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Sample records for aeruginosa salmonella typhimurium

  1. Comparative effect of methioninyl adenylate on the growth of Salmonella typhimurium and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Enouf, J; Laurence, F; Farrugia, G; Blanchard, P; Robert-Gero, M

    1976-10-11

    The bacteriostatic effect of methioninyl adenylate(MAMP)--a specific inhibitor of the enzyme methionyl-tRNA synthetase--was investigated on Salmonella typhimurium and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. 0.1 mM of this molecule added to the culture, inhibits the growth of S. typhimurium. The inhibition is specifically reversible by 0.1 mM L-methionine. In the same conditions even 1-2 mM MAMP has a very slight effect on the growth rate of P. aeruginosa and only during the first two generations. The same observation was made with the two other members of the fluorescens group P.fluorescens and P.putida. The growth rate of P. testosteroni with 1 mM MAMP in the medium is similar to the growth rate of P. aeruginosa but the other member of the acidovorans group P. acidovorans is much more affected by the smae concentration of the inhibitor. --P. multivorans is inhibited by MAMP like P. acidovorans but with a somewhat higher yield at the end of the culture. --MAMP has no effect on P. alcaligenes. The possible reasons for the weak bacteriostatic effect of MAMP on P. aeruginosa were investigated. It was established that the inhibitor enters the cells and is not used as a carbon and energy source. The intracellular methionine concentration in S. typhimurium and in P. aeruginosa is about the same and does not increase when bacteria are cultivated with MAMP. The MTS of the two microorganisms is inhibited by MAMP in vitro to about the same extent. Furthermore the tRNAmet from P. aeruginosa are fully acylated after 3 to 4 generations with this compound. Nevertheless MAMP elicits higher MTS activity in P. aeruginosa and in P. acidovorans after 1 h of incubation. The most striking difference between S. typhimurium and P. aeruginosa is that the intra and extracellular level of 5'phosphodiesterase which degrades MAMP is 10-20 fold higher in the second than in the first species.

  2. Evaluation of copper ion of antibacterial effect on Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhimurium and Helicobacter pylori and optical, mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young-Hwan; Choi, Yu-ri; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Choi, Se-Young

    2012-02-01

    Antibacterial effect on Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhimurium and Helicobacter pylori of copper ion was researched. Also, additional effects of copper ion coating on optical and mechanical properties were researched as well. Copper ion was coated on glass substrate as a thin film to prevent bacteria from growing. Cupric nitrate was used as precursors for copper ion. The copper ion contained sol was deposited by spin coating process on glass substrate. Then, the deposited substrates were heat treated at the temperature range between 200 °C and 250 °C. The thickness of deposited copper layer on the surface was 63 nm. The antibacterial effect of copper ion coated glass on P. aeruginosa, S. typhimurium and H. pylori demonstrated excellent effect compared with parent glass. Copper ion contained layer on glass showed a similar value of transmittance compared with value of parent glass. The 3-point bending strength and Vickers hardness were 209.2 MPa, 540.9 kg/mm2 which were about 1.5% and 1.3% higher than the value of parent glass. From these findings, it is clear that copper ion coating on glass substrate showed outstanding effect not only in antibacterial activity but also in optical and mechanical properties as well.

  3. 9 CFR 113.120 - Salmonella Typhimurium Bacterin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Salmonella Typhimurium Bacterin. 113... REQUIREMENTS Inactivated Bacterial Products § 113.120 Salmonella Typhimurium Bacterin. Salmonella Typhimurium Bacterin shall be prepared from a culture of Salmonella typhimurium which has been inactivated and...

  4. Targeted Cancer Therapy Using Engineered Salmonella typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jin Hai

    2016-01-01

    Obligate or facultative anaerobic bacteria such as Bifidobacterium, Clostridium, Salmonella, or Escherichia coli specifically colonize and proliferate inside tumor tissues and inhibit tumor growth. Among them, attenuated Salmonella typhimurium (S. typhimurium) has been widely studied in animal cancer models and Phase I clinical trials in human patients. S. typhimurium genes are easily manipulated; thus diverse attenuated strains of S. typhimurium have been designed and engineered as tumor-targeting therapeutics or drug delivery vehicles that show both an excellent safety profile and therapeutic efficacy in mouse models. An attenuated strain of S. typhimurium, VNP20009, successfully targeted human metastatic melanoma and squamous cell carcinoma in Phase I clinical trials; however, the efficacy requires further refinement. Along with the characteristics of self-targeting, proliferation, and deep tissue penetration, the ease of genetic manipulation allows for the production of more attenuated strains with greater safety profiles and vector systems that deliver designable cargo molecules for cancer diagnosis and/or therapy. Here, we discuss recent progress in the field of Salmonellae-mediated cancer therapy. PMID:27689027

  5. Targeted Cancer Therapy Using Engineered Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jin Hai; Min, Jung-Joon

    2016-09-01

    Obligate or facultative anaerobic bacteria such as Bifidobacterium, Clostridium, Salmonella, or Escherichia coli specifically colonize and proliferate inside tumor tissues and inhibit tumor growth. Among them, attenuated Salmonella typhimurium (S. typhimurium) has been widely studied in animal cancer models and Phase I clinical trials in human patients. S. typhimurium genes are easily manipulated; thus diverse attenuated strains of S. typhimurium have been designed and engineered as tumor-targeting therapeutics or drug delivery vehicles that show both an excellent safety profile and therapeutic efficacy in mouse models. An attenuated strain of S. typhimurium, VNP20009, successfully targeted human metastatic melanoma and squamous cell carcinoma in Phase I clinical trials; however, the efficacy requires further refinement. Along with the characteristics of self-targeting, proliferation, and deep tissue penetration, the ease of genetic manipulation allows for the production of more attenuated strains with greater safety profiles and vector systems that deliver designable cargo molecules for cancer diagnosis and/or therapy. Here, we discuss recent progress in the field of Salmonellae-mediated cancer therapy. PMID:27689027

  6. Targeted Cancer Therapy Using Engineered Salmonella typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jin Hai

    2016-01-01

    Obligate or facultative anaerobic bacteria such as Bifidobacterium, Clostridium, Salmonella, or Escherichia coli specifically colonize and proliferate inside tumor tissues and inhibit tumor growth. Among them, attenuated Salmonella typhimurium (S. typhimurium) has been widely studied in animal cancer models and Phase I clinical trials in human patients. S. typhimurium genes are easily manipulated; thus diverse attenuated strains of S. typhimurium have been designed and engineered as tumor-targeting therapeutics or drug delivery vehicles that show both an excellent safety profile and therapeutic efficacy in mouse models. An attenuated strain of S. typhimurium, VNP20009, successfully targeted human metastatic melanoma and squamous cell carcinoma in Phase I clinical trials; however, the efficacy requires further refinement. Along with the characteristics of self-targeting, proliferation, and deep tissue penetration, the ease of genetic manipulation allows for the production of more attenuated strains with greater safety profiles and vector systems that deliver designable cargo molecules for cancer diagnosis and/or therapy. Here, we discuss recent progress in the field of Salmonellae-mediated cancer therapy.

  7. Dr. Cheryl Nickerson studies Salmonella Typhimurium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Dr. Cheryl Nickerson of Tulane University is studying the effects of simulated low-g on a well-known pathogen, Salmonella typhimurium, a bacterium that causes two to four million cases of gastrointestinal illness in the United States each year. While most healthy people recover readily, S. typhimurium can kill people with weakened immune systems. Thus, a simple case of food poisoning could disrupt a space mission. Using the NASA rotating-wall bioreactor, Nickerson cultured S. typhimurium in modeled microgravity. Mice infected with the bacterium died an average of three days faster than the control mice, indicating that S. typhimurium's virulence was enhanced by the bioreactor. Earlier research showed that 3 percent of the genes were altered by exposure to the bioreactor. Nickerson's work earned her a 2001 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers.

  8. Chasing Salmonella Typhimurium in free range egg production system.

    PubMed

    Chousalkar, Kapil; Gole, Vaibhav; Caraguel, Charles; Rault, Jean-Loup

    2016-08-30

    Free range production systems are becoming a major source of egg production in Australia and worldwide. This study investigated shedding and ecology of Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella species in a free range layer flock, wild birds and foxes in the vicinity of the free range farm in different seasons. Shedding of Salmonella was significantly higher in summer. Within the shed, overall, Salmonella prevalence was highest in dust. Corticosterone level in faeces was highest in spring and lowest in winter. There was no direct association between the Salmonella shedding (MPN/gm) and corticosterone levels in faeces. Salmonella Typhimurium MLVA types isolated from fox and wild birds were similar to MLVA types isolated from layer flock and reported during human food borne illness. Wild birds and foxes appear to play an important role in S. Typhimurium ecology and food safety. Environmental factors could play a role in evolution of S. Typhimurium in free range environment.

  9. Chasing Salmonella Typhimurium in free range egg production system.

    PubMed

    Chousalkar, Kapil; Gole, Vaibhav; Caraguel, Charles; Rault, Jean-Loup

    2016-08-30

    Free range production systems are becoming a major source of egg production in Australia and worldwide. This study investigated shedding and ecology of Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella species in a free range layer flock, wild birds and foxes in the vicinity of the free range farm in different seasons. Shedding of Salmonella was significantly higher in summer. Within the shed, overall, Salmonella prevalence was highest in dust. Corticosterone level in faeces was highest in spring and lowest in winter. There was no direct association between the Salmonella shedding (MPN/gm) and corticosterone levels in faeces. Salmonella Typhimurium MLVA types isolated from fox and wild birds were similar to MLVA types isolated from layer flock and reported during human food borne illness. Wild birds and foxes appear to play an important role in S. Typhimurium ecology and food safety. Environmental factors could play a role in evolution of S. Typhimurium in free range environment. PMID:27527766

  10. Phosphate starvation regulon of Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Foster, J W; Spector, M P

    1986-05-01

    Several phosphate-starvation-inducible (psi) genetic loci in Salmonella typhimurium were identified by fusing the lacZ gene to psi promoters by using the Mu d1 and Mu d1-8 bacteriophages. Although several different starvation conditions were examined, the psi loci responded solely to phosphate deprivation. A regulatory locus, psiR, was identified as controlling the psiC locus. The psiR locus did not affect the expression of the Escherichia coli phoA locus or any of the other psi loci described.

  11. Study of Salmonella Typhimurium Infection in Laying Hens.

    PubMed

    Pande, Vivek V; Devon, Rebecca L; Sharma, Pardeep; McWhorter, Andrea R; Chousalkar, Kapil K

    2016-01-01

    Members of Salmonella enterica are frequently involved in egg and egg product related human food poisoning outbreaks worldwide. In Australia, Salmonella Typhimurium is frequently involved in egg and egg product related foodborne illness and Salmonella Mbandaka has also been found to be a contaminant of the layer farm environment. The ability possessed by Salmonella Enteritidis to colonize reproductive organs and contaminate developing eggs has been well-described. However, there are few studies investigating this ability for Salmonella Typhimurium. The hypothesis of this study was that the Salmonella Typhimurium can colonize the gut for a prolonged period of time and that horizontal infection through feces is the main route of egg contamination. At 14 weeks of age hens were orally infected with either S. Typhimurium PT 9 or S. Typhimurium PT 9 and Salmonella Mbandaka. Salmonella shedding in feces and eggs was monitored for 15 weeks post-infection. Egg shell surface and internal contents of eggs laid by infected hens were cultured independently for detection of Salmonella spp. The mean Salmonella load in feces ranged from 1.54 to 63.35 and 0.31 to 98.38 most probable number/g (MPN/g) in the S. Typhimurium and S. Typhimurium + S. Mbandaka group, respectively. No correlation was found between mean fecal Salmonella load and frequency of egg shell contamination. Egg shell contamination was higher in S. Typhimurium + S. Mbandaka infected group (7.2% S. Typhimurium, 14.1% S. Mbandaka) compared to birds infected with S. Typhimurium (5.66%) however, co-infection had no significant impact on egg contamination by S. Typhimurium. Throughout the study Salmonella was not recovered from internal contents of eggs laid by hens. Salmonella was isolated from different segments of oviduct of hens from both the groups, however pathology was not observed on microscopic examination. This study investigated Salmonella shedding for up to 15 weeks p.i which is a longer period of time

  12. Study of Salmonella Typhimurium Infection in Laying Hens

    PubMed Central

    Pande, Vivek V.; Devon, Rebecca L.; Sharma, Pardeep; McWhorter, Andrea R.; Chousalkar, Kapil K.

    2016-01-01

    Members of Salmonella enterica are frequently involved in egg and egg product related human food poisoning outbreaks worldwide. In Australia, Salmonella Typhimurium is frequently involved in egg and egg product related foodborne illness and Salmonella Mbandaka has also been found to be a contaminant of the layer farm environment. The ability possessed by Salmonella Enteritidis to colonize reproductive organs and contaminate developing eggs has been well-described. However, there are few studies investigating this ability for Salmonella Typhimurium. The hypothesis of this study was that the Salmonella Typhimurium can colonize the gut for a prolonged period of time and that horizontal infection through feces is the main route of egg contamination. At 14 weeks of age hens were orally infected with either S. Typhimurium PT 9 or S. Typhimurium PT 9 and Salmonella Mbandaka. Salmonella shedding in feces and eggs was monitored for 15 weeks post-infection. Egg shell surface and internal contents of eggs laid by infected hens were cultured independently for detection of Salmonella spp. The mean Salmonella load in feces ranged from 1.54 to 63.35 and 0.31 to 98.38 most probable number/g (MPN/g) in the S. Typhimurium and S. Typhimurium + S. Mbandaka group, respectively. No correlation was found between mean fecal Salmonella load and frequency of egg shell contamination. Egg shell contamination was higher in S. Typhimurium + S. Mbandaka infected group (7.2% S. Typhimurium, 14.1% S. Mbandaka) compared to birds infected with S. Typhimurium (5.66%) however, co-infection had no significant impact on egg contamination by S. Typhimurium. Throughout the study Salmonella was not recovered from internal contents of eggs laid by hens. Salmonella was isolated from different segments of oviduct of hens from both the groups, however pathology was not observed on microscopic examination. This study investigated Salmonella shedding for up to 15 weeks p.i which is a longer period of time

  13. Detection of Salmonella enterica serotype typhimurium DT104 in Mozambique.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Joaquim; Herrera-Leon, Silvia; Mandomando, Inacio; Macete, Eusebio; Puyol, Laura; Echeita, Aurora; Alonso, Pedro L

    2008-12-01

    The spread of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium definitive phage type DT104 in sub-Saharan Africa is a public health concern. We obtained two isolates of S. typhimurium DT104 from blood cultures of infants with malaria in Mozambique. Both isolates contained Salmonella genomic island 1A and had the same pulsed-field gel electrophoresis PulseNet pattern (STYMXB.0005). Results showed the need for continuous surveillance of Salmonella spp. serotypes circulating in this area.

  14. Variable symmetry in Salmonella typhimurium flagellar motors.

    PubMed

    Young, Howard S; Dang, Hongyue; Lai, Yimin; DeRosier, David J; Khan, Shahid

    2003-01-01

    Electron cryomicroscopy of rotor complexes of the Salmonella typhimurium flagellar motor, overproduced in a nonmotile Escherichia coli host, has revealed a variation in subunit symmetry of the cytoplasmic ring (C ring) module. C rings with subunit symmetries ranging from 31 to 38 were found. They formed a Gaussian distribution around a mean between 34 and 35, a similar number to that determined for native C rings. C-ring diameter scaled with the number of subunits, indicating that the elliptical-shaped subunits maintained constant intersubunit spacing. Taken together with evidence that the M ring does not correspondingly increase in size, this finding indicates that rotor assembly does not require strict stoichiometric interactions between the M- and C-ring subunits. Implications for motor function are discussed.

  15. Genetic map of Salmonella typhimurium, edition VIII.

    PubMed Central

    Sanderson, K E; Hessel, A; Rudd, K E

    1995-01-01

    We present edition VIII of the genetic map of Salmonella typhimurium LT2. We list a total of 1,159 genes, 1,080 of which have been located on the circular chromosome and 29 of which are on pSLT, the 90-kb plasmid usually found in LT2 lines. The remaining 50 genes are not yet mapped. The coordinate system used in this edition is neither minutes of transfer time in conjugation crosses nor units representing "phage lengths" of DNA of the transducing phage P22, as used in earlier editions, but centisomes and kilobases based on physical analysis of the lengths of DNA segments between genes. Some of these lengths have been determined by digestion of DNA by rare-cutting endonucleases and separation of fragments by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Other lengths have been determined by analysis of DNA sequences in GenBank. We have constructed StySeq1, which incorporates all Salmonella DNA sequence data known to us. StySeq1 comprises over 548 kb of nonredundant chromosomal genomic sequences, representing 11.4% of the chromosome, which is estimated to be just over 4,800 kb in length. Most of these sequences were assigned locations on the chromosome, in some cases by analogy with mapped Escherichia coli sequences. PMID:7603411

  16. Salmonella Typhimurium grown in a rotating wall bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Salmonella typhimurium appears green in on human intestinal tissue (stained red) cultured in a NASA rotating wall bioreactor. Dr. Cheryl Nickerson of Tulane University is studying the effects of simulated low-g on a well-known pathogen, Salmonella typhimurium, a bacterium that causes two to four million cases of gastrointestinal illness in the United States each year. While most healthy people recover readily, S. typhimurium can kill people with weakened immune systems. Thus, a simple case of food poisoning could disrupt a space mission. Using the NASA rotating-wall bioreactor, Nickerson cultured S. typhimurium in modeled microgravity. Mice infected with the bacterium died an average of three days faster than the control mice, indicating that S. typhimurium's virulence was enhanced by the bioreactor. Earlier research showed that 3 percent of the genes were altered by exposure to the bioreactor. Nickerson's work earned her a 2001 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers.

  17. Salmonella typhimurium meningitis in an adult patient with AIDS.

    PubMed

    Swe, K Swe; Nagel, G; Van der Westhuizen, M; Hoosen, A A

    2008-01-01

    Salmonella meningitis is an unusual complication of Salmonella sepsis and occurs mainly in children. A rare case of Salmonella typhimurium meningitis occurring in an adult HIV positive man who presented with a history of fever and diarrhoea is reported. On examination he was dehydrated, and had oral thrush, weakness of lower limbs and neck stiffness. A septic diagnostic screen was performed and he was commenced on empiric intravenous cefotaxime therapy for meningitis. S typhimurium was cultured from cerebrospinal fluid and blood culture specimens. It was non-lactose fermenting, oxidase negative, H(2)S positive and motile. Cefotaxime was continued for 14 days and the patient responded without neurological sequelae. PMID:17158637

  18. Methods for Tumor Targeting with Salmonella typhimurium A1-R.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Robert M; Zhao, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella typhimurium A1-R (S. typhimurium A1-R) has shown great preclinical promise as a broad-based anti-cancer therapeutic (please see Chapter 1 ). The present chapter describes materials and methods for the preclinical study of S. typhimurium A1-R in clinically-relevant mouse models. Establishment of orthotopic metastatic mouse models of the major cancer types is described, as well as other useful models, for efficacy studies of S. typhimurium A1-R or other tumor-targeting bacteria, as well. Imaging methods are described to visualize GFP-labeled S. typhimurium A1-R, as well as GFP- and/or RFP-labeled cancer cells in vitro and in vivo, which S. typhimurium A1-R targets. The mouse models include metastasis to major organs that are life-threatening to cancer patients including the liver, lung, bone, and brain and how to target these metastases with S. typhimurium A1-R. Various routes of administration of S. typhimurium A1-R are described with the advantages and disadvantages of each. Basic experiments to determine toxic effects of S. typhimurium A1-R are also described. Also described are methodologies for combining S. typhimurium A1-R and chemotherapy. The testing of S. typhimurium A1-R on patient tumors in patient-derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) mouse models is also described. The major methodologies described in this chapter should be translatable for clinical studies. PMID:26846809

  19. Comparison of the environmental survival characteristics of Salmonella Dublin and Salmonella Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Kirchner, Miranda J; Liebana, Ernesto; McLaren, Ian; Clifton-Hadley, Felicity A; Wales, Andrew D; Davies, Robert H

    2012-10-12

    To examine possible correlations in bovine Salmonella isolates between environmental survival and serovar-associated epidemiological patterns, bovine field isolates of Salmonella serovars Typhimurium and Dublin (two each) were inoculated into bovine faeces slurry and tested monthly by culture for survival during a six-month period of storage at a variable ambient temperature in a disused animal transporter. Low moisture conditions, where the slurry was dried onto wooden dowels, increased detectable survival of a low-level inoculum by up to five months, compared with wet slurry. A more modest increase of survival time was seen with storage of wet slurry under refrigeration at 4°C. Under both dry and wet conditions, the concentration of culturable Salmonella Typhimurium declined at a slower rate than did that of Salmonella Dublin. Salmonella that was naturally contaminating bovine faeces from farms with Salmonella Typhimurium did not show superior survival times compared with Salmonella Typhimurium that had been artificially inoculated into samples. The differing survival characteristics of the two serovars that was observed in environmental faeces may complement their different modes of infection in cattle. Salmonella Dublin, being a bovine host-adapted strain that establishes chronic infection in some animals, may have less need to survive for a prolonged period outside of its host than does Salmonella Typhimurium.

  20. Assessment of attenuated Salmonella vaccine strains in controlling experimental Salmonella Typhimurium infection in chickens.

    PubMed

    Pei, Yanlong; Parreira, Valeria R; Roland, Kenneth L; Curtiss, Roy; Prescott, John F

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella hold considerable promise as vaccine delivery vectors for heterologous antigens in chickens. Such vaccines have the potential additional benefit of also controlling Salmonella infection in immunized birds. As a way of selecting attenuated strains with optimal immunogenic potential as antigen delivery vectors, this study screened 20 novel Salmonella Typhimurium vaccine strains, differing in mutations associated with delayed antigen synthesis and delayed attenuation, for their efficacy in controlling colonization by virulent Salmonella Typhimurium, as well as for their persistence in the intestine and the spleen. Marked differences were observed between strains in these characteristics, which provide the basis for selection for further study as vaccine vectors.

  1. [Chronic Salmonella typhimurium diarrhea in an immunocompetent patient].

    PubMed

    Mellado-Ferreiro, M; Jarne-Betrán, V; Arteaga-Mazuelas, M; Abínzano-Guillén, M L

    2016-01-01

    Chronic diarrhea caused by infection in immunocompetent patients is an infrequent condition in developed countries, although certain pathogens,generally parasites (Giardia lamblia, Isospora belli,Cryptosporidium, Cyclospora, Strongyloides, Ameba,Trichuris and Schistosoma) and some bacteria (Aeromonas,Plesiomonas, Campylobacter, Clostridium difficile, Salmonella or Mycobacterium tuberculosis)can cause persistent diarrhea.We present the case of a patient who showed Salmonella typhimurium in his stool culture and recovered following treatment with levofloxacin for 7 days. PMID:27125610

  2. Internal Colonization of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium in Tomato Plants

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Ganyu; Hu, Jiahuai; Cevallos-Cevallos, Juan M.; Richardson, Susanna M.; Bartz, Jerry A.; van Bruggen, Ariena H. C.

    2011-01-01

    Several Salmonella enterica outbreaks have been traced back to contaminated tomatoes. In this study, the internalization of S. enterica Typhimurium via tomato leaves was investigated as affected by surfactants and bacterial rdar morphotype, which was reported to be important for the environmental persistence and attachment of Salmonella to plants. Surfactants, especially Silwet L-77, promoted ingress and survival of S. enterica Typhimurium in tomato leaves. In each of two experiments, 84 tomato plants were inoculated two to four times before fruiting with GFP-labeled S. enterica Typhimurium strain MAE110 (with rdar morphotype) or MAE119 (without rdar). For each inoculation, single leaflets were dipped in 109 CFU/ml Salmonella suspension with Silwet L-77. Inoculated and adjacent leaflets were tested for Salmonella survival for 3 weeks after each inoculation. The surface and pulp of ripe fruits produced on these plants were also examined for Salmonella. Populations of both Salmonella strains in inoculated leaflets decreased during 2 weeks after inoculation but remained unchanged (at about 104 CFU/g) in week 3. Populations of MAE110 were significantly higher (P<0.05) than those of MAE119 from day 3 after inoculation. In the first year, nine fruits collected from one of the 42 MAE119 inoculated plants were positive for S. enterica Typhimurium. In the second year, Salmonella was detected in adjacent non-inoculated leaves of eight tomato plants (five inoculated with strain MAE110). The pulp of 12 fruits from two plants inoculated with MAE110 was Salmonella positive (about 106 CFU/g). Internalization was confirmed by fluorescence and confocal laser microscopy. For the first time, convincing evidence is presented that S. enterica can move inside tomato plants grown in natural field soil and colonize fruits at high levels without inducing any symptoms, except for a slight reduction in plant growth. PMID:22096553

  3. Growth of Salmonella typhimurium in skim milk concentrates.

    PubMed

    Dega, C A; Goepfert, J M; Amundson, C H

    1972-01-01

    The influence of various levels of skim milk solids and temperature on the duration of lag phase, growth rate, and extent of growth of Salmonella typhimurium was investigated. The effect on growth of salmonellae (and a strain of Escherichia coli) of reduced pressure at a constant solids level and under conditions simulating vacuum condensation of skim milk was also studied. S. typhimurium grew when inoculated into skim milk solutions ranging from 10 to 60% solids and over a temperature range of 23 to 44 C. At 10 to 12 C, growth was evident only in the 10% skim milk. As the total solids level was increased or incubation temperature was deviated from the optimum, or both, there was an increase in the lag phase and generation time of salmonellae. A lower cell population also resulted. The generation time at 37 C of S. typhimurium incubated at atmospheric pressure was approximately one-half that in skim milk concentrates held under reduced pressure. In addition, a slightly longer lag phase and lower cell yield characterized the growth under reduced pressure. Concentration of skim milk had little or no effect on viability of salmonellae or E. coli when the vapor temperature in the vacuum pan was below the maximum growth temperature for salmonellae. Increasing the vapor temperature to 48 C caused a two-log reduction in viable organisms during the concentrating period (65 min).

  4. Ingress of Salmonella enterica Typhimurium into tomato leaves through hydathodes.

    PubMed

    Gu, Ganyu; Cevallos-Cevallos, Juan M; van Bruggen, Ariena H C

    2013-01-01

    Internal contamination of Salmonella in plants is attracting increasing attention for food safety reasons. In this study, three different tomato cultivars "Florida Lanai", "Crown Jewel", "Ailsa Craig" and the transgenic line Sp5 of "Ailsa Craig" were inoculated with 1 µl GFP-labeled Salmonella Typhimurium through guttation droplets at concentrations of 10(9) or 10(7) CFU/ml. Survival of Salmonella on/in tomato leaves was detected by both direct plating and enrichment methods. Salmonella cells survived best on/in the inoculated leaves of cultivar "Ailsa Craig" and decreased fastest on/in "Florida Lanai" leaves. Increased guttation in the abscisic acid over-expressing Sp5 plants may have facilitated the entrance of Salmonella into leaves and the colonization on the surface of tomato leaves. Internalization of Salmonella Typhimurium in tomato leaves through guttation drop inoculation was confirmed by confocal laser microscopy. For the first time, convincing evidence is presented that S. enterica can enter tomato leaves through hydathodes and move into the vascular system, which may result in the internal translocation of the bacteria inside plants.

  5. Sensitive and rapid molecular detection assays for Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Heidelberg

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella enterica is a significant cause of gastroenteritis worldwide, with S. enterica serovars Typhimurium and Heidelberg being particularly prevalent. S. enterica serovars Typhimurium and Heidelberg have broad host ranges infecting poultry, dairy animals and humans. Traditional methods used fo...

  6. Detection of Salmonella typhimurium using an electrochemical immunosensor.

    PubMed

    Salam, Faridah; Tothill, Ibtisam E

    2009-04-15

    An electrochemical immunosensor based on screen-printed gold working electrode with onboard carbon counter and silver-silver chloride pseudo-reference electrode for Salmonella typhimurium detection is described in this paper. Monoclonal anti-S. typhimurium antibody was immobilized using physical and covalent immobilization via amine coupling of carboxymethyldextran on the surface of the gold working electrode. A direct sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) format was then developed and optimized using a polyclonal anti-Salmonella antibodies conjugated to horseradish peroxidase (HRP) as the enzyme label. 3,3',5,5'-Tetramethylbenzidine dihydrochloride (TMB)/H(2)O(2) was used as the enzyme mediator/substrate system. Electrochemical detection was conducted using chronoamperometry at -200 mV vs. onboard screen-printed Ag-AgCl pseudo-reference electrode. The applied potential was selected through the study of the electrochemical behaviour of bare gold electrode with TMB-H(2)O(2)-IgG-HRP system. S. typhimurium detection of 5x10(3) cells ml(-1) and approximately 20 cells ml(-1) was achieved respectively for physical and covalent antibody immobilization. The developed sensor was then compared to a commercial ELISA kit and a chromogenic agar plating method for meat samples analysis. The sensor format shows a promising technology for simple and sensitive detection system for Salmonella contamination. Rapid detection of Salmonella is a key to the prevention and identification of problems related to health and safety.

  7. Growth rate paradox of Salmonella typhimurium within host macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Abshire, K Z; Neidhardt, F C

    1993-01-01

    The growth rate of Salmonella typhimurium U937 within host macrophages was estimated by two independent methods. The extent to which ribosomal protein L12 is acetylated to produce ribosomal protein L7 changes markedly with the growth rate. By this measure, the intracellular bacteria appeared to be growing rapidly. Measurements of viable bacteria, however, indicated that the bacteria were growing slowly. A solution of this apparent growth rate paradox was sought by treating U937 cells infected with S. typhimurium X3306 with ampicillin or chloramphenicol to help determine the number of bacteria that were actively growing and dividing in the intracellular condition. Use of these antibiotics showed that by 2 h after invasion, the intracellular bacteria consisted of at least two populations, one static and the other rapidly dividing. This finding implies that previously described changes in the gene expression of S. typhimurium are important for the survival and/or multiplication of the bacteria within the macrophage. Images PMID:8509329

  8. Structural characterization of the Salmonella typhimurium LT2 umu operon.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, S M; Crowne, H M; Pidsley, S C; Sedgwick, S G

    1990-01-01

    The umuDC operon of Escherichia coli encodes functions required for mutagenesis induced by radiation and a wide variety of chemicals. The closely related organism Salmonella typhimurium is markedly less mutable than E. coli, but a umu homolog has recently been identified and cloned from the LT2 subline. In this study the nucleotide sequence and structure of the S. typhimurium LT2 umu operon have been determined and its gene products have been identified so that the molecular basis of umu activity might be understood more fully. S. typhimurium LT2 umu consists of a smaller 417-base-pair (bp) umuD gene ending 2 bp upstream of a larger 1,266-bp umuC gene. The only apparent structural difference between the two operons is the lack of gene overlap. An SOS box identical to that found in E. coli is present in the promoter region upstream of umuD. The calculated molecular masses of the umuD and umuC gene products were 15.3 and 47.8 kilodaltons, respectively, which agree with figures determined by transpositional disruption and maxicell analysis. The S. typhimurium and E. coli umuD sequences were 68% homologous and encoded products with 71% amino acid identity; the umuC sequences were 71% homologous and encoded products with 83% amino acid identity. Furthermore, the potential UmuD cleavage site and associated catalytic sites could be identified. Thus the very different mutagenic responses of S. typhimurium LT2 and E. coli cannot be accounted for by gross differences in operon structure or gene products. Rather, the ability of the cloned S. typhimurium umuD gene to give stronger complementation of E. coli umuD77 mutants in the absence of a functional umuC gene suggests that Salmonella UmuC protein normally constrains UmuD protein activity. Images PMID:2203737

  9. Polyamines are required for virulence in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Jelsbak, Lotte; Thomsen, Line Elnif; Wallrodt, Inke; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal; Olsen, John Elmerdahl

    2012-01-01

    Sensing and responding to environmental cues is a fundamental characteristic of bacterial physiology and virulence. Here we identify polyamines as novel environmental signals essential for virulence of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, a major intracellular pathogen and a model organism for studying typhoid fever. Central to its virulence are two major virulence loci Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1 and 2 (SPI1 and SPI2). SPI1 promotes invasion of epithelial cells, whereas SPI2 enables S. Typhimurium to survive and proliferate within specialized compartments inside host cells. In this study, we show that an S. Typhimurium polyamine mutant is defective for invasion, intracellular survival, killing of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and systemic infection of the mouse model of typhoid fever. Virulence of the mutant could be restored by genetic complementation, and invasion and intracellular survival could, as well, be complemented by the addition of exogenous putrescine and spermidine to the bacterial cultures prior to infection. Interestingly, intracellular survival of the polyamine mutant was significantly enhanced above the wild type level by the addition of exogenous putrescine and spermidine to the bacterial cultures prior to infection, indicating that these polyamines function as an environmental signal that primes S. Typhimurium for intracellular survival. Accordingly, experiments addressed at elucidating the roles of these polyamines in infection revealed that expression of genes from both of the major virulence loci SPI1 and SPI2 responded to exogenous polyamines and was reduced in the polyamine mutant. Together our data demonstrate that putrescine and spermidine play a critical role in controlling virulence in S. Typhimurium most likely through stimulation of expression of essential virulence loci. Moreover, our data implicate these polyamines as key signals in S. Typhimurium virulence.

  10. Salmonella typhimurium gyrA mutations associated with fluoroquinolone resistance.

    PubMed Central

    Reyna, F; Huesca, M; González, V; Fuchs, L Y

    1995-01-01

    Spontaneous quinolone-resistant mutants obtained from Salmonella typhimurium Su694 were screened for mutations by direct DNA sequencing of an amplified PCR gyrA fragment. Substitutions Ser-83-->Phe (Ser83Phe), Ser83Tyr, Asp87Tyr, and Asp87Asn and double mutation Ala67Pro-Gly81Ser, which resulted in decreased sensitivities to ciprofloxacin, enoxacin, pefloxacin, norfloxacin, ofloxacin, and nalidixic acid, were found. The levels of resistance to quinolones for each mutant were determined. PMID:7492118

  11. Salmonella Typhimurium exploits inflammation to its own advantage in piglets.

    PubMed

    Chirullo, Barbara; Pesciaroli, Michele; Drumo, Rosanna; Ruggeri, Jessica; Razzuoli, Elisabetta; Pistoia, Claudia; Petrucci, Paola; Martinelli, Nicola; Cucco, Lucilla; Moscati, Livia; Amadori, Massimo; Magistrali, Chiara F; Alborali, Giovanni L; Pasquali, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) is responsible for foodborne zoonotic infections that, in humans, induce self-limiting gastroenteritis. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the wild-type strain S. Typhimurium (STM14028) is able to exploit inflammation fostering an active infection. Due to the similarity between human and porcine diseases induced by S. Typhimurium, we used piglets as a model for salmonellosis and gastrointestinal research. This study showed that STM14028 is able to efficiently colonize in vitro porcine mono-macrophages and intestinal columnar epithelial (IPEC-J2) cells, and that the colonization significantly increases with LPS pre-treatment. This increase was then reversed by inhibiting the LPS stimulation through LPS antagonist, confirming an active role of LPS stimulation in STM14028-intracellular colonization. Moreover, LPS in vivo treatment increased cytokines blood level and body temperature at 4 h post infection, which is consistent with an acute inflammatory stimulus, capable to influence the colonization of STM14028 in different organs and tissues. The present study proves for the first time that in acute enteric salmonellosis, S. Typhimurium exploits inflammation for its benefit in piglets.

  12. A weak adaptive response to alkylation damage in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, P; Sedgwick, B

    1991-01-01

    An efficient adaptive response to alkylation damage was observed in several enterobacterial species, including Klebsiella aerogenes, Shigella sonnei, Shigella boydii, Escherichia alkalescens, Escherichia hermanii, and Escherichia fergusonii. Increased O6-methylguanine-DNA and methylphosphotriester-DNA methyltransferase activities correlated with the induction of a 39-kDa protein recognized by monoclonal antibodies raised against the Escherichia coli Ada protein. Induced methyltransferase activities were similarly observed in Aerobacter aerogenes and Citrobacter intermedius, although no antigenically cross-reacting material was present. Weak induction of a 39-kDa protein immunologically related to the E. coli Ada protein occurred in Salmonella typhimurium. This protein encoded by the cloned S. typhimurium ada gene was shown to be an active methyltransferase which repaired O6-methylguanine and methylphosphotriesters in DNA as efficiently as did the E. coli Ada protein. However, the mehtyltransferase activity of the weakly induced 39-kDa protein in S. typhimurium was not detected, apparently because it was self-methylated and thus inactivated during the adaptive N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine pretreatment. In contrast, the E. coli ada gene on a low-copy-number plasmid was efficiently induced in S. typhimurium, and high methyltransferase activities were observed. We concluded that the inefficient induction of the adaptive response in S. typhimurium results from weak transcriptional activation of its ada gene by the self-methylated protein. Images PMID:2050626

  13. Phagocytic and chemiluminescent responses of mouse peritoneal macrophages to living and killed Salmonella typhimurium and other bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, T; Blumenstock, E; Kanegasaki, S

    1981-01-01

    In the presence of luminol, resident as well as thioglycolate-induced and immunized macrophages emitted chemiluminescence more efficiently when the cells were exposed to living Salmonella typhimurium than when they were exposed to the same bacterium killed by ultraviolet light or heat. This phenomenon was observed whether or not the bacterium was opsonized. The different response to living and killed bacteria was also found with Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus morganii, and Enterobacter aerogenes, but not with Shigella sonnei, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Propionibacterium acnes. The results suggest that macrophages respond better to living, motile bacteria than to nonmotile or killed bacteria. The experimental results obtained with motility mutants of S. typhimurium, E. coli, and P. aeruginosa confirm that macrophages exposed to the motile bacteria emit chemiluminescence more efficiently and ingest the motile bacteria at a much faster rate than the nonmotile bacteria. Images PMID:6788707

  14. Phagocytic and chemiluminescent responses of mouse peritoneal macrophages to living and killed Salmonella typhimurium and other bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Tomita, T.; Blumenstock, E.; Kanegasaki, S.

    1981-06-01

    In the presence of luminol, resident as well as thioglycolate-induced and immunized macrophages emitted chemiluminescence more efficiently when the cells were exposed to living Salmonella typhimurium than when they were exposed to the same bacterium killed by ultraviolet light or heat. This phenomenon was observed whether or not the bacterium was opsonized. The different response to living and killed bacteria was also found with Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus morganii, and Enterobacter aerogenes, but not with Shigella sonnei, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Propionibacterium acnes. The results suggest that macrophages respond better to living, motile bacteria than to nonmotile or killed bacteria. The experimental results obtained with motility mutants of S. typhimurium, E. coli, and P. aeruginosa confirm that macrophages exposed to the motile bacteria emit chemiluminescence more efficiently and ingest the motile bacteria at a much faster rate than the nonmotile bacteria.

  15. Persistence of salmonella typhimurium in nopal cladodes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fresh produce associated outbreaks have increased in the last few years. E.coli O157:H7 and Salmonella have been causative agents of infection in these outbreaks. Fresh produce is consumed raw, and in the absence of terminal kill treatment, it is imperative to understand sources of contamination o...

  16. Persistence of salmonella Typhimurium in Nopal

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Having documented information available on the capability of Salmonella to remain in the cladode tissue it is important to understand the role of nopal on the lifecycle of enteropathogenic bacteria in humans, as well as for management and control programs of theses pathogens in plants. Because of th...

  17. Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella Sofia: Growth in and Persistence on Eggs under Production and Retail Conditions.

    PubMed

    McAuley, Catherine M; Duffy, Lesley L; Subasinghe, Nela; Hogg, Geoff; Coventry, John; Fegan, Narelle

    2015-01-01

    Salmonellosis in Australia has been linked to eggs and egg products with specific serotypes associated with outbreaks. We compared attachment to and survival on egg shells and growth in eggs of two Salmonella serotypes, an egg outbreak associated Salmonella Typhimurium and a non-egg-associated Salmonella enterica ssp. II 1,4,12,27:b:[e,n,x] (S. Sofia). Experiments were conducted at combinations of 4, 15, 22, 37 and 42 °C. No significant differences occurred between the serotypes in maximum growth rates, which were significantly greater (P < 0.001) in egg yolk (0.427 log10 CFU/mL/h) compared to whole egg (0.312 log10 CFU/mL/h) and egg white (0.029 log10 CFU/mL/h). Attachment to egg shells varied by time (1 or 20 min) and temperature (4, 22 and 42 °C), with S. Typhimurium isolates attaching at higher levels (P < 0.05) than S. Sofia after 1 min at 4 °C and S. Typhimurium ATCC 14028 attaching at higher (P < 0.05) levels at 22 °C. Survival on egg shells was not significantly different across isolates. Salmonella serotypes behaved similarly regarding growth in egg contents, attachment to egg shells and survival on eggs, indicating that other factors more likely contributed to reasons for S. Typhimurium being implicated in multiple egg-associated outbreaks. PMID:26539536

  18. The engineered Salmonella typhimurium inhibits tumorigenesis in advanced glioma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian-qiang; Zhan, Yue-fu; Wang, Wei; Jiang, Sheng-nan; Li, Xiang-ying

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the antitumor role of the attenuated Salmonella typhimurium ΔppGpp with inducible cytolysin A (ClyA) in advanced stage of glioma. Materials and methods The C6 rat glioma cells were orthotopically implanted by surgery into the caudate nucleus of rat brains. The rats were then randomly divided into the treatment group (SL + ClyA) (n=12), negative control group (SL) (n=12), and control group (phosphate-buffered saline [PBS]) (n=12). In the treatment group, the attenuated S. typhimurium were transformed with the plasmid-encoded antitumor gene ClyA. The expression of ClyA was controlled by the TetR-regulated promoter in response to extracellular doxycycline. The plasmid also contained an imaging gene lux to allow illumination of the tumor infected by the bacteria. The rat glioma C6 cells were implanted into the caudate nucleus of all rats. The engineered S. typhimurium and respective controls were injected intravenously into the rats 21 days after initial tumor implantation. The pathological analysis of the glioma tumor was performed at 21 days and 28 days (7 days after doxycycline treatment) postimplantation. All rats underwent MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) and bioluminescence study at 21 days and 28 days postimplantation to detect tumor volume. The differences between the three groups in tumor volume and survival time were analyzed. Results Advanced stage glioma was detected at 21 days postimplantation. Bioluminescence showed that the engineered S. typhimurium accumulated in glioma tumors and disappeared in the normal reticuloendothelial tissues 3 days after intravenous injection. MRI showed that the tumor volume in the S. typhimurium with ClyA group were significantly reduced compared to the bacteria alone and no bacteria groups 7 days post-doxycycline treatment (P<0.05), while the necrotic tumor volume in the S. typhimurium with ClyA group and S. typhimurium alone group increased significantly compared to the control group (P<0.01). In

  19. Detection of Salmonella typhimurium using polyclonal antibody immobilized magnetostrictive biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guntupalli, R.; Hu, Jing; Lakshmanan, Ramji S.; Wan, Jiehui; Huang, Shichu; Yang, Hong; Barbaree, James M.; Huang, T. S.; Chin, Bryan A.

    2006-05-01

    Novel mass-sensitive, magnetostrictive sensors have a characteristic resonant frequency that can be determined by monitoring the magnetic flux emitted by the sensor in response to an applied, time varying, magnetic field. This magnetostrictive platform has a unique advantage over conventional sensor platforms in that measurement is wireless or remote. These biosensors can thus be used in-situ for detecting pathogens and biological threat agents. In this work, we have used a magnetostrictive platform immobilized with a polyclonal antibody (the bio-molecular recognition element) to form a biosensor for the detection of Salmonella typhimurium. Upon exposure to solutions containing Salmonella typhimurium bacteria, the bacteria were bound to the sensor and the additional mass of the bound bacteria caused a shift in the sensor's resonant frequency. Responses of the sensors to different concentrations of S. typhimurium were recorded and the results correlated with those obtained from scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of samples. Good agreement between the measured number of bound bacterial cells (attached mass) and frequency shifts were obtained. The longevity and specificity of the selected polyclonal antibody were also investigated and are reported.

  20. Using a surface plasmon resonance biosensor for rapid detection of salmonella typhimurium in chicken carcass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chicken is one of the most popular meat products in the world. Salmonella Typhimurium is a common foodborne pathogens associated with the processing of poultry. An optical Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) biosensor was sensitive to the presence of Salmonella Typhimurium in chicken carcass. The Spr...

  1. Rapid detection of Salmonella Typhimurium in chicken carcass using a SPR biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shizhou; Lan, Yubin; Yin, Yongguang; Dasari, Thirumala R.

    2005-11-01

    The SPR biosensor was sensitive to the presence of Salmonella Typhimurium in chicken carcass. The selectivity of the SPR biosensor was assayed using a series of antibody concentrations and dilution series of the organism. The SPR biosensor was specific to Salmonella Typhimurium at concentrations of 106 CFU/ml. Initial results show potential for its application for pathogenic bacteria monitoring.

  2. Photonic Plasmid Stability of Transformed Salmonella Typhimurium: A Comparison of Three Unique Plasmids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Acquiring a highly stable photonic plasmid in transformed Salmonella Typhimurium for use in biophotonic studies of bacterial tracking in vivo is critical to experimental paradigm development. The objective of this study was to determine stability of transformed Salmonella Typhimurium (S....

  3. Photonic plasmid stability of transformed Salmonella typhimurium: A comparison of three unique plasmids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acquiring a highly stable photonic plasmid in transformed Salmonella typhimurium for use in biophotonic studies of bacterial tracking in vivo is critical to experimental paradigm development. The objective of this study was to determine stability of transformed Salmonella typhimurium (S. typh-lux) u...

  4. Ordered expression of virulence genes in Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Papezova, K; Gregorova, D; Jonuschies, J; Rychlik, I

    2007-01-01

    Using transcriptional promoter fusions, we investigated the expression of selected SPI-1 and SPI-2 genes of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium). Promoters of genes related to the invasion of the epithelial cell (hilA, hilC, hilD, invF, sicA, sopA, sopB and sopE2) were active in Luria-Bertani (LB) medium and LB with butyrate but were suppressed by bile salts and in glucose minimal (M9) medium. Genes related to S. Typhimurium intracellular survival (phoP, ssrA, ssaB, ssaG, sifA, sifB and pipB) were characterized by their expression in stationary phase in LB and M9 medium. Activity of phoP and ssrA promoters indicated that these might be expressed inside the gut. SPI-1 genes were expressed on the transition to stationary phase while SPI-2 genes were expressed in stationary phase. Among SPI-1 genes, those with regulatory functions preceded in expression the effector genes and sop genes were expressed in the order of sopA, sopB and sopE2, showing hierarchy in the expression of S. Typhimurium virulence genes.

  5. Clonal groups of Salmonella typhimurium in New York State.

    PubMed Central

    McDonough, P L; Timoney, J F; Jacobson, R H; Khakhria, R

    1989-01-01

    The epidemiology of 278 strains of Salmonella typhimurium isolated from 1973 to 1981 from animals in New York State was studied by using four "fingerprinting" techniques, bacteriophage type (B.R. Callow, J. Hyg. 57:346-359, 1959), biotype (J. P. Duguid, E. S. Anderson, G. A. Alfredsson, R. Barker, and D. C. Old, J. Med. Microbiol. 8:149-166, 1975), plasmid profile, and antibiogram. Phage type with biotype was the most useful marker for distinguishing clonal groups of S. typhimurium. Four clones of S. typhimurium predominated, i.e., phage type/biotypes U275/26, 49/26, 10/3, and 2/3. U275/26 and 49/26 were commonly found until 1976, but clones 10/3 and 2/3 were predominant after 1976. Comparison of results with data from Canada suggested a dissemination of strains of S. typhimurium between Canada and New York. Cattle were a common source of phage type 49, as has been observed in other countries. PMID:2656740

  6. Dispersal of Salmonella Typhimurium by rain splash onto tomato plants.

    PubMed

    Cevallos-Cevallos, Juan M; Danyluk, Michelle D; Gu, Ganyu; Vallad, Gary E; van Bruggen, Ariena H C

    2012-03-01

    Outbreaks of Salmonella enterica have increasingly been associated with tomatoes and traced back to production areas, but the spread of Salmonella from a point source onto plants has not been described. Splash dispersal by rain could be one means of dissemination. Green fluorescent protein-labeled, kanamycin-resistant Salmonella enterica sv. Typhimurium dispensed on the surface of plastic mulch, organic mulch, or soil at 10⁸ CFU/cm² was used as the point source in the center of a rain simulator. Tomato plants in soil with and without plastic or organic mulch were placed around the point source, and rain intensities of 60 and 110 mm/h were applied for 5, 10, 20, and 30 min. Dispersal of Salmonella followed a negative exponential model with a half distance of 3 cm at 110 mm/h. Dispersed Salmonella survived for 3 days on tomato leaflets, with a total decline of 5 log and an initial decimal reduction time of 10 h. Recovery of dispersed Salmonella from plants at the maximum observed distance ranged from 3 CFU/g of leaflet after a rain episode of 110 mm/h for 10 min on soil to 117 CFU/g of leaflet on plastic mulch. Dispersal of Salmonella on plants with and without mulch was significantly enhanced by increasing rain duration from 0 to 10 min, but dispersal was reduced when rainfall duration increased from 10 to 30 min. Salmonella may be dispersed by rain to contaminate tomato plants in the field, especially during rain events of 10 min and when plastic mulch is used.

  7. Dissemination of Salmonella enterica serotype agona and multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serotype typhimurium in Cuba.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Roberto; Ruiz, Joaquim; Ramírez, Margarita; Bravo, Laura; Fernández, Anabel; Aladueña, Ana; Echeíta, Aurora; Gascón, Joaquim; Alonso, Pedro L; Vila, Jordi

    2006-06-01

    The molecular epidemiology, antimicrobial susceptibility, and mechanisms of resistance of 34 Salmonella spp. strains causing acute gastroenteritis, isolated from different provinces in Cuba, were determined. Sixty-four percent of the strains showed multiresistance. Salmonella typhimurium was the most frequent with 15 strains (44%), 13 of which belonged to phagotype 104 and presented similar genetic profiles of pulsed field gel electrophoresis. High levels of resistance to tetracycline (53%), spectinomycin (50%), ampicillin (44%), and chloramphenicol (41%) were found. Resistance to tetracycline was associated with the tet G and tet A genes. Resistance to ampicillin was caused by the presence of beta-lactamases, mainly the CARB type. The floR gene was the main mechanism of resistance to chloramphenicol. Our results showed an antimicrobial susceptible clone of Salmonella enterica serotype Agona in two separate regions. This is the first report of the widespread dissemination of a multiresistant clone of S. enterica serotype Typhimurium definitive phage type 104 in Cuba.

  8. A Novel P22 Prophage in Salmonella typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Downs, Diana M.; Roth, John R.

    1987-01-01

    Under several sets of conditions, all of which seem to perturb purine metabolism, Salmonella typhimurium releases a variety of phages which were not known to be present in the strain. These cryptic phages are not induced by UV irradiation. Furthermore, the induction process does not require a functional recA gene product. While phages of several phenotypic classes have been recovered, including both turbid and clear plaque formers, all appear to be variants of P22 because all show DNA restriction patterns indistinguishable from that of P22. The variety of types suggests that the cryptic prophage is mutagenized as a consequence of the induction process. All the temperate phages tested are capable of transducing a variety of chromosomal markers with high efficiency. The phages induced in this novel way are capable of forming plaques on the strains that gave rise to them. Since the strains releasing phage are not immune to P22, the parental lysogens must not express immunity and the phage must be held in a cryptic state by a novel mechanism. The released phage possess an intact P22 immunity system because many can form standard immune lysogens after reinfection of Salmonella. These results raise the possibility that Salmonella typhimurium harbors cryptic phages that are subject to a novel system of global control related to purine metabolism. Preliminary evidence suggests that the regulation system may involve DNA modification. PMID:3319766

  9. Clustered Intracellular Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Blocks Host Cell Cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    Durkin, Charlotte H.; Helaine, Sophie; Boucrot, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Several bacterial pathogens and viruses interfere with the cell cycle of their host cells to enhance virulence. This is especially apparent in bacteria that colonize the gut epithelium, where inhibition of the cell cycle of infected cells enhances the intestinal colonization. We found that intracellular Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium induced the binucleation of a large proportion of epithelial cells by 14 h postinvasion and that the effect was dependent on an intact Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI-2) type 3 secretion system. The SPI-2 effectors SseF and SseG were required to induce binucleation. SseF and SseG are known to maintain microcolonies of Salmonella-containing vacuoles close to the microtubule organizing center of infected epithelial cells. During host cell division, these clustered microcolonies prevented the correct localization of members of the chromosomal passenger complex and mitotic kinesin-like protein 1 and consequently prevented cytokinesis. Tetraploidy, arising from a cytokinesis defect, is known to have a deleterious effect on subsequent cell divisions, resulting in either chromosomal instabilities or cell cycle arrest. In infected mice, proliferation of small intestinal epithelial cells was compromised in an SseF/SseG-dependent manner, suggesting that cytokinesis failure caused by S. Typhimurium delays epithelial cell turnover in the intestine. PMID:27185791

  10. Clustered Intracellular Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Blocks Host Cell Cytokinesis.

    PubMed

    Santos, António J M; Durkin, Charlotte H; Helaine, Sophie; Boucrot, Emmanuel; Holden, David W

    2016-07-01

    Several bacterial pathogens and viruses interfere with the cell cycle of their host cells to enhance virulence. This is especially apparent in bacteria that colonize the gut epithelium, where inhibition of the cell cycle of infected cells enhances the intestinal colonization. We found that intracellular Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium induced the binucleation of a large proportion of epithelial cells by 14 h postinvasion and that the effect was dependent on an intact Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI-2) type 3 secretion system. The SPI-2 effectors SseF and SseG were required to induce binucleation. SseF and SseG are known to maintain microcolonies of Salmonella-containing vacuoles close to the microtubule organizing center of infected epithelial cells. During host cell division, these clustered microcolonies prevented the correct localization of members of the chromosomal passenger complex and mitotic kinesin-like protein 1 and consequently prevented cytokinesis. Tetraploidy, arising from a cytokinesis defect, is known to have a deleterious effect on subsequent cell divisions, resulting in either chromosomal instabilities or cell cycle arrest. In infected mice, proliferation of small intestinal epithelial cells was compromised in an SseF/SseG-dependent manner, suggesting that cytokinesis failure caused by S Typhimurium delays epithelial cell turnover in the intestine.

  11. Regulation of cobalamin biosynthetic operons in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Escalante-Semerena, J C; Roth, J R

    1987-01-01

    Transcription of cobalamin (cob) biosynthetic genes in Salmonella typhimurium is repressed by cobalamin and by molecular oxygen. These genes seem to be subject to catabolite repression, and they are maximally expressed under conditions of anaerobic respiration of glycerol-fumarate. A 215-fold increase in the expression of cob genes occurs when S. typhimurium shifts from aerobic growth on glucose to anaerobic respiration of glycerol-fumarate under strictly anoxic growth conditions. Exogenous cyclic AMP substantially stimulates the transcription of cob-lac fusions during aerobic growth. However, cyclic AMP is not absolutely required for the expression of the pathway, nor does it mediate the aerobic control. Cobalamin biosynthesis is not seen under aerobic growth conditions, even when transcription is stimulated by the addition of cyclic AMP. Hence, additional control mechanisms triggered by the presence of molecular oxygen must operate independently from transcription effects on the cob operons. PMID:3032913

  12. Salmonella typhimurium metC operator-constitutive mutations.

    PubMed

    Park, Y M; Stauffer, G V

    1989-07-15

    We used an Escherichia coli lac deletion strain lysogenized with a metC-lacZ fusion phage (lambda Clac) to select operator-constitutive mutations in the Salmonella typhimurium metC gene control region. The mutations were located in a region containing 2 tandemly repeated 8 bp palindromes previously proposed to be the MetJ repressor binding site. Lysogens carrying lambda Clac mutant phage exhibit high beta-galactosidase levels that are only partially repressible by methionine. The results suggest that the mutations disrupt the methionine control system mediated by the metJ gene product. PMID:2506106

  13. Global Genomic Epidemiology of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium DT104

    DOE PAGES

    Leekitcharoenphon, Pimlapas; Hendriksen, Rene S.; Le Hello, Simon; Weill, François-Xavier; Baggesen, Dorte Lau; Jun, Se-Ran; Ussery, David W.; Lund, Ole; Crook, Derrick W.; Wilson, Daniel J.; et al

    2016-03-04

    It has been 30 years since the initial emergence and subsequent rapid global spread of multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 (MDR DT104). Nonetheless, its origin and transmission route have never been revealed. In this paper, we used whole-genome sequencing (WGS) and temporally structured sequence analysis within a Bayesian framework to reconstruct temporal and spatial phylogenetic trees and estimate the rates of mutation and divergence times of 315 S. Typhimurium DT104 isolates sampled from 1969 to 2012 from 21 countries on six continents. DT104 was estimated to have emerged initially as antimicrobial susceptible in ~1948 (95% credible interval [CI], 1934more » to 1962) and later became MDR DT104 in ~1972 (95% CI, 1972 to 1988) through horizontal transfer of the 13-kb Salmonella genomic island 1 (SGI1) MDR region into susceptible strains already containing SGI1. This was followed by multiple transmission events, initially from central Europe and later between several European countries. An independent transmission to the United States and another to Japan occurred, and from there MDR DT104 was probably transmitted to Taiwan and Canada. An independent acquisition of resistance genes took place in Thailand in ~1975 (95% CI, 1975 to 1990). In Denmark, WGS analysis provided evidence for transmission of the organism between herds of animals. Interestingly, the demographic history of Danish MDR DT104 provided evidence for the success of the program to eradicate Salmonella from pig herds in Denmark from 1996 to 2000. Finally, the results from this study refute several hypotheses on the evolution of DT104 and suggest that WGS may be useful in monitoring emerging clones and devising strategies for prevention of Salmonella infections.« less

  14. Global Genomic Epidemiology of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium DT104

    PubMed Central

    Hendriksen, Rene S.; Le Hello, Simon; Weill, François-Xavier; Baggesen, Dorte Lau; Jun, Se-Ran; Lund, Ole; Crook, Derrick W.; Wilson, Daniel J.; Aarestrup, Frank M.

    2016-01-01

    It has been 30 years since the initial emergence and subsequent rapid global spread of multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 (MDR DT104). Nonetheless, its origin and transmission route have never been revealed. We used whole-genome sequencing (WGS) and temporally structured sequence analysis within a Bayesian framework to reconstruct temporal and spatial phylogenetic trees and estimate the rates of mutation and divergence times of 315 S. Typhimurium DT104 isolates sampled from 1969 to 2012 from 21 countries on six continents. DT104 was estimated to have emerged initially as antimicrobial susceptible in ∼1948 (95% credible interval [CI], 1934 to 1962) and later became MDR DT104 in ∼1972 (95% CI, 1972 to 1988) through horizontal transfer of the 13-kb Salmonella genomic island 1 (SGI1) MDR region into susceptible strains already containing SGI1. This was followed by multiple transmission events, initially from central Europe and later between several European countries. An independent transmission to the United States and another to Japan occurred, and from there MDR DT104 was probably transmitted to Taiwan and Canada. An independent acquisition of resistance genes took place in Thailand in ∼1975 (95% CI, 1975 to 1990). In Denmark, WGS analysis provided evidence for transmission of the organism between herds of animals. Interestingly, the demographic history of Danish MDR DT104 provided evidence for the success of the program to eradicate Salmonella from pig herds in Denmark from 1996 to 2000. The results from this study refute several hypotheses on the evolution of DT104 and suggest that WGS may be useful in monitoring emerging clones and devising strategies for prevention of Salmonella infections. PMID:26944846

  15. Biofilm formation and the survival of Salmonella Typhimurium on parsley.

    PubMed

    Lapidot, Anat; Romling, Ute; Yaron, Sima

    2006-06-15

    Although several studies provide evidence that the formation of biofilms by human pathogens on plant tissue is possible, to date there is no direct evidence that biofilms enhance the resistance of plant-associated pathogens to disinfectants or biocides. We hypothesized that biofilm formation would enhance the adhesion and survival of Salmonella on leafy vegetables. To test our hypothesis, we compared the adhesion and persistence of Salmonella Typhimurium and its biofilm-deficient isogenic mutant. Following inoculation of parsley and rinsing with water or chlorine solution, both strains had similar survival properties, and up to 3-log reduction were observed, depending on chlorine concentration. This indicates that the biofilm matrix of Salmonella likely does not play a significant role in initial adhesion and survival after disinfection. After a week of storage the biofilm producing strain survived chlorination significantly better than the biofilm-deficient mutant. However, the recovery of the mutant was still elevated, indicating that although the biofilm matrix has a role in persistence of Salmonella after chlorination treatment of parsley, this is not the most important mechanism, and other mechanisms, probably the ability to penetrate the plant tissue or the pre-existing biofilms, or production of different polysaccharides other than cellulose, provide the protection.

  16. Defining the Core Genome of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium for Genomic Surveillance and Epidemiological Typing.

    PubMed

    Fu, Songzhe; Octavia, Sophie; Tanaka, Mark M; Sintchenko, Vitali; Lan, Ruiting

    2015-08-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is the most common Salmonella serovar causing foodborne infections in Australia and many other countries. Twenty-one S. Typhimurium strains from Salmonella reference collection A (SARA) were analyzed using Illumina high-throughput genome sequencing. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 21 SARA strains ranged from 46 to 11,916 SNPs, with an average of 1,577 SNPs per strain. Together with 47 strains selected from publicly available S. Typhimurium genomes, the S. Typhimurium core genes (STCG) were determined. The STCG consist of 3,846 genes, a set that is much larger than that of the 2,882 Salmonella core genes (SCG) found previously. The STCG together with 1,576 core intergenic regions (IGRs) were defined as the S. Typhimurium core genome. Using 93 S. Typhimurium genomes from 13 epidemiologically confirmed community outbreaks, we demonstrated that typing based on the S. Typhimurium core genome (STCG plus core IGRs) provides superior resolution and higher discriminatory power than that based on SCG for outbreak investigation and molecular epidemiology of S. Typhimurium. STCG and STCG plus core IGR typing achieved 100% separation of all outbreaks compared to that of SCG typing, which failed to separate isolates from two outbreaks from background isolates. Defining the S. Typhimurium core genome allows standardization of genes/regions to be used for high-resolution epidemiological typing and genomic surveillance of S. Typhimurium.

  17. An rfaH mutant of Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium is attenuated in swine and reduces intestinal colonization, fecal shedding, and disease severity due to virulent Salmonella Typhimurium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Swine are often asymptomatic carriers of Salmonella spp., and interventions are needed to limit colonization of swine to enhance food safety and reduce environmental contamination. We evaluated the attenuation and potential vaccine use in pigs of a Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium mutant of r...

  18. Isolation and characterization of Salmonella typhimurium glyoxylate shunt mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, R B; Maloy, S R

    1987-01-01

    Growth of Salmonella typhimurium on acetate as a sole carbon source requires expression of the glyoxylate shunt; however, the genes for the glyoxylate shunt enzymes have not been previously identified in S. typhimurium. In this study, we isolated transposon insertions in the genes for the two unique enzymes of this pathway, aceA (isocitrate lyase) and aceB (malate synthase). The aceA and aceB genes were located at 89.5 min on the S. typhimurium genetic map. Genetic linkage to nearby loci indicated that the relative gene order is purDJ metA aceB aceA. Transposon insertions in aceB were polar on aceA, suggesting that the genes form an operon transcribed from aceB to aceA. Transcriptional regulation of the aceBA operon was studied by constructing mini-Mu d(lac Kan) operon fusions. Analysis of these fusions indicated that expression of the aceBA operon is regulated at the level of transcription; the aceBA genes were induced when acetate was present and repressing carbon sources were absent. Although glucose represses expression of the aceBA operon, repression does not seem to be mediated solely by cyclic AMP-cyclic AMP receptor protein complex. Mutants with altered regulation of the aceBA operon were isolated. PMID:3298210

  19. Detection of Salmonella typhimurium using phage-based magnetostrictive sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshmanan, Ramji S.; Hu, Jing; Guntupalli, Rajesh; Wan, Jiehui; Huang, Shichu; Yang, Hong; Petrenko, Valery A.; Barbaree, James M.; Chin, Bryan A.

    2006-05-01

    This article presents a contactless, remote sensing Salmonella typhimurium sensor based on the principle of magnetostriction. Magnetostrictive materials have been used widely for various types of sensor systems. In this work, the use of a magnetostrictive material for the detection of Salmonella typhimurium has been established. The mass of the bacteria attached to the sensor causes changes in the resonance frequency of the sensor. Filamentous bacteriophage was used as a probe order to ensure specific and selective binding of the bacteria onto the sensor surface. Thus changes in response of the sensor due to the mass added onto the sensor caused by specific attachment of bacteria can be monitored in absence of any contact to the sensor. The response of the sensor due to increasing concentrations (from 5x101 to 5x10 8 cfu/ml) of the bacteria was studied. A reduction in the physical dimensions enhances the sensitivity of these sensors and hence different dimensions of the sensor ribbons were studied. For a 2mm x 0.1mm x 0.02mm the detection limit was observed to be of the order of 10 4 cfu/mL and for a sensor of 1mm x 0.2mm x 0.02mm a reduced detection limit of 10 3 cfu/mL was achieved.

  20. Isolation of QseC-regulated genes in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium by transposon mutgagenesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Non-typhoidal Salmonella, a leading cause of U.S. foodborne disease and food-related deaths, often asymptomatically colonizes food-producing animals. In fact, >50% of U.S. swine production facilities test positive for Salmonella. The multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 NCTC13348 c...

  1. Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella Sofia: Growth in and Persistence on Eggs under Production and Retail Conditions

    PubMed Central

    McAuley, Catherine M.; Duffy, Lesley L.; Subasinghe, Nela; Hogg, Geoff; Coventry, John; Fegan, Narelle

    2015-01-01

    Salmonellosis in Australia has been linked to eggs and egg products with specific serotypes associated with outbreaks. We compared attachment to and survival on egg shells and growth in eggs of two Salmonella serotypes, an egg outbreak associated Salmonella Typhimurium and a non-egg-associated Salmonella enterica ssp. II 1,4,12,27:b:[e,n,x] (S. Sofia). Experiments were conducted at combinations of 4, 15, 22, 37 and 42°C. No significant differences occurred between the serotypes in maximum growth rates, which were significantly greater (P < 0.001) in egg yolk (0.427 log10 CFU/mL/h) compared to whole egg (0.312 log10 CFU/mL/h) and egg white (0.029 log10 CFU/mL/h). Attachment to egg shells varied by time (1 or 20 min) and temperature (4, 22 and 42°C), with S. Typhimurium isolates attaching at higher levels (P < 0.05) than S. Sofia after 1 min at 4°C and S. Typhimurium ATCC 14028 attaching at higher (P < 0.05) levels at 22°C. Survival on egg shells was not significantly different across isolates. Salmonella serotypes behaved similarly regarding growth in egg contents, attachment to egg shells and survival on eggs, indicating that other factors more likely contributed to reasons for S. Typhimurium being implicated in multiple egg-associated outbreaks. PMID:26539536

  2. Global Genomic Epidemiology of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium DT104.

    PubMed

    Leekitcharoenphon, Pimlapas; Hendriksen, Rene S; Le Hello, Simon; Weill, François-Xavier; Baggesen, Dorte Lau; Jun, Se-Ran; Ussery, David W; Lund, Ole; Crook, Derrick W; Wilson, Daniel J; Aarestrup, Frank M

    2016-04-01

    It has been 30 years since the initial emergence and subsequent rapid global spread of multidrug-resistant Salmonella entericaserovar Typhimurium DT104 (MDR DT104). Nonetheless, its origin and transmission route have never been revealed. We used whole-genome sequencing (WGS) and temporally structured sequence analysis within a Bayesian framework to reconstruct temporal and spatial phylogenetic trees and estimate the rates of mutation and divergence times of 315S Typhimurium DT104 isolates sampled from 1969 to 2012 from 21 countries on six continents. DT104 was estimated to have emerged initially as antimicrobial susceptible in ∼1948 (95% credible interval [CI], 1934 to 1962) and later became MDR DT104 in ∼1972 (95% CI, 1972 to 1988) through horizontal transfer of the 13-kb Salmonella genomic island 1 (SGI1) MDR region into susceptible strains already containing SGI1. This was followed by multiple transmission events, initially from central Europe and later between several European countries. An independent transmission to the United States and another to Japan occurred, and from there MDR DT104 was probably transmitted to Taiwan and Canada. An independent acquisition of resistance genes took place in Thailand in ∼1975 (95% CI, 1975 to 1990). In Denmark, WGS analysis provided evidence for transmission of the organism between herds of animals. Interestingly, the demographic history of Danish MDR DT104 provided evidence for the success of the program to eradicate Salmonellafrom pig herds in Denmark from 1996 to 2000. The results from this study refute several hypotheses on the evolution of DT104 and suggest that WGS may be useful in monitoring emerging clones and devising strategies for prevention of Salmonella infections.

  3. Global Genomic Epidemiology of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium DT104.

    PubMed

    Leekitcharoenphon, Pimlapas; Hendriksen, Rene S; Le Hello, Simon; Weill, François-Xavier; Baggesen, Dorte Lau; Jun, Se-Ran; Ussery, David W; Lund, Ole; Crook, Derrick W; Wilson, Daniel J; Aarestrup, Frank M

    2016-04-01

    It has been 30 years since the initial emergence and subsequent rapid global spread of multidrug-resistant Salmonella entericaserovar Typhimurium DT104 (MDR DT104). Nonetheless, its origin and transmission route have never been revealed. We used whole-genome sequencing (WGS) and temporally structured sequence analysis within a Bayesian framework to reconstruct temporal and spatial phylogenetic trees and estimate the rates of mutation and divergence times of 315S Typhimurium DT104 isolates sampled from 1969 to 2012 from 21 countries on six continents. DT104 was estimated to have emerged initially as antimicrobial susceptible in ∼1948 (95% credible interval [CI], 1934 to 1962) and later became MDR DT104 in ∼1972 (95% CI, 1972 to 1988) through horizontal transfer of the 13-kb Salmonella genomic island 1 (SGI1) MDR region into susceptible strains already containing SGI1. This was followed by multiple transmission events, initially from central Europe and later between several European countries. An independent transmission to the United States and another to Japan occurred, and from there MDR DT104 was probably transmitted to Taiwan and Canada. An independent acquisition of resistance genes took place in Thailand in ∼1975 (95% CI, 1975 to 1990). In Denmark, WGS analysis provided evidence for transmission of the organism between herds of animals. Interestingly, the demographic history of Danish MDR DT104 provided evidence for the success of the program to eradicate Salmonellafrom pig herds in Denmark from 1996 to 2000. The results from this study refute several hypotheses on the evolution of DT104 and suggest that WGS may be useful in monitoring emerging clones and devising strategies for prevention of Salmonella infections. PMID:26944846

  4. Flagella-independent surface motility in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Park, Sun-Yang; Pontes, Mauricio H; Groisman, Eduardo A

    2015-02-10

    Flagella are multiprotein complexes necessary for swimming and swarming motility. In Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, flagella-mediated motility is repressed by the PhoP/PhoQ regulatory system. We now report that Salmonella can move on 0.3% agarose media in a flagella-independent manner when experiencing the PhoP/PhoQ-inducing signal low Mg(2+). This motility requires the PhoP-activated mgtA, mgtC, and pagM genes, which specify a Mg(2+) transporter, an inhibitor of Salmonella's own F1Fo ATPase, and a small protein of unknown function, respectively. The MgtA and MgtC proteins are necessary for pagM expression because pagM mRNA levels were lower in mgtA and mgtC mutants than in wild-type Salmonella, and also because pagM expression from a heterologous promoter rescued motility in mgtA and mgtC mutants. PagM promotes group motility by a surface protein(s), as a pagM-expressing strain conferred motility upon a pagM null mutant, and proteinase K treatment eliminated motility. The pagM gene is rarely found outside subspecies I of S. enterica and often present in nonfunctional allelic forms in organisms lacking the identified motility. Deletion of the pagM gene reduced bacterial replication on 0.3% agarose low Mg(2+) media but not in low Mg(2+) liquid media. Our findings define a form of motility that allows Salmonella to scavenge nutrients and to escape toxic compounds in low Mg(2+) semisolid environments. PMID:25624475

  5. Oral administration of the Salmonella Typhimurium vaccine strain Nal2/Rif9/Rtt to laying hens at day of hatch reduces shedding and caecal colonization of Salmonella 4,12:i:-, the monophasic variant of Salmonella Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Kilroy, Sofie; Raspoet, Ruth; Devloo, Rosalie; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Ducatelle, Richard; Van Immerseel, Filip

    2015-06-01

    A new monophasic variant of Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella enterica serotype 4,12:i:-, is rapidly emerging. This serotype is now considered to be among the 10 most common serovars isolated from humans in many countries in Europe and in the United States. The public health risk posed by these emerging monophasic Salmonella Typhimurium strains is considered comparable to that of classical Salmonella Typhimurium strains. The serotype 4,12:i:- is frequently isolated from pigs but also poultry are carrying strains from this serotype. In the current study, we evaluated the efficacy of the Salmonella Typhimurium strain Nal2/Rif9/Rtt, a strain contained in the commercially available live vaccines AviPro Salmonella Duo and AviPro Salmonella VacT, against infection with the emerging monophasic variant in poultry. Three independent trials were conducted. In all trials, laying type chicks were orally vaccinated with the Salmonella Typhimurium strain Nal2/Rif9/Rtt at d hatch, while the birds were challenged the next d with a different infection dose in each trial (low, high, and intermediate). For the intermediate-dose study, a seeder bird model was used in which one out of 3 animals were infected while all individual birds were infected in the other trials. Data obtained from each independent trial show that oral administration of the Salmonella Typhimurium strain Nal2/Rif9/Rtt at d hatch reduced shedding, caecal, and internal organ colonization of Salmonella Typhimurium 4,12:i:-, administered at d 2 life. This indicates that Salmonella Typhimurium strain Nal2/Rif9/Rtt can help to control Salmonella 4,12:i:- infections in poultry. PMID:25825785

  6. Intracontinental spread of human invasive Salmonella Typhimurium pathovariants in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Okoro, Chinyere K; Kingsley, Robert A; Connor, Thomas R; Harris, Simon R; Parry, Christopher M; Al-Mashhadani, Manar N; Kariuki, Samuel; Msefula, Chisomo L; Gordon, Melita A; de Pinna, Elizabeth; Wain, John; Heyderman, Robert S; Obaro, Stephen; Alonso, Pedro L; Mandomando, Inacio; MacLennan, Calman A; Tapia, Milagritos D; Levine, Myron M; Tennant, Sharon M; Parkhill, Julian; Dougan, Gordon

    2012-11-01

    A highly invasive form of non-typhoidal Salmonella (iNTS) disease has recently been documented in many countries in sub-Saharan Africa. The most common Salmonella enterica serovar causing this disease is Typhimurium (Salmonella Typhimurium). We applied whole-genome sequence-based phylogenetic methods to define the population structure of sub-Saharan African invasive Salmonella Typhimurium isolates and compared these to global Salmonella Typhimurium populations. Notably, the vast majority of sub-Saharan invasive Salmonella Typhimurium isolates fell within two closely related, highly clustered phylogenetic lineages that we estimate emerged independently ∼52 and ∼35 years ago in close temporal association with the current HIV pandemic. Clonal replacement of isolates from lineage I by those from lineage II was potentially influenced by the use of chloramphenicol for the treatment of iNTS disease. Our analysis suggests that iNTS disease is in part an epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa caused by highly related Salmonella Typhimurium lineages that may have occupied new niches associated with a compromised human population and antibiotic treatment.

  7. Interaction of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Typhimurium and mung bean (Phaseolus aureus) plants.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bhoj Raj; Chandra, Mudit; Agarwal, Ravikant

    2005-03-01

    The effect of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Typhimurium, a zoonotic serovar, on mung bean (Phaseolus aureus) cultivar Pant Mung-3 plants was studied. Inoculation of mung bean seeds with Salmonella Typhimurium (7.2 x 10(5) CFU/ml) reduced sprouting rate (P < 0.07). This effect was more pronounced at higher levels of contamination. In the soil inoculated with Salmonella Typhimurium (7.2 x 10(6) CFU/g), germination was retarded and the number of defective sprouts was also significantly higher (P < 0.002). Salmonella Typhimurium grew inside germinating seeds and plant tissues and persisted in seedlings, adult plants, and harvested seedlings dried and stored at room temperature (30 degrees C) up to 45 days. Phaseolus aureus plants grown in sterile soil was resistant to Salmonella Typhimurium infection at 15 days of age and cleared Salmonella from all the aerial parts within 3 h of infection. However, Salmonella Typhimurium could be reisolated from the basal area of the stem and from soil even after 45 days of exposure to the pathogen.

  8. Passive rotation of flagella on paralyzed Salmonella typhimurium (mot) mutants by external rotatory driving force.

    PubMed Central

    Ishihara, A; Yamaguchi, S; Hotani, H

    1981-01-01

    Salmonella typhimurium mot mutants are unable to rotate their flagella. Dark-field light microscopy showed that the flagella could be rotated passively by an external rotatory driving force. Images PMID:7007338

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of NC983, a Live Attenuated Strain of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Troxell, Bryan; Fink, Ryan C.; Dickey, Allison N.; Scholl, Elizabeth H.

    2016-01-01

    Foodborne infections caused by Salmonella enterica serovars are a significant problem worldwide. Presented here is the genome sequence of the nontyphoidal S. enterica serovar Typhimurium mutant strain NC983, a potential vaccine candidate. PMID:27738027

  10. Identification of new secreted effectors in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Geddes, Kaoru; Worley, Micah; Niemann, George; Heffron, Fred

    2005-10-01

    A common theme in bacterial pathogenesis is the secretion of bacterial products that modify cellular functions to overcome host defenses. Gram-negative bacterial pathogens use type III secretion systems (TTSSs) to inject effector proteins into host cells. The genes encoding the structural components of the type III secretion apparatus are conserved among bacterial species and can be identified by sequence homology. In contrast, the sequences of secreted effector proteins are less conserved and are therefore difficult to identify. A strategy was developed to identify virulence factors secreted by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium into the host cell cytoplasm. We constructed a transposon, which we refer to as mini-Tn5-cycler, to generate translational fusions between Salmonella chromosomal genes and a fragment of the calmodulin-dependent adenylate cyclase gene derived from Bordetella pertussis (cyaA'). In-frame fusions to bacterial proteins that are secreted into the eukaryotic cell cytoplasm were identified by high levels of cyclic AMP in infected cells. The assay was sufficiently sensitive that a single secreted fusion could be identified among several hundred that were not secreted. This approach identified three new effectors as well as seven that have been previously characterized. A deletion of one of the new effectors, steA (Salmonella translocated effector A), attenuated virulence. In addition, SteA localizes to the trans-Golgi network in both transfected and infected cells. This approach has identified new secreted effector proteins in Salmonella and will likely be useful for other organisms, even those in which genetic manipulation is more difficult.

  11. Mutagenicity study of butachlor and its metabolites using Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Kuei-Yao; Lin, Hwai-Jeng; Lin, Jen-Kun; Kuo, Wein-Shung; Ou, Yueh-Hsing

    2005-12-01

    Butachlor is the most commonly used herbicide in Taiwan and many other countries. It has been reported to be an indirect mutagen and carcinogen in various in vitro assay systems. Previous investigation has also demonstrated that butachlor stimulates cell proliferation, transforms normal embryonic cells, and induces stomach tumors in Spraque-Dawley rats. However, the mechanism of butachlor carcinogenicity is still not clear. In order to clarify the toxicologic and carcinogenic properties of butachlor, we proposed a metabolic pathway, and synthesized the authentic metabolites by chemical methods. In addition, we tested the mutagenicity of butachlor and these metabolites on Salmonella typhimurium. The results indicate that butachlor might manifest its carcinogenicity via the mutagenicity of its metabolic products. Although the molecular mechanism of butachlor-induced cellular toxicity is still not clear, it is likely that the cellular transformation ability of butachlor is partly associated with its mutagenicity.

  12. Regulation of biofilm formation in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Simm, Roger; Ahmad, Irfan; Rhen, Mikael; Le Guyon, Soazig; Römling, Ute

    2014-01-01

    In animals, plants and the environment, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium forms the red dry and rough (rdar) biofilm characterized by extracellular matrix components curli and cellulose. With complex expression control by at least ten transcription factors, the bistably expressed orphan response regulator CsgD directs rdar morphotype development. CsgD expression is an integral part of the Hfq regulon and the complex cyclic diguanosine monophosphate signaling network partially controlled by the global RNA-binding protein CsrA. Cell wall turnover and the periplasmic redox status regulate csgD expression on a post-transcriptional level by unknown mechanisms. Furthermore, phosphorylation of CsgD is a potential inactivation and degradation signal in biofilm dissolution. Including complex incoherent feed-forward loops, regulation of biofilm formation versus motility and virulence is of recognized complexity.

  13. Associations between host characteristics and antimicrobial resistance of Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Ruddat, I; Tietze, E; Ziehm, D; Kreienbrock, L

    2014-10-01

    A collection of Salmonella Typhimurium isolates obtained from sporadic salmonellosis cases in humans from Lower Saxony, Germany between June 2008 and May 2010 was used to perform an exploratory risk-factor analysis on antimicrobial resistance (AMR) using comprehensive host information on sociodemographic attributes, medical history, food habits and animal contact. Multivariate resistance profiles of minimum inhibitory concentrations for 13 antimicrobial agents were analysed using a non-parametric approach with multifactorial models adjusted for phage types. Statistically significant associations were observed for consumption of antimicrobial agents, region type and three factors on egg-purchasing behaviour, indicating that besides antimicrobial use the proximity to other community members, health consciousness and other lifestyle-related attributes may play a role in the dissemination of resistances. Furthermore, a statistically significant increase in AMR from the first study year to the second year was observed.

  14. Oral Immunization of Mice with Killed Salmonella typhimurium Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Waldman, Robert H.; Grunspan, Ruth; Ganguly, Rama

    1972-01-01

    A study was undertaken to assess the efficacy of oral, parenteral, and intraperitoneal immunization methods of administering killed Salmonella typhimurium vaccine to mice and to evaluate the effectiveness of single and multiple doses of the vaccine containing varied numbers of the killed bacteria. A further objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of adding substances to the vaccine to which have been ascribed “adjuvant” properties. The protection was estimated by isolation of bacteria from the spleen and feces after oral challenge of the mice with live S. typhimurium. The results showed that one or more doses of 1010 organisms given orally led to significant protection. This rate of protection increased proportionately with the number of doses up to 10 doses, which offered 100% protection. Streptomycin, when added to multiple doses of 109 or more organisms given orally, increased the degree of protection, but beryllium sulfate and pertussis vaccine did not. Although multiple doses afforded similar systemic protection by all three routes of immunization, oral immunization yielded significantly greater local protection than that observed after subcutaneous or intraperitoneal immunization. PMID:4564152

  15. Natural surface coating to inactivate Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium and maintain quality of cherry tomatoes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objectives of the present study were to investigate the effectiveness of zein-based coatings in reducing populations of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and preserving quality of cherry tomatoes. Tomatoes were inoculated with a cocktail of S. Typhimurium LT2 plus three mutants on the smoo...

  16. Prevalence and antibiotic resistance of Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Typhimurium in raw chicken meat at retail markets in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Thung, T Y; Mahyudin, N A; Basri, D F; Wan Mohamed Radzi, C W J; Nakaguchi, Y; Nishibuchi, M; Radu, S

    2016-08-01

    Salmonellosis is one of the major food-borne diseases in many countries. This study was carried out to determine the occurrence of Salmonella spp., Salmonella Enteritidis, and Salmonella Typhimurium in raw chicken meat from wet markets and hypermarkets in Selangor, as well as to determine the antibiotic susceptibility profile of S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium. The most probable number (MPN) in combination with multiplex polymerase chain reaction (mPCR) method was used to quantify the Salmonella spp., S. Enteritidis, and S. Typhimurium in the samples. The occurrence of Salmonella spp., S. Enteritidis, and S. Typhimurium in 120 chicken meat samples were 20.80%, 6.70%, and 2.50%, respectively with estimated quantity varying from <3 to 15 MPN/g. The antibiogram testing revealed differential multi-drug resistance among S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium isolates. All the isolates were resistance to erythromycin, penicillin, and vancomycin whereas sensitivity was recorded for Amoxicillin/Clavulanic acid, Gentamicin, Tetracycline, and Trimethoprim. Our findings demonstrated that the retail chicken meat could be a source of multiple antimicrobial-resistance Salmonella and may constitute a public health concern in Malaysia. PMID:27118863

  17. T-2 toxin induced Salmonella Typhimurium intoxication results in decreased Salmonella numbers in the cecum contents of pigs, despite marked effects on Salmonella-host cell interactions.

    PubMed

    Verbrugghe, Elin; Vandenbroucke, Virginie; Dhaenens, Maarten; Shearer, Neil; Goossens, Joline; De Saeger, Sarah; Eeckhout, Mia; D'Herde, Katharina; Thompson, Arthur; Deforce, Dieter; Boyen, Filip; Leyman, Bregje; Van Parys, Alexander; De Backer, Patrick; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Croubels, Siska; Pasmans, Frank

    2012-03-22

    The mycotoxin T-2 toxin and Salmonella Typhimurium infections pose a significant threat to human and animal health. Interactions between both agents may result in a different outcome of the infection. Therefore, the aim of the presented study was to investigate the effects of low and relevant concentrations of T-2 toxin on the course of a Salmonella Typhimurium infection in pigs. We showed that the presence of 15 and 83 μg T-2 toxin per kg feed significantly decreased the amount of Salmonella Typhimurium bacteria present in the cecum contents, and a tendency to a reduced colonization of the jejunum, ileum, cecum, colon and colon contents was noticed. In vitro, proteomic analysis of porcine enterocytes revealed that a very low concentration of T-2 toxin (5 ng/mL) affects the protein expression of mitochondrial, endoplasmatic reticulum and cytoskeleton associated proteins, proteins involved in protein synthesis and folding, RNA synthesis, mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling and regulatory processes. Similarly low concentrations (1-100 ng/mL) promoted the susceptibility of porcine macrophages and intestinal epithelial cells to Salmonella Typhimurium invasion, in a SPI-1 independent manner. Furthermore, T-2 toxin (1-5 ng/mL) promoted the translocation of Salmonella Typhimurium over an intestinal porcine epithelial cell monolayer. Although these findings may seem in favour of Salmonella Typhimurium, microarray analysis showed that T-2 toxin (5 ng/mL) causes an intoxication of Salmonella Typhimurium, represented by a reduced motility and a downregulation of metabolic and Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1 genes. This study demonstrates marked interactions of T-2 toxin with Salmonella Typhimurium pathogenesis, resulting in bacterial intoxication.

  18. The detection of Salmonella typhimurium on shell eggs using a phage-based biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Yating; Li, Suiqiong; Horikawa, Shin; Shen, Wen; Park, Mi-Kyung; Vodyanoy, Vitaly J.; Chin, Bryan A.

    2011-06-01

    This paper presents the direct detection of Salmonella typhimurium on shell eggs using a phage-based magnetoelastic (ME) biosensor. The ME biosensor consists of a ME resonator as the sensor platform and E2 phage as the biorecognition element that is genetically engineered to specifically bind with Salmonella typhimurium. The ME biosensor, which is a wireless sensor, vibrates with a characteristic resonant frequency under an externally applied magnetic field. Multiple sensors can easily be remotely monitored. Multiple measurement and control sensors were placed on the shell eggs contaminated by Salmonella typhimurium solutions with different known concentrations. The resonant frequency of sensors before and after the exposure to the spiked shell eggs was measured. The frequency shift of the measurement sensors was significantly different than the control sensors indicating Salmonella contamination. Scanning electron microscopy was used to confirm binding of Salmonella to the sensor surface and the resulting frequency shift results.

  19. Apramycin resistance plasmids in Escherichia coli: possible transfer to Salmonella typhimurium in calves.

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, J. E.; Shelley, J. C.; Walton, J. R.; Hart, C. A.; Bennett, M.

    1992-01-01

    An outbreak of salmonellosis in calves was monitored for persistence of Salmonella typhimurium excretion in faeces and the effect of treatment with apramycin. Prior to treatment apramycin-resistant Escherichia coli were present but all S. typhimurium isolates were sensitive. Following the treatment of six calves with apramycin, apramycin-resistant S. typhimurium were isolated from two treated calves and one untreated calf. Plasmid profiles of E. coli and S. typhimurium were compared and plasmids conferring resistance to apramycin and several other antibiotics were transferred by conjugation in vitro from calf E. coli and S. typhimurium isolates to E. coli K-12 and from E. coli to S. typhimurium. The plasmids conjugated with high frequency in vitro from E. coli to S. typhimurium, and hybridized to a DNA probe specific for the gene encoding aminoglycoside acetyltransferase 3-IV (AAC(3)-IV) which confers resistance to apramycin, gentamicin, netilmicin and tobramycin. Images Fig. 1 PMID:1582469

  20. Genotoxicity and genotoxic enhancing effect of tetrandrine in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Whong, W Z; Lu, C H; Stewart, J D; Jiang, H X; Ong, T

    1989-03-01

    Tetrandrine has been used for the treatment of silicosis in China. The potential genotoxic and carcinogenic hazards of this drug were studied using the Salmonella/histidine reversion assay and the SOS/Umu test. The results show that tetrandrine was weakly mutagenic to Salmonella typhimurium TA98 with metabolic activation and did not induce SOS response. However, tetrandrine increased the mutagenic activity of benzo[alpha]pyrene, trinitrofluorenone (TNF), 2-aminoanthracene (2AA), diesel emission particles, airborne particles, and cigarette smoke condensate by more than 100%; the activity of aflatoxin B1 and fried beef was increased by over 75%. It also increased the 2AA and TNF-induced SOS response by more than 300%. These results indicated that tetrandrine was a weak promutagen inducing frameshift mutations and was a potent genotoxic enhancer. The mechanism for the genotoxic enhancement is not known. However, the fact that the increase in mutagenicity was noted only in TA98 and not in TA1538 suggested that the enhancement of genotoxicity by tetrandrine may result from an increase in error-prone DNA repair. PMID:2646534

  1. Toxicity and Mutagenicity of Hexavalent Chromium on Salmonella typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Petrilli, Fernando L.; De Flora, Silvio

    1977-01-01

    Four hexavalent and two trivalent chromium compounds were tested for toxicity and mutagenicity by means of the Salmonella typhimurium/mammalian-microsome test. All hexavalent compounds yielded a complete inhibition of bacterial growth at doses of 400 to 800 μg/plate, a significant increase of his+ revertant colonies at doses ranging from 10 to 200 μg, and no effect at doses of less than 10 μg. The distinctive sensitivity of the four Salmonella strains tested (TA1535, TA1537, TA98, and TA100) suggested that hexavalent chromium directly interacts with bacterial deoxyribonucleic acid by causing both frameshift mutations and basepair substitutions. The latter mutations, which are prevalent, are amplified by an error-prone recombinational repair of the damaged deoxyribonucleic acid. On the average, 1 μmol of hexavalent chromium yielded approximately 500 revertants of the TA100 strain, irrespective of the compound tested (sodium dichromate, calcium chromate, potassium chromate, or chromic acid). The mutagenic potency of the hexavalent metal was not enhanced by adding the microsomal fraction of rat hepatocytes, induced either with sodium barbital or with Aroclor 1254. The two trivalent compounds (chromium potassium sulfate and chromic chloride), with or without the microsomal fraction, were neither toxic nor mutagenic for the bacterial tester strains. Images PMID:326184

  2. Antibiotics induce the expression of attachment genes in specific isolates of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    More than 27 percent of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium isolates from humans in the United States are resistant to three or more antibiotics. This presents an important food safety concern as multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella is associated with increased morbidity in humans. It has been...

  3. Identification of a umuDC locus in Salmonella typhimurium LT2.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, C M; Eisenstadt, E

    1989-01-01

    The umuDC operon of Escherichia coli is required for efficient mutagenesis by UV light and many other DNA-damaging agents. The existence of a umuDC analog in Salmonella typhimurium has been questioned. With DNA probes to the E. coli umuD and umuC genes, we detected, by Southern blot hybridization, sequences similar to both of these genes in S. typhimurium LT2. We also confirmed that the presence of cloned E. coli umuD enhances the UV mutability and resistance of S. typhimurium. Our data strongly suggest that S. typhimurium contains a functional umuDC operon. Images PMID:2661537

  4. Inactivation of Salmonella Senftenberg, Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella Tennessee in peanut butter by 915 MHz microwave heating.

    PubMed

    Song, Won-Jae; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2016-02-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of a 915 MHz microwave with 3 different levels to inactivate 3 serovars of Salmonella in peanut butter. Peanut butter inoculated with Salmonella enterica serovar Senftenberg, S. enterica serovar Typhimurium and S. enterica serovar Tennessee were treated with a 915 MHz microwave with 2, 4 and 6 kW and acid and peroxide values and color changes were determined after 5 min of microwave heating. Salmonella populations were reduced with increasing treatment time and treatment power. Six kW 915 MHz microwave treatment for 5 min reduced these three Salmonella serovars by 3.24-4.26 log CFU/g. Four and two kW 915 MHz microwave processing for 5 min reduced these Salmonella serovars by 1.14-1.48 and 0.15-0.42 log CFU/g, respectively. Microwave treatment did not affect acid, peroxide, or color values of peanut butter. These results demonstrate that 915 MHz microwave processing can be used as a control method for reducing Salmonella in peanut butter without producing quality deterioration. PMID:26678129

  5. Inactivation of Salmonella Senftenberg, Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella Tennessee in peanut butter by 915 MHz microwave heating.

    PubMed

    Song, Won-Jae; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2016-02-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of a 915 MHz microwave with 3 different levels to inactivate 3 serovars of Salmonella in peanut butter. Peanut butter inoculated with Salmonella enterica serovar Senftenberg, S. enterica serovar Typhimurium and S. enterica serovar Tennessee were treated with a 915 MHz microwave with 2, 4 and 6 kW and acid and peroxide values and color changes were determined after 5 min of microwave heating. Salmonella populations were reduced with increasing treatment time and treatment power. Six kW 915 MHz microwave treatment for 5 min reduced these three Salmonella serovars by 3.24-4.26 log CFU/g. Four and two kW 915 MHz microwave processing for 5 min reduced these Salmonella serovars by 1.14-1.48 and 0.15-0.42 log CFU/g, respectively. Microwave treatment did not affect acid, peroxide, or color values of peanut butter. These results demonstrate that 915 MHz microwave processing can be used as a control method for reducing Salmonella in peanut butter without producing quality deterioration.

  6. Role of SPI-1 in the interactions of Salmonella Typhimurium with porcine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Boyen, F; Pasmans, F; Donné, E; Van Immerseel, F; Adriaensen, C; Hernalsteens, J-P; Ducatelle, R; Haesebrouck, F

    2006-03-10

    Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1 (SPI-1) genes are indispensable for virulence of Salmonella Typhimurium in mice after oral challenge. These genes mediate invasion in intestinal epithelial cells and induce cell death in murine macrophages. The role of SPI-1 in the pathogenesis of Salmonella Typhimurium infections in food producing animals is not known. It was the aim of the present study to characterize the interactions of a porcine Salmonella Typhimurium field strain and its isogenic mutants in the SPI-1 genes hilA, sipA and sipB with porcine macrophages. SPI-1 was found to be important in the invasion of porcine pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAM) and the induction of the formation of spacious phagosomes. Both early and delayed cytotoxicity were seen in PAM, but only the early cytotoxicity was SPI-1 dependent. Exposure of PAM to Salmonella Typhimurium induced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and interleukin-8, but no differences were noticed between the induction mediated by the wild type strain and its SPI-1 mutant strains. In conclusion, invasion of porcine macrophages and the induction of early, but not delayed, cytotoxicity by Salmonella Typhimurium is SPI-1 dependent. SPI-1 dependent invasion, however, is not a prerequisite to induce a pro-inflammatory response.

  7. Interaction of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium with Intestinal Organoids Derived from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Forbester, Jessica L; Goulding, David; Vallier, Ludovic; Hannan, Nicholas; Hale, Christine; Pickard, Derek; Mukhopadhyay, Subhankar; Dougan, Gordon

    2015-07-01

    The intestinal mucosa forms the first line of defense against infections mediated by enteric pathogens such as salmonellae. Here we exploited intestinal "organoids" (iHOs) generated from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hIPSCs) to explore the interaction of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium with iHOs. Imaging and RNA sequencing were used to analyze these interactions, and clear changes in transcriptional signatures were detected, including altered patterns of cytokine expression after the exposure of iHOs to bacteria. S. Typhimurium microinjected into the lumen of iHOs was able to invade the epithelial barrier, with many bacteria residing within Salmonella-containing vacuoles. An S. Typhimurium invA mutant defective in the Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 invasion apparatus was less capable of invading the iHO epithelium. Hence, we provide evidence that hIPSC-derived organoids are a promising model of the intestinal epithelium for assessing interactions with enteric pathogens.

  8. House Sparrows Do Not Constitute a Significant Salmonella Typhimurium Reservoir across Urban Gradients in Flanders, Belgium.

    PubMed

    Rouffaer, Lieze Oscar; Lens, Luc; Haesendonck, Roel; Teyssier, Aimeric; Hudin, Noraine Salleh; Strubbe, Diederik; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Pasmans, Frank; Martel, An

    2016-01-01

    In recent decades major declines in urban house sparrow (Passer domesticus) populations have been observed in north-western European cities, whereas suburban and rural house sparrow populations have remained relatively stable or are recovering from previous declines. Differential exposure to avian pathogens known to cause epidemics in house sparrows may in part explain this spatial pattern of declines. Here we investigate the potential effect of urbanization on the development of a bacterial pathogen reservoir in free-ranging house sparrows. This was achieved by comparing the prevalence of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serotype Typhimurium in 364 apparently healthy house sparrows captured in urban, suburban and rural regions across Flanders, Belgium between September 2013 and March 2014. In addition 12 dead birds, received from bird rescue centers, were necropsied. The apparent absence of Salmonella Typhimurium in fecal samples of healthy birds, and the identification of only one house sparrow seropositive for Salmonella spp., suggests that during the winter of 2013-2014 these birds did not represent any considerable Salmonella Typhimurium reservoir in Belgium and thus may be considered naïve hosts, susceptible to clinical infection. This susceptibility is demonstrated by the isolation of two different Salmonella Typhimurium strains from two of the deceased house sparrows: one DT99, typically associated with disease in pigeons, and one DT195, previously associated with a passerine decline. The apparent absence (prevalence: <1.3%) of a reservoir in healthy house sparrows and the association of infection with clinical disease suggests that the impact of Salmonella Typhimurium on house sparrows is largely driven by the risk of exogenous exposure to pathogenic Salmonella Typhimurium strains. However, no inference could be made on a causal relationship between Salmonella infection and the observed house sparrow population declines.

  9. House Sparrows Do Not Constitute a Significant Salmonella Typhimurium Reservoir across Urban Gradients in Flanders, Belgium

    PubMed Central

    Rouffaer, Lieze Oscar; Lens, Luc; Haesendonck, Roel; Teyssier, Aimeric; Hudin, Noraine Salleh; Strubbe, Diederik; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Pasmans, Frank; Martel, An

    2016-01-01

    In recent decades major declines in urban house sparrow (Passer domesticus) populations have been observed in north-western European cities, whereas suburban and rural house sparrow populations have remained relatively stable or are recovering from previous declines. Differential exposure to avian pathogens known to cause epidemics in house sparrows may in part explain this spatial pattern of declines. Here we investigate the potential effect of urbanization on the development of a bacterial pathogen reservoir in free-ranging house sparrows. This was achieved by comparing the prevalence of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serotype Typhimurium in 364 apparently healthy house sparrows captured in urban, suburban and rural regions across Flanders, Belgium between September 2013 and March 2014. In addition 12 dead birds, received from bird rescue centers, were necropsied. The apparent absence of Salmonella Typhimurium in fecal samples of healthy birds, and the identification of only one house sparrow seropositive for Salmonella spp., suggests that during the winter of 2013–2014 these birds did not represent any considerable Salmonella Typhimurium reservoir in Belgium and thus may be considered naïve hosts, susceptible to clinical infection. This susceptibility is demonstrated by the isolation of two different Salmonella Typhimurium strains from two of the deceased house sparrows: one DT99, typically associated with disease in pigeons, and one DT195, previously associated with a passerine decline. The apparent absence (prevalence: <1.3%) of a reservoir in healthy house sparrows and the association of infection with clinical disease suggests that the impact of Salmonella Typhimurium on house sparrows is largely driven by the risk of exogenous exposure to pathogenic Salmonella Typhimurium strains. However, no inference could be made on a causal relationship between Salmonella infection and the observed house sparrow population declines. PMID:27168186

  10. Probiotic bacteria reduce salmonella typhimurium intestinal colonization by competing for iron.

    PubMed

    Deriu, Elisa; Liu, Janet Z; Pezeshki, Milad; Edwards, Robert A; Ochoa, Roxanna J; Contreras, Heidi; Libby, Stephen J; Fang, Ferric C; Raffatellu, Manuela

    2013-07-17

    Host inflammation alters the availability of nutrients such as iron to limit microbial growth. However, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium thrives in the inflamed gut by scavenging for iron with siderophores. By administering Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917, which assimilates iron by similar mechanisms, we show that this nonpathogenic bacterium can outcompete and reduce S. Typhimurium colonization in mouse models of acute colitis and chronic persistent infection. This probiotic activity depends on E. coli Nissle iron acquisition, given that mutants deficient in iron uptake colonize the intestine but do not reduce S. Typhimurium colonization. Additionally, the ability of E. coli Nissle to overcome iron restriction by the host protein lipocalin 2, which counteracts some siderophores, is essential, given that S. Typhimurium is unaffected by E. coli Nissle in lipocalin 2-deficient mice. Thus, iron availability impacts S. Typhimurium growth, and E. coli Nissle reduces S. Typhimurium intestinal colonization by competing for this limiting nutrient. PMID:23870311

  11. Salmonella newport and typhimurium colonization of fruit differs from leaves in various tomato cultivars.

    PubMed

    Han, Sanghyun; Micallef, Shirley Ann

    2014-11-01

    Several outbreaks of Salmonella enterica infections have been linked to tomatoes. One cost-effective way to complement on-farm preventive Good Agricultural Practices is to identify cultivars with inherent decreased susceptibility to Salmonella colonization. Fruit and leaves of 13 tomato cultivars with distinct phenotypes were screened to evaluate their susceptibility to Salmonella epiphytic colonization. Field-grown fruit or gnotobiotically grown seedling leaves were spot inoculated in replicate with either Salmonella Typhimurium LT2 or a tomato outbreak-associated strain of Salmonella Newport. Initial loads of the Salmonella inocula were 2.5 log CFU per fruit and 3.5 or 7.0 log CFU per seedling. Salmonella cells were retrieved and enumerated using direct plating after 24 h of incubation at room temperature for fruit and 72 h at 26°C during the day and 18°C at night for seedling leaves. Epiphytic colonization of fruit by S. enterica was cultivar-dependent and serotype-specific, but did not necessarily correlate with leaf colonization. Fruit of cultivar Heinz-1706 were the least colonized by Salmonella Newport, while the highest populations were retrieved from fruit of Nyagous. By contrast, seedling leaves supporting the lowest populations were Florida 91 VF and the highest were Virginia Sweets for Salmonella Newport. For Salmonella Typhimurium the lowest was Nyagous and the highest was Heinz-1706 and Moneymaker. The tomato outbreak strain of Salmonella Newport attained higher population densities on fruit than did Salmonella Typhimurium, suggesting better adaptation to tomato fruit colonization. Salmonella Newport populations were significantly lower on leaves, but not fruit of the near-isogenic line Movione, compared with the parent cultivar Moneymaker, suggesting the immunity conferring gene Pto could be responding to this outbreak strain. Susceptibility of tomato fruit to Salmonella colonization is highly variable and could be one criterion for cultivar

  12. Antibiotic treatment selects for cooperative virulence of Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Diard, Médéric; Sellin, Mikael E; Dolowschiak, Tamas; Arnoldini, Markus; Ackermann, Martin; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich

    2014-09-01

    Antibiotics are powerful therapeutics but are not equally effective against all cells in bacterial populations. Bacteria that express an antibiotic-tolerant phenotype ("persisters") can evade treatment [1]. Persisters can cause relapses of the infection after the end of the therapy [2]. It is still poorly understood whether persistence affects the evolution of bacterial virulence. During infections, persisters have been found preferentially at particular sites within the host [3, 4]. If bacterial virulence factors are required to reach such sites, treatment with antibiotics could impose selection on the expression of virulence genes, in addition to their well-established effects on bacterial resistance. Here, we report that treatment with antibiotics selects for virulence and fosters transmissibility of Salmonella Typhimurium. In a mouse model for Salmonella diarrhea, treatment with the broad-spectrum antibiotic ciprofloxacin reverses the outcome of competition between wild-type bacteria and avirulent mutants that can spontaneously arise during within-host evolution [5]. While avirulent mutants take over the gut lumen and abolish disease transmission in untreated mice, ciprofloxacin tilts the balance in favor of virulent, wild-type bacteria. This is explained by the need for virulence factors to invade gut tissues and form a persistent reservoir. Avirulent mutants remain in the gut lumen and are eradicated. Upon cessation of antibiotic treatment, tissue-lodged wild-type pathogens reseed the gut lumen and thereby facilitate disease transmissibility to new hosts. Our results suggest a general principle by which antibiotic treatment can promote cooperative virulence during within-host evolution, increase duration of transmissibility, and thereby enhance the spread of an infectious disease. PMID:25131673

  13. Antibiotic treatment selects for cooperative virulence of Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Diard, Médéric; Sellin, Mikael E; Dolowschiak, Tamas; Arnoldini, Markus; Ackermann, Martin; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich

    2014-09-01

    Antibiotics are powerful therapeutics but are not equally effective against all cells in bacterial populations. Bacteria that express an antibiotic-tolerant phenotype ("persisters") can evade treatment [1]. Persisters can cause relapses of the infection after the end of the therapy [2]. It is still poorly understood whether persistence affects the evolution of bacterial virulence. During infections, persisters have been found preferentially at particular sites within the host [3, 4]. If bacterial virulence factors are required to reach such sites, treatment with antibiotics could impose selection on the expression of virulence genes, in addition to their well-established effects on bacterial resistance. Here, we report that treatment with antibiotics selects for virulence and fosters transmissibility of Salmonella Typhimurium. In a mouse model for Salmonella diarrhea, treatment with the broad-spectrum antibiotic ciprofloxacin reverses the outcome of competition between wild-type bacteria and avirulent mutants that can spontaneously arise during within-host evolution [5]. While avirulent mutants take over the gut lumen and abolish disease transmission in untreated mice, ciprofloxacin tilts the balance in favor of virulent, wild-type bacteria. This is explained by the need for virulence factors to invade gut tissues and form a persistent reservoir. Avirulent mutants remain in the gut lumen and are eradicated. Upon cessation of antibiotic treatment, tissue-lodged wild-type pathogens reseed the gut lumen and thereby facilitate disease transmissibility to new hosts. Our results suggest a general principle by which antibiotic treatment can promote cooperative virulence during within-host evolution, increase duration of transmissibility, and thereby enhance the spread of an infectious disease.

  14. Effect of Chitosan on Salmonella Typhimurium in Broiler Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Menconi, Anita; Pumford, Neil R.; Morgan, Marion J.; Bielke, Lisa R.; Kallapura, Gopala; Latorre, Juan D.; Wolfenden, Amanda D.; Hernandez-Velasco, Xochitl; Hargis, Billy M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Public concern with the incidence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, particularly among foodborne pathogens such as Salmonella, has been challenging the poultry industry to find alternative means of control. The purposes of the present study were to evaluate in vitro and in vivo effects of chitosan on Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (ST) infection in broiler chicks. For in vitro crop assay experiments, tubes containing feed, water, and ST were treated with either saline as a control or 0.2% chitosan. The entire assay was repeated in three trials. In two independent in vivo trials, 40 broiler chicks were assigned to an untreated control diet or dietary treatment with 0.2% chitosan for 7 days (20 broiler chicks/treatment). At day 4, chicks were challenged with 2×105 colony-forming units (CFU) ST/bird. In a third in vivo trial, 100 broiler chicks were assigned to untreated control diet or dietary treatment with 0.2% chitosan for 10 days (50 broiler chicks/treatment) to evaluate ST horizontal transmission. At day 3, 10 birds were challenged with 105 CFU ST/bird, and the remaining nonchallenged birds (n=40) were kept in the same floor pen. In all three in vitro trials, 0.2% chitosan significantly reduced total CFU of ST at 0.5 and 6 h postinoculation compared with control (p<0.05). In two in vivo trials, at 7 days, dietary 0.2% chitosan significantly reduced total CFU of recovered ST in the ceca in both experiments. Dietary 0.2% chitosan significantly reduced total ST CFU recovered in the ceca of horizontally challenged birds in the third in vivo trial. Chitosan at 0.2% significantly reduced the CFU of recovered ST in vitro and in vivo, proving to be an alternative tool to reduce crop, ceca, and consequently carcass ST contamination as well as decreasing the amount of ST shed to the environment. PMID:24237042

  15. An enterobacterial common antigen mutant of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium as a vaccine candidate.

    PubMed

    Bridge, Dacie R; Whitmire, Jeannette M; Gilbreath, Jeremy J; Metcalf, Eleanor S; Merrell, D Scott

    2015-09-01

    Due to increasing rates of invasive Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection, there is a need for an effective vaccine to prevent this disease. Previous studies showed that a mutation in the first gene of the Enterobacterial common antigen biosynthetic pathway, wecA, resulted in attenuation of S. Typhimurium in a murine model of salmonellosis. Furthermore, immunization with a wecA(-) strain protected against lethal challenge with the parental wild type S. Typhimurium strain. Herein, we examined whether the S. Typhimurium wecA(-) strain could also provide cross-protection against non-parental strains of S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis. We found that intraperitoneal immunization (IP) with S. Typhimurium SL1344 wecA(-) resulted in a significant increase in survival compared to control mice for all Salmonella challenge strains tested. Oral immunization with SL1344 wecA(-) also resulted in increased survival; however, protection was less significant than with intraperitoneal immunization. The increase in survival of SL1344 wecA(-) immunized mice was associated with a Salmonella-specific IgG antibody response. Furthermore, analysis of sera from IP and orally immunized animals revealed cross-reactive antibodies to numerous Salmonella isolates. Functional analysis of antibodies found within the sera from IP immunized animals revealed agglutination and opsonophagocytic activity against all tested O:4 Salmonella serovars. Together these results indicate that immunization with a S. Typhimurium wecA(-) strain confers protection against lethal challenge with wild type S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis and that immunization correlates with functional antibody production.

  16. Toxic effects of gold nanoparticles on Salmonella typhimurium bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuguang; Lawson, Rasheeda; Ray, Paresh C; Yu, Hongtao

    2013-01-01

    Nanometer-sized gold, due to its beautiful and bountiful color and unique optical properties, is a versatile material for many industrial and societal applications. We have studied the effect of gold nanoparticles on Salmonella typhimurium strain TA 102. The gold nanoparticles in solution prepared using the citrate reduction method is found not to be toxic or mutagenic but photomutagenic to the bacteria; however, careful control experiments indicate that the photomutagenicity is due to the co-existing citrate and Au3+ ions, not due to the gold nanoparticle itself. Au3+ is also found to be photomutagenic to the bacteria at concentrations lower than 1 µM, but toxic at higher concentrations. The toxicity of Au3+ is enhanced by light irradiation. The photomutagenicity of both citrate and Au3+ is likely due to the formation of free radicals, as a result of light-induced citrate decarboxylation or Au3+ oxidation of co-existing molecules. Both processes can generate free radicals that may cause DNA damage and mutation. Studies of the interaction of gold nanoparticles with the bacteria indicate that gold nanoparticles can be absorbed onto the bacteria surface but not able to penetrate the bacteria wall to enter the bacteria. PMID:21415096

  17. Outbreak of Salmonella Typhimurium 44 related to egg consumption.

    PubMed

    Dyda, Amalie; Hundy, Rebecca; Moffatt, Cameron R M; Cameron, Scott

    2009-12-01

    ACT Health investigated an outbreak of gastroenteritis associated with a local restaurant in December 2008. The infecting agent was Salmonella serotype Typhimurium phage type 44. A case control study was conducted to identify the source of infection. A total of 22 cases and 9 controls were recruited to take part in the study. Both poached eggs (odds ratio [OR] 42.00) and hollandaise sauce (OR 19.00) had elevated odds ratios that were statistically significant. The major limitation of the study was the small sample size and small number of controls. Despite this, a strong association with illness and consumption of eggs and hollandaise sauce was detected and this was further supported by environmental evidence. The investigation concluded that the cause of the outbreak was putatively contaminated eggs, either on their own or as an ingredient used in hollandaise sauce. The investigation and control measures led to an improvement in hygiene practices at the restaurant and contributed to the voluntary recall of the contaminated batch of eggs from the Australian Capital Territory. The results of the study also build upon other evidence that egg-related salmonellosis is now common in Australia and attention to commercial practices at production and processing is overdue.

  18. Zinc concentration and survival in rats infected with Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Tocco-Bradley, R; Kluger, M J

    1984-01-01

    Percent survival was measured in male rats injected intravenously with live Salmonella typhimurium when plasma and tissue zinc levels were manipulated. Alzet pumps implanted intraperitoneally infused zinc gluconate or sodium gluconate (controls) from the onset of infection to 72 h postinfection. Plasma and tissue zinc levels were manipulated by infusing (i) 180 micrograms of Zn per h to achieve supranormal plasma and tissue zinc concentrations, (ii) 120 micrograms of Zn per h to prevent the infection-induced fall and to maintain plasma zinc levels at noninfection levels while raising tissue levels above that of infected controls, and (iii) 30 micrograms of Zn per h to increase tissue zinc levels while allowing the infection-induced decrease in plasma zinc. Preventing the fall in plasma zinc while raising liver zinc to supranormal levels enhanced rather than reduced percent survival; raising plasma and liver zinc to supranormal levels returned survival to control levels. Loading the liver with an excess of zinc without changing plasma zinc (30 micrograms of Zn per h) did not increase percent survival in the infected host. Pretreatment or administration of zinc at the time of infection led to increased percent survival compared with administration of zinc 4 h after the onset of infection. PMID:6746092

  19. Oxidative stress responses in Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Farr, S B; Kogoma, T

    1991-01-01

    Oxidative stress is strongly implicated in a number of diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disorders, and atherosclerosis, and its emerging as one of the most important causative agents of mutagenesis, tumorigenesis, and aging. Recent progress on the genetics and molecular biology of the cellular responses to oxidative stress, primarily in Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium, is summarized. Bacteria respond to oxidative stress by invoking two distinct stress responses, the peroxide stimulon and the superoxide stimulon, depending on whether the stress is mediated by peroxides or the superoxide anion. The two stimulons each contain a set of more than 30 genes. The expression of a subset of genes in each stimulon is under the control of a positive regulatory element; these genes constitute the OxyR and SoxRS regulons. The schemes of regulation of the two regulons by their respective regulators are reviewed in detail, and the overlaps of these regulons with other stress responses such as the heat shock and SOS responses are discussed. The products of Oxy-R- and SoxRS-regulated genes, such as catalases and superoxide dismutases, are involved in the prevention of oxidative damage, whereas others, such as endonuclease IV, play a role in the repair of oxidative damage. The potential roles of these and other gene products in the defense against oxidative damage in DNA, proteins, and membranes are discussed in detail. A brief discussion of the similarities and differences between oxidative stress responses in bacteria and eukaryotic organisms concludes this review. PMID:1779927

  20. Molecular characterization of Salmonella Typhimurium highly successful outbreak strains.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Randi Føns; Litrup, Eva; Larsson, Jonas T; Torpdahl, Mia; Sørensen, Gitte; Müller, Luise; Nielsen, Eva M

    2011-06-01

    Three large clusters of Salmonella Typhimurium infections in Denmark in 2008 and 2009 were defined by multilocus variable number of tandem repeat analysis (MLVA). One of these proved to be the hereto largest Danish cluster of salmonellosis with 1446 cases. Two smaller clusters with a total of 197 and 89 cases, respectively, were seen concurrently. These clusters shared epidemiological characteristics such as age distribution, geography, and time. To investigate the possible genetic relationship between the cluster strains, these were further characterized by phage typing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and Optical Mapping. Although the MLVA method proved robust and well-performing in detecting and defining clusters, the employment of a second typing method detected an additional fourth cluster among the isolates. The cluster strains were stable throughout the almost 2-year period, even though we detected changes in three of five MLVA loci in a small fraction of isolates. These changes were mainly due to the gain or loss of single repeats. Optical Mapping of the large cluster strain indicated no increased content of virulence genes; however, Optical Mapping did reveal a large insert, a probable prophage, in the main cluster. This probable prophage may give the cluster strain a competitive advantage. The molecular methods employed suggested that the four clusters represented four distinct strains, although they seemed to be epidemiologically linked and shared genotypic characteristics.

  1. Survival of Campylobacter jejuni and Salmonella enterica Typhimurium in vacuum-packed, moisture-enhanced pork.

    PubMed

    Wen, Xuesong; Dickson, James S

    2012-03-01

    The abilities of Campylobacter jejuni and Salmonella enterica Typhimurium to survive in vacuum-packaged, moisture-enhanced pork stored at 4 or 10°C were examined. Pork loins were surface inoculated with either C. jejuni or Salmonella Typhimurium and then moisture enhanced to a target of 10 or 20%. The enhanced pork loins were sliced 1 cm thick and vacuum packaged. A pork loin without moisture enhancement was sliced and vacuum packaged as a control. Samples were collected, plated, and the numbers of surviving organisms were determined periodically during storage at 4 and 10°C. The numbers of C. jejuni or Salmonella Typhimurium in samples with different moisture enhancement levels were similar (P > 0.05). No significant differences (P > 0.05) in C. jejuni counts were observed between samples at 10°C and those at 4°C. In contrast, the numbers of Salmonella Typhimurium in samples at 10°C had significantly (P < 0.05) increased (0.41 log CFU/g) from those at the refrigerated temperature of 4°C. Vacuum storage at 4 and 10°C for 28 days did not result in dramatic reductions in the mean numbers of C. jejuni and Salmonella Typhimurium. Our findings indicate that vacuum packaging under chilled conditions will not add substantially to safety for moisture-enhanced pork. Strict hygienic practices or the implementation of decontamination technologies is recommended.

  2. QseC mediates Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium virulence in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Cristiano G; Weinshenker, David; Sperandio, Vanessa

    2010-03-01

    The autoinducer-3 (AI-3)/epinephrine (Epi)/norepinephrine (NE) interkingdom signaling system mediates chemical communication between bacteria and their mammalian hosts. The three signals are sensed by the QseC histidine kinase (HK) sensor. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is a pathogen that uses HKs to sense its environment and regulate virulence. Salmonella serovar Typhimurium invades epithelial cells and survives within macrophages. Invasion of epithelial cells is mediated by the type III secretion system (T3SS) encoded in Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1), while macrophage survival and systemic disease are mediated by the T3SS encoded in SPI-2. Here we show that QseC plays an important role in Salmonella serovar Typhimurium pathogenicity. A qseC mutant was impaired in flagellar motility, in invasion of epithelial cells, and in survival within macrophages and was attenuated for systemic infection in 129x1/SvJ mice. QseC acts globally, regulating expression of genes within SPI-1 and SPI-2 in vitro and in vivo (during infection of mice). Additionally, dopamine beta-hydroxylase knockout (Dbh(-)(/)(-)) mice that do not produce Epi or NE showed different susceptibility to Salmonella serovar Typhimurium infection than wild-type mice. These data suggest that the AI-3/Epi/NE signaling system is a key factor during Salmonella serovar Typhimurium pathogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Elucidation of the role of this interkingdom signaling system in Salmonella serovar Typhimurium should contribute to a better understanding of the complex interplay between the pathogen and the host during infection.

  3. Differences in the motility phenotype of multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium exposed to various antibiotics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) is one of the most prevalent foodborne-associated bacteria in humans and livestock, and over 35 per cent of these isolates are resistant to three or more antibiotics. This is a concern as multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella has been associat...

  4. Fate of Salmonella Typhimurium in laboratory-scale drinking water biofilms.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, L M; Brözel, V S; Venter, S N

    2013-12-01

    Investigations were carried out to evaluate and quantify colonization of laboratory-scale drinking water biofilms by a chromosomally green fluorescent protein (gfp)-tagged strain of Salmonella Typhimurium. Gfp encodes the green fluorescent protein and thus allows in situ detection of undisturbed cells and is ideally suited for monitoring Salmonella in biofilms. The fate and persistence of non-typhoidal Salmonella in simulated drinking water biofilms was investigated. The ability of Salmonella to form biofilms in monoculture and the fate and persistence of Salmonella in a mixed aquatic biofilm was examined. In monoculture S. Typhimurium formed loosely structured biofilms. Salmonella colonized established multi-species drinking water biofilms within 24 hours, forming micro-colonies within the biofilm. S. Typhimurium was also released at high levels from the drinking water-associated biofilm into the water passing through the system. This indicated that Salmonella could enter into, survive and grow within, and be released from a drinking water biofilm. The ability of Salmonella to survive and persist in a drinking water biofilm, and be released at high levels into the flow for recolonization elsewhere, indicates the potential for a persistent health risk to consumers once a network becomes contaminated with this bacterium.

  5. Salmonella typhimurium phage type 141 infections in Sheffield during 1984 and 1985: association with hens' eggs.

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, P. A.; Rhodes, P.; Rylands, W.

    1988-01-01

    Food poisoning due to Salmonella typhimurium phage type 141 was unusual in the Sheffield area before 1984. The sudden increase in incidence of this phage type during 1984 and 1985, and its causative role in several small outbreaks in this period have been investigated. Epidemiological and laboratory investigations suggested that hens' eggs were the most likely source of S. typhimurium phage type 141. PMID:3042440

  6. DNA Adenine Methylase Mutants of Salmonella Typhimurium and a Novel Dam-Regulated Locus

    PubMed Central

    Torreblanca, J.; Casadesus, J.

    1996-01-01

    Mutants of Salmonella typhimurium lacking DNA adenine methylase were isolated; they include insertion and deletion alleles. The dam locus maps at 75 min between cysG and aroB, similar to the Escherichia coli dam gene. Dam(-) mutants of S. typhimurium resemble those of E. coli in the following phenotypes: (1) increased spontaneous mutations, (2) moderate SOS induction, (3) enhancement of duplication segregation, (4) inviability of dam recA and dam recB mutants, and (5) suppression of the inviability of the dam recA and dam recB combinations by mutations that eliminate mismatch repair. However, differences between S. typhimurium and E. coli dam mutants are also found: (1) S. typhimurium dam mutants do not show increased UV sensitivity, suggesting that methyl-directed mismatch repair does not participate in the repair of UV-induced DNA damage in Salmonella. (2) S. typhimurium dam recJ mutants are viable, suggesting that the Salmonella RecJ function does not participate in the repair of DNA strand breaks formed in the absence of Dam methylation. We also describe a genetic screen for detecting novel genes regulated by Dam methylation and a locus repressed by Dam methylation in the S. typhimurium virulence (or ``cryptic'') plasmid. PMID:8878670

  7. Deletion of Invasion Protein B in Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Influences Bacterial Invasion and Virulence.

    PubMed

    Chen, Songbiao; Zhang, Chunjie; Liao, Chengshui; Li, Jing; Yu, Chuan; Cheng, Xiangchao; Yu, Zuhua; Zhang, Mingliang; Wang, Yang

    2015-12-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) has a wide host range and causes infections ranging from severe gastroenteritis to systemic infections in human, as well as causing typhoid-like disease in murine models of infection. S. Typhimurium translocates its effector proteins through the Salmonella pathogenicity island-I (SPI-I)-encoded T3SS-I needle complex. This study focuses on invasion protein B (SipB) of S. Typhimurium, which plays an active role in SPI-I invasion efficiency. To test our hypothesis, a sipB deletion mutant was constructed through double-crossover allelic using the suicide vector pRE112ΔsipB, and its biological characteristics were analyzed. The results showed that the SipB does not affect the growth of Salmonella, but the adherence, invasion, and virulence of the mutant were significantly decreased compared with wild-type S. Typhimurium (SL1344). This research indicates that SipB is an important virulence factor in the pathogenicity of S. Typhimurium.

  8. Indigenous microorganisms prevent reduction in cecal size induced by Salmonella typhimurium in vaccinated gnotobiotic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Tannock, G W; Savage, D C

    1976-01-01

    Germfree CD-1 mice challenged by the oral route with Salmonella typhimurium had ceca that were abnormal in appearance and reduced in size compared to those of germfree controls. Similarly, germfree mice injected with heat-killed S. typhimurium or gnotobiotes associated with three indigenous microbes (Lactobacillus, Bacteroides, Clostridium), and subsequently challenged with S. typhimurium also had small ceca. By contrast, gnotobiotic mice that had been both injected with the heat-killed S. typhimurium and associated with the three indigenous microbes before challenge with S. typhimurium had ceca similar in size and appearance to germfree mice. Thus, indigenous microorganisms could interfere with the mechanism by which the pathogen induced the decrease in cecal size, but could do so only in mice injected with heat-killed bacteria. This phenomenon suggests synergism between the interference effected by the indigenous bacteria and the resistance mechanisms of the animal. Images PMID:765282

  9. The antimicrobial peptide cathelicidin-BF could be a potential therapeutic for Salmonella typhimurium infection.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xi; Zhang, Lin; Wang, Yizhen

    2015-02-01

    Resistance is increasing to several critical antimicrobials used to treat Salmonella typhimurium infection, urging people to search for new antimicrobial agents. In this work, we reported the possibility of a potent antimicrobial peptide cathelicidin-BF found in the venom of the snake Bungarus fasciatus in treating Salmonella typhimurium infection. We tested its activity in biological fluids and in vivo using a mouse model of Salmonella typhimurium infection, and examined the effect of cathelicidin-BF on Salmonella invasion to epithelial cells. In addition, the biodistribution of cathelicidin-BF was evaluated by using in vivo optical imaging. The results revealed that cathelicidin-BF was unstable in gastrointestinal tract, but retained substantially active in murine serum. Cathelicidin-BF attenuated the clinical symptoms of Salmonella infected-mice, significantly reduced the number of internalized Salmonella and attenuated Salmonella-induced decreases in TER in epithelial cells. Our results provide a first indication for the potential of cathelicidin-BF as a novel therapeutic option for salmonellosis.

  10. Assessment of antibiotic resistance phenotype and integrons in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium isolated from swine.

    PubMed

    Rayamajhi, Nabin; Kang, Sang Gyun; Kang, Mi Lan; Lee, Hee Soo; Park, Kyung Yoon; Yoo, Han Sang

    2008-10-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) isolated and identified from swine were subjected for the analysis of antibiotic resistance pattern and clinically important class 1 and 2 integrons. In addition, S. Typhimurium isolates exhibiting ampicillin, chloramphenicol, streptomycin, sulfamethoxazole, tetracycline and florfenicol (ACSSuTF) resistance pattern as described in most Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium definitive type 104 (DT104) were characterized by polymerase chain reaction. All the isolates were resistant to more than four antibiotics and showed the highest resistance to streptomycin (94.1%), followed by tetracycline (90.1%), ampicillin (64.7%), chloramphenicol (56.8%) and gentamicin (54.9%). MIC value for the ten isolates ranged between 0.125-2 mug/ml for ciprofloxacin. Among the beta-lactams used, only one of the isolate exhibited resistance to ceftiofur (MIC 8 microg/ml). Sixty eight percent of these multi drug resistance (MDR) S. Typhimurium isolates carried clinically important class 1 integron with 1kb (aadA) and/or 2kb (dhfrXII-orfF-aadA2) resistance gene cassettes. This study reports the increasing trend of multi drug resistance (MDR) S. Typhimurium with clinically important class 1 integron in pigs. In addition, emergence of the ACSSuTF-type resistance in S. Typhimurium PT other than DT104 may limit the use of resistance gene markers in its detection methods by PCR. PMID:18981675

  11. Molecular characterization of antibiotic resistant Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella Kentucky isolated from pre- and post-chill whole broilers carcasses.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Tagelsir; Zhao, Shaohua; White, David G; Parveen, Salina

    2014-04-01

    There is conflicting data regarding whether commercial chilling has any effect on persistence of Salmonella serovars, including antibiotic resistant variants, on chicken carcasses. A total of 309 Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella Kentucky isolates recovered from pre- and post-chill whole broiler carcasses were characterized for genetic relatedness using Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) and for the presence of virulence factors (invA, pagC, spvC) by PCR and for aerobactin and colicin production by bioassays. A subset of these isolates (n = 218) displaying resistance to either sulfisoxazole and/or ceftiofur [S. Typhimurium (n = 66) and S. Kentucky (n = 152)] were further tested for the presence of associated antibiotic resistance elements (class-I integrons and blaCMY genes) by PCR. All 145 ceftiofur resistant S. Kentucky and S. Typhimurium isolates possessed blaCMY genes. Class-I integrons were only detected in 6.1% (n = 4/66) of sulfisoxazole resistant S. Typhimurium isolates. The PFGE analysis revealed the presence of genetically diverse populations within the recovered isolates but clusters were generally concordant with serotypes and antimicrobial resistance profiles. At a 100% pattern similarity index, thirty-six percent of the undistinguishable S. Typhimurium and 22% of the undistinguishable S. Kentucky isolates were recovered from the same chilling step. All isolates possessed the invA and pagC genes, but only 1.4%possessed spvC. Irrespective of the chilling step, there was a significant difference (P < 0.05) in the production of aerobactin and colicin between S. Typhimurium and S. Kentucky isolates. Taken together, these results indicate that chilling impacted the recovery of particular Salmonella clonal groups but had no effect on the presence of class-I integrons, blaCMY genes, and tested virulence factors.

  12. Molecular epidemiological characteristics of Salmonella enterica serovars Enteritidis, Typhimurium and Livingstone strains isolated in a Tunisian university hospital.

    PubMed

    Ktari, Sonia; Ksibi, Boutheina; Gharsallah, Houda; Mnif, Basma; Maalej, Sonda; Rhimi, Fouzia; Hammami, Adnene

    2016-03-01

    Enteritidis, Typhimurium and Livingstone are the main Salmonella enterica serovars recovered in Tunisia. Here, we aimed to assess the genetic diversity of fifty-seven Salmonella enterica strains from different sampling periods, origins and settings using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) and multi-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA). Salmonella Enteritidis, isolated from human and food sources from two regions in Sfax in 2007, were grouped into one cluster using PFGE. However, using MLVA these strains were divided into two clusters. Salmonella Typhimurium strains, recovered in 2012 and represent sporadic cases of human clinical isolates, were included in one PFGE cluster. Nevertheless, the MLVA technique, divided Salmonella Typhimurium isolates into six clusters with diversity index reaching (DI = 0.757). For Salmonella Livingstone which was responsible of two nosocomial outbreaks during 2000-2003, the PFGE and MLVA methods showed that these strains were genetically closely related. Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Livingstone populations showed a single ST lineage ST11 and ST543 respectively. For Salmonella Typhimurium, two MLST sequence types ST19 and ST328 were defined. Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Typhimurium strains were clearly differentiated by MLVA which was not the case using PFGE.

  13. An rfaH Mutant of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium is Attenuated in Swine and Reduces Intestinal Colonization, Fecal Shedding, and Disease Severity Due to Virulent Salmonella Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Bearson, Bradley L.; Bearson, Shawn M. D.; Kich, Jalusa D.; Lee, In Soo

    2014-01-01

    Swine are often asymptomatic carriers of Salmonella spp., and interventions are needed to limit colonization of swine to enhance food safety and reduce environmental contamination. We evaluated the attenuation and potential vaccine use in pigs of a Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium mutant of rfaH, the gene encoding the RfaH antiterminator that prevents premature termination of long mRNA transcripts. Pigs inoculated with wild-type S. Typhimurium exhibited a significant elevation in average body temperature (fever) at 1 and 2 days post-inoculation; rfaH-inoculated pigs did not (n = 5/group). During the 7-day trial, a significant reduction of Salmonella in the feces, tonsils, and cecum were observed in the rfaH-inoculated pigs compared to wild-type inoculated pigs. To determine whether vaccination with the rfaH mutant could provide protection against wild-type S. Typhimurium challenge, two groups of pigs (n = 14/group) were intranasally inoculated with either the rfaH mutant or a PBS placebo at 6 and 8 weeks of age and challenged with the parental, wild-type S. Typhimurium at 11 weeks of age. The average body temperature was significantly elevated in the mock-vaccinated pigs at 1 and 2 days post-challenge, but not in the rfaH-vaccinated pigs. Fecal shedding at 2 and 3 days post-challenge and colonization of intestinal tract tissues at 7 days post-challenge by wild-type S. Typhimurium was significantly reduced in the rfaH-vaccinated pigs compared to mock-vaccinated pigs. Serological analysis using the IDEXX HerdChek Swine Salmonella Test Kit indicated that vaccination with the rfaH mutant did not stimulate an immune response against LPS. These results indicate that vaccination of swine with the attenuated rfaH mutant confers protection against challenge with virulent S. Typhimurium but does not interfere with herd level monitoring for Salmonella spp., thereby allowing for differentiation of infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA). PMID

  14. Virulent Salmonella typhimurium-induced lymphocyte depletion and immunosuppression in chickens.

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, J O; Curtiss, R

    1994-01-01

    The effect of experimental Salmonella infection on chicken lymphoid organs, immune responses, and fecal shedding of salmonellae were assessed following oral inoculation of 1-day-old chicks or intra-air-sac infection of 4-week-old chickens with virulent S. typhimurium wild-type chi 3761 or avirulent S. typhimurium delta cya delta crp vaccine strain chi 3985. Some 4-week-old chickens infected intra-air-sac with chi 3761 or chi 3985 were challenged with Bordetella avium to determine the effect of Salmonella infection on secondary infection by B. avium. S. typhimurium chi 3761 caused lymphocyte depletion, atrophy of lymphoid organs, and immunosuppression 2 days after infection in 1-day-old chicks and 4-week-old chickens. The observed lymphocyte depletion or atrophy of lymphoid organs was transient and dose dependent. Lymphocyte depletion and immunosuppression were associated with prolonged fecal shedding of S. typhimurium chi 3761. No lymphocyte depletion, immunosuppression, or prolonged Salmonella shedding was observed in groups of chickens infected orally or intra-air-sac with chi 3985. Infection of chickens with salmonellae before challenge with B. avium did not suppress the specific antibody response to B. avium. However, B. avium isolation was higher in visceral organs of chickens infected with chi 3761 and challenged with B. avium than in chickens infected with B. avium only. Infection of chickens with chi 3985 reduced B. avium colonization. We report a new factor in Salmonella pathogenesis and reveal a phenomenon which may play a critical role in the development of Salmonella carrier status in chickens. We also showed that 10(8) CFU of chi 3985, which is our established oral vaccination dose for chickens, did not cause immunosuppression or enhance the development of Salmonella carrier status in chickens. Images PMID:8168969

  15. Effect of Feeding Chlortetracycline on the Reservoir of Salmonella typhimurium in Experimentally Infected Swine

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Robert D.; Rollins, Larry D.; Pocurull, Dorothy W.; Selwyn, Murray; Mercer, H. Dwight

    1978-01-01

    Swine were fed either a diet containing 110 mg of chlortetracycline (CTC) per kg (100 g/ton) or a control diet and were inoculated orally with Salmonella typhimurium that was either susceptible or resistant to CTC. The quantity, duration, and prevalence of fecal elimination of S. typhimurium, as well as the effect of CTC on the transmission of S. typhimurium from infected to uninfected swine, were determined. When animals were infected with CTC-resistant S. typhimurium, CTC increased the quantity (P < 0.05), duration (P < 0.05), and prevalence (P < 0.01) of fecal shedding, the transmission from infected to uninfected swine, and the recovery of the infecting organism at necropsy. When animals were infected with CTC-susceptible S. typhimurium, CTC reduced the quantity (between 7 and 10 days postinfection) (P < 0.01), duration (P < 0.05), and prevalence (P < 0.05) of fecal shedding, the transmission from infected to uninfected swine, and the recovery of the infecting organism at necropsy. Resistance to tetracycline was transferred in vivo to 4 and 6% of the susceptible infecting S. typhimurium recovered from the untreated and treated groups, respectively. The increased reservoir of S. typhimurium and the transfer of resistance to susceptible S. typhimurium have implications for both animal and public health. PMID:365087

  16. 2D proteome analysis initiates new Insights on the Salmonella Typhimurium LuxS protein

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Quorum sensing is a term describing a bacterial communication system mediated by the production and recognition of small signaling molecules. The LuxS enzyme, catalyzing the synthesis of AI-2, is conserved in a wide diversity of bacteria. AI-2 has therefore been suggested as an interspecies quorum sensing signal. To investigate the role of endogenous AI-2 in protein expression of the Gram-negative pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium), we performed a 2D-DIGE proteomics experiment comparing total protein extract of wildtype S. Typhimurium with that of a luxS mutant, unable to produce AI-2. Results Differential proteome analysis of wildtype S. Typhimurium versus a luxS mutant revealed relatively few changes beyond the known effect on phase 2 flagellin. However, two highly differentially expressed protein spots with similar molecular weight but differing isoelectric point, were identified as LuxS whereas the S. Typhimurium genome contains only one luxS gene. This observation was further explored and we show that the S. Typhimurium LuxS protein can undergo posttranslational modification at a catalytic cysteine residue. Additionally, by constructing LuxS-βla and LuxS-PhoA fusion proteins, we demonstrate that S. Typhimurium LuxS can substitute the cognate signal peptide sequences of β-lactamase and alkaline phosphatase for translocation across the cytoplasmic membrane in S. Typhimurium. This was further confirmed by fractionation of S. Typhimurium protein extracts, followed by Western blot analysis. Conclusion 2D-DIGE analysis of a luxS mutant vs. wildtype Salmonella Typhimurium did not reveal new insights into the role of AI-2/LuxS in Salmonella as only a small amount of proteins were differentially expressed. However, subsequent in depth analysis of the LuxS protein itself revealed two interesting features: posttranslational modification and potential translocation across the cytoplasmic membrane. As the S. Typhimurium Lux

  17. Complete Genome Sequence of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Strain YU15 (Sequence Type 19) Harboring the Salmonella Genomic Island 1 and Virulence Plasmid pSTV

    PubMed Central

    Calva, Edmundo; Puente, José L.; Zaidi, Mussaret B.

    2016-01-01

    The complete genome of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium sequence type 19 (ST19) strain YU15, isolated in Yucatán, Mexico, from a human baby stool culture, was determined using PacBio technology. The chromosome contains five intact prophages and the Salmonella genomic island 1 (SGI1). This strain carries the Salmonella virulence plasmid pSTV. PMID:27081132

  18. Tumor-Targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Robert M

    2016-01-01

    The present chapter reviews the development of the tumor-targeting amino-acid auxotrophic strain S. typhimurium A1 and the in vivo selection and characterization of the high-tumor-targeting strain S. typhimurium A1-R. Efficacy of S. typhimurium A1-R in nude-mouse models of prostate, breast, pancreatic, and ovarian cancer, as well as sarcoma and glioma in orthotopic mouse models is described. Also reviewed is efficacy of S. typhimurium A1-R targeting of primary bone tumor and lung metastasis of high-grade osteosarcoma, breast-cancer brain metastasis, and experimental breast-cancer bone metastasis in orthotopic mouse models. The efficacy of S. typhimurium A1-R on pancreatic cancer stem cells, on pancreatic cancer in combination with anti-angiogenic agents, as well as on cervical cancer, soft-tissue sarcoma, and pancreatic cancer patient-derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) mouse models, is also described.

  19. Reduction of Salmonella Typhimurium in experimentally challenged broilers by nitrate adaptation and chlorate supplementation in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yong Soo; Anderson, Robin C; Byrd, James A; Edrington, Thomas S; Moore, Randle W; Callaway, Todd R; McReynolds, Jack; Nisbet, David J

    2003-04-01

    The effects of two feed supplements on Salmonella Typhimurium in the ceca of market-age broilers were determined. Broilers orally challenged 6 days before slaughter with a novobiocin- and nalidixic acid-resistant strain of Salmonella Typhimurium were divided into one of four groups (20 birds each). The first group (the control group) received no treatment, the second group received sodium nitrate (SN) treatment (574 mg of NaNO3 per kg of feed), the third group received experimental chlorate product (ECP) treatment (15 mM NaClO3 equivalents), and the fourth group received ECP treatment in combination with SN treatment. The SN treatment was administered via feed for 5 days immediately before slaughter, and ECP was provided via ad libitum access to drinking water for the last 2 days before slaughter. Cecal contents were subjected to bacterial analysis. Significant (P < 0.05) Salmonella Typhimurium reductions (ca. 2 log units) relative to levels for untreated control broilers were observed for broilers receiving ECP in combination with SN. The ECP-only treatment resulted in significant (P < 0.05) reductions (ca. 0.8 log) of Salmonella Typhimurium in trial 2. We hypothesize that increasing Salmonella Typhimurium nitrate reductase activity resulted in increased enzymatic reduction of chlorate to chlorite, with a concomitant decrease in cecal Salmonella Typhimurium levels. On the basis of these results, preadaptation with SN followed by ECP supplementation immediately preharvest could be a potential strategy for the reduction of Salmonella Typhimurium in broilers.

  20. Analysis of the Salmonella typhimurium Proteome through Environmental Response toward Infectious Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Adkins, Joshua N.; Mottaz, Heather M.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Gustin, Jean K.; Rue, Joanne; Clauss, Therese RW; Purvine, Samuel O.; Rodland, Karin D.; Heffron, Fred; Smith, Richard D.

    2006-08-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (aka, S. typhimurium) is a facultative intracellular pathogen that causes ~40,000 reported cases of acute gastroenteritis and diarrhea a year in the United States. To develop a deeper understanding of the infectious state of S. typhimurium, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-based “bottom-up” proteomics was used to globally analyze the proteins present under specific growth conditions. Salmonella typhimurium LT2 strain cells were grown in contrasting culture conditions that mimicked both natural free-living conditions and an infectious state, i.e., logarithm phase, stationary phase and Mg-depleted medium growth. Initial comparisons of the LT2 strain protein abundances among cell culture conditions indicate that the majority of proteins do not change significantly. Not unexpectedly, cells grown in Mg-depleted medium conditions had a higher abundance of Mg2+ transport proteins than found in other growth conditions. A second more virulent Salmonella typhimurium strain (14028) was also studied with these growth conditions and used to directly compare to the LT2 strain. The strain comparison offers a unique opportunity to compare and contrast observations in these closely related bacteria. One particular protein family, propanediol utilization proteins, was drastically more abundant in the 14028 strain than in the LT2 strain, and may be a contributor to increased pathogenicity in the 14028 strain.

  1. Subversion of innate and adaptive immune activation induced by structurally modified lipopolysaccharide from Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Pastelin-Palacios, Rodolfo; Gil-Cruz, Cristina; Pérez-Shibayama, Christian I; Moreno-Eutimio, Mario A; Cervantes-Barragán, Luisa; Arriaga-Pizano, Lourdes; Ludewig, Burkhard; Cunningham, Adam F; García-Zepeda, Eduardo A; Becker, Ingeborg; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia; Bonifaz, Laura; Gunn, John S; Isibasi, Armando; López-Macías, Constantino

    2011-08-01

    Salmonella are successful pathogens that infect millions of people every year. During infection, Salmonella typhimurium changes the structure of its lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in response to the host environment, rendering bacteria resistant to cationic peptide lysis in vitro. However, the role of these structural changes in LPS as in vivo virulence factors and their effects on immune responses and the generation of immunity are largely unknown. We report that modified LPS are less efficient than wild-type LPS at inducing pro-inflammatory responses. The impact of this LPS-mediated subversion of innate immune responses was demonstrated by increased mortality in mice infected with a non-lethal dose of an attenuated S. typhimurium strain mixed with the modified LPS moieties. Up-regulation of co-stimulatory molecules on antigen-presenting cells and CD4(+) T-cell activation were affected by these modified LPS. Strains of S. typhimurium carrying structurally modified LPS are markedly less efficient at inducing specific antibody responses. Immunization with modified LPS moiety preparations combined with experimental antigens, induced an impaired Toll-like receptor 4-mediated adjuvant effect. Strains of S. typhimurium carrying structurally modified LPS are markedly less efficient at inducing immunity against challenge with virulent S. typhimurium. Hence, changes in S. typhimurium LPS structure impact not only on innate immune responses but also on both humoral and cellular adaptive immune responses.

  2. Subversion of innate and adaptive immune activation induced by structurally modified lipopolysaccharide from Salmonella typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Pastelin-Palacios, Rodolfo; Gil-Cruz, Cristina; Pérez-Shibayama, Christian I; Moreno-Eutimio, Mario A; Cervantes-Barragán, Luisa; Arriaga-Pizano, Lourdes; Ludewig, Burkhard; Cunningham, Adam F; García-Zepeda, Eduardo A; Becker, Ingeborg; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia; Bonifaz, Laura; Gunn, John S; Isibasi, Armando; López-Macías, Constantino

    2011-01-01

    Salmonella are successful pathogens that infect millions of people every year. During infection, Salmonella typhimurium changes the structure of its lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in response to the host environment, rendering bacteria resistant to cationic peptide lysis in vitro. However, the role of these structural changes in LPS as in vivo virulence factors and their effects on immune responses and the generation of immunity are largely unknown. We report that modified LPS are less efficient than wild-type LPS at inducing pro-inflammatory responses. The impact of this LPS-mediated subversion of innate immune responses was demonstrated by increased mortality in mice infected with a non-lethal dose of an attenuated S. typhimurium strain mixed with the modified LPS moieties. Up-regulation of co-stimulatory molecules on antigen-presenting cells and CD4+ T-cell activation were affected by these modified LPS. Strains of S. typhimurium carrying structurally modified LPS are markedly less efficient at inducing specific antibody responses. Immunization with modified LPS moiety preparations combined with experimental antigens, induced an impaired Toll-like receptor 4-mediated adjuvant effect. Strains of S. typhimurium carrying structurally modified LPS are markedly less efficient at inducing immunity against challenge with virulent S. typhimurium. Hence, changes in S. typhimurium LPS structure impact not only on innate immune responses but also on both humoral and cellular adaptive immune responses. PMID:21631497

  3. Invasive Salmonella enterica serotype typhimurium infections, Democratic Republic of the Congo, 2007-2011.

    PubMed

    Ley, Benedikt; Le Hello, Simon; Lunguya, Octavie; Lejon, Veerle; Muyembe, Jean-Jacques; Weill, François-Xavier; Jacobs, Jan

    2014-04-01

    Infection with Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium sequence type (ST) 313 is associated with high rates of drug resistance, bloodstream infections, and death. To determine whether ST313 is dominant in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, we studied 180 isolates collected during 2007-2011; 96% belonged to CRISPOL type CT28, which is associated with ST313.

  4. Autoinducer AI-2 is involved in regulating a variety of cellular processes in Salmonella Typhimurium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    LuxS/AI-2 mediated cell signaling is a known strategy that modulates a variety of bacterial processes in prokaryotes. Salmonella Typhimurium is known to possess LuxS/AI-2 mediated cell signaling. Until now, the Lsr- ABC transporter system (LuxS- regulated) is the only known process controlled by t...

  5. Invasive Salmonella enterica serotype typhimurium infections, Democratic Republic of the Congo, 2007-2011.

    PubMed

    Ley, Benedikt; Le Hello, Simon; Lunguya, Octavie; Lejon, Veerle; Muyembe, Jean-Jacques; Weill, François-Xavier; Jacobs, Jan

    2014-04-01

    Infection with Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium sequence type (ST) 313 is associated with high rates of drug resistance, bloodstream infections, and death. To determine whether ST313 is dominant in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, we studied 180 isolates collected during 2007-2011; 96% belonged to CRISPOL type CT28, which is associated with ST313. PMID:24655438

  6. Cloning, sequencing and in silico analysis of omp C of salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Jha, Richa; Kumar, Anil; Saxena, Anjani; Tamuly, Shantanu; Saxena, M K

    2012-01-01

    Salmonella Typhimurium is an important pathogen having a broad host range. In human population it causes mostly gastroenteritis but there are reports in which it was found to be responsible to cause several lethal diseases like endocarditis and meningitis. Poultry products are the major sources of this organism in India as these are consumed at various stages of cooking. The available vaccines have their own limitations such as short-term immunity. Outer membrane proteins have shown some promising potential, so in the present study Omp C of Salmonella Typhimurium was cloned and sequenced to explore the possibility of development of r-DNA vaccine against Salmonella Typhimurium for poultry. The sequence of Omp C was studied for antigenic indexing, epitope mapping, and MHC mapping using various bioinformatic tools. The ORF analysis revealed a complete coding region of approximately 1000 bp. Five major and 13 minor B-cell epitopes were identified having an antigenic index of 1.7. The sequences also showed major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and class II binding region indicating a potential of eliciting cell-mediated immune response. The findings indicate that Omp C may be proven as promising candidate for development of r-DNA vaccine against Salmonella Typhimurium.

  7. Cloning, Sequencing and In Silico Analysis of Omp C of Salmonella Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Richa; Kumar, Anil; Saxena, Anjani; Tamuly, Shantanu; Saxena, M. K.

    2012-01-01

    Salmonella Typhimurium is an important pathogen having a broad host range. In human population it causes mostly gastroenteritis but there are reports in which it was found to be responsible to cause several lethal diseases like endocarditis and meningitis. Poultry products are the major sources of this organism in India as these are consumed at various stages of cooking. The available vaccines have their own limitations such as short-term immunity. Outer membrane proteins have shown some promising potential, so in the present study Omp C of Salmonella Typhimurium was cloned and sequenced to explore the possibility of development of r-DNA vaccine against Salmonella Typhimurium for poultry. The sequence of Omp C was studied for antigenic indexing, epitope mapping, and MHC mapping using various bioinformatic tools. The ORF analysis revealed a complete coding region of approximately 1000 bp. Five major and 13 minor B-cell epitopes were identified having an antigenic index of 1.7. The sequences also showed major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and class II binding region indicating a potential of eliciting cell-mediated immune response. The findings indicate that Omp C may be proven as promising candidate for development of r-DNA vaccine against Salmonella Typhimurium. PMID:23762587

  8. Salmonella enterica Serovars Typhimurium and Dublin Can Lyse Macrophages by a Mechanism Distinct from Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Patricia R.; Gautier, Anne V.; Paulin, Sue M.; Bland, A. Patricia; Jones, Philip W.; Wallis, Timothy S.

    2000-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium and Dublin lysed primary bovine alveolar macrophages and immortalized J774.2 macrophage-like cells in the absence of either the morphological changes or DNA fragmentation characteristic of apoptosis. Macrophage lysis was dependent on a subset of caspases and an intact sipB gene. PMID:10816540

  9. Rice hull smoke extract inactivates Salmonella Typhimurium in laboratory media and protects infected mice against mortality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A recently discovered and characterized rice hull liquid smoke extract was tested for bactericidal activity against Salmonella Typhimurium using the disc-agar method. The Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) value of rice hull smoke extract was found to be 0.822% (v/v). The in vivo antibacterial a...

  10. Osmoregulated periplasmic glucans of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium are required for optimal virulence in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We purified osmoregulated periplasmic glucans (OPGs) from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and found them to be composed of 100% glucose with 2-linked glucose as the most abundant residue with terminal glucose, 2,3-linked and 2,6-linked glucose also present in high quantities. The two structu...

  11. Complete Genome Sequence of a Myoviridae Bacteriophage Infecting Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Paradiso, Rubina; Orsini, Massimiliano; Bolletti Censi, Sergio; Galiero, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    The bacteriophage 118970_sal3 was isolated from water buffalo feces in southern Italy, exhibiting lytic activity against Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. This bacteriophage belongs to the Myoviridae family and has a 39,464-bp double-stranded DNA (ds-DNA) genome containing 53 coding sequences (CDSs). PMID:27688333

  12. A WATERBORNE SALMONELLA TYPHIMURIUM OUTBREAK IN GIDEON, MISSOURI: RESULTS FROM A FIELD INVESTIGATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A waterborne disease outbreak associated with Salmonella typhimurium was identified in Gideon, Missouri (population 1104), a town in southeastern Missouri (USA) in December, 1993. It was estimated by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) that approximately 44% o...

  13. Complete Genome Sequence of a Myoviridae Bacteriophage Infecting Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Paradiso, Rubina; Orsini, Massimiliano; Bolletti Censi, Sergio; Borriello, Giorgia; Galiero, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    The bacteriophage 118970_sal3 was isolated from water buffalo feces in southern Italy, exhibiting lytic activity against Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. This bacteriophage belongs to the Myoviridae family and has a 39,464-bp double-stranded DNA (ds-DNA) genome containing 53 coding sequences (CDSs). PMID:27688333

  14. Influence of light exposure on horizontal transmission of Salmonella typhimurium in weaned pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of the following experiment was to examine the effect of light exposure on horizontal transmission of Salmonella typhimurium in weaned pigs. Twenty crossbred pigs (average BW = 15 kg) were housed in isolation rooms (10 pigs/room) and randomly assigned to one of two lighting regimes: ...

  15. Complete Genome Sequence of a Myoviridae Bacteriophage Infecting Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Paradiso, Rubina; Orsini, Massimiliano; Bolletti Censi, Sergio; Borriello, Giorgia; Galiero, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    The bacteriophage 118970_sal3 was isolated from water buffalo feces in southern Italy, exhibiting lytic activity against Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. This bacteriophage belongs to the Myoviridae family and has a 39,464-bp double-stranded DNA (ds-DNA) genome containing 53 coding sequences (CDSs).

  16. Swarm and swim motilities of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and role of osmoregulated periplasmic glucans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strains synthesize osmoregulated periplasmic glucans (OPGs) under low osmolarity conditions (< 70 mos mol l-1). OPG synthesis is not observed when cells are grown in iso- or hyper-osmotic media (> 400 mos mol l-1). Mutation in OPG structural gene...

  17. Effect of Salmonella enteric Serovar Typhimurium in Pregnant Mice: A Biochemical and Histopathological Study

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Geeta; Verma, Ishita; Sharma, Lalita

    2012-01-01

    Background Food borne infections caused by Salmonella enterica species are increasing globally and pregnancy poses a significant threat in developing countries, where sanitation facilities are inadequate. Thus, the present study was designed to delineate the effect of Salmonella infection during pregnancy. Method Pregnant, BALB/c mice were challenged orally with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium on gestational day 10 and were monitored for bacterial load, hepatic injury, histopathological alterations vis-a-vis oxidant and antioxidant levels. Results Pregnant-Salmonella-infected mice had higher bacterial translocation in the liver, spleen as well as liver enzymes mainly aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase compared with Salmonella-infected mice. The levels of lipid peroxidation were significantly higher in all the organs of both pregnant-Salmonella-infected and Salmonella-infected mice compared with control mice. However, the activities of antioxidant enzymes (reduced glutathione, superoxide dismutase and catalase) were lower in the liver, spleen and placenta of pregnant, pregnant-Salmonella-infected and Salmonella-infected mice compared with control mice, but the decrease was more in pregnant-Salmonella-infected mice indicating depression of antioxidant defense system. Histopathologically, pregnant-Salmonella-infected mice had more architectural damage in the liver, spleen and placenta compared with other groups. Conclusion Pregnancy makes the host more vulnerable to typhoid fever by affecting the physiology of pivotal organs and highlighting the importance of early and prompts diagnosis so as to avoid the further materno-fetal complications.

  18. Effectiveness of radiation processing for elimination of Salmonella Typhimurium from minimally processed pineapple (Ananas comosus Merr.).

    PubMed

    Shashidhar, Ravindranath; Dhokane, Varsha S; Hajare, Sachin N; Sharma, Arun; Bandekar, Jayant R

    2007-04-01

    The microbiological quality of market samples of minimally processed (MP) pineapple was examined. The effectiveness of radiation treatment in eliminating Salmonella Typhimurium from laboratory inoculated ready-to-eat pineapple slices was also studied. Microbiological quality of minimally processed pineapple samples from Mumbai market was poor; 8.8% of the samples were positive for Salmonella. D(10) (the radiation dose required to reduce bacterial population by 90%) value for S. Typhimurium inoculated in pineapple was 0.242 kGy. Inoculated pack studies in minimally processed pineapple showed that the treatment with a 2-kGy dose of gamma radiation could eliminate 5 log CFU/g of S. Typhimurium. The pathogen was not detected from radiation-processed samples up to 12 d during storage at 4 and 10 degrees C. The processing of market samples with 1 and 2 kGy was effective in improving the microbiological quality of these products.

  19. Evaluating Chemical Mitigation of Salmonella Typhimurium ATCC 14028 in Animal Feed Ingredients.

    PubMed

    Cochrane, Roger A; Huss, Anne R; Aldrich, Gregory C; Stark, Charles R; Jones, Cassandra K

    2016-04-01

    Salmonella Typhimurium is a potential feed safety hazard in animal feed ingredients. Thermal mitigation of Salmonella spp. during rendering is effective but does not eliminate the potential for cross-contamination. Therefore, the objective of this experiment was to evaluate the effectiveness of chemicals to mitigate postrendering Salmonella Typhimurium ATCC 14028 contamination in rendered proteins over time. Treatments were arranged in a 6 × 4 factorial with six chemical treatments and four rendered protein meals. The chemical treatments included (i) control without chemical treatment, (ii) 0.3% commercial formaldehyde product, (iii) 2% essential oil blend, (iv) 2% medium chain fatty acid blend, (v) 3% organic acid blend, and (vi) 1% sodium bisulfate. The four rendered protein meals included (i) feather meal, (ii) blood meal, (iii) meat and bone meal, and (iv) poultry by-product meal. After matrices were chemically treated, they were inoculated with Salmonella Typhimurium ATCC 14028, stored at room temperature, and enumerated via plate counts on days 0, 1, 3, 7, 14, 21, and 42 postinoculation. The Salmonella concentration in ingredients treated with medium chain fatty acid and commercial formaldehyde were similar to one another (P = 0.23) but were 2 log lower than the control (P < 0.05). Ingredients treated with organic acids and essential oils also had lower Salmonella concentrations than the control (P < 0.05). Time also played a significant role in Salmonella mitigation, because all days except days 14 and 21 (P = 0.92) differed from one another. Rendered protein matrix also affected Salmonella stability, because concentrations in meat and bone meal and blood meal were similar to one another (P = 0.36) but were greater than levels in feather meal and poultry by-product meal (P < 0.05). In summary, chemical treatment and time both mitigated Salmonella Typhimurium ATCC 14028, but their effectiveness was matrix dependent. Time and chemical treatment with medium

  20. Behavior of Salmonella typhimurium during manufacture and curing of cheddar cheese.

    PubMed

    Goepfert, J M; Olson, N F; Marth, E H

    1968-06-01

    Nine vats of stirred-curd granular cheddar cheese were made with whole milk contaminated with Salmonella typhimurium after pasteurization. Enumeration of salmonellae by the most probable number technique during manufacture and curing showed that these organisms multiplied rapidly during manufacture until the curd was salted. Thereafter and throughout the curing period, the salmonellae declined in number at a rate dependent on the temperature of curing. Evidence is presented indicating that the production of volatile fatty acids in the curd during curing may be responsible for this decline.

  1. The transcriptional landscape and small RNAs of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Kröger, Carsten; Dillon, Shane C; Cameron, Andrew D S; Papenfort, Kai; Sivasankaran, Sathesh K; Hokamp, Karsten; Chao, Yanjie; Sittka, Alexandra; Hébrard, Magali; Händler, Kristian; Colgan, Aoife; Leekitcharoenphon, Pimlapas; Langridge, Gemma C; Lohan, Amanda J; Loftus, Brendan; Lucchini, Sacha; Ussery, David W; Dorman, Charles J; Thomson, Nicholas R; Vogel, Jörg; Hinton, Jay C D

    2012-05-15

    More than 50 y of research have provided great insight into the physiology, metabolism, and molecular biology of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium), but important gaps in our knowledge remain. It is clear that a precise choreography of gene expression is required for Salmonella infection, but basic genetic information such as the global locations of transcription start sites (TSSs) has been lacking. We combined three RNA-sequencing techniques and two sequencing platforms to generate a robust picture of transcription in S. Typhimurium. Differential RNA sequencing identified 1,873 TSSs on the chromosome of S. Typhimurium SL1344 and 13% of these TSSs initiated antisense transcripts. Unique findings include the TSSs of the virulence regulators phoP, slyA, and invF. Chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed that RNA polymerase was bound to 70% of the TSSs, and two-thirds of these TSSs were associated with σ(70) (including phoP, slyA, and invF) from which we identified the -10 and -35 motifs of σ(70)-dependent S. Typhimurium gene promoters. Overall, we corrected the location of important genes and discovered 18 times more promoters than identified previously. S. Typhimurium expresses 140 small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) at early stationary phase, including 60 newly identified sRNAs. Almost half of the experimentally verified sRNAs were found to be unique to the Salmonella genus, and <20% were found throughout the Enterobacteriaceae. This description of the transcriptional map of SL1344 advances our understanding of S. Typhimurium, arguably the most important bacterial infection model.

  2. Design of Glycoconjugate Vaccines against Invasive African Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Micoli, F.; Lanzilao, L.; Gavini, M.; Alfini, R.; Brandt, C.; Clare, S.; Mastroeni, P.; Saul, A.; MacLennan, C. A.

    2014-01-01

    Nontyphoidal salmonellae, particularly Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, are a major cause of invasive disease in Africa, affecting mainly young children and HIV-infected individuals. Glycoconjugate vaccines provide a safe and reliable strategy against invasive polysaccharide-encapsulated pathogens, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a target of protective immune responses. With the aim of designing an effective vaccine against S. Typhimurium, we have synthesized different glycoconjugates, by linking O-antigen and core sugars (OAg) of LPS to the nontoxic mutant of diphtheria toxin (CRM197). The OAg-CRM197 conjugates varied in (i) OAg source, with three S. Typhimurium strains used for OAg extraction, producing OAg with differences in structural specificities, (ii) OAg chain length, and (iii) OAg/CRM197 ratio. All glycoconjugates were compared for immunogenicity and ability to induce serum bactericidal activity in mice. In vivo enhancement of bacterial clearance was assessed for a selected S. Typhimurium glycoconjugate by challenge with live Salmonella. We found that the largest anti-OAg antibody responses were elicited by (i) vaccines synthesized from OAg with the highest glucosylation levels, (ii) OAg composed of mixed- or medium-molecular-weight populations, and (iii) a lower OAg/CRM197 ratio. In addition, we found that bactericidal activity can be influenced by S. Typhimurium OAg strain, most likely as a result of differences in OAg O-acetylation and glucosylation. Finally, we confirmed that mice immunized with the selected OAg-conjugate were protected against S. Typhimurium colonization of the spleen and liver. In conclusion, our findings indicate that differences in the design of OAg-based glycoconjugate vaccines against invasive African S. Typhimurium can have profound effects on immunogenicity and therefore optimal vaccine design requires careful consideration. PMID:25547792

  3. L-Asparaginase II Produced by Salmonella Typhimurium Inhibits T Cell Responses and Mediates Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Kullas, Amy L.; McClelland, Michael; Yang, Hee-Jeong; Tam, Jason W.; Torres, AnnMarie; Porwollik, Steffen; Mena, Patricio; McPhee, Joseph B.; Bogomolnaya, Lydia; Andrews-Polymenis, Helene; van der Velden, Adrianus W.M.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium avoids clearance by the host immune system by suppressing T cell responses; however, the mechanisms that mediate this immunosuppression remain unknown. We show that S. Typhimurium inhibit T cell responses by producing L-Asparaginase II, which catalyzes the hydrolysis of L-asparagine to aspartic acid and ammonia. L-Asparaginase II is necessary and sufficient to suppress T cell blastogenesis, cytokine production, and proliferation and to downmodulate expression of the T cell receptor. Furthermore, S. Typhimurium-induced inhibition of T cells in vitro is prevented upon addition of L-asparagine. S. Typhimurium lacking the L-Asparaginase II gene (STM3106) are unable to inhibit T cell responses and exhibit attenuated virulence in vivo. L-Asparaginases are used to treat acute lymphoblastic leukemia through mechanisms that likely involve amino acid starvation of leukemic cells, and these findings indicate that pathogens similarly use L-asparagine deprivation to limit T cell responses. PMID:23245323

  4. Neutrophils Are a Source of Gamma Interferon during Acute Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Spees, Alanna M.; Kingsbury, Dawn D.; Wangdi, Tamding; Xavier, Mariana N.; Tsolis, Renée M.

    2014-01-01

    Gamma interferon (IFN-γ) is an important driver of intestinal inflammation during colitis caused by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. Here we used the mouse colitis model to investigate the cellular sources of IFN-γ in the cecal mucosa during the acute phase of an S. Typhimurium infection. While IFN-γ staining was detected in T cells, NK cells, and inflammatory monocytes at 2 days after infection, the majority of IFN-γ-positive cells in the cecal mucosa were neutrophils. Furthermore, neutrophil depletion blunted mucosal Ifng expression and reduced the severity of intestinal lesions during S. Typhimurium infection. We conclude that neutrophils are a prominent cellular source of IFN-γ during the innate phase of S. Typhimurium-induced colitis. PMID:24421037

  5. Characterization of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium and Monophasic Salmonella Serovar 1,4,[5],12:i:- Isolates in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Amavisit, P.; Boonyawiwat, W.; Bangtrakulnont, A.

    2005-01-01

    Duplex PCR was developed to screen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium phage type DT104 and related strains in Thailand because a phage typing laboratory of serovar Typhimurium is not available. Of 46 isolates of serovar Typhimurium and 32 isolates of S. enterica serovar 1,4,[5],12:i:-, 15 (33%) and 30 (94%) were duplex PCR positive, respectively. All isolates were submitted for phage typing to analyze the specificity of the PCR assay. Among serovar Typhimurium isolates that yielded positive duplex PCRs, only seven isolates were phage types DT104 or U302, and eight isolates were undefined types, whereas the negative PCR isolates were either other phage types, including DT7, DT12, DT66, DT79, DT166, DT170, DT193, and DT208 or an undefined type. The serovar Typhimurium and serovar 1,4,[5],12:i:- isolates that were duplex PCR positive were further subtyped by using XbaI PFGE to reveal their genetic relatedness. All serovar Typhimurium phage type DT104 strains had indistinguishable chromosomal patterns. The isolates of phage type U302 and most of the serovar 1,4,[5],12:i:- isolates that were duplex PCR positive yielded similar pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns. The patterns of PCR-negative isolates distinctly differed from the patterns of PCR-positive isolates. A total of 26% of all isolates had a dominant R-type ACSSuTG that was not found in the isolates of phage type DT104. PMID:15956391

  6. Protection of mice against Salmonella typhimurium with an O-specific polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccine.

    PubMed Central

    Watson, D C; Robbins, J B; Szu, S C

    1992-01-01

    Serious infections with salmonellae remain a threat in many human populations. Despite extensive study of salmonella infections in animals and clinical experience with killed cellular vaccines, there are no vaccines against serotypes other than Salmonella typhi licensed for human use. Serum antibodies to the O-specific polysaccharide (O-SP) of salmonellae protect mice against invasive infection. In order to render it immunogenic, we have conjugated the O-SP of Salmonella typhimurium to carrier proteins by various schemes. O-SP conjugated to tetanus toxoid (O-SP-TT) elicited antibodies in outbred mice after three subcutaneous injections without adjuvant. The O-SP alone elicited no detectable antibody. The antibody response to O-SP-TT was boosted by successive doses and consisted of immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgM. Most mice only produced antibodies specific for the abequose (O:4 factor) region of the O-SP. Occasional animals also produced antibodies to the core oligosaccharide. Immunized mice were protected against intraperitoneal challenge with S. typhimurium, demonstrating a 160-fold increase in the 50% lethal dose. Passive immunization with conjugate-induced IgM or IgG also protected against challenge. These results indicate that an O-SP-TT conjugate, when given by a route and formulation acceptable for human use, protects mice against challenge with S. typhimurium. Images PMID:1383154

  7. Organically managed soils reduce internal colonization of tomato plants by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Gu, Ganyu; Cevallos-Cevallos, Juan M; Vallad, Gary E; van Bruggen, Ariena H C

    2013-04-01

    A two-phase experiment was conducted twice to investigate the effects of soil management on movement of Salmonella enterica Typhimurium in tomato plants. In the first phase, individual leaflets of 84 tomato plants grown in conventional or organic soils were dip inoculated two to four times before fruiting with either of two Salmonella Typhimurium strains (10(9) CFU/ml; 0.025% [vol/vol] Silwet L-77). Inoculated and adjacent leaflets were tested for Salmonella spp. densities for 30 days after each inoculation. Endophytic bacterial communities were characterized by polymerase chain reaction denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis before and after inoculation. Fruit and seed were examined for Salmonella spp. incidence. In phase 2, extracted seed were planted in conventional soil, and contamination of leaves and fruit of the second generation was checked. More Salmonella spp. survived in inoculated leaves on plants grown in conventional than in organic soil. The soil management effect on Salmonella spp. survival was confirmed for tomato plants grown in two additional pairs of soils. Endophytic bacterial diversities of tomato plants grown in conventional soils were significantly lower than those in organic soils. All contaminated fruit (1%) were from tomato plants grown in conventional soil. Approximately 5% of the seed from infested fruit were internally contaminated. No Salmonella sp. was detected in plants grown from contaminated seed. PMID:23506364

  8. Attenuated Salmonella typhimurium SV4089 as a potential carrier of oral DNA vaccine in chickens.

    PubMed

    Jazayeri, Seyed Davoud; Ideris, Aini; Zakaria, Zunita; Omar, Abdul Rahman

    2012-01-01

    Attenuated Salmonella has been used as a carrier for DNA vaccine. However, in vitro and in vivo studies on the bacteria following transfection of plasmid DNA were poorly studied. In this paper, eukaryotic expression plasmids encoding avian influenza virus (AIV) subtype H5N1 genes, pcDNA3.1/HA, NA, and NP, were transfected into an attenuated Salmonella enteric typhimurium SV4089. In vitro stability of the transfected plasmids into Salmonella were over 90% after 100 generations. The attenuated Salmonella were able to invade MCF-7 (1.2%) and MCF-10A (0.5%) human breast cancer cells. Newly hatched specific-pathogen-free (SPF) chicks were inoculated once by oral gavage with 10(9) colony-forming unit (CFU) of the attenuated Salmonella. No abnormal clinical signs or deaths were recorded after inoculation. Viable bacteria were detected 3 days after inoculation by plating from spleen, liver, and cecum. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were carried out for confirmation. Salmonella was not detected in blood cultures although serum antibody immune responses to Salmonella O antiserum group D1 factor 1, 9, and 12 antigens were observed in all the inoculated chickens after 7 days up to 35 days. Our results showed that live attenuated S. typhimurium SV4089 harboring pcDNA3.1/HA, NA, and NP may provide a unique alternative as a carrier for DNA oral vaccine in chickens.

  9. Yersinia enterocolitica inhibits Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Listeria monocytogenes cellular uptake.

    PubMed

    Habyarimana, Fabien; Swearingen, Matthew C; Young, Glenn M; Seveau, Stephanie; Ahmer, Brian M M

    2014-01-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica biovar 1B employs two type three secretion systems (T3SS), Ysa and Ysc, which inject effector proteins into macrophages to prevent phagocytosis. Conversely, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium uses a T3SS encoded by Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI1) to actively invade cells that are normally nonphagocytic and a second T3SS encoded by SPI2 to survive within macrophages. Given the distinctly different outcomes that occur with regard to host cell uptake of S. Typhimurium and Y. enterocolitica, we investigated how each pathogen influences the internalization outcome of the other. Y. enterocolitica reduces S. Typhimurium invasion of HeLa and Caco-2 cells to a level similar to that observed using an S. Typhimurium SPI1 mutant alone. However, Y. enterocolitica had no effect on S. Typhimurium uptake by J774.1 or RAW264.7 macrophage-like cells. Y. enterocolitica was also able to inhibit the invasion of epithelial and macrophage-like cells by Listeria monocytogenes. Y. enterocolitica mutants lacking either the Ysa or Ysc T3SS were partially defective, while double mutants were completely defective, in blocking S. Typhimurium uptake by epithelial cells. S. Typhimurium encodes a LuxR homolog, SdiA, which detects N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs) produced by Y. enterocolitica and upregulates the expression of an invasin (Rck) and a putative T3SS effector (SrgE). Two different methods of constitutively activating the S. Typhimurium SdiA regulon failed to reverse the uptake blockade imposed by Y. enterocolitica.

  10. Inactivation of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium on fresh produce by cold atmospheric gas plasma technology.

    PubMed

    Fernández, A; Noriega, E; Thompson, A

    2013-02-01

    Cold atmospheric gas plasma treatment (CAP) is an alternative approach for the decontamination of fresh and minimally processed food. In this study, the effects of growth phase, growth temperature and chemical treatment regime on the inactivation of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) by Nitrogen CAP were examined. Furthermore, the efficacy of CAP treatment for decontaminating lettuce and strawberry surfaces and potato tissue inoculated with S. Typhimurium was evaluated. It was found that the rate of inactivation of S. Typhimurium was independent of the growth phase, growth temperature and chemical treatment regime. Under optimal conditions, a 2 min treatment resulted in a 2.71 log-reduction of S. Typhimurium viability on membrane filters whereas a 15 min treatment was necessary to achieve 2.72, 1.76 and 0.94 log-reductions of viability on lettuce, strawberry and potato, respectively. We suggest that the differing efficiency of CAP treatment on the inactivation of S. Typhimurium on these different types of fresh foods is a consequence of their surface features. Scanning electron microscopy of the surface structures of contaminated samples of lettuce, strawberry and potato revealed topographical features whereby S. Typhimurium cells could be protected from the active species generated by plasma.

  11. Survival, prophage induction, and invasive properties of lysogenic Salmonella Typhimurium exposed to simulated gastrointestinal conditions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Songrae; Ryu, Kanghee; Biswas, Debabrata; Ahn, Juhee

    2014-09-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the viability, prophage induction, invasive ability, and relative gene expression in lysogenic Salmonella Typhimurium exposed to the simulated gastric juice (SGJ) at pH 2 (SGJ-2), 3 (SGJ-3), 4 (SGJ-4), and 5 (SGJ-5) for 30 min followed by 0.5 % bile salts for 2 h. The susceptibility of lysogenic S. Typhimurium increased with decreasing pH value and increasing bile salt concentration. The lysogenic S. Typhimurium cells were least susceptible to SGJ-4 and SGJ-5, showing <1 log reduction. The highest prophage induction was observed by 3.34 log PFU/ml in lysogenic S. Typhimurium at SGJ-3 in the presence of 0.5 % bile salts. The numbers of invading lysogenic S. Typhimurium treated at SGJ-3, SGJ-4, and SGJ-5 were 3.57, 3.73, and 4.15 log CFU/cm(2), respectively. Most genes (hilA, hilC, hilD, invA, invE, invF, and sirA) were down-regulated in lysogenic S. Typhimurium treated at SGJ-3, SGJ-4, and SGJ-5. This study provides useful information for understanding physiological changes of lysogenic S. Typhimurium in the simulated gastrointestinal conditions. PMID:24929817

  12. Salmonella typhimurium-induced M1 macrophage polarization is dependent on the bacterial O antigen.

    PubMed

    Luo, Fengling; Sun, Xiaoming; Qu, Zhen; Zhang, Xiaolian

    2016-02-01

    Recently, macrophages were shown to be capable of differentiating toward two phenotypes after antigen stimulation: a classically activated (M1) or an alternatively activated phenotype (M2). To investigate the effect of Salmonella enteric serovar typhimurium (S. typhimurium) on macrophage differentiation, we compared macrophage phenotypes after infection of murine bone marrow-derived macrophages with wild-type S. typhimurium and its isogenic rfc mutant. S. typhimurium C5 induced M1 macrophage polarization and enhanced inducible nitric oxide synthase expression by macrophages; this induction was dependent on Toll-like receptor 4. In contrast, the Δrfc mutant (S. typhimurium C5 rfc::Km(r)) lost this function and induced an M2 response in the macrophages. Here, we propose that S. typhimurium C5 is capable of polarizing macrophages towards the M1 phenotype and that this polarization is dependent on the O antigen encoded by rfc. Our finding indicates that M1 macrophage polarization induced by S. typhimurium may be related to the ability of this intracellular bacterium to survive and replicate within macrophages, which is essential for systemic disease.

  13. A conditionally lethal mutant of Salmonella Typhimurium induces a protective response in mice.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Alejandro A; Villagra, Nicolás A; Jerez, Sebastián A; Fuentes, Juan A; Mora, Guido C

    2016-02-01

    Here we present the design of a conditionally lethal mutant of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) which growth depends on tetracycline (Tet). Four mutants of S. Typhimurium, with Tet-conditional growth, were created by inserting the tetRA cassette. Three of the mutants presented a conditional-lethal phenotype in vitro. One mutant in the yabB gene remained conditional inside cells and did not persisted after 24 h in cell cultures. The capacity of S. Typhimurium yabB::tetRA to invade deep organs was investigated in intraperitoneally (IP) infected mice fed with or without chlortetracycline (CTet), a Tet analog with lower antibiotic activity. The yabB::tetRA mutant was undetectable in liver or spleen of animals under normal diet, while in mice under diet including CTet, yabB::tetRA invaded at a level comparable to the WT in mice under normal diet. Moreover, yabB::tetRA produced a strong humoral-immunoresponse after one IP immunization with 10(6) bacteria, measured as serum reactivity against S. Typhimurium whole cell extract. By contrast, oral immunization with 10(6) bacteria was weaker and variable on inducing antibodies. Consistently, IP infected mice were fully protected in a challenge with 10(4) oral S. Typhimurium, while protection was partial in orally immunized mice. Our data indicate that S. Typhimurium yabB::tetRA is a conditionally attenuated strain capable of inducing a protective response in mice in non-permissive conditions.

  14. Salmonella typhimurium infection increases p53 acetylation in intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shaoping; Ye, Zhongde; Liu, Xingyin; Zhao, Yun; Xia, Yinglin; Steiner, Andrew; Petrof, Elaine O; Claud, Erika C; Sun, Jun

    2010-05-01

    The ability of Salmonella typhimurium to enter intestinal epithelial cells constitutes a crucial step in pathogenesis. Salmonella invasion of the intestinal epithelium requires bacterial type three secretion system. Type three secretion system is a transport device that injects virulence proteins, called effectors, to paralyze or reprogram the eukaryotic cells. Avirulence factor for Salmonella (AvrA) is a Salmonella effector that inhibits the host's inflammatory responses. The mechanism by which AvrA modulates host cell signaling is not entirely clear. p53 is situated at the crossroads of a network of signaling pathways that are essential for genotoxic and nongenotoxic stress responses. We hypothesized that Salmonella infection activates the p53 pathway. We demonstrated that Salmonella infection increased p53 acetylation. Cells infected with AvrA-sufficient Salmonella have increased p53 acetylation, whereas cells infected with AvrA-deficient Salmonella have less p53 acetylation. In a cell-free system, AvrA possessed acetyltransferase activity and used p53 as a substrate. AvrA expression increased p53 transcriptional activity and induced cell cycle arrest. HCT116 p53-/- cells had less inflammatory responses. In a mouse model of Salmonella infection, intestinal epithelial p53 acetylation was increased by AvrA expression. Our studies provide novel mechanistic evidence that Salmonella modulates the p53 pathway during intestinal inflammation and infection.

  15. A murine model to study the antibacterial effect of copper on infectivity of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Sharan, Riti; Chhibber, Sanjay; Reed, Robert H

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of copper as an antibacterial agent on the infectivity of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. Mice were infected orally with a standardized dose of unstressed Salmonella Typhimurium and copper-stressed cells of Salmonella Typhimurium. Bacterial counts in ileum, blood, liver and spleen were observed up to 168 h under normal aerobic conditions. Serum sensitivity, phagocytosis, malondialdehyde levels and histopathology were studied for both set of animals. A decreased bacterial count in the organs with mild symptoms of infection and a complete recovery by 48 h was observed in mice infected with copper-stressed bacteria. Histopathological examination of ileum tissue demonstrated regeneration of damaged tissue post-infection with copper-stressed bacteria and no malondialdehyde levels were detected after 24 h in ileum, spleen and liver. Exposure to copper sensitized Salmonella Typhimurium to the lytic action of serum and intracellular killing by peritoneal macrophages. It can be concluded that copper stress confers a decrease in the infectivity of healthy Salmonella Typhimurium in normal mice. This study highlights the significance of use of copper as an antibacterial agent against Salmonella Typhimurium in reducing the risk of incidence of Salmonella infections from contaminated water.

  16. Evaluation of the respiratory route as a viable portal of entry for Salmonella in poultry via intratracheal challenge of Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Typhimurium1

    PubMed Central

    Kallapura, G.; Morgan, M. J.; Pumford, N. R.; Bielke, L. R.; Wolfenden, A. D.; Faulkner, O. B.; Latorre, J. D.; Menconi, A.; Hernandez-Velasco, X.; Kuttappan, V. A.; Hargis, B. M.; Tellez, G.

    2014-01-01

    Experimental and epidemiological evidence suggests that primary infection of Salmonella is by the oral-fecal route for poultry. However, the airborne transmission of Salmonella and similar enteric zoonotic pathogens has been historically neglected. Increasing evidence of Salmonella bioaerosol generation in production facilities and studies suggesting the vulnerabilities of the avian respiratory architecture together have indicated the possibility of the respiratory system being a potential portal of entry for Salmonella in poultry. Presently, we evaluated this hypothesis through intratracheal (IT) administration of Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Typhimurium, as separate challenges, in a total of 4 independent trials, followed by enumeration of cfu recovery in ceca-cecal tonsils and recovery incidence in liver and spleen. In all trials, both Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Typhimurium, challenged IT colonized cecae to a similar or greater extent than oral administration at identical challenge levels. In most trials, chickens cultured for cfu enumeration from IT-challenged chicks at same dose as orally challenged, resulted in an increase of 1.5 log higher Salmonella Enteritidis from ceca-cecal tonsils and a much lower dose IT of Salmonella Enteritidis could colonize ceca to the same extent than a higher oral challenge. This trend of increased cecal colonization due to IT challenge was observed with all trails involving week-old birds (experiment 2 and 3), which are widely considered to be more difficult to infect via the oral route. Liver-spleen incidence data showed 33% of liver and spleen samples to be positive for Salmonella Enteritidis administered IT (106 cfu/chick), compared with 0% when administered orally (experiment 2, trial 1). Collectively, these data suggest that the respiratory tract may be a largely overlooked portal of entry for Salmonella infections in chickens. PMID:24570455

  17. Tumour-targeted delivery of TRAIL using Salmonella typhimurium enhances breast cancer survival in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ganai, S; Arenas, R B; Forbes, N S

    2009-01-01

    Background: An effective cancer therapeutic must selectively target tumours with minimal systemic toxicity. Expression of a cytotoxic protein using Salmonella typhimurium would enable spatial and temporal control of delivery because these bacteria preferentially target tumours over normal tissue. Methods: We engineered non-pathogenic S. typhimurium to secrete murine TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) under the control of the prokaryotic radiation-inducible RecA promoter. The response of the RecA promoter to radiation was measured using fluorometry and immunoblotting. TRAIL toxicity was determined using flow cytometry and by measuring caspase-3 activation. A syngeneic murine tumour model was used to determine bacterial accumulation and the response to expressed TRAIL. Results: After irradiation, engineered S. typhimurium secreted TRAIL, which caused caspase-3-mediated apoptosis and death in 4T1 mammary carcinoma cells in culture. Systemic injection of Salmonella and induction of TRAIL expression using 2 Gy γ-irradiation caused a significant delay in mammary tumour growth and reduced the risk of death by 76% when compared with irradiated controls. Repeated dosing with TRAIL-bearing Salmonella in conjunction with radiation improved the 30-day survival from 0 to 100%. Conclusion: These results show the pre-clinical utility of S. typhimurium as a TRAIL expression vector that effectively reduces tumour growth and extends host survival. PMID:19861961

  18. Coptidis rhizome and Si Jun Zi Tang Can Prevent Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chiung-Hung; Yu, Bi; Su, Chiu-Hsian; Chen, Daniel S.; Hou, Yu-Chi; Chen, Yueh-Sheng; Hsu, Yuan-Man

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella, a common zoonotic pathogen, causes gastroenteritis in both humans and animals. Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) has been used to improve gastrointestinal dysfunction and to modify the immune response to inflammation for centuries. This study used six herbal plants and four TCM formulae to rate their efficacy in preventing S. Typhimurium infection via mouse model. Minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of Coptidis rhizome (CR) against the reference strain tallied 12.5 mg/ml and against clinical isolate ST21 was 25 mg/ml. MBCs of other herbal extracts and formulae on Salmonella Typhimurium strains were above 50 mg/ml. In the mice model, CR and Si Jun Zi Tang (SJZT) could significantly decrease the bacterial load in organs and blood after being challenged, along with body weight loss due to the infection. CR and SJZT alleviated infection-induced interferon-gamma levels in the serum and tissues, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) levels in intestinal tissues. CR and SJZT serum metabolites could suppress S. Typhimurium invasion and TNF-α expression in RAW264.7 cells. The therapeutic activity of CR and SJZT may involve berberine, ginsenoside Rb1, and glycyrrhizin, interfering with Salmonella when invading macrophages. CR and SJZT has shown potential in preventing S. Typhimurium infection through the regulation of the immune response. PMID:25133542

  19. Multiple clones within multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium phage type DT104. The Greek Nontyphoidal Salmonella Study Group.

    PubMed

    Markogiannakis, A; Tassios, P T; Lambiri, M; Ward, L R; Kourea-Kremastinou, J; Legakis, N J; Vatopoulos, A C

    2000-03-01

    Six distinct clones were present among Greek multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium phage type DT104, since isolates belonging to resistance phenotypes including the ACSSuT (ampicillin, chloramphenicol, streptomycin, sulfonamides, and tetracycline) core could be distinguished with respect to their pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns, int1 integron structures, and presence or absence of antibiotic resistance genes ant(3'')-Ia, pse-1, and tem-1.

  20. Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Exploits Inflammation to Modify Swine Intestinal Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Drumo, Rosanna; Pesciaroli, Michele; Ruggeri, Jessica; Tarantino, Michela; Chirullo, Barbara; Pistoia, Claudia; Petrucci, Paola; Martinelli, Nicola; Moscati, Livia; Manuali, Elisabetta; Pavone, Silvia; Picciolini, Matteo; Ammendola, Serena; Gabai, Gianfranco; Battistoni, Andrea; Pezzotti, Giovanni; Alborali, Giovanni L.; Napolioni, Valerio; Pasquali, Paolo; Magistrali, Chiara F.

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is an important zoonotic gastrointestinal pathogen responsible for foodborne disease worldwide. It is a successful enteric pathogen because it has developed virulence strategies allowing it to survive in a highly inflamed intestinal environment exploiting inflammation to overcome colonization resistance provided by intestinal microbiota. In this study, we used piglets featuring an intact microbiota, which naturally develop gastroenteritis, as model for salmonellosis. We compared the effects on the intestinal microbiota induced by a wild type and an attenuated S. Typhimurium in order to evaluate whether the modifications are correlated with the virulence of the strain. This study showed that Salmonella alters microbiota in a virulence-dependent manner. We found that the wild type S. Typhimurium induced inflammation and a reduction of specific protecting microbiota species (SCFA-producing bacteria) normally involved in providing a barrier against pathogens. Both these effects could contribute to impair colonization resistance, increasing the host susceptibility to wild type S. Typhimurium colonization. In contrast, the attenuated S. Typhimurium, which is characterized by a reduced ability to colonize the intestine, and by a very mild inflammatory response, was unable to successfully sustain competition with the microbiota. PMID:26835435

  1. Salmonella typhimurium infection triggers dendritic cells and macrophages to adopt distinct migration patterns in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chunfang; Wood, Michael W; Galyov, Edouard E; Höpken, Uta E; Lipp, Martin; Bodmer, Helen C; Tough, David F; Carter, Robert W

    2006-11-01

    The presence of an anti-bacterial T cell response and evidence of bacterial products in inflamed joints of reactive arthritis patients suggests an antigen transportation role in this disease for macrophages and dendritic cells. We have investigated the functional properties and in vivo migration of macrophages and DC after infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. typhimurium). BM-derived macrophages and DC displayed enhanced expression of costimulatory molecules (CD40 and CD86) and increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-alpha, IL-6 and IL-12p40) and nitric oxide after infection. Upon adoptive transfer into mice, infected DC migrated to lymphoid tissues and induced an anti-Salmonella T cell response, whereas infected macrophages did not. Infection of DC with S. typhimurium was associated with strong up-regulation of the chemokine receptor CCR7 and acquisition of responsiveness to chemokines acting through this receptor. Moreover, S. typhimurium-infected CCR7-deficient DC were unable to migrate to lymph nodes after adoptive transfer, although they did reach the spleen. Our data demonstrate distinct roles for macrophages and DC as antigen transporters after S. typhimurium infection and a dependence on CCR7 for migration of DC to lymph nodes after bacterial infection. PMID:17048271

  2. The porin OmpC of Salmonella typhimurium mediates adherence to macrophages.

    PubMed

    Negm, R S; Pistole, T G

    1999-08-01

    Macrophages recognize, adhere to, and phagocytose Salmonella typhimurium. The major outer membrane protein OmpC is a candidate ligand for macrophage recognition. To confirm this we used transposon mutagenesis to develop an ompC-deficient mutant in a known virulent strain of S. typhimurium; mutant and wild type were compared in macrophage adherence and association assays. Radiolabeled wild type S. typhimurium bound to macrophages at five-fold higher levels than did the ompC mutant. In association assays, macrophages in monolayers bound and internalized three-fold more wild type than mutant, while macrophages in suspension bound and internalized 40-fold more wild type than mutant. The ompC gene of our test strain of S. typhimurium contains several discrete differences compared with the ompC genes of Salmonella typhi and Escherichia coli. The deduced OmpC amino acid sequence of S. typhimurium shares 77 and 98% identity with OmpC amino acid sequence of E. coli and S. typhi, respectively. Evidence from this study supports a role for the OmpC protein in initial recognition by macrophages and distinguishes regions of this protein that potentially participate in host-cell recognition of bacteria by phagocytic cells.

  3. Peptidase N encoded by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium modulates systemic infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Patil, Veerupaxagouda; Kumar, Anujith; Kuruppath, Sanjana; Nandi, Dipankar

    2007-11-01

    The cytosolic protein degradation pathway, involving ATP-dependent proteases and ATP-independent peptidases, is important for modulating several cellular responses. The involvement of pathogen-encoded ATP-dependent proteases is well established during infection. However, the roles of ATP-independent peptidases in this process are not well studied. The functional role of Peptidase N (PepN), an ATP-independent enzyme belonging to the M1 family, during systemic infection of mice by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (Salmonella typhimurium) was investigated. In a systemic model of infection, the number of CFU of S. typhimurium containing a targeted deletion in peptidase N (DeltapepN), compared with wild type, was significantly higher in the lymph node and spleen. In addition, S. typhimurium replicated in the thymus and greatly reduced the number of immature CD4(+)CD8(+) thymocytes in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Strains lacking or overexpressing pepN were used to show that the reduction in the number of thymocytes, but not lymph node cells, depends on a critical number of CFU. These findings establish a role for PepN in reducing the in vivo CFU of S. typhimurium during systemic infection. The implications of these results, in the context of the roles of proteases and peptidases, during host-pathogen interactions are discussed.

  4. A community effort towards a knowledge-base and mathematical model of the human pathogen Salmonella Typhimurium LT2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Metabolic reconstructions (MRs) are common denominators in systems biology and represent biochemical, genetic, and genomic (BiGG) knowledge-bases for target organisms by capturing currently available information in a consistent, structured manner. Salmonella enterica subspecies I serovar Typhimurium...

  5. Isolation of glutamate-inserting ochre suppressor mutants of Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Prival, M J

    1996-01-01

    Glutamate-inserting ochre suppressors have been identified among late-arising, spontaneous revertants of a hisG428 mutant of Salmonella typhimurium and an argE3 mutant of Escherichia coli. The S. typhimurium suppressors mapped in the tRNA2(Glu) gene gltU at 82 min; those in E. coli were found to be in tRNA2(Glu) genes gltW at 56 min, gltU at 85 min, and gltT at 90 min. PMID:8631694

  6. Complete genome sequence of Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium bacteriophage SPN1S.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hakdong; Lee, Ju-Hoon; Lim, Jeong-A; Kim, Hyeryen; Ryu, Sangryeol

    2012-01-01

    To understand the interaction between the host of pathogenic Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and its bacteriophage, we isolated the bacteriophage SPN1S. It is a lysogenic phage in the Podoviridae family and uses the O-antigen of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) as a host receptor. Comparative genomic analysis of phage SPN1S and the S. enterica serovar Anatum-specific phage ε15 revealed different host specificities, probably due to the low homology of host specificity-related genes. Here we report the complete circular genome sequence of S. Typhimurium-specific bacteriophage SPN1S and show the results of our analysis. PMID:22205721

  7. Rapid detection of Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium by surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Lan; Zhang, Ping; Zheng, Da-wei; Wang, Yang-jun-qi; Zhong, Ru-gang

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is used as an analytical tool for the detection and identification of pathogenic bacteria of Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Salmonella typhimurium (S. typhimurium). Compared with normal Raman signal, the intensity of SERS signal is greatly enhanced. After processing all SERS data, the obvious differences between the SERS spectra of two species are determined. And applying the chemometric tools of principal component analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis (PCA-HCA), the SERS spectra of two species are distinguished more accurately. The results indicate that SERS analysis can provide a rapid and sensitive method for the detection of pathogenic bacteria.

  8. Draft Genome Sequences of 40 Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Strains Isolated from Humans and Food in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Fernanda; Medeiros, Marta Inês Cazentini; Rodrigues, Dália Prazeres; Payne, Justin; Timme, Ruth E.

    2016-01-01

    Salmonellosis is an important health problem worldwide and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is one of the most common isolated serovars. Here, we reported the draft genomes of 40 S. Typhimurium strains isolated from humans and food in Brazil. These draft genomes will improve phylogenetic analysis and will help enhance our understanding of strains of this serovar isolated in Brazil. PMID:27660768

  9. Draft Genome Sequences of 40 Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Strains Isolated from Humans and Food in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Fernanda; Medeiros, Marta Inês Cazentini; Rodrigues, Dália Prazeres; Payne, Justin; Timme, Ruth E; Allard, Marc W; Falcão, Juliana Pfrimer

    2016-01-01

    Salmonellosis is an important health problem worldwide and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is one of the most common isolated serovars. Here, we reported the draft genomes of 40 S Typhimurium strains isolated from humans and food in Brazil. These draft genomes will improve phylogenetic analysis and will help enhance our understanding of strains of this serovar isolated in Brazil. PMID:27660768

  10. Refined live attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Enteritidis vaccines mediate homologous and heterologous serogroup protection in mice.

    PubMed

    Tennant, Sharon M; Schmidlein, Patrick; Simon, Raphael; Pasetti, Marcela F; Galen, James E; Levine, Myron M

    2015-12-01

    Invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) infections constitute a major health problem among infants and toddlers in sub-Saharan Africa; these infections also occur in infants and the elderly in developed countries. We genetically engineered a Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain of multilocus sequence type 313, the predominant genotype circulating in sub-Saharan Africa. We evaluated the capacities of S. Typhimurium and Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis ΔguaBA ΔclpX live oral vaccines to protect mice against a highly lethal challenge dose of the homologous serovar and determined protection against other group B and D serovars circulating in sub-Saharan Africa. The vaccines S. Typhimurium CVD 1931 and S. Enteritidis CVD 1944 were immunogenic and protected BALB/c mice against 10,000 50% lethal doses (LD50) of S. Typhimurium or S. Enteritidis, respectively. S. Typhimurium CVD 1931 protected mice against the group B serovar Salmonella enterica serovar Stanleyville (91% vaccine efficacy), and S. Enteritidis CVD 1944 protected mice against the group D serovar Salmonella enterica serovar Dublin (85% vaccine efficacy). High rates of survival were observed when mice were infected 12 weeks postimmunization, indicating that the vaccines elicited long-lived protective immunity. Whereas CVD 1931 did not protect against S. Enteritidis R11, CVD 1944 did mediate protection against S. Typhimurium D65 (81% efficacy). These findings suggest that a bivalent (S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis) vaccine would provide broad protection against the majority of invasive NTS infections in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:26351285

  11. Refined live attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Enteritidis vaccines mediate homologous and heterologous serogroup protection in mice.

    PubMed

    Tennant, Sharon M; Schmidlein, Patrick; Simon, Raphael; Pasetti, Marcela F; Galen, James E; Levine, Myron M

    2015-12-01

    Invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) infections constitute a major health problem among infants and toddlers in sub-Saharan Africa; these infections also occur in infants and the elderly in developed countries. We genetically engineered a Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain of multilocus sequence type 313, the predominant genotype circulating in sub-Saharan Africa. We evaluated the capacities of S. Typhimurium and Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis ΔguaBA ΔclpX live oral vaccines to protect mice against a highly lethal challenge dose of the homologous serovar and determined protection against other group B and D serovars circulating in sub-Saharan Africa. The vaccines S. Typhimurium CVD 1931 and S. Enteritidis CVD 1944 were immunogenic and protected BALB/c mice against 10,000 50% lethal doses (LD50) of S. Typhimurium or S. Enteritidis, respectively. S. Typhimurium CVD 1931 protected mice against the group B serovar Salmonella enterica serovar Stanleyville (91% vaccine efficacy), and S. Enteritidis CVD 1944 protected mice against the group D serovar Salmonella enterica serovar Dublin (85% vaccine efficacy). High rates of survival were observed when mice were infected 12 weeks postimmunization, indicating that the vaccines elicited long-lived protective immunity. Whereas CVD 1931 did not protect against S. Enteritidis R11, CVD 1944 did mediate protection against S. Typhimurium D65 (81% efficacy). These findings suggest that a bivalent (S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis) vaccine would provide broad protection against the majority of invasive NTS infections in sub-Saharan Africa.

  12. Multistate outbreak of human Salmonella typhimurium infections associated with aquatic frogs - United States, 2009.

    PubMed

    2010-01-01

    During April-July 2009, the Utah Department of Health identified five cases of Salmonella Typhimurium infection with indistinguishable pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns, predominantly among children. In August, CDC began a multistate outbreak investigation to determine the source of the infections. This report summarizes the results of this ongoing investigation, which, as of December 30, had identified 85 S. Typhimurium human isolates with the outbreak strain from 31 states. In a multistate case-control study, exposure to frogs was found to be significantly associated with illness (63% of cases versus 3% of controls; matched odds ratio [mOR] = 24.4). Among 14 case-patients who knew the type of frog, all had exposure to an exclusively aquatic frog species, the African dwarf frog. Environmental samples from aquariums containing aquatic frogs in four homes of case-patients yielded S. Typhimurium isolates matching the outbreak strain. Preliminary traceback information has indicated these frogs likely came from the same breeder in California. Reptiles (e.g., turtles) and amphibians (e.g., frogs) have long been recognized as Salmonella carriers, and three multistate outbreaks of human Salmonella infections associated with turtle contact have occurred since 2006. However, this is the first reported multistate outbreak of Salmonella infections associated with amphibians. Educational materials aimed at preventing salmonellosis from contact with reptiles should be expanded to include amphibians, such as aquatic frogs.

  13. Receptor Diversity and Host Interaction of Bacteriophages Infecting Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyeryen; Choi, Younho; Heu, Sunggi; Ryu, Sangryeol

    2012-01-01

    Background Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Typhimurium is a Gram-negative pathogen causing salmonellosis. Salmonella Typhimurium-targeting bacteriophages have been proposed as an alternative biocontrol agent to antibiotics. To further understand infection and interaction mechanisms between the host strains and the bacteriophages, the receptor diversity of these phages needs to be elucidated. Methodology/Principal Findings Twenty-five Salmonella phages were isolated and their receptors were identified by screening a Tn5 random mutant library of S. Typhimurium SL1344. Among them, three types of receptors were identified flagella (11 phages), vitamin B12 uptake outer membrane protein, BtuB (7 phages) and lipopolysaccharide-related O-antigen (7 phages). TEM observation revealed that the phages using flagella (group F) or BtuB (group B) as a receptor belong to Siphoviridae family, and the phages using O-antigen of LPS as a receptor (group L) belong to Podoviridae family. Interestingly, while some of group F phages (F-I) target FliC host receptor, others (F-II) target both FliC and FljB receptors, suggesting that two subgroups are present in group F phages. Cross-resistance assay of group B and L revealed that group L phages could not infect group B phage-resistant strains and reversely group B phages could not infect group L SPN9TCW-resistant strain. Conclusions/Significance In this report, three receptor groups of 25 newly isolated S. Typhimurium-targeting phages were determined. Among them, two subgroups of group F phages interact with their host receptors in different manner. In addition, the host receptors of group B or group L SPN9TCW phages hinder other group phage infection, probably due to interaction between receptors of their groups. This study provides novel insights into phage-host receptor interaction for Salmonella phages and will inform development of optimal phage therapy for protection against Salmonella. PMID:22927964

  14. Quantitative evaluation of E. coli F4 and Salmonella Typhimurium binding capacity of yeast derivatives

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The target of the present study was to quantify the capacity of different commercially available yeast derivatives to bind E. coli F4 and Salmonella Typhimurium. In addition, a correlation analysis was performed for the obtained binding numbers and the mannan-, glucan- and protein contents of the products, respectively. In a subsequent experiment, different yeast strains were fermented and treated by autolysis or French press to obtain a concentrated yeast cell wall. The capacity of yeast cell wall products to bind E. coli F4 and Salmonella Typhimurium was assessed with a quantitative microbiological microplate-based assay by measuring the optical density (OD) as the growth parameter of adhering bacteria. Total mannan and glucan were determined by HPLC using an isocratic method and a Refractive Index (RI) Detector. Total protein was determined by Total Kjeldahl Nitrogen (TKN). Statistical analyses were performed with IBM SPSS V19 using Spearman correlation and Mann Whitney U Test. Different yeast derivatives show different binding numbers, which indicate differences in product quality. Interestingly, the binding numbers for Salmonella Typhimurium are consistently higher (between one and two orders of magnitude) than for E. coli F4. We could demonstrate some statistical significant correlations between the mannan- and glucan content of different yeast derivatives and pathogen binding numbers; however, for the different yeast strains fermented under standardized laboratory conditions, no statistically significant correlations between the mannan- and glucan content and the binding numbers for E. coli and Salmonella Typhimurium were found. Interestingly, we could demonstrate that the yeast autolysis had a statistically significant difference on E. coli binding in contrast to the French press treatment. Salmonella binding was independent of these two treatments. As such, we could not give a clear statement about the binding factors involved. We propose that many more

  15. Study of the role of the htrB gene in Salmonella typhimurium virulence.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, B D; Nichols, W A; Gibson, B W; Sunshine, M G; Apicella, M A

    1997-01-01

    We have undertaken a study to investigate the contribution of the htrB gene to the virulence of pathogenic Salmonella typhimurium. An htrB::mini-Tn10 mutation from Escherichia coli was transferred by transduction to the mouse-virulent strain S. typhimurium SL1344 to create an htrB mutant. The S. typhimurium htrB mutant was inoculated into mice and found to be severely limited in its ability to colonize organs of the lymphatic system and to cause systemic disease in mice. A variety of experiments were performed to determine the possible reasons for this loss of virulence. Serum killing assays revealed that the S. typhimurium htrB mutant was as resistant to killing by complement as the wild-type strain. However, macrophage survival assays revealed that the S. typhimurium htrB mutant was more sensitive to the intracellular environment of murine macrophages than the wild-type strain. In addition, the bioactivity of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of the htrB mutant was reduced compared to that of the LPS from the parent strain as measured by both a Limulus amoebocyte lysate endotoxin quantitation assay and a tumor necrosis factor alpha bioassay. These results indicate that the htrB gene plays a role in the virulence of S. typhimurium. PMID:9353064

  16. The elimination of Salmonella typhimurium in sewage sludge by aerobic mesophilic stabilization and lime hydrated stabilization.

    PubMed

    Plachá, Iveta; Venglovský, Ján; Maková, Zuzana; Martinéz, José

    2008-07-01

    This study observed the effects of two methods, aerobic mesophilic stabilization and lime hydrated stabilization of sewage sludge upon the survival of Salmonella typhimurium. Raw (primary) sludges from the mechanical biological municipal sewage treatment plant were used. Aerobic stabilization and lime hydrated stabilization were carried out in a laboratory fermentor. Aerobic stabilization was carried out in the mesophilic temperature range (from 25.70+/-0.40 to 37.82+/-1.38 degrees C). Lime hydrated was used at an amount of 10 kg/m(3) for the stabilization. Sludge samples were inoculated with a broth culture of S. typhimurium. Quantitative and qualitative examinations of the presence of S. typhimurium were carried out. Aerobic mesophilic stabilization caused elimination S. typhimurium within 48 h. The T(90) value of S. typhimurium was 6.66+/-0.20 h. During the lime hydrated stabilization pH values significantly increased from 5.66+/-0.07 to 12.12+/-0.02 (P<0.01). S. typhimurium was inactivated within 1h and the T(90) value was 0.19+/-0.01 h. Our study confirmed that the treatment of sewage sludge with lime hydrated was significantly more effective than the aerobic mesophilic stabilization, (P<0.01). PMID:17931859

  17. Macrophages recognize and adhere to an OmpD-like protein of Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Negm, R S; Pistole, T G

    1998-03-01

    Murine peritoneal macrophages bind to Salmonella typhimurium in vitro in the absence of exogenous opsonins. We have identified an outer membrane protein of S. typhimurium that mediates this adhesion. Biotin-labeled macrophages were used to probe electroblotted envelope proteins of S. typhimurium that had been previously resolved by polyacrylamide electrophoresis under denaturing and reducing conditions. Macrophages bound to an outer membrane protein with an apparent molecular mass of 44 kDa. The protein was purified to homogeneity and free of detectable lipopolysaccharide. Limited microsequencing of this protein resulted in a 15-amino acid query sequence of A-E-V-Y-N-K-D-G-N-K-L-D-L-Y-G, which shares complete identity with a 15-mer of both the OmpD of S. typhimurium SH 7454 and the OmpC polypeptide of Escherichia coli K-12. Picomolar concentrations of this purified protein significantly inhibited the subsequent adherence of 35S-labeled S. typhimurium to macrophages in monolayers. We propose that this 44-kDa protein is involved in the recognition of S. typhimurium by macrophage during the initial stages of infection.

  18. Halogenation and proteolysis of complement component C3 on Salmonella typhimurium during phagocytosis by human neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Joiner, K.A.; Schweinle, J.E.

    1989-05-01

    We examined the fate of C component C3 on the surface of Salmonella typhimurium during ingestion by human neutrophils. Initial experiments showed that C3 fragments and C3-acceptor complexes were the major serum ligands which were surface iodinated by canine myeloperoxidase on serum-incubated rough and smooth isolates of S. typhimurium. In contrast, labeled C3 was not identified when the same organisms were ingested by neutrophils in the presence of 125I-Na, a situation previously shown to iodinate particulate targets via the neutrophil myeloperoxidase-halide-H2O2 system. Pretreatment of neutrophils before phagocytosis with the lipid-soluble protease inhibitor diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP), but not with other protease inhibitors (p-nitrophenylguanidinobenzoate, leupeptin, pepstatin), substantially blocked proteolysis of 125I-C3 on S. typhimurium strain RG108 during ingestion by neutrophils. Purification of neutrophil phagosomes containing S. typhimurium-bearing 125I-C3 showed that DFP but no other protease inhibitors blocked proteolysis of 125I-C3 within phagosomes. Iodinated C3-acceptor complexes were identified by immunoprecipitation from the detergent-insoluble fraction of phagosomes prepared from DFP-treated cells ingesting S. typhimurium in the presence of 125I-Na. These results show that C3 fragments on the surface of S. typhimurium are the major serum ligands which are halogenated and degraded by proteolysis during phagocytosis by human neutrophils, and suggest that the majority of proteolysis on the ingested target occurs within the neutrophil phagosome.

  19. Bioprobes Based on Aptamer and Silica Fluorescent Nanoparticles for Bacteria Salmonella typhimurium Detection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiu-Yue; Kang, Yan-Jun

    2016-12-01

    In this study, we have developed an efficient method based on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) aptamers along with silica fluorescence nanoparticles for bacteria Salmonella typhimurium detection. Carboxyl-modified Tris(2,2'-bipyridyl)dichlororuthenium(II) hexahydrate (RuBPY)-doped silica nanoparticles (COOH-FSiNPs) were prepared using reverse microemulsion method, and the streptavidin was conjugated to the surface of the prepared COOH-FSiNPs. The bacteria S. typhimurium was incubated with a specific ssDNA biotin-labeled aptamer, and then the aptamer-bacteria conjugates were treated with the synthetic streptavidin-conjugated silica fluorescence nanoprobes (SA-FSiNPs). The results under fluorescence microscopy show that SA-FSiNPs can be applied effectively for the labeling of bacteria S. typhimurium with great photostable property. To further verify the specificity of SA-FSiNPs out of multiple bacterial conditions, variant concentrations of bacteria mixtures composed of bacteria S. typhimurium, Escherichia coli, and Bacillus subtilis were treated with SA-FSiNPs.In addition, the feasibility of SA-FSiNPs for bacteria S. typhimurium detection in chicken samples was assessed. All the results display that the established aptamer-based nanoprobes exhibit the superiority for bacteria S. typhimurium detection, which is referentially significant for wider application prospects in pathogen detection.

  20. The anti-infective activity of punicalagin against Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar typhimurium in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Guanghui; Feng, Yuqing; Xu, Yunfeng; Wu, Qian; Han, Qi'an; Liang, Xiujun; Yang, Baowei; Wang, Xin; Xia, Xiaodong

    2015-07-01

    Punicalagin, a major bioactive component of pomegranate peel, has been proven to have antioxidant, antiviral, anti-apoptosis, and hepatoprotective properties. The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-infective activity of punicalagin in a mouse model. C57BL/6 mice were initially challenged with Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar typhimurium (S. typhimurium) and then treated with punicalagin. Food and water consumption and body weight were recorded daily. On day 8 post infection, the mice were sacrificed to examine pathogen counts in tissues, hematological parameters, cytokine levels, and histological changes. Compared to mice only infected with S. typhimurium, punicalagin-treated mice had more food consumption and less weight loss. A higher survival rate and lower counts of viable S. typhimurium in feces, liver, spleen, and kidney were found in the punicalagin-treated mice. The enzyme linked immunosorbent assay showed that the levels of IL-6, IL-10, and IFN-γ in serum and the spleen and TNF-α in serum, the spleen and the liver were reduced by punicalagin. Moreover, more neutrophils and higher neutrophil-to-mononuclear cell ratios in the punicalagin-treated mice were observed. Histological examination showed that punicalagin protected cells in the liver and spleen from hemorrhagic necrosis. It is concluded that punicalagin has a beneficial effect against S. typhimurium infection in mice. The anti-infective properties, together with other nutritionally beneficial effects, make punicalagin a promising supplement in human food or animal feeds to prevent disease associated with S. typhimurium.

  1. Genomic Variability of Serial Human Isolates of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Associated with Prolonged Carriage.

    PubMed

    Octavia, Sophie; Wang, Qinning; Tanaka, Mark M; Sintchenko, Vitali; Lan, Ruiting

    2015-11-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is an important foodborne human pathogen that often causes self-limiting but severe gastroenteritis. Prolonged excretion of S. Typhimurium after the infection can lead to secondary transmissions. However, little is known about within-host genomic variation in bacteria associated with asymptomatic shedding. Genomes of 35 longitudinal isolates of S. Typhimurium recovered from 11 patients (children and adults) with culture-confirmed gastroenteritis were sequenced. There were three or four isolates obtained from each patient. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were analyzed in these isolates, which were recovered between 1 and 279 days after the initial diagnosis. Limited genomic variation (5 SNPs or fewer) was associated with short- and long-term carriage of S. Typhimurium. None of the isolates was shown to be due to reinfection. SNPs occurred randomly, and the majority of the SNPs were nonsynonymous. Two nonsense mutations were observed. A nonsense mutation in flhC rendered the isolate nonmotile, whereas the significance of a nonsense mutation in yihV is unknown. The estimated mutation rate is 1.49 × 10(-6) substitution per site per year. S. Typhimurium isolates excreted in stools following acute gastroenteritis in children and adults demonstrated limited genomic variability over time, regardless of the duration of carriage. These findings have important implications for the detection of possible transmission events suspected by public health genomic surveillance of S. Typhimurium infections.

  2. Microgravity as a novel environmental signal affecting Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium virulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nickerson, C. A.; Ott, C. M.; Mister, S. J.; Morrow, B. J.; Burns-Keliher, L.; Pierson, D. L.

    2000-01-01

    The effects of spaceflight on the infectious disease process have only been studied at the level of the host immune response and indicate a blunting of the immune mechanism in humans and animals. Accordingly, it is necessary to assess potential changes in microbial virulence associated with spaceflight which may impact the probability of in-flight infectious disease. In this study, we investigated the effect of altered gravitational vectors on Salmonella virulence in mice. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium grown under modeled microgravity (MMG) were more virulent and were recovered in higher numbers from the murine spleen and liver following oral infection compared to organisms grown under normal gravity. Furthermore, MMG-grown salmonellae were more resistant to acid stress and macrophage killing and exhibited significant differences in protein synthesis than did normal-gravity-grown cells. Our results indicate that the environment created by simulated microgravity represents a novel environmental regulatory factor of Salmonella virulence.

  3. Isolation and immunological characterization of a 55-kilodalton surface protein from Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Foulaki, K; Gruber, W; Schlecht, S

    1989-01-01

    Surface proteins of different Salmonella R mutants were labeled selectively by treating live bacteria with cycloheptaamylose-dansylchloride. The labeled proteins were extracted from the cells with 6 M urea and analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. From the urea extract a 55-kilodalton protein common to numerous Salmonella strains could be isolated by ion-exchange chromatography and gel filtration free of lipopolysaccharide. Immunization of rabbits with isolated protein led to the formation of specific antibodies. Such antiprotein antisera could be employed in Western blots for the specific identification of the 55-kilodalton protein in bacterial extracts containing mixtures of different Salmonella proteins. The importance of this antigen is emphasized by antisera against acetone-killed Salmonella bacteria, showing a preferential interaction with the 55-kilodalton protein in Western blots. Active immunization of mice with the 55-kilodalton protein afforded significant protection against experimental infection with S. typhimurium. Images PMID:2651306

  4. TTSS2-deficient hha mutant of Salmonella Typhimurium exhibits significant systemic attenuation in immunocompromised hosts

    PubMed Central

    Vishwakarma, Vikalp; Pati, Niladri Bhusan; Ray, Shilpa; Das, Susmita; Suar, Mrutyunjay

    2014-01-01

    Non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) infections are emerging as leading problem worldwide and the variations in host immune status append to the concern of NTS. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is one of the causative agents of NTS infections and has been extensively studied. The inactivation of Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI2) encoded type-III secretion system 2 (TTSS2) has been reported rendering the strain incapable for systemic dissemination to host sites and has also been proposed as live-attenuated vaccine. However, infections from TTSS2-deficient Salmonella have also been reported. In this study, mutant strain MT15 was developed by inactivation of the hemolysin expression modulating protein (hha) in TTSS2-deficient S. Typhimurium background. The MT15 strain showed significant level of attenuation in immune-deprived murine colitis model when tested in iNos−/−, IL10−/−, and CD40L−/− mice groups in C57BL/6 background. Further, the mutation in hha does not implicate any defect in bacterial colonization to the host gut. The long-term infection of developed mutant strain conferred protective immune responses to suitably immunized streptomycin pre-treated C57BL/6 mice. The immunization enhanced the CD4+ and CD8+ cell types involved in bacterial clearance. The serum IgG and luminal secretory IgA (sIgA) was also found to be elevated after the due course of infection. Additionally, the immunized C57BL/6 mice were protected from the subsequent lethal infection of Salmonella Typhimurium. Collectively, these findings implicate the involvement of hemolysin expression modulating protein (Hha) in establishment of bacterial infection. In light of the observed attenuation of the developed mutant strain, this study proposes the possible significance of SPI2-deficient hha mutant as an alternative live-attenuated vaccine strain for use against lethal Salmonella infections. PMID:24401482

  5. DNA topology and adaptation of Salmonella typhimurium to an intracellular environment.

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, D G; Bowe, F; Hale, C; Dougan, G; Dorman, C J

    2000-01-01

    The expression of genes coding for determinants of DNA topology in the facultative intracellular pathogen Salmonella typhimurium was studied during adaptation by the bacteria to the intracellular environment of J774A.1 macrophage-like cells. A reporter plasmid was used to monitor changes in DNA supercoiling during intracellular growth. Induction of the dps and spv genes, previously shown to be induced in the macrophage, was detected, as was expression of genes coding for DNA gyrase, integration host factor and the nucleoid-associated protein H-NS. The topA gene, coding for the DNA relaxing enzyme topoisomerase I, was not induced. Reporter plasmid data showed that bacterial DNA became relaxed following uptake of S. typhimurium cells by the macrophage. These data indicate that DNA topology in S. typhimurium undergoes significant changes during adaptation to the intracellular environment. A model describing how this process may operate is discussed. PMID:10874730

  6. Molecular evolution of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and pathogenic Escherichia coli: from pathogenesis to therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Lavigne, Jean-Philippe; Blanc-Potard, Anne-Béatrice

    2008-03-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) and certain Escherichia coli are human pathogens that have evolved through the acquisition of multiple virulence determinants by horizontal gene transfer. Similar genetic elements, as pathogenicity islands and virulence plasmids, have driven molecular evolution of virulence in both species. In addition, the contribution of prophages has been recently highlighted as a reservoir for pathogenic diversity. Characterization of horizontally acquired virulence genes has several clinical implications. First, identification of virulence determinants that have a sporadic distribution and are specifically associated with a pathotype and/or a pathology can be useful markers for risk assessment and diagnosis. Secondly, virulence factors widely distributed in pathogenic strains, but absent from non-pathogenic bacteria, are interesting targets for the development of novel antimicrobial chemotherapies and vaccines. Here, we summarize the horizontally acquired virulence factors of S. Typhimurium, enterohemorrhagic E. coli O157:H7 and uropathogenic E. coli, and we describe their use in novel therapeutic approaches.

  7. Lipocalin-2 ensures host defense against Salmonella Typhimurium by controlling macrophage iron homeostasis and immune response

    PubMed Central

    Nairz, Manfred; Schroll, Andrea; Haschka, David; Dichtl, Stefanie; Sonnweber, Thomas; Theurl, Igor; Theurl, Milan; Lindner, Ewald; Demetz, Egon; Aβhoff, Malte; Bellmann-Weiler, Rosa; Müller, Raphael; Gerner, Romana R.; Moschen, Alexander R.; Baumgartner, Nadja; Moser, Patrizia L.; Talasz, Heribert; Tilg, Herbert; Fang, Ferric C.; Weiss, Günter

    2015-01-01

    Lipocalin-2 (Lcn2) is an innate immune peptide with pleiotropic effects. Lcn2 binds iron-laden bacterial siderophores, chemo-attracts neutrophils and has immunomodulatory and apoptosis-regulating effects. In this study we show that upon infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, Lcn2 promotes iron export from Salmonella-infected macrophages, which reduces cellular iron content and enhances the generation of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Lcn2 represses IL-10 production while augmenting Nos2, TNF-α and IL-6 expression. Lcn2-/- macrophages have elevated IL-10 levels as a consequence of increased iron content. The crucial role of Lcn-2/IL-10 interactions was further demonstrated by the greater ability of Lcn2-/- IL-10-/- macrophages and mice to control intracellular Salmonella proliferation in comparison to Lcn2-/- counterparts. Over-expression of the iron exporter ferroportin-1 in Lcn2-/- macrophages represses IL-10 and restores TNF-α and IL-6 production to the levels found in wild-type macrophages, so that killing and clearance of intracellular Salmonella is promoted. Our observations suggest that Lcn2 promotes host resistance to Salmonella Typhimurium infection by binding bacterial siderophores and suppressing IL-10 production, and that both functions are linked to its ability to shuttle iron from macrophages. PMID:26332507

  8. Identification of virulence properties in Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 using Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Surasri N; Anriany, Yuda; Grim, Christopher J; Kim, Sungji; Chang, Zenas; Joseph, Sam W; Cinar, Hediye N

    2013-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serover Typhimurium definitive phage type DT104, resistant to multiple antibiotics, is one of the most widespread Salmonella species in human infection worldwide. Although several cohort studies indicate that DT104 carrying the multidrug resistance (MDR) locus on salmonella genomic island 1 is a possible hyper-virulent strain compared to DT104 strains without MDR, or other Salmonella enterica serotypes, existing experimental evidence regarding virulence properties associated with the MDR region is controversial. To address this question, we constructed an isogenic MDR deletion (∆MDR) mutant strain of DT104, SNS12, by allelic exchange and used Caenorhabditis elegans as a host model to assess differences in virulence between these two strains. SNS12 exhibited decreased virulence in C. elegans, and we observed increased colonization and proliferation of the intestine of C. elegans by DT104. The immune response against MDR-carrying DT104 appears to function through a non-canonical Unfolded Protein Response (UPR) pathway, namely prion-like-(QN-rich)-domain-bearing protein pathway (PQN), in a ced-1 dependent manner in C. elegans. Further, we also demonstrate that genes of the PQN pathway and antimicrobial peptide gene abf-2, are expressed at higher transcriptional levels in worms immediately following exposure to DT104, in comparison with worms exposed to SNS12. Altogether, our results suggest that the MDR region of Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 has a direct role in virulence against Caenorhabditis elegans.

  9. Microevolution of Monophasic Salmonella Typhimurium during Epidemic, United Kingdom, 2005-2010.

    PubMed

    Petrovska, Liljana; Mather, Alison E; AbuOun, Manal; Branchu, Priscilla; Harris, Simon R; Connor, Thomas; Hopkins, K L; Underwood, A; Lettini, Antonia A; Page, Andrew; Bagnall, Mary; Wain, John; Parkhill, Julian; Dougan, Gordon; Davies, Robert; Kingsley, Robert A

    2016-04-01

    Microevolution associated with emergence and expansion of new epidemic clones of bacterial pathogens holds the key to epidemiologic success. To determine microevolution associated with monophasic Salmonella Typhimurium during an epidemic, we performed comparative whole-genome sequencing and phylogenomic analysis of isolates from the United Kingdom and Italy during 2005-2012. These isolates formed a single clade distinct from recent monophasic epidemic clones previously described from North America and Spain. The UK monophasic epidemic clones showed a novel genomic island encoding resistance to heavy metals and a composite transposon encoding antimicrobial drug resistance genes not present in other Salmonella Typhimurium isolates, which may have contributed to epidemiologic success. A remarkable amount of genotypic variation accumulated during clonal expansion that occurred during the epidemic, including multiple independent acquisitions of a novel prophage carrying the sopE gene and multiple deletion events affecting the phase II flagellin locus. This high level of microevolution may affect antigenicity, pathogenicity, and transmission. PMID:26982594

  10. Microevolution of Monophasic Salmonella Typhimurium during Epidemic, United Kingdom, 2005–2010

    PubMed Central

    Petrovska, Liljana; Mather, Alison E.; AbuOun, Manal; Branchu, Priscilla; Harris, Simon R.; Connor, Thomas; Hopkins, K.L.; Underwood, A.; Lettini, Antonia A.; Page, Andrew; Bagnall, Mary; Wain, John; Parkhill, Julian; Dougan, Gordon; Davies, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Microevolution associated with emergence and expansion of new epidemic clones of bacterial pathogens holds the key to epidemiologic success. To determine microevolution associated with monophasic Salmonella Typhimurium during an epidemic, we performed comparative whole-genome sequencing and phylogenomic analysis of isolates from the United Kingdom and Italy during 2005–2012. These isolates formed a single clade distinct from recent monophasic epidemic clones previously described from North America and Spain. The UK monophasic epidemic clones showed a novel genomic island encoding resistance to heavy metals and a composite transposon encoding antimicrobial drug resistance genes not present in other Salmonella Typhimurium isolates, which may have contributed to epidemiologic success. A remarkable amount of genotypic variation accumulated during clonal expansion that occurred during the epidemic, including multiple independent acquisitions of a novel prophage carrying the sopE gene and multiple deletion events affecting the phase II flagellin locus. This high level of microevolution may affect antigenicity, pathogenicity, and transmission. PMID:26982594

  11. Microevolution of Monophasic Salmonella Typhimurium during Epidemic, United Kingdom, 2005-2010.

    PubMed

    Petrovska, Liljana; Mather, Alison E; AbuOun, Manal; Branchu, Priscilla; Harris, Simon R; Connor, Thomas; Hopkins, K L; Underwood, A; Lettini, Antonia A; Page, Andrew; Bagnall, Mary; Wain, John; Parkhill, Julian; Dougan, Gordon; Davies, Robert; Kingsley, Robert A

    2016-04-01

    Microevolution associated with emergence and expansion of new epidemic clones of bacterial pathogens holds the key to epidemiologic success. To determine microevolution associated with monophasic Salmonella Typhimurium during an epidemic, we performed comparative whole-genome sequencing and phylogenomic analysis of isolates from the United Kingdom and Italy during 2005-2012. These isolates formed a single clade distinct from recent monophasic epidemic clones previously described from North America and Spain. The UK monophasic epidemic clones showed a novel genomic island encoding resistance to heavy metals and a composite transposon encoding antimicrobial drug resistance genes not present in other Salmonella Typhimurium isolates, which may have contributed to epidemiologic success. A remarkable amount of genotypic variation accumulated during clonal expansion that occurred during the epidemic, including multiple independent acquisitions of a novel prophage carrying the sopE gene and multiple deletion events affecting the phase II flagellin locus. This high level of microevolution may affect antigenicity, pathogenicity, and transmission.

  12. Mutagenicity study of nine monoalkyl phthalates and a dialkyl phthalate using Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, K; Tanaka, A; Yamaha, T; Kurata, H

    1983-04-01

    Nine monoalkyl (C1-C8) phthalates and di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) were assayed for mutagenicity in two strains of Salmonella typhimurium (TA98 and TA100) and two strains of Escherichia coli WP2 try- (uvrA+ and uvrA-) with and without metabolic activation with S-9 mix. The procedure of Ames et al. (Mutation Res. 1975, 31, 347) was used, with minor modifications. None of the compounds tested showed any mutagenic activity, but all the monoalkyl phthalates showed some lethality towards the S. typhimurium strains, the most toxic being monoheptyl phthalate. A marginally lethal effect on the Salmonella strains was shown by DEHP, but only at the highest concentration tested (2000 micrograms/plate) and in the absence of S-9 mix.

  13. The Salmonella pathogenicity island 2-encoded type III secretion system is essential for the survival of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in free-living amoebae.

    PubMed

    Bleasdale, Benjamin; Lott, Penelope J; Jagannathan, Aparna; Stevens, Mark P; Birtles, Richard J; Wigley, Paul

    2009-03-01

    Free-living amoebae represent a potential reservoir and predator of Salmonella enterica. Through the use of type III secretion system (T3SS) mutants and analysis of transcription of selected T3SS genes, we demonstrated that the Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 is highly induced during S. enterica serovar Typhimurium infection of Acanthamoeba polyphaga and is essential for survival within amoebae.

  14. Salmonella typhimurium Suppresses Tumor Growth via the Pro-Inflammatory Cytokine Interleukin-1β

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung-Eun; Phan, Thuy Xuan; Nguyen, Vu Hong; Dinh-Vu, Hong-Van; Zheng, Jin Hai; Yun, Misun; Park, Sung-Gyoo; Hong, Yeongjin; Choy, Hyon E.; Szardenings, Michael; Hwang, Won; Park, Jin-A; Park, SunHee; Im, Sin-Hyeog; Min, Jung-Joon

    2015-01-01

    Although strains of attenuated Salmonella typhimurium and wild-type Escherichia coli show similar tumor-targeting capacities, only S. typhimurium significantly suppresses tumor growth in mice. The aim of the present study was to examine bacteria-mediated immune responses by conducting comparative analyses of the cytokine profiles and immune cell populations within tumor tissues colonized by E. coli or attenuated Salmonellae. CT26 tumor-bearing mice were treated with two different bacterial strains: S. typhimurium defective in ppGpp synthesis (ΔppGpp Salmonellae) or wild-type E. coli MG1655. Cytokine profiles and immune cell populations in tumor tissue colonized by these two bacterial strains were examined at two time points based on the pattern of tumor growth after ΔppGpp Salmonellae treatment: 1) when tumor growth was suppressed ('suppression stage') and 2) when they began to re-grow ('re-growing stage'). The levels of IL-1β and TNF-α were markedly increased in tumors colonized by ΔppGpp Salmonellae. This increase was associated with tumor regression; the levels of both IL-1β and TNF-α returned to normal level when the tumors started to re-grow. To identify the immune cells primarily responsible for Salmonellae-mediated tumor suppression, we examined the major cell types that produce IL-1β and TNF-α. We found that macrophages and dendritic cells were the main producers of TNF-α and IL-1β. Inhibiting IL-1β production in Salmonellae-treated mice restored tumor growth, whereas tumor growth was suppressed for longer by local administration of recombinant IL-1β or TNF-α in conjunction with Salmonella therapy. These findings suggested that IL-1β and TNF-α play important roles in Salmonella-mediated cancer therapy. A better understanding of host immune responses in Salmonella therapy may increase the success of a given drug, particularly when various strategies are combined with bacteriotherapy. PMID:26516371

  15. Impact of phytopathogen infection and extreme weather stress on internalization of Salmonella Typhimurium in lettuce.

    PubMed

    Ge, Chongtao; Lee, Cheonghoon; Nangle, Ed; Li, Jianrong; Gardner, David; Kleinhenz, Matthew; Lee, Jiyoung

    2014-01-01

    Internalization of human pathogens, common in many types of fresh produce, is a threat to human health since the internalized pathogens cannot be fully inactivated/removed by washing with water or sanitizers. Given that pathogen internalization can be affected by many environmental factors, this study was conducted to investigate the influence of two types of plant stress on the internalization of Salmonella Typhimurium in iceberg lettuce during pre-harvest. The stresses were: abiotic (water stress induced by extreme weather events) and biotic (phytopathogen infection by lettuce mosaic virus [LMV]). Lettuce with and without LMV infection were purposefully contaminated with green fluorescence protein-labeled S. Typhimurium on the leaf surfaces. Lettuce was also subjected to water stress conditions (drought and storm) which were simulated by irrigating with different amounts of water. The internalized S. Typhimurium in the different parts of the lettuce were quantified by plate count and real-time quantitative PCR and confirmed with a laser scanning confocal microscope. Salmonella internalization occurred under the conditions outlined above; however internalization levels were not significantly affected by water stress alone. In contrast, the extent of culturable S. Typhimurium internalized in the leafy part of the lettuce decreased when infected with LMV under water stress conditions and contaminated with high levels of S. Typhimurium. On the other hand, LMV-infected lettuce showed a significant increase in the levels of culturable bacteria in the roots. In conclusion, internalization was observed under all experimental conditions when the lettuce surface was contaminated with S. Typhimurium. However, the extent of internalization was only affected by water stress when lettuce was infected with LMV. PMID:24220663

  16. Use of acetic and citric acids to control Salmonella Typhimurium in tahini (sesame paste).

    PubMed

    Al-Nabulsi, Anas A; Olaimat, Amin N; Osaili, Tareq M; Shaker, Reyad R; Zein Elabedeen, Noor; Jaradat, Ziad W; Abushelaibi, Aisha; Holley, Richard A

    2014-09-01

    Since tahini and its products have been linked to Salmonella illness outbreaks and product recalls in recent years, this study assessed the ability of Salmonella Typhimurium to survive or grow in commercial tahini and when hydrated (10% w/v in water), treated with 0.1%-0.5% acetic or citric acids, and stored at 37, 21 and 10 °C for 28 d. S. Typhimurium survived in commercial tahini up to 28 d but was reduced in numbers from 1.7 to 3.3 log10 CFU/ml. However, in the moist or hydrated tahini, significant growth of S. Typhimurium occurred at the tested temperatures. Acetic and citric acids at ≤0.5% reduced S. Typhimurium by 2.7-4.8 log10 CFU/ml and 2.5-3.8 log10 CFU/ml, respectively, in commercial tahini at 28 d. In hydrated tahini the organic acids were more effective. S. Typhimurium cells were not detected in the presence of 0.5% acetic acid after 7 d or with 0.5% citric acid after 21 d at the tested temperatures. The ability of S. Typhimurium to grow or survive in commercial tahini and products containing hydrated tahini may contribute to salmonellosis outbreaks; however, use of acetic and citric acids in ready-to-eat foods prepared from tahini can significantly minimize the risk associated with this pathogen.

  17. Epidemiology of a Salmonella enterica subsp. Enterica serovar Typhimurium strain associated with a songbird outbreak.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blehert, David S.; Hernandez, Sonia M.; Keel, Kevin; Sanchez, Susan; Trees, Eija; ,

    2012-01-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium is responsible for the majority of salmonellosis cases worldwide. This Salmonella serovar is also responsible for die-offs in songbird populations. In 2009, there was an S. Typhimurium epizootic reported in pine siskins in the eastern United States. At the time, there was also a human outbreak with this serovar that was associated with contaminated peanuts. As peanuts are also used in wild-bird food, it was hypothesized that the pine siskin epizootic was related to this human outbreak. A comparison of songbird and human S. Typhimurium pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns revealed that the epizootic was attributed not to the peanut-associated strain but, rather, to a songbird strain first characterized from an American goldfinch in 1998. This same S. Typhimurium strain (PFGE type A3) was also identified in the PulseNet USA database, accounting for 137 of 77,941 total S. Typhimurium PFGE entries. A second molecular typing method, multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA), confirmed that the same strain was responsible for the pine siskin epizootic in the eastern United States but was distinct from a genetically related strain isolated from pine siskins in Minnesota. The pine siskin A3 strain was first encountered in May 2008 in an American goldfinch and later in a northern cardinal at the start of the pine siskin epizootic. MLVA also confirmed the clonal nature of S. Typhimurium in songbirds and established that the pine siskin epizootic strain was unique to the finch family. For 2009, the distribution of PFGE type A3 in passerines and humans mirrored the highest population density of pine siskins for the East Coast.

  18. Impact of phytopathogen infection and extreme weather stress on internalization of Salmonella Typhimurium in lettuce.

    PubMed

    Ge, Chongtao; Lee, Cheonghoon; Nangle, Ed; Li, Jianrong; Gardner, David; Kleinhenz, Matthew; Lee, Jiyoung

    2014-01-01

    Internalization of human pathogens, common in many types of fresh produce, is a threat to human health since the internalized pathogens cannot be fully inactivated/removed by washing with water or sanitizers. Given that pathogen internalization can be affected by many environmental factors, this study was conducted to investigate the influence of two types of plant stress on the internalization of Salmonella Typhimurium in iceberg lettuce during pre-harvest. The stresses were: abiotic (water stress induced by extreme weather events) and biotic (phytopathogen infection by lettuce mosaic virus [LMV]). Lettuce with and without LMV infection were purposefully contaminated with green fluorescence protein-labeled S. Typhimurium on the leaf surfaces. Lettuce was also subjected to water stress conditions (drought and storm) which were simulated by irrigating with different amounts of water. The internalized S. Typhimurium in the different parts of the lettuce were quantified by plate count and real-time quantitative PCR and confirmed with a laser scanning confocal microscope. Salmonella internalization occurred under the conditions outlined above; however internalization levels were not significantly affected by water stress alone. In contrast, the extent of culturable S. Typhimurium internalized in the leafy part of the lettuce decreased when infected with LMV under water stress conditions and contaminated with high levels of S. Typhimurium. On the other hand, LMV-infected lettuce showed a significant increase in the levels of culturable bacteria in the roots. In conclusion, internalization was observed under all experimental conditions when the lettuce surface was contaminated with S. Typhimurium. However, the extent of internalization was only affected by water stress when lettuce was infected with LMV.

  19. Draft Genome Sequences of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovars Typhimurium and Nottingham Isolated from Food Products

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jie; Ayers, Sherry; Melka, David C.; Curry, Phillip E.; Payne, Justin S.; Laasri, Anna; Wang, Charles; Hammack, Thomas S.; Brown, Eric W.

    2016-01-01

    A quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) designed to detect Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis, targeting the sdf gene, generated positive results for S. enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium (CFSAN033950) and S. enterica subsp. enterica serovar Nottingham (CFSAN006803) isolated from food samples. Both strains show pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns distinct from those of S. Enteritidis. Here, we report the genome sequences of these two strains. PMID:27445384

  20. Evaluation of alternariol and alternariol methyl ether for mutagenic activity in Salmonella typhimurium

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, V.M.; Stack, M.E. )

    1994-10-01

    Alternariol and alternariol methyl ether were tested in the Ames Salmonella typhimurium assay, and both were shown, with and without metabolic activation, to be nonmutagenic to strains TA98 and TA100. The finding of other investigators that alternariol methyl ether is weakly mutagenic to Ta98 without metabolic activation could have resulted from the presence of a small amount of one of the highly mutagenic altertoxins in the alternariol methyl ether originally tested. 9 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Effect of chlorate, molybdate, and shikimic acid on Salmonella Typhimurium in aerobic and anaerobic cultures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two studies were conducted to examine the effects of shikimic acid (60 µg/mL) and(or) molybdate (1 mM) on the sensitivity of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium to sodium chlorate (5 mM) during anaerobic (90% N2:5% CO2:5% H2) or aerobic growth in brain heart infusion broth supplemented with 5 mM...

  2. Dissemination of clonal Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium isolates causing salmonellosis in Mauritius.

    PubMed

    Issack, Mohammad I; Garcia-Migura, Lourdes; Ramsamy, Veemala D; Svendsen, Christina A; Pornruangwong, Srirat; Pulsrikarn, Chaiwat; Hendriksen, Rene S

    2013-07-01

    Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium is one of the leading causes of salmonellosis in Mauritius, where it has also been associated with outbreaks of foodborne illness. However, little is known about its molecular epidemiology in the country. This study was therefore undertaken to investigate the clonality and source of Salmonella Typhimurium in Mauritius by studying human, food, and poultry isolates by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and antibiotic minimum inhibitory concentration determination. Forty-nine isolates collected between 2008 and 2011 were analyzed, including 25 stool isolates from foodborne illness outbreaks and sporadic gastroenteritis cases, four blood isolates, one postmortem colon isolate, 14 food isolates, and five poultry isolates. All isolates were pansusceptible to the 16 antibiotics tested, except for two isolates that were resistant to sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim. Overall characterization of the isolates by PFGE digested with XbaI and BlnI resulted in eight different patterns. The largest of the clusters in the composite dataset consisted of 20 isolates, including two raw chicken isolates, four poultry isolates, and nine human stool isolates from two outbreaks. A second cluster consisted of 18 isolates, of which 12 originated from human blood and stool samples from both sporadic and outbreak cases. Six food isolates were also found in this cluster, including isolates from raw and grilled chicken, marlin mousse, and cooked pork. One poultry isolate had a closely related PFGE pattern. The results indicate that one clone of Salmonella Typhimurium found in poultry has been causing outbreaks of foodborne illness in Mauritius and another clone that has caused many cases of gastrointestinal illness and bacteremia in humans could also be linked to poultry. Thus, poultry appears to be a major reservoir for Salmonella Typhimurium in Mauritius. Initiating on-farm control strategies and measures against future dissemination may

  3. Expression Divergence between Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium Reflects Their Lifestyles

    PubMed Central

    Meysman, Pieter; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Aminael; Fu, Qiang; Marchal, Kathleen; Engelen, Kristof

    2013-01-01

    Escherichia coli K12 is a commensal bacteria and one of the best-studied model organisms. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, on the other hand, is a facultative intracellular pathogen. These two prokaryotic species can be considered related phylogenetically, and they share a large amount of their genetic material, which is commonly termed the “core genome.” Despite their shared core genome, both species display very different lifestyles, and it is unclear to what extent the core genome, apart from the species-specific genes, plays a role in this lifestyle divergence. In this study, we focus on the differences in expression domains for the orthologous genes in E. coli and S. Typhimurium. The iterative comparison of coexpression methodology was used on large expression compendia of both species to uncover the conservation and divergence of gene expression. We found that gene expression conservation occurs mostly independently from amino acid similarity. According to our estimates, at least more than one quarter of the orthologous genes has a different expression domain in E. coli than in S. Typhimurium. Genes involved with key cellular processes are most likely to have conserved their expression domains, whereas genes showing diverged expression are associated with metabolic processes that, although present in both species, are regulated differently. The expression domains of the shared “core” genome of E. coli and S. Typhimurium, consisting of highly conserved orthologs, have been tuned to help accommodate the differences in lifestyle and the pathogenic potential of Salmonella. PMID:23427276

  4. Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Invades Fibroblasts by Multiple Routes Differing from the Entry into Epithelial Cells▿

    PubMed Central

    Aiastui, Ana; Pucciarelli, M. Graciela; García-del Portillo, Francisco

    2010-01-01

    Fibroblasts are ubiquitous cells essential to tissue homeostasis. Despite their nonphagocytic nature, fibroblasts restrain replication of intracellular bacterial pathogens such as Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. The extent to which the entry route of the pathogen determines this intracellular response is unknown. Here, we analyzed S. Typhimurium invasion in fibroblasts obtained from diverse origins, including primary cultures and stable nontransformed cell lines derived from normal tissues. Features distinct to the invasion of epithelial cells were found in all fibroblasts tested. In some fibroblasts, bacteria lacking the type III secretion system encoded in the Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 displayed significant invasion rates and induced the formation of lamellipodia and filopodia at the fibroblast-bacteria contact site. Other bacterial invasion traits observed in fibroblasts were the requirement of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, mitogen-activated protein kinase MEK1, and both actin filaments and microtubules. RNA interference studies showed that different Rho family GTPases are targeted by S. Typhimurium to enter into distinct fibroblasts. Rac1 and Cdc42 knockdown affected invasion of normal rat kidney fibroblasts, whereas none of the GTPases tested (Rac1, Cdc42, RhoA, or RhoG) was essential for invasion of immortalized human foreskin fibroblasts. Collectively, these data reveal a marked diversity in the modes used by S. Typhimurium to enter into fibroblasts. PMID:20368348

  5. Rapid detection of Salmonella typhimurium on fresh spinach leaves using phage-immobilized magnetoelastic biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horikawa, Shin; Li, Suiqiong; Chai, Yating; Park, Mi-Kyung; Shen, Wen; Barbaree, James M.; Vodyanoy, Vitaly J.; Chin, Bryan A.

    2011-06-01

    This paper presents an investigation into the use of magnetoelastic biosensors for the rapid detection of Salmonella typhimurium on fresh spinach leaves. The biosensors used in this investigation were comprised of a strip-shaped, goldcoated sensor platform (2 mm-long) diced from a ferromagnetic, amorphous alloy and a filamentous fd-tet phage which specifically binds with S. typhimurium. After surface blocking with bovine serum albumin, these biosensors were, without any preceding sample preparation, directly placed on wet spinach leaves inoculated with various concentrations of S. typhimurium. Upon contact with cells, the phage binds S. typhimurium to the sensor thereby increasing the total mass of the sensor. This change in mass causes a corresponding decrease in the sensor's resonant frequency. After 25 min, the sensors were collected from the leaf surface and measurements of the resonant frequency were performed immediately. The total assay time was less than 30 min. The frequency changes for measurement sensors (i.e., phageimmobilized) were found to be statistically different from those for control sensors (sensors without phage), down to 5 × 106 cells/ml. The detection limit may be improved by using smaller, micron-sized sensors that will have a higher probability of contacting Salmonella on the rough surfaces of spinach leaves.

  6. Characterization of blaCMY plasmids and their possible role in source attribution of salmonella enterica serotype typhimurium infections

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella is an important cause of foodborne illness; however, identifying the source of these infections can be difficult. This is especially true for Salmonella serotype Typhimurium, which is found in diverse agricultural niches. Cephalosporins are one of the primary treatment choices for complic...

  7. Postmortem photonic imaging of lux-modified Salmonella typhimurium within the gastrointestinal tract of swine following oral inoculation in vivo

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The study objective was to monitor Salmonella progression by photonic detection through segments of the gastrointestinal tract following oral inoculation. Pigs (~ 80 kg) were inoculated orally with 3.1 or 4.1×10*10 colony forming units (cfu) of Salmonella typhimurium transformed with plasmid pAK1-lu...

  8. Salmonella Genomic Island 1 (SGI1) and genetic characteristics of animal and food isolates of Salmonella typhimurium DT104 in Hungary.

    PubMed

    Fekete, Péter Zsolt; Nagy, Béla

    2008-03-01

    To study the genetic characteristics of DT104 strains of Salmonella Typhimurium and the prevalence of Salmonella Genomic Island (SGI1) in Hungary, 140 recent Salmonella strains of food and animal origin were examined. For the first time in Hungary, the SGI1 was found in 17 out of 59 S. Typhimurium isolates (all proven to be DT104 phage type). These 17 strains were then subtyped by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) into 6 pulsotypes which were less correlated with the geographic origin than with the animal species of origin.

  9. Cellular Requirements for Systemic Control of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Infections in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bedoui, Sammy

    2014-01-01

    The rational design of vaccines requires an understanding of the contributions of individual immune cell subsets to immunity. With this understanding, targeted vaccine delivery approaches and adjuvants can be developed to maximize vaccine efficiency and to minimize side effects (S. H. E. Kaufmann et al., Immunity 33:555–577, 2010; T. Ben-Yedidia and R. Arnon, Hum. Vaccines 1:95–101, 2005). We have addressed the contributions of different immune cell subsets and their ability to contribute to the control and clearance of the facultative intracellular pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) in a murine model. Using a systematic and reproducible model of experimental attenuated S. Typhimurium infection, we show that distinct lymphocyte deficiencies lead to one of four different infection outcomes: clearance, chronic infection, early death, or late death. Our study demonstrates a high level of functional redundancy in the ability of different lymphocyte subsets to provide interferon gamma (IFN-γ), a critical cytokine in Salmonella immunity. Whereas early control of the infection was entirely dependent on IFN-γ but not on any particular lymphocyte subset, clearance of the infection critically required CD4+ T cells but appeared to be independent of IFN-γ. These data reinforce the idea of a bimodal immune response against Salmonella: an early T cell-independent but IFN-γ-dependent phase and a late T cell-dependent phase that may be IFN-γ independent. PMID:25225248

  10. Salmonella typhimurium as a basis for a live oral Echinococcus granulosus vaccine.

    PubMed

    Chabalgoity, J A; Moreno, M; Carol, H; Dougan, G; Hormaeche, C E

    2000-10-15

    A live attenuated Salmonella typhimurium vaccine candidate, LVR01, was constructed by introducing a null deletion into the aroC gene of the parental canine S. typhimurium isolate, P228067. LVR01 was used to orally deliver to the canine immune system a fatty acid binding protein (FABP) from Echinococcus granulosus (EgDf1), as a fusion protein with fragment C (TetC) of tetanus toxin. Immunization studies demonstrated that live LVR01 is well tolerated by orally vaccinated dogs. There was no detectable shedding of the vaccine strain in the faeces 2 days after immunization. Humoral antibody responses were observed against Salmonella, TetC and EgDf1. Cellular responses were consistently detected against Salmonella and TetC. A cellular response against EgDf1 was also seen in a proportion of the LVR01 vaccinated dogs. We propose S. typhimurium LVR01 as a carrier for recombinant antigens and a vector for the construction of multivalent oral vaccines for dogs.

  11. Growth potential of exponential- and stationary-phase Salmonella Typhimurium during sausage fermentation.

    PubMed

    Birk, T; Henriksen, S; Müller, K; Hansen, T B; Aabo, S

    2016-11-01

    Raw meat for sausage production can be contaminated with Salmonella. For technical reasons, meat is often frozen prior to mincing but it is unknown how growth of Salmonella in meat prior to freezing affects its growth potential during sausage fermentation. We investigated survival of exponential- and stationary-phase Salmonella Typhimurium (DT12 and DTU292) during freezing at -18°C and their subsequent growth potential during 72h sausage fermentation at 25°C. After 0, 7 and >35d of frozen storage, sausage batters were prepared with NaCl (3%) and NaNO2 (0, 100ppm) and fermented with and without starter culture. With no starter culture, both strains grew in both growth phases. In general, a functional starter culture abolished S. Typhimurium growth independent of growth phase and we concluded that ensuring correct fermentation is important for sausage safety. However, despite efficient fermentation, sporadic growth of exponential-phase cells of S. Typhimurium was observed drawing attention to the handling and storage of sausage meat.

  12. EXPERIMENTAL RUNT DISEASE IN MICE CAUSED BY SALMONELLA TYPHIMURIUM, VAR. COPENHAGEN

    PubMed Central

    Brooke, Marcus S.

    1964-01-01

    The strain of Salmonella typhimurium isolated from the subcutaneous abscess of a runted mouse and used in this study was somewhat unusual, but not unique, in that it had a high virulence for young mice, yet low infectivity. This strain could mimic many of the features, signs, and symptoms of immunological runting when injected into neonates, either in pure culture, or when mixed with spleen cells, or when present in infected isologous or F1 hybrid spleen cells. Thus, the incidence of Salmonella runting was dose-dependent and related to the age of the neonate. Runts failed to gain weight, were sickly, and usually died within 30 days. They had a marked splenomegaly and hepatomegaly associated with areas of necrosis. However, in marked contrast to immunological runts they did not have lymphoid atrophy. The incidence of runting was diminished when frozen-thawed spleen cell suspensions were used, but not with sonicated or heated suspensions or spleen cells from lethally irradiated mice. Runting could be prevented by immunizing breeders with S. typhimurium, and serum from mice immunized against S. typhimurium protected neonates injected with this organism. Isologous adult spleen cells did not protect against Salmonella runting. It is suggested that in studies on runting only the intravenous route be used and that heated cells serve as a control. More rigid criteria should be applied to runting than those frequently accepted and mice should be autopsied whenever possible. PMID:14207058

  13. A mutation in tdcA attenuates the virulence of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sangyong; Kim, Minjeong; Choi, Jeongjoon; Ryu, Sangryeol

    2010-05-01

    The Salmonella tdc operon encodes enzymes belonging to a metabolic pathway that degrades L-serine and L-threonine. The upregulation of the tdc operon and increased virulence of Salmonella grown under oxygen-limiting conditions prompted us to investigate the role of the tdc operon in the pathogenesis of Salmonella Typhimurium. A Salmonella strain carrying a null mutation in tdcA, which encodes the transcriptional activator of the tdc operon, was impaired in mice infected intraperitoneally with the bacterium. In addition, the Salmonella tdcA mutant showed reduced replication compared with the parental strain in cultured animal cells, although their growth rates were similar in various culture media. To understand the function of TdcA in pathogenesis, we performed two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and found that flagellar and PhoP-regulated proteins were affected by the tdcA mutation. The results of beta-galactosidase assays and FACS analysis showed that, among the four PhoP-dependent genes tested, the expression of ssaG, which is located in Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI2), was reduced in the tdcA mutant, especially in the intracellular environment of macrophages. Taken together, our data suggest that tdcA plays an important role in the pathogenesis of Salmonella.

  14. Colonization of internal organs by Salmonella serovars Heidelberg and Typhimurium in experimentally infected laying hens housed in enriched colony cages at different stocking densities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Contaminated eggs produced by infected commercial laying flocks are often implicated as sources of human infections with Salmonella Enteritidis, but Salmonella serovars Heidelberg and Typhimurium have also been significantly associated with egg-transmitted illness. Contamination of the edible conten...

  15. Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli dissimilarity: Closely related bacteria with distinct metabolic profiles.

    PubMed

    Sargo, Cintia R; Campani, Gilson; Silva, Gabriel G; Giordano, Roberto C; Da Silva, Adilson J; Zangirolami, Teresa C; Correia, Daniela M; Ferreira, Eugénio C; Rocha, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Live attenuated strains of Salmonella typhimurium have been extensively investigated as vaccines for a number of infectious diseases. However, there is still little information available concerning aspects of their metabolism. S. typhimurium and Escherichia coli show a high degree of similarity in terms of their genome contents and metabolic networks. However, this work presents experimental evidence showing that significant differences exist in their abilities to direct carbon fluxes to biomass and energy production. It is important to study the metabolism of Salmonella to elucidate the formation of acetate and other metabolites involved in optimizing the production of biomass, essential for the development of recombinant vaccines. The metabolism of Salmonella under aerobic conditions was assessed using continuous cultures performed at dilution rates ranging from 0.1 to 0.67 h(-1), with glucose as main substrate. Acetate assimilation and glucose metabolism under anaerobic conditions were also investigated using batch cultures. Chemostat cultivations showed deviation of carbon towards acetate formation, starting at dilution rates above 0.1 h(-1). This differed from previous findings for E. coli, where acetate accumulation was only detected at dilution rates exceeding 0.4 h(-1), and was due to the lower rate of acetate assimilation by S. typhimurium under aerobic conditions. Under anaerobic conditions, both microorganisms mainly produced ethanol, acetate, and formate. A genome-scale metabolic model, reconstructed for Salmonella based on an E. coli model, provided a poor description of the mixed fermentation pattern observed during Salmonella cultures, reinforcing the different patterns of carbon utilization exhibited by these closely related bacteria. PMID:26097206

  16. DNA microarray analysis of Salmonella serotype Typhimurium strains causing different symptoms of disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica is one of the leading food-borne pathogens in the USA and European countries. Outcome of human Salmonella serotype Typhimurium infections ranges from mild self-limiting diarrhoea to severe diarrhoea that requires hospitalization. Increased knowledge of the mechanisms that are responsible for causing infection and especially the severity of infection is of high interest. Results Strains were selected from patients with mild infections (n = 9) and patients with severe infections (n = 9) and clinical data allowed us to correct for known underlying diseases. Additionally, outbreak isolates (n = 3) were selected. Strains were analyzed on a DNA-DNA microarray for presence or absence of 281 genes covering marker groups of genes related to pathogenicity, phages, antimicrobial resistance, fimbriae, mobility, serotype and metabolism. Strains showed highly similar profiles when comparing virulence associated genes, but differences between strains were detected in the prophage marker group. The Salmonella virulence plasmid was present in 72% of the strains, but presence or absence of the virulence plasmid did not correspond to disease symptoms. A dendrogram clustered strains into four groups. Clustering confirmed DT104 as being a clonal phagetype. Clustering of the remaining strains was mainly correlated to presence or absence of the virulence plasmid and mobile elements such as transposons. Each of the four clusters in the tree represented an almost equal amount of strains causing severe or mild symptoms of infection. Conclusions We investigated clinical significance of known virulence factors of Salmonella serotype Typhimurium strains causing different disease symptoms, and conclude that the few detected differences in Salmonella serotype Typhimurium do not affect outcome of human disease. PMID:20356366

  17. Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli dissimilarity: Closely related bacteria with distinct metabolic profiles.

    PubMed

    Sargo, Cintia R; Campani, Gilson; Silva, Gabriel G; Giordano, Roberto C; Da Silva, Adilson J; Zangirolami, Teresa C; Correia, Daniela M; Ferreira, Eugénio C; Rocha, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Live attenuated strains of Salmonella typhimurium have been extensively investigated as vaccines for a number of infectious diseases. However, there is still little information available concerning aspects of their metabolism. S. typhimurium and Escherichia coli show a high degree of similarity in terms of their genome contents and metabolic networks. However, this work presents experimental evidence showing that significant differences exist in their abilities to direct carbon fluxes to biomass and energy production. It is important to study the metabolism of Salmonella to elucidate the formation of acetate and other metabolites involved in optimizing the production of biomass, essential for the development of recombinant vaccines. The metabolism of Salmonella under aerobic conditions was assessed using continuous cultures performed at dilution rates ranging from 0.1 to 0.67 h(-1), with glucose as main substrate. Acetate assimilation and glucose metabolism under anaerobic conditions were also investigated using batch cultures. Chemostat cultivations showed deviation of carbon towards acetate formation, starting at dilution rates above 0.1 h(-1). This differed from previous findings for E. coli, where acetate accumulation was only detected at dilution rates exceeding 0.4 h(-1), and was due to the lower rate of acetate assimilation by S. typhimurium under aerobic conditions. Under anaerobic conditions, both microorganisms mainly produced ethanol, acetate, and formate. A genome-scale metabolic model, reconstructed for Salmonella based on an E. coli model, provided a poor description of the mixed fermentation pattern observed during Salmonella cultures, reinforcing the different patterns of carbon utilization exhibited by these closely related bacteria.

  18. Type I interferon induces necroptosis in macrophages during infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Nirmal; McComb, Scott; Mulligan, Rebecca; Dudani, Renu; Krishnan, Lakshmi; Sad, Subash

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) is a virulent pathogen that induces rapid host death. Here we observed that host survival after infection with S. Typhimurium was enhanced in the absence of type I interferon signaling, with improved survival of mice deficient in the receptor for type I interferons (Ifnar1−/− mice) that was attributed to macrophages. Although there was no impairment in cytokine expression or inflammasome activation in Ifnar1−/− macrophages, they were highly resistant to S. Typhimurium–induced cell death. Specific inhibition of the kinase RIP1or knockdown of the gene encoding the kinase RIP3 prevented the death of wild-type macrophages, which indicated that necroptosis was a mechanism of cell death. Finally, RIP3-deficient macrophages, which cannot undergo necroptosis, had similarly less death and enhanced control of S. Typhimurium in vivo. Thus, we propose that S. Typhimurium induces the production of type I interferon, which drives necroptosis of macrophages and allows them to evade the immune response. PMID:22922364

  19. Immunogenicity of transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) M gene delivered by attenuated Salmonella typhimurium in mice.

    PubMed

    Qing, Ying; Liu, Jiawen; Huang, Xiaobo; Li, Yaqing; Zhang, Yudi; Chen, Jie; Wen, Xintian; Cao, Sanjie; Wen, Yiping; Wu, Rui; Yan, Qigui; Ma, Xiaoping

    2016-04-01

    Attenuated Salmonella typhimurium (S. typhimurium) was selected as a transgenic vehicle for the development of live mucosal vaccines against transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) based on the M gene. An approximate 1.0 kb DNA fragment, encoding for glycoprotein M, was amplified by RT-PCR and cloned into eukaryotic expression vector pVAX1. The recombinant plasmid pVAX-M was transformed by electroporation into attenuated S. typhimurium SL7207, and the expression and translation of the pVAX-M delivered by recombinant S. typhimurium SL7207 (pVAX-M) was detected both in vitro and in vivo. BALB/c mice were inoculated orally with SL7207 (pVAX-M) at different dosages to evaluate safety of the vaccines. The bacterium was safe to mice at a dosage of 2 × 10(9) CFU, almost eliminated from the spleen and liver at week 4 post-immunization and eventually cleared at week 6. Mice immunized with 1 × 10(9) CFU of SL7207 (pVAX-M) elicited specific anti-TGEV local mucosal and humoral responses including levels of IgA, IgG, IL-4, and IFN-γ as measured by indirect ELISA assay. Moreover, the control groups (pVAX group, PBS group) maintained at a normal level during week 4-8 post-immunization. The results indicated that attenuated S. typhimurium could be used as a delivery vector for oral immunization of TGEV M gene vaccine. PMID:26837896

  20. Survival and activity of Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli in tropical freshwater.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, L; Muñiz, I; Toranzos, G A; Hazen, T C

    1989-07-01

    The survival of Salmonella typhimurium LT2 and Escherichia coli was studied in situ in a tropical rain forest watershed using membrane diffusion chambers. Numbers were determined by acridine orange staining and a Coulter counter. Population activity was determined by microautoradiography, cell respiration, frequency of dividing cells, and by nucleic acid composition. Numbers of Salm, typhimurium and E. coli decreased less than 1 log unit after 105 h as measured by direct count methods. Activity as measured by respiration, acridine orange activity, frequency of dividing cells, and microautoradiography indicated that both bacteria remained moderately active during the entire study. After 24 h, E. coli was more active than Salm. typhimurium, as measured by nucleic acid composition, and frequency of dividing cells. Both E. coli and Salm. typhimurium survived and remained active in this tropical rain forest watershed for more than 5 d, suggesting that Salm. typhimurium may be of prolonged public health significance once it is introduced into tropical surface waters. As E. coli was active and survived for a long time in this natural environment, it would seem to be unsuitable as an indicator of recent faecal contamination in tropical waters.

  1. Structure and regulation of the Salmonella typhimurium rnc-era-recO operon.

    PubMed

    Anderson, P E; Matsunaga, J; Simons, E L; Simons, R W

    1996-01-01

    The Escherichia coli rnc-era-recO operon encodes ribonuclease III (RNase III; a dsRNA endonuclease involved in rRNA and mRNA processing and decay), Era (an essential G-protein of unknown functions and RecO (involved in the RecF homologous recombination pathway). Expression of the rnc and era genes is negatively autoregulated: RNase III cleaves the rncO 'operator' in the untranslated leader, destabilizing the operon mRNA. As part of a larger effort to understand RNase III and Era structure and function, we characterized rnc operon structure, function and regulation in the closely related bacterium Salmonella typhimurium. Construction of a S typhimurium strain conditionally defective for RNase III and Era expression showed that Era is essential for cell growth. This mutant strain also enabled selection of recombinant clones containing the intact S typhimurium rnc-era-recO operon, whose nucleotide sequence, predicted protein sequence, and predicted rncO RNA secondary structure were all highly conserved with those of E coli. Furthermore, genetic and biochemical analysis revealed that S typhimurium rnc gene expression is negatively autoregulated by a mechanism very similar or identical to that in E coli, and that the cleavage specificities of RNase IIIs.t. and RNase IIIE.c. are indistinguishable with regard to rncO cleavage and S typhimurium 23S rRNA fragmentation in vivo. PMID:9150881

  2. Galactose epimeraseless mutants of Salmonella typhimurium as live vaccines for calves.

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, R C; Gyles, C L

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of a galactose epimeraseless mutant of Salmonella typhimurium administered as an oral vaccine to one week old calves and to investigate properties of galactose epimeraseless mutants which affect their virulence and immunogenicity. The galactose epimeraseless mutant S. typhimurium strain G30D caused diarrhea and fever in three calves to which it was administered orally at a dose of 10(10) organisms; all three calves died following challenge with virulent S. typhimurium ten days postvaccination. Mild illness developed in four calves vaccinated with a dose of 9 X 10(6) organisms and one of these calves survived challenge. Three unvaccinated calves died following challenge. The vaccine organism persisted in tissues and was shed for a prolonged period by calves which received 10(10) organisms. Studies of characteristics of galactose epimeraseless mutants of S. typhimurium showed that, in the presence of galactose, there is selection for secondary mutants which are galactose resistant. The studies indicate that galactose epimeraseless mutants of S. typhimurium are not good candidate live vaccine organisms for use in calves. PMID:3530414

  3. Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Lacking hfq Gene Confers Protective Immunity against Murine Typhoid

    PubMed Central

    Lahiri, Amit; Joy, Omana; Chakravortty, Dipshikha

    2011-01-01

    Salmonella enterica is an important enteric pathogen and its various serovars are involved in causing both systemic and intestinal diseases in humans and domestic animals. The emergence of multidrug-resistant strains of Salmonella leading to increased morbidity and mortality has further complicated its management. Live attenuated vaccines have been proven superior over killed or subunit vaccines due to their ability to induce protective immunity. Of the various strategies used for the generation of live attenuated vaccine strains, focus has gradually shifted towards manipulation of virulence regulator genes. Hfq is a RNA chaperon which mediates the binding of small RNAs to the mRNA and assists in post-transcriptional gene regulation in bacteria. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of the Salmonella Typhimurium Δhfq strain as a candidate for live oral vaccine in murine model of typhoid fever. Salmonella hfq deletion mutant is highly attenuated in cell culture and animal model implying a significant role of Hfq in bacterial virulence. Oral immunization with the Salmonella hfq deletion mutant efficiently protects mice against subsequent oral challenge with virulent strain of Salmonella Typhimurium. Moreover, protection was induced upon both multiple as well as single dose of immunizations. The vaccine strain appears to be safe for use in pregnant mice and the protection is mediated by the increase in the number of CD4+ T lymphocytes upon vaccination. The levels of serum IgG and secretory-IgA in intestinal washes specific to lipopolysaccharide and outer membrane protein were significantly increased upon vaccination. Furthermore, hfq deletion mutant showed enhanced antigen presentation by dendritic cells compared to the wild type strain. Taken together, the studies in murine immunization model suggest that the Salmonella hfq deletion mutant can be a novel live oral vaccine candidate. PMID:21347426

  4. Effect of streptomycin administration on colonization resistance to Salmonella typhimurium in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Que, J U; Hentges, D J

    1985-01-01

    The addition of 5 mg of streptomycin sulfate per ml to the drinking water of Swiss white mice resulted in a 100,000-fold reduction in the 50% implantation dose of streptomycin-resistant Salmonella typhimurium for the animals. When streptomycin-treated and untreated mice were challenged orogastrically with 10(3) viable S. typhimurium organisms, 100% of the treated and none of the untreated mice excreted the pathogen in their feces. Similarly, translocation of S. typhimurium from the intestinal tract to the liver, spleen, and mesentery occurred in 10 of 10 treated mice but in none of the untreated mice 7 days after challenge with 10(3) CFU. Studies of colonization dynamics showed that S. typhimurium was present at high population levels in the intestines of streptomycin-treated mice and in detectable levels in the liver, spleen, and mesentery within 72 h after challenge with 10(3), 10(5), or 10(8) organisms. In untreated mice challenged with either 10(3) or 10(5) S. typhimurium organisms, the organisms were isolated from ileal and cecal tissues but not from ileal or cecal contents or from extraintestinal tissue 72 h after challenge. When untreated mice were challenged with 10(8) organisms, however, S. typhimurium was present in all organs and in intestinal contents. Streptomycin treatment, therefore, facilitated colonization and development of streptomycin-resistant S. typhimurium populations in intestines of mice and the subsequent translocation of the organisms from the intestinal tract to other tissues. PMID:3884509

  5. Atypical, fljB-Negative Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Strain of Serovar 4,5,12:i:− Appears To Be a Monophasic Variant of Serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Echeita, M. Aurora; Herrera, Silvia; Usera, Miguel A.

    2001-01-01

    An fljB-negative, multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar 4,5,12:i:− phage type DT U302 strain (resistant to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, sulfonamide, gentamicin, streptomycin, tetracycline, and sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim) emerged and spread in Spain in 1997. Sequences specific for Salmonella serovar Typhimurium and phage type DT 104 and U302 were present in this atypical Salmonella strain, suggesting that it is a monophasic Salmonella serovar Typhimurium variant. PMID:11474028

  6. Atypical, fljB-negative Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica strain of serovar 4,5,12:i:- appears to be a monophasic variant of serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Echeita, M A; Herrera, S; Usera, M A

    2001-08-01

    An fljB-negative, multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar 4,5,12:i:- phage type DT U302 strain (resistant to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, sulfonamide, gentamicin, streptomycin, tetracycline, and sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim) emerged and spread in Spain in 1997. Sequences specific for Salmonella serovar Typhimurium and phage type DT 104 and U302 were present in this atypical Salmonella strain, suggesting that it is a monophasic Salmonella serovar Typhimurium variant.

  7. Outbreak of Salmonella typhimurium phage type 44 infection among attendees of a wedding reception, April 2009.

    PubMed

    Denehy, Emma J; Raupach, Jane C A; Cameron, Scott A; Lokuge, Kamalini M; Koehler, Ann P

    2011-06-01

    On 30 April 2009, the Communicable Disease Control Branch (CDCB) South Australia was notified of a Salmonella infection in a person who attended a wedding reception on 25 April 2009. Several other attendees reported becoming unwell with a similar gastrointestinal illness. The CDCB commenced an investigation to: characterise the outbreak in terms of person, place and time; identify probable source or sources; and implement control measures. A retrospective cohort study was undertaken among wedding reception attendees. A questionnaire collecting information on demographics, illness and menu items consumed was given to the majority of attendees. An environmental inspection of the wedding reception premise and food supplier premise, including food sampling was conducted to identify plausible sources of infection. The questionnaire response rate was 77%, from which an attack rate of 20% was calculated. There was a significant association between consumption of garlic aioli and illness (OR 5.4, 95% CI: 1.6, 18.1). Nine wedding reception attendees' stool samples tested positive for Salmonella Typhimurium phage type 44. A sample of garlic aioli also tested positive for Salmonella Typhimurium phage type 44. The ingredients of the garlic aioli included raw egg yolk, roasted garlic, Dijon mustard, vinegar and vegetable oil. The raw egg yolk was identified as a high risk food item; however no eggs tested positive for Salmonella. PMID:22010514

  8. Rapid DNA transformation in Salmonella Typhimurium by the hydrogel exposure method.

    PubMed

    Elabed, Hamouda; Hamza, Rim; Bakhrouf, Amina; Gaddour, Kamel

    2016-07-01

    Even with advances in molecular cloning and DNA transformation, new or alternative methods that permit DNA penetration in Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Typhimurium are required in order to use this pathogen in biotechnological or medical applications. In this work, an adapted protocol of bacterial transformation with plasmid DNA based on the "Yoshida effect" was applied and optimized on Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium LT2 reference strain. The plasmid transference based on the use of sepiolite as acicular materials to promote cell piercing via friction forces produced by spreading on the surface of a hydrogel. The transforming mixture containing sepiolite nanofibers, bacterial cells to be transformed and plasmid DNA were plated directly on selective medium containing 2% agar. In order to improve the procedure, three variables were tested and the transformation of Salmonella cells was accomplished using plasmids pUC19 and pBR322. Using the optimized protocol on Salmonella LT2 strain, the efficiency was about 10(5) transformed cells per 10(9) subjected to transformation with 0.2μg plasmid DNA. In summary, the procedure is fast, offers opportune efficiency and promises to become one of the widely used transformation methods in laboratories. PMID:27154729

  9. Stress-induced prophage DNA replication in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Russell, Nathalie; Elrod, Brandon; Dominguez, Katrina

    2009-09-01

    Salmonella Typhimurium, a foodborne pathogen, is the cause of new outbreaks every year. The virulence of new pathogens is determined by their virulence genes, many of them carried on transferable elements, such as prophages. In bacteria harboring multiple prophages such as Salmonella, the reassortment of these genes plays a major role in the emergence of new pathogens and consequently new epidemics. This gene transfer depends on prophage induction and the initiation of the phage lytic cycle. In the present study we have tested the effects of bacterial extracytoplasmic stress on prophage induction. We developed a quantitative real-time PCR assay to quantify variations in phage genes copy number, representative of phage DNA replication associated with the initiation of the lytic cycle. The induction of the four Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium LT2 prophages (Fels-1, Fels-2, Gifsy-1 and Gifsy-2) was measured during exponential growth, stationary phase, starvation, as well as after treatment with Mitomycin C, Ampicillin or heat. Our results show that the four prophages respond differently to each treatment. Gifsy-2 showed constant low level of induction independently of the extracytoplasmic stress, Fels-1 was strongly induced after DNA damage, Fels-2 showed spontaneous induction only during optimal bacterial growth, and Gifsy-1 was repressed in all conditions. These findings show that the transfer of virulence genes can respond to and depend on variations of the bacterial surrounding conditions, and help to explain the appearance of new Salmonella outbreaks.

  10. The role of the st313-td gene in virulence of Salmonella Typhimurium ST313.

    PubMed

    Herrero-Fresno, Ana; Wallrodt, Inke; Leekitcharoenphon, Pimlapas; Olsen, John Elmerdahl; Aarestrup, Frank M; Hendriksen, Rene S

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium ST313 has emerged in sub-Saharan Africa causing severe infections in humans. Therefore, it has been speculated that this specific sequence type, ST313, carries factors associated with increased pathogenicity. We assessed the role in virulence of a gene with a yet unknown function, st313-td, detected in ST313 through comparative genomics. Additionally, the structure of the genomic island ST313-GI, harbouring the gene was determined. The gene st313-td was cloned into wild type S. Typhimurium 4/74 (4/74-C) as well as knocked out in S. Typhimurium ST313 02-03/002 (Δst313-td) followed by complementation (02-03/002-C). Δst313-td was less virulent in mice following i.p. challenge than the wild type and this phenotype could be partly complemented in trans, indicating that st313-td plays a role during systemic infection. The gene st313-td was shown not to affect invasion of cultured epithelial cells, while the absence of the gene significantly affects uptake and intracellular survival within macrophages. The gene st313-td was proven to be strongly associated to invasiveness, harboured by 92.5% of S. Typhimurium blood isolates (n = 82) and 100% of S. Dublin strains (n = 50) analysed. On the contrary, S. Typhimurium isolates of animal and food origin (n = 82) did not carry st313-td. Six human, non-blood isolates of S. Typhimurium from Belarus, China and Nepal harboured the gene and belonged to sequence types ST398 and ST19. Our data showed a global presence of the st313-td gene and in other sequence types than ST313. The gene st313-td was shown to be expressed during logarithmic phase of growth in 14 selected Salmonella strains carrying the gene. This study reveals that st313-td plays a role in S. Typhimurium ST313 pathogenesis and adds another chapter to understanding of the virulence of S. Typhimurium and in particular of the emerging sequence type ST313.

  11. Analysis of the ArcA regulon in anaerobically grown Salmonella enterica sv. Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) is a Gram-negative pathogen that must successfully adapt to the broad fluctuations in the concentration of dissolved dioxygen encountered in the host. In Escherichia coli, ArcA (Aerobic Respiratory Control) helps the cells to sense and respond to the presence of dioxygen. The global role of ArcA in E. coli is well characterized; however, little is known about its role in anaerobically grown S. Typhimurium. Results We compared the transcriptional profiles of the virulent wild-type (WT) strain (ATCC 14028s) and its isogenic arcA mutant grown under anaerobic conditions. We found that ArcA directly or indirectly regulates 392 genes (8.5% of the genome); of these, 138 genes are poorly characterized. Regulation by ArcA in S. Typhimurium is similar, but distinct from that in E. coli. Thus, genes/operons involved in core metabolic pathways (e.g., succinyl-CoA, fatty acid degradation, cytochrome oxidase complexes, flagellar biosynthesis, motility, and chemotaxis) were regulated similarly in the two organisms. However, genes/operons present in both organisms, but regulated differently by ArcA in S. Typhimurium included those coding for ethanolamine utilization, lactate transport and metabolism, and succinate dehydrogenases. Salmonella-specific genes/operons regulated by ArcA included those required for propanediol utilization, flagellar genes (mcpAC, cheV), Gifsy-1 prophage genes, and three SPI-3 genes (mgtBC, slsA, STM3784). In agreement with our microarray data, the arcA mutant was non-motile, lacked flagella, and was as virulent in mice as the WT. Additionally, we identified a set of 120 genes whose regulation was shared with the anaerobic redox regulator, Fnr. Conclusion(s) We have identified the ArcA regulon in anaerobically grown S. Typhimurium. Our results demonstrated that in S. Typhimurium, ArcA serves as a transcriptional regulator coordinating cellular metabolism, flagella biosynthesis, and

  12. Survival of Salmonella Typhimurium in poultry-based meat preparations during grilling, frying and baking.

    PubMed

    Roccato, Anna; Uyttendaele, Mieke; Cibin, Veronica; Barrucci, Federica; Cappa, Veronica; Zavagnin, Paola; Longo, Alessandra; Ricci, Antonia

    2015-03-16

    The burden of food-borne diseases still represents a threat to public health; in 2012, the domestic setting accounted for 57.6% of strong-evidence EU food-borne Salmonella outbreaks. Next to cross-contamination, inadequate cooking procedure is considered as one of the most important factors contributing to food-borne illness. The few studies which have assessed the effect of domestic cooking on the presence and numbers of pathogens in different types of meat have shown that consumer-style cooking methods can allow bacteria to survive and that the probability of eating home-cooked poultry meat that still contains surviving bacteria after heating is higher than previously assumed. Thus, the main purpose of this study was to reproduce and assess the effect of several types of cooking treatments (according to label instructions and not following label instructions) on the presence and numbers of Salmonella Typhimurium DT 104 artificially inoculated in five types of poultry-based meat preparations (burgers, sausages, ready-to-cook-kebabs, quail roulades and extruded roulades) that are likely to be contaminated by Salmonella. Three contamination levels (10 cfu/g; 100 cfu/g and 1000 cfu/g) and three cooking techniques (grilling, frying and baking) were applied. Cooking treatments performed according to label instructions eliminated Salmonella Typhimurium (absence per 25g) for contamination levels of 10 and 100 cfu/g but not for contamination levels of 1000 cfu/g. After improper cooking, 26 out of 78 samples were Salmonella-positive, and 23 out of these 26 samples were artificially contaminated with bacterial loads between 100 and 1000 cfu/g. Nine out of 26 samples provided quantifiable results with a minimum level of 1.4MPN/g in kebabs (initial inoculum level: 100 cfu/g) after grilling and a maximum level of 170MPN/g recorded in sausages (initial inoculum level: 1000 cfu/g) after grilling. Kebabs were the most common Salmonella-positive meat product after cooking

  13. Natural surface coating to inactivate Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and maintain quality of cherry tomatoes.

    PubMed

    Yun, Juan; Fan, Xuetong; Li, Xihong; Jin, Tony Z; Jia, Xiaoyu; Mattheis, James P

    2015-01-16

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the effectiveness of zein-based coatings in reducing populations of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and preserving quality of cherry tomatoes. Tomatoes were inoculated with a cocktail of S. Typhimurium LT2 plus three attenuated strains on the smooth skin surface and stem scar area. The zein-based coatings with and without cinnamon (up to 20%) and mustard essential oil or a commercial wax formulation were applied onto tomatoes and the treated fruits were stored at 10 °C for up to 3 weeks. Populations of S. Typhimurium decreased with increased essential oil concentration and storage duration. S. Typhimurium populations on the smooth skin surface were reduced by 4.6 and 2.8 log colony forming units(CFU)/g by the zein coatings with 20% cinnamon and 20% mustard oil, respectively, 5h after coating. The same coating reduced populations of S. Typhimurium to levels below detection limit (1.0 log CFU/g) on the stem scar area of tomato during 7 days of storage at 10 °C. Salmonella populations were not reduced on fruit coated with the commercial wax. All of the coatings resulted in reduced weight loss compared with uncoated control. Compared with the control, loss of firmness and ascorbic acid during storage was prevented by all of the coatings except the zein coating with 20% mustard oil which enhanced softening. Color was not consistently affected by any of the coating treatments during 21 days of storage at 10°C. The results suggest that the zein-based coating containing cinnamon oil might be used to enhance microbial safety and quality of tomato.

  14. Natural surface coating to inactivate Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and maintain quality of cherry tomatoes.

    PubMed

    Yun, Juan; Fan, Xuetong; Li, Xihong; Jin, Tony Z; Jia, Xiaoyu; Mattheis, James P

    2015-01-16

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the effectiveness of zein-based coatings in reducing populations of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and preserving quality of cherry tomatoes. Tomatoes were inoculated with a cocktail of S. Typhimurium LT2 plus three attenuated strains on the smooth skin surface and stem scar area. The zein-based coatings with and without cinnamon (up to 20%) and mustard essential oil or a commercial wax formulation were applied onto tomatoes and the treated fruits were stored at 10 °C for up to 3 weeks. Populations of S. Typhimurium decreased with increased essential oil concentration and storage duration. S. Typhimurium populations on the smooth skin surface were reduced by 4.6 and 2.8 log colony forming units(CFU)/g by the zein coatings with 20% cinnamon and 20% mustard oil, respectively, 5h after coating. The same coating reduced populations of S. Typhimurium to levels below detection limit (1.0 log CFU/g) on the stem scar area of tomato during 7 days of storage at 10 °C. Salmonella populations were not reduced on fruit coated with the commercial wax. All of the coatings resulted in reduced weight loss compared with uncoated control. Compared with the control, loss of firmness and ascorbic acid during storage was prevented by all of the coatings except the zein coating with 20% mustard oil which enhanced softening. Color was not consistently affected by any of the coating treatments during 21 days of storage at 10°C. The results suggest that the zein-based coating containing cinnamon oil might be used to enhance microbial safety and quality of tomato. PMID:25462924

  15. Neutrophils prevent extracellular colonization of the liver microvasculature by Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Conlan, J W

    1996-03-01

    The early course of hepatic infection with the facultative intracellular bacterial pathogen Salmonella typhimurium was examined in control mice and in mice selectively depleted of neutrophils by treatment with a granulocyte-specific monoclonal antibody. The results show that >200-fold more salmonellae were recovered in livers of the latter group of mice than in livers of the former group by 24 h of parenterally initiated infection. Comparative histological examination of the livers from both groups of mice indicated that neutrophils participate in early anti-Salmonella defense in the liver in part by aborting infection in permissive hepatocytes and by inhibiting extracellular bacterial colonization of the hepatic microvasculature. It is shown in addition that systemic salmonellosis was also severely exacerbated in neutropenic mice infected intragastrically with the pathogen.

  16. Evaluation of three intervention strategies to reduce the transmission of Salmonella Typhimurium in pigs.

    PubMed

    De Ridder, L; Maes, D; Dewulf, J; Pasmans, F; Boyen, F; Haesebrouck, F; Méroc, E; Butaye, P; Van der Stede, Y

    2013-09-01

    Despite current control measures, Salmonella in pigs remains a major public health concern. In this in vivo study, the effect of three intervention strategies on Salmonella Typhimurium transmission in pigs was evaluated. The first intervention was feed supplemented with coated calcium-butyrate (group A); the second comprised oral vaccination with a double-attenuated Salmonella Typhimurium strain (group B), and the third was acidification of drinking water with a mixture of organic acids (group C). After challenge at 8 weeks of age, animals were individually sampled for 6 weeks (blood once per week; faeces twice per week) and then were euthanased at 14 weeks of age. Post-mortem ileum, caecum, ileocaecal lymph nodes, and tonsils were sampled, along with ileal, caecal and rectal contents, and tested for the presence of Salmonella spp. Transmission was quantified by calculating an 'adjusted' reproduction ratio 'Ra' and its 95% confidence interval (CI). The proportion of pigs that excreted Salmonella spp. via the faeces was significantly higher in group C (58%, P<0.0001) and the positive control group (41%, P=0.03), compared to group B (15%), and the proportion in group C was also significantly higher than in group A (23%, P=0.01). Group A had the lowest proportion of positive post-mortem samples (18%), followed by group B (31%), the positive control group (41%) and group C (64%) (P<0.03). The highest transmission was seen in the positive control group and group C (Ra=+∞ with 95% CI [1.88; +∞]), followed by group B (Ra=2.61 [1.21; 9.45]) and A (Ra=1.76 [1.02; 9.01]). The results of this study suggest that vaccination and supplementation of the feed with coated calcium-butyrate limited Salmonella transmission in pigs and might be useful control measures.

  17. The ferric enterobactin transporter Fep is required for persistent Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium infection.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Toni A; Moreland, Sarah M; Andrews-Polymenis, Helene; Detweiler, Corrella S

    2013-11-01

    Most bacterial pathogens require iron to grow and colonize host tissues. The Gram-negative bacterium Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium causes a natural systemic infection of mice that models acute and chronic human typhoid fever. S. Typhimurium resides in tissues within cells of the monocyte lineage, which limit pathogen access to iron, a mechanism of nutritional immunity. The primary ferric iron import system encoded by Salmonella is the siderophore ABC transporter FepBDGC. The Fep system has a known role in acute infection, but it is unclear whether ferric iron uptake or the ferric iron binding siderophores enterobactin and salmochelin are required for persistent infection. We defined the role of the Fep iron transporter and siderophores in the replication of Salmonella in macrophages and in mice that develop acute followed by persistent infections. Replication of wild-type and iron transporter mutant Salmonella strains was quantified in cultured macrophages, fecal pellets, and host tissues in mixed- and single-infection experiments. We show that deletion of fepB attenuated Salmonella replication and colonization within macrophages and mice. Additionally, the genes required to produce and transport enterobactin and salmochelin across the outer membrane receptors, fepA and iroN, are needed for colonization of all tissues examined. However, salmochelin appears to be more important than enterobactin in the colonization of the spleen and liver, both sites of dissemination. Thus, the FepBDGC ferric iron transporter and the siderophores enterobactin and salmochelin are required by Salmonella to evade nutritional immunity in macrophages and cause persistent infection in mice.

  18. Social stress increases fecal shedding of Salmonella typhimurium by early weaned piglets.

    PubMed

    Callaway, T R; Morrow, J L; Edrington, T S; Genovese, K J; Dowd, S; Carroll, J; Dailey, J W; Harvey, R B; Poole, T L; Anderson, R C; Nisbet, D J

    2006-09-01

    "Segregated early weaning" (SEW) of pigs reduces exposure to pathogenic bacteria, but upon arrival at grower facilities pigs may be co-mingled regardless of farm of origin. The present study was designed to examine the effect of mixing (social) stress on populations of Salmonella enterica Typhimurium in SEW pigs. Piglets (7 days old; n = 28 in each of 2 replicates) were separated into 2 treatments (control and mixed groups) of 2 pens per treatment (7 piglets/pen). One (n = 1) "seeder" pig/pen was inoculated with 10(9) CFU of S. Typhimurium. Each seeder was placed with non-inoculated "contact" piglets (n = 6). A"contact" piglet was swapped each day between the "mixed" pens for 5 days; pigs in control pens were not exchanged. On day 5, the incidence of fecal Salmonella shedding was higher in the mixed contact pigs (P < 0.05). Rectal Salmonella and cecal coliform populations in mixed pigs were significantly (P < 0.05) greater than in control pigs but cecal Salmonella populations were not different. Mixed pigs were more susceptible to tissue invasiveness (i.e., Salmonella-positive tonsils and lymph nodes) than control pigs. These results indicate that social stress of weaned pigs may increase susceptibility to and/or fecal shedding of Salmonella. Food-borne Salmonella infections in the United States are estimated to cost the economy dollar 2.4 billion annually (ERS/USDA, 2001). Approximately 6-9% of human salmonellosis is associated with the consumption of pork products (Frenzen et al., 1999). Salmonella is relatively common on swine farms and has been isolated from all stages of the pork production chain (Davies et al., 1999; Fedorka-Cray et al., 1997b; Rostagno et al., 2003). Salmonella is a threat to the pork industry not only from a food-safety perspective as a public health concern, but some Salmonella serotypes can cause clinical illnesses in swine, negatively impacting production efficiency and profitability (Schwartz, 1991). PMID:16875421

  19. The two murein lipoproteins of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium contribute to the virulence of the organism.

    PubMed

    Sha, J; Fadl, A A; Klimpel, G R; Niesel, D W; Popov, V L; Chopra, A K

    2004-07-01

    Septic shock due to Salmonella and other gram-negative enteric pathogens is a leading cause of death worldwide. The role of lipopolysaccharide in sepsis is well studied; however, the contribution of other bacterial outer membrane components, such as Braun (murein) lipoprotein (Lpp), is not well defined. The genome of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium harbors two copies of the lipoprotein (lpp) gene. We constructed a serovar Typhimurium strain with deletions in both copies of the lpp gene (lpp1 and lpp2) by marker exchange mutagenesis. The integrity of the cell membrane and the secretion of the effector proteins through the type III secretion system were not affected in the lpp double-knockout mutant. Subsequently, the virulence potential of this mutant was examined in a cell culture system using T84 intestinal epithelial and RAW264.7 macrophage cell lines and a mouse model of salmonellosis. The lpp double-knockout mutant was defective in invading and inducing cytotoxic effects in T84 and RAW264.7 cells, although binding of the mutant to the host cell was not affected when compared to the wild-type (WT) serovar Typhimurium. The motility of the mutant was impaired, despite the finding that the number of flagella was similar in the lpp double knockout mutant and the WT serovar Typhimurium. Deletion in the lpp genes did not affect the intracellular survival and replication of Salmonella in macrophages and T84 cells. Induction of the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-8 (IL-8) was significantly reduced in macrophages and T84 cells infected with the lpp double-knockout mutant. The levels of IL-8 remained unaffected in T84 cells when infected with either live or heat-killed WT and lpp mutant, indicating that invasion was not required for IL-8 production and that Toll-like receptor 2 signaling might be affected in the Lpp double-knockout mutant. These effects of the Lpp protein could be restored by complementation of the isogenic

  20. Sanitizing alternatives for Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium on bell peppers at household kitchens.

    PubMed

    Soto Beltran, Marcela; Jimenez Edeza, Maribel; Viera, Celina; Martinez, Celida I; Chaidez, Cristobal

    2013-01-01

    Fresh fruits and vegetables are known to play an important role as carriers of disease-causing organisms in household kitchens. The aims of this study were to assess and compare the effectiveness of sodium hypochlorite, organic acid-based and silver-based products to reduce Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium inoculated on individual bell pepper pieces. Inoculated bell pepper pieces (n = 5) were submerged in sodium hypochlorite, organic acid-based and silver-based product solutions, at the concentration specified in the product label for sanitization of fruits and vegetables. Sodium hypochlorite reduced E. coli and Salmonella typhimurium by 3.13 Log10/25 cm(2) and 2.73 Log10/25 cm(2), respectively. Organic-based and silver-based products reduced E. coli and S. typhimurium by 2.23 Log10/25 cm(2), 1.74 Log10/25 cm(2) and 2.10 Log10/25 cm(2), 1.92 Log10/25 cm(2), respectively. The results showed that greater attention is needed in selecting sanitizing products to kill or remove human pathogens from fresh produce to minimize risk of foodborne infections. PMID:23067329

  1. Propanediol utilization genes (pdu) of Salmonella typhimurium: three genes for the propanediol dehydratase.

    PubMed Central

    Bobik, T A; Xu, Y; Jeter, R M; Otto, K E; Roth, J R

    1997-01-01

    The propanediol utilization (pdu) operon of Salmonella typhimurium encodes proteins required for the catabolism of propanediol, including a coenzyme B12-dependent propanediol dehydratase. A clone that expresses propanediol dehydratase activity was isolated from a Salmonella genomic library. DNA sequence analysis showed that the clone included part of the pduF gene, the pduABCDE genes, and a long partial open reading frame (ORF1). The clone included 3.9 kbp of pdu DNA which had not been previously sequenced. Complementation and expression studies with subclones constructed via PCR showed that three genes (pduCDE) are necessary and sufficient for propanediol dehydratase activity. The function of ORF1 was not determined. Analyses showed that the S. typhimurium propanediol dehydratase was related to coenzyme B12-dependent glycerol dehydratases from Citrobacter freundii and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Unexpectedly, the S. typhimurium propanediol dehydratase was found to be 98% identical in amino acid sequence to the Klebsiella oxytoca propanediol dehydratase; this is a much higher identity than expected, given the relationship between these organisms. DNA sequence analyses also supported previous studies indicating that the pdu operon was inherited along with the adjacent cobalamin biosynthesis operon by a single horizontal gene transfer. PMID:9352910

  2. The inositol phosphatase SHIP controls Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection in vivo.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Jennifer L; Sly, Laura M; Krystal, Gerald; Finlay, B Brett

    2008-07-01

    The SH2 domain-containing inositol 5'-phosphatase, SHIP, negatively regulates various hematopoietic cell functions and is critical for maintaining immune homeostasis. However, whether SHIP plays a role in controlling bacterial infections in vivo remains unknown. Salmonella enterica causes human salmonellosis, a disease that ranges in severity from mild gastroenteritis to severe systemic illness, resulting in significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. The susceptibility of ship(+/+) and ship(-/-) mice and bone marrow-derived macrophages to S. enterica serovar Typhimurium infection was compared. ship(-/-) mice displayed an increased susceptibility to both oral and intraperitoneal serovar Typhimurium infection and had significantly higher bacterial loads in intestinal and systemic sites than ship(+/+) mice, indicating a role for SHIP in the gut-associated and systemic pathogenesis of serovar Typhimurium in vivo. Cytokine analysis of serum from orally infected mice showed that ship(-/-) mice produce lower levels of Th1 cytokines than do ship(+/+) animals at 2 days postinfection, and in vitro analysis of supernatants taken from infected bone marrow-derived macrophages derived to mimic the in vivo ship(-/-) alternatively activated (M2) macrophage phenotype correlated with these data. M2 macrophages were the predominant population in vivo in both oral and intraperitoneal infections, since tissue macrophages within the small intestine and peritoneal macrophages from ship(-/-) mice showed elevated levels of the M2 macrophage markers Ym1 and Arginase 1 compared to ship(+/+) cells. Based on these data, we propose that M2 macrophage skewing in ship(-/-) mice contributes to ineffective clearance of Salmonella in vivo.

  3. Sanitizing alternatives for Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium on bell peppers at household kitchens.

    PubMed

    Soto Beltran, Marcela; Jimenez Edeza, Maribel; Viera, Celina; Martinez, Celida I; Chaidez, Cristobal

    2013-01-01

    Fresh fruits and vegetables are known to play an important role as carriers of disease-causing organisms in household kitchens. The aims of this study were to assess and compare the effectiveness of sodium hypochlorite, organic acid-based and silver-based products to reduce Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium inoculated on individual bell pepper pieces. Inoculated bell pepper pieces (n = 5) were submerged in sodium hypochlorite, organic acid-based and silver-based product solutions, at the concentration specified in the product label for sanitization of fruits and vegetables. Sodium hypochlorite reduced E. coli and Salmonella typhimurium by 3.13 Log10/25 cm(2) and 2.73 Log10/25 cm(2), respectively. Organic-based and silver-based products reduced E. coli and S. typhimurium by 2.23 Log10/25 cm(2), 1.74 Log10/25 cm(2) and 2.10 Log10/25 cm(2), 1.92 Log10/25 cm(2), respectively. The results showed that greater attention is needed in selecting sanitizing products to kill or remove human pathogens from fresh produce to minimize risk of foodborne infections.

  4. Iron regulated genes of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in response to norepinephrine and the requirement of fepCDG for norepinephrine-enhanced growth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The presence of catecholamines in vivo may stimulate enteric bacteria including the foodborne pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium by two mechanisms, acting as a quorum sensing signal and providing iron in the presence of serum. To identify genes of Salmonella Typhimurium that participa...

  5. Chloramphenicol and tetracycline decrease motility and increase invasion and attachment gene expression in specific isolates of multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) is one of the most common serovars isolated from humans and livestock, and over 35 percent of these isolates are resistant to three or more antibiotics. Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella is a public health concern as it is associated with i...

  6. Antibiotic Resistance in Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Associates with CRISPR Sequence Type

    PubMed Central

    DiMarzio, Michael; Shariat, Nikki; Kariyawasam, Subhashinie; Barrangou, Rodolphe

    2013-01-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium is a leading cause of food-borne salmonellosis in the United States. The number of antibiotic-resistant isolates identified in humans is steadily increasing, suggesting that the spread of antibiotic-resistant strains is a major threat to public health. S. Typhimurium is commonly identified in a wide range of animal hosts, food sources, and environments, but little is known about the factors mediating the spread of antibiotic resistance in this ecologically complex serovar. Previously, we developed a subtyping method, CRISPR–multi-virulence-locus sequence typing (MVLST), which discriminates among strains of several common S. enterica serovars. Here, CRISPR-MVLST identified 22 sequence types within a collection of 76 S. Typhimurium isolates from a variety of animal sources throughout central Pennsylvania. Six of the sequence types were identified in more than one isolate, and we observed statistically significant differences in resistance among these sequence types to 7 antibiotics commonly used in veterinary and human medicine, such as ceftiofur and ampicillin (P < 0.05). Importantly, five of these sequence types were subsequently identified in human clinical isolates, and a subset of these isolates had identical antibiotic resistance patterns, suggesting that these subpopulations are being transmitted through the food system. Therefore, CRISPR-MVLST is a promising subtyping method for monitoring the farm-to-fork spread of antibiotic resistance in S. Typhimurium. PMID:23796925

  7. Regulation of fucose and 1,2-propanediol utilization by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Staib, Lena; Fuchs, Thilo M

    2015-01-01

    After ingestion, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) encounters a densely populated, competitive environment in the gastrointestinal tract. To escape nutrient limitation caused by the intestinal microbiota, this pathogen has acquired specific metabolic traits to use compounds that are not metabolized by the commensal bacteria. For example, the utilization of 1,2-propanediol (1,2-PD), a product of the fermentation of L-fucose, which is present in foods of herbal origin and is also a terminal sugar of gut mucins. Under anaerobic conditions and in the presence of tetrathionate, 1,2-PD can serve as an energy source for S. Typhimurium. Comprehensive database analysis revealed that the 1,2-PD and fucose utilization operons are present in all S. enterica serovars sequenced thus far. The operon, consisting of 21 genes, is expressed as a single polycistronic mRNA. As demonstrated here, 1,2-PD was formed and further used when S. Typhimurium strain 14028 was grown with L-fucose, and the gene fucA encoding L-fuculose-1-phosphate aldolase was required for this growth. Using promoter fusions, we monitored the expression of the propanediol utilization operon that was induced at very low concentrations of 1,2-PD and was inhibited by the presence of D-glucose.

  8. Cloning and properties of the Salmonella typhimurium tricarboxylate transport operon in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Widenhorn, K.A.; Boos, W.; Somers, J.M.; Kay, W.W.

    1988-02-01

    The tricarboxylate transport operon (tctI) was cloned in Escherichia coli as a 12-kilobase (kb) fragment from an EcoRI library of the Salmonella typhimurium chromosome in lambdagtWES. It was further subcloned as a 12-kb fragment into pACYC184 and as an 8-kb fragment into pBR322. By insertional mutagenesis mediated by lambdaTn5, restriction mapping, and phenotypic testing, the tctI operon was localized to a 4.5-kb region. The tctC gene which encodes a periplasmic binding protein (C-protein) was located near the center of the insert. E. coli/tctI clones on either multicopy or single-copy vectors grew on the same tricarboxylates as S. typhimurium, although unusually long growth lags were observed. E. coli/tctI clones exhibited similar (/sup 14/C) fluorocitrate transport kinetics to those of S. typhimurium, whereas E. coli alone was virtually impermeable to (/sup 14/C) fluorocitrate. The periplasmic C proteins (C1 and C2 isoelectric forms) were produced in prodigious quantities from the cloned strains. Motile E. coli/tctI clones were not chemotactic toward citrate, whereas tctI deletion mutants of S. typhimurium were. Taken together, these observations indicate that tctI is not an operon involved in chemotaxis.

  9. Bioprobes Based on Aptamer and Silica Fluorescent Nanoparticles for Bacteria Salmonella typhimurium Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiu-Yue; Kang, Yan-Jun

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we have developed an efficient method based on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) aptamers along with silica fluorescence nanoparticles for bacteria Salmonella typhimurium detection. Carboxyl-modified Tris(2,2'-bipyridyl)dichlororuthenium(II) hexahydrate (RuBPY)-doped silica nanoparticles (COOH-FSiNPs) were prepared using reverse microemulsion method, and the streptavidin was conjugated to the surface of the prepared COOH-FSiNPs. The bacteria S. typhimurium was incubated with a specific ssDNA biotin-labeled aptamer, and then the aptamer-bacteria conjugates were treated with the synthetic streptavidin-conjugated silica fluorescence nanoprobes (SA-FSiNPs). The results under fluorescence microscopy show that SA-FSiNPs can be applied effectively for the labeling of bacteria S. typhimurium with great photostable property. To further verify the specificity of SA-FSiNPs out of multiple bacterial conditions, variant concentrations of bacteria mixtures composed of bacteria S. typhimurium, Escherichia coli, and Bacillus subtilis were treated with SA-FSiNPs.

  10. tRNA modified bases and oxidative stress in Salmonella typhimurium

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, G.F.

    1987-01-01

    The mechanisms of toxicity of two different environmental stresses have been characterized in Salmonella typhimurium. The toxicity of near-UV (NUV) light (300-400 nm) appeared to be mediated by oxidative mechanisms. The overproduction of NUV-absorbing proteins sensitized the cells to killing by NUV. Selenium also appeared to be toxic to S. typhimurium by oxidative mechanisms. At low concentrations, the main target for this toxicity appeared to be intracellular thiols. At higher concentrations, selenite toxicity appeared to have been mediated by oxygen radicals which we have shown to be produced by the reactions of selenite with sulfhydryl groups. Such radicals may also have been involved in the selenite mutagenicity we have observed in S. typhimurium. The function of two different modified bases with respect to such oxidative stress has been characterized. The isolation of mutants lacking these bases has facilitated this investigation. S. typhimurium contained a single seleno-modified base, 5-methylaminomethyl-2-selenouridine (mnm{sup 5}Se{sup 2}U). Mutants which were unable to incorporate selenium into their tRNA (selA) were isolated based on a pleiotropic defect in selenium metabolism.

  11. Regulation of fucose and 1,2-propanediol utilization by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Staib, Lena; Fuchs, Thilo M.

    2015-01-01

    After ingestion, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) encounters a densely populated, competitive environment in the gastrointestinal tract. To escape nutrient limitation caused by the intestinal microbiota, this pathogen has acquired specific metabolic traits to use compounds that are not metabolized by the commensal bacteria. For example, the utilization of 1,2-propanediol (1,2-PD), a product of the fermentation of L-fucose, which is present in foods of herbal origin and is also a terminal sugar of gut mucins. Under anaerobic conditions and in the presence of tetrathionate, 1,2-PD can serve as an energy source for S. Typhimurium. Comprehensive database analysis revealed that the 1,2-PD and fucose utilization operons are present in all S. enterica serovars sequenced thus far. The operon, consisting of 21 genes, is expressed as a single polycistronic mRNA. As demonstrated here, 1,2-PD was formed and further used when S. Typhimurium strain 14028 was grown with L-fucose, and the gene fucA encoding L-fuculose-1-phosphate aldolase was required for this growth. Using promoter fusions, we monitored the expression of the propanediol utilization operon that was induced at very low concentrations of 1,2-PD and was inhibited by the presence of D-glucose. PMID:26528264

  12. Fur regulon of Salmonella typhimurium: identification of new iron-regulated genes.

    PubMed Central

    Tsolis, R M; Bäumler, A J; Stojiljkovic, I; Heffron, F

    1995-01-01

    In order to identify genes belonging to the Fur regulon of Salmonella typhimurium, a bank of 10,000 independent S. typhimurium MudJ insertion mutants was screened for lacZ fusions regulated by the iron response regulator Fur. In parallel, a plasmid gene bank of S. typhimurium consisting of 10,000 independent clones was screened for Fur-regulated promoters or iron binding proteins by the Fur titration assay (FURTA). Fur-regulated MudJ insertions and Fur-regulated promoters were mapped. In addition, iron-regulated promoter activities of transcriptional fusions from MudJ insertions and FURTA-positive clones were quantified. The nucleotide sequences of 11 FURTA-positive plasmids and of short fragments of DNA flanking three MudJ insertions were determined. By these methods we identified 14 Fur-regulated genes of S. typhimurium. For 11 of these genes, Fur-regulated homologs have been described in Escherichia coli or Yersinia enterocolitica, including fhuA,fhuB,fepA,fes,fepD,p43,entB,fur ,foxA,hemP, and fhuE. In addition, we identified three genes with homologs in other bacteria which have not previously been shown to be Fur regulated. PMID:7642488

  13. H2-M3 Major Histocompatibility Complex Class Ib-Restricted CD8 T Cells Induced by Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Infection Recognize Proteins Released by Salmonella Serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Ugrinovic, S.; Brooks, C. G.; Robson, J.; Blacklaws, B. A.; Hormaeche, C. E.; Robinson, J. H.

    2005-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium causes a typhoid-like disease in mice which has been studied extensively as a model for typhoid fever in humans. CD8 T cells contribute to protection against S. enterica serovar Typhimurium in mice, but little is known about the specificity and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) restriction of the response. We report here that CD8 T-cell lines derived from S. enterica serovar Typhimurium-infected BALB/c mice lysed bone marrow macrophages infected with S. enterica serovar Typhimurium or pulsed with proteins from S. enterica serovar Typhimurium culture supernatants. Cytoxicity was beta-2-microglobulin dependent and largely TAP dependent, although not MHC class Ia restricted, as target cells of several different MHC haplotypes were lysed. The data suggested the participation of class Ib MHC molecules although no evidence for the presence of Qa1-restricted T cells could be found, unlike in previous reports. Instead, the T-cell lines lysed H2-M3-transfected fibroblasts infected with S. enterica serovar Typhimurium SL3261 or treated with Salmonella culture supernatants. Thus, this report increases the number of MHC class Ib antigen-presenting molecules known for Salmonella antigens to three: Qa-1, HLA-E, and now H2-M3. It also expands the range of pathogens that induce H2-M3-restricted CD8 T cells to include an example of gram-negative bacteria. PMID:16299293

  14. Tackling the issue of environmental survival of live Salmonella Typhimurium vaccines: deletion of the lon gene.

    PubMed

    Leyman, Bregje; Boyen, Filip; Van Parys, Alexander; Verbrugghe, Elin; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Pasmans, Frank

    2012-12-01

    Vaccination is an important measure to control Salmonella contamination in the meat production chain. A previous study showed that both the ΔrfaJ and ΔrfaL strains are suitable markers and allow serological differentiation of infected and vaccinated animals. The aim of this study was to verify whether deletion of the lon gene in a Salmonella Typhimurium ΔrfaJ marker strain resulted in decreased environmental survival. Our results indicate that deletion of the lon gene in the ΔrfaJ strain did not affect invasiveness in IPEC-J2 cells and resulted in an increased susceptibility to UV, disinfectants (such as hydrogen peroxide and tosylchloramide sodium) and citric acid. Immunization of pigs with inactivated ΔrfaJ or ΔlonΔrfaJ vaccines allowed differentiation of infected and vaccinated pigs. Furthermore, deletion of the lon gene did not reduce the protection conferred by live wild type or ΔrfaJ vaccines against subsequent challenge with a virulent Salmonella Typhimurium strain in BALB/c mice. Based on our results in mice, we conclude that deletion of lon in ΔrfaJ contributes to environmental safety of the ΔrfaJ DIVA strain.

  15. Whole Genome Sequencing for the Retrospective Investigation of an Outbreak of Salmonella Typhimurium DT 8

    PubMed Central

    Ashton, Philip M; Peters, Tansy; Ameh, Linda; McAleer, Ralph; Petrie, Stewart; Nair, Satheesh; Muscat, Ivan; de Pinna, Elizabeth; Dallman, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Background: Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT8 is uncommon within the European Union. An increase in this phage type was reported in the summer of 2013 in the States of Jersey. Methods: A total of 21 human cases with this phage type were microbiologically confirmed. Salmonella isolates from mayonnaise made using raw eggs were also confirmed as being Salmonella Typhimurium DT8. The epidemiological investigations strongly supported a link between mayonnaise consumption and illness. Whole genome sequencing (WGS) was used to retrospectively investigate this outbreak with a view to assess the similarity between the suspect food and the human isolates and to characterise a known point source outbreak to assist in development of algorithms for outbreak detection. Results: Sequence data showed that the outbreak associated isolates, including the food isolates, formed a tightly clustered monophyletic group, with a maximum pairwise distance of 3 single nucleotide polymorphisms. Conclusions: WGS data is useful in confirming the causative agent of outbreaks where food and clinical isolates are available. This dataset, comprising a known outbreak, will be useful in the development of automatic algorithms for outbreak detection. PMID:25713745

  16. Development of ceftriaxone resistance affects the virulence properties of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium strains.

    PubMed

    Li, Liang; Yang, Yu-Rong; Liao, Xiao-Ping; Lei, Chun-Yin; Sun, Jian; Li, Lu-Lu; Liu, Bao-Tao; Yang, Shou-Shen; Liu, Ya-Hong

    2013-01-01

    Development of antibiotic resistance may alter the virulence properties of bacterial organisms. In this study, nine clinical ceftriaxone-susceptible Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium strains were subjected to stepwise selection with increasing concentrations of ceftriaxone in culture media. Mutations in virulence-associated genes and antibiotic efflux genes were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA sequencing. The expression levels of virulence genes invA and stn as well as efflux pump genes tolC, arcA, and arcB before and after the selection were measured by real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The stepwise selection resulted in the development of Salmonella strains that were highly resistant to ceftriaxone. Sequence analysis did not reveal any mutations or deletions in the examined virulence genes and regulatory gene, but a silent mutation (T423C) in acrR (encoding a repressor for the efflux pump) was detected in most of the ceftriaxone-resistant strains. The qRT-PCR revealed increased expression of the AcrAB-TolC efflux pump and decreased expression of invA and stn in the ceftriaxone-resistant strains. Moreover, decreased invasion into cultured epithelial cells and reduced growth rates were observed with the resistant strains. These results suggest that acquisition of ceftriaxone resistance is associated with the overexpression of the AcrAB-TolC efflux pump and leads to reduced virulence in Salmonella Typhimurium.

  17. MdsABC-Mediated Pathway for Pathogenicity in Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Song, Saemee; Lee, Boeun; Yeom, Ji-Hyun; Hwang, Soonhye; Kang, Ilnam; Cho, Jang-Cheon; Ha, Nam-Chul; Bae, Jeehyeon; Lee, Kangseok; Kim, Yong-Hak

    2015-11-01

    MdsABC is a Salmonella-specific tripartite efflux pump that has been implicated in the virulence of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium; however, little is known about the virulence factors associated with this pump. We observed MdsABC expression-dependent alterations in the degree of resistance to extracellular oxidative stress and macrophage-mediated killing. Thin-layer chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry analyses revealed that overexpression of MdsABC led to increased secretion of 1-palmitoyl-2-stearoyl-phosphatidylserine (PSPS), affecting the ability of the bacteria to invade and survive in host cells. Overexpression of MdsABC and external addition of PSPS similarly rendered the mdsABC deletion strain resistant to diamide. Diagonal gel analysis showed that PSPS treatment reduced the diamide-mediated formation of disulfide bonds, particularly in the membrane fraction of the bacteria. Salmonella infection of macrophages induced the upregulation of MdsABC expression and led to an increase of intracellular bacterial number and host cell death, similar to the effects of MdsABC overexpression and PSPS pretreatment on the mdsABC deletion strain. Our study shows that MdsABC mediates a previously uncharacterized pathway that involves PSPS as a key factor for the survival and virulence of S. Typhimurium in phagocytic cells.

  18. Type VI Secretion System-Associated Gene Clusters Contribute to Pathogenesis of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Mulder, David T.; Cooper, Colin A.

    2012-01-01

    The enteropathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium employs a suite of tightly regulated virulence factors within the intracellular compartment of phagocytic host cells resulting in systemic dissemination in mice. A type VI secretion system (T6SS) within Salmonella pathogenicity island 6 (SPI-6) has been implicated in this process; however, the regulatory inputs and the roles of noncore genes in this system are not well understood. Here we describe four clusters of noncore T6SS genes in SPI-6 based on a comparative relationship with the T6SS-3 of Burkholderia mallei and report that the disruption of these genes results in defects in intracellular replication and systemic dissemination in mice. In addition, we show that the expression of the SPI-6-encoded Hcp and VgrG orthologs is enhanced during late stages of macrophage infection. We identify six regions that are transcriptionally active during cell infections and that have regulatory contributions from the regulators of virulence SsrB, PhoP, and SlyA. We show that levels of protein expression are very weak under in vitro conditions and that expression is not enhanced upon the deletion of ssrB, phoP, slyA, qseC, ompR, or hfq, suggesting an unknown activating factor. These data suggest that the SPI-6 T6SS has been integrated into the Salmonella Typhimurium virulence network and customized for host-pathogen interactions through the action of noncore genes. PMID:22493086

  19. Role of Nod1 in mucosal dendritic cells during Salmonella pathogenicity island 1-independent Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection.

    PubMed

    Le Bourhis, Lionel; Magalhaes, Joao Gamelas; Selvanantham, Thirumahal; Travassos, Leonardo H; Geddes, Kaoru; Fritz, Jörg H; Viala, Jérôme; Tedin, Karsten; Girardin, Stephen E; Philpott, Dana J

    2009-10-01

    Recent advances in immunology have highlighted the critical function of pattern-recognition molecules (PRMs) in generating the innate immune response to effectively target pathogens. Nod1 and Nod2 are intracellular PRMs that detect peptidoglycan motifs from the cell walls of bacteria once they gain access to the cytosol. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is an enteric intracellular pathogen that causes a severe disease in the mouse model. This pathogen resides within vacuoles inside the cell, but the question of whether cytosolic PRMs such as Nod1 and Nod2 could have an impact on the course of S. Typhimurium infection in vivo has not been addressed. Here, we show that deficiency in the PRM Nod1, but not Nod2, resulted in increased susceptibility toward a mutant strain of S. Typhimurium that targets directly lamina propria dendritic cells (DCs) for its entry into the host. Using this bacterium and bone marrow chimeras, we uncovered a surprising role for Nod1 in myeloid cells controlling bacterial infection at the level of the intestinal lamina propria. Indeed, DCs deficient for Nod1 exhibited impaired clearance of the bacteria, both in vitro and in vivo, leading to increased organ colonization and decreased host survival after oral infection. Taken together, these findings demonstrate a key role for Nod1 in the host response to an enteric bacterial pathogen through the modulation of intestinal lamina propria DCs.

  20. Growth response of Salmonella typhimurium in the presence of natural and synthetic antimicrobials: estimation of MICs from three different models.

    PubMed

    Guillier, L; Nazer, A I; Dubois-Brissonnet, F

    2007-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the MICs of 14 antimicrobials for Salmonella Typhimurium with three methods and to check the influence of experiment duration on the estimation of MICs. The growth of Salmonella Typhimurium in a brain heart infusion medium containing various concentrations of natural aromatic compounds, organic acids, or salts was monitored by absorbance measurements for 24 or 72 h. Three different ways of analyzing optical density (OD) curves were tested for the determination of MICs. Both quantitative methods gave similar MICs for most of the compounds. The semiquantitative method does not allow estimating the MIC for all compounds. Noticeable differences were found between MICs obtained for 24- or 72-h experiments, whatever the method used. The proposed methods and models can be used for the estimation of MICs from OD data. MICs could be used for a quantitative approach to Salmonella Typhimurium growth.

  1. Salmonella typhimurium TnphoA mutants with increased sensitivity to biological and chemical detergents.

    PubMed

    Lacroix, F J; Avoyne, C; Pinault, C; Popoff, M Y; Pardon, P

    1995-10-01

    Salmonella typhimurium is a ubiquitous pathogenic bacterium able to sustain the environmental conditions of the gastrointestinal tract, including biliary salts. To understand the mechanisms involved in bile salt resistance and, more generally, detergent resistance, we investigated S. typhimurium mutants produced with the random mutagenic TnphoA transposon. A total of 3,000 transpositional mutants were isolated. Three strains among the 1,432 first mutants lost the ability to grow in the presence of biological and chemical detergents. They were prototrophic and exhibited normal lipopolysaccharide and outer membrane protein profiles after SDS-PAGE. They did not show sensitivity to dyes but showed very different sensitivities to antibiotics. For each mutant strain, Southern blotting analysis revealed a unique TnphoA insertion at different chromosomal locations. These observations were confirmed by transduction experiments.

  2. Competitive exclusion of Salmonella typhimurium in broilers fed with vermicompost and complex carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Spencer, J L; Chambers, J R; Modler, H W

    1998-01-01

    Vermicompost (VC) was produced by earthworms fed with fresh chicken faeces, and was earth-like in appearance and odour. In three experiments, VC was sprinkled on the first feed of newly-hatched broiler chicks. Treated and control groups were challenged on day 6 by the addition of seeder chicks that had been inoculated orally with Salmonella typhimurium. Chickens were killed at intervals during a 6-week period and were tested for colonization of the pathogen in the crop, caecum and internal organs. The VC-treated groups were significantly more resistant (p < 0.01) to colonization by S. typhimurium than the untreated controls. In one experiment, the VC treatment appeared to have conferred complete protection against colonization of both the crop and caecum. Colonization of the crop was increased transiently by addition to the diet of 2.5% fructooligosaccharide, xylo-oligosaccharide or transgalactosylated oligosaccharide. The influence of these carbohydrates on colonization of the caecum was variable. PMID:18484271

  3. Combined effect of acetate and reduced water activity in survival of Salmonella typhimurium 7136.

    PubMed

    Meyer, L B; Martin, S E; Witter, L D

    1981-05-01

    Whereas Salmonella typhimurium 7136 will not grow at reduced water activity (aw), it was survival in such items as intermediate-moisture foods is of interest. Initial studies demonstrated that the addition of 0.3 M acetate (pH 4.7) to glycerol-Trypticase soy broth (BBL Microbiology Systems) solutions (aw 0.86) reduced the viability of S. typhimurium cells. The extent of death of cells exposed to reduced aw was increased by decreasing the pH or increasing the concentration of acetate. Acidification of glycerol-Trypticase soy broth reduced the D40 degrees C value exhibited by cells exposed to a range of aw solutions (0.65 to 0.92). Acetate appeared to affect survival more dramatically as aw values approached the minimum growth limit. Acidification with acetate also reduced cell survival in a variety of humectant solutions with an aw of 0.86 (glycerol, dextrose, and NaCl). PMID:7020593

  4. Isolation and characterization of mutants of Salmonella typhimurium with a disturbed process of generation of nonculturable forms

    SciTech Connect

    Romanova, Y.M.; Terekhov, A.A.; Gintsburg, A.L.

    1995-08-01

    A laboratory model of the induction of nonculturable forms in Salmonella typhimurium has been developed. Mutants of S. typhimurium were obtained using insertion mutagenesis via the TnPhoA transposon. These mutants were impaired in the cell transition from the vegetative to the nonculturable state assayed in this model. Mutants have various phenotypes and are located in different regions of the chromosome, as shown by the data obtained using pulsed-field electrophoresis of genomic DNA. 11 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Correlates of protection induced by live Aro- Salmonella typhimurium vaccines in the murine typhoid model.

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, J A; Villarreal-Ramos, B; Mastroeni, P; Demarco de Hormaeche, R; Hormaeche, C E

    1997-01-01

    Live attenuated salmonella vaccines generally confer better protection than killed vaccines. The immune responses in BALB/c mice elicited by immunization with a live attenuated Aro Salmonella typhimurium vaccine given orally, intravenously or subcutaneously were compared with those elicited by killed whole-cell vaccines (acetone or heat-treated) given subcutaneously. Live vaccines given by all routes elicited higher interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) responses in spleen cells against an alkali-treated whole-cell salmonella lysate than did killed vaccines. Live and killed vaccines elicited high total antibody levels to smooth lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay), but all live vaccine regimes elicited higher IgG2a, suggesting a Th1 response. Oral and intravenous vaccination with live organisms elicited IgA against smooth LPS which subcutaneous vaccination with live or killed salmonellae failed to evoke. Western blots using rough whole-cell lysates showed that all vaccines elicited a varied anti-protein response; however, all groups immunized with live organisms recognized three unidentified bands of MW 52,000, 46,000 and 18,000 which were consistently absent in groups immunized with killed organisms. The results indicate that immunization with live aroA salmonellae elicited a Th1 type of response, including bystander T-cell help to LPS, and a response to proteins not seen in mice that received killed vaccines. Images Figure 6 PMID:9176117

  6. Inherent Variability of Growth Media Impacts the Ability of Salmonella Typhimurium to Interact with Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sridhar, Sushmita; Steele-Mortimer, Olivia

    2016-01-01

    Efficient invasion of non-phagocytic cells, such as intestinal epithelial cells, by Salmonella Typhimurium is dependent on the Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1 (SPI-1)-encoded Type Three Secretion System. The environmental cues involved in SPI-1 induction are not well understood. In vitro, various conditions are used to induce SPI-1 and the invasive phenotype. Although lysogeny broth (LB) is widely used, multiple formulations exist, and variation can arise due to intrinsic differences in complex components. Minimal media are also susceptible to variation. Still, the impact of these inconsistencies on Salmonella virulence gene expression has not been well studied. The goal of this project is to identify growth conditions in LB and minimal medium that affect SPI-1 induction in vitro using both whole population and single cell analysis. Here we show, using a fluorescent reporter of the SPI-1 gene prgH, that growth of Salmonella in LB yields variable induction. Deliberate modification of media components can influence the invasive profile. Finally, we demonstrate that changes in SPI-1 inducing conditions can affect the ability of Salmonella to replicate intracellularly. These data indicate that the specific media growth conditions impact how the bacteria interact with host cells. PMID:27280414

  7. Inherent Variability of Growth Media Impacts the Ability of Salmonella Typhimurium to Interact with Host Cells.

    PubMed

    Sridhar, Sushmita; Steele-Mortimer, Olivia

    2016-01-01

    Efficient invasion of non-phagocytic cells, such as intestinal epithelial cells, by Salmonella Typhimurium is dependent on the Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1 (SPI-1)-encoded Type Three Secretion System. The environmental cues involved in SPI-1 induction are not well understood. In vitro, various conditions are used to induce SPI-1 and the invasive phenotype. Although lysogeny broth (LB) is widely used, multiple formulations exist, and variation can arise due to intrinsic differences in complex components. Minimal media are also susceptible to variation. Still, the impact of these inconsistencies on Salmonella virulence gene expression has not been well studied. The goal of this project is to identify growth conditions in LB and minimal medium that affect SPI-1 induction in vitro using both whole population and single cell analysis. Here we show, using a fluorescent reporter of the SPI-1 gene prgH, that growth of Salmonella in LB yields variable induction. Deliberate modification of media components can influence the invasive profile. Finally, we demonstrate that changes in SPI-1 inducing conditions can affect the ability of Salmonella to replicate intracellularly. These data indicate that the specific media growth conditions impact how the bacteria interact with host cells.

  8. An allelotyping PCR for identifying Salmonella enterica serovars Enteritidis, Hadar, Heidelberg, and Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Maurer, John J; Lee, Margie D; Cheng, Ying; Pedroso, Adriana

    2011-07-22

    Current commercial PCRs tests for identifying Salmonella target genes unique to this genus. However, there are two species, six subspecies, and over 2,500 different Salmonella serovars, and not all are equal in their significance to public health. For example, finding S. enterica subspecies IIIa Arizona on a table egg layer farm is insignificant compared to the isolation of S. enterica subspecies I serovar Enteritidis, the leading cause of salmonellosis linked to the consumption of table eggs. Serovars are identified based on antigenic differences in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)(O antigen) and flagellin (H1 and H2 antigens). These antigenic differences are the outward appearance of the diversity of genes and gene alleles associated with this phenotype. We have developed an allelotyping, multiplex PCR that keys on genetic differences between four major S. enterica subspecies I serovars found in poultry and associated with significant human disease in the US. The PCR primer pairs were targeted to key genes or sequences unique to a specific Salmonella serovar and designed to produce an amplicon with size specific for that gene or allele. Salmonella serovar is assigned to an isolate based on the combination of PCR test results for specific LPS and flagellin gene alleles. The multiplex PCRs described in this article are specific for the detection of S. enterica subspecies I serovars Enteritidis, Hadar, Heidelberg, and Typhimurium. Here we demonstrate how to use the multiplex PCRs to identify serovar for a Salmonella isolate.

  9. The Salmonella typhimurium mar locus: molecular and genetic analyses and assessment of its role in virulence.

    PubMed Central

    Sulavik, M C; Dazer, M; Miller, P F

    1997-01-01

    The marRAB operon is a regulatory locus that controls multiple drug resistance in Escherichia coli. marA encodes a positive regulator of the antibiotic resistance response, acting by altering the expression of unlinked genes. marR encodes a repressor of marRAB transcription and controls the production of MarA in response to environmental signals. A molecular and genetic study of the homologous operon in Salmonella typhimurium was undertaken, and the role of marA in virulence in a murine model was assessed. Expression of E. coli marA (marAEC) present on a multicopy plasmid in S. typhimurium resulted in a multiple antibiotic resistance (Mar) phenotype, suggesting that a similar regulon exists in this organism. A genomic plasmid library containing S. typhimurium chromosomal sequences was introduced into an E. coli strain that was deleted for the mar locus and contained a single-copy marR'-'lacZ translational fusion. Plasmid clones that contained both S. typhimurium marR (marRSt) and marA (marASt) genes were identified as those that were capable of repressing expression of the fusion and which resulted in a Mar phenotype. The predicted amino acid sequences of MarRSt, MarASt, and MarBSt were 91, 86, and 42% identical, respectively, to the same genes from E. coli, while the operator/promoter region of the operon was 86% identical to the same 98-nucleotide-upstream region in E. coli. The marRAB transcriptional start sites for both organisms were determined by primer extension, and a marRABSt transcript of approximately 1.1 kb was identified by Northern blot analysis. Its accumulation was shown to be inducible by sodium salicylate. Open reading frames flanking the marRAB operon were also conserved. An S. typhimurium marA disruption strain was constructed by an allelic exchange method and compared to the wild-type strain for virulence in a murine BALB/c infection model. No effect on virulence was noted. The endogenous S. typhimurium plasmid that is associated with virulence

  10. Bacteriophages with potential to inactivate Salmonella Typhimurium: Use of single phage suspensions and phage cocktails.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Carla; Moreirinha, Catarina; Lewicka, Magdalena; Almeida, Paulo; Clemente, Carla; Cunha, Ângela; Delgadillo, Ivonne; Romalde, Jésus L; Nunes, Maria L; Almeida, Adelaide

    2016-07-15

    The aim of this study was to compare the dynamics of three previously isolated bacteriophages (or phages) individually (phSE-1, phSE-2 and phSE-5) or combined in cocktails of two or three phages (phSE-1/phSE-2, phSE-1/phSE-5, phSE-2/phSE-5 and phSE-1/phSE-2/phSE-5) to control Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (Salmonella Typhimurium) in order to evaluate their potential application during depuration. Phages were assigned to the family Siphoviridae and revealed identical restriction digest profiles, although they showed a different phage adsorption, host range, burst size, explosion time and survival in seawater. The three phages were effective against S. Typhimurium (reduction of ∼2.0 log CFU/mL after 4h treatment). The use of cocktails was not significantly more effective than the use of single phages. A big fraction of the remained bacteria are phage-resistant mutants (frequency of phage-resistant mutants 9.19×10(-5)-5.11×10(-4)) but phage- resistant bacterial mutants was lower for the cocktail phages than for the single phage suspensions and the phage phSE-1 presented the highest rate of resistance and phage phSE-5 the lowest one. The spectral changes of S. Typhimurium resistant and phage-sensitive cells were compared and revealed relevant differences for peaks associated to amide I (1620cm(-1)) and amide II (1515cm(-1)) from proteins and from carbohydrates and phosphates region (1080-1000cm(-1)). Despite the similar efficiency of individual phages, the development of lower resistance indicates that phage cocktails might be the most promising choice to be used during the bivalve depuration to control the transmission of salmonellosis.

  11. Generalized transduction between Salmonella typhi and Salmonella typhimurium by phage j2 and characterization of the j2 plasmid in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Mise, K; Yoshida, Y; Kawai, M

    1983-11-01

    Phage j2, a P1-like phage in Salmonella typhi, was heteroimmune to phage P1 and existed in the lysogenic state as a plasmid of molecular size 58.6 MDal. The phage j2 plasmid was incompatible with the P1 plasmid (IncY group). A j2-sensitive mutant of Salmonella typhimurium LT2 was isolated by transduction of j2Ap phage into LT2 followed by curing of the prophage. The mutant was used to demonstrate transduction between S. typhi and S. typhimurium by phage j2.

  12. Inactivation kinetics and virulence potential of Salmonella Typhimurium and Listeria monocytogenes treated by combined high pressure and nisin.

    PubMed

    Gou, Jingyu; Lee, Hyeon-Yong; Ahn, Juhee

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the physiological and molecular changes of Salmonella Typhimurium and Listeria monocytogenes in deionized water (DIW) and nisin solutions (100 IU/g) during high pressure processing (HPP). Strains of Salmonella Typhimurium and L. monocytogenes in DIW or nisin solutions were subjected to 200, 300, and 400 MPa for 20 min. The Weibull model adequately described the HPP inactivation of Salmonella Typhimurium and L. monocytogenes. Salmonella Typhimurium and L. monocytogenes populations were reduced to less than 1 CFU/ml in DIW and nisin solutions under 400 MPa. The highest b value was 5.75 for Salmonella Typhimurium in nisin solution under 400 MPa. L. monocytogenes was more sensitive to pressure change when suspended in DIW than when suspended in nisin. The pressure sensitivity of both Salmonella Typhimurium and L. monocytogenes was higher in DIW solution (141 to 243 MPa) than in nisin solution (608 to 872 MPa). No recovery of HPP-injured cells in DIW and nisin solutions treated at 400 MPa was observed after 7 days of refrigerated storage. The heterogeneity of HPP-treated cells was revealed in flow cytometry dot plots. The transcripts of stn, invA, prfA, and inlA were relatively down-regulated in HPP-treated nisin solution. The combination of high pressure and nisin could noticeably suppress the expression of virulence-associated genes. These results provide useful information for understanding the physiological and molecular characteristics of foodborne pathogens under high-pressure stress. PMID:21219737

  13. A comparative study of thermal and acid inactivation kinetics in fruit juices of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Salmonella enterica serovar Senftenberg grown at acidic conditions.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Ordóñez, Avelino; Fernández, Ana; Bernardo, Ana; López, Mercedes

    2009-11-01

    Acid and heat inactivation in orange and apple juices of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium Colección Española de Cultivos Tipo (i.e., Spanish Type Culture Collection) 443 (CECT 443) (Salmonella Typhimurium) and S. enterica serovar Senftenberg CECT 4384 (Salmonella Senftenberg) grown in buffered brain heart infusion (pH 7.0) and acidified brain heart infusion up to pH 4.5 with acetic, citric, lactic, and hydrochloric acids was evaluated. Acid adaptation induced an adaptive response that increased the subsequent resistance to extreme pH conditions (pH 2.5) and to heat, although the magnitude of these responses differed between the two isolates and fruit juices. The acid resistance in orange juice for acid-adapted cells (D-values of 28.3-34.5 min for Salmonella Senftenberg and 30.0-39.2 min for Salmonella Typhimurium) resulted to be about two to three times higher than that corresponding to non-acid-adapted cells. In apple juice, acid-adapted Salmonella Senftenberg cells survived better than those of Salmonella Typhimurium, obtaining mean D-values of 114.8 +/- 12.3 and 41.9 +/- 2.5 min, respectively. The thermotolerance of non-acid-adapted Salmonella Typhimurium in orange (D(58)-value: 0.028 min) and apple juices (D(58)-value: 0.10 min) was approximately double for acid-adapted cells. This cross-protection to heat was more strongly expressed in Salmonella Senftenberg. D(58)-values obtained for non-acid-adapted cells in orange (0.11 min) and apple juices (0.19 min) increased approximately 10 and 5 times, respectively, after their growth in acidified media. The conditions prevailing during bacterial growth and heat treatment did not significantly influence the z-values observed (6.0 +/- 0.3 degrees C for Salmonella Typhimurium and 7.0 +/- 0.3 degrees C for Salmonella Senftenberg). The enhanced acid resistance found for both isolates could enable them to survive for prolonged time periods in the gastrointestinal tract, increasing the risk of illness. Further, it

  14. Global gene expression of a murein (Braun) lipoprotein mutant of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium by microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Fadl, A A; Galindo, C L; Sha, J; Klimpel, G R; Popov, V L; Chopra, A K

    2006-06-01

    Braun/murein lipoprotein (Lpp) is one of the major outer membrane components of gram-negative enteric bacteria involved in inflammatory responses and septic shock. In previous studies, we reported that two copies of the lipoprotein (lpp) gene (designated as lppA and lppB) existed on the chromosome of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. Deletion of both lppA and lppB genes rendered Salmonella defective in invasion, motility, induction of cytotoxicity, and production of inflammatory cytokines/chemokines. The lppAB double-knockout (DKO) mutant was attenuated in mice, and animals immunized with this mutant were protected against subsequent challenge with lethal doses of wild-type (wt) S. Typhimurium. To better understand how deletion of the lpp gene might affect Salmonella virulence, we performed global transcriptional profiling of the genes in the wt and the lppAB DKO mutant of S. Typhimurium using microarrays. Our data revealed alterations in the expression of flagellar genes, invasion-associated type III secretion system genes, and transcriptional virulence gene regulators in the lppAB DKO mutant compared to wt S. Typhimurium. These data correlated with the lppAB DKO mutant phenotype and provided possible mechanism(s) of Lpp-associated attenuation in S. Typhimurium. Although these studies were performed in in vitro grown bacteria, our future research will be targeted at global transcriptional profiling of the genes in in vivo grown wt S. Typhimurium and its Lpp mutant.

  15. The NRAMP proteins of Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli are selective manganese transporters involved in the response to reactive oxygen.

    PubMed

    Kehres, D G; Zaharik, M L; Finlay, B B; Maguire, M E

    2000-06-01

    NRAMPs (natural resistance-associated macrophage proteins) have been characterized in mammals as divalent transition metal transporters involved in iron metabolism and host resistance to certain pathogens. The mechanism of pathogen resistance is proposed to involve sequestration of Fe2+ and Mn2+, cofactors of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic catalases and superoxide dismutases, not only to protect the macrophage against its own generation of reactive oxygen species, but to deny the cations to the pathogen for synthesis of its protective enzymes. NRAMP homologues are also present in bacteria. We report the cloning and characterization of the single NRAMP genes in Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica ssp. typhimurium, and the cloning of two distinct NRAMP genes from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and an internal fragment of an NRAMP gene in Burkholderia cepacia. The genes are designated mntH because the two enterobacterial NRAMPs encode H+-stimulated, highly selective manganese(II) transport systems, accounting for all Mn2+ uptake in each species under the conditions tested. For S. typhimurium MntH, the Km for 54Mn2+ ( approximately 0.1 microM) was pH independent, but maximal uptake increased as pH decreased. Monovalent cations, osmotic strength, Mg2+ and Ca2+ did not inhibit 54Mn2+ uptake. Ni2+, Cu2+ and Zn2+ inhibited uptake with Kis greater than 100 microM, Co2+ with a Ki of 20 microM and Fe2+ with a Ki that decreased from 100 microM at pH 7. 6 to 10 microM at pH 5.5. Fe3+ and Pb2+ inhibited weakly, exhibiting Kis of 50 microM, while Cd2+ was a potent inhibitor with a Ki of about 1 microM. E. coli MntH had a similar inhibition profile, except that Kis were three- to 10-fold higher. Both S. typhimurium and E. coli MntH also transport 55Fe2+ however, the Kms are equivalent to the Kis for Fe2+ inhibition of Mn2+ uptake, and are thus too high to be physiologically relevant. In both S. typhimurium and E. coli, mntH:lacZ constructs were strongly induced by hydrogen peroxide

  16. Influence of Natural Organic Matter on Attachment Kinetics of Salmonella Typhimurium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, I.; Zorlu, O.; Hill, J. E.; Walker, S. L.

    2011-12-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is one of the most common and virulent bacterial pathogens, usually found in food and water. This waterborne pathogen has been attributed to causing gastroenteritis and typhoid fever, leading to 16 million cases and over half a million deaths worldwide each year. Natural organic matter (NOM) is ubiquitous in environment and previous work has shown NOM to enhance the stability and transport of bacteria cells; hence NOM will certainly interact with Salmonella and affect its transport in environment. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of NOM (Suwannee River humic acid standard II, SRHA) on the attachment kinetics of a model Salmonella (Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium SA5983) to glass. The transport study was conducted in a parallel plate flow chamber using fluorescent microscope to visualize the bacterial cells, which were tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP). The solution pH was unadjusted, and the flow rate through parallel plate channel was 0.1 mL/min to simulate groundwater conditions. Parameters varied in this study were NOM presence, ion valence (K+, Ca2+) as well as cell growth phase (mid-exponential and late-exponential growth phases). These parameters were chosen because ion valence may alter the NOM conformation and capacity for bridging, as well growth phase impacts the cellular surface chemistry. Extensive characterization of the bacterial cells was conducted including measurements of electrophoretic mobility, hydrophobicity, acidity, surface charge density and extracellular polymeric substance content. Additionally, electrokintic characterization was conducted for the glass. Preliminary results demonstrated the sensitivity of cell attachment to ionic valence and cell growth phase. Also the addition of NOM reduced the attachment of the Salmonella cells significantly under all of these conditions. Without NOM, attachment efficiencies (α) in KCl were similar at both growth

  17. Tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R inhibits human prostate cancer experimental bone metastasis in mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Toneri, Makoto; Miwa, Shinji; Zhang, Yong; Hu, Cameron; Yano, Shuya; Matsumoto, Yasunori; Bouvet, Michael; Nakanishi, Hayao; Hoffman, Robert M.; Zhao, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Bone metastasis is a frequent occurrence in prostate cancer patients and often is lethal. Zoledronic acid (ZOL) is often used for bone metastasis with limited efficacy. More effective models and treatment methods are required to improve the outcome of prostate cancer patients. In the present study, the effects of tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R were analyzed in vitro and in vivo on prostate cancer cells and experimental bone metastasis. Both ZOL and S. typhimurium A1-R inhibited the growth of PC-3 cells expressing red fluorescent protien in vitro. To investigate the efficacy of S. typhimurium A1-R on prostate cancer experimental bone metastasis, we established models of both early and advanced stage bone metastasis. The mice were treated with ZOL, S. typhimurium A1-R, and combination therapy of both ZOL and S. typhimurium A1-R. ZOL and S. typhimurium A1-R inhibited the growth of solitary bone metastases. S. typhimurium A1-R treatment significantly decreased bone metastasis and delayed the appearance of PC-3 bone metastases of multiple mouse models. Additionally, S. typhimurium A1-R treatment significantly improved the overall survival of the mice with multiple bone metastases. The results of the present study indicate that S. typhimurium A1-R is useful to prevent and inhibit prostate cancer bone metastasis and has potential for future clinical use in the adjuvant setting. PMID:26431498

  18. Tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R inhibits human prostate cancer experimental bone metastasis in mouse models.

    PubMed

    Toneri, Makoto; Miwa, Shinji; Zhang, Yong; Hu, Cameron; Yano, Shuya; Matsumoto, Yasunori; Bouvet, Michael; Nakanishi, Hayao; Hoffman, Robert M; Zhao, Ming

    2015-10-13

    Bone metastasis is a frequent occurrence in prostate cancer patients and often is lethal. Zoledronic acid (ZOL) is often used for bone metastasis with limited efficacy. More effective models and treatment methods are required to improve the outcome of prostate cancer patients. In the present study, the effects of tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R were analyzed in vitro and in vivo on prostate cancer cells and experimental bone metastasis. Both ZOL and S. typhimurium A1-R inhibited the growth of PC-3 cells expressing red fluorescent protien in vitro. To investigate the efficacy of S. typhimurium A1-R on prostate cancer experimental bone metastasis, we established models of both early and advanced stage bone metastasis. The mice were treated with ZOL, S. typhimurium A1-R, and combination therapy of both ZOL and S. typhimurium A1-R. ZOL and S. typhimurium A1-R inhibited the growth of solitary bone metastases. S. typhimurium A1-R treatment significantly decreased bone metastasis and delayed the appearance of PC-3 bone metastases of multiple mouse models. Additionally, S. typhimurium A1-R treatment significantly improved the overall survival of the mice with multiple bone metastases. The results of the present study indicate that S. typhimurium A1-R is useful to prevent and inhibit prostate cancer bone metastasis and has potential for future clinical use in the adjuvant setting.

  19. Ethanolamine Utilization Contributes to Proliferation of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium in Food and in Nematodes▿

    PubMed Central

    Srikumar, Shabarinath; Fuchs, Thilo M.

    2011-01-01

    Only three pathogenic bacterial species, Salmonella enterica, Clostridium perfringens, and Listeria monocytogenes, are able to utilize both ethanolamine and 1,2-propanediol as a sole carbon source. Degradation of these substrates, abundant in food and the gut, depends on cobalamin, which is synthesized de novo only under anaerobic conditions. Although the eut, pdu, and cob-cbi gene clusters comprise 40 kb, the conditions under which they confer a selection advantage on these food-borne pathogens remain largely unknown. Here we used the luciferase reporter system to determine the response of the Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium promoters PeutS, PpocR, PpduF, and PpduA to a set of carbon sources, to egg yolk, to whole milk, and to milk protein or fat fractions. Depending on the supplements, specific inductions up to 3 orders of magnitude were observed for PeutS and PpduA, which drive the expression of most eut and pdu genes. To correlate these significant expression data with growth properties, nonpolar deletions of pocR, regulating the pdu and cob-cbi genes, and of eutR, involved in eut gene activation, were constructed in S. Typhimurium strain 14028. During exponential growth of the mutants 14028ΔpocR and 14028ΔeutR, 2- to 3-fold-reduced proliferation in milk and egg yolk was observed. Using the Caenorhabditis elegans infection model, we could also demonstrate that the proliferation of S. Typhimurium in the nematode is supported by an active ethanolamine degradation pathway. Taking these findings together, this study quantifies the differential expression of eut and pdu genes under distinct conditions and provides experimental evidence that the ethanolamine utilization pathway allows salmonellae to occupy specific metabolic niches within food environments and within their host organisms. PMID:21037291

  20. Cluster of genes controlling proline degradation in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Ratzkin, B; Roth, J

    1978-01-01

    A cluster of genes essential for degradation of proline to glutamate (put) is located between the pyrC and pyrD loci at min 22 of the Salmonella chromosome. A series of 25 deletion mutants of this region have been isolated and used to construct a fine-structure map of the put genes. The map includes mutations affecting the proline degradative activities, proline oxidase and pyrroline-5-carboxylic dehydrogenase. Also included are mutations affecting the major proline permease and a regulatory mutation that affects both enzyme and permease production. The two enzymatic activities appear to be encoded by a single gene (putA). The regulatory mutation maps between the putA gene and the proline permease gene (putP). PMID:342507

  1. Inactivation of Enterobacter sakazakii, Bacillus cereus, and Salmonella typhimurium in powdered weaning food by electron-beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Yun-Hee; Park, Ji-Yong; Park, Jong-Hyun; Chung, Myong-Soo; Kwon, Ki-Sung; Chung, Kyungsook; Won, Misun; Song, Kyung-Bin

    2008-09-01

    Inactivation of Enterobacter sakazakii, Bacillus cereus, and Salmonella typhimurium were evaluated in powdered weaning food using electron-beam irradiation. E. sakazakii, B. cereus, and S. typhimurium were eliminated by irradiation at 16, 8, and 8 kGy, respectively. The D10-vlaues of E. sakazakii, B. cereus, and S. typhimurium inoculated on powdered weaning food were 4.83, 1.22, and 0.98 kGy, respectively. The results suggest that electron-beam irradiation should inhibit the growth of pathogenic bacteria on baby food without impairing qualities.

  2. Detection of Salmonella typhimurium in dairy products with flow cytometry and monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    McClelland, R G; Pinder, A C

    1994-01-01

    Flow cytometry, combined with fluorescently labelled monoclonal antibodies, offers advantages of speed and sensitivity for the detection of specific pathogenic bacteria in foods. We investigated the detection of Salmonella typhimurium in eggs and milk. Using a sample clearing procedure, we determined that the detection limit was on the order of 10(3) cells per ml after a total analysis time of 40 min. After 6 h of nonselective enrichment, the detection limits were 10 cells per ml for milk and 1 cell per ml for eggs, even in the presence of a 10,000-fold excess of Escherichia coli cells. Images PMID:7811064

  3. Interaction of Salmonella Typhimurium with Dendritic Cells Derived from Pluripotent Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Raffaella; Hale, Christine; Goulding, David; Andrews, Robert; Abdellah, Zarah; Fairchild, Paul J.; Dougan, Gordon

    2012-01-01

    Using an in vitro differentiation protocol we isolated cells with the properties of dendritic cells (DCs) from immunologically refractive pluripotent murine embryonic stem cells (ESCs). These ES-derived dendritic cells (ESDCs) expressed cytokines and were able to present antigen to a T cell line. Infection of ESDCs with Salmonella Typhimurium stimulated the expression of immune cell markers and thousands of murine genes, many associated with the immune response. Consequently, this system provides a novel in vitro model, amenable to genetic modification, for monitoring host/pathogen interactions. PMID:23284947

  4. Serratia marcescens contains a heterodimeric HU protein like Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Oberto, J; Rouviere-Yaniv, J

    1996-01-01

    Homologs of the dimeric HU protein of Escherichia coli can be found in every prokaryotic organism that has been analyzed. In this work, we demonstrate that Serratia marcescens synthesizes two distinct HU subunits, like E. coli and Salmonella typhimurium, suggesting that the heterodimeric HU protein could be a common feature of enteric bacteria. A phylogenetic analysis of the HU-type proteins (HU and IHF) is presented, and a scheme for the origin of the hup genes and the onset of HU heterodimericity is suggested. PMID:8550432

  5. Quantifying the toxic and mutagenic activity of complex mixtures with Salmonella typhimurium

    SciTech Connect

    Somani, S.M.; Schaeffer, D.J.; Mack, J.O.

    1981-03-01

    The toxicity and mutagenicity of 11 compounds individually and in mixtures were quantified in Salmonella typhimurium strains TA98, TA100, and TA1537 by a modification of the Ames spot test. The distance (millimeters) from the center of the petri dish to the bacterial growth front represented the toxic response. When mutagenicity occurred, the distance from the inner radius to the outer radius of the mutagenic growth represented the mutagenic response. Multiple regression analysis was used to quantify the toxicity and mutagenicity of individual compounds in the mixtures. The results indicate that the effects of compounds in mixtures are generally additive.

  6. [Immunosuppressive components of extracellular lipopolysaccharide highly virulent strain Salmonella typhimurium 1468].

    PubMed

    Molozhavaia, O S; Borisova, E V

    2002-01-01

    Immunosuppressive activity of culture liquid substrate (CFS) of highly virulent strain Salmonella typhimurium has been studied. A model of delayed hypersensitivity (DHS) to nonbacterial antigen in mice, a method of gel-filtration through the sephadex column G-200, immunosorbents were used. Three components with immunosuppressive activity: thermolabile component and thermostable one with direct immunosuppressive action and the third thermolabile component which manifested inductive immunosuppressive activity only after redox treatment have been revealed in the strain CFS. O-specific and lipid parts were found in the composition of all the components. This allowed them to be related to lipopolysaccharide.

  7. Mutagenic activity of thiram in Ames tester strains of Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Zdzienicka, M; Zieleńska, M; Tudek, B; Szymczyk, T

    1979-09-01

    The mutagenic activity of thiram was investigated in 4 histidine-requiring strains of Salmonella typhimurium (TA1535, TA100, TA1538, TA98) with and without activation by liver microsomes. In strains TA1535 and TA100, thiram induces mutations without metabolic activation. The presence of rat-liver microsome fraction, cysteine or glutathione abolish its mutagenic activity in these strains. In contrast, thiram requires metabolic activation for the expression of its mutagenic activity in TA1538 and TA98 strains. The compounds containing the sulphydryl group abolish mutagenic activity of thiram in these strains, too.

  8. Genetic Analysis of Carbohydrate Transport-deficient Mutants of Salmonella typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Levinthal, Mark; Simoni, Robert D.

    1969-01-01

    Mutants (car) isolated from Salmonella typhimurium were unable to utilize or ferment the following carbohydrates (all d-configuration): glucose, fructose, mannose, N-acetylglucosamine, sorbitol, mannitol, maltose, melibiose, and glycerol. The mutants did utilize galactose, glucose 6-phosphate, gluconic acid, glucuronic acid, pyruvate, and l-lactate. Biochemical analysis showed that there were two classes of mutants, each lacking one component of a phosphotransferase system. CarA mutants were deficient in enzyme I; carB lacked the phosphate carrier protein, HPr. Mapping experiments showed that the carA gene was located near pro; the carB gene mapped near purC. PMID:4884816

  9. An outbreak of Salmonella serotype Typhimurium infections with an unusually long incubation period.

    PubMed

    Brooks, John T; Matyas, Bela T; Fontana, John; DeGroot, Mary Ann; Beuchat, Larry R; Hoekstra, Michael; Friedman, Cindy R

    2012-03-01

    A 1998 investigation of an outbreak of Salmonella serotype Typhimurium infections among children tasting unpasteurized milk during tours of a dairy farm demonstrated a distribution of unusually long incubation periods (median, 8 days; interquartile range [IQR], 6-14 days). Bacterial isolates were highly acid tolerant and contained genes associated with protection against destructive phagocytic reactive oxygen intermediates. We hypothesize that exposure to low-dose oral inoculum of a pathogen with these properties could have contributed to cases of non-typhoidal salmonellosis with the longest incubation period reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

  10. Virulent Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium evades adaptive immunity by preventing dendritic cells from activating T cells.

    PubMed

    Tobar, Jaime A; Carreño, Leandro J; Bueno, Susan M; González, Pablo A; Mora, Jorge E; Quezada, Sergio A; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2006-11-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) constitute the link between innate and adaptive immunity by directly recognizing pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) in bacteria and by presenting bacterial antigens to T cells. Recognition of PAMPs renders DCs as professional antigen-presenting cells able to prime naïve T cells and initiate adaptive immunity against bacteria. Therefore, interfering with DC function would promote bacterial survival and dissemination. Understanding the molecular mechanisms that have evolved in virulent bacteria to evade activation of adaptive immunity requires the characterization of virulence factors that interfere with DC function. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, the causative agent of typhoid-like disease in the mouse, can prevent antigen presentation to T cells by avoiding lysosomal degradation in DCs. Here, we show that this feature of virulent Salmonella applies in vivo to prevent activation of adaptive immunity. In addition, this attribute of virulent Salmonella requires functional expression of a type three secretion system (TTSS) and effector proteins encoded within the Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI-2). In contrast to wild-type virulent Salmonella, mutant strains carrying specific deletions of SPI-2 genes encoding TTSS components or effectors proteins are targeted to lysosomes and are no longer able to prevent DCs from activating T cells in vitro or in vivo. SPI-2 mutant strains are attenuated in vivo, showing reduced tissue colonization and enhanced T-cell activation, which confers protection against a challenge with wild-type virulent Salmonella. Our data suggest that impairment of DC function by the activity of SPI-2 gene products is crucial for Salmonella pathogenesis.

  11. Growth and virulence properties of biofilm-forming Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium under different acidic conditions.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hua; Lee, Hyeon-Yong; Ahn, Juhee

    2010-12-01

    This study was designed to characterize the viability and potential virulence of bofilm-forming Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium under different pH levels, ranging from 5 to 7. The plate count method and real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) were used to evaluate the survival of S. Typhimurium grown in Trypticase soy broth (TSB) adjusted to pH 5, 6, and 7 (TSB-5, TSB-6, and TSB-7, respectively) at 37°C for 10 days. In TSB-5 and TSB-6, the numbers of viable cells estimated by using the real-time RT-PCR were greater than the culturable counts enumerated by the plate count method. Reflectance micro-Fourier transform infrared (micro-FTIR) spectroscopy was used to evaluate the biochemical changes in biofilm cells. Considerable changes in chemical components were observed in the biofilm cells grown in TSB-5 and TSB-6 when compared to the cells grown in TSB-7. The enterotoxin production and invasive ability of planktonic and biofilm S. Typhimurium cells were inferred by the relative levels of expression of stn and invA. The levels of expression of stn and invA were significantly increased in biofilm S. Typhimurium cells grown in TSB-5 (1.9-fold and 3.2-fold) and TSB-6 (2.1-fold and 22.3-fold) after 10 days of incubation. These results suggest that the biofilm-forming S. Typhimurium under different pH levels might change the virulence production and stress response mechanisms.

  12. A colonisation-inhibition culture consisting of Salmonella Enteritidis and Typhimurium ΔhilAssrAfliG strains protects against infection by strains of both serotypes in broilers.

    PubMed

    De Cort, W; Mot, D; Haesebrouck, F; Ducatelle, R; Van Immerseel, F

    2014-08-01

    Consumption of contaminated poultry meat is still an important cause of Salmonella infections in humans and there is a need for control methods that protect broilers from day-of-hatch until slaughter age against infection with Salmonella. Colonisation-inhibition, a concept in which a live Salmonella strain is orally administered to day-old chickens and protects against subsequent challenge, can potentially be used as control method. In this study, the efficacy of a Salmonella Typhimurium ΔhilAssrAfliG strain as a colonisation-inhibition strain for protection of broilers against Salmonella Typhimurium was evaluated. Administration of a Salmonella Typhimurium ΔhilAssrAfliG strain to day-old broiler chickens decreased faecal shedding and strongly reduced caecal and internal organ colonisation of a Salmonella Typhimurium challenge strain administered one day later using a seeder bird model. In addition, it was verified whether a colonisation-inhibition culture could be developed that protects against both Salmonella Enteritidis and Typhimurium. Therefore, the Salmonella Typhimurium ΔhilAssrAfliG strain was orally administered simultaneously with a Salmonella Enteritidis ΔhilAssrAfliG strain to day-old broiler chickens, which resulted in a decreased caecal and internal organ colonisation for both a Salmonella Enteritidis and a Salmonella Typhimurium challenge strain short after hatching, using a seeder bird model. The combined culture was not protective against Salmonella Paratyphi B varietas Java challenge, indicating serotype-specific protection mechanisms. The data suggest that colonisation-inhibition can potentially be used as a versatile control method to protect poultry against several Salmonella serotypes. PMID:24975814

  13. Quantitative proteomic identification of host factors involved in the Salmonella typhimurium infection cycle.

    PubMed

    Kaloyanova, Dora; Vogels, Mijke; van Balkom, Bas W M; Helms, J Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative proteomics, based on stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC), can be used to identify host proteins involved in the intracellular interplay with pathogens. This method allows identification of proteins subject to degradation or upregulation in response to intracellular infection. It can also be used to study intracellular dynamics (trafficking) of proteins in response to the infection. Here, we describe the analysis of changes in protein profiles determined in Golgi-enriched fractions isolated from cells that were either mock-infected or infected with Salmonella typhimurium. Using the SILAC approach we were able to identify 105 proteins in Golgi-enriched fractions that were significantly changed in their abundance as a result of Salmonella infection.

  14. Replication of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium in Human Monocyte-Derived Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Lathrop, Stephanie K; Binder, Kelsey A; Starr, Tregei; Cooper, Kendal G; Chong, Audrey; Carmody, Aaron B; Steele-Mortimer, Olivia

    2015-07-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is a common cause of food-borne gastrointestinal illness, but additionally it causes potentially fatal bacteremia in some immunocompromised patients. In mice, systemic spread and replication of the bacteria depend upon infection of and replication within macrophages, but replication in human macrophages is not widely reported or well studied. In order to assess the ability of Salmonella Typhimurium to replicate in human macrophages, we infected primary monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) that had been differentiated under conditions known to generate different phenotypes. We found that replication in MDM depends greatly upon the phenotype of the cells, as M1-skewed macrophages did not allow replication, while M2a macrophages and macrophages differentiated with macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) alone (termed M0) did. We describe how additional conditions that alter the macrophage phenotype or the gene expression of the bacteria affect the outcome of infection. In M0 MDM, the temporal expression of representative genes from Salmonella pathogenicity islands 1 and 2 (SPI1 and SPI2) and the importance of the PhoP/Q two-component regulatory system are similar to what has been shown in mouse macrophages. However, in contrast to mouse macrophages, where replication is SPI2 dependent, we observed early SPI2-independent replication in addition to later SPI2-dependent replication in M0 macrophages. Only SPI2-dependent replication was associated with death of the host cell at later time points. Altogether, our results reveal a very nuanced interaction between Salmonella and human macrophages. PMID:25895967

  15. Functional conservation among members of the Salmonella typhimurium InvA family of proteins.

    PubMed

    Ginocchio, C C; Galán, J E

    1995-02-01

    InvA, which is essential for Salmonella spp. to enter cultured epithelial cells, is a member of a family of proteins involved in either flagellar biosynthesis or the secretion of virulence determinants by a number of plant and mammalian pathogens. The predicted overall secondary structures of these proteins show significant similarities and indicate a modular construction with a hydrophobic amino-terminal half, consisting of six to eight potential transmembrane domains, and a hydrophilic carboxy terminus which is predicted to reside in the cytoplasm. These proteins can be aligned over the entire length of their polypeptide sequences, with the highest degree of homology found in the amino terminus and clusters of conserved residues in the carboxy terminus. We examined the functional conservation among members of this protein family by assessing the ability of MxiA of Shigella flexneri and LcrD of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis to restore invasiveness to an invA mutant of Salmonella typhimurium. We found that MxiA was able to complement the entry defect of the invA mutant strain of S. typhimurium. In contrast, LcrD failed to complement the same strain. However, a plasmid carrying a gene encoding a chimeric protein consisting of the amino terminus of LcrD and the carboxy terminus of InvA complemented the defect of the Salmonella invA mutant. These results indicate that the secretory systems in which these proteins participate are functionally similar and that the Salmonella and Shigella systems are very closely related. These data also suggest that determinants of specificity may be located at the carboxy termini of these proteins.

  16. Magnetic focusing immunosensor for the detection of Salmonella typhimurium in foods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pivarnik, Philip E.; Cao, He; Letcher, Stephen V.; Pierson, Arthur H.; Rand, Arthur G.

    1999-01-01

    From 1988 through 1992 Salmonellosis accounted for 27% of the total reported foodborne disease outbreaks and 57% of the outbreaks in which the pathogen was identified. The prevalence of Salmonellosis and the new requirements to monitor the organism as a marker in pathogen reduction programs will drive the need for rapid, on-site testing. A compact fiber optic fluorometer using a red diode laser as an excitation source and fiber probes for analyte detection has been constructed and used to measure Salmonella. The organisms were isolated with anti-Salmonella magnetic beads and were labeled with a secondary antibody conjugated to a red fluorescent dye. The response of the system was proportional to the concentration of Salmonella typhimurium from 3.2 X 105 colony forming units (CFU)/ml to 1.6 X 107 CFU/ml. The system was developed to utilize a fiber-optic magnetic focusing problem that attracted the magnetic microspheres to the surface of a sample chamber directly in front of the excitation and emission fibers. The signal obtained from a homogenous suspension of fluorescent magnetic microspheres was 9 to 10 picowatts. After focusing, the signal from the fluorescent labeled magnetic microspheres increased to 200 picowatts, approximately 20 times greater than the homogeneous suspension. The magnetic focusing assay detected 1.59 X 105 colony forming units/ml of Salmonella typhimurium cultured in growth media. The process of magnetic focusing in front of the fibers has the potential to reduce the background fluorescence from unbound secondary antibodies, eliminating several rinsing steps, resulting in a simple rapid assay.

  17. Mapping the Regulatory Network for Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Carol; Stringer, Anne M.; Mao, Chunhong; Palumbo, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Salmonella enterica pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1) encodes proteins required for invasion of gut epithelial cells. The timing of invasion is tightly controlled by a complex regulatory network. The transcription factor (TF) HilD is the master regulator of this process and senses environmental signals associated with invasion. HilD activates transcription of genes within and outside SPI-1, including six other TFs. Thus, the transcriptional program associated with host cell invasion is controlled by at least 7 TFs. However, very few of the regulatory targets are known for these TFs, and the extent of the regulatory network is unclear. In this study, we used complementary genomic approaches to map the direct regulatory targets of all 7 TFs. Our data reveal a highly complex and interconnected network that includes many previously undescribed regulatory targets. Moreover, the network extends well beyond the 7 TFs, due to the inclusion of many additional TFs and noncoding RNAs. By comparing gene expression profiles of regulatory targets for the 7 TFs, we identified many uncharacterized genes that are likely to play direct roles in invasion. We also uncovered cross talk between SPI-1 regulation and other regulatory pathways, which, in turn, identified gene clusters that likely share related functions. Our data are freely available through an intuitive online browser and represent a valuable resource for the bacterial research community. PMID:27601571

  18. Mutagenicity of rubber vulcanization gases in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Hedenstedt, A; Ramel, C; Wachtmeister, C A

    1981-01-01

    Gases formed by rubber and rubber additives in the vulcanization process were collected with a laboratory-scale glass apparatus. Mutagenicity testing of the vulcanization gases by the Salmonella/microsome test was conducted with strains TA1535, TA1538, TA98, and TA100 in the absence and presence of a metabolizing system from rat liver homogenates. The mutagenicity of gases derived by heating chloroprene rubber and ethylene propylene rubber was established with both base substitution- and frameshift-sensitive strains and that of a styrene-butadiene rubber was established with the base substitution-sensitive stain TA100. Tests on pyrolysis gases from a butadiene acrylonitrile rubber revealed only toxic effects. Curing systems, additives, and filling materials from various sources were represented in the material. Gases were collected at temperature levels corresponding to both mixing and curing of these particular rubbers in the industrial operations. Attempts were made to correlate the mutagenicity of the gases to the presence of mutagenic components in the rubber mixtures.

  19. Characterization of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Salmonella enterica serovar 4,[5],12:i:- isolates from pigs presenting with diarrhea in Korea

    PubMed Central

    LEE, Ki-Eun; LEE, Deog-Yong; CHOI, Hwan-Won; CHAE, Su-Jin; YUN, Young-Sun; LEE, Ki-Chan; CHO, Yun-Sang; YANG, Dong-Kun

    2015-01-01

    Between 2011 and 2012, a total of 896 pig fecal samples were collected from nine provinces in Korea, and 50 salmonella enterica susp. enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) was isolated. The characteristics of the 50 strains were analyzed, and 4 strains were identified as Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar 4,[5],12:i:-. Salmonella 4,[5],12:i:- could not be distinguished from S. Typhimurium through phage typing, antimicrobial resistance testing or multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA). However, among the four Salmonella 4,[5],12:i:- strains, one (KVCC-BA1400078) was identified as a Salmonella 4,[5],12:i:- clone isolated from humans in the United States, and another (KVCC-BA1400080) was identified as DT193, which has been primarily isolated from humans and animals in European countries. The presence of Salmonella 4,[5],12:i:- in Korea poses a significant threat of horizontal transfer between pigs and humans. PMID:26074410

  20. Identification and Characterization of Outer Membrane Vesicle-Associated Proteins in Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Jaewoo; Kim, Seul I; Ryu, Sangryeol

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is a primary cause of enteric diseases and has acquired a variety of virulence factors during its evolution into a pathogen. Secreted virulence factors interact with commensal flora and host cells and enable Salmonella to survive and thrive in hostile environments. Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) released from many Gram-negative bacteria function as a mechanism for the secretion of complex mixtures, including virulence factors. We performed a proteomic analysis of OMVs that were isolated under standard laboratory and acidic minimal medium conditions and identified 14 OMV-associated proteins that were observed in the OMV fraction isolated only under the acidic minimal medium conditions, which reproduced the nutrient-deficient intracellular milieu. The inferred roles of these 14 proteins were diverse, including transporter, enzyme, and transcriptional regulator. The absence of these proteins influenced Salmonella survival inside murine macrophages. Eleven of these proteins were predicted to possess secretion signal sequences at their N termini, and three (HupA, GlnH, and PhoN) of the proteins were found to be translocated into the cytoplasm of host cells. The comparative proteomic profiling of OMVs performed in this study revealed different protein compositions in the OMVs isolated under the two different conditions, which indicates that the OMV cargo depends on the growth conditions and provides a deeper insight into how Salmonella utilizes OMVs to adapt to environmental changes. PMID:24935973

  1. Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Skills To Succeed in the Host: Virulence and Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Fàbrega, Anna

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is a primary enteric pathogen infecting both humans and animals. Infection begins with the ingestion of contaminated food or water so that salmonellae reach the intestinal epithelium and trigger gastrointestinal disease. In some patients the infection spreads upon invasion of the intestinal epithelium, internalization within phagocytes, and subsequent dissemination. In that case, antimicrobial therapy, based on fluoroquinolones and expanded-spectrum cephalosporins as the current drugs of choice, is indicated. To accomplish the pathogenic process, the Salmonella chromosome comprises several virulence mechanisms. The most important virulence genes are those located within the so-called Salmonella pathogenicity islands (SPIs). Thus far, five SPIs have been reported to have a major contribution to pathogenesis. Nonetheless, further virulence traits, such as the pSLT virulence plasmid, adhesins, flagella, and biofilm-related proteins, also contribute to success within the host. Several regulatory mechanisms which synchronize all these elements in order to guarantee bacterial survival have been described. These mechanisms govern the transitions from the different pathogenic stages and drive the pathogen to achieve maximal efficiency inside the host. This review focuses primarily on the virulence armamentarium of this pathogen and the extremely complicated regulatory network controlling its success. PMID:23554419

  2. Three-dimensional tissue assemblies: novel models for the study of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium pathogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nickerson, C. A.; Goodwin, T. J.; Terlonge, J.; Ott, C. M.; Buchanan, K. L.; Uicker, W. C.; Emami, K.; LeBlanc, C. L.; Ramamurthy, R.; Clarke, M. S.; Vanderburg, C. R.; Hammond, T.; Pierson, D. L.

    2001-01-01

    The lack of readily available experimental systems has limited knowledge pertaining to the development of Salmonella-induced gastroenteritis and diarrheal disease in humans. We used a novel low-shear stress cell culture system developed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration in conjunction with cultivation of three-dimensional (3-D) aggregates of human intestinal tissue to study the infectivity of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium for human intestinal epithelium. Immunohistochemical characterization and microscopic analysis of 3-D aggregates of the human intestinal epithelial cell line Int-407 revealed that the 3-D cells more accurately modeled human in vivo differentiated tissues than did conventional monolayer cultures of the same cells. Results from infectivity studies showed that Salmonella established infection of the 3-D cells in a much different manner than that observed for monolayers. Following the same time course of infection with Salmonella, 3-D Int-407 cells displayed minimal loss of structural integrity compared to that of Int-407 monolayers. Furthermore, Salmonella exhibited significantly lower abilities to adhere to, invade, and induce apoptosis of 3-D Int-407 cells than it did for infected Int-407 monolayers. Analysis of cytokine expression profiles of 3-D Int-407 cells and monolayers following infection with Salmonella revealed significant differences in expression of interleukin 1alpha (IL-1alpha), IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-1Ra, and tumor necrosis factor alpha mRNAs between the two cultures. In addition, uninfected 3-D Int-407 cells constitutively expressed higher levels of transforming growth factor beta1 mRNA and prostaglandin E2 than did uninfected Int-407 monolayers. By more accurately modeling many aspects of human in vivo tissues, the 3-D intestinal cell model generated in this study offers a novel approach for studying microbial infectivity from the perspective of the host-pathogen interaction.

  3. Three-Dimensional Tissue Assemblies: Novel Models for the Study of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nickerson, Cheryl A.; Goodwin, Thomas J.; Terlonge, Jacqueline; Ott, C. Mark; Buchanan, Kent L.; Uicker, William C.; Emami, Kamal; LeBlanc, Carly L.; Ramamurthy, Rajee; Clarke, Mark S.; Vanderburg, Charles R.; Hammond, Timothy; Pierson, Duane L.

    2001-01-01

    The lack of readily available experimental systems has limited knowledge pertaining to the development of Salmonella-induced gastroenteritis and diarrheal disease in humans. We used a novel low-shear stress cell culture system developed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration in conjunction with cultivation of three-dimensional (3-D) aggregates of human intestinal tissue to study the infectivity of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium for human intestinal epithelium. Immunohistochemical characterization and microscopic analysis of 3-D aggregates of the human intestinal epithelial cell line Int-407 revealed that the 3-D cells more accurately modeled human in vivo differentiated tissues than did conventional monolayer cultures of the same cells. Results from infectivity studies showed that Salmonella established infection of the 3-D cells in a much different manner than that observed for monolayers. Following the same time course of infection with Salmonella, 3-D Int-407 cells displayed minimal loss of structural integrity compared to that of Int-407 monolayers. Furthermore, Salmonella exhibited significantly lower abilities to adhere to, invade, and induce apoptosis of 3-D Int-407 cells than it did for infected Int-407 monolayers. Analysis of cytokine expression profiles of 3-D Int-407 cells and monolayers following infection with Salmonella revealed significant differences in expression of interleukin 1α (IL-1α), IL-1β, IL-6, IL-1Ra, and tumor necrosis factor alpha mRNAs between the two cultures. In addition, uninfected 3-D Int-407 cells constitutively expressed higher levels of transforming growth factor β1 mRNA and prostaglandin E2 than did uninfected Int-407 monolayers. By more accurately modeling many aspects of human in vivo tissues, the 3-D intestinal cell model generated in this study offers a novel approach for studying microbial infectivity from the perspective of the host-pathogen interaction. PMID:11598087

  4. Higher Storage Temperature Causes Greater Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Internal Penetration of Artificially Contaminated, Commercially Available, Washed Free Range Eggs.

    PubMed

    Whiley, Alice; Fallowfield, Howard; Ross, Kirstin; McEvoy, Vanessa; Whiley, Harriet

    2016-07-01

    Foodborne salmonellosis is a major public health concern, with contaminated eggs identified as a significant source of infection. In Australia, the most prevalent cause of salmonellosis from eggs is Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium. This study explored the effect of temperature after 1, 7, 14, 21, and 28 days of storage on commercially available washed free range eggs, artificially contaminated with Salmonella Typhimurium on the external surface. At each time point, the external surface of the egg, the crushed eggshell, and the internal egg yolk and albumen were analyzed for Salmonella. After 28 days of storage, 25% of eggs stored at 4°C, 50% of eggs stored at 14°C, and 100% of eggs stored at 23 and 35°C were internally contaminated with Salmonella. After 1 day of storage, more than 50% of all eggs had Salmonella present in the crushed shell after the external surface had been disinfected with ethanol. This is the first study to demonstrate that refrigeration reduced the potential for Salmonella Typhimurium to penetrate the eggshell membrane and internally contaminate table eggs commercially available in Australia. It also suggests that the processes of cracking eggs may be a source of cross-contamination within the kitchen.

  5. Higher Storage Temperature Causes Greater Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Internal Penetration of Artificially Contaminated, Commercially Available, Washed Free Range Eggs.

    PubMed

    Whiley, Alice; Fallowfield, Howard; Ross, Kirstin; McEvoy, Vanessa; Whiley, Harriet

    2016-07-01

    Foodborne salmonellosis is a major public health concern, with contaminated eggs identified as a significant source of infection. In Australia, the most prevalent cause of salmonellosis from eggs is Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium. This study explored the effect of temperature after 1, 7, 14, 21, and 28 days of storage on commercially available washed free range eggs, artificially contaminated with Salmonella Typhimurium on the external surface. At each time point, the external surface of the egg, the crushed eggshell, and the internal egg yolk and albumen were analyzed for Salmonella. After 28 days of storage, 25% of eggs stored at 4°C, 50% of eggs stored at 14°C, and 100% of eggs stored at 23 and 35°C were internally contaminated with Salmonella. After 1 day of storage, more than 50% of all eggs had Salmonella present in the crushed shell after the external surface had been disinfected with ethanol. This is the first study to demonstrate that refrigeration reduced the potential for Salmonella Typhimurium to penetrate the eggshell membrane and internally contaminate table eggs commercially available in Australia. It also suggests that the processes of cracking eggs may be a source of cross-contamination within the kitchen. PMID:27357046

  6. Inverse agonist of estrogen-related receptor γ controls Salmonella typhimurium infection by modulating host iron homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Don-Kyu; Jeong, Jae-Ho; Lee, Ji-Min; Kim, Kwang Soo; Park, Seung-Hwan; Kim, Yong Deuk; Koh, Minseob; Shin, Minsang; Jung, Yoon Seok; Kim, Hyung-Seok; Lee, Tae-Hoon; Oh, Byung-Chul; Kim, Jae Il; Park, Hwan Tae; Jeong, Won-Il; Lee, Chul-Ho; Park, Seung Bum; Min, Jung-Joon; Jung, Sook-In; Choi, Seok-Yong; Choy, Hyon E; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2014-04-01

    In response to microbial infection, expression of the defensin-like peptide hepcidin (encoded by Hamp) is induced in hepatocytes to decrease iron release from macrophages. To elucidate the mechanism by which Salmonella enterica var. Typhimurium (S. typhimurium), an intramacrophage bacterium, alters host iron metabolism for its own survival, we examined the role of nuclear receptor family members belonging to the NR3B subfamily in mouse hepatocytes. Here, we report that estrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ, encoded by Esrrg) modulates the intramacrophage proliferation of S. typhimurium by altering host iron homeostasis, and we demonstrate an antimicrobial effect of an ERRγ inverse agonist. Hepatic ERRγ expression was induced by S. typhimurium-stimulated interleukin-6 signaling, resulting in an induction of hepcidin and eventual hypoferremia in mice. Conversely, ablation of ERRγ mRNA expression in liver attenuated the S. typhimurium-mediated induction of hepcidin and normalized the hypoferremia caused by S. typhimurium infection. An inverse agonist of ERRγ ameliorated S. typhimurium-mediated hypoferremia through reduction of ERRγ-mediated hepcidin mRNA expression and exerted a potent antimicrobial effect on the S. typhimurium infection, thereby improving host survival. Taken together, these findings suggest an alternative approach to control multidrug-resistant intracellular bacteria by modulating host iron homeostasis.

  7. Release of lipopolysaccharide from intracellular compartments containing Salmonella typhimurium to vesicles of the host epithelial cell.

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-del Portillo, F; Stein, M A; Finlay, B B

    1997-01-01

    The biological effects of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on eucaryotic cells have traditionally been characterized following extracellular challenge of LPS on susceptible cells. In this study, we report the capacity of Salmonella typhimurium to release LPS once it is located in the intracellular environment of cultured epithelial cells. LPS is liberated from vacuolar compartments, where intracellular bacteria reside, to vesicles present in the host cell cytosol. The vesicle-associated LPS is detected in infected cells from the time when invading bacteria enter the host cell. Release of LPS is restricted to S. typhimurium-infected cells, with no LPS observed in neighboring uninfected cells, suggesting that dissemination of LPS occurs entirely within the intracellular environment of the infected cell. The amount of LPS present in host vesicles reaches a maximum when intracellular S. typhimurium cells start to proliferate, a time at which the entire host cell cytosol is filled with numerous vesicles containing LPS. All these data support the concept that intracellular bacterial pathogens might signal the host cell from intracellular locations by releasing bioactive bacterial components such as LPS. PMID:8975888

  8. Comparative characterization of release factor RF-3 genes of Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium, and Dichelobacter nodosus.

    PubMed Central

    Kawazu, Y; Ito, K; Matsumura, K; Nakamura, Y

    1995-01-01

    The termination of protein synthesis in bacteria requires two codon-specific release factors, RF-1 and RF-2. A gene for a third factor, RF-3, that stimulates the RF-1 and RF-2 activities has been isolated from the gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and Dichelobacter nodosus. In this work, we isolated the RF-3 gene from Salmonella typhimurium and compared the three encoded RF-3 proteins by immunoblotting and intergeneric complementation and suppression. A murine polyclonal antibody against E. coli RF-3 reacted with both S. typhimurium and D. nodosus RF-3 proteins. The heterologous RF-3 genes complemented a null RF-3 mutation of E. coli regardless of having different sequence identities at the protein level. Additionally, multicopy expression of either of these RF-3 genes suppressed temperature-sensitive RF-2 mutations of E. coli and S. typhimurium by restoring adequate peptide chain release. These findings strongly suggest that the RF-3 proteins of these gram-negative bacteria share common structural and functional domains necessary for RF-3 activity and support the notion that RF-3 interacts functionally and/or physically with RF-2 during translation termination. PMID:7559341

  9. Biofilm formation ability of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium acrAB mutants.

    PubMed

    Schlisselberg, Dov B; Kler, Edna; Kisluk, Guy; Shachar, Dina; Yaron, Sima

    2015-10-01

    Recent studies offer contradictory findings about the role of multidrug efflux pumps in bacterial biofilm development. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the involvement of the AcrAB efflux pump in biofilm formation by investigating the ability of AcrB and AcrAB null mutants of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium to produce biofilms. Three models were used to compare the ability of S. Typhimurium wild-type and its mutants to form biofilms: formation of biofilm on polystyrene surfaces; production of biofilm (mat model) on the air/liquid interface; and expression of curli and cellulose on Congo red-supplemented agar plates. All three investigated genotypes formed biofilms with similar characteristics. However, upon exposure to chloramphenicol, formation of biofilms on solid surfaces as well as the production of curli were either reduced or were delayed more significantly in both mutants, whilst there was no visible effect on pellicle formation. It can be concluded that when no selective pressure is applied, S. Typhimurium is able to produce biofilms even when the AcrAB efflux pumps are inactivated, implying that the use of efflux pump inhibitors to prevent biofilm formation is not a general solution and that combined treatments might be more efficient. Other factors that affect the ability to produce biofilms depending on efflux pump activity are yet to be identified.

  10. Adherence of Salmonella typhimurium to murine peritoneal macrophages is mediated by lipopolysaccharide and complement receptors.

    PubMed

    al-Bahry, S N; Pistole, T G

    1997-06-01

    Adherence of Salmonella typhimurium to mouse peritoneal macrophages (Mø) was monitored using a direct microscopic assay and flow cytometry. Competitive binding studies using wild-type lipopolysaccharide and derivatives confirmed a role for this moiety in bacterial adherence. Mø pretreated with 2-deoxy-D-glucose exhibited lower binding activity than did untreated controls, suggesting involvement of either Fc or complement receptors. Pre-exposing Mø to Fc fragments, however, failed to reduce bacterial binding, thus eliminating a role for Fc receptors in this process. Mø pretreated with neutrophil elastase exhibited a diminished ability to bind S. typhimurium, suggesting involvement of complement receptor 1. Monoclonal antibodies M1/70 and M18/2, specific for epitopes on the alpha and beta chains, respectively, of complement receptor 3, also blocked this adherence. In each case we were unable to eliminate completely bacterial adhesion to Mø. Monoclonal antibodies to two additional Mø receptors, Mac-2 and Mac-3, did not block bacterial attachment. These data indicate that multiple mechanisms are involved in the initial adhesion of S. typhimurium to mouse Mø.

  11. Survival of Salmonella typhimurium and Staphylococcus aureus in eggs cooked by different methods.

    PubMed

    Baker, R C; Hogarty, S; Poon, W; Vadehra, D V

    1983-07-01

    Shell eggs inoculated with Salmonella typhimurium and Staphylococcus aureus were cooked by recommended procedures for boiling, poaching, and frying. Except for poaching, the recommended procedures were inadequate in destroying the inoculum placed in the yolk. Boiling for 7 min was necessary for complete destruction of S. typhimurium and it took 12 min of boiling to destroy Staph. aureus. Cooking time-temperature relationship for complete kill depended on the cooking method with fried eggs. Four minutes and 70 C were needed for covered eggs, 3 min on each side at 64 C for turned over eggs, while cooking for 7.5 min at 64 C for sunnyside eggs was not sufficient for destruction of both of the test organisms. None of the test organisms could be recovered from omelets baked by the recommended procedure (86 C for 25 min). Scrambling for 1 min at 74 C was required for the complete destruction of S. typhimurium and 2 min at 78 C for Staph. aureus.

  12. Bistable expression of CsgD in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium connects virulence to persistence.

    PubMed

    MacKenzie, Keith D; Wang, Yejun; Shivak, Dylan J; Wong, Cynthia S; Hoffman, Leia J L; Lam, Shirley; Kröger, Carsten; Cameron, Andrew D S; Townsend, Hugh G G; Köster, Wolfgang; White, Aaron P

    2015-06-01

    Pathogenic bacteria often need to survive in the host and the environment, and it is not well understood how cells transition between these equally challenging situations. For the human and animal pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, biofilm formation is correlated with persistence outside a host, but the connection to virulence is unknown. In this study, we analyzed multicellular-aggregate and planktonic-cell subpopulations that coexist when S. Typhimurium is grown under biofilm-inducing conditions. These cell types arise due to bistable expression of CsgD, the central biofilm regulator. Despite being exposed to the same stresses, the two cell subpopulations had 1,856 genes that were differentially expressed, as determined by transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq). Aggregated cells displayed the characteristic gene expression of biofilms, whereas planktonic cells had enhanced expression of numerous virulence genes. Increased type three secretion synthesis in planktonic cells correlated with enhanced invasion of a human intestinal cell line and significantly increased virulence in mice compared to the aggregates. However, when the same groups of cells were exposed to desiccation, the aggregates survived better, and the competitive advantage of planktonic cells was lost. We hypothesize that CsgD-based differentiation is a form of bet hedging, with single cells primed for host cell invasion and aggregated cells adapted for persistence in the environment. This allows S. Typhimurium to spread the risks of transmission and ensures a smooth transition between the host and the environment.

  13. Spatial Segregation of Virulence Gene Expression during Acute Enteric Infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Laughlin, Richard C.; Knodler, Leigh A.; Barhoumi, Roula; Payne, H. Ross; Wu, Jing; Gomez, Gabriel; Pugh, Roberta; Lawhon, Sara D.; Bäumler, Andreas J.; Steele-Mortimer, Olivia; Adams, L. Garry

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT To establish a replicative niche during its infectious cycle between the intestinal lumen and tissue, the enteric pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium requires numerous virulence genes, including genes for two type III secretion systems (T3SS) and their cognate effectors. To better understand the host-pathogen relationship, including early infection dynamics and induction kinetics of the bacterial virulence program in the context of a natural host, we monitored the subcellular localization and temporal expression of T3SS-1 and T3SS-2 using fluorescent single-cell reporters in a bovine, ligated ileal loop model of infection. We observed that the majority of bacteria at 2 h postinfection are flagellated, express T3SS-1 but not T3SS-2, and are associated with the epithelium or with extruding enterocytes. In epithelial cells, S. Typhimurium cells were surrounded by intact vacuolar membranes or present within membrane-compromised vacuoles that typically contained numerous vesicular structures. By 8 h postinfection, T3SS-2-expressing bacteria were detected in the lamina propria and in the underlying mucosa, while T3SS-1-expressing bacteria were in the lumen. Our work identifies for the first time the temporal and spatial regulation of T3SS-1 and -2 expression during an enteric infection in a natural host and provides further support for the concept of cytosolic S. Typhimurium in extruding epithelium as a mechanism for reseeding the lumen. PMID:24496791

  14. The type VI secretion system gene cluster of Salmonella typhimurium: required for full virulence in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ji; Guo, Ji-Tao; Li, Yong-Guo; Johnston, Randal N; Liu, Gui-Rong; Liu, Shu-Lin

    2013-07-01

    Type VI secretion system (T6SS) has increasingly been believed to participate in the infection process for many bacterial pathogens, but its role in the virulence of Salmonella typhimurium remains unclear. To look into this, we deleted the T6SS cluster from the genome of S. typhimurium 14028s and analyzed the phenotype of the resulting T6SS knockout mutant (T6SSKO mutant) in vitro and in vivo. We found that the T6SSKO mutant exhibited reduced capability in colonizing the spleen and liver in an in vivo colonization competition model in BALB/c mice infected by the oral route. Additionally, infection via intraperitoneal administration also showed that the T6SSKO mutant was less capable of colonizing the mouse spleen and liver than the wild-type strain. We did not detect significant differences between the T6SSKO and wild-type strains in epithelial cell invasion tests. However, in the macrophage RAW264.7 cell line, the T6SSKO mutant survived and proliferated significantly more poorly than the wild-type strain. These findings indicate that T6SS gene cluster is required for full virulence of S. typhimurium 14028s in BALB/c mice, possibly due to its roles in bacterial survival and proliferation in macrophages.

  15. Biofilm formation ability of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium acrAB mutants.

    PubMed

    Schlisselberg, Dov B; Kler, Edna; Kisluk, Guy; Shachar, Dina; Yaron, Sima

    2015-10-01

    Recent studies offer contradictory findings about the role of multidrug efflux pumps in bacterial biofilm development. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the involvement of the AcrAB efflux pump in biofilm formation by investigating the ability of AcrB and AcrAB null mutants of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium to produce biofilms. Three models were used to compare the ability of S. Typhimurium wild-type and its mutants to form biofilms: formation of biofilm on polystyrene surfaces; production of biofilm (mat model) on the air/liquid interface; and expression of curli and cellulose on Congo red-supplemented agar plates. All three investigated genotypes formed biofilms with similar characteristics. However, upon exposure to chloramphenicol, formation of biofilms on solid surfaces as well as the production of curli were either reduced or were delayed more significantly in both mutants, whilst there was no visible effect on pellicle formation. It can be concluded that when no selective pressure is applied, S. Typhimurium is able to produce biofilms even when the AcrAB efflux pumps are inactivated, implying that the use of efflux pump inhibitors to prevent biofilm formation is not a general solution and that combined treatments might be more efficient. Other factors that affect the ability to produce biofilms depending on efflux pump activity are yet to be identified. PMID:26260191

  16. Design and implementation of a collaborative study of the mutagenicity of complex mixtures in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Lewtas, J; Claxton, L D; Rosenkranz, H S; Schuetzle, D; Shelby, M; Matsushita, H; Würgler, F E; Zimmermann, F K; Löfroth, G; May, W E

    1992-01-01

    In 1987, the International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS) in collaboration with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) and the U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology (U.S. NIST) initiated an international collaborative study of the mutagenicity of complex environmental mixtures in the Ames Salmonella typhimurium mutation assay. The objectives of this study were: (1) to estimate the inter- and intra-laboratory variability associated with the extraction of mixtures for bioassay, (2) to estimate the inter- and intra-laboratory variability associated with the Salmonella typhimurium bioassay when applied to complex mixtures, and (3) to determine whether standard reference complex mixtures would be useful in mutagenicity studies and to evaluate whether reference or certified mutagenicity values determined from this collaborative study should be reported. The complex mixtures used in this study were selected from standard reference materials (SRMs) which had previously been issued by the U.S. NIST as SRM 1597 (coal tar), SRM 1649 (diesel particulate matter) and SRM 1650 (urban air particulate matter) with certified values for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. These SRM complex mixtures are available to scientists as reference standards for analytical chemistry research and are under consideration as SRMs for mutagenicity studies of complex environmental mixtures. This paper briefly describes the final study design, protocol, selection of the complex mixtures, and implementation of this international study.

  17. Isolation and characterization of a cloned Porphyromonas gingivalis hemagglutinin from an avirulent strain of Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Dusek, D M; Progulske-Fox, A; Whitlock, J; Brown, T A

    1993-01-01

    Identification of surface macromolecules of Porphyromonas gingivalis that act as virulence factors in periodontal disease has important implications for studying host-parasite interactions as well as for potential vaccine development. The objective of this study was to determine whether a cloned, P. gingivalis hemagglutinin gene could be expressed in an intact form in an avirulent Salmonella typhimurium vaccine construct and to characterize the recombinant protein. The recombinant protein was purified from the vaccine strain, characterized, and tested for biological activity as a competitive inhibitor of hemagglutination. Cells of S. typhimurium SL3261/pST7 grown in Luria broth were broken by sonic disruption and fractionated. The purified recombinant protein was found to inhibit hemagglutination of erythrocytes by whole P. gingivalis cells. The same purified protein was analyzed for its N-terminal amino acid sequence and amino acid composition and found to match that predicted from the nucleotide sequence of the cloned gene. These results indicate that a surface macromolecule of P. gingivalis can be expressed in an intact and biologically active form in a Salmonella carrier strain. Images PMID:8381773

  18. Efficiency of Conditionally Attenuated Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium in Bacterium-Mediated Tumor Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Frahm, Michael; Kocijancic, Dino; Rohde, Manfred; Hensel, Michael; Curtiss, Roy; Erhardt, Marc; Weiss, Siegfried

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Increasing numbers of cancer cases generate a great urge for new treatment options. Applying bacteria like Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium for cancer therapy represents an intensively explored option. These bacteria have been shown not only to colonize solid tumors but also to exhibit an intrinsic antitumor effect. In addition, they could serve as tumor-targeting vectors for therapeutic molecules. However, the pathogenic S. Typhimurium strains used for tumor therapy need to be attenuated for safe application. Here, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) deletion mutants (ΔrfaL, ΔrfaG, ΔrfaH, ΔrfaD, ΔrfaP, and ΔmsbB mutants) of Salmonella were investigated for efficiency in tumor therapy. Of such variants, the ΔrfaD and ΔrfaG deep rough mutants exhibited the best tumor specificity and lowest pathogenicity. However, the intrinsic antitumor effect was found to be weak. To overcome this limitation, conditional attenuation was tested by complementing the mutants with an inducible arabinose promoter. The chromosomal integration of the respective LPS biosynthesis genes into the araBAD locus exhibited the best balance of attenuation and therapeutic benefit. Thus, the present study establishes a basis for the development of an applicably cancer therapeutic bacterium. PMID:25873375

  19. Salmonella typhimurium DT104: a virulent and drug-resistant pathogen.

    PubMed Central

    Poppe, C; Smart, N; Khakhria, R; Johnson, W; Spika, J; Prescott, J

    1998-01-01

    Salmonella typhimurium phage type (PT) or definitive type (DT) 104 is a virulent pathogen for humans and animals, particularly cattle. It has been isolated increasingly from humans and animals in the United Kingdom and several other European countries and, more recently, in the United States and Canada. Humans may acquire the infection from foods of animal origin contaminated with the infective organism. Farm families are particularly at risk of acquiring the infection by contact with infected animals or by drinking unpasteurized milk. The symptoms in cattle are watery to bloody diarrhea, a drop in milk production, pyrexia, anorexia, dehydration and depression. Infection may result in septicemic salmonellosis and, upon necropsy, a fibrinonecrotic enterocolitis may be observed. The infection occurs more commonly in the calving season than at other times. Feedlot cattle and pigs may also be affected. Prolonged carriage and shedding of the pathogen may occur. Symptoms in humans consist of diarrhea, fever, headache, nausea, abdominal pain, vomiting, and, less frequently, blood in the stool. Salmonella typhimurium DT104 strains are commonly resistant to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, streptomycin, sulfonamides, and tetracycline. PMID:9752592

  20. Isolation and plasmid characterization of carbapenemase (IMP-4) producing Salmonella enterica Typhimurium from cats

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Sam; O’Dea, Mark; Trott, Darren J.; Abraham, Rebecca J.; Hughes, David; Pang, Stanley; McKew, Genevieve; Cheong, Elaine Y. L.; Merlino, John; Saputra, Sugiyono; Malik, Richard; Gottlieb, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) are a pressing public health issue due to limited therapeutic options to treat such infections. CREs have been predominantly isolated from humans and environmental samples and they are rarely reported among companion animals. In this study we report on the isolation and plasmid characterization of carbapenemase (IMP-4) producing Salmonella enterica Typhimurium from a companion animal. Carbapenemase-producing S. enterica Typhimurium carrying blaIMP-4 was identified from a systemically unwell (index) cat and three additional cats at an animal shelter. All isolates were identical and belonged to ST19. Genome sequencing revealed the acquisition of a multidrug-resistant IncHI2 plasmid (pIMP4-SEM1) that encoded resistance to nine antimicrobial classes including carbapenems and carried the blaIMP-4-qacG-aacA4-catB3 cassette array. The plasmid also encoded resistance to arsenic (MIC-150 mM). Comparative analysis revealed that the plasmid pIMP4-SEM1 showed greatest similarity to two blaIMP-8 carrying IncHI2 plasmids from Enterobacter spp. isolated from humans in China. This is the first report of CRE carrying a blaIMP-4 gene causing a clinical infection in a companion animal, with presumed nosocomial spread. This study illustrates the broader community risk entailed in escalating CRE transmission within a zoonotic species such as Salmonella, and in a cycle that encompasses humans, animals and the environment. PMID:27767038

  1. Effect of Pulsed Electric Field on Membrane Lipids and Oxidative Injury of Salmonella typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Ou; Zeng, Xin-An; Brennan, Charles S.; Han, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella typhimurium cells were subjected to pulsed electric field (PEF) treatment at 25 kV/cm for 0–4 ms to investigate the effect of PEF on the cytoplasmic membrane lipids and oxidative injury of cells. Results indicated that PEF treatment induced a decrease of membrane fluidity of Salmonella typhimurium (S. typhimuriumi), possibly due to the alterations of fatty acid biosynthesis-associated gene expressions (down-regulation of cfa and fabA gene expressions and the up-regulation of fabD gene expression), which, in turn, modified the composition of membrane lipid (decrease in the content ratio of unsaturated fatty acids to saturated fatty acids). In addition, oxidative injury induced by PEF treatment was associated with an increase in the content of malondialdehyde. The up-regulation of cytochrome bo oxidase gene expressions (cyoA, cyoB, and cyoC) indicated that membrane damage was induced by PEF treatment, which was related to the repairing mechanism of alleviating the oxidative injury caused by PEF treatment. Based on these results, we achieved better understanding of microbial injury induced by PEF, suggesting that micro-organisms tend to decrease membrane fluidity in response to PEF treatment and, thus, a greater membrane fluidity might improve the efficiency of PEF treatment to inactivate micro-organisms. PMID:27556460

  2. A method for investigating protein-protein interactions related to Salmonella typhimurium pathogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, Saiful M.; Shi, Liang; Yoon, Hyunjin; Ansong, Charles; Rommereim, Leah M.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Auberry, Kenneth J.; Moore, R. J.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Heffron, Fred; Smith, Richard D.

    2009-02-10

    We successfully modified an existing method to investigate protein-protein interactions in the pathogenic bacterium Salmonella typhimurium (STM). This method includes i) addition of a histidine-biotin-histidine tag to the bait proteins via recombinant DNA techniques; ii) in vivo cross-linking with formaldehyde; iii) tandem affinity purification of bait proteins under fully denaturing conditions; and iv) identification of the proteins cross-linked to the bait proteins by liquid-chromatography in conjunction with tandem mass-spectrometry. In vivo cross-linking stabilized protein interactions permitted the subsequent two-step purification step conducted under denaturing conditions. The two-step purification greatly reduced nonspecific binding of non-cross-linked proteins to bait proteins. Two different negative controls were employed to reduce false-positive identification. In an initial demonstration of this approach, we tagged three selected STM proteins- HimD, PduB and PhoP- with known binding partners that ranged from stable (e.g., HimD) to transient (i.e., PhoP). Distinct sets of interacting proteins were identified with each bait protein, including the known binding partners such as HimA for HimD, as well as anticipated and unexpected binding partners. Our results suggest that novel protein-protein interactions may be critical to pathogenesis by Salmonella typhimurium. .

  3. Structural basis for the mechanism of inhibition of uridine phosphorylase from Salmonella typhimurium

    SciTech Connect

    Lashkov, A. A.; Zhukhlistova, N. E.; Sotnichenko, S. E.; Gabdulkhakov, A. G.; Mikhailov, A. M.

    2010-01-15

    The three-dimensional structures of three complexes of Salmonella typhimurium uridine phosphorylase with the inhibitor 2,2'-anhydrouridine, the substrate PO{sub 4}, and with both the inhibitor 2,2'-anhydrouridine and the substrate PO{sub 4} (a binary complex) were studied in detail by X-ray diffraction. The structures of the complexes were refined at 2.38, 1.5, and 1.75 A resolution, respectively. Changes in the three-dimensional structure of the subunits in different crystal structures are considered depending on the presence or absence of the inhibitor molecule and (or) the phosphate ion in the active site of the enzyme. The presence of the phosphate ion in the phosphate-binding site was found to substantially change the orientations of the side chains of the amino-acid residues Arg30, Arg91, and Arg48 coordinated to this ion. A comparison showed that the highly flexible loop L9 is unstable. The atomic coordinates of the refined structures of the complexes and the corresponding structure factors were deposited in the Protein Data Bank (their PDB ID codes are 3DD0 and 3C74). The experimental data on the spatial reorganization of the active site caused by changes in its functional state from the unligated to the completely inhibited state suggest the structural basis for the mechanism of inhibition of Salmonella typhimurium uridine phosphorylase.

  4. Effect of Pulsed Electric Field on Membrane Lipids and Oxidative Injury of Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Yun, Ou; Zeng, Xin-An; Brennan, Charles S; Han, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella typhimurium cells were subjected to pulsed electric field (PEF) treatment at 25 kV/cm for 0-4 ms to investigate the effect of PEF on the cytoplasmic membrane lipids and oxidative injury of cells. Results indicated that PEF treatment induced a decrease of membrane fluidity of Salmonella typhimurium (S. typhimuriumi), possibly due to the alterations of fatty acid biosynthesis-associated gene expressions (down-regulation of cfa and fabA gene expressions and the up-regulation of fabD gene expression), which, in turn, modified the composition of membrane lipid (decrease in the content ratio of unsaturated fatty acids to saturated fatty acids). In addition, oxidative injury induced by PEF treatment was associated with an increase in the content of malondialdehyde. The up-regulation of cytochrome bo oxidase gene expressions (cyoA, cyoB, and cyoC) indicated that membrane damage was induced by PEF treatment, which was related to the repairing mechanism of alleviating the oxidative injury caused by PEF treatment. Based on these results, we achieved better understanding of microbial injury induced by PEF, suggesting that micro-organisms tend to decrease membrane fluidity in response to PEF treatment and, thus, a greater membrane fluidity might improve the efficiency of PEF treatment to inactivate micro-organisms. PMID:27556460

  5. Protective Effect of Moderate Exercise for BALB/c Mice with Salmonella Typhimurium Infection.

    PubMed

    Campos-Rodríguez, R; Godínez-Victoria, M; Arciniega-Martínez, I M; Reséndiz-Albor, A A; Reyna-Garfias, H; Cruz-Hernández, T R; Drago-Serrano, M E

    2016-01-01

    Moderate exercise enhances resistance to pathogen-associated infections. However, its influence on intestinal IgA levels and resistance to Salmonella typhimurium in mice has not been reported. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of moderate exercise on bacterial resistance and the intestinal-IgA response in a murine typhoid model. Sedentary and exercised (under a protocol of moderate swimming) BALB/c mice were orally infected with Salmonella typhimurium and sacrificed on days 7 or 14 post-infection (n=5 per group). Compared with infected sedentary mice, infected exercised animals had i) lower intestinal and systemic bacterial loads; ii) higher total and specific intestinal-IgA levels, iii) a higher percentage of IgA plasma cells in lamina propria; iv) a higher level on day 7 and lower level on day 14 of intestinal α- and J-chain mRNA and plasma corticosterone, v) unchanged mRNA expression of intestinal pIgR, and vi) a higher mRNA expression of liver pIgR, α-chain and J-chain on day 7. Hence, it is likely that an increase in corticosterone levels (stress response) induced by moderate exercise increased intestinal IgA levels by enabling greater liver expression of pIgR mRNA, leading to a rise in IgA transcytosis from the liver to intestine. The overall effect of these changes is an enhanced resistance to infection.

  6. A quantitative model for nonrandom generalized transduction, applied to the phage P22-Salmonella typhimurium system.

    PubMed

    Mandecki, W; Krajewska-Grynkiewicz, K; Klopotowski, T

    1986-10-01

    A mathematical model for nonrandom generalized transduction is proposed and analyzed. The model takes into account the finite number of transducing particle classes for any given marker. The equations for estimation of the distance between markers from contransduction frequency data are derived and standard errors of the estimates are given. The obtained relationships depend significantly on the number of classes of transducing fragments. The model was applied to estimate the number of transducing fragment classes for a given marker in transduction with phage P22 of Salmonella typhimurium. It was found that the literature data on frequencies of contransduction in crosses with mutual substitution of selective and nonselective markers can be rationalized most accurately by assuming that the mean number of classes is equal to 2. An improved method for analysis of cotransduction data is proposed on the basis of our model and the results of calculation. The method relies on solving a set of algebraic equations for cotransduction frequencies of markers located within one phage length. The method allows a relatively precise determination of distances between markers, positions of transducing particle ends and deletion or insertion lengths. The approach is applied to the trp-cysB-pyrF and aroC-hisT-purF-dhuA regions of the Salmonella typhimurium chromosome.

  7. Genome Scanning for Conditionally Essential Genes in Salmonella enterica Serotype Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Khatiwara, Anita; Jiang, Tieshan; Sung, Sam-Sun; Dawoud, Turki; Kim, Jeong Nam; Bhattacharya, Dhruva; Kim, Hee-Bal; Ricke, Steven C.

    2012-01-01

    As more whole-genome sequences become available, there is an increasing demand for high-throughput methods that link genes to phenotypes, facilitating discovery of new gene functions. In this study, we describe a new version of the Tn-seq method involving a modified EZ:Tn5 transposon for genome-wide and quantitative mapping of all insertions in a complex mutant library utilizing massively parallel Illumina sequencing. This Tn-seq method was applied to a genome-saturating Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium mutant library recovered from selection under 3 different in vitro growth conditions (diluted Luria-Bertani [LB] medium, LB medium plus bile acid, and LB medium at 42°C), mimicking some aspects of host stressors. We identified an overlapping set of 105 protein-coding genes in S. Typhimurium that are conditionally essential under at least one of the above selective conditions. Competition assays using 4 deletion mutants (pyrD, glnL, recD, and STM14_5307) confirmed the phenotypes predicted by Tn-seq data, validating the utility of this approach in discovering new gene functions. With continuously increasing sequencing capacity of next generation sequencing technologies, this robust Tn-seq method will aid in revealing unexplored genetic determinants and the underlying mechanisms of various biological processes in Salmonella and the other approximately 70 bacterial species for which EZ:Tn5 mutagenesis has been established. PMID:22367088

  8. Antigenic determinants of the OmpC porin from Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Singh, S P; Singh, S R; Williams, Y U; Jones, L; Abdullah, T

    1995-01-01

    The antigenic determinants of Salmonella typhimurium OmpC were investigated by the analysis of cyanogen bromide (CNBr)-generated porin peptides with antiporin monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). We identified six bands (f1 to f6) with estimated molecular masses of 35.5, 31.0, 25.0, 22.5, 13.8, and 10.0 kDa, respectively. In addition, two small fragments (f7 and f8; 3.0 to 6.0 kDa) were detected only infrequently. The OmpC monomer or its CNBr-generated peptides were electrophoretically transferred to a polyvinylidene difluoride membrane and then subjected to amino acid composition analysis and N-terminal sequencing. A comparison of the amino acid composition data with known compositions of Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhi OmpC showed some differences; however, the amino acid sequences of 71 residues identified in S. typhimurium showed 88 and 98% identity with OmpC from E. coli and S. typhi, respectively. The screening of CNBr peptides with the 12 anti-(S. typhimurium) OmpC MAbs by Western blot (immunoblot), in conjunction with the prediction of the OmpC folding pattern based on the known three-dimensional structure of E. coli OmpF, showed that four MAbs reacted with surface-exposed epitopes on loops L2, L8, and L4 to L7, four MAbs reacted with a region in the eyelet structure on loop L3, and four MAbs reacted with the buried epitopes on transmembrane beta strands. The MAbs reacting with surface-exposed loops showed no cross-reaction with E. coli OmpC, whose sequence has diverged extensively from that of S. typhi and (probably) S. typhimurium OmpC only in regions of the externally exposed loops. In contrast, MAbs reacting with transmembrane beta strands, whose sequence is strongly conserved, showed strong cross-reaction with E. coli OmpC. These results show that comparison with the E. coli OmpF structure predicts the folding pattern of S. typhimurium OmpC rather accurately and that evolutionary divergence in sequences is confined to the external loops. The possible

  9. transcriptional response of pigs to Salmonella infection: Comparison of responses to infection with Salmonella eimerica serotype Typhimurium as that observed in S. choleraesuis infection.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Swine responses to, and control of, Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium (ST) infection have been compared to S. enterica serotype Choleraesuis (SC) infection. Using subtractive suppression hybridization (SSH), long oligonucleotide Qiagen and Affymetrix porcine GeneChip® arrays, and real time ge...

  10. Ineffectiveness of Vi and chemically treated endotoxins as typhoid vaccines in mice challenged with a Salmonella typhosa-Salmonella typhimurium hybrid.

    PubMed Central

    Diena, B B; Ryan, A; Wallace, R; Ashton, F E; Johnson, E M; Baron, L S

    1975-01-01

    Purified Vi antigen, acetic anthydride-treated Salmonella typhosa endotoxin, and potassium methylate-treated S. typhosa endotoxin employed as vaccines in Swiss white mice failed to protect these animals against challenge with a virulent S. typhimurium hybrid expressing S. typhosa antigens. PMID:1107227

  11. Molecular profiling: Catecholamine modulation of gene expression in Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Investigations of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium have demonstrated that these bacterial pathogens can respond to the presence of catecholamines including norepinephrine and/or epinephrine in their environment by modulating gene expression and exhibiting various ...

  12. Use of Glycerol as an Optical Clearing Agent for Enhancing Photonic Transference and Detection of Salmonella typhimurium Through Porcine Skin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate glycerol (GLY) and GLY + dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) to increase photonic detection of transformed Salmonella typhimurium (S. typh-lux) through porcine skin. Skin was placed on 96-well plates containing S. typh-lux, imaged (5 min) using a CCD camera, and the...

  13. USE OF GLYCEROL AS AN OPTICAL CLEARING AGENT FOR ENHANCING PHOTONIC TRANSFERENCE AND DETECTIONOF SALMONELLA TYPHIMURIUM THROUGH PORCINE SKIN

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate glycerol (GLY) and GLY+DMSO (dimethyl sulfoxide) to increase photonic detection of transformed Salmonella typhimurium (S.typh-Lux) through porcineskin. A 96-well plate containing S. typh-lux was imaged for 5 min as a control reference usinga CCD camera. Sk...

  14. Inactivation of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and quality maintenance of cherry tomatoes treated with gaseous essential oils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The antimicrobial activity of the essential oils (EOs) from cinnamon bark, oregano, mustard and of their major components cinnamaldehyde, carvacrol, and allyl isothiocyanate (AIT) were evaluated as a gaseous treatment to reduce Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in vitro and on tomatoes. In dif...

  15. Contaminated Larval and Adult Lesser Mealworms, Alphitobius diaperinus (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae)can Transmit Salmonella Typhimurium in a Broiler Flock

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ability of the lesser mealworm, Alphitobius diaperinus (Panzer), commonly known as the darkling beetle, to transmit a marker strain Salmonella Typhimurium to day-of-hatch broiler chicks was evaluated, as well as the spread to non-challenged pen mates. Day-of-hatch chicks were orally gavaged wit...

  16. Effect of zinc on growth performance, gut morphometry, and cecal microbial community in broilers challenged with Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yuxin; Lei, Zhao; Yuan, Jianmin; Yang, Ying; Guo, Yuming; Zhang, Bingkun

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the effects of supplemental zinc on growth performance, gut morphometry, and the cecal microbial community in broilers challenged with Salmonella typhimurium, 180, 1-day-old male Cobb 500 broiler chicks were randomly assigned to 3 treatments with ten replicates for a 42 day experiment. The 3 treatments were: unchallenged, S. typhimurium-challenged, and S. typhimurium-challenged with 120 mg/kg of zinc supplementation in the diet. Salmonella infection caused a reduction in body-weight gain and feed intake, disrupted the intestinal structure by decreasing the villus-height/crypt-depth ratio of the ileum and increasing the apoptotic index of ileal epithelial cells. Moreover, the cecal microbial community was altered by Salmonella infection, as demonstrated by a reduced number of Lactobacillus and total bacteria. Dietary zinc supplementation improved growth performance by increasing the body-weight gain and feed intake in the challenged broilers. In addition, zinc repaired intestinal injury by reducing the apoptotic index of ileal epithelial cells, enhancing villus height and the villus-height/crypt-depth ratio of the ileum, and the proliferation index of ileal epithelial cells. Finally, zinc regulated the cecal microbial community by increasing the number of total bacteria and beneficial Lactobacillus bacteria, and reducing the number of Salmonella. The results indicated that dietary zinc supplementation improved growth performance, intestinal morphology, and intestinal microbiota in S. typhimurium-challenged broilers. PMID:25467118

  17. BEHAVIOR OF ESCHERICHIA COLI O157:H7, LISTERIA MONOCYTOGENES, AND SALMONELLA TYPHIMURIUM IN TEEWURST, A RAW SPREADABLE SAUSAGE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fate of Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella Typhimurium, or Escherichia coli O157:H7 were separately monitored both in and on teewurst, a traditional raw and spreadable sausage of Germanic origin. Multi-strain cocktails of each pathogen (ca. 5.0 log CFU/g) were used to separately inoculate teewur...

  18. Inactivation of Salmonella Typhimurium and quality preservation of cherry tomatoes by in-package aerosolization of antimicrobials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the efficacy of in-package aerosolized aqueous sanitizers in reducing populations of attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium inoculated on tomato fruit and in maintaining fruit quality. Cherry tomatoes were inoculated with a cocktail of ...

  19. Use of Glycerol as an Optical Clearing Agent for Enhancing Photonic Transference and Detection of Salmonella typhimurium through Porcine Skin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate glycerol (GLY) and GLY + dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) to increase photonic detection of transformed Salmonella typhimurium (S. typh-lux) through porcine skin. Skin was placed on 96-well plates containing S. typh-lux, imaged (5 min) using a CCD camera, and the...

  20. Lactic acid bacteria and bifidobacteria attenuate the proinflammatory response in intestinal epithelial cells induced by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Carey, Christine M; Kostrzynska, Magdalena

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation is a physiological response to infections and tissue injury; however, abnormal immune responses can give rise to chronic inflammation and contribute to disease progression. Various dietary components, including probiotic lactic acid bacteria and prebiotics, have the potential to modulate intestinal inflammatory responses. One factor in particular, the chemokine interleukin-8 (IL-8, CXCL-8), is one of the major mediators of the inflammatory response. The purpose of this study was to investigate modulation of the inflammatory host response induced by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 in the presence of selected probiotics and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from human sources, dairy products, and farm animals. IL-8 gene expression and protein production in HT-29 cells were evaluated by real-time PCR and ELISA, respectively. Pre-incubation of HT-29 cells with Lactobacillus kefir IM002, Bifidobacterium adolescentis FRP 61, Bifidobacterium longum FRP 68 and FRP 69, Bifidobacterium breve FRP 334, and Leuconostoc mesenteroides IM080 significantly inhibited IL-8 secretion induced by Salmonella Typhimurium DT104. Co-culture of selected probiotics and Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 reduced IL-8 production, while potential probiotics and LAB had no effect on IL-8 secretion in HT-29 cells preincubated with Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 prior to adding probiotics. Lactobacillus kefir IM002 supernatant also significantly reduced IL-8 production. In conclusion, our study suggests that probiotic bifidobacteria and LAB modulate cytokine induction and possess anti-inflammatory properties; however, the effectiveness is strain dependent.

  1. Interaction of Bifidobacterium animalis subspecies lactis (Bb 12) and Salmonella typhimurium in continuous-flow chemostatic culture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A commercially available probiotic, Bifidobacterium animalis subspecies lactis (Bb12) was adapted to and maintained in a continuous-flow chemostat culture. We evaluated the growth characteristics and interactive effects of Bb12 and a porcine-derived Salmonella typhimurium (St) when cultivated singly...

  2. Interaction of Bifidobacterium animalis subspecies lactis (Bb12) and Salmonella typhimurium in continuous-flow chemostatic culture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A commercially available probiotic, Bifidobacterium animalis subspecies lactis (Bb12) was adapted to and maintained in a continuous-flow chemostat culture. We evaluated the growth characteristics and in interactive effects of Bb12 and a porcine-derived Salmonella typhimurium (St) when cultivated si...

  3. Immunogenicity and Cross-Protective Efficacy Induced by Outer Membrane Proteins from Salmonella Typhimurium Mutants with Truncated LPS in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qiong; Liu, Qing; Zhao, Xinxin; Liu, Tian; Yi, Jie; Liang, Kang; Kong, Qingke

    2016-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a major virulence factor present in the outer membrane of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium). Outer membrane proteins (OMPs) from Salmonella show high immunogenicity and provide protection against Salmonella infection, and truncated LPS alters the outer membrane composition of the cell wall. In our previous study, we demonstrated that Salmonella mutants carrying truncated LPS failed to induce strong immune responses and cross-reaction to other enteric bacteria, due to their high attenuation and low colonization in the host. Therefore, we plan to investigate whether outer membrane proteins from Salmonella mutants with truncated LPS resulting from a series of nonpolar mutations, including ∆waaC12, ∆waaF15, ∆waaG42, ∆rfaH49, ∆waaI43, ∆waaJ44, ∆waaL46, ∆wbaP45 and ∆wzy-48, affect immunogenicity and provide protection against diverse Salmonella challenge. In this study, the immunogenicity and cross-protection efficiency of purified OMPs from all mutants were investigated to explore a potential OMP vaccine to protect against homologous or heterologous serotype Salmonella challenge. The results demonstrated that OMPs from three Salmonella mutants (∆waaC12, ∆waaJ44 and ∆waaL46) induced higher immune responses and provided good protection against homologous S. Typhimurium. The OMPs from these three mutants were also selected to determine the cross-protective efficacy against homologous and heterologous serotype Salmonella. Our results indicated that the mutant ∆waaC12 can elicit higher cross-reactivity and can provide good protection against S. Choleraesuis and S. Enteritidis infection and that the cross-reactivity may be ascribed to an antigen of approximately 18.4–30 kDa. PMID:27011167

  4. Growth and destruction of Salmonella typhimurium in egg white foam products cooked by microwaves.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, R E; Cloninger, M; Fields, M L

    1968-12-01

    Currently, in both home and institutional food preparation, attempts are being made to produce high quality foods with a minimum of time and effort. Research is being carried out to develop equipment capable of cooking foods in a fraction of the time required by conventional methods; as a result, the problem arises as to the bacteriological safety of these products. We investigated the microbiological aspects of lemon and chocolate foam pies before and after cooking by microwaves for less than 2 min. Pies prepared with sterile equipment under sanitary conditions were inoculated with washed cells from a 24-hr broth culture of Salmonella typhimurium and were incubated for 24, 48, and 72 hr at 33 C. The same procedures were followed in model systems to determine the effects of various sugar and pH levels on the survival of S. typhimurium. No S. typhimurium was detected in inoculated cooked or uncooked lemon pies by the plating method; with the Lactose Broth pre-enrichment method, survivors were detected in lemon pies immediately after preparation. After electronic cooking, no survivors were detected in lemon pies by plate counts, whereas cells were recovered from chocolate pies by the Lactose Broth method. Both chocolate and lemon pies had lower counts throughout the 72-hr incubation period than the model systems compared to them. With the model systems, at pH 7.3, media containing sugar inhibited the growth of S. typhimurium but did not cause a significant reduction in counts during the incubation times studied. At pH 3.7, media without sugar yielded no cells with the Lactose Broth pre-enrichment method after 48 hr of incubation, whereas media with sugar were not sterile until after 72 hr of incubation. Apparently, the presence of sugar in the medium had a protective influence which made the lethal effect of the low pH less severe.

  5. Growth and Destruction of Salmonella typhimurium in Egg White Foam Products Cooked by Microwaves1

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, Ruth E.; Cloninger, Marion; Fields, M. L.

    1968-01-01

    Currently, in both home and institutional food preparation, attempts are being made to produce high quality foods with a minimum of time and effort. Research is being carried out to develop equipment capable of cooking foods in a fraction of the time required by conventional methods; as a result, the problem arises as to the bacteriological safety of these products. We investigated the microbiological aspects of lemon and chocolate foam pies before and after cooking by microwaves for less than 2 min. Pies prepared with sterile equipment under sanitary conditions were inoculated with washed cells from a 24-hr broth culture of Salmonella typhimurium and were incubated for 24, 48, and 72 hr at 33 C. The same procedures were followed in model systems to determine the effects of various sugar and pH levels on the survival of S. typhimurium. No S. typhimurium was detected in inoculated cooked or uncooked lemon pies by the plating method; with the Lactose Broth pre-enrichment method, survivors were detected in lemon pies immediately after preparation. After electronic cooking, no survivors were detected in lemon pies by plate counts, whereas cells were recovered from chocolate pies by the Lactose Broth method. Both chocolate and lemon pies had lower counts throughout the 72-hr incubation period than the model systems compared to them. With the model systems, at pH 7.3, media containing sugar inhibited the growth of S. typhimurium but did not cause a significant reduction in counts during the incubation times studied. At pH 3.7, media without sugar yielded no cells with the Lactose Broth pre-enrichment method after 48 hr of incubation, whereas media with sugar were not sterile until after 72 hr of incubation. Apparently, the presence of sugar in the medium had a protective influence which made the lethal effect of the low pH less severe. PMID:4881962

  6. Phage-based magnetoelastic biosensor for the detection of Salmonella typhimurium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Suiqiong; Lakshmanan, Ramji S.; Guntupalli, Rajesh; Huang, Shichu; Cheng, Z.-Y.; Petrenko, Valery A.; Barbaree, James M.; Vodyanoy, Vitaly; Chin, Bryan A.

    2009-05-01

    In this paper, we report a wireless magnetoelastic (ME) biosensor with phage as the bio-recognition probe for real time detection of Salmonella typhimurium. The ME biosensor was constructed by immobilizing filamentous phage that specifically binds with S. typhimurium onto the surface of a strip-shaped ME particle. The ME sensor oscillates with a characteristic resonance frequency when subjected to a time varying magnetic field. Binding between the phage and antigen (bacteria) causes a shift in the sensor's resonance frequency. Sensors with different dimensions were exposed to various known concentrations of S. typhimurium ranging from 5 x101 to 5 x 108 cfu/ml. The detection limit of the ME sensors was found to improve as the size of the sensor became smaller. The detection limit was found to improve from 161 Hz/decade (2mm length sensors) to 1150 Hz/decade (500 μm length sensors). The stability of the ME biosensor was investigated by storing the sensor at different temperatures (25, 45, and 65 °C), and then evaluating the binding activity of the stored biosensor after exposure to S. typhimurium solution (5 x 108 cfu/ml). The results showed that the phage-coated biosensor is robust. Even after storage in excess of 60 days at 65 °C, the phage-coated sensors have a greater binding affinity than the best antibody coated sensors stored for 1 day at 45 °C. The antibody coated sensors showed near zero binding affinity after 3 days of storage at 65 °C.

  7. Probing the ArcA regulon under aerobic/ROS conditions in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is a reactive oxygen species (ROS), which is part of the oxidative burst encountered upon internalization of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) by phagocytic cells. It has previously been established that, the ArcAB two-component system plays a critical role in ROS resistance, but the genes regulated by the system remained undetermined to date. We therefore investigated the ArcA regulon in aerobically growing S. Typhimurium before and after exposure to H2O2 by querying gene expression and other physiological changes in wild type and ΔarcA strains. Results In the ΔarcA strain, expression of 292 genes showed direct or indirect regulation by ArcA in response to H2O2, of which 141were also regulated in aerobiosis, but in the opposite direction. Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) of the expression data from WT and ΔarcA strains, revealed that, in response to H2O2 challenge in aerobically grown cells, ArcA down regulated multiple PEP-PTS and ABC transporters, while up regulating genes involved in glutathione and glycerolipid metabolism and nucleotide transport. Further biochemical analysis guided by GSEA results showed that deletion of arcA during aerobic growth lead to increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production which was concomitant with an increased NADH/NAD+ ratio. In absence of ArcA under aerobic conditions, H2O2 exposure resulted in lower levels of glutathione reductase activity, leading to a decreased GSH (reduced glutathione)/GSSG (oxidized glutathione) ratio. Conclusion The ArcA regulon was defined in 2 conditions, aerobic growth and the combination of peroxide treatment and aerobic growth in S. Typhimurium. ArcA coordinates a response that involves multiple aspects of the carbon flux through central metabolism, which ultimately modulates the reducing potential of the cell. PMID:24044554

  8. Acid environments affect biofilm formation and gene expression in isolates of Salmonella enterica Typhimurium DT104.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Denis; McCabe, Evonne M; McCusker, Matthew P; Martins, Marta; Fanning, Séamus; Duffy, Geraldine

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the survival and potential virulence of biofilm-forming Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 under mild acid conditions. Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 employs an acid tolerance response (ATR) allowing it to adapt to acidic environments. The threat that these acid adapted cells pose to food safety could be enhanced if they also produce biofilms in acidic conditions. The cells were acid-adapted by culturing them in 1% glucose and their ability to form biofilms on stainless steel and on the surface of Luria Bertani (LB) broth at pH7 and pH5 was examined. Plate counts were performed to examine cell survival. RNA was isolated from cells to examine changes in the expression of genes associated with virulence, invasion, biofilm formation and global gene regulation in response to acid stress. Of the 4 isolates that were examined only one (1481) that produced a rigid biofilm in LB broth at pH7 also formed this same structure at pH5. This indicated that the lactic acid severely impeded the biofilm producing capabilities of the other isolates examined under these conditions. Isolate 1481 also had higher expression of genes associated with virulence (hilA) and invasion (invA) with a 24.34-fold and 13.68-fold increase in relative gene expression respectively at pH5 compared to pH7. Although genes associated with biofilm formation had increased expression in response to acid stress for all the isolates this only resulted in the formation of a biofilm by isolate 1481. This suggests that in addition to the range of genes associated with biofilm production at neutral pH, there are genes whose protein products specifically aid in biofilm production in acidic environments. Furthermore, it highlights the potential for the use of lactic acid for the inhibition of Salmonella biofilms.

  9. Complete Proteome of a Quinolone-Resistant Salmonella Typhimurium Phage Type DT104B Clinical Strain

    PubMed Central

    Correia, Susana; Nunes-Miranda, Júlio D.; Pinto, Luís; Santos, Hugo M.; de Toro, María; Sáenz, Yolanda; Torres, Carmen; Capelo, José Luis; Poeta, Patrícia; Igrejas, Gilberto

    2014-01-01

    Salmonellosis is one of the most common and widely distributed foodborne diseases. The emergence of Salmonella strains that are resistant to a variety of antimicrobials is a serious global public health concern. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium definitive phage type 104 (DT104) is one of these emerging epidemic multidrug resistant strains. Here we collate information from the diverse and comprehensive range of experiments on Salmonella proteomes that have been published. We then present a new study of the proteome of the quinolone-resistant Se20 strain (phage type DT104B), recovered after ciprofloxacin treatment and compared it to the proteome of reference strain SL1344. A total of 186 and 219 protein spots were recovered from Se20 and SL1344 protein extracts, respectively, after two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The signatures of 94% of the protein spots were successfully identified through matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Three antimicrobial resistance related proteins, whose genes were previously detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), were identified in the clinical strain. The presence of these proteins, dihydropteroate synthase type-2 (sul2 gene), aminoglycoside resistance protein A (strA gene) and aminoglycoside 6'-N-acetyltransferase type Ib-cr4 (aac(6')-Ib-cr4 gene), was confirmed in the DT104B clinical strain. The aac(6')-Ib-cr4 gene is responsible for plasmid-mediated aminoglycoside and quinolone resistance. This is a preliminary analysis of the proteome of these two S. Typhimurium strains and further work is being developed to better understand how antimicrobial resistance is developing in this pathogen. PMID:25196519

  10. The muc+ gene of plasmid pKM101 prevents respiration shutoff in far ultraviolet-irradiated Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Swenson, P A

    1981-01-01

    The plasmid PKM101 is known to protect Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium against killing by far UV irradiation and to enhance UV-induced mutagenesis. The muc+ gene of the plasmid is responsible for both of these effects. This paper shows that respiration of S. typhimurium shuts off about an hour after UV irradiation and that pKM101 prevents the shutoff. Plasmids which contained Tn5 translocatable elements, either in (and having produced a muc mutation) or flanking the muc+ gene, have been introduced into S. typhimurium. The muc mutant plasmid, which does not protect its host against UV killing and does not enhance UV induced mutagenesis, also does not protect against UV induced respiration shutoff. Likewise, plasmids in which the Tn5 translocatable elements flank the muc+ gene protect against shutoff of respiration. Thus the muc+ gene of pKM101 is responsible for protection against UV induced shutoff of respiration in S. typhimurium.

  11. Amplification of an invA gene sequence of Salmonella typhimurium by polymerase chain reaction as a specific method of detection of Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Rahn, K; De Grandis, S A; Clarke, R C; McEwen, S A; Galán, J E; Ginocchio, C; Curtiss, R; Gyles, C L

    1992-08-01

    Amplification of nucleotide sequences within the invA gene of Salmonella typhimurium was evaluated as a means of detecting Salmonella. A collection of 630 strains of Salmonella comprising over 100 serovars, including the 20 most prevalent serovars isolated from animals and humans in Canada, was examined. Controls consisted of 142 non-Salmonella strains comprising 21 genera of bacteria. Cultures were screened by inoculating a single colony of bacteria directly into a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) mixture which contained a pair of primers specific for the invA gene. The specific PCR product was a 284 bp DNA fragment which was visualized in 2% agarose gels. With the exception of two S. litchfield and two S. senftenberg strains, all Salmonella strains were detected. In contrast, none of the non-Salmonella strains yielded the specific amplification product. Non-specific amplification of a few non-Salmonella strains resulted in a product that was distinctly different in size from the specific 284 bp product. Specificity of amplification was further confirmed by demonstration of hybridization of a 32P-labelled invA gene fragment only to the specific 284 bp product. The detection of 99.4% of Salmonella strains tested and the failure to specifically amplify DNA from non-Salmonella strains confirm that the invA gene contains sequences unique to Salmonella and demonstrate that this gene is a suitable PCR target, with potential diagnostic applications.

  12. SopB effector protein of Salmonella Typhimurium is translocated in mesenteric lymph nodes during murine salmonellosis.

    PubMed

    Giacomodonato, Mónica N; Sarnacki, Sebastián H; Llana, Mariángeles Noto; Cerquetti, María C

    2011-04-01

    Salmonella Typhimurium harbors two Salmonella pathogenicity islands (SPIs), each encoding a type three secretion system for virulence proteins. Although there is increasing evidence of postinvasion roles for SPI-1, it has been generally accepted that SPI-1 genes are downregulated following the invasion process. Here, we analyzed the expression and translocation of SopB in vitro, in cell culture and in vivo. To this end, a sopB-FLAG-tagged strain of Salmonella Typhimurium was obtained by epitope tagging. Tagged proteins were detected by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting with anti-FLAG antibodies. SopB expression was observed in vitro under cultured conditions that mimic the intestinal niche and different intracellular environments. In agreement, bacteria isolated from infected monolayers expressed and translocated SopB for at least 24 h postinoculation. For in vivo experiments, BALB/c mice were inoculated intraperitoneally with the tagged strain of Salmonella Typhimurium. Infecting bacteria and infected cells were recovered from mesenteric lymph nodes. Our results showed that SopB continues to be synthesized in vivo during 5 days after inoculation. Interestingly, translocation of SopB was detected in the cytosol of cells isolated from lymph nodes 1 day after infection. Altogether, these findings indicate that the expression and translocation of SopB during Salmonella infection is not constrained to the initial host-bacteria encounter in the intestinal environment as defined previously.

  13. Purification of antibodies to O antigen of Salmonella Typhimurium from human serum by affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    O'Shaughnessy, Colette M; Micoli, Francesca; Gavini, Massimiliano; Goodall, Margaret; Cobbold, Mark; Saul, Allan; Maclennan, Calman A

    2013-01-31

    Nontyphoidal Salmonellae (NTS) are a common cause of bacteraemia in children and HIV-infected adults in Sub-Saharan Africa. We have previously shown that antibodies play a key role in both bactericidal and cellular mechanisms of immunity to NTS, but found that high concentrations of antibody to Salmonella Typhimurium O antigen (OAg) in the serum of some HIV-infected African adults is associated with impaired killing of NTS. To further investigate the function of antibodies to the OAg of NTS, we developed a method to purify these antibodies from human serum by affinity chromatography. Purified Salmonella Typhimurium OAg was activated with adipic acid dihydrazide (ADH) via two different chemistries before linking to N-hydroxysuccinamide-Sepharose resin: one ADH molecule was introduced per OAg chain on its terminal 3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonic acid sugar (OAg-ADH), or multiple ADH molecules were attached along the OAg chain after oxidation with sodium periodate (OAgoxADH). Both resulting columns worked well when tested with commercial polyclonal anti-O:4,5 antibodies from rabbit serum. Over 90% of the applied antibodies bound to the resin and 89% of these antibodies were then eluted as detected by ELISA. OAg-ADH was preferred as the method for OAg derivatisation as it does not modify the saccharide chain and can be applied to OAg from different bacteria. Both columns were able to bind OAg-specific antibodies in human serum, but antibody recovery was initially low. Different elution buffers were tested and different amounts of OAg-ADH were linked to the resin to improve the yield. Optimal recovery (51%) was obtained by loading 1mg of activated OAg per ml of resin and eluting with 0.1M glycine, 0.1M NaCl pH2.4. The column matrix could be regenerated following elution with no detectable loss in performance for over ten uses. This method offers the potential to purify antibodies to Salmonella OAg from polyclonal serum following vaccination or natural exposure to Salmonella

  14. A novel contribution of spvB to pathogenesis of Salmonella Typhimurium by inhibiting autophagy in host cells.

    PubMed

    Chu, Yuanyuan; Gao, Song; Wang, Ting; Yan, Jing; Xu, Guangmei; Li, Yuanyuan; Niu, Hua; Huang, Rui; Wu, Shuyan

    2016-02-16

    Salmonella plasmid virulence genes (spv) are highly conserved in strains of clinically important Salmonella serovars. It is essential for Salmonella plasmid-correlated virulence, although the exact mechanism remains to be elucidated. Autophagy has been reported to play an important role in host immune responses limiting Salmonella infection. Our previous studies demonstrated that Salmonella conjugative plasmid harboring spv genes could enhance bacterial cytotoxicity by inhibiting autophagy. In the present study, we investigated whether spvB, which is one of the most important constituents of spv ORF could intervene in autophagy pathway. Murine macrophage-like cells J774A.1, human epithelial HeLa cells, and BALB/c mice infected with Salmonella Typhimurium wild type, mutant and complementary strains (carrying or free spvB or complemented only with ADP-ribosyltransferase activity of SpvB) were used in vitro and in vivo assay, respectively. To further explore the molecular mechanisms, both SpvB ectopic eukaryotic expression system and cells deficient in essential autophagy components by siRNA were generated. Results indicated that spvB could suppress autophagosome formation through its function in depolymerizing actin, and aggravate inflammatory injury of the host in response to S. Typhimurium infection. Our studies demonstrated virulence of spvB involving in inhibition of autophagic flux for the first time, which could provide novel insights into Salmonella pathogenesis, and have potential application to develop new antibacterial strategies for Salmonellosis.

  15. aroA-Deficient Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Is More Than a Metabolically Attenuated Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Frahm, Michael; Kocijancic, Dino; Rohde, Manfred; Eckweiler, Denitsa; Bielecka, Agata; Bueno, Emilio; Cava, Felipe; Abraham, Wolf-Rainer; Curtiss, Roy; Häussler, Susanne; Erhardt, Marc; Weiss, Siegfried

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Recombinant attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strains are believed to act as powerful live vaccine carriers that are able to elicit protection against various pathogens. Auxotrophic mutations, such as a deletion of aroA, are commonly introduced into such bacteria for attenuation without incapacitating immunostimulation. In this study, we describe the surprising finding that deletion of aroA dramatically increased the virulence of attenuated Salmonella in mouse models. Mutant bacteria lacking aroA elicited increased levels of the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) after systemic application. A detailed genetic and phenotypic characterization in combination with transcriptomic and metabolic profiling demonstrated that ΔaroA mutants display pleiotropic alterations in cellular physiology and lipid and amino acid metabolism, as well as increased sensitivity to penicillin, complement, and phagocytic uptake. In concert with other immunomodulating mutations, deletion of aroA affected flagellin phase variation and gene expression of the virulence-associated genes arnT and ansB. Finally, ΔaroA strains displayed significantly improved tumor therapeutic activity. These results highlight the importance of a functional shikimate pathway to control homeostatic bacterial physiology. They further highlight the great potential of ΔaroA-attenuated Salmonella for the development of vaccines and cancer therapies with important implications for host-pathogen interactions and translational medicine. PMID:27601574

  16. Deficiency of serum bactericidal activity against Salmonella typhimurium in sickle cell anaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Hand, W L; King, N L

    1977-01-01

    Systemic salmonellosis is a recognized complication of sickle cell anemia (SCA). In our initial study of SCA host defences against salmonella, we evaluated the bactericidal activity of serum against Salmonella typhimurium. When compared to controls, sera from eight out of nineteen SCA patients were deficient in bactericidal function. Levels of factor B, haemolytic complement and agglutinating antibody were similar in SCA and control sera. However, abnormalities that might theoretically account for the decreased antibacterial activity were observed in many SCA sera. These abnormal findings included: (a) defective function of the alternative complement pathway (decreased bacterial killing in the presence of Mg EGTA); (b) low serum C3 concentration; and (c) decreased total iron-binding capacity (TIBC), with a resultant increase in per cent saturation of iron-binding capacity. Of these deficiencies only the abnormal alternative pathway function was significantly associated with decreased serum bactericidal activity. A suggested function of serum bactericidal activity is prevention of bacteraemia by susceptible organisms. Thus diminished serum bactericidal capacity may increase the risk of Salmonella bacteraemia in some individuals with sickle cell disease. PMID:342154

  17. Cytosporone B, an inhibitor of the type III secretion system of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianfang; Lv, Chao; Sun, Weiyang; Li, Zhenyu; Han, Xiaowei; Li, Yaoyao; Shen, Yuemao

    2013-05-01

    Bacterial virulence factors have been increasingly regarded as attractive targets for development of novel antibacterial agents. Virulence inhibitors are less likely to generate bacterial resistance, which makes them superior to traditional antibiotics that target bacterial viability. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, an important food-borne human pathogen, has type III secretion system (T3SS) as its major virulence factor. T3SS secretes effector proteins to facilitate invasion into host cells. In this study, we identified several analogs of cytosporone B (Csn-B) that strongly block the secretion of Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1)-associated effector proteins, without affecting the secretion of flagellar protein FliC in vitro. Csn-B and two other derivatives exhibited a strong inhibitory effect on SPI-1-mediated invasion to HeLa cells, while no significant toxicity to bacteria was observed. Nucleoid proteins Hha and H-NS bind to the promoters of SPI-1 regulator genes hilD, hilC, and rtsA to repress their expression and consequently regulate the expression of SPI-1 apparatus and effector genes. We found that Csn-B upregulated the transcription of hha and hns, implying that Csn-B probably affected the secretion of effectors through the Hha-H-NS regulatory pathway. In summary, this study presented an effective SPI-1 inhibitor, Csn-B, which may have potential in drug development against antibiotic-resistant Salmonella.

  18. Multistate outbreak of human Salmonella typhimurium infections associated with pet turtle exposure - United States, 2008.

    PubMed

    2010-02-26

    On September 4, 2008, the Philadelphia Department of Public Health (PDPH) and the Pennsylvania Department of Health (PADOH) notified CDC of an outbreak of possible turtle-associated human Salmonella Typhimurium infections detected by identifying strains with similar pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns in PulseNet. Turtles and other reptiles have long been recognized as sources of human Salmonella infections, and the sale or distribution of small turtles (those with carapace lengths <4 inches) has been prohibited in the United States since 1975. CDC and state and local health departments conducted a multistate investigation during September-November 2008. This report summarizes the results of that investigation, which identified 135 cases in 25 states and the District of Columbia; 45% were in children aged Salmonella awareness education at the point-of-sale), could augment federal prevention efforts. PMID:20186118

  19. The RNA chaperone Hfq is essential for the virulence of Salmonella typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Sittka, Alexandra; Pfeiffer, Verena; Tedin, Karsten; Vogel, Jörg

    2007-01-01

    The RNA chaperone, Hfq, plays a diverse role in bacterial physiology beyond its original role as a host factor required for replication of Qβ RNA bacteriophage. In this study, we show that Hfq is involved in the expression and secretion of virulence factors in the facultative intracellular pathogen, Salmonella typhimurium. A Salmonella hfq deletion strain is highly attenuated in mice after both oral and intraperitoneal infection, and shows a severe defect in invasion of epithelial cells and a growth defect in both epithelial cells and macrophages in vitro. Surprisingly, we find that these phenotypes are largely independent of the previously reported requirement of Hfq for expression of the stationary phase sigma factor, RpoS. Our results implicate Hfq as a key regulator of multiple aspects of virulence including regulation of motility and outer membrane protein (OmpD) expression in addition to invasion and intracellular growth. These pleiotropic effects are suggested to involve a network of regulatory small non-coding RNAs, placing Hfq at the centre of post-transcriptional regulation of virulence gene expression in Salmonella. In addition, the hfq mutation appears to cause a chronic activation of the RpoE-mediated envelope stress response which is likely due to a misregulation of membrane protein expression. PMID:17163975

  20. Suppression of inflammation by recombinant Salmonella typhimurium harboring CCL22 microRNA.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Won Suck; Ryu, Seung Rel; Lee, Seung Seok; Chae, Yang Seok; Kim, Eun Jae; Choi, Ji Hyun; Oh, Sejin; Park, Se Ho; Choung, Ji Tae; Yoo, Young; Park, Yong Keun

    2012-03-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is an inflammatory, chronically relapsing, puritic skin disorder. These syndromes result from multifactorial inheritance, with interaction between genetic and environmental factors. In particular, the macrophage-derived chemokine CCL22 is directly implicated in skin inflammatory reactions and its levels are significantly elevated in serum and correlated with disease severity in AD. We tested the suppression of the CCL22 gene by microRNA (miRNA) and observed the effects in mice with inflammation similar to AD. We used Salmonella as a vector to deliver miRNA. The recombinant strain of Salmonella typhimurium expressing CCL22 miRNA (ST-miRCCL22) was prepared for in vivo knockdown of CCL22. ST-miRCCL22 was orally inoculated into mice and the CCL22 gene suppressed with CCL22 miRNA in the activated lymphocytes. IgE and interleukin-4 were inhibited and interferon-γ was induced after treatments with ST-miRCCL22 and CCL22 was suppressed. Further, Th17 cells were suppressed in the atopic mice treated with ST-miRCCL22. These results suggested that suppression of the CCL22 gene using Salmonella induced anti-inflammatory effects. PMID:21823987

  1. A Rapid and Sensitive Method to Identify and Differentiate Salmonella enterica Serotype Typhimurium and Salmonella enterica Serotype 4,[5],12:i:- by Combining Traditional Serotyping and Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Barco, Lisa; Lettini, Antonia Anna; Ramon, Elena; Longo, Alessandra; Saccardin, Cristina; Pozza, Maria Cristina Dalla

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serotype 4,[5],12:i:- is an emerging serovar considered as a monophasic variant of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium. The antigenic and genetic similarity between Salmonella 4,[5],12:i:- and Salmonella Typhimurium suggests that they may behave in a similar way and represent a comparable threat to public health. As serotyping alone does not necessarily provide for identification of Salmonella 4,[5],12:i:- and its differentiation from Salmonella Typhimurium, a method that combines traditional serotyping and a multiplex polymerase chain reaction has been tested on 208 strains serotyped as Salmonella 4,[5],12:i:-, Salmonella Typhimurium, and similar serovars of serogroup B sharing the same phase-1 antigen “i.” For 191 strains, the combined method fully confirmed the results provided by traditional serotyping, whereas for 17 strains of Salmonella 4,[5],12:i:- and Salmonella Typhimurium some inconsistencies emerged between the two methods. The combined method resulted in a more accurate and faster identification of these two relevant serovars. PMID:21247297

  2. The Common Structural Architecture of Shigella flexneri and Salmonella typhimurium Type Three Secretion Needles

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Rashmi; Loquet, Antoine; Giller, Karin; Riedel, Dietmar; Laube, Britta; Kolbe, Michael; Baker, David; Becker, Stefan; Lange, Adam

    2013-01-01

    The Type Three Secretion System (T3SS), or injectisome, is a macromolecular infection machinery present in many pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria. It consists of a basal body, anchored in both bacterial membranes, and a hollow needle through which effector proteins are delivered into the target host cell. Two different architectures of the T3SS needle have been previously proposed. First, an atomic model of the Salmonella typhimurium needle was generated from solid-state NMR data. The needle subunit protein, PrgI, comprises a rigid-extended N-terminal segment and a helix-loop-helix motif with the N-terminus located on the outside face of the needle. Second, a model of the Shigella flexneri needle was generated from a high-resolution 7.7-Å cryo-electron microscopy density map. The subunit protein, MxiH, contains an N-terminal α-helix, a loop, another α-helix, a 14-residue-long β-hairpin (Q51–Q64) and a C-terminal α-helix, with the N-terminus facing inward to the lumen of the needle. In the current study, we carried out solid-state NMR measurements of wild-type Shigella flexneri needles polymerized in vitro and identified the following secondary structure elements for MxiH: a rigid-extended N-terminal segment (S2-T11), an α-helix (L12-A38), a loop (E39-P44) and a C-terminal α-helix (Q45-R83). Using immunogold labeling in vitro and in vivo on functional needles, we located the N-terminus of MxiH subunits on the exterior of the assembly, consistent with evolutionary sequence conservation patterns and mutagenesis data. We generated a homology model of Shigella flexneri needles compatible with both experimental data: the MxiH solid-state NMR chemical shifts and the state-of-the-art cryoEM density map. These results corroborate the solid-state NMR structure previously solved for Salmonella typhimurium PrgI needles and establish that Shigella flexneri and Salmonella typhimurium subunit proteins adopt a conserved structure and orientation in their assembled state

  3. Inactivated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium monophasic variant (S. Typhimurium 1,4,[5],12:i-) in sows is effective to control infection in piglets under field condition.

    PubMed

    Ruggeri, J; Pesciaroli, M; Foresti, F; Giacomini, E; Lazzaro, M; Ossiprandi, M C; Corradi, A; Lombardi, G; Pasquali, P; Alborali, G L

    2015-10-22

    The monophasic variant of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, namely Salmonella 1,4,[5],12:i-, has been increasingly responsible for foodborne human cases of disease and is most frequently detected in pork, since the variant is widely spread in pig farms. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of an autologous vaccine in decreasing the prevalence of Salmonella 1,4,[5],12:i-, in pigs. The trial was performed in a multisite pig production system of Northern Italy. The autogenous vaccine was prepared from the Salmonella 1,4,[5],12:i- strain isolated from the clinical case occurring in the Farm. Different immunization protocols were applied, ranging from interventions only in sows or piglets, or both. Microbiological analysis was performed to assess faecal shedding in sows and their offspring from birth till end of the production cycle and organ colonization of slaughtered pigs. Body weight of pigs was recorded at different time-points. Humoral immune response was evaluated in serum samples of sows and piglets. S. Typhimurium 1,4,[5],12:i- determines reduction of animal growth and farm production, furthermore, contamination of carcasses at the slaughterhouse. The load of bacteria entering into the food processing chain is differently influenced by the regimen of administration of inactivated vaccine. In particular, a combined vaccination of sows and their offspring was able to improve the weight gain of growing pigs, to limit Salmonella colonization of organs and to reduce the number of carrier pigs, and hence lowering the risk of introducing Salmonella organisms in the slaughter process. PMID:26260858

  4. ZBP-89 Regulates Expression of Tryptophan Hydroxylase I and Mucosal Defense Against Salmonella Typhimurium in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Essien, Bryan; Grasberger, Helmut; Romain, Rachael D.; Law, David J.; Veniaminova, Natalia A.; Saqui-Salces, Milena; El-Zaatari, Mohamad; Tessier, Arthur; Hayes, Michael M.; Yang, Alexander C.; Merchant, Juanita L.

    2013-01-01

    Background & Aims ZBP-89 (also ZNF148 or Zfp148) is a butyrate-inducible zinc finger transcription factor that binds to GC-rich DNA elements. Deletion of the N-terminal domain is sufficient to increase mucosal susceptibility to chemical injury and inflammation. We investigated whether conditional deletion of ZBP-89 from the intestinal and colonic epithelium of mice increases their susceptibility to pathogens such as Salmonella typhimurium. Methods We generated mice with a conditional null allele of Zfp148 (ZBP-89FL/FL), using homologous recombination to flank Zfp148 with LoxP sites (ZBP-89FL/FL), and then breeding the resulting mice with those that express VillinCre. We used microarray analysis to compare gene expression patterns in colonic mucosa between ZBP-89FL/FL and C57BL/6 wild-type mice (controls). Mice were gavaged with 2 isogenic strains of S typhimurium after administration of streptomycin. Results Microarray analysis revealed that the colonic mucosa of ZBP-89FL/FL mice had reduced levels of tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (Tph1) mRNA, encoding the rate-limiting enzyme in enterochromaffin cell serotonin (5HT) biosynthesis. DNA affinity precipitation demonstrated direct binding of ZBP-89 to the mouse Tph1 promoter, which was required for its basal and butyrate-inducible expression. ZBP-89FL/FL mice did not increase mucosal levels of 5HT in response to S typhimurium infection and succumbed to the infection 2 days before control mice. The ΔhilA isogenic mutant of S typhimurium lacks this butyrate-regulated locus and stimulated, rather than suppressed, expression of Tph1 approximately 50-fold in control, but not ZBP-89FL/FL mice, correlating with fecal levels of butyrate. Conclusions ZBP-89 is required for butyrate-induced expression of the Tph1 gene and subsequent production of 5HT in response to bacterial infection in mice. Reductions in epithelial ZBP-89 increase susceptibility to colitis and sepsis following infection with S typhimurium, partly due to reduced

  5. Effects of gamma irradiation for inactivating Salmonella Typhimurium in peanut butter product during storage.

    PubMed

    Ban, Ga-Hee; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2014-02-01

    Three types (A, B, and C) of peanut butter product with different water activities (0.18, 0.39, and 0.65 aw) inoculated with a 3-strain mixture of Salmonella Typhimurium were subjected to gamma irradiation (⁶⁰Co) treatment, with doses ranging from 0 to 3 kGy. The inactivation of S. Typhimurium in the 3 types of treated peanut butter product over a 14 day storage period and the influence of storage temperature at 4 (refrigerated) and 25 °C (ambient), and peanut butter product formulation were investigated. Three types of peanut butter product inoculated with S. Typhimurium to a level of ca. 6.6 log CFU/g and subjected to gamma irradiation experienced significant (p<0.05) reductions of 1.3 to 1.9, 2.6 to 2.8, and 3.5 to 4.0 log CFU/g at doses of 1, 2, and 3 kGy, respectively. The time required to reduce S. Typhimurium in peanut butter product to undetectable levels was 14, 5, and 5 days at 25°C after exposure to 3 kGy for products A, B, and C, respectively, and 7 days at 25 °C following exposure to 2 kGy for product C. During storage at 4 and 25 °C, survival of S. Typhimurium was lowest in product C compared to products A and B. Water activity (a(w)) of peanut butter product was likely the most critical factor affecting pathogen survival. When a(w) is reduced, radiolysis of water is reduced, thereby decreasing antimicrobial action. Overall, death was more rapid at 25 °C versus 4 °C for all peanut butter products during 14 day storage. Following gamma irradiation, acid values of peanut butter product were not significantly different from the control, and general observations failed to detect changes in color and aroma, even though lightness observed using a colorimeter was slightly reduced on day 0. The use of gamma irradiation has potential in preventing spoilage of post-packaged food by destroying microorganisms and improving the safety and quality of foods without compromising sensory quality.

  6. Effects of gamma irradiation for inactivating Salmonella Typhimurium in peanut butter product during storage.

    PubMed

    Ban, Ga-Hee; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2014-02-01

    Three types (A, B, and C) of peanut butter product with different water activities (0.18, 0.39, and 0.65 aw) inoculated with a 3-strain mixture of Salmonella Typhimurium were subjected to gamma irradiation (⁶⁰Co) treatment, with doses ranging from 0 to 3 kGy. The inactivation of S. Typhimurium in the 3 types of treated peanut butter product over a 14 day storage period and the influence of storage temperature at 4 (refrigerated) and 25 °C (ambient), and peanut butter product formulation were investigated. Three types of peanut butter product inoculated with S. Typhimurium to a level of ca. 6.6 log CFU/g and subjected to gamma irradiation experienced significant (p<0.05) reductions of 1.3 to 1.9, 2.6 to 2.8, and 3.5 to 4.0 log CFU/g at doses of 1, 2, and 3 kGy, respectively. The time required to reduce S. Typhimurium in peanut butter product to undetectable levels was 14, 5, and 5 days at 25°C after exposure to 3 kGy for products A, B, and C, respectively, and 7 days at 25 °C following exposure to 2 kGy for product C. During storage at 4 and 25 °C, survival of S. Typhimurium was lowest in product C compared to products A and B. Water activity (a(w)) of peanut butter product was likely the most critical factor affecting pathogen survival. When a(w) is reduced, radiolysis of water is reduced, thereby decreasing antimicrobial action. Overall, death was more rapid at 25 °C versus 4 °C for all peanut butter products during 14 day storage. Following gamma irradiation, acid values of peanut butter product were not significantly different from the control, and general observations failed to detect changes in color and aroma, even though lightness observed using a colorimeter was slightly reduced on day 0. The use of gamma irradiation has potential in preventing spoilage of post-packaged food by destroying microorganisms and improving the safety and quality of foods without compromising sensory quality. PMID:24321602

  7. β-1,3/1,6-Glucan alleviated intestinal mucosal barrier impairment of broiler chickens challenged with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yujing; Guo, Yuming; Wang, Zhong

    2013-07-01

    This study investigated the protective effect of β-1,3/1,6-glucan on gut morphology, intestinal epithelial tight junctions, and bacterial translocation of broiler chickens challenged with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. Ninety Salmonella-free Arbor Acre male broiler chickens were randomly divided into 3 groups: negative control group (NC), Salmonella Typhimurium-infected positive group (PC), and the Salmonella Typhimurium-infected group with dietary 100 mg/kg of β-1,3/1,6-glucan supplementation (T) to determine the effect of β-1,3/1,6-glucan on intestinal barrier function. Salmonella Typhimurium challenge alone significantly decreased villus height (P < 0.001), villus height/crypt depth ratio (P < 0.05), and the number of goblet cells (P < 0.001) in the jejunum at 14 d postinfection (dpi), but significantly increased the number of intestinal secretory IgA (sIgA)-expressing cells at 14 dpi (P < 0.01) and total sIgA levels in the jejunum at 7 (P < 0.05) and 14 dpi (P < 0.01) compared with the unchallenged birds (NC). Dietary β-1,3/1,6-glucan supplementation not only significantly increased villus height, villus height/crypt depth ratio, and the number of goblet cells (P < 0.01), but also increased the number of sIgA-expressing cells (P < 0.05) and sIgA content in the jejunum at 14 dpi (P < 0.01) in birds challenged with Salmonella Typhimurium in comparison with Salmonella Typhimurium challenge alone. β-1,3/1,6-Glucan addition had significant inhibitory effects (P < 0.05) on cecal Salmonella colonization levels and liver Salmonella invasion of the Salmonella Typhimurium-infected birds compared with the PC group. Intestinal tight junction proteins claudin-1, claudin-4, and occludin mRNA expression in the jejunum at 14 dpi was significantly decreased by Salmonella Typhimurium challenge alone (P < 0.01) compared with that of the NC group, whereas β-1,3/1,6-glucan supplementation significantly increased claudin-1 and occludin mRNA expression (P < 0.01) at

  8. Survival of Salmonella Tennessee, Salmonella Typhimurium DT104, and Enterococcus faecium in peanut paste formulations at two different levels of water activity and fat.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Ai; Enache, Elena; Black, D Glenn; Elliott, Philip H; Napier, Carla D; Podolak, Richard; Hayman, Melinda M

    2014-08-01

    Long-term survival of heat-stressed Salmonella Tennessee, Salmonella Typhimurium DT104, and Enterococcus faecium was evaluated in four model peanut paste formulations with a combination of two water activity (aw) levels (0.3 and 0.6) and two fat levels (47 and 56%) over 12 months at 20 ± 1°C. Prior to storage, the inoculated peanut paste formulations were heat treated at 75°C for up to 50 min to obtain an approximately 1.0-log reduction of each organism. The cell population of each organism in each formulation was monitored with tryptic soy agar plate counts, immediately after heat treatment, at 2 weeks for the first month, and then monthly for up to 1 year. The log reductions (log CFU per gram) following 12 months of storage were between 1.3 and 2.4 for Salmonella Tennessee, 1.8 and 2.8 for Salmonella Typhimurium, and 1.1 and 2.1 for E. faecium in four types of model peanut paste formulations. Enhanced survivability was observed in pastes with lower aw for all organisms, compared with those with higher aw (P < 0.05). In contrast, the effect of fat level (47 and 56%) on survival of all organisms was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). Whereas survivability of Salmonella Tennessee and Typhimurium DT104 did not differ significantly (P > 0.05), E. faecium demonstrated higher survivability than Salmonella (P < 0.05). Salmonella survived in the model peanut pastes well over 12 months, which is longer than the expected shelf life for peanut butter products. The information from this study can be used to design safer food processing and food safety plans for peanut butter processing. PMID:25198585

  9. Effects of residual antibiotics in groundwater on Salmonella typhimurium: changes in antibiotic resistance, in vivo and in vitro pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Haznedaroglu, Berat Z; Yates, Marylynn V; Maduro, Morris F; Walker, Sharon L

    2012-01-01

    An outbreak-causing strain of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium was exposed to groundwater with residual antibiotics for up to four weeks. Representative concentrations (0.05, 1, and 100 μg L(-1)) of amoxicillin, tetracycline, and a mixture of several other antibiotics (1 μg L(-1) each) were spiked into artificially prepared groundwater (AGW). Antibiotic susceptibility analysis and the virulence response of stressed Salmonella were determined on a weekly basis by using human epithelial cells (HEp2) and soil nematodes (C. elegans). Results have shown that Salmonella typhimurium remains viable for long periods of exposure to antibiotic-supplemented groundwater; however, they failed to cultivate as an indication of a viable but nonculturable state. Prolonged antibiotics exposure did not induce any changes in the antibiotic susceptibility profile of the S. typhimurium strain used in this study. S. typhimurium exposed to 0.05 and 1 μg L(-1) amoxicillin, and 1 μg L(-1) tetracycline showed hyper-virulent profiles in both in vitro and in vivo virulence assays with the HEp2 cells and C. elegans respectively, most evident following 2nd and 3rd weeks of exposure. PMID:22051852

  10. Divergent Roles of Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 2 and Metabolic Traits during Interaction of S. enterica Serovar Typhimurium with Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hölzer, Stefanie U.; Hensel, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms of virulence of the gastrointestinal pathogen Salmonella enterica are commonly studied using cell culture models of infection. In this work, we performed a direct comparison of the interaction of S. enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) with the non-polarized epithelial cell line HeLa, the polarized cell lines CaCo2, T84 and MDCK, and macrophage-like RAW264.7 cells. The ability of S. Typhimurium wild-type and previously characterized auxotrophic mutant strains to enter host cells, survive and proliferate within mammalian cells and deploy the Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 2-encoded type III secretion system (SPI2-T3SS) was quantified. We found that the entry of S. Typhimurium into polarized cells was much more efficient than entry into non-polarized cells or phagocytic uptake. While SPI2-T3SS dependent intracellular proliferation was observed in HeLa and RAW cells, the intracellular replication in polarized cells was highly restricted and not affected by defective SPI2-T3SS. The contribution of aromatic amino acid metabolism and purine biosynthesis to intracellular proliferation was distinct in the various cell lines investigated. These observations indicate that the virulence phenotypes of S. Typhimurium are significantly affected by the cell culture model applied. PMID:22427996

  11. Nutritional and metabolic requirements for the infection of HeLa cells by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Bowden, Steven D; Hopper-Chidlaw, Amanda C; Rice, Christopher J; Ramachandran, Vinoy K; Kelly, David J; Thompson, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella is the causative agent of a spectrum of human and animal diseases ranging from gastroenteritis to typhoid fever. It is a food--and water--borne pathogen and infects via ingestion followed by invasion of intestinal epithelial cells and phagocytic cells. In this study we employed a mutational approach to define the nutrients and metabolic pathways required by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium during infection of a human epithelial cell line (HeLa). We deleted the key glycolytic genes, pfkA and pfkB to show that S. Typhimurium utilizes glycolysis for replication within HeLa cells; however, glycolysis was not absolutely essential for intracellular replication. Using S. Typhimurium strains deleted for genes encoding components of the phosphotransferase system and glucose transport, we show that glucose is a major substrate required for the intracellular replication of S. Typhimurium in HeLa cells. We also deleted genes encoding enzymes involved in the utilization of gluconeogenic substrates and the glyoxylate shunt and show that neither of these pathways were required for intracellular replication of S. Typhimurium within HeLa cells.

  12. Acid adaptation affects the viability of Listeria monocytogenes BCRC 14846 and Salmonella Typhimurium BCRC 10747 exposed to disinfectants at 25°C and 40°C.

    PubMed

    Lin, Meng-Hsuan; Lee, Shiow-Ling; Chou, Cheng-Chun

    2011-10-01

    In the present study, Listeria monocytogenes BCRC 14846 and Salmonella Typhimurium BCRC 10747 were subjected to acid adaptation at pH 5.5 at 37°C for 1 and 4 h, respectively. The viability of the acid-adapted cells of test organisms exposed to Clidox-S, a chlorine-containing disinfectant, and Quatricide, a quaternary ammonium compound, was examined and compared with that of the control cells at 25°C and 40°C. Results revealed that acid adaptation significantly enhanced the viability of L. monocytogenes and Salmonella Typhimurium exposed to the disinfectants under investigation. Both pathogens examined were more susceptible to Clidox-S and Quatricide at 40°C than at 25°C. Further, L. monocytogenes was more susceptible to Quatricide than Salmonella Typhimurium, whereas Salmonella Typhimurium was more susceptible to Clidox-S than L. monocytogenes.

  13. Accelerated Cellular Uptake and Metabolism of L-Thyroxine during Acute Salmonella typhimurium Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    DeRubertis, Frederick R.; Woeber, Kenneth A.

    1973-01-01

    The effects of acute Salmonella typhimurium sepsis on the kinetics of peripheral L-thyroxine (T4) distribution and metabolism and on serum total and free T4 concentrations were studied in rhesus monkeys inoculated i.v. with either heat-killed or viable organisms. The rate of disappearance of labeled T4 from serum was increased within 8 h after inoculation of monkeys with either heat-killed or viable Salmonella. The effects of the heat-killed organisms were transient and no longer evident by 16 h postinoculation. The monkeys inoculated with the viable Salmonella experienced a 2-3 day febrile, septic illness that was accompanied by an increase in the absolute rate of T4 disposal. In the infected monkeys, serum total T4 and endogenously labeled protein-bound iodine concentrations fell significantly during the period of acute sepsis and then rose during convalescence to values that exceeded the preinoculation values, suggesting that thyroidal secretion of hormone had increased in response to a primary depletion of the peripheral hormonal pool. Total cellular and hepatic uptakes of T4 were enhanced by 4 h after inoculation of monkeys with either heat-killed or viable Salmonella, but the increase in total cellular uptake persisted for 24 h only in the monkeys inoculated with the viable organisms. These alterations in T4 kinetics could neither be correlated with changes in the binding of T4 in plasma nor attributed to an increase in vascular permeability. Moreover, they could not be ascribed to an in vitro product of bacterial growth, suggesting that the presence of the organisms themselves was required. An acceleration of T4 disappearance was also observed during Escherichia coli and Diplococcus pucumoniae bacteremias. Our findings are consistent with a primary increase in the cellular uptake and metabolism of T4 during bacterial sepsis, possibly related to phagocytic cell function in the host. PMID:4629910

  14. Experimental annotation of post-translational features and translated coding regions in the pathogen Salmonella Typhimurium

    SciTech Connect

    Ansong, Charles; Tolic, Nikola; Purvine, Samuel O.; Porwollik, Steffen; Jones, Marcus B.; Yoon, Hyunjin; Payne, Samuel H.; Martin, Jessica L.; Burnet, Meagan C.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Venepally, Pratap; Smith, Richard D.; Peterson, Scott; Heffron, Fred; Mcclelland, Michael; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2011-08-25

    Complete and accurate genome annotation is crucial for comprehensive and systematic studies of biological systems. For example systems biology-oriented genome scale modeling efforts greatly benefit from accurate annotation of protein-coding genes to develop proper functioning models. However, determining protein-coding genes for most new genomes is almost completely performed by inference, using computational predictions with significant documented error rates (> 15%). Furthermore, gene prediction programs provide no information on biologically important post-translational processing events critical for protein function. With the ability to directly measure peptides arising from expressed proteins, mass spectrometry-based proteomics approaches can be used to augment and verify coding regions of a genomic sequence and importantly detect post-translational processing events. In this study we utilized “shotgun” proteomics to guide accurate primary genome annotation of the bacterial pathogen Salmonella Typhimurium 14028 to facilitate a systems-level understanding of Salmonella biology. The data provides protein-level experimental confirmation for 44% of predicted protein-coding genes, suggests revisions to 48 genes assigned incorrect translational start sites, and uncovers 13 non-annotated genes missed by gene prediction programs. We also present a comprehensive analysis of post-translational processing events in Salmonella, revealing a wide range of complex chemical modifications (70 distinct modifications) and confirming more than 130 signal peptide and N-terminal methionine cleavage events in Salmonella. This study highlights several ways in which proteomics data applied during the primary stages of annotation can improve the quality of genome annotations, especially with regards to the annotation of mature protein products.

  15. A descriptive study of human Salmonella serotype typhimurium infections reported in Ontario from 1990 to 1998

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Michael W; Odoi, Agricola; Majowicz, Shannon E; Michel, Pascal; Middleton, Dean; Ciebin, Bruce; Doré, Kathryn; McEwen, Scott A; Aramini, Jeffery A; Deeks, Shelley; Jamieson, Frances; Ahmed, Rafiq; Rodgers, Frank G; Wilson, Jeff B

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Salmonella infections cause gastrointestinal and systemic diseases worldwide and are the leading causes of food-borne illnesses in North America (1-4). Salmonella serotype typhimurium (ST), in particular, is increasingly becoming a major public health concern because of its ability to acquire multiple resistant genes (5,6). OBJECTIVE: To describe demographic, temporal and geographical distributions, and reported risk factors of nonoutbreak cases of ST reported to a surveillance system in Ontario. METHODOLOGY: Descriptive analyses were performed on data on salmonellosis cases reported in Ontario between 1990 and 1998. Direct age- and sex-standardized rates were computed, and temporal trend analyses were performed using simple linear regression and a general additive model with a locally weighted regression (LOESS) smoother. RESULTS: The mean annual rates of infections with all Salmonella serotypes and with ST were 27 cases per 100,000 persons and 3.7 cases per 100,000 persons, respectively. Males and children under five years of age had significantly higher rates of both ST and ST definitive type 104 (DT104) infections. There was also evidence of temporal clustering of all strains of Salmonella, with significantly more cases being reported during the summer. Significantly higher rates of ST DT104 were observed in urban areas compared with rural areas, suggesting potential differences in the geographical distribution of risk factors. CONCLUSIONS: Information on demographic, temporal and geographical distributions, and risk factors is critical in planning disease control strategies. Further prospective analytical observation studies are needed to gain a better understanding of the epidemiology of ST and ST DT104 in Ontario, which will better guide disease control decisions. PMID:18159468

  16. Coordinated Regulation of Virulence during Systemic Infection of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Hyunjin; McDermott, Jason E.; Porwollik, Steffen; Mcclelland, Michael; Heffron, Fred

    2009-02-20

    Salmonella must respond to a myriad of environmental cues during infection of a mouse and express specific subsets of genes in a temporal and spatial manner to subvert the host defense mechanisms but these regulatory pathways are poorly established. To unravel how micro-environmental signals are processed and integrated into coordinated action, we constructed in-frame non-polar deletions of 84 regulators inferred to play a role in Salmonella typhimurium virulence and tested them in three virulence assays (intraperitoneal (i.p.), and intragastric (i.g.) infection in BALB/c mice, and persistence in SvJ129 mice). Overall 36 regulators were identified that were less virulent in at least one assay, and of those, 15 regulators were required for systemic mouse infection in an acute infection model. As a first step towards understanding the interplay between a pathogen and its host from a systems biology standpoint we focused on these 15 genes. Transcriptional profiles were obtained for each of these 15 regulators from strains grown under four different environmental conditions. These results as well as publicly available transcriptional profiles were analyzed using both network inference and cluster analysis algorithms. The analysis predicts a regulatory network in which all 15 regulators control a specific set of genes necessary for Salmonella to cause systemic infection. We tested the regulatory model by expressing a subset of the regulators in trans and monitoring transcription of 7 known virulence factors located within Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI-2). These experiments validated the regulatory model and showed that, for these 7 genes, the response regulator SsrB and the marR type regulator SlyA co-regulate in a regulatory cascade by integrating multiple signals.

  17. Direct attachment of nanoparticle cargo to Salmonella typhimurium membranes designed for combination bacteriotherapy against tumors.

    PubMed

    Kazmierczak, Robert; Choe, Elizabeth; Sinclair, Jared; Eisenstark, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticle technology is an emerging approach to resolve difficult-to-manage internal diseases. It is highly regarded, in particular, for medical use in treatment of cancer due to the innate ability of certain nanoparticles to accumulate in the porous environment of tumors and to be toxic to cancer cells. However, the therapeutic success of nanoparticles is limited by the technical difficulty of fully penetrating and thus attacking the tumor. Additionally, while nanoparticles possess seeming-specificity due to the unique physiological properties of tumors themselves, it is difficult to tailor the delivery of nanoparticles or drugs in other models, such as use in cardiac disease, to the specific target. Thus, a need for delivery systems that will accurately and precisely bring nanoparticles carrying drug payloads to their intended sites currently exists. Our solution to this engineering challenge is to load such nanoparticles onto a biological "mailman" (a novel, nontoxic, therapeutic strain of Salmonella typhimurium engineered to preferentially and precisely seek out, penetrate, and hinder prostate cancer cells as the biological delivery system) that will deliver the therapeutics to a target site. In this chapter, we describe two methods that establish proof-of-concept for our cargo loading and delivery system by attaching nanoparticles to the Salmonella membrane. The first method (Subheading 1.1) describes association of sucrose-conjugated gold nanoparticles to the surface of Salmonella bacteria. The second method (Subheading 1.2) biotinylates the native Salmonella membrane to attach streptavidin-conjugated fluorophores as example nanoparticle cargo, with an alternative method (expression of membrane bound biotin target sites using autodisplay plasmid vectors) that increases the concentration of biotin on the membrane surface for streptavidin-conjugated nanoparticle attachment. By directly attaching the fluorophores to our bacterial vector through biocompatible

  18. Effect of experimental chlorate product administration in the drinking water on Salmonella typhimurium contamination of broilers.

    PubMed

    Byrd, J A; Anderson, R C; Callaway, T R; Moore, R W; Knape, K D; Kubena, L F; Ziprin, R L; Nisbet, D J

    2003-09-01

    The crop is a known source of Salmonella and Campylobacter contamination. Previously, we evaluated lactic acid in the drinking water during a simulated pretransport feed withdrawal (FW) and reported 0.44% lactic acid significantly (P < 0.05) reduced the number of Salmonella recovered in market-age broiler crops. However, total consumption of the organic acid-treated drinking water was reduced. Presently, we evaluated the effect of experimental chlorate product (ECP; 1x ECP is equivalent to a 15 mM chlorate ion concentration) during a 10-h pretransport FW. Market-age broilers were obtained from a commercial processing plant and randomly assigned to ECP-treated or control (nontreated) groups. Broilers were challenged by crop gavage with 10(8) Salmonella Typhimurium (ST) immediately upon arrival and 1 d prior to termination of the experiment. One day later, broilers were killed for ST enumeration (cfu) in the crop and ceca. Broilers provided ECP 24 h prior to slaughter consumed slightly more ECP water than broilers provided distilled water. Treatment with ECP caused a significant decrease (P < 0.05) in the incidence of ST in crop contents (2%) as compared to the controls (36.7%). Similarly, ECP treatment caused a significant decrease (P < 0.05) in number of ST (0.96 log10 ST/g cecal content) detected in the ceca when compared to controls (2.52 log10 ST). This study suggested that incorporation of ECP in the drinking water 24 to 48 h prior to slaughter could reduce Salmonella contamination in broilers.

  19. Direct attachment of nanoparticle cargo to Salmonella typhimurium membranes designed for combination bacteriotherapy against tumors.

    PubMed

    Kazmierczak, Robert; Choe, Elizabeth; Sinclair, Jared; Eisenstark, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticle technology is an emerging approach to resolve difficult-to-manage internal diseases. It is highly regarded, in particular, for medical use in treatment of cancer due to the innate ability of certain nanoparticles to accumulate in the porous environment of tumors and to be toxic to cancer cells. However, the therapeutic success of nanoparticles is limited by the technical difficulty of fully penetrating and thus attacking the tumor. Additionally, while nanoparticles possess seeming-specificity due to the unique physiological properties of tumors themselves, it is difficult to tailor the delivery of nanoparticles or drugs in other models, such as use in cardiac disease, to the specific target. Thus, a need for delivery systems that will accurately and precisely bring nanoparticles carrying drug payloads to their intended sites currently exists. Our solution to this engineering challenge is to load such nanoparticles onto a biological "mailman" (a novel, nontoxic, therapeutic strain of Salmonella typhimurium engineered to preferentially and precisely seek out, penetrate, and hinder prostate cancer cells as the biological delivery system) that will deliver the therapeutics to a target site. In this chapter, we describe two methods that establish proof-of-concept for our cargo loading and delivery system by attaching nanoparticles to the Salmonella membrane. The first method (Subheading 1.1) describes association of sucrose-conjugated gold nanoparticles to the surface of Salmonella bacteria. The second method (Subheading 1.2) biotinylates the native Salmonella membrane to attach streptavidin-conjugated fluorophores as example nanoparticle cargo, with an alternative method (expression of membrane bound biotin target sites using autodisplay plasmid vectors) that increases the concentration of biotin on the membrane surface for streptavidin-conjugated nanoparticle attachment. By directly attaching the fluorophores to our bacterial vector through biocompatible

  20. Comprehensive Assignment of Roles for Salmonella Typhimurium Genes in Intestinal Colonization of Food-Producing Animals

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Sarah E.; Pleasance, Stephen J.; Hudson, Debra L.; Davies, Holly M.; Wang, Jinhong; van Diemen, Pauline M.; Buckley, Anthony M.; Bowen, Alison J.; Pullinger, Gillian D.; Turner, Daniel J.; Langridge, Gemma C.; Turner, A. Keith; Parkhill, Julian; Charles, Ian G.; Maskell, Duncan J.; Stevens, Mark P.

    2013-01-01

    Chickens, pigs, and cattle are key reservoirs of Salmonella enterica, a foodborne pathogen of worldwide importance. Though a decade has elapsed since publication of the first Salmonella genome, thousands of genes remain of hypothetical or unknown function, and the basis of colonization of reservoir hosts is ill-defined. Moreover, previous surveys of the role of Salmonella genes in vivo have focused on systemic virulence in murine typhoid models, and the genetic basis of intestinal persistence and thus zoonotic transmission have received little study. We therefore screened pools of random insertion mutants of S. enterica serovar Typhimurium in chickens, pigs, and cattle by transposon-directed insertion-site sequencing (TraDIS). The identity and relative fitness in each host of 7,702 mutants was simultaneously assigned by massively parallel sequencing of transposon-flanking regions. Phenotypes were assigned to 2,715 different genes, providing a phenotype–genotype map of unprecedented resolution. The data are self-consistent in that multiple independent mutations in a given gene or pathway were observed to exert a similar fitness cost. Phenotypes were further validated by screening defined null mutants in chickens. Our data indicate that a core set of genes is required for infection of all three host species, and smaller sets of genes may mediate persistence in specific hosts. By assigning roles to thousands of Salmonella genes in key reservoir hosts, our data facilitate systems approaches to understand pathogenesis and the rational design of novel cross-protective vaccines and inhibitors. Moreover, by simultaneously assigning the genotype and phenotype of over 90% of mutants screened in complex pools, our data establish TraDIS as a powerful tool to apply rich functional annotation to microbial genomes with minimal animal use. PMID:23637626

  1. Strain dependent protection conferred by Lactobacillus spp. administered orally with a Salmonella Typhimurium vaccine in a murine challenge model.

    PubMed

    Esvaran, M; Conway, P L

    2012-03-30

    Consumption of Lactobacillus spp. has been shown to enhance immune responses in mice. This study examined the immuno-adjuvant capacity of two strains: Lactobacillus acidophilus L10 and Lactobacillus fermentum PC2, in the induction of protective humoral immunity in a Salmonella Typhimurium vaccine challenge model. Briefly, BALB/c mice were divided into four groups. Three groups of mice received S. Typhimurium vaccine (10(8) colony forming units (CFU) per dose) on days 0 and 14. In addition to the vaccine, five doses (10(8) CFU per dose) of either L. acidophilus L10 or L. fermentum PC2 were also administered to a group. All mice were challenged with viable S. Typhimurium on day 28. On day 10 post challenge, the study was terminated and microbial and immunological parameters were assessed. Mice dosed with L. fermentum PC2 in addition to the vaccine had a significantly enhanced S. Typhimurium humoral response. The mice in this group had high levels of lactobacilli in the feces and in association with the Peyer's patches, no detectable levels of either lactobacilli or S. Typhimurium in the spleen, and no detectable weight loss. Mice given L. acidophilus L10 with the vaccine were unable to exhibit elevated S. Typhimurium specific humoral responses. However, there was no detectable S. Typhimurium in the spleens of this group. Interestingly, translocation of lactobacilli into the spleen was observed as well as a slight weight loss was noted in mice that received the L. acidophilus L10 with the vaccine. This study shows that, the L. fermentum PC2 had a greater capacity than the L. acidophilus L10 to act as an oral adjuvant in a S. Typhimurium oral vaccine program and afforded greater protection against a live S. Typhimurium challenge.

  2. High-Throughput CRISPR Typing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex and Salmonella enterica Serotype Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Sola, Christophe; Abadia, Edgar; Le Hello, Simon; Weill, François-Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Spoligotyping was developed almost 18 years ago and still remains a popular first-lane genotyping technique to identify and subtype Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) clinical isolates at a phylogeographic level. For other pathogens, such as Salmonella enterica, recent studies suggest that specifically designed spoligotyping techniques could be interesting for public health purposes. Spoligotyping was in its original format a reverse line-blot hybridization method using capture probes designed on "spacers" and attached to a membrane's surface and a PCR product obtained from clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs). Cowan et al. and Fabre et al. were the first to propose a high-throughput Spoligotyping method based on microbeads for MTC and S. enterica serotype Typhimurium, respectively. The main advantages of the high-throughput Spoligotyping techniques we describe here are their low cost, their robustness, and the existence (at least for MTC) of very large databases that allow comparisons between spoligotypes from anywhere.

  3. High-Throughput CRISPR Typing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex and Salmonella enterica Serotype Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Sola, Christophe; Abadia, Edgar; Le Hello, Simon; Weill, François-Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Spoligotyping was developed almost 18 years ago and still remains a popular first-lane genotyping technique to identify and subtype Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) clinical isolates at a phylogeographic level. For other pathogens, such as Salmonella enterica, recent studies suggest that specifically designed spoligotyping techniques could be interesting for public health purposes. Spoligotyping was in its original format a reverse line-blot hybridization method using capture probes designed on "spacers" and attached to a membrane's surface and a PCR product obtained from clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs). Cowan et al. and Fabre et al. were the first to propose a high-throughput Spoligotyping method based on microbeads for MTC and S. enterica serotype Typhimurium, respectively. The main advantages of the high-throughput Spoligotyping techniques we describe here are their low cost, their robustness, and the existence (at least for MTC) of very large databases that allow comparisons between spoligotypes from anywhere. PMID:25981468

  4. Characterization of a Salmonella typhimurium hisU mutant defective in tRNA precursor processing.

    PubMed Central

    Bossi, L; Ciampi, M S; Cortese, R

    1978-01-01

    The DA11 mutant of Salmonella typhimurium, originally isolated as derepressed for the histidine operon, carries a temperature-dependent alteration in a nucleolytic enzyme specifically involved in the maturation of tRNA. As a consequence of this alteration, no detectable synthesis of any mature tRNA species occurs in DA11 upon shift at 43 degrees C, whereas many tRNA precursors, whose sizes range between 80 and 750 nucleotides, do accumulate. Kinetic studies on the synthesis and processing of these maturation intermediates show that these molecules represent different stages in the maturation pathway, most of them being the products of previous nucleolytic events. These RNA molecules are in vivo substrates of methylation and thiolation enzymes and can be cleaved in vitro to 4S RNA by wild-type but not by DA11 cell-free extract. Evidence is presented that DA11 is very probably a ribonuclease P mutant. Images PMID:350829

  5. Glycomimicry: display of the GM3 sugar epitope on Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica sv Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Ilg, Karin; Yavuz, Elif; Maffioli, Carola; Priem, Bernard; Aebi, Markus

    2010-10-01

    Oligosaccharides present on the surface of pathogenic bacteria play an important role in their interaction with their host. Bacteria with altered cell surface structures can be used to study these interactions, and glycoengineering represents a tool to display a glycoepitope on a different bacterium. Here, we present non-pathogenic Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium expressing the sialyllactose oligosaccharide epitope of the ganglioside GM3. By expression of the galactosyltransferase LgtE and the sialic acid transferase Lst as well as the CMP-sialic acid synthetase SiaB from Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Neisseria meningitidis in engineered strains devoid of the sialic acid catabolism, the GM3 sugar epitope was displayed on these bacteria as demonstrated by live cell immunostaining and a detailed analysis of their lipooligosaccharides. These strains offer the possibility to investigate the role of sialic acid in the recognition of bacteria by the immune system in a non-pathogenic background.

  6. Organogermanium compounds as inhibitors of the activity of direct acting mutagens in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Schimmer, O; Eschelbach, H; Breitinger, D K; Grützner, T; Wick, H

    1997-12-01

    The organogermanium compounds bis(D,L-lactato)germanium(IV), bis(L-lactato)germanium(IV), bis (thiolactato)germanium(IV) and bis(thioglycolato)germanium(IV) were tested for their antimutagenic activity in Salmonella typhimurium strains TA98 and TA100. Each compound showed moderate activity against the mutagenic effect of nitroaromatic compounds and weak effects against the mutagenic activity of ethylmethane sulfonate. No inhibition of mutagenicity was observed against the indirect acting promutagens benzo(a)pyrene and 2-aminoanthracene. The compounds differed only quantitatively in their antimutagenicity spectrum. It is concluded from these results that an intracellular mechanism is involved in the inhibition of ethylmethane sulfonate-induced mutagenicity. The effect is probably produced, at least partially, at the level of DNA repair. Frameshift mutations seem to be prevented with higher efficiency than base pair substitutions.

  7. Novel hexamerization motif is discovered in a conserved cytoplasmic protein from Salmonella typhimurium.

    SciTech Connect

    Petrova, T.; Cuff, M.; Wu, R.; Kim, Y.; Holzle, D.; Joachimiak, A.; Biosciences Division; Inst. of Mathematical Problems of Biology

    2007-01-01

    The cytoplasmic protein Stm3548 of unknown function obtained from a strain of Salmonella typhimurium was determined by X-ray crystallography at a resolution of 2.25 A. The asymmetric unit contains a hexamer of structurally identical monomers. The monomer is a globular domain with a long beta-hairpin protrusion that distinguishes this structure. This beta-hairpin occupies a central position in the hexamer, and its residues participate in the majority of interactions between subunits of the hexamer. We suggest that the structure of Stm3548 presents a new hexamerization motif. Because the residues participating in interdomain interactions are highly conserved among close members of protein family DUF1355 and buried solvent accessible area for the hexamer is significant, the hexamer is most likely conserved as well. A light scattering experiment confirmed the presence of hexamer in solution.

  8. Interdigitated microelectrode (IME) impedance sensor for the detection of viable Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liju; Li, Yanbin; Griffis, Carl L; Johnson, Michael G

    2004-05-15

    Interdigitated microelectrodes (IMEs) were used as impedance sensors for rapid detection of viable Salmonella typhimurium in a selective medium and milk samples. The impedance growth curves, impedance against bacterial growth time, were recorded at four frequencies (10Hz, 100Hz, 1kHz, and 10kHz) during the growth of S. typhimurium. The impedance did not change until the cell number reached 10(5)-10(6) CFUml(-1). The greatest change in impedance was observed at 10Hz. To better understand the mechanism of the IME impedance sensor, an equivalent electrical circuit, consisting of double layer capacitors, a dielectric capacitor, and a medium resistor, was introduced and used for interpreting the change in impedance during bacterial growth. Bacterial attachment to the electrode surface was observed with scanning electron microscopy, and it had effect on the impedance measurement. The detection time, t(D), defined as the time for the impedance to start change, was obtained from the impedance growth curve at 10Hz and had a linear relationship with the logarithmic value of the initial cell number of S. typhimurium in the medium and milk samples. The regression equations for the cell numbers between 4.8 and 5.4 x 10(5) CFUml(-1) were t(D) = -1.38 log N + 10.18 with R(2) = 0.99 in the pure medium and t(D) = -1.54 log N + 11.33 with R(2) = 0.98 in milk samples, respectively. The detection times for 4.8 and 5.4 x 10(5) CFUml(-1) initial cell numbers were 9.3 and 2.2 h, respectively, and the detection limit could be as low as 1 cell in a sample.

  9. Spray method for recovery of heat-injured Salmonella Typhimurium and Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Back, Kyeong-Hwan; Kim, Sang-Oh; Park, Ki-Hwan; Chung, Myung-Sub; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2012-10-01

    Selective agar is inadequate for supporting recovery of injured cells. During risk assessment of certain foods, both injured and noninjured cells must be enumerated. In this study, a new method (agar spray method) for recovering sublethally heat-injured microorganisms was developed and used for recovery of heat-injured Salmonella Typhimurium and Listeria monocytogenes. Molten selective agar was applied as an overlay to presolidified nonselective tryptic soy agar (TSA) by spray application. Heat-injured cells (55°C for 10 min in 0.1% peptone water or 55°C for 15 min in sterilized skim milk) were inoculated directly onto solidified TSA. After a 2-h incubation period for cell repair, selective agar was applied to the TSA surface with a sprayer, and the plates were incubated. The recovery rate for heat-injured Salmonella Typhimurium and L. monocytogenes with the spray method was compared with the corresponding rates associated with TSA alone, selective media alone, and the conventional overlay method (selective agar poured on top of resuscitated cells grown on TSA and incubated for 2 h). No significant differences (P > 0.05) were found in pathogen recovery obtained with TSA, the overlay method, and the spray method. However, a lower recovery rate (P < 0.05) was obtained for isolation of injured cells on selective media. Overall, these results indicate that the agar spray method is an acceptable alternative to the conventional overlay method and is a simpler and more convenient approach to recovery and detection of injured cells.

  10. Longitudinal characterization of monophasic Salmonella Typhimurium throughout the pig's life cycle.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Laura; Centeno, Maria Madalena; Couto, Natacha; Nunes, Telmo; Almeida, Virgílio; Alban, Lis; Pomba, Constança

    2016-08-30

    Swine have been described as an important reservoir of multidrug resistant monophasic Salmonella Typhimurium, though information on its ecology is scarce. A longitudinal study was performed in order to elucidate the Salmonella 4,[5],12:i:- dynamics throughout the pig's production cycle. A total of 209 faecal samples were collected from 10 sows and in six sampling times during the life of 70 pigs from a Portuguese industrial farm, and 43 isolates of S. 4,[5],12:i:- were identified and characterized regarding clonality and antimicrobial resistance phenotype and genotype. Most isolates (n=42) exhibited resistance to at least ampicillin, kanamycin, neomycin, streptomycin, tetracycline and sulfonamides (encoded by blaTEM, aphAI-IAB, strA, strB, tetB and sul2, respectively). Isolates obtained during the finishing phase showed additional resistance to chloramphenicol and florfenicol (floR), gentamicin and netilmicin (aac(3')-IV). To our knowledge, this study is the first description of aphAI-IAB in S. 4,[5],12:i:-. PFGE analysis showed uneven distribution of isolates into three clusters, A (n=34), B (n=8) and C (n=1). PFGE cluster A was predominant in sows (n=5) and piglets in the farrowing phase (n=17) and in pigs in the early finishing phase (n=11) suggesting a carryover from birth to adult age. The introduction of PFGE cluster B isolates in adulthood could have had an external source, reinforcing the relevance of environmental transmission in the farm ecosystem. This study reveals a dynamic interaction between monophasic S. Typhimurium and the pressures exerted under an intensive swine production setting. PMID:27527788

  11. Inhibition of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium lipopolysaccharide deacylation by aminoarabinose membrane modification.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Kiyoshi; Ernst, Robert K; Miller, Samuel I

    2005-04-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium remodels the lipid A component of lipopolysaccharide, a major component of the outer membrane, to survive within animals. The activation of the sensor kinase PhoQ in host environments increases the synthesis of enzymes that deacylate, palmitoylate, hydroxylate, and attach aminoarabinose to lipid A, also known as endotoxin. These modifications promote bacterial resistance to antimicrobial peptides and reduce the host recognition of lipid A by Toll-like receptor 4. The Salmonella lipid A 3-O-deacylase, PagL, is an outer membrane protein whose expression is regulated by PhoQ. In S. enterica serovar Typhimurium strains that had the ability to add aminoarabinose to lipid A, 3-O-deacylated lipid A species were not detected, despite the PhoQ induction of PagL protein expression. In contrast, strains defective for the aminoarabinose modification of lipid A demonstrated in vivo PagL activity, indicating that this membrane modification inhibited PagL's enzymatic activity. Since not all lipid A molecules are modified with aminoarabinose upon PhoQ activation, these results cannot be ascribed to the substrate specificity of PagL. PagL-dependent deacylation was detected in sonically disrupted membranes and membranes treated with the nonionic detergent n-octyl-beta-d-glucopyranoside, suggesting that perturbation of the intact outer membrane releases PagL from posttranslational inhibition by aminoarabinose-containing membranes. Taken together, these results suggest that PagL enzymatic deacylation is posttranslationally inhibited by membrane environments, which either sequester PagL from its substrate or alter its conformation.

  12. Functionalized polymeric magnetic nanoconstructs for selective capturing and sensitive detection of Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Sruti; Kaur, Avneet; Jain, Swati; Sabharwal, Prabhjot K; Singh, Harpal

    2016-09-21

    Rapid detection and enumeration of pathogens is essential for monitoring contamination and spoilage of food products to ensure improved quality control management. Functionalized polymeric magnetic nanoconstructs (FPMNCs) were developed as an effective immunomagnetic separator and sensing platform for the selective capturing of Salmonella typhimurium. Novel FPMNCs were prepared in three stages involving synthesis of iron oxide (IO) dispersion, capping with sodium oleate and encapsulation of preformed IO nanoparticles by in-situ free radical emulsion polymerization of styrene (St), methyl methacrylate (MMA) and acetoacetoxy ethylmethacrylate (AAEM). PMMA improves the stability of FPMNCs by bridging extremely hydrophobic PS and hydrophilic PAAEM. Core-shell morphology of hydrophobic core of IO, PS & PMMA and hydrophilic shell of PAAEM was demonstrated by SEM, TEM and FTIR studies. FPMNCs with surface functionalized acetoacetoxy groups were covalently attached with polyclonal antibodies against Salmonella common structural antigen (CSA-1-Ab) without using any linker and catalyst. Colorimetric readout signal was acquired using CSA-1-Ab-HRP as secondary antibody after formation of sandwich immunocomplex with bacteria where the optical density of the samples were recorded using ELISA plate reader at 450 nm. The developed immunoassay was specific and selective which captures only targeted S. typhimurium with a detection limit of 10 cells/mL lower than infectious dose of salmonellosis infection. Minimal interference of food matrix with high signal to noise ratio was shown by various food samples. In addition, the performance of developed FPMNC based immunoassay was superior to commercially available immunomagnetic microbeads demonstrating undisputed advantage for capturing and detecting specific bacteria without any pre-enrichment of sample. PMID:27590554

  13. Rescuing chemotaxis of the anticancer agent Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium VNP20009.

    PubMed

    Broadway, Katherine M; Denson, Elizabeth A P; Jensen, Roderick V; Scharf, Birgit E

    2015-10-10

    The role of chemotaxis and motility in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium tumor colonization remains unclear. We determined through swim plate assays that the well-established anticancer agent S. Typhimurium VNP20009 is deficient in chemotaxis, and that this phenotype is suppressible. Through genome sequencing, we revealed that VNP20009 and four selected suppressor mutants had a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in cheY causing a mutation in the conserved proline residue at position 110. CheY is the response regulator that interacts with the flagellar motor-switch complex and modulates rotational bias. The four suppressor mutants additionally carried non-synonymous SNPs in fliM encoding a flagellar switch protein. The CheY-P110S mutation in VNP20009 likely rendered the protein unable to interact with FliM, a phenotype that could be suppressed by mutations in FliM. We replaced the mutated cheY in VNP20009 with the wild-type copy and chemotaxis was partially restored. The swim ring of the rescued strain, VNP20009 cheY(+), was 46% the size of the parental strain 14028 swim ring. When tested in capillary assays, VNP20009 cheY(+) was 69% efficient in chemotaxis towards the attractant aspartate as compared to 14028. Potential reasons for the lack of complete restoration and implications for bacterial tumor colonization will be discussed.

  14. Aptasensors for rapid detection of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella typhimurium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wen-he; Li, Min; Wang, Yue; Ouyang, Hou-xian; Wang, Lin; Li, Ci-xiu; Cao, Yu-chen; Meng, Qing-he; Lu, Jian-xin

    2012-11-01

    Herein we reported the development of aptamer-based biosensors (aptasensors) based on label-free aptamers and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) for detection of Escherichia coli ( E. coli) O157:H7 and Salmonella typhimurium. Target bacteria binding aptamers are adsorbed on the surface of unmodified AuNPs to capture target bacteria, and the detection was accomplished by target bacteria-induced aggregation of the aptasensor which is associated as red-to-purple color change upon high-salt conditions. By employing anti- E. coli O157:H7 aptamer and anti- S. typhimurium aptamer, we developed a convenient and rapid approach that could selectively detect bacteria without specialized instrumentation and pretreatment steps such as cell lysis. The aptasensor could detect as low as 105colony-forming units (CFU)/ml target bacteria within 20 min or less and its specificity was 100%. This novel method has a great potential application in rapid detection of bacteria in the near future.

  15. Antimutagenic effects of aqueous fraction of Myristica fragrans (Houtt.) leaves on Salmonella typhimurium and Mus musculus.

    PubMed

    Akinboro, Akeem; Bin Mohamed, Kamaruzaman; Asmawi, Mohd Zaini; Yekeen, Taofeek A

    2014-01-01

    Natural plant extracts offer a promising hope in the prevention/treatment of cancer arising from genetic mutations. This study evaluated in vitro and in vivo mutagenic and antimutagenic effects of aqueous fraction of Myristica fragrans (AFMF) leaves on TA100 strain of Salmonella typhimurium and Mus musculus (Male Swiss albino mice), respectively. The antioxidant activity of AFMF against 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), total phenolic and flavonoid contents were determined, followed by its phytochemical elucidation using the Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography technique (UPLC). The mutagenicity of AFMF at 4, 20, 50, 100, 200, 500, and 1000 µg/well was <2.0 in S. typhimurium and the induced micronucleated polychromatic and normochromatic erythrocytes at 500, 1000, 2000, and 4000 mg/kg were not significantly different from the negative control (p≥0.05). The mutagenic activity of benzo[a]pyrene and cyclophosphamide was significantly suppressed above 50.0% throughout the tested concentrations. Fifty percent of the free radicals from DPPH were scavenged by AFMF at 0.11 mg/ml. Total phenolic and flavonoid contents of AFMF were 51.0 mg GAE/g and 27 mg QE/g, respectively. Rutin was elucidated by the UPLC technique, and thereby suspected to be the phytochemical responsible for the observed antimutagenic activity. Thus far, AFMF seems to contain a promising chemotherapeutic agent for the prevention of genetic damage that is crucial for cancer development.

  16. Regulation of Branched-Chain Amino Acid Biosynthesis in Salmonella typhimurium: Isolation of Regulatory Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Calvo, J. M.; Freundlich, M.; Umbarger, H. E.

    1969-01-01

    5′,5′,5′-Trifluoro-dl-leucine inhibited the activity of α-isopropylmalate synthetase (the initial enzyme unique to leucine biosynthesis) as well as the growth of Salmonella typhimurium. Mutants of S. typhimurium resistant to the analogue were isolated and characterized. In most cases, they overproduced and excreted leucine or leucine, valine, and isoleucine as a result of an alteration in the regulation of branched-chain amino acid biosynthesis. Biochemical and genetic tests allowed the mutants to be grouped into three classes: I, a moderately large group (13%) which had high, constitutive leucine biosynthetic enzyme levels and mutant sites linked to the leucine operon (operator constitutive); II, a single mutant in which the mutant site was linked to the leucine operon and in which α-isopropylmalate synthetase was not inhibited by leucine (feedback negative); III, a majority type which had constitutive levels of leucine, valine, and isoleucine biosynthetic enzymes and mutant sites unlinked to the leucine operon. Mutants of class I provide important evidence for the concept of an operon organization of genes involved in leucine biosynthesis. The properties of class III mutants indicate that there is some element involved in regulation which is common to the three pathways. Images PMID:4887507

  17. Tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R arrests growth of breast-cancer brain metastasis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Miwa, Shinji; Zhang, Nan; Hoffman, Robert M; Zhao, Ming

    2015-02-20

    Brain metastasis is a morbid, treatment-resistant, end-stage frequent occurrence in breast cancer patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R on breast cancer brain metastases. High brain-metastatic variants of murine 4T1 breast cancer cells expressing red fluorescent protein (RFP) were injected orthotopically in the mammary fat pad in non-transgenic nude mice or in the left ventricle of non-transgenic nude mice and transgenic nude mice expressing nestin-driven green fluorescent protein (ND-GFP). ND-GFP mice express GFP in nascent blood vessels. In the orthotopically-injected mice, the primary tumor was surgically-resected in order to allow brain metastasis to develop. At various time points, the tumors and vasculature in the brain were imaged by confocal and stereo fluorescence microscopy. Some of the breast cancer cells that reached the brain extravasated and grew perivascularly and some of the cells proliferated within the vasculature. S. typhimurium A1-R significantly inhibited brain metastasis in both metastatic models and increased survival of the orthotopically-transplanted, primary-tumor-resected mice (p<0.05). The results of the present study suggest the clinical potential of bacterial therapy of breast cancer brain metastasis.

  18. Complex regulatory network encompassing the Csr, c-di-GMP and motility systems of Salmonella Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Jonas, Kristina; Edwards, Adrianne N; Ahmad, Irfan; Romeo, Tony; Römling, Ute; Melefors, Ojar

    2010-02-01

    Bacterial survival depends on the ability to switch between sessile and motile lifestyles in response to changing environmental conditions. In many species, this switch is governed by (3'-5')-cyclic-diguanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP), a signalling molecule, which is metabolized by proteins containing GGDEF and/or EAL domains. Salmonella Typhimurium contains 20 such proteins. Here, we show that the RNA-binding protein CsrA regulates the expression of eight genes encoding GGDEF, GGDEF-EAL and EAL domain proteins. CsrA bound directly to the mRNA leaders of five of these genes, suggesting that it may regulate these genes post-transcriptionally. The c-di-GMP-specific phosphodiesterase STM3611, which reciprocally controls flagella function and production of biofilm matrix components, was regulated by CsrA binding to the mRNA, but was also indirectly regulated by CsrA through the FlhDC/FliA flagella cascade and STM1344. STM1344 is an unconventional (c-di-GMP-inactive) EAL domain protein, recently identified as a negative regulator of flagella gene expression. Here, we demonstrate that CsrA directly downregulates expression of STM1344, which in turn regulates STM3611 through fliA and thus reciprocally controls motility and biofilm factors. Altogether, our data reveal that the concerted and complex regulation of several genes encoding GGDEF/EAL domain proteins allows CsrA to control the motility-sessility switch in S. Typhimurium at multiple levels.

  19. The effects of stainless steel finish on Salmonella Typhimurium attachment, biofilm formation and sensitivity to chlorine.

    PubMed

    Schlisselberg, Dov B; Yaron, Sima

    2013-08-01

    Bacterial colonization and biofilm formation on stainless steel (SS) surfaces can be sources for cross contamination in food processing facilities, possessing a great threat to public health and food quality. Here the aim was to demonstrate the influence of surface finish of AISI 316 SS on colonization, biofilm formation and susceptibility of Salmonella Typhimurium to disinfection. Initial attachment of S. Typhimurium on surfaces of SS was four times lower, when surface was polished by Bright-Alum (BA) or Electropolishing (EP), as compared to Mechanical Sanded (MS) or the untreated surface (NT). The correlation between roughness and initial bacterial attachment couldn't account on its own to explain differences seen. Biofilms with similar thickness (15-18 μm) were developed on all surfaces 1-day post inoculation, whereas EP was the least covered surface (23%). Following 5-days, biofilm thickness was lowest on EP and MS (30 μm) and highest on NT (62 μm) surfaces. An analysis of surface composition suggested a link between surface chemistry and biofilm development, where the higher concentrations of metal ions in EP and MS surfaces correlated with limited biofilm formation. Interestingly, disinfection of biofilms with chlorine was up to 130 times more effective on the EP surface (0.005% surviving) than on the other surfaces. Overall these results suggest that surface finish should be considered carefully in a food processing plant. PMID:23628616

  20. An outbreak of Salmonella typhimurium DT170 associated with kebab meat and yogurt relish.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, M. R.; Salmon, R. L.; Nehaul, L.; Mably, S.; Wafford, L.; Nolan-Farrell, M. Z.; Gardner, D.; Ribeiro, C. D.

    1999-01-01

    During July 1995, an outbreak of Salmonella typhimurium definitive type (DT) 170, an unusual strain, occurred in South Wales. A case-control study found that illness was associated with eating kebabs (odds ratio undefined, P = 0.002), doner kebabs (odds ratio 7.9, 95 % confidence interval 1.5-20.5, P = 0.02) and kebabs with yoghurt based relish (odds ratio undefined, P = 0.009) but not with eating kebabs with mayonnaise-based relish (odds ratio 2.4, 95 % confidence interval 0.4-13.9, P = 0.53). Environmental investigations discovered a complex web of producers and wholesale suppliers. Kebab meat and yoghurt had been supplied to the two main implicated outlets by a single wholesaler. Samples of raw minced lamb and several environmental swabs taken at the wholesaler were positive for S. typhimurium DT170. Blood-stained, unsealed yoghurt pots were observed to be stored under a rack of raw lamb. Investigators of food poisoning outbreaks linked to takeaway food should consider cross-contaminated relishes and dressings as well as undercooked meat as potential vehicles of infection. PMID:10459639

  1. Visualization of specific gene expression in individual Salmonella typhimurium cells by in situ PCR.

    PubMed Central

    Tolker-Nielsen, T; Holmstrøm, K; Molin, S

    1997-01-01

    An in situ PCR protocol by which we can monitor the presence or absence of lac mRNA in individual cells of a Salmonella typhimurium F' lac+ strain has been developed. In this protocol, fixed cells are permeabilized with lysozyme and subjected to a seminested reverse transcriptase PCR using reporter molecule-labeled primers, and subsequently, intracellular reporter molecules are detected microscopically at the individual-cell level by use of a horseradish peroxidase-conjugated antifluorescein antibody assay. In order to determine the sensitivity of the in situ PCR assay, the ability to detect lac mRNA in suboptimally isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside-induced cells was investigated. By use of a single-cell beta-galactosidase assay, it was confirmed that homogeneous suboptimally induced cultures of S. typhimurium F' lacY cells could be established, and the number of functional lac mRNAs in individual cells was estimated from standard population level beta-galactosidase assays. Cells estimated to contain a single lac mRNA were detected as containing lac mRNA by the in situ PCR method. Conclusively, we demonstrate the potential of in situ PCR for detection of even poorly expressed mRNA in individual bacterial cells. PMID:9361404

  2. Actin restructuring during Salmonella typhimurium infection investigated by confocal and super-resolution microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jason J.; Kunde, Yuliya A.; Hong-Geller, Elizabeth; Werner, James H.

    2014-01-01

    We have used super-resolution optical microscopy and confocal microscopy to visualize the cytoskeletal restructuring of HeLa cells that accompanies and enables Salmonella typhimurium internalization. Herein, we report the use of confocal microscopy to verify and explore infection conditions that would be compatible with super-resolution optical microscopy, using Alexa-488 labeled phalloidin to stain the actin cytoskeletal network. While it is well known that actin restructuring and cytoskeletal rearrangements often accompany and assist in bacterial infection, most studies have employed conventional diffraction-limited fluorescence microscopy to explore these changes. Here we show that the superior spatial resolution provided by single-molecule localization methods (such as direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy) enables more precise visualization of the nanoscale changes in the actin cytoskeleton that accompany bacterial infection. In particular, we found that a thin (100-nm) ring of actin often surrounds an invading bacteria 10 to 20 min postinfection, with this ring being transitory in nature. We estimate that a few hundred monofilaments of actin surround the S. typhimurium in this heretofore unreported bacterial internalization intermediate.

  3. A Network Inference Workflow Applied to Virulence-Related Processes in Salmonella typhimurium

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Ronald C.; Singhal, Mudita; Weller, Jennifer B.; Khoshnevis, Saeed; Shi, Liang; McDermott, Jason E.

    2009-04-20

    Inference of the structure of mRNA transcriptional regulatory networks, protein regulatory or interaction networks, and protein activation/inactivation-based signal transduction networks are critical tasks in systems biology. In this article we discuss a workflow for the reconstruction of parts of the transcriptional regulatory network of the pathogenic bacterium Salmonella typhimurium based on the information contained in sets of microarray gene expression data now available for that organism, and describe our results obtained by following this workflow. The primary tool is one of the network inference algorithms deployed in the Software Environment for BIological Network Inference (SEBINI). Specifically, we selected the algorithm called Context Likelihood of Relatedness (CLR), which uses the mutual information contained in the gene expression data to infer regulatory connections. The associated analysis pipeline automatically stores the inferred edges from the CLR runs within SEBINI and, upon request, transfers the inferred edges into either Cytoscape or the plug-in Collective Analysis of Biological of Biological Interaction Networks (CABIN) tool for further post-analysis of the inferred regulatory edges. The following article presents the outcome of this workflow, as well as the protocols followed for microarray data collection, data cleansing, and network inference. Our analysis revealed several interesting interactions, functional groups, metabolic pathways, and regulons in S. typhimurium.

  4. The effects of stainless steel finish on Salmonella Typhimurium attachment, biofilm formation and sensitivity to chlorine.

    PubMed

    Schlisselberg, Dov B; Yaron, Sima

    2013-08-01

    Bacterial colonization and biofilm formation on stainless steel (SS) surfaces can be sources for cross contamination in food processing facilities, possessing a great threat to public health and food quality. Here the aim was to demonstrate the influence of surface finish of AISI 316 SS on colonization, biofilm formation and susceptibility of Salmonella Typhimurium to disinfection. Initial attachment of S. Typhimurium on surfaces of SS was four times lower, when surface was polished by Bright-Alum (BA) or Electropolishing (EP), as compared to Mechanical Sanded (MS) or the untreated surface (NT). The correlation between roughness and initial bacterial attachment couldn't account on its own to explain differences seen. Biofilms with similar thickness (15-18 μm) were developed on all surfaces 1-day post inoculation, whereas EP was the least covered surface (23%). Following 5-days, biofilm thickness was lowest on EP and MS (30 μm) and highest on NT (62 μm) surfaces. An analysis of surface composition suggested a link between surface chemistry and biofilm development, where the higher concentrations of metal ions in EP and MS surfaces correlated with limited biofilm formation. Interestingly, disinfection of biofilms with chlorine was up to 130 times more effective on the EP surface (0.005% surviving) than on the other surfaces. Overall these results suggest that surface finish should be considered carefully in a food processing plant.

  5. Genetics of Swarming Motility in Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium: Critical Role for Lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Toguchi, Adam; Siano, Michael; Burkart, Mark; Harshey, Rasika M.

    2000-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium can differentiate into hyperflagellated swarmer cells on agar of an appropriate consistency (0.5 to 0.8%), allowing efficient colonization of the growth surface. Flagella are essential for this form of motility. In order to identify genes involved in swarming, we carried out extensive transposon mutagenesis of serovar Typhimurium, screening for those that had functional flagella yet were unable to swarm. A majority of these mutants were defective in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) synthesis, a large number were defective in chemotaxis, and some had defects in putative two-component signaling components. While the latter two classes were defective in swarmer cell differentiation, representative LPS mutants were not and could be rescued for swarming by external addition of a biosurfactant. A mutation in waaG (LPS core modification) secreted copious amounts of slime and showed a precocious swarming phenotype. We suggest that the O antigen improves surface “wettability” required for swarm colony expansion, that the LPS core could play a role in slime generation, and that multiple two-component systems cooperate to promote swarmer cell differentiation. The failure to identify specific swarming signals such as amino acids, pH changes, oxygen, iron starvation, increased viscosity, flagellar rotation, or autoinducers leads us to consider a model in which the external slime is itself both the signal and the milieu for swarming motility. The model explains the cell density dependence of the swarming phenomenon. PMID:11053374

  6. Immunostimulation of sugar cane extract on neutrophils to Salmonella typhimurium infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming-Hua; Lo, Dan-Yuan; Liao, Jiunn-Wang; Hsuan, Shih-Ling; Chien, Maw-Sheng; Lin, Cheng-Chung; Chen, Ter-Hsin; Lee, Wei-Cheng

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the immunomodulatory effects of sugar cane extract (SCE) on the biological activities of neutrophils in mice. Six-week-old BALB/c mice were fed 1250 mg/kg of SCE once. The generation, migration and biological functions of neutrophils and the survival rates of the mice in response to Salmonella typhimurium infection were evaluated. The results show that the numbers of both bone marrow cells and neutrophils were significantly increased in response to SCE administration (p < 0.05) compared with controls. The migration, phagocytosis and H₂O₂ generation of neutrophils were all significantly enhanced in SCE-treated mice (p < 0.05). After challenge with S. typhimurium (lethal dose, 50% (LD₅₀), SCE-treated mice had a 19.2% higher survival rate and milder hepatic lesions than the controls. Additionally, fewer invasive bacteria were recovered from the spleens of SCE-treated mice. In conclusion, our results suggest that SCE has a positive regulatory effect on the biological function of mouse neutrophils that may increase host resistance against bacterial infections.

  7. Flagella of Salmonella typhimurium are a virulence factor in infected C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed Central

    Carsiotis, M; Weinstein, D L; Karch, H; Holder, I A; O'Brien, A D

    1984-01-01

    To determine whether flagella, chemotaxis, and motility of Salmonella typhimurium are virulence factors in infected C57BL/6J mice, we constructed isogenic pairs of derivatives of the nonfimbriated virulent strain SL3201. Of each pair, one member contained a mutation in a single gene that is required for expression of normal chemotactically directed motility, whereas the other member contained the wild-type form of the gene. No additional differences between the members of a pair were evident. The phenotypic parameters examined for all derivatives included in vitro growth rate, sensitivity to P22 phage, amino acid auxotrophy, and biotype. For a flagellated and nonflagellated pair, the electron microscopic appearance of each member was examined as well as its lipopolysaccharide and outer membrane profiles by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The virulence of the various derivatives was then assessed in mice challenged orally, intraperitoneally, or intravenously. The results established that flagella, whether functional or nonfunctional as organelles of motility, were S. typhimurium virulence factors and that neither chemotaxis nor motility was required for virulence. Images PMID:6389363

  8. Antimutagenic effects of aqueous fraction of Myristica fragrans (Houtt.) leaves on Salmonella typhimurium and Mus musculus.

    PubMed

    Akinboro, Akeem; Bin Mohamed, Kamaruzaman; Asmawi, Mohd Zaini; Yekeen, Taofeek A

    2014-01-01

    Natural plant extracts offer a promising hope in the prevention/treatment of cancer arising from genetic mutations. This study evaluated in vitro and in vivo mutagenic and antimutagenic effects of aqueous fraction of Myristica fragrans (AFMF) leaves on TA100 strain of Salmonella typhimurium and Mus musculus (Male Swiss albino mice), respectively. The antioxidant activity of AFMF against 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), total phenolic and flavonoid contents were determined, followed by its phytochemical elucidation using the Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography technique (UPLC). The mutagenicity of AFMF at 4, 20, 50, 100, 200, 500, and 1000 µg/well was <2.0 in S. typhimurium and the induced micronucleated polychromatic and normochromatic erythrocytes at 500, 1000, 2000, and 4000 mg/kg were not significantly different from the negative control (p≥0.05). The mutagenic activity of benzo[a]pyrene and cyclophosphamide was significantly suppressed above 50.0% throughout the tested concentrations. Fifty percent of the free radicals from DPPH were scavenged by AFMF at 0.11 mg/ml. Total phenolic and flavonoid contents of AFMF were 51.0 mg GAE/g and 27 mg QE/g, respectively. Rutin was elucidated by the UPLC technique, and thereby suspected to be the phytochemical responsible for the observed antimutagenic activity. Thus far, AFMF seems to contain a promising chemotherapeutic agent for the prevention of genetic damage that is crucial for cancer development. PMID:25520963

  9. Accumulation and elimination of Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium by hard clams in an in vitro system.

    PubMed Central

    Timoney, J F; Abston, A

    1984-01-01

    A simple, in vitro protocol was devised to study contamination by and subsequent elimination of Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium in the hard clam, Mercenaria mercenaria. The test bacteria were eliminated rapidly at similar rates for 8 h after exposure and less rapidly thereafter. At 24 h, numbers of E. coli had declined more than S. typhimurium. Bacteria were cleared in the form of rapidly sedimenting fecal and pseudofecal particulates with which the bacteria were stably associated. Ionic bonding was apparently not involved in this association. Degradation of substantial numbers of bacteria occurred in feces at between 6 and 24 h. PMID:6378093

  10. Oxygenated drinking water enhances immune activity in pigs and increases immune responses of pigs during Salmonella typhimurium infection.

    PubMed

    Jung, Bock-Gie; Lee, Jin-A; Lee, Bong-Joo

    2012-12-01

    It has been considered that drinking oxygenated water improves oxygen availability, which may increase vitality and improve immune functions. The present study evaluated the effects of oxygenated drinking water on immune function in pigs. Continuous drinking of oxygenated water markedly increased peripheral blood mononuclear cell proliferation, interleukin-1β expression level and the CD4(+):CD8(+) cell ratio in pigs. During Salmonella Typhimurium infection, total leukocytes and relative cytokines expression levels were significantly increased in pigs consuming oxygenated water compared with pigs consuming tap water. These findings suggest that oxygenated drinking water enhances immune activity in pigs and increases immune responses of pigs during S. Typhimurium Infection.

  11. The Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium QseB Response Regulator Negatively Regulates Bacterial Motility and Swine Colonization in the Absence of the QseC Sensor Kinase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) responds to the catecholamine, norepinephrine by increasing bacterial growth and enhancing motility. In this study, iron with or without the siderophore, ferrioxamine E also enhanced bacterial motility. Iron-enhanced motility was growth-rate ...

  12. A Mutation in the PoxA Gene of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Results in Altered Protein Production, Elevated Susceptibility to Environmental Challenges, and Decreased Swine Colonization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using signature-tagged mutagenesis of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium), a mutation in the poxA gene (STM4344; yjeA; poxR), encoding a putative lysyl-tRNA synthetase, was previously identified by our research group which caused decreased survival in an ex vivo swine stomach co...

  13. Stability of plasmids R1-19 and R100 in hyper-recombinant Escherichia coli strains and in Salmonella typhimurium strains.

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Eichelmann, M C; Torres, H K

    1983-01-01

    Plasmids R1-19 and R100 dissociate in hyper-recominant Escherichia coli strains in a way that is similar to but slower than dissociation in Salmonella typhimurium. The results presented suggest that the molecular mechanism for plasmid dissociation in hyper-recombinant E. coli strains is different than that in S. typhimurium strains. PMID:6343357

  14. Identification of environmental reservoirs of nontyphoidal salmonellosis: aptamer-assisted bioconcentration and subsequent detection of salmonella typhimurium by quantitative polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Jyoti, Anurag; Vajpayee, Poornima; Singh, Gulshan; Patel, Chandra Bali; Gupta, Kailash Chand; Shanker, Rishi

    2011-10-15

    In this study, identification of environmental reservoirs of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium (abbreviated as Salmonella Typhimurium) in sediments, water, and aquatic flora collected from the Ganges River (Ganges riverine material) was carried out by adopting a two-step strategy. Step 1 comprised a selective serovar-specific capture of Salmonella Typhimurium from potential reservoirs. Step 2 involved culture-free detection of selectively captured Salmonella Typhimurium by ttr gene-specific molecular beacon (MB) based quantitative polymerase chain reaction (q-PCR). The ttr gene-specific MB designed in this study could detect 1 colony-forming unit (cfu)/PCR captured by serovar-specific DNA aptamer. Sediments, water, and aquatic flora collected from the Ganges River were highly contaminated with Salmonella Typhimurium. The preanalytical step in the form of serovar-specific DNA aptamer-based biocapture of bacterial cells was found to enhance the sensitivity of the fluorescent probe in the presence of nonspecific DNA . Information about the presence of environmental reservoirs of Salmonella Typhimurium in the Ganges River region may pave the way for forecasting and management of nontyphoidal salmonellosis in south Asia.

  15. Persistence of a Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium DT12 Clone in a Piggery and in Agricultural Soil Amended with Salmonella-Contaminated Slurry

    PubMed Central

    Baloda, Suraj B.; Christensen, Lise; Trajcevska, Silvija

    2001-01-01

    Prevalence of Salmonella enterica on a Danish pig farm presenting recurrent infections was investigated. A comparison of the pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns of fecal isolates from piggeries, waste slurry, and agricultural soil amended with Salmonella-contaminated animal waste (slurry) and subclinical isolates from the same farm (collected in 1996 and later) showed identical patterns, indicating long-term persistence of the Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT12 clone in the herd environment. Furthermore, when Salmonella-contaminated slurry was disposed of on the agricultural soil (a common waste disposal practice), the pathogen was isolated up to 14 days after the spread, indicating potentially high risks of transmission of the pathogen in the environment, animals, and humans. PMID:11375208

  16. Characterization of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium from Marine Environments in Coastal Waters of Galicia (Spain)

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Urtaza, Jaime; Liebana, Ernesto; Garcia-Migura, Lourdes; Perez-Piñeiro, Pelayo; Saco, Montserrat

    2004-01-01

    Twenty-three Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium isolates from marine environments were characterized by phage typing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis, plasmid analysis, and antibiotic resistance, and the distribution of the different types in the coastal waters were subsequently analyzed. Five phage types were identified among the isolates (PT41, PT135, PT99, DT104, and DT193). PT135 isolates were exclusively detected during the winter months from 1998 to 2000, whereas DT104 and PT41 isolates were detected exclusively in the summer months from 2000 to 2002. XbaI PFGE analysis revealed 9 PFGE types, and plasmid profiling identified 8 plasmid types (with 1 to 6 plasmids) among the isolates. Only three isolates presented multidrug resistance to antibiotics. Two DT104 isolates were resistant to 8 and 7 antibiotics (profiles ACCeFNaSSuT and ACeFNeSSuT), whereas a PT193 isolate presented resistance to 6 antibiotics (profile ACFSSu). In addition, four PT41 isolates were resistant to a single antibiotic. The detection of multidrug-resistant phage types DT104 and DT193 in shellfish emphasizes the importance of monitoring the presence of Salmonella in routine surveillance of live bivalve molluscs. PMID:15240279

  17. Characterization of Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium from marine environments in coastal waters of Galicia (Spain).

    PubMed

    Martinez-Urtaza, Jaime; Liebana, Ernesto; Garcia-Migura, Lourdes; Perez-Piñeiro, Pelayo; Saco, Montserrat

    2004-07-01

    Twenty-three Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium isolates from marine environments were characterized by phage typing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis, plasmid analysis, and antibiotic resistance, and the distribution of the different types in the coastal waters were subsequently analyzed. Five phage types were identified among the isolates (PT41, PT135, PT99, DT104, and DT193). PT135 isolates were exclusively detected during the winter months from 1998 to 2000, whereas DT104 and PT41 isolates were detected exclusively in the summer months from 2000 to 2002. XbaI PFGE analysis revealed 9 PFGE types, and plasmid profiling identified 8 plasmid types (with 1 to 6 plasmids) among the isolates. Only three isolates presented multidrug resistance to antibiotics. Two DT104 isolates were resistant to 8 and 7 antibiotics (profiles ACCeFNaSSuT and ACeFNeSSuT), whereas a PT193 isolate presented resistance to 6 antibiotics (profile ACFSSu). In addition, four PT41 isolates were resistant to a single antibiotic. The detection of multidrug-resistant phage types DT104 and DT193 in shellfish emphasizes the importance of monitoring the presence of Salmonella in routine surveillance of live bivalve molluscs.

  18. Transcriptional activity of the transposable element Tn10 in the Salmonella typhimurium ilvGEDA operon.

    PubMed Central

    Blazey, D L; Burns, R O

    1982-01-01

    Polarity of Tn10 insertion mutations in the Salmonella typhimurium ilvGEDA operon depends on both the location and the orientation of the Tn10 element. One orientation of Tn10 insertions in ilvG and ilvE permits low-level expression of the downstream ilvEDA and ilvDA genes, respectively. Our analysis of Salmonella ilv recombinant plasmids shows that this residual ilv expression must result from Tn10-directed transcription and does not reflect the presence of internal promoters in the ilvGEDA operon, as was previously suggested. The opposite orientation of Tn10 insertion in ilvE prevents ilvDA expression, indicating that only one end of Tn10 is normally active in transcribing adjacent genes. Both orientations of Tn10 insertion in ilvD exert absolute polarity on ilvA expression. Expression of ilvA is known to be dependent on effective translation of ilvD, perhaps reflecting the lack of a ribosome binding site proximal to the ilvA sequence. Therefore, recognition of the ability of Tn10 to promote transcription of contiguous genes in the ilvGEDA operon apparently requires the presence of associated ribosome binding sites. PMID:6289328

  19. Diffusion and persistence of multidrug resistant Salmonella Typhimurium strains phage type DT120 in southern Italy.

    PubMed

    De Vito, Danila; Monno, Rosa; Nuccio, Federica; Legretto, Marilisa; Oliva, Marta; Coscia, Maria Franca; Dionisi, Anna Maria; Calia, Carla; Capolongo, Carmen; Pazzani, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Sixty-two multidrug resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strains isolated from 255 clinical strains collected in Southern Italy in 2006-2008 were characterised for antimicrobial resistance genes, pulsotype, and phage type. Most strains (83.9%) were resistant to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, streptomycin, sulfamethoxazole, and tetracycline (ACSSuT) encoded in 88.5% by the Salmonella genomic island (SGI1) and in 11.5% by the InH-like integron (bla OXA-30-aadA1) and catA1, sul1, and tet(B) genes. STYMXB.0061 (75%) and DT120 (84.6%) were the prevalent pulsotype and phage type identified in these strains, respectively. Five other resistance patterns were found either in single or in a low number of isolates. The pandemic clone DT104 (ACSSuT encoded by SGI1) has been identified in Italy since 1992, while strains DT120 (ACSSuT encoded by SGI1) have never been previously reported in Italy. In Europe, clinical strains DT120 have been reported from sporadic outbreaks linked to the consumption of pork products. However, none of these strains were STYMXB.0061 and SGI1 positive. The prevalent identification and persistence of DT120 isolates would suggest, in Southern Italy, a phage type shifting of the pandemic DT104 clone pulsotype STYMXB.0061. Additionally, these findings raise epidemiological concern about the potential diffusion of these emerging multidrug resistant (SGI linked) DT120 strains.

  20. Disubstituted amino-, nitroso-, and nitrofluorenes: a physicochemical basis for structure-activity relationships in Salmonella typhimurium

    SciTech Connect

    Vance, W.A.; Wang, Y.Y.; Okamoto, H.S.

    1987-01-01

    Twenty-nine derivatives of fluorene were tested for mutagenic potency in four strains of Salmonella typhimurium with and/or without S9 microsomal activation. The effects of a second functional group on the mutagenic activity of an amino-nitroso-, and nitrofluorene were correlated with its physical and chemical properties. When the functional group is conjugated by resonance, both inductive and resonance effects are determinants of mutagenic potency. Electron-withdrawing groups such as the halogens (F, Cl, Br, and I), nitro, nitroso, and cyano at C-7 increased the mutagenic potency of 2-nitrofluorene. Acetylation of a hydroxy or an amino group at C-7 increased the mutagenic potency of 2-nitrofluorene. The physical properties of a second functional group are expected to exert their effect(s) at three points in the metabolic activation of 2,7-disubstituted fluorene derivatives: 1) initial reduction of the nitro group (redox effect), 2) stabilization of the hydroxylamine (inductive effect), and 3) stabilization/destabilization of the nitrenium ion (resonance and inductive effects). The relationships between the physical properties of a second functional group and their effects on biological activities of nitro- and aminofluorenes in the Ames Salmonella assay may be of predictive value in a first approximation of both the mutagenic and carcinogenic potency of chemicals with comparable structures such as fluoranthene and biphenyl.

  1. A miniaturized Ames mutagenicity assay employing bioluminescent strains of Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Côté, C; Blaise, C; Delisle, C E; Meighen, E A; Hansen, P D

    1995-12-01

    Increased awareness of the role of environmental factors in carcinogenesis has led to an emphasis on preventing or minimizing exposure to genotoxicants. This is presently promoting the development of simple, rapid, cost-effective mutagenicity screening assays. We have developed a test system based on the well-known Salmonella mutagenicity assay. The lux genes, which permit cells to emit light through bioluminescence, were introduced into Salmonella typhimurium strain TA98. These bacteria were exposed for 48 h to chemicals or complex mixtures in 48-well microplates containing an appropriate liquid medium. Cells were subsequently centrifuged and resuspended in buffer. The final postexposure revertant biomass was then estimated using a microluminometer. Replication trials confirmed methodological reproducibility. Clear dose-response relationships were obtained with the direct frameshift mutagens 4NQO and 2NF. Mutagenicity threshold effect concentrations found for these compounds were comparable to those reported in the literature. Industrial effluents and environmental extracts (effluents, suspended solids) were also tested and results compared well with those of the SOS Chromotest. While further validation of this new adaptation of the Ames test will be required, it appears at this time that it could be well suited for routine screening of xenobiotics and environmental samples. PMID:8552135

  2. Igg Subclasses Targeting the Flagella of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Can Mediate Phagocytosis and Bacterial Killing

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Yun Shan; Armour, Kathryn L; Clark, Michael R; Grant, Andrew J; Mastroeni, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Invasive non-typhoidal Salmonella are a common cause of invasive disease in immuno-compromised individuals and in children. Multi-drug resistance poses challenges to disease control, with a critical need for effective vaccines. Flagellin is an attractive vaccine candidate due to surface exposure and high epitope copy number, but its potential as a target for opsonophacytic antibodies is unclear. We examined the effect of targeting flagella with different classes of IgG on the interaction between Salmonella Typhimurium and a human phagocyte-like cell line, THP-1. We tagged the FliC flagellar protein with a foreign CD52 mimotope (TSSPSAD) and bacteria were opsonized with a panel of humanised CD52 antibodies with the same antigen-binding V-region, but different constant regions. We found that IgG binding to flagella increases bacterial phagocytosis and reduces viable intracellular bacterial numbers. Opsonisation with IgG3, followed by IgG1, IgG4, and IgG2, resulted in the highest level of bacterial uptake and in the highest reduction in the intracellular load of viable bacteria. Taken together, our data provide proof-of-principle evidence that targeting flagella with antibodies can increase the antibacterial function of host cells, with IgG3 being the most potent subclass. These data will assist the rational design of urgently needed, optimised vaccines against iNTS disease. PMID:27366588

  3. Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Exploits Toll-Like Receptor Signaling during the Host-Pathogen Interaction▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Christine E.; Sad, Subash; Coombes, Brian K.

    2009-01-01

    Salmonella survives and replicates in host cells by using a type III secretion system to evade host immune defenses. The innate immune system plays an important role as a first line of defense against pathogens and is mediated in part by Toll-like receptors (TLRs); however, the infection dynamics of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium within macrophages stimulated with TLR ligands is poorly understood. We studied the infection dynamics of Salmonella in murine macrophages previously exposed to TLR ligands and report that treatment of macrophages with four different TLR agonists resulted in their increased phagocytic capacity toward Salmonella but not fluorescent microspheres. Further analysis revealed that the intracellular replication of Salmonella was enhanced in TLR-stimulated macrophages in a manner requiring a functional type III secretion system and enhanced transcriptional activity of the sseA virulence gene operon. Studies of mice that normally resolve an acute primary infection with Salmonella revealed that pretreatment of animals with CpG DNA had a detrimental effect on disease outcome. CpG-treated mice infected with Salmonella all succumbed to infection and had higher bacterial loads in the spleen than did control animals. These data suggest that Salmonella can exploit macrophages activated via the innate immune system for increased intracellular survival. PMID:19720755

  4. Biological and virulence characteristics of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium following deletion of glucose-inhibited division (gidA) gene.

    PubMed

    Shippy, Daniel C; Eakley, Nicholas M; Bochsler, Philip N; Chopra, Ashok K; Fadl, Amin A

    2011-06-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is a frequent cause of enteric disease due to the consumption of contaminated food. Identification and characterization of bacterial factors involved in Salmonella pathogenesis would help develop effective strategies for controlling salmonellosis. To investigate the role of glucose-inhibited division gene (gidA) in Salmonella virulence, we constructed a Salmonella mutant strain in which gidA was deleted. Deletion of gidA rendered Salmonella deficient in the invasion of intestinal epithelial cells, bacterial motility, intracellular survival, and induction of cytotoxicity in host cells. Deletion of gidA rendered the organism to display a filamentous morphology compared to the normal rod-shaped nature of Salmonella. Furthermore, a significant attenuation in the induction of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, histopathological lesions, and systemic infection was observed in mice infected with the gidA mutant. Most importantly, a significant increase in LD(50) was observed in mice infected with the gidA mutant, and mice immunized with the gidA mutant were able to survive a lethal dose of wild-type Salmonella. Additionally, deletion of gidA significantly altered the expression of several bacterial factors associated with pathogenesis as indicated by global transcriptional and proteomic profiling. Taken together, our data indicate GidA as a potential regulator of Salmonella virulence genes.

  5. Assessing Salmonella typhimurium persistence in poultry carcasses under multiple thermal conditions consistent with composting and wet rendering.

    PubMed

    Vaddella, V; Pitesky, M; Cao, W; Govinthasamy, V; Shi, J; Pandey, P

    2016-03-01

    Mitigation of Salmonella associated with poultry carcasses is primarily accomplished by rendering or carcass composting. While rendering temperatures and pressures are well established for pathogen inactivation in poultry carcasses, parameters controlling composting processes are less defined in part because multiple conditions and procedures are utilized. Consequently, limited knowledge exists describing the impacts of composting with varying temperature and mixing protocols with respect to the inactivation of Salmonella in poultry carcasses. To improve the existing knowledge of Salmonella survival in poultry carcasses, inactivation of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (ST) LT2 was investigated. The impacts of various composting temperatures (55, 62.5°C) and low-rendering (i.e., pasteurization) temperatures (70, 78°C) on Salmonella inactivation were tested in a bench-top setting using a ground carcass slurry and whole birds under mixed and non-mixed conditions. Results showed that the ground carcass slurry and the whole carcass exposed to temperatures consistent with composting had no detectable Salmonella after 110 h with a level of detection of one CFU/mL of ground carcass slurry and one CFU/g of whole carcasses, respectively. In addition, grinding of carcasses as opposed to whole carcasses was more predictable with respect to Salmonella heat inactivation. Furthermore, results showed that constant mixing decreased the overall time required to eliminate Salmonella under composting and low-rendering temperatures.

  6. Inactivation and sub-lethal injury of salmonella typhi, salmonella typhimurium and vibrio cholerae in copper water storage vessels

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background This study provides information on the antibacterial effect of copper against the water-borne pathogens Salmonella Typhi, Salmonella Typhimurium and Vibrio cholerae. Methods Suspensions of each pathogen were kept in water within a traditional copper vessel at 30°C for 24 h. Samples were withdrawn, diluted and plated onto suitable growth media. Conventional enumeration of healthy (uninjured) bacteria was carried out using standard aerobic incubation conditions. Additionally, reactive oxygen species-neutralised (ROS-n) conditions were achieved by adding the peroxide scavenger sodium pyruvate to the medium with anaerobic incubation, to enumerate uninjured (ROS-insensitive) and injured (ROS-sensitive) bacteria. Differences between log-transformed means of conventional (aerobic) and ROS-n counts were statistically evaluated using t tests. Results Overall, all three pathogens were inactivated by storage in copper vessels for 24 h. However, for shorter-term incubation (4-12 h), higher counts were observed under ROS-n conditions than under aerobic conditions, which demonstrate the presence of substantial numbers of sub-lethally injured cells prior to their complete inactivation. Conclusions The present study has for the first time confirmed that these bacterial pathogens are inactivated by storage in a copper vessel within 24 h. However, it has also demonstrated that it is necessary to account for short-term sub-lethal injury, manifest as ROS-sensitivity, in order to more fully understand the process. This has important practical implications in terms of the time required to store water within a copper vessel to completely inactivate these bacteria and thereby remove the risk of water-borne disease transmission by this route. PMID:21794163

  7. Saccharomyces boulardii modifies Salmonella typhimurium traffic and host immune responses along the intestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Pontier-Bres, Rodolphe; Munro, Patrick; Boyer, Laurent; Anty, Rodolphe; Imbert, Véronique; Terciolo, Chloé; André, Fréderic; Rampal, Patrick; Lemichez, Emmanuel; Peyron, Jean-François; Czerucka, Dorota

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (ST) is an enteropathogenic Gram-negative bacterium that causes infection following oral ingestion. ST spreads rapidly along the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) and invades the intestinal epithelium to ultimately reach internal body organs. The probiotic yeast Saccharomyces boulardii BIOCODEX (S.b-B) is prescribed for prophylaxis of diarrheal infectious diseases. We previously showed that S.b-B prevents weight loss in ST-infected mice and significantly decreases bacterial translocation to the spleen and liver. This study was designed to investigate the effect of S.b-B on ST migration along the GIT and the impact of the yeast on the host's early innate immune responses. Bioluminescent imaging (BLI) was used to evaluate the effect of S.b-B on the progression of luminescent Salmonella Typhimurium (ST-lux) in the GIT of mice pretreated with streptomycin. Photonic emission (PE) was measured in GIT extracts (stomach, small intestine, cecum and colon) at various time periods post-infection (PI). PE analysis revealed that, 45 min PI, ST-lux had migrated slightly faster in the mice treated with S.b-B than in the untreated infected animals. At 90 min PI, ST-lux had reached the cecum in both groups of mice. Adhesion of ST to S.b-B was visualized in the intestines of the mice and probably accounts for (1) the faster elimination of ST-lux in the feces, and (2) reduced translocation of ST to the spleen and liver. In the early phase of infection, S.b-B also modifies the host's immune responses by (1) increasing IFN-γ gene expression and decreasing IL-10 gene expression in the small intestine, and (2) elevating both IFN-γ, and IL-10 mRNA levels in the cecum. BLI revealed that S.b-B modifies ST migration and the host immune response along the GIT. Study findings shed new light on the protective mechanisms of S.b-B during the early phase of Salmonella pathogenesis.

  8. Saccharomyces boulardii modifies Salmonella typhimurium traffic and host immune responses along the intestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Pontier-Bres, Rodolphe; Munro, Patrick; Boyer, Laurent; Anty, Rodolphe; Imbert, Véronique; Terciolo, Chloé; André, Fréderic; Rampal, Patrick; Lemichez, Emmanuel; Peyron, Jean-François; Czerucka, Dorota

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (ST) is an enteropathogenic Gram-negative bacterium that causes infection following oral ingestion. ST spreads rapidly along the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) and invades the intestinal epithelium to ultimately reach internal body organs. The probiotic yeast Saccharomyces boulardii BIOCODEX (S.b-B) is prescribed for prophylaxis of diarrheal infectious diseases. We previously showed that S.b-B prevents weight loss in ST-infected mice and significantly decreases bacterial translocation to the spleen and liver. This study was designed to investigate the effect of S.b-B on ST migration along the GIT and the impact of the yeast on the host's early innate immune responses. Bioluminescent imaging (BLI) was used to evaluate the effect of S.b-B on the progression of luminescent Salmonella Typhimurium (ST-lux) in the GIT of mice pretreated with streptomycin. Photonic emission (PE) was measured in GIT extracts (stomach, small intestine, cecum and colon) at various time periods post-infection (PI). PE analysis revealed that, 45 min PI, ST-lux had migrated slightly faster in the mice treated with S.b-B than in the untreated infected animals. At 90 min PI, ST-lux had reached the cecum in both groups of mice. Adhesion of ST to S.b-B was visualized in the intestines of the mice and probably accounts for (1) the faster elimination of ST-lux in the feces, and (2) reduced translocation of ST to the spleen and liver. In the early phase of infection, S.b-B also modifies the host's immune responses by (1) increasing IFN-γ gene expression and decreasing IL-10 gene expression in the small intestine, and (2) elevating both IFN-γ, and IL-10 mRNA levels in the cecum. BLI revealed that S.b-B modifies ST migration and the host immune response along the GIT. Study findings shed new light on the protective mechanisms of S.b-B during the early phase of Salmonella pathogenesis. PMID:25118595

  9. Respiratory hydrogen use by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is essential for virulence.

    PubMed

    Maier, R J; Olczak, A; Maier, S; Soni, S; Gunn, J

    2004-11-01

    Based on available annotated gene sequence information, the enteric pathogen salmonella, like other enteric bacteria, contains three putative membrane-associated H2-using hydrogenase enzymes. These enzymes split molecular H2, releasing low-potential electrons that are used to reduce quinone or heme-containing components of the respiratory chain. Here we show that each of the three distinct membrane-associated hydrogenases of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is coupled to a respiratory pathway that uses oxygen as the terminal electron acceptor. Cells grown in a blood-based medium expressed four times the amount of hydrogenase (H2 oxidation) activity that cells grown on Luria Bertani medium did. Cells suspended in phosphate-buffered saline consumed 2 mol of H2 per mol of O2 used in the H2-O2 respiratory pathway, and the activity was inhibited by the respiration inhibitor cyanide. Molecular hydrogen levels averaging over 40 microM were measured in organs (i.e., livers and spleens) of live mice, and levels within the intestinal tract (the presumed origin of the gas) were four times greater than this. The half-saturation affinity of S. enterica serovar Typhimurium for H2 is only 2.1 microM, so it is expected that H2-utilizing hydrogenase enzymes are saturated with the reducing substrate in vivo. All three hydrogenase enzymes contribute to the virulence of the bacterium in a typhoid fever-mouse model, based on results from strains with mutations in each of the three hydrogenase genes. The introduced mutations are nonpolar, and growth of the mutant strains was like that of the parent strain. The combined removal of all three hydrogenases resulted in a strain that is avirulent and (in contrast to the parent strain) one that is unable to invade liver or spleen tissue. The introduction of one of the hydrogenase genes into the triple mutant strain on a low-copy-number plasmid resulted in a strain that was able to both oxidize H2 and cause morbidity in mice within 11

  10. Characterization of intestinal invasion by Salmonella typhimurium and Salmonella dublin and effect of a mutation in the invH gene.

    PubMed Central

    Watson, P R; Paulin, S M; Bland, A P; Jones, P W; Wallis, T S

    1995-01-01

    The relative levels of invasiveness of two bovine isolates each of Salmonella typhimurium and Salmonella dublin and of invH mutants of S. typhimurium were determined in MDCK and Int 407 cultured-cell assays and in bovine ileal loops. S. dublin was found to be significantly less invasive in cultured cells than S. typhimurium, but this difference was not observed in bovine intestines. The invH mutants exhibited a significant reduction in invasion in both cultured cells and bovine intestines. The invasive phenotypes of the strains were confirmed by fluorescent microscopy and scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The wild-type strains were observed in the laminae propriae of the intestinal villi, while in contrast the invH mutants were generally associated with the enterocyte layer. The degree of damage in the bovine ileum was related to the magnitude of the invasion. There was no difference in the amount of S. typhimurium or S. dublin recovered from the bovine ileum either with or without Peyer's patches 3 h after inoculation of the loop. PMID:7790093

  11. Salmonella choleraesuis and Salmonella typhimurium associated with liver cells after intravenous inoculation of rats are localized mainly in Kupffer cells and multiply intracellularly.

    PubMed

    Nnalue, N A; Shnyra, A; Hultenby, K; Lindberg, A A

    1992-07-01

    Male Sprague-Dawley rats were inoculated intravenously with Salmonella choleraesuis or Salmonella typhimurium and used over 3 consecutive days to produce highly enriched (greater than 95% homogenous) preparations of Kupffer and mononuclear cells (KC), liver endothelial cells (LEC), and hepatocytes. The methods involved collagenase perfusion of the liver in situ, differential centrifugation of liver cells over a Percoll gradient, and selective attachment of the cells to plastic or to culture dishes coated with collagen. The different cell preparations were then assayed for the number and location, intracellular or extracellular, of associated viable bacteria. Most of the viable bacteria recovered were associated with KC and were mainly intracellular. The intracellular bacteria in KC from rats infected with either bacterial strain increased about 20- to 50-fold over 2 days. Some of the bacteria associated with LEC and in some experiments with hepatocytes also survived treatment with gentamicin and increased in number with time. Intracellular bacteria were readily visualized in KC by light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. On rare occasions, bacteria were seen within LEC from rats infected with S. choleraesuis but not from those infected with S. typhimurium. Microcolonies of S. typhimurium but not of S. choleraesuis were occasionally found on the surface of some LEC. Bacteria were not seen within or on the surface of hepatocytes by transmission or scanning electron microscopy. The integration of microscopic and viability data suggested that most intracellular S. choleraesuis organisms in KC had been killed whereas most intracellular S. typhimurium organisms were viable.

  12. Rapid mapping in Salmonella typhimurium with Mud-P22 prophages.

    PubMed Central

    Benson, N R; Goldman, B S

    1992-01-01

    A new method for mapping mutations in the Salmonella typhimurium chromosome is described and applied to the localization of novel regulatory mutations affecting expression of the nirB (nitrite reductase) gene. The mapping technique is also illustrated by the mapping of mutations in genes affecting carbohydrate catabolism and biosynthetic pathways. The new mapping method involves use of the hybrid phage MudP and MudQ (together referred to as Mud-P22), originally constructed by Youderian et al. (Genetics 118:581-592, 1988). This report describes a set of Mud-P22 lysogens, each member of the set containing a different Mud-P22 insertion. The insertions are scattered along the entire Salmonella genome. These lysogens, when induced by mitomycin C, generate transducing lysates that are enriched (45- to 1,400-fold over the background, generalized transducing particle population) for transducing particles containing bacterial DNA that flanks one side of the insertion. We demonstrate that within the set of lysogens there can be found at least one Mud-P22 insertion that enriches for any particular region of the Salmonella chromosome and that, therefore, all regions of the chromosome are discretely enriched and represented by the collection as a whole. We describe a technique that allows the rapid and facile determination of which lysate contains enriched sequences for the repair of a mutant locus, thereby allowing the determination of the map position of the locus. This technique is applicable to those mutations for which the wild-type allele is selectable. We also describe a procedure whereby any Tn10 insertion can be mapped by selecting for the loss of Tetr. Images PMID:1311301

  13. Glutathione: an intracellular and extracellular protective agent in Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    Levels of glutathione, were measured in several aerobically grown strains of Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli. External accumulation of GSH was inhibited by 30 mM NaN/sub 3/. Thus, GSH export may be energy dependent. Greater than 50% of the glutathione detected in the media was in the reduced form. Since the oxidized glutathione in the media could be accounted for by oxidation during aerobic incubation as well as in sample processing, the glutathione was predominantly exported in the reduced form. Extracellular glutathione was detected in log phase cultures of 2 out of 2 E. coli strains and 6 of 8 Salmonella strains tested. Two-dimensional paper chromatography of supernatants from cultures labelled with Na/sub 2//sup 35/SO/sub 4/ confirmed the presence of GSH and revealed five other sulfur-containing compounds in the media of Salmonella and E. coli cultures. Since media from cultures of an E. coli GSH/sup -/ strain contained compounds with identical R/sub f/'s, the five unidentified compounds were not derivatives of GSH. The addition of 26 ..mu..M GSH to cultures of TA1534 partially protected the bacteria from the toxic effects of 54 ..mu..M N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG). When MNNG was preincubated with equimolar GSH, the mutagenicity of the MNNG was neutralized. The addition of micromolar GSH to cultures and E. coli GSH/sup -/ strain protected the cells from growth inhibition by micromolar concentrations of mercuric chloride, silver nitrate, cisplatin, cadmium chloride, and iodoacetamide. The data presented demonstrate that micromolar concentrations of external GSH can significantly shorten the recovery time of cells after exposure to toxic agents in the environment.

  14. Real-time reverse transcriptase PCR for the rapid and sensitive detection of Salmonella typhimurium from pork.

    PubMed

    Techathuvanan, Chayapa; Draughon, Frances Ann; D'Souza, Doris Helen

    2010-03-01

    Reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) detects the presence of mRNA and has a greater potential for detecting viable pathogens than do DNA-based PCR assays, with improved speed and sensitivity compared with traditional methods. Our objective was to rapidly and sensitively detect Salmonella Typhimurium from pork within two 8-h work shifts using a SYBR Green I real-time RT-PCR (rt-RT-PCR) assay. Pork chop and sausage samples (25 g) were inoculated with 10(8) to 10(0) CFU of Salmonella Typhimurium and stomached in 225 ml of tetrathionate broth. Serial dilutions were spread plated on xylose lysine Tergitol 4 agar either immediately or after 10 h of selective preenrichment or preenrichment followed by 12 h of selective enrichment (for stressed cells) at 37 degrees C for standard cultural enumeration. RNA was extracted using the TRIzol method. The rt-RT-PCR assay was carried out in a Bio-Rad iCycler using a SYBR Green I one-step RT-PCR kit and Salmonella specific invA gene primers with an internal amplification control (IAC). The PCR was followed by melting temperature (T(m)) analysis to determine specific Salmonella invA (T(m) = 87.5 degrees C) and IAC (T(m) = 82 degrees C) products. Improved Salmonella detection up to 10(1) CFU/25 g of pork and 10(0) CFU/25 g of sausages was obtained after 10 h of enrichment within approximately 24 h. Even without enrichment, Salmonella could be detected from both pork chop and sausage at 10(6) CFU/25 g within 1 day. This robust rt-RT-PCR detects and confirms Salmonella in pork within approximately 24 h and thus is significantly faster than traditional methods that take >/=1 week. This assay shows promise for routine testing and monitoring of Salmonella by the pork industry.

  15. Salmonella typhimurium impedes innate immunity with a mast-cell-suppressing protein tyrosine phosphatase, SptP.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hae Woong; Brooking-Dixon, Rhea; Neupane, Subham; Lee, Chul-Jin; Miao, Edward A; Staats, Herman F; Abraham, Soman N

    2013-12-12

    The virulence of Salmonella is linked to its invasive capacity and suppression of adaptive immunity. This does not explain, however, the rapid dissemination of the pathogen after it breaches the gut. In our study, S. Typhimurium suppressed degranulation of local mast cells (MCs), resulting in limited neutrophil recruitment and restricting outflow of vascular contents into infection sites, thus facilitating bacterial spread. MC suppression was mediated by secreted effector protein (SptP), which shares structural homology with Yersinia YopH. SptP functioned by dephosphorylating the vesicle fusion protein N-ethylmalemide-sensitive factor and by blocking phosphorylation of Syk. Without SptP, orally challenged S. Typhimurium failed to suppress MC degranulation and exhibited limited colonization of the mesenteric lymph nodes. Administration of SptP to sites of E. coli infection markedly enhanced its virulence. Thus, SptP-mediated inactivation of local MCs is a powerful mechanism utilized by S. Typhimurium to impede early innate immunity.

  16. Effects of irradiation and fumaric acid treatment on the inactivation of Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella typhimurium inoculated on sliced ham

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hyeon-Jeong; Lee, Ji-Hye; Song, Kyung Bin

    2011-11-01

    To examine the effects of fumaric acid and electron beam irradiation on the inactivation of foodborne pathogens in ready-to-eat meat products, sliced ham was inoculated with Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella typhimurium. The inoculated ham slices were treated with 0.5% fumaric acid or electron beam irradiation at 2 kGy. Fumaric acid treatment reduced the populations of L. monocytogenes and S. typhimurium by approximately 1 log CFU/g compared to control populations. In contrast, electron beam irradiation decreased the populations of S. typhimurium and L. monocytogenes by 3.78 and 2.42 log CFU/g, respectively. These results suggest that electron beam irradiation is a better and appropriate technique for improving the microbial safety of sliced ham.

  17. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium BaeSR two-component system positively regulates sodA in response to ciprofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, P; Collao, B; Álvarez, R; Salinas, H; Morales, E H; Calderón, I L; Saavedra, C P; Gil, F

    2013-10-01

    In response to antibiotics, bacteria activate regulatory systems that control the expression of genes that participate in detoxifying these compounds, like multidrug efflux systems. We previously demonstrated that the BaeSR two-component system from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) participates in the detection of ciprofloxacin, a bactericidal antibiotic, and in the positive regulation of mdtA, an efflux pump implicated in antibiotic resistance. In the present work, we provide further evidence for a role of the S. Typhimurium BaeSR two-component system in response to ciprofloxacin treatment and show that it regulates sodA expression. We demonstrate that, in the absence of BaeSR, the transcript levels of sodA and the activity of its gene product are lower. Using electrophoretic mobility shift assays and transcriptional fusions, we demonstrate that BaeR regulates sodA by a direct interaction with the promoter region.

  18. Inhibition of Salmonella typhimurium by medium-chain fatty acids in an in vitro simulation of the porcine cecum.

    PubMed

    Messens, Winy; Goris, Johan; Dierick, Noël; Herman, Lieve; Heyndrickx, Marc

    2010-02-24

    Salmonella typhimurium was responsible for more than half of the reported cases of human salmonellosis in Belgium in 2007 and was the predominant serovar isolated from slaughter pig carcasses. To lower the Salmonella contamination of pork meat, measures can be taken at the primary production level, e.g. by reducing the shedding of Salmonella through the use of feed additives such as medium-chain fatty acids (MCFAs). An in vitro continuous culture system, simulating the porcine cecum, was developed for investigating the effect of MCFAs (sodium caproate, sodium caprylate and sodium caprinate) on the pig intestinal microbial community. The system was monitored by plating on selective media, PCR-DGGE and HPLC analysis of fermentation products. An inoculated S. typhimurium strain could be maintained by the system at a population size of about 5 log(10)cfu/mL. By the addition of 15 mM caprylate, significant reductions of coliforms and Salmonella counts by 4.69 log(10) units (95% confidence interval: 4.19-5.18) could be achieved, while other bacterial populations were clearly less affected. This concentration seems economically feasible in pig feed, provided that the substance can reach the cecum without being absorbed. Thus, caprylate, for example in the form of encapsulated beads or as triacylglycerol oil, might have potential as a Salmonella-reducing additive in pig feed. PMID:19709819

  19. Inhibition of Salmonella typhimurium by medium-chain fatty acids in an in vitro simulation of the porcine cecum.

    PubMed

    Messens, Winy; Goris, Johan; Dierick, Noël; Herman, Lieve; Heyndrickx, Marc

    2010-02-24

    Salmonella typhimurium was responsible for more than half of the reported cases of human salmonellosis in Belgium in 2007 and was the predominant serovar isolated from slaughter pig carcasses. To lower the Salmonella contamination of pork meat, measures can be taken at the primary production level, e.g. by reducing the shedding of Salmonella through the use of feed additives such as medium-chain fatty acids (MCFAs). An in vitro continuous culture system, simulating the porcine cecum, was developed for investigating the effect of MCFAs (sodium caproate, sodium caprylate and sodium caprinate) on the pig intestinal microbial community. The system was monitored by plating on selective media, PCR-DGGE and HPLC analysis of fermentation products. An inoculated S. typhimurium strain could be maintained by the system at a population size of about 5 log(10)cfu/mL. By the addition of 15 mM caprylate, significant reductions of coliforms and Salmonella counts by 4.69 log(10) units (95% confidence interval: 4.19-5.18) could be achieved, while other bacterial populations were clearly less affected. This concentration seems economically feasible in pig feed, provided that the substance can reach the cecum without being absorbed. Thus, caprylate, for example in the form of encapsulated beads or as triacylglycerol oil, might have potential as a Salmonella-reducing additive in pig feed.

  20. Salmonella typhimurium's transthyretin-like protein is a host-specific factor important in fecal survival in chickens.

    PubMed

    Hennebry, Sarah C; Sait, Leanne C; Mantena, Raju; Humphrey, Thomas J; Yang, Ji; Scott, Timothy; Kupz, Andreas; Richardson, Samantha J; Strugnell, Richard A

    2012-01-01

    The transthyretin-like protein (TLP) from Salmonella enterica subspecies I is a periplasmic protein with high level structural similarity to a protein found in mammals and fish. In humans, the protein homologue, transthyretin, binds and carries retinol and thyroxine, and a series of other, unrelated aromatic compounds. Here we show that the amino acid sequence of the TLP from different species, subspecies and serovars of the Salmonella genus is highly conserved and demonstrate that the TLP gene is constitutively expressed in S. Typhimurium and that copper and other divalent metal ions severely inhibit enzyme activity of the TLP, a cyclic amidohydrolase that hydrolyses 5-hydroxyisourate (5-HIU). In order to determine the in vivo role of the S. Typhimurium TLP, we constructed a strain of mouse-virulent S. Typhimurium SL1344 bearing a mutation in the TLP gene (SL1344 ΔyedX). We assessed the virulence of this strain via oral inoculation of mice and chickens. Whilst SL1344 ΔyedX induced a systemic infection in both organisms, the bacterial load detected in the faeces of infected chickens was significantly reduced when compared to the load of S. Typhimurium SL1344. These data demonstrate that the TLP gene is required for survival of S. Typhimurium in a high uric acid environment such as chicken faeces, and that metabolic traits of Salmonellae in natural and contrived hosts may be fundamentally different. Our data also highlight the importance of using appropriate animal models for the study of bacterial pathogenesis especially where host-specific virulence factors or traits are the subject of the study.

  1. The architecture and ppGpp-dependent expression of the primary transcriptome of Salmonella Typhimurium during invasion gene expression

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Invasion of intestinal epithelial cells by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) requires expression of the extracellular virulence gene expression programme (STEX), activation of which is dependent on the signalling molecule guanosine tetraphosphate (ppGpp). Recently, next-generation transcriptomics (RNA-seq) has revealed the unexpected complexity of bacterial transcriptomes and in this report we use differential RNA sequencing (dRNA-seq) to define the high-resolution transcriptomic architecture of wild-type S. Typhimurium and a ppGpp null strain under growth conditions which model STEX. In doing so we show that ppGpp plays a much wider role in regulating the S. Typhimurium STEX primary transcriptome than previously recognised. Results Here we report the precise mapping of transcriptional start sites (TSSs) for 78% of the S. Typhimurium open reading frames (ORFs). The TSS mapping enabled a genome-wide promoter analysis resulting in the prediction of 169 alternative sigma factor binding sites, and the prediction of the structure of 625 operons. We also report the discovery of 55 new candidate small RNAs (sRNAs) and 302 candidate antisense RNAs (asRNAs). We discovered 32 ppGpp-dependent alternative TSSs and determined the extent and level of ppGpp-dependent coding and non-coding transcription. We found that 34% and 20% of coding and non-coding RNA transcription respectively was ppGpp-dependent under these growth conditions, adding a further dimension to the role of this remarkable small regulatory molecule in enabling rapid adaptation to the infective environment. Conclusions The transcriptional architecture of S. Typhimurium and finer definition of the key role ppGpp plays in regulating Salmonella coding and non-coding transcription should promote the understanding of gene regulation in this important food borne pathogen and act as a resource for future research. PMID:22251276

  2. Inactivation of Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Salmonella typhimurium with compounds available in households.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hua; Kendall, Patricia A; Medeiros, Lydia; Sofos, John N

    2009-06-01

    Solutions of selected household products were tested for their effectiveness against Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Salmonella Typhimurium. Hydrogen peroxide (1.5 and 3%), vinegar (2.5 and 5% acetic acid), baking soda (11, 33, and 50% sodium bicarbonate), household bleach (0.0314, 0.0933, and 0.670% sodium hypochlorite), 5% acetic acid (prepared from glacial acetic acid), and 5% citric acid solutions were tested against the three pathogens individually (five-strain composites of each, 10(8) CFU/ml) by using a modified AOAC International suspension test at initial temperatures of 25 and 55degrees C for 1 and 10 min. All bleach solutions (pH 8.36 to 10.14) produced a >5-log reduction of all pathogens tested after 1 min at 25 degrees C, whereas all baking soda solutions (pH 7.32 to 7.55) were ineffective (<1-log reduction) even after 10 min at an initial temperature of 55 degrees C. After 1 min at 25 degrees C, 3% hydrogen peroxide (pH 2.75) achieved a >5-log reduction of both Salmonella Typhimurium and E. coli O157:H7, whereas undiluted vinegar (pH 2.58) had a similar effect only against Salmonella Typhimurium. Compared with 1 min at 25 degrees C, greater reductions of L. monocytogenes (P < 0.05) were obtained with all organic acid and hydrogen peroxide treatments after 10 min at an initial temperature of 55 degrees C. The efficacies of household compounds against all tested pathogens decreased in the following order: 0.0314% sodium hypochlorite > 3% hydrogen peroxide > undiluted vinegar and 5% acetic acid > 5% citric acid > baking soda (50% sodium bicarbonate). The sensitivity of the tested pathogens to all tested household compounds followed the sequence of Salmonella Typhimurium > E. coli O157: H7 > L. monocytogenes. PMID:19610330

  3. Subunit constituent of the porin trimers that form the permeability channels in the outer membrane of Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, J; Nakae, T

    1980-01-01

    The polypeptide composition of the functional porin trimers that produced the permeability channels in the outer membrane of Salmonella typhimurium was examined on two-dimensional slab gels. The results suggested that the majority of porin trimers from strains producing mixed species of porin polypeptides consisted of homologous subunit polypeptides. The present results do not exclude the possibility that a small fraction of porin trimer is constructed from heterologous subunit polypeptides. Images PMID:6246065

  4. Use of bioluminescence to model the thermal inactivation of Salmonella typhimurium in the presence of a competitive microflora.

    PubMed Central

    Duffy, G; Ellison, A; Anderson, W; Cole, M B; Stewart, G S

    1995-01-01

    The survival of Salmonella typhimurium was investigated by bioluminescence and standard plating techniques in pure cultures and in the presence of competitors after the cultures were heated to 55 degrees C for increasing lengths of time. Decimal reduction (D) values increased from 0.43 to 2.09 min in the presence of 10(8) CFU of competitors ml-1, indicating a significant protective effect. PMID:7574653

  5. Inactivation of Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Salmonella typhimurium with compounds available in households.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hua; Kendall, Patricia A; Medeiros, Lydia; Sofos, John N

    2009-06-01

    Solutions of selected household products were tested for their effectiveness against Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Salmonella Typhimurium. Hydrogen peroxide (1.5 and 3%), vinegar (2.5 and 5% acetic acid), baking soda (11, 33, and 50% sodium bicarbonate), household bleach (0.0314, 0.0933, and 0.670% sodium hypochlorite), 5% acetic acid (prepared from glacial acetic acid), and 5% citric acid solutions were tested against the three pathogens individually (five-strain composites of each, 10(8) CFU/ml) by using a modified AOAC International suspension test at initial temperatures of 25 and 55degrees C for 1 and 10 min. All bleach solutions (pH 8.36 to 10.14) produced a >5-log reduction of all pathogens tested after 1 min at 25 degrees C, whereas all baking soda solutions (pH 7.32 to 7.55) were ineffective (<1-log reduction) even after 10 min at an initial temperature of 55 degrees C. After 1 min at 25 degrees C, 3% hydrogen peroxide (pH 2.75) achieved a >5-log reduction of both Salmonella Typhimurium and E. coli O157:H7, whereas undiluted vinegar (pH 2.58) had a similar effect only against Salmonella Typhimurium. Compared with 1 min at 25 degrees C, greater reductions of L. monocytogenes (P < 0.05) were obtained with all organic acid and hydrogen peroxide treatments after 10 min at an initial temperature of 55 degrees C. The efficacies of household compounds against all tested pathogens decreased in the following order: 0.0314% sodium hypochlorite > 3% hydrogen peroxide > undiluted vinegar and 5% acetic acid > 5% citric acid > baking soda (50% sodium bicarbonate). The sensitivity of the tested pathogens to all tested household compounds followed the sequence of Salmonella Typhimurium > E. coli O157: H7 > L. monocytogenes.

  6. Differences in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain invasiveness are associated with heterogeneity in SPI-1 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Clark, Leann; Perrett, Charlotte A; Malt, Layla; Harward, Caryn; Humphrey, Suzanne; Jepson, Katy A; Martinez-Argudo, Isabel; Carney, Laura J; La Ragione, Roberto M; Humphrey, Tom J; Jepson, Mark A

    2011-07-01

    Most studies on Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection focus on strains ATCC SL1344 or NTCC 12023 (ATCC 14028). We have compared the abilities of these strains to induce membrane ruffles and invade epithelial cells. S. Typhimurium strain 12023 is less invasive and induces smaller membrane ruffles on MDCK cells compared with SL1344. Since the SPI-1 effector SopE is present in SL1344 and absent from 12023, and SL1344 sopE mutants have reduced invasiveness, we investigated whether 12023 is less invasive due to the absence of SopE. However, comparison of SopE(+) and SopE(-) S. Typhimurium strains, sopE deletion mutants and 12023 expressing a sopE plasmid revealed no consistent relationship between SopE status and relative invasiveness. Nevertheless, absence of SopE was closely correlated with reduced size of membrane ruffles. A PprgH-gfp reporter revealed that relatively few of the 12023 population (and that of the equivalent strain ATCC 14028) express SPI-1 compared to other S. Typhimurium strains. Expression of a PhilA-gfp reporter mirrored that of PprgH-gfp in 12023 and SL1344, implicating reduced signalling via the transcription factor HilA in the heterogeneous SPI-1 expression of these strains. The previously unrecognized strain heterogeneity in SPI-1 expression and invasiveness has important implications for studies of Salmonella infection.

  7. Phosphate groups of lipid A are essential for Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium virulence and affect innate and adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Kong, Qingke; Six, David A; Liu, Qing; Gu, Lillian; Wang, Shifeng; Alamuri, Praveen; Raetz, Christian R H; Curtiss, Roy

    2012-09-01

    Lipid A is a key component of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria and stimulates proinflammatory responses via the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-MD2-CD14 pathway. Its endotoxic activity depends on the number and length of acyl chains and its phosphorylation state. In Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, removal of the secondary laurate or myristate chain in lipid A results in bacterial attenuation and growth defects in vitro. However, the roles of the two lipid A phosphate groups in bacterial virulence and immunogenicity remain unknown. Here, we used an S. Typhimurium msbB pagL pagP lpxR mutant, carrying penta-acylated lipid A, as the parent strain to construct a series of mutants synthesizing 1-dephosphorylated, 4'-dephosphorylated, or nonphosphorylated penta-acylated lipid A. Dephosphorylated mutants exhibited increased sensitivity to deoxycholate and showed increased resistance to polymyxin B. Removal of both phosphate groups severely attenuated the mutants when administered orally to BALB/c mice, but the mutants colonized the lymphatic tissues and were sufficiently immunogenic to protect the host from challenge with wild-type S. Typhimurium. Mice receiving S. Typhimurium with 1-dephosphorylated or nonphosphorylated penta-acylated lipid A exhibited reduced levels of cytokines. Attenuated and dephosphorylated Salmonella vaccines were able to induce adaptive immunity against heterologous (PspA of Streptococcus pneumoniae) and homologous antigens (lipopolysaccharide [LPS] and outer membrane proteins [OMPs]).

  8. Investigation and management of an outbreak of Salmonella Typhimurium DT8 associated with duck eggs, Ireland 2009 to 2011.

    PubMed

    Garvey, P; McKeown, P; Kelly, P; Cormican, M; Anderson, W; Flack, A; Barron, S; De Lappe, N; Buckley, J; Cosgrove, C; Molloy, D; O' Connor, J; O' Sullivan, P; Matthews, J; Ward, M; Breslin, A; O' Sullivan, M B; Kelleher, K; McNamara, A; Foley-Nolan, C; Pelly, H; Cloak, F

    2013-04-18

    Salmonella Typhimurium DT8 was a very rare cause of human illness in Ireland between 2000 and 2008, with only four human isolates from three patients being identified. Over a 19-month period between August 2009 and February 2011, 34 confirmed cases and one probable case of Salmonella Typhimurium DT8 were detected, all of which had an MLVA pattern 2-10-NA-12-212 or a closely related pattern. The epidemiological investigations strongly supported a linkbetween illness and exposure to duck eggs. Moreover, S. Typhimurium with an MLVA pattern indistinguishable (or closely related) to the isolates from human cases, was identified in 22 commercial and backyard duck flocks, twelve of which were linked with known human cases. A range of control measures were taken at farm level, and advice was provided to consumers on the hygienic handling and cooking of duck eggs. Although no definitive link was established with a concurrent duck egg-related outbreak of S. Typhimurium DT8 in the United Kingdom, it seems likely that the two events were related. It may be appropriate for other countries with a tradition of consuming duck eggs to consider the need for measures to reduce the risk of similar outbreaks.

  9. Cellular changes and cytokine expression in the ilea of gnotobiotic piglets resulting from peroral Salmonella typhimurium challenge.

    PubMed Central

    Trebichavský, I; Dlabac, V; Reháková, Z; Zahradnícková, M; Splíchal, I

    1997-01-01

    Two stable rough mutants of Salmonella spp. were studied as live peroral vaccines. The SF1591 mutant of S. typhimurium (Ra chemotype) protected germ-free piglets against subsequent infection with virulent smooth S. typhimurium LT2, whereas a deep-rough mutant of S. minnesota mR595 (Re chemotype) did not. We investigated cytokine and leukocyte profiles in the ilea of gnotobiotic piglets colonized for 1 week either with rough mutants alone or with rough mutants followed by S. typhimurium LT2. The ileal mucosae of piglets associated with strain SF1591 alone were not inflamed. Villi contained activated macrophages, and enterocytes expressed transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta). Subsequent infection of piglets with S. typhimurium LT2 resulted in immigration of alphabeta T cells and immunoglobulin A (IgA) response. In contrast, the ileal mucosae of piglets associated with strain mR595 alone expressed heat shock proteins and inflammatory cytokines but not TGF-beta. Acellular villi contained numerous gammadelta T cells but no alphabeta T cells. After subsequent challenge with the LT2 strain, most piglets died of sepsis. Intestinal mucosae contained IgG but no IgA. These findings suggest the importance of cytokine signals in the regulation of intestinal responses against Salmonella infection. PMID:9393822

  10. The transcriptional programme of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium reveals a key role for tryptophan metabolism in biofilms

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Biofilm formation enhances the capacity of pathogenic Salmonella bacteria to survive stresses that are commonly encountered within food processing and during host infection. The persistence of Salmonella within the food chain has become a major health concern, as biofilms can serve as a reservoir for the contamination of food products. While the molecular mechanisms required for the survival of bacteria on surfaces are not fully understood, transcriptional studies of other bacteria have demonstrated that biofilm growth triggers the expression of specific sets of genes, compared with planktonic cells. Until now, most gene expression studies of Salmonella have focused on the effect of infection-relevant stressors on virulence or the comparison of mutant and wild-type bacteria. However little is known about the physiological responses taking place inside a Salmonella biofilm. Results We have determined the transcriptomic and proteomic profiles of biofilms of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. We discovered that 124 detectable proteins were differentially expressed in the biofilm compared with planktonic cells, and that 10% of the S. Typhimurium genome (433 genes) showed a 2-fold or more change in the biofilm compared with planktonic cells. The genes that were significantly up-regulated implicated certain cellular processes in biofilm development including amino acid metabolism, cell motility, global regulation and tolerance to stress. We found that the most highly down-regulated genes in the biofilm were located on Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 2 (SPI2), and that a functional SPI2 secretion system regulator (ssrA) was required for S. Typhimurium biofilm formation. We identified STM0341 as a gene of unknown function that was needed for biofilm growth. Genes involved in tryptophan (trp) biosynthesis and transport were up-regulated in the biofilm. Deletion of trpE led to decreased bacterial attachment and this biofilm defect was restored by exogenous

  11. Survival of artificially inoculated Escherichia coli and Salmonella Typhimurium on the surface of raw poultry products subjected to crust freezing.

    PubMed

    Chaves, B D; Han, I Y; Dawson, P L; Northcutt, J K

    2011-12-01

    Escherichia coli and Salmonella spp. are ubiquitous in the poultry production environment, and hence, their transmission to poultry products is of concern. Industry has widely used freezing as a strategy to halt pathogen growth, and more recently, crust freezing has been suggested as a means to improve mechanical operations, quality, and safety of poultry products. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of crust freezing on the survival of Escherichia coli and Salmonella Typhimurium that were artificially inoculated on the surface of raw poultry products with or without adhering skin. Ampicillin-resistant (AR) E. coli JM 109 and nalidixic acid-resistant (NAR) Salmonella Typhimurium were used in the experiments. A set of cultures was subjected to cold-shock stress by storage at 4°C for 10 d. After being either cold-shocked or non-cold-shocked, commercial chicken breasts without skin and chicken thighs with skin were inoculated in separate experiments with each bacterium. Samples were crust frozen at -85°C for 20 min or completely frozen at -85°C for 60 min. The E. coli and Salmonella Typhimurium were recovered on appropriate selective and nonselective media containing the corresponding antibiotic. Log reductions and extent of injury were calculated and treatments were compared using ANOVA. No significant differences were observed in the reduction of cold-shocked or non-cold-shocked bacteria on products with or without skin that were crust or completely frozen. The average reduction for E. coli was 0.15 log(10) cfu/mL of rinse, and for Salmonella Typhimurium 0.10 log(10) cfu/mL of rinse; therefore, none of the final reductions were greater than the desired target (1 log). Bacterial cell injury was not significantly different (P > 0.05) among any of the treatments. Data showed no practical significance for initial reduction of these pathogens from crust freezing and thus, this technology should not be considered as a strategy for the reduction of E

  12. RNA-seq analysis of prophage induction in multidrug-resistant salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium DT104 following exposure to the agricultural antibiotic carbadox

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Non-typhoidal Salmonella is a leading cause of U.S. foodborne disease and food-related deaths. Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 contains 5 prophages in the genome that may be induced to produce phage under various environmental conditions, including antibiotic exposure. We inve...

  13. Differences in Pathogenesis for Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in the Mouse Versus the Swine Model Identify Bacterial Gene Products Required for Systemic but not Gastrointestinal Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Over the last several decades, the mouse model of Typhoid fever has been an extremely productive model to investigate Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium pathogenesis. The mouse is the paradigm for investigating systemic disease due to infection by Salmonella; however, the swine model of gastro...

  14. Evaluation of the addition of charcoals to broiler diets on the recovery of Salmonella Typhimurium during grow-out and processing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two experiments evaluated prebiotics added to feed on the recovery of Salmonella in broilers during grow-out and processing. In experiment 1, "seeder" chicks were inoculated with Salmonella Typhimurium and placed with penmates. Treatments were: basal control, 0.3% bamboo charcoal, 0.6% bamboo charco...

  15. Colonization of internal organs by Salmonella serovars Heidelberg and Typhimurium in experimentally infected laying hens housed in enriched colony cages at different stocking densities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Contaminated eggs produced by infected commercial laying flocks are often implicated as sources of human infections with Salmonella Enteritidis, but Salmonella serovars Heidelberg and Typhimurium have also been associated with egg-transmitted illness. Contamination of the edible contents of eggs is ...

  16. Complete Genome Sequence of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Strain SO3 (Sequence Type 302) Isolated from a Baby with Meningitis in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Puente, José L.; Calva, Edmundo; Zaidi, Mussaret B.

    2016-01-01

    The complete genome of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain SO3 (sequence type 302), isolated from a fatal meningitis infection in Mexico, was determined using PacBio technology. The chromosome hosts six complete prophages and is predicted to harbor 51 genomic islands, including 13 pathogenicity islands (SPIs). It carries the Salmonella virulence plasmid (pSTV). PMID:27103717

  17. Heat shock and cold shock treatments affect the survival of Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella Typhimurium exposed to disinfectants.

    PubMed

    Lin, Meng-Hsuan; Chiang, Ming-Lun; Pan, Chorng-Liang; Chou, Cheng-Chun

    2012-04-01

    The foodborne pathogens Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella Typhimurium were subjected to heat shock at 48°C for 10 and 30 min, respectively, and then cold shocked at 15°C for 3 h. The effect of these shocks on the viability of test organisms exposed to chlorine dioxide and quaternary ammonium compounds was then determined. After exposure to the disinfectants, the viable population of each test organism, regardless of heat shock or cold shock treatment, decreased as the exposure period was extended. Both heat shock and cold shock treatments reduced the susceptibility of L. monocytogenes to both disinfectants at 25°C. However, for Salmonella Typhimurium, exposure to the chlorine dioxide disinfectant or quaternary ammonium compounds at 25°C significantly reduced (P < 0.05) survival of heat-shocked cells but significantly increased (P < 0.05) survival of cold-shocked cells compared with control cells. Survival of both L. monocytogenes and Salmonella Typhimurium generally was reduced after exposure to disinfectants at 40°C compared with 25°C.

  18. Synthesis of Metallo-β-Lactamase VIM-2 Is Associated with a Fitness Reduction in Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Cordeiro, Nicolás F.; Chabalgoity, José A.; Yim, Lucía

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance, especially due to β-lactamases, has become one of the main obstacles in the correct treatment of Salmonella infections; furthermore, antibiotic resistance determines a gain of function that may encompass a biological cost, or fitness reduction, to the resistant bacteria. The aim of this work was to determine in vitro if the production of the class B β-lactamase VIM-2 determined a fitness cost for Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. To that end the gene blaVIM-2 was cloned into the virulent strain S. Typhimurium SL1344, using both the tightly regulated pBAD22 vector and the natural plasmid pST12, for inducible and constitutive expression, respectively. Fitness studies were performed by means of motility, growth rate, invasiveness in epithelial cells, and plasmid stability. The expression of blaVIM-2 was accompanied by alterations in micro- and macroscopic morphology and reduced growth rate and motility, as well as diminished invasiveness in epithelial cells. These results suggest that VIM-2 production entails a substantial fitness cost for S. Typhimurium, which in turn may account for the extremely low number of reports of metallo-β-lactamase-producing Salmonella spp. PMID:25136026

  19. Transport and distribution of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in loamy and sandy soil monoliths with applied liquid manure.

    PubMed

    Bech, Tina B; Johnsen, Kaare; Dalsgaard, Anders; Laegdsmand, Mette; Jacobsen, Ole Hørbye; Jacobsen, Carsten S

    2010-02-01

    A leaching experiment, where liquid manure spiked with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (Tet(+)) DSM554 was applied to soil surfaces, was conducted on intact soil monoliths (60 cm in diameter and 100 cm long). A total of 6.5 x 10(10) CFU was applied to each column. We found that Salmonella serovar Typhimurium could be transported to a 1-m depth in loamy soil at concentrations reaching 1.3 x 10(5) CFU/ml of leachate. The test strain was found in concentrations ranging from 300 to 1.3(5) cells/ml in loamy soil throughout the 27 days of the experiment, while concentrations below 20 cells/ml were sporadically detected in the leachates from sandy monoliths. Real-time PCR targeting invA DNA showed a clear correspondence between the total and culturable numbers of cells in the leachate, indicating that most cells leached were viable. On day 28, distribution of Salmonella serovar Typhimurium at five depths in the four monoliths was determined. The highest recovery rate, ranging from 1.5% to 3.8% of the total applied inoculum, was found in the top 0.2 m.

  20. Murein lipoprotein is a critical outer membrane component involved in Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium systemic infection.

    PubMed

    Fadl, A A; Sha, J; Klimpel, G R; Olano, J P; Niesel, D W; Chopra, A K

    2005-02-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and Braun (murein) lipoprotein (Lpp) are major components of the outer membrane of gram-negative enteric bacteria that function as potent stimulators of inflammatory and immune responses. In a previous paper, we provided evidence that two functional copies of the lipoprotein gene (lppA and lppB) located on the chromosome of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium contributed to bacterial virulence. In this study, we characterized lppA and lppB single-knockout (SKO) mutants and compared them with an lpp double-knockout (DKO) mutant using in vitro and in vivo models. Compared to the lpp DKO mutant, which was nonmotile, the motility of the lpp SKO mutants was significantly increased (73 to 77%), although the level of motility did not reach the level of wild-type (WT) S. enterica serovar Typhimurium. Likewise, the cytotoxicity was also significantly increased when T84 human intestinal epithelial cells and RAW264.7 murine macrophages were infected with the lpp SKO mutants compared to the cytotoxicity when cells were infected with the lpp DKO mutant. The level of interleukin-8 (IL-8) in polarized T84 cells infected with the lppB SKO mutant was significantly higher (two- to threefold higher), reaching the level in cells infected with WT S. enterica serovar Typhimurium, than the level in host cells infected with the lppA SKO mutant. The lpp DKO mutant induced minimal levels of IL-8. Similarly, sera from mice infected with the lppB SKO mutant contained 4.5- to 10-fold-higher levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and IL-6; the levels of these cytokines were 1.7- to 3.0-fold greater in the lppA SKO mutant-infected mice than in animals challenged with the lpp DKO mutant. The increased cytokine levels observed with the lppB SKO mutant in mice correlated with greater tissue damage in the livers and spleens of these mice than in the organs of animals infected with the lppA SKO and lpp DKO mutants. Moreover, the lppB SKO mutant-infected mice had increased

  1. The effect of feeding diets containing permitted antibiotics on the faecal excretion of Salmonella typhimurium by experimentally infected chickens.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, H. W.; Tucker, J. F.

    1975-01-01

    Groups of 45 chickens were fed continuously on diets containing 10 or 100 mg./kg. of different 'growth-promoting' antibiotics and infected orally with a nalidixic acid-resistant mutant of Salmonella typhimurium. The amount of S. typhimurium organisms excreted in their faeces was estimated by culturing them at weekly intervals and in a standard manner on plates of brilliant green agar containing sodium nalidixate, both direct and after enrichment in selenite broth. All of four groups fed diets containing 100 mg./kg. of nitrovin in three different experiments excreted much larger amounts of S. typhimurium than did groups fed antibiotic-free diets. In some, but not all, experiments, larger amounts were also excreted by groups fed diets containing 10 mg./kg. of nitrovin or 10 or 100 mg./kg. of flavomycin or tylosin. Feeding diets containing 10 or 100 mg./kg. of virginiamycin or bacitracin either did not influence or slightly increased the amount of S. typhimiurium excreted. Two groups fed continuously on diets containing 100 or 500 mg./kg. of sulphaquinoxaline for 44 days excreted smaller amounts of the S. typhimurium organisms that did groups fed antibiotic-free diets; no sulphonamide-resistant organisms of the S. typhimurium strain were isolated from the faeces. PMID:1100715

  2. Gold nanoparticle-DNA aptamer conjugate-assisted delivery of antimicrobial peptide effectively eliminates intracellular Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Boeun; Kim, Daeyoung; Lee, Jong-Kook; Kim, Suk; Bae, Jeehyeon; Park, Yoonkyung; Lee, Kangseok

    2016-10-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are a promising new class of antibacterial compounds. However, their applications in the treatment of intracellular pathogenic bacteria have been limited by their in vivo instability and low penetrating ability into mammalian cells. Here, we report that gold nanoparticles conjugated with DNA aptamer (AuNP-Apt) efficiently delivered AMPs into mammalian living systems with enhanced stability of the AMPs. C-terminally hexahistidine-tagged A3-APO (A3-APO(His)) AMPs were loaded onto AuNPs conjugated with His-tag DNA aptamer (AuNP-Apt(His)) by simple mixing and were delivered into Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium)-infected HeLa cells, resulting in the increased viability of host cells due to the elimination of intracellular S. Typhimurium cells. Furthermore, the intravenous injection of AuNP-Apt(His) loaded with A3-APO(His) into S. Typhimurium-infected mice resulted in a complete inhibition of S. Typhimurium colonization in the mice organs, leading to 100% survival of the mice. Therefore, AuNP-Apt(His) can serve as an innovative platform for AMP therapeutics to treat intracellular bacterial infections in mammals.

  3. Immune responses to a recombinant attenuated Salmonella typhimurium strain expressing a Taenia solium oncosphere antigen TSOL18.

    PubMed

    Ding, Juntao; Zheng, Yadong; Wang, Ying; Dou, Yongxi; Chen, Xiaoyu; Zhu, Xueliang; Wang, Shuai; Zhang, Shaohua; Liu, Zhenyong; Hou, Junling; Zhai, Junjun; Yan, Hongbin; Luo, Xuenong; Cai, Xuepeng

    2013-01-01

    A tapeworm, Taenia solium, remains a great threat to human health, particularly in developing countries. The life cycle of T. solium is thought to be terminated via vaccination of intermediate hosts. In this study, we constructed a recombinant attenuated Salmonella typhimurium live vaccine strain χ4558 expressing a TSOL18 antigen. SDS-PAGE and Western blot confirmed the expression of the interest protein and its antigenic property. The recombinant strain stably propagated in vitro, of which the growth was not reversely influenced by TSOL18 protein expressed. It was also shown that mice survived 10(12) CFU of S. typhimurium χ4558, while all mice infected with 10(7) CFU of the wild-type died within five days. The mouse experiment indicated that vaccine strain χ4558 induced a high titer of specific antibody for a long time. In contrast to the controls, the vaccinated mice had an obvious augment of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes and the percentage of helper CD4(+)/CD8(+) T lymphocytes was significantly increased (p<0.01). After oral administration, S. typhimurium χ4558 was first colonized mainly in the Peyer's patches and then predominantly in the mesenteric lymph nodes and spleens in the vaccinated mice. In addition, the high levels of specific anti-TSOL18 antibodies were also observed in pigs administrated with S. typhimurium χ4558. Collectively, these results demonstrate the possibility of use of an attenuated S. typhimurium strain as a vector to deliver protective antigens of T. solium.

  4. Genome and Transcriptome Adaptation Accompanying Emergence of the Definitive Type 2 Host-Restricted Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Pathovar

    PubMed Central

    Kingsley, Robert A.; Kay, Sally; Connor, Thomas; Barquist, Lars; Sait, Leanne; Holt, Kathryn E.; Sivaraman, Karthi; Wileman, Thomas; Goulding, David; Clare, Simon; Hale, Christine; Seshasayee, Aswin; Harris, Simon; Thomson, Nicholas R.; Gardner, Paul; Rabsch, Wolfgang; Wigley, Paul; Humphrey, Tom; Parkhill, Julian; Dougan, Gordon

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium definitive type 2 (DT2) is host restricted to Columba livia (rock or feral pigeon) but is also closely related to S. Typhimurium isolates that circulate in livestock and cause a zoonosis characterized by gastroenteritis in humans. DT2 isolates formed a distinct phylogenetic cluster within S. Typhimurium based on whole-genome-sequence polymorphisms. Comparative genome analysis of DT2 94-213 and S. Typhimurium SL1344, DT104, and D23580 identified few differences in gene content with the exception of variations within prophages. However, DT2 94-213 harbored 22 pseudogenes that were intact in other closely related S. Typhimurium strains. We report a novel in silico approach to identify single amino acid substitutions in proteins that have a high probability of a functional impact. One polymorphism identified using this method, a single-residue deletion in the Tar protein, abrogated chemotaxis to aspartate in vitro. DT2 94-213 also exhibited an altered transcriptional profile in response to culture at 42°C compared to that of SL1344. Such differentially regulated genes included a number involved in flagellum biosynthesis and motility. PMID:23982073

  5. Polymorphonuclear leukocyte migration across model intestinal epithelia enhances Salmonella typhimurium killing via the epithelial derived cytokine, IL-6.

    PubMed

    Nadeau, William J; Pistole, Thomas G; McCormick, Beth A

    2002-11-01

    The host response to Salmonella typhimurium involves movement of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) across the epithelium and into the intestinal lumen. Following their arrival in the lumen, the PMN attempt to combat bacterial infection by activating antimicrobial defenses such as granule release, oxidative burst, phagocytosis, and cell signaling. We sought to examine PMN-S. typhimurium interaction following PMN arrival in the lumenal compartment. Here, for the first time, we demonstrate that PMN that have transmigrated across model intestinal epithelia have an enhanced ability to kill S. typhimurium. Our data provide evidence to indicate that the extracellular release of the primary and secondary granules of PMN, myeloperoxidase and lactoferrin, respectively, is correlated with enhanced bacterial killing. Furthermore, epithelial cells, during PMN transmigration, release the cytokine IL-6. IL-6 is known to increase intracellular stores of Ca(2+), and we have determined that this epithelial released cytokine is not only responsible for priming the PMN to release their granules, but also stimulating the PMN to kill S. typhimurium. These results substantiate the pathway in which PMN transmigration activates the epithelial release of IL-6, which in turn increases intracellular Ca(2+) storage. Our results, herein, extend this pathway to include an enhanced PMN granule release and an enhanced killing of S. typhimurium.

  6. N-hydroxyarylamine O-acetyltransferase of Salmonella typhimurium: proposal for a common catalytic mechanism of arylamine acetyltransferase enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, M; Igarashi, T; Kaminuma, T; Sofuni, T; Nohmi, T

    1994-01-01

    Acetyl-CoA:N-hydroxyarylamine O-acetyltransferase is an enzyme involved in the metabolic activation of N-hydroxyarylamines derived from mutagenic and carcinogenic aromatic amines and nitroarenes. The O-acetyltransferase gene of Salmonella typhimurium has been cloned, and new Ames tester substrains highly sensitive to mutagenic aromatic amines and nitroarenes have been established in our laboratory. The nucleotide sequence of the O-acetyltransferase gene was determined. There was an open reading frame of 843 nucleotides coding for a protein with a calculated molecular weight of 32,177, which was close to the molecular weight of the O-acetyltransferase protein determined by using the maxicell technique. Only the residue of Cys69 in O-acetyltransferase of S. typhimurium and its corresponding residue (Cys68) in N-acetyltransferase of higher organisms were conserved in all acetyltransferase enzymes sequenced so far. The amino acid sequence Arg-Gly-Gly-X-Cys, including the Cys69, was highly conserved. A mutant O-acetyltransferase of S. typhimurium, which contained Ala69 instead of Cys69, no longer showed the activities of O- and N-acetyltransferase. These results suggest that the Cys69 of S. typhimurium and the corresponding cysteine residues of the higher organisms are essential for the enzyme activities as an acetyl-CoA binding site. We propose a new catalytic model of acetyltransferase for S. typhimurium and the higher organisms. PMID:7889864

  7. The Structure of the Salmonella typhimurium Type III Secretion System Needle Shows Divergence from the Flagellar System

    PubMed Central

    Galkin, Vitold E.; Schmied, Wolfgang H.; Schraidt, Oliver; Marlovits, Thomas C.; Egelman, Edward H.

    2010-01-01

    The Type III Secretion System (T3SS) is essential for the infectivity of many pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria. The T3SS contains proteins that form a channel in the inner and outer bacterial membranes, as well as an extracellular needle that is used for transporting and injecting effector proteins into a host cell. The homology between the T3SS and the bacterial flagellar system has been firmly established, based upon both sequence similarities between respective proteins in the two systems and the structural homology of the higher-order assemblies. It has previously been shown that the Shigella flexneri needle has a helical symmetry of ~ 5.6 subunits per turn, which is quite similar to that of the most intensively studied flagellar filament, from Salmonella typhimurium, which has ~ 5.5 subunits per turn. We now show that the S. typhimurium needle, expected by homology arguments to be more similar to the S. typhimurium flagellar filament than is the needle from Shigella, actually has ~ 6.3 subunits per turn. It is not currently understood how host cell contact, made at the tip of the needle, is communicated to the secretory system at the base. In contrast to the S. typhimurium flagellar filament, which shows a nearly crystalline order, the S. typhimurium needle has a highly variable symmetry, which could be used to transmit information about host cell contact. PMID:20060835

  8. Gold nanoparticle-DNA aptamer conjugate-assisted delivery of antimicrobial peptide effectively eliminates intracellular Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Boeun; Kim, Daeyoung; Lee, Jong-Kook; Kim, Suk; Bae, Jeehyeon; Park, Yoonkyung; Lee, Kangseok

    2016-10-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are a promising new class of antibacterial compounds. However, their applications in the treatment of intracellular pathogenic bacteria have been limited by their in vivo instability and low penetrating ability into mammalian cells. Here, we report that gold nanoparticles conjugated with DNA aptamer (AuNP-Apt) efficiently delivered AMPs into mammalian living systems with enhanced stability of the AMPs. C-terminally hexahistidine-tagged A3-APO (A3-APO(His)) AMPs were loaded onto AuNPs conjugated with His-tag DNA aptamer (AuNP-Apt(His)) by simple mixing and were delivered into Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium)-infected HeLa cells, resulting in the increased viability of host cells due to the elimination of intracellular S. Typhimurium cells. Furthermore, the intravenous injection of AuNP-Apt(His) loaded with A3-APO(His) into S. Typhimurium-infected mice resulted in a complete inhibition of S. Typhimurium colonization in the mice organs, leading to 100% survival of the mice. Therefore, AuNP-Apt(His) can serve as an innovative platform for AMP therapeutics to treat intracellular bacterial infections in mammals. PMID:27424215

  9. Differential innate immune responses of bovine peripheral blood leukocytes to Salmonella enterica serovars Dublin, Typhimurium, and Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Pan, Deng; Rostagno, Marcos H; Ebner, Paul D; Eicher, Susan D

    2015-05-15

    The majority of Salmonella serovars cause no clinical disease in cattle, while some are associated with severe disease. The objective of the current study was to determine the innate immune responses of bovine peripheral blood leukocytes exposed to Salmonella enterica serovar Dublin (bovine-specific), Salmonella typhimurium (murine adapted, but zoonotic), and Salmonella enteritidis (poultry host-adapted) in 3-week-old calves. All Salmonella exposures increased cell surface CD14 and CD18 regardless of serovar. The greatest CD14 marker mean fluorescence was in monocytes and the greatest mean fluorescent of the marker mean was in neutrophils. Phagocytosis increased with all serovars, but was not different among them. Neutrophils had the greatest marker mean fluorescence for phagocytosis, with all serovars being equal. Oxidative burst increased in all serovars compared to control cells, but were not different among the serovars. Neutrophils and monocytes were similar in the oxidative burst, with limited oxidative burst detected in the primarily lymphocyte population. mRNA expression of TNF-α, IL-8, and IL-12, increased above the control cells whereas none of these serovars affected mRNA expression of TLR4. TNF-α was greatest in S. enterica and S. typhimurium, compared to Salmonella dublin. In contrast, IL-8 was expressed more in S. dublin than S. typhiurium, with S. Enteriditus intermediary. These results show while cell surface markers, phagocytosis, and oxidative burst were largely unaffected by serovar, cytokine and chemokine expression differed among the Salmonella serovars. It appears that internal responses of the cells differ, rather than cell recognition, creating pathogenicity differences among of the serovars, even in the neonate with developing immunity.

  10. Insertion of a 59 amino acid peptide in Salmonella Typhimurium membrane results in loss of virulence in mice.

    PubMed

    Porta, Amalia; Morello, Silvana; Granata, Ilaria; Iannone, Raffaella; Maresca, Bruno

    2014-11-01

    We demonstrated previously that expression of a single trans-membrane region of the Δ(12) -desaturase gene of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (Salmonella Typhimurium) altered the membrane physical state of this pathogen, induced a significant change in the pattern of mRNA transcription of major heat shock genes, and inhibited pathogen growth inside murine macrophages. In this study, we demonstrate that injection of the modified Salmonella strain [Stm(pBAD200)] into C57Bl6j mice is safe. Survival of mice was associated with bacterial clearance, an increased number of splenic leukocytes, and high levels of interleukin-12, interferon γ and tumor necrosis factor α in spleens as well as in sera. Furthermore, Stm(pBAD200)-injected mice developed a Salmonella-specific antibody and Th1-like responses. Mice challenged with Stm(pBAD200) are protected from systemic infection with Salmonella wild-type. Similarly, mice infected with Stm(pBAD200) by the oral route survived when challenged with an oral lethal dose of Salmonella wild-type. The avirulent Stm(pBAD200) phenotype is associated with a remarkable change in the expression of the hilC, hilD, hilA, invF and phoP genes, among others, whose products are required for invasion and replication of Salmonella inside phagocytic cells. These data demonstrate the use of trans-membrane peptides to generate attenuated strains, providing a potential novel strategy to develop vaccines for both animal and human use.

  11. Development of a faradic impedimetric immunosensor for the detection of Salmonella typhimurium in milk.

    PubMed

    Mantzila, Aikaterini G; Maipa, Vassiliki; Prodromidis, Mamas I

    2008-02-15

    The development of a faradic impedimetric immunosensor for the detection of S. typhimurium in milk is described for first time. Polyclonal anti-Salmonella was cross-linked, in the presence of glutaraldehyde, on gold electrodes modified with a single 11-amino-1-undecanethiol (MUAM) self-assembled monolayer (SAM) or a mixed SAM of MUAM and 6-mercapto-1-hexanol at a constant 1 + 3 proportion, respectively. The mixed SAM was also deposited in the presence of triethylamine, which was used to prevent the formation of interplane hydrogen bonds among amine-terminated thiols. The effect of the different surface modifications on both the sensitivity and the selectivity of the immunosensors was investigated. The alteration of the interfacial features of the electrodes due to different modification or recognition steps, was measured by faradic electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in the presence of a hexacyanoferrate(II)/(III) redox couple. A substantial amplification of the measuring signal was achieved by performing the immunoreaction directly in culture samples. This resulted in immunosensors with great analytical features, as follows: (i) high sensitivity; the response of the immunosensors increases with respect to the detection time as a consequence of the simultaneous proliferation of the viable bacteria cells in the tested samples; (ii) validity; the response of the immunosensors is practically insensitive to the presence of dead cells; (iii) working simplicity; elimination of various centrifugation and washing steps, which are used for the isolation of bacteria cells from the culture. The proposed immunosensors were successfully used for the detection of S. typhimurium in experimentally inoculated milk samples. The effect of different postblocking agents on the performance of the immunosensors in real samples was also examined. PMID:18217725

  12. Structure of the ribosomal interacting GTPase YjeQ from the enterobacterial species Salmonella typhimurium

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, C. E.; Johnson, C.; Lamb, H. K.; Lockyer, M.; Charles, I. G.; Hawkins, A. R.; Stammers, D. K.

    2007-11-01

    The X-ray crystal structure of the GTPase YjeQ from S. typhimurium is presented and compared with those of orthologues from T. maritima and B. subtilis. The YjeQ class of P-loop GTPases assist in ribosome biogenesis and also bind to the 30S subunit of mature ribosomes. YjeQ ribosomal binding is GTP-dependent and thought to specifically direct protein synthesis, although the nature of the upstream signal causing this event in vivo is as yet unknown. The attenuating effect of YjeQ mutants on bacterial growth in Escherichia coli makes it a potential target for novel antimicrobial agents. In order to further explore the structure and function of YjeQ, the isolation, crystallization and structure determination of YjeQ from the enterobacterial species Salmonella typhimurium (StYjeQ) is reported. Whilst the overall StYjeQ fold is similar to those of the previously reported Thematoga maritima and Bacillus subtilis orthologues, particularly the GTPase domain, there are larger differences in the three OB folds. Although the zinc-finger secondary structure is conserved, significant sequence differences alter the nature of the external surface in each case and may reflect varying signalling pathways. Therefore, it may be easier to develop YjeQ-specific inhibitors that target the N- and C-terminal regions, disrupting the metabolic connectivity rather than the GTPase activity. The availability of coordinates for StYjeQ will provide a significantly improved basis for threading Gram-negative orthologue sequences and in silico compound-screening studies, with the potential for the development of species-selective drugs.

  13. Nitrocompound activation by cell-free extracts of nitroreductase-proficient Salmonella typhimurium strains.

    PubMed

    Salamanca-Pinzón, S G; Camacho-Carranza, R; Hernández-Ojeda, S L; Espinosa-Aguirre, J J

    2006-11-01

    A characterization of nitrocompounds activation by cell-free extracts (CFE) of wild-type (AB(+)), SnrA deficient (B(+)), Cnr deficient (A(+)) and SnrA/Cnr deficient (AB(-)) Salmonella typhimurium strains has been done. The Ames mutagenicity test (S. typhimurium his(+) reversion assay) was used, as well as nitroreductase (NR) activity determinations where the decrease in absorbance generated by nitrofurantoin (NFN) reduction and NADP(H) oxidation in the presence of NFN, nitrofurazone (NFZ), metronidazole (MTZ) and 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4NQO) were followed. Different aromatic and heterocyclic compounds were tested for mutagenic activation: 2-nitrofluorene (2-NF); 2,7-dinitrofluorene (2,7-DNF); 1-nitropyrene (1-NP), 1,3-dinitropyrene (1,3-DNP); 1,6-dinitropyrene (1,6-DNP); and 1,8-dinitropyrene (1,8-DNP). Differential mutagenicity was found with individual cell free extracts, being higher when the wild type or Cnr containing extract was used; nevertheless, depending on the nitrocompound, activation was found when either NR, SnrA or Cnr, were present. In addition, all nitrocompounds were more mutagenic after metabolic activation by CFE of NR proficient strains, although AB(-) extract still showed activation capacity. On the other hand, NR activity was predominantly catalyzed by wild type CFE followed by A(+), B(+) and AB(-) extracts in that order. We can conclude that results from the Ames test indicate that Cnr is the major NR, while NFN and NFZ reductions were predominantly catalyzed by SnrA. The characterization of the residual NR activity detected by the mutagenicity assay and the biochemical determinations in the AB(-) CFE needs further investigation. PMID:16998228

  14. Relevant Genes Linked to Virulence Are Required for Salmonella Typhimurium to Survive Intracellularly in the Social Amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Riquelme, Sebastián; Varas, Macarena; Valenzuela, Camila; Velozo, Paula; Chahin, Nicolás; Aguilera, Paulina; Sabag, Andrea; Labra, Bayron; Álvarez, Sergio A; Chávez, Francisco P; Santiviago, Carlos A

    2016-01-01

    The social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum has proven to be a useful model for studying relevant aspects of the host-pathogen interaction. In this work, D. discoideum was used as a model to study the ability of Salmonella Typhimurium to survive in amoebae and to evaluate the contribution of selected genes in this process. To do this, we performed infection assays using axenic cultures of D. discoideum co-cultured with wild-type S. Typhimurium and/or defined mutant strains. Our results confirmed that wild-type S. Typhimurium is able to survive intracellularly in D. discoideum. In contrast, mutants ΔaroA and ΔwaaL are defective in intracellular survival in this amoeba. Next, we included in our study a group of mutants in genes directly linked to Salmonella virulence. Of note, mutants ΔinvA, ΔssaD, ΔclpV, and ΔphoPQ also showed an impaired ability to survive intracellularly in D. discoideum. This indicates that S. Typhimurium requires a functional biosynthetic pathway of aromatic compounds, a lipopolysaccharide containing a complete O-antigen, the type III secretion systems (T3SS) encoded in SPI-1 and SPI-2, the type VI secretion system (T6SS) encoded in SPI-6 and PhoP/PhoQ two-component system to survive in D. discoideum. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the requirement of O-antigen and T6SS in the survival of Salmonella within amoebae. In addition, mutants ΔinvA and ΔssaD were internalized in higher numbers than the wild-type strain during competitive infections, suggesting that S. Typhimurium requires the T3SS encoded in SPI-1 and SPI-2 to evade phagocytosis by D. discoideum. Altogether, these results indicate that S. Typhimurium exploits a common set of genes and molecular mechanisms to survive within amoeba and animal host cells. The use of D. discoideum as a model for host-pathogen interactions will allow us to discover the gene repertoire used by Salmonella to survive inside the amoeba and to study the cellular processes that are affected

  15. Relevant Genes Linked to Virulence Are Required for Salmonella Typhimurium to Survive Intracellularly in the Social Amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum

    PubMed Central

    Riquelme, Sebastián; Varas, Macarena; Valenzuela, Camila; Velozo, Paula; Chahin, Nicolás; Aguilera, Paulina; Sabag, Andrea; Labra, Bayron; Álvarez, Sergio A.; Chávez, Francisco P.; Santiviago, Carlos A.

    2016-01-01

    The social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum has proven to be a useful model for studying relevant aspects of the host-pathogen interaction. In this work, D. discoideum was used as a model to study the ability of Salmonella Typhimurium to survive in amoebae and to evaluate the contribution of selected genes in this process. To do this, we performed infection assays using axenic cultures of D. discoideum co-cultured with wild-type S. Typhimurium and/or defined mutant strains. Our results confirmed that wild-type S. Typhimurium is able to survive intracellularly in D. discoideum. In contrast, mutants ΔaroA and ΔwaaL are defective in intracellular survival in this amoeba. Next, we included in our study a group of mutants in genes directly linked to Salmonella virulence. Of note, mutants ΔinvA, ΔssaD, ΔclpV, and ΔphoPQ also showed an impaired ability to survive intracellularly in D. discoideum. This indicates that S. Typhimurium requires a functional biosynthetic pathway of aromatic compounds, a lipopolysaccharide containing a complete O-antigen, the type III secretion systems (T3SS) encoded in SPI-1 and SPI-2, the type VI secretion system (T6SS) encoded in SPI-6 and PhoP/PhoQ two-component system to survive in D. discoideum. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the requirement of O-antigen and T6SS in the survival of Salmonella within amoebae. In addition, mutants ΔinvA and ΔssaD were internalized in higher numbers than the wild-type strain during competitive infections, suggesting that S. Typhimurium requires the T3SS encoded in SPI-1 and SPI-2 to evade phagocytosis by D. discoideum. Altogether, these results indicate that S. Typhimurium exploits a common set of genes and molecular mechanisms to survive within amoeba and animal host cells. The use of D. discoideum as a model for host–pathogen interactions will allow us to discover the gene repertoire used by Salmonella to survive inside the amoeba and to study the cellular processes that are affected

  16. Relevant Genes Linked to Virulence Are Required for Salmonella Typhimurium to Survive Intracellularly in the Social Amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Riquelme, Sebastián; Varas, Macarena; Valenzuela, Camila; Velozo, Paula; Chahin, Nicolás; Aguilera, Paulina; Sabag, Andrea; Labra, Bayron; Álvarez, Sergio A; Chávez, Francisco P; Santiviago, Carlos A

    2016-01-01

    The social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum has proven to be a useful model for studying relevant aspects of the host-pathogen interaction. In this work, D. discoideum was used as a model to study the ability of Salmonella Typhimurium to survive in amoebae and to evaluate the contribution of selected genes in this process. To do this, we performed infection assays using axenic cultures of D. discoideum co-cultured with wild-type S. Typhimurium and/or defined mutant strains. Our results confirmed that wild-type S. Typhimurium is able to survive intracellularly in D. discoideum. In contrast, mutants ΔaroA and ΔwaaL are defective in intracellular survival in this amoeba. Next, we included in our study a group of mutants in genes directly linked to Salmonella virulence. Of note, mutants ΔinvA, ΔssaD, ΔclpV, and ΔphoPQ also showed an impaired ability to survive intracellularly in D. discoideum. This indicates that S. Typhimurium requires a functional biosynthetic pathway of aromatic compounds, a lipopolysaccharide containing a complete O-antigen, the type III secretion systems (T3SS) encoded in SPI-1 and SPI-2, the type VI secretion system (T6SS) encoded in SPI-6 and PhoP/PhoQ two-component system to survive in D. discoideum. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the requirement of O-antigen and T6SS in the survival of Salmonella within amoebae. In addition, mutants ΔinvA and ΔssaD were internalized in higher numbers than the wild-type strain during competitive infections, suggesting that S. Typhimurium requires the T3SS encoded in SPI-1 and SPI-2 to evade phagocytosis by D. discoideum. Altogether, these results indicate that S. Typhimurium exploits a common set of genes and molecular mechanisms to survive within amoeba and animal host cells. The use of D. discoideum as a model for host-pathogen interactions will allow us to discover the gene repertoire used by Salmonella to survive inside the amoeba and to study the cellular processes that are affected

  17. Relevant Genes Linked to Virulence Are Required for Salmonella Typhimurium to Survive Intracellularly in the Social Amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum

    PubMed Central

    Riquelme, Sebastián; Varas, Macarena; Valenzuela, Camila; Velozo, Paula; Chahin, Nicolás; Aguilera, Paulina; Sabag, Andrea; Labra, Bayron; Álvarez, Sergio A.; Chávez, Francisco P.; Santiviago, Carlos A.

    2016-01-01

    The social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum has proven to be a useful model for studying relevant aspects of the host-pathogen interaction. In this work, D. discoideum was used as a model to study the ability of Salmonella Typhimurium to survive in amoebae and to evaluate the contribution of selected genes in this process. To do this, we performed infection assays using axenic cultures of D. discoideum co-cultured with wild-type S. Typhimurium and/or defined mutant strains. Our results confirmed that wild-type S. Typhimurium is able to survive intracellularly in D. discoideum. In contrast, mutants ΔaroA and ΔwaaL are defective in intracellular survival in this amoeba. Next, we included in our study a group of mutants in genes directly linked to Salmonella virulence. Of note, mutants ΔinvA, ΔssaD, ΔclpV, and ΔphoPQ also showed an impaired ability to survive intracellularly in D. discoideum. This indicates that S. Typhimurium requires a functional biosynthetic pathway of aromatic compounds, a lipopolysaccharide containing a complete O-antigen, the type III secretion systems (T3SS) encoded in SPI-1 and SPI-2, the type VI secretion system (T6SS) encoded in SPI-6 and PhoP/PhoQ two-component system to survive in D. discoideum. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the requirement of O-antigen and T6SS in the survival of Salmonella within amoebae. In addition, mutants ΔinvA and ΔssaD were internalized in higher numbers than the wild-type strain during competitive infections, suggesting that S. Typhimurium requires the T3SS encoded in SPI-1 and SPI-2 to evade phagocytosis by D. discoideum. Altogether, these results indicate that S. Typhimurium exploits a common set of genes and molecular mechanisms to survive within amoeba and animal host cells. The use of D. discoideum as a model for host–pathogen interactions will allow us to discover the gene repertoire used by Salmonella to survive inside the amoeba and to study the cellular processes that are affected

  18. Salmonella Typhimurium induces SPI-1 and SPI-2 regulated and strain dependent downregulation of MHC II expression on porcine alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Van Parys, Alexander; Boyen, Filip; Verbrugghe, Elin; Leyman, Bregje; Bram, Flahou; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Pasmans, Frank

    2012-06-13

    Foodborne salmonellosis is one of the most important bacterial zoonotic diseases worldwide. Salmonella Typhimurium is the serovar most frequently isolated from persistently infected slaughter pigs in Europe. Circumvention of the host's immune system by Salmonella might contribute to persistent infection of pigs. In the present study, we found that Salmonella Typhimurium strain 112910a specifically downregulated MHC II, but not MHC I, expression on porcine alveolar macrophages in a Salmonella pathogenicity island (SPI)-1 and SPI-2 dependent way. Salmonella induced downregulation of MHC II expression and intracellular proliferation of Salmonella in macrophages were significantly impaired after opsonization with Salmonella specific antibodies prior to inoculation. Furthermore, the capacity to downregulate MHC II expression on macrophages differed significantly among Salmonella strains, independently of strain specific differences in invasion capacity, Salmonella induced cytotoxicity and altered macrophage activation status. The fact that strain specific differences in MHC II downregulation did not correlate with the extent of in vitro SPI-1 or SPI-2 gene expression indicates that other factors are involved in MHC II downregulation as well. Since Salmonella strain dependent interference with the pig's immune response through downregulation of MHC II expression might indicate that certain Salmonella strains are more likely to escape serological detection, our findings are of major interest for Salmonella monitoring programs primarily based on serology.

  19. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Escherichia coli contamination of root and leaf vegetables grown in soils with incorporated bovine manure.

    PubMed

    Natvig, Erin E; Ingham, Steven C; Ingham, Barbara H; Cooperband, Leslie R; Roper, Teryl R

    2002-06-01

    Bovine manure, with or without added Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (three strains), was incorporated into silty clay loam (SCL) and loamy sand (LS) soil beds (53- by 114-cm surface area, 17.5 cm deep) and maintained in two controlled-environment chambers. The S. enterica serovar Typhimurium inoculum was 4 to 5 log CFU/g in manure-fertilized soil. The conditions in the two environmental chambers, each containing inoculated and uninoculated beds of manure-fertilized soil, simulated daily average Madison, Wis., weather conditions (hourly temperatures, rainfall, daylight, and humidity) for a 1 March or a 1 June manure application and subsequent vegetable growing seasons ending 9 August or 28 September, respectively. Core soil samples were taken biweekly from both inoculated and uninoculated soil beds in each chamber. Radishes, arugula, and carrots were planted in soil beds, thinned, and harvested. Soils, thinned vegetables, and harvested vegetables were analyzed for S. enterica serovar Typhimurium and Escherichia coli (indigenous in manure). After the 1 March manure application, S. enterica serovar Typhimurium was detected at low levels in both soils on 31 May, but not on vegetables planted 1 May and harvested 12 July from either soil. After the 1 June manure application, S. enterica serovar Typhimurium was detected in SCL soil on 7 September and on radishes and arugula planted in SCL soil on 15 August and harvested on 27 September. In LS soil, S. enterica serovar Typhimurium died at a similar rate (P >or= 0.05) after the 1 June manure application and was less often detected on arugula and radishes harvested from this soil compared to the SCL soil. Pathogen levels on vegetables were decreased by washing. Manure application in cool (daily average maximum temperature of <10 degrees C) spring conditions is recommended to ensure that harvested vegetables are not contaminated with S. enterica serovar Typhimurium. Manure application under warmer (daily average

  20. Differences in Host Cell Invasion and Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1 Expression between Salmonella enterica Serovar Paratyphi A and Nontyphoidal S. Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Elhadad, Dana; Desai, Prerak; Grassl, Guntram A.; McClelland, Michael; Rahav, Galia

    2016-01-01

    Active invasion into nonphagocytic host cells is central to Salmonella enterica pathogenicity and dependent on multiple genes within Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1). Here, we explored the invasion phenotype and the expression of SPI-1 in the typhoidal serovar S. Paratyphi A compared to that of the nontyphoidal serovar S. Typhimurium. We demonstrate that while S. Typhimurium is equally invasive under both aerobic and microaerobic conditions, S. Paratyphi A invades only following growth under microaerobic conditions. Transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq), reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR), Western blot, and secretome analyses established that S. Paratyphi A expresses much lower levels of SPI-1 genes and secretes lesser amounts of SPI-1 effector proteins than S. Typhimurium, especially under aerobic growth. Bypassing the native SPI-1 regulation by inducible expression of the SPI-1 activator, HilA, considerably elevated SPI-1 gene expression, host cell invasion, disruption of epithelial integrity, and induction of proinflammatory cytokine secretion by S. Paratyphi A but not by S. Typhimurium, suggesting that SPI-1 expression is naturally downregulated in S. Paratyphi A. Using streptomycin-treated mice, we were able to establish substantial intestinal colonization by S. Paratyphi A and showed moderately higher pathology and intestinal inflammation in mice infected with S. Paratyphi A overexpressing hilA. Collectively, our results reveal unexpected differences in SPI-1 expression between S. Paratyphi A and S. Typhimurium, indicate that S. Paratyphi A host cell invasion is suppressed under aerobic conditions, and suggest that lower invasion in aerobic sites and suppressed expression of immunogenic SPI-1 components contributes to the restrained inflammatory infection elicited by S. Paratyphi A. PMID:26857569