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Sample records for aeruginosa pulmonary infection

  1. Screening of Lactobacillus spp. for the prevention of Pseudomonas aeruginosa pulmonary infections

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that significantly increases morbidity and mortality in nosocomial infections and cystic fibrosis patients. Its pathogenicity especially relies on the production of virulence factors or resistances to many antibiotics. Since multiplication of antibiotic resistance can lead to therapeutic impasses, it becomes necessary to develop new tools for fighting P. aeruginosa infections. The use of probiotics is one of the ways currently being explored. Probiotics are microorganisms that exert a positive effect on the host’s health and some of them are known to possess antibacterial activities. Since most of their effects have been shown in the digestive tract, experimental data compatible with the respiratory environment are strongly needed. The main goal of this study was then to test the capacity of lactobacilli to inhibit major virulence factors (elastolytic activity and biofilm formation) associated with P. aeruginosa pathogenicity. Results Sixty-seven lactobacilli were isolated from the oral cavities of healthy volunteers. These isolates together with 20 lactobacilli isolated from raw milks, were tested for their capacity to decrease biofilm formation and activity of the elastase produced by P. aeruginosa PAO1. Ten isolates, particularly efficient, were accurately identified using a polyphasic approach (API 50 CHL, mass-spectrometry and 16S/rpoA/pheS genes sequencing) and typed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). The 8 remaining strains belonging to the L. fermentum (6), L. zeae (1) and L. paracasei (1) species were sensitive to all antibiotics tested with the exception of the intrinsic resistance to vancomycin. The strains were all able to grow in artificial saliva. Conclusion Eight strains belonging to L. fermentum, L. zeae and L. paracasei species harbouring anti-elastase and anti-biofilm properties are potential probiotics for fighting P. aeruginosa pulmonary infections. However, further

  2. Alginate synthesis by Pseudomonas aeruginosa: a key pathogenic factor in chronic pulmonary infections of cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed Central

    May, T B; Shinabarger, D; Maharaj, R; Kato, J; Chu, L; DeVault, J D; Roychoudhury, S; Zielinski, N A; Berry, A; Rothmel, R K

    1991-01-01

    Pulmonary infection by mucoid, alginate-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the leading cause of mortality among patients suffering from cystic fibrosis. Alginate-producing P. aeruginosa is uniquely associated with the environment of the cystic fibrosis-affected lung, where alginate is believed to increase resistance to both the host immune system and antibiotic therapy. Recent evidence indicates that P. aeruginosa is most resistant to antibiotics when the infecting cells are present as a biofilm, as they appear to be in the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients. Inhibition of the protective alginate barrier with nontoxic compounds targeted against alginate biosynthetic and regulatory proteins may prove useful in eradicating P. aeruginosa from this environment. Our research has dealt with elucidating the biosynthetic pathway and regulatory mechanism(s) responsible for alginate synthesis by P. aeruginosa. This review summarizes reports on the role of alginate in cystic fibrosis-associated pulmonary infections caused by P. aeruginosa and provides details about the biosynthesis and regulation of this exopolysaccharide. PMID:1906371

  3. Activation of pulmonary and lymph node dendritic cells during chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Damlund, Dina Silke Malling; Christophersen, Lars; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Alhede, Morten; Høiby, Niels; Moser, Claus

    2016-06-01

    The majority of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients acquire chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection, resulting in increased mortality and morbidity. The chronic P. aeruginosa lung infection is characterized by bacteria growing in biofilm surrounded by polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs). However, the infection is not eradicated and the inflammatory response leads to gradual degradation of the lung tissue. In CF patients, a Th2-dominated adaptive immune response with a pronounced antibody response is correlated with poorer outcome. Dendritic cells (DCs) are crucial in bridging the innate immune system with the adaptive immune response. Once activated, the DCs deliver a set of signals to uncommitted T cells that induce development, such as expansion of regulatory T cells and polarization of Th1, Th2 or Th17 subsets. In this study, we characterized DCs in lungs and regional lymph nodes in BALB/c mice infected using intratracheal installation of P. aeruginosa embedded in seaweed alginate in the lungs. A significantly elevated concentration of DCs was detected earlier in the lungs than in the regional lymph nodes. To evaluate whether the chronic P. aeruginosa lung infection leads to activation of DCs, costimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86 were analyzed. During infection, the DCs showed significant elevation of CD80 and CD86 expression in both the lungs and the regional lymph nodes. Interestingly, the percentage of CD86-positive cells was significantly higher than the percentage of CD80-positive cells in the lymph nodes. In addition, cytokine production from Lipopolysaccharides (LPS)-stimulated DCs was analyzed demonstrating elevated production of IL-6, IL-10 and IL-12. However, production of IL-12 was suppressed earlier than IL-6 and IL-10. These results support that DCs are involved in skewing of the Th1/Th2 balance in CF and may be a possible treatment target. PMID:27009697

  4. Protective effect of pilin protein with alum+naloxone adjuvant against acute pulmonary Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection.

    PubMed

    Banadkoki, Abbas Zare; Keshavarzmehr, Morteza; Afshar, Zahra; Aleyasin, Neda; Fatemi, Mohammad Javad; Behrouz, Bahador; Hashemi, Farhad B

    2016-09-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important opportunistic human pathogen that causes a wide variety of severe nosocomial infections. Type IV pili of P. aeruginosa are made up of polymerized pilin that aids in bacterial adhesion, biofilm formation and twitching motility. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of alum and naloxone (alum+NLX) as an adjuvant for P. aeruginosa recombinant PilA (r-PilA) as a vaccine candidate in the improvement of humoral and cellular immunity. Primary immunization with r-PilA in combination with alum+NLX followed by two booster shots was sufficient to generate robust cellular and humoral responses, which were Th1 and Th2 type responses consisting of IgG1 and IgG2a subtypes. Analysis of the cytokine response among immunized mice showed an increased production of IL-4, INF-γ and IL-17 by splenocytes upon stimulation by r-PilA. These sera were also able to reduce bacterial load in the lung tissue of challenged mice. The reduction of systemic bacterial spread resulted in increased survival rates in challenged immunized mice. In conclusion, immunization with r-PilA combined with alum+NLX evokes cellular and humoral immune responses, which play an important role in providing protection against acute P. aeruginosa lung infection among immunized mice. PMID:27427517

  5. Pulmonary delivery of tobramycin-loaded nanostructured lipid carriers for Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections associated with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Sastre, María; Pastor, Marta; Esquisabel, Amaia; Sans, Eulàlia; Viñas, Miguel; Fleischer, Aarne; Palomino, Esther; Bachiller, Daniel; Pedraz, José Luis

    2016-02-10

    Among the pathogens that affect cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most prevalent. As a way to fight against this infection, nanotechnology has emerged over the last decades as a promising alternative to overcome resistance to antibiotics in infectious diseases. The goal of this work was to elaborate and characterize lipid nanoparticles for pulmonary delivery of tobramycin. Tobramycin-loaded nanostructured lipid carriers (Tb-NLCs) were prepared by hot melt homogenization technique. In addition, nanoparticles labeled with infrared dye (IR-NLCs) were used to investigate their in vivo performance after pulmonary administration. Tb-NLCs displayed a mean diameter size around 250 nm, high drug encapsulation (93%) and sustained release profile. Tb-NLCs showed to be active against clinically isolated P. aeruginosa. Moreover, Tb-NLCs did not decrease cell viability and were able to overcome an artificial mucus barrier in the presence of mucolytics agents. During the in vivo assay, IR-NLCs were administered to several mice by the intratracheal route using a Penn Century device. Next, the biodistribution of the nanoparticles was analyzed at different time points showing a wide nanosystem distribution in the lungs. Altogether, tobramycin-loaded NLCs seem to us an encouraging alternative to the currently available CF therapies. PMID:26705155

  6. Pulmonary delivery of tobramycin-loaded nanostructured lipid carriers for Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections associated with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Sastre, María; Pastor, Marta; Esquisabel, Amaia; Sans, Eulàlia; Viñas, Miguel; Fleischer, Aarne; Palomino, Esther; Bachiller, Daniel; Pedraz, José Luis

    2016-02-10

    Among the pathogens that affect cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most prevalent. As a way to fight against this infection, nanotechnology has emerged over the last decades as a promising alternative to overcome resistance to antibiotics in infectious diseases. The goal of this work was to elaborate and characterize lipid nanoparticles for pulmonary delivery of tobramycin. Tobramycin-loaded nanostructured lipid carriers (Tb-NLCs) were prepared by hot melt homogenization technique. In addition, nanoparticles labeled with infrared dye (IR-NLCs) were used to investigate their in vivo performance after pulmonary administration. Tb-NLCs displayed a mean diameter size around 250 nm, high drug encapsulation (93%) and sustained release profile. Tb-NLCs showed to be active against clinically isolated P. aeruginosa. Moreover, Tb-NLCs did not decrease cell viability and were able to overcome an artificial mucus barrier in the presence of mucolytics agents. During the in vivo assay, IR-NLCs were administered to several mice by the intratracheal route using a Penn Century device. Next, the biodistribution of the nanoparticles was analyzed at different time points showing a wide nanosystem distribution in the lungs. Altogether, tobramycin-loaded NLCs seem to us an encouraging alternative to the currently available CF therapies.

  7. Cheating by type 3 secretion system-negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa during pulmonary infection

    PubMed Central

    McKeithen-Mead, Saria; Al Moussawi, Khatoun; Kazmierczak, Barbara I.

    2014-01-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa expresses a type 3 secretion system (T3SS) strongly associated with bacterial virulence in murine models and human patients. T3SS effectors target host innate immune mechanisms, and T3SS-defective mutants are cleared more efficiently than T3SS-positive bacteria by an immunocompetent host. Nonetheless, T3SS-negative isolates are recovered from many patients with documented P. aeruginosa infections, leading us to test whether T3SS-negative strains could have a selective advantage during in vivo infection. Mice were infected with mixtures of T3SS-positive WT P. aeruginosa plus isogenic T3SS-OFF or constitutively T3SS-ON mutants. Relative fitness of bacteria in this acute pneumonia model was reflected by the competitive index of mutants relative to WT. T3SS-OFF strains outcompeted WT PA103 in vivo, whereas a T3SS-ON mutant showed decreased fitness compared with WT. In vitro growth rates of WT and T3SS-OFF bacteria were determined under T3SS-inducing conditions and did not differ significantly. Increased fitness of T3SS-OFF bacteria was no longer observed at high ratios of T3SS-OFF to WT, a feature characteristic of bacterial cheaters. Cheating by T3SS-OFF bacteria occurred only when T3SS-positive bacteria expressed the phospholipase A2 effector Exotoxin U (ExoU). T3SS-OFF bacteria showed no fitness advantage in competition experiments carried out in immunodeficient MyD88-knockout mice or in neutrophil-depleted animals. Our findings indicate that T3SS-negative isolates benefit from the public good provided by ExoU-mediated killing of recruited innate immune cells. Whether this transient increase in fitness observed for T3SS-negative strains in mice contributes to the observed persistence of T3SS-negative isolates in humans is of ongoing interest. PMID:24821799

  8. Cheating by type 3 secretion system-negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa during pulmonary infection.

    PubMed

    Czechowska, Kamila; McKeithen-Mead, Saria; Al Moussawi, Khatoun; Kazmierczak, Barbara I

    2014-05-27

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa expresses a type 3 secretion system (T3SS) strongly associated with bacterial virulence in murine models and human patients. T3SS effectors target host innate immune mechanisms, and T3SS-defective mutants are cleared more efficiently than T3SS-positive bacteria by an immunocompetent host. Nonetheless, T3SS-negative isolates are recovered from many patients with documented P. aeruginosa infections, leading us to test whether T3SS-negative strains could have a selective advantage during in vivo infection. Mice were infected with mixtures of T3SS-positive WT P. aeruginosa plus isogenic T3SS-OFF or constitutively T3SS-ON mutants. Relative fitness of bacteria in this acute pneumonia model was reflected by the competitive index of mutants relative to WT. T3SS-OFF strains outcompeted WT PA103 in vivo, whereas a T3SS-ON mutant showed decreased fitness compared with WT. In vitro growth rates of WT and T3SS-OFF bacteria were determined under T3SS-inducing conditions and did not differ significantly. Increased fitness of T3SS-OFF bacteria was no longer observed at high ratios of T3SS-OFF to WT, a feature characteristic of bacterial cheaters. Cheating by T3SS-OFF bacteria occurred only when T3SS-positive bacteria expressed the phospholipase A2 effector Exotoxin U (ExoU). T3SS-OFF bacteria showed no fitness advantage in competition experiments carried out in immunodeficient MyD88-knockout mice or in neutrophil-depleted animals. Our findings indicate that T3SS-negative isolates benefit from the public good provided by ExoU-mediated killing of recruited innate immune cells. Whether this transient increase in fitness observed for T3SS-negative strains in mice contributes to the observed persistence of T3SS-negative isolates in humans is of ongoing interest.

  9. Role of ppGpp in Pseudomonas aeruginosa acute pulmonary infection and virulence regulation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaohui; Yu, Hua; Zhang, Di; Xiong, Junzhi; Qiu, Jing; Xin, Rong; He, Xiaomei; Sheng, Halei; Cai, Wenqiang; Jiang, Lu; Zhang, Kebin; Hu, Xiaomei

    2016-11-01

    During infection, bacteria might generate adaptive responses to facilitate their survival and colonization in the host environment. The alarmone guanosine 5'-triphosphate-3'-diphosphate (ppGpp), the levels of which are regulated by the RelA and SpoT enzymes, plays a critical role in mediating bacterial adaptive responses and virulence. However, the mechanism by which ppGpp regulates virulence-associated traits in Pseudomonas aeruginosa is poorly understood. To investigate the regulatory role of ppGpp, the ppGpp-deficient strain ΔRS (relA and spoT gene double mutant) and the complemented strain ΔRS(++) (complemented with relA and spoT genes) were constructed. Herein, we reported that the ΔRS strain showed decreased cytotoxicity towards A549 human alveolar adenocarcinoma cell lines and led to reduced mortality, lung edema and inflammatory cell infiltration in a mouse model of acute pneumonia compared to wild-type PAO1 and the complemented strain ΔRS(++). Subsequent analyses demonstrated that the ΔRS strain displayed reduced T3SS expression, decreased levels of elastase activity, pyocyanin, pyoverdin and alginate, and inhibited swarming and biofilm formation compared to PAO1 and the complemented strain ΔRS(++). In addition, the results demonstrate that ppGpp-mediated regulation of T3SS, virulence factor production, and swarming occurs in a quinolone quorum-sensing system-dependent manner. Taken together, these results suggest that ppGpp is required for virulence regulation in P. aeruginosa, providing new clues for the development of interference strategies against bacterial infection. PMID:27664726

  10. Role of ppGpp in Pseudomonas aeruginosa acute pulmonary infection and virulence regulation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaohui; Yu, Hua; Zhang, Di; Xiong, Junzhi; Qiu, Jing; Xin, Rong; He, Xiaomei; Sheng, Halei; Cai, Wenqiang; Jiang, Lu; Zhang, Kebin; Hu, Xiaomei

    2016-11-01

    During infection, bacteria might generate adaptive responses to facilitate their survival and colonization in the host environment. The alarmone guanosine 5'-triphosphate-3'-diphosphate (ppGpp), the levels of which are regulated by the RelA and SpoT enzymes, plays a critical role in mediating bacterial adaptive responses and virulence. However, the mechanism by which ppGpp regulates virulence-associated traits in Pseudomonas aeruginosa is poorly understood. To investigate the regulatory role of ppGpp, the ppGpp-deficient strain ΔRS (relA and spoT gene double mutant) and the complemented strain ΔRS(++) (complemented with relA and spoT genes) were constructed. Herein, we reported that the ΔRS strain showed decreased cytotoxicity towards A549 human alveolar adenocarcinoma cell lines and led to reduced mortality, lung edema and inflammatory cell infiltration in a mouse model of acute pneumonia compared to wild-type PAO1 and the complemented strain ΔRS(++). Subsequent analyses demonstrated that the ΔRS strain displayed reduced T3SS expression, decreased levels of elastase activity, pyocyanin, pyoverdin and alginate, and inhibited swarming and biofilm formation compared to PAO1 and the complemented strain ΔRS(++). In addition, the results demonstrate that ppGpp-mediated regulation of T3SS, virulence factor production, and swarming occurs in a quinolone quorum-sensing system-dependent manner. Taken together, these results suggest that ppGpp is required for virulence regulation in P. aeruginosa, providing new clues for the development of interference strategies against bacterial infection.

  11. Eradication of mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa with fluid liposome-encapsulated tobramycin in an animal model of chronic pulmonary infection.

    PubMed Central

    Beaulac, C; Clément-Major, S; Hawari, J; Lagacé, J

    1996-01-01

    Despite controversies associated with forms and value of antibiotic therapy for cystic fibrosis patients, antibiotherapy remains a cornerstone in the management of those patients. Locally administered liposome-encapsulated antibiotics may offer advantages over free antibiotics, including sustained concentration of the antibiotic, minimal systemic absorption, reduced toxicity, and increased efficacy. We evaluated the efficacy of free and encapsulated tobramycin in fluid and rigid liposomal formulations administered to rats chronically infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Chronic infection in lungs was established by intratracheal administration of 10(5) CFU of a mucoid variant of P. aeruginosa PA 508 prepared in agar beads. Antibiotic treatments were given intratracheally at time intervals of 16 h. After the last treatment, lung bacterial counts were determined and tobramycin levels in the lungs and kidneys were evaluated by high-performance liquid chromatographic analysis and microbiological assay. Two independent experiments showed that animals treated with encapsulated tobramycin in fluid liposomes had a number of CFU less than the minimal CFU number required to be statistically acceptable compared with > or = 10(6) CFU per pair of lungs for animals treated with encapsulated tobramycin in rigid liposomes, free antibiotic, or liposomes without tobramycin. Tobramycin measured in the lungs at 16 h after the last treatment following the administration of encapsulated antibiotic was still active, and its concentration was > or = 27 micrograms/mg of tissue. Low levels of tobramycin were detected in the kidneys (0.59 to 0.87 micrograms/mg of tissue) after the administration of encapsulated antibiotic, while 5.31 micrograms/mg of tissue was detected in the kidneys following the administration of free antibiotic. These results suggest that the local administration of fluid liposomes with encapsulated tobramycin could greatly improve the management of chronic pulmonary

  12. Respiratory syncytial virus infection enhances Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm growth through dysregulation of nutritional immunity.

    PubMed

    Hendricks, Matthew R; Lashua, Lauren P; Fischer, Douglas K; Flitter, Becca A; Eichinger, Katherine M; Durbin, Joan E; Sarkar, Saumendra N; Coyne, Carolyn B; Empey, Kerry M; Bomberger, Jennifer M

    2016-02-01

    Clinical observations link respiratory virus infection and Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization in chronic lung disease, including cystic fibrosis (CF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The development of P. aeruginosa into highly antibiotic-resistant biofilm communities promotes airway colonization and accounts for disease progression in patients. Although clinical studies show a strong correlation between CF patients' acquisition of chronic P. aeruginosa infections and respiratory virus infection, little is known about the mechanism by which chronic P. aeruginosa infections are initiated in the host. Using a coculture model to study the formation of bacterial biofilm formation associated with the airway epithelium, we show that respiratory viral infections and the induction of antiviral interferons promote robust secondary P. aeruginosa biofilm formation. We report that the induction of antiviral IFN signaling in response to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection induces bacterial biofilm formation through a mechanism of dysregulated iron homeostasis of the airway epithelium. Moreover, increased apical release of the host iron-binding protein transferrin during RSV infection promotes P. aeruginosa biofilm development in vitro and in vivo. Thus, nutritional immunity pathways that are disrupted during respiratory viral infection create an environment that favors secondary bacterial infection and may provide previously unidentified targets to combat bacterial biofilm formation.

  13. Respiratory syncytial virus infection enhances Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm growth through dysregulation of nutritional immunity

    PubMed Central

    Hendricks, Matthew R.; Lashua, Lauren P.; Fischer, Douglas K.; Flitter, Becca A.; Eichinger, Katherine M.; Durbin, Joan E.; Sarkar, Saumendra N.; Coyne, Carolyn B.; Empey, Kerry M.; Bomberger, Jennifer M.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical observations link respiratory virus infection and Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization in chronic lung disease, including cystic fibrosis (CF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The development of P. aeruginosa into highly antibiotic-resistant biofilm communities promotes airway colonization and accounts for disease progression in patients. Although clinical studies show a strong correlation between CF patients’ acquisition of chronic P. aeruginosa infections and respiratory virus infection, little is known about the mechanism by which chronic P. aeruginosa infections are initiated in the host. Using a coculture model to study the formation of bacterial biofilm formation associated with the airway epithelium, we show that respiratory viral infections and the induction of antiviral interferons promote robust secondary P. aeruginosa biofilm formation. We report that the induction of antiviral IFN signaling in response to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection induces bacterial biofilm formation through a mechanism of dysregulated iron homeostasis of the airway epithelium. Moreover, increased apical release of the host iron-binding protein transferrin during RSV infection promotes P. aeruginosa biofilm development in vitro and in vivo. Thus, nutritional immunity pathways that are disrupted during respiratory viral infection create an environment that favors secondary bacterial infection and may provide previously unidentified targets to combat bacterial biofilm formation. PMID:26729873

  14. Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates in severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: characterization and risk factors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are at increased risk of infection by P. aeruginosa. The specific role of bronchiectasis in both infection and chronic colonization by this microorganism in COPD, however, remains ill defined. To evaluate the prevalence and risk factors for P. aeruginosa recovery from sputum in outpatients with severe COPD, characterizing P. aeruginosa isolates by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and focusing on the influence of bronchiectasis on chronic colonization in these patients. Methods A case-cohort study of 118 patients with severe COPD attended at a Respiratory Day Unit for an acute infectious exacerbation and followed up over one year. High-resolution CT scans were performed during stability for bronchiectasis assessment and sputum cultures were obtained during exacerbation and stability in all patients. P. aeruginosa isolates were genotyped by PFGE. Determinants of the recovery of P. aeruginosa in sputum and chronic colonization by this microorganism were assessed by multivariate analysis. Results P. aeruginosa was isolated from 41 of the 118 patients studied (34.7%). Five of these 41 patients (12.2%) with P. aeruginosa recovery fulfilled criteria for chronic colonization. In the multivariate analysis, the extent of bronchiectasis (OR 9.8, 95% CI: 1.7 to 54.8) and the number of antibiotic courses (OR 1.7, 95% CI: 1.1 to 2.5) were independently associated with an increased risk of P. aeruginosa isolation. Chronic colonization was unrelated to the presence of bronchiectasis (p=0.75). In patients with chronic colonization the isolates of P. aeruginosa retrieved corresponded to the same clones during the follow-up, and most of the multidrug resistant isolates (19/21) were harbored by these patients. Conclusions The main risk factors for P. aeruginosa isolation in severe COPD were the extent of bronchiectasis and exposure to antibiotics. Over 10% of these patients fulfilled criteria for

  15. Pseudomonas aeruginosa In Vitro Phenotypes Distinguish Cystic Fibrosis Infection Stages and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Rosenfeld, Margaret; Gibson, Ronald L.; Ramsey, Bonnie W.; Kulasekara, Hemantha D.; Retsch-Bogart, George Z.; Morgan, Wayne; Wolter, Daniel J.; Pope, Christopher E.; Houston, Laura S.; Kulasekara, Bridget R.; Khan, Umer; Burns, Jane L.; Miller, Samuel I.; Hoffman, Lucas R.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Pseudomonas aeruginosa undergoes phenotypic changes during cystic fibrosis (CF) lung infection. Although mucoidy is traditionally associated with transition to chronic infection, we hypothesized that additional in vitro phenotypes correlate with this transition and contribute to disease. Objectives: To characterize the relationships between in vitro P. aeruginosa phenotypes, infection stage, and clinical outcomes. Methods: A total of 649 children with CF and newly identified P. aeruginosa were followed for a median 5.4 years during which a total of 2,594 P. aeruginosa isolates were collected. Twenty-six in vitro bacterial phenotypes were assessed among the isolates, including measures of motility, exoproduct production, colony morphology, growth, and metabolism. Measurements and Main Results: P. aeruginosa phenotypes present at the time of culture were associated with both stage of infection (new onset, intermittent, or chronic) and the primary clinical outcome, occurrence of a pulmonary exacerbation (PE) in the subsequent 2 years. Two in vitro P. aeruginosa phenotypes best distinguished infection stages: pyoverdine production (31% of new-onset cultures, 48% of intermittent, 69% of chronic) and reduced protease production (31%, 39%, and 65%, respectively). The best P. aeruginosa phenotypic predictors of subsequent occurrence of a PE were mucoidy (odds ratio, 1.75; 95% confidence interval, 1.19–2.57) and reduced twitching motility (odds ratio, 1.43; 95% confidence interval, 1.11–1.84). Conclusions: In this large epidemiologic study of CF P. aeruginosa adaptation, P. aeruginosa isolates exhibited two in vitro phenotypes that best distinguished early and later infection stages. Among the many phenotypes tested, mucoidy and reduced twitching best predicted subsequent PE. These phenotypes indicate potentially useful prognostic markers of transition to chronic infection and advancing lung disease. PMID:24937177

  16. Nosocomial infections due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa: review of recent trends.

    PubMed

    Cross, A; Allen, J R; Burke, J; Ducel, G; Harris, A; John, J; Johnson, D; Lew, M; MacMillan, B; Meers, P

    1983-01-01

    The role of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in nosocomial infections occurring since 1975 is reviewed. Data from the National Nosocomial Infections Study conducted by the Centers for Disease Control, from individual medical centers, and from the literature were used to compare the relative frequency of occurrence of nosocomial infection caused by P. aeruginosa with that of infection caused by other gram-negative bacilli. The relative frequency of P. aeruginosa as a nosocomial pathogen has increased, although wide variations are seen among individual medical centers. P. aeruginosa continues to be a major pathogen among patients with immunosuppression, cystic fibrosis, malignancy, and trauma. While Staphylococcus aureus has become the predominant pathogen in some large burn centers, P. aeruginosa is the most important gram-negative pathogen. Periodic review of the epidemiology of P. aeruginosa infection is warranted in view of the changing incidence of infection caused by this organism.

  17. Excessive inflammatory response of cystic fibrosis mice to bronchopulmonary infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Heeckeren, A; Walenga, R; Konstan, M W; Bonfield, T; Davis, P B; Ferkol, T

    1997-01-01

    In cystic fibrosis (CF), defective function of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) in airway epithelial cells and submucosal glands results in chronic pulmonary infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The pulmonary infection incites an intense host inflammatory response, causing progressive suppurative pulmonary disease. Mouse models of CF, however, fail to develop pulmonary disease spontaneously. We examined the effects of bronchopulmonary infection on mice homozygous for the S489X mutation of the CFTR gene using an animal model of chronic Pseudomonas endobronchial infection. Slurries of sterile agarose beads or beads containing a clinical isolate of mucoid P. aeruginosa were instilled in the right lung of normal or CF mice. The mortality of CF mice inoculated with Pseudomonas-laden beads was significantly higher than that of normal animals: 82% of infected CF mice, but only 23% of normal mice, died within 10 d of infection (P = 0.023). The concentration of inflammatory mediators, including TNF-alpha, murine macrophage inflammatory protein-2, and KC/N51, in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid in CF mice 3 d after infection and before any mortality, was markedly elevated compared with normal mice. This inflammatory response also correlated with weight loss observed in both CF and normal littermates after inoculation. Thus, this model may permit examination of the relationship of bacterial infections, inflammation, and the cellular and genetic defects in CF. PMID:9389746

  18. Surfactant proteins A and D enhance pulmonary clearance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Giannoni, Eric; Sawa, Teiji; Allen, Lennell; Wiener-Kronish, Jeanine; Hawgood, Sam

    2006-06-01

    Surfactant protein (SP)-A and SP-D, members of the collectin family, are involved in innate host defenses against various bacterial and viral pathogens. In this study, we asked whether SP-A and SP-D enhance clearance of a nonmucoid strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from the lungs. We infected mice deficient in SP-A (SP-A-/-), SP-D (SP-D-/-) and both pulmonary collectins (SP-AD-/-) by intratracheal administration of P. aeruginosa. Six hours after infection, bacterial counts were significantly higher in SP-A-/-, SP-D-/-, and SP-AD-/- compared with wild-type (WT) mice. Forty-eight hours after infection, bacterial counts were significantly higher in SP-A-/- mice compared with WT mice and in SP-AD-/- mice compared with WT, SP-A-/-, and SP-D-/- mice. Phagocytosis of the bacteria by alveolar macrophages was decreased in SP-A-/- and SP-D-/- mice. Levels of macrophage inflammatory peptide-2 and IL-6 were more elevated in the lungs of SP-D and SP-AD-/- mice compared with WT mice. There was more infiltration by neutrophils in the lungs of SP-D-/- compared with WT and SP-A-/- mice 48 h after infection. This study shows that SP-A and SP-D enhance pulmonary clearance of P. aeruginosa by stimulating phagocytosis by alveolar macrophages and by modulating the inflammatory response in the lungs. These findings also show that the functions of SP-A and SP-D are not completely redundant in vivo.

  19. Augmentation of oxidant injury to human pulmonary epithelial cells by the Pseudomonas aeruginosa siderophore pyochelin.

    PubMed Central

    Britigan, B E; Rasmussen, G T; Cox, C D

    1997-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes acute and chronic infections of the human lung, with resultant tissue injury. We have previously shown that iron bound to pyochelin, a siderophore secreted by the organism to acquire iron, is an efficient catalyst for hydroxyl radical (HO.) formation and augments injury to pulmonary artery endothelial cells resulting from their exposure to superoxide (O2.) and/or H2O2. Sources for O2-. and H2O2 included phorbol myristate acetate (PMA)-stimulated neutrophils and pyocyanin. Pyocyanin, another P. aeruginosa secretory product, undergoes cell-mediated redox, thereby forming O2-. and H2O2. In P. aeruginosa lung infections, damage to airway epithelial cells is probably more extensive than that to endothelial cells. Therefore, we examined whether ferripyochelin also augments oxidant-mediated damage to airway epithelial cells. A549 cells, a human type II alveolar epithelial cell line, was exposed to H2O2, PMA-stimulated neutrophils, or pyocyanin, and injury was determined by release of 51Cr from prelabeled cells. Ferripyochelin significantly increased (> 10-fold) oxidant-mediated cell injury regardless of whether H2O2, neutrophils, or pyocyanin was employed. Apo-pyochelin was not effective, and ferripyochelin was not toxic by itself at the concentrations employed. Spin trapping with alpha-(4-pyrridyl-1-oxide)-N-t-butyl-nitrone-ethanol confirmed the generation of HO., and injury was decreased by a variety of antioxidants, including superoxide dismutase, catalase, and dimethylthiourea. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that the presence of ferripyochelin at sites of P. aeruginosa lung infection could contribute to tissue injury through its ability to promote HO.-mediated damage to airway epithelial cells. PMID:9038317

  20. Type IV pilus glycosylation mediates resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to opsonic activities of the pulmonary surfactant protein A.

    PubMed

    Tan, Rommel M; Kuang, Zhizhou; Hao, Yonghua; Lee, Francis; Lee, Timothy; Lee, Ryan J; Lau, Gee W

    2015-04-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major bacterial pathogen commonly associated with chronic lung infections in cystic fibrosis (CF). Previously, we have demonstrated that the type IV pilus (Tfp) of P. aeruginosa mediates resistance to antibacterial effects of pulmonary surfactant protein A (SP-A). Interestingly, P. aeruginosa strains with group I pilins are O-glycosylated through the TfpO glycosyltransferase with a single subunit of O-antigen (O-ag). Importantly, TfpO-mediated O-glycosylation is important for virulence in mouse lungs, exemplified by more frequent lung infection in CF with TfpO-expressing P. aeruginosa strains. However, the mechanism underlying the importance of Tfp glycosylation in P. aeruginosa pathogenesis is not fully understood. Here, we demonstrated one mechanism of increased fitness mediated by O-glycosylation of group 1 pilins on Tfp in the P. aeruginosa clinical isolate 1244. Using an acute pneumonia model in SP-A+/+ versus SP-A-/- mice, the O-glycosylation-deficient ΔtfpO mutant was found to be attenuated in lung infection. Both 1244 and ΔtfpO strains showed equal levels of susceptibility to SP-A-mediated membrane permeability. In contrast, the ΔtfpO mutant was more susceptible to opsonization by SP-A and by other pulmonary and circulating opsonins, SP-D and mannose binding lectin 2, respectively. Importantly, the increased susceptibility to phagocytosis was abrogated in the absence of opsonins. These results indicate that O-glycosylation of Tfp with O-ag specifically confers resistance to opsonization during host-mediated phagocytosis. PMID:25605768

  1. Bacteriophage-based therapy in cystic fibrosis-associated Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections: rationale and current status.

    PubMed

    Hraiech, Sami; Brégeon, Fabienne; Rolain, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary infections involving Pseudomonas aeruginosa are among the leading causes of the deterioration of the respiratory status of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. The emergence of multidrug-resistant strains in such populations, favored by iterative antibiotic cures, has led to the urgent need for new therapies. Among them, bacteriophage-based therapies deserve a focus. One century of empiric use in the ex-USSR countries suggests that bacteriophages may have beneficial effects against a large range of bacterial infections. Interest in bacteriophages has recently renewed in Western countries, and the in vitro data available suggest that bacteriophage-based therapy may be of significant interest for the treatment of pulmonary infections in CF patients. Although the clinical data concerning this specific population are relatively scarce, the beginning of the first large randomized study evaluating bacteriophage-based therapy in burn infections suggests that the time has come to assess the effectiveness of this new therapy in CF P. aeruginosa pneumonia. Consequently, the aim of this review is, after a brief history, to summarize the evidence concerning bacteriophage efficacy against P. aeruginosa and, more specifically, the in vitro studies, animal models, and clinical trials targeting CF.

  2. Bacteriophage-based therapy in cystic fibrosis-associated Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections: rationale and current status

    PubMed Central

    Hraiech, Sami; Brégeon, Fabienne; Rolain, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary infections involving Pseudomonas aeruginosa are among the leading causes of the deterioration of the respiratory status of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. The emergence of multidrug-resistant strains in such populations, favored by iterative antibiotic cures, has led to the urgent need for new therapies. Among them, bacteriophage-based therapies deserve a focus. One century of empiric use in the ex-USSR countries suggests that bacteriophages may have beneficial effects against a large range of bacterial infections. Interest in bacteriophages has recently renewed in Western countries, and the in vitro data available suggest that bacteriophage-based therapy may be of significant interest for the treatment of pulmonary infections in CF patients. Although the clinical data concerning this specific population are relatively scarce, the beginning of the first large randomized study evaluating bacteriophage-based therapy in burn infections suggests that the time has come to assess the effectiveness of this new therapy in CF P. aeruginosa pneumonia. Consequently, the aim of this review is, after a brief history, to summarize the evidence concerning bacteriophage efficacy against P. aeruginosa and, more specifically, the in vitro studies, animal models, and clinical trials targeting CF. PMID:26213462

  3. Tracking the immunopathological response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa during respiratory infections

    PubMed Central

    Cigana, Cristina; Lorè, Nicola Ivan; Riva, Camilla; De Fino, Ida; Spagnuolo, Lorenza; Sipione, Barbara; Rossi, Giacomo; Nonis, Alessandro; Cabrini, Giulio; Bragonzi, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Repeated cycles of infections, caused mainly by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, combined with a robust host immune response and tissue injury, determine the course and outcome of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. As the disease progresses, P. aeruginosa adapts to the host modifying dramatically its phenotype; however, it remains unclear whether and how bacterial adaptive variants and their persistence influence the pathogenesis and disease development. Using in vitro and murine models of infection, we showed that P. aeruginosa CF-adaptive variants shaped the innate immune response favoring their persistence. Next, we refined a murine model of chronic pneumonia extending P. aeruginosa infection up to three months. In this model, including CFTR-deficient mice, we unveil that the P. aeruginosa persistence lead to CF hallmarks of airway remodelling and fibrosis, including epithelial hyperplasia and structure degeneration, goblet cell metaplasia, collagen deposition, elastin degradation and several additional markers of tissue damage. This murine model of P. aeruginosa chronic infection, reproducing CF lung pathology, will be instrumental to identify novel molecular targets and test newly tailored molecules inhibiting chronic inflammation and tissue damage processes in pre-clinical studies. PMID:26883959

  4. Phage therapy of pulmonary infections

    PubMed Central

    Abedon, Stephen T

    2015-01-01

    It is generally agreed that a bacteriophage-associated phenomenon was first unambiguously observed one-hundred years ago with the findings of Twort in 1915. This was independently followed by complementary observations by d'Hérelle in 1917. D'Hérelle's appreciation of the bacteriophage phenomenon appears to have directly led to the development of phages as antibacterial agents within a variety of contexts, including medical and agricultural. Phage use to combat nuisance bacteria appears to be especially useful where targets are sufficiently problematic, suitably bactericidal phages exist, and alternative approaches are lacking in effectiveness, availability, safety, or cost effectiveness, etc. Phage development as antibacterial agents has been strongest particularly when antibiotics have been less available or useful, e.g., such as in the treatment of chronic infections by antibiotic-resistant bacteria. One relatively under-explored or at least not highly reported use of phages as therapeutic agents has been to combat bacterial infections of the lungs and associated tissues. These infections are diverse in terms of their etiologies, manifestations, and also in terms of potential strategies of phage delivery. Here I review the literature considering the phage therapy of pulmonary and pulmonary-related infections, with emphasis on reports of clinical treatment along with experimental treatment of pulmonary infections using animal models. PMID:26442188

  5. Why Does the Healthy Cornea Resist Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infection?

    PubMed Central

    Evans, David J.; Fleiszig, Suzanne M. J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To provide our perspective on why the cornea is resistant to infection based on our research results with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Perspective We focus on our current understanding of the interplay between bacteria, tear fluid and the corneal epithelium that determine health as the usual outcome, and propose a theoretical model for how contact lens wear might change those interactions to enable susceptibility to P. aeruginosa infection. Methods Use of “null-infection” in vivo models, cultured human corneal epithelial cells, contact lens-wearing animal models, and bacterial genetics help to elucidate mechanisms by which P. aeruginosa survive at the ocular surface, adheres, and traverses multilayered corneal epithelia. These models also help elucidate the molecular mechanisms of corneal epithelial innate defense. Results and Discussion Tear fluid and the corneal epithelium combine to make a formidable defense against P. aeruginosa infection of the cornea. Part of that defense involves the expression of antimicrobials such as β-defensins, the cathelicidin LL-37, cytokeratin-derived antimicrobial peptides, and RNase7. Immunomodulators such as SP-D and ST2 also contribute. Innate defenses of the cornea depend in part on MyD88, a key adaptor protein of TLR and IL-1R signaling, but the basal lamina represents the final barrier to bacterial penetration. Overcoming these defenses involves P. aeruginosa adaptation, expression of the type three secretion system, proteases, and P. aeruginosa biofilm formation on contact lenses. Conclusion After more than two decades of research focused on understanding how contact lens wear predisposes to P. aeruginosa infection, our working hypothesis places blame for microbial keratitis on bacterial adaptation to ocular surface defenses, combined with changes to the biochemistry of the corneal surface caused by trapping bacteria and tear fluid against the cornea under the lens. PMID:23601656

  6. DIAGNOSIS OF PULMONARY COCCIDIOIDAL INFECTIONS

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Charles E.

    1951-01-01

    A wide variety of pulmonary lesions may be caused by coccidioidomycosis. Suspicion of coccidioidomycosis may be substantiated by careful clinical-epidemiological histories. The first laboratory procedure should be a coccidioidin skin test. If the reaction to the test is positive, serological tests are next. Also, if there is no reaction to coccidioidin, serological tests are still indicated if dissemination is suspected. The more severe the infection, the greater the probability of establishing a diagnosis serologically. In only three-fifths of patients with coccidioidal cavities can the diagnosis be fixed serologically. In such patients if differential skin tests are not conclusive, attempt should be made to recover the fungus. However, this is accompanied by great risk of laboratory infection. Eosinophilia and accelerated erythrocyte sedimentation are only circumstantial items of evidence, as is the appearance of the pulmonary roentgenogram. ImagesFigure 1. PMID:14886741

  7. Phenotypic diversity within a Pseudomonas aeruginosa population infecting an adult with cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Shawn T.; Diaz Caballero, Julio; Cheang, Mary; Coburn, Bryan; Wang, Pauline W.; Donaldson, Sylva L.; Zhang, Yu; Liu, Mingyao; Keshavjee, Shaf; Yau, Yvonne C.W.; Waters, Valerie J.; Elizabeth Tullis, D.; Guttman, David S.; Hwang, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic airway infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa contribute to the progression of pulmonary disease in individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF). In the setting of CF, within-patient adaptation of a P. aeruginosa strain generates phenotypic diversity that can complicate microbiological analysis of patient samples. We investigated within- and between- sample diversity of 34 phenotypes among 235 P. aeruginosa isolates cultured from sputum samples collected from a single CF patient over the span of one year, and assessed colony morphology as a screening tool for predicting phenotypes, including antimicrobial susceptibilities. We identified 15 distinct colony morphotypes that varied significantly in abundance both within and between sputum samples. Substantial within sample phenotypic heterogeneity was also noted in other phenotypes, with morphotypes being unreliable predictors of antimicrobial susceptibility and other phenotypes. Emergence of isolates with reduced susceptibility to β-lactams was observed during periods of clinical therapy with aztreonam. Our findings confirm that the P. aeruginosa population in chronic CF lung infections is highly dynamic, and that intra-sample phenotypic diversity is underestimated if only one or few colonies are analyzed per sample. PMID:26047320

  8. [Corynebacterium ulcerans pulmonary infection].

    PubMed

    Thouvenin, Maxime; Beilouny, Bassam; Badell, Edgar; Guiso, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Corynebacterium ulcerans is a bacterium able to infect humans by inducing a disease close to diphtheria. We describe the case of a 83-year-old patient hospitalized as a matter of urgency in intensive care for which C. ulcerans was isolated in pure culture in its bronchial samples. Even if the isolate was not secreting toxin in vitro, it possesses the tox gene which motivated the use of specific antitoxin serum. After two months of intensive care the patient went out of the service. It is about a remarkable case of clinicobiologic collaboration.

  9. Pulmonary Strongyloides stercoralis infection

    PubMed Central

    Dogan, Canan; Gayaf, Mine; Ozsoz, Ayse; Sahin, Birsen; Aksel, Nimet; Karasu, Isil; Aydogdu, Zekiye; Turgay, Nevin

    2014-01-01

    The 17-year-old male patient presented with fever, weakness, dyspnea and weight loss. His chest radiography demonstrated diffuse reticulonodular density, and high-resolution lung tomography indicated diffuse micronodules and prevalent ground-glass pattern. The findings were consistent with miliary involvement. The patient underwent examinations for rheumatology, immunology, cytology and infectious conditions. His immune system was normal and had no comorbidities or any history of immunosuppressive treatment. Strongyloides stercoralis larvae were noted upon direct inspection of the feces. Clinical and radiological improvement was achieved with albendazole 400 mg/day. This case is being presented since miliary involvement in the lungs caused by S. stercoralis infection in an individual with intact immune system is rare and difficult to diagnosis. PMID:26029521

  10. Increased morbidity associated with chronic infection by an epidemic Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain in CF patients

    PubMed Central

    Al-Aloul, M; Crawley, J; Winstanley, C; Hart, C; Ledson, M; Walshaw, M

    2004-01-01

    Background: Chronic pulmonary infection with transmissible Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains in individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF) has been reported, raising issues of cross infection and patient segregation. The first such strain to be described (the Liverpool epidemic strain, LES) is now widespread in many UK CF centres. However, whether such infection carries a worse prognosis is unknown. To address this, the clinical course of a group of CF patients chronically infected by LES was compared with that in patients harbouring unique strains. Methods: Using P aeruginosa strain genotyping, two cohorts of CF patients attending the Liverpool CF service were identified who were LES positive or negative in 1998 and remained so until 2002. From these, two groups of 12 patients were matched in 1998 for age, spirometric parameters, and nutritional state and their clinical course was followed for 5 years. Patients chronically infected with Burkholderia cepacia were excluded. Results: Patients chronically infected with LES had a greater annual loss of lung function than those not chronically infected by LES (mean difference between groups -4.4% (95% CI -8.1 to -0.9; p<0.02)), and by 2002 their percentage predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) was worse (mean 65.0% v 82.6%, p<0.03). Their nutritional state also deteriorated over the study period (mean difference between groups in body mass index -0.7 (95% CI -1.2 to -0.2; p<0.01)), such that by 2002 they were malnourished compared with LES negative patients (mean BMI 19.4 v 22.7, p<0.02). Conclusions: Chronic infection with the Liverpool epidemic P aeruginosa strain in CF patients confers a worse prognosis than infection with unique strains alone, confirming the need for patient segregation. Since this strain is common in many CF units, strain identification in all CF centres is essential. This can only be carried out using genomic typing methods. PMID:15047956

  11. Infections with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Tümmler, B; Bosshammer, J; Breitenstein, S; Brockhausen, I; Gudowius, P; Herrmann, C; Herrmann, S; Heuer, T; Kubesch, P; Mekus, F; Römling, U; Schmidt, K D; Spangenberg, C; Walter, S

    1997-02-01

    The lung infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa is regarded as one of the major causes of health decline in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). The CF host response to the persistent bacterial antigen load in the endobronchiolar lumen is characterized by a pronounced humoral response, local production of cytokines, influx of neutrophils into the lung and a protease-protease inhibitor imbalance predominantly sustained by released neutrophil elastase. CF is an autosomal recessive disease, and we could demonstrate for our local patient population that the age-dependent risk to become chronically colonized with P. aeruginosa can be differentiated by the disease-causing CFTR mutation genotype. The age-specific colonisation rates were significantly lower in pancreas sufficient than in pancreas insufficient patients. P. aeruginosa is occasionally detected in throat swabs already in infancy or early childhood in most patients although there is a lapse of several years amenable to preventive measures such as vaccination until onset of persistent colonization. The epidemiology of the infection with P. aeruginosa was investigated by quantitative macrorestriction fragment pattern analysis. The distribution and frequency of clones found in CF patients match that found in other clinical and environmental aquatic habitats, but the over-representation of specific clones at a CF clinic indicates a significant impact of nosocomial transmission for the prevalence of P. aeruginosa-positive patients at a particular center. Most patients remain colonized with the initially acquired P. aeruginosa clone. According to direct sputum analysis the majority of patients is carrying a single clonal variant at a concentration of 10(7)-10(9) CFU. Co-colonization with other species or other clones is infrequent. Independent of the underlying genotype, the CF lung habitat triggers a uniform, genetically fixed conversion of bacterial phenotype. Most CFP, aeruginosa strains become non-motile, mucoid

  12. A New Era of Pulmonary Delivery of Nano-antimicrobial Therapeutics to Treat Chronic Pulmonary Infections.

    PubMed

    Merchant, Zahra; Buckton, Graham; Taylor, Kevin M G; Stapleton, Paul; Saleem, Imran Y; Zariwala, Mohammed G; Somavarapu, Satyanarayana

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary infections may be fatal especially in immunocompromised patients and patients with underlying pulmonary dysfunction, such as those with cystic fibrosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder, etc. According to the WHO, lower respiratory tract infections ranked first amongst the leading causes of death in 2012, and tuberculosis was included in the top 10 causes of death in low income countries, placing a considerable strain on their economies and healthcare systems. Eradication of lower respiratory infections is arduous, leading to high healthcare costs and requiring higher doses of antibiotics to reach optimal concentrations at the site of pulmonary infection for protracted periods. Hence direct inhalation to the respiratory epithelium has been investigated extensively in the past decade, and seems to be an attractive approach to eradicate and hence overcome this widespread problem. Moreover, engineering inhalation formulations wherein the antibiotics are encapsulated within nanoscale carriers could serve to overcome many of the limitations faced by conventional antibiotics, like difficulty in treating intracellular pathogens such as mycobacteria spp. and salmonella spp., biofilmassociated pathogens like Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus, passage through the sputum associated with disorders like cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder, systemic side effects following oral/parenteral delivery and inadequate concentrations of antibiotic at the site of infection leading to resistance. Encapsulation of antibiotics in nanocarriers may help in providing a protective environment to combat antibiotic degradation, confer controlled-release properties, hence reducing dosing frequency, and may increase uptake via specific and non-specific targeting modalities. Hence nanotechnology combined with direct administration to the airways using commercially available delivery devices, is a highly attractive formulation strategy to

  13. VDUP1 exacerbates bacteremic shock in mice infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Piao, Zheng-Hao; Kim, Mi Sun; Jeong, Mira; Yun, Sohyun; Lee, Suk Hyung; Sun, Hu-Nan; Song, Hae Young; Suh, Hyun-Woo; Jung, Haiyoung; Yoon, Suk Ran; Kim, Tae-Don; Lee, Young-Ho; Choi, Inpyo

    2012-11-01

    Vitamin-D3 upregulated protein-1 (VDUP1) is a stress response protein. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) infection is a leading cause of death. Mice infected with live P. aeruginosa exhibit significantly decreased VDUP1 expression. However, the function of VDUP1 during P. aeruginosa-induced mouse bacteremic shock is unknown. To address the function of VDUP1 in P. aeruginosa-infected mice, we constructed a bacteremic shock model wherein both wild-type and VDUP1-deficient mice were infected intra-peritoneally with live P. aeruginosa. We found that VDUP1-deficient mice were more resistant to P. aeruginosa-induced bacteremic shock than wild-type mice, as shown by the increased survival, accelerated bacterial clearance and suppression of cytokine overproduction of the VDUP1-deficient mice. VDUP1 promoted the recruitment of neutrophils into the peritoneal cavities of infected mice. VDUP1 impeded the phagocytosis of non-opsonized P. aeruginosa via phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway in macrophages. P. aeruginosa infection induced the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and the increased production of ROS by the peritoneal cells of VDUP1-deficient mice was advantageous in clearing the bacteria. Overall, VDUP1 aggravates bacteremic shock; thus, VDUP1 can be considered a target molecule for the inhibition of P. aeruginosa-induced bacteremic shock.

  14. Heritability of Respiratory Infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Green, Deanna M.; Collaco, J. Michael; McDougal, Kathryn E.; Naughton, Kathleen M.; Blackman, Scott M.; Cutting, Garry R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To quantify the relative contribution of factors other than cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator genotype and environment on the acquisition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pa) by patients with cystic fibrosis. Study design Lung infection with Pa and mucoid Pa was assessed using a co-twin study design of 44 monozygous (MZ) and 17 dizygous (DZ) twin pairs. Two definitions were used to establish infection: first positive culture and persistent positive culture. Genetic contribution to infection (ie, heritability) was estimated based on concordance analysis, logistic regression, and age at onset of infection through comparison of intraclass correlation coefficients. Results Concordance for persistent Pa infection was higher in MZ (0.83; 25 of 30 pairs) than DZ twins (0.45; 5 of 11 pairs), generating a heritability of 0.76. Logistic regression adjusted for age corroborated genetic control of persistent Pa infection. The correlation for age at persistent Pa infection was higher in MZ twins (0.589; 95% CI, 0.222-0.704) than in DZ twins (0.162; 95% CI, −0.352 to 0.607), generating a heritability of 0.85. Conclusion Genetic modifiers play a significant role in the establishment and timing of persistent Pa infection in individuals with cystic fibrosis. PMID:22364820

  15. Pseudomonas aeruginosa forms Biofilms in Acute InfectionIndependent of Cell-to-Cell Signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Schaber, J. Andy; Triffo, W.J.; Suh, Sang J.; Oliver, Jeffrey W.; Hastert, Mary C.; Griswold, John A.; Auer, Manfred; Hamood, Abdul N.; Rumbaugh, Kendra P.

    2006-09-20

    Biofilms are bacterial communities residing within a polysaccharide matrix that are associated with persistence and antibiotic resistance in chronic infections. We show that the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa forms biofilms within 8 hours of infection in thermally-injured mice, demonstrating that biofilms contribute to bacterial colonization in acute infections. P. aeruginosa biofilms were visualized within burned tissue surrounding blood vessels and adipose cells. Although quorum sensing (QS), a bacterial signaling mechanism, coordinates differentiation of biofilms in vitro, wild type and QS-deficient P. aeruginosa formed similar biofilms in vivo. Our findings demonstrate that P. aeruginosa forms biofilms on specific host tissues independent of QS.

  16. Inactivated Pseudomonas aeruginosa inhibits hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension by preventing TGF-β1/Smad signaling

    PubMed Central

    Chai, S.D.; Liu, T.; Dong, M.F.; Li, Z.K.; Tang, P.Z.; Wang, J.T.; Ma, S.J.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the common colonizing bacteria of the human body and is an opportunistic pathogen frequently associated with respiratory infections. Inactivated P. aeruginosa (IPA) have a variety of biological effects against inflammation and allergy. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling plays a critical role in the regulation of cell growth, differentiation, and development in a wide range of biological systems. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of IPA on TGF-β/Smad signaling in vivo, using a hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension (PH) rat model. Sprague Dawley rats (n=40) were exposed to 10% oxygen for 21 days to induce PH. At the same time, IPA was administered intravenously from day 1 to day 14. Mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) and the right ventricle (RV) to left ventricle plus the interventricular septum (LV+S) mass ratio were used to evaluate the development of PH. Vessel thickness and density were measured using immunohistochemistry. Primary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) were isolated and the proliferation of PASMCs was assayed by flow cytometry. The production of TGF-β1 in cultured supernatant of PASMCs was assayed by ELISA. The expression levels of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), TGF-β1 and phospho-Smad 2/3 in PASMCs were assayed by western blot. Our data indicated that IPA attenuated PH, RV hypertrophy and pulmonary vascular remodeling in rats, which was probably mediated by restraining the hypoxia-induced overactive TGF-β1/Smad signaling. In conclusion, IPA is a promising protective treatment in PH due to the inhibiting effects on TGF-β1/Smad 2/3 signaling. PMID:27580007

  17. Inactivated Pseudomonas aeruginosa inhibits hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension by preventing TGF-β1/Smad signaling.

    PubMed

    Chai, S D; Liu, T; Dong, M F; Li, Z K; Tang, P Z; Wang, J T; Ma, S J

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the common colonizing bacteria of the human body and is an opportunistic pathogen frequently associated with respiratory infections. Inactivated P. aeruginosa (IPA) have a variety of biological effects against inflammation and allergy. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling plays a critical role in the regulation of cell growth, differentiation, and development in a wide range of biological systems. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of IPA on TGF-β/Smad signaling in vivo, using a hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension (PH) rat model. Sprague Dawley rats (n=40) were exposed to 10% oxygen for 21 days to induce PH. At the same time, IPA was administered intravenously from day 1 to day 14. Mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) and the right ventricle (RV) to left ventricle plus the interventricular septum (LV+S) mass ratio were used to evaluate the development of PH. Vessel thickness and density were measured using immunohistochemistry. Primary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) were isolated and the proliferation of PASMCs was assayed by flow cytometry. The production of TGF-β1 in cultured supernatant of PASMCs was assayed by ELISA. The expression levels of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), TGF-β1 and phospho-Smad 2/3 in PASMCs were assayed by western blot. Our data indicated that IPA attenuated PH, RV hypertrophy and pulmonary vascular remodeling in rats, which was probably mediated by restraining the hypoxia-induced overactive TGF-β1/Smad signaling. In conclusion, IPA is a promising protective treatment in PH due to the inhibiting effects on TGF-β1/Smad 2/3 signaling. PMID:27580007

  18. Pulmonary Fungal Infection Caused by Neoscytalidium dimidiatum

    PubMed Central

    Neff, Luke; Lee, Samuel A.; Sutton, Deanna A.; Wiederhold, Nathan P.; Lindner, Jonathan; Fan, Hongxin

    2015-01-01

    Neoscytalidium dimidiatum is a mold known to cause onychomycosis and dermatomycosis; however, it is an extremely rare cause of systemic infection. We report a case of pulmonary infection with Neoscytalidium dimidiatum in an immunocompromised patient and discuss in vitro susceptibility data from this case and previous literature. PMID:25948605

  19. Lung Microbiota Changes Associated with Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa Lung Infection and the Impact of Intravenous Colistimethate Sodium

    PubMed Central

    Collie, David; Glendinning, Laura; Govan, John; Wright, Steven; Thornton, Elisabeth; Tennant, Peter; Doherty, Catherine; McLachlan, Gerry

    2015-01-01

    Background Exacerbations associated with chronic lung infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa are a major contributor to morbidity, mortality and premature death in cystic fibrosis. Such exacerbations are treated with antibiotics, which generally lead to an improvement in lung function and reduced sputum P. aeruginosa density. This potentially suggests a role for the latter in the pathogenesis of exacerbations. However, other data suggesting that changes in P. aeruginosa sputum culture status may not reliably predict an improvement in clinical status, and data indicating no significant changes in either total bacterial counts or in P. aeruginosa numbers in sputum samples collected prior to pulmonary exacerbation sheds doubt on this assumption. We used our recently developed lung segmental model of chronic Pseudomonas infection in sheep to investigate the lung microbiota changes associated with chronic P. aeruginosa lung infection and the impact of systemic therapy with colistimethate sodium (CMS). Methodology/Principal Findings We collected protected specimen brush (PSB) samples from sheep (n = 8) both prior to and 14 days after establishment of chronic local lung infection with P aeruginosa. Samples were taken from both directly infected lung segments (direct) and segments spatially remote to such sites (remote). Four sheep were treated with daily intravenous injections of CMS between days 7 and 14, and four were treated with a placebo. Necropsy examination at d14 confirmed the presence of chronic local lung infection and lung pathology in every direct lung segment. The predominant orders in lung microbiota communities before infection were Bacillales, Actinomycetales and Clostridiales. While lung microbiota samples were more likely to share similarities with other samples derived from the same lung, considerable within- and between-animal heterogeneity could be appreciated. Pseudomonadales joined the aforementioned list of predominant orders in lung microbiota

  20. Type IV pilus of Pseudomonas aeruginosa confers resistance to antimicrobial activities of the pulmonary surfactant protein-A.

    PubMed

    Tan, Rommel Max; Kuang, Zhizhou; Hao, Yonghua; Lau, Gee W

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa(PA) is a Gram-negative bacterial pathogen commonly associated with chronic lung infections. Previously, we have identified several PA virulence factors that are important for resistance to the surfactant protein-A (SP-A), a pulmonary innate immunity protein that mediates bacterial opsonization and membrane permeabilization. In this study, we demonstrate that the type IV pilus (Tfp) is important in the resistance of PA to the antibacterial effects of SP-A. The Tfp-deficient mutant ΔpilA is severely attenuated in an acute pneumonia model of infection in the lungs of wild-type mice, but is virulent in the lungs of SP-A(-/-) mice. The ΔpilA bacteria are more susceptible to SP-A-mediated aggregation and opsonization. In addition, the integrity of the outer membranes of ΔpilA bacteria is compromised, rendering them more susceptible to SP-A-mediated membrane permeabilization. By comparing Tfp extension and retraction mutants, we demonstrate that the increased susceptibility of ΔpilA to SP-A-mediated opsonization requires the total absence of Tfp from PA cells. Finally, we provide evidence of increased expression of nonpilus adhesin OprH that may serve as an SP-A ligand, resulting in increased phagocytosis and preferential pulmonary clearance of ΔpilA. PMID:24080545

  1. Exhaled Breath Analysis Using Electronic Nose in Cystic Fibrosis and Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia Patients with Chronic Pulmonary Infections

    PubMed Central

    Joensen, Odin; Paff, Tamara; Haarman, Eric G.; Skovgaard, Ib M.; Jensen, Peter Ø.; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Nielsen, Kim G.

    2014-01-01

    The current diagnostic work-up and monitoring of pulmonary infections may be perceived as invasive, is time consuming and expensive. In this explorative study, we investigated whether or not a non-invasive exhaled breath analysis using an electronic nose would discriminate between cystic fibrosis (CF) and primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) with or without various well characterized chronic pulmonary infections. We recruited 64 patients with CF and 21 with PCD based on known chronic infection status. 21 healthy volunteers served as controls. An electronic nose was employed to analyze exhaled breath samples. Principal component reduction and discriminant analysis were used to construct internally cross-validated receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves. Breath profiles of CF and PCD patients differed significantly from healthy controls p = 0.001 and p = 0.005, respectively. Profiles of CF patients having a chronic P. aeruginosa infection differed significantly from to non-chronically infected CF patients p = 0.044. We confirmed the previously established discriminative power of exhaled breath analysis in separation between healthy subjects and patients with CF or PCD. Furthermore, this method significantly discriminates CF patients suffering from a chronic pulmonary P. aeruginosa (PA) infection from CF patients without a chronic pulmonary infection. Further studies are needed for verification and to investigate the role of electronic nose technology in the very early diagnostic workup of pulmonary infections before the establishment of a chronic infection. PMID:25542036

  2. Nano-antibiotics in chronic lung infection therapy against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Hadinoto, Kunn; Cheow, Wean Sin

    2014-04-01

    Antibiotic encapsulation into nanoparticle carriers has emerged as a promising inhaled antibiotic formulation for treatment of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection prevalent in chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases. Attributed to their prolonged lung retention, sustained antibiotic release, and mucus penetrating ability, antibiotic nanoparticles, or nano-antibiotics in short, can address the principal weakness of inhaled antibiotic solution, i.e. low antibiotic exposure in the vicinity of P. aeruginosa biofilm colonies resulting in diminished anti-pseudomonal efficacy after repeated uses. This review details the current state of development and limitations of the two most widely studied forms of nano-antibiotics, i.e. liposomes and polymer nanoparticles. Factors in their formulation that influence the anti-pseudomonal efficacy in vitro and in vivo, such as liposome's membrane rigidity, surface charge, size, and polymer hydrophobicity, are discussed. This review reveals that the superior anti-pseudomonal efficacy of liposomal antibiotics to free antibiotics has been clearly established when they are correctly formulated, with several liposomal antibiotic formulations are currently undergoing clinical trials. Liposomal antibiotics, nevertheless, are not without limitation due to their weak physicochemical stability. In contrast, only mucus penetrating ability of the more stable polymeric nano-antibiotics has been established, while their anti-pseudomonal efficacy has only been examined in vitro from which their superiority to free antibiotics has not been ascertained. Lastly, future research needs to bring liposome and polymer-based nano-antibiotics closer to their clinical realization are identified.

  3. Role of IL-1β in Experimental Cystic Fibrosis upon P. aeruginosa Infection

    PubMed Central

    Palomo, Jennifer; Marchiol, Tiffany; Piotet, Julie; Fauconnier, Louis; Robinet, Marieke; Reverchon, Flora; Le Bert, Marc; Togbe, Dieudonnée; Buijs-Offerman, Ruvalic; Stolarczyk, Marta; Quesniaux, Valérie F. J.; Scholte, Bob J.; Ryffel, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is associated with increased inflammatory responses to pathogen challenge. Here we revisited the role of IL-1β in lung pathology using the experimental F508del-CFTR murine model on C57BL/6 genetic background (Cftrtm1eur or d/d), on double deficient for d/d and type 1 interleukin-1 receptor (d/d X IL-1R1−/−), and antibody neutralization. At steady state, young adult d/d mice did not show any signs of spontaneous lung inflammation. However, IL-1R1 deficiency conferred partial protection to repeated P. aeruginosa endotoxins/LPS lung instillation in d/d mice, as 50% of d/d mice succumbed to inflammation, whereas all d/d x IL-1R1−/− double mutants survived with lower initial weight loss and less pulmonary collagen and mucus production, suggesting that the absence of IL-1R1 signaling is protective in d/d mice in LPS-induced lung damage. Using P. aeruginosa acute lung infection we found heightened neutrophil recruitment in d/d mice with higher epithelial damage, increased bacterial load in BALF, and augmented IL-1β and TNF-α in parenchyma as compared to WT mice. Thus, F508del-CFTR mice show enhanced IL-1β signaling in response to P. aeruginosa. IL-1β antibody neutralization had no effect on lung homeostasis in either d/d or WT mice, however P. aeruginosa induced lung inflammation and bacterial load were diminished by IL-1β antibody neutralization. In conclusion, enhanced susceptibility to P. aeruginosa in d/d mice correlates with an excessive inflammation and with increased IL-1β production and reduced bacterial clearance. Further, we show that neutralization of IL-1β in d/d mice through the double mutation d/d x IL-1R1−/− and in WT via antibody neutralization attenuates inflammation. This supports the notion that intervention in the IL-1R1/IL-1β pathway may be detrimental in CF patients. PMID:25500839

  4. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cepacia infection in cystic fibrosis patients treated in Toronto and Copenhagen.

    PubMed

    Johansen, H K; Kovesi, T A; Koch, C; Corey, M; Høiby, N; Levison, H

    1998-08-01

    Differences in the course of pulmonary disease in cystic fibrosis (CF) may be altered by different treatment strategies in different CF centers. The Copenhagen clinic uses scheduled, regular and very aggressive treatment of lung infection. The Toronto clinic treats pulmonary infection with oral, inhaled, or intravenous antibiotics, and has emphasized aggressive nutritional therapy. This study compared the clinical status of CF patients treated in the two centers (Toronto, Canada, n=302, and Copenhagen, Denmark, n=214) using a cross-sectional design in terms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) and Burkholderia cepacia (BC) lung infections, pulmonary function, and levels of PA and BC precipitating antibodies (precipitins). Median ages were similar, but the age distribution was significantly different, with a higher proportion of patients under 10 and > or = 25 years in Toronto, and higher proportion of patients 11-24 years of age in Copenhagen. A higher number of female patients was observed in Copenhagen than in Toronto. Seventy-nine percent of Copenhagen patients, and 52% of Toronto patients were deltaF508 homozygous. Of all the patients, 20.1% of Copenhagen patients and 38% of Toronto patients were deltaF508 heterozygous. Ten percent of Toronto patients had two uncommon mutations. Pulmonary function and nutritional status in both groups were similar despite varying treatment strategies. The prevalence of PA was lower in Danish children and higher in Danish adults than in Canada. These differences are probably due to cohort isolation, which was introduced in Copenhagen in 1981. The prevalence of BC was higher in Toronto than in Copenhagen patients at all ages. In both centers, the number of PA and BC precipitins increased with age in patients chronically infected with PA and BC, respectively, and the number of both PA and BC precipitins rose with declining lung function. This study suggests that the clinic populations had similar pulmonary and nutritional statuses

  5. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Dose-Response and Bathing Water Infection

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most commonly identified opportunistic pathogen associated with pool acquired bather disease. To better understand why this microorganism poses this protracted problem we recently appraised P. aeruginosa pool risk management. Much is known about the ...

  6. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Diversification during Infection Development in Cystic Fibrosis Lungs-A Review.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Ana Margarida; Pereira, Maria Olívia

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most prevalent pathogen of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. Its long persistence in CF airways is associated with sophisticated mechanisms of adaptation, including biofilm formation, resistance to antibiotics, hypermutability and customized pathogenicity in which virulence factors are expressed according the infection stage. CF adaptation is triggered by high selective pressure of inflamed CF lungs and by antibiotic treatments. Bacteria undergo genetic, phenotypic, and physiological variations that are fastened by the repeating interplay of mutation and selection. During CF infection development, P. aeruginosa gradually shifts from an acute virulent pathogen of early infection to a host-adapted pathogen of chronic infection. This paper reviews the most common changes undergone by P. aeruginosa at each stage of infection development in CF lungs. The comprehensive understanding of the adaptation process of P. aeruginosa may help to design more effective antimicrobial treatments and to identify new targets for future drugs to prevent the progression of infection to chronic stages. PMID:25438018

  7. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Diversification during Infection Development in Cystic Fibrosis Lungs—A Review

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Ana Margarida; Pereira, Maria Olívia

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most prevalent pathogen of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. Its long persistence in CF airways is associated with sophisticated mechanisms of adaptation, including biofilm formation, resistance to antibiotics, hypermutability and customized pathogenicity in which virulence factors are expressed according the infection stage. CF adaptation is triggered by high selective pressure of inflamed CF lungs and by antibiotic treatments. Bacteria undergo genetic, phenotypic, and physiological variations that are fastened by the repeating interplay of mutation and selection. During CF infection development, P. aeruginosa gradually shifts from an acute virulent pathogen of early infection to a host-adapted pathogen of chronic infection. This paper reviews the most common changes undergone by P. aeruginosa at each stage of infection development in CF lungs. The comprehensive understanding of the adaptation process of P. aeruginosa may help to design more effective antimicrobial treatments and to identify new targets for future drugs to prevent the progression of infection to chronic stages. PMID:25438018

  8. Pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma associated with Aspergillus infection.

    PubMed

    Pinckard, J Keith; Rosenbluth, Daniel B; Patel, Kishor; Dehner, Louis P; Pfeifer, John D

    2003-01-01

    A 38-year-old immunocompetent man with occupational exposure to Aspergillus presented with dyspnea, pleuritic chest pain, and hemoptysis. Chest roentgenograms and computed tomography scans demonstrated multiple pulmonary nodules bilaterally. An initial set of bronchial washing cultures grew Aspergillus fumigatus, serologic testing showed an elevated anti-Aspergillus titer, and immunodiffusion testing was positive for antibody against A. fumigatus and A. niger. There was no microbiologic or serologic evidence of infection by other pathogens, and no clinical or laboratory evidence of autoimmune disease. An open lung biopsy was diagnostic of pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma. This novel association with Aspergillus infection not only expands the spectrum of pathogens linked to pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma but also documents a new pattern of lung disease that can be caused by Aspergillus. PMID:12598920

  9. [Pulmonary infections with non-tuberculous mycobacteria].

    PubMed

    Fløe, Andreas; Hermansen, Thomas Stig; Lillebæk, Troels; Hilberg, Ole

    2016-06-20

    In recent decades, an increasing incidence of pulmonary infections with non-tuberculous mycobacteria has been reported, primarily affecting patients with structural lung diseases and/or immunosuppression. In Denmark, approximately 100 new cases of infection with non-tuberculous mycobacteria occur yearly, most commonly with Mycobac-terium avium complex. Diagnosis is based on clinical, radiological and microbiological criteria. Treatment is difficult, and outcomes are often poor. Antibiotic treatment should be performed by specialists with reference to international guidelines. PMID:27401987

  10. [The protective activity of 2 normal immunoglobulin preparations for intravenous administration in experimental Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection].

    PubMed

    Vasilev, Ch L; Veleva, K V; Tekelieva, R Kh; Pencheva, P I

    1991-02-01

    The antibody levels in 18 batches of the preparations of human immunoglobulin, Immunovenin and Immunovenin-Intact, for intravenous injection were determined in the enzyme immunoassay with the use of the mixture of P. aeruginosa lipopolysaccharide antigens of seven immunotypes. The average antibody titers in these preparations were identical. The preparations were found to have protective action against P. aeruginosa experimental infection in mice.

  11. Pseudomonas aeruginosa adapts its iron uptake strategies in function of the type of infections

    PubMed Central

    Cornelis, Pierre; Dingemans, Jozef

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative γ-Proteobacterium which is known for its capacity to colonize various niches, including some invertebrate and vertebrate hosts, making it one of the most frequent bacteria causing opportunistic infections. P. aeruginosa is able to cause acute as well as chronic infections and it uses different colonization and virulence factors to do so. Infections range from septicemia, urinary infections, burn wound colonization, and chronic colonization of the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients. Like the vast majority of organisms, P. aeruginosa needs iron to sustain growth. P. aeruginosa utilizes different strategies to take up iron, depending on the type of infection it causes. Two siderophores are produced by this bacterium, pyoverdine and pyochelin, characterized by high and low affinities for iron respectively. P. aeruginosa is also able to utilize different siderophores from other microorganisms (siderophore piracy). It can also take up heme from hemoproteins via two different systems. Under microaerobic or anaerobic conditions, P. aeruginosa is also able to take up ferrous iron via its Feo system using redox-cycling phenazines. Depending on the type of infection, P. aeruginosa can therefore adapt by switching from one iron uptake system to another as we will describe in this short review. PMID:24294593

  12. Pseudomonas aeruginosa adapts its iron uptake strategies in function of the type of infections.

    PubMed

    Cornelis, Pierre; Dingemans, Jozef

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative γ-Proteobacterium which is known for its capacity to colonize various niches, including some invertebrate and vertebrate hosts, making it one of the most frequent bacteria causing opportunistic infections. P. aeruginosa is able to cause acute as well as chronic infections and it uses different colonization and virulence factors to do so. Infections range from septicemia, urinary infections, burn wound colonization, and chronic colonization of the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients. Like the vast majority of organisms, P. aeruginosa needs iron to sustain growth. P. aeruginosa utilizes different strategies to take up iron, depending on the type of infection it causes. Two siderophores are produced by this bacterium, pyoverdine and pyochelin, characterized by high and low affinities for iron respectively. P. aeruginosa is also able to utilize different siderophores from other microorganisms (siderophore piracy). It can also take up heme from hemoproteins via two different systems. Under microaerobic or anaerobic conditions, P. aeruginosa is also able to take up ferrous iron via its Feo system using redox-cycling phenazines. Depending on the type of infection, P. aeruginosa can therefore adapt by switching from one iron uptake system to another as we will describe in this short review. PMID:24294593

  13. [Septic pulmonary emboli caused by parenteral nutrition catheter infection].

    PubMed

    Kuwabara, M; Itoi, K; Ariyasu, T; Yanagihara, K; Nasu, T

    1990-09-01

    A case of septic pulmonary emboli due to parenteral nutrition catheter infection was reported. Characteristic radiologic features were recognized. A 50-year-old man, who was receiving parenteral nutrition after total gastrectomy, consulted our department with complaints of fever and general malaise. A chest radiograph showed scattered ill-defined small peripheral nodules, which were not present before parenteral nutrition, and these nodules were quickly formed cavities + in 2nd day. He was suffering from high fever, hemo-sputum and dyspnea after removal of the parenteral nutrition catheter. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was isolated from the tip of parenteral nutrition catheter and sputum cultures. Septic pulmonary emboli were diagnosed and antibiotic therapy was performed. Bacterial endocarditis and septic thrombophlebitis were ruled out. The multiple cavity nodules extended to involve the peripheral areas of the lung and invasive shadows appeared on the chest radiograph in 8th day. Then, the invasive shadows disappeared and the walls of the cavitary lesions became thinner. After 2 months, all cavitary lesions disappeared with only linear shadows remaining. PMID:2125088

  14. Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infection in a Child with Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Ang, Jocelyn Y; Abdel-Haq, Nahed; Zhu, Frank; Thabit, Abrar K; Nicolau, David P; Satlin, Michael J; van Duin, David

    2016-10-01

    We describe a pediatric cystic fibrosis patient who developed a pulmonary exacerbation due to two multidrug-resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates. In addition to these MDR organisms, the case was further complicated by β-lactam allergy. Despite the MDR phenotype, both isolates were susceptible to an antimicrobial combination. PMID:27664282

  15. Distinct Pathogenesis and Host Responses during Infection of C. elegans by P. aeruginosa and S. aureus

    PubMed Central

    Irazoqui, Javier E.; Troemel, Emily R.; Feinbaum, Rhonda L.; Luhachack, Lyly G.; Cezairliyan, Brent O.; Ausubel, Frederick M.

    2010-01-01

    The genetically tractable model host Caenorhabditis elegans provides a valuable tool to dissect host-microbe interactions in vivo. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus utilize virulence factors involved in human disease to infect and kill C. elegans. Despite much progress, virtually nothing is known regarding the cytopathology of infection and the proximate causes of nematode death. Using light and electron microscopy, we found that P. aeruginosa infection entails intestinal distention, accumulation of an unidentified extracellular matrix and P. aeruginosa-synthesized outer membrane vesicles in the gut lumen and on the apical surface of intestinal cells, the appearance of abnormal autophagosomes inside intestinal cells, and P. aeruginosa intracellular invasion of C. elegans. Importantly, heat-killed P. aeruginosa fails to elicit a significant host response, suggesting that the C. elegans response to P. aeruginosa is activated either by heat-labile signals or pathogen-induced damage. In contrast, S. aureus infection causes enterocyte effacement, intestinal epithelium destruction, and complete degradation of internal organs. S. aureus activates a strong transcriptional response in C. elegans intestinal epithelial cells, which aids host survival during infection and shares elements with human innate responses. The C. elegans genes induced in response to S. aureus are mostly distinct from those induced by P. aeruginosa. In contrast to P. aeruginosa, heat-killed S. aureus activates a similar response as live S. aureus, which appears to be independent of the single C. elegans Toll-Like Receptor (TLR) protein. These data suggest that the host response to S. aureus is possibly mediated by pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). Because our data suggest that neither the P. aeruginosa nor the S. aureus–triggered response requires canonical TLR signaling, they imply the existence of unidentified mechanisms for pathogen detection in C. elegans, with

  16. Pseudomonas aeruginosa forms biofilms in acute infection independent of cell-to-cell signaling.

    PubMed

    Schaber, J Andy; Triffo, W Jeffrey; Suh, Sang Jin; Oliver, Jeffrey W; Hastert, Mary Catherine; Griswold, John A; Auer, Manfred; Hamood, Abdul N; Rumbaugh, Kendra P

    2007-08-01

    Biofilms are bacterial communities residing within a polysaccharide matrix that are associated with persistence and antibiotic resistance in chronic infections. We show that the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa forms biofilms within 8 h of infection in thermally injured mice, demonstrating that biofilms contribute to bacterial colonization in acute infections as well. Using light, electron, and confocal scanning laser microscopy, P. aeruginosa biofilms were visualized within burned tissue surrounding blood vessels and adipose cells. Although quorum sensing (QS), a bacterial signaling mechanism, coordinates differentiation of biofilms in vitro, wild-type and QS-deficient P. aeruginosa strains formed similar biofilms in vivo. Our findings demonstrate that P. aeruginosa forms biofilms on specific host tissues independently of QS.

  17. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Uses Multiple Pathways To Acquire Iron during Chronic Infection in Cystic Fibrosis Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Konings, Anna F.; Martin, Lois W.; Sharples, Katrina J.; Roddam, Louise F.; Latham, Roger; Reid, David W.

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa chronically infects the lungs of more than 80% of adult patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and is a major contributor to the progression of disease pathology. P. aeruginosa requires iron for growth and has multiple iron uptake systems that have been studied in bacteria grown in laboratory culture. The purpose of this research was to determine which of these are active during infection in CF. RNA was extracted from 149 sputum samples obtained from 23 CF patients. Reverse transcription–quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) was used to measure the expression of P. aeruginosa genes encoding transport systems for the siderophores pyoverdine and pyochelin, for heme, and for ferrous ions. Expression of P. aeruginosa genes could be quantified in 89% of the sputum samples. Expression of genes associated with siderophore-mediated iron uptake was detected in most samples but was at low levels in some samples, indicating that other iron uptake mechanisms are active. Expression of genes encoding heme transport systems was also detected in most samples, indicating that heme uptake occurs during infection in CF. feoB expression was detected in all sputum samples, implying an important role for ferrous ion uptake by P. aeruginosa in CF. Our data show that multiple P. aeruginosa iron uptake mechanisms are active in chronic CF infection and that RT-qPCR of RNA extracted from sputum provides a powerful tool for investigating bacterial physiology during infection in CF. PMID:23690396

  18. Pseudomonas aeruginosa uses multiple pathways to acquire iron during chronic infection in cystic fibrosis lungs.

    PubMed

    Konings, Anna F; Martin, Lois W; Sharples, Katrina J; Roddam, Louise F; Latham, Roger; Reid, David W; Lamont, Iain L

    2013-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa chronically infects the lungs of more than 80% of adult patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and is a major contributor to the progression of disease pathology. P. aeruginosa requires iron for growth and has multiple iron uptake systems that have been studied in bacteria grown in laboratory culture. The purpose of this research was to determine which of these are active during infection in CF. RNA was extracted from 149 sputum samples obtained from 23 CF patients. Reverse transcription-quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) was used to measure the expression of P. aeruginosa genes encoding transport systems for the siderophores pyoverdine and pyochelin, for heme, and for ferrous ions. Expression of P. aeruginosa genes could be quantified in 89% of the sputum samples. Expression of genes associated with siderophore-mediated iron uptake was detected in most samples but was at low levels in some samples, indicating that other iron uptake mechanisms are active. Expression of genes encoding heme transport systems was also detected in most samples, indicating that heme uptake occurs during infection in CF. feoB expression was detected in all sputum samples, implying an important role for ferrous ion uptake by P. aeruginosa in CF. Our data show that multiple P. aeruginosa iron uptake mechanisms are active in chronic CF infection and that RT-qPCR of RNA extracted from sputum provides a powerful tool for investigating bacterial physiology during infection in CF. PMID:23690396

  19. Drosophila melanogaster as an Animal Model for the Study of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Infections In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Mulcahy, Heidi; Sibley, Christopher D.; Surette, Michael G.; Lewenza, Shawn

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen capable of causing both acute and chronic infections in susceptible hosts. Chronic P. aeruginosa infections are thought to be caused by bacterial biofilms. Biofilms are highly structured, multicellular, microbial communities encased in an extracellular matrix that enable long-term survival in the host. The aim of this research was to develop an animal model that would allow an in vivo study of P. aeruginosa biofilm infections in a Drosophila melanogaster host. At 24 h post oral infection of Drosophila, P. aeruginosa biofilms localized to and were visualized in dissected Drosophila crops. These biofilms had a characteristic aggregate structure and an extracellular matrix composed of DNA and exopolysaccharide. P. aeruginosa cells recovered from in vivo grown biofilms had increased antibiotic resistance relative to planktonically grown cells. In vivo, biofilm formation was dependent on expression of the pel exopolysaccharide genes, as a pelB::lux mutant failed to form biofilms. The pelB::lux mutant was significantly more virulent than PAO1, while a hyperbiofilm strain (PAZHI3) demonstrated significantly less virulence than PAO1, as indicated by survival of infected flies at day 14 postinfection. Biofilm formation, by strains PAO1 and PAZHI3, in the crop was associated with induction of diptericin, cecropin A1 and drosomycin antimicrobial peptide gene expression 24 h postinfection. In contrast, infection with the non-biofilm forming strain pelB::lux resulted in decreased AMP gene expression in the fly. In summary, these results provide novel insights into host-pathogen interactions during P. aeruginosa oral infection of Drosophila and highlight the use of Drosophila as an infection model that permits the study of P. aeruginosa biofilms in vivo. PMID:21998591

  20. IL-17A impairs host tolerance during airway chronic infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Lorè, Nicola Ivan; Cigana, Cristina; Riva, Camilla; De Fino, Ida; Nonis, Alessandro; Spagnuolo, Lorenza; Sipione, Barbara; Cariani, Lisa; Girelli, Daniela; Rossi, Giacomo; Basso, Veronica; Colombo, Carla; Mondino, Anna; Bragonzi, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Resistance and tolerance mechanisms participate to the interplay between host and pathogens. IL-17-mediated response has been shown to be crucial for host resistance to respiratory infections, whereas its role in host tolerance during chronic airway colonization is still unclear. Here, we investigated whether IL-17-mediated response modulates mechanisms of host tolerance during airways chronic infection by P. aeruginosa. First, we found that IL-17A levels were sustained in mice at both early and advanced stages of P. aeruginosa chronic infection and confirmed these observations in human respiratory samples from cystic fibrosis patients infected by P. aeruginosa. Using IL-17a−/− or IL-17ra−/− mice, we found that the deficiency of IL-17A/IL-17RA axis was associated with: i) increased incidence of chronic infection and bacterial burden, indicating its role in the host resistance to P. aeruginosa; ii) reduced cytokine levels (KC), tissue innate immune cells and markers of tissue damage (pro-MMP-9, elastin degradation, TGF-β1), proving alteration of host tolerance. Blockade of IL-17A activity by a monoclonal antibody, started when chronic infection is established, did not alter host resistance but increased tolerance. In conclusion, this study identifies IL-17-mediated response as a negative regulator of host tolerance during P. aeruginosa chronic airway infection. PMID:27189736

  1. Phage Therapy: a Step Forward in the Treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infections.

    PubMed

    Pires, Diana P; Vilas Boas, Diana; Sillankorva, Sanna; Azeredo, Joana

    2015-08-01

    Antimicrobial resistance constitutes one of the major worldwide public health concerns. Bacteria are becoming resistant to the vast majority of antibiotics, and nowadays, a common infection can be fatal. To address this situation, the use of phages for the treatment of bacterial infections has been extensively studied as an alternative therapeutic strategy. Since Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most common causes of health care-associated infections, many studies have reported the in vitro and in vivo antibacterial efficacy of phage therapy against this bacterium. This review collects data of all the P. aeruginosa phages sequenced to date, providing a better understanding about their biodiversity. This review further addresses the in vitro and in vivo results obtained by using phages to treat or prevent P. aeruginosa infections as well as the major hurdles associated with this therapy. PMID:25972556

  2. Phage Therapy: a Step Forward in the Treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infections

    PubMed Central

    Pires, Diana P.; Vilas Boas, Diana; Sillankorva, Sanna

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance constitutes one of the major worldwide public health concerns. Bacteria are becoming resistant to the vast majority of antibiotics, and nowadays, a common infection can be fatal. To address this situation, the use of phages for the treatment of bacterial infections has been extensively studied as an alternative therapeutic strategy. Since Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most common causes of health care-associated infections, many studies have reported the in vitro and in vivo antibacterial efficacy of phage therapy against this bacterium. This review collects data of all the P. aeruginosa phages sequenced to date, providing a better understanding about their biodiversity. This review further addresses the in vitro and in vivo results obtained by using phages to treat or prevent P. aeruginosa infections as well as the major hurdles associated with this therapy. PMID:25972556

  3. Role of Iron Uptake Systems in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Virulence and Airway Infection.

    PubMed

    Minandri, Fabrizia; Imperi, Francesco; Frangipani, Emanuela; Bonchi, Carlo; Visaggio, Daniela; Facchini, Marcella; Pasquali, Paolo; Bragonzi, Alessandra; Visca, Paolo

    2016-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a leading cause of hospital-acquired pneumonia and chronic lung infections in cystic fibrosis patients. Iron is essential for bacterial growth, and P. aeruginosa expresses multiple iron uptake systems, whose role in lung infection deserves further investigation. P. aeruginosa Fe(3+) uptake systems include the pyoverdine and pyochelin siderophores and two systems for heme uptake, all of which are dependent on the TonB energy transducer. P. aeruginosa also has the FeoB transporter for Fe(2+) acquisition. To assess the roles of individual iron uptake systems in P. aeruginosa lung infection, single and double deletion mutants were generated in P. aeruginosa PAO1 and characterized in vitro, using iron-poor media and human serum, and in vivo, using a mouse model of lung infection. The iron uptake-null mutant (tonB1 feoB) and the Fe(3+) transport mutant (tonB1) did not grow aerobically under low-iron conditions and were avirulent in the mouse model. Conversely, the wild type and the feoB, hasR phuR (heme uptake), and pchD (pyochelin) mutants grew in vitro and caused 60 to 90% mortality in mice. The pyoverdine mutant (pvdA) and the siderophore-null mutant (pvdA pchD) grew aerobically in iron-poor media but not in human serum, and they caused low mortality in mice (10 to 20%). To differentiate the roles of pyoverdine in iron uptake and virulence regulation, a pvdA fpvR double mutant defective in pyoverdine production but expressing wild-type levels of pyoverdine-regulated virulence factors was generated. Deletion of fpvR in the pvdA background partially restored the lethal phenotype, indicating that pyoverdine contributes to the pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa lung infection by combining iron transport and virulence-inducing capabilities. PMID:27271740

  4. Role of Iron Uptake Systems in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Virulence and Airway Infection.

    PubMed

    Minandri, Fabrizia; Imperi, Francesco; Frangipani, Emanuela; Bonchi, Carlo; Visaggio, Daniela; Facchini, Marcella; Pasquali, Paolo; Bragonzi, Alessandra; Visca, Paolo

    2016-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a leading cause of hospital-acquired pneumonia and chronic lung infections in cystic fibrosis patients. Iron is essential for bacterial growth, and P. aeruginosa expresses multiple iron uptake systems, whose role in lung infection deserves further investigation. P. aeruginosa Fe(3+) uptake systems include the pyoverdine and pyochelin siderophores and two systems for heme uptake, all of which are dependent on the TonB energy transducer. P. aeruginosa also has the FeoB transporter for Fe(2+) acquisition. To assess the roles of individual iron uptake systems in P. aeruginosa lung infection, single and double deletion mutants were generated in P. aeruginosa PAO1 and characterized in vitro, using iron-poor media and human serum, and in vivo, using a mouse model of lung infection. The iron uptake-null mutant (tonB1 feoB) and the Fe(3+) transport mutant (tonB1) did not grow aerobically under low-iron conditions and were avirulent in the mouse model. Conversely, the wild type and the feoB, hasR phuR (heme uptake), and pchD (pyochelin) mutants grew in vitro and caused 60 to 90% mortality in mice. The pyoverdine mutant (pvdA) and the siderophore-null mutant (pvdA pchD) grew aerobically in iron-poor media but not in human serum, and they caused low mortality in mice (10 to 20%). To differentiate the roles of pyoverdine in iron uptake and virulence regulation, a pvdA fpvR double mutant defective in pyoverdine production but expressing wild-type levels of pyoverdine-regulated virulence factors was generated. Deletion of fpvR in the pvdA background partially restored the lethal phenotype, indicating that pyoverdine contributes to the pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa lung infection by combining iron transport and virulence-inducing capabilities.

  5. Pseudomonas aeruginosa wound infection involves activation of its iron acquisition system in response to fascial contact

    PubMed Central

    Kim, M.; Christley, S.; Khodarev, N. N.; Fleming, I.; Huang, Y.; Chang, E.; Zaborina, O.; Alverdy, J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Wound infections are traditionally thought to occur when microbial burden exceeds the innate clearance capacity of host immune system. Here we introduce the idea that the wound environment itself plays a significant contributory role to wound infection. Methods We developed a clinically relevant murine model of soft tissue infection to explore the role of activation of microbial virulence in response to tissue factors as a mechanism by which pathogenic bacteria cause wound infections. Mice underwent abdominal skin incision and light muscle injury with a crushing forceps versus skin incision alone followed by topical inoculation of P. aeruginosa. Mice were sacrificed on postoperative day 6 and abdominal tissues analyzed for clinical signs of wound infection. To determine if specific wound tissues components induce bacterial virulence, P. aeruginosa was exposed to skin, fascia, and muscle. Results Gross wound infection due to P. aeruginosa was observed to be significantly increased in injured tissues vs non-injured (80% vs 10%) tissues (n=20/group, p<0.0001). Exposure of P. aeruginosa to individual tissue components demonstrated that fascia significantly induced bacterial virulence as judged by the production of pyocyanin, a redox-active phenazine compound known to kill immune cells. Whole genome transcriptional profiling of P. aeruginosa exposed to fascia demonstrated activation of multiple genes responsible for the synthesis of the iron scavenging molecule pyochelin. Conclusion We conclude that wound elements, in particular fascia, may play a significant role in enhancing the virulence of P. aeruginosa and may contribute to the pathogenesis of clinical wound infection. PMID:25807409

  6. Multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in children undergoing chemotherapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Caselli, Désirée; Cesaro, Simone; Ziino, Ottavio; Zanazzo, Giulio; Manicone, Rosaria; Livadiotti, Susanna; Cellini, Monica; Frenos, Stefano; Milano, Giuseppe M; Cappelli, Barbara; Licciardello, Maria; Beretta, Chiara; Aricò, Maurizio; Castagnola, Elio

    2010-09-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one leading gram-negative organism associated with nosocomial infections. Bacteremia is life-threatening in the immunocompromised host. Increasing frequency of multi-drug-resistant (MDRPA) strains is concerning. We started a retrospective survey in the pediatric hematology oncology Italian network. Between 2000 and 2008, 127 patients with Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteremia were reported from 12 centers; 31.4% of isolates were MDRPA. Death within 30 days of a positive blood culture occurred in 19.6% (25/127) of total patients; in patients with MDRPA infection it occurred in 35.8% (14/39). In the multivariate analysis, only MDRPA had significant association with infection-related death. This is the largest series of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteremia cases from pediatric hematology oncology centers. Monitoring local bacterial isolates epidemiology is mandatory and will allow empiric antibiotic therapy to be tailored to reduce fatalities.

  7. Impact of new water systems on healthcare-associated colonization or infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Lefebvre, Annick; Quantin, Catherine; Vanhems, Philippe; Lucet, Jean-Christophe; Bertrand, Xavier; Astruc, Karine; Chavanet, Pascal; Aho-Glélé, Ludwig S.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: We aimed to study the impact of new water systems, which were less contaminated with P. aeruginosa, on the incidence of healthcare-associated P. aeruginosa cases (colonizations or infections) in care units that moved to a different building between 2005 and 2014. Methods: Generalized Estimated Equations were used to compare the incidence of P. aeruginosa healthcare-associated cases according to the building. Results: Twenty-nine units moved during the study period and 2,759 cases occurred in these units. No difference was observed when the new building was compared with older buildings overall. Conclusion: Our results did not support our hypothesis of a positive association between water system contamination and the incidence of healthcare-associated P. aeruginosa cases. These results must be confirmed by linking results of water samples and patients’ data. PMID:27274443

  8. Septic pulmonary embolism induced by dental infection.

    PubMed

    Shiota, Yutaro; Taniguchi, Akihiko; Yuzurio, Syota; Horita, Naokatsu; Hosokawa, Shinobu; Watanabe, Yoichi; Tohmori, Hidetoshi; Ono, Tetsuya

    2013-01-01

    Dental infection can be an important source for septic pulmonary embolism (SPE), but only a few cases of SPE accompanying dental infection have been reported. The aim of this study was to characterize the clinical features of SPE induced by dental infection. Patients who fulfilled the diagnostic criteria described in the text were recruited in a retrospective fashion. All 9 patients were men, with a median age of 59 years (range:47 to 74 years). Eight patients had chest pain (88.9%), 5 had a preceding toothache (55.6%) and 3 had preceding gingival swelling (33.3%). Blood cultures obtained from 7 patients were negative. Periodontitis was found in all of the cases, periapical periodontitis in 5 cases, and gingival abscess in 3 cases. The median duration of hospitalization was 15 days, and symptoms were mild in some cases. In addition to antimicrobial therapy, tooth extraction was performed in 3 cases, tooth scaling in 6. SPE induced by dental infection has prominent clinical characteristics such as male preponderance, chest pain, preceding toothache, and mild clinical course.

  9. Towards understanding Pseudomonas aeruginosa burn wound infections by profiling gene expression.

    PubMed

    Bielecki, Piotr; Glik, Justyna; Kawecki, Marek; Martins dos Santos, Vítor A P

    2008-05-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a key opportunistic pathogen causing severe acute and chronic nosocomial infections in immunocompromised or catheterized patients. It is prevalent in burn wound infections and it is generally multi-drug resistant. Understanding the genetic programs underlying infection is essential to develop highly needed new strategies for prevention and therapy. This work reviews expression profiling efforts conducted worldwide towards gaining insights into pathogenesis by P. aeruginosa, in particular in burn wounds. Work on various infection models, including the burned mouse model, has identified several direct virulence factors and elucidated their mode of action. In vivo gene expression experiments using In vivo Expression Technology (IVET) ascertained distinct regulatory circuits and traits that have helped explain P. aeruginosa s success as a general pathogen. The sequencing of the whole genome from a number of P. aeruginosa strains and the construction of genome-wide microarrays have paved the road to the several insightful studies on the (interacting) traits underlying infection. A series of in vitro and initial in vivo gene expression studies revealed specific traits pivotal for infection, such as quorum sensing systems, iron acquisition and oxidative stress responses, and toxin production among others. The data sets obtained from global transcriptional profiling provide insights that will be essential for the development of new targets and options for prevention and intervention.

  10. Initial Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in patients with cystic fibrosis: characteristics of eradicated and persistent isolates.

    PubMed

    Tramper-Stranders, G A; van der Ent, C K; Molin, S; Yang, L; Hansen, S K; Rau, M H; Ciofu, O; Johansen, H K; Wolfs, T F W

    2012-06-01

    Despite intensive eradication therapy, some CF patients with early Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection rapidly develop a chronic infection. To elucidate factors associated with this persistence, bacterial characteristics of early P. aeruginosa isolates were analysed that were either eradicated rapidly or persisted despite multiple antimicrobial treatments. Eighty-six early infection episodes were studied. First P. aeruginosa isolates from patients with eradication (36) or persistent infection (16) were included; isolates from patients with intermittent infection (34) were omitted from the study. Virulence assays, antimicrobial resistance, cytotoxicity and mutation frequencies were analysed in vitro. P. aeruginosa was genotyped by SNP-array. Transcriptomic profiles of two eradicated and two persistent strains were compared. Nineteen per cent of patients developed persistent infection; 42% achieved eradication. Secretion of virulence factors and mutation frequencies were highly variable among both eradicated and persistent isolates and were not different between the groups. Cytotoxicity was present in 57% of eradicated vs. 100% of persistent isolates (p <0.01). None of the isolates were resistant to antibiotics. The isolates were genotypically highly diverse. Multivariate analysis showed that in vitro determined bacterial characteristics could not predict persistence after first P. aeruginosa infection. Preliminary transcriptomic data showed increased expression of some genes related to a metabolic pathway. The early onset of chronic infection was not associated with (in vitro determined) bacterial characteristics only. Although the persistent isolates were more often cytotoxic, for the individual patient it was not possible to predict the risk of persistence based on bacterial characteristics. Unknown factors such as host-pathogen and pathogen-pathogen interactions should be further explored. PMID:21883670

  11. Loss of social behaviours in populations of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infecting lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Jiricny, Natalie; Molin, Søren; Foster, Kevin; Diggle, Stephen P; Scanlan, Pauline D; Ghoul, Melanie; Johansen, Helle Krogh; Santorelli, Lorenzo A; Popat, Roman; West, Stuart A; Griffin, Ashleigh S

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, is an opportunistic, bacterial pathogen causing persistent and frequently fatal infections of the lung in patients with cystic fibrosis. Isolates from chronic infections differ from laboratory and environmental strains in a range of traits and this is widely interpreted as the result of adaptation to the lung environment. Typically, chronic strains carry mutations in global regulation factors that could effect reduced expression of social traits, raising the possibility that competitive dynamics between cooperative and selfish, cheating strains could also drive changes in P. aeruginosa infections. We compared the expression of cooperative traits - biofilm formation, secretion of exo-products and quorum sensing (QS) - in P. aeruginosa isolates that were estimated to have spent different lengths of time in the lung based on clinical information. All three exo-products involved in nutrient acquisition were produced in significantly smaller quantities with increased duration of infection, and patterns across four QS signal molecules were consistent with accumulation over time of mutations in lasR, which are known to disrupt the ability of cells to respond to QS signal. Pyocyanin production, and the proportion of cells in biofilm relative to motile, free-living cells in liquid culture, did not change. Overall, our results confirm that the loss of social behaviour is a consistent trend with time spent in the lung and suggest that social dynamics are potentially relevant to understanding the behaviour of P. aeruginosa in lung infections. PMID:24454693

  12. Loss of social behaviours in populations of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infecting lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Jiricny, Natalie; Molin, Søren; Foster, Kevin; Diggle, Stephen P; Scanlan, Pauline D; Ghoul, Melanie; Johansen, Helle Krogh; Santorelli, Lorenzo A; Popat, Roman; West, Stuart A; Griffin, Ashleigh S

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, is an opportunistic, bacterial pathogen causing persistent and frequently fatal infections of the lung in patients with cystic fibrosis. Isolates from chronic infections differ from laboratory and environmental strains in a range of traits and this is widely interpreted as the result of adaptation to the lung environment. Typically, chronic strains carry mutations in global regulation factors that could effect reduced expression of social traits, raising the possibility that competitive dynamics between cooperative and selfish, cheating strains could also drive changes in P. aeruginosa infections. We compared the expression of cooperative traits - biofilm formation, secretion of exo-products and quorum sensing (QS) - in P. aeruginosa isolates that were estimated to have spent different lengths of time in the lung based on clinical information. All three exo-products involved in nutrient acquisition were produced in significantly smaller quantities with increased duration of infection, and patterns across four QS signal molecules were consistent with accumulation over time of mutations in lasR, which are known to disrupt the ability of cells to respond to QS signal. Pyocyanin production, and the proportion of cells in biofilm relative to motile, free-living cells in liquid culture, did not change. Overall, our results confirm that the loss of social behaviour is a consistent trend with time spent in the lung and suggest that social dynamics are potentially relevant to understanding the behaviour of P. aeruginosa in lung infections.

  13. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Evolutionary Adaptation and Diversification in Cystic Fibrosis Chronic Lung Infections

    PubMed Central

    Winstanley, Craig; O’Brien, Siobhan; Brockhurst, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa populations undergo a characteristic evolutionary adaptation during chronic infection of the cystic fibrosis (CF) lung, including reduced production of virulence factors, transition to a biofilm-associated lifestyle, and evolution of high-level antibiotic resistance. Populations of P. aeruginosa in chronic CF lung infections typically exhibit high phenotypic diversity, including for clinically important traits such as antibiotic resistance and toxin production, and this diversity is dynamic over time, making accurate diagnosis and treatment challenging. Population genomics studies reveal extensive genetic diversity within patients, including for transmissible strains the coexistence of highly divergent lineages acquired by patient-to-patient transmission. The inherent spatial structure and spatial heterogeneity of selection in the CF lung appears to play a key role in driving P. aeruginosa diversification. PMID:26946977

  14. Virulence Gene Profiles of Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated From Iranian Hospital Infections

    PubMed Central

    Fazeli, Nastaran; Momtaz, Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Background: The most common hospital-acquired pathogen is Pseudomonas aeruginosa. It is a multidrug resistant bacterium causing systemic infections. Objectives: The present study was carried out in order to investigate the distribution of virulence factors and antibiotic resistance properties of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from various types of hospital infections in Iran. Patients and Methods: Two-hundred and seventeen human infection specimens were collected from Baqiyatallah and Payambaran hospitals in Tehran, Iran. The clinical samples were cultured immediately and samples positive for P. aeruginosa were analyzed for the presence of antibiotic resistance and bacterial virulence genes using PCR (polymerase chain reaction). Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed using disk diffusion methodology with Müeller–Hinton agar. Results: Fifty-eight out of 127 (45.66%) male infection specimens and 44 out of 90 (48.88%) female infection specimens harbored P. aeruginosa. Also, 65% (in male specimens) and 21% (in female specimens) of respiratory system infections were positive for P. aeruginosa, which was a high rate. The genes encoding exoenzyme S (67.64%) and phospholipases C (45.09%) were the most common virulence genes found among the strains. The incidences of various β-lactams encoding genes, including blaTEM, blaSHV, blaOXA, blaCTX-M, blaDHA, and blaVEB were 94.11%, 16.66%, 15.68%, 18.62%, 21.56%, and 17.64%, respectively. The most commonly detected fluoroquinolones encoding gene was gyrA (15. 68%). High resistance levels to penicillin (100%), tetracycline (90.19%), streptomycin (64.70%), and erythromycin (43.13%) were observed too. Conclusions: Our findings should raise awareness about antibiotic resistance in hospitalized patients in Iran. Clinicians should exercise caution in prescribing antibiotics, especially in cases of human infections. PMID:25763199

  15. Evaluation of Risk Factors for Antibiotic Resistance in Patients with Nosocomial Infections Caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Sonmezer, Meliha Cagla; Ertem, Gunay; Erdinc, Fatma Sebnem; Kaya Kilic, Esra; Tulek, Necla; Adiloglu, Ali; Hatipoglu, Cigdem

    2016-01-01

    Background. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) is resistant to various antibiotics and can cause serious nosocomial infections with high morbidity and mortality. In this clinical study, we investigated the risk factors in patients who were diagnosed with P. aeruginosa-related nosocomial infection. Methods. A retrospective case control study including patients with P. aeruginosa-related nosocomial infection. Patients who were resistant to any of the six antibiotics (imipenem, meropenem, piperacillin-tazobactam, ciprofloxacin, amikacin, and ceftazidime) constituted the study group. Results. One hundred and twenty isolates were isolated. Various risk factors were detected for each antibiotic in the univariate analysis. In the multivariate analysis, previous cefazolin use was found as an independent risk factor for the development of imipenem resistance (OR = 3.33; CI 95% [1.11-10.0]; p = 0.03), whereas previous cerebrovascular attack (OR = 3.57; CI 95% [1.31-9.76]; p = 0.01) and previous meropenem use (OR = 4.13; CI 95% [1.21-14.07]; p = 0.02) were independent factors for the development of meropenem resistance. For the development of resistance to ciprofloxacin, hospitalization in the neurology intensive care unit (OR = 4.24; CI 95% [1.5-11.98]; p = 0.006) and mechanical ventilator application (OR = 11.7; CI 95% [2.24-61.45]; p = 0.004) were independent risk factors. Conclusion. The meticulous application of contact measures can decrease the rate of nosocomial infections. PMID:27656220

  16. Spanish consensus on the prevention and treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bronchial infections in cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Cantón, Rafael; Máiz, Luis; Escribano, Amparo; Olveira, Casilda; Oliver, Antonio; Asensio, Oscar; Gartner, Silvia; Roma, Eva; Quintana-Gallego, Esther; Salcedo, Antonio; Girón, Rosa; Barrio, María Isabel; Pastor, María Dolores; Prados, Concepción; Martínez-Martínez, María Teresa; Barberán, José; Castón, Juan José; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Poveda, José Luis; Vázquez, Carlos; de Gracia, Javier; Solé, Amparo

    2015-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the main pathogen in bronchopulmonary infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. It can only be eradicated at early infection stages while reduction of its bacterial load is the therapeutic goal during chronic infection or exacerbations. Neonatal screening and pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic knowledge has modified the management of CF-patients. A culture based microbiological follow-up should be performed in patients with no infection with P.aeruginosa. At initial infection, inhaled colistin (0,5-2MU/tid), tobramycin (300mg/bid) or aztreonam (75mg/tid) with or without oral ciprofloxacin (15-20mg/kg/bid, 2-3weeks) are recommended. In chronic infections, treatment is based on continuous administration of colistin or with a 28-day on-off regimen with tobramycin or aztreonam. During mild-moderate exacerbations oral ciprofloxacin (2-3weeks) can be administered while serious exacerbations must be treated with intravenous combination therapy (beta-lactam with an aminoglycoside or a fluoroquinolone). Future studies will support antibiotic rotation and/or new combination therapies. Epidemiological measures are also recommended to avoid new P.aeruginosa infections and "patient-to-patient transmission" of this pathogen. PMID:25614377

  17. Is Quorum Sensing Interference a Viable Alternative to Treat Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infections?

    PubMed Central

    García-Contreras, Rodolfo

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) coordinates the expression of multiple virulence factors in Pseudomonas aeruginosa; hence its inhibition has been postulated as a new alternative to treat its infections. In particular, QS interference approaches claim that they attenuate bacterial virulence without directly decreasing bacterial growth and suggest that in vivo the immune system would control the infections. Moreover, since in vitro experiments performed in rich medium demonstrate that interfering with QS decreases the production of virulence factors without affecting bacterial growth it was assumed than in vivo therapies will minimize the selection of resistant strains. Therefore, the underlying assumptions toward an effective implementation of a successful Quorum sensing interference (QSI) therapy for treating P. aeruginosa infections are that (i) QS only exerts important effects in the regulation of virulence genes but it does not affect metabolic processes linked to growth, (ii) the expression of virulence factors is only positively regulated by QS, (iii) inhibition of virulence factors in vivo do not affect bacterial growth, (iv) the immune system of the infected patients will be able to get rid of the infections, and (v) the therapy will be effective in the strains that are actively producing the infections. Nevertheless, for QSI in P. aeruginosa, substantial experimental evidence against the validity of most of these assumptions has accumulated during the past years, suggesting that a far better understanding of its virulence and its behavior during infections is needed in order to design truly solid QSI therapeutic alternatives to combat this remarkable pathogen. PMID:27683577

  18. Spanish consensus on the prevention and treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bronchial infections in cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Cantón, Rafael; Máiz, Luis; Escribano, Amparo; Olveira, Casilda; Oliver, Antonio; Asensio, Oscar; Gartner, Silvia; Roma, Eva; Quintana-Gallego, Esther; Salcedo, Antonio; Girón, Rosa; Barrio, María Isabel; Pastor, María Dolores; Prados, Concepción; Martínez-Martínez, María Teresa; Barberán, José; Castón, Juan José; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Poveda, José Luis; Vázquez, Carlos; de Gracia, Javier; Solé, Amparo

    2015-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the main pathogen in bronchopulmonary infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. It can only be eradicated at early infection stages while reduction of its bacterial load is the therapeutic goal during chronic infection or exacerbations. Neonatal screening and pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic knowledge has modified the management of CF-patients. A culture based microbiological follow-up should be performed in patients with no infection with P.aeruginosa. At initial infection, inhaled colistin (0,5-2MU/tid), tobramycin (300mg/bid) or aztreonam (75mg/tid) with or without oral ciprofloxacin (15-20mg/kg/bid, 2-3weeks) are recommended. In chronic infections, treatment is based on continuous administration of colistin or with a 28-day on-off regimen with tobramycin or aztreonam. During mild-moderate exacerbations oral ciprofloxacin (2-3weeks) can be administered while serious exacerbations must be treated with intravenous combination therapy (beta-lactam with an aminoglycoside or a fluoroquinolone). Future studies will support antibiotic rotation and/or new combination therapies. Epidemiological measures are also recommended to avoid new P.aeruginosa infections and "patient-to-patient transmission" of this pathogen.

  19. Is Quorum Sensing Interference a Viable Alternative to Treat Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infections?

    PubMed

    García-Contreras, Rodolfo

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) coordinates the expression of multiple virulence factors in Pseudomonas aeruginosa; hence its inhibition has been postulated as a new alternative to treat its infections. In particular, QS interference approaches claim that they attenuate bacterial virulence without directly decreasing bacterial growth and suggest that in vivo the immune system would control the infections. Moreover, since in vitro experiments performed in rich medium demonstrate that interfering with QS decreases the production of virulence factors without affecting bacterial growth it was assumed than in vivo therapies will minimize the selection of resistant strains. Therefore, the underlying assumptions toward an effective implementation of a successful Quorum sensing interference (QSI) therapy for treating P. aeruginosa infections are that (i) QS only exerts important effects in the regulation of virulence genes but it does not affect metabolic processes linked to growth, (ii) the expression of virulence factors is only positively regulated by QS, (iii) inhibition of virulence factors in vivo do not affect bacterial growth, (iv) the immune system of the infected patients will be able to get rid of the infections, and (v) the therapy will be effective in the strains that are actively producing the infections. Nevertheless, for QSI in P. aeruginosa, substantial experimental evidence against the validity of most of these assumptions has accumulated during the past years, suggesting that a far better understanding of its virulence and its behavior during infections is needed in order to design truly solid QSI therapeutic alternatives to combat this remarkable pathogen.

  20. Intrinsic and environmental mutagenesis drive diversification and persistence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in chronic lung infections.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Rojas, Alexandro; Oliver, Antonio; Blázquez, Jesús

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a versatile opportunistic pathogen causing a wide variety of hospital-acquired acute infections in immunocompromised patients as well as chronic respiratory infections in patients suffering from cystic fibrosis or other chronic respiratory diseases. Several traits contribute to its ability to colonize and persist in the lungs of chronically infected patients, including development of high resistance to antimicrobials and hypermutability, biofilm growth, and alginate hyperproduction, or a customized pathogenicity, which may include the loss of classical virulence factors and metabolic changes. Here we argue that a combination of both intrinsic and environmental mutagenesis leads to a high number of mutant variants in the population. The conducive environment then triggers a positive feedback loop leading to adaptation and persistence of P. aeruginosa, rendering these chronic infections almost impossible to eradicate. PMID:22080096

  1. Pulmonary chondroid hamartoma with nontuberculous mycobacterial infection: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong Chul; Moon, Jin Chang; Gang, Su Jin; Park, Seung Yong; Kim, So Ri

    2015-04-01

    Solitary pulmonary nodules (SPNs) can be manifested in a variety of disorders including neoplasms, infection, inflammation, and vascular or congenital abnormalities. In addition, they are often accompanied with other pulmonary pathologic lesions such as consolidations and several pulmonary disorders present as similar pulmonary nodular lesions simultaneously. Diagnostic workup is important for these SPNs; however, many physicians often miss the second diagnosis for multiple pulmonary lesions with SPNs due to lack of clinical suspicion that each pulmonary nodule or pathologic lesion can have each other's diagnosis. Herein, we report 2 cases of coexistence of pulmonary chondroid hamartoma with nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) infection presenting as pulmonary nodules and multiple consolidative lesions. A 60-year-old man was admitted for the evaluation of multifocal pulmonary lesions including SPN with chronic exertional dyspnea. Multiple lung tissues were obtained from each lesion through percutaneous transthoracic needle biopsy (PTNB). At the same time, bacteriologic examination was performed using respiratory samples obtained by bronchoscopy. Based on pathologic and microbiologic results, the patient diagnosed as pulmonary chondroid hamartoma with pulmonary NTM infectious disease. In addition, a 56-year-old woman visited for the evaluation of a small SPN. The SPN was resected surgically for the pathologic examination and turned out to be pulmonary chondroid hamartoma. Interestingly, the diagnostic workup revealed that the patient had Lady Windermere syndrome which is one of features for Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) pulmonary disease. Both patients were treated with the standard antibiotics against MAC as recommended by the ATS/IDSA guideline. This is the first report of 2 patients, as far as we know, that chondroid hamartoma and NTM disease develop simultaneously in the lung. This report emphasizes that physicians should endeavor to confirm the individual

  2. Neurotrophic and neuroimmune responses to early-life Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in rat lungs.

    PubMed

    Cardenas, Silvia; Scuri, Mario; Samsell, Lennie; Ducatman, Barbara; Bejarano, Pablo; Auais, Alexander; Doud, Melissa; Mathee, Kalai; Piedimonte, Giovanni

    2010-09-01

    Early-life respiratory infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa is common in children with cystic fibrosis or immune deficits. Although many of its clinical manifestations involve neural reflexes, little information is available on the peripheral nervous system of infected airways. This study sought to determine whether early-life infection triggers a neurogenic-mediated immunoinflammatory response, the mechanisms of this response, and its relationship with other immunoinflammatory pathways. Weanling and adult rats were inoculated with suspensions containing P. aeruginosa (PAO1) coated on alginate microspheres suspended in Tris-CaCl(2) buffer. Five days after infection, rats were injected with capsaicin to stimulate nociceptive nerves in the airway mucosa, and microvascular permeability was measured using Evans blue as a tracer. PAO1 increased neurogenic inflammation in the extra- and intrapulmonary compartments of weanlings but not in adults. The mechanism involves selective overexpression of NGF, which is critical for the local increase in microvascular permeability and for the infiltration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes into infected lung parenchyma. These effects are mediated in part by induction of downstream inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, especially IL-1beta, IL-18, and leptin. Our data suggest that neurogenic-mediated immunoinflammatory mechanisms play important roles in airway inflammation and hyperreactivity associated with P. aeruginosa when infection occurs early in life. PMID:20543002

  3. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy on drug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa-induced infection. An in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Maria C E; Prates, Renato A; Kato, Ilka T; Núñez, Silvia C; Courrol, Lília C; Ribeiro, Martha S

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is considered one of the most important pathogens that represent life-threatening risk in nosocomial environments, mainly in patients with severe burns. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) has been effective to kill bacteria. The purpose of this study was to develop a burn wound and bloodstream infection model and verify aPDT effects on it. In vitro, we tested two wavelengths (blue and red LEDs) on a clinical isolate of P. aeruginosa strain with resistance to multiple antibiotics using HB:La(+3) as photosensitizer. Verapamil(®) associated to aPDT was also studied. In vivo, P. aeruginosa-infected burned mice were submitted to aPDT. Bacterial counting was performed on local infection and bloodstream. Survival time of animals was also monitored. In this study, aPDT was effective to reduce P. aeruginosa in vitro. In addition, Verapamil(®) assay showed that HB:La(+3) is not recognized by ATP-binding cassete (ABC) efflux pump mechanism. In the in vivo study, aPDT was able to reduce bacterial load in burn wounds, delay bacteremia and keep the bacterial levels in blood 2-3 logs lower compared with an untreated group. Mice survival was increased on 24 h. Thus, this result suggests that aPDT may also be a novel prophylactic treatment in the care of burned patients. PMID:22404212

  4. Incidence Rate for Hantavirus Infections without Pulmonary Syndrome, Panama

    PubMed Central

    Armien, Blas; Pascale, Juan M.; Munoz, Carlos; Lee, Sang-Joon; Choi, Kook L.; Avila, Mario; Broce, Candida; Armien, Anibal G.; Gracia, Fernando; Hjelle, Brian

    2011-01-01

    During 2001–2007, to determine incidence of all hantavirus infections, including those without pulmonary syndrome, in western Panama, we conducted 11 communitywide surveys. Among 1,129 persons, antibody prevalence was 16.5%–60.4%. Repeat surveys of 476 found that patients who seroconverted outnumbered patients with hantavirus pulmonary syndrome by 14 to 1. PMID:22000376

  5. Lactic acid bacteria protect human intestinal epithelial cells from Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections.

    PubMed

    Affhan, S; Dachang, W; Xin, Y; Shang, D

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are opportunistic pathogens that cause nosocomial and food-borne infections. They promote intestinal diseases. Gastrointestinal colonization by S. aureus and P. aeruginosa has rarely been researched. These organisms spread to extra gastrointestinal niches, resulting in increasingly progressive infections. Lactic acid bacteria are Gram-positive bacteria that produce lactic acid as the major end-product of carbohydrate fermentation. These bacteria inhibit pathogen colonization and modulate the host immune response. This study aimed to investigate the effects of Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus rhamnosus on enteric infections caused by the paradigmatic human pathogens S. aureus ATCC25923 and P. aeruginosa ATCC27853. The effect of whole cells and neutralized cell-free supernatant (CFS) of the lactobacilli on LoVo human carcinoma enterocyte (ATCC CCL-229) infection was analyzed by co-exposure, pre-exposure, and post-exposure studies. Simultaneous application of whole cells and CFS of the lactobacilli significantly eradicated enterocyte infection (P < 0.05); however, this effect was not seen when the whole cells and CFS were added after or prior to the infection (P > 0.05). This result could be attributed to interference by extracellular polymeric substances and cell surface hydrophobicity, which resulted in the development of a pathogen that did not form colonies. Furthermore, results of the plate count and LIVE/ DEAD BacLight bacterial viability staining attributed this inhibition to a non-bacteriocin-like substance, which acted independently of organic acid and H2O2 production. Based on these results, the cell-free supernatant derived from lactobacilli was concluded to restrain the development of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa enteric infections. PMID:26681052

  6. Gallium maltolate treatment eradicates Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in thermally injured mice.

    PubMed

    DeLeon, Katrina; Balldin, Fredrik; Watters, Chase; Hamood, Abdul; Griswold, John; Sreedharan, Sunil; Rumbaugh, Kendra P

    2009-04-01

    Gallium (Ga) is a semimetallic element that has demonstrated therapeutic and diagnostic-imaging potential in a number of disease settings, including cancer and infectious diseases. Gallium's biological actions stem from its ionic radius being almost the same as that of ferric iron (Fe(3+)), whereby it can replace iron (Fe) in Fe(3+)-dependent biological systems, such as bacterial and mammalian Fe transporters and Fe(3+)-containing enzymes. Unlike Fe(3+), ionic gallium (Ga(3+)) cannot be reduced, and when incorporated, it inactivates Fe(3+)-dependent reduction and oxidation processes that are necessary for bacterial and mammalian cell proliferation. Most pathogenic bacteria require Fe for growth and function, and the availability of Fe in the host or environment can greatly enhance virulence. We examined whether gallium maltolate (GaM), a novel formulation of Ga, had antibacterial activity in a thermally injured acute infection mouse model. Dose-response studies indicated that a GaM dose as low as 25 mg/kg of body weight delivered subcutaneously was sufficient to provide 100% survival in a lethal P. aeruginosa-infected thermally injured mouse model. Mice treated with 100 mg/kg GaM had undetectable levels of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in their wounds, livers, and spleens, while the wounds of untreated mice were colonized with over 10(8) P. aeruginosa CFU/g of tissue and their livers and spleens were colonized with over 10(5) P. aeruginosa CFU/g of tissue. GaM also significantly reduced the colonization of Staphylococcus aureus and Acinetobacter baumannii in the wounds of thermally injured mice. Furthermore, GaM was also therapeutically effective in preventing preestablished P. aeruginosa infections at the site of the injury from spreading systemically. Taken together, our data suggest that GaM is potentially a novel antibacterial agent for the prevention and treatment of wound infections following thermal injury. PMID:19188381

  7. Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection-induced chronic bronchitis and emphysematous changes in CCSP-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Takemasa; Fujita, Masaki; Hirano, Ryosuke; Uchino, Junji; Tajiri, Yukari; Fukuyama, Satoru; Morimoto, Yasuo; Watanabe, Kentaro

    2016-01-01

    The club cell secretory protein (CCSP) is a regulator of lung inflammation following acute respiratory infection or lung injury. Recently, the relationship between CCSP and COPD has been reported. Since COPD results from an abnormal inflammatory response, we hypothesized that CCSP could have a protective role against chronic inflammation-induced lung damage. To address this issue, the pathophysiology of chronic lung inflammation induced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in CCSP-deficient mice was determined. A tube of 5 mm in length was soaked in a fluid containing P. aeruginosa (PAO01 strain) for 1 week and inserted into the trachea of CCSP-deficient mice. One week later, P. aeruginosa was administered into the trachea. Five weeks after insertion of tube, the mice were sacrificed. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluids were collected to determine the bacterial growth, and the lung histology and physiology were also examined. P. aeruginosa was continuously detected in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids during the study. Neutrophils were increased in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluids from the CCSP-deficient mice in comparison to wild-type mice. A histological study demonstrated chronic inflammation around bronchus, serious bronchial stenosis, and alveolar enlargement in the CCSP-deficient mice. The lung physiology study demonstrated an increase in the lung compliance of the CCSP-deficient mice. Chronic P. aeruginosa inflammation resulted in chronic bronchitis and emphysematous changes in the CCSP-deficient mice. CCSP could play an important role in protecting the host from the chronic inflammation-induced lung damage. PMID:27703342

  8. Mimicking the host and its microenvironment in vitro for studying mucosal infections by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Crabbé, Aurélie; Ledesma, Maria A.; Nickerson, Cheryl A.

    2014-01-01

    Why is a healthy person protected from Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections, while individuals with cystic fibrosis or damaged epithelium are particularly susceptible to this opportunistic pathogen? In order to address this question, it is essential to thoroughly understand the dynamic interplay between the host microenvironment and P. aeruginosa. Therefore, using modeI systems that represent key aspects of human mucosal tissues in health and disease allows recreating in vivo host-pathogen interactions in a physiologically relevant manner. In this review, we discuss how factors of mucosal tissues, such as apical-basolateral polarity, junctional complexes, extracellular matrix proteins, mucus, multicellular complexity (including indigenous microbiota), and other physicochemical factors affect P. aeruginosa pathogenesis and are thus important to mimic in vitro. We highlight in vitro cell and tissue culture model systems of increasing complexity that have been used over the past 35 years to study the infectious disease process of P. aeruginosa, mainly focusing on lung models, and their respective advantages and limitations. Continued improvements of in vitro models based on our expanding knowledge of host microenvironmental factors that participate in P. aeruginosa pathogenesis will help advance fundamental understanding of pathogenic mechanisms and increase the translational potential of research findings from bench to the patient’s bedside. PMID:24737619

  9. Phase II studies of nebulised Arikace in CF patients with Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection

    PubMed Central

    Clancy, J P; Dupont, L; Konstan, M W; Billings, J; Fustik, S; Goss, C H; Lymp, J; Minic, P; Quittner, A L; Rubenstein, R C; Young, K R; Saiman, L; Burns, J L; Govan, J R W; Ramsey, B; Gupta, R

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Arikace is a liposomal amikacin preparation for aerosol delivery with potent Pseudomonas aeruginosa killing and prolonged lung deposition. Objectives To examine the safety and efficacy of 28 days of once-daily Arikace in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients chronically infected with P aeruginosa. Methods 105 subjects were evaluated in double-blind, placebo-controlled studies. Subjects were randomised to once-daily Arikace (70, 140, 280 and 560 mg; n=7, 5, 21 and 36 subjects) or placebo (n=36) for 28 days. Primary outcomes included safety and tolerability. Secondary outcomes included lung function (forced expiratory volume at one second (FEV1)), P aeruginosa density in sputum, and the Cystic Fibrosis Quality of Life Questionnaire—Revised (CFQ-R). Results The adverse event profile was similar among Arikace and placebo subjects. The relative change in FEV1 was higher in the 560 mg dose group at day 28 (p=0.033) and at day 56 (28 days post-treatment, 0.093L±0.203 vs −0.032L±0.119; p=0.003) versus placebo. Sputum P aeruginosa density decreased >1 log in the 560 mg group versus placebo (days 14, 28 and 35; p=0.021). The Respiratory Domain of the CFQ-R increased by the Minimal Clinically Important Difference (MCID) in 67% of Arikace subjects (560 mg) versus 36% of placebo (p=0.006), and correlated with FEV1 improvements at days 14, 28 and 42 (p<0.05). An open-label extension (560 mg Arikace) for 28 days followed by 56 days off over six cycles confirmed durable improvements in lung function and sputum P aeruginosa density (n=49). Conclusions Once-daily Arikace demonstrated acute tolerability, safety, biologic activity and efficacy in patients with CF with P aeruginosa infection. PMID:23749840

  10. Exhaled breath hydrogen cyanide as a marker of early Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in children with cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Belcher, John; Jones, Andrew M.; Smith, David; Smyth, Alan R.; Southern, Kevin W.; Španěl, Patrik; Webb, A. Kevin; Lenney, Warren

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen cyanide is readily detected in the headspace above Pseudomonas aeruginosa cultures and in the breath of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with chronic (P. aeruginosa) infection. We investigated if exhaled breath HCN is an early marker of P. aeruginosa infection. 233 children with CF who were free from P. aeruginosa infection were followed for 2 years. Their median (interquartile range) age was 8.0 (5.0–12.2) years. At each study visit, an exhaled breath sample was collected for hydrogen cyanide analysis. In total, 2055 breath samples were analysed. At the end of the study, the hydrogen cyanide concentrations were compared to the results of routine microbiology surveillance. P. aeruginosa was isolated from 71 children during the study with an incidence (95% CI) of 0.19 (0.15–0.23) cases per patient-year. Using a random-effects logistic model, the estimated odds ratio (95% CI) was 3.1 (2.6–3.6), which showed that for a 1- ppbv increase in exhaled breath hydrogen cyanide, we expected a 212% increase in the odds of P. aeruginosa infection. The sensitivity and specificity were estimated at 33% and 99%, respectively. Exhaled breath hydrogen cyanide is a specific biomarker of new P. aeruginosa infection in children with CF. Its low sensitivity means that at present, hydrogen cyanide cannot be used as a screening test for this infection. PMID:27730156

  11. Increased susceptibility to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection under hindlimb-unloading conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aviles, Hernan; Belay, Tesfaye; Fountain, Kimberly; Vance, Monique; Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    2003-01-01

    It has been reported that spaceflight conditions alter the immune system and resistance to infection [Belay T, Aviles H, Vance M, Fountain K, and Sonnenfeld G. J Allergy Clin Immunol 170: 262-268, 2002; Hankins WR and Ziegelschmid JF. In: Biomedical Results of Apollo. Washington, DC: NASA, 1975, p. 43-81. (NASA Spec. Rep. SP-368)]. Ground-based models, including the hindlimb-unloading model, have become important tools for increasing understanding of how spaceflight conditions can influence physiology. The objective of the present study was to determine the effect of hindlimb unloading on the susceptibility of mice to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. Hindlimb-unloaded and control mice were subcutaneously infected with 1 LD50 of P. aeruginosa. Survival, bacterial organ load, and antibody and corticosterone levels were compared among the groups. Hindlimb unloading had detrimental effects for infected mice. Animals in the hindlimb-unloaded group, compared with controls, 1). showed significantly increased mortality and reduced time to death, 2). had increased levels of corticosterone, and 3). were much less able to clear bacteria from the organs. These results suggest that hindlimb unloading may induce the production of corticosterone, which may play a critical role in the modulation of the immune system leading to increased susceptibility to P. aeruginosa infection.

  12. Increased susceptibility to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection under hindlimb-unloading conditions.

    PubMed

    Aviles, Hernan; Belay, Tesfaye; Fountain, Kimberly; Vance, Monique; Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    2003-07-01

    It has been reported that spaceflight conditions alter the immune system and resistance to infection [Belay T, Aviles H, Vance M, Fountain K, and Sonnenfeld G. J Allergy Clin Immunol 170: 262-268, 2002; Hankins WR and Ziegelschmid JF. In: Biomedical Results of Apollo. Washington, DC: NASA, 1975, p. 43-81. (NASA Spec. Rep. SP-368)]. Ground-based models, including the hindlimb-unloading model, have become important tools for increasing understanding of how spaceflight conditions can influence physiology. The objective of the present study was to determine the effect of hindlimb unloading on the susceptibility of mice to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. Hindlimb-unloaded and control mice were subcutaneously infected with 1 LD50 of P. aeruginosa. Survival, bacterial organ load, and antibody and corticosterone levels were compared among the groups. Hindlimb unloading had detrimental effects for infected mice. Animals in the hindlimb-unloaded group, compared with controls, 1). showed significantly increased mortality and reduced time to death, 2). had increased levels of corticosterone, and 3). were much less able to clear bacteria from the organs. These results suggest that hindlimb unloading may induce the production of corticosterone, which may play a critical role in the modulation of the immune system leading to increased susceptibility to P. aeruginosa infection. PMID:12626488

  13. Prevalence of Pulmonary Infections Caused by Atypical Pathogens in non-HIV Immunocompromised Patients.

    PubMed

    Grabczak, E M; Krenke, R; Przybylski, M; Kolkowska-Lesniak, A; Chazan, R; Dzieciatkowski, T

    2016-01-01

    Although atypical bacteria are important causes of lower airway infections, data on their role in immunocompromised patients are scarce. The aim of the study was to evaluate the prevalence of atypical pulmonary infections in patients with various types of immunosuppression, and to analyze clinical characteristics of these infections. Eighty non-HIV immunocompromised patients with different underlying diseases and clinical and radiological signs of pulmonary infection were enrolled. Due to incomplete data on eight patients, 72 patients were eligible for final analysis (median age 58 years). All patients underwent fiberoptic bronchoscopy and bronchoalveolar lavage. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) fluid samples were sent for direct microscopy, cultures, and fungal antigen detection, when appropriate. Commercial qualitative amplification assay (PNEUMOTRIS oligomix Alert Kit(®)), based on nested PCR method, was used to detect specific DNA sequences of L. pneumophila, C. pneumoniae, and M. pneumoniae in BALF. There were 61 (84.7 %) patients with hematologic diseases, 3 (4.2 %) after solid organ transplantation, and 8 (11.1 %) with miscellaneous diseases affecting immune status. Specific sequences of M. pneumoniae, C. pneumoniae, and L. pneumophila DNA were found in 7 (9.7 %), 2 (2.8 %), and 0 patients, respectively. In 8 of these patients co-infections with different microorganisms were demonstrated. Co-infection with A. baumanii and P. aeruginosa was diagnosed in three patients who died. We conclude that atypical lower airway infections are uncommon in immunocompromised patients. The majority of these infections are co-infections rather than single pathogen infections. PMID:27334731

  14. Assessing phage therapy against Pseudomonas aeruginosa using a Galleria mellonella infection model.

    PubMed

    Beeton, M L; Alves, D R; Enright, M C; Jenkins, A T A

    2015-08-01

    The Galleria mellonella infection model was used to assess the in vivo efficacy of phage therapy against laboratory and clinical strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In a first series of experiments, Galleria were infected with the laboratory strain P. aeruginosa PAO1 and were treated with varying multiplicity of infection (MOI) of phages either 2h post-infection (treatment) or 2h pre-infection (prevention) via injection into the haemolymph. To address the kinetics of infection, larvae were bled over a period of 24h for quantification of bacteria and phages. Survival rates at 24h when infected with 10 cells/larvae were greater in the prevention versus treatment model (47% vs. 40%, MOI=10; 47% vs. 20%, MOI=1; and 33% vs. 7%, MOI=0.1). This pattern held true when 100 cells/larvae were used (87% vs. 20%, MOI=10; 53% vs. 13%, MOI=1; 67% vs. 7%, MOI=0.1). By 24h post-infection, phages kept bacterial cell numbers in the haemolymph 1000-fold lower than in the non-treated group. In a second series of experiments using clinical strains to further validate the prevention model, phages protected Galleria when infected with both a bacteraemia (0% vs. 85%) and a cystic fibrosis (80% vs. 100%) isolate. Therefore, this study validates the use of G. mellonella as a simple, robust and cost-effective model for initial in vivo examination of P. aeruginosa-targeted phage therapy, which may be applied to other pathogens with similarly low infective doses. PMID:26100212

  15. Primary pulmonary botryomycosis: a bacterial lung infection mimicking lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Ariza-Prota, M A; Pando-Sandoval, A; García-Clemente, M; Jiménez, H; Álvarez-Álvarez, C; Casan-Clara, P

    2013-07-01

    Primary pulmonary botryomycosis, or bacterial pseudomycosis, is an unusual bacterial infection characterised by the formation of eosinophilic granules that resemble those of Actinomyces species infection. The diagnosis of botryomycosis is based on culture of the granules revealing gram-positive cocci or gram-negative bacilli. The bacterial pathogen most frequently found is Staphylococcus aureus. The pathobiology remains unknown. Pulmonary botryomycosis can resemble actinomycosis, tuberculosis or invasive carcinoma. Definitive treatment requires a combination of both surgical debridement and long-term antimicrobial therapy. We present a case of primary pulmonary botryomycosis in an immunocompetent patient.

  16. Effects of Chinese medicinal herbs on a rat model of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection.

    PubMed

    Song, Z; Johansen, H K; Moser, C; Høiby, N

    1996-05-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of two kinds of Chinese medicinal herbs, Isatis tinctoria L (ITL) and Daphne giraldii Nitsche (DGN), on a rat model of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection mimicking cystic fibrosis (CF). Compared to the control group, both drugs were able to reduce the incidence of lung abscess (p < 0.05) and to decrease the severity of the macroscopic pathology in lungs (p < 0.05). In the great majority of the rats, the herbs altered the inflammatory response in the lungs from an acute type inflammation, dominated by polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN), to a chronic type inflammation, dominated by mononuclear leukocytes (MN). DGN also improved the clearance of P. aeruginosa from the lungs (p < 0.03) compared with the control group. There were no significant differences between the control group and the two herbal groups with regard to serum IgG and IgA anti-P. aeruginosa sonicate antibodies. However, the IgM concentration in the ITL group was significantly lower than in the control group (p < 0.03). These results suggest that the two medicinal herbs might be helpful to CF patients with chronic P. aeruginosa lung infection, DGN being the most favorable. PMID:8703440

  17. Role of small colony variants in persistence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in cystic fibrosis lungs

    PubMed Central

    Malone, Jacob G

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that predominates during the later stages of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung infections. Over many years of chronic lung colonization, P. aeruginosa undergoes extensive adaptation to the lung environment, evolving both toward a persistent, low virulence state and simultaneously diversifying to produce a number of phenotypically distinct morphs. These lung-adapted P. aeruginosa strains include the small colony variants (SCVs), small, autoaggregative isolates that show enhanced biofilm formation, strong attachment to surfaces, and increased production of exopolysaccharides. Their appearance in the sputum of CF patients correlates with increased resistance to antibiotics, poor lung function, and prolonged persistence of infection, increasing their relevance as a subject for clinical investigation. The evolution of SCVs in the CF lung is associated with overproduction of the ubiquitous bacterial signaling molecule cyclic-di-GMP, with increased cyclic-di-GMP levels shown to be responsible for the SCV phenotype in a number of different CF lung isolates. Here, we review the current state of research in clinical P. aeruginosa SCVs. We will discuss the phenotypic characteristics underpinning the SCV morphotype, the clinical implications of lung colonization with SCVs, and the molecular basis and clinical evolution of the SCV phenotype in the CF lung environment. PMID:26251621

  18. Phenotypes selected during chronic lung infection in cystic fibrosis patients: implications for the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm infections.

    PubMed

    Ciofu, Oana; Mandsberg, Lotte F; Wang, Hengzhuang; Høiby, Niels

    2012-07-01

    During chronic lung infection of patients with cystic fibrosis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa can survive for long periods of time under the challenging selective pressure imposed by the immune system and antibiotic treatment as a result of its biofilm mode of growth and adaptive evolution mediated by genetic variation. Mucoidy, hypermutability and acquirement of mutational antibiotic resistance are important adaptive phenotypes that are selected during chronic P. aeruginosa infection. This review dicsusses the role played by these phenotypes for the tolerance of biofilms to antibiotics and show that mucoidy and hypermutability change the architecture of in vitro formed biofilms and lead to increase tolerance to antibiotics. Production of high levels of beta-lactamase impairs penetration of beta-lactam antibiotics due to inactivation of the antibiotic. In conclusion, these data underline the importance of biofilm prevention strategies by early aggressive antibiotic prophylaxis or therapy before phenotypic diversification during chronic lung infection of patients with cystic fibrosis.

  19. In-Vivo Expression Profiling of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infections Reveals Niche-Specific and Strain-Independent Transcriptional Programs

    PubMed Central

    Bielecki, Piotr; Puchałka, Jacek; Wos-Oxley, Melissa L.; Loessner, Holger; Glik, Justyna; Kawecki, Marek; Nowak, Mariusz; Tümmler, Burkhard; Weiss, Siegfried; dos Santos, Vítor A. P. Martins

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a threatening, opportunistic pathogen causing disease in immunocompromised individuals. The hallmark of P. aeruginosa virulence is its multi-factorial and combinatorial nature. It renders such bacteria infectious for many organisms and it is often resistant to antibiotics. To gain insights into the physiology of P. aeruginosa during infection, we assessed the transcriptional programs of three different P. aeruginosa strains directly after isolation from burn wounds of humans. We compared the programs to those of the same strains using two infection models: a plant model, which consisted of the infection of the midrib of lettuce leaves, and a murine tumor model, which was obtained by infection of mice with an induced tumor in the abdomen. All control conditions of P. aeruginosa cells growing in suspension and as a biofilm were added to the analysis. We found that these different P. aeruginosa strains express a pool of distinct genetic traits that are activated under particular infection conditions regardless of their genetic variability. The knowledge herein generated will advance our understanding of P. aeruginosa virulence and provide valuable cues for the definition of prospective targets to develop novel intervention strategies. PMID:21931663

  20. In-vivo expression profiling of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections reveals niche-specific and strain-independent transcriptional programs.

    PubMed

    Bielecki, Piotr; Puchałka, Jacek; Wos-Oxley, Melissa L; Loessner, Holger; Glik, Justyna; Kawecki, Marek; Nowak, Mariusz; Tümmler, Burkhard; Weiss, Siegfried; dos Santos, Vítor A P Martins

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a threatening, opportunistic pathogen causing disease in immunocompromised individuals. The hallmark of P. aeruginosa virulence is its multi-factorial and combinatorial nature. It renders such bacteria infectious for many organisms and it is often resistant to antibiotics. To gain insights into the physiology of P. aeruginosa during infection, we assessed the transcriptional programs of three different P. aeruginosa strains directly after isolation from burn wounds of humans. We compared the programs to those of the same strains using two infection models: a plant model, which consisted of the infection of the midrib of lettuce leaves, and a murine tumor model, which was obtained by infection of mice with an induced tumor in the abdomen. All control conditions of P. aeruginosa cells growing in suspension and as a biofilm were added to the analysis. We found that these different P. aeruginosa strains express a pool of distinct genetic traits that are activated under particular infection conditions regardless of their genetic variability. The knowledge herein generated will advance our understanding of P. aeruginosa virulence and provide valuable cues for the definition of prospective targets to develop novel intervention strategies.

  1. Interactions of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus USA300 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in polymicrobial wound infection.

    PubMed

    Pastar, Irena; Nusbaum, Aron G; Gil, Joel; Patel, Shailee B; Chen, Juan; Valdes, Jose; Stojadinovic, Olivera; Plano, Lisa R; Tomic-Canic, Marjana; Davis, Stephen C

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the pathology resulting from Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa polymicrobial wound infections is of great importance due to their ubiquitous nature, increasing prevalence, growing resistance to antimicrobial agents, and ability to delay healing. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus USA300 is the leading cause of community-associated bacterial infections resulting in increased morbidity and mortality. We utilized a well-established porcine partial thickness wound healing model to study the synergistic effects of USA300 and P. aeruginosa on wound healing. Wound re-epithelialization was significantly delayed by mixed-species biofilms through suppression of keratinocyte growth factor 1. Pseudomonas showed an inhibitory effect on USA300 growth in vitro while both species co-existed in cutaneous wounds in vivo. Polymicrobial wound infection in the presence of P. aeruginosa resulted in induced expression of USA300 virulence factors Panton-Valentine leukocidin and α-hemolysin. These results provide evidence for the interaction of bacterial species within mixed-species biofilms in vivo and for the first time, the contribution of virulence factors to the severity of polymicrobial wound infections.

  2. Les infections à Pseudomonas aeruginosa au service des maladies infectieuses du CHU YO, Burkina Faso: à propos deux cas

    PubMed Central

    Mamoudou, Savadogo; Lassina, Dao; Fla, Koueta

    2015-01-01

    Nous rapportons deux cas d'infection à Pseudomonas aeruginosa: un cas de méningite et un cas d'infection urinaire. Les auteurs rappellent qu’à côté des étiologies classiques des méningites et des infections urinaires, des germes résistants comme Pseudomonas aeruginosa peuvent être responsables d'infections à localisation méningées et urinaires et dont il faut connaître pour une bonne prise en charge. Le traitement de ces infections requiert un antibiogramme au regard de la grande capacité de résistance de Pseudomonas aeruginosa en milieu hospitalier. La limitation des gestes invasifs et l'application rigoureuse des mesures de prévention des infections en milieu hospitalier contribueront à lutter efficacement contre ces infections en milieu de soins. PMID:26491521

  3. Evaluation of Risk Factors for Antibiotic Resistance in Patients with Nosocomial Infections Caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Ertem, Gunay; Erdinc, Fatma Sebnem; Kaya Kilic, Esra; Adiloglu, Ali; Hatipoglu, Cigdem

    2016-01-01

    Background. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) is resistant to various antibiotics and can cause serious nosocomial infections with high morbidity and mortality. In this clinical study, we investigated the risk factors in patients who were diagnosed with P. aeruginosa-related nosocomial infection. Methods. A retrospective case control study including patients with P. aeruginosa-related nosocomial infection. Patients who were resistant to any of the six antibiotics (imipenem, meropenem, piperacillin-tazobactam, ciprofloxacin, amikacin, and ceftazidime) constituted the study group. Results. One hundred and twenty isolates were isolated. Various risk factors were detected for each antibiotic in the univariate analysis. In the multivariate analysis, previous cefazolin use was found as an independent risk factor for the development of imipenem resistance (OR = 3.33; CI 95% [1.11–10.0]; p = 0.03), whereas previous cerebrovascular attack (OR = 3.57; CI 95% [1.31–9.76]; p = 0.01) and previous meropenem use (OR = 4.13; CI 95% [1.21–14.07]; p = 0.02) were independent factors for the development of meropenem resistance. For the development of resistance to ciprofloxacin, hospitalization in the neurology intensive care unit (OR = 4.24; CI 95% [1.5–11.98]; p = 0.006) and mechanical ventilator application (OR = 11.7; CI 95% [2.24–61.45]; p = 0.004) were independent risk factors. Conclusion. The meticulous application of contact measures can decrease the rate of nosocomial infections. PMID:27656220

  4. Evaluation of Risk Factors for Antibiotic Resistance in Patients with Nosocomial Infections Caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Ertem, Gunay; Erdinc, Fatma Sebnem; Kaya Kilic, Esra; Adiloglu, Ali; Hatipoglu, Cigdem

    2016-01-01

    Background. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) is resistant to various antibiotics and can cause serious nosocomial infections with high morbidity and mortality. In this clinical study, we investigated the risk factors in patients who were diagnosed with P. aeruginosa-related nosocomial infection. Methods. A retrospective case control study including patients with P. aeruginosa-related nosocomial infection. Patients who were resistant to any of the six antibiotics (imipenem, meropenem, piperacillin-tazobactam, ciprofloxacin, amikacin, and ceftazidime) constituted the study group. Results. One hundred and twenty isolates were isolated. Various risk factors were detected for each antibiotic in the univariate analysis. In the multivariate analysis, previous cefazolin use was found as an independent risk factor for the development of imipenem resistance (OR = 3.33; CI 95% [1.11–10.0]; p = 0.03), whereas previous cerebrovascular attack (OR = 3.57; CI 95% [1.31–9.76]; p = 0.01) and previous meropenem use (OR = 4.13; CI 95% [1.21–14.07]; p = 0.02) were independent factors for the development of meropenem resistance. For the development of resistance to ciprofloxacin, hospitalization in the neurology intensive care unit (OR = 4.24; CI 95% [1.5–11.98]; p = 0.006) and mechanical ventilator application (OR = 11.7; CI 95% [2.24–61.45]; p = 0.004) were independent risk factors. Conclusion. The meticulous application of contact measures can decrease the rate of nosocomial infections.

  5. Flagellin induces myeloid-derived suppressor cells: implications for Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in cystic fibrosis lung disease.

    PubMed

    Rieber, Nikolaus; Brand, Alina; Hector, Andreas; Graepler-Mainka, Ute; Ost, Michael; Schäfer, Iris; Wecker, Irene; Neri, Davide; Wirth, Andreas; Mays, Lauren; Zundel, Sabine; Fuchs, Jörg; Handgretinger, Rupert; Stern, Martin; Hogardt, Michael; Döring, Gerd; Riethmüller, Joachim; Kormann, Michael; Hartl, Dominik

    2013-02-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa persists in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and drives CF lung disease progression. P. aeruginosa potently activates the innate immune system, mainly mediated through pathogen-associated molecular patterns, such as flagellin. However, the host is unable to eradicate this flagellated bacterium efficiently. The underlying immunological mechanisms are incompletely understood. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are innate immune cells generated in cancer and proinflammatory microenvironments and are capable of suppressing T cell responses. We hypothesized that P. aeruginosa induces MDSCs to escape T cell immunity. In this article, we demonstrate that granulocytic MDSCs accumulate in CF patients chronically infected with P. aeruginosa and correlate with CF lung disease activity. Flagellated P. aeruginosa culture supernatants induced the generation of MDSCs, an effect that was 1) dose-dependently mimicked by purified flagellin protein, 2) significantly reduced using flagellin-deficient P. aeruginosa bacteria, and 3) corresponded to TLR5 expression on MDSCs in vitro and in vivo. Both purified flagellin and flagellated P. aeruginosa induced an MDSC phenotype distinct from that of the previously described MDSC-inducing cytokine GM-CSF, characterized by an upregulation of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 on the surface of MDSCs. Functionally, P. aeruginosa-infected CF patient ex vivo-isolated as well as flagellin or P. aeruginosa in vitro-generated MDSCs efficiently suppressed polyclonal T cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner and modulated Th17 responses. These studies demonstrate that flagellin induces the generation of MDSCs and suggest that P. aeruginosa uses this mechanism to undermine T cell-mediated host defense in CF and other P. aeruginosa-associated chronic lung diseases. PMID:23277486

  6. Comparison of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome between monomicrobial and polymicrobial Pseudomonas aeruginosa nosocomial bloodstream infections

    PubMed Central

    Marra, Alexandre R; Bearman, Gonzalo ML; Wenzel, Richard P; Edmond, Michael B

    2005-01-01

    Background Some studies of nosocomial bloodstream infection (nBSI) have demonstrated a higher mortality for polymicrobial bacteremia when compared to monomicrobial nBSI. The purpose of this study was to compare differences in systemic inflammatory response and mortality between monomicrobial and polymicrobial nBSI with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Methods We performed a historical cohort study on 98 adults with P. aeruginosa (Pa) nBSI. SIRS scores were determined 2 days prior to the first positive blood culture through 14 days afterwards. Monomicrobial (n = 77) and polymicrobial BSIs (n = 21) were compared. Results 78.6% of BSIs were caused by monomicrobial P. aeruginosa infection (MPa) and 21.4% by polymicrobial P. aeruginosa infection (PPa). Median APACHE II score on the day of BSI was 22 for MPa and 23 for PPa BSIs. Septic shock occurred in 33.3% of PPa and in 39.0% of MPa (p = 0.64). Progression to septic shock was associated with death more frequently in PPa (OR 38.5, CI95 2.9–508.5) than MPa (OR 4.5, CI95 1.7–12.1). Maximal SIR (severe sepsis, septic shock or death) was seen on day 0 for PPa BSI vs. day 1 for MPa. No significant difference was noted in the incidence of organ failure, 7-day or overall mortality between the two groups. Univariate analysis revealed that APACHE II score ≥20 at BSI onset, Charlson weighted comorbidity index ≥3, burn injury and respiratory, cardiovascular, renal and hematologic failure were associated with death, while age, malignant disease, diabetes mellitus, hepatic failure, gastrointestinal complications, inappropriate antimicrobial therapy, infection with imipenem resistant P. aeruginosa and polymicrobial nBSI were not. Multivariate analysis revealed that hematologic failure (p < 0.001) and APACHE II score ≥20 at BSI onset (p = 0.005) independently predicted death. Conclusion In this historical cohort study of nBSI with P. aeruginosa, the incidence of septic shock and organ failure was high in both groups. Additionally

  7. Opportunistic Pulmonary Bordetella hinzii Infection after Avian Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Dupin, Clarisse; Bénézit, François; Goret, Julien; Piau, Caroline; Jouneau, Stéphane; Guillot, Sophie; Mégraud, Francis; Kayal, Samer; Desrues, Benoit; Le Coustumier, Alain; Guiso, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    We report 2 cases of pulmonary Bordetella hinzii infection in immunodeficient patients. One of these rare cases demonstrated the potential transmission of the bacteria from an avian reservoir through occupational exposure and its persistence in humans. We establish bacteriologic management of these infections and suggest therapeutic options if needed. PMID:26584467

  8. Prevention of bloodstream infections by photodynamic inactivation of multiresistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa in burn wounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, M. C. E.; Prates, R. A.; Toffoli, D. J.; Courrol, L. C.; Ribeiro, M. S.

    2010-02-01

    Bloodstream infections are potentially life-threatening diseases. They can cause serious secondary infections, and may result in endocarditis, severe sepsis or toxic-shock syndrome. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen and one of the most important etiological factors responsible for nosocomial infections, mainly in immuno-compromissed hosts, characteristic of patients with severe burns. Its multiresistance to antibiotics produces many therapeutic problems, and for this reason, the development of an alternative method to antibiotic therapy is needed. Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) may be an effective and alternative therapeutic option to prevent bloodstream infections in patients with severe burns. In this study we report the use of PDI to prevent bloodstream infections in mice with third-degree burns. Burns were produced on the back of the animals and they were infected with 109 cfu/mL of multi-resistant (MR) P. aeruginosa. Fifteen animals were divided into 3 groups: control, PDT blue and PDT red. PDT was performed thirty minutes after bacterial inoculation using 10μM HB:La+3 and a light-emitting diode (LED) emitting at λ=460nm+/-20nm and a LED emitting at λ=645 nm+/-10nm for 120s. Blood of mice were colected at 7h, 10h, 15h, 18h and 22h pos-infection (p.i.) for bacterial counting. Control group presented 1×104 cfu/mL in bloodstream at 7h p.i. increasing to 1×106 at 22h, while mice PDT-treated did not present any bacteria at 7h; only at 22h p.i. they presented 1×104cfu/mL. These results suggest that HB:La+3 associated to blue LED or red LED is effective to delay and diminish MR P.aeruginosa bloodstream invasion in third-degree-burned mice.

  9. Study on antimicrobial potential of neem oil nanoemulsion against Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in Labeo rohita.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Prabhakar; R S, Suresh Kumar; Jerobin, Jayakumar; Thomas, John; Mukherjee, Amitava; Chandrasekaran, Natarajan

    2014-01-01

    Presence of several biochemical constituents in neem makes it an efficient antimicrobial agent for pathogenic diseases. The current investigation was aimed to assess the therapeutic potential of neem nanoemulsion as a control measure for Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in freshwater fish Labeo rohita. The median lethal concentration (LC50) for the neem oil and neem nanoemulsion was 73.9 and 160.3 mg/L, respectively. The biomarker enzymes of treated fish tissues showed a significant difference in the level of glutathione reductase, catalase, and lipid peroxidation in neem oil-treated samples than in neem nanoemulsion-treated samples at P<0.05. The results were corroborative with histopathology and ultrastructural analysis. The bacterial infection of P. aeruginosa treated using neem nanoemulsion was more effective in both in vitro and in vivo methods. Present findings suggest that neem-based nanoemulsion has negligible toxicity to Rohu fishes. This makes neem-based nanoemulsion as an efficient therapeutic agent against P. aeruginosa infection, leading to its possible usage in the aquaculture industry.

  10. Study on antimicrobial potential of neem oil nanoemulsion against Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in Labeo rohita.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Prabhakar; R S, Suresh Kumar; Jerobin, Jayakumar; Thomas, John; Mukherjee, Amitava; Chandrasekaran, Natarajan

    2014-01-01

    Presence of several biochemical constituents in neem makes it an efficient antimicrobial agent for pathogenic diseases. The current investigation was aimed to assess the therapeutic potential of neem nanoemulsion as a control measure for Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in freshwater fish Labeo rohita. The median lethal concentration (LC50) for the neem oil and neem nanoemulsion was 73.9 and 160.3 mg/L, respectively. The biomarker enzymes of treated fish tissues showed a significant difference in the level of glutathione reductase, catalase, and lipid peroxidation in neem oil-treated samples than in neem nanoemulsion-treated samples at P<0.05. The results were corroborative with histopathology and ultrastructural analysis. The bacterial infection of P. aeruginosa treated using neem nanoemulsion was more effective in both in vitro and in vivo methods. Present findings suggest that neem-based nanoemulsion has negligible toxicity to Rohu fishes. This makes neem-based nanoemulsion as an efficient therapeutic agent against P. aeruginosa infection, leading to its possible usage in the aquaculture industry. PMID:24502533

  11. Pulmonary Mycobacterium avium infection demonstrating unusual lobar caseous pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Okuzumi, Shinichi; Minematsu, Naoto; Sasaki, Mamoru; Ohsawa, Kazuma; Murakami, Marohito

    2016-09-01

    Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection is a major medical concern in Japan because of its increased prevalence and associated mortality. A common radiological feature in pulmonary MAC infection is a mixture of two basic patterns: fibrocavitary and nodular bronchiectatic; however, lobar consolidation is rare. We report an 83-year-old man with lobar caseous pneumonia caused by pulmonary MAC infection. Radiological findings were predominantly composed of dense lobar consolidation and ground-glass opacity. A diagnosis was made in accordance with the clinical and microbiological criteria set by the American Thoracic Society. A histological examination of lung specimens obtained by using a bronchoscope revealed a caseous granulomatous inflammation with an appearance of Langhans cells. The patient was treated using combined mycobacterium chemotherapy with an initial positive response for 6 months; however, the disease progressed later. We suggest that an awareness of lobar pneumonic consolidation as a rare radiological finding in pulmonary MAC infection is important. PMID:27516892

  12. Successful implementation of infection control strategies prevents P. aeruginosa transmission among cystic fibrosis patients inside the hospital

    PubMed Central

    Matt, Benedikt; Mitteregger, Dieter; Renner, Sabine; Presterl, Elisabeth; Assadian, Ojan; Diab-Elschahawi, Magda

    2014-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to characterise the epidemiology of P. aeruginosa isolated from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients at the Vienna General Hospital (VGH) by molecular genetic fingerprinting in order to understand transmission ways and to evaluate the established infection control protocols. Methods: The outpatient clinic for CF patients at the VGH cares for children and adolescents up to the age of 18 years. Among an average of 139 patients cared for at the clinic, 41 were tested positive for P. aeruginosa during the study period. Fifty P. aeruginosa isolates, obtained between August 2010 and March 2012 from routine examinations of CF patients, were subject to molecular characterization using the DiversiLab® method. Results: 42 distinguishable molecular-biological patterns were identified, 7 of which were found multiple times. 40 out of 42 genotypes were retrieved from single patients only, while two patterns were present in two patients each. Nine patients presented with two or more phenotypically diverse P. aeruginosa isolates. In five of these cases the retrieved isolates belonged to the same genotype. Conclusion: The broad genetic heterogeneity of P. aeruginosa in the studied patient population suggests that the majority of CF patients cared for at the VGH acquire P. aeruginosa from environmental sources. It may be concluded that implemented infection control guidelines have been successful in preventing nosocomial transmission of P. aeruginosa among CF patients within the VGH and patient-to-patient transmission outside the hospital. Chronic polyclonal infection/colonization was rare in the study population. PMID:25285264

  13. The Healing Effect of Licorice on Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infected Burn Wounds in Experimental Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Tanideh, Nader; Rokhsari, Pedram; Mehrabani, Davood; Mohammadi Samani, Soleiman; Sabet Sarvestani, Fatemeh; Ashraf, Mohammad Javad; Koohi Hosseinabadi, Omid; Shamsian, Shahram; Ahmadi, Nasrollah

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Burn is still one of the most devastating injuries in emergency medicine while improvements in wound healing knowledge and technology have resulted into development of new dressings. This study was undertaken to evaluate the healing effect of licorice in Pseudomonas aeruginosa infected burn wounds of experimental rat model. METHODS One hundred and twenty female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly allocated to 4 equal groups. Group A received silver sulfadiazine ointment, Group B received 10% licorice extract and Group C was considered as control group and received gel base as the base of medication. Group D did not receive any medication and just underwent burn injury. A standard 3rd degree burn wound was produced by a hot plate with similar size about 20% of total body surface area (TBSA) and at identical temperature. After 24 h of burn production, 108 colony forming units (CFU) of toxigenic strains of P. aeruginosa (PA 103) were inoculated subcutaneously into the burnt area. After 3, 7, 14, 21 and 28 days of therapy, the animals were sacrificed and burn areas were macroscopically examined and histologically evaluated. RESULTS Decrease in size of the burn wounds, in inflammation and re-epithelialization were poor in groups B-D. Infection to P. aeruginosa was still visible in groups B-D but was absent in Group A. The mean histological score, tensile strength, maximum stress, yield strength and stiffness in groups B-D were lower compared with Group A. CONCLUSION Licorice extract in 10% concentration was shown not to be effective in healing of P. aeruginosa infected burn wounds. PMID:25489532

  14. Pathogenic Phenotype and Genotype of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from Spontaneous Canine Ocular Infections

    PubMed Central

    Ledbetter, Eric C.; Mun, James J.; Kowbel, David; Fleiszig, Suzanne M. J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose This study was designed to determine whether the ability to adversely affect corneal epithelial cell health is a factor common to Pseudomonas aeruginosa keratitis strains and to assess the prevalence of each pathogenic phenotype and genotype in a canine model of naturally-acquired P. aeruginosa ocular infection. Methods P. aeruginosa ocular isolates were collected by sampling 100 dogs without disease (six isolates collected) and by sampling dogs with conjunctivitis (two isolates), endophthalmitis (one isolate), active keratitis (12 isolates), and resolved P. aeruginosa keratitis (four isolates). Phenotype was determined in vitro by quantifying corneal epithelial cell invasion by gentamicin survival assays, and cytotoxic activity by Trypan blue exclusion assays. Genotyping was performed for genes encoding the type III secreted effectors. Results The ratio of invasive to cytotoxic strains with 95% confidence intervals (CI) was 0.83 (CI, 0.42– 0.99) for conjunctival microflora isolates, 0.80 (CI, 0.54 – 0.94) for ocular infection isolates, and 1.0 (CI, 0.45–1.0) for strains isolated post-resolution of keratitis. Among ocular infection isolates, invasive and cytotoxic strains were significantly (P ≤ 0.02) associated with older and younger dogs, respectively. Visible adverse effects on epithelial cells were significantly (P ≤ 0.03) more frequent for keratitis strains (6/12) than other strains (1/13), but only three of these keratitis strains and the single non-keratitis strain possessed ExoU. Conclusions Invasive strains predominated in the dogs of this study. Only keratitis strains had visible adverse effects on epithelial cells without overt cytotoxicity, suggesting virulence strategies affecting live corneal epithelial cell health are selected for among keratitis strains. PMID:18836164

  15. Specific Resistance to Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infection in Zebrafish Is Mediated by the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Phennicie, Ryan T.; Sullivan, Matthew J.; Singer, John T.; Yoder, Jeffrey A.; Kim, Carol H.

    2010-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a genetic disease caused by recessive mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene and is associated with prevalent and chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections. Despite numerous studies that have sought to elucidate the role of CFTR in the innate immune response, the links between CFTR, innate immunity, and P. aeruginosa infection remain unclear. The present work highlights the zebrafish as a powerful model organism for human infectious disease, particularly infection by P. aeruginosa. Zebrafish embryos with reduced expression of the cftr gene (Cftr morphants) exhibited reduced respiratory burst response and directed neutrophil migration, supporting a connection between cftr and the innate immune response. Cftr morphants were infected with P. aeruginosa or other bacterial species that are commonly associated with infections in CF patients, including Burkholderia cenocepacia, Haemophilus influenzae, and Staphylococcus aureus. Intriguingly, the bacterial burden of P. aeruginosa was found to be significantly higher in zebrafish Cftr morphants than in controls, but this phenomenon was not observed with the other bacterial species. Bacterial burden in Cftr morphants infected with a P. aeruginosa ΔLasR mutant, a quorum sensing-deficient strain, was comparable to that in control fish, indicating that the regulation of virulence factors through LasR is required for enhancement of infection in the absence of Cftr. The zebrafish system provides a multitude of advantages for studying the pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa and for understanding the role that innate immune cells, such as neutrophils, play in the host response to acute bacterial infections commonly associated with cystic fibrosis. PMID:20732993

  16. Noncontact, low-frequency ultrasound as an effective therapy against Pseudomonas aeruginosa-infected biofilm wounds.

    PubMed

    Seth, Akhil K; Nguyen, Khang T; Geringer, Matthew R; Hong, Seok J; Leung, Kai P; Mustoe, Thomas A; Galiano, Robert D

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms, a critical chronic wound mediator, remain difficult to treat. Energy-based devices may potentially improve healing, but with no evidence of efficacy against biofilms. This study evaluates noncontact, low-frequency ultrasound (NLFU) in the treatment of biofilm-infected wounds. Six-millimeter dermal punch wounds in rabbit ears were inoculated with 10(7) colony-forming units of Pseudomonas aeruginosa or left as sterile controls. A biofilm was established in vivo using our published model. NLFU treatment was carried out every other day or every day, with contralateral ear wounds acting as internal, untreated controls. Wounds were harvested for several quantitative endpoints and scanning electron microscopy to evaluate the biofilm structure. The P. aeruginosa biofilm consistently impaired wound epithelialization and granulation. NLFU, both every other day and every day, improved healing and reduced bacterial counts relative to untreated controls (p < 0.05). Scanning electron microscopy confirmed a qualitative decrease in bacteria after both treatments. NLFU also reduced inflammatory cytokine expression (p < 0.05). Our study suggests that NLFU is an effective therapy against P. aeruginosa wound biofilm. This represents the first in vivo evidence of energy-based modalities' impact on wound biofilm, setting the foundation for future mechanistic studies. Continued wound care technology research is essential to improving our understanding, and treatment, of biofilm-infected chronic wounds.

  17. Multiple roles of Pseudomonas aeruginosa TBCF10839 PilY1 in motility, transport and infection

    PubMed Central

    Bohn, Yu-Sing Tammy; Brandes, Gudrun; Rakhimova, Elza; Horatzek, Sonja; Salunkhe, Prabhakar; Munder, Antje; van Barneveld, Andrea; Jordan, Doris; Bredenbruch, Florian; Häußler, Susanne; Riedel, Kathrin; Eberl, Leo; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Moser, Claus; Hoiby, Niels; Tümmler, Burkhard; Wiehlmann, Lutz

    2008-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils are the most important mammalian host defence cells against infections with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Screening of a signature tagged mutagenesis library of the non-piliated P. aeruginosa strain TBCF10839 uncovered that transposon inactivation of its pilY1 gene rendered the bacterium more resistant against killing by neutrophils than the wild type and any other of the more than 3000 tested mutants. Inactivation of pilY1 led to the loss of twitching motility in twitching-proficient wild-type PA14 and PAO1 strains, predisposed to autolysis and impaired the secretion of quinolones and pyocyanin, but on the other hand promoted growth in stationary phase and bacterial survival in murine airway infection models. The PilY1 population consisted of a major full-length and a minor shorter PilY1* isoform. PilY1* was detectable in small extracellular quinolone-positive aggregates, but not in the pilus. P. aeruginosa PilY1 is not an adhesin on the pilus tip, but assists in pilus biogenesis, twitching motility, secretion of secondary metabolites and in the control of cell density in the bacterial population. PMID:19054330

  18. Antibiofilm and Anti-Infection of a Marine Bacterial Exopolysaccharide Against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shimei; Liu, Ge; Jin, Weihua; Xiu, Pengyuan; Sun, Chaomin

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a well-known pathogenic bacterium that forms biofilms and produces virulence factors, thus leading to major problems in many fields, such as clinical infection, food contamination, and marine biofouling. In this study, we report the purification and characterization of an exopolysaccharide EPS273 from the culture supernatant of marine bacterium P. stutzeri 273. The exopolysaccharide EPS273 not only effectively inhibits biofilm formation but also disperses preformed biofilm of P. aeruginosa PAO1. High performance liquid chromatography traces of the hydrolyzed polysaccharides shows that EPS273 primarily consists of glucosamine, rhamnose, glucose and mannose. Further investigation demonstrates that EPS273 reduces the production of the virulence factors pyocyanin, exoprotease, and rhamnolipid, and the virulence of P. aeruginosa PAO1 to human lung cells A549 and zebrafish embryos is also obviously attenuated by EPS273. In addition, EPS273 also greatly reduces the production of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and extracellular DNA (eDNA), which are important factors for biofilm formation. Furthermore, EPS273 exhibits strong antioxidant potential by quenching hydroxyl and superoxide anion radicals. Notably, the antibiofouling activity of EPS273 is observed in the marine environment up to 2 weeks according to the amounts of bacteria and diatoms in the glass slides submerged in the ocean. Taken together, the properties of EPS273 indicate that it has a promising prospect in combating bacterial biofilm-associated infection, food-processing contamination and marine biofouling. PMID:26903981

  19. Antibiofilm and Anti-Infection of a Marine Bacterial Exopolysaccharide Against Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shimei; Liu, Ge; Jin, Weihua; Xiu, Pengyuan; Sun, Chaomin

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a well-known pathogenic bacterium that forms biofilms and produces virulence factors, thus leading to major problems in many fields, such as clinical infection, food contamination, and marine biofouling. In this study, we report the purification and characterization of an exopolysaccharide EPS273 from the culture supernatant of marine bacterium P. stutzeri 273. The exopolysaccharide EPS273 not only effectively inhibits biofilm formation but also disperses preformed biofilm of P. aeruginosa PAO1. High performance liquid chromatography traces of the hydrolyzed polysaccharides shows that EPS273 primarily consists of glucosamine, rhamnose, glucose and mannose. Further investigation demonstrates that EPS273 reduces the production of the virulence factors pyocyanin, exoprotease, and rhamnolipid, and the virulence of P. aeruginosa PAO1 to human lung cells A549 and zebrafish embryos is also obviously attenuated by EPS273. In addition, EPS273 also greatly reduces the production of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and extracellular DNA (eDNA), which are important factors for biofilm formation. Furthermore, EPS273 exhibits strong antioxidant potential by quenching hydroxyl and superoxide anion radicals. Notably, the antibiofouling activity of EPS273 is observed in the marine environment up to 2 weeks according to the amounts of bacteria and diatoms in the glass slides submerged in the ocean. Taken together, the properties of EPS273 indicate that it has a promising prospect in combating bacterial biofilm-associated infection, food-processing contamination and marine biofouling. PMID:26903981

  20. The Healing Effect of Scrophularia Striata on Experimental Burn Wounds Infected to Pseudomonas Aeruginosa in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Tanideh, Nader; Haddadi, Mohammad Hossein; Rokni-Hosseini, Mohammad Hossein; Hossienzadeh, Masood; Mehrabani, Davood; Sayehmiri, Kourosh; Koohi-Hossienabadi, Omid

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The cause of death in burn patients after 48 hours of hospitalization has been reported to be bacterial infections. Recently, due to the compounds accelerating the healing process and the intense reduction of treatment side effects, medicinal plants are used to cure burn wound infections. This study aims to investigate the medicinal effect of the ethanolic extract of Scrophularia striata on burn wound infection in in-vivo and in-vitro in comparison with silver sulfadiazine (SSD). METHODS One hundred and fifty male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into 3 equal groups. A hot plate of 1×1cm was used to create second degree burn wounds. The ethanolic extract of S. striata was provided through percolation method. Group 1 was treated with SSD, group 2 with S. striata, and group 3 was considered as control group. All animals were infected to Pseudomonas aeruginosa. On days 3, 7, 10, 14, and 21 after burn wound injury, the animals were euthanized and were evaluated histologically. The MIC and MBC were determined using the micro dilution method. RESULTS The rate of wound healing was significantly greater in S. striata group in comparison to SSD and control groups. CONCLUSION S. striata contains was shown to have anti-bacterial and wound healing effects while this effect was significantly more than SSD denoting to its use when needed for burn wounds infected to P. aeruginosa. PMID:25606472

  1. Prevalence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. in subgingival biofilm and saliva of subjects with chronic periodontal infection.

    PubMed

    Souto, Renata; Silva-Boghossian, Carina M; Colombo, Ana Paula Vieira

    2014-01-01

    P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. are important pathogens associated with late nosocomial pneumonia in hospitalized and institutionalized individuals. The oral cavity may be a major source of these respiratory pathogens, particularly in the presence of poor oral hygiene and periodontal infection. This study investigated the prevalence of P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. in subgingival biofilm and saliva of subjects with periodontal disease or health. Samples were obtained from 55 periodontally healthy (PH) and 169 chronic periodontitis (CP) patients. DNA was obtained from the samples and detection of P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. was carried out by multiplex and nested PCR. P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. were detected in 40% and 45% of all samples, respectively. No significant differences in the distribution of these microorganisms between men and women, subgingival biofilm and saliva samples, patients ≤ 35 and > 35 years of age, and smokers and non-smokers were observed regardless periodontal status (p > 0.05). In contrast, the frequencies of P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. in saliva and biofilm samples were significantly greater in CP than PH patients (p < 0.01). Smokers presenting P. aeruginosa and high frequencies of supragingival plaque were more likely to present CP than PH. P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. are frequently detected in the oral microbiota of CP. Poor oral hygiene, smoking and the presence of P. aeruginosa are strongly associated with periodontitis.

  2. Prevalence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. in subgingival biofilm and saliva of subjects with chronic periodontal infection

    PubMed Central

    Souto, Renata; Silva-Boghossian, Carina M.; Colombo, Ana Paula Vieira

    2014-01-01

    P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. are important pathogens associated with late nosocomial pneumonia in hospitalized and institutionalized individuals. The oral cavity may be a major source of these respiratory pathogens, particularly in the presence of poor oral hygiene and periodontal infection. This study investigated the prevalence of P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. in subgingival biofilm and saliva of subjects with periodontal disease or health. Samples were obtained from 55 periodontally healthy (PH) and 169 chronic periodontitis (CP) patients. DNA was obtained from the samples and detection of P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. was carried out by multiplex and nested PCR. P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. were detected in 40% and 45% of all samples, respectively. No significant differences in the distribution of these microorganisms between men and women, subgingival biofilm and saliva samples, patients ≤ 35 and > 35 years of age, and smokers and non-smokers were observed regardless periodontal status (p > 0.05). In contrast, the frequencies of P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. in saliva and biofilm samples were significantly greater in CP than PH patients (p < 0.01). Smokers presenting P. aeruginosa and high frequencies of supragingival plaque were more likely to present CP than PH. P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. are frequently detected in the oral microbiota of CP. Poor oral hygiene, smoking and the presence of P. aeruginosa are strongly associated with periodontitis. PMID:25242933

  3. Prevalence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. in subgingival biofilm and saliva of subjects with chronic periodontal infection.

    PubMed

    Souto, Renata; Silva-Boghossian, Carina M; Colombo, Ana Paula Vieira

    2014-01-01

    P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. are important pathogens associated with late nosocomial pneumonia in hospitalized and institutionalized individuals. The oral cavity may be a major source of these respiratory pathogens, particularly in the presence of poor oral hygiene and periodontal infection. This study investigated the prevalence of P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. in subgingival biofilm and saliva of subjects with periodontal disease or health. Samples were obtained from 55 periodontally healthy (PH) and 169 chronic periodontitis (CP) patients. DNA was obtained from the samples and detection of P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. was carried out by multiplex and nested PCR. P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. were detected in 40% and 45% of all samples, respectively. No significant differences in the distribution of these microorganisms between men and women, subgingival biofilm and saliva samples, patients ≤ 35 and > 35 years of age, and smokers and non-smokers were observed regardless periodontal status (p > 0.05). In contrast, the frequencies of P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. in saliva and biofilm samples were significantly greater in CP than PH patients (p < 0.01). Smokers presenting P. aeruginosa and high frequencies of supragingival plaque were more likely to present CP than PH. P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. are frequently detected in the oral microbiota of CP. Poor oral hygiene, smoking and the presence of P. aeruginosa are strongly associated with periodontitis. PMID:25242933

  4. Mobile genetic elements of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from hydrotherapy facility and respiratory infections.

    PubMed

    Pereira, S G; Cardoso, O

    2014-03-01

    The content of mobile genetic elements in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates of a pristine natural mineral water system associated with healthcare was compared with clinical isolates from respiratory infections. One isolate, from the therapy pool circuit, presented a class 1 integron, with 100% similarity to a class 1 integron contained in plasmid p4800 of the Klebsiella pneumoniae Kp4800 strain, which is the first time it has been reported in P. aeruginosa. Class 1 integrons were found in 25.6% of the clinical isolates. PAGI1 orf3 was more prevalent in environmental isolates, while PAGI2 c105 and PAGI3 sg100 were more prevalent in clinical isolates. Plasmids were not observed in either population.

  5. A simple alfalfa seedling infection model for Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains associated with cystic fibrosis shows AlgT (sigma-22) and RhlR contribute to pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Silo-Suh, Laura; Suh, Sang-Jin; Sokol, Pamela A.; Ohman, Dennis E.

    2002-01-01

    A sensitive plant infection model was developed to identify virulence factors in nontypeable, alginate overproducing (mucoid) Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with chronic pulmonary disease. Nontypeable strains with defects in lipopolysaccharide O-side chains are common to CF and often exhibit low virulence in animal models of infection. However, 1,000 such bacteria were enough to show disease symptoms in the alfalfa infection. A typical mucoid CF isolate, FRD1, and its isogenic mutants were tested for alfalfa seedling infection. Although defects in the global regulators Vfr, RpoS, PvdS, or LasR had no discernable effect on virulence, a defect in RhlR reduced the infection frequency by >50%. A defect in alginate biosynthesis resulted in plant disease with >3-fold more bacteria per plant, suggesting that alginate overproduction attenuated bacterial growth in planta. FRD1 derivatives lacking AlgT, a sigma factor required for alginate production, were reduced >50% in the frequency of infection. Thus, AlgT apparently regulates factors in FRD1, besides alginate, important for pathogenesis. In contrast, in a non-CF strain, PAO1, an algT mutation did not affect its virulence on alfalfa. Conversely, PAO1 virulence was reduced in a mucA mutant that overproduced alginate. These observations suggested that mucoid conversion in CF may be driven by a selection for organisms with attenuated virulence or growth in the lung, which promotes a chronic infection. These studies also demonstrated that the wounded alfalfa seedling infection model is a useful tool to identify factors contributing to the persistence of P. aeruginosa in CF. PMID:12426404

  6. Evaluation of Mannosidase and Trypsin Enzymes Effects on Biofilm Production of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated from Burn Wound Infections

    PubMed Central

    Banar, Maryam; Emaneini, Mohammad; Satarzadeh, Mhboubeh; Abdellahi, Nafiseh; Beigverdi, Reza; van Leeuwen, Willem B.; Jabalameli, Fereshteh

    2016-01-01

    Biofilm is an important virulence factor in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and has a substantial role in antibiotic resistance and chronic burn wound infections. New therapeutic agents against P. aeruginosa, degrading biofilms in burn wounds and improving the efficacy of current antimicrobial agents, are required. In this study, the effects of α-mannosidase, β-mannosidase and trypsin enzymes on the degradation of P. aeruginosa biofilms and on the reduction of ceftazidime minimum biofilm eliminating concentrations (MBEC) were evaluated. All tested enzymes, destroyed the biofilms and reduced the ceftazidime MBECs. However, only trypsin had no cytotoxic effect on A-431 human epidermoid carcinoma cell lines. In conclusion, since trypsin had better features than mannosidase enzymes, it can be a promising agent in combatting P. aeruginosa burn wound infections. PMID:27736961

  7. Host Genetic Background Influences the Response to the Opportunistic Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infection Altering Cell-Mediated Immunity and Bacterial Replication

    PubMed Central

    Lorè, Nicola Ivan; Rossi, Giacomo; Cigana, Cristina; De Fino, Ida; Iraqi, Fuad A.; Bragonzi, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common cause of healthcare-associated infections including pneumonia, bloodstream, urinary tract, and surgical site infections. The clinical outcome of P. aeruginosa infections may be extremely variable among individuals at risk and patients affected by cystic fibrosis. However, risk factors for P. aeruginosa infection remain largely unknown. To identify and track the host factors influencing P. aeruginosa lung infections, inbred immunocompetent mouse strains were screened in a pneumonia model system. A/J, BALB/cJ, BALB/cAnNCrl, BALB/cByJ, C3H/HeOuJ, C57BL/6J, C57BL/6NCrl, DBA/2J, and 129S2/SvPasCRL mice were infected with P. aeruginosa clinical strain and monitored for body weight and mortality up to seven days. The most deviant survival phenotypes were observed for A/J, 129S2/SvPasCRL and DBA/2J showing high susceptibility while BALB/cAnNCrl and C3H/HeOuJ showing more resistance to P. aeruginosa infection. Next, one of the most susceptible and resistant mouse strains were characterized for their deviant clinical and immunological phenotype by scoring bacterial count, cell-mediated immunity, cytokines and chemokines profile and lung pathology in an early time course. Susceptible A/J mice showed significantly higher bacterial burden, higher cytokines and chemokines levels but lower leukocyte recruitment, particularly neutrophils, when compared to C3H/HeOuJ resistant mice. Pathologic scores showed lower inflammatory severity, reduced intraluminal and interstitial inflammation extent, bronchial and parenchymal involvement and diminished alveolar damage in the lungs of A/J when compared to C3H/HeOuJ. Our findings indicate that during an early phase of infection a prompt inflammatory response in the airways set the conditions for a non-permissive environment to P. aeruginosa replication and lock the spread to other organs. Host gene(s) may have a role in the reduction of cell-mediated immunity playing a critical role in the control of P

  8. Host genetic background influences the response to the opportunistic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection altering cell-mediated immunity and bacterial replication.

    PubMed

    De Simone, Maura; Spagnuolo, Lorenza; Lorè, Nicola Ivan; Rossi, Giacomo; Cigana, Cristina; De Fino, Ida; Iraqi, Fuad A; Bragonzi, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common cause of healthcare-associated infections including pneumonia, bloodstream, urinary tract, and surgical site infections. The clinical outcome of P. aeruginosa infections may be extremely variable among individuals at risk and patients affected by cystic fibrosis. However, risk factors for P. aeruginosa infection remain largely unknown. To identify and track the host factors influencing P. aeruginosa lung infections, inbred immunocompetent mouse strains were screened in a pneumonia model system. A/J, BALB/cJ, BALB/cAnNCrl, BALB/cByJ, C3H/HeOuJ, C57BL/6J, C57BL/6NCrl, DBA/2J, and 129S2/SvPasCRL mice were infected with P. aeruginosa clinical strain and monitored for body weight and mortality up to seven days. The most deviant survival phenotypes were observed for A/J, 129S2/SvPasCRL and DBA/2J showing high susceptibility while BALB/cAnNCrl and C3H/HeOuJ showing more resistance to P. aeruginosa infection. Next, one of the most susceptible and resistant mouse strains were characterized for their deviant clinical and immunological phenotype by scoring bacterial count, cell-mediated immunity, cytokines and chemokines profile and lung pathology in an early time course. Susceptible A/J mice showed significantly higher bacterial burden, higher cytokines and chemokines levels but lower leukocyte recruitment, particularly neutrophils, when compared to C3H/HeOuJ resistant mice. Pathologic scores showed lower inflammatory severity, reduced intraluminal and interstitial inflammation extent, bronchial and parenchymal involvement and diminished alveolar damage in the lungs of A/J when compared to C3H/HeOuJ. Our findings indicate that during an early phase of infection a prompt inflammatory response in the airways set the conditions for a non-permissive environment to P. aeruginosa replication and lock the spread to other organs. Host gene(s) may have a role in the reduction of cell-mediated immunity playing a critical role in the control of P

  9. Efficacy of the Novel Antibiotic POL7001 in Preclinical Models of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Cigana, Cristina; Bernardini, Francesca; Facchini, Marcella; Alcalá-Franco, Beatriz; Riva, Camilla; De Fino, Ida; Rossi, Alice; Ranucci, Serena; Misson, Pauline; Chevalier, Eric; Brodmann, Maj; Schmitt, Michel; Wach, Achim; Dale, Glenn E; Obrecht, Daniel; Bragonzi, Alessandra

    2016-08-01

    The clinical development of antibiotics with a new mode of action combined with efficient pulmonary drug delivery is a priority against untreatable Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections. POL7001 is a macrocycle antibiotic belonging to the novel class of protein epitope mimetic (PEM) molecules with selective and potent activity against P. aeruginosa We investigated ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) and cystic fibrosis (CF) as indications of the clinical potential of POL7001 to treat P. aeruginosa pulmonary infections. MICs of POL7001 and comparators were measured for reference and clinical P. aeruginosa strains. The therapeutic efficacy of POL7001 given by pulmonary administration was evaluated in murine models of P. aeruginosa acute and chronic pneumonia. POL7001 showed potent in vitro activity against a large panel of P. aeruginosa isolates from CF patients, including multidrug-resistant (MDR) isolates with adaptive phenotypes such as mucoid or hypermutable phenotypes. The efficacy of POL7001 was demonstrated in both wild-type and CF mice. In addition to a reduced bacterial burden in the lung, POL7001-treated mice showed progressive body weight recovery and reduced levels of inflammatory markers, indicating an improvement in general condition. Pharmacokinetic studies indicated that POL7001 reached significant concentrations in the lung after pulmonary administration, with low systemic exposure. These results support the further evaluation of POL7001 as a novel therapeutic agent for the treatment of P. aeruginosa pulmonary infections.

  10. The Effect of Infection Control Nurses on the Occurrence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Healthcare-Acquired Infection and Multidrug-Resistant Strains in Critically-Ill Children

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wei; He, Linxi; Liu, Chunfeng; Rong, Jian; Shi, Yongyan; Song, Wenliang; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Lijie

    2015-01-01

    Background Healthcare-acquired Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) infections in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU), which have a high incidence, increase treatment costs and mortality, and seriously threaten the safety of critically ill children. It is essential to seek convenient and effective methods to control and prevent healthcare-acquired infections (HAIs). This research was conducted to study the effect of infection control nurses on the occurrence of P. aeruginosa HAIs and multi-drug resistance (MDR) strains in PICU. Methods The clinical data was divided into two groups, with the age ranging from 1 month to 14 years. One group of the critically ill patients(N = 3,722) was admitted to PICU from 2007 to 2010, without the management of infection control nurses. The other group of the critically ill patients (N = 3,943) was admitted to PICU from 2011 to 2013, with the management of infection control nurses. Compare the mortality, morbidity and the incidence of acquired P. aeruginosa infections to evaluate the effect of infection control nurses. Results After implementation of the post of infection control nurses, the patient's overall mortality fell from 4.81% to 3.73%. Among the patients with endotracheal intubation more than 48 hours, the incidence of endotracheal intubation-related pneumonia decreased from 44.6% to 34.32%. The mortality of patients with endotracheal intubation decreased from 16.96% to 10.17%, and the morbidity of HAIs with P. aeruginosa decreased from 1.89% to 1.07%. The mutual different rate (MDR) dropped from 67.95% to 44.23%. There were remarkable differences in these rates between the two groups (p<0.05). Conclusion Implementing the post of infection control nurses is associated with effectively reducing the HAI rate, especially the incidence and morbidity of P. aeruginosa HAIs, reducing PICU mortality, improving P. aeruginosa drug resistance. PMID:26630032

  11. Primary pulmonary hypertension associated with human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Golpe, R.; Fernandez-Infante, B.; Fernandez-Rozas, S.

    1998-01-01

    Several cardiorespiratory diseases can complicate human immunodeficiency virus infection. Primary pulmonary hypertension is a rare clinical disorder which carries a bad prognosis. More than 90 cases of HIV-associated primary pulmonary hypertension have been reported to date. Although its pathogenesis remains unknown, some evidence suggests a possible role for the virus itself in its development. Genetic susceptibility may also be implicated. The clinical and histopathologic features of this entity do not differ from those of classic primary pulmonary hypertension. The diagnosis requires a high degree of clinical suspicion and a careful evaluation to rule out causes of secondary pulmonary hypertension. In addition to supportive measures, anticoagulation and vasodilators have been used to treat this disorder, although sufficient data regarding long-term results with these therapies are lacking. PMID:9799910

  12. Controlling methicillin resistant Staphyloccocus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa wound infections with a novel biomaterial.

    PubMed

    Martineau, Lucie; Davis, Stephen C; Peng, Henry T; Hung, Andy

    2007-01-01

    Wound infections, especially those associated with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, offer considerable challenges for clinicians. Our laboratory has recently developed novel composite biomaterials (DRDC) for wound dressing applications, and demonstrated their in vitro bactericidal efficacy. In the present study, we assessed the proliferation of planktonic and sessile Pseudomonas aeruginosa and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in porcine full-thickness wounds covered for up to 48 h with either saline- or mafenide acetate-loaded DRDC puffs and meshes. All biomaterials were applied 4 h following bacterial inoculation of the wounds with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, to allow colonization of the tissues and initiation of biofilm formation. The drug-loaded biomaterials eradicated both the planktonic and biofilm bacteria in the wounds within 24 h (p <. 05), irrespective of the bacterial strain or architecture of the dressing. While the wound bioburdens increased in the ensuing 24 h, they remained approximately 2 log(10) colony-forming units (CFU) below (p <. 05) their respective baseline values. Similarly, less than 4 log(10) CFU was recovered in the drug-loaded DRDC biomaterials throughout the study. These data show that the DRDC puffs and meshes are effective in delivering certain medications, such as antimicrobial agents, to the wound bed, suggesting considerable value of this material for treating wounds, especially those with irregular shapes, contours, and depths.

  13. Bacterial and Clinical Characteristics of Health Care- and Community-Acquired Bloodstream Infections Due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Hattemer, Angela; Hauser, Alan; Diaz, Maureen; Scheetz, Marc; Shah, Nirav; Allen, Jonathan P.; Porhomayon, Jahan

    2013-01-01

    Health care-associated infections, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa bloodstream infection, have been linked to delays in appropriate antibiotic therapy and an increased mortality rate. The objective of this study was to evaluate intrinsic virulence, bacterial resistance, and clinical outcomes of health care-associated bloodstream infections (HCABSIs) in comparison with those of community-acquired bloodstream infections (CABSIs) caused by P. aeruginosa. We conducted a retrospective multicenter study of consecutive P. aeruginosa bacteremia patients at two university-affiliated hospitals. Demographic, clinical, and treatment data were collected. Microbiologic analyses included in vitro susceptibility profiles and type III secretory (TTS) phenotypes. Sixty CABSI and 90 HCABSI episodes were analyzed. Patients with HCABSIs had more organ dysfunction at the time of bacteremia (P = 0.05) and were more likely to have been exposed to antimicrobial therapy (P < 0.001) than those with CABSIs. Ninety-two percent of the carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa infections were characterized as HCABSIs. The 30-day mortality rate for CABSIs was 26% versus 36% for HCABSIs (P = 0.38). The sequential organ failure assessment score at the time of bacteremia (hazard ratio [HR], 1.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1 to 1.3) and the TTS phenotype (HR 2.1; 95% CI, 1.1 to 3.9) were found to be independent predictors of the 30-day mortality rate. No mortality rate difference was observed between CABSIs and HCABSIs caused by P. aeruginosa. Severity of illness and expression of TTS proteins were the strongest predictors of the 30-day mortality rate due to P. aeruginosa bacteremia. Future P. aeruginosa bacteremia trials designed to neutralize TTS proteins are warranted. PMID:23733476

  14. Infection control in the pulmonary function test laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Rasam, Shweta Amol; Apte, Komalkirti Keshavkiran; Salvi, Sundeep Santosh

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary function testing plays a crucial role in the diagnostic evaluation of patients with lung diseases. Cases of cross infection acquired from the pulmonary function laboratory, although rare, have been reported from various countries. It is therefore imperative to identify the risks and potential organisms implicated in cross infections in a pulmonary function test (PFT) laboratory and implement better and more effective infection control procedures, which will help in preventing cross infections. The infrastructure, the daily patient flow, and the prevalent disinfection techniques used in a PFT laboratory, all play a significant role in transmission of infections. Simple measures to tackle the cross infection potential in a PFT laboratory can help reduce this risk to a bare minimum. Use of specialized techniques and equipment can also be of much use in a set up that has a high turnover of patients. This review aims at creating awareness about the possible pathogens and situations commonly encountered in a PFT laboratory. We have attempted to suggest some relevant and useful infection control measures with regard to disinfection, sterilization, and patient planning and segregation to help minimize the risk of cross infections in a PFT laboratory. The review also highlights the lacuna in the current scenario of PFT laboratories in India and the need to develop newer and better methods of infection control, which will be more user-friendly and cost effective. Further studies to study the possible pathogens in a PFT laboratory and evaluate the prevalent infection control strategies will be needed to enable us to draw more precious conclusions, which can lead to more relevant, contextual recommendations for cross infections control in PFT lab in India. PMID:26180386

  15. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of BMAP-derived peptides for the treatment of cystic fibrosis-related pulmonary infections.

    PubMed

    Mardirossian, Mario; Pompilio, Arianna; Crocetta, Valentina; De Nicola, Serena; Guida, Filomena; Degasperi, Margherita; Gennaro, Renato; Di Bonaventura, Giovanni; Scocchi, Marco

    2016-09-01

    Patients with cystic fibrosis require pharmacological treatment against chronic lung infections. The alpha-helical antimicrobial peptides BMAP-27 and BMAP-28 have shown to be highly active in vitro against planktonic and sessile forms of multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia cystic fibrosis strains. To develop small antibacterial peptides for therapeutic use, we tested shortened/modified BMAP fragments, and selected the one with the highest in vitro antibacterial activity and lowest in vivo acute pulmonary toxicity. All the new peptides have shown to roughly maintain their antibacterial activity in vitro. The 1-18 N-terminal fragment of BMAP-27, showing MIC90 of 16 µg/ml against P. aeruginosa isolates and strain-dependent anti-biofilm effects, showed the lowest pulmonary toxicity in mice. However, when tested in a murine model of acute lung infection by P. aeruginosa, BMAP-27(1-18) did not show any curative effect. If exposed to murine broncho-alveolar lavage fluid BMAP-27(1-18) was degraded within 10 min, suggesting it is not stable in pulmonary environment, probably due to murine proteases. Our results indicate that shortened BMAP peptides could represent a starting point for antibacterial drugs, but they also indicate that they need a further optimization for effective in vivo use. PMID:27270571

  16. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of antibiotics in biofilm infections of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hengzhuang, Wang; Høiby, Niels; Ciofu, Oana

    2014-01-01

    Although progress on biofilm research has been obtained during the past decades, the treatment of biofilm infections with antibiotics remains a riddle. The pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) profiles of an antimicrobial agent provide important information helping to establish an efficient dosing regimen and to minimize the development of antimicrobial tolerance and resistance in biofilm infections. Unfortunately, most previous PK/PD studies of antibiotics have been done on planktonic cells, and extrapolation of the results on biofilms is problematic as bacterial biofilms differ from planktonic grown cells in the growth rate, gene expression, and metabolism. Here, we set up several protocols for the studies of PK/PD of antibiotics in biofilm infections of P. aeruginosa in vitro and in vivo. It should be underlined that none of the protocols in biofilms have yet been certificated for clinical use or proved useful for guidance of antibiotic therapy.

  17. Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Humanized Mice Infected with HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Nusbaum, Rebecca J.; Calderon, Veronica E.; Huante, Matthew B.; Sutjita, Putri; Vijayakumar, Sudhamathi; Lancaster, Katrina L.; Hunter, Robert L.; Actor, Jeffrey K.; Cirillo, Jeffrey D.; Aronson, Judith; Gelman, Benjamin B.; Lisinicchia, Joshua G.; Valbuena, Gustavo; Endsley, Janice J.

    2016-01-01

    Co-infection with HIV increases the morbidity and mortality associated with tuberculosis due to multiple factors including a poorly understood microbial synergy. We developed a novel small animal model of co-infection in the humanized mouse to investigate how HIV infection disrupts pulmonary containment of Mtb. Following dual infection, HIV-infected cells were localized to sites of Mtb-driven inflammation and mycobacterial replication in the lung. Consistent with disease in human subjects, we observed increased mycobacterial burden, loss of granuloma structure, and increased progression of TB disease, due to HIV co-infection. Importantly, we observed an HIV-dependent pro-inflammatory cytokine signature (IL-1β, IL-6, TNFα, and IL-8), neutrophil accumulation, and greater lung pathology in the Mtb-co-infected lung. These results suggest that in the early stages of acute co-infection in the humanized mouse, infection with HIV exacerbates the pro-inflammatory response to pulmonary Mtb, leading to poorly formed granulomas, more severe lung pathology, and increased mycobacterial burden and dissemination. PMID:26908312

  18. Contribution of quorum sensing to the virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in pressure ulcer infection in rats.

    PubMed

    Nakagami, Gojiro; Morohoshi, Tomohiro; Ikeda, Tsukasa; Ohta, Yasunori; Sagara, Hiroshi; Huang, Lijuan; Nagase, Takashi; Sugama, Junko; Sanada, Hiromi

    2011-01-01

    The impact of quorum sensing (QS) in in vivo models of infection has been widely investigated, but there are no descriptions for ischemic wound infection. To explore the role of QS in Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the establishment of ischemic wound infection, we challenged a pressure ulcer model in rats with the PAO-1, PAO-1 derivatives ΔlasIΔrhlI and ΔlasRΔrhlR strains, which cannot induce the virulence factor under QS control, thus the reduced tissue destruction was expended in these mutant strains. However unexpectedly, on postwounding day 3, the inflammatory responses in the three groups were similarly severe and the numbers of bacteria in tissue samples did not differ among the three strains. Biofilm formation was immature in QS-deficient strains, defined by the absence of dense bacterial aggregates and extracellular polymeric substance, which was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa QS signal, acylated homoserine lactone, was only quantified from wound samples in the PAO-1 group. The swimming and twitching motilities were significantly enhanced in the ΔlasRΔrhlR group compared with the PAO-1 group in vitro. A significantly larger wound area was correlated with the bacterial motility. The inflammation in the early phase of bacterial challenge to wounds with immature biofilm formation in the QS-deficient strains indicated that the role of QS was more crucial for the chronic phase than for the acute phase of infection. The present findings indicate a difference in the importance of QS in ischemic wound infections compared with other infection models.

  19. Effect of bacteriophage infection in combination with tobramycin on the emergence of resistance in Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    PubMed

    Coulter, Lindsey B; McLean, Robert J C; Rohde, Rodney E; Aron, Gary M

    2014-10-03

    Bacteriophage infection and antibiotics used individually to reduce biofilm mass often result in the emergence of significant levels of phage and antibiotic resistant cells. In contrast, combination therapy in Escherichia coli biofilms employing T4 phage and tobramycin resulted in greater than 99% and 39% reduction in antibiotic and phage resistant cells, respectively. In P. aeruginosa biofilms, combination therapy resulted in a 60% and 99% reduction in antibiotic and PB-1 phage resistant cells, respectively. Although the combined treatment resulted in greater reduction of E. coli CFUs compared to the use of antibiotic alone, infection of P. aeruginosa biofilms with PB-1 in the presence of tobramycin was only as effective in the reduction of CFUs as the use of antibiotic alone. The study demonstrated phage infection in combination with tobramycin can significantly reduce the emergence of antibiotic and phage resistant cells in both E. coli and P. aeruginosa biofilms, however, a reduction in biomass was dependent on the phage-host system.

  20. Profile of Virulence Factors in the Multi-Drug Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strains of Human Urinary Tract Infections (UTI)

    PubMed Central

    Habibi, Asghar; Honarmand, Ramin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Putative virulence factors are responsible for the pathogenicity of UTIs caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa). Resistance of P. aeruginosa to commonly used antibiotics is caused by the extreme overprescription of those antibiotics. Objectives: The goal of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of virulence factors and the antibiotic resistance patterns of P. aeruginosa isolates in UTI cases in Iran. Patients and Methods: Two hundred and fifty urine samples were collected from patients who suffered from UTIs. Samples were cultured immediately, and those that were P. aeruginosa-positive were analyzed for the presence of virulence genes using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) was performed using the disk diffusion method. Results: Of the 250 urine samples analyzed, 8 samples (3.2%) were positive for P. aeruginosa. The prevalence of P. aeruginosa in male and female patients was 2.7% and 3.5%, respectively, (P = 0.035). In patients less than 10 years old, it was 4.2%, and in patients more than 55 years old, it was 4.2%. These were the most commonly infected groups. The highest levels of resistance were seen against ampicillin (87.5%), norfloxacin (62.5%), gentamycin (62.5%), amikacin (62.5%), and aztreonam (62.5%), while the lowest were seen for meropenem (0%), imipenem (12.5%), and polymyxin B (12.5%). LasB (87.5%), pclH (75%), pilB (75%), and exoS (75%) were the most commonly detected virulence factors in the P. aeruginosa isolates. Conclusions: It is logical to first prescribe meropenem, imipenem, and polymyxin B in cases of UTIs caused by P. aeruginosa. Medical practitioners should be aware of the presence of levels of antibiotic resistance in hospitalized UTI patients in Iran. PMID:26756017

  1. Seeking the source of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in a recently opened hospital: an observational study using whole-genome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Quick, Joshua; Cumley, Nicola; Wearn, Christopher M; Niebel, Marc; Constantinidou, Chrystala; Thomas, Chris M; Pallen, Mark J; Moiemen, Naiem S; Bamford, Amy; Oppenheim, Beryl; Loman, Nicholas J

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common nosocomial pathogen responsible for significant morbidity and mortality internationally. Patients may become colonised or infected with P. aeruginosa after exposure to contaminated sources within the hospital environment. The aim of this study was to determine whether whole-genome sequencing (WGS) can be used to determine the source in a cohort of burns patients at high risk of P. aeruginosa acquisition. Study design An observational prospective cohort study. Setting Burns care ward and critical care ward in the UK. Participants Patients with >7% total burns by surface area were recruited into the study. Methods All patients were screened for P. aeruginosa on admission and samples taken from their immediate environment, including water. Screening patients who subsequently developed a positive P. aeruginosa microbiology result were subject to enhanced environmental surveillance. All isolates of P. aeruginosa were genome sequenced. Sequence analysis looked at similarity and relatedness between isolates. Results WGS for 141 P. aeruginosa isolates were obtained from patients, hospital water and the ward environment. Phylogenetic analysis revealed eight distinct clades, with a single clade representing the majority of environmental isolates in the burns unit. Isolates from three patients had identical genotypes compared with water isolates from the same room. There was clear clustering of water isolates by room and outlet, allowing the source of acquisitions to be unambiguously identified. Whole-genome shotgun sequencing of biofilm DNA extracted from a thermostatic mixer valve revealed this was the source of a P. aeruginosa subpopulation previously detected in water. In the remaining two cases there was no clear link to the hospital environment. Conclusions This study reveals that WGS can be used for source tracking of P. aeruginosa in a hospital setting, and that acquisitions can be traced to a specific source within a

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of Extremely Drug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ST357) Strain CMC_VB_PA_B22862 Isolated from a Community-Acquired Bloodstream Infection

    PubMed Central

    Pragasam, Agila Kumari; Yesurajan, Francis; Doss C, George Priya; George, Biju; Devanga Ragupathi, Naveen Kumar; Walia, Kamini

    2016-01-01

    Extremely drug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains causing severe infections have become a serious concern across the world. Here, we report draft genome sequence of P. aeruginosa with an extremely drug-resistant profile isolated from a patient with community-acquired bloodstream infection in India. PMID:27795257

  3. Immunochemical Determination of Pyocyanin and 1-Hydroxyphenazine as Potential Biomarkers of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infections.

    PubMed

    Pastells, Carme; Pascual, Nuria; Sanchez-Baeza, Francisco; Marco, M-Pilar

    2016-02-01

    A novel immunochemical approach to diagnose Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections is reported, which is based on the quantification of relevant and specific virulence factors secreted by this microorganism. Specific antibodies have been raised using hapten PC1 (a 1:1 mixture of 9-hydroxy- and 6-hydroxy-phenazine-2-carobxylic acids), designed to recognize 1-hydroxyphenazine (1-OHphz), which is the main metabolite of pyocyanin (PYO). PYO is one of the most important virulence factors produced by nearly all P. aeruginosa strains, and other species do not produce this factor. With these antibodies, an immunochemical analytical procedure able to quantify both 1-OHphz and PYO in complex clinical samples has been developed. 1-OHphz can be directly measured in solubilized sputum samples diluted 20 times with the assay buffer. Quantification of PYO is accomplished after conversion to 1-OHphz in just 20 min under basic conditions. A LOD of 0.60 ± 0.01 nM (4.80 ± 0.08 nmol kg(-1) sputum) is reached for both biomarker targets under the conditions established, a value that is much below the reported concentrations on sputum samples obtained from infected patients (up to 100 μM). The assay is robust, reproducible, accurate, can be run in about 2 h, and many samples can be measured simultaneously. The present reported assay could represent a significant improvement in the diagnosis of infectious diseases caused by this pathogen. PMID:26738983

  4. Besifloxacin ophthalmic suspension 0.6% in the treatment of bacterial conjunctivitis patients with Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections

    PubMed Central

    Silverstein, Bruce E; Morris, Timothy W; Gearinger, Lynne S; DeCory, Heleen H; Comstock, Timothy L

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of besifloxacin ophthalmic suspension 0.6% when used in the treatment of bacterial conjunctivitis infections due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Methods We undertook a post hoc analysis of clinical outcomes in patients with bacterial conjunctivitis due to P. aeruginosa across four prospective, multicenter, double-masked, randomized, controlled, clinical studies of besifloxacin ophthalmic suspension 0.6%. Efficacy outcomes included bacterial eradication and clinical resolution of the baseline infection at follow-up visits. Bacterial eradication was defined as the absence of ocular bacterial species present at or above threshold at baseline, while clinical resolution was defined as grade 0 ocular discharge and bulbar conjunctival injection. Safety outcomes included the incidence of adverse events, changes in visual acuity, and biomicroscopy and ophthalmoscopy findings. Patient outcomes were summarized and bacterial eradication and clinical resolution rates integrated. Results Of 1317 patients with culture-confirmed bacterial conjunctivitis across four clinical studies, nine (0.7%) were infected with P. aeruginosa at baseline, and of these, five were randomized to treatment with besifloxacin ophthalmic suspension 0.6%. Bacterial eradication of the baseline infection was observed at both follow-up visits in all five patients. Clinical resolution was achieved in two of five patients by the first follow-up visit and four of five patients by the second follow-up visit. There were no adverse events reported in these patients. There were no clinically meaningful biomicroscopy findings or changes in ophthalmoscopy or visual acuity. Conclusion The incidence of bacterial conjunctivitis due to P. aeruginosa was low. Treatment of patients with P. aeruginosa infections with besifloxacin ophthalmic suspension 0.6% led to bacterial eradication of P. aeruginosa by the first follow-up visit and high rates of clinical

  5. Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing molecules correlate with clinical status in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Barr, Helen L; Halliday, Nigel; Cámara, Miguel; Barrett, David A; Williams, Paul; Forrester, Douglas L; Simms, Rebecca; Smyth, Alan R; Honeybourne, David; Whitehouse, Joanna L; Nash, Edward F; Dewar, Jane; Clayton, Andrew; Knox, Alan J; Fogarty, Andrew W

    2015-10-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces quorum sensing signal molecules that are potential biomarkers for infection.A prospective study of 60 cystic fibrosis patients with chronic P. aeruginosa, who required intravenous antibiotics for pulmonary exacerbations, was undertaken. Clinical measurements and biological samples were obtained at the start and end of the treatment period. Additional data were available for 29 of these patients when they were clinically stable.Cross-sectionally, quorum sensing signal molecules were detectable in the sputum, plasma and urine of 86%, 75% and 83% patients, respectively. They were positively correlated between the three biofluids. Positive correlations were observed for most quorum sensing signal molecules in sputum, plasma and urine, with quantitative measures of pulmonary P. aeruginosa load at the start of a pulmonary exacerbation. Plasma concentrations of 2-nonyl-4-hydroxy-quinoline (NHQ) were significantly higher at the start of a pulmonary exacerbation compared to clinical stability (p<0.01). Following the administration of systemic antibiotics, plasma 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline (p=0.02) and NHQ concentrations (p<0.01) decreased significantly.In conclusion, quorum sensing signal molecules are detectable in cystic fibrosis patients with pulmonary P. aeruginosa infection and are positively correlated with quantitative measures of P. aeruginosa. NHQ correlates with clinical status and has potential as a novel biomarker for P. aeruginosa infection.

  6. Expression profiling of Yersinia pestis during mouse pulmonary infection.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Jonathan N; Lyons, C Rick; Johnston, Stephen Albert

    2006-11-01

    Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, can be transmitted by infected flea bite or inhaled aerosol. Both routes of infection have a high mortality rate, and pneumonic infections of Y. pestis represent a significant concern as a tool of bioterrorism. Understanding the transcriptional program of this pathogen during pulmonary infection should be valuable in understanding plague pathogenesis, as well as potentially offering insights into new vaccines and therapeutics. Toward this goal we developed a long oligonucleotide microarray to the plague bacillus and evaluated the expression profiles of Y. pestis in vitro and in the mouse pulmonary infection model in vivo. The in vitro analysis compared expression patterns at 27 versus 37 degrees C, as a surrogate of the transition from the flea to the mammalian host. The in vivo analysis used intranasal challenge to the mouse lung. By amplifying the Y. pestis RNA from individual mouse lungs we were able to map the transcriptional profile of plague at postinfection days 1 to 3. Our data present a very different transcriptional profile between in vivo and in vitro expression, suggesting Y. pestis responds to a variety of host signals during infection. Of note was the number of genes found in genomic regions with altered %GC content that are upregulated within the mouse lung environment. These data suggest these regions may provide particularly promising targets for both vaccines and therapeutics. PMID:17132091

  7. Effects of a human antiflagellar monoclonal antibody in combination with antibiotics on Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection.

    PubMed Central

    Uezumi, I; Terashima, M; Kohzuki, T; Kato, M; Irie, K; Ochi, H; Noguchi, H

    1992-01-01

    The in vivo activity of human immunoglobulin M monoclonal antibody IN-2A8, which is specific for flagellum type b of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, was evaluated in comparison to anti-O antigen (serotype B) MAb KO-2F2 and in combination with antibiotics. IN-2A8 showed stronger activity than KO-2F2 against subcutaneous infection in burned mice, while it was much less active against intraperitoneal infection in normal mice. In a burn infection model, IN-2A8 inhibited the increase of bacteria in skin lesions weakly and that in blood significantly, suggesting that it strongly suppressed bacterial spread to blood. The activity of IN-2A8 in combination with 10 antipseudomonal antibiotics against intraperitoneal infection was examined. Clear additive effect was observed with a combination of either carbapenem or aminoglycoside antibiotics in terms of mouse survival. The administration of an antibiotic, imipenem-cilastatin, simultaneously with or before that of IN-2A8 gave a combined effect, but the reverse order did not. The combination of IN-2A8 with imipenem-cilastatin decreased numbers of viable bacteria in the peritoneal cavity and blood and kept them low for a longer time than did either treatment alone. These results suggest that an antiflagellar monoclonal antibody would be effective against systemic infection in combination with some kinds of antibiotics. Images PMID:1416830

  8. Pulmonary Balantidium coli infection in a leukemic patient.

    PubMed

    Anargyrou, K; Petrikkos, G L; Suller, M T E; Skiada, A; Siakantaris, M P; Osuntoyinbo, R T; Pangalis, G; Vaiopoulos, G

    2003-07-01

    A 59-year-old woman suffering from chronic lymphocytic leukemia developed pulmonary lesions; bronchoalveolar lavage was performed for possible systemic fungal infection. However, direct microscopic analysis revealed ciliated protozoa identified as Balantidium coli. B. coli is the only known pathogenic ciliate, and is usually associated with intestinal infection in areas associated with pig rearing. On very rare occasions the organisms may invade extra-intestinal organs, in this case the lungs of an immunocompromised patient. This case is unusual as balantidiasis is rare in Europe, the patient had no obvious contact with pigs, and there was no history of diarrhea prior to pulmonary colonization. Metronidazole was rapidly administered, and the condition improved after 24-48 hr. PMID:12827655

  9. Enoxacin therapy for severe pleuro-pulmonary infections.

    PubMed

    Thadepalli, H; Mathai, D; Bansal, M B; Chuah, S K

    1991-10-01

    Enoxacin, a new 6-fluoroquinolone known to be active in vitro against most common pulmonary pathogens, was evaluated in comparison with ceftazidime, a third generation cephalosporin proven to be effective in the treatment of gram negative pneumonias. Clinical and microbiologic responses to therapy were satisfactory and comparable in both antibiotic groups. Enoxacin could be an effective alternative choice in the treatment of lower respiratory tract infections caused by gram negative organisms.

  10. Effects of phosphate supplementation on Pseudomonas aeruginosa invasive behavior in burn wound infections: A simple approach to a big problem.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi-Samani, Soliman; Kouroshfard, Shahriyar; Azarpira, Negar

    2016-03-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of inorganic phosphate supplementation on invasive behavior of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in burn wound infections. An emulsion-based lotion containing sodium dihydrogen phosphate was formulated and then 50 female Sprague-Dawley rats with burn wounds were used to assess the effect of phosphate supplementation on swarming motility of P. aeruginosa. On the second day after burn, four groups of rats were inoculated with P. aeruginosa and one group was left as negative control. The treatment was started on day 3 and the animals were followed up for 4 weeks. Significant improvement in wound healing was observed in the phosphate-receiving group after the 4-week follow-up, compared to the negative control, positive control, and silver sulfadiazine-receiving groups. Histopathological assessment of the tissue samples also indicated the healing process in phosphate-enriched lotion receiving group. The results showed that inorganic phosphate supplementation results in alteration of the virulence behavior of P. aeruginosa and improvement in the wound healing process. In conclusion, phosphate supplementation would be a rational strategy in the eradication of P. aeruginosa wound infection.

  11. Effects of phosphate supplementation on Pseudomonas aeruginosa invasive behavior in burn wound infections: A simple approach to a big problem.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi-Samani, Soliman; Kouroshfard, Shahriyar; Azarpira, Negar

    2016-03-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of inorganic phosphate supplementation on invasive behavior of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in burn wound infections. An emulsion-based lotion containing sodium dihydrogen phosphate was formulated and then 50 female Sprague-Dawley rats with burn wounds were used to assess the effect of phosphate supplementation on swarming motility of P. aeruginosa. On the second day after burn, four groups of rats were inoculated with P. aeruginosa and one group was left as negative control. The treatment was started on day 3 and the animals were followed up for 4 weeks. Significant improvement in wound healing was observed in the phosphate-receiving group after the 4-week follow-up, compared to the negative control, positive control, and silver sulfadiazine-receiving groups. Histopathological assessment of the tissue samples also indicated the healing process in phosphate-enriched lotion receiving group. The results showed that inorganic phosphate supplementation results in alteration of the virulence behavior of P. aeruginosa and improvement in the wound healing process. In conclusion, phosphate supplementation would be a rational strategy in the eradication of P. aeruginosa wound infection. PMID:26787129

  12. Aloe vera Gel: Effective Therapeutic Agent against Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates Recovered from Burn Wound Infections

    PubMed Central

    Goudarzi, Mehdi; Fazeli, Maryam; Azad, Mehdi; Seyedjavadi, Sima Sadat; Mousavi, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Aloe vera is an herbal medicinal plant with biological activities, such as antimicrobial, anticancer, anti-inflammatory, and antidiabetic ones, and immunomodulatory properties. The purpose of this study was investigation of in vitro antimicrobial activity of A. vera gel against multidrug-resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from patients with burn wound infections. Methods. During a 6-month study, 140 clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa were collected from patients admitted to the burn wards of a hospital in Tehran, Iran. Antimicrobial susceptibility test was carried out against the pathogens using the A. vera gel and antibiotics (imipenem, gentamicin, and ciprofloxacin). Results. The antibiogram revealed that 47 (33.6%) of all isolates were MDR P. aeruginosa. The extract isolated from A. vera has antibacterial activity against all of isolates. Also, 42 (89.4%) isolates were inhibited by A. vera gel extract at minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) ≤ 200 µg/mL. MIC value of A. vera gel for other isolates (10.6%) was 800 µg/mL. All of MDR P. aeruginosa strains were inhibited by A. vera at similar MIC50 and MIC90 200 µg/mL. Conclusion. Based on our results, A. vera gel at various concentrations can be used as an effective antibacterial agent in order to prevent wound infection caused by P. aeruginosa. PMID:26266047

  13. The pulmonary involvement in Theileria lestoquardi naturally infected sheep.

    PubMed

    El Imam, Ahmed H; Hassan, Shawgi M; Gameel, Ahmed A; El Hussein, Abdelrahim M; Taha, Khalid M

    2016-01-01

    Malignant Ovine Theileriosis (MOT) caused by Theileria lestoquardi is considered a major constraint for sheep production in many areas of the world including Sudan. Pulmonary oedema is thought to be the main cause of animal death, but the mechanism, the cell types involved and/or the probable cause of this pneumonia has yet to be defined. The present study was carried out to investigate the pulmonary involvement post T. lestoquardi infection and to identify the cell types involved in pneumonia. Apparently healthy sheep were exposed to ticks challenge in T. lestoquardi endemic area. Lungs impression smears and tissue sections for histopathology were processed. At necropsy, fifteen infected sheep revealed severe pneumonia associated with oedema and accumulation of creamy-grayish frothy exudates. The microscopic findings of examined lungs showed emphysema, congestion, collapse and proliferation of immense amount of different kinds of cells. The current study indicates that T. lestoquardi infections are accompanied with remarkable pulmonary involvements and may lead to respiratory failure and death. PMID:27262956

  14. Auxotrophic variants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa are selected from prototrophic wild-type strains in respiratory infections in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Barth, A L; Pitt, T L

    1995-01-01

    Twenty-four nutritionally dependent (auxotrophic) Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains were isolated from 20 cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and tested for their amino acid requirements. Two different methods were necessary to identify the nutritional status of all isolates. Methionine was the most common single amino acid required (9 of 24 isolates), followed by leucine and arginine or ornithine. In total, a requirement for 12 different compounds or combination of compounds was demonstrated. Auxotrophic and prototrophic pairs of isolates from the same patient were compared by macrorestriction analysis of DNA in pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Thirteen of 18 pairs analyzed presented identical restriction fragment length polymorphism profiles following digestion of DNA with XbaI. Three of the remaining pairs showed percentage similarities of 77, 91, and 98%, and the profiles of two pairs could not be compared because of the excessive degradation of their DNA. These results suggest that auxotrophic and prototrophic P. aeruginosa isolates colonizing the same CF patient constitute an isogenic group and raise the possibility that auxotrophs are selected from the prototrophic population during the course of pulmonary infection in CF patients. PMID:7699062

  15. Insights into the respiratory tract microbiota of patients with cystic fibrosis during early Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization

    SciTech Connect

    Keravec, Marlene; Mounier, Jerome; Prestat , Emmanuel; Vallet, Sophie; Jansson, Janet K.; Bergaud , Gaetaqn; Rosec, Silvain; Gourious, Stephanie; Rault, Gilles; Coton, Emmanuel; Barbier, George; Hery-Arnaud, Geneveieve

    2015-08-09

    Abstract Pseudomonas aeruginosa plays a major role in cystic fibrosis (CF) progression. Therefore, it is important to understand the initial steps of P. aeruginosa infection. The structure and dynamics of CF respiratory tract microbial communities during the early stages of P. aeruginosa colonization were characterized by pyrosequencing and cloning-sequencing. The respiratory microbiota showed high diversity, related to the young age of the CF cohort (mean age 10 years). Wide inter- and intra-individual variations were revealed. A common core microbiota of 5 phyla and 13 predominant genera was found, the majority of which were obligate anaerobes. A few genera were significantly more prevalent in patients never infected by P. aeruginosa. Persistence of an anaerobic core microbiota regardless of P. aeruginosa status suggests a major role of certain anaerobes in the pathophysiology of lung infections in CF. Some genera may be potential biomarkers of pulmonary infection state.

  16. Insights into the respiratory tract microbiota of patients with cystic fibrosis during early Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization

    DOE PAGES

    Keravec, Marlène; Mounier, Jérôme; Prestat, Emmanuel; Vallet, Sophie; Jansson, Janet K.; Burgaud, Gaëtan; Rosec, Sylvain; Gouriou, Stéphanie; Rault, Gilles; Coton, Emmanuel; et al

    2015-08-09

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa plays a major role in cystic fibrosis (CF) progression. Therefore, it is important to understand the initial steps of P. aeruginosa infection. The structure and dynamics of CF respiratory tract microbial communities during the early stages of P. aeruginosa colonization were characterized by pyrosequencing and cloning-sequencing. The respiratory microbiota showed high diversity, related to the young age of the CF cohort (mean age 10 years). Wide inter- and intra-individual variations were revealed. A common core microbiota of 5 phyla and 13 predominant genera was found, the majority of which were obligate anaerobes. A few genera were significantly moremore » prevalent in patients never infected by P. aeruginosa. Persistence of an anaerobic core microbiota regardless of P. aeruginosa status suggests a major role of certain anaerobes in the pathophysiology of lung infections in CF. Some genera may be potential biomarkers of pulmonary infection state.« less

  17. Evolution and diversification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the paranasal sinuses of cystic fibrosis children have implications for chronic lung infection.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Susse Kirkelund; Rau, Martin Holm; Johansen, Helle Krogh; Ciofu, Oana; Jelsbak, Lars; Yang, Lei; Folkesson, Anders; Jarmer, Hanne Østergaard; Aanæs, Kasper; von Buchwald, Christian; Høiby, Niels; Molin, Søren

    2012-01-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a frequent colonizer of the airways of patients suffering from cystic fibrosis (CF). Depending on early treatment regimens, the colonization will, with high probability, develop into chronic infections sooner or later, and it is important to establish under which conditions the switch to chronic infection takes place. In association with a recently established sinus surgery treatment program for CF patients at the Copenhagen CF Center, colonization of the paranasal sinuses with P. aeruginosa has been investigated, paralleled by sampling of sputum from the same patients. On the basis of genotyping and phenotypic characterization including transcription profiling, the diversity of the P. aeruginosa populations in the sinuses and the lower airways was investigated and compared. The observations made from several children show that the paranasal sinuses constitute an important niche for the colonizing bacteria in many patients. The paranasal sinuses often harbor distinct bacterial subpopulations, and in the early colonization phases there seems to be a migration from the sinuses to the lower airways, suggesting that independent adaptation and evolution take place in the sinuses. Importantly, before the onset of chronic lung infection, lineages with mutations conferring a large fitness benefit in CF airways such as mucA and lasR as well as small colony variants and antibiotic-resistant clones are part of the sinus populations. Thus, the paranasal sinuses potentially constitute a protected niche of adapted clones of P. aeruginosa, which can intermittently seed the lungs and pave the way for subsequent chronic lung infections.

  18. Complete Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA1, Isolated from a Patient with a Respiratory Tract Infection.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shuguang; Le, Shuai; Li, Gang; Shen, Mengyu; Tan, Yinling; Zhao, Xia; Wang, Jing; Shen, Wei; Guo, Keke; Yang, Yuhui; Zhu, Hongbin; Li, Shu; Li, Ming; Zhu, Junmin; Rao, Xiancai; Hu, Fuquan

    2015-01-01

    We report the 6,498,072-bp complete genome sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA1, which was isolated from a patient with a respiratory tract infection in Chongqing, People's Republic of China. Whole-genome sequencing was performed using single-molecule real-time (SMRT) technology, and de novo assembly revealed a single contig with 396-fold sequence coverage. PMID:26659688

  19. Disseminated fungal infection complicated with pulmonary haemorrhage in a case of acute myeloid leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Thulkar, S; Sharma, S; Das, P; Kumar, L

    2000-01-01

    Pulmonary haemorrhage is a common necropsy finding in acute leukaemia, however, it is rarely diagnosed during life. A man with acute myeloid leukaemia is reported who presented with disseminated fungal infection, anaemia, thrombocytopenia, and subconjuctival and petechial haemorrhages. During the course of the patient's illness, the chest infection was complicated with bilateral pulmonary haemorrhage. The diagnosis of pulmonary haemorrhage was based on characteristic clinical and radiological findings. The patient improved on treatment.


Keywords: leukaemia; pulmonary infiltrate; haemorrhage PMID:11060145

  20. Nosocomial urinary tract infection in the intensive care unit: when should Pseudomonas aeruginosa be suspected? Experience of the French national surveillance of nosocomial infections in the intensive care unit, Rea-Raisin.

    PubMed

    Venier, A-G; Lavigne, T; Jarno, P; L'heriteau, F; Coignard, B; Savey, A; Rogues, A-M

    2012-01-01

    Individual and ward risk factors for P. aeruginosa-induced urinary tract infection in the case of nosocomial urinary tract infection in the intensive care unit were determined with hierarchical (multilevel) logistic regression. The 2004-2006 prospective French national intensive care unit nosocomial infection surveillance dataset was used and 3252 patients with urinary tract infection were included; 16% were infected by P. aeruginosa. Individual risk factors were male sex, duration of stay, antibiotics at admission and transfer from another intensive care unit. Ward risk factors were patient turnover and incidence of P. aeruginosa-infected patients.

  1. Protective effect of recombinant murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor against Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in leukocytopenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, T.; Okamura, S.; Okada, K.; Suga, A.; Shimono, N.; Ohhara, N.; Hirota, Y.; Sawae, Y.; Niho, Y.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of recombinant murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rmGM-CSF) against Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in ICR mice were investigated. Mice were treated with cyclophosphamide (CPA) and were then injected intraperitoneally with rmGM-CSF three times daily, beginning on the day after CPA treatment, for 7 days. The number of peripheral blood leukocytes in both CPA- and rmGM-CSF-treated mice and control CPA-treated mice reached a nadir on day 4, when P. aeruginosa was injected intraperitoneally. The administration of rmGM-CSF significantly increased the proportion of survivors among mice infected with a lethal dose of P. aeruginosa. This effect was further analyzed by monitoring sequential changes in leukocyte count and bacterial growth in various organs. The number of bacteria in the peritoneal cavities, peripheral blood samples, and livers of GM-CSF-treated mice decreased to an undetectable level after a transient increase, and the number was significantly lower than that in control mice. In GM-CSF-treated mice, the neutrophil levels in peripheral blood started to increase 5 days after CPA administration and were consistently higher than those in controls. Furthermore, the neutrophils in GM-CSF-treated mice were more mature morphologically. Thus, the prophylactic effect of rmGM-CSF against P. aeruginosa infection may result from a rapid recovery of myelopoiesis and a partial enhancement of mature neutrophil function. PMID:2656523

  2. Large Porous Particles for Sustained Release of a Decoy Oligonucelotide and Poly(ethylenimine): Potential for Combined Therapy of Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa Lung Infections.

    PubMed

    d'Angelo, Ivana; Perfetto, Brunella; Costabile, Gabriella; Ambrosini, Veronica; Caputo, Pina; Miro, Agnese; d'Emmanuele di Villa Bianca, Roberta; Sorrentino, Raffaella; Donnarumma, Giovanna; Quaglia, Fabiana; Ungaro, Francesca

    2016-05-01

    We have recently demonstrated that the specific inhibition of nuclear factor-κB by a decoy oligonucleotide (dec-ODN) delivered through inhalable large porous particles (LPP) made of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) may be highly beneficial for long-term treatment of lung inflammation. Nevertheless, besides chronic inflammation, multifunctional systems aimed to control also infection are required in chronic lung diseases, such as cystic fibrosis (CF). In this work, we tested the hypothesis that engineering PLGA-based LPP with branched poly(ethylenimine) (PEI) may improve LPP properties for pulmonary delivery of dec-ODN, with particular regard to the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections. After getting insight into the role of PEI on the technological properties of PLGA-based LPP for delivery of dec-ODN, the putative synergistic effect of PEI free or PEI released from LPP on in vitro antimicrobial activity of tobramycin (Tb) and aztreonam (AZT) against P. aeruginosa was elucidated. Meanwhile, cytotoxicity studies on A549 cells were carried out. Results clearly demonstrate that the dry powders have promising aerosolization properties and afford a prolonged in vitro release of both dec-ODN and PEI. The encapsulation of PEI into LPP results in a 2-fold reduction of the minimum inhibitory concentration of AZT, while reducing the cytotoxic effect of PEI. Of note, the developed ODN/PLGA/PEI LPP persisted at lung at least for 14 days after intratracheal administration in rats where they can provide sustained and combined release of dec-ODN and PEI. dec-ODN will likely act as an anti-inflammatory drug, while PEI may enhance the therapeutic activity of inhaled antibiotics, which are commonly employed for the treatment of concomitant lung infections. PMID:27002689

  3. In Vitro Analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Virulence Using Conditions That Mimic the Environment at Specific Infection Sites.

    PubMed

    Colmer-Hamood, J A; Dzvova, N; Kruczek, C; Hamood, A N

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative opportunistic pathogen that causes chronic lung infection in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and acute systemic infections in severely burned patients and immunocompromised patients including cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy and HIV infected individuals. In response to the environmental conditions at specific infection sites, P. aeruginosa expresses certain sets of cell-associated and extracellular virulence factors that produce tissue damage. Analyzing the mechanisms that govern the production of these virulence factors in vitro requires media that closely mimic the environmental conditions within the infection sites. In this chapter, we review studies based on media that closely resemble three in vivo conditions, the thick mucus accumulated within the lung alveoli of CF patients, the serum-rich wound bed and the bloodstream. Media resembling the CF alveolar mucus include standard laboratory media supplemented with sputum obtained from CF patients as well as prepared synthetic mucus media formulated to contain the individual components of CF sputum. Media supplemented with serum or individual serum components have served as surrogates for the soluble host components of wound infections, while whole blood has been used to investigate the adaptation of pathogens to the bloodstream. Studies using these media have provided valuable information regarding P. aeruginosa gene expression in different host environments as varying sets of genes were differentially regulated during growth in each medium. The unique effects observed indicate the essential role of these in vitro media that closely mimic the in vivo conditions in providing accurate information regarding the pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa infections. PMID:27571695

  4. Early Cytokine and Chemokine Gene Expression during Pseudomonas aeruginosa Corneal Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kernacki, Karen A.; Goebel, Dennis J.; Poosch, Michael S.; Hazlett, Linda D.

    1998-01-01

    Using a multiprobe RNase protection assay, we examined cytokine and chemokine mRNAs that were expressed after corneal infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in mice. Cytokines that were upregulated included interleukin-1α (IL-1α) and -1β, IL-1 receptor antagonist, IL-6, IL-11, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, macrophage colony-stimulating factor, stem cell factor, lymphotoxin β, transforming growth factor β1, and tumor necrosis factor alpha. Chemokine transcripts that were upregulated included Eotaxin; gamma-interferon-inducible protein 10; monocyte chemoattractant protein 1; macrophage inflammatory proteins 1α, 1β, and 2; and RANTES. Peak expression of these cytokines and chemokines was observed between 1 and 3 days after infection. These responses returned to or approached baseline preinfection levels by 7 days after ocular challenge. Identification of the various cytokines and chemokines upregulated during corneal infection provides important information relevant to unraveling the pathogenesis induced by this bacterium and provides hope that specific molecules can be targeted for therapy. PMID:9423885

  5. Inhibition of Biofilm Formation, Quorum Sensing and Infection in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by Natural Products-Inspired Organosulfur Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Cady, Nathaniel C.; McKean, Kurt A.; Behnke, Jason; Kubec, Roman; Mosier, Aaron P.; Kasper, Stephen H.; Burz, David S.; Musah, Rabi A.

    2012-01-01

    Using a microplate-based screening assay, the effects on Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 biofilm formation of several S-substituted cysteine sulfoxides and their corresponding disulfide derivatives were evaluated. From our library of compounds, S-phenyl-L-cysteine sulfoxide and its breakdown product, diphenyl disulfide, significantly reduced the amount of biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa at levels equivalent to the active concentration of 4-nitropyridine-N-oxide (NPO) (1 mM). Unlike NPO, which is an established inhibitor of bacterial biofilms, our active compounds did not reduce planktonic cell growth and only affected biofilm formation. When used in a Drosophila-based infection model, both S-phenyl-L-cysteine sulfoxide and diphenyl disulfide significantly reduced the P. aeruginosa recovered 18 h post infection (relative to the control), and were non-lethal to the fly hosts. The possibility that the observed biofilm inhibitory effects were related to quorum sensing inhibition (QSI) was investigated using Escherichia coli-based reporters expressing P. aeruginosa lasR or rhIR response proteins, as well as an endogenous P. aeruginosa reporter from the lasI/lasR QS system. Inhibition of quorum sensing by S-phenyl-L-cysteine sulfoxide was observed in all of the reporter systems tested, whereas diphenyl disulfide did not exhibit QSI in either of the E. coli reporters, and showed very limited inhibition in the P. aeruginosa reporter. Since both compounds inhibit biofilm formation but do not show similar QSI activity, it is concluded that they may be functioning by different pathways. The hypothesis that biofilm inhibition by the two active compounds discovered in this work occurs through QSI is discussed. PMID:22715388

  6. Protective role of Th17 cells in pulmonary infection.

    PubMed

    Rathore, Jitendra Singh; Wang, Yan

    2016-03-18

    Th17 cells are characterized as preferential producer of interleukins including IL-17A, IL-17F, IL-21 and IL-22. Corresponding receptors of these cytokines are expressed on number of cell types found in the mucosa, including epithelial cells and fibroblasts which constitute the prime targets of the Th17-associated cytokines. Binding of IL-17 family members to their corresponding receptors lead to modulation of antimicrobial functions of target cells including alveolar epithelial cells. Stimulated alveolar epithelial cells produce antimicrobial peptides and are involved in granulepoesis, neutrophil recruitment and tissue repair. Mucosal immunity mediated by Th17 cells is protective against numerous pulmonary pathogens including extracellular bacterial and fungal pathogens. This review focuses on the protective role of Th17 cells during pulmonary infection, highlighting subset differentiation, effector cytokines production, followed by study of the binding of these cytokines to their corresponding receptors, the subsequent signaling pathway they engender and their effector role in host defense.

  7. Protective role of Th17 cells in pulmonary infection.

    PubMed

    Rathore, Jitendra Singh; Wang, Yan

    2016-03-18

    Th17 cells are characterized as preferential producer of interleukins including IL-17A, IL-17F, IL-21 and IL-22. Corresponding receptors of these cytokines are expressed on number of cell types found in the mucosa, including epithelial cells and fibroblasts which constitute the prime targets of the Th17-associated cytokines. Binding of IL-17 family members to their corresponding receptors lead to modulation of antimicrobial functions of target cells including alveolar epithelial cells. Stimulated alveolar epithelial cells produce antimicrobial peptides and are involved in granulepoesis, neutrophil recruitment and tissue repair. Mucosal immunity mediated by Th17 cells is protective against numerous pulmonary pathogens including extracellular bacterial and fungal pathogens. This review focuses on the protective role of Th17 cells during pulmonary infection, highlighting subset differentiation, effector cytokines production, followed by study of the binding of these cytokines to their corresponding receptors, the subsequent signaling pathway they engender and their effector role in host defense. PMID:26878294

  8. A non-surgical rat model of foreign body-associated urinary tract infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Kurosaka, Y; Ishida, Y; Yamamura, E; Takase, H; Otani, T; Kumon, H

    2001-01-01

    This study established a rat model of foreign body-associated urinary tract infection. A spiral polyethylene tube (PT) was placed transurethrally into the bladder without surgical manipulation, followed by transurethral inoculation with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The persistence of P. aeruginosa in the kidneys and bladder was significantly enhanced by placement of the PT, whereas the bacteria were eliminated rapidly from the urinary tract in the animals without the PT. Scanning electron microscopy revealed a thick biofilm on the surface of the PT from the early stage of infection. Histopathologically, acute pyelonephritis was followed by chronic renal inflammation as well as continuous and sporadic polymorphonuclear leukocyte accumulation and hemorrhage in the pelvis and adjacent tissues, suggesting continuous ascending introduction of the bacteria from the biofilm adhering to the PT. We believe our model simulates the pathophysiology of foreign body-associated urinary tract infection characterized by biofilm formation on the surface of a foreign body.

  9. Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection augments inflammation through miR-301b repression of c-Myb-mediated immune activation and infiltration.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuefeng; He, Sisi; Li, Rongpeng; Zhou, Xikun; Zhang, Shuang; Yu, Min; Ye, Yan; Wang, Yongsheng; Huang, Canhua; Wu, Min

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play critical roles in various biological processes, including cell proliferation, development and host defence. However, the molecular mechanism for miRNAs in regulating bacterial-induced inflammation remains largely unclear. Here, we report that miR-301b augments pro-inflammatory response during pulmonary infection, and caffeine suppresses the effect of miR-301b and thereby augments respiratory immunity. LPS treatment or Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection induces miR-301b expression via a TLR4/MyD88/NF-κB pathway. Importantly, caffeine decreases miR-301b expression through negative regulation of the cAMP/PKA/NF-κB axis. Further, c-Myb is identified as a target of miR-301b, which positively modulates anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-4 and TGF-β1, but negatively regulates pro-inflammatory cytokines MIP-1α and IL-17A. Moreover, repression of miR-301b results in increased transcription of c-Myb and elevated levels of neutrophil infiltration, thereby alleviating infectious symptoms in mice. These findings reveal miR-301b as a new controller of inflammatory response by repressing c-Myb function to inhibit the anti-inflammatory response to bacterial infection, representing a novel mechanism for balancing inflammation. PMID:27670114

  10. New-onset neonatal pulmonary hypertension associated with a rhinovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Patel, Nishit; The, Tiong G

    2012-01-01

    A 3.5-week-old male neonate who developed an upper and lower respiratory tract rhinovirus infection that was temporally associated with the development of severe pulmonary hypertension is described. Rhinovirus has not previously been associated with pulmonary hypertension. This child developed severe pulmonary hypertension with right ventricular failure, requiring mechanical ventilation, nitric oxide inhalation and, eventually, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

  11. Increased susceptibility to lethal Candida infections in burned mice preinfected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa or pretreated with proteolytic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Neely, A N; Law, E J; Holder, I A

    1986-04-01

    Lethal Candida infections in burn patients are frequently preceded by or occur concomitantly with bacterial infections, which are often due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In this study, we developed a burned, mixed-challenge mouse model, which was designed to determine whether and how a recent bacterial infection could influence the development of subsequent candidosis. In this model, burned mice that were preinfected with a sublethal challenge of elastase-producing P. aeruginosa strain WR-5 and then sublethally challenged with Candida albicans exhibited a mortality rate of 60%, while unburned mice challenged in the same way and burned mice that received only one challenge organism exhibited mortality rates of less than 10%. Quantitative microbial counts performed with the kidneys, livers, and eschars of burned mice challenged with both organisms indicated that the deaths were due to Candida infection. Substitution of an elastase-negative P. aeruginosa strain for strain WR-5 in the model resulted in significantly lower mortality rates and lower microbial numbers in the organs. When the Pseudomonas enzyme elastase was substituted for the elastase-positive bacteria in the model, both the mortality rates and the organ counts were comparable to the values found after preinfection with strain WR-5. Another protease, thermolysin, was substituted for the elastase and produced similar mortality results. When the protease inhibitor alpha 2-macroglobulin was given to burned mice infected with the two organisms, it prevented the deaths due to Candida infection. We concluded that this model is one way to study bacterial-fungal infections in burned mice, that recent Pseudomonas infections could predispose burned mice to fatal candidosis, and that the proteolytic activity generated by the bacteria was primarily responsible for the establishment of lethal fungal infections.

  12. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator is an Epithelial Cell Receptor for Clearance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from the Lung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pier, Gerald B.; Grout, Martha; Zaidi, Tanweer S.

    1997-10-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a chloride ion channel, but its relationship to the primary clinical manifestation of CF, chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa pulmonary infection, is unclear. We report that CFTR is a cellular receptor for binding, endocytosing, and clearing P. aeruginosa from the normal lung. Murine cells expressing recombinant human wild-type CFTR ingested 30-100 times as many P. aeruginosa as cells lacking CFTR or expressing mutant Δ F508 CFTR protein. Purified CFTR inhibited ingestion of P. aeruginosa by human airway epithelial cells. The first extracellular domain of CFTR specifically bound to P. aeruginosa and a synthetic peptide of this region inhibited P. aeruginosa internalization in vivo, leading to increased bacterial lung burdens. CFTR clears P. aeruginosa from the lung, indicating a direct connection between mutations in CFTR and the clinical consequences of CF.

  13. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infection in a Group of Captive Humboldt Penguins ( Spheniscus humboldti ).

    PubMed

    Widmer, Dimitri; Ziemssen, Eva; Schade, Benjamin; Kappe, Eva; Schmitt, Ferdinand; Kempf, Hermann; Wibbelt, Gudrun

    2016-06-01

    Nine Humboldt penguins ( Spheniscus humboldti ), between 1 and 1.5 years old and kept at Zoo Dresden, developed local and systemic infections with various opportunistic pathogens within a period of 4 months. Affected birds died peracutely without preceding symptoms or showed various clinical signs, including separation from conspecifics, reduced food intake, lethargy, dyspnea, swelling of the salt glands, and ocular discharge. One bird showed central nervous signs, including seizures. Pathologic examination of deceased birds revealed severe necrotizing inflammation of the mucous membranes and deep structures of the glottis, trachea, nasal sinus, and conchae and granulomatous inflammation of the salt glands. Further findings were airsacculitis, pneumonia, hepatitis, conjunctivitis, and myositis. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the predominant pathogen in 7 cases. Six penguins died or were euthanatized, whereas 3 penguins that received systemic antibiotic treatment with tobramycin (10 mg/kg IM q24h for 10 days) showed rapid clinical improvement. Insufficient turnover rate of the filtration system, biofilm formation on pipe surfaces, and other factors are assumed to have promoted pathogen buildup in the pool water and subsequent infection.

  14. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infection in a Group of Captive Humboldt Penguins ( Spheniscus humboldti ).

    PubMed

    Widmer, Dimitri; Ziemssen, Eva; Schade, Benjamin; Kappe, Eva; Schmitt, Ferdinand; Kempf, Hermann; Wibbelt, Gudrun

    2016-06-01

    Nine Humboldt penguins ( Spheniscus humboldti ), between 1 and 1.5 years old and kept at Zoo Dresden, developed local and systemic infections with various opportunistic pathogens within a period of 4 months. Affected birds died peracutely without preceding symptoms or showed various clinical signs, including separation from conspecifics, reduced food intake, lethargy, dyspnea, swelling of the salt glands, and ocular discharge. One bird showed central nervous signs, including seizures. Pathologic examination of deceased birds revealed severe necrotizing inflammation of the mucous membranes and deep structures of the glottis, trachea, nasal sinus, and conchae and granulomatous inflammation of the salt glands. Further findings were airsacculitis, pneumonia, hepatitis, conjunctivitis, and myositis. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the predominant pathogen in 7 cases. Six penguins died or were euthanatized, whereas 3 penguins that received systemic antibiotic treatment with tobramycin (10 mg/kg IM q24h for 10 days) showed rapid clinical improvement. Insufficient turnover rate of the filtration system, biofilm formation on pipe surfaces, and other factors are assumed to have promoted pathogen buildup in the pool water and subsequent infection. PMID:27315388

  15. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and infection. Disruption of the microbiome?

    PubMed

    Sethi, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    The dynamics of infection in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are complex, and microbiome technology has provided us with a new research tool for its better understanding. There is compartmentalization of the microbiota in the various parts of the lung. Studies of the lower airway lumen microbiota in COPD have yielded confusing results, and additional studies with scrupulous attention to prevent and account for upper airway contamination of bronchoalveolar lavage samples are required. Lung tissue microbiota has been examined in three studies, which also demonstrate varied results based on the site of sampling (bronchial mucosa, lung parenchyma), and this variation extends to sampling sites within a lobe of the lung. The Vicious Circle Hypothesis embodies how an altered lung microbiome could contribute to COPD progression. Relating microbiota composition to airway and systemic inflammation and clinical outcomes are important research questions. Although various obstacles need to be surmounted, ultimately lung microbiome studies will provide new insights into how infection contributes to COPD.

  16. Efficacy of species-specific protein antibiotics in a murine model of acute Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection

    PubMed Central

    McCaughey, Laura C.; Ritchie, Neil. D.; Douce, Gillian R.; Evans, Thomas J.; Walker, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Protein antibiotics, known as bacteriocins, are widely produced by bacteria for intraspecies competition. The potency and targeted action of bacteriocins suggests that they could be developed into clinically useful antibiotics against highly drug resistant Gram-negative pathogens for which there are few therapeutic options. Here we show that Pseudomonas aeruginosa specific bacteriocins, known as pyocins, show strong efficacy in a murine model of P. aeruginosa lung infection, with the concentration of pyocin S5 required to afford protection from a lethal infection at least 100-fold lower than the most commonly used inhaled antibiotic tobramycin. Additionally, pyocins are stable in the lung, poorly immunogenic at high concentrations and efficacy is maintained in the presence of pyocin specific antibodies after repeated pyocin administration. Bacteriocin encoding genes are frequently found in microbial genomes and could therefore offer a ready supply of highly targeted and potent antibiotics active against problematic Gram-negative pathogens. PMID:27444885

  17. Human immunodeficiency virus, herpes virus infections, and pulmonary vascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Sonia C.; Almodovar, Sharilyn

    2013-01-01

    The following state-of-the-art seminar was delivered as part of the Aspen Lung Conference on Pulmonary Hypertension and Vascular Diseases held in Aspen, Colorado in June 2012. This paper will summarize the lecture and present results from a nonhuman primate model of infection with Simian (Human) Immunodeficiency Virus - nef chimeric virions as well as the idea that polymorphisms in the HIV-1 nef gene may be driving the immune response that results in exuberant inflammation and aberrant endothelial cell (EC) function. We will present data gathered from primary HIV nef isolates where we tested the biological consequences of these polymorphisms and how their presence in human populations may predict patients at risk for developing this disease. In this article, we also discuss how a dysregulated immune system, in conjunction with a viral infection, could contribute to pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Both autoimmune diseases and some viruses are associated with defects in the immune system, primarily in the function of regulatory T cells. These T-cell defects may be a common pathway in the formation of plexiform lesions. Regardless of the route by which viruses may lead to PAH, it is important to recognize their role in this rare disease. PMID:23662195

  18. Infected infradiaphragmatic retroperitoneal extralobar pulmonary sequestration: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Koo; Choi, Young Ho; Ryu, Se Min; Kim, Han Kyeom; Chae, Yang Seok; Sohn, Young-sang; Kim, Hark Jei

    2005-12-01

    Infradiaphragmatic extralobar pulmonary sequestration is an extremely rare congenital malformation. It is more frequently diagnosed in the antenatal period due to routine ultrasonic examination of the fetus or in the first 6 months of life, though on rare occasions it is discovered incidentally in adults. A 32-yr-old man presenting with epigastric discomfort and fever was referred. Computed tomographic scanning showed that a 16-cm, multiseptated, dumbbell-shaped, huge cystic tumor was located beneath the diaphragm. On the next day, 850 mL of thick yellowish pus was drained by sonography-guided fine needle aspiration for the purpose of infection control and diagnosis, but no microscopic organisms were found in repeated culture studies. Surgical removal of the cyst was performed through thoracoabdominal incision and most of these pathologic lesions were removed but we could not find the feeding arteries or any fistulous tract to surrounding structures. Histopathologic study revealed that it was extralobar pulmonary sequestration and culture study showed that many WBC and necrotic materials were found but there were no microorganisms in the cystic contents. We report the first case of an infected infradiaphragmatic retroperitoneal extralobar sequestration which was administered a staged management and achieved an excellent clinical course.

  19. Bundled strategies against infection after liver transplantation: Lessons from multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Sato, Asahi; Kaido, Toshimi; Iida, Taku; Yagi, Shintaro; Hata, Koichiro; Okajima, Hideaki; Takakura, Shunji; Ichiyama, Satoshi; Uemoto, Shinji

    2016-04-01

    Infection is a life-threatening complication after liver transplantation (LT). A recent outbreak of multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa triggered changes in our infection control measures. This study investigated the usefulness of our bundled interventions against postoperative infection after LT. This before-and-after analysis enrolled 130 patients who underwent living donor or deceased donor LT between January 2011 and October 2014. We initiated 3 measures after January 2013: (1) we required LT candidates to be able to walk independently; (2) we increased the hand hygiene compliance rate and contact precautions; and (3) we introduced procalcitonin (PCT) measurement for a more precise determination of empirical antimicrobial treatment. We compared factors affecting the emergence of drug-resistant microorganisms, such as the duration of antimicrobial and carbapenem therapy and hospital stay, and outcomes such as bacteremia and death from infection between before (n = 77) and after (n = 53) the LT suspension period. The utility of PCT measurement was also evaluated. Patients' backgrounds were not significantly different before and after the protocol revision. Incidence of bacteremia (44% versus 25%; P = 0.02), detection rate of multiple bacteria (18% versus 4%; P = 0.01), and deaths from infections (12% versus 2%; P =  0.04) significantly decreased after the protocol revision. Duration of antibiotic (42.3 versus 25.1 days; P =  0.002) and carbapenem administration (15.1 versus 5.2 days; P < 0.001) and the length of postoperative hospital stay (85.4 versus 63.5 days; P =  0.048) also decreased after the protocol revision. PCT mean values were significantly higher in the bacteremia group (10.10 ng/mL), compared with the uneventful group (0.65 ng/mL; P =  0.002) and rejection group (2.30 ng/mL; P =  0.02). One-year overall survival after LT significantly increased in the latter period (71% versus 94%; P =  0

  20. Bundled strategies against infection after liver transplantation: Lessons from multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Sato, Asahi; Kaido, Toshimi; Iida, Taku; Yagi, Shintaro; Hata, Koichiro; Okajima, Hideaki; Takakura, Shunji; Ichiyama, Satoshi; Uemoto, Shinji

    2016-04-01

    Infection is a life-threatening complication after liver transplantation (LT). A recent outbreak of multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa triggered changes in our infection control measures. This study investigated the usefulness of our bundled interventions against postoperative infection after LT. This before-and-after analysis enrolled 130 patients who underwent living donor or deceased donor LT between January 2011 and October 2014. We initiated 3 measures after January 2013: (1) we required LT candidates to be able to walk independently; (2) we increased the hand hygiene compliance rate and contact precautions; and (3) we introduced procalcitonin (PCT) measurement for a more precise determination of empirical antimicrobial treatment. We compared factors affecting the emergence of drug-resistant microorganisms, such as the duration of antimicrobial and carbapenem therapy and hospital stay, and outcomes such as bacteremia and death from infection between before (n = 77) and after (n = 53) the LT suspension period. The utility of PCT measurement was also evaluated. Patients' backgrounds were not significantly different before and after the protocol revision. Incidence of bacteremia (44% versus 25%; P = 0.02), detection rate of multiple bacteria (18% versus 4%; P = 0.01), and deaths from infections (12% versus 2%; P =  0.04) significantly decreased after the protocol revision. Duration of antibiotic (42.3 versus 25.1 days; P =  0.002) and carbapenem administration (15.1 versus 5.2 days; P < 0.001) and the length of postoperative hospital stay (85.4 versus 63.5 days; P =  0.048) also decreased after the protocol revision. PCT mean values were significantly higher in the bacteremia group (10.10 ng/mL), compared with the uneventful group (0.65 ng/mL; P =  0.002) and rejection group (2.30 ng/mL; P =  0.02). One-year overall survival after LT significantly increased in the latter period (71% versus 94%; P =  0

  1. Baicalein attenuates the quorum sensing-controlled virulence factors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and relieves the inflammatory response in P. aeruginosa-infected macrophages by downregulating the MAPK and NFκB signal-transduction pathways

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jing; Kong, Jin-liang; Dong, Bi-ying; Huang, Hong; Wang, Ke; Wu, Li-hong; Hou, Chang-chun; Liang, Yue; Li, Bing; Chen, Yi-qiang

    2016-01-01

    Burgeoning antibiotic resistance and unfavorable outcomes of inflammatory injury after Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection have necessitated the development of novel agents that not only target quorum sensing (QS) but also combat inflammatory injury with the least risk of resistance. This study aimed to assess the anti-QS and anti-inflammatory activities of baicalein, a traditional herbal medicine that is widely used in the People’s Republic of China, against P. aeruginosa infection. We found that subminimum inhibitory concentrations of baicalein efficiently interfered with the QS-signaling pathway of P. aeruginosa via downregulation of the transcription of QS-regulated genes and the translation of QS-signaling molecules. This interference resulted in the global attenuation of QS-controlled virulence factors, such as motility and biofilm formation, and the secretion into the culture supernatant of extracellular virulence factors, including pyocyanin, LasA protease, LasB elastase, and rhamnolipids. Moreover, we examined the anti-inflammatory activity of baicalein and its mode of action via a P. aeruginosa-infected macrophage model to address its therapeutic effect. Baicalein reduced the P. aeruginosa-induced secretion of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and TNFα. In addition, baicalein suppressed P. aeruginosa-induced activation of the MAPK and NFκB signal-transduction pathways in cocultured macrophages; this may be the mechanism by which baicalein inhibits the production of proinflammatory cytokines. Therefore, our study demonstrates that baicalein represents a potential treatment for P. aeruginosa infection because it clearly exhibits both antibacterial and anti-inflammatory activities. PMID:26792984

  2. Baicalein attenuates the quorum sensing-controlled virulence factors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and relieves the inflammatory response in P. aeruginosa-infected macrophages by downregulating the MAPK and NFκB signal-transduction pathways.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jing; Kong, Jin-Liang; Dong, Bi-Ying; Huang, Hong; Wang, Ke; Wu, Li-Hong; Hou, Chang-Chun; Liang, Yue; Li, Bing; Chen, Yi-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Burgeoning antibiotic resistance and unfavorable outcomes of inflammatory injury after Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection have necessitated the development of novel agents that not only target quorum sensing (QS) but also combat inflammatory injury with the least risk of resistance. This study aimed to assess the anti-QS and anti-inflammatory activities of baicalein, a traditional herbal medicine that is widely used in the People's Republic of China, against P. aeruginosa infection. We found that subminimum inhibitory concentrations of baicalein efficiently interfered with the QS-signaling pathway of P. aeruginosa via downregulation of the transcription of QS-regulated genes and the translation of QS-signaling molecules. This interference resulted in the global attenuation of QS-controlled virulence factors, such as motility and biofilm formation, and the secretion into the culture supernatant of extracellular virulence factors, including pyocyanin, LasA protease, LasB elastase, and rhamnolipids. Moreover, we examined the anti-inflammatory activity of baicalein and its mode of action via a P. aeruginosa-infected macrophage model to address its therapeutic effect. Baicalein reduced the P. aeruginosa-induced secretion of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and TNFα. In addition, baicalein suppressed P. aeruginosa-induced activation of the MAPK and NFκB signal-transduction pathways in cocultured macrophages; this may be the mechanism by which baicalein inhibits the production of proinflammatory cytokines. Therefore, our study demonstrates that baicalein represents a potential treatment for P. aeruginosa infection because it clearly exhibits both antibacterial and anti-inflammatory activities.

  3. Requirement of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa CbrA Sensor Kinase for Full Virulence in a Murine Acute Lung Infection Model

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Amy T. Y.; Janot, Laure; Pena, Olga M.; Neidig, Anke; Kukavica-Ibrulj, Irena; Hilchie, Ashley; Levesque, Roger C.; Overhage, Joerg

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that is a major cause of respiratory tract and other nosocomial infections. The sensor kinase CbrA is a central regulator of carbon and nitrogen metabolism and in vitro also regulates virulence-related processes in P. aeruginosa. Here, we investigated the role of CbrA in two murine models of infection. In both peritoneal infections in leukopenic mice and lung infection models, the cbrA mutant was less virulent since substantially larger numbers of cbrA mutant bacteria were required to cause the same level of infection as wild-type or complemented bacteria. In contrast, in the chronic rat lung model the cbrA mutant grew and persisted as well as the wild type, indicating that the decrease of in vivo virulence of the cbrA mutant did not result from growth deficiencies on particular carbon substrates observed in vitro. In addition, a mutant in the cognate response regulator CbrB showed no defect in virulence in the peritoneal infection model, ruling out the involvement of certain alterations of virulence properties in the cbrA mutant including defective swarming motility, increased biofilm formation, and cytotoxicity, since these alterations are controlled through CbrB. Further investigations indicated that the mutant was more susceptible to uptake by phagocytes in vitro, resulting in greater overall bacterial killing. Consistent with the virulence defect, it took a smaller number of Dictyostelium discoideum amoebae to kill the cbrA mutant than to kill the wild type. Transcriptional analysis of the cbrA mutant during D. discoideum infection led to the conclusion that CbrA played an important role in the iron metabolism, protection of P. aeruginosa against oxidative stress, and the regulation of certain virulence factors. PMID:24379284

  4. Requirement of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa CbrA sensor kinase for full virulence in a murine acute lung infection model.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Amy T Y; Janot, Laure; Pena, Olga M; Neidig, Anke; Kukavica-Ibrulj, Irena; Hilchie, Ashley; Levesque, Roger C; Overhage, Joerg; Hancock, Robert E W

    2014-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that is a major cause of respiratory tract and other nosocomial infections. The sensor kinase CbrA is a central regulator of carbon and nitrogen metabolism and in vitro also regulates virulence-related processes in P. aeruginosa. Here, we investigated the role of CbrA in two murine models of infection. In both peritoneal infections in leukopenic mice and lung infection models, the cbrA mutant was less virulent since substantially larger numbers of cbrA mutant bacteria were required to cause the same level of infection as wild-type or complemented bacteria. In contrast, in the chronic rat lung model the cbrA mutant grew and persisted as well as the wild type, indicating that the decrease of in vivo virulence of the cbrA mutant did not result from growth deficiencies on particular carbon substrates observed in vitro. In addition, a mutant in the cognate response regulator CbrB showed no defect in virulence in the peritoneal infection model, ruling out the involvement of certain alterations of virulence properties in the cbrA mutant including defective swarming motility, increased biofilm formation, and cytotoxicity, since these alterations are controlled through CbrB. Further investigations indicated that the mutant was more susceptible to uptake by phagocytes in vitro, resulting in greater overall bacterial killing. Consistent with the virulence defect, it took a smaller number of Dictyostelium discoideum amoebae to kill the cbrA mutant than to kill the wild type. Transcriptional analysis of the cbrA mutant during D. discoideum infection led to the conclusion that CbrA played an important role in the iron metabolism, protection of P. aeruginosa against oxidative stress, and the regulation of certain virulence factors.

  5. Antibiotic resistance pattern of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from urine samples of Urinary Tract Infections patients in Karachi, Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Dania Aijaz; Wasim, Shehnaz; Essa Abdullah, Farhan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibiotic resistance pattern of Psedomonas aeruginosa and its prevalence in patients with urinary tract infections (UTI) for effective treatment in a developing country like Pakistan. Methods: This is an observational study conducted for a period of ten months which ended on December 2013 at the Dr. Essa Laboratory and Diagnostic Centre in Karachi. A total of 4668 urine samples of UTI patients were collected and standard microbiological techniques were performed to identify the organisms in urine cultures. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed by Kirby-Bauer technique for twenty five commonly used antimicrobials and then analyzed on SPSS version 17. Results: P. aeruginosa was isolated in 254 cultures (5.4%). The most resistant drugs included Ceclor(100%) and Cefizox (100%) followed by Amoxil/Ampicillin (99.6%), Ceflixime (99.6%), Doxycycline (99.6%), Cefuroxime (99.2%), Cephradine (99.2%), Cotrimoxazole (99.2%), Nalidixic acid (98.8%), Pipemidic acid (98.6%) and Augmentin (97.6%). Conclusion: Emerging resistant strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa are potentially linked to injudicious use of drugs leading to ineffective empirical therapy and in turn, appearance of even more resistant strains of the bacterium. Therefore, we recommend culture and sensitivity testing to determine the presence of P.aeruginosa prior to specific antimicrobial therapy. PMID:26101487

  6. Colistimethate sodium for the treatment of chronic pulmonary infection in cystic fibrosis: an evidence-based review of its place in therapy

    PubMed Central

    Koerner-Rettberg, Cordula; Ballmann, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    Chronic bacterial respiratory-tract infections are a major driving force in the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease and promote chronic lung-function decline, destruction, and progression to respiratory failure at a premature age. Gram-negative bacteria colonizing the airways in CF are a major problem in CF therapy due to their tendency to develop a high degree of resistance to antibiotic agents over time. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the dominating bacterial strain infecting the CF lung from early childhood on, and multiresistant strains frequently develop after years of therapy. Colistin has been used for treating pulmonary bacterial infections in CF for decades due to its very good Gram-negative activity. However, drawbacks include concerns regarding toxicity when being applied systemically, and the lack of approval for application by inhalation in the USA for many years. Other antibiotic substances for systemic use are available with good to excellent Gram-negative and anti-Pseudomonas activity, while there are only three substances approved for inhalation use in the treatment of chronic pulmonary infection with proven benefit in CF. The emergence of multiresistant strains leaving nearly no antibiotic substance as a treatment option, the limited number of antibiotics with high activity against P. aeruginosa, the concerns about increasing the risk of antibiotic resistance by continuous antibiotic therapy, the development of new drug formulations and drug-delivery devices, and, finally, the differing treatment strategies used in CF centers call for defining the place of this “old” drug, colistimethate, in today’s CF therapy. This article reviews the available evidence to reflect on the place of colistimethate sodium in the therapy of chronic pulmonary infection in CF. PMID:25278817

  7. Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in patients with cystic fibrosis: scientific evidence regarding clinical impact, diagnosis, and treatment*

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Luiz Vicente Ribeiro Ferreira; Ferreira, Flavia de Aguiar; Reis, Francisco José Caldeira; de Britto, Murilo Carlos Amorim; Levy, Carlos Emilio; Clark, Otavio; Ribeiro, José Dirceu

    2013-01-01

    Evidence-based techniques have been increasingly used in the creation of clinical guidelines and the development of recommendations for medical practice. The use of levels of evidence allows the reader to identify the quality of scientific information that supports the recommendations made by experts. The objective of this review was to address current concepts related to the clinical impact, diagnosis, and treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in patients with cystic fibrosis. For the preparation of this review, the authors defined a group of questions that would be answered in accordance with the principles of PICO–an acronym based on questions regarding the Patients of interest, Intervention being studied, Comparison of the intervention, and Outcome of interest. For each question, a structured review of the literature was performed using the Medline database in order to identify the studies with the methodological design most appropriate to answering the question. The questions were designed so that each of the authors could write a response. A first draft was prepared and discussed by the group. Recommendations were then made on the basis of the level of scientific evidence, in accordance with the classification system devised by the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine, as well as the level of agreement among the members of the group. PMID:24068273

  8. Real-time PCR detection of host-mediated cyanophage gene transcripts during infection of a natural Microcystis aeruginosa population.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Mitsuhiro; Yoshida, Takashi; Yoshida-Takashima, Yukari; Kashima, Aki; Hiroishi, Shingo

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR (real-time RT-PCR) assay to detect and quantify mRNA of cyanophages within infected Microcystis aeruginosa cells in a freshwater pond. Laboratory-based data showed that the relative abundance of the cyanophage g91 mRNA within host cells increased before cyanophage numbers increased in culture. This transcriptional pattern indicated the kinetics of the viral infection suggesting the real-time RT-PCR method to be a potential tool for environmental monitoring of cyanophage infections. In this field survey, the numbers of infected M. aeruginosa cell populations estimated from cyanophage numbers were low at 0.01-2.9 cells mL(-1). The highest relative abundance of phage g91 RNA (10(-2) per rnpB transcript) was at about the same levels of expression as laboratory-based growth data for Ma-LMM01 (estimated density of infected host cells: 10(5) cells mL(-1)); and was observed when cyanophage numbers rapidly increased (as well as a decrease in host cell numbers). Quantification of cyanophage numbers is important to understand ecological relationships between the phage and its hosts. Our data suggest the quantification of phage gene transcripts within a natural host cell population to be a strong tool for investigating the quantitative effects of phage lysis during infection of the host population.

  9. Simple sequence repeats together with mismatch repair deficiency can bias mutagenic pathways in Pseudomonas aeruginosa during chronic lung infection.

    PubMed

    Moyano, Alejandro J; Feliziani, Sofía; Di Rienzo, Julio A; Smania, Andrea M

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that chronically infects the airways of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and undergoes a process of genetic adaptation based on mutagenesis. We evaluated the role of mononucleotide G:C and A:T simple sequence repeats (SSRs) in this adaptive process. An in silico survey of the genome sequences of 7 P. aeruginosa strains showed that mononucleotide G:C SSRs but not A:T SSRs were greatly under-represented in coding regions, suggesting a strong counterselection process for G:C SSRs with lengths >5 bp but not for A:T SSRs. A meta-analysis of published whole genome sequence data for a P. aeruginosa strain from a CF patient with chronic airway infection showed that G:C SSRs but not A:T SSRs were frequently mutated during the infection process through the insertion or deletion of one or more SSR subunits. The mutation tendency of G:C SSRs was length-dependent and increased exponentially as a function of SSR length. When this strain naturally became a stable Mismatch Repair System (MRS)-deficient mutator, the degree of increase of G:C SSRs mutations (5-fold) was much higher than that of other types of mutation (2.2-fold or less). Sequence analysis of several mutated genes reported for two different collections, both containing mutator and non-mutator strains of P. aeruginosa from CF chronic infections, showed that the proportion of G:C SSR mutations was significantly higher in mutators than in non-mutators, whereas no such difference was observed for A:T SSR mutations. Our findings, taken together, provide genome-scale evidences that under a MRS-deficient background, long G:C SSRs are able to stochastically bias mutagenic pathways by making the genes in which they are harbored more prone to mutation. The combination of MRS deficiency and virulence-related genes that contain long G:C SSRs is therefore a matter of concern in P. aeruginosa CF chronic infection.

  10. Antimicrobial resistance and genetic characterization of fluoroquinolone resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from canine infections.

    PubMed

    Rubin, J; Walker, R D; Blickenstaff, K; Bodeis-Jones, S; Zhao, S

    2008-09-18

    Infections with antimicrobial-resistant bacteria are a great challenge in both human and veterinary medicine. The purpose of this study was to determine antimicrobial susceptibility of 106 strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from dogs with otitis and pyoderma from 2003 to 2006 in the United States. Three antimicrobial panels, including 6 classes and 32 antimicrobial agents, were used. A wide range of susceptibility patterns were noted with some isolates being resistant to between 8 and 28 (mean 16) of the antimicrobials tested. Among the beta-lactams, all isolates were resistant to ampicillin, cefoxitin, cefpodoxime, cephalothin and cefazolin followed by amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (99%), ceftiofur (97%), ceftriaxone (39%), cefotaxime (26%), and cefotaxime/clavulanic acid (20%), whereas less than 7% of isolates were resistant to ceftazidime/clavulanic acid, ceftazidime, piperacillin/tazobactam or cefepime. Two isolates were resistant to the carbapenems. Among the quinolones and fluoroquinolones, the most isolates were resistant to naladixic acid (96%), followed by orbifloxacin (52%), difloxacin (43%), enrofloxacin (31%), marbofloxacin (27%), gatifloxacin (23%), levofloxacin (21%), and ciprofloxacin (16%). Among the aminoglycosides, the most resistance was seen to kanamycin (90%), followed by streptomycin (69%), gentamicin (7%), and amikacin (3%). Of the remaining antimicrobials 100% of the isolates were resistant to chloramphenicol followed by tetracycline (98%), trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (57%), and sulfisoxazole (51%). Point mutations were present in gyrA, gyrB, parC, and/or parE genes among 34 of the 102 naladixic acid-resistant isolates. Two isolates contained class 1 integrons carrying aadA gene conferring streptomycin and spectinomycin resistance. The findings suggest that many antimicrobial agents commonly used in companion animals may not constitute appropriate therapy for canine pseudomonas infections.

  11. Azithromycin and ciprofloxacin: a possible synergistic combination against Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm-associated urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Saini, Hina; Chhibber, Sanjay; Harjai, Kusum

    2015-04-01

    Biofilm formation is becoming a predominant feature in nosocomial infections. Since biofilms are increasingly resistant to antibiotics, making monotherapy ineffective, combination therapy appears to be relevant for their eradication. This study assessed the potential of azithromycin (AZM) and ciprofloxacin (CIP) alone and in combination in vitro and in a mouse model of urinary tract infection (UTI) induced with biofilm cells of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In vitro antibacterial and antibiofilm activities of antibiotics alone and in combination were assessed using the fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI), time-kill analysis and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). In vivo efficacy was evaluated in a UTI model by quantitation of bacterial burden in kidney and bladder tissue, renal histopathology, pathology index factors (MDA and NO), and pro-inflammatory (MIP-2 and IL-6) and anti-inflammatory (IL-10) cytokines. MICs of AZM and CIP for strain PAO1 were 256 and 0.5 μg/mL, respectively; MBECs were 4096 and 1024 μg/mL. Synergistic interaction was observed between AZM and CIP both against planktonic and biofilm bacteria (FICI<0.5). The combination was also able to inhibit biofilm formation (at MIC levels) as observed with CLSM. Oral therapy with AZM (500 mg/kg) and CIP (30 mg/kg) combination in mice for 4 days showed accelerated clearance of bacteria from kidney and bladder tissue, improved renal histopathology, decreased levels of MDA and NO, significant decline in MIP-2 and IL-6, and increased IL-10 in the kidney (P<0.0001). We conclude that AZM+CIP therapy holds promise against biofilm-associated UTIs as it confers antibacterial, immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory effects. PMID:25604277

  12. Pulmonary uptake in Indium-111 leukocyte imaging: clinical significance in patients with suspected occult infections

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, P.S.; Datz, F.L.; Disbro, M.A.; Alazraki, N.P.; Taylor, A.T.

    1984-02-01

    A retrospective review was undertaken to evaluate the frequency and significance of pulmonary activity noted on 306 indium-111 leukocyte studies involving 232 patients with suspected occult infections. Forty-eight studies showed pulmonary activity in one of two patterns of uptake, focal or diffuse. Fourteen of 27 studies (52%) with focal uptake and two of 21 studies (10%) with diffuse uptake were associated with infectious processes. Lung uptake of indium-111-labeled leukocytes was a poor predictor of pulmonary infection in patients studied for occult infection, although the focal pattern was more likely than the diffuse pattern to be associated with infection.

  13. Endobronchial lesion due to pulmonary Fusobacterium nucleatum infection in a child.

    PubMed

    Gedik, Ahmet H; Cakir, Erkan; Soysal, Omer; Umutoğlu, Tarık

    2014-03-01

    Clinically significant infections due to the members of the genus Fusobacterium are rare. The clinical manifestations of pulmonary Fusobacterium nucleatum infections range from simple aspiration pneumonia to severe diseases as necrotizing pneumonia, lung abscess, and empyema. Endobronchial lesions and obstructions are rarely seen in children and are often a misdiagnosed result in delay of definitive treatment. Here, we report a case of endobronchial lesion due to pulmonary F. nucleatum infection in an entirely healthy child before illness. This is the first case reported in the literature of endobronchial lesion due to pulmonary F. nucleatum infection.

  14. RNA-Seq Transcriptomic Responses of Full-Thickness Dermal Excision Wounds to Pseudomonas aeruginosa Acute and Biofilm Infection

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tsute; Qian, Li-Wu; Fourcaudot, Andrea B.; Yamane, Kazuyoshi; Chen, Ping; Abercrombie, Johnathan J.; You, Tao; Leung, Kai P.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections of wounds in clinical settings are major complications whose outcomes are influenced by host responses that are not completely understood. Herein we evaluated transcriptomic changes of wounds as they counter P. aeruginosa infection—first active infection, and then chronic biofilm infection. We used the dermal full-thickness, rabbit ear excisional wound model. We studied the wound response: towards acute infection at 2, 6, and 24 hrs after inoculating 106 bacteria into day-3 wounds; and, towards more chronic biofilm infection of wounds similarly infected for 24 hrs but then treated with topical antibiotic to coerce biofilm growth and evaluated at day 5 and 9 post-infection. The wounds were analyzed for bacterial counts, expression of P. aeruginosa virulence and biofilm-synthesis genes, biofilm morphology, infiltrating immune cells, re-epithelialization, and genome-wide gene expression (RNA-Seq transcriptome). This analysis revealed that 2 hrs after bacterial inoculation into day-3 wounds, the down-regulated genes (infected vs. non-infected) of the wound edge were nearly all non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), comprised of snoRNA, miRNA, and RNU6 pseudogenes, and their down-regulation preceded a general down-regulation of skin-enriched coding gene expression. As the active infection intensified, ncRNAs remained overrepresented among down-regulated genes; however, at 6 and 24 hrs they changed to a different set, which overlapped between these times, and excluded RNU6 pseudogenes but included snRNA components of the major and minor spliceosomes. Additionally, the raw counts of multiple types of differentially-expressed ncRNAs increased on post-wounding day 3 in control wounds, but infection suppressed this increase. After 5 and 9 days, these ncRNA counts in control wounds decreased, whereas they increased in the infected, healing-impaired wounds. These data suggest a sequential and coordinated change in the levels of transcripts of multiple

  15. Tasco®: A Product of Ascophyllum nodosum Enhances Immune Response of Caenorhabditis elegans Against Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kandasamy, Saveetha; Khan, Wajahatullah; Evans, Franklin; Critchley, Alan T.; Prithiviraj, Balakrishnan

    2012-01-01

    The effects of Tasco®, a product made from the brown seaweed (Ascophyllum nodosum) were tested for the ability to protect Caenorhabditis elegans against Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. A water extract of Tasco® (TWE) reduced P. aeruginosa inflicted mortality in the nematode. The TWE, at a concentration of 300 µg/mL, offered the maximum protection and induced the expression of innate immune response genes viz.; zk6.7 (Lypases), lys-1 (Lysozyme), spp-1 (Saponin like protein), f28d1.3 (Thaumatin like protein), t20g5.7 (Matridin SK domain protein), abf-1 (Antibacterial protein) and f38a1.5 (Lectin family protein). Further, TWE treatment also affected a number of virulence components of the P. aeuroginosa and reduced its secreted virulence factors such as lipase, proteases and toxic metabolites; hydrogen cyanide and pyocyanin. Decreased virulence factors were associated with a significant reduction in expression of regulatory genes involved in quorum sensing, lasI, lasR, rhlI and rhlR. In conclusion, the TWE-treatment protected the C. elegans against P. aeruginosa infection by a combination of effects on the innate immunity of the worms and direct effects on the bacterial quorum sensing and virulence factors. PMID:22363222

  16. Tasco®: a product of Ascophyllum nodosum enhances immune response of Caenorhabditis elegans against Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Saveetha; Khan, Wajahatullah; Evans, Franklin; Critchley, Alan T; Prithiviraj, Balakrishnan

    2012-01-01

    The effects of Tasco®, a product made from the brown seaweed (Ascophyllum nodosum) were tested for the ability to protect Caenorhabditis elegans against Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. A water extract of Tasco® (TWE) reduced P. aeruginosa inflicted mortality in the nematode. The TWE, at a concentration of 300 µg/mL, offered the maximum protection and induced the expression of innate immune response genes viz.; zk6.7 (Lypases), lys-1 (Lysozyme), spp-1 (Saponin like protein), f28d1.3 (Thaumatin like protein), t20g5.7 (Matridin SK domain protein), abf-1 (Antibacterial protein) and f38a1.5 (Lectin family protein). Further, TWE treatment also affected a number of virulence components of the P. aeuroginosa and reduced its secreted virulence factors such as lipase, proteases and toxic metabolites; hydrogen cyanide and pyocyanin. Decreased virulence factors were associated with a significant reduction in expression of regulatory genes involved in quorum sensing, lasI, lasR, rhlI and rhlR. In conclusion, the TWE-treatment protected the C. elegans against P. aeruginosa infection by a combination of effects on the innate immunity of the worms and direct effects on the bacterial quorum sensing and virulence factors. PMID:22363222

  17. Pulmonary Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Infection. A Multisystem, Multigenic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Szymanski, Eva P.; Leung, Janice M.; Fowler, Cedar J.; Haney, Carissa; Hsu, Amy P.; Chen, Fei; Duggal, Priya; Oler, Andrew J.; McCormack, Ryan; Podack, Eckhard; Drummond, Rebecca A.; Lionakis, Michail S.; Browne, Sarah K.; Prevots, D. Rebecca; Knowles, Michael; Cutting, Gary; Liu, Xinyue; Devine, Scott E.; Fraser, Claire M.; Tettelin, Hervé; Olivier, Kenneth N.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: The clinical features of patients infected with pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacteria (PNTM) are well described, but the genetic components of infection susceptibility are not. Objectives: To examine genetic variants in patients with PNTM, their unaffected family members, and a control group. Methods: Whole-exome sequencing was done on 69 white patients with PNTM and 18 of their white unaffected family members. We performed a candidate gene analysis using immune, cystic fibrosis transmembrance conductance regulator (CFTR), cilia, and connective tissue gene sets. The numbers of patients, family members, and control subjects with variants in each category were compared, as was the average number of variants per person. Measurements and Main Results: A significantly higher number of patients with PNTM than the other subjects had low-frequency, protein-affecting variants in immune, CFTR, cilia, and connective tissue categories (35, 26, 90, and 90%, respectively). Patients with PNTM also had significantly more cilia and connective tissue variants per person than did control subjects (2.47 and 2.55 compared with 1.38 and 1.40, respectively; P = 1.4 × 10−6 and P = 2.7 × 10−8, respectively). Patients with PNTM had an average of 5.26 variants across all categories (1.98 in control subjects; P = 2.8 × 10−17), and they were more likely than control subjects to have variants in multiple categories. We observed similar results for family members without PNTM infection, with the exception of the immune category. Conclusions: Patients with PNTM have more low-frequency, protein-affecting variants in immune, CFTR, cilia, and connective tissue genes than their unaffected family members and control subjects. We propose that PNTM infection is a multigenic disease in which combinations of variants across gene categories, plus environmental exposures, increase susceptibility to the infection. PMID:26038974

  18. Twenty-Five-Year Outbreak of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infecting Individuals with Cystic Fibrosis: Identification of the Prairie Epidemic Strain

    PubMed Central

    Glezerson, Bryan A.; Sibley, Christopher D.; Sibley, Kristen A.; Duong, Jessica; Purighalla, Swathi; Mody, Christopher H.; Workentine, Matthew L.; Storey, Douglas G.; Surette, Michael G.; Rabin, Harvey R.

    2014-01-01

    Transmissible strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa have been described for cystic fibrosis (CF) and may be associated with a worse prognosis. Using a comprehensive strain biobank spanning 3 decades, we sought to determine the prevalence and stability of chronic P. aeruginosa infection in an adult population. P. aeruginosa isolates from sputum samples collected at initial enrollment in our adult clinic and at the most recent clinic visit were examined by a combination of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing and compared against a collection of established transmissible and local non-CF bronchiectasis (nCFB) isolates. A total of 372 isolates from 107 patients, spanning 674 patient-years, including 66 patients with matched isolates from initial and final encounters, were screened. A novel clone with increased antibacterial resistance, termed the prairie epidemic strain (PES), was found in 29% (31/107 patients) of chronically infected patients referred from multiple prairie-based CF centers. This isolate was not found in those diagnosed with CF as adults or in a control population with nCFB. While 90% (60/66 patients) of patients had stable infection over a mean of 10.8 years, five patients experienced strain displacement of unique isolates, with PES occurring within 2 years of transitioning to adult care. PES has been present in our cohort since at least 1987, is unique to CF, generally establishes chronic infection during childhood, and has been found in patients at the time of transition of patients from multiple prairie-based CF clinics, suggesting broad endemicity. Studies are under way to evaluate the clinical implications of PES infection. PMID:24452167

  19. Oral care and pulmonary infection - the importance of plaque scoring

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Improving the quality of oral hygiene is recognised as an important counter measure for reducing the incidence of ventilator-associated pneumonia amongst critically ill patients. Toothbrushing physically disrupts the dental plaque that acts as a reservoir for pulmonary infection and therefore has the potential to reduce the incidence of ventilator-associated pneumonia. Gu and colleagues performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of oral hygiene with and without a toothbrush and found no difference in the incidence of pneumonia in mechanically ventilated patients. The diagnosis of ventilator-associated pneumonia is prone to bias and future studies of oral care interventions should focus on measures of oral cleanliness such as plaque and gingival scores. Once the optimal strategy for oral hygiene is defined in the critically ill, larger studies focussing on ventilator-associated pneumonia or mortality can be conducted. PMID:23302185

  20. Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis with Disseminated Infection in Immunocompetent Patient

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-González, Gabriel; Ricart de Mesones, Antoni; Tazi-Mezalek, Rachid; Marron-Moya, Maria Teresa; Rosell, Antoni; Mañez, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) is a rare pathology with increasing incidence mainly in critical care settings and recently in immunocompetent patients. The mortality of the disease is very high, regardless of an early diagnosis and aggressive treatment. Here, we report a case of a 56 yr old previously healthy woman who was found unconscious at home and admitted to the emergency room with mild respiratory insufficiency. In the first 24 hours she developed an acute respiratory failure with new radiographic infiltrates requiring Intensive Care Unit admission. A severe obstructive pattern with impossibility of ventilation because of bilateral atelectasis was observed, requiring emergent venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenator device insertion. Bronchoscopy revealed occlusion of main bronchi, demonstrating by biopsy an invasive infection by Aspergillus fumigatus and A. flavus. Despite an aggressive treatment and vital support the patient had a fatal outcome. The forensic study confirms the diagnosis of IPA but also revealed the presence of disseminated aspergillosis. PMID:27445566

  1. Life-threatening Dobrava hantavirus infection with unusually extended pulmonary involvement.

    PubMed

    Schütt, M; Meisel, H; Krüger, D H; Ulrich, R; Dalhoff, K; Dodt, C

    2004-07-01

    In Europe, hantavirus infections usually present as hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome and its mild form nephropathia epidemica, while clinical cases with severe pulmonary affections are extremely rare and appear to be confined to infections by New World hanta viruses in the Americas. We report on a female patient from Northern Germany, who suffered primarily from severe acute respiratory distress syndrome-like pulmonary failure due to Dobrava hantavirus infection that was complicated by acute renal insufficiency.

  2. Toward Repositioning Niclosamide for Antivirulence Therapy of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Lung Infections: Development of Inhalable Formulations through Nanosuspension Technology.

    PubMed

    Costabile, Gabriella; d'Angelo, Ivana; Rampioni, Giordano; Bondì, Roslen; Pompili, Barbara; Ascenzioni, Fiorentina; Mitidieri, Emma; d'Emmanuele di Villa Bianca, Roberta; Sorrentino, Raffaella; Miro, Agnese; Quaglia, Fabiana; Imperi, Francesco; Leoni, Livia; Ungaro, Francesca

    2015-08-01

    Inhaled antivirulence drugs are currently considered a promising therapeutic option to treat Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections in cystic fibrosis (CF). We have recently shown that the anthelmintic drug niclosamide (NCL) has strong quorum sensing (QS) inhibiting activity against P. aeruginosa and could be repurposed as an antivirulence drug. In this work, we developed dry powders containing NCL nanoparticles that can be reconstituted in saline solution to produce inhalable nanosuspensions. NCL nanoparticles were produced by high-pressure homogenization (HPH) using polysorbate 20 or polysorbate 80 as stabilizers. After 20 cycles of HPH, all formulations showed similar properties in the form of needle-shape nanocrystals with a hydrodynamic diameter of approximately 450 nm and a zeta potential of -20 mV. Nanosuspensions stabilized with polysorbate 80 at 10% w/w to NCL (T80_10) showed an optimal solubility profile in simulated interstitial lung fluid. T80_10 was successfully dried into mannitol-based dry powder by spray drying. Dry powder (T80_10 DP) was reconstituted in saline solution and showed optimal in vitro aerosol performance. Both T80_10 and T80_10 DP were able to inhibit P. aeruginosa QS at NCL concentrations of 2.5-10 μM. NCL, and these formulations did not significantly affect the viability of CF bronchial epithelial cells in vitro at microbiologically active concentrations (i.e., ≤10 μM). In vivo acute toxicity studies in rats confirmed no observable toxicity of the NCL T80_10 DP formulation upon intratracheal administration at a concentration 100-fold higher than the anti-QS activity concentration. These preliminary results suggest that NCL repurposed in the form of inhalable nanosuspensions has great potential for the local treatment of P. aeruginosa lung infections as in the case of CF patients.

  3. Impact of new water systems on healthcare-associated colonization or infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Annick; Quantin, Catherine; Vanhems, Philippe; Lucet, Jean-Christophe; Bertrand, Xavier; Astruc, Karine; Chavanet, Pascal; Aho-Glélé, Ludwig S

    2016-01-01

    Zielsetzung: Untersucht werden sollte der Einfluss eines neuen weniger mit P. aeruginosa kontaminierten Wassersystems auf die Inzidenz nosokomialer Kolonisation oder Infektion mit P. aeruginosa in Pflegeeinheiten, die zwischen 2005 und 2014 in ein anderes Gebäude verlagert wurden. Methode: Mit dem Modell der generalisierten Schätzgleichungen (Generalized Estimated Equations) wurde die Inzidenz nosokomialer Fällen von P. aeruginosa zwischen den beiden Gebäuden verglichen. Ergebnisse: 29 Einheiten mit 2.759 in diesen Einheiten nachgewiesenen Fällen wurden während des Studienzeitraums verlagert. Zwischen dem neuem und dem alten Gebäude war keine Differenz nachweisbar.Schlussfolgerung: Die Ergebnisse unterstützen nicht die Hypothese einer positiven Assoziation zwischen der Trinkwasserkontamination und der Inzidenz nosokomialer P. aeruginosa-Fälle. Allerdings bedarf diese Aussage der Überprüfung des Zusammenhangs zwischen kontaminierten Wasserproben und Patientendaten.

  4. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in disease.

    PubMed

    Mulcahy, Lawrence R; Isabella, Vincent M; Lewis, Kim

    2014-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a ubiquitous organism that is the focus of intense research because of its prominent role in disease. Due to its relatively large genome and flexible metabolic capabilities, this organism exploits numerous environmental niches. It is an opportunistic pathogen that sets upon the human host when the normal immune defenses are disabled. Its deadliness is most apparent in cystic fibrosis patients, but it also is a major problem in burn wounds, chronic wounds, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder, surface growth on implanted biomaterials, and within hospital surface and water supplies, where it poses a host of threats to vulnerable patients (Peleg and Hooper, N Engl J Med 362:1804-1813, 2010; Breathnach et al., J Hosp Infect 82:19-24, 2012). Once established in the patient, P. aeruginosa can be especially difficult to treat. The genome encodes a host of resistance genes, including multidrug efflux pumps (Poole, J Mol Microbiol Biotechnol 3:255-264, 2001) and enzymes conferring resistance to beta-lactam and aminoglycoside antibotics (Vahdani et al., Annal Burns Fire Disast 25:78-81, 2012), making therapy against this gram-negative pathogen particularly challenging due to the lack of novel antimicrobial therapeutics (Lewis, Nature 485: 439-440, 2012). This challenge is compounded by the ability of P. aeruginosa to grow in a biofilm, which may enhance its ability to cause infections by protecting bacteria from host defenses and chemotherapy. Here, we review recent studies of P. aeruginosa biofilms with a focus on how this unique mode of growth contributes to its ability to cause recalcitrant infections.

  5. Questions on causality and responsibility arising from an outbreak of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in Norway

    PubMed Central

    Iversen, Bjørn G; Hofmann, Bjørn; Aavitsland, Preben

    2008-01-01

    In 2002, Norway experienced a large outbreak of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in hospitals with 231 confirmed cases. This fuelled intense public and professional debates on what were the causes and who were responsible. In epidemiology, other sciences, in philosophy and in law there is a long tradition of discussing the concept of causality. We use this outbreak as a case; apply various theories of causality from different disciplines to discuss the roles and responsibilities of some of the parties involved. Mackie's concept of INUS conditions, Hill's nine viewpoints to study association for claiming causation, deterministic and probabilistic ways of reasoning, all shed light on the issues of causality in this outbreak. Moreover, applying legal theories of causation (counterfactual reasoning and the "but-for" test and the NESS test) proved especially useful, but the case also illustrated the weaknesses of the various theories of causation. We conclude that many factors contributed to causing the outbreak, but that contamination of a medical device in the production facility was the major necessary condition. The reuse of the medical device in hospitals contributed primarily to the size of the outbreak. The unintended error by its producer – and to a minor extent by the hospital practice – was mainly due to non-application of relevant knowledge and skills, and appears to constitute professional negligence. Due to criminal procedure laws and other factors outside the discourse of causality, no one was criminally charged for the outbreak which caused much suffering and shortening the life of at least 34 people. PMID:18947429

  6. Catheter-related infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa: virulence factors involved and their relationships.

    PubMed

    Olejnickova, Katerina; Hola, Veronika; Ruzicka, Filip

    2014-11-01

    The nosocomial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is equipped with a large arsenal of cell-associated and secreted virulence factors which enhance its invasive potential. The complex relationships among virulence determinants have hitherto not been fully elucidated. In the present study, 175 catheter-related isolates were observed for the presence of selected virulence factors, namely extracellular enzymes and siderophore production, biofilm formation, resistance to antibiotics, and motility. A high percentage of the strains produced most of the tested virulence factors. A positive correlation was identified between the production of several exoproducts, and also between the formation of both types of biofilm. An opposite trend was observed between the two types of biofilm and the production of siderophores. Whereas the relationship between the submerged biofilm production (i.e. the biofilm formed on the solid surface below the water level) and the siderophore secretion was negative, the production of air-liquid interface (A-L) biofilm (i.e. the biofilm floating on the surface of the cultivation medium) and the siderophore secretion were positively correlated. All correlations were statistically significant at the level P = 0.05 with the correlation coefficient γ ≥ 0.50. Our results suggest that: (1) the co-production of the lytic enzymes and siderophores can play an important role in the pathogenesis of the catheter-related infections and should be taken into account when the virulence potential is assessed; (2) biofilm-positive strains are capable of forming both submerged and non-attached A-L biofilms; and (3) the different micro-environment in the submerged biofilm and A-L biofilm layers have opposite consequences for the production of other virulence factors.

  7. Chronic lung infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm is cured by L-Methionine in combination with antibiotic therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gnanadhas, Divya Prakash; Elango, Monalisha; Datey, Akshay; Chakravortty, Dipshikha

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are associated with 80–90% of infections. Within the biofilm, bacteria are refractile to antibiotics, requiring concentrations >1,000 times the minimum inhibitory concentration. Proteins, carbohydrates and DNA are the major components of biofilm matrix. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) biofilms, which are majorly associated with chronic lung infection, contain extracellular DNA (eDNA) as a major component. Herein, we report for the first time that L-Methionine (L-Met) at 0.5 μM inhibits Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) biofilm formation and disassembles established PA biofilm by inducing DNase expression. Four DNase genes (sbcB, endA, eddB and recJ) were highly up-regulated upon L-Met treatment along with increased DNase activity in the culture supernatant. Since eDNA plays a major role in establishing and maintaining the PA biofilm, DNase activity is effective in disrupting the biofilm. Upon treatment with L-Met, the otherwise recalcitrant PA biofilm now shows susceptibility to ciprofloxacin. This was reflected in vivo, in the murine chronic PA lung infection model. Mice treated with L-Met responded better to antibiotic treatment, leading to enhanced survival as compared to mice treated with ciprofloxacin alone. These results clearly demonstrate that L-Met can be used along with antibiotic as an effective therapeutic against chronic PA biofilm infection. PMID:26521707

  8. Interference of Lactobacillus plantarum with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in vitro and in infected burns: the potential use of probiotics in wound treatment.

    PubMed

    Valdéz, J C; Peral, M C; Rachid, M; Santana, M; Perdigón, G

    2005-06-01

    This study evaluated the ability of the probiotic organism Lactobacillus plantarum to inhibit the pathogenic activity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, both in vitro and in vivo, and investigated the mechanisms involved in such protection. L. plantarum whole cultures, culture filtrates (acid filtrate and neutralised acid filtrate) and isolated, washed cells were tested in vitro for their effects on the production of the P. aeruginosa quorum-sensing signal molecules, acyl-homoserine-lactones (AHLs), and two virulence factors controlled by these signal molecules, elastase and biofilm. All were inhibited by L. plantarum cultures and filtrates, but not by isolated, washed cells. The acid L. plantarum growth medium itself had some inhibitory activity, but the greatest activity was exerted by the whole culture. To test the in-vivo activity of L. plantarum, a burned-mouse model was used in which burns infected with P. aeruginosa were treated with L. plantarum at 3, 4, 5, 7 and 9 days post-infection. Samples from skin, liver and spleen taken after 5, 10 and 15 days demonstrated inhibition of P. aeruginosa colonisation by L. plantarum. There was also an improvement in tissue repair, enhanced phagocytosis of P. aeruginosa by tissue phagocytes, and a decrease in apoptosis at 10 days. These results indicate that L. plantarum and/or its by-products are potential therapeutic agents for the local treatment of P. aeruginosa burn infections.

  9. Treatment for patients with multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii pulmonary infection

    PubMed Central

    PAN, TAO; LIU, XIAOYUN; XIANG, SHOUGUI; JI, WENLI

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial infections are common but have become increasingly resistant to drugs. The aim of the present study was to examine the combined treatment of traditional Chinese and Western medicine in 30 cases of pulmonary infection with multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii. Patients were divided into groups A and B according to drug treatments. Cefoperazone or sulbactam and tanreqing were administered in group A, and cefoperazone or sulbactam in group B. The curative effect and prognosis of the two groups were recorded and the remaining treatments were performed routinely in the clinic. For the combined therapy group, which was administered sulperazone and tanreqing, 8 patients were recovered, 6 patients had significant effects, 3 patients exhibited some improvement and 1 patient had no response. One of the patients did not survive after 28 days. By contrast, there were 4 patients that were successfully treated, 3 patients with significant effects, 2 patients with some improvement and 2 patients had no response in the sulperazone group, and 4 patients did not survive after 28 days. In conclusion, the combined therapy of cefoperazone or sulbactam supplemented with tanreqing was identified to be more effective than cefoperazone or sulbactam as monotherapy, for treating multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii. PMID:27073447

  10. A proof-of-concept model for the identification of the key events in the infection process with specific reference to Pseudomonas aeruginosa in corneal infections

    PubMed Central

    Soumpasis, Ilias; Knapp, Laura; Pitt, Tyrone

    2015-01-01

    Background It is a common medical practice to characterise an infection based on the causative agent and to adopt therapeutic and prevention strategies targeting the agent itself. However, from an epidemiological perspective, exposure to a microbe can be harmless to a host as a result of low-level exposure or due to host immune response, with opportunistic infection only occurring as a result of changes in the host, pathogen, or surrounding environment. Methods We have attempted to review systematically the key host, pathogen, and environmental factors that may significantly impact clinical outcomes of exposure to a pathogen, using Pseudomonas aeruginosa eye infection as a case study. Results and discussion Extended contact lens wearing and compromised hygiene may predispose users to microbial keratitis, which can be a severe and vision-threatening infection. P. aeruginosa has a wide array of virulence-associated genes and sensing systems to initiate and maintain cell populations at the corneal surface and beyond. We have adapted the well-known concept of the epidemiological triangle in combination with the classic risk assessment framework (hazard identification, characterisation, and exposure) to develop a conceptual pathway-based model that demonstrates the overlapping relationships between the host, the pathogen, and the environment; and to illustrate the key events in P. aeruginosa eye infection. Conclusion This strategy differs from traditional approaches that consider potential risk factors in isolation, and hopefully will aid the identification of data and models to inform preventive and therapeutic measures in addition to risk assessment. Furthermore, this may facilitate the identification of knowledge gaps to direct research in areas of greatest impact to avert or mitigate adverse outcomes of infection. PMID:26546946

  11. Evaluation of antibiotic efficacy against infections caused by planktonic or biofilm cultures of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae in Galleria mellonella.

    PubMed

    Benthall, Gabriel; Touzel, Rebecca E; Hind, Charlotte K; Titball, Richard W; Sutton, J Mark; Thomas, Rachael J; Wand, Matthew E

    2015-11-01

    The lack of novel antibiotics for more than a decade has placed increased pressure on existing therapies to combat the emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacterial pathogens. This study evaluated the Galleria mellonella insect model in determining the efficacy of available antibiotics against planktonic and biofilm infections of MDR Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae strains in comparison with in vitro minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) determination. In general, in vitro analysis agreed with the G. mellonella studies, and susceptibility in Galleria identified different drug resistance mechanisms. However, the carbapenems tested appeared to perform better in vivo than in vitro, with meropenem and imipenem able to clear K. pneumoniae and P. aeruginosa infections with strains that had bla(NDM-1) and bla(VIM) carbapenemases. This study also established an implant model in G. mellonella to allow testing of antibiotic efficacy against biofilm-derived infections. A reduction in antibiotic efficacy of amikacin against K. pneumoniae and P. aeruginosa biofilms was observed compared with a planktonic infection. Ciprofloxacin was found to be less effective at clearing a P. aeruginosa biofilm infection compared with a planktonic infection, but no statistical difference was seen between K. pneumoniae biofilm and planktonic infections treated with this antibiotic (P>0.05). This study provides important information regarding the suitability of Galleria as a model for antibiotic efficacy testing both against planktonic and biofilm-derived MDR infections. PMID:26364845

  12. Evaluation of antibiotic efficacy against infections caused by planktonic or biofilm cultures of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae in Galleria mellonella.

    PubMed

    Benthall, Gabriel; Touzel, Rebecca E; Hind, Charlotte K; Titball, Richard W; Sutton, J Mark; Thomas, Rachael J; Wand, Matthew E

    2015-11-01

    The lack of novel antibiotics for more than a decade has placed increased pressure on existing therapies to combat the emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacterial pathogens. This study evaluated the Galleria mellonella insect model in determining the efficacy of available antibiotics against planktonic and biofilm infections of MDR Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae strains in comparison with in vitro minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) determination. In general, in vitro analysis agreed with the G. mellonella studies, and susceptibility in Galleria identified different drug resistance mechanisms. However, the carbapenems tested appeared to perform better in vivo than in vitro, with meropenem and imipenem able to clear K. pneumoniae and P. aeruginosa infections with strains that had bla(NDM-1) and bla(VIM) carbapenemases. This study also established an implant model in G. mellonella to allow testing of antibiotic efficacy against biofilm-derived infections. A reduction in antibiotic efficacy of amikacin against K. pneumoniae and P. aeruginosa biofilms was observed compared with a planktonic infection. Ciprofloxacin was found to be less effective at clearing a P. aeruginosa biofilm infection compared with a planktonic infection, but no statistical difference was seen between K. pneumoniae biofilm and planktonic infections treated with this antibiotic (P>0.05). This study provides important information regarding the suitability of Galleria as a model for antibiotic efficacy testing both against planktonic and biofilm-derived MDR infections.

  13. Cardiopulmonary manifestations of isolated pulmonary valve infective endocarditis demonstrated with cardiac CT.

    PubMed

    Passen, Edward; Feng, Zekun

    2015-01-01

    Right-sided infective endocarditis involving the pulmonary valve is rare. This pictorial essay discusses the use and findings of cardiac CT combined with delayed chest CT and noncontrast chest CT of pulmonary valve endocarditis. Cardiac CT is able to show the full spectrum of right-sided endocarditis cardiopulmonary features including manifestations that cannot be demonstrated by echocardiography.

  14. Evolution of metabolic divergence in Pseudomonas aeruginosa during long-term infection facilitates a proto-cooperative interspecies interaction

    PubMed Central

    Frydenlund Michelsen, Charlotte; Hossein Khademi, Seyed Mohammad; Krogh Johansen, Helle; Ingmer, Hanne; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Jelsbak, Lars

    2016-01-01

    The effect of polymicrobial interactions on pathogen physiology and how it can act either to limit pathogen colonization or to potentiate pathogen expansion and virulence are not well understood. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus are opportunistic pathogens commonly found together in polymicrobial human infections. However, we have previously shown that the interactions between these two bacterial species are strain dependent. Whereas P. aeruginosa PAO1, a commonly used laboratory strain, effectively suppressed S. aureus growth, we observed a commensal-like interaction between the human host-adapted strain, DK2-P2M24-2003, and S. aureus. In this study, characterization by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) and mass spectral (MS) molecular networking revealed a significant metabolic divergence between P. aeruginosa PAO1 and DK2-P2M24-2003, which comprised several virulence factors and signaling 4-hydroxy-2-alkylquinoline (HAQ) molecules. Strikingly, a further modulation of the HAQ profile was observed in DK2-P2M24-2003 during interaction with S. aureus, resulting in an area with thickened colony morphology at the P. aeruginosa–S. aureus interface. In addition, we found an HAQ-mediated protection of S. aureus by DK2-P2M24-2003 from the killing effect of tobramycin. Our findings suggest a model where the metabolic divergence manifested in human host-adapted P. aeruginosa is further modulated during interaction with S. aureus and facilitate a proto-cooperative P. aeruginosa–S. aureus relationship. PMID:26684729

  15. Pulmonary Immunostimulation with MALP-2 in Influenza Virus-Infected Mice Increases Survival after Pneumococcal Superinfection

    PubMed Central

    Reppe, Katrin; Radünzel, Peter; Dietert, Kristina; Tschernig, Thomas; Wolff, Thorsten; Hammerschmidt, Sven; Gruber, Achim D.; Suttorp, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary infection with influenza virus is frequently complicated by bacterial superinfection, with Streptococcus pneumoniae being the most prevalent causal pathogen and hence often associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Local immunosuppression due to pulmonary influenza virus infection has been identified as a major cause of the pathogenesis of secondary bacterial lung infection. Thus, specific local stimulation of the pulmonary innate immune system in subjects with influenza virus infection might improve the host defense against secondary bacterial pathogens. In the present study, we examined the effect of pulmonary immunostimulation with Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR-2)-stimulating macrophage-activating lipopeptide 2 (MALP-2) in influenza A virus (IAV)-infected mice on the course of subsequent pneumococcal superinfection. Female C57BL/6N mice infected with IAV were treated with MALP-2 on day 5 and challenged with S. pneumoniae on day 6. Intratracheal MALP-2 application increased proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine release and enhanced the recruitment of leukocytes, mainly neutrophils, into the alveolar space of IAV-infected mice, without detectable systemic side effects. Local pulmonary instillation of MALP-2 in IAV-infected mice 24 h before transnasal pneumococcal infection considerably reduced the bacterial number in the lung tissue without inducing exaggerated inflammation. The pulmonary viral load was not altered by MALP-2. Clinically, MALP-2 treatment of IAV-infected mice increased survival rates and reduced hypothermia and body weight loss after pneumococcal superinfection compared to those of untreated coinfected mice. In conclusion, local immunostimulation with MALP-2 in influenza virus-infected mice improved pulmonary bacterial elimination and increased survival after subsequent pneumococcal superinfection. PMID:26371127

  16. A genetic approach to the development of new therapeutic phages to fight pseudomonas aeruginosa in wound infections.

    PubMed

    Krylov, Victor; Shaburova, Olga; Krylov, Sergey; Pleteneva, Elena

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a frequent participant in wound infections. Emergence of multiple antibiotic resistant strains has created significant problems in the treatment of infected wounds. Phage therapy (PT) has been proposed as a possible alternative approach. Infected wounds are the perfect place for PT applications, since the basic condition for PT is ensured; namely, the direct contact of bacteria and their viruses. Plenty of virulent ("lytic") and temperate ("lysogenic") bacteriophages are known in P. aeruginosa. However, the number of virulent phage species acceptable for PT and their mutability are limited. Besides, there are different deviations in the behavior of virulent (and temperate) phages from their expected canonical models of development. We consider some examples of non-canonical phage-bacterium interactions and the possibility of their use in PT. In addition, some optimal approaches to the development of phage therapy will be discussed from the point of view of a biologist, considering the danger of phage-assisted horizontal gene transfer (HGT), and from the point of view of a surgeon who has accepted the Hippocrates Oath to cure patients by all possible means. It is also time now to discuss the possible approaches in international cooperation for the development of PT. We think it would be advantageous to make phage therapy a kind of personalized medicine. PMID:23344559

  17. A Genetic Approach to the Development of New Therapeutic Phages to Fight Pseudomonas Aeruginosa in Wound Infections

    PubMed Central

    Krylov, Victor; Shaburova, Olga; Krylov, Sergey; Pleteneva, Elena

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a frequent participant in wound infections. Emergence of multiple antibiotic resistant strains has created significant problems in the treatment of infected wounds. Phage therapy (PT) has been proposed as a possible alternative approach. Infected wounds are the perfect place for PT applications, since the basic condition for PT is ensured; namely, the direct contact of bacteria and their viruses. Plenty of virulent (“lytic”) and temperate (“lysogenic”) bacteriophages are known in P. aeruginosa. However, the number of virulent phage species acceptable for PT and their mutability are limited. Besides, there are different deviations in the behavior of virulent (and temperate) phages from their expected canonical models of development. We consider some examples of non-canonical phage-bacterium interactions and the possibility of their use in PT. In addition, some optimal approaches to the development of phage therapy will be discussed from the point of view of a biologist, considering the danger of phage-assisted horizontal gene transfer (HGT), and from the point of view of a surgeon who has accepted the Hippocrates Oath to cure patients by all possible means. It is also time now to discuss the possible approaches in international cooperation for the development of PT. We think it would be advantageous to make phage therapy a kind of personalized medicine. PMID:23344559

  18. Role of Adherence in the Pathogenesis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Lung Infection in Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Donald E.; Bass, Joe A.; Johanson, W. G.; Straus, David C.

    1980-01-01

    A correlation has been demonstrated between the in vitro adherence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to upper respiratory tract epithelium and colonization of the respiratory tract by this organism. Twenty patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and 20 age-matched controls were examined in this study. All of the CF patients but none of the controls were colonized with P. aeruginosa at the time of study. P. aeruginosa adherence to isolated epithelial cells, as determined by an in vitro assay, was 19.1 ± 1.1 bacteria per buccal epithelial cell in the CF patients and 2.3 ± 0.3 bacteria per cell in the controls (P < 0.01). P. aeruginosa strains of the mucoid colony type adhered in significantly lower numbers to buccal epithelial cells than did strains of the rough colony type (1.8 + 0.1 versus 24.8 ± 0.9, P < 0.001). This difference might explain the common observation that the initial pseudomonas colonization of the respiratory tract of CF patients is due to organisms of the rough colony type. We have further demonstrated that increased P. aeruginosa adherence in vitro varies directly with the loss of a protease-sensitive glycoprotein, fibronectin, from the cell surface, as well as increased levels of salivary proteases in CF patients. When examined by a direct radioimmune binding assay, buccal cells from CF patients possessed only 17% of the total cell surface fibronectin present on similar cells obtained from controls. Salivary protease levels, as measured by 125I release from an 125I-labeled insoluble fibrin matrix, were increased about threefold in CF patients versus controls. Thus, colonization of the respiratory tract by P. aeruginosa in CF patients correlates well with buccal cell adherence of this organism; increased adherence is associated with decreased amounts of fibronectin on respiratory epithelial cell surfaces and increased levels of salivary proteases. PMID:7014444

  19. Irreversible pulmonary hypertension associated with Troglostrongylus brevior infection in a kitten.

    PubMed

    Crisi, Paolo E; Traversa, Donato; Di Cesare, Angela; Luciani, Alessia; Civitella, Carla; Santori, Domenico; Boari, Andrea

    2015-10-01

    A four month-old kitten was referred at the Veterinary Teaching Hospital of Teramo, Italy. Physical examination, echocardiography, thoracic radiography, copromicroscopy and biomolecular assays led to a diagnosis of severe parasitic bronchopneumonia by Troglostrongylus brevior complicated by pulmonary hypertension. A single administration of a spot on solution containing imidacloprid 10%/moxidectin 1% was effective in stopping larval shedding but clinical, radiographic and echocardiographic signs of bronchopneumonia and pulmonary hypertension still persisted after further follow-ups.While cases of pulmonary hypertension are known in infections by Aelurostrongylus abstrusus, this is the first report of irreversible pulmonary hypertension in a kitten with troglostrongylosis. PMID:26412548

  20. Cyanide in bronchoalveolar lavage is not diagnostic for Pseudomonas aeruginosa in children with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Stutz, M D; Gangell, C L; Berry, L J; Garratt, L W; Sheil, B; Sly, P D

    2011-03-01

    Early detection of the cyanobacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the lungs of young children with cystic fibrosis (CF) is considered the key to delaying chronic pulmonary disease. We investigated whether cyanide in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid could be used as an early diagnostic biomarker of infection. Cyanide was measured in 226 BAL samples (36 P. aeruginosa infected) obtained from 96 infants and young children with CF participating in an early surveillance programme involving annual BAL. Cyanide was detected in 97.2% of P. aeruginosa infected and 60.5% of uninfected samples. Cyanide concentrations were significantly higher in BALs infected with P. aeruginosa (median (25th-75th percentile) 27.3 (22.1-33.3) μM) than those which were not (17.2 (7.85-23.0) μM, p<0.001). The best sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values were obtained with a cut-off concentration of 20.6 μM, and were 83%, 66%, 32% and 96%, respectively. Neutrophil number in BAL was a significant predictor of cyanide concentration (p<0.001). Cyanide concentration can distinguish between P. aeruginosa infected and uninfected BALs as a group, but not individually; therefore, cyanide is a poor diagnostic biomarker of P. aeruginosa infection. Cyanide levels in BAL are related to the level of neutrophilic inflammation.

  1. Recombination is a key driver of genomic and phenotypic diversity in a Pseudomonas aeruginosa population during cystic fibrosis infection.

    PubMed

    Darch, Sophie E; McNally, Alan; Harrison, Freya; Corander, Jukka; Barr, Helen L; Paszkiewicz, Konrad; Holden, Stephen; Fogarty, Andrew; Crusz, Shanika A; Diggle, Stephen P

    2015-01-01

    The Cystic Fibrosis (CF) lung harbors a complex, polymicrobial ecosystem, in which Pseudomonas aeruginosa is capable of sustaining chronic infections, which are highly resistant to multiple antibiotics. Here, we investigate the phenotypic and genotypic diversity of 44 morphologically identical P. aeruginosa isolates taken from a single CF patient sputum sample. Comprehensive phenotypic analysis of isolates revealed large variances and trade-offs in growth, virulence factors and quorum sensing (QS) signals. Whole genome analysis of 22 isolates revealed high levels of intra-isolate diversity ranging from 5 to 64 SNPs and that recombination and not spontaneous mutation was the dominant driver of diversity in this population. Furthermore, phenotypic differences between isolates were not linked to mutations in known genes but were statistically associated with distinct recombination events. We also assessed antibiotic susceptibility of all isolates. Resistance to antibiotics significantly increased when multiple isolates were mixed together. Our results highlight the significant role of recombination in generating phenotypic and genetic diversification during in vivo chronic CF infection. We also discuss (i) how these findings could influence how patient-to-patient transmission studies are performed using whole genome sequencing, and (ii) the need to refine antibiotic susceptibility testing in sputum samples taken from patients with CF. PMID:25578031

  2. New possibility for providing protection against urinary tract infection caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa by non-adjuvanted flagellin 'b' induced immunity.

    PubMed

    Sabharwal, Neha; Chhibber, Sanjay; Harjai, Kusum

    2014-12-01

    In the present study we demonstrated a novel protective role of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 flagellin 'b' in prevention of urinary tract infection (UTI). P. aeruginosa is motile via single polar flagellum made up of polymerized flagellin proteins. It is a serious nosocomial pathogen causing UTIs. Predisposing factors include instrumentation and catheterization which enhance colonization with P. aeruginosa, leading to ascending infection. Hence for a newer, safer and effective approach, the present study focussed on the prophylaxis using bacterial flagellin, isolated and purified (PCR sequencing and MALDI-TOF) from P. aeruginosa PAO1 strain, which triggers immune response [both non-specific and specific (active and passive)] as defense against infection. Administration of flagellin 'b' via intraperitoneal route enhanced the clearance of homologous as well as heterologous bacteria (P. aeruginosa uroisolate carrying flagellin 'a') in renal tissue, decreased the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and reverted structural integrity of renal tissue to near normal in female LACA mice. Immunization suppressed the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines [interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α)] and activated humoral immune response. Anti-flagellin antibodies (quantified by ELISA) helped in the clearance of bacterial load by opsonophagocytosis. Adoptive transfer of antisera also protected mice from PAO1 challenge, indicating protective role of antibodies. In conclusion, this is the first report that describes flagellin as a potential prophylactic agent which downregulates inflammation and curbs UTIs.

  3. New possibility for providing protection against urinary tract infection caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa by non-adjuvanted flagellin 'b' induced immunity.

    PubMed

    Sabharwal, Neha; Chhibber, Sanjay; Harjai, Kusum

    2014-12-01

    In the present study we demonstrated a novel protective role of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 flagellin 'b' in prevention of urinary tract infection (UTI). P. aeruginosa is motile via single polar flagellum made up of polymerized flagellin proteins. It is a serious nosocomial pathogen causing UTIs. Predisposing factors include instrumentation and catheterization which enhance colonization with P. aeruginosa, leading to ascending infection. Hence for a newer, safer and effective approach, the present study focussed on the prophylaxis using bacterial flagellin, isolated and purified (PCR sequencing and MALDI-TOF) from P. aeruginosa PAO1 strain, which triggers immune response [both non-specific and specific (active and passive)] as defense against infection. Administration of flagellin 'b' via intraperitoneal route enhanced the clearance of homologous as well as heterologous bacteria (P. aeruginosa uroisolate carrying flagellin 'a') in renal tissue, decreased the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and reverted structural integrity of renal tissue to near normal in female LACA mice. Immunization suppressed the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines [interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α)] and activated humoral immune response. Anti-flagellin antibodies (quantified by ELISA) helped in the clearance of bacterial load by opsonophagocytosis. Adoptive transfer of antisera also protected mice from PAO1 challenge, indicating protective role of antibodies. In conclusion, this is the first report that describes flagellin as a potential prophylactic agent which downregulates inflammation and curbs UTIs. PMID:25455605

  4. Antipathogenic properties of Lactobacillus plantarum on Pseudomonas aeruginosa: the potential use of its supernatants in the treatment of infected chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Alberto N; Cabral, María E Sesto; Noseda, Diego; Bosch, Alejandra; Yantorno, Osvaldo M; Valdez, Juan C

    2012-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria delay wound healing through several different mechanisms such as persistent production of inflammatory mediators or maintenance of necrotic neutrophils, which release cytolytic enzymes and free oxygen radicals. One of the most frequent pathogens isolated from infections in chronic wounds is Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This bacterium is extremely refractory to therapy and to host immune attack when it forms biofilms. Therefore, antibiotics and antiseptics are becoming useless in the treatment of these infections. In previous works, we demonstrated that Lactobacillus plantarum has an important antipathogenic capacity on P. aeruginosa. The aim of the present work was to elucidate the mechanism involved in the control of growth of P. aeruginosa on different surfaces by L. plantarum. For this purpose, we investigated the effects of L. plantarum supernatants on pathogenic properties of P. aeruginosa, such as adhesion, viability, virulence factors, biofilm formation, and quorum sensing signal expression. L. plantarum supernatants were able to inhibit pathogenic properties of P. aeruginosa by a quorum quenching mechanism. The antipathogenic properties mentioned above, together with the immunomodulatory, tissue repair, and angiogenesis properties in the supernatants of L. plantarum, make them an attractive option in infected chronic wound treatment.

  5. Next-Generation "-omics" Approaches Reveal a Massive Alteration of Host RNA Metabolism during Bacteriophage Infection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Chevallereau, Anne; Blasdel, Bob G; De Smet, Jeroen; Monot, Marc; Zimmermann, Michael; Kogadeeva, Maria; Sauer, Uwe; Jorth, Peter; Whiteley, Marvin; Debarbieux, Laurent; Lavigne, Rob

    2016-07-01

    As interest in the therapeutic and biotechnological potentials of bacteriophages has grown, so has value in understanding their basic biology. However, detailed knowledge of infection cycles has been limited to a small number of model bacteriophages, mostly infecting Escherichia coli. We present here the first analysis coupling data obtained from global next-generation approaches, RNA-Sequencing and metabolomics, to characterize interactions between the virulent bacteriophage PAK_P3 and its host Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We detected a dramatic global depletion of bacterial transcripts coupled with their replacement by viral RNAs over the course of infection, eventually leading to drastic changes in pyrimidine metabolism. This process relies on host machinery hijacking as suggested by the strong up-regulation of one bacterial operon involved in RNA processing. Moreover, we found that RNA-based regulation plays a central role in PAK_P3 lifecycle as antisense transcripts are produced mainly during the early stage of infection and viral small non coding RNAs are massively expressed at the end of infection. This work highlights the prominent role of RNA metabolism in the infection strategy of a bacteriophage belonging to a new characterized sub-family of viruses with promising therapeutic potential. PMID:27380413

  6. Outbreak of nosocomial urinary tract infections due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a paediatric surgical unit associated with tap-water contamination.

    PubMed

    Ferroni, A; Nguyen, L; Pron, B; Quesne, G; Brusset, M C; Berche, P

    1998-08-01

    An outbreak of 14 cases of urinary tract infections by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, including six symptomatic infections, occurred from September to November 1994 in a paediatric surgical unit. During the outbreak, urine samples from patients and multiple samples from the environment of patients were tested for the presence of P. aeruginosa. Bacterial isolates were studied by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Genotypic analysis showed that most of the isolates from children were different. Multiple P. aeruginosa isolates were also found in the tap water, as the only putative source of contamination. Two of these isolates were identified in two infected patients, indicating possible direct contamination of patients via tap water and this was related to the distal colonization of faucets. Bacteria were eradicated from tap water by replacement of taps. The cluster of cases of P. aeruginosa urinary infection was, therefore, related to multiple contaminations through tap water. These results illustrate an unexpected risk of nosocomial infection and emphasizes the importance of checking tap water to prevent bacterial contamination through handwashing in contaminated water. PMID:9749401

  7. Review: Antibiotic discovery in the age of structural biology - a comprehensive overview with special reference to development of drugs for the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection.

    PubMed

    Koehnke, Alessa; Friedrich, Reinhard E

    2015-01-01

    Due to the persistence and spread of antibiotic resistance, the discovery and exploitation of new antibiotic targets should be the subject of intensive research. Effective strategies are required to develop antibiotic alternatives. Antibiotics that act on new targets or via novel mechanisms have the greatest likelihood of overcoming resistance. In particular, there is a lack of specific antibiotics for Pseudomonas aeruginosa, one of the leading causes of healthcare-associated infections, exhibiting high resistance levels. Herein we describe how structure-based drug design can be used to achieve new antibiotics for the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection, using an essential enzyme of the fatty acid synthesis pathway from P. aeruginosa as an example.

  8. Effect of Pseudomonas aeruginosa-derived pyocyanin and 1-hydroxyphenazine on pulmonary mucociliary clearance monitored scintigraphically in the baboon model.

    PubMed

    Dormehl, I; Ras, G; Taylor, G; Hugo, N

    1991-01-01

    The effect of products of the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa on mucociliary lung clearance has been monitored in vivo in the baboon model by scintigraphy. Clearance was found to be inhibited by both 1-hydroxyphenazine and pyocyanin, and a dose-effect was illustrated by the former. This confirms previous in vitro results as well as results from work on guinea-pigs, and holds good prospects for the use of the baboon model under anesthesia in such investigations.

  9. Genome-Wide Identification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Virulence-Related Genes Using a Caenorhabditis elegans Infection Model

    PubMed Central

    Feinbaum, Rhonda L.; Urbach, Jonathan M.; Liberati, Nicole T.; Djonovic, Slavica; Adonizio, Allison; Carvunis, Anne-Ruxandra; Ausubel, Frederick M.

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PA14 is an opportunistic human pathogen capable of infecting a wide range of organisms including the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We used a non-redundant transposon mutant library consisting of 5,850 clones corresponding to 75% of the total and approximately 80% of the non-essential PA14 ORFs to carry out a genome-wide screen for attenuation of PA14 virulence in C. elegans. We defined a functionally diverse 180 mutant set (representing 170 unique genes) necessary for normal levels of virulence that included both known and novel virulence factors. Seven previously uncharacterized virulence genes (ABC transporters PchH and PchI, aminopeptidase PepP, ATPase/molecular chaperone ClpA, cold shock domain protein PA0456, putative enoyl-CoA hydratase/isomerase PA0745, and putative transcriptional regulator PA14_27700) were characterized with respect to pigment production and motility and all but one of these mutants exhibited pleiotropic defects in addition to their avirulent phenotype. We examined the collection of genes required for normal levels of PA14 virulence with respect to occurrence in P. aeruginosa strain-specific genomic regions, location on putative and known genomic islands, and phylogenetic distribution across prokaryotes. Genes predominantly contributing to virulence in C. elegans showed neither a bias for strain-specific regions of the P. aeruginosa genome nor for putatively horizontally transferred genomic islands. Instead, within the collection of virulence-related PA14 genes, there was an overrepresentation of genes with a broad phylogenetic distribution that also occur with high frequency in many prokaryotic clades, suggesting that in aggregate the genes required for PA14 virulence in C. elegans are biased towards evolutionarily conserved genes. PMID:22911607

  10. Host cell polarity proteins participate in innate immunity to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Cindy S.; Eran, Yoni; Ruch, Travis R.; Bryant, David M.; Datta, Anirban; Brakeman, Paul; Kierbel, Arlinet; Wittmann, Torsten; Metzger, Ross J.; Mostov, Keith E.; Engel, Joanne N.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The mucosal epithelium consists of polarized cells with distinct apical and basolateral membranes that serve as functional and physical barriers to the organisms’ exterior. The apical surface of the epithelium constitutes the first point of contact between mucosal pathogens, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and their host. We observed that binding of P. aeruginosa aggregates to the apical surface of polarized cells leads to the striking formation of an actin-rich membrane protrusion with ‘inverted’ polarity, containing basolateral lipids and membrane components. Such protrusions were associated with a spatially localized host immune response to P. aeruginosa aggregates that required bacterial flagella and a Type III secretion system apparatus. Host protrusions form de novo underneath bacterial aggregates and involve the apical recruitment of a Par3/Par6α/aPKC/Rac1 signaling module for a robust, spatially localized host NFκB response. Our data reveal an unanticipated role for spatio-temporal epithelial polarity changes in the activation of innate immune responses. PMID:24832456

  11. Rasamsonia argillacea pulmonary and aortic graft infection in an immune-competent patient.

    PubMed

    Doyon, Jeffrey B; Sutton, Deanna A; Theodore, Pierre; Dhillon, Gurmohan; Jones, Kirk D; Thompson, Elizabeth H; Fu, Jianmin; Wickes, Brian L; Koehler, Jane E; Schwartz, Brian S

    2013-02-01

    Rasamsonia argillacea (formerly known as Geosmithia argillacea) is a fungus recently recognized as a pathogen of immunocompromised patients. Here we report the first case of Rasamsonia infection in an immunocompetent host, presenting as a pulmonary and aortic graft infection. Its morphological similarity to nonpathogenic Penicillium species delayed the diagnosis and initiation of appropriate treatment.

  12. A Case of Infective Endocarditis and Pulmonary Septic Emboli Caused by Lactococcus lactis

    PubMed Central

    Habib, Adib; Asli, Nazih; Geffen, Yuval; Miron, Dan; Elias, Nael

    2016-01-01

    Infective endocarditis is a rare condition in children with normal hearts. We present here a case of previously healthy eleven-year-old girl with infective endocarditis and pulmonary septic emboli caused by a very rare bacterial etiology (Lactococcus lactis). Identification of this pathogen was only made by polymerase chain reaction. PMID:27774332

  13. Clonal dissemination, emergence of mutator lineages and antibiotic resistance evolution in Pseudomonas aeruginosa cystic fibrosis chronic lung infection.

    PubMed

    López-Causapé, Carla; Rojo-Molinero, Estrella; Mulet, Xavier; Cabot, Gabriel; Moyà, Bartolomé; Figuerola, Joan; Togores, Bernat; Pérez, José L; Oliver, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Chronic respiratory infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major cause of mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF). We investigated the interplay between three key microbiological aspects of these infections: the occurrence of transmissible and persistent strains, the emergence of variants with enhanced mutation rates (mutators) and the evolution of antibiotic resistance. For this purpose, 10 sequential isolates, covering up to an 8-year period, from each of 10 CF patients were studied. As anticipated, resistance significantly accumulated overtime, and occurred more frequently among mutator variants detected in 6 of the patients. Nevertheless, highest resistance was documented for the nonmutator CF epidemic strain LES-1 (ST-146) detected for the first time in Spain. A correlation between resistance profiles and resistance mechanisms evaluated [efflux pump (mexB, mexD, mexF, and mexY) and ampC overexpression and OprD production] was not always obvious and hypersusceptibility to certain antibiotics (such as aztreonam or meropenem) was frequently observed. The analysis of whole genome macrorestriction fragments through Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) revealed that a single genotype (clone FQSE-A) produced persistent infections in 4 of the patients. Multilocus Sequence typing (MLST) identified clone FQSE-A as the CF epidemic clone ST-274, but striking discrepancies between PFGE and MLST profiles were evidenced. While PFGE macrorestriction patterns remained stable, a new sequence type (ST-1089) was detected in two of the patients, differing from ST-274 by only two point mutations in two of the genes, each leading to a nonpreviously described allele. Moreover, detailed genetic analyses revealed that the new ST-1089 is a mutS deficient mutator lineage that evolved from the epidemic strain ST-274, acquired specific resistance mechanisms, and underwent further interpatient spread. Thus, presented results provide the first evidence of interpatient dissemination of mutator

  14. Infection of human mucosal tissue by Pseudomonas aeruginosa requires sequential and mutually dependent virulence factors and a novel pilus-associated adhesin

    PubMed Central

    Heiniger, Ryan W.; Winther-Larsen, Hanne C.; Pickles, Raymond J.; Koomey, Michael; Wolfgang, Matthew C.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Tissue damage predisposes humans to life-threatening disseminating infection by the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Bacterial adherence to host tissue is a critical first step in this infection process. It is well established that P. aeruginosa attachment to host cells involves type IV pili (TFP), which are retractile surface fibers. The molecular details of attachment and the identity of the bacterial adhesin and host receptor remain controversial. Using a mucosal epithelium model system derived from primary human tissue, we show that the pilus-associated protein PilY1 is required for bacterial adherence. We establish that P. aeruginosa preferentially binds to exposed basolateral host cell surfaces, providing a mechanistic explanation for opportunistic infection of damaged tissue. Further, we demonstrate that invasion and fulminant infection of intact host tissue requires the coordinated and mutually dependent action of multiple bacterial factors, including pilus fiber retraction and the host cell intoxication system, termed type III secretion. Our findings offer new and important insights into the complex interactions between a pathogen and its human host and provide compelling evidence that PilY1 serves as the principal P. aeruginosa adhesin for human tissue and that it specifically recognizes a host receptor localized or enriched on basolateral epithelial cell surfaces. PMID:20331639

  15. Pulmonary Valve Infective Endocarditis in an Adult Patient with Severe Congenital Pulmonary Stenosis and Ostium Secundum Atrial Septal Defect

    PubMed Central

    Lacalzada, Juan; Enjuanes, Cristina; Izquierdo, Maria Manuela; Barragán Acea, Antonio; De La Rosa, Alejandro; Laynez, Ignacio

    2010-01-01

    A hypertensive 76-year-old man with severe pulmonary valve stenosis (PVS) and recent initiation of haemodialysis was referred with fever, chills, and asthenia. One month prior, he had been admitted with similar symptoms. Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) had shown a PVS and no valve vegetations were observed. Following discharge, he was readmitted with fever and blood cultures positive for Staphylococcus haemolyticus. A new TTE revealed two pulmonary valve vegetations and a previously undetected ostium secundum-type atrial septal defect (ASD), confirmed by transesophageal echocardiography. The clinical course was uneventful with intravenous antibiotic treatment and the patient was safely discharged. This is a case of pulmonary valve infective endocarditis (IE). The incidence of right-sided IE is on the rise due to the increased number of patients using central venous lines, pacing, haemodialysis and other intravascular devices. Pulmonary valve IE is extremely rare, especially in structurally normal hearts. The case reported here, presents a combination of predisposing factors, such as severe congenital PVS, the presence of a central venous catheter, and haemodialysis. The fact that it was an older patient with severe congenital PVS and associated with a previously undiagnosed ASD, is also an unusual feature of this case, making it even more interesting. PMID:21234101

  16. Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody-associated Vasculitis Superimposed on Infection-related Glomerulonephritis Secondary to Pulmonary Mycobacterium avium Complex Infection.

    PubMed

    Asano, Shuichi; Mizuno, Shige; Okachi, Shotaro; Aso, Hiromichi; Wakahara, Keiko; Hashimoto, Naozumi; Ito, Satoru; Kozaki, Yohei; Katsuno, Takayuki; Maruyama, Shoichi; Hasegawa, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    A 73-year-old woman was diagnosed with pulmonary Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection and received no treatment. Disease progression was evident one year later with the development of myeloperoxidase-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) titers and systemic symptoms of a fever, polyarthritis, purpura, and rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis. Her symptoms did not improve with antibiotic treatment. A renal biopsy revealed crescentic glomerulonephritis with immunodeposition. According to these findings, she was diagnosed with ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) superimposed on infection-related glomerulonephritis (IRGN). Although there was a risk of aggravating an underlying infection, the combination therapy of corticosteroid and antibiotics improved AAV, IRGN, and even the lung radiological findings. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of AAV and IRGN secondary to pulmonary MAC infection. PMID:27580547

  17. Pulmonary toxoplasmosis in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients in the era of antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Velásquez, Jorge N; Ledesma, Bibiana A; Nigro, Monica G; Vittar, Natalia; Rueda, Nestor; De Carolis, Luis; Figueiras, Olga; Carnevale, Silvana; Corti, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a severe opportunistic infection in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The lung is a major site of infection after the central nervous system. In this report we described two cases of pneumonia due to Toxoplasma gondii infection in HIV patients with antiretroviral therapy. Clinical and radiological abnormalities are not specific. Pulmonary toxoplasmosis should be considered in HIV-infected patients with late stage of HIV, CD4 count less than 100 cells/µl and a poor adherence to HAART. PMID:26933317

  18. Pulmonary toxoplasmosis in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients in the era of antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Velásquez, Jorge N; Ledesma, Bibiana A; Nigro, Monica G; Vittar, Natalia; Rueda, Nestor; De Carolis, Luis; Figueiras, Olga; Carnevale, Silvana; Corti, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a severe opportunistic infection in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The lung is a major site of infection after the central nervous system. In this report we described two cases of pneumonia due to Toxoplasma gondii infection in HIV patients with antiretroviral therapy. Clinical and radiological abnormalities are not specific. Pulmonary toxoplasmosis should be considered in HIV-infected patients with late stage of HIV, CD4 count less than 100 cells/µl and a poor adherence to HAART.

  19. Pulmonary toxoplasmosis in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients in the era of antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Velásquez, Jorge N; Ledesma, Bibiana A; Nigro, Monica G; Vittar, Natalia; Rueda, Nestor; De Carolis, Luis; Figueiras, Olga; Carnevale, Silvana; Corti, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a severe opportunistic infection in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The lung is a major site of infection after the central nervous system. In this report we described two cases of pneumonia due to Toxoplasma gondii infection in HIV patients with antiretroviral therapy. Clinical and radiological abnormalities are not specific. Pulmonary toxoplasmosis should be considered in HIV-infected patients with late stage of HIV, CD4 count less than 100 cells/µl and a poor adherence to HAART. PMID:26933317

  20. Microevolution of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to a chronic pathogen of the cystic fibrosis lung.

    PubMed

    Hogardt, Michael; Heesemann, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the leading pathogen of chronic cystic fibrosis (CF) lung infection. Life-long persistance of P. aeruginosa in the CF lung requires a sophisticated habitat-specific adaptation of this pathogen to the heterogeneous and fluctuating lung environment. Due to the high selective pressure of inflamed CF lungs, P. aeruginosa increasingly experiences complex physiological and morphological changes. Pulmonary adaptation of P. aeruginosa is mediated by genetic variations that are fixed by the repeating interplay of mutation and selection. In this context, the emergence of hypermutable phenotypes (mutator strains) obviously improves the microevolution of P. aeruginosa to the diverse microenvironments of the CF lung. Mutator phenotypes are amplified during CF lung disease and accelerate the intraclonal diversification of P. aeruginosa. The resulting generation of numerous subclonal variants is advantegous to prepare P. aeruginosa population for unpredictable stresses (insurance hypothesis) and thus supports long-term survival of this pathogen. Oxygen restriction within CF lung environment further promotes persistence of P. aeruginosa due to increased antibiotic tolerance, alginate production and biofilm formation. Finally, P. aeruginosa shifts from an acute virulent pathogen of early infection to a host-adapted chronic virulent pathogen of end-stage infection of the CF lung. Common changes that are observed among chronic P. aeruginosa CF isolates include alterations in surface antigens, loss of virulence-associated traits, increasing antibiotic resistances, the overproduction of the exopolysaccharide alginate and the modulation of intermediary and micro-aerobic metabolic pathways (Hogardt and Heesemann, Int J Med Microbiol 300(8):557-562, 2010). Loss-of-function mutations in mucA and lasR genes determine the transition to mucoidity and loss of quorum sensing, which are hallmarks of the chronic virulence potential of P. aeruginosa. Metabolic factors

  1. Differentiation of pulmonary bacterial pathogens in cystic fibrosis by volatile metabolites emitted by their in vitro cultures: Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and the Burkholderia cepacia complex.

    PubMed

    Dryahina, Kseniya; Sovová, Kristýna; Nemec, Alexandr; Španěl, Patrik

    2016-01-01

    As a contribution to the continuing search for breath biomarkers of lung and airways infection in patients with cystic fibrosis, CF, we have analysed the volatile metabolites released in vitro by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and other bacteria involved in respiratory infections in these patients, i.e. those belonging to the Burkholderia cepacia complex, Staphylococcus aureus or Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. These opportunistic pathogens are generally harmless to healthy people but they may cause serious infections in patients with severe underlying disease or impaired immunity such as CF patients. Volatile organic compounds emitted from the cultures of strains belonging to the above-mentioned four taxa were analysed by selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry. In order to minimize the effect of differences in media composition all strains were cultured in three different liquid media. Multivariate statistical analysis reveals that the four taxa can be well discriminated by the differences in the headspace VOC concentration profiles. The compounds that should be targeted in breath as potential biomarkers of airway infection were identified for each of these taxa of CF pathogens. PMID:27506232

  2. Chlamydiae and Mycoplasma infections in pulmonary MALT lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Chanudet, E; Adam, P; Nicholson, A G; Wotherspoon, A C; Ranaldi, R; Goteri, G; Pileri, S A; Ye, H; Müller-Hermelink, H K; Du, M-Q

    2007-01-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae, Chlamydia trachomatis and Chlamydia psittaci were detected at low frequencies (<20%) among 69 pulmonary mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphomas, 30 other lymphoproliferative disorders (LPD) and 44 non-LPD. The incidence of individual Chlamydiae was generally higher in MALT lymphoma than non-LPD, although not reaching statistical significance. Mycoplasma pneumoniae DNA was not detected. PMID:17876330

  3. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infective Endocarditis Following Aortic Valve Implantation: A Note of Caution

    PubMed Central

    Dapás, Juan Ignacio; Rivero, Cynthia; Burgos, Pablo; Vila, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is an alternative treatment for severe aortic valve stenosis (AS) in patients with prohibitive risk for surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR). Prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) is a rare complication of this relatively novel procedure and current guidelines do not include specific recommendations for its treatment. We report a case of PVE due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa after TAVI that required SAVR, with successful outcome. PVE usually occurs during the first year after TAVI and entails a high mortality risk because patients eligible for this min-imally invasive procedure are fragile (i.e. advanced age and/or severe comorbidities). Additionally, clinical presentation may be atypical or subtle and transesophageal echocardiogram (TEE) may not be conclusive, which delays diagnosis and treatment worsening the prognosis. This case highlights that open SAVR might be ultimately indicated as part of treatment for TAVI-PVE despite a high-risk surgery score. PMID:27014375

  4. Vaccine-Mediated Immune Responses to Experimental Pulmonary Cryptococcus gattii Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Ashok K.; Hameed, Rumanasma S.; Wozniak, Karen L.; Hole, Camaron R.; Leopold Wager, Chrissy M.; Weintraub, Susan T.; Lopez-Ribot, Jose L.; Wormley, Floyd L.

    2014-01-01

    Cryptococcus gattii is a fungal pathogen that can cause life-threatening respiratory and disseminated infections in immune-competent and immune-suppressed individuals. Currently, there are no standardized vaccines against cryptococcosis in humans, underlying an urgent need for effective therapies and/or vaccines. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of intranasal immunization with C. gattii cell wall associated (CW) and/or cytoplasmic (CP) protein preparations to induce protection against experimental pulmonary C. gattii infection in mice. BALB/c mice immunized with C. gattii CW and/or CP protein preparations exhibited a significant reduction in pulmonary fungal burden and prolonged survival following pulmonary challenge with C. gattii. Protection was associated with significantly increased pro-inflammatory and Th1-type cytokine recall responses, in vitro and increased C. gattii-specific antibody production in immunized mice challenged with C. gattii. A number of immunodominant proteins were identified following immunoblot analysis of C. gattii CW and CP protein preparations using sera from immunized mice. Immunization with a combined CW and CP protein preparation resulted in an early increase in pulmonary T cell infiltrates following challenge with C. gattii. Overall, our studies show that C. gattii CW and CP protein preparations contain antigens that may be included in a subunit vaccine to induce prolonged protection against pulmonary C. gattii infection. PMID:25119981

  5. Dynamic Immune Cell Recruitment After Murine Pulmonary Aspergillus fumigatus Infection under Different Immunosuppressive Regimens

    PubMed Central

    Kalleda, Natarajaswamy; Amich, Jorge; Arslan, Berkan; Poreddy, Spoorthi; Mattenheimer, Katharina; Mokhtari, Zeinab; Einsele, Hermann; Brock, Matthias; Heinze, Katrin Gertrud; Beilhack, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Humans are continuously exposed to airborne spores of the saprophytic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus. However, in healthy individuals pulmonary host defense mechanisms efficiently eliminate the fungus. In contrast, A. fumigatus causes devastating infections in immunocompromised patients. Host immune responses against A. fumigatus lung infections in immunocompromised conditions have remained largely elusive. Given the dynamic changes in immune cell subsets within tissues upon immunosuppressive therapy, we dissected the spatiotemporal pulmonary immune response after A. fumigatus infection to reveal basic immunological events that fail to effectively control invasive fungal disease. In different immunocompromised murine models, myeloid, notably neutrophils, and macrophages, but not lymphoid cells were strongly recruited to the lungs upon infection. Other myeloid cells, particularly dendritic cells and monocytes, were only recruited to lungs of corticosteroid treated mice, which developed a strong pulmonary inflammation after infection. Lymphoid cells, particularly CD4+ or CD8+ T-cells and NK cells were highly reduced upon immunosuppression and not recruited after A. fumigatus infection. Moreover, adoptive CD11b+ myeloid cell transfer rescued cyclophosphamide immunosuppressed mice from lethal A. fumigatus infection but not cortisone and cyclophosphamide immunosuppressed mice. Our findings illustrate that CD11b+ myeloid cells are critical for anti-A. fumigatus defense under cyclophosphamide immunosuppressed conditions. PMID:27468286

  6. Concurrent pulmonary Aspergillus fumigatus and mucor infection in a cardiac transplant recipient: a case report.

    PubMed

    Webb, B J; Blair, J E; Kusne, S; Scott, R L; Steidley, D E; Arabia, F A; Vikram, H R

    2013-03-01

    Invasive fungal infections are a significant complication of solid organ transplantation. Here we report the first case of concurrent invasive pulmonary fungal infection caused by Aspergillus fumigatus and Mucor species in a heart transplant recipient. Polymicrobial mold infection is rare but should be considered in solid organ transplant recipients who fail to respond to initial antifungal therapy targeting a single organism. It is also of interest that in addition to potent immunosuppression and prolonged voriconazole therapy, possible airway fungal colonization following hurricane Katrina cleaning efforts might have contributed to this dual invasive mold infection. PMID:23267784

  7. Concurrent pulmonary Aspergillus fumigatus and mucor infection in a cardiac transplant recipient: a case report.

    PubMed

    Webb, B J; Blair, J E; Kusne, S; Scott, R L; Steidley, D E; Arabia, F A; Vikram, H R

    2013-03-01

    Invasive fungal infections are a significant complication of solid organ transplantation. Here we report the first case of concurrent invasive pulmonary fungal infection caused by Aspergillus fumigatus and Mucor species in a heart transplant recipient. Polymicrobial mold infection is rare but should be considered in solid organ transplant recipients who fail to respond to initial antifungal therapy targeting a single organism. It is also of interest that in addition to potent immunosuppression and prolonged voriconazole therapy, possible airway fungal colonization following hurricane Katrina cleaning efforts might have contributed to this dual invasive mold infection.

  8. Chronic Infection by Mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa Associated with Dysregulation in T-Cell Immunity to Outer Membrane Porin F

    PubMed Central

    Quigley, Kathryn J.; Reynolds, Catherine J.; Goudet, Amelie; Raynsford, Eleanor J.; Sergeant, Ruhena; Quigley, Andrew; Worgall, Stefan; Bilton, Diana; Wilson, Robert; Loebinger, Michael R.; Maillere, Bernard; Altmann, Daniel M.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) is an environmental pathogen that commonly infects individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF) and non-CF bronchiectasis, impacting morbidity and mortality. To understand the pathobiology of interactions between the bacterium and host adaptive immunity and to inform rational vaccine design, it is important to understand the adaptive immune correlates of disease. Objectives: To characterize T-cell immunity to the PA antigen outer membrane porin F (OprF) by analyzing immunodominant epitopes in relation to infection status. Methods: Patients with non-CF bronchiectasis were stratified by frequency of PA isolation. T-cell IFN-γ immunity to OprF and its immunodominant epitopes was characterized. Patterns of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) restriction of immunodominant epitopes were defined using HLA class II transgenic mice. Immunity was characterized with respect to cytokine and chemokine secretion, antibody response, and T-cell activation transcripts. Measurements and Main Results: Patients were stratified according to whether PA was never, sometimes (<50%), or frequently (≥50%) isolated from sputum. Patients with frequent PA sputum-positive isolates were more likely to be infected by mucoid PA, and they showed a narrow T-cell epitope response and a relative reduction in Th1 polarizing transcription factors but enhanced immunity with respect to antibody production, innate cytokines, and chemokines. Conclusions: We have defined the immunodominant, HLA-restricted T-cell epitopes of OprF. Our observation that chronic infection is associated with a response of narrowed specificity, despite strong innate and antibody immunity, may help to explain susceptibility in these individuals and pave the way for better vaccine design to achieve protective immunity. PMID:25789411

  9. Impact of Sustained Eradication of New Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infection on Long-term Outcomes in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Mayer-Hamblett, Nicole; Kloster, Margaret; Rosenfeld, Margaret; Gibson, Ronald L.; Retsch-Bogart, George Z.; Emerson, Julia; Thompson, Valeria; Ramsey, Bonnie W.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pa) is the most important pathogen infecting the airways in individuals with cystic fibrosis. A key question is whether children with newly acquired Pa infection who are able to achieve sustained eradication after early antipseudomonal therapy demonstrate improved long-term health outcomes compared with those who are unable to achieve a sustained microbiologic response. Methods. This cohort study utilized observational follow-up data on children participating in the Early Pseudomonas Infection Control trial who received standardized therapy for newly acquired Pa. Sustained eradicators were defined as those who maintained Pa-negative cultures for 12 months after initial antipseudomonal therapy. Associations between eradication status and outcomes were assessed. Results. Of the 249 trial participants included in the study, 172 (69%) achieved sustained eradication of Pa during the trial (sustained eradicators). Over the median 5-year follow-up, sustained eradicators had a 74% reduced risk of developing chronic Pa (hazard ratio [HR], 0.26; 95% confidence interval [CI], .17–.40) and a 57% reduced risk of mucoidy (HR, 0.43; 95% CI, .25–.73) compared with nonsustained eradicators. Sustained eradicators had significantly less anti-Pa antibiotic usage during follow-up compared with nonsustained eradicators. There was no association between eradication status and clinical outcomes including rate of exacerbation and lung function decline. Conclusions. This is the first study to quantify the long-term durability of microbiological response associated with early antipseudomonal therapy, demonstrating the critical importance of optimizing antipseudomonal therapies during early Pa infection. The clinical impact of failure to achieve sustained Pa eradication remains unclear, however, and may be confounded by anti-Pa antibiotic usage. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT00097773. PMID:25972024

  10. Outbreak of Multi-Drug Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Bloodstream Infection in the Haematology Unit of a South African Academic Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Mudau, Maanda; Jacobson, Rachael; Minenza, Nadia; Kuonza, Lazarus; Morris, Vida; Engelbrecht, Heather; Nicol, Mark P.; Bamford, Colleen

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe an outbreak of multi-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa bloodstream infections (MRPA-BSI) that occurred in the haematology ward of a tertiary academic hospital in Cape Town, South Africa, and determine risk factors for acquisition of MRPA-BSI. Methods The outbreak investigation included a search for additional cases, review of patient records, environmental and staff screening, molecular typing using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and Multi-locus sequencing (MLST) and a retrospective case-control study. Results Ten MRPA-BSI cases occurred in the haematology ward between January 2010 and January 2011. The case fatality rate was 80%. Staff screening specimens were negative for MRPA and an environmental source was not identified. PFGE showed that 9/10 isolates were related. MLST showed that 3 of these 9 isolates belonged to Sequence type (ST) 233 while the unrelated isolate belonged to ST260. Conclusion We have described an outbreak of MRPA-BSI occurring over an extended period of time among neutropenic haematology patients. Molecular typing confirms that the outbreak was predominantly due to a single strain. The source of the outbreak was not identified, but the outbreak appears to have been controlled following intensive infection control measures. PMID:23516393

  11. Comparative study of protective effects of chitin, chitosan, and N-acetyl chitohexaose against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Listeria monocytogenes infections in mice.

    PubMed

    Okawa, Yoshio; Kobayashi, Makiko; Suzuki, Shigeo; Suzuki, Masuko

    2003-06-01

    We conducted a comparative study of the protective effects of chitin, chitosan, and N-acetyl chitohexaose (NACOS-6) against mice infected intravenously or intraperitoneally with Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Listeria monocytogenes. Mice pretreated with chitin, chitosan, and NACOS-6 showed resistance to intraperitoneal infections by both microbes. Only mice pretreated with chitin and chitosan showed resistance to intravenous infections by both microbes. The number, active oxygen generation, and myeloperoxidase activity of peritoneal exudate cells (PEC) in the chitin, chitosan, and NACOS-6-treated mice were greater than those of the untreated mice. Also, these PEC factors from mice pretreated with chitin and chitosan were greater than those from the NACOS-6-treated mice.

  12. INTESTINAL AND PULMONARY INFECTION BY Cryptosporidium parvum IN TWO PATIENTS WITH HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    REINA, Fábio Tadeu Rodrigues; RIBEIRO, Camila Aparecida; de ARAÚJO, Ronalda Silva; MATTÉ, Maria Helena; CASTANHO, Roberto Esteves Pires; TANAKA, Ioshie Ibara; VIGGIANI, Ana Maria Ferreira Sornas; MARTINS, Luciamáre Perinetti Alves

    2016-01-01

    We describe two patients with HIV/AIDS who presented pulmonary and intestinal infection caused by Cryptosporidium parvum, with a fatal outcome. The lack of available description of changes in clinical signs and radiographic characteristics of this disease when it is located in the extra-intestinal region causes low prevalence of early diagnosis and a subsequent lack of treatment. PMID:27007564

  13. The optimum timing to wean invasive ventilation for patients with AECOPD or COPD with pulmonary infection.

    PubMed

    Song, Yuanlin; Chen, Rongchang; Zhan, Qingyuan; Chen, Shujing; Luo, Zujin; Ou, Jiaxian; Wang, Chen

    2016-01-01

    COPD is characterized by a progressive decline in lung function and mental and physical comorbidities. It is a significant burden worldwide due to its growing prevalence, comorbidities, and mortality. Complication by bronchial-pulmonary infection causes 50%-90% of acute exacerbations of COPD (AECOPD), which may lead to the aggregation of COPD symptoms and the development of acute respiratory failure. Non-invasive or invasive ventilation (IV) is usually implemented to treat acute respiratory failure. However, ventilatory support (mainly IV) should be discarded as soon as possible to prevent the onset of time-dependent complications. To withdraw IV, an optimum timing has to be selected based on weaning assessment and spontaneous breathing trial or replacement of IV by non-IV at pulmonary infection control window. The former method is more suitable for patients with AECOPD without significant bronchial-pulmonary infection while the latter method is more suitable for patients with AECOPD with acute significant bronchial-pulmonary infection. PMID:27042042

  14. Possible pulmonary Rhizopus oryzae infection in a previously healthy child after a near-drowning incident.

    PubMed

    Gerlach, Magdalena M; Lippmann, Norman; Kobelt, Louise; Petzold-Quinque, Stefanie; Ritter, Lutz; Kiess, Wieland; Siekmeyer, Manuela

    2016-06-01

    This article reports on a previously healthy 17-month-old boy who developed pulmonary mucormycosis after a near-drowning incident in a goose pond. The patient survived without neurological sequelae and recovered, under treatment with amphotericin B, from the rare and often invasive fungal infection with Rhizopus spp., usually occurring in immunodeficient patients.

  15. INTESTINAL AND PULMONARY INFECTION BY Cryptosporidium parvum IN TWO PATIENTS WITH HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Reina, Fábio Tadeu Rodrigues; Ribeiro, Camila Aparecida; Araújo, Ronalda Silva de; Matté, Maria Helena; Castanho, Roberto Esteves Pires; Tanaka, Ioshie Ibara; Viggiani, Ana Maria Ferreira Sornas; Martins, Luciamáre Perinetti Alves

    2016-01-01

    We describe two patients with HIV/AIDS who presented pulmonary and intestinal infection caused by Cryptosporidium parvum, with a fatal outcome. The lack of available description of changes in clinical signs and radiographic characteristics of this disease when it is located in the extra-intestinal region causes low prevalence of early diagnosis and a subsequent lack of treatment. PMID:27007564

  16. In vitro efficacy of copper and silver ions in eradicating Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and Acinetobacter baumannii: implications for on-site disinfection for hospital infection control.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hsin-I; Shih, Hsiu-Yun; Lee, Chien-Ming; Yang, Thomas C; Lay, Jiunn-Jyi; Lin, Yusen E

    2008-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and Acinetobacter baumannii are major opportunistic waterborne pathogens causing hospital-acquired infections. Copper-silver ionization has been shown to be effective in controlling Legionella colonization in hospital water systems. The objective was to determine the efficacy of copper and silver ions alone and in combination in eradicating P. aeruginosa, S. maltophilia and A. baumannii at the concentration applied to Legionella control. Kill curve experiments and mathematical modeling were conducted at copper and silver ion concentrations of 0.1, 0.2, 0.4, 0.8 and 0.01, 0.02, 0.04, 0.08 mg/L, respectively. The combinations of copper and silver ions were tested at concentrations of 0.2/0.02 and 0.4/0.04 mg/L, respectively. Initial organism concentration was ca. of 3 x 10(6)cfu/mL, and viability of the test organisms was assessed at predetermined time intervals. Samples (0.1 mL) withdrawn were mixed with 10 microL neutralizer solution immediately, serially diluted and plated in duplicate onto blood agar plates. The culture plates were incubated for 48 h at 37 degrees C and enumerated for the cfu (detection limit 10 cfu/mL). The results showed all copper ion concentrations tested (0.1-0.8 mg/L) achieved more than 99.999% reduction of P. aeruginosa which appears to be more susceptible to copper ions than S. maltophilia and A. baumannii. Silver ions concentration of 0.08 mg/L achieved more than 99.999% reduction of P. aeruginosa, S. maltophilia and A. baumannii in 6, 12 and 96 h, respectively. Combination of copper and silver ions exhibited a synergistic effect against P. aeruginosa and A. baumannii while the combination exhibited an antagonistic effect against S. maltophilia. Ionization may have a potential to eradicate P. aeruginosa, S. maltophilia and A. baumannii from hospital water systems.

  17. The Approach to Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Talwalkar, Jaideep S; Murray, Thomas S

    2016-03-01

    There is a high prevalence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in patients with cystic fibrosis and clear epidemiologic links between chronic infection and morbidity and mortality exist. Prevention and early identification of infection are critical, and stand to improve with the advent of new vaccines and laboratory methods. Once the organism is identified, a variety of treatment options are available. Aggressive use of antipseudomonal antibiotics is the standard of care for acute pulmonary exacerbations in cystic fibrosis, and providers must take into account specific patient characteristics when making treatment decisions related to antibiotic selection, route and duration of administration, and site of care.

  18. Increased susceptibility to pulmonary Pseudomonas infection in Splunc1 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanyan; Di, Marissa E; Chu, Hong Wei; Liu, Xinyu; Wang, Ling; Wenzel, Sally; Di, Y Peter

    2013-10-15

    The airway epithelium is the first line of host defense against pathogens. The short palate, lung, and nasal epithelium clone (SPLUNC)1 protein is secreted in respiratory tracts and is a member of the bacterial/permeability increasing (BPI) fold-containing protein family, which shares structural similarities with BPI-like proteins. On the basis of its homology with BPIs and restricted expression of SPLUNC1 in serous cells of submucosal glands and surface epithelial cells of the upper respiratory tract, SPLUNC1 is thought to possess antimicrobial activity in host defense. SPLUNC1 is also reported to have surfactant properties, which may contribute to anti-biofilm defenses. The objective of this study was to determine the in vivo functions of SPLUNC1 following Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection and to elucidate the underlying mechanism by using a knockout (KO) mouse model with a genetic ablation of Splunc1. Splunc1 KO mice showed accelerated mortality and increased susceptibility to P. aeruginosa infection with significantly decreased survival rates, increased bacterial burdens, exaggerated tissue injuries, and elevated proinflammatory cytokine levels as compared with those of their wild-type littermates. Increased neutrophil infiltration in Splunc1 KO mice was accompanied by elevated chemokine levels, including Cxcl1, Cxcl2, and Ccl20. Furthermore, the expression of several epithelial secretory proteins and antimicrobial molecules was considerably suppressed in the lungs of Splunc1 KO mice. The deficiency of Splunc1 in mouse airway epithelium also results in increased biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa. Taken together, our results support that the ablation of Splunc1 in mouse airways affects the mucociliary clearance, resulting in decreased innate immune response during Pseudomonas-induced respiratory infection. PMID:24048904

  19. A crucial role of Flagellin in the induction of airway mucus production by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Ben Mohamed, Fatima; Mohamed, Fatima Ben; Garcia-Verdugo, Ignacio; Medina, Mathieu; Balloy, Viviane; Chignard, Michel; Ramphal, Reuben; Touqui, Lhousseine

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen involved in nosocomial infections. Flagellin is a P. aeruginosa virulence factor involved in host response to this pathogen. We examined the role of flagellin in P. aeruginosa-induced mucus secretion. Using a mouse model of pulmonary infection we showed that PAK, a wild type strain of P. aeruginosa, induced airway mucus secretion and mucin muc5ac expression at higher levels than its flagellin-deficient mutant (ΔFliC). PAK induced expression of MUC5AC and MUC2 in both human airway epithelial NCI-H292 cell line and in primary epithelial cells. In contrast, ΔFliC infection had lower to no effect on MUC5AC and MUC2 expressions. A purified P. aeruginosa flagellin induced MUC5AC expression in parallel to IL-8 secretion in NCI-H292 cells. Accordingly, ΔFliC mutant stimulated IL-8 secretion at significantly lower levels compared to PAK. Incubation of NCI-H292 cells with exogenous IL-8 induced MUC5AC expression and pre-incubation of these cells with an anti-IL-8 antibody abrogated flagellin-mediated MUC5AC expression. Silencing of TLR5 and Naip, siRNA inhibited both flagellin-induced MUC5AC expression and IL-8 secretion. Finally, inhibition of ERK abolished the expression of both PAK- and flagellin-induced MUC5AC. We conclude that: (i) flagellin is crucial in P. aeruginosa-induced mucus hyper-secretion through TLR5 and Naip pathways; (ii) this process is mediated by ERK and amplified by IL-8. Our findings help understand the mechanisms involved in mucus secretion during pulmonary infectious disease induced by P. aeruginosa, such as in cystic fibrosis. PMID:22768318

  20. Pulmonary thromboembolism and hypertension after thiacetarsamide vs melarsomine dihydrochloride treatment of Dirofilaria immitis infection in dogs.

    PubMed

    Rawlings, C A; Raynaud, J P; Lewis, R E; Duncan, J R

    1993-06-01

    The severity of pulmonary thromboembolism and pulmonary hypertension induced by heartworms dying after administration of 2 adulticides was evaluated. Because melarsomine dihydrochloride (RM340) has been shown to be more effective in killing Dirofilaria immitis (heartworms) than the traditional approved adulticide, thiacetarsamide, an attempt was made to determine whether this new adulticide induced more severe lung disease. Before adulticide treatment, 32 dogs with naturally acquired heartworm infections received physical examinations, semiquantitative antigen concentration tests, CBC, platelet counts, serum biochemistry analyses, arterial blood gas determinations, thoracic radiography, pulmonary arteriography, and pulmonary hemodynamic tests. Eight dogs with a low burden and 9 dogs with a high burden of heartworms were treated with thiacetarsamide, and 7 dogs with a low burden and 8 dogs with a high burden were treated with RM340. Except for the heartworm-burden test, tests were repeated at regular intervals during the first 7 weeks after treatment. None of the dogs coughed or had dyspnea after treatment. Six of 9 dogs with high worm burdens and 4 of 8 dogs with low worm burdens had surviving heartworms after thiacetarsamide treatment, in contrast to only 3 of 15 RM340-treated dogs. Differences between the 2 adulticide treatments were minimal as determined by thoracic radiography, pulmonary hemodynamic tests, clinical laboratory analyses, pulmonary arteriography, or necropsy. The RM340 treatment was a more effective adulticide, but it did not increase the severity of hypertension and thromboembolism.

  1. Do linear logistic model analyses of volatile biomarkers in exhaled breath of cystic fibrosis patients reliably indicate Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection?

    PubMed

    Španěl, Patrik; Sovová, Kristýna; Dryahina, Kseniya; Doušová, Tereza; Dřevínek, Pavel; Smith, David

    2016-01-01

    Non-invasive breath analysis has been used to search for volatile biomarkers of lungs and airways infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, PA, in cystic fibrosis patients. The exhaled breath of 20 PA-infected patients and 38 PA-negative patients was analysed using selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry, SIFT-MS. Special attention was given to the positive identification and accurate quantification of 16 volatile compounds (VOCs) as assured by the detailed consideration of their analytical ion chemistry occurring in the SIFT-MS reactor. However, the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the concentrations of any of the 16 compounds taken individually were found to be low. But when a linear combination of the concentrations of all 16 VOCs was used to construct an optimised receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve using a linear logistic model, the diagnostic separation of PA-infected patients relative to the PA-negative patients was apparently good in terms of the derived sensitivity (89%), specificity (86%), and the area under the ROC curve is 0.91. Four compounds were revealed by the linear logistic model as significant, viz. malondialdehyde, isoprene, phenol and acetoin. The implications of these results to PA detection in the airways are assessed. Whilst such a metabolomics approach to optimise the ROC curve is widely used in breath analysis, it can lead to misleading indications. Therefore, we conclude that the results of the linear logistic model analyses are of limited immediate clinical value. The identified compounds should rather be considered as a stimulus for further independent studies involving larger patient cohorts. PMID:27532768

  2. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Infections: Community Structure, Antimicrobial Tolerance and Immune Response.

    PubMed

    Rybtke, Morten; Hultqvist, Louise Dahl; Givskov, Michael; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2015-11-20

    Studies of biopsies from infectious sites, explanted tissue and medical devises have provided evidence that biofilms are the underlying cause of a variety of tissue-associated and implant-associated recalcitrant human infections. With a need for novel anti-biofilm treatment strategies, research in biofilm infection microbiology, biofilm formation mechanisms and biofilm-associated antimicrobial tolerance has become an important area in microbiology. Substantial knowledge about biofilm formation mechanisms, biofilm-associated antimicrobial tolerance and immune evasion mechanisms has been obtained through work with biofilms grown in in vitro experimental setups, and the relevance of this information in the context of chronic infections is being investigated by the use of animal models of infection. Because our current in vitro experimental setups and animal models have limitations, new advanced in vitro models developed with knowledge about the chemical landscape at infectious sites are needed.

  3. Association of overexpression of efflux pump genes with antibiotic resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains clinically isolated from urinary tract infection patients.

    PubMed

    Shigemura, Katsumi; Osawa, Kayo; Kato, Ayaka; Tokimatsu, Issei; Arakawa, Soichi; Shirakawa, Toshiro; Fujisawa, Masato

    2015-09-01

    There are several mechanisms for antibiotic-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The purpose of this study is to investigate the association between the expression of efflux pump-coding genes and antibiotic resistance in P. aeruginosa causing urinary tract infections (UTIs). We extracted the RNA from 105 clinical strains of P. aeruginosa isolated from UTI patients with full data on antibiotic MICs and assayed real-time quantitative reverse-transcription PCR. We investigated the gene expressions of four resistance nodulation cell division-type multi-drug efflux pump systems (MexAB-OprM, MexCD-OprJ, MexEF-OprN and MexXY(-OprA)) and the correlation of the MICs of nine antibiotics, risk factors and antibiotic resistance-related genes with expressions of mexB, mexC, mexE and mexY. Multivariate statistical data demonstrated a significant relationship between increased expression of mexB or mexC and complicated UTI (Odds ratio=8.03, P<0.001 and Odds ratio=8.86, P=0.032, respectively). We also found a significant association between the increased expression of mexC and resistance to levofloxacin (LVFX) (Odds ratio=4.48, P=0.035). In conclusion, increased expression of mexC leads to LVFX resistance in P. aeruginosa causing UTI. These results contribute to our knowledge of the efflux pump system and antibiotic resistance.

  4. Successful treatment with faropenem and clarithromycin of pulmonary Mycobacterium abscessus infection.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Eisaku; Kimoto, Terumi; Tsuyuguchi, Kazunari; Suzuki, Katsuhiro; Amitani, Ryoichi

    2002-09-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus accounts for 80% of rapidly growing mycobacterial pulmonary infections and can be lethal. Treatment is difficult because of the paucity of effective drugs. We describe a patient with pulmonary M. abscessus infection who was treated with a regimen that included faropenem, a novel oral penem, and clarithromycin. He showed favorable responses to the treatment for more than 12 months. In vitro, faropenem had considerable inhibitory activities against 56 strains of rapidly growing mycobacteria, including M. peregrinum, M. chelonae, M. fortuitum, and M. abscessus (stated in order of increasing minimal inhibitory concentrations). Thus, faropenem has the potential to be used as an adjunctive drug with clarithromycin for the treatment of infection with rapidly growing mycobacteria, including M. abscessus. PMID:12373490

  5. Genotypic and phenotypic variation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa reveals signatures of secondary infection and mutator activity in certain cystic fibrosis patients with chronic lung infections.

    PubMed

    Warren, Ashley E; Boulianne-Larsen, Carla M; Chandler, Christine B; Chiotti, Kami; Kroll, Evgueny; Miller, Scott R; Taddei, Francois; Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle; Ferroni, Agnes; McInnerney, Kathleen; Franklin, Michael J; Rosenzweig, Frank

    2011-12-01

    Evolutionary adaptation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to the cystic fibrosis lung is limited by genetic variation, which depends on rates of horizontal gene transfer and mutation supply. Because each may increase following secondary infection or mutator emergence, we sought to ascertain the incidence of secondary infection and genetic variability in populations containing or lacking mutators. Forty-nine strains collected over 3 years from 16 patients were phenotyped for antibiotic resistance and mutator status and were genotyped by repetitive-sequence PCR (rep-PCR), pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Though phenotypic and genetic polymorphisms were widespread and clustered more strongly within than between longitudinal series, their distribution revealed instances of secondary infection. Sequence data, however, indicated that interlineage recombination predated initial strain isolation. Mutator series were more likely to be multiply antibiotic resistant, but not necessarily more variable in their nucleotide sequences, than nonmutators. One mutator and one nonmutator series were sequenced at mismatch repair loci and analyzed for gene content using DNA microarrays. Both were wild type with respect to mutL, but mutators carried an 8-bp mutS deletion causing a frameshift mutation. Both series lacked 126 genes encoding pilins, siderophores, and virulence factors whose inactivation has been linked to adaptation during chronic infection. Mutators exhibited loss of severalfold more genes having functions related to mobile elements, motility, and attachment. A 105-kb, 86-gene deletion was observed in one nonmutator that resulted in loss of virulence factors related to pyoverdine synthesis and elements of the multidrug efflux regulon. Diminished DNA repair activity may facilitate but not be absolutely required for rapid evolutionary change.

  6. IgA modulates respiratory dysfunction as a sequela to pulmonary chlamydial infection as neonates.

    PubMed

    Lanka, Gopala Krishna Koundinya; Yu, Jieh-Juen; Gong, Siqi; Gupta, Rishein; Mustafa, Shamimunisa B; Murthy, Ashlesh K; Zhong, Guangming; Chambers, James P; Guentzel, M Neal; Arulanandam, Bernard P

    2016-04-01

    Neonatal Chlamydia lung infections are associated with serious sequelae such as asthma and airway hyper-reactivity in children and adults. Our previous studies demonstrated the importance of Th-1 type cytokines, IL-12 and IFN-γ in protection against neonatal pulmonary chlamydial challenge; however, the role of the humoral arm of defense has not been elucidated. We hypothesized that B-cells and IgA, the major mucosal antibody, play a protective role in newborns against development of later life respiratory sequelae to Chlamydia infection. Our studies using neonatal mice revealed that all WT and IgA-deficient (IgA(-/-)) animals survived a sublethal pulmonary Chlamydia muridarum challenge at one day after birth with similar reduction in bacterial burdens over time. In contrast, all B-cell-deficient (μMT) mice succumbed to infection at the same challenge dose correlating to failure to control bacterial burdens in the lungs. Although IgA may not be important for bacterial clearance, we observed IgA(-/-) mice displayed greater respiratory dysfunction 5 weeks post challenge. Specifically, comparative respiratory functional analyses revealed a significant shift upward in P-V loops, and higher dynamic resistance in IgA(-/-) animals. This study provides insight(s) into the protective role of IgA in neonates against pulmonary chlamydial infection induced respiratory pathological sequelae observed later in life.

  7. A Rare Case of Pulmonary Artery Dissection Associated With Infective Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiaoqing; Wang, Xiaoqin; Wang, Chuan; Zhou, Kaiyu; Li, Yifei; Hua, Yimin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary artery dissection (PAD) is a rare condition with high mortality and has not been reported in patient with infective endocarditis (IE). Here, we report the first case of such patient who experienced PDA and survived after surgical intervention. A 10-year-old female child was diagnosed as IE with a patent ductus arteriosis (PDA) and a vegetation on the left side of pulmonary artery trunk (10 × 5 mm2). Following 3-week antibacterial treatment, the body temperature of patient returned to normal, and the size of vegetation reduced (7 × 3 mm2). However, the patient had a sudden attack of sustained and crushing right chest pain, orthopnea with increasing respiratory rate (> 60/min), and acute high fever. Echocardiography revealed the detachment of vegetation on the first day and dissection of pulmonary artery on the next day. The patient received immediate surgical intervention. It was found that aneurysm had a size of 28 × 20 mm2 and its orifice (the dissecting site) located on the opposite side of the PDA opening (right side of the pulmonary artery trunk). The dissected left wall of pulmonary artery trunk was reconstructed followed by the closure of PDA with suture. The patient recovered uneventfully. From this case, we learned that the surgical intervention should be considered at an early time for IE patients who have a vegetation in pulmonary artery and PDA. After the infection is under control, the earlier surgery may prevent severe complications. PMID:27175632

  8. A Rare Case of Pulmonary Artery Dissection Associated With Infective Endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiaoqing; Wang, Xiaoqin; Wang, Chuan; Zhou, Kaiyu; Li, Yifei; Hua, Yimin

    2016-05-01

    Pulmonary artery dissection (PAD) is a rare condition with high mortality and has not been reported in patient with infective endocarditis (IE). Here, we report the first case of such patient who experienced PDA and survived after surgical intervention.A 10-year-old female child was diagnosed as IE with a patent ductus arteriosis (PDA) and a vegetation on the left side of pulmonary artery trunk (10 × 5 mm). Following 3-week antibacterial treatment, the body temperature of patient returned to normal, and the size of vegetation reduced (7 × 3 mm). However, the patient had a sudden attack of sustained and crushing right chest pain, orthopnea with increasing respiratory rate (> 60/min), and acute high fever. Echocardiography revealed the detachment of vegetation on the first day and dissection of pulmonary artery on the next day. The patient received immediate surgical intervention. It was found that aneurysm had a size of 28 × 20 mm and its orifice (the dissecting site) located on the opposite side of the PDA opening (right side of the pulmonary artery trunk). The dissected left wall of pulmonary artery trunk was reconstructed followed by the closure of PDA with suture. The patient recovered uneventfully.From this case, we learned that the surgical intervention should be considered at an early time for IE patients who have a vegetation in pulmonary artery and PDA. After the infection is under control, the earlier surgery may prevent severe complications. PMID:27175632

  9. Cavitary pulmonary infection with Mycobacterium avium observed by bronchoscopy.

    PubMed

    Uruga, Hironori; Suzuki, Aika; Hanada, Shigeo; Takaya, Hisashi; Miyamoto, Atsushi; Morokawa, Nasa; Fujii, Takeshi; Kurosaki, Atsuko; Kishi, Kazuma

    2012-10-01

    A 58-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of fever and loss of appetite. He had undergone surgery for esophageal cancer. A chest radiography 12 years after the surgery revealed cavitary lesions in the right upper lobe of the lung. The patient was then diagnosed as having Mycobacterium avium infection. The cavitary lesions worsened 2 years after clarithromycin monotherapy. Bronchoscopy was performed to observe the interior of the cavity. Gray debris adhering to the cavitary wall decreased after intensive treatment with Streptomycin, rifabutin, levofloxacin, and ethambutol. This is a rare case in which treatment efficacy of M. avium infection was directly observed by serial bronchoscopy. PMID:23207537

  10. Clearance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Foreign-Body Biofilm Infections through Reduction of the Cyclic Di-GMP Level in the Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Louise D.; van Gennip, Maria; Rybtke, Morten T.; Wu, Hong; Chiang, Wen-Chi; Alhede, Morten; Høiby, Niels; Nielsen, Thomas E.; Givskov, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Opportunistic pathogenic bacteria can engage in biofilm-based infections that evade immune responses and develop into chronic conditions. Because conventional antimicrobials cannot efficiently eradicate biofilms, there is an urgent need to develop alternative measures to combat biofilm infections. It has recently been established that the secondary messenger cyclic diguanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) functions as a positive regulator of biofilm formation in several different bacteria. In the present study we investigated whether manipulation of the c-di-GMP level in bacteria potentially can be used for biofilm control in vivo. We constructed a Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain in which a reduction in the c-di-GMP level can be achieved via induction of the Escherichia coli YhjH c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase. Initial experiments showed that induction of yhjH expression led to dispersal of the majority of the bacteria in in vitro-grown P. aeruginosa biofilms. Subsequently, we demonstrated that P. aeruginosa biofilms growing on silicone implants, located in the peritoneal cavity of mice, dispersed after induction of the YhjH protein. Bacteria accumulated temporarily in the spleen after induction of biofilm dispersal, but the mice tolerated the dispersed bacteria well. The present work provides proof of the concept that modulation of the c-di-GMP level in bacteria is a viable strategy for biofilm control. PMID:23690403

  11. Mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates maintain the biofilm formation capacity and the gene expression profiles during the chronic lung infection of CF patients.

    PubMed

    Lee, Baoleri; Schjerling, Charlotte K; Kirkby, Nikolai; Hoffmann, Nadine; Borup, Rehannah; Molin, Søren; Høiby, Niels; Ciofu, Oana

    2011-04-01

    Phenotypic and genotypic diversifications of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the airways of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) promote long-term survival of bacteria during chronic lung infection. Twelve clonally related, sequential mucoid and non-mucoid paired P. aeruginosa isolates obtained from three Danish CF patients were investigated. The in vitro biofilm formation capacity was studied under static and flow through conditions and the global gene expression profiles were investigated by Affymetrix GeneChip. Regulatory genes of alginate production and quorum sensing (QS) system were sequenced and measurements of the alginate production and the detection of the QS signal molecules were performed. Comparisons of mucoid and non-mucoid isolates from early and late stages of the infection showed that the mucoid phenotype maintained over a decade the capacity to form in vitro biofilm and showed an unaltered transcriptional profile, whereas substantial alterations in the transcriptional profiles and loss of the capacity to form in vitro biofilms were observed in corresponding isolates of the non-mucoid phenotype. The conserved gene expression pattern in the mucoid isolates vs the diversity of changes in non-mucoid isolates observed in this particular P. aeruginosa clone reflects different adaptation strategies used by these two phenotypes in the different niches of the CF lung environment. PMID:21492226

  12. Hypertonic saline infusion in traumatic brain injury increases the incidence of pulmonary infection.

    PubMed

    Coritsidis, George; Diamond, Nechama; Rahman, Aleef; Solodnik, Paul; Lawrence, Kayode; Rhazouani, Salwa; Phalakornkul, Suganda

    2015-08-01

    We aimed to investigate the incidence of electrolyte abnormalities, acute kidney injury (AKI), deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and infections in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) treated with hypertonic saline (HTS) as osmolar therapy. We retrospectively studied 205 TBI patients, 96 with HTS and 109 without, admitted to the surgical/trauma intensive care unit between 2006 and 2012. Hemodynamics, electrolytes, length of stay (LOS), acute physiological assessment and chronic health evaluation II (APACHE II), injury severity scores (ISS) and mortality were tabulated. Infection, mechanical ventilation, DVT and AKI incidence were reviewed. HTS was associated with increased LOS and all infections (p=0.0001). After correction for the Glasgow coma scale (GCS) and ventilator need, pulmonary infections (p=0.001) and LOS remained higher with HTS (p=0.0048). HTS did not result in increased blood pressure, DVT, AKI or neurological benefits. HTS significantly increased the odds for all infections, most specifically pulmonary infections, in patients with GCS<8. Due to these findings, HTS in TBI should be administered with caution regardless of acuity. PMID:26055957

  13. Hypertonic saline infusion in traumatic brain injury increases the incidence of pulmonary infection.

    PubMed

    Coritsidis, George; Diamond, Nechama; Rahman, Aleef; Solodnik, Paul; Lawrence, Kayode; Rhazouani, Salwa; Phalakornkul, Suganda

    2015-08-01

    We aimed to investigate the incidence of electrolyte abnormalities, acute kidney injury (AKI), deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and infections in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) treated with hypertonic saline (HTS) as osmolar therapy. We retrospectively studied 205 TBI patients, 96 with HTS and 109 without, admitted to the surgical/trauma intensive care unit between 2006 and 2012. Hemodynamics, electrolytes, length of stay (LOS), acute physiological assessment and chronic health evaluation II (APACHE II), injury severity scores (ISS) and mortality were tabulated. Infection, mechanical ventilation, DVT and AKI incidence were reviewed. HTS was associated with increased LOS and all infections (p=0.0001). After correction for the Glasgow coma scale (GCS) and ventilator need, pulmonary infections (p=0.001) and LOS remained higher with HTS (p=0.0048). HTS did not result in increased blood pressure, DVT, AKI or neurological benefits. HTS significantly increased the odds for all infections, most specifically pulmonary infections, in patients with GCS<8. Due to these findings, HTS in TBI should be administered with caution regardless of acuity.

  14. Tobramycin inhalation powder: a review of its use in the treatment of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    McKeage, Kate

    2013-11-01

    Inhaled tobramycin, an aminoglycoside antibacterial, has been in widespread use in the form of a nebulized solution against Pseudomonas aeruginosa for many years. More recently, tobramycin inhalation powder (TIP; TOBI(®) Podhaler(™)) was formulated using PulmoSphere(™) technology for administration as a dry powder via the T-326 Inhaler. This technology enables the administration of an intrapulmonary drug dose that is similar to that achieved with nebulized tobramycin inhalation solution (TIS), but reduces the administration time for TIP to one-third of that for TIS. TIP is approved in several countries, including the EU and US, for use in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients aged ≥6 years with P. aeruginosa infection. In well designed clinical trials in CF patients, the antipseudomonal efficacy of intermittent twice-daily TIP 112 mg was greater than that of placebo in one trial (a second trial was unable to recruit sufficient patient numbers for meaningful analyses), and non-inferior to that of intermittent twice-daily nebulized TIS 300 mg/5 mL with regard to lung function and sputum density of P. aeruginosa. In addition, patients using TIP were more satisfied with their treatment than those using nebulized TIS, largely as a result of improved overall convenience. TIP is generally well tolerated, with a similar safety profile to that of TIS, except for a higher incidence of cough. In conclusion, TIP administered via the T-326 Inhaler is an effective antipseudomonal agent with non-inferior efficacy and generally similar tolerability to that of nebulized TIS in CF patients with chronic P. aeruginosa infection. Compared with nebulized TIS, TIP has a faster delivery and is more portable and convenient.

  15. A Quadruple Knockout of lasIR and rhlIR of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 That Retains Wild-Type Twitching Motility Has Equivalent Infectivity and Persistence to PAO1 in a Mouse Model of Lung Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lazenby, James J.; Griffin, Phoebe E.; Kyd, Jennelle; Whitchurch, Cynthia B.; Cooley, Margaret A.

    2013-01-01

    It has been widely reported that quorum-sensing incapable strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa are less virulent than wild type strains. However, quorum sensing mutants of P. aeruginosa have been shown to develop other spontaneous mutations under prolonged culture conditions, and one of the phenotypes of P. aeruginosa that is frequently affected by this phenomenon is type IV pili-dependent motility, referred to as twitching motility. As twitching motility has been reported to be important for adhesion and colonisation, we aimed to generate a quorum-sensing knockout for which the heritage was recorded and the virulence factor production in areas unrelated to quorum sensing was known to be intact. We created a lasIRrhlIR quadruple knockout in PAO1 using a published technique that allows for the deletion of antibiotic resistance cartridges following mutagenesis, to create an unmarked QS knockout of PAO1, thereby avoiding the need for use of antibiotics in culturing, which can have subtle effects on bacterial phenotype. We phenotyped this mutant demonstrating that it produced reduced levels of protease and elastase, barely detectable levels of pyoverdin and undetectable levels of the quorum sensing signal molecules N-3-oxododecanoly-L-homoserine lactone and N-butyryl homoserine lactone, but retained full twitching motility. We then used a mouse model of acute lung infection with P. aeruginosa to demonstrate that the lasIRrhlIR knockout strain showed equal persistence to wild type parental PAO1, induced equal or greater neutrophil infiltration to the lungs, and induced similar levels of expression of inflammatory cytokines in the lungs and similar antibody responses, both in terms of magnitude and isotype. Our results suggest, in contrast to previous reports, that lack of quorum sensing alone does not significantly affect the immunogenicity, infectiveness and persistence of P. aeruginosa in a mouse model of acute lung infection. PMID:23593362

  16. Probiotics: a new way to fight bacterial pulmonary infections?

    PubMed

    Alexandre, Y; Le Blay, G; Boisramé-Gastrin, S; Le Gall, F; Héry-Arnaud, G; Gouriou, S; Vallet, S; Le Berre, R

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotics, of which Fleming has identified the first representative, penicillin, in 1928, allowed dramatical improvement of the treatment of patients presenting with infectious diseases. However, once an antibiotic is used, resistance may develop more or less rapidly in some bacteria. It is thus necessary to develop therapeutic alternatives, such as the use of probiotics, defined by the World Health Organization (WHO) as "micro-organisms which, administered live and in adequate amounts, confer a benefit to the health of the host". The scope of these micro-organisms is broad, concerning many areas including that of infectious diseases, especially respiratory infections. We describe the rational use of probiotics in respiratory tract infections and detail the results of various clinical studies describing the use of probiotics in the management of respiratory infections such as nosocomial or community acquired pneumonia, or on specific grounds such as cystic fibrosis. The results are sometimes contradictory, but the therapeutic potential of probiotics seems promising. Implementing research to understand their mechanisms of action is critical to conduct therapeutic tests based on a specific rational for the strains to be used, the dose, as well as the chosen mode and rhythm of administration.

  17. A clinical study of photodynamic therapy for chronic skin ulcers in lower limbs infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Lei, Xia; Liu, Bo; Huang, Zheng; Wu, Jinjin

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the antimicrobial activity and healing-promoting effect of topical photodynamic therapy (ALA-PDT) on chronic skin ulcers infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA). A total of 26 patients with chronic skin ulcers in lower limbs infected with PA were enrolled. The surface areas of the ulcers were treated with either δ-aminolevulinic acid (ALA)-mediated PDT (20% ALA solution, 1.5 h incubation, 630 nm red light, 80 J/cm(2)) or red light alone, both once a week for two weeks. Before treatment, the wound areas and the bacteria levels in these two groups were comparable (p > 0.05). Results indicated that the bacteria levels in the skin ulcers of the light only group of 24 h post-treatment (3.4 × 10(7) ± 7.1 × 10(7) CFU/cm(2)) and pre-treatment (5.5 × 10(7) ± 1.6 × 10(8) CFU/cm(2)) were not significantly different. In contrast, the bacteria levels on the surfaces of the ulcers in the PDT group of 24 h post-treatment (6.3 × 10(5) ± 1.7 × 10(6) CFU/cm(2)) and pre-treatment (8.9 × 10(7) ± 1.7 × 10(8) CFU/cm(2)) were significantly different (p < 0.01). At seven days post treatment, the mean ulcer area in the red light group was reduced from 11.85 ± 6.83 to 7.8 ± 4.9 cm(2) (p < 0.01), that of PDT group from 12.72 ± 8.58 to 3.4 ± 3.4 cm(2) (p < 0.01). Better healing was seen in PDT group (p < 0.01). In conclusion, ALA-PDT is a potential modality to control PA infection and promote healing of chronic skin ulcers in lower limbs.

  18. Pulmonary infection with rapidly growing mycobacteria in a singer with achalasia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Cramer, J P; Sudeck, H; Burchard, G D

    2007-04-01

    We report the case of a 37-year-old male patient with prolonged pneumonia and achalasia. Culture and molecular genetic typing identified Mycobacterium abscessus as causative agent. Treatment with clarithromycin and minocycline over 8 months gradually resolved the infection. Rapidly growing, non-obligate pathogenic mycobacteria are widespread in the environment. Several cases of pulmonary infections with these mycobacteria in patients with achalasia have been reported, suggesting a causative association. This is the first report of a case with isolation of M. abscessus in this context. PMID:17316814

  19. Effect of hypochlorous acid solution on the eradication and prevention of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection, serum biochemical variables, and cecum microbiota in rats.

    PubMed

    Goto, Kazuo; Kuwayama, Eri; Nozu, Ryoko; Ueno, Masami; Hayashimoto, Nobuhito

    2015-01-01

    In this study, hypochlorous acid solution, a weak acid, provided as drinking water to rats, was evaluated for its ability to eradicate and prevent Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection, while monitoring its simultaneous effect on serum biochemical variables and microbiota in the rat cecum. The results suggest that the solution could not eliminate the bacteria in the experimentally infected rats; however, the administration of a 10-parts-per-million (ppm) hypochlorous acid solution as drinking water was effective in inhibiting horizontal spread of P. aeruginosa infection among cage mates. Additionally, exposure to hypochlorous solution did not have any effect on serum biochemical variables of the rat including levels of total cholesterol, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), albumin, total bilirubin, lipase, amylase, urea nitrogen, total protein, calcium (Ca), phosphorus (P), sodium (Na), chlorine (Cl), except for potassium (K) levels. The most frequently isolated bacteria in the rat cecum included species belonging to Bacteroidales, Lactobacillus, Clostridiales, Erysipelotrichaceae, Akkermansia, Coriobacteriales, and Firmicutes. The ratio of the terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) peaks did not differ across rats administered with 5 and 10 ppm weak acid solution as compared to the control group for any of the bacteria, except for Erysipelotrichaceae and Firmicutes, where the ratio of T-RFLP peaks was higher in the 5 ppm group for Erysipelotrichaceae and in the 10 ppm group for Firmicutes than that in the control group (P<0.01). The results suggest that the weak acid hypochlorous solution could not eradicate P. aeruginosa completely from rats. The solution was effective in preventing infection without affecting serum biochemical variables; however, some of bacterial microbiota may have changed due to administration of the solution.

  20. Effect of hypochlorous acid solution on the eradication and prevention of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection, serum biochemical variables, and cecum microbiota in rats

    PubMed Central

    GOTO, Kazuo; KUWAYAMA, Eri; NOZU, Ryoko; UENO, Masami; HAYASHIMOTO, Nobuhito

    2015-01-01

    In this study, hypochlorous acid solution, a weak acid, provided as drinking water to rats, was evaluated for its ability to eradicate and prevent Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection, while monitoring its simultaneous effect on serum biochemical variables and microbiota in the rat cecum. The results suggest that the solution could not eliminate the bacteria in the experimentally infected rats; however, the administration of a 10-parts-per-million (ppm) hypochlorous acid solution as drinking water was effective in inhibiting horizontal spread of P. aeruginosa infection among cage mates. Additionally, exposure to hypochlorous solution did not have any effect on serum biochemical variables of the rat including levels of total cholesterol, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), albumin, total bilirubin, lipase, amylase, urea nitrogen, total protein, calcium (Ca), phosphorus (P), sodium (Na), chlorine (Cl), except for potassium (K) levels. The most frequently isolated bacteria in the rat cecum included species belonging to Bacteroidales, Lactobacillus, Clostridiales, Erysipelotrichaceae, Akkermansia, Coriobacteriales, and Firmicutes. The ratio of the terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) peaks did not differ across rats administered with 5 and 10 ppm weak acid solution as compared to the control group for any of the bacteria, except for Erysipelotrichaceae and Firmicutes, where the ratio of T-RFLP peaks was higher in the 5 ppm group for Erysipelotrichaceae and in the 10 ppm group for Firmicutes than that in the control group (P<0.01). The results suggest that the weak acid hypochlorous solution could not eradicate P. aeruginosa completely from rats. The solution was effective in preventing infection without affecting serum biochemical variables; however, some of bacterial microbiota may have changed due to administration of the solution. PMID:25736708

  1. Traveller's coccidioidomycosis: case report of pulmonary infection diagnosed in Israel.

    PubMed

    Lefler, E; Weiler-Ravell, D; Merzbach, D; Ben-Izhak, O; Best, L A

    1992-05-01

    A 60-year-old temporary Israeli resident travelled to Arizona, developed an influenzalike infection, and returned with a space-occupying lesion in the lung. Since the patient was a heavy smoker, lung cancer was suspected and he was operated on. A granuloma was reported on frozen sections, and Coccidioides immitis was revealed on stained preparations and by microbiological investigation. Coccidioidomycosis is unusual in Israel; therefore, it is important to be aware of this mycosis in patients who have a history of recent visits to areas of endemicity in North America, Central America, and South America.

  2. Orchestration of pulmonary T cell immunity during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection: immunity interruptus

    PubMed Central

    Behar, Samuel M.; Carpenter, Stephen M.; Booty, Matthew G.; Barber, Daniel L.; Jayaraman, Pushpa

    2014-01-01

    Despite the introduction almost a century ago of Mycobacterium bovis BCG (BCG), an attenuated form of M. bovis that is used as a vaccine against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, tuberculosis remains a global health threat and kills more than 1.5 million people each year. This is mostly because BCG fails to prevent pulmonary disease – the contagious form of tuberculosis. Although there have been significant advances in understanding how the immune system responds to infection, the qualities that define protective immunity against M. tuberculosis remain poorly characterized. The ability to predict who will maintain control over the infection and who will succumb to clinical disease would revolutionize our approach to surveillance, control, and treatment. Here we review the current understanding of pulmonary T cell responses following M. tuberculosis infection. While infection elicits a strong immune response that contains infection, M. tuberculosis evades eradication. Traditionally, its intracellular lifestyle and alteration of macrophage function are viewed as the dominant mechanisms of evasion. Now we appreciate that chronic inflammation leads to T cell dysfunction. While this may arise as the host balances the goals of bacterial sterilization and avoidance of tissue damage, it is becoming clear that T cell dysfunction impairs host resistance. Defining the mechanisms that lead to T cell dysfunction is crucial as memory T cell responses are likely to be subject to the same subject to the same pressures. Thus, success of T cell based vaccines is predicated on memory T cells avoiding exhaustion while at the same time not promoting overt tissue damage. PMID:25311810

  3. COMPUTER-AIDED DIAGNOSIS OF PULMONARY INFECTIONS USING TEXTURE ANALYSIS AND SUPPORT VECTOR MACHINE CLASSIFICATION

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jianhua; Dwyer, Andrew; Summers, Ronald M.; Mollura, Daniel J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to develop and test a computer-assisted detection method for identification and measurement of pulmonary abnormalities on chest CT in cases of infection, such as novel H1N1 influenza. The method developed could be a potentially useful tool for classifying and quantifying pulmonary infectious disease on CT. Subjects and Methods Forty Chest CTs were studied using texture analysis and support vector machine (SVM) classification to differentiate normal from abnormal lung regions on CT, including ten cases of immunohistochemistry proven infection, ten normal controls, and twenty cases of fibrosis. Results Statistically significant differences in the receiver operator characteristics (ROC) curves for detecting abnormal regions in H1N1 infection were obtained between normal lung and regions of fibrosis, with significant differences in texture features of different infections. These differences enable quantification of abnormal lung volumes in CT imaging. Conclusion Texture analysis and support vector machine classification can distinguish between areas of abnormality in acute infection and areas of chronic fibrosis, differentiate lesions having consolidative and ground glass appearances, and quantify those texture features to increase the precision of CT scoring as a potential tool for measuring disease progression and severity. PMID:21295734

  4. Rapid detection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biomarkers in biological fluids using surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaomeng; Chen, Jing; Zhao, Yiping; Zughaier, Susu M.

    2014-05-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) is an opportunistic pathogen that causes major infection not only in Cystic Fibrosis patients but also in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and in critically ill patients in intensive care units. Successful antibiotic treatment of the infection relies on accurate and rapid identification of the infectious agents. Conventional microbiological detection methods usually take more than 3 days to obtain accurate results. We have developed a rapid diagnostic technique based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering to directly identify PA from biological fluids. P. aeruginosa strains, PAO1 and PA14, are cultured in lysogeny broth, and the SERS spectra of the broth show the signature Raman peaks from pyocyanin and pyoverdine, two major biomarkers that P. aeruginosa secretes during its growth, as well as lipopolysaccharides. This provides the evidence that the presence of these biomarkers can be used to indicate P. aeruginosa infection. A total of 22 clinical exhaled breath condensates (EBC) samples were obtained from subjects with CF disease and from non-CF healthy donors. SERS spectra of these EBC samples were obtained and further analyzed by both principle component analysis and partial least square-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). PLS-DA can discriminate the samples with P. aeruginosa infection and the ones without P. aeruginosa infection at 99.3% sensitivity and 99.6% specificity. In addition, this technique can also discriminate samples from subject with CF disease and healthy donor with 97.5% sensitivity and 100% specificity. These results demonstrate the potential of using SERS of EBC samples as a rapid diagnostic tool to detect PA infection.

  5. Immunological Signatures after Bordetella pertussis Infection Demonstrate Importance of Pulmonary Innate Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Brummelman, Jolanda; van der Maas, Larissa; Tilstra, Wichard; Pennings, Jeroen L. A.; Han, Wanda G. H.; van Els, Cécile A. C. M.; van Riet, Elly; Kersten, Gideon F. A.; Metz, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Effective immunity against Bordetella pertussis is currently under discussion following the stacking evidence of pertussis resurgence in the vaccinated population. Natural immunity is more effective than vaccine-induced immunity indicating that knowledge on infection-induced responses may contribute to improve vaccination strategies. We applied a systems biology approach comprising microarray, flow cytometry and multiplex immunoassays to unravel the molecular and cellular signatures in unprotected mice and protected mice with infection-induced immunity, around a B. pertussis challenge. Pre-existing systemic memory Th1/Th17 cells, memory B-cells, and mucosal IgA specific for Ptx, Vag8, Fim2/3 were detected in the protected mice 56 days after an experimental infection. In addition, pre-existing high activity and reactivation of pulmonary innate cells such as alveolar macrophages, M-cells and goblet cells was detected. The pro-inflammatory responses in the lungs and serum, and neutrophil recruitment in the spleen upon an infectious challenge of unprotected mice were absent in protected mice. Instead, fast pulmonary immune responses in protected mice led to efficient bacterial clearance and harbored potential new gene markers that contribute to immunity against B. pertussis. These responses comprised of innate makers, such as Clca3, Retlna, Glycam1, Gp2, and Umod, next to adaptive markers, such as CCR6+ B-cells, CCR6+ Th17 cells and CXCR6+ T-cells as demonstrated by transcriptome analysis. In conclusion, besides effective Th1/Th17 and mucosal IgA responses, the primary infection-induced immunity benefits from activation of pulmonary resident innate immune cells, achieved by local pathogen-recognition. These molecular signatures of primary infection-induced immunity provided potential markers to improve vaccine-induced immunity against B. pertussis. PMID:27711188

  6. Prevalence and characterization of opportunistic candidal infections among patients with pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Astekar, Madhusudan; Bhatiya, Priyanka Sharma; Sowmya, GV

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although Candida albicans remains the most common cause of human candidiasis, the frequency of infection attributed to other members of the genus is also increasing. Hence, the present study was carried out to know the prevalence of opportunistic candidal infection in tuberculosis, and if positive, the species of Candida that is most commonly associated. Materials and Methods: The present study comprised sixty pulmonary tuberculosis patients who were divided into (1) fresh or untreated group, (2A) chronic or treated group having no complications and (2B) having complications, comprising twenty patients each, respectively. The collected sputum samples were initially stained with Ziehl–Neelsen stain for confirmation of presence of tubercle Bacilli. Primary isolation was done on Sabouraud Dextrose Agar (SDA). The candidal colonies were confirmed microscopically for the presence of pseudohyphae. Further speciation of the positive candidal samples was carried out using ChromAgar. Result: The total fungal prevalence among 60 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis on SDA was 33 (55%) Candida and 3 (5%) Aspergillus. The prevalence of different candidal species on ChromAgar showed C. albicans as the predominant one, followed by Candida tropicalis and Candida krusei. Freshly diagnosed or untreated group was less commonly associated with pulmonary mycoses than chronic or treated group. The prevalence of Candida had increased with treatment, duration and age, and it was more in males than females. Conclusion: The present study confirms the phenomenon of opportunistic candidal infections in pulmonary tuberculosis patients. Rapid and reliable identification of Candida species is essential as they differ in their virulence and sensitivity to antifungal drugs.

  7. Prevalence and characterization of opportunistic candidal infections among patients with pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Astekar, Madhusudan; Bhatiya, Priyanka Sharma; Sowmya, GV

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although Candida albicans remains the most common cause of human candidiasis, the frequency of infection attributed to other members of the genus is also increasing. Hence, the present study was carried out to know the prevalence of opportunistic candidal infection in tuberculosis, and if positive, the species of Candida that is most commonly associated. Materials and Methods: The present study comprised sixty pulmonary tuberculosis patients who were divided into (1) fresh or untreated group, (2A) chronic or treated group having no complications and (2B) having complications, comprising twenty patients each, respectively. The collected sputum samples were initially stained with Ziehl–Neelsen stain for confirmation of presence of tubercle Bacilli. Primary isolation was done on Sabouraud Dextrose Agar (SDA). The candidal colonies were confirmed microscopically for the presence of pseudohyphae. Further speciation of the positive candidal samples was carried out using ChromAgar. Result: The total fungal prevalence among 60 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis on SDA was 33 (55%) Candida and 3 (5%) Aspergillus. The prevalence of different candidal species on ChromAgar showed C. albicans as the predominant one, followed by Candida tropicalis and Candida krusei. Freshly diagnosed or untreated group was less commonly associated with pulmonary mycoses than chronic or treated group. The prevalence of Candida had increased with treatment, duration and age, and it was more in males than females. Conclusion: The present study confirms the phenomenon of opportunistic candidal infections in pulmonary tuberculosis patients. Rapid and reliable identification of Candida species is essential as they differ in their virulence and sensitivity to antifungal drugs. PMID:27601806

  8. Inhaled formulations and pulmonary drug delivery systems for respiratory infections.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qi Tony; Leung, Sharon Shui Yee; Tang, Patricia; Parumasivam, Thaigarajan; Loh, Zhi Hui; Chan, Hak-Kim

    2015-05-01

    Respiratory infections represent a major global health problem. They are often treated by parenteral administrations of antimicrobials. Unfortunately, systemic therapies of high-dose antimicrobials can lead to severe adverse effects and this calls for a need to develop inhaled formulations that enable targeted drug delivery to the airways with minimal systemic drug exposure. Recent technological advances facilitate the development of inhaled anti-microbial therapies. The newer mesh nebulisers have achieved minimal drug residue, higher aerosolisation efficiencies and rapid administration compared to traditional jet nebulisers. Novel particle engineering and intelligent device design also make dry powder inhalers appealing for the delivery of high-dose antibiotics. In view of the fact that no new antibiotic entities against multi-drug resistant bacteria have come close to commercialisation, advanced formulation strategies are in high demand for combating respiratory 'super bugs'.

  9. Detection of Temporal Clusters of Healthcare-Associated Infections or Colonizations with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Two Hospitals: Comparison of SaTScan and WHONET Software Packages

    PubMed Central

    Lefebvre, Annick; Bertrand, Xavier; Vanhems, Philippe; Lucet, Jean-Christophe; Chavanet, Pascal; Astruc, Karine; Thouverez, Michelle; Quantin, Catherine; Aho-Glélé, Ludwig Serge

    2015-01-01

    The identification of temporal clusters of healthcare-associated colonizations or infections is a challenge in infection control. WHONET software is available to achieve these objectives using laboratory databases of hospitals but it has never been compared with SaTScan regarding its detection performance. This study provided the opportunity to evaluate the performance of WHONET software in comparison with SaTScan software as a reference to detect clusters of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. A retrospective study was conducted in two French university hospitals. Cases of P. aeruginosa colonizations or infections occurring between 1st January 2005 and 30th April 2014 in the first hospital were analyzed overall and by medical ward/care unit. Poisson temporal and space-time permutation models were used. Analyses were repeated for the second hospital on data from 1st July 2007 to 31st December 2013 to validate WHONET software (in comparison with SaTScan) in another setting. During the study period, 3,946 isolates of P. aeruginosa were recovered from 2,996 patients in the first hospital. The incidence rate was 89.8 per 100,000 patient-days (95% CI [87.0; 92.6]). Several clusters were observed overall and at the unit level and some of these were detected whatever the method used. WHONET results were consistent with the analyses that took patient-days and temporal trends into account in both hospitals. Because it is more flexible and easier to use than SaTScan, WHONET software seems to be a useful tool for the prospective surveillance of hospital data although it does not take populations at risk into account. PMID:26448036

  10. Detection of Temporal Clusters of Healthcare-Associated Infections or Colonizations with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Two Hospitals: Comparison of SaTScan and WHONET Software Packages.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Annick; Bertrand, Xavier; Vanhems, Philippe; Lucet, Jean-Christophe; Chavanet, Pascal; Astruc, Karine; Thouverez, Michelle; Quantin, Catherine; Aho-Glélé, Ludwig Serge

    2015-01-01

    The identification of temporal clusters of healthcare-associated colonizations or infections is a challenge in infection control. WHONET software is available to achieve these objectives using laboratory databases of hospitals but it has never been compared with SaTScan regarding its detection performance. This study provided the opportunity to evaluate the performance of WHONET software in comparison with SaTScan software as a reference to detect clusters of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. A retrospective study was conducted in two French university hospitals. Cases of P. aeruginosa colonizations or infections occurring between 1st January 2005 and 30th April 2014 in the first hospital were analyzed overall and by medical ward/care unit. Poisson temporal and space-time permutation models were used. Analyses were repeated for the second hospital on data from 1st July 2007 to 31st December 2013 to validate WHONET software (in comparison with SaTScan) in another setting. During the study period, 3,946 isolates of P. aeruginosa were recovered from 2,996 patients in the first hospital. The incidence rate was 89.8 per 100,000 patient-days (95% CI [87.0; 92.6]). Several clusters were observed overall and at the unit level and some of these were detected whatever the method used. WHONET results were consistent with the analyses that took patient-days and temporal trends into account in both hospitals. Because it is more flexible and easier to use than SaTScan, WHONET software seems to be a useful tool for the prospective surveillance of hospital data although it does not take populations at risk into account.

  11. Intranasal Immunization Strategy To Impede Pilin-Mediated Binding of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to Airway Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Jennifer C.; Tham, Doris M.; Feng, Weijun; Huang, Fan; Embaie, Selamawit; Liu, Keyi; Dean, Deborah; Hertle, Ralf; FitzGerald, David J.; Mrsny, Randall J.

    2005-01-01

    Prevention of pulmonary Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections represents a critical unmet medical need for cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. We have examined the tenet that a mucosal immunization approach can reduce interactions of a piliated form of this opportunistic pathogen with respiratory epithelial cells. Vaccinations were performed using ntPEpilinPAK, a protein chimera composed of a nontoxic form of P. aeruginosa exotoxin A (ntPE), where the C-terminal loop amino acid sequence of the PAK strain pilin protein was inserted in place of the ntPE Ib domain. Intranasal (i.n.) immunization of BALB/c mice with ntPEpilinPAK generated both serum and saliva immune responses. A series of in vitro studies showed that diluted samples of saliva obtained from immunized mice reduced pilin-dependent P. aeruginosa binding to polarized human tracheal epithelial cells, protected human pulmonary epithelial cells from cytotoxic actions associated with bacterial challenge, and reduced exotoxin A toxicity. Overall, i.n. administration of ntPEpilinPAK induced mucosal and systemic immune responses that may be beneficial for blocking early stage adhesion and/or infection events of epithelial cell-P. aeruginosa interactions at oropharyngeal surfaces. PMID:16239575

  12. Pulmonary surfactant phosphatidylglycerol inhibits respiratory syncytial virus–induced inflammation and infection

    PubMed Central

    Numata, Mari; Chu, Hong Wei; Dakhama, Azzeddine; Voelker, Dennis R.

    2009-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common cause of hospitalization for respiratory tract infection in young children. It is also a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in elderly individuals and in persons with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Currently, no reliable vaccine or simple RSV antiviral therapy is available. Recently, we determined that the minor pulmonary surfactant phospholipid, palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidylglycerol (POPG), could markedly attenuate inflammatory responses induced by lipopolysaccharide through direct interactions with the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) interacting proteins CD14 and MD-2. CD14 and TLR4 have been implicated in the host response to RSV. Treatment of bronchial epithelial cells with POPG significantly inhibited interleukin-6 and -8 production, as well as the cytopathic effects induced by RSV. The phospholipid bound RSV with high affinity and inhibited viral attachment to HEp2 cells. POPG blocked viral plaque formation in vitro by 4 log units, and markedly suppressed the expansion of plaques from cells preinfected with the virus. Administration of POPG to mice, concomitant with viral infection, almost completely eliminated the recovery of virus from the lungs at 3 and 5 days after infection, and abrogated IFN-γ (IFN-γ) production and the enhanced expression of surfactant protein D (SP-D). These findings demonstrate an important approach to prevention and treatment of RSV infections using exogenous administration of a specific surfactant phospholipid. PMID:20080799

  13. [Natural infection with Angiostrongylus vasorum: characterisation of 3 dogs with pulmonary hypertension].

    PubMed

    Glaus, T; Schnyder, M; Dennler, M; Tschuor, F; Wenger, M; Sieber-Ruckstuhl, N

    2010-07-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH), together with its accompanying clinical signs and underlying causes, e.g. pulmonary thrombosis, are more and more recognized as an important clinical entity also in dogs. This article characterizes the clinical picture of 3 dogs with PH caused by natural infection with Angiostrongylus vasorum. All 3 dogs were of small breeds ( < 10 kg), the age at the time of diagnosis was 1, 2 and 11 years. Clinically, dyspnea and exercise intolerance were the predominating signs, 2 dogs developed hemoptysis, 1 dog developed right sided congestive heart failure. Severe arterial hypoxemia (PaO2 41 - 53 mmHg) reflected the severity of pulmonary parenchymal and vascular damage. Severe hyperglobulinemia (59 und 88 g/l) in two dogs implicated a long lasting infection. Anthelmintic treatment in 2 dogs resulted in quick clinical, radiographic and echocardiographic normalization. PH is the consequence of multiple causes and pathomechanisms, and the recognition of PH is primarily of differential diagnostic relevance. Prognosis and therapy in cases with PH mainly depend on the underlying cause, rather than on the PH and on its degree.

  14. Synergistic combination of clinical and imaging features predicts abnormal imaging patterns of pulmonary infections

    PubMed Central

    Bagci, Ulas; Jaster-Miller, Kirsten; Olivier, Kenneth N.; Yao, Jianhua; Mollura, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    We designed and tested a novel hybrid statistical model that accepts radiologic image features and clinical variables, and integrates this information in order to automatically predict abnormalities in chest computed-tomography (CT) scans and identify potentially important infectious disease biomarkers. In 200 patients, 160 with various pulmonary infections and 40 healthy controls, we extracted 34 clinical variables from laboratory tests and 25 textural features from CT images. From the CT scans, pleural effusion (PE), linear opacity (or thickening) (LT), tree-in-bud (TIB), pulmonary nodules, ground glass opacity (GGO), and consolidation abnormality patterns were analyzed and predicted through clinical, textural (imaging), or combined attributes. The presence and severity of each abnormality pattern was validated by visual analysis of the CT scans. The proposed biomarker identification system included two important steps: (i) a coarse identification of an abnormal imaging pattern by adaptively selected features (AmRMR), and (ii) a fine selection of the most important features from the previous step, and assigning them as biomarkers, depending on the prediction accuracy. Selected biomarkers were used to classify normal and abnormal patterns by using a boosted decision tree (BDT) classifier. For all abnormal imaging patterns, an average prediction accuracy of 76.15% was obtained. Experimental results demonstrated that our proposed biomarker identification approach is promising and may advance the data processing in clinical pulmonary infection research and diagnostic techniques. PMID:23930819

  15. Annexin A2 Regulates Autophagy in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infection through the Akt1-mTOR-ULK1/2 Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Rongpeng; Tan, Shirui; Yu, Min; Jundt, Michael C; Zhang, Shuang; Wu, Min

    2015-10-15

    Earlier studies reported that a cell membrane protein, Annexin A2 (AnxA2), plays multiple roles in the development, invasion, and metastasis of cancer. Recent studies demonstrated that AnxA2 also functions in immunity against infection, but the underlying mechanism remains largely elusive. Using a mouse infection model, we reveal a crucial role for AnxA2 in host defense against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, as anxa2(-/-) mice manifested severe lung injury, systemic dissemination, and increased mortality compared with wild-type littermates. In addition, anxa2(-/-) mice exhibited elevated inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, and IFN-γ), decreased bacterial clearance by macrophages, and increased superoxide release in the lung. We further identified an unexpected molecular interaction between AnxA2 and Fam13A, which activated Rho GTPase. P. aeruginosa infection induced autophagosome formation by inhibiting Akt1 and mTOR. Our results indicate that AnxA2 regulates autophagy, thereby contributing to host immunity against bacteria through the Akt1-mTOR-ULK1/2 signaling pathway.

  16. Exome Sequencing of Phenotypic Extremes Identifies CAV2 and TMC6 as Interacting Modifiers of Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infection in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Emond, Mary J.; Louie, Tin; Emerson, Julia; Chong, Jessica X.; Mathias, Rasika A.; Knowles, Michael R.; Rieder, Mark J.; Tabor, Holly K.; Nickerson, Debbie A.; Barnes, Kathleen C.; GO, Lung; Gibson, Ronald L.; Bamshad, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Discovery of rare or low frequency variants in exome or genome data that are associated with complex traits often will require use of very large sample sizes to achieve adequate statistical power. For a fixed sample size, sequencing of individuals sampled from the tails of a phenotype distribution (i.e., extreme phenotypes design) maximizes power and this approach was recently validated empirically with the discovery of variants in DCTN4 that influence the natural history of P. aeruginosa airway infection in persons with cystic fibrosis (CF; MIM219700). The increasing availability of large exome/genome sequence datasets that serve as proxies for population-based controls affords the opportunity to test an alternative, potentially more powerful and generalizable strategy, in which the frequency of rare variants in a single extreme phenotypic group is compared to a control group (i.e., extreme phenotype vs. control population design). As proof-of-principle, we applied this approach to search for variants associated with risk for age-of-onset of chronic P. aeruginosa airway infection among individuals with CF and identified variants in CAV2 and TMC6 that were significantly associated with group status. These results were validated using a large, prospective, longitudinal CF cohort and confirmed a significant association of a variant in CAV2 with increased age-of-onset of P. aeruginosa airway infection (hazard ratio = 0.48, 95% CI=[0.32, 0.88]) and variants in TMC6 with diminished age-of-onset of P. aeruginosa airway infection (HR = 5.4, 95% CI=[2.2, 13.5]) A strong interaction between CAV2 and TMC6 variants was observed (HR=12.1, 95% CI=[3.8, 39]) for children with the deleterious TMC6 variant and without the CAV2 protective variant. Neither gene showed a significant association using an extreme phenotypes design, and conditions for which the power of an extreme phenotype vs. control population design was greater than that for the extreme phenotypes design were

  17. Prevalence of and risk factors for pulmonary tuberculosis among newly diagnosed HIV-1 infected Nigerian children

    PubMed Central

    Ebonyi, Augustine O.; Oguche, Stephen; Ejeliogu, Emeka U.; Agbaji, Oche O.; Shehu, Nathan Y.; Abah, Isaac O.; Sagay, Atiene S.; Ugoagwu, Placid O.; Okonkwo, Prosper I.; Idoko, John A.; Kanki, Phyllis J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Studies on the prevalence of and risk factors for tuberculosis (TB) among newly diagnosed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected children in sub-Saharan Africa are scarce and in Nigeria there is paucity of reported data. We determined the prevalence of and risk factors for pulmonary TB (PTB) in newly diagnosed (treatment-naïve) HIV-1 infected children at the pediatric HIV clinic of the Jos University Teaching Hospital (JUTH) in Nigeria. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of 876 children, aged 2 months – 13 years, diagnosed with HIV-1 infection between July 2005 and December 2012, of which 286 were diagnosed with PTB at presentation after TB screening. The study site was the AIDS Prevention Initiative in Nigeria (APIN)-supported Pediatric HIV clinic at JUTH, Jos. A multivariate forward logistic regression modelling was used to identify risk factors for PTB-HIV co-infection. Results The prevalence of PTB-HIV co-infection was 32% (286/876). Severe immunosuppression (SI) and World Health Organization (WHO) HIV clinical stage 3/4 were identified as independent risk factors for PTB-HIV co-infection in HIV infected children. The odds of PTB-HIV co-infection was increased two-fold in HIV-infected children with WHO clinical stage 3/4 compared to those with stage 1/2 (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 1.76 [1.31-2.37], p<0.001) and 1.5-fold in children with SI compared to those without SI (AOR 1.52 [1.12-2.06], p=0.007). Conclusion In our setting, the burden of PTB was high among newly diagnosed HIV-infected children, and late WHO HIV clinical stage and severe immunosuppression were associated with PTB-HIV co-infection. Therefore there is a clear need to improve strategies for early diagnosis of both HIV and PTB to optimize clinical outcomes. PMID:27019829

  18. Fatal pulmonary co-infection with pneumocystis and cytomegalovirus in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chuganji, Eri; Abe, Toshikazu; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Nakano, Noriyuki; Kanai, Takao; Ohara, Gen; Takayashiki, Norio; Noguchi, Masayuki; Morishita, Yukio; Aoki, Makoto; Tokuda, Yasuharu

    2014-01-01

    A 33-year-old homosexual Japanese man who admitted to having sex with men presented with a two-week history of dyspnea and fever. Chest imaging showed diffuse pulmonary frosted-glass-like shadows. A blood test revealed positive HIV antibodies with a CD4 cell count of 66/μL. Bronchoalveolar lavage identified pneumocystis. Although the patient exhibited a transient response to anti-pneumocystis treatment and mega-dose steroid pulse therapy, he eventually died from respiratory failure. An autopsy suggested massive cytomegalovirus and pneumocystis pneumonitis. The pulmonary co-infection with cytomegalovirus may have been worsened by the use of mega-dose steroids, and such therapy should be avoided in patients with a high HIV viral load and low CD4 count.

  19. Prolonged survival of scavenger receptor class A-deficient mice from pulmonary Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection

    PubMed Central

    Sever-Chroneos, Zvjezdana; Tvinnereim, Amy; Hunter, Robert L.; Chroneos, Zissis C.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY The present study tested the hypothesis that the scavenger receptor SR-A modulates granuloma formation in response to pulmonary infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). To test this hypothesis, we monitored survival and histopathology in WT and SR-A-deficient mice following aerosol infection with MTB Rv. SR-A-deficient (SR-A−/−) mice infected with MTB survived significantly longer than WT mice; the mean survival of SR-A−/− mice exceeded 430 days compared to 230 days for WT mice. Early granuloma formation was not impaired in SR-A−/− mice. The extended survival of SR-A−/− mice was associated with 13- and 3-fold higher number of CD4+ lymphocytes and antigen presenting cells in SR-A−/− lungs compared to WT mice 280 after infection. The histopathology of chronically infected SR-A−/− lungs, however, was marked by abundant cholesterol clefts in parenchymal lesions containing infection in multinucleated giant cells. The present study indicates SR-A as a candidate gene of the innate immune system influencing the chronic phase of M. tuberculosis infection. PMID:22088322

  20. Overexpression of RORγt Enhances Pulmonary Inflammation after Infection with Mycobacterium Avium

    PubMed Central

    Matsuyama, Masashi; Ishii, Yukio; Sakurai, Hirofumi; Ano, Satoshi; Morishima, Yuko; Yoh, Keigyou; Takahashi, Satoru; Ogawa, Kenji; Hizawa, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) is the most common cause of nontuberculous mycobacterial disease in humans. The role of Th17 immunity in the pathogenesis of intracellular bacteria, such as MAC, is not currently understood. Transcription factor RAR-related orphan receptor gamma t (RORγt) is known as the master regulator for Th17 cell development. Here, we investigated the role of RORγt in host responses against MAC infection. Wild-type (WT) mice and RORγt-overexpressing mice were infected with MAC via intratracheal inoculation. Systemic MAC growth was not different between WT mice and RORγt-overexpressing mice. However, neutrophilic pulmonary inflammation following MAC infection was enhanced in RORγt-overexpressing mice compared with that in WT mice. The cytokine expression shifted toward a Th17 phenotype in the lungs of RORγt-overexpressing mice following MAC infection; the levels of IL-6 and IL-17 were significantly higher in the lung of these mice than in WT mice. In addition to the increase in IL-17 single-positive T cells, T cells producing both IL-17 and interferon-γ were elevated in the lung of RORγt-overexpressing mice following MAC infection. These findings suggest that RORγt overexpression-mediated Th17 bias contributes to local inflammation rather than systemic responses, by regulating neutrophil recruitment into the sites of infection during MAC infection. PMID:26784959

  1. A case of pulmonary Serratia marcescens granuloma radiologically mimicking metastatic malignancy and tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Das, Joyutpal; Layton, Benjamin; Lamb, Harriet; Sinnott, Nicola; Leahy, Bernard C

    2015-11-01

    Serratia marcescens is a saprophytic gram-negative bacillus capable of causing a wide range of infections. A 57-year-old female was admitted to our hospital for four weeks with community acquired pneumonia. A chest x-ray, six weeks after discharge, demonstrated multiple, bilateral 'cannon ball'-like opacities and mediastinal lymphadenopathy which were highly suspicious of disseminated malignancy or tuberculosis. The only symptom that this patient had was a productive cough. She had multiple commodities, but no specific immunodeficiency disorder. Interestingly, her sputum and bronchial washing samples grew S. marcescens. The computed tomography-guided lung biopsy demonstrated necrotic granulomatous changes. There was no pathological evidence of tuberculosis or fungal infection, malignancy or vasculitis. There are only a handful of reported cases of Serratia granulomas. Thus, we are reporting a rare instance of pulmonary Serratia marcescens granuloma radiologically mimicking metastatic malignancy and tuberculosis infection.

  2. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa generalized transducing phage phiPA3 is a new member of the phiKZ-like group of 'jumbo' phages, and infects model laboratory strains and clinical isolates from cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Monson, Rita; Foulds, Ian; Foweraker, Juliet; Welch, Martin; Salmond, George P C

    2011-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important pathogen in cystic fibrosis patients, and a model organism for the study of nosocomially acquired infections, biofilms and intrinsic multidrug resistance. In this study we characterize ϕPA3, a new generalized transducing bacteriophage for P. aeruginosa. ϕPA3 transduced chromosomal mutations between PAO1 strains, and infected multiple P. aeruginosa clinical isolates as well as the P. aeruginosa model laboratory strains PAK and PA14. Electron microscopy imaging was used to classify ϕPA3 in the order Caudovirales and the family Myoviridae. The genome of ϕPA3 was sequenced and found to contain 309,208 bp, the second-largest bacteriophage currently deposited in GenBank. The genome contains 378 ORFs and five tRNAs. Many ORF products in the ϕPA3 genome are similar to proteins encoded by P. aeruginosa phage ϕKZ and Pseudomonas chlororaphis phage 201ϕ2-1, and so ϕPA3 was classified genetically as a member of the ϕKZ-like group of phages. This is the first report of a member of this group of phages acting as a generalized transducer. Given its wide host range, high transduction efficiency and large genome size, the 'jumbo' phage ϕPA3 could be a powerful tool in functional genomic analysis of diverse P. aeruginosa strains of fundamental and clinical importance.

  3. [Pneumocystis jiroveci infection in immunocompetent patients with pulmonary disorders, in Portugal].

    PubMed

    Matos, Olga; Costa, Marina Célia; Correia, Isabel; Monteiro, Paula; Vieira, Jorge Roldão; Soares, Jorge; Bonnet, Marina; Esteves, Francisco; Antunes, Francisco

    2006-01-01

    The use of molecular tools with a great capacity to detect and differentiate strains of Pneumocystis has resulted: in the identification of low numbers of P. jiroveci organisms in clinically silent, colonized, immunocompromised patients and in immunocompetent persons. Considering this information, the aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of P. jiroveci carriers (subclinical infections) in Portuguese patients with pulmonary disorders and in healthy individuals. A total of 45 pulmonary specimens were collected from 45 immunocompetent adults with pulmonary disorders, and 37 oral washings from 37 healthy adults, between March 2001 and February 2004. All samples were analysed by indirect immunofluorescence with monoclonal antibodies and by amplification of the LSU mtrRNA by nested PCR. The results obtained in this study indicate that: 1) P. jiroveci is frequently detected (24.4%) in patients with pulmonary disorders in Portugal; 2) this population might play a role in circulation and transmission of P. jiroveci organisms in the community; 3) patients receiving corticosteroids are more likely to have detectable P. jiroveci in lungs (18%) than patients who are not receiving this immunosuppressor (12%); 4) P. jiroveci is infrequently detected in healthy adults. This may be due to very low numbers of latent organisms present in the lungs of healthy adults, difficulty in detecting few organisms, or due to the type of samples used. Screening of these individuals and notification of the results to their physician might be important: for further follow-up and whether or not prophylaxis or treatment should be prescribed; and for the clarification of the epidemiology of P. jiroveci asymptomatic infections.

  4. Insights into the respiratory tract microbiota of patients with cystic fibrosis during early Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization

    SciTech Connect

    Keravec, Marlène; Mounier, Jérôme; Prestat, Emmanuel; Vallet, Sophie; Jansson, Janet K.; Burgaud, Gaëtan; Rosec, Sylvain; Gouriou, Stéphanie; Rault, Gilles; Coton, Emmanuel; Barbier, Georges; Héry-Arnaud, Geneviève

    2015-08-09

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa plays a major role in cystic fibrosis (CF) progression. Therefore, it is important to understand the initial steps of P. aeruginosa infection. The structure and dynamics of CF respiratory tract microbial communities during the early stages of P. aeruginosa colonization were characterized by pyrosequencing and cloning-sequencing. The respiratory microbiota showed high diversity, related to the young age of the CF cohort (mean age 10 years). Wide inter- and intra-individual variations were revealed. A common core microbiota of 5 phyla and 13 predominant genera was found, the majority of which were obligate anaerobes. A few genera were significantly more prevalent in patients never infected by P. aeruginosa. Persistence of an anaerobic core microbiota regardless of P. aeruginosa status suggests a major role of certain anaerobes in the pathophysiology of lung infections in CF. Some genera may be potential biomarkers of pulmonary infection state.

  5. Cystic fibrosis–adapted Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing lasR mutants cause hyperinflammatory responses

    PubMed Central

    LaFayette, Shantelle L.; Houle, Daniel; Beaudoin, Trevor; Wojewodka, Gabriella; Radzioch, Danuta; Hoffman, Lucas R.; Burns, Jane L.; Dandekar, Ajai A.; Smalley, Nicole E.; Chandler, Josephine R.; Zlosnik, James E.; Speert, David P.; Bernier, Joanie; Matouk, Elias; Brochiero, Emmanuelle; Rousseau, Simon; Nguyen, Dao

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis lung disease is characterized by chronic airway infections with the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa and severe neutrophilic pulmonary inflammation. P. aeruginosa undergoes extensive genetic adaptation to the cystic fibrosis (CF) lung environment, and adaptive mutations in the quorum sensing regulator gene lasR commonly arise. We sought to define how mutations in lasR alter host-pathogen relationships. We demonstrate that lasR mutants induce exaggerated host inflammatory responses in respiratory epithelial cells, with increased accumulation of proinflammatory cytokines and neutrophil recruitment due to the loss of bacterial protease–dependent cytokine degradation. In subacute pulmonary infections, lasR mutant–infected mice show greater neutrophilic inflammation and immunopathology compared with wild-type infections. Finally, we observed that CF patients infected with lasR mutants have increased plasma interleukin-8 (IL-8), a marker of inflammation. These findings suggest that bacterial adaptive changes may worsen pulmonary inflammation and directly contribute to the pathogenesis and progression of chronic lung disease in CF patients. PMID:26457326

  6. Myeloid derived hypoxia inducible factor 1-alpha is required for protection against pulmonary Aspergillus fumigatus infection.

    PubMed

    Shepardson, Kelly M; Jhingran, Anupam; Caffrey, Alayna; Obar, Joshua J; Suratt, Benjamin T; Berwin, Brent L; Hohl, Tobias M; Cramer, Robert A

    2014-09-01

    Hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF1α) is the mammalian transcriptional factor that controls metabolism, survival, and innate immunity in response to inflammation and low oxygen. Previous work established that generation of hypoxic microenvironments occurs within the lung during infection with the human fungal pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus. Here we demonstrate that A. fumigatus stabilizes HIF1α protein early after pulmonary challenge that is inhibited by treatment of mice with the steroid triamcinolone. Utilizing myeloid deficient HIF1α mice, we observed that HIF1α is required for survival and fungal clearance early following pulmonary challenge with A. fumigatus. Unlike previously reported research with bacterial pathogens, HIF1α deficient neutrophils and macrophages were surprisingly not defective in fungal conidial killing. The increase in susceptibility of the myeloid deficient HIF1α mice to A. fumigatus was in part due to decreased early production of the chemokine CXCL1 (KC) and increased neutrophil apoptosis at the site of infection, resulting in decreased neutrophil numbers in the lung. Addition of recombinant CXCL1 restored neutrophil survival and numbers, murine survival, and fungal clearance. These results suggest that there are unique HIF1α mediated mechanisms employed by the host for protection and defense against fungal pathogen growth and invasion in the lung. Additionally, this work supports the strategy of exploring HIF1α as a therapeutic target in specific immunosuppressed populations with fungal infections.

  7. Myeloid Derived Hypoxia Inducible Factor 1-alpha Is Required for Protection against Pulmonary Aspergillus fumigatus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Shepardson, Kelly M.; Jhingran, Anupam; Caffrey, Alayna; Obar, Joshua J.; Suratt, Benjamin T.; Berwin, Brent L.; Hohl, Tobias M.; Cramer, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF1α) is the mammalian transcriptional factor that controls metabolism, survival, and innate immunity in response to inflammation and low oxygen. Previous work established that generation of hypoxic microenvironments occurs within the lung during infection with the human fungal pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus. Here we demonstrate that A. fumigatus stabilizes HIF1α protein early after pulmonary challenge that is inhibited by treatment of mice with the steroid triamcinolone. Utilizing myeloid deficient HIF1α mice, we observed that HIF1α is required for survival and fungal clearance early following pulmonary challenge with A. fumigatus. Unlike previously reported research with bacterial pathogens, HIF1α deficient neutrophils and macrophages were surprisingly not defective in fungal conidial killing. The increase in susceptibility of the myeloid deficient HIF1α mice to A. fumigatus was in part due to decreased early production of the chemokine CXCL1 (KC) and increased neutrophil apoptosis at the site of infection, resulting in decreased neutrophil numbers in the lung. Addition of recombinant CXCL1 restored neutrophil survival and numbers, murine survival, and fungal clearance. These results suggest that there are unique HIF1α mediated mechanisms employed by the host for protection and defense against fungal pathogen growth and invasion in the lung. Additionally, this work supports the strategy of exploring HIF1α as a therapeutic target in specific immunosuppressed populations with fungal infections. PMID:25255025

  8. Toward an Alternative Therapeutic Approach for Skin Infections: Antagonistic Activity of Lactobacilli Against Antibiotic-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Hafez, Mohamed M; Maghrabi, Ibrahim A; Zaki, Noha M

    2013-09-01

    The wide spread of antimicrobial resistance has urged the need of alternative therapeutic approach. In this context, probiotic lactobacilli have been reported for the prevention and treatment of many gastrointestinal and urogenital infections. However, very little is known about their antagonistic activity against skin pathogens. Accordingly, the present study aimed to investigate the potential of lactobacilli to interfere with pathogenesis features of two antibiotic-resistant skin pathogens, namely methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and multiple-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. A total of 49 lactobacilli were recovered, identified and tested for their antagonistic activities against the aforementioned pathogens. Of these, eight isolates were capable of blocking the adherence of pathogens to mammalian cells independent of the skin pathogen tested or model adopted. Moreover, three Lactobacillus isolates (LRA4, LC2 and LR5) effectively prevented the pathogen internalization into epithelial cells in addition to potentiating phagocyte-mediated pathogen killing. Interestingly, the lactobacilli LC2, LF9 and LRA4 markedly inhibited the growth of P. aeruginosa and S. aureus isolates in coculture experiments. Besides, the lactobacilli LRA4, LC2, LR5 and LF9 have counteracted pathogen cytotoxicity. Taken together, the present study revealed some inhibitory activities of lactobacilli against two antibiotic-resistant skin pathogens. Moreover, it revealed two lactobacilli, namely LC2 and LRA4, with antagonistic capacity against different virulence determinants of skin pathogens. These lactobacilli are considered promising probiotic candidates that may represent an alternative therapeutic approach for skin infections.

  9. [Pulmonary hypertension in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus: current situation].

    PubMed

    Soto-Abánades, Clara Itzíar; Alcolea-Batres, Sergio; Ríos-Blanco, Juan José

    2013-01-01

    The increase in survival that has been achieved with the new treatments in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy, has enabled clinicians and researchers to analyze issues that emerge in the long term in patients with HIV infection. Although the majority of cardiovascular complications have been widely described, the pathogenesis of pulmonary arterial hypertension is still poorly understood, and is one of the more complex and feared complications as it worsens the prognosis and quality of life of these patients This article reviews newer aspects related to the aetiology, symptoms, diagnosis and treatment of this disease.

  10. Isolation of Mycobacterium kumamotonense from a patient with pulmonary infection and latent tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kontos, Fanourios; Mavromanolakis, Dimitrios Nikitas; Zande, Marina Chari; Gitti, Zoe Georgios

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium kumamotonense is a novel, slow-growing non-chromogenic nontuberculous mycobacterium, which belongs to Mycobacterium terrae complex. We report, for the first time in Greece, the isolation of M. kumamotonense from an immunocompetent patient with pulmonary infection and latent tuberculosis. M. kumamotonense was identified by sequencing analysis of 16S rDNA and 65-kDa heat shock protein genes while by commercial molecular assays it was misidentified as Mycobacterium celatum. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed by the reference broth microdilution method. The strain was susceptible to amikacin, clarithromycin, rifampin, ciprofloxacin, moxifloxacin, rifabutin, ethambutol and linezolid. PMID:27080783

  11. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa Lipid A Deacylase: Selection for Expression and Loss within the Cystic Fibrosis Airway

    PubMed Central

    Ernst, Robert K.; Adams, Kristin N.; Moskowitz, Samuel M.; Kraig, Gretchen M.; Kawasaki, Kiyoshi; Stead, Christopher M.; Trent, M. Stephen; Miller, Samuel I.

    2006-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is the major surface component of gram-negative bacteria, and a component of LPS, lipid A, is recognized by the innate immune system through the Toll-like receptor 4/MD-2 complex. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an environmental gram-negative bacterium that opportunistically infects the respiratory tracts of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), can synthesize various structures of lipid A. Lipid A from P. aeruginosa strains isolated from infants with CF has a specific structure that includes the removal of the 3 position 3-OH C10 fatty acid. Here we demonstrate increased expression of the P. aeruginosa lipid A 3-O-deacylase (PagL) in isolates from CF infants compared to that in environmental isolates. PagL activity was increased in environmental isolates by growth in medium limited for magnesium and decreased by growth at low temperature in laboratory-adapted strains of P. aeruginosa. P. aeruginosa PagL was shown to be an outer membrane protein by isopycnic density gradient centrifugation. Heterologous expression of P. aeruginosa pagL in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Escherichia coli resulted in removal of the 3-OH C14 fatty acid from lipid A, indicating that P. aeruginosa PagL recognizes either 3-OH C10 or 3-OH C14. Finally, deacylated lipid A species were not observed in some clinical P. aeruginosa isolates from patients with severe pulmonary disease, suggesting that loss of PagL function can occur during long-term adaptation to the CF airway. PMID:16352835

  12. Next-Generation “-omics” Approaches Reveal a Massive Alteration of Host RNA Metabolism during Bacteriophage Infection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Monot, Marc; Kogadeeva, Maria; Sauer, Uwe; Jorth, Peter; Whiteley, Marvin; Debarbieux, Laurent; Lavigne, Rob

    2016-01-01

    As interest in the therapeutic and biotechnological potentials of bacteriophages has grown, so has value in understanding their basic biology. However, detailed knowledge of infection cycles has been limited to a small number of model bacteriophages, mostly infecting Escherichia coli. We present here the first analysis coupling data obtained from global next-generation approaches, RNA-Sequencing and metabolomics, to characterize interactions between the virulent bacteriophage PAK_P3 and its host Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We detected a dramatic global depletion of bacterial transcripts coupled with their replacement by viral RNAs over the course of infection, eventually leading to drastic changes in pyrimidine metabolism. This process relies on host machinery hijacking as suggested by the strong up-regulation of one bacterial operon involved in RNA processing. Moreover, we found that RNA-based regulation plays a central role in PAK_P3 lifecycle as antisense transcripts are produced mainly during the early stage of infection and viral small non coding RNAs are massively expressed at the end of infection. This work highlights the prominent role of RNA metabolism in the infection strategy of a bacteriophage belonging to a new characterized sub-family of viruses with promising therapeutic potential. PMID:27380413

  13. A comparison of 111In-HIG scintigraphy and chest radiology in the identification of pulmonary infection in patients with HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Buscombe, J R; Oyen, W J; Corstens, F H; Ell, P J; Miller, R F

    1995-05-01

    Prospectively, we compared the results of chest radiology and functional imaging, using 111In-labelled polyclonal human IgG (111In-HIG), in the identification of pulmonary infection in patients infected by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Sixty-three studies were performed on 57 HIV-infected patients presenting with suspected chest infection or fever of unknown cause, in each of whom a planar chest radiograph was obtained within 24 h of the 111In-HIG study. The results of the two imaging modalities were compared with the final microbiological or cytological diagnosis. Forty patients were found to have pulmonary infection, 25 of whom were correctly identified with chest radiology (sensitivity 62%) and 39 with 111In-HIG (sensitivity 97%). In those patients without infection, chest radiology was abnormal in 13 cases (specificity 43%), while there was only one false-positive 111In-HIG study (specificity 95%). 111In-HIG correctly identified the presence or absence of active lung infection in 61 of 63 cases (accuracy 93%). This was significantly better (chi 2 = 8.25, upsilon = 1, P < 0.01) than chest radiology, which correctly identified the presence or absence of infection in 35 of 63 cases (accuracy 55%). In HIV antibody-positive patients, functional imaging with 111In-HIG is more accurate than chest X-ray in the identification of pulmonary infection.

  14. A lethal disease model for hantavirus pulmonary syndrome in immunosuppressed Syrian hamsters infected with Sin Nombre virus.

    PubMed

    Brocato, Rebecca L; Hammerbeck, Christopher D; Bell, Todd M; Wells, Jay B; Queen, Laurie A; Hooper, Jay W

    2014-01-01

    Sin Nombre virus (SNV) is a rodent-borne hantavirus that causes hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) predominantly in North America. SNV infection of immunocompetent hamsters results in an asymptomatic infection; the only lethal disease model for a pathogenic hantavirus is Andes virus (ANDV) infection of Syrian hamsters. Efforts to create a lethal SNV disease model in hamsters by repeatedly passaging virus through the hamster have demonstrated increased dissemination of the virus but no signs of disease. In this study, we demonstrate that immunosuppression of hamsters through the administration of a combination of dexamethasone and cyclophosphamide, followed by infection with SNV, results in a vascular leak syndrome that accurately mimics both HPS disease in humans and ANDV infection of hamsters. Immunosuppressed hamsters infected with SNV have a mean number of days to death of 13 and display clinical signs associated with HPS, including pulmonary edema. Viral antigen was widely detectable throughout the pulmonary endothelium. Histologic analysis of lung sections showed marked inflammation and edema within the alveolar septa of SNV-infected hamsters, results which are similar to what is exhibited by hamsters infected with ANDV. Importantly, SNV-specific neutralizing polyclonal antibody administered 5 days after SNV infection conferred significant protection against disease. This experiment not only demonstrated that the disease was caused by SNV, it also demonstrated the utility of this animal model for testing candidate medical countermeasures. This is the first report of lethal disease caused by SNV in an adult small-animal model.

  15. Intestinal parasite co-infection among pulmonary tuberculosis cases without human immunodeficiency virus infection in a rural county in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin-Xu; Chen, Jia-Xu; Wang, Li-Xia; Tian, Li-Guang; Zhang, Yu-Ping; Dong, Shuang-Pin; Hu, Xue-Guang; Liu, Jian; Wang, Feng-Feng; Wang, Yue; Yin, Xiao-Mei; He, Li-Jun; Yan, Qiu-Ye; Zhang, Hong-Wei; Xu, Bian-Li; Zhou, Xiao-Nong

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies of co-infection with tuberculosis (TB) and intestinal parasites in humans have not been extensively investigated in China. A cross-section study was conducted in a rural county of Henan Province, China. Pulmonary TB (PTB) case-patients receiving treatment for infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and healthy controls matched for geographic area, age, and sex were surveyed by using questionnaires. Fecal and blood specimens were collected for detection of intestinal parasites, routine blood examination, and infection with human immunodeficiency virus. The chi-square test was used for univariate analysis and multivariate logistic regression models were used to adjust for potential confounding factors. A total of 369 persons with PTB and 366 healthy controls were included; all participants were negative for human immunodeficiency virus. The overall prevalence of intestinal parasites in persons with PTB was 14.9%, including intestinal protozoa (7.9%) and helminthes (7.6%). The infection spectrum of intestinal parasites was Entamoeba spp. (1.4%), Blastocystis hominis (6.2%), Trichomonas hominis (0.3%), Clonorchis sinensis (0.3%), Ascaris lumbricoides (0.5%), Trichuris trichiura (2.2%), and hookworm (4.6%). The prevalence of intestinal parasites showed no significant difference between persons with PTB and healthy controls after adjusting for potential confounding factors. There was no factor that affected infection rates for intestinal parasites between the two groups. Infection with intestinal parasites of persons with PTB was associated with female sex (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 2.05, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.01-4.17), body mass index ≤ 19 (AOR = 3.02, 95% CI = 1.47-6.20), and anemia (AOR = 2.43, 95% CI = 1.17-5.03). Infection of healthy controls was only associated with an annual labor time in farmlands > 2 months (AOR = 4.50, 95% CI = 2.03-10.00). In addition, there was no significant trend between rates of infection with

  16. Intestinal Parasite Co-infection among Pulmonary Tuberculosis Cases without Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection in a Rural County in China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin-Xu; Chen, Jia-Xu; Wang, Li-Xia; Tian, Li-Guang; Zhang, Yu-Ping; Dong, Shuang-Pin; Hu, Xue-Guang; Liu, Jian; Wang, Feng-Feng; Wang, Yue; Yin, Xiao-Mei; He, Li-Jun; Yan, Qiu-Ye; Zhang, Hong-Wei; Xu, Bian-Li; Zhou, Xiao-Nong

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies of co-infection with tuberculosis (TB) and intestinal parasites in humans have not been extensively investigated in China. A cross-section study was conducted in a rural county of Henan Province, China. Pulmonary TB (PTB) case-patients receiving treatment for infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and healthy controls matched for geographic area, age, and sex were surveyed by using questionnaires. Fecal and blood specimens were collected for detection of intestinal parasites, routine blood examination, and infection with human immunodeficiency virus. The chi-square test was used for univariate analysis and multivariate logistic regression models were used to adjust for potential confounding factors. A total of 369 persons with PTB and 366 healthy controls were included; all participants were negative for human immunodeficiency virus. The overall prevalence of intestinal parasites in persons with PTB was 14.9%, including intestinal protozoa (7.9%) and helminthes (7.6%). The infection spectrum of intestinal parasites was Entamoeba spp. (1.4%), Blastocystis hominis (6.2%), Trichomonas hominis (0.3%), Clonorchis sinensis (0.3%), Ascaris lumbricoides (0.5%), Trichuris trichiura (2.2%), and hookworm (4.6%). The prevalence of intestinal parasites showed no significant difference between persons with PTB and healthy controls after adjusting for potential confounding factors. There was no factor that affected infection rates for intestinal parasites between the two groups. Infection with intestinal parasites of persons with PTB was associated with female sex (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 2.05, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.01–4.17), body mass index ≤ 19 (AOR = 3.02, 95% CI = 1.47–6.20), and anemia (AOR = 2.43, 95% CI = 1.17–5.03). Infection of healthy controls was only associated with an annual labor time in farmlands > 2 months (AOR = 4.50, 95% CI = 2.03–10.00). In addition, there was no significant trend between rates of infection with

  17. Relationships between Mycobacterium isolates from patients with pulmonary mycobacterial infection and potting soils.

    PubMed

    De Groote, Mary Ann; Pace, Norman R; Fulton, Kayte; Falkinham, Joseph O

    2006-12-01

    High numbers of mycobacteria, including known pathogenic species such as Mycobacterium avium, Mycobacterium intracellulare, and Mycobacterium chelonae, were recovered from aerosols produced by pouring commercial potting soil products and potting soil samples provided by patients with pulmonary mycobacterial infections. The dominant mycobacteria in the soil samples corresponded to the dominant species implicated clinically. Profiles of large restriction fragments obtained by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis demonstrated a closely related pair of M. avium isolates recovered from a patient and from that patient's own potting soil. Thus, potting soils are potential sources of infection by environmental mycobacteria. Use of dust-excluding masks should be considered during potting or other activities that generate aerosol with soil.

  18. Right Pulmonary Artery Distensibility Index (RPAD Index). A field study of an echocardiographic method to detect early development of pulmonary hypertension and its severity even in the absence of regurgitant jets for Doppler evaluation in heartworm-infected dogs.

    PubMed

    Venco, Luigi; Mihaylova, Liliya; Boon, June A

    2014-11-15

    Despite the term "heartworm disease" Dirofilaria immitis infection in dogs should be considered a pulmonary arterial disease that might only involve the right heart structures in its late stage. Chronic infection by adult heartworms in dogs results in proliferative endoarteritis leading to progressively increasing pulmonary artery pressure due to reduced elasticity. Elasticity allows the pulmonary arteries to stretch in response to each pulse and helps maintain a relatively constant pressure in the arteries despite the pulsating nature of the blood flow. Pulmonary artery distensibility for both acute and chronic pulmonary hypertension has been investigated in humans using MRI and has been correlated with the severity of hypertension and its outcome and treatment response. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether echocardiographic measurement of the percentage change in diameter of the right pulmonary artery in systole and diastole (distensibility) may be of value in assessing the presence and severity of pulmonary hypertension in heartworm-infected dogs. The Right Pulmonary Artery Distensibility Index (RPAD Index) (which is calculated as the difference in diameter of the right pulmonary artery in systole and diastole) was calculated in healthy and naturally infected heartworm-positive dogs. The right pulmonary artery was chosen because it is usually affected earlier and to a greater degree. Data were obtained from healthy heartworm-free dogs without any clinical, radiographic, or echocardiographic signs of pulmonary hypertension; naturally infected heartworm-positive dogs in different stages of the disease in which pulmonary pressure could be measured by Doppler echocardiography (using tricuspid and or pulmonary regurgitation velocity and pressure gradient); and naturally infected heartworm-positive dogs in different stages of the disease (with or without tricuspid and or pulmonary regurgitation) in which the pulmonary pressure was measured

  19. Pulmonary infection caused by Mycobacterium kansasii: findings on computed tomography of the chest*

    PubMed Central

    Mogami, Roberto; Goldenberg, Telma; de Marca, Patricia Gomes Cytrangulo; Mello, Fernanda Carvalho de Queiroz; Lopes, Agnaldo José

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe the main tomography findings in patients diagnosed with pulmonary infection caused by Mycobacterium kansasii. Materials and Methods Retrospective study of computed tomography scans of 19 patients with pulmonary infection by M. kansasii. Results Of the 19 patients evaluated, 10 (52.6%) were male and 9 (47.4%) were female. The mean age of the patients was 58 years (range, 33-76 years). Computed tomography findings were as follows: architectural distortion, in 17 patients (89.5%); reticular opacities and bronchiectasis, in 16 (84.2%); cavities, in 14 (73.7%); centrilobular nodules, in 13 (68.4%); small consolidations, in 10 (52.6%); atelectasis and large consolidations, in 9 (47.4%); subpleural blebs and emphysema, in 6 (31.6%); and adenopathy, in 1 (5.3%). Conclusion There was a predominance of cavities, as well as of involvement of the small and large airways. The airway disease was characterized by bronchiectasis and bronchiolitis presenting as centrilobular nodules. PMID:27777472

  20. [Acanthamoeba, naturally intracellularly infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, after their isolation from a microbiologically contaminated drinking water system in a hospital].

    PubMed

    Michel, R; Burghardt, H; Bergmann, H

    1995-03-01

    The drinking water system of a new hospital building that was highly contaminated with bacteria before opening was investigated too for the prevalence of small free living amoebae. Germ counts resulted in > 100 CFU/ml in 100% of the cold water samples, that showed also growth of P. aeruginosa, whereas E. coli and coliforme bacteria could not be identified. The investigation of 37 water samples for protozoa revealed growth of small freeliving amoebae in 20 samples (54%) belonging to 10 species of the genus Acanthamoeba, Naegleria, Hartmannella, Echinamoeba among others. In addition 2 Ciliate- and 2 Microflagellate-species could be observed. While all Naegleria strains isolated belonged to the N. gruberi-complex two of 16 Acanthamoeba-isolates proved to be pathogenic for laboratory mice. From 7 watersamples positive with P. aeruginosa 5 Acanthamoeba- and 2 Echinamoeba strains could be isolated which revealed intracellular multiplication of P. aeruginosa. Because of their well known resistances against chlorine, the amoebae and their cysts are considered to be vectors for these intracellular bacteria. A complete sanitation of the incriminated drinking water system was accomplished by combined chemical and thermic disinfection measures.

  1. Impact of pre-transplant pulmonary infection developed in horizontal laminar flow unit on the outcome of subsequent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    He, Gan-Lin; Chang, Ying-Jun; Xu, Lan-Ping; Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Wang, Yu; Liu, Kai-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Background So far, there is very little literature on how pre-transplant pulmonary infection developed in horizontal laminar flow unit (HLFU) affects outcomes of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). Methods A retrospective analysis was performed on allo-HSCT recipients who were diagnosed with pre-transplant pulmonary infection developed in HLFU between January 2012 and December 2012. Various tests were analyzed to evaluate the overall survival (OS) and pulmonary infection rate after allo-HSCT. Results Among 317 patients who received allo-HSCT from related donors, 7 cases of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-haploidentical transplantation reported a fever, cough, and other symptoms before transplantation. Chest radiography findings showed pulmonary infection, and the C-reactive protein (CRP) level was higher than normal, which confirmed pulmonary infection (incidence rate 2.21%). The Breslow test suggested that the early survival rate was lower in the group with pre-transplant pulmonary infection than in the group without pre-transplant pulmonary infection (OS: 28.4 vs. 42.4 months; P=0.023); the early survival rate was lower in patients with a pulmonary infection accompanied by bilateral pleural effusion than in patients without pleural effusion (OS: 1.5 vs. 36.3 months; P=0.010). In the first month after transplantation, the difference in the CD4CD45RO+CD45RA- and CD4CD45RO-CD45RA+ between the groups with and without pre-transplant pulmonary infection was statistically significant (P<0.05). Patients with pre-transplant pulmonary infection who survived >3 years had a higher rate of pulmonary infection in the first 2 months after allo-HSCT than those without pre-transplant pulmonary infection [100% (5/5 patients) vs. 38.1% (118/310); χ2=5.542, P=0.019]. Conclusions Development of pre-transplant pulmonary infection in the HLFU in patients with hematological malignancies who receive HLA-haploidentical HSCT is associated with an increased risk

  2. Impact of pre-transplant pulmonary infection developed in horizontal laminar flow unit on the outcome of subsequent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    He, Gan-Lin; Chang, Ying-Jun; Xu, Lan-Ping; Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Wang, Yu; Liu, Kai-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Background So far, there is very little literature on how pre-transplant pulmonary infection developed in horizontal laminar flow unit (HLFU) affects outcomes of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). Methods A retrospective analysis was performed on allo-HSCT recipients who were diagnosed with pre-transplant pulmonary infection developed in HLFU between January 2012 and December 2012. Various tests were analyzed to evaluate the overall survival (OS) and pulmonary infection rate after allo-HSCT. Results Among 317 patients who received allo-HSCT from related donors, 7 cases of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-haploidentical transplantation reported a fever, cough, and other symptoms before transplantation. Chest radiography findings showed pulmonary infection, and the C-reactive protein (CRP) level was higher than normal, which confirmed pulmonary infection (incidence rate 2.21%). The Breslow test suggested that the early survival rate was lower in the group with pre-transplant pulmonary infection than in the group without pre-transplant pulmonary infection (OS: 28.4 vs. 42.4 months; P=0.023); the early survival rate was lower in patients with a pulmonary infection accompanied by bilateral pleural effusion than in patients without pleural effusion (OS: 1.5 vs. 36.3 months; P=0.010). In the first month after transplantation, the difference in the CD4CD45RO+CD45RA- and CD4CD45RO-CD45RA+ between the groups with and without pre-transplant pulmonary infection was statistically significant (P<0.05). Patients with pre-transplant pulmonary infection who survived >3 years had a higher rate of pulmonary infection in the first 2 months after allo-HSCT than those without pre-transplant pulmonary infection [100% (5/5 patients) vs. 38.1% (118/310); χ2=5.542, P=0.019]. Conclusions Development of pre-transplant pulmonary infection in the HLFU in patients with hematological malignancies who receive HLA-haploidentical HSCT is associated with an increased risk

  3. Inhibition of Quorum Sensing-Controlled Virulence Factors and Biofilm Formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by Culture Extract from Novel Bacterial Species of Paenibacillus Using a Rat Model of Chronic Lung Infection

    PubMed Central

    Alasil, Saad Musbah; Omar, Rahmat; Yusof, Mohd Yasim

    2015-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a key regulator of virulence factors and biofilm formation in Gram-negative bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Microorganisms that inhabit soil are of strategic importance in the discovery of compounds with anti-QS properties. The objective of the study was to test the culture extract of a taxonomically novel species of Paenibacillus strain 139SI for its inhibitory effects on the QS-controlled virulence factors and biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa both in vitro and in vivo. The Paenibacillus sp. culture extract was used to test its anti-QS effects on the LasA protease, LasB elastase, pyoverdin production, and biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa as well as evaluate its therapeutic effects on lung bacteriology, pathology, hematological profile, and serum antibody responses of experimental animals in a rat model of chronic lung infection. Results showed significant decrease in the activities of QS-controlled LasA protease, LasB elastase pyoverdin, and biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa caused by the culture extract. Moreover, the extract significantly prolonged the survival times of rats and facilitated the clearance of biofilm infections from infected lungs. In conclusion, the antiquorum sensing effects of culture extract from a novel species of Paenibacillus provide new insights to combat biofilm-associated infections. PMID:26904749

  4. Inhibition of Quorum Sensing-Controlled Virulence Factors and Biofilm Formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by Culture Extract from Novel Bacterial Species of Paenibacillus Using a Rat Model of Chronic Lung Infection.

    PubMed

    Alasil, Saad Musbah; Omar, Rahmat; Ismail, Salmah; Yusof, Mohd Yasim

    2015-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a key regulator of virulence factors and biofilm formation in Gram-negative bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Microorganisms that inhabit soil are of strategic importance in the discovery of compounds with anti-QS properties. The objective of the study was to test the culture extract of a taxonomically novel species of Paenibacillus strain 139SI for its inhibitory effects on the QS-controlled virulence factors and biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa both in vitro and in vivo. The Paenibacillus sp. culture extract was used to test its anti-QS effects on the LasA protease, LasB elastase, pyoverdin production, and biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa as well as evaluate its therapeutic effects on lung bacteriology, pathology, hematological profile, and serum antibody responses of experimental animals in a rat model of chronic lung infection. Results showed significant decrease in the activities of QS-controlled LasA protease, LasB elastase pyoverdin, and biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa caused by the culture extract. Moreover, the extract significantly prolonged the survival times of rats and facilitated the clearance of biofilm infections from infected lungs. In conclusion, the antiquorum sensing effects of culture extract from a novel species of Paenibacillus provide new insights to combat biofilm-associated infections. PMID:26904749

  5. [Microbiological results of bronchoalveolar lavage that was performed for opportunistic pulmonary infections].

    PubMed

    Gülcü, Aylin; Sevinç, Can; Esen, Nuran; Kilinç, Oğuz; Uçan, Eyüp Sabri; Itil, Oya; Cimrin, Arif Hikmet; Kömüs, Nuray; Sener, Gülper; Akkoçlu, Atila; Gülay, Zeynep; Yücesoy, Mine

    2006-01-01

    Between 2001-2002; in 62 cases, 33 (53%) male, 29 (47%) female, mean age 51.4 +/- 18.1 years) bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed for diagnosis of opportunistic pulmonary infection and specimens were evaluated for results of microbiological examinations. There was hematological malignancy in 18 (29%) and solid organ malignancy in 13 (21%) cases. Thirty-one (50%) cases were immunocompromised for reasons other than malignancy. By endoscopic evaluation endobronchial lesion was seen in 2 (3%) cases, indirect tumor signs were seen in 2 (3%) cases and signs of infection were seen in 11 (18%) cases. Forty-even (76%) cases were endoscopically normal. Acid-fast bacilli (AFB) direct examination was positive in 3 (5%) cases. In 4 (6%) cases mycobacterial culture was positive, Mycobacterium tuberculosis-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was also positive in these four cases. Examination of gram-stained smears for bacteria was associated with infection in 14 (23%) cases. Bacteriologic cultures were positive for single potential pathogen in 10 (16%) cases, and for mixed pathogens in 7 (11%) cases for a total number of 17 (27%). Fungal cultures were positive in 3 (5%) cases all of which had hematological malignancy. As a result in 24 (39%) cases microbiological agent of infection is determined: in four mycobacteria, in 17 bacteria other than mycobacteria and in three fungi. PMID:17001542

  6. [Microbiological results of bronchoalveolar lavage that was performed for opportunistic pulmonary infections].

    PubMed

    Gülcü, Aylin; Sevinç, Can; Esen, Nuran; Kilinç, Oğuz; Uçan, Eyüp Sabri; Itil, Oya; Cimrin, Arif Hikmet; Kömüs, Nuray; Sener, Gülper; Akkoçlu, Atila; Gülay, Zeynep; Yücesoy, Mine

    2006-01-01

    Between 2001-2002; in 62 cases, 33 (53%) male, 29 (47%) female, mean age 51.4 +/- 18.1 years) bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed for diagnosis of opportunistic pulmonary infection and specimens were evaluated for results of microbiological examinations. There was hematological malignancy in 18 (29%) and solid organ malignancy in 13 (21%) cases. Thirty-one (50%) cases were immunocompromised for reasons other than malignancy. By endoscopic evaluation endobronchial lesion was seen in 2 (3%) cases, indirect tumor signs were seen in 2 (3%) cases and signs of infection were seen in 11 (18%) cases. Forty-even (76%) cases were endoscopically normal. Acid-fast bacilli (AFB) direct examination was positive in 3 (5%) cases. In 4 (6%) cases mycobacterial culture was positive, Mycobacterium tuberculosis-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was also positive in these four cases. Examination of gram-stained smears for bacteria was associated with infection in 14 (23%) cases. Bacteriologic cultures were positive for single potential pathogen in 10 (16%) cases, and for mixed pathogens in 7 (11%) cases for a total number of 17 (27%). Fungal cultures were positive in 3 (5%) cases all of which had hematological malignancy. As a result in 24 (39%) cases microbiological agent of infection is determined: in four mycobacteria, in 17 bacteria other than mycobacteria and in three fungi.

  7. Enterovirus 71 Infection Causes Severe Pulmonary Lesions in Gerbils, Meriones unguiculatus, Which Can Be Prevented by Passive Immunization with Specific Antisera

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Yong; Qian, Lei; Yang, Zhang-Nv; Xie, Rong-Hui; Sun, Yi-Sheng; Lu, Hang-Jing; Miao, Zi-Ping; Li, Chan; Li, Xiao; Liang, Wei-Feng; Huang, Xiao-Xiao; Xia, Shi-Chang; Chen, Zhi-Ping; Jiang, Jian-Min; Zhang, Yan-Jun; Mei, Ling-Ling; Liu, She-Lan; Gu, Hua; Xu, Zhi-Yao; Fu, Xiao-Fei; Zhu, Zhi-Yong; Zhu, Han-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenic pulmonary edema caused by severe brainstem encephalitis is the leading cause of death in young children infected by Enterovirus 71 (EV71). However, no pulmonary lesions have been found in EV71-infected transgenic or non-transgenic mouse models. Development of a suitable animal model is important for studying EV71 pathogenesis and assessing effect of therapeutic approaches. We had found neurological disorders in EV71-induced young gerbils previously. Here, we report severe pulmonary lesions characterized with pulmonary congestion and hemorrhage in a gerbil model for EV71 infection. In the EV71-infected gerbils, six 21-day-old or younger gerbils presented with a sudden onset of symptoms and rapid illness progression after inoculation with 1×105.5 TCID50 of EV71 via intraperitoneal (IP) or intramuscular (IM) route. Respiratory symptoms were observed along with interstitial pneumonia, pulmonary congestion and extensive lung hemorrhage could be detected in the lung tissues by histopathological examination. EV71 viral titer was found to be peak at late stages of infection. EV71-induced pulmonary lesions, together with severe neurological disorders were also observed in gerbils, accurately mimicking the disease process in EV71-infected patients. Passive transfer with immune sera from EV71 infected adult gerbils with a neutralizing antibody (GMT=89) prevented severe pulmonary lesion formation after lethal EV71 challenge. These results establish this gerbil model as a useful platform for studying the pathogenesis of EV71-induced pulmonary lesions, immunotherapy and antiviral drugs. PMID:25767882

  8. Role of therapeutic drug monitoring in pulmonary infections: use and potential for expanded use of dried blood spot samples.

    PubMed

    Hofman, Susan; Bolhuis, Mathieu S; Koster, Remco A; Akkerman, Onno W; van Assen, Sander; Stove, Christophe; Alffenaar, Jan-Willem C

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory tract infections are among the most common infections in men. We reviewed literature to document their pharmacological treatments, and the extent to which therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) is needed during treatment. We subsequently examined potential use of dried blood spots as sample procedure for TDM. TDM was found to be an important component of clinical care for many (but not all) pulmonary infections. For gentamicin, linezolid, voriconazole and posaconazole dried blood spot methods and their use in TDM were already evident in literature. For glycopeptides, β-lactam antibiotics and fluoroquinolones it was determined that development of a dried blood spot (DBS) method could be useful. This review identifies specific antibiotics for which development of DBS methods could support the optimization of treatment of pulmonary infections.

  9. Biological efficacy and stability of diluted ticarcillin-clavulanic acid in the topical treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections.

    PubMed

    Bateman, Fiona L; Moss, Susan M; Trott, Darren J; Shipstone, Michael A

    2012-04-01

    Topical compounded Timentin(®) diluted with an inactive vehicle has been reported to be effective in the treatment of otitis externa caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The aims of this study were to determine the biological efficacy of Timentin(®) (ticarcillin and clavulanic acid) when diluted in the carrier vehicle Methopt(®) against P. aeruginosa and to determine the efficacy and stability of Timentin(®) aqueous stock concentrate solution. Timentin(®) stock concentrate was tested against four P. aeruginosa isolates on days 0, 7, 14, 21 and 28; then after 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 9 and 12 months of storage at 4 or -20°C. The diluted Timentin(®)-Methopt(®) solutions were tested against all isolates after 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 17, 21, 24 and 28 days of storage at 24 or 4°C. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) levels for all strains were determined using the broth microdilution method. The MIC of the stock solution remained relatively constant and acceptable throughout the study when stored at -20°C and was also acceptable for shorter time periods (6-9 months) when stored at 4°C. The MIC for the diluted Timentin(®)-Methopt(®) solution remained relatively constant and acceptable throughout the study for all four bacterial strains, with no difference between the solutions stored at 4 or 24°C. The results of this study indicate that storage of the Timentin(®) stock solution at -20°C does not compromise efficacy for at least 12 months and that Timentin(®) diluted in Methopt(®) was stable for 28 days when stored at either 4 or 24°C.

  10. Risk factors for mortality in patients with bloodstream infections caused by carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa: clinical impact of bacterial virulence and strains on outcome.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Su Jin; Yoon, Sang Sun; Bae, Il Kwon; Jeong, Seok Hoon; Kim, June Myung; Lee, Kyungwon

    2014-10-01

    The incidence of carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (CRPA) bacteremia has increased in recent years, and infections caused by CRPA result in higher mortality than those caused by susceptible strains. This study was performed to evaluate the risk factors for mortality and to study the impact of virulence factors and bacterial strains on clinical outcomes in patients with CRPA bacteremia. Data on 63 episodes of CRPA bacteremia that have occurred between January 1, 2007, and December 31, 2009, in a teaching hospital (2000 beds) in Seoul, Korea, were analyzed. The Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) score at the time of CRPA bacteremia and the capacity of CRPA to form biofilm were independent predictive factors for mortality in patients with CRPA bacteremia. In addition, the biofilm-forming ability and elastase activity of strains were correlated with APACHE II scores to measure the severity of disease and estimate predicted mortality in the patients.

  11. Pulmonary ultrasonographic abnormalities associated with naturally occurring equine influenza virus infection in standardbred racehorses.

    PubMed

    Gross, Diane K; Morley, Paul S; Hinchcliff, Kenneth W; Reichle, Jean K; Slemons, Richard D

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine if naturally occurring acute infectious upper respiratory disease (IRD) caused by equine influenza virus is associated with ultrasonographically detectable pleural and pulmonary abnormalities in horses. Standardbred racehorses were evaluated for signs of IRD, defined as acute coughing or mucopurulent nasal discharge. For every horse with IRD (n = 16), 1 or 2 horses with no signs of IRD and the same owner or trainer (n = 30) were included. Thoracic ultrasonography was performed within 5-10 days of the onset of clinical disease in horses with IRD. Horses without IRD were examined at the same time as the horses with IRD with which they were enrolled. The rank of the ultrasound scores of horses with IRD was compared to that of horses without IRD. Equine influenza virus was identified as the primary etiologic agent associated with IRD in this study. Mild lung consolidation and peripheral pulmonary irregularities were found in 11 (69%) of 16 of the horses with IRD and 11 (37%) of 30 of control horses. Lung consolidation (median score = 1) and peripheral irregularities scores (median score = 1) were greater in horses with IRD compared to horses without IRD (median score = 0; P < .05). Pleural effusion was not observed. Equine influenza virus infection can result in abnormalities of the equine lower respiratory tract. Despite the mild nature of IRD observed in this study, lung consolidation and peripheral pulmonary irregularities were more commonly observed in horses with clinical signs of IRD. Further work is needed to determine the clinical significance of these ultrasonographic abnormalities. PMID:15515590

  12. Massive pulmonary hemorrhage in enterovirus 71-infected hand, foot, and mouth disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Seong; Lee, Young Il; Ahn, Jeong Bae; Kim, Mi Jin; Kim, Jae Hyun; Kim, Nam Hee; Hwang, Jong Hee; Kim, Dong Wook; Lee, Chong Guk; Song, Tae Won

    2015-03-01

    Hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) is an acute, mostly self-limiting infection. Patients usually recover without any sequelae. However, a few cases are life threatening, especially those caused by enterovirus 71 (EV71). A 12-month-old boy was admitted to a primary hospital with high fever and vesicular lesions of the mouth, hands, and feet. After 3 days, he experienced 3 seizure episodes and was referred to our hospital. On admission, he was conscious and his chest radiograph was normal. However, 6 hours later, he suddenly lost consciousness and had developed a massive pulmonary hemorrhage that continued until his death. He experienced several more intermittent seizures, and diffuse infiltration of both lung fields was observed on chest radiography. Intravenous immunoglobulin, dexamethasone, cefotaxime, leukocyte-depleted red blood cells, fresh frozen plasma, inotropics, vitamin K, and endotracheal epinephrine were administered. The patient died 9 hours after intubation, within 3 days from fever onset. EV71 subgenotype C4a was isolated retrospectively from serum and nasopharyngeal swab by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Here, we report a fatal case of EV71-associated HFMD with sudden-onset massive pulmonary hemorrhage and suspected encephalitis. PMID:25861335

  13. Prior exposure to acrolein accelerates pulmonary inflammation in influenza A-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Ong, Ferrer H C; Henry, Peter J; Burcham, Philip C

    2012-08-01

    The combustion product acrolein contributes to several smoke-related health disorders, but whether this immunomodulatory toxicant alters pulmonary susceptibility to viruses has received little attention. To study the effects of prior acrolein dosing on the severity of influenza A viral infection, male BALB/c mice received acrolein (1mg/kg) or saline (control) via oropharyngeal aspiration either 4- or 7-days prior to intranasal inoculation with either influenza A/PR/8/34 virus or vehicle. At 0, 2, 4 and 7 days post-inoculation, lung samples were assessed for histological changes while pulmonary inflammation was monitored by estimating immune cell numbers and cytokine levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). After viral challenge, animals that were exposed to acrolein 4 days previously experienced greater weight loss and exhibited an accelerated inflammatory response at 2 days after viral inoculation. Thus compared to saline-pretreated, virus-challenged controls, BALF recovered from these mice contained higher numbers of macrophages and neutrophils in addition to increased levels of several inflammatory cytokines, including IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, TNF, IFN-γ, KC, and MCP-1. The acrolein-induced increase in viral susceptibility was suppressed by the carbonyl scavenger bisulphite. These findings suggest acute acrolein intoxication "primes" the lung to mount an accelerated immune response to inhaled viruses.

  14. Tuberculosis and pulmonary candidiasis co-infection present in a previously healthy patient

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez Borré, Gustavo; Gómez Camargo, Doris; Chalavé Jiménez, Neylor; Bellido Rodríguez, Javier; Cuadrado Cano, Bernarda; Navarro Gómez, Shirley

    2016-01-01

    Background: The coexistance among fungal pathogens and tuberculosis pulmonary is a clinical condition that generally occurs in immunosuppressive patients, however, immunocompetent patients may have this condition less frequently. Objective: We report the case of an immunocompetent patient diagnosed with coinfection Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Candida albicans. Case Description: A female patient, who is a 22-years old, with fever and a new onset of hemoptysis. Clinical findings and diagnosis: Diminished vesicular breath sounds in the apical region and basal crackling rales in the left lung base were found in the physical examination. Microbiological tests include: chest radiography and CAT scan pictograms in high resolution, Ziehl-Neelsen stain, growth medium for fungus and mycobacteria through Sabouraudís agar method with D-glucose. Medical examinations showed Candida albicans fungus and Mycobacterium tuberculosis present in the patient. Treatment and Outcome: Patient was treated with anti-tuberculosis and anti-fungal medications, which produced good responses. Clinical relevance: Pulmonary tuberculosis and fungal co-infection are not common in immunocompetent patients. However, we can suspect that there is a presence of these diseases by detecting new onset of hemoptysis in patients. PMID:27546933

  15. IL-22 Defect During Streptococcus pneumoniae Infection Triggers Exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Pichavant, Muriel; Sharan, Riti; Le Rouzic, Olivier; Olivier, Cécile; Hennegrave, Florence; Rémy, Gaëlle; Pérez-Cruz, Magdiel; Koné, Bachirou; Gosset, Pierre; Just, Nicolas; Gosset, Philippe

    2015-11-01

    Progression of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is linked to episodes of exacerbations caused by bacterial infections due to Streptococcus pneumoniae. Our objective was to identify during COPD, factors of susceptibility to bacterial infections among cytokine network and their role in COPD exacerbations. S. pneumoniae was used to sub-lethally challenge mice chronically exposed to air or cigarette smoke (CS) and to stimulate peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from non-smokers, smokers and COPD patients. The immune response and the cytokine production were evaluated. Delayed clearance of the bacteria and stronger lung inflammation observed in infected CS-exposed mice were associated with an altered production of IL-17 and IL-22 by innate immune cells. This defect was related to a reduced production of IL-1β and IL-23 by antigen presenting cells. Importantly, supplementation with recombinant IL-22 restored bacterial clearance in CS-exposed mice and limited lung alteration. In contrast with non-smokers, blood NK and NKT cells from COPD patients failed to increase IL-17 and IL-22 levels in response to S. pneumoniae, in association with a defect in IL-1β and IL-23 secretion. This study identified IL-17 and IL-22 as susceptibility factors in COPD exacerbation. Therefore targeting such cytokines could represent a potent strategy to control COPD exacerbation.

  16. Pulmonary surfactant as vehicle for intratracheally instilled tobramycin in mice infected with Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    van't Veen, A.; Mouton, J. W.; Gommers, D.; Lachmann, B.

    1996-01-01

    1. The use of pulmonary surfactant has been proposed as a vehicle for antibiotic delivery to the alveolar compartment of the lung. This study investigated survival rates of mice with a respiratory Klebsiella pneumoniae infection treated intratracheally with tobramycin using a natural exogenous surfactant preparation as vehicle. 2. At day 1 after infection, animals were injected intratracheally with 20 microliters of the following solutions: (1) a mixture of surfactant (500 micrograms) and tobramycin (250 micrograms); (2) tobramycin (250 micrograms) alone; (3) surfactant (500 micrograms) alone; and (4) NaHCO3 buffer (control, sham-treatment). A fifth group received no treatment (control). Deaths were registered every 12 h for 8 consecutive days. 3. The results show an increased survival in the group receiving the surfactant-tobramycin mixture compared to the group receiving tobramycin alone (P < 0.05), the group receiving surfactant alone (P < 0.01) and the control groups (P < 0.01). It is concluded that intratracheal instillation of surfactant-tobramycin is superior to tobramycin alone in protecting animals from death due to a respiratory Klebsiella pneumoniae infection. PMID:8937717

  17. Bacterial Infection in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in 2000: a State-of-the-Art Review

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, Sanjay; Murphy, Timothy F.

    2001-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States. The precise role of bacterial infection in the course and pathogenesis of COPD has been a source of controversy for decades. Chronic bacterial colonization of the lower airways contributes to airway inflammation; more research is needed to test the hypothesis that this bacterial colonization accelerates the progressive decline in lung function seen in COPD (the vicious circle hypothesis). The course of COPD is characterized by intermittent exacerbations of the disease. Studies of samples obtained by bronchoscopy with the protected specimen brush, analysis of the human immune response with appropriate immunoassays, and antibiotic trials reveal that approximately half of exacerbations are caused by bacteria. Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, and Streptococcus pneumoniae are the most common causes of exacerbations, while Chlamydia pneumoniae causes a small proportion. The role of Haemophilus parainfluenzae and gram-negative bacilli remains to be established. Recent progress in studies of the molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis of infection in the human respiratory tract and in vaccine development guided by such studies promises to lead to novel ways to treat and prevent bacterial infections in COPD. PMID:11292642

  18. [Pulmonary vasculitis as a clinical mask of HCV infection: efficiency of interferon-free antiviral therapy].

    PubMed

    Stelmakh, V V; Kozlov, V K; Sukhanov, D S; Skipsky, I M

    2014-01-01

    The paper describes a clinical case of pulmonary vasculitis caused by hepatitis C virus (HCV). Its diagnosis was established on the basis of in-depth laboratory testing and an investigation of the molecular biological markers of viremia (polymerase chain reaction--PCR--HCV RNA) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. By taking into account of extrahepatic HCV replication and contraindications to interferon therapy, the female patient was given an interferon-free antiviral therapy cycle using an interferonogenic inductor in combination with ribavirin. Pathogenic therapy (methylpred and ursodeoxycholic acid) was additionally performed. An interferon-free regimen of cycloferon + ribavirin led to sustained remission of HCV infection running with its systemic manifestations. The therapy could improve the function of not only the liver, but also the lung. In suspected extrahepatic HCV infections, an investigation of molecular biological markers for viremia (HCV RNA PCR) in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells is an essential diagnostic technique. Interferonogenic inductors, cycloferon in particular, should be used in combination with ribavirin when a chronic hepatitis C patient with the extrahepatic manifestations of HCV infection has contraindications to conventional therapy with recombinant interferon-α. PMID:25715495

  19. Pulmonary cryptococcosis and Capillaria aerophila infection in an FIV-positive cat.

    PubMed

    Barrs, V R; Martin, P; Nicoll, R G; Beatty, J A; Malik, R

    2000-03-01

    A 12-year-old, FIV-positive, domestic longhair cat was presented with a history of sneezing and coughing during the previous seven months. On thoracic radiographs, a prominent bronchial pattern and three focal, opacified nodules were seen. Cytology of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid demonstrated spherical, capsulate, narrow-necked, budding yeasts within macrophages. Culture of the fluid yielded a heavy growth of Cryptococcus neoformans var neoformans. The serum latex cryptococcal antigen agglutination test titre was 158. The cat was treated with itraconazole and the cough resolved over a 5-month period but then recurred. Repeat thoracic radiographs showed resolution of the pulmonary nodules but a persistent bronchial pattern. Adult nematodes and ova with morphology characteristic of Capillaria aerophila were seen in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and no yeasts were cultured from the fluid. The cryptococcal titre was zero. The lungworm infection was treated successfully with abamectin and the cough resolved. Immunosuppression related to FIV infection may have predisposed this cat to sequential respiratory tract infections. PMID:10860150

  20. Monomethylarsonous Acid (MMAIII) Has an Adverse Effect on the Innate Immune Response of Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells to Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Notch, Emily G.; Goodale, Britton C.; Barnaby, Roxanna; Coutermarsh, Bonita; Berwin, Brent; Taylor, Vivien F.; Jackson, Brian P.; Stanton, Bruce A.

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic is the number one contaminant of concern with regard to human health according to the World Health Organization. Epidemiological studies on Asian and South American populations have linked arsenic exposure with an increased incidence of lung disease, including pneumonia, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, both of which are associated with bacterial infection. However, little is known about the effects of low dose arsenic exposure, or the contributions of organic arsenic to the innate immune response to bacterial infection. This study examined the effects on Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) induced cytokine secretion by human bronchial epithelial cells (HBEC) by inorganic sodium arsenite (iAsIII) and two major metabolites, monomethylarsonous acid (MMAIII) and dimethylarsenic acid (DMAV), at concentrations relevant to the U.S. population. Neither iAsIII nor DMAV altered P. aeruginosa induced cytokine secretion. By contrast, MMAIII increased P. aeruginosa induced secretion of IL-8, IL-6 and CXCL2. A combination of iAsIII, MMAIII and DMAV (10 pbb total) reduced IL-8 and CXCL1 secretion. These data demonstrate for the first time that exposure to MMAIII alone, and a combination of iAsIII, MMAIII and DMAV at levels relevant to the U.S. may have negative effects on the innate immune response of human bronchial epithelial cells to P. aeruginosa. PMID:26554712

  1. Pulmonary migratory infiltrates due to mycoplasma infection: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    You, Wenjie; Chen, Bi; Li, Jing; Shou, Juan; Xue, Shan; Liu, Xueqing; Jiang, Handong

    2016-06-01

    Pulmonary migratory infiltrates (PMI) are observed in a few diseases. We report here a case of PMI attributed to Mycoplasma pneumonia (Mp) infection. The patient's past medical history was characterized by fleeting and/or relapses of patchy opacification or infiltrates of parenchyma throughout the whole lung field except for left lower lobe radiographically. Serological assays revealed an elevation of IgG antibody specific to Mp and its fourfold increase in convalescent serum. Histopathological findings showed polypoid plugs of fibroblastic tissue filling and obliterating small air ways and interstitial infiltrates of mononuclear inflammatory cells in the vicinal alveolar septa. The patient was treated with azithromycin which resulted in a dramatic improvement clinically and imageologically. In spite of the increasing incidence of Mp, the possible unusual imaging manifestation and underlying mechanism haven't attracted enough attention. To our knowledge, there are rare reports of such cases. PMID:27293865

  2. Pulmonary nocardiosis caused by Nocardia exalbida complicating Pneumocystis pneumonia in an HIV-infected patient.

    PubMed

    Imai, Kentaro; Koibuchi, Tomohiko; Kikuchi, Tadashi; Koga, Michiko; Nakamura, Hitomi; Miura, Toshiyuki; Gonoi, Tohru; Yazawa, Katsukiyo; Iwamoto, Aikichi; Fujii, Takeshi

    2011-08-01

    A 47-year-old man with optimally controlled type-2 diabetes mellitus and chronic hepatitis B was admitted to a local hospital because of a 1-week history of cough and high-grade fever. He was diagnosed with Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) and Klebsiella pneumonia from a chest radiograph and sputum. Simultaneously, he was found to have HIV infection with a CD4 count of 76/μl. Despite alteration of treatment secondary to the development of allergic reaction to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX), the patient was able to complete a 3-week therapy for PCP after being switched to pentamidine isetionate. After the treatment of PCP, he was referred to our hospital for the initiation of anti-HIV therapy. He presented with recurrent high-grade fever of a few days' duration prior to his initial visit, which subsequently led to his admission. Chest computed tomography (CT) showed the enlargement of a previously identified infiltrate in the left upper lung field, and the sputum culture upon admission was positive for Gram-positive branching rods; the organism was later identified as Nocardia exalbida. Due to his allergy to sulfonamide, the patient was treated with imipenem (IMP) and amikacin (AMK) given intravenously for 17 days, followed by garenoxacin (GRNX) taken orally for 6 months, without any adverse effects. The chest infiltrate resolved completely, and he remains stable without relapse 8 months after the completion of the therapy. Pulmonary nocardiosis should be considered as a differential diagnosis of recurring pneumonia in immunocompromised patients, especially in HIV-infected individuals. Oral administration of GRNX following IMP and AMK can be used as an alternative to TMP-SMX therapy in cases of pulmonary nocardiosis caused by N. exalbida. PMID:21249414

  3. Pseudomonas aeruginosa pyocyanin activates NRF2-ARE-mediated transcriptional response via the ROS-EGFR-PI3K-AKT/MEK-ERK MAP kinase signaling in pulmonary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ying; Duan, Chaohui; Kuang, Zhizhou; Hao, Yonghua; Jeffries, Jayme L; Lau, Gee W

    2013-01-01

    The redox-active pyocyanin (PCN) secreted by the respiratory pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) and causes oxidative stress to pulmonary epithelial cells. Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (NRF2) confers protection against ROS-mediated cell death by inducing the expression of detoxifying enzymes and proteins via its binding to the cis-acting antioxidant response element (ARE). However, a clear relationship between NRF2 and PCN-mediated oxidative stress has not been established experimentally. In this study, we investigated the induction of NRF2-ARE response by PCN in the pulmonary epithelial cells. We analyzed the effect of PCN on NRF2 expression and nuclear translocation in cultured human airway epithelial cells, and in a mouse model of chronic PCN exposure. NRF2-dependent transcription of antioxidative enzymes was also assessed. Furthermore, we used inhibitors to examine the involvement of EGFR and its downstream signaling components that mediate NRF2-ARE-activation in response to PCN. PCN enhances the nuclear NRF2 accumulation and activates the transcription of ARE-mediated antioxidant genes. Furthermore, PCN activates NRF2 by inducing the EGFR-phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) signaling pathway and its main downstream effectors, AKT and MEK1/2-ERK1/2 MAP kinases. Inhibition of the EGFR-PI3K signaling markedly attenuates PCN-stimulated NRF2 accumulation in the nucleus. We demonstrate for the first time that PCN-mediated oxidative stress activates the EGFR-PI3K-AKT/MEK1/2-ERK1/2 MAP kinase signaling pathway, leading to nuclear NRF2 translocation and ARE responsiveness in pulmonary epithelial cells.

  4. A Pseudomonas aeruginosa toxin that hijacks the host ubiquitin proteolytic system.

    PubMed

    Bomberger, Jennifer M; Ye, Siying; Maceachran, Daniel P; Koeppen, Katja; Barnaby, Roxanna L; O'Toole, George A; Stanton, Bruce A

    2011-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) is an opportunistic pathogen chronically infecting the lungs of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), pneumonia, cystic fibrosis (CF), and bronchiectasis. Cif (PA2934), a bacterial toxin secreted in outer membrane vesicles (OMV) by P. aeruginosa, reduces CFTR-mediated chloride secretion by human airway epithelial cells, a key driving force for mucociliary clearance. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanism whereby Cif reduces CFTR-mediated chloride secretion. Cif redirected endocytosed CFTR from recycling endosomes to lysosomes by stabilizing an inhibitory effect of G3BP1 on the deubiquitinating enzyme (DUB), USP10, thereby reducing USP10-mediated deubiquitination of CFTR and increasing the degradation of CFTR in lysosomes. This is the first example of a bacterial toxin that regulates the activity of a host DUB. These data suggest that the ability of P. aeruginosa to chronically infect the lungs of patients with COPD, pneumonia, CF, and bronchiectasis is due in part to the secretion of OMV containing Cif, which inhibits CFTR-mediated chloride secretion and thereby reduces the mucociliary clearance of pathogens.

  5. IgA and/or IgG subclass deficiency in children with recurrent respiratory infections and its relationship with chronic pulmonary damage.

    PubMed

    Ozkan, H; Atlihan, F; Genel, F; Targan, S; Gunvar, T

    2005-01-01

    Most patients with IgA and/or IgG subclass deficiency are asymptomatic but some may suffer from frequent mainly respiratory infections. The aim of our study was to determine the frequency of IgA and/or IgG subclass deficiencies and the rate of chronic pulmonary damage secondary to recurrent pulmonary infections in these children. Serum IgA and IgG subclass levels were measured in 225 children aged 6 months to 6 years with recurrent sinopulmonary infections (44 with recurrent upper respiratory tract infections, 100 with recurrent pulmonary infections and 81 with recurrent bronchiolitis). In order to determine chronic pulmonary damage due to recurrent infections in patients with recurrent pulmonary infections CT scans of thorax were also obtained. The overall frequency of antibody defects was found to be 19.1%. IgA deficiency was observed in 9.3%, IgG subclass deficiency in 8.4% and IgA + IgG subclass deficiency in 1.4%. The prevalance of IgA and/or IgG subclass deficiency was 25% in patients with recurrent upper respiratory tract infections, 22% in patients with recurrent pulmonary infections and 12.3% in patients with recurrent bronchiolitis (p>0.05). Chronic pulmonary damage in lungs was determined radiologically in 17 of 100 cases with recurrent pulmonary infection. In IgG subclass deficiencies sequel changes, although not statistically significant, were observed five times more frequently than that of IgA deficiencies. CT scans revealed pulmonary sequels in 5 of the 22 (22.7%) patients with recurrent pulmonary infections and immunodeficiency (bronchiectasis in 2 patients with IgG3 deficiency, fibrotic changes in one with IgA deficiency and in one with IgG3 deficiency, bronchiolitis obliterans in one with IgG2 + IgG3 deficiency). On the other hand, pulmonary sequels were observed in 12 patients (15.4%) with normal immunoglobulin levels. Eight of them were bronchiolitis obliterans, 2 of them were atelectasia and 1 of them was bronchiectasia. We therefore suggest

  6. Detection of blaSPM-1, blaKPC, blaTEM and blaCTX-M genes in isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter spp. and Klebsiella spp. from cancer patients with healthcare-associated infections.

    PubMed

    Jácome, Paula Regina Luna de Araújo; Alves, Lílian Rodrigues; Jácome-Júnior, Agenor Tavares; Silva, Maria Jesuíta Bezerra da; Lima, Jailton Lobo da Costa; Araújo, Paulo Sérgio Ramos; Lopes, Ana Catarina S; Maciel, Maria Amélia Vieira

    2016-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter spp. and Klebsiella spp. are three of the pathogens most frequently involved in infections of cancer patients, and the production of β -lactamases is a major mechanism of resistance due to its wide diversity of existing enzymes. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the microbiological profile and data related to patients and infections, and to search for β -lactamase genes in bacterial isolates from hospitalized cancer patients in a hospital in Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil. A total of 169 isolates were recovered between 2012 and 2014, of which 58 were P. aeruginosa, 36 were Acinetobacter spp. and 75 were Klebsiella spp. A high percentage of carbapenem resistance was observed in P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. Among the carbapenem-resistant bacteria, the blaSPM-1 gene was detected in P. aeruginosa (35.5 %) and Acinetobacter spp. (3.8 %), while blaKPC was detected in P. aeruginosa (25.8 %) only. Among the third- and fourth-generation cephalosporin-resistant strains, in Klebsiella spp. we detected the genes blaTEM (30.6 %), blaCTX-M (58.3 %) and blaKPC (5.6 %), and in Acinetobacter spp. only blaTEM (25.9 %). This the first report of an Acinetobacter baumannii blaSPM-1 gene carrier that has been isolated in Brazil. The most frequent cancer types were bowel tumour [14.8 %; 95 % confidence interval (CI95 %) 9.8-21.1 %], breast cancer (13.6 %; CI95 % 8.8-19.7 %) and prostate cancer (11.2%; CI95 % 6.9-17.0 %). These results therefore provide knowledge of susceptibility profile and resistance mechanisms and thus can contribute to the strategic formulation of hospital infection control plans and the rational use of antimicrobials, reducing mortality from infection levels in cancer patients. PMID:27217349

  7. Morphological Pulmonary Diffusion Capacity for Oxygen of Burmese Pythons (Python molurus): a Comparison of Animals in Healthy Condition and with Different Pulmonary Infections.

    PubMed

    Starck, J M; Weimer, I; Aupperle, H; Müller, K; Marschang, R E; Kiefer, I; Pees, M

    2015-11-01

    A qualitative and quantitative morphological study of the pulmonary exchange capacity of healthy and diseased Burmese pythons (Python molurus) was carried out in order to test the hypothesis that the high morphological excess capacity for oxygen exchange in the lungs of these snakes is one of the reasons why pathological processes extend throughout the lung parenchyma and impair major parts of the lungs before clinical signs of respiratory disease become apparent. Twenty-four Burmese pythons (12 healthy and 12 diseased) were included in the study. A stereology-based approach was used to quantify the lung parenchyma using computed tomography. Light microscopy was used to quantify tissue compartments and the respiratory exchange surface, and transmission electron microscopy was used to measure the thickness of the diffusion barrier. The morphological diffusion capacity for oxygen of the lungs and the anatomical diffusion factor were calculated. The calculated anatomical diffusion capacity was compared with published values for oxygen consumption of healthy snakes, and the degree to which the exchange capacity can be obstructed before normal physiological function is impaired was estimated. Heterogeneous pulmonary infections result in graded morphological transformations of pulmonary parenchyma involving lymphocyte migration into the connective tissue and thickening of the septal connective tissue, increasing thickness of the diffusion barrier and increasing transformation of the pulmonary epithelium into a columnar pseudostratified or stratified epithelium. The transformed epithelium developed by hyperplasia of ciliated cells arising from the tip of the faveolar septa and by hyperplasia of type II pneumocytes. These results support the idea that the lungs have a remarkable overcapacity for oxygen consumption and that the development of pulmonary disease continuously reduces the capacity for oxygen consumption. However, due to the overcapacity of the lungs, this

  8. Anti-inflammatory effects of indirubin derivatives on influenza A virus-infected human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kwok, Hoi-Hin; Poon, Po-Ying; Fok, Siu-Ping; Ying-Kit Yue, Patrick; Mak, Nai-Ki; Chan, Michael Chi-Wai; Peiris, Joseph Sriyal Malik; Wong, Ricky Ngok-Shun

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) poses global threats to human health. Acute respiratory distress syndrome and multi-organ dysfunction are major complications in patients with severe influenza infection. This may be explained by the recent studies which highlighted the role of the pulmonary endothelium as the center of innate immune cells recruitment and excessive pro-inflammatory cytokines production. In this report, we examined the potential immunomodulatory effects of two indirubin derivatives, indirubin-3'-(2,3-dihydroxypropyl)-oximether (E804) and indirubin-3'-oxime (E231), on IAV (H9N2) infected-human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HPMECs). Infection of H9N2 on HPMECs induced a high level of chemokines and cytokines production including IP-10, RANTES, IL-6, IFN-β and IFN-γ1. Post-treatment of E804 or E231 could significantly suppress the production of these cytokines. H9N2 infection rapidly triggered the activation of innate immunity through phosphorylation of signaling molecules including mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) proteins. Using specific inhibitors or small-interfering RNA, we confirmed that indirubin derivatives can suppress H9N2-induced cytokines production through MAPKs and STAT3 signaling pathways. These results underscore the immunomodulatory effects of indirubin derivatives on pulmonary endothelium and its therapeutic potential on IAV-infection. PMID:26732368

  9. Anti-inflammatory effects of indirubin derivatives on influenza A virus-infected human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Kwok, Hoi-Hin; Poon, Po-Ying; Fok, Siu-Ping; Ying-Kit Yue, Patrick; Mak, Nai-Ki; Chan, Michael Chi-Wai; Peiris, Joseph Sriyal Malik; Wong, Ricky Ngok-Shun

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) poses global threats to human health. Acute respiratory distress syndrome and multi-organ dysfunction are major complications in patients with severe influenza infection. This may be explained by the recent studies which highlighted the role of the pulmonary endothelium as the center of innate immune cells recruitment and excessive pro-inflammatory cytokines production. In this report, we examined the potential immunomodulatory effects of two indirubin derivatives, indirubin-3′-(2,3-dihydroxypropyl)-oximether (E804) and indirubin-3′-oxime (E231), on IAV (H9N2) infected-human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HPMECs). Infection of H9N2 on HPMECs induced a high level of chemokines and cytokines production including IP-10, RANTES, IL-6, IFN-β and IFN-γ1. Post-treatment of E804 or E231 could significantly suppress the production of these cytokines. H9N2 infection rapidly triggered the activation of innate immunity through phosphorylation of signaling molecules including mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) proteins. Using specific inhibitors or small-interfering RNA, we confirmed that indirubin derivatives can suppress H9N2-induced cytokines production through MAPKs and STAT3 signaling pathways. These results underscore the immunomodulatory effects of indirubin derivatives on pulmonary endothelium and its therapeutic potential on IAV-infection. PMID:26732368

  10. Infective endocarditis and septic pulmonary embolism following scorpion sting envenoming in an 11-year-old child.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Vellasamy; Krishnamurthy, Sriram; Mahadevan, Subramanian; Bethou, Adhisivam; Deepak Barathi, S

    2014-05-01

    Scorpion sting is one of the common paediatric toxicological problems encountered in southern India. This rural emergency often results in an autonomic storm causing peripheral circulatory failure and/or congestive cardiac failure, leading to pulmonary oedema. A rare case of scorpion sting envenoming in an 11-year-old boy that led to local cellulitis, dyspnoea and congestive heart failure is presented. This was followed by a persistent high-grade fever which lasted for more than 2 weeks and was complicated by fatal Staphylococcus aureus infective endocarditis and septic pulmonary embolism. Although infective endocarditis has been reported occasionally in adults following scorpion sting, this is the first case of infective endocarditis in a native valve in a child following scorpion sting. The literature is reviewed and the mechanisms for this association are discussed.

  11. Pulmonary Actinomyces graevenitzii infection presenting as organizing pneumonia diagnosed by PCR analysis.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Yu; Iikura, Motoyasu; Horio, Yuko; Ohkusu, Kiyofumi; Kobayashi, Nobuyuki

    2012-08-01

    We report what is believed to be the first case of pulmonary Actinomyces graevenitzii infection presenting as organizing pneumonia. Fever and night sweats developed in a 69-year-old male. The only abnormal laboratory data were an elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein level. On chest images, multiple consolidations with air bronchograms were seen in the bilateral lungs. Histological examination from lung biopsy revealed a pattern of organizing pneumonia with microabscesses, but definitive diagnosis was not obtained because culture from lung specimen was negative. A. graevenitzii was eventually identified in the lung biopsy specimen by detection of an Actinomyces-specific PCR product followed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The patient was treated with high-dose ampicillin intravenously for 1 month, followed by oral amoxicillin and clarithromycin for 6 months, and recovered. We suggest that actinomycosis can present as organizing pneumonia, and identification of infection by PCR analysis and rRNA gene sequencing is a useful strategy in cases that are difficult to diagnose.

  12. Invasive pulmonary fungal infections in patients with connective tissue disease: a retrospective study from northern China

    PubMed Central

    Ge, H.F.; Liu, X.Q.; Zhu, Y.Q.; Chen, H.Q.; Chen, G.Z.

    2016-01-01

    Invasive pulmonary fungal infection (IPFI) is a potentially fatal complication in patients with connective tissue disease (CTD). The current study aimed to uncover the clinical characteristics and risk factors of patients with IPFI-CTD. The files of 2186 CTD patients admitted to a single center in northern China between January 2011 and December 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. A total of 47 CTD patients with IPFI were enrolled into this study and assigned to the CTD-IPFI group, while 47 uninfected CTD patients were assigned to the control group. Clinical manifestations were recorded, and risk factors of IPFI were calculated by stepwise logistical regression analysis. Forty-seven (2.15%) CTD patients developed IPFI. Systemic lupus erythematosus patients were responsible for the highest proportion (36.17%) of cases with IPFI. Candida albicans (72.3%) accounted for the most common fungal species. CTD-IPFI patients had significantly elevated white blood cell count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein and fasting glucose values compared to controls (P<0.05). Cough, sputum and blood in phlegm were the most common symptoms. Risk factors of IPFI in CTD included maximum prednisone dose ≥30 mg/day within 3 months prior to infection, anti-microbial drug therapy, and interstitial pneumonia. CTD patients who have underlying interstitial pneumonia, prior prednisone or multiple antibiotics, were more likely to develop IPFI. PMID:27683823

  13. Flow Cytometric Analysis of Protective T-Cell Response Against Pulmonary Coccidioides Infection.

    PubMed

    Hung, Chiung-Yu; Wozniak, Karen L; Cole, Garry T

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of systemic fungal infections has increased throughout the world, spurring much interest in developing effective vaccines. Coccidioidomycosis, also known as San Joaquin Valley fever, is a potentially life-threatening respiratory mycosis. A vaccine against Coccidioides infection would contribute significantly to the well-being of the approx. 30 million residents in the Southwestern USA as well as the multitude of travelers who annually visit the endemic regions. We have applied a live, attenuated vaccine (∆T) to explore the nature of vaccine immunity in mice after intranasal challenge with a potentially lethal dose of Coccidioides spores. Coccidioides spores are airborne and highly infectious for mammalian hosts and classified as a biosafety level 3 agent. T cells are critical in the development of protective immunity against a variety of microorganisms as well as the development of autoimmune disease and allergic responses. Profiles of cytokines detected in lung homogenates of ∆T-vaccinated mice were indicative of a mixed Th1, Th2, and Th17 immune response. We have developed an intracellular cytokine staining and flow cytometric (ICS) technique to measure activated CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and IFN-γ-, IL-4-, IL-5-, and IL-17A-producing T cells in the lungs of mice that are challenged with a potentially lethal dose of Coccidioides spores. The numbers of pulmonary Th1 and Th17 cells during the first 2 weeks post-challenge showed a progressive increase in vaccinated mice and corresponded with reduction of fungal burden. In this protocol, we describe the methodology for culture and isolation of the live, attenuated ΔT spores of Coccidioides used to vaccinate mice, preparation of pulmonary cells, and staining protocol for cell surface markers and intracellular cytokines. This is the most reliable and robust procedure to measure frequencies and numbers of each selected T-cell subsets in lungs of vaccinated versus control mice and can be readily

  14. Links between Anr and Quorum Sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, John H.; Dolben, Emily F.; Smith, T. Jarrod; Bhuju, Sabin

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the transcription factor Anr controls the cellular response to low oxygen or anoxia. Anr activity is high in oxygen-limited environments, including biofilms and populations associated with chronic infections, and Anr is necessary for persistence in a model of pulmonary infection. In this study, we characterized the Anr regulon in biofilm-grown cells at 1% oxygen in the laboratory strain PAO1 and in a quorum sensing (QS)-deficient clinical isolate, J215. As expected, transcripts related to denitrification, arginine fermentation, high-affinity cytochrome oxidases, and CupA fimbriae were lower in the Δanr derivatives. In addition, we observed that transcripts associated with quorum sensing regulation, iron acquisition and storage, type VI secretion, and the catabolism of aromatic compounds were also differentially expressed in the Δanr strains. Prior reports have shown that quorum sensing-defective mutants have higher levels of denitrification, and we found that multiple Anr-regulated processes, including denitrification, were strongly inversely proportional to quorum sensing in both transcriptional and protein-based assays. We also found that in LasR-defective strains but not their LasR-intact counterparts, Anr regulated the production of the 4-hydroxy-2-alkylquinolines, which play roles in quorum sensing and interspecies interactions. These data show that Anr was required for the expression of important metabolic pathways in low-oxygen biofilms, and they reveal an expanded and compensatory role for Anr in the regulation of virulence-related genes in quorum sensing mutants, such as those commonly isolated from infections. IMPORTANCE Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes acute ocular, soft tissue, and pulmonary infections, as well as chronic infections in the airways of cystic fibrosis patients. P. aeruginosa uses quorum sensing (QS) to regulate virulence, but mutations in the gene encoding the master regulator of QS, lasR, are frequently

  15. D-enantiomeric peptides that eradicate wild-type and multi-drug resistant biofilms and protect against lethal Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections

    PubMed Central

    de la Fuente-Núñez, César; Reffuveille, Fany; Mansour, Sarah C.; Reckseidler-Zenteno, Shauna L.; Hernández, Diego; Brackman, Gilles; Coenye, Tom; Hancock, Robert E.W.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY In many infections, bacteria form surface-associated communities known as biofilms that are substantially more resistant to antibiotics than their planktonic counterparts. Based on the design features of active anti-biofilm peptides, we made a series of related 12-amino acid L-, D- and retro-inverso derivatives. Specific D-enantiomeric peptides were the most potent at inhibiting biofilm development and eradicating pre-formed biofilms of seven species of wild-type and multiply antibiotic resistant Gram-negative pathogens. Moreover, these peptides showed strong synergy with conventional antibiotics, reducing the antibiotic concentrations required for complete biofilm inhibition by up to 64-fold. As shown previously for 1018, these D-amino acid peptides targeted the intracellular stringent response signal (p)ppGpp. The most potent peptides DJK-5 and DJK-6 protected invertebrates from lethal P. aeruginosa infections, and were considerably more active than a previously described L-amino acid peptide 1018. Thus, the protease resistant peptides produced here were more effective both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:25699603

  16. Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Severely-malnourished or HIV-infected Children with Pneumonia: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Tahmeed; Pietroni, Mark A.C.; Faruque, Abu S.G.; Ashraf, Hasan; Bardhan, Pradip K.; Hossain, Md. Iqbal; Das, Sumon Kumar; Salam, Mohammed Abdus

    2013-01-01

    Presentation of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) as acute pneumonia in severely-malnourished and HIV-positive children has received very little attention, although this is very important in the management of pneumonia in children living in communities where TB is highly endemic. Our aim was to identify confirmed TB in children with acute pneumonia and HIV infection and/or severe acute malnutrition (SAM) (weight-for-length/height or weight-for-age z score <-3 of the WHO median, or presence of nutritional oedema). We conducted a literature search, using PubMed and Web of Science in April 2013 for the period from January 1974 through April 2013. We included only those studies that reported confirmed TB identified by acid fast bacilli (AFB) through smear microscopy, or by culture-positive specimens from children with acute pneumonia and SAM and/or HIV infection. The specimens were collected either from induced sputum (IS), or gastric lavage (GL), or broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL), or percutaneous lung aspirates (LA). Pneumonia was defined as the radiological evidence of lobar or patchy consolidation and/or clinical evidence of severe/very severe pneumonia according to the WHO criteria of acute respiratory infection. A total of 17 studies met our search criteria but 6 were relevant for our review. Eleven studies were excluded as those did not assess the HIV status of the children or specify the nutritional status of the children with acute pneumonia and TB. We identified only 747 under-five children from the six relevant studies that determined a tubercular aetiology of acute pneumonia in children with SAM and/or positive HIV status. Three studies were reported from South Africa and one each from the Gambia, Ethiopia, and Thailand where 610, 90, 35, and 12 children were enrolled and 64 (10%), 23 (26%), 5 (14%), and 1 (8%) children were identified with active TB respectively, with a total of 93 (12%) children with active TB. Among 610 HIV-infected children in three studies

  17. Pulmonary Arterial Lesions in New World Camelids in Association With Dicrocoelium dendriticum and Fasciola hepatica Infection.

    PubMed

    Hilbe, M; Robert, N; Pospischil, A; Gerspach, C

    2015-11-01

    In Switzerland, dicrocoeliasis is regarded as the most significant parasitic infection of llamas and alpacas. Fasciola hepatica infestation is also a problem but less common. The aim of the present retrospective study was to evaluate the lungs of New World camelids (NWCs) for evidence of arterial hypertension in association with liver changes due to liver fluke infestation. The lungs of 20 llamas and 20 alpacas with liver fluke infestation were histologically evaluated. The hematoxylin and eosin and van Gieson (VG)-elastica stains as well as immunohistology for the expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) were used to visualize the structures of arterial walls. Parasitology of fecal matter (11 llamas and 17 alpacas) confirmed that most of these animals were infested with both Dicrocoelium dendriticum and other gastrointestinal parasites. In most cases (10/12 llamas, 4/6 alpacas), liver enzyme activity in serum was elevated. Histologically, arteries in the lungs of 9 of 20 llamas (45%) and 3 of 20 alpacas (15%) showed severe intimal and adventitial and slight to moderate medial thickening, which was confirmed with α-SMA and VG-elastica staining. All animals exhibited typical liver changes, such as fibrosis and biliary hyperplasia, in association with the presence of liver flukes. This study shows that liver flukes can induce proliferative changes in lung arteries in NWCs that resemble those seen with pulmonary arterial hypertension due to liver parasites in humans. However, the degree of liver fluke infestation was not correlated with the extent of liver damage, or with the amount of thoracic or abdominal effusion or pulmonary arterial changes.

  18. Dendritic Cell-Based Immunization Ameliorates Pulmonary Infection with Highly Virulent Cryptococcus gattii

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, Keigo; Okubo, Yoichiro; Aki, Kyoko; Urai, Makoto; Kaneko, Yukihiro; Shimizu, Kiminori; Wang, Dan-Ni; Okawara, Akiko; Nara, Takuya; Ohkouchi, Kayo; Mizuguchi, Yuki; Kawamoto, Susumu; Kamei, Katsuhiko; Ohno, Hideaki; Niki, Yoshihito; Shibuya, Kazutoshi; Miyazaki, Yoshitsugu

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcosis due to a highly virulent fungus, Cryptococcus gattii, emerged as an infectious disease on Vancouver Island in Canada and surrounding areas in 1999, causing deaths among immunocompetent individuals. Previous studies indicated that C. gattii strain R265 isolated from the Canadian outbreak had immune avoidance or immune suppression capabilities. However, protective immunity against C. gattii has not been identified. In this study, we used a gain-of-function approach to investigate the protective immunity against C. gattii infection using a dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccine. Bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) efficiently engulfed acapsular C. gattii (Δcap60 strain), which resulted in their expression of costimulatory molecules and inflammatory cytokines. This was not observed for BMDCs that were cultured with encapsulated strains. When Δcap60 strain-pulsed BMDCs were transferred to mice prior to intratracheal R265 infection, significant amelioration of pathology, fungal burden, and the survival rate resulted compared with those in controls. Multinucleated giant cells (MGCs) that engulfed fungal cells were significantly increased in the lungs of immunized mice. Interleukin 17A (IL-17A)-, gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α)-producing lymphocytes were significantly increased in the spleens and lungs of immunized mice. The protective effect of this DC vaccine was significantly reduced in IFN-γ knockout mice. These results demonstrated that an increase in cytokine-producing lymphocytes and the development of MGCs that engulfed fungal cells were associated with the protection against pulmonary infection with highly virulent C. gattii and suggested that IFN-γ may have been an important mediator for this vaccine-induced protection. PMID:25644007

  19. Genetic delivery of an anti-RSV antibody to protect against pulmonary infection with RSV.

    PubMed

    Skaricic, Davor; Traube, Chani; De, Bishnu; Joh, Ju; Boyer, Julie; Crystal, Ronald G; Worgall, Stefan

    2008-08-15

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a common cause of severe lower respiratory tract infections. Protection against infection with RSV can be achieved by monthly administration of the humanized monoclonal antibody palivizumab. The present study analyzes if genetic delivery of a murine version of palivizumab by single administration would achieve high-level and sustained antibody expression to protect mice against pulmonary infection with RSV. A murine version of the palivizumab antibody was constructed by replacing the human sequences with sequences from the constant region of a murine IgG1 antibody, while preserving the complementarity-determining region. As a proof-of-principle to test the validity of the strategy, the coding sequence for the heavy and light chains were cloned into a replication-defective serotype 5 human adenovirus vector (AdalphaRSV). Antibody expression and specificity for RSV was confirmed by Western analysis. To determine if AdalphaRSV would mediate production of anti-RSV antibodies in vivo, 5x10(10) particle units of AdalphaRSV or a control vector without transgene (AdNull), were administered intravenously to BALB/c mice. RSV neutralizing antibodies were detected in the serum after 4 days in mice receiving AdalphaRSV but not in AdNull-infected or naive mice (p<0.05). The mice that had received AdalphaRSV had at least 5.4-fold lower RSV titers in the lung 4 days following intranasal challenge with RSV compared to the AdNull or naive group (p<0.01). To evaluate long-term protection, the antibody construct was expressed in a non-human primate serotype rh.10 adeno-associated virus vector (AAVrh.10alphaRSV). RSV neutralizing antibodies were detected in serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid for up to 21 wk following intrapleural administration of AAVrh.10alphaRSV, but not with a control AAV vector expressing an unrelated transgene (AAVrh.10alpha1AT). Following challenge with RSV at 7 or 21 wk, 14.3-fold and 10.6-fold lower RSV titers were

  20. Pulmonary Infection Caused by Gymnascella hyalinospora in a Patient with Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Iwen, Peter C.; Sigler, Lynne; Tarantolo, Stefano; Sutton, Deanna A.; Rinaldi, Michael G.; Lackner, Rudy P.; McCarthy, Dora I.; Hinrichs, Steven H.

    2000-01-01

    We report the first case of invasive pulmonary infection caused by the thermotolerant ascomycetous fungus Gymnascella hyalinospora in a 43-year-old female from the rural midwestern United States. The patient was diagnosed with acute myelogenous leukemia and treated with induction chemotherapy. She was discharged in stable condition with an absolute neutrophil count of 100 cells per μl. Four days after discharge, she presented to the Cancer Clinic with fever and pancytopenia. A solitary pulmonary nodule was found in the right middle lobe which was resected by video-assisted thoracoscopy (VATHS). Histopathological examination revealed septate branching hyphae, suggesting a diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis; however, occasional yeast-like cells were also present. The culture grew a mold that appeared dull white with a slight brownish tint that failed to sporulate on standard media. The mold was found to be positive by the AccuProbe Blastomyces dermatitidis Culture ID Test (Gen-Probe Inc., San Diego, Calif.), but this result appeared to be incompatible with the morphology of the structures in tissue. The patient was removed from consideration for stem cell transplant and was treated for 6 weeks with amphotericin B (AmB), followed by itraconazole (Itr). A VATHS with biopsy performed 6 months later showed no evidence of mold infection. In vitro, the isolate appeared to be susceptible to AmB and resistant to fluconazole and 5-fluorocytosine. Results for Itr could not be obtained for the case isolate due to its failure to grow in polyethylene glycol used to solubilize the drug; however, MICs for a second isolate appeared to be elevated. The case isolate was subsequently identified as G. hyalinospora based on its formation of oblate, smooth-walled ascospores within yellow or yellow-green tufts of aerial hyphae on sporulation media. Repeat testing with the Blastomyces probe demonstrated false-positive results with the case isolate and a reference isolate of G

  1. Pediatric Pulmonary and Cardiovascular Complications of Vertically Transmitted HIV Infection (P2C2)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-13

    Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome; Lung Diseases; Cardiovascular Diseases; Heart Diseases; Heart Failure; HIV Infections; Cytomegalovirus Infections; Pneumocystis Carinii Infections; Ebstein-Barr Virus Infections

  2. Novel Inhaled Combination Powder Containing Amorphous Colistin and Crystalline Rifapentine with Enhanced Antimicrobial Activities against Planktonic Cells and Biofilm of Pseudomonas aeruginosa for Respiratory Infections.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qi Tony; Sun, Si-Ping; Chan, John Gar Yan; Wang, Ping; Barraud, Nicolas; Rice, Scott A; Wang, Jiping; Li, Jian; Chan, Hak-Kim

    2015-08-01

    Colistin has been increasingly used for the treatment of respiratory infections caused by Gram-negative bacteria. Unfortunately parenteral administration of colistin can cause severe adverse effects. This study aimed to develop an inhaled combination dry powder formulation of colistin and rifapentine for the treatment of respiratory infections. The combination formulation was produced by spray-drying rifapentine particles suspended in an aqueous colistin solution. The combination dry powder had enhanced antimicrobial activities against planktonic cells and biofilm cultures of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, with both minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum biofilm inhibitory concentration (MBIC) values (2 and 4 mg/L, respectively) being half that of pure colistin (MIC 4 mg/L and MBIC 8 mg/L) and 1/16th that of pure rifapentine (MIC 32 mg/L and MBIC 64 mg/L). High aerosol performance, as measured via an Aerolizer device, was observed with emitted doses>89% and fine particle fraction (FPF) total>76%. The proportion of submicron particles of rifapentine particles was minimized by the attachment of colistin, which increased the overall particle mass and aerodynamic size distribution. Using the spray-drying method described here, stable particles of amorphous colistin and crystalline rifapentine were distributed homogeneously in each stage of the impinger. Unlike the colistin alone formulation, no deterioration in aerosol performance was found for the combination powder when exposed to a high relative humidity of 75%. In our previous study, surface coating by rifampicin contributed to the moisture protection of colistin. Here, a novel approach with a new mechanism was proposed whereby moisture protection was attributed to the carrier effect of elongated crystalline rifapentine particles, which minimized contact between hygroscopic colistin particles. This inhaled combination antibiotic formulation with enhanced aerosol dispersion efficiency and in vitro efficacy

  3. Molecular identification of Mycobacterium chimaera as a cause of infection in a patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Bills, Nathan D; Hinrichs, Steven H; Aden, Tricia A; Wickert, Robert S; Iwen, Peter C

    2009-03-01

    This report describes a case of Mycobacterium chimaera infection in a patient with a history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease where the organism was identified by using molecular methods. M. chimaera was identified from fresh lung tissue and from an instrument-negative mycobacterial growth indicator tube broth culture. The utility of using sequence analysis of the internal transcribed spacer region for the rapid identification of a slow-growing nontuberculous Mycobacterium spp. where conventional culture methods were not successful was shown.

  4. Ndk, a novel host-responsive regulator, negatively regulates bacterial virulence through quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hua; Xiong, Junzhi; Zhang, Rong; Hu, Xiaomei; Qiu, Jing; Zhang, Di; Xu, Xiaohui; Xin, Rong; He, Xiaomei; Xie, Wei; Sheng, Halei; Chen, Qian; Zhang, Le; Rao, Xiancai; Zhang, Kebin

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria could adjust gene expression to enable their survival in the distinct host environment. However, the mechanism by which bacteria adapt to the host environment is not well described. In this study, we demonstrated that nucleoside diphosphate kinase (Ndk) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is critical for adjusting the bacterial virulence determinants during infection. Ndk expression was down-regulated in the pulmonary alveoli of a mouse model of acute pneumonia. Knockout of ndk up-regulated transcription factor ExsA-mediated T3S regulon expression and decreased exoproduct-related gene expression through the inhibition of the quorum sensing hierarchy. Moreover, in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated that the ndk mutant exhibits enhanced cytotoxicity and host pathogenicity by increasing T3SS proteins. Taken together, our data reveal that ndk is a critical novel host-responsive gene required for coordinating P. aeruginosa virulence upon acute infection. PMID:27345215

  5. Ndk, a novel host-responsive regulator, negatively regulates bacterial virulence through quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hua; Xiong, Junzhi; Zhang, Rong; Hu, Xiaomei; Qiu, Jing; Zhang, Di; Xu, Xiaohui; Xin, Rong; He, Xiaomei; Xie, Wei; Sheng, Halei; Chen, Qian; Zhang, Le; Rao, Xiancai; Zhang, Kebin

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria could adjust gene expression to enable their survival in the distinct host environment. However, the mechanism by which bacteria adapt to the host environment is not well described. In this study, we demonstrated that nucleoside diphosphate kinase (Ndk) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is critical for adjusting the bacterial virulence determinants during infection. Ndk expression was down-regulated in the pulmonary alveoli of a mouse model of acute pneumonia. Knockout of ndk up-regulated transcription factor ExsA-mediated T3S regulon expression and decreased exoproduct-related gene expression through the inhibition of the quorum sensing hierarchy. Moreover, in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated that the ndk mutant exhibits enhanced cytotoxicity and host pathogenicity by increasing T3SS proteins. Taken together, our data reveal that ndk is a critical novel host-responsive gene required for coordinating P. aeruginosa virulence upon acute infection. PMID:27345215

  6. Ozone-enhanced pulmonary infection with Streptococcus zooepidemicus in mice. The role of alveolar macrophage function and capsular virulence factors

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmour, M.I.; Park, P.; Selgrade, M.K. )

    1993-03-01

    Ozone exposure has been shown to increase the susceptibility of mice to pulmonary bacterial infection. We report here the differences in susceptibility of two strains of mice (C3H/HeJ and C57Bl/6) to pulmonary challenge with Streptococcus zooepidemicus, and demonstrate an association between O3 exposure, reduced alveolar macrophage (AM) function, and increased mortality to infection. After a 3-h exposure to air or to 0.4 or 0.8 ppm O3, mice received an infection of bacteria by aerosol. Subsequent mortality observed over a 20-day period for any given exposure concentration was greater in the C3H/HeJ mice than in the C57Bl/6 mice. Phagocytosis assays identified the AM from O3-exposed lungs as having an impaired ability to engulf the bacteria. Baseline phagocytic activity in C3H/HeJ mice was lower than that in C57Bl/6 mice. Microbiologic assessment of the lungs at various times after infection revealed that the streptococci proliferated rapidly in the lungs of O3-exposed mice, grew more quickly upon isolation, and displayed a mucoid colony appearance indicative of increased encapsulation. In vitro assays confirmed that the encapsulated isolates prevented binding of the bacteria to AM, and reinfection of nonexposed mice with the encapsulated isolate resulted in increased mortality compared with infection with similar numbers of the original unencapsulated bacteria. We have demonstrated that O3 inhalation impairs AM activity in the lung. The streptococci are then able to proliferate and more fully express virulence factors, in particular, the antiphagocytic capsule, which prohibits the ingestion of bacteria by pulmonary phagocytes and leads to increased severity of infection.

  7. Attenuation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence by quorum sensing inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Hentzer, Morten; Wu, Hong; Andersen, Jens Bo; Riedel, Kathrin; Rasmussen, Thomas B.; Bagge, Niels; Kumar, Naresh; Schembri, Mark A.; Song, Zhijun; Kristoffersen, Peter; Manefield, Mike; Costerton, John W.; Molin, Søren; Eberl, Leo; Steinberg, Peter; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Høiby, Niels; Givskov, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Traditional treatment of infectious diseases is based on compounds that kill or inhibit growth of bacteria. A major concern with this approach is the frequent development of resistance to antibiotics. The discovery of communication systems (quorum sensing systems) regulating bacterial virulence has afforded a novel opportunity to control infectious bacteria without interfering with growth. Compounds that can override communication signals have been found in the marine environment. Using Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 as an example of an opportunistic human pathogen, we show that a synthetic derivate of natural furanone compounds can act as a potent antagonist of bacterial quorum sensing. We employed GeneChip® microarray technology to identify furanone target genes and to map the quorum sensing regulon. The transcriptome analysis showed that the furanone drug specifically targeted quorum sensing systems and inhibited virulence factor expression. Application of the drug to P.aeruginosa biofilms increased bacterial susceptibility to tobramycin and SDS. In a mouse pulmonary infection model, the drug inhibited quorum sensing of the infecting bacteria and promoted their clearance by the mouse immune response. PMID:12881415

  8. Lipoxin Inhibits Fungal Uptake by Macrophages and Reduces the Severity of Acute Pulmonary Infection Caused by Paracoccidioides brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Laura R R; Loures, Flávio V; de Araújo, Eliseu F; Feriotti, Cláudia; Costa, Tânia A; Serezani, Carlos Henrique; Jancar, Sonia; Calich, Vera L G

    2015-01-01

    Cysteinyl leukotrienes (CysLTs) and lipoxins (LXs) are lipid mediators that control inflammation, with the former inducing and the latter inhibiting this process. Because the role played by these mediators in paracoccidioidomycosis was not investigated, we aimed to characterize the role of CysLT in the pulmonary infection developed by resistant (A/J) and susceptible (B10.A) mice. 48 h after infection, elevated levels of pulmonary LTC4 and LXA4 were produced by both mouse strains, but higher levels were found in the lungs of susceptible mice. Blocking the CysLTs receptor by MTL reduced fungal loads in B10.A, but not in A/J mice. In susceptible mice, MLT treatment led to reduced influx of PMN leukocytes, increased recruitment of monocytes, predominant synthesis of anti-inflammatory cytokines, and augmented expression of 5- and 15-lipoxygenase mRNA, suggesting a prevalent LXA4 activity. In agreement, MTL-treated macrophages showed reduced fungal burdens associated with decreased ingestion of fungal cells. Furthermore, the addition of exogenous LX reduced, and the specific blockade of the LX receptor increased the fungal loads of B10.A macrophages. This study showed for the first time that inhibition of CysLTs signaling results in less severe pulmonary paracoccidioidomycosis that occurs in parallel with elevated LX activity and reduced infection of macrophages.

  9. Lipoxin Inhibits Fungal Uptake by Macrophages and Reduces the Severity of Acute Pulmonary Infection Caused by Paracoccidioides brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Laura R. R.; Loures, Flávio V.; de Araújo, Eliseu F.; Feriotti, Cláudia; Costa, Tânia A.; Serezani, Carlos Henrique; Jancar, Sonia; Calich, Vera L. G.

    2015-01-01

    Cysteinyl leukotrienes (CysLTs) and lipoxins (LXs) are lipid mediators that control inflammation, with the former inducing and the latter inhibiting this process. Because the role played by these mediators in paracoccidioidomycosis was not investigated, we aimed to characterize the role of CysLT in the pulmonary infection developed by resistant (A/J) and susceptible (B10.A) mice. 48 h after infection, elevated levels of pulmonary LTC4 and LXA4 were produced by both mouse strains, but higher levels were found in the lungs of susceptible mice. Blocking the CysLTs receptor by MTL reduced fungal loads in B10.A, but not in A/J mice. In susceptible mice, MLT treatment led to reduced influx of PMN leukocytes, increased recruitment of monocytes, predominant synthesis of anti-inflammatory cytokines, and augmented expression of 5- and 15-lipoxygenase mRNA, suggesting a prevalent LXA4 activity. In agreement, MTL-treated macrophages showed reduced fungal burdens associated with decreased ingestion of fungal cells. Furthermore, the addition of exogenous LX reduced, and the specific blockade of the LX receptor increased the fungal loads of B10.A macrophages. This study showed for the first time that inhibition of CysLTs signaling results in less severe pulmonary paracoccidioidomycosis that occurs in parallel with elevated LX activity and reduced infection of macrophages. PMID:26635449

  10. Pulmonary hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... that damage the lungs, such as scleroderma and rheumatoid arthritis Birth defects of the heart Blood clots in the lung ( pulmonary embolism ) Heart failure Heart valve disease HIV infection Low oxygen levels in the blood ...

  11. Septic Pulmonary Embolism Caused by Infected Pacemaker Leads After Replacement of a Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Device

    PubMed Central

    Said, Salah A.M.; Nijhuis, Rogier; Derks, Anita; Droste, Herman

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 70 Final Diagnosis: Pacemaker leads endocarditis Symptoms: Bacterial lead endocarditis • congestive heart failure • fever • pacemaker dysfunction Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Pacemaker box replacement due to end-of-service Specialty: Cardiology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) has been demonstrated to reduce morbidity and mortality in patients with advanced, drug-refractory heart failure. Procedure-related mortality is less than 1% in larger studies. Approximately10% of CRT patients have to undergo surgical revision because of infections, dislocations, or unacceptable electrical behavior manifested as high threshold, unstable sensing, or unwanted phrenic nerve stimulation. Case Report: A 70-year-old man with symptomatic congestive heart failure underwent implantation of a biventricular pacemaker on the left anterior chest wall in 2003 and pulse generator exchange in August 2009. The patient responded well to CRT. At follow-up, the pacing system functioned normally. In September 2009, in the context of a predialysis program, an abdominal computed tomography (CT) scan was performed in another hospital for assessment and evaluation of chronic kidney disease. This procedure was complicated with peripheral thrombophlebitis that was managed appropriately with complete recovery. Eight months later (May 2010), the patient was admitted to our hospital with fever, anemia, and elevated infection parameters. During admission, blood cultures grew Staphylococcus epidermidis. The chest X-ray, lung perfusion scintigraphy, and CT scan depicted pulmonary embolism and infarction. The right ventricular lead threshold was found to be increased to 7 volts with unsuccessful capture. Echocardiography demonstrated vegetations on leads. The entire pacing system was explanted, but the patient expired few days later following percutaneous removal due to multiorgan failure. Conclusions: In heart failure

  12. Septic Pulmonary Embolism Caused by Infected Pacemaker Leads After Replacement of a Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Device.

    PubMed

    Said, Salah A M; Nijhuis, Rogier; Derks, Anita; Droste, Herman

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) has been demonstrated to reduce morbidity and mortality in patients with advanced, drug-refractory heart failure. Procedure-related mortality is less than 1% in larger studies. Approximately10% of CRT patients have to undergo surgical revision because of infections, dislocations, or unacceptable electrical behavior manifested as high threshold, unstable sensing, or unwanted phrenic nerve stimulation. CASE REPORT A 70-year-old man with symptomatic congestive heart failure underwent implantation of a biventricular pacemaker on the left anterior chest wall in 2003 and pulse generator exchange in August 2009. The patient responded well to CRT. At follow-up, the pacing system functioned normally. In September 2009, in the context of a predialysis program, an abdominal computed tomography (CT) scan was performed in another hospital for assessment and evaluation of chronic kidney disease. This procedure was complicated with peripheral thrombophlebitis that was managed appropriately with complete recovery. Eight months later (May 2010), the patient was admitted to our hospital with fever, anemia, and elevated infection parameters. During admission, blood cultures grew Staphylococcus epidermidis. The chest X-ray, lung perfusion scintigraphy, and CT scan depicted pulmonary embolism and infarction. The right ventricular lead threshold was found to be increased to 7 volts with unsuccessful capture. Echocardiography demonstrated vegetations on leads. The entire pacing system was explanted, but the patient expired few days later following percutaneous removal due to multiorgan failure. CONCLUSIONS In heart failure, replacement of the CRT device may be complicated by bacterial endocarditis. As noted from this case report, sudden elevation of the pacing lead threshold should prompt thorough and immediate investigation to unravel its causes, not only the electrical characteristics but also the anatomical features. PMID:27435910

  13. Insights into the mechanisms of protective immunity against Cryptococcus neoformans infection using a mouse model of pulmonary cryptococcosis.

    PubMed

    Wozniak, Karen L; Ravi, Sailatha; Macias, Sandra; Young, Mattie L; Olszewski, Michal A; Steele, Chad; Wormley, Floyd L

    2009-09-03

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an opportunistic fungal pathogen that causes life-threatening pneumonia and meningoencephalitis in immune compromised individuals. Previous studies have shown that immunization of BALB/c mice with an IFN-gamma-producing C. neoformans strain, H99gamma, results in complete protection against a second pulmonary challenge with an otherwise lethal cryptococcal strain. The current study evaluated local anamnestic cell-mediated immune responses against pulmonary cryptococcosis in mice immunized with C. neoformans strain H99gamma compared to mice immunized with heat-killed C. neoformans (HKC.n.). Mice immunized with C. neoformans strain H99gamma had significantly reduced pulmonary fungal burden post-secondary challenge compared to mice immunized with HKC.n. Protection against pulmonary cryptococcosis was associated with increased pulmonary granulomatous formation and leukocyte infiltration followed by a rapid resolution of pulmonary inflammation, which protected the lungs from severe allergic bronchopulmonary mycosis (ABPM)-pathology that developed in the lungs of mice immunized with HKC.n. Pulmonary challenge of interleukin (IL)-4 receptor, IL-12p40, IL-12p35, IFN-gamma, T cell and B cell deficient mice with C. neoformans strain H99gamma demonstrated a requirement for Th1-type T cell-mediated immunity, but not B cell-mediated immunity, for the induction of H99gamma-mediated protective immune responses against pulmonary C. neoformans infection. CD4(+) T cells, CD11c(+) cells, and Gr-1(+) cells were increased in both proportion and absolute number in protected mice. In addition, significantly increased production of Th1-type/pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, and conversely, reduced Th2-type cytokine production was observed in the lungs of protected mice. Interestingly, protection was not associated with increased production of cytokines IFN-gamma or TNF-alpha in lungs of protected mice. In conclusion, immunization with C. neoformans

  14. Acquired resistance to innate immune clearance promotes Klebsiella pneumoniae ST258 pulmonary infection

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Danielle; Peñaloza, Hernán; Wang, Zheng; Wickersham, Matthew; Parker, Dane; Patel, Purvi; Koller, Antonius; Chen, Emily I.; Bueno, Susan M.; Uhlemann, Anne-Catrin; Prince, Alice

    2016-01-01

    Adaptive changes in the genome of a locally predominant clinical isolate of the multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae ST258 (KP35) were identified and help to explain the selection of this strain as a successful pulmonary pathogen. The acquisition of 4 new ortholog groups, including an arginine transporter, enabled KP35 to outcompete related ST258 strains lacking these genes. KP35 infection elicited a monocytic response, dominated by Ly6Chi monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells that lacked phagocytic capabilities, expressed IL-10, arginase, and antiinflammatory surface markers. In comparison with other K. pneumoniae strains, KP35 induced global changes in the phagocytic response identified with proteomics, including evasion of Ca2+ and calpain activation necessary for phagocytic killing, confirmed in functional studies with neutrophils. This comprehensive analysis of an ST258 K. pneumoniae isolate reveals ongoing genetic adaptation to host microenvironments and innate immune clearance mechanisms that complements its repertoire of antimicrobial resistance genes and facilitates persistence in the lung. PMID:27777978

  15. The effect of the weather on pulmonary exacerbations and viral infections among adults with cystic fibrosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flight, W. G.; Bright-Thomas, R. J.; Sarran, C.; Mutton, K. J.; Morris, J.; Webb, A. K.; Jones, A. M.

    2014-01-01

    The effect of changes in the weather on the respiratory health of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) is unclear. We conducted a prospective study to determine the impact of climate and season on the incidence of viral respiratory infections (VRI) and pulmonary exacerbations (PEx) among adults with CF. Between December 2010 and April 2012, 98 adults with CF were followed for 12 months. Polymerase chain reaction assays for nine viruses were performed on sputum, nose and throat swabs every 2 months and additionally at onset of PEx. Hourly temperature and relative humidity measurements were recorded throughout the study. Statistical analysis utilized generalized estimating equation (GEE) models. Pre-specified criteria for VRI and PEx were met at 29 % and 37 % of visits, respectively. Rhinovirus accounted for 72 % of identified viruses. Incidence of rhinovirus peaked in autumn while non-rhinovirus VRI peaked in winter. Rhinovirus was associated with increased mean temperatures (OR 1.07; p = 0.001), while non-rhinovirus VRI was associated with lower mean temperatures (OR 0.87; p < 0.001). PEx occurred frequently throughout the study with no clear seasonal pattern observed. There was no significant association between climate variables and the incidence of either PEx or antibiotic prescription. There is a seasonal pattern to VRI in adults with CF. The incidence of VRI but not PEx is associated with changes in ambient temperature.

  16. Multiple oesophago-respiratory fistulae: sequelae of pulmonary tuberculosis in retroviral infection

    PubMed Central

    Low, Soo Fin; Ngiu, Chai Soon; Hing, Erica Yee; Abu Bakar, Norzailin

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) is a common infectious disease worldwide. However, mediastinal tuberculous lymphadenitis complicated by oesophageal involvement and oesophago-respiratory fistula is now uncommon due to improved anti-tuberculous regimes and better general awareness. The overall incidence of acquired oesophago-respiratory fistula due to infection is low, and therefore, the lesion is not often a frontrunner in differential diagnosis. Still, tuberculous oesophago-respiratory fistulae can potentially occur in patients with retroviral disease, as they tend to have atypical and more virulent manifestations. In this study, we report the case of multiple oesophago-respiratory fistulae in a patient with PTB and retroviral disease, and highlight the computed tomography features of these lesions as an atypical presentation of PTB in retroviral disease. Clinicians should suspect oesophago-respiratory fistulae if patients present with Ono’s sign, and remain particularly vigilant for patients with underlying PTB and retroviral disease, as early diagnosis and treatment could help to reduce mortality. PMID:24347038

  17. The rare case of Alternaria alternata cutaneous and pulmonary infection in a heart transplant recipient treated by azole antifungals.

    PubMed

    Sečníková, Zuzana; Jůzlová, Kateřina; Vojáčková, Naděžda; Kazakov, Dmitry V; Hošková, Lenka; Fialová, Jorga; Džambová, Martina; Hercogová, Jana

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of Alternaria alternata cutaneous and pulmonary infection in a 62-year-old man after heart transplantation treated by azole antifungals. Alternaria spp. belong to a group of opportunistic dematiaceous fungi with worldwide distribution. The cutaneous form of the infection in human is very rare and occurs predominantly among immunosuppressed patients. Therefore, diagnosis is often delayed or not reached at all. Appropriate treatment is not standardized and remains a matter of discussion. According to current studies, the best results are obtained with systemic azole antifungal therapy combined with surgical intervention.

  18. Sequential Treatment of Biofilms with Aztreonam and Tobramycin Is a Novel Strategy for Combating Pseudomonas aeruginosa Chronic Respiratory Infections.

    PubMed

    Rojo-Molinero, Estrella; Macià, María D; Rubio, Rosa; Moyà, Bartolomé; Cabot, Gabriel; López-Causapé, Carla; Pérez, José L; Cantón, Rafael; Oliver, Antonio

    2016-05-01

    Traditional therapeutic strategies to control chronic colonization in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients are based on the use of a single nebulized antibiotic. In this study, we evaluated the therapeutic efficacy and dynamics of antibiotic resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms under sequential therapy with inhaled aztreonam (ATM) and tobramycin (TOB). Laboratory strains PAO1, PAOMS (hypermutable), PAOMA (mucoid), and PAOMSA (mucoid and hypermutable) and two hypermutable CF strains, 146-HSE (Liverpool epidemic strain [LES-1]) and 1089-HSE (ST1089), were used. Biofilms were developed using the flow cell system. Mature biofilms were challenged with peak and 1/10-peak concentrations of ATM (700 mg/liter and 70 mg/liter), TOB (1,000 mg/liter and 100 mg/liter), and their alternations (ATM/TOB/ATM and TOB/ATM/TOB) for 2 (t = 2), 4 (t = 4), and 6 days (t = 6). The numbers of viable cells (CFU) and resistant mutants were determined. Biofilm structural dynamics were monitored by confocal laser scanning microscopy and processed with COMSTAT and IMARIS software programs. TOB monotherapy produced an intense decrease in CFU that was not always correlated with a reduction in biomass and/or a bactericidal effect on biofilms, particularly for the CF strains. The ATM monotherapy bactericidal effect was lower, but effects on biofilm biomass and/or structure, including intense filamentation, were documented. The alternation of TOB and ATM led to an enhancement of the antibiofilm activity against laboratory and CF strains compared to that with the individual regimens, potentiating the bactericidal effect and/or the reduction in biomass, particularly at peak concentrations. Resistant mutants were not documented in any of the regimens at the peak concentrations and only anecdotally at the 1/10-peak concentrations. These results support the clinical evaluation of sequential regimens with inhaled antibiotics in CF, as opposed to the current maintenance treatments with just one

  19. The Accessory Genome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Kung, Vanderlene L.; Ozer, Egon A.; Hauser, Alan R.

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains exhibit significant variability in pathogenicity and ecological flexibility. Such interstrain differences reflect the dynamic nature of the P. aeruginosa genome, which is composed of a relatively invariable “core genome” and a highly variable “accessory genome.” Here we review the major classes of genetic elements comprising the P. aeruginosa accessory genome and highlight emerging themes in the acquisition and functional importance of these elements. Although the precise phenotypes endowed by the majority of the P. aeruginosa accessory genome have yet to be determined, rapid progress is being made, and a clearer understanding of the role of the P. aeruginosa accessory genome in ecology and infection is emerging. PMID:21119020

  20. Detection of Host-Derived Sphingosine by Pseudomonas aeruginosa Is Important for Survival in the Murine Lung

    PubMed Central

    LaBauve, Annette E.; Wargo, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common environmental bacterium that is also a significant opportunistic pathogen, particularly of the human lung. We must understand how P. aeruginosa responds to the lung environment in order to identify the regulatory changes that bacteria use to establish and maintain infections. The P. aeruginosa response to pulmonary surfactant was used as a model to identify transcripts likely induced during lung infection. The most highly induced transcript in pulmonary surfactant, PA5325 (sphA), is regulated by an AraC-family transcription factor, PA5324 (SphR). We found that sphA was specifically induced by sphingosine in an SphR-dependent manner, and also via metabolism of sphingomyelin, ceramide, or sphingoshine-1-phosphate to sphingosine. These sphingolipids not only play a structural role in lipid membranes, but some are also intracellular and intercellular signaling molecules important in normal eukaryotic cell functions as well as orchestrating immune responses. The members of the SphR transcriptome were identified by microarray analyses, and DNA binding assays showed specific interaction of these promoters with SphR, which enabled us to determine the consensus SphR binding site. SphR binding to DNA was modified by sphingosine and we used labeled sphingosine to demonstrate direct binding of sphingosine by SphR. Deletion of sphR resulted in reduced bacterial survival during mouse lung infection. In vitro experiments show that deletion of sphR increases sensitivity to the antimicrobial effects of sphingosine which could, in part, explain the in vivo phenotype. This is the first identification of a sphingosine-responsive transcription factor in bacteria. We predict that SphR transcriptional regulation may be important in response to many sites of infection in eukaryotes and the presence of homologous transcription factors in other pathogens suggests that sphingosine detection is not limited to P. aeruginosa. PMID:24465209

  1. Protection of immunocompromised mice against lethal infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa by active or passive immunization with recombinant P. aeruginosa outer membrane protein F and outer membrane protein I fusion proteins.

    PubMed Central

    von Specht, B U; Knapp, B; Muth, G; Bröker, M; Hungerer, K D; Diehl, K D; Massarrat, K; Seemann, A; Domdey, H

    1995-01-01

    Recombinant outer membrane proteins (Oprs) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were expressed in Escherichia coli as glutathione S-transferase (GST)-linked fusion proteins. GST-linked Oprs F and I (GST-OprF190-350 [GST linked to OprF spanning amino acids 190 to 350] and GST-OprI21-83, respectively) and recombinant hybrid Oprs (GST-OprF190-342-OprI21-83 and GST-OprI21-83-OprF190-350) were isolated and tested for their efficacy as vaccines in immunodeficient mice. GST-OprF-OprI protected the mice against a 975-fold 50% lethal dose of P. aeruginosa. Expression of GST-unfused OprF-OprI failed in E. coli, although this hybrid protein has been expressed without a fusion part in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and used for immunizing rabbits. The immune rabbit sera protected severe combined deficient (SCID) mice against a 1,000-fold 50% lethal dose of P. aeruginosa. Evidence is provided to show that the most C-terminal part of OprF (i.e., amino acids 332 to 350) carries an important protective epitope. Opr-based hybrid proteins may have implications for a clinical vaccine against P. aeruginosa. PMID:7729895

  2. In Pulmonary Paracoccidioidomycosis IL-10 Deficiency Leads to Increased Immunity and Regressive Infection without Enhancing Tissue Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Feriotti, Claudia; Araújo, Eliseu F.; Bassi, Ênio J.; Loures, Flávio V.; Calich, Vera L. G.

    2013-01-01

    Background Cellular immunity is the main defense mechanism in paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), the most important systemic mycosis in Latin America. Th1 immunity and IFN-γ activated macrophages are fundamental to immunoprotection that is antagonized by IL-10, an anti-inflammatory cytokine. Both in human and experimental PCM, several evidences indicate that the suppressive effect of IL-10 causes detrimental effects to infected hosts. Because direct studies have not been performed, this study was aimed to characterize the function of IL-10 in pulmonary PCM. Methodology/Principal Findings Wild type (WT) and IL-10−/− C57BL/6 mice were used to characterize the role of IL-10 in the innate and adaptive immunity against Paracoccidioides brasiliensis (Pb) infection. We verified that Pb-infected peritoneal macrophages from IL-10−/− mice presented higher phagocytic and fungicidal activities than WT macrophages, and these activities were associated with elevated production of IFN-γ, TNF-α, nitric oxide (NO) and MCP-1. For in vivo studies, IL-10−/− and WT mice were i.t. infected with 1×106 Pb yeasts and studied at several post-infection periods. Compared to WT mice, IL-10−/− mice showed increased resistance to P. brasiliensis infection as determined by the progressive control of pulmonary fungal loads and total clearance of fungal cells from dissemination organs. This behavior was accompanied by enhanced delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions, precocious humoral immunity and controlled tissue pathology resulting in increased survival times. In addition, IL-10−/− mice developed precocious T cell immunity mediated by increased numbers of lung infiltrating effector/memory CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. The inflammatory reactions and the production of Th1/Th2/Th17 cytokines were reduced at late phases of infection, paralleling the regressive infection of IL-10−/− mice. Conclusions/Significance Our work demonstrates for the first time that IL-10 plays a detrimental

  3. Iron-Regulated Expression of Alginate Production, Mucoid Phenotype, and Biofilm Formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Wiens, Jacinta R.; Vasil, Adriana I.; Schurr, Michael J.; Vasil, Michael L.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains of non-cystic fibrosis (non-CF) origin do not produce significant amounts of extracellular alginate and are nonmucoid. In CF, such isolates can become mucoid through mutation of one of the genes (mucA, mucB, mucC, or mucD) that produce regulatory factors that sequester AlgU, required for increased expression of alginate genes. Mutation of the muc genes in the nonmucoid PAO1, PA14, PAKS-1, and Ps388 strains led to increased levels of extracellular alginate and an obvious mucoid phenotype, but only under iron-limiting growth conditions (≤5 µM), not under iron-replete conditions (≥10 µM). In contrast, >50% of P. aeruginosa isolates from chronic CF pulmonary infections expressed increased levels of alginate and mucoidy both under iron-limiting and iron-replete conditions (i.e., iron-constitutive phenotype). No single iron regulatory factor (e.g., Fur, PvdS) was associated with this loss of iron-regulated alginate expression and mucoidy in these CF isolates. However, the loss of only pyoverdine production, or its uptake, abrogated the ability of P. aeruginosa to produce a robust biofilm that represents the Psl-type of biofilm. In contrast, we show that mutation of the pyoverdine and pyochelin biosynthesis genes and the pyoverdine receptor (FpvA) lead to iron-constitutive expression of the key alginate biosynthesis gene, algD, and an explicitly mucoid phenotype in both iron-limiting and iron-replete conditions. These data indicate that alginate production and mucoidy, in contrast to other types of biofilms produced by P. aeruginosa, are substantially enhanced under iron limitation. These results also have compelling implications in relation to the use of iron chelators in the treatment of P. aeruginosa CF infections. PMID:24496793

  4. Soluble metals in residual oil fly ash alter innate and adaptive pulmonary immune responses to bacterial infection in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, Jenny R. . E-mail: jur6@cdc.gov; Young, Shih-Houng; Castranova, Vincent; Antonini, James M.

    2007-06-15

    The soluble metals of the pollutant, residual oil fly ash (ROFA), have been shown to alter pulmonary bacterial clearance in rats. The goal of this study was to determine the potential effects on both the innate and adaptive lung immune responses after bacterial infection in rats pre-exposed to the soluble metals in ROFA. Sprague-Dawley rats were intratracheally dosed (i.t.) at day 0 with ROFA (R-Total) (1.0 mg/100 g body weight), the soluble fraction of ROFA (R-Soluble), the soluble sample subject to a chelator (R-Chelex), or phosphate-buffered saline (Saline). On day 3, rats were administered an i.t. dose of 5 x 10{sup 4} Listeria monocytogenes. On days 6, 8, and 10, bacterial pulmonary clearance was monitored and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed on days 3 (pre-infection), 6, 8, and 10. A concentrated first fraction of lavage fluid was retained for analysis of lactate dehydrogenase and albumin to assess lung injury. BAL cell number, phenotype, and production of reactive oxygen (ROS) and nitrogen species (RNS) were assessed, and a variety of cytokines were measured in the BAL fluid. Rats pre-treated with R-Soluble showed elevated lung injury/cytotoxicity and increased cellular influx into the lungs. R-Soluble-treatment also altered ROS, RNS, and cytokine levels, and caused a degree of macrophage and T cell inhibition. These effects of R-Soluble result in increased pulmonary bacterial burden after infection. The results suggest that soluble metals in ROFA increase lung injury and inflammation, and alter both innate and adaptive pulmonary immune responses.

  5. Successful Colistin Treatment of Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infection Using a Rapid Method for Determination of Colistin in Plasma: Usefulness of Therapeutic Drug Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Takehiro; Ishiguro, Nobuhisa; Oku, Kenji; Higuchi, Issei; Nakagawa, Ikuma; Noguchi, Atsushi; Yasuda, Shinsuke; Fukumoto, Tatsuya; Iwasaki, Sumio; Akizawa, Kouji; Furugen, Ayako; Yamaguchi, Hiroaki; Iseki, Ken

    2015-01-01

    A 56-year-old woman with systemic lupus erythematosus had bacteremia due to multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MDRP). She was initially treated with imipenem-cilastatin, tobramycin, and aztreonam; however, MDRP was still detected intermittently in her plasma. Multidrug-susceptibility tests demonstrated that MDRP was susceptible only to colistin. Therefore, in addition to these antibiotics, the administration of intravenous colistin methanesulfonate, a prodrug formula of colistin, was started at a daily dose of 2.5 mg/kg (as colistin base activity). The initial dose setting was based on the patient's renal function (baseline creatinine clearance=32.7 mL/min). After initiating colistin, the patient's C-reactive protein levels gradually decreased. Blood cultures showed no evidence of MDRP on days 8, 14, and 22 after colistin initiation. However, the patient's renal function went from bad to worse owing to septic shock induced by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection. A few days later, the trough plasma levels of colistin were 7.88 mg/L, which appeared to be higher than expected. After decreasing the colistin dose, the patient's renal function gradually improved. On the final day of colistin treatment, the plasma levels decreased to 0.60 mg/L. MDRP could not be detected in blood culture after colistin treatment. Therefore, we successfully treated a case of bloodstream infection due to MDRP by therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) of colistin. It is suggested that the monitoring of blood colistin levels by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry can contribute to safer, more effective antimicrobial therapy of MDRP because TDM facilitates quick decisions on dose adjustments.

  6. Comparison of susceptibility of cystic-fibrosis-related and non-cystic-fibrosis-related Pseudomonas aeruginosa to chlorine-based disinfecting solutions: implications for infection prevention and ward disinfection.

    PubMed

    Moore, John E; Rendall, Jacqueline C

    2014-09-01

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from cystic fibrosis (CF) sputum was shown to be more tolerant to the most commonly used chlorine-based disinfecting agent in the UK, with approximately 7 out of 10 isolates surviving a residual free chlorine (RFC) concentration of 500 p.p.m., when compared with antibiotic-sensitive invasive P. aeruginosa from a non-CF blood culture source, where 8 out of 10 isolates were killed at a RFC concentration of 100 p.p.m. All CF isolates were killed at 1000 p.p.m. chlorine. Additional studies were performed to examine factors that influenced the concentration of RFC from chlorine-based (sodium dichloroisocyanurate) disinfecting agents in contact with CF sputum and their components (bacterial cells, glycocalyx) to assess the reduction of the bactericidal activity of such disinfecting agents. Pseudomonas glycocalyx had a greater inhibitory effect of chlorine deactivation than bacterial cells. Calibration curves demonstrated the relative deactivating capacity on RFC from clinical soils, in the order pus>CF sputum>wound discharge fluid/synovial fluid>ascites fluid>bile, where quantitatively each 1 % (w/v) CF sputum reduced the RFC by 43 p.p.m. Sublethal stressing of P. aeruginosa with chlorine resulted in lowered susceptibility to colistin (P = 0.0326) but not to meropenem, tobramycin or ciprofloxacin. In conclusion, heavy contamination of healthcare fomites with CF sputum containing MDR P. aeruginosa may result in exhaustion of RFC, and this, combined with an increased resistance to chlorine with such strains, may lead to their survival and increased antibiotic resistance in such environments. CF infection prevention strategies in such scenarios should therefore target interventions with increased concentrations of chlorine to ensure the eradication of MDR P. aeruginosa from the CF healthcare environment. PMID:24925907

  7. Comparison of susceptibility of cystic-fibrosis-related and non-cystic-fibrosis-related Pseudomonas aeruginosa to chlorine-based disinfecting solutions: implications for infection prevention and ward disinfection.

    PubMed

    Moore, John E; Rendall, Jacqueline C

    2014-09-01

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from cystic fibrosis (CF) sputum was shown to be more tolerant to the most commonly used chlorine-based disinfecting agent in the UK, with approximately 7 out of 10 isolates surviving a residual free chlorine (RFC) concentration of 500 p.p.m., when compared with antibiotic-sensitive invasive P. aeruginosa from a non-CF blood culture source, where 8 out of 10 isolates were killed at a RFC concentration of 100 p.p.m. All CF isolates were killed at 1000 p.p.m. chlorine. Additional studies were performed to examine factors that influenced the concentration of RFC from chlorine-based (sodium dichloroisocyanurate) disinfecting agents in contact with CF sputum and their components (bacterial cells, glycocalyx) to assess the reduction of the bactericidal activity of such disinfecting agents. Pseudomonas glycocalyx had a greater inhibitory effect of chlorine deactivation than bacterial cells. Calibration curves demonstrated the relative deactivating capacity on RFC from clinical soils, in the order pus>CF sputum>wound discharge fluid/synovial fluid>ascites fluid>bile, where quantitatively each 1 % (w/v) CF sputum reduced the RFC by 43 p.p.m. Sublethal stressing of P. aeruginosa with chlorine resulted in lowered susceptibility to colistin (P = 0.0326) but not to meropenem, tobramycin or ciprofloxacin. In conclusion, heavy contamination of healthcare fomites with CF sputum containing MDR P. aeruginosa may result in exhaustion of RFC, and this, combined with an increased resistance to chlorine with such strains, may lead to their survival and increased antibiotic resistance in such environments. CF infection prevention strategies in such scenarios should therefore target interventions with increased concentrations of chlorine to ensure the eradication of MDR P. aeruginosa from the CF healthcare environment.

  8. [Pulmonary infection caused by Mycobacterium gordonae (M. gordonae) in a healthy middle-aged male].

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, T; Tada, K; Ishii, M

    1992-02-01

    A 51-year-old man was admitted to our hospital in July 1989 because of an abnormality in his chest radiograph. On his yearly health check-up, an abnormality of his chest radiography was first noted in June 1988. At that time, examinations including bronchoscopy were performed but no specific diagnosis was made. On admission, his chest radiograph revealed new infiltrates at the apex of the right lung which were not present in June 1988. Three out of 5 consecutive sputum specimens after admission produced a pure growth of 100 colonies to 1+ of acid-fast bacilli (AFB). This AFB was scotochromogenic, and hydrolysis of Tween 80 at 5 days was positive. It did not reduce nitrate, and niacin test was negative. It was sensitive to ethambutol at a concentration of 5 micrograms/ml, and was not tolerant to 0.2% picric acid. We thus identified this AFB to be M. gordonae. The patient was treated with rifampicin (450 mg/day), isoniazid (400 mg/day), and ethambutol (1000 mg/day) for 9 months. After 2 months of treatment the sputum cultures became negative, and the chest radiograph showed improvement of the infiltrates. M. gordonae is considered to be one of the least pathogenic AFB to man. Most recent reports of M. gordonae infection have been in immunocompromized hosts or patients with a history of pulmonary tuberculosis. The present case is a very rare example of this organism affecting a healthy male, and thus yields new information on the pathogenesis of M. gordonae in man.

  9. Co-endemicity of Pulmonary Tuberculosis and Intestinal Helminth Infection in the People's Republic of China.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin-Xu; Ren, Zhou-Peng; Wang, Li-Xia; Zhang, Hui; Jiang, Shi-Wen; Chen, Jia-Xu; Wang, Jin-Feng; Zhou, Xiao-Nong

    2016-03-01

    Both pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) and intestinal helminth infection (IHI) affect millions of individuals every year in China. However, the national-scale estimation of prevalence predictors and prevalence maps for these diseases, as well as co-endemic relative risk (RR) maps of both diseases' prevalence are not well developed. There are co-endemic, high prevalence areas of both diseases, whose delimitation is essential for devising effective control strategies. Bayesian geostatistical logistic regression models including socio-economic, climatic, geographical and environmental predictors were fitted separately for active PTB and IHI based on data from the national surveys for PTB and major human parasitic diseases that were completed in 2010 and 2004, respectively. Prevalence maps and co-endemic RR maps were constructed for both diseases by means of Bayesian Kriging model and Bayesian shared component model capable of appraising the fraction of variance of spatial RRs shared by both diseases, and those specific for each one, under an assumption that there are unobserved covariates common to both diseases. Our results indicate that gross domestic product (GDP) per capita had a negative association, while rural regions, the arid and polar zones and elevation had positive association with active PTB prevalence; for the IHI prevalence, GDP per capita and distance to water bodies had a negative association, the equatorial and warm zones and the normalized difference vegetation index had a positive association. Moderate to high prevalence of active PTB and low prevalence of IHI were predicted in western regions, low to moderate prevalence of active PTB and low prevalence of IHI were predicted in north-central regions and the southeast coastal regions, and moderate to high prevalence of active PTB and high prevalence of IHI were predicted in the south-western regions. Thus, co-endemic areas of active PTB and IHI were located in the south-western regions of China, which

  10. Mycobacterial Etiology of Pulmonary Tuberculosis and Association with HIV Infection and Multidrug Resistance in Northern Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    El-Kamary, Samer S.; Abimiku, Alash'le; Ezati, Nicholas; Mosunmola, Iwakun; Brown, Clayton; Tracy, Kathleen J.; Obasanya, Joshua; Blattner, William

    2013-01-01

    Objective. Data on pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) complex in Nigeria are limited. We investigated species of MTB complex in TB cases from northern Nigeria. Methods. New TB suspects were enrolled, screened for HIV and their sputum samples were cultured after routine microscopy. Genotypes MTBC and MTBDRplus were used to characterize the MTB complex species and their resistance to isoniazid and rifampicin. Results. Of the 1,603 patients enrolled, 375 (23%) had MTB complex infection: 354 (94.4%) had Mycobacterium tuberculosis; 20 (5.3%) had Mycobacterium africanum; and one had Mycobacterium bovis (0.3%). Cases were more likely to be male (AOR = 1.87, 95% CI : 1.42–2.46; P ≤ 0.001), young (AOR = 2.03, 95% CI : 1.56–2.65; P ≤ 0.001) and have HIV (AOR = 1.43, 95% CI : 1.06–1.92; P = 0.032). In 23 patients (6.1%), the mycobacterium was resistant to at least one drug, and these cases were more likely to have HIV and prior TB treatment (AOR = 3.62, 95% CI : 1.51–8.84; P = 0.004; AOR : 4.43; 95% CI : 1.71–11.45 P = 0.002 resp.), compared to cases without any resistance. Conclusion. Mycobacterium tuberculosis remained the predominant specie in TB in this setting followed by Mycobacterium africanum while Mycobacterium bovis was rare. The association of TB drug resistance with HIV has implications for TB treatment. PMID:23970967

  11. Co-endemicity of Pulmonary Tuberculosis and Intestinal Helminth Infection in the People's Republic of China.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin-Xu; Ren, Zhou-Peng; Wang, Li-Xia; Zhang, Hui; Jiang, Shi-Wen; Chen, Jia-Xu; Wang, Jin-Feng; Zhou, Xiao-Nong

    2016-03-01

    Both pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) and intestinal helminth infection (IHI) affect millions of individuals every year in China. However, the national-scale estimation of prevalence predictors and prevalence maps for these diseases, as well as co-endemic relative risk (RR) maps of both diseases' prevalence are not well developed. There are co-endemic, high prevalence areas of both diseases, whose delimitation is essential for devising effective control strategies. Bayesian geostatistical logistic regression models including socio-economic, climatic, geographical and environmental predictors were fitted separately for active PTB and IHI based on data from the national surveys for PTB and major human parasitic diseases that were completed in 2010 and 2004, respectively. Prevalence maps and co-endemic RR maps were constructed for both diseases by means of Bayesian Kriging model and Bayesian shared component model capable of appraising the fraction of variance of spatial RRs shared by both diseases, and those specific for each one, under an assumption that there are unobserved covariates common to both diseases. Our results indicate that gross domestic product (GDP) per capita had a negative association, while rural regions, the arid and polar zones and elevation had positive association with active PTB prevalence; for the IHI prevalence, GDP per capita and distance to water bodies had a negative association, the equatorial and warm zones and the normalized difference vegetation index had a positive association. Moderate to high prevalence of active PTB and low prevalence of IHI were predicted in western regions, low to moderate prevalence of active PTB and low prevalence of IHI were predicted in north-central regions and the southeast coastal regions, and moderate to high prevalence of active PTB and high prevalence of IHI were predicted in the south-western regions. Thus, co-endemic areas of active PTB and IHI were located in the south-western regions of China, which

  12. Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase 1 Regulates Resistance to Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Marie Mei; Yoon, Bong-June; Osiewicz, Keith; Preston, Michael; Bundy, Brian; van Heeckeren, Anna M.; Werb, Zena; Soloway, Paul D.

    2005-01-01

    Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1)-deficient mice are resistant to Pseudomonas aeruginosa corneal infections. Corneas healed completely in TIMP-1-deficient mice, and infections were cleared faster in TIMP-1-deficient mice than in wild-type littermates. Genetic suppression studies using matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-deficient mice showed that MMP-9, MMP-3, and MMP-7 but not MMP-2 or MMP-12 are needed for resistance. Increased resistance was also seen during pulmonary infections. These results identify a novel pathway regulating infection resistance. PMID:15618213

  13. [Clinical diagnosis of HIV infection in patients with acute surgical diseases of the abdominal cavity organs and pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Nguen, V Kh; Stroganov, P V; Geshelin, S A

    2011-09-01

    The results of treatment of 81 patients, suffering tuberculosis and operated in emergency for an acute surgical diseases of the abdominal cavity organs, are adduced, in 29 of them--nonspecific diseases of nontuberculosis genesis were diagnosed. In 52 patients the indication for emergency operation performance were complications of abdominal tuberculosis (perforation of the tuberculosis ulcers of small intestine--in 37, the tuberculosis mesadenitis--in 15), of them in 34--pulmonary tuberculosis was in inactive phase, that's why the HIV presence was supposed. In 26 patients the diagnosis was confirmed, basing on serologic analysis data. The presence of intraabdominal catastrophe, caused by abdominal tuberculosis complications on inactive pulmonary tuberculosis background witnesses with 85.3% probability the HIV-infectioning of the patient.

  14. Resolution of migratory pulmonary infiltrates by moxifloxacin in a patient with dual infection of Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Bordetella pertussis.

    PubMed

    Kazama, Itsuro; Tamada, Tsutomu; Nakajima, Toshiyuki

    2012-12-01

    A 37-year-old Japanese woman, who was not vaccinated against Bordetella pertussis, developed a nocturnal fever with persistent dry cough for more than 2 weeks. A chest radiograph showed poorly-defined nodular opacities in the left lung. Due to the significant rise in serum antibodies for both Mycoplasma pneumoniae and B. pertussis, a diagnosis of dual infection with the organisms was made. Despite the use of susceptible antibiotics, the patient symptoms did not improve and her chest radiograph showed migratory pulmonary infiltrates. However, a quinolone derivative, moxifloxacin, dramatically improved her symptoms and resolved the pulmonary infiltrates shortly after administration. In this case, due to the lymphocyte-stimulatory nature of M. pneumoniae and B. pertussis, an increased immunological response was likely to be involved in the pathogenesis of pneumonia. The immunomodulatory property of moxifloxacin was thought to repress the increased lymphocyte activity, and thus facilitated complete remission of the disease. PMID:23299070

  15. Comparative Efficacy and Safety of Four Randomized Regimens to Treat Early Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infection in Children with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Treggiari, Miriam M.; Retsch-Bogart, George; Mayer-Hamblett, Nicole; Khan, Umer; Kulich, Michal; Kronmal, Richard; Williams, Judy; Hiatt, Peter; Gibson, Ronald L.; Spencer, Terry; Orenstein, David; Chatfield, Barbara A.; Froh, Deborah K.; Burns, Jane L.; Rosenfeld, Margaret; Ramsey, Bonnie W.

    2014-01-01

    Context While therapy for early Pa acquisition has been shown to be efficacious, the best regimen to achieve airway clearance has not been delineated. Objectives To investigate the efficacy and safety of four anti-pseudomonal treatments in children with cystic fibrosis (CF) with recently acquired Pa. Design, Setting, and Patients In a multicenter trial in the US, 304 children with CF ages 1–12 years within 6 months of Pa detection were randomized to one of four antibiotic regimens for an 18-month period (six 12-week quarters) between December 2004 and June 2009. Participants randomized to cycled therapy received tobramycin inhalation solution (300 mg BID) for 28 days, with oral ciprofloxacin (15–20 mg/kg BID) or oral placebo for 14 days every quarter, while participants randomized to culture-based therapy received the same treatments only during quarters with positive Pa cultures. Main outcome measures The primary endpoints were time to pulmonary exacerbation requiring intravenous antibiotics and proportion of Pa-positive cultures. Results The intention-to-treat analysis included 304 participants. There was no interaction between treatments. There were no statistically significant differences in exacerbation rates between cycled and culture-based groups (hazard ratio [HR], 0.95, 95%CI, 0.54–1.66) or ciprofloxacin and placebo (HR 1.45, 95%CI, 0.82–2.54). The ORs of Pa positive culture comparing cycled vs. culture-based group were 0.78 (95%CI, 0.49–1.23) and OR 1.10; 95%CI, 0.71–1.71) comparing ciprofloxacin vs. placebo. Adverse events were similar across groups. Conclusions No difference in rate of exacerbation or prevalence of Pa positivity was detected between cycled and culture-based therapies. Adding ciprofloxacin produced no benefits. PMID:21893650

  16. Innate and adaptive cellular phenotypes contributing to pulmonary disease in mice after respiratory syncytial virus immunization and infection.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Tae; Kim, Ki-Hye; Hwang, Hye Suk; Lee, Youri; Kwon, Young-Man; Ko, Eun-Ju; Jung, Yu-Jin; Lee, Yu-Na; Kim, Min-Chul; Kang, Sang-Moo

    2015-11-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the major leading cause of infantile viral bronchiolitis. However, cellular phenotypes contributing to the RSV protection and vaccine-enhanced disease remain largely unknown. Upon RSV challenge, we analyzed phenotypes and cellularity in the lung of mice that were naïve, immunized with formalin inactivated RSV (FI-RSV), or re-infected with RSV. In comparison with naïve and live RSV re-infected mice, the high levels of eosinophils, neutrophils, plasmacytoid and CD11b(+) dendritic cells, and IL-4(+) CD4(+) T cells were found to be contributing to pulmonary inflammation in FI-RSV immune mice despite lung viral clearance. Alveolar macrophages appeared to play differential roles in protection and inflammation upon RSV infection of different RSV immune mice. These results suggest that multiple innate and adaptive immune components differentially contribute to RSV disease and inflammation.

  17. Nonopsonic antibodies in cystic fibrosis. Pseudomonas aeruginosa lipopolysaccharide-specific immunoglobulin G antibodies from infected patient sera inhibit neutrophil oxidative responses.

    PubMed Central

    Eichler, I; Joris, L; Hsu, Y P; Van Wye, J; Bram, R; Moss, R

    1989-01-01

    Antibody opsonins from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients were investigated using nonmucoid and mucoid lipopolysaccharide (LPS) immunotype 1 Pseudomonas aeruginosa as bacterial ligands and PMN phagocytes. CF sera were compared to normal sera, polyvalent PA LPS hyperimmune globulin, and isotype switch variant monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific for type 1 PA LPS. Sera from PA-infected CF patients (CF PA+) had elevated levels of PA LPS and alginate IgG antibodies and promoted significantly greater antibody-dependent PMN chemiluminescence responses than sera from uninfected CF patients (CF PA-) or normal human sera (NHS). After adjustment for autologous IgG PA LPS antibody content, however, CF PA+ sera had less antibody-dependent opsonic activity than sera from CF PA- patients (P less than 0.025) or NHS (P less than 0.0025), suggesting qualitative opsonic defects of IgG PA LPS antibodies in CF PA+ sera. Antigen-specific immunoprecipitation of PA LPS antibodies enhanced opsonization by 40% of CF PA+ sera while uniformly reducing that from CF PA- sera (P less than 0.01), indicating LPS-specific nonopsonic antibodies in some CF PA+ sera. Alginate antibodies were not critical opsonins in most uninfected CF patient sera. PA LPS IgG antibodies isolated by immunoaffinity chromatography from NHS, hyperimmune globulin, and CF PA- sources were opsonic and had greater activity at equal antigen-binding concentration than identical antibodies isolated from infected CF patients (P less than 0.01-0.05); the majority of isolates from CF PA+ sera did not promote PMN oxidative responses above nonopsonic baseline. A potential isotypic basis for these findings was supported by differences in PMN responses to PA opsonized with MAbs of identical specificity but differing isotypes. PA LPS-specific IgG antibodies inhibiting PMN oxidative responses in infected patient sera demonstrate antigen-specific immunomodulation of host responses by chronic bacterial parasitism in CF, which may play a role

  18. Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension among HIV-Infected Children: Results of a National Survey and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    L'Huillier, Arnaud Grégoire; Posfay-Barbe, Klara Maria; Pictet, Hiba; Beghetti, Maurice

    2015-01-01

    Since the advent of highly active anti-retroviral therapy, HIV-related mortality has decreased dramatically. As a consequence, patients are living longer, and HIV infection is becoming a chronic disease. Patients and caretakers have to deal with chronic complications of infection and treatment, such as cardiovascular diseases, which now represent an important health issue, even in the pediatric population. Prevalence of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in the adult HIV population is around 0.4-0.6%, which is around 1000- to 2500-fold more prevalent than in the general population. In recent adult PAH registries, HIV has been identified as the fourth cause of PAH, accounting for approximately 6-7% of cases. Therefore, regular screening is recommended in HIV-infected adults by many experts. If HIV-associated PAH is mainly reported in HIV-infected adults, pediatric cases have also been, albeit rarely, described. This scarcity may be due to a very low PAH prevalence, or due to the lack of systematic cardiovascular screening in pediatric patients. As PAH may manifest only years or decades after infection, a systematic screening should perhaps also be recommended to HIV-infected children. In this context, we retrospectively looked for PAH screening in children included in our national Swiss Mother and Child HIV cohort study. A questionnaire was sent to all pediatric infectious disease specialists taking care of HIV-infected children in the cohort. The questions tried to identify symptoms suggestive of cardiovascular risk factors and asked which screening test was performed. In the 71 HIV-infected children for which we obtained an answer, no child was known for PAH. However, only two had been screened for PAH, and the diagnosis was not confirmed. In conclusion, PAH in HIV-infected children is possibly underestimated due to lack of screening. Systematic echocardiographic evaluation should be performed in HIV-infected children.

  19. Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension among HIV-Infected Children: Results of a National Survey and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    L’Huillier, Arnaud Grégoire; Posfay-Barbe, Klara Maria; Pictet, Hiba; Beghetti, Maurice

    2015-01-01

    Since the advent of highly active anti-retroviral therapy, HIV-related mortality has decreased dramatically. As a consequence, patients are living longer, and HIV infection is becoming a chronic disease. Patients and caretakers have to deal with chronic complications of infection and treatment, such as cardiovascular diseases, which now represent an important health issue, even in the pediatric population. Prevalence of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in the adult HIV population is around 0.4–0.6%, which is around 1000- to 2500-fold more prevalent than in the general population. In recent adult PAH registries, HIV has been identified as the fourth cause of PAH, accounting for approximately 6–7% of cases. Therefore, regular screening is recommended in HIV-infected adults by many experts. If HIV-associated PAH is mainly reported in HIV-infected adults, pediatric cases have also been, albeit rarely, described. This scarcity may be due to a very low PAH prevalence, or due to the lack of systematic cardiovascular screening in pediatric patients. As PAH may manifest only years or decades after infection, a systematic screening should perhaps also be recommended to HIV-infected children. In this context, we retrospectively looked for PAH screening in children included in our national Swiss Mother and Child HIV cohort study. A questionnaire was sent to all pediatric infectious disease specialists taking care of HIV-infected children in the cohort. The questions tried to identify symptoms suggestive of cardiovascular risk factors and asked which screening test was performed. In the 71 HIV-infected children for which we obtained an answer, no child was known for PAH. However, only two had been screened for PAH, and the diagnosis was not confirmed. In conclusion, PAH in HIV-infected children is possibly underestimated due to lack of screening. Systematic echocardiographic evaluation should be performed in HIV-infected children. PMID:25905096

  20. Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension among HIV-Infected Children: Results of a National Survey and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    L'Huillier, Arnaud Grégoire; Posfay-Barbe, Klara Maria; Pictet, Hiba; Beghetti, Maurice

    2015-01-01

    Since the advent of highly active anti-retroviral therapy, HIV-related mortality has decreased dramatically. As a consequence, patients are living longer, and HIV infection is becoming a chronic disease. Patients and caretakers have to deal with chronic complications of infection and treatment, such as cardiovascular diseases, which now represent an important health issue, even in the pediatric population. Prevalence of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in the adult HIV population is around 0.4-0.6%, which is around 1000- to 2500-fold more prevalent than in the general population. In recent adult PAH registries, HIV has been identified as the fourth cause of PAH, accounting for approximately 6-7% of cases. Therefore, regular screening is recommended in HIV-infected adults by many experts. If HIV-associated PAH is mainly reported in HIV-infected adults, pediatric cases have also been, albeit rarely, described. This scarcity may be due to a very low PAH prevalence, or due to the lack of systematic cardiovascular screening in pediatric patients. As PAH may manifest only years or decades after infection, a systematic screening should perhaps also be recommended to HIV-infected children. In this context, we retrospectively looked for PAH screening in children included in our national Swiss Mother and Child HIV cohort study. A questionnaire was sent to all pediatric infectious disease specialists taking care of HIV-infected children in the cohort. The questions tried to identify symptoms suggestive of cardiovascular risk factors and asked which screening test was performed. In the 71 HIV-infected children for which we obtained an answer, no child was known for PAH. However, only two had been screened for PAH, and the diagnosis was not confirmed. In conclusion, PAH in HIV-infected children is possibly underestimated due to lack of screening. Systematic echocardiographic evaluation should be performed in HIV-infected children. PMID:25905096

  1. Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS)

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: About CDC.gov . Hantavirus Share Compartir Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS) Severe HPS. Image courtesy D. ... the workers showed evidence of infection or illness. Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS) Topics Transmission Where HPS is ...

  2. Are ciprofloxacin dosage regimens adequate for antimicrobial efficacy and prevention of resistance? Pseudomonas aeruginosa bloodstream infection in elderly patients as a simulation case study.

    PubMed

    Cazaubon, Yoann; Bourguignon, Laurent; Goutelle, Sylvain; Martin, Olivier; Maire, Pascal; Ducher, Michel

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this work was to define the optimal dosage (OD) of ciprofloxacin in order to prevent the emergence of bacterial resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a geriatric population with a bloodstream infection. A thousand pharmacokinetic profiles were simulated with a ciprofloxacin pharmacokinetic model from the literature. Three dosing regimens were tested for five days: once daily (QD), twice daily (BID), and thrice daily (TID). First of all, effective dosages (ED) of ciprofloxacin were defined as those achieving a target AUC24 /MIC ≥ 125. Then, these ED were simulated in order to calculate the percentage of time spent within the mutant selection window (TMSW ) and to select optimal dosage (OD) defined as those achieving TMSW ≤ 20%. Based on the AUC24 /MIC, for low MICs (0.125 μg/mL), all dosing regimens recommended by French guidelines were effective. For intermediate MICs (0.25 and 0.5 μg/mL), simulated doses higher than those recommended were needed to achieve the efficacy target. About prevention of resistance for low MICs, dosages recommended were only effective in patients with creatinine clearance (CLCR ) ≥ 60 mL/min. For intermediate MICs, dosages higher than recommended were needed to achieve the optimality target. This study shows that current ciprofloxacin dosing guidelines have not been optimized to prevent the emergence of bacterial resistance, especially in geriatric patients with mild to severe renal impairment. To achieve both efficacy and prevention of resistance, ciprofloxacin dosages greater than those recommended would be needed. Tolerance of such higher doses needs to be evaluated in clinical studies.

  3. Pulmonary Mycobacterium abscessus Infection in a Patient with Triple A Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Emiralioğlu, Nagehan; Ersöz, Deniz Doğru; Oğuz, Berna; Saribas, Zeynep; Yalçın, Ebru; Özçelik, Uğur; Özsürekçi, Yasemin; Cengiz, Ali Bülent; Kiper, Nural

    2016-08-01

    Gastroesophageal disorders such as achalasia can be associated with pulmonary disorders because of non-tuberculous mycobacteria, frequently masquerading as aspiration pneumonia. The optimal therapeutic regimen and duration of treatment for non-tuberculous mycobacteria lung disease is not well established. Here, we present an 11 year old male patient with Mycobacterium abscessus pulmonary disease and underlying triple A syndrome, who was successfully treated with 2 months of imipenem, amikacin, clarithromycin and continued for long-term antibiotic treatment. PMID:27080471

  4. Susceptibility to Progressive Cryptococcus neoformans Pulmonary Infection Is Regulated by Loci on Mouse Chromosomes 1 and 9

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Scott F.; Lafferty, Erin I.; Flaczyk, Adam; Fujiwara, T. Mary; Homer, Robert; Morgan, Kenneth; Loredo-Osti, J C.

    2012-01-01

    Genetic factors that regulate the pathogenesis of pneumonia caused by the fungus Cryptococcus neoformans are poorly understood. Through a phenotypic strain survey we observed that inbred C3H/HeN mice develop a significantly greater lung fungal burden than mice of the resistant CBA/J strain 4 weeks following intratracheal infection with C. neoformans ATCC 24067. The aim of the present study was to characterize the inflammatory response of C3H/HeN mice following C. neoformans pulmonary infection and to identify genetic loci that regulate host defense. Following cryptococcal infection, C3H/HeN mice demonstrated a Th2 immune response with heightened airway and tissue eosinophilia, goblet cell metaplasia, and significantly higher lung interleukin-5 (IL-5) and IL-13 protein expression relative to CBA/J mice. Conversely, CBA/J mice exhibited greater airway and tissue neutrophilia that was associated with significantly higher pulmonary expression of gamma interferon, CXCL10, and IL-17 proteins than C3H/HeN mice. Using the fungal burden at 4 weeks postinfection as a phenotype, genome-wide quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis among 435 segregating (C3H/HeN × CBA/J)F2 (C3HCBAF2) hybrids identified two significant QTLs on chromosomes 1 (Cnes4) and 9 (Cnes5) that control susceptibility to cryptococcal pneumonia in an additive manner. Susceptible C3H/HeN mice carry a resistance allele at Cnes4 and a susceptibility allele at Cnes5. These studies reveal additional genetic complexity of the host response to C. neoformans that is associated with divergent patterns of pulmonary inflammation. PMID:22988020

  5. Is There any Relationship Between Extra-Pulmonary Manifestations of Mycoplasma Pneumoniae Infection and Atopy/Respiratory Allergy in Children?

    PubMed Central

    Poddighe, Dimitri; Marseglia, Gian Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a common cause of respiratory infections in children, but sometimes extra-pulmonary diseases can be observed. The immunological mechanisms involved in these extra-respiratory complications are unknown. Here, we report a small case series of Mycoplasma-related diseases including 5 children who developed: i) aseptic meningitis; ii) urticarial rash and pericardial effusion; iii) pleural effusion with severe eosinophilia; iv) Stevens-Johnson syndrome; v) multiform erythema. Interestingly, all children were moderately to highly atopic, as a common immunologic feature. PMID:27114818

  6. In vivo short-term exposure to residual oil fly ash impairs pulmonary innate immune response against environmental mycobacterium infection.

    PubMed

    Delfosse, Verónica C; Tasat, Deborah R; Gioffré, Andrea K

    2015-05-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown that pollution derived from industrial and vehicular transportation induces adverse health effects causing broad ambient respiratory diseases. Therefore, air pollution should be taken into account when microbial diseases are evaluated. Environmental mycobacteria (EM) are opportunist pathogens that can affect a variety of immune compromised patients, which impacts significantly on human morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of residual oil fly ash (ROFA) pre-exposure on the pulmonary response after challenge with opportunistic mycobacteria by means of an acute short-term in vivo experimental animal model. We exposed BALB/c mice to ROFA and observed a significant reduction on bacterial clearance at 24 h post infection. To study the basis of this impaired response four groups of animals were instilled with (a) saline solution (Control), (b) ROFA (1 mg kg(-1) BW), (c) ROFA and EM-infected (Mycobacterium phlei, 8 × 10(6) CFU), and (d) EM-infected. Animals were sacrificed 24 h postinfection and biomarkers of lung injury and proinflammatory madiators were examined in the bronchoalveolar lavage. Our results indicate that ROFA was able to produce an acute pulmonary injury characterized by an increase in bronchoalveolar polymorphonuclear (PMN) cells influx and a rise in O2 (-) generation. Exposure to ROFA before M. phlei infection reduced total cell number and caused a significant decline in PMN cells recruitment (p < 0.05), O2 (-) generation, TNFα (p < 0.001), and IL-6 (p < 0.001) levels. Hence, our results suggest that, in this animal model, the acute short-term pre-exposure to ROFA reduces early lung response to EM infection.

  7. Clinical Correlates and Drug Resistance in HIV-Infected and -Uninfected Pulmonary Tuberculosis Patients in South India

    PubMed Central

    Sara, Chandy; Elsa, Heylen; Baijayanti, Mishra; Lennartsdotter, Ekstrand Maria

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To examine demographics, clinical correlates, sputum AFB (acid fast bacilli) smear grading DOTS (Directly Observed Therapy Short Course) uptake, and drug resistance in a cohort of newly-diagnosed, smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) patients with respect to HIV status at baseline, and compare smear conversion rates, side effects and mortality after two months. Design A prospective study among 54 HIV positive and 41 HIV negative pulmonary TB patients. Data were collected via face-to-face interviews, review of medical records, and lab tests. Results HIVTB co-infected patients, though more symptomatic at baseline, showed more improvement in their symptoms compared to HIV-uninfected TB patients at follow-up. The HIV co-infected group had more prevalent perceived side effects, and sputum smear positivity was marginally higher compared to the HIV negative group at follow-up. Mortality was higher among the HIV-infected group. Both groups had high rates of resistance to first-line anti-tubercular drugs, particularly isoniazid. There was no significant difference in the drug resistance patterns between the groups. Conclusions Prompt initiation and provision of daily regimens of ATT (Anti-Tubercular treatment) along with ART (Anti-Retroviral treatment) via ART centers is urgently needed in India. As resistance to ART and/or ATT is directly linked to medication non-adherence, the use of counseling, regular reinforcement, early detection and appropriate intervention strategies to tackle this complex issue could help prevent premature mortality and development of resistance in HIV-TB co-infected patients. The high rate of isoniazid resistance might preclude its use in India as prophylaxis for latent TB in HIV infected persons as per the World Health Organization (WHO) guideline.

  8. Clinical Correlates and Drug Resistance in HIV-Infected and -Uninfected Pulmonary Tuberculosis Patients in South India

    PubMed Central

    Sara, Chandy; Elsa, Heylen; Baijayanti, Mishra; Lennartsdotter, Ekstrand Maria

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To examine demographics, clinical correlates, sputum AFB (acid fast bacilli) smear grading DOTS (Directly Observed Therapy Short Course) uptake, and drug resistance in a cohort of newly-diagnosed, smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) patients with respect to HIV status at baseline, and compare smear conversion rates, side effects and mortality after two months. Design A prospective study among 54 HIV positive and 41 HIV negative pulmonary TB patients. Data were collected via face-to-face interviews, review of medical records, and lab tests. Results HIVTB co-infected patients, though more symptomatic at baseline, showed more improvement in their symptoms compared to HIV-uninfected TB patients at follow-up. The HIV co-infected group had more prevalent perceived side effects, and sputum smear positivity was marginally higher compared to the HIV negative group at follow-up. Mortality was higher among the HIV-infected group. Both groups had high rates of resistance to first-line anti-tubercular drugs, particularly isoniazid. There was no significant difference in the drug resistance patterns between the groups. Conclusions Prompt initiation and provision of daily regimens of ATT (Anti-Tubercular treatment) along with ART (Anti-Retroviral treatment) via ART centers is urgently needed in India. As resistance to ART and/or ATT is directly linked to medication non-adherence, the use of counseling, regular reinforcement, early detection and appropriate intervention strategies to tackle this complex issue could help prevent premature mortality and development of resistance in HIV-TB co-infected patients. The high rate of isoniazid resistance might preclude its use in India as prophylaxis for latent TB in HIV infected persons as per the World Health Organization (WHO) guideline. PMID:27708985

  9. Pulmonary fungal infections in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia: is it the time to revise the radiological diagnostic criteria?

    PubMed

    Maccioni, Francesca; Vetere, Simone; De Felice, Carlo; Al Ansari, Najwa; Micozzi, Alessandra; Gentile, Giuseppe; Foà, Robin; Girmenia, Corrado

    2016-06-01

    The definition of pulmonary fungal infections (PFI) according to the EORTC-MSG criteria may lack diagnostic sensitivity due to the possible presentation of PFI with different radiological pictures. We evaluated the hypothesis to apply less restrictive radiological criteria to define PFI in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) submitted to chemotherapy. Overall, 73 consecutive episodes of pulmonary infiltrates associated to positive serum galactomannan test or fungal isolation or galactomannan detection from respiratory specimens were considered. CT scans acquired at the onset of symptoms (time-0) and within 4 weeks (time-1) were analysed to identify specific (group A) or aspecific radiological signs (group B). Pulmonary infiltrates fulfilled the EORTC-MSG criteria in 49 patients (group A), whereas in 24 patients (group B) they did not reach the criteria due to aspecific CT findings at time-0. Eleven of 21 (52.4%) patients of the group B evaluable for the evolution of the radiological findings fulfilled EORTC-MSG criteria at time-1. All the analysed clinical and mycological characteristics, response to antifungal therapy and survival were comparable in the two groups. Our study seems to confirm the possibility to extend the radiological suspicion of PFI to less restrictive chest CT findings when supported by microbiological criteria in high-risk haematological patients. PMID:26865204

  10. Pulmonary infection caused by Talaromyces purpurogenus in a patient with multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Atalay, Altay; Koc, Ayse Nedret; Akyol, Gulsah; Cakir, Nuri; Kaynar, Leylagul; Ulu-Kilic, Aysegul

    2016-06-01

    A 66-year-old female patient with multiple myeloma (MM) was admitted to the emergency service on 29.09.2014 with an inability to walk, and urinary and faecal incontinence. She had previously undergone autologous bone marrow transplantation (ABMT) twice. The patient was hospitalized at the Department of Haematology. Further investigations showed findings suggestive of a spinal mass at the T5-T6-T7 level, and a mass lesion in the iliac fossa. The mass lesion was resected and needle biopsy was performed during a colonoscopy. Examination of the specimens revealed plasmacytoma. The patient also had chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and was suffering from respiratory distress. After consultation with an infectious diseases specialist the patient was placed on an intravenous antibiotherapy with piperacillin/tazobactam (4.5g x 3) on 17.10.2014. During piperacillin/tazobactam treatment, the patient suffered from drowsiness, her general condition deteriorated, and she had rales on auscultation of the lungs. The patient underwent thoracic computerized tomography (CT) which showed areas of focal consolidation in the lower lobes of the two lungs (more prominent on the left), and increased medullary density. The radiology report suggested that fungal infection could not be ruled out based on the CT images. The sputum sample was sent to the mycology laboratory and direct microscopic examination performed with Gram and Giemsa staining showed the presence of septate hyphae; therefore voriconazole was added to the treatment. Slow growing (at day 10), grey-greenish colonies and red pigment formation were observed in all culture media except cycloheximide-containing Sabouraud dextrose agar (SDA) medium. The isolate was initially considered to be Talaromyces marneffei. However, it was subsequently identified by DNA sequencing analysis as Talaromyces purpurogenus. The patient was discharged at her own wish, as she was willing to continue treatment in her hometown

  11. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Acquisition in Cystic Fibrosis Patients in Context of Otorhinolaryngological Surgery or Dentist Attendance: Case Series and Discussion of Preventive Concepts.

    PubMed

    Mainz, Jochen G; Gerber, Andrea; Lorenz, Michael; Michl, Ruth; Hentschel, Julia; Nader, Anika; Beck, James F; Pletz, Mathias W; Mueller, Andreas H

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. P. aeruginosa is the primary cause for pulmonary destruction and premature death in cystic fibrosis (CF). Therefore, prevention of airway colonization with the pathogen, ubiquitously present in water, is essential. Infection of CF patients with P. aeruginosa after dentist treatment was proven and dental unit waterlines were identified as source, suggesting prophylactic measures. For their almost regular sinonasal involvement, CF patients often require otorhinolaryngological (ORL) attendance. Despite some fields around ORL-procedures with comparable risk for acquisition of P. aeruginosa, such CF cases have not yet been reported. We present four CF patients, who primarily acquired P. aeruginosa around ORL surgery, and one around dentist treatment. Additionally, we discuss risks and preventive strategies for CF patients undergoing ORL-treatment. Perils include contact to pathogen-carriers in waiting rooms, instrumentation, suction, drilling, and flushing fluid, when droplets containing pathogens can be nebulized. Postsurgery mucosal damage and debridement impair sinonasal mucociliary clearance, facilitating pathogen proliferation and infestation. Therefore, sinonasal surgery and dentist treatment of CF patients without chronic P. aeruginosa colonization must be linked to repeated microbiological assessment. Further studies must elaborate whether all CF patients undergoing ORL-surgery require antipseudomonal prophylaxis, including nasal lavages containing antibiotics. Altogether, this underestimated risk requires structured prevention protocols. PMID:25866686

  12. Non-pigmented strain of serratia marcescens: an unusual pathogen causing pulmonary infection in a patient with malignancy.

    PubMed

    Roy, Priyamvada; Ahmed, Nishat Hussain; Grover, R K

    2014-06-01

    Serratia marcescens is a member of the family Enterobacteriaceae. It has emerged in recent years as an opportunistic pathogen of nosocomial infections. Some biotypes of Serratia marcescens produce the non-diffusible red pigment prodigiosin. Though both pigmented and non-pigmented biotypes may be pathogenic for humans, the non-pigmented biotypes are more virulent due to cytotoxin production and presence of plasmids mediating antibiotic resistance. However in India only one study done 31 years back has reported on infections caused by non-pigmented strains of Serratia marcescens. We present a case of a patient with squamous cell carcinoma of the left retromolar trigone, soft palate and buccal mucosa, who developed pulmonary infection with non-pigmented strain of Serratia marcescens. According to the available literature, this is the second report on infection with non-pigmented strain of Serratia marcescens from India. It is imperative to accurately detect the non-pigmented biotypes due to their tendency to cause serious and difficult to treat infections.

  13. Non-Pigmented Strain of Serratia Marcescens: An Unusual Pathogen Causing Pulmonary Infection in A Patient with Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Nishat Hussain; Grover, R.K

    2014-01-01

    Serratia marcescens is a member of the family Enterobacteriaceae. It has emerged in recent years as an opportunistic pathogen of nosocomial infections. Some biotypes of Serratia marcescens produce the non-diffusible red pigment prodigiosin. Though both pigmented and non-pigmented biotypes may be pathogenic for humans, the non-pigmented biotypes are more virulent due to cytotoxin production and presence of plasmids mediating antibiotic resistance. However in India only one study done 31 years back has reported on infections caused by non-pigmented strains of Serratia marcescens. We present a case of a patient with squamous cell carcinoma of the left retromolar trigone, soft palate and buccal mucosa, who developed pulmonary infection with non-pigmented strain of Serratia marcescens. According to the available literature, this is the second report on infection with non-pigmented strain of Serratia marcescens from India. It is imperative to accurately detect the non-pigmented biotypes due to their tendency to cause serious and difficult to treat infections. PMID:25120985

  14. [A CASE OF PULMONARY MYCOBACTERIUM ABSCESSUS INFECTION THAT DEVELOPED DURING IMMUNOSUPPRESSIVE THERAPY FOR MYASTHENIA GRAVIS WITH RECURRENT THYMOMA].

    PubMed

    Matsuse, Hiroto; Oshio, Takeshi; Kishimoto, Kumiko; Nakayama, Haruo

    2016-02-01

    A 58-year-old man developed cough, sputum, and low-grade fever during immunosuppressive treatment with corticosteroids and cyclosporine for myasthenia gravis with recurrent thymoma. Since chest CT revealed diffuse nodular opacities in both lung fields, he was referred to our department. Mycobacterium abscessus was repeatedly cultured from his sputum, and he was diagnosed with pulmonary M. abscessus infection. Although both chest radiological findings and clinical symptoms were mild, he required treatment with immunosuppressive agents and systemic anesthesia for resection of the recurrent thymoma. Based on complications and according to the patient's preference, oral treatment with clarithromycin 600 mg/day, levofloxacin 500 mg/day, and faropenem 600 mg/day was initiated on an outpatient basis. Following these treatments, his chest CT findings and clinical symptoms subsided, and the thymoma was successfully resected. Our experience with the present case suggests a possible treatment strategy for M. abscessus infection in immunocompromised and complicated cases. PMID:27263226

  15. [A CASE OF PULMONARY MYCOBACTERIUM ABSCESSUS INFECTION THAT DEVELOPED DURING IMMUNOSUPPRESSIVE THERAPY FOR MYASTHENIA GRAVIS WITH RECURRENT THYMOMA].

    PubMed

    Matsuse, Hiroto; Oshio, Takeshi; Kishimoto, Kumiko; Nakayama, Haruo

    2016-02-01

    A 58-year-old man developed cough, sputum, and low-grade fever during immunosuppressive treatment with corticosteroids and cyclosporine for myasthenia gravis with recurrent thymoma. Since chest CT revealed diffuse nodular opacities in both lung fields, he was referred to our department. Mycobacterium abscessus was repeatedly cultured from his sputum, and he was diagnosed with pulmonary M. abscessus infection. Although both chest radiological findings and clinical symptoms were mild, he required treatment with immunosuppressive agents and systemic anesthesia for resection of the recurrent thymoma. Based on complications and according to the patient's preference, oral treatment with clarithromycin 600 mg/day, levofloxacin 500 mg/day, and faropenem 600 mg/day was initiated on an outpatient basis. Following these treatments, his chest CT findings and clinical symptoms subsided, and the thymoma was successfully resected. Our experience with the present case suggests a possible treatment strategy for M. abscessus infection in immunocompromised and complicated cases.

  16. NK cells interfere with the generation of resistance against mycoplasma respiratory infection following nasal-pulmonary immunization1

    PubMed Central

    Bodhankar, Sheetal; Woolard, Mathew D.; Sun, Xiangle; Simecka, Jerry W.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the impact of NK cells on the development of protective adaptive immunity in response to nasal-pulmonary immunization against mycoplasma. Depletion of NK cells prior to nasal-pulmonary immunization enhanced resistance to mycoplasma respiratory infection. The effect of NK cells on the generation of protective immunity in lungs was dependent on lymphoid cells, as immunization of either SCID mice or immunocompetent mice depleted of CD4+ T cells did not demonstrate any increased resistance in the presence or absence of NK cells. The presence of NK cells at the time of nasal-pulmonary immunization modulated mycoplasma-specific cytokine responses in lungs and lower respiratory nodes. In particular, NK cells skewed the mycoplasma-specific T cell cytokine responses in the draining lymph nodes to higher IL-4, IL-13 and IL-17 while lowering IFN-γ responses. Adoptive transfer of total lung lymphocytes isolated from immunized mice into naïve mice led to a significant reduction in the mycoplasma numbers in lungs, and the resistance was greater if cells were obtained from immunized mice which were depleted of NK cells. Similar results were obtained if purified B cells, T cells or CD4+ T cells were used. Interestingly, this is the first time that a favorable role of functional CD4+ T cells in mediating protection in mycoplasma respiratory disease was demonstrated. Thus, NK cells can influence the responses of multiple lymphocyte populations capable of mediating resistance to mycoplasma infection. PMID:19625649

  17. Prevalence and incidence of pulmonary hypertension among HIV-infected people in Africa: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bigna, Jean Joel R; Nansseu, Jobert Richie N; Um, Lewis N; Noumegni, Steve Raoul N; Simé, Paule Sandra D; Aminde, Leopold Ndemngue; Koulla-Shiro, Sinata; Noubiap, Jean Jacques N

    2016-01-01

    Objective Patients infected with HIV have a direly increased risk of developing pulmonary hypertension (PH), and of dying from the condition. While Africa carries the greatest burden of HIV infection worldwide, there is unclear data summarising the epidemiology of PH among HIV-infected people in this region. Our objective was to determine the prevalence and incidence of PH among HIV-infected people living across Africa. Design A systematic review and meta-analysis. Participants HIV-infected African people residing in Africa. Outcome Prevalence and incidence of PH diagnosed through echocardiography or right heart catheterisation. Data sources Articles published in PubMed/MEDLINE, EMBASE, African Journals Online and African Index Medicus between 1 January 1980 and 30 June 2016, without any language restriction. Results Overall, 121 studies were screened; 3 were included in this review: 1 from Southern Africa (South Africa), 1 from Eastern Africa (Tanzania) and 1 from Central Africa (Cameroon). These studies included HIV-infected adult patients selected based on presentation with cardiovascular symptoms. No study reported PH incidence or PH incidence/prevalence among children and adolescents. The quality assessment yielded moderate risk of bias. Ages of participants ranged between 18 and 78 years, and the proportion of females varied between 52.3% and 68.8%. The prevalence of PH in the pooled sample of 664 patients was 14% (95% CI 6%–23%). Limitations Only 3 studies were found eligible from 3 regions of the African continent. Conclusions The prevalence of PH among HIV-infected people in Africa seems very high. Further studies are urgently warranted to determine the incidence of HIV-induced PH, which must include all subregions of Africa. Trial registration number Review registration number PROSPERO CRD42016033863. PMID:27554104

  18. Development of potent inhibitors of pyocyanin production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Laura C.; O’Loughlin, Colleen T.; Zhang, Zinan; Siryaporn, Albert; Silpe, Justin E.; Bassler, Bonnie L.; Semmelhack, Martin F.

    2015-01-01

    The development of new approaches for the treatment of antimicrobial-resistant infections is an urgent public health priority. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa pathogen, in particular, is a leading source of infection in hospital settings, with few available treatment options. In the context of an effort to develop antivirulence strategies to combat bacterial infection, we identified a series of highly effective small molecules that inhibit the production of pyocyanin, a redox-active virulence factor produced by P. aeruginosa. Interestingly, these new antagonists appear to suppress P. aeruginosa virulence factor production through a pathway that is independent of LasR and RhlR. PMID:25597392

  19. Severe Leptospira interrogans serovar Icterohaemorrhagiae infection with hepato-renal-pulmonary involvement treated with corticosteroids

    PubMed Central

    Schulze, Marco H; Raschel, Heribert; Langen, Heinz-Jakob; Stich, August; Tappe, Dennis

    2014-01-01

    Key Clinical Message The traditional concept of immediate antibiotic treatment in suspected leptospirosis seems to be especially important for patients up to day 4 of clinical illness. As immune mechanisms probably play a crucial role in advanced leptospirosis with presumed pulmonary hemorrhages, patients might benefit from corticosteroids or other immunosuppressive agents beside antibiotics. PMID:25614810

  20. Pulmonary cavitary Mycobacterium kyorinense (M. kyorinense) infection in an Australian woman.

    PubMed

    Muruganandan, Sanjeevan; Jayaram, Lata; Wong, Jenny Siaw Jin; Guy, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    We describe a patient with pulmonary cavitary pneumonia from whom we serially isolated Mycobacterium kyorinense, an organism not previously reported in Australia, or associated with cavitary disease. We discuss the clinical presentation, the isolation of the organism on several specimens and initial management. M. kyorinense is a recently characterized species, which has previously only been described in Japan and Brazil [1]. PMID:26793450

  1. The Role of Surfactant in Lung Disease and Host Defense against Pulmonary Infections.

    PubMed

    Han, SeungHye; Mallampalli, Rama K

    2015-05-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is essential for life as it lines the alveoli to lower surface tension, thereby preventing atelectasis during breathing. Surfactant is enriched with a relatively unique phospholipid, termed dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, and four surfactant-associated proteins, SP-A, SP-B, SP-C, and SP-D. The hydrophobic proteins, SP-B and SP-C, together with dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, confer surface tension-lowering properties to the material. The more hydrophilic surfactant components, SP-A and SP-D, participate in pulmonary host defense and modify immune responses. Specifically, SP-A and SP-D bind and partake in the clearance of a variety of bacterial, fungal, and viral pathogens and can dampen antigen-induced immune function of effector cells. Emerging data also show immunosuppressive actions of some surfactant-associated lipids, such as phosphatidylglycerol. Conversely, microbial pathogens in preclinical models impair surfactant synthesis and secretion, and microbial proteinases degrade surfactant-associated proteins. Deficiencies of surfactant components are classically observed in the neonatal respiratory distress syndrome, where surfactant replacement therapies have been the mainstay of treatment. However, functional or compositional deficiencies of surfactant are also observed in a variety of acute and chronic lung disorders. Increased surfactant is seen in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, a disorder characterized by a functional deficiency of the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor or development of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor antibodies. Genetic polymorphisms of some surfactant proteins such as SP-C are linked to interstitial pulmonary fibrosis. Here, we briefly review the composition, antimicrobial properties, and relevance of pulmonary surfactant to lung disorders and present its therapeutic implications.

  2. Developing an international Pseudomonas aeruginosa reference panel

    PubMed Central

    De Soyza, Anthony; Hall, Amanda J; Mahenthiralingam, Eshwar; Drevinek, Pavel; Kaca, Wieslaw; Drulis-Kawa, Zuzanna; Stoitsova, Stoyanka R; Toth, Veronika; Coenye, Tom; Zlosnik, James E A; Burns, Jane L; Sá-Correia, Isabel; De Vos, Daniel; Pirnay, Jean-Paul; Kidd, Timothy J; Reid, David; Manos, Jim; Klockgether, Jens; Wiehlmann, Lutz; Tümmler, Burkhard; McClean, Siobhán; Winstanley, Craig

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major opportunistic pathogen in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and causes a wide range of infections among other susceptible populations. Its inherent resistance to many antimicrobials also makes it difficult to treat infections with this pathogen. Recent evidence has highlighted the diversity of this species, yet despite this, the majority of studies on virulence and pathogenesis focus on a small number of strains. There is a pressing need for a P. aeruginosa reference panel to harmonize and coordinate the collective efforts of the P. aeruginosa research community. We have collated a panel of 43 P. aeruginosa strains that reflects the organism's diversity. In addition to the commonly studied clones, this panel includes transmissible strains, sequential CF isolates, strains with specific virulence characteristics, and strains that represent serotype, genotype or geographic diversity. This focussed panel of P. aeruginosa isolates will help accelerate and consolidate the discovery of virulence determinants, improve our understanding of the pathogenesis of infections caused by this pathogen, and provide the community with a valuable resource for the testing of novel therapeutic agents. PMID:24214409

  3. Glycerol metabolism promotes biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Scoffield, Jessica; Silo-Suh, Laura

    2016-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes persistent infections in the airways of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Airway sputum contains various host-derived nutrients that can be utilized by P. aeruginosa, including phosphotidylcholine, a major component of host cell membranes. Phosphotidylcholine can be degraded by P. aeruginosa to glycerol and fatty acids to increase the availability of glycerol in the CF lung. In this study, we explored the role that glycerol metabolism plays in biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa. We report that glycerol metabolism promotes biofilm formation by both a chronic CF isolate (FRD1) and a wound isolate (PAO1) of P. aeruginosa. Moreover, loss of the GlpR regulator, which represses the expression of genes involved in glycerol metabolism, enhances biofilm formation in FRD1 through the upregulation of Pel polysaccharide. Taken together, our results suggest that glycerol metabolism may be a key factor that contributes to P. aeruginosa persistence by promoting biofilm formation.

  4. Glycerol metabolism promotes biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Scoffield, Jessica; Silo-Suh, Laura

    2016-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes persistent infections in the airways of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Airway sputum contains various host-derived nutrients that can be utilized by P. aeruginosa, including phosphotidylcholine, a major component of host cell membranes. Phosphotidylcholine can be degraded by P. aeruginosa to glycerol and fatty acids to increase the availability of glycerol in the CF lung. In this study, we explored the role that glycerol metabolism plays in biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa. We report that glycerol metabolism promotes biofilm formation by both a chronic CF isolate (FRD1) and a wound isolate (PAO1) of P. aeruginosa. Moreover, loss of the GlpR regulator, which represses the expression of genes involved in glycerol metabolism, enhances biofilm formation in FRD1 through the upregulation of Pel polysaccharide. Taken together, our results suggest that glycerol metabolism may be a key factor that contributes to P. aeruginosa persistence by promoting biofilm formation. PMID:27392247

  5. Pneumocystis murina infection and cigarette smoke exposure interact to cause increased organism burden, development of airspace enlargement, and pulmonary inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Paul J; Preston, Angela M; Ling, Tony; Du, Ming; Fields, W Bradley; Curtis, Jeffrey L; Beck, James M

    2008-08-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by the presence of airflow obstruction and lung destruction with airspace enlargement. In addition to cigarette smoking, respiratory pathogens play a role in pathogenesis, but specific organisms are not always identified. Recent reports demonstrate associations between the detection of Pneumocystis jirovecii DNA in lung specimens or respiratory secretions and the presence of emphysema in COPD patients. Additionally, human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals who smoke cigarettes develop early emphysema, but a role for P. jirovecii in pathogenesis remains speculative. We developed a new experimental model using immunocompetent mice to test the interaction of cigarette smoke exposure and environmentally acquired Pneumocystis murina infection in vivo. We hypothesized that cigarette smoke and P. murina would interact to cause increases in total lung capacity, airspace enlargement, and pulmonary inflammation. We found that exposure to cigarette smoke significantly increases the lung organism burden of P. murina. Pulmonary infection with P. murina, combined with cigarette smoke exposure, results in changes in pulmonary function and airspace enlargement characteristic of pulmonary emphysema. P. murina and cigarette smoke exposure interact to cause increased lung inflammatory cell accumulation. These findings establish a novel animal model system to explore the role of Pneumocystis species in the pathogenesis of COPD. PMID:18490462

  6. Tobramycin-Treated Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 Enhances Streptococcus constellatus 7155 Biofilm Formation in a Cystic Fibrosis Model System

    PubMed Central

    Price, Katherine E.; Naimie, Amanda A.; Griffin, Edward F.; Bay, Charles

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a human genetic disorder which results in a lung environment that is highly conducive to chronic microbial infection. Over the past decade, deep-sequencing studies have demonstrated that the CF lung can harbor a highly diverse polymicrobial community. We expanded our existing in vitro model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation on CF-derived airway cells to include this broader set of CF airway colonizers to investigate their contributions to CF lung disease, particularly as they relate to the antibiotic response of the population. Using this system, we identified an interspecies interaction between P. aeruginosa, a bacterium associated with declining lung function and worsening disease, and Streptococcus constellatus, a bacterium correlated with the onset of pulmonary exacerbations in CF patients. The growth rate and cytotoxicity of S. constellatus 7155 and P. aeruginosa PA14 were unchanged when grown together as mixed biofilms in the absence of antibiotics. However, the addition of tobramycin, the frontline maintenance therapy antibiotic for individuals with CF, to a mixed biofilm of S. constellatus 7155 and P. aeruginosa PA14 resulted in enhanced S. constellatus biofilm formation. Through a candidate genetic approach, we showed that P. aeruginosa rhamnolipids were reduced upon tobramycin exposure, allowing for S. constellatus 7155 biofilm enhancement, and monorhamnolipids were sufficient to reduce S. constellatus 7155 biofilm viability in the absence of tobramycin. While the findings presented here are specific to a biofilm of S. constellatus 7155 and P. aeruginosa PA14, they highlight the potential of polymicrobial interactions to impact antibiotic tolerance in unanticipated ways. IMPORTANCE Deep-sequencing studies have demonstrated that the CF lung can harbor a diverse polymicrobial community. By recapitulating the polymicrobial communities observed in the CF lung and identifying mechanisms of interspecies interactions

  7. The cytolytic activity of pulmonary CD8+ lymphocytes, induced by infection with a vaccinia virus recombinant expressing the M2 protein of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), correlates with resistance to RSV infection in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, A B; Connors, M; Firestone, C Y; Morse, H C; Murphy, B R

    1993-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that the pulmonary resistance to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) challenge induced by immunization with a recombinant vaccinia virus expressing the M2 protein of RSV (vac-M2) was significantly greater 9 days after immunization than at 28 days and was mediated predominantly by CD8+ T cells. In this study, we have extended these findings and sought to determine whether the level of CD8+ cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) activity measured in vitro correlates with the resistance to RSV challenge in vivo. Three lines of evidence documented an association between the presence of pulmonary CTL activity and resistance to RSV challenge. First, vac-M2 immunization induced pulmonary CD8+ CTL activity and pulmonary resistance to RSV infection in BALB/c (H-2d) mice, whereas significant levels of pulmonary CTL activity and resistance to RSV infection were not seen in BALB.K (H-2k) or BALB.B (H-2b) mice. Second, pulmonary CD8+ CTL activity was not induced by infection with other vaccinia virus-RSV recombinants that did not induce resistance to RSV challenge. Third, the peak of pulmonary CTL activity correlated with the peak of resistance to RSV replication (day 6), with little resistance being observed 45 days after immunization. An accelerated clearance of virus was not observed when mice were challenged with RSV 45 days after immunization with vac-M2. The results indicate that resistance to RSV induced by immunization with vac-M2 is mainly mediated by primary pulmonary CTLs and that this resistance decreases to very low levels within 2 months following immunization. The implications for inclusion of CTL epitopes into RSV vaccines are discussed in the context of these observations. PMID:8419638

  8. Infections Acquired via Fresh Water: From Lakes to Hot Tubs.

    PubMed

    Ayi, Bertha

    2015-12-01

    This chapter is unique in its focus on infections that are acquired in water. For those who like to swim and spend time in water parks and pools, the exposure to water and therefore the risk of infection is higher. Recreational water illnesses are illnesses related to recreation in water. Of these recreational water illnesses, infections are the most common because water laden with microorganisms or contaminated by human activity gains access to healthy tissue through the skin and body orifices. Infection occurs by inhalation, ingestion, or direct invasion of the respiratory and gastrointestinal tract. Gastrointestinal infections are the most common. This chapter discusses skin and soft tissue infections, ocular infections, urinary tract infections, pulmonary infections, central nervous system infections, and disseminated infections that can occur as people come into contact with natural nonmarine water bodies as well as manmade aquatic environments. Most of these infections are mild but can occasionally be life threatening. There is a focus on the latest methods to treat these infections. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a very common pathogen in water. The chapter discusses P. aeruginosa dermatitis at length and also looks at keratitis and pneumonia caused by this organism. The chapter also discusses the latest treatments for primary amoebic meningoencephalitis, a severe life-threatening illness with a high mortality, caused by Naegleria fowleri. Finally, there is an in-depth discussion of the notorious gastrointestinal illnesses such as norovirus and Cryptosporidium parvum that can affect large numbers of people at a time. PMID:27337285

  9. Fatal pulmonary edema in white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) associated with adenovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Sorden, S D; Woods, L W; Lehmkuhl, H D

    2000-07-01

    Sporadic sudden deaths in adult white-tailed deer occurred from November 1997 through August 1998 on an Iowa game farm. Three of the 4 deer necropsied had severe pulmonary edema, widespread mild lymphocytic vasculitis, and amphophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies in scattered endothelial cells in blood vessels in the lung and abdominal viscera. Immunohistochemistry with bovine adenovirus 5 antisera and transmission electron microscopy demonstrated adenoviral antigen and nucleocapsids, respectively, within endothelial cells. Adenovirus was isolated in cell culture from 1 of the affected deer. The isolate was neutralized by California black-tailed deer adenovirus antiserum. These findings indicate that adenovirus should be considered in the differential diagnosis of both black-tailed and white-tailed deer with pulmonary edema and/or hemorrhagic enteropathy.

  10. Depletion of Neutrophils Promotes the Resolution of Pulmonary Inflammation and Fibrosis in Mice Infected with Paracoccidioides brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    Arango, Julián Camilo

    2016-01-01

    Chronic stages of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) are characterized by granulomatous lesions which promote the development of pulmonary fibrosis leading to the loss of respiratory function in 50% of patients; in addition, it has been observed that neutrophils predominate during these chronic stages of P. brasiliensis infection. The goal of this study was to evaluate the role of the neutrophil during the chronic stages of experimental pulmonary PCM and during the fibrosis development and tissue repair using a monoclonal specific to this phagocytic cell. Male BALB/c mice were inoculated intranasally with 1.5x106 P. brasiliensis yeast cells. A monoclonal antibody specific to neutrophils was administered at 4 weeks post-inoculation followed by doses every 48h during two weeks. Mice were sacrificed at 8 and 12 weeks post-inoculation to assess cellularity, fungal load, cytokine/chemokine levels, histopathological analysis, collagen and expression of genes related to fibrosis development. Depletion of neutrophils was associated with a significant decrease in the number of eosinophils, dendritic cells, B cells, CD4-T cells, MDSCs and Treg cells, fungal load and levels of most of the pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines evaluated, including IL-17, TNF-α and TGF-β1. Recovery of lung architecture was also associated with reduced levels of collagen, high expression of TGF-β3, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-12 and -14, and decreased expression of tissue inhibitor metalloproteinase (TIMP)-2, and MMP-8. Depletion of neutrophils might attenuate lung fibrosis and inflammation through down-regulating TGF-β1, TNF-α, IL-17, MMP-8 and TIMP-2. These results suggest that neutrophil could be considered as a therapeutic target in pulmonary fibrosis induced by P. brasiliensis. PMID:27690127

  11. Prevalence and risk factors of intestinal protozoan and helminth infections among pulmonary tuberculosis patients without HIV infection in a rural county in P. R. China.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin-Xu; Chen, Jia-Xu; Wang, Li-Xia; Tian, Li-Guang; Zhang, Yu-Ping; Dong, Shuang-Pin; Hu, Xue-Guang; Liu, Jian; Wang, Feng-Feng; Wang, Yue; Yin, Xiao-Mei; He, Li-Jun; Yan, Qiu-Ye; Zhang, Hong-Wei; Xu, Bian-Li; Zhou, Xiao-Nong

    2015-09-01

    Although co-infection of tuberculosis (TB) and intestinal parasites, including protozoa and helminths, in humans has been widely studied globally, very little of this phenomenon is known in China. Therefore, a cross-sectional study was conducted in a rural county of China to investigate such co-infections. Patients with pulmonary TB (PTB) undergoing anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis (anti-MTB) treatment were surveyed by questionnaires, and their feces and blood specimens were collected for detection of intestinal protozoa and helminths, routine blood examination and HIV detection. The χ(2) test and multivariate logistic regression model were used to identify risk factors. A total of 369 patients with PTB were included and all of them were HIV negative. Overall, only 7.3% of participants were infected with intestinal protozoa, among which prevalence of Blastocystis hominis, Entamoeba spp. and Trichomonas hominis were 6.0%, 1.1% and 0.3%, respectively; 7.0% were infected with intestinal helminths, among which prevalence of hookworm, Trichuris trichiura, Ascaris lumbricoides and Clonorchis sinensis were 4.3%, 1.9%, 0.5% and 0.3%, respectively; and 0.5% were simultaneously infected with intestinal protozoa and helminths. Among patients with PTB, body mass index (BMI)≤18 (OR=3.30, 95% CI=1.44-7.54) and raised poultry or livestock (e.g., chicken, duck, pig) (OR=3.96, 95% CI=1.32-11.89) were significantly associated with harboring intestinal protozoan infection, while BMI≤18 (OR=3.32, 95% CI=1.39-7.91), anemia (OR=3.40, 95% CI=1.44-8.02) and laboring barefoot in farmlands (OR=4.54, 95% CI=1.88-10.92) were significantly associated with having intestinal helminth infection. Additionally, there was no significant relationship between duration of anti-MTB treatment and infection rates of intestinal parasites including protozoa and helminths. Therefore, preventing malnutrition, avoiding unprotected contact with reservoirs of protozoa, and improving health education for good

  12. Prevalence and risk factors of intestinal protozoan and helminth infections among pulmonary tuberculosis patients without HIV infection in a rural county in P. R. China.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin-Xu; Chen, Jia-Xu; Wang, Li-Xia; Tian, Li-Guang; Zhang, Yu-Ping; Dong, Shuang-Pin; Hu, Xue-Guang; Liu, Jian; Wang, Feng-Feng; Wang, Yue; Yin, Xiao-Mei; He, Li-Jun; Yan, Qiu-Ye; Zhang, Hong-Wei; Xu, Bian-Li; Zhou, Xiao-Nong

    2015-09-01

    Although co-infection of tuberculosis (TB) and intestinal parasites, including protozoa and helminths, in humans has been widely studied globally, very little of this phenomenon is known in China. Therefore, a cross-sectional study was conducted in a rural county of China to investigate such co-infections. Patients with pulmonary TB (PTB) undergoing anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis (anti-MTB) treatment were surveyed by questionnaires, and their feces and blood specimens were collected for detection of intestinal protozoa and helminths, routine blood examination and HIV detection. The χ(2) test and multivariate logistic regression model were used to identify risk factors. A total of 369 patients with PTB were included and all of them were HIV negative. Overall, only 7.3% of participants were infected with intestinal protozoa, among which prevalence of Blastocystis hominis, Entamoeba spp. and Trichomonas hominis were 6.0%, 1.1% and 0.3%, respectively; 7.0% were infected with intestinal helminths, among which prevalence of hookworm, Trichuris trichiura, Ascaris lumbricoides and Clonorchis sinensis were 4.3%, 1.9%, 0.5% and 0.3%, respectively; and 0.5% were simultaneously infected with intestinal protozoa and helminths. Among patients with PTB, body mass index (BMI)≤18 (OR=3.30, 95% CI=1.44-7.54) and raised poultry or livestock (e.g., chicken, duck, pig) (OR=3.96, 95% CI=1.32-11.89) were significantly associated with harboring intestinal protozoan infection, while BMI≤18 (OR=3.32, 95% CI=1.39-7.91), anemia (OR=3.40, 95% CI=1.44-8.02) and laboring barefoot in farmlands (OR=4.54, 95% CI=1.88-10.92) were significantly associated with having intestinal helminth infection. Additionally, there was no significant relationship between duration of anti-MTB treatment and infection rates of intestinal parasites including protozoa and helminths. Therefore, preventing malnutrition, avoiding unprotected contact with reservoirs of protozoa, and improving health education for good

  13. Correlates of Delayed Diagnosis among Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Pulmonary Tuberculosis Suspects in a Rural HIV Clinic, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Boniface, Respicious; Moshabela, Mosa; Zulliger, Rose; Macpherson, Peter; Nyasulu, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Background. Delay in pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) diagnosis is one of the major factors that affect outcome and threatens continued spread of tuberculosis. This study aimed at determining factors associated with delayed PTB diagnosis among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected individuals. Methods. A retrospective observational study was done using clinic records of HIV-infected PTB suspects attending an HIV/AIDS clinic at Tintswalo rural hospital in South Africa (SA) between January 2006 and December 2007. Using routine clinic registers, 480 records were identified. Results. PTB diagnosis delay was found among 77/176 (43.8%) of the patients diagnosed with PTB. The mean delay of PTB diagnosis was 170.6 days; diagnosis delay ranged 1-30 days in 27 (35.1%) patients, 31-180 days in 24 (33.8%) patients; 24 (31.2%) patients remained undiagnosed for ≥180 days. Independent factors associated with delayed diagnosis were: older age >40 years (Odds Ratio (OR) 3.43, 95% CI 1.45-8.08) and virological failure (OR 2.72, 95% CI 1.09-6.74). Conclusion. There is a considerable delayed PTB diagnosis among HIV-infected patients in rural SA. Older patients as well as patients with high viral load are at a higher risk of PTB diagnosis delay. Therefore efforts to reduce PTB diagnosis delay need to emphasised.

  14. Unusual suspects: pulmonary opportunistic infections masquerading as tumor metastasis in a patient with adrenocorticotropic hormone-producing pancreatic neuroendocrine cancer.

    PubMed

    Chowdry, Rajasree P; Bhimani, Chandar; Delgado, Maria A; Lee, Daniel J; Dayamani, Priya; Sica, Gabriel L; Owonikoko, Taofeek K

    2012-11-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (p-NETs) are a rare group of neoplasms but with increasing incidence. The atypical complications that arise in the setting of functional endocrine tumors are underreported and therefore have not received sufficient attention and the necessary mention in the oncology literature. The clinical implications of these complications pose management challenges starting with the difficulty in establishing diagnosis, accurate staging and optimal treatment of the primary process. We present the case of a middle-aged woman diagnosed with adrenocorticotropic hormone-producing carcinoma arising from the pancreas whose case was complicated by excessive uncontrolled hypercortisolism and reactivation of pulmonary opportunistic infections that confounded her management. We believe that this case illustration will be of value to practicing oncologists and other groups of physicians who are called upon to participate in the multidisciplinary treatment of these relatively rare but highly challenging cases. PMID:23118805

  15. Unusual suspects: pulmonary opportunistic infections masquerading as tumor metastasis in a patient with adrenocorticotropic hormone-producing pancreatic neuroendocrine cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chowdry, Rajasree P.; Bhimani, Chandar; Delgado, Maria A.; Lee, Daniel J.; Dayamani, Priya; Sica, Gabriel L.

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (p-NETs) are a rare group of neoplasms but with increasing incidence. The atypical complications that arise in the setting of functional endocrine tumors are underreported and therefore have not received sufficient attention and the necessary mention in the oncology literature. The clinical implications of these complications pose management challenges starting with the difficulty in establishing diagnosis, accurate staging and optimal treatment of the primary process. We present the case of a middle-aged woman diagnosed with adrenocorticotropic hormone-producing carcinoma arising from the pancreas whose case was complicated by excessive uncontrolled hypercortisolism and reactivation of pulmonary opportunistic infections that confounded her management. We believe that this case illustration will be of value to practicing oncologists and other groups of physicians who are called upon to participate in the multidisciplinary treatment of these relatively rare but highly challenging cases. PMID:23118805

  16. [Pulmonary cystic disease may be a rare complication to recurrent respiratory human papilloma virus infection].

    PubMed

    Laurberg, Peter Thaysen; Weinreich, Ulla M Øller

    2014-12-01

    A 19-year-old woman with a history of juvenile laryngeal papillomatosis (JLP), treated since childhood with multiple resections, was admitted with symptoms of pneumonia. A chest X-ray and CAT-scan revealed multiple lung cysts and a bronchoalveolar lavage detected human papilloma virus 11. The patient responded well to antibiotics. A body plethysmography showed small lung volumes and low diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide, but normal volume diffusion capacity divided by alveolar volume. Pulmonary cystic disease should be considered when patients with JLP have symptoms of pneumonia.

  17. Protection against P. aeruginosa with an adenovirus vector containing an OprF epitope in the capsid

    PubMed Central

    Worgall, Stefan; Krause, Anja; Rivara, Michael; Hee, Kyung-Kim; Vintayen, Enrico V.; Hackett, Neil R.; Roelvink, Peter W.; Bruder, Joseph T.; Wickham, Thomas J.; Kovesdi, Imre; Crystal, Ronald G.

    2005-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important opportunistic pathogen that can cause chronic and often life-threatening infections of the respiratory tract, particularly in individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF). Because infections with P. aeruginosa remain the major cause of the high morbidity and mortality of CF, a vaccine against P. aeruginosa would be very useful for preventing this disorder. The outer membrane protein F (OprF) of P. aeruginosa is a promising vaccine candidate and various B cell epitopes within OprF have been identified. Given that adenovirus (Ad) vectors have strong immunogenic potential and can function as adjuvants for genetic vaccines, the present study evaluates the immunogenic and protective properties of a novel replication-deficient Ad vector in which the Ad hexon protein was modified to include a 14–amino acid epitope of P. aeruginosa OprF (Epi8) in loop 1 of the hypervariable region 5 of the hexon (AdZ.Epi8). Immunization of C57BL/6 mice with AdZ.Epi8 resulted in detectable serum anti–P. aeruginosa and anti-OprF humoral responses. These responses were haplotype dependent, with higher serum anti-OprF titers in CBA mice than in BALB/c or C57BL/6 mice. AdZ.Epi8 induced Epi8-specific IFN-γ–positive CD4 and CD8 T cell responses and resulted in protection against a lethal pulmonary challenge with agar-encapsulated P. aeruginosa. Importantly, repeated administration of AdZ.Epi8 resulted in boosting of the anti-OprF humoral and anti-Epi8 cellular response, whereas no boosting effect was present in the response against the transgene β-galactosidase. These observations suggest that Ad vectors expressing pathogen epitopes in their capsid will protect against an extracellular pathogen and will allow boosting of the epitope-specific humoral response with repeated administration, a strategy that should prove useful in developing Ad vectors as vaccines where humoral immunity will be protective. PMID:15841217

  18. Fatal systemic adenoviral infection superimposed on pulmonary mucormycosis in a child with acute leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Yu Mi; Hwang-Bo, Seok; Kim, Seong koo; Han, Seung Beom; Chung, Nack-Gyun; Kang, Jin Han

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Although adenovirus (ADV) infection usually causes self-limiting respiratory disorders in immune competent children; severe and systemic ADV infection in children undergoing chemotherapy for leukemia has been continuously reported. Nevertheless, there has been no consensus on risk factors and treatment strategies for severe ADV infection in children undergoing chemotherapy. Case summary: We report a case of a 15-year-old boy with a fatal systemic ADV infection. He had received reinduction chemotherapy for relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia under continuing antifungal therapy for previously diagnosed fungal pneumonia. He complained of fever and right shoulder pain 4 days after completing the reinduction chemotherapy. In spite of appropriate antibiotic and antifungal therapy, pneumonia was aggravated and gross hematuria was accompanied. A multiplex polymerase chain reaction test for respiratory viruses was positive for ADV in a blood sample, and a urine culture was positive for ADV. He received oral ribavirin, intravenous immunoglobulin, and intravenous cidofovir therapy; however, he eventually died. Relapsed leukemia, concurrent fungal pneumonia, and delayed cidofovir administration were considered the cause of the grave outcome in this patient. Conclusion: ADV may cause severe infections not only in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant recipients, but also in patients undergoing chemotherapy for acute leukemia. The risk factors for severe ADV infection in patients undergoing chemotherapy should be determined in the future studies, and early antiviral therapy should be administered to immune compromised patients with systemic ADV infection. PMID:27749571

  19. Virulence-Dependent Alterations in the Kinetics of Immune Cells during Pulmonary Infection by Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Han, Seung Jung; Kim, HongMin; Kwon, Kee Woong; Kim, So Jeong; Eum, Seok-Yong; Cho, Sang-Nae; Shin, Sung Jae

    2015-01-01

    A better understanding of the kinetics of accumulated immune cells that are involved in pathophysiology during Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection may help to facilitate the development of vaccines and immunological interventions. However, the kinetics of innate and adaptive cells that are associated with pathogenesis during Mtb infection and their relationship to Mtb virulence are not clearly understood. In this study, we used a mouse model to compare the bacterial burden, inflammation and kinetics of immune cells during aerogenic infection in the lung between laboratory-adapted strains (Mtb H37Rv and H37Ra) and Mtb K strain, a hyper-virulent W-Beijing lineage strain. The Mtb K strain multiplied more than 10- and 3.54-fold more rapidly than H37Ra and H37Rv, respectively, during the early stage of infection (at 28 days post-infection) and resulted in exacerbated lung pathology at 56 to 112 days post-infection. Similar numbers of innate immune cells had infiltrated, regardless of the strain, by 14 days post-infection. High, time-dependent frequencies of F4/80-CD11c+CD11b-Siglec-H+PDCA-1+ plasmacytoid DCs and CD11c-CD11b+Gr-1int cells were observed in the lungs of mice that were infected with the Mtb K strain. Regarding adaptive immunity, Th1 and Th17 T cells that express T-bet and RORγt, respectively, significantly increased in the lungs that were infected with the laboratory-adapted strains, and the population of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells was remarkably increased at 112 days post-infection in the lungs of mice that were infected with the K strain. Collectively, our findings indicate that the highly virulent Mtb K strain may trigger the accumulation of pDCs and Gr1intCD11b+ cells with the concomitant down-regulation of the Th1 response and the maintenance of an up-regulated Th2 response without inducing a Th17 response during chronic infection. These results will help to determine which immune system components must be considered for the development

  20. Premedication with Clarithromycin Is Effective against Secondary Bacterial Pneumonia during Influenza Virus Infection in a Pulmonary Emphysema Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Harada, Tatsuhiko; Ishimatsu, Yuji; Hara, Atsuko; Morita, Towako; Nakashima, Shota; Kakugawa, Tomoyuki; Sakamoto, Noriho; Kosai, Kosuke; Izumikawa, Koichi; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Mukae, Hiroshi; Kohno, Shigeru

    2016-09-01

    Secondary bacterial pneumonia (SBP) during influenza increases the severity of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and its associated mortality. Macrolide antibiotics, including clarithromycin (CAM), are potential treatments for a variety of chronic respiratory diseases owing to their pharmacological activities, in addition to antimicrobial action. We examined the efficacy of CAM for the treatment of SBP after influenza infection in COPD. Specifically, we evaluated the effect of CAM in elastase-induced emphysema mice that were inoculated with influenza virus (strain A/PR8/34) and subsequently infected with macrolide-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae CAM was administered to the emphysema mice 4 days prior to influenza virus inoculation. Premedication with CAM improved pathologic responses and bacterial load 2 days after S. pneumoniae inoculation. Survival rates were higher in emphysema mice than control mice. While CAM premedication did not affect viral titers or exert antibacterial activity against S. pneumoniae in the lungs, it enhanced host defense and reduced inflammation, as evidenced by the significant reductions in total cell and neutrophil counts and interferon (IFN)-γ levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung homogenates. These results suggest that CAM protects against SBP during influenza in elastase-induced emphysema mice by reducing IFN-γ production, thus enhancing immunity to SBP, and by decreasing neutrophil infiltration into the lung to prevent injury. Accordingly, CAM may be an effective strategy to prevent secondary bacterial pneumonia in COPD patients in areas in which vaccines are inaccessible or limited.

  1. Premedication with Clarithromycin Is Effective against Secondary Bacterial Pneumonia during Influenza Virus Infection in a Pulmonary Emphysema Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Harada, Tatsuhiko; Ishimatsu, Yuji; Hara, Atsuko; Morita, Towako; Nakashima, Shota; Kakugawa, Tomoyuki; Sakamoto, Noriho; Kosai, Kosuke; Izumikawa, Koichi; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Mukae, Hiroshi; Kohno, Shigeru

    2016-09-01

    Secondary bacterial pneumonia (SBP) during influenza increases the severity of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and its associated mortality. Macrolide antibiotics, including clarithromycin (CAM), are potential treatments for a variety of chronic respiratory diseases owing to their pharmacological activities, in addition to antimicrobial action. We examined the efficacy of CAM for the treatment of SBP after influenza infection in COPD. Specifically, we evaluated the effect of CAM in elastase-induced emphysema mice that were inoculated with influenza virus (strain A/PR8/34) and subsequently infected with macrolide-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae CAM was administered to the emphysema mice 4 days prior to influenza virus inoculation. Premedication with CAM improved pathologic responses and bacterial load 2 days after S. pneumoniae inoculation. Survival rates were higher in emphysema mice than control mice. While CAM premedication did not affect viral titers or exert antibacterial activity against S. pneumoniae in the lungs, it enhanced ho