan converter

    DOEpatents

    Moore, James M.; Leighton, James F.

    1990-01-01

    High printing speeds for graphics data are achieved with a laser printer by transmitting compressed graphics data from a main processor over an I/O (input/output) channel to a vector generator scan converter which reconstructs a full graphics image for input to the laser printer through a raster data input port. The vector generator scan converter includes a microprocessor with associated microcode memory containing a microcode instruction set, a working memory for storing compressed data, vector generator hardward for drawing a full graphic image from vector parameters calculated by the microprocessor, image buffer memory for storing the reconstructed graphics image and an output scanner for reading the graphics image data and inputting the data to the printer. The vector generator scan converter eliminates the bottleneck created by the I/O channel for transmitting graphics data from the main processor to the laser printer, and increases printer speed up to thirty fold.

  20. Nonuniversality of entanglement convertibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragança, Helena; Mascarenhas, Eduardo; Luiz, G. I.; Duarte, C.; Pereira, R. G.; Santos, M. F.; Aguiar, M. C. O.

    2014-06-01

    Recently, it has been suggested that operational properties connected to quantum computation can be alternative indicators of quantum phase transitions. In this work we systematically study these operational properties in one-dimensional systems that present phase transitions of different orders. For this purpose, we evaluate the local convertibility between bipartite ground states. Our results suggest that the operational properties, related to nonanalyticities of the entanglement spectrum, are good detectors of explicit symmetries of the model, but not necessarily of phase transitions. We also show that thermodynamically equivalent phases, such as Luttinger liquids, may display different convertibility properties depending on the underlying microscopic model.

  1. A solar thermophotovoltaic converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demichelis, F.; Minetti-Mezzetti, E.

    1980-08-01

    A model of a thermophotovoltaic (TPV) converter is presented. Sunlight was focused by an optical system into a spherical cavity made of tungsten or of ytterbium oxide, thereby heating the cavity. The spectral region of the incandescent radiation emitted by the cavity in the range 0.6-1.1 microns (corresponding to the maximum efficiency of silicon cells) was directed onto a distribution of cells facing the radiator. The part of the spectrum not in the range 0.6-1.1 microns was sent back to the radiator and recycled. Conversion efficiencies of about 24% are possible in a TPV converter operating with a 2000 K radiator.

  2. Fractional Watt AMTEC Converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, T. K.; Rasmussen, J. R.

    2006-01-01

    We report here the long term performance of a small, multi-tube AMTEC converter. This converter was designed to operate and produce approximately 12 watt of electrical output from a small, 4 to 6 watt radioisotope heat source for remote power applications. It was built and put on test in 1999 using electrical heaters as stand-ins for the radioisotope capsule. Since that time it has accumulated more than 5 years of run time at an input heater temperature of 700 °C, with numerous thermal cycles to ambient that were generally related to grid power failures or physical moves of the test apparatus. The power output has remained, with variations due to orientation changes and minor variations due to small temperature changes, essentially constant at 0.40 W to 0.60 W over the test period and operation is ongoing. The converter casing and mechanical structure was fabricated from 316 SS and the electrodes are sputtered titanium nitride films. Separate static tests of a multilayer insulation package suitable for use with the converter showed the capability to reach 700 °C with a thermal input of < 4 watts.

  3. Thermionic energy converters

    DOEpatents

    Monroe, Jr., James E.

    1977-08-09

    A thermionic device for converting nuclear energy into electrical energy comprising a tubular anode spaced from and surrounding a cylindrical cathode, the cathode having an outer emitting surface of ruthenium, and nuclear fuel on the inner cylindrical surface. The nuclear fuel is a ceramic composition of fissionable material in a metal matrix. An axial void is provided to collect and contain fission product gases.

  4. Liquid metal thermal electric converter

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, Joseph P.; Andraka, Charles E.; Lukens, Laurance L.; Moreno, James B.

    1989-01-01

    A liquid metal thermal electric converter which converts heat energy to electrical energy. The design of the liquid metal thermal electric converter incorporates a unique configuration which directs the metal fluid pressure to the outside of the tube which results in the structural loads in the tube to be compressive. A liquid metal thermal electric converter refluxing boiler with series connection of tubes and a multiple cell liquid metal thermal electric converter are also provided.

  5. Strong white light in P2O5-Li2O-Yb2O3-Sb2O3 glass doped with Pr3+ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming, Chengguo; Han, Yingdong; Song, Feng; Ren, Xiaobin; An, Liqun

    2013-01-01

    P2O5-Li2O-Yb2O3-Sb2O3 glasses doped with Pr3+ ion had been prepared to explore white-light-emitting materials. The photoluminescence spectra of the glasses were measured under 270 nm excitation. The emission color of the glass doped with 2 mol% Pr3+ ion was white to the naked eye, and the CIE coordinates (0.336, 0.319) of the sample were close to the standard equal energy white-light illumination (x=0.333, y=0.333). The present working mechanism of the commercial white-LEDs is that a yellow phosphor is excited by a blue LED chip. The emission characters are restricted by the intensity of the blue light and the thickness of the phosphor. However, the luminescent characters of our materials are not effected by the pumping light. Thus, our materials will be helpful in developing white-light-emitting materials.

  6. Ultrawide-band near-infrared light source over 1 mW by Sm3+,Pr3+-codoped glass phosphor combined with LED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchi, Shingo; Shimizu, Yusuke; Watanabe, Keita; Uemura, Hiroki; Takeda, Yoshikazu

    2014-07-01

    We have synthesized 0.3Sm2O3-0.12Pr2O3-10Bi2O3-45Sb2O3-45B2O3 glass as an ultrawide-band near-infrared phosphor for LED-based light sources. We have achieved an ultrawide-band luminescence from 760 to 1100 nm with an output power of over 1 mW by combining a blue LED with Sm3+,Pr3+-codoped borate glass in one package. Absorption bands corresponding to C-H and O-H stretchings in aqueous solutions of glucose have been observed using this light source and a multichannel spectrometer. These results indicate that the Sm3+,Pr3+-codoped borate glass combined with the blue LED is a useful novel light source for absorption spectrometry.

  7. Spaceflight Effects on Virulence of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broadway, S.; Goins, T.; Crandell, C.; Richards, C.; Patel, M.; Pyle, B.

    2008-06-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen found in the environment. It is known to infect the immunocompromised. The organism has about 25 virulence genes that play different roles in disease processes. Several exotoxin proteins may be produced, including ExoA, ExoS, ExoT and ExoY, and other virulence factors. In spaceflight, possible increased expression of P. aeruginosa virulence proteins could increase health risks for spaceflight crews who experience decreased immunity. Cultures of P. aeruginosa strains PA01 and PA103 grown on orbit on Shuttle Endeavour flight STS-123 vs. static ground controls were used for analysis. The production of ETA was quantitated using an ELISA procedure. Results showed that while flight cultures of PA103 produced slightly more ETA than corresponding ground controls, the opposite was found for PA01. While it appears that spaceflight has little effect on ETA, stimulation of other virulence factors could cause increased virulence of this organism in space flight. Similar increased virulence in spaceflight has been observed for other bacteria. This is important because astronauts may be more susceptible to opportunistic pathogens including P. aeruginosa.

  8. [Macrolides, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Guillot, M; Amiour, M; El Hachem, C; Harchaoui, S; Ribault, V; Paris, C

    2006-10-01

    Long-term low dose azithromycin treatment in cystic fibrosis patients with chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection is safe and reduces the decline in lung function, the number of acute exacerbations and improves nutritional status; underlying efficacy mechanisms are multiple and synergistic. PMID:17370396

  9. Pseudomonas Aeruginosa: Resistance to the Max

    PubMed Central

    Poole, Keith

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is intrinsically resistant to a variety of antimicrobials and can develop resistance during anti-pseudomonal chemotherapy both of which compromise treatment of infections caused by this organism. Resistance to multiple classes of antimicrobials (multidrug resistance) in particular is increasingly common in P. aeruginosa, with a number of reports of pan-resistant isolates treatable with a single agent, colistin. Acquired resistance in this organism is multifactorial and attributable to chromosomal mutations and the acquisition of resistance genes via horizontal gene transfer. Mutational changes impacting resistance include upregulation of multidrug efflux systems to promote antimicrobial expulsion, derepression of ampC, AmpC alterations that expand the enzyme's substrate specificity (i.e., extended-spectrum AmpC), alterations to outer membrane permeability to limit antimicrobial entry and alterations to antimicrobial targets. Acquired mechanisms contributing to resistance in P. aeruginosa include β-lactamases, notably the extended-spectrum β-lactamases and the carbapenemases that hydrolyze most β-lactams, aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes, and 16S rRNA methylases that provide high-level pan-aminoglycoside resistance. The organism's propensity to grow in vivo as antimicrobial-tolerant biofilms and the occurrence of hypermutator strains that yield antimicrobial resistant mutants at higher frequency also compromise anti-pseudomonal chemotherapy. With limited therapeutic options and increasing resistance will the untreatable P. aeruginosa infection soon be upon us? PMID:21747788

  10. Surface attachment induces Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence

    PubMed Central

    Siryaporn, Albert; Kuchma, Sherry L.; O’Toole, George A.; Gitai, Zemer

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa infects every type of host that has been examined by deploying multiple virulence factors. Previous studies of virulence regulation have largely focused on chemical cues, but P. aeruginosa may also respond to mechanical cues. Using a rapid imaging-based virulence assay, we demonstrate that P. aeruginosa activates virulence in response to attachment to a range of chemically distinct surfaces, suggesting that this bacterial species responds to mechanical properties of its substrates. Surface-activated virulence requires quorum sensing, but activating quorum sensing does not induce virulence without surface attachment. The activation of virulence by surfaces also requires the surface-exposed protein PilY1, which has a domain homologous to a eukaryotic mechanosensor. Specific mutation of the putative PilY1 mechanosensory domain is sufficient to induce virulence in non–surface-attached cells, suggesting that PilY1 mediates surface mechanotransduction. Triggering virulence only when cells are both at high density and attached to a surface—two host-nonspecific cues—explains how P. aeruginosa precisely regulates virulence while maintaining broad host specificity. PMID:25385640

  11. Spectroscopic properties of Pr3+ and Er3+ ions in lead-free borate glasses modified by BaF2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisarska, Joanna; Pisarski, Wojciech A.; Dorosz, Dominik; Dorosz, Jan

    2015-09-01

    Lead-free oxyfluoride borate glasses singly doped with Pr3+ and Er3+ were prepared and next investigated using absorption and luminescence spectroscopy. In the studied glass system, barium oxide was substituted by BaF2. Two luminescence bands of Pr3+ located at visible spectral region are observed, which correspond to 3P0-3H4 (blue) and 1D2-3H4 (reddish orange) transitions, respectively. The luminescence bands due to 1D2-3H4 transition of Pr3+ are shifted to shorter wavelengths, when BaO was substituted by BaF2. Near-infrared luminescence spectra of Er3+ ions in lead-free borate glasses modified by BaF2 correspond to 4I13/2-4I15/2 transition. Their spectral linewidths increase with increasing BaF2 concentration. The changes in measured lifetimes of rare earth ions are well correlated with the bonding parameters calculated from the optical absorption spectra.

  12. Enhanced UVB emission and analysis of chemical states of Ca5(PO4)3OH:Gd3+,Pr3+ phosphor prepared by co-precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokoena, P. P.; Nagpure, I. M.; Kumar, Vinay; Kroon, R. E.; Olivier, E. J.; Neethling, J. H.; Swart, H. C.; Ntwaeaborwa, O. M.

    2014-08-01

    Hydroxyapatite (Ca5(PO4)3OH) is a well-known bioceramic material used in medical applications because of its ability to form direct chemical bonds with living tissues. This mineral is currently used as a host for rare-earth ions (e.g. Gd3+, Pr3+, Tb3+, etc.) to prepare phosphors that can be used in light emitting devices of different types. In this study Ca5(PO4)3OH:Gd3+,Pr3+ phosphors were prepared by the co-precipitation method and were characterised by x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The x-ray diffraction pattern was consistent with the hexagonal phase of Ca5(PO4)3OH referenced in JCPDS card number 73-0293. The x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data indicated that Ca2+ occupied two different lattice sites, referred to as Ca1 and Ca2. The photoluminescence data exhibited a narrowband emission located at 313 nm, which is associated with the 6P7/2→8S7/2 transition of the Gd3+ ion. This emission is classified as ultraviolet B and it is suitable for use in phototherapy lamps to treat various skin diseases. The photoluminescence intensity of the 313 nm emission was enhanced considerably by Pr3+ co-doping.

  13. 100 MW 1.6-μm Pr+3:LaCl3 Propulsion Laser Pumped by a Nuclear-Pumped He/Ar/Xe Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boody, Frederick P.

    2003-05-01

    A 20 kHz, 100-MW average power, pulsed 1.6-μm Pr+3:LaCl3 up-conversion laser for space propulsion, pumped at high intensity by a continuous 212-MW, 2.026-μm He/Ar/Xe nuclear-pumped laser, is proposed. 1.6 μm falls within the 1.72 μm > λ > 1.53 μm atmospheric transmission window and is sufficiently distant from 1.4 μm to be relatively eye safe. The high pulse rate minimizes dribble and thus maximizes specific impulse. The nuclear-pumped laser is also a steady-state nuclear reactor. The Pr+3:LaCl3 solid-state laser combines the many small beams produced by the reactor-laser with high beam quality. It consists of an array of face-pumped thin disks at Brewster's angle, face-cooled by high-pressure turbulent helium. The inhomogeneities introduced by the disk array are corrected by using a double pass geometry with a phase-conjugate mirror, as suggested by Magda. The fraction of the pump energy extracted from the Pr+3:LaCl3 laser is 47% at a pump intensity of 2×105 W/cm2. The He/Ar/Xe laser is 0.4% efficient, giving an overall efficiency of 0.2%, equivalent to ~0.8% if electrically pumped.

  14. Structural characterizations and intense green upconversion emission in Yb3+, Pr3+ co-doped Y2O3 nano-phosphor.

    PubMed

    Yadav, R S; Verma, R K; Bahadur, A; Rai, S B

    2015-02-25

    We report the structural and optical properties of Yb(3+), Pr(3+) co-doped Y2O3 nano-phosphor synthesized through solution combustion method. The structural studies reveal the nano-crystalline structure of the sample. The energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) measurements confirm the presence of Y, O, Pr and Yb elements in the sample. Fourier transform infrared studies show the vibrational features of the samples. The fluorescence spectra of the samples have been monitored on excitation with 976 nm and the intense green upconversion emission observed at 552 nm is due to (3)P0→(3)H5 electronic transition. The concentration of Pr(3+) ion in the sample is optimized and the fluorescence intensity is maximum at 0.08 mol% of Pr(3+). The power dependence studies reveal the involvement of two photons in the emission process. The possible mechanism of upconversion has been discussed on the basis of schematic energy level diagram. The sample annealed at higher temperature enhances the fluorescence intensity up to 8 times and this enhancement is discussed in terms of the removal of optical quenching centers. The nano-phosphor can be applicable in the field of display devices and green laser. PMID:25233026

  15. Structural characterizations and intense green upconversion emission in Yb3+, Pr3+ co-doped Y2O3 nano-phosphor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, R. S.; Verma, R. K.; Bahadur, A.; Rai, S. B.

    2015-02-01

    We report the structural and optical properties of Yb3+, Pr3+ co-doped Y2O3 nano-phosphor synthesized through solution combustion method. The structural studies reveal the nano-crystalline structure of the sample. The energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) measurements confirm the presence of Y, O, Pr and Yb elements in the sample. Fourier transform infrared studies show the vibrational features of the samples. The fluorescence spectra of the samples have been monitored on excitation with 976 nm and the intense green upconversion emission observed at 552 nm is due to 3P0 → 3H5 electronic transition. The concentration of Pr3+ ion in the sample is optimized and the fluorescence intensity is maximum at 0.08 mol% of Pr3+. The power dependence studies reveal the involvement of two photons in the emission process. The possible mechanism of upconversion has been discussed on the basis of schematic energy level diagram. The sample annealed at higher temperature enhances the fluorescence intensity up to 8 times and this enhancement is discussed in terms of the removal of optical quenching centers. The nano-phosphor can be applicable in the field of display devices and green laser.

  16. Parametric energy converter

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.N.

    1981-10-20

    A method and apparatus for converting thermal energy into mechanical energy by parametric pumping of rotary inertia. In a preferred embodiment, a modified tesla turbine rotor is positioned within a rotary boiler along its axis of rotation. An external heat source, such as solar radiation, is directed onto the outer casing of the boiler to convert the liquid to steam. As the steam spirals inwardly toward the discs of the rotor, the moment of inertia of the mass of steam is reduced to thereby substantially increase its kinetic energy. The laminar flow of steam between the discs of the rotor transfers the increased kinetic energy to the rotor which can be coupled out through an output shaft to perform mechanical work. A portion of the mechanical output can be fed back to maintain rotation of the boiler.

  17. Thermionic energy converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, J. F. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    The efficiency of thermionic energy converters is improved by internal distribution of tiny sorted cesium diodes driven by the thermal gradient between the primary emitter and the collector. The tiny, sorted diode distribution comprises protrusions of the emitter material from the main emitter face which contact the main collector face thermally but not electrically. The main collector ends of the protrusions are separated from the main collector by a thin layer of insulation, such as aluminum oxide. The shorted tiny diode distribution augments cesium ionization through internal thermal effects only within the main diode. No electrical inputs are required. This ionization enhancement by the distribution of the tiny shorted diodes not only reduces the plasma voltage drop but also increases the power output and efficiency of the overall thermionic energy converter.

  18. Digital to synchro converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Predina, Joseph P. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A digital-to-synchro converter is provided where a binary input code specifies a desired shaft angle and where an resolver type position transducer is employed with additional circuitry to generate a shaft position error signal indicative of the angular difference between the desired shaft angle and the actual shaft angle. The additional circuitry corrects for known and calculated errors in the shaft position detection process and equipment.

  19. Protease IV, a quorum sensing-dependent protease of Pseudomonas aeruginosa modulates insect innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Park, Su-Jin; Kim, Soo-Kyoung; So, Yong-In; Park, Ha-Young; Li, Xi-Hui; Yeom, Doo Hwan; Lee, Mi-Nan; Lee, Bok-Luel; Lee, Joon-Hee

    2014-12-01

    In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, quorum sensing (QS) plays an essential role in pathogenesis and the QS response controls many virulence factors. Using a mealworm, Tenebrio molitor as a host model, we found that Protease IV, a QS-regulated exoprotease of P. aeruginosa functions as a key virulence effector causing the melanization and death of T. molitor larvae. Protease IV was able to degrade zymogens of spätzle processing enzyme (SPE) and SPE-activating enzyme (SAE) without the activation of the antimicrobial peptide (AMP) production. Since SPE and SAE function to activate spätzle, a ligand of Toll receptor in the innate immune system of T. molitor, we suggest that Protease IV may interfere with the activation of the Toll signaling. Independently of the Toll pathway, the melanization response, another innate immunity was still generated, since Protease IV directly converted Tenebrio prophenoloxidase into active phenoloxidase. Protease IV also worked as an important factor in the virulence to brine shrimp and nematode. These results suggest that Protease IV provides P. aeruginosa with a sophisticated way to escape the immune attack of host by interfering with the production of AMPs. PMID:25315216

  20. Conversion of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quinolone Signal and Related Alkylhydroxyquinolines by Rhodococcus sp. Strain BG43

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Christine; Birmes, Franziska S.; Niewerth, Heiko

    2014-01-01

    A bacterial strain, which based on the sequences of its 16S rRNA, gyrB, catA, and qsdA genes, was identified as a Rhodococcus sp. closely related to Rhodococcus erythropolis, was isolated from soil by enrichment on the Pseudomonas quinolone signal [PQS; 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone], a quorum sensing signal employed by the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The isolate, termed Rhodococcus sp. strain BG43, cometabolically degraded PQS and its biosynthetic precursor 2-heptyl-4(1H)-quinolone (HHQ) to anthranilic acid. HHQ degradation was accompanied by transient formation of PQS, and HHQ hydroxylation by cell extracts required NADH, indicating that strain BG43 has a HHQ monooxygenase isofunctional to the biosynthetic enzyme PqsH of P. aeruginosa. The enzymes catalyzing HHQ hydroxylation and PQS degradation were inducible by PQS, suggesting a specific pathway. Remarkably, Rhodococcus sp. BG43 is also capable of transforming 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide to PQS. It thus converts an antibacterial secondary metabolite of P. aeruginosa to a quorum sensing signal molecule. PMID:25239889

  1. Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0 produces enantio-pyochelin, the optical antipode of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa siderophore pyochelin.

    PubMed

    Youard, Zeb A; Mislin, Gaëtan L A; Majcherczyk, Paul A; Schalk, Isabelle J; Reimmann, Cornelia

    2007-12-01

    The siderophore pyochelin is made by a thiotemplate mechanism from salicylate and two molecules of cysteine. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the first cysteine residue is converted to its D-isoform during thiazoline ring formation whereas the second cysteine remains in its L-configuration, thus determining the stereochemistry of the two interconvertible pyochelin diastereoisomers as 4'R, 2''R, 4''R (pyochelin I) and 4'R, 2''S, 4''R (pyochelin II). Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0 was found to make a different stereoisomeric mixture, which promoted growth under iron limitation in strain CHA0 and induced the expression of its biosynthetic genes, but was not recognized as a siderophore and signaling molecule by P. aeruginosa. Reciprocally, pyochelin promoted growth and induced pyochelin gene expression in P. aeruginosa, but was not functional in P. fluorescens. The structure of the CHA0 siderophore was determined by mass spectrometry, thin-layer chromatography, NMR, polarimetry, and chiral HPLC as enantio-pyochelin, the optical antipode of the P. aeruginosa siderophore pyochelin. Enantio-pyochelin was chemically synthesized and confirmed to be active in CHA0. Its potential biosynthetic pathway in CHA0 is discussed. PMID:17938167

  2. Transistorized converter provides nondissipative regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    A transistorized regulator converter efficiently converts fluctuating input voltages to a constant output voltage, avoiding the use of saturable reactors. It is nondissipative in operation and functions in an open loop through variable duty cycles.

  3. Electrothermodynamic (etd) power converter

    SciTech Connect

    Marks, A.M.

    1983-07-26

    These inventions relate to novel advances in Electrothermodynamics (ETD), also known as charged aerosol, heat/electric power generators: (1) A new more efficient, compact converging/diverging configuration comprising a torus of revolution (TORON) used with a gas flywheel. (2) A ''Method II'' two-fluid mixed flow ejector/converter in a gas flywheel loop employing a primary steam or a high molecular weight driver jet such as a fluorocarbon containing charged aerosol water droplets and a low molecular weight carrier gas such as hydrogen or helium with an electro-negative gas additive, in a Rankine cycle including a vapor/gas and liquid separator with a bypass to the ejector/converter loop. (3) A ''Method III'' two-fluid mixed flow comprising a supersonic jet expanding conically within a subsonic flow, separated by a boundary layer in which the charged aerosol forms downstream of the orifice, at a cross section of at least 100 times the orifice section; and in which the electric charge density of the charged aerosol decreases along the jet axis, whereby substantially all of the kinetic power of the jet is converted to electric power within the jet, there being no ejector. (4) An array of supersonic jets utilizing Method III. (5) An array of supersonic jets utilizing Method III without separating duct walls in which ''convection cells'' provide return flows, forming a plurality of TORON configurations. (6) A supercritical Rankline cycle in a single stage employing Method III. (7) A method IV two-fluid cycle uses charged aerosols in an inert gas and operates on an Ericsson-type cycle. (8) Optimum operating conditions are defined for Methods II, III, and IV. (9) A high potential emitter is employed with a grounded body, and a sapphire tube sealed to metal by a new technique provides an insulating duct for the high temperature, high pressure vapor.

  4. Cycloidal Wave Energy Converter

    SciTech Connect

    Stefan G. Siegel, Ph.D.

    2012-11-30

    This program allowed further advancing the development of a novel type of wave energy converter, a Cycloidal Wave Energy Converter or CycWEC. A CycWEC consists of one or more hydrofoils rotating around a central shaft, and operates fully submerged beneath the water surface. It operates under feedback control sensing the incoming waves, and converts wave power to shaft power directly without any intermediate power take off system. Previous research consisting of numerical simulations and two dimensional small 1:300 scale wave flume experiments had indicated wave cancellation efficiencies beyond 95%. The present work was centered on construction and testing of a 1:10 scale model and conducting two testing campaigns in a three dimensional wave basin. These experiments allowed for the first time for direct measurement of electrical power generated as well as the interaction of the CycWEC in a three dimensional environment. The Atargis team successfully conducted two testing campaigns at the Texas A&M Offshore Technology Research Center and was able to demonstrate electricity generation. In addition, three dimensional wave diffraction results show the ability to achieve wave focusing, thus increasing the amount of wave power that can be extracted beyond what was expected from earlier two dimensional investigations. Numerical results showed wave cancellation efficiencies for irregular waves to be on par with results for regular waves over a wide range of wave lengths. Using the results from previous simulations and experiments a full scale prototype was designed and its performance in a North Atlantic wave climate of average 30kW/m of wave crest was estimated. A full scale WEC with a blade span of 150m will deliver a design power of 5MW at an estimated levelized cost of energy (LCOE) in the range of 10-17 US cents per kWh. Based on the new results achieved in the 1:10 scale experiments these estimates appear conservative and the likely performance at full scale will

  5. Gallium phosphide energy converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, P. E.; Dinetta, L. C.; Goetz, M. A.

    1995-01-01

    Gallium phosphide (GaP) energy converters may be successfully deployed to provide new mission capabilities for spacecraft. Betavoltaic power supplies based on the conversion of tritium beta decay to electricity using GaP energy converters can supply long term low-level power with high reliability. High temperature solar cells, also based on GaP, can be used in inward-bound missions greatly reducing the need for thermal dissipation. Results are presented for GaP direct conversion devices powered by Ni-63 and compared to the conversion of light emitted by tritiarated phosphors. Leakage currents as low as 1.2 x 10(exp -17) A/sq cm have been measured and the temperature dependence of the reverse saturation current is found to have ideal behavior. Temperature dependent IV, QE, R(sub sh), and V(sub oc) results are also presented. These data are used to predict the high-temperature solar cell and betacell performance of GaP devices and suggest appropriate applications for the deployment of this technology.

  6. Bidirectional buck boost converter

    DOEpatents

    Esser, Albert Andreas Maria

    1998-03-31

    A bidirectional buck boost converter and method of operating the same allows regulation of power flow between first and second voltage sources in which the voltage level at each source is subject to change and power flow is independent of relative voltage levels. In one embodiment, the converter is designed for hard switching while another embodiment implements soft switching of the switching devices. In both embodiments, first and second switching devices are serially coupled between a relatively positive terminal and a relatively negative terminal of a first voltage source with third and fourth switching devices serially coupled between a relatively positive terminal and a relatively negative terminal of a second voltage source. A free-wheeling diode is coupled, respectively, in parallel opposition with respective ones of the switching devices. An inductor is coupled between a junction of the first and second switching devices and a junction of the third and fourth switching devices. Gating pulses supplied by a gating circuit selectively enable operation of the switching devices for transferring power between the voltage sources. In the second embodiment, each switching device is shunted by a capacitor and the switching devices are operated when voltage across the device is substantially zero.

  7. Bidirectional buck boost converter

    DOEpatents

    Esser, A.A.M.

    1998-03-31

    A bidirectional buck boost converter and method of operating the same allows regulation of power flow between first and second voltage sources in which the voltage level at each source is subject to change and power flow is independent of relative voltage levels. In one embodiment, the converter is designed for hard switching while another embodiment implements soft switching of the switching devices. In both embodiments, first and second switching devices are serially coupled between a relatively positive terminal and a relatively negative terminal of a first voltage source with third and fourth switching devices serially coupled between a relatively positive terminal and a relatively negative terminal of a second voltage source. A free-wheeling diode is coupled, respectively, in parallel opposition with respective ones of the switching devices. An inductor is coupled between a junction of the first and second switching devices and a junction of the third and fourth switching devices. Gating pulses supplied by a gating circuit selectively enable operation of the switching devices for transferring power between the voltage sources. In the second embodiment, each switching device is shunted by a capacitor and the switching devices are operated when voltage across the device is substantially zero. 20 figs.

  8. Glycerol metabolism promotes biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Scoffield, Jessica; Silo-Suh, Laura

    2016-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes persistent infections in the airways of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Airway sputum contains various host-derived nutrients that can be utilized by P. aeruginosa, including phosphotidylcholine, a major component of host cell membranes. Phosphotidylcholine can be degraded by P. aeruginosa to glycerol and fatty acids to increase the availability of glycerol in the CF lung. In this study, we explored the role that glycerol metabolism plays in biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa. We report that glycerol metabolism promotes biofilm formation by both a chronic CF isolate (FRD1) and a wound isolate (PAO1) of P. aeruginosa. Moreover, loss of the GlpR regulator, which represses the expression of genes involved in glycerol metabolism, enhances biofilm formation in FRD1 through the upregulation of Pel polysaccharide. Taken together, our results suggest that glycerol metabolism may be a key factor that contributes to P. aeruginosa persistence by promoting biofilm formation. PMID:27392247

  9. Transferable imipenem resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, M; Iyobe, S; Inoue, M; Mitsuhashi, S

    1991-01-01

    We isolated an imipenem-resistant strain, GN17203, of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The strain produced a beta-lactamase that hydrolyzed imipenem. The beta-lactamase was encoded by a 31-MDa plasmid, pMS350, which belongs to incompatibility group P-9. The plasmic conferred resistance to beta-lactams, gentamicin, and sulfonamide and was transferable by conjugation to P. aeruginosa but not to Escherichia coli. The molecular weight of the purified enzyme was estimated to be 28,000, and the isoelectric point was 9.0. The enzyme showed a broad substrate profile, hydrolyzing imipenem, oxyiminocephalosporins, 7-methoxycephalosporins, and penicillins. The enzyme activity was inhibited by EDTA, iodine, p-chloromercuribenzoate, CuSO4, and HgCl2 but not by clavulanic acid or sulbactam. Images PMID:1901695

  10. Pseudomonas aeruginosa ventilator-associated pneumonia management

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Estrada, Sergio; Borgatta, Bárbara; Rello, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia is the most common infection in intensive care unit patients associated with high morbidity rates and elevated economic costs; Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most frequent bacteria linked with this entity, with a high attributable mortality despite adequate treatment that is increased in the presence of multiresistant strains, a situation that is becoming more common in intensive care units. In this manuscript, we review the current management of ventilator-associated pneumonia due to P. aeruginosa, the most recent antipseudomonal agents, and new adjunctive therapies that are shifting the way we treat these infections. We support early initiation of broad-spectrum antipseudomonal antibiotics in present, followed by culture-guided monotherapy de-escalation when susceptibilities are available. Future management should be directed at blocking virulence; the role of alternative strategies such as new antibiotics, nebulized treatments, and vaccines is promising. PMID:26855594

  11. Pseudomonas aeruginosa endophthalmitis masquerading as chronic uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Nagaraj, Kalpana Badami; Jayadev, Chaitra

    2013-01-01

    A 65-year-old male presented with decreased vision in the left eye of 15-day duration after having undergone an uneventful cataract surgery 10 months back. He had been previously treated with systemic steroids for recurrent uveitis postoperatively on three occasions in the same eye. B-scan ultrasonography showed multiple clumplike echoes suggestive of vitreous inflammation. Aqueous tap revealed Pseudomonas aeruginosa sensitive to ciprofloxacin. The patient was treated with intravitreal ciprofloxacin and vancomycin along with systemic ciprofloxacin with good clinical response. Even a virulent organism such as P.aeruginosa can present as a chronic uveitis, which, if missed, can lead to a delay in accurate diagnosis and appropriate management. PMID:23803484

  12. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm: potential therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Garima; Rao, Saloni; Bansal, Ankiti; Dang, Shweta; Gupta, Sanjay; Gabrani, Reema

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a gram-negative pathogen that has become an important cause of infection, especially in patients with compromised host defense mechanisms. It is frequently related to nosocomial infections such as pneumonia, urinary tract infections (UTIs) and bacteremia. The biofilm formed by the bacteria allows it to adhere to any surface, living or non-living and thus Pseudomonal infections can involve any part of the body. Further, the adaptive and genetic changes of the micro-organisms within the biofilm make them resistant to all known antimicrobial agents making the Pseudomonal infections complicated and life threatening. Pel, Psl and Alg operons present in P. aeruginosa are responsible for the biosynthesis of extracellular polysaccharide which plays an important role in cell-cell and cell-surface interactions during biofilm formation. Understanding the bacterial virulence which depends on a large number of cell-associated and extracellular factors is essential to know the potential drug targets for future studies. Current novel methods like small molecule based inhibitors, phytochemicals, bacteriophage therapy, photodynamic therapy, antimicrobial peptides, monoclonal antibodies and nanoparticles to curtail the biofilm formed by P. aeruginosa are being discussed in this review. PMID:24309094

  13. Electromagnetic wave energy converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, R. L. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    Electromagnetic wave energy is converted into electric power with an array of mutually insulated electromagnetic wave absorber elements each responsive to an electric field component of the wave as it impinges thereon. Each element includes a portion tapered in the direction of wave propagation to provide a relatively wideband response spectrum. Each element includes an output for deriving a voltage replica of the electric field variations intercepted by it. Adjacent elements are positioned relative to each other so that an electric field subsists between adjacent elements in response to the impinging wave. The electric field results in a voltage difference between adjacent elements that is fed to a rectifier to derive dc output power.

  14. Fluorescent radiation converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viehmann, W. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A fluorescence radiation converter is described which includes a substantially undoped optically transparent substrate and a waveshifter coating deposited on at least one portion of the substrate for absorption of radiation and conversion of fluorescent radiation. The coating is formed to substantially 1000 g/liter of a solvent, 70 to 200 g/liter of an organic polymer, and 0.2 to 25 g/liter of at least one organic fluorescent dye. The incoming incident radiation impinges on the coating. Radiation is absorbed by the fluorescent dye and is re-emitted as a longer wavelength radiation. Radiation is trapped within the substrate and is totally internally reflected by the boundary surface. Emitted radiation leaves the substrate ends to be detected.

  15. Unity power factor converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wester, Gene W. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A unity power factor converter capable of effecting either inversion (dc-to-dc) or rectification (ac-to-dc), and capable of providing bilateral power control from a DC source (or load) through an AC transmission line to a DC load (or source) for power flow in either direction, is comprised of comparators for comparing the AC current i with an AC signal i.sub.ref (or its phase inversion) derived from the AC ports to generate control signals to operate a switch control circuit for high speed switching to shape the AC current waveform to a sine waveform, and synchronize it in phase and frequency with the AC voltage at the AC ports, by selectively switching the connections to a series inductor as required to increase or decrease the current i.

  16. The effects of Ho3+ and Pr3+ ions on the spectroscopic properties of Er3+ doped SrGdGa3O7 crystals used in mid-infrared lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Houping; Feng, Jianghe; Wang, Yan; Li, Jianfu; Ji, Yuexia; Jia, Zhitai; Tu, Chaoyang

    2015-11-01

    Ho3+ and Pr3+ ions were introduced into Er3+ : SrGdGa3O7 crystal, respectively, for enhanced 2.7 μm emissions. The effects of Ho3+ and Pr3+ on the spectroscopic properties and mutual energy transfer mechanisms were investigated. It is found that the introductions of Ho3+ and Pr3+ are helpful to achieve enhanced mid-infrared emissions and reduced near-infrared emissions. The up-conversion emission in Er3+/Ho3+ : SrGdGa3O7 crystal was stronger than that in Er3+ : SrGdGa3O7 crystal, while that in Er3+/Pr3+ : SrGdGa3O7 crystal was decreased. Introducing Ho3+ and Pr3+ depopulated the lower laser lever through energy transfer and thus reduced the fluorescence lifetime of Er3+ : 4I13/2 in Er3+/Ho3+ : SrGdGa3O7 and Er3+/Pr3+ : SrGdGa3O7 crystals to 1/2 and 1/10 of that in Er3+ : SrGdGa3O7 crystal without significantly affecting the fluorescence lifetime of the upper laser level Er3+ : 4I11/2, which greatly reduces the self-saturation problem. However, with reduced up-conversion emission and a weaker self-termination effect, Pr3+ is a more appropriate sensitizer than Ho3+ for Er3+ in this crystal. All the results imply that Er3+/Pr3+ : SrGdGa3O7 crystal could act as a potential gain media for an enhanced 2.7 μm MIR laser.

  17. Development and validation of a lateral flow assay (LFA) for the determination of IgG-antibodies to Pr3 (cANCA) and MPO (pANCA).

    PubMed

    Offermann, N; Conrad, K; Fritzler, M J; Fooke Achterrath, M

    2014-01-31

    The timely diagnosis of vasculopathies, such as granulomatosis with polyangiitis, has important implications for the favorable clinical outcome of these diseases. In the clinical setting, autoantibodies to proteinase 3 (Pr3) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) have been shown to be valuable adjuncts to an early and accurate diagnosis. The sensitive and specific detection of anti-Pr3 and anti-MPO was shown using a point of care device that employed rapid Lateral Flow Technologies. The validation of the lateral flow assay (LFA) was performed with serum samples collected in two Reference Laboratories and showed excellent results that were comparable to widely accepted and used ELISA. The advantage of the LFA is the flexibility to be used as an economical, point of care diagnostic device, features that are especially important for an early and accurate diagnosis and the prompt initiation of appropriate treatment so as to avoid inevitable development of undue complications of these diseases such as disseminated organ involvement, e.g. renal failure. PMID:24291125

  18. Functional near infrared-emitting Cr3+/Pr3+ co-doped zinc gallogermanate persistent luminescent nanoparticles with superlong afterglow for in vivo targeted bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Abdukayum, Abdukader; Chen, Jia-Tong; Zhao, Qiang; Yan, Xiu-Ping

    2013-09-25

    Near infrared (NIR)-emitting persistent luminescent nanoparticles (PLNPs) have great potential for in vivo bioimaging with the advantages of no need for in situ excitation, high signal-to-noise ratio, and deep tissue penetration. However, functional NIR-emitting PLNPs with long afterglow for long-term in vivo imaging are lacking. Here, we show the synthesis of NIR-emitting long-persistent luminescent nanoparticles (LPLNPs) Zn2.94Ga1.96Ge2O10:Cr(3+),Pr(3+) by a citrate sol-gel method in combination with a subsequent reducing atmosphere-free calcination. The persistent luminescence of the LPLNPs is significantly improved via codoping Pr(3+)/Cr(3+) and creating suitable Zn deficiency in zinc gallogermanate. The LPLNP powder exhibits bright NIR luminescence in the biological transparency window with a superlong afterglow time of over 15 days. A persistent energy transfer between host and Cr(3+) ion in the LPLNPs is observed and its mechanism is discussed. PEGylation greatly improves the biocompatibility and water solubility of the LPLNPs. Further bioconjugation with c(RGDyK) peptide makes the LPLNPs promising for long-term in vivo targeted tumor imaging with low toxicity. PMID:23988232

  19. Ligand field density functional theory calculation of the 4f2→ 4f15d1 transitions in the quantum cutter Cs2KYF6:Pr3+.

    PubMed

    Ramanantoanina, Harry; Urland, Werner; Cimpoesu, Fanica; Daul, Claude

    2013-09-01

    Herein we present a Ligand Field Density Functional Theory (LFDFT) based methodology for the analysis of the 4f(n)→ 4f(n-1)5d(1) transitions in rare earth compounds and apply it for the characterization of the 4f(2)→ 4f(1)5d(1) transitions in the quantum cutter Cs2KYF6:Pr(3+) with the elpasolite structure type. The methodological advances are relevant for the analysis and prospection of materials acting as phosphors in light-emitting diodes. The positions of the zero-phonon energy corresponding to the states of the electron configurations 4f(2) and 4f(1)5d(1) are calculated, where the praseodymium ion may occupy either the Cs(+)-, K(+)- or the Y(3+)-site, and are compared with available experimental data. The theoretical results show that the occupation of the three undistorted sites allows a quantum-cutting process. However size effects due to the difference between the ionic radii of Pr(3+) and K(+) as well as Cs(+) lead to the distortion of the K(+)- and the Cs(+)-site, which finally exclude these sites for quantum-cutting. A detailed discussion about the origin of this distortion is also described. PMID:23846586

  20. Temperature evolution of the luminescence decay of Sr0.33Ba0.67Nb2O6 : Pr3+.

    PubMed

    Mahlik, S; Lazarowska, A; Speghini, A; Bettinelli, M; Grinberg, M

    2014-04-23

    This article presents a spectroscopic investigation of Sr(0.33)Ba(0.67)(NbO2)3, doped with 1 mol% of Pr(3+). Photoluminescence and luminescence kinetics were measured at different temperatures at ambient (ferroelectric phase) and 76 kbar pressures (paraelectric phase). The photoluminescence spectrum is dominated by (1)D2 → (3)H4 transition of Pr(3+) in both phases. At ambient pressure when the system is excited with UV radiation, the intensity of dominant (1)D2 → (3)H4 emission evidently increases in the 200-293 K temperature range. This effect is attributed to enhancement of the excitation of the (1)D2 state through the praseodymium trapped exciton state, which at higher temperatures does not populate the higher lying (3)P0 state. Additionally, under UV radiation the material exhibits afterglow luminescence activated by temperature that can also have an impact on the increase of the (1)D2 emission. We propose that the afterglow luminescence is related to the existence of electron traps. At a pressure of 76 kbar the depth of the electron traps decreases in comparison to the ones observed at ambient pressure. However, the phase transition does not change the number of electron traps. PMID:24695003

  1. Luminescence behavior of SrS:Pr 3+ micron-sized phosphor fabricated through chemical co-precipitation route and post-annealing processess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitale, Shreyas S.; Sharma, Suchinder K.; Dubey, R. N.; Qureshi, M. S.; Malik, M. Manzar

    2009-04-01

    Synthesis of Pr 3+ doped SrS phosphor has been reported through chemical co-precipitation route employing hydrazine-sulfur solution as a source of sulfur ions and its luminescence properties are investigated in this paper. Good crystallinity and cubic SrS phase having lattice constant 5.99 nm is achieved after post-precipitation calcinations of powder at 900 °C. The morphological studies of annealed samples reveal terracing growth of micron-size particles. Photoluminescence studies reveal three excitation bands at 276, 314 and 355 nm and prominent emission line at 494 nm along with weaker emission contribution between 600 and 700 nm due to 3P 0- 1H 4 and 3P 0- 3F 2 transitions of Pr 3+, respectively. Thermoluminescence measurements show a broad glow curve structure with maximum centered at 106.2 °C when excited with 254 nm UV radiations. Tm- Tstop method suggests the presence of four trapping levels. Computerized glow curve deconvolution tool is used to evaluate the effective trapping parameters using first-order kinetic model and suggests quasi-continuous distribution of traps having energy in the range 0.8-1.1 eV and frequency factors between 10 10 and 10 12/s.

  2. Infrared to infrared upconversion emission in Pr3+/Yb3+ co-doped La2O3 and La(OH)3 nano-phosphors: A comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, R. S.; Verma, R. K.; Bahadur, A.; Rai, S. B.

    2015-05-01

    The Pr3+/Yb3+ co-doped La2O3 and La(OH)3 nano-phosphors have been synthesized through solution combustion method. The structure and morphology of the samples have been studied using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The physical and optical properties of the samples have been measured and compared. A broad intense infrared emission centered at 850 nm due to 1I6 → 1G4 transition along with sharp green emission centerd at 513 nm due to 3P0 → 3H4 transition are observed on excitation with 976 nm laser. The emission intensity of Pr3+ is optimized with concentration and it is maximum at 0.08 mol%. The annealed samples are found to be more crystalline and emit larger photoluminescence due to removal of quenching centers. The power dependent study of green upconversion emission indicates the involvement of two photons. The phosphor in La(OH)3 phase is more stable though the photoluminescence emission is slightly weak. La(OH)3 is less toxic compared to La2O3 and is biocompatible. It generates more heat and can be used in biothermal treatment.

  3. Interconfigurational 5d → 4f luminescence of Ce3+ and Pr3+ in Ca9Lu(PO4)7.

    PubMed

    Trevisani, M; Ivanovskikh, K V; Piccinelli, F; Speghini, A; Bettinelli, M

    2012-09-26

    Ca(9)Lu(PO(4))(7):Ce (3+) and Ca (9)Lu (PO (4))(7):Pr (3+) polycrystalline materials were synthesized by solid state reaction at high temperature. The materials were characterized by powder x-ray diffraction (XRPD). The luminescence spectroscopy and the excited state dynamics of these compounds were investigated upon excitation with UV/VUV synchrotron radiation. Both materials showed efficient and fast 5d-4f emission upon direct VUV excitation into the 5d levels but only Ca(9)Lu(PO(4))(7):Ce (3+) revealed luminescence upon excitation across the bandgap. The decay kinetics of the 5d-4f emission upon VUV intra-center excitation is characterized by a decay time of 29 ns for Ce (3+) and 17 ns for Pr (3+) with no significant build-up after the excitation pulse. For the both compounds, no significant temperature dependence of the 5d-4f emission lifetime was observed within the range 8-300 K. PMID:22944734

  4. Infrared to infrared upconversion emission in Pr(3+)/Yb(3+) co-doped La2O3 and La(OH)3 nano-phosphors: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Yadav, R S; Verma, R K; Bahadur, A; Rai, S B

    2015-05-01

    The Pr(3+)/Yb(3+) co-doped La2O3 and La(OH)3 nano-phosphors have been synthesized through solution combustion method. The structure and morphology of the samples have been studied using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The physical and optical properties of the samples have been measured and compared. A broad intense infrared emission centered at 850nm due to (1)I6→(1)G4 transition along with sharp green emission centerd at 513nm due to (3)P0→(3)H4 transition are observed on excitation with 976nm laser. The emission intensity of Pr(3+) is optimized with concentration and it is maximum at 0.08mol%. The annealed samples are found to be more crystalline and emit larger photoluminescence due to removal of quenching centers. The power dependent study of green upconversion emission indicates the involvement of two photons. The phosphor in La(OH)3 phase is more stable though the photoluminescence emission is slightly weak. La(OH)3 is less toxic compared to La2O3 and is biocompatible. It generates more heat and can be used in biothermal treatment. PMID:25706603

  5. Turbo-Brayton Power Converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breedlove, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Future NASA space missions will require advanced thermal-to-electric power converters that are reliable, efficient, and lightweight. Creare, LLC, is developing a turbo-Brayton power converter that offers high efficiency and specific power. The converter employs gas bearings to provide maintenance free, long-life operation. Discrete components can be packaged to fit optimally with other subsystems, and the converter's continuous gas flow can communicate directly with remote heat sources and heat rejection surfaces without the need for ancillary heat-transfer components and intermediate flow loops. Creare has completed detailed analyses, trade studies, fabrication trials, and preliminary designs for the components and converter assembly. The company is fabricating and testing a breadboard converter.

  6. Fluorescence properties of SrAl12O19 : Pr3+ quantum cutting phosphor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Y.; Masada, K.; Kurokawa, H.; Motomura, H.; Jinno, M.; Tachibana, K.

    2013-02-01

    A phosphor, SrAl12O19 doped with Pr (SA : Pr), is investigated in this research in order to improve the luminous efficacy of a mercury-free Xe discharge fluorescent lamp (FL). The obtained sample works as a quantum cutting phosphor which converts an absorbed photon of Xe emission at 172 nm into two visible photons, one at 401.8 nm and the other at 486.3, 526.3, 623.7 or 644.6 nm. The concentration of Pr is optimized and the visible emission of the phosphor becomes maximum at 5 mol%. The photoluminescence measurements show that the relative quantum efficiency of SA : Pr (Pr: 5 mol%) is 38.4% of BaMgAl10O17 : Eu2+ (BAM : Eu). The luminance of a Xe dielectric-barrier-discharge (DBD) FL coated with SA : Pr (Pr: 5 mol%) achieves 28.8% of the same lamp with BAM : Eu. The CIE colour coordinate of the SA : Pr (Pr: 5 mol%) excited by the Xe-DBD lamp is x = 0.307 and y = 0.292. The SA : Pr phosphor has an excitation band peaking at 468 nm corresponding to the 1I6 state and a low intensity excitation band lying from 250 to 420 nm. The latter is attributed to the self-trapped exciton (STE) band. This STE band causes an energy path due to non-radiative transition from 1S0 to 3P0 in the excitation at 172 nm. The former excitation band around 468 nm coincides with an ordinary blue LED's emission. When the phosphor is excited at this wavelength, the emission spectra are observed at 486.3, 526.3, 623.7 and 644.6 nm. Therefore, the SA : Pr may alternatively be useful for white LEDs excited by blue light.

  7. Pulsed thermionic converter study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A nuclear electric propulsion concept using a thermionic reactor inductively coupled to a magnetoplasmadynamic accelerator (MPD arc jet) is described, and the results of preliminary analyses are presented. In this system, the MPD thruster operates intermittently at higher voltages and power levels than the thermionic generating unit. A typical thrust pulse from the MPD arc jet is characterized by power levels of 1 to 4 MWe, a duration of 1 msec, and a duty cycle of approximately 20%. The thermionic generating unit operates continuously but with a lower power level of approximately 0.4 MWe. Energy storage between thrust pulses is provided by building up a large current in an inductor using the output of the thermionic converter array. Periodically, the charging current is interrupted, and the energy stored in the magnetic field of the inductor is utilized for a short duration thrust pulse. The results of the preliminary analysis show that a coupling effectiveness of approximately 85 to 90% is feasible for a nominal 400 KWe system with an inductive unit suitable for a flight vehicle.

  8. Self-powered microthermionic converter

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, Albert C.; King, Donald B.; Zavadil, Kevin R.; Kravitz, Stanley H.; Tigges, Chris P.; Vawter, Gregory A.

    2004-08-10

    A self-powered microthermionic converter having an internal thermal power source integrated into the microthermionic converter. These converters can have high energy-conversion efficiencies over a range of operating temperatures. Microengineering techniques are used to manufacture the converter. The utilization of an internal thermal power source increases potential for mobility and incorporation into small devices. High energy efficiency is obtained by utilization of micron-scale interelectrode gap spacing. Alpha-particle emitting radioisotopes can be used for the internal thermal power source, such as curium and polonium isotopes.

  9. Chromosomal Organization and Segregation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Vallet-Gely, Isabelle; Boccard, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    The study of chromosomal organization and segregation in a handful of bacteria has revealed surprising variety in the mechanisms mediating such fundamental processes. In this study, we further emphasized this diversity by revealing an original organization of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa chromosome. We analyzed the localization of 20 chromosomal markers and several components of the replication machinery in this important opportunistic γ-proteobacteria pathogen. This technique allowed us to show that the 6.3 Mb unique circular chromosome of P. aeruginosa is globally oriented from the old pole of the cell to the division plane/new pole along the oriC-dif axis. The replication machinery is positioned at mid-cell, and the chromosomal loci from oriC to dif are moved sequentially to mid-cell prior to replication. The two chromosomal copies are subsequently segregated at their final subcellular destination in the two halves of the cell. We identified two regions in which markers localize at similar positions, suggesting a bias in the distribution of chromosomal regions in the cell. The first region encompasses 1.4 Mb surrounding oriC, where loci are positioned around the 0.2/0.8 relative cell length upon segregation. The second region contains at least 800 kb surrounding dif, where loci show an extensive colocalization step following replication. We also showed that disrupting the ParABS system is very detrimental in P. aeruginosa. Possible mechanisms responsible for the coordinated chromosomal segregation process and for the presence of large distinctive regions are discussed. PMID:23658532

  10. Introduction of Pseudomonas aeruginosa into a Hospital via Vegetables

    PubMed Central

    Kominos, Spyros D.; Copeland, Charles E.; Grosiak, Barbara; Postic, Bosko

    1972-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa was isolated from tomatoes, radishes, celery, carrots, endive, cabbage, cucumbers, onions, and lettuce obtained from the kitchen of a general hospital, with tomatoes yielding both highest frequencies of isolation and highest counts. Presence of P. aeruginosa on the hands of kitchen personnel and cutting boards and knives which they used suggests acquisition of the organism through contact with these vegetables. It is estimated that a patient consuming an average portion of tomato salad might ingest as many as 5 × 103 colony-forming units of P. aeruginosa. Pyocine types of P. aeruginosa isolated from clinical specimens were frequently identical to those recovered from vegetables, thus implicating tomatoes and other vegetables as an important source and vehicle by which P. aeruginosa colonizes the intestinal tract of patients. PMID:4628795

  11. Algal Growth Potential of Microcystis aeruginosa from Reclaimed Water.

    PubMed

    Joo, Jin Chul; Ahn, Chang Hyuk; Lee, Saeromi; Jang, Dae-Gyu; Lee, Woo Hyoung; Ryu, Byong Ro

    2016-01-01

    Algal growth potential (AGP) of the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa (M. aeruginosa, NIES-298) using reclaimed water from various wastewater reclamation pilot plants was investigated to evaluate the feasibility of the reclaimed water usage for recreational purposes. After completing the coagulation and ultrafiltration processes, the concentrations of most contaminants in the reclaimed water were lower than the reuse guidelines for recreational water. However, M. aeruginosa successfully adapted to low levels of soluble reactive phosphorus (PO(3-)(4)) concentrations. The AGP values of M. aeruginosa decreased with the progression of treatment processes, and with the increases in the dilution volume. Also, both the AGP and chlorophyll-a values can be estimated a priori without conducting the AGP tests. Therefore, aquatic ecosystems in locations prone to environmental conditions favorable for the growth of M. aeruginosa require more rigorous nutrient management plans (e.g., reverse osmosis and dilution with clean water resources) to reduce the nutrient availability. PMID:26803027

  12. Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection mimicking erythema annulare centrifugum.

    PubMed

    Czechowicz, R T; Warren, L J; Moore, L; Saxon, B

    2001-02-01

    A 3-year-old girl receiving chemotherapy for acute lymphocytic leukaemia developed a rapidly expanding red annular plaque on her thigh, initially without signs of systemic toxicity or local pain. Subsequently she developed Pseudomonas aeruginosa sepsis and purpura at the leading edge of the plaque. Skin biopsy showed an extensive necrotizing vasculitis with numerous Gram-negative bacilli in the blood vessel walls. In immunocompromised individuals, skin biopsy and culture of cutaneous lesions for bacteria and fungi should be considered even in the absence of signs of systemic toxicity or multiple lesions. PMID:11233725

  13. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa Proteome during Anaerobic Growth‡

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Manhong; Guina, Tina; Brittnacher, Mitchell; Nguyen, Hai; Eng, Jimmy; Miller, Samuel I.

    2005-01-01

    Isotope-coded affinity tag analysis and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by tandem mass spectrometry were used to identify Pseudomonas aeruginosa proteins expressed during anaerobic growth. Out of the 617 proteins identified, 158 were changed in abundance during anaerobic growth compared to during aerobic growth, including proteins whose increased expression was expected based on their role in anaerobic metabolism. These results form the basis for future analyses of alterations in bacterial protein content during growth in various environments, including the cystic fibrosis airway. PMID:16291692

  14. Biosynthesis of Gold Nanoparticles Using Pseudomonas Aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Abd El-Aziz, M.; Badr, Y.; Mahmoud, M. A.

    2007-02-14

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa were used for extracellular biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles (Au NPs). Consequently, Au NPs were formed due to reduction of gold ion by bacterial cell supernatant of P. aeruginos ATCC 90271, P. aeruginos (2) and P. aeruginos (1). The UV-Vis. and fluorescence spectra of the bacterial as well as chemical prepared Au NPs were recorded. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) micrograph showed the formation of well-dispersed gold nanoparticles in the range of 15-30 nm. The process of reduction being extracellular and may lead to the development of an easy bioprocess for synthesis of Au NPs.

  15. Proposed electromagnetic wave energy converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    Device converts wave energy into electric power through array of insulated absorber elements responsive to field of impinging electromagnetic radiation. Device could also serve as solar energy converter that is potentially less expensive and fragile than solar cells, yet substantially more efficient.

  16. Thyristor converter simulation and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S.Y.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper we present a simulation on thyristor converters. The simulation features nonlinearity, non-uniform firing, and the commutations. Several applications such as a current regulation, a converter frequency characteristics analysis, and a power line disturbance analysis will be presented. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  17. Synthesis, structure, and reductive elimination in the series Tp'Rh(PR3)(Ar(F))H; determination of rhodium-carbon bond energies of fluoroaryl substituents.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Taro; Brennessel, William W; Clot, Eric; Eisenstein, Odile; Jones, William D

    2010-11-21

    A series of complexes of the type Tp'Rh(PR(3))(Ar(F))H, where PR(3) = PMe(3) (3) and PMe(2)Ph (9), Ar(F) = C(6)F(5) (a), 2,3,4,5-C(6)F(4)H (b), 2,3,5,6-C(6)F(4)H (c), 2,4,6-C(6)F(3)H(2) (d), 2,3-C(6)F(2)H(3) (e), 2,5-C(6)F(2)H(3) (g), and 2-C(6)FH(4) (h) and Tp' = tris(3,5-dimethylpyrazolyl)borate, has been synthesized as stable crystalline compounds by the reactions of the [Tp'Rh(PR(3))] fragment with the corresponding fluorinated aromatic hydrocarbons, and their structures were characterized by NMR spectroscopy and elemental analysis together with X-ray crystallography. The kinetics of the reductive eliminations of fluoroarenes from complexes 3a-h in benzene-d(6) solutions at 140 °C were investigated, but were complicated by the formation of the rhodium(I) bisphosphine complex, Tp'Rh(PMe(3))(2) (4). On the other hand, thermal reactions of (9) in THF-d(8) solutions at 120 °C resulted in the formation of an intramolecular C-H bond activated complex of the phenyl group on the phosphorus atom, Tp'Rh(κ(2)-C(6)H(4)-2-PMe(2))H (7), which prevents the formation of the corresponding bisphosphine complex. The experimentally determined rates of the reductive eliminations of fluoroarenes from the complexes 9a-h and their kinetic selectivities for formation in competition with the metallacycle have been used to determine relative Rh-CAr(F) bond energies. The Rh-CAr(F) bond energy is found to be dependent on the number of ortho fluorines. A plot of Rh-CAr(F) vs. C-H bond strengths resulted in a line with a slope R(M-C/C-H) of 2.15 that closely matches the DFT calculated value (slope = 2.05). PMID:20924525

  18. OXIDATIVE ASSIMILATION OF GLUCOSE BY PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Margaret G.; Campbell, J. J. R.

    1962-01-01

    Duncan, Margaret G. (The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada) and J. J. R. Campbell. Oxidative assimilation of glucose by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. J. Bacteriol. 84:784–792. 1962—Oxidative assimilation of glucose by washed-cell suspensions of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was studied using C14-labeled substrate. At the time of glucose disappearance, only small amounts of radioactivity were present in the cells, and α-ketoglutaric acid accumulated in the supernatant fluid. Most of the material synthesized by the cells during oxidative assimilation was nitrogenous, the ammonia being supplied by the endogenous respiration. The cold trichloroacetic acid-soluble fraction and the lipid fraction appeared to be important during the early stages of oxidative assimilation, and the largest percentage of the incorporated radioactivity was found in the protein fraction. In the presence of added ammonia, assimilation was greatly increased and no α-ketoglutaric acid was found in the supernatant fluid. Sodium azide partially inhibited incorporation into all major cell fractions, and at higher concentrations depressed the rate of glucose oxidation. During oxidative assimilation, chloramphenicol specifically inhibited the synthesis of protein. Oxidative assimilation of glucose by this organism did not appear to involve the synthesis of a primary product such as is found in the majority of bacteria. PMID:16561965

  19. Shear-enhanced adhesion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecuyer, Sigolene; Rusconi, Roberto; Shen, Yi; Forsyth, Alison; Stone, Howard

    2010-03-01

    Bacterial adhesion is the first step in the development of surface-associated communities known as biofilms, which are the cause of many problems in medical devices and industrial water systems. However the underlying mechanisms of initial bacterial attachment are not fully understood. We have investigated the effects of hydrodynamics on the probability of adsorption and detachment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PA14 on model surfaces under flow, in straight microfluidic channels, and measured the distribution of bacteria residence time as a function of the shear rate. Our main discovery is a counter-intuitive enhanced adhesion as the shear stress is increased over a wide range of shear rates. In order to identify the origin of this phenomenon, we have performed experiments with several mutant strains. Our results show that shear-enhanced adhesion is not regulated by primary surface organelles, and that this process is not specific to a certain type of surface, but rather appears a general feature of the adhesive behavior of P. aeruginosa. These results suggest that shear-induced adhesion could be a very widespread strategy in nature.

  20. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA01 Gene Collection

    PubMed Central

    LaBaer, Joshua; Qiu, QingQing; Anumanthan, Anukanth; Mar, Wenhong; Zuo, Dongmei; Murthy, T.V.S.; Taycher, Helen; Halleck, Allison; Hainsworth, Eugenie; Lory, Stephen; Brizuela, Leonardo

    2004-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a common inhabitant of soil and water, is an opportunistic pathogen of growing clinical relevance. Its genome, one of the largest among bacteria [5570 open reading frames (ORFs)] approaches that of simple eukaryotes. We have constructed a comprehensive gene collection for this organism utilizing the annotated genome of P. aeruginosa PA01 and a highly automated and laboratory information management system (LIMS)-supported production line. All the individual ORFs have been successfully PCR-amplified and cloned into a recombination-based cloning system. We have isolated and archived four independent isolates of each individual ORF. Full sequence analysis of the first isolate for one-third of the ORFs in the collection has been completed. We used two sets of genes from this repository for high-throughput expression and purification of recombinant proteins in different systems. The purified proteins have been used to set up biochemical and immunological assays directed towards characterization of histidine kinases and identification of bacterial proteins involved in the immune response of cystic fibrosis patients. This gene repository provides a powerful tool for proteome- and genome-scale research of this organism, and the strategies adopted to generate this repository serve as a model for building clone sets for other bacteria. PMID:15489342

  1. 1 W of 261 nm cw generation in a Pr 3+:LiYF 4 laser pumped by an optically pumped semiconductor laser at 479 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostroumov, Vasiliy; Seelert, Wolf

    2008-02-01

    The lack of blue pump sources for Pr-doped materials has been overcome with the recent progress in optically pumped semiconductor lasers (OPS) operating at 479 nm. The availability of reliable high power OPS pump lasers, makes Pr 3+-doped crystals ideal gain media for compact and efficient ultraviolet solid-state lasers with output power in the Watt range. We report on the scalability of a 522/261 nm Pr:YLF cw laser that is dual-end-pumped by two OPS lasers at 479 nm. At 9.6 W of incident pump power more than 4 W were obtained at 522 nm with a slope efficiency of 45%. Intracavity frequency doubling of 522 nm resulted in 1 Watt of cw UV output at 261 nm.

  2. Influence of Ca2+ doped on structural and optical properties of RPO4 (R = Ce3+, Nd3+ and Pr3+) compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemdek, El Mokhtar; Benkhouja, Khalil; Touhtouh, Samira; Sbiaai, Khalid; Arbaoui, Abdezzahid; Bakasse, Mina; Hajjaji, Abdelowahed; Boughaleb, Yahia; Saez-Puche, Regino

    2013-11-01

    This paper investigates the effect of doping by Ca2+ ions on the structural and optical properties of RPO4 (R = Ce3+, Nd3+ and Pr3+) compounds. A simple ceramic method in air at 900 °C was used to prepare all compounds. The structural characterization of compounds was carried out by using X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and IR spectroscopy. Optical properties were characterized by reflectance spectral data and by colorimeter. The results reveal a single monazite phase for x values up to 0.4. The lattice parameters of the synthesized samples decrease linearly with the reduction of ionic radius of the Ce3+. These rare earth phosphates based materials have a potential to be adopted for the eco-friendly colorants for paints and plastics.

  3. Growth and diode-pumped laser operation of Pr3+:β-(Y0.5,Gd0.5)F3 at various transitions.

    PubMed

    Werner Metz, Philip; Marzahl, Daniel-Timo; Guguschev, Christo; Bertram, Rainer; Kränkel, Christian; Huber, Günter

    2015-06-15

    We report on the crystal growth of the orthorhombic low-temperature β-phase of (Y0.5,Gd0.5)F3 (YGF) single crystals. The crystals were activated with trivalent praseodymium (Pr3+) and characterized with respect to their ground state absorption and stimulated emission properties. Under InGaN-laser-diode pumping, laser oscillation was obtained at more than ten wavelengths in the green, orange, red, and dark red spectral regions. In these initial experiments, output powers exceeding 100 mW and slope efficiencies between 10% and 30% were obtained. To the best of our knowledge, these results represent the first application of YGF crystals as laser host material for any active ion. PMID:26076240

  4. Broadband sensitization of downconversion phosphor YPO4 by optimizing TiO2 substitution in host lattice co-doped with Pr3+-Yb3+ ion-couple

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kai-Yu; Liu, Li-Ying; Wang, Ru-Zhi; Xiao, Si-Guo; Zhou, Hua; Yan, Hui

    2014-03-01

    This study demonstrates a feasible and efficient route to alleviate the absorption problem of the terrestrial solar spectrum and enhance broadband luminescence from a promising down conversion powder phosphor YPO4 co-doped with Pr3+-Yb3+ lanthanide ion-couple: incorporating a third sensitizing transition metal ion, e.g., Ti4+. The x-ray powder diffraction results confirm the lattice substitution by the solid-state reaction doping rather than the formation of any secondary phase. The emission spectral results and the luminescence decay curve analysis show that the downconversion luminescence can be enhanced by 200%-300% and the quantum efficiency enhanced by more than 20% at the wavelength of around 980 nm, the best response spectrum for Si-based solar cells, by optimizing TiO2 doping concentration at 7 mol. %.

  5. Characteristics of the energy bands and the spectroscopic parameters of Pr3+ ions in PrCl3 mixed methanol, iso-propanol and butanol solutions.

    PubMed

    Jana, Samar; Mitra, Subrata

    2011-12-01

    An investigation on the absorption spectra of the praseodymium chloride (PrCl(3)) in methanol, iso-propanol and butanol is carried out between 190 nm and 1100 nm. We have observed and assigned six energy bands of the 4f(2) electronic configuration of the Pr(3+) ion in the visible to near-infra-red and one due to 4f5d configuration in the ultraviolet region. The 4f5d band has been detected properly for low concentration of PrCl(3). We have also constructed a free-ion Hamiltonian and calculated the energy levels of the 4f(2) configuration theoretically. Hence, the best fit free-ion parameters are deduced. PMID:21840250

  6. Proteomic analysis of keratitis-associated Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Sewell, Abby; Dunmire, Jeffrey; Wehmann, Michael; Rowe, Theresa

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To compare the proteomic profile of a clinical isolate of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) obtained from an infected cornea of a contact lens wearer and the laboratory strain P. aeruginosa ATCC 10145. Methods Antibiotic sensitivity, motility, biofilm formation, and virulence tests were performed using standard methods. Whole protein lysates were analyzed with liquid chromatography/ tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in triplicate, and relative protein abundances were determined with spectral counting. The G test followed by a post hoc Holm-Sidak adjustment was used for the statistical analyses to determine significance in the differential expression of proteins between the two strains. Results A total of 687 proteins were detected. One-hundred thirty-three (133) proteins were significantly different between the two strains. Among these, 13 were upregulated, and 16 were downregulated in the clinical strain compared to ATCC 10145, whereas 57 were detected only in the clinical strain. The upregulated proteins are associated with virulence and pathogenicity. Conclusions Proteins detected at higher levels in the clinical strain of P. aeruginosa were proteins known to be virulence factors. These results confirm that the keratitis-associated P. aeruginosa strain is pathogenic and expresses a higher number of virulence factors compared to the laboratory strain ATCC 10145. Identification of the protein profile of the corneal strain of P. aeruginosa in this study will aid in elucidating novel intervention strategies for reducing the burden of P. aeruginosa infection in keratitis. PMID:25221424

  7. Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization in patients with spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed Central

    Gilmore, D S; Bruce, S K; Jimenez, E M; Schick, D G; Morrow, J W; Montgomerie, J Z

    1982-01-01

    The prevalence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization of patients with spinal cord injury was studied annually from 1976 to 1980. The urethra, perineum, rectum, drainage bag, and urine of patients on the spinal cord injury service were cultured. A total of 224 men and 32 women were studied. Most patients were managed with an external urinary collection system or padding, with or without intermittent catheterization. P. aeruginosa was cultured from one or more body sites (urethra, perineum, or rectum) in 65% of men and 18% of women. Drainage bags on the beds were frequently colonized with P. aeruginosa (73%). Significant bacteriuria with P. aeruginosa was present in 19% of the men and 13% of the women. P. aeruginosa colonization of body sites in men was closely associated with the use of an external urinary collection system. Significantly greater urethral and perineal colonization was found in men using an external urinary collection system. P. aeruginosa serotype 11 was the predominant serotype for the first 3 years, and the number of patients colonized with serotype 11 increased with length of hospital stay. The prevalence of serotype 11 significantly decreased in the last 2 years. The antibiotic susceptibility of the strains of P. aeruginosa isolated from these patients did not change in the 5 years, except that there was increasing susceptibility to carbenicillin in later years. This increasing susceptibility to carbenicillin was a reflection of a decreased prevalence of serotype 11 in these patients, since serotype 11 was more resistant than other serotypes to carbenicillin. PMID:6818251

  8. Binding of protegrin-1 to Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cepacia

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, Mark T; Wang, Wei; Shamova, Olga; Lehrer, Robert I; Schiller, Neal L

    2002-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cepacia infections of cystic fibrosis patients' lungs are often resistant to conventional antibiotic therapy. Protegrins are antimicrobial peptides with potent activity against many bacteria, including P. aeruginosa. The present study evaluates the correlation between protegrin-1 (PG-1) sensitivity/resistance and protegrin binding in P. aeruginosa and B. cepacia. Methods The PG-1 sensitivity/resistance and PG-1 binding properties of P. aeruginosa and B. cepacia were assessed using radial diffusion assays, radioiodinated PG-1, and surface plasmon resonance (BiaCore). Results The six P. aeruginosa strains examined were very sensitive to PG-1, exhibiting minimal active concentrations from 0.0625–0.5 μg/ml in radial diffusion assays. In contrast, all five B. cepacia strains examined were greater than 10-fold to 100-fold more resistant, with minimal active concentrations ranging from 6–10 μg/ml. When incubated with a radioiodinated variant of PG-1, a sensitive P. aeruginosa strain bound considerably more protegrin molecules per cell than a resistant B. cepacia strain. Binding/diffusion and surface plasmon resonance assays revealed that isolated lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and lipid A from the sensitive P. aeruginosa strains bound PG-1 more effectively than LPS and lipid A from resistant B. cepacia strains. Conclusion These findings support the hypothesis that the relative resistance of B. cepacia to protegrin is due to a reduced number of PG-1 binding sites on the lipid A moiety of its LPS. PMID:11980587

  9. Biodegradation of crude oil by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the presence of rhamnolipids*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guo-liang; Wu, Yue-ting; Qian, Xin-ping; Meng, Qin

    2005-01-01

    The potential biodegradation of crude oil was assessed based on the development of a fermentative process with a strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa which produced 15.4 g/L rhamnolipids when cultured in a basal mineral medium using glycerol as a sole carbon source. However, neither cell growth nor rhamnolipid production was observed in the comparative culture system using crude oil as the sole carbon source instead. As rhamnolipid, an effective biosurfactant, has been reported to stimulate the biodegradation of hydrocarbons, 1 g/L glycerol or 0.22 g/L rhamnolipid was initially added into the medium to facilitate the biodegradation of crude oil. In both situations, more than 58% of crude oil was degraded and further converted into accumulated cell biomass and rhamnolipids. These results suggest that Pseudomonas aeruginosa could degrade most of crude oil with direct or indirect addition of rhamnolipid. And this conclusion was further supported by another adsorption experiment, where the adsorption capacity of crude oil by killed cell biomass was negligible in comparison with the biologic activities of live cell biomass. PMID:16052704

  10. Formation and Operation of the Histidine-degrading Pathway in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Lessie, Thomas G.; Neidhardt, Frederick C.

    1967-01-01

    Histidine ammonia lyase (histidase), urocanase, and the capacity to degrade formiminoglutamate, which are respectively involved in steps I, II, and IV in the catabolism of histidine, were induced during growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on histidine or urocanate, and were formed gratuitously in the presence of dihydro-urocanate. Urocanase-deficient bacteria formed enzymes I and IV constitutively; presumably they accumulate enough urocanate from the breakdown of endogenous histidine to induce formation of the pathway. Urocanate did not satisfy the histidine requirement of a histidine auxotroph, indicating that it probably acted as an inducer without being converted to histidine. The results imply that urocanate is the physiological inducer of the histidine-degrading enzymes in P. aeruginosa. Enzymes of the pathway were extremely sensitive to catabolite repression; enzymes I and II, but not IV, were coordinately repressed. Our results suggest a specific involvement of nitrogenous metabolites in the repression. Mutant bacteria with altered sensitivity to repression were obtained. The molecular weight of partially purified histidase was estimated at 210,000 by sucrose gradient centrifugation. Its Km for histidine was 2 × 10−3 m in tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane chloride buffer. Sigmoid saturation curves were obtained in pyrophosphate buffer, indicating that the enzyme might have multiple binding sites for histidine. Under certain conditions, histidase appeared to be partially inactive in vivo. These findings suggest that some sort of allosteric interaction involving histidase may play a role in governing the operation of the pathway of histidine catabolism. PMID:4290562

  11. Pantethine rescues phosphopantothenoylcysteine synthetase and phosphopantothenoylcysteine decarboxylase deficiency in Escherichia coli but not in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Balibar, Carl J; Hollis-Symynkywicz, Micah F; Tao, Jianshi

    2011-07-01

    Coenzyme A (CoA) plays a central and essential role in all living organisms. The pathway leading to CoA biosynthesis has been considered an attractive target for developing new antimicrobial agents with novel mechanisms of action. By using an arabinose-regulated expression system, the essentiality of coaBC, a single gene encoding a bifunctional protein catalyzing two consecutive steps in the CoA pathway converting 4'-phosphopantothenate to 4'-phosphopantetheine, was confirmed in Escherichia coli. Utilizing this regulated coaBC strain, it was further demonstrated that E. coli can effectively metabolize pantethine to bypass the requirement for coaBC. Interestingly, pantethine cannot be used by Pseudomonas aeruginosa to obviate coaBC. Through reciprocal complementation studies in combination with biochemical characterization, it was demonstrated that the differential characteristics of pantethine utilization in these two microorganisms are due to the different substrate specificities associated with endogenous pantothenate kinase, the first enzyme in the CoA biosynthetic pathway encoded by coaA in E. coli and coaX in P. aeruginosa. PMID:21551303

  12. Production of Neisseria gonorrhoeae pili (fimbriae) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Hoyne, P A; Haas, R; Meyer, T F; Davies, J K; Elleman, T C

    1992-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa K/2PfS, when transformed with an expression plasmid harboring the pilin gene (pilE1) of Neisseria gonorrhoeae MS11, was able to express and assemble gonococcal pilin monomers into surface-associated pili, as judged by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, immunoblotting, and immunoelectron microscopy. Concomitant with the expression of gonococcal pili in P. aeruginosa was the virtual loss of production of P. aeruginosa K/2PfS pili normally associated with the host cell. Images PMID:1358873

  13. Development of potent inhibitors of pyocyanin production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Laura C.; O’Loughlin, Colleen T.; Zhang, Zinan; Siryaporn, Albert; Silpe, Justin E.; Bassler, Bonnie L.; Semmelhack, Martin F.

    2015-01-01

    The development of new approaches for the treatment of antimicrobial-resistant infections is an urgent public health priority. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa pathogen, in particular, is a leading source of infection in hospital settings, with few available treatment options. In the context of an effort to develop antivirulence strategies to combat bacterial infection, we identified a series of highly effective small molecules that inhibit the production of pyocyanin, a redox-active virulence factor produced by P. aeruginosa. Interestingly, these new antagonists appear to suppress P. aeruginosa virulence factor production through a pathway that is independent of LasR and RhlR. PMID:25597392

  14. Comparison of UVB and UVC irradiation disinfection efficacies on Pseudomonas Aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) biofilm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argyraki, A.; Markvart, M.; Nielsen, Anne; Bjarnsholt, T.; Bjørndal, L.; Petersen, P. M.

    2016-04-01

    Disinfection routines are important in all clinical applications. The uprising problem of antibiotic resistance has driven major research efforts towards alternative disinfection approaches, involving light-based solutions. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) is a common bacterium that can cause skin, soft tissue, lungs, kidney and urinary tract infections. Moreover, it can be found on and in medical equipment causing often cross infections in hospitals. The objective of this study was to test the efficiency, of two different light-based disinfection treatments, namely UVB and UVC irradiation, on P. aeruginosa biofilms at different growth stages. In our experiments a new type of UV light emitting diodes (LEDs) were used to deliver UV irradiation on the biofilms, in the UVB (296nm) and UVC (266nm) region. The killing rate was studied as a function of dose for 24h grown biofilms. The dose was ramped from 72J/m2 to 10000J/m2. It was shown that UVB irradiation was more effective than UVC irradiation in inactivating P. aeruginosa biofilms. No colony forming units (CFU) were observed for the UVB treated biofilms when the dose was 10000 J/m2 (CFU in control sample: 7.5 x 104). UVB irradiation at a dose of 20000J/m2 on mature biofilms (72h grown) resulted in a 3.9 log killing efficacy. The fact that the wavelength of 296nm exists in daylight and has such disinfection ability on biofilms gives new perspectives for applications within disinfection at hospitals.

  15. Wind/water energy converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paulkovich, J.

    1979-01-01

    Device will convert wind, water, tidal or wave energy into electrical or mechanical energy. Is comprised of windmill-like paddles or blades synchronously geared to orient themselves to wind direction for optimum energy extraction.

  16. PvdP is a tyrosinase that drives maturation of the pyoverdine chromophore in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Nadal-Jimenez, Pol; Koch, Gudrun; Reis, Carlos R; Muntendam, Remco; Raj, Hans; Jeronimus-Stratingh, C Margot; Cool, Robbert H; Quax, Wim J

    2014-07-01

    The iron binding siderophore pyoverdine constitutes a major adaptive factor contributing to both virulence and survival in fluorescent pseudomonads. For decades, pyoverdine production has allowed the identification and classification of fluorescent and nonfluorescent pseudomonads. Here, we demonstrate that PvdP, a periplasmic enzyme of previously unknown function, is a tyrosinase required for the maturation of the pyoverdine chromophore in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. PvdP converts the nonfluorescent ferribactin, containing two iron binding groups, into a fluorescent pyoverdine, forming a strong hexadentate complex with ferrous iron, by three consecutive oxidation steps. PvdP represents the first characterized member of a small family of tyrosinases present in fluorescent pseudomonads that are required for siderophore maturation and are capable of acting on large peptidic substrates. PMID:24816606

  17. PvdP Is a Tyrosinase That Drives Maturation of the Pyoverdine Chromophore in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Nadal-Jimenez, Pol; Koch, Gudrun; Reis, Carlos R.; Muntendam, Remco; Raj, Hans; Jeronimus-Stratingh, C. Margot; Cool, Robbert H.

    2014-01-01

    The iron binding siderophore pyoverdine constitutes a major adaptive factor contributing to both virulence and survival in fluorescent pseudomonads. For decades, pyoverdine production has allowed the identification and classification of fluorescent and nonfluorescent pseudomonads. Here, we demonstrate that PvdP, a periplasmic enzyme of previously unknown function, is a tyrosinase required for the maturation of the pyoverdine chromophore in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. PvdP converts the nonfluorescent ferribactin, containing two iron binding groups, into a fluorescent pyoverdine, forming a strong hexadentate complex with ferrous iron, by three consecutive oxidation steps. PvdP represents the first characterized member of a small family of tyrosinases present in fluorescent pseudomonads that are required for siderophore maturation and are capable of acting on large peptidic substrates. PMID:24816606

  18. Boron nitride converted carbon fiber

    DOEpatents

    Rousseas, Michael; Mickelson, William; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2016-04-05

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to boron nitride converted carbon fiber. In one aspect, a method may include the operations of providing boron oxide and carbon fiber, heating the boron oxide to melt the boron oxide and heating the carbon fiber, mixing a nitrogen-containing gas with boron oxide vapor from molten boron oxide, and converting at least a portion of the carbon fiber to boron nitride.

  19. Vesiculation from Pseudomonas aeruginosa under SOS

    PubMed Central

    Maredia, Reshma; Devineni, Navya; Lentz, Peter; Dallo, Shatha F.; Yu, JiehJuen; Guentzel, Neal; Chambers, James; Arulanandam, Bernard; Haskins, William E.; Weitao, Tao

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial infections can be aggravated by antibiotic treatment that induces SOS response and vesiculation. This leads to a hypothesis concerning association of SOS with vesiculation. To test it, we conducted multiple analyses of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) produced from the Pseudomonas aeruginosa wild type in which SOS is induced by ciprofloxacin and from the LexA noncleavable (lexAN) strain in which SOS is repressed. The levels of OMV proteins, lipids, and cytotoxicity increased for both the treated strains, demonstrating vesiculation stimulation by the antibiotic treatment. However, the further increase was suppressed in the lexAN strains, suggesting the SOS involvement. Obviously, the stimulated vesiculation is attributed by both SOS-related and unrelated factors. OMV subproteomic analysis was performed to examine these factors, which reflected the OMV-mediated cytotoxicity and the physiology of the vesiculating cells under treatment and SOS. Thus, SOS plays a role in the vesiculation stimulation that contributes to cytotoxicity. PMID:22448133

  20. Human targets of Pseudomonas aeruginosa pyocyanin

    PubMed Central

    Ran, Huimin; Hassett, Daniel J.; Lau, Gee W.

    2003-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces copious amounts of the redoxactive tricyclic compound pyocyanin that kills competing microbes and mammalian cells, especially during cystic fibrosis lung infection. Cross-phylum susceptibility to pyocyanin suggests the existence of evolutionarily conserved physiological targets. We screened a Saccharomyces cerevisiae deletion library to identify presumptive pyocyanin targets with the expectation that similar targets would be conserved in humans. Fifty S. cerevisiae targets were provisionally identified, of which 60% have orthologous human counterparts. These targets encompassed major cellular pathways involved in the cell cycle, electron transport and respiration, epidermal cell growth, protein sorting, vesicle transport, and the vacuolar ATPase. Using cultured human lung epithelial cells, we showed that pyocyanin-mediated reactive oxygen intermediates inactivate human vacuolar ATPase, supporting the validity of the yeast screen. We discuss how the inactivation of VATPase may negatively impact the lung function of cystic fibrosis patients. PMID:14605211

  1. Amino Acid Transport in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Kay, W. W.; Gronlund, Audrey F.

    1969-01-01

    Properties of the transport systems for amino acids in Pseudomonas aeruginosa were investigated. Exogenous 14C-labeled amino acids were shown to equilibrate with the internal native amino acid pool prior to incorporation into protein. When added at low external concentrations, the majority of the amino acids examined entered the protein of the cell unaltered. The rates of amino acid transport, established at low concentrations with 18 commonly occurring amino acids, varied as much as 40-fold. The transport process became saturated at high external amino acid concentrations, was temperature-sensitive, and was inhibited by sodium azide and iodoacetamide. Intracellular to extracellular amino acid ratios of 100- to 300-fold were maintained during exponential growth of the population in a glucose minimal medium. When the medium became depleted of glucose, neither extracellular nor intracellular amino acids could be detected. PMID:4974392

  2. Ambroxol interferes with Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qi; Yu, Jialin; Yang, Xiqiang; Wang, Jiarong; Wang, Lijia; Lin, Yayin; Lin, Lihua

    2010-09-01

    The mucolytic agent ambroxol has been reported to interfere with the formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa-derived biofilms in addition to reducing alginate production by undefined mechanisms. Since quorum sensing is a key regulator of virulence and biofilm formation, we examined the effects of ambroxol on P. aeruginosa PAO1 wild-type bacterial clearance rates, adhesion profiles and biofilm formation compared with the quorum sensing-deficient, double-mutant strains DeltalasR DeltarhlR and DeltalasI DeltarhlI. Data presented in this report demonstrated that ambroxol treatment reduced survival rates of the double-mutant strains compared with the wild-type strain in a dose-dependent manner even though the double-mutants had increased adhesion in the presence of ambroxol compared with the wild-type strain. The PAO1 wild-type strain produced a significantly thicker biofilm (21.64+/-0.57 microm) compared with the biofilms produced by the DeltalasR DeltarhlR (7.36+/-0.2 microm) and DeltalasI DeltarhlI (6.62+/-0.31 microm) isolates. Ambroxol treatment reduced biofilm thickness, increased areal porosity, and decreased the average diffusion distance and textual entropy of wild-type and double-mutant strains. However, compared with the double-mutant strains, the changes observed for the wild-type strain were more clearly defined. Finally, ambroxol exhibited significant antagonistic quorum-sensing properties, suggesting that it could be adapted for use clinically in the treatment of cystic fibrosis and to reduce biofilm formation and in the colonisation of indwelling devices. PMID:20580207

  3. Structural and Functional Analysis of the Pyocyanin Biosynthetic Protein PhzM from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons,J.; Greenhagen, B.; Shi, K.; Calabrese, K.; Robinson, H.; Ladner, J.

    2007-01-01

    Pyocyanin is a biologically active phenazine produced by the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. It is thought to endow P. aeruginosa with a competitive growth advantage in colonized tissue and is also thought to be a virulence factor in diseases such as cystic fibrosis and AIDS where patients are commonly infected by pathogenic Pseudomonads due to their immunocompromised state. Pyocyanin is also a chemically interesting compound due to its unusual oxidation-reduction activity. Phenazine-1-carboxylic acid, the precursor to the bioactive phenazines, is synthesized from chorismic acid by enzymes encoded in a seven-gene cistron in P. aeruginosa and in other Pseudomonads. Phenzine-1-carboxylic acid is believed to be converted to pyocyanin by the sequential actions of the putative S-adenosylmethionine-dependent N-methyltransferase PhzM and the putative flavin-dependent hydroxylase PhzS. Here we report the 1.8 {angstrom} crystal structure of PhzM determined by single anomalous dispersion. Unlike many methyltransferases, PhzM is a dimer in solution. The 36 kDa PhzM polypeptide folds into three domains. The C-terminal domain exhibits the {alpha}/{beta}-hydrolase fold typical of small molecule methyltransferases. Two smaller N-terminal domains form much of the dimer interface. Structural alignments with known methyltransferases show that PhzM is most similar to the plant O-methyltransferases that are characterized by an unusual intertwined dimer interface. The structure of PhzM contains no ligands, and the active site is open and solvent-exposed when compared to structures of similar enzymes. In vitro experiments using purified PhzM alone demonstrate that it has little or no ability to methylate phenzine-1-carboxylic acid. However, when the putative hydroxylase PhzS is included, pyocyanin is readily produced. This observation suggests that a mechanism has evolved in P. aeruginosa that ensures efficient production of pyocyanin via the prevention of the formation and

  4. Acquisition and Role of Molybdate in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Pederick, Victoria G.; Eijkelkamp, Bart A.; Ween, Miranda P.; Begg, Stephanie L.; Paton, James C.

    2014-01-01

    In microaerophilic or anaerobic environments, Pseudomonas aeruginosa utilizes nitrate reduction for energy production, a process dependent on the availability of the oxyanionic form of molybdenum, molybdate (MoO42−). Here, we show that molybdate acquisition in P. aeruginosa occurs via a high-affinity ATP-binding cassette permease (ModABC). ModA is a cluster D-III solute binding protein capable of interacting with molybdate or tungstate oxyanions. Deletion of the modA gene reduces cellular molybdate concentrations and results in inhibition of anaerobic growth and nitrate reduction. Further, we show that conditions that permit nitrate reduction also cause inhibition of biofilm formation and an alteration in fatty acid composition of P. aeruginosa. Collectively, these data highlight the importance of molybdate for anaerobic growth of P. aeruginosa and reveal novel consequences of nitrate reduction on biofilm formation and cell membrane composition. PMID:25172858

  5. Acquisition and role of molybdate in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Pederick, Victoria G; Eijkelkamp, Bart A; Ween, Miranda P; Begg, Stephanie L; Paton, James C; McDevitt, Christopher A

    2014-11-01

    In microaerophilic or anaerobic environments, Pseudomonas aeruginosa utilizes nitrate reduction for energy production, a process dependent on the availability of the oxyanionic form of molybdenum, molybdate (MoO4 (2-)). Here, we show that molybdate acquisition in P. aeruginosa occurs via a high-affinity ATP-binding cassette permease (ModABC). ModA is a cluster D-III solute binding protein capable of interacting with molybdate or tungstate oxyanions. Deletion of the modA gene reduces cellular molybdate concentrations and results in inhibition of anaerobic growth and nitrate reduction. Further, we show that conditions that permit nitrate reduction also cause inhibition of biofilm formation and an alteration in fatty acid composition of P. aeruginosa. Collectively, these data highlight the importance of molybdate for anaerobic growth of P. aeruginosa and reveal novel consequences of nitrate reduction on biofilm formation and cell membrane composition. PMID:25172858

  6. Microbial degradation of quinoline and methylquinolines. [Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Aislabie, J.; Bej, A.K.; Hurst, H.; Rothenburger, S.; Atlas, R.M. )

    1990-02-01

    Several bacterial cultures were isolated that are able to degrade quinoline and to transform or to degrade methylquinolines. The degradation of quinoline by strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa QP and Pseudomonas. putida QP produced hydroxyquinolines, a transient pink compound, and other undetermined products. The quinoline-degrading strains of P. aeruginosa QP and P. putida QP hydroxylated a limited number of methylquinolines but could not degrade them, nor could they transform 2-methylquinoline, isoquinoline, or pyridine. Another pseudomonad, Pseudomonas sp. strain MQP, was isolated that could degrade 2-methylquinoline. P. aeruginosa QP was able to degrade or to transform quinoline and a few methylquinolines in a complex heterocyclic nitrogen-containing fraction of a shale oil. All of the quinoline- and methylquinoline-degrading strains have multiple plasmids including a common 250-kilobase plasmid. The 225-, 250-, and 320-kilobase plasmids of the P. aeruginosa QP strain all contained genes involved in quinoline metabolism.

  7. Expression of pili from Bacteroides nodosus in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Elleman, T C; Hoyne, P A; Stewart, D J; McKern, N M; Peterson, J E

    1986-01-01

    The pili of Bacteroides nodosus, the causative agent of ovine footrot, constitute the major host-protective immunogen against homologous serotypic challenge. The pilin gene from B. nodosus 198 has been cloned and morphologically expressed as extracellular pili in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by using a plasmid-borne, thermoregulated expression system. B. nodosus pilin could not be detected in cultures of P. aeruginosa grown at 32 degrees C, but after induction at 37 degrees C, B. nodosus pili were expressed on the cell surface of P. aeruginosa to the virtual exclusion of the host cell pili. Pili harvested from induced P. aeruginosa cultures were used to immunize sheep against footrot. The serum agglutinating antibody titers of vaccinated sheep were comparable to those of sheep receiving pili from B. nodosus. Subsequent challenge of the sheep with B. nodosus 198 indicated that the recombinant- DNA-derived pili vaccine and the B. nodosus pili vaccine provided similar levels of protection against footrot. Images PMID:2877967

  8. Suppression of fungal growth exhibited by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, J R

    1994-01-01

    Three surgery patients were monitored postoperatively, with particular reference to lung infection. In each case there was a clinical impression that Pseudomonas aeruginosa suppressed the growth of Candida albicans in patients with clinically significant lung infections from whom both of these organisms were isolated from serial sputum samples. Regrowth of C. albicans after P. aeruginosa eradication occurred in two patients, despite fluconazole therapy, to which both C. albicans isolates were susceptible. In all three patients, the strain of P. aeruginosa was found to inhibit the growth of the corresponding C. albicans strain in vitro. Further in vitro susceptibility studies revealed significant inhibition by 10 strains of P. aeruginosa of 11 strains of fungi known to infect humans; these were Candida krusei, Candida keyfr, Candida guillermondii, Candida tropicalis, Candida lusitaniae, Candida parapsilosis, Candida pseudotropicalis, Candida albicans, Torulopsis glabrata, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Aspergillus fumigatus. PMID:8150966

  9. A Stannyl-Decorated Zintl Ion [Ge18Pd3(Sn(i)Pr3)6](2-): Twinned Icosahedron with a Common Pd3-Face or 18-Vertex Hypho-Deltahedron with a Pd3-Triangle Inside.

    PubMed

    Perla, Luis G; Sevov, Slavi C

    2016-08-10

    We report the synthesis and characterization of the title anion which has a germanium/palladium cluster core of [Ge18Pd3] and six tri-isopropyl tin substituents. Its two Ge9-halves are the first examples of germanium deltahedra with three nonsilyl substituents, tri-isopropyl tin in this case. The new cluster is made by a reaction of an acetonitrile suspension of K4Ge9 with (i)Pr3SnCl that generates primarily tristannylated 9-atom clusters [Ge9{Sn(i)Pr3}3](-), followed by addition of Pd(PPh3)4 to the reaction mixture. It was structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction in [K(222crypt)]2[Ge18Pd3{Sn(i)Pr3}6]·(i)Pr2O and was also confirmed in solution by ESI-MS and NMR. The new anion can be viewed both as a dimer of face-fused icosahedra (twinned icosahedron) with a common Pd3-face, i.e., [((i)Pr3Sn)3Ge9Pd3Ge9(Sn(i)Pr3)3](2-) that resembles but is not isoelectronic with the known borane version B21H18(-) or as a large hypho-deltahedron of 18 Ge-atoms with a triangle of Pd3 inside, i.e., [Pd3@Ge18(Sn(i)Pr3)6](2-). DFT calculations show a very large HOMO-LUMO gap of 2.42 eV. PMID:27466825

  10. Radiation effects on DC-DC Converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Dexin; Attia, John O.; Kankam, Mark D. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    DC-DC switching converters are circuits that can be used to convert a DC voltage of one value to another by switching action. They are increasing being used in space systems. Most of the popular DC-DC switching converters utilize power MOSFETs. However power MOSFETs, when subjected to radiation, are susceptible to degradation of device characteristics or catastrophic failure. This work focuses on the effects of total ionizing dose on converter performance. Four fundamental switching converters (buck converter, buck-boost converter, cuk converter, and flyback converter) were built using Harris IRF250 power MOSFETs. These converters were designed for converting an input of 60 volts to an output of about 12 volts with a switching frequency of 100 kHz. The four converters were irradiated with a Co-60 gamma source at dose rate of 217 rad/min. The performances of the four converters were examined during the exposure to the radiation. The experimental results show that the output voltage of the converters increases as total dose increases. However, the increases of the output voltage were different for the four different converters, with the buck converter and cuk converter the highest and the flyback converter the lowest. We observed significant increases in output voltage for cuk converter at a total dose of 24 krad (si).

  11. New bioactive lipids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many oxygenated fatty acids are bioactive compounds. Nocardia cholesterolicum and Flavobacterium DS5 convert oleic acid to 10 hydroxy stearic acid and linoleic acid to 10-hydroxy-12(Z)-octadecanoic acid. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PR3 converts oleic acid to the new compounds, 7,10-dihydroxy-8(E)-octad...

  12. New bioactive fatty acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many oxygenated fatty acids are bioactive compounds. Nocardia cholesterolicum and Flavobacterium DS5 convert oleic acid to 10 hydroxy stearic acid and linoleic acid to 10-hydroxy-12(Z)-octadecanoic acid. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PR3 converts oleic acid to the new compounds, 7,10-dihydroxy-8(E)-octad...

  13. Value-added products from vegetable oils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oxygenated fatty acids are useful as specialty chemicals, plasticizers, and biomedicals. Nocardia cholesterolicum and Flavobacterium DS5 convert oleic acid to 10 hydroxy stearic acid and linoleic acid to 10-hydroxy-12(Z)-octadecanoic acid. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PR3 converts oleic acid to new comp...

  14. New bioactive fatty acids from vegetable oils and new uses of bioglycerin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many oxygenated fatty acids are bioactive compounds. Nocardia cholesterolicum and Flavobacterium DS5 convert oleic acid to 10 hydroxy stearic acid and linoleic acid to 10-hydroxy-12(Z)-octadecanoic acid. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PR3 converts oleic acid to new compounds, 7,10-dihydroxy-8(E)-octadecen...

  15. New Bioactive Fatty Acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many oxygenated fatty acids are bioactive compounds. Nocardia cholesterolicum and Flavobacterium DS5 convert oleic acid to 10 hydroxy stearic acid and linoleic acid to 10-hydroxy-12(Z)-octadecanoic acid. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PR3 converts oleic acid to new compounds, 7,10-dihydroxy-8(E)-octadecen...

  16. Biosynthesis of a Rare Di-N-Acetylated Sugar in the Lipopolysaccharides of both Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Bordetella pertussis Occurs via an Identical Scheme despite Different Gene Clusters▿

    PubMed Central

    Westman, Erin L.; Preston, Andrew; Field, Robert A.; Lam, Joseph S.

    2008-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Bordetella pertussis produce lipopolysaccharide (LPS) that contains 2,3-diacetamido-2,3-dideoxy-d-mannuronic acid (d-ManNAc3NAcA). A five-enzyme biosynthetic pathway that requires WbpA, WbpB, WbpE, WbpD, and WbpI has been proposed for the production of this sugar in P. aeruginosa, based on analysis of genes present in the B-band LPS biosynthesis cluster. In the analogous B. pertussis cluster, homologs of wbpB to wbpI were present, but a putative dehydrogenase gene was missing; therefore, the biosynthetic mechanism for UDP-d-ManNAc3NAcA was unclear. Nonpolar knockout mutants of each P. aeruginosa gene were constructed. Complementation analysis of the mutants demonstrated that B-band LPS production was restored to P. aeruginosa knockout mutants when the relevant B. pertussis genes were supplied in trans. Thus, the genes that encode the putative oxidase, transaminase, N-acetyltransferase, and epimerase enzymes in B. pertussis are functional homologs of those in P. aeruginosa. Two candidate dehydrogenase genes were located by searching the B. pertussis genome; these have 80% identity to P. aeruginosa wbpO (serotype O6) and 32% identity to wbpA (serotype O5). These genes, wbpO1629 and wbpO3150, were shown to complement a wbpA knockout of P. aeruginosa. Capillary electrophoresis was used to characterize the enzymatic activities of purified WbpO1629 and WbpO3150, and mass spectrometry analysis confirmed that the two enzymes are dehydrogenases capable of converting UDP-d-GlcNAc, UDP-d-GalNAc, to a lesser extent, and UDP-d-Glc, to a much lesser extent. Together, these results suggest that B. pertussis produces UDP-d-ManNAc3NAcA through the same pathway proposed for P. aeruginosa, despite differences in the genomic context of the genes involved. PMID:18621892

  17. Singly Flagellated Pseudomonas aeruginosa Chemotaxes Efficiently by Unbiased Motor Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Qiuxian; Li, Zhaojun; Ouyang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen that has long been known to chemotax. More recently, it has been established that chemotaxis is an important factor in the ability of P. aeruginosa to make biofilms. Genes that allow P. aeruginosa to chemotax are homologous with genes in the paradigmatic model organism for chemotaxis, Escherichia coli. However, P. aeruginosa is singly flagellated and E. coli has multiple flagella. Therefore, the regulation of counterclockwise/clockwise flagellar motor bias that allows E. coli to efficiently chemotax by runs and tumbles would lead to inefficient chemotaxis by P. aeruginosa, as half of a randomly oriented population would respond to a chemoattractant gradient in the wrong sense. How P. aeruginosa regulates flagellar rotation to achieve chemotaxis is not known. Here, we analyze the swimming trajectories of single cells in microfluidic channels and the rotations of cells tethered by their flagella to the surface of a variable-environment flow cell. We show that P. aeruginosa chemotaxes by symmetrically increasing the durations of both counterclockwise and clockwise flagellar rotations when swimming up the chemoattractant gradient and symmetrically decreasing rotation durations when swimming down the chemoattractant gradient. Unlike the case for E. coli, the counterclockwise/clockwise bias stays constant for P. aeruginosa. We describe P. aeruginosa’s chemotaxis using an analytical model for symmetric motor regulation. We use this model to do simulations that show that, given P. aeruginosa’s physiological constraints on motility, its distinct, symmetric regulation of motor switching optimizes chemotaxis. PMID:27048795

  18. Pyochelin potentiates the inhibitory activity of gallium on Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Frangipani, Emanuela; Bonchi, Carlo; Minandri, Fabrizia; Imperi, Francesco; Visca, Paolo

    2014-09-01

    Gallium (Ga) is an iron mimetic that has successfully been repurposed for antibacterial chemotherapy. To improve the antibacterial potency of Ga on Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the effect of complexation with a variety of siderophores and synthetic chelators was tested. Ga complexed with the pyochelin siderophore (at a 1:2 ratio) was more efficient than Ga(NO3)3 in inhibiting P. aeruginosa growth, and its activity was dependent on increased Ga entrance into the cell through the pyochelin translocon. PMID:24957826

  19. Rapid and Energy-Saving Microwave-Assisted Solid-State Synthesis of Pr(3+)-, Eu(3+)-, or Tb(3+)-Doped Lu2O3 Persistent Luminescence Materials.

    PubMed

    Pedroso, Cássio C S; Carvalho, José M; Rodrigues, Lucas C V; Hölsä, Jorma; Brito, Hermi F

    2016-08-01

    Persistent luminescence materials Lu2O3:R(3+),M (Pr,Hf(IV); Eu; or Tb,Ca(2+)) were successfully and rapidly (22 min) prepared by microwave-assisted solid-state synthesis (MASS) using a carbon microwave susceptor and H3BO3 as flux. Reaction times are reduced by up to 93% over previous synthetic methods, without special gases application and using a domestic microwave oven. All materials prepared with H3BO3 flux exhibit LuBO3 impurities that were quantified by Rietveld refinement from synchrotron radiation X-ray powder diffraction patterns. The flux does not considerably affect the crystalline structure of the C-Lu2O3, however. Scanning electron micrographs suggest low surface area when H3BO3 flux is used in the materials' synthesis, decreasing the amount of surface hydroxyl groups in Lu2O3 and improving the luminescence intensity of the phosphors. The carbon used as the susceptor generates CO gas, leading to complete reduction of Tb(IV) to Tb(3+) and partial conversion of Pr(IV) to Pr(3+) present in the Tb4O7 and Pr6O11 precursors, as indicated by X-ray absorption near-edge structure data. Persistent luminescence spectra of the materials show the red/near-IR, reddish orange, and green emission colors assigned to the 4f(n) → 4f(n) transitions characteristics of Pr(3+), Eu(3+), and Tb(3+) ions, respectively. Differences between the UV-excited and persistent luminescence spectra can be explained by the preferential persistent luminescence emission of R(3+) ion in the S6 site rather than R(3+) in the C2 site. In addition, inclusion of Hf(IV) and Ca(2+) codopants in the Lu2O3 host increases the emission intensity and duration of persistent luminescence due to generation of traps caused by charge compensation in the lattice. Photonic materials prepared by MASS with H3BO3 flux show higher persistent luminescence performance than those prepared by the ceramic method or MASS without flux. Color tuning of persistent luminescence in Lu2O3:R(3+),M provides potential

  20. Tracking the immunopathological response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa during respiratory infections

    PubMed Central

    Cigana, Cristina; Lorè, Nicola Ivan; Riva, Camilla; De Fino, Ida; Spagnuolo, Lorenza; Sipione, Barbara; Rossi, Giacomo; Nonis, Alessandro; Cabrini, Giulio; Bragonzi, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Repeated cycles of infections, caused mainly by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, combined with a robust host immune response and tissue injury, determine the course and outcome of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. As the disease progresses, P. aeruginosa adapts to the host modifying dramatically its phenotype; however, it remains unclear whether and how bacterial adaptive variants and their persistence influence the pathogenesis and disease development. Using in vitro and murine models of infection, we showed that P. aeruginosa CF-adaptive variants shaped the innate immune response favoring their persistence. Next, we refined a murine model of chronic pneumonia extending P. aeruginosa infection up to three months. In this model, including CFTR-deficient mice, we unveil that the P. aeruginosa persistence lead to CF hallmarks of airway remodelling and fibrosis, including epithelial hyperplasia and structure degeneration, goblet cell metaplasia, collagen deposition, elastin degradation and several additional markers of tissue damage. This murine model of P. aeruginosa chronic infection, reproducing CF lung pathology, will be instrumental to identify novel molecular targets and test newly tailored molecules inhibiting chronic inflammation and tissue damage processes in pre-clinical studies. PMID:26883959

  1. Tracking the immunopathological response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa during respiratory infections.

    PubMed

    Cigana, Cristina; Lorè, Nicola Ivan; Riva, Camilla; De Fino, Ida; Spagnuolo, Lorenza; Sipione, Barbara; Rossi, Giacomo; Nonis, Alessandro; Cabrini, Giulio; Bragonzi, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Repeated cycles of infections, caused mainly by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, combined with a robust host immune response and tissue injury, determine the course and outcome of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. As the disease progresses, P. aeruginosa adapts to the host modifying dramatically its phenotype; however, it remains unclear whether and how bacterial adaptive variants and their persistence influence the pathogenesis and disease development. Using in vitro and murine models of infection, we showed that P. aeruginosa CF-adaptive variants shaped the innate immune response favoring their persistence. Next, we refined a murine model of chronic pneumonia extending P. aeruginosa infection up to three months. In this model, including CFTR-deficient mice, we unveil that the P. aeruginosa persistence lead to CF hallmarks of airway remodelling and fibrosis, including epithelial hyperplasia and structure degeneration, goblet cell metaplasia, collagen deposition, elastin degradation and several additional markers of tissue damage. This murine model of P. aeruginosa chronic infection, reproducing CF lung pathology, will be instrumental to identify novel molecular targets and test newly tailored molecules inhibiting chronic inflammation and tissue damage processes in pre-clinical studies. PMID:26883959

  2. A dynamic and intricate regulatory network determines Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramanian, Deepak; Schneper, Lisa; Kumari, Hansi; Mathee, Kalai

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a metabolically versatile bacterium that is found in a wide range of biotic and abiotic habitats. It is a major human opportunistic pathogen causing numerous acute and chronic infections. The critical traits contributing to the pathogenic potential of P. aeruginosa are the production of a myriad of virulence factors, formation of biofilms and antibiotic resistance. Expression of these traits is under stringent regulation, and it responds to largely unidentified environmental signals. This review is focused on providing a global picture of virulence gene regulation in P. aeruginosa. In addition to key regulatory pathways that control the transition from acute to chronic infection phenotypes, some regulators have been identified that modulate multiple virulence mechanisms. Despite of a propensity for chaotic behaviour, no chaotic motifs were readily observed in the P. aeruginosa virulence regulatory network. Having a ‘birds-eye’ view of the regulatory cascades provides the forum opportunities to pose questions, formulate hypotheses and evaluate theories in elucidating P. aeruginosa pathogenesis. Understanding the mechanisms involved in making P. aeruginosa a successful pathogen is essential in helping devise control strategies. PMID:23143271

  3. ZnuA and zinc homeostasis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Pederick, Victoria G.; Eijkelkamp, Bart A.; Begg, Stephanie L.; Ween, Miranda P.; McAllister, Lauren J.; Paton, James C.; McDevitt, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a ubiquitous environmental bacterium and a clinically significant opportunistic human pathogen. Central to the ability of P. aeruginosa to colonise both environmental and host niches is the acquisition of zinc. Here we show that P. aeruginosa PAO1 acquires zinc via an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) permease in which ZnuA is the high affinity, zinc-specific binding protein. Zinc uptake in Gram-negative organisms predominantly occurs via an ABC permease, and consistent with this expectation a P. aeruginosa ΔznuA mutant strain showed an ~60% reduction in cellular zinc accumulation, while other metal ions were essentially unaffected. Despite the major reduction in zinc accumulation, minimal phenotypic differences were observed between the wild-type and ΔznuA mutant strains. However, the effect of zinc limitation on the transcriptome of P. aeruginosa PAO1 revealed significant changes in gene expression that enable adaptation to low-zinc conditions. Genes significantly up-regulated included non-zinc-requiring paralogs of zinc-dependent proteins and a number of novel import pathways associated with zinc acquisition. Collectively, this study provides new insight into the acquisition of zinc by P. aeruginosa PAO1, revealing a hitherto unrecognized complexity in zinc homeostasis that enables the bacterium to survive under zinc limitation. PMID:26290475

  4. Interspecies Interaction between Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Other Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Tashiro, Yosuke; Yawata, Yutaka; Toyofuku, Masanori; Uchiyama, Hiroo; Nomura, Nobuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Microbes interact with each other in multicellular communities and this interaction enables certain microorganisms to survive in various environments. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a highly adaptable bacterium that ubiquitously inhabits diverse environments including soil, marine habitats, plants and animals. Behind this adaptivity, P. aeruginosa has abilities not only to outcompete others but also to communicate with each other to develop a multispecies community. In this review, we focus on how P. aeruginosa interacts with other microorganisms. P. aeruginosa secretes antimicrobial chemicals to compete and signal molecules to cooperate with other organisms. In other cases, it directly conveys antimicrobial enzymes to other bacteria using the Type VI secretion system (T6SS) or membrane vesicles (MVs). Quorum sensing is a central regulatory system used to exert their ability including antimicrobial effects and cooperation with other microbes. At least three quorum sensing systems are found in P. aeruginosa, Las, Rhl and Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS) systems. These quorum-sensing systems control the synthesis of extracellular antimicrobial chemicals as well as interaction with other organisms via T6SS or MVs. In addition, we explain the potential of microbial interaction analysis using several micro devices, which would bring fresh sensitivity to the study of interspecies interaction between P. aeruginosa and other organisms. PMID:23363620

  5. Antioxidant enzyme activities of Microcystis aeruginosa in response to nonylphenols and degradation of nonylphenols by M. aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingxian; Xie, Ping

    2007-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of chemical nonylphenols (NPs) on the antioxidant system of Microcystis aeruginosa strains. The degradation and sorption of NPs by M. aeruginosa were also evaluated. High concentrations of NPs (1 and 2 mg/l) were found to cause increases in superoxidase dismutase (SOD) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activities and in glutathione (GSH) levels. These results suggest that toxic stress manifested by elevated SOD and GST levels and GSH contents may be responsible for the toxicity of NPs to M. aeruginosa and that the algal cells could improve their antioxidant and detoxification ability through the enhancement of enzymatic and nonenzymatic prevention substances. The observed elevations in GSH levels and GST activities were relatively higher than those in SOD activities, indicating that GSH and GST contributed more in eliminating toxic effects than SOD. Low concentrations of NPs (0.05-0.2 mg/l) enhanced cell growth and decreased GST activity in algal cells of M. aeruginosa, suggesting that NPs may have acted as a protecting factor, such as an antioxidant. The larger portion of the NPs (>60%) disappeared after 12 days of incubation, indicating the strong ability of M. aeruginosa to degrade the moderate persistent NP compounds. The sorption ratio of M. aeruginosa after a 12-day exposure to low nominal concentrations of NPs (0.02-0.5 mg/l) was relatively high (>30%). The fact that M. aeruginosa effectively resisted the toxic effects of NPs and strongly degraded these pollutants indicate that M. aeruginosa cells have a strong ability to adapt to variations in environmental conditions and that low and moderate concentrations of organic compounds may favor its survival. Further studies are needed to provide detailed information on the fate of persistent organic pollutants and the survival of algae and to determine the possible role of organic pollutants in the occurrence of water blooms in eutrophic lakes. PMID:17342429

  6. Evidence of spin glass like ordering and electronic phase arrest in Pr3+ doped Sm0.5Sr0.5MnO3 bulk manganites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giri, S. K.; Panda, J.; Nath, T. K.

    2012-06-01

    The effect of doping of rare earth Pr3+ ion replacing Sm3+ in Sm0.5Sr0.5MnO3 is investigated in details. Measurements of linear and non linear ac magnetic susceptibility, resistivity, magnetoresistance on chemically synthesized (Sm0.5-xPrx)Sr0.5MnO3 shows various interesting features with doping level x=0.15. Here we observe the frequency independent FM-PM transition at higher temperature followed by a frequency dependent re-entered magnetic transition at lower temperature through complex ac susceptibility measurements. We have ascribed our observation to the formation of finite size ferromagnetic clusters which are formed as a consequence of intrinsic phase separation and undergo Spin glass-like freezing below certain temperature in this manganite. The magnetoresistance of the samples also show strong irreversibility with respect to sweeping of the field between highest positive and negative values. All these experimental results have been attributed to phase separation effect and kinetic arrest of electronically phase separated system.

  7. Growth and optical properties of Pr3+:KLu(WO4)2 laser crystal: a candidate for red emission laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yi; Zhu, Xiurong; Zhang, Xianke; Yuan, Jujun; Yu, Huajun; Kuang, Fangguang; Xiong, Zuzhou; Liao, Jianfei; Zhang, Wen; Wang, Guofu

    2016-06-01

    A Pr3+:KLu(WO4)2 crystal with dimension of 30 × 30 × 15 mm3 was grown in the K2W2O7 flux. A slice was cut from the crystal, and the polarized absorption and fluorescence spectra were measured at room temperature. Based on the J-O theory, the oscillator intensity parameters Ω t ( t = 2, 4, 6), spontaneous emission probabilities and branch ratios were estimated and good results had been obtained. Furthermore, the crystal has a relatively large emission cross-section in the region of 615-630 nm with the highest value of 14.5 × 10-20 cm2, which indicates that the crystal is good for the application in red emission laser. The emission decay time for 1D2 and 3P0 multiplets was discussed. By adapting the I-H model to fit the emission decay curves, the lifetime for 1D2 at 607 nm and 3P0 at 615 nm are 19.72 μs and 8.95 μs, respectively. Then the corresponding fluorescence quantum efficiencies of the two multiplets reach 83.7 % and 87.9 %, respectively. All the studies illustrate that this crystal is potential in red emission laser application.

  8. Growth and optical properties of Pr3+:KLu(WO4)2 laser crystal: a candidate for red emission laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yi; Zhu, Xiurong; Zhang, Xianke; Yuan, Jujun; Yu, Huajun; Kuang, Fangguang; Xiong, Zuzhou; Liao, Jianfei; Zhang, Wen; Wang, Guofu

    2016-04-01

    A Pr3+:KLu(WO4)2 crystal with dimension of 30 × 30 × 15 mm3 was grown in the K2W2O7 flux. A slice was cut from the crystal, and the polarized absorption and fluorescence spectra were measured at room temperature. Based on the J-O theory, the oscillator intensity parameters Ω t (t = 2, 4, 6), spontaneous emission probabilities and branch ratios were estimated and good results had been obtained. Furthermore, the crystal has a relatively large emission cross-section in the region of 615-630 nm with the highest value of 14.5 × 10-20 cm2, which indicates that the crystal is good for the application in red emission laser. The emission decay time for 1D2 and 3P0 multiplets was discussed. By adapting the I-H model to fit the emission decay curves, the lifetime for 1D2 at 607 nm and 3P0 at 615 nm are 19.72 μs and 8.95 μs, respectively. Then the corresponding fluorescence quantum efficiencies of the two multiplets reach 83.7 % and 87.9 %, respectively. All the studies illustrate that this crystal is potential in red emission laser application.

  9. Experimental determination of intracavity losses of monolithic Fabry-Perot cavities made of Pr3+:Y2SiO5.

    PubMed

    Goto, Hayato; Nakamura, Satoshi; Ichimura, Kouichi

    2010-11-01

    We propose an experimental method with which all the following quantities can be determined separately: the intracavity loss and individual cavity-mirror transmittances of a monolithic Fabry-Perot cavity and furthermore the coupling efficiency between the cavity mode and the incident light. It is notable that the modified version of this method can also be applied to whispering-gallery-mode cavities. Using this method, we measured the intracavity losses of monolithic Fabry-Perot cavities made of Pr3+:Y2SiO5 at room temperature. The knowledge of the intracavity losses is very important for applications of such cavities, e.g., to quantum information technologies. It turns out that fairly high losses (about 0.1%) exist even for a sample with extremely low dopant concentration (2×10(-5) at. %). The experimental results also indicate that the loss may be mainly due to the bulk loss of Y2SiO5 crystal. The bulk loss is estimated to be 7×10(-4) cm(-1) (0.003 dB/cm) or lower. PMID:21164720

  10. Structure, photoluminescence and thermoluminescence study of a composite ZnTa2O6/ZnGa2O4 compound doped with Pr3+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noto, L. L.; Shaat, S. K. K.; Poelman, D.; Dhlamini, M. S.; Mothudi, B. M.; Swart, H. C.

    2016-05-01

    The study of persistent luminescence is interesting for applications related to biological imaging, self-lit roads and security signs. Composite Pr-doped samples were prepared in one pot by solid chemical reaction at 1200 °C for 4 h. The X-ray diffraction patterns of the samples showed mixed phases which correspond to ZnGa2O4 and ZnTa2O6 phases. Interestingly, the secondary electron microscopy images showed that the surface morphology is composed of particles with different shapes: irregular, rhombus and rod shapes. The X-ray maps obtained using field emission scanning electron microscopy, confirmed that the irregular particles correspond to ZnTa2O6, and the rods correspond to ZnGa2O4. Red emission was observed from 1D2 → 3H4, 3P0 → 3H6, 3P0 → 3F2 and 1D2 → 3H5 transitions of Pr3+. The lifetime of the persistent luminescence was measured, and the corresponding trapping centres were investigated using thermoluminescence spectroscopy.

  11. Magnetic ordering of hyperfine-coupled nuclear and 4f-electron moments in the clathrate compound Pr3Pd20Ge6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwakami, O.; Namisashi, Y.; Abe, S.; Matsumoto, K.; Ano, G.; Akatsu, M.; Mitsumoto, K.; Nemoto, Y.; Takeda, N.; Goto, T.; Kitazawa, H.

    2014-09-01

    Complex ac susceptibility, χ =χ'-iχ'', measurements of the clathrate compound Pr3Pd20Ge6 were performed in static fields up to 10 mT for H ∥[001] and at temperatures down to 500 μK. Praseodymium (Pr) nuclear magnetic moments at the 8c site, where quadrupole moments of 4f electrons order at TQ1=250 mK, were found to order antiferromagnetically at 9 mK, as shown by a peak in χ' and a substantial increase in thermal relaxation time. The large enhancement factor (1+K8c) obtained by calculation of the hyperfine-enhanced nuclear susceptibility of Pr at the 8c site accounts for the high transition temperature of Pr nuclear magnetic moments and the large χ' below 30 mK. From analysis of the crystalline electric field and the mean-field approximation, we conclude that a χ peak at 77 mK can be ascribed to an antiferromagnetic ordering of magnetic moments of 4f electrons at the 4a site. We found that nuclear and f-electron moments order separately on two sublattices in this compound. The temperature and magnetic field dependence of χ' and χ'' between 30 and 60 mK are discussed in terms of dissipation phenomena.

  12. High efficiency thermionic converter studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffman, F. N.; Sommer, A. H.; Balestra, C. L.; Briere, T. R.; Lieb, D.; Oettinger, P. E.; Goodale, D. B.

    1977-01-01

    Research in thermionic energy conversion technology is reported. The objectives were to produce converters suitable for use in out of core space reactors, radioisotope generators, and solar satellites. The development of emitter electrodes that operate at low cesium pressure, stable low work function collector electrodes, and more efficient means of space charge neutralization were investigated to improve thermionic converter performance. Potential improvements in collector properties were noted with evaporated thin film barium oxide coatings. Experiments with cesium carbonate suggest this substance may provide optimum combinations of cesium and oxygen for thermionic conversion.

  13. [Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonisation in bronchiectatic patients and clinical reflections].

    PubMed

    Kömüs, Nuray; Tertemiz, Kemal Can; Akkoçlu, Atila; Gülay, Zeynep; Yilmaz, Erkan

    2006-01-01

    Bronchiectasis is characterized with irreversible dilatation according to destruction of epithelium, elastic and muscular layer. Most important cause of bronchiectasis is chronic bacterial infections. Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonisation is frequently seen in bronchiectatic patients. We aimed to find out P. aeruginosa colonisation frequency and clinical, radiological and spirometric reflections due to colonisation. We analysed 83 cases retrospectively. Mean age was 58.2 and 54.2% of them were female. Bronchiectasis were localised 19.3% in left lung, 19.3% right and 61.4% bilaterally. 29 (35.8%) normal, 28 (34.6%) obstructive, 7 (8.6%) restrictive, 17 (21%) mixed type disorders are detected in spirometric measures. Sputum culture performed in 50 cases. No microorganism colonisation determined in 30 (60%) cases, P. aeruginosa colonisation 16 (32%), Haemophilus influenzae 2 (4%), 1 (2%) Streptococcus pneumoniae and Proteus mirabilis 1 (2%) cases. P. aeruginosa colonisation determined more frequent in males (p<0.05). No significant correlation detected between colonisation and age or smoking habits (p>0.05). In cases with colonisation; clubbing and hemoptysis were significantly frequent (p<0.05). Only peribronchial thickening was significantly correlated with colonisation in radiological findings (p<0.05). In blood gase analysis PaO2, oxygen saturation were lower and PaCO2 higher in cases colonised with P. aeruginosa but it was not statisticaly significant (p>0.05). Hospitalization rate was higher in P. aeruginosa colonised cases (p>0.05). It is an important problem about mortality because of higher hemoptysis and hospitalisation requirement rate in P. aeruginosa colonised cases. PMID:17203422

  14. Why Does the Healthy Cornea Resist Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infection?

    PubMed Central

    Evans, David J.; Fleiszig, Suzanne M. J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To provide our perspective on why the cornea is resistant to infection based on our research results with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Perspective We focus on our current understanding of the interplay between bacteria, tear fluid and the corneal epithelium that determine health as the usual outcome, and propose a theoretical model for how contact lens wear might change those interactions to enable susceptibility to P. aeruginosa infection. Methods Use of “null-infection” in vivo models, cultured human corneal epithelial cells, contact lens-wearing animal models, and bacterial genetics help to elucidate mechanisms by which P. aeruginosa survive at the ocular surface, adheres, and traverses multilayered corneal epithelia. These models also help elucidate the molecular mechanisms of corneal epithelial innate defense. Results and Discussion Tear fluid and the corneal epithelium combine to make a formidable defense against P. aeruginosa infection of the cornea. Part of that defense involves the expression of antimicrobials such as β-defensins, the cathelicidin LL-37, cytokeratin-derived antimicrobial peptides, and RNase7. Immunomodulators such as SP-D and ST2 also contribute. Innate defenses of the cornea depend in part on MyD88, a key adaptor protein of TLR and IL-1R signaling, but the basal lamina represents the final barrier to bacterial penetration. Overcoming these defenses involves P. aeruginosa adaptation, expression of the type three secretion system, proteases, and P. aeruginosa biofilm formation on contact lenses. Conclusion After more than two decades of research focused on understanding how contact lens wear predisposes to P. aeruginosa infection, our working hypothesis places blame for microbial keratitis on bacterial adaptation to ocular surface defenses, combined with changes to the biochemistry of the corneal surface caused by trapping bacteria and tear fluid against the cornea under the lens. PMID:23601656

  15. Hybrid-mode thermionic converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasor, N. S.; Britt, E. J.

    1976-01-01

    Converter's collector electrode has uniform low work-function surface and operates at sufficiently low temperature to produce negligible electron emission. Emitter electrode has main region which has intermediate work-function and auxiliary region which has relatively high work-function surface.

  16. Charge-pump voltage converter

    DOEpatents

    Brainard, John P.; Christenson, Todd R.

    2009-11-03

    A charge-pump voltage converter for converting a low voltage provided by a low-voltage source to a higher voltage. Charge is inductively generated on a transfer rotor electrode during its transit past an inductor stator electrode and subsequently transferred by the rotating rotor to a collector stator electrode for storage or use. Repetition of the charge transfer process leads to a build-up of voltage on a charge-receiving device. Connection of multiple charge-pump voltage converters in series can generate higher voltages, and connection of multiple charge-pump voltage converters in parallel can generate higher currents. Microelectromechanical (MEMS) embodiments of this invention provide a small and compact high-voltage (several hundred V) voltage source starting with a few-V initial voltage source. The microscale size of many embodiments of this invention make it ideally suited for MEMS- and other micro-applications where integration of the voltage or charge source in a small package is highly desirable.

  17. Converting accounts receivable into cash.

    PubMed

    Folk, M D; Roest, P R

    1995-09-01

    In recent years, increasing numbers of healthcare providers have converted their accounts receivable into cash through a process called securitization. This practice has gained popularity because it provides a means to raise capital necessary to healthcare organizations. Although securitization transactions can be complex, they may provide increased financial flexibility to providers as they prepare for continuing change in the healthcare industry. PMID:10145096

  18. Genome comparison of Pseudomonas aeruginosa large phages.

    PubMed

    Hertveldt, Kirsten; Lavigne, Rob; Pleteneva, Elena; Sernova, Natalia; Kurochkina, Lidia; Korchevskii, Roman; Robben, Johan; Mesyanzhinov, Vadim; Krylov, Victor N; Volckaert, Guido

    2005-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa phage EL is a dsDNA phage related to the giant phiKZ-like Myoviridae. The EL genome sequence comprises 211,215 bp and has 201 predicted open reading frames (ORFs). The EL genome does not share DNA sequence homology with other viruses and micro-organisms sequenced to date. However, one-third of the predicted EL gene products (gps) shares similarity (Blast alignments of 17-55% amino acid identity) with phiKZ proteins. Comparative EL and phiKZ genomics reveals that these giant phages are an example of substantially diverged genetic mosaics. Based on the position of similar EL and phiKZ predicted gene products, five genome regions can be delineated in EL, four of which are relatively conserved between EL and phiKZ. Region IV, a 17.7 kb genome region with 28 predicted ORFs, is unique to EL. Fourteen EL ORFs have been assigned a putative function based on protein similarity. Assigned proteins are involved in DNA replication and nucleotide metabolism (NAD+-dependent DNA ligase, ribonuclease HI, helicase, thymidylate kinase), host lysis and particle structure. EL-gp146 is the first chaperonin GroEL sequence identified in a viral genome. Besides a putative transposase, EL harbours predicted mobile endonucleases related to H-N-H and LAGLIDADG homing endonucleases associated with group I intron and intein intervening sequences. PMID:16256135

  19. Spontaneous release of lipopolysaccharide by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Cadieux, J E; Kuzio, J; Milazzo, F H; Kropinski, A M

    1983-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO grown in glucose mineral salts medium released lipopolysaccharide which was chemically and immunologically similar to the cellular lipopolysaccharide. In addition, it possessed identical phage E79-inactivating properties. Through neutralization of phage activity and hemolysis inhibition assays, the organism was found to liberate lipopolysaccharide at a constant rate during log-phase growth equivalent to 1.3 to 2.2 ng/10(8) cells over a growth temperature range of 25 to 42 degrees C. At 19 degrees C, a lipopolysaccharide was released which was deficient in phage-inactivating activity but retained its immunological properties. Chemical analysis of lipopolysaccharide extracted from cells grown at 19 degrees C showed a deficiency in the O-side-chain component fucosamine. Gel exclusion chromatography of the polysaccharide fraction derived from lipopolysaccharide isolated from cells grown at 19 degrees C exhibited a decreased content of side-chain polysaccharide as well as a difference in the hexosamine:hexose ratio. The results of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoretic analysis confirmed these results as well as establishing that an essentially normal distribution of side-chain repeating unit lengths were to be found in the 19 degrees C preparation. These results suggest a decrease in the frequency of capping R-form lipopolysaccharide at 19 degrees C. Images PMID:6409883

  20. Spaceflight promotes biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Kim, Wooseong; Tengra, Farah K; Young, Zachary; Shong, Jasmine; Marchand, Nicholas; Chan, Hon Kit; Pangule, Ravindra C; Parra, Macarena; Dordick, Jonathan S; Plawsky, Joel L; Collins, Cynthia H

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the effects of spaceflight on microbial communities is crucial for the success of long-term, manned space missions. Surface-associated bacterial communities, known as biofilms, were abundant on the Mir space station and continue to be a challenge on the International Space Station. The health and safety hazards linked to the development of biofilms are of particular concern due to the suppression of immune function observed during spaceflight. While planktonic cultures of microbes have indicated that spaceflight can lead to increases in growth and virulence, the effects of spaceflight on biofilm development and physiology remain unclear. To address this issue, Pseudomonas aeruginosa was cultured during two Space Shuttle Atlantis missions: STS-132 and STS-135, and the biofilms formed during spaceflight were characterized. Spaceflight was observed to increase the number of viable cells, biofilm biomass, and thickness relative to normal gravity controls. Moreover, the biofilms formed during spaceflight exhibited a column-and-canopy structure that has not been observed on Earth. The increase in the amount of biofilms and the formation of the novel architecture during spaceflight were observed to be independent of carbon source and phosphate concentrations in the media. However, flagella-driven motility was shown to be essential for the formation of this biofilm architecture during spaceflight. These findings represent the first evidence that spaceflight affects community-level behaviors of bacteria and highlight the importance of understanding how both harmful and beneficial human-microbe interactions may be altered during spaceflight. PMID:23658630

  1. Iron Depletion Enhances Production of Antimicrobials by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Angela T.; Jones, Jace W.; Ruge, Max A.; Kane, Maureen A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a heritable disease characterized by chronic, polymicrobial lung infections. While Staphylococcus aureus is the dominant lung pathogen in young CF patients, Pseudomonas aeruginosa becomes predominant by adulthood. P. aeruginosa produces a variety of antimicrobials that likely contribute to this shift in microbial populations. In particular, secretion of 2-alkyl-4(1H)-quinolones (AQs) contributes to lysis of S. aureus in coculture, providing an iron source to P. aeruginosa both in vitro and in vivo. We previously showed that production of one such AQ, the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS), is enhanced by iron depletion and that this induction is dependent upon the iron-responsive PrrF small RNAs (sRNAs). Here, we demonstrate that antimicrobial activity against S. aureus during coculture is also enhanced by iron depletion, and we provide evidence that multiple AQs contribute to this activity. Strikingly, a P. aeruginosa ΔprrF mutant, which produces very little PQS in monoculture, was capable of mediating iron-regulated growth suppression of S. aureus. We show that the presence of S. aureus suppresses the ΔprrF1,2 mutant's defect in iron-regulated PQS production, indicating that a PrrF-independent iron regulatory pathway mediates AQ production in coculture. We further demonstrate that iron-regulated antimicrobial production is conserved in multiple P. aeruginosa strains, including clinical isolates from CF patients. These results demonstrate that iron plays a central role in modulating interactions of P. aeruginosa with S. aureus. Moreover, our studies suggest that established iron regulatory pathways of these pathogens are significantly altered during polymicrobial infections. IMPORTANCE Chronic polymicrobial infections involving Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality, as the interplay between these two organisms exacerbates infection. This is in part due to enhanced

  2. Parametric study of laser photovoltaic energy converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, G. H.; Heinbockel, J. H.

    1987-01-01

    Photovoltaic converters are of interest for converting laser power to electrical power in a space-based laser power system. This paper describes a model for photovoltaic laser converters and the application of this model to a neodymium laser silicon photovoltaic converter system. A parametric study which defines the sensitivity of the photovoltaic parameters is described. An optimized silicon photovoltaic converter has an efficiency greater than 50 percent for 1000 W/sq cm of neodymium laser radiation.

  3. Spectral and kinetic characterization of CaS:Pr 3+ phosphor synthesized through chemical co-precipitation route and post annealing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitale, Shreyas S.; Sharma, Suchinder K.; Dubey, R. N.; Qureshi, M. S.; Malik, M. M.

    2010-01-01

    Synthesis of Pr 3+ doped CaS phosphor has been reported through chemical co-precipitation route and post annealing in the presence of NaCl, KCl and NH 4Cl flux. Good crystallinity and cubic CaS phase is achieved after post-precipitation calcinations of powder at 900 °C for 1 h duration. Pseudo-spherical morphostructural features of micron-size particles are observed for phosphor prepared via chemical route. Phosphor samples are also prepared via solid-state carbothermal reduction technique for comparative studies and exhibit dendrite like structures. Prominent excitation bands at 276, 320 nm are observed for the present phosphor samples. The emission spectra show a duo-band feature at 495 and 580 nm where a spectral overlap of host lattice emission due to intrinsic defects and characteristic spectral features of Pr ion due to 3P 0- 1H 4, 3P 1- 1H 5, 1D 2- 3H 4 and 3P 0- 3F 2 transitions can be observed. The carbothermal route synthesized CaS:Pr shows spectral features of Pr ion due to 3P 0- 1H 4 and 3P 0- 3F j transitions. Electron spin resonance investigations reveal the presence of unintentional Mn 2+ through a sextet signature. F + electron trapping center is detected having g = 2.0034. Thermoluminescence glow curves possess a broad duo-band feature between room temperature -100 °C and >125 °C under host UV irradiation. Kinetic characterization using glow curve deconvolution reveals quasicontinuous distribution of traps having energy between 0.56 and 1.15 eV and frequency factors between 10 7 and 10 11/sec.

  4. Lagooning of wastewaters favors dissemination of clinically relevant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Petit, Stéphanie M-C; Lavenir, Raphaël; Colinon-Dupuich, Céline; Boukerb, Amine M; Cholley, Pascal; Bertrand, Xavier; Freney, Jean; Doléans-Jordheim, Anne; Nazaret, Sylvie; Laurent, Frédéric; Cournoyer, Benoit

    2013-10-01

    The significance of wastewater treatment lagoons (WWTLs) as point sources of clinically relevant Pseudomonas aeruginosa that can disseminate through rural and peri-urban catchments was investigated. A panel of P. aeruginosa strains collected over three years from WWTLs and community-acquired infections was compared by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) DNA fingerprinting and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Forty-four distantly related PFGE profiles and four clonal complexes were found among the WWTL strains analyzed. Some genotypes were repeatedly detected from different parts of WWTLs, including the influent, suggesting an ability to migrate and persist over time. MLST showed all investigated lineages to match sequence types described in other countries and strains from major clinical clones such as PA14 of ST253 and "C" of ST17 were observed. Some of these genotypes matched isolates from community-acquired infections recorded in the WWTL geographic area. Most WWTL strains harbored the main P. aeruginosa virulence genes; 13% harbored exoU-encoded cytoxins, but on at least six different genomic islands, with some of these showing signs of genomic instability. P. aeruginosa appeared to be highly successful opportunistic colonizers of WWTLs. Lagooning of wastewaters was found to favor dissemination of clinically relevant P. aeruginosa among peri-urban watersheds. PMID:23792168

  5. Anti-PcrV antibody strategies against virulent Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Sawa, Teiji; Ito, Emi; Nguyen, Vinh Huu; Haight, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic bacterial pathogen that causes fatal acute lung infections in critically ill individuals. Its pathogenesis is associated with bacterial virulence conferred by the type III secretion system (TTSS), through which P. aeruginosa causes necrosis of the lung epithelium and disseminates into the circulation, resulting in bacteremia, sepsis, and mortality. TTSS allows P. aeruginosa to directly translocate cytotoxins into eukaryotic cells, inducing cell death. The P. aeruginosa V-antigen PcrV, a homolog of the Yersinia V-antigen LcrV, is an indispensable contributor to TTS toxin translocation. Vaccination against PcrV ensures the survival of challenged mice and decreases lung inflammation and injury. Both the rabbit polyclonal anti-PcrV antibody and the murine monoclonal anti-PcrV antibody, mAb166, inhibit TTS toxin translocation. mAb166 IgG was cloned, and a molecular engineered humanized anti-PcrV IgG antigen-binding fragment, KB001, was developed for clinical use. KB001 is currently undergoing Phase-II clinical trials for ventilator-associated pneumonia in France and chronic pneumonia in cystic fibrosis in USA. In these studies, KB001 has demonstrated its safety, a favorable pharmacokinetic profile, and promising potential as a nonantibiotic strategy to reduce airway inflammation and damage in P. aeruginosa pneumonia. PMID:25483637

  6. A network biology approach to denitrification in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Arat, Seda; Bullerjahn, George S.; Laubenbacher, Reinhard

    2015-02-23

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a metabolically flexible member of the Gammaproteobacteria. Under anaerobic conditions and the presence of nitrate, P. aeruginosa can perform (complete) denitrification, a respiratory process of dissimilatory nitrate reduction to nitrogen gas via nitrite (NO₂), nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N₂O). This study focuses on understanding the influence of environmental conditions on bacterial denitrification performance, using a mathematical model of a metabolic network in P. aeruginosa. To our knowledge, this is the first mathematical model of denitrification for this bacterium. Analysis of the long-term behavior of the network under changing concentration levels of oxygen (O₂), nitrate (NO₃),more » and phosphate (PO₄) suggests that PO₄ concentration strongly affects denitrification performance. The model provides three predictions on denitrification activity of P. aeruginosa under various environmental conditions, and these predictions are either experimentally validated or supported by pertinent biological literature. One motivation for this study is to capture the effect of PO₄ on a denitrification metabolic network of P. aeruginosa in order to shed light on mechanisms for greenhouse gas N₂O accumulation during seasonal oxygen depletion in aquatic environments such as Lake Erie (Laurentian Great Lakes, USA). Simulating the microbial production of greenhouse gases in anaerobic aquatic systems such as Lake Erie allows a deeper understanding of the contributing environmental effects that will inform studies on, and remediation strategies for, other hypoxic sites worldwide.« less

  7. A Network Biology Approach to Denitrification in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Arat, Seda; Bullerjahn, George S.; Laubenbacher, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a metabolically flexible member of the Gammaproteobacteria. Under anaerobic conditions and the presence of nitrate, P. aeruginosa can perform (complete) denitrification, a respiratory process of dissimilatory nitrate reduction to nitrogen gas via nitrite (NO2), nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N2O). This study focuses on understanding the influence of environmental conditions on bacterial denitrification performance, using a mathematical model of a metabolic network in P. aeruginosa. To our knowledge, this is the first mathematical model of denitrification for this bacterium. Analysis of the long-term behavior of the network under changing concentration levels of oxygen (O2), nitrate (NO3), and phosphate (PO4) suggests that PO4 concentration strongly affects denitrification performance. The model provides three predictions on denitrification activity of P. aeruginosa under various environmental conditions, and these predictions are either experimentally validated or supported by pertinent biological literature. One motivation for this study is to capture the effect of PO4 on a denitrification metabolic network of P. aeruginosa in order to shed light on mechanisms for greenhouse gas N2O accumulation during seasonal oxygen depletion in aquatic environments such as Lake Erie (Laurentian Great Lakes, USA). Simulating the microbial production of greenhouse gases in anaerobic aquatic systems such as Lake Erie allows a deeper understanding of the contributing environmental effects that will inform studies on, and remediation strategies for, other hypoxic sites worldwide. PMID:25706405

  8. Update on the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia.

    PubMed

    El Solh, Ali A; Alhajhusain, Ahmad

    2009-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important cause of nosocomial pneumonia associated with a high morbidity and mortality rate. This bacterium expresses a variety of factors that confer resistance to a broad array of antimicrobial agents. Empirical antibiotic therapy is often inadequate because cultures from initial specimens grow strains that are resistant to initial antibiotics. Surveillance data, hospital antibiogram and individualization of regimens based on prior antibiotic use may reduce the risk of inadequate therapy. The use of combination therapies for P. aeruginosa pneumonia has been a long-advocated practice, but the potential increased value of combination therapy over monotherapy remains controversial. Doripenem and biapenem are new carbapenems that have excellent activity against P. aeruginosa; however, they lack activity against strains that express resistance to the currently available carbapenems. The polymyxins remain the most consistently effective agents against multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa. Strains that are panantibiotic-resistant are rare, but their incidence is increasing. Antibiotic combinations that yield some degree of susceptibility in vitro are the recourse, although the efficacy of these regimens has yet to be established in clinical studies. Experimental polypeptides may provide a new therapeutic approach. Among these, the anti-PcrV immunoglobulin G antibody that blocks the type III secretion system-mediated virulence of P. aeruginosa has recently entered Phase I/II clinical trials. PMID:19520717

  9. Long Term Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa Airway Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Facchini, Marcella; De Fino, Ida; Riva, Camilla; Bragonzi, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    A mouse model of chronic airway infection is a key asset in cystic fibrosis (CF) research, although there are a number of concerns regarding the model itself. Early phases of inflammation and infection have been widely studied by using the Pseudomonas aeruginosa agar-beads mouse model, while only few reports have focused on the long-term chronic infection in vivo. The main challenge for long term chronic infection remains the low bacterial burden by P. aeruginosa and the low percentage of infected mice weeks after challenge, indicating that bacterial cells are progressively cleared by the host. This paper presents a method for obtaining efficient long-term chronic infection in mice. This method is based on the embedding of the P. aeruginosa clinical strains in the agar-beads in vitro, followed by intratracheal instillation in C57Bl/6NCrl mice. Bilateral lung infection is associated with several measurable read-outs including weight loss, mortality, chronic infection, and inflammatory response. The P. aeruginosa RP73 clinical strain was preferred over the PAO1 reference laboratory strain since it resulted in a comparatively lower mortality, more severe lesions, and higher chronic infection. P. aeruginosa colonization may persist in the lung for over three months. Murine lung pathology resembles that of CF patients with advanced chronic pulmonary disease. This murine model most closely mimics the course of the human disease and can be used both for studies on the pathogenesis and for the evaluation of novel therapies. PMID:24686327

  10. A network biology approach to denitrification in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Arat, Seda; Bullerjahn, George S; Laubenbacher, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a metabolically flexible member of the Gammaproteobacteria. Under anaerobic conditions and the presence of nitrate, P. aeruginosa can perform (complete) denitrification, a respiratory process of dissimilatory nitrate reduction to nitrogen gas via nitrite (NO2), nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N2O). This study focuses on understanding the influence of environmental conditions on bacterial denitrification performance, using a mathematical model of a metabolic network in P. aeruginosa. To our knowledge, this is the first mathematical model of denitrification for this bacterium. Analysis of the long-term behavior of the network under changing concentration levels of oxygen (O2), nitrate (NO3), and phosphate (PO4) suggests that PO4 concentration strongly affects denitrification performance. The model provides three predictions on denitrification activity of P. aeruginosa under various environmental conditions, and these predictions are either experimentally validated or supported by pertinent biological literature. One motivation for this study is to capture the effect of PO4 on a denitrification metabolic network of P. aeruginosa in order to shed light on mechanisms for greenhouse gas N2O accumulation during seasonal oxygen depletion in aquatic environments such as Lake Erie (Laurentian Great Lakes, USA). Simulating the microbial production of greenhouse gases in anaerobic aquatic systems such as Lake Erie allows a deeper understanding of the contributing environmental effects that will inform studies on, and remediation strategies for, other hypoxic sites worldwide. PMID:25706405

  11. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Virulence and Therapy: Evolving Translational Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Veesenmeyer, Jeffrey L.; Lisboa, Thiago; Rello, Jordi

    2009-01-01

    Structured abstract Objective Although most reviews of Pseudomonas aeruginosa therapeutics focus on antibiotics currently in use or in the pipeline, we review evolving translational strategies aimed at using virulence factor antagonists as adjuvant therapies. Data Source Current literature regarding P. aeruginosa virulence determinants and approaches that target them, with an emphasis on type III secretion, quorum-sensing, biofilms, and flagella. Data Extraction and Synthesis P. aeruginosa remains one of the most important pathogens in nosocomial infections, with high associated morbidity and mortality. Its predilection to develop resistance to antibiotics and expression of multiple virulence factors contributes to the frequent ineffectiveness of current therapies. Among the many P. aeruginosa virulence determinants that impact infections, type III secretion, quorum sensing, biofilm formation, and flagella have been the focus of much recent investigation. Here we review how increased understanding of these important bacterial structures and processes has enabled the development of novel approaches to inhibit each. These promising translational strategies may lead to the development of adjuvant therapies capable of improving outcomes. Conclusions Adjuvant therapies directed against virulence factors have the potential to improve outcomes in P. aeruginosa infections. PMID:19325463

  12. The Genomic Basis of Evolutionary Innovation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Andreas; MacLean, R. Craig

    2016-01-01

    Novel traits play a key role in evolution, but their origins remain poorly understood. Here we address this problem by using experimental evolution to study bacterial innovation in real time. We allowed 380 populations of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to adapt to 95 different carbon sources that challenged bacteria with either evolving novel metabolic traits or optimizing existing traits. Whole genome sequencing of more than 80 clones revealed profound differences in the genetic basis of innovation and optimization. Innovation was associated with the rapid acquisition of mutations in genes involved in transcription and metabolism. Mutations in pre-existing duplicate genes in the P. aeruginosa genome were common during innovation, but not optimization. These duplicate genes may have been acquired by P. aeruginosa due to either spontaneous gene amplification or horizontal gene transfer. High throughput phenotype assays revealed that novelty was associated with increased pleiotropic costs that are likely to constrain innovation. However, mutations in duplicate genes with close homologs in the P. aeruginosa genome were associated with low pleiotropic costs compared to mutations in duplicate genes with distant homologs in the P. aeruginosa genome, suggesting that functional redundancy between duplicates facilitates innovation by buffering pleiotropic costs. PMID:27149698

  13. UV-VIS-NIR luminescence properties of an intense 5d broadband sensitized Eu2SiS4:Er3+ suitable for solar spectral converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Gongguo; Cui, Qiuyu; Liu, Guodong

    2016-07-01

    A novel broadband sensitized near-infrared emitting phosphor, Eu2SiS4:Er3+, was developed as promising solar spectral converter for Si solar cells. Eu2SiS4:Er3+ has broadband absorptions ranging from 250 nm to 550 nm which can efficiently facilitate the UV-green part of the solar photon flux spectrum and exhibits intense NIR emission of Er3+, perfectly matching the maximum spectral response of Si solar cells. The NIR integrated emission intensity of Eu2SiS4:0.02Er3+ is 6.14 times as intense as that of a dual-mode solar spectral converter CaLaGa3S6O:0.01Ce3+, 0.06Pr3+. These results demonstrate that Eu2SiS4:Er3+ phosphor is a promising candidate used as solar spectral converter.

  14. Photoelectric converters with quantum coherence.

    PubMed

    Su, Shan-He; Sun, Chang-Pu; Li, Sheng-Wen; Chen, Jin-Can

    2016-05-01

    Photon impingement is capable of liberating electrons in electronic devices and driving the electron flux from the lower chemical potential to higher chemical potential. Previous studies hinted that the thermodynamic efficiency of a nanosized photoelectric converter at maximum power is bounded by the Curzon-Ahlborn efficiency η_{CA}. In this study, we apply quantum effects to design a photoelectric converter based on a three-level quantum dot (QD) interacting with fermionic baths and photons. We show that, by adopting a pair of suitable degenerate states, quantum coherences induced by the couplings of QDs to sunlight and fermion baths can coexist steadily in nanoelectronic systems. Our analysis indicates that the efficiency at maximum power is no longer limited to η_{CA} through manipulation of carefully controlled quantum coherences. PMID:27300826

  15. Vibration converter with magnetic levitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladilin, A. V.; Pirogov, V. A.; Golyamina, I. P.; Kulaev, U. V.; Kurbatov, P. A.; Kurbatova, E. P.

    2015-05-01

    The paper presents a mathematical model, the results of computational and theoretical research, and the feasibility of creating a vibration converter with full magnetic levitation in the suspension of a high-temperature superconductor (HTSC). The axial and radial stability of the active part of the converter is provided by the interaction of the magnetic field of ring-shaped permanent magnets and a hollow cylinder made of the ceramic HTSC material. The force is created by a system of current-carrying coils whose magnetic field is polarized by permanent magnets and interacts with induced currents in the superconducting cylinder. The case of transition to the superconducting state of HTSC material in the field of the permanent magnets (FC mode) is considered. The data confirm the outlook for the proposed technical solutions.

  16. Photoelectric converters with quantum coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Shan-He; Sun, Chang-Pu; Li, Sheng-Wen; Chen, Jin-Can

    2016-05-01

    Photon impingement is capable of liberating electrons in electronic devices and driving the electron flux from the lower chemical potential to higher chemical potential. Previous studies hinted that the thermodynamic efficiency of a nanosized photoelectric converter at maximum power is bounded by the Curzon-Ahlborn efficiency ηCA. In this study, we apply quantum effects to design a photoelectric converter based on a three-level quantum dot (QD) interacting with fermionic baths and photons. We show that, by adopting a pair of suitable degenerate states, quantum coherences induced by the couplings of QDs to sunlight and fermion baths can coexist steadily in nanoelectronic systems. Our analysis indicates that the efficiency at maximum power is no longer limited to ηCA through manipulation of carefully controlled quantum coherences.

  17. Portable convertible blast effects shield

    DOEpatents

    Pastrnak, John W.; Hollaway, Rocky; Henning, Carl D.; Deteresa, Steve; Grundler, Walter; Hagler, Lisle B.; Kokko, Edwin; Switzer, Vernon A

    2007-05-22

    A rapidly deployable portable convertible blast effects shield/ballistic shield includes a set two or more telescoping cylindrical rings operably connected to each other to convert between a telescopically-collapsed configuration for storage and transport, and a telescopically-extended upright configuration forming an expanded inner volume. In a first embodiment, the upright configuration provides blast effects shielding, such as against blast pressures, shrapnel, and/or fire balls. And in a second embodiment, the upright configuration provides ballistic shielding, such as against incoming weapons fire, shrapnel, etc. Each ring has a high-strength material construction, such as a composite fiber and matrix material, capable of substantially inhibiting blast effects and impinging projectiles from passing through the shield. And the set of rings are releasably securable to each other in the telescopically-extended upright configuration, such as by click locks.

  18. Portable convertible blast effects shield

    DOEpatents

    Pastrnak, John W.; Hollaway, Rocky; Henning, Carl D.; Deteresa, Steve; Grundler, Walter; Hagler, Lisle B.; Kokko, Edwin; Switzer, Vernon A.

    2011-03-15

    A rapidly deployable portable convertible blast effects shield/ballistic shield includes a set two or more frusto-conically-tapered telescoping rings operably connected to each other to convert between a telescopically-collapsed configuration for storage and transport, and a telescopically-extended upright configuration forming an expanded inner volume. In a first embodiment, the upright configuration provides blast effects shielding, such as against blast pressures, shrapnel, and/or fire balls. And in a second embodiment, the upright configuration provides ballistic shielding, such as against incoming weapons fire, shrapnel, etc. Each ring has a high-strength material construction, such as a composite fiber and matrix material, capable of substantially inhibiting blast effects and impinging projectiles from passing through the shield. And the set of rings are releasably securable to each other in the telescopically-extended upright configuration by the friction fit of adjacent pairs of frusto-conically-tapered rings to each other.

  19. Portable convertible blast effects shield

    DOEpatents

    Pastrnak, John W.; Hollaway, Rocky; Henning, Carl D.; Deteresa, Steve; Grundler, Walter; Hagler,; Lisle B.; Kokko, Edwin; Switzer, Vernon A

    2010-10-26

    A rapidly deployable portable convertible blast effects shield/ballistic shield includes a set two or more telescoping cylindrical rings operably connected to each other to convert between a telescopically-collapsed configuration for storage and transport, and a telescopically-extended upright configuration forming an expanded inner volume. In a first embodiment, the upright configuration provides blast effects shielding, such as against blast pressures, shrapnel, and/or fire balls. And in a second embodiment, the upright configuration provides ballistic shielding, such as against incoming weapons fire, shrapnel, etc. Each ring has a high-strength material construction, such as a composite fiber and matrix material, capable of substantially inhibiting blast effects and impinging projectiles from passing through the shield. And the set of rings are releasably securable to each other in the telescopically-extended upright configuration, such as by click locks.

  20. Ambroxol inhibits mucoid conversion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and contributes to the bactericidal activity of ciprofloxacin against mucoid P. aeruginosa biofilms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenlei; Yu, Jialin; He, Yu; Wang, Zhengli; Li, Fang

    2016-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen that can cause severe infections in immunocompromised individuals. Because it forms biofilms, which protect against host immune attack and increase resistance to conventional antibiotics, mucoid P. aeruginosa is nearly impossible to eradicate. Moreover, mucoid conversion of P. aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients leads to poor outcomes. This conversion is mainly due to mucA gene mutation, which is thought to be induced by polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and the reactive oxygen species they release. Ambroxol, a mucolytic agent with antioxidant characteristics, is used clinically, and this compound has recently been demonstrated to possess anti-biofilm properties. In this study, we found that ambroxol inhibits the H2 O2 -mediated conversion of P. aeruginosa from a non-mucoid to a mucoid phenotype, an effect that is due to its antioxidant property against H2 O2 . Furthermore, the bactericidal activity of ciprofloxacin against mucoid P. aeruginosa biofilms was increased in vitro when used in combination with ambroxol. PMID:27102839

  1. Simplified dc to dc converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruber, R. P. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A dc to dc converter which can start with a shorted output and which regulates output voltage and current is described. Voltage controlled switches directed current through the primary of a transformer the secondary of which includes virtual reactance. The switching frequency of the switches is appropriately varied to increase the voltage drop across the virtual reactance in the secondary winding to which there is connected a low impedance load. A starting circuit suitable for voltage switching devices is provided.

  2. Monoclonal antibodies to Pseudomonas aeruginosa ferripyochelin-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Sokol, P A; Woods, D E

    1986-01-01

    Hybridomas secreting specific monoclonal antibodies against the Pseudomonas aeruginosa ferripyochelin-binding protein (FBP) were isolated. These monoclonal antibodies reacted with FBP in immunoblots of outer membrane preparations from all serotypes of P. aeruginosa. Two of the monoclonal antibodies also reacted with FBP in strains of P. putida, P. fluorescens, and P. stutzeri. These antibodies did not react with outer membranes of P. cepacia, "P. multivorans," P. maltophilia, or other gram-negative organisms. The monoclonal antibodies were opsonophagocytic and blocked the binding of [59Fe]ferripyochelin to isolated outer membranes of strain PAO. By indirect immunofluorescence techniques, the monoclonal antibodies were used to demonstrate that FBP is present on the cell surface of P. aeruginosa cells grown in low-iron but not high-iron medium. These observations were confirmed by using 125I in surface-labeling techniques. Images PMID:3091506

  3. Subtilase SprP exerts pleiotropic effects in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Pelzer, Alexander; Polen, Tino; Funken, Horst; Rosenau, Frank; Wilhelm, Susanne; Bott, Michael; Jaeger, Karl-Erich

    2014-02-01

    The open reading frame PA1242 in the genome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 encodes a putative protease belonging to the peptidase S8 family of subtilases. The respective enzyme termed SprP consists of an N-terminal signal peptide and a so-called S8 domain linked by a domain of unknown function (DUF). Presumably, this DUF domain defines a discrete class of Pseudomonas proteins as homologous domains can be identified almost exclusively in proteins of the genus Pseudomonas. The sprP gene was expressed in Escherichia coli and proteolytic activity was demonstrated. A P. aeruginosa ∆sprP mutant was constructed and its gene expression pattern compared to the wild-type strain by genome microarray analysis revealing altered expression levels of 218 genes. Apparently, SprP is involved in regulation of a variety of different cellular processes in P. aeruginosa including pyoverdine synthesis, denitrification, the formation of cell aggregates, and of biofilms. PMID:24376018

  4. Agricultural plants and soil as a reservoir for Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Green, S K; Schroth, M N; Cho, J J; Kominos, S K; Vitanza-jack, V B

    1974-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa was detected in 24% of the soil samples but in only 0.13% of the vegetable samples from various agricultural areas of California. The distribution of pyocin types of soil and vegetable isolates was similar to that of clinical strains, and three of the soil isolates were resistant to carbenicillin. Pseudomonas aeruginosa multiplied in lettuce and bean under conditions of high temperature and high relative humidity (27 C and 80-95% relative humidity) but declined when the temperature and humidity were lowered (16 C, 55-75% relative humidity). The results suggest that soil is a reservior for P. aeruginosa and that the bacterium has the capacity to colonize plants during favorable conditions of temperature and moisture. PMID:4217591

  5. Agricultural Plants and Soil as a Reservoir for Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Green, Sylvia K.; Schroth, Milton N.; Cho, John J.; Kominos, Spyros D.; Vitanza-Jack, Vilma B.

    1974-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa was detected in 24% of the soil samples but in only 0.13% of the vegetable samples from various agricultural areas of California. The distribution of pyocin types of soil and vegetable isolates was similar to that of clinical strains, and three of the soil isolates were resistant to carbenicillin. Pseudomonas aeruginosa multiplied in lettuce and bean under conditions of high temperature and high relative humidity (27 C and 80-95% relative humidity) but declined when the temperature and humidity were lowered (16 C, 55-75% relative humidity). The results suggest that soil is a reservior for P. aeruginosa and that the bacterium has the capacity to colonize plants during favorable conditions of temperature and moisture. PMID:4217591

  6. Sphingoid long chain bases prevent lung infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Pewzner-Jung, Yael; Tavakoli Tabazavareh, Shaghayegh; Grassmé, Heike; Becker, Katrin Anne; Japtok, Lukasz; Steinmann, Jörg; Joseph, Tammar; Lang, Stephan; Tuemmler, Burkhard; Schuchman, Edward H; Lentsch, Alex B; Kleuser, Burkhard; Edwards, Michael J; Futerman, Anthony H; Gulbins, Erich

    2014-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis patients and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, trauma, burn wound, or patients requiring ventilation are susceptible to severe pulmonary infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Physiological innate defense mechanisms against this pathogen, and their alterations in lung diseases, are for the most part unknown. We now demonstrate a role for the sphingoid long chain base, sphingosine, in determining susceptibility to lung infection by P. aeruginosa. Tracheal and bronchial sphingosine levels were significantly reduced in tissues from cystic fibrosis patients and from cystic fibrosis mouse models due to reduced activity of acid ceramidase, which generates sphingosine from ceramide. Inhalation of mice with sphingosine, with a sphingosine analog, FTY720, or with acid ceramidase rescued susceptible mice from infection. Our data suggest that luminal sphingosine in tracheal and bronchial epithelial cells prevents pulmonary P. aeruginosa infection in normal individuals, paving the way for novel therapeutic paradigms based on inhalation of acid ceramidase or of sphingoid long chain bases in lung infection. PMID:25085879

  7. Surface action of gentamicin on Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Kadurugamuwa, J L; Clarke, A J; Beveridge, T J

    1993-01-01

    The mode of action of gentamicin has traditionally been considered to be at the 30S ribosomal level. However, the inhibition of bacterial protein synthesis alone appears to be insufficient to entirely explain the bactericidal effects. Bacteriolysis is also mediated through perturbation of the cell surface by gentamicin (J.L. Kadurugamuwa, J.S. Lam, and T.J. Beveridge, Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 37:715-721, 1993). In order to separate the surface effect from protein synthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1, we chemically conjugated bovine serum albumin (BSA) to gentamicin, making the antibiotic too large to penetrate through the cell envelope to interact with the ribosomes of the cytoplasm. Furthermore, this BSA-gentamicin conjugate was also used to coat colloidal gold particles as a probe for electron microscopy to study the surface effect during antibiotic exposure. High-performance liquid chromatography confirmed the conjugation of the protein to the antibiotic. The conjugated gentamicin and BSA retained bactericidal activity and inhibited protein synthesis on isolated ribosomes in vitro but not on intact cells in vivo because of its exclusion from the cytoplasm. When reacted against the bacteria, numerous gentamicin-BSA-gold particles were clearly seen on the cell surfaces of whole mounts and thin sections of cells, while the cytoplasm was devoid of such particles. Disruption of the cell envelope was also observed since gentamicin-BSA and gentamicin-BSA-gold destabilized the outer membrane, evolved outer membrane blebs and vesicles, and formed holes in the cell surface. The morphological evidence suggests that the initial binding of the antibiotic disrupts the packing order of lipopolysaccharide of the outer membrane, which ultimately forms holes in the cell envelope and can lead to cell lysis. It is apparent that gentamicin has two potentially lethal effects on gram-negative cells, that resulting from inhibition of protein synthesis and that resulting from

  8. Recent advancements in photonic converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayduk, Michael J.; Bussjager, Rebecca J.; Getbehead, Mark A.; Louthain, James A.

    2000-09-01

    Analog-to-digital converters (ADCs) are an essential component of digital receiver systems. Progress at advancing the electronic ADC modules has been very slow due in large part to the difficulties in fabricating the electronic circuitry required for very high resolution and high sampling rate converters. This slow progress has resulted in a bottleneck between the received analog signal and the digital signal processing system. Single or multiple analog signal down conversion stages are required in digital receivers to down convert the received analog signal to an intermediate frequency (IF) that can be processed by the electronic ADC. There has been much recent interest in the use of photonics for direct digitization of the analog signal at the received RF frequency thus eliminating the need for analog down conversion. This paper reviews some of the recent research advancements in photonic ADCs. We will especially focus on the development of a novel photonic ADC module that uses semiconductor saturable absorbers to perform the data quantization. We will also present recent results in the development of a mode-locked fiber laser used as the sampling source in this photonic ADC architecture.

  9. High efficiency thermionic converter studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffman, F. N.; Sommer, A. H.; Balestra, C. L.; Briere, D. P.; Oettinger, P. E.

    1976-01-01

    The objective is to improve thermionic converter performance by means of reduced interelectrode losses, greater emitter capabilities, and lower collector work functions until the converter performance level is suitable for out-of-core space reactors and radioisotope generators. Electrode screening experiments have identified several promising collector materials. Back emission work function measurements of a ZnO collector in a thermionic diode have given values less than 1.3 eV. Diode tests were conducted over the range of temperatures of interest for space power applications. Enhanced mode converter experiments have included triodes operated in both the surface ionization and plasmatron modes. Pulsed triodes were studied as a function of pulse length, pulse potential, inert gas fill pressure, cesium pressure, spacing, emitter temperature and collector temperature. Current amplifications (i.e., mean output current/mean grid current) of several hundred were observed up to output current densities of one amp/sq cm. These data correspond to an equivalent arc drop less than 0.1 eV.

  10. Polyclonal and monoclonal antibody therapy for experimental Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia.

    PubMed Central

    Pennington, J E; Small, G J; Lostrom, M E; Pier, G B

    1986-01-01

    A human immunoglobulin G preparation, enriched in antibodies to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) Pseudomonas aeruginosa antigens (PA-IGIV) and murine monoclonal antibodies (MAb) to P. aeruginosa Fisher immunotype-1 (IT-1) LPS antigen and outer membrane protein F (porin), were evaluated for therapeutic efficacy in a guinea pig model of P. aeruginosa pneumonia. The concentration of antibodies to IT-1 LPS was 7.6 micrograms/ml in PA-IGIV and 478 micrograms/ml in the IT-1 MAb preparation. No antibody to IT-1 was detected in MAb to porin. For study, animals were infected by intratracheal instillation of IT-1 P. aeruginosa and then treated 2 h later with intravenous infusions of PA-IGIV, IT-1 MAb, or porin MAb. Control groups received intravenous albumin, and routinely died from pneumonia. Both PA-IGIV (500 mg/kg) and IT-1 MAb (greater than or equal to 2.5 mg/kg) treatment resulted in increased survival (P less than 0.01 to 0.001), and also improved intrapulmonary killing of bacteria. Porin MAb failed to protect from fatal pneumonia. IT-1 MAb treatment produced more survivals than did PA-IGIV treatment but only at dosages of MAb resulting in serum antibody concentrations greater than those achieved with PA-IGIV. PA-IGIV and IT-1 MAb demonstrated in vitro and in vivo (posttreatment guinea pig serum) opsonophagocytic activity for the IT-1 challenge strain. However, the polyclonal preparation required complement, whereas the MAb did not. We conclude that passive immunization with polyclonal hyperimmune P. aeruginosa globulin or with MAb to LPS antigens may be useful in the treatment of acute P. aeruginosa pneumonia. The relative efficacies of such preparations may be limited, however, by their type-specific LPS antibody concentrations. PMID:3093385

  11. Characterisation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa related to bovine mastitis.

    PubMed

    Park, Hye Rim; Hong, Min Ki; Hwang, Sun Young; Park, Young Kyung; Kwon, Ka Hee; Yoon, Jang Won; Shin, Sook; Kim, Jae Hong; Park, Yong Ho

    2014-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the causative pathogens of bovine mastitis. Most P. aeruginosa strains possess the type III secretion system (TTSS), which may increase somatic cell counts (SCCs) in milk from mastitis-affected cows. Moreover, most of P. aeruginosa cells can form biofilms, thereby reducing antibiotic efficacy. In this study, the presence and effect of TTSS-related genotypes on increase of SCCs among 122 P. aeruginosa isolates obtained from raw milk samples from mastitis-affected cows and their antibiotic susceptibility at planktonic and biofilm status were investigated. Based on the presence of TTSS-related genes a total of 82.7% of the isolates were found to harbour exoU and/or exoS genes, including the invasive (exoU-/exoS+, 69.4%), cytotoxic (exoU+/exoS-, 8.3%) and cytotoxic/invasive strains (exoU+/ exoS+, 5.0%). Milk containing exoS-positive isolates had higher SCCs than those containing exoS-negative isolates. The majority of isolates showed gentamicin, amikacin, meropenem and ciprofloxacin susceptibility at planktonic status. However, the susceptibility was decreased at the biofilm status. Based on minimum biofilm eradication concentration (MBEC)/minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) ratios, the range of change in antibiotic susceptibility varied widely depending on the antibiotics (from ≥ 3.1-fold to ≥ 475.0-fold). In conclusion, most P. aeruginosa isolates studied here had a genotype related to increase in SCCs. The efficiency of antibiotic therapy against P. aeruginosa-related bovine mastitis could be improved by analysing both the MBEC and the MIC of isolates. PMID:24334080

  12. [Susceptibility and resistence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to antimicrobial agents].

    PubMed

    Gamero Delgado, M C; García-Mayorgas, A D; Rodríguez, F; Ibarra, A; Casal, M

    2007-06-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic microorganism that is frequently the cause of nosocomial infections. Multiple mechanisms are involved in its natural and acquired resistance to many of the antimicrobial agents commonly used in clinical practice. The objective of this study was to assess the susceptibility and resistance patterns of P. aeruginosa strains isolated in Hospital Reina Sofia between 2000 and 2005, as well as to analyze the differences between intrahospital and extrahospital isolates in 2005 and to compare the results with those obtained in other studies. A total of 3,019 strains of P. aeruginosa from different hospitals and nonhospital settings were evaluated, taking into consideration their degree of sensitivity to different antibiotics. The MICs were determined by means of the Wider I automated system (Soria Melguizo), taking into consideration the criteria of susceptibility and resistance recommended by MENSURA. Results of the analysis showed that P. aeruginosa maintained similar levels of antimicrobial susceptibility during the period 2000-2005, with increased susceptibility to amikacin, gentamicin and tobramycin. There were also important differences in the degree of susceptibility between intrahospital and extrahospital strains, except for imipenem and fosfomycin. The intrahospital difference in susceptibility was also evaluated, emphasizing the importance of periodically studying susceptibility and resistance patterns of P. aeruginosa in each setting in order to evaluate different therapeutic guidelines, as it is not always advisable to extrapolate data from different regions. These differences can be explained by the different use of antibiotics in each center and the geographic variations of the resistance mechanisms of P. aeruginosa. PMID:17893761

  13. Structural genes for salicylate biosynthesis from chorismate in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Serino, L; Reimmann, C; Baur, H; Beyeler, M; Visca, P; Haas, D

    1995-11-15

    Salicylate is a precursor of pyochelin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and both compounds display siderophore activity. To elucidate the salicylate biosynthetic pathway, we have cloned and sequenced a chromosomal region of P. aeruginosa PAO1 containing two adjacent genes, designated pchB and pchA, which are necessary for salicylate formation. The pchA gene encodes a protein of 52 kDa with extensive similarity to the chorismate-utilizing enzymes isochorismate synthase, anthranilate synthase (component I) and p-aminobenzoate synthase (component I), whereas the 11 kDa protein encoded by pchB does not show significant similarity with other proteins. The pchB stop codon overlaps the presumed pchA start codon. Expression of the pchA gene in P. aeruginosa appears to depend on the transcription and translation of the upstream pchB gene. The pchBA genes are the first salicylate biosynthetic genes to be reported. Salicylate formation was demonstrated in an Escherichia coli entC mutant lacking isochorismate synthase when this strain expressed both the pchBA genes, but not when it expressed pchB alone. By contrast, an entB mutant of E. coli blocked in the conversion of isochorismate to 2,3-dihydro-2,3-dihydroxybenzoate formed salicylate when transformed with a pchB expression construct. Salicylate formation could also be demonstrated in vitro when chorismate was incubated with a crude extract of P. aeruginosa containing overproduced PchA and PchB proteins; salicylate and pyruvate were formed in equimolar amounts. Furthermore, salicylate-forming activity could be detected in extracts from a P. aeruginosa pyoverdin-negative mutant when grown under iron limitation, but not with iron excess. Our results are consistent with a pathway leading from chorismate to isochorismate and then to salicylate plus pyruvate, catalyzed consecutively by the iron-repressible PchA and PchB proteins in P. aeruginosa. PMID:7500944

  14. Crystal Structure of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Virulence Factor Regulator

    SciTech Connect

    Cordes, Timothy J.; Worzalla, Gregory A.; Ginster, Aaron M.; Forest, Katrina T.

    2012-09-07

    Virulence factor regulator (Vfr) enhances Pseudomonas aeruginosa pathogenicity through its role as a global transcriptional regulator. The crystal structure of Vfr shows that it is a winged-helix DNA-binding protein like its homologue cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP). In addition to an expected primary cyclic AMP-binding site, a second ligand-binding site is nestled between the N-terminal domain and the C-terminal helix-turn-helix domain. Unlike CRP, Vfr is a symmetric dimer in the absence of DNA. Removal of seven disordered N-terminal residues of Vfr prvents the growth of P. aeruginosa.

  15. [Structural components and peculiarities of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm organization].

    PubMed

    Balko, O B; Avdieieva, L V

    2010-01-01

    Peculiarities of the structural organization of bacterial biofilm during its formation and disintegration have been investigated on the model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa UCM B-900 (ATCC 9027). It was shown, that development of the biofilm in a stationary system on glass was a two-vector process with changes in time and space. P. aeruginosa UCM B-900 biofilm is formed from single cells, passes through the stages of base components, net structure, islands and comes to the end with integration into a complete monolayer. The biofilm degradation repeats the stages of its formation in the reverse sequence. PMID:20812507

  16. Bioleaching of copper oxide ore by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabani, M. A.; Irannajad, M.; Azadmehr, A. R.; Meshkini, M.

    2013-12-01

    Bioleaching is an environmentally friendly method for extraction of metal from ores. In this study, bioleaching of copper oxide ore by Pseudomonas aeruginosa was investigated. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a heterotrophic bacterium that can produce various organic acids in an appropriate culture medium, and these acids can operate as leaching agents. The parameters, such as particle size, glucose percentage in the culture medium, bioleaching time, and solid/liquid ratio were optimized. Optimum bioleaching conditions were found as follows: particle size of 150-177 μm, glucose percentage of 6%, bioleaching time of 8 d, and solid/liquid ratio of 1:80. Under these conditions, 53% of copper was extracted.

  17. Cell-to-cell signaling and Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections.

    PubMed Central

    Van Delden, C.; Iglewski, B. H.

    1998-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a bacterium responsible for severe nosocomial infections, life-threatening infections in immunocompromised persons, and chronic infections in cystic fibrosis patients. The bacterium's virulence depends on a large number of cell-associated and extracellular factors. Cell-to-cell signaling systems control the expression and allow a coordinated, cell-density-dependent production of many extracellular virulence factors. We discuss the possible role of cell-to-cell signaling in the pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa infections and present a rationale for targeting cell-to-cell signaling systems in the development of new therapeutic approaches. PMID:9866731

  18. Large wind energy converter: Growian 3 MW

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koerber, F.; Thiele, H. A.

    1979-01-01

    The main features of the Growian wind energy converter are presented. Energy yield, environmental impact, and construction of the energy converter are discussed. Reliability of the windpowered system is assessed.

  19. Auxiliary resonant DC tank converter

    DOEpatents

    Peng, Fang Z.

    2000-01-01

    An auxiliary resonant dc tank (ARDCT) converter is provided for achieving soft-switching in a power converter. An ARDCT circuit is coupled directly across a dc bus to the inverter to generate a resonant dc bus voltage, including upper and lower resonant capacitors connected in series as a resonant leg, first and second dc tank capacitors connected in series as a tank leg, and an auxiliary resonant circuit comprising a series combination of a resonant inductor and a pair of auxiliary switching devices. The ARDCT circuit further includes first clamping means for holding the resonant dc bus voltage to the dc tank voltage of the tank leg, and second clamping means for clamping the resonant dc bus voltage to zero during a resonant period. The ARDCT circuit resonantly brings the dc bus voltage to zero in order to provide a zero-voltage switching opportunity for the inverter, then quickly rebounds the dc bus voltage back to the dc tank voltage after the inverter changes state. The auxiliary switching devices are turned on and off under zero-current conditions. The ARDCT circuit only absorbs ripples of the inverter dc bus current, thus having less current stress. In addition, since the ARDCT circuit is coupled in parallel with the dc power supply and the inverter for merely assisting soft-switching of the inverter without participating in real dc power transmission and power conversion, malfunction and failure of the tank circuit will not affect the functional operation of the inverter; thus a highly reliable converter system is expected.

  20. Gene expression in Pseudomonas aeruginosa swarming motility

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is capable of three types of motilities: swimming, twitching and swarming. The latter is characterized by a fast and coordinated group movement over a semi-solid surface resulting from intercellular interactions and morphological differentiation. A striking feature of swarming motility is the complex fractal-like patterns displayed by migrating bacteria while they move away from their inoculation point. This type of group behaviour is still poorly understood and its characterization provides important information on bacterial structured communities such as biofilms. Using GeneChip® Affymetrix microarrays, we obtained the transcriptomic profiles of both bacterial populations located at the tip of migrating tendrils and swarm center of swarming colonies and compared these profiles to that of a bacterial control population grown on the same media but solidified to not allow swarming motility. Results Microarray raw data were corrected for background noise with the RMA algorithm and quantile normalized. Differentially expressed genes between the three conditions were selected using a threshold of 1.5 log2-fold, which gave a total of 378 selected genes (6.3% of the predicted open reading frames of strain PA14). Major shifts in gene expression patterns are observed in each growth conditions, highlighting the presence of distinct bacterial subpopulations within a swarming colony (tendril tips vs. swarm center). Unexpectedly, microarrays expression data reveal that a minority of genes are up-regulated in tendril tip populations. Among them, we found energy metabolism, ribosomal protein and transport of small molecules related genes. On the other hand, many well-known virulence factors genes were globally repressed in tendril tip cells. Swarm center cells are distinct and appear to be under oxidative and copper stress responses. Conclusions Results reported in this study show that, as opposed to swarm center cells, tendril

  1. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Promotes Escherichia coli Biofilm Formation in Nutrient-Limited Medium

    PubMed Central

    Culotti, Alessandro; Packman, Aaron I.

    2014-01-01

    Biofilms have been implicated as an important reservoir for pathogens and commensal enteric bacteria such as Escherichia coli in natural and engineered water systems. However, the processes that regulate the survival of E. coli in aquatic biofilms have not been thoroughly studied. We examined the effects of hydrodynamic shear and nutrient concentrations on E. coli colonization of pre-established Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms, co-inoculation of E. coli and P. aeruginosa biofilms, and P. aeruginosa colonization of pre-established E. coli biofilms. In nutritionally-limited R2A medium, E. coli dominated biofilms when co-inoculated with P. aeruginosa, and successfully colonized and overgrew pre-established P. aeruginosa biofilms. In more enriched media, P. aeruginosa formed larger clusters, but E. coli still extensively overgrew and colonized the interior of P. aeruginosa clusters. In mono-culture, E. coli formed sparse and discontinuous biofilms. After P. aeruginosa was introduced to these biofilms, E. coli growth increased substantially, resulting in patterns of biofilm colonization similar to those observed under other sequences of organism introduction, i.e., E. coli overgrew P. aeruginosa and colonized the interior of P. aeruginosa clusters. These results demonstrate that E. coli not only persists in aquatic biofilms under depleted nutritional conditions, but interactions with P. aeruginosa can greatly increase E. coli growth in biofilms under these experimental conditions. PMID:25198725

  2. Pseudomonas aeruginosa facilitates Campylobacter jejuni growth in biofilms under oxic flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Culotti, Alessandro; Packman, Aaron I

    2015-12-01

    We investigated the growth of Campylobacter jejuni in biofilms with Pseudomonas aeruginosa under oxic flow conditions. We observed the growth of C. jejuni in mono-culture, deposited on pre-established P. aeruginosa biofilms, and co-inoculated with P. aeruginosa. In mono-culture, C. jejuni was unable to form biofilms. However, deposited C. jejuni continuously grew on pre-established P. aeruginosa biofilms for a period of 3 days. The growth of scattered C. jejuni clusters was strictly limited to the P. aeruginosa biofilm surface, and no intergrowth was observed. Co-culturing of C. jejuni and P. aeruginosa also enabled the growth of both organisms in biofilms, with C. jejuni clusters developing on the surface of the P. aeruginosa biofilm. Dissolved oxygen (DO) measurements in the medium showed that P. aeruginosa biofilms depleted the effluent DO from 9.0 to 0.5 mg L(-1) 24 hours after inoculation. The localized microaerophilic environment generated by P. aeruginosa promoted the persistence and growth of C. jejuni. Our findings show that P. aeruginosa not only prolongs the survival of C. jejuni under oxic conditions, but also enables the growth of C. jejuni on the surface of P. aeruginosa biofilms. PMID:26610432

  3. Pseudomonas aeruginosa promotes Escherichia coli biofilm formation in nutrient-limited medium.

    PubMed

    Culotti, Alessandro; Packman, Aaron I

    2014-01-01

    Biofilms have been implicated as an important reservoir for pathogens and commensal enteric bacteria such as Escherichia coli in natural and engineered water systems. However, the processes that regulate the survival of E. coli in aquatic biofilms have not been thoroughly studied. We examined the effects of hydrodynamic shear and nutrient concentrations on E. coli colonization of pre-established Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms, co-inoculation of E. coli and P. aeruginosa biofilms, and P. aeruginosa colonization of pre-established E. coli biofilms. In nutritionally-limited R2A medium, E. coli dominated biofilms when co-inoculated with P. aeruginosa, and successfully colonized and overgrew pre-established P. aeruginosa biofilms. In more enriched media, P. aeruginosa formed larger clusters, but E. coli still extensively overgrew and colonized the interior of P. aeruginosa clusters. In mono-culture, E. coli formed sparse and discontinuous biofilms. After P. aeruginosa was introduced to these biofilms, E. coli growth increased substantially, resulting in patterns of biofilm colonization similar to those observed under other sequences of organism introduction, i.e., E. coli overgrew P. aeruginosa and colonized the interior of P. aeruginosa clusters. These results demonstrate that E. coli not only persists in aquatic biofilms under depleted nutritional conditions, but interactions with P. aeruginosa can greatly increase E. coli growth in biofilms under these experimental conditions. PMID:25198725

  4. Oral bacteria modulate invasion and induction of apoptosis in HEp-2 cells by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yaping; Teng, Di; Burke, Andrew C; Haase, Elaine M; Scannapieco, Frank A

    2009-02-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important opportunistic bacterial pathogen, causing infections of the respiratory and other organ systems in susceptible hosts. P. aeruginosa infection is initiated by adhesion to and invasion of mucosal epithelial cells. The failure of host defenses to eliminate P. aeruginosa from mucosal surfaces results in P. aeruginosa proliferation, sometimes followed by overt infection and tissue destruction. There is growing evidence that associates poor oral health and respiratory infection. An in vitro model system for bacterial invasion of respiratory epithelial cells was used to investigate the influence of oral bacteria on P. aeruginosa epithelial cell invasion. Oral pathogens including Porphyromonas gingivalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum and Aggregatibacter (Actinobacillus) actinomycetemcomitans increased invasion of P. aeruginosa into HEp-2 cells from one- to threefold. In contrast, non-pathogenic oral bacteria such as Actinomyces naeslundii and Streptococcus gordonii showed no significant influence on P. aeruginosa invasion. P. aeruginosa together with oral bacteria stimulated greater cytokine production from HEp-2 cells than did P. aeruginosa alone. P. aeruginosa in combination with periodontal pathogens also increased apoptosis of HEp-2 cells and induced elevated caspase-3 activity. These results suggest that oral bacteria, especially periodontal pathogens, may foster P. aeruginosa invasion into respiratory epithelial cells to enhance host cell cytokine release and apoptosis. PMID:19041936

  5. Comparative studies on growth and physiological responses of unicellular and colonial Microcystis aeruginosa to Acorus calamus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, S-H; Chang, J-J; Cao, J-Y; Yang, C-L

    2015-02-01

    In order to explore the growth inhibition and physiological responses of unicellular and colonial Microcystis aeruginosa during coexistence with Acorus calamus, algal densities, chlorophyll a contents, exopolysaccharide (EPS) concentrations, malondialdehyde (MDA) contents, catalase (CAT) activities, and peroxidase (POD) activities of the two algae strains were analyzed. Although the unicellular and colonial strains of M. aeruginosa were both inhibited by A. calamus, unicellular algae were more sensitive than the colonial algae. The measurement results for EPS, MDA, CAT, and POD showed that unicellular M. aeruginosa had higher levels of stress related damage than colonial strains when they were exposed to the same density of A. calamus, and the cellular defense system of colonial M. aeruginosa was stronger than that of unicellular M. aeruginosa. Natural blooms of Microcystis are typically composed of colonial forms of M. aeruginosa, therefore future efforts to control such blooms, possibly through the development of new algicides, should focus on the unique characteristics of colonial M. aeruginosa strains. PMID:25416545

  6. 12 CFR 1.6 - Convertible securities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Convertible securities. 1.6 Section 1.6 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY INVESTMENT SECURITIES § 1.6 Convertible securities. A national bank may not purchase securities convertible into stock at the option...

  7. 12 CFR 1.6 - Convertible securities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Convertible securities. 1.6 Section 1.6 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY INVESTMENT SECURITIES § 1.6 Convertible securities. A national bank may not purchase securities convertible into stock at the option of the...

  8. 12 CFR 1.6 - Convertible securities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Convertible securities. 1.6 Section 1.6 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY INVESTMENT SECURITIES § 1.6 Convertible securities. A national bank may not purchase securities convertible into stock at the option...

  9. 12 CFR 1.6 - Convertible securities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Convertible securities. 1.6 Section 1.6 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY INVESTMENT SECURITIES § 1.6 Convertible securities. A national bank may not purchase securities convertible into stock at the option...

  10. Deactivation effects of the lowest excited state of Ho3+ at 2.9 μm emission introduced by Pr3+ ions in LiLuF4 crystal.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peixiong; Hang, Yin; Zhang, LianHan

    2012-12-15

    The use of Pr3+ codoping for enhancement of the Ho3+:5I6 →5I7 mid-IR emissions were investigated in the LiLuF4 crystal for the first time. It was found that Pr3+ greatly increased Ho3+ 2.9 μm emission by depopulating the Ho3+:5I7 level while having little influence on the Ho3+:5I6 level, leading to greater population inversion. The energy transfer efficiency from Ho3+:5I7 to Pr3+:3F2 is calculated to be 88%. Based on Judd-Ofelt theory, the 2.9 μm emission cross section is calculated to be 1.91×10(-20)   cm2, and the gain property of the Ho3+:5I6 →5I7 transition is discussed. We propose that the Ho, Pr:LiLuF4 crystal may be a promising material for 2.9 μm laser applications. PMID:23258065

  11. Frequency upconversion luminescence in Yb3+-sensitized Er3+- and Pr3+-codoped PbGeO3:PbF2:xF2 (x = Mg, Ba) glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Alexandre O.; Gouveia-Neto, Artur; Bueno, Luciano A.

    2016-01-01

    The optical properties and energy-transfer upconversion luminescence of Er3+- and Pr3+/Yb3+-codoped PbGeO3-PbF2-xF2 (x=Mg, Ba) glass and glass-ceramic under infrared excitation at 975 nm is investigated. In Er3+/Yb3+-codoped samples, green (525 and 550 nm) and red (662 nm) luminescence corresponding to the H2→I4, S4→I4 e F4→I4, respectively, was readily observed. In the Pr3+/Yb3+-codoped system, emission peaks around 485, 530, 610, and 645, which were ascribed to the P03-HJ3 (J=4,5,6) and P03-FJ3 (J=2,3,4) transitions, respectively, were observed. The population of the praseodymium P03 emitting level was accomplished through a combination of ground-state absorption of Yb ions at F2, energy-transfer Yb3+(F2)-Pr3+(H43), and excited-state absorption of Pr ions provoking the G41-P03 transition. The dependence of the upconversion emission on glass composition, pump power, and doping contents was also examined. Glassy and glass-ceramic samples were compared in order to determine the system with better luminescence efficiency.

  12. Influence of zinc on Pseudomonas aeruginosa susceptibilities to imipenem.

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, G L; Louie, A; Baltch, A L; Chu, R C; Smith, R P; Ritz, W J; Michelsen, P

    1993-01-01

    Serial dilution susceptibility testing of imipenem against 59 clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, conducted simultaneously on single lots of Difco and BBL Mueller-Hinton agar (MHA), resulted in MICs for 90% of strains tested of 8 and 16 micrograms/ml, respectively. MICs for Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Pseudomonas spp. were also higher on BBL MHA. Quantification of the cation content of the two MHAs by atomic absorption spectroscopy demonstrated that the zinc concentration in BBL MHA was 15 times greater than that measured in Difco MHA (2.61 and 0.17 micrograms/ml, respectively). Concentrations of calcium, magnesium, iron, manganese, and copper in the two agars were similar. Addition of zinc to Difco MHA resulted in increases in MICs of imipenem for P. aeruginosa but not in the MICs of ceftazidime or cefpirome for P. aeruginosa (P < 0.01). A lesser zinc effect was seen on the activity of imipenem against E. coli, K. pneumoniae, and Pseudomonas spp. The activities of ceftazidime and cefpirome were similar on both MHAs when tested against all gram-negative organisms in this study. Thus, the effect of zinc in MHA was clearly demonstrated by a significant increase in the MICs of imipenem for P. aeruginosa, and, to a lesser extent, for other gram-negative bacilli. PMID:8408557

  13. MexXY multidrug efflux system of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Morita, Yuji; Tomida, Junko; Kawamura, Yoshiaki

    2012-01-01

    Anti-pseudomonas aminoglycosides, such as amikacin and tobramycin, are used in the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections. However, their use is linked to the development of resistance. During the last decade, the MexXY multidrug efflux system has been comprehensively studied, and numerous reports of laboratory and clinical isolates have been published. This system has been increasingly recognized as one of the primary determinants of aminoglycoside resistance in P. aeruginosa. In P. aeruginosa cystic fibrosis isolates, upregulation of the pump is considered the most common mechanism of aminoglycoside resistance. Non-fermentative Gram-negative pathogens possessing very close MexXY orthologs such as Achromobacter xylosoxidans and various Burkholderia species (e.g., Burkholderia pseudomallei and B. cepacia complexes), but not B. gladioli, are intrinsically resistant to aminoglycosides. Here, we summarize the properties (e.g., discovery, mechanism, gene expression, clinical significance) of the P. aeruginosa MexXY pump and other aminoglycoside efflux pumps such as AcrD of Escherichia coli, AmrAB-OprA of B. pseudomallei, and AdeABC of Acinetobacter baumannii. MexXY inducibility of the PA5471 gene product, which is dependent on ribosome inhibition or oxidative stress, is noteworthy. Moreover, the discovery of the cognate outer membrane component (OprA) of MexXY in the multidrug-resistant clinical isolate PA7, serotype O12 deserves special attention. PMID:23233851

  14. EFFECTS OF CYANOPHAGE SAM-1 UPON 'MICROCYSTIS AERUGINOSA'

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cyanophage SAM-1, which infects Synechoccus cedrorum, Anacystis nidulans and certain strains of Microcystis aeruginosa has been isolated from sewage. The host range of cyanophage SAM-1 differs from those of other reported cyanophages. Phage SAM-1 stocks are rapidly inactivated at...

  15. AMINOGLYCOSIDE RESISTANCE GENES IN Pseudomonas aeruginosa ISOLATES FROM CUMANA, VENEZUELA.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Bertinellys; Rodulfo, Hectorina; Carreño, Numirin; Guzmán, Militza; Salazar, Elsa; De Donato, Marcos

    2016-01-01

    The enzymatic modification of aminoglycosides by aminoglycoside-acetyltransferases (AAC), aminoglycoside-adenyltransferases (AAD), and aminoglycoside-phosphotransferases (APH), is the most common resistance mechanism in P. aeruginosa and these enzymes can be coded on mobile genetic elements that contribute to their dispersion. One hundred and thirty seven P. aeruginosa isolates from the University Hospital, Cumana, Venezuela (HUAPA) were evaluated. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by the disk diffusion method and theaac, aadB and aph genes were detected by PCR. Most of the P. aeruginosa isolates (33/137) were identified from the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), mainly from discharges (96/137). The frequency of resistant P. aeruginosaisolates was found to be higher for the aminoglycosides tobramycin and amikacin (30.7 and 29.9%, respectively). Phenotype VI, resistant to these antibiotics, was the most frequent (14/49), followed by phenotype I, resistant to all the aminoglycosides tested (12/49). The aac(6´)-Ib,aphA1 and aadB genes were the most frequently detected, and the simultaneous presence of several resistance genes in the same isolate was demonstrated. Aminoglycoside resistance in isolates ofP. aeruginosa at the HUAPA is partly due to the presence of the aac(6´)-Ib, aphA1 andaadB genes, but the high rates of antimicrobial resistance suggest the existence of several mechanisms acting together. This is the first report of aminoglycoside resistance genes in Venezuela and one of the few in Latin America. PMID:27007556

  16. Reduction of PCN biosynthesis by NO in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lei; Zhang, Yuying; Wang, Yan; Qiao, Xinhua; Zi, Jing; Chen, Chang; Wan, Yi

    2016-08-01

    Pyocyanin (PCN), a virulence factor synthesized by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, plays an important role during clinical infections. There is no study of the effect of nitric oxide (NO) on PCN biosynthesis. Here, the effect of NO on PCN levels in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PAO1, a common reference strain, was tested. The results showed that the NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) can significantly reduce PCN levels (82.5% reduction at 60μM SNP). Furthermore, the effect of endogenous NO on PCN was tested by constructing PAO1 nor (NO reductase gene) knockout mutants. Compared to the wild-type strain, the Δnor strain had a lower PCN (86% reduction in Δnor). To examine whether the results were universal with other P. aeruginosa strains, we collected 4 clinical strains from a hospital, tested their PCN levels after SNP treatment, and obtained similar results, i.e., PCN biosynthesis was inhibited by NO. These results suggest that NO treatment may be a new strategy to inhibit PCN biosynthesis and could provide novel insights into eliminating P. aeruginosa virulence as a clinical goal. PMID:26874276

  17. Autophagy protects C. elegans against necrosis during Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Cheng-Gang; Ma, Yi-Cheng; Dai, Li-Li; Zhang, Ke-Qin

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy, a conserved pathway that delivers intracellular materials into lysosomes for degradation, is involved in development, aging, and a variety of diseases. Accumulating evidence demonstrates that autophagy plays a protective role against infectious diseases by diminishing intracellular pathogens, including bacteria, viruses, and parasites. However, the mechanism by which autophagy regulates innate immunity remains largely unknown. Here, we show that autophagy is involved in host defense against a pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the metazoan Caenorhabditis elegans. P. aeruginosa infection induces autophagy via a conserved extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Intriguingly, impairment of autophagy does not influence the intestinal accumulation of P. aeruginosa, but instead induces intestinal necrosis. Inhibition of necrosis results in the survival of autophagy-deficient worms after P. aeruginosa infection. These findings reveal a previously unidentified role for autophagy in protection against necrosis triggered by pathogenic bacteria in C. elegans and implicate that such a function of autophagy may be conserved through the inflammatory response in diverse organisms. PMID:25114220

  18. Full Virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Requires OprF▿

    PubMed Central

    Fito-Boncompte, Laurène; Chapalain, Annelise; Bouffartigues, Emeline; Chaker, Hichem; Lesouhaitier, Olivier; Gicquel, Gwendoline; Bazire, Alexis; Madi, Amar; Connil, Nathalie; Véron, Wilfried; Taupin, Laure; Toussaint, Bertrand; Cornelis, Pierre; Wei, Qing; Shioya, Koki; Déziel, Eric; Feuilloley, Marc G. J.; Orange, Nicole; Dufour, Alain; Chevalier, Sylvie

    2011-01-01

    OprF is a general outer membrane porin of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a well-known human opportunistic pathogen associated with severe hospital-acquired sepsis and chronic lung infections of cystic fibrosis patients. A multiphenotypic approach, based on the comparative study of a wild-type strain of P. aeruginosa, its isogenic oprF mutant, and an oprF-complemented strain, showed that OprF is required for P. aeruginosa virulence. The absence of OprF results in impaired adhesion to animal cells, secretion of ExoT and ExoS toxins through the type III secretion system (T3SS), and production of the quorum-sensing-dependent virulence factors pyocyanin, elastase, lectin PA-1L, and exotoxin A. Accordingly, in the oprF mutant, production of the signal molecules N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone and N-butanoyl-l-homoserine lactone was found to be reduced and delayed, respectively. Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS) production was decreased, while its precursor, 4-hydroxy-2-heptylquinoline (HHQ), accumulated in the cells. Taken together, these results show the involvement of OprF in P. aeruginosa virulence, at least partly through modulation of the quorum-sensing network. This is the first study showing a link between OprF, PQS synthesis, T3SS, and virulence factor production, providing novel insights into virulence expression. PMID:21189321

  19. Full virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa requires OprF.

    PubMed

    Fito-Boncompte, Laurène; Chapalain, Annelise; Bouffartigues, Emeline; Chaker, Hichem; Lesouhaitier, Olivier; Gicquel, Gwendoline; Bazire, Alexis; Madi, Amar; Connil, Nathalie; Véron, Wilfried; Taupin, Laure; Toussaint, Bertrand; Cornelis, Pierre; Wei, Qing; Shioya, Koki; Déziel, Eric; Feuilloley, Marc G J; Orange, Nicole; Dufour, Alain; Chevalier, Sylvie

    2011-03-01

    OprF is a general outer membrane porin of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a well-known human opportunistic pathogen associated with severe hospital-acquired sepsis and chronic lung infections of cystic fibrosis patients. A multiphenotypic approach, based on the comparative study of a wild-type strain of P. aeruginosa, its isogenic oprF mutant, and an oprF-complemented strain, showed that OprF is required for P. aeruginosa virulence. The absence of OprF results in impaired adhesion to animal cells, secretion of ExoT and ExoS toxins through the type III secretion system (T3SS), and production of the quorum-sensing-dependent virulence factors pyocyanin, elastase, lectin PA-1L, and exotoxin A. Accordingly, in the oprF mutant, production of the signal molecules N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone and N-butanoyl-l-homoserine lactone was found to be reduced and delayed, respectively. Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS) production was decreased, while its precursor, 4-hydroxy-2-heptylquinoline (HHQ), accumulated in the cells. Taken together, these results show the involvement of OprF in P. aeruginosa virulence, at least partly through modulation of the quorum-sensing network. This is the first study showing a link between OprF, PQS synthesis, T3SS, and virulence factor production, providing novel insights into virulence expression. PMID:21189321

  20. [Sodium houttuyfonate inhibits virulence related motility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa].

    PubMed

    Wu, Da-qiang; Huang, Wei-feng; Duan, Qiang-jun; Cheng, Hui-juan; Wang, Chang-zhong

    2015-04-01

    Sodium houttuyfonate (SH) is a derivative of effective component of a Chinese material medica, Houttuynia cordata, which is applied in anti-infection of microorganism. But, the antimicrobial mechanisms of SH still remain unclear. Here, we firstly discovered that SH effectively inhibits the three types of virulence related motility of.Pseudomonas aeruginosa, i.e., swimming, twitching and swarming. The plate assay results showed that the inhibitory action of SH against swimming and twitching in 24 h and swarming in 48 h is dose-dependent; and bacteria nearly lost all of the motile activities under the concentration of 1 x minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) (512 mg x L(-1) same as azithromycin positive group (1 x MIC, 16 mg x L(-1)). Furthermore, we found that the expression of structural gene flgB and pilG is down-regulated by SH, which implies that inhibitory mechanism of SH against motility of P. aeruginosa may be due to the inhibition of flagella and pili bioformation of P. aeruginosa by SR Therefore, our presented results firstly demonstrate that SH effectively inhibits the motility activities of P. aeruginosa, and suggest that SH could be a promising antipseudomonas agents in clinic. PMID:26281603

  1. Inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation on wound dressings

    PubMed Central

    Brandenburg, Kenneth S.; Calderon, Diego F.; Kierski, Patricia R.; Brown, Amanda L.; Shah, Nihar M.; Abbott, Nicholas L.; Schurr, Michael J.; Murphy, Christopher J.; McAnulty, Jonathan F.; Czuprynski, Charles J.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic non-healing skin wounds often contain bacterial biofilms that prevent normal wound healing and closure and present challenges to the use of conventional wound dressings. We investigated inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation, a common pathogen of chronic skin wounds, on a commercially available biological wound dressing. Building upon prior reports, we examined whether the amino acid tryptophan would inhibit P. aeruginosa biofilm formation on the 3-dimensional surface of the biological dressing. Bacterial biomass and biofilm polysaccharides were quantified using crystal violet staining or an enzyme linked lectin, respectively. Bacterial cells and biofilm matrix adherent to the wound dressing were visualized through scanning electron microscopy. D-/L-tryptophan inhibited P. aeruginosa biofilm formation on the wound dressing in a dose dependent manner and was not directly cytotoxic to immortalized human keratinocytes although there was some reduction in cellular metabolism or enzymatic activity. More importantly, D-/L-tryptophan did not impair wound healing in a splinted skin wound murine model. Furthermore, wound closure was improved when D-/L-tryptophan treated wound dressing with P. aeruginosa biofilms were compared with untreated dressings. These findings indicate that tryptophan may prove useful for integration into wound dressings to inhibit biofilm formation and promote wound healing. PMID:26342168

  2. Pyoverdine, the Major Siderophore in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Evades NGAL Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Peek, Mary E.; Bhatnagar, Abhinav; McCarty, Nael A.; Zughaier, Susu M.

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most common pathogen that persists in the cystic fibrosis lungs. Bacteria such as P. aeruginosa secrete siderophores (iron-chelating molecules) and the host limits bacterial growth by producing neutrophil-gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) that specifically scavenges bacterial siderophores, therefore preventing bacteria from establishing infection. P. aeruginosa produces a major siderophore known as pyoverdine, found to be important for bacterial virulence and biofilm development. We report that pyoverdine did not bind to NGAL, as measured by tryptophan fluorescence quenching, while enterobactin bound to NGAL effectively causing a strong response. The experimental data indicate that pyoverdine evades NGAL recognition. We then employed a molecular modeling approach to simulate the binding of pyoverdine to human NGAL using NGAL's published crystal structures. The docking of pyoverdine to NGAL predicted nine different docking positions; however, neither apo- nor ferric forms of pyoverdine docked into the ligand-binding site in the calyx of NGAL where siderophores are known to bind. The molecular modeling results offer structural support that pyoverdine does not bind to NGAL, confirming the results obtained in the tryptophan quenching assay. The data suggest that pyoverdine is a stealth siderophore that evades NGAL recognition allowing P. aeruginosa to establish chronic infections in CF lungs. PMID:22973307

  3. Pyoverdine, the Major Siderophore in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Evades NGAL Recognition.

    PubMed

    Peek, Mary E; Bhatnagar, Abhinav; McCarty, Nael A; Zughaier, Susu M

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most common pathogen that persists in the cystic fibrosis lungs. Bacteria such as P. aeruginosa secrete siderophores (iron-chelating molecules) and the host limits bacterial growth by producing neutrophil-gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) that specifically scavenges bacterial siderophores, therefore preventing bacteria from establishing infection. P. aeruginosa produces a major siderophore known as pyoverdine, found to be important for bacterial virulence and biofilm development. We report that pyoverdine did not bind to NGAL, as measured by tryptophan fluorescence quenching, while enterobactin bound to NGAL effectively causing a strong response. The experimental data indicate that pyoverdine evades NGAL recognition. We then employed a molecular modeling approach to simulate the binding of pyoverdine to human NGAL using NGAL's published crystal structures. The docking of pyoverdine to NGAL predicted nine different docking positions; however, neither apo- nor ferric forms of pyoverdine docked into the ligand-binding site in the calyx of NGAL where siderophores are known to bind. The molecular modeling results offer structural support that pyoverdine does not bind to NGAL, confirming the results obtained in the tryptophan quenching assay. The data suggest that pyoverdine is a stealth siderophore that evades NGAL recognition allowing P. aeruginosa to establish chronic infections in CF lungs. PMID:22973307

  4. Removal of Microcystis aeruginosa using cationic starch modified soils.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wenqing; Tan, Wanqiao; Wang, Lijing; Pan, Gang

    2016-06-15

    A cheap and biodegradable modifier, cationic starch (CS), was used to turn local soils into effective flocculants for Microcystis aeruginosa (M. aeruginosa) removal. The isoelectric point of soil particles was remarkably increased from pH 0.5 to 11.8 after modification with CS, which made CS modified soil particles positively charged and obtain algal flocculation ability. At the soil concentration of 100 mg/L, when the CS modifier was 10 mg/L, 86% of M. aeruginosa cells were removed within 30 min. Lower or higher CS dosage led to limited algal removal. About 71% and 45% of M. aeruginosa cells were removed within 30 min when CS was 5 mg/L and 80 mg/L, respectively. This is because only part of algal cells combined with CS modified soil particles through charge neutralization at low dosage, while flocs formed at high CS dosage were positively charged which prevents further aggregation among the flocs. The floc stability was quantified by a floc breakage index under applied shear force. Algal flocs formed at acid and alkaline conditions were more prone to be broken than those at the neutral condition. The cost and biodegradability concerns may be largely reduced through the use of CS modified local soils. For field applications, other practical issues (e.g., re-suspension) should be further studied by jointly using other methods. PMID:26143587

  5. 7-fluoroindole as an antivirulence compound against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin-Hyung; Kim, Yong-Guy; Cho, Moo Hwan; Kim, Jung-Ae; Lee, Jintae

    2012-04-01

    The emergence of antibiotic resistance has necessitated new therapeutic approaches for combating persistent bacterial infection. An alternative approach is regulation of bacterial virulence instead of growth suppression, which can readily lead to drug resistance. The virulence of the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa depends on a large number of extracellular factors and biofilm formation. Thirty-one natural and synthetic indole derivatives were screened. 7-fluoroindole (7FI) was identified as a compound that inhibits biofilm formation and blood hemolysis without inhibiting the growth of planktonic P. aeruginosa cells. Moreover, 7FI markedly reduced the production of quorum-sensing (QS)-regulated virulence factors 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone, pyocyanin, rhamnolipid, two siderophores, pyoverdine and pyochelin. 7FI clearly suppressed swarming motility, protease activity and the production of a polymeric matrix in P. aeruginosa. However, unlike natural indole compounds, synthetic 7FI did not increase antibiotic resistance. Therefore, 7FI is a potential candidate for use in an antivirulence approach against persistent P. aeruginosa infection. PMID:22251040

  6. Adaptation of aerobically growing Pseudomonas aeruginosa to copper starvation.

    PubMed

    Frangipani, Emanuela; Slaveykova, Vera I; Reimmann, Cornelia; Haas, Dieter

    2008-10-01

    Restricted bioavailability of copper in certain environments can interfere with cellular respiration because copper is an essential cofactor of most terminal oxidases. The global response of the metabolically versatile bacterium and opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa to copper limitation was assessed under aerobic conditions. Expression of cioAB (encoding an alternative, copper-independent, cyanide-resistant ubiquinol oxidase) was upregulated, whereas numerous iron uptake functions (including the siderophores pyoverdine and pyochelin) were expressed at reduced levels, presumably reflecting a lower demand for iron by respiratory enzymes. Wild-type P. aeruginosa was able to grow aerobically in a defined glucose medium depleted of copper, whereas a cioAB mutant did not grow. Thus, P. aeruginosa relies on the CioAB enzyme to cope with severe copper deprivation. A quadruple cyo cco1 cco2 cox mutant, which was deleted for all known heme-copper terminal oxidases of P. aeruginosa, grew aerobically, albeit more slowly than did the wild type, indicating that the CioAB enzyme is capable of energy conservation. However, the expression of a cioA'-'lacZ fusion was less dependent on the copper status in the quadruple mutant than in the wild type, suggesting that copper availability might affect cioAB expression indirectly, via the function of the heme-copper oxidases. PMID:18708503

  7. Genetic characterization of Microcystis aeruginosa isolates from Portuguese freshwater systems.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Cristiana; Vasconcelos, Vitor; Antunes, Agostinho

    2016-07-01

    Cyanobacteria are microorganisms that pose a serious threat to the aquatic waterways through the production of dense blooms under eutrophic conditions and the release of toxic secondary metabolites-cyanotoxins. Within cyanobacteria, the colonial planktonic Microcystis aeruginosa is widely distributed in both fresh and brackish aquatic environments throughout the world being frequently observed in the Portuguese water systems. Apart from the well-established distribution of M. aeruginosa in Portugal, knowledge of its genetic diversity and population structure is unknown. Therefore, in this study twenty-seven strains were obtained from the North, Centre and South regions of Portugal and were subjected to extensive phylogenetic analyses using simultaneously four distinct genetic markers (16S rRNA, 16S-23S ITS, DNA gyrase subunit ß and cell division protein (ftsZ)) encompassing in total 2834 bp. With this work we characterized the phylogenetic relationship among the Portuguese strains, with the southern strains showing higher genetic structure relatively to the North and Centre strains. A total of fifteen genotypes were determined for M. aeruginosa in Portuguese water systems revealing a high genetic diversity. This is also the first study to report geographic variation on the population structure of the Portuguese M. aeruginosa. PMID:27263013

  8. Elastase Deficiency Phenotype of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Canine Otitis Externa Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Petermann, Shana R.; Doetkott, Curt; Rust, Lynn

    2001-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa veterinary isolates were assayed for elastase and total matrix protease activity. The elastase activity of canine ear isolates was much less than that of strain PAO1 and that of all other veterinary isolates (P < 0.0001). The results indicate that canine ear isolates have a distinct elastase phenotype. PMID:11329471

  9. AMINOGLYCOSIDE RESISTANCE GENES IN Pseudomonas aeruginosa ISOLATES FROM CUMANA, VENEZUELA

    PubMed Central

    TEIXEIRA, Bertinellys; RODULFO, Hectorina; CARREÑO, Numirin; GUZMÁN, Militza; SALAZAR, Elsa; DONATO, Marcos DE

    2016-01-01

    The enzymatic modification of aminoglycosides by aminoglycoside-acetyltransferases (AAC), aminoglycoside-adenyltransferases (AAD), and aminoglycoside-phosphotransferases (APH), is the most common resistance mechanism in P. aeruginosa and these enzymes can be coded on mobile genetic elements that contribute to their dispersion. One hundred and thirty seven P. aeruginosa isolates from the University Hospital, Cumana, Venezuela (HUAPA) were evaluated. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by the disk diffusion method and theaac, aadB and aph genes were detected by PCR. Most of the P. aeruginosa isolates (33/137) were identified from the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), mainly from discharges (96/137). The frequency of resistant P. aeruginosaisolates was found to be higher for the aminoglycosides tobramycin and amikacin (30.7 and 29.9%, respectively). Phenotype VI, resistant to these antibiotics, was the most frequent (14/49), followed by phenotype I, resistant to all the aminoglycosides tested (12/49). The aac(6´)-Ib,aphA1 and aadB genes were the most frequently detected, and the simultaneous presence of several resistance genes in the same isolate was demonstrated. Aminoglycoside resistance in isolates ofP. aeruginosa at the HUAPA is partly due to the presence of the aac(6´)-Ib, aphA1 andaadB genes, but the high rates of antimicrobial resistance suggest the existence of several mechanisms acting together. This is the first report of aminoglycoside resistance genes in Venezuela and one of the few in Latin America. PMID:27007556

  10. Hybrid thermionic-photovoltaic converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datas, A.

    2016-04-01

    A conceptual device for the direct conversion of heat into electricity is presented. This concept hybridizes thermionic (TI) and thermophotovoltaic (TPV) energy conversion in a single thermionic-photovoltaic (TIPV) solid-state device. This device transforms into electricity both the electron and photon fluxes emitted by an incandescent surface. This letter presents an idealized analysis of this device in order to determine its theoretical potential. According to this analysis, the key advantage of this converter, with respect to either TPV or TI, is the higher power density in an extended temperature range. For low temperatures, TIPV performs like TPV due to the negligible electron flux. On the contrary, for high temperatures, TIPV performs like TI due to the great enhancement of the electron flux, which overshadows the photon flux contribution. At the intermediate temperatures, ˜1650 K in the case of this particular study, I show that the power density potential of TIPV converter is twice as great as that of TPV and TI. The greatest impact concerns applications in which the temperature varies in a relatively wide range, for which averaged power density enhancement above 500% is attainable.

  11. A dc to dc converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, A. E.; Gould, J. M.; Matheney, J. L.; Garrett, H. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    The object of the invention is to provide an improved converter for converting one direct current voltage to another. A plurality of phased square wave voltages are provided from a ring counter through amplifiers to a like plurality of output transformers. Each of these transformers has two windings, and S(1) winding and an S(2) winding. The S(1) windings are connected in series, then the S(2) windings are connected in series, and finally, the two sets of windings are connected in series. One of six SCRs is connected between each two series connected windings to a positive output terminal and one of diodes is connected between each set of two windings of a zero output terminal. By virtue of this configuration, a quite high average direct current voltage is obtained, which varies between full voltage and two-thirds full voltage rather than from full voltage to zero. Further, its variation, ripple frequency, is reduced to one-sixth of that present in a single phase system. Application to raising battery voltage for an ion propulsion system is mentioned.

  12. Dissecting the Machinery That Introduces Disulfide Bonds in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Arts, Isabelle S.; Ball, Geneviève; Leverrier, Pauline; Garvis, Steven; Nicolaes, Valérie; Vertommen, Didier; Ize, Bérengère; Tamu Dufe, Veronica; Messens, Joris; Voulhoux, Romé; Collet, Jean-François

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Disulfide bond formation is required for the folding of many bacterial virulence factors. However, whereas the Escherichia coli disulfide bond-forming system is well characterized, not much is known on the pathways that oxidatively fold proteins in pathogenic bacteria. Here, we report the detailed unraveling of the pathway that introduces disulfide bonds in the periplasm of the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The genome of P. aeruginosa uniquely encodes two DsbA proteins (P. aeruginosa DsbA1 [PaDsbA1] and PaDsbA2) and two DsbB proteins (PaDsbB1 and PaDsbB2). We found that PaDsbA1, the primary donor of disulfide bonds to secreted proteins, is maintained oxidized in vivo by both PaDsbB1 and PaDsbB2. In vitro reconstitution of the pathway confirms that both PaDsbB1 and PaDsbB2 shuttle electrons from PaDsbA1 to membrane-bound quinones. Accordingly, deletion of both P. aeruginosa dsbB1 (PadsbB1) and PadsbB2 is required to prevent the folding of several P. aeruginosa virulence factors and to lead to a significant decrease in pathogenicity. Using a high-throughput proteomic approach, we also analyzed the impact of PadsbA1 deletion on the global periplasmic proteome of P. aeruginosa, which allowed us to identify more than 20 new potential substrates of this major oxidoreductase. Finally, we report the biochemical and structural characterization of PaDsbA2, a highly oxidizing oxidoreductase, which seems to be expressed under specific conditions. By fully dissecting the machinery that introduces disulfide bonds in P. aeruginosa, our work opens the way to the design of novel antibacterial molecules able to disarm this pathogen by preventing the proper assembly of its arsenal of virulence factors. PMID:24327342

  13. Characterization of protease IV expression in Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Conibear, Tim C R; Willcox, Mark D P; Flanagan, Judith L; Zhu, Hua

    2012-02-01

    Expression of protease IV by Pseudomonas aeruginosa during ocular infections contributes significantly to tissue damage. However, several P. aeruginosa strains isolated from ocular infections or inflammatory events produce very low levels of protease IV. The aim of the present study was to characterize, genetically and phenotypically, the presence and expression of the protease IV gene in a group of clinical isolates that cause adverse ocular events of varying degrees, and to elucidate the possible control mechanisms of expression associated with this virulence factor. Protease IV gene sequences from seven clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa were determined and compared to P. aeruginosa strains PAO1 and PA103-29. Production and enzyme activity of protease IV were measured in test strains and compared to that of quorum-sensing gene (lasRI) mutants and the expression of other virulence factors. Protease IV gene sequence similarities between the isolates were 97.5-99.5 %. The strains were classified into two distinct phylogenetic groups that correlated with the presence of exo-enzymes from type three secretion systems (TTSS). Protease IV concentrations produced by PAOΔlasRI mutants and the two clinical isolates with a lasRI gene deficiency were restored to levels comparable to strain PAO1 following complementation of the quorum-sensing gene deficiencies. The protease IV gene is highly conserved in P. aeruginosa clinical isolates that cause a range of adverse ocular events. Observed variations within the gene sequence appear to correlate with presence of specific TTSS genes. Protease IV expression was shown to be regulated by the Las quorum-sensing system. PMID:21921113

  14. Antibacterial activity of Lawsonia inermis Linn (Henna) against Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Habbal, O; Hasson, SS; El-Hag, AH; Al-Mahrooqi, Z; Al-Hashmi, N; Al-Bimani, Z; Al-Balushi, MS; Al-Jabri, AA

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the antibacterial activity of henna (Lawsonia inermis Linn) obtained from different regions of Oman against a wide array of micro-organisms. Methods Fresh henna samples were obtained from different regions of Oman as leaves and seeds. 100 g fresh and dry leaves and 50 g of fresh and dry seeds were separately soaked in 500 mL of ethanol for three days, respectively, with frequent agitation. The mixture was filtered, and the crude extract was collected. The crude extract was then heated, at 48 °C in a water bath to evaporate its liquid content. The dry crude henna extract was then tested for its antibacterial activity using well-diffusion antibiotic susceptibility technique. Henna extracts were investigated for their antibacterial activity at different concentrations against a wide array of different micro-organisms including a laboratory standard bacterial strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (NCTC 10662) (P. aeruginosa) and eleven fresh clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa obtained from patients attending the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital (SQUH). 2-Hydroxy-p-Nathoqinone-Tech (2-HPNT, MW=174.16, C10H6O3) was included as control (at 50% concentration) along with the henna samples tested. Results Henna samples demonstrated antibacterial activity against all isolates but the highest susceptibility was against P. aeruginosa with henna samples obtained from Al-sharqyia region. Conclusions Omani henna from Al-sharqyia region demonstrates high in vitro anti-P. aeruginosa activity compared with many henna samples from different regions of Oman. PMID:23569753

  15. Ferritin and ferrihydrite nanoparticles as iron sources for Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Dehner, Carolyn; Morales-Soto, Nydia; Behera, Rabindra K.; Shrout, Joshua; Theil, Elizabeth C.; Maurice, Patricia A.

    2013-01-01

    Metabolism of iron derived from insoluble and/ or scarce sources is essential for pathogenic and environmental microbes. The ability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to acquire iron from exogenous ferritin was assessed; ferritin is an iron-concentrating and antioxidant protein complex composed of a catalytic protein and caged ferrihydrite nanomineral synthesized from Fe(II) and O2 or H2O2. Ferritin and free ferrihydrite supported growth of P. aeruginosa with indistinguishable kinetics and final culture densities. The P. aeruginosa PAO1 mutant (ΔpvdDΔpchEF), which is incapable of siderophore production, grew as well as the wild type when ferritin was the iron source. Such data suggest that P. aeruginosa can acquire iron by siderophore-independent mechanisms, including secretion of small-molecule reductant(s). Protease inhibitors abolished the growth of the siderophore-free strain on ferritins, with only a small effect on growth of the wild type; predictably, protease inhibitors had no effect on growth with free ferrihydrite as the iron source. Proteolytic activity was higher with the siderophore-free strain, suggesting that the role of proteases in the degradation of ferritin is particularly important for iron acquisition in the absence of siderophores. The combined results demonstrate the importance of both free ferrihydrite, a natural environmental form of iron and a model for an insoluble form of partly denatured ferritin called hemosiderin, and caged ferritin iron minerals as bacterial iron sources. Ferritin is also revealed as a growth promoter of opportunistic, pathogenic bacteria such a P. aeruginosa in diseased tissues such as the cystic fibrotic lung, where ferritin concentrations are abnormally high. PMID:23417538

  16. Synergistic bactericidal effects of acrinol and tetracycline against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Saji, M; Fujii, K; Ohkuni, H; Irie, N; Osono, E; Kato, F

    2000-06-01

    Combined treatment of acrinol (Ac) and tetracycline hydrochloride (Tc) against Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated from clinical specimens synergistically increased the bactericidal effect. The minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of Ac against P. aeruginosa strain no. 985 was 200 microg/ml, while the MBC of Ac against strains no. 47 and no. 783 was above 800 microg/ml for each. The MBC of Tc was above 400 microg/ml against each of the tested strains. However, simultaneous treatment with 25 microg/ml Ac and 200 microg/ml Tc against P. aeruginosa strain no. 985 decreased the viable cell number from 107 cfu/ml to <10 cfu/ml within 24 h, while a higher concentration of Tc (400 microg/ml) with Ac (25 microg/ml) reduced the viable cell number to <10 cfu/ml within 8 h. A similar synergistic bactericidal effect of Ac and Tc was observed in strains no. 47 and no. 783 by treatment with 200 microg/ml Ac and 200 microg/ml or 400 microg/ml Tc. The degree of bactericidal effect against P. aeruginosa was proportional to the concentration of Tc under the condition of a constant concentration of Ac. Furthermore, Ac-treated cells of strain no. 47 were killed by a following Tc treatment, but cells pretreated with Tc did not show such a sensitivity to Ac. To induce the synergistic effect of Ac and Tc, Ac must be applied to P. aeruginosa before or at the same time as Tc. PMID:11810541

  17. Zingerone silences quorum sensing and attenuates virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Lokender; Chhibber, Sanjay; Kumar, Rajnish; Kumar, Manoj; Harjai, Kusum

    2015-04-01

    Quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa plays an imperative role in virulence factor, biofilm formation and antimicrobial resistance. Blocking quorum sensing pathways are viewed as viable anti-virulent therapy in association with traditional antimicrobial therapy. Anti-quorum sensing dietary phytochemicals with may prove to be a safe and viable choice as anti-virulent drug candidates. Previously, our lab proved zingerone as potent anti-biofilm agent hence; further its anti-virulent and anti-quorum activities were evaluated. Zingerone, besides decreasing swimming, swarming and twitching phenotypes of P. aeruginosa PAO1, reduced biofilm forming capacity and production of virulence factors including rhamnolipid, elastase, protease, pyocyanin, cell free and cell bound hemolysin (p<0.001) indicating anti-virulent property attributing towards attenuation of virulence of P. aeruginosa. Further zingerone not only had marked effect on the production of quorum sensing signal molecules by clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa but also showed significant interference with the activation of QS reporter strains. To study the mechanism of blocking quorum sensing cascade, in silico analysis was carried out. Anti-QS activity was attributed to interference with the ligand receptor interaction of zingerone with QS receptors (TraR, LasR, RhlR and PqsR). Zingerone showed a good comparative docking score to respective autoinducer molecules which was even higher than that of vanillin, a proven anti-quorum sensing phytochemical. The results of the present study revealed the anti-quorum sensing activity of zingerone targeting ligand-receptor interaction, hence proposing zingerone as a suitable anti-virulent drug candidate against P. aeruginosa infections. PMID:25704369

  18. Photovoltaic converters for solar-pumped lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Gilbert H.; Heinbockel, John H.

    1988-01-01

    The authors describe a mathematical parametric study of converters used to convert laser radiation to electricity for space-based laser power systems. Two different lasers, the 1.06-micron Nd laser and the 1.315-micron iodine laser, are used in the vertical junction converter. The calculated efficiency is 50 percent for a 100-junction Si photovoltaic converter when used with a Nd laser. The calculated efficiency for a 1000-junction Ga(0.53)In(0.47)As photovoltaic converter is 43 percent when used with an iodine laser.

  19. Thermoelectric converters for alternating current standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anatychuk, L. I.; Taschuk, D. D.

    2012-06-01

    Thermoelectric converters of alternating current remain priority instruments when creating standard equipment. This work presents the results of design and manufacture of alternating current converter for a military standard of alternating current in Ukraine. Results of simulation of temperature distribution in converter elements, ways of optimization to improve the accuracy of alternating current signal reproduction are presented. Results of metrological trials are given. The quality of thermoelectric material specially created for alternating current metrology is verified. The converter was used in alternating current standard for the frequency range from 10 Hz to 30 MHz. The efficiency of using thermoelectric signal converters in measuring instruments is confirmed.

  20. Narrow line-width phosphors for phosphor-converted white light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanna, Aloka

    The luminous efficacy of present day phosphor-converted white LEDs is limited by phosphors with broad spectral emission in the long wavelength visible range (600-700 nm). The light output from the cool-white LEDs that do not use a red phosphor is 30-35% higher than the warm white LEDs fabricated with a red phosphor in addition to the yellow phosphor. However, the CRI of cool-white LEDs is significantly lower (~60-70) than the CRI of the warm white LEDs (~80-95) due to lack of the red photons in the emission spectrum. Therefore, a trade-off exists between luminous efficacy and color rendering capability of light generated by phosphor-converted white LEDs. In order to solve this problem, an efficient red phosphor with considerably narrow full width of half maxima (~5-10 nm) and emission in the 600-650 nm wavelength range is required. The narrow spectral line-width can be achieved by introducing trivalent lanthanide ions like Eu3+, Pr3+ and Sm3+ (λpeak- 615 nm, 650 nm, 655 nm) in oxide host lattices although the high energy gaps of these hosts makes these phosphors unsuitable for excitation with near-UV/Blue (380-470 nm) LED sources. Therefore, the goal of this project is two-fold- to develop new material systems which can serve as potential hosts for trivalent lanthanide ions like Eu3+, Pr3+ and Sm3+ (λpeak- 615 nm, 650 nm, 655 nm) with strong excitation bands in the near-UV/blue wavelength region (380-470 nm) and improve the efficiency of the known oxide phosphors doped with trivalent lanthanide ions and the novel phosphors via crystal growth processes. Moreover, phosphors in the green-yellow wavelength region with a narrow emission line-width have the potential of improving the luminous efficacy of the phosphor-converted LEDs as the human eye sensitivity curve peaks at 555 nm. Thus, in parallel with the narrow line-width red phosphor research, new compositions doped with Tb3+ (550 nm), Dy3+ (575 nm), etc. are being explored with strong excitation bands in near

  1. Converting to proactive environmental management

    SciTech Connect

    Duff, P.B.

    1994-12-31

    There are three components which the environmental manager of any major company faces. The first component deals with complying with today`s laws and regulations. The second component involves correcting past disposal activities which were consistent with standard industrial practice and complied with the laws and regulations in effect at the time. In the 1990s, a third component has emerged and gained increasing importance: taking the environmental program beyond compliance. Improvements in areas such as waste minimization, toxic chemical usage reduction, product life-cycle design, and selection of off-site disposal facilities go beyond the current regulations to bring valuable environmental and economic benefits to the company and the community. The key to successfully managing an environmental organization is the ability to convert the company`s program from reactive to proactive. This chapter provides guidance on successfully making this conversion.

  2. Thermionic converter emitter support arrangement

    DOEpatents

    Allen, Daniel T.

    1990-01-01

    A support is provided for use in a thermionic converter to support an end an emitter to keep it out of contact with a surrounding collector while allowing the emitter end to move axially at its temperatures changes. The emitter end (34) is supported by a spring structure (44) that includes a pair of Belleville springs, and the spring structure is supported by a support structure (42) fixed to the housing that includes the collector. The support structure is in the form of a sandwich with a small metal spring-engaging element (74) at the front end, a larger metal main support (76) at the rear end that is attached to the housng, and with a ceramic layer (80) between them that is bonded by hot isostatic pressing to the metal element and metal main support. The spring structure can include a loose wafer (120) captured between the Belleville springs.

  3. Thermionic converter emitter support arrangement

    DOEpatents

    Allen, Daniel T.

    1990-01-01

    A support is provided for use in a therminonic converter to support an end of an emitter to keep it out of contact with a surrounding collector while allowing the emitter end to move axially as its temperature changes. The emitter end (34) is supported by a spring structure (44) that includes a pair of Belleville springs, and the spring structure is supported by a support structure (42) fixed to the housing that includes the collector. The support structure is in the form of a sandwich with a small metal spring-engaging element (74) at the front end, a larger metal main support (76) at the rear end that is attached to the housing, and with a ceramic layer (80) between them that is bonded by hot isostatic pressing to the metal element and metal main support. The spring structure can include a loose wafer (120) captured between the Belleville springs.

  4. Glycan involvement in the adhesion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to tears.

    PubMed

    Kautto, Liisa; Nguyen-Khuong, Terry; Everest-Dass, Arun; Leong, Andrea; Zhao, Zhenjun; Willcox, Mark D P; Packer, Nicolle H; Peterson, Robyn

    2016-04-01

    The human eye is constantly bathed by tears, which protect the ocular surface via a variety of mechanisms. The O-linked glycans of tear mucins have long been considered to play a role in binding to pathogens and facilitating their removal in the tear flow. Other conjugated glycans in tears could similarly contribute to pathogen binding and removal but have received less attention. In the work presented here we assessed the contribution of glycan moieties, in particular the protein attached N-glycans, presented by the broad complement of tear proteins to the adhesion of the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a leading cause of microbial keratitis and ulceration of the cornea. Our adhesion assay involved immobilising the macromolecular components of tears into the wells of a polyvinyl difluoride (PVDF) microtitre filter plate and probing the binding of fluorescently labelled bacteria. Three P. aeruginosa strains were studied: a cytotoxic strain (6206) and an invasive strain (6294) from eye infections, and an invasive strain (320) from a urinary tract infection (UTI). The ocular isolates adhered two to three times more to human tears than to human saliva or porcine gastric mucin, suggesting ocular niche-specific adaptation. Support for the role of the N-glycans carried by human tear proteins in the binding and removal of P. aeruginosa from the eye was shown by: 1) pre-incubation of the bacteria with free component sugars, galactose, mannose, fucose and sialyl lactose (or combination thereof) inhibiting adhesion of all the P. aeruginosa strains to the immobilised tear proteins, with the greatest inhibition of binding of the ocular cytotoxic 6206 and least for the invasive 6294 strain; 2) pre-incubation of the bacteria with N-glycans released from the commercially available human milk lactoferrin, an abundant protein that carries N-linked glycans in tears, inhibiting the adhesion to tears of the ocular bacteria by up to 70%, which was significantly more

  5. Accumulation of Pyrimidine Intermediate Orotate Decreases Virulence Factor Production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Niazy, Abdurahman; Hughes, Lee E

    2015-08-01

    The impact of orotate accumulation in the medically important bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa was studied by deleting pyrE, the gene encoding orotate phosphoribosyltransferase and responsible for converting orotate into orotate monophosphate within the de novo pyrimidine synthesis pathway. The pyrE mutant accumulated orotate and exhibited decreased production of hemolysin, casein protease, and elastase. Feeding orotate at a concentration of 51.25 μM to the wild type, PAO1, likewise decreased production of these factors except for hemolysin, which was not affected. A significant increase in the pigments pyocyanin and pyoverdin was also observed. Pyocyanin increase in the pyrE mutant was heightened when the mutant was supplemented with orotate. Although pyoverdin production in the wild-type PAO1 was unaffected by orotate supplementation, a decrease in the mutant's production was observed when supplemented with orotate. These results indicate a significant reduction in virulence factor production in the pyrE mutant and reduction in some virulence factors in the wild type when supplemented with orotate. PMID:25917504

  6. Toward Understanding the Outer Membrane Uptake of Small Molecules by Pseudomonas aeruginosa*

    PubMed Central

    Eren, Elif; Parkin, Jamie; Adelanwa, Ayodele; Cheneke, Belete; Movileanu, Liviu; Khalid, Syma; van den Berg, Bert

    2013-01-01

    Because small molecules enter Gram-negative bacteria via outer membrane (OM) channels, understanding OM transport is essential for the rational design of improved and new antibiotics. In the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, most small molecules are taken up by outer membrane carboxylate channel (Occ) proteins, which can be divided into two distinct subfamilies, OccD and OccK. Here we characterize substrate transport mediated by Occ proteins belonging to both subfamilies. Based on the determination of the OccK2-glucuronate co-crystal structure, we identify the channel residues that are essential for substrate transport. We further show that the pore regions of the channels are rigid in the OccK subfamily and highly dynamic in the OccD subfamily. We also demonstrate that the substrate carboxylate group interacts with central residues of the basic ladder, a row of arginine and lysine residues that leads to and away from the binding site at the channel constriction. Moreover, the importance of the basic ladder residues corresponds to their degree of conservation. Finally, we apply the generated insights by converting the archetype of the entire family, OccD1, from a basic amino acid-specific channel into a channel with a preference for negatively charged amino acids. PMID:23467408

  7. Performance of Power Converters at Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elbuluk, Malik E.; Gerber, Scott; Hammoud, Ahmad; Patterson, Richard L.

    2001-01-01

    Power converters capable of operation at cryogenic temperatures are anticipated to play an important role in the power system architecture of future NASA deep space missions. Design of such converters to survive cryogenic temperatures will improve the power system performance and reduce development and launch costs. Aerospace power systems are mainly a DC distribution network. Therefore, DC/DC and DC/AC converters provide the outputs needed to different loads at various power levels. Recently, research efforts have been performed at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) to design and evaluate DC/DC converters that are capable of operating at cryogenic temperatures. This paper presents a summary of the research performed to evaluate the low temperature performance of five DC/DC converters. Various parameters were investigated as a function of temperature in the range of 20 to -196 C. Data pertaining to the output voltage regulation and efficiency of the converters is presented and discussed.

  8. Radiation-Tolerant DC-DC Converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skutt, Glenn; Sable, Dan; Leslie, Leonard; Graham, Shawn

    2012-01-01

    A document discusses power converters suitable for space use that meet the DSCC MIL-PRF-38534 Appendix G radiation hardness level P classification. A method for qualifying commercially produced electronic parts for DC-DC converters per the Defense Supply Center Columbus (DSCC) radiation hardened assurance requirements was developed. Development and compliance testing of standard hybrid converters suitable for space use were completed for missions with total dose radiation requirements of up to 30 kRad. This innovation provides the same overall performance as standard hybrid converters, but includes assurance of radiation- tolerant design through components and design compliance testing. This availability of design-certified radiation-tolerant converters can significantly reduce total cost and delivery time for power converters for space applications that fit the appropriate DSCC classification (30 kRad).

  9. Heat flow in a pyroelectric converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, R. B.; Butler, W. F.; Drummond, J. E.; Bruno, D. A.; Briscoe, J. M.

    1985-12-01

    A simulated pyroelectric converter has been constructed. The heat flow and temperature profiles within the converter have been measured. Computer simulations of the heat flow compare well with the measurements and predict an efficiency of 12 percent of the Carnot limit for a real pyroelectric converter with the operating configuration of the simulation. These heat flow results are useful in considerations of heat engines using active materials other than pyroelectrics, such as Nitinol, when these engines utilize similar heat flow management.

  10. Silicon waveguide based TE mode converter.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Liow, Tsung-Yang; Yu, Mingbin; Lo, Guo-Qiang; Kwong, Dim-Lee

    2010-11-22

    A silicon waveguide based TE mode converter was designed for the mode conversion between a horizontal waveguide and vertical waveguide in the two-layer structure waveguide based polarization diversity circuit. The TE mode converter's performance was studied. The polarization mode converter with minimum length of 5 μm was demonstrated to provide the TE mode conversion while maintaining the polarization status. The insertion loss at the transition region was less than 2 dB. PMID:21164874

  11. Ocean floor mounting of wave energy converters

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, Stefan G

    2015-01-20

    A system for mounting a set of wave energy converters in the ocean includes a pole attached to a floor of an ocean and a slider mounted on the pole in a manner that permits the slider to move vertically along the pole and rotate about the pole. The wave energy converters can then be mounted on the slider to allow adjustment of the depth and orientation of the wave energy converters.

  12. Flagellation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in newly divided cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Kun; Lee, Calvin; Anda, Jaime; Wong, Gerard

    2015-03-01

    For monotrichous bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, after cell division, one daughter cell inherits the old flagellum from its mother cell, and the other grows a new flagellum during or after cell division. It had been shown that the new flagellum grows at the distal pole of the dividing cell when the two daughter cells haven't completely separated. However, for those daughter cells who grow new flagella after division, it still remains unknown at which pole the new flagellum will grow. Here, by combining our newly developed bacteria family tree tracking techniques with genetic manipulation method, we showed that for the daughter cell who did not inherit the old flagellum, a new flagellum has about 90% chances to grow at the newly formed pole. We proposed a model for flagellation of P. aeruginosa.

  13. Is levofloxacin as active as ciprofloxacin against Pseudomonas aeruginosa?

    PubMed

    Bonfiglio, G

    2001-01-01

    The in vitro activity of levofloxacin against 300 Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from hospitalized patients, with the exception of those recovered in intensive care or hematology units, was compared to ofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, piperacillin, amikacin, ceftazidime and imipenem. Imipenem showed the best activity (81.6%), followed by piperacillin (80.7%). The activity of levofloxacin was equal to that of ciprofloxacin (75.3%) but was more active than ofloxacin (58.1%). Moreover, the MIC values of levofloxacin did not show any statistical difference using two different inocula. Levofloxacin shows an excellent bactericidal activity being generally within one doubling dilution of the MIC. These results were also confirmed by the time-killing studies. In conclusion, according to the in vitro activity, levofloxacin could be considered a good option for the treatment of infections sustained by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and clinical experiments are required to corroborate our in vitro data. PMID:11399859

  14. Structure of a putative acetyltransferase (PA1377) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, Anna M.; Tata, Renée; Chauviac, François-Xavier; Sutton, Brian J.; Brown, Paul R.

    2008-05-01

    The crystal structure of an acetyltransferase encoded by the gene PA1377 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been determined at 2.25 Å resolution. Comparison with a related acetyltransferase revealed a structural difference in the active site that was taken to reflect a difference in substrate binding and/or specificity between the two enzymes. Gene PA1377 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa encodes a 177-amino-acid conserved hypothetical protein of unknown function. The structure of this protein (termed pitax) has been solved in space group I222 to 2.25 Å resolution. Pitax belongs to the GCN5-related N-acetyltransferase family and contains all four sequence motifs conserved among family members. The β-strand structure in one of these motifs (motif A) is disrupted, which is believed to affect binding of the substrate that accepts the acetyl group from acetyl-CoA.

  15. Novel Strategies for the Treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infections.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Stefanie; Sommer, Roman; Hinsberger, Stefan; Lu, Cenbin; Hartmann, Rolf W; Empting, Martin; Titz, Alexander

    2016-07-14

    Infections with Pseudomonas aeruginosa have become a concerning threat in hospital-acquired infections and for cystic fibrosis patients. The major problem leading to high mortality lies in the appearance of drug-resistant strains. Therefore, a vast number of approaches to develop novel anti-infectives is currently pursued. These diverse strategies span from killing (new antibiotics) to disarming (antivirulence) the pathogen. Particular emphasis lies on the development of compounds that inhibit biofilms formed in chronic infections to restore susceptibility toward antibiotics. Numerous promising results are summarized in this perspective. Antibiotics with a novel mode of action will be needed to avoid cross resistance against currently used therapeutic agents. Importantly, antivirulence drugs are expected to yield a significantly reduced rate of resistance development. Most developments are still far from the application. It can however be expected that combination therapies, also containing antivirulence agents, will pave the way toward novel treatment options against P. aeruginosa. PMID:26804741

  16. Biofilm Matrix and Its Regulation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Qing; Ma, Luyan Z.

    2013-01-01

    Biofilms are communities of microorganisms embedded in extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) matrix. Bacteria in biofilms demonstrate distinct features from their free-living planktonic counterparts, such as different physiology and high resistance to immune system and antibiotics that render biofilm a source of chronic and persistent infections. A deeper understanding of biofilms will ultimately provide insights into the development of alternative treatment for biofilm infections. The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a model bacterium for biofilm research, is notorious for its ability to cause chronic infections by its high level of drug resistance involving the formation of biofilms. In this review, we summarize recent advances in biofilm formation, focusing on the biofilm matrix and its regulation in P. aeruginosa, aiming to provide resources for the understanding and control of bacterial biofilms. PMID:24145749

  17. Activity of Chitosans in combination with antibiotics in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Tin, San; Sakharkar, Kishore R.; Lim, Chu Sing; Sakharkar, Meena K.

    2009-01-01

    Chitosan and its derivative water soluble Chitosan oligosaccharide are used in a variety of applications in pharmaceutical preparations. In this study, 2 wild (ATCC 15729 and PAO1) and 2 mutant strains (PT121 and PT149) of P. aeruginosa are investigated for drug-drug interactions in vitro. 10 antimicrobial agents (antibiotics) are combined with different degree of deacetylated Chitosans and Chitosan oligosaccharide. All the chitosans show synergistic activity with sulfamethoxazole, a sulfonamide antimicrobial agent. It is interesting to observe that the MIC value for the MexEF-OprN overexpressing mutant strain of P. aeruginosa is 5 fold higher than the other strains under investigation suggesting a possible role of this efflux pump in Sulfamethoxazole efflux. The findings suggest on the use of chitosans as enhancing agent in combination with antibiotics in pharmaceutical preparations. PMID:19173037

  18. Fatty Acids Synthesized from Hexadecane by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Ethel M.; Brenner, Rodolfo R.

    1966-01-01

    Romero, Ethel M. (Universidad Nacional de la Plata, La Plata, Argentina), and Rodolfo M. Brenner. Fatty acids synthesized from hexadecane by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. J. Bacteriol. 91:183–188. 1966.—The lipids extracted from Pseudomonas aeruginosa incubated with hexadecane in a mineral medium were separated into a nonpolar and three polar fractions by thin-layer chromatography. The fatty acid composition of the four cellular fractions and that of the lipids excreted into the medium was studied by gas-liquid chromatography. Saturated fatty acids with 14 to 22 carbons were recognized, together with monoenoic, dienoic, and hydroxylated acids. Hydroxylated fatty acids were principally found in two polar fractions containing rhamnose and glucose; the other polar fraction, containing serine, alanine, ethanolamine, and leucine, was richer in monoenoic fatty acids. Octadecadienoic acid was found in the neutral fraction. PMID:4955247

  19. Morphogenetic expression of Bacteroides nodosus fimbriae in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Mattick, J S; Bills, M M; Anderson, B J; Dalrymple, B; Mott, M R; Egerton, J R

    1987-01-01

    Type 4 fimbriae are found in a range of pathogenic bacteria, including Bacteroides nodosus, Moraxella bovis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The structural subunits of these fimbriae all contain a highly conserved hydrophobic amino-terminal sequence preceding a variable hydrophilic carboxy-terminal region. We show here that recombinant P. aeruginosa cells containing the B. nodosus fimbrial subunit gene under the control of a strong promoter (pL, from bacteriophage lambda) produced large amounts of fimbriae that were structurally and antigenically indistinguishable from those produced by B. nodosus. This was demonstrated by fimbrial isolation and purification, electrophoretic and Western transfer analyses, and immunogold labeling and electron microscopy. These results suggest that type 4 fimbriated bacteria use a common mechanism for fimbrial assembly and that the structural subunits are interchangeable, thereby providing a basis for the development of multivalent vaccines. Images PMID:2878919

  20. Chlorinated phenol-induced physiological antibiotic resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Muller, Jocelyn Fraga; Ghosh, Sudeshna; Ikuma, Kaoru; Stevens, Ann M; Love, Nancy G

    2015-11-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a ubiquitous environmental bacterium and an opportunistic pathogen with the ability to rapidly develop multidrug resistance under selective pressure. Previous work demonstrated that upon exposure to the environmental contaminant pentachlorophenol (PCP), P. aeruginosa PAO1 increases expression of multiple multidrug efflux pumps, including the MexAB-OprM pump. The current study describes increases in the antibiotic resistance of PAO1 upon exposure to PCP and other chlorinated organics, including triclosan. Only exposure to chlorinated phenols induced the mexAB-oprM-mediated antibiotic-resistant phenotype. Thus, chlorinated phenols have the potential to contribute to transient phenotypic increases of antibiotic resistance that are relevant when both compounds are present in the environment. PMID:26403431

  1. Biosurfactants production by Pseudomonas aeruginosa FR using palm oil.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Fernando J S; Vazquez, Leonardo; De Campos, Norberto P; de França, Francisca P

    2006-03-01

    Biosurfactants production by a strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa using palm oil as a sole carbon source was investigated. The experiments were carried out in 500-mL conical flasks containing 100 mL of mineral media supplemented with palm oil as the sole carbon source. The P. aeruginosa FR strain was able to reduce surface tension of three tested inorganic media. Rotation velocities from 100 to 150 rpm provided free-cell fermented media with the lowest surface tension of approx 33 mN/m. Emulsification index results of even 100% were achieved when diesel was used as oil phase. Eight surface-active compounds produced by the bacterium were identified by mass spectrometry. PMID:18563649

  2. Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Treated with Azithromycin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phelan, Vanessa V.; Fang, Jinshu; Dorrestein, Pieter C.

    2015-06-01

    In microbiology, changes in specialized metabolite production (cell-to-cell signaling metabolites, virulence factors, and natural products) are measured using phenotypic assays. However, advances in mass spectrometry-based techniques including imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) now allow researchers to directly visualize the production of specialized metabolites from microbial colony biofilms. In this study, a combination of IMS and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was used to visualize the effect of the macrolide antibiotic azithromycin (AZM) on colony biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Although previous research suggested that AZM may inhibit cell-to-cell signaling of P. aeruginosa and thereby reduce pathogenicity, we observed no clear decrease in specialized metabolite production.

  3. The Psl economy in early P. aeruginosa biofilm development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Kun; Tseng, Boo Shan; Jin, Fan; Gibiansky, Max; Harrison, Joe; Parsek, Matthew; Wong, Gerard

    2012-02-01

    Psl from P. aeruginosa (PAO1) is a mannose- and galactose-rich exopolysaccharide (EPS). It has been shown that Psl plays an important role in bacterial surface adhesion. Here, we examine role of Psl in controlling motility and microcolony formation during early biofilm development, by translating video microscopy movies into searchable databases of bacterial trajectories. We use a massively-parallel cell tracking algorithm to extract the full motility history of every cell in a large community. We find that at early stages of growth, P. aeruginosa motility is guided by Psl and self-organize in a manner analogous to a capitalist economic system, resulting in a power law bacterial distribution where a small number of bacteria are extremely ``rich'' in communally produced Psl. By comparing overproducers and underproducers of Psl, we find that local Psl levels determine post-division cell fates: High local Psl levels drive the formation of sessile microcolonies that grow exponentially.

  4. Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Treated With Azithromycin

    PubMed Central

    Phelan, Vanessa V.; Fang, Jinshu; Dorrestein, Pieter C.

    2015-01-01

    In microbiology, changes in specialized metabolite production (cell-to-cell signaling metabolites, virulence factors and natural products) are measured using phenotypic assays. However, advances in mass spectrometry based techniques including imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) now allow researchers to directly visualize the production of specialized metabolites from microbial colony biofilms. In this study, a combination of IMS and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was used to visualize the effect of the macrolide antibiotic azithromycin (AZM) on colony biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. While previous research suggested that AZM may inhibit cell-to-cell signaling of P. aeruginosa and thereby reducing pathogenicity, we observed no clear decrease in specialized metabolite production. PMID:25801585

  5. Necrotizing stomatitis: report of 3 Pseudomonas aeruginosa-positive patients.

    PubMed

    Barasch, Andrei; Gordon, Sara; Geist, Rose Y; Geist, James R

    2003-08-01

    Necrotizing oral lesions have been described in immunosuppressed patients, usually in association with gingival and periodontal pathoses. The etiology of these lesions has not been completely elucidated. We present 3 patients with a type of necrotizing stomatitis in which clinical patterns appear distinct from the periodontal forms of the disease. The lesions yielded bacterial cultures positive for Pseudomonas aeruginosa and reverted to no growth in 2 patients after proper antibiotic therapy. We propose that P aeruginosa may be responsible for selected necrotizing oral lesions with a clinical presentation lacking typical necrotizing periodontal disease and that this condition may represent the intraoral counterpart of ecthyma gangrenosum. In such cases, bacterial culture of the lesion becomes imperative because the disease does not respond to typical periodontal and antimicrobial therapy. PMID:12931084

  6. Vacuum-insulated catalytic converter

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.

    2001-01-01

    A catalytic converter has an inner canister that contains catalyst-coated substrates and an outer canister that encloses an annular, variable vacuum insulation chamber surrounding the inner canister. An annular tank containing phase-change material for heat storage and release is positioned in the variable vacuum insulation chamber a distance spaced part from the inner canister. A reversible hydrogen getter in the variable vacuum insulation chamber, preferably on a surface of the heat storage tank, releases hydrogen into the variable vacuum insulation chamber to conduct heat when the phase-change material is hot and absorbs the hydrogen to limit heat transfer to radiation when the phase-change material is cool. A porous zeolite trap in the inner canister absorbs and retains hydrocarbons from the exhaust gases when the catalyst-coated substrates and zeolite trap are cold and releases the hydrocarbons for reaction on the catalyst-coated substrate when the zeolite trap and catalyst-coated substrate get hot.

  7. A closely regulated TWT converter.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopper, D. J.; Andryczyk, R. W.

    1971-01-01

    The design concept for the TWT amplifier converter for possible use in the Thermoelectric Outer Planet Spacecraft (TOPS) is presented. An unusual combination of semiconductors and magnetics was utilized to achieve very stable voltage regulation on a number of separate outputs to satisfy the requirements of a high-power TWT, and at the same time operate at an efficiency of better than 90% from a 30-V source. The circuitry consists of an output filter, an auxiliary Jensen oscillator driving a high-reactance transformer to provide current limiting to the heater, a variable time delay, a main Jensen oscillator driving the power transformer with a maximum step-up ratio of 120 to 1, and series transistorized post regulators to provide precise voltage adjustment and low output impedance. This paper discusses the design of the high-reactance transformer and the high step-up ratio transformer, as well as the high-voltage series regulators that are limited in range and operate at the top of the unregulated output voltage. Test data are presented, and details of current transients caused by charging the filter circuits, input current ripple, and output voltage ripples are considered.

  8. DC/DC Converter Stability Testing Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Bright L.

    2008-01-01

    This report presents study results on hybrid DC/DC converter stability testing methods. An input impedance measurement method and a gain/phase margin measurement method were evaluated to be effective to determine front-end oscillation and feedback loop oscillation. In particular, certain channel power levels of converter input noises have been found to have high degree correlation with the gain/phase margins. It becomes a potential new method to evaluate stability levels of all type of DC/DC converters by utilizing the spectral analysis on converter input noises.

  9. Membrane proteomes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Dé, E; Cosette, P; Coquet, L; Siroy, A; Alexandre, S; Duncan, A; Naudin, B; Rihouey, C; Schaumann, A; Junter, G A; Jouenne, T

    2011-12-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are known for their intrinsic resistance to antibiotics. Between mechanisms involved in this resistance, diminished expression of outer membrane proteins and up-regulation of efflux pumps play an important role. The characterization of membrane proteins is consequently necessary because of their importance in the antibiotic resistance but also in virulence. This review presents proteomic investigations aiming to describe the protein content of the membranes of these two bacterial species. PMID:19942379

  10. Outbreak of hot-foot syndrome - caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Michl, R K; Rusche, T; Grimm, S; Limpert, E; Beck, J F; Dost, A

    2012-07-01

    Infections with Pseudomonas aeruginosa can cause the hot-foot syndrome, presenting with painful plantar erythematous nodules. Particularly, the mechanically stressed areas of the foot are affected after contact with contaminated water from saunas, swimming pools, hot tubs, etc. We report an outbreak of hot-foot syndrome caused by Pseudomonas in 10 patients. The therapeutic regimens applied reached from local antiseptic therapy to systemic antibiotics. PMID:22187332

  11. Characterization of a rhodanese from the cyanogenic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Cipollone, Rita; Bigotti, Maria Giulia; Frangipani, Emanuela; Ascenzi, Paolo; Visca, Paolo

    2004-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the rRNA group I type species of genus Pseudomonas, is a Gram-negative, aerobic bacterium responsible for serious infection in humans. P. aeruginosa pathogenicity has been associated with the production of several virulence factors, including cyanide. Here, the biochemical characterization of recombinant P. aeruginosa rhodanese (Pa RhdA), catalyzing the sulfur transfer from thiosulfate to a thiophilic acceptor, e.g., cyanide, is reported. Sequence homology analysis of Pa RhdA predicts the sulfur-transfer reaction to occur through persulfuration of the conserved catalytic Cys230 residue. Accordingly, the titration of active Pa RhdA with cyanide indicates the presence of one extra sulfur bound to the Cys230 Sgamma atom per active enzyme molecule. Values of K(m) for thiosulfate binding to Pa RhdA are 1.0 and 7.4mM at pH 7.3 and 8.6, respectively, and 25 degrees C. However, the value of K(m) for cyanide binding to Pa RhdA (=14 mM, at 25 degrees C) and the value of V(max) (=750 micromol min(-1)mg(-1), at 25 degrees C) for the Pa RhdA-catalyzed sulfur-transfer reaction are essentially pH- and substrate-independent. Therefore, the thiosulfate-dependent Pa RhdA persulfuration is favored at pH 7.3 (i.e., the cytosolic pH of the bacterial cell) rather than pH 8.6 (i.e., the standard pH for rhodanese activity assay). Within this pH range, conformational change(s) occur at the Pa RhdA active site during the catalytic cycle. As a whole, rhodanese may participate in multiple detoxification mechanisms protecting P. aeruginosa from endogenous and environmental cyanide. PMID:15522204

  12. [Phlegmonous gastritis. Report of a case induced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa].

    PubMed

    Ramos Jiménez, F A; Arocena Cedrón, M G; Goikoetxea Artola, J M; Lázaro Aramburu, S; Múgica Barreiros, P

    1992-06-01

    The authors present a case of phlegmonous gastritis in a 65 year old patient. The diagnosis was made in the operating room and the treatment was conservative; no gastric resection was done. This clinical entity is interesting because it is a least frequent pathology, the pathogenic bacteria which was the cause (Pseudomona aeruginosa) has at this time not been reported in the literature, including the favorable outcome of the patient without gastric resection. PMID:1633018

  13. Draft Genome Sequences of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from Wounded Military Personnel

    PubMed Central

    Arivett, Brock A.; Ream, Dave C.; Fiester, Steven E.; Kidane, Destaalem

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a Gram-negative bacterium that causes severe hospital-acquired infections, is grouped as an ESKAPE (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter species) pathogen because of its extensive drug resistance phenotypes and effects on human health worldwide. Five multidrug resistant P. aeruginosa strains isolated from wounded military personnel were sequenced and annotated in this work. PMID:27516516

  14. Draft Genome Sequences of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from Wounded Military Personnel.

    PubMed

    Arivett, Brock A; Ream, Dave C; Fiester, Steven E; Kidane, Destaalem; Actis, Luis A

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a Gram-negative bacterium that causes severe hospital-acquired infections, is grouped as an ESKAPE (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter species) pathogen because of its extensive drug resistance phenotypes and effects on human health worldwide. Five multidrug resistant P. aeruginosa strains isolated from wounded military personnel were sequenced and annotated in this work. PMID:27516516

  15. Effect of tannin extract against Pseudomonas aeruginosa producing metallo beta-lactamase.

    PubMed

    Ghafourian, S; Mohebi, R; Sekawi, Z; Raftari, M; Neela, V; Ghafourian, E; Aboualigalehdari, E; Rahbar, M; Sadeghifard, N

    2012-01-01

    Carbapenems are the most potent beta-lactam agents with a broad-spectrum activity against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. They are stable in the presence of penicillinases and cephalosporinases. This study was focused on frequency of metallo beta- lactamase (MBL) among Pesudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated in patients with urinary tract infection, effect of tannin against PA positive strains which produced blaVIM or blaIMP and both of these genes (Species). Detection of MBL was performed by phonotypic and genotypic methods. Tannin extract was tested against P. aeruginosa producing MBL. During the study period, 240 P. aeruginosa isolates were identified. Among them 64 (26.6 percent) isolates were imipenem non-susceptible and confirmed by imipenem/EDTA. Our results revealed that the growth of blaVIM positive P. aeruginosa inhibited at 15 microg/ml concentration. The experiment repeated for blaIMP-positive P. aeruginosa and P. aeruginosa which harbored blaIMP and blaVIM, the results showed 35 microg/ml was the best concentration for inhibition of P. aeruginosa-positive blaIMP and also P. aeruginosa blaIMP and blaVIM. In conclusion, tannin was effective against P. aeruginosa producing blaVIM and blaIMP and both of them so it can be substituted with common antibiotics. The result showed significantly P. aeruginosa-harbored blaIMP was more responsible for imipenem resistance than P. aeruginosa-positive blaVIM. Interestingly, tannin was more effective against MBL-P. aeruginosa in comparison with current antibiotics. PMID:22824750

  16. Inquisition of Microcystis aeruginosa and Synechocystis nanowires: characterization and modelling.

    PubMed

    Sure, Sandeep; Torriero, Angel A J; Gaur, Aditya; Li, Lu Hua; Chen, Ying; Tripathi, Chandrakant; Adholeya, Alok; Ackland, M Leigh; Kochar, Mandira

    2015-11-01

    Identification of extracellular conductive pilus-like structures (PLS) i.e. microbial nanowires has spurred great interest among scientists due to their potential applications in the fields of biogeochemistry, bioelectronics, bioremediation etc. Using conductive atomic force microscopy, we identified microbial nanowires in Microcystis aeruginosa PCC 7806 which is an aerobic, photosynthetic microorganism. We also confirmed the earlier finding that Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 produces microbial nanowires. In contrast to the use of highly instrumented continuous flow reactors for Synechocystis reported earlier, we identified simple and optimum culture conditions which allow increased production of nanowires in both test cyanobacteria. Production of these nanowires in Synechocystis and Microcystis were found to be sensitive to the availability of carbon source and light intensity. These structures seem to be proteinaceous in nature and their diameter was found to be 4.5-7 and 8.5-11 nm in Synechocystis and M. aeruginosa, respectively. Characterization of Synechocystis nanowires by transmission electron microscopy and biochemical techniques confirmed that they are type IV pili (TFP) while nanowires in M. aeruginosa were found to be similar to an unnamed protein (GenBank : CAO90693.1). Modelling studies of the Synechocystis TFP subunit i.e. PilA1 indicated that strategically placed aromatic amino acids may be involved in electron transfer through these nanowires. This study identifies PLS from Microcystis which can act as nanowires and supports the earlier hypothesis that microbial nanowires are widespread in nature and play diverse roles. PMID:26319534

  17. Impact of quorum sensing on fitness of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Heurlier, Karin; Dénervaud, Valérie; Haas, Dieter

    2006-04-01

    In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, cell-cell communication based on N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) signal molecules (termed quorum sensing) is known to control the production of extracellular virulence factors. Hence, in pathogenic interactions with host organisms, the quorum-sensing (QS) machinery can confer a selective advantage on P. aeruginosa. However, as shown by transcriptomic and proteomic studies, many intracellular metabolic functions are also regulated by quorum sensing. Some of these serve to regenerate the AHL precursors methionine and S-adenosyl-methionine and to degrade adenosine via inosine and hypoxanthine. The fact that a significant percentage of clinical and environmental isolates of P. aeruginosa is defective for QS because of mutation in the major QS regulatory gene lasR, raises the question of whether the QS machinery can have a negative impact on the organism's fitness. In vitro, lasR mutants have a higher probability to escape lytic death in stationary phase under alkaline conditions than has the QS-proficient wild type. Similar selective forces might also operate in natural environments. PMID:16503417

  18. PA3297 Counteracts Antimicrobial Effects of Azithromycin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Hao; Zhang, Lu; Weng, Yuding; Chen, Ronghao; Zhu, Feng; Jin, Yongxin; Cheng, Zhihui; Jin, Shouguang; Wu, Weihui

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes acute and chronic infections in human. Its increasing resistance to antibiotics requires alternative treatments that are more effective than available strategies. Among the alternatives is the unconventional usage of conventional antibiotics, of which the macrolide antibiotic azithromycin (AZM) provides a paradigmatic example. AZM therapy is associated with a small but consistent improvement in respiratory function of cystic fibrosis patients suffering from chronic P. aeruginosa infection. Besides immunomodulating activities, AZM represses bacterial genes involved in virulence, quorum sensing, biofilm formation, and motility, all of which are due to stalling of ribosome and depletion of cellular tRNA pool. However, how P. aeruginosa responds to and counteracts the effects of AZM remain elusive. Here, we found that deficiency of PA3297, a gene encoding a DEAH-box helicase, intensified AZM-mediated bacterial killing, suppression of pyocyanin production and swarming motility, and hypersusceptibility to hydrogen peroxide. We demonstrated that expression of PA3297 is induced by the interaction between AZM and ribosome. Importantly, mutation of PA3297 resulted in elevated levels of unprocessed 23S-5S rRNA in the presence of AZM, which might lead to increased susceptibility to AZM-mediated effects. Our results revealed one of the bacterial responses in counteracting the detrimental effects of AZM. PMID:27014238

  19. Genotypic analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from ocular infection.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Suzuki, Takashi; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Oka, Naoko; Ishikawa, Eri; Shinomiya, Hiroto; Ohashi, Yuichi

    2014-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the causative pathogen of keratitis, conjunctivitis, and dacryocystitis. However little is known about their clinical epidemiology in Japan. In this study we investigated the genotypic characterization and serotype of P. aeruginosa isolates from ocular infections. Thirty-four clinical P. aeruginosa isolates were characterized according to infection type, the type III secretion system (TTSS), serotype, and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). We divided the isolates into four clinical infection types as follows: Contact lens (CL)-related keratitis (CL-keratitis; 15 isolates), non CL-related keratitis (non CL-keratitis; 8 isolates), conjunctivitis (7 isolates), and dacryocystitis (4 isolates). Regarding the TTSS classification and serotyping classification, no significant differences were found among the infection types. Two clusters (I, II) and three subclusters (A, B, C) were classified according to MLST. CL-keratitis isolates with exoU positivity were clustered in II-B, and conjunctivitis was clustered in cluster I. Some linkage was found between the genetic background and CL-keratitis or conjunctivitis. PMID:24746897

  20. Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteriophage phi PLS27-lipopolysaccharide interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Jarrell, K F; Kropinski, A M

    1981-01-01

    We investigated the phi PLS27 receptor in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PAO lipopolysaccharide (LPS) by analyzing a resistant mutant. This mutant, which was designated AK1282, had the most defective LPS yet reported for a P. aeruginosa rough mutant; this LPS contained only lipid A, 2-keto-3-deoxyoctonate, heptose, and alanine as major components. In addition, this LPS lacked galactosamine, which is present in the inner core of the LPS of other rough mutants. The loss of galactosamine but only a small decrease in the alanine content indicated that the core of strain PAO LPS differed from the core structure which has been suggested for the LPS of other well-characterized P. aeruginosa strains. Our analysis also indicated that galactosamine residues may be crucial for phi PLS27 receptor activity of the LPS. Electrodialysis of LPS and conversion to salt forms (sodium or triethylamine) influenced the phage-inactivating capacity of the LPS, as did the medium in which the inactivation occurred; experiments performed in 1/10-strength broth resulted in much lower PhI50 (concentration of LPS causing a 50% decrease in the titer of phage during 1 h of incubation at 37 degrees C) values than experiments performed in regular-strength broth. Sonication of the LPS also increased the phage-inactivating capacities of the LPS preparations. PMID:6798225

  1. Nosocomial outbreak of OXA-18-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Kalai Blagui, S; Achour, W; Abbassi, M S; Bejaoui, M; Abdeladhim, A; Ben Hassen, A

    2007-08-01

    Following systematic screening for ceftazidime-resistant (CAZ-R) Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 24 isolates producing extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) were recovered during a 24-month period at the National Bone Marrow Transplant Centre of Tunisia. These isolates were from seven immunocompromised patients and from environmental swabs. ESBLs inhibited by clavulanic acid were detected by double-disk diffusion tests. Isoelectric focusing revealed that these isolates produced two to four beta-lactamases with pIs of 5.5, 6.1, 6.4, 7.6 or 8.2, and PCR detected the presence of bla(OXA-18), bla(SHV) and bla(TEM) genes in 24, 21 and two isolates, respectively. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis defined two dominant genotypic groups: group A (16 isolates) and group B (four isolates). Sequencing of PCR products from representative isolates identified the bla(OXA-18) gene and revealed nucleotide sequences belonging to the bla(SHV-1) and bla(TEM-1) genes. Isolates producing OXA-18 belonged to genomic group A and were isolated from four immunocompromised patients in the haematology and graft units, and from two wash-basins in the graft unit. No immunocompromised patient harboured the clonal epidemic strain upon admission. This is the first report of the OXA-18-type ESBL in P. aeruginosa in Tunisia, and the first description of an outbreak caused by an OXA-18-producing strain of P. aeruginosa. PMID:17610599

  2. Antimicrobial activities of Saudi honey against Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Al-Nahari, Alaa A.M.; Almasaudi, Saad B.; Abd El-Ghany, El Sayed M.; Barbour, Elie; Al Jaouni, Soad K.; Harakeh, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Five types of imported and local honey were screened for both their bacteriocidal/bacteriostatic activities against both Imipenem resistant and sensitive Pseudomonas aeruginosa in both Brain Heart infusion broth and Mueller–Hinton agar. The results indicated that the effect was concentration and type of honey dependant. All types of honey tested exerted a full inhibition of bacterial growth at the highest concentration tested of 50% at 24 h of contact. The inhibitory effect of honey on bacterial growth was clear with concentrations of 20% and 10% and this effect was most evident in the case of Manuka honey as compared to Nigella sativa honey and Seder honey. Manuka honey UMF +20 showed a bacteriocidal activity on both Imipenem resistant and sensitive P. aeruginosa, while Seder honey and N. sativa honey exerted only a bacteriostatic effect. Manuka honey UMF +10 showed most effect on antimicrobial resistance. Manuka honey UMF +10 had an effect on modulation of Imipenem resistant P. aeruginosa. Conclusion: The results indicated that various types of honey affected the test organisms differently. Modulation of antimicrobial resistance was seen in the case Manuka honey UMF +10. PMID:26288553

  3. Strategies for improved rhamnolipid production by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA1

    PubMed Central

    Pereira Jr, Nei; Freire, Denise M.G.

    2016-01-01

    Rhamnolipids are biosurfactants with potential for diversified industrial and environmental uses. The present study evaluated three strategies for increasing the production of rhamnolipid-type biosurfactants produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PA1. The influence of pH, the addition of P. aeruginosa spent culture medium and the use of a fed-batch process were examined. The culture medium adjusted to pH 7.0 was the most productive. Furthermore, the pH of the culture medium had a measurable effect on the ratio of synthesized mono- and dirhamnolipids. At pH values below 7.3, the proportion of monorhamnolipids decreased from 45 to 24%. The recycling of 20% of the spent culture medium in where P. aeruginosa was grown up to the later stationary phase was responsible for a 100% increase in rhamnolipid volumetric productivity in the new culture medium. Finally, the use of fed-batch operation under conditions of limited nitrogen resulted in a 3.8-fold increase in the amount of rhamnolipids produced (2.9 g L−1–10.9 g L−1). These results offer promising pathways for the optimization of processes for the production of rhamnolipids. PMID:27257553

  4. Distinct synergistic action of piperacillin and methylglyoxal against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Sayanti; Chaki, Shaswati; Das, Sukhen; Sen, Saswati; Dutta, Samir Kr; Dastidar, Sujata G

    2011-07-01

    The dicarbonyl compound methylglyoxal is a natural constituent of Manuka honey produced from Manuka flowers in New Zealand. It is known to possess both anticancer and antibacterial activity. Such observations prompted to investigate the ability of methylglyoxal as a potent drug against multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. A total of 12 test P. aeruginosa strains isolated from various hospitals were tested for their resistances against many antibiotics, most of which are applied in the treatment of P. aeruginosa infections. Results revealed that the strains were resistant to many drugs at high levels, only piperacillin, carbenicillin, amikacin and ciprofloxacin showed resistances at comparatively lower levels. Following multiple experimentations it was observed that methylglyoxal was also antimicrobic against all the strains at comparable levels. Distinct and statistically significant synergism was observed between methylglyoxal and piperacillin by disc diffusion tests when compared with their individual effects. The fractional inhibitory concentration index of this combination evaluated by checkerboard analysis, was 0.5, which confirmed synergism between the pair. Synergism was also noted when methylglyoxal was combined with carbenicillin and amikacin. PMID:21800506

  5. Mechanism of azithromycin inhibition of HSL synthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Jianming; Zhang, Ni; Huang, Bin; Cai, Renxin; Wu, Binning; E, Shunmei; Fang, Chengcai; Chen, Cha

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen and a leading cause of nosocomial infections. Unfortunately, P. aeruginosa has low antibiotic susceptibility due to several chromosomally encoded antibiotic resistance genes. Hence, we carried out mechanistic studies to determine how azithromycin affects quorum sensing and virulence in P. aeruginosa. lasI and rhlI single and double mutants were constructed. We then undertook a quantitative approach to determine the optimal concentration of azithromycin and culture time that can affect the expression of HSLs. Furthermore, based on the above results, the effect on quorum sensing was analyzed at a transcriptional level. It was found that 2 μg/mL azithromycin caused a 79% decrease in 3-oxo-C12-HSL secretion during cultivation, while C4-HSL secretion was strongly repressed in the early stages. Azithromycin acts on ribosomes; to determine whether this can elicit alternative modes of gene expression, transcriptional regulation of representative virulence genes was analyzed. We propose a new relationship for lasI and rhlI: lasI acts as a cell density sensor, and rhlI functions as a fine-tuning mechanism for coordination between different quorum sensing systems. PMID:27075730

  6. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Displays Multiple Phenotypes during Development as a Biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Sauer, Karin; Camper, Anne K.; Ehrlich, Garth D.; Costerton, J. William; Davies, David G.

    2002-01-01

    Complementary approaches were employed to characterize transitional episodes in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm development using direct observation and whole-cell protein analysis. Microscopy and in situ reporter gene analysis were used to directly observe changes in biofilm physiology and to act as signposts to standardize protein collection for two-dimensional electrophoretic analysis and protein identification in chemostat and continuous-culture biofilm-grown populations. Using these approaches, we characterized five stages of biofilm development: (i) reversible attachment, (ii) irreversible attachment, (iii) maturation-1, (iv) maturation-2, and (v) dispersion. Biofilm cells were shown to change regulation of motility, alginate production, and quorum sensing during the process of development. The average difference in detectable protein regulation between each of the five stages of development was 35% (approximately 525 proteins). When planktonic cells were compared with maturation-2 stage biofilm cells, more than 800 proteins were shown to have a sixfold or greater change in expression level (over 50% of the proteome). This difference was higher than when planktonic P. aeruginosa were compared with planktonic cultures of Pseudomonas putida. Las quorum sensing was shown to play no role in early biofilm development but was important in later stages. Biofilm cells in the dispersion stage were more similar to planktonic bacteria than to maturation-2 stage bacteria. These results demonstrate that P. aeruginosa displays multiple phenotypes during biofilm development and that knowledge of stage-specific physiology may be important in detecting and controlling biofilm growth. PMID:11807075

  7. Pseudomonas aeruginosa immunotype 5 polysaccharide-toxin A conjugate vaccine.

    PubMed Central

    Cryz, S J; Furer, E; Sadoff, J C; Germanier, R

    1986-01-01

    Polysaccharide (PS) derived from Pseudomonas aeruginosa immunotype 5 lipopolysaccharide was covalently coupled to toxin A by reductive amination with adipic acid dihydrazide as a spacer molecule. The resulting PS-toxin A conjugate was composed of 27.5% PS and 72.5% toxin A. The conjugate was composed of heterogeneous high-molecular-weight species, all of which possessed an Mr greater than 670,000. The conjugate was nontoxic for mice and nonpyrogenic at a dose of 50 micrograms/kg of body weight when intravenously administered to rabbits. Immunization of rabbits with the conjugate evoked both an antilipopolysaccharide immunoglobulin G (IgG) and an anti-toxin A IgG response. Anticonjugate IgG was capable of neutralizing the cytotoxic effect of toxin A. Immunization of mice with the conjugate increased the mean lethal dose from 4.5 X 10(1) P. aeruginosa for control mice to 9.6 X 10(5) P. aeruginosa for vaccinated mice. Similarly, immunization raised the mean lethal dose for toxin A from 0.2 to 4.67 micrograms per mouse. PMID:3082756

  8. Mechanism of azithromycin inhibition of HSL synthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Jianming; Zhang, Ni; Huang, Bin; Cai, Renxin; Wu, Binning; E, Shunmei; Fang, Chengcai; Chen, Cha

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen and a leading cause of nosocomial infections. Unfortunately, P. aeruginosa has low antibiotic susceptibility due to several chromosomally encoded antibiotic resistance genes. Hence, we carried out mechanistic studies to determine how azithromycin affects quorum sensing and virulence in P. aeruginosa. lasI and rhlI single and double mutants were constructed. We then undertook a quantitative approach to determine the optimal concentration of azithromycin and culture time that can affect the expression of HSLs. Furthermore, based on the above results, the effect on quorum sensing was analyzed at a transcriptional level. It was found that 2 μg/mL azithromycin caused a 79% decrease in 3-oxo-C12-HSL secretion during cultivation, while C4-HSL secretion was strongly repressed in the early stages. Azithromycin acts on ribosomes; to determine whether this can elicit alternative modes of gene expression, transcriptional regulation of representative virulence genes was analyzed. We propose a new relationship for lasI and rhlI: lasI acts as a cell density sensor, and rhlI functions as a fine-tuning mechanism for coordination between different quorum sensing systems. PMID:27075730

  9. Origin and Impact of Nitric Oxide in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Cutruzzolà, Francesca; Frankenberg-Dinkel, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    The formation of the organized bacterial community called biofilm is a crucial event in bacterial physiology. Given that biofilms are often refractory to antibiotics and disinfectants to which planktonic bacteria are susceptible, their formation is also an industrially and medically relevant issue. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a well-known human pathogen causing acute and chronic infections, is considered a model organism to study biofilms. A large number of environmental cues control biofilm dynamics in bacterial cells. In particular, the dispersal of individual cells from the biofilm requires metabolic and morphological reprogramming in which the second messenger bis-(3′-5′)-cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP) plays a central role. The diatomic gas nitric oxide (NO), a well-known signaling molecule in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, is able to induce the dispersal of P. aeruginosa and other bacterial biofilms by lowering c-di-GMP levels. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the molecular mechanisms connecting NO sensing to the activation of c-di-GMP-specific phosphodiesterases in P. aeruginosa, ultimately leading to c-di-GMP decrease and biofilm dispersal. PMID:26260455

  10. Arsenic Efflux from Microcystis aeruginosa under Different Phosphate Regimes

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Changzhou; Wang, Zhenhong; Luo, Zhuanxi

    2014-01-01

    Phytoplankton plays an important role in arsenic speciation, distribution, and cycling in freshwater environments. Little information, however, is available on arsenic efflux from the cyanobacteria Microcystis aeruginosa under different phosphate regimes. This study investigated M. aeruginosa arsenic efflux and speciation by pre-exposing it to 10 µM arsenate or arsenite for 24 h during limited (12 h) and extended (13 d) depuration periods under phosphate enriched (+P) and phosphate depleted (−P) treatments. Arsenate was the predominant species detected in algal cells throughout the depuration period while arsenite only accounted for no greater than 45% of intracellular arsenic. During the limited depuration period, arsenic efflux occurred rapidly and only arsenate was detected in solutions. During the extended depuration period, however, arsenate and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) were found to be the two predominant arsenic species detected in solutions under −P treatments, but arsenate was the only species detected under +P treatments. Experimental results also suggest that phosphorus has a significant effect in accelerating arsenic efflux and promoting arsenite bio-oxidation in M. aeruginosa. Furthermore, phosphorus depletion can reduce arsenic efflux from algal cells as well as accelerate arsenic reduction and methylation. These findings can contribute to our understanding of arsenic biogeochemistry in aquatic environments and its potential environmental risks under different phosphorus levels. PMID:25549253

  11. Rhamnolipids Modulate Swarming Motility Patterns of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Caiazza, Nicky C.; Shanks, Robert M. Q.; O'Toole, G. A.

    2005-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is capable of twitching, swimming, and swarming motility. The latter form of translocation occurs on semisolid surfaces, requires functional flagella and biosurfactant production, and results in complex motility patterns. From the point of inoculation, bacteria migrate as defined groups, referred to as tendrils, moving in a coordinated manner capable of sensing and responding to other groups of cells. We were able to show that P. aeruginosa produces extracellular factors capable of modulating tendril movement, and genetic analysis revealed that modulation of these movements was dependent on rhamnolipid biosynthesis. An rhlB mutant (deficient in mono- and dirhamnolipid production) and an rhlC mutant (deficient in dirhamnolipid production) exhibited altered swarming patterns characterized by irregularly shaped tendrils. In addition, agar supplemented with rhamnolipid-containing spent supernatant inhibited wild-type (WT) swarming, whereas agar supplemented with spent supernatant from mutants that do not make rhamnolipids had no effect on WT P. aeruginosa swarming. Addition of purified rhamnolipids to swarming medium also inhibited swarming motility of the WT strain. We also show that a sadB mutant does not sense and/or respond to other groups of swarming cells and this mutant was capable of swarming on media supplemented with rhamnolipid-containing spent supernatant or purified rhamnolipids. The abilities to produce and respond to rhamnolipids in the context of group behavior are discussed. PMID:16237018

  12. Light intensity adaptation and phycobilisome composition of Microcystis aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Raps, S.; Kycia, J.H.; Ledbetter, M.C.; Siegelman, H.W.

    1985-12-01

    Phycobilisomes isolated from Microcystis aeruginosa grown to midlog at high light (270 microeinsteins per square meter per second) or at low light intensities (40 microeinsteins per square meter per second) were found to be identical. Electron micrographs established that they have a triangular central core apparently consisting of three allophycocyanin trimers surrounded by six rods, each composed of two hexameric phycocyanin molecules. The apparent mass of a phycobilisome obtained by gel filtration is 2.96 x 10/sup 6/ daltons. The molar ratio of the phycobiliproteins per phycobilisome is 12 phycocyanin hexamers:9 allophycocyanin trimers. The electron microscopic observations combined with the phycobilisome apparent mass and the phycobiliprotein stoichiometry data indicate that M. aeruginosa phycobilisomes are composed of a triangular central core of three stacks of three allophycocyanin trimers and six rods each containing two phycocyanin hexamers. Adaptation of M. aeruginosa to high light intensity results in a decrease in the number of phycobilisomes per cell with no alteration in phycobilisome composition or structure.

  13. Mycofabricated biosilver nanoparticles interrupt Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing systems.

    PubMed

    Singh, Braj R; Singh, Brahma N; Singh, Akanksha; Khan, Wasi; Naqvi, Alim H; Singh, Harikesh B

    2015-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a chemical communication process that Pseudomonas aeruginosa uses to regulate virulence and biofilm formation. Disabling of QS is an emerging approach for combating its pathogenicity. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been widely applied as antimicrobial agents against human pathogenic bacteria and fungi, but not for the attenuation of bacterial QS. Here we mycofabricated AgNPs (mfAgNPs) using metabolites of soil fungus Rhizopus arrhizus BRS-07 and tested their effect on QS-regulated virulence and biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa. Transcriptional studies demonstrated that mfAgNPs reduced the levels of LasIR-RhlIR. Treatment of mfAgNPs inhibited biofilm formation, production of several virulence factors (e.g. LasA protease, LasB elastrase, pyocyanin, pyoverdin, pyochelin, rhamnolipid, and alginate) and reduced AHLs production. Further genes quantification analyses revealed that mfAgNPs significantly down-regulated QS-regulated genes, specifically those encoded to the secretion of virulence factors. The results clearly indicated the anti-virulence property of mfAgNPs by inhibiting P. aeruginosa QS signaling. PMID:26347993

  14. Gallium induces the production of virulence factors in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    García-Contreras, Rodolfo; Pérez-Eretza, Berenice; Lira-Silva, Elizabeth; Jasso-Chávez, Ricardo; Coria-Jiménez, Rafael; Rangel-Vega, Adrián; Maeda, Toshinari; Wood, Thomas K

    2014-02-01

    The novel antimicrobial gallium is a nonredox iron III analogue with bacteriostatic and bactericidal properties, effective for the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in vitro and in vivo in mouse and rabbit infection models. It interferes with iron metabolism, transport, and presumably its homeostasis. As gallium exerts its antimicrobial effects by competing with iron, we hypothesized that it ultimately will lead cells to an iron deficiency status. As iron deficiency promotes the expression of virulence factors in vitro and promotes the pathogenicity of P. aeruginosa in animal models, it is anticipated that treatment with gallium will also promote the production of virulence factors. To test this hypothesis, the reference strain PA14 and two clinical isolates from patients with cystic fibrosis were exposed to gallium, and their production of pyocyanin, rhamnolipids, elastase, alkaline protease, alginate, pyoverdine, and biofilm was determined. Gallium treatment induced the production of all the virulence factors tested in the three strains except for pyoverdine. In addition, as the Ga-induced virulence factors are quorum sensing controlled, co-administration of Ga and the quorum quencher brominated furanone C-30 was assayed, and it was found that C-30 alleviated growth inhibition from gallium. Hence, adding both C-30 and gallium may be more effective in the treatment of P. aeruginosa infections. PMID:24151196

  15. Origin and Impact of Nitric Oxide in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The formation of the organized bacterial community called biofilm is a crucial event in bacterial physiology. Given that biofilms are often refractory to antibiotics and disinfectants to which planktonic bacteria are susceptible, their formation is also an industrially and medically relevant issue. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a well-known human pathogen causing acute and chronic infections, is considered a model organism to study biofilms. A large number of environmental cues control biofilm dynamics in bacterial cells. In particular, the dispersal of individual cells from the biofilm requires metabolic and morphological reprogramming in which the second messenger bis-(3′-5′)-cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP) plays a central role. The diatomic gas nitric oxide (NO), a well-known signaling molecule in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, is able to induce the dispersal of P. aeruginosa and other bacterial biofilms by lowering c-di-GMP levels. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the molecular mechanisms connecting NO sensing to the activation of c-di-GMP-specific phosphodiesterases in P. aeruginosa, ultimately leading to c-di-GMP decrease and biofilm dispersal. PMID:26260455

  16. Morphogenetic expression of Moraxella bovis fimbriae (pili) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Beard, M K; Mattick, J S; Moore, L J; Mott, M R; Marrs, C F; Egerton, J R

    1990-01-01

    Type 4 fimbriae (pili) are found in a wide variety of gram-negative bacteria and are composed of small structural subunits which share significant sequence homology among different species, especially at their amino-terminal ends. Previous studies demonstrating morphogenetic expression of Bacteroides nodosus fimbriae from cloned subunit genes in Pseudomonas aeruginosa suggested that there is a common mechanism for type 4 fimbriae assembly and that the structural subunits are interchangeable (J. S. Mattick et al., J. Bacteriol. 169:33-41, 1987). Here we have examined the expression of Moraxella bovis fimbrial subunits in P. aeruginosa. M. bovis subunits were assembled into extracellular fimbriae in this host, in some cases as a homopolymer but in others as a mosaic with the indigenous subunit, indicating structural equivalence. This result contrasts with other studies in which recombinant P. aeruginosa expressing different subunits produced fimbriae composed almost exclusively of one subunit or the other (T. C. Elleman and J. E. Peterson, Mol. Microbiol. 1:377-380, 1987). Both observations can be explained by reversibility of subunit-subunit interactions at the site of assembly, with the forward equilibrium favoring chain extension between compatible subunits. Images PMID:1970564

  17. INHIBITION OF VIRULENCE FACTORS OF PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA BY DICLOFENAC SODIUM.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Hisham A

    2015-01-01

    Resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to antibiotics is a major problem. Targeting virulence factors is an alternative option to avoid the emergence of resistance to antibiotics. The effect of sub-inhibitory concentration of diclofenac sodium on the production of virulence factors of P. aeruginosa was investigated. The virulence factors included protease, haemolysin, pyocyanin and pyoverdin, in addition to pathogenic behaviors such as swimming and twitching motilities and biofilm formation. Diclofenac sodium showed significant inhibition of virulence factors as compared to the control. Diclofenac sodium decreased twitching and swimming motilities by 29.27% and 45.36%, respectively. The percentage of inhibition of pyocyanin by diclofenac sodium was 42.32%. On the other hand, pyoverdin was inhibited to a lesser extent (36.72%). Diclofenac sodium reduced protease by 52.58% and biofilm formation by 58.37%. Moreover, haemolytic activity in the presence of diclofenac sodium was 15.64% as compared to the control (100% haemolytic activity). The inhibitory activities may be due to inhibition of quorum sensing that regulates the expression of virulence factors. This study suggests the potential for the use of diclofenac sodium as an anti-virulence agent in the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections. PMID:27328521

  18. PA3297 Counteracts Antimicrobial Effects of Azithromycin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Tan, Hao; Zhang, Lu; Weng, Yuding; Chen, Ronghao; Zhu, Feng; Jin, Yongxin; Cheng, Zhihui; Jin, Shouguang; Wu, Weihui

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes acute and chronic infections in human. Its increasing resistance to antibiotics requires alternative treatments that are more effective than available strategies. Among the alternatives is the unconventional usage of conventional antibiotics, of which the macrolide antibiotic azithromycin (AZM) provides a paradigmatic example. AZM therapy is associated with a small but consistent improvement in respiratory function of cystic fibrosis patients suffering from chronic P. aeruginosa infection. Besides immunomodulating activities, AZM represses bacterial genes involved in virulence, quorum sensing, biofilm formation, and motility, all of which are due to stalling of ribosome and depletion of cellular tRNA pool. However, how P. aeruginosa responds to and counteracts the effects of AZM remain elusive. Here, we found that deficiency of PA3297, a gene encoding a DEAH-box helicase, intensified AZM-mediated bacterial killing, suppression of pyocyanin production and swarming motility, and hypersusceptibility to hydrogen peroxide. We demonstrated that expression of PA3297 is induced by the interaction between AZM and ribosome. Importantly, mutation of PA3297 resulted in elevated levels of unprocessed 23S-5S rRNA in the presence of AZM, which might lead to increased susceptibility to AZM-mediated effects. Our results revealed one of the bacterial responses in counteracting the detrimental effects of AZM. PMID:27014238

  19. Biomolecular Mechanisms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Laverty, Garry; Gorman, Sean P.; Gilmore, Brendan F.

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli are the most prevalent Gram-negative biofilm forming medical device associated pathogens, particularly with respect to catheter associated urinary tract infections. In a similar manner to Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative biofilm formation is fundamentally determined by a series of steps outlined more fully in this review, namely adhesion, cellular aggregation, and the production of an extracellular polymeric matrix. More specifically this review will explore the biosynthesis and role of pili and flagella in Gram-negative adhesion and accumulation on surfaces in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli. The process of biofilm maturation is compared and contrasted in both species, namely the production of the exopolysaccharides via the polysaccharide synthesis locus (Psl), pellicle Formation (Pel) and alginic acid synthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and UDP-4-amino-4-deoxy-l-arabinose and colonic acid synthesis in Escherichia coli. An emphasis is placed on the importance of the LuxR homologue sdiA; the luxS/autoinducer-II; an autoinducer-III/epinephrine/norepinephrine and indole mediated Quorum sensing systems in enabling Gram-negative bacteria to adapt to their environments. The majority of Gram-negative biofilms consist of polysaccharides of a simple sugar structure (either homo- or heteropolysaccharides) that provide an optimum environment for the survival and maturation of bacteria, allowing them to display increased resistance to antibiotics and predation. PMID:25438014

  20. Mycofabricated biosilver nanoparticles interrupt Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing systems

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Braj R.; Singh, Brahma N.; Singh, Akanksha; Khan, Wasi; Naqvi, Alim H.; Singh, Harikesh B.

    2015-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a chemical communication process that Pseudomonas aeruginosa uses to regulate virulence and biofilm formation. Disabling of QS is an emerging approach for combating its pathogenicity. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been widely applied as antimicrobial agents against human pathogenic bacteria and fungi, but not for the attenuation of bacterial QS. Here we mycofabricated AgNPs (mfAgNPs) using metabolites of soil fungus Rhizopus arrhizus BRS-07 and tested their effect on QS-regulated virulence and biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa. Transcriptional studies demonstrated that mfAgNPs reduced the levels of LasIR-RhlIR. Treatment of mfAgNPs inhibited biofilm formation, production of several virulence factors (e.g. LasA protease, LasB elastrase, pyocyanin, pyoverdin, pyochelin, rhamnolipid, and alginate) and reduced AHLs production. Further genes quantification analyses revealed that mfAgNPs significantly down-regulated QS-regulated genes, specifically those encoded to the secretion of virulence factors. The results clearly indicated the anti-virulence property of mfAgNPs by inhibiting P. aeruginosa QS signaling. PMID:26347993

  1. Epidemiology of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a tertiary referral teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Bradbury, R S; Champion, A C; Reid, D W

    2009-10-01

    A genotypically indistinguishable strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Australian epidemic strain III: AES III) has previously been found in a proportion of adults with cystic fibrosis (CF) in Tasmania, Australia. The aim of this study was to identify a source of these infections within the major tertiary referral hospital for the State of Tasmania, and to determine if this strain could be isolated from settings other than the CF lung. A total of 120 isolates of P. aeruginosa were collected from clinical and environmental sources within the hospital and from environmental locations in the hospital vicinity. These isolates were genotyped by random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed using the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute method. Confirmation of similar genotypes identified by RAPD-PCR was performed using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis with restriction enzyme SpeI. AES III was not recovered from any source other than the respiratory secretions of CF patients. P. aeruginosa in the non-CF settings was found to be panmictic, and no cross-infection or acquisition of hospital environment strains by patients was observed. PMID:19699556

  2. Continued transmission of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from a wash hand basin tap in a critical care unit.

    PubMed

    Garvey, M I; Bradley, C W; Tracey, J; Oppenheim, B

    2016-09-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important nosocomial pathogen, colonizing hospital water supplies including taps and sinks. We report a cluster of P. aeruginosa acquisitions during a period of five months from tap water to patients occupying the same burns single room in a critical care unit. Pseudomonas aeruginosa cultured from clinical isolates from four different patients was indistinguishable from water strains by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Water outlets in critical care may be a source of P. aeruginosa despite following the national guidance, and updated guidance and improved control measures are needed to reduce the risks of transmission to patients. PMID:27249962

  3. Quorum-sensing-regulated virulence factors in Pseudomonas aeruginosa are toxic to Lucilia sericata maggots

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, A. S.; Joergensen, B.; Bjarnsholt, T.; Johansen, H.; Karlsmark, T.; Givskov, M.; Krogfelt, K. A.

    2010-01-01

    Maggot debridement therapy (MDT) is widely used for debridement of chronic infected wounds; however, for wounds harbouring specific bacteria limited effect or failure of the treatment has been described. Here we studied the survival of Lucilia sericata maggots encountering Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 in a simple assay with emphasis on the quorum-sensing (QS)-regulated virulence. The maggots were challenged with GFP-tagged P. aeruginosa wild-type (WT) PAO1 and a GFP-tagged P. aeruginosa ΔlasR rhlR (ΔRR) QS-deficient mutant in different concentrations. Maggots were killed in the presence of WT PAO1 whereas the challenge with the QS mutant showed a survival reduction of ∼25 % compared to negative controls. Furthermore, bacterial intake by the maggots was lower in the presence of WT PAO1 compared to the PAO1 ΔRR mutant. Maggot excretions/secretions (ES) were assayed for the presence of QS inhibitors; only high doses of ES showed inhibition of QS in P. aeruginosa. Thus P. aeruginosa was shown to be toxic to L. sericata maggots. This, coupled to the preferential feeding by the maggots and reduced ingestion of P. aeruginosa, could explain MDT failure in wounds colonized by P. aeruginosa. Wounds heavily colonized with P. aeruginosa should be a counterindication for MDT unless used in combination with a pre-treatment with other topical therapeutics targeting P. aeruginosa. PMID:19892758

  4. Inactivation of Microcystis aeruginosa using dielectric barrier discharge low-temperature plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Sichuan; Chen, Jierong; Wang, Gang; Li, Xiaoyong; Ma, Yun

    2013-05-01

    The efficiency of Microcystis aeruginosa plasma inactivation was investigated using dielectric barrier discharge low-temperature plasma. The inactivation efficiency was characterized in terms of optical density. The influence of electrical and physicochemical parameters on M. aeruginosa inactivation was studied to determine the optimal experimental conditions. The influence of active species was studied. The proliferation of the M. aeruginosa cells was significantly decreased under plasma exposure. The morphologic changes in M. aeruginosa were characterized under scanning electron microscopy. These results suggest that the low-temperature plasma technology is a promising method for water pollution control.

  5. Functional characterization of macrophage receptors for in vitro phagocytosis of unopsonized Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Speert, D P; Wright, S D; Silverstein, S C; Mah, B

    1988-01-01

    The phagocytic receptor for unopsonized Pseudomonas aeruginosa was characterized functionally using human monocyte-derived macrophages. Freshly isolated human peripheral blood monocytes were unable to ingest unopsonized P. aeruginosa; ingestion did not occur until the cells had been in culture for 2 d and it became maximal after 4 d. Macrophages plated on coverslips derivatized with anti-BSA IgG or with human gamma-globulin lost the capacity to phagocytose unopsonized P. aeruginosa, unopsonized zymosan, and EIgG but bound C3bi-coated erythrocytes normally. Each of the four human IgG subclasses and Fc fragments of anti-BSA IgG inhibited phagocytosis of both unopsonized P. aeruginosa and EIgG. Phagocytosis of P. aeruginosa and zymosan was markedly impaired and EIgG minimally inhibited if macrophages were plated on coverslips derivatized with mannan or when mannan was added to the phagocytosis buffer. Phagocytosis of P. aeruginosa and zymosan, and binding of EC3bi was dependent on the presence of divalent cations, but phagocytosis of EIgG was not. The macrophage phagocytic receptor for unopsonized P. aeruginosa was inactivated by proteolytic enzymes. Phagocytosis of P. aeruginosa was inhibited by D-mannose, L-fucose, and alpha methyl mannoside, but not by L-mannose, D-fucose, or D-glucose. The same sugars inhibited phagocytosis of unopsonized zymosan. We conclude that phagocytosis of unopsonized P. aeruginosa by human monocyte-derived macrophages is facilitated by mannose receptors. Images PMID:3138287

  6. Inactivation of Microcystis aeruginosa using dielectric barrier discharge low-temperature plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Pu, Sichuan; Chen, Jierong; Wang, Gang; Li, Xiaoyong; Ma, Yun

    2013-05-13

    The efficiency of Microcystis aeruginosa plasma inactivation was investigated using dielectric barrier discharge low-temperature plasma. The inactivation efficiency was characterized in terms of optical density. The influence of electrical and physicochemical parameters on M. aeruginosa inactivation was studied to determine the optimal experimental conditions. The influence of active species was studied. The proliferation of the M. aeruginosa cells was significantly decreased under plasma exposure. The morphologic changes in M. aeruginosa were characterized under scanning electron microscopy. These results suggest that the low-temperature plasma technology is a promising method for water pollution control.

  7. Pseudomonas aeruginosa forms Biofilms in Acute InfectionIndependent of Cell-to-Cell Signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Schaber, J. Andy; Triffo, W.J.; Suh, Sang J.; Oliver, Jeffrey W.; Hastert, Mary C.; Griswold, John A.; Auer, Manfred; Hamood, Abdul N.; Rumbaugh, Kendra P.

    2006-09-20

    Biofilms are bacterial communities residing within a polysaccharide matrix that are associated with persistence and antibiotic resistance in chronic infections. We show that the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa forms biofilms within 8 hours of infection in thermally-injured mice, demonstrating that biofilms contribute to bacterial colonization in acute infections. P. aeruginosa biofilms were visualized within burned tissue surrounding blood vessels and adipose cells. Although quorum sensing (QS), a bacterial signaling mechanism, coordinates differentiation of biofilms in vitro, wild type and QS-deficient P. aeruginosa formed similar biofilms in vivo. Our findings demonstrate that P. aeruginosa forms biofilms on specific host tissues independent of QS.

  8. Antibiofilm activity of Streptomyces sp. BFI 230 and Kribbella sp. BFI 1562 against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Guy; Lee, Jin-Hyung; Kim, Chang-Jin; Lee, Jae-Chan; Ju, Yoon Jung; Cho, Moo Hwan; Lee, Jintae

    2012-12-01

    Members of the actinomycetes family are a rich source of bioactive compounds including diverse antibiotics. This study sought to identify novel and non-toxic biofilm inhibitors from the actinomycetes library for reducing the biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. After the screening of 4104 actinomycetes strains, we found that the culture spent medium (1 %, v/v) of Streptomyces sp. BFI 230 and Kribbella sp. BFI 1562 inhibited P. aeruginosa biofilm formation by 90 % without affecting the growth of planktonic P. aeruginosa cells, while the spent media enhanced the swarming motility of P. aeruginosa. Global transcriptome analyses revealed that the spent medium of Streptomyces sp. BFI 230 induced expression of phenazine, pyoverdine, pyochelin synthesis genes, and iron uptake genes in P. aeruginosa. The addition of exogenous iron restored the biofilm formation and swarming motility of P. aeruginosa in the presence of the spent medium of Streptomyces sp. BFI 230, which suggests that the Streptomyces sp. BFI 230 strain interfered iron acquisition in P. aeruginosa. Experiments on solvent extraction, heat treatment, and proteinase K treatment suggested that hydrophilic compound(s), possibly extracellular peptides or proteins from Streptomyces sp. BFI 230 cause the biofilm reduction of P. aeruginosa. Together, this study indicates that actinomycetes strains have an ability to control the biofilm of P. aeruginosa. PMID:22722911

  9. Evolutionary insight from whole-genome sequencing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Marvig, Rasmus Lykke; Sommer, Lea M; Jelsbak, Lars; Molin, Søren; Johansen, Helle Krogh

    2015-01-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes chronic airway infections in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), and it is directly associated with the morbidity and mortality connected with this disease. The ability of P. aeruginosa to establish chronic infections in CF patients is suggested to be due to the large genetic repertoire of P. aeruginosa and its ability to genetically adapt to the host environment. Here, we review the recent work that has applied whole-genome sequencing to understand P. aeruginosa population genomics, within-host microevolution and diversity, mutational mechanisms, genetic adaptation and transmission events. Finally, we summarize the advances in relation to medical applications and laboratory evolution experiments. PMID:25865196

  10. Effect of Human Burn Wound Exudate on Pseudomonas aeruginosa Virulence.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Manuel R; Fleuchot, Betty; Lauciello, Leonardo; Jafari, Paris; Applegate, Lee Ann; Raffoul, Wassim; Que, Yok-Ai; Perron, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Burn wound sepsis is currently the main cause of morbidity and mortality after burn trauma. Infections by notorious pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Acinetobacter baumannii impair patient recovery and can even lead to fatality. In this study, we investigated the effect of burn wound exudates (BWEs) on the virulence of those pathogens. BWEs were collected within 7 days after burn trauma from 5 burn patients. We first monitored their effect on pathogen growth. In contrast to A. baumannii and S. aureus, P. aeruginosa was the only pathogen able to grow within these human fluids. Expression of typical virulence factors such as pyocyanin and pyoverdine was even enhanced compared the levels seen with standard laboratory medium. A detailed chemical composition analysis of BWE was performed, which enabled us to determine the major components of BWE and underline the metabolic modifications induced by burn trauma. These data are essential for the development of an artificial medium mimicking the burn wound environment and the establishment of an in vitro system to analyze the initial steps of burn wound infections. IMPORTANCE Microbial infection of severe burn wounds is currently a major medical challenge. Of the infections by bacteria able to colonize such injuries, those by Pseudomonas aeruginosa are among the most severe, causing major delays in burn patient recovery or leading to fatal issues. In this study, we investigated the growth properties of several burn wound pathogens in biological fluids secreted from human burn wounds. We found that P. aeruginosa strains were able to proliferate but not those of the other pathogens tested. In addition, burn wound exudates (BWEs) stimulate the expression of virulence factors in P. aeruginosa. The chemical composition analysis of BWEs enabled us to determine the major components of these fluids. These data are essential for the development of an artificial medium mimicking the burn wound

  11. Effect of Human Burn Wound Exudate on Pseudomonas aeruginosa Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Manuel R.; Fleuchot, Betty; Lauciello, Leonardo; Jafari, Paris; Applegate, Lee Ann; Raffoul, Wassim; Que, Yok-Ai

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Burn wound sepsis is currently the main cause of morbidity and mortality after burn trauma. Infections by notorious pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Acinetobacter baumannii impair patient recovery and can even lead to fatality. In this study, we investigated the effect of burn wound exudates (BWEs) on the virulence of those pathogens. BWEs were collected within 7 days after burn trauma from 5 burn patients. We first monitored their effect on pathogen growth. In contrast to A. baumannii and S. aureus, P. aeruginosa was the only pathogen able to grow within these human fluids. Expression of typical virulence factors such as pyocyanin and pyoverdine was even enhanced compared the levels seen with standard laboratory medium. A detailed chemical composition analysis of BWE was performed, which enabled us to determine the major components of BWE and underline the metabolic modifications induced by burn trauma. These data are essential for the development of an artificial medium mimicking the burn wound environment and the establishment of an in vitro system to analyze the initial steps of burn wound infections. IMPORTANCE Microbial infection of severe burn wounds is currently a major medical challenge. Of the infections by bacteria able to colonize such injuries, those by Pseudomonas aeruginosa are among the most severe, causing major delays in burn patient recovery or leading to fatal issues. In this study, we investigated the growth properties of several burn wound pathogens in biological fluids secreted from human burn wounds. We found that P. aeruginosa strains were able to proliferate but not those of the other pathogens tested. In addition, burn wound exudates (BWEs) stimulate the expression of virulence factors in P. aeruginosa. The chemical composition analysis of BWEs enabled us to determine the major components of these fluids. These data are essential for the development of an artificial medium mimicking the

  12. RF digital-to-analog converter

    DOEpatents

    Conway, P.H.; Yu, D.U.L.

    1995-02-28

    A digital-to-analog converter is disclosed for producing an RF output signal proportional to a digital input word of N bits from an RF reference input, N being an integer greater or equal to 2. The converter comprises a plurality of power splitters, power combiners and a plurality of mixers or RF switches connected in a predetermined configuration. 18 figs.

  13. High-Efficiency dc/dc Converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturman, J.

    1982-01-01

    High-efficiency dc/dc converter has been developed that provides commonly used voltages of plus or minus 12 Volts from an unregulated dc source of from 14 to 40 Volts. Unique features of converter are its high efficiency at low power level and ability to provide output either larger or smaller than input voltage.

  14. Passive Resonant Bidirectional Converter with Galvanic Barrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenblad, Nathan S. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A passive resonant bidirectional converter system that transports energy across a galvanic barrier includes a converter using at least first and second converter sections, each section including a pair of transfer terminals, a center tapped winding; a chopper circuit interconnected between the center tapped winding and one of the transfer terminals; an inductance feed winding interconnected between the other of the transfer terminals and the center tap and a resonant tank circuit including at least the inductance of the center tap winding and the parasitic capacitance of the chopper circuit for operating the converter section at resonance; the center tapped windings of the first and second converter sections being disposed on a first common winding core and the inductance feed windings of the first and second converter sections being disposed on a second common winding core for automatically synchronizing the resonant oscillation of the first and second converter sections and transferring energy between the converter sections until the voltage across the pairs of transfer terminals achieves the turns ratio of the center tapped windings.

  15. Controller for a wave energy converter

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, David G.; Bull, Diana L.; Robinett, III, Rush D.

    2015-09-22

    A wave energy converter (WEC) is described, the WEC including a power take off (PTO) that converts relative motion of bodies of the WEC into electrical energy. A controller controls operation of the PTO, causing the PTO to act as a motor to widen a wave frequency spectrum that is usable to generate electrical energy.

  16. RF digital-to-analog converter

    DOEpatents

    Conway, Patrick H.; Yu, David U. L.

    1995-01-01

    A digital-to analogue converter for producing an RF output signal proportional to a digital input word of N bits from an RF reference input, N being an integer greater or equal to 2. The converter comprises a plurality of power splitters, power combiners and a plurality of mixers or RF switches connected in a predetermined configuration.

  17. Power Converters Secure Electronics in Harsh Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2013-01-01

    In order to harden power converters for the rigors of space, NASA awarded multiple SBIR contracts to Blacksburg, Virginia-based VPT Inc. The resulting hybrid DC-DC converters have proven valuable in aerospace applications, and as a result the company has generated millions in revenue from the product line and created four high-tech jobs to handle production.

  18. Distributed electrical leads for thermionic converter

    DOEpatents

    Fitzpatrick, Gary O.; Britt, Edward J.

    1979-01-01

    In a thermionic converter, means are provided for coupling an electrical lead to at least one of the electrodes thereof. The means include a bus bar and a plurality of distributed leads coupled to the bus bar each of which penetrates through one electrode and are then coupled to the other electrode of the converter in spaced apart relation.

  19. Radiation Effects on DC-DC Converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, De-Xin; AbdulMazid, M. D.; Attia, John O.; Kankam, Mark D. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In this work, several DC-DC converters were designed and built. The converters are Buck Buck-Boost, Cuk, Flyback, and full-bridge zero-voltage switched. The total ionizing dose radiation and single event effects on the converters were investigated. The experimental results for the TID effects tests show that the voltages of the Buck Buck-Boost, Cuk, and Flyback converters increase as total dose increased when using power MOSFET IRF250 as a switching transistor. The change in output voltage with total dose is highest for the Buck converter and the lowest for Flyback converter. The trend of increase in output voltages with total dose in the present work agrees with those of the literature. The trends of the experimental results also agree with those obtained from PSPICE simulation. For the full-bridge zero-voltage switch converter, it was observed that the dc-dc converter with IRF250 power MOSFET did not show a significant change of output voltage with total dose. In addition, for the dc-dc converter with FSF254R4 radiation-hardened power MOSFET, the output voltage did not change significantly with total dose. The experimental results were confirmed by PSPICE simulation that showed that FB-ZVS converter with IRF250 power MOSFET's was not affected with the increase in total ionizing dose. Single Event Effects (SEE) radiation tests were performed on FB-ZVS converters. It was observed that the FB-ZVS converter with the IRF250 power MOSFET, when the device was irradiated with Krypton ion with ion-energy of 150 MeV and LET of 41.3 MeV-square cm/mg, the output voltage increased with the increase in fluence. However, for Krypton with ion-energy of 600 MeV and LET of 33.65 MeV-square cm/mg, and two out of four transistors of the converter were permanently damaged. The dc-dc converter with FSF254R4 radiation hardened power MOSFET's did not show significant change at the output voltage with fluence while being irradiated by Krypton with ion energy of 1.20 GeV and LET of 25

  20. Modelling, analyses and design of switching converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuk, S. M.; Middlebrook, R. D.

    1978-01-01

    A state-space averaging method for modelling switching dc-to-dc converters for both continuous and discontinuous conduction mode is developed. In each case the starting point is the unified state-space representation, and the end result is a complete linear circuit model, for each conduction mode, which correctly represents all essential features, namely, the input, output, and transfer properties (static dc as well as dynamic ac small-signal). While the method is generally applicable to any switching converter, it is extensively illustrated for the three common power stages (buck, boost, and buck-boost). The results for these converters are then easily tabulated owing to the fixed equivalent circuit topology of their canonical circuit model. The insights that emerge from the general state-space modelling approach lead to the design of new converter topologies through the study of generic properties of the cascade connection of basic buck and boost converters.

  1. High frequency converters for thermophotovoltaic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Fatemi, N.S.; Hoffman, R.W. Jr.; Lowe, R.A.; Jenkins, P.P.; Garverick, L.M.; Wilt, D.M.; Scheiman, D.

    1996-12-31

    Thermophotovoltaic (TPV) converters were developed and tested at the heat source operating temperature of 1,700 K. Rare-earth-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) and lutetium yttrium aluminum garnet (Lu, YAG) selective emitters, as well as a blackbody emitter, were coupled to InGaAs/InP photovoltaic (PV) cells and bandpass/infrared (IR) reflector filters. YAG-based selective emitters were adopted with Ho, Tm, and Er. PV cells had bandgaps of 0.51, 0.57, and 0.69 eV. Converter energy conversion efficiencies approaching 30%, as well as electrical output power densities near 2 W/cm{sup 2} were demonstrated. The overall performance of the filtered blackbody-based converter was found to be superior to the selective emitter YAG-based converters. The details of the measurements performed on the above converters and their individual components are presented.

  2. Evaluations of uranium-nitride fueled converters.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimada, K.; Cassell, P. L.

    1971-01-01

    Evaluation of two uranium-nitride (UN) fueled converters was initiated at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory to investigate the effect of fuel on the converter performance while being operated out-of-core. The initial tests were performed with the dynamic data acquisition system that was developed at the Laboratory. Parametric tests of these converters were to obtain: (1) static volt-ampere curves, (2) dynamic volt-ampere curves, and (3) the electrode work functions. The power outputs were 9.3 W/sq cm for the rhenium converter and 3.8 W/sq cm for the tungsten converter at 0.6 V when the emitter surface temperature was 2000 K, according to the static volt-ampere curves.

  3. Qualitative model of a plasma photoelectric converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbunov, N. A.; Flamant, G.

    2009-01-01

    A converter of focused optical radiation into electric current is considered on the basis of the photovoltaic effect in plasmas. The converter model is based on analysis of asymmetric spatial distributions of charge particle number density and ambipolar potential in the photoplasma produced by external optical radiation focused in a heat pipe filled with a mixture of alkali vapor and a heavy inert gas. Energy balance in the plasma photoelectric converter is analyzed. The conditions in which the external radiation energy is effectively absorbed in the converter are indicated. The plasma parameters for which the energy of absorbed optical radiation is mainly spent on sustaining the ambipolar field in the plasma are determined. It is shown that the plasma photoelectric converter makes it possible to attain a high conversion efficiency for focused solar radiation.

  4. Boost matrix converters in clean energy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaman, Ekrem

    This dissertation describes an investigation of novel power electronic converters, based on the ultra-sparse matrix topology and characterized by the minimum number of semiconductor switches. The Z-source, Quasi Z-source, Series Z-source and Switched-inductor Z-source networks were originally proposed for boosting the output voltage of power electronic inverters. These ideas were extended here on three-phase to three-phase and three-phase to single-phase indirect matrix converters. For the three-phase to three-phase matrix converters, the Z-source networks are placed between the three-switch input rectifier stage and the output six-switch inverter stage. A brief shoot-through state produces the voltage boost. An optimal pulse width modulation technique was developed to achieve high boosting capability and minimum switching losses in the converter. For the three-phase to single-phase matrix converters, those networks are placed similarly. For control purposes, a new modulation technique has been developed. As an example application, the proposed converters constitute a viable alternative to the existing solutions in residential wind-energy systems, where a low-voltage variable-speed generator feeds power to the higher-voltage fixed-frequency grid. Comprehensive analytical derivations and simulation results were carried out to investigate the operation of the proposed converters. Performance of the proposed converters was then compared between each other as well as with conventional converters. The operation of the converters was experimentally validated using a laboratory prototype.

  5. Optical properties and electronic band structure of BiMg2PO6, BiMg2VO6, BiMg2VO6:Pr3+ and BiMg2VO6:Eu3+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barros, A.; Deloncle, R.; Deschamp, J.; Boutinaud, P.; Chadeyron, G.; Mahiou, R.; Cavalli, E.; Brik, M. G.

    2014-08-01

    The luminescence properties of the yellow pigment BiMg2VO6 are revisited and those of BiMg2PO6, BiMg2VO6:Pr3+ and BiMg2VO6:Eu3+ are described. It is shown that the undoped systems exhibit broad band emission in the green or orange spectral regions, but only upon UV or near UV excitation. In contradiction with a previous report, we found that the blue, host absorbed, photons are lost non-radiatively and do not contribute to the luminescence processes in BiMg2VO6. To understand these experimental results, the optical properties of BiMg2VO6 and BiMg2PO6 are theoretically analysed on the basis of electronic structure diagrams calculated by the DFT method. It is found that the optical transitions are mostly localised within [VO4]3- units or non-regular Bi3+ ions and occur in the UV or near UV regions. The luminescence of the trivalent lanthanide dopants is weak (Eu3+) or unobserved (Pr3+) in BiMg2VO6 which is explained by inefficient energy migration in the host lattice to the impurity sites.

  6. Pseudomonas aeruginosa acquisition on an intensive care unit: relationship between antibiotic selective pressure and patients' environment

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship among Pseudomonas aeruginosa acquisition on the intensive care unit (ICU), environmental contamination and antibiotic selective pressure against P. aeruginosa. Methods An open, prospective cohort study was carried out in a 16-bed medical ICU where P. aeruginosa was endemic. Over a six-month period, all patients without P. aeruginosa on admission and with a length of stay >72 h were included. Throat, nasal, rectal, sputum and urine samples were taken on admission and at weekly intervals and screened for P. aeruginosa. All antibiotic treatments were recorded daily. Environmental analysis included weekly tap water specimen culture and the presence of other patients colonized with P. aeruginosa. Results A total of 126 patients were included, comprising 1,345 patient-days. Antibiotics were given to 106 patients (antibiotic selective pressure for P. aeruginosa in 39). P. aeruginosa was acquired by 20 patients (16%) and was isolated from 164/536 environmental samples (31%). Two conditions were independently associated with P. aeruginosa acquisition by multivariate analysis: (i) patients receiving ≥3 days of antibiotic selective pressure together with at least one colonized patient on the same ward on the previous day (odds ratio (OR) = 10.3 ((% confidence interval (CI): 1.8 to 57.4); P = 0.01); and (ii) presence of an invasive device (OR = 7.7 (95% CI: 2.3 to 25.7); P = 0.001). Conclusions Specific interaction between both patient colonization pressure and selective antibiotic pressure is the most relevant factor for P. aeruginosa acquisition on an ICU. This suggests that combined efforts are needed against both factors to decrease colonization with P. aeruginosa. PMID:21306623

  7. Cooperative pathogenicity in cystic fibrosis: Stenotrophomonas maltophilia modulates Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence in mixed biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Pompilio, Arianna; Crocetta, Valentina; De Nicola, Serena; Verginelli, Fabio; Fiscarelli, Ersilia; Di Bonaventura, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    The present study was undertaken in order to understand more about the interaction occurring between S. maltophilia and P. aeruginosa, which are frequently co-isolated from CF airways. For this purpose, S. maltophilia RR7 and P. aeruginosa RR8 strains, co-isolated from the lung of a chronically infected CF patient during a pulmonary exacerbation episode, were evaluated for reciprocal effect during planktonic growth, adhesion and biofilm formation onto both polystyrene and CF bronchial cell monolayer, motility, as well as for gene expression in mixed biofilms. P. aeruginosa significantly affected S. maltophilia growth in both planktonic and biofilm cultures, due to an inhibitory activity probably requiring direct contact. Conversely, no effect was observed on P. aeruginosa by S. maltophilia. Compared with monocultures, the adhesiveness of P. aeruginosa on CFBE41o- cells was significantly reduced by S. maltophilia, which probably acts by reducing P. aeruginosa's swimming motility. An opposite trend was observed for biofilm formation, confirming the findings obtained using polystyrene. When grown in mixed biofilm with S. maltophilia, P. aeruginosa significantly over-expressed aprA, and algD—codifying for protease and alginate, respectively—while the quorum sensing related rhlR and lasI genes were down-regulated. The induced alginate expression by P. aeruginosa might be responsible for the protection of S. maltophilia against tobramycin activity we observed in mixed biofilms. Taken together, our results suggest that the existence of reciprocal interference of S. maltophilia and P. aeruginosa in CF lung is plausible. In particular, S. maltophilia might confer some selective “fitness advantage” to P. aeruginosa under the specific conditions of chronic infection or, alternatively, increase the virulence of P. aeruginosa thus leading to pulmonary exacerbation. PMID:26441885

  8. Candida albicans Inhibits Pseudomonas aeruginosa Virulence through Suppression of Pyochelin and Pyoverdine Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Medina, Eduardo; Fan, Di; Coughlin, Laura A; Ho, Evi X; Lamont, Iain L; Reimmann, Cornelia; Hooper, Lora V; Koh, Andrew Y

    2015-08-01

    Bacterial-fungal interactions have important physiologic and medical ramifications, but the mechanisms of these interactions are poorly understood. The gut is host to trillions of microorganisms, and bacterial-fungal interactions are likely to be important. Using a neutropenic mouse model of microbial gastrointestinal colonization and dissemination, we show that the fungus Candida albicans inhibits the virulence of the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa by inhibiting P. aeruginosa pyochelin and pyoverdine gene expression, which plays a critical role in iron acquisition and virulence. Accordingly, deletion of both P. aeruginosa pyochelin and pyoverdine genes attenuates P. aeruginosa virulence. Heat-killed C. albicans has no effect on P. aeruginosa, whereas C. albicans secreted proteins directly suppress P. aeruginosa pyoverdine and pyochelin expression and inhibit P. aeruginosa virulence in mice. Interestingly, suppression or deletion of pyochelin and pyoverdine genes has no effect on P. aeruginosa's ability to colonize the GI tract but does decrease P. aeruginosa's cytotoxic effect on cultured colonocytes. Finally, oral iron supplementation restores P. aeruginosa virulence in P. aeruginosa and C. albicans colonized mice. Together, our findings provide insight into how a bacterial-fungal interaction can modulate bacterial virulence in the intestine. Previously described bacterial-fungal antagonistic interactions have focused on growth inhibition or colonization inhibition/modulation, yet here we describe a novel observation of fungal-inhibition of bacterial effectors critical for virulence but not important for colonization. These findings validate the use of a mammalian model system to explore the complexities of polymicrobial, polykingdom infections in order to identify new therapeutic targets for preventing microbial disease. PMID:26313907

  9. A substitution at His-120 in the LasA protease of Pseudomonas aeruginosa blocks enzymatic activity without affecting propeptide processing or extracellular secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Gustin, J K; Kessler, E; Ohman, D E

    1996-01-01

    The LasA protease of Pseudomonas aeruginosa can degrade elastin and is an important contributor to the pathogenesis of this organism. LasA (20 kDa) is a member of the beta-lytic endopeptidase family of extracellular bacterial proteases, and it shows high-level staphylolytic activity. We sequenced the lasA gene from strain FRD1 and overexpressed it in Escherichia coli. The lasA gene encodes a precursor, known as pre-proLasA, of 45,582 Da. Amino-terminal sequence analysis allowed the identification of the signal peptidase cleavage site and revealed that the 31-amino-acid signal peptide was removed in E. coli. The remaining proLasA (42 kDa) did not undergo autoproteolytic processing and showed little staphylolytic activity. However, it was readily processed to a 20-kDa active staphylolytic protease by incubation with trypsin or with the culture filtrate of a P. aeruginosa lasAdelta mutant. Thus, removal of the propeptide (22 kDa) was required to convert proLasA into an active protease. Although LasA protease was critical for staphylolytic activity, other proteases like elastase were found to enhance staphylolysis. Under the control of an inducible trc promoter, lasA was overexpressed in P. aeruginosa and the processing intermediates were examined. Compared with wild-type cells, the overproducing cells accumulated more 42-kDa proLasA species, and the culture supernatants of the overproducing cells showed increased levels of active 20-kDa LasA protease. Small amounts of a 25-kDa extracellular LasA-related protein, which could represent a potential processing intermediate, were also observed. To better understand the structure-function relationships in LasA protease, we tested whether His-120-X-His-122 in the mature portion of LasA plays a role in activity. This motif and surrounding sequences are conserved in the related beta-lytic protease of Achromobacter lyticus. Oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis was used to change His-120 to Ala-120, thus forming the lasA5 allele

  10. Acoustics of automotive catalytic converter assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickey, Nolan S.; Selamet, Ahmet; Parks, Steve J.; Tallio, Kevin V.; Miazgowicz, Keith D.; Radavich, Paul M.

    2003-10-01

    In an automotive exhaust system, the purpose of the catalytic converter is to reduce pollutant emissions. However, catalytic converters also affect the engine and exhaust system breathing characteristics; they increase backpressure, affect exhaust system acoustic characteristics, and contribute to exhaust manifold tuning. Thus, radiated sound models should include catalytic converters since they can affect both the source characteristics and the exhaust system acoustic behavior. A typical catalytic converter assembly employs a ceramic substrate to carry the catalytically active noble metals. The substrate has numerous parallel tubes and is mounted in a housing with swelling mat or wire mesh around its periphery. Seals at the ends of the substrate can be used to help force flow through the substrate and/or protect the mat material. Typically, catalytic converter studies only consider sound propagation in the small capillary tubes of the substrate. Investigations of the acoustic characteristics of entire catalytic converter assemblies (housing, substrate, seals, and mat) do not appear to be available. This work experimentally investigates the acoustic behavior of catalytic converter assemblies and the contributions of the separate components to sound attenuation. Experimental findings are interpreted with respect to available techniques for modeling sound propagation in ceramic substrates.

  11. Paerucumarin, a new metabolite produced by the pvc gene cluster from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Clarke-Pearson, Michael F; Brady, Sean F

    2008-10-01

    The pvc gene cluster from Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been linked to the biosynthesis of both the pyoverdine chromophore and pseudoverdine. Our reinvestigation of the role this gene cluster plays in P. aeruginosa secondary metabolite biosynthesis shows that its major product is actually paerucumarin, a novel isonitrile functionalized cumarin. PMID:18689486

  12. Network-assisted investigation of virulence and antibiotic-resistance systems in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Sohyun; Kim, Chan Yeong; Ji, Sun-Gou; Go, Junhyeok; Kim, Hanhae; Yang, Sunmo; Kim, Hye Jin; Cho, Ara; Yoon, Sang Sun; Lee, Insuk

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative bacterium of clinical significance. Although the genome of PAO1, a prototype strain of P. aeruginosa, has been extensively studied, approximately one-third of the functional genome remains unknown. With the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains of P. aeruginosa, there is an urgent need to develop novel antibiotic and anti-virulence strategies, which may be facilitated by an approach that explores P. aeruginosa gene function in systems-level models. Here, we present a genome-wide functional network of P. aeruginosa genes, PseudomonasNet, which covers 98% of the coding genome, and a companion web server to generate functional hypotheses using various network-search algorithms. We demonstrate that PseudomonasNet-assisted predictions can effectively identify novel genes involved in virulence and antibiotic resistance. Moreover, an antibiotic-resistance network based on PseudomonasNet reveals that P. aeruginosa has common modular genetic organisations that confer increased or decreased resistance to diverse antibiotics, which accounts for the pervasiveness of cross-resistance across multiple drugs. The same network also suggests that P. aeruginosa has developed mechanism of trade-off in resistance across drugs by altering genetic interactions. Taken together, these results clearly demonstrate the usefulness of a genome-scale functional network to investigate pathogenic systems in P. aeruginosa. PMID:27194047

  13. Effects of Microcystis aeruginosa on life history of water flea Daphnia magna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liping; Li, Kang; Chen, Taoying; Dai, Xilin; Jiang, Min; Diana, James S.

    2011-07-01

    Cyanobacterial blooms in eutrophic freshwater systems are a worldwide problem, creating adverse effects for many aquatic organisms by producing toxic microcystins and deteriorating water quality. In this study, microcystins (MCs) in Microcystis aeruginosa, and Daphnia magna exposed to M. aeruginosa, were analyzed by HPLC-MS, and the effects of M. aeruginosa on D. magna were investigated. When D. magna was exposed to M. aeruginosa for more than 2 h, Microcystin-LR (MC-LR) was detected. When exposed to 1.5 × 106, 3 × 106, 0.75 × 107, and 1.5 × 107 cell/mL of M. aeruginosa for 96 h, average survival of D. magna for treatments were 23.33%, 33.33%, 13.33%, 16.67%, respectively, which were significantly lower than the average 100% survival in the control group ( P < 0.05). The adverse effects of M. aeruginosa on body length, time for the first brood, brood numbers, gross fecundity, lifespan, and population growth of D. magna were density-dependent. These results suggest that the occurrence of M. aeruginosa blooms could strongly inhibit the population growth of D. magna through depression of survival, individual growth and gross fecundity. In the most serious situations, M. aeruginosa blooms could undermine the food web by eliminating filter-feeding zooplankton, which would destroy the ecological balance of aquaculture water bodies.

  14. Differential effects of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on biofilm formation by different strains of Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    PubMed

    Pihl, Maria; Davies, Julia R; Chávez de Paz, Luis E; Svensäter, Gunnel

    2010-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus epidermidis are common opportunistic pathogens associated with medical device-related biofilm infections. 16S rRNA-FISH and confocal laser scanning microscopy were used to study these two bacteria in dual-species biofilms. Two of the four S. epidermidis strains used were shown to form biofilms more avidly on polymer surfaces than the other two strains. In dual-species biofilms, the presence of P. aeruginosa reduced biofilm formation by S. epidermidis, although different clinical isolates differed in their susceptibility to this effect. The most resistant isolate coexisted with P. aeruginosa for up to 18 h and was also resistant to the effects of the culture supernatant from P. aeruginosa biofilms, which caused dispersal from established biofilms of other S. epidermidis strains. Thus, different strains of S. epidermidis differed in their capacity to withstand the action of P. aeruginosa, with some being better equipped than others to coexist in biofilms with P. aeruginosa. Our data suggest that where S. epidermidis and P. aeruginosa are present on abiotic surfaces such as medical devices, S. epidermidis biofilm formation can be inhibited by P. aeruginosa through two mechanisms: disruption by extracellular products, possibly polysaccharides, and, in the later stages, by cell lysis. PMID:20528934

  15. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa Pathogenicity Island PAPI-1 is transferred via a novel Type IV pilus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major cause of nosocomial infections, particularly in immunocompromised patients or in individuals with cystic fibrosis. The notable ability of P. aeruginosa to inhabit a broad range of environments including humans is in part due to its large and diverse genomic repertoi...

  16. Effects of sulfate on microcystin production, photosynthesis, and oxidative stress in Microcystis aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Gin, Karina Y H; He, Yiliang

    2016-02-01

    Increasing sulfate in freshwater systems, caused by human activities and climate change, may have negative effects on aquatic organisms. Microcystis aeruginosa (M. aeruginosa) is both a major primary producer and a common toxic cyanobacterium, playing an important role in the aquatic environment. This study first investigated the effects of sulfate on M. aeruginosa. The experiment presented here aims at analyzing the effects of sulfate on physiological indices, molecular levels, and its influencing mechanism. The results of our experiment showed that sulfate (at 40, 80, and 300 mg L(-1)) inhibited M. aeruginosa growth, increased both intracellular and extracellular toxin contents, and enhanced the mcyD transcript level. Sulfate inhibited the photosynthesis of M. aeruginosa, based on the decrease in pigment content and the down-regulation of photosynthesis-related genes after sulfate exposure. Furthermore, sulfate decreased the maximum electron transport rate, causing the cell to accumulate surplus electrons and form reactive oxygen species (ROS). Sulfate also increased the malondialdehyde (MDA) content, which showed that sulfate damaged the cytomembrane. This damage contributed to the release of intracellular toxin to the culture medium. Although sulfate increased superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities, expression of sod, and total antioxidant capacity in M. aeruginosa, it still overwhelmed the antioxidant system since the ROS level simultaneously increased, and finally caused oxidative stress. Our results indicate that sulfate has direct effects on M. aeruginosa, inhibits photosynthesis, causes oxidative stress, increases toxin production, and affects the related genes expression in M. aeruginosa. PMID:26490939

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of a Klebsiella pneumoniae Carbapenemase-Positive Sequence Type 111 Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain

    PubMed Central

    Dotson, Gabrielle A.; Dekker, John P.; Palmore, Tara N.; Segre, Julia A.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of a sequence type 111 Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain isolated in 2014 from a patient at the NIH Clinical Center. This P. aeruginosa strain exhibits pan-drug resistance and harbors the blaKPC-2 gene, encoding the Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase enzyme, on a plasmid. PMID:26868386

  18. Network-assisted investigation of virulence and antibiotic-resistance systems in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Sohyun; Kim, Chan Yeong; Ji, Sun-Gou; Go, Junhyeok; Kim, Hanhae; Yang, Sunmo; Kim, Hye Jin; Cho, Ara; Yoon, Sang Sun; Lee, Insuk

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative bacterium of clinical significance. Although the genome of PAO1, a prototype strain of P. aeruginosa, has been extensively studied, approximately one-third of the functional genome remains unknown. With the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains of P. aeruginosa, there is an urgent need to develop novel antibiotic and anti-virulence strategies, which may be facilitated by an approach that explores P. aeruginosa gene function in systems-level models. Here, we present a genome-wide functional network of P. aeruginosa genes, PseudomonasNet, which covers 98% of the coding genome, and a companion web server to generate functional hypotheses using various network-search algorithms. We demonstrate that PseudomonasNet-assisted predictions can effectively identify novel genes involved in virulence and antibiotic resistance. Moreover, an antibiotic-resistance network based on PseudomonasNet reveals that P. aeruginosa has common modular genetic organisations that confer increased or decreased resistance to diverse antibiotics, which accounts for the pervasiveness of cross-resistance across multiple drugs. The same network also suggests that P. aeruginosa has developed mechanism of trade-off in resistance across drugs by altering genetic interactions. Taken together, these results clearly demonstrate the usefulness of a genome-scale functional network to investigate pathogenic systems in P. aeruginosa. PMID:27194047

  19. Targeting iron uptake to control Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Smith, Daniel J; Lamont, Iain L; Anderson, Greg J; Reid, David W

    2013-12-01

    The aerobic Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen responsible for life-threatening acute and chronic infections in humans. As part of chronic infection P. aeruginosa forms biofilms, which shield the encased bacteria from host immune clearance and provide an impermeable and protective barrier against currently available antimicrobial agents. P. aeruginosa has an absolute requirement for iron for infection success. By influencing cell-cell communication (quorum sensing) and virulence factor expression, iron is a powerful regulator of P. aeruginosa behaviour. Consequently, the imposed perturbation of iron acquisition systems has been proposed as a novel therapeutic approach to the treatment of P. aeruginosa biofilm infection. In this review, we explore the influence of iron availability on P. aeruginosa infection in the lungs of the people with the autosomal recessive condition cystic fibrosis as an archetypal model of chronic P. aeruginosa biofilm infection. Novel therapeutics aimed at disrupting P. aeruginosa are discussed, with an emphasis placed on identifying the barriers that need to be overcome in order to translate these promising in vitro agents into effective therapies in human pulmonary infections. PMID:23143541

  20. The periplasmic protein TolB as a potential drug target in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Lo Sciuto, Alessandra; Fernández-Piñar, Regina; Bertuccini, Lucia; Iosi, Francesca; Superti, Fabiana; Imperi, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most dreaded pathogens in the hospital setting, and represents a prototype of multi-drug resistant "superbug" for which effective therapeutic options are very limited. The identification and characterization of new cellular functions that are essential for P. aeruginosa viability and/or virulence could drive the development of anti-Pseudomonas compounds with novel mechanisms of action. In this study we investigated whether TolB, the periplasmic component of the Tol-Pal trans-envelope protein complex of Gram-negative bacteria, represents a potential drug target in P. aeruginosa. By combining conditional mutagenesis with the analysis of specific pathogenicity-related phenotypes, we demonstrated that TolB is essential for P. aeruginosa growth, both in laboratory and clinical strains, and that TolB-depleted P. aeruginosa cells are strongly defective in cell-envelope integrity, resistance to human serum and several antibiotics, as well as in the ability to cause infection and persist in an insect model of P. aeruginosa infection. The essentiality of TolB for P. aeruginosa growth, resistance and pathogenicity highlights the potential of TolB as a novel molecular target for anti-P. aeruginosa drug discovery. PMID:25093328

  1. Inhalation with Fucose and Galactose for Treatment of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa in Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hauber, Hans-Peter; Schulz, Maria; Pforte, Almuth; Mack, Dietrich; Zabel, Peter; Schumacher, Udo

    2008-01-01

    Background: Colonisation of cystic fibrosis (CF) lungs with Pseudomonas aeruginosa is facilitated by two lectins, which bind to the sugar coat of the surface lining epithelia and stop the cilia beating. Objectives: We hypothesized that P. aeruginosa lung infection should be cleared by inhalation of fucose and galactose, which compete for the sugar binding site of the two lectins and thus inhibit the binding of P. aeruginosa. Methods: 11 adult CF patients with chronic infection with P. aeruginosa were treated twice daily with inhalation of a fucose/galactose solution for 21 days (4 patients only received inhalation, 7 patients received inhalation and intravenous antibiotics). Microbial counts of P. aeruginosa, lung function measurements, and inflammatory markers were determined before and after treatment. Results: The sugar inhalation was well tolerated and no adverse side effects were observed. Inhalation alone as well as combined therapy (inhalation and antibiotics) significantly decreased P. aeruginosa in sputum (P < 0.05). Both therapies also significantly reduced TNFα expression in sputum and peripheral blood cells (P < 0.05). No change in lung function measurements was observed. Conclusions: Inhalation of simple sugars is a safe and effective measure to reduce the P. aeruginosa counts in CF patients. This may provide an alternative therapeutical approach to treat infection with P. aeruginosa. PMID:19043609

  2. PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA-FECAL COLIFORM RELATIONSHIPS IN ESTUARINE AND FRESH RECREATIONAL WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study has shown that Pseudomonas aeruginosa cannot be used as the basis of water standards for the prevention of enteric disease during the recreational use of surface waters. However, P. aeruginosa determinations, when used in conjunction with the assay of fecal coliforms o...

  3. Genome macrorestriction analysis of sequential Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from bronchiectasis patients without cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Hla, S W; Hui, K P; Tan, W C; Ho, B

    1996-01-01

    The respiratory tracts of bronchiectasis patients may be persistently colonized with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, despite intensive chemotherapy. The organism may undergo phenotypic changes in these patients, providing misleading typing results by conventional methods. We prospectively studied eight bronchiectasis patients without cystic fibrosis over a period of 1 year. A high microbial load of P. aeruginosa was found in 70% of sputum samples collected. Of these, 55 sequential P. aeruginosa isolates were characterized by a genotyping method, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, to overcome the problem of differentiating the P. aeruginosa strains during chemotherapy. Genome macrorestriction fingerprinting patterns were analyzed after digestion with XbaI restriction endonuclease. Of the eight patients, six harbored a single dominant strain of P. aeruginosa, with an intrapatient macrorestriction similarity pattern range of 96 to 100%. The other two patients were infected with mixed bacterial isolates including P. aeruginosa. However, diversity was observed in the P. aeruginosa isolates from all eight patients, with a relatedness of only 55 to 65%. The study further strengthens the fact that pulsed-field gel electrophoresis can be used efficiently and effectively to differentiate P. aeruginosa strains in bronchiectasis patients without cystic fibrosis. PMID:8904417

  4. MOLECULAR CHARACTERIZATION OF 'PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA' BACTERIOPHAGES: IDENTIFICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF THE NOVEL VIRUS B86

    EPA Science Inventory

    The authors have characterized a new phage, B86, of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from nature. It is a temperate, uv-inducible, generalized transducing phage. To determine the relatedness of his phage to other characterized P. aeruginosa phages, DNA homology studies were carrie...

  5. Effects of clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Pihl, Maria; Chávez de Paz, Luis E; Schmidtchen, Artur; Svensäter, Gunnel; Davies, Julia R

    2010-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is often found in chronic infections, including cystic fibrosis lung infections and those related to chronic wounds and venous ulcers. At the latter sites, P. aeruginosa can be isolated together with Staphylococcus epidermidis, and we have therefore explored the effect of clinical isolates and laboratory strains of P. aeruginosa strains on colonization by S. epidermidis in dual-species biofilms. Biofilm formation was assayed using 16S rRNA FISH and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Among the six P. aeruginosa strains tested, one particular strain, denoted 14:2, exerted a significant inhibitory effect, and even after 6 h, S. epidermidis levels in dual-species biofilms were reduced by >85% compared with those without P. aeruginosa. Interestingly, strain 14:2 was found to be negative for classical virulence determinants including pyocyanin, elastase and alkaline protease. Therefore, we suggest that less virulent phenotypes of P. aeruginosa, which may develop over time in chronic infections, could counteract colonization by S. epidermidis, ensuring persistence and dominance by P. aeruginosa in the host micro-habitat. Further studies are required to explain the inhibitory effect on S. epidermidis, although extracellular polysaccharides produced by P. aeruginosa might play a role in this phenomenon. PMID:20579097

  6. Network-assisted investigation of virulence and antibiotic-resistance systems in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Sohyun; Kim, Chan Yeong; Ji, Sun-Gou; Go, Junhyeok; Kim, Hanhae; Yang, Sunmo; Kim, Hye Jin; Cho, Ara; Yoon, Sang Sun; Lee, Insuk

    2016-05-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative bacterium of clinical significance. Although the genome of PAO1, a prototype strain of P. aeruginosa, has been extensively studied, approximately one-third of the functional genome remains unknown. With the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains of P. aeruginosa, there is an urgent need to develop novel antibiotic and anti-virulence strategies, which may be facilitated by an approach that explores P. aeruginosa gene function in systems-level models. Here, we present a genome-wide functional network of P. aeruginosa genes, PseudomonasNet, which covers 98% of the coding genome, and a companion web server to generate functional hypotheses using various network-search algorithms. We demonstrate that PseudomonasNet-assisted predictions can effectively identify novel genes involved in virulence and antibiotic resistance. Moreover, an antibiotic-resistance network based on PseudomonasNet reveals that P. aeruginosa has common modular genetic organisations that confer increased or decreased resistance to diverse antibiotics, which accounts for the pervasiveness of cross-resistance across multiple drugs. The same network also suggests that P. aeruginosa has developed mechanism of trade-off in resistance across drugs by altering genetic interactions. Taken together, these results clearly demonstrate the usefulness of a genome-scale functional network to investigate pathogenic systems in P. aeruginosa.

  7. Cellular responses and biodegradation of amoxicillin in Microcystis aeruginosa at different nitrogen levels.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Wang, Feng; Chen, Xiao; Zhang, Jian; Gao, Baoyu

    2015-01-01

    The influence of nitrogen on the interactions between amoxicillin and Microcystis aeruginosa was investigated using a 7-day exposure test. Growth of M. aeruginosa was not significantly (p>0.05) affected by amoxicillin at the lowest nitrogen level of 0.05 mg L(-1), stimulated by 500 ng L(-1) of amoxicillin at a moderate nitrogen level of 0.5 mg L(-1) and enhanced by 200-500 ng L(-1) of amoxicillin at the highest nitrogen level of 5 mg L(-1). The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the synthesis of glutathione S-transferases (GST) and glutathione (GSH) were more sensitive to amoxicillin and were stimulated at all nitrogen levels. At the lowest nitrogen level of 0.05 mg L(-1), superoxide dismutase and peroxidase were not effective at eliminating amoxicillin-induced ROS, resulting in the highest malondialdehyde content in M. aeruginosa. The biodegradation of 18.5-30.5% of amoxicillin by M. aeruginosa was coupled to increasing GST activity and GSH content. Elevated nitrogen concentrations significantly enhanced (p<0.05) the stimulation effect of amoxicillin on the growth of M. aeruginosa, the antioxidant responses to amoxicillin and the biodegradation of amoxicillin in M. aeruginosa. The nitrogen-dependent hormesis effect of the coexisting amoxicillin contaminant on the M. aeruginosa bloom should be fully considered during the control of M. aeruginosa bloom. PMID:25450926

  8. Programmable Analog-To-Digital Converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kist, Edward H., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    High-speed analog-to-digital converter with programmable voltage steps that can be changed during operation. Allows concentration of converter resolution over specific portion of waveform. Particularly useful in digitizing wind-shear radar and lidar return signals, in digital oscilloscopes, and other applications in which desirable to increase digital resolution over specific area of waveform while accepting lower resolution over rest of waveform. Effective increase in dynamic range achieved without increase in number of analog-to-digital converter bits. Enabling faster analog-to-digital conversion.

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Quorum-Sensing and Quorum-Quenching Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain MW3a

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Cheng Siang; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Xin Yue

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa has a broad range of habitation, from aquatic environments to human lungs. The coexistence of quorum-sensing and quorum-quenching activities occurs in P. aeruginosa strain MW3a. In this work, we present the draft genome sequence of P. aeruginosa MW3a, an interesting bacterium isolated from a marine environment. PMID:24744329

  10. Pseudomonas aeruginosa outer membrane adhesins for human respiratory mucus glycoproteins.

    PubMed Central

    Carnoy, C; Scharfman, A; Van Brussel, E; Lamblin, G; Ramphal, R; Roussel, P

    1994-01-01

    The attachment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to human respiratory mucus represents an important step in the development of lung infection, especially in cases of cystic fibrosis. For this purpose, microtiter plate adhesion assays have been developed and have suggested that nonpilus adhesins of P. aeruginosa are the most important ones for binding to human respiratory mucins. In order to characterize these mucin-binding adhesins, outer membrane proteins (OMP) from two adhesive strains, 1244-NP and PAK-NP, and their poorly adhesive rpoN mutants, 1244-N3 and PAK-N1, were prepared by a mild extraction with Zwittergent 3-14. Mucin-binding adhesins were detected after polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and blotting of the OMP on nitrocellulose replicas, using human bronchial mucins labeled with 125I. The binding properties of these OMP with lactotransferrin, another glycoprotein abundant in respiratory mucus, were also studied. Radiolabeled mucins detected four bands at 48, 46, 28, and 25 kDa with strain PAK-NP. With the nonmucoid strain 1244-NP, five bands were observed at 48, 46, 42, 28, and 25 kDa. The bands at 48 and 25 kDa were also visualized by radiolabeled lactotransferrin. These bands were partially or completely displaced by nonradiolabeled respiratory mucin glycopeptides but not by tetramethylurea, suggesting that they recognized carbohydrate sites. In contrast, the poorly adhesive strains showed weakly binding bands. These results demonstrate that outer membranes from two different nonpiliated P. aeruginosa strains express multiple adhesins with an affinity for human respiratory mucins and/or lactotransferrin. Images PMID:8168955

  11. Transcriptional analysis of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa exoenzyme S structural gene.

    PubMed Central

    Yahr, T L; Hovey, A K; Kulich, S M; Frank, D W

    1995-01-01

    The transcriptional regulation of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa exoS gene was investigated. Expression of exoS in P. aeruginosa PA103 was dependent upon growth in a low-cation environment and the presence of a functional exsA gene. Promoter fusion analysis indicated that a 285-bp PstI-NsiI fragment, located 5' of the exoS coding region, contained a functional promoter for exoS. Expression of the reporter gene was inducible in a low-cation growth environment and required a functional copy of exsA. Divergent promoters, coordinately regulated with exoS transcription, were identified within the PstI-NsiI fragment. A fusion derivative of ExsA, MALA3A2, was shown to bind directly to the PstI-NsiI probe. DNase I protection analysis demonstrated that MALA3A2 bound to the intergenic region between the postulated -35 boxes of each promoter region. Northern (RNA) blot analysis with probes internal to and upstream of exoS demonstrated that separate, coordinately regulated mRNAs were expressed in P. aeruginosa. These data suggested that a locus, coregulated with exoS transcription, was located upstream of exoS. DNA sequence analysis of the exoS upstream region revealed three open reading frames, ORF 1, ORF 2, and ORF 3. ORF 1 demonstrated significant homology to the SycE/YerA protein of Yersinia sp. SycE/YerA is postulated to function as a chaperone for the YopE cytotoxin. The loci encoding YopE and ExoS show similarities in genetic organization, protein composition, and regulation. PMID:7868588

  12. Mucin Promotes Rapid Surface Motility in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Amy T. Y.; Parayno, Alicia; Hancock, Robert E. W.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT An important environmental factor that determines the mode of motility adopted by Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the viscosity of the medium, often provided by adjusting agar concentrations in vitro. However, the viscous gel-like property of the mucus layer that overlays epithelial surfaces is largely due to the glycoprotein mucin. P. aeruginosa is known to swim within 0.3% (wt/vol) agar and swarm on the surface at 0.5% (wt/vol) agar with amino acids as a weak nitrogen source. When physiological concentrations or as little as 0.05% (wt/vol) mucin was added to the swimming agar, in addition to swimming, P. aeruginosa was observed to undergo highly accelerated motility on the surface of the agar. The surface motility colonies in the presence of mucin appeared to be circular, with a bright green center surrounded by a thicker white edge. While intact flagella were required for the surface motility in the presence of mucin, type IV pili and rhamnolipid production were not. Replacement of mucin with other wetting agents indicated that the lubricant properties of mucin might contribute to the surface motility. Based on studies with mutants, the quorum-sensing systems (las and rhl) and the orphan autoinducer receptor QscR played important roles in this form of surface motility. Transcriptional analysis of cells taken from the motility zone revealed the upregulation of genes involved in virulence and resistance. Based on these results, we suggest that mucin may be promoting a new or highly modified form of surface motility, which we propose should be termed “surfing.” PMID:22550036

  13. Pseudomonas aeruginosa EftM Is a Thermoregulated Methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Owings, Joshua P; Kuiper, Emily G; Prezioso, Samantha M; Meisner, Jeffrey; Varga, John J; Zelinskaya, Natalia; Dammer, Eric B; Duong, Duc M; Seyfried, Nicholas T; Albertí, Sebastián; Conn, Graeme L; Goldberg, Joanna B

    2016-02-12

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative opportunistic pathogen that trimethylates elongation factor-thermo-unstable (EF-Tu) on lysine 5. Lysine 5 methylation occurs in a temperature-dependent manner and is generally only seen when P. aeruginosa is grown at temperatures close to ambient (25 °C) but not at higher temperatures (37 °C). We have previously identified the gene, eftM (for EF-Tu-modifying enzyme), responsible for this modification and shown its activity to be associated with increased bacterial adhesion to and invasion of respiratory epithelial cells. Bioinformatic analyses predicted EftM to be a Class I S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM)-dependent methyltransferase. An in vitro methyltransferase assay was employed to show that, in the presence of SAM, EftM directly trimethylates EF-Tu. A natural variant of EftM, with a glycine to arginine substitution at position 50 in the predicted SAM-binding domain, lacks both SAM binding and enzyme activity. Mass spectrometry analysis of the in vitro methyltransferase reaction products revealed that EftM exclusively methylates at lysine 5 of EF-Tu in a distributive manner. Consistent with the in vivo temperature dependence of methylation of EF-Tu, preincubation of EftM at 37 °C abolished methyltransferase activity, whereas this activity was retained when EftM was preincubated at 25 °C. Irreversible protein unfolding at 37 °C was observed, and we propose that this instability is the molecular basis for the temperature dependence of EftM activity. Collectively, our results show that EftM is a thermolabile, SAM-dependent methyltransferase that directly trimethylates lysine 5 of EF-Tu in P. aeruginosa. PMID:26677219

  14. Streptococcus pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia induce distinct host responses

    PubMed Central

    McConnell, Kevin W.; McDunn, Jonathan E.; Clark, Andrew T.; Dunne, W. Michael; Dixon, David J.; Turnbull, Isaiah R.; DiPasco, Peter J.; Osberghaus, William F.; Sherman, Benjamin; Martin, James R.; Walter, Michael J.; Cobb, J. Perren; Buchman, Timothy G.; Hotchkiss, Richard S.; Coopersmith, Craig M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Pathogens that cause pneumonia may be treated in a targeted fashion by antibiotics, but if this therapy fails, treatment involves only non-specific supportive measures, independent of the inciting infection. The purpose of this study was to determine whether host response is similar following disparate infections with similar mortalities. Design Prospective, randomized controlled study. Setting Animal laboratory in a university medical center. Interventions Pneumonia was induced in FVB/N mice by either Streptococcus pneumoniae or two different concentrations of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Plasma and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from septic animals was assayed by a microarray immunoassay measuring 18 inflammatory mediators at multiple timepoints. Measurements and Main Results The host response was dependent upon the causative organism as well as kinetics of mortality, but the pro- and anti- inflammatory response was independent of inoculum concentration or degree of bacteremia. Pneumonia caused by different concentrations of the same bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, also yielded distinct inflammatory responses; however, inflammatory mediator expression did not directly track the severity of infection. For all infections, the host response was compartmentalized, with markedly different concentrations of inflammatory mediators in the systemic circulation and the lungs. Hierarchical clustering analysis resulted in the identification of 5 distinct clusters of the host response to bacterial infection. Principal components analysis correlated pulmonary MIP-2 and IL-10 with progression of infection while elevated plasma TNFsr2 and MCP-1 were indicative of fulminant disease with >90% mortality within 48 hours. Conclusions Septic mice have distinct local and systemic responses to Streptococcus pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia. Targeting specific host inflammatory responses induced by distinct bacterial infections could represent a potential therapeutic

  15. Biotic inactivation of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa quinolone signal molecule.

    PubMed

    Soh, Eliza Ye-Chen; Chhabra, Siri R; Halliday, Nigel; Heeb, Stephan; Müller, Christine; Birmes, Franziska S; Fetzner, Susanne; Cámara, Miguel; Chan, Kok-Gan; Williams, Paul

    2015-11-01

    In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, quorum sensing (QS) regulates the production of secondary metabolites, many of which are antimicrobials that impact on polymicrobial community composition. Consequently, quenching QS modulates the environmental impact of P. aeruginosa. To identify bacteria capable of inactivating the QS signal molecule 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone (PQS), a minimal medium containing PQS as the sole carbon source was used to enrich a Malaysian rainforest soil sample. This yielded an Achromobacter xylosoxidans strain (Q19) that inactivated PQS, yielding a new fluorescent compound (I-PQS) confirmed as PQS-derived using deuterated PQS. The I-PQS structure was elucidated using mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy as 2-heptyl-2-hydroxy-1,2-dihydroquinoline-3,4-dione (HHQD). Achromobacter xylosoxidans Q19 oxidized PQS congeners with alkyl chains ranging from C1 to C5 and also N-methyl PQS, yielding the corresponding 2-hydroxy-1,2-dihydroquinoline-3,4-diones, but was unable to inactivate the PQS precursor HHQ. This indicates that the hydroxyl group at position 3 in PQS is essential and that A. xylosoxidans inactivates PQS via a pathway involving the incorporation of oxygen at C2 of the heterocyclic ring. The conversion of PQS to HHQD also occurred on incubation with 12/17 A. xylosoxidans strains recovered from cystic fibrosis patients, with P. aeruginosa and with Arthrobacter, suggesting that formation of hydroxylated PQS may be a common mechanism of inactivation. PMID:25809238

  16. [Virulence factors in Pseudomonas aeruginosa: mechanisms and modes of regulation].

    PubMed

    Ben Haj Khalifa, Anis; Moissenet, Didier; Vu Thien, Hoang; Khedher, Mohamed

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a bacterium responsible for severe nosocomial infections, life-threatening infections in immunocompromised persons, and chronic infections in cystic fibrosis patients. The bacterium's virulence depends on a large number of cell-associated and extracellular factors. The virulence factors play an important pathological role in the colonization, the survival of the bacteria and the invasion of tissues. There are two types of virulence factors: (1) factors involved in the acute infection: these factors are either on the surface of P. aeruginosa, either secreted. The pili allow adherence to the epithelium. The exoenzyme S and other adhesins reinforce the adherence to epithelial cells. The exotoxin A is responsible of tissue necrosis. Phospholipase C is a thermolabile haemolysin. The pathogenic role of exoenzyme S is attributable to the disruption of normal cytoskeletal organization, the destruction of immunoglobulin G and A, leads to depolymerization of actin filaments and contributes to the resistance to macrophages. P. aeruginosa produces at least four proteases causing bleeding and tissue necrosis; (2) factors involved in the chronic infection: siderophores (pyoverdin and pyochelin), allow the bacteria to multiply in the absence of ferrous ions. The strains isolated from patients with cystic fibrosis have a pseudocapsule of alginate that protects the bacterium from phagocytosis, dehydration and antibiotics. Moreover, it improves adherence to epithelial cells forming a biofilm. Two different types of regulation systems control the expression of the majority of these virulence factors: the two-component transcriptional regulatory system and the quorum sensing system. These two mechanisms are necessary to the survival and the proliferation of this microorganism in the host. PMID:21896403

  17. Impact of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase on virulence factor production by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Jonathan B; Scoffield, Jessica; Woolnough, Jessica L; Silo-Suh, Laura

    2014-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa establishes life-long chronic infections in the cystic fibrosis (CF) lung by utilizing various adaptation strategies. Some of these strategies include altering metabolic pathways to utilize readily available nutrients present in the host environment. The airway sputum contains various host-derived nutrients that can be utilized by P. aeruginosa, including phosphatidylcholine, a major component of lung surfactant. Pseudomonas aeruginosa can degrade phosphatidylcholine to glycerol and fatty acids to increase the availability of usable carbon sources in the CF lung. In this study, we show that some CF-adapted P. aeruginosa isolates utilize glycerol more efficiently as a carbon source than nonadapted isolates. Furthermore, a mutation in a gene required for glycerol utilization impacts the production of several virulence factors in both acute and chronic isolates of P. aeruginosa. Taken together, the results suggest that interference with this metabolic pathway may have potential therapeutic benefits. PMID:25409940

  18. Insights into the respiratory tract microbiota of patients with cystic fibrosis during early Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Keravec, Marlène; Mounier, Jérôme; Prestat, Emmanuel; Vallet, Sophie; Jansson, Janet K.; Burgaud, Gaëtan; Rosec, Sylvain; Gouriou, Stéphanie; Rault, Gilles; Coton, Emmanuel; et al

    2015-08-09

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa plays a major role in cystic fibrosis (CF) progression. Therefore, it is important to understand the initial steps of P. aeruginosa infection. The structure and dynamics of CF respiratory tract microbial communities during the early stages of P. aeruginosa colonization were characterized by pyrosequencing and cloning-sequencing. The respiratory microbiota showed high diversity, related to the young age of the CF cohort (mean age 10 years). Wide inter- and intra-individual variations were revealed. A common core microbiota of 5 phyla and 13 predominant genera was found, the majority of which were obligate anaerobes. A few genera were significantly moremore » prevalent in patients never infected by P. aeruginosa. Persistence of an anaerobic core microbiota regardless of P. aeruginosa status suggests a major role of certain anaerobes in the pathophysiology of lung infections in CF. Some genera may be potential biomarkers of pulmonary infection state.« less

  19. Insights into the respiratory tract microbiota of patients with cystic fibrosis during early Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization

    SciTech Connect

    Keravec, Marlene; Mounier, Jerome; Prestat , Emmanuel; Vallet, Sophie; Jansson, Janet K.; Bergaud , Gaetaqn; Rosec, Silvain; Gourious, Stephanie; Rault, Gilles; Coton, Emmanuel; Barbier, George; Hery-Arnaud, Geneveieve

    2015-08-09

    Abstract Pseudomonas aeruginosa plays a major role in cystic fibrosis (CF) progression. Therefore, it is important to understand the initial steps of P. aeruginosa infection. The structure and dynamics of CF respiratory tract microbial communities during the early stages of P. aeruginosa colonization were characterized by pyrosequencing and cloning-sequencing. The respiratory microbiota showed high diversity, related to the young age of the CF cohort (mean age 10 years). Wide inter- and intra-individual variations were revealed. A common core microbiota of 5 phyla and 13 predominant genera was found, the majority of which were obligate anaerobes. A few genera were significantly more prevalent in patients never infected by P. aeruginosa. Persistence of an anaerobic core microbiota regardless of P. aeruginosa status suggests a major role of certain anaerobes in the pathophysiology of lung infections in CF. Some genera may be potential biomarkers of pulmonary infection state.

  20. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa Transcriptional Landscape Is Shaped by Environmental Heterogeneity and Genetic Variation

    PubMed Central

    Schniederjans, Monika; Khaledi, Ariane; Hornischer, Klaus; Schulz, Sebastian; Bielecka, Agata; Eckweiler, Denitsa; Pohl, Sarah; Häussler, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Phenotypic variability among bacteria depends on gene expression in response to different environments, and it also reflects differences in genomic structure. In this study, we analyzed transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) profiles of 151 Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates under standard laboratory conditions and of one P. aeruginosa type strain under 14 different environmental conditions. Our approach allowed dissection of the impact of the genetic background versus environmental cues on P. aeruginosa gene expression profiles and revealed that phenotypic variation was larger in response to changing environments than between genomically different isolates. We demonstrate that mutations within the global regulator LasR affect more than one trait (pleiotropy) and that the interaction between mutations (epistasis) shapes the P. aeruginosa phenotypic plasticity landscape. Because of pleiotropic and epistatic effects, average genotype and phenotype measures appeared to be uncorrelated in P. aeruginosa. PMID:26126853

  1. Insights into the respiratory tract microbiota of patients with cystic fibrosis during early Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization.

    PubMed

    Keravec, Marlène; Mounier, Jérôme; Prestat, Emmanuel; Vallet, Sophie; Jansson, Janet K; Burgaud, Gaëtan; Rosec, Sylvain; Gouriou, Stéphanie; Rault, Gilles; Coton, Emmanuel; Barbier, Georges; Héry-Arnaud, Geneviève

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa plays a major role in cystic fibrosis (CF) progression. Therefore, it is important to understand the initial steps of P. aeruginosa infection. The structure and dynamics of CF respiratory tract microbial communities during the early stages of P. aeruginosa colonization were characterized by pyrosequencing and cloning-sequencing. The respiratory microbiota showed high diversity, related to the young age of the CF cohort (mean age 10 years). Wide inter- and intra-individual variations were revealed. A common core microbiota of 5 phyla and 13 predominant genera was found, the majority of which were obligate anaerobes. A few genera were significantly more prevalent in patients never infected by P. aeruginosa. Persistence of an anaerobic core microbiota regardless of P. aeruginosa status suggests a major role of certain anaerobes in the pathophysiology of lung infections in CF. Some genera may be potential biomarkers of pulmonary infection state. PMID:26266076

  2. Adaptation of the Cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa to Light Intensity 1

    PubMed Central

    Raps, Shirley; Wyman, Kevin; Siegelman, Harold W.; Falkowski, Paul G.

    1983-01-01

    Light intensity adaptation (20 to 565 microeinsteins per square meter per second) of Microcystis aeruginosa (UV-027) was examined in turbidostat culture. Chlorophyll a and phycocyanin concentrations decreased with increasing light intensity while carotenoid, cellular carbon, and nitrogen contents did not vary. Variation in the number but not the size of photosynthetic units per cell, based on chlorophyll a/P700 ratios, occurred on light intensity adaptation. Changes in the numbers of photosynthetic units partially dampened the effects of changes in light intensity on growth rates. PMID:16663094

  3. Protective role of murine norovirus against Pseudomonas aeruginosa acute pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Thépaut, Marion; Grandjean, Teddy; Hober, Didier; Lobert, Pierre-Emmanuel; Bortolotti, Perrine; Faure, Karine; Dessein, Rodrigue; Kipnis, Eric; Guery, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    The murine norovirus (MNV) is a recently discovered mouse pathogen, representing the most common contaminant in laboratory mouse colonies. Nevertheless, the effects of MNV infection on biomedical research are still unclear. We tested the hypothesis that MNV infection could alter immune response in mice with acute lung infection. Here we report that co-infection with MNV increases survival of mice with Pseudomonas aeruginosa acute lung injury and decreases in vivo production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Our results suggest that MNV infection can deeply modify the parameters studied in conventional models of infection and lead to false conclusions in experimental models. PMID:26338794

  4. Nanoindentation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterial biofilm using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baniasadi, Mahmoud; Xu, Zhe; Gandee, Leah; Du, Yingjie; Lu, Hongbing; Zimmern, Philippe; Minary-Jolandan, Majid

    2014-12-01

    Bacterial biofilms are a source of many chronic infections. Biofilms and their inherent resistance to antibiotics are attributable to a range of health issues including affecting prosthetic implants, hospital-acquired infections, and wound infection. Mechanical properties of biofilm, in particular, at micro- and nano-scales, are governed by microstructures and porosity of the biofilm, which in turn may contribute to their inherent antibiotic resistance. We utilize atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanoindentation and finite element simulation to investigate the nanoscale mechanical properties of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterial biofilm. This biofilm was derived from human samples and represents a medically relevant model.

  5. Mitogenic effects of purified outer membrane proteins from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y H; Hancock, R E; Mishell, R I

    1980-01-01

    Three major outer membrane proteins from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 were purified and tested for their ability to stimulate resting murine lymphocytes to proliferate. It was demonstrated that picomole amounts of all three proteins were mitogenic for both intact and T-lymphocyte-depleted populations of spleen cells from C3H/HeJ mice. In contrast, they had no activity against either mature or immature thymocytes. Since the strain of mice used is unable to respond to lipopolysaccharide, we condlude that the three proteins are B-cell mitogens. Images Fig. 2 PMID:6769818

  6. Locus of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa toxin A gene.

    PubMed Central

    Hanne, L F; Howe, T R; Iglewski, B H

    1983-01-01

    The gene for Pseudomonas aeruginosa toxin A has been mapped in the late region of the chromosome of strain PAO. Strain PAO-PR1, which produces parental levels of toxin A antigen that is enzymatically inactive and nontoxic, was used as the donor for R68.45 plasmid-mediated genetic exchange. Strain PAO-PR1 (toxA1) was mated with toxin A-producing strains, and exconjugates for selected prototrophic markers were tested for the transfer of toxA1. The toxA1 gene was located between cnu-9001 and pur-67 at approximately 85 min on the PAO chromosome. PMID:6403508

  7. Phosphorylated tyrosine in the flagellum filament protein of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly-Wintenberg, K.; Anderson, T.; Montie, T.C. )

    1990-09-01

    Purified flagella from two strains of {sup 32}P-labeled Pseudomonas aeruginosa were shown to be phosphorylated. This was confirmed by autoradiography of flagellin protein in polyacrylamide gels. Thin-layer electrophoresis and autoradiography of flagellin partial hydrolysates indicated that phosphotyrosine was the major phosphorylated amino acid. High-pressure liquid chromatographic analysis confirmed the presence of phosphotyrosine in flagellum filament protein. Preliminary data indicated that less than one tyrosine per subunit was phosphorylated. No evidence was found for phosphorylation of serine or threonine. A function related to tyrosine phosphorylation has not been determined.

  8. An unusual presentation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa blebitis following combined surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bharathi, Shabana; Raman, Ganesh V; Mohan, Dhavalikar Mrunali; Krishnan, Anjana

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of blebitis that occurred 3 years later following a combined glaucoma and cataract surgery. It was an atypical presentation, as patient had no classical fiery looking signs of blebitis despite the isolated organism being Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Improvized surgical techniques like use of Mitomycin C, releasable flap sutures though considered as part of the recommended procedure for better surgical outcomes, their role as potential risk factors for visually blinding complications like endophthalmitis are often overlooked. This case report throws light on such risk factors for bleb associated infections and recommends removal or trimming of all releasable sutures and the need for a regular postoperative follow-up. PMID:25370403

  9. Mapping of mutations in Pseudomonas aeruginosa defective in pyoverdin production.

    PubMed Central

    Ankenbauer, R; Hanne, L F; Cox, C D

    1986-01-01

    Twelve mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO defective in pyoverdin production were isolated (after chemical and transposon mutagenesis) that were nonfluorescent and unable to grow on medium containing 400 microM ethylenediaminedi(o-hydroxyphenylacetic acid). Four mutants were unable to produce hydroxamate, six were hydroxamate positive, one was temperature sensitive for pyoverdin production, and another was unable to synthesize pyoverdin on succinate minimal medium but was capable of synthesizing pyoverdin when grown on Casamino Acids medium (Difco Laboratories, Detroit, Mich.). The mutations were mapped on the PAO chromosome. All the mutations affecting pyoverdin production were located at 65 to 70 min, between catA1 and mtu-9002. PMID:3087966

  10. Computer Simulation of the Rough Lipopolysaccharide Membrane of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Lins, Roberto D.; Straatsma, TP

    2001-08-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) form the major constituent of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, and are believed to play a key role in processes that govern microbial metal binding, microbial adsorption to mineral surfaces, and microbe mediated oxidation/reduction reactions at the bacterial exterior surface. A computational modeling capability is being developed for the study of geochemical reactions at the outer bacterial envelope of Gram-negative bacteria. The understanding of these mechanisms is crucial for the development of successful environmental bioremediation strategies. A molecular model for the rough LPS of Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been designed based on available experimentally determined structural information.

  11. Secretion of Elastinolytic Enzymes and Their Propeptides by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Peter; de Groot, Arjan; Bitter, Wilbert; Tommassen, Jan

    1998-01-01

    Elastase of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is synthesized as a preproenzyme. The signal sequence is cleaved off during transport across the inner membrane and, in the periplasm, proelastase is further processed. We demonstrate that the propeptide and the mature elastase are both secreted but that the propeptide is degraded extracellularly. In addition, reduction of the extracellular proteolytic activity led to the accumulation of unprocessed forms of LasA and LasD in the extracellular medium, which shows that these enzymes are secreted in association with their propeptides. Furthermore, a hitherto undefined protein with homology to a Streptomyces griseus aminopeptidase accumulated under these conditions. PMID:9642203

  12. Secretion of elastinolytic enzymes and their propeptides by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Braun, P; de Groot, A; Bitter, W; Tommassen, J

    1998-07-01

    Elastase of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is synthesized as a preproenzyme. The signal sequence is cleaved off during transport across the inner membrane and, in the periplasm, proelastase is further processed. We demonstrate that the propeptide and the mature elastase are both secreted but that the propeptide is degraded extracellularly. In addition, reduction of the extracellular proteolytic activity led to the accumulation of unprocessed forms of LasA and LasD in the extracellular medium, which shows that these enzymes are secreted in association with their propeptides. Furthermore, a hitherto undefined protein with homology to a Streptomyces griseus aminopeptidase accumulated under these conditions. PMID:9642203

  13. [Surviving Forms in Antibiotic-Treated Pseudomonas aeruginosa].

    PubMed

    Mulyukin, A L; Kozlova, A N; Sorokin, V V; Suzina, N E; Cherdyntseva, T A; Kotova, I B; Gaponov, A M; Tutel'yan, A V; El'-Registan, G I

    2015-01-01

    Survival of bacterial populations treated with lethal doses of antibiotics is ensured by the presence of very small numbers of persister cells. Unlike antibiotic-resistant cells, antibiotic tolerance of persisters is not inheritable and reversible. The present work provides evidence supporting the hypothesis of transformation (maturation) of persisters of an opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa revealed by ciprofloxacin (CF) treatment (25-100 μg/mL) into dormant cystlike cells (CLC) and non-culturable cells (NC), as was described previously for a number. of non-spore-forming bacteria. Subpopulations of type 1 and type 2 persisters, which survived antibiotic treatment and developed into dormant forms, were heterogeneous in their capacity to form colonies or microcolonies upon germination, in resistance to heating at 70 degrees C, and in cell morphology Type 1 persisters, which were formed after 1-month incubation in the stationary-phase cultures in the medium with decreased C and N concentrations, developed in several types of surviving cells, including those similar to CLC in cell morphology. In the course of 1-month incubation of type 2 persisters, which were formed in exponentially growing cultures, other types of surviving cells developed: immature CLC and L-forms. Unlike P. aeruginosa CLC formed in the control post-stationary phase cultures without antibiotic treatment, most of 1-month persisters, especially type 2 ones, were characterized by the loss of colony-forming capacity, probably due to transition into an uncultured state with relatively high numbers of live intact cells (Live/Dead test). Another survival strategy of P. aeruginosa populations was ensured by a minor subpopulation of CF-tolerant and CF-resistant cells able to grow in the form of microcolonies or regular colonies of decreased size in the presence of the antibiotic. The described P. aeruginosa dormant forms may be responsible for persistent forms in bacteria carriers and latent

  14. Efficiency optimization of a thermionic converter array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, Y. S.; Phillips, W. M.

    1979-01-01

    Intensive study of the outer planets of the solar system requires the use of nuclear power for electric propulsion of spacecraft. Among the power conversion devices being considered for this application are thermionic converters. This paper presents the results of computer modeling of thermionic converters to identify the major design variables and select an optimum size for each of the thermionic converters for the power conversion system under consideration. Among the variables investigated were electrical and thermal losses in electrodes, leads and heat chokes. Those elements which minimized the electrical losses tended to increase thermal losses and system weight. Overall mechanical design and relative positioning of components also had impacts on converter efficiency and the power subsystem weight. Numerical calculations were made using the computer heat transfer code SINDA coupled with electrical loss parameters. The results of the computations are presented in this paper.

  15. Rotorcraft convertible engines for the 1980s

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eisenberg, J. D.

    1982-01-01

    Two rotorcraft studies were executed. The goal was to identify attractive techniques for implementing convertible powerplants for the ABC, Folded Tilt Rotor, and X-wing type high speed, high-L/D rotorcraft; to determine the DOC and fuel savings benefits achieved thereby; and to define research required to bring these powerplants into existence by the 1990's. These studies are reviewed herein and the different methods of approach are pointed out as well as the key findings. Fan shaft engines using variable inlet guide vanes or torque converters, and turboprop powerplants appear attractive. Savings in DOC and fuel consumption of over 15 percent are predicted in some cases as a result of convertible engine use rather than using separate engines for the thrust and the shaft functions. Areas of required research are fan performance (including noise), integrated engine/rotorcraft control, torque converters, turbine design, airflow for rotorcraft torque control, bleed for lift flow, and transmissions and clutches.

  16. Waveguide mode converter and method using same

    DOEpatents

    Moeller, Charles P.

    1990-01-01

    A waveguide mode converter converts electromagnetic power being transmitted in a TE.sub.0n or a TM.sub.0n mode, where n is an integer, to an HE.sub.11 mode. The conversion process occurs in a single stage without requiring the power to pass through any intermediate modes. The converter comprises a length of circular corrugated waveguide formed in a multiperiod periodic curve. The period of the curve is selected to couple the desired modes and decouple undesired modes. The corrugation depth is selected to control the phase propagation constant, or wavenumbers, of the input and output modes, thereby preventing coherent coupling to competing modes. In one embodiment, both the period and amplitude of the curve may be selectively adjusted, thereby allowing the converter to be tuned to maximize the conversion efficiency.

  17. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 exopolysaccharides are important for mixed species biofilm community development and stress tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Periasamy, Saravanan; Nair, Harikrishnan A. S.; Lee, Kai W. K.; Ong, Jolene; Goh, Jie Q. J.; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Rice, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 produces three polysaccharides, alginate, Psl, and Pel that play distinct roles in attachment and biofilm formation for monospecies biofilms. Considerably less is known about their role in the development of mixed species biofilm communities. This study has investigated the roles of alginate, Psl, and Pel during biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa in a defined and experimentally informative mixed species biofilm community, consisting of P. aeruginosa, Pseudomonas protegens, and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Loss of the Psl polysaccharide had the biggest impact on the integration of P. aeruginosa in the mixed species biofilms, where the percent composition of the psl mutant was significantly lower (0.06%) than its wild-type (WT) parent (2.44%). In contrast, loss of the Pel polysaccharide had no impact on mixed species biofilm development. Loss of alginate or its overproduction resulted in P. aeruginosa representing 8.4 and 18.11%, respectively, of the mixed species biofilm. Dual species biofilms of P. aeruginosa and K. pneumoniae were not affected by loss of alginate, Pel, or Psl, while the mucoid P. aeruginosa strain achieved a greater biomass than its parent strain. When P. aeruginosa was grown with P. protegens, loss of the Pel or alginate polysaccharides resulted in biofilms that were not significantly different from biofilms formed by the WT PAO1. In contrast, overproduction of alginate resulted in biofilms that were comprised of 35–40% of P. aeruginosa, which was significantly higher than the WT (5–20%). Loss of the Psl polysaccharide significantly reduced the percentage composition of P. aeruginosa in dual species biofilms with P. protegens (<1%). Loss of the Psl polysaccharide significantly disrupted the communal stress resistance of the three species biofilms. Thus, the polysaccharide composition of an individual species significantly impacts mixed species biofilm development and the emergent properties of such communities. PMID

  18. Cystic fibrosis-niche adaptation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa reduces virulence in multiple infection hosts.

    PubMed

    Lorè, Nicola Ivan; Cigana, Cristina; De Fino, Ida; Riva, Camilla; Juhas, Mario; Schwager, Stephan; Eberl, Leo; Bragonzi, Alessandra

    2012-01-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is able to thrive in diverse ecological niches and to cause serious human infection. P. aeruginosa environmental strains are producing various virulence factors that are required for establishing acute infections in several host organisms; however, the P. aeruginosa phenotypic variants favour long-term persistence in the cystic fibrosis (CF) airways. Whether P. aeruginosa strains, which have adapted to the CF-niche, have lost their competitive fitness in the other environment remains to be investigated. In this paper, three P. aeruginosa clonal lineages, including early strains isolated at the onset of infection, and late strains, isolated after several years of chronic lung infection from patients with CF, were analysed in multi-host model systems of acute infection. P. aeruginosa early isolates caused lethality in the three non-mammalian hosts, namely Caenorhabditis elegans, Galleria mellonella, and Drosophila melanogaster, while late adapted clonal isolates were attenuated in acute virulence. When two different mouse genetic background strains, namely C57Bl/6NCrl and Balb/cAnNCrl, were used as acute infection models, early P. aeruginosa CF isolates were lethal, while late isolates exhibited reduced or abolished acute virulence. Severe histopathological lesions, including high leukocytes recruitment and bacterial load, were detected in the lungs of mice infected with P. aeruginosa CF early isolates, while late isolates were progressively cleared. In addition, systemic bacterial spread and invasion of epithelial cells, which were detected for P. aeruginosa CF early strains, were not observed with late strains. Our findings indicate that niche-specific selection in P. aeruginosa reduced its ability to cause acute infections across a broad range of hosts while maintaining the capacity for chronic infection in the CF host. PMID:22558188

  19. Cystic Fibrosis-Niche Adaptation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Reduces Virulence in Multiple Infection Hosts

    PubMed Central

    De Fino, Ida; Riva, Camilla; Juhas, Mario; Schwager, Stephan; Eberl, Leo; Bragonzi, Alessandra

    2012-01-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is able to thrive in diverse ecological niches and to cause serious human infection. P. aeruginosa environmental strains are producing various virulence factors that are required for establishing acute infections in several host organisms; however, the P. aeruginosa phenotypic variants favour long-term persistence in the cystic fibrosis (CF) airways. Whether P. aeruginosa strains, which have adapted to the CF-niche, have lost their competitive fitness in the other environment remains to be investigated. In this paper, three P. aeruginosa clonal lineages, including early strains isolated at the onset of infection, and late strains, isolated after several years of chronic lung infection from patients with CF, were analysed in multi-host model systems of acute infection. P. aeruginosa early isolates caused lethality in the three non-mammalian hosts, namely Caenorhabditis elegans, Galleria mellonella, and Drosophila melanogaster, while late adapted clonal isolates were attenuated in acute virulence. When two different mouse genetic background strains, namely C57Bl/6NCrl and Balb/cAnNCrl, were used as acute infection models, early P. aeruginosa CF isolates were lethal, while late isolates exhibited reduced or abolished acute virulence. Severe histopathological lesions, including high leukocytes recruitment and bacterial load, were detected in the lungs of mice infected with P. aeruginosa CF early isolates, while late isolates were progressively cleared. In addition, systemic bacterial spread and invasion of epithelial cells, which were detected for P. aeruginosa CF early strains, were not observed with late strains. Our findings indicate that niche-specific selection in P. aeruginosa reduced its ability to cause acute infections across a broad range of hosts while maintaining the capacity for chronic infection in the CF host. PMID:22558188

  20. ANALOG-TO-DIGITAL DATA CONVERTER

    DOEpatents

    Rodgers, G.W.; Althouse, J.E.; Anderson, D.P.; Bussey, G.R.; Minnear, L.H.

    1960-09-01

    Electrical apparatus is described, particularly useful in telemetry work, for converting analog signals into electrical pulses and recording them. An electronic editor commands the taking of signal readings at a frequency which varies according to linearity of the analog signal being converted. Readings of information signals are recorded, along with time base readings and serial numbering, if desired, on magnetic tape and the latter may be used to operate a computer or the like. Magnetic tape data may be transferred to punched cards.

  1. On lossless switched-capacitor power converters

    SciTech Connect

    Tse, C.K.; Wong, S.C.; Chow, M.H.L.

    1995-05-01

    This paper addresses the design of efficient switched-capacitor power converters. The discussion starts with a review of the fundamental limitation of switched-capacitor circuits which shows that the topology of such circuits and the ``forced`` step changes of capacitor voltages are the inherent attributes of power loss. Although the argument follows from a rather trivial result from basic circuit theory, it addresses an important issue on the maximum efficiency achievable in a switched-capacitor converter circuit. Based on the observed topological constraint of switched-capacitor converter circuits, the simplest lossless topology for AC/DC conversion is deduced. Also discussed is a simple version of lossless topology that achieves isolation between the source and the load. Finally, an experimental AC/DC switched-capacitor converter, based on the proposed idea, is presented which demonstrates an improved efficiency over other existing switched-capacitor converters. The proposed AC/DC converter contains no inductors and thus is suitable for custom IC implementation for very low power applications.

  2. Purification and properties of two deoxyribonucleases of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, R V; Clark, A J

    1976-01-01

    A survey of the major deoxyribonucleases in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PAO was undertaken. Two activities predominated in Brij-58 lysates of this organism. These have been purified from contaminating nuclease activities, and some of their properties have been elucidated. The first was a nuclease that degraded heat-denatured deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) to mono- and dinucleotides. The activity of this enzyme was confined to single-stranded DNA, and 100% of the substrate was hydrolyzed to acid-soluble material. The Mg2+ optimum is low (1 to 3mM), and the molecular weight is 6 X 10(4). The second predominant activity was an adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP)-dependent deoxyribonuclease. This enzyme had an absolute dependence on the presence of ATP Mg2+ concentrations of approximately 10 mM. Five moles of ATP was consumed for each mole of phosphodiester bonds cleaved. The acid-soluble products of the reaction consisted of short oligonucleotides from one to six bases in length. Only 50% of the double-stranded DNA was rendered acid soluble in a limit digest. The molecular weight of this enzyme is 3 X 10(5). The observation of these enzymes in P. aeruginosa is consistent with the possibility that recombinational pathways similar to those of Escherichia coli are operating in this organism. PMID:60331

  3. Mechanical destruction of pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms by ultrasound exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jin; Bigelow, Timothy A.; Halverson, Larry J.; Middendorf, Jill; Rusk, Ben

    2012-10-01

    Medical implants are prone to colonization by bacterial biofilms, which are highly resistant to antibiotics. Normally, surgery is required to replace the infected implant. One promising non-invasive treatment option is to destroy the biofilm with high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) exposure. In our study, Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterial biofilms were grown on graphite disks in a flow chamber for three days prior to exposing them to ultrasound pulses of varying duration or burst period. The pulses were 20 cycles in duration at a frequency of 1.1 MHz from a spherically focused transducer (f/1, 63 mm focal length), creating peak compressional and rarefactional pressures at the disk surface of 30 and 13 MPa, respectively. P. aeruginosa were tagged with GFP and cells killed by HIFU were visualized using propidium iodide, which permeates membranes of dead cells, to aid determining the extent of biofilm destruction and whether cells are alive or dead. Our results indicate that a 30-s exposure and 6-ms pulse period or those combinations with the same number of pulses, were sufficient to destroy the biofilm and to kill the remaining cells. Reducing the number of pulses decreased biofilm destruction, leaving more dead and live bacteria on the surface.

  4. Phage selection restores antibiotic sensitivity in MDR Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Benjamin K.; Sistrom, Mark; Wertz, John E.; Kortright, Kaitlyn E.; Narayan, Deepak; Turner, Paul E.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing prevalence and severity of multi-drug-resistant (MDR) bacterial infections has necessitated novel antibacterial strategies. Ideally, new approaches would target bacterial pathogens while exerting selection for reduced pathogenesis when these bacteria inevitably evolve resistance to therapeutic intervention. As an example of such a management strategy, we isolated a lytic bacteriophage, OMKO1, (family Myoviridae) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa that utilizes the outer membrane porin M (OprM) of the multidrug efflux systems MexAB and MexXY as a receptor-binding site. Results show that phage selection produces an evolutionary trade-off in MDR P. aeruginosa, whereby the evolution of bacterial resistance to phage attack changes the efflux pump mechanism, causing increased sensitivity to drugs from several antibiotic classes. Although modern phage therapy is still in its infancy, we conclude that phages, such as OMKO1, represent a new approach to phage therapy where bacteriophages exert selection for MDR bacteria to become increasingly sensitive to traditional antibiotics. This approach, using phages as targeted antibacterials, could extend the lifetime of our current antibiotics and potentially reduce the incidence of antibiotic resistant infections. PMID:27225966

  5. Combined effects of two antibiotic contaminants on Microcystis aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Zhang, Jian; Gao, Baoyu; Feng, Suping

    2014-08-30

    Combined toxicity of spiramycin and amoxicillin was tested in Microcystis aeruginosa. The respective 50% effective concentrations (EC50mix) expressed in toxic unit (TU) values were 1.25 and 1.83 for spiramycin and amoxicillin mixed at 1:7 and 1:1, suggesting an antagonistic interaction at the median effect level. Deviations from the prediction of concentration addition (CA) and independent action (IA) models further indicated that combined toxicity of two antibiotics mixed at 1:1 varied from synergism to antagonism with increasing test concentration. Both the EC50mix of 0.86 (in TU value) and the deviation from two models manifested a synergistic interaction between spiramycin and amoxicillin mixed at 7:1. At an environmentally relevant concentration of 800ngL(-1), combined effect of mixed antibiotics on algal growth changed from stimulation to inhibition with the increasing proportion of higher toxic component (spiramycin). Chlorophyll-a content and expression levels of psbA, psaB, and rbcL varied in a similar manner as growth rate, suggesting a correlation between algal growth and photosynthesis under exposure to mixed antibiotics. The stimulation of microcystin-production by mixed antibiotics was related with the elevated expression of mcyB. The mixture of two target antibiotics with low proportion of spiramycin (<50%) could increase the harm of M. aeruginosa to aquatic environments by stimulating algal growth and production and release of microcystin-LR at their current contamination levels. PMID:25051238

  6. Mechanical Properties of Type IV Pili in P. Aeruginosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Shun; Touhami, Ahmed; Scheurwater, Edie; Harvey, Hanjeong; Burrows, Lori; Dutcher, John

    2009-03-01

    Type IV pili (Tfp) are thin flexible protein filaments that extend from the cell membrane of bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. The mechanical properties of Tfp are of great importance since they allow bacteria to interact with and colonize various surfaces. In the present study, we have used atomic force microscopy (AFM) for both imaging and pulling on Tfp from P. aeruginosa (PAO1) and from its PilA, PilT, and FliC mutants. A single pilus filament was mechanically stretched and the resulting force-extension profiles were fitted using the worm-like-chain (WLC) model. The statistical distributions obtained for contour length, persistence length, and number of pili per bacteria pole, were used to evaluate the mechanical properties of a single pilus and the biogenesis functions of different proteins (PilA, PilT) involved in its assembly and disassembly. Importantly, the persistence length value of ˜ 1 μm measured in the present study, which is consistent with the curvature of the pili observed in our AFM images, is significantly lower than the value of 5 μm reported earlier by Skerker et al. (1). Our results shed new light on the role of mechanical forces that mediate bacteria-surface interactions and biofilm formation. 1- J.M. Skerker and H.C. Berg, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 98, 6901-6904 (2001).

  7. Denitrification by Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Under Simulated Engineered Martain Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, S. D.; Currier, P. A.; Thomas, D. J.

    The growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in denitrifying medium was observed for 14 days in the presence of a martian soil analog (JSC Mars-1) and elevated CO2 levels. A four-way test was conducted comparing growth of experimental samples to growth in the presence of inert silica (“Earth soil”) and normal terrestrial atmosphere. The combination of 50 mL of fluorescence-denitrification medium and 10 grams of soil additive simulated an aquatic environment, which was contained in sealed culture bottles. Nitrite assays of the media (to test for consumption during denitrification), gas sampling from the bottles to observe nitrogen production, and colony counts to quantify growth rate were all performed at 0, 7 and 14 days after inoculation. Supplemental tests performed included nitrate assays (to confirm the occurrence of denitrification) and culture fluorescence (as a non-invasive growth test). Growth and denitrification took place under all conditions, and no significant differ- ences were observed between samples. These data indicate that the presence of simulated martian regolith and elevated CO2 have little or no effect on the growth of or denitrification by P. aeruginosa at the concentrations used.

  8. A molecular mechanism that stabilizes cooperative secretions in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Wook

    2010-01-01

    Summary Bacterial populations frequently act as a collective by secreting a wide range of compounds necessary for cell-cell communication, host colonization and virulence. However, how such behaviors avoid exploitation by spontaneous ‘cheater’ mutants that use but do not contribute to secretions remains unclear. We investigate this question using Pseudomonas aeruginosa swarming, a collective surface motility requiring massive secretions of rhamnolipid biosurfactants. We first show that swarming is immune to the evolution of rhlA− ‘cheaters’. We then demonstrate that P. aeruginosa resists cheating through metabolic prudence: wild-type cells secrete biosurfactants only when the cost of their production and impact on individual fitness is low, therefore preventing non-secreting strains from gaining an evolutionary advantage. Metabolic prudence works because the carbon-rich biosurfactants are only produced when growth is limited by another growth limiting nutrient, the nitrogen source. By genetically manipulating a strain to produce the biosurfactants constitutively we show that swarming becomes cheatable: a non-producing strain rapidly outcompetes and replaces this obligate cooperator. We argue that metabolic prudence, which may first evolve as a direct response to cheating or simply to optimize growth, can explain the maintenance of massive secretions in many bacteria. More generally, prudent regulation is a mechanism to stabilize cooperation. PMID:21166901

  9. Phage selection restores antibiotic sensitivity in MDR Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Chan, Benjamin K; Sistrom, Mark; Wertz, John E; Kortright, Kaitlyn E; Narayan, Deepak; Turner, Paul E

    2016-01-01

    Increasing prevalence and severity of multi-drug-resistant (MDR) bacterial infections has necessitated novel antibacterial strategies. Ideally, new approaches would target bacterial pathogens while exerting selection for reduced pathogenesis when these bacteria inevitably evolve resistance to therapeutic intervention. As an example of such a management strategy, we isolated a lytic bacteriophage, OMKO1, (family Myoviridae) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa that utilizes the outer membrane porin M (OprM) of the multidrug efflux systems MexAB and MexXY as a receptor-binding site. Results show that phage selection produces an evolutionary trade-off in MDR P. aeruginosa, whereby the evolution of bacterial resistance to phage attack changes the efflux pump mechanism, causing increased sensitivity to drugs from several antibiotic classes. Although modern phage therapy is still in its infancy, we conclude that phages, such as OMKO1, represent a new approach to phage therapy where bacteriophages exert selection for MDR bacteria to become increasingly sensitive to traditional antibiotics. This approach, using phages as targeted antibacterials, could extend the lifetime of our current antibiotics and potentially reduce the incidence of antibiotic resistant infections. PMID:27225966

  10. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Exopolyphosphatase Is Also a Polyphosphate: ADP Phosphotransferase

    PubMed Central

    Beassoni, Paola R.; Gallarato, Lucas A.; Boetsch, Cristhian; Garrido, Mónica N.; Lisa, Angela T.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa exopolyphosphatase (paPpx; EC 3.6.1.11) catalyzes the hydrolysis of polyphosphates (polyP), producing polyPn−1 plus inorganic phosphate (Pi). In a recent work we have shown that paPpx is involved in the pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa. The present study was aimed at performing the biochemical characterization of this enzyme. We found some properties that were already described for E. coli Ppx (ecPpx) but we also discovered new and original characteristics of paPpx: (i) the peptide that connects subdomains II and III is essential for enzyme activity; (ii) NH4+ is an activator of the enzyme and may function at concentrations lower than those of K+; (iii) Zn2+ is also an activator of paPpx and may substitute Mg2+ in the catalytic site; and (iv) paPpx also has phosphotransferase activity, dependent on Mg2+ and capable of producing ATP regardless of the presence or absence of K+ or NH4+ ions. In addition, we detected that the active site responsible for the phosphatase activity is also responsible for the phosphotransferase activity. Through the combination of molecular modeling and docking techniques, we propose a model of the paPpx N-terminal domain in complex with a polyP chain of 7 residues long and a molecule of ADP to explain the phosphotransferase activity. PMID:26576296

  11. Carbapenem Resistance Mechanisms in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Hyunjoo; Kim, Jong-Won; Kim, Jungmin; Lee, Ji Hyang; Choe, Kang Won; Gotoh, Naomasa

    2001-01-01

    In order to define the contributions of the mechanisms for carbapenem resistance in clinical strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, we investigated the presence of OprD, the expressions of the MexAB-OprM and MexEF-OprN systems, and the production of the β-lactamases for 44 clinical strains. All of the carbapenem-resistant isolates showed the loss of or decreased levels of OprD. Three strains overexpressed the MexAB-OprM efflux system by carrying mutations in mexR. These three strains had the amino acid substitution in MexR protein, Arg (CGG) → Gln (CAG), at the position of amino acid 70. None of the isolates, however, expressed the MexEF-OprN efflux system. For the characterization of β-lactamases, at least 13 isolates were the depressed mutants, and 12 strains produced secondary β-lactamases. Based on the above resistance mechanisms, the MICs of carbapenem for the isolates were analyzed. The MICs of carbapenem were mostly determined by the expression of OprD. The MICs of meropenem were two- to four-fold increased for the isolates which overexpressed MexAB-OprM in the background of OprD loss. However, the elevated MICs of meropenem for some individual isolates could not be explained. These findings suggested that other resistance mechanisms would play a role in meropenem resistance in clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa. PMID:11158744

  12. Genes related to chromate resistance by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Sonia L; Vargas, Eréndira; Ramírez-Díaz, Martha I; Campos-García, Jesús; Cervantes, Carlos

    2008-08-01

    Chromate-hypersensitive mutants of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 strain were isolated using transposon-insertion mutagenesis. Comparison of the nucleotide sequences of the regions interrupted in the mutants with the PAO1 genome revealed that the genes affected in three mutant strains were oprE (ORF PA0291), rmlA (ORF PA5163), and ftsK (ORF PA2615), respectively. A relationship of these genes with chromate tolerance has not been previously reported. No other phenotypic changes were observed in the oprE mutant but its resistance to chromate was not fully restored by expressing the ChrA protein, which extrudes chromate ions from the cytoplasm to the periplasmic space. These data suggest that OprE participates in the efflux of chromate from the periplasm to the outside. Increased susceptibility of the rmlA mutant to the metals cadmium and mercury and to the anion-superoxide generator paraquat suggests a protective role of LPS against chromate toxicity. A higher susceptibility of the ftsK mutant to compounds affecting DNA structure (ciprofloxacin, tellurite, mitomycin C) suggests a role of FtsK in the recombinational repair of DNA damage caused by chromate. In conclusion, the P. aeruginosa genome contains diverse genes related to its intrinsic resistance to chromate. Systems pertaining to the outer membrane (OprE), the cell wall (LPS), and the cytoplasm (FtsK) were identified in this work as involved in chromate protection mechanisms. PMID:18446454

  13. Identification of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa 1244 Pilin Glycosylation Site

    PubMed Central

    Comer, Jason E.; Marshall, Mark A.; Blanch, Vincent J.; Deal, Carolyn D.; Castric, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Previous work (P. Castric, F. J. Cassels, and R. W. Carlson, J. Biol. Chem. 276:26479-26485, 2001) has shown the Pseudomonas aeruginosa 1244 pilin glycan to be covalently bound to a serine residue. N-terminal sequencing of pilin fragments produced from endopeptidase treatment and identified by reaction with a glycan-specific monoclonal antibody indicated that the glycan was present between residue 75 and the pilin carboxy terminus. Further sequencing of these peptides revealed that serine residues 75, 81, 84, 105, 106, and 108 were not modified. Conversion of serine 148, but not serine 118, to alanine by site-directed mutagenesis, resulted in loss of the ability to carry out pilin glycosylation when tested in an in vivo system. These results showed the pilin glycan to be attached to residue 148, the carboxy-terminal amino acid. The carboxy-proximal portion of the pilin disulfide loop, which is adjacent to the pilin glycan, was found to be a major linear B-cell epitope, as determined by peptide epitope mapping analysis. Immunization of mice with pure pili produced antibodies that recognized the pilin glycan. These sera also reacted with P. aeruginosa 1244 lipopolysaccharide as measured by Western blotting and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. PMID:12010970

  14. Type IV pili mechanochemically regulate virulence factors in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Persat, Alexandre; Inclan, Yuki F.; Engel, Joanne N.; Stone, Howard A.; Gitai, Zemer

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria have evolved a wide range of sensing systems to appropriately respond to environmental signals. Here we demonstrate that the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa detects contact with surfaces on short timescales using the mechanical activity of its type IV pili, a major surface adhesin. This signal transduction mechanism requires attachment of type IV pili to a solid surface, followed by pilus retraction and signal transduction through the Chp chemosensory system, a chemotaxis-like sensory system that regulates cAMP production and transcription of hundreds of genes, including key virulence factors. Like other chemotaxis pathways, pili-mediated surface sensing results in a transient response amplified by a positive feedback that increases type IV pili activity, thereby promoting long-term surface attachment that can stimulate additional virulence and biofilm-inducing pathways. The methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein-like chemosensor PilJ directly interacts with the major pilin subunit PilA. Our results thus support a mechanochemical model where a chemosensory system measures the mechanically induced conformational changes in stretched type IV pili. These findings demonstrate that P. aeruginosa not only uses type IV pili for surface-specific twitching motility, but also as a sensor regulating surface-induced gene expression and pathogenicity. PMID:26041805

  15. [New Virulent Bacteriophages Active against Multiresistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strains].

    PubMed

    Balarjishvili, N Sh; Kvachadze, L I; Kutateladze, M I; Meskhi, T Sh; Pataridze, T K; Berishvili, T A; Tevdoradze, E Sh

    2015-01-01

    The sensitivity of 512 newly isolated Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical strains to six classes of anti-microbial preparations has been studied. Antibiotic-resistant strains were selected and genotyped. Three new virulent bacteriophages of the families Myoviridae and Podoviridae were isolated against these strains. The parameters of the intracellular phage development cycle were established, and the influence of inactivating factors (temperature, pH, and UV exposure) on phage viability was studied. The molecular weight of the phage genome was determined. Phage DNA restriction analysis and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of envelope protein SDS were carried out. The plating efficacy of phages on 28 genetically distant antibiotic-resistant P. aeruginosa strains was studied. It was established that 26 of them were lysed by phages with a high efficacy. The range of antibacterial action of the studied phages and their mixtures on 427 multi-drug-resistant clinical isolates was assessed. It is shown that including these phages in one multicomponent preparation enhanced their lytic activity. PMID:26859962

  16. [Growth inhibition effect of immobilized pectinase on Microcystis aeruginosa].

    PubMed

    Shen, Qing-Qing; Peng, Qian; Lai, Yong-Hong; Ji, Kai-Yan; Han, Xiu-Lin

    2012-12-01

    To confirm the growth inhibition effect of immobilized pectinase on algae, co-cultivation method was used to investigate the effect of immobilized pectinase on the growth of Microcystis aeruginosa. After co-cultivation, the damage status of the algae was observed through electron microscope, and the effect of immobilized pectase on the physiological and biochemical characteristics of the algae was also measured. The results showed that the algae and immobilized pectase co-cultivated solution etiolated distinctly on the third day and there was a significantly positive correlation between the extent of etiolation and the dosage as well as the treating time of the immobilized pectinase. Under electron microscope, plasmolysis was found in the slightly damaged cells, and the cell surface of these cells was rough, uneven and irregular; the severely damaged cells were collapsed or disintegrated completely. The algal yield and the chlorophyll a content decreased significantly with the increase of the treating time. The measurement of the malondiadehyde (MDA) value showed that the antioxidation system of the treated algal cells was destroyed, and their membrane lipid was severely peroxidated. The study indicated that the immobilized pectinase could efficiently inhibit the growth of M. aeruginosa, and the inhibitory rate reached up to 96%. PMID:23379158

  17. Pseudomonas aeruginosa: my research passion. Interview by Hannah Branch.

    PubMed

    Hazlett, Linda

    2013-07-01

    Linda Hazlett is a department chair and distinguished professor at Wayne State University (MI, USA). Her research is focused on the host immune response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa and its role in ocular infections. Dr Hazlett has been funded continuously by the NIH by R01 support for 34 years. She is currently principal investigator of two R01 grants from the National Eye Institute that study pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa in the eye. Dr Hazlett oversees four Course Directors who lead Year 1 medical student teaching, in addition to two graduate course directors. Furthermore, although not involved in medical teaching, she educates graduate students and mentors a Research Scientist and a Research Assistant Professor. Throughout her career, Dr Hazlett has achieved several honors and awards including Distinguished Professor at Wayne State University (2008), National Eye Institute Core Center (P30) grant for 1987-2013, Chair of Physiology Search 2008-2009, Member of the Academy of Scholars at Wayne State University, Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology fellow at the Gold Medal level (2009) and was an invited speaker at the Gordon Conference 2010. PMID:23841630

  18. Identification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Phenazines that Kill Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Cezairliyan, Brent; Vinayavekhin, Nawaporn; Grenfell-Lee, Daniel; Yuen, Grace J.; Saghatelian, Alan; Ausubel, Frederick M.

    2013-01-01

    Pathogenic microbes employ a variety of methods to overcome host defenses, including the production and dispersal of molecules that are toxic to their hosts. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a Gram-negative bacterium, is a pathogen of a diverse variety of hosts including mammals and the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. In this study, we identify three small molecules in the phenazine class that are produced by P. aeruginosa strain PA14 that are toxic to C. elegans. We demonstrate that 1-hydroxyphenazine, phenazine-1-carboxylic acid, and pyocyanin are capable of killing nematodes in a matter of hours. 1-hydroxyphenazine is toxic over a wide pH range, whereas the toxicities of phenazine-1-carboxylic acid and pyocyanin are pH-dependent at non-overlapping pH ranges. We found that acidification of the growth medium by PA14 activates the toxicity of phenazine-1-carboxylic acid, which is the primary toxic agent towards C. elegans in our assay. Pyocyanin is not toxic under acidic conditions and 1-hydroxyphenazine is produced at concentrations too low to kill C. elegans. These results suggest a role for phenazine-1-carboxylic acid in mammalian pathogenesis because PA14 mutants deficient in phenazine production have been shown to be defective in pathogenesis in mice. More generally, these data demonstrate how diversity within a class of metabolites could affect bacterial toxicity in different environmental niches. PMID:23300454

  19. Attenuation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence by quorum sensing inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Hentzer, Morten; Wu, Hong; Andersen, Jens Bo; Riedel, Kathrin; Rasmussen, Thomas B.; Bagge, Niels; Kumar, Naresh; Schembri, Mark A.; Song, Zhijun; Kristoffersen, Peter; Manefield, Mike; Costerton, John W.; Molin, Søren; Eberl, Leo; Steinberg, Peter; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Høiby, Niels; Givskov, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Traditional treatment of infectious diseases is based on compounds that kill or inhibit growth of bacteria. A major concern with this approach is the frequent development of resistance to antibiotics. The discovery of communication systems (quorum sensing systems) regulating bacterial virulence has afforded a novel opportunity to control infectious bacteria without interfering with growth. Compounds that can override communication signals have been found in the marine environment. Using Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 as an example of an opportunistic human pathogen, we show that a synthetic derivate of natural furanone compounds can act as a potent antagonist of bacterial quorum sensing. We employed GeneChip® microarray technology to identify furanone target genes and to map the quorum sensing regulon. The transcriptome analysis showed that the furanone drug specifically targeted quorum sensing systems and inhibited virulence factor expression. Application of the drug to P.aeruginosa biofilms increased bacterial susceptibility to tobramycin and SDS. In a mouse pulmonary infection model, the drug inhibited quorum sensing of the infecting bacteria and promoted their clearance by the mouse immune response. PMID:12881415

  20. Characterization of an Arginine:Pyruvate Transaminase in Arginine Catabolism of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1▿

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhe; Lu, Chung-Dar

    2007-01-01

    The arginine transaminase (ATA) pathway represents one of the multiple pathways for l-arginine catabolism in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The AruH protein was proposed to catalyze the first step in the ATA pathway, converting the substrates l-arginine and pyruvate into 2-ketoarginine and l-alanine. Here we report the initial biochemical characterization of this enzyme. The aruH gene was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and its product was purified to homogeneity. High-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry (MS) analyses were employed to detect the presence of the transamination products 2-ketoarginine and l-alanine, thus demonstrating the proposed biochemical reaction catalyzed by AruH. The enzymatic properties and kinetic parameters of dimeric recombinant AruH were determined by a coupled reaction with NAD+ and l-alanine dehydrogenase. The optimal activity of AruH was found at pH 9.0, and it has a novel substrate specificity with an order of preference of Arg > Lys > Met > Leu > Orn > Gln. With l-arginine and pyruvate as the substrates, Lineweaver-Burk plots of the data revealed a series of parallel lines characteristic of a ping-pong kinetic mechanism with calculated Vmax and kcat values of 54.6 ± 2.5 μmol/min/mg and 38.6 ± 1.8 s−1. The apparent Km and catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) were 1.6 ± 0.1 mM and 24.1 mM−1 s−1 for pyruvate and 13.9 ± 0.8 mM and 2.8 mM−1 s−1 for l-arginine. When l-lysine was used as the substrate, MS analysis suggested Δ1-piperideine-2-carboxylate as its transamination product. These results implied that AruH may have a broader physiological function in amino acid catabolism. PMID:17416668