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Sample records for aeruginosa reca gene

  1. Characterization of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa recA gene: the Les- phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Kokjohn, T.A.; Miller, R.V.

    1988-02-01

    The Les- phenotype (lysogeny establishment deficient) is a pleiotropic effect of the lesB908 mutation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO. lesB908-containing strains are also (i) deficient in general recombination, (ii) sensitive to UV irradiation, and (iii) deficient in UV-stimulated induction of prophages. The P. aeruginosa recA-containing plasmid pKML3001 complemented each of these pleiotropic characteristics of the lesB908 mutation, supporting the hypothesis that lesB908 is an allele of the P. aeruginosa recA gene. The phenotypic effects of the lesB908 mutation may be best explained by the hypothesis that the lesB908 gene product is altered in such a way that it has lost synaptase activity but possesses intrinsic protease activity in the absence of DNA damage. The Les- phenotype is a result of the rapid destruction of newly synthesized phage repressor, resulting in lytic growth of the infecting virus. This hypothesis is consistent with the observations that increasing the number of copies of the phage repressor gene by increasing the multiplicity of infection (i.e., average number of phage genomes per cell) or by introducing the cloned phage repressor gene into a lesB908 mutant will also suppress the Les- phenotype in a phage-specific fashion.

  2. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE 'PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA RECA' ANALOG AND ITS PROTEIN PRODUCT: 'REC-102' IS A MUTANT ALLELE OF THE 'P. AERUGINOSA' PAO 'RECA' GENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cloned was a 2.3 kilobase pair fragment of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO chromosome which is capable of complementing recA mutations of Escherichia coli. The recA-complementing activity was further localized to a 1.5 kilobase pair PvuII-HindIII fragment. The direction of transcr...

  3. Recombinogenic activity of chimeric recA genes (Pseudomonas aeruginosa/Escherichia coli): a search for RecA protein regions responsible for this activity.

    PubMed Central

    Bakhlanova, I V; Ogawa, T; Lanzov, V A

    2001-01-01

    In the background of weak, if any, constitutive SOS function, RecA from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (RecAPa) shows a higher frequency of recombination exchange (FRE) per DNA unit length as compared to RecA from Escherichia coli (RecAEc). To understand the molecular basis for this observation and to determine which regions of the RecAPa polypeptide are responsible for this unusual activity, we analyzed recAX chimeras between the recAEc and recAPa genes. We chose 31 previously described recombination- and repair-proficient recAX hybrids and determined their FRE calculated from linkage frequency data and constitutive SOS function expression as measured by using the lacZ gene under control of an SOS-regulated promoter. Relative to recAEc, the FRE of recAPa was 6.5 times greater; the relative alterations of FRE for recAX genes varied from approximately 0.6 to 9.0. No quantitative correlation between the FRE increase and constitutive SOS function was observed. Single ([L29M] or [I102D]), double ([G136N, V142I]), and multiple substitutions in related pairs of chimeric RecAX proteins significantly altered their relative FRE values. The residue content of three separate regions within the N-terminal and central but not the C-terminal protein domains within the RecA molecule also influenced the FRE values. Critical amino acids in these regions were located close to previously identified sequences that comprise the two surfaces for subunit interactions in the RecA polymer. We suggest that the intensity of the interactions between the subunits is a key factor in determining the FRE promoted by RecA in vivo. PMID:11560883

  4. Autogenous regulation and kinetics of induction of Pseudomonas aeruginosa recA transcription as analyzed with operon fusions

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, J.M.; Ohman, D.E.

    1988-10-01

    A promoterless chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene (cat) was used to construct recA-cat operon fusions to quantitatively examine the transcriptional regulation of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa recA gene in P. aeruginosa PAO. Wild-type P. aeruginosa containing the recA8-cat fusion was treated with methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and showed immediate induction of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) specific activity, whereas a recA::Tn501 mutant of P. aeruginosa containing recA8-cat showed no induction with MMS. This indicated that a functional copy of recA was required for derepression of recA transcription and that P. aeruginosa recA protein was a positive regulatory factor promoting its own expression. Compared with that in the wild type, the uninduced level of CAT in recA8-cat-containing cells was reduced by approximately one-half in the recA::Tn501 mutant, indicating that recA+-dependent spontaneous induction contributes to the uninduced levels of recA expression in P. aeruginosa. MMS (0.012%) caused recA-directed CAT synthesis to increase almost immediately, with maximum CAT activity, fourfold higher than uninduced levels, attained at 60 min postinduction. The kinetics of recA8-cat fusion activity were shown to be directly related to the MMS doses used. Another fusion called recAa1-cat, where cat was located between the two transcriptional terminators of the P. aeruginosa recA gene, also showed dose-dependent induction by MMS, but the CAT activity from recAa1-cat was only one-half of that obtained with recA8-cat under the same conditions. Treatment of recA+ P. aeruginosa containing recA8-cat with UV irradiation produced an immediate effect on recA8-cat transcription and showed little UV dose dependency at doses of 5 J/m2 or greater.

  5. Autogenous regulation and kinetics of induction of Pseudomonas aeruginosa recA transcription as analyzed with operon fusions.

    PubMed Central

    Horn, J M; Ohman, D E

    1988-01-01

    A promoterless chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene (cat) was used to construct recA-cat operon fusions to quantitatively examine the transcriptional regulation of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa recA gene in P. aeruginosa PAO. Wild-type P. aeruginosa containing the recA8-cat fusion was treated with methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and showed immediate induction of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) specific activity, whereas a recA::Tn501 mutant of P. aeruginosa containing recA8-cat showed no induction with MMS. This indicated that a functional copy of recA was required for derepression of recA transcription and that P. aeruginosa recA protein was a positive regulatory factor promoting its own expression. Compared with that in the wild type, the uninduced level of CAT in recA8-cat-containing cells was reduced by approximately one-half in the recA::Tn501 mutant, indicating that recA+-dependent spontaneous induction contributes to the uninduced levels of recA expression in P. aeruginosa. MMS (0.012%) caused recA-directed CAT synthesis to increase almost immediately, with maximum CAT activity, fourfold higher than uninduced levels, attained at 60 min postinduction. The kinetics of recA8-cat fusion activity were shown to be directly related to the MMS doses used. Another fusion called recAa1-cat, where cat was located between the two transcriptional terminators of the P. aeruginosa recA gene, also showed dose-dependent induction by MMS, but the CAT activity from recAa1-cat was only one-half of that obtained with recA8-cat under the same conditions. Treatment of recA+ P. aeruginosa containing recA8-cat with UV irradiation produced an immediate effect on recA8-cat transcription and showed little UV dose dependency at doses of 5 J/m2 or greater. Treatment with 10 J/m2 produced peak levels of recA-directed CAT activity, fivefold higher than background levels, by 60 min postirradiation; CAT activity remained at peak levels during the 120 min of the experiment. In contrast

  6. Cloning of the recA gene of Neisseria gonorrhoeae and construction of gonococcal recA mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Koomey, J M; Falkow, S

    1987-01-01

    Interspecific complementation of an Escherichia coli recA mutant was used to identify recombinant plasmids within a genomic cosmid library derived from Neisseria gonorrhoeae that carry the gonococcal recA gene. These plasmids complement the E. coli recA mutation in both homologous recombination functions and resistance to DNA damaging agents. Subcloning, deletion mapping, and transposon Tn5 mutagenesis were used to localize the gonococcal gene responsible for suppression of the E. coli RecA- phenotype. Defined mutations in and near the cloned gonococcal recA gene were constructed in vitro and concurrently associated with a selectable genetic marker for N. gonorrhoeae and the mutated alleles were then reintroduced into the gonococcal chromosome by transformation-mediated marker rescue. This work resulted in the construction of two isogenic strains of N. gonorrhoeae, one of which expresses a reduced proficiency in homologous recombination activity and DNA repair function while the other displays an absolute deficiency in these capacities. These gonococcal mutants behaved similarly to recA mutants of other procaryotic species and displayed phenotypes consistent with the data obtained by heterospecific complementation in an E. coli recA host. The functional activities of the recA gene products of N. gonorrhoeae and E. coli appear to be highly conserved. Images PMID:3100504

  7. Transcriptional analysis of the recA gene of Streptococcus thermophilus

    PubMed Central

    Giliberti, Gabriele; Baccigalupi, Loredana; Cordone, Angelina; Ricca, Ezio; De Felice, Maurilio

    2006-01-01

    Background RecA is a highly conserved prokaryotic protein that not only plays several important roles connected to DNA metabolism but also affects the cell response to various stress conditions. While RecA is highly conserved, the mechanism of transcriptional regulation of its structural gene is less conserved. In Escherichia coli the LexA protein acts as a recA repressor and is able, in response to DNA damage, of RecA-promoted self-cleavage, thus allowing recA transcription. The LexA paradigm, although confirmed in a wide number of cases, is not universally valid. In some cases LexA does not control recA transcription while in other RecA-containing bacteria a LexA homologue is not present. Results We have studied the recA transcriptional regulation in S. thermophilus, a bacterium that does not contain a LexA homologue. We have characterized the promoter region of the gene and observed that its expression is strongly induced by DNA damage. The analysis of deletion mutants and of translational gene fusions showed that a DNA region of 83 base pairs, containg the recA promoter and the transcriptional start site, is sufficient to ensure normal expression of the gene. Unlike LexA of E. coli, the factor controlling recA expression in S. thermophilus acts in a RecA-independent way since recA induction was observed in a strain carrying a recA null mutation. Conclusion In S. thermophilus, as in many other bacteria,recA expression is strongly induced by DNA damage, however, in this organism expression of the gene is controlled by a factor different from those well characterized in other bacteria. A small DNA region extending from 62 base pairs upstream of the recA transcriptional start site to 21 base pairs downstream of it carries all the information needed for normal regulation of the S. thermophilus recA gene. PMID:16972988

  8. Comparative evolution of the recA gene of surface and deep subsurface microorganisms (an evolutionary clock of intermediate rate). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.V.

    1998-04-01

    Because of the ability of the recA protein product to maintain both DNA integrity and increase genetic diversity, this gene may be essential to the survival of microorganisms following the damaging effects of numerous environmental stresses such as exposure to solar UV radiation, exposure to gamma radiation, starvation, and changing environments. While the various activities and amino-acid sequence of recA have been highly conserved among the eubacteria and archaea, little is known as to whether a strict structure-function relationship has been conserved. In other words, are the same regions of this highly plastic, functionally heterogeneous protein involved in the same catalytic capacities throughout the bacterial kingdom? While it is reasonable to assume that this type of conservation has also occurred, we felt it necessary to test the assumption by demonstrating that mutations in different genera of bacteria which eliminate similar functions (i.e., lead to similar phenotypes) are caused by changes in the amino-acid sequence in the same regions of their recA proteins. Therefore, we located the changes in nucleotide sequence in two recA mutants of P. aeruginosa which displayed mutant phenotypes in recombination and UV resistance. Our assumption was that if structure-function relationships held, these mutations would be found in areas already identified as essential for the function of the E. coli recA protein.

  9. Characterization of the recA gene regions of Spiroplasma citri and Spiroplasma melliferum.

    PubMed Central

    Marais, A; Bove, J M; Renaudin, J

    1996-01-01

    In previous studies (A. Marais, J. M. Bove, and J. Renaudin, J. Bacteriol. 178:862-870, 1996), we have shown that the recA gene of Spiroplasma citri R8A2 was restricted to the first 390 nucleotides of the N-terminal part. PCR amplification and sequencing studies of five additional strains of S. citri have revealed that these strains had the same organization at the recA region as the R8A2 strain. In contrast to S. citri, Spiroplasma melliferum was found to contain a full-length recA gene. However, in all five S. melliferum strains tested, a TAA stop codon was found within the N-terminal region of the recA reading frame. Our results suggest that S. melliferum, as well as S. citri, is RecA deficient. In agreement with the recA mutant genotype of S. citri and S. melliferum, we have shown that these organisms are highly sensitive to UV irradiation. PMID:8955327

  10. Transoceanic spreading of pathogenic strains of Vibrio parahaemolyticus with distinctive genetic signatures in the recA gene.

    PubMed

    González-Escalona, Narjol; Gavilan, Ronnie G; Brown, Eric W; Martinez-Urtaza, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is an important human pathogen whose transmission is associated with the consumption of contaminated seafood. Consistent multilocus sequence typing for V. parahaemolyticus has shown difficulties in the amplification of the recA gene by PCR associated with a lack of amplification or a larger PCR product than expected. In one strain (090-96, Peru, 1996), the produced PCR product was determined to be composed of two recA fragments derived from different Vibrio species. To better understand this phenomenon, we sequenced the whole genome of this strain. The hybrid recA gene was found to be the result of a fragmentation of the original lineage-specific recA gene resulting from a DNA insertion of approximately 30 kb in length. This insert had a G+C content of 38.8%, lower than that of the average G+C content of V. parahaemolyticus (45.2%), and contained 19 ORFs, including a complete recA gene. This new acquired recA gene deviated 24% in sequence from the original recA and was distantly related to recA genes from bacteria of the Vibrionaceae family. The reconstruction of the original recA gene (recA3) identified the precursor as belonging to ST189, a sequence type reported previously only in Asian countries. The identification of this singular genetic feature in strains from Asia reveals new evidence for genetic connectivity between V. parahaemolyticus populations at both sides of the Pacific Ocean that, in addition to the previously described pandemic clone, supports the existence of a recurrent transoceanic spreading of pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus with the corresponding potential risk of pandemic expansion. PMID:25679989

  11. [CONSTRUCTION AND PROPERTIES OF THE FRANCISELLA TULARENSIS VACCINE STRAIN WITHOUT ONE COPY OF THE IGLC GENE AND WITHOUT RECA GENE].

    PubMed

    Mokrievich, A N; Vakhrameeva, G M; Titareva, G M; Bakhteeva, I V; Mironova, R I; Kombarova, T I; Kravchenko, T B; Dyatlov, I A; Pavlov, V M

    2015-01-01

    The live vaccine based on the Francisella tularensis subsp. holarctica vaccine strain 15 NIIEG line is used in Russia against tularemia. This vaccine is highly effective, but fairly unstable. Therefore, development of stable live tularemia vaccine with minimal side effect is rather urgent. The method of allel removal in the F. tularensis vaccine strain was used to remove one copy of the iglC gene, which is required to provide intracellular production of the vaccine strain, as well as removal of the recA gene. The latter is crucial for homological recombination. pGM5 suicide vector based on pHV33 bireplicon plasmid was constructed to provide replacement of intact F. tularensis chromosome segments by modified segments. Modified chromosome segments contain F. Tularensis DNA fragment without iglC structural gene segment 545 p. b. (in pGMΔiglC plasmid), as well as DNA fragment containing no recA structural gene segment 1060 p.b. (pGMΔrecA plasmid). The constructed 15/23-1ΔrecA mutant, in contrast to the vaccine strain 15, was capable of reproducing in the macrophage-like cells J774A.1 line, whereas the efficiency of the reproduction was 8-10 times less. BALB/c mouse responded to immunization by the 15/23-1ΔrecA strain by smaller weight decrease (-2%) as compared to the strain 15 (-14%). Bacteria of the 15/23-1ΔrecA strain were virtually incapable of germinating from the BALB/c murine spleen 14 days after invasion, whereas bacteria of the strain 15 were found in the murine organs even after 21 days. The F. tularensis 15/23-1ΔrecA strain having smaller reaction ability can be used as a basis for construction of stable live safe tularemia vaccine. PMID:26665740

  12. Expression stability of 13 housekeeping genes during carbon starvation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Alqarni, Budoor; Colley, Brendan; Klebensberger, Janosch; McDougald, Diane; Rice, Scott A

    2016-08-01

    Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) is a reliable technique for quantifying mRNA levels when normalised by a stable reference gene/s. Many putative reference genes are known to be affected by physiological stresses, such as nutrient limitation and hence may not be suitable for normalisation. In this study of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the expression of 13 commonly used reference genes, rpoS, proC, recA, rpsL, rho, oprL, anr, tipA, nadB, fabD, ampC, algD and gyrA, were analysed for changes in expression under carbon starvation and nutrient replete conditions. The results showed that rpoS was the only stably expressed housekeeping gene during carbon starvation. In contrast, other commonly used housekeeping genes were shown to vary by as much as 10-100 fold under starvation conditions. This study has identified a suitable reference gene for qRT-PCR in P. aeruginosa during carbon starvation. The results presented here highlight the need to validate housekeeping genes under the chosen experimental conditions. PMID:27297333

  13. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA01 Gene Collection

    PubMed Central

    LaBaer, Joshua; Qiu, QingQing; Anumanthan, Anukanth; Mar, Wenhong; Zuo, Dongmei; Murthy, T.V.S.; Taycher, Helen; Halleck, Allison; Hainsworth, Eugenie; Lory, Stephen; Brizuela, Leonardo

    2004-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a common inhabitant of soil and water, is an opportunistic pathogen of growing clinical relevance. Its genome, one of the largest among bacteria [5570 open reading frames (ORFs)] approaches that of simple eukaryotes. We have constructed a comprehensive gene collection for this organism utilizing the annotated genome of P. aeruginosa PA01 and a highly automated and laboratory information management system (LIMS)-supported production line. All the individual ORFs have been successfully PCR-amplified and cloned into a recombination-based cloning system. We have isolated and archived four independent isolates of each individual ORF. Full sequence analysis of the first isolate for one-third of the ORFs in the collection has been completed. We used two sets of genes from this repository for high-throughput expression and purification of recombinant proteins in different systems. The purified proteins have been used to set up biochemical and immunological assays directed towards characterization of histidine kinases and identification of bacterial proteins involved in the immune response of cystic fibrosis patients. This gene repository provides a powerful tool for proteome- and genome-scale research of this organism, and the strategies adopted to generate this repository serve as a model for building clone sets for other bacteria. PMID:15489342

  14. Identification of Bacillus Probiotics Isolated from Soil Rhizosphere Using 16S rRNA, recA, rpoB Gene Sequencing and RAPD-PCR.

    PubMed

    Mohkam, Milad; Nezafat, Navid; Berenjian, Aydin; Mobasher, Mohammad Ali; Ghasemi, Younes

    2016-03-01

    Some Bacillus species, especially Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus pumilus groups, have highly similar 16S rRNA gene sequences, which are hard to identify based on 16S rDNA sequence analysis. To conquer this drawback, rpoB, recA sequence analysis along with randomly amplified polymorphic (RAPD) fingerprinting was examined as an alternative method for differentiating Bacillus species. The 16S rRNA, rpoB and recA genes were amplified via a polymerase chain reaction using their specific primers. The resulted PCR amplicons were sequenced, and phylogenetic analysis was employed by MEGA 6 software. Identification based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing was underpinned by rpoB and recA gene sequencing as well as RAPD-PCR technique. Subsequently, concatenation and phylogenetic analysis showed that extent of diversity and similarity were better obtained by rpoB and recA primers, which are also reinforced by RAPD-PCR methods. However, in one case, these approaches failed to identify one isolate, which in combination with the phenotypical method offsets this issue. Overall, RAPD fingerprinting, rpoB and recA along with concatenated genes sequence analysis discriminated closely related Bacillus species, which highlights the significance of the multigenic method in more precisely distinguishing Bacillus strains. This research emphasizes the benefit of RAPD fingerprinting, rpoB and recA sequence analysis superior to 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis for suitable and effective identification of Bacillus species as recommended for probiotic products. PMID:26898909

  15. Activated RecA protein may induce expression of a gene that is not controlled by the LexA repressor and whose function is required for mutagenesis and repair of UV-irradiated bacteriophage lambda

    SciTech Connect

    Calsou, P.; Villaverde, A.; Defais, M.

    1987-10-01

    The activated form of the RecA protein (RecA) is known to be involved in the reactivation and mutagenesis of UV-irradiated bacteriophage lambda and in the expression of the SOS response in Escherichia coli K-12. The expression of the SOS response requires cleavage of the LexA repressor by RecA and the subsequent expression of LexA-controlled genes. The evidence presented here suggests that RecA induces the expression of a gene(s) that is not under LexA control and that is also necessary for maximal repair and mutagenesis of damaged phage. This conclusion is based on the chloramphenicol sensitivity of RecA -dependent repair and mutagenesis of damaged bacteriophage lambda in lexA(Def) hosts.

  16. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE 'PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA' RECA GENE: THE LES (LYSOGENY ESTABLISHMENT DEFICIENT)- PHENOTYPE (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Les- (lysogeny establishment deficient) phenotype is a pleiotropic effect of the lesB908 mutation of Pseudomonas aruginosa PAO. LesB908-containing strains are also deficient in general recombination, sensitive to UV irradiation, and deficient in UV-stimulated induction of pro...

  17. Gene expression in Pseudomonas aeruginosa swarming motility

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is capable of three types of motilities: swimming, twitching and swarming. The latter is characterized by a fast and coordinated group movement over a semi-solid surface resulting from intercellular interactions and morphological differentiation. A striking feature of swarming motility is the complex fractal-like patterns displayed by migrating bacteria while they move away from their inoculation point. This type of group behaviour is still poorly understood and its characterization provides important information on bacterial structured communities such as biofilms. Using GeneChip® Affymetrix microarrays, we obtained the transcriptomic profiles of both bacterial populations located at the tip of migrating tendrils and swarm center of swarming colonies and compared these profiles to that of a bacterial control population grown on the same media but solidified to not allow swarming motility. Results Microarray raw data were corrected for background noise with the RMA algorithm and quantile normalized. Differentially expressed genes between the three conditions were selected using a threshold of 1.5 log2-fold, which gave a total of 378 selected genes (6.3% of the predicted open reading frames of strain PA14). Major shifts in gene expression patterns are observed in each growth conditions, highlighting the presence of distinct bacterial subpopulations within a swarming colony (tendril tips vs. swarm center). Unexpectedly, microarrays expression data reveal that a minority of genes are up-regulated in tendril tip populations. Among them, we found energy metabolism, ribosomal protein and transport of small molecules related genes. On the other hand, many well-known virulence factors genes were globally repressed in tendril tip cells. Swarm center cells are distinct and appear to be under oxidative and copper stress responses. Conclusions Results reported in this study show that, as opposed to swarm center cells, tendril

  18. Genotyping of bacteria belonging to the former Erwinia genus by PCR-RFLP analysis of a recA gene fragment.

    PubMed

    Waleron, Małgorzata; Waleron, Krzysztof; Podhajska, Anna J; Lojkowska, Ewa

    2002-02-01

    Genotypic characterization, based on the analysis of restriction fragment length polymorphism of the recA gene fragment PCR product (recA PCR-RFLP), was performed on members of the former Erwinia genus. PCR primers deduced from published recA gene sequences of Erwinia carotovora allowed the amplification of an approximately 730 bp DNA fragment from each of the 19 Erwinia species tested. Amplified recA fragments were compared using RFLP analysis with four endonucleases (AluI, HinfI, TasI and Tru1I), allowing the detection of characteristic patterns of RFLP products for most of the Erwinia species. Between one and three specific RFLP groups were identified among most of the species tested (Erwinia amylovora, Erwinia ananas, Erwinia cacticida, Erwinia cypripedii, Erwinia herbicola, Erwinia mallotivora, Erwinia milletiae, Erwinia nigrifluens, Erwinia persicina, Erwinia psidii, Erwinia quercina, Erwinia rhapontici, Erwinia rubrifaciens, Erwinia salicis, Erwinia stewartii, Erwinia tracheiphila, Erwinia uredovora, Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica, Erwinia carotovora subsp. betavasculorum, Erwinia carotovora subsp. odorifera and Erwinia carotovora subsp. wasabiae). However, in two cases, Erwinia chrysanthemi and Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora, 15 and 18 specific RFLP groups were detected, respectively. The variability of genetic patterns within these bacteria could be explained in terms of their geographic origin and/or wide host-range. The results indicated that PCR-RFLP analysis of the recA gene fragment is a useful tool for identification of species and subspecies belonging to the former Erwinia genus, as well as for differentiation of strains within E. carotovora subsp. carotovora and E. chrysanthemi. PMID:11832521

  19. Transposon mutagenesis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa exoprotease genes.

    PubMed Central

    Stapleton, M J; Jagger, K S; Warren, R L

    1984-01-01

    Transposon Tn5 was used to generate protease-deficient insertion mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The presence of Tn5 in the chromosome of P. aeruginosa was demonstrated by transduction and DNA-DNA hybridization. The altered protease production and kanamycin resistance were cotransduced into a wild-type P. aeruginosa strain. A radiolabeled probe of Tn5 DNA hybridized to specific BamHI fragments isolated from the insertion mutants. Two independently isolated Tn5 insertion mutants had reduced protease production, partially impaired elastase activity, and no immunologically reactive alkaline protease. Images PMID:6317657

  20. Structural genes for salicylate biosynthesis from chorismate in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Serino, L; Reimmann, C; Baur, H; Beyeler, M; Visca, P; Haas, D

    1995-11-15

    Salicylate is a precursor of pyochelin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and both compounds display siderophore activity. To elucidate the salicylate biosynthetic pathway, we have cloned and sequenced a chromosomal region of P. aeruginosa PAO1 containing two adjacent genes, designated pchB and pchA, which are necessary for salicylate formation. The pchA gene encodes a protein of 52 kDa with extensive similarity to the chorismate-utilizing enzymes isochorismate synthase, anthranilate synthase (component I) and p-aminobenzoate synthase (component I), whereas the 11 kDa protein encoded by pchB does not show significant similarity with other proteins. The pchB stop codon overlaps the presumed pchA start codon. Expression of the pchA gene in P. aeruginosa appears to depend on the transcription and translation of the upstream pchB gene. The pchBA genes are the first salicylate biosynthetic genes to be reported. Salicylate formation was demonstrated in an Escherichia coli entC mutant lacking isochorismate synthase when this strain expressed both the pchBA genes, but not when it expressed pchB alone. By contrast, an entB mutant of E. coli blocked in the conversion of isochorismate to 2,3-dihydro-2,3-dihydroxybenzoate formed salicylate when transformed with a pchB expression construct. Salicylate formation could also be demonstrated in vitro when chorismate was incubated with a crude extract of P. aeruginosa containing overproduced PchA and PchB proteins; salicylate and pyruvate were formed in equimolar amounts. Furthermore, salicylate-forming activity could be detected in extracts from a P. aeruginosa pyoverdin-negative mutant when grown under iron limitation, but not with iron excess. Our results are consistent with a pathway leading from chorismate to isochorismate and then to salicylate plus pyruvate, catalyzed consecutively by the iron-repressible PchA and PchB proteins in P. aeruginosa. PMID:7500944

  1. Regulation of bacterial RecA protein function.

    PubMed

    Cox, Michael M

    2007-01-01

    The RecA protein is a recombinase functioning in recombinational DNA repair in bacteria. RecA is regulated at many levels. The expression of the recA gene is regulated within the SOS response. The activity of the RecA protein itself is autoregulated by its own C-terminus. RecA is also regulated by the action of other proteins. To date, these include the RecF, RecO, RecR, DinI, RecX, RdgC, PsiB, and UvrD proteins. The SSB protein also indirectly affects RecA function by competing for ssDNA binding sites. The RecO and RecR, and possibly the RecF proteins, all facilitate RecA loading onto SSB-coated ssDNA. The RecX protein blocks RecA filament extension, and may have other effects on RecA activity. The DinI protein stabilizes RecA filaments. The RdgC protein binds to dsDNA and blocks RecA access to dsDNA. The PsiB protein, encoded by F plasmids, is uncharacterized, but may inhibit RecA in some manner. The UvrD helicase removes RecA filaments from RecA. All of these proteins function in a network that determines where and how RecA functions. Additional regulatory proteins may remain to be discovered. The elaborate regulatory pattern is likely to be reprised for RecA homologues in archaeans and eukaryotes. PMID:17364684

  2. AMINOGLYCOSIDE RESISTANCE GENES IN Pseudomonas aeruginosa ISOLATES FROM CUMANA, VENEZUELA.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Bertinellys; Rodulfo, Hectorina; Carreño, Numirin; Guzmán, Militza; Salazar, Elsa; De Donato, Marcos

    2016-01-01

    The enzymatic modification of aminoglycosides by aminoglycoside-acetyltransferases (AAC), aminoglycoside-adenyltransferases (AAD), and aminoglycoside-phosphotransferases (APH), is the most common resistance mechanism in P. aeruginosa and these enzymes can be coded on mobile genetic elements that contribute to their dispersion. One hundred and thirty seven P. aeruginosa isolates from the University Hospital, Cumana, Venezuela (HUAPA) were evaluated. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by the disk diffusion method and theaac, aadB and aph genes were detected by PCR. Most of the P. aeruginosa isolates (33/137) were identified from the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), mainly from discharges (96/137). The frequency of resistant P. aeruginosaisolates was found to be higher for the aminoglycosides tobramycin and amikacin (30.7 and 29.9%, respectively). Phenotype VI, resistant to these antibiotics, was the most frequent (14/49), followed by phenotype I, resistant to all the aminoglycosides tested (12/49). The aac(6´)-Ib,aphA1 and aadB genes were the most frequently detected, and the simultaneous presence of several resistance genes in the same isolate was demonstrated. Aminoglycoside resistance in isolates ofP. aeruginosa at the HUAPA is partly due to the presence of the aac(6´)-Ib, aphA1 andaadB genes, but the high rates of antimicrobial resistance suggest the existence of several mechanisms acting together. This is the first report of aminoglycoside resistance genes in Venezuela and one of the few in Latin America. PMID:27007556

  3. AMINOGLYCOSIDE RESISTANCE GENES IN Pseudomonas aeruginosa ISOLATES FROM CUMANA, VENEZUELA

    PubMed Central

    TEIXEIRA, Bertinellys; RODULFO, Hectorina; CARREÑO, Numirin; GUZMÁN, Militza; SALAZAR, Elsa; DONATO, Marcos DE

    2016-01-01

    The enzymatic modification of aminoglycosides by aminoglycoside-acetyltransferases (AAC), aminoglycoside-adenyltransferases (AAD), and aminoglycoside-phosphotransferases (APH), is the most common resistance mechanism in P. aeruginosa and these enzymes can be coded on mobile genetic elements that contribute to their dispersion. One hundred and thirty seven P. aeruginosa isolates from the University Hospital, Cumana, Venezuela (HUAPA) were evaluated. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by the disk diffusion method and theaac, aadB and aph genes were detected by PCR. Most of the P. aeruginosa isolates (33/137) were identified from the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), mainly from discharges (96/137). The frequency of resistant P. aeruginosaisolates was found to be higher for the aminoglycosides tobramycin and amikacin (30.7 and 29.9%, respectively). Phenotype VI, resistant to these antibiotics, was the most frequent (14/49), followed by phenotype I, resistant to all the aminoglycosides tested (12/49). The aac(6´)-Ib,aphA1 and aadB genes were the most frequently detected, and the simultaneous presence of several resistance genes in the same isolate was demonstrated. Aminoglycoside resistance in isolates ofP. aeruginosa at the HUAPA is partly due to the presence of the aac(6´)-Ib, aphA1 andaadB genes, but the high rates of antimicrobial resistance suggest the existence of several mechanisms acting together. This is the first report of aminoglycoside resistance genes in Venezuela and one of the few in Latin America. PMID:27007556

  4. Comparative sequence analysis of a recA gene fragment brings new evidence for a change in the taxonomy of the Lactobacillus casei group.

    PubMed

    Felis, G E; Dellaglio, F; Mizzi, L; Torriani, S

    2001-11-01

    The taxonomic positions of species of the Lactobacillus casei group have been evaluated by sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of a 277 bp recA gene fragment. High sequence similarity between strain ATCC 393T, currently designated as the type strain of L. casei, and the type strain of Lactobacillus zeae, LMG 17315T, has been established, while L. casei ATCC 334 and Lactobacillus paracasei NCDO 151T form a single phylogenetic group. The taxonomic status of species and strains at issue is discussed. PMID:11760954

  5. Overexpression of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi recA gene confers fluoroquinolone resistance in Escherichia coli DH5α.

    PubMed

    Yassien, M A M; Elfaky, M A

    2015-11-01

    A spontaneous fluoroquinolone-resistant mutant (STM1) was isolated from its parent Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi) clinical isolate. Unlike its parent isolate, this mutant has selective resistance to fluoroquinolones without any change in its sensitivity to various other antibiotics. DNA gyrase assays revealed that the fluoroquinolone resistance phenotype of the STM1 mutant did not result from alteration of the fluoroquinolone sensitivity of the DNA gyrase isolated from it. To study the mechanism of fluoroquinolone resistance, a genomic library from the STM1 mutant was constructed in Escherichia coli DH5α and two recombinant plasmids were obtained. Only one of these plasmids (STM1-A) conferred the selective fluoroquinolone resistance phenotype to E. coli DH5α. The chromosomal insert from STM1-A, digested with EcoRI and HindIII restriction endonucleases, produced two DNA fragments and these were cloned separately into pUC19 thereby generating two new plasmids, STM1-A1 and STM1-A2. Only STM1-A1 conferred the selective fluoroquinolone resistance phenotype to E. coli DH5α. Sequence and subcloning analyses of STM1-A1 showed the presence of an intact RecA open reading frame. Unlike that of the wild-type E. coli DH5α, protein analysis of a crude STM1-A1 extract showed overexpression of a 40 kDa protein. Western blotting confirmed the 40 kDa protein band to be RecA. When a RecA PCR product was cloned into pGEM-T and introduced into E. coli DH5α, the STM1-A11 subclone retained fluoroquinolone resistance. These results suggest that overexpression of RecA causes selective fluoroquinolone resistance in E. coli DH5α. PMID:26375447

  6. Locus of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa toxin A gene.

    PubMed Central

    Hanne, L F; Howe, T R; Iglewski, B H

    1983-01-01

    The gene for Pseudomonas aeruginosa toxin A has been mapped in the late region of the chromosome of strain PAO. Strain PAO-PR1, which produces parental levels of toxin A antigen that is enzymatically inactive and nontoxic, was used as the donor for R68.45 plasmid-mediated genetic exchange. Strain PAO-PR1 (toxA1) was mated with toxin A-producing strains, and exconjugates for selected prototrophic markers were tested for the transfer of toxA1. The toxA1 gene was located between cnu-9001 and pur-67 at approximately 85 min on the PAO chromosome. PMID:6403508

  7. Transcriptional analysis of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa exoenzyme S structural gene.

    PubMed Central

    Yahr, T L; Hovey, A K; Kulich, S M; Frank, D W

    1995-01-01

    The transcriptional regulation of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa exoS gene was investigated. Expression of exoS in P. aeruginosa PA103 was dependent upon growth in a low-cation environment and the presence of a functional exsA gene. Promoter fusion analysis indicated that a 285-bp PstI-NsiI fragment, located 5' of the exoS coding region, contained a functional promoter for exoS. Expression of the reporter gene was inducible in a low-cation growth environment and required a functional copy of exsA. Divergent promoters, coordinately regulated with exoS transcription, were identified within the PstI-NsiI fragment. A fusion derivative of ExsA, MALA3A2, was shown to bind directly to the PstI-NsiI probe. DNase I protection analysis demonstrated that MALA3A2 bound to the intergenic region between the postulated -35 boxes of each promoter region. Northern (RNA) blot analysis with probes internal to and upstream of exoS demonstrated that separate, coordinately regulated mRNAs were expressed in P. aeruginosa. These data suggested that a locus, coregulated with exoS transcription, was located upstream of exoS. DNA sequence analysis of the exoS upstream region revealed three open reading frames, ORF 1, ORF 2, and ORF 3. ORF 1 demonstrated significant homology to the SycE/YerA protein of Yersinia sp. SycE/YerA is postulated to function as a chaperone for the YopE cytotoxin. The loci encoding YopE and ExoS show similarities in genetic organization, protein composition, and regulation. PMID:7868588

  8. The influence of carbon sources on the expression of the recA gene and genotoxicity detection by an Acinetobacter bioreporter.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bo; Song, Yizhi; Zhang, Dayi; Huang, Wei E; Zhang, Xu; Li, Guanghe

    2015-04-01

    Bacterial whole-cell bioreporters are practical and reliable analytical tools to assess the toxicity and bioavailability of environmental contaminants, yet evidence has shown that their performance could be affected by different carbon sources. This paper evaluated the influence of carbon sources on the recA gene (ACIAD1385) in a DNA damage-inducible recA::luxCDABE Acinetobacter bioreporter and optimized the induction conditions for its practical application in environmental monitoring. Different carbon sources, including LB, potassium acetate (MMA), sodium citrate (MMC), sodium pyruvate (MMP), and sodium succinate (MMS), significantly influenced (p < 0.05) the bioluminescence intensity of the genotoxicity bioreporter. A reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) showed the different expression levels of the DNA damage-inducible gene recA (p < 0.05), suggesting that carbon sources influenced the DNA damage response in the Acinetobacter bioreporter at the transcriptional level. Additionally, proteomic analysis identified 122 proteins that were differentially expressed after exposure to mitomycin C in defined media and LB, and 5 of them were related to the DNA damage response, indicating the effects of carbon sources on the DNA damage response in Acinetobacter at the translational level. The repression effect caused by the rich medium, LB, was possibly related to the mechanism of carbon catabolite repression. Our results suggest that the practical application of Acinetobacter bioreporters to the genotoxicity assessment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated soils could be significantly improved by using a standard medium of defined composition, as this could increase their sensitivity. PMID:25764502

  9. Genes related to chromate resistance by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Sonia L; Vargas, Eréndira; Ramírez-Díaz, Martha I; Campos-García, Jesús; Cervantes, Carlos

    2008-08-01

    Chromate-hypersensitive mutants of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 strain were isolated using transposon-insertion mutagenesis. Comparison of the nucleotide sequences of the regions interrupted in the mutants with the PAO1 genome revealed that the genes affected in three mutant strains were oprE (ORF PA0291), rmlA (ORF PA5163), and ftsK (ORF PA2615), respectively. A relationship of these genes with chromate tolerance has not been previously reported. No other phenotypic changes were observed in the oprE mutant but its resistance to chromate was not fully restored by expressing the ChrA protein, which extrudes chromate ions from the cytoplasm to the periplasmic space. These data suggest that OprE participates in the efflux of chromate from the periplasm to the outside. Increased susceptibility of the rmlA mutant to the metals cadmium and mercury and to the anion-superoxide generator paraquat suggests a protective role of LPS against chromate toxicity. A higher susceptibility of the ftsK mutant to compounds affecting DNA structure (ciprofloxacin, tellurite, mitomycin C) suggests a role of FtsK in the recombinational repair of DNA damage caused by chromate. In conclusion, the P. aeruginosa genome contains diverse genes related to its intrinsic resistance to chromate. Systems pertaining to the outer membrane (OprE), the cell wall (LPS), and the cytoplasm (FtsK) were identified in this work as involved in chromate protection mechanisms. PMID:18446454

  10. Paerucumarin, a new metabolite produced by the pvc gene cluster from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Clarke-Pearson, Michael F; Brady, Sean F

    2008-10-01

    The pvc gene cluster from Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been linked to the biosynthesis of both the pyoverdine chromophore and pseudoverdine. Our reinvestigation of the role this gene cluster plays in P. aeruginosa secondary metabolite biosynthesis shows that its major product is actually paerucumarin, a novel isonitrile functionalized cumarin. PMID:18689486

  11. Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeat-Dependent, Biofilm-Specific Death of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Mediated by Increased Expression of Phage-Related Genes

    PubMed Central

    Heussler, Gary E.; Cady, Kyle C.; Koeppen, Katja; Bhuju, Sabin; Stanton, Bruce A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated (CRISPR/Cas) system is an adaptive immune system present in many archaea and bacteria. CRISPR/Cas systems are incredibly diverse, and there is increasing evidence of CRISPR/Cas systems playing a role in cellular functions distinct from phage immunity. Previously, our laboratory reported one such alternate function in which the type 1-F CRISPR/Cas system of the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain UCBPP-PA14 (abbreviated as P. aeruginosa PA14) inhibits both biofilm formation and swarming motility when the bacterium is lysogenized by the bacteriophage DMS3. In this study, we demonstrated that the presence of just the DMS3 protospacer and the protospacer-adjacent motif (PAM) on the P. aeruginosa genome is necessary and sufficient for this CRISPR-dependent loss of these group behaviors, with no requirement of additional DMS3 sequences. We also demonstrated that the interaction of the CRISPR system with the DMS3 protospacer induces expression of SOS-regulated phage-related genes, including the well-characterized pyocin operon, through the activity of the nuclease Cas3 and subsequent RecA activation. Furthermore, our data suggest that expression of the phage-related genes results in bacterial cell death on a surface due to the inability of the CRISPR-engaged strain to downregulate phage-related gene expression, while these phage-related genes have minimal impact on growth and viability under planktonic conditions. Deletion of the phage-related genes restores biofilm formation and swarming motility while still maintaining a functional CRISPR/Cas system, demonstrating that the loss of these group behaviors is an indirect effect of CRISPR self-targeting. PMID:25968642

  12. The rpoN gene product of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is required for expression of diverse genes, including the flagellin gene.

    PubMed Central

    Totten, P A; Lara, J C; Lory, S

    1990-01-01

    The product of the rpoN gene is an alternative sigma factor of RNA polymerase which is required for transcription of a number of genes in members of the family Enterobacteriaceae, including those that specify enzymes of nitrogen assimilation, amino acid uptake, and degradation of a variety of organic molecules. We have previously shown that transcription of the pilin gene of Pseudomonas aeruginosa also requires RpoN (K. S. Ishimoto and S. Lory, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 86:1954-1957, 1989) and have undertaken a more extensive survey of genes under RpoN control. Strains of P. aeruginosa that carry an insertionally inactivated rpoN gene were constructed and shown to be nonmotile because of the inability of these mutants to synthesize flagellin. The mutation in rpoN had no effect on expression of extracellular polypeptides, outer membrane proteins, and the alginate capsule. However, the rpoN mutants were glutamine auxotrophs and were defective in glutamine synthetase, indicating defects in nitrogen assimilation. In addition, the P. aeruginosa rpoN mutants were defective in urease activity. These findings indicate that the sigma factor encoded by the rpoN gene is used by P. aeruginosa for transcription of a diverse set of genes that specify biosynthetic enzymes, degradative enzymes, and surface components. These rpoN-controlled genes include pili and flagella which are required for full virulence of the organism. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 PMID:2152909

  13. CLONING AND EXPRESSION OF THE CATA AND CATBC GENE CLUSTERS FROM PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA PAO

    EPA Science Inventory

    A 9.9-kilobase (kb) BAMIII estriction endonuclease fragment encoding the catA and catBC gene clusters was selected from a gene bank of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1c chromosome. he catA, catB, and catC genes encode enzymes that catalyze consecutive reactions in the catechol bra...

  14. Cloning and expression of a gene segment encoding the enzymatic moiety of Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A.

    PubMed Central

    Mozola, M A; Wilson, R B; Jordan, E M; Draper, R K; Clowes, R C

    1984-01-01

    Using the broad-host-range plasmid vector pRO1614, we cloned a segment of the gene from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA103 encoding the enzymatically active part of the exotoxin A protein. Expression of the cloned gene segment has been achieved both in Escherichia coli and in a nontoxigenic P. aeruginosa host, as assayed by the production of exotoxin A-related antigen and by the ability of the gene product to ADP-ribosylate elongation factor 2. Western blot hybridization analysis revealed a series of polypeptides antigenically related to exotoxin A, the largest of which had a molecular weight of ca. 50,000. Images PMID:6086583

  15. Wide Dissemination of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Producing β-Lactamase blaKPC-2 Gene in Colombia▿

    PubMed Central

    Cuzon, Gaelle; Naas, Thierry; Villegas, Maria-Virginia; Correa, Adriana; Quinn, John P.; Nordmann, Patrice

    2011-01-01

    Ten blaKPC-2-harboring Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from hospitals located in five different Colombian cities have been characterized. Isolates were multidrug resistant, belonged to five different pulsotypes, and possessed naturally chromosome-encoded blaAmpC and blaOXA-50 genes and the acquired blaKPC-2 gene. In most cases, the blaKPC-2 genes were carried by plasmids of different sizes and were associated with Tn4401b or a new structure containing only part of the Tn4401 sequence. This study revealed that several clones of P. aeruginosa producing blaKPC-2 are disseminating in Colombia. PMID:21844315

  16. Functional recA, lexA, umuD, umuC, polA, and polB genes are not required for the Escherichia coli UVM response.

    PubMed Central

    Palejwala, V A; Wang, G E; Murphy, H S; Humayun, M Z

    1995-01-01

    The Escherichia coli UVM response is a recently described phenomenon in which pretreatment of cells with DNA-damaging agents such as UV or alkylating agents significantly enhances mutation fixation at a model mutagenic lesion (3,N4-ethenocytosine; epsilon C) borne on a transfected M13 single-stranded DNA genome. Since UVM is observed in delta recA cells in which SOS induction should not occur, UVM may represent a novel, SOS-independent, inducible response. Here, we have addressed two specific hypothetical mechanisms for UVM: (i) UVM results from a recA-independent pathway for the induction of SOS genes thought to play a role in induced mutagenesis, and (ii) UVM results from a polymerase switch in which M13 replication in treated cells is carried out by DNA polymerase I (or DNA polymerase II) instead of DNA polymerase III. To address these hypotheses, E. coli cells with known defects in recA, lexA, umuDC, polA, or polB were treated with UV or 1-methyl-3-nitro-1-nitrosoguanidine before transfection of M13 single-stranded DNA bearing a site-specific ethenocytosine lesion. Survival of the transfected DNA was measured as transfection efficiency, and mutagenesis at the epsilon C residue was analyzed by a quantitative multiplex DNA sequencing technology. Our results show that UVM is observable in delta recA cells, in lexA3 (noninducible SOS repressor) cells, in LexA-overproducing cells, and in delta umuDC cells. Furthermore, our data show that UVM induction occurs in the absence of detectable induction of dinD, an SOS gene. These results make it unlikely that UVM results from a recA-independent alternative induction pathway for SOS gene. PMID:7592365

  17. Identification of virulence genes in a pathogenic strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by representational difference analysis.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ji Young; Sifri, Costi D; Goumnerov, Boyan C; Rahme, Laurence G; Ausubel, Frederick M; Calderwood, Stephen B

    2002-02-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that may cause severe infections in humans and other vertebrates. In addition, a human clinical isolate of P. aeruginosa, strain PA14, also causes disease in a variety of nonvertebrate hosts, including plants, Caenorhabditis elegans, and the greater wax moth, Galleria mellonella. This has led to the development of a multihost pathogenesis system in which plants, nematodes, and insects have been used as adjuncts to animal models for the identification of P. aeruginosa virulence factors. Another approach to identifying virulence genes in bacteria is to take advantage of the natural differences in pathogenicity between isolates of the same species and to use a subtractive hybridization technique to recover relevant genomic differences. The sequenced strain of P. aeruginosa, strain PAO1, has substantial differences in virulence from strain PA14 in several of the multihost models of pathogenicity, and we have utilized the technique of representational difference analysis (RDA) to directly identify genomic differences between P. aeruginosa strains PA14 and PAO1. We have found that the pilC, pilA, and uvrD genes in strain PA14 differ substantially from their counterparts in strain PAO1. In addition, we have recovered a gene homologous to the ybtQ gene from Yersinia, which is specifically present in strain PA14 but absent in strain PAO1. Mutation of the ybtQ homolog in P. aeruginosa strain PA14 significantly attenuates the virulence of this strain in both G. mellonella and a burned mouse model of sepsis to levels comparable to those seen with PAO1. This suggests that the increased virulence of P. aeruginosa strain PA14 compared to PAO1 may relate to specific genomic differences identifiable by RDA. PMID:11807055

  18. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa pfpI gene plays an antimutator role and provides general stress protection.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Rojas, Alexandro; Blázquez, Jesús

    2009-02-01

    Hypermutator Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains, characterized by an increased spontaneous-mutation rate, are found at high frequencies in chronic lung infections. Hypermutability is associated with the loss of antimutator genes related to DNA repair or damage avoidance systems. Only a few antimutator genes have been described in P. aeruginosa, although there is some evidence that additional genes may be involved in naturally occurring hypermutability. In order to find new P. aeruginosa antimutator genes, we constructed and screened a library of random insertions in the PA14 strain. Some previously described P. aeruginosa and/or Escherichia coli antimutator genes, such as mutS, mutL, uvrD, mutT, ung, and mutY, were detected, indicating a good coverage of our insertional library. One additional mutant contained an insertion in the P. aeruginosa PA14-04650 (pfpI) gene, putatively encoding a member of the DJ-1/ThiJ/PfpI superfamily, which includes chaperones, peptidases, and the Parkinson's disease protein DJ-1a. The pfpI-defective mutants in both PAO1 and PA14 showed higher spontaneous mutation rates than the wild-type strains, suggesting that PfpI plays a key role in DNA protection under nonstress conditions. Moreover, the inactivation of pfpI resulted in a dramatic increase in the H(2)O(2)-induced mutant frequency. Global transcription studies showed the induction of bacteriophage Pf1 genes and the repression of genes related to iron metabolism, suggesting that the increased spontaneous-mutant frequency may be due to reduced protection against the basal level of reactive oxygen species. Finally, pfpI mutants are more sensitive to different types of stress and are affected in biofilm formation. PMID:19028889

  19. Modulating Cellular Recombination Potential through Alterations in RecA Structure and Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Bakhlanova, Irina V.; Dudkina, Alexandra V.; Baitin, Dima M.; Knight, Kendall L.; Cox, Michael M.; Lanzov, Vladislav A.

    2010-01-01

    The wild type E. coli RecA protein is a recombinase platform with unrealized recombination potential. We have explored the factors affecting recombination during conjugation with a quantitative assay. Regulatory proteins that affect RecA function have the capacity to increase or decrease recombination frequencies by factors up to 6 fold. Autoinhibition by the RecA C-terminus can affect recombination frequency by factors up to 4 fold. The greatest changes in recombination frequency measured here are brought about by point mutations in the recA gene. RecA variants can increase recombination frequencies by more than 50 fold. The RecA protein thus possesses an inherently broad functional range. The RecA protein of Escherichia coli (EcRecA) is not optimized for recombination function. Instead, much of the recombination potential of EcRecA is structurally suppressed, probably reflecting cellular requirements. One point mutation in EcRecA with a particularly dramatic effect on recombination frequency, D112R, exhibits an enhanced capacity to load onto SSB-coated ssDNA, overcome the effects of regulatory proteins such as PsiB and RecX, and to pair homologous DNAs. Comparisons of key RecA protein mutants reveal two components to RecA recombination function – filament formation and the inherent DNA pairing activity of the formed filaments. PMID:21143322

  20. Directed Evolution of RecA Variants with Enhanced Capacity for Conjugational Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Taejin; Chitteni-Pattu, Sindhu; Cox, Benjamin L.; Wood, Elizabeth A.; Sandler, Steven J.; Cox, Michael M.

    2015-01-01

    The recombination activity of Escherichia coli (E. coli) RecA protein reflects an evolutionary balance between the positive and potentially deleterious effects of recombination. We have perturbed that balance, generating RecA variants exhibiting improved recombination functionality via random mutagenesis followed by directed evolution for enhanced function in conjugation. A recA gene segment encoding a 59 residue segment of the protein (Val79-Ala137), encompassing an extensive subunit-subunit interface region, was subjected to degenerate oligonucleotide-mediated mutagenesis. An iterative selection process generated at least 18 recA gene variants capable of producing a higher yield of transconjugants. Three of the variant proteins, RecA I102L, RecA V79L and RecA E86G/C90G were characterized based on their prominence. Relative to wild type RecA, the selected RecA variants exhibited faster rates of ATP hydrolysis, more rapid displacement of SSB, decreased inhibition by the RecX regulator protein, and in general displayed a greater persistence on DNA. The enhancement in conjugational function comes at the price of a measurable RecA-mediated cellular growth deficiency. Persistent DNA binding represents a barrier to other processes of DNA metabolism in vivo. The growth deficiency is alleviated by expression of the functionally robust RecX protein from Neisseria gonorrhoeae. RecA filaments can be a barrier to processes like replication and transcription. RecA regulation by RecX protein is important in maintaining an optimal balance between recombination and other aspects of DNA metabolism. PMID:26047498

  1. Changes in the physiology and gene expression of Microcystis aeruginosa under EGCG stress.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yaping; Wang, Jin; Yu, Yang; Shi, Limei; Kong, Fanxiang

    2014-12-01

    EGCG (Epigallocatechin-3-gallate) has an allelopathic inhibitory effect on Microcystis aeruginosa. Cellular structure, physiological and biochemical reactions and gene expression were examined to explore the mechanism of inhibition. As was shown in electron microscopy, the structure of the cell wall, cell membrane and thylakoid was disrupted by EGCG. EGCG also reduced the efficiency of photosynthesis and the electron transfer rate in M. aeruginosa cells, as was determined with a flow cytometer. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis demonstrated that gene expression of the core proteins of the photosynthesis centers PSI and PSII and ATP synthase were reduced, while the expression of the phycobilisome degradation protein A gene (nbl A) was elevated. The expression of the universal stress protein gene increased, which would enhance the adaptive capacity of Microcystis cells to polyphenols and oxidative stress. Furthermore, EGCG elevated the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in M. aeruginosa cells, and thus caused oxidative cellular damage. When treated with EGCG at low concentrations (10 and 40 mg L(-)(1)), the cells were able to activate defense systems to degrade the excess ROS. But at a concentration of 70 mg L(-)(1), oxidative stress exceeded tolerance limits, and the cells were severely damaged. We concluded that damage to photosynthesis and oxidative stress were the primary mechanisms for the allelopathic effect of EGCG on M. aeruginosa. PMID:25016428

  2. Molecular surveillance for carbapenemase genes in carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Australian patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Tai, Anna S; Kidd, Timothy J; Whiley, David M; Ramsay, Kay A; Buckley, Cameron; Bell, Scott C

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of acquired carbapenemase genes amongst carbapenem non-susceptible Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates in Australian patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Cross-sectional molecular surveillance for acquired carbapenemase genes was performed on CF P. aeruginosa isolates from two isolate banks comprising: (i) 662 carbapenem resistant P. aeruginosa isolates from 227 patients attending 10 geographically diverse Australian CF centres (2007-2009), and (ii) 519 P. aeruginosa isolates from a cohort of 173 adult patients attending one Queensland CF clinic in 2011. All 1189 P. aeruginosa isolates were tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) protocols targeting ten common carbapenemase genes, as well the Class 1 integron intI1 gene and the aadB aminoglycoside resistance gene. No carbapenemase genes were identified among all isolates tested. The intI1 and aadB genes were frequently detected and were significantly associated with the AUST-02 strain (OR 24.6, 95% CI 9.3-65.6; p < 0.0001) predominantly from Queensland patients. Despite the high prevalence of carbapenem resistance in P. aeruginosa in Australian patients with CF, no acquired carbapenemase genes were detected in the study, suggesting chromosomal mutations remain the key resistance mechanism in CF isolates. Systematic surveillance for carbapenemase-producing P. aeruginosa in CF by molecular surveillance is ongoing. PMID:25551306

  3. Virulence Gene Profiles of Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated From Iranian Hospital Infections

    PubMed Central

    Fazeli, Nastaran; Momtaz, Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Background: The most common hospital-acquired pathogen is Pseudomonas aeruginosa. It is a multidrug resistant bacterium causing systemic infections. Objectives: The present study was carried out in order to investigate the distribution of virulence factors and antibiotic resistance properties of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from various types of hospital infections in Iran. Patients and Methods: Two-hundred and seventeen human infection specimens were collected from Baqiyatallah and Payambaran hospitals in Tehran, Iran. The clinical samples were cultured immediately and samples positive for P. aeruginosa were analyzed for the presence of antibiotic resistance and bacterial virulence genes using PCR (polymerase chain reaction). Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed using disk diffusion methodology with Müeller–Hinton agar. Results: Fifty-eight out of 127 (45.66%) male infection specimens and 44 out of 90 (48.88%) female infection specimens harbored P. aeruginosa. Also, 65% (in male specimens) and 21% (in female specimens) of respiratory system infections were positive for P. aeruginosa, which was a high rate. The genes encoding exoenzyme S (67.64%) and phospholipases C (45.09%) were the most common virulence genes found among the strains. The incidences of various β-lactams encoding genes, including blaTEM, blaSHV, blaOXA, blaCTX-M, blaDHA, and blaVEB were 94.11%, 16.66%, 15.68%, 18.62%, 21.56%, and 17.64%, respectively. The most commonly detected fluoroquinolones encoding gene was gyrA (15. 68%). High resistance levels to penicillin (100%), tetracycline (90.19%), streptomycin (64.70%), and erythromycin (43.13%) were observed too. Conclusions: Our findings should raise awareness about antibiotic resistance in hospitalized patients in Iran. Clinicians should exercise caution in prescribing antibiotics, especially in cases of human infections. PMID:25763199

  4. Norepinephrine represses the expression of toxA and the siderophore genes in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Li, Wang; Lyte, Mark; Freestone, Primrose P; Ajmal, Aziba; Colmer-Hamood, Jane A; Hamood, Abdul N

    2009-10-01

    Among the different extracellular virulence factors produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa are exotoxin A (ETA) and the pyoverdine and pyochelin siderophores. Production of ETA and the siderophores requires the function of the iron-starvation sigma factor PvdS, the transcriptional activator RegA, and the AraC-activator PchR. Iron represses the production of ETA and the siderophores by repressing the expression of pvdS, regA, and pchR. PvdS regulates the expression of the ETA gene, toxA, regA, and the pyoverdine synthesis genes. The catecholamine norepinephrine enhances the growth of pathogenic bacteria by transferring iron from host-binding proteins. In this study, we elucidated the mechanism by which norepinephrine and other catecholamines induce P. aeruginosa growth. We also investigated whether norepinephrine regulates the expression of toxA and the siderophore genes, and the mechanism of this regulation. Norepinephrine enhanced the growth of P. aeruginosa by supplying iron from transferrin. This provision of iron repressed the expression of toxA, the pyoverdine genes pvdD and pvdE, and their regulators, pvdS, regA, and pchR, suggesting that norepinephrine accomplishes this repression through PvdS and PchR. Additionally, norepinephrine bypassed PvdS and supported the growth of a pvdS deletion mutant, indicating that norepinephrine transfers iron to P. aeruginosa independent of pyoverdine. Thus, norepinephrine apparently influences the pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa by affecting its pattern of growth and the production of virulence factors. PMID:19686346

  5. Changes in metabolites, antioxidant system, and gene expression in Microcystis aeruginosa under sodium chloride stress.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Mao, Feijian; Kirumba, George Chira; Jiang, Cheng; Manefield, Mike; He, Yiliang

    2015-12-01

    Microcystis (M.) aeruginosa, one of the most common bloom-forming cyanobacteria, occurs worldwide. The Qingcaosha (QCS) Reservoir is undergoing eutrophication and faces the problem of saltwater intrusion. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of sudden salinity changes on physiological parameters and related gene transcription in M. aeruginosa under controlled laboratory conditions. The results showed that sodium chloride (50, 200 and 500 mg L(-1) NaCl) inhibited the algal growth and decreased pigment concentrations (chlorophyll a, carotenoid and phycocyanin). Sodium chloride increased both the intracellular and extracellular microcystin contents and elevated the mcyD transcript level in M. aeruginosa. It also increased the malondialdehyde (MDA) content and caused cytomembrane damage. This damage caused the release of intracellular toxins into the culture medium. In addition, NaCl decreased the maximum electron transport rate, increased the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and changed the cellular redox status. Consequently, NaCl inhibited the expression of cpcB, psbA and rbcL. Furthermore, NaCl increased the activities of superoxide dismutases (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione reductase (GR), and total glutathione peroxidase (GPx). The transcript levels of sod and reduced glutathione (gsh) were also increased after exposure to NaCl. Our results indicate that a sudden increase in salinity increases the production and excretion of microcystin, changes the cellular redox status, enhances the activities of antioxidant enzymes, inhibits photosynthesis, and affects transcript levels of related genes in M. aeruginosa. PMID:26232039

  6. Mapping of the gene specifying aminoglycoside 3'-phosphotransferase II on the Pseudomonas aeruginosa chromosome.

    PubMed Central

    Okii, M; Iyobe, S; Mitsuhashi, S

    1983-01-01

    We examined the aminoglycoside inactivation enzymes in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains, seven clinical isolates and seven laboratory strains without plasmids. All strains were found to possess the enzyme aminoglycoside 3'-phosphotransferase II [APH(3')-II]. We isolated an APH(3')-II-deficient mutant from a PAO strain by mutagenesis with N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. By plasmid (FP5 or R68.45)-mediated conjugation, we determined the locus of the gene specifying the APH(3')-II between trp-6 and pro-82 on the PAO chromosome and designated this gene aphA. It was concluded that the intrinsic resistance of P. aeruginosa to kanamycins, neomycins, paromomycins, ribostamycin, and butirosins was due to this newly determined gene. PMID:6307974

  7. SpoT-triggered stringent response controls usp gene expression in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Boes, Nelli; Schreiber, Kerstin; Schobert, Max

    2008-11-01

    The universal stress proteins (Usps) UspK (PA3309) and UspN (PA4352) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa are essential for surviving specific anaerobic energy stress conditions such as pyruvate fermentation and anaerobic stationary phase. Expression of the respective genes is under the control of the oxygen-sensing regulator Anr. In this study we investigated the regulation of uspN and three additional P. aeruginosa usp genes: uspL (PA1789), uspM (PA4328), and uspO (PA5027). Anr induces expression of these genes in response to anaerobic conditions. Using promoter-lacZ fusions, we showed that PuspL-lacZ, PuspM-lacZ, and PuspO-lacZ were also induced in stationary phase as described for PuspN-lacZ. However, stationary phase gene expression was abolished in the P. aeruginosa triple mutant Deltaanr DeltarelA DeltaspoT. The relA and spoT genes encode the regulatory components of the stringent response. We determined pppGpp and ppGpp levels using a thin-layer chromatography approach and detected the accumulation of ppGpp in the wild type and the DeltarelA mutant in stationary phase, indicating a SpoT-derived control of ppGpp accumulation. Additional investigation of stationary phase in LB medium revealed that alkaline pH values are involved in the regulatory process of ppGpp accumulation. PMID:18776018

  8. Modulation of Type III Secretion System in Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Involvement of the PA4857 Gene Product

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Miao; Zhao, Jingru; Kang, Huaping; Kong, Weina; Zhao, Yuanyu; Wu, Min; Liang, Haihua

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that causes serious acute or chronic infections in humans. Acute infections typically involve the type III secretion systems (T3SSs) and bacterial motility, whereas chronic infections are often associated with biofilm formation and the type VI secretion system. To identify new genes required for pathogenesis, a transposon mutagenesis library was constructed and the gene PA4857, named tspR, was found to modulate T3SS gene expression. Deletion of P. aeruginosa tspR reduced the virulence in a mouse acute lung infection model and diminished cytotoxicity. Suppression of T3SS gene expression in the tspR mutant resulted from compromised translation of the T3SS master regulator ExsA. TspR negatively regulated two small RNAs, RsmY and RsmZ, which control RsmA. Our data demonstrated that defects in T3SS expression and biofilm formation in retS mutant could be partially restored by overexpression of tspR. Taken together, our results demonstrated that the newly identified retS-tspR pathway is coordinated with the retS-gacS system, which regulates the genes associated with acute and chronic infections and controls the lifestyle choice of P. aeruginosa. PMID:26858696

  9. Intrinsic and Extrinsic Regulation of Type III Secretion Gene Expression in Pseudomonas Aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Manisha R.; King, Jessica M.; Yahr, Timothy L.

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that is particularly problematic in the healthcare setting where it is a frequent cause of pneumonia, bloodstream, and urinary tract infections. An important determinant of P. aeruginosa virulence is a type III secretion system (T3SS). T3SS-dependent intoxication is a complex process that minimally requires binding of P. aeruginosa to host cells, injection of the cytotoxic effector proteins through the host cell plasma membrane, and induction of T3SS gene expression. The latter process, referred to as contact-dependent expression, involves a well-characterized regulatory cascade that activates T3SS gene expression in response to host cell contact. Although host cell contact is a primary activating signal for T3SS gene expression, the involvement of multiple membrane-bound regulatory systems indicates that additional environmental signals also play a role in controlling expression of the T3SS. These regulatory systems coordinate T3SS gene expression with many other cellular activities including motility, mucoidy, polysaccharide production, and biofilm formation. The signals to which the organism responds are poorly understood but many seem to be coupled to the metabolic state of the cell and integrated within a master circuit that assimilates informational signals from endogenous and exogenous sources. Herein we review progress toward unraveling this complex circuitry, provide analysis of the current knowledge gaps, and highlight potential areas for future studies. Complete understanding of the regulatory networks that control T3SS gene expression will maximize opportunities for the development of strategies to treat P. aeruginosa infections. PMID:21833328

  10. Effects of Chlorine Stress on Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm and Analysis of Related Gene Expressions.

    PubMed

    Kekeç, Özge; Gökalsın, Barış; Karaltı, İskender; Kayhan, Figen Esin; Sesal, Nüzhet Cenk

    2016-08-01

    Chlorine is deployed worldwide to clean waters and prevent water-originated illnesses. However, chlorine has a limited disinfection capacity against biofilms. Microorganisms form biofilms to protect themselves from biological threats such as disinfectant chemicals. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen and its biofilm form attaches to surfaces, living buried into exopolysaccharides, can be present in all watery environments including tap water and drinking water. This research aimed to study the biofilm trigger mechanism of the opportunistic pathogen P. aeruginosa PAO1 strain, which is known to form biofilm in water supply systems and human body, under chlorine stress levels. In addition to biofilm staining, certain genes that are relevant to the stress condition were selected for gene expression analysis. The bacteria cultures were grown under chlorine stress with concentrations of 0.5, 0.7 and 1 mg/l. Six gene regions were determined related to biofilm and stress response: rpoS, bifA, migA, katB, soxR, and algC. Biofilm formation was analyzed by basic fuchsin staining, and gene expressions were quantified by quantitative real-time PCR. According to the results, highest biofilm production was observed in P. aeruginosa PAO1 wild strain under no stress conditions. Higher biofilm amounts were observed for bacteria under 0.5 and 0.7 mg/l chlorine stress compared to 1 mg/l chlorine stress. PMID:27146505

  11. Large-scale isolation of candidate virulence genes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by in vivo selection.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, J; Mushegian, A; Lory, S; Jin, S

    1996-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic human pathogen, is a major causative agent of mortality and morbidity in immunocompromised patients and those with cystic fibrosis genetic disease. To identify new virulence genes of P. aeruginosa, a selection system was developed based on the in vivo expression technology (IVET) that was first reported in Salmonella system. An adenine-requiring auxotrophic mutant strain of P. aeruginosa was isolated and found avirulent on neutropenic mice. A DNA fragment that can complement the mutant strain, containing purEK operon that is required for de novo biosynthesis of purine, was sequenced and used in the IVET vector construction. By applying the IVET selection system to a neutropenic mouse infection model, genetic loci that are specifically induced in vivo were identified. Twenty-two such loci were partially sequenced and analyzed. One of them was a well-studied virulence factor, pyochelin receptor (FptA), that is involved in iron acquisition. Fifteen showed significant homology to reported sequences in GenBank, while the remaining six did not. One locus, designated np20, encodes an open reading frame that shares amino acid sequence homology to transcriptional regulators, especially to the ferric uptake regulator (Fur) proteins of other bacteria. An insertional np20 null mutant strain of P. aeruginosa did not show a growth defect on laboratory media; however, its virulence on neutropenic mice was significantly reduced compared with that of a wild-type parent strain, demonstrating the importance of the np20 locus in the bacterial virulence. The successful isolation of genetic loci that affect bacterial virulence demonstrates the utility of the IVET system in identification of new virulence genes of P. aeruginosa. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:8816818

  12. Shift in Ribonucleotide Reductase Gene Expression in Pseudomonas aeruginosa during Infection ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Sjöberg, Britt-Marie; Torrents, Eduard

    2011-01-01

    The roles of different ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) in bacterial pathogenesis have not been studied systematically. In this work we analyzed the importance of the different Pseudomonas aeruginosa RNRs in pathogenesis using the Drosophila melanogaster host-pathogen interaction model. P. aeruginosa codes for three different RNRs with different environmental requirements. Class II and III RNR chromosomal mutants exhibited reduced virulence in this model. Translational reporter fusions of RNR gene nrdA, nrdJ, or nrdD to the green fluorescent protein were constructed to measure the expression of each class during the infection process. Analysis of the P. aeruginosa infection by flow cytometry revealed increased expression of nrdJ and nrdD and decreased nrdA expression during the infection process. Expression of each RNR class fits with the pathogenicities of the chromosomal deletion mutants. An extended understanding of the pathogenicity and physiology of P. aeruginosa will be important for the development of novel drugs against infections in cystic fibrosis patients. PMID:21502590

  13. LuxR homolog-independent gene regulation by acyl-homoserine lactones in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Chugani, Sudha; Greenberg, Everett Peter

    2010-06-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum control of gene expression involves three LuxR-type signal receptors LasR, RhlR, and QscR that respond to the LasI- and RhlI-generated acyl-homoserine lactone (acyl-HSL) signals 3OC12-HSL and C4-HSL. We found that a LasR-RhlR-QscR triple mutant responds to acyl-HSLs by regulating at least 37 genes. LuxR homolog-independent activation of the representative genes antA and catB also occurs in the wild type. Expression of antA was influenced the most by C10-HSL and to a lesser extent by other acyl-HSLs, including the P. aeruginosa 3OC12-HSL and C4-HSL signals. The ant and cat operons encode enzymes for the degradation of anthranilate to tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates. Our results indicate that LuxR homolog-independent acyl-HSL control of the ant and cat operons occurs via regulation of antR, which codes for the transcriptional activator of the ant operon. Although P. aeruginosa has multiple pathways for anthranilate synthesis, one pathway-the kynurenine pathway for tryptophan degradation-is required for acyl-HSL activation of the ant operon. The kynurenine pathway is also the critical source of anthranilate for energy metabolism via the antABC gene products, as well as the source of anthranilate for synthesis of the P. aeruginosa quinolone signal. Our discovery of LuxR homolog-independent responses to acyl-HSLs provides insight into acyl-HSL signaling. PMID:20498077

  14. Rapid detection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa targeting the toxA gene in intensive care unit patients from Beijing, China

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Derong; Zou, Dayang; Liu, Hui; Yang, Zhan; Huang, Simo; Liu, Ningwei; He, Xiaoming; Liu, Wei; Huang, Liuyu

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major opportunistic pathogen in hospital-acquired infections and exhibits increasing antibiotic resistance. A rapid and sensitive molecular method for its detection in clinical samples is needed to guide therapeutic treatment and to control P. aeruginosa outbreaks. In this study, we established a polymerase spiral reaction (PSR) method for rapid detection of P. aeruginosa by targeting the toxA gene, which regulates exotoxin A synthesis. Real-time turbidity monitoring and a chromogenic visualization using hydroxynaphthol blue were used to assess the reaction. All 17 non- P. aeruginosa strains tested negative, indicating the high specificity of the PSR primers. The detection limit was 2.3 pg/μl within 60 min at isothermal temperature (65°C), 10-fold more sensitive than conventional PCR. Then, the PSR assay was applied to a clinical surveillance of P. aeruginosa in three top hospitals in Beijing, China. Of the 130 sputum samples collected from ICU patients with suspected multi-resistant infections, 37 P. aeruginosa isolates were identified from the positive samples. All clinical strains belonged to 10 different P. aeruginosa multilocus sequence typing groups and exhibited high resistance to carbapenems, cephalosporins, and aminoglycosides. Interestingly, of the 33 imipenem-resistant isolates, 30 (90.9%) had lost the outer membrane porin oprD gene. Moreover, isolate SY-95, containing multiple antibiotic resistance genes, possessed the ability to hydrolyze all antibiotics used in clinic and was susceptible only to polymyxin B. Our study showed the high level of antibiotic resistance and co-occurrence of resistance genes in the clinical strains, indicating a rapid and continuing evolution of P. aeruginosa. In conclusion, we developed a P. aeruginosa PSR assay, which could be a useful tool for clinical screening, especially in case of poor resources, or for point-of-care testing. PMID:26500639

  15. Genetic Acquisition of NDM Gene Offers Sustainability among Clinical Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Clinical Settings

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Shweta; Upadhyay, Supriya; Sen, Malay Ranjan; Maurya, Anand Prakash; Choudhury, Debarati; Bhattacharjee, Amitabha

    2015-01-01

    New Delhi metallo β-lactamases are one of the most significant emerging resistance determinants towards carbapenem drugs. Their persistence and adaptability often depends on their genetic environment and linkage. This study reports a unique and novel arrangement of blaNDM-1 gene within clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from a tertiary referral hospital in north India. Three NDM positive clonally unrelated clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa were recovered from hospital patients. Association of integron with blaNDM-1 and presence of gene cassettes were assessed by PCR. Genetic linkage of NDM gene with ISAba125 was determined and in negative cases linkage in upstream region was mapped by inverse PCR. In which only one isolate’s NDM gene was linked with ISAba125 for mobility, while other two reveals new genetic arrangement and found to be inserted within DNA directed RNA polymerase gene of the host genome detected by inverse PCR followed by sequencing analysis. In continuation significance of this novel linkage was further analyzed wherein promoter site detected by Softberry BPROM software and activity were assessed by cloning succeeding semi-quantitative RT-PCR indicating the higher expression level of NDM gene. This study concluded out that the unique genetic makeup of NDM gene with DNA-dependent-RNA-polymerase favours adaptability to the host in hospital environment against huge antibiotic pressure. PMID:25635921

  16. Genetic acquisition of NDM gene offers sustainability among clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in clinical settings.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Shweta; Upadhyay, Supriya; Sen, Malay Ranjan; Maurya, Anand Prakash; Choudhury, Debarati; Bhattacharjee, Amitabha

    2015-01-01

    New Delhi metallo β-lactamases are one of the most significant emerging resistance determinants towards carbapenem drugs. Their persistence and adaptability often depends on their genetic environment and linkage. This study reports a unique and novel arrangement of blaNDM-1 gene within clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from a tertiary referral hospital in north India. Three NDM positive clonally unrelated clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa were recovered from hospital patients. Association of integron with blaNDM-1 and presence of gene cassettes were assessed by PCR. Genetic linkage of NDM gene with ISAba125 was determined and in negative cases linkage in upstream region was mapped by inverse PCR. In which only one isolate's NDM gene was linked with ISAba125 for mobility, while other two reveals new genetic arrangement and found to be inserted within DNA directed RNA polymerase gene of the host genome detected by inverse PCR followed by sequencing analysis. In continuation significance of this novel linkage was further analyzed wherein promoter site detected by Softberry BPROM software and activity were assessed by cloning succeeding semi-quantitative RT-PCR indicating the higher expression level of NDM gene. This study concluded out that the unique genetic makeup of NDM gene with DNA-dependent-RNA-polymerase favours adaptability to the host in hospital environment against huge antibiotic pressure. PMID:25635921

  17. Construction of a recA mutant of Azospirillum lipoferum and involvement of recA in phase variation.

    PubMed

    Vial, Ludovic; Pothier, Joël F; Normand, Philippe; Moënne-Loccoz, Yvan; Bally, René; Wisniewski-Dyé, Florence

    2004-07-15

    The plant-growth promoting rhizobacterium Azospirillum lipoferum strain 4B generates in vitro a stable phase variant designated 4VI at frequencies of 10(-4) to 10(-3) per cell per generation. Variant 4VI displays pleitropic modifications, such as the loss of swimming motility and the inability to assimilate certain sugars compared to the wild type. The mechanism underlying phase variation is unknown. To determine whether RecA-mediated processes are involved in phase variation, the recA gene of A. lipoferum 4B was cloned and sequenced and a recA mutant (termed 4BrecA) was constructed by allelic exchange. Strain 4BrecA showed increased sensitivity to UV and MMS compared with 4B and impaired recombinase activity. The ability to generate variants in vitro was not altered; the variants from 4BrecA exhibited all morphological and biochemical features characteristic of the variant generated by strain 4B. However, the frequency of variants generated by 4BrecA was increased by up to 10-fold. So, in contrast with many studies showing the abolition or a large reduction of the frequency of phase variation in recA mutants, this study describes an enhancement of phase variation in the absence of a functional recA. PMID:15251210

  18. Anabolic ornithine carbamoyltransferase of Pseudomonas aeruginosa: nucleotide sequence and transcriptional control of the argF structural gene.

    PubMed Central

    Itoh, Y; Soldati, L; Stalon, V; Falmagne, P; Terawaki, Y; Leisinger, T; Haas, D

    1988-01-01

    In Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO the anabolic ornithine carbamoyltransferase (OTCase, EC 2.1.3.3) is the product of the argF gene and the only arginine biosynthetic enzyme whose synthesis is repressible by arginine. We have determined the complete nucleotide sequence of the argF gene including its promoter-control region. The deduced amino acid sequence of the anabolic OTCase consists of 305 residues (Mr 33,924), and this was confirmed by the N-terminal amino acid sequence, the total amino acid composition, and the subunit Mr of the purified enzyme. The native anabolic OTCase (Mr 110,000 to 125,000) was found to be a trimer by cross-linking experiments. P. aeruginosa also has a catabolic OTCase (the arcB gene product), which catalyzes the reverse reaction of the anabolic conversion. At the nucleotide sequence level, the P. aeruginosa argF gene had 52.4% identity with the arcB gene. The Escherichia coli argF and argI genes, which code for anabolic OTCase isoenzymes, had 47.3 and 44.9% identity, respectively, with the P. aeruginosa argF sequence. This suggests that these four genes have evolved from a common ancestral gene. The arcB gene appears to be more closely related to the E. coli argF gene than to the P. aeruginosa argF gene. Two transcripts (mRNA-1, mRNA-2) of the P. aeruginosa argF gene were identified by S1 mapping. The transcription initiation site for mRNA-1 was preceded by sequences having partial homology with the E. coli -35 and -10 consensus promoter sequences. No sequence similar to consensus promoters of enteric bacteria was found upstream of the 5' end of mRNA-2. E. coli carrying a P. aeruginosa argF+ recombinant plasmid produced mRNA-1 with low efficiency but no (or very little) mRNA-2. Arginine repressed argF transcription in P. aeruginosa. In the argF promoter region no sequence homologous to the "arg box" (arginine operator module) of E. coli was found. The mechanism of arginine repression in P. aeruginosa thus appears to be different from that in

  19. Regulation of the hemA gene during 5-aminolevulinic acid formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Hungerer, C; Troup, B; Römling, U; Jahn, D

    1995-01-01

    The general tetrapyrrole precursor 5-aminolevulinic acid is formed in bacteria via two different biosynthetic pathways. Members of the alpha group of the proteobacteria use 5-aminolevulinic acid synthase for the condensation of succinyl-coenzyme A and glycine, while other bacteria utilize a two-step pathway from aminoacylated tRNA(Glu). The tRNA-dependent pathway, involving the enzymes glutamyl-tRNA reductase (encoded by hemA) and glutamate-1-semialdehyde-2,1-aminomutase (encoded by hemL), was demonstrated to be used by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas putida, Pseudomonas stutzeri, Comamonas testosteroni, Azotobacter vinelandii, and Acinetobacter calcoaceticus. To study the regulation of the pathway, the glutamyl-tRNA reductase gene (hemA) from P. aeruginosa was cloned by complementation of an Escherichia coli hemA mutant. The hemA gene was mapped to the SpeI A fragment and the DpnIL fragment of the P. aeruginosa chromosome corresponding to min 24.1 to 26.8. The cloned hemA gene, coding for a protein of 423 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 46,234 Da, forms an operon with the gene for protein release factor 1 (prf1). This translational factor mediates the termination of the protein chain at the ribosome at amber and ochre codons. Since the cloned hemA gene did not possess one of the appropriate stop codons, an autoregulatory mechanism such as that postulated for the enterobacterial system was ruled out. Three open reading frames of unknown function transcribed in the opposite direction to the hemA gene were found. hemM/orf1 and orf2 were found to be homologous to open reading frames located in the 5' region of enterobacterial hemA genes. Utilization of both transcription start sites was changed in a P. aeruginosa mutant missing the oxygen regulator Anr (Fnr analog), indicating the involvement of the transcription factor in hemA expression. DNA sequences homologous to one half of an Anr binding site were detected at one of the determined

  20. Microcyclamide Biosynthesis in Two Strains of Microcystis aeruginosa: from Structure to Genes and Vice Versa▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Ziemert, Nadine; Ishida, Keishi; Quillardet, Philippe; Bouchier, Christiane; Hertweck, Christian; de Marsac, Nicole Tandeau; Dittmann, Elke

    2008-01-01

    Comparative analysis of related biosynthetic gene clusters can provide new insights into the versatility of these pathways and allow the discovery of new natural products. The freshwater cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa NIES298 produces the cytotoxic peptide microcyclamide. Here, we provide evidence that the cyclic hexapeptide is formed by a ribosomal pathway through the activity of a set of processing enzymes closely resembling those recently shown to be involved in patellamide biosynthesis in cyanobacterial symbionts of ascidians. Besides two subtilisin-type proteases and a heterocyclization enzyme, the gene cluster discovered in strain NIES298 encodes six further open reading frames, two of them without similarity to enzymes encoded by the patellamide gene cluster. Analyses of genomic data of a second cyanobacterial strain, M. aeruginosa PCC 7806, guided the discovery and structural elucidation of two novel peptides of the microcyclamide family. The identification of the microcyclamide biosynthetic genes provided an avenue by which to study the regulation of peptide synthesis at the transcriptional level. The precursor genes were strongly and constitutively expressed throughout the growth phase, excluding the autoinduction of these peptides, as has been observed for several peptide pheromone families in bacteria. PMID:18245249

  1. Identification of Novel Genes Responsible for Overexpression of ampC in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsumi, Yuko; Tomita, Haruyoshi

    2013-01-01

    The development of resistance to antipseudomonal penicillins and cephalosporins mediated by the chromosomal ampC gene in Pseudomonas aeruginosa is of clinical importance. We isolated piperacillin-resistant mutants derived from P. aeruginosa PAO1 and analyzed two mutants that had an insertion in mpl and nuoN. One mutant, YT1677, was resistant to piperacillin and ceftazidime and had an insertion in mpl, which encodes UDP-N-acetylmuramate:l-alanyl-γ-d-glutamyl-meso-diaminopimelate ligase. The other mutant, YT7988, showed increased MICs of piperacillin, ceftazidime, cefepime, and cefoperazone, and the insertion was mapped to nuoN, which encodes NADH dehydrogenase I chain N. Complementation experiments demonstrated that these mutations resulted in higher levels of resistance to β-lactams. The expression of genes reported to be involved in β-lactam resistance was examined by real-time PCR in YT1677 and YT7988 mutants. Overexpression was observed for only ampC, and other genes were expressed normally. Deletion of the ampR gene in YT1677 and YT7988 resulted in decreased expression of ampC, indicating that the mutations in YT1677 and YT7988 affected the expression of ampC through the function of AmpR. PMID:24041903

  2. [Incidence of alginate-coding gene in carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains].

    PubMed

    Bogiel, Tomasz; Kwiecińska-Piróg, Joanna; Kozuszko, Sylwia; Gospodarek, Eugenia

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa rods are one of the most common isolated opportunistic nosocomial pathogens. Strains usually are capable to secret a capsule-like polysaccharide called alginate important for evasion of host defenses, especially during chronic pulmonary disease of patients with cystic fibrosis. Most genes for alginate biosynthesis and lysis are encoded by the operon. The aim of our study was to evaluate the incidence of algD sequence, generally use for alginate-coding gene detection, in 120 P. aeruginosa strains resistant to carbapenems. All isolates were obtained in the Department of Clinical Microbiology University Hospital no. 1 of dr A. Jurasz Collegium Medicum of L. Rydygier in Bydgoszcz Nicolaus Copernicus University in Toruń. Examined strains demonstrated resistance to carbenicillin (90,0%), ticarcillin (89,2%) and ticarcillin clavulanate (86,7%). All strains were susceptible to colistin. The majority of examined strains was susceptible to ceftazidime and cefepime (40,8% each) and norfloxacin (37,5%). Presence of algD gene - noted in 112 (93,3%) strains proves that not every strain is capable to produce alginate. It was also found out that differences in algD genes incidence in case of different clinical material that strains were isolated from were not statistically important. PMID:22184909

  3. Gene PA2449 Is Essential for Glycine Metabolism and Pyocyanin Biosynthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1

    PubMed Central

    Lundgren, Benjamin R.; Thornton, William; Dornan, Mark H.; Villegas-Peñaranda, Luis Roberto; Boddy, Christopher N.

    2013-01-01

    Many pseudomonads produce redox active compounds called phenazines that function in a variety of biological processes. Phenazines are well known for their toxicity against non-phenazine-producing organisms, which allows them to serve as crucial biocontrol agents and virulence factors during infection. As for other secondary metabolites, conditions of nutritional stress or limitation stimulate the production of phenazines, but little is known of the molecular details underlying this phenomenon. Using a combination of microarray and metabolite analyses, we demonstrate that the assimilation of glycine as a carbon source and the biosynthesis of pyocyanin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 are both dependent on the PA2449 gene. The inactivation of the PA2449 gene was found to influence the transcription of a core set of genes encoding a glycine cleavage system, serine hydroxymethyltransferase, and serine dehydratase. PA2449 also affected the transcription of several genes that are integral in cell signaling and pyocyanin biosynthesis in P. aeruginosa PAO1. This study sheds light on the unexpected relationship between the utilization of an unfavorable carbon source and the production of pyocyanin. PA2449 is conserved among pseudomonads and might be universally involved in the assimilation of glycine among this metabolically diverse group of bacteria. PMID:23457254

  4. Assessing the role of Pseudomonas aeruginosa surface-active gene expression in hexadecane biodegradation in sand.

    PubMed

    Holden, P A; LaMontagne, M G; Bruce, A K; Miller, W G; Lindow, S E

    2002-05-01

    Low pollutant substrate bioavailability limits hydrocarbon biodegradation in soils. Bacterially produced surface-active compounds, such as rhamnolipid biosurfactant and the PA bioemulsifying protein produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, can improve bioavailability and biodegradation in liquid culture, but their production and roles in soils are unknown. In this study, we asked if the genes for surface-active compounds are expressed in unsaturated porous media contaminated with hexadecane. Furthermore, if expression does occur, is biodegradation enhanced? To detect expression of genes for surface-active compounds, we fused the gfp reporter gene either to the promoter region of pra, which encodes for the emulsifying PA protein, or to the promoter of the transcriptional activator rhlR. We assessed green fluorescent protein (GFP) production conferred by these gene fusions in P. aeruginosa PG201. GFP was produced in sand culture, indicating that the rhlR and pra genes are both transcribed in unsaturated porous media. Confocal laser scanning microscopy of liquid drops revealed that gfp expression was localized at the hexadecane-water interface. Wild-type PG201 and its mutants that are deficient in either PA protein, rhamnolipid synthesis, or both were studied to determine if the genetic potential to make surface-active compounds confers an advantage to P. aeruginosa biodegrading hexadecane in sand. Hexadecane depletion rates and carbon utilization efficiency in sand culture were the same for wild-type and mutant strains, i.e., whether PG201 was proficient or deficient in surfactant or emulsifier production. Environmental scanning electron microscopy revealed that colonization of sand grains was sparse, with cells in small monolayer clusters instead of multilayered biofilms. Our findings suggest that P. aeruginosa likely produces surface-active compounds in sand culture. However, the ability to produce surface-active compounds did not enhance biodegradation in sand culture

  5. Integrated whole-genome screening for Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence genes using multiple disease models reveals that pathogenicity is host specific.

    PubMed

    Dubern, Jean-Frédéric; Cigana, Cristina; De Simone, Maura; Lazenby, James; Juhas, Mario; Schwager, Stephan; Bianconi, Irene; Döring, Gerd; Eberl, Leo; Williams, Paul; Bragonzi, Alessandra; Cámara, Miguel

    2015-11-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a multi-host opportunistic pathogen causing a wide range of diseases because of the armoury of virulence factors it produces, and it is difficult to eradicate because of its intrinsic resistance to antibiotics. Using an integrated whole-genome approach, we searched for P. aeruginosa virulence genes with multi-host relevance. We constructed a random library of 57 360 Tn5 mutants in P. aeruginosa PAO1-L and screened it in vitro for those showing pleiotropic effects in virulence phenotypes (reduced swarming, exo-protease and pyocyanin production). A set of these pleiotropic mutants were assayed for reduced toxicity in Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, human cell lines and mice. Surprisingly, the screening revealed that the virulence of the majority of P. aeruginosa mutants varied between disease models, suggesting that virulence is dependent on the disease model used and hence the host environment. Genomic analysis revealed that these virulence-related genes encoded proteins from almost all functional classes, which were conserved among P. aeruginosa strains. Thus, we provide strong evidence that although P. aeruginosa is capable of infecting a wide range of hosts, many of its virulence determinants are host specific. These findings have important implication when searching for novel anti-virulence targets to develop new treatments against P. aeruginosa. PMID:25845292

  6. Use of In-Biofilm Expression Technology To Identify Genes Involved in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Development†

    PubMed Central

    Finelli, Antonio; Gallant, Claude V.; Jarvi, Keith; Burrows, Lori L.

    2003-01-01

    Mature Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms form complex three-dimensional architecture and are tolerant of antibiotics and other antimicrobial compounds. In this work, an in vivo expression technology system, originally designed to study virulence-associated genes in complex mammalian environments, was used to identify genes up-regulated in P. aeruginosa grown to a mature (5-day) biofilm. Five unique cloned promoters unable to promote in vitro growth in the absence of purines after recovery from the biofilm environment were identified. The open reading frames downstream of the cloned promoter regions were identified, and knockout mutants were generated. Insertional mutation of PA5065, a homologue of Escherichia coli ubiB, was lethal, while inactivation of PA0240 (a porin homologue), PA3710 (a putative alcohol dehydrogenase), and PA3782 (a homologue of the Streptomyces griseus developmental regulator adpA) had no effect on planktonic growth but caused defects in biofilm formation in static and flowing systems. In competition experiments, mutants demonstrated reduced fitness compared with the parent strain, comprising less than 0.0001% of total biofilm cells after 5 days. Therefore, using in-biofilm expression technology, we have identified novel genes that do not affect planktonic growth but are important for biofilm formation, development, and fitness. PMID:12700249

  7. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA-I lectin gene molecular analysis and expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Avichezer, D; Gilboa-Garber, N; Garber, N C; Katcoff, D J

    1994-05-17

    This communication describes a Pseudomonas aeruginosa DNA fragment (cloned in lambda gt11) which contains the structural gene coding for the galactophilic PA-I lectin (pa-1L, 369 bp) and an additional downstream 237 bp sequence. This DNA is relatively rich in G + C (54%), and exhibits a strong codon preference biased for XXC and also for XXG. The Shine-Dalgarno site of the gene is preceded by an adjacent ATATAT sequence resembling the -10 sequence of the Escherichia coli promoter. The stop codons are followed by a stem and loop structure--typical of the rho-independent transcriptional stop element. This lambda gt11-cloned DNA was expressed in E. coli Y1090 cells. The resulting cell lysates exhibited a galactose-specific hemagglutination and a protein with electrophoretic mobility similar to that of the native PA-I, which were both absent from E. coli lysates infected with ovalbumin gene-bearing bacteriophages. The recombinant PA-I, purified by gel filtration and affinity chromatography, was shown to be a galactophilic hemagglutinin resembling the native lectin in molecular weight and selective reactivity with rabbit anti native PA-I serum. These results are important for development of a safe Pseudomonas aeruginosa vaccine using recombinant DNA techniques, thus avoiding contamination with toxic products of this bacterium. PMID:8193158

  8. Identification of Genes Involved in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm-Specific Resistance to Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Fritsch, Meredith; Hammond, Lisa; Landreville, Ryan; Slatculescu, Cristina; Colavita, Antonio; Mah, Thien-Fah

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a key opportunistic pathogen characterized by its biofilm formation ability and high-level multiple antibiotic resistance. By screening a library of random transposon insertion mutants with an increased biofilm-specifc antibiotic susceptibility, we previously identified 3 genes or operons of P. aeruginosa UCBPP-PA14 (ndvB, PA1875–1877 and tssC1) that do not affect biofilm formation but are involved in biofilm-specific antibiotic resistance. In this study, we demonstrate that PA0756–0757 (encoding a putative two-component regulatory system), PA2070 and PA5033 (encoding hypothetical proteins of unknown function) display increased expression in biofilm cells and also have a role in biofilm-specific antibiotic resistance. Furthermore, deletion of each of PA0756, PA2070 and PA5033 resulted in a significant reduction of lethality in Caenorhabditis elegans, indicating a role for these genes in both biofilm-specific antibiotic resistance and persistence in vivo. Together, these data suggest that these genes are potential targets for antimicrobial agents. PMID:23637868

  9. Normal and Cystic Fibrosis Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells Infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa Exhibit Distinct Gene Activation Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Balloy, Viviane; Varet, Hugo; Dillies, Marie-Agnès; Proux, Caroline; Jagla, Bernd; Coppée, Jean-Yves; Tabary, Olivier; Corvol, Harriet; Chignard, Michel; Guillot, Loïc

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims In cystic fibrosis (CF), Pseudomonas aeruginosa is not eradicated from the lower respiratory tract and is associated with epithelial inflammation that eventually causes tissue damage. To identify the molecular determinants of an effective response to P. aeruginosa infection, we performed a transcriptomic analysis of primary human bronchial epithelial cells from healthy donors (CTRL) 2, 4, and 6 h after induced P. aeruginosa infection. Compared to noninfected cells, infected cells showed changes in gene activity, which were most marked 6 h postinfection and usually consisted in upregulation. Results By comparing for each time point of infection, the transcriptomic response of epithelial cells from CF patients and healthy donors, we identified 851, 638, 667, and 980 differentially expressed genes 0, 2, 4, and 6 h postinfection, respectively. Gene selection followed by bioinformatic analysis showed that most of the differentially expressed genes, either up- or downregulated, were in the protein-binding and catalytic gene-ontology categories. Finally, we established that the protein products of the genes exhibiting the greatest differential upregulation (CSF2, CCL2, TNF, CSF3, MMP1, and MMP10) between CF patients and CTRL were produced in higher amounts by infected cells from CF patients versus CTRL. Conclusions The differentially expressed genes in CF patients may constitute a signature for a detrimental inflammatory response and for an inefficient P. aeruginosa host-cell response. PMID:26485688

  10. Clove bud oil reduces kynurenine and inhibits pqs A gene expression in P. aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    H, Jayalekshmi; Omanakuttan, Athira; Pandurangan, N; S Vargis, Vidhu; Maneesh, M; G Nair, Bipin; B Kumar, Geetha

    2016-04-01

    Quorum sensing (QS), a communication system involved in virulence of pathogenic bacteria like Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a promising target to combat multiple drug resistance. In vitro studies using clove bud oil (CBO) in P. aeruginosa revealed a concentration dependent attenuation of a variety of virulence factors including motility, extracellular DNA, exopolysaccharides and pigment production. Furthermore, treatment with CBO demonstrated a distinct dose-dependent reduction in biofilm formation as well as promoting dispersion of already formed biofilm, observations that were also supported by porcine skin ex vivo studies. Expression studies of genes involved in signalling systems of P. aeruginosa indicated a specific decrease in transcription of pqsA, but not in the lasI or rhlI levels. Additionally, the expression of vfr and gacA genes, involved in regulation, was also not affected by CBO treatment. CBO also influenced the PQS signalling pathway by decreasing the levels of kynurenine, an effect which was reversed by the addition of exogenous kynurenine. Though the synthesis of the signalling molecules of the Las and Rhl pathways was not affected by CBO, their activity was significantly affected, as observed by decrease in levels of their various effectors. Molecular modelling studies demonstrated that eugenol, the major component of CBO, favourably binds to the QS receptor by hydrophobic interactions as well as by hydrogen bonding with Arg61 and Tyr41 which are key amino acid residues of the LasR receptor. These results thus elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying the action of CBO and provide the basis for the identification of an attractive QS inhibitor. PMID:26821927

  11. Sequence and transcriptional start site of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa outer membrane porin protein F gene.

    PubMed Central

    Duchêne, M; Schweizer, A; Lottspeich, F; Krauss, G; Marget, M; Vogel, K; von Specht, B U; Domdey, H

    1988-01-01

    Porin F is one of the major proteins of the outer membrane of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. It forms water-filled pores of variable size. Porin F is a candidate for a vaccine against P. aeruginosa because it antigenically cross-reacts in all serotype strains of the International Antigenic Typing Scheme. We have isolated the gene for porin F from a lambda EMBL3 bacteriophage library by using oligodeoxynucleotide hybridization probes and have determined its nucleotide sequence. Different peptide sequences obtained from isolated porin F confirmed the deduced protein sequence. The mature protein consists of 326 amino acid residues and has a molecular weight of 35,250. The precursor contains an N-terminal signal peptide of 24 amino acid residues. S1 protection and primer extension experiments, together with Northern (RNA) blots, indicate that the mRNA coding for porin F is monocistronic with short untranslated regions of about 58 bases at the 5' end and about 47 bases at the 3' end. The sequences in the -10 and -35 regions upstream of the transcriptional start site are closely related to the Escherichia coli promoter consensus sequences, which explains why the porin F gene is expressed in E. coli under the control of its own promoter. The amino acid sequence of porin F is not homologous to the different E. coli porins OmpF, OmpC, LamB, and PhoE. On the other hand, a highly homologous region of 30 amino acids between the OmpA proteins of different enteric bacteria and porin F of P. aeruginosa was detected. The core region of the homology to E. coli OmpA had 11 of 12 amino acid residues in common. Images PMID:2447060

  12. Rhodococcus erythropolis BG43 Genes Mediating Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quinolone Signal Degradation and Virulence Factor Attenuation.

    PubMed

    Müller, Christine; Birmes, Franziska S; Rückert, Christian; Kalinowski, Jörn; Fetzner, Susanne

    2015-11-01

    Rhodococcus erythropolis BG43 is able to degrade the Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing signal molecules PQS (Pseudomonas quinolone signal) [2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone] and HHQ [2-heptyl-4(1H)-quinolone] to anthranilic acid. Based on the hypothesis that degradation of HHQ might involve hydroxylation to PQS followed by dioxygenolytic cleavage of the heterocyclic ring and hydrolysis of the resulting N-octanoylanthranilate, the genome was searched for corresponding candidate genes. Two gene clusters, aqdA1B1C1 and aqdA2B2C2, each predicted to code for a hydrolase, a flavin monooxygenase, and a dioxygenase related to 1H-3-hydroxy-4-oxoquinaldine 2,4-dioxygenase, were identified on circular plasmid pRLCBG43 of strain BG43. Transcription of all genes was upregulated by PQS, suggesting that both gene clusters code for alkylquinolone-specific catabolic enzymes. An aqdR gene encoding a putative transcriptional regulator, which was also inducible by PQS, is located adjacent to the aqdA2B2C2 cluster. Expression of aqdA2B2C2 in Escherichia coli conferred the ability to degrade HHQ and PQS to anthranilic acid; however, for E. coli transformed with aqdA1B1C1, only PQS degradation was observed. Purification of the recombinant AqdC1 protein verified that it catalyzes the cleavage of PQS to form N-octanoylanthranilic acid and carbon monoxide and revealed apparent Km and kcat values for PQS of ∼27 μM and 21 s(-1), respectively. Heterologous expression of the PQS dioxygenase gene aqdC1 or aqdC2 in P. aeruginosa PAO1 quenched the production of the virulence factors pyocyanin and rhamnolipid and reduced the synthesis of the siderophore pyoverdine. Thus, the toolbox of quorum-quenching enzymes is expanded by new PQS dioxygenases. PMID:26319870

  13. Gene expression and physiological role of Pseudomonas aeruginosa methionine sulfoxide reductases during oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Romsang, Adisak; Atichartpongkul, Sopapan; Trinachartvanit, Wachareeporn; Vattanaviboon, Paiboon; Mongkolsuk, Skorn

    2013-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 has two differentially expressed methionine sulfoxide reductase genes: msrA (PA5018) and msrB (PA2827). The msrA gene is expressed constitutively at a high level throughout all growth phases, whereas msrB expression is highly induced by oxidative stress, such as sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) treatment. Inactivation of either msrA or msrB or both genes (msrA msrB mutant) rendered the mutants less resistant than the parental PAO1 strain to oxidants such as NaOCl and H2O2. Unexpectedly, msr mutants have disparate resistance patterns when exposed to paraquat, a superoxide generator. The msrA mutant had a higher paraquat resistance level than the msrB mutant, which had a lower paraquat resistance level than the PAO1 strain. The expression levels of msrA showed an inverse correlation with the paraquat resistance level, and this atypical paraquat resistance pattern was not observed with msrB. Virulence testing using a Drosophila melanogaster model revealed that the msrA, msrB, and, to a greater extent, msrA msrB double mutants had an attenuated virulence phenotype. The data indicate that msrA and msrB are essential genes for oxidative stress protection and bacterial virulence. The pattern of expression and mutant phenotypes of P. aeruginosa msrA and msrB differ from previously characterized msr genes from other bacteria. Thus, as highly conserved genes, the msrA and msrB have diverse expression patterns and physiological roles that depend on the environmental niche where the bacteria thrive. PMID:23687271

  14. Rhodococcus erythropolis BG43 Genes Mediating Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quinolone Signal Degradation and Virulence Factor Attenuation

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Christine; Birmes, Franziska S.; Rückert, Christian; Kalinowski, Jörn

    2015-01-01

    Rhodococcus erythropolis BG43 is able to degrade the Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing signal molecules PQS (Pseudomonas quinolone signal) [2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone] and HHQ [2-heptyl-4(1H)-quinolone] to anthranilic acid. Based on the hypothesis that degradation of HHQ might involve hydroxylation to PQS followed by dioxygenolytic cleavage of the heterocyclic ring and hydrolysis of the resulting N-octanoylanthranilate, the genome was searched for corresponding candidate genes. Two gene clusters, aqdA1B1C1 and aqdA2B2C2, each predicted to code for a hydrolase, a flavin monooxygenase, and a dioxygenase related to 1H-3-hydroxy-4-oxoquinaldine 2,4-dioxygenase, were identified on circular plasmid pRLCBG43 of strain BG43. Transcription of all genes was upregulated by PQS, suggesting that both gene clusters code for alkylquinolone-specific catabolic enzymes. An aqdR gene encoding a putative transcriptional regulator, which was also inducible by PQS, is located adjacent to the aqdA2B2C2 cluster. Expression of aqdA2B2C2 in Escherichia coli conferred the ability to degrade HHQ and PQS to anthranilic acid; however, for E. coli transformed with aqdA1B1C1, only PQS degradation was observed. Purification of the recombinant AqdC1 protein verified that it catalyzes the cleavage of PQS to form N-octanoylanthranilic acid and carbon monoxide and revealed apparent Km and kcat values for PQS of ∼27 μM and 21 s−1, respectively. Heterologous expression of the PQS dioxygenase gene aqdC1 or aqdC2 in P. aeruginosa PAO1 quenched the production of the virulence factors pyocyanin and rhamnolipid and reduced the synthesis of the siderophore pyoverdine. Thus, the toolbox of quorum-quenching enzymes is expanded by new PQS dioxygenases. PMID:26319870

  15. Silver-coated carbon nanotubes downregulate the expression of Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence genes: a potential mechanism for their antimicrobial effect

    PubMed Central

    Dosunmu, Ejovwoke; Chaudhari, Atul A; Singh, Shree R; Dennis, Vida A; Pillai, Shreekumar R

    2015-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of silver-coated carbon nanotubes (AgCNTs) and their potential mode of action against mucoid and nonmucoid strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was investigated in vitro. The results showed that AgCNTs exhibited antimicrobial activity against both strains with minimum inhibitory concentrations of approximately 8 µg/mL, indicating a high sensitivity of P. aeruginosa to AgCNTs. AgCNTs were also bactericidal against both strains at the same minimum inhibitory concentration. Scanning and transmission electron-microscopy studies further revealed that a majority of the cells treated with AgCNTs transformed from smooth rod-shape morphology to disintegrated cells with broken/damaged membranes, resulting in leakage of cytoplasmic contents to produce ghost cells. The molecular effects of AgCNTs on P. aeruginosa genes involved in virulence and pathogenicity, stress response, and efflux pumps were evaluated for changes in their expression. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) showed that after exposure to AgCNTs, the expression levels of the rpoS, rsmZ, and oprD genes were significantly downregulated in both strains of P. aeruginosa compared to the untreated samples. These results suggest that the mechanism of action of AgCNTs may be attributed to their effect on cell-membrane integrity, downregulation of virulence-gene expression, and induction of general and oxidative stress in P. aeruginosa. PMID:26346483

  16. Silver-coated carbon nanotubes downregulate the expression of Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence genes: a potential mechanism for their antimicrobial effect.

    PubMed

    Dosunmu, Ejovwoke; Chaudhari, Atul A; Singh, Shree R; Dennis, Vida A; Pillai, Shreekumar R

    2015-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of silver-coated carbon nanotubes (AgCNTs) and their potential mode of action against mucoid and nonmucoid strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was investigated in vitro. The results showed that AgCNTs exhibited antimicrobial activity against both strains with minimum inhibitory concentrations of approximately 8 µg/mL, indicating a high sensitivity of P. aeruginosa to AgCNTs. AgCNTs were also bactericidal against both strains at the same minimum inhibitory concentration. Scanning and transmission electron-microscopy studies further revealed that a majority of the cells treated with AgCNTs transformed from smooth rod-shape morphology to disintegrated cells with broken/damaged membranes, resulting in leakage of cytoplasmic contents to produce ghost cells. The molecular effects of AgCNTs on P. aeruginosa genes involved in virulence and pathogenicity, stress response, and efflux pumps were evaluated for changes in their expression. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) showed that after exposure to AgCNTs, the expression levels of the rpoS, rsmZ, and oprD genes were significantly downregulated in both strains of P. aeruginosa compared to the untreated samples. These results suggest that the mechanism of action of AgCNTs may be attributed to their effect on cell-membrane integrity, downregulation of virulence-gene expression, and induction of general and oxidative stress in P. aeruginosa. PMID:26346483

  17. A genomic island integrated into recA of Vibrio cholerae contains a divergent recA and provides multi-pathway protection from DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Rapa, Rita A; Islam, Atiqul; Monahan, Leigh G; Mutreja, Ankur; Thomson, Nicholas; Charles, Ian G; Stokes, Harold W; Labbate, Maurizio

    2015-04-01

    Lateral gene transfer (LGT) has been crucial in the evolution of the cholera pathogen, Vibrio cholerae. The two major virulence factors are present on two different mobile genetic elements, a bacteriophage containing the cholera toxin genes and a genomic island (GI) containing the intestinal adhesin genes. Non-toxigenic V. cholerae in the aquatic environment are a major source of novel DNA that allows the pathogen to morph via LGT. In this study, we report a novel GI from a non-toxigenic V. cholerae strain containing multiple genes involved in DNA repair including the recombination repair gene recA that is 23% divergent from the indigenous recA and genes involved in the translesion synthesis pathway. This is the first report of a GI containing the critical gene recA and the first report of a GI that targets insertion into a specific site within recA. We show that possession of the island in Escherichia coli is protective against DNA damage induced by UV-irradiation and DNA targeting antibiotics. This study highlights the importance of genetic elements such as GIs in the evolution of V. cholerae and emphasizes the importance of environmental strains as a source of novel DNA that can influence the pathogenicity of toxigenic strains. PMID:24889424

  18. Co-Cultures of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Roseobacter denitrificans Reveal Shifts in Gene Expression Levels Compared to Solo Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Conway, Crystal A.; Esiobu, Nwadiuto; Lopez, Jose V.

    2012-01-01

    Consistent biosynthesis of desired secondary metabolites (SMs) from pure microbial cultures is often unreliable. In a proof-of-principle study to induce SM gene expression and production, we describe mixed “co-culturing” conditions and monitoring of messages via quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). Gene expression of model bacterial strains (Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and Roseobacter denitrificans Och114) was analyzed in pure solo and mixed cocultures to infer the effects of interspecies interactions on gene expression in vitro, Two P. aeruginosa genes (PhzH coding for portions of the phenazine antibiotic pathway leading to pyocyanin (PCN) and the RhdA gene for thiosulfate: cyanide sulfurtransferase (Rhodanese)) and two R. denitrificans genes (BetaLact for metallo-beta-lactamase and the DMSP gene for dimethylpropiothetin dethiomethylase) were assessed for differential expression. Results showed that R. denitrificans DMSP and BetaLact gene expression became elevated in a mixed culture. In contrast, P. aeruginosa co-cultures with R. denitrificans or a third species did not increase target gene expression above control levels. This paper provides insight for better control of target SM gene expression in vitro and bypass complex genetic engineering manipulations. PMID:22566756

  19. Analysis of transcription of the exotoxin A gene of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Grant, C C; Vasil, M L

    1986-01-01

    Analysis of RNA isolated from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA103 and PAKS grown under Fe2+-limiting (0.08 microgram/ml) and Fe2+-sufficient (10 micrograms/ml) conditions demonstrated that exotoxin A (ETA) expression is regulated by Fe2+ at the level of transcription. S1 nuclease mapping revealed two 5' termini of the tox transcript, 89 base pairs (bp) (S1A) and 62 bp (S1B) 5' to the ETA initiation codon. There appeared to be no consensus promoter sequence for either tox transcript. An 8-bp direct repeat was found 5' to the start of transcript S1A. Transcript S1B mapped 8 bp upstream of a dodecamer sequence conserved between the ETA and phospholipase C genes of P. aeruginosa. Multicopy plasmids in which the expression of ETA is directed from the Escherichia coli trp promoter (ptrpETA-RSF1010) or the tox promoter (pCMtox) were constructed and mobilized into a Tox-P. aeruginosa strain, WR5. WR5 synthesized and secreted high levels of ETA when it was expressed from the E. coli trp promoter; however, the synthesis of ETA from its own promoter in this strain was very low. These and other data suggest that the expression of ETA is under a positive control mechanism. A fusion of the ETA promoter fragment to lacZ was constructed. Use of this fusion plasmid revealed that this DNA fragment directed the synthesis of beta-galactosidase in E. coli at very low levels and that the synthesis of beta-galactosidase from this fusion in E. coli was not regulated by Fe2+. Images PMID:2430945

  20. Pseudomonas aeruginosa lipopolysaccharide inhibits Candida albicans hyphae formation and alters gene expression during biofilm development.

    PubMed

    Bandara, H M H N; K Cheung, B P; Watt, R M; Jin, L J; Samaranayake, L P

    2013-02-01

    Elucidation of bacterial and fungal interactions in multispecies biofilms will have major impacts on understanding the pathophysiology of infections. The objectives of this study were to (i) evaluate the effect of Pseudomonas aeruginosa lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on Candida albicans hyphal development and transcriptional regulation, (ii) investigate protein expression during biofilm formation, and (iii) propose likely molecular mechanisms for these interactions. The effect of LPS on C. albicans biofilms was assessed by XTT-reduction and growth curve assays, light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Changes in candidal hypha-specific genes (HSGs) and transcription factor EFG1 expression were assessed by real-time polymerase chain reaction and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, respectively. Proteome changes were examined by mass spectrometry. Both metabolic activities and growth rates of LPS-treated C. albicans biofilms were significantly lower (P < 0.05). There were higher proportions of budding yeasts in test biofilms compared with the controls. SEM and CLSM further confirmed these data. Significantly upregulated HSGs (at 48 h) and EFG1 (up to 48 h) were noted in the test biofilms (P < 0.05) but cAMP levels remained unaffected. Proteomic analysis showed suppression of candidal septicolysin-like protein, potential reductase-flavodoxin fragment, serine hydroxymethyltransferase, hypothetical proteins Cao19.10301(ATP7), CaO19.4716(GDH1), CaO19.11135(PGK1), CaO19.9877(HNT1) by P. aeruginosa LPS. Our data imply that bacterial LPS inhibit C. albicans biofilm formation and hyphal development. The P. aeruginosa LPS likely target glycolysis-associated mechanisms during candidal filamentation. PMID:23194472

  1. Genetic Diversity among Arthrobacter Species Collected across a Heterogeneous Series of Terrestrial Deep-Subsurface Sediments as Determined on the Basis of 16S rRNA and recA Gene Sequences

    PubMed Central

    van Waasbergen, Lorraine G.; Balkwill, David L.; Crocker, Fiona H.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Miller, Robert V.

    2000-01-01

    This study was undertaken in an effort to understand how the population structure of bacteria within terrestrial deep-subsurface environments correlates with the physical and chemical structure of their environment. Phylogenetic analysis was performed on strains of Arthrobacter that were collected from various depths, which included a number of different sedimentary units from the Yakima Barricade borehole at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford site, Washington, in August 1992. At the same time that bacteria were isolated, detailed information on the physical, chemical, and microbiological characteristics of the sediments was collected. Phylogenetic trees were prepared from the 39 deep-subsurface Arthrobacter isolates (as well as 17 related type strains) based on 16S rRNA and recA gene sequences. Analyses based on each gene independently were in general agreement. These analyses showed that, for all but one of the strata (sedimentary layers characterized by their own unifying lithologic composition), the deep-subsurface isolates from the same stratum are largely monophyletic. Notably, the layers for which this is true were composed of impermeable sediments. This suggests that the populations within each of these strata have remained isolated under constant, uniform conditions, which have selected for a particular dominant genotype in each stratum. Conversely, the few strains isolated from a gravel-rich layer appeared along several lineages. This suggests that the higher-permeability gravel decreases the degree of isolation of this population (through greater groundwater flow), creating fluctuations in environmental conditions or allowing migration, such that a dominant population has not been established. No correlation was seen between the relationship of the strains and any particular chemical or physical characteristics of the sediments. Thus, this work suggests that within sedimentary deep-subsurface environments, permeability of the deposits plays a major

  2. CLONING, EXPRESSION, AND NUCLEOTIDE SEQUENCE OF THE PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA 142 OHB GENES CODING FOR OXYGENOLYTIC ORTHO DEHALOGENATION OF HALOBENZOATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have cloned and characterized novel oxygenolytic ortho-dehalogenation (ohb) genes from 2-chlorobenzoate (2-CBA)- and2,4-dichlorobenzoate (2,4-dCBA)-degrading Pseudomonas aeruginosa 142. Among 3,700 Escherichia coli recombinants, two clones,DH5alphaF' (pOD22) and DH5alphaF'; ...

  3. The pvc operon regulates the expression of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa fimbrial chaperone/usher pathway (cup) genes.

    PubMed

    Qaisar, Uzma; Luo, Liming; Haley, Cecily L; Brady, Sean F; Carty, Nancy L; Colmer-Hamood, Jane A; Hamood, Abdul N

    2013-01-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa fimbrial structures encoded by the cup gene clusters (cupB and cupC) contribute to its attachment to abiotic surfaces and biofilm formation. The P. aeruginosa pvcABCD gene cluster encodes enzymes that synthesize a novel isonitrile functionalized cumarin, paerucumarin. Paerucumarin has already been characterized chemically, but this is the first report elucidating its role in bacterial biology. We examined the relationship between the pvc operon and the cup gene clusters in the P. aeruginosa strain MPAO1. Mutations within the pvc genes compromised biofilm development and significantly reduced the expression of cupB1-6 and cupC1-3, as well as different genes of the cupB/cupC two-component regulatory systems, roc1/roc2. Adjacent to pvc is the transcriptional regulator ptxR. A ptxR mutation in MPAO1 significantly reduced the expression of the pvc genes, the cupB/cupC genes, and the roc1/roc2 genes. Overexpression of the intact chromosomally-encoded pvc operon by a ptxR plasmid significantly enhanced cupB2, cupC2, rocS1, and rocS2 expression and biofilm development. Exogenously added paerucumarin significantly increased the expression of cupB2, cupC2, rocS1 and rocS2 in the pvcA mutant. Our results suggest that pvc influences P. aeruginosa biofilm development through the cup gene clusters in a pathway that involves paerucumarin, PtxR, and different cup regulators. PMID:23646138

  4. The pvc Operon Regulates the Expression of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Fimbrial Chaperone/Usher Pathway (Cup) Genes

    PubMed Central

    Qaisar, Uzma; Luo, Liming; Haley, Cecily L.; Brady, Sean F.; Carty, Nancy L.; Colmer-Hamood, Jane A.; Hamood, Abdul N.

    2013-01-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa fimbrial structures encoded by the cup gene clusters (cupB and cupC) contribute to its attachment to abiotic surfaces and biofilm formation. The P. aeruginosa pvcABCD gene cluster encodes enzymes that synthesize a novel isonitrile functionalized cumarin, paerucumarin. Paerucumarin has already been characterized chemically, but this is the first report elucidating its role in bacterial biology. We examined the relationship between the pvc operon and the cup gene clusters in the P. aeruginosa strain MPAO1. Mutations within the pvc genes compromised biofilm development and significantly reduced the expression of cupB1-6 and cupC1-3, as well as different genes of the cupB/cupC two-component regulatory systems, roc1/roc2. Adjacent to pvc is the transcriptional regulator ptxR. A ptxR mutation in MPAO1 significantly reduced the expression of the pvc genes, the cupB/cupC genes, and the roc1/roc2 genes. Overexpression of the intact chromosomally-encoded pvc operon by a ptxR plasmid significantly enhanced cupB2, cupC2, rocS1, and rocS2 expression and biofilm development. Exogenously added paerucumarin significantly increased the expression of cupB2, cupC2, rocS1 and rocS2 in the pvcA mutant. Our results suggest that pvc influences P. aeruginosa biofilm development through the cup gene clusters in a pathway that involves paerucumarin, PtxR, and different cup regulators. PMID:23646138

  5. SuhB Is a Regulator of Multiple Virulence Genes and Essential for Pathogenesis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kewei; Xu, Chang; Jin, Yongxin; Sun, Ziyu; Liu, Chang; Shi, Jing; Chen, Gukui; Chen, Ronghao; Jin, Shouguang; Wu, Weihui

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT During initial colonization and chronic infection, pathogenic bacteria encounter distinct host environments. Adjusting gene expression accordingly is essential for the pathogenesis. Pseudomonas aeruginosa has evolved complicated regulatory networks to regulate different sets of virulence factors to facilitate colonization and persistence. The type III secretion system (T3SS) and motility are associated with acute infections, while biofilm formation and the type VI secretion system (T6SS) are associated with chronic persistence. To identify novel regulatory genes required for pathogenesis, we screened a P. aeruginosa transposon (Tn) insertion library and found suhB to be an essential gene for the T3SS gene expression. The expression of suhB was upregulated in a mouse acute lung infection model, and loss of suhB resulted in avirulence. Suppression of T3SS gene expression in the suhB mutant is linked to a defective translation of the T3SS master regulator, ExsA. Further studies demonstrated that suhB mutation led to the upregulation of GacA and its downstream small RNAs, RsmY and RsmZ, triggering T6SS expression and biofilm formation while inhibiting the T3SS. Our results demonstrate that an in vivo-inducible gene, suhB, reciprocally regulates genes associated with acute and chronic infections and plays an essential role in the pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa. PMID:24169572

  6. Genetic and functional characterization of the gene cluster specifying expression of Pseudomonas aeruginosa pili.

    PubMed Central

    Koga, T; Ishimoto, K; Lory, S

    1993-01-01

    The genetic organization of the gene cluster containing pilA, the structural gene for type IV pilin of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, as well as the accessory genes pilB, pilC, and pilD, has been studied. DNA sequences capable of initiating transcription when fused to a promoterless lacZ gene have been identified in the pilA-pilB and pilB-pilC intergenic regions. Unlike pilA, which requires rpoN (encoding the sigma 54 subunit of RNA polymerase) and products of two regulatory genes, pilS and pilR, expression of pilB, pilC, or pilD did not depend on any of these transcriptional regulators. Moreover, transcription of pilA from the tac promoter in an rpoN mutant background resulted in piliated bacteria, suggesting that the RpoN-based regulatory network is specific for pilA and does not control expression of any other genes necessary for formation of pili. Insertion of the omega fragment containing strong transcriptional terminators into pilB, pilC, and pilD failed to have a polar effect on expression of downstream genes, as determined by the ability of each cloned gene to complement, in trans, the corresponding insertionally inactivated chromosomal copy. Insertions into pilC, however, resulted in decreased synthesis of PilD as determined by quantitation of PilD enzymatic activity in processing prepilin in vitro and by immunoassay. This finding suggests that PilD may require PilC for its optimal stability or correct membrane localization. Images PMID:7681046

  7. Construction and Characterization of a recA Mutant of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans by Marker Exchange Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhenying; Guiliani, Nicolas; Appia-Ayme, Corinne; Borne, Françoise; Ratouchniak, Jeanine; Bonnefoy, Violaine

    2000-01-01

    To construct Thiobacillus ferrooxidans mutants by marker exchange mutagenesis, a genetic transfer system is required. The transfer of broad-host-range plasmids belonging to the incompatibility groups IncQ (pKT240 and pJRD215), IncP (pJB3Km1), and IncW (pUFR034) from Escherichia coli to two private T. ferrooxidans strains (BRGM1 and Tf-49) and to two collection strains (ATCC 33020 and ATCC 19859) by conjugation was analyzed. To knock out the T. ferrooxidans recA gene, a mobilizable suicide plasmid carrying the ATCC 33020 recA gene disrupted by a kanamycin resistance gene was transferred from E. coli to T. ferrooxidans ATCC 33020 by conjugation under the best conditions determined. The two kanamycin-resistant clones, which have retained the kanamycin-resistant phenotype after growth for several generations in nonselective medium, were shown to have the kanamycin resistance gene inserted within the recA gene, indicating that the recA::Ω-Km mutated allele was transferred from the suicide plasmid to the chromosome by homologous recombination. These mutants exhibited a slightly reduced growth rate and an increased sensitivity to UV and γ irradiation compared to the wild-type strain. However, the T. ferrooxidans recA mutants are less sensitive to these physical DNA-damaging agents than the recA mutants described in other bacterial species, suggesting that RecA plays a minor role in DNA repair in T. ferrooxidans. PMID:10735871

  8. Pseudomonas aeruginosa fur Overlaps with a Gene Encoding a Novel Outer Membrane Lipoprotein, OmlA

    PubMed Central

    Ochsner, Urs A.; Vasil, Adriana I.; Johnson, Zaiga; Vasil, Michael L.

    1999-01-01

    A novel outer membrane lipoprotein in Pseudomonas aeruginosa is encoded by the omlA gene, which was identified immediately upstream of the fur (ferric uptake regulator) gene. The omlA and fur genes were divergently transcribed and had overlapping promoter regions. The proximal fur P2 promoter and the omlA promoter shared a 5-bp DNA motif for their −10 promoter elements. The distal fur P1 promoter was located within the omlA coding sequence, and the omlA and fur T1 mRNAs overlapped by 154 nucleotides. Optimal expression of both fur and omlA required roughly 200 bp of DNA upstream of the promoter regions, suggesting the presence of cis-acting transcriptional activation elements located within the omlA and fur genes, respectively. The levels of Fur and OmlA proteins had no influence on omlA or fur expression, excluding any trans-acting cross-regulation between fur and omlA. Expression of omlA was constitutive regardless of growth phase, oxygen tension, iron concentration, pH, and temperature. OmlA contained a signal sequence typical of bacterial lipoproteins, with a cysteine as a putative cleavage and lipid attachment site. Inhibition of signal peptidase II by globomycin resulted in failure to process OmlA, thus giving strong evidence that OmlA is a lipoprotein. Cell fractionation followed by Western blot analysis indicated that all OmlA protein is localized in the outer membrane. Mature OmlA was an acidic (pI = 4.5) protein of 17.3 kDa and had close to 40% amino acid sequence identity to SmpA (small protein A) of Escherichia coli, Vibrio cholerae, and Haemophilus influenzae, a protein of unknown function. All P. aeruginosa strains tested as well as Pseudomonas fluorescens were found to produce OmlA. A mutant strain with impaired production of OmlA but no change in the expression of the overlapping fur gene was constructed. The omlA mutant was hypersusceptible to anionic detergents such as sodium dodecyl sulfate and deoxycholate, and it showed increased

  9. RECA: A network by students, for students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remolina Gutierrez, M. C.; Velasco Moreno, S.; Hoyos Restrepo, P.; Jimenez Nieto, J. D.; Ramos, A. F.; Buitrago-Casas, J. C.

    2014-10-01

    RECA (Red de Estudiantes Colombianos de Astronomía) is a national network created by Colombian students that needed to be connected by their love for astronomy and astrophysics. It compiles most of the university groups and individuals that are willing to make part of a bigger community that gives benefits such as outreach activities, student links, and resources. This work is divided in 3 main parts. The first one is a quick review of the history of RECA since it was proposed in the III Colombian Astronomy Congress until today. After that, we review all the achievements and activities that the network has made and the people that collaborated to make it possible. Finally, we emphasize the vision that RECA has for the next years and what it can give to the development of astronomy in Latin America regarding to students flux, training and research.

  10. Nucleotide sequence of the rpoN gene and characterization of two downstream open reading frames in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Jin, S; Ishimoto, K; Lory, S

    1994-01-01

    The rpoN gene of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is required for the expression of a number of diverse genes, ranging from several classes of bacterial adhesins to enzymes for amino acid biosynthesis. The nucleotide sequence of the rpoN gene and its flanking region has been determined. The deduced amino acid sequence of the rpoN product is highly homologous to sequences of RpoN proteins of other microorganisms. Moreover, two open reading frames (ORF1 and ORF2) encoding peptides of 103 and 154 amino acids long, respectively, were found downstream of the rpoN gene. These two ORF products have a high degree of amino acid sequence homology with products of similar ORFs located adjacent to the rpoN genes in other microorganisms. Mutations in either ORF lead to a significant increase in P. aeruginosa generation time when propagated on minimal medium. These mutations had no effect on the expression of pilin or flagellin genes, whose expression depends on RpoN. Complementation analysis showed that the two ORFs are in the same transcriptional unit and the growth defects of the two ORF mutants on minimal medium are due to mutational effects on ORF2. The adverse effect of the ORF mutations on the growth of P. aeruginosa in minimal media can be suppressed by the addition of glutamine but not arginine, glutamate, histidine, or proline. Since rpoN mutants of P. aeruginosa display this same amino acid requirement for growth, the ORF2 product very likely functions as a coinducer of some but not all of the RpoN-controlled genes. Images PMID:8113171

  11. Structural gene and complete amino acid sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa IFO 3455 elastase.

    PubMed Central

    Fukushima, J; Yamamoto, S; Morihara, K; Atsumi, Y; Takeuchi, H; Kawamoto, S; Okuda, K

    1989-01-01

    The DNA encoding the elastase of Pseudomonas aeruginosa IFO 3455 was cloned, and its complete nucleotide sequence was determined. When the cloned gene was ligated to pUC18, the Escherichia coli expression vector, bacteria carrying the gene exhibited high levels of both elastase activity and elastase antigens. The amino acid sequence, deduced from the nucleotide sequence, revealed that the mature elastase consisted of 301 amino acids with a relative molecular mass of 32,926 daltons. The amino acid composition predicted from the DNA sequence was quite similar to the chemically determined composition of purified elastase reported previously. We also observed nucleotide sequence encoding a signal peptide and "pro" sequence consisting of 197 amino acids upstream from the mature elastase protein gene. The amino acid sequence analysis revealed that both the N-terminal sequence of the purified elastase and the N-terminal side sequences of the C-terminal tryptic peptide as well as the internal lysyl peptide fragment were completely identical to the deduced amino acid sequences. The pattern of identity of amino acid sequences was quite evident in the regions that include structurally and functionally important residues of Bacillus subtilis thermolysin. PMID:2493453

  12. Gene Expression in Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Evidence of Iron Override Effects on Quorum Sensing and Biofilm-Specific Gene Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Bollinger, Nikki; Hassett, Daniel J.; Iglewski, Barbara H.; Costerton, J. William; McDermott, Timothy R.

    2001-01-01

    Prior studies established that the Pseudomonas aeruginosa oxidative stress response is influenced by iron availability, whereas more recent evidence demonstrated that it was also controlled by quorum sensing (QS) regulatory circuitry. In the present study, sodA (encoding manganese-cofactored superoxide dismutase [Mn-SOD]) and Mn-SOD were used as a reporter gene and endogenous reporter enzyme, respectively, to reexamine control mechanisms that govern the oxidative stress response and to better understand how QS and a nutrient stress response interact or overlap in this bacterium. In cells grown in Trypticase soy broth (TSB), Mn-SOD was found in wild-type stationary-phase planktonic cells but not in a lasI or lasR mutant. However, Mn-SOD activity was completely suppressed in the wild-type strain when TSB was supplemented with iron. Reporter gene studies indicated that sodA transcription could be variably induced in iron-starved cells of all three strains, depending on growth stage. Iron starvation induction of sodA was greatest in the wild-type strain and least in the lasR mutant and was maximal in stationary-phase cells. Reporter experiments in the wild-type strain showed increased lasI::lacZ transcription in response to iron limitation, whereas the expression level in the las mutants was minimal and iron starvation induction of lasI::lacZ did not occur. Studies comparing Mn-SOD activity in P. aeruginosa biofilms and planktonic cultures were also initiated. In wild-type biofilms, Mn-SOD was not detected until after 6 days, although in iron-limited wild-type biofilms Mn-SOD was detected within the initial 24 h of biofilm establishment and formation. Unlike planktonic bacteria, Mn-SOD was constitutive in the lasI and lasR mutant biofilms but could be suppressed if the growth medium was amended with 25 μM ferric chloride. This study demonstrated that (i) the nutritional status of the cell must be taken into account when one is evaluating QS-based gene expression; (ii

  13. Natural populations of lactic acid bacteria associated with silage fermentation as determined by phenotype, 16S ribosomal RNA and recA gene analysis.

    PubMed

    Pang, Huili; Qin, Guangyong; Tan, Zhongfang; Li, Zongwei; Wang, Yanping; Cai, Yimin

    2011-05-01

    One hundred and fifty-six strains isolated from corn (Zea mays L.), forage paddy rice (Oryza sativa L.), sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L.) and alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) silages prepared on dairy farms were screened, of which 110 isolates were considered to be lactic acid bacteria (LAB) according to their Gram-positive and catalase-negative characteristics and, mainly, the lactic acid metabolic products. These isolates were divided into eight groups (A-H) based on the following properties: morphological and biochemical characteristics, γ-aminobutyric acid production capacity, and 16S rRNA gene sequences. They were identified as Weissella cibaria (36.4%), Weissella confusa (9.1%), Leuconostoc citreum (5.3%), Leuconostoc lactis (4.9%), Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides (8.0%), Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis (4.5%), Lactobacillus paraplantarum (4.5%) and Lactobacillus plantarum (27.3%). W. cibaria and W. confusa were mainly present in corn silages, and L. plantarum was dominant on sorghum and forage paddy rice silages, while L. pseudomesenteroides, L. plantarum and L. paraplantarum were the dominant species in alfalfa silage. The corn, sorghum and forage paddy rice silages were well preserved with lower pH values and ammonia-N concentrations, but had higher lactic acid content, while the alfalfa silage had relatively poor quality with higher pH values and ammonia-N concentrations, and lower lactic acid content. The present study confirmed the diversity of LAB species inhabiting silages. It showed that the differing natural populations of LAB on these silages might influence fermentation quality. These results will enable future research on the relationship between LAB species and silage fermentation quality, and will enhance the screening of appropriate inoculants aimed at improving such quality. PMID:21282025

  14. Biochemical characterization of RecA variants that contribute to extreme resistance to ionizing radiation

    PubMed Central

    Piechura, Joseph R.; Tseng, Tzu-Ling; Hsu, Hsin-Fang; Byrne, Rose T.; Windgassen, Tricia A.; Chitteni-Pattu, Sindhu; Battista, John R.; Li, Hung-Wen; Cox, Michael M.

    2015-01-01

    Among strains of Escherichia coli that have evolved to survive extreme exposure to ionizing radiation, mutations in the recA gene are prominent and contribute substantially to the acquired phenotype. Changes at amino acid residue 276, D276A and D276N, occur repeatedly and in separate evolved populations. RecA D276A and RecA D276N exhibit unique adaptations to an environment that can require the repair of hundreds of double strand breaks. These two RecA protein variants (a) exhibit a faster rate of filament nucleation on DNA, as well as a slower extension under at least some conditions, leading potentially to a distribution of the protein among a higher number of shorter filaments, (b) promote DNA strand exchange more efficiently in the context of a shorter filament, and (c) are markedly less inhibited by ADP. These adaptations potentially allow RecA protein to address larger numbers of double strand DNA breaks in an environment where ADP concentrations are higher due to a compromised cellular metabolism. PMID:25559557

  15. RT-PCR detection of exotoxin genes expression in multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Tartor, Y H; El-Naenaeey, E Y

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) is an opportunistic pathogen responsible for causing a wide variety of acute and chronic infections with significant levels of morbidity and mortality. These infections are very hard to eradicate because of the expression of numerous virulence factors and the intrinsic resistance against antibiotics. Herein, this study analyzed antimicrobial susceptibility of PA isolated from broiler chickens and cattle as well as expression of five significant exotoxin genes (exoU, exoS, toxA, lasB, and phzM) and ecfX as internal control. Genomic DNA was amplified employing oprL gene for species specific detection of PA. The highest resistance was found to ampicillin, erythromycin, followed by, chloramphenicol, trimethoprim/ sulfamethoxazole and tetracycline, intermediately sensitive to ceftazidime, cefoperazone, and highly sensitive to gentamicin, levofloxacin, imipenem, ciprofloxacin and colistin. It appears that exoU+ and increased resistance to SXT may be co-selected traits. Vast majority of PA isolates expressed exoS (78.6%), exoU (71.4%) and both in more virulent strains. The ubiquity of toxA, lasB, exoU and exoS among PA clinical isolates is consistent with an important role for these virulence factors in chicken respiratory diseases and cattle mastitis that can be highlighted as potential therapeutic targets for treatment of infections caused by heterogeneous and resistant PA strains. PMID:26828988

  16. Complete nucleotide sequence of the structural gene for alkaline proteinase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa IFO 3455.

    PubMed Central

    Okuda, K; Morihara, K; Atsumi, Y; Takeuchi, H; Kawamoto, S; Kawasaki, H; Suzuki, K; Fukushima, J

    1990-01-01

    The DNA-encoding alkaline proteinase (AP) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa IFO 3455 was cloned, and its complete nucleotide sequence was determined. When the cloned gene was ligated to pUC18, the Escherichia coli expression vector, the gene-incorporated bacteria expressed high levels of both AP activity and AP antigens. The amino acid sequence deduced from the nucleotide sequence revealed that the mature AP consists of 467 amino acids with a relative molecular weight of 49,507. The amino acid composition predicted from the DNA sequence was similar to the chemically determined composition of purified AP reported previously. The amino acid sequence analysis revealed that both the N-terminal side sequence of the purified AP and several internal lysyl peptide fragments were identical to the deduced amino acid sequences. The percent homology of amino acid sequences between AP and Serratia protease was about 55%. The zinc ligands and an active site of the AP were predicted by comparing the structure of the enzyme with of Serratia protease, thermolysin, Bacillus subtilis neutral protease, and Pseudomonas elastase. PMID:2123832

  17. Role of porins in the antibiotic susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa: construction of mutants with deletions in the multiple porin genes.

    PubMed

    Yoneyama, H; Yamano, Y; Nakae, T

    1995-08-01

    We inserted deletions in the chromosomal genes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa coded for the outer membrane porins, proteins C, D2, or E1, and all possible combinations of these proteins by the gene replacement technique and selecting for imipenem-resistance. Determination of the minimum inhibitory concentrations of beta-lactams, fluoroquinolones, chloramphenicol and gentamicin in these mutants revealed that most mutants showed equal susceptibility to the porin-sufficient strain. The only exception was that imipenem and meropenem showed increased minimum inhibitory concentrations in all of the mutants lacking protein D2. These results firmly established that the P. aeruginosa porins identified so far form the pores do not accommodate the passage of most antipseudomonal antibiotics, with the exception of carbapenems. PMID:7639767

  18. FUNCTIONAL ANALYSIS OF GENES FOR BIOSYNTHESIS OF PYOCYANIN AND PHENAZINE-1-CARBOXAMIDE FROM PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA PAO1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two seven-gene phenazine biosynthetic loci were cloned from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. The operons, designated phzA1B1C1D1E1F1G1 and phzA2B2C2D2E2F2G2, are homologous to previously studied phenazine biosynthetic operons from P. fluorescens and P. aureofaciens. Functional studies in phenazine-nonpr...

  19. Impaired Pulmonary Defense Against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in VEGF Gene Inactivated Mouse Lung

    PubMed Central

    Breen, Ellen C.; Malloy, Jaret L.; Tang, Kechun; Xia, Feng; Fu, Zhenxing; Hancock, Robert E. W.; Overhage, Joerg; Wagner, Peter D.; Spragg, Roger G.

    2012-01-01

    Repeated bacterial and viral infections are known to contribute to worsening lung function in several respiratory diseases, including asthma, cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Previous studies have reported alveolar wall cell apoptosis and parenchymal damage in adult pulmonary VEGF gene ablated mice. We hypothesized that VEGF expressed by type II cells is also necessary to provide an effective host defense against bacteria in part by maintaining surfactant homeostasis. Therefore, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PAO1) levels were evaluated in mice following lung-targeted VEGF gene inactivation, and alterations in VEGF-dependent type II cell function were evaluated by measuring surfactant homeostasis in mouse lungs and isolated type II cells. In VEGF-deficient lungs increased PAO1 levels and pro-inflammatory cytokines, TNFα and IL-6, were detected 24 hours after bacterial instillation compared to control lungs. In vivo lung-targeted VEGF gene deletion (57% decrease in total pulmonary VEGF) did not alter alveolar surfactant or tissue disaturated phosphatidylcholine (DSPC) levels. However, sphingomyelin content, choline phosphate cytidylyltransferase (CCT) mRNA and SP-D expression were decreased. In isolated type II cells an 80% reduction of VEGF protein resulted in decreases in total phospholipids (PL), DSPC, DSPC synthesis, surfactant associated proteins (SP)-B and -D, and the lipid transporters, ABCA1 and Rab3D. TPA-induced DSPC secretion and apoptosis were elevated in VEGF-deficient type II cells. These results suggest a potential protective role for type II cell-expressed VEGF against bacterial initiated infection. PMID:22718316

  20. The Widespread Multidrug-Resistant Serotype O12 Pseudomonas aeruginosa Clone Emerged through Concomitant Horizontal Transfer of Serotype Antigen and Antibiotic Resistance Gene Clusters

    PubMed Central

    Thrane, Sandra Wingaard; Taylor, Véronique L.; Freschi, Luca; Kukavica-Ibrulj, Irena; Boyle, Brian; Laroche, Jérôme; Pirnay, Jean-Paul; Lévesque, Roger C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The O-specific antigen (OSA) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa lipopolysaccharide is highly varied by sugar identity, side chains, and bond between O-repeats. These differences classified P. aeruginosa into 20 distinct serotypes. In the past few decades, O12 has emerged as the predominant serotype in clinical settings and outbreaks. These serotype O12 isolates exhibit high levels of resistance to various classes of antibiotics. Here, we explore how the P. aeruginosa OSA biosynthesis gene clusters evolve in the population by investigating the association between the phylogenetic relationships among 83 P. aeruginosa strains and their serotypes. While most serotypes were closely linked to the core genome phylogeny, we observed horizontal exchange of OSA biosynthesis genes among phylogenetically distinct P. aeruginosa strains. Specifically, we identified a “serotype island” ranging from 62 kb to 185 kb containing the P. aeruginosa O12 OSA gene cluster, an antibiotic resistance determinant (gyrAC248T), and other genes that have been transferred between P. aeruginosa strains with distinct core genome architectures. We showed that these genes were likely acquired from an O12 serotype strain that is closely related to P. aeruginosa PA7. Acquisition and recombination of the “serotype island” resulted in displacement of the native OSA gene cluster and expression of the O12 serotype in the recipients. Serotype switching by recombination has apparently occurred multiple times involving bacteria of various genomic backgrounds. In conclusion, serotype switching in combination with acquisition of an antibiotic resistance determinant most likely contributed to the dissemination of the O12 serotype in clinical settings. PMID:26396243

  1. Gene-scrambling mutagenesis: generation and analysis of insertional mutations in the alginate regulatory region of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Mohr, C D; Deretic, V

    1990-11-01

    A novel method for random mutagenesis of targeted chromosomal regions in Pseudomona aeruginosa was developed. This method can be used with a cloned DNA fragment of indefinite size that contains a putative gene of interest. Cloned DNA is digested to produce small fragments that are then randomly reassembled into long DNA inserts by using cosmid vectors and lambda packaging reaction. This DNA is then transferred into P. aeruginosa and forced into the chromosome via homologous recombination, producing in a single step a random set of insertional mutants along a desired region of the chromosome. Application of this method to extend the analysis of the alginate regulatory region, using a cloned 6.2-kb fragment with the algR gene and the previously uncharacterized flanking regions, produced several insertional mutations. One mutation was obtained in algR, a known transcriptional regulatory of mucoidy in P. aeruginosa. The null mutation of algR was generated in a mucoid derivative of the standard genetic strain PAO responsive to different environmental factors. This mutation was used to demonstrate that the algR gene product was not essential for the regulation of its promoters. Additional insertions were obtained in regions downstream and upstream of algR. A mutation that did not affect mucoidy was generated in a gene located 1 kb upstream of algR. This gene was transcribed in the direction opposite that of algR transcription and encoded a polypeptide of 47 kDa. Partial nucleotide sequence analysis revealed strong homology of its predicted gene product with the human and yeast argininosuccinate lyases. An insertion downstream of algR produced a strain showing reduced induction of mucoidy in response to growth on nitrate as the nitrogen source. PMID:2121708

  2. Gene-scrambling mutagenesis: generation and analysis of insertional mutations in the alginate regulatory region of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Mohr, C D; Deretic, V

    1990-01-01

    A novel method for random mutagenesis of targeted chromosomal regions in Pseudomona aeruginosa was developed. This method can be used with a cloned DNA fragment of indefinite size that contains a putative gene of interest. Cloned DNA is digested to produce small fragments that are then randomly reassembled into long DNA inserts by using cosmid vectors and lambda packaging reaction. This DNA is then transferred into P. aeruginosa and forced into the chromosome via homologous recombination, producing in a single step a random set of insertional mutants along a desired region of the chromosome. Application of this method to extend the analysis of the alginate regulatory region, using a cloned 6.2-kb fragment with the algR gene and the previously uncharacterized flanking regions, produced several insertional mutations. One mutation was obtained in algR, a known transcriptional regulatory of mucoidy in P. aeruginosa. The null mutation of algR was generated in a mucoid derivative of the standard genetic strain PAO responsive to different environmental factors. This mutation was used to demonstrate that the algR gene product was not essential for the regulation of its promoters. Additional insertions were obtained in regions downstream and upstream of algR. A mutation that did not affect mucoidy was generated in a gene located 1 kb upstream of algR. This gene was transcribed in the direction opposite that of algR transcription and encoded a polypeptide of 47 kDa. Partial nucleotide sequence analysis revealed strong homology of its predicted gene product with the human and yeast argininosuccinate lyases. An insertion downstream of algR produced a strain showing reduced induction of mucoidy in response to growth on nitrate as the nitrogen source. Images PMID:2121708

  3. Identification and characterization of the gltK gene encoding a membrane-associated glucose transport protein of pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Adewoye, L O; Worobec, E A

    2000-08-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa oprB gene encodes the carbohydrate-selective OprB porin, which translocates substrate molecules across the outer membrane to the periplasmic glucose-binding protein. We identified and cloned two open reading frames (ORFs) flanking the oprB gene but are not in operonic arrangement with the oprB gene. The downstream ORF encodes a putative polypeptide homologous to members of a family of transcriptional repressors, whereas the oprB gene is preceded by an ORF encoding a putative product, which exhibits strong homology to several carbohydrate transport ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins. The genomic copy of the upstream ORF was mutagenized by homologous recombination. Analysis of the deletion mutant in comparison with the wild type revealed a significant reduction in [14C] glucose transport activity in the mutant strain, suggesting that this ORF likely encodes the inner membrane component of the glucose ABC transporter. It is thus designated gltK gene to reflect its homology to the Pseudomona fluorescens mtlK and its involvement in the high-affinity glucose transport system. Multiple alignment analysis revealed that the P. aeruginosa gltK gene product is a member of the MalK subfamily of ABC proteins. PMID:10940570

  4. Thiols, recA induction and radiosensitivity in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Naslund, M; Anderstam, B; Granath, F; Ehrenberg, L

    1996-01-01

    Induction by gamma-radiation, UV radiation or hydroxyurea of RecA gene product synthesis in Escherichia coli, monitored as beta-D-galactosidase in recA-lacZ fusion strains, was shown to be inhibited if 2-mercaptoethylamine (MEA) was added before treatment with the inducing agents. If cysteine (Cys) at low concentrations was added at the same time as MEA it counteracted the action of MEA. The effect of MEA may be described as a competitive inhibition of an inducing or conducting effect of Cys. In E. coli GE499 (uvrA+), complete inhibition by 30-mmol dm-3 MEA of recA induction was associated with about five times higher radio-resistence. Both of these effects of MEA were completely reversed by 0.3-mmol dm-3 Cys. As shown in parallel experiments with E. coli GE500 (uvrA-), these effects of MEA and Cys were shown to be independent of excision-repair proficiency. Treatment of bacteria with MEA and/or Cys was shown not to lead to increased intracellular concentrations of these thiols. Instead, treatment with them appeared to provoke conspicuous increases in glutathione levels, which are, however, probably not directly involved in the studied action of MEA and Cys. PMID:8601760

  5. The Cryptic dsdA Gene Encodes a Functional D-Serine Dehydratase in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    PubMed

    Li, Guoqing; Lu, Chung-Dar

    2016-06-01

    D-Serine, an important neurotransmitter, also contributes to bacterial adaptation and virulence in humans. It was reported that Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 can grow on D-serine as the sole nitrogen source, and growth was severely reduced in the dadA mutant devoid of the D-alanine dehydrogenase with broad substrate specificity. In this study, the dsdA gene (PA3357) encoding a putative D-serine dehydratase was subjected to further characterization. Growth on D-serine as the sole source of nitrogen was retained in the ∆dsdA mutant and was abolished completely in the ∆dadA and ∆dadA-∆dsdA mutants. However, when complemented by dsdA on a plasmid, the double mutant was able to grow on D-serine as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen, supporting the proposed biochemical function of DsdA in the conversion of D-serine into pyruvate and ammonia. Among D- and L-amino acids tested, only D-serine and D-threonine could serve as the substrates of DsdA, and the Km of DsdA with D-serine was calculated to be 330 μM. Comparative genomics revealed that this cryptic dsdA gene was highly conserved in strains of P. aeruginosa, and that most strains of Pseudomonas putida possess putative dsdCAX genes encoding a transcriptional regulator DsdC and a D-serine transporter DsdX as in enteric bacteria. In conclusion, this study supports the presence of a cryptic dsdA gene encoding a functional D-serine dehydratase in P. aeruginosa, and the absence of dsdA expression in response to exogenous D-serine might be due to the loss of regulatory elements for gene activation during evolution. PMID:26957519

  6. Genome analysis and gene nblA identification of Microcystis aeruginosa myovirus (MaMV-DC) reveal the evidence for horizontal gene transfer events between cyanomyovirus and host.

    PubMed

    Ou, Tong; Gao, Xiao-Chan; Li, San-Hua; Zhang, Qi-Ya

    2015-12-01

    The genome sequence, genetic characterization and nblA gene function of Microcystis aeruginosa myovirus isolated from Lake Dianchi in China (MaMV-DC) have been analysed. The genome DNA is 169 223 bp long, with 170 predicted protein-coding genes (001L–170L) and a tRNA gene. About one-sixth of these genes have homologues in the host cyanobacteria M. aeruginosa. The genome carries a gene homologous to host nblA, which encodes a protein involved in the degradation of cyanobacterial phycobilisome. Its expression during MaMV-DC infection was confirmed by reverse transcriptase PCR and Western blot detection and abundant expression was companied by the significant decline of phycocyanin content and massive release of progeny MaMV-DC. In addition, expressing MaMV-DC nblA reduced the phycocyanin peak and the phycocyanin to chlorophyll ratio in model cyanobacteria. These results confirm that horizontal gene transfer events have occurred between cyanobacterial host and cyanomyovirus and suggest that MaMV-DC carrying host-derived genes (such as 005L, that codes for NblA) is responsible for more efficient expression of cyanophage genes and release of progeny cyanophage. This study provides novel insight into the horizontal gene transfer in cyanophage and the interactions between cyanophage and their host. PMID:26399243

  7. Point-of-care and visual detection of P. aeruginosa and its toxin genes by multiple LAMP and lateral flow nucleic acid biosensor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuting; Cheng, Nan; Xu, Yuancong; Huang, Kunlun; Luo, Yunbo; Xu, Wentao

    2016-07-15

    This study describes a simple and sensitive approach for visual and point-of-care detection of P. aeruginosa and its toxin genes based on multiple loop-mediated isothermal amplification (mLAMP) and lateral flow nucleic acid biosensor (LFNAB). Differentiation of the internal standard gene ecfX and toxin genes (ExoS and ExoU) in P. aeruginosa was determined using FITC-, hex-and digoxin-modified primers in the mLAMP process. In the presence of biotin-and FITC- (hex-, digoxin-) modified primers and Bst DNA polymerase large fragments, the mLAMP produced numerous biotin- and FITC- (hex-, digoxin-) attached duplex DNA products. The products were detected by LFNAB through dual immunoreactions (anti-biotin antibodies on the gold nanoparticle (Au-NP) and biotin on the duplex, anti-FITC (hex, digoxin) antibodies on the LFNAB test line and FITC (hex, digoxin) on the duplex). The accumulation of Au-NPs produced a characteristic red band, enabling visual detection of P. aeruginosa and its toxin genes without instrumentation. After systematic optimization of LFNAB preparation and detecting conditions, the current approach was capable of detecting concentrations as low as 20 CFU/mL P. aeruginosa or its toxin genes within 50min without complicated instrument, which is more sensitive than PCR. Therefore, this approach provides a simple, pollution free, sensitive, and low-cost point-of-care test for the detection of P. aeruginosa and its toxin genes. PMID:26985584

  8. Discovery and characterization of RecA protein of thermophilic bacterium Thermus thermophilus MAT72 phage Tt72 that increases specificity of a PCR-based DNA amplification.

    PubMed

    Stefanska, Aleksandra; Kaczorowska, Anna-Karina; Plotka, Magdalena; Fridjonsson, Olafur H; Hreggvidsson, Gudmundur O; Hjorleifsdottir, Sigridur; Kristjansson, Jakob K; Dabrowski, Slawomir; Kaczorowski, Tadeusz

    2014-07-20

    The recA gene of newly discovered Thermus thermophilus MAT72 phage Tt72 (Myoviridae) was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The 1020-bp gene codes for a 339-amino-acid polypeptide with an Mr of 38,155 which shows 38.7% positional identity to the E. coli RecA protein. When expressed in E. coli, the Tt72 recA gene did not confer the ability to complement the ultraviolet light (254nm) sensitivity of an E. coli recA mutant. Tt72 RecA protein has been purified with good yield to catalytic and electrophoretic homogeneity using a three-step chromatography procedure. Biochemical characterization indicated that the protein can pair and promote ATP-dependent strand exchange reaction resulting in formation of a heteroduplex DNA at 60°C under conditions otherwise optimal for E. coli RecA. When the Tt72 RecA protein was included in a standard PCR-based DNA amplification reaction, the specificity of the PCR assays was significantly improved by eliminating non-specific products. PMID:24786823

  9. Construction and characterization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa protein F-deficient mutants after in vitro and in vivo insertion mutagenesis of the cloned gene.

    PubMed Central

    Woodruff, W A; Hancock, R E

    1988-01-01

    Mutants with insertion mutations in the Pseudomonas aeruginosa protein F (oprF) gene were created in vivo by Tn1 mutagenesis of the cloned gene in Escherichia coli and in vitro by insertion of the streptomycin resistance-encoding omega fragment into the cloned gene, followed by transfer of the mutated protein F gene back to P. aeruginosa. Homologous recombination into the P. aeruginosa chromosome was driven by a bacteriophage F116L transduction method in the oprF::Tn1 mutants or Tn5-instability in the oprF::omega mutants. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western immunoblotting demonstrated that the resultant oprF insertion mutants had lost protein F, whereas restriction digestion and Southern blotting experiments proved that the mutants contained a single chromosomal oprF gene with either Tn1 or omega inserted into it. It has been proposed that protein F has a role in antibiotic uptake in P. aeruginosa. Measurement of antibiotic resistance levels showed small to marginal increases in resistance, compared with that of the parent P. aeruginosa strain, to a variety of beta-lactam antibiotics. Protein F-deficient mutants had altered barrier properties as revealed by a three- to fivefold increase in the uptake of the hydrophobic fluorescent probe 1-N-phenylnaphthylamine. Images PMID:2836364

  10. Nucleotide sequence of the Porphyromonas gingivalis W83 recA homolog and construction of a recA-deficient mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, H M; Morgan, R M; Macrina, F L

    1997-01-01

    Degenerate oligonucleotide primers were used in PCR to amplify a region of the recA homolog from Porphyromonas gingivalis W83. The resulting PCR fragment was used as a probe to identify a recombinant lambda DASH phage (L10) carrying the P. gingivalis recA homolog. The recA homolog was localized to a 2.1-kb BamHI fragment. The nucleotide sequence of this 2.1-kb fragment was determined, and a 1.02-kb open reading frame (341 amino acids) was detected. The predicted amino acid sequence was strikingly similar (90% identical residues) to the RecA protein from Bacteroides fragilis. No SOS box, characteristic of LexA-regulated promoters, was found in the 5' upstream region of the P. gingivalis recA homolog. In both methyl methanesulfonate and UV survival experiments the recA homolog from P. gingivalis complemented the recA mutation of Escherichia coli HB101. The cloned P. gingivalis recA gene was insertionally inactivated with the ermF-ermAM antibiotic resistance cassette to create a recA-deficient mutant (FLL33) by allelic exchange. The recA-deficient mutant was significantly more sensitive to UV irradiation than the wild-type strain, W83. W83 and FLL33 showed the same level of virulence in in vivo experiments using a mouse model. These results suggest that the recA gene in P. gingivalis W83 plays the expected role of repairing DNA damage caused by UV irradiation. However, inactivation of this gene did not alter the virulence of P. gingivalis in the mouse model. PMID:9353038

  11. Sodium houttuyfonate inhibits biofilm formation and alginate biosynthesis-associated gene expression in a clinical strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in vitro

    PubMed Central

    WU, DA-QIANG; CHENG, HUIJUAN; DUAN, QIANGJUN; HUANG, WEIFENG

    2015-01-01

    The increasing multidrug resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa has become a serious public-health problem. In the present study, the inhibitory activities of sodium houttuyfonate (SH) against biofilm formation and alginate production in a clinical strain of P. aeruginosa (AH16) were investigated in vitro using crystal violet dying and standard curve methods, respectively. The cellular morphology of P. aeruginosa treated with SH was observed using a scanning electron microscope. Furthermore, reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to identify differences in the expression levels of genes associated with alginate biosynthesis as a result of the SH treatment. The results indicated that SH significantly inhibited biofilm formation, and decreased the levels of the primary biofilm constituent, alginate, in P. aeruginosa AH16 at various stages of biofilm development. In addition, scanning electron microscopy observations demonstrated that SH markedly altered the cellular morphology and biofilm structure of P. aeruginosa. Furthermore, the results from the reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis indicated that SH inhibited biofilm formation by mitigating the expression of the algD and algR genes, which are associated with alginate biosynthesis. Therefore, the present study has provided novel insights into the potent effects and underlying mechanisms of SH-induced inhibition of biofilm formation in a clinical strain of P. aeruginosa. PMID:26622388

  12. Regulation of alkyl-dihydrothiazole-carboxylates (ATCs) by iron and the pyochelin gene cluster in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Vinayavekhin, Nawaporn; Saghatelian, Alan

    2009-08-21

    Using the pyochelin (pch) gene cluster as an example, we demonstrate the utility of untargeted metabolomics in the discovery and characterization of secondary metabolites regulated by biosynthetic gene clusters. Comparison of the extracellular metabolomes of pch gene cluster mutants to the wild-type Pseudomonas aeruginosa (strain PA 14) identified 198 ions regulated by the pch genes. In addition to known metabolites, we characterized the structure of a pair of novel metabolites regulated by the pch gene cluster as 2-alkyl-4,5-dihydrothiazole-4-carboxylates (ATCs), using a combination of mass spectrometry, chemical synthesis, and stable isotope labeling. Subsequent assays revealed that ATCs bind iron and are regulated by iron levels in the media in a similar fashion as other metabolites associated with the pch gene cluster. Further genetic complementation and overexpression analyses of the pch genes revealed ATC production to be dependent on the pchE gene in the pch gene cluster. Overall, these studies highlight the ability of untargeted metabolomics to reveal regulatory connections between gene clusters and secondary metabolites, including novel metabolites. PMID:19621937

  13. Molecular Analysis of the Sequences Surrounding blaOXA-45 Reveals Acquisition of This Gene by Pseudomonas aeruginosa via a Novel ISCR Element, ISCR5▿

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongyang; Walsh, Timothy R.; Toleman, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    The blaOXA-45 gene of Pseudomonas aeruginosa 07-406 is driven by a promoter found within a truncated ISPme1 insertion sequence. The gene is located between nonidentical repeats of a new ISCR element, ISCR5, which is likely responsible for its acquisition. Sequence analysis indicates that ISCR5 is a chimera of ISCR3 and ISCR16. PMID:19064894

  14. Influence of ferric iron on gene expression and rhamnolipid synthesis during batch cultivation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    PubMed

    Schmidberger, Anke; Henkel, Marius; Hausmann, Rudolf; Schwartz, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    Bioprocesses based on sustainable resources and rhamnolipids in particular have become increasingly attractive in recent years. These surface-active glycolipids with various chemical and biological properties have diverse biotechnological applications and are naturally produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Their production, however, is tightly governed by a complex growth-dependent regulatory network, one of the major obstacles in the way to upscale production. P. aeruginosa PAO1 was grown in shake flask cultures using varying concentrations of ferric iron. Gene expression was assessed using quantitative PCR. A strong increase in relative expression of the genes for rhamnolipid synthesis, rhlA and rhlC, as well as the genes of the pqs quorum sensing regulon was observed under iron-limiting conditions. Iron repletion on the other hand caused a down-regulation of those genes. Furthermore, gene expression of different iron regulation-related factors, i.e. pvdS, fur and bqsS, was increased in response to iron limitation. Ensuing from these results, a batch cultivation using production medium without any addition of iron was conducted. Both biomass formation and specific growth rates were not impaired compared to normal cultivation conditions. Expression of rhlA, rhlC and pvdS, as well as the gene for the 3-oxo-C12-HSL synthetase, lasI, increased until late stationary growth phase. After this time point, their expression steadily decreased. Expression of the C4-HSL synthetase gene, rhlI, on the other hand, was found to be highly increased during the entire process. PMID:24752844

  15. Replication Restart after Replication-Transcription Conflicts Requires RecA in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Million-Weaver, Samuel; Samadpour, Ariana Nakta

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Efficient duplication of genomes depends on reactivation of replication forks outside the origin. Replication restart can be facilitated by recombination proteins, especially if single- or double-strand breaks form in the DNA. Each type of DNA break is processed by a distinct pathway, though both depend on the RecA protein. One common obstacle that can stall forks, potentially leading to breaks in the DNA, is transcription. Though replication stalling by transcription is prevalent, the nature of DNA breaks and the prerequisites for replication restart in response to these encounters remain unknown. Here, we used an engineered site-specific replication-transcription conflict to identify and dissect the pathways required for the resolution and restart of replication forks stalled by transcription in Bacillus subtilis. We found that RecA, its loader proteins RecO and AddAB, and the Holliday junction resolvase RecU are required for efficient survival and replication restart after conflicts with transcription. Genetic analyses showed that RecO and AddAB act in parallel to facilitate RecA loading at the site of the conflict but that they can each partially compensate for the other's absence. Finally, we found that RecA and either RecO or AddAB are required for the replication restart and helicase loader protein, DnaD, to associate with the engineered conflict region. These results suggest that conflicts can lead to both single-strand gaps and double-strand breaks in the DNA and that RecA loading and Holliday junction resolution are required for replication restart at regions of replication-transcription conflicts. IMPORTANCE Head-on conflicts between replication and transcription occur when a gene is expressed from the lagging strand. These encounters stall the replisome and potentially break the DNA. We investigated the necessary mechanisms for Bacillus subtilis cells to overcome a site-specific engineered conflict with transcription of a protein-coding gene

  16. Genes Required for and Effects of Alginate Overproduction Induced by Growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on Pseudomonas Isolation Agar Supplemented with Ammonium Metavanadate

    PubMed Central

    Damron, F. Heath; Barbier, Mariette; McKenney, Elizabeth S.; Schurr, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that can adapt to changing environments and can secrete an exopolysaccharide known as alginate as a protection response, resulting in a colony morphology and phenotype referred to as mucoid. However, how P. aeruginosa senses its environment and activates alginate overproduction is not fully understood. Previously, we showed that Pseudomonas isolation agar supplemented with ammonium metavanadate (PIAAMV) induces P. aeruginosa to overproduce alginate. Vanadate is a phosphate mimic and causes protein misfolding by disruption of disulfide bonds. Here we used PIAAMV to characterize the pathways involved in inducible alginate production and tested the global effects of P. aeruginosa growth on PIAAMV by a mutant library screen, by transcriptomics, and in a murine acute virulence model. The PA14 nonredundant mutant library was screened on PIAAMV to identify new genes that are required for the inducible alginate stress response. A functionally diverse set of genes encoding products involved in cell envelope biogenesis, peptidoglycan remodeling, uptake of phosphate and iron, phenazine biosynthesis, and other processes were identified as positive regulators of the mucoid phenotype on PIAAMV. Transcriptome analysis of P. aeruginosa cultures growing in the presence of vanadate showed differential expression of genes involved in virulence, envelope biogenesis, and cell stress pathways. In this study, it was observed that growth on PIAAMV attenuates P. aeruginosa in a mouse pneumonia model. Induction of alginate overproduction occurs as a stress response to protect P. aeruginosa, but it may be possible to modulate and inhibit these pathways based on the new genes identified in this study. PMID:23794622

  17. Serum Albumin Alters the Expression of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Iron Controlled Genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objectives of this study were to examine the effect serum on global transcription within P. aeruginosa at different phases of growth and the role of iron in this regulation. Results presented in this study suggest a novel mechanism through which serum regulates the expression of different P. ae...

  18. Functional analysis of pyochelin-/enantiopyochelin-related genes from a pathogenicity island of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PA14.

    PubMed

    Maspoli, Alessandro; Wenner, Nicolas; Mislin, Gaëtan L A; Reimmann, Cornelia

    2014-06-01

    Genomic islands are foreign DNA blocks inserted in so-called regions of genomic plasticity (RGP). Depending on their gene content, they are classified as pathogenicity, symbiosis, metabolic, fitness or resistance islands, although a detailed functional analysis is often lacking. Here we focused on a 34-kb pathogenicity island of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 (PA14GI-6), which is inserted at RGP5 and carries genes related to those for pyochelin/enantiopyochelin biosynthesis. These enantiomeric siderophores of P. aeruginosa and certain strains of Pseudomonas protegens are assembled by a thiotemplate mechanism from salicylate and two molecules of cysteine. The biochemical function of several proteins encoded by PA14GI-6 was investigated by a series of complementation analyses using mutants affected in potential homologs. We found that PA14_54940 codes for a bifunctional salicylate synthase/salicyl-AMP ligase (for generation and activation of salicylate), that PA14_54930 specifies a dihydroaeruginoic acid (Dha) synthetase (for coupling salicylate with a cysteine-derived thiazoline ring), that PA14_54910 produces a type II thioesterase (for quality control), and that PA14_54880 encodes a serine O-acetyltransferase (for increased cysteine availability). The structure of the PA14GI-6-specified metabolite was determined by mass spectrometry, thin-layer chromatography, and HPLC as (R)-Dha, an iron chelator with antibacterial, antifungal and antitumor activity. The conservation of this genomic island in many clinical and environmental P. aeruginosa isolates of different geographical origin suggests that the ability for Dha production may confer a selective advantage to its host. PMID:24682869

  19. Biosynthesis of a Rare Di-N-Acetylated Sugar in the Lipopolysaccharides of both Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Bordetella pertussis Occurs via an Identical Scheme despite Different Gene Clusters▿

    PubMed Central

    Westman, Erin L.; Preston, Andrew; Field, Robert A.; Lam, Joseph S.

    2008-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Bordetella pertussis produce lipopolysaccharide (LPS) that contains 2,3-diacetamido-2,3-dideoxy-d-mannuronic acid (d-ManNAc3NAcA). A five-enzyme biosynthetic pathway that requires WbpA, WbpB, WbpE, WbpD, and WbpI has been proposed for the production of this sugar in P. aeruginosa, based on analysis of genes present in the B-band LPS biosynthesis cluster. In the analogous B. pertussis cluster, homologs of wbpB to wbpI were present, but a putative dehydrogenase gene was missing; therefore, the biosynthetic mechanism for UDP-d-ManNAc3NAcA was unclear. Nonpolar knockout mutants of each P. aeruginosa gene were constructed. Complementation analysis of the mutants demonstrated that B-band LPS production was restored to P. aeruginosa knockout mutants when the relevant B. pertussis genes were supplied in trans. Thus, the genes that encode the putative oxidase, transaminase, N-acetyltransferase, and epimerase enzymes in B. pertussis are functional homologs of those in P. aeruginosa. Two candidate dehydrogenase genes were located by searching the B. pertussis genome; these have 80% identity to P. aeruginosa wbpO (serotype O6) and 32% identity to wbpA (serotype O5). These genes, wbpO1629 and wbpO3150, were shown to complement a wbpA knockout of P. aeruginosa. Capillary electrophoresis was used to characterize the enzymatic activities of purified WbpO1629 and WbpO3150, and mass spectrometry analysis confirmed that the two enzymes are dehydrogenases capable of converting UDP-d-GlcNAc, UDP-d-GalNAc, to a lesser extent, and UDP-d-Glc, to a much lesser extent. Together, these results suggest that B. pertussis produces UDP-d-ManNAc3NAcA through the same pathway proposed for P. aeruginosa, despite differences in the genomic context of the genes involved. PMID:18621892

  20. Presence of exoY, exoS, exoU and exoT genes, antibiotic resistance and biofilm production among Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates in Northwest Iran

    PubMed Central

    Azimi, Somayeh; Kafil, Hossein Samadi; Baghi, Hossein Bannazadeh; Shokrian, Saeed; Najaf, Khadijeh; Asgharzadeh, Mohammad; Yousefi, Mehdi; Shahrivar, Firooz; Aghazadeh, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pseudomonas aeruginosa, as Gram-negative rod bacilli, has an important role in human infection. In the present study we aimed to investigate the presence of exo genes and biofilm production among Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates in Northwest Iran. Material and methods: 160 isolates of P. aeruginosa were collected and identified by biochemical tests and were characterized for antibiotic resistance. Biofilm production was evaluated by microtiter plate assay and the presence of exo genes was evaluated by allele-specific PCR (polymerase chain reaction). Chi-square test was used for statistical analysis. Results: The most effective antibiotics against isolates were colistin and polymyxin B. 87% of the isolates were biofilm producers of which 69% were strongly biofilm producers. 55% of the isolates carried exoY, 52% of the isolates carried exoU, and 26.3% and 5% carried exoS and exoT, respectively. Conclusion: Our findings showed different distribution of exo genes in clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa in Northwest Iran. ExoS and exoU were more prevalent in non-biofilm producers and exoY was more prevalent in biofilm producer isolates. These results might indicate the importance of exoY in biofilm production of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. PMID:26958458

  1. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa efflux pump MexGHI-OpmD transports a natural phenazine that controls gene expression and biofilm development.

    PubMed

    Sakhtah, Hassan; Koyama, Leslie; Zhang, Yihan; Morales, Diana K; Fields, Blanche L; Price-Whelan, Alexa; Hogan, Deborah A; Shepard, Kenneth; Dietrich, Lars E P

    2016-06-21

    Redox-cycling compounds, including endogenously produced phenazine antibiotics, induce expression of the efflux pump MexGHI-OpmD in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa Previous studies of P. aeruginosa virulence, physiology, and biofilm development have focused on the blue phenazine pyocyanin and the yellow phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA). In P. aeruginosa phenazine biosynthesis, conversion of PCA to pyocyanin is presumed to proceed through the intermediate 5-methylphenazine-1-carboxylate (5-Me-PCA), a reactive compound that has eluded detection in most laboratory samples. Here, we apply electrochemical methods to directly detect 5-Me-PCA and find that it is transported by MexGHI-OpmD in P. aeruginosa strain PA14 planktonic and biofilm cells. We also show that 5-Me-PCA is sufficient to fully induce MexGHI-OpmD expression and that it is required for wild-type colony biofilm morphogenesis. These physiological effects are consistent with the high redox potential of 5-Me-PCA, which distinguishes it from other well-studied P. aeruginosa phenazines. Our observations highlight the importance of this compound, which was previously overlooked due to the challenges associated with its detection, in the context of P. aeruginosa gene expression and multicellular behavior. This study constitutes a unique demonstration of efflux-based self-resistance, controlled by a simple circuit, in a Gram-negative pathogen. PMID:27274079

  2. Sodium houttuyfonate affects production of N-acyl homoserine lactone and quorum sensing-regulated genes expression in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Daqiang; Huang, Weifeng; Duan, Qiangjun; Li, Fang; Cheng, Huijuan

    2014-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a means of cell-to-cell communication that uses diffusible signaling molecules that are sensed by the population to determine population density, thus allowing co-ordinate gene regulation in response to population density. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, production of the QS signaling molecule, N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL), co-ordinates expression of key factors of pathogenesis, including biofilm formation and toxin secretion. It is predicted that the inhibition of AHL sensing would provide an effective clinical treatment to reduce the expression of virulence factors and increase the effectiveness of antimicrobial agents. We previously demonstrated that sodium houttuyfonate (SH), commonly used in traditional Chinese medicine to treat infectious diseases, can effectively inhibit QS-regulated processes, including biofilm formation. Here, using a model system, we demonstrate that SH causes the dose-dependent inhibition of AHL production, through down-regulation of the AHL biosynthesis gene, lasI. Addition of SH also resulted in down-regulation of expression of the AHL sensor and transcriptional regulator, LasR, and inhibited the production of the QS-regulated virulence factors, pyocyanin and LasA. These results suggest that the antimicrobial activity of SH may be due to its ability to disrupt QS in P. aeruginosa. PMID:25505457

  3. Characterization of the metabolic pathway and catabolic gene expression in biphenyl degrading marine bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa JP-11.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Jaya; Das, Surajit

    2016-02-01

    Metabolic pathway of biphenyl assimilation and the catabolic gene expression in a marine bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa JP-11, isolated from the coastal sediments of Odisha, India have been studied. This strain utilized 98.86% ± 2.29% of biphenyl within 72 h when supplied as the sole source of carbon, however, preferential utilization of glucose was observed over catechol and biphenyl when grown in a complex medium. Combination of chromatographic and spectrophotometric techniques confirmed the catechol pathway and identified 2-Hydroxy-6-oxo-6-phenylhexa-2, 4-dienoate as the intermediate metabolic product. Assimilation of biphenyl was initiated by its dioxygenation, forming cis-2, 3-dihydro-2, 3-dihydroxybiphenyl subsequently transformed to 2-hydroxy-6-oxo-6-phenylhexa-2, 4-dienoate. In the lower pathway, cis-1, 6-dihydroxy-2, 4-cyclohexadiene-1-carboxylic acid was detected which formed catechol before entering into the Krebs cycle. Detection of key enzyme catechol-1, 2-dioxygenase in the cell-free extract of P. aeruginosa JP-11 supported the proposed degradation pathway. The primary enzyme for biphenyl assimilation, biphenyl dioxygenase encoded by bphA gene was found in the genome of the isolate. On increasing biphenyl stress (50, 100, 150 and 200 mg L(-1)), bphA gene showed a significant (P < 0.01) up-regulation upto 43.5 folds. Production of biosurfactant was confirmed and the rhamnolipid synthesizing gene rhlAB was amplified. This gene also showed a significant (P < 0.01) up-regulation upto 258 folds on increasing biphenyl stress. PMID:26519802

  4. RecA Inhibitors Potentiate Antibiotic Activity and Block Evolution of Antibiotic Resistance.

    PubMed

    Alam, Md Kausar; Alhhazmi, Areej; DeCoteau, John F; Luo, Yu; Geyer, C Ronald

    2016-03-17

    Antibiotic resistance arises from the maintenance of resistance mutations or genes acquired from the acquisition of adaptive de novo mutations or the transfer of resistance genes. Antibiotic resistance is acquired in response to antibiotic therapy by activating SOS-mediated DNA repair and mutagenesis and horizontal gene transfer pathways. Initiation of the SOS pathway promotes activation of RecA, inactivation of LexA repressor, and induction of SOS genes. Here, we have identified and characterized phthalocyanine tetrasulfonic acid RecA inhibitors that block antibiotic-induced activation of the SOS response. These inhibitors potentiate the activity of bactericidal antibiotics, including members of the quinolone, β-lactam, and aminoglycoside families in both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. They reduce the ability of bacteria to acquire antibiotic resistance mutations and to transfer mobile genetic elements conferring resistance. This study highlights the advantage of including RecA inhibitors in bactericidal antibiotic therapies and provides a new strategy for prolonging antibiotic shelf life. PMID:26991103

  5. Plasmid Profile Analysis and bla VIM Gene Detection of Metalo β-lactamase (MBL) Producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from Clinical Samples

    PubMed Central

    M, Jeya

    2014-01-01

    Introduction:Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a frequent colonizer of hospitalized patients. They are responsible for serious infections such as meningitis, urological infections, septicemia and pneumonia. Carbapenem resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is currently increasingly reported which is often mediated by production of metallo-β-lactamase (MBL). Multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates may involve reduced cell wall permeability, production of chromosomal and plasmid mediated β lactamases, aminoglycosides modifying enzymes and an active multidrug efflux mechanism. Objective: This study is aimed to detect the presence and the nature of plasmids among metallo-β-lactamase producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates. Also to detect the presence of bla VIM gene from these isolates. Materials and Methods: Clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa showing the metalo-β-lactamase enzyme (MBL) production were isolated. The MBL production was confirmed by three different methods. From the MBL producing isolates plasmid extraction was done by alkaline lysis method. Plasmid positive isolates were subjected for blaVIM gene detection by PCR method. Results: Two thousand seventy six clinical samples yielded 316 (15.22%) Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates, out of which 141 (44.62%) were multidrug resistant. Among them 25 (17.73%) were metallo-β-lactamase enzyme producers. Plasmids were extracted from 18 out of 25 isolates tested. Five out of 18 isolates were positive for the blaVIM gene detection by the PCR amplification. Conclusion: The MBL producers were susceptible to polymyxin /colistin with MIC ranging from 0.5 – 2μg/ml. Molecular detection of specific genes bla VIM were positive among the carbapenem resistant isolates. PMID:25120980

  6. Detection of elastase production in Escherichia coli with the elastase structural gene from several non-elastase-producing strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, E; Kawamoto, S; Fukushima, J; Hamajima, K; Onishi, H; Miyagi, Y; Inami, S; Morihara, K; Okuda, K

    1991-01-01

    The elastase structural gene from Pseudomonas aeruginosa IFO 3455 has been cloned and sequenced. Using this gene as a probe, we cloned the DNA fragments (pEL3080R, pEL10, and pEL103R) of the elastase gene from non-elastase-producing strains (P. aeruginosa IFO 3080, N-10, and PA103 respectively). These three Pseudomonas strains showed no detectable levels of elastase antigenicity by Western blotting (immunoblotting) or by elastase activity. When elastase structural genes about 8 kb in length were cloned into pUC18, an Escherichia coli expression vector, we were able to detect both elastase antigenicity and elastolytic activity in two bacterial clones (E. coli pEL10 and E. coli pEL103R). However, neither elastolytic activity nor elastase antigenicity was detected in the E. coli pEL3080R clone, although elastase mRNA was observed. The partial restriction map determined with several restriction enzymes of these three structural genes corresponded to that of P. aeruginosa IFO 3455. We sequenced the three DNA segments of the elastase gene from non-elastase-producing strains and compared the sequences with those from the elastase-producing P. aeruginosa strains IFO 3455 and PAO1. In P. aeruginosa N-10 and PA103, the sequences were almost identical to those from elastase-producing strains, except for several nucleotide differences. These minor differences may reflect a microheterogeneity of the elastase gene. These results suggest that two of the non-elastase-producing strains have the normal elastase structural gene and that elastase production is repressed by regulation of this gene expression in P. aeruginosa. Possible reasons for the lack of expression in these two strains are offered in this paper. In P. aeruginosa IFO 3080, the sequence had a 1-base deletion in the coding region, which should have caused a frameshift variation in the amino acid sequence. At present, we have no explanation for the abnormal posttransciptional behavior of this strain. Images PMID

  7. Conservation of an ATP-binding domain among recA proteins from Proteus vulgaris, erwinia carotovora, Shigella flexneri, and Escherichia coli K-12 and B/r

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, K.L.; Hess, R.M.; McEntee, K.

    1988-06-01

    The purified RecA proteins encoded by the cloned genes from Proteus vulgaris, Erwinia carotovora, Shigella flexneri, and Escherichia coli B/r were compared with the RecA protein from E. coli K-12. Each of the proteins hydrolyzed ATP in the presence of single-stranded DNA, and each was covalently modified with the photoaffinity ATP analog 8-azidoadenosine 5'-triphosphate (8N/sub 3/ATP). Two-dimensional tryptic maps of the four heterologous RecA proteins demonstrated considerable structural conservation among these bacterial genera. Moreover, when the (..cap alpha..-/sup 32/P)8N/sub 3/ATP-modified proteins were digested with trypsin and analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography, a single peak of radioactivity was detected in each of the digests and these peptides eluted identically with the tryptic peptide T/sub 31/ of the E. coli K-12 RecA protein, which was the unique site of 8N/sub 3/ATP photolabeling. Each of the heterologous recA genes hybridized to oligonucleotide probes derived from the ATP-binding domain sequence of the E. coli K-12 gene. These last results demonstrate that the ATP-binding domain of the RecA protein has been strongly conserved for greater than 10/sup 7/ years.

  8. The mismatch repair system (mutS, mutL and uvrD genes) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa: molecular characterization of naturally occurring mutants.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Antonio; Baquero, Fernando; Blázquez, Jesús

    2002-03-01

    We have recently described the presence of a high proportion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates (20%) with an increased mutation frequency (mutators) in the lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. In four out of 11 independent P. aeruginosa strains, the high mutation frequency was found to be complemented with the wild-type mutS gene from P. aeruginosa PAO1. Here, we report the cloning and sequencing of two additional P. aeruginosa mismatch repair genes and the characterization, by complementation of deficient strains, of these two putative P. aeruginosa mismatch repair genes (mutL and uvrD). We also describe the alterations in the mutS, mutL and uvrD genes responsible for the mutator phenotype of hypermutable P. aeruginosa strains isolated from CF patients. Seven out of the 11 mutator strains were found to be defective in the MMR system (four mutS, two mutL and one uvrD). In four cases (three mutS and one mutL), the genes contained frameshift mutations. The fourth mutS strain showed a 3.3 kb insertion after the 10th nucleotide of the mutS gene, and a 54 nucleotide deletion between two eight nucleotide direct repeats. This deletion, involving domain II of MutS, was found to be the main one responsible for mutS inactivation. The second mutL strain presented a K310M mutation, equivalent to K307 in Escherichia coli MutL, a residue known to be essential for its ATPase activity. Finally, the uvrD strain had three amino acid substitutions within the conserved ATP binding site of the deduced UvrD polypeptide, showing defective mismatch repair activity. Interestingly, cells carrying this mutant allele exhibited a fully active UvrABC-mediated excision repair. The results shown here indicate that the putative P. aeruginosa mutS, mutL and uvrD genes are mutator genes and that their alteration results in a mutator phenotype. PMID:11952911

  9. Pyocyanine Biosynthetic Genes in Clinical and Environmental Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Detection of Pyocyanine’s Antimicrobial Effects with or without Colloidal Silver Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Nowroozi, Jamileh; Akhavan Sepahi, Abbas; Rashnonejad, Afrooz

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Pyocyanine plays an important role in the pathogenesis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, (P. aeruginosa) and is known to have inhibitory and bactericidal effects. This study has aimed to detect the phenazine biosynthetic operon (phz ABCDEFG) and two phenazine modifying genes (phzM and phzS) by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and detection of its possible protein bands by sodium dodecyl sulfate - polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The antimicrobial effects of pyocyanine alone and mixed with colloidal silver nanoparticles were studied. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive study, clinical and environmental species of P. aeruginosa were isolated by thioglycollate medium culture and cetrimide agar, respectively. The existence of a phenazine biosynthetic operon and two phenazine modifying genes as well as their protein products were confirmed by PCR and SDS-PAGE, respectively. Pyocyanine was extracted with chloroform and its antimicrobial effects against bacteria such as; Escherichia coli (E. coli), P. aeruginosaand Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) bacteria and yeast Candida albicans (C. albicans) were tested using well, spot and disk diffusion methods. Results: In this study, 3 out of 48 clinical strains were unable to produce pyocyanine on cetrimide and Mueller Hinton (MH) agar. Two strains did not have phenazine modifying gene bands. Another strain did not have the possible protein band of the phzM gene. Pyocyanine had antimicrobial effects against the microbial strains, which increased in the presence of silver nanoparticles. Conclusion: According to the results of the present study, some P. aeruginosa strains are unable to produce pyocyanine due to the absence of the phzM or phzS genes. Therefore, these genes have an important role in pyocyanine production in P. aeruginosa. Pyocyanine shows synergistic antimicrobial effects in the presence of silver nanoparticles against microbial strains. PMID:23626932

  10. Novel mechanism for UV sensitivity and apparent UV nonmutability of recA432 mutants: persistent LexA cleavage following SOS induction.

    PubMed Central

    Ennis, D G; Little, J W; Mount, D W

    1993-01-01

    The recA432 mutant allele was isolated (T. Kato and Y. Shinoura, Mol. Gen. Genet. 156:121-131, 1977) by virtue of its defect in cellular mutagenesis (Mut-) and its hypersensitivity to damage by UV irradiation (UVs), which were phenotypes expected for a recA mutant. However, we found that in a different genetic background (lexA51 sulA211 uvrB+), recA432 mutants expressed certain mutant phenotypes but not the Mut- and UVs phenotypes (D.G. Ennis, N. Ossanna, and D.W. Mount, J. Bacteriol. 171:2533-2541, 1989). We present several lines of evidence that these differences resulted from the sulA genotype of the cell and that the apparent UVs and Mut- phenotypes of the sulA+ derivatives resulted from lethal filamentation of induced cells because of persistent derepression of sulA. First, transduction of sulA(Def) mutations into the recA432 strains restored cellular mutagenesis and resistance to UV. Second, recA432 sulA+ strains underwent filamentous death following SOS-inducing treatments. Third, cleavage of LexA repressor in a recA432 strain continued at a rapid rate long after UV induction, at a time when cleavage of the repressor in the recA+ parental strain had substantially declined. Fourth, we confirmed that a single mutation (recA432) conferring both the UVs and Mut- phenotypes mapped to the recA gene. These findings indicate that the RecA432 mutant protein is defective in making the transition back to the deactivated state following SOS induction; thus, the SOS-induced state of recA432 mutants is prolonged and can account for an excess of SulA protein, leading to filamentation. These results are discussed in the context of molecular models for RecA activation for LexA and UmuD cleavage and their roles in the control of mutagenesis and cell division in the SOS response. Images PMID:8226685

  11. Metallo-beta-Lactamase VIM-1, SPM-1, and IMP-1 Genes Among Clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa Species Isolated in Zahedan, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Ghamgosha, Mehdi; Shahrekizahedani, Shahram; Kafilzadeh, Farshid; Bameri, Zakaria; Taheri, Ramezan Ali; Farnoosh, Gholamreza

    2015-01-01

    Background: One of the major clinical problems regarding Pseudomonas aeruginosa is attributed to metallo-beta-lactamases (MBL). This group of enzymes is a subset of beta lactamases which belong to group B of Ambler classification and cause hydrolysis of carbapenems. Based on epidemiological studies conducted worldwide, it is proved that prevalence of genes coding MBLs in P. aeruginosa species are different in various geographic zones and even in various hospitals. Therefore, according to the clinical importance of organisms generating MBLs, it is necessary to identify and control these bacteria in hospitals for therapeutic purposes. Objectives: The current study aimed to investigate the Metallo-beta-Lactamase VIM-1, SPM-1, and IMP-1 genes among clinical P. aeruginosa species isolated in Zahedan, Iran. Materials and Methods: The current study investigated the presence of MBL through phenotypic and genotypic methods and also the pattern of antibiotic resistance in P. aeruginosa species isolated in hospitals. The Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) against imipeneme was measured for 191 P. aeruginosa species isolated from Zahedan hospitals after identification through biochemical methods and determination of the antibiotic resistance pattern. Strains with MIC > 4 µg/mL were studied by phenotypic and genotypic methods. Results: The rate of resistance against imipeneme was 5.7% and after carrying out the phenotypic experiments, nine species were identified as of MBL producer. Seven species were confirmed by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) method. Gene VIM-1 was the predominant gene among the positive (antibiotic resistant) species. Conclusions: The study results showed that MBL genes were present in some of the species isolated from Zahedan hospitals. Regarding the importance of MBL producer bacteria in hospitals, quick identification and evaluation of these clinical species can be considered as an important and basic step for treatment and control of pseudomonad

  12. Conjugational hyperrecombination achieved by derepressing the LexA regulon, altering the properties of RecA protein and inactivating mismatch repair in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Lanzov, Vladislav A; Bakhlanova, Irina V; Clark, Alvin J

    2003-01-01

    The frequency of recombinational exchanges (FRE) that disrupt co-inheritance of transferred donor markers in Escherichia coli Hfr by F(-) crosses differs by up to a factor of two depending on physiological factors and culture conditions. Under standard conditions we found FRE to be 5.01 +/- 0.43 exchanges per 100-min units of DNA length for wild-type strains of the AB1157 line. Using these conditions we showed a cumulative effect of various mutations on FRE. Constitutive SOS expression by lexA gene inactivation (lexA71::Tn5) and recA gene mutation (recA730) showed, respectively, approximately 4- and 7-fold increases of FRE. The double lexA71 recA730 combination gave an approximately 17-fold increase in FRE. Addition of mutS215::Tn10, inactivating the mismatch repair system, to the double lexA recA mutant increased FRE to approximately 26-fold above wild-type FRE. Finally, we showed that another recA mutation produced as much SOS expression as recA730 but increased FRE only 3-fold. We conclude that three factors contribute to normally low FRE under standard conditions: repression of the LexA regulon, the properties of wild-type RecA protein, and a functioning MutSHL mismatch repair system. We discuss mechanisms by which the lexA, recA, and mutS mutations may elevate FRE cumulatively to obtain hyperrecombination. PMID:12702672

  13. Pseudomonas aeruginosa lasI/rhlI quorum sensing genes promote phagocytosis and aquaporin 9 redistribution to the leading and trailing regions in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Holm, Angelika; Karlsson, Thommie; Vikström, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa controls production of its multiple virulence factors and biofilm development via the quorum sensing (QS) system. QS signals also interact with and affect the behavior of eukaryotic cells. Host water homeostasis and aquaporins (AQP) are essential during pathological conditions since they interfere with the cell cytoskeleton and signaling, and hereby affect cell morphology and functions. We investigated the contribution of P. aeruginosa QS genes lasI/rhlI to phagocytosis, cell morphology, AQP9 expression, and distribution in human macrophages, using immunoblotting, confocal, and nanoscale imaging. Wild type P. aeruginosa with a functional QS system was a more attractive prey for macrophages than the lasI/rhlI mutant lacking the production of QS molecules, 3O-C12-HSL, and C4-HSL, and associated virulence factors. The P. aeruginosa infections resulted in elevated AQP9 expression and relocalization to the leading and trailing regions in macrophages, increased cell area and length; bacteria with a functional QS system lasI/rhlI achieved stronger responses. We present evidence for a new role of water fluxes via AQP9 during bacteria–macrophage interaction and for the QS system as an important stimulus in this process. These novel events in the interplay between P. aeruginosa and macrophages may influence on the outcome of infection, inflammation, and development of disease. PMID:26388857

  14. A Site-Specific Integrative Plasmid Found in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Clinical Isolate HS87 along with A Plasmid Carrying an Aminoglycoside-Resistant Gene.

    PubMed

    Bi, Dexi; Xie, Yingzhou; Tai, Cui; Jiang, Xiaofei; Zhang, Jie; Harrison, Ewan M; Jia, Shiru; Deng, Zixin; Rajakumar, Kumar; Ou, Hong-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Plasmids play critical roles in bacterial fitness and evolution of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Here two plasmids found in a drug-resistant P. aeruginosa clinical isolate HS87 were completely sequenced. The pHS87b plasmid (11.2 kb) carries phage-related genes and function-unknown genes. Notably, pHS87b encodes an integrase and has an adjacent tRNAThr-associated attachment site. A corresponding integrated form of pHS87b at the tRNAThr locus was identified on the chromosome of P. aeruginosa, showing that pHS87b is able to site-specifically integrate into the 3'-end of the tRNAThr gene. The pHS87a plasmid (26.8 kb) displays a plastic structure containing a putative replication module, stability factors and a variable region. The RepA of pHS87a shows significant similarity to the replication proteins of pPT23A-family plasmids. pHS87a carries a transposon Tn6049, a truncated insertion sequence ΔIS1071 and a Tn402-like class 1 integron which contains an aacA4 cassette that may confer aminoglycoside resistance. Thus, pHS87b is a site-specific integrative plasmid whereas pHS87a is a plastic antibiotic resistance plasmid. The two native plasmids may promote the fitness and evolution of P. aeruginosa. PMID:26841043

  15. A Site-Specific Integrative Plasmid Found in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Clinical Isolate HS87 along with A Plasmid Carrying an Aminoglycoside-Resistant Gene

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Cui; Jiang, Xiaofei; Zhang, Jie; Harrison, Ewan M.; Jia, Shiru; Deng, Zixin; Rajakumar, Kumar; Ou, Hong-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Plasmids play critical roles in bacterial fitness and evolution of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Here two plasmids found in a drug-resistant P. aeruginosa clinical isolate HS87 were completely sequenced. The pHS87b plasmid (11.2 kb) carries phage-related genes and function-unknown genes. Notably, pHS87b encodes an integrase and has an adjacent tRNAThr-associated attachment site. A corresponding integrated form of pHS87b at the tRNAThr locus was identified on the chromosome of P. aeruginosa, showing that pHS87b is able to site-specifically integrate into the 3’-end of the tRNAThr gene. The pHS87a plasmid (26.8 kb) displays a plastic structure containing a putative replication module, stability factors and a variable region. The RepA of pHS87a shows significant similarity to the replication proteins of pPT23A-family plasmids. pHS87a carries a transposon Tn6049, a truncated insertion sequence ΔIS1071 and a Tn402-like class 1 integron which contains an aacA4 cassette that may confer aminoglycoside resistance. Thus, pHS87b is a site-specific integrative plasmid whereas pHS87a is a plastic antibiotic resistance plasmid. The two native plasmids may promote the fitness and evolution of P. aeruginosa. PMID:26841043

  16. AntR-mediated bidirectional activation of antA and antR, anthranilate degradative genes in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo-Kyoung; Im, Su-Jin; Yeom, Doo-Hwan; Lee, Joon-Hee

    2012-08-15

    Bidirectional activation of transcription is a peculiar regulation mode of gene expression. In this study, we show that genes involved in the metabolism of anthranilate, a precursor of biosynthesis of tryptophan and Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS) are regulated by this bidirectional activation of transcription. Anthranilate is degraded by anthranilate dioxygenase complex encoded by antABC operon, and AntR, a LysR-type regulator encoded by antR activates the transcription of antABC operon in the presence of anthranilate. In P. aeruginosa, antABC and antR are divergently located and AntR binds to the intergenic region between antA and antR to activate the antABC transcription. In this study, we determined the transcriptional start site of the antA promoter (antA(p)) and AntR-responsive elements (AREs) in P. aeruginosa. The upstream deletion analysis of antA(p) and in vitro gel shift assay with purified AntR showed that there are two AREs at -194 to -148 and -88 to -47 regions. We also found that AntR activates antR promoter (antR(p)) in the opposite direction and both AREs are important in the bidirectional activation of antA(p) and antR(p). Two AREs have different binding affinities to AntR and the strength of transcriptional activation was dramatically asymmetric depending on the direction. We suggest that the different affinities of two AREs may explain the asymmetry of the bidirectional activation by AntR. PMID:22609066

  17. Prevalence of ESBLs genes among multidrug-resistant isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from patients in Tehran.

    PubMed

    Shahcheraghi, Freshteh; Nikbin, Vajiheh-Sadat; Feizabadi, Mohammad Mehdi

    2009-03-01

    Drug susceptibility testing and PCR assay were used to determine the antibiotic susceptibility patterns and prevalence of genes encoding five different extended spectrum betalactamases (ESBLs) (PER, VEB, SHV, GES, and TEM) among 600 isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa cultured from patients at two hospitals in Tehran. Susceptibility of isolates to 12 different antibiotics was tested using disk diffusion method. The MICs for ceftazidime and imipenem were also determined using microbroth dilution assay. Isolates showing MICs >or=16 for ceftazidime were subjected to PCR targeting bla(SHV), bla(PER), bla(GES), bla(VEB), and bla(TEM) genes that encode ESBL. The rates of resistance were as follows: tetracycline (92%), carbenicillin (62%), cefotaxime (56%), ceftriaxon (53%), piperacilin (46%), gentamicin (31%), piperacilin/tazobactam (28%), ceftazidime (25%), amikacin (23%), ciprofloxacin (19.5%), and imipenem (6%). Thirty-nine percent of isolates (n = 234) showed MICs >or=16 microg/ml for ceftazidime, and 5.45% showed MICs >or=16 microg/ml for imepenem. The imipenem-resistant isolates showed high rate of susceptibility to colistin (89%) and polymixin B (95.5%). The frequency of bla(VEB), bla(SHV), bla(PER), bla(GES), and bla(TEM) among the ESBL isolates (MIC >or=16) were 24%, 22%, 17%, 0%, and 9%, respectively. Isolates containing bla(VEB) were resistant to almost all tested antibiotics except imepenem. This is the first report on the existence of bla(VEB), and bla(PER) in Iran. Colistin and polymixin B are highly potent against the imipenem-resistant isolates of P. aeruginosa. PMID:19265477

  18. Real-time PCR based analysis of metal resistance genes in metal resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain J007.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Sangeeta; Sar, Pinaki

    2016-07-01

    A uranium (U)-resistant and -accumulating Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain was characterized to assess the response of toxic metals toward its growth and expression of metal resistance determinants. The bacterium showed MIC (minimum inhibitory concentration) values of 6, 3, and 2 mM for Zn, Cu, and Cd, respectively; with resistance phenotype conferred by periplasmic Cu sequestering copA and RND type heavy metal efflux czcA genes. Real-time PCR-based expression analysis revealed significant upregulation of both these genes upon exposure to low concentrations of metals for short duration, whereas the global stress response gene sodA encoding superoxide dismutase enzyme was upregulated only at higher metal concentrations or longer exposure time. It could also be inferred that copA and czcA are involved in providing resistance only at low metal concentrations, whereas involvement of "global stress response" phenomenon (expression of sodA) at higher metal concentration or increased exposure was evident. This study provides significant understanding of the adaptive response of bacteria surviving in metal and radionuclide contaminated environments along with the development of real-time PCR-based quantification method of using metal resistance genes as biomarker for monitoring relevant bacteria in such habitats. PMID:26662317

  19. Target gene approaches: Gene expression in Daphnia magna exposed to predator-borne kairomones or to microcystin-producing and microcystin-free Microcystis aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Two major biological stressors of freshwater zooplankton of the genus Daphnia are predation and fluctuations in food quality. Here we use kairomones released from a planktivorous fish (Leucaspius delineatus) and from an invertebrate predator (larvae of Chaoborus flavicans) to simulate predation pressure; a microcystin-producing culture of the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa and a microcystin-deficient mutant are used to investigate effects of low food quality. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) allows quantification of the impact of biotic stressors on differential gene activity. The draft genome sequence for Daphnia pulex facilitates the use of candidate genes by precisely identifying orthologs to functionally characterized genes in other model species. This information is obtained by constructing phylogenetic trees of candidate genes with the knowledge that the Daphnia genome is composed of many expanded gene families. Results We evaluated seven candidate reference genes for QPCR in Daphnia magna after exposure to kairomones. As a robust approach, a combination normalisation factor (NF) was calculated based on the geometric mean of three of these seven reference genes: glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, TATA-box binding protein and succinate dehydrogenase. Using this NF, expression of the target genes actin and alpha-tubulin were revealed to be unchanged in the presence of the tested kairomones. The presence of fish kairomone up-regulated one gene (cyclophilin) involved in the folding of proteins, whereas Chaoborus kairomone down-regulated the same gene. We evaluated the same set of candidate reference genes for QPCR in Daphnia magna after exposure to a microcystin-producing and a microcystin-free strain of the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa. The NF was calculated based on the reference genes 18S ribosomal RNA, alpha-tubulin and TATA-box binding protein. We found glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and

  20. Fine-tuning recA expression in Staphylococcus aureus for antimicrobial photoinactivation: importance of photo-induced DNA damage in the photoinactivation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Grinholc, Mariusz; Rodziewicz, Aleksandra; Forys, Katarzyna; Rapacka-Zdonczyk, Aleksandra; Kawiak, Anna; Domachowska, Anna; Golunski, Grzegorz; Wolz, Christiane; Mesak, Lili; Becker, Karsten; Bielawski, Krzysztof P

    2015-11-01

    Bacterial cell envelope is generally accepted as the primary target for a photo-induced oxidative stress. It is plausible that DNA damage occurs during the antimicrobial photoinactivation. Here we investigate the correlation between DNA damage and photoinactivation by evaluating the level of RecA-based DNA repair system in Staphylococcus aureus. By using exogenous photosensitizers (new methylene blue (NMB), toluidine blue O (TBO), 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(1-methyl-4-pyridinio)porphyrin tetra(p-toluenesulfonate) (TMPyP), zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc), Rose Bengal (RB)) and ALA-induced endogenous porphyrin-dependent blue light (405 nm), several outcomes were observed: (i) an increase of DNA damage (from gel electrophoresis in DNA damage assay), (ii) an increase of recA expression (luminescence assay in recA-lux strain), and (iii) an increase of RecA protein level (Western blotting). When recA expression was repressed by novobiocin, or abolished by deleting the gene, S. aureus susceptibility towards photoinactivation was increased at approximately a hundred-fold. The absence of RecA increases DNA damage to yield bactericidal effect. In novobiocin-resistant mutant (gyrB), as opposed to wild type, neither RecA protein level nor cell's susceptibility was affected by photoinactivation (when novobiocin is present). This is to suggest that GyrB-dependent inhibition mediated recA repression. Therefore, we have established the role of RecA in DNA damage during photoinactivation. With the use of rifampicin mutation frequency and Ames tests, we demonstrated that photoinactivation did not increase S. aureus mutagenesis and potentially is not mutagenic toward eukaryotic cells. The results suggest that the treatment is considered safe. In conclusion, we provide an evidence that recA inhibitor may serve as therapeutic adjuvant for antimicrobial photoinactivation. Clinical relevance of our findings warrants further investigations. PMID:26252968

  1. Presence of blaPER-1 and blaVEB-1 beta-lactamase genes among isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from South West of Iran.

    PubMed

    Davodian, Elham; Sadeghifard, Nourkhoda; Ghasemian, Abdolmajid; Noorbakhsh, Samileh

    2016-09-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates have acquired resistance to antibiotics such as novel beta-lactams. The aim of this study was to investigate the blaPER-1, blaVEB-1, and blaPSE-1 genes among isolates of P. aeruginosa among intensive care unit (ICU) patients. Sixty-five isolates were collected. The antibiotic susceptibility testing and combined disk tests were performed to detect the isolates producing extended spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs) among ceftazidime-resistant isolates. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of blaPER-1, blaVEB-1, and blaPSE-1 genes was conducted. Ten (15.3%) isolates were ESBL-positive, of which 40% (n=4) belonged to males and 60% (n=6) were collected from females. Moreover, two and one isolates harbored blaPER-1 and blaVEB-1 genes, respectively. PMID:26944896

  2. Detection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by a triplex polymerase chain reaction assay based on lasI/R and gyrB genes.

    PubMed

    Aghamollaei, Hosseine; Moghaddam, Mehrdad M; Kooshki, Hamid; Heiat, Mohammad; Mirnejad, Reza; Barzi, Nastaran S

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a nosocomial pathogen, which, due to its inherent and acquired resistance to a wide range of antibiotics, causes high mortality rates. Therefore, rapid detection of the bacterium with high specificity and sensitivity plays a critical role in the control of the pathogenic bacterium. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy and specificity of a prompt detection of the bacterium based on a triplex polymerase chain reaction that amplifies the lasI, lasR and gyrB genes. For this purpose, 30 clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa and 30 wound biopsy samples were retrieved from clinical diagnostic laboratories. After the extraction of the chromosomal DNA, the desired genes were amplified using uniplex and triplex PCR with appropriate primers. The specificity of the primers was evaluated by a comparison of the PCR results for P. aeruginosa clinical samples and non-Pseudomonas species control samples. The sensitivity of the primers was determined using a serial dilution of the genomic DNA template (100 ng to 100 fg) and by a comparison of the PCR and bacterial culture results. The results showed that the triplex PCR assay was positive for all of the samples (100%), while the PCR identifications were negative for non-Pseudomonas species. Additionally, at 10(-4) and 10(-5) diluted genomic DNA from P. aeruginosa (10 pg and 1 pg), the triplex PCR test was positive for the Las and gyrB genes in all of the samples, respectively. Based on these results, the designed primers can be used for the rapid, specific and sensitive diagnosis of P. aeruginosa in a triplex PCR assay. PMID:25863575

  3. Frequency of PER, VEB, SHV, TEM and CTX-M Genes in Resistant Strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Producing Extended Spectrum β-Lactamases

    PubMed Central

    Bokaeian, Mohmmad; Shahraki Zahedani, Shahram; Soltanian Bajgiran, Morteza; Ansari Moghaddam, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most common pathogen causing nosocomial infections. Resistance of P. aeruginosa strains to broad-spectrum cephalosporins may be mediated by extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs). Objectives: We intended to investigate the prevalence of ESBLs and antimicrobial susceptibilities of P. aeruginosa isolated from patients in Zahedan, Iran. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, during 2012–2013, 116 P. aeruginosa isolates were collected from a teaching hospital in Zahedan, Iran. Susceptibility to eight antimicrobial agents was carried out by disk diffusion method. The ESBL producing strains were detected by combination disk test (CDT). ESBL positive isolates as well as other isolates showing minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) ≥ 4 μg/mL for ceftazidime, cefotaxime, ceftriaxone and aztreonam, were screened for the presence of the genes encoding blaTEM, blaSHV, blaPER-1 and blaVEB-1, by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results: Ciprofloxacin and piperacillin were the most efficient antipseudomonal agents. The results disclosed that 19 (16.37%) of the isolates were multidrug resistant and 8 (6.89%) were ESBL-positive. Of the 116 isolates, 30 (25.86%) were resistant to at least one of the antibiotics ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, cefotaxime or aztreonam and among these 30 (100%), 4 (13.3%), 2 (6.6%) and 2 (6.6%), amplified blaTEM, blaVEB-1, blaPER-1 and blaSHV, respectively. From the 30 TEM-positive isolates, 22 were ESBL-negative. Sequencing of the ESBL genes verified the accuracy of the PCR products. Conclusions: According to our results, blaTEM-116 was the most frequent isolated ESBL gene among the P. aeruginosa strains isolated from patients. PMID:25789123

  4. Rapid and Sensitive Detection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Chlorinated Water and Aerosols targeting gyrB gene using Real-time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang Soo; Wetzel, Kaedra; Buckley, Timothy; Wozniak, Daniel; Lee, Jiyoung

    2011-01-01

    Aims For the rapid detection of P. aeruginosa from chlorinated water and aerosols, gyrB gene-based real-time PCR assay was developed and investigated. Methods and Results Two novel primer sets (pa722F/746MGB/899R and pa722F/746MGB/788R) were designed using the most updated 611 Pseudomonas and 748 other bacterial gyrB genes for achieving high specificity. Their specificity showed 100% accuracy when tested with various strains including clinical isolates from cystic fibrosis patients. The assay was tested with P. aeruginosa-containing chlorinated water and aerosols to simulate the waterborne and airborne transmission routes (detection limit 3.3 × 102 CFU·PCR−1 − 2.3 × 103 CFU·PCR−1). No chlorine interference in real-time PCR was observed at drinking water level (~ 1 mg·L−1), but high level of chorine (12 mg·L−1) interfered the assay, thus neutralization was needed. P. aeruginosa in aerosol was successfully detected after capturing with gelatin filters with minimum 2 min of sampling time when the initial concentration of 104 CFU·mL−1 bacteria existed in the nebulizer. Conclusions A highly specific and rapid assay (2–3 hrs) was developed by targeting gyrB gene for the detection of P. aeruginosa in chlorinated water and aerosols, combined with optimized sample collection methods and sample processing, so the direct DNA extraction from either water or aerosol was possible while achieving the desired sensitivity of the method. Significance and Impact The new assay can provide timely and accurate risk assessment to prevent P. aeruginosa exposure from water and aerosol, resulting in reduced disease burden, especially among immune-compromised and susceptible individuals. This approach can be easily utilized as a platform technology for the detection of other types of microorganisms, especially for those that are transmitted via water and aerosol routes, such as Legionella pneumophila. PMID:21794031

  5. UvrD helicase, unlike Rep helicase, dismantles RecA nucleoprotein filaments in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Veaute, Xavier; Delmas, Stéphane; Selva, Marjorie; Jeusset, Josette; Le Cam, Eric; Matic, Ivan; Fabre, Francis; Petit, Marie-Agnès

    2005-01-12

    The roles of UvrD and Rep DNA helicases of Escherichia coli are not yet fully understood. In particular, the reason for rep uvrD double mutant lethality remains obscure. We reported earlier that mutations in recF, recO or recR genes suppress the lethality of uvrD rep, and proposed that an essential activity common to UvrD and Rep is either to participate in the removal of toxic recombination intermediates or to favour the proper progression of replication. Here, we show that UvrD, but not Rep, directly prevents homologous recombination in vivo. In addition to RecFOR, we provide evidence that RecA contributes to toxicity in the rep uvrD mutant. In vitro, UvrD dismantles the RecA nucleoprotein filament, while Rep has only a marginal activity. We conclude that UvrD and Rep do not share a common activity that is essential in vivo: while Rep appears to act at the replication stage, UvrD plays a role of RecA nucleoprotein filament remover. This activity of UvrD is similar to that of the yeast Srs2 helicase. PMID:15565170

  6. [Identification of SHV-type extended spectrum beta-lactamase genes in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism and insertion site restriction-PCR].

    PubMed

    Kalai Blagui, S; Achour, W; Abdeladhim, A; Ben Hassen, A

    2009-07-01

    We propose a simple and rapid method to discriminate SHV-type extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) genes in P. aeruginosa based on PCR techniques (PCR-RFLP and RSI-PCR). We studied 22 producing ESBL P. aeruginosa strains isolated from seven immunocompromised patients (19 isolates) and from environmental swabs (three isolates) at the Bone Marrow Transplantation Center of Tunis. Screening PCR with primer pairs designed to detect gene encoding TEM, SHV, OXA group I, OXA group II, OXA-18 and PER-1 ESBL was positive for bla(OXA18) and bla(SHV) genes in all isolates. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis using SpeI endonuclease defined five genotypic groups. For at least one isolate corresponding to each genotype observed, restriction of PCR products by DdeI and BsrI revealed the same restriction pattern that the bla(SHV-1) negative control; in the same way, RSI-PCR products digestion by NruI, thus excluding 35, 238 and 240 mutations characterizing reported ESBL in P. aeruginosa (SHV-2a, SHV5 et SHV12), and suggesting that studied bla(SHV) genes were not ESBL ones. Genomic DNA hybridization by southern blot with probe consisting in bla(SHV-1) gene was positive in these isolates. Sequencing the full-length open reading frame revealed nucleotide sequence of the bla(SHV-1). PCR-RFLP and RSI-PCR results were then confirmed. This approach is effective for screening P. aeruginosa for ESBL genes carriage in epidemiological studies and for detecting new variants. PMID:18838231

  7. Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain That Caused an Outbreak in a Neurosurgery Ward and Its aac(6′)-Iae Gene Cassette Encoding a Novel Aminoglycoside Acetyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Sekiguchi, Jun-ichiro; Asagi, Tsukasa; Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru; Fujino, Tomoko; Kobayashi, Intetsu; Morita, Koji; Kikuchi, Yoshihiro; Kuratsuji, Tadatoshi; Kirikae, Teruo

    2005-01-01

    We characterized multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated from patients involved in an outbreak of catheter-associated urinary tract infections that occurred in a neurosurgery ward of a hospital in Sendai, Japan. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of SpeI-, XbaI-, or HpaI-digested genomic DNAs from the isolates revealed that clonal expansion of a P. aeruginosa strain designated IMCJ2.S1 had occurred in the ward. This strain possessed broad-spectrum resistance to aminoglycosides, β-lactams, fluoroquinolones, tetracyclines, sulfonamides, and chlorhexidine. Strain IMCJ2.S1 showed a level of resistance to some kinds of disinfectants similar to that of a control strain of P. aeruginosa, ATCC 27853. IMCJ2.S1 contained a novel class 1 integron, In113, in the chromosome but not on a plasmid. In113 contains an array of three gene cassettes of blaIMP-1, a novel aminoglycoside resistance gene, and the aadA1 gene. The aminoglycoside resistance gene, designated aac(6′)-Iae, encoded a 183-amino-acid protein that shared 57.1% identity with AAC(6′)-Iq. Recombinant AAC(6′)-Iae protein showed aminoglycoside 6′-N-acetyltransferase activity by thin-layer chromatography. Escherichia coli expressing exogenous aac(6′)-Iae showed resistance to amikacin, dibekacin, isepamicin, kanamycin, netilmicin, sisomicin, and tobramycin but not to arbekacin, gentamicins, or streptomycin. Alterations of gyrA and parC at the amino acid sequence level were detected in IMCJ2.S1, suggesting that such mutations confer the resistance to fluoroquinolones observed for this strain. These results indicate that P. aeruginosa IMCJ2.S1 has developed multidrug resistance by acquiring resistance determinants, including a novel member of the aac(6′)-I family and mutations in drug resistance genes. PMID:16127047

  8. Cloning and nucleotide sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa DNA gyrase gyrA gene from strain PAO1 and quinolone-resistant clinical isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Kureishi, A; Diver, J M; Beckthold, B; Schollaardt, T; Bryan, L E

    1994-01-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa DNA gyrase gyrA gene was cloned and sequenced from strain PAO1. An open reading frame of 2,769 bp was found; it coded for a protein of 923 amino acids with an estimated molecular mass of 103 kDa. The derived amino acid sequence shared 67% identity with Escherichia coli GyrA and 54% identity with Bacillus subtilis GyrA, although conserved regions were present throughout the sequences, particularly toward the N terminus. Complementation of an E. coli mutant with a temperature-sensitive gyrA gene with the PAO1 gyrA gene showed that the gene is expressed in E. coli and is able to functionally complement the E. coli DNA gyrase B subunit. Expression of PAO1 gyrA in E. coli or P. aeruginosa with mutationally altered gyrA genes caused a reversion to wild-type quinolone susceptibility, indicating that the intrinsic susceptibility of the PAO1 GyrA to quinolones is comparable to that of the E. coli enzyme. PCR was used to amplify 360 bp of P. aeruginosa gyrA encompassing the so-called quinolone resistance-determining region from ciprofloxacin-resistant clinical isolates from patients with cystic fibrosis. Mutations were found in three of nine isolates tested; these mutations caused the following alterations in the sequence of GyrA: Asp at position 87 (Asp-87) to Asn, Asp-87 to Tyr, and Thr-83 to Ile. The resistance mechanisms in the other six isolates are unknown. The results of the study suggested that mechanisms other than a mutational alteration in gyrA are the most common mechanism of ciprofloxacin resistance in P. aeruginosa from the lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis. Images PMID:7811002

  9. Production of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa neuraminidase is increased under hyperosmolar conditions and is regulated by genes involved in alginate expression.

    PubMed Central

    Cacalano, G; Kays, M; Saiman, L; Prince, A

    1992-01-01

    The pathogenesis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in cystic fibrosis (CF) is a complex process attributed to specific characteristics of both the host and the infecting organism. In this study, the properties of the PAO1 neuraminidase were examined to determine its potential role in facilitating Pseudomonas colonization of the respiratory epithelium. The PAO1 neuraminidase was 1000-fold more active than the Clostridium perfringens enzyme in releasing sialic acid from respiratory epithelial cells. This effect correlated with increased adherence of PAO1 to epithelial cells after exposure to PAO1 neuraminidase and was consistent with in vitro studies demonstrating Pseudomonas adherence to asialoganglioside receptors. The regulation of the neuraminidase gene nanA was examined in Pseudomonas and as cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. In hyperosmolar conditions neuraminidase expression was increased by 50% (P less than 0.0004), an effect which was OmpR dependent in E. coli. In Pseudomonas the osmotic regulation of neuraminidase production was dependent upon algR1 and algR2, genes involved in the transcriptional activation of algD, which is responsible for the mucoid phenotype of Pseudomonas and pathognomonic for chronic infection in CF. Under the hyperosmolar conditions postulated to exist in the CF lung, nanA is likely to be expressed to facilitate the initial adherence of Pseudomonas to the respiratory tract. Images PMID:1601994

  10. Changes in gene expression, cell physiology and toxicity of the harmful cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa at elevated CO2

    PubMed Central

    Sandrini, Giovanni; Cunsolo, Serena; Schuurmans, J. Merijn; Matthijs, Hans C. P.; Huisman, Jef

    2015-01-01

    Rising CO2 concentrations may have large effects on aquatic microorganisms. In this study, we investigated how elevated pCO2 affects the harmful freshwater cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa. This species is capable of producing dense blooms and hepatotoxins called microcystins. Strain PCC 7806 was cultured in chemostats that were shifted from low to high pCO2 conditions. This resulted in a transition from a C-limited to a light-limited steady state, with a ~2.7-fold increase of the cyanobacterial biomass and ~2.5-fold more microcystin per cell. Cells increased their chlorophyll a and phycocyanin content, and raised their PSI/PSII ratio at high pCO2. Surprisingly, cells had a lower dry weight and contained less carbohydrates, which might be an adaptation to improve the buoyancy of Microcystis when light becomes more limiting at high pCO2. Only 234 of the 4691 genes responded to elevated pCO2. For instance, expression of the carboxysome, RuBisCO, photosystem and C metabolism genes did not change significantly, and only a few N assimilation genes were expressed differently. The lack of large-scale changes in the transcriptome could suit a buoyant species that lives in eutrophic lakes with strong CO2 fluctuations very well. However, we found major responses in inorganic carbon uptake. At low pCO2, cells were mainly dependent on bicarbonate uptake, whereas at high pCO2 gene expression of the bicarbonate uptake systems was down-regulated and cells shifted to CO2 and low-affinity bicarbonate uptake. These results show that the need for high-affinity bicarbonate uptake systems ceases at elevated CO2. Moreover, the combination of an increased cyanobacterial abundance, improved buoyancy, and higher toxin content per cell indicates that rising atmospheric CO2 levels may increase the problems associated with the harmful cyanobacterium Microcystis in eutrophic lakes. PMID:25999931

  11. Multiple phenotypic alterations caused by a c-type cytochrome maturation ccmC gene mutation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Baert, Barbara; Baysse, Christine; Matthijs, Sandra; Cornelis, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    In some Proteobacteria biogenesis of c-type cytochromes depends on the products of the ccmABCDEFG(H) genes, which encode inner-membrane proteins. Inactivation of some ccm genes, in particular ccmC, has an impact on other processes as well, including siderophore production and utilization. Non-polar insertions were generated in the Pseudomonas aeruginosa ccmA, ccmC, ccmE, ccmF and ccmH genes, and their impacts on different phenotypes were compared. Only in the case of the ccmC mutant was cytochrome c production totally abrogated. The ccmC mutant, and to a lesser extent the ccmF mutant, showed a range of other phenotypic changes. The production of the siderophore pyoverdine was very low and growth under the condition of iron limitation was severely restricted, but production of the second siderophore, pyochelin, was increased. Interestingly, other traits were also strongly affected by the ccmC mutation, including the production of pyocyanin, swarming and twitching motility, and rhamnolipid production. The production of N-acyl homoserine lactones or the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS) was, however, not affected in the ccmC and ccmF mutants. The ccmC mutant was also found to accumulate porphyrins, and catalase production was undetectable, consistent with the increased sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide. Finally, reduction in the content of [Fe-S] clusters was evidenced in both ccmC and ccmF mutants. Wild-type phenotypes were restored by complementation with a ccmC gene from Pseudomonas fluorescens ATCC 17400. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that CcmC is a key determinant for cytochrome c biogenesis, pyoverdine maturation, and expression of some quorum sensing-regulated traits. PMID:18174132

  12. Molecular cloning and characterization of the oprQ gene coding for outer membrane protein OprE3 of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, K; Gotoh, N; Tsujimoto, H; Yamada, H; Yoshihara, E; Nakae, T; Nishino, T

    1999-01-01

    We cloned and characterized the oprQ gene coding for outer membrane protein OprE3 of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. The oprQ gene was composed of 1,275 base pairs including a sequence encoding for the signal sequence and a mature protein with a Mr of 44,602. Computer-aided alignment and hydropathy analyses of the predicted amino acid sequences suggested that OprE3 is a transmembrane protein homologous to outer membrane proteins of P. aeruginosa such as OprD2 (OprD) porin and OprE1 (OprE) porin. Susceptibility to several antibiotics of the strains lacking or overproducing OprE3 was indistinguishable from that of the wild-type strain, suggesting that OprE3 is unlikely involved in the diffusion of carbapenems and other beta-lactam antibiotics. PMID:10338201

  13. Ellagic Acid Derivatives from Terminalia chebula Retz. Downregulate the Expression of Quorum Sensing Genes to Attenuate Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Sarabhai, Sajal; Sharma, Prince; Capalash, Neena

    2013-01-01

    Background Burgeoning antibiotic resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa has necessitated the development of anti pathogenic agents that can quench acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) mediated QS with least risk of resistance. This study explores the anti quorum sensing potential of T. chebula Retz. and identification of probable compounds(s) showing anti QS activity and the mechanism of attenuation of P. aeruginosa PAO1 virulence factors. Methods and Results Methanol extract of T. chebula Retz. fruit showed anti QS activity using Agrobacterium tumefaciens A136. Bioactive fraction (F7), obtained by fractionation of methanol extract using Sephadex LH20, showed significant reduction (p<0.001) in QS regulated production of extracellular virulence factors in P. aeruginosa PAO1. Biofilm formation and alginate were significantly (p<0.05) reduced with enhanced (20%) susceptibility to tobramycin. Real Time PCR of F7 treated P. aeruginosa showed down regulation of autoinducer synthase (lasI and rhlI) and their cognate receptor (lasR and rhlR) genes by 89, 90, 90 and 93%, respectively. Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry also showed 90 and 64% reduction in the production of 3-oxo-C12HSL and C4HSL after treatment. Decrease in AHLs as one of the mechanisms of quorum quenching by F7 was supported by the reversal of inhibited swarming motility in F7-treated P. aeruginosa PAO1 on addition of C4HSL. F7 also showed antagonistic activity against 3-oxo-C12HSL-dependent QS in E. coli bioreporter. C. elegans fed on F7-treated P. aeruginosa showed enhanced survival with LT50 increasing from 24 to 72 h. LC-ESI-MS of F7 revealed the presence of ellagic acid derivatives responsible for anti QS activity in T. chebula extract. Conclusions This is the first report on anti QS activity of T. chebula fruit linked to EADs which down regulate the expression of lasIR and rhlIR genes with concomitant decrease in AHLs in P. aeruginosa PAO1 causing attenuation of its virulence factors and enhanced

  14. Genetic analyses of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from healthy captive snakes: evidence of high inter- and intrasite dissemination and occurrence of antibiotic resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Colinon, Céline; Jocktane, Dominique; Brothier, Elisabeth; Rossolini, Gian Maria; Cournoyer, Benoit; Nazaret, Sylvie

    2010-03-01

    Faecal carriage of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was investigated by selective plating and PCR identification test, among healthy captive snakes from zoological and private collections from France as well as from wild snakes from Guinea. P. aeruginosa faecal carriage among captive snakes was high (72 out of 83 individuals), but low among wild specimen (3 out of 23 individuals). Genetic diversity analyses of the isolates, based on SpeI-PFGE profiles, evidenced five dominant clones or clonal complexes spreading among snakes within a site and between sites and persisting over time. Similar clones or clonal complexes were detected from mouth swabs of the owners and from water and preys used to feed the snakes, evidencing various sources of snake colonization and the first cases of P. aeruginosa cross-contamination between snakes and owners. These observations led to the conclusion that P. aeruginosa behaves as an opportunistic species within snakes in captivity and that colonization and dissemination occurs consecutively to processes similar to those identified within the hospital. Antibiotic susceptibility testing showed that most isolates had a wild-type resistance profile except for one persistent clone isolated from both snakes and preys that harboured multiple antimicrobial resistance genes mediated by an integron carrying the qacH, aadB, aadA2 and cmlA10 cassettes, and a tetA(C)-carrying transposon. Biocides or antibiotics used in the zoological garden could have led to the acquisition of this integron. PMID:20002132

  15. Evaluating the influence of light intensity in mcyA gene expression and microcystin production in toxic strains of Planktothrix agardhii and Microcystis aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Salvador, Daniel; Churro, Catarina; Valério, Elisabete

    2016-04-01

    Cyanobacteria are phytoplanktonic organisms widely occurring in freshwaters, being frequently associated with the production of toxins, namely microcystins (MCs). MCs are produced non-ribosomally by a multienzyme complex (mcy genes). It has been reported that environmental factors, such as light intensity, can influence toxin production. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of light intensity in the transcription of the mcyA gene and corresponding production of microcystins in toxic isolates of Planktothrix agardhii, where little is known, and compare them to Microcystis aeruginosa. For that purpose, cultures were exposed to three different light intensities (4, 20 and 30 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1)) for 18 days at 20 ± 1 °C. The growth was followed daily using absorbance readings. Samples were collected at each growth stage for cell counting, microcystins quantification and RNA extraction. The level of transcripts was quantified by RT-qPCR and the relative expression determined using 16S rDNA, gltA and rpoC1 as reference genes. The most stable reference genes in M. aeruginosa were rpoC1 and gltA, whereas in P. agardhii were 16S rDNA and gltA. There was a correspondence between the growth rate and light intensity in M. aeruginosa and P. agardhii. The growth rates for both species were lower at 4 and higher at 30 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1). Microcystin concentration per cell was similar between light intensities in M. aeruginosa and over time, while in P. agardhii it was higher in the stationary phase at 4 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1). There were differences in the expression of mcyA between the two species. In M. aeruginosa, the highest levels of expression occurred at 4 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1) in the adaptation phase, whereas for P. agardhii it was at 4μmol photons m(-2) s(-1) in the exponential growth phase. Our results indicate that the light intensities tested had distinct influences on the growth, microcystin production and mcyA expression levels

  16. Isolation of the braZ gene encoding the carrier for a novel branched-chain amino acid transport system in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, T; Kose-Terai, K; Uratani, Y

    1991-03-01

    The braZ gene for a novel branched-chain amino acid transport system in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO was isolated and characterized. Determination of the nucleotide sequence showed that the braZ gene comprises 1,311 nucleotides specifying a protein of 437 amino acids. Hydropathy analysis suggested that the product is an integral membrane protein with 12 membrane-spanning segments. The amino acid sequence showed extensive homology to those of the braB and brnQ gene products, branched-chain amino acid carriers of P. aeruginosa and Salmonella typhimurium, respectively. By using the T7 RNA polymerase-promoter system, the braZ gene product was identified as a protein of an apparent Mr of 34,000 on a sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel. Properties of the transport system encoded by braZ were studied by using P. aeruginosa PAO3537, defective in both the high- and low-affinity branched-chain amino acid transport systems (LIV-I and LIV-II, respectively). The transport system encoded by braZ was found to be another effective branched-chain amino acid transport system in P. aeruginosa PAO and was thus designated as LIV-III. This system is specific for isoleucine and valine, giving the same Km value of 12 microM for these amino acids. The system was found, however, to have a very low affinity for leucine, with a Km value of 150 microM, which contrasts with the substrate specificities of LIV-I and LIV-II. PMID:1900503

  17. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa rhlG Gene Encodes an NADPH-Dependent β-Ketoacyl Reductase Which Is Specifically Involved in Rhamnolipid Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Campos-García, Jesús; Caro, Alma Delia; Nájera, Rebeca; Miller-Maier, Raina M.; Al-Tahhan, Ragheb A.; Soberón-Chávez, Gloria

    1998-01-01

    A Pseudomonas aeruginosa gene homologous to the fabG gene, which encodes the NADPH-dependent β-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductase required for fatty acid synthesis, was identified. The insertional mutation of this fabG homolog (herein called rhlG) produced no apparent effect on the growth rate and total lipid content of P. aeruginosa cells, but the production of rhamnolipids was completely abrogated. These results suggest that the synthetic pathway for the fatty acid moiety of rhamnolipids is separate from the general fatty acid synthetic pathway, starting with a specific ketoacyl reduction step catalyzed by the RhlG protein. In addition, the synthesis of poly-β-hydroxyalkanoate (PHA) is delayed in this mutant, suggesting that RhlG participates in PHA synthesis, although it is not the only reductase involved in this pathway. Traits regulated by the quorum-sensing response, other than rhamnolipid production, including production of proteases, pyocyanine, and the autoinducer butanoyl-homoserine lactone (PAI-2), were not affected by the rhlG mutation. We conclude that the P. aeruginosa rhlG gene encodes an NADPH-dependent β-ketoacyl reductase absolutely required for the synthesis of the β-hydroxy acid moiety of rhamnolipids and that it has a minor role in PHA production. Expression of rhlG mRNA under different culture conditions is consistent with this conclusion. PMID:9721281

  18. The pilG gene product, required for Pseudomonas aeruginosa pilus production and twitching motility, is homologous to the enteric, single-domain response regulator CheY.

    PubMed Central

    Darzins, A

    1993-01-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa pilG gene, encoding a protein which is involved in pilus production, was cloned by phenotypic complementation of a unique, pilus-defective mutant of strain PAO1. This mutant, designated FA2, although resistant to the pilus-specific phage D3112 was sensitive to the pilus-specific phages B3 and F116L. In spite of the unusual phage sensitivity pattern, FA2 lacked the ability to produce functional polar pili (pil) and was incapable of twitching motility (twt). Genetic analysis revealed that the FA2 pil mutation, designated pilG1, mapped near the met-28 marker located at 20 min and was distinct from the previously described pilT mutation. This map location was confirmed by localization of a 6.2-kb EcoRI fragment that complemented FA2 on the SpeI and DpnI physical map of the P. aeruginosa PAO1 chromosome. A 700-bp region encompassing the pilG gene was sequenced, and a 405-bp open reading frame, with characteristic P. aeruginosa codon bias, was identified. The molecular weight of the protein predicted from the amino acid sequence of PilG, which was determined to be 14,717, corresponded very closely to that of a polypeptide with the apparent molecular weight of 15,000 detected after expression of pilG from the T7 promoter in Escherichia coli. Moreover, the predicted amino acid sequence of PilG showed significant homology to that of the enteric CheY protein, a single-domain response regulator. A chromosomal pilG insertion mutant, constructed by allele replacement of the wild-type gene, was not capable of pilus production or twitching motility but displayed normal flagellum-mediated motility. These results, therefore, suggest that PilG may be an important part of the signal transduction system involved in the elaboration of P. aeruginosa pili. Images PMID:8104179

  19. Cloning and nucleotide sequence of the pvdA gene encoding the pyoverdin biosynthetic enzyme L-ornithine N5-oxygenase in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Visca, P; Ciervo, A; Orsi, N

    1994-01-01

    The enzyme L-ornithine N5-oxygenase catalyzes the hydroxylation of L-ornithine (L-Orn), which represents an early step in the biosynthesis of the peptidic moiety of the fluorescent siderophore pyoverdin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. A gene bank of DNA from P. aeruginosa PAO1 (ATCC 15692) was constructed in the broad-host-range cosmid pLAFR3 and mobilized into the L-Orn N5-oxygenase-defective (pvdA) P. aeruginosa mutant PALS124. Screening for fluorescent transconjugants made it possible to identify the trans-complementing cosmid pPV4, which was able to restore pyoverdin synthesis and L-Orn N5-oxygenase activity in the pvdA mutant PALS124. The 17-kb PAO1 DNA insert of pPV4 contained at least two genetic determinants involved in pyoverdin synthesis, i.e., pvdA and pvdC4, as shown by complementation analysis of a set of mutants blocked in different steps of the pyoverdin biosynthetic pathway. Deletion analysis, subcloning, and transposon mutagenesis enabled us to locate the pvdA gene in a minimum DNA fragment of 1.7 kb flanked by two SphI restriction sites. Complementation of the pvdA mutation was under stringent iron control; both pyoverdin synthesis and L-Orn N5-oxygenase activity were undetectable in cells of the trans-complemented mutant which had been grown in the presence of 100 microM FeCl3. The entire nucleotide sequence of the pvdA gene, from which the primary structure of the encoded polypeptide was deduced, was determined. The pvdA structural gene is 1,278 bp; the cloned DNA fragment contains at the 5' end of the gene a putative ribosome-binding site but apparently lacks known promoterlike sequences. The P. aeruginosa L-Orn N5-oxygenase gene codes for a 426-amino-acid peptide with a predicted molecular mass of 47.7 kDa and an isoelectric point of 8.1. The enzyme shows approximately 50% homology with functional analogs, i.e., L-lysine N6-hydroxylase of aerobactin-producing Escherichia coli and L-Orn N5-oxygenase of ferrichrome-producing Ustilago maydis. The pvd

  20. Characterization of VIM-2, a carbapenem-hydrolyzing metallo-beta-lactamase and its plasmid- and integron-borne gene from a Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolate in France.

    PubMed

    Poirel, L; Naas, T; Nicolas, D; Collet, L; Bellais, S; Cavallo, J D; Nordmann, P

    2000-04-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa COL-1 was identified in a blood culture of a 39-year-old-woman treated with imipenem in Marseilles, France, in 1996. This strain was resistant to beta-lactams, including ureidopenicillins, ticarcillin-clavulanic acid, cefepime, ceftazidime, imipenem, and meropenem, but remained susceptible to the monobactam aztreonam. The carbapenem-hydrolyzing beta-lactamase gene of P. aeruginosa COL-1 was cloned, sequenced, and expressed in Escherichia coli DH10B. The deduced 266-amino-acid protein was an Ambler class B beta-lactamase, with amino acid identities of 32% with B-II from Bacillus cereus; 31% with IMP-1 from several gram-negative rods in Japan, including P. aeruginosa; 27% with CcrA from Bacteroides fragilis; 24% with BlaB from Chryseobacterium meningosepticum; 24% with IND-1 from Chryseobacterium indologenes; 21% with CphA-1 from Aeromonas hydrophila; and 11% with L-1 from Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. It was most closely related to VIM-1 beta-lactamase recently reported from Italian P. aeruginosa clinical isolates (90% amino acid identity). Purified VIM-2 beta-lactamase had a pI of 5.6, a relative molecular mass of 29.7 kDa, and a broad substrate hydrolysis range, including penicillins, cephalosporins, cephamycins, oxacephamycins, and carbapenems, but not monobactams. As a metallo-beta-lactamase, its activity was zinc dependent and inhibited by EDTA (50% inhibitory concentration, 50 microM). VIM-2 conferred a resistance pattern to beta-lactams in E. coli DH10B that paralleled its in vitro hydrolytic properties, except for susceptibility to ureidopenicillins, carbapenems, and cefepime. bla(VIM-2) was located on a ca. 45-kb plasmid that in addition conferred resistance to sulfamides and that was not self-transmissible either from P. aeruginosa to E. coli or from E. coli to E. coli. bla(VIM-2) was the only gene cassette located within the variable region of a novel class 1 integron, In56, that was weakly related to the bla(VIM-1)-containing

  1. Spread of integron-associated VIM-type metallo-beta-lactamase genes among imipenem-nonsusceptible Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains in Greek hospitals.

    PubMed

    Giakkoupi, P; Petrikkos, G; Tzouvelekis, L S; Tsonas, S; Legakis, N J; Vatopoulos, A C

    2003-02-01

    Fifty-eight imipenem-nonsusceptible (MIC >or= 8 microg/ml) Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated during May 2001 in 15 Greek hospitals were studied. Thirty-six isolates derived from nine hospitals carried VIM-type metallo-beta-lactamase genes, as found by PCR. In 34 isolates, bla(VIM) was associated with class 1 integrons of various sizes. DNA sequencing indicated the presence of bla(VIM-2) gene cassettes in a variety of integron structures. Random amplified polymorphic DNA typing suggested diversity of the bla(VIM)-positive strains. Synergy between 2-mercaptoacetic acid and imipenem indicated carbapenemase activity in 26 bla(VIM)-positive strains. PMID:12574292

  2. The Walker A motif mutation recA4159 abolishes the SOS response and recombination in a recA730 mutant of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Šimatović, Ana; Mitrikeski, Petar T; Vlašić, Ignacija; Sopta, Mary; Brčić-Kostić, Krunoslav

    2016-01-01

    In bacteria, the RecA protein forms recombinogenic filaments required for the SOS response and DNA recombination. In order to form a recombinogenic filament, wild type RecA needs to bind ATP and to interact with mediator proteins. The RecA730 protein is a mutant version of RecA with superior catalytic abilities, allowing filament formation without the help of mediator proteins. The mechanism of RecA730 filament formation is not well understood, and the question remains as to whether the RecA730 protein requires ATP binding in order to become competent for filament formation. We examined two mutants, recA730,4159 (presumed to be defective for ATP binding) and recA730,2201 (defective for ATP hydrolysis), and show that they have different properties with respect to SOS induction, conjugational recombination and double-strand break repair. We show that ATP binding is essential for all RecA730 functions, while ATP hydrolysis is required only for double-strand break repair. Our results emphasize the similarity of the SOS response and conjugational recombination, neither of which requires ATP hydrolysis by RecA730. PMID:27130282

  3. Pseudomonas aeruginosa High-Level Resistance to Polymyxins and Other Antimicrobial Peptides Requires cprA, a Gene That Is Disrupted in the PAO1 Strain

    PubMed Central

    Gutu, Alina D.; Rodgers, Nicole S.; Park, Jihye

    2015-01-01

    The arn locus, found in many Gram-negative bacterial pathogens, mediates resistance to polymyxins and other cationic antimicrobial peptides through 4-amino-l-arabinose modification of the lipid A moiety of lipopolysaccharide. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, several two-component regulatory systems (TCSs) control the arn locus, which is necessary but not sufficient for these resistance phenotypes. A previous transposon mutagenesis screen to identify additional polymyxin resistance genes that these systems regulate implicated an open reading frame designated PA1559 in the genome of the P. aeruginosa PAO1 strain. Resequencing of this chromosomal region and bioinformatics analysis for a variety of P. aeruginosa strains revealed that in the sequenced PAO1 strain, a guanine deletion at the end of PA1559 results in a frameshift and truncation of a full-length open reading frame that also encompasses PA1560 in non-PAO1 strains, such as P. aeruginosa PAK. Deletion analysis in the PAK strain showed that this full-length open reading frame, designated cprA, is necessary for polymyxin resistance conferred by activating mutations in the PhoPQ, PmrAB, and CprRS TCSs. The cprA gene was also required for PmrAB-mediated resistance to other cationic antimicrobial peptides in the PAK strain. Repair of the mutated cprA allele in the PAO1 strain restored polymyxin resistance conferred by an activating TCS mutation. The deletion of cprA did not affect the arn-mediated lipid A modification, indicating that the CprA protein is necessary for a different aspect of polymyxin resistance. This protein has a domain structure with a strong similarity to the extended short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase family that comprises isomerases, lyases, and oxidoreductases. These results suggest a new avenue through which to pursue targeted inhibition of polymyxin resistance. PMID:26100714

  4. Mutations in the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Needle Protein Gene pscF Confer Resistance to Phenoxyacetamide Inhibitors of the Type III Secretion System

    PubMed Central

    Bowlin, Nicholas O.; Williams, John D.; Knoten, Claire A.; Torhan, Matthew C.; Tashjian, Tommy F.; Li, Bing; Aiello, Daniel; Mecsas, Joan; Hauser, Alan R.; Peet, Norton P.; Bowlin, Terry L.

    2014-01-01

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) is a clinically important virulence mechanism in Pseudomonas aeruginosa that secretes and translocates effector toxins into host cells, impeding the host's rapid innate immune response to infection. Inhibitors of T3SS may be useful as prophylactic or adjunctive therapeutic agents to augment the activity of antibiotics in P. aeruginosa infections, such as pneumonia and bacteremia. One such inhibitor, the phenoxyacetamide MBX 1641, exhibits very responsive structure-activity relationships, including striking stereoselectivity, in its inhibition of P. aeruginosa T3SS. These features suggest interaction with a specific, but unknown, protein target. Here, we identify the apparent molecular target by isolating inhibitor-resistant mutants and mapping the mutation sites by deep sequencing. Selection and sequencing of four independent mutants resistant to the phenoxyacetamide inhibitor MBX 2359 identified the T3SS gene pscF, encoding the needle apparatus, as the only locus of mutations common to all four strains. Transfer of the wild-type and mutated alleles of pscF, together with its chaperone and cochaperone genes pscE and pscG, to a ΔpscF P. aeruginosa strain demonstrated that each of the single-codon mutations in pscF is necessary and sufficient to provide secretion and translocation that is resistant to a variety of phenoxyacetamide inhibitor analogs but not to T3SS inhibitors with different chemical scaffolds. These results implicate the PscF needle protein as an apparent new molecular target for T3SS inhibitor discovery and suggest that three other chemically distinct T3SS inhibitors interact with one or more different targets or a different region of PscF. PMID:24468789

  5. Identification of plasmid OXA and other β-lactamase genes among carbapenem-resistant isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from the Clinical University Hospital in northeastern Poland.

    PubMed

    Sacha, Paweł; Michalska, Anna; Ojdana, Dominika; Wieczorek, Piotr; Hauschild, Tomasz; Majewski, Piotr; Tryniszewska, Elżbieta

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the prevalence of OXA and other β-lactamase genes, antibiotic susceptibility, and the genetic relatedness among clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa resistant to carbapenems. The presence of bla- OXA genes was demonstrated in 48% of isolates belonging to four PFGE profiles. Most of them contained the blaOXA-2 gene (88.3%). Other blaOXA genes (Ps1310 with blaOXA-30 and Ps1309 with blaOXA-10) were found in only two isolates. The tested isolates also contained other β-lactamase genes such as blaVIM-2, blaVIM-4, blaSHV-5, and blaTEM-1. All isolates were susceptible only to colistin (100%). PMID:25938753

  6. RecA mediates MgpB and MgpC phase and antigenic variation in Mycoplasma genitalium, but plays a minor role in DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Burgos, Raul; Wood, Gwendolyn E.; Young, Lei; Glass, John I.; Totten, Patricia A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Mycoplasma genitalium, a sexually transmitted human pathogen, encodes MgpB and MgpC adhesins that undergo phase and antigenic variation through recombination with archived “MgPar” donor sequences. The mechanism and molecular factors required for this genetic variation are poorly understood. In this study, we estimate that sequence variation at the mgpB/C locus occurs in vitro at a frequency of >1.25 × 10−4 events/ genome/generation using a quantitative anchored-PCR assay. This rate was dramatically reduced in a recA deletion mutant and increased in a complemented strain overexpressing RecA. Similarly, the frequency of hemadsorption-deficient phase variants was reduced in the recA mutant, but restored by complementation. Unlike Escherichia coli, inactivation of recA in M. genitalium had a minimal effect on survival after exposure to mitomycin C or UV irradiation. In contrast, a deletion mutant for the predicted nucleotide excision repair (NER) uvrC gene, showed growth defects and was exquisitely sensitive to DNA damage. We conclude that M. genitalium RecA has a primary role in mgpB/C-MgPar recombination leading to antigenic and phase variation, yet plays a minor role in DNA repair. Our results also suggest that M. genitalium possess an active NER system, possibly representing the main DNA repair pathway in this minimal bacterium. PMID:22686427

  7. Antibiotic resistance pattern and evaluation of metallo-beta lactamase genes (VIM and IMP) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains producing MBL enzyme, isolated from patients with secondary immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Shirani, Kiana; Ataei, Behrouz; Roshandel, Fardad

    2016-01-01

    Background: One of the most common causes of hospital-acquired secondary infections in hospitalized patients is Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The aim of this study is to evaluate the expression of IMP and VIM in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains (carbapenem resistant and producer MBL enzyme) in patients with secondary immunodeficiency. Materials and Methods: In a cross sectional study, 96 patients with secondary immunodeficiency hospitalized in the Al-Zahra hospital were selected. Carbapenem resistant strains isolated and modified Hodge test was performed in order to confirm the presence of the metallo carbapenemase enzyme. Under the standard conditions they were sent to the central laboratory for investigating nosocomial infection Multiplex PCR. Results: Of 96 samples 28.1% were IMP positive, 5.2% VIM positive and 3.1% both VIM and IMP positive. The prevalence of multidrug resistance in the IMP and/or VIM negative samples was 29%, while all 5 VIM positive samples have had multidrug resistance. Also the prevalence of multi-drug resistance in IMP positive samples were 96.3% and in IMP and VIM positive samples were 100%. According to Fisher’s test, the prevalence of multi-drug resistance based on gene expression has significant difference (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Based on the results of this study it can be concluded that, a significant percentage of patients with secondary immunodeficiency that suffer nosocomial infections with multidrug resistance, especially Pseudomonas aeruginosa, are probably MBL-producing gene positive. Therefore the cause of infection should be considered in the hospital care system to identify their features, the presence of genes involved in the development of multi-drug resistance and antibiotic therapy. PMID:27563634

  8. Gene cluster for dissimilatory nitrite reductase (nir) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa: sequencing and identification of a locus for heme d1 biosynthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Kawasaki, S; Arai, H; Kodama, T; Igarashi, Y

    1997-01-01

    The primary structure of an nir gene cluster necessary for production of active dissimilatory nitrite reductase was determined from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Seven open reading frames, designated nirDLGHJEN, were identified downstream of the previously reported nirSMCF genes. From nirS through nirN, the stop codon of one gene and the start codon of the next gene were closely linked, suggesting that nirSMCFDLGHJEN are expressed from a promoter which regulates the transcription of nirSM. The amino acid sequences deduced from the nirDLGH genes were homologous to each other. A gene, designated nirJ, which encodes a protein of 387 amino acids, showed partial identity with each of the nirDLGH genes. The nirE gene encodes a protein of 279 amino acids homologous to S-adenosyl-L-methionine:uroporphyrinogen III methyltransferase from other bacterial strains. In addition, NirE shows 21.0% identity with NirF in the N-terminal 100-amino-acid residues. A gene, designated nirN, encodes a protein of 493 amino acids with a conserved binding motif for heme c (CXXCH) and a typical N-terminal signal sequence for membrane translocation. The derived NirN protein shows 23.9% identity with nitrite reductase (NirS). Insertional mutation and complementation analyses showed that all of the nirFDLGHJE genes were necessary for the biosynthesis of heme d1. PMID:8982003

  9. Novel variant (bla(VIM-4)) of the metallo-beta-lactamase gene bla(VIM-1) in a clinical strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Pournaras, Spyros; Tsakris, Athanassios; Maniati, Maria; Tzouvelekis, Leonidas S; Maniatis, Antonios N

    2002-12-01

    A Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolate highly resistant to carbapenems was collected from a patient with postsurgical cerebrospinal infection in Greece. The isolate carried a class 1 integron that contained as a sole cassette the gene bla(VIM-4), a novel variant of bla(VIM-1), with one nucleotide difference resulting in a Ser-to-Arg change at amino acid position 175 of the VIM-1 enzyme. This is the first detection of a VIM-1 variant after its appearance in Italy. PMID:12435718

  10. Clinical and Molecular Epidemiology of Multidrug-Resistant P. aeruginosa Carrying aac(6')-Ib-cr, qnrS1 and blaSPM Genes in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Bruna Fuga; Ferreira, Melina Lorraine; Campos, Paola Amaral de; Royer, Sabrina; Batistão, Deivid William da Fonseca; Dantas, Raquel Cristina Cavalcanti; Gonçalves, Iara Rossi; Faria, Ana Luiza Souza; Brito, Cristiane Silveira de; Yokosawa, Jonny; Gontijo-Filho, Paulo Pinto; Ribas, Rosineide Marques

    2016-01-01

    We described a comprehensive analysis of the molecular epidemiology of multidrug-resistant (MDR) P. aeruginosa. Molecular analysis included typing by Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis, identification of genes of interest through PCR-based assays and sequencing of target genes. Case-control study was conducted to better understand the prognostic of patients and the impact of inappropriate therapy in patients with bacteremia, as well as the risk factors of MDR infections. We observed a high rate of MDR isolates (40.7%), and 51.0% of them was independently associated with inappropriate antibiotic therapy. Bacteremia was detected in 66.9% of patients, and prolonged hospital stay was expressive in those resistant to fluoroquinolone. Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes (PMQR), qnrS1 and aac(6')Ib-cr, were detected in two different nosocomial isolates (5.3%), and the aac(6')-Ib7 variant was detected at a high frequency (87.5%) in those negative to PMQR. The presence of mutations in gyrA and parC genes was observed in 100% and 85% of selected isolates, respectively. Isolates harboring PMQR genes or mutations in gyrA and parC were not closely related, except in those containing SPM (São Paulo metallo-β-lactamase) clone. In addition, there is no study published in Brazil to date reporting the presence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates harboring both qnrS1 and aac(6')Ib-cr genes, with alarming frequency of patients with inappropriate therapy. PMID:27219003

  11. Products of three accessory genes, pilB, pilC, and pilD, are required for biogenesis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa pili.

    PubMed Central

    Nunn, D; Bergman, S; Lory, S

    1990-01-01

    The polar pili of Pseudomonas aeruginosa are composed of monomers of the pilin structural subunits. The biogenesis of pili involves the synthesis of pilin precursor, cleavage of a six-amino-acid leader peptide, membrane translocation, and assembly of monomers into a filamentous structure extending from the bacterial surface. This report describes three novel genes necessary for the formation of pili. DNA sequences adjacent to pilA, the pilin structural gene, were cloned and mutagenized with transposon Tn5. Each of the insertions were introduced into the chromosome of P. aeruginosa PAK by gene replacement. The effect of the Tn5 insertions in the bacterial chromosome on pilus assembly was assessed by electron microscopy and sensitivity of mutants to a pilus-specific bacteriophage. The resultant mutants were also tested for synthesis and membrane localization of the pilin antigen in order to define the genes required for maturation, export, and assembly of pilin. A 4.0-kilobase-pair region of DNA adjacent to the pilin structural gene was found to be essential for formation of pili. This region was sequenced and found to contain three open reading frames coding for 62-, 38- to 45-, and 28- to 32-kilodalton proteins (pilB, pilC, and pilD, respectively). Three proteins of similar molecular weight were expressed in Escherichia coli from the 4.0-kilobase-pair fragment flanking pilA with use of a T7 promoter-polymerase expression system. The results of the analyses of the three genes and the implications for pilin assembly and maturation are discussed. Images PMID:1971619

  12. Clinical and Molecular Epidemiology of Multidrug-Resistant P. aeruginosa Carrying aac(6')-Ib-cr, qnrS1 and blaSPM Genes in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, Bruna Fuga; Ferreira, Melina Lorraine; de Campos, Paola Amaral; Royer, Sabrina; Batistão, Deivid William da Fonseca; Dantas, Raquel Cristina Cavalcanti; Gonçalves, Iara Rossi; Faria, Ana Luiza Souza; de Brito, Cristiane Silveira; Yokosawa, Jonny; Gontijo-Filho, Paulo Pinto; Ribas, Rosineide Marques

    2016-01-01

    We described a comprehensive analysis of the molecular epidemiology of multidrug-resistant (MDR) P. aeruginosa. Molecular analysis included typing by Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis, identification of genes of interest through PCR-based assays and sequencing of target genes. Case-control study was conducted to better understand the prognostic of patients and the impact of inappropriate therapy in patients with bacteremia, as well as the risk factors of MDR infections. We observed a high rate of MDR isolates (40.7%), and 51.0% of them was independently associated with inappropriate antibiotic therapy. Bacteremia was detected in 66.9% of patients, and prolonged hospital stay was expressive in those resistant to fluoroquinolone. Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes (PMQR), qnrS1 and aac(6’)Ib-cr, were detected in two different nosocomial isolates (5.3%), and the aac(6’)-Ib7 variant was detected at a high frequency (87.5%) in those negative to PMQR. The presence of mutations in gyrA and parC genes was observed in 100% and 85% of selected isolates, respectively. Isolates harboring PMQR genes or mutations in gyrA and parC were not closely related, except in those containing SPM (São Paulo metallo-β-lactamase) clone. In addition, there is no study published in Brazil to date reporting the presence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates harboring both qnrS1 and aac(6’)Ib-cr genes, with alarming frequency of patients with inappropriate therapy. PMID:27219003

  13. Dihydroaeruginoic acid synthetase and pyochelin synthetase, products of the pchEF genes, are induced by extracellular pyochelin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Reimmann, C; Serino, L; Beyeler, M; Haas, D

    1998-11-01

    The siderophore pyochelin of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is derived from one molecule of salicylate and two molecules of cysteine. Two cotranscribed genes, pchEF, encoding peptide synthetases have been identified and characterized. pchE was required for the conversion of salicylate to dihydroaeruginoate (Dha), the condensation product of salicylate and one cysteine residue and pchF was essential for the synthesis of pyochelin from Dha. The deduced PchE (156 kDa) and PchF (197 kDa) proteins had adenylation, thiolation and condensation/cyclization motifs arranged as modules which are typical of those peptide synthetases forming thiazoline rings. The pchEF genes were coregulated with the pchDCBA operon, which provides enzymes for the synthesis (PchBA) and activation (PchD) of salicylate as well as a putative thioesterase (PchC). Expression of a translational pchE'-'lacZ fusion was strictly dependent on the PchR regulator and was induced by extracellular pyochelin, the end product of the pathway. Iron replete conditions led to Fur (ferric uptake regulator)-dependent repression of the pchE'-'lacZ fusion. A translational pchD'-'lacZ fusion was also positively regulated by PchR and pyochelin and repressed by Fur and iron. Thus, autoinduction by pyochelin (or ferric pyochelin) and repression by iron ensure a sensitive control of the pyochelin pathway in P. aeruginosa. PMID:9846750

  14. A Sister-Strand Exchange Mechanism for Reca-Independent Deletion of Repeated DNA Sequences in Escherichia Coli

    PubMed Central

    Lovett, S. T.; Drapkin, P. T.; Sutera-Jr., V. A.; Gluckman-Peskind, T. J.

    1993-01-01

    In the genomes of many organisms, deletions arise between tandemly repeated DNA sequences of lengths ranging from several kilobases to only a few nucleotides. Using a plasmid-based assay for deletion of a 787-bp tandem repeat, we have found that a recA-independent mechanism contributes substantially to the deletion process of even this large region of homology. No Escherichia coli recombination gene tested, including recA, had greater than a fivefold effect on deletion rates. The recA-independence of deletion formation is also observed with constructions present on the chromosome. RecA promotes synapsis and transfer of homologous DNA strands in vitro and is indispensable for intermolecular recombination events in vivo measured after conjugation. Because deletion formation in E. coli shows little or no dependence on recA, it has been assumed that homologous recombination contributes little to the deletion process. However, we have found recA-independent deletion products suggestive of reciprocal crossovers when branch migration in the cell is inhibited by a ruvA mutation. We propose a model for recA-independent crossovers between replicating sister strands, which can also explain deletion or amplification of repeated sequences. We suggest that this process may be initiated as post-replicational DNA repair; subsequent strand misalignment at repeated sequences leads to genetic rearrangements. PMID:8293969

  15. A RecA Protein Surface Required for Activation of DNA Polymerase V

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, Angela J.; Erdem, Aysen L.; Sabat, Grzegorz; Karata, Kiyonobu; Jaszczur, Malgorzata M.; Vo, Dan D.; Olsen, Tayla M.; Woodgate, Roger; Goodman, Myron F.; Cox, Michael M.

    2015-01-01

    DNA polymerase V (pol V) of Escherichia coli is a translesion DNA polymerase responsible for most of the mutagenesis observed during the SOS response. Pol V is activated by transfer of a RecA subunit from the 3'-proximal end of a RecA nucleoprotein filament to form a functional complex called DNA polymerase V Mutasome (pol V Mut). We identify a RecA surface, defined by residues 112-117, that either directly interacts with or is in very close proximity to amino acid residues on two distinct surfaces of the UmuC subunit of pol V. One of these surfaces is uniquely prominent in the active pol V Mut. Several conformational states are populated in the inactive and active complexes of RecA with pol V. The RecA D112R and RecA D112R N113R double mutant proteins exhibit successively reduced capacity for pol V activation. The double mutant RecA is specifically defective in the ATP binding step of the activation pathway. Unlike the classic non-mutable RecA S117F (recA1730), the RecA D112R N113R variant exhibits no defect in filament formation on DNA and promotes all other RecA activities efficiently. An important pol V activation surface of RecA protein is thus centered in a region encompassing amino acid residues 112, 113, and 117, a surface exposed at the 3'-proximal end of a RecA filament. The same RecA surface is not utilized in the RecA activation of the homologous and highly mutagenic RumA'2B polymerase encoded by the integrating-conjugative element (ICE) R391, indicating a lack of structural conservation between the two systems. The RecA D112R N113R protein represents a new separation of function mutant, proficient in all RecA functions except SOS mutagenesis. PMID:25811184

  16. Molecular epidemiology of clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates carrying IMP-1 metallo-beta-lactamase gene in a University Hospital in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Ozgumus, Osman Birol; Caylan, Rahmet; Tosun, Ilknur; Sandalli, Cemal; Aydin, Kemalettin; Koksal, Iftihar

    2007-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates carrying IMP- or VIM-type metallo-beta-lactamase (MBL) have been increasingly reported in hospitals worldwide. One hundred P. aeruginosa clinical isolates from unrelated inpatients hospitalized at a Turkish university hospital were screened for the presence of bla(IMP) and bla(VIM) genes by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). One (1%) isolate was found to carry a VIM-type MBL gene, whereas nine (9%) carried an IMP-1 MBL gene carried on a cassette inserted into a class 1 integron. Only four of the IMP producers were detected as MBL producers according to E-test MBL. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of imipenem for the IMP-1 and VIM-type MBL-producers were highly variable (MIC values, 8-128 mug/ml). Imipenem resistance was not plasmid-mediated according to the transformation assays. Piperacillin/tazobactam was the only effective drug in antimicrobial susceptibility testing. No aztreonam-resistant IMP and VIM producers were detected to produce an extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL). Three class 1 integrons of approximately 2,300 bp, 1,800 bp, and 1,500 bp in size were detected in each of the nine IMP-positive isolates. Sequencing revealed three novel gene cassette arrays, aac(3)-1c-cmlA5, bla(IMP-1)-aadA7-like, and aacA7-smr-2-orfD. Enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus PCR (ERIC-PCR) indicated that a clonal spread of IMP-1-producers had occurred in this hospital. PMID:17949306

  17. Suppression of constitutive SOS expression by recA4162 (I298V) and recA4164 (L126V) requires UvrD and RecX in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Long, Jarukit E; Renzette, Nicholas; Sandler, Steven J

    2009-07-01

    Sensing DNA damage and initiation of genetic responses to repair DNA damage are critical to cell survival. In Escherichia coli, RecA polymerizes on ssDNA produced by DNA damage creating a RecA-DNA filament that interacts with the LexA repressor inducing the SOS response. RecA filament stability is negatively modulated by RecX and UvrD. recA730 (E38K) and recA4142 (F217Y) constitutively express the SOS response. recA4162 (I298V) and recA4164 (L126V) are intragenic suppressors of the constitutive SOS phenotype of recA730. Herein, it is shown that these suppressors are not allele specific and can suppress SOS(C) expression of recA730 and recA4142 in cis and in trans. recA4162 and recA4164 single mutants (and the recA730 and recA4142 derivatives) are Rec(+), UV(R) and are able to induce the SOS response after UV treatment like wild-type. UvrD and RecX are required for the suppression in two (recA730,4164 and recA4142,4162) of the four double mutants tested. To explain the data, one model suggests that recA(C) alleles promote SOS(C) expression by mimicking RecA filament structures that induce SOS and the suppressor alleles mimic RecA filament at end of SOS. UvrD and RecX are attracted to these latter structures to help dismantle or destabilize the RecA filament. PMID:19555451

  18. Genetic analysis of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO high-affinity branched-chain amino acid transport system by use of plasmids carrying the bra genes.

    PubMed Central

    Hoshino, T; Kose, K

    1990-01-01

    About 30 mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO defective in the high-affinity branched-chain amino acid transport system (LIV-I) were isolated by the selection for resistance to 4-aza-DL-leucine, a toxic leucine analog for LIV-I. All of the mutants were complemented by plasmid pKTH24, harboring the braC gene, which encodes the branched-chain amino acid-binding protein, and the four open reading frames named braD, braE, braF, and braG (T. Hoshino and K. Kose, J. Bacteriol. 172:5531-5539, 1990). We identified five cistrons corresponding to these bra genes by complementation analysis with various derivatives of pKTH24, confirming that the braD, braE, braF, and braG genes are required for the LIV-I transport system. We also found mutations that seem likely to be mutations in a promoter region for the bra genes and those with polarity in the intercistronic region between braC and braD. Analysis with an omega interposon showed that the bra genes are organized as an operon and are cotranscribed in the order braC-braD-braE-braF-braG from a promoter located in the 5'-flanking region of the braC gene. PMID:2120184

  19. Dispersal of carbapenemase blaVIM-1 gene associated with different Tn402 variants, mercury transposons, and conjugative plasmids in Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Tato, Marta; Coque, Teresa M; Baquero, Fernando; Cantón, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    The emergence of bla(VIM-1) within four different genetic platforms from distinct Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates in an area with a low prevalence of metallo-beta-lactamase producers is reported. Forty-three VIM-1-producing isolates (including 19 Enterobacter cloacae, 2 Escherichia coli, and 2 P. aeruginosa isolates, 18 Klebsiella pneumoniae isolate, and 2 Klebsiella oxytoca isolate) recovered from 2005 to 2007 and corresponding to 15 pulsed-field gel electrophoresis types were studied. The Enterobacteriaceae isolates corresponded to a hospital outbreak, and the P. aeruginosa isolates were sporadically recovered. The genetic context of the integrons carrying bla(VIM-1) (arbitrarily designated types A, B, C, and D) was characterized by PCR mapping based on known Tn402 and mercury transposons and further sequencing. Among Enterobacteriaceae isolates, bla(VIM-1) was part of integrons located either in an In2-Tn402 element linked to Tn21 (type A; In110-bla(VIM-1)-aacA4-aadA1) or in a Tn402 transposon lacking the whole tni module [type B; In113-bla(VIM-1)-aacA4-dhfrII (also called dfrB1)-aadA1-catB2] and the transposon was associated with an IncHI2 or IncI1 plasmid, respectively. Among P. aeruginosa isolates, bla(VIM-1) was part of a new gene cassette array located in a defective Tn402 transposon carrying either tniBDelta3 and tniA (type C; bla(VIM-1)-aadA1) or tniC and DeltatniQ (type D; bla(VIM-1)-aadB), and both Tn402 variants were associated with conjugative plasmids of 30 kb. The dissemination of bla(VIM-1) was associated with different genetic structures and bacterial hosts, depicting a complex emergence and evolutionary network scenario in our facility, Ramón y Cajal University Hospital, Madrid, Spain. Knowledge of the complex epidemiology of bla(VIM-1) is necessary to control this emerging threat. PMID:19901094

  20. Active displacement of RecA filaments by UvrD translocase activity.

    PubMed

    Petrova, Vessela; Chen, Stefanie H; Molzberger, Eileen T; Tomko, Eric; Chitteni-Pattu, Sindhu; Jia, Haifeng; Ordabayev, Yerdos; Lohman, Timothy M; Cox, Michael M

    2015-04-30

    The UvrD helicase has been implicated in the disassembly of RecA nucleoprotein filaments in vivo and in vitro. We demonstrate that UvrD utilizes an active mechanism to remove RecA from the DNA. Efficient RecA removal depends on the availability of DNA binding sites for UvrD and/or the accessibility of the RecA filament ends. The removal of RecA from DNA also requires ATP hydrolysis by the UvrD helicase but not by RecA protein. The RecA-removal activity of UvrD is slowed by RecA variants with enhanced DNA-binding properties. The ATPase rate of UvrD during RecA removal is much slower than the ATPase activity of UvrD when it is functioning either as a translocase or a helicase on DNA in the absence of RecA. Thus, in this context UvrD may operate in a specialized disassembly mode. PMID:25824953

  1. Structural and Functional Studies of H. seropedicae RecA Protein – Insights into the Polymerization of RecA Protein as Nucleoprotein Filament

    PubMed Central

    Galvão, Carolina W.; Saab, Sérgio C.; Iulek, Jorge; Etto, Rafael M.; Steffens, Maria B. R.; Chitteni-Pattu, Sindhu; Stanage, Tyler; Keck, James L.; Cox, Michael M.

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial RecA protein plays a role in the complex system of DNA damage repair. Here, we report the functional and structural characterization of the Herbaspirillum seropedicae RecA protein (HsRecA). HsRecA protein is more efficient at displacing SSB protein from ssDNA than Escherichia coli RecA protein. HsRecA also promotes DNA strand exchange more efficiently. The three dimensional structure of HsRecA-ADP/ATP complex has been solved to 1.7 Å resolution. HsRecA protein contains a small N-terminal domain, a central core ATPase domain and a large C-terminal domain, that are similar to homologous bacterial RecA proteins. Comparative structural analysis showed that the N-terminal polymerization motif of archaeal and eukaryotic RecA family proteins are also present in bacterial RecAs. Reconstruction of electrostatic potential from the hexameric structure of HsRecA-ADP/ATP revealed a high positive charge along the inner side, where ssDNA is bound inside the filament. The properties of this surface may explain the greater capacity of HsRecA protein to bind ssDNA, forming a contiguous nucleoprotein filament, displace SSB and promote DNA exchange relative to EcRecA. Our functional and structural analyses provide insight into the molecular mechanisms of polymerization of bacterial RecA as a helical nucleoprotein filament. PMID:27447485

  2. Structural and Functional Studies of H. seropedicae RecA Protein - Insights into the Polymerization of RecA Protein as Nucleoprotein Filament.

    PubMed

    Leite, Wellington C; Galvão, Carolina W; Saab, Sérgio C; Iulek, Jorge; Etto, Rafael M; Steffens, Maria B R; Chitteni-Pattu, Sindhu; Stanage, Tyler; Keck, James L; Cox, Michael M

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial RecA protein plays a role in the complex system of DNA damage repair. Here, we report the functional and structural characterization of the Herbaspirillum seropedicae RecA protein (HsRecA). HsRecA protein is more efficient at displacing SSB protein from ssDNA than Escherichia coli RecA protein. HsRecA also promotes DNA strand exchange more efficiently. The three dimensional structure of HsRecA-ADP/ATP complex has been solved to 1.7 Å resolution. HsRecA protein contains a small N-terminal domain, a central core ATPase domain and a large C-terminal domain, that are similar to homologous bacterial RecA proteins. Comparative structural analysis showed that the N-terminal polymerization motif of archaeal and eukaryotic RecA family proteins are also present in bacterial RecAs. Reconstruction of electrostatic potential from the hexameric structure of HsRecA-ADP/ATP revealed a high positive charge along the inner side, where ssDNA is bound inside the filament. The properties of this surface may explain the greater capacity of HsRecA protein to bind ssDNA, forming a contiguous nucleoprotein filament, displace SSB and promote DNA exchange relative to EcRecA. Our functional and structural analyses provide insight into the molecular mechanisms of polymerization of bacterial RecA as a helical nucleoprotein filament. PMID:27447485

  3. Determination of DNA sequences required for regulated Mycobacterium tuberculosis RecA expression in response to DNA-damaging agents suggests that two modes of regulation exist.

    PubMed Central

    Movahedzadeh, F; Colston, M J; Davis, E O

    1997-01-01

    The recA gene of Mycobacterium tuberculosis has previously been cloned and sequenced (E. O. Davis, S. G. Sedgwick, and M. J. Colston, J. Bacteriol. 173:5653-5662, 1991). In this study, the expression of this gene was shown to be inducible in response to various DNA-damaging agents by using a transcriptional fusion to the reporter gene encoding chloramphenicol acetyltransferase. A segment of DNA around 300 bp upstream of the coding region was shown to be required for expression. However, primer extension analysis indicated that the transcriptional start sites were 47 and 93 bp upstream of the translation initiation codon. Sequence motifs with homology to two families of Escherichia coli promoters but also with significant differences were located near these proposed transcription start sites. The differences from the E. coli consensus patterns would explain the previously described lack of expression of the M. tuberculosis recA gene from its own promoter in E. coli. In addition, the M. tuberculosis LexA protein was shown to bind specifically to a sequence, GAAC-N4-GTTC, overlapping one of these putative promoters and homologous to the Bacillus subtilis Cheo box involved in the regulation of SOS genes. The region of DNA 300 bp upstream of the recA gene was shown not to contain a promoter, suggesting that it functions as an upstream activator sequence. PMID:9171394

  4. Antibiotic Resistance Pattern and Evaluation of Metallo-Beta Lactamase Genes Including bla-IMP and bla-VIM Types in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated from Patients in Tehran Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Aghamiri, Samira; Amirmozafari, Nour; Fallah Mehrabadi, Jalil; Fouladtan, Babak; Samadi Kafil, Hossein

    2014-01-01

    Beta-lactamase producing strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa are important etiological agents of hospital infections. Carbapenems are among the most effective antibiotics used against Pseudomonas infections, but they can be rendered infective by group B β-lactamase, commonly called metallo-beta lactamase. In this study, the antimicrobial sensitivity patterns of P. aeruginosa strains isolated from 9 different hospitals in Tehran, Iran, as well as the prevalence of MBLs genes (bla-VIM and bla-IMP) were determined. A total of 212 strains of P. aeruginosa recovered from patients in hospitals in Tehran were confirmed by both biochemical methods and PCR. Their antimicrobial sensitivity patterns were determined by Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. Following MIC determination, imipenem resistant strains were selected by DDST method which was followed by PCR tests for determination of MBLs genes: bla-IMP and bla-VIM. The results indicated that, in the DDST phenotypic method, among the 100 imipenem resistant isolates, 75 strains were MBLs positive. The PCR test indicated that 70 strains (33%) carried bla-VIM gene and 20 strains (9%) harbored bla-IMP. The results indicated that the extent of antibiotic resistance among Pseudomonas aeruginosa is on the rise. This may be due to production of MBLs enzymes. Therefore, determination of antibiotic sensitivity patterns and MBLs production by these bacteria, can be important in control of clinical Pseudomonas infection. PMID:24944839

  5. Homologues of Neisserial Heme Oxygenase in Gram-Negative Bacteria: Degradation of Heme by the Product of the pigA Gene of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Ratliff, Melanie; Zhu, Wenming; Deshmukh, Rahul; Wilks, Angela; Stojiljkovic, Igor

    2001-01-01

    The oxidative cleavage of heme to release iron is a mechanism by which some bacterial pathogens can utilize heme as an iron source. The pigA gene of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is shown to encode a heme oxygenase protein, which was identified in the genome sequence by its significant homology (37%) with HemO of Neisseria meningitidis. When the gene encoding the neisserial heme oxygenase, hemO, was replaced with pigA, we demonstrated that pigA could functionally replace hemO and allow for heme utilization by neisseriae. Furthermore, when pigA was disrupted by cassette mutagenesis in P. aeruginosa, heme utilization was defective in iron-poor media supplemented with heme. This defect could be restored both by the addition of exogenous FeSO4, indicating that the mutant did not have a defect in iron metabolism, and by in trans complementation with pigA from a plasmid with an inducible promoter. The PigA protein was purified by ion-exchange chromotography. The UV-visible spectrum of PigA reconstituted with heme showed characteristics previously reported for other bacterial and mammalian heme oxygenases. The heme-PigA complex could be converted to ferric biliverdin in the presence of ascorbate, demonstrating the need for an exogenous reductant. Acidification and high-performance liquid chromatography analysis of the ascorbate reduction products identified a major product of biliverdin IX-β. This differs from the previously characterized heme oxygenases in which biliverdin IX-α is the typical product. We conclude that PigA is a heme oxygenase and may represent a class of these enzymes with novel regiospecificity. PMID:11591684

  6. Characterization of the Medium- and Long-Chain n-Alkanes Degrading Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain SJTD-1 and Its Alkane Hydroxylase Genes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huan; Xu, Jing; Liang, Rubing; Liu, Jianhua

    2014-01-01

    A gram-negative aliphatic hydrocarbon-degrading bacterium SJTD-1 isolated from oil-contaminated soil was identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa by comparative analyses of the 16S rRNA sequence, phenotype, and physiological features. SJTD-1 could efficiently mineralize medium- and long-chain n-alkanes (C12-C30) as its sole carbon source within seven days, showing the most optimal growth on n-hexadecane, followed by n-octadecane, and n-eicosane. In 36 h, 500 mg/L of tetradecane, hexadecane, and octadecane were transformed completely; and 2 g/L n-hexadecane was degraded to undetectable levels within 72 h. Two putative alkane-degrading genes (gene 3623 and gene 4712) were characterized and our results indicated that their gene products were rate-limiting enzymes involved in the synergetic catabolism of C12–C16 alkanes. On the basis of bioinformatics and transcriptional analysis, two P450 monooxygenases, along with a putative AlmA-like oxygenase, were examined. Genetically defective mutants lacking the characteristic alkane hydroxylase failed to degrade n-octadecane, thereby suggesting a different catalytic mechanism for the microbial transformation of alkanes with chain lengths over C18. PMID:25165808

  7. Detection of blaSPM-1, blaKPC, blaTEM and blaCTX-M genes in isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter spp. and Klebsiella spp. from cancer patients with healthcare-associated infections.

    PubMed

    Jácome, Paula Regina Luna de Araújo; Alves, Lílian Rodrigues; Jácome-Júnior, Agenor Tavares; Silva, Maria Jesuíta Bezerra da; Lima, Jailton Lobo da Costa; Araújo, Paulo Sérgio Ramos; Lopes, Ana Catarina S; Maciel, Maria Amélia Vieira

    2016-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter spp. and Klebsiella spp. are three of the pathogens most frequently involved in infections of cancer patients, and the production of β -lactamases is a major mechanism of resistance due to its wide diversity of existing enzymes. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the microbiological profile and data related to patients and infections, and to search for β -lactamase genes in bacterial isolates from hospitalized cancer patients in a hospital in Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil. A total of 169 isolates were recovered between 2012 and 2014, of which 58 were P. aeruginosa, 36 were Acinetobacter spp. and 75 were Klebsiella spp. A high percentage of carbapenem resistance was observed in P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. Among the carbapenem-resistant bacteria, the blaSPM-1 gene was detected in P. aeruginosa (35.5 %) and Acinetobacter spp. (3.8 %), while blaKPC was detected in P. aeruginosa (25.8 %) only. Among the third- and fourth-generation cephalosporin-resistant strains, in Klebsiella spp. we detected the genes blaTEM (30.6 %), blaCTX-M (58.3 %) and blaKPC (5.6 %), and in Acinetobacter spp. only blaTEM (25.9 %). This the first report of an Acinetobacter baumannii blaSPM-1 gene carrier that has been isolated in Brazil. The most frequent cancer types were bowel tumour [14.8 %; 95 % confidence interval (CI95 %) 9.8-21.1 %], breast cancer (13.6 %; CI95 % 8.8-19.7 %) and prostate cancer (11.2%; CI95 % 6.9-17.0 %). These results therefore provide knowledge of susceptibility profile and resistance mechanisms and thus can contribute to the strategic formulation of hospital infection control plans and the rational use of antimicrobials, reducing mortality from infection levels in cancer patients. PMID:27217349

  8. Cloning, nucleotide sequences, and identification of products of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO bra genes, which encode the high-affinity branched-chain amino acid transport system.

    PubMed Central

    Hoshino, T; Kose, K

    1990-01-01

    A DNA fragment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO containing genes specifying the high-affinity branched-chain amino acid transport system (LIV-I) was isolated. The fragment contained the braC gene, encoding the binding protein for branched-chain amino acids, and the 4-kilobase DNA segment adjacent to 3' of braC. The nucleotide sequence of the 4-kilobase DNA fragment was determined and found to contain four open reading frames, designated braD, braE, braF, and braG. The braD and braE genes specify very hydrophobic proteins of 307 and 417 amino acid residues, respectively. The braD gene product showed extensive homology (67% identical) to the livH gene product, a component required for the Escherichia coli high-affinity branched-chain amino acid transport systems. The braF and braG genes encode proteins of 255 and 233 amino acids, respectively, both containing amino acid sequences typical of proteins with ATP-binding sites. By using a T7 RNA polymerase/promoter system together with plasmids having various deletions in the braDEFG region, the braD, braE, braF, and braG gene products were identified as proteins with apparent Mrs of 25,500, 34,000, 30,000, and 27,000, respectively. These proteins were found among cell membrane proteins on a sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel stained with Coomassie blue. Images PMID:2120183

  9. [Carriage of class 1 and 2 integrons in Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from clinical specimens and a novel gene cassette array: blaOXA-11-cmlA7].

    PubMed

    Mengeloğlu, Fırat Zafer; Copur Çiçek, Ayşegül; Koçoğlu, Esra; Sandallı, Cemal; Budak, Emine Esra; Ozgümüş, Osman Birol

    2014-01-01

    The dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes between bacteria leads to serious problems in the treatment of infectious diseases. It has been shown that resistance genes can also be carried by the integrons. There are limited studies regarding the carriage of class 1 and 2 integrons in Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical strains in Turkey. The aims of this study were to investigate the carriage rates of class 1 and class 2 integrons in A.baumannii and P.aeruginosa strains isolated from clinical samples in Abant Izzet Baysal University Hospital, and to characterize the antibiotic resistance gene cassettes in these integrons by sequence analyses. A total of 137 strains (77 A.baumannii and 60 P.aeruginosa) isolated from various clinical specimens (56% were sputum, 19% wound, 11% urine, 11% blood, 3% catheter), between March 2010-December 2012, were included in the study. The identification and antibiotic susceptibility tests of the isolates were performed by Vitek 2 Compact (bioMérieux, France) and BD Phoenix 100 (Becton Dickinson, USA) systems. The presence of integrons were screened by PCR method using specific primer pairs targeting class 1 (intI1) and 2 (intI2) integrase regions. All the samples that revealed integron amplification were subjected to DNA sequence analysis, both in the forms of cloned products and PCR amplicons. In the study, the highest susceptibility rates were found against colistin (96%) and tigecycline (78%) in A.baumannii, and against piperacillin/tazobactam (97%) and piperacillin (93%) in P.aeruginosa isolates. The highest resistance rate was determined for piperacillin/tazobactam (95%) in A.baumannii strains. The presence of intI1 gene was detected in 33% (26/77) of A.baumannii and 10% (6/60) of P.aeruginosa isolates. When variable regions in intI1 positive strains were amplified by PCR, eight (8/77, 10%) A.baumannii and three (3/60, 5%) P.aeruginosa strains were found to harbor antibiotic resistance gene

  10. Prophage induction and differential RecA and UmuDAb transcriptome regulation in the DNA damage responses of Acinetobacter baumannii and Acinetobacter baylyi.

    PubMed

    Hare, Janelle M; Ferrell, Joshua C; Witkowski, Travis A; Grice, Alison N

    2014-01-01

    The SOS response to DNA damage that induces up to 10% of the prokaryotic genome requires RecA action to relieve LexA transcriptional repression. In Acinetobacter species, which lack LexA, the error-prone polymerase accessory UmuDAb is instead required for ddrR induction after DNA damage, suggesting it might be a LexA analog. RNA-Seq experiments defined the DNA damage transcriptome (mitomycin C-induced) of wild type, recA and umuDAb mutant strains of both A. baylyi ADP1 and A. baumannii ATCC 17978. Of the typical SOS response genes, few were differentially regulated in these species; many were repressed or absent. A striking 38.4% of all ADP1 genes, and 11.4% of all 17978 genes, were repressed under these conditions. In A. baylyi ADP1, 66 genes (2.0% of the genome), including a CRISPR/Cas system, were DNA damage-induced, and belonged to four regulons defined by differential use of recA and umuDAb. In A. baumannii ATCC 17978, however, induction of 99% of the 152 mitomycin C-induced genes depended on recA, and only 28 of these genes required umuDAb for their induction. 90% of the induced A. baumannii genes were clustered in three prophage regions, and bacteriophage particles were observed after mitomycin C treatment. These prophages encoded esvI, esvK1, and esvK2, ethanol-stimulated virulence genes previously identified in a Caenorhabditis elegans model, as well as error-prone polymerase alleles. The induction of all 17978 error-prone polymerase alleles, whether prophage-encoded or not, was recA dependent, but only these DNA polymerase V-related genes were de-repressed in the umuDAb mutant in the absence of DNA damage. These results suggest that both species possess a robust and complex DNA damage response involving both recA-dependent and recA-independent regulons, and further demonstrates that although umuDAb has a specialized role in repressing error-prone polymerases, additional regulators likely participate in these species' transcriptional response to DNA damage

  11. Prophage Induction and Differential RecA and UmuDAb Transcriptome Regulation in the DNA Damage Responses of Acinetobacter baumannii and Acinetobacter baylyi

    PubMed Central

    Hare, Janelle M.; Ferrell, Joshua C.; Witkowski, Travis A.; Grice, Alison N.

    2014-01-01

    The SOS response to DNA damage that induces up to 10% of the prokaryotic genome requires RecA action to relieve LexA transcriptional repression. In Acinetobacter species, which lack LexA, the error-prone polymerase accessory UmuDAb is instead required for ddrR induction after DNA damage, suggesting it might be a LexA analog. RNA-Seq experiments defined the DNA damage transcriptome (mitomycin C-induced) of wild type, recA and umuDAb mutant strains of both A. baylyi ADP1 and A. baumannii ATCC 17978. Of the typical SOS response genes, few were differentially regulated in these species; many were repressed or absent. A striking 38.4% of all ADP1 genes, and 11.4% of all 17978 genes, were repressed under these conditions. In A. baylyi ADP1, 66 genes (2.0% of the genome), including a CRISPR/Cas system, were DNA damage-induced, and belonged to four regulons defined by differential use of recA and umuDAb. In A. baumannii ATCC 17978, however, induction of 99% of the 152 mitomycin C-induced genes depended on recA, and only 28 of these genes required umuDAb for their induction. 90% of the induced A. baumannii genes were clustered in three prophage regions, and bacteriophage particles were observed after mitomycin C treatment. These prophages encoded esvI, esvK1, and esvK2, ethanol-stimulated virulence genes previously identified in a Caenorhabditis elegans model, as well as error-prone polymerase alleles. The induction of all 17978 error-prone polymerase alleles, whether prophage-encoded or not, was recA dependent, but only these DNA polymerase V-related genes were de-repressed in the umuDAb mutant in the absence of DNA damage. These results suggest that both species possess a robust and complex DNA damage response involving both recA-dependent and recA-independent regulons, and further demonstrates that although umuDAb has a specialized role in repressing error-prone polymerases, additional regulators likely participate in these species' transcriptional response to DNA damage

  12. Comparative studies of the Acinetobacter genus and the species identification method based on the recA sequences.

    PubMed

    Krawczyk, B; Lewandowski, K; Kur, J

    2002-02-01

    The recA gene is indispensable for a maintaining and diversification of the bacterial genetic material. Given its important role in ensuring cell viability, it is not surprising that the RecA protein is both ubiquitous and well conserved among a range of prokaryotes. Previously, we reported Acinetobacter genomic species identification method based on PCR amplification of an internal fragment of the recA gene with subsequent restriction analysis (RFLP) with HinfI and MboI enzymes. In present study, the PCR products containing the internal fragment of the recA gene, for 25 Acinetobacter strains belonging to all genomic species, were sequenced. Based on the nucleotide sequences the restriction maps and phylogenetic tree were prepared. The restriction maps revealed that Tsp509I restriction enzyme is the most discriminating for RFLP. To verify the computer analysis, the amplified DNAs from all reference genomic species available (43 strains) and 34 clinical strains were digested with each of the three restriction endonucleases mentioned. The results of digestion confirmed the computer analysis. The reconstructed phylogenetic tree showed linkages between genomic species 1 (Acinetobacter calcoaceticus), 2 (Acinetobacter baumannii), 3, 'between 1 and 3', TU13 and 'close to TU13'; genomic species 4, 6, BJ13, BJ14, BJ15, BJ16 and BJ17; genomic species 7 (Acinetobacter johnsonii) and TU14; genomic species 10 and 11; genomic species 8 (Acinetobacter Iwoffii), 9, 12 (Acinetobacter radioresistens) and TU15; and genomic species 5 (Acinetobacter junii). It is interesting that one branch in the phylogenetic tree contains haemolytic species-genomic species 4 (A. haemolyticus), BJ13, BJ14, BJ15, BJ16 and BJ17. The proposed genotypic method clearly revealed that the RFLP profiles obtained with Tsp509I enzyme might be useful for species identification of Acinetobacter strains. In this context, recA/RFLP genotypic method should be seen as an ideal preliminary screening method for large

  13. Involvement of the RpoN protein in the transcription of the oprE gene in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Yamano, Y; Nishikawa, T; Komatsu, Y

    1998-05-01

    OprE is a channel-forming outer membrane protein of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the expression of which is induced under anaerobic conditions. We constructed various mutants and observed the effects on oprE expression. Deficiency in RpoN, an alternative sigma factor for RNA polymerase, abolished oprE expression under aerobic conditions, but did not affect the expression under anaerobic conditions. One mutation on the putative RpoN recognition site also caused reduction of oprE expression. The region 500 nucleotides upstream of the mRNA start site was required for optimal oprE transcription, which contains an AT-rich region including a putative integration host factor binding site. These results indicate that OprE production is directly or indirectly controlled by RpoN but also require some other regulatory proteins bound to the upstream region. PMID:9595661

  14. Characterization of the new metallo-beta-lactamase VIM-13 and its integron-borne gene from a Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolate in Spain.

    PubMed

    Juan, Carlos; Beceiro, Alejandro; Gutiérrez, Olivia; Albertí, Sebastián; Garau, Margalida; Pérez, José L; Bou, Germán; Oliver, Antonio

    2008-10-01

    During a survey conducted to evaluate the incidence of class B carbapenemase (metallo-beta-lactamase [MBL])-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains from hospitals in Majorca, Spain, five clinical isolates showed a positive Etest MBL screening test result. In one of them, strain PA-SL2, the presence of a new bla(VIM) derivative (bla(VIM-13)) was detected by PCR amplification with bla(VIM-1)-specific primers followed by sequencing. The bla(VIM-13)-producing isolate showed resistance to all beta-lactams (except aztreonam), gentamicin, tobramycin, and ciprofloxacin. VIM-13 exhibited 93% and 88% amino acid sequence identities with VIM-1 and VIM-2, respectively. bla(VIM-13) was cloned in parallel with bla(VIM-1), and the resistance profile conferred was analyzed both in Escherichia coli and in P. aeruginosa backgrounds. Compared to VIM-1, VIM-13 conferred slightly higher levels of resistance to piperacillin and lower levels of resistance to ceftazidime and cefepime. VIM-13 and VIM-1 were purified in parallel as well, and their kinetic parameters were compared. The k(cat)/K(m) ratios for the antibiotics mentioned above were in good agreement with the MIC data. Furthermore, EDTA inhibited the activity of VIM-13 approximately 25 times less than it inhibited the activity of VIM-1. VIM-13 was harbored in a class 1 integron, along with a new variant (Ala108Thr) of the aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme encoding gene aacA4, which confers resistance to gentamicin and tobramycin. Finally, the VIM-13 integron was apparently located in the chromosome, since transformation and conjugation experiments consistently yielded negative results and the bla(VIM-13) probe hybridized only with the genomic DNA. PMID:18644957

  15. l-Methionine sulfoximine, but not phosphinothricin, is a substrate for an acetyltransferase (gene PA4866) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa: structural and functional studies.

    PubMed

    Davies, Anna M; Tata, Renée; Beavil, Rebecca L; Sutton, Brian J; Brown, Paul R

    2007-02-20

    The gene PA4866 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa is documented in the Pseudomonas genome database as encoding a 172 amino acid hypothetical acetyltransferase. We and others have described the 3D structure of this protein (termed pita) [Davies et al. (2005) Proteins: Struct., Funct., Bioinf. 61, 677-679; Nocek et al., unpublished results], and structures have also been reported for homologues from Agrobacterium tumefaciens (Rajashankar et al., unpublished results) and Bacillus subtilis [Badger et al. (2005) Proteins: Struct., Funct., Bioinf. 60, 787-796]. Pita homologues are found in a large number of bacterial genomes, and while the majority of these have been assigned putative phosphinothricin acetyltransferase activity, their true function is unknown. In this paper we report that pita has no activity toward phosphinothricin. Instead, we demonstrate that pita acts as an acetyltransferase using the glutamate analogues l-methionine sulfoximine and l-methionine sulfone as substrates, with Km(app) values of 1.3 +/- 0.21 and 1.3 +/- 0.13 mM and kcat(app) values of 505 +/- 43 and 610 +/- 23 s-1 for l-methionine sulfoximine and l-methionine sulfone, respectively. A high-resolution (1.55 A) crystal structure of pita in complex with one of these substrates (l-methionine sulfoximine) has been solved, revealing the mode of its interaction with the enzyme. Comparison with the apoenzyme structure has also revealed how certain active site residues undergo a conformational change upon substrate binding. To investigate the role of pita in P. aeruginosa, a mutant strain, Depp4, in which pita was inactivated through an in-frame deletion, was constructed by allelic exchange. Growth of strain Depp4 in the absence of glutamine was inhibited by l-methionine sulfoximine, suggesting a role for pita in protecting glutamine synthetase from inhibition. PMID:17253769

  16. Long-term field release of bioluminescent Sinorhizobium meliloti strains to assess the influence of a recA mutation on the strains' survival.

    PubMed

    Selbitschka, W; Keller, M; Miethling-Graff, R; Dresing, U; Schwieger, F; Krahn, I; Homann, I; Dammann-Kalinowski, T; Pühler, A; Tebbe, C C

    2006-10-01

    A field release experiment was carried out to study the fate of the isogenic, firefly luciferase (luc) gene-tagged Sinorhizobium meliloti strains L1 (RecA-) and L33 (RecA+) in the environment. Both strains were released at concentrations of approximately 10(6) cfu g(-1) soil in replicate and randomized field plots, which had been sown with alfalfa (Medicago sativa). The survival of both strains during the following 7 years could be subdivided into three phases: a sharp decline for more than two orders of magnitude within the first 4 months (phase I), followed by fluctuations around an average number of 10(4) cfu g(-1) soil for nearly 4 years (phase II), and a further decline to approximately 60 cfu g(-1) (phase III). At most sampling dates, no significant differences in the survival of both strains were detected, indicating that the recA gene function was dispensable under these environmental conditions. During the field inoculation, both strains were dispersed accidentally by wind in small numbers to noninoculated field plots. Strain L33 established at a concentration of more than 10(3) cfu g(-1) soil with subsequent seasonal fluctuations. Although strain L1 must have been disseminated to a similar extent, it could never be recovered from noninoculated field plots, indicating that the recA mutation interfered with the strain's capability to establish there. At the beginning of the field experiment, an indigenous alfalfa-nodulating population was below the limit of detection. In the following years, however, an indigenous population arose, which finally outcompeted both strains for saprophytic growth and alfalfa nodulation. RecA- strain L1 was outcompeted for alfalfa nodulation slightly faster than its RecA+ counterpart L33. The diversity of the indigenous population was characterized by employing the Enterobacterial Repetitive Intergenic Consensus polymerase chain reaction fingerprint method. Typing of 2731 root nodule isolates revealed a total of 38 fingerprint

  17. The IncP-6 Plasmid p10265-KPC from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Carries a Novel ΔISEc33-Associated bla KPC-2 Gene Cluster.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xiaotian; Zhou, Dongsheng; Xiong, Wei; Feng, Jiao; Luo, Wenbo; Luo, Guangming; Wang, Haijing; Sun, Fengjun; Zhou, Xiangdong

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain 10265 was recovered from a patient with pneumonia in a Chinese public hospital, and it displays the carbapenem resistance phenotype due to the acquisition of a non-conjugative but mobilizable IncP-6-type plasmid p10265-KPC. p10265-KPC carries a Tn5563-borne defective mer locus, and a novel ΔISEc33-associated bla KPC-2 gene cluster without paired inverted repeats and paired direct repeats at both ends. Mobilization of this ΔISEc33-associated element in p10265-KPC would be attributed to homologous recombination-based insertion of a foreign structure Tn3-ISApu1-orf7-ISApu2- ISKpn27-Δbla TEM-1 -bla KPC-2 -ΔISKpn6- korC-orf6-klcA-ΔrepB into a pre-existent intact ISEc33, making ISEc33 truncated at the 3' end. The previously reported pCOL-1 represents the first sequenced KPC-producing IncP-6 plasmid, while p10265-KPC is the second one. These two plasmids carry two distinct bla KPC-2 gene clusters, which are inserted into the different sites of the IncP-6 backbone and have different evolutionary histories of assembly and mobilization. This is the first report of identification of the IncP-6-type resistance plasmid in China. PMID:27014233

  18. The IncP-6 Plasmid p10265-KPC from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Carries a Novel ΔISEc33-Associated blaKPC-2 Gene Cluster

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xiaotian; Zhou, Dongsheng; Xiong, Wei; Feng, Jiao; Luo, Wenbo; Luo, Guangming; Wang, Haijing; Sun, Fengjun; Zhou, Xiangdong

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain 10265 was recovered from a patient with pneumonia in a Chinese public hospital, and it displays the carbapenem resistance phenotype due to the acquisition of a non-conjugative but mobilizable IncP-6-type plasmid p10265-KPC. p10265-KPC carries a Tn5563-borne defective mer locus, and a novel ΔISEc33-associated blaKPC-2 gene cluster without paired inverted repeats and paired direct repeats at both ends. Mobilization of this ΔISEc33-associated element in p10265-KPC would be attributed to homologous recombination-based insertion of a foreign structure Tn3-ISApu1-orf7-ISApu2- ISKpn27-ΔblaTEM-1-blaKPC-2-ΔISKpn6- korC-orf6-klcA-ΔrepB into a pre-existent intact ISEc33, making ISEc33 truncated at the 3′ end. The previously reported pCOL-1 represents the first sequenced KPC-producing IncP-6 plasmid, while p10265-KPC is the second one. These two plasmids carry two distinct blaKPC-2 gene clusters, which are inserted into the different sites of the IncP-6 backbone and have different evolutionary histories of assembly and mobilization. This is the first report of identification of the IncP-6-type resistance plasmid in China. PMID:27014233

  19. Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms Found in the migA and wbpX Glycosyltransferase Genes Account for the Intrinsic Lipopolysaccharide Defects Exhibited by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Youai; Murphy, Kathleen; Lo, Reggie Y.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 is widely used by researchers in many laboratories because of its enhanced virulence over strain PAO1 in a wide range of hosts. Although lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is an important virulence factor of all P. aeruginosa strains, the LPS of PA14 has not been characterized fully. A recent study showed that the structure of its O-specific antigen (OSA) belongs to serotype O19. We found that the OSA gene cluster of PA14 shares ∼99% identity with those of the O10/O19 group. These two serotypes share the same O-unit structure, except for an O-acetyl substitution in one of the sugars in O10. Here we showed that both PA14 and O19 LPS cross-reacted with the O10-specific monoclonal antibody MF76-2 in Western blots. Analysis by SDS-PAGE and silver staining showed that PA14 LPS exhibited modal chain lengths that were different from those of O19 LPS, in that only “very long” and “short” chain lengths were observed, while “medium” and “long” chain lengths were not detected. Two other novel observations included the lack of the uncapped core oligosaccharide epitope and of common polysaccharide antigen (CPA) LPS. The lack of the uncapped core oligosaccharide was caused by point mutations in the glycosyltransferase gene migA, while the CPA-negative phenotype was correlated with a single amino acid substitution, G20R, in the glycosyltransferase WbpX. Additionally, we showed that restoring CPA biosynthesis in PA14 significantly stimulated mature biofilm formation after 72 h, while outer membrane vesicle production was not affected. IMPORTANCE P. aeruginosa PA14 is a clinical isolate that has become an important reference strain used by many researchers worldwide. LPS of PA14 has not been characterized fully, and hence, confusion about its phenotype exists in the literature. In the present study, we set out to characterize the O-specific antigen (OSA), the common polysaccharide antigen (CPA), and the core oligosaccharide produced by

  20. Transcription of the oprF Gene of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Is Dependent Mainly on the SigX Sigma Factor and Is Sucrose Induced

    PubMed Central

    Bouffartigues, Emeline; Gicquel, Gwendoline; Bazire, Alexis; Bains, Manjeet; Maillot, Olivier; Vieillard, Julien; Feuilloley, Marc G. J.; Orange, Nicole; Hancock, R. E. W.; Dufour, Alain

    2012-01-01

    The OprF porin is the major outer membrane protein of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. OprF is involved in several crucial functions, including cell structure, outer membrane permeability, environmental sensing, and virulence. The oprF gene is preceded by the sigX gene, which encodes the poorly studied extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factor SigX. Three oprF promoters were previously identified. Two intertwined promoters dependent on σ70 and SigX are located in the sigX-oprF intergenic region, whereas a promoter dependent on the ECF AlgU lies within the sigX gene. An additional promoter was found in the cmpX-sigX intergenic region. In this study, we dissected the contribution of each promoter region and of each sigma factor to oprF transcription using transcriptional fusions. In Luria-Bertani (LB) medium, the oprF-proximal region (sigX-oprF intergenic region) accounted for about 80% of the oprF transcription, whereas the AlgU-dependent promoter had marginal activity. Using the sigX mutant PAOSX, we observed that the SigX-dependent promoter was largely predominant over the σ70-dependent promoter. oprF transcription was increased in response to low NaCl or high sucrose concentrations, and this induced transcription was strongly impaired in the absence of SigX. The lack of OprF itself increased oprF transcription. Since these conditions led to cell wall alterations, oprF transcription could be activated by signals triggered by perturbation of the cell envelope. PMID:22685281

  1. RecA: Regulation and Mechanism of a Molecular Search Engine.

    PubMed

    Bell, Jason C; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C

    2016-06-01

    Homologous recombination maintains genomic integrity by repairing broken chromosomes. The broken chromosome is partially resected to produce single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) that is used to search for homologous double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). This homology driven 'search and rescue' is catalyzed by a class of DNA strand exchange proteins that are defined in relation to Escherichia coli RecA, which forms a filament on ssDNA. Here, we review the regulation of RecA filament assembly and the mechanism by which RecA quickly and efficiently searches for and identifies a unique homologous sequence among a vast excess of heterologous DNA. Given that RecA is the prototypic DNA strand exchange protein, its behavior affords insight into the actions of eukaryotic RAD51 orthologs and their regulators, BRCA2 and other tumor suppressors. PMID:27156117

  2. Effects of copper sulfate, hydrogen peroxide and N-phenyl-2-naphthylamine on oxidative stress and the expression of genes involved photosynthesis and microcystin disposition in Microcystis aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Qian, Haifeng; Yu, Shuqiong; Sun, Zhengqi; Xie, Xiucai; Liu, Weiping; Fu, Zhengwei

    2010-09-01

    Algal blooms have been increasing in prevalence all over the world, destroying ecosystems and placing other organisms at risk. Chemical remediation is one of most important methods of controlling algal bloom formation. The effects of copper sulfate, hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and N-phenyl-2-naphthylamine on photosynthesis-related and microcystin-related gene transcription and physiological changes of Microcystis aeruginosa were analyzed. The results suggest that transcription of psaB, psbD1 and rbcL was inhibited by the three algaecides, which blocked the electron transport chain, significantly enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation and overwhelmed the antioxidant system. The increase in ROS destroyed pigment synthesis and membrane integrity, which inhibited or killed the algal cells. Furthermore, H(2)O(2) treatment down-regulated mcyD transcription, which indicated a decrease in the microcystin level in the cells. Our results demonstrate that H(2)O(2) has the greatest potential as an algaecide because it not only inhibits algae growth but may reduce microcystin synthesis. PMID:20566224

  3. Glycerol metabolism promotes biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Scoffield, Jessica; Silo-Suh, Laura

    2016-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes persistent infections in the airways of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Airway sputum contains various host-derived nutrients that can be utilized by P. aeruginosa, including phosphotidylcholine, a major component of host cell membranes. Phosphotidylcholine can be degraded by P. aeruginosa to glycerol and fatty acids to increase the availability of glycerol in the CF lung. In this study, we explored the role that glycerol metabolism plays in biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa. We report that glycerol metabolism promotes biofilm formation by both a chronic CF isolate (FRD1) and a wound isolate (PAO1) of P. aeruginosa. Moreover, loss of the GlpR regulator, which represses the expression of genes involved in glycerol metabolism, enhances biofilm formation in FRD1 through the upregulation of Pel polysaccharide. Taken together, our results suggest that glycerol metabolism may be a key factor that contributes to P. aeruginosa persistence by promoting biofilm formation. PMID:27392247

  4. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Population Structure Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Pirnay, Jean-Paul; Bilocq, Florence; Pot, Bruno; Cornelis, Pierre; Zizi, Martin; Van Eldere, Johan; Deschaght, Pieter; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Jennes, Serge; Pitt, Tyrone; De Vos, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    At present there are strong indications that Pseudomonas aeruginosa exhibits an epidemic population structure; clinical isolates are indistinguishable from environmental isolates, and they do not exhibit a specific (disease) habitat selection. However, some important issues, such as the worldwide emergence of highly transmissible P. aeruginosa clones among cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and the spread and persistence of multidrug resistant (MDR) strains in hospital wards with high antibiotic pressure, remain contentious. To further investigate the population structure of P. aeruginosa, eight parameters were analyzed and combined for 328 unrelated isolates, collected over the last 125 years from 69 localities in 30 countries on five continents, from diverse clinical (human and animal) and environmental habitats. The analysed parameters were: i) O serotype, ii) Fluorescent Amplified-Fragment Length Polymorphism (FALFP) pattern, nucleotide sequences of outer membrane protein genes, iii) oprI, iv) oprL, v) oprD, vi) pyoverdine receptor gene profile (fpvA type and fpvB prevalence), and prevalence of vii) exoenzyme genes exoS and exoU and viii) group I pilin glycosyltransferase gene tfpO. These traits were combined and analysed using biological data analysis software and visualized in the form of a minimum spanning tree (MST). We revealed a network of relationships between all analyzed parameters and non-congruence between experiments. At the same time we observed several conserved clones, characterized by an almost identical data set. These observations confirm the nonclonal epidemic population structure of P. aeruginosa, a superficially clonal structure with frequent recombinations, in which occasionally highly successful epidemic clones arise. One of these clones is the renown and widespread MDR serotype O12 clone. On the other hand, we found no evidence for a widespread CF transmissible clone. All but one of the 43 analysed CF strains belonged to a ubiquitous P

  5. Polycistronic transcription of fused cassettes and identification of translation initiation signals in an unusual gene cassette array from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Érica L.; Vicente, Ana Carolina Paulo

    2015-01-01

    The gene cassettes found in class 1 integrons are generally promoterless units composed by an open reading frame (ORF), a short 5’ untranslated region (UTR) and a 3’ recombination site ( attC). Fused gene cassettes are generated by partial or total loss of the attC from the first cassette in an array, creating, in some cases, a fusion with the ORF from the next cassette. These structures are rare and little is known about their mechanisms of mobilization and expression. The aim of this study was to evaluate the dynamic of mobilization and transcription of the gcu14-bla GES-1 /aacA4 gene cassette array, which harbours a fused gene cassette represented by bla GES-1 /aacA4. The cassette array was analyzed by Northern blot and real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in order to assess the transcription mechanism of bla GES-1 /aacA4 fused cassette. Also, inverse polymerase chain reactions (PCR) were performed to detect the free circular forms of gcu14, bla GES-1 and aacA4. The Northern blot and real time RT-PCR revealed a polycistronic transcription, in which the fused cassette bla GES-1 /aacA4 is transcribed as a unique gene, while gcu14 (with a canonical attC recombination site) has a monocistronic transcription. The gcu14 cassette, closer to the weak configuration of cassette promoter (PcW), had a higher transcription level than bla GES-1/ aacA4, indicating that the cassette position affects the transcript amounts. The presence of ORF-11 at attI1, immediately preceding gcu14, and of a Shine-Dalgarno sequence upstream bla GES-1/ aacA4 composes a scenario for the occurrence of array translation. Inverse PCR generated amplicons corresponding to gcu14, gcu14-aacA4 and gcu14-bla GES-1/ aacA4 free circular forms, but not to bla GES-1 and aacA4 alone, indicating that the GES-1 truncated attC is not substrate of integrase activity and that these genes are mobilized together as a unique cassette. This study was original in showing the

  6. Identification of pathways, gene networks and paralogous gene families in Daphnia pulex responding to exposure to the toxic cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Asselman, Jana; De Coninck, Dieter IM; Glaholt, Stephen; Colbourne, John K; Janssen, Colin R; Shaw, Joseph R; De Schamphelaere, Karel AC

    2013-01-01

    Although cyanobacteria produce a wide range of natural toxins that impact aquatic organisms, food webs and water quality, the mechanisms of toxicity are still insufficiently understood. Here, we implemented a whole-genome expression microarray to identify pathways, gene networks and paralogous gene families responsive to Microcystis stress in Daphnia pulex. Therefore, neonates of a sensitive isolate were given a diet contaminated with Microcystis to contrast with those given a control diet for sixteen days. The microarray revealed 2247 differentially expressed (DE) genes (7.6% of the array) in response to Microcystis, of which 17% are lineage specific( i.e., these genes have no detectable homology to any other gene in currently available databases) and 49% are gene duplicates (paralogs). We identified four pathways/gene networks and eight paralogous gene families affected by Microcystis. Differential regulation of the ribosome, including 3 paralogous gene families encoding 40S, 60S and mitochondrial ribosomal proteins, suggests an impact of Microcystis on protein synthesis of D. pulex. In addition, differential regulation of the oxidative phosphorylation pathway (including the NADH ubquinone oxidoreductase gene family) and the trypsin paralogous gene family (a major component of the digestive system in D. pulex) could explain why fitness is reduced based on energy budget considerations. PMID:22799445

  7. Specificity in suppression of SOS expression by recA4162 and uvrD303.

    PubMed

    Massoni, Shawn C; Sandler, Steven J

    2013-12-01

    Detection and repair of DNA damage is essential in all organisms and depends on the ability of proteins recognizing and processing specific DNA substrates. In E. coli, the RecA protein forms a filament on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) produced by DNA damage and induces the SOS response. Previous work has shown that one type of recA mutation (e.g., recA4162 (I298V)) and one type of uvrD mutation (e.g., uvrD303 (D403A, D404A)) can differentially decrease SOS expression depending on the type of inducing treatments (UV damage versus RecA mutants that constitutively express SOS). Here it is tested using other SOS inducing conditions if there is a general feature of ssDNA generated during these treatments that allows recA4162 and uvrD303 to decrease SOS expression. The SOS inducing conditions tested include growing cells containing temperature-sensitive DNA replication mutations (dnaE486, dnaG2903, dnaN159, dnaZ2016 (at 37°C)), a del(polA)501 mutation and induction of Double-Strand Breaks (DSBs). uvrD303 could decrease SOS expression under all conditions, while recA4162 could decrease SOS expression under all conditions except in the polA strain or when DSBs occur. It is hypothesized that recA4162 suppresses SOS expression best when the ssDNA occurs at a gap and that uvrD303 is able to decrease SOS expression when the ssDNA is either at a gap or when it is generated at a DSB (but does so better at a gap). PMID:24084169

  8. The Transcription Factor AmrZ Utilizes Multiple DNA Binding Modes to Recognize Activator and Repressor Sequences of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Virulence Genes

    PubMed Central

    Pryor, Edward E.; Waligora, Elizabeth A.; Xu, Binjie; Dellos-Nolan, Sheri; Wozniak, Daniel J.; Hollis, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    AmrZ, a member of the Ribbon-Helix-Helix family of DNA binding proteins, functions as both a transcriptional activator and repressor of multiple genes encoding Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence factors. The expression of these virulence factors leads to chronic and sustained infections associated with worsening prognosis. In this study, we present the X-ray crystal structure of AmrZ in complex with DNA containing the repressor site, amrZ1. Binding of AmrZ to this site leads to auto-repression. AmrZ binds this DNA sequence as a dimer-of-dimers, and makes specific base contacts to two half sites, separated by a five base pair linker region. Analysis of the linker region shows a narrowing of the minor groove, causing significant distortions. AmrZ binding assays utilizing sequences containing variations in this linker region reveals that secondary structure of the DNA, conferred by the sequence of this region, is an important determinant in binding affinity. The results from these experiments allow for the creation of a model where both intrinsic structure of the DNA and specific nucleotide recognition are absolutely necessary for binding of the protein. We also examined AmrZ binding to the algD promoter, which results in activation of the alginate exopolysaccharide biosynthetic operon, and found the protein utilizes different interactions with this site. Finally, we tested the in vivo effects of this differential binding by switching the AmrZ binding site at algD, where it acts as an activator, for a repressor binding sequence and show that differences in binding alone do not affect transcriptional regulation. PMID:22511872

  9. AmrZ Beta-Sheet Residues Are Essential for DNA Binding and Transcriptional Control of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Virulence Genes ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Waligora, Elizabeth A.; Ramsey, Deborah M.; Pryor, Edward E.; Lu, Haiping; Hollis, Thomas; Sloan, Gina P.; Deora, Rajendar; Wozniak, Daniel J.

    2010-01-01

    AmrZ is a putative ribbon-helix-helix (RHH) transcriptional regulator. RHH proteins utilize residues within the β-sheet for DNA binding, while the α-helices promote oligomerization. AmrZ is of interest due to its dual roles as a transcriptional activator and as a repressor, regulating genes encoding virulence factors associated with both chronic and acute Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. In this study, cross-linking revealed that AmrZ forms oligomers in solution but that the amino terminus, containing an unordered region and a β-sheet, were not required for oligomerization. The first 12 unordered residues (extended amino terminus) contributed minimally to DNA binding. Mutagenesis of the AmrZ β-sheet demonstrated that residues 18, 20, and 22 were essential for DNA binding at both activation and repressor sites, suggesting that AmrZ utilizes a similar mechanism for binding to these sites. Mice infected with amrZ mutants exhibited reduced bacterial burden, morbidity, and mortality. Direct in vivo competition assays showed a 5-fold competitive advantage for the wild type over an isogenic amrZ mutant. Finally, the reduced infection phenotype of the amrZ-null strain was similar to that of a strain expressing a DNA-binding-deficient AmrZ variant, indicating that DNA binding and transcriptional regulation by AmrZ is responsible for the in vivo virulence defect. These recent infection data, along with previously identified AmrZ-regulated virulence factors, suggest the necessity of AmrZ transcriptional regulation for optimal virulence during acute infection. PMID:20709902

  10. An Integrative Approach to the Study of Filamentous Oligomeric Assemblies, with Application to RecA

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, Benjamin; Ezelin, Johann; Poulain, Pierre; Saladin, Adrien; Zacharias, Martin; Robert, Charles H.; Prévost, Chantal

    2015-01-01

    Oligomeric macromolecules in the cell self-organize into a wide variety of geometrical motifs such as helices, rings or linear filaments. The recombinase proteins involved in homologous recombination present many such assembly motifs. Here, we examine in particular the polymorphic characteristics of RecA, the most studied member of the recombinase family, using an integrative approach that relates local modes of monomer/monomer association to the global architecture of their screw-type organization. In our approach, local modes of association are sampled via docking or Monte Carlo simulations. This enables shedding new light on fiber morphologies that may be adopted by the RecA protein. Two distinct RecA helical morphologies, the so-called “extended” and “compressed” forms, are known to play a role in homologous recombination. We investigate the variability within each form in terms of helical parameters and steric accessibility. We also address possible helical discontinuities in RecA filaments due to multiple monomer-monomer association modes. By relating local interface organization to global filament morphology, the strategies developed here to study RecA self-assembly are particularly well suited to other DNA-binding proteins and to filamentous protein assemblies in general. PMID:25785454

  11. Image analysis reveals that Escherichia coli RecA protein consists of two domains.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, X; Egelman, E H

    1990-01-01

    The Escherichia coli RecA protein catalyzes homologous genetic recombination by forming helical polymers around DNA molecules. These polymers have an ATPase activity, which is essential for the movement of strands between two DNA molecules. One obstacle to structural studies of the RecA filament has been that the ATPase results in a dynamical polymer containing a mixture of states with respect to the bound ATP and its hydrolytic products. We have formed filaments which are trapped in the ADP-Pi state by substituting AIF4- for the Pi, and have used these stable filaments to generate a three-dimensional reconstruction from electron micrographs. The resolution of the reconstruction is sufficient to resolve the 38-k RecA subunit into two nearly equal domains. This reconstruction provides the most detailed view yet of the RecA protein, and serves as a framework within which existing biochemical data on RecA can be understood. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 12 PMID:2137715

  12. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in disease.

    PubMed

    Mulcahy, Lawrence R; Isabella, Vincent M; Lewis, Kim

    2014-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a ubiquitous organism that is the focus of intense research because of its prominent role in disease. Due to its relatively large genome and flexible metabolic capabilities, this organism exploits numerous environmental niches. It is an opportunistic pathogen that sets upon the human host when the normal immune defenses are disabled. Its deadliness is most apparent in cystic fibrosis patients, but it also is a major problem in burn wounds, chronic wounds, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder, surface growth on implanted biomaterials, and within hospital surface and water supplies, where it poses a host of threats to vulnerable patients (Peleg and Hooper, N Engl J Med 362:1804-1813, 2010; Breathnach et al., J Hosp Infect 82:19-24, 2012). Once established in the patient, P. aeruginosa can be especially difficult to treat. The genome encodes a host of resistance genes, including multidrug efflux pumps (Poole, J Mol Microbiol Biotechnol 3:255-264, 2001) and enzymes conferring resistance to beta-lactam and aminoglycoside antibotics (Vahdani et al., Annal Burns Fire Disast 25:78-81, 2012), making therapy against this gram-negative pathogen particularly challenging due to the lack of novel antimicrobial therapeutics (Lewis, Nature 485: 439-440, 2012). This challenge is compounded by the ability of P. aeruginosa to grow in a biofilm, which may enhance its ability to cause infections by protecting bacteria from host defenses and chemotherapy. Here, we review recent studies of P. aeruginosa biofilms with a focus on how this unique mode of growth contributes to its ability to cause recalcitrant infections. PMID:24096885

  13. Two distinct ferritin-like molecules in Pseudomonas aeruginosa: the product of the bfrA gene is a bacterial ferritin (FtnA) and not a bacterioferritin (Bfr).

    PubMed

    Yao, Huili; Jepkorir, Grace; Lovell, Scott; Nama, Pavithra V; Weeratunga, Saroja; Battaile, Kevin P; Rivera, Mario

    2011-06-14

    Two distinct types of ferritin-like molecules often coexist in bacteria, the heme binding bacterioferritins (Bfr) and the non-heme binding bacterial ferritins (Ftn). The early isolation of a ferritin-like molecule from Pseudomonas aeruginosa suggested the possibility of a bacterioferritin assembled from two different subunits [Moore, G. R., et al. (1994) Biochem. J. 304, 493-497]. Subsequent studies demonstrated the presence of two genes encoding ferritin-like molecules in P. aeruginosa, designated bfrA and bfrB, and suggested that two distinct bacterioferritins may coexist [Ma, J.-F., et al. (1999) J. Bacteriol. 181, 3730-3742]. In this report, we present structural evidence demonstrating that the product of the bfrA gene is a ferritin-like molecule not capable of binding heme that harbors a catalytically active ferroxidase center with structural properties similar to those characteristic of bacterial and archaeal Ftns and clearly distinct from those of the ferroxidase center typical of Bfrs. Consequently, the product of the bfrA gene in P. aeruginosa is a bacterial ferritin, which we propose should be termed Pa FtnA. These results, together with the previous characterization of the product of the bfrB gene as a genuine bacterioferritin (Pa BfrB) [Weeratunga, S. J., et al. (2010) Biochemistry 49, 1160-1175], indicate the coexistence of a bacterial ferritin (Pa FtnA) and a bacterioferritin (Pa BfrB) in P. aeruginosa. In agreement with this idea, we also obtained evidence demonstrating that release of iron from Pa BfrB and Pa FtnA is likely subject to different regulation in P. aerugionsa. Whereas the efficient release of iron stored in Pa FtnA requires only the input of electrons from a ferredoxin NADP reductase (Pa Fpr), the release of iron stored in Pa BfrB requires not only electron delivery by Pa Fpr but also the presence of a "regulator", the apo form of a bacterioferritin-associated ferredoxin (apo Pa Bfd). Finally, structural analysis of iron uptake in

  14. Two distinct ferritin-like molecules in P. aeruginosa: The product of the bfrA gene is a bacterial ferritin (FtnA) not a bacterioferritin (Bfr)†€

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Huili; Jepkorir, Grace; Lovell, Scott; Nama, Pavithra V.; Weeratunga, Saroja; Battaile, Kevin P.; Rivera, Mario

    2011-01-01

    Two distinct types of ferritin-like molecules often coexist in bacteria, the heme binding bacterioferritins (Bfr) and the non-heme binding bacterial ferritins (Ftn). The early isolation of a ferritin-like molecule from P. aeruginosa suggested the possibility of a bacterioferritin assembled from two different subunits [Moore, G. R., Kadir, F. H., Al-Massad, F. K., Le Brun, N. E., Thomson, A. J., Greenwood, C., Keen, J. N. and Findlay, J. B. C. (1994) Biochem. J. 304, 493–497]. Subsequent studies demonstrated the presence of two genes coding for ferritin-like molecules in P. aeruginosa, designated bfrA and bfrB, and suggested that two distinct bacterioferritins may coexist [Ma, J.-F., Ochsner, U. A., Klotz, M. G, Nanayakkara, V. K., Howell, M. L., Johnson, Z., Posey, J. E., Vasil, M. L., Monaco, J. J., and Hassett, D. J. (1999) J. Bacteriol. 181, 3730–3742]. In this report we present structural evidence demonstrating that the product of the bfrA gene is a ferritin-like molecule not capable of binding heme which harbors a catalytically active ferroxidase center with structural properties similar to those characteristic of bacterial and archaeal Ftns and clearly distinct from the ferroxidase center typical of Bfrs. Consequently, the product of the bfrA gene in P. aeruginosa is a bacterial ferritin, which we propose should be termed Pa FtnA. These results, together with the previous characterization of the product of the bfrB gene as a genuine bacterioferritin (Pa BfrB) [Weeratunga, S. J., Lovell, S., Yao, H., Battaile, K. P., Fischer, C. J., Gee, C. E., and Rivera, M. (2010) Biochemistry 49. 1160–1175] indicate the coexistence of a bacterial ferritin (Pa FtnA) and a bacterioferritin (Pa BfrB) in P. aeruginosa. In agreement with this idea, we also obtained evidence demonstrating that release of iron from Pa BfrB and Pa FtnA is likely subject to different regulation in P. aerugionsa: Whereas the efficient release of iron stored in Pa FtnA requires only the input of

  15. Genetic and Biochemical Characterization of an Acquired Subgroup B3 Metallo-β-Lactamase Gene, blaAIM-1, and Its Unique Genetic Context in Pseudomonas aeruginosa from Australia

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Dongeun; Toleman, Mark A.; Bell, Jan; Ritchie, Brett; Pratt, Rachael; Ryley, Henry

    2012-01-01

    Three clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates (WCH2677, WCH2813, and WCH2837) isolated from the Women's and Children's Hospital, Adelaide, Australia, produced a metallo-β-lactamase (MBL)-positive Etest result. All isolates were PCR negative for known MBL genes. A gene bank was created, and an MBL gene, designated blaAIM-1, was cloned and fully characterized. The encoded enzyme, AIM-1, is a group B3 MBL that has the highest level of identity to THIN-B and L1. It is chromosomal and flanked by two copies (one intact and one truncated) of an ISCR element, ISCR15. Southern hybridization studies indicated the movement of both ISCR15 and blaAIM-1 within the three different clinical isolates. AIM-1 hydrolyzes most β-lactams, with the exception of aztreonam and, to a lesser extent, ceftazidime; however, it possesses significantly higher kcat values for cefepime and carbapenems than most other MBLs. AIM-1 was the first mobile group B3 enzyme detected and signals further problems for already beleaguered antimicrobial regimes to treat serious P. aeruginosa and other Gram-negative infections. PMID:22985886

  16. Genetic and biochemical characterization of an acquired subgroup B3 metallo-β-lactamase gene, blaAIM-1, and its unique genetic context in Pseudomonas aeruginosa from Australia.

    PubMed

    Yong, Dongeun; Toleman, Mark A; Bell, Jan; Ritchie, Brett; Pratt, Rachael; Ryley, Henry; Walsh, Timothy R

    2012-12-01

    Three clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates (WCH2677, WCH2813, and WCH2837) isolated from the Women's and Children's Hospital, Adelaide, Australia, produced a metallo-β-lactamase (MBL)-positive Etest result. All isolates were PCR negative for known MBL genes. A gene bank was created, and an MBL gene, designated bla(AIM-1), was cloned and fully characterized. The encoded enzyme, AIM-1, is a group B3 MBL that has the highest level of identity to THIN-B and L1. It is chromosomal and flanked by two copies (one intact and one truncated) of an ISCR element, ISCR15. Southern hybridization studies indicated the movement of both ISCR15 and bla(AIM-1) within the three different clinical isolates. AIM-1 hydrolyzes most β-lactams, with the exception of aztreonam and, to a lesser extent, ceftazidime; however, it possesses significantly higher k(cat) values for cefepime and carbapenems than most other MBLs. AIM-1 was the first mobile group B3 enzyme detected and signals further problems for already beleaguered antimicrobial regimes to treat serious P. aeruginosa and other Gram-negative infections. PMID:22985886

  17. Responses of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to antimicrobials

    PubMed Central

    Morita, Yuji; Tomida, Junko; Kawamura, Yoshiaki

    2014-01-01

    Infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa often are hard to treat; inappropriate chemotherapy readily selects multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa. This organism can be exposed to a wide range of concentrations of antimicrobials during treatment; learning more about the responses of P. aeruginosa to antimicrobials is therefore important. We review here responses of the bacterium P. aeruginosa upon exposure to antimicrobials at levels below the inhibitory concentration. Carbapenems (e.g., imipenem) have been shown to induce the formation of thicker and more robust biofilms, while fluoroquinolones (e.g., ciprofloxacin) and aminoglycosides (e.g., tobramycin) have been shown to induce biofilm formation. Ciprofloxacin also has been demonstrated to enhance the frequency of mutation to carbapenem resistance. Conversely, although macrolides (e.g., azithromycin) typically are not effective against P. aeruginosa because of the pseudomonal outer-membrane impermeability and efflux, macrolides do lead to a reduction in virulence factor production. Similarly, tetracycline is not very effective against this organism, but is known to induce the type-III secretion system and consequently enhance cytotoxicity of P. aeruginosa in vivo. Of special note are the effects of antibacterials and disinfectants on pseudomonal efflux systems. Sub-inhibitory concentrations of protein synthesis inhibitors (aminoglycosides, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, etc.) induce the MexXY multidrug efflux system. This response is known to be mediated by interference with the translation of the leader peptide PA5471.1, with consequent effects on expression of the PA5471 gene product. Additionally, induction of the MexCD-OprJ multidrug efflux system is observed upon exposure to sub-inhibitory concentrations of disinfectants such as chlorhexidine and benzalkonium. This response is known to be dependent upon the AlgU stress response factor. Altogether, these biological responses of P. aeruginosa provide useful

  18. Responses of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to antimicrobials.

    PubMed

    Morita, Yuji; Tomida, Junko; Kawamura, Yoshiaki

    2014-01-01

    Infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa often are hard to treat; inappropriate chemotherapy readily selects multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa. This organism can be exposed to a wide range of concentrations of antimicrobials during treatment; learning more about the responses of P. aeruginosa to antimicrobials is therefore important. We review here responses of the bacterium P. aeruginosa upon exposure to antimicrobials at levels below the inhibitory concentration. Carbapenems (e.g., imipenem) have been shown to induce the formation of thicker and more robust biofilms, while fluoroquinolones (e.g., ciprofloxacin) and aminoglycosides (e.g., tobramycin) have been shown to induce biofilm formation. Ciprofloxacin also has been demonstrated to enhance the frequency of mutation to carbapenem resistance. Conversely, although macrolides (e.g., azithromycin) typically are not effective against P. aeruginosa because of the pseudomonal outer-membrane impermeability and efflux, macrolides do lead to a reduction in virulence factor production. Similarly, tetracycline is not very effective against this organism, but is known to induce the type-III secretion system and consequently enhance cytotoxicity of P. aeruginosa in vivo. Of special note are the effects of antibacterials and disinfectants on pseudomonal efflux systems. Sub-inhibitory concentrations of protein synthesis inhibitors (aminoglycosides, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, etc.) induce the MexXY multidrug efflux system. This response is known to be mediated by interference with the translation of the leader peptide PA5471.1, with consequent effects on expression of the PA5471 gene product. Additionally, induction of the MexCD-OprJ multidrug efflux system is observed upon exposure to sub-inhibitory concentrations of disinfectants such as chlorhexidine and benzalkonium. This response is known to be dependent upon the AlgU stress response factor. Altogether, these biological responses of P. aeruginosa provide useful

  19. Optimal conditions for decorating outer surface of single-walled carbon nanotubes with RecA proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oura, Shusuke; Umemura, Kazuo

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we estimated the optimal reaction conditions for decorating the outer surface of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with RecA proteins by comparison with hybrids of RecA and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). To react SWNTs with RecA proteins, we first prepared ssDNA-SWNT hybrids. The heights of the ssDNA-SWNT hybrids increased as the amount of RecA used in the reaction increased, as determined from atomic force microscopy images. We further confirmed the increasing adsorption of RecA proteins onto ssDNA on SWNT surfaces by agarose gel electrophoresis. These results suggest that the combination of RecA proteins and ssDNA-SWNT hybrids forms RecA-ssDNA-SWNT hybrids. We also successfully controlled the amount of RecA adsorbed on the ssDNA-SWNT hybrids. Our results thus indicate the optimized reaction conditions for decorating the outer surface of SWNTs with RecA proteins, which is the key to the development of novel biosensors and nanomaterial-based bioelectronics.

  20. Crystal structure of THEP1 from the hyperthermophile Aquifex aeolicus: a variation of the RecA fold

    PubMed Central

    Roßbach, Michael; Daumke, Oliver; Klinger, Claudia; Wittinghofer, Alfred; Kaufmann, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Background aaTHEP1, the gene product of aq_1292 from Aquifex aeolicus, shows sequence homology to proteins from most thermophiles, hyperthermophiles, and higher organisms such as man, mouse, and fly. In contrast, there are almost no homologous proteins in mesophilic unicellular microorganisms. aaTHEP1 is a thermophilic enzyme exhibiting both ATPase and GTPase activity in vitro. Although annotated as a nucleotide kinase, such an activity could not be confirmed for aaTHEP1 experimentally and the in vivo function of aaTHEP1 is still unknown. Results Here we report the crystal structure of selenomethionine substituted nucleotide-free aaTHEP1 at 1.4 Å resolution using a multiple anomalous dispersion phasing protocol. The protein is composed of a single domain that belongs to the family of 3-layer (α/β/α)-structures consisting of nine central strands flanked by six helices. The closest structural homologue as determined by DALI is the RecA family. In contrast to the latter proteins, aaTHEP1 possesses an extension of the β-sheet consisting of four additional β-strands. Conclusion We conclude that the structure of aaTHEP1 represents a variation of the RecA fold. Although the catalytic function of aaTHEP1 remains unclear, structural details indicate that it does not belong to the group of GTPases, kinases or adenosyltransferases. A mainly positive electrostatic surface indicates that aaTHEP1 might be a DNA/RNA modifying enzyme. The resolved structure of aaTHEP1 can serve as paradigm for the complete THEP1 family. PMID:15777481

  1. Dynamic Growth and Shrinkage Govern the pH Dependence of RecA Filament Stability

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Hyun; Park, Jeehae; Joo, Chirlmin; Kim, Doseok; Ha, Taekjip

    2015-01-01

    RecA proteins form a long stable filament on a single-stranded DNA and catalyze strand exchange reaction. The stability of RecA filament changes dramatically with pH, yet its detailed mechanism is not known. Here, using a single molecule assay, we determined the binding and dissociation rates of RecA monomers at the filament ends at various pH. The pH-induced rate changes were moderate but occurred in opposite directions for binding and dissociation, resulting in a substantial increase in filament stability in lower pH. The highly charged residues in C-terminal domain do not contribute to the pH dependent stability. The stability enhancement of RecA filament in low pH may help the cell to cope with acidic stress by fine-tuning of the binding and dissociation rates without losing the highly dynamic nature of the filament required for strand exchange. PMID:25608006

  2. Solution structure of DinI provides insight into its mode of RecA inactivation.

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, B. E.; Voloshin, O. N.; Camerini-Otero, R. D.; Bax, A.

    2000-01-01

    The Escherichia coli RecA protein triggers both DNA repair and mutagenesis in a process known as the SOS response. The 81-residue E. coli protein DinI inhibits activity of RecA in vivo. The solution structure of DinI has been determined by multidimensional triple resonance NMR spectroscopy, using restraints derived from two sets of residual dipolar couplings, obtained in bicelle and phage media, supplemented with J couplings and a moderate number of NOE restraints. DinI has an alpha/beta fold comprised of a three-stranded beta-sheet and two alpha-helices. The beta-sheet topology is unusual: the central strand is flanked by a parallel and an antiparallel strand and the sheet is remarkably flat. The structure of DinI shows that six negatively charged Glu and Asp residues on DinI's kinked C-terminal alpha-helix form an extended, negatively charged ridge. We propose that this ridge mimics the electrostatic character of the DNA phospodiester backbone, thereby enabling DinI to compete with single-stranded DNA for RecA binding. Biochemical data confirm that DinI is able to displace ssDNA from RecA. PMID:11152126

  3. Function of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa NrdR Transcription Factor: Global Transcriptomic Analysis and Its Role on Ribonucleotide Reductase Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Crespo, Anna; Pedraz, Lucas; Torrents, Eduard

    2015-01-01

    Ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) are a family of sophisticated enzymes responsible for the synthesis of the deoxyribonucleotides (dNTPs), the building blocks for DNA synthesis and repair. Although any living cell must contain one RNR activity to continue living, bacteria have the capacity to encode different RNR classes in the same genome, allowing them to adapt to different environments and growing conditions. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is well known for its adaptability and surprisingly encodes all three known RNR classes (Ia, II and III). There must be a complex transcriptional regulation network behind this RNR activity, dictating which RNR class will be expressed according to specific growing conditions. In this work, we aim to uncover the role of the transcriptional regulator NrdR in P. aeruginosa. We demonstrate that NrdR regulates all three RNR classes, being involved in differential control depending on whether the growth conditions are aerobic or anaerobic. Moreover, we also identify for the first time that NrdR is not only involved in controlling RNR expression but also regulates topoisomerase I (topA) transcription. Finally, to obtain the entire picture of NrdR regulon, we performed a global transcriptomic analysis comparing the transcription profile of wild-type and nrdR mutant strains. The results provide many new data about the regulatory network that controls P. aeruginosa RNR transcription, bringing us a step closer to the understanding of this complex system. PMID:25909779

  4. RecA bundles mediate homology pairing between distant sisters during DNA break repair.

    PubMed

    Lesterlin, Christian; Ball, Graeme; Schermelleh, Lothar; Sherratt, David J

    2014-02-13

    DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair by homologous recombination has evolved to maintain genetic integrity in all organisms. Although many reactions that occur during homologous recombination are known, it is unclear where, when and how they occur in cells. Here, by using conventional and super-resolution microscopy, we describe the progression of DSB repair in live Escherichia coli. Specifically, we investigate whether homologous recombination can occur efficiently between distant sister loci that have segregated to opposite halves of an E. coli cell. We show that a site-specific DSB in one sister can be repaired efficiently using distant sister homology. After RecBCD processing of the DSB, RecA is recruited to the cut locus, where it nucleates into a bundle that contains many more RecA molecules than can associate with the two single-stranded DNA regions that form at the DSB. Mature bundles extend along the long axis of the cell, in the space between the bulk nucleoid and the inner membrane. Bundle formation is followed by pairing, in which the two ends of the cut locus relocate at the periphery of the nucleoid and together move rapidly towards the homology of the uncut sister. After sister locus pairing, RecA bundles disassemble and proteins that act late in homologous recombination are recruited to give viable recombinants 1-2-generation-time equivalents after formation of the initial DSB. Mutated RecA proteins that do not form bundles are defective in sister pairing and in DSB-induced repair. This work reveals an unanticipated role of RecA bundles in channelling the movement of the DNA DSB ends, thereby facilitating the long-range homology search that occurs before the strand invasion and transfer reactions. PMID:24362571

  5. RecA bundles mediate homology pairing between distant sisters during DNA break repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesterlin, Christian; Ball, Graeme; Schermelleh, Lothar; Sherratt, David J.

    2014-02-01

    DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair by homologous recombination has evolved to maintain genetic integrity in all organisms. Although many reactions that occur during homologous recombination are known, it is unclear where, when and how they occur in cells. Here, by using conventional and super-resolution microscopy, we describe the progression of DSB repair in live Escherichia coli. Specifically, we investigate whether homologous recombination can occur efficiently between distant sister loci that have segregated to opposite halves of an E. coli cell. We show that a site-specific DSB in one sister can be repaired efficiently using distant sister homology. After RecBCD processing of the DSB, RecA is recruited to the cut locus, where it nucleates into a bundle that contains many more RecA molecules than can associate with the two single-stranded DNA regions that form at the DSB. Mature bundles extend along the long axis of the cell, in the space between the bulk nucleoid and the inner membrane. Bundle formation is followed by pairing, in which the two ends of the cut locus relocate at the periphery of the nucleoid and together move rapidly towards the homology of the uncut sister. After sister locus pairing, RecA bundles disassemble and proteins that act late in homologous recombination are recruited to give viable recombinants 1-2-generation-time equivalents after formation of the initial DSB. Mutated RecA proteins that do not form bundles are defective in sister pairing and in DSB-induced repair. This work reveals an unanticipated role of RecA bundles in channelling the movement of the DNA DSB ends, thereby facilitating the long-range homology search that occurs before the strand invasion and transfer reactions.

  6. Pseudomonas Aeruginosa: Resistance to the Max

    PubMed Central

    Poole, Keith

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is intrinsically resistant to a variety of antimicrobials and can develop resistance during anti-pseudomonal chemotherapy both of which compromise treatment of infections caused by this organism. Resistance to multiple classes of antimicrobials (multidrug resistance) in particular is increasingly common in P. aeruginosa, with a number of reports of pan-resistant isolates treatable with a single agent, colistin. Acquired resistance in this organism is multifactorial and attributable to chromosomal mutations and the acquisition of resistance genes via horizontal gene transfer. Mutational changes impacting resistance include upregulation of multidrug efflux systems to promote antimicrobial expulsion, derepression of ampC, AmpC alterations that expand the enzyme's substrate specificity (i.e., extended-spectrum AmpC), alterations to outer membrane permeability to limit antimicrobial entry and alterations to antimicrobial targets. Acquired mechanisms contributing to resistance in P. aeruginosa include β-lactamases, notably the extended-spectrum β-lactamases and the carbapenemases that hydrolyze most β-lactams, aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes, and 16S rRNA methylases that provide high-level pan-aminoglycoside resistance. The organism's propensity to grow in vivo as antimicrobial-tolerant biofilms and the occurrence of hypermutator strains that yield antimicrobial resistant mutants at higher frequency also compromise anti-pseudomonal chemotherapy. With limited therapeutic options and increasing resistance will the untreatable P. aeruginosa infection soon be upon us? PMID:21747788

  7. Production of Neisseria gonorrhoeae pili (fimbriae) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Hoyne, P A; Haas, R; Meyer, T F; Davies, J K; Elleman, T C

    1992-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa K/2PfS, when transformed with an expression plasmid harboring the pilin gene (pilE1) of Neisseria gonorrhoeae MS11, was able to express and assemble gonococcal pilin monomers into surface-associated pili, as judged by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, immunoblotting, and immunoelectron microscopy. Concomitant with the expression of gonococcal pili in P. aeruginosa was the virtual loss of production of P. aeruginosa K/2PfS pili normally associated with the host cell. Images PMID:1358873

  8. Effects of pressure and temperature on the binding of RecA protein to single-stranded DNA

    PubMed Central

    Merrin, Jack; Kumar, Pradeep; Libchaber, Albert

    2011-01-01

    The binding and polymerization of RecA protein to DNA is required for recombination, which is an essential function of life. We study the pressure and temperature dependence of RecA binding to single-stranded DNA in the presence of adenosine 5'-[γ-thio]triphosphate (ATP[γ-S]), in a temperature regulated high pressure cell using fluorescence anisotropy. Measurements were possible at temperatures between 5–60 °C and pressures up to 300 MPa. Experiments were performed on Escherichia coli RecA and RecA from a thermophilic bacteria, Thermus thermophilus. For E. coli RecA at a given temperature, binding is a monotonically decreasing and reversible function of pressure. At atmospheric pressure, E. coli RecA binding decreases monotonically up to 42 °C, where a sharp transition to the unbound state indicates irreversible heat inactivation. T. thermophilus showed no such transition within the temperature range of our apparatus. Furthermore, we find that binding occurs for a wider range of pressure and temperature for T. thermophilus compared to E. coli RecA, suggesting a correlation between thermophilicity and barophilicity. We use a two-state model of RecA binding/unbinding to extract the associated thermodynamic parameters. For E. coli, we find that the binding/unbinding phase boundary is hyperbolic. Our results of the binding of RecA from E. coli and T. thermophilus show adaptation to pressure and temperature at the single protein level. PMID:22123983

  9. The Genomic Basis of Evolutionary Innovation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Andreas; MacLean, R. Craig

    2016-01-01

    Novel traits play a key role in evolution, but their origins remain poorly understood. Here we address this problem by using experimental evolution to study bacterial innovation in real time. We allowed 380 populations of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to adapt to 95 different carbon sources that challenged bacteria with either evolving novel metabolic traits or optimizing existing traits. Whole genome sequencing of more than 80 clones revealed profound differences in the genetic basis of innovation and optimization. Innovation was associated with the rapid acquisition of mutations in genes involved in transcription and metabolism. Mutations in pre-existing duplicate genes in the P. aeruginosa genome were common during innovation, but not optimization. These duplicate genes may have been acquired by P. aeruginosa due to either spontaneous gene amplification or horizontal gene transfer. High throughput phenotype assays revealed that novelty was associated with increased pleiotropic costs that are likely to constrain innovation. However, mutations in duplicate genes with close homologs in the P. aeruginosa genome were associated with low pleiotropic costs compared to mutations in duplicate genes with distant homologs in the P. aeruginosa genome, suggesting that functional redundancy between duplicates facilitates innovation by buffering pleiotropic costs. PMID:27149698

  10. Spaceflight Effects on Virulence of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broadway, S.; Goins, T.; Crandell, C.; Richards, C.; Patel, M.; Pyle, B.

    2008-06-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen found in the environment. It is known to infect the immunocompromised. The organism has about 25 virulence genes that play different roles in disease processes. Several exotoxin proteins may be produced, including ExoA, ExoS, ExoT and ExoY, and other virulence factors. In spaceflight, possible increased expression of P. aeruginosa virulence proteins could increase health risks for spaceflight crews who experience decreased immunity. Cultures of P. aeruginosa strains PA01 and PA103 grown on orbit on Shuttle Endeavour flight STS-123 vs. static ground controls were used for analysis. The production of ETA was quantitated using an ELISA procedure. Results showed that while flight cultures of PA103 produced slightly more ETA than corresponding ground controls, the opposite was found for PA01. While it appears that spaceflight has little effect on ETA, stimulation of other virulence factors could cause increased virulence of this organism in space flight. Similar increased virulence in spaceflight has been observed for other bacteria. This is important because astronauts may be more susceptible to opportunistic pathogens including P. aeruginosa.

  11. Inhibition of ATPase activity of the recA protein by ATP ribose-modified analogs.

    PubMed

    Karasaki, Y; Higashi, K

    1984-09-01

    The single-stranded, DNA-dependent ATPase activity of purified recA protein was found to be inhibited competitively by ribose-modified analogs of ATP, 3'-O-anthraniloyl-ATP (Ant-ATP), and 3'-O-(N-methylanthraniloyl)-ATP (Mant-ATP). The Ki values for Ant-ATP and Mant-ATP were around 7 and 3 microM at pH 7.5, respectively. The inhibitions by these analogs were much stronger than that by ADP, which is also a competitive inhibitor for the ATPase activity of the recA protein. The Ki value for ADP is 76 microM. Ant-ATP and Mant-ATP reduced the Hill coefficient for ATP hydrolysis and thus contributed to the cooperative effect of ATP. PMID:6237610

  12. Two Modes of Binding of DinI to RecA Filament Provide a New Insight Into Regulation of SOS Response by DinI Protein

    PubMed Central

    Galkin, Vitold E.; Britt, Rachel L.; Bane, Lukas B.; Yu, Xiong; Cox, Michael M.; Egelman, Edward H.

    2011-01-01

    The RecA protein plays a principal role in the bacterial SOS response to DNA damage. The induction of the SOS response is well understood and involves the cleavage of the LexA repressor catalyzed by the RecA nucleoprotein filament. In contrast, our understanding of the regulation and termination of the SOS response is much more limited. RecX and DinI are two major regulators of RecA’s ability to promote LexA cleavage and a strand exchange reaction and are believed to modulate its activity in ongoing SOS events. DinI’s function in the SOS response remains controversial since its interaction with the RecA filament is concentration-dependent and may result in either stabilization or depolymerization of the filament. The 17 C-terminal residues of RecA modulate the interaction between DinI and RecA. We demonstrate that DinI binds to the active RecA filament in two distinct structural modes. In the first mode DinI binds to the C-terminus of a RecA protomer. In the second mode DinI resides deeply in the groove of the RecA filament with its negatively charged C-terminal helix proximal to the L2 loop of RecA. The deletion of the 17 C-terminal residues of RecA favors the second mode of binding. We suggest that the negatively charged C-terminus of RecA prevents DinI from entering the groove and protects the RecA filament from depolymerization. Polymorphic binding of DinI to RecA filaments implies an even more complex role of DinI in the bacterial SOS response. PMID:21458462

  13. The effects of buffers and pH on the thermal stability, unfolding and substrate binding of RecA.

    PubMed

    Metrick, Michael A; Temple, Joshua E; MacDonald, Gina

    2013-12-31

    The Escherichia coli protein RecA is responsible for catalysis of the strand transfer reaction used in DNA repair and recombination. Previous studies in our lab have shown that high concentrations of salts stabilize RecA in a reverse-anionic Hofmeister series. Here we investigate how changes in pH and buffer alter the thermal unfolding and cofactor binding. RecA in 20mM HEPES, MES, Tris and phosphate buffers was studied in the pH range from 6.5 to 8.5 using circular dichroism (CD), infrared (IR) and fluorescence spectroscopies. The results show all of the buffers studied stabilize RecA up to 50°C above the Tris melting temperature and influence RecA's ability to nucleate on double-stranded DNA. Infrared and CD spectra of RecA in the different buffers do not show that secondary structural changes are associated with increased stability or decreased ability to nucleate on dsDNA. These results suggest the differences in stability arise from decreasing positive charge and/or buffer interactions. PMID:24036048

  14. X-ray Crystal Structure of the Bacterial Conjugation Factor PsiB, a Negative Regulator of RecA

    SciTech Connect

    Petrova, Vessela; Satyshur, Kenneth A.; George, Nicholas P.; McCaslin, Darrell; Cox, Michael M.; Keck, James L.

    2012-03-16

    During bacterial conjugation, genetic material from one cell is transferred to another as single-stranded DNA. The introduction of single-stranded DNA into the recipient cell would ordinarily trigger a potentially deleterious transcriptional response called SOS, which is initiated by RecA protein filaments formed on the DNA. During F plasmid conjugation, however, the SOS response is suppressed by PsiB, an F-plasmid-encoded protein that binds and sequesters free RecA to prevent filament formation. Among the many characterized RecA modulator proteins, PsiB is unique in using sequestration as an inhibitory mechanism. We describe the crystal structure of PsiB from the Escherichia coli F plasmid. The stucture of PsiB is surprisingly similar to CapZ, a eukaryotic actin filament capping protein. Structure-directed neutralization of electronegative surfaces on PsiB abrogates RecA inhibition whereas neutralization of an electropositive surface element enhances PsiB inhibition of RecA. Together, these studies provide a first molecular view of PsiB and highlight its use as a reagent in studies of RecA activity.

  15. Investigating direct interaction between Escherichia coli topoisomerase I and RecA.

    PubMed

    Banda, Srikanth; Tiwari, Purushottam Babu; Darici, Yesim; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching

    2016-07-01

    Protein-protein interactions are of special importance in cellular processes, including replication, transcription, recombination, and repair. Escherichia coli topoisomerase I (EcTOP1) is primarily involved in the relaxation of negative DNA supercoiling. E. coli RecA, the key protein for homologous recombination and SOS DNA-damage response, has been shown to stimulate the relaxation activity of EcTOP1. The evidence for their direct protein-protein interaction has not been previously established. We report here the direct physical interaction between E. coli RecA and topoisomerase I. We demonstrated the RecA-topoisomerase I interaction via pull-down assays, and surface plasmon resonance measurements. Molecular docking supports the observation that the interaction involves the topoisomerase I N-terminal domains that form the active site. Our results from pull-down assays showed that ATP, although not required, enhances the RecA-EcTOP1 interaction. We propose that E. coli RecA physically interacts with topoisomerase I to modulate the chromosomal DNA supercoiling. PMID:27001450

  16. An improved recombineering approach by adding RecA to lambda Red recombination.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junping; Sarov, Mihail; Rientjes, Jeanette; Fu, Jun; Hollak, Heike; Kranz, Harald; Xie, Wei; Stewart, A Francis; Zhang, Youming

    2006-01-01

    Recombineering is the use of homologous recombination in Escherichia coli for DNA engineering. Of several approaches, use of the lambda phage Red operon is emerging as the most reliable and flexible. The Red operon includes three components: Redalpha, a 5' to 3' exonuclease, Redbeta, an annealing protein, and Redgamma, an inhibitor of the major E. coli exonuclease and recombination complex, RecBCD. Most E. coli cloning hosts are recA deficient to eliminate recombination and therefore enhance the stability of cloned DNAs. However, loss of RecA also impairs general cellular integrity. Here we report that transient RecA co-expression enhances the total number of successful recombinations in bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs), mostly because the E. coli host is more able to survive the stresses of DNA transformation procedures. We combined this practical improvement with the advantages of a temperature-sensitive version of the low copy pSC101 plasmid to develop a protocol that is convenient and more efficient than any recombineering procedure, for use of either double- or single-stranded DNA, published to date. PMID:16382181

  17. Acquisition and Role of Molybdate in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Pederick, Victoria G.; Eijkelkamp, Bart A.; Ween, Miranda P.; Begg, Stephanie L.; Paton, James C.

    2014-01-01

    In microaerophilic or anaerobic environments, Pseudomonas aeruginosa utilizes nitrate reduction for energy production, a process dependent on the availability of the oxyanionic form of molybdenum, molybdate (MoO42−). Here, we show that molybdate acquisition in P. aeruginosa occurs via a high-affinity ATP-binding cassette permease (ModABC). ModA is a cluster D-III solute binding protein capable of interacting with molybdate or tungstate oxyanions. Deletion of the modA gene reduces cellular molybdate concentrations and results in inhibition of anaerobic growth and nitrate reduction. Further, we show that conditions that permit nitrate reduction also cause inhibition of biofilm formation and an alteration in fatty acid composition of P. aeruginosa. Collectively, these data highlight the importance of molybdate for anaerobic growth of P. aeruginosa and reveal novel consequences of nitrate reduction on biofilm formation and cell membrane composition. PMID:25172858

  18. Acquisition and role of molybdate in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Pederick, Victoria G; Eijkelkamp, Bart A; Ween, Miranda P; Begg, Stephanie L; Paton, James C; McDevitt, Christopher A

    2014-11-01

    In microaerophilic or anaerobic environments, Pseudomonas aeruginosa utilizes nitrate reduction for energy production, a process dependent on the availability of the oxyanionic form of molybdenum, molybdate (MoO4 (2-)). Here, we show that molybdate acquisition in P. aeruginosa occurs via a high-affinity ATP-binding cassette permease (ModABC). ModA is a cluster D-III solute binding protein capable of interacting with molybdate or tungstate oxyanions. Deletion of the modA gene reduces cellular molybdate concentrations and results in inhibition of anaerobic growth and nitrate reduction. Further, we show that conditions that permit nitrate reduction also cause inhibition of biofilm formation and an alteration in fatty acid composition of P. aeruginosa. Collectively, these data highlight the importance of molybdate for anaerobic growth of P. aeruginosa and reveal novel consequences of nitrate reduction on biofilm formation and cell membrane composition. PMID:25172858

  19. Microbial degradation of quinoline and methylquinolines. [Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Aislabie, J.; Bej, A.K.; Hurst, H.; Rothenburger, S.; Atlas, R.M. )

    1990-02-01

    Several bacterial cultures were isolated that are able to degrade quinoline and to transform or to degrade methylquinolines. The degradation of quinoline by strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa QP and Pseudomonas. putida QP produced hydroxyquinolines, a transient pink compound, and other undetermined products. The quinoline-degrading strains of P. aeruginosa QP and P. putida QP hydroxylated a limited number of methylquinolines but could not degrade them, nor could they transform 2-methylquinoline, isoquinoline, or pyridine. Another pseudomonad, Pseudomonas sp. strain MQP, was isolated that could degrade 2-methylquinoline. P. aeruginosa QP was able to degrade or to transform quinoline and a few methylquinolines in a complex heterocyclic nitrogen-containing fraction of a shale oil. All of the quinoline- and methylquinoline-degrading strains have multiple plasmids including a common 250-kilobase plasmid. The 225-, 250-, and 320-kilobase plasmids of the P. aeruginosa QP strain all contained genes involved in quinoline metabolism.

  20. Expression of pili from Bacteroides nodosus in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Elleman, T C; Hoyne, P A; Stewart, D J; McKern, N M; Peterson, J E

    1986-01-01

    The pili of Bacteroides nodosus, the causative agent of ovine footrot, constitute the major host-protective immunogen against homologous serotypic challenge. The pilin gene from B. nodosus 198 has been cloned and morphologically expressed as extracellular pili in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by using a plasmid-borne, thermoregulated expression system. B. nodosus pilin could not be detected in cultures of P. aeruginosa grown at 32 degrees C, but after induction at 37 degrees C, B. nodosus pili were expressed on the cell surface of P. aeruginosa to the virtual exclusion of the host cell pili. Pili harvested from induced P. aeruginosa cultures were used to immunize sheep against footrot. The serum agglutinating antibody titers of vaccinated sheep were comparable to those of sheep receiving pili from B. nodosus. Subsequent challenge of the sheep with B. nodosus 198 indicated that the recombinant- DNA-derived pili vaccine and the B. nodosus pili vaccine provided similar levels of protection against footrot. Images PMID:2877967

  1. ZnuA and zinc homeostasis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Pederick, Victoria G.; Eijkelkamp, Bart A.; Begg, Stephanie L.; Ween, Miranda P.; McAllister, Lauren J.; Paton, James C.; McDevitt, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a ubiquitous environmental bacterium and a clinically significant opportunistic human pathogen. Central to the ability of P. aeruginosa to colonise both environmental and host niches is the acquisition of zinc. Here we show that P. aeruginosa PAO1 acquires zinc via an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) permease in which ZnuA is the high affinity, zinc-specific binding protein. Zinc uptake in Gram-negative organisms predominantly occurs via an ABC permease, and consistent with this expectation a P. aeruginosa ΔznuA mutant strain showed an ~60% reduction in cellular zinc accumulation, while other metal ions were essentially unaffected. Despite the major reduction in zinc accumulation, minimal phenotypic differences were observed between the wild-type and ΔznuA mutant strains. However, the effect of zinc limitation on the transcriptome of P. aeruginosa PAO1 revealed significant changes in gene expression that enable adaptation to low-zinc conditions. Genes significantly up-regulated included non-zinc-requiring paralogs of zinc-dependent proteins and a number of novel import pathways associated with zinc acquisition. Collectively, this study provides new insight into the acquisition of zinc by P. aeruginosa PAO1, revealing a hitherto unrecognized complexity in zinc homeostasis that enables the bacterium to survive under zinc limitation. PMID:26290475

  2. Singly Flagellated Pseudomonas aeruginosa Chemotaxes Efficiently by Unbiased Motor Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Qiuxian; Li, Zhaojun; Ouyang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen that has long been known to chemotax. More recently, it has been established that chemotaxis is an important factor in the ability of P. aeruginosa to make biofilms. Genes that allow P. aeruginosa to chemotax are homologous with genes in the paradigmatic model organism for chemotaxis, Escherichia coli. However, P. aeruginosa is singly flagellated and E. coli has multiple flagella. Therefore, the regulation of counterclockwise/clockwise flagellar motor bias that allows E. coli to efficiently chemotax by runs and tumbles would lead to inefficient chemotaxis by P. aeruginosa, as half of a randomly oriented population would respond to a chemoattractant gradient in the wrong sense. How P. aeruginosa regulates flagellar rotation to achieve chemotaxis is not known. Here, we analyze the swimming trajectories of single cells in microfluidic channels and the rotations of cells tethered by their flagella to the surface of a variable-environment flow cell. We show that P. aeruginosa chemotaxes by symmetrically increasing the durations of both counterclockwise and clockwise flagellar rotations when swimming up the chemoattractant gradient and symmetrically decreasing rotation durations when swimming down the chemoattractant gradient. Unlike the case for E. coli, the counterclockwise/clockwise bias stays constant for P. aeruginosa. We describe P. aeruginosa’s chemotaxis using an analytical model for symmetric motor regulation. We use this model to do simulations that show that, given P. aeruginosa’s physiological constraints on motility, its distinct, symmetric regulation of motor switching optimizes chemotaxis. PMID:27048795

  3. Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutants affected in anaerobic growth on arginine: evidence for a four-gene cluster encoding the arginine deiminase pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Vander Wauven, C; Piérard, A; Kley-Raymann, M; Haas, D

    1984-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO was able to grow in the absence of exogenous terminal electron acceptors, provided that the medium contained 30 to 40 mM L-arginine and 0.4% yeast extract. Under strictly anaerobic conditions (O2 at less than 1 ppm), growth could be measured as an increase in protein and proceeded in a non-exponential way; arginine was largely converted to ornithine but not entirely consumed at the end of growth. In the GasPak anaerobic jar (Becton Dickinson and Co.), the wild-type strain PAO1 grew on arginine-yeast extract medium in 3 to 5 days; mutants could be isolated that were unable to grow under these conditions. All mutants (except one) were defective in at least one of the three enzymes of the arginine deiminase pathway (arcA, arcB, and arcC mutants) or in a novel function that might be involved in anaerobic arginine uptake (arcD mutants). The mutations arcA (arginine deiminase), arcB (catabolic ornithine carbamoyltransferase), arcC (carbamate kinase), and arcD were highly cotransducible and mapped in the 17-min chromosome region. Some mutations in the arc cluster led to low, noninducible levels of all three arginine deiminase pathway enzymes and thus may affect control elements required for induction of the postulated arc operon. Two fluorescent pseudomonads (P. putida and P. fluorescens) and P. mendocina, as well as one PAO mutant, possessed an inducible arginine deiminase pathway and yet were unable to grow fermentatively on arginine. The ability to use arginine-derived ATP for growth may provide P. aeruginosa with a selective advantage when oxygen and nitrate are scarce. PMID:6438064

  4. Direct imaging of RecA nucleation and growth on single molecules of SSB-coated ssDNA

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Jason C.; Plank, Jody L.; Dombrowski, Christopher C.; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C.

    2012-01-01

    Escherichia coli RecA is the defining member of a ubiquitous class of DNA strand exchange proteins that are essential for homologous recombination, a pathway that maintains genomic integrity by repairing broken DNA1. To function, filaments of RecA must nucleate and grow on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) in direct competition with ssDNA-binding protein (SSB), which rapidly binds and continuously sequesters ssDNA, kinetically blocking RecA assembly2,3. This dynamic self-assembly on a DNA lattice, in competition with another protein, is unique for the RecA-family relative to other filament-forming proteins such as actin and tubulin. The complexity of this process has hindered our understanding of RecA filament assembly because ensemble measurements cannot reliably distinguish between the nucleation and growth phases, despite extensive and diverse attempts2–5. Previous single-molecule assays have measured nucleation and growth of RecA—and its eukaryotic homolog RAD51—on naked dsDNA and ssDNA6–12; however, the template for RecA self-assembly in vivo is SSB-coated ssDNA3. Using single-molecule microscopy, we directly visualized RecA filament assembly on single molecules of SSB-coated ssDNA, simultaneously measuring nucleation and growth. We establish that a dimer of RecA is required for nucleation, followed by growth of the filament through monomer addition, consistent with the finding that nucleation, but not growth, is modulated by nucleotide and magnesium ion cofactors. Filament growth is bidirectional, albeit faster in the 5′→3′ direction. Both nucleation and growth are repressed at physiological conditions, highlighting the essential role of recombination mediators in potentiating assembly in vivo. We define a two-step kinetic mechanism where RecA nucleates on transiently exposed ssDNA during SSB sliding and/or partial dissociation (i.e., DNA unwrapping) and then grows. We further demonstrate that the recombination mediator protein pair, Rec

  5. Subtilase SprP exerts pleiotropic effects in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Pelzer, Alexander; Polen, Tino; Funken, Horst; Rosenau, Frank; Wilhelm, Susanne; Bott, Michael; Jaeger, Karl-Erich

    2014-02-01

    The open reading frame PA1242 in the genome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 encodes a putative protease belonging to the peptidase S8 family of subtilases. The respective enzyme termed SprP consists of an N-terminal signal peptide and a so-called S8 domain linked by a domain of unknown function (DUF). Presumably, this DUF domain defines a discrete class of Pseudomonas proteins as homologous domains can be identified almost exclusively in proteins of the genus Pseudomonas. The sprP gene was expressed in Escherichia coli and proteolytic activity was demonstrated. A P. aeruginosa ∆sprP mutant was constructed and its gene expression pattern compared to the wild-type strain by genome microarray analysis revealing altered expression levels of 218 genes. Apparently, SprP is involved in regulation of a variety of different cellular processes in P. aeruginosa including pyoverdine synthesis, denitrification, the formation of cell aggregates, and of biofilms. PMID:24376018

  6. Decoy oligodeoxyribonucleotides and peptide nucleic acids-DNA chimeras targeting nuclear factor kappa-B: inhibition of IL-8 gene expression in cystic fibrosis cells infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Gambari, Roberto; Borgatti, Monica; Bezzerri, Valentino; Nicolis, Elena; Lampronti, Ilaria; Dechecchi, Maria Cristina; Mancini, Irene; Tamanini, Anna; Cabrini, Giulio

    2010-12-15

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is characterized by a deep inflammatory process, with production and release of cytokines and chemokines, among which interleukin 8 (IL-8) represents one of the most important. Accordingly, there is a growing interest in developing therapies against IL-8, with the aim of reducing the excessive inflammatory response in the airways of CF patients. Since transcription factor NF-kappaB plays a critical role in IL-8 expression, the transcription factor decoy (TFD) strategy might be of interest. TFD is based on biomolecules mimicking the target sites of transcription factors (TFs) and able to interfere with TF activity when delivered to target cells. Here, we review the inhibitory effects of decoy oligodeoxyribonucleotides (ODNs) on expression of IL-8 gene and secretion of IL-8 by cystic fibrosis cells infected by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In addition, the effects of decoy molecules based on peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are discussed. In this respect PNA-DNA-PNA (PDP) chimeras are interesting: (a) unlike PNAs, they can be complexed with liposomes and microspheres; (b) unlike oligodeoxyribonucleotides (ODNs), they are resistant to DNAses, serum and cytoplasmic extracts; (c) unlike PNA/PNA and PNA/DNA hybrids, they are potent decoy molecules. Interestingly, PDP/PDP NF-kappaB decoy chimeras inhibit accumulation of pro-inflammatory mRNAs (including IL-8 mRNA) in P. aeruginosa infected IB3-1, cells reproducing the effects of decoy oligonucleotides. The effects of PDP/PDP chimeras, unlike ODN-based decoys, are observed even in absence of protection with lipofectamine. Since IL-8 is pivotal in pro-inflammatory processes affecting cystic fibrosis, inhibition of its functions might have a clinical relevance. PMID:20615393

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of a Klebsiella pneumoniae Carbapenemase-Positive Sequence Type 111 Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain

    PubMed Central

    Dotson, Gabrielle A.; Dekker, John P.; Palmore, Tara N.; Segre, Julia A.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of a sequence type 111 Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain isolated in 2014 from a patient at the NIH Clinical Center. This P. aeruginosa strain exhibits pan-drug resistance and harbors the blaKPC-2 gene, encoding the Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase enzyme, on a plasmid. PMID:26868386

  8. Antibiofilm activity of Streptomyces sp. BFI 230 and Kribbella sp. BFI 1562 against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Guy; Lee, Jin-Hyung; Kim, Chang-Jin; Lee, Jae-Chan; Ju, Yoon Jung; Cho, Moo Hwan; Lee, Jintae

    2012-12-01

    Members of the actinomycetes family are a rich source of bioactive compounds including diverse antibiotics. This study sought to identify novel and non-toxic biofilm inhibitors from the actinomycetes library for reducing the biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. After the screening of 4104 actinomycetes strains, we found that the culture spent medium (1 %, v/v) of Streptomyces sp. BFI 230 and Kribbella sp. BFI 1562 inhibited P. aeruginosa biofilm formation by 90 % without affecting the growth of planktonic P. aeruginosa cells, while the spent media enhanced the swarming motility of P. aeruginosa. Global transcriptome analyses revealed that the spent medium of Streptomyces sp. BFI 230 induced expression of phenazine, pyoverdine, pyochelin synthesis genes, and iron uptake genes in P. aeruginosa. The addition of exogenous iron restored the biofilm formation and swarming motility of P. aeruginosa in the presence of the spent medium of Streptomyces sp. BFI 230, which suggests that the Streptomyces sp. BFI 230 strain interfered iron acquisition in P. aeruginosa. Experiments on solvent extraction, heat treatment, and proteinase K treatment suggested that hydrophilic compound(s), possibly extracellular peptides or proteins from Streptomyces sp. BFI 230 cause the biofilm reduction of P. aeruginosa. Together, this study indicates that actinomycetes strains have an ability to control the biofilm of P. aeruginosa. PMID:22722911

  9. Characterization of protease IV expression in Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Conibear, Tim C R; Willcox, Mark D P; Flanagan, Judith L; Zhu, Hua

    2012-02-01

    Expression of protease IV by Pseudomonas aeruginosa during ocular infections contributes significantly to tissue damage. However, several P. aeruginosa strains isolated from ocular infections or inflammatory events produce very low levels of protease IV. The aim of the present study was to characterize, genetically and phenotypically, the presence and expression of the protease IV gene in a group of clinical isolates that cause adverse ocular events of varying degrees, and to elucidate the possible control mechanisms of expression associated with this virulence factor. Protease IV gene sequences from seven clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa were determined and compared to P. aeruginosa strains PAO1 and PA103-29. Production and enzyme activity of protease IV were measured in test strains and compared to that of quorum-sensing gene (lasRI) mutants and the expression of other virulence factors. Protease IV gene sequence similarities between the isolates were 97.5-99.5 %. The strains were classified into two distinct phylogenetic groups that correlated with the presence of exo-enzymes from type three secretion systems (TTSS). Protease IV concentrations produced by PAOΔlasRI mutants and the two clinical isolates with a lasRI gene deficiency were restored to levels comparable to strain PAO1 following complementation of the quorum-sensing gene deficiencies. The protease IV gene is highly conserved in P. aeruginosa clinical isolates that cause a range of adverse ocular events. Observed variations within the gene sequence appear to correlate with presence of specific TTSS genes. Protease IV expression was shown to be regulated by the Las quorum-sensing system. PMID:21921113

  10. A dynamic and intricate regulatory network determines Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramanian, Deepak; Schneper, Lisa; Kumari, Hansi; Mathee, Kalai

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a metabolically versatile bacterium that is found in a wide range of biotic and abiotic habitats. It is a major human opportunistic pathogen causing numerous acute and chronic infections. The critical traits contributing to the pathogenic potential of P. aeruginosa are the production of a myriad of virulence factors, formation of biofilms and antibiotic resistance. Expression of these traits is under stringent regulation, and it responds to largely unidentified environmental signals. This review is focused on providing a global picture of virulence gene regulation in P. aeruginosa. In addition to key regulatory pathways that control the transition from acute to chronic infection phenotypes, some regulators have been identified that modulate multiple virulence mechanisms. Despite of a propensity for chaotic behaviour, no chaotic motifs were readily observed in the P. aeruginosa virulence regulatory network. Having a ‘birds-eye’ view of the regulatory cascades provides the forum opportunities to pose questions, formulate hypotheses and evaluate theories in elucidating P. aeruginosa pathogenesis. Understanding the mechanisms involved in making P. aeruginosa a successful pathogen is essential in helping devise control strategies. PMID:23143271

  11. Efficacy of species-specific recA PCR tests in the identification of Burkholderia cepacia complex environmental isolates.

    PubMed

    Dalmastri, Claudia; Pirone, Luisa; Tabacchioni, Silvia; Bevivino, Annamaria; Chiarini, Luigi

    2005-05-01

    In this study, we evaluated if recA species-specific PCR assays could be successfully applied to identify environmental isolates of the widespread Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) species. A total of 729 Bcc rhizosphere isolates collected in different samplings were assigned to the species B. cepacia genomovar I (61), B. cenocepacia recA lineage IIIB (514), B. ambifaria (124) and B. pyrrocinia (30), by means of recA (RFLP) analysis, and PCR tests were performed to assess sensitivity and specificity of recA species-specific primers pairs. B. cepacia genomovar I specific primers produced the expected amplicon with all isolates of the corresponding species (sensitivity, 100%), and cross-reacted with all B. pyrrocinia isolates. On the contrary, B. cenocepacia IIIB primers did not give the expected amplicon in 164 B. cenocepacia IIIB isolates (sensitivity, 68.1%), and isolates of distinct populations showed different sensitivity. B. ambifaria primers failed to amplify a recA-specific fragment only in a few isolates of this species (sensitivity, 93.5%). The absence of specific amplification in a high number of B. cenocepacia rhizosphere isolates indicates that recA specific PCR assays can lead to an underestimation of environmental microorganisms belonging to this bacterial species. PMID:15869960

  12. Candida albicans Inhibits Pseudomonas aeruginosa Virulence through Suppression of Pyochelin and Pyoverdine Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Medina, Eduardo; Fan, Di; Coughlin, Laura A; Ho, Evi X; Lamont, Iain L; Reimmann, Cornelia; Hooper, Lora V; Koh, Andrew Y

    2015-08-01

    Bacterial-fungal interactions have important physiologic and medical ramifications, but the mechanisms of these interactions are poorly understood. The gut is host to trillions of microorganisms, and bacterial-fungal interactions are likely to be important. Using a neutropenic mouse model of microbial gastrointestinal colonization and dissemination, we show that the fungus Candida albicans inhibits the virulence of the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa by inhibiting P. aeruginosa pyochelin and pyoverdine gene expression, which plays a critical role in iron acquisition and virulence. Accordingly, deletion of both P. aeruginosa pyochelin and pyoverdine genes attenuates P. aeruginosa virulence. Heat-killed C. albicans has no effect on P. aeruginosa, whereas C. albicans secreted proteins directly suppress P. aeruginosa pyoverdine and pyochelin expression and inhibit P. aeruginosa virulence in mice. Interestingly, suppression or deletion of pyochelin and pyoverdine genes has no effect on P. aeruginosa's ability to colonize the GI tract but does decrease P. aeruginosa's cytotoxic effect on cultured colonocytes. Finally, oral iron supplementation restores P. aeruginosa virulence in P. aeruginosa and C. albicans colonized mice. Together, our findings provide insight into how a bacterial-fungal interaction can modulate bacterial virulence in the intestine. Previously described bacterial-fungal antagonistic interactions have focused on growth inhibition or colonization inhibition/modulation, yet here we describe a novel observation of fungal-inhibition of bacterial effectors critical for virulence but not important for colonization. These findings validate the use of a mammalian model system to explore the complexities of polymicrobial, polykingdom infections in order to identify new therapeutic targets for preventing microbial disease. PMID:26313907

  13. Network-assisted investigation of virulence and antibiotic-resistance systems in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Sohyun; Kim, Chan Yeong; Ji, Sun-Gou; Go, Junhyeok; Kim, Hanhae; Yang, Sunmo; Kim, Hye Jin; Cho, Ara; Yoon, Sang Sun; Lee, Insuk

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative bacterium of clinical significance. Although the genome of PAO1, a prototype strain of P. aeruginosa, has been extensively studied, approximately one-third of the functional genome remains unknown. With the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains of P. aeruginosa, there is an urgent need to develop novel antibiotic and anti-virulence strategies, which may be facilitated by an approach that explores P. aeruginosa gene function in systems-level models. Here, we present a genome-wide functional network of P. aeruginosa genes, PseudomonasNet, which covers 98% of the coding genome, and a companion web server to generate functional hypotheses using various network-search algorithms. We demonstrate that PseudomonasNet-assisted predictions can effectively identify novel genes involved in virulence and antibiotic resistance. Moreover, an antibiotic-resistance network based on PseudomonasNet reveals that P. aeruginosa has common modular genetic organisations that confer increased or decreased resistance to diverse antibiotics, which accounts for the pervasiveness of cross-resistance across multiple drugs. The same network also suggests that P. aeruginosa has developed mechanism of trade-off in resistance across drugs by altering genetic interactions. Taken together, these results clearly demonstrate the usefulness of a genome-scale functional network to investigate pathogenic systems in P. aeruginosa. PMID:27194047

  14. Network-assisted investigation of virulence and antibiotic-resistance systems in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Sohyun; Kim, Chan Yeong; Ji, Sun-Gou; Go, Junhyeok; Kim, Hanhae; Yang, Sunmo; Kim, Hye Jin; Cho, Ara; Yoon, Sang Sun; Lee, Insuk

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative bacterium of clinical significance. Although the genome of PAO1, a prototype strain of P. aeruginosa, has been extensively studied, approximately one-third of the functional genome remains unknown. With the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains of P. aeruginosa, there is an urgent need to develop novel antibiotic and anti-virulence strategies, which may be facilitated by an approach that explores P. aeruginosa gene function in systems-level models. Here, we present a genome-wide functional network of P. aeruginosa genes, PseudomonasNet, which covers 98% of the coding genome, and a companion web server to generate functional hypotheses using various network-search algorithms. We demonstrate that PseudomonasNet-assisted predictions can effectively identify novel genes involved in virulence and antibiotic resistance. Moreover, an antibiotic-resistance network based on PseudomonasNet reveals that P. aeruginosa has common modular genetic organisations that confer increased or decreased resistance to diverse antibiotics, which accounts for the pervasiveness of cross-resistance across multiple drugs. The same network also suggests that P. aeruginosa has developed mechanism of trade-off in resistance across drugs by altering genetic interactions. Taken together, these results clearly demonstrate the usefulness of a genome-scale functional network to investigate pathogenic systems in P. aeruginosa. PMID:27194047

  15. Network-assisted investigation of virulence and antibiotic-resistance systems in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Sohyun; Kim, Chan Yeong; Ji, Sun-Gou; Go, Junhyeok; Kim, Hanhae; Yang, Sunmo; Kim, Hye Jin; Cho, Ara; Yoon, Sang Sun; Lee, Insuk

    2016-05-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative bacterium of clinical significance. Although the genome of PAO1, a prototype strain of P. aeruginosa, has been extensively studied, approximately one-third of the functional genome remains unknown. With the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains of P. aeruginosa, there is an urgent need to develop novel antibiotic and anti-virulence strategies, which may be facilitated by an approach that explores P. aeruginosa gene function in systems-level models. Here, we present a genome-wide functional network of P. aeruginosa genes, PseudomonasNet, which covers 98% of the coding genome, and a companion web server to generate functional hypotheses using various network-search algorithms. We demonstrate that PseudomonasNet-assisted predictions can effectively identify novel genes involved in virulence and antibiotic resistance. Moreover, an antibiotic-resistance network based on PseudomonasNet reveals that P. aeruginosa has common modular genetic organisations that confer increased or decreased resistance to diverse antibiotics, which accounts for the pervasiveness of cross-resistance across multiple drugs. The same network also suggests that P. aeruginosa has developed mechanism of trade-off in resistance across drugs by altering genetic interactions. Taken together, these results clearly demonstrate the usefulness of a genome-scale functional network to investigate pathogenic systems in P. aeruginosa.

  16. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa Transcriptional Landscape Is Shaped by Environmental Heterogeneity and Genetic Variation

    PubMed Central

    Schniederjans, Monika; Khaledi, Ariane; Hornischer, Klaus; Schulz, Sebastian; Bielecka, Agata; Eckweiler, Denitsa; Pohl, Sarah; Häussler, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Phenotypic variability among bacteria depends on gene expression in response to different environments, and it also reflects differences in genomic structure. In this study, we analyzed transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) profiles of 151 Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates under standard laboratory conditions and of one P. aeruginosa type strain under 14 different environmental conditions. Our approach allowed dissection of the impact of the genetic background versus environmental cues on P. aeruginosa gene expression profiles and revealed that phenotypic variation was larger in response to changing environments than between genomically different isolates. We demonstrate that mutations within the global regulator LasR affect more than one trait (pleiotropy) and that the interaction between mutations (epistasis) shapes the P. aeruginosa phenotypic plasticity landscape. Because of pleiotropic and epistatic effects, average genotype and phenotype measures appeared to be uncorrelated in P. aeruginosa. PMID:26126853

  17. Development of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa Agmatine Biosensor.

    PubMed

    Gilbertsen, Adam; Williams, Bryan

    2014-12-01

    Agmatine, decarboxylated arginine, is an important intermediary in polyamine production for many prokaryotes, but serves higher functions in eukaryotes such as nitric oxide inhibition and roles in neurotransmission. Pseudomonas aeruginosa relies on the arginine decarboxylase and agmatine deiminase pathways to convert arginine into putrescine. One of the two known agmatine deiminase operons, aguBA, contains an agmatine sensitive TetR promoter controlled by AguR. We have discovered that this promoter element can produce a titratable induction of its gene products in response to agmatine, and utilized this discovery to make a luminescent agmatine biosensor in P. aeruginosa. The genome of the P. aeruginosa lab strain UCBPP-PA14 was altered to remove both its ability to synthesize or destroy agmatine, and insertion of the luminescent reporter construct allows it to produce light in proportion to the amount of exogenous agmatine applied from ~100 nM to 1mM. Furthermore it does not respond to related compounds including arginine or putrescine. To demonstrate potential applications the biosensor was used to detect agmatine in spent supernatants, to monitor the development of arginine decarboxylase over time, and to detect agmatine in the spinal cords of live mice. PMID:25587430

  18. Involvement of Pseudomonas aeruginosa rhodanese in protection from cyanide toxicity.

    PubMed

    Cipollone, Rita; Frangipani, Emanuela; Tiburzi, Federica; Imperi, Francesco; Ascenzi, Paolo; Visca, Paolo

    2007-01-01

    Cyanide is a serious environmental pollutant and a biocontrol metabolite in plant growth-promoting Pseudomonas species. Here we report on the presence of multiple sulfurtransferases in the cyanogenic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and investigate in detail RhdA, a thiosulfate:cyanide sulfurtransferase (rhodanese) which converts cyanide to less toxic thiocyanate. RhdA is a cytoplasmic enzyme acting as the principal rhodanese in P. aeruginosa. The rhdA gene forms a transcriptional unit with the PA4955 and psd genes and is controlled by two promoters located upstream of PA4955 and rhdA. Both promoters direct constitutive RhdA expression and show similar patterns of activity, involving moderate down-regulation at the stationary phase or in the presence of exogenous cyanide. We previously observed that RhdA overproduction protects Escherichia coli against cyanide toxicity, and here we show that physiological RhdA levels contribute to P. aeruginosa survival under cyanogenic conditions. The growth of a DeltarhdA mutant is impaired under cyanogenic conditions and fully restored upon complementation with rhdA. Wild-type P. aeruginosa outcompetes the DeltarhdA mutant in cyanogenic coculture assays. Hence, RhdA could be regarded as an effector of P. aeruginosa intrinsic resistance to cyanide, insofar as it provides the bacterium with a defense mechanism against endogenous cyanide toxicity, in addition to cyanide-resistant respiration. PMID:17098912

  19. Effect of tannin extract against Pseudomonas aeruginosa producing metallo beta-lactamase.

    PubMed

    Ghafourian, S; Mohebi, R; Sekawi, Z; Raftari, M; Neela, V; Ghafourian, E; Aboualigalehdari, E; Rahbar, M; Sadeghifard, N

    2012-01-01

    Carbapenems are the most potent beta-lactam agents with a broad-spectrum activity against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. They are stable in the presence of penicillinases and cephalosporinases. This study was focused on frequency of metallo beta- lactamase (MBL) among Pesudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated in patients with urinary tract infection, effect of tannin against PA positive strains which produced blaVIM or blaIMP and both of these genes (Species). Detection of MBL was performed by phonotypic and genotypic methods. Tannin extract was tested against P. aeruginosa producing MBL. During the study period, 240 P. aeruginosa isolates were identified. Among them 64 (26.6 percent) isolates were imipenem non-susceptible and confirmed by imipenem/EDTA. Our results revealed that the growth of blaVIM positive P. aeruginosa inhibited at 15 microg/ml concentration. The experiment repeated for blaIMP-positive P. aeruginosa and P. aeruginosa which harbored blaIMP and blaVIM, the results showed 35 microg/ml was the best concentration for inhibition of P. aeruginosa-positive blaIMP and also P. aeruginosa blaIMP and blaVIM. In conclusion, tannin was effective against P. aeruginosa producing blaVIM and blaIMP and both of them so it can be substituted with common antibiotics. The result showed significantly P. aeruginosa-harbored blaIMP was more responsible for imipenem resistance than P. aeruginosa-positive blaVIM. Interestingly, tannin was more effective against MBL-P. aeruginosa in comparison with current antibiotics. PMID:22824750

  20. Chemotaxis by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Moulton, R C; Montie, T C

    1979-01-01

    Chemotaxis by Pseudomonas aeruginosa RM46 has been studied, and conditions required for chemotaxis have been defined, by using the Adler capillary assay technique. Several amino acids, organic acids, and glucose were shown to be attractants of varying effectiveness for this organism. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid was absolutely required for chemotaxis, and magnesium was also necessary for a maximum response. Serine taxis was greatest when the chemotaxis medium contained 1.5 X 10(-5) M ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and 0.005 M magnesium chloride. It was not necessary to include methionine in the chemotaxis medium. The strength of the chemotactic responses to glucose and to citrate was dependent on prior growth of the bacteria on glucose and citrate, respectively. Accumulation in response to serine was inhibited by the addition of succinate, citrate, malate, glucose, pyruvate, or methionine to the chemotaxis medium. Inhibition by succinate was not dependent on the concentration of attractant in the capillary. However, the degree to which glucose and citrate inhibited serine taxis was dependent on the carbon source utilized for growth. Further investigation of this inhibition may provide information about the mechanisms of chemotaxis in P. aeruginosa. PMID:104961

  1. Cooperative pathogenicity in cystic fibrosis: Stenotrophomonas maltophilia modulates Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence in mixed biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Pompilio, Arianna; Crocetta, Valentina; De Nicola, Serena; Verginelli, Fabio; Fiscarelli, Ersilia; Di Bonaventura, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    The present study was undertaken in order to understand more about the interaction occurring between S. maltophilia and P. aeruginosa, which are frequently co-isolated from CF airways. For this purpose, S. maltophilia RR7 and P. aeruginosa RR8 strains, co-isolated from the lung of a chronically infected CF patient during a pulmonary exacerbation episode, were evaluated for reciprocal effect during planktonic growth, adhesion and biofilm formation onto both polystyrene and CF bronchial cell monolayer, motility, as well as for gene expression in mixed biofilms. P. aeruginosa significantly affected S. maltophilia growth in both planktonic and biofilm cultures, due to an inhibitory activity probably requiring direct contact. Conversely, no effect was observed on P. aeruginosa by S. maltophilia. Compared with monocultures, the adhesiveness of P. aeruginosa on CFBE41o- cells was significantly reduced by S. maltophilia, which probably acts by reducing P. aeruginosa's swimming motility. An opposite trend was observed for biofilm formation, confirming the findings obtained using polystyrene. When grown in mixed biofilm with S. maltophilia, P. aeruginosa significantly over-expressed aprA, and algD—codifying for protease and alginate, respectively—while the quorum sensing related rhlR and lasI genes were down-regulated. The induced alginate expression by P. aeruginosa might be responsible for the protection of S. maltophilia against tobramycin activity we observed in mixed biofilms. Taken together, our results suggest that the existence of reciprocal interference of S. maltophilia and P. aeruginosa in CF lung is plausible. In particular, S. maltophilia might confer some selective “fitness advantage” to P. aeruginosa under the specific conditions of chronic infection or, alternatively, increase the virulence of P. aeruginosa thus leading to pulmonary exacerbation. PMID:26441885

  2. SSB diffusion on single stranded DNA stimulates RecA filament formation

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Rahul; Kozlov, Alexander G.; Lohman, Timothy M.; Ha, Taekjip

    2009-01-01

    Single stranded (ss)DNA generated in the cell during DNA metabolism is stabilized and protected by binding of single stranded DNA binding (SSB) proteins. E. coli SSB, a representative homotetrameric SSB, binds to ssDNA by wrapping the DNA using its four subunits. However, such a tightly wrapped, high affinity protein-DNA complex still needs to be removed or repositioned quickly for unhindered action of other proteins. Here, we show, using single molecule two and three-color FRET, that tetrameric SSB can spontaneously migrate along ssDNA. Diffusional migration of SSB helps in the local displacement of SSB by an elongating RecA filament. SSB diffusion also melts short DNA hairpins transiently and stimulates RecA filament elongation on DNA with secondary structure. This first observation of diffusional movement of a protein on ssDNA introduces a new paradigm for how an SSB protein can be redistributed, while remaining tightly bound to ssDNA during recombination and repair processes. PMID:19820696

  3. Effects of sulfate on microcystin production, photosynthesis, and oxidative stress in Microcystis aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Gin, Karina Y H; He, Yiliang

    2016-02-01

    Increasing sulfate in freshwater systems, caused by human activities and climate change, may have negative effects on aquatic organisms. Microcystis aeruginosa (M. aeruginosa) is both a major primary producer and a common toxic cyanobacterium, playing an important role in the aquatic environment. This study first investigated the effects of sulfate on M. aeruginosa. The experiment presented here aims at analyzing the effects of sulfate on physiological indices, molecular levels, and its influencing mechanism. The results of our experiment showed that sulfate (at 40, 80, and 300 mg L(-1)) inhibited M. aeruginosa growth, increased both intracellular and extracellular toxin contents, and enhanced the mcyD transcript level. Sulfate inhibited the photosynthesis of M. aeruginosa, based on the decrease in pigment content and the down-regulation of photosynthesis-related genes after sulfate exposure. Furthermore, sulfate decreased the maximum electron transport rate, causing the cell to accumulate surplus electrons and form reactive oxygen species (ROS). Sulfate also increased the malondialdehyde (MDA) content, which showed that sulfate damaged the cytomembrane. This damage contributed to the release of intracellular toxin to the culture medium. Although sulfate increased superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities, expression of sod, and total antioxidant capacity in M. aeruginosa, it still overwhelmed the antioxidant system since the ROS level simultaneously increased, and finally caused oxidative stress. Our results indicate that sulfate has direct effects on M. aeruginosa, inhibits photosynthesis, causes oxidative stress, increases toxin production, and affects the related genes expression in M. aeruginosa. PMID:26490939

  4. Strains of the Harmful Cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa Differ in Gene Expression and Activity of Inorganic Carbon Uptake Systems at Elevated CO2 Levels.

    PubMed

    Sandrini, Giovanni; Jakupovic, Dennis; Matthijs, Hans C P; Huisman, Jef

    2015-11-01

    Cyanobacteria are generally assumed to be effective competitors at low CO2 levels because of their efficient CO2-concentrating mechanism (CCM), and yet how bloom-forming cyanobacteria respond to rising CO2 concentrations is less clear. Here, we investigate changes in CCM gene expression at ambient CO2 (400 ppm) and elevated CO2 (1,100 ppm) in six strains of the harmful cyanobacterium Microcystis. All strains downregulated cmpA encoding the high-affinity bicarbonate uptake system BCT1, whereas both the low- and high-affinity CO2 uptake genes were expressed constitutively. Four strains downregulated the bicarbonate uptake genes bicA and/or sbtA, whereas two strains showed constitutive expression of the bicA-sbtA operon. In one of the latter strains, a transposon insert in bicA caused low bicA and sbtA transcript levels, which made this strain solely dependent on BCT1 for bicarbonate uptake. Activity measurements of the inorganic carbon (Ci) uptake systems confirmed the CCM gene expression results. Interestingly, genes encoding the RuBisCO enzyme, structural carboxysome components, and carbonic anhydrases were not regulated. Hence, Microcystis mainly regulates the initial uptake of inorganic carbon, which might be an effective strategy for a species experiencing strongly fluctuating Ci concentrations. Our results show that CCM gene regulation of Microcystis varies among strains. The observed genetic and phenotypic variation in CCM responses may offer an important template for natural selection, leading to major changes in the genetic composition of harmful cyanobacterial blooms at elevated CO2. PMID:26319871

  5. Strains of the Harmful Cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa Differ in Gene Expression and Activity of Inorganic Carbon Uptake Systems at Elevated CO2 Levels

    PubMed Central

    Sandrini, Giovanni; Jakupovic, Dennis; Matthijs, Hans C. P.

    2015-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are generally assumed to be effective competitors at low CO2 levels because of their efficient CO2-concentrating mechanism (CCM), and yet how bloom-forming cyanobacteria respond to rising CO2 concentrations is less clear. Here, we investigate changes in CCM gene expression at ambient CO2 (400 ppm) and elevated CO2 (1,100 ppm) in six strains of the harmful cyanobacterium Microcystis. All strains downregulated cmpA encoding the high-affinity bicarbonate uptake system BCT1, whereas both the low- and high-affinity CO2 uptake genes were expressed constitutively. Four strains downregulated the bicarbonate uptake genes bicA and/or sbtA, whereas two strains showed constitutive expression of the bicA-sbtA operon. In one of the latter strains, a transposon insert in bicA caused low bicA and sbtA transcript levels, which made this strain solely dependent on BCT1 for bicarbonate uptake. Activity measurements of the inorganic carbon (Ci) uptake systems confirmed the CCM gene expression results. Interestingly, genes encoding the RuBisCO enzyme, structural carboxysome components, and carbonic anhydrases were not regulated. Hence, Microcystis mainly regulates the initial uptake of inorganic carbon, which might be an effective strategy for a species experiencing strongly fluctuating Ci concentrations. Our results show that CCM gene regulation of Microcystis varies among strains. The observed genetic and phenotypic variation in CCM responses may offer an important template for natural selection, leading to major changes in the genetic composition of harmful cyanobacterial blooms at elevated CO2. PMID:26319871

  6. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa extracellular secondary metabolite, Paerucumarin, chelates iron and is not localized to extracellular membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Qaisar, Uzma; Kruczek, Cassandra J; Azeem, Muhammed; Javaid, Nasir; Colmer-Hamood, Jane A; Hamood, Abdul N

    2016-08-01

    Proteins encoded by the Pseudomonas aeruginosa pvcA-D operon synthesize a novel isonitrile functionalized cumarin termed paerucumarin. The pvcA-D operon enhances the expression of the P. aeruginosa fimbrial chaperone/usher pathway (cup) genes and this effect is mediated through paerucumarin. Whether pvcA-D and/or paerucumarin affect the expression of other P. aeruginosa genes is not known. In this study, we examined the effect of a mutation in pvcA-D operon the global transcriptome of the P. aeruginosa strain PAO1-UW. The mutation reduced the expression of several ironcontrolled genes including pvdS, which is essential for the expression of the pyoverdine genes. Additional transcriptional studies showed that the pvcA-D operon is not regulated by iron. Exogenously added paerucumarin enhanced pyoverdine production and pvdS expression in PAO1-UW. Iron-chelation experiments revealed that purified paerucumarin chelates iron. However, exogenously added paerucumarin significantly reduced the growth of a P. aeruginosa mutant defective in pyoverdine and pyochelin production. In contrast to other secondary metabolite, Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS), paerucumarin is not localized to the P. aeruginosa membrane vesicles. These results suggest that paerucumarin enhances the expression of iron-controlled genes by chelating iron within the P. aeruginosa extracellular environment. Although paerucumarin chelates iron, it does not function as a siderophore. Unlike PQS, paerucumarin is not associated with the P. aeruginosa cell envelope. PMID:27480638

  7. Lagooning of wastewaters favors dissemination of clinically relevant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Petit, Stéphanie M-C; Lavenir, Raphaël; Colinon-Dupuich, Céline; Boukerb, Amine M; Cholley, Pascal; Bertrand, Xavier; Freney, Jean; Doléans-Jordheim, Anne; Nazaret, Sylvie; Laurent, Frédéric; Cournoyer, Benoit

    2013-10-01

    The significance of wastewater treatment lagoons (WWTLs) as point sources of clinically relevant Pseudomonas aeruginosa that can disseminate through rural and peri-urban catchments was investigated. A panel of P. aeruginosa strains collected over three years from WWTLs and community-acquired infections was compared by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) DNA fingerprinting and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Forty-four distantly related PFGE profiles and four clonal complexes were found among the WWTL strains analyzed. Some genotypes were repeatedly detected from different parts of WWTLs, including the influent, suggesting an ability to migrate and persist over time. MLST showed all investigated lineages to match sequence types described in other countries and strains from major clinical clones such as PA14 of ST253 and "C" of ST17 were observed. Some of these genotypes matched isolates from community-acquired infections recorded in the WWTL geographic area. Most WWTL strains harbored the main P. aeruginosa virulence genes; 13% harbored exoU-encoded cytoxins, but on at least six different genomic islands, with some of these showing signs of genomic instability. P. aeruginosa appeared to be highly successful opportunistic colonizers of WWTLs. Lagooning of wastewaters was found to favor dissemination of clinically relevant P. aeruginosa among peri-urban watersheds. PMID:23792168

  8. Impact of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase on virulence factor production by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Jonathan B; Scoffield, Jessica; Woolnough, Jessica L; Silo-Suh, Laura

    2014-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa establishes life-long chronic infections in the cystic fibrosis (CF) lung by utilizing various adaptation strategies. Some of these strategies include altering metabolic pathways to utilize readily available nutrients present in the host environment. The airway sputum contains various host-derived nutrients that can be utilized by P. aeruginosa, including phosphatidylcholine, a major component of lung surfactant. Pseudomonas aeruginosa can degrade phosphatidylcholine to glycerol and fatty acids to increase the availability of usable carbon sources in the CF lung. In this study, we show that some CF-adapted P. aeruginosa isolates utilize glycerol more efficiently as a carbon source than nonadapted isolates. Furthermore, a mutation in a gene required for glycerol utilization impacts the production of several virulence factors in both acute and chronic isolates of P. aeruginosa. Taken together, the results suggest that interference with this metabolic pathway may have potential therapeutic benefits. PMID:25409940

  9. Non-covalent interactions between ATP and RecA DNA-repairing proteins: DFT and semiempirical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Jorge

    2015-03-01

    The role of Bacterial RecA in the structural maintenance of genomes and the genetic information they carry has been established. In particular, the RecA DNA-repairing protein from D. Radiodurans, a radiation-resistant bacteria, is crucial for the repair of double strand breaks (DSBs). We have performed semi-empirical free-energy calculations and QM/MM calculations to study their non-covalent interactions with ATP and ADP. Such studies provide insight into the mechanisms of ATP/ADP --> RecA energy transfer and, therefore, about specific functional uses of incoming energy for DNA repairing mechanisms. We present a detailed analysis of the non-covalent interactions which minimize the interaction Gibbs free energies leading to the most stable non-covalent binding sites. Van der Waal, hydrogen bonding and electrostatic interactions has been quantified which provides a detailed insight into the mechanisms of ATP-RecA interaction. Further, possible chemical interactions and functional roles of RecA proteins are explored based on the previously mentioned studies. Acknowledgements: Funded, in part, by DTRA award 106339 (JHR). Dr. Mark C. Palenik and Mrs. Lora Beard are gratefully acknowledged Supported in part by DTRA Award 106339.

  10. Characterisation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa related to bovine mastitis.

    PubMed

    Park, Hye Rim; Hong, Min Ki; Hwang, Sun Young; Park, Young Kyung; Kwon, Ka Hee; Yoon, Jang Won; Shin, Sook; Kim, Jae Hong; Park, Yong Ho

    2014-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the causative pathogens of bovine mastitis. Most P. aeruginosa strains possess the type III secretion system (TTSS), which may increase somatic cell counts (SCCs) in milk from mastitis-affected cows. Moreover, most of P. aeruginosa cells can form biofilms, thereby reducing antibiotic efficacy. In this study, the presence and effect of TTSS-related genotypes on increase of SCCs among 122 P. aeruginosa isolates obtained from raw milk samples from mastitis-affected cows and their antibiotic susceptibility at planktonic and biofilm status were investigated. Based on the presence of TTSS-related genes a total of 82.7% of the isolates were found to harbour exoU and/or exoS genes, including the invasive (exoU-/exoS+, 69.4%), cytotoxic (exoU+/exoS-, 8.3%) and cytotoxic/invasive strains (exoU+/ exoS+, 5.0%). Milk containing exoS-positive isolates had higher SCCs than those containing exoS-negative isolates. The majority of isolates showed gentamicin, amikacin, meropenem and ciprofloxacin susceptibility at planktonic status. However, the susceptibility was decreased at the biofilm status. Based on minimum biofilm eradication concentration (MBEC)/minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) ratios, the range of change in antibiotic susceptibility varied widely depending on the antibiotics (from ≥ 3.1-fold to ≥ 475.0-fold). In conclusion, most P. aeruginosa isolates studied here had a genotype related to increase in SCCs. The efficiency of antibiotic therapy against P. aeruginosa-related bovine mastitis could be improved by analysing both the MBEC and the MIC of isolates. PMID:24334080

  11. Ambroxol inhibits mucoid conversion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and contributes to the bactericidal activity of ciprofloxacin against mucoid P. aeruginosa biofilms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenlei; Yu, Jialin; He, Yu; Wang, Zhengli; Li, Fang

    2016-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen that can cause severe infections in immunocompromised individuals. Because it forms biofilms, which protect against host immune attack and increase resistance to conventional antibiotics, mucoid P. aeruginosa is nearly impossible to eradicate. Moreover, mucoid conversion of P. aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients leads to poor outcomes. This conversion is mainly due to mucA gene mutation, which is thought to be induced by polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and the reactive oxygen species they release. Ambroxol, a mucolytic agent with antioxidant characteristics, is used clinically, and this compound has recently been demonstrated to possess anti-biofilm properties. In this study, we found that ambroxol inhibits the H2 O2 -mediated conversion of P. aeruginosa from a non-mucoid to a mucoid phenotype, an effect that is due to its antioxidant property against H2 O2 . Furthermore, the bactericidal activity of ciprofloxacin against mucoid P. aeruginosa biofilms was increased in vitro when used in combination with ambroxol. PMID:27102839

  12. Draft genome sequence of blaVeb-1, blaoxa-10 producing multi-drug resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain VRFPA09 recovered from bloodstream infection.

    PubMed

    Murugan, Nandagopal; Malathi, Jambulingam; Umashankar, Vetrivel; Madhavan, Hajib NarahariRao

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) bacteremia causes significant mortality rate due to emergence of multidrug resistant (MDR) nosocomial infections. We report the draft genome sequence of P. aeruginosa strain VRFPA09, a human bloodstream isolate, phenotypically proven as MDR strain. Whole genome sequencing on VRFPA09, deciphered betalactamase encoding blav(eb-1) and bla(OXA-10) genes and multiple drug resistance, virulence factor encoding genes. PMID:26413042

  13. Preparation of plasmid DNA by gamma-irradiation of recA cells

    SciTech Connect

    Radford, A.J.; MacPhee, D.G.; Reanney, D.C.

    1983-11-01

    If recA bacteria are exposed to appropriate doses of gamma-irradiation, nondividing cells which can sustain the multiplication of ''small'' plasmids are produced. The gamma-irradiation technique has a number of advantages over other methods for preparing pure plasmid DNA: (1) there is little, if any, contamination of DNA preparations by chromosomal DNA owing to extensive degradation of the irradiated DNA by endogenous nucleases, (2) there is no need to introduce a uvr mutation to the host bacteria (there is when UV is used to inactivate the chromosome), (3) the method is extremely simple to work with since operations are not limited by considerations of volume and cell density, and (4) there is no need to transfer material from container to container. Yields of plasmid DNA obtained by the gamma-irradiation technique compare favorably with those obtained by other methods.

  14. Complete genome sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa lytic bacteriophage PA1O which resembles temperate bacteriophage D3112.

    PubMed

    Kim, Shukho; Rahman, Marzia; Kim, Jungmin

    2012-03-01

    A novel Pseudomonas aeruginosa lytic bacteriophage (phage), PA1Ø, was isolated, and its genome was sequenced completely. This phage is able to lyse not only P. aeruginosa but also Staphylococcus aureus. Genome analysis of PA1Ø showed that it is similar to a P. aeruginosa temperate phage, D3112, with the exception of the absence of a c repressor-encoding gene, which is known to play a critical role in the maintenance of the lysogenic state of D3112 in P. aeruginosa. PMID:22354942

  15. Multilocus Sequence Typing and Phylogenetic Analyses of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from the Ocean▿

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Nurul Huda; Ahsan, Mahbuba; Yoshizawa, Susumu; Hosoya, Shoichi; Yokota, Akira; Kogure, Kazuhiro

    2008-01-01

    Recent isolation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains from the open ocean and subsequent pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analyses indicate that these strains have a unique genotype (N. H. Khan, Y. Ishii, N. Kimata-Kino, H. Esaki, T. Nishino, M. Nishimura, and K. Kogure, Microb. Ecol. 53:173-186, 2007). We hypothesized that ocean P. aeruginosa strains have a unique phylogenetic position relative to other strains. The objective of this study was to clarify the intraspecies phylogenetic relationship between marine strains and other strains from various geographical locations. Considering the advantages of using databases, multilocus sequence typing (MLST) was chosen for the typing and discrimination of ocean P. aeruginosa strains. Seven housekeeping genes (acsA, aroE, guaA, mutL, nuoD, ppsA, and trpE) were analyzed, and the results were compared with data on the MLST website. These genes were also used for phylogenetic analysis of P. aeruginosa. Rooted and unrooted phylogenetic trees were generated for each gene locus and the concatenated gene fragments. MLST data showed that all the ocean strains were new. Trees constructed for individual and concatenated genes revealed that ocean P. aeruginosa strains have clusters distinct from those of other P. aeruginosa strains. These clusters roughly reflected the geographical locations of the isolates. These data support our previous findings that P. aeruginosa strains are present in the ocean. It can be concluded that the ocean P. aeruginosa strains have diverged from other isolates and form a distinct cluster based on MLST and phylogenetic analyses of seven housekeeping genes. PMID:18757570

  16. Role of RecA and the SOS Response in Thymineless Death in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Fonville, Natalie C.; Bates, David; Hastings, P. J.; Hanawalt, Philip C.; Rosenberg, Susan M.

    2010-01-01

    Thymineless death (TLD) is a classic and enigmatic phenomenon, documented in bacterial, yeast, and human cells, whereby cells lose viability rapidly when deprived of thymine. Despite its being the essential mode of action of important chemotherapeutic agents, and despite having been studied extensively for decades, the basic mechanisms of TLD have remained elusive. In Escherichia coli, several proteins involved in homologous recombination (HR) are required for TLD, however, surprisingly, RecA, the central HR protein and activator of the SOS DNA–damage response was reported not to be. We demonstrate that RecA and the SOS response are required for a substantial fraction of TLD. We show that some of the Rec proteins implicated previously promote TLD via facilitating activation of the SOS response and that, of the roughly 40 proteins upregulated by SOS, SulA, an SOS–inducible inhibitor of cell division, accounts for most or all of how SOS causes TLD. The data imply that much of TLD results from an irreversible cell-cycle checkpoint due to blocked cell division. FISH analyses of the DNA in cells undergoing TLD reveal blocked replication and apparent DNA loss with the region near the replication origin underrepresented initially and the region near the terminus lost later. Models implicating formation of single-strand DNA at blocked replication forks, a SulA-blocked cell cycle, and RecQ/RecJ-catalyzed DNA degradation and HR are discussed. The data predict the importance of DNA damage-response and HR networks to TLD and chemotherapy resistance in humans. PMID:20221259

  17. The bacterial replicative helicase DnaB evolved from a RecA duplication.

    PubMed

    Leipe, D D; Aravind, L; Grishin, N V; Koonin, E V

    2000-01-01

    The RecA/Rad51/DCM1 family of ATP-dependent recombinases plays a crucial role in genetic recombination and double-stranded DNA break repair in Archaea, Bacteria, and Eukaryota. DnaB is the replication fork helicase in all Bacteria. We show here that DnaB shares significant sequence similarity with RecA and Rad51/DMC1 and two other related families of ATPases, Sms and KaiC. The conserved region spans the entire ATP- and DNA-binding domain that consists of about 250 amino acid residues and includes 7 distinct motifs. Comparison with the three-dimensional structure of Escherichia coli RecA and phage T7 DnaB (gp4) reveals that the area of sequence conservation includes the central parallel beta-sheet and most of the connecting helices and loops as well as a smaller domain that consists of a amino-terminal helix and a carboxy-terminal beta-meander. Additionally, we show that animals, plants, and the malarial Plasmodium but not Saccharomyces cerevisiae encode a previously undetected DnaB homolog that might function in the mitochondria. The DnaB homolog from Arabidopsis also contains a DnaG-primase domain and the DnaB homolog from the nematode seems to contain an inactivated version of the primase. This domain organization is reminiscent of bacteriophage primases-helicases and suggests that DnaB might have been horizontally introduced into the nuclear eukaryotic genome via a phage vector. We hypothesize that DnaB originated from a duplication of a RecA-like ancestor after the divergence of the bacteria from Archaea and eukaryotes, which indicates that the replication fork helicases in Bacteria and Archaea/Eukaryota have evolved independently. PMID:10645945

  18. Diverse nucleotide compositions and sequence fluctuation in Rubisco protein genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holden, Todd; Dehipawala, S.; Cheung, E.; Bienaime, R.; Ye, J.; Tremberger, G., Jr.; Schneider, P.; Lieberman, D.; Cheung, T.

    2011-10-01

    The Rubisco protein-enzyme is arguably the most abundance protein on Earth. The biology dogma of transcription and translation necessitates the study of the Rubisco genes and Rubisco-like genes in various species. Stronger correlation of fractal dimension of the atomic number fluctuation along a DNA sequence with Shannon entropy has been observed in the studied Rubisco-like gene sequences, suggesting a more diverse evolutionary pressure and constraints in the Rubisco sequences. The strategy of using metal for structural stabilization appears to be an ancient mechanism, with data from the porphobilinogen deaminase gene in Capsaspora owczarzaki and Monosiga brevicollis. Using the chi-square distance probability, our analysis supports the conjecture that the more ancient Rubisco-like sequence in Microcystis aeruginosa would have experienced very different evolutionary pressure and bio-chemical constraint as compared to Bordetella bronchiseptica, the two microbes occupying either end of the correlation graph. Our exploratory study would indicate that high fractal dimension Rubisco sequence would support high carbon dioxide rate via the Michaelis- Menten coefficient; with implication for the control of the whooping cough pathogen Bordetella bronchiseptica, a microbe containing a high fractal dimension Rubisco-like sequence (2.07). Using the internal comparison of chi-square distance probability for 16S rRNA (~ E-22) versus radiation repair Rec-A gene (~ E-05) in high GC content Deinococcus radiodurans, our analysis supports the conjecture that high GC content microbes containing Rubisco-like sequence are likely to include an extra-terrestrial origin, relative to Deinococcus radiodurans. Similar photosynthesis process that could utilize host star radiation would not compete with radiation resistant process from the biology dogma perspective in environments such as Mars and exoplanets.

  19. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing signal molecule N-(3-oxododecanoyl) homoserine lactone enhances keratinocyte migration and induces Mmp13 gene expression in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Paes, Camila

    2012-10-19

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An evidence of the positive effect of AHL on epithelialization process is provided. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AHL enhances keratinocyte's ability to migrate in an in vitro scratch wound model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AHL induces the expression of Mmp13. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Topical application of AHL represents a possible strategy to treat chronic wounds. -- Abstract: Re-epithelialization is an essential step of wound healing involving three overlapping keratinocyte functions: migration, proliferation and differentiation. While quorum sensing (QS) is a cell density-dependent signaling system that enables bacteria to regulate the expression of certain genes, the QS molecule N-(3-oxododecanoyl) homoserine lactone (AHL) exerts effects also on mammalian cells in a process called inter-kingdom signaling. Recent studies have shown that AHL improves epithelialization in in vivo wound healing models but detailed understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms are needed. The present study focused on the AHL as a candidate reagent to improve wound healing through direct modulation of keratinocyte's activity in the re-epithelialization process. Results indicated that AHL enhances the keratinocyte's ability to migrate in an in vitro scratch wound healing model probably due to the high Mmp13 gene expression analysis after AHL treatment that was revealed by real-time RT-PCR. Inhibition of activator protein 1 (AP-1) signaling pathway completely prevented the migration of keratinocytes, and also resulted in a diminished Mmp13 gene expression, suggesting that AP-1 might be essential in the AHL-induced migration. Taken together, these results imply that AHL is a promising candidate molecule to improve re-epithelialization through the induction of migration of keratinocytes. Further investigation is needed to clarify the mechanism of action and molecular pathway of AHL on the keratinocyte migration process.

  20. Candida albicans Inhibits Pseudomonas aeruginosa Virulence through Suppression of Pyochelin and Pyoverdine Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Medina, Eduardo; Fan, Di; Coughlin, Laura A.; Ho, Evi X.; Lamont, Iain L.; Reimmann, Cornelia; Hooper, Lora V.; Koh, Andrew Y.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial-fungal interactions have important physiologic and medical ramifications, but the mechanisms of these interactions are poorly understood. The gut is host to trillions of microorganisms, and bacterial-fungal interactions are likely to be important. Using a neutropenic mouse model of microbial gastrointestinal colonization and dissemination, we show that the fungus Candida albicans inhibits the virulence of the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa by inhibiting P. aeruginosa pyochelin and pyoverdine gene expression, which plays a critical role in iron acquisition and virulence. Accordingly, deletion of both P. aeruginosa pyochelin and pyoverdine genes attenuates P. aeruginosa virulence. Heat-killed C. albicans has no effect on P. aeruginosa, whereas C. albicans secreted proteins directly suppress P. aeruginosa pyoverdine and pyochelin expression and inhibit P. aeruginosa virulence in mice. Interestingly, suppression or deletion of pyochelin and pyoverdine genes has no effect on P. aeruginosa’s ability to colonize the GI tract but does decrease P. aeruginosa’s cytotoxic effect on cultured colonocytes. Finally, oral iron supplementation restores P. aeruginosa virulence in P. aeruginosa and C. albicans colonized mice. Together, our findings provide insight into how a bacterial-fungal interaction can modulate bacterial virulence in the intestine. Previously described bacterial-fungal antagonistic interactions have focused on growth inhibition or colonization inhibition/modulation, yet here we describe a novel observation of fungal-inhibition of bacterial effectors critical for virulence but not important for colonization. These findings validate the use of a mammalian model system to explore the complexities of polymicrobial, polykingdom infections in order to identify new therapeutic targets for preventing microbial disease. PMID:26313907

  1. MexXY multidrug efflux system of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Morita, Yuji; Tomida, Junko; Kawamura, Yoshiaki

    2012-01-01

    Anti-pseudomonas aminoglycosides, such as amikacin and tobramycin, are used in the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections. However, their use is linked to the development of resistance. During the last decade, the MexXY multidrug efflux system has been comprehensively studied, and numerous reports of laboratory and clinical isolates have been published. This system has been increasingly recognized as one of the primary determinants of aminoglycoside resistance in P. aeruginosa. In P. aeruginosa cystic fibrosis isolates, upregulation of the pump is considered the most common mechanism of aminoglycoside resistance. Non-fermentative Gram-negative pathogens possessing very close MexXY orthologs such as Achromobacter xylosoxidans and various Burkholderia species (e.g., Burkholderia pseudomallei and B. cepacia complexes), but not B. gladioli, are intrinsically resistant to aminoglycosides. Here, we summarize the properties (e.g., discovery, mechanism, gene expression, clinical significance) of the P. aeruginosa MexXY pump and other aminoglycoside efflux pumps such as AcrD of Escherichia coli, AmrAB-OprA of B. pseudomallei, and AdeABC of Acinetobacter baumannii. MexXY inducibility of the PA5471 gene product, which is dependent on ribosome inhibition or oxidative stress, is noteworthy. Moreover, the discovery of the cognate outer membrane component (OprA) of MexXY in the multidrug-resistant clinical isolate PA7, serotype O12 deserves special attention. PMID:23233851

  2. Pseudomonas aeruginosa uses multiple pathways to acquire iron during chronic infection in cystic fibrosis lungs.

    PubMed

    Konings, Anna F; Martin, Lois W; Sharples, Katrina J; Roddam, Louise F; Latham, Roger; Reid, David W; Lamont, Iain L

    2013-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa chronically infects the lungs of more than 80% of adult patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and is a major contributor to the progression of disease pathology. P. aeruginosa requires iron for growth and has multiple iron uptake systems that have been studied in bacteria grown in laboratory culture. The purpose of this research was to determine which of these are active during infection in CF. RNA was extracted from 149 sputum samples obtained from 23 CF patients. Reverse transcription-quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) was used to measure the expression of P. aeruginosa genes encoding transport systems for the siderophores pyoverdine and pyochelin, for heme, and for ferrous ions. Expression of P. aeruginosa genes could be quantified in 89% of the sputum samples. Expression of genes associated with siderophore-mediated iron uptake was detected in most samples but was at low levels in some samples, indicating that other iron uptake mechanisms are active. Expression of genes encoding heme transport systems was also detected in most samples, indicating that heme uptake occurs during infection in CF. feoB expression was detected in all sputum samples, implying an important role for ferrous ion uptake by P. aeruginosa in CF. Our data show that multiple P. aeruginosa iron uptake mechanisms are active in chronic CF infection and that RT-qPCR of RNA extracted from sputum provides a powerful tool for investigating bacterial physiology during infection in CF. PMID:23690396

  3. Differentiation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa pili based on sequence and B-cell epitope analyses.

    PubMed Central

    Castric, P A; Deal, C D

    1994-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences of three previously undescribed Pseudomonas aeruginosa pilin structural genes are presented. Comparisons of deduced pilin primary structure and flanking DNA sequence allowed placement of these and six previously published sequences into one of two groups. Epitope mapping, using overlapping immobilized peptides representing the pilin primary structure, with antipilin monoclonal antibodies revealed several B-cell determinants grouped near the carboxyl terminus of P. aeruginosa 1244 pilin. One determinant was found to reside near the pilin constant region. These determinants were found associated with the pili of 31 of 95 P. aeruginosa clinical isolates. PMID:7507890

  4. Capsule production by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn, A.R.

    1984-01-01

    Mucoid strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, associated almost exclusively with chronic respiratory infections in patients with cystic fibrosis, possess a capsule composed of alginic acid similar to one produced by Azotobacter vinelandii. Recent reports have provided evidence that the biosynthetic pathway for alginate in P. aeruginosa may differ from the pathway proposed for A. vinelandii in that synthesis in P. aeruginosa may occur by way of the Entner-Doudoroff pathway. Incorporation of isotope from (6-/sup 14/C)glucose into alginate by both P. aueroginosa and A. vinelandii was 10-fold greater than that from either (1-/sup 14/C)/sup -/ or (2-/sup 14/C)glucose, indicating preferential utilization of the bottom half of the glucose molecule for alginate biosynthesis. These data strongly suggest that the Entner-Doudoroff pathway plays a major role in alginate synthesis in both P. aeruginosa and A. vinelandii. The enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism in mucoid strains of P. aeruginosa appear to be unchanged whether alignate is actively produced or not and activities do not differ significantly from nonmucoid strain PAO.

  5. Mechanisms responsible for the emergence of carbapenem resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Meletis, G; Exindari, M; Vavatsi, N; Sofianou, D; Diza, E

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) is an opportunistic pathogen associated with a range of nosocomial infections. This microorganism is noted for its intrinsic resistance to antibiotics and for its ability to acquire genes encoding resistance determinants. Among the beta-lactam antibiotics, carbapenems with antipseudomonal activity are important agents for the therapy of infections due to P. aeruginosa. The development of carbapenem resistance among P. aeruginosa strains is multifactorial. Plasmid or integron-mediated carbapenemases, increased expression of efflux systems, reduced porin expression and increased chromosomal cephalosporinase activity have all been defined as contributory factors. Phenotypic tests and molecular techniques are used for the characterization of the resistance determinants. The isolation of carbapenem resistant strains is alarming and requires the implementation of strict infection control measures in order to prevent the spread of carbapenemase encoding genes to unrelated clones or to other bacterial species. PMID:23935307

  6. Purification and properties of 2,3-dihydroxybiphenyl dioxygenase from polychlorinated biphenyl-degrading Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes and Pseudomonas aeruginosa carrying the cloned bphC gene

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa, K.; Arimura, N.

    1987-02-01

    2,3-Dihydroxybiphenyl dioxygenase, involved in biphenyl and polychlorinated biphenyl degradation, was purified from cell extracts of polychlorinated biphenyl-degrading Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes KF707 and Pseudomonas aeruginas PAO1161 carrying the cloned bphC gene (encoding 2,3-dihydroxybiphenyl dioxygenase). The purified enzyme contained ferrous iron as a prosthetic group. The specific activities decreased with the loss of ferrous iron from the enzyme, and the activity was restored by incubation with ferrous iron in the presence of cysteine. Addition of ferric iron caused the complete inactivation of the enzyme. The molecular weight was estimated to be 250,000. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed a single band with a molecular weight of 31,000, indicating that the enzyme consists of eight identical subunits. The enzyme was specific only for 2,3-dihydroxybiphenyl with a K/sub m/ value of 87 ..mu..M. No significant activity was observed for 3,4-dihydroxybiphenyl, catechol, or 3-methyl- and 4-methylcatechol. The molecular weight, subunit structure, ferrous iron requirement, and NH/sub 2/-terminal sequence (starting with serine up to 12 residues) were the same between the two enzymes obtained from KF707 and PAO1161 (bphC).

  7. A Long-Chain Flavodoxin Protects Pseudomonas aeruginosa from Oxidative Stress and Host Bacterial Clearance

    PubMed Central

    Moyano, Alejandro J.; Krapp, Adriana R.; Mondotte, Juan A.; Bocco, José L.; Saleh, Maria-Carla; Carrillo, Néstor; Smania, Andrea M.

    2014-01-01

    Long-chain flavodoxins, ubiquitous electron shuttles containing flavin mononucleotide (FMN) as prosthetic group, play an important protective role against reactive oxygen species (ROS) in various microorganisms. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen which frequently has to face ROS toxicity in the environment as well as within the host. We identified a single ORF, hereafter referred to as fldP (for flavodoxin from P . aeruginosa), displaying the highest similarity in length, sequence identity and predicted secondary structure with typical long-chain flavodoxins. The gene was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant product (FldP) could bind FMN and exhibited flavodoxin activity in vitro. Expression of fldP in P. aeruginosa was induced by oxidative stress conditions through an OxyR-independent mechanism, and an fldP-null mutant accumulated higher intracellular ROS levels and exhibited decreased tolerance to H2O2 toxicity compared to wild-type siblings. The mutant phenotype could be complemented by expression of a cyanobacterial flavodoxin. Overexpression of FldP in a mutT-deficient P. aeruginosa strain decreased H2O2-induced cell death and the hypermutability caused by DNA oxidative damage. FldP contributed to the survival of P. aeruginosa within cultured mammalian macrophages and in infected Drosophila melanogaster, which led in turn to accelerated death of the flies. Interestingly, the fldP gene is present in some but not all P. aeruginosa strains, constituting a component of the P. aeruginosa accessory genome. It is located in a genomic island as part of a self-regulated polycistronic operon containing a suite of stress-associated genes. The collected results indicate that the fldP gene encodes a long-chain flavodoxin, which protects the cell from oxidative stress, thereby expanding the capabilities of P. aeruginosa to thrive in hostile environments. PMID:24550745

  8. 3-indolylacetonitrile decreases Escherichia coli O157:H7 biofilm formation and Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin-Hyung; Cho, Moo Hwan; Lee, Jintae

    2011-01-01

    Intercellular signal indole and its derivative hydroxyindoles inhibit Escherichia coli biofilm and diminish Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence. However, indole and bacterial indole derivatives are unstable in the microbial community because they are quickly degraded by diverse bacterial oxygenases. Hence, this work sought to identify novel, non-toxic, stable and potent indole derivatives from plant sources for inhibiting the biofilm formation of E. coli O157:H7 and P. aeruginosa. Here, plant auxin 3-indolylacetonitrile (IAN) was found to inhibit the biofilm formation of both E. coli O157:H7 and P. aeruginosa without affecting its growth. IAN more effectively inhibited biofilms than indole for the two pathogenic bacteria. Additionally, IAN decreased the production of virulence factors including 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone (PQS), pyocyanin and pyoverdine in P. aeruginosa. DNA microarray analysis indicated that IAN repressed genes involved in curli formation and glycerol metabolism, whereas IAN induced indole-related genes and prophage genes in E. coli O157:H7. It appeared that IAN inhibited the biofilm formation of E. coli by reducing curli formation and inducing indole production. Also, corroborating phenotypic results of P. aeruginosa, whole-transcriptomic data showed that IAN repressed virulence-related genes and motility-related genes, while IAN induced several small molecule transport genes. Furthermore, unlike bacterial indole derivatives, plant-originated IAN was stable in the presence of either E. coli or P. aeruginosa. Additionally, indole-3-carboxyaldehyde was another natural biofilm inhibitor for both E. coli and P. aeruginosa. PMID:20649646

  9. Homologous pairing between single-stranded DNA immobilized on a nitrocellulose membrane and duplex DNA is specific for RecA activity in bacterial crude extract.

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, P; Corteggiani, E; Dutreix, M; Coppey, J; Lopez, B S

    1993-01-01

    Reaction between a circular single stranded and a linear double stranded DNA molecule (ssDNA and dsDNA) provides an efficient system to study recombination mediated by RecA protein. However, classical assays using reaction in solution require highly purified enzymes. This limits biochemical studies of mutant RecA proteins from Escherichia coli or of RecA proteins from other organisms. We describe here an assay that is specific for RecA activity even in bacterial crude extracts. In this assay, the ssDNA is bound to a nitrocellulose membrane, proteins are loaded on this membrane and it is then incubated with a labeled homologous dsDNA. Joint molecules are visualized by autoradiography. We have shown that, despite the reduced mobility of the DNA due to its binding to the membrane, RecA protein is able to promote formation of stable plectonemic joints, in a homology dependent manner. Fourteen other proteins involved in DNA metabolism were checked and did not produce a signal in our assay. Moreover, in Dot blot analysis as well as after native electrophoresis and electrotransfer on a ssDNA coated membrane, production of a signal was strictly dependent on the presence of active RecA protein in the bacterial crude extracts used. We named this assay Pairing On Membrane blot (POM blot). Images PMID:8367282

  10. Structure of a putative acetyltransferase (PA1377) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, Anna M.; Tata, Renée; Chauviac, François-Xavier; Sutton, Brian J.; Brown, Paul R.

    2008-05-01

    The crystal structure of an acetyltransferase encoded by the gene PA1377 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been determined at 2.25 Å resolution. Comparison with a related acetyltransferase revealed a structural difference in the active site that was taken to reflect a difference in substrate binding and/or specificity between the two enzymes. Gene PA1377 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa encodes a 177-amino-acid conserved hypothetical protein of unknown function. The structure of this protein (termed pitax) has been solved in space group I222 to 2.25 Å resolution. Pitax belongs to the GCN5-related N-acetyltransferase family and contains all four sequence motifs conserved among family members. The β-strand structure in one of these motifs (motif A) is disrupted, which is believed to affect binding of the substrate that accepts the acetyl group from acetyl-CoA.

  11. Correlated motion of protein subdomains and large-scale conformational flexibility of RecA protein filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Garmay; A, Shvetsov; D, Karelov; D, Lebedev; A, Radulescu; M, Petukhov; V, Isaev-Ivanov

    2012-02-01

    Based on X-ray crystallographic data available at Protein Data Bank, we have built molecular dynamics (MD) models of homologous recombinases RecA from E. coli and D. radiodurans. Functional form of RecA enzyme, which is known to be a long helical filament, was approximated by a trimer, simulated in periodic water box. The MD trajectories were analyzed in terms of large-scale conformational motions that could be detectable by neutron and X-ray scattering techniques. The analysis revealed that large-scale RecA monomer dynamics can be described in terms of relative motions of 7 subdomains. Motion of C-terminal domain was the major contributor to the overall dynamics of protein. Principal component analysis (PCA) of the MD trajectories in the atom coordinate space showed that rotation of C-domain is correlated with the conformational changes in the central domain and N-terminal domain, that forms the monomer-monomer interface. Thus, even though C-terminal domain is relatively far from the interface, its orientation is correlated with large-scale filament conformation. PCA of the trajectories in the main chain dihedral angle coordinate space implicates a co-existence of a several different large-scale conformations of the modeled trimer. In order to clarify the relationship of independent domain orientation with large-scale filament conformation, we have performed analysis of independent domain motion and its implications on the filament geometry.

  12. Recombinational branch migration by the RadA/Sms paralog of RecA in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Deani L; Lovett, Susan T

    2016-01-01

    RadA (also known as 'Sms') is a highly conserved protein, found in almost all eubacteria and plants, with sequence similarity to the RecA strand exchange protein and a role in homologous recombination. We investigate here the biochemical properties of the E. coli RadA protein and several mutant forms. RadA is a DNA-dependent ATPase, a DNA-binding protein and can stimulate the branch migration phase of RecA-mediated strand transfer reactions. RadA cannot mediate synaptic pairing between homologous DNA molecules but can drive branch migration to extend the region of heteroduplex DNA, even without RecA. Unlike other branch migration factors RecG and RuvAB, RadA stimulates branch migration within the context of the RecA filament, in the direction of RecA-mediated strand exchange. We propose that RadA-mediated branch migration aids recombination by allowing the 3’ invading strand to be incorporated into heteroduplex DNA and to be extended by DNA polymerases. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10807.001 PMID:26845522

  13. Enhanced Clearance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Gamma.

    PubMed

    Bedi, Brahmchetna; Yuan, Zhihong; Joo, Myungsoo; Zughaier, Susu M; Goldberg, Joanna B; Arbiser, Jack L; Hart, C Michael; Sadikot, Ruxana T

    2016-07-01

    The pathogenic profile of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is related to its ability to secrete a variety of virulence factors. Quorum sensing (QS) is a mechanism wherein small diffusible molecules, specifically acyl-homoserine lactones, are produced by P. aeruginosa to promote virulence. We show here that macrophage clearance of P. aeruginosa (PAO1) is enhanced by activation of the nuclear hormone receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ). Macrophages treated with a PPARγ agonist (pioglitazone) showed enhanced phagocytosis and bacterial killing of PAO1. It is known that PAO1 QS molecules are inactivated by PON-2. QS molecules are also known to inhibit activation of PPARγ by competitively binding PPARγ receptors. In accord with this observation, we found that infection of macrophages with PAO1 inhibited expression of PPARγ and PON-2. Mechanistically, we show that PPARγ induces macrophage paraoxonase 2 (PON-2), an enzyme that degrades QS molecules produced by P. aeruginosa Gene silencing studies confirmed that enhanced clearance of PAO1 in macrophages by PPARγ is PON-2 dependent. Further, we show that PPARγ agonists also enhance clearance of P. aeruginosa from lungs of mice infected with PAO1. Together, these data demonstrate that P. aeruginosa impairs the ability of host cells to mount an immune response by inhibiting PPARγ through secretion of QS molecules. These studies define a novel mechanism by which PPARγ contributes to the host immunoprotective effects during bacterial infection and suggest a role for PPARγ immunotherapy for P. aeruginosa infections. PMID:27091928

  14. Reduction of PCN biosynthesis by NO in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lei; Zhang, Yuying; Wang, Yan; Qiao, Xinhua; Zi, Jing; Chen, Chang; Wan, Yi

    2016-08-01

    Pyocyanin (PCN), a virulence factor synthesized by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, plays an important role during clinical infections. There is no study of the effect of nitric oxide (NO) on PCN biosynthesis. Here, the effect of NO on PCN levels in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PAO1, a common reference strain, was tested. The results showed that the NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) can significantly reduce PCN levels (82.5% reduction at 60μM SNP). Furthermore, the effect of endogenous NO on PCN was tested by constructing PAO1 nor (NO reductase gene) knockout mutants. Compared to the wild-type strain, the Δnor strain had a lower PCN (86% reduction in Δnor). To examine whether the results were universal with other P. aeruginosa strains, we collected 4 clinical strains from a hospital, tested their PCN levels after SNP treatment, and obtained similar results, i.e., PCN biosynthesis was inhibited by NO. These results suggest that NO treatment may be a new strategy to inhibit PCN biosynthesis and could provide novel insights into eliminating P. aeruginosa virulence as a clinical goal. PMID:26874276

  15. [Sodium houttuyfonate inhibits virulence related motility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa].

    PubMed

    Wu, Da-qiang; Huang, Wei-feng; Duan, Qiang-jun; Cheng, Hui-juan; Wang, Chang-zhong

    2015-04-01

    Sodium houttuyfonate (SH) is a derivative of effective component of a Chinese material medica, Houttuynia cordata, which is applied in anti-infection of microorganism. But, the antimicrobial mechanisms of SH still remain unclear. Here, we firstly discovered that SH effectively inhibits the three types of virulence related motility of.Pseudomonas aeruginosa, i.e., swimming, twitching and swarming. The plate assay results showed that the inhibitory action of SH against swimming and twitching in 24 h and swarming in 48 h is dose-dependent; and bacteria nearly lost all of the motile activities under the concentration of 1 x minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) (512 mg x L(-1) same as azithromycin positive group (1 x MIC, 16 mg x L(-1)). Furthermore, we found that the expression of structural gene flgB and pilG is down-regulated by SH, which implies that inhibitory mechanism of SH against motility of P. aeruginosa may be due to the inhibition of flagella and pili bioformation of P. aeruginosa by SR Therefore, our presented results firstly demonstrate that SH effectively inhibits the motility activities of P. aeruginosa, and suggest that SH could be a promising antipseudomonas agents in clinic. PMID:26281603

  16. PcrA helicase dismantles RecA filaments by reeling in DNA in uniform steps

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jeehae; Myong, Sua; Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Yu, Jin; Lohman, Timothy M.; Ha, Taekjip

    2010-01-01

    Translocation of helicase-like proteins on nucleic acids underlies key cellular functions. However, it is still unclear how translocation can drive removal of DNA bound proteins, and basic properties like the elementary step size remain controversial. Using single molecule fluorescence analysis on a prototypical superfamily 1 helicase, Bacillus stearothermophilus PcrA, we discovered that PcrA preferentially translocates on the DNA lagging strand instead of unwinding the template duplex. PcrA anchors itself to the template duplex using the 2B subdomain and reels in the lagging strand, extruding a single stranded loop. Static disorder limited previous ensemble studies of PcrA stepping mechanism. Here, highly repetitive looping revealed that PcrA translocates in uniform steps of 1 nt. This reeling-in activity requires the open conformation of PcrA and can rapidly dismantle a preformed RecA filament even at low PcrA concentrations suggesting a mode of action for eliminating potentially deleterious recombination intermediates. PMID:20723756

  17. PcrA helicase dismantles RecA filaments by reeling in DNA in uniform steps.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeehae; Myong, Sua; Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Lee, Kyung Suk; Yu, Jin; Lohman, Timothy M; Ha, Taekjip

    2010-08-20

    Translocation of helicase-like proteins on nucleic acids underlies key cellular functions. However, it is still unclear how translocation can drive removal of DNA-bound proteins, and basic properties like the elementary step size remain controversial. Using single-molecule fluorescence analysis on a prototypical superfamily 1 helicase, Bacillus stearothermophilus PcrA, we discovered that PcrA preferentially translocates on the DNA lagging strand instead of unwinding the template duplex. PcrA anchors itself to the template duplex using the 2B subdomain and reels in the lagging strand, extruding a single-stranded loop. Static disorder limited previous ensemble studies of a PcrA stepping mechanism. Here, highly repetitive looping revealed that PcrA translocates in uniform steps of 1 nt. This reeling-in activity requires the open conformation of PcrA and can rapidly dismantle a preformed RecA filament even at low PcrA concentrations, suggesting a mode of action for eliminating potentially deleterious recombination intermediates. PMID:20723756

  18. Identification of Novel Genomic Islands in Liverpool Epidemic Strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Using Segmentation and Clustering.

    PubMed

    Jani, Mehul; Mathee, Kalai; Azad, Rajeev K

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen implicated in a myriad of infections and a leading pathogen responsible for mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Horizontal transfers of genes among the microorganisms living within CF patients have led to highly virulent and multi-drug resistant strains such as the Liverpool epidemic strain of P. aeruginosa, namely the LESB58 strain that has the propensity to acquire virulence and antibiotic resistance genes. Often these genes are acquired in large clusters, referred to as "genomic islands (GIs)." To decipher GIs and understand their contributions to the evolution of virulence and antibiotic resistance in P. aeruginosa LESB58, we utilized a recursive segmentation and clustering procedure, presented here as a genome-mining tool, "GEMINI." GEMINI was validated on experimentally verified islands in the LESB58 strain before examining its potential to decipher novel islands. Of the 6062 genes in P. aeruginosa LESB58, 596 genes were identified to be resident on 20 GIs of which 12 have not been previously reported. Comparative genomics provided evidence in support of our novel predictions. Furthermore, GEMINI unraveled the mosaic structure of islands that are composed of segments of likely different evolutionary origins, and demonstrated its ability to identify potential strain biomarkers. These newly found islands likely have contributed to the hyper-virulence and multidrug resistance of the Liverpool epidemic strain of P. aeruginosa. PMID:27536294

  19. Identification of Novel Genomic Islands in Liverpool Epidemic Strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Using Segmentation and Clustering

    PubMed Central

    Jani, Mehul; Mathee, Kalai; Azad, Rajeev K.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen implicated in a myriad of infections and a leading pathogen responsible for mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Horizontal transfers of genes among the microorganisms living within CF patients have led to highly virulent and multi-drug resistant strains such as the Liverpool epidemic strain of P. aeruginosa, namely the LESB58 strain that has the propensity to acquire virulence and antibiotic resistance genes. Often these genes are acquired in large clusters, referred to as “genomic islands (GIs).” To decipher GIs and understand their contributions to the evolution of virulence and antibiotic resistance in P. aeruginosa LESB58, we utilized a recursive segmentation and clustering procedure, presented here as a genome-mining tool, “GEMINI.” GEMINI was validated on experimentally verified islands in the LESB58 strain before examining its potential to decipher novel islands. Of the 6062 genes in P. aeruginosa LESB58, 596 genes were identified to be resident on 20 GIs of which 12 have not been previously reported. Comparative genomics provided evidence in support of our novel predictions. Furthermore, GEMINI unraveled the mosaic structure of islands that are composed of segments of likely different evolutionary origins, and demonstrated its ability to identify potential strain biomarkers. These newly found islands likely have contributed to the hyper-virulence and multidrug resistance of the Liverpool epidemic strain of P. aeruginosa. PMID:27536294

  20. Nosocomial outbreak of OXA-18-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Kalai Blagui, S; Achour, W; Abbassi, M S; Bejaoui, M; Abdeladhim, A; Ben Hassen, A

    2007-08-01

    Following systematic screening for ceftazidime-resistant (CAZ-R) Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 24 isolates producing extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) were recovered during a 24-month period at the National Bone Marrow Transplant Centre of Tunisia. These isolates were from seven immunocompromised patients and from environmental swabs. ESBLs inhibited by clavulanic acid were detected by double-disk diffusion tests. Isoelectric focusing revealed that these isolates produced two to four beta-lactamases with pIs of 5.5, 6.1, 6.4, 7.6 or 8.2, and PCR detected the presence of bla(OXA-18), bla(SHV) and bla(TEM) genes in 24, 21 and two isolates, respectively. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis defined two dominant genotypic groups: group A (16 isolates) and group B (four isolates). Sequencing of PCR products from representative isolates identified the bla(OXA-18) gene and revealed nucleotide sequences belonging to the bla(SHV-1) and bla(TEM-1) genes. Isolates producing OXA-18 belonged to genomic group A and were isolated from four immunocompromised patients in the haematology and graft units, and from two wash-basins in the graft unit. No immunocompromised patient harboured the clonal epidemic strain upon admission. This is the first report of the OXA-18-type ESBL in P. aeruginosa in Tunisia, and the first description of an outbreak caused by an OXA-18-producing strain of P. aeruginosa. PMID:17610599

  1. Mechanism of azithromycin inhibition of HSL synthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Jianming; Zhang, Ni; Huang, Bin; Cai, Renxin; Wu, Binning; E, Shunmei; Fang, Chengcai; Chen, Cha

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen and a leading cause of nosocomial infections. Unfortunately, P. aeruginosa has low antibiotic susceptibility due to several chromosomally encoded antibiotic resistance genes. Hence, we carried out mechanistic studies to determine how azithromycin affects quorum sensing and virulence in P. aeruginosa. lasI and rhlI single and double mutants were constructed. We then undertook a quantitative approach to determine the optimal concentration of azithromycin and culture time that can affect the expression of HSLs. Furthermore, based on the above results, the effect on quorum sensing was analyzed at a transcriptional level. It was found that 2 μg/mL azithromycin caused a 79% decrease in 3-oxo-C12-HSL secretion during cultivation, while C4-HSL secretion was strongly repressed in the early stages. Azithromycin acts on ribosomes; to determine whether this can elicit alternative modes of gene expression, transcriptional regulation of representative virulence genes was analyzed. We propose a new relationship for lasI and rhlI: lasI acts as a cell density sensor, and rhlI functions as a fine-tuning mechanism for coordination between different quorum sensing systems. PMID:27075730

  2. Mechanism of azithromycin inhibition of HSL synthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Jianming; Zhang, Ni; Huang, Bin; Cai, Renxin; Wu, Binning; E, Shunmei; Fang, Chengcai; Chen, Cha

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen and a leading cause of nosocomial infections. Unfortunately, P. aeruginosa has low antibiotic susceptibility due to several chromosomally encoded antibiotic resistance genes. Hence, we carried out mechanistic studies to determine how azithromycin affects quorum sensing and virulence in P. aeruginosa. lasI and rhlI single and double mutants were constructed. We then undertook a quantitative approach to determine the optimal concentration of azithromycin and culture time that can affect the expression of HSLs. Furthermore, based on the above results, the effect on quorum sensing was analyzed at a transcriptional level. It was found that 2 μg/mL azithromycin caused a 79% decrease in 3-oxo-C12-HSL secretion during cultivation, while C4-HSL secretion was strongly repressed in the early stages. Azithromycin acts on ribosomes; to determine whether this can elicit alternative modes of gene expression, transcriptional regulation of representative virulence genes was analyzed. We propose a new relationship for lasI and rhlI: lasI acts as a cell density sensor, and rhlI functions as a fine-tuning mechanism for coordination between different quorum sensing systems. PMID:27075730

  3. Indole and 7-hydroxyindole diminish Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jintae; Attila, Can; Cirillo, Suat L G; Cirillo, Jeffrey D; Wood, Thomas K

    2009-01-01

    Indole is an extracellular biofilm signal for Escherichia coli, and many bacterial oxygenases readily convert indole to various oxidized compounds including 7-hydroxyindole (7HI). Here we investigate the impact of indole and 7HI on Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 virulence and quorum sensing (QS)-regulated phenotypes; this strain does not synthesize these compounds but degrades them rapidly. Indole and 7HI both altered extensively gene expression in a manner opposite that of acylhomoserine lactones; the most repressed genes encode the mexGHI-opmD multidrug efflux pump and genes involved in the synthesis of QS-regulated virulence factors including pyocyanin (phz operon), 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone (PQS) signal (pqs operon), pyochelin (pch operon) and pyoverdine (pvd operon). Corroborating these microarray results, indole and 7HI decreased production of pyocyanin, rhamnolipid, PQS and pyoverdine and enhanced antibiotic resistance. In addition, indole affected the utilization of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus, and 7HI abolished swarming motility. Furthermore, 7HI reduced pulmonary colonization of P. aeruginosa in guinea pigs and increased clearance in lungs. Hence, indole-related compounds have potential as a novel antivirulence approach for the recalcitrant pathogen P. aeruginosa. PMID:21261883

  4. Distinct Pathogenesis and Host Responses during Infection of C. elegans by P. aeruginosa and S. aureus

    PubMed Central

    Irazoqui, Javier E.; Troemel, Emily R.; Feinbaum, Rhonda L.; Luhachack, Lyly G.; Cezairliyan, Brent O.; Ausubel, Frederick M.

    2010-01-01

    The genetically tractable model host Caenorhabditis elegans provides a valuable tool to dissect host-microbe interactions in vivo. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus utilize virulence factors involved in human disease to infect and kill C. elegans. Despite much progress, virtually nothing is known regarding the cytopathology of infection and the proximate causes of nematode death. Using light and electron microscopy, we found that P. aeruginosa infection entails intestinal distention, accumulation of an unidentified extracellular matrix and P. aeruginosa-synthesized outer membrane vesicles in the gut lumen and on the apical surface of intestinal cells, the appearance of abnormal autophagosomes inside intestinal cells, and P. aeruginosa intracellular invasion of C. elegans. Importantly, heat-killed P. aeruginosa fails to elicit a significant host response, suggesting that the C. elegans response to P. aeruginosa is activated either by heat-labile signals or pathogen-induced damage. In contrast, S. aureus infection causes enterocyte effacement, intestinal epithelium destruction, and complete degradation of internal organs. S. aureus activates a strong transcriptional response in C. elegans intestinal epithelial cells, which aids host survival during infection and shares elements with human innate responses. The C. elegans genes induced in response to S. aureus are mostly distinct from those induced by P. aeruginosa. In contrast to P. aeruginosa, heat-killed S. aureus activates a similar response as live S. aureus, which appears to be independent of the single C. elegans Toll-Like Receptor (TLR) protein. These data suggest that the host response to S. aureus is possibly mediated by pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). Because our data suggest that neither the P. aeruginosa nor the S. aureus–triggered response requires canonical TLR signaling, they imply the existence of unidentified mechanisms for pathogen detection in C. elegans, with

  5. FvbA is required for vibriobactin utilization in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Elias, Sivan; Degtyar, Elena; Banin, Ehud

    2011-07-01

    Bacteria acquire iron through a highly specific mechanism involving iron-chelating molecules termed siderophores. The Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa can utilize siderophores produced by other micro-organisms to facilitate iron uptake. Here we show that a P. aeruginosa strain deficient in siderophore production can use the Vibrio cholerae siderophore vibriobactin as an iron source. In addition, we identified a P. aeruginosa gene, PA4156 (fvbA), encoding a protein highly homologous to the V. cholerae vibriobactin receptor (ViuA). A P. aeruginosa mutant in the two endogenous siderophores (pyoverdine and pyochelin) and in fvbA was unable to utilize vibriobactin as an iron source. Additionally, preliminary analyses revealed the involvement of vibriobactin, Fur protein and an IclR-type regulator, FvbR (PA4157), in fvbA regulation. PMID:21546589

  6. Inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Swarming Motility by 1-Naphthol and Other Bicyclic Compounds Bearing Hydroxyl Groups

    PubMed Central

    Oura, Hiromu; Tashiro, Yosuke; Toyofuku, Masanori; Ueda, Kousetsu; Kiyokawa, Tatsunori; Ito, Satoshi; Takahashi, Yurika; Lee, Seunguk; Nojiri, Hideaki; Nakajima-Kambe, Toshiaki; Uchiyama, Hiroo; Futamata, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Many bacteria convert bicyclic compounds, such as indole and naphthalene, to oxidized compounds, including hydroxyindoles and naphthols. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a ubiquitous bacterium that inhabits diverse environments, shows pathogenicity against animals, plants, and other microorganisms, and increasing evidence has shown that several bicyclic compounds alter the virulence-related phenotypes of P. aeruginosa. Here, we revealed that hydroxyindoles (4- and 5-hydroxyindoles) and naphthalene derivatives bearing hydroxyl groups specifically inhibit swarming motility but have minor effects on other motilities, including swimming and twitching, in P. aeruginosa. Further analyses using 1-naphthol showed that this effect is also associated with clinically isolated hyperswarming P. aeruginosa cells. Swarming motility is associated with the dispersion of cells from biofilms, and the addition of 1-naphthol maintained biofilm biomass without cell dispersion. We showed that this 1-naphthol-dependent swarming inhibition is independent of changes of rhamnolipid production and the intracellular level of signaling molecule cyclic-di-GMP (c-di-GMP). Transcriptome analyses revealed that 1-naphthol increases gene expression associated with multidrug efflux and represses gene expression associated with aerotaxis and with pyochelin, flagellar, and pilus synthesis. In the present study, we showed that several bicyclic compounds bearing hydroxyl groups inhibit the swarming motility of P. aeruginosa, and these results provide new insight into the chemical structures that inhibit the specific phenotypes of P. aeruginosa. PMID:25681177

  7. Inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa swarming motility by 1-naphthol and other bicyclic compounds bearing hydroxyl groups.

    PubMed

    Oura, Hiromu; Tashiro, Yosuke; Toyofuku, Masanori; Ueda, Kousetsu; Kiyokawa, Tatsunori; Ito, Satoshi; Takahashi, Yurika; Lee, Seunguk; Nojiri, Hideaki; Nakajima-Kambe, Toshiaki; Uchiyama, Hiroo; Futamata, Hiroyuki; Nomura, Nobuhiko

    2015-04-01

    Many bacteria convert bicyclic compounds, such as indole and naphthalene, to oxidized compounds, including hydroxyindoles and naphthols. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a ubiquitous bacterium that inhabits diverse environments, shows pathogenicity against animals, plants, and other microorganisms, and increasing evidence has shown that several bicyclic compounds alter the virulence-related phenotypes of P. aeruginosa. Here, we revealed that hydroxyindoles (4- and 5-hydroxyindoles) and naphthalene derivatives bearing hydroxyl groups specifically inhibit swarming motility but have minor effects on other motilities, including swimming and twitching, in P. aeruginosa. Further analyses using 1-naphthol showed that this effect is also associated with clinically isolated hyperswarming P. aeruginosa cells. Swarming motility is associated with the dispersion of cells from biofilms, and the addition of 1-naphthol maintained biofilm biomass without cell dispersion. We showed that this 1-naphthol-dependent swarming inhibition is independent of changes of rhamnolipid production and the intracellular level of signaling molecule cyclic-di-GMP (c-di-GMP). Transcriptome analyses revealed that 1-naphthol increases gene expression associated with multidrug efflux and represses gene expression associated with aerotaxis and with pyochelin, flagellar, and pilus synthesis. In the present study, we showed that several bicyclic compounds bearing hydroxyl groups inhibit the swarming motility of P. aeruginosa, and these results provide new insight into the chemical structures that inhibit the specific phenotypes of P. aeruginosa. PMID:25681177

  8. The ferrichrome receptor A as a new target for Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence attenuation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Keehoon; Lee, Kang-Mu; Go, Junhyeok; Ryu, Jae-Chan; Ryu, Ji-Hwan; Yoon, Sang Sun

    2016-06-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen, known to develop robust biofilms. Its biofilm development increases when antibiotics are presented at subminimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) for reasons that remain unclear. In order to identify genes that affect biofilm development under such a sublethal antibiotic stress condition, we screened a transposon (Tn) mutant library of PAO1, a prototype P. aeruginosa strain. Among ∼5000 mutants, a fiuA gene mutant was verified to form very defective biofilms in the presence of sub-MIC carbenicillin. The fiuA gene encodes ferrichrome receptor A, involved in the iron acquisition process. Of note, biofilm formation was not decreased in the ΔpchΔpvd mutant defective in the production of pyochelin and pyoverdine, two well-characterized P. aeruginosa siderophore molecules. Moreover, ΔfiuA, a non-polar fiuA deletion mutant, produced a significantly decreased level of elastase, a major virulence determinant. Mouse airway infection experiments revealed that the mutant expressed significantly less pathogenicity. Our results suggest that the fiuA gene has pleiotropic functions that affect P. aeruginosa biofilm development and virulence. The targeting of FiuA could enable the attenuation of P. aeruginosa virulence and may be suitable for the development of a drug that specifically controls the virulence of this important pathogen. PMID:27190289

  9. Characterization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutants with altered piliation.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, K; Lory, S

    1987-01-01

    The pilus-specific Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteriophage P04 was used to select spontaneous mutants of strain PAK which have altered piliation. The largest class of phage-resistant mutants synthesized the pilin polypeptide, but did not assemble pili. These mutants are likely to contain mutations in genes required for pilus assembly and not mutations in the pilin structural gene, as they could not be complemented by a normal copy of the pilin gene. In addition, two alterations in pilin gene transcription were found among the mutants--hyperpiliated mutants which overproduce pilin mRNA, and a mutant with temperature-sensitive pilin gene transcription. We also present a model for the regulation of pilin gene transcription by a feedback mechanism sensitive to the relative rates of pilus assembly and disassembly. Images PMID:2445731

  10. Cis-2-dodecenoic acid signal modulates virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa through interference with quorum sensing systems and T3SS

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cis-2-dodecenoic acid (BDSF) is well known for its important functions in intraspecies signaling in Burkholderia cenocepacia. Previous work has also established an important role of BDSF in interspecies and inter-kingdom communications. It was identified that BDSF modulates virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. However, how BDSF interferes with virulence of P. aeruginosa is still not clear. Results We report here that BDSF mediates the cross-talk between B. cenocepacia and P. aeruginosa through interference with quorum sensing (QS) systems and type III secretion system (T3SS) of P. aeruginosa. Bioassay results revealed that exogenous addition of BDSF not only reduced the transcriptional expression of the regulator encoding gene of QS systems, i.e., lasR, pqsR, and rhlR, but also simultaneously decreased the production of QS signals including 3-oxo-C12-HSL, Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS) and C4-HSL, consequently resulting in the down-regulation of biofilm formation and virulence factor production of P. aeruginosa. Furthermore, BDSF and some of its derivatives are also capable of inhibiting T3SS of P. aeruginosa at a micromolar level. Treatment with BDSF obviously reduced the virulence of P. aeruginosa in both HeLa cell and zebrafish infection models. Conclusions These results depict that BDSF modulates virulence of P. aeruginosa through interference with QS systems and T3SS. PMID:24134835

  11. PA3297 Counteracts Antimicrobial Effects of Azithromycin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Hao; Zhang, Lu; Weng, Yuding; Chen, Ronghao; Zhu, Feng; Jin, Yongxin; Cheng, Zhihui; Jin, Shouguang; Wu, Weihui

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes acute and chronic infections in human. Its increasing resistance to antibiotics requires alternative treatments that are more effective than available strategies. Among the alternatives is the unconventional usage of conventional antibiotics, of which the macrolide antibiotic azithromycin (AZM) provides a paradigmatic example. AZM therapy is associated with a small but consistent improvement in respiratory function of cystic fibrosis patients suffering from chronic P. aeruginosa infection. Besides immunomodulating activities, AZM represses bacterial genes involved in virulence, quorum sensing, biofilm formation, and motility, all of which are due to stalling of ribosome and depletion of cellular tRNA pool. However, how P. aeruginosa responds to and counteracts the effects of AZM remain elusive. Here, we found that deficiency of PA3297, a gene encoding a DEAH-box helicase, intensified AZM-mediated bacterial killing, suppression of pyocyanin production and swarming motility, and hypersusceptibility to hydrogen peroxide. We demonstrated that expression of PA3297 is induced by the interaction between AZM and ribosome. Importantly, mutation of PA3297 resulted in elevated levels of unprocessed 23S-5S rRNA in the presence of AZM, which might lead to increased susceptibility to AZM-mediated effects. Our results revealed one of the bacterial responses in counteracting the detrimental effects of AZM. PMID:27014238

  12. Mycofabricated biosilver nanoparticles interrupt Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing systems.

    PubMed

    Singh, Braj R; Singh, Brahma N; Singh, Akanksha; Khan, Wasi; Naqvi, Alim H; Singh, Harikesh B

    2015-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a chemical communication process that Pseudomonas aeruginosa uses to regulate virulence and biofilm formation. Disabling of QS is an emerging approach for combating its pathogenicity. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been widely applied as antimicrobial agents against human pathogenic bacteria and fungi, but not for the attenuation of bacterial QS. Here we mycofabricated AgNPs (mfAgNPs) using metabolites of soil fungus Rhizopus arrhizus BRS-07 and tested their effect on QS-regulated virulence and biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa. Transcriptional studies demonstrated that mfAgNPs reduced the levels of LasIR-RhlIR. Treatment of mfAgNPs inhibited biofilm formation, production of several virulence factors (e.g. LasA protease, LasB elastrase, pyocyanin, pyoverdin, pyochelin, rhamnolipid, and alginate) and reduced AHLs production. Further genes quantification analyses revealed that mfAgNPs significantly down-regulated QS-regulated genes, specifically those encoded to the secretion of virulence factors. The results clearly indicated the anti-virulence property of mfAgNPs by inhibiting P. aeruginosa QS signaling. PMID:26347993

  13. PA3297 Counteracts Antimicrobial Effects of Azithromycin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Tan, Hao; Zhang, Lu; Weng, Yuding; Chen, Ronghao; Zhu, Feng; Jin, Yongxin; Cheng, Zhihui; Jin, Shouguang; Wu, Weihui

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes acute and chronic infections in human. Its increasing resistance to antibiotics requires alternative treatments that are more effective than available strategies. Among the alternatives is the unconventional usage of conventional antibiotics, of which the macrolide antibiotic azithromycin (AZM) provides a paradigmatic example. AZM therapy is associated with a small but consistent improvement in respiratory function of cystic fibrosis patients suffering from chronic P. aeruginosa infection. Besides immunomodulating activities, AZM represses bacterial genes involved in virulence, quorum sensing, biofilm formation, and motility, all of which are due to stalling of ribosome and depletion of cellular tRNA pool. However, how P. aeruginosa responds to and counteracts the effects of AZM remain elusive. Here, we found that deficiency of PA3297, a gene encoding a DEAH-box helicase, intensified AZM-mediated bacterial killing, suppression of pyocyanin production and swarming motility, and hypersusceptibility to hydrogen peroxide. We demonstrated that expression of PA3297 is induced by the interaction between AZM and ribosome. Importantly, mutation of PA3297 resulted in elevated levels of unprocessed 23S-5S rRNA in the presence of AZM, which might lead to increased susceptibility to AZM-mediated effects. Our results revealed one of the bacterial responses in counteracting the detrimental effects of AZM. PMID:27014238

  14. Mycofabricated biosilver nanoparticles interrupt Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing systems

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Braj R.; Singh, Brahma N.; Singh, Akanksha; Khan, Wasi; Naqvi, Alim H.; Singh, Harikesh B.

    2015-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a chemical communication process that Pseudomonas aeruginosa uses to regulate virulence and biofilm formation. Disabling of QS is an emerging approach for combating its pathogenicity. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been widely applied as antimicrobial agents against human pathogenic bacteria and fungi, but not for the attenuation of bacterial QS. Here we mycofabricated AgNPs (mfAgNPs) using metabolites of soil fungus Rhizopus arrhizus BRS-07 and tested their effect on QS-regulated virulence and biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa. Transcriptional studies demonstrated that mfAgNPs reduced the levels of LasIR-RhlIR. Treatment of mfAgNPs inhibited biofilm formation, production of several virulence factors (e.g. LasA protease, LasB elastrase, pyocyanin, pyoverdin, pyochelin, rhamnolipid, and alginate) and reduced AHLs production. Further genes quantification analyses revealed that mfAgNPs significantly down-regulated QS-regulated genes, specifically those encoded to the secretion of virulence factors. The results clearly indicated the anti-virulence property of mfAgNPs by inhibiting P. aeruginosa QS signaling. PMID:26347993

  15. Tryptophan Inhibits Biofilm Formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Brandenburg, Kenneth S.; Rodriguez, Karien J.; McAnulty, Jonathan F.; Murphy, Christopher J.; Abbott, Nicholas L.; Schurr, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been implicated in the pathology of chronic wounds. Both the d and l isoforms of tryptophan inhibited P. aeruginosa biofilm formation on tissue culture plates, with an equimolar ratio of d and l isoforms producing the greatest inhibitory effect. Addition of d-/l-tryptophan to existing biofilms inhibited further biofilm growth and caused partial biofilm disassembly. Tryptophan significantly increased swimming motility, which may be responsible in part for diminished biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa. PMID:23318791

  16. Ionic Hydrogen Bonds and Lipid Packing Defects Determine the Binding Orientation and Insertion Depth of RecA on Multicomponent Lipid Bilayers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Leili; Rajendram, Manohary; Weibel, Douglas B; Yethiraj, Arun; Cui, Qiang

    2016-08-25

    We describe a computational and experimental approach for probing the binding properties of the RecA protein at the surface of anionic membranes. Fluorescence measurements indicate that RecA behaves differently when bound to phosphatidylglycerol (PG)- and cardiolipin (CL)-containing liposomes. We use a multistage computational protocol that integrates an implicit membrane/solvent model, the highly mobile mimetic membrane model, and the full atomistic membrane model to study how different anionic lipids perturb RecA binding to the membrane. With anionic lipids studied here, the binding interface involves three key regions: the N-terminal helix, the DNA binding loop L2, and the M-M7 region. The nature of binding involves both electrostatic interactions between cationic protein residues and lipid polar/charged groups and insertion of hydrophobic residues. The L2 loop contributes more to membrane insertion than the N-terminal helix. More subtle aspects of RecA-membrane interaction are influenced by specific properties of anionic lipids. Ionic hydrogen bonds between the carboxylate group in phosphatidylserine and several lysine residues in the C-terminal region of RecA stabilize the parallel (∥) binding orientation, which is not locally stable on PG- and CL-containing membranes despite similarity in the overall charge density. Lipid packing defects, which are more prevalent in the presence of conical lipids, are observed to enhance the insertion depth of hydrophobic motifs. The computational finding that RecA binds in a similar orientation to PG- and CL-containing membranes is consistent with the fact that PG alone is sufficient to induce RecA polar localization, although CL might be more effective because of its tighter binding to RecA. The different fluorescence behaviors of RecA upon binding to PG- and CL-containing liposomes is likely due to the different structures and flexibility of the C-terminal region of RecA when it binds to different anionic phospholipids

  17. Morphogenetic expression of Bacteroides nodosus fimbriae in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Mattick, J S; Bills, M M; Anderson, B J; Dalrymple, B; Mott, M R; Egerton, J R

    1987-01-01

    Type 4 fimbriae are found in a range of pathogenic bacteria, including Bacteroides nodosus, Moraxella bovis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The structural subunits of these fimbriae all contain a highly conserved hydrophobic amino-terminal sequence preceding a variable hydrophilic carboxy-terminal region. We show here that recombinant P. aeruginosa cells containing the B. nodosus fimbrial subunit gene under the control of a strong promoter (pL, from bacteriophage lambda) produced large amounts of fimbriae that were structurally and antigenically indistinguishable from those produced by B. nodosus. This was demonstrated by fimbrial isolation and purification, electrophoretic and Western transfer analyses, and immunogold labeling and electron microscopy. These results suggest that type 4 fimbriated bacteria use a common mechanism for fimbrial assembly and that the structural subunits are interchangeable, thereby providing a basis for the development of multivalent vaccines. Images PMID:2878919

  18. New Small Plasmid Harboring blaKPC-2 in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Galetti, Renata; Andrade, Leonardo Neves; Chandler, Michael; Varani, Alessandro de Mello; Darini, Ana Lúcia Costa

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the genetic context of blaKPC-2 in Pseudomonas aeruginosa sequence type 244 from Brazil. The blaKPC-2 gene was detected in a new small plasmid, pBH6. Complete sequencing revealed that pBH6 was 3,652 bp long and included the Tn3 resolvase and Tn3 inverted repeat (IR), a partial copy of ISKpn6, and a putative ori region but no rep genes. pBH6 replicated stably into Escherichia coli strain DH10B and P. aeruginosa strain PAO. PMID:26953192

  19. Emergence of Carbapenem-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii Clinical Isolates Collected from Some Libyan Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Mathlouthi, Najla; Areig, Zaynab; Al Bayssari, Charbel; Bakour, Sofiane; Ali El Salabi, Allaaeddin; Ben Gwierif, Salha; Zorgani, Abdulaziz A; Ben Slama, Karim; Chouchani, Chedly; Rolain, Jean-Marc

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the molecular mechanism of carbapenem resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolates recovered from Libyan hospitals between April 2013 and April 2014. In total, 49 strains (24 P. aeruginosa and 25 A. baumannii) were isolated, including 21 P. aeruginosa and 22 A. baumannii isolates (87.75%) resistant to imipenem (minimum inhibitory concentrations ≥16 μg/ml). The blaVIM-2 gene was detected in 19 P. aeruginosa isolates. All imipenem-resistant P. aeruginosa isolates showed the presence of OprD mutations. Acquired OXA-carbapenemase-encoding genes were present in all A. baumannii isolates: blaOXA-23 (n=19) and blaOXA-24 (n=3). Finally, a total of 13 and 17 different sequence types were assigned to the 21 P. aeruginosa and the 22 A. baumannii carbapenem-resistant isolates, respectively. This study is the first report describing imipenem-resistant P. aeruginosa and A. baumannii isolated from patients in Libya. We report the first case of co-occurrence of blaVIM-2 with oprD porin loss in identical isolates of P. aeruginosa in Libya and demonstrate that these oprD mutations can be used as a tool to study the clonality in P. aeruginosa isolates. We also report the first identification of multidrug-resistant A. baumannii isolates harboring blaOXA-23-like, blaOXA-24-like, and blaOXA-48-like genes in Libya. PMID:25587875

  20. Characterization of Toxin-Antitoxin (TA) Systems in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Clinical Isolates in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Savari, Mohammad; Rostami, Soodabeh; Ekrami, Alireza; Bahador, Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is among the most problematic hospital and community-acquired pathogens. Toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems are maintenance regulatory systems in bacteria and have recently been considered new targets for antimicrobial therapy. The prevalence and transcription of these systems in clinical isolates are still unknown. Objectives: The aim of this study was to characterize three types of TA systems (parDE, relBE, and higBA) among P. aeruginosa clinical isolates. Materials and Methods: We typed our clinical isolates by ERIC-PCR (enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus sequence-based polymerase chain reaction) and BOX-PCR. We then investigated 174 P. aeruginosa clinical isolates from three hospitals in Ahvaz, Iran, for the presence of TA system genes, and determined whether these systems were encoded on chromosomes or plasmids by amplification of the flanking regions. Results: Our results showed that in the 174 P. aeruginosa isolates, relBE and higBA were universal, but parDE was less prevalent. Both of the flanking regions of the parDE genes in all positive isolates were amplified. The flanking regions of nearly all relBE genes were amplified. Amplification was observed for the downstream sequence of every higBA locus, as well as for the region upstream of higBA, except in 14 strains. Conclusions: Based on the presence of TA systems in the majority of P. aeruginosa isolates, these could be used as a novel target for antimicrobial therapy. PMID:27099681

  1. Divergence of a strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa during an outbreak of ovine mastitis.

    PubMed

    Wright, Elli A; Di Lorenzo, Valeria; Trappetti, Claudia; Liciardi, Manuele; Orru, Germano; Viti, Carlo; Bronowski, Christina; Hall, Amanda J; Darby, Alistair C; Oggioni, Marco R; Winstanley, Craig

    2015-01-30

    Bacterial infections causing mastitis in sheep can result in severe economic losses for farmers. A large survey of milk samples from ewes with mastitis in Sardinia, Italy, indicated an increasing prevalence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections. It has been shown previously that during chronic, biofilm-associated infections P. aeruginosa populations diversify. We report the phenotypic and genomic characterisation of two clonal P. aeruginosa isolates (PSE305 and PSE306) from a mastitis infection outbreak, representing distinct colony morphology variants. In addition to pigment production, PSE305 and PSE306 differed in phenotypic characteristics including biofilm formation, utilisation of various carbon and nitrogen sources, twitching motility. We found higher levels of expression of genes associated with biofilm formation (pelB) and twitching motility (flgD) in PSE305, compared to the biofilm and twitching-defective PSE306. Comparative genomics analysis revealed single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and minor insertion/deletion variations between PSE305 and PSE306, including a SNP mutation in the pilP gene of PSE306. By introducing a wild-type pilP gene we were able to partially complement the defective twitching motility of PSE306. There were also three larger regions of difference between the two genomes, indicating genomic instability. Hence, we have demonstrated that P. aeruginosa population divergence can occur during an outbreak of mastitis, leading to significant variations in phenotype and genotype, and resembling the behaviour of P. aeruginosa during chronic biofilm-associated infections. PMID:25475851

  2. Single-Molecule Imaging of DNA Pairing by RecA Reveals a 3-Dimensional Homology Search

    PubMed Central

    Forget, Anthony L.; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C.

    2011-01-01

    DNA breaks can be repaired with high-fidelity by homologous recombination. A ubiquitous protein that is essential for this DNA template-directed repair is RecA1. After resection of broken DNA to produce single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), RecA assembles on this ssDNA into a filament with the unique capacity to search and find DNA sequences in double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) that are homologous to the ssDNA. This homology search is vital to recombinational DNA repair, and results in homologous pairing and exchange of DNA strands. Homologous pairing involves DNA sequence-specific target location by the RecA-ssDNA complex. Despite decades of study, the mechanism of this enigmatic search process remains unknown. RecA is a DNA-dependent ATPase, but ATP hydrolysis is not required for DNA pairing and strand exchange2,3, eliminating active search processes. Using dual optical trapping to manipulate DNA, and single-molecule fluorescence microscopy to image DNA pairing, we demonstrate that both the three-dimensional conformational state of the dsDNA target and the length of the homologous RecA-ssDNA filament play important roles in the homology search. We discovered that as the end-to-end distance of the target dsDNA molecule is increased, constraining its available 3-dimensional conformations, the rate of homologous pairing decreases. Conversely, when the length of the ssDNA in the nucleoprotein filament is increased, homology is found faster. We propose a model for the DNA homology search process termed “intersegmental contact sampling”, wherein the intrinsic multivalent nature of the RecA nucleoprotein filament is employed to search DNA sequence space within 3-dimensional domains of DNA, exploiting multiple weak contacts to rapidly search for homology. Our findings highlight the importance of the 3-dimensional conformational dynamics of DNA, reveal a previously unknown facet of the homology search, and provide insight into the mechanism of DNA target location by this member of a

  3. Phylogenetic Distribution of CRISPR-Cas Systems in Antibiotic-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    van Belkum, Alex; Soriaga, Leah B.; LaFave, Matthew C.; Akella, Srividya; Veyrieras, Jean-Baptiste; Barbu, E. Magda; Shortridge, Dee; Blanc, Bernadette; Hannum, Gregory; Zambardi, Gilles; Miller, Kristofer; Enright, Mark C.; Mugnier, Nathalie; Brami, Daniel; Schicklin, Stéphane; Felderman, Martina; Schwartz, Ariel S.; Richardson, Toby H.; Peterson, Todd C.; Hubby, Bolyn

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an antibiotic-refractory pathogen with a large genome and extensive genotypic diversity. Historically, P. aeruginosa has been a major model system for understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying type I clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated protein (CRISPR-Cas)-based bacterial immune system function. However, little information on the phylogenetic distribution and potential role of these CRISPR-Cas systems in molding the P. aeruginosa accessory genome and antibiotic resistance elements is known. Computational approaches were used to identify and characterize CRISPR-Cas systems within 672 genomes, and in the process, we identified a previously unreported and putatively mobile type I-C P. aeruginosa CRISPR-Cas system. Furthermore, genomes harboring noninhibited type I-F and I-E CRISPR-Cas systems were on average ~300 kb smaller than those without a CRISPR-Cas system. In silico analysis demonstrated that the accessory genome (n = 22,036 genes) harbored the majority of identified CRISPR-Cas targets. We also assembled a global spacer library that aided the identification of difficult-to-characterize mobile genetic elements within next-generation sequencing (NGS) data and allowed CRISPR typing of a majority of P. aeruginosa strains. In summary, our analysis demonstrated that CRISPR-Cas systems play an important role in shaping the accessory genomes of globally distributed P. aeruginosa isolates. PMID:26604259

  4. Pseudomonas cepacia adherence to respiratory epithelial cells is enhanced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Saiman, L.; Cacalano, G.; Prince, A. )

    1990-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas cepacia are both opportunistic pathogens of patients with cystic fibrosis. The binding characteristics of these two species were compared to determine if they use similar mechanisms to adhere to respiratory epithelial cells. P. cepacia 249 was shown to be piliated, but there was no detectable homology between P. aeruginosa pilin gene probes and P. cepacia genomic DNA. P. cepacia and P. aeruginosa did not appear to compete for epithelial receptors. In the presence of purified P. aeruginosa pili, the adherence of 35S-labeled strain 249 to respiratory epithelial monolayers was unaffected, while that of P. aeruginosa PAO1 was decreased by 55%. The binding of P. cepacia 249 and 715j was increased by 2.4-fold and 1.5-fold, respectively, in the presence of an equal inoculum of PAO1. Interbacterial agglutination contributed to the increased adherence of P. cepacia, as the binding of 249 was increased twofold in the presence of irradiated PAO1. PAO1 exoproducts had a marked effect in enhancing the ability of the P. cepacia strains to adhere to the epithelial monolayers. A PAO1 supernatant increased the binding of 249 by eightfold and that of 715j by fourfold. Thus, there appears to be a synergistic relationship between P. aeruginosa and P. cepacia in which PAO1 exoproducts modify the epithelial cell surface, exposing receptors and facilitating increased P. cepacia attachment.

  5. Role of the Outer Membrane Protein OprD2 in Carbapenem-Resistance Mechanisms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jilu; Pan, Yaping; Fang, Yaping

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between the outer membrane protein OprD2 and carbapenem-resistance in 141 clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa collected between January and December 2013 from the First Affiliated Hospital of Anhui Medical University in China. Agar dilution methods were employed to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration of meropenem (MEM) and imipenem (IMP) for P. aeruginosa. The gene encoding OprD2 was amplified from141 P. aeruginosa isolates and analyzed by PCR and DNA sequencing. Differences between the effects of IMPR and IMPS groups on the resistance of the P. aeruginosa were observed by SDS-poly acrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Three resistance types were classified in the 141 carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa (CRPA) isolates tested, namely IMPRMEMR (66.7%), IMPRMEMS (32.6%), and IMPRMEMS (0.7%). DNA sequencing revealed significant diverse gene mutations in the OprD2-encoding gene in these strains. Thirty-four strains had large fragment deletions in the OprD2gene, in 6 strains the gene contained fragment inserts, and in 96 resistant strains, the gene featured small fragment deletions or multi-site mutations. Only 4 metallo-β-lactamase strains and 1 imipenem-sensitive (meropenem-resistant) strain showed a normal OprD2 gene. Using SDS-PAGE to detect the outer membrane protein in 16 CRPA isolates, it was found that 10 IMPRMEMR strains and 5 IMPRMEMS strains had lost the OprD2 protein, while the IMPSMEMR strain contained a normal 46-kDa protein. In conclusion, mutation or loss of the OprD2-encoding gene caused the loss of OprD2, which further led to carbapenem-resistance of P. aeruginosa. Our findings provide insights into the mechanism of carbapenem resistance in P. aeruginosa. PMID:26440806

  6. A Tribute to Disorder in the Genome of the Bloom-Forming Freshwater Cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Humbert, Jean-François; Barbe, Valérie; Latifi, Amel; Gugger, Muriel; Calteau, Alexandra; Coursin, Therese; Lajus, Aurélie; Castelli, Vanina; Oztas, Sophie; Samson, Gaëlle; Longin, Cyrille; Medigue, Claudine; de Marsac, Nicole Tandeau

    2013-01-01

    Microcystis aeruginosa is one of the most common bloom-forming cyanobacteria in freshwater ecosystems worldwide. This species produces numerous secondary metabolites, including microcystins, which are harmful to human health. We sequenced the genomes of ten strains of M. aeruginosa in order to explore the genomic basis of their ability to occupy varied environments and proliferate. Our findings show that M. aeruginosa genomes are characterized by having a large open pangenome, and that each genome contains similar proportions of core and flexible genes. By comparing the GC content of each gene to the mean value of the whole genome, we estimated that in each genome, around 11% of the genes seem to result from recent horizontal gene transfer events. Moreover, several large gene clusters resulting from HGT (up to 19 kb) have been found, illustrating the ability of this species to integrate such large DNA molecules. It appeared also that all M. aeruginosa displays a large genomic plasticity, which is characterized by a high proportion of repeat sequences and by low synteny values between the strains. Finally, we identified 13 secondary metabolite gene clusters, including three new putative clusters. When comparing the genomes of Microcystis and Prochlorococcus, one of the dominant picocyanobacteria living in marine ecosystems, our findings show that they are characterized by having almost opposite evolutionary strategies, both of which have led to ecological success in their respective environments. PMID:23950996

  7. Inhibition of co-colonizing cystic fibrosis-associated pathogens by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia multivorans.

    PubMed

    Costello, Anne; Reen, F Jerry; O'Gara, Fergal; Callaghan, Máire; McClean, Siobhán

    2014-07-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a recessive genetic disease characterized by chronic respiratory infections and inflammation causing permanent lung damage. Recurrent infections are caused by Gram-negative antibiotic-resistant bacterial pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) and the emerging pathogen genus Pandoraea. In this study, the interactions between co-colonizing CF pathogens were investigated. Both Pandoraea and Bcc elicited potent pro-inflammatory responses that were significantly greater than Ps. aeruginosa. The original aim was to examine whether combinations of pro-inflammatory pathogens would further exacerbate inflammation. In contrast, when these pathogens were colonized in the presence of Ps. aeruginosa the pro-inflammatory response was significantly decreased. Real-time PCR quantification of bacterial DNA from mixed cultures indicated that Ps. aeruginosa significantly inhibited the growth of Burkholderia multivorans, Burkholderia cenocepacia, Pandoraea pulmonicola and Pandoraea apista, which may be a factor in its dominance as a colonizer of CF patients. Ps. aeruginosa cell-free supernatant also suppressed growth of these pathogens, indicating that inhibition was innate rather than a response to the presence of a competitor. Screening of a Ps. aeruginosa mutant library highlighted a role for quorum sensing and pyoverdine biosynthesis genes in the inhibition of B. cenocepacia. Pyoverdine was confirmed to contribute to the inhibition of B. cenocepacia strain J2315. B. multivorans was the only species that could significantly inhibit Ps. aeruginosa growth. B. multivorans also inhibited B. cenocepacia and Pa. apista. In conclusion, both Ps. aeruginosa and B. multivorans are capable of suppressing growth and virulence of co-colonizing CF pathogens. PMID:24790091

  8. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Lon and ClpXP proteases: roles in linking carbon catabolite repression system with quorum-sensing system.

    PubMed

    Yang, Nana; Lan, Lefu

    2016-02-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) plays critical roles in virulence gene expression and the pathogenesis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an important human pathogen. However, the regulatory effects, especially that occur directly upstream of the QS system, remain largely unknown. Here, we review recent advances in the understanding of the key component of carbon catabolite repression (CCR) system and protein quality control (PQC) system in regulating the QS system in P. aeruginosa. We propose that PQC proteases Lon and ClpXP may have an important role in linking CCR with QS, and thus contribute to the integration of nutritional cues into the regulatory network governing the virulence factors expression in P. aeruginosa. PMID:26045103

  9. Genome comparison of Pseudomonas aeruginosa large phages.

    PubMed

    Hertveldt, Kirsten; Lavigne, Rob; Pleteneva, Elena; Sernova, Natalia; Kurochkina, Lidia; Korchevskii, Roman; Robben, Johan; Mesyanzhinov, Vadim; Krylov, Victor N; Volckaert, Guido

    2005-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa phage EL is a dsDNA phage related to the giant phiKZ-like Myoviridae. The EL genome sequence comprises 211,215 bp and has 201 predicted open reading frames (ORFs). The EL genome does not share DNA sequence homology with other viruses and micro-organisms sequenced to date. However, one-third of the predicted EL gene products (gps) shares similarity (Blast alignments of 17-55% amino acid identity) with phiKZ proteins. Comparative EL and phiKZ genomics reveals that these giant phages are an example of substantially diverged genetic mosaics. Based on the position of similar EL and phiKZ predicted gene products, five genome regions can be delineated in EL, four of which are relatively conserved between EL and phiKZ. Region IV, a 17.7 kb genome region with 28 predicted ORFs, is unique to EL. Fourteen EL ORFs have been assigned a putative function based on protein similarity. Assigned proteins are involved in DNA replication and nucleotide metabolism (NAD+-dependent DNA ligase, ribonuclease HI, helicase, thymidylate kinase), host lysis and particle structure. EL-gp146 is the first chaperonin GroEL sequence identified in a viral genome. Besides a putative transposase, EL harbours predicted mobile endonucleases related to H-N-H and LAGLIDADG homing endonucleases associated with group I intron and intein intervening sequences. PMID:16256135

  10. Chemical Inhibition of Kynureninase Reduces Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quorum Sensing and Virulence Factor Expression.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Stephen H; Bonocora, Richard P; Wade, Joseph T; Musah, Rabi Ann; Cady, Nathaniel C

    2016-04-15

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa utilizes multiple quorum sensing (QS) pathways to coordinate an arsenal of virulence factors. We previously identified several cysteine-based compounds inspired by natural products from the plant Petiveria alliacea which are capable of antagonizing multiple QS circuits as well as reducing P. aeruginosa biofilm formation. To understand the global effects of such compounds on virulence factor production and elucidate their mechanism of action, RNA-seq transcriptomic analysis was performed on P. aeruginosa PAO1 exposed to S-phenyl-l-cysteine sulfoxide, the most potent inhibitor from the prior study. Exposure to this inhibitor down-regulated expression of several QS-regulated virulence operons (e.g., phenazine biosynthesis, type VI secretion systems). Interestingly, many genes that were differentially regulated pertain to the related metabolic pathways that yield precursors of pyochelin, tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates, phenazines, and Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS). Activation of the MexT-regulon was also indicated, including the multidrug efflux pump encoded by mexEF-oprN, which has previously been shown to inhibit QS and pathogenicity. Deeper investigation of the metabolites involved in these systems revealed that S-phenyl-l-cysteine sulfoxide has structural similarity to kynurenine, a precursor of anthranilate, which is critical for P. aeruginosa virulence. By supplementing exogenous anthranilate, the QS-inhibitory effect was reversed. Finally, it was shown that S-phenyl-l-cysteine sulfoxide competitively inhibits P. aeruginosa kynureninase (KynU) activity in vitro and reduces PQS production in vivo. The kynurenine pathway has been implicated in P. aeruginosa QS and virulence factor expression; however, this is the first study to show that targeted inhibition of KynU affects P. aeruginosa gene expression and QS, suggesting a potential antivirulence strategy. PMID:26785289

  11. The Accessory Genome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Kung, Vanderlene L.; Ozer, Egon A.; Hauser, Alan R.

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains exhibit significant variability in pathogenicity and ecological flexibility. Such interstrain differences reflect the dynamic nature of the P. aeruginosa genome, which is composed of a relatively invariable “core genome” and a highly variable “accessory genome.” Here we review the major classes of genetic elements comprising the P. aeruginosa accessory genome and highlight emerging themes in the acquisition and functional importance of these elements. Although the precise phenotypes endowed by the majority of the P. aeruginosa accessory genome have yet to be determined, rapid progress is being made, and a clearer understanding of the role of the P. aeruginosa accessory genome in ecology and infection is emerging. PMID:21119020

  12. Impact of quorum sensing on fitness of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Heurlier, Karin; Dénervaud, Valérie; Haas, Dieter

    2006-04-01

    In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, cell-cell communication based on N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) signal molecules (termed quorum sensing) is known to control the production of extracellular virulence factors. Hence, in pathogenic interactions with host organisms, the quorum-sensing (QS) machinery can confer a selective advantage on P. aeruginosa. However, as shown by transcriptomic and proteomic studies, many intracellular metabolic functions are also regulated by quorum sensing. Some of these serve to regenerate the AHL precursors methionine and S-adenosyl-methionine and to degrade adenosine via inosine and hypoxanthine. The fact that a significant percentage of clinical and environmental isolates of P. aeruginosa is defective for QS because of mutation in the major QS regulatory gene lasR, raises the question of whether the QS machinery can have a negative impact on the organism's fitness. In vitro, lasR mutants have a higher probability to escape lytic death in stationary phase under alkaline conditions than has the QS-proficient wild type. Similar selective forces might also operate in natural environments. PMID:16503417

  13. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Displays Multiple Phenotypes during Development as a Biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Sauer, Karin; Camper, Anne K.; Ehrlich, Garth D.; Costerton, J. William; Davies, David G.

    2002-01-01

    Complementary approaches were employed to characterize transitional episodes in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm development using direct observation and whole-cell protein analysis. Microscopy and in situ reporter gene analysis were used to directly observe changes in biofilm physiology and to act as signposts to standardize protein collection for two-dimensional electrophoretic analysis and protein identification in chemostat and continuous-culture biofilm-grown populations. Using these approaches, we characterized five stages of biofilm development: (i) reversible attachment, (ii) irreversible attachment, (iii) maturation-1, (iv) maturation-2, and (v) dispersion. Biofilm cells were shown to change regulation of motility, alginate production, and quorum sensing during the process of development. The average difference in detectable protein regulation between each of the five stages of development was 35% (approximately 525 proteins). When planktonic cells were compared with maturation-2 stage biofilm cells, more than 800 proteins were shown to have a sixfold or greater change in expression level (over 50% of the proteome). This difference was higher than when planktonic P. aeruginosa were compared with planktonic cultures of Pseudomonas putida. Las quorum sensing was shown to play no role in early biofilm development but was important in later stages. Biofilm cells in the dispersion stage were more similar to planktonic bacteria than to maturation-2 stage bacteria. These results demonstrate that P. aeruginosa displays multiple phenotypes during biofilm development and that knowledge of stage-specific physiology may be important in detecting and controlling biofilm growth. PMID:11807075

  14. Morphogenetic expression of Moraxella bovis fimbriae (pili) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Beard, M K; Mattick, J S; Moore, L J; Mott, M R; Marrs, C F; Egerton, J R

    1990-01-01

    Type 4 fimbriae (pili) are found in a wide variety of gram-negative bacteria and are composed of small structural subunits which share significant sequence homology among different species, especially at their amino-terminal ends. Previous studies demonstrating morphogenetic expression of Bacteroides nodosus fimbriae from cloned subunit genes in Pseudomonas aeruginosa suggested that there is a common mechanism for type 4 fimbriae assembly and that the structural subunits are interchangeable (J. S. Mattick et al., J. Bacteriol. 169:33-41, 1987). Here we have examined the expression of Moraxella bovis fimbrial subunits in P. aeruginosa. M. bovis subunits were assembled into extracellular fimbriae in this host, in some cases as a homopolymer but in others as a mosaic with the indigenous subunit, indicating structural equivalence. This result contrasts with other studies in which recombinant P. aeruginosa expressing different subunits produced fimbriae composed almost exclusively of one subunit or the other (T. C. Elleman and J. E. Peterson, Mol. Microbiol. 1:377-380, 1987). Both observations can be explained by reversibility of subunit-subunit interactions at the site of assembly, with the forward equilibrium favoring chain extension between compatible subunits. Images PMID:1970564

  15. In vitro and in vivo screening for novel essential cell-envelope proteins in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Piñar, Regina; Lo Sciuto, Alessandra; Rossi, Alice; Ranucci, Serena; Bragonzi, Alessandra; Imperi, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa represents a prototype of multi-drug resistant opportunistic pathogens for which novel therapeutic options are urgently required. In order to identify new candidates as potential drug targets, we combined large-scale transposon mutagenesis data analysis and bioinformatics predictions to retrieve a set of putative essential genes which are conserved in P. aeruginosa and predicted to encode cell envelope or secreted proteins. By generating unmarked deletion or conditional mutants, we confirmed the in vitro essentiality of two periplasmic proteins, LptH and LolA, responsible for lipopolysaccharide and lipoproteins transport to the outer membrane respectively, and confirmed that they are important for cell envelope stability. LptH was also found to be essential for P. aeruginosa ability to cause infection in different animal models. Conversely, LolA-depleted cells appeared only partially impaired in pathogenicity, indicating that this protein likely plays a less relevant role during bacterial infection. Finally, we ruled out any involvement of the other six proteins under investigation in P. aeruginosa growth, cell envelope stability and virulence. Besides proposing LptH as a very promising drug target in P. aeruginosa, this study confirms the importance of in vitro and in vivo validation of potential essential genes identified through random transposon mutagenesis. PMID:26621210

  16. Analysis of the swimming activity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by using photonic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Chia-Han; Chang, Bo-Jui; Huang, Ying-Jung; Fan, Chia-Chieh; Peng, Hwei-Ling; Chi, Sien; Hsu, Long

    2005-08-01

    Swimming activity of flagella is a main factor of the motility of bacteria. Flagella expressed on the surface of bacterial species serve as a primary means of motility including swimming. We propose to use optical tweezers to analyze the swimming activity of bacteria. The sample bacteria in the work is Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and it is a gram-negative bacterium and often causes leading to burn wound infections, urinary-tract infections, and pneumonia. The single polar flagellum of P. aeruginosa has been demonstrated to be important virulence and colonization factor of this opportunistic pathogen. We demonstrate a gene to regulate the bacterial swimming activity in P. aeruginosa PAO1 by biological method. However, the change of flagellar morphology was not observed by electron microscopy analysis, suggesting that the gene regulates the flagellar rotation that could not be detected by biological method. PFM exhibits a spatial resolution of a few nanometers to detect the relative position of the probe at an acquisition rate over 1 MHz. By binding a probe such as a bead or a quantum dot on the flagella, we expect the rotation of the probe due to the flagella could be detected. It is expected that the study of the swimming activity of P. aeruginosa provide potent method for the pathogenic role of the flagella in P. aeruginosa.

  17. bZIP transcription factor zip-2 mediates an early response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Estes, Kathleen A.; Dunbar, Tiffany L.; Powell, Jennifer R.; Ausubel, Frederick M.; Troemel, Emily R.

    2010-01-01

    Very little is known about how animals discriminate pathogens from innocuous microbes. To address this question, we examined infection-response gene induction in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We focused on genes that are induced in C. elegans by infection with the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, but are not induced by an isogenic attenuated gacA mutant. Most of these genes are induced independently of known immunity pathways. We generated a GFP reporter for one of these genes, infection response gene 1 (irg-1), which is induced strongly by wild-type P. aeruginosa strain PA14, but not by other C. elegans pathogens or by other wild-type P. aeruginosa strains that are weakly pathogenic to C. elegans. To identify components of the pathway that induces irg-1 in response to infection, we performed an RNA interference screen of C. elegans transcription factors. This screen identified zip-2, a bZIP transcription factor that is required for inducing irg-1, as well as several other genes, and is important for defense against infection by P. aeruginosa. These data indicate that zip-2 is part of a specialized pathogen response pathway that is induced by virulent strains of P. aeruginosa and provides defense against this pathogen. PMID:20133860

  18. Evaluation of the ability of C. albicans to form biofilm in the presence of phage-resistant phenotypes of P. aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Pires, Diana P; Silva, Sónia; Almeida, Carina; Henriques, Mariana; Anderson, Erin M; Lam, Joseph S; Sillankorva, Sanna; Azeredo, Joana

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida albicans are disparate microbial species, but both are known to be opportunistic pathogens frequently associated with nosocomial infections. The aim of this study was to provide a better understanding of the interactions between these microorganisms in dual-species biofilms. Several bacteriophage-resistant P. aeruginosa phenotypes have been isolated and were used in dual-species mixed-biofilm studies. Twenty-four and 48 h mixed-biofilms were formed using the isolated phenotypes of phage-resistant P. aeruginosa and these were compared with similar experiments using other P. aeruginosa strains with a defined lipopolysaccharide (LPS) deficiency based on chromosomal knockout of specific LPS biosynthetic genes. Overall, the results showed that the variants of phage-resistant P. aeruginosa and LPS mutants were both less effective in inhibiting the growth of C. albicans in mixed-biofilms compared to the wild-type strains of P. aeruginosa. Conversely, the proliferation of P. aeruginosa was not influenced by the presence of C. albicans. In conclusion, the ability of strains of P. aeruginosa to inhibit the formation of a biofilm of C. albicans appears to be correlated with the LPS chain lengths of phenotypes of P. aeruginosa, suggesting that LPS has a suppressive effect on the growth of C. albicans. PMID:24063626

  19. The combined eff ects of Dolichospermum flos-aquae, light, and temperature on microcystin production by Microcystis aeruginosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ruoqi; Li, Fangfang; Liu, Jiadong; Zheng, Hongye; Shen, Fei; Xue, Yarong; Liu, Changhong

    2016-03-01

    The eff ects of light, temperature, and coculture on the intracellular microcystin-LR (MC-LR) quota of Microcystis aeruginosa were evaluated based on coculture experiments with nontoxic Dolichospermum (Anabaena) flos-aquae. The MC-LR quota and transcription of mcyB and mcyD genes encoding MC synthetases in M. aeruginosa were evaluated on the basis of cell counts, high-performance liquid chromatography, and reverse-transcription quantitative real-time PCR. The MC-LR quotas of M. aeruginosa in coculture with a 1/1 ratio of inoculum of the two species were significantly lower relative to monocultures 6-d after inoculation. Decreased MC-LR quotas under coculture conditions were enhanced by increasing the D. flos-aquae to M. aeruginosa ratio in the inoculum and by environmental factors, such as temperature and light intensity. Moreover, the transcriptional concentrations of mcyB and mcyD genes in M. aeruginosa were significantly inhibited by D. flos-aquae competition in coculture (P <0.01), lowered to 20% of initial concentrations within 8 days. These data suggested that coculture eff ects by D. flos-aquae not only reduced M. aeruginosa's intracellular MC-LR quota via inhibition of genes encoding MC synthetases, but also that this eff ect was regulated by environmental factors, including temperature and light intensities.

  20. Physiological responses of Microcystis aeruginosa against the algicidal bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Su; Yin, Hua; Tang, Shaoyu; Peng, Hui; Yin, Donggao; Yang, Yixuan; Liu, Zehua; Dang, Zhi

    2016-05-01

    Proliferation of cyanobacteria in aquatic ecosystems has caused water security problems throughout the world. Our preliminary study has showed that Pseudomonas aeruginosa can inhibit the growth of cyanobacterium, Microcystis aeruginosa. In order to explore the inhibitory mechanism of P. aeruginosa on the cell growth and synthesis of intracellular substances of M. aeruginosa, concentrations of Chlorophyll-a, intracellular protein, carbohydrate, enzyme activities and ion metabolism of M. aeruginosa, were investigated. The results indicated that 83.84% algicidal efficiency of P. aeruginosa was achieved after treatment for 7 days. The strain inhibited the reproduction of M. aeruginosa by impeding the synthesis of intracellular protein and carbohydrate of cyanobacterium, and only a very small part of intracellular protein and carbohydrate was detected after exposure to P. aeruginosa for 5 days. P. aeruginosa caused the alteration of intracellular antioxidant enzyme activity of M. aeruginosa, such as catalase, peroxidase. The accumulation of malondialdehyde aggravated membrane injury after treatment for 3 days. P. aeruginosa also affected the ion metabolism of cyanobacteria. The release of Na(+) and Cl(-) was significantly enhanced while the uptake of K(+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+), NO3(-) and SO4(2)(-) decreased. Surface morphology and intracellular structure of cyanobacteria and bacterial cells changed dramatically over time as evidenced by electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) analysis. These results revealed that the algicidal activity of P. aeruginosa was primarily due to the fermentation liquid of P. aeruginosa that impeded the synthesis of intracellular protein and carbohydrate, and damaged the cell membrane through membrane lipid peroxidation. PMID:26866757

  1. Major Transcriptome Changes Accompany the Growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Blood from Patients with Severe Thermal Injuries.

    PubMed

    Kruczek, Cassandra; Kottapalli, Kameswara Rao; Dissanaike, Sharmila; Dzvova, Nyaradzo; Griswold, John A; Colmer-Hamood, Jane A; Hamood, Abdul N

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative opportunistic pathogen that causes serious infections in immunocompromised hosts including severely burned patients. After multiplying within the burn wound, P. aeruginosa translocate into the bloodstream causing bacterial sepsis frequently leading to organ dysfunction and septic shock. Although the pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa infection of thermally-injured wounds has been extensively analyzed, little is known regarding the ability of P. aeruginosa to adapt and survive within the blood of severely burned patients during systemic infection. To identify such adaptations, transcriptome analyses (RNA-seq) were conducted on P. aeruginosa strain PA14 that was grown in whole blood from a healthy volunteer or three severely burned patients. Compared with growth in blood from healthy volunteers, growth of PA14 in the blood from severely burned patients significantly altered the expression of 2596 genes, with expression of 1060 genes enhanced, while that of 1536 genes was reduced. Genes whose expression was significantly reduced included genes related to quorum sensing, quorum sensing-controlled virulence factors and transport of heme, phosphate, and phosphonate. Genes whose expression was significantly enhanced were related to the type III secretion system, the pyochelin iron-acquisition system, flagellum synthesis, and pyocyanin production. We confirmed changes in expression of many of these genes using qRT-PCR. Although severe burns altered the levels of different blood components in each patient, the growth of PA14 in their blood produced similar changes in the expression of each gene. These results suggest that, in response to changes in the blood of severely burned patients and as part of its survival strategy, P. aeruginosa enhances the expression of certain virulence genes and reduces the expression of others. PMID:26933952

  2. Major Transcriptome Changes Accompany the Growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Blood from Patients with Severe Thermal Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Kruczek, Cassandra; Kottapalli, Kameswara Rao; Dissanaike, Sharmila; Dzvova, Nyaradzo; Griswold, John A.; Colmer-Hamood, Jane A.; Hamood, Abdul N.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative opportunistic pathogen that causes serious infections in immunocompromised hosts including severely burned patients. After multiplying within the burn wound, P. aeruginosa translocate into the bloodstream causing bacterial sepsis frequently leading to organ dysfunction and septic shock. Although the pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa infection of thermally-injured wounds has been extensively analyzed, little is known regarding the ability of P. aeruginosa to adapt and survive within the blood of severely burned patients during systemic infection. To identify such adaptations, transcriptome analyses (RNA-seq) were conducted on P. aeruginosa strain PA14 that was grown in whole blood from a healthy volunteer or three severely burned patients. Compared with growth in blood from healthy volunteers, growth of PA14 in the blood from severely burned patients significantly altered the expression of 2596 genes, with expression of 1060 genes enhanced, while that of 1536 genes was reduced. Genes whose expression was significantly reduced included genes related to quorum sensing, quorum sensing-controlled virulence factors and transport of heme, phosphate, and phosphonate. Genes whose expression was significantly enhanced were related to the type III secretion system, the pyochelin iron-acquisition system, flagellum synthesis, and pyocyanin production. We confirmed changes in expression of many of these genes using qRT-PCR. Although severe burns altered the levels of different blood components in each patient, the growth of PA14 in their blood produced similar changes in the expression of each gene. These results suggest that, in response to changes in the blood of severely burned patients and as part of its survival strategy, P. aeruginosa enhances the expression of certain virulence genes and reduces the expression of others. PMID:26933952

  3. Draft Genome Assembly of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quality Control Reference Strain Boston 41501.

    PubMed

    Minogue, T D; Daligault, H E; Davenport, K W; Broomall, S M; Bruce, D C; Chain, P S; Coyne, S R; Gibbons, H S; Jaissle, J; Chertkov, O; Freitas, T; Rosenzweig, C N; Xu, Y; Johnson, S L

    2014-01-01

    We present the scaffolded genome assembly of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Boston 41501, now publicly available in GenBank (JOVK00000000) in 10 contigs placed into a single scaffold. The 6.82-Mbp genome contains 66.1% G+C content and 6,295 coding sequences, including type 4 pilus and type 3 secretion system production genes. PMID:25278526

  4. Draft Genome Assembly of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quality Control Reference Strain Boston 41501

    PubMed Central

    Minogue, T. D.; Daligault, H. E.; Davenport, K. W.; Broomall, S. M.; Bruce, D. C.; Chain, P. S.; Coyne, S. R.; Gibbons, H. S.; Jaissle, J.; Chertkov, O.; Freitas, T.; Rosenzweig, C. N.; Xu, Y.

    2014-01-01

    We present the scaffolded genome assembly of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Boston 41501, now publicly available in GenBank (JOVK00000000) in 10 contigs placed into a single scaffold. The 6.82-Mbp genome contains 66.1% G+C content and 6,295 coding sequences, including type 4 pilus and type 3 secretion system production genes. PMID:25278526

  5. Potent Antibacterial Antisense Peptide–Peptide Nucleic Acid Conjugates Against Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Ghosal, Anubrata

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen causing severe infections in hospital settings, especially with immune compromised patients, and the increasing prevalence of multidrug resistant strains urges search for new drugs with novel mechanisms of action. In this study we introduce antisense peptide–peptide nucleic acid (PNA) conjugates as antibacterial agents against P. aeruginosa. We have designed and optimized antisense peptide–PNA conjugates targeting the translation initiation region of the ftsZ gene (an essential bacterial gene involved in cell division) or the acpP gene (an essential bacterial gene involved in fatty acid synthesis) of P. aeruginosa (PA01) and characterized these compounds according to their antimicrobial activity and mode of action. Four antisense PNA oligomers conjugated to the H-(R-Ahx-R)4-Ahx-βala or the H-(R-Ahx)6-βala peptide exhibited complete growth inhibition of P. aeruginosa strains PA01, PA14, and LESB58 at 1–2 μM concentrations without any indication of bacterial membrane disruption (even at 20 μM), and resulted in specific reduction of the targeted mRNA levels. One of the four compounds showed clear bactericidal activity while the other significantly reduced bacterial survival. These results open the possibility of development of antisense antibacterials for treatment of Pseudomonas infections. PMID:23030590

  6. Contamination of Hospital Water Supplies in Gilan, Iran, with Legionella pneumophila, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi Jalali Moghadam, Masoumeh; Honarmand, Hamidreza; Asfaram Meshginshahr, Sajad

    2015-01-01

    This study is designed to determine the contamination degree of hospital water supplies with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Legionella pneumophila, and E. coli in Gilan, Iran. Samples were collected directly into sterile containers and concentrated by centrifuge. Half part of any sample transferred to yeast extract broth and the second part transferred to Trypticase Soy Broth and incubated for 3 days. DNA was extracted by using commercial kit. Four rounds of PCR were performed as follows: multiplex PCR for detecting Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Integron 1, and Metallo-β-lactamases gene; PCR for detecting Legionella pneumophila and mip gene separately; PCR for detecting E. coli; and another PCR for detecting whole bacterial presence. Contamination rates of cold, warm, and incubator water samples with P. aeruginosa, were 16.6%, 37.5%, and 6.8% consequently. Degrees of contamination with L. pneumophila were 3.3%, 9.3%, and 10.9% and with E. coli were zero, 6.2%, and zero. Total bacterial contamination of cold, warm, and incubator water samples was 93.3%, 84.4%, and 89.0% consequently. Metallo-β-lactamases gene was found in 20.0% of all samples. Contamination degree with P. aeruginosa was considerable and with L. pneumophila was moderate. Metallo-β-lactamases gene was found frequently indicating widespread multiple drug resistance bacteria. We suggest using new decontamination method based on nanotechnology. PMID:26448745

  7. Burn sepsis: bacterial interference with Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Levenson, S M; Gruber, D K; Gruber, C; Watford, A; Seifter, E

    1981-05-01

    The pathogenicity of several strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa for burned rats (3 degrees scald burns, 20% body surface) following topical application of the bacteria to the burn within 1 hour after burning was established. Following this, it was demonstrated that purposeful infection of such 3 degrees scald burns of rats by a strain of Ps. aeruginosa of low virulence (JB-77) protects the rats from the lethal effect of subsequent (48-hour) topical contamination of the burn by a highly virulent strain of Ps. aeruginosa (VA-134) (p less than 0.001). This finding was confirmed in a similar experiment beginning with germfree rats. When the challenge with the highly virulent Ps. aeruginosa strain was 24 hours (rather than 48 hours) after the burning and topical contamination of the burn with the low virulence strain of Ps. aeruginosa, there was little protection (p N.S.). When burned rats were given the low virulence strain of Ps. aeruginosa by gavage right after burning, there was not protection to subsequent (48 hours) challenge by topical application of the highly virulent strain of Ps. aeruginosa to the burn (11/12 vs 12/12 dying). Our finding that purposeful infection of a 3 degrees burn of rats (conventional and also germfree) by a strain of Ps. aeruginosa of low virulence protects from the lethal effect of subsequent (48-hour) topical contamination of the burn by a highly virulent strain of Ps. aeruginosa is due, we believe, to direct bacterial interference between the two strains of pseudomonas. PMID:6785444

  8. Investigation of Reference Genes in Vibrio parahaemolyticus for Gene Expression Analysis Using Quantitative RT-PCR

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yue-jiao; Sun, Xiao-hong; Xu, Xiao-yan; Zhao, Yong; Pan, Ying-jie; Hwang, Cheng-An; Wu, Vivian C. H.

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a significant human pathogen capable of causing foodborne gastroenteritis associated with the consumption of contaminated raw or undercooked seafood. Quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) is a useful tool for studying gene expression in V. parahaemolyticus to characterize its virulence factors and understand the effect of environmental conditions on its pathogenicity. However, there is not a stable gene in V. parahaemolyticus that has been identified for use as a reference gene for qRT-PCR. This study evaluated the stability of 6 reference genes (16S rRNA, recA, rpoS, pvsA, pvuA, and gapdh) in 5 V. parahaemolyticus strains (O3:K6-clinical strain-tdh+, ATCC33846-tdh+, ATCC33847-tdh+, ATCC17802-trh+, and F13-environmental strain-tdh+) cultured at 4 different temperatures (15, 25, 37 and 42°C). Stability values were calculated using GeNorm, NormFinder, BestKeeper, and Delta CT algorithms. The results indicated that recA was the most stably expressed gene in the V. parahaemolyticus strains cultured at different temperatures. This study examined multiple V. parahaemolyticus strains and growth temperatures, hence the finding provided stronger evidence that recA can be used as a reference gene for gene expression studies in V. parahaemolyticus. PMID:26659406

  9. The prrF-Encoded Small Regulatory RNAs Are Required for Iron Homeostasis and Virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Reinhart, Alexandria A.; Powell, Daniel A.; Nguyen, Angela T.; O'Neill, Maura; Djapgne, Louise; Wilks, Angela; Ernst, Robert K.

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that requires iron to cause infection, but it also must regulate the uptake of iron to avoid iron toxicity. The iron-responsive PrrF1 and PrrF2 small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) are part of P. aeruginosa's iron regulatory network and affect the expression of at least 50 genes encoding iron-containing proteins. The genes encoding the PrrF1 and PrrF2 sRNAs are encoded in tandem in P. aeruginosa, allowing for the expression of a distinct, heme-responsive sRNA named PrrH that appears to regulate genes involved in heme metabolism. Using a combination of growth, mass spectrometry, and gene expression analysis, we showed that the ΔprrF1,2 mutant, which lacks expression of the PrrF and PrrH sRNAs, is defective for both iron and heme homeostasis. We also identified phuS, encoding a heme binding protein involved in heme acquisition, and vreR, encoding a previously identified regulator of P. aeruginosa virulence genes, as novel targets of prrF-mediated heme regulation. Finally, we showed that the prrF locus encoding the PrrF and PrrH sRNAs is required for P. aeruginosa virulence in a murine model of acute lung infection. Moreover, we showed that inoculation with a ΔprrF1,2 deletion mutant protects against future challenge with wild-type P. aeruginosa. Combined, these data demonstrate that the prrF-encoded sRNAs are critical regulators of P. aeruginosa virulence. PMID:25510881

  10. Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical and environmental isolates constitute a single population with high phenotypic diversity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen with a high incidence of hospital infections that represents a threat to immune compromised patients. Genomic studies have shown that, in contrast to other pathogenic bacteria, clinical and environmental isolates do not show particular genomic differences. In addition, genetic variability of all the P. aeruginosa strains whose genomes have been sequenced is extremely low. This low genomic variability might be explained if clinical strains constitute a subpopulation of this bacterial species present in environments that are close to human populations, which preferentially produce virulence associated traits. Results In this work, we sequenced the genomes and performed phenotypic descriptions for four non-human P. aeruginosa isolates collected from a plant, the ocean, a water-spring, and from dolphin stomach. We show that the four strains are phenotypically diverse and that this is not reflected in genomic variability, since their genomes are almost identical. Furthermore, we performed a detailed comparative genomic analysis of the four strains studied in this work with the thirteen previously reported P. aeruginosa genomes by means of describing their core and pan-genomes. Conclusions Contrary to what has been described for other bacteria we have found that the P. aeruginosa core genome is constituted by a high proportion of genes and that its pan-genome is thus relatively small. Considering the high degree of genomic conservation between isolates of P. aeruginosa from diverse environments, including human tissues, some implications for the treatment of infections are discussed. This work also represents a methodological contribution for the genomic study of P. aeruginosa, since we provide a database of the comparison of all the proteins encoded by the seventeen strains analyzed. PMID:24773920

  11. Tracking Down Antibiotic-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates in a Wastewater Network

    PubMed Central

    Slekovec, Céline; Plantin, Julie; Cholley, Pascal; Thouverez, Michelle; Talon, Daniel; Bertrand, Xavier; Hocquet, Didier

    2012-01-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa-containing wastewater released by hospitals is treated by wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), generating sludge, which is used as a fertilizer, and effluent, which is discharged into rivers. We evaluated the risk of dissemination of antibiotic-resistant P. aeruginosa (AR-PA) from the hospital to the environment via the wastewater network. Over a 10-week period, we sampled weekly 11 points (hospital and urban wastewater, untreated and treated water, sludge) of the wastewater network and the river upstream and downstream of the WWTP of a city in eastern France. We quantified the P. aeruginosa load by colony counting. We determined the susceptibility to 16 antibiotics of 225 isolates, which we sorted into three categories (wild-type, antibiotic-resistant and multidrug-resistant). Extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) and metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs) were identified by gene sequencing. All non-wild-type isolates (n = 56) and a similar number of wild-type isolates (n = 54) were genotyped by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing. Almost all the samples (105/110, 95.5%) contained P. aeruginosa, with high loads in hospital wastewater and sludge (≥3×106 CFU/l or/kg). Most of the multidrug-resistant isolates belonged to ST235, CC111 and ST395. They were found in hospital wastewater and some produced ESBLs such as PER-1 and MBLs such as IMP-29. The WWTP greatly reduced P. aeruginosa counts in effluent, but the P. aeruginosa load in the river was nonetheless higher downstream than upstream from the WWTP. We conclude that the antibiotic-resistant P. aeruginosa released by hospitals is found in the water downstream from the WWTP and in sludge, constituting a potential risk of environmental contamination. PMID:23284623

  12. Dissemination of carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Romania.

    PubMed

    Dortet, Laurent; Flonta, Mirela; Boudehen, Yves-Marie; Creton, Elodie; Bernabeu, Sandrine; Vogel, Anaïs; Naas, Thierry

    2015-11-01

    Fifteen carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae isolates and 12 carbapenemase-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates were recovered from patients hospitalized between August 2011 and March 2013 at the Hospital of Infectious Disease, Cluj-Napoca, Romania. One KPC-, nine NDM-1-, four OXA-48-, and one VIM-4-producing Enterobacteriaceae isolates along with 11 VIM-2-producing and one IMP-13-producing P. aeruginosa isolates were recovered from clinical samples. All carbapenemase genes were located on self-conjugative plasmids and were associated with other resistance determinants, including extended-spectrum β-lactamases and RmtC methylases. PMID:26303798

  13. Profile of Virulence Factors in the Multi-Drug Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strains of Human Urinary Tract Infections (UTI)

    PubMed Central

    Habibi, Asghar; Honarmand, Ramin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Putative virulence factors are responsible for the pathogenicity of UTIs caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa). Resistance of P. aeruginosa to commonly used antibiotics is caused by the extreme overprescription of those antibiotics. Objectives: The goal of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of virulence factors and the antibiotic resistance patterns of P. aeruginosa isolates in UTI cases in Iran. Patients and Methods: Two hundred and fifty urine samples were collected from patients who suffered from UTIs. Samples were cultured immediately, and those that were P. aeruginosa-positive were analyzed for the presence of virulence genes using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) was performed using the disk diffusion method. Results: Of the 250 urine samples analyzed, 8 samples (3.2%) were positive for P. aeruginosa. The prevalence of P. aeruginosa in male and female patients was 2.7% and 3.5%, respectively, (P = 0.035). In patients less than 10 years old, it was 4.2%, and in patients more than 55 years old, it was 4.2%. These were the most commonly infected groups. The highest levels of resistance were seen against ampicillin (87.5%), norfloxacin (62.5%), gentamycin (62.5%), amikacin (62.5%), and aztreonam (62.5%), while the lowest were seen for meropenem (0%), imipenem (12.5%), and polymyxin B (12.5%). LasB (87.5%), pclH (75%), pilB (75%), and exoS (75%) were the most commonly detected virulence factors in the P. aeruginosa isolates. Conclusions: It is logical to first prescribe meropenem, imipenem, and polymyxin B in cases of UTIs caused by P. aeruginosa. Medical practitioners should be aware of the presence of levels of antibiotic resistance in hospitalized UTI patients in Iran. PMID:26756017

  14. Transposition of the oxacillin-hydrolyzing penicillinase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, T; Tanaka, M; Nohara, C; Fukunaga, Y; Yamagishi, S

    1981-01-01

    We have found that the oxacillin-hydrolyzing penicillinase gene (oxa) encoded by plasmid RGN238 transposes to various plasmids in a recA background. We call this transposable element Tn2603. Tn2603 encodes the genes for streptomycin, sulfonamide, and mercury resistance in addition to the oxa gene. Tn2603 has a molecular size of 19.6 kilobase pairs and appears to be flanked by small inverted repeat sequences of about 200 base pairs long. Images PMID:6257651

  15. The Gac/Rsm and cyclic-di-GMP signalling networks coordinately regulate iron uptake in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Frangipani, Emanuela; Visaggio, Daniela; Heeb, Stephan; Kaever, Volkhard; Cámara, Miguel; Visca, Paolo; Imperi, Francesco

    2014-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a versatile bacterial pathogen capable of occupying diverse ecological niches. To cope with iron limitation, P. aeruginosa secretes two siderophores, pyoverdine and pyochelin, whose ability to deliver iron to the cell is crucial for biofilm formation and pathogenicity. In this study, we describe a link between iron uptake and the Gac/Rsm system, a conserved signal transducing pathway of P. aeruginosa that controls the production of extracellular products and virulence factors, as well as the switch from planktonic to biofilm lifestyle. We have observed that pyoverdine and pyochelin production in P. aeruginosa is strongly dependent on the activation state of the Gac/Rsm pathway, which controls siderophore regulatory and biosynthetic genes at the transcriptional level, in a manner that does not involve regulation of ferric uptake regulator (Fur) expression. Gac/Rsm-mediated regulation of iron uptake genes appears to be conserved in different P. aeruginosa strains. Further experiments led to propose that the Gac/Rsm system regulates siderophore production through modulation of the intracellular levels of the second messenger c-di-GMP, indicating that the c-di-GMP and the Gac/Rsm regulatory networks essential for biofilm formation can also coordinately control iron uptake in P. aeruginosa. PMID:23796404

  16. High-temperature piezoelectric crystals ReCa4O(BO3)3: a review.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fapeng; Hou, Shuai; Zhao, Xian; Zhang, Shujun

    2014-08-01

    High-temperature sensors are desirable for structural health monitoring and/or nondestructive evaluation of next-generation turbines, more efficient jet engines, and the furnace components of electrical power plants. Of all the investigated high-temperature piezoelectric materials, rare-earth calcium oxyborate crystals ReCa4O(BO3)3 (ReCOB, Re: rare-earth) exhibit attractive advantages for high-temperature piezoelectric sensing. In this paper, the electroelastic properties of different ReCOB piezoelectric crystals are investigated. The crosstalk between various vibration modes are discussed, from which the optimized crystal cuts are achieved. Furthermore, temperature dependences of the electrical resistivity, dielectric, elastic, piezoelectric, and electromechanical properties of ReCOB crystals are studied. Finally, the thermal properties, including thermal expansion, specific heat, and thermal conductivity at elevated temperatures are studied and compared with commercially available high-temperature piezoelectric crystals. PMID:25073142

  17. Transcriptional Activation of Mucin by Pseudomonas aeruginosa Lipopolysaccharide in the Pathogenesis of Cystic Fibrosis Lung Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian-Dong; Dohrman, Austin F.; Gallup, Marianne; Miyata, Susumu; Gum, James R.; Kim, Young S.; Nadel, Jay A.; Prince, Alice; Basbaum, Carol B.

    1997-02-01

    An unresolved question in cystic fibrosis (CF) research is how mutations of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator, a CI ion channel, cause airway mucus obstruction leading to fatal lung disease. Recent evidence has linked the CF transmembrane conductance regulator mutation to the onset and persistence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in the airways, and here we provide evidence directly linking P. aeruginosa infection to mucus overproduction. We show that P. aeruginosa lipopolysaccharide profoundly upregulates transcription of the mucin gene MUC 2 in epithelial cells via inducible enhancer elements and that this effect is blocked by the tyrosine kinase inhibitors genistein and tyrphostin AG 126. These findings improve our understanding of CF pathogenesis and suggest that the attenuation of mucin production by lipopolysaccharide antagonists and tyrosine kinase inhibitors could reduce morbidity and mortality in this disease.

  18. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa AlgZR two-component system coordinates multiple phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Okkotsu, Yuta; Little, Alexander S.; Schurr, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that causes a multitude of infections. These infections can occur at almost any site in the body and are usually associated with a breach of the innate immune system. One of the prominent sites where P. aeruginosa causes chronic infections is within the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients. P. aeruginosa uses two-component systems that sense environmental changes to differentially express virulence factors that cause both acute and chronic infections. The P. aeruginosa AlgZR two component system is one of its global regulatory systems that affects the organism's fitness in a broad manner. This two-component system is absolutely required for two P. aeruginosa phenotypes: twitching motility and alginate production, indicating its importance in both chronic and acute infections. Additionally, global transcriptome analyses indicate that it regulates the expression of many different genes, including those associated with quorum sensing, type IV pili, type III secretion system, anaerobic metabolism, cyanide and rhamnolipid production. This review examines the complex AlgZR regulatory network, what is known about the structure and function of each protein, and how it relates to the organism's ability to cause infections. PMID:24999454

  19. Pigments influence the tolerance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 to photodynamically induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Orlandi, Viviana T; Bolognese, Fabrizio; Chiodaroli, Luca; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Barbieri, Paola

    2015-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen known to be resistant to different classes of antibiotics and disinfectants. P. aeruginosa also displays a certain degree of tolerance to photodynamic therapy (PDT), an alternative antimicrobial approach exploiting a photo-oxidative stress induced by exogenous photosensitizers and visible light. To evaluate whether P. aeruginosa pigments can contribute to its relative tolerance to PDT, we analysed the response to this treatment of isogenic transposon mutants of P. aeruginosa PAO1 with altered pigmentation. In general, in the presence of pigments a higher tolerance to PDT-induced photo-oxidative stress was observed. Hyperproduction of pyomelanin makes the cells much more tolerant to stress caused by either radicals or singlet oxygen generated by different photosensitizers upon photoactivation. Phenazines, pyocyanin and phenazine-1-carboxylic acid, produced in different amounts depending on the cultural conditions, are able to counteract both types of PDT-elicited reactive oxygen species. Hyperproduction of pyoverdine, caused by a mutation in a quorum-sensing gene, rendered P. aeruginosa more tolerant to a photosensitizer that generates mainly singlet oxygen, although in this case the observed tolerance to photo-oxidative stress cannot be exclusively attributed to the presence of the pigment. PMID:26419906

  20. Associations among Human-Associated Fecal Contamination, Microcystis aeruginosa, and Microcystin at Lake Erie Beaches

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Cheonghoon; Marion, Jason W.; Cheung, Melissa; Lee, Chang Soo; Lee, Jiyoung

    2015-01-01

    Lake Erie beaches exhibit impaired water quality due to fecal contamination and cyanobacterial blooms, though few studies address potential relationships between these two public health hazards. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), Microcystis aeruginosa was monitored in conjunction with a human-associated fecal marker (Bacteroides fragilis group; g-Bfra), microcystin, and water quality parameters at two beaches to evaluate their potential associations. During the summer of 2010, water samples were collected 32 times from both Euclid and Villa Angela beaches. The phycocyanin intergenic spacer (PC-IGS) and the microcystin-producing (mcyA) gene in M. aeruginosa were quantified with qPCR. PC-IGS and mcyA were detected in 50.0% and 39.1% of samples, respectively, and showed increased occurrences after mid-August. Correlation and regression analyses showed that water temperature was negatively correlated with M. aeruginosa markers and microcystin. The densities of mcyA and the g-Bfra were predicted by nitrate, implicating fecal contamination as contributing to the growth of M. aeruginosa by nitrate loading. Microcystin was correlated with mcyA (r = 0.413, p < 0.01), suggesting toxin-producing M. aeruginosa populations may significantly contribute to microcystin production. Additionally, microcystin was correlated with total phosphorus (r = 0.628, p < 0.001), which was higher at Euclid (p < 0.05), possibly contributing to higher microcystin concentrations at Euclid. PMID:26378564

  1. The Susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strains from Cystic Fibrosis Patients to Bacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    Essoh, Christiane; Blouin, Yann; Loukou, Guillaume; Cablanmian, Arsher; Lathro, Serge; Kutter, Elizabeth; Thien, Hoang Vu; Vergnaud, Gilles; Pourcel, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Phage therapy may become a complement to antibiotics in the treatment of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. To design efficient therapeutic cocktails, the genetic diversity of the species and the spectrum of susceptibility to bacteriophages must be investigated. Bacterial strains showing high levels of phage resistance need to be identified in order to decipher the underlying mechanisms. Here we have selected genetically diverse P. aeruginosa strains from cystic fibrosis patients and tested their susceptibility to a large collection of phages. Based on plaque morphology and restriction profiles, six different phages were purified from “pyophage”, a commercial cocktail directed against five different bacterial species, including P. aeruginosa. Characterization of these phages by electron microscopy and sequencing of genome fragments showed that they belong to 4 different genera. Among 47 P. aeruginosa strains, 13 were not lysed by any of the isolated phages individually or by pyophage. We isolated two new phages that could lyse some of these strains, and their genomes were sequenced. The presence/absence of a CRISPR-Cas system (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats and Crisper associated genes) was investigated to evaluate the role of the system in phage resistance. Altogether, the results show that some P. aeruginosa strains cannot support the growth of any of the tested phages belonging to 5 different genera, and suggest that the CRISPR-Cas system is not a major defence mechanism against these lytic phages. PMID:23637754

  2. Human Granulocyte Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Enhances Antibiotic Susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Persister Cells.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Geetika S; Yao, Xiangyu; Wang, Jing; Peng, Bo; Bader, Rebecca A; Ren, Dacheng

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial persister cells are highly tolerant to antibiotics and cause chronic infections. However, little is known about the interaction between host immune systems with this subpopulation of metabolically inactive cells, and direct effects of host immune factors (in the absence of immune cells) on persister cells have not been studied. Here we report that human granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) can sensitize the persister cells of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and PDO300 to multiple antibiotics including ciprofloxacin, tobramycin, tetracycline, and gentamicin. GM-CSF also sensitized the biofilm cells of P. aeruginosa PAO1 and PDO300 to tobramycin in the presence of biofilm matrix degrading enzymes. The DNA microarray and qPCR results indicated that GM-CSF induced the genes for flagellar motility and pyocin production in the persister cells, but not the normal cells of P. aeruginosa PAO1. Consistently, the supernatants from GM-CSF treated P. aeruginosa PAO1 persister cell suspensions were found cidal to the pyocin sensitive strain P. aeruginosa PAK. Collectively, these findings suggest that host immune factors and bacterial persisters may directly interact, leading to enhanced susceptibility of persister cells to antibiotics. PMID:26616387

  3. Development and evaluation of a new PCR assay for detection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa D genotype.

    PubMed

    Lødeng, A G G; Ahlén, C; Lysvand, H; Mandal, L H; Iversen, O J

    2006-08-01

    This report describes a new PCR-based assay for the detection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa genotype D in occupational saturation diving systems in the North Sea. This genotype has persisted in these systems for 11 years (1993-2003) and represents 18% of isolates from infections analysed during this period. The new PCR assay was based on sequences obtained after randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR analysis of a group of isolates related to diving that had been identified previously by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). The primer set for the D genotype targets a gene that codes for a hypothetical class 4 protein in the P. aeruginosa PAO1 genome. A primer set able to detect P. aeruginosa at the species level was also designed, based on the 23S-5S rDNA spacer region. The two assays produced 382-bp and 192-bp amplicons, respectively. The PCR assay was evaluated by analysing 100 P. aeruginosa isolates related to diving, representing 28 PFGE genotypes, and 38 clinical and community P. aeruginosa isolates and strains from other species. The assay identified all of the genotype D isolates tested. Two additional diving-relevant genotypes (TP2 and TP27) were also identified, as well as three isolates of non-diving origin. It was concluded that the new PCR assay is a useful tool for early detection and prevention of infections with the D genotype. PMID:16842571

  4. Human Granulocyte Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Enhances Antibiotic Susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Persister Cells

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Geetika S.; Yao, Xiangyu; Wang, Jing; Peng, Bo; Bader, Rebecca A.; Ren, Dacheng

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial persister cells are highly tolerant to antibiotics and cause chronic infections. However, little is known about the interaction between host immune systems with this subpopulation of metabolically inactive cells, and direct effects of host immune factors (in the absence of immune cells) on persister cells have not been studied. Here we report that human granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) can sensitize the persister cells of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and PDO300 to multiple antibiotics including ciprofloxacin, tobramycin, tetracycline, and gentamicin. GM-CSF also sensitized the biofilm cells of P. aeruginosa PAO1 and PDO300 to tobramycin in the presence of biofilm matrix degrading enzymes. The DNA microarray and qPCR results indicated that GM-CSF induced the genes for flagellar motility and pyocin production in the persister cells, but not the normal cells of P. aeruginosa PAO1. Consistently, the supernatants from GM-CSF treated P. aeruginosa PAO1 persister cell suspensions were found cidal to the pyocin sensitive strain P. aeruginosa PAK. Collectively, these findings suggest that host immune factors and bacterial persisters may directly interact, leading to enhanced susceptibility of persister cells to antibiotics. PMID:26616387

  5. Extracellular DNA Acidifies Biofilms and Induces Aminoglycoside Resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Wilton, Mike; Charron-Mazenod, Laetitia; Moore, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Biofilms consist of surface-adhered bacterial communities encased in an extracellular matrix composed of DNA, exopolysaccharides, and proteins. Extracellular DNA (eDNA) has a structural role in the formation of biofilms, can bind and shield biofilms from aminoglycosides, and induces antimicrobial peptide resistance mechanisms. Here, we provide evidence that eDNA is responsible for the acidification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa planktonic cultures and biofilms. Further, we show that acidic pH and acidification via eDNA constitute a signal that is perceived by P. aeruginosa to induce the expression of genes regulated by the PhoPQ and PmrAB two-component regulatory systems. Planktonic P. aeruginosa cultured in exogenous 0.2% DNA or under acidic conditions demonstrates a 2- to 8-fold increase in aminoglycoside resistance. This resistance phenotype requires the aminoarabinose modification of lipid A and the production of spermidine on the bacterial outer membrane, which likely reduce the entry of aminoglycosides. Interestingly, the additions of the basic amino acid l-arginine and sodium bicarbonate neutralize the pH and restore P. aeruginosa susceptibility to aminoglycosides, even in the presence of eDNA. These data illustrate that the accumulation of eDNA in biofilms and infection sites can acidify the local environment and that acidic pH promotes the P. aeruginosa antibiotic resistance phenotype. PMID:26552982

  6. Associations among Human-Associated Fecal Contamination, Microcystis aeruginosa, and Microcystin at Lake Erie Beaches.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cheonghoon; Marion, Jason W; Cheung, Melissa; Lee, Chang Soo; Lee, Jiyoung

    2015-09-01

    Lake Erie beaches exhibit impaired water quality due to fecal contamination and cyanobacterial blooms, though few studies address potential relationships between these two public health hazards. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), Microcystis aeruginosa was monitored in conjunction with a human-associated fecal marker (Bacteroides fragilis group; g-Bfra), microcystin, and water quality parameters at two beaches to evaluate their potential associations. During the summer of 2010, water samples were collected 32 times from both Euclid and Villa Angela beaches. The phycocyanin intergenic spacer (PC-IGS) and the microcystin-producing (mcyA) gene in M. aeruginosa were quantified with qPCR. PC-IGS and mcyA were detected in 50.0% and 39.1% of samples, respectively, and showed increased occurrences after mid-August. Correlation and regression analyses showed that water temperature was negatively correlated with M. aeruginosa markers and microcystin. The densities of mcyA and the g-Bfra were predicted by nitrate, implicating fecal contamination as contributing to the growth of M. aeruginosa by nitrate loading. Microcystin was correlated with mcyA (r = 0.413, p < 0.01), suggesting toxin-producing M. aeruginosa populations may significantly contribute to microcystin production. Additionally, microcystin was correlated with total phosphorus (r = 0.628, p < 0.001), which was higher at Euclid (p < 0.05), possibly contributing to higher microcystin concentrations at Euclid. PMID:26378564

  7. Occurrence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Kuwait soil.

    PubMed

    Al-Saleh, Esmaeil; Akbar, Abrar

    2015-02-01

    Environmentally ubiquitous bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa evolved mechanisms to adapt and prevail under diverse conditions. In the current investigation, strains of P. aeruginosa demonstrating high rates of crude oil utilization and tolerance to high concentrations of heavy metals were found in both crude oil-contaminated and uncontaminated sites in Kuwait, and were dominant in the contaminated sites. The incidence of P. aeruginosa in tested soils implies the definitive pattern of crude oil contamination in the selection of the bacterial population in petroleum-contaminated sites in Kuwait. Surprisingly, the unculturable P. aeruginosa in different soil samples showed significant high similarity coefficients based on 16S-RFLP analyses, implying that the unculturable fraction of existing bacterial population in environmental samples is more stable and, hence, reliable for phylogenetic studies compared to the culturable bacteria. PMID:25014900

  8. Antibiotic Conditioned Growth Medium of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benathen, Isaiah A.; Cazeau, Barbara; Joseph, Njeri

    2004-01-01

    A simple method to study the consequences of bacterial antibiosis after interspecific competition between microorganisms is presented. Common microorganisms are used as the test organisms and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are used as the source of the inhibitor agents.

  9. A novel siderophore system is essential for the growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in airway mucus.

    PubMed

    Gi, Mia; Lee, Kang-Mu; Kim, Sang Cheol; Yoon, Joo-Heon; Yoon, Sang Sun; Choi, Jae Young

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa establishes airway infections in Cystic Fibrosis patients. Here, we investigate the molecular interactions between P. aeruginosa and airway mucus secretions (AMS) derived from the primary cultures of normal human tracheal epithelial (NHTE) cells. PAO1, a prototype strain of P. aeruginosa, was capable of proliferating during incubation with AMS, while all other tested bacterial species perished. A PAO1 mutant lacking PA4834 gene became susceptible to AMS treatment. The ΔPA4834 mutant was grown in AMS supplemented with 100 μM ferric iron, suggesting that the PA4834 gene product is involved in iron metabolism. Consistently, intracellular iron content was decreased in the mutant, but not in PAO1 after the AMS treatment. Importantly, a PAO1 mutant unable to produce both pyoverdine and pyochelin remained viable, suggesting that these two major siderophore molecules are dispensable for maintaining viability during incubation with AMS. The ΔPA4834 mutant was regrown in AMS amended with 100 μM nicotianamine, a phytosiderophore whose production is predicted to be mediated by the PA4836 gene. Infectivity of the ΔPA4834 mutant was also significantly compromised in vivo. Together, our results identify a genetic element encoding a novel iron acquisition system that plays a previously undiscovered role in P. aeruginosa airway infection. PMID:26446565

  10. A novel siderophore system is essential for the growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in airway mucus

    PubMed Central

    Gi, Mia; Lee, Kang-Mu; Kim, Sang Cheol; Yoon, Joo-Heon; Yoon, Sang Sun; Choi, Jae Young

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa establishes airway infections in Cystic Fibrosis patients. Here, we investigate the molecular interactions between P. aeruginosa and airway mucus secretions (AMS) derived from the primary cultures of normal human tracheal epithelial (NHTE) cells. PAO1, a prototype strain of P. aeruginosa, was capable of proliferating during incubation with AMS, while all other tested bacterial species perished. A PAO1 mutant lacking PA4834 gene became susceptible to AMS treatment. The ΔPA4834 mutant was grown in AMS supplemented with 100 μM ferric iron, suggesting that the PA4834 gene product is involved in iron metabolism. Consistently, intracellular iron content was decreased in the mutant, but not in PAO1 after the AMS treatment. Importantly, a PAO1 mutant unable to produce both pyoverdine and pyochelin remained viable, suggesting that these two major siderophore molecules are dispensable for maintaining viability during incubation with AMS. The ΔPA4834 mutant was regrown in AMS amended with 100 μM nicotianamine, a phytosiderophore whose production is predicted to be mediated by the PA4836 gene. Infectivity of the ΔPA4834 mutant was also significantly compromised in vivo. Together, our results identify a genetic element encoding a novel iron acquisition system that plays a previously undiscovered role in P. aeruginosa airway infection. PMID:26446565

  11. Impairment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Resistance to Antibiotics by Combining the Drugs with a New Quorum-Sensing Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Lajoie, Barbora; El Hage, Salome; Baziard, Genevieve; Roques, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa plays an important role in chronic lung infections among patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) through its ability to form antibiotic-resistant biofilms. In P. aeruginosa, biofilm development and the production of several virulence factors are mainly regulated by the rhl and las quorum-sensing (QS) systems, which are controlled by two N-acyl-homoserine lactone signal molecules. In a previous study, we discovered an original QS inhibitor, N-(2-pyrimidyl)butanamide, called C11, based on the structure of C4-homoserine lactone, and found that it is able to significantly inhibit P. aeruginosa biofilm formation. However, recent data indicate that P. aeruginosa grows under anaerobic conditions and forms biofilms in the lungs of CF patients that are denser and more robust than those formed under aerobic conditions. Our confocal microscopy observations of P. aeruginosa biofilms developed under aerobic and anaerobic conditions confirmed that the biofilms formed under these two conditions have radically different architectures. C11 showed significant dose-dependent antibiofilm activity on biofilms grown under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions, with a greater inhibitory effect being seen under conditions of anaerobiosis. Gene expression analyses performed by quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR showed that C11 led to the significant downregulation of rhl QS regulatory genes but also to the downregulation of both las QS regulatory genes and QS system-regulated virulence genes, rhlA and lasB. Furthermore, the activity of C11 in combination with antibiotics against P. aeruginosa biofilms was tested, and synergistic antibiofilm activity between C11 and ciprofloxacin, tobramycin, and colistin was obtained under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. This study demonstrates that C11 may increase the efficacy of treatments for P. aeruginosa infections by increasing the susceptibility of biofilms to antibiotics and by attenuating the pathogenicity of the

  12. Vaccination against respiratory Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection

    PubMed Central

    Grimwood, Keith; Kyd, Jennelle M; Owen, Suzzanne J; Massa, Helen M; Cripps, Allan W

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa are a major clinical problem globally, particularly for patients with chronic pulmonary disorders, such as those with cystic fibrosis (CF), non-CF bronchiectasis (nCFB) and severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In addition, critically ill and immunocompromised patients are also at significant risk of P. aeruginosa infection. For almost half a century, research efforts have focused toward development of a vaccine against infections caused by P. aeruginosa, but a licensed vaccine is not yet available. Significant advances in identifying potential vaccine antigens have been made. Immunisations via both the mucosal and systemic routes have been trialled in animal models and their effectiveness in clearing acute infections demonstrated. The challenge for translation of this research to human applications remains, since P. aeruginosa infections in the human respiratory tract can present both as an acute or chronic infection. In addition, immunisation prior to infection may not be possible for many patients with CF, nCFB or COPD. Therefore, development of a therapeutic vaccine provides an alternative approach for treatment of chronic infection. Preliminary animal and human studies suggest that mucosal immunisation may be effective as a therapeutic vaccine against P. aeruginosa respiratory infections. Nevertheless, more research is needed to improve our understanding of the basic biology of P. aeruginosa and the mechanisms needed to upregulate the induction of host immune pathways to prevent infection. Recognition of variability in the host immune responses for a range of patient health conditions at risk from P. aeruginosa infection is also required to support development of a successful vaccine delivery strategy and vaccine. Activation of mucosal immune responses may provide improved efficacy of vaccination for P. aeruginosa during both acute exacerbations and chronic infection. PMID:25483510

  13. Adaptation of Iron Homeostasis Pathways by a Pseudomonas aeruginosa Pyoverdine Mutant in the Cystic Fibrosis Lung

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Angela T.; O'Neill, Maura J.; Watts, Annabelle M.; Robson, Cynthia L.; Lamont, Iain L.; Wilks, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients suffer from chronic bacterial lung infections, most notably by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which persists for decades in the lungs and undergoes extensive evolution. P. aeruginosa requires iron for virulence and uses the fluorescent siderophore pyoverdine to scavenge and solubilize ferric iron during acute infections. Pyoverdine mutants accumulate in the lungs of some CF patients, however, suggesting that the heme and ferrous iron acquisition pathways of P. aeruginosa are more important in this environment. Here, we sought to determine how evolution of P. aeruginosa in the CF lung affects iron acquisition and regulatory pathways through the use of longitudinal CF isolates. These analyses demonstrated a significant reduction of siderophore production during the course of CF lung infection in nearly all strains tested. Mass spectrometry analysis of one of these strains showed that the later CF isolate has streamlined the metabolic flux of extracellular heme through the HemO heme oxygenase, resulting in more-efficient heme utilization. Moreover, gene expression analysis shows that iron regulation via the PrrF small RNAs (sRNAs) is enhanced in the later CF isolate. Finally, analysis of P. aeruginosa gene expression in the lungs of various CF patients demonstrates that both PrrF and HemO are consistently expressed in the CF lung environment. Combined, these results suggest that heme is a critical source of iron during prolonged infection of the CF lung and that changes in iron and heme regulatory pathways play a crucial role in adaptation of P. aeruginosa to this ever-changing host environment. PMID:24727222

  14. Adaptation of iron homeostasis pathways by a Pseudomonas aeruginosa pyoverdine mutant in the cystic fibrosis lung.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Angela T; O'Neill, Maura J; Watts, Annabelle M; Robson, Cynthia L; Lamont, Iain L; Wilks, Angela; Oglesby-Sherrouse, Amanda G

    2014-06-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients suffer from chronic bacterial lung infections, most notably by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which persists for decades in the lungs and undergoes extensive evolution. P. aeruginosa requires iron for virulence and uses the fluorescent siderophore pyoverdine to scavenge and solubilize ferric iron during acute infections. Pyoverdine mutants accumulate in the lungs of some CF patients, however, suggesting that the heme and ferrous iron acquisition pathways of P. aeruginosa are more important in this environment. Here, we sought to determine how evolution of P. aeruginosa in the CF lung affects iron acquisition and regulatory pathways through the use of longitudinal CF isolates. These analyses demonstrated a significant reduction of siderophore production during the course of CF lung infection in nearly all strains tested. Mass spectrometry analysis of one of these strains showed that the later CF isolate has streamlined the metabolic flux of extracellular heme through the HemO heme oxygenase, resulting in more-efficient heme utilization. Moreover, gene expression analysis shows that iron regulation via the PrrF small RNAs (sRNAs) is enhanced in the later CF isolate. Finally, analysis of P. aeruginosa gene expression in the lungs of various CF patients demonstrates that both PrrF and HemO are consistently expressed in the CF lung environment. Combined, these results suggest that heme is a critical source of iron during prolonged infection of the CF lung and that changes in iron and heme regulatory pathways play a crucial role in adaptation of P. aeruginosa to this ever-changing host environment. PMID:24727222

  15. A Novel Signal Transduction Pathway that Modulates rhl Quorum Sensing and Bacterial Virulence in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Feifei; Xia, Yongjie; Lou, Jingyu; Zhang, Xue; Yang, Nana; Sun, Xiaoxu; Zhang, Qin; Zhuo, Chao; Huang, Xi; Deng, Xin; Yang, Cai-Guang; Ye, Yan; Zhao, Jing; Wu, Min; Lan, Lefu

    2014-01-01

    The rhl quorum-sensing (QS) system plays critical roles in the pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa. However, the regulatory effects that occur directly upstream of the rhl QS system are poorly understood. Here, we show that deletion of gene encoding for the two-component sensor BfmS leads to the activation of its cognate response regulator BfmR, which in turn directly binds to the promoter and decreases the expression of the rhlR gene that encodes the QS regulator RhlR, causing the inhibition of the rhl QS system. In the absence of bfmS, the Acka-Pta pathway can modulate the regulatory activity of BfmR. In addition, BfmS tunes the expression of 202 genes that comprise 3.6% of the P. aeruginosa genome. We further demonstrate that deletion of bfmS causes substantially reduced virulence in lettuce leaf, reduced cytotoxicity, enhanced invasion, and reduced bacterial survival during acute mouse lung infection. Intriguingly, specific missense mutations, which occur naturally in the bfmS gene in P. aeruginosa cystic fibrosis (CF) isolates such as DK2 strains and RP73 strain, can produce BfmS variants (BfmSL181P, BfmSL181P/E376Q, and BfmSR393H) that no longer repress, but instead activate BfmR. As a result, BfmS variants, but not the wild-type BfmS, inhibit the rhl QS system. This study thus uncovers a previously unexplored signal transduction pathway, BfmS/BfmR/RhlR, for the regulation of rhl QS in P. aeruginosa. We propose that BfmRS TCS may have an important role in the regulation and evolution of P. aeruginosa virulence during chronic infection in CF lungs. PMID:25166864

  16. The transcriptional regulator AlgR is essential for Pseudomonas aeruginosa pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lizewski, Stephen E; Lundberg, Derek S; Schurr, Michael J

    2002-11-01

    Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection is the major cause of morbidity and mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. One P. aeruginosa virulence factor unique to CF isolates is overproduction of alginate, phenotypically termed mucoidy. Mucoidy is the result of increased transcription from the algD gene and is activated by the transcriptional regulator AlgR. Mutations in algR result in a nonmucoid phenotype and loss of twitching motility. Additionally, AlgR controls transcription of algC, encoding a dual-function enzyme necessary for both lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and alginate production. Therefore, to determine the effect of algR on P. aeruginosa virulence, an algR mutant was examined for sensitivity to reactive oxygen intermediates, killing by phagocytes, systemic virulence, and the ability to maintain a murine lung infection. We found that P. aeruginosa PAO700 (algR::Gm(r)) was less lethal than PAO1, as tested in an acute septicemia infection mouse model, and was cleared more efficiently in a mouse pneumonia model. Additionally, the algR mutant (PAO700) was more sensitive to hypochlorite. However, PAO700 was more resistant to hydrogen peroxide and killed less readily in an acellular myeloperoxidase assay than PAO1. There was little difference in killing between PAO1 and PAO700 with macrophage-like J774 cells and human polymorhonuclear leukocytes. Two-dimensional gel analysis of P. aeruginosa algR mutant and wild-type protein extracts revealed 47 differentially regulated proteins, suggesting that AlgR plays both a positive role and a negative role in gene expression. Together, these results imply that AlgR is necessary for virulence and regulates genes in addition to the genes associated with alginate and LPS production and pilus function. PMID:12379685

  17. Type IV pili mechanochemically regulate virulence factors in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Persat, Alexandre; Inclan, Yuki F.; Engel, Joanne N.; Stone, Howard A.; Gitai, Zemer

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria have evolved a wide range of sensing systems to appropriately respond to environmental signals. Here we demonstrate that the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa detects contact with surfaces on short timescales using the mechanical activity of its type IV pili, a major surface adhesin. This signal transduction mechanism requires attachment of type IV pili to a solid surface, followed by pilus retraction and signal transduction through the Chp chemosensory system, a chemotaxis-like sensory system that regulates cAMP production and transcription of hundreds of genes, including key virulence factors. Like other chemotaxis pathways, pili-mediated surface sensing results in a transient response amplified by a positive feedback that increases type IV pili activity, thereby promoting long-term surface attachment that can stimulate additional virulence and biofilm-inducing pathways. The methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein-like chemosensor PilJ directly interacts with the major pilin subunit PilA. Our results thus support a mechanochemical model where a chemosensory system measures the mechanically induced conformational changes in stretched type IV pili. These findings demonstrate that P. aeruginosa not only uses type IV pili for surface-specific twitching motility, but also as a sensor regulating surface-induced gene expression and pathogenicity. PMID:26041805

  18. Attenuation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence by quorum sensing inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Hentzer, Morten; Wu, Hong; Andersen, Jens Bo; Riedel, Kathrin; Rasmussen, Thomas B.; Bagge, Niels; Kumar, Naresh; Schembri, Mark A.; Song, Zhijun; Kristoffersen, Peter; Manefield, Mike; Costerton, John W.; Molin, Søren; Eberl, Leo; Steinberg, Peter; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Høiby, Niels; Givskov, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Traditional treatment of infectious diseases is based on compounds that kill or inhibit growth of bacteria. A major concern with this approach is the frequent development of resistance to antibiotics. The discovery of communication systems (quorum sensing systems) regulating bacterial virulence has afforded a novel opportunity to control infectious bacteria without interfering with growth. Compounds that can override communication signals have been found in the marine environment. Using Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 as an example of an opportunistic human pathogen, we show that a synthetic derivate of natural furanone compounds can act as a potent antagonist of bacterial quorum sensing. We employed GeneChip® microarray technology to identify furanone target genes and to map the quorum sensing regulon. The transcriptome analysis showed that the furanone drug specifically targeted quorum sensing systems and inhibited virulence factor expression. Application of the drug to P.aeruginosa biofilms increased bacterial susceptibility to tobramycin and SDS. In a mouse pulmonary infection model, the drug inhibited quorum sensing of the infecting bacteria and promoted their clearance by the mouse immune response. PMID:12881415

  19. Global Transcriptomic Analysis of Interactions between Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Bacteriophage PaP3

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xia; Chen, Canhuang; Shen, Wei; Huang, Guangtao; Le, Shuai; Lu, Shuguang; Li, Ming; Zhao, Yan; Wang, Jing; Rao, Xiancai; Li, Gang; Shen, Mengyu; Guo, Keke; Yang, Yuhui; Tan, Yinling; Hu, Fuquan

    2016-01-01

    The interactions between Bacteriophage (phage) and host bacteria are widespread in nature and influences of phage replication on the host cells are complex and extensive. Here, we investigate genome-wide interactions of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) and its temperate phage PaP3 at five time points during phage infection. Compared to the uninfected host, 38% (2160/5633) genes of phage-infected host were identified as differentially expressed genes (DEGs). Functional analysis of the repressed DEGs revealed infection-stage-dependent pathway communications. Based on gene co-expression analysis, most PaP3 middle genes were predicted to have negative impact on host transcriptional regulators. Sub-network enrichment analysis revealed that adjacent genes of PaP3 interacted with the same host genes and might possess similar functions. Finally, our results suggested that during the whole infection stage, the early genes of PaP3 had stronger regulatory role in host gene expression than middle and late genes, while the host genes involved amino acid metabolism were the most “vulnerable” targets of these phage genes. This work provides the basis for understanding survival mechanisms of parasites and host, and seeking phage gene products that could potentially be used in anti-bacterial infection. PMID:26750429

  20. Comparative genomics reveals diversified CRISPR-Cas systems of globally distributed Microcystis aeruginosa, a freshwater bloom-forming cyanobacterium

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chen; Lin, Feibi; Li, Qi; Li, Tao; Zhao, Jindong

    2015-01-01

    Microcystis aeruginosa is one of the most common and dominant bloom-forming cyanobacteria in freshwater lakes around the world. Microcystis cells can produce toxic secondary metabolites, such as microcystins, which are harmful to human health. Two M. aeruginosa strains were isolated from two highly eutrophic lakes in China and their genomes were sequenced. Comparative genomic analysis was performed with the 12 other available M. aeruginosa genomes and closely related unicellular cyanobacterium. Each genome of M. aeruginosa containing at least one clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) locus and total 71 loci were identified, suggesting it is ubiquitous in M. aeruginosa genomes. In addition to the previously reported subtype I-D cas gene sets, three CAS subtypes I-A, III-A and III-B were identified and characterized in this study. Seven types of CRISPR direct repeat have close association with CAS subtype, confirming that different and specific secondary structures of CRISPR repeats are important for the recognition, binding and process of corresponding cas gene sets. Homology search of the CRISPR spacer sequences provides a history of not only resistance to bacteriophages and plasmids known to be associated with M. aeruginosa, but also the ability to target much more exogenous genetic material in the natural environment. These adaptive and heritable defense mechanisms play a vital role in keeping genomic stability and self-maintenance by restriction of horizontal gene transfer. Maintaining genomic stability and modulating genomic plasticity are both important evolutionary strategies for M. aeruginosa in adaptation and survival in various habitats. PMID:26029174

  1. QUANTIFICATION OF RECA GENE EXPRESSION AS AN INDICATOR OF REPAIR POTENTIAL IN MARINE BACTERIOPLANKTON COMMUNITIES OF ANTARCTICA.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Marine bacteria in surface waters must cope daily with the damaging effects of exposure to solar radiation (containing both UV-A and UV-B wavelengths), which produces lesions in their DNA. As the stratospheric ozone layer is depleted, these coping mechanisms are likely to play an...

  2. Mutation and killing of Escherichia coli expressing a cloned Bacillus subtilis gene whose product alters DNA conformation.

    PubMed Central

    Setlow, J K; Randesi, M; Adams, J G; Setlow, B; Setlow, P

    1992-01-01

    Expression of the Bacillus subtilis gene coding for SspC, a small, acid-soluble protein, caused both killing and mutation in a number of Escherichia coli B and K-12 strains. SspC was previously shown to bind E. coli DNA in vivo, and in vitro this protein binds DNA and converts it into an A-like conformation. Analysis of revertants of nonsense mutations showed that SspC caused single-base changes, and a greater proportion of these were at A-T base pairs. Mutation in the recA gene abolished the induction of mutations upon synthesis of SspC, but the killing was only slightly greater than in RecA+ cells. Mutations in the umuC and umuD genes eliminated most of the mutagenic effect of SspC but not the killing, while the lexA mutation increased mutagenesis but did not appreciably affect the killing. Since there was neither killing nor mutation of E. coli after synthesis of a mutant SspC which does not bind DNA, it appears likely that the binding of wild-type SspC to DNA, with the attendant conformational change, was responsible for the killing and mutation. A strain containing the B. subtilis gene that is constitutive for the RecA protein at 42 degrees C showed a lower frequency of mutation when that temperature was used to induce the RecA protein than when the temperature was 30 degrees C, where the RecA level is low, suggesting that at the elevated temperature the high RecA level could be inhibiting binding of the B. subtilis protein to DNA. PMID:1314805

  3. Plant mitochondrial recombination surveillance requires unusual RecA and MutS homologs.

    PubMed

    Shedge, Vikas; Arrieta-Montiel, Maria; Christensen, Alan C; Mackenzie, Sally A

    2007-04-01

    For >20 years, the enigmatic behavior of plant mitochondrial genomes has been well described but not well understood. Chimeric genes appear, and occasionally are differentially replicated or expressed, with significant effects on plant phenotype, most notably on male fertility, yet the mechanisms of DNA replication, chimera formation, and recombination have remained elusive. Using mutations in two important genes of mitochondrial DNA metabolism, we have observed reproducible asymmetric recombination events occurring at specific locations in the mitochondrial genome. Based on these experiments and existing models of double-strand break repair, we propose a model for plant mitochondrial DNA replication, chimeric gene formation, and the illegitimate recombination events that lead to stoichiometric changes. We also address the physiological and developmental effects of aberrant events in mitochondrial genome maintenance, showing that mitochondrial genome rearrangements, when controlled, influence plant reproduction, but when uncontrolled, lead to aberrant growth phenotypes and dramatic reduction of the cell cycle. PMID:17468263

  4. LasI/R and RhlI/R Quorum Sensing in a Strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Beneficial to Plants▿

    PubMed Central

    Steindler, Laura; Bertani, Iris; De Sordi, Luisa; Schwager, Stephan; Eberl, Leo; Venturi, Vittorio

    2009-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa possesses three quorum-sensing (QS) systems which are key in the expression of a large number of genes, including many virulence factors. Most studies of QS in P. aeruginosa have been performed in clinical isolates and have therefore focused on its role in pathogenicity. P. aeruginosa, however, is regarded as a ubiquitous organism capable of colonizing many different environments and also of establishing beneficial associations with plants. In this study we examined the role of the two N-acyl homoserine lactone systems known as RhlI/R and LasI/R in the environmental rice rhizosphere isolate P. aeruginosa PUPa3. Both the Rhl and Las systems are involved in the regulation of plant growth-promoting traits. The environmental P. aeruginosa PUPa3 is pathogenic in two nonmammalian infection models, and only the double las rhl mutants are attenuated for virulence. In fact it was established that the two QS systems are not hierarchically organized and that they are both important for the colonization of the rice rhizosphere. This is an in-depth genetic and molecular study of QS in an environmental P. aeruginosa strain and highlights several differences with QS regulation in the clinical isolate PAO1. PMID:19525275

  5. Nitrite reductase is critical for Pseudomonas aeruginosa survival during co-infection with the oral commensal Streptococcus parasanguinis.

    PubMed

    Scoffield, Jessica A; Wu, Hui

    2016-02-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the major aetiological agent of chronic pulmonary infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. However, recent evidence suggests that the polymicrobial community of the CF lung may also harbour oral streptococci, and colonization by these micro-organisms may have a negative impact on P. aeruginosa within the CF lung. Our previous studies demonstrated that nitrite abundance plays an important role in P. aeruginosa survival during co-infection with oral streptococci. Nitrite reductase is a key enzyme involved in nitrite metabolism. Therefore, the objective of this study was to examine the role nitrite reductase (gene nirS) plays in P. aeruginosa survival during co-infection with an oral streptococcus, Streptococcus parasanguinis. Inactivation of nirS in both the chronic CF isolate FRD1 and acute wound isolate PAO1 reduced the survival rate of P. aeruginosa when co-cultured with S. parasanguinis. Growth of both mutants was restored when co-cultured with S. parasanguinis that was defective for H2O2 production. Furthermore, the nitrite reductase mutant was unable to kill Drosophila melanogaster during co-infection with S. parasanguinis. Taken together, these results suggest that nitrite reductase plays an important role for survival of P. aeruginosa during co-infection with S. parasanguinis. PMID:26673783

  6. The heterologous siderophores ferrioxamine B and ferrichrome activate signaling pathways in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Llamas, María A; Sparrius, Marion; Kloet, Roy; Jiménez, Connie R; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, Christina; Bitter, Wilbert

    2006-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa secretes two siderophores, pyoverdine and pyochelin, under iron-limiting conditions. These siderophores are recognized at the cell surface by specific outer membrane receptors, also known as TonB-dependent receptors. In addition, this bacterium is also able to incorporate many heterologous siderophores of bacterial or fungal origin, which is reflected by the presence of 32 additional genes encoding putative TonB-dependent receptors. In this work, we have used a proteomic approach to identify the inducing conditions for P. aeruginosa TonB-dependent receptors. In total, 11 of these receptors could be discerned under various conditions. Two of them are only produced in the presence of the hydroxamate siderophores ferrioxamine B and ferrichrome. Regulation of their synthesis is affected by both iron and the presence of a cognate siderophore. Analysis of the P. aeruginosa genome showed that both receptor genes are located next to a regulatory locus encoding an extracytoplasmic function sigma factor and a transmembrane sensor. The involvement of this putative regulatory locus in the specific induction of the ferrioxamine B and ferrichrome receptors has been demonstrated. These results show that P. aeruginosa has evolved multiple specific regulatory systems to allow the regulation of TonB-dependent receptors. PMID:16484199

  7. Cranberry-derived proanthocyanidins impair virulence and inhibit quorum sensing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Maisuria, Vimal B.; Los Santos, Yossef Lopez-de; Tufenkji, Nathalie; Déziel, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria have evolved multiple strategies for causing infections that include producing virulence factors, undertaking motility, developing biofilms, and invading host cells. N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL)-mediated quorum sensing (QS) tightly regulates the expression of multiple virulence factors in the opportunistic pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Thus, inhibiting QS could lead to health benefits. In this study, we demonstrate an anti-virulence activity of a cranberry extract rich in proanthocyanidins (cerPAC) against P. aeruginosa in the model host Drosophila melanogaster and show this is mediated by QS interference. cerPAC reduced the production of QS-regulated virulence determinants and protected D. melanogaster from fatal infection by P. aeruginosa PA14. Quantification of AHL production using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry confirmed that cerPAC effectively reduced the level of AHLs produced by the bacteria. Furthermore, monitoring QS signaling gene expression revealed that AHL synthases LasI/RhlI and QS transcriptional regulators LasR/RhlR genes were inhibited and antagonized, respectively, by cerPAC. Molecular docking studies suggest that cranberry-derived proanthocyanidin binds to QS transcriptional regulators, mainly interacting with their ligand binding sites. These findings provide insights into the underlying mechanisms of action of a cerPAC to restrict the virulence of P. aeruginosa and can have implications in the development of alternative approaches to control infections. PMID:27503003

  8. Antibiotic resistance profiles and virulence markers of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated from composts.

    PubMed

    Kaszab, Edit; Szoboszlay, Sándor; Dobolyi, Csaba; Háhn, Judit; Pék, Nikoletta; Kriszt, Balázs

    2011-01-01

    The aim of our work was to determine the presence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in compost raw materials, immature and mature compost, and compost-treated soil. Twenty-five strains of P. aeruginosa were isolated from a raw material (plant straw), immature and mature compost and compost-treated soil samples. The strains were identified using the PCR method for the detection of species specific variable regions of 16S rDNA. Strains were examined for the presence of five different virulence-related gene sequences (exoA, exoU, exoT, exoS and exoY) and their antibiotic resistance profiles were determined. Based on our results, species P. aeruginosa can reach significant numbers (up to 10(6) MPN/g sample) during composting and 92.0% of the isolated strains carrying at least two gene sequences encoding toxic proteins. Various types of drug resistance were detected among compost originating strains, mainly against third generation Cephalosporins and Carbapenems. Six isolates were able to resist two different classes of antibiotics (third generation Cephalosporins and Carbapenems, wide spectrum Penicillins or Aminoglycosides, respectively). Based on our results, composts can be a source of P. aeruginosa and might be a concern to individuals susceptible to this opportunistic pathogen. PMID:20817443

  9. Cranberry-derived proanthocyanidins impair virulence and inhibit quorum sensing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Maisuria, Vimal B; Los Santos, Yossef Lopez-de; Tufenkji, Nathalie; Déziel, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria have evolved multiple strategies for causing infections that include producing virulence factors, undertaking motility, developing biofilms, and invading host cells. N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL)-mediated quorum sensing (QS) tightly regulates the expression of multiple virulence factors in the opportunistic pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Thus, inhibiting QS could lead to health benefits. In this study, we demonstrate an anti-virulence activity of a cranberry extract rich in proanthocyanidins (cerPAC) against P. aeruginosa in the model host Drosophila melanogaster and show this is mediated by QS interference. cerPAC reduced the production of QS-regulated virulence determinants and protected D. melanogaster from fatal infection by P. aeruginosa PA14. Quantification of AHL production using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry confirmed that cerPAC effectively reduced the level of AHLs produced by the bacteria. Furthermore, monitoring QS signaling gene expression revealed that AHL synthases LasI/RhlI and QS transcriptional regulators LasR/RhlR genes were inhibited and antagonized, respectively, by cerPAC. Molecular docking studies suggest that cranberry-derived proanthocyanidin binds to QS transcriptional regulators, mainly interacting with their ligand binding sites. These findings provide insights into the underlying mechanisms of action of a cerPAC to restrict the virulence of P. aeruginosa and can have implications in the development of alternative approaches to control infections. PMID:27503003

  10. Extracts of Cordia gilletii de wild (Boraginaceae) quench the quorum sensing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1

    PubMed Central

    Okusa, Philippe N.; Rasamiravaka, Tsiry; Vandeputte, Olivier; Stévigny, Caroline; Jaziri, Mondher El; Duez, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The fight against infectious diseases and antimicrobial resistances needs the exploration of new active compounds with new proprieties like disrupting quorum sensing (QS) mechanisms, which is a cell-to-cell communication that regulates bacterial virulence factors. In this work, leaves and root barks extracts of a Congolese medicinal plant, Cordia gilletii, were investigated for their effect on the production of Pseudomonas aeruginosa major virulence factors regulated by QS. Materials and Methods: The effect of C. gilletii extracts on virulence factors of P. aeruginosa PAO1 was studied by the evaluation of the production of pyocyanine, elastase and biofilm; and by the measurement of the expression of QS-related genes. Results: The dichloromethane extract from root barks was found to quench the production of pyocyanin, a QS-dependent virulence factor in P. aeruginosa PAO1. Moreover, this extract specifically inhibits the expression of several QS-regulated genes (i.e. lasB, rhlA, lasI, lasR, rhlI, and rhlR) and reduces biofilm formation by PAO1. Conclusion: This study contributes to explain the efficacy of C. gilletii in the traditional treatment of infectious diseases caused by P. aeruginosa. PMID:26401363

  11. phoU Inactivation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Enhances Accumulation of ppGpp and Polyphosphate

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Luiz Gustavo; Ortiz, Julia Helena; Schneider, René P.

    2015-01-01

    Inorganic polyphosphate (polyP) is a linear polymer composed of several molecules of orthophosphate (Pi) linked by energy-rich phosphoanhydride bonds. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pi is taken up by the ABC transporter Pst, encoded by an operon consisting of five genes. The first four genes encode proteins involved in the transport of Pi and the last gene of the operon, phoU, codes for a protein which exact function is unknown. We show here that the inactivation of phoU in P. aeruginosa enhanced Pi removal from the medium and polyP accumulation. The phoU mutant also accumulated high levels of the alarmone guanosine tetraphosphate (ppGpp), which in turn increased the buildup of polyP. In addition, phoU inactivation had several pleiotropic effects, such as reduced growth rate and yield and increased sensitivity to antibiotics and stresses. However, biofilm formation was not affected by the phoU mutation. PMID:25710363

  12. Mucin Promotes Rapid Surface Motility in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Amy T. Y.; Parayno, Alicia; Hancock, Robert E. W.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT An important environmental factor that determines the mode of motility adopted by Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the viscosity of the medium, often provided by adjusting agar concentrations in vitro. However, the viscous gel-like property of the mucus layer that overlays epithelial surfaces is largely due to the glycoprotein mucin. P. aeruginosa is known to swim within 0.3% (wt/vol) agar and swarm on the surface at 0.5% (wt/vol) agar with amino acids as a weak nitrogen source. When physiological concentrations or as little as 0.05% (wt/vol) mucin was added to the swimming agar, in addition to swimming, P. aeruginosa was observed to undergo highly accelerated motility on the surface of the agar. The surface motility colonies in the presence of mucin appeared to be circular, with a bright green center surrounded by a thicker white edge. While intact flagella were required for the surface motility in the presence of mucin, type IV pili and rhamnolipid production were not. Replacement of mucin with other wetting agents indicated that the lubricant properties of mucin might contribute to the surface motility. Based on studies with mutants, the quorum-sensing systems (las and rhl) and the orphan autoinducer receptor QscR played important roles in this form of surface motility. Transcriptional analysis of cells taken from the motility zone revealed the upregulation of genes involved in virulence and resistance. Based on these results, we suggest that mucin may be promoting a new or highly modified form of surface motility, which we propose should be termed “surfing.” PMID:22550036

  13. Pseudomonas aeruginosa EftM Is a Thermoregulated Methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Owings, Joshua P; Kuiper, Emily G; Prezioso, Samantha M; Meisner, Jeffrey; Varga, John J; Zelinskaya, Natalia; Dammer, Eric B; Duong, Duc M; Seyfried, Nicholas T; Albertí, Sebastián; Conn, Graeme L; Goldberg, Joanna B

    2016-02-12

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative opportunistic pathogen that trimethylates elongation factor-thermo-unstable (EF-Tu) on lysine 5. Lysine 5 methylation occurs in a temperature-dependent manner and is generally only seen when P. aeruginosa is grown at temperatures close to ambient (25 °C) but not at higher temperatures (37 °C). We have previously identified the gene, eftM (for EF-Tu-modifying enzyme), responsible for this modification and shown its activity to be associated with increased bacterial adhesion to and invasion of respiratory epithelial cells. Bioinformatic analyses predicted EftM to be a Class I S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM)-dependent methyltransferase. An in vitro methyltransferase assay was employed to show that, in the presence of SAM, EftM directly trimethylates EF-Tu. A natural variant of EftM, with a glycine to arginine substitution at position 50 in the predicted SAM-binding domain, lacks both SAM binding and enzyme activity. Mass spectrometry analysis of the in vitro methyltransferase reaction products revealed that EftM exclusively methylates at lysine 5 of EF-Tu in a distributive manner. Consistent with the in vivo temperature dependence of methylation of EF-Tu, preincubation of EftM at 37 °C abolished methyltransferase activity, whereas this activity was retained when EftM was preincubated at 25 °C. Irreversible protein unfolding at 37 °C was observed, and we propose that this instability is the molecular basis for the temperature dependence of EftM activity. Collectively, our results show that EftM is a thermolabile, SAM-dependent methyltransferase that directly trimethylates lysine 5 of EF-Tu in P. aeruginosa. PMID:26677219

  14. Loss of genes for DNA recombination and repair in the reductive genome evolution of thioautotrophic symbionts of Calyptogena clams

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Two Calyptogena clam intracellular obligate symbionts, Ca. Vesicomyosocius okutanii (Vok; C. okutanii symbiont) and Ca. Ruthia magnifica (Rma; C. magnifica symbiont), have small genomes (1.02 and 1.16 Mb, respectively) with low G+C contents (31.6% and 34.0%, respectively) and are thought to be in an ongoing stage of reductive genome evolution (RGE). They lack recA and some genes for DNA repair, including mutY. The loss of recA and mutY is thought to contribute to the stabilization of their genome architectures and GC bias, respectively. To understand how these genes were lost from the symbiont genomes, we surveyed these genes in the genomes from 10 other Calyptogena clam symbionts using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results Phylogenetic trees reconstructed using concatenated 16S and 23S rRNA gene sequences showed that the symbionts formed two clades, clade I (symbionts of C. kawamurai, C. laubieri, C. kilmeri, C. okutanii and C. soyoae) and clade II (those of C. pacifica, C. fausta, C. nautilei, C. stearnsii, C. magnifica, C. fossajaponica and C. phaseoliformis). recA was detected by PCR with consensus primers for recA in the symbiont of C. phaseoliformis. A detailed homology search revealed a remnant recA in the Rma genome. Using PCR with a newly designed primer set, intact recA or its remnant was detected in clade II symbionts. In clade I symbionts, the recA coding region was found to be mostly deleted. In the Rma genome, a pseudogene of mutY was found. Using PCR with newly designed primer sets, mutY was not found in clade I symbionts but was found in clade II symbionts. The G+C content of 16S and 23S rRNA genes in symbionts lacking mutY was significantly lower than in those with mutY. Conclusions The extant Calyptogena clam symbionts in clade II were shown to have recA and mutY or their remnants, while those in clade I did not. The present results indicate that the extant symbionts are losing these genes in RGE, and that the loss of mut

  15. Cloning, expression and purification of penicillin-binding protein 3 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa CMCC 10104.

    PubMed

    An, Yan Dong; Du, Qi Zhen; Tong, Li Yan; Yu, Zhao Wu; Gong, Xing Wen

    2015-06-01

    Penicillin-binding protein 3 (PBP3) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the primary target of β-lactams used to treat pseudomonas infections. Meanwhile, structure change and overproduction of PBP3 play important roles in the drug resistance of P. aeruginosa. Therefore, studies on the gene and structure of PBP3 are urgently needed. P. aeruginosa CMCC 10104 is a type culture strain common used in China. However, there is no report on its genomic and proteomic profiles. In this study, based on ftsI of P. aeruginosa PAO1, the gene encoding PBP3 was cloned from CMCC 10104. A truncated version of the ftsI gene, omitting the bases encoding the hydrophobic leader peptide (amino acids 1-34), was amplified by PCR. The cloned DNA shared 99.76% identity with ftsI from PAO1. Only four bases were different (66 C-A, 1020 T-C, 1233 T-C, and 1527 T-C). However, there were no differences between their deduced amino acid sequences. The recombinant PBP3 (rPBP3), containing a 6-histidine tag, was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). Immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) with Ni(2+)-NTA agarose was used for its purification. The purified rPBP3 was identified by SDS-PAGE and western blot analysis, and showed a single band at about 60kDa with purity higher than 95%. The penicillin-binding assay indicated that the obtained rPBP3 was functional and not hindered by the presence of the C-terminal His-tag. The protocol described in this study offers a method for obtaining purified recombinant PBP3 from P. aeruginosa CMCC 10104. PMID:25514204

  16. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Dose-Response and Bathing Water Infection

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most commonly identified opportunistic pathogen associated with pool acquired bather disease. To better understand why this microorganism poses this protracted problem we recently appraised P. aeruginosa pool risk management. Much is known about the ...

  17. Biological cost of hypermutation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains from patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Montanari, Sara; Oliver, Antonio; Salerno, Paola; Mena, Ana; Bertoni, Giovanni; Tümmler, Burkhard; Cariani, Lisa; Conese, Massimo; Döring, Gerd; Bragonzi, Alessandra

    2007-05-01

    The high prevalence of hypermutable (mismatch repair-deficient) Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) is thought to be driven by their co-selection with adaptive mutations required for long-term persistence. Whether the increased mutation rate of naturally hypermutable strains is associated with a biological benefit or cost for the colonization of secondary environments is not known. Thirty-nine P. aeruginosa strains were collected from ten patients with CF during their course of chronic lung infections and screened for hypermutability. Seven hypermutable P. aeruginosa strains (18 %) isolated from six patients with CF (60 %) were identified and assigned to five different genotypes. Complementation and sequence analysis in the mutS, mutL and uvrD genes of these hypermutable P. aeruginosa strains revealed novel mutations. To understand the consequences of hypermutation for the fitness of the organisms, five pairs of clinical wild-type/hypermutable, clonally related P. aeruginosa strains and the laboratory strains PAO1/PAO1DeltamutS were subjected to competition in vitro and in the agar-beads mouse model of chronic airway infection. When tested in competition assay in vitro, the wild-type outcompeted four clinical hypermutable strains and the PAO1DeltamutS strain. In vivo, all of the hypermutable strains were less efficient at establishing lung infection than their wild-type clones. These results suggest that P. aeruginosa hypermutation is associated with a biological cost, reducing the potential for colonization of new environments and therefore strain transmissibility. PMID:17464058

  18. Screening of Lactobacillus spp. for the prevention of Pseudomonas aeruginosa pulmonary infections

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that significantly increases morbidity and mortality in nosocomial infections and cystic fibrosis patients. Its pathogenicity especially relies on the production of virulence factors or resistances to many antibiotics. Since multiplication of antibiotic resistance can lead to therapeutic impasses, it becomes necessary to develop new tools for fighting P. aeruginosa infections. The use of probiotics is one of the ways currently being explored. Probiotics are microorganisms that exert a positive effect on the host’s health and some of them are known to possess antibacterial activities. Since most of their effects have been shown in the digestive tract, experimental data compatible with the respiratory environment are strongly needed. The main goal of this study was then to test the capacity of lactobacilli to inhibit major virulence factors (elastolytic activity and biofilm formation) associated with P. aeruginosa pathogenicity. Results Sixty-seven lactobacilli were isolated from the oral cavities of healthy volunteers. These isolates together with 20 lactobacilli isolated from raw milks, were tested for their capacity to decrease biofilm formation and activity of the elastase produced by P. aeruginosa PAO1. Ten isolates, particularly efficient, were accurately identified using a polyphasic approach (API 50 CHL, mass-spectrometry and 16S/rpoA/pheS genes sequencing) and typed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). The 8 remaining strains belonging to the L. fermentum (6), L. zeae (1) and L. paracasei (1) species were sensitive to all antibiotics tested with the exception of the intrinsic resistance to vancomycin. The strains were all able to grow in artificial saliva. Conclusion Eight strains belonging to L. fermentum, L. zeae and L. paracasei species harbouring anti-elastase and anti-biofilm properties are potential probiotics for fighting P. aeruginosa pulmonary infections. However, further

  19. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa universal stress protein PA4352 is essential for surviving anaerobic energy stress.

    PubMed

    Boes, Nelli; Schreiber, Kerstin; Härtig, Elisabeth; Jaensch, Lothar; Schobert, Max

    2006-09-01

    During infection of the cystic fibrosis (CF) lung, Pseudomonas aeruginosa microcolonies are embedded in the anaerobic CF mucus. This anaerobic environment seems to contribute to the formation of more robust P. aeruginosa biofilms and to an increased antibiotic tolerance and therefore promotes persistent infection. This study characterizes the P. aeruginosa protein PA4352, which is important for survival under anaerobic energy stress conditions. PA4352 belongs to the universal stress protein (Usp) superfamily and harbors two Usp domains in tandem. In Escherichia coli, Usp-type stress proteins are involved in survival during aerobic growth arrest and under various other stresses. A P. aeruginosa PA4352 knockout mutant was tested for survival under several stress conditions. We found a decrease in viability of this mutant compared to the P. aeruginosa wild type during anaerobic energy starvation caused by the missing electron acceptors oxygen and nitrate. Consistent with this phenotype under anaerobic conditions, the PA4352 knockout mutant was also highly sensitive to carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, the chemical uncoupler of the electron transport chain. Primer extension experiments identified two promoters upstream of the PA4352 gene. One promoter is activated in response to oxygen limitation by the oxygen-sensing regulatory protein Anr. The center of a putative Anr binding site was identified 41.5 bp upstream of the transcriptional start site. The second promoter is active only in the stationary phase, however, independently of RpoS, RelA, or quorum sensing. This is the second P. aeruginosa Usp-type stress protein that we have identified as important for survival under anaerobic conditions, which resembles the environment during persistent infection. PMID:16952944

  20. Pseudomonas aeruginosa wound infection involves activation of its iron acquisition system in response to fascial contact

    PubMed Central

    Kim, M.; Christley, S.; Khodarev, N. N.; Fleming, I.; Huang, Y.; Chang, E.; Zaborina, O.; Alverdy, J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Wound infections are traditionally thought to occur when microbial burden exceeds the innate clearance capacity of host immune system. Here we introduce the idea that the wound environment itself plays a significant contributory role to wound infection. Methods We developed a clinically relevant murine model of soft tissue infection to explore the role of activation of microbial virulence in response to tissue factors as a mechanism by which pathogenic bacteria cause wound infections. Mice underwent abdominal skin incision and light muscle injury with a crushing forceps versus skin incision alone followed by topical inoculation of P. aeruginosa. Mice were sacrificed on postoperative day 6 and abdominal tissues analyzed for clinical signs of wound infection. To determine if specific wound tissues components induce bacterial virulence, P. aeruginosa was exposed to skin, fascia, and muscle. Results Gross wound infection due to P. aeruginosa was observed to be significantly increased in injured tissues vs non-injured (80% vs 10%) tissues (n=20/group, p<0.0001). Exposure of P. aeruginosa to individual tissue components demonstrated that fascia significantly induced bacterial virulence as judged by the production of pyocyanin, a redox-active phenazine compound known to kill immune cells. Whole genome transcriptional profiling of P. aeruginosa exposed to fascia demonstrated activation of multiple genes responsible for the synthesis of the iron scavenging molecule pyochelin. Conclusion We conclude that wound elements, in particular fascia, may play a significant role in enhancing the virulence of P. aeruginosa and may contribute to the pathogenesis of clinical wound infection. PMID:25807409

  1. Metallo‐beta‐lactamases among imipenem‐resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a brazilian university hospital

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Maria Renata Gomes; Caiaffa‐Filho, Hélio Hehl; Burattini, Marcelo Nascimento; Rossi, Flávia

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Imipenem‐resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa resulting from metallo‐β‐lactamases has been reported to be an important cause of nosocomial infection and is a critical therapeutic problem worldwide, especially in the case of bacteremia. OBJECTIVES: To determine the frequency of metallo‐β‐lactamases among imipenem‐resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates and to compare methods of phenotypic and molecular detection. METHODS: During 2006, 69 imipenem‐resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa samples were isolated from blood and tested for metallo‐β‐lactamase production using phenotypic methods. Minimal Inhibitory Concentratrions (MIC) (µg/mL) was determined with commercial microdilution panels. Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) was performed among metallo‐β‐lactamase producers. RESULTS: Of all the blood isolates, 34.5% were found to be imipenem‐resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Positive phenotypic tests for metallo‐β‐lactamases ranged from 28%‐77%, and Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) were positive in 30% (of note, 81% of those samples were blaSPM‐1 and 19% were blaVIM‐2). Ethylenediamine tetracetic acid (EDTA) combinations for the detected enzymes had low kappa values; thus, care should be taken when use it as a phenotypic indicator of MBL. Despite a very resistant antibiogram, four isolates demonstrated the worrisome finding of a colistin MIC in the resistant range. PFGE showed a clonal pattern. CONCLUSION: Metallo‐β‐lactamases among imipenem‐resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa were detected in 30.4% of imipenem‐resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates. This number might have been higher if other genes were included. SPM‐1 was the predominant enzyme found. Phenotypic tests with low kappa values could be misleading when testing for metallo‐β‐lactamases. Polymerase Chain Reaction detection remains the gold standard. PMID:21049207

  2. The mechanism of recA polA lethality: Suppression by RecA-independent recombination repair activated by the lexA(Def) mutation in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Yang; Kogoma, Tokio

    1995-04-01

    The mechanism of recA polA lethality in Escherichia coli has been studied. Complementation tests have indicated that both the 5{prime} {yields} 3{prime} exonuclease and the polymerization activities of DNA polymerase I are essential for viability in the absence of RecA protein, whereas the viability and DNA replication of DNA polymerase I-defective cells depend on the recombinase activity of RecA. An alkaline sucrose gradient sedimentation analysis has indicated that RecA has only a minor role in Okazaki fragment processing. Double-strand break repair is proposed for the major role of RecA in the absence of DNA polymerase I. The lexA(Def)::Tn5 mutation has previously been shown to suppress the temperature-sensitive growth of recA200(Ts) polA25::spc mutants. The lexA(Def) mutation can alleviate impaired DNA synthesis in the recA200(Ts) polA25::spc mutant cells at the restrictive temperature. recF{sup +} is essential for this suppression pathway, recJ and recQ mutations have minor but significant adverse effects on the suppression. The recA200(Ts) allele in the recA200(Ts) polA25::spc lexA(Def) mutant can be replaced by {Delta}recA, indicating that the lexA(Def)-induced suppression is RecA independent. lexA(Def) reduces the sensitivity of {Delta}recA polA25::spc cells to UV damage by {approximately}10{sup 4}-fold. lexA(Def) also restores P1 transduction proficiency to the {Delta}recA polA25::spc mutant to a level that is 7.3% of the recA{sup +} wild type. These results suggest that lexA(Def) activates a RecA-independent, RecF-dependent recombination repair pathway that suppresses the defect in DNA replication in recA polA double mutants. 52 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. Pseudomonas aeruginosa d-Arabinofuranose Biosynthetic Pathway and Its Role in Type IV Pilus Assembly*

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Hanjeong; Kus, Julianne V.; Tessier, Luc; Kelly, John; Burrows, Lori L.

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains PA7 and Pa5196 glycosylate their type IVa pilins with α1,5-linked d-arabinofuranose (d-Araf), a rare sugar configuration identical to that found in cell wall polymers of the Corynebacterineae. Despite this chemical identity, the pathway for biosynthesis of α1,5-d-Araf in Gram-negative bacteria is unknown. Bioinformatics analyses pointed to a cluster of seven P. aeruginosa genes, including homologues of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genes Rv3806c, Rv3790, and Rv3791, required for synthesis of a polyprenyl-linked d-ribose precursor and its epimerization to d-Araf. Pa5196 mutants lacking the orthologues of those genes had non-arabinosylated pilins, poor twitching motility, and significantly fewer surface pili than the wild type even in a retraction-deficient (pilT) background. The Pa5196 pilus system assembled heterologous non-glycosylated pilins efficiently, demonstrating that it does not require post-translationally modified subunits. Together the data suggest that pilins of group IV strains need to be glycosylated for productive subunit-subunit interactions. A recombinant P. aeruginosa PAO1 strain co-expressing the genes for d-Araf biosynthesis, the pilin modification enzyme TfpW, and the acceptor PilAIV produced arabinosylated pili, confirming that the Pa5196 genes identified are both necessary and sufficient. A P. aeruginosa epimerase knock-out could be complemented with the corresponding Mycobacterium smegmatis gene, demonstrating conservation between the systems of the Corynebacterineae and Pseudomonas. This work describes a novel Gram-negative pathway for biosynthesis of d-Araf, a key therapeutic target in Corynebacterineae. PMID:21676874

  4. Developing an international Pseudomonas aeruginosa reference panel

    PubMed Central

    De Soyza, Anthony; Hall, Amanda J; Mahenthiralingam, Eshwar; Drevinek, Pavel; Kaca, Wieslaw; Drulis-Kawa, Zuzanna; Stoitsova, Stoyanka R; Toth, Veronika; Coenye, Tom; Zlosnik, James E A; Burns, Jane L; Sá-Correia, Isabel; De Vos, Daniel; Pirnay, Jean-Paul; Kidd, Timothy J; Reid, David; Manos, Jim; Klockgether, Jens; Wiehlmann, Lutz; Tümmler, Burkhard; McClean, Siobhán; Winstanley, Craig

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major opportunistic pathogen in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and causes a wide range of infections among other susceptible populations. Its inherent resistance to many antimicrobials also makes it difficult to treat infections with this pathogen. Recent evidence has highlighted the diversity of this species, yet despite this, the majority of studies on virulence and pathogenesis focus on a small number of strains. There is a pressing need for a P. aeruginosa reference panel to harmonize and coordinate the collective efforts of the P. aeruginosa research community. We have collated a panel of 43 P. aeruginosa strains that reflects the organism's diversity. In addition to the commonly studied clones, this panel includes transmissible strains, sequential CF isolates, strains with specific virulence characteristics, and strains that represent serotype, genotype or geographic diversity. This focussed panel of P. aeruginosa isolates will help accelerate and consolidate the discovery of virulence determinants, improve our understanding of the pathogenesis of infections caused by this pathogen, and provide the community with a valuable resource for the testing of novel therapeutic agents. PMID:24214409

  5. Clonal complex Pseudomonas aeruginosa in horses.

    PubMed

    Kidd, Timothy J; Gibson, Justine S; Moss, Susan; Greer, Ristan M; Cobbold, Rowland N; Wright, John D; Ramsay, Kay A; Grimwood, Keith; Bell, Scott C

    2011-05-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is associated with infectious endometritis in horses. Although infectious endometritis is often considered a venereal infection, there is relatively limited genotypic-based evidence to support this mode of transmission. The study sought to determine the relatedness between genital P. aeruginosa isolates collected from a limited geographical region using molecular strain typing. Enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus PCR typing was performed on 93 isolates collected between 2005 and 2009 from 2058 thoroughbred horses (including 18 stallions) at 66 studs. While P. aeruginosa was not detected in the stallions, 53/93 (57%) mares harbouring P. aeruginosa had clonally related strains, which included a single dominant genotype detected in 42 (45%) mares from 13 different studs. These novel findings suggest that most equine genital P. aeruginosa infections in this region may have been acquired from mechanisms other than direct horse to horse transmission. Instead, other potential acquisition pathways, as well as strain specific adaptation to the equine genital tract, should be investigated. PMID:21183294

  6. Regulation of Recombination between gtfB/gtfC Genes in Streptococcus mutans by Recombinase A

    PubMed Central

    Inagaki, Satoko; Fujita, Kazuyo; Takashima, Yukiko; Nagayama, Kayoko; Ardin, Arifah C.; Matsumi, Yuki; Matsumoto-Nakano, Michiyo

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans produces 3 types of glucosyltransferases (GTFs), whose cooperative action is essential for cellular adhesion. The recombinase A (RecA) protein is required for homologous recombination. In our previous study, we isolated several strains with a smooth colony morphology and low GTF activity, characteristics speculated to be derived from the GTF fusions. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the mechanism of those fusions. S. mutans strain MT8148 was grown in the presence of recombinant RecA (rRecA) protein, after which smooth colonies were isolated. The biological functions and sequences of the gtfB and gtfC genes of this as well as other clinical strains were determined. The sucrose-dependent adherence rates of those strains were reduced as compared to that of MT8148. Determination of the sequences of the gtfB and gtfC genes showed that an approximately 3500 bp region was deleted from the area between them. Furthermore, expression of the recA gene was elevated in those strains as compared to MT8148. These results suggest that RecA has an important role in fusions of gtfB and gtfC genes, leading to alteration of colony morphology and reduction in sucrose-dependent adhesion. PMID:23476132

  7. Characterization of exo-s, exo-u, and alg virulence factors and antimicrobial resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from migratory Egyptian vultures from India.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Pradeep; Faridi, Farah; Mir, Irfan A; Sharma, Sandeep K

    2014-01-01

    This study of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in fecal droppings of migratory Egyptian vultures (Neophron p. percnopterus) revealed eight positive samples (n=25) by a 16S rRNA gene-based PCR in two consecutive winter seasons. Disk diffusion sensitivity testing revealed three multiple antimicrobial resistant (MAR) isolates. Genotypic characterization showed mutually exclusive exo-s and exo-u virulence genes in five and three isolates, respectively, while the alg gene was present in all of the isolates. MAR isolates with virulence genes were detected in both seasons. The Egyptian vultures could potentially be vectors of pathogenic and MAR P. aeruginosa, thereby affecting regional control and preventive measures. PMID:25317261

  8. Proposal of a quantitative PCR-based protocol for an optimal Pseudomonas aeruginosa detection in patients with cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The lung of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) is particularly sensitive to Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This bacterium plays an important role in the poor outcome of CF patients. During the disease progress, first acquisition of P. aeruginosa is the key-step in the management of CF patients. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) offers an opportunity to detect earlier the first acquisition of P. aeruginosa by CF patients. Given the lack of a validated protocol, our goal was to find an optimal molecular protocol for detection of P. aeruginosa in CF patients. Methods We compared two formerly described qPCR formats in early detection of P. aeruginosa in CF sputum samples: a qPCR targeting oprL gene, and a multiplex PCR targeting gyrB and ecfX genes. Results Tested in vitro on a large panel of P. aeruginosa isolates and others gram-negative bacilli, oprL qPCR exhibited a better sensitivity (threshold of 10 CFU/mL versus 730 CFU/mL), whereas the gyrB/ecfX qPCR exhibited a better specificity (90% versus 73%). These results were validated ex vivo on 46 CF sputum samples positive for P. aeruginosa in culture. Ex vivo assays revealed that qPCR detected 100 times more bacterial cells than culture-based method did. Conclusion Based on these results, we proposed a reference molecular protocol combining the two qPCRs, which offers a sensitivity of 100% with a threshold of 10 CFU/mL and a specificity of 100%. This combined qPCR-based protocol can be adapted and used for other future prospective studies. PMID:24088260

  9. Specific Resistance to Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infection in Zebrafish Is Mediated by the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Phennicie, Ryan T.; Sullivan, Matthew J.; Singer, John T.; Yoder, Jeffrey A.; Kim, Carol H.

    2010-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a genetic disease caused by recessive mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene and is associated with prevalent and chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections. Despite numerous studies that have sought to elucidate the role of CFTR in the innate immune response, the links between CFTR, innate immunity, and P. aeruginosa infection remain unclear. The present work highlights the zebrafish as a powerful model organism for human infectious disease, particularly infection by P. aeruginosa. Zebrafish embryos with reduced expression of the cftr gene (Cftr morphants) exhibited reduced respiratory burst response and directed neutrophil migration, supporting a connection between cftr and the innate immune response. Cftr morphants were infected with P. aeruginosa or other bacterial species that are commonly associated with infections in CF patients, including Burkholderia cenocepacia, Haemophilus influenzae, and Staphylococcus aureus. Intriguingly, the bacterial burden of P. aeruginosa was found to be significantly higher in zebrafish Cftr morphants than in controls, but this phenomenon was not observed with the other bacterial species. Bacterial burden in Cftr morphants infected with a P. aeruginosa ΔLasR mutant, a quorum sensing-deficient strain, was comparable to that in control fish, indicating that the regulation of virulence factors through LasR is required for enhancement of infection in the absence of Cftr. The zebrafish system provides a multitude of advantages for studying the pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa and for understanding the role that innate immune cells, such as neutrophils, play in the host response to acute bacterial infections commonly associated with cystic fibrosis. PMID:20732993

  10. Quantitative genomic analysis of RecA protein binding during DNA double-strand break repair reveals RecBCD action in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Cockram, Charlotte A.; Filatenkova, Milana; Danos, Vincent; El Karoui, Meriem; Leach, David R. F.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding molecular mechanisms in the context of living cells requires the development of new methods of in vivo biochemical analysis to complement established in vitro biochemistry. A critically important molecular mechanism is genetic recombination, required for the beneficial reassortment of genetic information and for DNA double-strand break repair (DSBR). Central to recombination is the RecA (Rad51) protein that assembles into a spiral filament on DNA and mediates genetic exchange. Here we have developed a method that combines chromatin immunoprecipitation with next-generation sequencing (ChIP-Seq) and mathematical modeling to quantify RecA protein binding during the active repair of a single DSB in the chromosome of Escherichia coli. We have used quantitative genomic analysis to infer the key in vivo molecular parameters governing RecA loading by the helicase/nuclease RecBCD at recombination hot-spots, known as Chi. Our genomic analysis has also revealed that DSBR at the lacZ locus causes a second RecBCD-mediated DSBR event to occur in the terminus region of the chromosome, over 1 Mb away. PMID:26261330

  11. Quantitative genomic analysis of RecA protein binding during DNA double-strand break repair reveals RecBCD action in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cockram, Charlotte A; Filatenkova, Milana; Danos, Vincent; El Karoui, Meriem; Leach, David R F

    2015-08-25

    Understanding molecular mechanisms in the context of living cells requires the development of new methods of in vivo biochemical analysis to complement established in vitro biochemistry. A critically important molecular mechanism is genetic recombination, required for the beneficial reassortment of genetic information and for DNA double-strand break repair (DSBR). Central to recombination is the RecA (Rad51) protein that assembles into a spiral filament on DNA and mediates genetic exchange. Here we have developed a method that combines chromatin immunoprecipitation with next-generation sequencing (ChIP-Seq) and mathematical modeling to quantify RecA protein binding during the active repair of a single DSB in the chromosome of Escherichia coli. We have used quantitative genomic analysis to infer the key in vivo molecular parameters governing RecA loading by the helicase/nuclease RecBCD at recombination hot-spots, known as Chi. Our genomic analysis has also revealed that DSBR at the lacZ locus causes a second RecBCD-mediated DSBR event to occur in the terminus region of the chromosome, over 1 Mb away. PMID:26261330

  12. Towards structural understanding of feedback control of arginine biosynthesis: cloning and expression of the gene for the arginine-inhibited N-acetyl-L-glutamate kinase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, purification and crystallization of the recombinant enzyme and preliminary X-ray studies.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Murga, M Leonor; Ramón-Maiques, Santiago; Gil-Ortiz, Fernando; Fita, Ignacio; Rubio, Vicente

    2002-06-01

    N-Acetyl-L-glutamate kinase (NAGK) catalyzes the second step in the pathway of arginine biosynthesis in microorganisms and plants. In many species, it is the pathway-controlling enzyme and is subject to feedback inhibition by arginine. The gene for the best characterized arginine-inhibitable NAGK, that from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, has been cloned in a pET22 plasmid and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The enzyme was purified in three steps to 95% purity and was shown by cross-linking to form dimers. It was crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method at 277 K in the presence of ADP, Mg and N-acetyl-L-glutamate. The crystallization solution contained 0.1 M sodium cacodylate pH 6.5, 150-170 mM magnesium acetate and 13% polyethylene glycol 8000. Prismatic crystals of maximum dimension approximately 0.5 mm diffract to 2.75 A resolution and belong to space group P1 (unit-cell parameters a = 71.86, b = 98.78, c = 162.9 A, alpha = 91.49, beta = 92.03, gamma = 107.56 degrees ). Packing density considerations agree with 6-18 NAGK monomers in the asymmetric unit, with a corresponding solvent content of 79-36%. Self-rotation function calculations confirm the space group and suggest the presence of 3-7 dimers in the unit cell. PMID:12037312

  13. Functional Cloning and Characterization of a Multidrug Efflux Pump, MexHI-OpmD, from a Pseudomonas aeruginosa Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Sekiya, Hiroshi; Mima, Takehiko; Morita, Yuji; Kuroda, Teruo; Mizushima, Tohru; Tsuchiya, Tomofusa

    2003-01-01

    We isolated mutant YM644, which showed elevated resistance to norfloxacin, ethidium bromide, acriflavine, and rhodamine 6G, from Pseudomonas aeruginosa YM64, a strain that lacks four major multidrug efflux pumps. The genes responsible for the resistance were mexHI-opmD. Elevated ethidium extrusion was observed with cells of YM644 and YM64 harboring a plasmid carrying the genes. Disruption of the genes in the chromosomal DNA of YM644 made the cells sensitive to the drugs. PMID:12937010

  14. Biofilm Formation Mechanisms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Predicted via Genome-Scale Kinetic Models of Bacterial Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Vital-Lopez, Francisco G.; Reifman, Jaques; Wallqvist, Anders

    2015-01-01

    A hallmark of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is its ability to establish biofilm-based infections that are difficult to eradicate. Biofilms are less susceptible to host inflammatory and immune responses and have higher antibiotic tolerance than free-living planktonic cells. Developing treatments against biofilms requires an understanding of bacterial biofilm-specific physiological traits. Research efforts have started to elucidate the intricate mechanisms underlying biofilm development. However, many aspects of these mechanisms are still poorly understood. Here, we addressed questions regarding biofilm metabolism using a genome-scale kinetic model of the P. aeruginosa metabolic network and gene expression profiles. Specifically, we computed metabolite concentration differences between known mutants with altered biofilm formation and the wild-type strain to predict drug targets against P. aeruginosa biofilms. We also simulated the altered metabolism driven by gene expression changes between biofilm and stationary growth-phase planktonic cultures. Our analysis suggests that the synthesis of important biofilm-related molecules, such as the quorum-sensing molecule Pseudomonas quinolone signal and the exopolysaccharide Psl, is regulated not only through the expression of genes in their own synthesis pathway, but also through the biofilm-specific expression of genes in pathways competing for precursors to these molecules. Finally, we investigated why mutants defective in anthranilate degradation have an impaired ability to form biofilms. Alternative to a previous hypothesis that this biofilm reduction is caused by a decrease in energy production, we proposed that the dysregulation of the synthesis of secondary metabolites derived from anthranilate and chorismate is what impaired the biofilms of these mutants. Notably, these insights generated through our kinetic model-based approach are not accessible from previous constraint-based model analyses of P. aeruginosa biofilm

  15. Transcriptome profiling reveals links between ParS/ParR, MexEF-OprN, and quorum sensing in the regulation of adaptation and virulence in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The ParS/ParR two component regulatory system plays critical roles for multidrug resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. It was demonstrated that in the presence of antimicrobials, ParR enhances bacterial survival by distinct mechanisms including activation of the mexXY efflux genes, enhancement of lipopolysaccharide modification through the arn operon, and reduction of the expression of oprD porin. Results In this study, we report on transcriptomic analyses of P. aeruginosa PAO1 wild type and parS and parR mutants growing in a defined minimal medium. Our transcriptomic analysis provides the first estimates of transcript abundance for the 5570 coding genes in P. aeruginosa PAO1. Comparative transcriptomics of P. aeruginosa PAO1 and par mutants identified a total of 464 genes regulated by ParS and ParR. Results also showed that mutations in the parS/parR system abolished expression of the mexEF-oprN operon by down-regulating the regulatory gene mexS. In addition to the known effects on drug resistance genes, transcript abundances of the quorum sensing genes (rhlIR and pqsABCDE-phnAB) were higher in both parS and parR mutants. In accordance with these results, a significant portion of the ParS/ParR regulated genes belonged to the MexEF-OprN and quorum sensing regulons. Deletion of the par genes also led to increased phenazine production and swarming motility, consistent with the up-regulation of the phenazine and rhamnolipid biosynthetic genes, respectively. Conclusion Our results link the ParS/ParR two component signal transduction system to MexEF-OprN and quorum sensing systems in P. aeruginosa. These results expand our understanding of the roles of the ParS/ParR system in the regulation of gene expression in P. aeruginosa, especially in the absence of antimicrobials. PMID:24034668

  16. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Cytotoxicity Is Attenuated at High Cell Density and Associated with the Accumulation of Phenylacetic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianhe; Dong, Yihu; Zhou, Tielin; Liu, Xiaoling; Deng, Yinyue; Wang, Chao; Lee, Jasmine; Zhang, Lian-Hui

    2013-01-01

    Background P. aeruginosa is known to cause acute cytotoxicity against various human and animal cells and tissues. Methodology/Findings Intriguingly, however, in this study we noticed that while a low cell density inoculum of P. aeruginosa caused severe cytotoxicity against human lung tissue cell line A549, increasing the cell density of bacterial inoculum led to decreased cytotoxicity. Addition of the supernatants from high density bacterial culture to low cell density inoculum protected the human cells from bacterial cytotoxic damage, suggesting that P. aeruginosa may produce and accumulate an inhibitory molecule(s) counteracting its pathogenic infection. The inhibitor was purified from the stationary-phase culture supernatants of P. aeruginosa strain PAO1 using bioassay-guided high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and characterized to be phenylacetic acid (PAA) by mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Microarray analysis revealed that treatment of P. aeruginosa with PAA down-regulated the transcriptional expression of Type III secretion system (T3SS) genes and related regulatory genes including rsmA and vfr, which were confirmed by transcriptional and translational analysis. Conclusions Identification of bacterial metabolite PAA as a T3SS-specific inhibitor explains this intriguing inverse cell-density-dependent-cytotoxicity phenomenon as T3SS is known to be a key virulence factor associated with cytotoxicity and acute infection. The findings may provide useful clues for design and development of new strategies to combat this formidable bacterial pathogen. PMID:23555919

  17. The discovery of error-prone DNA polymerase V and its unique regulation by RecA and ATP.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Myron F

    2014-09-26

    My career pathway has taken a circuitous route, beginning with a Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from The Johns Hopkins University, followed by five postdoctoral years in biology at Hopkins and culminating in a faculty position in biological sciences at the University of Southern California. My startup package in 1973 consisted of $2,500, not to be spent all at once, plus an ancient Packard scintillation counter that had a series of rapidly flashing light bulbs to indicate a radioactive readout in counts/minute. My research pathway has been similarly circuitous. The discovery of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase V (pol V) began with an attempt to identify the mutagenic DNA polymerase responsible for copying damaged DNA as part of the well known SOS regulon. Although we succeeded in identifying a DNA polymerase, one that was induced as part of the SOS response, we actually rediscovered DNA polymerase II, albeit in a new role. A decade later, we discovered a new polymerase, pol V, whose activity turned out to be regulated by bound molecules of RecA protein and ATP. This Reflections article describes our research trajectory, includes a review of key features of DNA damage-induced SOS mutagenesis leading us to pol V, and reflects on some of the principal researchers who have made indispensable contributions to our efforts. PMID:25160630

  18. The Discovery of Error-prone DNA Polymerase V and Its Unique Regulation by RecA and ATP

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Myron F.

    2014-01-01

    My career pathway has taken a circuitous route, beginning with a Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from The Johns Hopkins University, followed by five postdoctoral years in biology at Hopkins and culminating in a faculty position in biological sciences at the University of Southern California. My startup package in 1973 consisted of $2,500, not to be spent all at once, plus an ancient Packard scintillation counter that had a series of rapidly flashing light bulbs to indicate a radioactive readout in counts/minute. My research pathway has been similarly circuitous. The discovery of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase V (pol V) began with an attempt to identify the mutagenic DNA polymerase responsible for copying damaged DNA as part of the well known SOS regulon. Although we succeeded in identifying a DNA polymerase, one that was induced as part of the SOS response, we actually rediscovered DNA polymerase II, albeit in a new role. A decade later, we discovered a new polymerase, pol V, whose activity turned out to be regulated by bound molecules of RecA protein and ATP. This Reflections article describes our research trajectory, includes a review of key features of DNA damage-induced SOS mutagenesis leading us to pol V, and reflects on some of the principal researchers who have made indispensable contributions to our efforts. PMID:25160630

  19. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of RecA superfamily ATPase PH0284 from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3

    SciTech Connect

    Bagautdinov, Bagautdin; Kunishima, Naoki

    2006-04-01

    RecA superfamily ATPase PH0284 from P. horikoshii OT3 was overexpressed, purified, crystallized and cocrystallized with ATP. Both crystal forms belong to the trigonal space group P3{sub 2}21 and diffract X-rays to 2.0 and 2.3 Å resolution, respectively. Circadian (daily) protein clocks are found in cyanobacteria, where a complex of the KaiA, KaiB and KaiC proteins generates circadian rhythms. The 28.09 kDa KaiC homologue PH0284 protein from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3 was cloned and expressed and the purified protein was crystallized by the oil-microbatch method at 295 K. X-ray diffraction data from the crystal were collected to 2.0 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation at 100 K. The crystal belongs to the trigonal space group P3{sub 2}21, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 96.06, c = 298.90 Å. Assuming the presence of one hexamer in the asymmetric unit gives a V{sub M} value of 2.36 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1} and a solvent content of 47.9%. A cocrystal with ATP was prepared and a diffraction data set was collected at 2.3 Å resolution.

  20. The Transcriptional Regulator CzcR Modulates Antibiotic Resistance and Quorum Sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Dieppois, Guennaëlle; Ducret, Véréna; Caille, Olivier; Perron, Karl

    2012-01-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa responds to zinc, cadmium and cobalt by way of the CzcRS two-component system. In presence of these metals the regulatory protein CzcR induces the expression of the CzcCBA efflux pump, expelling and thereby inducing resistance to Zn, Cd and Co. Importantly, CzcR co-regulates carbapenem antibiotic resistance by repressing the expression of the OprD porin, the route of entry for these antibiotics. This unexpected co-regulation led us to address the role of CzcR in other cellular processes unrelated to the metal response. We found that CzcR affected the expression of numerous genes directly involved in the virulence of P. aeruginosa even in the absence of the inducible metals. Notably the full expression of quorum sensing 3-oxo-C12-HSL and C4-HSL autoinducer molecules is impaired in the absence of CzcR. In agreement with this, the virulence of the czcRS deletion mutant is affected in a C. elegans animal killing assay. Additionally, chromosome immunoprecipitation experiments allowed us to localize CzcR on the promoter of several regulated genes, suggesting a direct control of target genes such as oprD, phzA1 and lasI. All together our data identify CzcR as a novel regulator involved in the control of several key genes for P. aeruginosa virulence processes. PMID:22666466

  1. The transcriptional regulator CzcR modulates antibiotic resistance and quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Dieppois, Guennaëlle; Ducret, Véréna; Caille, Olivier; Perron, Karl

    2012-01-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa responds to zinc, cadmium and cobalt by way of the CzcRS two-component system. In presence of these metals the regulatory protein CzcR induces the expression of the CzcCBA efflux pump, expelling and thereby inducing resistance to Zn, Cd and Co. Importantly, CzcR co-regulates carbapenem antibiotic resistance by repressing the expression of the OprD porin, the route of entry for these antibiotics. This unexpected co-regulation led us to address the role of CzcR in other cellular processes unrelated to the metal response. We found that CzcR affected the expression of numerous genes directly involved in the virulence of P. aeruginosa even in the absence of the inducible metals. Notably the full expression of quorum sensing 3-oxo-C12-HSL and C4-HSL autoinducer molecules is impaired in the absence of CzcR. In agreement with this, the virulence of the czcRS deletion mutant is affected in a C. elegans animal killing assay. Additionally, chromosome immunoprecipitation experiments allowed us to localize CzcR on the promoter of several regulated genes, suggesting a direct control of target genes such as oprD, phzA1 and lasI. All together our data identify CzcR as a novel regulator involved in the control of several key genes for P. aeruginosa virulence processes. PMID:22666466

  2. Genomic analysis and temperature-dependent transcriptome profiles of the rhizosphere originating strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa M18

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Our previously published reports have described an effective biocontrol agent named Pseudomonas sp. M18 as its 16S rDNA sequence and several regulator genes share homologous sequences with those of P. aeruginosa, but there are several unusual phenotypic features. This study aims to explore its strain specific genomic features and gene expression patterns at different temperatures. Results The complete M18 genome is composed of a single chromosome of 6,327,754 base pairs containing 5684 open reading frames. Seven genomic islands, including two novel prophages and five specific non-phage islands were identified besides the conserved P. aeruginosa core genome. Each prophage contains a putative chitinase coding gene, and the prophage II contains a capB gene encoding a putative cold stress protein. The non-phage genomic islands contain genes responsible for pyoluteorin biosynthesis, environmental substance degradation and type I and III restriction-modification systems. Compared with other P. aeruginosa strains, the fewest number (3) of insertion sequences and the most number (3) of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats in M18 genome may contribute to the relative genome stability. Although the M18 genome is most closely related to that of P. aeruginosa strain LESB58, the strain M18 is more susceptible to several antimicrobial agents and easier to be erased in a mouse acute lung infection model than the strain LESB58. The whole M18 transcriptomic analysis indicated that 10.6% of the expressed genes are temperature-dependent, with 22 genes up-regulated at 28°C in three non-phage genomic islands and one prophage but none at 37°C. Conclusions The P. aeruginosa strain M18 has evolved its specific genomic structures and temperature dependent expression patterns to meet the requirement of its fitness and competitiveness under selective pressures imposed on the strain in rhizosphere niche. PMID:21884571

  3. Effect of Shear Stress on Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated from the Cystic Fibrosis Lung

    PubMed Central

    Dingemans, Jozef; Monsieurs, Pieter; Yu, Sung-Huan; Crabbé, Aurélie; Förstner, Konrad U.; Malfroot, Anne

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chronic colonization of the lungs by Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. To gain insights into the characteristic biofilm phenotype of P. aeruginosa in the CF lungs, mimicking the CF lung environment is critical. We previously showed that growth of the non-CF-adapted P. aeruginosa PAO1 strain in a rotating wall vessel, a device that simulates the low fluid shear (LS) conditions present in the CF lung, leads to the formation of in-suspension, self-aggregating biofilms. In the present study, we determined the phenotypic and transcriptomic changes associated with the growth of a highly adapted, transmissible P. aeruginosa CF strain in artificial sputum medium under LS conditions. Robust self-aggregating biofilms were observed only under LS conditions. Growth under LS conditions resulted in the upregulation of genes involved in stress response, alginate biosynthesis, denitrification, glycine betaine biosynthesis, glycerol metabolism, and cell shape maintenance, while genes involved in phenazine biosynthesis, type VI secretion, and multidrug efflux were downregulated. In addition, a number of small RNAs appeared to be involved in the response to shear stress. Finally, quorum sensing was found to be slightly but significantly affected by shear stress, resulting in higher production of autoinducer molecules during growth under high fluid shear (HS) conditions. In summary, our study revealed a way to modulate the behavior of a highly adapted P. aeruginosa CF strain by means of introducing shear stress, driving it from a biofilm lifestyle to a more planktonic lifestyle. PMID:27486191

  4. Microarray analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum-sensing regulons: effects of growth phase and environment.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Victoria E; Bushnell, Daniel; Passador, Luciano; Brooks, Andrew I; Iglewski, Barbara H

    2003-04-01

    Bacterial communication via quorum sensing (QS) has been reported to be important in the production of virulence factors, antibiotic sensitivity, and biofilm development. Two QS systems, known as the las and rhl systems, have been identified previously in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. High-density oligonucleotide microarrays for the P. aeruginosa PAO1 genome were used to investigate global gene expression patterns modulated by QS regulons. In the initial experiments we focused on identifying las and/or rhl QS-regulated genes using a QS signal generation-deficient mutant (PAO-JP2) that was cultured with and without added exogenous autoinducers [N-(3-oxododecanoyl) homoserine lactone and N-butyryl homoserine lactone]. Conservatively, 616 genes showed statistically significant differential expression (P genes were identified as being QS regulated at the mid-logarithmic phase, and 450 genes were identified as being QS regulated at the early stationary phase. Most of the previously reported QS-promoted genes were confirmed, and a large number of additional QS-promoted genes were identified. Importantly, 222 genes were identified as being QS repressed. Environmental factors, such as medium composition and oxygen availability, eliminated detection of transcripts of many genes that were identified as being QS regulated. PMID:12644477

  5. Protection against Pseudomonas aeruginosa Chronic Lung Infection in Mice by Genetic Immunization against Outer Membrane Protein F (OprF) of P. aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Price, Brian M.; Galloway, Darrell R.; Baker, Neil R.; Gilleland, Linda B.; Staczek, John; Gilleland, Harry E.

    2001-01-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa major constitutive outer membrane porin protein OprF, which has previously been shown to be a protective antigen, was targeted as a DNA vaccine candidate. The oprF gene was cloned into plasmid vector pVR1020, and the plasmid vaccines were delivered to mice by biolistic (gene gun) intradermal inoculation. Antibody titers in antisera from immunized mice were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and the elicited antibodies were shown to be specifically reactive to OprF by immunoblotting. The immunoglobulin G (IgG) immune response was predominantly of the IgG1 isotype. Sera from DNA vaccine-immunized mice had significantly greater opsonic activity in opsonophagocytic assays than did sera from control mice. Following the initial immunization and two consecutive boosts, each at 2-week intervals, protection was demonstrated in a mouse model of chronic pulmonary infection by P. aeruginosa. Eight days postchallenge, both lungs were removed and examined. A significant reduction in the presence of severe macroscopic lesions, as well as in the number of bacteria present in the lungs, was seen. Based on these findings, genetic immunization with oprF has potential for development as a vaccine to protect humans against infection by P. aeruginosa. PMID:11292786

  6. 6-Gingerol reduces Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation and virulence via quorum sensing inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Han-Shin; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Byun, Youngjoo; Park, Hee-Deung

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a well-known pathogenic bacterium that forms biofilms and produces virulence factors via quorum sensing (QS). Interfering with normal QS interactions between signal molecules and their cognate receptors is a developing strategy for attenuating its virulence. Here we tested the hypothesis that 6-gingerol, a pungent oil of fresh ginger, reduces biofilm formation and virulence by antagonistically binding to P. aeruginosa QS receptors. In silico studies demonstrated molecular binding occurs between 6-gingerol and the QS receptor LasR through hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions. Experimentally 6-gingerol reduced biofilm formation, several virulence factors (e.g., exoprotease, rhamnolipid, and pyocyanin), and mice mortality. Further transcriptome analyses demonstrated that 6-gingerol successfully repressed QS-induced genes, specifically those related to the production of virulence factors. These results strongly support our hypothesis and offer insight into the molecular mechanism that caused QS gene repression. PMID:25728862

  7. Stress responses as determinants of antimicrobial resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa: multidrug efflux and more.

    PubMed

    Poole, Keith

    2014-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a notoriously antimicrobial-resistant organism that is increasingly refractory to antimicrobial chemotherapy. While the usual array of acquired resistance mechanisms contribute to resistance development in this organism a multitude of endogenous genes also play a role. These include a variety of multidrug efflux loci that contribute to both intrinsic and acquired antimicrobial resistance. Despite their roles in resistance, however, it is clear that these efflux systems function in more than just antimicrobial efflux. Indeed, recent data indicate that they are recruited in response to environmental stress and, therefore, function as components of the organism's stress responses. In fact, a number of endogenous resistance-promoting genes are linked to environmental stress, functioning as part of known stress responses or recruited in response to a variety of environmental stress stimuli. Stress responses are, thus, important determinants of antimicrobial resistance in P. aeruginosa. As such, they represent possible therapeutic targets in countering antimicrobial resistance in this organism. PMID:25388098

  8. Kinetics and Mechanism of Fenpropathrin Biodegradation by a Newly Isolated Pseudomonas aeruginosa sp. Strain JQ-41.

    PubMed

    Song, Haihai; Zhou, Zhiren; Liu, Yuanxiu; Deng, Si; Xu, Heng

    2015-09-01

    A soil bacterium designated strain JQ-41, capable of growth on fenpropathrin as the sole carbon source and energy source, was isolated from a long-term pyrethroid insecticide-treated orchard. Based on the morphology, physio-biochemical characteristics, and 16S rDNA gene analysis, as well as the G+C content of the genomic DNA, the strain JQ-41 was identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Up to 92.3% of 50 mg l(-1) fenpropathrin was degraded by P. aeruginosa strain at 30°C and pH 7 within 7 days. The kinetic parameters q max, K s, and K i were established to be 1.14 day(-1), 38.41 mg l(-1), and 137.67 mg l(-1), respectively, and the critical inhibitor concentration was determined to be 72.72 mg l(-1). Cell surface hydrophobicity of P. aeruginosa strain was enhanced during growth on fenpropathrin. Three metabolites from fenpropathrin degradation were identified by gas chromatography mass spectrometry, and then a possible degradation pathway was proposed. In addition, this isolate was also able to degrade a wide range of synthetic pyrethroid insecticides including cypermethrin, deltamethrin, bifenthrin, and cyhalothrin with the degradation process following the first-order kinetic model. Taken together, our results provide insights into the kinetics and mechanism of fenpropathrin degradation by P. aeruginosa strain and also highlight its promising potential in bioremediation of pyrethroid-contaminated environment. PMID:26068594

  9. Prevalence and Clonal Dissemination of Metallo-Beta-Lactamase-Producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Kermanshah

    PubMed Central

    Akya, Alisha; Salimi, Afsaneh; Nomanpour, Bizhan; Ahmadi, Kamal

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen associated with nosocomial infections. The emergence and dissemination of metallo-beta-lactamases (MBLs) has contributed to the high rate of resistance among P. aeruginosa isolates. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to describe the prevalence and the clonal dissemination of MBL- producing P. aeruginosa isolates collected from major hospitals in Kermanshah. Materials and Methods: Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed using the minimal inhibitory concentrations. The MBLs were investigated using the Double-Disk Synergy Test (DDST) and Polymerase Chain Reaction. Molecular typing was performed by Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE). Results: Of the 60 P. aeruginosa isolates included in this study, 30 (50%) were resistant to Gentamicin, 38 (63.3%) to Piperacillin, 42 (70%) to Ceftazidime, and 45 (75%) to Cefepime. Twenty-nine (48.3%) isolates were MBL producers in the DDST test. Five (8.3%) isolates were positive for the VIM gene. PFGE analysis among the MBL producers revealed 12 distinct clonal patterns. Conclusions: The inter- and intra-hospital dissemination of resistant clones is a matter of concern and is an indicator of the level of the improvement and surveillance of standard hygiene, particularly disinfection and hand washing before and after contact with patients. Given the emergence of MBL-producing strains, surveillance has become an important procedure to control the transmission of resistant strains. PMID:26421137

  10. TypA is involved in virulence, antimicrobial resistance and biofilm formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important opportunistic human pathogen and is extremely difficult to treat due to its high intrinsic and adaptive antibiotic resistance, ability to form biofilms in chronic infections and broad arsenal of virulence factors, which are finely regulated. TypA is a GTPase that has recently been identified to modulate virulence in enteric Gram-negative pathogens. Results Here, we demonstrate that mutation of typA in P. aeruginosa resulted in reduced virulence in phagocytic amoebae and human macrophage models of infection. In addition, the typA mutant was attenuated in rapid cell attachment to surfaces and biofilm formation, and exhibited reduced antibiotic resistance to ß-lactam, tetracycline and antimicrobial peptide antibiotics. Quantitative RT-PCR revealed the down-regulation, in a typA mutant, of important virulence-related genes such as those involved in regulation and assembly of the Type III secretion system, consistent with the observed phenotypes and role in virulence of P. aeruginosa. Conclusions These data suggest that TypA is a newly identified modulator of pathogenesis in P. aeruginosa and is involved in multiple virulence-related characteristics. PMID:23570569

  11. Lichen secondary metabolite evernic acid as potential quorum sensing inhibitor against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Gökalsın, Barış; Sesal, Nüzhet Cenk

    2016-09-01

    Cystic Fibrosis is a genetic disease and it affects the respiratory and digestive systems. Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in Cystic Fibrosis are presented as the main cause for high mortality and morbidity rates. Pseudomonas aeruginosa populations can regulate their virulence gene expressions via the bacterial communication system: quorum sensing. Inhibition of quorum sensing by employing quorum sensing inhibitors can leave the bacteria vulnerable. Therefore, determining natural sources to obtain potential quorum sensing inhibitors is essential. Lichens have ethnobotanical value for their medicinal properties and it is possible that their secondary metabolites have quorum sensing inhibitor properties. This study aims to investigate an alternative treatment approach by utilizing lichen secondary metabolite evernic acid to reduce the expressions of Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence factors by inhibiting quorum sensing. For this purpose, fluorescent monitor strains were utilized for quorum sensing inhibitor screens and quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR analyses were conducted for comparison. Results indicate that evernic acid is capable of inhibiting Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing systems. PMID:27465850

  12. Sensitizing Pseudomonas aeruginosa to antibiotics by electrochemical disruption of membrane functions.

    PubMed

    Niepa, Tagbo H R; Snepenger, Laura M; Wang, Hao; Sivan, Shiril; Gilbert, Jeremy L; Jones, Marcus B; Ren, Dacheng

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we reported synergistic effects between 70 μA/cm(2) direct current and tobramycin in killing Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 persister cells, a phenomenon we named electrochemical control of persister cells (ECCP; Niepa et al. Biomaterials 33: 7356-7365, 2012). To understand the mechanism of ECCP, the effects of electrochemical treatments mediated via stainless steel 304 and carbon electrodes on P. aeruginosa PAO1 were systematically compared using complementary approaches in this study. Electron microscopic analysis revealed that μA/cm(2) level direct current (DC) caused substantial changes in the structure and membrane integrity of P. aeruginosa PAO1 cells. DC treatments using SS304 electrodes induced cell lysis, while the same level of DC generated using carbon electrodes led to aggregation of intracellular proteins and increased permeabilization of P. aeruginosa PAO1 cells to antibiotics. The profound effects of DC on the physiology of persister cells were corroborated with DNA microarray analysis, which revealed the induction of genes associated with pyocin production and SOS response in DC-treated persister cells. Interestingly, sequential treatment using DC mediated with carbon electrodes followed by tobramycin was found more effective than concurrent treatment; and total eradication of persister cells was achieved. PMID:26461119

  13. Contribution of the Twin Arginine Translocation system to the exoproteome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Geneviève; Antelmann, Haike; Imbert, Paul Roger Claude; Gimenez, Maxime Rémi; Voulhoux, Romé; Ize, Bérengère

    2016-01-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa uses secretion systems to deliver exoproteins into the environment. These exoproteins contribute to bacterial survival, adaptation, and virulence. The Twin arginine translocation (Tat) export system enables the export of folded proteins into the periplasm, some of which can then be further secreted outside the cell. However, the full range of proteins that are conveyed by Tat is unknown, despite the importance of Tat for the adaptability and full virulence of P. aeruginosa. In this work, we explored the P. aeruginosa Tat-dependent exoproteome under phosphate starvation by two-dimensional gel analysis. We identified the major secreted proteins and new Tat-dependent exoproteins. These exoproteins were further analyzed by a combination of in silico analysis, regulation studies, and protein localization. Altogether we reveal that the absence of the Tat system significantly affects the composition of the exoproteome by impairing protein export and affecting gene expression. Notably we discovered three new Tat exoproteins and one novel type II secretion substrate. Our data also allowed the identification of two new start codons highlighting the importance of protein annotation for subcellular predictions. The new exoproteins that we identify may play a significant role in P. aeruginosa pathogenesis, host interaction and niche adaptation. PMID:27279369

  14. ZnO nanoparticles inhibit Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation and virulence factor production.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin-Hyung; Kim, Yong-Guy; Cho, Moo Hwan; Lee, Jintae

    2014-12-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces a variety of virulence factors, and biofilms of this bacterium are much more resistant to antibiotics than planktonic cells. Thirty-six metal ions have been investigated to identify antivirulence and antibiofilm metal ions. Zinc ions and ZnO nanoparticles were found to markedly inhibit biofilm formation and the production of pyocyanin, Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS), pyochelin, and hemolytic activity of P. aeruginosa without affecting the growth of planktonic cells. Transcriptome analyses showed that ZnO nanoparticles induce the zinc cation efflux pump czc operon and several important transcriptional regulators (porin gene opdT and type III repressor ptrA), but repress the pyocyanin-related phz operon, which explains observed phenotypic changes. A mutant study showed that the effects of ZnO nanoparticles on the control of pyocyanin production and biofilm formation require the czc regulator CzcR. In addition, ZnO nanoparticles markedly increased the cellular hydrophilicity of P. aeruginosa cells. Our results support that ZnO nanoparticles are potential antivirulence materials against recalcitrant P. aeruginosa infections and possibly other important pathogens. PMID:24958247

  15. Global Regulator MorA Affects Virulence-Associated Protease Secretion in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1

    PubMed Central

    Ravichandran, Ayshwarya; Wong, Chui Ching; Swarup, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial invasion plays a critical role in the establishment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection and is aided by two major virulence factors – surface appendages and secreted proteases. The second messenger cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) is known to affect bacterial attachment to surfaces, biofilm formation and related virulence phenomena. Here we report that MorA, a global regulator with GGDEF and EAL domains that was previously reported to affect virulence factors, negatively regulates protease secretion via the type II secretion system (T2SS) in P. aeruginosa PAO1. Infection assays with mutant strains carrying gene deletion and domain mutants show that host cell invasion is dependent on the active domain function of MorA. Further investigations suggest that the MorA-mediated c-di-GMP signaling affects protease secretion largely at a post-translational level. We thus report c-di-GMP second messenger system as a novel regulator of T2SS function in P. aeruginosa. Given that T2SS is a central and constitutive pump, and the secreted proteases are involved in interactions with the microbial surroundings, our data broadens the significance of c-di-GMP signaling in P. aeruginosa pathogenesis and ecological fitness. PMID:25894344

  16. Identification of novel members of the bacterial azoreductase family in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Crescente, Vincenzo; Holland, Sinead M; Kashyap, Sapna; Polycarpou, Elena; Sim, Edith; Ryan, Ali

    2016-03-01

    Azoreductases are a family of diverse enzymes found in many pathogenic bacteria as well as distant homologues being present in eukarya. In addition to having azoreductase activity, these enzymes are also suggested to have NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase (NQO) activity which leads to a proposed role in plant pathogenesis. Azoreductases have also been suggested to play a role in the mammalian pathogenesis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In view of the importance of P. aeruginosa as a pathogen, we therefore characterized recombinant enzymes following expression of a group of putative azoreductase genes from P. aeruginosa expressed in Escherichia coli. The enzymes include members of the arsenic-resistance protein H (ArsH), tryptophan repressor-binding protein A (WrbA), modulator of drug activity B (MdaB) and YieF families. The ArsH, MdaB and YieF family members all show azoreductase and NQO activities. In contrast, WrbA is the first enzyme to show NQO activity but does not reduce any of the 11 azo compounds tested under a wide range of conditions. These studies will allow further investigation of the possible role of these enzymes in the pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa. PMID:26621870

  17. Isolation of a Poterioochromonas capable of feeding on Microcystis aeruginosa and degrading microcystin-LR.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xue; Hu, Hong-Ying; Hong, Yu; Yang, Jia

    2008-11-01

    Algal blooms have become a worldwide issue recently, especially those comprised of toxic cyanobacteria. Grazers' predation of bloom-forming algae plays an important role in water clearing. In this study, a species of golden alga (strain ZX1), capable of feeding on the toxic cyanobacteria Microcystis aeruginosa, was isolated and identified as Poterioochromonas sp. (GenBank accession: EU586184) on the basis of morphological characteristics and 18s rRNA gene sequencing. Feeding experiments showed that ZX1 could clear high densities of M. aeruginosa (7.3 x 10(5)-4.3 x 10(6) cells mL(-1)) in a short time (40 h), with inhibition ratios higher than 99.9%. ZX1 grew during the feeding processes and achieved a maximum density of 10-20% of the initial M. aeruginosa density. Furthermore, this study is the first to report that ZX1 was able to degrade microcystin-LR (MC-LR) in cells of M. aeruginosa while digesting the whole cells, and that the degradation process was determined to be carried out inside the ZX1 cell. For a total MC-LR (intra- and extracellular) concentration of up to 114 microg L(-1), 82.7% was removed in 40 h. This study sheds light on the importance of golden alga in aquatic microbial ecosystems and in the natural transportation/transformation of MC-LR. PMID:18811657

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain N002, Isolated from Crude Oil-Contaminated Soil from Geleky, Assam, India

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Abhjit Sarma; Baruah, Reshita; Gogoi, Dhrubajyoti; Borah, Maina

    2013-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of crude oil-degrading Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain N002, isolated from a crude oil-polluted soil sample from Geleky, Assam, India. Multiple genes potentially involved in crude oil degradation were identified. PMID:23405324

  19. [Macrolides, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Guillot, M; Amiour, M; El Hachem, C; Harchaoui, S; Ribault, V; Paris, C

    2006-10-01

    Long-term low dose azithromycin treatment in cystic fibrosis patients with chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection is safe and reduces the decline in lung function, the number of acute exacerbations and improves nutritional status; underlying efficacy mechanisms are multiple and synergistic. PMID:17370396

  20. Surface attachment induces Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence

    PubMed Central

    Siryaporn, Albert; Kuchma, Sherry L.; O’Toole, George A.; Gitai, Zemer

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa infects every type of host that has been examined by deploying multiple virulence factors. Previous studies of virulence regulation have largely focused on chemical cues, but P. aeruginosa may also respond to mechanical cues. Using a rapid imaging-based virulence assay, we demonstrate that P. aeruginosa activates virulence in response to attachment to a range of chemically distinct surfaces, suggesting that this bacterial species responds to mechanical properties of its substrates. Surface-activated virulence requires quorum sensing, but activating quorum sensing does not induce virulence without surface attachment. The activation of virulence by surfaces also requires the surface-exposed protein PilY1, which has a domain homologous to a eukaryotic mechanosensor. Specific mutation of the putative PilY1 mechanosensory domain is sufficient to induce virulence in non–surface-attached cells, suggesting that PilY1 mediates surface mechanotransduction. Triggering virulence only when cells are both at high density and attached to a surface—two host-nonspecific cues—explains how P. aeruginosa precisely regulates virulence while maintaining broad host specificity. PMID:25385640

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of a Clinically Isolated Extensively Drug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain

    PubMed Central

    Manivannan, Bhavani; Mahalingam, Niranjana; Jadhao, Sudhir; Mishra, Amrita; Nilawe, Pravin

    2016-01-01

    We present the draft genome assembly of an extensively drug-resistant (XDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain isolated from a patient with a history of genito urinary tuberculosis. The draft genome is 7,022,546 bp with a G+C content of 65.48%. It carries 7 phage genomes, genes for quorum sensing, biofilm formation, virulence, and antibiotic resistance. PMID:27013045

  2. Diverse Mobilized Class 1 Integrons Are Common in the Chromosomes of Pathogenic Pseudomonas aeruginosa Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Elena; Marquez, Carolina; Ingold, Ana; Merlino, John; Djordjevic, Steven P.; Roy Chowdhury, Piklu

    2012-01-01

    Eleven clinical class 1 integron-containing Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from Australia and Uruguay were investigated for the genomic locations of these elements. Several novel class 1 integrons/transposons were found in at least four distinct locations in the chromosome, including genomic islands. These elements seem to be undergoing successful dispersal by lateral gene transfer since integrons were identified across several lineages and more than one clonal line. PMID:22271862

  3. Anaerobically controlled expression system derived from the arcDABC operon of Pseudomonas aeruginosa: application to lipase production.

    PubMed Central

    Winteler, H V; Schneidinger, B; Jaeger, K E; Haas, D

    1996-01-01

    The anaerobically inducible arcDABC operon encodes the enzymes of the arginine deiminase pathway in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Upon induction, the arcAB mRNAs and proteins reach high intracellular levels, because of a strong anaerobically controlled promoter and mRNA processing in arcD, leading to stable downstream transcripts. We explored the usefulness of this system for the construction of expression vectors. The lacZ gene of Escherichia coli was expressed to the highest levels when fused close to the arc promoter. Insertion of lacZ further downstream into arcA or arcB did not stabilize the intrinsically unstable lacZ mRNA. On the contrary, lacZ mRNA appeared to be a vulnerable endonuclease target destabilizing arcAB mRNAs in the 5'-to-3' direction in P. aeruginosa. The native arc promoter was modified for optional expression in the -10 sequence and in the -40 region, which is a binding site for the anaerobic regulator ANR. In P. aeruginosa grown either anaerobically or with oxygen limitation in unshaken cultures, this promoter was stronger than the induced tac promoter. The P. aeruginosa lipAH genes, which encode extracellular lipase and lipase foldase, respectively, were fused directly to the modified arc promoter in an IncQ vector plasmid. Semianaerobic static cultures of P. aeruginosa PAO1 carrying this recombinant plasmid overproduced extracellular lipase 30-fold during stationary phase compared with the production by strain PAO1 without the plasmid. Severe oxygen limitation, in contrast, resulted in poor lipase productivity despite effective induction of the ANR-dependent promoter, suggesting that secretion of active lipase is blocked by the absence of oxygen. In conclusion, the modified arc promoter is useful for driving the expression of cloned genes in P. aeruginosa during oxygen-limited growth and stationary phase. PMID:8795231

  4. Baicalein attenuates the quorum sensing-controlled virulence factors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and relieves the inflammatory response in P. aeruginosa-infected macrophages by downregulating the MAPK and NFκB signal-transduction pathways

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jing; Kong, Jin-liang; Dong, Bi-ying; Huang, Hong; Wang, Ke; Wu, Li-hong; Hou, Chang-chun; Liang, Yue; Li, Bing; Chen, Yi-qiang

    2016-01-01

    Burgeoning antibiotic resistance and unfavorable outcomes of inflammatory injury after Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection have necessitated the development of novel agents that not only target quorum sensing (QS) but also combat inflammatory injury with the least risk of resistance. This study aimed to assess the anti-QS and anti-inflammatory activities of baicalein, a traditional herbal medicine that is widely used in the People’s Republic of China, against P. aeruginosa infection. We found that subminimum inhibitory concentrations of baicalein efficiently interfered with the QS-signaling pathway of P. aeruginosa via downregulation of the transcription of QS-regulated genes and the translation of QS-signaling molecules. This interference resulted in the global attenuation of QS-controlled virulence factors, such as motility and biofilm formation, and the secretion into the culture supernatant of extracellular virulence factors, including pyocyanin, LasA protease, LasB elastase, and rhamnolipids. Moreover, we examined the anti-inflammatory activity of baicalein and its mode of action via a P. aeruginosa-infected macrophage model to address its therapeutic effect. Baicalein reduced the P. aeruginosa-induced secretion of the infl