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Sample records for aeruginosa serratia marcescens

  1. Hospital Isolates of Serratia marcescens Transferring Ampicillin, Carbenicillin, and Gentamicin Resistance to Other Gram-Negative Bacteria Including Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Olexy, Vera M.; Bird, Thomas J.; Grieble, Hans G.; Farrand, Stephen K.

    1979-01-01

    Thirteen independent isolates of Serratia marcescens associated with nosocomial urinary tract infections were obtained from the clinical microbiology laboratory at Hines Veterans Administration Hospital. The isolates were resistant to at least ampicillin, carbenicillin, gentamicin, and tobramycin. They could be divided into two groups on the basis of their antibiotypes. Group I (9 strains) showed resistance to 13 antibiotics, including 3 beta-lactams, 6 aminoglycosides, tetracycline, sulfonamide, trimethoprim, and polymyxin B. Group II (4 strains) was resistant to 11 antibiotics, including 3 beta-lactams, 5 aminoglycosides, sulfonamide, trimethoprim, and polymyxin B. Donors from both groups transferred resistance traits to Escherichia coli. Transconjugants from matings with group II donors all acquired resistance to nine antibiotics, including the three beta-lactams, five aminoglycosides, and sulfonamide. Transconjugants from matings with group I donors were of varied antibiotypes, inheriting resistance to up to 11 of the 13 antibiotics. Resistances to trimethoprim and polymyxin B were never observed to transfer. E. coli transconjugants of each group were capable of transferring multiple-antibiotic resistance to several other members of the family Enterobacteriaceae. All group II S. marcescens and E. coli donors and all group I S. marcescens donors transferred carbenicillin, streptomycin, kanamycin, gentamicin, tobramycin, and sisomicin resistance to Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The results suggest that these S. marcescens strains harbor R factors of a broader host range than previously reported. PMID:106772

  2. Comparative in vitro synergistic activity of new beta-lactam antimicrobial agents and amikacin against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Serratia marcescens.

    PubMed Central

    Kurtz, T O; Winston, D J; Bruckner, D A; Martin, W J

    1981-01-01

    The in vitro synergistic activities of moxalactam, cefoperazone, or cefotaxime in combination with amikacin or piperacillin were compared against aminoglycoside-susceptible and aminoglycoside-resistant isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Serratia marcescens by the checkerboard agar dilution method. All antimicrobial combinations demonstrated some synergy, and no antagonism was observed. Moxalactam plus amikacin and piperacillin plus amikacin were most frequently synergistic (two-thirds of the isolates inhibited synergistically by each combination), whereas combinations of moxalactam, cefotaxime, or cefoperazone with piperacillin were synergistic against only 18 to 25% of the isolates. Moxalactam plus amikacin was the combination most often synergistic for amikacin-susceptible P. aeruginosa, and piperacillin plus amikacin was the combination most frequently synergistic for amikacin-resistant P. aeruginosa and amikacin-susceptible S. marcescens. These results demonstrate frequent in vitro synergistic activity between the new beta-lactam agents and amikacin (especially moxalactam or piperacillin with amikacin), but comparative clinical trials are needed to establish the relative efficacy and toxicity of these combinations. PMID:6792982

  3. Killing of Serratia marcescens biofilms with chloramphenicol.

    PubMed

    Ray, Christopher; Shenoy, Anukul T; Orihuela, Carlos J; González-Juarbe, Norberto

    2017-03-29

    Serratia marcescens is a Gram-negative bacterium with proven resistance to multiple antibiotics and causative of catheter-associated infections. Bacterial colonization of catheters mainly involves the formation of biofilm. The objectives of this study were to explore the susceptibility of S. marcescens biofilms to high doses of common antibiotics and non-antimicrobial agents. Biofilms formed by a clinical isolate of S. marcescens were treated with ceftriaxone, kanamycin, gentamicin, and chloramphenicol at doses corresponding to 10, 100 and 1000 times their planktonic minimum inhibitory concentration. In addition, biofilms were also treated with chemical compounds such as polysorbate-80 and ursolic acid. S. marcescens demonstrated susceptibility to ceftriaxone, kanamycin, gentamicin, and chloramphenicol in its planktonic form, however, only chloramphenicol reduced both biofilm biomass and biofilm viability. Polysorbate-80 and ursolic acid had minimal to no effect on either planktonic and biofilm grown S. marcescens. Our results suggest that supratherapeutic doses of chloramphenicol can be used effectively against established S. marcescens biofilms.

  4. Formation and Purification of Serratia marcescens Arylsulfatase

    PubMed Central

    Murooka, Yoshikatsu; Yim, Moo-Hyun; Harada, Tokuya

    1980-01-01

    The effects of culture conditions on arylsulfatase production by six strains of the genus Serratia were studied. Synthesis of arylsulfatases in all six strains was repressed in media with inorganic sulfate or methionine as the sole source of sulfur and derepressed by the addition of tyramine. Serratia marcescens IFO 3046 grew most rapidly and produced a high level of arylsulfatase when cultured on mannitol with inorganic sulfate and tyramine. The derepressed synthesis of arylsulfatase in S. marcescens was not subject to strong catabolite repression. The molecular weight of purified arylsulfatase was determined to be between 46,000 and 49,000. Arylsulfatase from S. marcescens differed in Km and Vmax values, substrate specificities, fluoride inhibition, and electrophoretic mobility from the enzyme from K. aerogenes, but had the same molecular weight as the latter. PMID:16345546

  5. Serratia marcescens osteomyelitis in Cushing's disease.

    PubMed

    Martins, Hugo F G; Raposo, Alexandra; Baptista, Isabel; Almeida, Julio

    2015-11-30

    We report a case of a 46-year-old man with fever, hypotension and arthralgias of the ankles and knees after brain surgery for a pituitary tumour causing Cushing's disease. Blood and urine cultures isolated Serratia marcescens; antibiotic susceptibility testing showed sensitivity to piperacillin-tazobactan and ciprofloxacin. Articular MRI showed inflammation and necrosis of both knees and ankles, and left hip and right elbow (compatible with osteomyelitis). Culture of an ankle abscess on the ankle joint was positive for Serratia marcescens. Bone scintigraphy confirmed osteomyelitic lesions. Medical treatment included antibiotics and strong opioid therapy for 14 weeks. The patient was discharged clinically improved maintaining ciprofloxacin for 24 additional weeks based on clinical and analytic recovery.

  6. Pink Breast Milk: Serratia marcescens Colonization.

    PubMed

    Valle, Cipatli Ayuzo Del; Salinas, Emilio Treviño

    2014-11-01

    Background Breast milk can turn pink with Serratia marcescens colonization, this bacterium has been associated with several diseases and even death. It is seen most commonly in the intensive care settings. Discoloration of the breast milk can lead to premature termination of nursing. We describe two cases of pink-colored breast milk in which S. marsescens was isolated from both the expressed breast milk. Antimicrobial treatment was administered to the mothers. Return to breastfeeding was successful in both the cases. Conclusions Pink breast milk is caused by S. marsescens colonization. In such cases,early recognition and treatment before the development of infection is recommended to return to breastfeeding.

  7. Induction of Yellow Pigmentation in Serratia marcescens

    PubMed Central

    Trias, Joaquim; Viñas, Miquel; Guinea, Jesús; Lorén, José G.

    1988-01-01

    The appearance of yellow pigmentation in nonpigmented strains of Serratia sp. has been demonstrated to be due to the production of a muconic acid, 2-hydroxy-5-carboxymethylmuconic acid semialdehyde. The 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetate 2,3-dioxygenase responsible for the synthesis of this muconic acid was induced in all strains tested. Another muconic acid, the β-cis-cis-carboxymuconic acid, could also be synthesized from 3,4-dihydroxybenzoate, but this product was not colored. Mutants that were unable to grow on tyrosine and produced yellow pigment were isolated from nonpigmented strains. These mutants had properties similar to those of the yellow-pigmented strains. The ability to produce pigment may be more widespread among Serratia marcescens strains than is currently known. PMID:16347803

  8. Partial characterization of Serratia marcescens nosocomial strains.

    PubMed

    Coria-Jiménez, V R; Villa-Tanaka, L; Ortíz-Torres, C

    1991-01-01

    A nosocomial infection outbreak occurred in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of the Instituto Nacional de Pediatría (INP) in México City, during the months of March, April and May in 1988 Serratia marcescens was isolated as the etiological agent for this epidemic. Up to date, the source of contamination, the spreading and the pathogenic mechanisms which were involved in this outbreak remain unknown. In order to study the dynamics of the bacterial population involved in this outbreak, all strains of nosocomial S. marcescens isolated during 1988 were collected and studied. Eighty nosocomial strains were analysed. For this purpose we used four different markers: antibiotic susceptibility, presence of plasmids, exoenzyme production and pigment synthesis from a precursor. Using these markers, we were able to establish that five subpopulations of bacteria were present during the ICU outbreak, and that one of these subpopulations, VIII-A, was the most frequently isolated. A short time after this outbreak, we obtained S. marcescens isolates with similar properties which proceeded from other hospital units, suggesting intrahospital dissemination of the strain in question. We believe that, eventually, this study will allow us to establish bacterial spreading models within our institution.

  9. Serratia marcescens: an unusual pathogen associated with snakebite cellulitis.

    PubMed

    Subramani, Parimala; Narasimhamurthy, Gokul Bindiganavile; Ashokan, Bhaskaran; Madappa, Beena Prasavangada

    2013-02-15

    This study reports a case of Serratia marcescens cellulitis following a snakebite in a 50-year-old woman. The bite was on the dorsum of the right hand with symptoms of envenomation. She developed swelling and cellulitis with tissue necrosis. Wound debridement was performed.  Pus and tissue biopsy cultures yielded Serratia marcescens sensitive to fluoroquinolones, aminoglycosides, third-generation cephalosporins and carbapenems. The patient responded to anti-snake venom (ASV) therapy, ciprofloxacin, local wound management and recovered uneventfully.

  10. Serratia marcescens harboring SME-4 in Brazil: A silent threat.

    PubMed

    Cayô, Rodrigo; Leme, Rodrigo Cuiabano Paes; Streling, Ana Paula; Matos, Adriana Pereira; Nodari, Carolina Silva; Chaves, Jessica Reis Esteves; Brandão, Jorge Luiz Ferreira; de Almeida, Maíra Fernandes; Carrareto, Valério; de Castro Pereira, Marco Aurélio; de Almeida, Jean Pierre Aquino; Ferreira, Demian Candido; Gales, Ana Cristina

    2017-04-01

    The intrinsic polymyxin resistance displayed by Serratia marcescens makes the acquisition of carbapenemase encoding genes a worrisome event. This study report a SME-4-producing S. marcescens isolate causing septic shock in Brazil. The insertion of novel resistance determinants and their consequent spread in our territory is noteworthy.

  11. Necrotizing Fasciitis of the Abdominal Wall Caused by Serratia Marcescens.

    PubMed

    Lakhani, Naheed A; Narsinghani, Umesh; Kumar, Ritu

    2015-04-15

    In this article, we present the first case of necrotizing fasciitis affecting the abdominal wall caused by Serratia marcescens and share results of a focused review of S. marcescens induced necrotizing fasciitis. Our patient underwent aorto-femoral bypass grafting for advanced peripheral vascular disease and presented 3 weeks postoperatively with pain, erythema and discharge from the incision site in the left lower abdominal wall and underwent multiple debridement of the affected area. Pathology of debrided tissue indicated extensive necrosis involving the adipose tissue, fascia and skeletal muscle. Wound cultures were positive for Serratia marcescens. She was successfully treated with antibiotics and multiple surgical debridements. Since necrotizing fasciitis is a medical and surgical emergency, it is critical to examine infectivity trends, clinical characteristics in its causative spectrum. Using PubMed we found 17 published cases of necrotizing fasciitis caused by Serratia marcescens, and then analyzed patterns among those cases. Serratia marcescens is prominent in the community and hospital settings, and information on infection presentations, risk factors, characteristics, treatment, course, and complications as provided through this study can help identify cases earlier and mitigate poor outcomes. Patients with positive blood cultures and those patients where surgical intervention was not provided or delayed had a higher mortality. Surgical intervention is a definite way to establish the diagnosis of necrotizing infection and differentiate it from other entities.

  12. Serratia marcescens spinal epidural abscess formation following acupuncture.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chih-Wei; Hsu, Shun-Neng; Liu, Jhih-Syuan; Hueng, Dueng-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    The formation of spinal epidural abscess following acupuncture is very rare. We herein report the case of a 54-year-old woman who presented with progressive low back pain and fever with a root sign. She underwent surgical decompression, with an immediate improvement of the low back pain. A culture of the epidural abscess grew Serratia marcescens. One year postoperatively, magnetic resonance imaging revealed the almost complete eradication of the abscess. This case is the first case of Serratia marcescens-associated spinal epidural abscess formation secondary to acupuncture. The characteristics of spinal epidural abscess that develop after acupuncture and how to prevent such complications are also discussed.

  13. Emergence of Metallo-β-Lactamase GIM-1 in a Clinical Isolate of Serratia marcescens

    PubMed Central

    Frontzek, Andre; Pfeifer, Yvonne

    2012-01-01

    The metallo-β-lactamase GIM-1 (German imipenemase) has been found so far only in clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from Germany. Here we report the detection of blaGIM-1 in a clinical strain of Serratia marcescens that was isolated from urine, blood, and wound samples over a period of 20 months. The strain was repeatedly isolated from one patient in two German hospitals and an outpatient department located in the region in which all previously described GIM-1-producing P. aeruginosa strains were identified. PMID:22710114

  14. Serratia marcescens is injurious to intestinal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Ochieng, John B; Boisen, Nadia; Lindsay, Brianna; Santiago, Araceli; Ouma, Collins; Ombok, Maurice; Fields, Barry; Stine, O Colin; Nataro, James P

    2014-01-01

    Diarrhea causes substantial morbidity and mortality in children in low-income countries. Although numerous pathogens cause diarrhea, the etiology of many episodes remains unknown. Serratia marcescens is incriminated in hospital-associated infections, and HIV/AIDS associated diarrhea. We have recently found that Serratia spp. may be found more commonly in the stools of patients with diarrhea than in asymptomatic control children. We therefore investigated the possible enteric pathogenicity of S. marcescens in vitro employing a polarized human colonic epithelial cell (T84) monolayer. Infected monolayers were assayed for bacterial invasion, transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER), cytotoxicity, interleukin-8 (IL-8) release and morphological changes by scanning electron microscopy. We observed significantly greater epithelial cell invasion by S. marcescens compared to Escherichia coli strain HS (p = 0.0038 respectively). Cell invasion was accompanied by reduction in TEER and secretion of IL-8. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) extracellular concentration rapidly increased within a few hours of exposure of the monolayer to S. marcescens. Scanning electron microscopy of S. marcescens-infected monolayers demonstrated destruction of microvilli and vacuolization. Our results suggest that S. marcescens interacts with intestinal epithelial cells in culture and induces dramatic alterations similar to those produced by known enteric pathogens. PMID:25426769

  15. Non-contiguous multifocal vertebral osteomyelitis caused by Serratia marcescens.

    PubMed

    Lau, Jen Xin; Li, Jordan Yuanzhi; Yong, Tuck Yean

    2015-03-01

    Serratia marcescens is a common nosocomial infection but a rare cause of osteomyelitis and more so of vertebral osteomyelitis. Vertebral osteomyelitis caused by this organism has been reported in few studies. We report a case of S. marcescens vertebral discitis and osteomyelitis affecting multiple non-contiguous vertebras. Although Staphylococcus aureus is the most common cause of vertebral osteomyelitis, rare causes, such as S. marcescens, need to be considered, especially when risk factors such as intravenous heroin use, post-spinal surgery and immunosuppression are present. Therefore, blood culture and where necessary biopsy of the infected region should be undertaken to establish the causative organism and determine appropriate antibiotic susceptibility. Prompt diagnosis of S. marcescens vertebral osteomyelitis followed by the appropriate treatment can achieve successful outcomes.

  16. A rare pathogen for subacute osteomyelitis in adolescent: Serratia marcescens

    PubMed Central

    Turgut, Necmettin; Akgul, Turgut; Arzu, Ufuk; Batıbay, Sefa Giray; Ekinci, Mehmet; Şen, Cengiz; Korkmaz, Murat

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION There are various pathogens reported for osteomyelitis. Osteomyelitis is bone infection which produces pain and fever, also threatens bone instability. It can lead to nonunion. The purpose of this report was to describe a case with union delay of the tibia due to serratia marcescens osteomyelitis. Serratia marcescens is an unexpected pathogen for subacute osteomyelitis in adolescence. Because of difficulty of diagnosis, treatment can be delayed or the situation can cause complications like nonunion or loss of function. PRESENTATION OF CASE Serratia marcescens is an unexpected pathogen for subacute osteomyelitis in adolescence. Because of difficulty of diagnosis, treatment can be delayed or cause complications like nonunion or loss of function. We present a meningomyelocele female adolescent operated with distal tibia varus osteotomy for correcting ankle valgus deformity. Insufficient healing was determined at osteotomy side on radiographs. The patient's erythrocyte sedimentation rate and CRP level was slightly higher with minimal clinical inflammation. MRI examination showed abscess formation at T2 imaging. Debridement, grafting and circular external fixation was performed. Sulperazon was started for drug therapy. Union was achieved after compression and distraction osteogenesis by circular external fixator. Orthopedic surgeons should be aware of opportunistic infections like serratia and keep in mind as a probable cause of disease. DISCUSSION Osteomyelitis is one of our main problems in orthopedics. Serratia does not come to mind as a causative factor when we learn the patient has osteomyelitis. We give treatment for the most expected pathogens like staphylococcus species firstly. This shows us the importance of bone biopsies and wound culture tests. Presented case is diagnosed as serratia osteomyelitis after culture results and given treatment with antibiotics and debridement. CONCLUSION Orthopedic surgeons should be aware of opportunistic infections

  17. Plasmid-determined resistance to fosfomycin in Serratia marcescens.

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, C; Garcia, J M; Llaneza, J; Mendez, F J; Hardisson, C; Ortiz, J M

    1980-01-01

    Multiple-antibiotic-resistant strains of Serratia marcescens isolated from hospitalized patients were examined for their ability to transfer antibiotic resistance to Escherichia coli by conjugation. Two different patterns of linked transferable resistance were found among the transconjugants. The first comprised resistance to carbenicillin, streptomycin, and fosfomycin; the second, and more common, pattern included resistance to carbenicillin, streptomycin, kanamycin, gentamicin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, sulfonamide, and fosfomycin. The two types of transconjugant strains carried a single plasmid of either 57 or 97 megadaltons in size. Both of these plasmids are present in parental S. marcescens strains resistant to fosfomycin. The 57-megadalton plasmid was transformed into E. coli. Images PMID:7004337

  18. Pink hypopyon in a patient with Serratia marcescens corneal ulceration.

    PubMed

    Stefater, James A; Borkar, Durga S; Chodosh, James

    2015-01-01

    A 65-year-old woman presented to the emergency ward at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary with 2 days of redness, irritation, photophobia, and diminished vision in her left eye. She was found to have a large central corneal ulcer with a small hypopyon. On the following day, after initiation of broad-spectrum antibiotics, the patient had improved symptoms but now had a 2-mm hypopyon that was distinctly pink in color. Cultures were positive for Serratia marcescens. A pink hypopyon, a rare occurrence, alerted the authors to a causative agent of Enterobacteriacae, either Klebsiella or Serratia. Immediate and intensive treatment was subsequently initiated.

  19. Aminoglycoside resistance patterns of Serratia marcescens strains of clinical origin.

    PubMed

    Coria-Jiménez, R; Ortiz-Torres, C

    1994-02-01

    Aminoglycoside resistance patterns of 147 Serratia marcescens strains of clinical origin were studied. All strains analysed belonged to three different bacterial populations. The periods of study and the institutions the strains were isolated from correlated significantly with the resistance patterns shown by the strains. The most frequent resistance patterns found were the following: ACC (6')-I at the Hospital Infantil de México (Children's Hospital of México), and ANT (2'') + AAC(6')-I at the Instituto Nacional de Pediatría (INPed or National Institute of Pediatrics) in Mexico City. Furthermore, the isolation frequency of aminoglycoside-sensitive strains decreased remarkably at the INPed over a 12-year period. These results suggest that there has been a selection of Serratia marcescens strains that are very resistant to aminoglycosides.

  20. Identification of a Csr system in Serratia marcescens 2170.

    PubMed

    Ito, Manabu; Nomura, Kazuki; Sugimoto, Hayuki; Watanabe, Takeshi; Suzuki, Kazushi

    2014-01-01

    The carbon storage regulator (Csr) global regulatory system is conserved in many eubacteria and coordinates the expression of various genes that facilitate adaptation during the major physiological growth phase. The Csr system in Escherichia coli comprises an RNA-binding protein, CsrA; small non-coding RNAs, CsrB and CsrC; and a decay factor for small RNAs, CsrD. In this study, we identified the Csr system in Serratia marcescens 2170. S. marcescens CsrA was 97% identical to E. coli CsrA. CsrB and CsrC RNAs had typical stem-loop structures, including a GGA motif that is the CsrA binding site. CsrD was composed of N-terminal two times transmembrane region and HAMP-like, GGDEF, and EAL domains. Overexpression of S. marcescens csr genes complemented the phenotype of E. coli csr mutants. S. marcescens CsrD affected the decay of CsrB and CsrC RNAs in E. coli. These results suggest that the Csr system in S. marcescens is composed of an RNA-binding protein, two Csr small RNAs, and a decay factor for Csr small RNAs.

  1. Genetic analysis of the chitinase system of Serratia marcescens 2170.

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, T; Kimura, K; Sumiya, T; Nikaidou, N; Suzuki, K; Suzuki, M; Taiyoji, M; Ferrer, S; Regue, M

    1997-01-01

    To carry out a genetic analysis of the degradation and utilization of chitin by Serratia marcescens 2170, various Tn5 insertion mutants with characteristic defects in chitinase production were isolated and partially characterized. Prior to the isolation of the mutants, proteins secreted into culture medium in the presence of chitin were analyzed. Four chitinases, A, B, C1, and C2, among other proteins, were detected in the culture supernatant of S. marcescens 2170. All four chitinases and a 21-kDa protein (CBP21) lacking chitinase activity showed chitin binding activity. Cloning and sequencing analysis of the genes encoding chitinases A and B of strain 2170 revealed extensive similarities to those of other strains of S. marcescens described previously. Tn5 insertion mutagenesis of strain 2170 was carried out, and mutants which formed altered clearing zones of colloidal chitin were selected. The obtained mutants were divided into five classes as follows: mutants with (i) no clearing zones, (ii) fuzzy clearing zones, (iii) large clearing zones, (iv) delayed clearing zones, and (v) small clearing zones. Preliminary characterization suggested that some of these mutants have defects in chitinase excretion, a negatively regulating mechanism of chitinase gene expression, an essential factor for chitinase gene expression, and a structural gene for a particular chitinase. These mutants could allow researchers to identify the genes involved in the degradation and utilization of chitin by S. marcescens 2170. PMID:9371460

  2. Cloning of a Serratia marcescens Gene Encoding Chitinase

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, R. L.; McPherson, S. A.; Drahos, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    Serratia marcescens, a chitinase-producing microorganism, was shown to produce five unique chitinolytic proteins with subunit molecular masses of 21, 36, 48, 52, and 57 kilodaltons. A cosmid library of S. marcescens DNA was constructed in the broad-host-range cosmid pLAFR1 and screened in Escherichia coli for clones capable of degrading chitin. A total of four independent clones (22- to 27-kilobase inserts) were isolated, characterized by restriction endonuclease digestion, and shown to share a common 9.5-kilobase EcoR1 fragment apparently encoding the same 57-kilodalton chitinase, the most abundant chitinase produced by S. marcescens. Chitinase expression from these constructs in both E. coli and Pseudomonas fluorescens 701E1 is apparently driven by an S. marcescens promoter. The significantly higher chitinase levels produced in E. coli relative to those in P. fluorescens 701E1 suggest that E. coli may recognize this promoter sequence more efficiently than P. fluorescens. Images PMID:16347012

  3. [Pigmentation of Serratia marcescens and spectral properties of prodigiosin].

    PubMed

    Andreeva, I N; Ogorodnikova, T I

    2015-01-01

    Pigmentation of Serratia marcescens depends on the composition of the cultivation medium. The cultures grown on glycerol-peptone medium and on the medium with acetate are red and yellow (yellowish orange), respectively, with the color depending on the ambient pH. S. marcescens cells growth on glycerol-peptone medium (visually of red color) contain two forms of prodigiosin: the "red" and "yellow" ones with absorption maxima at 535 and 460-470 nm, respectively. The absorption spectrum of prodigiosin in the native pigment-protein complex was different from the spectrum of the pigment dissolved in ethanol and resembled that of the cell suspension in the presence of an additional absorption maximum at 500 nm.

  4. Nematicidal activity of microbial pigment from Serratia marcescens.

    PubMed

    Rahul, Suryawanshi; Chandrashekhar, Patil; Hemant, Borase; Chandrakant, Narkhede; Laxmikant, Shinde; Satish, Patil

    2014-01-01

    Ineffectiveness of available nematicides and the high damage caused by plant-parasitic nematodes result in the urgent need to find some natural remedy for their control. Bioactivity of the pigment extracted from Serratia marcescens was screened for controlling nematodes at their juvenile stage. Test pigment was found effective against juvenile stages of Radopholus similis and Meloidogyne javanica at low concentrations (LC50 values, 83 and 79 μg/mL, respectively) as compared with positive control of copper sulphate (LC50 values, 380 and 280 μg/mL, respectively). The pigment also exhibited inhibition on nematode egg-hatching ability. Characterisation of extracted pigment with TLC, FTIR, HPLC, HPTLC and spectroscopic analysis confirmed the presence of prodigiosin as a bioactive metabolite. Considering the sensory mechanism of pathogen recognition by nematodes, the use of microbial secondary metabolites can be effective for nematode control rather than using whole organism.

  5. [Serratia marcescens outbreak in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: Guayaquil, Ecuador].

    PubMed

    Soria, Claudia; Nieto, Nelson; Villacís, José E; Lainez, Sara; Cartelle, Mónica

    2016-12-01

    We report a Serratia marcescens outbreak occurred in the NICU of a pediatric hospital in Guayaquil, Ecuador. Nine cases of infection were detected, from which septicemia was developed in 55.5%. The index case was a newborn derived from another institution with septic arthritis caused by the outbreak strain. The infection rate was 17.6% and mortality rate was 33.3%. All isolates were resistant to aminoglycosides and susceptible to third generation cephalosporins and carbapenems. Clonality analysis by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) revealed the presence of two closely related clones confirming the horizontal spread. Measures were taken by the committee such as: strengthening the hand hygiene, patient hygiene and cohort studies of gastrointestinal colonization, which allowed the control of the outbreak.

  6. Serratia marcescens Bullous Cellulitis in a Splenectomized Patient: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Fournier, John B; Dabiri, Ganary; Thomas, Vinod; Skowron, Gail; Carson, Polly; Falanga, Vincent

    2016-06-01

    Serratia marcescens is a Gram-negative bacillus belonging to the Enterobacteriaceae family. Cutaneous infection with Serratia is rare, and usually occurs in immunocompromised individuals. Primary cutaneous infections are uncommon, but they are typically severe and are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The pathogenetic factors leading to S. marcescens infection are not fully understood, but contributing virulence factors include proteases, secreted exotoxins, and the formation of biofilm. We report a case of cellulitis occurring in a splenectomized patient, which led to multiple wound debridements and a transmetatarsal amputation. This dramatic case led us to review the published literature on soft tissue infections caused by S. marcescens.

  7. Purification and Characterization of a Serratia marcescens Metalloprotease

    PubMed Central

    Lyerly, David; Kreger, Arnold

    1979-01-01

    An extracellular, nonelastolytic, neutral metalloprotease of Serratia marcescens was purified by sequential ammonium sulfate precipitation, hydroxyapatite adsorption chromatography, flat-bed isoelectric focusing, and Sephadex G-100 gel filtration. The protease preparation had a 280/260 nm absorbance ratio of 1.8, was free of detectable amounts of endotoxin, carbohydrate, phosphorus, and other known extracellular enzymes of S. marcescens, and was homogeneous by Ouchterlony double immunodiffusion and Grabar-Williams immunoelectrophoresis. Crossed immunoelectrophoresis, thin-layer electrofocusing in polyacrylamide gel, and polyacrylamide disc gel electrophoresis showed three to four closely migrating, Coomassie blue-staining components in the protease preparation. However, zymogram analyses of the patterns showed that protease activity was associated with each component and that the protease was, therefore, microheterogeneous. The isoelectric point and sedimentation coefficient of the protease were approximately 5.3 to 5.4 and 4.2S, respectively, and the molecular weight estimated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and by gel filtration was approximately 52,500 and 44,000, respectively. The pH optimum range, with azocasein as the substrate, was 5.5 to 7.5. The enzyme contained a high percentage of acidic amino acids, no cysteine, and 1 g-atom of Zn2+ and 7 g-atoms of Ca2+ per mol. Various heavy metal ions and chelating agents and heating at 60°C for 15 min inactivated the enzyme. Intracorneal, intratracheal, and intradermal administration of the protease into rabbits elicited rapid and extensive tissue damage. The minimum lethal intravenous dose for mice was approximately 17 mg/kg of body weight. Images PMID:37166

  8. Effects of Dimerization of Serratia marcescens Endonuclease on Water Dynamics.

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chuanying; Beck, Brian W.; Krause, Kurt; Weksberg, Tiffany E.; Pettitt, Bernard M.

    2007-02-15

    The research described in this product was performed in part in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The dynamics and structure of Serratia marcescens endonuclease and its neighboring solvent are investigated by molecular dynamics (MD). Comparisons are made with structural and biochemical experiments. The dimer form is physiologic and functions more processively than the monomer. We previously found a channel formed by connected clusters of waters from the active site to the dimer interface. Here, we show that dimerization clearly changes correlations in the water structure and dynamics in the active site not seen in the monomer. Our results indicate that water at the active sites of the dimer is less affected compared with bulk solvent than in the monomer where it has much slower characteristic relaxation times. Given that water is a required participant in the reaction, this gives a clear advantage to dimerization in the absence of an apparent ability to use both active sites simultaneously.

  9. Outbreak of a Cluster with Epidemic Behavior Due to Serratia marcescens after Colistin Administration in a Hospital Setting

    PubMed Central

    Merkier, Andrea Karina; Rodríguez, María Cecilia; Togneri, Ana; Brengi, Silvina; Osuna, Carolina; Pichel, Mariana; Cassini, Marcelo H.

    2013-01-01

    Serratia marcescens causes health care-associated infections with important morbidity and mortality. Particularly, outbreaks produced by multidrug-resistant isolates of this species, which is already naturally resistant to several antibiotics, including colistin, are usually described with high rates of fatal outcomes throughout the world. Thus, it is important to survey factors associated with increasing frequency and/or emergence of multidrug-resistant S. marcescens nosocomial infections. We report the investigation and control of an outbreak with 40% mortality due to multidrug-resistant S. marcescens infections that happened from November 2007 to April 2008 after treatment with colistin for Acinetobacter baumannii meningitis was started at hospital H1 in 2005. Since that year, the epidemiological pattern of frequently recovered species has changed, with an increase of S. marcescens and Proteus mirabilis infections in 2006 in concordance with a significant decrease of the numbers of P. aeruginosa and A. baumannii isolates. A single pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) cluster of S. marcescens isolates was identified during the outbreak. When this cluster was compared with S. marcescens strains (n = 21) from 10 other hospitals (1997 to 2010), it was also identified in both sporadic and outbreak isolates circulating in 4 hospitals in Argentina. In132::ISCR1::blaCTX-M-2 was associated with the multidrug-resistant cluster with epidemic behavior when isolated from outbreaks. Standard infection control interventions interrupted transmission of this cluster even when treatment with colistin continued in several wards of hospital H1 until now. Optimizing use of colistin should be achieved simultaneously with improved infection control to prevent the emergence of species naturally resistant to colistin, such as S. marcescens and P. mirabilis. PMID:23698525

  10. Spaceflight Causes Increased Virulence of Serratia Marcescens on a Drosophila Melanogaster Host

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharya, Sharmila; Wade, William; Clemens-Grisham, Rachel; Hosamani, Ravikumar; Bhardwaj, Shilpa R.; Lera, Matthew P.; Gresser, Amy L.

    2015-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster, or the fruit fly, has long been an important organism for Earth-based research, and is now increasingly utilized as a model system to understand the biological effects of spaceflight. Studies in Drosophila melanogaster have shown altered immune responses in 3rd instar larvae and adult males following spaceflight, changes similar to those observed in astronauts. In addition, spaceflight has also been shown to affect bacterial physiology, as evidenced by studies describing altered virulence of Salmonella typhimurium following spaceflight and variation in biofilm growth patterns for the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa during flight. We recently sent Serratia marcescens Db11, a Drosophila pathogen and an opportunistic human pathogen, to the ISS on SpaceX-5 (Fruit Fly Lab-01). S. marcescens samples were stored at 4degC for 24 days on-orbit and then allowed to grow for 120 hours at ambient station temperature before being returned to Earth. Upon return, bacteria were isolated and preserved in 50% glycerol or RNAlater. Storage, growth, and isolation for ground control samples were performed using the same procedures. Spaceflight and ground samples stored in 50% glycerol were diluted and injected into 5-7-day-old ground-born adult D. melanogaster. Lethality was significantly greater in flies injected with the spaceflight samples compared to those injected with ground bacterial samples. These results indicate a shift in the virulence profile of the spaceflight S. marcescens Db11 and will be further assessed with molecular biological analyses. Our findings strengthen the conclusion that spaceflight impacts the virulence of bacterial pathogens on model host organisms such as the fruit fly. This research was supported by NASA's ISS Program Office (ISSPO) and Space Life and Physical Sciences Research and Applications (SLPSRA).

  11. Draft genome sequence of a GES-5-producing Serratia marcescens isolated in southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Nodari, Carolina Silva; Siebert, Marina; Matte, Ursula da Silveira; Barth, Afonso Luís

    Serratia marcescens is a Gram-negative rod intrinsically resistant to polymyxins and usually associated with wound, respiratory and urinary tract infections. The whole genome of the first GES-5-producing S. marcescens isolated from a Brazilian patient was sequenced using Ion Torrent PGM System. Besides blaGES-5, we were able to identify genes encoding for other β-lactamases, for aminoglycoside modifying enzymes and for an efflux pump to tetracyclines.

  12. Compatible results obtained from biotyping and serotyping in Serratia marcescens.

    PubMed

    Grimont, P A; Grimont, F; Le Minor, S; Davis, B; Pigache, F

    1979-10-01

    The correspondence between complete serotype and biotype (P.A.D. Grimont and F. Grimont, J. Clin. Microbiol. 8:73-83, 1978) of 474 Serratia marcescens strains was studied. Of 127 serotypes, 70 were represented by two or more strains of the same serotype belonged to one biotype. However, for 91% of serotypes, strains of the same serotype belonged to one biogroup--i.e., a group of closely related biotypes. Biogroups are A1 (A1a, A1b); A2/6 (A2a, A2b, A6a, A6b); A3 (A3a, A3b, A3c, A3d); A4 (A4a, A4b); A5/8 (A5, A8a, A8b, A8c); and TCT (TCT, TT). Only two serotypes were composed of a mixture of pigmented and nonpigmented biogroups. Pigmented biogroups (A1 and A2/6) were otherwise differentiated from nonpigmented biogroups (A3, A4, A5/8, and TCT) by serotyping. Some biogroups preferentially occurred in some O serogroups: A4 in 01; A2/6 in O6, O8, and O14; and A3 in O9, O12, and O15. Three H serogroups were found to be biochemically homogeneous: H1, H7, and H20 were respectively and uniquely composed of biogroups A4, TCT, and A3. A square matrix of O versus H serogroups, with the corresponding biogroup for each O X H combination, was used for comparisons between O groups and between H groups. Identical patterns of biogroups were shown by serogroups O6, O8, and O14. Taxonomical, ecological, and practical consequences of these findings are discussed.

  13. Necrotizing Fasciitis of the Lower Extremity Caused by Serratia marcescens A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Heigh, Evelyn G; Maletta-Bailey, April; Haight, John; Landis, Gregg S

    2016-03-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare and potentially fatal infection, with mortality of up to 30%. This case report describes a patient recovering from a laryngectomy for laryngeal squamous cell cancer who developed nosocomial necrotizing fasciitis of the lower extremity due to Serratia marcescens . Only eight cases of necrotizing fasciitis exclusive to the lower extremity due to S marcescens have been previously reported. Patients with S marcescens necrotizing fasciitis of the lower extremity often have multiple comorbidities, are frequently immunosuppressed, and have a strikingly high mortality rate.

  14. Emergence of Serratia marcescens isolates possessing carbapenem-hydrolysing β-lactamase KPC-2 from China.

    PubMed

    Lin, X; Hu, Q; Zhang, R; Hu, Y; Xu, X; Lv, H

    2016-09-01

    Eighty-three carbapenem-resistant Serratia marcescens isolates were recovered from Zhejiang Provincial People's Hospital, China. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of imipenem, meropenem, and ertapenem for all isolates were 2 to >128 μg/mL. Polymerase chain reaction indicated that 63 S. marcescens isolates produced Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC)-2. Clone A (15 isolates) and clone B (41 isolates) were the two dominant clones and clone A strains were gradually replaced by clone B strains between 2011 and 2014. The results indicate that blaKPC-2-positive S. marcescens emerged in our hospital as the major mechanism of carbapenem resistance.

  15. Leishmania (Leishmania) chagasi interactions with Serratia marcescens: ultrastructural studies, lysis and carbohydrate effects.

    PubMed

    Moraes, Caroline S; Seabra, Sergio H; Castro, Daniele P; Brazil, Reginaldo P; de Souza, Wanderley; Garcia, Eloi S; Azambuja, Patrícia

    2008-04-01

    Studies on the lysis of L. chagasi caused by the bacteria Serratia marcescens were carried out. In vitro experiments demonstrated that S. marcescens variant SM 365, a prodigiosin pigment producer, lysed this species of Leishmania but variant DB11, a nonpigmented bacteria, was unable to lyse the parasite. High concentrations of d-mannose were found to protect L. chagasi markedly diminishing the lysis by S. marcescens SM 365. Promastigotes of L. chagasi bound the lectin Concanavalin A conjugated with FITC, the fluorescence was intensely found at the base of the flagellum (flagellar pocket). Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the bacteria adherence occurred mainly in the flagellar pocket. S. marcescens SM 365 formed filamentous structures, identified as biofilms, which connect the protozoan to the developing bacterial clusters, in low concentrations of bacteria after 30 min incubation time. We suggest that bacterial mannose-sensitive (MS) fimbriae are relevant to S. marcescens SM 365 in the lysis of L. chagasi.

  16. Effect of iron and salt on prodigiosin synthesis in Serratia marcescens.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverman, M. P.; Munoz, E. F.

    1973-01-01

    Iron requirements of Serratia marcescens for growth and prodigiosin synthesis are investigated. Sodium chloride of sea salt is shown to be responsible for inhibition of prodigiosin synthesis in the microorganism. The role of sodium chloride in the terminal biosynthetic pathway of the pigment is discussed.

  17. Draft Genome Sequences of Pandrug-Resistant Serratia marcescens Clinical Isolates Harboring blaNDM-1

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yancheng; Falgenhauer, Linda; Kempf, Volkhard A. J.; Hogardt, Michael; Göttig, Stephan; Imirzalioglu, Can

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The draft genome sequences of two clonal, pandrug-resistant Serratia marcescens clinical isolates were determined. The resistance phenotype was plasmid driven, as 14 of 17 resistance genes were present on large IncFIB(K), IncHI2, and IncA/C2 plasmids indicating a large pool of transmissible antibiotic resistance genes. PMID:28104656

  18. Genome Sequence of Serratia marcescens MSU97, a Plant-Associated Bacterium That Makes Multiple Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Udaondo, Zulema

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Serratia marcescens MSU97 was isolated from the Guayana region of Venezuela due to its ability to suppress plant-pathogenic oomycetes. Here, we report the genome sequence of MSU97, which produces various antibiotics, including the bacterial acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) carboxylase inhibitor andrimid, the chlorinated macrolide oocydin A, and the red linear tripyrrole antibiotic prodigiosin. PMID:28254993

  19. Necrotizing cellulitis with multiple abscesses on the leg caused by Serratia marcescens.

    PubMed

    Hau, Estelle; Bouaziz, Jean-David; Lafaurie, Matthieu; Saussine, Anne; Masson, Vincent; Rausky, Jonathan; Bagot, Martine; Guibal, Fabien

    2016-03-01

    Serratia marcescens is an unusual cause of severe skin infection initially described in immunocompromised patients. We report a case of necrotizing cellulitis of the leg caused by S marcescens in a 68-year-old woman with diabetes mellitus and a history of chronic lymphoedema of the leg. We reviewed the literature and found 49 cases of severe skin infections from S marcescens that included 20 cases of necrotizing fasciitis (NF) as well as 29 cases of severe skin infections without NF (non-NF cases). Patients were immunocompromised in 59% to 70% of cases. The mortality rate was high in NF cases (60%) versus non-NF cases (3%). Surgery was required in 95% of NF cases and in 24% of non-NF cases. The other clinical manifestations of S marcescens skin infection reported in the literature included disseminated papular eruptions in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus with folliculitis on the trunk. Serratia marcescens is naturally resistant to amoxicillin alone and amoxicillin associated with clavulanic acid. Broad-spectrum antibiotics are indicated to treat S marcescens skin infections, and surgery should be promptly considered in cases of severe skin infections if appropriate antibiotic therapy does not lead to rapid improvement.

  20. Role of Serratia marcescens ACE2 on diesel degradation and its influence on corrosion.

    PubMed

    Rajasekar, Aruliah; Babu, Thambidurai Ganesh; Pandian, Shunmugiah Thevar Karutha; Maruthamuthu, Sundaram; Palaniswamy, Narayanan; Rajendran, Annamalai

    2007-09-01

    A facultative anaerobic species Serratia marcescens ACE2 isolated from the corrosion products of diesel transporting pipeline in North West, India was identified by 16S rDNA sequence analysis. The role of Serratia marcesens ACE2 on biodegradation of diesel and its influence on the corrosion of API 5LX steel has been elucidated. The degrading strain ACE2 is involved in the process of corrosion of steel API 5LX and also utilizes the diesel as an organic source. The quantitative biodegradation efficiency (BE) of diesel was 58%, calculated by gas-chromatography-mass spectrum analysis. On the basis of gas-chromatography-mass spectrum (GC-MS), Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffractometer (XRD), the involvement of Serratia marcescens on degradation and corrosion has been investigated. This basic study will be useful for the development of new approaches for detection, monitoring and control of microbial corrosion.

  1. Three consecutive outbreaks of Serratia marcescens in a neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Fleisch, Felix; Zimmermann-Baer, Urs; Zbinden, Reinhard; Bischoff, Gian; Arlettaz, Romaine; Waldvogel, Katharina; Nadal, David; Ruef, Christian

    2002-03-15

    We investigated an outbreak of Serratia marcescens in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) of the University Hospital of Zurich. S. marcescens infection was detected in 4 children transferred from the NICU to the University Children's Hospital (Zurich). All isolates showed identical banding patterns by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). In a prevalence survey, 11 of 20 neonates were found to be colonized. S. marcescens was isolated from bottles of liquid theophylline. Despite replacement of these bottles, S. marcescens colonization was detected in additional patients. Prospective collection of stool and gastric aspirate specimens revealed that colonization occurred in some babies within 24 hours after delivery. These isolates showed a different genotype. Cultures of milk from used milk bottles yielded S. marcescens. These isolates showed a third genotype. The method of reprocessing bottles was changed to thermal disinfection. In follow-up prevalence studies, 0 of 29 neonates were found to be colonized by S. marcescens. In summary, 3 consecutive outbreaks caused by 3 genetically unrelated clones of S. marcescens could be documented. Contaminated milk could be identified as the source of at least the third outbreak.

  2. Anti-biofilm activity of Pseudoalteromonas flavipulchra SktPp1 against Serratia marcescens SMJ-11

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, Faiq; Usup, Gires; Ahmad, Asmat

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to examine the anti-biofilm activity of Pseudoalteromonas flavipulchra SktPp1 crude extract against the biofilm producer, Serratia marcescens. The crude extract of P. flavipulchra SktPp1 was extracted with ethyl acetate. The sub-minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), 0.1 mg/ml, has been used in this study. The anti-biofilm activity of P. flavipulchra SktPp1 crude extract was assessed against the biofilm of S. marcescens using the crystal violet assay. The growth curve has been used as the indicator of the effect of crude extracts to bacterial growth. The sub-MIC crude extract was tested against two of S. marcescens virulence factors, including the swarming ability and production of prodigiosin using the swarming assay and prodigiosin assay. The growth curves of S. marcescens indicated that the sub-MIC concentration of crude extract did not affect the growth of S. marcescens. The production of prodigiosin was reduced by 44%. The diameter of the swarming area was reduced from 8.7 cm to 0.8 cm. The sub-MIC crude extract inhibits 26.9% of the biofilm production in S. marcescens. This crude extract lost its activity at 50°C and above. In conclusion, crude extract of P. flavipulchra SktPp1 has the ability to inhibit S. marcescens SMJ-11 biofilm formation.

  3. Mechanisms of Bacterial (Serratia marcescens) Attachment to, Migration along, and Killing of Fungal Hyphae

    PubMed Central

    Hover, Tal; Maya, Tal; Ron, Sapir; Sandovsky, Hani; Shadkchan, Yana; Kijner, Nitzan; Mitiagin, Yulia; Fichtman, Boris; Harel, Amnon; Shanks, Robert M. Q.; Bruna, Roberto E.; García-Véscovi, Eleonora

    2016-01-01

    We have found a remarkable capacity for the ubiquitous Gram-negative rod bacterium Serratia marcescens to migrate along and kill the mycelia of zygomycete molds. This migration was restricted to zygomycete molds and several basidiomycete species. No migration was seen on any molds of the phylum Ascomycota. S. marcescens migration did not require fungal viability or surrounding growth medium, as bacteria migrated along aerial hyphae as well. S. marcescens did not exhibit growth tropism toward zygomycete mycelium. Bacterial migration along hyphae proceeded only when the hyphae grew into the bacterial colony. S. marcescens cells initially migrated along the hyphae, forming attached microcolonies that grew and coalesced to generate a biofilm that covered and killed the mycelium. Flagellum-defective strains of S. marcescens were able to migrate along zygomycete hyphae, although they were significantly slower than the wild-type strain and were delayed in fungal killing. Bacterial attachment to the mycelium does not necessitate type 1 fimbrial adhesion, since mutants defective in this adhesin migrated equally well as or faster than the wild-type strain. Killing does not depend on the secretion of S. marcescens chitinases, as mutants in which all three chitinase genes were deleted retained wild-type killing abilities. A better understanding of the mechanisms by which S. marcescens binds to, spreads on, and kills fungal hyphae might serve as an excellent model system for such interactions in general; fungal killing could be employed in agricultural fungal biocontrol. PMID:26896140

  4. Mechanisms of Bacterial (Serratia marcescens) Attachment to, Migration along, and Killing of Fungal Hyphae.

    PubMed

    Hover, Tal; Maya, Tal; Ron, Sapir; Sandovsky, Hani; Shadkchan, Yana; Kijner, Nitzan; Mitiagin, Yulia; Fichtman, Boris; Harel, Amnon; Shanks, Robert M Q; Bruna, Roberto E; García-Véscovi, Eleonora; Osherov, Nir

    2016-05-01

    We have found a remarkable capacity for the ubiquitous Gram-negative rod bacterium Serratia marcescens to migrate along and kill the mycelia of zygomycete molds. This migration was restricted to zygomycete molds and several basidiomycete species. No migration was seen on any molds of the phylum Ascomycota. S. marcescens migration did not require fungal viability or surrounding growth medium, as bacteria migrated along aerial hyphae as well.S. marcescens did not exhibit growth tropism toward zygomycete mycelium. Bacterial migration along hyphae proceeded only when the hyphae grew into the bacterial colony. S. marcescens cells initially migrated along the hyphae, forming attached microcolonies that grew and coalesced to generate a biofilm that covered and killed the mycelium. Flagellum-defective strains of S. marcescens were able to migrate along zygomycete hyphae, although they were significantly slower than the wild-type strain and were delayed in fungal killing. Bacterial attachment to the mycelium does not necessitate type 1 fimbrial adhesion, since mutants defective in this adhesin migrated equally well as or faster than the wild-type strain. Killing does not depend on the secretion of S. marcescens chitinases, as mutants in which all three chitinase genes were deleted retained wild-type killing abilities. A better understanding of the mechanisms by which S. marcescens binds to, spreads on, and kills fungal hyphae might serve as an excellent model system for such interactions in general; fungal killing could be employed in agricultural fungal biocontrol.

  5. Pathogenicity of Isolates of Serratia Marcescens towards Larvae of the Scarab Phyllophaga Blanchardi (Coleoptera)

    PubMed Central

    Pineda-Castellanos, Mónica L.; Rodríguez-Segura, Zitlhally; Villalobos, Francisco J.; Hernández, Luciano; Lina, Laura; Nuñez-Valdez, M. Eugenia

    2015-01-01

    Serratia marcescens is a Gram negative bacterium (Enterobacteriaceae) often associated with infection of insects. In order to find pathogenic bacteria with the potential to control scarab larvae, several bacterial strains were isolated from the hemocoel of diseased Phyllophaga spp (Coleoptera:Scarabaeidae) larvae collected from cornfields in Mexico. Five isolates were identified as Serratia marcescens by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and biochemical tests. Oral and injection bioassays using healthy Phyllophaga blanchardi larvae fed with the S. marcescens isolates showed different degrees of antifeeding effect and mortality. No insecticidal activity was observed for Spodoptera frugiperda larvae (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) by oral inoculation. S. marcescens (Sm81) cell-free culture supernatant caused significant antifeeding effect and mortality to P. blanchardi larvae by oral bioassay and also mortality by injection bioassay. Heat treated culture broths lost the ability to cause disease symptoms, suggesting the involvement of proteins in the toxic activity. A protein of 50.2 kDa was purified from the cell-free broth and showed insecticidal activity by injection bioassay towards P. blanchardi. Analysis of the insecticidal protein by tandem- mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) showed similarity to a Serralysin-like protein from S. marcescens spp. This insecticidal protein could have applications in agricultural biotechnology. PMID:25984910

  6. Mutation of crp mediates Serratia marcescens serralysin and global secreted protein production

    PubMed Central

    Shanks, Robert M.Q.; Stella, Nicholas A.; Arena, Kristin E.; Fender, James E.

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial species Serratia marcescens secretes both beneficial and cytotoxic proteins. Here we report that a crp mutant exhibited elevated secreted protease activity. A genetic screen revealed that the gene coding for the metalloprotease serralysin was necessary for the elevated proteolysis, and this was confirmed by western blot analysis. Proteomic analysis of secreted proteins corroborated increased secretion of serralysin protease by crp mutants compared to the wild type. The crp-mutant-secreted fractions also contained less chitinase and chitin binding protein. These data support the hypothesis that cAMP-CRP is an upstream indirect regulator of serralysin production and they provide novel insight into the S. marcescens secretome. PMID:23072819

  7. Epidemic septic arthritis caused by Serratia marcescens and associated with a benzalkonium chloride antiseptic.

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, A K; McCarthy, M A; Martone, W J; Anderson, R L

    1987-01-01

    During a 6-week period, 10 patients were admitted to a hospital for treatment of knee or shoulder joint infections due to Serratia species. Isolates from eight patients were identified as Serratia marcescens with identical biochemical characteristics and antibiotic susceptibility patterns. Before the onset of infections, all patients had been treated by two orthopedic surgeons who shared an office. Studies revealed that infections were associated with previous joint injections (P = 4.44 X 10(-5] of methylprednisolone and lidocaine. Environmental cultures revealed that a canister of cotton balls soaked in aqueous benzalkonium chloride and two multiple-dose vials of methylprednisolone previously used by office personnel were contaminated with the epidemic strain of S. marcescens. The canister may have served as a potential reservoir for contamination of sterile solutions and equipment used for joint injections, of skin at the injection site, and of hands of personnel. No further cases occurred after the use of aqueous benzalkonium chloride was discontinued. PMID:3298308

  8. The role of outer membrane in Serratia marcescens intrinsic resistance to antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, L; Ruiz, N; Leranoz, S; Viñas, M; Puig, M

    1997-09-01

    Three different porins from Serratia marcescens were described. They were named Omp1, Omp2 and Omp3 and their molecular weights were 42, 40 and 39 kDa respectively. Omp2 and Omp3 showed osmoregulation and thermoregulation in a similar way to OmpC and OmpF of Escherichia coli. Permeability coefficients of the outer membrane of this species were calculated following the Zimmermann and Rosselet method. P values were similar to those obtained in Escherichia coli, which suggests that the chromosomal beta-lactamase would play a major role in the resistance of Serratia marcescens to beta-lactam antibiotics. Both MIC values and permeabilities were modified by salycilates and acetylsalycilate. Synergism between the outer membrane and the beta-lactamase was also evaluated. When bacteria grew in the presence of a beta-lactam in the medium, the beta-lactamase accounted for most of the resistance.

  9. [The influence of the antivitamine pyrithiamine on the metabolism of the thiamin-autotrophic Serratia marcescens].

    PubMed

    Hagedorn, H; Schmidt, O R

    1975-03-12

    A new method is described for the quantitative microbiological analysis of the thiamine analog pyrithiamine present in biological material. The method uses a mutant of Lactobacillus fermenti (ATCC 9338) stimulated by pyrithiamine. By this specific method it is found that Serratia marcescens is able to consume and to phosphorylate the antivitamine (presumably to pyrithiamine monophosphate). The uptake of the analog influences neither the generation time of Serratia marcescens nor the biomass of the culture, nor the total amounts of carbohydrate and protein within the cells. On the contrary, pyrithiamin stimulates the exponential death-rate k and decreases the quantity of neutral fats. The carbon source glycerol is consumed at a higher rate, which is paralleled by an increased total amount of pyruvate as well as by an increased biosynthesis of acetoin.

  10. Cloning and characterization of two Serratia marcescens genes involved in core lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Guasch, J F; Piqué, N; Climent, N; Ferrer, S; Merino, S; Rubires, X; Tomas, J M; Regué, M

    1996-01-01

    Bacteriocin 28b from Serratia marcescens binds to Escherichia coli outer membrane proteins OmpA and OmpF and to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) core (J. Enfedaque, S. Ferrer, J. F. Guasch, J. Tomás, and M. Requé, Can. J. Microbiol. 42:19-26, 1996). A cosmid-based genomic library of S. marcescens was introduced into E. coli NM554, and clones were screened for bacteriocin 28b resistance phenotype. One clone conferring resistance to bacteriocin 28b and showing an altered LPS core mobility in polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was found. Southern blot experiments using DNA fragments containing E. coli rfa genes as probes suggested that the recombinant cosmid contained S. marcescens genes involved in LPS core biosynthesis. Subcloning, isolation of subclones and Tn5tac1 insertion mutants, and sequencing allowed identification of two apparently cotranscribed genes. The deduced amino acid sequence from the upstream gene showed 80% amino acid identity to the KdtA protein from E. coli, suggesting that this gene codes for the 3-deoxy-manno-octulosonic acid transferase of S. marcescens. The downstream gene (kdtX) codes for a protein showing 20% amino acid identity to the Haemophilus influenzae kdtB gene product. The S. marcescens KdtX protein is unrelated to the KdtB protein of E. coli K-12. Expression of the kdtX gene from S. marcescens in E. coli confers resistance to bacteriocin 28b. PMID:8824620

  11. Nosocomial transmission of Serratia marcescens in a veterinary hospital due to contamination by benzalkonium chloride.

    PubMed Central

    Fox, J G; Beaucage, C M; Folta, C A; Thornton, G W

    1981-01-01

    During a 1-year period, Serratia marcescens was isolated from 50% of all contaminate intravenous catheters from dogs and cats in a large veterinary hospital. S. marcescens was also isolated from respiratory tracts, genitourinary tracts, skin, and other sites in hospitalized animals. A total of 55% of the clinical isolates and 66% of the intravenous catheter isolates had the same API biochemical profile. The source of the S. marcescens was determined to be aqueous benzalkonium chloride (0.025%) sponge pots located in the intensive care unit, surgery rooms, and outpatient clinic areas of the hospital. Of the 11 S. marcescens isolates submitted to the Centers for Disease Control for serotyping (6 from aqueous benzalkonium chloride sponge pots, 5 from intravenous catheters), 8 were identified as serotype O10:H11. All S. marcescens isolates tested for antibiotic susceptibilities were multiply resistant; isolates were most frequently resistant to streptomycin, cephalothin, and ampicillin. This study demonstrates that improper use of disinfectants plays an important role in the nosocomial transmission of S. marcescens. PMID:7024303

  12. Antimicrobial effect and membrane-active mechanism of tea polyphenols against Serratia marcescens.

    PubMed

    Yi, Shumin; Wang, Wei; Bai, Fengling; Zhu, Junli; Li, Jianrong; Li, Xuepeng; Xu, Yongxia; Sun, Tong; He, Yutang

    2014-02-01

    In this study, we investigated the antimicrobial effect of tea polyphenols (TP) against Serratia marcescens and examined the related mechanism. Morphology changes of S. marcescens were first observed by transmission electron microscopy after treatment with TP, which indicated that the primary inhibition action of TP was to damage the bacterial cell membranes. The permeability of the outer and inner membrane of S. marcescens dramatically increased after TP treatment, which caused severe disruption of cell membrane, followed by the release of small cellular molecules. Furthermore, a proteomics approach based on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF/TOF MS analysis was used to study the difference of membrane protein expression in the control and TP treatment S. marcescens. The results showed that the expression of some metabolism enzymes and chaperones in TP-treated S. marcescens significantly increased compared to the untreated group, which might result in the metabolic disorder of this bacteria. Taken together, our results first demonstrated that TP had a significant growth inhibition effect on S. marcescens through cell membrane damage.

  13. Nosocomial Infection of Serratia marcescens May Induce a Protective Effect of Monkeys Exposed to Bacillus anthracis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    toxin " effect in this experiment. The innate immune response may have protected the AGMs from a lethal inhalational dose of B. anthracis spores. 15...SUBJECT TERMS Bacillus anthracis, anthrax, Serratia marcescens, protective effect, Coley’s toxin , efficacy, laboratory animals, nonhuman primates...Coley’s toxin ’’ effect in this experiment. The innate immune response may have protected the AGMs from a lethal inhalational dose of B. anthracis

  14. Isolation of pigmented and nonpigmented mutants of Serratia marcescens with reduced cell surface hydrophobicity

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, M.

    1984-10-01

    Enrichment for nonhydrophobic mutants of Serratia marcescens yielded two types: (i) a nonpigmented mutant which exhibited partial hydrophobic characteristics compared with the wild type, as determined by adherence to hexadecane and polystyrene; and (ii) a pigmented, nonhydrophobic mutant whose colonies were translucent with respect to those of the wild type. The data suggest that the pronounced cell surface hydrophobicity of the wild type is mediated by a combination of several surface f

  15. Sepsis and Hemocyte Loss in Honey Bees (Apis mellifera) Infected with Serratia marcescens Strain Sicaria

    PubMed Central

    Burritt, Nancy L.; Foss, Nicole J.; Neeno-Eckwall, Eric C.; Church, James O.; Hildebrand, Jacob A.; Warshauer, David M.; Perna, Nicole T.; Burritt, James B.

    2016-01-01

    Global loss of honey bee colonies is threatening the human food supply. Diverse pathogens reduce honey bee hardiness needed to sustain colonies, especially in winter. We isolated a free-living Gram negative bacillus from hemolymph of worker honey bees (Apis mellifera) found separated from winter clusters. In some hives, greater than 90% of the dying bees detached from the winter cluster were found to contain this bacterium in their hemolymph. Throughout the year, the same organism was rarely found in bees engaged in normal hive activities, but was detected in about half of Varroa destructor mites obtained from colonies that housed the septic bees. Flow cytometry of hemolymph from septic bees showed a significant reduction of plasmatocytes and other types of hemocytes. Interpretation of the16S rRNA sequence of the bacterium indicated that it belongs to the Serratia genus of Gram-negative Gammaproteobacteria, which has not previously been implicated as a pathogen of adult honey bees. Complete genome sequence analysis of the bacterium supported its classification as a novel strain of Serratia marcescens, which was designated as S. marcescens strain sicaria (Ss1). When compared with other strains of S. marcescens, Ss1 demonstrated several phenotypic and genetic differences, including 65 genes not previously found in other Serratia genomes. Some of the unique genes we identified in Ss1 were related to those from bacterial insect pathogens and commensals. Recovery of this organism extends a complex pathosphere of agents which may contribute to failure of honey bee colonies. PMID:28002470

  16. Sepsis and Hemocyte Loss in Honey Bees (Apis mellifera) Infected with Serratia marcescens Strain Sicaria.

    PubMed

    Burritt, Nancy L; Foss, Nicole J; Neeno-Eckwall, Eric C; Church, James O; Hilger, Anna M; Hildebrand, Jacob A; Warshauer, David M; Perna, Nicole T; Burritt, James B

    2016-01-01

    Global loss of honey bee colonies is threatening the human food supply. Diverse pathogens reduce honey bee hardiness needed to sustain colonies, especially in winter. We isolated a free-living Gram negative bacillus from hemolymph of worker honey bees (Apis mellifera) found separated from winter clusters. In some hives, greater than 90% of the dying bees detached from the winter cluster were found to contain this bacterium in their hemolymph. Throughout the year, the same organism was rarely found in bees engaged in normal hive activities, but was detected in about half of Varroa destructor mites obtained from colonies that housed the septic bees. Flow cytometry of hemolymph from septic bees showed a significant reduction of plasmatocytes and other types of hemocytes. Interpretation of the16S rRNA sequence of the bacterium indicated that it belongs to the Serratia genus of Gram-negative Gammaproteobacteria, which has not previously been implicated as a pathogen of adult honey bees. Complete genome sequence analysis of the bacterium supported its classification as a novel strain of Serratia marcescens, which was designated as S. marcescens strain sicaria (Ss1). When compared with other strains of S. marcescens, Ss1 demonstrated several phenotypic and genetic differences, including 65 genes not previously found in other Serratia genomes. Some of the unique genes we identified in Ss1 were related to those from bacterial insect pathogens and commensals. Recovery of this organism extends a complex pathosphere of agents which may contribute to failure of honey bee colonies.

  17. Severe necrotizing myocarditis caused by serratia marcescens infection in an axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum).

    PubMed

    Del-Pozo, J; Girling, S; Pizzi, R; Mancinelli, E; Else, R W

    2011-05-01

    This report provides the first account of the pathological changes associated with infection by Serratia marcescens in an adult male axolotl. The infection resulted in septicaemia with severe multifocal necrotizing myocarditis. The latter lesion evolved to cardiac rupture, haemopericardium and death resulting from cardiac tamponade. This animal was exposed to higher than usual temperatures (24-25 °C) 2 weeks before the onset of disease and this may have resulted in immunocompromise and opportunistic bacterial infection. S. marcescens was isolated from the coelomic and pericardial cavity. Both isolates were identical and were resistant to β-lactam antibiotics, but not to aminoglycosides or fluoroquinolones. The production of red prodigiosin pigment by the bacterium suggested an environmental origin. Overall, the clinical and histopathological presentation suggests that S. marcescens should be included in the list of aetiological agents of the 'red-leg'/bacterial dermatosepticaemia syndrome of amphibians.

  18. Oxidation of dibenzothiophene (DBT) by Serratia marcescens UCP 1549 formed biphenyl as final product

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The desulphurization of dibenzothiophene (DBT), a recalcitrant thiophenic fossil fuel component by Serratia marcescens (UCP 1549) in order for reducing the Sulphur content was investigated. The Study was carried out establishing the growth profile using Luria Bertani medium to different concentrations of DBT during 120 hours at 28°C, and orbital Shaker at 150 rpm. Results The results indicated that concentrations of DBT 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 mM do not affected the growth of the bacterium. The DBT showed similar Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) and Minimum Bactericidal Concentration (MCB) (3.68 mM). The desulphurization of DBT by S. marcescens was used with 96 hours of growth on 2 mM of DBT, and was determined by gas chromatography (GC) and GC-mass spectrometry. In order to study the desulphurization process by S. marcescens was observed the presence of a sulfur-free product at 16 hours of cultivation. Conclusions The data suggests the use of metabolic pathway “4S” by S. marcescens (UCP 1549) and formed biphenyl. The microbial desulphurization process by Serratia can be suggest significant reducing sulphur content in DBT, and showed promising potential for reduction of the sulfur content in diesel oil. PMID:22583489

  19. The opportunistic pathogen Serratia marcescens utilizes type VI secretion to target bacterial competitors.

    PubMed

    Murdoch, Sarah L; Trunk, Katharina; English, Grant; Fritsch, Maximilian J; Pourkarimi, Ehsan; Coulthurst, Sarah J

    2011-11-01

    The type VI secretion system (T6SS) is the most recently described and least understood of the protein secretion systems of Gram-negative bacteria. It is widely distributed and has been implicated in the virulence of various pathogens, but its mechanism and exact mode of action remain to be defined. Additionally there have been several very recent reports that some T6SSs can target bacteria rather than eukaryotic cells. Serratia marcescens is an opportunistic enteric pathogen, a class of bacteria responsible for a significant proportion of hospital-acquired infections. We describe the identification of a functional T6SS in S. marcescens strain Db10, the first report of type VI secretion by an opportunist enteric bacterium. The T6SS of S. marcescens Db10 is active, with secretion of Hcp to the culture medium readily detected, and is expressed constitutively under normal growth conditions from a large transcriptional unit. Expression of the T6SS genes did not appear to be dependent on the integrity of the T6SS. The S. marcescens Db10 T6SS is not required for virulence in three nonmammalian virulence models. It does, however, exhibit dramatic antibacterial killing activity against several other bacterial species and is required for S. marcescens to persist in a mixed culture with another opportunist pathogen, Enterobacter cloacae. Importantly, this antibacterial killing activity is highly strain specific, with the S. marcescens Db10 T6SS being highly effective against another strain of S. marcescens with a very similar and active T6SS. We conclude that type VI secretion plays a crucial role in the competitiveness, and thus indirectly the virulence, of S. marcescens and other opportunistic bacterial pathogens.

  20. Optimized production of Serratia marcescens B742 mutants for preparing chitin from shrimp shells powders.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongcai; Fang, Jiyang; Deng, Yun; Zhao, Yanyun

    2014-08-01

    To improve the deproteinization (DP) efficacy of shrimp shell powders (SSP) for preparing chitin, Serratia marcescens B742 mutants were prepared using 2% diethyl sulfate (DES), UV-irradiation, and/or microwave heating treatments. Both single-stage and multi-stage mutations were investigated for optimizing S. marcescens B742 mutation conditions. Under the optimized mutation conditions (2% DES treatment for 30min plus successive 20min UV-irradiation), the protease and chitosanase activity produced by mutant S. marcescens B742 was 240.15 and 170.6mU/mL, respectively, as compared with 212.58±1.51 and 83.75±6.51mU/mL, respectively, by wild S. marcescens B742. DP efficacy of SSP by mutant S. marcescens B742 reached 91.4±4.6% after 3d of submerged fermentation instead of 83.4±4.7% from the wild S. marcescens B742 after 4d of submerged fermentation. Molecular mass of chitosanase and protease was 41.20 and 47.10kDa, respectively, and both enzymes were verified by mass spectrometry analysis. The chitosanase from both wild and mutant S. marcescens B742 was activated by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), Tween 20, Tween 40, and Triton-100, and the protease and chitosanase were strongly inhibited by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). These results suggested that S. marcescens B742 mutants can be used in the biological production of chitin through deproteinization of SSP.

  1. Corneal Ring Infiltrates Caused by Serratia marcescens in a Patient with Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Chaidaroon, Winai; Supalaset, Sumet

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To describe corneal ring infiltrates caused by Serratia marcescens in a patient with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) who wore contact lenses. Methods A case study of a patient with keratitis due to an infection caused by S. marcescens and exhibiting corneal ring infiltrates was reviewed for history, clinical manifestation, microscopic study, and management. Results A 29-year-old man who had a history of contact lens wear and HIV-1 infection was admitted to hospital because of blurred vision, redness, and corneal infiltrates in the shape of a ring in the left eye. The visual acuity (VA) in both eyes was hand movement (uncorrected). Corneal scrapings were performed. The culture results of the corneal specimens revealed S. marcescens. The culture results of the contact lens disclosed the same organism. The corneal ulcer responded well to treatment with topical gentamycin sulfate 14 mg/ml. The final VA remained hand movement. Conclusions S. marcescens can cause ring infiltrates in a HIV-1 patient who wears contact lenses. The treatment result for S. marcescens keratitis in a HIV-1 patient who wore contact lenses was favorable after intensive use of fortified topical antibiotics. PMID:27721784

  2. Characterization and comparison of serratia marcescens isolated from edible cactus and from silkworm for virulence potential and chitosan susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Yu, Rongrong; Liu, Baoping; Tang, Qiaomei; Zhang, Guoqing; Wang, Yanli; Xie, Guanlin; Sun, Guochang

    2011-01-01

    Representative strains of Serratia marcescens from an edible cactus plant and silkworms were characterized and a comparison based on their cellular fatty acid composition, 16S rRNA and groE gene sequence analysis as well as silkworm virulence and chitosan susceptibility was carried out. Results from this study indicate that there are no significant differences between the phenotypic and molecular characterization, virulence and chitosan susceptibility of the S. marcescens strains from the cactus plant and silkworms. Silkworms inoculated with S. marcescens from either plant or silkworm resulted in nearly 100% mortality. Chitosan solution exhibited strong antibacterial activity against S. marcescens. This activity increased with the increase of chitosan concentration and incubation time regardless of the strain source. Also, the results indicate that the plant associated S. marcescens maybe plays a possible role in the contamination of humans and animals, in particular silkworms, while chitosan showed a potential to control the contamination caused by S. marcescens.

  3. Characterization and Comparison of Serratia Marcescens Isolated from Edible Cactus and from Silkworm for Virulence Potential and Chitosan Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bin; Yu, Rongrong; Liu, Baoping; Tang, Qiaomei; Zhang, Guoqing; Wang, Yanli; Xie, Guanlin; Sun, Guochang

    2011-01-01

    Representative strains of Serratia marcescens from an edible cactus plant and silkworms were characterized and a comparison based on their cellular fatty acid composition, 16S rRNA and groE gene sequence analysis as well as silkworm virulence and chitosan susceptibility was carried out. Results from this study indicate that there are no significant differences between the phenotypic and molecular characterization, virulence and chitosan susceptibility of the S. marcescens strains from the cactus plant and silkworms. Silkworms inoculated with S. marcescens from either plant or silkworm resulted in nearly 100% mortality. Chitosan solution exhibited strong antibacterial activity against S. marcescens. This activity increased with the increase of chitosan concentration and incubation time regardless of the strain source. Also, the results indicate that the plant associated S. marcescens maybe plays a possible role in the contamination of humans and animals, in particular silkworms, while chitosan showed a potential to control the contamination caused by S. marcescens. PMID:24031610

  4. Comparative Genome Analyses of Serratia marcescens FS14 Reveals Its High Antagonistic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Li, Pengpeng; Kwok, Amy H. Y.; Jiang, Jingwei; Ran, Tingting; Xu, Dongqing; Wang, Weiwu; Leung, Frederick C.

    2015-01-01

    S. marcescens FS14 was isolated from an Atractylodes macrocephala Koidz plant that was infected by Fusarium oxysporum and showed symptoms of root rot. With the completion of the genome sequence of FS14, the first comprehensive comparative-genomic analysis of the Serratia genus was performed. Pan-genome and COG analyses showed that the majority of the conserved core genes are involved in basic cellular functions, while genomic factors such as prophages contribute considerably to genome diversity. Additionally, a Type I restriction-modification system, a Type III secretion system and tellurium resistance genes are found in only some Serratia species. Comparative analysis further identified that S. marcescens FS14 possesses multiple mechanisms for antagonism against other microorganisms, including the production of prodigiosin, bacteriocins, and multi-antibiotic resistant determinants as well as chitinases. The presence of two evolutionarily distinct Type VI secretion systems (T6SSs) in FS14 may provide further competitive advantages for FS14 against other microbes. To our knowledge, this is the first report of comparative analysis on T6SSs in the genus, which identifies four types of T6SSs in Serratia spp.. Competition bioassays of FS14 against the vital plant pathogenic bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum and fungi Fusarium oxysporum and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum were performed to support our genomic analyses, in which FS14 demonstrated high antagonistic activities against both bacterial and fungal phytopathogens. PMID:25856195

  5. Inhibition of Serratia marcescens Smj-11 biofilm formation by Alcaligenes faecalis STN17 crude extract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutfi, Zainal; Usup, Gires; Ahmad, Asmat

    2014-09-01

    Serratia marcescens biofilms are formed when they are bound to surfaces in aqueous environments. S. marcescens utilizes N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) as its quorum sensing signal molecule. The accumulation of AHL indicates the bacteria to produce matrices to form biofilms. Prodigiosin (2-methyl-3-pentyl-6-methoxyprodigiosin), which causes red pigmentation in the colonies, are also produced when the AHL reaches a certain threshold. The Alcaligenes faecalis STN17 crude extract is believed to inhibit quorum sensing in the S. marcescens Smj-11 and, thus, impedes its biofilm formation ability. A. faecalis STN17 was grown in marine broth, and ethyl acetate extraction was carried out. The crude compound of A. faecalis STN17 was diluted at high concentration (0.2-6.4 mg/mL) and was taken to confirm anti-biofilm activity through the crystal violet method in 96-wells plate. Then, the crude extract underwent purification using simple solvents partitioning test to discern the respective compounds that had the anti-biofilm activity under the crystal violet method. The crystal violet test showed that the crude did have anti-biofilm activity on S. marcescens Smj-11, but did not kill the cells. This finding signifies that the suppression of biofilm formation in S. marcescens by A. faecalis STN17 has a strong correlation. The partitioning test showed that A. faecalis STN17 crude extract has several compounds and only the compound(s) in chloroform showed activities. In conclusion, the crude extract of A. faecalis STN17 has the ability to inhibit S. marcescens Smj-11 biofilm formation.

  6. Inhibition of Serratia marcescens Smj-11 biofilm formation by Alcaligenes faecalis STN17 crude extract

    SciTech Connect

    Lutfi, Zainal; Ahmad, Asmat; Usup, Gires

    2014-09-03

    Serratia marcescens biofilms are formed when they are bound to surfaces in aqueous environments. S. marcescens utilizes N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) as its quorum sensing signal molecule. The accumulation of AHL indicates the bacteria to produce matrices to form biofilms. Prodigiosin (2-methyl-3-pentyl-6-methoxyprodigiosin), which causes red pigmentation in the colonies, are also produced when the AHL reaches a certain threshold. The Alcaligenes faecalis STN17 crude extract is believed to inhibit quorum sensing in the S. marcescens Smj-11 and, thus, impedes its biofilm formation ability. A. faecalis STN17 was grown in marine broth, and ethyl acetate extraction was carried out. The crude compound of A. faecalis STN17 was diluted at high concentration (0.2-6.4 mg/mL) and was taken to confirm anti-biofilm activity through the crystal violet method in 96-wells plate. Then, the crude extract underwent purification using simple solvents partitioning test to discern the respective compounds that had the anti-biofilm activity under the crystal violet method. The crystal violet test showed that the crude did have anti-biofilm activity on S. marcescens Smj-11, but did not kill the cells. This finding signifies that the suppression of biofilm formation in S. marcescens by A. faecalis STN17 has a strong correlation. The partitioning test showed that A. faecalis STN17 crude extract has several compounds and only the compound(s) in chloroform showed activities. In conclusion, the crude extract of A. faecalis STN17 has the ability to inhibit S. marcescens Smj-11 biofilm formation.

  7. Prodigiosin production by Serratia marcescens UCP 1549 using renewable-resources as a low cost substrate.

    PubMed

    de Araújo, Helvia W Casullo; Fukushima, K; Takaki, Galba M Campos

    2010-10-08

    A new strain of Serratia marcescens UCP1459 isolated from a semi-arid soil produced the natural red pigment prodigiosin, characterized by an uncommon pyrrolylpyrromethane skeleton. Prodigiosin is a promising drug due to its reported antifungal, immunosuppressive and anti-proliferative activities. The objective of this work was to indentify a suitable medium to simultaneously enhance S. marcescens growth and pigment production using renewable resources obtained from industrial wastes. S. marcescens produced the highest level of prodigiosin (49.5 g/L) at 48 h of cultivation using 6% "manipueira" (cassava wastewater) supplemented with mannitol (2%) at pH 7 and 28 °C. Carbohydrates in "manipueira" and mannitol play a role in the enhanced cell growth and prodigiosin production. The purified pigment extracted from the biomass was analyzed by mass spectrophotometry and showed the expected molecular weight of 324 Da corresponding to prodigiosin. In conclusion, we have successfully designed a new, economically feasible medium supporting enhanced S. marcescens growth and a high yield production of prodigiosin.

  8. Enhanced production of prodigiosin by Serratia marcescens MO-1 using ram horn peptone.

    PubMed

    Kurbanoglu, Esabi Basaran; Ozdal, Murat; Ozdal, Ozlem Gur; Algur, Omer Faruk

    2015-06-01

    This work addresses the production of prodigiosin from ram horn peptone (RHP) using MO-1, a local isolate in submerged culture. First, a novel gram-negative and rod-shaped bacterial strain, MO-1, was isolated from the body of the grasshopper (Poecilemon tauricola Ramme 1951), which was collected from pesticide-contaminated fields. Sequence analysis of 16S rDNA classified the microbe as Serratia marcescens. The substrate utilization potential (BIOLOG) and fatty acid methyl ester profile (FAME) of S. marcescens were also determined. The effect of RHP on the production of prodigiosin by S. marcescens MO-1 was investigated, and the results showed that RHP supplementation promoted the growth of MO-1 and increased the production of prodigiosin. A concentration of 0.4% (w/v) RHP resulted in the greatest yield of prodigiosin (277.74 mg/L) after 48 h when mannitol was used as the sole source of carbon. The pigment yield was also influenced by the types of carbon sources and peptones. As a result, RHP was demonstrated to be a suitable substrate for prodigiosin production. These results revealed that prodigiosin could be produced efficiently by S. marcescens using RHP.

  9. The response of Serratia marcescens JG to environmental changes by quorum sensing system.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shu-Jing; Liu, Hui-Jun; Weng, Cai-Hong; Lai, Chun-Fen; Ai, Liu-Ying; Liu, Yu-Chen; Zhu, Hu

    2016-08-01

    Many bacterial cells are known to regulate their cooperative behaviors and physiological processes through a molecular mechanism called quorum sensing. Quorum sensing in Serratia marcescens JG is mediated by the synthesis of autoinducer 2 (AI-2) which is a furanosyl borate diester. In this study, the response of quorum sensing in S. marcescens JG to environment changes such as the initial pH, carbon sources and boracic acid was investigated by a bioreporter and real-time PCR analysis. The results show that glucose can affect AI-2 synthesis to the greatest extent, and 2.0 % glucose can stimulate S. marcescens JG to produce more AI-2, with a 3.5-fold increase in activity compared with control culture. Furthermore, the response of quorum sensing to changes in glucose concentration was performed by changing the amount of luxS RNA transcripts. A maximum of luxS transcription appeared during the exponential growth phase when the glucose concentration was 20.0 g/L. AI-2 production was also slightly impacted by the low initial pH. It is significant for us that the addition of boracic acid at microdosage (0.1-0.2 g/L) can also induce AI-2 synthesis, which probably demonstrated the feasible fact that the 4,5-dihydroxy-2, 3-pentanedione cyclizes by the addition of borate and the loss of water, is hydrated and is converted to the final AI-2 in S. marcescens JG.

  10. Prodigiosin from the supernatant of Serratia marcescens induces apoptosis in haematopoietic cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Montaner, Beatriz; Navarro, Sira; Piqué, Maria; Vilaseca, Marta; Martinell, Marc; Giralt, Ernest; Gil, Joan; Pérez-Tomás, Ricardo

    2000-01-01

    The effects of supernatant from the bacterial strain Serratia marcescens 2170 (CS-2170) on the viability of different haematopoietic cancer cell lines (Jurkat, NSO, HL-60 and Ramos) and nonmalignant cells (NIH-3T3 and MDCK) was studied. We examined whether this cytotoxic effect was due to apoptosis, and we purified the molecule responsible for this effect and determined its chemical structure.Using an MTT assay we showed a rapid (4 h) decrease in the number of viable cells. This cytotoxic effect was due to apoptosis, according to the fragmentation pattern of DNA, Hoechst 33342 staining and FACS analysis of the phosphatidylserine externalization. This apoptosis was blocked by using the caspase inhibitor Z-VAD.fmk, indicating the involvement of caspases.Prodigiosin is a red pigment produced by various bacteria including S. marcescens. Using mutants of S. marcescens (OF, WF and 933) that do not synthesize prodigiosin, we further showed that prodigiosin is involved in this apoptosis. This evidence was corroborated by spectroscopic analysis of prodigiosin isolated from S. marcescens.These results indicate that prodigiosin, an immunosuppressor, induces apoptosis in haematopoietic cancer cells with no marked toxicity in nonmalignant cells, raising the possibility of its therapeutic use as an antineoplastic drug. PMID:11015311

  11. Toxicity evaluation of prodigiosin from Serratia marcescens in a Caenorhabditis elegans model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seah, Siew-Wei; Nathan, Sheila; Wan, Kiew-Lian

    2016-11-01

    Serratia marcescens produces several secondary metabolites, including a red antimicrobial pigment, prodigiosin. There is considerable interest in prodigiosin and its derivatives due to their anticancer and immunosuppressive properties. Prodigiosin has also become the main choice of red dye in textiles. As prodigiosin has potentially high commercial value, there is a demand to develop high-throughput and cost-effective bioprocesses for prodigiosin production. However little is still known about its toxicity. This study was carried out to investigate the toxicity effect of prodigiosin. To determine if prodigiosin was potentially toxic to eukaryotic systems, the S. marcescens ATCC 274 wild type (Sma 274) and the non-prodigiosin producer S. marcescens Bizio WF mutant ATCC 29635 (WF mutant) were grown under the optimised conditions for prodigiosin production and fed to the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. The mean time to death (TDmean) for Sma 274-infected worms assayed on agar was 112.6 hours while the WF mutant culture had a TDmean of 104.4 hours. However, the nematode killing kinetics were not significantly different between the prodigiosin-producing and non-producing S. marcescens strains (p>0.05). In lieu of its non-toxic property, prodigiosin has the potential to be developed for safe therapeutic applications and as a safe environmental friendly bio-dye.

  12. Isolation and characterization of genes encoding two chitinase enzymes from Serratia marcescens

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Jonathan D. G.; Grady, Karen L.; Suslow, Trevor V.; Bedbrook, John R.

    1986-01-01

    Analysis of clones isolated from a cosmid DNA library indicates that the Serratia marcescens chromosome contains at least two genes, chiA and chiB, which encode distinct secreted forms of the enzyme chitinase. These genes have been characterized by inspection of chitinase activity and secreted proteins in Escherichia coli strains containing subclones of these cosmids. The two chitinase genes show no detectable homology to each other. DNA sequence analysis of one of the genes predicts an amino acid sequence with an N-terminal signal peptide typical of genes encoding secreted bacterial proteins. This gene was mutagenized by cloning a neomycin phosphotransferase gene within its coding region, and the insertion mutation was recombined into the parental S. marcescens strain. The resulting chiA mutant transconjugant showed reduced chitinase production, reduced inhibition of fungal spore germination and reduced biological control of a fungal plant pathogen. ImagesFig. 2. PMID:16453672

  13. A Hospital-wide Outbreak of Serratia marcescens, and Ishikawa's "Fishbone" Analysis to Support Outbreak Control.

    PubMed

    Vetter, Luzia; Schuepfer, Guido; Kuster, Stefan P; Rossi, Marco

    2016-01-01

    A nosocomial outbreak of Serratia marcescens in respiratory samples predominantly from patients in a surgical intensive care unit is reported. Most of these patients were cardiac surgical patients. Initially, a vigorous but inconclusive investigation was implemented on the basis of standardized (according the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) steps of outbreak investigation. Then, a systemic quality management approach with "fishbone" analysis was added. As a consequence, plausible causes for the outbreak were identified: (i) S marcescens was found on the transesophageal echocardiography probe used during cardiac surgery; and (ii) the quality of the surface disinfection was insufficient due to multiple reasons and was completely reengineered. In conclusion, in addition to the standardized steps of outbreak investigation, the complementary use of quality management tools such as the Ishikawa "fishbone" analysis is helpful for outbreak control. The complete reengineering of the disinfectant procurement and logistics is assumed to have been the most effective measure to control the described outbreak.

  14. Molecular cloning and characterization of a multidrug efflux pump, SmfY, from Serratia marcescens.

    PubMed

    Shahcheraghi, Fereshteh; Minato, Yusuke; Chen, Jing; Mizushima, Tohru; Ogawa, Wakano; Kuroda, Teruo; Tsuchiya, Tomofusa

    2007-04-01

    We cloned a gene smfY for multidrug efflux pump from chromosomal DNA of Serratia marcescens using drug-hypersensitive Escherichia coli KAM32 as the host, and characterized the pump. E. coli KAM32/pESM42 carrying the smfY showed significantly increased MICs of various drugs including DAPI, norfloxacin, benzalkonium chloride, acriflavine and ethidium bromide, compared with the control. We also detected energy-dependent ethidium and acriflavine efflux due to the SmfY. Sequence analysis revealed that the SmfY was a multidrug efflux pump of the MF (Major Facilitator) superfamily transporters. This is the first report of a multidrug efflux pump belonging to the MF superfamily in S. marcescens.

  15. Epidemiological markers of Serratia marcescens isolates causing nosocomial infections in Spain (1981-1991).

    PubMed

    Boquete, T; Vindel, A; Martin-Bourgon, C; Azañedo, L; Sáez-Nieto, J A

    1996-12-01

    The distribution of epidemiological markers (serotyping and phage-typing) of Serratia marcescens isolates from nosocomial episodes (63 nosocomial cutbreaks with 475 isolates, and 1208 sporadic cases) received in our laboratory during the period 1981-1991 was studied. The records for 1683 isolates from Spanish hospitals have been analyzed. In relation with the sporadic cases, the predominant types were serotype O6 (13.4%) and serotype O14 (11.4%); polyagglutinable strains accounted for 15.6%; in outbreaks, type O14 is clearly predominant (27.4%). Phage-typing was a good secondary marker, with a 87.9% of typability; the number of lytic patterns was very high, extended patterns (six or more phages) being the most frequent. We have studied the characteristics of S. marcescens isolates causing infections in the nosocomial environment in Spain.

  16. Outbreak of Serratia marcescens Bloodstream Infections in Patients Receiving Parenteral Nutrition Prepared by a Compounding Pharmacy

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Neil; Hocevar, Susan N.; Moulton-Meissner, Heather A.; Stevens, Kelly M.; McIntyre, Mary G.; Jensen, Bette; Kuhar, David T.; Noble-Wang, Judith A.; Schnatz, Rick G.; Becker, Shawn C.; Kastango, Eric S.; Shehab, Nadine; Kallen, Alexander J.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Compounding pharmacies often prepare parenteral nutrition (PN) and must adhere to rigorous standards to avoid contamination of the sterile preparation. In March 2011, Serratia marcescens bloodstream infections (BSIs) were identified in 5 patients receiving PN from a single compounding pharmacy. An investigation was conducted to identify potential sources of contamination and prevent further infections. Methods. Cases were defined as S. marcescens BSIs in patients receiving PN from the pharmacy between January and March 2011. We reviewed case patients’ clinical records, evaluated pharmacy compounding practices, and obtained epidemiologically directed environmental cultures. Molecular relatedness of available Serratia isolates was determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Results. Nineteen case patients were identified; 9 died. The attack rate for patients receiving PN in March was 35%. No case patients were younger than 18 years. In October 2010, the pharmacy began compounding and filter-sterilizing amino acid solution for adult PN using nonsterile amino acids due to a national manufacturer shortage. Review of this process identified breaches in mixing, filtration, and sterility testing practices. S. marcescens was identified from a pharmacy water faucet, mixing container, and opened amino acid powder. These isolates were indistinguishable from the outbreak strain by PFGE. Conclusions. Compounding of nonsterile amino acid components of PN was initiated due to a manufacturer shortage. Failure to follow recommended compounding standards contributed to an outbreak of S. marcescens BSIs. Improved adherence to sterile compounding standards, critical examination of standards for sterile compounding from nonsterile ingredients, and more rigorous oversight of compounding pharmacies is needed to prevent future outbreaks. PMID:24729502

  17. Interference of quorum sensing in urinary pathogen Serratia marcescens by Anethum graveolens.

    PubMed

    Salini, Ramesh; Pandian, Shunmugiah Karutha

    2015-08-01

    Serratia marcescens is an opportunistic turned obligate pathogen frequently associated with urinary tract infections (UTI) and are multidrug resistant at most instances. Quorum sensing (QS) system, a population-dependent global regulatory system, controls the pathogenesis machinery of S. marcescens as it does in other pathogens. In the present study, methanol extract of a common herb and spice, Anethum graveolens (AGME) was assessed for its anti-QS potential against the clinical isolate of S. marcescens. AGME notably reduced the biofilm formation and QS-dependent virulence factors production in a concentration-dependent manner (64-1024 μg mL(-1)). The light and confocal microscopic images clearly evidenced the antibiofilm activity of AGME (256 μg mL(-1)) at its minimal biofilm inhibitory concentration. Besides, in support of biochemical assays, the expression analysis of QS-regulated genes fimC, bsmA and flhD which are crucial for initial adhesion and motility confirmed their downregulation upon exposure to AGME. LC-MS analysis of AGME revealed 3-O-methyl ellagic acid (3-O-ME) as one of its active principles having nearly similar antibiofilm activity and a reduced inhibition of prodigiosin (27%) and protease (15%) compared to AGME [prodigiosin (47%) and protease (50%)]. UFLC analysis revealed that 0.355 mg g(-1) of 3-O-ME was present in the AGME. AGME and the 3-O-ME significantly interfered the QS system of a QS model strain S. marcescens MG1 and its mutant S. marcescens MG44 which in turn corroborates the anti-QS mechanism of AGME.

  18. Serratia marcescens: Biochemical, Serological, and Epidemiological Characteristics and Antibiotic Susceptibility of Strains Isolated at Boston City Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Wilfert, James N.; Barrett, Fred F.; Ewing, W. H.; Finland, Maxwell; Kass, Edward H.

    1970-01-01

    The biochemical, serological, and epidemiological characteristics of 95 strains of Serratia marcescens isolated at the Boston City Hospital were examined. Several strains were shown to be endemic, and the majority of isolates were cultured from urine or respiratory secretions. Serratia species were highly resistant to polymyxin B and the cephalosporins, and various proportions were also resistant to other antibiotics including kanamycin, but all of the isolates were sensitive to gentamicin. The appearance of resistance to kanamycin and nalidixic acid among endemic strains was demonstrated. The nosocomial nature of Serratia infections, particularly those involving the urinary tract, was confirmed. Many clinical bacteriology laboratories currently fail to identify the nonpigmented strains. PMID:4314379

  19. Enzyme polymorphism, prodigiosin production, and plasmid fingerprints in clinical and naturally occurring isolates of Serratia marcescens.

    PubMed Central

    Gargallo-Viola, D

    1989-01-01

    Enzyme polymorphism and genetic relationship among 99 Serratia marcescens isolates obtained from clinical and environmental sources were determined by analysis of electromorphs in nine enzyme loci encoded by chromosomal genes. Seven of the loci were polymorphic, and 33 distinctive electrophoretic types (ETs) representing multilocus genotypes were identified. Cluster analysis, based on the proportion of mismatches between multilocus genotypes, revealed two clearly differentiated groups of ETs in S. marcescens. One was represented exclusively by isolates with nonchromogenic biotypes recovered almost entirely (97.3%) from clinical samples. The other group comprised all isolates characterized by the production of prodigiosin or by belonging to a chromogenic biotype. Absolute correlation was found between the ability to produce prodigiosin and the absence of plasmids. In contrast, 24% of the nonchromogenic isolates contained plasmids. Results obtained by analysis of multilocus genotypes were related to those obtained by biotyping and plasmid fingerprinting. However, more groups could be distinguished by analysis of ETs than by biotyping. Plasmid fingerprinting was a limited typing system because many isolates lacked plasmids. Although the results of this study did not permit a definitive correlation between ETs and pathogenicity of the isolates, more detailed studies of these groups will help to understand the different clinical significances of the nonchromogenic and chromogenic isolates of S. marcescens. PMID:2663918

  20. Potential transmission of Pantoea spp. and Serratia marcescens (Enterobacteriales: Enterobacteriaceae) to plants by Lygus hesperus (Hemiptera: Miridae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lygus hesperus Knight (Hemiptera: Miridae) is a key agricultural pest in the western United States. In a recent study, proteins from Pantoea ananatis and Serratia marcescens (Enterobacteriales: Enterobacteriaceae) were identified in diet that was stylet-probed and fed upon by L. hesperus adults. P...

  1. Genome Sequence of Rhizobacterium Serratia marcescens Strain 90-166, Which Triggers Induced Systemic Resistance and Plant Growth Promotion.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Haeyoung; Kloepper, Joseph W; Ryu, Choong-Min

    2015-06-18

    The rhizobacterium Serratia marcescens strain 90-166 elicits induced systemic resistance against plant pathogens and herbivores and promotes plant growth under greenhouse and field conditions. Strain 90-166 secretes volatile compounds, siderophores, salicylic acid, and quorum-sensing autoinducers as bacterial determinants toward plant health. Herein, we present its draft genome sequence.

  2. Production, characterization, cloning and sequence analysis of a monofunctional catalase from Serratia marcescens SYBC08.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Hua-Wei; Cai, Yu-Jie; Liao, Xiang-Ru; Zhang, Feng; Zhang, Da-Bing

    2011-04-01

    A monofunctional catalase from Serratia marcescens SYBC08 produced by liquid state fermentation in 7 liter fermenter was isolated and purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation (ASP), ion exchange chromatography (IEC), and gel filtration (GF) and characterized. Its sequence was analyzed by LC-MS/MS technique and gene cloning. The highest catalase production (20,289 U · ml(-1)) was achieved after incubation for 40 h. The purified catalase had an estimated molecular mass of 230 kDa, consisting of four identical subunits of 58 kDa. High specific activity of the catalase (199,584 U · mg(-1) protein) was 3.44 times higher than that of Halomonas sp. Sk1 catalase (57,900 U · mg(-1) protein). The enzyme without peroxidase activity was found to be an atypical electronic spectrum of monofunctional catalase. The apparent K(m) and V(max) were 78 mM and 188, 212 per µM H(2) O(2) µM heme(-1) s(-1), respectivly. The enzyme displayed a broad pH activity range (pH 5.0-11.0), with optimal pH range of 7.0-9.0: It was most active at 20 °C and had 78% activity at 0 °C. Its thermo stability was slightly higher compared to that of commercial catalase from bovine liver. LC-MS/MS analysis confirmed that the deduced amino acid sequence of cloning gene was the catalase sequence from Serratia marcescens SYBC08. The sequence was compared with that of 23 related catalases. Although most of active site residues, NADPH-binding residues, proximal residues of the heme, distal residues of the heme and residues interacting with a water molecule in the enzyme were well conserved in 23 related catalases, weakly conserved residues were found. Its sequence was closely related with that of catalases from pathogenic bacterium in the family Enterobacteriaceae. This result imply that the enzyme with high specific activity plays a significant role in preventing those microorganisms of the family Enterobacteriaceae against hydrogen peroxide resulted in cellular damage. Calalase yield by Serratia

  3. Molecular detection and analysis of a novel metalloprotease gene of entomopathogenic Serratia marcescens strains in infected Galleria mellonella.

    PubMed

    Tambong, J T; Xu, R; Sadiku, A; Chen, Q; Badiss, A; Yu, Q

    2014-04-01

    Serratia marcescens strains isolated from entomopathogenic nematodes (Rhabditis sp.) were examined for their pathogenicity and establishment in wax moth (Galleria mellonella) larvae. All the Serratia strains were potently pathogenic to G. mellonella larvae, leading to death within 48 h. The strains were shown to possess a metalloprotease gene encoding for a novel serralysin-like protein. Rapid establishment of the bacteria in infected larvae was confirmed by specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detection of a DNA fragment encoding for this protein. Detection of the viable Serratia strains in infected larvae was validated using the SYBR Green reverse transcriptase real-time PCR assay targeting the metalloprotease gene. Nucleotide sequences of the metalloprotease gene obtained in our study showed 72 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) and 3 insertions compared with the metalloprotease gene of S. marcescens E-15. The metalloprotease gene had 60 synonymous and 8 nonsynonymous substitutions relative to the closest GenBank entry, S. marcescens E-15. A comparison of the amino acid composition of the new serralysin-like protein with that of the serralysin protein of S. marcescens E-15 revealed differences at 11 positions and a new aspartic acid residue. Analysis of the effect of protein variation suggests that a new aspartic acid residue resulting from nonsynonymous nucleotide mutations in the protein structure could have the most significant effect on its biological function. The new metalloprotease gene and (or) its product could have applications in plant agricultural biotechnology.

  4. KPC-PRODUCING Serratia marcescens IN A HOME-CARE PATIENT FROM RECIFE, BRAZIL

    PubMed Central

    MARGATE, Emmily; MAGALHÃES, Vera; FEHLBERG, Lorena Cristina Corrêa; GALES, Ana Cristina; LOPES, Ana Catarina Souza

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY In this brief communication we describe the occurrence of a KPC-producing Serratia marcescensisolate in a home-care patient from Recife, Brazil. The bla KPC, bla SPM, bla IMP, bla VIM bla OXA, bla CTX-M, bla SHV, bla TEM and bla GES genes were investigated by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) and DNA sequencing. The isolate was positive for bla KPC-2 and bla TEM-1 and was resistant to aztreonam, cefepime, cefotaxime, imipenem, meropenem, gentamicin, ciprofloxacin and cefazidime, and susceptible only to amikacin, tigecycline and gatifloxacin. This is the first report in Brazil of KPC-producing S. marcescens clinical isolate outside of a hospital environment. Caregivers should be alert for the presence of this isolate in the community setting. PMID:26422164

  5. [Post-antibiotic effect of imipenem, amikacin and ciprofloxacin against various strains of Serratia marcescens].

    PubMed

    Bollet, C; Mallet, M N; Bouchemal, H; de Micco, P

    1990-05-01

    The authors compared the post-antibiotic effect (PAE) of imipenem, amikacin, ciprofloxacin, and latamoxef against Serratia marcescens ATCC 13880 (type strain) and against 12 clinical strains belonging to Grimont's most frequent biotypes: A2a, A3a, A3b, A4a, A4b, A5, A6a, A8a, A8b, A8c, TT, TCT. PAE was determined by measuring bacterial growth kinetics after one hour exposure to concentration of 2 x MIC of 10(6) CFUs in Mueller-Hinton broth. Drug removal was by 10-3 dilution of the exposed culture. A PAE was consistently present with imipenem (range 0.8-2.9 hrs), amikacin (range 1.0-4.9 hrs), ciprofloxacin (range 1.4-2.8 hrs). The duration of PAE did not correlate with MIC or Grimont's biotypes.

  6. Properties of a class C beta-lactamase from Serratia marcescens.

    PubMed

    Joris, B; De Meester, F; Galleni, M; Masson, S; Dusart, J; Frère, J M; Van Beeumen, J; Bush, K; Sykes, R

    1986-11-01

    A beta-lactamase produced by a penicillin-resistant strain of Serratia marcescens was isolated and purified. The kcat. value for benzylpenicillin was about 5% of that observed for the best cephalosporin substrates. However, the low Km of the penam resulted in a high catalytic efficiency (kcat./Km) and the classification of the enzyme as a cephalosporinase might not be completely justified. It also exhibited a low but measurable activity against cefotaxime, cefuroxime, cefoxitin and moxalactam. Substrate-induced inactivation was observed both with a very good (cephalothin) or a very bad (moxalactam) substrate. The active site was labelled by beta-iodopenicillanate. Trypsin digestion produced a 19-residue active-site peptide whose sequence clearly allowed the classification of the enzyme as a class C beta-lactamase.

  7. The role of quorum sensing mediated developmental traits in the resistance of Serratia marcescens biofilms against protozoan grazing.

    PubMed

    Queck, Shu-Yeong; Weitere, Markus; Moreno, Ana María; Rice, Scott A; Kjelleberg, Staffan

    2006-06-01

    Resistance against protozoan grazers is a crucial factor that is important for the survival of many bacteria in their natural environment. However, the basis of resistance to protozoans and how resistance factors are regulated is poorly understood. In part, resistance may be due to biofilm formation, which is known to protect bacteria from environmental stress conditions. The ubiquitous organism Serratia marcescens uses quorum sensing (QS) control to regulate virulence factor expression and biofilm formation. We hypothesized that the QS system of S. marcescens also regulates mechanisms that protect biofilms against protozoan grazing. To investigate this hypothesis, we compared the interactions of wild-type and QS mutant strains of S. marcescens biofilms with two protozoans having different feeding types under batch and flow conditions. Under batch conditions, S. marcescens forms microcolony biofilms, and filamentous biofilms are formed under flow conditions. The microcolony-type biofilms were protected from grazing by the suspension feeder, flagellate Bodo saltans, but were not protected from the surface feeder, Acanthamoeba polyphaga. In contrast, the filamentous biofilm provided protection against A. polyphaga. The main findings presented in this study suggest that (i) the QS system is not involved in grazing resistance of S. marcescens microcolony-type biofilms; (ii) QS in S. marcescens regulates antiprotozoan factor(s) that do not interfere with the grazing efficiency of the protozoans; and (iii) QS-controlled, biofilm-specific differentiation of filaments and cell chains in biofilms of S. marcescens provides an efficient mechanism against protozoan grazing.

  8. Serratia marcescens arn, a PhoP-regulated locus necessary for polymyxin B resistance.

    PubMed

    Lin, Quei Yen; Tsai, Yi-Lin; Liu, Ming-Che; Lin, Wei-Cheng; Hsueh, Po-Ren; Liaw, Shwu-Jen

    2014-09-01

    Polymyxins, which are increasingly being used to treat infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria, perform poorly against Serratia marcescens. To investigate the underlying mechanisms, Tn5 mutagenesis was performed and two mutants exhibiting increased polymyxin B (PB) susceptibility were isolated. The mutants were found to have Tn5 inserted into the arnB and arnC genes. In other bacteria, arnB and arnC belong to the seven-gene arn operon, which is involved in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) modification. LPSs of arn mutants had greater PB-binding abilities than that of wild-type LPS. Further, we identified PhoP, a bacterial two-component response regulator, as a regulator of PB susceptibility in S. marcescens. By the reporter assay, we found PB- and low-Mg2+-induced expression of phoP and arn in the wild-type strain but not in the phoP mutant. Complementation of the phoP mutant with the full-length phoP gene restored the PB MIC and induction by PB and low Mg2+ levels, as in the wild type. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) further demonstrated that PhoP bound directly to the arn promoter. The PB challenge test confirmed that pretreatment with PB and low Mg2+ levels protected S. marcescens from a PB challenge in the wild-type strain but not in the phoP mutant. Real-time reverse transcriptase-PCR also indicated that PB serves as a signal to regulate expression of ugd, a gene required for LPS modification, in S. marcescens through a PhoP-dependent pathway. Finally, we found that PB-resistant clinical isolates displayed greater expression of arnA upon exposure to PB than did susceptible isolates. This is the first report to describe the role of S. marcescens arn in PB resistance and its modulation by PB and Mg2+ through the PhoP protein.

  9. The Rcs signal transduction pathway is triggered by enterobacterial common antigen structure alterations in Serratia marcescens.

    PubMed

    Castelli, María E; Véscovi, Eleonora García

    2011-01-01

    The enterobacterial common antigen (ECA) is a highly conserved exopolysaccharide in Gram-negative bacteria whose role remains largely uncharacterized. In a previous work, we have demonstrated that disrupting the integrity of the ECA biosynthetic pathway imposed severe deficiencies to the Serratia marcescens motile (swimming and swarming) capacity. In this work, we show that alterations in the ECA structure activate the Rcs phosphorelay, which results in the repression of the flagellar biogenesis regulatory cascade. In addition, a detailed analysis of wec cluster mutant strains, which provoke the disruption of the ECA biosynthesis at different levels of the pathway, suggests that the absence of the periplasmic ECA cyclic structure could constitute a potential signal detected by the RcsF-RcsCDB phosphorelay. We also identify SMA1167 as a member of the S. marcescens Rcs regulon and show that high osmolarity induces Rcs activity in this bacterium. These results provide a new perspective from which to understand the phylogenetic conservation of ECA among enterobacteria and the basis for the virulence attenuation detected in wec mutant strains in other pathogenic bacteria.

  10. Potential of Chitinolytic Serratia marcescens Strain JPP1 for Biological Control of Aspergillus parasiticus and Aflatoxin

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; Yan, Pei-sheng; Cao, Li-xin; Ding, Qing-long; Shao, Chi; Zhao, Teng-fei

    2013-01-01

    Serratia marcescens strain JPP1 was isolated from peanut hulls in Huai'an city, Jiangsu Province, China. Its potential to inhibit the mycelial growth of Aspergillus parasiticus and the subsequent aflatoxin production was evaluated. The strain JPP1 could produce chitinase to degrade fungal cell walls, which was the main mechanism of strain JPP1 for biocontrol. Scanning electron microscopy of fungi treated with the crude chitinase revealed abnormal morphological changes. While the strain was grown in the peanut hulls-based medium, the chitinase activity reached 7.39 units. RT-PCR analysis showed that the crude chitinase repressed the transcription of genes involved in the aflatoxin gene cluster, such as aflR, aflC (pksL1), and aflO (dmtA) genes. By visual agar plate assay and tip culture method, the strain JPP1 exhibited remarkable inhibitory effect on mycelia growth (antifungal ratio >95%) and subsequent aflatoxin production (antiaflatoxigenic ratio >98%). An in vitro assay with seed coating agent of bacterial suspension showed that strain JPP1 effectively reduced fungal growth and subsequent aflatoxin production on peanut seeds, and its antagonistic effect was superior to the common agricultural fungicide of carbendazim. These characteristics suggest that S. marcescens JPP1 strain could potentially be utilized for the biological control of phytopathogenic fungi and aflatoxin in Chinese peanut main producing areas. PMID:23865052

  11. Interactions between the tropical sea anemone Aiptasia pallida and Serratia marcescens, an opportunistic pathogen of corals.

    PubMed

    Krediet, Cory J; Meyer, Julie L; Gimbrone, Nicholas; Yanong, Roy; Berzins, Ilze; Alagely, Ali; Castro, Herman; Ritchie, Kim B; Paul, Valerie J; Teplitski, Max

    2014-06-01

    Coral reefs are under increasing stress caused by global and local environmental changes, which are thought to increase the susceptibility of corals to opportunistic pathogens. In the absence of an easily culturable model animal, the understanding of the mechanisms of disease progression in corals remains fairly limited. In the present study, we tested the susceptibility of the tropical sea anemone Aiptasia pallida to an opportunistic coral pathogen (Serratia marcescens). A. pallida was susceptible to S. marcescens PDL100 and responded to this opportunistic coral pathogen with darkening of the tissues and retraction of tentacles, followed by complete disintegration of polyp tissues. Histological observations revealed loss of zooxanthellae and structural changes in eosinophilic granular cells in response to pathogen infection. A screen of S. marcescens mutants identified a motility and tetrathionate reductase mutants as defective in virulence in the A. pallida infection model. In co-infections with the wild-type strain, the tetrathionate reductase mutant was less fit within the surface mucopolysaccharide layer of the host coral Acropora palmata.

  12. Ribotyping provides efficient differentiation of nosocomial Serratia marcescens isolates in a pediatric hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Bingen, E H; Mariani-Kurkdjian, P; Lambert-Zechovsky, N Y; Desjardins, P; Denamur, E; Aujard, Y; Vilmer, E; Elion, J

    1992-01-01

    Ribotyping with a nonradioactive probing system was used for the epidemiological evaluation of 15 Serratia marcescens nosocomial strains isolated from the stools of 12 children with no apparent illness in five different hospital wards over a 20-day period. Our results indicate that the occurrence of S. marcescens colonization was the result of the spread of a single epidemiological strain in the hematology ward, the oncology ward, and the gastroenterology ward and in two neonates in the neonatology ward, suggesting cross-contamination between the patients in these four wards. This isolate was genotypically unrelated to the bacterial strain found in the three other patients in the neonatology ward. Interestingly, one patient in the neonatology ward harbored these two genotypically different strains. Finally, the patient in the intensive care unit was colonized with a different strain. We find ribotyping to be a more reliable technique than biochemical typing. The results of ribotyping are more easily interpreted than are those of total DNA analysis, with an equivalent degree of discrimination. Images PMID:1354222

  13. Identification of SlpB, a Cytotoxic Protease from Serratia marcescens

    PubMed Central

    Stella, Nicholas A.; Hunt, Kristin M.; Brothers, Kimberly M.; Zhang, Liang; Thibodeau, Patrick H.

    2015-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium and opportunistic pathogen Serratia marcescens causes ocular infections in healthy individuals. Secreted protease activity was characterized from 44 ocular clinical isolates, and a higher frequency of protease-positive strains was observed among keratitis isolates than among conjunctivitis isolates. A positive correlation between protease activity and cytotoxicity to human corneal epithelial cells in vitro was determined. Deletion of prtS in clinical keratitis isolate K904 reduced, but did not eliminate, cytotoxicity and secreted protease production. This indicated that PrtS is necessary for full cytotoxicity to ocular cells and implied the existence of another secreted protease(s) and cytotoxic factors. Bioinformatic analysis of the S. marcescens Db11 genome revealed three additional open reading frames predicted to code for serralysin-like proteases noted here as slpB, slpC, and slpD. Induced expression of prtS and slpB, but not slpC and slpD, in strain PIC3611 rendered the strain cytotoxic to a lung carcinoma cell line; however, only prtS induction was sufficient for cytotoxicity to a corneal cell line. Strain K904 with deletion of both prtS and slpB genes was defective in secreted protease activity and cytotoxicity to human cell lines. PAGE analysis suggests that SlpB is produced at lower levels than PrtS. Purified SlpB demonstrated calcium-dependent and AprI-inhibited protease activity and cytotoxicity to airway and ocular cell lines in vitro. Lastly, genetic analysis indicated that the type I secretion system gene, lipD, is required for SlpB secretion. These genetic data introduce SlpB as a new cytotoxic protease from S. marcescens. PMID:25939509

  14. Identification of SlpB, a Cytotoxic Protease from Serratia marcescens.

    PubMed

    Shanks, Robert M Q; Stella, Nicholas A; Hunt, Kristin M; Brothers, Kimberly M; Zhang, Liang; Thibodeau, Patrick H

    2015-07-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium and opportunistic pathogen Serratia marcescens causes ocular infections in healthy individuals. Secreted protease activity was characterized from 44 ocular clinical isolates, and a higher frequency of protease-positive strains was observed among keratitis isolates than among conjunctivitis isolates. A positive correlation between protease activity and cytotoxicity to human corneal epithelial cells in vitro was determined. Deletion of prtS in clinical keratitis isolate K904 reduced, but did not eliminate, cytotoxicity and secreted protease production. This indicated that PrtS is necessary for full cytotoxicity to ocular cells and implied the existence of another secreted protease(s) and cytotoxic factors. Bioinformatic analysis of the S. marcescens Db11 genome revealed three additional open reading frames predicted to code for serralysin-like proteases noted here as slpB, slpC, and slpD. Induced expression of prtS and slpB, but not slpC and slpD, in strain PIC3611 rendered the strain cytotoxic to a lung carcinoma cell line; however, only prtS induction was sufficient for cytotoxicity to a corneal cell line. Strain K904 with deletion of both prtS and slpB genes was defective in secreted protease activity and cytotoxicity to human cell lines. PAGE analysis suggests that SlpB is produced at lower levels than PrtS. Purified SlpB demonstrated calcium-dependent and AprI-inhibited protease activity and cytotoxicity to airway and ocular cell lines in vitro. Lastly, genetic analysis indicated that the type I secretion system gene, lipD, is required for SlpB secretion. These genetic data introduce SlpB as a new cytotoxic protease from S. marcescens.

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of a Multidrug-Resistant Nosocomial Serratia marcescens Strain That Persisted in a Hospital in Kemerovo, Russian Federation

    PubMed Central

    Azarov, Daniil; Goncharov, Artemiy; Brodina, Tatyana; Lebedeva, Ekaterina; Taranenko, Irina; Feting, Anna; Bakaev, Michael; Brusina, Elena; Zueva, Lyudmila

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Serratia marcescens is a frequent cause of health care-associated infections and has led to multiple outbreaks. Here, we report the draft genome of a multidrug-resistant S. marcescens strain 189 which was isolated in 2012 as a predominant clone in a neonatal hospital in Kemerovo. PMID:28280035

  16. Insights of biosurfactant producing Serratia marcescens strain W2.3 isolated from diseased tilapia fish: a draft genome analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Serratia marcescens is an opportunistic bacterial pathogen with broad range of host ranging from vertebrates, invertebrates and plants. S. marcescens strain W2.3 was isolated from a diseased tilapia fish and it was suspected to be the causal agent for the fish disease as virulence genes were found within its genome. In this study, for the first time, the genome sequences of S. marcescens strain W2.3 were sequenced using the Illumina MiSeq platform. Result Several virulent factors of S. marcescens such as serrawettin, a biosurfactant, has been reported to be regulated by N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL)-based quorum sensing (QS). In our previous studies, an unusual AHL with long acyl side chain was detected from this isolate suggesting the possibility of novel virulence factors regulation. This evokes our interest in the genome of this bacterial strain and hereby we present the draft genome of S. marcescens W2.3, which carries the serrawettin production gene, swrA and the AHL-based QS transcriptional regulator gene, luxR which is an orphan luxR. Conclusion With the availability of the whole genome sequences of S. marcescens W2.3, this will pave the way for the study of the QS-mediated genes expression in this bacterium. PMID:24148830

  17. SME-3, a novel member of the Serratia marcescens SME family of carbapenem-hydrolyzing beta-lactamases.

    PubMed

    Queenan, Anne Marie; Shang, Wenchi; Schreckenberger, Paul; Lolans, Karen; Bush, Karen; Quinn, John

    2006-10-01

    Imipenem-resistant Serratia marcescens isolates were cultured from a lung transplant patient given multiple antibiotics over several months. The strains expressed SME-3, a beta-lactamase of the rare SME carbapenem-hydrolyzing family. SME-3 differed from SME-1 by a single amino acid substitution of tyrosine for histidine at position 105, but the two beta-lactamases displayed similar hydrolytic profiles.

  18. Effects of anti-odor automobile air-conditioning system products on adherence of Serratia marcescens to aluminum.

    PubMed

    Drago, G K; Simmons, R B; Price, D L; Crow, S A; Ahearn, D G

    2002-12-01

    Sixteen commercial products for use in automobile air-conditioning systems (ACS), most designated for abatement of malodors presumably of microbial origin, were examined for their potential to inhibit attachment and to detach cells of the Gram-negative bacterium Serratia marcescens on aluminum sections. Numbers of attached cells were appreciably reduced (>60%) following immersion in three alcohol-type and two acrylic-coating-type products. Several products had essentially no effect on the attached cells. Most of the products indicated for alleviation of associated microbial odors from ACS provided only short-term effects. When products were coated onto aluminum prior to exposure to the cells, water-insoluble coatings appeared to provide more consistent inhibition of primary adherence of S. marcescens. The differences in degrees of primary adherence of a selected strain of S. marcescens to variously treated aluminum provided a rapid and reproducible assessment of potential antimicrobial efficacy of ACS products.

  19. Recent independent emergence of multiple multidrug-resistant Serratia marcescens clones within the United Kingdom and Ireland

    PubMed Central

    Moradigaravand, Danesh; Boinett, Christine J.; Martin, Veronique; Peacock, Sharon J.; Parkhill, Julian

    2016-01-01

    Serratia marcescens, a member of the Enterobacteriaceae family, is a Gram-negative bacterium responsible for a wide range of nosocomial infections. The emergence of multidrug-resistant strains is an increasing danger to public health. To design effective means to control the dissemination of S. marcescens, an in-depth analysis of the population structure and variation is required. Utilizing whole-genome sequencing, we characterized the population structure and variation, as well as the antimicrobial resistance determinants, of a systematic collection of antimicrobial-resistant S. marcescens associated with bloodstream infections in hospitals across the United Kingdom and Ireland between 2001 and 2011. Our results show that S. marcescens is a diverse species with a high level of genomic variation. However, the collection was largely composed of a limited number of clones that emerged from this diverse background within the past few decades. We identified potential recent transmissions of these clones, within and between hospitals, and showed that they have acquired antimicrobial resistance determinants for different beta-lactams, ciprofloxacin, and tetracyclines on multiple occasions. The expansion of these multidrug-resistant clones suggests that the treatment of S. marcescens infections will become increasingly difficult in the future. PMID:27432456

  20. Biosynthesis of bismuth nanoparticles using Serratia marcescens isolated from the Caspian Sea and their characterisation.

    PubMed

    Nazari, P; Faramarzi, M A; Sepehrizadeh, Z; Mofid, M R; Bazaz, R D; Shahverdi, A R

    2012-06-01

    Today, synthesis of nanoparticles (NPs) using micro-organisms has been receiving increasing attention. In this investigation, a bismuth-reducing bacterium was isolated from the Caspian Sea in Northern Iran and was used for intracellular biosynthesis of elemental bismuth NPs. This isolate was identified as non-pigmented Serratia marcescens using conventional identification assays and the 16s rDNA fragment amplification method and used to prepare bismuth NPs. The biogenic bismuth NPs were released by liquid nitrogen and highly purified using an n-octanol water two-phase extraction system. Different characterisations of the purified NPs such as particle shapes, size and purity were carried out with different instruments. The energy-dispersive X-ray and X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns demonstrated that the purified NPs consisted of only bismuth and are amorphous. In addition, the transmission electron micrograph showed that the small NPs formed larger aggregated NPs around <150 nm. Although the chemical syntheses of elemental bismuth NPs have been reported in the literature, the biological synthesis of elemental bismuth NPs has not been published yet. This is the first report to demonstrate a biological method for synthesising bismuth NPs and their purification with a simple solvent partitioning method.

  1. Influence of incubation temperature on biofilm formation and corrosion of carbon steel by Serratia marcescens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harimawan, Ardiyan; Devianto, Hary; Kurniawan, Ignatius Chandra; Utomo, Josephine Christine

    2017-01-01

    Microbial induced corrosion (MIC) or biocorrosion is one type of corrosion, directly or indirectly influenced by microbial activities, by forming biofilm and adhering on the metal surface. When forming biofilm, the microorganisms can produce extracellular products which influence the cathodic and anodic reactions on metal surfaces. This will result in electrochemical changes in the interface between the biofilm and the metal surface, leading to corrosion and deterioration of the metal. MIC might be caused by various types of microorganism which leads to different corrosion mechanism and reaction kinetics. Furthermore, this process will also be influenced by various environmental conditions, such as pH and temperature. This research is aimed to determine the effect of incubation temperature on corrosion of carbon steel caused by Serratia marcescens in a mixture solution of synthetic seawater with Luria Bertani medium with a ratio of 4:1. The incubation was performed for 19 days with incubation temperature of 30, 37, and 50°C. The analyses of biofilm were conducted by total plate count (TPC), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Biofilm was found to be evenly growth on the surface and increasing with increasing incubation temperature. It consists of functional group of alcohol, alkane, amine, nitro, sulfate, carboxylic acid, and polysulfide. The analyses of the corrosion were conducted by gravimetric and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Higher incubation temperature was found to increase the corrosion rate. However, the corrosion products were not detected by XRD analysis.

  2. Heterotrophic nitrogen removal by a newly-isolated alkalitolerant microorganism, Serratia marcescens W5.

    PubMed

    Wang, Teng; Dang, Qifeng; Liu, Chengsheng; Yan, Jingquan; Fan, Bing; Cha, Dongsu; Yin, Yanyan; Zhang, Yubei

    2016-07-01

    A new microbe, Serratia marcescens W5 was successfully isolated. Its feasibility in purification of excessively nitrogen-containing wastewater was evaluated using inorganic nitrogen media. Single factor tests showed that W5 exhibited high ammonium removal rates (above 80%) under different culture conditions (pH 7-10, C/N ratios of 6-20, 15-35°C, 0-2.5% of salinity, respectively). Besides various organic carbon sources, W5 was able to utilize calcium carbonate with 28.05% of ammonium removed. Further experiments indicated that W5 was capable of resisting high-strength ammonium (1200mg/L) with the maximum removal rate of 514.13mgL(-1)d(-1). The nitrogen removal pathway of W5 was also tested, showing that both nitrite and nitrate were efficiently removed only in the presence of ammonium, with hydroxylamine as intermediate, which was different from the conventional nitrogen removal pathway. All the results verified that W5 was a good candidate for the purification of excessively nitrogenous wastewater.

  3. Mechanisms involved in Escherichia coli and Serratia marcescens removal during activated sludge wastewater treatment

    PubMed Central

    Orruño, Maite; Garaizabal, Idoia; Bravo, Zaloa; Parada, Claudia; Barcina, Isabel; Arana, Inés

    2014-01-01

    Wastewater treatment reduces environmental contamination by removing gross solids and mitigating the effects of pollution. Treatment also reduces the number of indicator organisms and pathogens. In this work, the fates of two coliform bacteria, Escherichia coli and Serratia marcescens, were analyzed in an activated sludge process to determine the main mechanisms involved in the reduction of pathogenic microorganisms during wastewater treatment. These bacteria, modified to express green fluorescent protein, were inoculated in an activated sludge unit and in batch systems containing wastewater. The results suggested that, among the different biological factors implied in bacterial removal, bacterivorous protozoa play a key role. Moreover, a representative number of bacteria persisted in the system as free-living or embedded cells, but their distribution into liquid or solid fractions varied depending on the bacterium tested, questioning the real value of bacterial indicators for the control of wastewater treatment process. Additionally, viable but nonculturable cells constituted an important part of the bacterial population adhered to solid fractions, what can be derived from the competition relationships with native bacteria, present in high densities in this environment. These facts, taken together, emphasize the need for reliable quantitative and qualitative analysis tools for the evaluation of pathogenic microbial composition in sludge, which could represent an undefined risk to public health and ecosystem functions when considering its recycling. PMID:25044599

  4. Survival of Serratia marcescens in benzalkonium chloride and in multiple-dose medication vials: relationship to epidemic septic arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, A K; Highsmith, A K; Martone, W J

    1987-01-01

    In an epidemic of septic arthritis due to Serratia marcescens, the intra-articular injection of contaminated methylprednisolone may have played a key role. The epidemic strain was found in used multiple-dose vials of methylprednisolone and in a canister of cotton balls soaked in benzalkonium chloride. The cotton balls had been used for antisepsis and disinfection. Growth characteristics of the epidemic strain of S. marcescens were compared with those of control strains of S. marcescens which had been obtained from unrelated nosocomial outbreaks. The epidemic strain was able to survive in 1:100 dilutions of benzalkonium chloride and was able to grow to greater than 10(5) CFU/ml in multiple-dose vials of methylprednisoline; control strains could not be recovered after 24 h in the same solutions. The preservative in methylprednisolone is gamma-myristyl picolinium chloride, a compound chemically related to benzalkonium chloride. We speculate that the epidemic strain of S. marcescens, which was resistant to benzalkonium chloride, had cross-resistance to gamma-myristyl picolinium chloride. If the cotton balls were used to disinfect the tops of the multiple-dose vials of methylprednisolone, small numbers of organisms subsequently introduced into the solution could have grown to high concentrations. PMID:3298309

  5. Serratia marcescens Induces Apoptotic Cell Death in Host Immune Cells via a Lipopolysaccharide- and Flagella-dependent Mechanism*

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Kenichi; Adachi, Tatsuo; Imamura, Katsutoshi; Takano, Shinya; Usui, Kimihito; Suzuki, Kazushi; Hamamoto, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Takeshi; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa

    2012-01-01

    Injection of Serratia marcescens into the blood (hemolymph) of the silkworm, Bombyx mori, induced the activation of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK), followed by caspase activation and apoptosis of blood cells (hemocytes). This process impaired the innate immune response in which pathogen cell wall components, such as glucan, stimulate hemocytes, leading to the activation of insect cytokine paralytic peptide. S. marcescens induced apoptotic cell death of silkworm hemocytes and mouse peritoneal macrophages in vitro. We searched for S. marcescens transposon mutants with attenuated ability to induce apoptosis of silkworm hemocytes. Among the genes identified, disruption mutants of wecA (a gene involved in lipopolysaccharide O-antigen synthesis), and flhD and fliR (essential genes in flagella synthesis) showed reduced motility and impaired induction of mouse macrophage cell death. These findings suggest that S. marcescens induces apoptosis of host immune cells via lipopolysaccharide- and flagella-dependent motility, leading to the suppression of host innate immunity. PMID:22859304

  6. Synthesis of hydroxytyrosol, 2-hydroxyphenylacetic acid, and 3-hydroxyphenylacetic acid by differential conversion of tyrosol isomers using Serratia marcescens strain.

    PubMed

    Allouche, Noureddine; Sayadi, Sami

    2005-08-10

    We investigated to develop an effective procedure to produce the potentially high-added-value phenolic compounds through bioconversion of tyrosol isomers. A soil bacterium, designated Serratia marcescens strain, was isolated on the basis of its ability to grow on p-tyrosol (4-hydroxyphenylethanol) as a sole source of carbon and energy. During growth on p-tyrosol, Ser. marcescens strain was capable of promoting the formation of hydroxytyrosol. To achieve maximal hydroxytyrosol yield, the growth state of the culture utilized for p-tyrosol conversion as well as the amount of p-tyrosol that was treated were optimized. The optimal yield of hydroxytyrosol (80%) was obtained by Ser. marcescens growing cells after a 7-h incubation using 2 g/L of p-tyrosol added at the end of the exponential phase to a culture pregrown on 1 g/L of p-tyrosol. Furthermore, the substrate specificity of the developed biosynthesis was investigated using m-tyrosol (3-hydroxyphenylethanol) and o-tyrosol (2-hydroxyphenylethanol) as substrates. Ser. marcescens strain transformed completely m-tyrosol and o-tyrosol into 3-hydroxyphenylacetic acid and 2-hydroxyphenylacetic acid, respectively, via the oxidation of the side chain carbon of the treated substrates. This proposed procedure is an alternative approach to obtain hydroxytyrosol, 2-hydroxyphenylacetic acid, and 3-hydroxyphenylacetic acid in an environmentally friendly way which could encourage their use as alternatives in the search for replacement of synthetic food additives.

  7. Serratia marcescens-contaminated baby shampoo causing an outbreak among newborns at King Abdulaziz University Hospital, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Madani, T A; Alsaedi, S; James, L; Eldeek, B S; Jiman-Fatani, A A; Alawi, M M; Marwan, D; Cudal, M; Macapagal, M; Bahlas, R; Farouq, M

    2011-05-01

    During November 2008 to January 2009, 11 babies in the neonatal intensive care (NICU) and three babies in the nursery were infected with Serratia marcescens at King Abdulaziz University Hospital in Saudi Arabia. Overall, fifteen infections were identified among 11 newborns in the NICU: septicaemia (five cases), purulent conjunctivitis (three), urinary tract infection (two), meningitis (two) and cellulitis (one). Three newborns in the nursery had three infections: purulent conjunctivitis (two cases) and omphalitis (one). Thirteen of 14 babies recovered fully but one died from S. marcescens meningitis and septicaemia. All infections were traced to intrinsically contaminated baby shampoo introduced to the units five days before the first reported case. The outbreak terminated following withdrawal of the shampoo product.

  8. Comparative susceptibilities of clinical isolates of Serratia marcescens to newer cephalosporins, alone and in combination with various aminoglycosides.

    PubMed Central

    Markowitz, S M; Sibilla, D J

    1980-01-01

    We examined 100 clinically significant isolates of Serratia marcescens for susceptibility to newer cephalosporin and cephamycin antibiotics, alone and in combination with various aminoglycosides. Moxalactam and cefotaxime were the most effective agents; all isolates were inhibited by 25 and 50 micrograms/ml, respectively. All strains were susceptible to amikacin at concentrations safely achievable in serum, whereas gentamicin, netilmicin, and tobramycin inhibited 63, 63, and 16% of the isolates, respectively. Moxalactam, cefotaxime, and amikacin were active against gentamicin-susceptible and gentamicin-resistant strains. Studies of synergy revealed that moxalactam and cefotaxime, in combination with netilmicin or amikacin, were often synergistic and infrequently antagonistic against cephalothin- and gentamicin-resistant strains. These results suggest that moxalactam and cefotaxime, alone or in combination, may be efficacious in treating infections due to multiply antibiotic-resistant S. marcescens. PMID:7004344

  9. Serratia marcescens infected silk suture rejected by combined acupuncture, moxibustion and low-power laser therapy from the abdominal fascia.

    PubMed

    Sternfeld, M; Finkelstein, Y; Hod, I

    1988-01-01

    Upper abdominal pains lasting 12 years after cholecystectomy, were improved in an 82-year-old woman following the rejection of indigestable silk surgical sutures induced by combined therapy of acupuncture, moxibustion and low-power laser beam irradiation directed to an old post-cholecystectomy scar. An inflammatory reaction followed by granulation tissue mass was developed. Embedded in the granulation tissue were the above mentioned silk sutures which finally were expelled through the skin at the operation scar. A surgical procedure suggested to the patient, in case of acupuncture therapy failure, was obviously avoided. Serratia-marcescens infection of the expelled material was bacteriologically defined.

  10. Effect of Sodium Fluorescein and Plating Medium on Recovery of Irradiated Escherichia coli and Serratia marcescens from Aerosols

    PubMed Central

    Dorsey, Emerson L.; Berendt, Richard F.; Neff, Everett L.

    1970-01-01

    Irradiation of aerosols of either Escherichia coli or Serratia marcescens with simulated solar (xenon) radiation caused a significant decrease in viability. When sodium fluorescein was employed to determine the physical loss of organisms from the aerosol, an additional adverse effect upon survival was noted. The decay curves indicated that at least two mechanisms of inactivation were operative, one due to aerosolization, the other to irradiation. After collection from aerosols, both species of microorganisms grew better on blood agar base than on Casitone agar, but this finding did not appear to be related to the effect of irradiation. PMID:4922085

  11. Production of prodigiosin and chitinases by tropical Serratia marcescens strains with potential to control plant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Román, Martha Ingrid; Holguín-Meléndez, Francisco; Bello-Mendoza, Ricardo; Guillén-Navarro, Karina; Dunn, Michael F; Huerta-Palacios, Graciela

    2012-01-01

    The potential of three Serratia marcescens strains (CFFSUR-B2, CFFSUR-B3 and CFFSUR-B4) isolated from tropical regions in Mexico to inhibit the mycelial growth and conidial germination of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, causal agent of fruit anthracnose, was evaluated. The ability of these strains to produce prodigiosin and chitinases when cultivated in oil seed-based media (peanut, sesame, soybean and castor bean) and in Luria-Bertani medium was determined. All of the strains exhibited similar fungal antagonistic activities and inhibited myceliar growth by more than 40% while inhibiting conidial germination by 81-89% (P = 0.01). The highest level of prodigiosin (40 μg/ml) was produced in the peanut-based medium while growth in soybean-based medium allowed the highest production of chitinases (56 units/ml), independent of the strain used. Strain CFFSUR-B2 grown in peanut medium was used to evaluate the effect of inoculum density and initial pH on metabolite production. The amount of prodigiosin produced increased with greater inoculum densities, with an initial density of 1 × 10(12) resulting in the highest production (60 μg/ml). Prodigiosin production was not affected by pH. The strains studied have the advantage of being adapted to tropical climates and are able to produce chitinases in the absence of chitin induction in vitro. These characteristics suggest their potential as biocontrol agents for fungal pathogens in tropical regions of the world.

  12. Biodegradation of diazinon by Serratia marcescens DI101 and its use in bioremediation of contaminated environment.

    PubMed

    Abo-Amer, Aly

    2011-01-01

    Four diazinon-degrading bacteria were isolated from agricultural soil by using an enrichment technique. The biochemical analysis and molecular method including RFLP indicated that these isolates were identical, and one strain designated DI101 was selected for further study. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rDNA sequencing indicated that the strain DI101 clearly belongs to the Serratia marcescens group. The ability of the strain to utilize diazinon as a source of carbon and phosphorus was investigated under different culture conditions. The DI101 strain was able to completely degrade 50 mg/l diazinon in MSM within 11 days with a degradation rate of 0.226 day-1. The inoculation of sterilized soil treated with 100 mg/kg of diazinon with 10(6) CFU/g DI101 resulted in a faster degradation rate than was recorded in non-sterilized soil. The diazinon degradation rate by DI101 was efficient at temperatures from 25 to 30degrees C and at pHs from 7.0 to 8.0. The degradation rate of diazinon was not affected by the absence of a phosphorus supplement, and addition of other carbon sources (glucose or succinate) resulted in the slowing down of the degradation rate. The maximum degradation rate (Vmax) of diazinon was 0.292 day-1 and its saturation constant (Ks) was 11 mg/l, as determined by a Michaelis-Menten curve. The strain was able to degrade diethylthiophosphate-containing organophosphates such as chlorpyrifos, coumaphos, parathion, and isazofos when provided as a source of carbon and phosphorus, but not ethoprophos, cadusafos, and fenamiphos. These results propose useful information for the potential application of the DI101 strain in bioremediation of pesticide-contaminated environments.

  13. Significant improvement of Serratia marcescens lipase fermentation, by optimizing medium, induction, and oxygen supply.

    PubMed

    Long, Zhang-De; Xu, Jian-He; Pan, Jiang

    2007-08-01

    Production of an extracellular lipase from Serratia marcescens ECU1010, which is an industrially important biocatalyst for the stereospecific synthesis of Diltiazem precursor, was carefully optimized in both shake flasks and a fermenter, using Tween-80 as the enzyme inducer. Dextrin and beef extract combined with ammonium sulfate were indicated to be the best carbon and nitrogen sources, respectively. With the increase of Tween-80 from 0 to 10 g l-1, the lipase production was greatly enhanced from merely 250 U l-1 to a maximum of 3,340 U l-1, giving the highest lipase yield of ca 640 U g-1 dry cell mass (DCW), although the maximum biomass (6.0 g DCW l-1) was achieved at 15 g l-1 of Tween-80. When the medium loading in shake flasks was reduced from 20 to 10% (v / v), the lipase production was significantly enhanced. The increase in shaking speed also resulted in an improvement of the lipase production, although the cell growth was slightly repressed, suggesting that the increase of dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration contributed to the enhancements of lipase yield. When the lipase fermentation was carried out in a 5-l fermenter, the lipase production reached a new maximum of 11,060 U l-1 by simply raising the aeration rate from 0.5 to 1.0 vvm, while keeping the dissolved oxygen above 20% saturation via intermittent adjustment of the agitation speed (> or =400 rpm), in the presence of a relatively low concentration (2 g l-1) of Tween-80 to prevent a potential foaming problem, which is easy to occur in the intensively aerated fermenter.

  14. Structure of the imipenem-hydrolyzing class A beta-lactamase SME-1 from Serratia marcescens.

    PubMed

    Sougakoff, Wladimir; L'Hermite, Guillaume; Pernot, Lucile; Naas, Thierry; Guillet, Valérie; Nordmann, Patrice; Jarlier, Vincent; Delettré, Jean

    2002-02-01

    The structure of the beta-lactamase SME-1 from Serratia marcescens, a class A enzyme characterized by its significant activity against imipenem, has been determined to 2.13 A resolution. The overall structure of SME-1 is similar to that of other class A beta-lactamases. In the active-site cavity, most of the residues found in SME-1 are conserved among class A beta-lactamases, except at positions 104, 105 and 237, where a tyrosine, a histidine and a serine are found, respectively, and at position 238, which is occupied by a cysteine forming a disulfide bridge with the other cysteine residue located at position 69. The crucial role played by this disulfide bridge in SME-1 was confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis of Cys69 to Ala, which resulted in a mutant unable to confer resistance to imipenem and all other beta-lactam antibiotics tested. Another striking structural feature found in SME-1 was the short distance separating the side chains of the active serine residue at position 70 and the strictly conserved glutamate at position 166, which is up to 1.4 A shorter in SME-1 compared with other class A beta-lactamases. Consequently, the SME-1 structure cannot accommodate the essential catalytic water molecule found between Ser70 and Glu166 in the other class A beta-lactamases described so far, suggesting that a significant conformational change may be necessary in SME-1 to properly position the hydrolytic water molecule involved in the hydrolysis of the acyl-enzyme intermediate.

  15. Epidemiological and bacteriological investigation of Serratia marcescens epidemic in a nursery and in a neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed Central

    Montanaro, D.; Grasso, G. M.; Annino, I.; De Ruggiero, N.; Scarcella, A.; Schioppa, F.

    1984-01-01

    An epidemic caused by Serratia marcescens that involved 26 infants admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) and 82 infants admitted to the Nursery of the 2nd Medical School of Naples is reported. Two different biotypes of S. marcescens with two completely different epidemiological patterns were identified. The prevalent biotype (A8b trigonelline-) was isolated in the delivery room, in the operating room, in the Nursery and in the NICU from items, healthy infant excreters and affected infants; the second biotype (A3a) was isolated only in the NICU from staff, two healthy infant excreters and two affected infants. Colonization of the throat and the gastrointestinal tract was frequent. Infected and colonized infants were the most important reservoir for serratia in the Nursery and in the NICU particularly for the type strain A3a. A mucus aspiration apparatus contaminated in the delivery room and the contamination of several instruments and items probably had a major role in the initiation and maintenance of the spread of the A8b strain. Mass contamination of the nursery has been related to overcrowding and a lack of the control measures; the transfer of high-risk colonized infants caused spread in the NICU. In the NICU the attack rate 26%; 69% of infants became ill; the case fatality ratio was 19%. Epidemiological investigation of the infants at risk showed some factors predisposing to infection with serratia. The hygienic measures failed to control the spread of serratia and it was necessary to refuse new admissions to pregnant women in order to decontaminate and re-organize the wards. PMID:6379044

  16. Serratia Secondary Metabolite Prodigiosin Inhibits Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Development by Producing Reactive Oxygen Species that Damage Biological Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Kimyon, Önder; Das, Theerthankar; Ibugo, Amaye I.; Kutty, Samuel K.; Ho, Kitty K.; Tebben, Jan; Kumar, Naresh; Manefield, Mike

    2016-01-01

    Prodigiosin is a heterocyclic bacterial secondary metabolite belonging to the class of tripyrrole compounds, synthesized by various types of bacteria including Serratia species. Prodigiosin has been the subject of intense research over the last decade for its ability to induce apoptosis in several cancer cell lines. Reports suggest that prodigiosin promotes oxidative damage to double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) in the presence of copper ions and consequently leads to inhibition of cell-cycle progression and cell death. However, prodigiosin has not been previously implicated in biofilm inhibition. In this study, the link between prodigiosin and biofilm inhibition through the production of redox active metabolites is presented. Our study showed that prodigiosin (500 μM) (extracted from Serratia marcescens culture) and a prodigiosin/copper(II) (100 μM each) complex have strong RNA and dsDNA cleaving properties while they have no pronounced effect on protein. Results support a role for oxidative damage to biomolecules by H2O2 and hydroxyl radical generation. Further, it was demonstrated that reactive oxygen species scavengers significantly reduced the DNA and RNA cleaving property of prodigiosin. P. aeruginosa cell surface hydrophobicity and biofilm integrity were significantly altered due to the cleavage of nucleic acids by prodigiosin or the prodigiosin/copper(II) complex. In addition, prodigiosin also facilitated the bactericidal activity. The ability of prodigiosinto cause nucleic acid degradation offers novel opportunities to interfere with extracellular DNA dependent bacterial biofilms. PMID:27446013

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of Serratia marcescens Strain LCT-SM166, a Space Flight Strain with a Specific Carbon Source Utilization Pattern.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yajuan; Du, Yu; Yuan, Yanting; Guo, Yinghua; Wang, Junfeng; Li, Tianzhi; Chang, De; Liu, Yan; Jiang, Xuege; Dai, Wenkui; Liu, Changting

    2014-02-13

    Serratia marcescens has been detected in space habitats. To explore the influence of the space flight environment on this bacterium, we investigated the genome sequence of LCT-SM166, which was isolated after space flight and has a specific carbon source utilization pattern.

  18. Coproduction of KPC-2 and IMP-10 in Carbapenem-Resistant Serratia marcescens Isolates from an Outbreak in a Brazilian Teaching Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Kesia Esther; Cayô, Rodrigo; Carvalhaes, Cecilia Godoy; Patussi Correia Sacchi, Flávia; Rodrigues-Costa, Fernanda; Ramos da Silva, Ana Carolina; Croda, Julio; Gales, Ana Cristina

    2015-01-01

    We describe an outbreak caused by KPC-2- and IMP-10-producing Serratia marcescens isolates in a Brazilian teaching hospital. Tigecycline was the only active antimicrobial agent tested. The blaIMP-10 gene was located in a new class 1 integron, named In990, carried by a nonconjugative plasmid, in contrast to blaKPC-2. PMID:25878341

  19. Ethanol extracts of Serratia marcescens are compatible with Trichoderma isolates for control of damping-off of cucumber caused by Pythium ultimum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Environmentally friendly control measures for soil-borne plant pathogens are needed that are effective in different soils when applied alone or as components of an integrated disease control strategy. Ethanol extracts of Serratia marcescens N4-5 when applied as a cucumber seed treatment effectively ...

  20. Outer membrane and porin characteristics of Serratia marcescens grown in vitro and in rat intraperitoneal diffusion chambers.

    PubMed Central

    Malouin, F; Campbell, G D; Halpenny, M; Becker, G W; Parr, T R

    1990-01-01

    The composition and antibiotic permeability barrier of the outer membrane of Serratia marcescens were assessed in cells grown in vivo and in vitro. Intraperitoneal diffusion chambers implanted in rats were used for the in vivo cultivation of bacteria. Outer membranes isolated from log-phase bacterial cells recovered from these chambers were compared with membranes isolated from cells grown in vitro. Analysis revealed that the suspected 41-kilodalton porin and the OmpA protein were recovered on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels in equal quantities. Several high-molecular-weight proteins, thought to be iron starvation induced, appeared in the diffusion chamber-grown cells. The outer membrane permeability barriers to cephaloridine were similar in in vivo- and in vitro-grown cells based on permeability coefficient calculations. The permeability coefficient of cephaloridine in S. marcescens cells (30.3 x 10(-5) to 38.9 x 10(-5) cm s-1) was greater than that obtained for an Escherichia coli strain expressing only porin OmpC but smaller than those obtained for the E. coli wild type and a strain expressing only porin OmpF. Functional characterization of the suspected porin was performed by using the planar lipid bilayer technology. The sodium dodecyl sulfate-0.4 M NaCl-soluble porin from both in vitro- and in vivo-grown cells showed an average single-channel conductance in 1 M KCl of 1.6. A partial amino acid sequence (19 residues) was obtained for the S. marcescens porin. The sequence showed a very high homology to the E. coli OmpC porin. These data identified the S. marcescens outer membrane 41-kilodalton protein as a porin by both functional and amino acid analyses. Also, the methodology used allowed for efficient growth and recovery of diffusion chamber-grown bacterial cells and permitted identification of specific in vivo-induced changes in bacterial cell membrane composition. Images PMID:2157667

  1. Biodegradation and bioremediation potential of diazinon-degrading Serratia marcescens to remove other organophosphorus pesticides from soils.

    PubMed

    Cycoń, Mariusz; Żmijowska, Agnieszka; Wójcik, Marcin; Piotrowska-Seget, Zofia

    2013-03-15

    The ability of diazinon-degrading Serratia marcescens to remove organophosphorus pesticides (OPPs), i.e. chlorpyrifos (CP), fenitrothion (FT), and parathion (PT) was studied in a mineral salt medium (MSM) and in three soils of different characteristics. This strain was capable of using all insecticides at concentration of 50 mg/l as the only carbon source when grown in MSM, and 58.9%, 70.5%, and 82.5% of the initial dosage of CP, FT, and PT, respectively was degraded within 14 days. The biodegradation experiment showed that autochthonous microflora in all soils was characterized by a degradation potential of all tested OPPs; however, the initial lag phases for degradation of CP and FT, especially in sandy soil, were observed. During the 42-day experiment, 45.3%, 61.4% and 72.5% of the initial dose of CP, FT, and PT, respectively, was removed in sandy soil whereas the degradation of CP, FT, and PT in the same period, in sandy loam and silty soils reached 61.4%, 79.7% and 64.2%, and 68.9%, 81.0% and 63.6%, respectively. S. marcescens introduced into sterile soils showed a higher degradation potential (5-13%) for OPPs removal than those observed in non-sterile soil with naturally occurring attenuation. Inoculation of non-sterile soils with S. marcescens enhanced the disappearance rates of all insecticides, and DT50 for CP, FT, and PT was reduced by 20.7, 11.3 and 13.0 days, and 11.9, 7.0 and 8.1 days, and 9.7, 14.5 and 12.6 days in sandy, sandy loam, and silty soils, respectively, in comparison with non-sterile soils with only indigenous microflora. This ability of S. marcescens makes it a suitable strain for bioremediation of soils contaminated with OPPs.

  2. New secreted toxins and immunity proteins encoded within the Type VI secretion system gene cluster of Serratia marcescens

    PubMed Central

    English, Grant; Trunk, Katharina; Rao, Vincenzo A; Srikannathasan, Velupillai; Hunter, William N; Coulthurst, Sarah J

    2012-01-01

    Protein secretion systems are critical to bacterial virulence and interactions with other organisms. The Type VI secretion system (T6SS) is found in many bacterial species and is used to target either eukaryotic cells or competitor bacteria. However, T6SS-secreted proteins have proven surprisingly elusive. Here, we identified two secreted substrates of the antibacterial T6SS from the opportunistic human pathogen, Serratia marcescens. Ssp1 and Ssp2, both encoded within the T6SS gene cluster, were confirmed as antibacterial toxins delivered by the T6SS. Four related proteins encoded around the Ssp proteins (‘Rap’ proteins) included two specifically conferring self-resistance (‘immunity’) against T6SS-dependent Ssp1 or Ssp2 toxicity. Biochemical characterization revealed specific, tight binding between cognate Ssp–Rap pairs, forming complexes of 2:2 stoichiometry. The atomic structures of two Rap proteins were solved, revealing a novel helical fold, dependent on a structural disulphide bond, a structural feature consistent with their functional localization. Homologues of the Serratia Ssp and Rap proteins are found encoded together within other T6SS gene clusters, thus they represent founder members of new families of T6SS-secreted and cognate immunity proteins. We suggest that Ssp proteins are the original substrates of the S. marcescens T6SS, before horizontal acquisition of other T6SS-secreted toxins. Molecular insight has been provided into how pathogens utilize antibacterial T6SSs to overcome competitors and succeed in polymicrobial niches. PMID:22957938

  3. Genetic and Structural Characterization of the Core Region of the Lipopolysaccharide from Serratia marcescens N28b (Serovar O4)

    PubMed Central

    Coderch, Núria; Piqué, Núria; Lindner, Buko; Abitiu, Nihal; Merino, Susana; Izquierdo, Luis; Jimenez, Natalia; Tomás, Juan M.; Holst, Otto; Regué, Miguel

    2004-01-01

    The gene cluster (waa) involved in Serratia marcescens N28b core lipopolysaccharide (LPS) biosynthesis was identified, cloned, and sequenced. Complementation analysis of known waa mutants from Escherichia coli K-12, Salmonella enterica, and Klebsiella pneumoniae led to the identification of five genes coding for products involved in the biosynthesis of a shared inner core structure: [l,d-HeppIIIα(1→7)-l,d-HeppIIα(1→3)-l,d-HeppIα(1→5)-KdopI(4←2)αKdopII] (l,d-Hepp, l-glycero-d-manno-heptopyranose; Kdo, 3-deoxy-d-manno-oct-2-ulosonic acid). Complementation and/or chemical analysis of several nonpolar mutants within the S. marcescens waa gene cluster suggested that in addition, three waa genes were shared by S. marcescens and K. pneumoniae, indicating that the core region of the LPS of S. marcescens and K. pneumoniae possesses additional common features. Chemical and structural analysis of the major oligosaccharide from the core region of LPS of an O-antigen-deficient mutant of S. marcescens N28b as well as complementation analysis led to the following proposed structure: β-Glc-(1→6)-α-Glc-(1→4))-α-d-GlcN-(1→4)-α-d-GalA-[(2←1)-α-d,d-Hep-(2←1)-α-Hep]-(1→3)-α-l,d-Hep[(7←1)-α-l,d-Hep]-(1→3)-α-l,d-Hep-[(4←1)-β-d-Glc]-(1→5)-Kdo. The D configuration of the β-Glc, α-GclN, and α-GalA residues was deduced from genetic data and thus is tentative. Furthermore, other oligosaccharides were identified by ion cyclotron resonance-Fourier-transformed electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, which presumably contained in addition one residue of d-glycero-d-talo-oct-2-ulosonic acid (Ko) or of a hexuronic acid. Several ions were identified that differed from others by a mass of +80 Da, suggesting a nonstoichiometric substitution by a monophosphate residue. However, none of these molecular species could be isolated in substantial amounts and structurally analyzed. On the basis of the structure shown above and the analysis of nonpolar mutants

  4. A conditional suicide system for Saccharomyces cerevisiae relying on the intracellular production of the Serratia marcescens nuclease.

    PubMed

    Balan, Andrea; Schenberg, Ana Clara G

    2005-02-01

    A conditional lethal system for biological containment of genetically modified strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is described. This suicide system is based on the intracellular production of the Serratia marcescens nuclease in the yeast cell, aiming at the destruction of the host genetic material. The S. marcescens nuclease, encoded by the nucA gene, is normally secreted by the bacterium into the medium. In the present work, the nucA gene, devoid of its signal peptide coding sequence, was cloned in a yeast expression vector, under control of the glucose-repressed S. cerevisiae alcohol dehydrogenase 2 gene (ADH2) promoter. When transformed into S. cerevisiae, the recombinant plasmid proved to be effective in killing the host cells upon glucose depletion from the medium, and the nuclease activity was found in lysates prepared from the transformants. In addition, the nuclease degrading effect was shown to reach chromosomal DNA in the yeast host. The killing effect of the nucA plasmid was also demonstrated in soil microcosm assays, indicating that whenever the GMM escapes into the environment where glucose is scarce, the nucA gene will be expressed and the resulting nuclease will destroy the genetic material and kill the cells. In contrast to other suicide systems that target the cell envelope, the advantage of the one described here is that it disfavours horizontal gene transfer from recombinant yeast cells to other microorganisms found in the environment.

  5. A Hospital-wide Outbreak of Serratia marcescens, and Ishikawa's “Fishbone” Analysis to Support Outbreak Control

    PubMed Central

    Vetter, Luzia; Schuepfer, Guido; Kuster, Stefan P.

    2016-01-01

    A nosocomial outbreak of Serratia marcescens in respiratory samples predominantly from patients in a surgical intensive care unit is reported. Most of these patients were cardiac surgical patients. Initially, a vigorous but inconclusive investigation was implemented on the basis of standardized (according the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) steps of outbreak investigation. Then, a systemic quality management approach with “fishbone” analysis was added. As a consequence, plausible causes for the outbreak were identified: (i) S marcescens was found on the transesophageal echocardiography probe used during cardiac surgery; and (ii) the quality of the surface disinfection was insufficient due to multiple reasons and was completely reengineered. In conclusion, in addition to the standardized steps of outbreak investigation, the complementary use of quality management tools such as the Ishikawa “fishbone” analysis is helpful for outbreak control. The complete reengineering of the disinfectant procurement and logistics is assumed to have been the most effective measure to control the described outbreak. PMID:26783861

  6. SME-type carbapenem-hydrolyzing class A beta-lactamases from geographically diverse Serratia marcescens strains.

    PubMed

    Queenan, A M; Torres-Viera, C; Gold, H S; Carmeli, Y; Eliopoulos, G M; Moellering, R C; Quinn, J P; Hindler, J; Medeiros, A A; Bush, K

    2000-11-01

    Three sets of carbapenem-resistant Serratia marcescens isolates have been identified in the United States: 1 isolate in Minnesota in 1985 (before approval of carbapenems for clinical use), 5 isolates in Los Angeles (University of California at Los Angeles [UCLA]) in 1992, and 19 isolates in Boston from 1994 to 1999. All isolates tested produced two beta-lactamases, an AmpC-type enzyme with pI values of 8.6 to 9.0 and one with a pI value of approximately 9.5. The enzyme with the higher pI in each strain hydrolyzed carbapenems and was not inhibited by EDTA, similar to the chromosomal class A SME-1 beta-lactamase isolated from the 1982 London strain S. marcescens S6. The genes encoding the carbapenem-hydrolyzing enzymes were cloned in Escherichia coli and sequenced. The enzyme from the Minnesota isolate had an amino acid sequence identical to that of SME-1. The isolates from Boston and UCLA produced SME-2, an enzyme with a single amino acid change relative to SME-1, a substitution from valine to glutamine at position 207. Purified SME enzymes from the U. S. isolates had beta-lactam hydrolysis profiles similar to that of the London SME-1 enzyme. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis revealed that the isolates showed some similarity but differed by at least three genetic events. In conclusion, a family of rare class A carbapenem-hydrolyzing beta-lactamases first described in London has now been identified in S. marcescens isolates across the United States.

  7. Utilization of Mucus from the Coral Acropora palmata by the Pathogen Serratia marcescens and by Environmental and Coral Commensal Bacteria▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Krediet, Cory J.; Ritchie, Kim B.; Cohen, Matthew; Lipp, Erin K.; Sutherland, Kathryn Patterson; Teplitski, Max

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, diseases of corals caused by opportunistic pathogens have become widespread. How opportunistic pathogens establish on coral surfaces, interact with native microbiota, and cause disease is not yet clear. This study compared the utilization of coral mucus by coral-associated commensal bacteria (“Photobacterium mandapamensis” and Halomonas meridiana) and by opportunistic Serratia marcescens pathogens. S. marcescens PDL100 (a pathogen associated with white pox disease of Acroporid corals) grew to higher population densities on components of mucus from the host coral. In an in vitro coculture on mucus from Acropora palmata, S. marcescens PDL100 isolates outgrew coral isolates. The white pox pathogen did not differ from other bacteria in growth on mucus from a nonhost coral, Montastraea faveolata. The ability of S. marcescens to cause disease in acroporid corals may be due, at least in part, to the ability of strain PDL100 to build to higher population numbers within the mucus surface layer of its acroporid host. During growth on mucus from A. palmata, similar glycosidase activities were present in coral commensal bacteria, in S. marcescens PDL100, and in environmental and human isolates of S. marcescens. The temporal regulation of these activities during growth on mucus, however, was distinct in the isolates. During early stages of growth on mucus, enzymatic activities in S. marcescens PDL100 were most similar to those in coral commensals. After overnight incubation on mucus, enzymatic activities in a white pox pathogen were most similar to those in pathogenic Serratia strains isolated from human mucosal surfaces. PMID:19395569

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of Serratia marcescens U36365, a Green Pigment–Producing Strain Isolated from a Patient with Urinary Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sahni, Rani Diana; Amalanathan, Rabecca; Devanga Ragupathi, Naveen Kumar; Mathai, John; Veeraraghavan, Balaji

    2016-01-01

    Serratia marcescens is an emerging nosocomial pathogen associated with urinary and respiratory tract infections. In this study, we determined the genome of a green pigment–producing clinical strain, U36365, isolated from a hospital in Southern India. De novo assembly of PacBio long-read sequencing indicates that the U36365 genome consists of a chromosome of 5.12 Mbps and no plasmids. PMID:27516523

  9. The Multifarious PGPR Serratia marcescens CDP-13 Augments Induced Systemic Resistance and Enhanced Salinity Tolerance of Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rajnish Prakash; Jha, Prabhat Nath

    2016-01-01

    The present study demonstrates the plant growth promoting (PGP) potential of a bacterial isolate CDP-13 isolated from ‘Capparis decidua’ plant, and its ability to protect plants from the deleterious effect of biotic and abiotic stressors. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, the isolate was identified as Serratia marcescens. Among the PGP traits, the isolate was found to be positive for ACC deaminase activity, phosphate solubilization, production of siderophore, indole acetic acid production, nitrogen fixation, and ammonia production. CDP-13 showed growth at an increased salt (NaCl) concentration of up to 6%, indicating its potential to survive and associate with plants growing in saline soil. The inoculation of S. marcescens enhanced the growth of wheat plant under salinity stress (150–200 mM). It significantly reduced inhibition of plant growth (15 to 85%) caused by salt stressors. Application of CDP-13 also modulated concentration (20 to 75%) of different osmoprotectants (proline, malondialdehyde, total soluble sugar, total protein content, and indole acetic acid) in plants suggesting its role in enabling plants to tolerate salt stressors. In addition, bacterial inoculation also reduced the disease severity caused by fungal infection, which illustrated its ability to confer induced systemic resistance (ISR) in host plants. Treatment of wheat plants with the test organism caused alteration in anti-oxidative enzymes activities (Superoxide dismutase, Catalase, and Peroxidase) under various salinity levels, and therefore minimizes the salinity-induced oxidative damages to the plants. Colonization efficiency of strain CDP-13 was confirmed by CFU count, epi-fluorescence microscopy, and ERIC-PCR-based DNA fingerprinting approach. Hence, the study indicates that bacterium CDP-13 enhances plant growth, and has potential for the amelioration of salinity stress in wheat plants. Likewise, the results also provide insights into biotechnological approaches to using

  10. The Multifarious PGPR Serratia marcescens CDP-13 Augments Induced Systemic Resistance and Enhanced Salinity Tolerance of Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Singh, Rajnish Prakash; Jha, Prabhat Nath

    2016-01-01

    The present study demonstrates the plant growth promoting (PGP) potential of a bacterial isolate CDP-13 isolated from 'Capparis decidua' plant, and its ability to protect plants from the deleterious effect of biotic and abiotic stressors. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, the isolate was identified as Serratia marcescens. Among the PGP traits, the isolate was found to be positive for ACC deaminase activity, phosphate solubilization, production of siderophore, indole acetic acid production, nitrogen fixation, and ammonia production. CDP-13 showed growth at an increased salt (NaCl) concentration of up to 6%, indicating its potential to survive and associate with plants growing in saline soil. The inoculation of S. marcescens enhanced the growth of wheat plant under salinity stress (150-200 mM). It significantly reduced inhibition of plant growth (15 to 85%) caused by salt stressors. Application of CDP-13 also modulated concentration (20 to 75%) of different osmoprotectants (proline, malondialdehyde, total soluble sugar, total protein content, and indole acetic acid) in plants suggesting its role in enabling plants to tolerate salt stressors. In addition, bacterial inoculation also reduced the disease severity caused by fungal infection, which illustrated its ability to confer induced systemic resistance (ISR) in host plants. Treatment of wheat plants with the test organism caused alteration in anti-oxidative enzymes activities (Superoxide dismutase, Catalase, and Peroxidase) under various salinity levels, and therefore minimizes the salinity-induced oxidative damages to the plants. Colonization efficiency of strain CDP-13 was confirmed by CFU count, epi-fluorescence microscopy, and ERIC-PCR-based DNA fingerprinting approach. Hence, the study indicates that bacterium CDP-13 enhances plant growth, and has potential for the amelioration of salinity stress in wheat plants. Likewise, the results also provide insights into biotechnological approaches to using PGPR

  11. The RssB/RssA two-component system regulates biosynthesis of the tripyrrole antibiotic, prodigiosin, in Serratia marcescens.

    PubMed

    Horng, Yu-Tze; Chang, Kai-Chih; Liu, Yen-Ni; Lai, Hsin-Chih; Soo, Po-Chi

    2010-06-01

    Serratia marcescens CH-1 produces a red, cell-associated pigment, prodigiosin, synthesized by enzymes encoded in the pig operon. The underlying regulatory mechanism, especially its relationship with the RssAB two-component system signaling, remained uncharacterized. Here, we show that phosphorylated RssB (RssB-P) directly binds to the promoter region of the pig operon (pigA promoter), as observed using an electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Furthermore, we identify the RssB-P binding site located downstream of the -10 and -35 regions in pigA using a DNase I footprinting assay. A compilation of the RssB-P binding sites in flhDC, rssB and pigA promoter regions reveals the presence of a conserved core sequence, GAGATTTTAGCTAAATTAATBTTT (B=C, G, or T), which we believe is the RssB binding sequence. Site-specific mutation of conserved nucleotides within the conserved RssB binding sequence in the pigA promoter region leads to absence of retardation in the presence of RssB-P in vitro and elevated transcription of pigA in vivo. These data suggest that RssAB signaling negatively regulates prodigiosin production, and such inhibition is mediated through direct and specific repression of transcriptional activity of the pig operon.

  12. Exploitation of a “hockey-puck” phenotype to identify pilus and biofilm regulators in Serratia marcescens through genetic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shanks, Robert M.Q.; Stella, Nicholas A.; Brothers, Kimberly M.; Polaski, Denise M.

    2016-01-01

    Pili are essential adhesive determinants for many bacterial pathogens. A suppressor mutation screen that takes advantage of a pilus-mediated self-aggregative “hockey-puck” colony phenotype was designed to identify novel regulators of type I pili in Serratia marcescens. Mutations that decreased pilus biosynthesis mapped to the fimABCD operon; to the genes alaT, fkpA, and oxyR; upstream of the flagellar master regulator operon flhDC; and to an uncharacterized gene encoding a predicted DUF1401 domain. biofilm formation and pilus-dependent agglutination assays were used to characterize the relative importance of the identified genes in pilus biosynthesis. Additional mutagenic or complementation analysis was used to verify the role of candidate genes in pilus biosynthesis. Presented data support a model that CRP negatively regulates pilus biosynthesis through increased expression of flhDC and decreased expression of oxyR. Further studies are warranted to determine the mechanism by which these genes mediate pilus biosynthesis or function. PMID:26640000

  13. Transcriptomic and proteomic responses of Serratia marcescens to spaceflight conditions involve large-scale changes in metabolic pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yajuan; Yuan, Yanting; Liu, Jinwen; Su, Longxiang; Chang, De; Guo, Yinghua; Chen, Zhenhong; Fang, Xiangqun; Wang, Junfeng; Li, Tianzhi; Zhou, Lisha; Fang, Chengxiang; Yang, Ruifu; Liu, Changting

    2014-04-01

    The microgravity environment of spaceflight expeditions has been associated with altered microbial responses. This study explores the characterization of Serratia marcescensis grown in a spaceflight environment at the phenotypic, transcriptomic and proteomic levels. From November 1, 2011 to November 17, 2011, a strain of S. marcescensis was sent into space for 398 h on the Shenzhou VIII spacecraft, and ground simulation was performed as a control (LCT-SM213). After the flight, two mutant strains (LCT-SM166 and LCT-SM262) were selected for further analysis. Although no changes in the morphology, post-culture growth kinetics, hemolysis or antibiotic sensitivity were observed, the two mutant strains exhibited significant changes in their metabolic profiles after exposure to spaceflight. Enrichment analysis of the transcriptome showed that the differentially expressed genes of the two spaceflight strains and the ground control strain mainly included those involved in metabolism and degradation. The proteome revealed that changes at the protein level were also associated with metabolic functions, such as glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, pyruvate metabolism, arginine and proline metabolism and the degradation of valine, leucine and isoleucine. In summary S. marcescens showed alterations primarily in genes and proteins that were associated with metabolism under spaceflight conditions, which gave us valuable clues for future research.

  14. The myelopoietic effects of a Serratia marcescens-derived biologic response modifier in a mouse model of thermal injury.

    PubMed

    Peterson, V M; Rundus, C H; Reinoehl, P J; Schroeter, S R; McCall, C A; Bartle, E J

    1992-04-01

    The proliferative defects observed in phagocytic stem cells after major thermal injuries may be caused by an inadequate production of colony-stimulating factors (CSFs), a family of hemopoietic cytokines necessary for the production and function of granulocytes and monocytes. In this study a biologic response modifier (S-BRM) consisting of sized vesicles derived from the cell membrane and ribosomes of Serratia marcescens was investigated in a mouse model of thermal injury to determine its ability to augment postburn myelopoiesis. Treatment of burned mice with S-BRM was well tolerated and was associated with statistically significant increases in absolute numbers of circulating granulocytes and monocytes compared with burned mice receiving saline solution. In addition, the size of the splenic myeloid stem cell compartment, as measured by granulocyte-macrophage stem cell colony formation in soft agar, was markedly expanded. Finally, plasma levels of CSF were increased significantly in burned mice receiving S-BRM but were not elevated in burned littermates treated with saline solution. These data suggest that production of CSF is suboptimal after thermal injury and S-BRM is capable of up-regulating postburn myelopoiesis by causing the release of CSF into the systemic circulation.

  15. Enhancement of prodigiosin production by Serratia marcescens TKU011 and its insecticidal activity relative to food colorants.

    PubMed

    Liang, Tzu-Wen; Chen, Shin-Yi; Chen, Yen-Chern; Chen, Chia-Hung; Yen, Yue-Horng; Wang, San-Lang

    2013-11-01

    Prodigiosin (PG) has been reported to have various biological activities. With the aim of increasing Serratia marcescens TKU011 PG production on squid pen powder (SPP)-containing medium, the effects of phosphate and ferrous ion supplementation, autoclave treatment, and aeration were studied. Autoclave treatment showed positive results for PG productivity (2.48 mg/mL), which increased 2.5-fold when the organism was incubated in 50 mL of 40-min autoclaved medium in a baffle-based flask (250 mL) containing 1.5% SPP at 30 °C for 1 day and then at 25 °C for 2 additional days. Furthermore, the use of pigments including PG and the food colorants Allura Red AC (R40) and Tartrazine (Y4) as insecticides was also investigated. The lethal concentrations causing 50% Drosophila larval mortality (LC50) of PG, Y4, and R40 using a 5-d exposure period were 230, 449, and 30000 ppm, respectively. The results indicated that the biopigment PG and the food colorant Y4 were potentially toxic to Drosophila larvae.

  16. Crystal structure of a complex between Serratia marcescens metallo-protease and an inhibitor from Erwinia chrysanthemi.

    PubMed

    Baumann, U; Bauer, M; Létoffé, S; Delepelaire, P; Wandersman, C

    1995-05-05

    The crystal structure of the complex between the 50 kDa metallo-endoproteinase from Serratia marcescens (SMP), a member of the metzincin superfamily, and an inhibitor from Erwinia chrysanthemi (Inh) was solved by molecular replacement using the known structure of SMP, and refined at 2.30 A resolution to a crystallographic R-factor of 0.195. The E. chrysanthemi inhibitor folds into a compact eight-stranded antiparallel beta-barrel of simple up-down topology such as is found for members of the retinol binding protein family. It mainly interacts with the protease via its five N-terminal residues, which insert into the active site cleft, occupying the S' sites. The first N-terminal residue, SerI1, is partially cleaved off by the protease, while SerI2 makes a hydrogen bond with the catalytically active glutamic acid, Glu177, of the protease. Further interactions are made between one face of the inhibitor formed by the strands s3, s4 and s5 and the protease segment 218 to 228, which is located immediately after the characteristic "Met-turn" of the metzincins.

  17. Evaluation of the effect of nutrient ratios on biosurfactant production by Serratia marcescens using a Box-Behnken design.

    PubMed

    Roldán-Carrillo, T; Martínez-García, X; Zapata-Peñasco, I; Castorena-Cortés, G; Reyes-Avila, J; Mayol-Castillo, M; Olguín-Lora, P

    2011-09-01

    The strain SmSA, identified as Serratia marcescens and known as a biosurfactant producer, was isolated from hydrocarbon contaminated soil from Veracruz, México. The interactions among the C/N, C/Mg and C/Fe ratios have not been examined for this microorganism. In this work was evaluated the effect of these nutrients at three levels using a mineral medium with glucose as the carbon source. A Box-Behnken experimental design was utilised to maximise biosurfactant production, which was assessed by oil spreading and surface tension tests. The treatment with C/N=5, C/Fe=26,000 and C/Mg=30 showed the best result since the surface tension was reduced to 30 mN m(-1). The multiple regression and response surface analyses indicated that the interaction between C/N and C/Mg had the utmost effect on the reduction of surface tension and biosurfactant production. The conditions of the best treatment were used to scale up biosurfactant production in a 3L bioreactor giving a yield of 4.1 gL(-1) of pure biosurfactant. It was found that the biosurfactant was mainly produced in the exponential phase and decreased the surface tension to 31 mN m(-1). The contact between the biosurfactant with heavy oil (15° API) increased its displacement from 9.3 to 18 cm.

  18. Epidemiology and molecular characterization of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacter spp., Pantoea agglomerans, and Serratia marcescens isolates from a Bulgarian hospital.

    PubMed

    Markovska, Rumyana Donkova; Stoeva, Temenuga Jekova; Bojkova, Kalina Dineva; Mitov, Ivan Gergov

    2014-04-01

    Forty-two extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing isolates of Enterobacter aerogenes, Enterobacter cloacae, Pantoea agglomerans, and Serratia marcescens, collected consecutively during the period January-November 2011 from the University Hospital in Varna, Bulgaria, were studied to characterize their ESBLs by isoelectric focusing, group-specific PCR, and sequencing. The epidemiological relationship was evaluated by random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis (RAPD). Transferability of ESBL genes was determined by conjugation experiments. Plasmid analysis was done by replicon typing and PstI fingerprinting. The overall rate of ESBL production was 20%. The most widespread enzyme was CTX-M-3, found in 64%. It was dominant in E. aerogenes (100%) and S. marcescens (83%). SHV-12, CTX-M-3, and CTX-M-15 were found among E. cloacae isolates in 50%, 35%, and 45%, respectively. Three main CTX-M-3-producing epidemic clones of E. aerogenes and S. marcescens have been detected. Among E. cloacae isolates, six different RAPD profiles were discerned. The plasmids harboring blaCTX-M-3 belonged to IncL/M type and demonstrated similar PstI fingerprinting profiles. IncFII plasmids were detected in two CTX-M-15-producing E. cloacae isolates. Our results demonstrate wide intrahospital dissemination of clonal E. aerogenes and S. marcescens isolates, carrying IncL/M conjugative plasmids.

  19. Carbapenem-resistant Serratia marcescens isolates producing Bush group 2f beta-lactamase (SME-1) in the United States: results from the MYSTIC Programme.

    PubMed

    Gales, A C; Biedenbach, D J; Winokur, P; Hacek, D M; Pfaller, M A; Jones, R N

    2001-02-01

    Two carbapenem (imipenem, meropenem)-resistant Serratia marcescens strains were isolated in the United States (Chicago, IL) through the 1999 MYSTIC (Meropenem Yearly Susceptibility Test Information Collection) Programme. The S. marcescens antimicrobial susceptible patterns were: susceptible to ceftriaxone, ceftazidime, and cefepime (MICs, < or = 0.25 microg/ml), and resistance to the carbapenems (imipenem and meropenem; MIC, > 32 microg/ml) and aztreonam (MIC, > = 16 microg/ml). Each S. marcescens isolate shared an identical epidemiologic type (ribotype and PFGE) and the outer membrane protein profile was also identical to those of the wild type susceptible strains from the same medical center. The PCR utilizing bla(sme-1) primers amplified a gene product that was identified as consistent with SME-1 after DNA sequencing. Imipenem and meropenem resistance due to production of carbapenem-hydrolyzing enzymes among clinical isolates is still very rare, but microbiology laboratories should be aware of these chromosomally encoded enzymes among class C beta-lactamases producing enteric bacilli such as S. marcescens and Enterobacter cloacae.

  20. Identification of two components of the Serratia marcescens metalloprotease transporter: protease SM secretion in Escherichia coli is TolC dependent.

    PubMed

    Létoffé, S; Ghigo, J M; Wandersman, C

    1993-11-01

    The Serratia marcescens metalloprotease (protease SM) belongs to a family of proteins secreted from gram-negative bacteria by a signal peptide-independent pathway which requires a specific transporter consisting of three proteins: two in the inner membrane and one in the outer membrane. The prtDSM and prtESM genes encoding the two S. marcescens inner membrane components were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Their nucleotide sequence revealed high overall homology with the two analogous inner membrane components of the Erwinia chrysanthemi protease secretion apparatus and lower, but still significant, homology with the two analogous inner membrane components of the E. coli hemolysin transporter. When expressed in E. coli, these two proteins, PrtDSM and PrtESM, allowed the secretion of protease SM only in the presence of TolC protein, the outer membrane component of the hemolysin transporter.

  1. Mo (VI) reduction to molybdenum blue by Serratia marcescens strain Dr.Y9.

    PubMed

    Yunus, Shukor Mohd; Hamim, Hamdan Mohd; Anas, Othaman Mohd; Aripin, Shamaan Nor; Arif, Syed Mohd

    2009-01-01

    In this work we report on the isolation of a local molybdenum-reducing bacterium. The bacterium reduced molybdate or Mo(6+) to molybdenum blue (oxidation states between 5+ to 6+). Electron donors that supported cellular growth were sucrose, maltose, mannitol, fructose, glucose and starch (in decreasing order) with sucrose supporting formation of the highest amount of molybdenum blue at 10 g/l after 24 hours of static incubation. The optimum molybdate and phosphate concentrations that supported molybdate reduction were 20 and 5 mM, respectively. Molybdate reduction was optimal at 37 degrees C. The molybdenum blue produced from cellular reduction exhibited a unique absorption spectrum with a maximum peak at 865 nm and a shoulder at 700 nm. The isolate was tentatively identified as S. marcescens strain Dr.Y9 based on carbon utilization profiles using Biolog GN plates and partial 16S rDNA molecular phylogeny. No inhibition of molybdenum-reducing activity was seen using electron transport system (ETS) inhibitors such as antimycin A, 1HQNO (Hydroxyquinoline-N-Oxide), sodium azide and cyanide suggesting that the ETS of this bacterium is not the site of molybdate reduction.

  2. Disruption of the copper efflux pump (CopA) of Serratia marcescens ATCC 274 pleiotropically affects copper sensitivity and production of the tripyrrole secondary metabolite, prodigiosin.

    PubMed

    Williamson, N R; Simonsen, H T; Harris, A K P; Leeper, F J; Salmond, George P C

    2006-02-01

    The prodigiosin biosynthetic gene cluster (pig cluster) of Serratia marcescens ATCC 274 (Sma 274) is flanked by cueR/copA homologues. Inactivation of the copA homologue resulted in an increased sensitivity to copper, confirming that CopA is involved in copper homeostasis in Sma 274. The effect of copper on the biosynthesis of prodigiosin in Sma 274 and the copA mutant strain was investigated. Increased levels of copper were found to reduce prodigiosin production in the wild type Sma 274, but increase production in the copA mutant strain. The physiological implications for CopA mediated prodigiosin production are discussed. We also demonstrate that the gene products of pigB-pigE of Sma 274 are sufficient for the biosynthesis of 2-methyl-3-n-amyl-pyrrole and condensation with 4-methoxy-2,2'-bipyrrole-5-carboxyaldehyde to form prodigiosin, as we have shown for Serratia sp. ATCC 39006.

  3. A Novel Class A Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase (BES-1) in Serratia marcescens Isolated in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Bonnet, R.; Sampaio, J. L. M.; Chanal, C.; Sirot, D.; De Champs, C.; Viallard, J. L.; Labia, R.; Sirot, J.

    2000-01-01

    Serratia marcescens Rio-5, one of 18 extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing strains isolated in several hospitals in Rio de Janeiro (Brazil) in 1996 and 1997, exhibited a high level of resistance to aztreonam (MIC, 512 μg/ml) and a distinctly higher level of resistance to cefotaxime (MIC, 64 μg/ml) than to ceftazidime (MIC, 8 μg/ml). The strain produced a plasmid-encoded ESBL with a pI of 7.5 whose bla gene was not related to those of other plasmid-mediated Ambler class A ESBLs. Cloning and sequencing revealed a bla gene encoding a novel class A β-lactamase in functional group 2be, designated BES-1 (Brazil extended-spectrum β-lactamase). This enzyme had 51% identity with chromosomal class A penicillinase of Yersinia enterocolitica Y56, which was the most closely related enzyme and 47 to 48% identity with CTX-M-type β-lactamases, which were the most closely related ESBLs. In common with CTX-M enzymes, BES-1 exhibited high cefotaxime-hydrolyzing activity (kcat, 425 s−1). However, BES-1 differed from CTX-M enzymes by its significant ceftazidime-hydrolyzing activity (kcat, 25 s−1), high affinity for aztreonam (Ki, 1 μM), and lower susceptibility to tazobactam (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50], 0.820 μM) than to clavulanate (IC50, 0.045 μM). Likewise, certain characteristic structural features of CTX-M enzymes, such as Phe-160, Ser-237, and Arg-276, were observed for BES-1, which, in addition, harbored different residues (Ala-104, Ser-171, Arg-220, Gly-240) and six additional residues at the end of the sequence. BES-1, therefore, may be an interesting model for further investigations of the structure-function relationships of class A ESBLs. PMID:11036023

  4. The influence of vegetable oils on biosurfactant production by Serratia marcescens.

    PubMed

    Ferraz, Cristina; De Araújo, Alvaro A; Pastore, Glaucia M

    2002-01-01

    The production of biosurfactant, a surface-active compound, by two Serratia marcescensstrains was tested on minimal culture medium supplemented with vegetable oils, considering that it is well known that these compounds stimulate biosurfactant production. The vegetable oils tested included soybean, olive, castor, sunflower, and coconut fat. The results showed a decrease in surface tension of the culture medium without oil from 64.54 to 29.57, with a critical micelle dilution (CMD(-1)) and CMD(-2) of 41.77 and 68.92 mN/m, respectively. Sunflower oil gave the best results (29.75 mN/m) with a CMD(-1) and CMD-2 of 36.69 and 51.41 mN/m, respectively. Sunflower oil contains about 60% of linoleic acid. The addition of linoleic acid decreased the surface tension from 53.70 to 28.39, with a CMD(-1) of 29.72 and CMD(-2) of 37.97, suggesting that this fatty acid stimulates the biosurfactant production by the LB006 strain. In addition, the crude precipitate surfactant reduced the surface tension of water from 72.00 to 28.70 mN/m. These results suggest that the sunflower oil's linoleic acid was responsible for the increase in biosurfactant production by the LB006 strain.

  5. Interdomain Contacts and the Stability of Serralysin Protease from Serratia marcescens.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Morrison, Anneliese J; Thibodeau, Patrick H

    2015-01-01

    The serralysin family of bacterial metalloproteases is associated with virulence in multiple modes of infection. These extracellular proteases are members of the Repeats-in-ToXin (RTX) family of toxins and virulence factors, which mediated virulence in E. coli, B. pertussis, and P. aeruginosa, as well as other animal and plant pathogens. The serralysin proteases are structurally dynamic and their folding is regulated by calcium binding to a C-terminal domain that defines the RTX family of proteins. Previous studies have suggested that interactions between N-terminal sequences and this C-terminal domain are important for the high thermal and chemical stabilities of the RTX proteases. Extending from this, stabilization of these interactions in the native structure may lead to hyperstabilization of the folded protein. To test this hypothesis, cysteine pairs were introduced into the N-terminal helix and the RTX domain and protease folding and activity were assessed. Under stringent pH and temperature conditions, the disulfide-bonded mutant showed increased protease activity and stability. This activity was dependent on the redox environment of the refolding reaction and could be blocked by selective modification of the cysteine residues before protease refolding. These data demonstrate that the thermal and chemical stability of these proteases is, in part, mediated by binding between the RTX domain and the N-terminal helix and demonstrate that stabilization of this interaction can further stabilize the active protease, leading to additional pH and thermal tolerance.

  6. Interdomain Contacts and the Stability of Serralysin Protease from Serratia marcescens

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liang; Morrison, Anneliese J.; Thibodeau, Patrick H.

    2015-01-01

    The serralysin family of bacterial metalloproteases is associated with virulence in multiple modes of infection. These extracellular proteases are members of the Repeats-in-ToXin (RTX) family of toxins and virulence factors, which mediated virulence in E. coli, B. pertussis, and P. aeruginosa, as well as other animal and plant pathogens. The serralysin proteases are structurally dynamic and their folding is regulated by calcium binding to a C-terminal domain that defines the RTX family of proteins. Previous studies have suggested that interactions between N-terminal sequences and this C-terminal domain are important for the high thermal and chemical stabilities of the RTX proteases. Extending from this, stabilization of these interactions in the native structure may lead to hyperstabilization of the folded protein. To test this hypothesis, cysteine pairs were introduced into the N-terminal helix and the RTX domain and protease folding and activity were assessed. Under stringent pH and temperature conditions, the disulfide-bonded mutant showed increased protease activity and stability. This activity was dependent on the redox environment of the refolding reaction and could be blocked by selective modification of the cysteine residues before protease refolding. These data demonstrate that the thermal and chemical stability of these proteases is, in part, mediated by binding between the RTX domain and the N-terminal helix and demonstrate that stabilization of this interaction can further stabilize the active protease, leading to additional pH and thermal tolerance. PMID:26378460

  7. Characterization of the gacA-dependent surface and coral mucus colonization by an opportunistic coral pathogen Serratia marcescens PDL100.

    PubMed

    Krediet, Cory J; Carpinone, Emily M; Ritchie, Kim B; Teplitski, Max

    2013-05-01

    Opportunistic pathogens rely on global regulatory systems to assess the environment and to control virulence and metabolism to overcome host defenses and outcompete host-associated microbiota. In Gammaproteobacteria, GacS/GacA is one such regulatory system. GacA orthologs direct the expression of the csr (rsm) small regulatory RNAs, which through their interaction with the RNA-binding protein CsrA (RsmA), control genes with functions in carbon metabolism, motility, biofilm formation, and virulence. The csrB gene was controlled by gacA in Serratia marcescens PDL100. A disruption of the S. marcescens gacA gene resulted in an increased fitness of the mutant on mucus of the host coral Acropora palmata and its high molecular weight fraction, whereas the mutant was as competitive as the wild type on the low molecular weight fraction of the mucus. Swarming motility and biofilm formation were reduced in the gacA mutant. This indicates a critical role for gacA in the efficient utilization of specific components of coral mucus and establishment within the surface mucopolysaccharide layer. While significantly affecting early colonization behaviors (coral mucus utilization, swarming motility, and biofilm formation), gacA was not required for virulence of S. marcescens PDL100 in either a model polyp Aiptasia pallida or in brine shrimp Artemia nauplii.

  8. Evidence for an Opportunistic and Endophytic Lifestyle of the Bursaphelenchus xylophilus-Associated Bacteria Serratia marcescens PWN146 Isolated from Wilting Pinus pinaster.

    PubMed

    Vicente, Cláudia S L; Nascimento, Francisco X; Barbosa, Pedro; Ke, Huei-Mien; Tsai, Isheng J; Hirao, Tomonori; Cock, Peter J A; Kikuchi, Taisei; Hasegawa, Koichi; Mota, Manuel

    2016-10-01

    Pine wilt disease (PWD) results from the interaction of three elements: the pathogenic nematode, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus; the insect-vector, Monochamus sp.; and the host tree, mostly Pinus species. Bacteria isolated from B. xylophilus may be a fourth element in this complex disease. However, the precise role of bacteria in this interaction is unclear as both plant-beneficial and as plant-pathogenic bacteria may be associated with PWD. Using whole genome sequencing and phenotypic characterization, we were able to investigate in more detail the genetic repertoire of Serratia marcescens PWN146, a bacterium associated with B. xylophilus. We show clear evidence that S. marcescens PWN146 is able to withstand and colonize the plant environment, without having any deleterious effects towards a susceptible host (Pinus thunbergii), B. xylophilus nor to the nematode model C. elegans. This bacterium is able to tolerate growth in presence of xenobiotic/organic compounds, and use phenylacetic acid as carbon source. Furthermore, we present a detailed list of S. marcescens PWN146 potentials to interfere with plant metabolism via hormonal pathways and/or nutritional acquisition, and to be competitive against other bacteria and/or fungi in terms of resource acquisition or production of antimicrobial compounds. Further investigation is required to understand the role of bacteria in PWD. We have now reinforced the theory that B. xylophilus-associated bacteria may have a plant origin.

  9. Enhanced production of prodigiosin-like pigment from Serratia marcescens SMdeltaR by medium improvement and oil-supplementation strategies.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yu-Hong; Chen, Wei-Chuan

    2005-06-01

    Serratia marcescens SMdeltaR, an SpnR-defective isogenic mutant of S. marcescens SS-1, was used to produce a prodigiosin-like pigment (PLP). Luria-Bertani (LB) broth, frequently used for prodigiosin biosynthesis with S. marcescens strains, was modified by increasing the concentrations of tryptone and yeast extract while completely removing NaCl from the medium. The resulting modified LB (MLB) medium achieved an almost 3.0-fold increase in PLP yield (152 mg l(-1)) when compared with the original LB broth. The addition of vegetable oils (2-6% [v/v]) to the fermentation broth markedly enhanced PLP production. PLP yields of 525, 579, and 790 mg l(-1) were obtained when the MLB medium was supplemented with 4% soybean oil, 4% olive oil and 6% sunflower oil, respectively. PLP production was found to be positively correlated with extracellular surface emulsification activity, suggesting a link between the PLP production and the presence of biosurfactant. This work shows that the optimal medium for PLP yield was sunflower oil (6%)-supplemented MLB medium, which resulted in an approximately 14-fold higher PLP yield than that in LB broth. Mass spectrometry and NMR analysis indicated that the PLP product is a prodigiosin derivative, called undecylprodigiosin.

  10. Effects of temperature, pH and NaCl content on in vitro putrescine and cadaverine production through the growth of Serratia marcescens CCM 303.

    PubMed

    Bubelová, Zuzana; Buňka, František; Taťáková, Monika; Štajnochová, Kateřina; Purevdorj, Khatantuul; Buňková, Leona

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the combined effect of temperature (10, 20 and 37°C), pH (4, 5, 6, 7 and 8), and NaCl content (0, 1, 3, 4, 5 and 6% w/v) on the growth and putrescine and cadaverine production of Serratia marcescens CCM 303 under model conditions. The decarboxylase activity of S. marcescens was monitored in broth after cultivation. The cultivation medium was enriched with selected amino acids (ornithine, arginine and lysine; 0.2% w/v each) serving as precursors of biogenic amines. Levels of putrescine and cadaverine in broth were analysed by high-performance liquid chromatography after pre-column derivatisation with o-phthalaldehyde reagent. S. marcescens produced higher amounts of putrescine (up to 2096.8 mg L(-1)) compared to cadaverine content (up to 343.3 mg L(-1)) in all cultivation media. The highest putrescine and cadaverine concentrations were reached during cultivation at 10-20°C, pH 5-7 and NaCl content 1-3% w/v. On the other hand, the highest BAs production of individual cell (recalculated based on a cell; so called "yield factor") was observed at 10°C, pH 4 and salt concentration 3-5% w/v as a response to environmental stress.

  11. Phenol, 2,4-bis(1,1-dimethylethyl) of marine bacterial origin inhibits quorum sensing mediated biofilm formation in the uropathogen Serratia marcescens.

    PubMed

    Padmavathi, Alwar Ramanujam; Abinaya, Bose; Pandian, Shunmugiah Karutha

    2014-10-01

    Intercellular communication in bacteria (quorum sensing, QS) is an important phenomenon in disease dissemination and pathogenesis, which controls biofilm formation also. This study reports the anti-QS and anti-biofilm efficacy of seaweed Gracilaria gracilis associated Vibrio alginolyticus G16 against Serratia marcescens. Purification and mass spectrometric analysis revealed the active principle as phenol, 2,4-bis(1,1-dimethylethyl) [PD]. PD affected the QS regulated virulence factor production in S. marcescens and resulted in a significant (p < 0.05) reduction in biofilm (85%), protease (41.9%), haemolysin (69.9%), lipase (84.3%), prodigiosin (84.5%) and extracellular polysaccharide (84.62%) secretion without hampering growth, as evidenced by XTT [2,3-bis (2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide] assay. qPCR analysis confirmed the down-regulation of the fimA, fimC, flhD and bsmA genes involved in biofilm formation. Apart from biofilm inhibition and disruption, PD increased the susceptibility of S. marcescens to gentamicin when administered synergistically, which opens another avenue for combinatorial therapy where PD can be used to enhance the efficacy of conventional antibiotics.

  12. Complete genome analysis of Serratia marcescens RSC-14: A plant growth-promoting bacterium that alleviates cadmium stress in host plants

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Abdur Rahim; Park, Gun-Seok; Asaf, Sajjad; Hong, Sung-Jun; Jung, Byung Kwon

    2017-01-01

    Serratia marcescens RSC-14 is a Gram-negative bacterium that was previously isolated from the surface-sterilized roots of the Cd-hyperaccumulator Solanum nigrum. The strain stimulates plant growth and alleviates Cd stress in host plants. To investigate the genetic basis for these traits, the complete genome of RSC-14 was obtained by single-molecule real-time sequencing. The genome of S. marcescens RSC-14 comprised a 5.12-Mbp-long circular chromosome containing 4,593 predicted protein-coding genes, 22 rRNA genes, 88 tRNA genes, and 41 pseudogenes. It contained genes with potential functions in plant growth promotion, including genes involved in indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) biosynthesis, acetoin synthesis, and phosphate solubilization. Moreover, annotation using NCBI and Rapid Annotation using Subsystem Technology identified several genes that encode antioxidant enzymes as well as genes involved in antioxidant production, supporting the observed resistance towards heavy metals, such as Cd. The presence of IAA pathway-related genes and oxidative stress-responsive enzyme genes may explain the plant growth-promoting potential and Cd tolerance, respectively. This is the first report of a complete genome sequence of Cd-tolerant S. marcescens and its plant growth promotion pathway. The whole-genome analysis of this strain clarified the genetic basis underlying its phenotypic and biochemical characteristics, underpinning the beneficial interactions between RSC-14 and plants. PMID:28187139

  13. Use of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis typing to study an outbreak of infection due to Serratia marcescens in a neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, G; Kelly, C; Solorzano, F; Leanos, B; Coria, R; Patterson, J E

    1996-01-01

    Serratia marcescens is a well-known cause of nosocomial infections and outbreaks, particularly in critically ill neonates and immunocompromised patients. Numerous methods have been proposed for typing. We used pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) typing to analyze an outbreak in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). We included 23 patient isolates from an outbreak (March to July 1995), and 10 patient isolates from different wards during the same time period. PFGE of whole-cell DNA digested by SpeI was used as a marker of strain identity. The most common presentation of the infection was sepsis in 18 of 23 (78%) neonates. Only four different biotypes were identified; biotype A8d accounted for 84% of the strains. PFGE typing revealed two clones responsible for two different clonal strain dissemination outbreaks from March to July, with 24 patient isolates being pattern A and 4 patient isolates being pattern E. PFGE typing suggests cross transmission between patients in the NICU and other wards. The isolates from 5 other patients showed distinct PFGE patterns. Extensive investigation and cultures failed to identify any environmental or staff reservoir of S. marcescens. This is one of the first reports applying PFGE to the study of S. marcescens, and this method was a useful marker of strain identity. PFGE typing distinguished strains which appeared to be the same by biotyping. PMID:8940460

  14. Kinetic analysis of growth rate, ATP, and pigmentation suggests an energy-spilling function for the pigment prodigiosin of Serratia marcescens.

    PubMed

    Haddix, Pryce L; Jones, Sarah; Patel, Pratik; Burnham, Sarah; Knights, Kaori; Powell, Joan N; LaForm, Amber

    2008-11-01

    Serratia marcescens is a gram-negative environmental bacterium and opportunistic pathogen. S. marcescens expresses prodigiosin, a bright red and cell-associated pigment which has no known biological function for producing cells. We present here a kinetic model relating cell, ATP, and prodigiosin concentration changes for S. marcescens during cultivation in batch culture. Cells were grown in a variety of complex broth media at temperatures which either promoted or essentially prevented pigmentation. High growth rates were accompanied by large decreases in cellular prodigiosin concentration; low growth rates were associated with rapid pigmentation. Prodigiosin was induced most strongly during limited growth as the population transitioned to stationary phase, suggesting a negative effect of this pigment on biomass production. Mathematically, the combined rate of formation of biomass and bioenergy (as ATP) was shown to be equivalent to the rate of prodigiosin production. Studies with cyanide inhibition of both oxidative phosphorylation and pigment production indicated that rates of biomass and net ATP synthesis were actually higher in the presence of cyanide, further suggesting a negative regulatory role for prodigiosin in cell and energy production under aerobic growth conditions. Considered in the context of the literature, these results suggest that prodigiosin reduces ATP production by a process termed energy spilling. This process may protect the cell by limiting production of reactive oxygen compounds. Other possible functions for prodigiosin as a mediator of cell death at population stationary phase are discussed.

  15. Improved consistency of control of damping-off of cucumber in multiple natural soils through combination of ethanol extract of Serratia marcescens with other biologically based disease control tactics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Environmentally friendly disease control tactics are needed that are consistently effective in soils that vary with regard to their biotic and abiotic components. An ethanol extract of Serratia marcescens N4-5, when applied as a cucumber seed treatment, effectively suppressed damping-off of cucumbe...

  16. Structural basis for type VI secreted peptidoglycan dl-endopeptidase function, specificity and neutralization in Serratia marcescens

    SciTech Connect

    Srikannathasan, Velupillai; English, Grant; Bui, Nhat Khai; Trunk, Katharina; O’Rourke, Patrick E. F.; Rao, Vincenzo A.; Vollmer, Waldemar; Coulthurst, Sarah J. Hunter, William N.

    2013-12-01

    Crystal structures of type VI secretion system-associated immunity proteins, a peptidoglycan endopeptidase and a complex of the endopeptidase and its cognate immunity protein are reported together with assays of endopeptidase activity and functional assessment. Some Gram-negative bacteria target their competitors by exploiting the type VI secretion system to extrude toxic effector proteins. To prevent self-harm, these bacteria also produce highly specific immunity proteins that neutralize these antagonistic effectors. Here, the peptidoglycan endopeptidase specificity of two type VI secretion-system-associated effectors from Serratia marcescens is characterized. These small secreted proteins, Ssp1 and Ssp2, cleave between γ-d-glutamic acid and l-meso-diaminopimelic acid with different specificities. Ssp2 degrades the acceptor part of cross-linked tetratetrapeptides. Ssp1 displays greater promiscuity and cleaves monomeric tripeptides, tetrapeptides and pentapeptides and dimeric tetratetra and tetrapenta muropeptides on both the acceptor and donor strands. Functional assays confirm the identity of a catalytic cysteine in these endopeptidases and crystal structures provide information on the structure–activity relationships of Ssp1 and, by comparison, of related effectors. Functional assays also reveal that neutralization of these effectors by their cognate immunity proteins, which are called resistance-associated proteins (Raps), contributes an essential role to cell fitness. The structures of two immunity proteins, Rap1a and Rap2a, responsible for the neutralization of Ssp1 and Ssp2-like endopeptidases, respectively, revealed two distinct folds, with that of Rap1a not having previously been observed. The structure of the Ssp1–Rap1a complex revealed a tightly bound heteromeric assembly with two effector molecules flanking a Rap1a dimer. A highly effective steric block of the Ssp1 active site forms the basis of effector neutralization. Comparisons with Ssp2–Rap2

  17. Biogenesis of outer membrane vesicles in Serratia marcescens is thermoregulated and can be induced by activation of the Rcs phosphorelay system.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Kenneth J; Castelli, Maria E; García Vescovi, Eleonora; Feldman, Mario F

    2012-06-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) have been identified in a wide range of bacteria, yet little is known of their biogenesis. It has been proposed that OMVs can act as long-range toxin delivery vectors and as a novel stress response. We have found that the formation of OMVs in the gram-negative opportunistic pathogen Serratia marcescens is thermoregulated, with a significant amount of OMVs produced at 22 or 30°C and negligible quantities formed at 37°C under laboratory conditions. Inactivation of the synthesis of the enterobacterial common antigen (ECA) resulted in a hypervesiculation phenotype, supporting the hypothesis that OMVs are produced in response to stress. We demonstrate that the phenotype can be reversed to wild-type (WT) levels upon the loss of the Rcs phosphorelay response regulator RcsB, but not RcsA, suggesting a role for the Rcs phosphorelay in the production of OMVs. MS fingerprinting of the OMVs provided evidence of cargo selection within wild-type cells, suggesting a possible role for Serratia OMVs in toxin delivery. In addition, OMV-associated cargo proved toxic upon injection into the haemocoel of Galleria mellonella larvae. These experiments demonstrate that OMVs are the result of a regulated process in Serratia and suggest that OMVs could play a role in virulence.

  18. Genetic evidence for an activator required for induction of colicin-like bacteriocin 28b production in Serratia marcescens by DNA-damaging agents.

    PubMed Central

    Ferrer, S; Viejo, M B; Guasch, J F; Enfedaque, J; Regué, M

    1996-01-01

    Bacteriocin 28b production is induced by mitomycin in wild-type Serratia marcescens 2170 but not in Escherichia coli harboring the bacteriocin 28b structural gene (bss). Studies with a bss-lacZ transcriptional fusion showed that mitomycin increased the level of bss gene transcription in S. marcescens but not in the E. coli background. A S. marcescens Tn5 insertion mutant was obtained (S. marcescens 2170 reg::Tn5) whose bacteriocin 28b production and bss gene transcription were not increased by mitomycin treatment. Cloning and DNA sequencing of the mutated region showed that the Tn5 insertion was flanked by an SOS box sequence and three genes that are probably cotranscribed (regA, regB, and regC). These three genes had homology to phage holins, phage lysozymes, and the Ogr transcriptional activator of P2 and related bacteriophages, respectively. Recombinant plasmid containing this wild-type DNA region complemented the reg::Tn5 regulatory mutant. A transcriptional fusion between a 157-bp DNA fragment, containing the apparent SOS box upstream of the regA gene, and the cat gene showed increased chloramphenicol acetyltransferase activity upon mitomycin treatment. Upstream of the bss gene, a sequence similar to the consensus sequence proposed to bind Ogr protein was found, but no sequence similar to an SOS box was detected. Our results suggest that transcriptional induction of bacteriocin 28b upon mitomycin treatment is mediated by the regC gene whose own transcription would be LexA dependent. PMID:8576068

  19. KPC-4 Is Encoded within a Truncated Tn4401 in an IncL/M Plasmid, pNE1280, Isolated from Enterobacter cloacae and Serratia marcescens

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Kendall A.; Van Schooneveld, Trevor C.; Thapa, Ishwor; Bastola, Dhundy; Williams, Laurina O.; Safranek, Thomas J.; Hinrichs, Steven H.; Rupp, Mark E.

    2013-01-01

    We describe the transfer of blaKPC-4 from Enterobacter cloacae to Serratia marcescens in a single patient. DNA sequencing revealed that KPC-4 was encoded on an IncL/M plasmid, pNE1280, closely related to pCTX-M360. Further analysis found that KPC-4 was encoded within a novel Tn4401 element (Tn4401f) containing a truncated tnpA and lacking tnpR, ISKpn7 left, and Tn4401 IRL-1, which are conserved in other Tn4401 transposons. This study highlights the continued evolution of Tn4401 transposons and movement to multiple plasmid backbones that results in acquisition by multiple species of Gram-negative bacilli. PMID:23070154

  20. Characterization of nosocomial Serratia marcescens isolates: comparison of Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of genomic DNA fragments and multilocus enzyme electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Irmscher, H M; Fischer, R; Beer, W; Seltmann, G

    1999-07-01

    A total of 66 Serratia marcescens isolates from 46 patients was investigated by macrorestriction using XbaI followed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. 7 restriction fragment patterns attributable to more than one patient and 9 individual patterns were identified. The isolates were additionally characterized by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The macrorestriction patterns and the multilocus enzyme electrophoresis patterns corresponded fairly well while the classifications derived from these methods were not completely congruent. The grouping achieved by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy on the basis of high (> 1000) and moderately high heterogeneity values (300) was consistent with the macrorestriction results. Grouping on a lower heterogeneity level did not contribute to further discrimination. In general, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy was less discriminatory than the two other methods, but easier to perform. Therefore, laboratories equipped with the necessary devices may use it to rapidly select bacterial isolates for macrorestriction or other well established characterization procedures.

  1. Modulation of Quorum Sensing in Acylhomoserine Lactone-Producing or -Degrading Tobacco Plants Leads to Alteration of Induced Systemic Resistance Elicited by the Rhizobacterium Serratia marcescens 90-166

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Choong-Min; Choi, Hye Kyung; Lee, Chi-Ho; Murphy, John F.; Lee, Jung-Kee; Kloepper, Joseph W.

    2013-01-01

    Numerous root-associated bacteria (rhizobacteria) are known to elicit induced systemic resistance (ISR) in plants. Bacterial cell-density-dependent quorum sensing (QS) is thought to be important for ISR. Here, we investigated the role of QS in the ISR elicited by the rhizobacterium, Serratia marcescens strain 90–166, in tobacco. Since S. marcescens 90–166 produces at least three QS signals, QS-mediated ISR in strain 90–166 has been difficult to understand. Therefore, we investigated the ISR capacity of two transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants that contained either bacterial acylhomoserine lactone-producing (AHL) or -degrading (AiiA) genes in conjunction with S. marcescens 90–166 to induce resistance against bacterial and viral pathogens. Root application of S. marcescens 90–166 increased ISR to the bacterial pathogens, Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci, in AHL plants and decreased ISR in AiiA plants. In contrast, ISR to Cucumber mosaic virus was reduced in AHL plants treated with S. marcescens 90–166 but enhanced in AiiA plants. Taken together, these data indicate that QS-dependent ISR is elicited by S. marcescens 90–166 in a pathogen-dependent manner. This study provides insight into QS-dependent ISR in tobacco elicited by S. marcescens 90–166. PMID:25288945

  2. Modulation of Quorum Sensing in Acylhomoserine Lactone-Producing or -Degrading Tobacco Plants Leads to Alteration of Induced Systemic Resistance Elicited by the Rhizobacterium Serratia marcescens 90-166.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Choong-Min; Choi, Hye Kyung; Lee, Chi-Ho; Murphy, John F; Lee, Jung-Kee; Kloepper, Joseph W

    2013-06-01

    Numerous root-associated bacteria (rhizobacteria) are known to elicit induced systemic resistance (ISR) in plants. Bacterial cell-density-dependent quorum sensing (QS) is thought to be important for ISR. Here, we investigated the role of QS in the ISR elicited by the rhizobacterium, Serratia marcescens strain 90-166, in tobacco. Since S. marcescens 90-166 produces at least three QS signals, QS-mediated ISR in strain 90-166 has been difficult to understand. Therefore, we investigated the ISR capacity of two transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants that contained either bacterial acylhomoserine lactone-producing (AHL) or -degrading (AiiA) genes in conjunction with S. marcescens 90-166 to induce resistance against bacterial and viral pathogens. Root application of S. marcescens 90-166 increased ISR to the bacterial pathogens, Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci, in AHL plants and decreased ISR in AiiA plants. In contrast, ISR to Cucumber mosaic virus was reduced in AHL plants treated with S. marcescens 90-166 but enhanced in AiiA plants. Taken together, these data indicate that QS-dependent ISR is elicited by S. marcescens 90-166 in a pathogen-dependent manner. This study provides insight into QS-dependent ISR in tobacco elicited by S. marcescens 90-166.

  3. Relative rates of nitric oxide and nitrous oxide production by nitrifiers, denitrifiers, and nitrate respirers. [Pseudomonas fluorescens; Serratia marcescens; Alcaligenes faecalis

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, I.C.; Levine, J.S.

    1986-05-01

    The authors investigated the effect of the partial pressure of oxygen (pO/sub 2/) on the production of NO and N/sub 2/O by a wide variety of common soil nitrifying, denitrifying, and nitrate-respiring bacteria under laboratory conditions. The production of NO per cell was highest by autotrophic nitrifiers and was independent of pO/sub 2/ in the range tested (0.5 to 10%), whereas N/sub 2/O production was inversely proportional to pO/sub 2/. Nitrous oxide production was highest in the denitrifier Pseudomonas fluorescens, but only under anaerobic conditions. The molar ratio of NO/N/sub 2/O produced was usually greater than unity for nitrifiers and much less than unity for denitrifiers. Chemodenitrification was the major source of both the NO and N/sub 2/O produced by the nitrate respirer Serratia marcescens. Chemodenitrification was also a possible source of NO and N/sub 2/O produced by the nitrate respirer Serratia marcescens. Chemodenitrification was also a possible source of No and N/sub 2/O in nitrifier cultures but only when high concentrations of nitrite had accumulated or were added to the medium. Although most of the denitrifiers produced NO and N/sub 2/O only under anaerobic conditions, chemostat cultures of Alcaligenes faecalis continued to emit these gases even when the cultures were sprayed with air. Based upon these results, we predict that aerobic soils are primary sources of NO and that N/sub 2/O is produced only when there is sufficient soil moisture to provide the anaerobic microsites necessary for denitrification by either denitrifiers or nitrifiers.

  4. Production of chitin from shrimp shell powders using Serratia marcescens B742 and Lactobacillus plantarum ATCC 8014 successive two-step fermentation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongcai; Jin, Yafang; Deng, Yun; Wang, Danfeng; Zhao, Yanyun

    2012-11-15

    Shrimp shell powders (SSPs) were fermented by successive two-step fermentation of Serratia marcescens B742 and Lactobacillus plantarum ATCC 8014 to extract chitin. Taguchi experimental design with orthogonal array was employed to investigate the most contributing factors on each of the one-step fermentation first. The identified optimal fermentation conditions for extracting chitin from SSPs using S. marcescens B742 were 2% SSP, 2h of sonication time, 10% incubation level, and 4d of culture time, while that of using L. plantarum ATCC 8014 fermentation was 2% SSP, 15% glucose, 10% incubation level, and 2d of culture time. Successive two-step fermentation using identified optimal fermentation conditions resulted in chitin yield of 18.9% with the final deproteinization (DP) and demineralization (DM) rate of 94.5% and 93.0%, respectively. The obtained chitin was compared with the commercial chitin from SSP using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FT-IR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Results showed that the chitin prepared by the successive two-step fermentation exhibited similar physicochemical and structural properties to those of the commercial one, while significantly less use of chemical reagents.

  5. Prevalence and characteristics of aac(6')-Ib-cr in AmpC-producing Enterobacter cloacae, Citrobacter freundii, and Serratia marcescens: a multicenter study from Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo-Young; Park, Yeon-Joon; Yu, Jin Kyung; Kim, Yeong Sic; Han, Kyungja

    2009-03-01

    We investigated the prevalence of aac(6')-Ib-cr and its association with other resistance genes in AmpC-producing Enterobacteriaceae without any selection criteria. A total of 479 clinical isolates of Enterobacter cloacae (179), Citrobacter freundii (134), and Serratia marcescens (166) from 12 laboratories between March and July 2005 were examined. We performed polymerase chain reaction for aac(6')-Ib, bla(OXA-1), ISEcp1, and class 1 integron. The aac(6')-Ib-cr was further identified by digestion with BstF5I and sequencing. The aac(6')-Ib was detected in 110 (23%) of 479 isolates, and 15 isolates (3.1%) were cr variants (8 E. cloacae, 5 C. freundii, and 2 S. marcescens). The aac(6')-Ib-cr was significantly associated with various resistance genes (bla(OXA-1), qnrS, qnrA, bla(CTX-M-3), and bla(CTX-M-14)), mobile elements (ISEcp1, ISCR1, and class 1 integron), and quinolone resistance. Eleven of 15 aac(6')-Ib-cr producers coharbored qnr genes. Although aac(6')-Ib-cr was uncommon in Korean AmpC producers, its association with various resistance genes and mobile elements would facilitate the dissemination of this variant.

  6. Prevalence, microbiology, and clinical characteristics of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacter spp., Serratia marcescens, Citrobacter freundii, and Morganella morganii in Korea.

    PubMed

    Choi, S-H; Lee, J E; Park, S J; Kim, M-N; Choo, E J; Kwak, Y G; Jeong, J-Y; Woo, J H; Kim, N J; Kim, Y S

    2007-08-01

    We examined the prevalence and characteristics of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing clinical isolates among Enterobacter spp., Serratia marcescens, Citrobacter freundii, and Morganella morganii, and evaluated screening criteria, clinical characteristics and outcomes of infections caused by ESBL-producing organisms. Between January and June 2005, a total of 493 nonduplicate consecutive isolates were collected at Asan Medical Center, a 2,300-bed tertiary hospital in Seoul, Republic of Korea. Fifty isolates (10.1%) were positive for phenotypical ESBL-test. The positive rate of phenotypical ESBL-test in Enterobacter spp., S. marcescens, C. freundii, and M. morganii was 12.8%, 12.4%, 4.9%, and 0% respectively. SHV-12 (18 isolates), CTX-M-9 (17 isolates), and TEM-52 (five isolates) were the most prevalent ESBL types. The ESBL in 17 strains could not be identified. As an ESBL screening criterion, the cefepime MIC >or=1 microg/ml had the highest sensitivity (0.84) and specificity (0.87). Half of the ESBL-producing isolates (25/50) were judged as pathogens. Cholangitis (ten cases), and pneumonia (six cases) were the most common infections. The overall mortality was 12.0%.

  7. Analysis of the reaction mechanism of the non-specific endonuclease of Serratia marcescens using an artificial minimal substrate.

    PubMed

    Kolmes, B; Franke, I; Friedhoff, P; Pingoud, A

    1996-11-18

    We have studied the mechanism of action of the Serratia nuclease using deoxythymidine 3',5'-bis-(p-nitrophenyl-phosphate) as a substrate. A comparison of the activity with which the wild-type enzyme and several mutant enzymes attack this artificial substrate and herring sperm DNA, respectively, supports the suggestion that His89 is the general base and a Mg2+ ion bound to Glu127 the general acid in the mechanism of phosphodiester bond hydrolysis by the Serratia nuclease, and that Asn119 directly participates in catalysis, for example by transition state stabilisation. Arg57, Arg87 and Arg131, essential for nuclease activity, are not needed for cleavage of the artificial substrate, suggesting that they are involved in binding and positioning of nucleic acid substrates.

  8. Chitinase from a novel strain of Serratia marcescens JPP1 for biocontrol of aflatoxin: molecular characterization and production optimization using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Yan, Pei-sheng; Cao, Li-xin

    2014-01-01

    Chitinase is one of the most important mycolytic enzymes with industrial significance, and produced by a number of organisms. A chitinase producing isolate Serratia marcescens JPP1 was obtained from peanut hulls in Jiangsu Province, China, and exhibited antagonistic activity against aflatoxins. In this study, we describe the optimization of medium composition with increased production of chitinase for the selected bacteria using statistical methods: Plackett-Burman design was applied to find the key ingredients, and central composite design of response surface methodology was used to optimize the levels of key ingredients for the best yield of chitinase. Maximum chitinase production was predicted to be 23.09 U/mL for a 2.1-fold increase in medium containing 12.70 g/L colloidal chitin, 7.34 g/L glucose, 5.00 g/L peptone, 1.32 g/L (NH4)2SO4, 0.7 g/L K2HPO4, and 0.5 g/L MgSO4 · 7H2O. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of the JPP1 chitinase gene was performed and obtained a 1,789 bp nucleotide sequence; its open reading frame encoded a protein of 499 amino acids named as ChiBjp.

  9. Evaluation and comparison of random amplification of polymorphic DNA, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and ADSRRS-fingerprinting for typing Serratia marcescens outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Krawczyk, Beata; Naumiuk, Lukasz; Lewandowski, Krzysztof; Baraniak, Anna; Gniadkowski, Marek; Samet, Alfred; Kur, Józef

    2003-10-15

    Amplification of DNA fragments surrounding rare restriction sites (ADSRRS-fingerprinting) is a novel assay based on suppression of polymerase chain reaction (PCR). This phenomenon allows the amplification of only a limited subset of DNA fragments, since only those with two different oligonucleotides ligated at the ends of complementary DNA strands are amplified in the PCR. The DNA fragments can be easily analyzed on polyacrylamide gels, stained with ethidium bromide. We have implemented this method using a set of clinical Serratia marcescens isolates from three outbreaks ongoing in the Public Hospital in Gdańsk (Poland). Clustering of ADSRRS-fingerprinting data matched epidemiological, microbiological, random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) data. Based on this study, we found that there is at least a similar power of discrimination between the present 'gold-standard' PFGE and the novel method, ADSRRS-fingerprinting. Although the ADSRRS-fingerprinting method may appear to be more complex than the RAPD technique, we found it fast and reproducible.

  10. Stereoselective synthesis of (R)-phenylephrine using recombinant Escherichia coli cells expressing a novel short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase gene from Serratia marcescens BCRC 10948.

    PubMed

    Peng, Guan-Jhih; Kuan, Yi-Chia; Chou, Hsiao-Yi; Fu, Tze-Kai; Lin, Jia-Shin; Hsu, Wen-Hwei; Yang, Ming-Te

    2014-01-20

    (R)-Phenylephrine [(R)-PE] is an α1-adrenergic receptor agonist and is widely used as a nasal decongestant to treat the common cold without the side effects of other ephedrine adrenergic drugs. We identified a short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SM_SDR) from Serratia marcescens BCRC 10948 that was able to convert 1-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-2-(methylamino) ethanone (HPMAE) into (R)-PE. The SM_SDR used NADPH and NADH as cofactors with specific activities of 17.35±0.71 and 5.57±0.07mU/mg protein, respectively, at 30°C and pH 7.0, thereby indicating that this enzyme could be categorized as an NADPH-preferring short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase. Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3) expressing SM_SDR could convert HPMAE into (R)-PE with more than 99% enantiomeric excess. The productivity and conversion yield were 0.57mmolPE/lh and 51.06%, respectively, using 10mM HPMAE. Fructose was the most effective carbon source for the conversion of HPMAE to (R)-PE.

  11. Chitinase from a Novel Strain of Serratia marcescens JPP1 for Biocontrol of Aflatoxin: Molecular Characterization and Production Optimization Using Response Surface Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; Yan, Pei-sheng; Cao, Li-xin

    2014-01-01

    Chitinase is one of the most important mycolytic enzymes with industrial significance, and produced by a number of organisms. A chitinase producing isolate Serratia marcescens JPP1 was obtained from peanut hulls in Jiangsu Province, China, and exhibited antagonistic activity against aflatoxins. In this study, we describe the optimization of medium composition with increased production of chitinase for the selected bacteria using statistical methods: Plackett-Burman design was applied to find the key ingredients, and central composite design of response surface methodology was used to optimize the levels of key ingredients for the best yield of chitinase. Maximum chitinase production was predicted to be 23.09 U/mL for a 2.1-fold increase in medium containing 12.70 g/L colloidal chitin, 7.34 g/L glucose, 5.00 g/L peptone, 1.32 g/L (NH4)2SO4, 0.7 g/L K2HPO4, and 0.5 g/L MgSO4·7H2O. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of the JPP1 chitinase gene was performed and obtained a 1,789 bp nucleotide sequence; its open reading frame encoded a protein of 499 amino acids named as ChiBjp. PMID:24812619

  12. Complete Sequence of Four Multidrug-Resistant MOBQ1 Plasmids Harboring blaGES-5 Isolated from Escherichia coli and Serratia marcescens Persisting in a Hospital in Canada.

    PubMed

    Boyd, David; Taylor, Geoffrey; Fuller, Jeff; Bryce, Elizabeth; Embree, Joanne; Gravel, Denise; Katz, Kevin; Kibsey, Pamela; Kuhn, Magdalena; Langley, Joanne; Mataseje, Laura; Mitchell, Robyn; Roscoe, Diane; Simor, Andrew; Thomas, Eva; Turgeon, Nathalie; Mulvey, Michael

    2015-06-01

    The usefulness of carbapenems for gram-negative infections is becoming compromised by organisms harboring carbapenemases, enzymes which can hydrolyze the drug. Currently KPC (class A), NDM (class B), and OXA-48 types (class D) are the most globally widespread carbapenemases. However, among the GES-type class A extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) there are variants that hydrolyze carbapenems, with blaGES-5 being the most common. Two Escherichia coli and two Serratia marcescens harboring blaGES-5 on plasmids were isolated by the Canadian Nosocomial Infection Surveillance Program (CNISP) from four different patients in a single hospital over a 2-year period. Complete sequencing of the blaGES-5 plasmids indicated that all four had nearly identical backbones consisting of genes for replication, partitioning, and stability, but contained variant accessory regions consisting of mobile elements and antimicrobial resistance genes. The plasmids were of a novel replicon type, but belonged to the MOBQ1 group based on relaxase sequences, and appeared to be mobilizable, but not self-transmissible. Considering the time periods of bacterial isolation, it would appear the blaGES-5 plasmid has persisted in an environmental niche for at least 2 years in the hospital. This has implications for infection control and clinical care when it is transferred to clinically relevant gram-negative organisms.

  13. Cloning, expression and characterization of glycerol dehydrogenase involved in 2,3-butanediol formation in Serratia marcescens H30.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liaoyuan; Xu, Quanming; Peng, Xiaoqian; Xu, Boheng; Wu, Yuehao; Yang, Yulong; Sun, Shujing; Hu, Kaihui; Shen, Yaling

    2014-09-01

    The meso-2,3-butanediol dehydrogenase (meso-BDH) from S. marcescens H30 is responsible for converting acetoin into 2,3-butanediol during sugar fermentation. Inactivation of the meso-BDH encoded by budC gene does not completely abolish 2,3-butanediol production, which suggests that another similar enzyme involved in 2,3-butanediol formation exists in S. marcescens H30. In the present study, a glycerol dehydrogenase (GDH) encoded by gldA gene from S. marcescens H30 was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3), purified and characterized for its properties. In vitro conversion indicated that the purified GDH could catalyze the interconversion of (3S)-acetoin/meso-2,3-butanediol and (3R)-acetoin/(2R,3R)-2,3-butanediol. (2S,3S)-2,3-Butanediol was not a substrate for the GDH at all. Kinetic parameters of the GDH enzyme showed lower K m value and higher catalytic efficiency for (3S/3R)-acetoin in comparison to those for (2R,3R)-2,3-butanediol and meso-2,3-butanediol, implying its physiological role in favor of 2,3-butanediol formation. Maximum activity for reduction of (3S/3R)-acetoin and oxidations of meso-2,3-butanediol and glycerol was observed at pH 8.0, while it was pH 7.0 for diacetyl reduction. The enzyme exhibited relative high thermotolerance with optimum temperature of 60 °C in the oxidation-reduction reactions. Over 60 % of maximum activity was retained at 70 °C. Additionally, the GDH activity was significantly enhanced for meso-2,3-BD oxidation in the presence of Fe(2+) and for (3S/3R)-acetoin reduction in the presence of Mn(2+), while several cations inhibited its activity, particularly Fe(2+) and Fe(3+) for (3S/3R)-acetoin reduction. The properties provided potential application for single configuration production of acetoin and 2,3-butanediol .

  14. An outbreak of Serratia marcescens infection in a special-care baby unit of a community hospital in United Arab Emirates: the importance of the air conditioner duct as a nosocomial reservoir.

    PubMed

    Uduman, S A; Farrukh, A S; Nath, K N R; Zuhair, M Y H; Ifrah, A; Khawla, A D; Sunita, P

    2002-11-01

    We report an outbreak of Serratia marcescens infection in a special-care baby unit (SCBU) of a university-affiliated community hospital in the United Arab Emirates. The outbreak involved 36 infants and lasted for 20 weeks. Seven of the colonized infants developed invasive illnesses in the form of bacteraemia (four cases), bacteraemic meningitis (two) and clinical sepsis (one). Three other term infants had purulent conjunctivitis. There were five deaths with an overall mortality of 14%. S. marcescens was cultured from airflow samples from the air conditioning (AC) which was the reservoir of infection in this outbreak. Elimination of the nosocomial source and outbreak containment were eventually achieved by specialized robotic cleaning of the entire AC duct system of the SCBU. Strict adherence to the infection control policies was reinforced to prevent transmission of cross-infection.

  15. A calcium-gated lid and a large beta-roll sandwich are revealed by the crystal structure of extracellular lipase from Serratia marcescens.

    PubMed

    Meier, Reto; Drepper, Thomas; Svensson, Vera; Jaeger, Karl-Erich; Baumann, Ulrich

    2007-10-26

    Lipase LipA from Serratia marcescens is a 613-amino acid enzyme belonging to family I.3 of lipolytic enzymes that has an important biotechnological application in the production of a chiral precursor for the coronary vasodilator diltiazem. Like other family I.3 lipases, LipA is secreted by Gram-negative bacteria via a type I secretion system and possesses 13 copies of a calcium binding tandem repeat motif, GGXGXDXUX (U, hydrophobic amino acids), in the C-terminal part of the polypeptide chain. The 1.8-A crystal structure of LipA reveals a close relation to eukaryotic lipases, whereas family I.1 and I.2 enzymes appear to be more distantly related. Interestingly, the structure shows for the N-terminal lipase domain a variation on the canonical alpha/beta hydrolase fold in an open conformation, where the putative lid helix is anchored by a Ca(2+) ion essential for activity. Another novel feature observed in this lipase structure is the presence of a helical hairpin additional to the putative lid helix that exposes a hydrophobic surface to the aqueous medium and might function as an additional lid. The tandem repeats form two separated parallel beta-roll domains that pack tightly against each other. Variations of the consensus sequence of the tandem repeats within the second beta-roll result in an asymmetric Ca(2+) binding on only one side of the roll. The analysis of the properties of the beta-roll domains suggests an intramolecular chaperone function.

  16. Resistance to Cefepime and Cefpirome Due to a 4-Amino-Acid Deletion in the Chromosome-Encoded AmpC β-Lactamase of a Serratia marcescens Clinical Isolate

    PubMed Central

    Mammeri, Hedi; Poirel, Laurent; Bemer, Pascal; Drugeon, Henri; Nordmann, Patrice

    2004-01-01

    A multiresistant Serratia marcescens strain, HD, isolated from a patient with a urinary tract infection, was resistant to amino-, carboxy-, and ureidopenicillins, ceftazidime, and cefepime and was susceptible to cefotaxime and ceftriaxone, according to the guidelines of the NCCLS. No synergy was found between expanded-spectrum cephalosporins and clavulanic acid, according to the double-disk synergy test. The blaAmpC gene of the strain was amplified by PCR and cloned into Escherichia coli DH10B, giving rise to high-level resistance to ceftazidime, cefepime, and cefpirome. Sequencing analysis revealed that the blaAmpC gene from S. marcescens HD had a 12-nucleotide deletion compared to the blaAmpC gene from reference strain S. marcescens S3, leading to a 4-amino-acid deletion located in the H-10 helix of the β-lactamase. Kinetic analysis showed that this enzyme significantly hydrolyzed ceftazidime, cefepime, and cefpirome. This work underlined that resistance to the latest expanded-spectrum cephalosporins may be mediated by structurally modified AmpC-type β-lactamases. PMID:14982755

  17. Resistance to cefepime and cefpirome due to a 4-amino-acid deletion in the chromosome-encoded AmpC beta-lactamase of a Serratia marcescens clinical isolate.

    PubMed

    Mammeri, Hedi; Poirel, Laurent; Bemer, Pascal; Drugeon, Henri; Nordmann, Patrice

    2004-03-01

    A multiresistant Serratia marcescens strain, HD, isolated from a patient with a urinary tract infection, was resistant to amino-, carboxy-, and ureidopenicillins, ceftazidime, and cefepime and was susceptible to cefotaxime and ceftriaxone, according to the guidelines of the NCCLS. No synergy was found between expanded-spectrum cephalosporins and clavulanic acid, according to the double-disk synergy test. The bla(AmpC) gene of the strain was amplified by PCR and cloned into Escherichia coli DH10B, giving rise to high-level resistance to ceftazidime, cefepime, and cefpirome. Sequencing analysis revealed that the bla(AmpC) gene from S. marcescens HD had a 12-nucleotide deletion compared to the bla(AmpC) gene from reference strain S. marcescens S3, leading to a 4-amino-acid deletion located in the H-10 helix of the beta-lactamase. Kinetic analysis showed that this enzyme significantly hydrolyzed ceftazidime, cefepime, and cefpirome. This work underlined that resistance to the latest expanded-spectrum cephalosporins may be mediated by structurally modified AmpC-type beta-lactamases.

  18. QM/MM free-energy simulations of reaction in Serratia marcescens Chitinase B reveal the protonation state of Asp142 and the critical role of Tyr214.

    PubMed

    Jitonnom, Jitrayut; Limb, Michael A L; Mulholland, Adrian J

    2014-05-08

    Serratia marcescens Chitinase B (ChiB), belonging to the glycosidase family 18 (GH18), catalyzes the hydrolysis of β-1,4-glycosidic bond, with retention of configuration, via an unusual substrate-assisted mechanism, in which the substrate itself acts as an intramolecular nucleophile. Here, both elementary steps (glycosylation and deglycosylation) of the ChiB-catalyzed reaction are investigated by means of combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) umbrella sampling molecular dynamics (MD) simulations at the SCC-DFTB/CHARMM22 level of theory. We examine the influence of the Asp142 protonation state on the reaction and the role that this residue performs in the reaction. Our simulations show that reaction with a neutral Asp142 is preferred and demonstrate that this residue provides electrostatic stabilization of the oxazolinium ion intermediate formed in the reaction. Insight into the conformational itinerary ((1,4)B↔(4)H5↔(4)C1) adopted by the substrate (bound in subsite -1) along the preferred reaction pathway is also provided by the simulations. The relative energies of the stationary points found along the reaction pathway calculated with SCC-DFTB and B3LYP were compared. The results suggest that SCC-DFTB is an accurate method for estimating the relative barriers for both steps of the reaction; however, it was found to overestimate the relative energy of an intermediate formed in the reaction when compared with the higher level of theory. Glycosylation is suggested to be a rate-determining step in the reaction with calculated overall reaction free-energy barrier of 20.5 kcal/mol, in a reasonable agreement with the 16.1 kcal/mol barrier derived from the experiment. The role of Tyr214 in catalysis was also investigated with the results, indicating that the residue plays a critical role in the deglycosylation step of the reaction. Simulations of the enzyme-product complex were also performed with an unbinding event suggested to have been observed

  19. A DFT study of the unusual substrate-assisted mechanism of Serratia marcescens chitinase B reveals the role of solvent and mutational effect on catalysis.

    PubMed

    Jitonnom, Jitrayut; Sattayanon, Chanchai; Kungwan, Nawee; Hannongbua, Supa

    2015-03-01

    Serratia marcescens chitinase B (SmChiB) catalyzes the hydrolysis of β-1,4-glycosidic bond, via an unusual substrate-assisted mechanism, in which the substrate itself acts as an intramolecular nucleophile. In this paper, the catalytic mechanism of SmChiB has been investigated by using density functional theory. The details of two consecutive steps (glycosylation and deglycosylation), the structures and energetics along the whole catalytic reaction, and the roles of solvent molecules as well as some conserved SmChiB residues (Asp142, Tyr214, Asp215, and Arg294) during catalysis are highlighted. Our calculations show that the formation of the oxazolinium cation intermediate in the glycosylation step was found to be a rate-determining step (with a barrier of 23 kcal/mol), in line with our previous computational studies (Jitonnom et al., 2011, 2014). The solvent water molecules have a significant effect on a catalytic efficiency in the degycosylation step: the catalytic water is essentially placed in a perfect position for nucleophic attack by hydrogen bond network, lowering the barrier height of this step from 11.3 kcal/mol to 2.9 kcal/mol when more water molecules were introduced. Upon the in silico mutations of the four conserved residues, their mutational effects on the relative stability of the reaction intermediates and the computed energetics can be obtained by comparing with the wild-type results. Mutations of Tyr214 to Phe or Ala have shown a profound effect on the relative stability of the oxazolinium intermediate, emphasizing a direct role of this residue in destabilizing the intermediate. In line with the experiment that the D142A mutation leads to almost complete loss of SmChiB activity, this mutation greatly decreases the stability of the intermediate, resulting in a very large increase in the activation barrier up to 50 kcal/mol. The salt-bridges residues (Asp215 and Arg294) were also found to play a role in stabilizing the oxazolinium intermediate.

  20. Multifarious beneficial traits and plant growth promoting potential of Serratia marcescens KiSII and Enterobacter sp. RNF 267 isolated from the rhizosphere of coconut palms (Cocos nucifera L.).

    PubMed

    George, Priya; Gupta, Alka; Gopal, Murali; Thomas, Litty; Thomas, George V

    2013-01-01

    Two plant growth promoting bacteria designated as KiSII and RNF 267 isolated from the rhizosphere of coconut palms were identified as Serratia marcescens and Enterobacter sp. based on their phenotypic features, BIOLOG studies and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Both bacteria exhibited phosphate solubilization, ammonification, and production of indole acetic acid, β-1, 3 glucanase activities and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate-deaminase activity. They could also tolerate a range of pH conditions, low temperature and salinity (NaCl). In addition, S. marcescens KiSII exhibited N- fixation potential, chitinase activity, siderophore production and antibiotics production. Seed bacterization with these bacteria increased the growth parameters of test plants such as paddy and cowpea over uninoculated control in green house assay. In coconut seedlings, significant increase in growth and nutrient uptake accompanied with higher populations of plant beneficial microorganisms in their rhizospheres were recorded on inoculation with both the PGPRs. The present study clearly revealed that PGPRs can aid in production of healthy and vigorous seedlings of coconut palm which are hardy perennial crops. They offer a scope to be developed into novel PGPR based bioinoculants for production of elite seedlings that can benefit the coconut farming community and the coconut based ecology.

  1. Evaluation of Phoenix Automated Microbiology System for detecting extended-spectrum beta-lactamases among chromosomal AmpC-producing Enterobacter cloacae, Enterobacter aerogenes, Citrobacter freundii, and Serratia marcescens.

    PubMed

    Park, Yeon-Joon; Yu, Jin Kyung; Lee, Seungok; Park, Jung-Jun; Oh, Eun-Jee

    2007-01-01

    We evaluated the BD Phoenix Extended-Spectrum beta-Lactamase (ESBL) detection test among chromosomal AmpC-producing Enterobacter cloacae, Enterobacter aerogenes, Citrobacter freundii, and Serratia marcescens. The study was conducted on 72 non-repetitive ESBL producers (33 E. cloacae, 13 E. aerogenes, 14 C. freundii, and 12 S. marcescens) and 77 ESBL non-producers (33 E. cloacae, 9 E. aerogenes, 6 C. freundii, and 29 S. marcescens). The organisms were selected as suspected ESBL-producers based on the double disk synergy test and confirmed by PCR amplification of blaTEM-1, blaSHV-1, blaCTX-M-1, blaCTX-M-2, and blaCTX-M-9. The Phoenix ESBL test, using a 5-well confirmatory test and the BDXpert system, was evaluated. Of the 72 isolates identified as ESBL-producers based on the DDST, 46 isolates harbored CTX-M-type enzymes, 21 harbored TEM type enzymes, and 31 harbored SHV enzymes. The Phoenix system identified ESBL only in 15 isolates. Of the 77 ESBL non-producers, ths Phoenix system identified ESBL in 4 isolates, 3 of which were confirmed to be ESBL-producers. In this study, the Phoenix system was highly specific (76/77, 98.7%), and it identified 3 additional ESBL-producers that were not detected by DDST. However, the Phoenix system's sensitivity was very low (15/72, 20.8%). Considering the increasing prevalence of ESBL production among AmpC-producers, the BD Phoenix system could not be considered a reliable stand-alone ESBL detection method for the strains tested in our study.

  2. Lipopolysaccharides from Serratia marcescens possess one or two 4-amino-4-deoxy-L-arabinopyranose 1-phosphate residues in the lipid A and D-glycero-D-talo-oct-2-ulopyranosonic acid in the inner core region.

    PubMed

    Vinogradov, Evgeny; Lindner, Buko; Seltmann, Guntram; Radziejewska-Lebrecht, Joanna; Holst, Otto

    2006-08-25

    The carbohydrate backbones of the core-lipid A region were characterized from the lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) of Serratia marcescens strains 111R (a rough mutant strain of serotype O29) and IFO 3735 (a smooth strain not serologically characterized but possessing the O-chain structure of serotype O19). The LPSs were degraded either by mild hydrazinolysis (de-O-acylation) and hot 4 M KOH (de-N-acylation), or by hydrolysis in 2 % aqueous acetic acid, or by deamination. Oligosaccharide phosphates were isolated by high-performance anion-exchange chromatography. Through the use of compositional analysis, electrospray ionization Fourier transform mass spectrometry, and 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy applying various one- and two-dimensional experiments, we identified the structures of the carbohydrate backbones that contained D-glycero-D-talo-oct-2-ulopyranosonic acid and 4-amino-4-deoxy-L-arabinose 1-phosphate residues. We also identified some truncated structures for both strains. All sugars were D-configured pyranoses and alpha-linked, except where stated otherwise.

  3. Potentiation of the synergistic activities of chitinases ChiA, ChiB and ChiC from Serratia marcescens CFFSUR-B2 by chitobiase (Chb) and chitin binding protein (CBP).

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Román, Martha Ingrid; Dunn, Michael F; Tinoco-Valencia, Raunel; Holguín-Meléndez, Francisco; Huerta-Palacios, Graciela; Guillén-Navarro, Karina

    2014-01-01

    With the goal of understanding the chitinolytic mechanism of the potential biological control strain Serratia marcescens CFFSUR-B2, genes encoding chitinases ChiA, ChiB and ChiC, chitobiase (Chb) and chitin binding protein (CBP) were cloned, the protein products overexpressed in Escherichia coli as 6His-Sumo fusion proteins and purified by affinity chromatography. Following affinity tag removal, the chitinolytic activity of the recombinant proteins was evaluated individually and in combination using colloidal chitin as substrate. ChiB and ChiC were highly active while ChiA was inactive. Reactions containing both ChiB and ChiC showed significantly increased N-acetylglucosamine trimer and dimer formation, but decreased monomer formation, compared to reactions with either enzyme alone. This suggests that while both ChiB and ChiC have a general affinity for the same substrate, they attack different sites and together degrade chitin more efficiently than either enzyme separately. Chb and CBP in combination with ChiB and ChiC (individually or together) increased their chitinase activity. We report for the first time the potentiating effect of Chb on the activity of the chitinases and the synergistic activity of a mixture of all five proteins (the three chitinases, Chb and CBP). These results contribute to our understanding of the mechanism of action of the chitinases produced by strain CFFSUR-B2 and provide a molecular basis for its high potential as a biocontrol agent against fungal pathogens.

  4. Biocontrol of the Sugarcane Borer Eldana saccharina by Expression of the Bacillus thuringiensis cry1Ac7 and Serratia marcescens chiA Genes in Sugarcane-Associated Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Downing, Katrina J.; Leslie, Graeme; Thomson, Jennifer A.

    2000-01-01

    The cry1Ac7 gene of Bacillus thuringiensis strain 234, showing activity against the sugarcane borer Eldana saccharina, was cloned under the control of the tac promoter. The fusion was introduced into the broad-host-range plasmid pKT240 and the integration vector pJFF350 and without the tac promoter into the broad-host-range plasmids pML122 and pKmM0. These plasmids were introduced into a Pseudomonas fluorescens strain isolated from the phylloplane of sugarcane and the endophytic bacterium Herbaspirillum seropedicae found in sugarcane. The ptac-cry1Ac7 construct was introduced into the chromosome of P. fluorescens using the integration vector pJFF350 carrying the artificial interposon Omegon-Km. Western blot analysis showed that the expression levels of the integrated cry1Ac7 gene were much higher under the control of the tac promoter than under the control of its endogenous promoter. It was also determined that multicopy expression in P. fluorescens and H. seropedicae of ptac-cry1Ac7 carried on pKT240 caused plasmid instability with no detectable protein expression. In H. seropedicae, more Cry1Ac7 toxin was produced when the gene was cloned under the control of the Nmr promoter on pML122 than in the opposite orientation and bioassays showed that the former resulted in higher mortality of E. saccharina larvae than the latter. P. fluorescens 14::ptac-tox resulted in higher mortality of larvae than did P. fluorescens 14::tox. An increased toxic effect was observed when P. fluorescens 14::ptac-tox was combined with P. fluorescens carrying the Serratia marcescens chitinase gene chiA, under the control of the tac promoter, integrated into the chromosome. PMID:10877771

  5. Serratia Infections: from Military Experiments to Current Practice

    PubMed Central

    Mahlen, Steven D.

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Serratia species, in particular Serratia marcescens, are significant human pathogens. S. marcescens has a long and interesting taxonomic, medical experimentation, military experimentation, and human clinical infection history. The organisms in this genus, particularly S. marcescens, were long thought to be nonpathogenic. Because S. marcescens was thought to be a nonpathogen and is usually red pigmented, the U.S. military conducted experiments that attempted to ascertain the spread of this organism released over large areas. In the process, members of both the public and the military were exposed to S. marcescens, and this was uncovered by the press in the 1970s, leading to U.S. congressional hearings. S. marcescens was found to be a certain human pathogen by the mid-1960s. S. marcescens and S. liquefaciens have been isolated as causative agents of numerous outbreaks and opportunistic infections, and the association of these organisms with point sources such as medical devices and various solutions given to hospitalized patients is striking. Serratia species appear to be common environmental organisms, and this helps to explain the large number of nosocomial infections due to these bacteria. Since many nosocomial infections are caused by multiply antibiotic-resistant strains of S. marcescens, this increases the danger to hospitalized patients, and hospital personnel should be vigilant in preventing nosocomial outbreaks due to this organism. S. marcescens, and probably other species in the genus, carries several antibiotic resistance determinants and is also capable of acquiring resistance genes. S. marcescens and S. liquefaciens are usually identified well in the clinical laboratory, but the other species are rare enough that laboratory technologists may not recognize them. 16S rRNA gene sequencing may enable better identification of some of the less common Serratia species. PMID:21976608

  6. Scleral buckle infection by Serratia species

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesh, Ramesh; Agarwal, Manisha; Singh, Shalini; Mayor, Rahul; Bansal, Aditya

    2017-01-01

    We describe a rare case of scleral buckle (SB) infection with Serratia species. A 48-year-old male with a history of retinal detachment repair with scleral buckling presented with redness, pain, and purulent discharge in the left eye for 4 days. Conjunctival erosion with exposure of the SB and scleral thinning was noted. The SB was removed and sent for culture. Blood and chocolate agar grew Gram-negative rod-shaped bacillus identified as Serratia marcescens. On the basis of the susceptibility test results, the patient was treated with oral and topical antibiotics. After 6 weeks of the treatment, his infection resolved. PMID:28298863

  7. Absence of Mutagenic Activity of Hycanthone in Serratia marcescens,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-29

    hycanthone. Life Sciences 37:161-167. 15. Clive, 0. 1974. Mutagenicity of thioxanthenes (hycanthone, lucanthone and four indazole derivatives) at the TK...and P. M. Hynds. 1978. Atmospheric reactions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: facile formation of inutayenic nitro derivatives. Science 202:515-519

  8. A pore-forming toxin enables Serratia a nonlytic egress from host cells.

    PubMed

    Di Venanzio, Gisela; Lazzaro, Martina; Morales, Enrique S; Krapf, Darío; García Véscovi, Eleonora

    2017-02-01

    Several pathogens co-opt host intracellular compartments to survive and replicate, and they thereafter disperse progeny to prosper in a new niche. Little is known about strategies displayed by Serratia marcescens to defeat immune responses and disseminate afterwards. Upon invasion of nonphagocytic cells, Serratia multiplies within autophagosome-like vacuoles. These Serratia-containing vacuoles (SeCV) circumvent progression into acidic/degradative compartments, avoiding elimination. In this work, we show that ShlA pore-forming toxin (PFT) commands Serratia escape from invaded cells. While ShlA-dependent, Ca(2)(+) local increase was shown in SeCVs tight proximity, intracellular Ca(2)(+) sequestration prevented Serratia exit. Accordingly, a Ca(2)(+) surge rescued a ShlA-deficient strain exit capacity, demonstrating that Ca(2)(+) mobilization is essential for egress. As opposed to wild-type-SeCV, the mutant strain-vacuole was wrapped by actin filaments, showing that ShlA expression rearranges host actin. Moreover, alteration of actin polymerization hindered wild-type Serratia escape, while increased intracellular Ca(2)(+) reorganized the mutant strain-SeCV actin distribution, restoring wild-type-SeCV phenotype. Our results demonstrate that, by ShlA expression, Serratia triggers a Ca(2)(+) signal that reshapes cytoskeleton dynamics and ends up pushing the SeCV load out of the cell, in an exocytic-like process. These results disclose that PFTs can be engaged in allowing bacteria to exit without compromising host cell integrity.

  9. Impact of Azithromycin on the Quorum Sensing-Controlled Proteome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Swatton, J. E.; Davenport, P. W.; Maunders, E. A.; Griffin, J. L.; Lilley, K. S.; Welch, M.

    2016-01-01

    The macrolide antibiotic, azithromycin (AZM), has been reported to improve the clinical outcome of cystic fibrosis patients, many of whom are chronically-infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. However, the highest clinically-achievable concentrations of this drug are well-below the minimum inhibitory concentration for P. aeruginosa, raising the question of why AZM exhibits therapeutic activity. One possibility that has been raised by earlier studies is that AZM inhibits quorum sensing (QS) by P. aeruginosa. To explicitly test this hypothesis the changes brought about by AZM treatment need to be compared with those associated with specific QS mutants grown alongside in the same growth medium, but this has not been done. In this work, we used quantitative 2D-difference gel electrophoresis and 1H-NMR spectroscopy footprint analysis to examine whether a range of clinically-relevant AZM concentrations elicited proteomic and metabolomic changes in wild-type cultures that were similar to those seen in cultures of defined QS mutants. Consistent with earlier reports, over half of the AZM-induced spot changes on the 2D gels were found to affect QS-regulated proteins. However, AZM modulated very few protein spots overall (compared with QS) and collectively, these modulated proteins comprised only a small fraction (12–13%) of the global QS regulon. We conclude that AZM perturbs a sub-regulon of the QS system but does not block QS per se. Reinforcing this notion, we further show that AZM is capable of attenuating virulence factor production in another Gram-negative species that secretes copious quantities of exoenzymes (Serratia marcescens), even in the absence of a functional QS system. PMID:26808156

  10. [Serratia infections, should we think about primary immunodeficiencies?

    PubMed

    Montaner Ramón, Alicia; Murillo Sanjuán, Laura; Martínez Faci, Cristina; Guerrero Laleona, Carmelo; Rodríguez-Vigil Iturrate, Carmen

    2017-04-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a primary immunodeficiency with an incidence of 1/200,000-250,000 live births. CGD affects mainly male patients, most of the mutations being X-linked, and autosomal recessive forms occur more frequently in communities with greater numbers of consanguineous marriages. CGD is characterized by sensitivity to recurrent and severe bacterial and fungal infections, with formation of granulomas due to the inability of phagocytes to generate reactive oxygen compounds, necessary for the intracellular death of phagocytic microorganisms. We report three cases of CGD in which Serratia marcescens was isolated, and after detailed anamnesis and performance of neutrophil function tests, a molecular diagnosis of the disease was reached. CGD can be manifested in a wide variety of ways, so that high suspicion and a meticulous anamnesis are essential to reach a diagnosis.

  11. Screening of antibiotics resistance to Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii by an advanced expert system.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Tatsuya; Takahashi, Hakuo

    2005-12-01

    The VITEK2 advanced expert system (AES) gives information about the antibiotics-resistance mechanisms based on the biological validation derived from the VITEK2 susceptibility result. In this study, we investigated whether or not this system correctly categorized the beta-lactamase resistance mechanism data derived from the VITEK2 susceptibility result using the testing card, AST-N025, with Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii. We used 131 strains, and their phenotypes were determined according to the biological and genetic screening. The AES analysis result matched the phenotype testing in 120 (91.6%) of the 131 strains. Incorrect findings were found in six strains, including three strains of Serratia marcescens. The resistance mechanism could not be determined in five strains, including three strains of Providencia rettgeri. The analysis of those phenotypes agreed in 34 (97.1%) among 35 strains with extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL), and in 27 (96.4%) among 28 strains with high-level cephalosporinase. The agreement ratio in the phenotype was very high as we expected. The incorrect and nondeterminable samples were strains with relatively high cephalosporinase that has variation of outer membrane protein. The AES was able to detect the phenotype for carbapenemase. The AES is a clinically useful system that allows taking prompt measures to treat patients because it can provide information about the resistance mechanism in less than half a day after starting the analysis.

  12. Snapshots of a shrinking partner: Genome reduction in Serratia symbiotica

    PubMed Central

    Manzano-Marín, Alejandro; Latorre, Amparo

    2016-01-01

    Genome reduction is pervasive among maternally-inherited endosymbiotic organisms, from bacteriocyte- to gut-associated ones. This genome erosion is a step-wise process in which once free-living organisms evolve to become obligate associates, thereby losing non-essential or redundant genes/functions. Serratia symbiotica (Gammaproteobacteria), a secondary endosymbiont present in many aphids (Hemiptera: Aphididae), displays various characteristics that make it a good model organism for studying genome reduction. While some strains are of facultative nature, others have established co-obligate associations with their respective aphid host and its primary endosymbiont (Buchnera). Furthermore, the different strains hold genomes of contrasting sizes and features, and have strikingly disparate cell shapes, sizes, and tissue tropism. Finally, genomes from closely related free-living Serratia marcescens are also available. In this study, we describe in detail the genome reduction process (from free-living to reduced obligate endosymbiont) undergone by S. symbiotica, and relate it to the stages of integration to the symbiotic system the different strains find themselves in. We establish that the genome reduction patterns observed in S. symbiotica follow those from other dwindling genomes, thus proving to be a good model for the study of the genome reduction process within a single bacterial taxon evolving in a similar biological niche (aphid-Buchnera). PMID:27599759

  13. Multiyear, Multinational Survey of the Incidence and Global Distribution of Metallo-β-Lactamase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Rabine, Sharon; Hackel, Meredith; McLaughlin, Robert E.; Biedenbach, Douglas J.; Bouchillon, Samuel K.; Sahm, Daniel F.; Bradford, Patricia A.

    2015-01-01

    Metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs) hydrolyze all classes of β-lactams except monobactams and are not inhibited by classic serine β-lactamase inhibitors. Gram-negative pathogens isolated from patient infections were collected from 202 medical centers in 40 countries as part of a global surveillance study from 2012 to 2014. Carbapenem-nonsusceptible Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were characterized for bla genes encoding VIM, IMP, NDM, SPM, and GIM variants using PCR and sequencing. A total of 471 MBL-positive isolates included the following species (numbers of isolates are in parentheses): P. aeruginosa (308), Klebsiella spp. (85), Enterobacter spp. (39), Proteeae (16), Citrobacter freundii (12), Escherichia coli (6), and Serratia marcescens (5) and were submitted by sites from 34 countries. Of these, 69.6% were collected in 9 countries (numbers of isolates are in parentheses): Russia (72), Greece (61), Philippines (54), Venezuela (29), and Kuwait, Nigeria, Romania, South Africa, and Thailand (20 to 25 isolates each). Thirty-two different MBL variants were detected (14 VIM, 14 IMP, and 4 NDM enzymes). Seven novel MBL variants were encountered in the study, each differing from a previously reported variant by one amino acid substitution: VIM-42 (VIM-1 [V223I]), VIM-43 (VIM-4 [A24V]), VIM-44 (VIM-2 [K257N]), VIM-45 (VIM-2 [T35I]), IMP-48 (IMP-14 [I69T]), IMP-49 (IMP-18 [V49F]), and NDM-16 (NDM-1 [R264H]). The in vitro activities of all tested antibiotics against MBL-positive Enterobacteriaceae were significantly reduced with the exception of that of aztreonam-avibactam (MIC90, 0.5 to 1 μg/ml), whereas colistin was the most effective agent against MBL-positive P. aeruginosa isolates (>97% susceptible). Although the global percentage of isolates encoding MBLs remains relatively low, their detection in 12 species, 34 countries, and all regions participating in this surveillance study is concerning. PMID:26643349

  14. Multiyear, Multinational Survey of the Incidence and Global Distribution of Metallo-β-Lactamase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Kazmierczak, Krystyna M; Rabine, Sharon; Hackel, Meredith; McLaughlin, Robert E; Biedenbach, Douglas J; Bouchillon, Samuel K; Sahm, Daniel F; Bradford, Patricia A

    2016-02-01

    Metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs) hydrolyze all classes of β-lactams except monobactams and are not inhibited by classic serine β-lactamase inhibitors. Gram-negative pathogens isolated from patient infections were collected from 202 medical centers in 40 countries as part of a global surveillance study from 2012 to 2014. Carbapenem-nonsusceptible Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were characterized for bla genes encoding VIM, IMP, NDM, SPM, and GIM variants using PCR and sequencing. A total of 471 MBL-positive isolates included the following species (numbers of isolates are in parentheses): P. aeruginosa (308), Klebsiella spp. (85), Enterobacter spp. (39), Proteeae (16), Citrobacter freundii (12), Escherichia coli (6), and Serratia marcescens (5) and were submitted by sites from 34 countries. Of these, 69.6% were collected in 9 countries (numbers of isolates are in parentheses): Russia (72), Greece (61), Philippines (54), Venezuela (29), and Kuwait, Nigeria, Romania, South Africa, and Thailand (20 to 25 isolates each). Thirty-two different MBL variants were detected (14 VIM, 14 IMP, and 4 NDM enzymes). Seven novel MBL variants were encountered in the study, each differing from a previously reported variant by one amino acid substitution: VIM-42 (VIM-1 [V223I]), VIM-43 (VIM-4 [A24V]), VIM-44 (VIM-2 [K257N]), VIM-45 (VIM-2 [T35I]), IMP-48 (IMP-14 [I69T]), IMP-49 (IMP-18 [V49F]), and NDM-16 (NDM-1 [R264H]). The in vitro activities of all tested antibiotics against MBL-positive Enterobacteriaceae were significantly reduced with the exception of that of aztreonam-avibactam (MIC90, 0.5 to 1 μg/ml), whereas colistin was the most effective agent against MBL-positive P. aeruginosa isolates (>97% susceptible). Although the global percentage of isolates encoding MBLs remains relatively low, their detection in 12 species, 34 countries, and all regions participating in this surveillance study is concerning.

  15. Kinetic analysis of the cleavage of natural and synthetic substrates by the Serratia nuclease.

    PubMed

    Friedhoff, P; Meiss, G; Kolmes, B; Pieper, U; Gimadutdinow, O; Urbanke, C; Pingoud, A

    1996-10-15

    The extracellular nuclease from Serratia marcescens is a non-specific endonuclease that hydrolyzes double-stranded and single-stranded DNA and RNA with high specific activity. Steady-state and presteady-state kinetic cleavage experiments were performed with natural and synthetic DNA and RNA substrates to understand the mechanism of action of the Serratia nuclease. Most of the natural substrates are cleaved with similar Kcat and K(m) values, the Kcat/K(m) ratios being comparable to that of staphylococcal nuclease. Substrates with extreme structural features, like poly(dA).poly(dT) or poly(dG).poly(dC), are cleaved by the Serratia nuclease with a 50 times higher or 10 times lower K(m), respectively, as salmon testis DNA. Neither with natural DNA or RNA nor synthetic oligodeoxynucleotide substrates did we observe substrate inhibition for the Serratia nuclease as reported recently. Experiments with short oligodeoxynucleotides confirmed previous results that for moderately good cleavage activity the substrate should contain at least five phosphate residues. Shorter substrates are still cleaved by the Serratia nuclease, albeit at a rate reduced by a factor of more than 100. Cleavage experiments with oligodeoxynucleotides substituted by a single phosphorothioate group showed that the negative charge of the pro-Rp-oxygen of the phosphate group 3' adjacent to the scissile phosphodiester bond is essential for cleavage, as only the Rp-phosphorothioate supports cleavage at the 5' adjacent phosphodiester bond. Furthermore, the modified bond itself is only cleaved in the Rp-diastereomer, albeit 1000 times more slowly than the corresponding unmodified phosphodiester bond, which offers the possibility to determine the stereochemical outcome of cleavage. Pre-steady-state cleavage experiments demonstrate that it is not dissociation of products but association of enzyme and substrate or the cleavage of the phosphodiester bond that is the rate-limiting step of the reaction. Finally

  16. A case of necrotising fasciitis caused by Serratia marsescens: extreme age as functional immunosuppression?

    PubMed

    Cope, Thomas Edmund; Cope, Wei; Beaumont, David Martin

    2013-03-01

    We report the case of a 97-year-old woman who had a prolonged hospital admission for the treatment of right-sided heart failure. During her stay she experienced a rapid deterioration, characterised by shortness of breath, cardiovascular compromise and a hot, red, swollen calf. Post-mortem examination demonstrated that this was caused by necrotising fasciitis due to Serratia marcescens as a single pathogen. This is only the second reported case of this condition in the absence of diabetes or immunosuppression, and clinical deterioration was much more rapid. The case underlines the importance of circumspection and regular review in the diagnosis of the elderly patient. It reminds us that these patients should be viewed as functionally immunosuppressed, and that some or all of the haematological markers of infection can be absent even in severe disease.

  17. The genome and proteome of Serratia bacteriophage η which forms unstable lysogens

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Serratia marcescens phage η is a temperate unclassified member of the Siphoviridae which had been reported as containing hypermodified guanine residues. Methods The DNA was characterized by enzymatic digestion followed by HPLC analysis of the nucleoside composition, and by DNA sequencing and proteomic analysis. Its ability to form stable lysogens and integrate was also investigated. Results Enzymatic digestion and HPLC analysis revealed phage η DNA did not contain modified bases. The genome sequence of this virus, determined using pyrosequencing, is 42,724 nucleotides in length with a mol% GC of 49.9 and is circularly permuted. Sixty-nine putative CDSs were identified of which 19 encode novel proteins. While seven close genetic relatives were identified, they shared sequence similarity with only genes 40 to 69 of the phage η genome, while gp1 to gp39 shared no conserved relationship. The structural proteome, determined by SDS-PAGE and mass spectrometry, revealed seven unique proteins. This phage forms very unstable lysogens with its host S. marcescens. PMID:24433577

  18. The archetype Pseudomonas aeruginosa proteins TssB and TagJ form a novel subcomplex in the bacterial type VI secretion system.

    PubMed

    Lossi, Nadine S; Manoli, Eleni; Simpson, Pete; Jones, Cerith; Hui, Kailyn; Dajani, Rana; Coulthurst, Sarah J; Freemont, Paul; Filloux, Alain

    2012-10-01

    In Pseudomonas aeruginosa three type VI secretion systems (T6SSs) coexist, called H1- to H3-T6SSs. Several T6SS components are proposed to be part of a macromolecular complex resembling the bacteriophage tail. The T6SS protein HsiE1 (TagJ) is unique to the H1-T6SS and absent from the H2- and H3-T6SSs. We demonstrate that HsiE1 interacts with a predicted N-terminal α-helix in HsiB1 (TssB) thus forming a novel subcomplex of the T6SS. HsiB1 is homologous to the Vibrio cholerae VipA component, which contributes to the formation of a bacteriophage tail sheath-like structure. We show that the interaction between HsiE1 and HsiB1 is specific and does not occur between HsiE1 and HsiB2. Proteins of the TssB family encoded in T6SS clusters lacking a gene encoding a TagJ-like component are often devoid of the predicted N-terminal helical region, which suggests co-evolution. We observe that a synthetic peptide corresponding to the N-terminal 20 amino acids of HsiB1 interacts with purified HsiE1 protein. This interaction is a common feature to other bacterial T6SSs that display a TagJ homologue as shown here with Serratia marcescens. We further show that hsiE1 is a non-essential gene for the T6SS and suggest that HsiE1 may modulate incorporation of HsiB1 into the T6SS.

  19. Ultrasound-assisted (R)-phenylephrine whole-cell bioconversion by S. marcescens N10612.

    PubMed

    Zang, Chi-Zong; Kan, Shu-Chen; Yeh, Chiung-Wen; Lin, Chia-Chi; Shieh, Chwen-Jen; Liu, Yung-Chuan

    2015-09-01

    The strain Serratia marcescens N10612 is used to perform the bioconversion of 1-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-2-(methyamino)-ethanone (HPMAE) to (R)-phenylephrine ((R)-PE), which is an ephedrine drug substitute. The use of an ultrasound approach is found to improve the efficiency of the (R)-PE bioconversion. The optimization of the (R)-PE bioconversion is carried out by means of statistical experiment design. The optimal conditions obtained are 1.0mM HPMAE, 18.68 g/L glucose and ultrasound power of 120 W, where the predicted specific rate of the (R)-PE bioconversion is 31.46 ± 2.22 (ìmol/h/g-cells) and the experimental specific rate is 33.27 ± 1.46 (ìmol/h/g-cells), which is 3-fold higher than for the operation under ultrasound power of 200 W (11.11 ìmol/h/g-cells) and 4.3-fold higher than for the shaking operation (7.69 ìmol/h/g-cells). The kinetics study of the bioconversion also shows that under the ultrasound operation, the optimal rate (Vmax) of the (R)-PE bioconversion increases from 7.69 to 11.11 (μmol/h/g-cells) and the substrate inhibition constant (KSi) increases from 1.063 mM for the shaking operation to 1.490 mM for ultrasound operation.

  20. Nosocomial septicemia caused by Serratia plymuthica.

    PubMed Central

    Domingo, D; Limia, A; Alarcón, T; Sanz, J C; Del Rey, M C; López-Brea, M

    1994-01-01

    We report a case of nosocomial septicemia in a 79-year-old patient caused by Serratia plymuthica with no evident focus of infection. The patient was treated with gentamicin (40 mg every 8 h) during 10 days; clinical resolution of the infection was obtained after the 10-day treatment period. PMID:8150981

  1. Biodegradation of the organophosphorus insecticide diazinon by Serratia sp. and Pseudomonas sp. and their use in bioremediation of contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Cycoń, Mariusz; Wójcik, Marcin; Piotrowska-Seget, Zofia

    2009-07-01

    An enrichment culture technique was used for the isolation of bacteria responsible for biodegradation of diazinon in soil. Three bacterial strains were screened and identified by MIDI-FAME profiling as Serratia liquefaciens, Serratia marcescens and Pseudomonas sp. All isolates were able to grow in mineral salt medium (MSM) supplemented with diazinon (50 mgL(-1)) as a sole carbon source, and within 14d 80-92% of the initial dose of insecticide was degraded by the isolates and their consortium. Degradation of diazinon was accelerated when MSM was supplemented with glucose. However, this process was linked with the decrease of pH values, after glucose utilization. Studies on biodegradation in sterilized soil showed that isolates and their consortium exhibited efficient degradation of insecticide (100mg kg(-1) soil) with a rate constant of 0.032-0.085d(-1), and DT(50) for diazinon was ranged from 11.5d to 24.5d. In contrast, degradation of insecticide in non-sterilized soil, non-supplemented earlier with diazinon, was characterized by a rate constant of 0.014d(-1) and the 7-d lag phase, during which only 2% of applied dose was degraded. The results suggested a strong correlation between microbial activity and chemical processes during diazinon degradation. Moreover, isolated bacterial strains may have potential for use in bioremediation of diazinon-contaminated soils.

  2. Chitin binding proteins act synergistically with chitinases in Serratia proteamaculans 568.

    PubMed

    Purushotham, Pallinti; Arun, P V Parvati Sai; Prakash, Jogadhenu S S; Podile, Appa Rao

    2012-01-01

    Genome sequence of Serratia proteamaculans 568 revealed the presence of three family 33 chitin binding proteins (CBPs). The three Sp CBPs (Sp CBP21, Sp CBP28 and Sp CBP50) were heterologously expressed and purified. Sp CBP21 and Sp CBP50 showed binding preference to β-chitin, while Sp CBP28 did not bind to chitin and cellulose substrates. Both Sp CBP21 and Sp CBP50 were synergistic with four chitinases from S. proteamaculans 568 (Sp ChiA, Sp ChiB, Sp ChiC and Sp ChiD) in degradation of α- and β-chitin, especially in the presence of external electron donor (reduced glutathione). Sp ChiD benefited most from Sp CBP21 or Sp CBP50 on α-chitin, while Sp ChiB and Sp ChiD had major advantage with these Sp CBPs on β-chitin. Dose responsive studies indicated that both the Sp CBPs exhibit synergism ≥ 0.2 µM. The addition of both Sp CBP21 and Sp CBP50 in different ratios to a synergistic mixture did not significantly increase the activity. Highly conserved polar residues, important in binding and activity of CBP21 from S. marcescens (Sm CBP21), were present in Sp CBP21 and Sp CBP50, while Sp CBP28 had only one such polar residue. The inability of Sp CBP28 to bind to the test substrates could be attributed to the absence of important polar residues.

  3. Bisphenol A removal by a Pseudomonas aeruginosa immobilized on granular activated carbon and operating in a fluidized bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Mita, Luigi; Grumiro, Laura; Rossi, Sergio; Bianco, Carmen; Defez, Roberto; Gallo, Pasquale; Mita, Damiano Gustavo; Diano, Nadia

    2015-06-30

    Serratia rubidiae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli K12 have been studied for their ability of Bisphenol A removal from aqueous systems and biofilm formation on activated granule carbon. Mathematical equations for biodegradation process have been elaborated and discussed. P. aeruginosa was found the best strain to be employed in the process of Bisphenol A removal. The yield in BPA removal of a P. aeruginosa biofilm grown on GAC and operating in a fluidized bed reactor has been evaluated. The results confirm the usefulness in using biological activated carbon (BAC process) to remove phenol compounds from aqueous systems.

  4. 21 CFR 866.3630 - Serratia spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Serratia spp. serological reagents. 866.3630 Section 866.3630 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3630 Serratia...

  5. 21 CFR 866.3630 - Serratia spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Serratia spp. serological reagents. 866.3630 Section 866.3630 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3630 Serratia...

  6. 21 CFR 866.3630 - Serratia spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Serratia spp. serological reagents. 866.3630 Section 866.3630 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3630 Serratia...

  7. 21 CFR 866.3630 - Serratia spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Serratia spp. serological reagents. 866.3630 Section 866.3630 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3630 Serratia...

  8. 21 CFR 866.3630 - Serratia spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Serratia spp. serological reagents. 866.3630 Section 866.3630 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3630 Serratia...

  9. Molecular Identification of the Biowarfare Simulant Serratia Marcescens From a 50-Year-Old Munition Buried at Fort Detrick, Maryland

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-01

    AY920253) Fig, 3, Phylogenetic tree derived from the 16S rRNA gene sequences. The lengths of the horizontal branches are proportional to the number...Ljdciiius cereus (AF205339) Fig, 4. Phylogenetic tree derived from the partial rpoB gene sequences. The lengths of the horizontal branches are proportional to...compared with those available in GenBank by using the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool.’’ Phylogenetic re- lationships were inferred by comparing

  10. Fatal pneumonia due to Serratia proteamaculans subsp. quinovora.

    PubMed Central

    Bollet, C; Grimont, P; Gainnier, M; Geissler, A; Sainty, J M; De Micco, P

    1993-01-01

    Serratia proteamaculans subsp. quinovora was isolated from several samples (blood cultures, tracheal aspirates, pleural effusion) from a patient with pneumonia. This is the first clinical isolate and the first documented human infection caused by this organism. PMID:8432835

  11. Ammonia produced by bacterial colonies promotes growth of ampicillin-sensitive Serratia sp. by means of antibiotic inactivation.

    PubMed

    Cepl, Jaroslav; Blahůšková, Anna; Cvrčková, Fatima; Markoš, Anton

    2014-05-01

    Volatiles produced by bacterial cultures are known to induce regulatory and metabolic alterations in nearby con-specific or heterospecific bacteria, resulting in phenotypic changes including acquisition of antibiotic resistance. We observed unhindered growth of ampicillin-sensitive Serratia rubidaea and S. marcescens on ampicillin-containing media, when exposed to volatiles produced by dense bacterial growth. However, this phenomenon appeared to result from pH increase in the medium caused by bacterial volatiles rather than alterations in the properties of the bacterial cultures, as alkalization of ampicillin-containing culture media to pH 8.5 by ammonia or Tris exhibited the same effects, while pretreatment of bacterial cultures under the same conditions prior to antibiotic exposure did not increase ampicillin resistance. Ampicillin was readily inactivated at pH 8.5, suggesting that observed bacterial growth results from metabolic alteration of the medium, rather than an active change in the target bacterial population (i.e. induction of resistance or tolerance). However, even such seemingly simple mechanism may provide a biologically meaningful basis for protection against antibiotics in microbial communities growing on semi-solid media.

  12. An insect pathogenic symbiosis between a Caenorhabditis and Serratia

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Julie; Cooper, Vaughn; Thomas, W. Kelley

    2011-01-01

    We described an association between a strain of the nematode Caenorhabditis briggsae, i.e. KT0001, and the bacteria Serratia sp. SCBI (South African Caenorhabditis briggsae isolate), which was able to kill the insect Galleria (G. mellonella). Here we show that the Serratia sp. SCBI lines the gut of the nematode, similar to the Heterorhabditis-Photorhabdus complex, indicating that the association is possibly internal. We also expand on the relevance of this tripartite, i.e. insect-nematode-bacteria, interaction in the broader evolutionary context and Caenorhabditis natural history. PMID:21389770

  13. Studies on the Formation of Murein-Bound Lipoprotein in Escherichia coli

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-15

    sequences of prolipoproteins from 19 ~. ~ and four other enterobacteriaceae species, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa 6. Construction of lQQ mutations by...caused spheroplast formation of Alcaligenes cells, and these amino acids exerted a synergistic effect with penicillin (Lark and Lark, 1959). 16...Proteus mirabilis, Morqanella morqanii, Erwinia amylovora and serratia marcescens, and in Pseudomonas aeruqinosa lipoprotein I (Fig. 5., YU, 1987

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of the Serratia rubidaea CIP 103234T Reference Strain, a Human-Opportunistic Pathogen.

    PubMed

    Bonnin, Rémy A; Girlich, Delphine; Imanci, Dilek; Dortet, Laurent; Naas, Thierry

    2015-11-19

    We provide here the first genome sequence of a Serratia rubidaea isolate, a human-opportunistic pathogen. This reference sequence will permit a comparison of this species with others of the Serratia genus.

  15. Increased resistance of contact lens related bacterial biofilms to antimicrobial activity of soft contact lens care solutions

    PubMed Central

    Szczotka-Flynn, Loretta B.; Imamura, Yoshifumi; Chandra, Jyotsna; Yu, Changping; Mukherjee, Pranab K.; Pearlman, Eric; Ghannoum, Mahmoud A.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE To determine if clinical and reference strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Serratia marcescens, and Staphylococcus aureus form biofilms on silicone hydrogel contact lenses, and ascertain antimicrobial activities of contact lens care solutions. METHODS Clinical and American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) reference strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Serratia marcescens, and Staphylococcus aureus were incubated with lotrafilcon A lenses under conditions that facilitate biofilm formation. Biofilms were quantified by quantitative culturing (colony forming units, CFUs), and gross morphology and architecture were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal microscopy. Susceptibilities of the planktonic and biofilm growth phases of the bacteria to five common multipurpose contact lens care solutions and one hydrogen peroxide care solution were assessed. RESULTS P. aeruginosa, S. marcescens, and S. aureus reference and clinical strains formed biofilms on lotrafilcon A silicone hydrogel contact lenses, as dense networks of cells arranged in multiple layers with visible extracellular matrix. The biofilms were resistant to commonly used biguanide preserved multipurpose care solutions. P. aeruginosa and S. aureus biofilms were susceptible to a hydrogen peroxide and a polyquaternium preserved care solution, whereas S. marcescens biofilm was resistant to a polyquaternium preserved care solution but susceptible to hydrogen peroxide disinfection. In contrast, the planktonic forms were always susceptible. CONCLUSIONS P. aeruginosa, S. marcescens, and S. aureus form biofilms on lotrafilcon A contact lenses, which in contrast to planktonic cells, are resistant to the antimicrobial activity of several soft contact lens care products. PMID:19654521

  16. Antibacterial activity of stem and leaf extract of Kedrostis foetidissima (Jacq.) Cogn.

    PubMed Central

    Priyavardhini, S.; Gowri, S. Shyamala; Vasantha, K.; Umadevi, M.

    2008-01-01

    The present study aimed at evaluating the antimicrobial activity of chloroform extracts of stem and leaf of Kedrostis foetidissima (jacq.) cogn. (Cucurbitaceae) against Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Serratia marcescens and Klebsiella pneumoniae. was carried out using agar disc diffusion technique. The results revealed that the chloroform extract of stem presented the highest zone of inhibition against Pseudomonas aeruginosa others show significant zone of inhibition. PMID:22557304

  17. Comparative Genomics of Serratia spp.: Two Paths towards Endosymbiotic Life

    PubMed Central

    Manzano-Marín, Alejandro; Lamelas, Araceli; Moya, Andrés; Latorre, Amparo

    2012-01-01

    Symbiosis is a widespread phenomenon in nature, in which insects show a great number of these associations. Buchnera aphidicola, the obligate endosymbiont of aphids, coexists in some species with another intracellular bacterium, Serratia symbiotica. Of particular interest is the case of the cedar aphid Cinara cedri, where B. aphidicola BCc and S. symbiotica SCc need each other to fulfil their symbiotic role with the insect. Moreover, various features seem to indicate that S. symbiotica SCc is closer to an obligate endosymbiont than to other facultative S. symbiotica, such as the one described for the aphid Acirthosyphon pisum (S. symbiotica SAp). This work is based on the comparative genomics of five strains of Serratia, three free-living and two endosymbiotic ones (one facultative and one obligate) which should allow us to dissect the genome reduction taking place in the adaptive process to an intracellular life-style. Using a pan-genome approach, we have identified shared and strain-specific genes from both endosymbiotic strains and gained insight into the different genetic reduction both S. symbiotica have undergone. We have identified both retained and reduced functional categories in S. symbiotica compared to the Free-Living Serratia (FLS) that seem to be related with its endosymbiotic role in their specific host-symbiont systems. By means of a phylogenomic reconstruction we have solved the position of both endosymbionts with confidence, established the probable insect-pathogen origin of the symbiotic clade as well as the high amino-acid substitution rate in S. symbiotica SCc. Finally, we were able to quantify the minimal number of rearrangements suffered in the endosymbiotic lineages and reconstruct a minimal rearrangement phylogeny. All these findings provide important evidence for the existence of at least two distinctive S. symbiotica lineages that are characterized by different rearrangements, gene content, genome size and branch lengths. PMID:23077583

  18. Complete genome sequence of Serratia plymuthica strain AS12

    PubMed Central

    Finlay, Roger D.; Alström, Sadhna; Goodwin, Lynne; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Lucas, Susan; Lapidus, Alla; Bruce, David; Pitluck, Sam; Peters, Lin; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Chertkov, Olga; Han, James; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Detter, John C.; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Ivanova, Natalia; Pagani, Ioanna; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Woyke, Tanja; Högberg, Nils

    2012-01-01

    A plant-associated member of the family Enterobacteriaceae, Serratia plymuthica strain AS12 was isolated from rapeseed roots. It is of scientific interest because it promotes plant growth and inhibits plant pathogens. The genome of S. plymuthica AS12 comprises a 5,443,009 bp long circular chromosome, which consists of 4,952 protein-coding genes, 87 tRNA genes and 7 rRNA operons. This genome was sequenced within the 2010 DOE-JGI Community Sequencing Program (CSP2010) as part of the project entitled “Genomics of four rapeseed plant growth promoting bacteria with antagonistic effect on plant pathogens”. PMID:22768360

  19. Report of six cases of human infection by Serratia plymuthica.

    PubMed Central

    Carrero, P; Garrote, J A; Pacheco, S; García, A I; Gil, R; Carbajosa, S G

    1995-01-01

    Serratia plymuthica is an uncommon cause of human infection. Only one case of chronic osteomyelitis and two cases of sepsis secondary to central venous catheter infection have been documented. We report the isolation of S. plymuthica from six patients. The organism was recovered from blood cultures in three cases in which the patients had lymphoblastic leukemia, lymphoma, or stroke. Two isolates were recovered from exudates (following knee and abdominal surgery). In the last case, the organism was isolated from the peritoneal fluid of a patient with cholecystitis. The infection was considered nosocomial in five cases and community acquired in the other. PMID:7714177

  20. [Pneumonia due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa].

    PubMed

    Vallés, Jordi; Mariscal, Dolors

    2005-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the leading causes of Gram-negative nosocomial pneumonia. It is the most common cause of ventilator-associated pneumonia and carries the highest mortality among hospital-acquired infections. P. aeruginosa produces a large number of toxins and surface components that make it especially virulent compared with other microorganisms. These include pili, flagella, membrane bound lipopolysaccharide, and secreted products such as exotoxins A, S and U, elastase, alkaline protease, cytotoxins and phospholipases. The most common mechanism of infection in mechanically ventilated patients is through aspiration of upper respiratory tract secretions previously colonized in the process of routine nursing care or via contaminated hands of hospital personnel. Intravenous therapy with an antipseudomonal regimen should be started immediately when P. aeruginosa pneumonia is suspected or confirmed. Empiric therapy with drugs active against P. aeruginosa should be started, especially in patients who have received previous antibiotics or present late-onset pneumonia.

  1. Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa cervical osteomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Meher, Sujeet Kumar; Jain, Harsh; Tripathy, Laxmi Narayan; Basu, Sunandan

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a rare cause of osteomyelitis of the cervical spine and is usually seen in the background of intravenous drug use and immunocompromised state. Very few cases of osteomyelitis of the cervical spine caused by pseudomonas aeruginosa have been reported in otherwise healthy patients. This is a case presentation of a young female, who in the absence of known risk factors for cervical osteomyelitis presented with progressively worsening neurological signs and symptoms. PMID:27891039

  2. The PhoBR two-component system regulates antibiotic biosynthesis in Serratia in response to phosphate

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Secondary metabolism in Serratia sp. ATCC 39006 (Serratia 39006) is controlled via a complex network of regulators, including a LuxIR-type (SmaIR) quorum sensing (QS) system. Here we investigate the molecular mechanism by which phosphate limitation controls biosynthesis of two antibiotic secondary metabolites, prodigiosin and carbapenem, in Serratia 39006. Results We demonstrate that a mutation in the high affinity phosphate transporter pstSCAB-phoU, believed to mimic low phosphate conditions, causes upregulation of secondary metabolism and QS in Serratia 39006, via the PhoBR two-component system. Phosphate limitation also activated secondary metabolism and QS in Serratia 39006. In addition, a pstS mutation resulted in upregulation of rap. Rap, a putative SlyA/MarR-family transcriptional regulator, shares similarity with the global regulator RovA (regulator of virulence) from Yersina spp. and is an activator of secondary metabolism in Serratia 39006. We demonstrate that expression of rap, pigA-O (encoding the prodigiosin biosynthetic operon) and smaI are controlled via PhoBR in Serratia 39006. Conclusion Phosphate limitation regulates secondary metabolism in Serratia 39006 via multiple inter-linked pathways, incorporating transcriptional control mediated by three important global regulators, PhoB, SmaR and Rap. PMID:19476633

  3. Genome Sequence of Carbon Dioxide-Sequestering Serratia sp. Strain ISTD04 Isolated from Marble Mining Rocks.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manish; Gazara, Rajesh Kumar; Verma, Sandhya; Kumar, Madan; Verma, Praveen Kumar; Thakur, Indu Shekhar

    2016-10-20

    The Serratia sp. strain ISTD04 has been identified as a carbon dioxide (CO2)-sequestering bacterium isolated from marble mining rocks in the Umra area, Rajasthan, India. This strain grows chemolithotrophically on media that contain sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) as the sole carbon source. Here, we report the genome sequence of 5.07 Mb Serratia sp. ISTD04.

  4. Studies on the antimicrobial properties of colloidal silver nanoparticles stabilized by bovine serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Thomas V; Kuriakose, Sunny

    2013-01-01

    Colloidal silver nanoparticles were synthesised using sol-gel method and these nanoparticles were stabilised by encapsulated into the scaffolds of bovine serum albumin. Silver nanoparticles and encapsulated products were characterised by FTIR, NMR, XRD, TG, SEM and TEM analyses. Silver nanoparticle encapsulated bovine serum albumin showed highly potent antibacterial activity towards the bacterial strains such as Staphylococcus aureus, Serratia marcescens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae.

  5. Determination of optimal dosage regimen for amikacin in healthy volunteers by study of pharmacokinetics and bactericidal activity.

    PubMed Central

    Garraffo, R; Drugeon, H B; Dellamonica, P; Bernard, E; Lapalus, P

    1990-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics and serum killing curves of amikacin, which was administered by a 30-minute intravenous infusion of single doses of 7.5 mg/kg and then 15 mg/kg, were investigated in six healthy volunteers who received the two doses in a crossover study with a washout period of 20 days. The serum killing curves were determined for four bacterial species: Escherichia coli, Serratia marcescens, Enterobacter cloacae, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. All strains were serum resistant, and the bactericidal activity was analyzed by separating the early phase (first 5 h) and the late phase (24 h) of the killing curve. For the early phase, the bactericidal activity was evaluated by correlating an index of surviving bacteria with amikacin concentrations. This methodology allowed determination of two parameters: the maximal effective concentration and the lowest effective concentration. For the late phase, the threshold values separating bacteriostatic and bactericidal activities were lower than 10 mg/liter for each strain. The concentration dependence of amikacin bactericidal activity was confirmed for Escherichia coli and Enterobacter cloacae and, to a lesser extent, for Serratia marcescens and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Correlation of these data with amikacin pharmacokinetic data in volunteers indicated that a daily dose of 15 mg/kg may be effective in the treatment of Escherichia coli and Enterobacter cloacae infections. For Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Serratia marcescens, the partially time-dependent activity probably necessitates two daily administrations and combination with another antibiotic. PMID:2111658

  6. Pseudomonas aeruginosa: breaking down barriers.

    PubMed

    Berube, Bryan J; Rangel, Stephanie M; Hauser, Alan R

    2016-02-01

    Many bacterial pathogens have evolved ingenious ways to escape from the lung during pneumonia to cause bacteremia. Unfortunately, the clinical consequences of this spread to the bloodstream are frequently dire. It is therefore important to understand the molecular mechanisms used by pathogens to breach the lung barrier. We have recently shown that Pseudomonas aeruginosa, one of the leading causes of hospital-acquired pneumonia, utilizes the type III secretion system effector ExoS to intoxicate pulmonary epithelial cells. Injection of these cells leads to localized disruption of the pulmonary-vascular barrier and dissemination of P. aeruginosa to the bloodstream. We put these data in the context of previous studies to provide a holistic model of P. aeruginosa dissemination from the lung. Finally, we compare P. aeruginosa dissemination to that of other bacteria to highlight the complexity of bacterial pneumonia. Although respiratory pathogens use distinct and intricate strategies to escape from the lungs, a thorough understanding of these processes can lay the foundation for new therapeutic approaches for bacterial pneumonia.

  7. First report of Serratia plymuthica causing onion bulb rot in Poland.

    PubMed

    Kowalska, Beata; Smolińska, Urszula; Oskiera, Michał

    2011-01-01

    Specific bacterial disease symptoms were observed on onion bulbs in almost all regions in Poland. For the purpose of identification of agents causing disease, bacteria were isolated from the symptomatic plants. Their pathogenicity was confirmed by using pathogenicity test on onion scales. These bacteria were identified biochemically and molecularly as Serratia plymuthica.

  8. Influence of volatile organic compounds emitted by Pseudomonas and Serratia strains on Agrobacterium tumefaciens biofilms.

    PubMed

    Plyuta, Vladimir; Lipasova, Valentina; Popova, Alexandra; Koksharova, Olga; Kuznetsov, Alexander; Szegedi, Erno; Chernin, Leonid; Khmel, Inessa

    2016-07-01

    The ability to form biofilms plays an important role in bacteria-host interactions, including plant pathogenicity. In this work, we investigated the action of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced by rhizospheric strains of Pseudomonas chlororaphis 449, Pseudomonas fluorescens B-4117, Serratia plymuthica IC1270, as well as Serratia proteamaculans strain 94, isolated from spoiled meat, on biofilms formation by three strains of Agrobacterium tumefaciens which are causative agents of crown-gall disease in a wide range of plants. In dual culture assays, the pool of volatiles emitted by the tested Pseudomonas and Serratia strains suppressed the formation of biofilms of A. tumefaciens strains grown on polycarbonate membrane filters and killed Agrobacterium cells in mature biofilms. The individual VOCs produced by the tested Pseudomonas strains, that is, ketones (2-nonanone, 2-heptanone, 2-undecanone), and dimethyl disulfide (DMDS) produced by Serratia strains, were shown to kill A. tumefaciens cells in mature biofilms and suppress their formation. The data obtained in this study suggest an additional potential of some ketones and DMDS as protectors of plants against A. tumefaciens strains, whose virulence is associated with the formation of biofilms on the infected plants.

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Serratia fonticola LMG 7882T Isolated from Freshwater

    PubMed Central

    Carneiro, Adriana Ribeiro; Jucá Ramos, Rommel Thiago; Baraúna, Rafael Azevedo; de Sá, Pablo Henrique; Marinho Almeida, Diogo; Barbosa, Silvanira; Pereira, Anabela; Alves, Artur; Egas, Conceição; Correia, António; Henriques, Isabel

    2013-01-01

    Serratia fonticola is a Gram-negative bacterium with a wide distribution in aquatic environments. On some occasions, it has also been regarded as a significant human pathogen. In this work, we report the first draft genome sequence of an S. fonticola strain (LMG 7882T), which was isolated from freshwater. PMID:24265499

  10. Uranium Biominerals Precipitated by an Environmental Isolate of Serratia under Anaerobic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Newsome, Laura; Morris, Katherine; Lloyd, Jonathan. R.

    2015-01-01

    Stimulating the microbially-mediated precipitation of uranium biominerals may be used to treat groundwater contamination at nuclear sites. The majority of studies to date have focussed on the reductive precipitation of uranium as U(IV) by U(VI)- and Fe(III)-reducing bacteria such as Geobacter and Shewanella species, although other mechanisms of uranium removal from solution can occur, including the precipitation of uranyl phosphates via bacterial phosphatase activity. Here we present the results of uranium biomineralisation experiments using an isolate of Serratia obtained from a sediment sample representative of the Sellafield nuclear site, UK. When supplied with glycerol phosphate, this Serratia strain was able to precipitate 1 mM of soluble U(VI) as uranyl phosphate minerals from the autunite group, under anaerobic and fermentative conditions. Under phosphate-limited anaerobic conditions and with glycerol as the electron donor, non-growing Serratia cells could precipitate 0.5 mM of uranium supplied as soluble U(VI), via reduction to nano-crystalline U(IV) uraninite. Some evidence for the reduction of solid phase uranyl(VI) phosphate was also observed. This study highlights the potential for Serratia and related species to play a role in the bioremediation of uranium contamination, via a range of different metabolic pathways, dependent on culturing or in situ conditions. PMID:26132209

  11. Phosphate taxis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Kato, J; Ito, A; Nikata, T; Ohtake, H

    1992-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa was shown to be attracted to phosphate. The chemotactic response was induced by phosphate starvation. The specificity of chemoreceptors for phosphate was high so that no other tested phosphorus compounds elicited a chemotactic response as strong as that elicited by phosphate. Competition experiments showed that the chemoreceptors for phosphate appeared to be different from those for the common amino acids. Mutants constitutive for alkaline phosphatase showed the chemotactic response to phosphate regardless of whether the cells were starved for phosphate.

  12. Carbenicillin resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Tebar, A; Rojo, F; Dámaso, D; Vázquez, D

    1982-01-01

    Four strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa obtained from clinical isolates which are carbenicillin resistant were studied to find the cause(s) of resistance to this beta-lactam antibiotic. The electrophoresis patterns of the four strains (PH20610, PH20815, PH4011, and PH4301) were found to be different from those of a wild-type strain, P. aeruginosa NCTC 10662, and appeared to lack penicillin-binding protein 2. Affinity of other penicillin-binding proteins from strains PH20610 and PH20815 for carbenicillin seemed to be normal or slightly diminished. Electrophoretic patterns of penicillin-binding proteins from strains PH4011 and PH4301 had more profound differences, since the affinities of their penicillin-binding proteins 1a, 1b, and 4 for carbenicillin were decreased by nearly two orders of magnitude relative to the preparations from the wild-type strain. Kinetic studies on binding of carbenicillin to penicillin-binding proteins both in isolated membrane preparations and in intact cells revealed that carbenicillin penetration into resistant cells was a much slower process than in susceptible cells, suggesting that the outer envelope structures serve as an efficient barrier against carbenicillin entry into our P. aeruginosa strains from clinical isolates. PMID:6821456

  13. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Population Structure Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Pirnay, Jean-Paul; Bilocq, Florence; Pot, Bruno; Cornelis, Pierre; Zizi, Martin; Van Eldere, Johan; Deschaght, Pieter; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Jennes, Serge; Pitt, Tyrone; De Vos, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    At present there are strong indications that Pseudomonas aeruginosa exhibits an epidemic population structure; clinical isolates are indistinguishable from environmental isolates, and they do not exhibit a specific (disease) habitat selection. However, some important issues, such as the worldwide emergence of highly transmissible P. aeruginosa clones among cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and the spread and persistence of multidrug resistant (MDR) strains in hospital wards with high antibiotic pressure, remain contentious. To further investigate the population structure of P. aeruginosa, eight parameters were analyzed and combined for 328 unrelated isolates, collected over the last 125 years from 69 localities in 30 countries on five continents, from diverse clinical (human and animal) and environmental habitats. The analysed parameters were: i) O serotype, ii) Fluorescent Amplified-Fragment Length Polymorphism (FALFP) pattern, nucleotide sequences of outer membrane protein genes, iii) oprI, iv) oprL, v) oprD, vi) pyoverdine receptor gene profile (fpvA type and fpvB prevalence), and prevalence of vii) exoenzyme genes exoS and exoU and viii) group I pilin glycosyltransferase gene tfpO. These traits were combined and analysed using biological data analysis software and visualized in the form of a minimum spanning tree (MST). We revealed a network of relationships between all analyzed parameters and non-congruence between experiments. At the same time we observed several conserved clones, characterized by an almost identical data set. These observations confirm the nonclonal epidemic population structure of P. aeruginosa, a superficially clonal structure with frequent recombinations, in which occasionally highly successful epidemic clones arise. One of these clones is the renown and widespread MDR serotype O12 clone. On the other hand, we found no evidence for a widespread CF transmissible clone. All but one of the 43 analysed CF strains belonged to a ubiquitous P

  14. Non-contiguous finished genome sequence of plant-growth promoting Serratia proteamaculans S4.

    PubMed

    Neupane, Saraswoti; Goodwin, Lynne A; Högberg, Nils; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Alström, Sadhna; Bruce, David; Quintana, Beverly; Munk, Christine; Daligault, Hajnalka; Teshima, Hazuki; Davenport, Karen; Reitenga, Krista; Green, Lance; Chain, Patrick; Erkkila, Tracy; Gu, Wei; Zhang, Xiaojing; Xu, Yan; Kunde, Yulia; Chertkov, Olga; Han, James; Han, Cliff; Detter, John C; Ivanova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Szeto, Ernest; Mavromatis, Kostas; Huntemann, Marcel; Nolan, Matt; Pitluck, Sam; Deshpande, Shweta; Markowitz, Victor; Pagani, Ioanna; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Woyke, Tanja; Finlay, Roger D

    2013-07-30

    Serratia proteamaculans S4 (previously Serratia sp. S4), isolated from the rhizosphere of wild Equisetum sp., has the ability to stimulate plant growth and to suppress the growth of several soil-borne fungal pathogens of economically important crops. Here we present the non-contiguous, finished genome sequence of S. proteamaculans S4, which consists of a 5,324,944 bp circular chromosome and a 129,797 bp circular plasmid. The chromosome contains 5,008 predicted genes while the plasmid comprises 134 predicted genes. In total, 4,993 genes are assigned as protein-coding genes. The genome consists of 22 rRNA genes, 82 tRNA genes and 58 pseudogenes. This genome is a part of the project "Genomics of four rapeseed plant growth-promoting bacteria with antagonistic effect on plant pathogens" awarded through the 2010 DOE-JGI's Community Sequencing Program.

  15. Complete genome sequence of the rapeseed plant-growth promoting Serratia plymuthica strain AS9.

    PubMed

    Neupane, Saraswoti; Högberg, Nils; Alström, Sadhna; Lucas, Susan; Han, James; Lapidus, Alla; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Peters, Lin; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Lu, Megan; Han, Cliff; Detter, John C; Tapia, Roxanne; Fiebig, Anne; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Ivanova, Natalia; Pagani, Ioanna; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Woyke, Tanja; Finlay, Roger D

    2012-03-19

    Serratia plymuthica are plant-associated, plant beneficial species belonging to the family Enterobacteriaceae. The members of the genus Serratia are ubiquitous in nature and their life style varies from endophytic to free-living. S. plymuthica AS9 is of special interest for its ability to inhibit fungal pathogens of rapeseed and to promote plant growth. The genome of S. plymuthica AS9 comprises a 5,442,880 bp long circular chromosome that consists of 4,952 protein-coding genes, 87 tRNA genes and 7 rRNA operons. This genome is part of the project entitled "Genomics of four rapeseed plant growth promoting bacteria with antagonistic effect on plant pathogens" awarded through the 2010 DOE-JGI Community Sequencing Program (CSP2010).

  16. Complete genome sequence of the rapeseed plant-growth promoting Serratia plymuthica strain AS9

    SciTech Connect

    Neupane, Saraswoti; Hogberg, Nils; Alstrom, Sadhna; Lucas, Susan; Han, James; Lapidus, Alla L.; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Peters, Lin; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Lu, Megan; Han, Cliff; Detter, J. Chris; Tapia, Roxanne; Fiebig, Anne; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Ivanova, N; Pagani, Ioanna; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Woyke, Tanja; Finlay, Roger D.

    2012-01-01

    Serratia plymuthica are plant-associated, plant beneficial species belonging to the family Enterobacteriaceae. The members of the genus Serratia are ubiquitous in nature and their life style varies from endophytic to free-living. S. plymuthica AS9 is of special interest for its ability to inhibit fungal pathogens of rapeseed and to promote plant growth. The genome of S. plymuthica AS9 comprises a 5,442,880 bp long circular chromosome that consists of 4,952 protein-coding genes, 87 tRNA genes and 7 rRNA operons. This genome is part of the project entitled Genomics of four rapeseed plant growth promoting bacteria with antagonistic effect on plant pathogens awarded through the 2010 DOE-JGI Community Sequencing Program (CSP2010).

  17. Complete genome sequence of the rapeseed plant-growth promoting Serratia plymuthica strain AS9

    PubMed Central

    Högberg, Nils; Alström, Sadhna; Lucas, Susan; Han, James; Lapidus, Alla; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Peters, Lin; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Lu, Megan; Han, Cliff; Detter, John C.; Tapia, Roxanne; Fiebig, Anne; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Ivanova, Natalia; Pagani, Ioanna; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Woyke, Tanja; Finlay, Roger D.

    2012-01-01

    Serratia plymuthica are plant-associated, plant beneficial species belonging to the family Enterobacteriaceae. The members of the genus Serratia are ubiquitous in nature and their life style varies from endophytic to free-living. S. plymuthica AS9 is of special interest for its ability to inhibit fungal pathogens of rapeseed and to promote plant growth. The genome of S. plymuthica AS9 comprises a 5,442,880 bp long circular chromosome that consists of 4,952 protein-coding genes, 87 tRNA genes and 7 rRNA operons. This genome is part of the project entitled “Genomics of four rapeseed plant growth promoting bacteria with antagonistic effect on plant pathogens” awarded through the 2010 DOE-JGI Community Sequencing Program (CSP2010). PMID:22675598

  18. Non-contiguous finished genome sequence of plant-growth promoting Serratia proteamaculans S4

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, Lynne A.; Högberg, Nils; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Alström, Sadhna; Bruce, David; Quintana, Beverly; Munk, Christine; Daligault, Hajnalka; Teshima, Hazuki; Davenport, Karen; Reitenga, Krista; Green, Lance; Chain, Patrick; Erkkila, Tracy; Gu, Wei; Zhang, Xiaojing; Xu, Yan; Kunde, Yulia; Chertkov, Olga; Han, James; Han, Cliff; Detter, John C.; Ivanova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Szeto, Ernest; Mavromatis, Kostas; Huntemann, Marcel; Nolan, Matt; Pitluck, Sam; Deshpande, Shweta; Markowitz, Victor; Pagani, Ioanna; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Woyke, Tanja; Finlay, Roger D.

    2013-01-01

    Serratia proteamaculans S4 (previously Serratia sp. S4), isolated from the rhizosphere of wild Equisetum sp., has the ability to stimulate plant growth and to suppress the growth of several soil-borne fungal pathogens of economically important crops. Here we present the non-contiguous, finished genome sequence of S. proteamaculans S4, which consists of a 5,324,944 bp circular chromosome and a 129,797 bp circular plasmid. The chromosome contains 5,008 predicted genes while the plasmid comprises 134 predicted genes. In total, 4,993 genes are assigned as protein-coding genes. The genome consists of 22 rRNA genes, 82 tRNA genes and 58 pseudogenes. This genome is a part of the project “Genomics of four rapeseed plant growth-promoting bacteria with antagonistic effect on plant pathogens” awarded through the 2010 DOE-JGI’s Community Sequencing Program. PMID:24501629

  19. Transcriptional responses of the bacterial antagonist Serratia plymuthica to the fungal phytopathogen Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Neupane, Saraswoti; Finlay, Roger D; Alström, Sadhna; Elfstrand, Malin; Högberg, Nils

    2015-02-01

    Rhizobacteria with biocontrol ability exploit a range of mechanisms to compete successfully with other microorganisms and to ensure their growth and survival in the rhizosphere, ultimately promoting plant growth. The rhizobacterium Serratia plymuthica AS13 is able to promote oilseed rape growth and improve seedling survival in the presence of the fungal pathogen, Rhizoctonia solani AG 2-1; however, our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the antagonism of Serratia is limited. To elucidate possible mechanisms, genome-wide gene expression profiling of S. plymuthica AS13 was carried out in the presence or absence of R. solani. We used RNA sequencing methodology to obtain a comprehensive overview of Serratia gene expression in response to R. solani. The differential gene expression profiles of S. plymuthica AS13 revealed significantly increased expression of genes related to the biosynthesis of the antibiotic pyrrolnitrin (prnABCD), protease production and transporters. The results presented here provide evidence that antibiosis is a major functional mechanism underlying the antagonistic behaviour of S. plymuthica AS13.

  20. Spaceflight and Simulated Microgravity Increases Virulence of the Known Bacterial Pathogen S. Marcescens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clemens-Grisham, Rachel Andrea; Bhattacharya, Sharmila; Wade, William

    2016-01-01

    After spaceflight, the number of immune cells is reduced in humans. In other research models, including Drosophila, not only is there a reduction in the number of plasmatocytes, but expression of immune-related genes is also changed after spaceflight. These observations suggest that the immune system is compromised after exposure to microgravity. It has also been reported that there is a change in virulence of some bacterial pathogens after spaceflight. We recently observed that samples of gram-negative S. marcescens retrieved from spaceflight is more virulent than ground controls, as determined by reduced survival and increased bacterial growth in the host. We were able to repeat this finding of increased virulence after exposure to simulated microgravity using the rotating wall vessel, a ground based analog to microgravity. With the ground and spaceflight samples, we looked at involvement of the Toll and Imd pathways in the Drosophila host in fighting infection by ground and spaceflight samples. We observed that Imd-pathway mutants were more susceptible to infection by the ground bacterial samples, which aligns with the known role of this pathway in fighting infections by gram-negative bacteria. When the Imd-pathway mutants were infected with the spaceflight sample, however, they exhibited the same susceptibility as seen with the ground control bacteria. Interestingly, all mutant flies show the same susceptibility to the spaceflight bacterial sample as do wild type flies. This suggests that neither humoral immunity pathway is effectively able to counter the increased pathogenicity of the space-flown S. marcescens bacteria.

  1. The Accessory Genome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Kung, Vanderlene L.; Ozer, Egon A.; Hauser, Alan R.

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains exhibit significant variability in pathogenicity and ecological flexibility. Such interstrain differences reflect the dynamic nature of the P. aeruginosa genome, which is composed of a relatively invariable “core genome” and a highly variable “accessory genome.” Here we review the major classes of genetic elements comprising the P. aeruginosa accessory genome and highlight emerging themes in the acquisition and functional importance of these elements. Although the precise phenotypes endowed by the majority of the P. aeruginosa accessory genome have yet to be determined, rapid progress is being made, and a clearer understanding of the role of the P. aeruginosa accessory genome in ecology and infection is emerging. PMID:21119020

  2. Improved production of isomaltulose by a newly isolated mutant of Serratia sp. cells immobilized in calcium alginate.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yonghwan; Koo, Bong-Seong; Lee, Hyeon-Cheol; Yoon, Youngdae

    2015-03-01

    Isomaltulose, also known as palatinose, is produced by sucrose isomerase and has been highlighted as a sugar substitute due to a number of advantageous properties. For the massive production of isomaltulose, high resistance to sucrose and stability of sucrose isomerase as well as sucrose conversion yields would be critical factors. We describe a series of screening procedures to isolate the mutant strain of Serratia sp. possessing enhanced isomaltulose production with improved stability. The new Serratia sp. isolated from a series of screening procedures allowed us to produce isomaltulose from 60% sucrose solution, with over 90% conversion yield. Moreover, when this strain was immobilized in calcium alginate beads and placed in a medium containing 60% sucrose, it showed over 70% sucrose conversion yields for 30 cycles of repeated-batch reactions. Thus, improved conversion activity and stability of the newly isolated Serratia sp. strain in the present study would be highly valuable for industries related to isomaltulose production.

  3. Effects of Psychrotrophic Bacteria, Serratia liquefaciens and Acinetobacter genomospecies 10 on Yogurt Quality.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yong Kook; Oh, Nam Su; Lee, Hyun Ah; Choi, Jong-Woo; Nam, Myoung Soo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of proteolytic (Serratia liquefaciens, match %: 99.39) or lipolytic (Acinetobacter genomospecies 10, match %: 99.90) psychrotrophic bacteria (bacterial counts, analysis of free fatty acids (FFA) and analysis of free amino acids) on the microbial and chemical properties (yogurt composition), and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) of yogurt during storage. Yogurts were prepared with raw milk preinoculated with each psychrotrophic bacteria. The total solid, fat, and protein content were not affected by preinoculation, but the pH of yogurt preinoculated with psychrotrophic bacteria was higher than in control. There was a dramatic increase in short chain free fatty acids among FFA in yogurt with Acinetobacter genomospecies 10. For 14 d of cold storage condition, SCFFA was 25.3 mg/kg to 34.4 mg/kg (1.36 times increased), MCFFA was 20.4 mg/kg to 25.7 mg/kg (1.26 times increased), and LCFFA was 240.2 mg/kg to 322.8 mg/kg (1.34 times increased). Serratia liquefaciens (match %: 99.39) in yogurt caused a greater accumulation of free amino acids (FAA), especially bitter peptides such as leucine, valine, arginine, and tyrosine, but SDS-PAGE showed that the inoculation of Serratia liquefaciens did not affect the degree of casein degradation during storage. Taken together, the excessive peptides and FFA in yogurt generated from psychrotrophic bacteria could develop off-flavors that degrade the quality of commercial yogurt products.

  4. Mechanism of 2,3-butanediol stereoisomers formation in a newly isolated Serratia sp. T241

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liaoyuan; Guo, Zewang; Chen, Jiebo; Xu, Quanming; Lin, Hui; Hu, Kaihui; Guan, Xiong; Shen, Yaling

    2016-01-01

    Serratia sp. T241, a newly isolated xylose-utilizing strain, produced three 2,3-butanediol (2,3-BD) stereoisomers. In this study, three 2,3-butanediol dehydrogenases (BDH1-3) and one glycerol dehydrogenase (GDH) involved in 2,3-BD isomers formation by Serratia sp. T241 were identified. In vitro conversion showed BDH1 and BDH2 could catalyzed (3S)-acetoin and (3R)-acetoin into (2S,3S)-2,3-BD and meso-2,3-BD, while BDH3 and GDH exhibited the activities from (3S)-acetoin and (3R)-acetoin to meso-2,3-BD and (2R,3R)-2,3-BD. Four encoding genes were assembled into E. coli with budA (acetolactate decarboxylase) and budB (acetolactate synthase), responsible for converting pyruvate into acetoin. E. coli expressing budAB-bdh1/2 produced meso-2,3-BD and (2S,3S)-2,3-BD. Correspondingly, (2R,3R)-2,3-BD and meso-2,3-BD were obtained by E. coli expressing budAB-bdh3/gdh. These results suggested four enzymes might contribute to 2,3-BD isomers formation. Mutants of four genes were developed in Serratia sp. T241. Δbdh1 led to reduced concentration of meso-2,3-BD and (2S,3S)-2,3-BD by 97.7% and 87.9%. (2R,3R)-2,3-BD with a loss of 73.3% was produced by Δbdh3. Enzyme activity assays showed the decrease of 98.4% and 22.4% by Δbdh1 and Δbdh3 compared with the wild strain. It suggested BDH1 and BDH3 played important roles in 2,3-BD formation, BDH2 and GDH have small effects on 2,3-BD production by Serratia sp. T241. PMID:26753612

  5. Mechanism of 2,3-butanediol stereoisomers formation in a newly isolated Serratia sp. T241.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liaoyuan; Guo, Zewang; Chen, Jiebo; Xu, Quanming; Lin, Hui; Hu, Kaihui; Guan, Xiong; Shen, Yaling

    2016-01-12

    Serratia sp. T241, a newly isolated xylose-utilizing strain, produced three 2,3-butanediol (2,3-BD) stereoisomers. In this study, three 2,3-butanediol dehydrogenases (BDH1-3) and one glycerol dehydrogenase (GDH) involved in 2,3-BD isomers formation by Serratia sp. T241 were identified. In vitro conversion showed BDH1 and BDH2 could catalyzed (3S)-acetoin and (3R)-acetoin into (2S,3S)-2,3-BD and meso-2,3-BD, while BDH3 and GDH exhibited the activities from (3S)-acetoin and (3R)-acetoin to meso-2,3-BD and (2R,3R)-2,3-BD. Four encoding genes were assembled into E. coli with budA (acetolactate decarboxylase) and budB (acetolactate synthase), responsible for converting pyruvate into acetoin. E. coli expressing budAB-bdh1/2 produced meso-2,3-BD and (2S,3S)-2,3-BD. Correspondingly, (2R,3R)-2,3-BD and meso-2,3-BD were obtained by E. coli expressing budAB-bdh3/gdh. These results suggested four enzymes might contribute to 2,3-BD isomers formation. Mutants of four genes were developed in Serratia sp. T241. Δbdh1 led to reduced concentration of meso-2,3-BD and (2S,3S)-2,3-BD by 97.7% and 87.9%. (2R,3R)-2,3-BD with a loss of 73.3% was produced by Δbdh3. Enzyme activity assays showed the decrease of 98.4% and 22.4% by Δbdh1 and Δbdh3 compared with the wild strain. It suggested BDH1 and BDH3 played important roles in 2,3-BD formation, BDH2 and GDH have small effects on 2,3-BD production by Serratia sp. T241.

  6. First complete genome sequence of a virulent bacteriophage infecting the opportunistic pathogen Serratia rubidaea.

    PubMed

    Xing, Shaozhen; Ma, Taping; Zhang, Xianglilan; Huang, Yong; Mi, Zhiqiang; Sun, Qiang; An, Xiaoping; Fan, Hang; Wu, Shuhui; Wei, Lin; Tong, Yigang

    2017-03-06

    A Serratia rubidaea phage, vB_Sru IME250, was isolated from hospital sewage. The morphology suggested that phage vB_Sru IME250 should be classified as a member of the family Myoviridae. High-throughput sequencing revealed that the phage genome has 154,938 nucleotides and consists of 193 coding DNA sequences, 90 of which have putative functions. The genome of vB_Sru IME250 is a linear, double-stranded DNA with an average GC content of 40.04%. The phage has a relatively high similarity to Klebsiella phage 0507-KN2-1, with a genome coverage of 84%.

  7. Complete genome sequence of the plant-associated Serratia plymuthica strain AS13

    PubMed Central

    Finlay, Roger D.; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Goodwin, Lynne; Alström, Sadhna; Lucas, Susan; Land, Miriam; Han, James; Lapidus, Alla; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Bruce, David; Pitluck, Sam; Peters, Lin; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Held, Brittany; Han, Cliff; Detter, John C.; Tapia, Roxanne; Hauser, Loren; Ivanova, Natalia; Pagani, Ioanna; Woyke, Tanja; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Högberg, Nils

    2012-01-01

    Serratia plymuthica AS13 is a plant-associated Gammaproteobacteria, isolated from rapeseed roots. It is of special interest because of its ability to inhibit fungal pathogens of rapeseed and to promote plant growth. The complete genome of S. plymuthica AS13 consists of a 5,442,549 bp circular chromosome. The chromosome contains 4,951 protein-coding genes, 87 tRNA genes and 7 rRNA operons. This genome was sequenced as part of the project entitled “Genomics of four rapeseed plant growth promoting bacteria with antagonistic effect on plant pathogens” within the 2010 DOE-JGI Community Sequencing Program (CSP2010). PMID:23450001

  8. Antibiotic Conditioned Growth Medium of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benathen, Isaiah A.; Cazeau, Barbara; Joseph, Njeri

    2004-01-01

    A simple method to study the consequences of bacterial antibiosis after interspecific competition between microorganisms is presented. Common microorganisms are used as the test organisms and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are used as the source of the inhibitor agents.

  9. Occurrence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Kuwait soil.

    PubMed

    Al-Saleh, Esmaeil; Akbar, Abrar

    2015-02-01

    Environmentally ubiquitous bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa evolved mechanisms to adapt and prevail under diverse conditions. In the current investigation, strains of P. aeruginosa demonstrating high rates of crude oil utilization and tolerance to high concentrations of heavy metals were found in both crude oil-contaminated and uncontaminated sites in Kuwait, and were dominant in the contaminated sites. The incidence of P. aeruginosa in tested soils implies the definitive pattern of crude oil contamination in the selection of the bacterial population in petroleum-contaminated sites in Kuwait. Surprisingly, the unculturable P. aeruginosa in different soil samples showed significant high similarity coefficients based on 16S-RFLP analyses, implying that the unculturable fraction of existing bacterial population in environmental samples is more stable and, hence, reliable for phylogenetic studies compared to the culturable bacteria.

  10. Osmoregulation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa under hyperosmotic shock.

    PubMed

    Velasco, R; Burgoa, R; Flores, E; Hernández, E; Villa, A; Vaca, S

    1995-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 strain was found to be able to tolerate 700 mM NaCl. 0.5 mM of the osmoprotectant betaine restablished the growth of this strain in 1200 mM NaCl. Intracellular K+ and glutamate concentrations of P. aeruginosa PAO1 after an hyperosmotic shock (400 mM NaCl) showed a permanent increase. Adition of betaine (0.5 mM) to the medium with NaCl had an inhibitory effect on the intracellular accumulation of glutamate. The results indicate that P. aeruginosa PAO1 resists high NaCl concentrations, K+ accumulation and glutamate synthesis probably being the first mechanisms involved in adaptation to osmotic stress. Also is is demonstrated that betaine modulates intracellular glutamate levels in osmotically stressed P. aeruginosa PAO1.

  11. E240V substitution increases catalytic efficiency toward ceftazidime in a new natural TEM-type extended-spectrum beta-lactamase, TEM-149, from Enterobacter aerogenes and Serratia marcescens clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Perilli, Mariagrazia; Celenza, Giuseppe; De Santis, Francesca; Pellegrini, Cristina; Forcella, Chiara; Rossolini, Gian Maria; Stefani, Stefania; Amicosante, Gianfranco

    2008-03-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize a novel extended-spectrum beta-lactamase that belongs to the TEM family, the TEM-149 enzyme, and that was isolated from the urine of two hospitalized patients from different hospitals in southern Italy. The peculiarity of this enzyme was the finding of a valine residue at position 240. The array of amino acid substitutions found in TEM-149 was as follows: E104K, R164S, M182T, and E240V. A reversion of a threonine residue at position 182 was also performed to create a new mutant, TEM-149 T182M, in order to assess the contribution of this substitution on the kinetic profile and the stability of TEM-149. The bla TEM-149 and bla TEM-149/T182M genes were cloned into pBC-SK, and the corresponding enzymes were purified from recombinant Escherichia coli HB101 by the same procedure. Both enzymes hydrolyzed all beta-lactams tested, with a preference for ceftazidime, which was found to be the best substrate. By comparison of the kinetic parameters of the TEM-149 and the TEM-149 T182M enzymes, a reduction of the catalytic efficiency for the TEM-149 T182M mutant was observed against all substrates tested except benzylpenicillin, cefotaxime, and aztreonam. Tazobactam, clavulanic acid, and sulbactam were good inhibitors of the TEM-149 beta-lactamase.

  12. Putting on the brakes: Bacterial impediment of wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Brothers, Kimberly M.; Stella, Nicholas A.; Hunt, Kristin M.; Romanowski, Eric G.; Liu, Xinyu; Klarlund, Jes K.; Shanks, Robert M. Q.

    2015-01-01

    The epithelium provides a crucial barrier to infection, and its integrity requires efficient wound healing. Bacterial cells and secretomes from a subset of tested species of bacteria inhibited human and porcine corneal epithelial cell migration in vitro and ex vivo. Secretomes from 95% of Serratia marcescens, 71% of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 29% of Staphylococcus aureus strains, and other bacterial species inhibited epithelial cell migration. Migration of human foreskin fibroblasts was also inhibited by S. marcescens secretomes indicating that the effect is not cornea specific. Transposon mutagenesis implicated lipopolysaccharide (LPS) core biosynthetic genes as being required to inhibit corneal epithelial cell migration. LPS depletion of S. marcescens secretomes with polymyxin B agarose rendered secretomes unable to inhibit epithelial cell migration. Purified LPS from S. marcescens, but not from Escherichia coli or S. marcescens strains with mutations in the waaG and waaC genes, inhibited epithelial cell migration in vitro and wound healing ex vivo. Together these data suggest that S. marcescens LPS is sufficient for inhibition of epithelial wound healing. This study presents a novel host-pathogen interaction with implications for infections where bacteria impact wound healing and provides evidence that secreted LPS is a key factor in the inhibitory mechanism. PMID:26365869

  13. Extraction of extracellular lipids from chemoautotrophic bacteria Serratia sp. ISTD04 for production of biodiesel.

    PubMed

    Bharti, Randhir K; Srivastava, Shaili; Thakur, Indu Shekhar

    2014-08-01

    A CO2 sequestering bacterial strain, Serratia sp. ISTD04, that produces a significant amount of extracellular lipids was isolated from marble mine rocks. (14)C labeling analysis revealed that the rate of assimilation of CO2 by the strain is 0.756×10(-9)μmolCO2fixedcell(-1)h(-1). It was found to produce 466mg/l of extracellular lipid which was characterized using (1)H NMR. After transesterification of lipids, the total saturated and unsaturated FAME was found to be 51% and 49% respectively. The major FAME contained in the biodiesel were palmitic acid methyl ester (C16:0), oleic acid methyl ester (C18:1) and 10-nonadecenoic acid methyl ester (C19:1). Biodiesel produced by Serratia sp. ISTD04 is balanced in terms of FAME composition of good quality. It also contained higher proportion of oleic acid (35%) which makes it suitable for utilization in existing engines. Thus, the strain can be harnessed commercially to sequester CO2 into biodiesel.

  14. Proteomic Analysis of Carbon Concentrating Chemolithotrophic Bacteria Serratia sp. for Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide

    PubMed Central

    Bharti, Randhir K.; Srivastava, Shaili; Thakur, Indu Shekhar

    2014-01-01

    A chemolithotrophic bacterium enriched in the chemostat in presence of sodium bicarbonate as sole carbon source was identified as Serratia sp. by 16S rRNA sequencing. Carbon dioxide sequestering capacity of bacterium was detected by carbonic anhydrase enzyme and ribulose-1, 5- bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO). The purified carbonic anhydrase showed molecular weight of 29 kDa. Molecular weight of RuBisCO was 550 kDa as determined by fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC), however, sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) showed presence of two subunits whose molecular weights were 56 and 14 kDa. The Western blot analysis of the crude protein and purified sample cross reacted with RuBisCO large-subunit polypeptides antibodies showed strong band pattern at molecular weight around 56 kDa regions. Whole cell soluble proteins of Serratia sp. grown under autotrophic and heterotrophic conditions were resolved by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF/MS for differential expression of proteins. In proteomic analysis of 63 protein spots, 48 spots were significantly up-regulated in the autotrophically grown cells; seven enzymes showed its utilization in autotrophic carbon fixation pathways and other metabolic activities of bacterium including lipid metabolisms indicated sequestration potency of carbon dioxide and production of biomaterials. PMID:24619032

  15. Quorum sensing activity of Serratia fonticola strain RB-25 isolated from an ex-landfill site.

    PubMed

    Ee, Robson; Lim, Yan-Lue; Tee, Kok-Keng; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2014-03-12

    Quorum sensing is a unique bacterial communication system which permits bacteria to synchronize their behaviour in accordance with the population density. The operation of this communication network involves the use of diffusible autoinducer molecules, termed N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs). Serratia spp. are well known for their use of quorum sensing to regulate the expression of various genes. In this study, we aimed to characterized the AHL production of a bacterium designated as strain RB-25 isolated from a former domestic waste landfill site. It was identified as Serratia fonticola using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry analysis and this was confirmed by 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing. High resolution triple quadrupole liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of S. fonticola strain RB-25 spent culture supernatant indicated the existence of three AHLs namely: N-butyryl-L-homoserine lactone (C4-HSL), N-hexanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (C6-HSL) and N-(3-oxohexanoyl) homoserine-lactone (3-oxo-C6 HSL). This is the first report of the production of these AHLs in S. fonticola.

  16. Proteomic analysis of carbon concentrating chemolithotrophic bacteria Serratia sp. for sequestration of carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Bharti, Randhir K; Srivastava, Shaili; Thakur, Indu Shekhar

    2014-01-01

    A chemolithotrophic bacterium enriched in the chemostat in presence of sodium bicarbonate as sole carbon source was identified as Serratia sp. by 16S rRNA sequencing. Carbon dioxide sequestering capacity of bacterium was detected by carbonic anhydrase enzyme and ribulose-1, 5- bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO). The purified carbonic anhydrase showed molecular weight of 29 kDa. Molecular weight of RuBisCO was 550 kDa as determined by fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC), however, sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) showed presence of two subunits whose molecular weights were 56 and 14 kDa. The Western blot analysis of the crude protein and purified sample cross reacted with RuBisCO large-subunit polypeptides antibodies showed strong band pattern at molecular weight around 56 kDa regions. Whole cell soluble proteins of Serratia sp. grown under autotrophic and heterotrophic conditions were resolved by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF/MS for differential expression of proteins. In proteomic analysis of 63 protein spots, 48 spots were significantly up-regulated in the autotrophically grown cells; seven enzymes showed its utilization in autotrophic carbon fixation pathways and other metabolic activities of bacterium including lipid metabolisms indicated sequestration potency of carbon dioxide and production of biomaterials.

  17. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Strains of Serratia spp. from the Midgut of the Malaria Mosquito Anopheles gambiae

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Dong; Hill-Clemons, Casey; Carissimo, Guillaume; Yu, Wanqin; Vernick, Kenneth D.

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report the annotated draft genome sequences of two strains of Serratia spp., Ag1 and Ag2, isolated from the midgut of two different strains of Anopheles gambiae. The genomes of these two strains are almost identical. PMID:25767231

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of Serratia fonticola UTAD54, a Carbapenem-Resistant Strain Isolated from Drinking Water

    PubMed Central

    Jucá Ramos, Rommel Thiago; Baraúna, Rafael Azevedo; de Sá, Pablo Henrique; Marinho Almeida, Diogo; Carneiro, Adriana Ribeiro; Barbosa, Silvanira; Pereira, Anabela; Alves, Artur; Saavedra, Maria José; Egas, Conceição; Silva, Artur; Correia, António

    2013-01-01

    Serratia fonticola UTAD54 is an environmental isolate that is resistant to carbapenems due to the presence of a class A carbapenemase and a metallo-β-lactamase that are unique to this strain. Its draft genome sequence was obtained to clarify the molecular basis of its carbapenem resistance and identify the genomic context of its carbapenem resistance determinants. PMID:24285645

  19. Complete Genome of Serratia sp. Strain FGI 94, a Strain Associated with Leaf-Cutter Ant Fungus Gardens.

    PubMed

    Aylward, Frank O; Tremmel, Daniel M; Starrett, Gabriel J; Bruce, David C; Chain, Patrick; Chen, Amy; Davenport, Karen W; Detter, Chris; Han, Cliff S; Han, James; Huntemann, Marcel; Ivanova, Natalia N; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Markowitz, Victor; Mavrommatis, Kostas; Nolan, Matt; Pagani, Ioanna; Pati, Amrita; Pitluck, Sam; Teshima, Hazuki; Deshpande, Shweta; Goodwin, Lynne; Woyke, Tanja; Currie, Cameron R

    2013-03-14

    Serratia sp. strain FGI 94 was isolated from a fungus garden of the leaf-cutter ant Atta colombica. Analysis of its 4.86-Mbp chromosome will help advance our knowledge of symbiotic interactions and plant biomass degradation in this ancient ant-fungus mutualism.

  20. Developing an international Pseudomonas aeruginosa reference panel.

    PubMed

    De Soyza, Anthony; Hall, Amanda J; Mahenthiralingam, Eshwar; Drevinek, Pavel; Kaca, Wieslaw; Drulis-Kawa, Zuzanna; Stoitsova, Stoyanka R; Toth, Veronika; Coenye, Tom; Zlosnik, James E A; Burns, Jane L; Sá-Correia, Isabel; De Vos, Daniel; Pirnay, Jean-Paul; Kidd, Timothy J; Reid, David; Manos, Jim; Klockgether, Jens; Wiehlmann, Lutz; Tümmler, Burkhard; McClean, Siobhán; Winstanley, Craig

    2013-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major opportunistic pathogen in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and causes a wide range of infections among other susceptible populations. Its inherent resistance to many antimicrobials also makes it difficult to treat infections with this pathogen. Recent evidence has highlighted the diversity of this species, yet despite this, the majority of studies on virulence and pathogenesis focus on a small number of strains. There is a pressing need for a P. aeruginosa reference panel to harmonize and coordinate the collective efforts of the P. aeruginosa research community. We have collated a panel of 43 P. aeruginosa strains that reflects the organism's diversity. In addition to the commonly studied clones, this panel includes transmissible strains, sequential CF isolates, strains with specific virulence characteristics, and strains that represent serotype, genotype or geographic diversity. This focussed panel of P. aeruginosa isolates will help accelerate and consolidate the discovery of virulence determinants, improve our understanding of the pathogenesis of infections caused by this pathogen, and provide the community with a valuable resource for the testing of novel therapeutic agents.

  1. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Dose-Response and Bathing Water Infection

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most commonly identified opportunistic pathogen associated with pool acquired bather disease. To better understand why this microorganism poses this protracted problem we recently appraised P. aeruginosa pool risk management. Much is known about the ...

  2. Iron-stimulated toxin production in Microcystis aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Utkilen, H; Gjølme, N

    1995-01-01

    Nitrate- and phosphate-limited conditions had no effect on toxin production by Microcystis aeruginosa. In contrast, iron-limited conditions influenced toxin production by M. aeruginosa, and iron uptake was light dependent. A model for production of toxin by M. aeruginosa is proposed. PMID:7574617

  3. 42 CFR 493.911 - Bacteriology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... the six major groups of bacteria: anaerobes, Enterobacteriaceae, gram-positive bacilli, gram-positive... typhimurium Serratia marcescens Shigella sonnei Yersinia enterocolitica Gram-positive bacilli:...

  4. Lufenuron suppresses the resistance of Formosan subterranean termites (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae) to entomopathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cai; Henderson, Gregg; Gautam, Bal K

    2013-08-01

    Pesticides can negatively affect insect immunity. Although studies show that Formosan subterranean termites, Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki, are resistant to microbial infections, the effects of pesticides on disease resistance is not well studied. In this study, C. formosanus previously fed lufenuron was exposed to each of the three entomopathogenic bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Schroeter) Migula, Serratia marcescens Bizio, and Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner subsp. israelensis. We found that termite mortality was significantly higher and synergistic in the combination of lufenuron and P. aeruginosa compared with treatment of lufenuron or P. aeruginosa alone. Other bacteria and lufenuron combinations were not quite as effective. Interestingly, only in treatments without lufenuron did termites show carcass-burying behavior. The results indicate that lufenuron, a chitin synthesis inhibitor, can suppress Formosan subterranean termite resistance to P. aeruginosa. Possible suppression mechanisms are discussed.

  5. Biofilm Formation and Quorum-Sensing-Molecule Production by Clinical Isolates of Serratia liquefaciens

    PubMed Central

    Remuzgo-Martínez, Sara; Lázaro-Díez, María; Mayer, Celia; Aranzamendi-Zaldumbide, Maitane; Padilla, Daniel; Calvo, Jorge; Marco, Francesc; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Icardo, José Manuel; Otero, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Serratia spp. are opportunistic human pathogens responsible for an increasing number of nosocomial infections. However, little is known about the virulence factors and regulatory circuits that may enhance the establishment and long-term survival of Serratia liquefaciens in the hospital environment. In this study, two reporter strains, Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 and VIR24, and high-resolution triple-quadrupole liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC-MS) were used to detect and to quantify N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) quorum-sensing signals in 20 S. liquefaciens strains isolated from clinical samples. Only four of the strains produced sufficient amounts of AHLs to activate the sensors. Investigation of two of the positive strains by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-MS confirmed the presence of significant amounts of short-acyl-chain AHLs (N-butyryl-l-homoserine lactone [C4-HSL] and N-hexanoyl-l-homoserine lactone [C6-HSL]) in both strains, which exhibited a complex and strain-specific signal profile that included minor amounts of other short-acyl-chain AHLs (N-octanoyl-l-homoserine lactone [C8-HSL] and N-3-oxohexanoyl-l-homoserine lactone [OC6-HSL]) and long-acyl-chain (C10, C12, and C14) AHLs. No correlation between biofilm formation and the production of large amounts of AHLs could be established. Fimbria-like structures were observed by transmission electron microscopy, and the presence of the type 1 fimbrial adhesin gene fimH in all strains was confirmed by PCR. The ability of S. liquefaciens to adhere to abiotic surfaces and to form biofilms likely contributes to its persistence in the hospital environment, increasing the probability of causing nosocomial infections. Therefore, a better understanding of the adherence properties of this species will provide greater insights into the diseases it causes. PMID:25746999

  6. Risk assessment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in water.

    PubMed

    Mena, Kristina D; Gerba, Charles P

    2009-01-01

    P. aeruginosa is part of a large group of free-living bacteria that are ubiquitous in the environment. This organism is often found in natural waters such as lakes and rivers in concentrations of 10/100 mL to >1,000/100 mL. However, it is not often found in drinking water. Usually it is found in 2% of samples, or less, and at concentrations up to 2,300 mL(-1) (Allen and Geldreich 1975) or more often at 3-4 CFU/mL. Its occurrence in drinking water is probably related more to its ability to colonize biofilms in plumbing fixtures (i.e., faucets, showerheads, etc.) than its presence in the distribution system or treated drinking water. P. aeruginosa can survive in deionized or distilled water (van der Jooij et al. 1982; Warburton et al. 1994). Hence, it may be found in low nutrient or oligotrophic environments, as well as in high nutrient environments such as in sewage and in the human body. P. aeruginosa can cause a wide range of infections, and is a leading cause of illness in immunocompromised individuals. In particular, it can be a serious pathogen in hospitals (Dembry et al. 1998). It can cause endocarditis, osteomyelitis, pneumonia, urinary tract infections, gastrointestinal infections, and meningitis, and is a leading cause of septicemia. P. aeruginosa is also a major cause of folliculitis and ear infections acquired by exposure to recreational waters containing the bacterium. In addition, it has been recognized as a serious cause of keratitis, especially in patients wearing contact lenses. P. aeruginosa is also a major pathogen in burn and cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and causes a high mortality rate in both populations (MOlina et al. 1991; Pollack 1995). P. aeruginosa is frequently found in whirlpools and hot tubs, sometimes in 94-100% of those tested at concenrations of <1 to 2,400 CFU/mL. The high concentrations found probably result from the relatively high temperatures of whirlpools, which favor the growth of P. aeruginosa, and the aeration which also

  7. Pseudomonas Aeruginosa: Resistance to the Max

    PubMed Central

    Poole, Keith

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is intrinsically resistant to a variety of antimicrobials and can develop resistance during anti-pseudomonal chemotherapy both of which compromise treatment of infections caused by this organism. Resistance to multiple classes of antimicrobials (multidrug resistance) in particular is increasingly common in P. aeruginosa, with a number of reports of pan-resistant isolates treatable with a single agent, colistin. Acquired resistance in this organism is multifactorial and attributable to chromosomal mutations and the acquisition of resistance genes via horizontal gene transfer. Mutational changes impacting resistance include upregulation of multidrug efflux systems to promote antimicrobial expulsion, derepression of ampC, AmpC alterations that expand the enzyme's substrate specificity (i.e., extended-spectrum AmpC), alterations to outer membrane permeability to limit antimicrobial entry and alterations to antimicrobial targets. Acquired mechanisms contributing to resistance in P. aeruginosa include β-lactamases, notably the extended-spectrum β-lactamases and the carbapenemases that hydrolyze most β-lactams, aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes, and 16S rRNA methylases that provide high-level pan-aminoglycoside resistance. The organism's propensity to grow in vivo as antimicrobial-tolerant biofilms and the occurrence of hypermutator strains that yield antimicrobial resistant mutants at higher frequency also compromise anti-pseudomonal chemotherapy. With limited therapeutic options and increasing resistance will the untreatable P. aeruginosa infection soon be upon us? PMID:21747788

  8. Spaceflight Effects on Virulence of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broadway, S.; Goins, T.; Crandell, C.; Richards, C.; Patel, M.; Pyle, B.

    2008-06-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen found in the environment. It is known to infect the immunocompromised. The organism has about 25 virulence genes that play different roles in disease processes. Several exotoxin proteins may be produced, including ExoA, ExoS, ExoT and ExoY, and other virulence factors. In spaceflight, possible increased expression of P. aeruginosa virulence proteins could increase health risks for spaceflight crews who experience decreased immunity. Cultures of P. aeruginosa strains PA01 and PA103 grown on orbit on Shuttle Endeavour flight STS-123 vs. static ground controls were used for analysis. The production of ETA was quantitated using an ELISA procedure. Results showed that while flight cultures of PA103 produced slightly more ETA than corresponding ground controls, the opposite was found for PA01. While it appears that spaceflight has little effect on ETA, stimulation of other virulence factors could cause increased virulence of this organism in space flight. Similar increased virulence in spaceflight has been observed for other bacteria. This is important because astronauts may be more susceptible to opportunistic pathogens including P. aeruginosa.

  9. Whole-Genome Sequence of Serratia liquefaciens HUMV-21, a Cytotoxic, Quorum-Sensing, and Biofilm-Producing Clinical Isolate

    PubMed Central

    Lázaro-Díez, María; Acosta, Felix; Remuzgo-Martínez, Sara; Ocampo-Sosa, Alain; Ocejo-Vinyals, Javier Gonzalo; Bravo, Jimena; El Aamri, Fátima; Escuela, Oliver; Martínez-Martínez, Luis

    2015-01-01

    A clinical isolate of Serratia liquefaciens (strain HUMV-21) was obtained from a skin ulcer of an adult patient. We report here its complete genome assembly using PacBio single-molecule real-time (SMRT) sequencing, which resulted in a single circular chromosome with 5.3 Mb. About 5,844 protein-coding genes are predicted from this assembly. PMID:26021922

  10. Evaluation of insecticidal activity of a bacterial strain, Serratia sp. EML-SE1 against diamondback moth.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hyung Uk; Mun, Hye Yeon; Oh, Hyung Keun; Kim, Seung Bum; Yang, Kwang Yeol; Kim, Iksoo; Lee, Hyang Burm

    2010-08-01

    To identify novel bioinsecticidal agents, a bacterial strain, Serratia sp. EML-SE1, was isolated from a dead larva of the lepidopteran diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella) collected from a cabbage field in Korea. In this study, the insecticidal activity of liquid cultures in Luria-Bertani broth (LBB) and nutrient broth (NB) of a bacterial strain, Serratia sp. EML-SE1 against thirty 3rd and 4th instar larvae of the diamondback moth was investigated on a Chinese cabbage leaf housed in a round plastic cage (Ø 10 x 6 cm). 72 h after spraying the cabbage leaf with LBB and NB cultures containing the bacterial strain, the mortalities of the larvae were determined to be 91.7% and 88.3%, respectively. In addition, the insecticidal activity on potted cabbage containing 14 leaves in a growth cage (165 x 83 x 124 cm) was found to be similar to that of the plastic cage experiment. The results of this study provided valuable information on the insecticidal activity of the liquid culture of a Serratia species against the diamondback moth.

  11. Persistence of microbial communities including Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a hospital environment: a potential health hazard

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The persistence of microbial communities and how they change in indoor environments is of immense interest to public health. Moreover, hospital acquired infections are significant contributors to morbidity and mortality. Evidence suggests that, in hospital environments agent transfer between surfaces causes healthcare associated infections in humans, and that surfaces are an important transmission route and may act as a reservoir for some of the pathogens. This study aimed to evaluate the diversity of microorganisms that persist on noncritical equipment and surfaces in a main hospital in Portugal, and are able to grow in selective media for Pseudomonas, and relate them with the presence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Results During 2 years, a total of 290 environmental samples were analyzed, in 3 different wards. The percentage of equipment in each ward that showed low contamination level varied between 22% and 38%, and more than 50% of the equipment sampled was highly contaminated. P. aeruginosa was repeatedly isolated from sinks (10 times), from the taps’ biofilm (16 times), and from the showers and bedside tables (two times). Two ERIC clones were isolated more than once. The contamination level of the different taps analyzed showed correlation with the contamination level of the hand gels support, soaps and sinks. Ten different bacteria genera were frequently isolated in the selective media for Pseudomonas. Organisms usually associated with nosocomial infections as Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Enterococcus feacalis, Serratia nematodiphila were also repeatedly isolated on the same equipment. Conclusions The environment may act as a reservoir for at least some of the pathogens implicated in nosocomial infections. The bacterial contamination level was related to the presence of humidity on the surfaces, and tap water (biofilm) was a point of dispersion of bacterial species, including potentially pathogenic organisms. The materials of the equipment

  12. Antimicrobial activity of essential oil from Schinus molle Linn.

    PubMed

    Gundidza, M

    1993-11-01

    The essential oil from the fresh leaves of Schinus molle isolated by hydrodistillation was tested for antibacterial activity using the hole plate diffusion method and for antifungal activity using the mycelium or single cell growth inhibition method. Results obtained showed that the volatile oil exhibited significant activity against the following bacterial species: Klebsiella pneumoniae, Alcaligenes faecalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Leuconostoc cremoris, Enterobacter aerogenes, Proteus vulgaris, Clostridium sporogenes, Acinetobacter calcoacetica, Escherichia coli, Beneckea natriegens, Citrobacter freundii, Serratia marcescens, Bacillus subtilis and Brochothrix thermosphacata. The fungal species Aspergillus ochraceus, Aspergillus parasiticus, Fusarium culmorum and Alternaria alternata exhibited significant sensitivity to the volatile oil.

  13. Culturable Aerobic and Facultative Anaerobic Intestinal Bacterial Flora of Black Cobra (Naja naja karachiensis) in Southern Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Junaid; Sagheer, Mehwish; Tabassum, Nazneen; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Using morphological analysis and biochemical testing, here for the first time, we determined the culturable gut bacterial flora (aerobes and facultative anaerobes) in the venomous Black Cobra (Naja naja karachiensis) from South Asia. The findings revealed that these snakes inhabit potentially pathogenic bacteria including Serratia marcescens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Shewanella putrefaciens, Aeromonas hydrophila, Salmonella sp., Moraxella sp., Bacillus sp., Ochrobactrum anthropi, and Providencia rettgeri. These findings are of concern, as injury from snake bite can result in wound infections and tissue necrosis leading to sepsis/necrotizing fasciitis and/or expose consumers of snake meat/medicine in the community to infections. PMID:25002979

  14. Antibacterial activities of Emblica officinalis and Coriandrum sativum against Gram negative urinary pathogens.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Sabahat; Tariq, Perween

    2007-01-01

    Present investigation is focused on antibacterial potential of aqueous infusions and aqueous decoctions of Emblica officinalis (amla) and Coriandrum sativum (coriander) against 345 bacterial isolates belonging to 6 different genera of Gram negative bacterial population isolated from urine specimens by employing well diffusion technique. Aqueous infusion and decoction of Emblica officinalis exhibited potent antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli (270), Klebsiella pneumoniae (51), K. ozaenae (3), Proteus mirabilis (5), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (10), Salmonella typhi (1), S. paratyphi A (2), S. paratyphi B (1) and Serratia marcescens (2) but did not show any antibacterial activity against Gram negative urinary pathogens.

  15. Modulation of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) by bacterial metalloproteases and protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Butterworth, Michael B; Zhang, Liang; Liu, Xiaoning; Shanks, Robert M; Thibodeau, Patrick H

    2014-01-01

    The serralysin family of metalloproteases is associated with the virulence of multiple gram-negative human pathogens, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Serratia marcescens. The serralysin proteases share highly conserved catalytic domains and show evolutionary similarity to the mammalian matrix metalloproteases. Our previous studies demonstrated that alkaline protease (AP) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa is capable of activating the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC), leading to an increase in sodium absorption in airway epithelia. The serralysin proteases are often co-expressed with endogenous, intracellular or periplasmic inhibitors, which putatively protect the bacterium from unwanted or unregulated protease activities. To evaluate the potential use of these small protein inhibitors in regulating the serralysin induced activation of ENaC, proteases from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Serratia marcescens were purified for characterization along with a high affinity inhibitor from Pseudomonas. Both proteases showed activity against in vitro substrates and could be blocked by near stoichiometric concentrations of the inhibitor. In addition, both proteases were capable of activating ENaC when added to the apical surfaces of multiple epithelial cells with similar slow activation kinetics. The high-affinity periplasmic inhibitor from Pseudomonas effectively blocked this activation. These data suggest that multiple metalloproteases are capable of activating ENaC. Further, the endogenous, periplasmic bacterial inhibitors may be useful for modulating the downstream effects of the serralysin virulence factors under physiological conditions.

  16. Pseudomonas aeruginosa ventilator-associated pneumonia management.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Estrada, Sergio; Borgatta, Bárbara; Rello, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia is the most common infection in intensive care unit patients associated with high morbidity rates and elevated economic costs; Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most frequent bacteria linked with this entity, with a high attributable mortality despite adequate treatment that is increased in the presence of multiresistant strains, a situation that is becoming more common in intensive care units. In this manuscript, we review the current management of ventilator-associated pneumonia due to P. aeruginosa, the most recent antipseudomonal agents, and new adjunctive therapies that are shifting the way we treat these infections. We support early initiation of broad-spectrum antipseudomonal antibiotics in present, followed by culture-guided monotherapy de-escalation when susceptibilities are available. Future management should be directed at blocking virulence; the role of alternative strategies such as new antibiotics, nebulized treatments, and vaccines is promising.

  17. Pseudomonas aeruginosa ventilator-associated pneumonia management

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Estrada, Sergio; Borgatta, Bárbara; Rello, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia is the most common infection in intensive care unit patients associated with high morbidity rates and elevated economic costs; Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most frequent bacteria linked with this entity, with a high attributable mortality despite adequate treatment that is increased in the presence of multiresistant strains, a situation that is becoming more common in intensive care units. In this manuscript, we review the current management of ventilator-associated pneumonia due to P. aeruginosa, the most recent antipseudomonal agents, and new adjunctive therapies that are shifting the way we treat these infections. We support early initiation of broad-spectrum antipseudomonal antibiotics in present, followed by culture-guided monotherapy de-escalation when susceptibilities are available. Future management should be directed at blocking virulence; the role of alternative strategies such as new antibiotics, nebulized treatments, and vaccines is promising. PMID:26855594

  18. Cryptic transposable phages of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Krylov, V.N.; Mit`kina, L.N.; Pleteneva, E.A.; Aleshin, V.V.

    1995-11-01

    Frequencies of nucleotide sequences homologous to phage transposons (PT) of two species, D3112 and B3, were assessed in genomes of natural Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains by the dot-blot hybridization method. These strains were incapable of liberating viable phages on a lawn of the PA01 standard indicator strain of P. aeruginosa. It was shown that the homologies detected belong to two groups, high and intermediate, with respect to homology level. Homology patterns were classified as high when they provided signals comparable to those for hybridization in a positive control; patterns were classified as intermediate when the hybridization level was higher than the background level, but lower than in the positive control. Homologous PT sequences were designated as cryptic PT. Intact cryptic PT prophages were shown to exist in genomes of particular natural strains manifesting a higher level of hybridization. However, the growth of these phages was limited by the restriction system of strain PA01. It is possible to isolate strains maintaining the growth of some cryptic PT. These strains differed from P. aeruginosa with respect to the specificity of the restriction and modification system. Nevertheless, in most cases, the attempt to identify a novel host capable of maintaining growth of a cryptic PT failed. Natural strains often carry cryptic PT related to both known PT species, D3112 and B3. The frequency of cryptic PT is extremely high, reaching 30% in strains with a high level of homology only and up to 50% in all strains exhibiting homology. This high PT frequency is assumed to be associated with the considerable variation of P. aeruginosa. 15 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  19. Pseudomonas aeruginosa essentials: an update on investigation of essential genes.

    PubMed

    Juhas, Mario

    2015-11-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the leading cause of nosocomial infections, particularly in immunocompromised, cancer, burn and cystic fibrosis patients. Development of novel antimicrobials against P. aeruginosa is therefore of the highest importance. Although the first reports on P. aeruginosa essential genes date back to the early 2000s, a number of more sensitive genomic approaches have been used recently to better define essential genes in this organism. These analyses highlight the evolution of the definition of an 'essential' gene from the traditional to the context-dependent. Essential genes, particularly those indispensable under the clinically relevant conditions, are considered to be promising targets of novel antibiotics against P. aeruginosa. This review provides an update on the investigation of P. aeruginosa essential genes. Special focus is on recently identified P. aeruginosa essential genes and their exploitation for the development of antimicrobials.

  20. Glycerol metabolism promotes biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Scoffield, Jessica; Silo-Suh, Laura

    2016-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes persistent infections in the airways of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Airway sputum contains various host-derived nutrients that can be utilized by P. aeruginosa, including phosphotidylcholine, a major component of host cell membranes. Phosphotidylcholine can be degraded by P. aeruginosa to glycerol and fatty acids to increase the availability of glycerol in the CF lung. In this study, we explored the role that glycerol metabolism plays in biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa. We report that glycerol metabolism promotes biofilm formation by both a chronic CF isolate (FRD1) and a wound isolate (PAO1) of P. aeruginosa. Moreover, loss of the GlpR regulator, which represses the expression of genes involved in glycerol metabolism, enhances biofilm formation in FRD1 through the upregulation of Pel polysaccharide. Taken together, our results suggest that glycerol metabolism may be a key factor that contributes to P. aeruginosa persistence by promoting biofilm formation.

  1. Mixing and Matching Siderophore Clusters: Structure and Biosynthesis of Serratiochelins from Serratia sp. V4

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Interrogation of the evolutionary history underlying the remarkable structures and biological activities of natural products has been complicated by not knowing the functions they have evolved to fulfill. Siderophores—soluble, low molecular weight compounds—have an easily understood and measured function: acquiring iron from the environment. Bacteria engage in a fierce competition to acquire iron, which rewards the production of siderophores that bind iron tightly and cannot be used or pirated by competitors. The structures and biosyntheses of “odd” siderophores can reveal the evolutionary strategy that led to their creation. We report a new Serratia strain that produces serratiochelin and an analog of serratiochelin. A genetic approach located the serratiochelin gene cluster, and targeted mutations in several genes implicated in serratiochelin biosynthesis were generated. Bioinformatic analyses and mutagenesis results demonstrate that genes from two well-known siderophore clusters, the Escherichia coli enterobactin cluster and the Vibrio cholera vibriobactin cluster, were shuffled to produce a new siderophore biosynthetic pathway. These results highlight how modular siderophore gene clusters can be mixed and matched during evolution to generate structural diversity in siderophores. PMID:22830960

  2. Serratia odorifera a Midgut Inhabitant of Aedes aegypti Mosquito Enhances Its Susceptibility to Dengue-2 Virus

    PubMed Central

    Apte-Deshpande, Anjali; Paingankar, Mandar; Gokhale, Mangesh D.; Deobagkar, Dileep N.

    2012-01-01

    Mosquito midgut plays a crucial role in its vector susceptibility and pathogen interaction. Identification of the sustainable microflora of the midgut environment can therefore help in evaluating its contribution in mosquito-pathogen interaction and in turn vector competence. To understand the bacterial diversity in the midgut of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, we conducted a screening study of the gut microbes of these mosquitoes which were either collected from fields or reared in the laboratory “culture-dependent” approach. This work demonstrated that the microbial flora of larvae and adult Ae. aegypti midgut is complex and is dominated by Gram negative proteobacteria. Serratia odorifera was found to be stably associated in the midguts of field collected and laboratory reared larvae and adult females. The potential influence of this sustainable gut microbe on DENV-2 susceptibility of this vector was evaluated by co-feeding S. odorifera with DENV-2 to adult Ae. aegypti females (free of gut flora). The observations revealed that the viral susceptibility of these Aedes females enhanced significantly as compared to solely dengue-2 fed and another gut inhabitant, Microbacterium oxydans co-fed females. Based on the results of this study we proposed that the enhancement in the DENV-2 susceptibility of Ae. aegypti females was due to blocking of prohibitin molecule present on the midgut surface of these females by the polypeptide of gut inhabitant S. odorifera. PMID:22848375

  3. Production and characterization of biodiesel from carbon dioxide concentrating chemolithotrophic bacteria, Serratia sp. ISTD04.

    PubMed

    Bharti, Randhir K; Srivastava, Shaili; Thakur, Indu Shekhar

    2014-02-01

    A chemolithotrophic bacterium, Serratia sp. ISTD04, enriched in the chemostat in presence of sodium bicarbonate as sole carbon source was evaluated for potential of carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration and biofuel production. CO2 sequestration efficiency of the bacterium was determined by enzymatic activity of carbonic anhydrase and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO). Further, Western blot analysis confirmed presence of RuBisCO. The bacterium produced 0.487 and 0.647mgmg(-1) per unit cell dry weight of hydrocarbons and lipids respectively. The hydrocarbons were within the range of C13-C24 making it equivalent to light oil. GC-MS analysis of lipids produced by the bacterium indicated presence of C15-C20 organic compounds that made it potential source of biodiesel after transesterification. GC-MS, FTIR and NMR spectroscopic characterization of the fatty acid methyl esters revealed the presence of 55% and 45% of unsaturated and saturated organic compounds respectively, thus making it a balanced biodiesel composition.

  4. Evaluation of bioremediation potentiality of ligninolytic Serratia liquefaciens for detoxification of pulp and paper mill effluent.

    PubMed

    Haq, Izharul; Kumar, Sharad; Kumari, Vineeta; Singh, Sudheer Kumar; Raj, Abhay

    2016-03-15

    Due to high pollution load and colour contributing substances, pulp and paper mill effluents cause serious aquatic and soil pollution. A lignin-degrading bacterial strain capable of decolourising Azure-B dye was identified as lignin peroxidase (LiP) producing strain LD-5. The strain was isolated from pulp and paper mill effluent contaminated site. Biochemical and 16S rDNA gene sequence analysis suggested that strain LD-5 belonged to the Serratia liquefaciens. The strain LD-5 effectively reduced pollution parameters (colour 72%, lignin 58%, COD 85% and phenol 95%) of real effluent after 144h of treatment at 30°C, pH 7.6 and 120rpm. Extracellular LiP produced by S. liquefaciens during effluent decolourisation was purified to homogeneity using ammonium sulfate (AMS) precipitation and DEAE cellulose column chromatography. The molecular weight of the purified lignin peroxidase was estimated to be ∼28kDa. Optimum pH and temperature for purified lignin peroxidase activity were determined as pH 6.0 and 40°C, respectively. Detoxified effluent was evaluated for residual toxicity by alkaline single cell (comet) gel electrophoresis (SCGE) assay using Saccharomyces cerevisiae MTCC 36 as model organism. The toxicity reduction to treated effluent was 49.4%. These findings suggest significant potential of S. liquefaciens for bioremediation of pulp and paper mill effluent.

  5. Decarboxylase gene expression and cadaverine and putrescine production by Serratia proteamaculans in vitro and in beef.

    PubMed

    De Filippis, Francesca; Pennacchia, Carmela; Di Pasqua, Rosangela; Fiore, Alberto; Fogliano, Vincenzo; Villani, Francesco; Ercolini, Danilo

    2013-08-01

    Studies of the molecular basis of microbial metabolic activities that are important for the changes in food quality are valuable in order to help in understanding the behavior of spoiling bacteria in food. The growth of a psychrotrophic Serratia proteamaculans strain was monitored in vitro and in artificially inoculated raw beef. Two growth temperatures (25°C and 4°C) were tested in vitro, while growth at 15°C and 4°C was monitored in beef. During growth, the expression of inducible lysine and ornithine-decarboxylase genes was evaluated by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR), while the presence of cadaverine and putrescine was quantified by LC-ESI-MS/MS. The expression of the decarboxylase genes, and the consequent production of cadaverine and putrescine were shown to be influenced by the temperature, as well as by the complexity of the growth medium. Generally, the maximum gene expression and amine production took place during the exponential and early stationary phase, respectively. In addition, lower temperatures caused slower growth and gene downregulation. Higher amounts of cadaverine compared to putrescine were found during growth in beef with the highest concentrations corresponding to microbial loads of ca. 9CFU/g. The differences found in gene expression evaluated in vitro and in beef suggested that such activities are more reliably investigated in situ in specific food matrices.

  6. Mixing and matching siderophore clusters: structure and biosynthesis of serratiochelins from Serratia sp. V4.

    PubMed

    Seyedsayamdost, Mohammad R; Cleto, Sara; Carr, Gavin; Vlamakis, Hera; João Vieira, Maria; Kolter, Roberto; Clardy, Jon

    2012-08-22

    Interrogation of the evolutionary history underlying the remarkable structures and biological activities of natural products has been complicated by not knowing the functions they have evolved to fulfill. Siderophores-soluble, low molecular weight compounds-have an easily understood and measured function: acquiring iron from the environment. Bacteria engage in a fierce competition to acquire iron, which rewards the production of siderophores that bind iron tightly and cannot be used or pirated by competitors. The structures and biosyntheses of "odd" siderophores can reveal the evolutionary strategy that led to their creation. We report a new Serratia strain that produces serratiochelin and an analog of serratiochelin. A genetic approach located the serratiochelin gene cluster, and targeted mutations in several genes implicated in serratiochelin biosynthesis were generated. Bioinformatic analyses and mutagenesis results demonstrate that genes from two well-known siderophore clusters, the Escherichia coli enterobactin cluster and the Vibrio cholera vibriobactin cluster, were shuffled to produce a new siderophore biosynthetic pathway. These results highlight how modular siderophore gene clusters can be mixed and matched during evolution to generate structural diversity in siderophores.

  7. Autophagy enhances bacterial clearance during P. aeruginosa lung infection.

    PubMed

    Junkins, Robert D; Shen, Ann; Rosen, Kirill; McCormick, Craig; Lin, Tong-Jun

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic bacterial pathogen which is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality among cystic fibrosis patients. Although P. aeruginosa is primarily considered an extacellular pathogen, recent reports have demonstrated that throughout the course of infection the bacterium acquires the ability to enter and reside within host cells. Normally intracellular pathogens are cleared through a process called autophagy which sequesters and degrades portions of the cytosol, including invading bacteria. However the role of autophagy in host defense against P. aeruginosa in vivo remains unknown. Understanding the role of autophagy during P. aeruginosa infection is of particular importance as mutations leading to cystic fibrosis have recently been shown to cause a blockade in the autophagy pathway, which could increase susceptibility to infection. Here we demonstrate that P. aeruginosa induces autophagy in mast cells, which have been recognized as sentinels in the host defense against bacterial infection. We further demonstrate that inhibition of autophagy through pharmacological means or protein knockdown inhibits clearance of intracellular P. aeruginosa in vitro, while pharmacologic induction of autophagy significantly increased bacterial clearance. Finally we find that pharmacological manipulation of autophagy in vivo effectively regulates bacterial clearance of P. aeruginosa from the lung. Together our results demonstrate that autophagy is required for an effective immune response against P. aeruginosa infection in vivo, and suggest that pharmacological interventions targeting the autophagy pathway could have considerable therapeutic potential in the treatment of P. aeruginosa lung infection.

  8. Mechanism of resistance to benzalkonium chloride by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Sakagami, Y; Yokoyama, H; Nishimura, H; Ose, Y; Tashima, T

    1989-08-01

    The mechanisms of resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to benzalkonium chloride (BC) were studied. The effluence of cell components was observed in susceptible P. aeruginosa by electron microscopy, but resistant P. aeruginosa seemed to be undamaged. No marked changes in cell surface potential between Escherichia coli NIHJC-2 and a spheroplast strain were found. The contents of phospholipids (PL) and fatty and neutral lipids (FNL) in the cell walls of resistant P. aeruginosa were higher than those in the cell walls of susceptible P. aeruginosa. The amounts of BC adsorbed to PL and FNL of cell walls of BC-resistant P. aeruginosa were lower than those for BC-susceptible P. aeruginosa. Fifteen species of cellular fatty acids were identified by capillary gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The ability of BC to permeate the cell wall was reduced because of the increase in cellular fatty acids. These results suggested that the resistance of P. aeruginosa to BC is mainly a result of increased in the contents of PL and FNL. In resistant P. aeruginosa, the decrease in the amount of BC adsorbed is likely to be the result of increases in the contents of PL and FNL.

  9. Mechanism of resistance to benzalkonium chloride by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Sakagami, Y; Yokoyama, H; Nishimura, H; Ose, Y; Tashima, T

    1989-01-01

    The mechanisms of resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to benzalkonium chloride (BC) were studied. The effluence of cell components was observed in susceptible P. aeruginosa by electron microscopy, but resistant P. aeruginosa seemed to be undamaged. No marked changes in cell surface potential between Escherichia coli NIHJC-2 and a spheroplast strain were found. The contents of phospholipids (PL) and fatty and neutral lipids (FNL) in the cell walls of resistant P. aeruginosa were higher than those in the cell walls of susceptible P. aeruginosa. The amounts of BC adsorbed to PL and FNL of cell walls of BC-resistant P. aeruginosa were lower than those for BC-susceptible P. aeruginosa. Fifteen species of cellular fatty acids were identified by capillary gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The ability of BC to permeate the cell wall was reduced because of the increase in cellular fatty acids. These results suggested that the resistance of P. aeruginosa to BC is mainly a result of increased in the contents of PL and FNL. In resistant P. aeruginosa, the decrease in the amount of BC adsorbed is likely to be the result of increases in the contents of PL and FNL. Images PMID:2506813

  10. [Profiles of the utilization of 20 amino acids as the only source of nitrogen and carbon in bacteria of the genera Klebsiella, Enterobacter, Serratia, Escherichia].

    PubMed

    Sivolodskiĭ, E P

    2005-01-01

    The profiles of the utilization of 20 protein amino acids in 118 Klebsiella pneumoniae sub- sp. pneumoniae, K. oxytoca, K. planticola, K. mobilis, Enterobacter cloacae, Serratia marscescens, S. liquefaciens, Escherichia coli strains isolated from clinical material were studied. The utilization of amino acids was determined on minimal saline agar containing amino acid as the only source of nitrogen and carbon; the results were evaluated after 72-hour incubation at 37 degrees C. 17 profiles of amino-acid utilization were thus determined, most of them genus-specific in enterobacteria: Klebsiella (profiles No. 1--6, 9, 10), Enterobacter (No. 11--13), Serratia (No. 14--16), Escherichia (No. 17). The full coincidence of amino-acid utilization profiles in bacteria of K. mobilis (No. 1, 6) and K. pneumoniae subsp. pneumoniae with out of such profiles in bacteria of the genera Enterobacter, Serratia, Escherichia was established, which confirmed that K. mobilis (formerly Enterobacter aerogenes) belonged to the genus Klebsiella.

  11. Insecticidal potency of bacterial species Bacillus thuringiensis SV2 and Serratia nematodiphila SV6 against larvae of mosquito species Aedes aegypti, Anopheles stephensi, and Culex quinquefasciatus.

    PubMed

    Patil, Chandrashekhar D; Patil, Satish V; Salunke, Bipinchandra K; Salunkhe, Rahul B

    2012-05-01

    The tremendous worldwide efforts to isolate novel mosquito larvicidal bacteria with improved efficacy present significant promise to control vector-borne diseases of public health importance. In the present study, two native bacterial isolates, Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt SV2) and Serratia species (SV6) were evaluated for mosquito larvicidal potential against the early fourth instar larvae of Aedes aegypti, Anopheles stephensi, and Culex quinquefasciatus with reference to B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis (Bti) H 14. The native Gram-positive, spore-forming Bt SV2 isolate showed 100% mortality against early fourth instars of Aedes aegypti, Anopheles stephensi, and Culex quinquefasciatus, in parallel to Bti H14 strain. After 24 h, Bt SV2 showed 98%, 89%, and 80.67%, and Bti H14 showed 92%, 98.33%, and 60% mortality against Aedes aegypti, Anopheles stephensi, and Culex quinquefasciatus, respectively. Serratia SV6 showed highest activity against Culex quinquefasciatus (100%) followed by Anopheles stephensi (95%) and Aedes aegypti (91%) after 48 h of exposure. The Gram-negative Serratia SV6 showed delayed toxicity compared to Bti H14 and Bt SV2 against early fourth instars of Aedes aegypti, Anopheles stephensi, and Culex quinquefasciatus. The relative mortality of all treatments after 12-h exposures showed the varied toxicity with respect to exposure time, bacterial treatment, and mosquito species. Genetic relatedness of the strains was confirmed on the basis of phylogenetic reconstructions based on alignment of 16S rRNA gene sequences which indicated a strong clustering of the strain SV2 with B. thuringiensis and the strain SV6 with Serratia nematodiphila. In conclusion, the native isolate B. thuringiensis SV2 showed significant toxicity while Serratia SV6 showed less and delayed toxicity against several mosquito species compared with BtiH14. They may be used as novel bacterial insecticidal agents in mosquito vector-borne disease control. To our knowledge, this is the

  12. Phytases from Enterobacter and Serratia species with desirable characteristics for food and feed applications.

    PubMed

    Kalsi, Harpreet Kaur; Singh, Rajveer; Dhaliwal, Harcharan Singh; Kumar, Vinod

    2016-06-01

    Phytases are enzymes of great industrial importance with wide range of applications in animal and human nutrition. These catalyze the hydrolysis of phosphomonoester bonds in phytate, thereby releasing lower forms of myo-inositol phosphates and inorganic phosphate. Addition of phytase to plant-based foods can improve its nutritional value and increase mineral bioavailability by decreasing nutritional effect of phytate. In the present investigation, 43 phytase positive bacteria on PSM plates were isolated from different sources and characterized for phytase activity. On the basis of phytase activity and zone of hydrolysis, two bacterial isolates (PSB-15 and PSB-45) were selected for further characterization studies, i.e., pH and temperature optima and stability, kinetic properties and effect of modulators. The phytases from both isolates were optimally active at the pH value from 3 to 8 and in the temperature range of 50-70 °C. Further, the stability of isolates was good in the pH range of 3.0-8.0. Much variation was observed in temperature and storage stability, responses of phytases to metal ions and modulators. The K m and V max values for PSB-15 phytase were 0.48 mM and 0.157 μM/min, while for PSB-45 these were 1.25 mM and 0.140 μM/min, respectively. Based on 16S rDNA gene sequence, the isolates were identified as Serratia sp. PSB-15 (GenBank Accession No. KR133277) and Enterobacter cloacae strain PSB-45 (GenBank Accession No. KR133282). The novel phytases from these isolates have multiple characteristics of high thermostability and good phytase activity at desirable range of pH and temperature for their efficient use in food and feed to facilitate hydrolysis of phytate-metal ion complex and in turn, increased bioavailability of important metal ions to monogastric animals.

  13. Synthesis of Long-Chain Chitooligosaccharides by a Hypertransglycosylating Processive Endochitinase of Serratia proteamaculans 568

    PubMed Central

    Purushotham, Pallinti

    2012-01-01

    We describe the heterologous expression and characterization of a 407-residue single-domain glycosyl hydrolase family 18 chitinase (SpChiD) from Gram-negative Serratia proteamaculans 568 that has unprecedented catalytic properties. SpChiD was optimally active at pH 6.0 and 40°C, where it showed a Km of 83 mg ml−1, a kcat of 3.9 × 102 h−1, and a kcat/Km of 4.7 h mg−1 ml−1 on colloidal chitin. On chitobiose, the Km, kcat, and kcat/Km were 203 μM, 1.3 × 102 h−1, and 0.62 h−1 μM−1, respectively. Hydrolytic activity on chitooligosaccharides (CHOS) and colloidal chitin indicated that SpChiD was an endo-acting processive enzyme, with the unique ability to convert released chitobiose to N-acetylglucosamine, the major end product. SpChiD showed hyper transglycosylation (TG) with trimer-hexamer CHOS substrates, generating considerable amounts of long-chain CHOS. The TG activity of SpChiD was dependent on both the length and concentration of the oligomeric substrate and also on the enzyme concentration. The length and amount of accumulated TG products increased with increases in the length of the substrate and its concentration and decreased with increases in the enzyme concentration. The SpChiD bound to insoluble and soluble chitin substrates despite the absence of accessory domains. Sequence alignments and structural modeling indicated that SpChiD would have a deep substrate-binding groove lined with aromatic residues, which is characteristic of processive enzymes. SpChiD shows a combination of properties that seems rare among family 18 chitinases and that may resemble the properties of human chitotriosidase. PMID:22685288

  14. Social cheating in Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing.

    PubMed

    Sandoz, Kelsi M; Mitzimberg, Shelby M; Schuster, Martin

    2007-10-02

    In a process termed quorum sensing, bacteria use diffusible chemical signals to coordinate cell density-dependent gene expression. In the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, quorum sensing controls hundreds of genes, many of which encode extracellular virulence factors. Quorum sensing is required for P. aeruginosa virulence in animal models. Curiously, quorum sensing-deficient variants, most of which carry a mutation in the gene encoding the central quorum sensing regulator lasR, are frequently isolated from acute and chronic infections. The mechanism for their emergence is not known. Here we provide experimental evidence suggesting that these lasR mutants are social cheaters that cease production of quorum-controlled factors and take advantage of their production by the group. We detected an emerging subpopulation of lasR mutants after approximately 100 generations of in vitro evolution of the P. aeruginosa wild-type strain under culture conditions that require quorum sensing for growth. Under such conditions, quorum sensing appears to impose a metabolic burden on the proliferating bacterial cell, because quorum-controlled genes not normally induced until cessation of growth were highly expressed early in growth, and a defined lasR mutant showed a growth advantage when cocultured with the parent strain. The emergence of quorum-sensing-deficient variants in certain environments is therefore an indicator of high quorum sensing activity of the bacterial population as a whole. It does not necessarily indicate that quorum sensing is insignificant, as has previously been suggested. Thus, novel antivirulence strategies aimed at disrupting bacterial communication may be particularly effective in such clinical settings.

  15. First report of NDM-1-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Zafer, Mai Mahmoud; Amin, Mady; El Mahallawy, Hadir; Ashour, Mohammed Seif El-Din; Al Agamy, Mohamed

    2014-12-01

    This work reports the occurrence of New Delhi metallo-beta-lactamase 1 (NDM-1) in metallo-beta-lactamase-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Egypt for the first time, and the presence of more than one blaMBL gene in carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa.

  16. Oxidation of 1-Tetradecene by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Markovetz, A. J.; Klug, M. J.; Forney, F. W.

    1967-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain Sol 20 was grown on 1-tetradecene as sole carbon source, and a vinyl-unsaturated 14-carbon monocarboxylic acid, 13-tetradecenoic acid, was identified from culture fluid. This acid was not produced when n-tetradecane served as substrate for growth. Oxidation of the methyl group represents one method of attack on the 1-alkene by this organism. Tentative identification of 2-tetradecanol indicates that an attack on the double bond is also occurring. α, ω-Dienes would not support growth. PMID:4962057

  17. Moxalactam therapy of infections caused by cephalothin-resistant bacteria: influence of serum inhibitory activity on clinical response and acquisition of antibiotic resistance during therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Platt, R; Ehrlich, S L; Afarian, J; O'Brien, T F; Pennington, J E; Kass, E H

    1981-01-01

    Thirty patients infected predominantly by Serratia marcescens and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were treated in an open trial with moxalactam, a broad-spectrum beta-lactam antibiotic. Twenty-three (76%) had a satisfactory microbiological or clinical response. Among 25 patients for whom serum inhibitory concentrations were measured, those with favorable microbiological responses had significantly higher values than those with poor responses (reciprocal geometric mean concentrations, 49 versus 4.9; P less than 0.01). A serum inhibitory concentration of greater than 1:8 correlated significantly with a favorable outcome (17 of 18 versus 2 of 7 responses; P less than 0.01). Although the overall clinical efficacy of moxalactam was good, resistant organisms of species identical to those of the original infecting isolates were recovered during therapy in seven cases, including five caused by Pseudomonas organisms and two caused by Serratia organisms. PMID:6458233

  18. Molecular epidemiology of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in an intensive care unit.

    PubMed Central

    Döring, G.; Hörz, M.; Ortelt, J.; Grupp, H.; Wolz, C.

    1993-01-01

    Genotyping was used to analyse Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from sink drains and 15 intubated patients as part of a 3-month prospective study of strain transmission in a medical-surgical intensive care unit. Ninety percent of all washbasin drains were persistently contaminated with several P. aeruginosa genotypes. In 60% (9/15) of the patients, P. aeruginosa colonization or infection was hospital-acquired: P. aeruginosa strains isolated from these patients were present in hospital sinks or in other patients before their admission. Since all patients were immobile, personnel were the probable route of transmission of P. aeruginosa in the hospital. The mechanism of strain transmission from sinks to hands during hand washing was investigated in a children's hospital. When P. aeruginosa was present at densities of > 10(5)/c.f.u. per ml in sink drains, hand washing resulted in hand contamination with P. aeruginosa via aerosol generation in the majority of experiments or P. aeruginosa was detected using an air sampler above the washing basin. High P. aeruginosa cfu were present at 4.30 h in the eight sinks (5.4 x 10(5)-7.0 x 10(10) c.f.u./ml), whereas at 13.00 h P. aeruginosa c.f.u. were significantly lower (3.1 x 10(2)-8.0 x 10(5) c.f.u./ml). These data reveal that the danger of bacterial contamination of hands during hand washing is highest in the morning. The identified transmission routes demand more effective hygienic measures in hospital settings particularly concerning personnel hands and sink drains. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8519308

  19. Imported PER-1 producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa, PER-1 producing Acinetobacter baumanii and VIM-2-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains in Hungary

    PubMed Central

    Szabó, Dora; Szentandrássy, Julia; Juhász, Zsuzsa; Katona, Katalin; Nagy, Károly; Rókusz, László

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumanii are important nosocomial pathogens with wide intrinsic resistance. However, due to the dissemination of the acquired resistance mechanisms, such as extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) and metallo beta-lactamase (MBL) production, multidrug resistant strains have been isolated more often. Case presentation We report a case of a Hungarian tourist, who was initially hospitalized in Egypt and later transferred to Hungary. On the day of admission PER-1-producing P. aeruginosa, PER-1 producing A. baumannii, SHV-5-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae and VIM-2-producing P. aeruginosa isolates were subcultured from the patient's samples in Hungary. Comparing the pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns of the P. aeruginosa strains from the patient to the P. aeruginosa strains occurring in this hospital, we can state that the PER-1-producing P. aeruginosa and VIM-2-producing P. aeruginosa had external origin. Conclusion This is the first report of PER-1-producing P. aeruginosa,and PER-1-producing A. baumanii strains in Hungary. This case highlights the importance of spreading of the beta-lactamase-mediated resistance mechanisms between countries and continents, showing the importance of careful screening and the isolation of patients arriving from a different country. PMID:18513394

  20. Antibacterial activity of sphingoid bases and fatty acids against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Carol L; Drake, David R; Dawson, Deborah V; Blanchette, Derek R; Brogden, Kim A; Wertz, Philip W

    2012-03-01

    There is growing evidence that the role of lipids in innate immunity is more important than previously realized. How lipids interact with bacteria to achieve a level of protection, however, is still poorly understood. To begin to address the mechanisms of antibacterial activity, we determined MICs and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) of lipids common to the skin and oral cavity--the sphingoid bases D-sphingosine, phytosphingosine, and dihydrosphingosine and the fatty acids sapienic acid and lauric acid--against four Gram-negative bacteria and seven Gram-positive bacteria. Exact Kruskal-Wallis tests of these values showed differences among lipid treatments (P < 0.0001) for each bacterial species except Serratia marcescens and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. D-sphingosine (MBC range, 0.3 to 19.6 μg/ml), dihydrosphingosine (MBC range, 0.6 to 39.1 μg/ml), and phytosphingosine (MBC range, 3.3 to 62.5 μg/ml) were active against all bacteria except S. marcescens and P. aeruginosa (MBC > 500 μg/ml). Sapienic acid (MBC range, 31.3 to 375.0 μg/ml) was active against Streptococcus sanguinis, Streptococcus mitis, and Fusobacterium nucleatum but not active against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, S. marcescens, P. aeruginosa, Corynebacterium bovis, Corynebacterium striatum, and Corynebacterium jeikeium (MBC > 500 μg/ml). Lauric acid (MBC range, 6.8 to 375.0 μg/ml) was active against all bacteria except E. coli, S. marcescens, and P. aeruginosa (MBC > 500 μg/ml). Complete killing was achieved as early as 0.5 h for some lipids but took as long as 24 h for others. Hence, sphingoid bases and fatty acids have different antibacterial activities and may have potential for prophylactic or therapeutic intervention in infection.

  1. Biotransformation of myrcene by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Dihydrolinalool and terpineol are sources of fragrances that provide a unique volatile terpenoid alcohol of low toxicity and thus are widely used in the perfumery industry, in folk medicine, and in aromatherapy. They are important chemical constituents of the essential oil of many plants. Previous studies have concerned the biotransformation of limonene by Pseudomonas putida. The objective of this research was to study biotransformation of myrcene by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The culture preparation was done using such variables as different microbial methods and incubation periods to obtain maximum cells of P. aeruginosa for myrcene biotransformation. Results It was found that myrcene was converted to dihydrolinalool and 2,6-dimethyloctane in high percentages. The biotransformation products were identified by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), ultraviolet (UV) analysis, gas chromatography (GC), and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS). Comparison of the different incubation times showed that 3 days was more effective, the major products being 2,6-dimethyloctane (90.0%) and α-terpineol (7.7%) and comprising 97.7%. In contrast, the main compounds derived for an incubation time of 1.5 days were dihydrolinalool (79.5%) and 2,6-dimethyloctane (9.3%), with a total yield of 88.8%. PMID:21609445

  2. Purification of extracellular lipase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Stuer, W; Jaeger, K E; Winkler, U K

    1986-01-01

    Lipase (triacylglycerol acylhydrolase, EC 3.1.1.3) was excreted by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAC1R during the late logarithmic growth phase. Characterization of cell-free culture supernatants by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed the presence of significant amounts of lipopolysaccharide, part of which seemed to be tightly bound to lipase. After concentration of culture supernatants by ultrafiltration, lipase-lipopolysaccharide complexes were dissociated by treatment with EDTA-Tris buffer and subsequent sonication in the presence of the zwitterionic detergent 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio]-1-propanesulfonate. The solubilized lipase was purified by isoelectric focusing in an agarose gel containing the same detergent; the lipase activity appeared in a single peak corresponding to a distinct band in the silver-stained gel. The isoelectric point was 5.8. Analysis of purified lipase by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and scanning revealed an apparent molecular weight of 29,000 and a specific activity of 760 mu kat/mg of protein. Estimations based on these data showed that a single P. aeruginosa cell excreted about 200 molecules of lipase, each having a molecular activity of 2.2 X 10(4) per s. Images PMID:3096967

  3. A Terpene Synthase Is Involved in the Synthesis of the Volatile Organic Compound Sodorifen of Serratia plymuthica 4Rx13

    PubMed Central

    Domik, Dajana; Thürmer, Andrea; Weise, Teresa; Brandt, Wolfgang; Daniel, Rolf; Piechulla, Birgit

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria release a plethora of volatile organic compounds, including compounds with extraordinary structures. Sodorifen (IUPAC name: 1,2,4,5,6,7,8-heptamethyl-3-methylenebicyclo[3.2.1]oct-6-ene) is a recently identified and unusual volatile hydrocarbon that is emitted by the rhizobacterium Serratia plymuthica 4R×13. Sodorifen comprises a bicyclic ring structure solely consisting of carbon and hydrogen atoms, where every carbon atom of the skeleton is substituted with either a methyl or a methylene group. This unusual feature of sodorifen made a prediction of its biosynthetic origin very difficult and so far its biosynthesis is unknown. To unravel the biosynthetic pathway we performed genome and transcriptome analyses to identify candidate genes. One knockout mutant (SOD_c20750) showed the desired negative sodorifen phenotype. Here it was shown for the first time that this gene is indispensable for the synthesis of sodorifen and strongly supports the hypothesis that sodorifen descends from the terpene metabolism. SOD_c20750 is the first bacterial terpene cyclase isolated from Serratia spp. and Enterobacteriales. Homology modeling revealed a 3D structure, which exhibits a functional role of amino acids for intermediate cation stabilization (W325) and putative proton acception (Y332). Moreover, the size and hydrophobicity of the active site strongly indicates that indeed the enzyme may catalyze the unusual compound sodorifen. PMID:27242752

  4. Rhizostabilization of metals in soils using Lupinus luteus inoculated with the metal resistant rhizobacterium Serratia sp. MSMC541.

    PubMed

    El Aafi, N; Brhada, F; Dary, M; Maltouf, A Filali; Pajuelo, E

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this work was to test Lupinus luteus plants, inoculated with metal resistant rhizobacteria, in order to phytostabilise metals in contaminated soils. The resistance to heavy metals of strains isolated from nodules of Lupinus plants was evaluated. The strain MSMC541 showed multi-resistance to several metals (up to 13.3 mM As, 2.2 mM Cd, 2.3 mM Cu, 9 mM Pb and 30 mM Zn), and it was selected for further characterization. Furthermore, this strain was able to biosorb great amounts of metals in cell biomass. 16S rDNA sequencing positioned this strain within the genus Serratia. The presence of arsenic resistance genes was confirmed by southern blot and PCR amplification. A rhizoremediation pot experiment was conducted using Lupinus luteus grown on sand supplemented with heavy metals and inoculated with MSMC541. Plant growth parameters and metal accumulation were determined in inoculated vs. non-inoculated Lupinus luteus plants. The results showed that inoculation with MSMC541 improved the plant tolerance to metals. At the same time, metal translocation to the shoot was significantly reduced upon inoculation. These results suggest that Lupinus luteus plants, inoculated with the metal resistant strain Serratia sp. MSMC541, have a great potential for phytostabilization of metal contaminated soils.

  5. Subinhibitory bismuth-thiols reduce virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chieh-Liang; Domenico, Philip; Hassett, Daniel J; Beveridge, Terry J; Hauser, Alan R; Kazzaz, Jeffrey A

    2002-06-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common pathogen in mechanically ventilated patients and produces a wide array of virulence factors. Bismuth-thiols (BTs) are active in vitro against all bacterial lung pathogens, including P. aeruginosa. The objective of these studies was to examine the biochemical and morphologic effects of sublethal BT concentrations on P. aeruginosa and to evaluate virulence in cell culture. Bismuth-dimercaprol, at a fraction of the minimal inhibitory concentration, reduced alginate expression by 67% in P. aeruginosa, whereas subinhibitory bismuth-ethanedithiol (BisEDT) reduced alginate by 92% in P. syringae. BisEDT effects on lipopolysaccharide content and type III secreted cytoxins were examined by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Subinhibitory BisEDT reduced cell-associated lipopolysaccharide, and inhibited processing of the secreted cytotoxic protein ExoU. BisEDT-induced outer membrane blebbing and aggregation of cytoplasmic material was noted in electron microscopy. Virulence of P. aeruginosa was assessed by adherence to epithelial cells and sensitivity to serum killing. BisEDT inhibited adherence of P. aeruginosa to 16HBE14o- cells by 28% and to a collagen matrix by 53%. BisEDT-treated bacteria were also 100-fold more sensitive to serum bactericidal activity. In summary, low BT concentrations affect P. aeruginosa in a variety of ways, the combination of which may help prevent or resolve respiratory tract infection.

  6. Dynorphin Activates Quorum Sensing Quinolone Signaling in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Zaborina, Olga; Lepine, Francois; Xiao, Gaoping; Valuckaite, Vesta; Chen, Yimei; Li, Terry; Ciancio, Mae; Zaborin, Alex; Petroff, Elaine; Turner, Jerrold R; Rahme, Laurence G; Chang, Eugene; Alverdy, John C

    2007-01-01

    There is now substantial evidence that compounds released during host stress directly activate the virulence of certain opportunistic pathogens. Here, we considered that endogenous opioids might function as such compounds, given that they are among the first signals to be released at multiple tissue sites during host stress. We tested the ability of various opioid compounds to enhance the virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa using pyocyanin production as a biological readout, and demonstrated enhanced virulence when P. aeruginosa was exposed to synthetic (U-50,488) and endogenous (dynorphin) κ-agonists. Using various mutants and reporter strains of P. aeruginosa, we identified involvement of key elements of the quorum sensing circuitry such as the global transcriptional regulator MvfR and the quorum sensing-related quinolone signaling molecules PQS, HHQ, and HQNO that respond to κ-opioids. The in vivo significance of κ-opioid signaling of P. aeruginosa was demonstrated in mice by showing that dynorphin is released from the intestinal mucosa following ischemia/reperfusion injury, activates quinolone signaling in P. aeruginosa, and enhances the virulence of P. aeruginosa against Lactobacillus spp. and Caenorhabditis elegans. Taken together, these data demonstrate that P. aeruginosa can intercept opioid compounds released during host stress and integrate them into core elements of quorum sensing circuitry leading to enhanced virulence. PMID:17367209

  7. Otopathogenic Pseudomonas aeruginosa Enters and Survives Inside Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Rahul; Lisi, Christopher V.; Kumari, Hansi; Grati, M’hamed; Blackwelder, Patricia; Yan, Denise; Jain, Chaitanya; Mathee, Kalai; Weckwerth, Paulo H.; Liu, Xue Z.

    2016-01-01

    Otitis media (OM) is a broad term describing a group of infectious and inflammatory disorders of the middle ear. Despite antibiotic therapy, acute OM can progress to chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM) characterized by ear drum perforation and purulent discharge. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most common pathogen associated with CSOM. Although, macrophages play an important role in innate immune responses but their role in the pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa-induced CSOM is not known. The objective of this study is to examine the interaction of P. aeruginosa with primary macrophages. We observed that P. aeruginosa enters and multiplies inside human and mouse primary macrophages. This bacterial entry in macrophages requires both microtubule and actin dependent processes. Transmission electron microscopy demonstrated that P. aeruginosa was present in membrane bound vesicles inside macrophages. Interestingly, deletion of oprF expression in P. aeruginosa abrogates its ability to survive inside macrophages. Our results suggest that otopathogenic P. aeruginosa entry and survival inside macrophages is OprF-dependent. The survival of bacteria inside macrophages will lead to evasion of killing and this lack of pathogen clearance by phagocytes contributes to the persistence of infection in CSOM. Understanding host–pathogen interaction will provide novel avenues to design effective treatment modalities against OM. PMID:27917157

  8. Interactions between Neutrophils and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Rada, Balázs

    2017-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) affects 70,000 patients worldwide. Morbidity and mortality in CF is largely caused by lung complications due to the triad of impaired mucociliary clearance, microbial infections and chronic inflammation. Cystic fibrosis airway inflammation is mediated by robust infiltration of polymorphonuclear neutrophil granulocytes (PMNs, neutrophils). Neutrophils are not capable of clearing lung infections and contribute to tissue damage by releasing their dangerous cargo. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen causing infections in immunocompromised individuals. P. aeruginosa is a main respiratory pathogen in CF infecting most patients. Although PMNs are key to attack and clear P. aeruginosa in immunocompetent individuals, PMNs fail to do so in CF. Understanding why neutrophils cannot clear P. aeruginosa in CF is essential to design novel therapies. This review provides an overview of the antimicrobial mechanisms by which PMNs attack and eliminate P. aeruginosa. It also summarizes current advances in our understanding of why PMNs are incapable of clearing P. aeruginosa and how this bacterium adapts to and resists PMN-mediated killing in the airways of CF patients chronically infected with P. aeruginosa. PMID:28282951

  9. Mast cells protect against Pseudomonas aeruginosa-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Junkins, Robert D; Carrigan, Svetlana O; Wu, Zhengli; Stadnyk, Andrew W; Cowley, Elizabeth; Issekutz, Thomas; Berman, Jason; Lin, Tong-Jun

    2014-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic pathogen, is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in immune-compromised individuals. Maintaining the integrity of the respiratory epithelium is critical for an effective host response to P. aeruginosa. Given the close spatial relationship between mast cells and the respiratory epithelium, and the importance of tightly regulated epithelial permeability during lung infections, we examined whether mast cells influence airway epithelial integrity during P. aeruginosa lung infection in a mouse model. We found that mast cell-deficient Kit(W-sh)/Kit(W-sh) mice displayed greatly increased epithelial permeability, bacterial dissemination, and neutrophil accumulation compared with wild-type animals after P. aeruginosa infection; these defects were corrected on reconstitution with mast cells. An in vitro Transwell co-culture model further demonstrated that a secreted mast cell factor decreased epithelial cell apoptosis and tumor necrosis factor production after P. aeruginosa infection. Together, our data demonstrate a previously unrecognized role for mast cells in the maintenance of epithelial integrity during P. aeruginosa infection, through a mechanism that likely involves prevention of epithelial apoptosis and tumor necrosis factor production. Our understanding of mechanisms of the host response to P. aeruginosa will open new avenues for the development of successful preventative and treatment strategies.

  10. Environmental Pseudomonads Inhibit Cystic Fibrosis Patient-Derived Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Payel; Davis, Elizabeth; Yu, Fengan; James, Sarah; Wildschutte, Julia H; Wiegmann, Daniel D; Sherman, David H; McKay, Robert M; LiPuma, John J; Wildschutte, Hans

    2017-01-15

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen which is evolving resistance to many currently used antibiotics. While much research has been devoted to the roles of pathogenic P. aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, less is known of its ecological properties. P. aeruginosa dominates the lungs during chronic infection in CF patients, yet its abundance in some environments is less than that of other diverse groups of pseudomonads. Here, we sought to determine if clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa are vulnerable to environmental pseudomonads that dominate soil and water habitats in one-to-one competitions which may provide a source of inhibitory factors. We isolated a total of 330 pseudomonads from diverse habitats of soil and freshwater ecosystems and competed these strains against one another to determine their capacity for antagonistic activity. Over 900 individual inhibitory events were observed. Extending the analysis to P. aeruginosa isolates revealed that clinical isolates, including ones with increased alginate production, were susceptible to competition by multiple environmental strains. We performed transposon mutagenesis on one isolate and identified an ∼14.8-kb locus involved in antagonistic activity. Only two other environmental isolates were observed to carry the locus, suggesting the presence of additional unique compounds or interactions among other isolates involved in outcompeting P. aeruginosa This collection of strains represents a source of compounds that are active against multiple pathogenic strains. With the evolution of resistance of P. aeruginosa to currently used antibiotics, these environmental strains provide opportunities for novel compound discovery against drug-resistant clinical strains.

  11. Effects of simulated Mars conditions on the survival and growth of Escherichia coli and Serratia liquefaciens.

    PubMed

    Berry, Bonnie J; Jenkins, David G; Schuerger, Andrew C

    2010-04-01

    Escherichia coli and Serratia liquefaciens, two bacterial spacecraft contaminants known to replicate under low atmospheric pressures of 2.5 kPa, were tested for growth and survival under simulated Mars conditions. Environmental stresses of high salinity, low temperature, and low pressure were screened alone and in combination for effects on bacterial survival and replication, and then cells were tested in Mars analog soils under simulated Mars conditions. Survival and replication of E. coli and S. liquefaciens cells in liquid medium were evaluated for 7 days under low temperatures (5, 10, 20, or 30 degrees C) with increasing concentrations (0, 5, 10, or 20%) of three salts (MgCl(2), MgSO(4), NaCl) reported to be present on the surface of Mars. Moderate to high growth rates were observed for E. coli and S. liquefaciens at 30 or 20 degrees C and in solutions with 0 or 5% salts. In contrast, cell densities of both species generally did not increase above initial inoculum levels under the highest salt concentrations (10 and 20%) and the four temperatures tested, with the exception that moderately higher cell densities were observed for both species at 10% MgSO(4) maintained at 20 or 30 degrees C. Growth rates of E. coli and S. liquefaciens in low salt concentrations were robust under all pressures (2.5, 10, or 101.3 kPa), exhibiting a general increase of up to 2.5 orders of magnitude above the initial inoculum levels of the assays. Vegetative E. coli cells were maintained in a Mars analog soil for 7 days under simulated Mars conditions that included temperatures between 20 and -50 degrees C for a day/night diurnal period, UVC irradiation (200 to 280 nm) at 3.6 W m(-2) for daytime operations (8 h), pressures held at a constant 0.71 kPa, and a gas composition that included the top five gases found in the martian atmosphere. Cell densities of E. coli failed to increase under simulated Mars conditions, and survival was reduced 1 to 2 orders of magnitude by the interactive

  12. Enhancing the Thermostability of Serratia plymuthica Sucrose Isomerase Using B-Factor-Directed Mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xuguo; Cheng, Sheng; Ai, Yixin; Wu, Jing

    2016-01-01

    The sucrose isomerase of Serratia plymuthica AS9 (AS9 PalI) was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) and characterized. The half-life of AS9 PalI was 20 min at 45°C, indicating that it was unstable. In order to improve its thermostability, six amino acid residues with higher B-factors were selected as targets for site-directed mutagenesis, and six mutants (E175N, K576D, K174D, G176D, S575D and N577K) were designed using the RosettaDesign server. The E175N and K576D mutants exhibited improved thermostability in preliminary experiments, so the double mutant E175N/K576D was constructed. These three mutants (E175N, K576D, E175N/K576D) were characterized in detail. The results indicate that the three mutants exhibit a slightly increased optimal temperature (35°C), compared with that of the wild-type enzyme (30°C). The mutants also share an identical pH optimum of 6.0, which is similar to that of the wild-type enzyme. The half-lives of the E175N, K576D and E175N/K576D mutants were 2.30, 1.78 and 7.65 times greater than that of the wild-type enzyme at 45°C, respectively. Kinetic studies showed that the Km values for the E175N, K576D and E175N/K576D mutants decreased by 6.6%, 2.0% and 11.0%, respectively, and their kcat/Km values increased by 38.2%, 4.2% and 19.4%, respectively, compared with those of the wild-type enzyme. After optimizing the conditions for isomaltulose production at 45°C, we found that the E175N, K576D and E175N/K576D mutants displayed slightly improved isomaltulose yields, compared with the wild-type enzyme. Therefore, the mutants produced in this study would be more suitable for industrial biosynthesis of isomaltulose.

  13. Enhancing the Thermostability of Serratia plymuthica Sucrose Isomerase Using B-Factor-Directed Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Yixin; Wu, Jing

    2016-01-01

    The sucrose isomerase of Serratia plymuthica AS9 (AS9 PalI) was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) and characterized. The half-life of AS9 PalI was 20 min at 45°C, indicating that it was unstable. In order to improve its thermostability, six amino acid residues with higher B-factors were selected as targets for site-directed mutagenesis, and six mutants (E175N, K576D, K174D, G176D, S575D and N577K) were designed using the RosettaDesign server. The E175N and K576D mutants exhibited improved thermostability in preliminary experiments, so the double mutant E175N/K576D was constructed. These three mutants (E175N, K576D, E175N/K576D) were characterized in detail. The results indicate that the three mutants exhibit a slightly increased optimal temperature (35°C), compared with that of the wild-type enzyme (30°C). The mutants also share an identical pH optimum of 6.0, which is similar to that of the wild-type enzyme. The half-lives of the E175N, K576D and E175N/K576D mutants were 2.30, 1.78 and 7.65 times greater than that of the wild-type enzyme at 45°C, respectively. Kinetic studies showed that the Km values for the E175N, K576D and E175N/K576D mutants decreased by 6.6%, 2.0% and 11.0%, respectively, and their kcat/Km values increased by 38.2%, 4.2% and 19.4%, respectively, compared with those of the wild-type enzyme. After optimizing the conditions for isomaltulose production at 45°C, we found that the E175N, K576D and E175N/K576D mutants displayed slightly improved isomaltulose yields, compared with the wild-type enzyme. Therefore, the mutants produced in this study would be more suitable for industrial biosynthesis of isomaltulose. PMID:26886729

  14. A study on a nascent entomopathogenic association between caenorhabditis briggsae and serratia sp.SCBI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abebe-Akele, Feseha

    Life is inconceivable in the absence of interactions which could be cooperative, antagonistic or neutral. Interactions are in constant flux because on one hand it is often difficult to demarcate where one form of interaction ends and the other begins on the other hand what is cooperative at one point in time could evolve into antagonistic or neutral or vice versa. Thus, organisms, as a consequence of mutation, adaptation and natural selection would inevitably enter into natural associations from which they emerge as mutual partners, inveterate enemies or passive cohabitants. Entomopathogenic nematode (EPN) partnerships are tripartite interactions where a nematode-bacteria symbiont duo attacks a third organism -an insect or insect larva-for the mutual benefit of the attacking partners and the detriment of the insect they invade. All three participants in the interaction---the nematode worms with their symbiont bacteria and the target insect host-are among the most ancient, diverse and abundant species on earth, however, these EPN partnerships are not as common as circumstances would suggest. EPN associations, which are arguably at the peak of evolutionary co adaptations, where two primitive forms of life cooperate to take advantage of a larger species are not only fascinating but immensely important for humans. The biological and molecular mechanisms underlying entomopathogenesis have been studied in great detail for decades for their potential as biological control agents against invasive insects. In spite of intense research in The EPN field, the evolutionary history of EPN associations are largely unknown because there are no known intermediate forms. In this thesis, a nascent EPN partnership is described between Caenorhabditid nematodes and Serratia sp. SCBI. Comparative analysis of this association with other EPNs suggests that crucial aspect of EPN associations may be the ability of partners to co-exist without killing each other and that the end results of

  15. Comparison of UVB and UVC irradiation disinfection efficacies on Pseudomonas Aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) biofilm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argyraki, A.; Markvart, M.; Nielsen, Anne; Bjarnsholt, T.; Bjørndal, L.; Petersen, P. M.

    2016-04-01

    Disinfection routines are important in all clinical applications. The uprising problem of antibiotic resistance has driven major research efforts towards alternative disinfection approaches, involving light-based solutions. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) is a common bacterium that can cause skin, soft tissue, lungs, kidney and urinary tract infections. Moreover, it can be found on and in medical equipment causing often cross infections in hospitals. The objective of this study was to test the efficiency, of two different light-based disinfection treatments, namely UVB and UVC irradiation, on P. aeruginosa biofilms at different growth stages. In our experiments a new type of UV light emitting diodes (LEDs) were used to deliver UV irradiation on the biofilms, in the UVB (296nm) and UVC (266nm) region. The killing rate was studied as a function of dose for 24h grown biofilms. The dose was ramped from 72J/m2 to 10000J/m2. It was shown that UVB irradiation was more effective than UVC irradiation in inactivating P. aeruginosa biofilms. No colony forming units (CFU) were observed for the UVB treated biofilms when the dose was 10000 J/m2 (CFU in control sample: 7.5 x 104). UVB irradiation at a dose of 20000J/m2 on mature biofilms (72h grown) resulted in a 3.9 log killing efficacy. The fact that the wavelength of 296nm exists in daylight and has such disinfection ability on biofilms gives new perspectives for applications within disinfection at hospitals.

  16. N-Acyl-l-Homoserine Lactone Autoinducers Control Production of an Extracellular Lipopeptide Biosurfactant Required for Swarming Motility of Serratia liquefaciens MG1

    PubMed Central

    Lindum, P. W.; Anthoni, U.; Christophersen, C.; Eberl, L.; Molin, S.; Givskov, M.

    1998-01-01

    A nonswarming Serratia liquefaciens mutant deficient in serrawettin W2 production was constructed by transposon mutagenesis. Sequence homology indicated that insertion had occurred in gene swrA, which encodes a putative peptide synthetase. Expression of swrA is controlled by quorum sensing. PMID:9829950

  17. Thermal mitigation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    PubMed Central

    O’Toole, Ann; Ricker, Erica B.; Nuxoll, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms infect 2 – 4 % of medical devices upon implantation, resulting in multiple surgeries and increased recovery time due to the very great increase in antibiotic resistance in the biofilm phenotype. This work investigates the feasibility of thermal mitigation of biofilms at physiologically accessible temperatures. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms were cultured to high bacterial density (1.7 × 109 CFU cm−2) and subjected to thermal shocks ranging from 50 °C to 80 °C for durations of 1 to 30 min. The decrease in viable bacteria was closely correlated with an Arrhenius temperature dependence and Weibull-style time dependence, demonstrating up to six orders of magnitude reduction in bacterial load. The bacterial load for films with more conventional initial bacterial densities dropped below quantifiable levels, indicating thermal mitigation as a viable approach to biofilm control. PMID:26371591

  18. The Regulatory Network of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important bacterial model due to its metabolic and pathogenic abilities, which allow it to interact and colonize a wide range of hosts, including plants and animals. In this work we compile and analyze the structure and organization of an experimentally supported regulatory network in this bacterium. Results The regulatory network consists of 690 genes and 1020 regulatory interactions between their products (12% of total genes: 54% sigma and 16% of transcription factors). This complex interplay makes the third largest regulatory network of those reported in bacteria. The entire network is enriched for activating interactions and, peculiarly, self-activation seems to occur more prominent for transcription factors (TFs), which contrasts with other biological networks where self-repression is dominant. The network contains a giant component of 650 genes organized into 11 hierarchies, encompassing important biological processes, such as, biofilms formation, production of exopolysaccharide alginate and several virulence factors, and of the so-called quorum sensing regulons. Conclusions The study of gene regulation in P. aeruginosa is biased towards pathogenesis and virulence processes, all of which are interconnected. The network shows power-law distribution -input degree -, and we identified the top ten global regulators, six two-element cycles, the longest paths have ten steps, six biological modules and the main motifs containing three and four elements. We think this work can provide insights for the design of further studies to cover the many gaps in knowledge of this important bacterial model, and for the design of systems strategies to combat this bacterium. PMID:22587778

  19. Ambroxol interferes with Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qi; Yu, Jialin; Yang, Xiqiang; Wang, Jiarong; Wang, Lijia; Lin, Yayin; Lin, Lihua

    2010-09-01

    The mucolytic agent ambroxol has been reported to interfere with the formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa-derived biofilms in addition to reducing alginate production by undefined mechanisms. Since quorum sensing is a key regulator of virulence and biofilm formation, we examined the effects of ambroxol on P. aeruginosa PAO1 wild-type bacterial clearance rates, adhesion profiles and biofilm formation compared with the quorum sensing-deficient, double-mutant strains DeltalasR DeltarhlR and DeltalasI DeltarhlI. Data presented in this report demonstrated that ambroxol treatment reduced survival rates of the double-mutant strains compared with the wild-type strain in a dose-dependent manner even though the double-mutants had increased adhesion in the presence of ambroxol compared with the wild-type strain. The PAO1 wild-type strain produced a significantly thicker biofilm (21.64+/-0.57 microm) compared with the biofilms produced by the DeltalasR DeltarhlR (7.36+/-0.2 microm) and DeltalasI DeltarhlI (6.62+/-0.31 microm) isolates. Ambroxol treatment reduced biofilm thickness, increased areal porosity, and decreased the average diffusion distance and textual entropy of wild-type and double-mutant strains. However, compared with the double-mutant strains, the changes observed for the wild-type strain were more clearly defined. Finally, ambroxol exhibited significant antagonistic quorum-sensing properties, suggesting that it could be adapted for use clinically in the treatment of cystic fibrosis and to reduce biofilm formation and in the colonisation of indwelling devices.

  20. Isolation of oxidase-negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa from sputum culture.

    PubMed

    Hampton, K D; Wasilauskas, B L

    1979-05-01

    Two isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa lacking characteristic indophenol oxidase were recovered from a sputum specimen. A discussion of the characteristic biochemical tests and antibiograms along with a possible explanation for this phenomenon is presented.

  1. Electrochemically monitoring the antibiotic susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    PubMed

    Webster, Thaddaeus A; Sismaet, Hunter J; Chan, I-ping J; Goluch, Edgar D

    2015-11-07

    The condition of cells in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms was monitored via the electrochemical detection of the electro-active virulence factor pyocyanin in a fabricated microfluidic growth chamber coupled with a disposable three electrode cell. Cells were exposed to 4, 16, and 100 mg L(-1) colistin sulfate after overnight growth. At the end of testing, the measured maximum peak current (and therefore pyocyanin concentration) was reduced by approximately 68% and 82% in P. aeruginosa exposed to 16 and 100 mg L(-1) colistin sulfate, respectively. Samples were removed from the microfluidic chamber, analyzed for viability using staining, and streaked onto culture plates to confirm that the P. aeruginosa cells were affected by the antibiotics. The correlation between electrical signal drop and the viability of P. aeruginosa cells after antibiotic exposure highlights the usefulness of this approach for future low cost antibiotic screening applications.

  2. Acquisition and Role of Molybdate in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Pederick, Victoria G.; Eijkelkamp, Bart A.; Ween, Miranda P.; Begg, Stephanie L.; Paton, James C.

    2014-01-01

    In microaerophilic or anaerobic environments, Pseudomonas aeruginosa utilizes nitrate reduction for energy production, a process dependent on the availability of the oxyanionic form of molybdenum, molybdate (MoO42−). Here, we show that molybdate acquisition in P. aeruginosa occurs via a high-affinity ATP-binding cassette permease (ModABC). ModA is a cluster D-III solute binding protein capable of interacting with molybdate or tungstate oxyanions. Deletion of the modA gene reduces cellular molybdate concentrations and results in inhibition of anaerobic growth and nitrate reduction. Further, we show that conditions that permit nitrate reduction also cause inhibition of biofilm formation and an alteration in fatty acid composition of P. aeruginosa. Collectively, these data highlight the importance of molybdate for anaerobic growth of P. aeruginosa and reveal novel consequences of nitrate reduction on biofilm formation and cell membrane composition. PMID:25172858

  3. Oxylipins produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa promote biofilm formation and virulence

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Eriel; Campos-Gómez, Javier

    2016-01-01

    The oxygenation of unsaturated fatty acids by dioxygenases occurs in all kingdoms of life and produces physiologically important lipids called oxylipins. The biological roles of oxylipins have been extensively studied in animals, plants, algae and fungi, but remain largely unidentified in prokaryotes. The bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa displays a diol synthase activity that transforms several monounsaturated fatty acids into mono- and di-hydroxylated derivatives. Here we show that oxylipins derived from this activity inhibit flagellum-driven motility and upregulate type IV pilus-dependent twitching motility of P. aeruginosa. Consequently, these oxylipins promote bacterial organization in microcolonies, increasing the ability of P. aeruginosa to form biofilms in vitro and in vivo (in Drosophila flies). We also demonstrate that oxylipins produced by P. aeruginosa promote virulence in Drosophila flies and lettuce. Our study thus uncovers a role for prokaryotic oxylipins in the physiology and pathogenicity of bacteria. PMID:27929111

  4. Acquisition and role of molybdate in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Pederick, Victoria G; Eijkelkamp, Bart A; Ween, Miranda P; Begg, Stephanie L; Paton, James C; McDevitt, Christopher A

    2014-11-01

    In microaerophilic or anaerobic environments, Pseudomonas aeruginosa utilizes nitrate reduction for energy production, a process dependent on the availability of the oxyanionic form of molybdenum, molybdate (MoO4 (2-)). Here, we show that molybdate acquisition in P. aeruginosa occurs via a high-affinity ATP-binding cassette permease (ModABC). ModA is a cluster D-III solute binding protein capable of interacting with molybdate or tungstate oxyanions. Deletion of the modA gene reduces cellular molybdate concentrations and results in inhibition of anaerobic growth and nitrate reduction. Further, we show that conditions that permit nitrate reduction also cause inhibition of biofilm formation and an alteration in fatty acid composition of P. aeruginosa. Collectively, these data highlight the importance of molybdate for anaerobic growth of P. aeruginosa and reveal novel consequences of nitrate reduction on biofilm formation and cell membrane composition.

  5. Mechanisms of phagocytosis and host clearance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Lovewell, Rustin R; Patankar, Yash R; Berwin, Brent

    2014-04-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic bacterial pathogen responsible for a high incidence of acute and chronic pulmonary infection. These infections are particularly prevalent in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cystic fibrosis: much of the morbidity and pathophysiology associated with these diseases is due to a hypersusceptibility to bacterial infection. Innate immunity, primarily through inflammatory cytokine production, cellular recruitment, and phagocytic clearance by neutrophils and macrophages, is the key to endogenous control of P. aeruginosa infection. In this review, we highlight recent advances toward understanding the innate immune response to P. aeruginosa, with a focus on the role of phagocytes in control of P. aeruginosa infection. Specifically, we summarize the cellular and molecular mechanisms of phagocytic recognition and uptake of P. aeruginosa, and how current animal models of P. aeruginosa infection reflect clinical observations in the context of phagocytic clearance of the bacteria. Several notable phenotypic changes to the bacteria are consistently observed during chronic pulmonary infections, including changes to mucoidy and flagellar motility, that likely enable or reflect their ability to persist. These traits are likewise examined in the context of how the bacteria avoid phagocytic clearance, inflammation, and sterilizing immunity.

  6. Tracking the immunopathological response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa during respiratory infections

    PubMed Central

    Cigana, Cristina; Lorè, Nicola Ivan; Riva, Camilla; De Fino, Ida; Spagnuolo, Lorenza; Sipione, Barbara; Rossi, Giacomo; Nonis, Alessandro; Cabrini, Giulio; Bragonzi, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Repeated cycles of infections, caused mainly by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, combined with a robust host immune response and tissue injury, determine the course and outcome of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. As the disease progresses, P. aeruginosa adapts to the host modifying dramatically its phenotype; however, it remains unclear whether and how bacterial adaptive variants and their persistence influence the pathogenesis and disease development. Using in vitro and murine models of infection, we showed that P. aeruginosa CF-adaptive variants shaped the innate immune response favoring their persistence. Next, we refined a murine model of chronic pneumonia extending P. aeruginosa infection up to three months. In this model, including CFTR-deficient mice, we unveil that the P. aeruginosa persistence lead to CF hallmarks of airway remodelling and fibrosis, including epithelial hyperplasia and structure degeneration, goblet cell metaplasia, collagen deposition, elastin degradation and several additional markers of tissue damage. This murine model of P. aeruginosa chronic infection, reproducing CF lung pathology, will be instrumental to identify novel molecular targets and test newly tailored molecules inhibiting chronic inflammation and tissue damage processes in pre-clinical studies. PMID:26883959

  7. Mechanisms of phagocytosis and host clearance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Lovewell, Rustin R.; Patankar, Yash R.

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic bacterial pathogen responsible for a high incidence of acute and chronic pulmonary infection. These infections are particularly prevalent in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cystic fibrosis: much of the morbidity and pathophysiology associated with these diseases is due to a hypersusceptibility to bacterial infection. Innate immunity, primarily through inflammatory cytokine production, cellular recruitment, and phagocytic clearance by neutrophils and macrophages, is the key to endogenous control of P. aeruginosa infection. In this review, we highlight recent advances toward understanding the innate immune response to P. aeruginosa, with a focus on the role of phagocytes in control of P. aeruginosa infection. Specifically, we summarize the cellular and molecular mechanisms of phagocytic recognition and uptake of P. aeruginosa, and how current animal models of P. aeruginosa infection reflect clinical observations in the context of phagocytic clearance of the bacteria. Several notable phenotypic changes to the bacteria are consistently observed during chronic pulmonary infections, including changes to mucoidy and flagellar motility, that likely enable or reflect their ability to persist. These traits are likewise examined in the context of how the bacteria avoid phagocytic clearance, inflammation, and sterilizing immunity. PMID:24464809

  8. Resistance to pefloxacin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Michea-Hamzehpour, M; Lucain, C; Pechere, J C

    1991-01-01

    Mechanisms of resistance to pefloxacin were investigated in four isogenic Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains: S (parent isolate; MIC, 2 micrograms/ml), PT1 and PT2 (posttherapy isolates obtained in animals; MICs, 32 and 128 micrograms/ml, respectively), and PT2-r (posttherapy isolate obtained after six in vitro subpassages of PT2; MIC, 32 micrograms/ml). [2-3H]adenine incorporation (indirect evidence of DNA gyrase activity) in EDTA-permeabilized cells was less affected by pefloxacin in PT2 and PT2-r (50% inhibitory concentration, 0.27 and 0.26 microgram/ml, respectively) than it was in S and PT1 (50% inhibitory concentration, 0.04 and 0.05 microgram/ml, respectively). Reduced [14C]pefloxacin labeling of intact cells in strains PT1 and PT2 correlated with more susceptibility to EDTA and the presence of more calcium (P less than 0.05) and phosphorus in the outer membrane fractions. Outer membrane protein analysis showed reduced expression of protein D2 (47 kDa) in strains PT1 and PT2. Other proteins were apparently similar in all strains. The addition of calcium chloride (2 mM) to the sodium dodecyl sulfate-solubilized samples of outer membrane proteins, before heating and Western blotting, probed with monoclonal antibody anti-OmpF showed electrophoretic mobility changes of OmpF in strains PT1 and PT2 which were not seen in strain S. Calcium-induced changes were reversed with ethyleneglycoltetraacetate. Decreased [14C]pefloxacin labeling was further correlated with an altered lipopolysaccharide pattern and increased 3-deoxy-D-mannooctulosonic acid concentration (P less than 0.01). These findings suggested that resistance to pefloxacin is associated with altered DNA gyrase in strain PT2-r, with altered permeability in PT1, and with both mechanisms in PT2. The decreased expression of protein D2 and the higher calcium and lipopolysaccharide contents of the outer membrane could be responsible for the permeability deficiency in P. aeruginosa. Images PMID:1645509

  9. Environmental Pseudomonads Inhibit Cystic Fibrosis Patient-Derived Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Payel; Davis, Elizabeth; Yu, Fengan; James, Sarah; Wildschutte, Julia H.; Wiegmann, Daniel D.; Sherman, David H.; McKay, Robert M.; LiPuma, John J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen which is evolving resistance to many currently used antibiotics. While much research has been devoted to the roles of pathogenic P. aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, less is known of its ecological properties. P. aeruginosa dominates the lungs during chronic infection in CF patients, yet its abundance in some environments is less than that of other diverse groups of pseudomonads. Here, we sought to determine if clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa are vulnerable to environmental pseudomonads that dominate soil and water habitats in one-to-one competitions which may provide a source of inhibitory factors. We isolated a total of 330 pseudomonads from diverse habitats of soil and freshwater ecosystems and competed these strains against one another to determine their capacity for antagonistic activity. Over 900 individual inhibitory events were observed. Extending the analysis to P. aeruginosa isolates revealed that clinical isolates, including ones with increased alginate production, were susceptible to competition by multiple environmental strains. We performed transposon mutagenesis on one isolate and identified an ∼14.8-kb locus involved in antagonistic activity. Only two other environmental isolates were observed to carry the locus, suggesting the presence of additional unique compounds or interactions among other isolates involved in outcompeting P. aeruginosa. This collection of strains represents a source of compounds that are active against multiple pathogenic strains. With the evolution of resistance of P. aeruginosa to currently used antibiotics, these environmental strains provide opportunities for novel compound discovery against drug-resistant clinical strains. IMPORTANCE We demonstrate that clinical CF-derived isolates of P. aeruginosa are susceptible to competition in the presence of environmental pseudomonads. We observed that many diverse environmental strains exhibited varied

  10. Effect of bacteria on survival and growth of Acanthamoeba castellanii.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Ahearn, D G

    1997-04-01

    The growth and survival of Acanthamoeba castellanii in the presence of Gram-negative bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Serratia marcescens, and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia varied with the densities and species of bacteria. All species of bacteria suspended in a buffered saline at densities of 10(5) to 10(6)/ml supported the growth and survival of 10(6)/ml trophozoites of Acanthamoeba castellanii in a buffered saline solution. At densities of bacteria to amoebae of 100:1 or greater, growth and survival of A. castellanii were suppressed, particularly by P. aeruginosa. In an enrichment medium, the rapid growth of most co-inoculated bacteria inhibited the growth and survival of the amoeba.

  11. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Lifestyle: A Paradigm for Adaptation, Survival, and Persistence

    PubMed Central

    Moradali, M. Fata; Ghods, Shirin; Rehm, Bernd H. A.

    2017-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen affecting immunocompromised patients. It is known as the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and as one of the leading causes of nosocomial infections. Due to a range of mechanisms for adaptation, survival and resistance to multiple classes of antibiotics, infections by P. aeruginosa strains can be life-threatening and it is emerging worldwide as public health threat. This review highlights the diversity of mechanisms by which P. aeruginosa promotes its survival and persistence in various environments and particularly at different stages of pathogenesis. We will review the importance and complexity of regulatory networks and genotypic-phenotypic variations known as adaptive radiation by which P. aeruginosa adjusts physiological processes for adaptation and survival in response to environmental cues and stresses. Accordingly, we will review the central regulatory role of quorum sensing and signaling systems by nucleotide-based second messengers resulting in different lifestyles of P. aeruginosa. Furthermore, various regulatory proteins will be discussed which form a plethora of controlling systems acting at transcriptional level for timely expression of genes enabling rapid responses to external stimuli and unfavorable conditions. Antibiotic resistance is a natural trait for P. aeruginosa and multiple mechanisms underlying different forms of antibiotic resistance will be discussed here. The importance of each mechanism in conferring resistance to various antipseudomonal antibiotics and their prevalence in clinical strains will be described. The underlying principles for acquiring resistance leading pan-drug resistant strains will be summarized. A future outlook emphasizes the need for collaborative international multidisciplinary efforts to translate current knowledge into strategies to prevent and treat P. aeruginosa infections while reducing the rate of antibiotic resistance

  12. Why Does the Healthy Cornea Resist Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infection?

    PubMed Central

    Evans, David J.; Fleiszig, Suzanne M. J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To provide our perspective on why the cornea is resistant to infection based on our research results with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Perspective We focus on our current understanding of the interplay between bacteria, tear fluid and the corneal epithelium that determine health as the usual outcome, and propose a theoretical model for how contact lens wear might change those interactions to enable susceptibility to P. aeruginosa infection. Methods Use of “null-infection” in vivo models, cultured human corneal epithelial cells, contact lens-wearing animal models, and bacterial genetics help to elucidate mechanisms by which P. aeruginosa survive at the ocular surface, adheres, and traverses multilayered corneal epithelia. These models also help elucidate the molecular mechanisms of corneal epithelial innate defense. Results and Discussion Tear fluid and the corneal epithelium combine to make a formidable defense against P. aeruginosa infection of the cornea. Part of that defense involves the expression of antimicrobials such as β-defensins, the cathelicidin LL-37, cytokeratin-derived antimicrobial peptides, and RNase7. Immunomodulators such as SP-D and ST2 also contribute. Innate defenses of the cornea depend in part on MyD88, a key adaptor protein of TLR and IL-1R signaling, but the basal lamina represents the final barrier to bacterial penetration. Overcoming these defenses involves P. aeruginosa adaptation, expression of the type three secretion system, proteases, and P. aeruginosa biofilm formation on contact lenses. Conclusion After more than two decades of research focused on understanding how contact lens wear predisposes to P. aeruginosa infection, our working hypothesis places blame for microbial keratitis on bacterial adaptation to ocular surface defenses, combined with changes to the biochemistry of the corneal surface caused by trapping bacteria and tear fluid against the cornea under the lens. PMID:23601656

  13. Evaluation of flagella and flagellin of Pseudomonas aeruginosa as vaccines.

    PubMed

    Campodónico, Victoria L; Llosa, Nicolás J; Grout, Martha; Döring, Gerd; Maira-Litrán, Tomás; Pier, Gerald B

    2010-02-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a serious pathogen in hospitalized, immunocompromised, and cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. P. aeruginosa is motile via a single polar flagellum made of polymerized flagellin proteins differentiated into two major serotypes: a and b. Antibodies to flagella delay onset of infection in CF patients, but whether immunity to polymeric flagella and that to monomeric flagellin are comparable has not been addressed, nor has the question of whether such antibodies might negatively impact Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5) activation, an important component of innate immunity to P. aeruginosa. We compared immunization with flagella and that with flagellin for in vitro effects on motility, opsonic killing, and protective efficacy using a mouse pneumonia model. Antibodies to flagella were superior to antibodies to flagellin at inhibiting motility, promoting opsonic killing, and mediating protection against P. aeruginosa pneumonia in mice. Protection against the flagellar type strains PAK and PA01 was maximal, but it was only marginal against motile clinical isolates from flagellum-immunized CF patients who nonetheless became colonized with P. aeruginosa. Purified flagellin was a more potent activator of TLR5 than were flagella and also elicited higher TLR5-neutralizing antibodies than did immunization with flagella. Antibody to type a but not type b flagella or flagellin inhibited TLR5 activation by whole bacterial cells. Overall, intact flagella appear to be superior for generating immunity to P. aeruginosa, and flagellin monomers might induce antibodies capable of neutralizing innate immunity due to TLR5 activation, but solid immunity to P. aeruginosa based on flagellar antigens may require additional components beyond type a and type b proteins from prototype strains.

  14. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Lifestyle: A Paradigm for Adaptation, Survival, and Persistence.

    PubMed

    Moradali, M Fata; Ghods, Shirin; Rehm, Bernd H A

    2017-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen affecting immunocompromised patients. It is known as the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and as one of the leading causes of nosocomial infections. Due to a range of mechanisms for adaptation, survival and resistance to multiple classes of antibiotics, infections by P. aeruginosa strains can be life-threatening and it is emerging worldwide as public health threat. This review highlights the diversity of mechanisms by which P. aeruginosa promotes its survival and persistence in various environments and particularly at different stages of pathogenesis. We will review the importance and complexity of regulatory networks and genotypic-phenotypic variations known as adaptive radiation by which P. aeruginosa adjusts physiological processes for adaptation and survival in response to environmental cues and stresses. Accordingly, we will review the central regulatory role of quorum sensing and signaling systems by nucleotide-based second messengers resulting in different lifestyles of P. aeruginosa. Furthermore, various regulatory proteins will be discussed which form a plethora of controlling systems acting at transcriptional level for timely expression of genes enabling rapid responses to external stimuli and unfavorable conditions. Antibiotic resistance is a natural trait for P. aeruginosa and multiple mechanisms underlying different forms of antibiotic resistance will be discussed here. The importance of each mechanism in conferring resistance to various antipseudomonal antibiotics and their prevalence in clinical strains will be described. The underlying principles for acquiring resistance leading pan-drug resistant strains will be summarized. A future outlook emphasizes the need for collaborative international multidisciplinary efforts to translate current knowledge into strategies to prevent and treat P. aeruginosa infections while reducing the rate of antibiotic resistance

  15. Secretion of phospholipase C by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Stinson, M W; Hayden, C

    1979-01-01

    The conditions necessary for the secretion of phospholipase C (phosphatidylcholine cholinephosphohydrolase) by Pseudomonas aeruginosa were studied. Enzyme secretion by washed cell suspensions required a carbon source and ammonium, potassium, and calcium ions. The calcium requirement could be substituted by magnesium and strontium but not by copper, manganese, cobalt, or zinc. During growth in liquid medium, cells secreted phospholipase C during late logarithmic and early stationary phases. Secretion was repressed by the addition of inorganic phosphate but not by organic phosphates, glucose, or sodium succinate. Studies with tetracycline indicated that de novo protein synthesis was necessary for the secretion of phospholipase C and that the exoenzyme was not released from a preformed periplasmic pool. Similarly, extraction of actively secreting cells with 0.2 M MgCl2 at pH 8.4 solubilized large quantities of the periplasmic enzyme alkaline phosphatase but insignificant amounts of phospholipase C. Bacteria continued to secrete enzyme for nearly 45 min after the addition of inorganic phosphate or rifampin. Images PMID:114487

  16. Comprehensive transposon mutant library of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Michael A.; Alwood, Ashley; Thaipisuttikul, Iyarit; Spencer, David; Haugen, Eric; Ernst, Stephen; Will, Oliver; Kaul, Rajinder; Raymond, Christopher; Levy, Ruth; Chun-Rong, Liu; Guenthner, Donald; Bovee, Donald; Olson, Maynard V.; Manoil, Colin

    2003-01-01

    We have developed technologies for creating saturating libraries of sequence-defined transposon insertion mutants in which each strain is maintained. Phenotypic analysis of such libraries should provide a virtually complete identification of nonessential genes required for any process for which a suitable screen can be devised. The approach was applied to Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic pathogen with a 6.3-Mbp genome. The library that was generated consists of 30,100 sequence-defined mutants, corresponding to an average of five insertions per gene. About 12% of the predicted genes of this organism lacked insertions; many of these genes are likely to be essential for growth on rich media. Based on statistical analyses and bioinformatic comparison to known essential genes in E. coli, we estimate that the actual number of essential genes is 300-400. Screening the collection for strains defective in two defined multigenic processes (twitching motility and prototrophic growth) identified mutants corresponding to nearly all genes expected from earlier studies. Thus, phenotypic analysis of the collection may produce essentially complete lists of genes required for diverse biological activities. The transposons used to generate the mutant collection have added features that should facilitate downstream studies of gene expression, protein localization, epistasis, and chromosome engineering. PMID:14617778

  17. Comprehensive transposon mutant library of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Michael A; Alwood, Ashley; Thaipisuttikul, Iyarit; Spencer, David; Haugen, Eric; Ernst, Stephen; Will, Oliver; Kaul, Rajinder; Raymond, Christopher; Levy, Ruth; Chun-Rong, Liu; Guenthner, Donald; Bovee, Donald; Olson, Maynard V; Manoil, Colin

    2003-11-25

    We have developed technologies for creating saturating libraries of sequence-defined transposon insertion mutants in which each strain is maintained. Phenotypic analysis of such libraries should provide a virtually complete identification of nonessential genes required for any process for which a suitable screen can be devised. The approach was applied to Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic pathogen with a 6.3-Mbp genome. The library that was generated consists of 30,100 sequence-defined mutants, corresponding to an average of five insertions per gene. About 12% of the predicted genes of this organism lacked insertions; many of these genes are likely to be essential for growth on rich media. Based on statistical analyses and bioinformatic comparison to known essential genes in E. coli, we estimate that the actual number of essential genes is 300-400. Screening the collection for strains defective in two defined multigenic processes (twitching motility and prototrophic growth) identified mutants corresponding to nearly all genes expected from earlier studies. Thus, phenotypic analysis of the collection may produce essentially complete lists of genes required for diverse biological activities. The transposons used to generate the mutant collection have added features that should facilitate downstream studies of gene expression, protein localization, epistasis, and chromosome engineering.

  18. Adherence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to contact lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.J.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to examined the interactions of P. aeruginosa with hydrogel contact lenses and other substrata, and characterize adherence to lenses under various physiological and physicochemical conditions. Isolates adhered to polystyrene, glass, and hydrogel lenses. With certain lens types, radiolabeled cells showed decreased adherence with increasing water content of the lenses, however, this correlation with not found for all lenses. Adherence to rigid gas permeable lenses was markedly greater than adherence to hydrogels. Best adherence occurred near pH 7 and at a sodium chloride concentration of 50 mM. Passive adhesion of heat-killed cells to hydrogels was lower than the adherence obtained of viable cells. Adherence to hydrogels was enhanced by mucin, lactoferrin, lysozyme, IgA, bovine serum albumin, and a mixture of these macromolecules. Adherence to coated and uncoated lenses was greater with a daily-wear hydrogel when compared with an extended-wear hydrogel of similar polymer composition. Greater adherence was attributed to a higher concentration of adsorbed macromolecules on the 45% water-content lens in comparison to the 55% water-content lens.

  19. Iron Depletion Enhances Production of Antimicrobials by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Angela T.; Jones, Jace W.; Ruge, Max A.; Kane, Maureen A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a heritable disease characterized by chronic, polymicrobial lung infections. While Staphylococcus aureus is the dominant lung pathogen in young CF patients, Pseudomonas aeruginosa becomes predominant by adulthood. P. aeruginosa produces a variety of antimicrobials that likely contribute to this shift in microbial populations. In particular, secretion of 2-alkyl-4(1H)-quinolones (AQs) contributes to lysis of S. aureus in coculture, providing an iron source to P. aeruginosa both in vitro and in vivo. We previously showed that production of one such AQ, the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS), is enhanced by iron depletion and that this induction is dependent upon the iron-responsive PrrF small RNAs (sRNAs). Here, we demonstrate that antimicrobial activity against S. aureus during coculture is also enhanced by iron depletion, and we provide evidence that multiple AQs contribute to this activity. Strikingly, a P. aeruginosa ΔprrF mutant, which produces very little PQS in monoculture, was capable of mediating iron-regulated growth suppression of S. aureus. We show that the presence of S. aureus suppresses the ΔprrF1,2 mutant's defect in iron-regulated PQS production, indicating that a PrrF-independent iron regulatory pathway mediates AQ production in coculture. We further demonstrate that iron-regulated antimicrobial production is conserved in multiple P. aeruginosa strains, including clinical isolates from CF patients. These results demonstrate that iron plays a central role in modulating interactions of P. aeruginosa with S. aureus. Moreover, our studies suggest that established iron regulatory pathways of these pathogens are significantly altered during polymicrobial infections. IMPORTANCE Chronic polymicrobial infections involving Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality, as the interplay between these two organisms exacerbates infection. This is in part due to enhanced

  20. Two types of phytases (histidine acid phytase and β-propeller phytase) in Serratia sp. TN49 from the gut of Batocera horsfieldi (coleoptera) larvae.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Yang, Peilong; Huang, Huoqing; Shi, Pengjun; Yuan, Tiezheng; Yao, Bin

    2011-11-01

    Microbial phytases play a major role in the mineralization of organic phosphorous, especially in symbiotic plants and animals. In this study, we identified two types of phytases in Serratia sp. TN49 that was harbored in the gut of Batocera horsfieldi (Coleoptera) larvae. The two phytases, an acidic histidine acid phosphatase (PhyH49) and an alkaline β-propeller phytase (PhyB49), shared low identities with known phytases (61% at most). PhyH49 and PhyB49 produced in Escherichia coli exhibited maximal activities at pH 5.0 (60°C) and pH 7.5-8.0 (45°C), respectively, and are complementary in phytate degradation over the pH range 2.0-9.0. Serratia sp. TN49 harboring both PhyH49 and PhyB49 might make it more adaptive to environment change, corresponding to the evolution trend of microorganism.

  1. A network biology approach to denitrification in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DOE PAGES

    Arat, Seda; Bullerjahn, George S.; Laubenbacher, Reinhard

    2015-02-23

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a metabolically flexible member of the Gammaproteobacteria. Under anaerobic conditions and the presence of nitrate, P. aeruginosa can perform (complete) denitrification, a respiratory process of dissimilatory nitrate reduction to nitrogen gas via nitrite (NO₂), nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N₂O). This study focuses on understanding the influence of environmental conditions on bacterial denitrification performance, using a mathematical model of a metabolic network in P. aeruginosa. To our knowledge, this is the first mathematical model of denitrification for this bacterium. Analysis of the long-term behavior of the network under changing concentration levels of oxygen (O₂), nitrate (NO₃),more » and phosphate (PO₄) suggests that PO₄ concentration strongly affects denitrification performance. The model provides three predictions on denitrification activity of P. aeruginosa under various environmental conditions, and these predictions are either experimentally validated or supported by pertinent biological literature. One motivation for this study is to capture the effect of PO₄ on a denitrification metabolic network of P. aeruginosa in order to shed light on mechanisms for greenhouse gas N₂O accumulation during seasonal oxygen depletion in aquatic environments such as Lake Erie (Laurentian Great Lakes, USA). Simulating the microbial production of greenhouse gases in anaerobic aquatic systems such as Lake Erie allows a deeper understanding of the contributing environmental effects that will inform studies on, and remediation strategies for, other hypoxic sites worldwide.« less

  2. Influence of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa on Exacerbation in Patients with Bronchiectasis

    PubMed Central

    Chawla, Kiran; Vishwanath, Shashidhar; Manu, Mohan K; Lazer, Bernaitis

    2015-01-01

    Background: A majority of the studies done on the western population have shown that Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes many severe infections in patients with bronchiectasis as compared to other pathogens. There is scarcity of similar data from the Asian population. Materials and Methods: A prospective study was undertaken to identify the various pathogens isolated from the respiratory samples of 117 patients with bronchiectasis from south India and to compare the clinicomicrobiological profile of infections caused by P. aeruginosa and other respiratory pathogens. Results: The respiratory pathogens were isolated from 63 (53.8%) patients. P. aeruginosa was the most common isolate (46.0%) followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae (14.3%) and other pathogenic bacteria. Patients included in the P. aeruginosa group had a higher number of exacerbations (p: 0.008), greater number of hospital admissions (p: 0.007), a prolonged hospital stay (p: 0.03), and poor lung function, compared to the patients infected with the non-Pseudomonas group. Conclusion: It is necessary to investigate the etiology of respiratory tract infections among bronchiectasis patients followed by the prompt management of cases diagnosed with P. aeruginosa infections, so as to lower the morbidity and have a better prognosis. PMID:25722615

  3. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Virulence and Therapy: Evolving Translational Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Veesenmeyer, Jeffrey L.; Lisboa, Thiago; Rello, Jordi

    2009-01-01

    Structured abstract Objective Although most reviews of Pseudomonas aeruginosa therapeutics focus on antibiotics currently in use or in the pipeline, we review evolving translational strategies aimed at using virulence factor antagonists as adjuvant therapies. Data Source Current literature regarding P. aeruginosa virulence determinants and approaches that target them, with an emphasis on type III secretion, quorum-sensing, biofilms, and flagella. Data Extraction and Synthesis P. aeruginosa remains one of the most important pathogens in nosocomial infections, with high associated morbidity and mortality. Its predilection to develop resistance to antibiotics and expression of multiple virulence factors contributes to the frequent ineffectiveness of current therapies. Among the many P. aeruginosa virulence determinants that impact infections, type III secretion, quorum sensing, biofilm formation, and flagella have been the focus of much recent investigation. Here we review how increased understanding of these important bacterial structures and processes has enabled the development of novel approaches to inhibit each. These promising translational strategies may lead to the development of adjuvant therapies capable of improving outcomes. Conclusions Adjuvant therapies directed against virulence factors have the potential to improve outcomes in P. aeruginosa infections. PMID:19325463

  4. [Resistance to antibiotics in Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Colombian hospitals].

    PubMed

    Villa, Lina M; Cortés, Jorge A; Leal, Aura L; Meneses, Andrés; Meléndez, Martha P

    2013-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections cause high morbidity and mortality. We performed a descriptive analysis of the rates of antibiotic resistance in isolates of P. aeruginosa in 33 hospitals enrolled in a surveillance network in Colombia. The study was conducted between January 2005 and December 2009 .9905 isolates of P. aeruginosa were identified, (4.9% of all strains). In intensive care units (ICU) P. aeruginosa showed an overall resistance to aztreonam, cefepime , ceftazidime, imipenem, meropenem , and piperacillin / tazobactam of 31.8% , 23.9% , 24.8%, 22.5%, 20.3% and 22.3%, respectively. Resistance rates increased for piperacillin/tazobactam, cefepime, and imipenem; remained unchanged for meropenem; and decreased for aminoglycosides, quinolones and ceftazidime. Resistance to one, two and three or more families of antibiotics was found in 17%, 12.5%, and 32.1%, respectively. In samples collected from the wards, the resistance rate was lower but usually over 10%. Antibiotic resistance in P. aeruginosa isolates in hospitalized patients and particularly in those admitted to ICUs in Colombia is high.

  5. Gold-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles restrict growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Niemirowicz, Katarzyna; Swiecicka, Izabela; Wilczewska, Agnieszka Z; Misztalewska, Iwona; Kalska-Szostko, Beata; Bienias, Kamil; Bucki, Robert; Car, Halina

    2014-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) and their derivatives (aminosilane and gold-coated) have been widely investigated in numerous medical applications, including their potential to act as antibacterial drug carriers that may penetrate into bacteria cells and biofilm mass. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a frequent cause of infection in hospitalized patients, and significant numbers of currently isolated clinical strains are resistant to standard antibiotic therapy. Here we describe the impact of three types of SPIONs on the growth of P. aeruginosa during long-term bacterial culture. Their size, structure, and physicochemical properties were determined using transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. We observed significant inhibition of P. aeruginosa growth in bacterial cultures continued over 96 hours in the presence of gold-functionalized nanoparticles (Fe₃O₄@Au). At the 48-hour time point, growth of P. aeruginosa, as assessed by the number of colonies grown from treated samples, showed the highest inhibition (decreased by 40%). These data provide strong evidence that Fe₃O₄@Au can dramatically reduce growth of P. aeruginosa and provide a platform for further study of the antibacterial activity of this nanomaterial.

  6. The Genomic Basis of Evolutionary Innovation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Andreas; MacLean, R. Craig

    2016-01-01

    Novel traits play a key role in evolution, but their origins remain poorly understood. Here we address this problem by using experimental evolution to study bacterial innovation in real time. We allowed 380 populations of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to adapt to 95 different carbon sources that challenged bacteria with either evolving novel metabolic traits or optimizing existing traits. Whole genome sequencing of more than 80 clones revealed profound differences in the genetic basis of innovation and optimization. Innovation was associated with the rapid acquisition of mutations in genes involved in transcription and metabolism. Mutations in pre-existing duplicate genes in the P. aeruginosa genome were common during innovation, but not optimization. These duplicate genes may have been acquired by P. aeruginosa due to either spontaneous gene amplification or horizontal gene transfer. High throughput phenotype assays revealed that novelty was associated with increased pleiotropic costs that are likely to constrain innovation. However, mutations in duplicate genes with close homologs in the P. aeruginosa genome were associated with low pleiotropic costs compared to mutations in duplicate genes with distant homologs in the P. aeruginosa genome, suggesting that functional redundancy between duplicates facilitates innovation by buffering pleiotropic costs. PMID:27149698

  7. The Genomic Basis of Evolutionary Innovation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Toll-Riera, Macarena; San Millan, Alvaro; Wagner, Andreas; MacLean, R Craig

    2016-05-01

    Novel traits play a key role in evolution, but their origins remain poorly understood. Here we address this problem by using experimental evolution to study bacterial innovation in real time. We allowed 380 populations of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to adapt to 95 different carbon sources that challenged bacteria with either evolving novel metabolic traits or optimizing existing traits. Whole genome sequencing of more than 80 clones revealed profound differences in the genetic basis of innovation and optimization. Innovation was associated with the rapid acquisition of mutations in genes involved in transcription and metabolism. Mutations in pre-existing duplicate genes in the P. aeruginosa genome were common during innovation, but not optimization. These duplicate genes may have been acquired by P. aeruginosa due to either spontaneous gene amplification or horizontal gene transfer. High throughput phenotype assays revealed that novelty was associated with increased pleiotropic costs that are likely to constrain innovation. However, mutations in duplicate genes with close homologs in the P. aeruginosa genome were associated with low pleiotropic costs compared to mutations in duplicate genes with distant homologs in the P. aeruginosa genome, suggesting that functional redundancy between duplicates facilitates innovation by buffering pleiotropic costs.

  8. Use of an ultraviolet light at point-of-dispense faucet to eliminate Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Gerba, Charles P

    2015-05-01

    Tap water is believed to be a significant source of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in health care environments. This study evaluated an ultraviolet (UV) light point-of-dispense water treatment system for control of P aeruginosa. No P aeruginosa was detected in 30 different water dispensers in which the UV light device had been operating for 1-34 months. In comparison, P aeruginosa was found in other taps that did not feature this UV light system.

  9. Ambroxol inhibits mucoid conversion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and contributes to the bactericidal activity of ciprofloxacin against mucoid P. aeruginosa biofilms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenlei; Yu, Jialin; He, Yu; Wang, Zhengli; Li, Fang

    2016-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen that can cause severe infections in immunocompromised individuals. Because it forms biofilms, which protect against host immune attack and increase resistance to conventional antibiotics, mucoid P. aeruginosa is nearly impossible to eradicate. Moreover, mucoid conversion of P. aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients leads to poor outcomes. This conversion is mainly due to mucA gene mutation, which is thought to be induced by polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and the reactive oxygen species they release. Ambroxol, a mucolytic agent with antioxidant characteristics, is used clinically, and this compound has recently been demonstrated to possess anti-biofilm properties. In this study, we found that ambroxol inhibits the H2 O2 -mediated conversion of P. aeruginosa from a non-mucoid to a mucoid phenotype, an effect that is due to its antioxidant property against H2 O2 . Furthermore, the bactericidal activity of ciprofloxacin against mucoid P. aeruginosa biofilms was increased in vitro when used in combination with ambroxol.

  10. Subtilase SprP exerts pleiotropic effects in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Pelzer, Alexander; Polen, Tino; Funken, Horst; Rosenau, Frank; Wilhelm, Susanne; Bott, Michael; Jaeger, Karl-Erich

    2014-01-01

    The open reading frame PA1242 in the genome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 encodes a putative protease belonging to the peptidase S8 family of subtilases. The respective enzyme termed SprP consists of an N-terminal signal peptide and a so-called S8 domain linked by a domain of unknown function (DUF). Presumably, this DUF domain defines a discrete class of Pseudomonas proteins as homologous domains can be identified almost exclusively in proteins of the genus Pseudomonas. The sprP gene was expressed in Escherichia coli and proteolytic activity was demonstrated. A P. aeruginosa ΔsprP mutant was constructed and its gene expression pattern compared to the wild-type strain by genome microarray analysis revealing altered expression levels of 218 genes. Apparently, SprP is involved in regulation of a variety of different cellular processes in P. aeruginosa including pyoverdine synthesis, denitrification, the formation of cell aggregates, and of biofilms. PMID:24376018

  11. Sphingoid long chain bases prevent lung infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Pewzner-Jung, Yael; Tavakoli Tabazavareh, Shaghayegh; Grassmé, Heike; Becker, Katrin Anne; Japtok, Lukasz; Steinmann, Jörg; Joseph, Tammar; Lang, Stephan; Tuemmler, Burkhard; Schuchman, Edward H; Lentsch, Alex B; Kleuser, Burkhard; Edwards, Michael J; Futerman, Anthony H; Gulbins, Erich

    2014-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis patients and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, trauma, burn wound, or patients requiring ventilation are susceptible to severe pulmonary infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Physiological innate defense mechanisms against this pathogen, and their alterations in lung diseases, are for the most part unknown. We now demonstrate a role for the sphingoid long chain base, sphingosine, in determining susceptibility to lung infection by P. aeruginosa. Tracheal and bronchial sphingosine levels were significantly reduced in tissues from cystic fibrosis patients and from cystic fibrosis mouse models due to reduced activity of acid ceramidase, which generates sphingosine from ceramide. Inhalation of mice with sphingosine, with a sphingosine analog, FTY720, or with acid ceramidase rescued susceptible mice from infection. Our data suggest that luminal sphingosine in tracheal and bronchial epithelial cells prevents pulmonary P. aeruginosa infection in normal individuals, paving the way for novel therapeutic paradigms based on inhalation of acid ceramidase or of sphingoid long chain bases in lung infection. PMID:25085879

  12. Subtilase SprP exerts pleiotropic effects in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Pelzer, Alexander; Polen, Tino; Funken, Horst; Rosenau, Frank; Wilhelm, Susanne; Bott, Michael; Jaeger, Karl-Erich

    2014-02-01

    The open reading frame PA1242 in the genome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 encodes a putative protease belonging to the peptidase S8 family of subtilases. The respective enzyme termed SprP consists of an N-terminal signal peptide and a so-called S8 domain linked by a domain of unknown function (DUF). Presumably, this DUF domain defines a discrete class of Pseudomonas proteins as homologous domains can be identified almost exclusively in proteins of the genus Pseudomonas. The sprP gene was expressed in Escherichia coli and proteolytic activity was demonstrated. A P. aeruginosa ∆sprP mutant was constructed and its gene expression pattern compared to the wild-type strain by genome microarray analysis revealing altered expression levels of 218 genes. Apparently, SprP is involved in regulation of a variety of different cellular processes in P. aeruginosa including pyoverdine synthesis, denitrification, the formation of cell aggregates, and of biofilms.

  13. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm, a programmed bacterial life for fitness.

    PubMed

    Lee, Keehoon; Yoon, Sang Sun

    2017-03-17

    Biofilm is a community of microbes that typically inhabits on surfaces and is encased in an extracellular matrix. Biofilms display very dissimilar characteristics to their planktonic counterparts. Biofilms are ubiquitous in the environments and influence our life tremendously in both positive and negative ways. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a bacterium, known to produce robust biofilms. P. aeruginosa biofilms cause severe problems in immunocompromised patients including those with cystic fibrosis or wound infection. Moreover, the unique biofilm properties further complicates the eradication of the biofilm infection and leading to the development of chronic infections. In this review, we discuss a history of biofilm research and general characteristics of bacterial biofilms. Then, distinct features pertaining to each stage of P. aeruginosa biofilm development are highlighted. Furthermore, infections caused by biofilms of its own or in association with other bacterial species (i.e., multi-species biofilms) are discussed in detail.

  14. Anionic fluoroquinolones as antibacterials against biofilm-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Long, Timothy E; Keding, Lexie C; Lewis, Demetria D; Anstead, Michael I; Withers, T Ryan; Yu, Hongwei D

    2016-02-15

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common biofilm-forming bacterial pathogen implicated in diseases of the lungs. The extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) of respiratory Pseudomonas biofilms are largely comprised of anionic molecules such as rhamnolipids and alginate that promote a mucoid phenotype. In this Letter, we examine the ability of negatively-charged fluoroquinolones to transverse the EPS and inhibit the growth of mucoid P. aeruginosa. Anionic fluoroquinolones were further compared with standard antibiotics via a novel microdiffusion assay to evaluate drug penetration through pseudomonal alginate and respiratory mucus from a patient with cystic fibrosis.

  15. A case of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa commercial tattoo infection.

    PubMed

    Maloberti, A; Betelli, M; Perego, M R; Foresti, S; Scarabelli, G; Grassi, G

    2015-11-18

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic Gram-negative bacterium that can cause disease in immunocompromised patients but also burn wounds and other cutaneous infections. We report the case of a 31 years old woman with a P. Aeruginosa commercial tattoo infection treated with intravenous antibiotic therapy. Today tattooing is increasingly common and despite specific regulations many cases of tattoo site infection are reported in the literature. Principal actual tattoo infective epidemiology includes Streptococcus pyogenes, Staphylococcus aureus and mycosis infections and parenteral transmission of HIV, HBV and HCV but also recently published cases of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus and non tuberculous mycobacterium tattoo infection.

  16. Accelerated corrosion of 2205 duplex stainless steel caused by marine aerobic Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dake; Xia, Jin; Zhou, Enze; Zhang, Dawei; Li, Huabing; Yang, Chunguang; Li, Qi; Lin, Hai; Li, Xiaogang; Yang, Ke

    2017-02-01

    Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) of 2205 duplex stainless steel (DSS) in the presence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was investigated through electrochemical and surface analyses. The electrochemical results showed that P. aeruginosa significantly reduced the corrosion resistance of 2205 DSS. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) images showed that the depths of the largest pits on 2205 DSS with and without P. aeruginosa were 14.0 and 4.9μm, respectively, indicating that the pitting corrosion was accelerated by P. aeruginosa. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results revealed that CrO3 and CrN formed on the 2205 DSS surface in the presence of P. aeruginosa.

  17. Biosynthesis of the antifungal haterumalide, oocydin A, in Serratia, and its regulation by quorum sensing, RpoS and Hfq

    PubMed Central

    Matilla, Miguel A; Leeper, Finian J; Salmond, George P C

    2015-01-01

    Polyketides represent an important class of bioactive natural products with a broad range of biological activities. We identified recently a large trans-acyltransferase (AT) polyketide synthase gene cluster responsible for the biosynthesis of the antifungal, anti-oomycete and antitumor haterumalide, oocydin A (ooc). Using genome sequencing and comparative genomics, we show that the ooc gene cluster is widespread within biocontrol and phytopathogenic strains of the enterobacteria, Serratia and Dickeya. The analysis of in frame deletion mutants confirmed the role of a hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase cassette, three flavin-dependent tailoring enzymes, a free-standing acyl carrier protein and two hypothetical proteins in oocydin A biosynthesis. The requirement of the three trans-acting AT domains for the biosynthesis of the macrolide was also demonstrated. Expression of the ooc gene cluster was shown to be positively regulated by an N-acyl-L-homoserine lactone-based quorum sensing system, but operating in a strain-dependent manner. At a post-transcriptional level, the RNA chaperone, Hfq, plays a key role in oocydin A biosynthesis. The Hfq-dependent regulation is partially mediated by the stationary phase sigma factor, RpoS, which was also shown to positively regulate the synthesis of the macrolide. Our results reveal differential regulation of the divergently transcribed ooc transcriptional units, highlighting the complexity of oocydin A production. PMID:25753587

  18. Identification and characterization of a heat-resistant protease from Serratia liquefaciens isolated from Brazilian cold raw milk.

    PubMed

    Machado, Solimar Gonçalves; Heyndrickx, Marc; De Block, Jan; Devreese, Bart; Vandenberghe, Isabel; Vanetti, Maria Cristina Dantas; Van Coillie, Els

    2016-04-02

    The cold storage of raw milk before heat treatment in dairy industry promotes the growth of psychrotrophic microorganisms, which are known for their ability to produce heat-resistant proteolytic enzymes. Although Pseudomonas is described as the main causative genus for high proteolytic spoilage potential in dairy products, Serratia liquefaciens secretes proteases and may be found in raw milk samples as well. However, at the present there is no information about the proteolytic spoilage potential of S. liquefaciens in milk after heat-treatment. The main aim of this research was to assess the proteolytic spoilage potential of S. liquefaciens isolated from Brazilian raw milk and to characterize the involved protease. S. liquefaciens was shown to secrete one heat-resistant spoilage metalloprotease of, approximately, 52 kDa encoded by the ser2 gene. The heat-resistance of Ser2 was similar to the aprX encoded metalloprotease produced by Pseudomonas. Although the ser2 gene was detected in all S. liquefaciens isolates tested in this study, the proteolytic activity of the isolates in milk was highly heterogeneous. Since nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences of ser2 of all tested isolates are identical, this heterogeneity may be attributed to differences in enzyme expression levels or post-translational modifications.

  19. Molybdenum reduction to molybdenum blue in Serratia sp. Strain DRY5 is catalyzed by a novel molybdenum-reducing enzyme.

    PubMed

    Shukor, M Y; Halmi, M I E; Rahman, M F A; Shamaan, N A; Syed, M A

    2014-01-01

    The first purification of the Mo-reducing enzyme from Serratia sp. strain DRY5 that is responsible for molybdenum reduction to molybdenum blue in the bacterium is reported. The monomeric enzyme has an apparent molecular weight of 105 kDalton. The isoelectric point of this enzyme was 7.55. The enzyme has an optimum pH of 6.0 and maximum activity between 25 and 35°C. The Mo-reducing enzyme was extremely sensitive to temperatures above 50°C (between 54 and 70°C). A plot of initial rates against substrate concentrations at 15 mM 12-MP registered a V max for NADH at 12.0 nmole Mo blue/min/mg protein. The apparent K m for NADH was 0.79 mM. At 5 mM NADH, the apparent V max and apparent K m values for 12-MP of 12.05 nmole/min/mg protein and 3.87 mM, respectively, were obtained. The catalytic efficiency (k cat/K m ) of the Mo-reducing enzyme was 5.47 M(-1) s(-1). The purification of this enzyme could probably help to solve the phenomenon of molybdenum reduction to molybdenum blue first reported in 1896 and would be useful for the understanding of the underlying mechanism in molybdenum bioremediation involving bioreduction.

  20. Pseudomonas aeruginosa facilitates Campylobacter jejuni growth in biofilms under oxic flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Culotti, Alessandro; Packman, Aaron I

    2015-12-01

    We investigated the growth of Campylobacter jejuni in biofilms with Pseudomonas aeruginosa under oxic flow conditions. We observed the growth of C. jejuni in mono-culture, deposited on pre-established P. aeruginosa biofilms, and co-inoculated with P. aeruginosa. In mono-culture, C. jejuni was unable to form biofilms. However, deposited C. jejuni continuously grew on pre-established P. aeruginosa biofilms for a period of 3 days. The growth of scattered C. jejuni clusters was strictly limited to the P. aeruginosa biofilm surface, and no intergrowth was observed. Co-culturing of C. jejuni and P. aeruginosa also enabled the growth of both organisms in biofilms, with C. jejuni clusters developing on the surface of the P. aeruginosa biofilm. Dissolved oxygen (DO) measurements in the medium showed that P. aeruginosa biofilms depleted the effluent DO from 9.0 to 0.5 mg L(-1) 24 hours after inoculation. The localized microaerophilic environment generated by P. aeruginosa promoted the persistence and growth of C. jejuni. Our findings show that P. aeruginosa not only prolongs the survival of C. jejuni under oxic conditions, but also enables the growth of C. jejuni on the surface of P. aeruginosa biofilms.

  1. Lipopolysaccharide induced acute red eye and corneal ulcers.

    PubMed

    Schultz, C L; Morck, D W; McKay, S G; Olson, M E; Buret, A

    1997-01-01

    Using a new animal model, the aims of this study were to assess the role played by purified lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and neutrophils in the pathogenesis of acute red-eye reactions (ARE) and corneal ulcers. In addition, IL-1 alpha was assessed for its implications in the formation of corneal ulcers. Following corneal abrasion, eyes of rabbits underwent single or double exposures to various doses of LPS from Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Serratia marcescens. This protocol induced ARE symptoms, and their severity depended on the dosage, number of LPS exposures, and type of LPS used (LPS from S. marcescens showing highest virulence). Corneal ulcers were induced by delivering a high dose of Serratia LPS (100 micrograms) followed by a low dose (10 micrograms). Histopathological examination revealed that both ARE and corneal ulceration were associated with prominent neutrophil infiltration. In addition, many lymphocytes and other monocytic cells infiltrated ulcerated ocular tissue. Tear fluids obtained from ulcerated eyes contained high concentrations of a protein recognized by anti-rabbit IL-1 alpha antibodies as demonstrated by immunoblotting studies. The results indicate that LPS can induce ARE and corneal ulceration in the absence of any live bacteria. Moreover, the findings implicate the accumulation of neutrophils and IL-1 alpha-related proteins in the pathogenesis of ARE and corneal ulcers.

  2. Infectious Risk Assessment of Unsafe Handling Practices and Management of Clinical Solid Waste

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Md. Sohrab; Rahman, Nik Norulaini Nik Ab; Balakrishnan, Venugopal; Puvanesuaran, Vignesh R.; Sarker, Md. Zaidul Islam; Kadir, Mohd Omar Ab

    2013-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine the bacterial agents present in various clinical solid wastes, general waste and clinical sharp waste. The waste was collected from different wards/units in a healthcare facility in Penang Island, Malaysia. The presence of bacterial agents in clinical and general waste was determined using the conventional bacteria identification methods. Several pathogenic bacteria including opportunistic bacterial agent such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella spp., Klebsiella pneumoniae, Serratia marcescens, Acinetobacter baumannii, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Enterococcus faecalis, Streptococcus pyogenes were detected in clinical solid wastes. The presence of specific pathogenic bacterial strains in clinical sharp waste was determined using 16s rDNA analysis. In this study, several nosocomial pathogenic bacteria strains of Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, Lysinibacillus sphaericus, Serratia marcescens, and Staphylococcus aureus were detected in clinical sharp waste. The present study suggests that waste generated from healthcare facilities should be sterilized at the point of generation in order to eliminate nosocomial infections from the general waste or either of the clinical wastes. PMID:23435587

  3. Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Endocarditis in Acute Myeloid Leukemia: A Rare Complication

    PubMed Central

    J, Barshay; A, Nemets; A, Ducach; G, Lugassy

    2008-01-01

    Infectious endocarditis is a rarely encountered complication among leukemia patient during induction therapy. We describe a young patient who developed prolonged high fever after aggressive chemotherapy for Acute Myeloid Leukemia. Pseudomonas Aeruginosa endocarditis was found to be the etiology for the febrile state. Our purpose is to emphasize the need for an early diagnosis of this rare, albeit treatable complication. PMID:23675106

  4. [Hospital infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Significance in intensive therapy].

    PubMed

    Sidorenko, S V; Gel'fand, E B; Mamontova, O A

    1999-01-01

    The significance of P. aeruginosa as an agent of hospital infections in intensive care departments is determined by high prevalence of this microorganism, its natural and acquired resistance to antibiotics of various groups, and severity of the infection it induces. The resistance of P. aeruginosa to antibiotics is different in different regions. Among the strains isolated in Moscow in intensive care wards for newborns 9% were resistant to meropenem, 10% to amicacine, 15% to imipramine, 16% to cefepime, 37% to ceftasidime, 45% to piperacylline/tasobactam, 45% to ciprofloxacine, and 60% to gentamicin; 1.5% of these strains were resistant to all tested antibiotics. High prevalence of antibiotic resistance among P. aeruginosa impedes the choice of drugs for empirical antibiotic therapy and increases the significance of microbiological diagnosis. Even if an agent is sensitive to such antibiotics as semisynthetic penicillines and aminoglycosides, their use as monotherapy in infections caused by P. aeruginosa is ineffective. Carbapenemes, III- IV generations cefalosporines, and fluoroquinolones can be used as mono therapy.

  5. Inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation on wound dressings

    PubMed Central

    Brandenburg, Kenneth S.; Calderon, Diego F.; Kierski, Patricia R.; Brown, Amanda L.; Shah, Nihar M.; Abbott, Nicholas L.; Schurr, Michael J.; Murphy, Christopher J.; McAnulty, Jonathan F.; Czuprynski, Charles J.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic non-healing skin wounds often contain bacterial biofilms that prevent normal wound healing and closure and present challenges to the use of conventional wound dressings. We investigated inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation, a common pathogen of chronic skin wounds, on a commercially available biological wound dressing. Building upon prior reports, we examined whether the amino acid tryptophan would inhibit P. aeruginosa biofilm formation on the 3-dimensional surface of the biological dressing. Bacterial biomass and biofilm polysaccharides were quantified using crystal violet staining or an enzyme linked lectin, respectively. Bacterial cells and biofilm matrix adherent to the wound dressing were visualized through scanning electron microscopy. D-/L-tryptophan inhibited P. aeruginosa biofilm formation on the wound dressing in a dose dependent manner and was not directly cytotoxic to immortalized human keratinocytes although there was some reduction in cellular metabolism or enzymatic activity. More importantly, D-/L-tryptophan did not impair wound healing in a splinted skin wound murine model. Furthermore, wound closure was improved when D-/L-tryptophan treated wound dressing with P. aeruginosa biofilms were compared with untreated dressings. These findings indicate that tryptophan may prove useful for integration into wound dressings to inhibit biofilm formation and promote wound healing. PMID:26342168

  6. Genetic characterization of Microcystis aeruginosa isolates from Portuguese freshwater systems.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Cristiana; Vasconcelos, Vitor; Antunes, Agostinho

    2016-07-01

    Cyanobacteria are microorganisms that pose a serious threat to the aquatic waterways through the production of dense blooms under eutrophic conditions and the release of toxic secondary metabolites-cyanotoxins. Within cyanobacteria, the colonial planktonic Microcystis aeruginosa is widely distributed in both fresh and brackish aquatic environments throughout the world being frequently observed in the Portuguese water systems. Apart from the well-established distribution of M. aeruginosa in Portugal, knowledge of its genetic diversity and population structure is unknown. Therefore, in this study twenty-seven strains were obtained from the North, Centre and South regions of Portugal and were subjected to extensive phylogenetic analyses using simultaneously four distinct genetic markers (16S rRNA, 16S-23S ITS, DNA gyrase subunit ß and cell division protein (ftsZ)) encompassing in total 2834 bp. With this work we characterized the phylogenetic relationship among the Portuguese strains, with the southern strains showing higher genetic structure relatively to the North and Centre strains. A total of fifteen genotypes were determined for M. aeruginosa in Portuguese water systems revealing a high genetic diversity. This is also the first study to report geographic variation on the population structure of the Portuguese M. aeruginosa.

  7. Pseudomonas aeruginosa sepsis in stem cell transplantation patients.

    PubMed

    Fanci, Rosa; Pecile, Patrizia; Casalone, Enrico; Mengoni, Alessio; Tamburini, Elena; Guidi, Stefano; Cecconi, Daniela; Bosi, Alberto; Nicoletti, Pierluigi; Mastromei, Giorgio

    2006-07-01

    We report the epidemiological investigation of an outbreak of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in 6 patients who shared, during different periods, the same 2 rooms of a bone marrow transplantation unit. Phenotypic and molecular analysis of isolates from patients and from the environment strongly suggested a single, environmental source of infection.

  8. 7-fluoroindole as an antivirulence compound against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin-Hyung; Kim, Yong-Guy; Cho, Moo Hwan; Kim, Jung-Ae; Lee, Jintae

    2012-04-01

    The emergence of antibiotic resistance has necessitated new therapeutic approaches for combating persistent bacterial infection. An alternative approach is regulation of bacterial virulence instead of growth suppression, which can readily lead to drug resistance. The virulence of the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa depends on a large number of extracellular factors and biofilm formation. Thirty-one natural and synthetic indole derivatives were screened. 7-fluoroindole (7FI) was identified as a compound that inhibits biofilm formation and blood hemolysis without inhibiting the growth of planktonic P. aeruginosa cells. Moreover, 7FI markedly reduced the production of quorum-sensing (QS)-regulated virulence factors 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone, pyocyanin, rhamnolipid, two siderophores, pyoverdine and pyochelin. 7FI clearly suppressed swarming motility, protease activity and the production of a polymeric matrix in P. aeruginosa. However, unlike natural indole compounds, synthetic 7FI did not increase antibiotic resistance. Therefore, 7FI is a potential candidate for use in an antivirulence approach against persistent P. aeruginosa infection.

  9. Removal of Microcystis aeruginosa using cationic starch modified soils.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wenqing; Tan, Wanqiao; Wang, Lijing; Pan, Gang

    2016-06-15

    A cheap and biodegradable modifier, cationic starch (CS), was used to turn local soils into effective flocculants for Microcystis aeruginosa (M. aeruginosa) removal. The isoelectric point of soil particles was remarkably increased from pH 0.5 to 11.8 after modification with CS, which made CS modified soil particles positively charged and obtain algal flocculation ability. At the soil concentration of 100 mg/L, when the CS modifier was 10 mg/L, 86% of M. aeruginosa cells were removed within 30 min. Lower or higher CS dosage led to limited algal removal. About 71% and 45% of M. aeruginosa cells were removed within 30 min when CS was 5 mg/L and 80 mg/L, respectively. This is because only part of algal cells combined with CS modified soil particles through charge neutralization at low dosage, while flocs formed at high CS dosage were positively charged which prevents further aggregation among the flocs. The floc stability was quantified by a floc breakage index under applied shear force. Algal flocs formed at acid and alkaline conditions were more prone to be broken than those at the neutral condition. The cost and biodegradability concerns may be largely reduced through the use of CS modified local soils. For field applications, other practical issues (e.g., re-suspension) should be further studied by jointly using other methods.

  10. Production of mucoid exopolysaccharide during development of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    PubMed Central

    Hoyle, B D; Williams, L J; Costerton, J W

    1993-01-01

    Production of mucoid exopolysaccharide by planktonic, chemostat-derived, and adherent Pseudomonas aeruginosa 579 bacteria was separately monitored for 7 days by using a lacZ-algD promoter-reporter gene and assays of total carbohydrate and metabolic activity. Mucoid exopolysaccharide production was transiently elevated following adherence but declined to planktonic levels by day 7. PMID:8423105

  11. Full Virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Requires OprF▿

    PubMed Central

    Fito-Boncompte, Laurène; Chapalain, Annelise; Bouffartigues, Emeline; Chaker, Hichem; Lesouhaitier, Olivier; Gicquel, Gwendoline; Bazire, Alexis; Madi, Amar; Connil, Nathalie; Véron, Wilfried; Taupin, Laure; Toussaint, Bertrand; Cornelis, Pierre; Wei, Qing; Shioya, Koki; Déziel, Eric; Feuilloley, Marc G. J.; Orange, Nicole; Dufour, Alain; Chevalier, Sylvie

    2011-01-01

    OprF is a general outer membrane porin of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a well-known human opportunistic pathogen associated with severe hospital-acquired sepsis and chronic lung infections of cystic fibrosis patients. A multiphenotypic approach, based on the comparative study of a wild-type strain of P. aeruginosa, its isogenic oprF mutant, and an oprF-complemented strain, showed that OprF is required for P. aeruginosa virulence. The absence of OprF results in impaired adhesion to animal cells, secretion of ExoT and ExoS toxins through the type III secretion system (T3SS), and production of the quorum-sensing-dependent virulence factors pyocyanin, elastase, lectin PA-1L, and exotoxin A. Accordingly, in the oprF mutant, production of the signal molecules N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone and N-butanoyl-l-homoserine lactone was found to be reduced and delayed, respectively. Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS) production was decreased, while its precursor, 4-hydroxy-2-heptylquinoline (HHQ), accumulated in the cells. Taken together, these results show the involvement of OprF in P. aeruginosa virulence, at least partly through modulation of the quorum-sensing network. This is the first study showing a link between OprF, PQS synthesis, T3SS, and virulence factor production, providing novel insights into virulence expression. PMID:21189321

  12. AMINOGLYCOSIDE RESISTANCE GENES IN Pseudomonas aeruginosa ISOLATES FROM CUMANA, VENEZUELA.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Bertinellys; Rodulfo, Hectorina; Carreño, Numirin; Guzmán, Militza; Salazar, Elsa; De Donato, Marcos

    2016-01-01

    The enzymatic modification of aminoglycosides by aminoglycoside-acetyltransferases (AAC), aminoglycoside-adenyltransferases (AAD), and aminoglycoside-phosphotransferases (APH), is the most common resistance mechanism in P. aeruginosa and these enzymes can be coded on mobile genetic elements that contribute to their dispersion. One hundred and thirty seven P. aeruginosa isolates from the University Hospital, Cumana, Venezuela (HUAPA) were evaluated. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by the disk diffusion method and theaac, aadB and aph genes were detected by PCR. Most of the P. aeruginosa isolates (33/137) were identified from the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), mainly from discharges (96/137). The frequency of resistant P. aeruginosaisolates was found to be higher for the aminoglycosides tobramycin and amikacin (30.7 and 29.9%, respectively). Phenotype VI, resistant to these antibiotics, was the most frequent (14/49), followed by phenotype I, resistant to all the aminoglycosides tested (12/49). The aac(6´)-Ib,aphA1 and aadB genes were the most frequently detected, and the simultaneous presence of several resistance genes in the same isolate was demonstrated. Aminoglycoside resistance in isolates ofP. aeruginosa at the HUAPA is partly due to the presence of the aac(6´)-Ib, aphA1 andaadB genes, but the high rates of antimicrobial resistance suggest the existence of several mechanisms acting together. This is the first report of aminoglycoside resistance genes in Venezuela and one of the few in Latin America.

  13. Identification, cloning, and expression of Pseudomonas aeruginosa phosphorylcholine phosphatase gene.

    PubMed

    Massimelli, María J; Beassoni, Paola R; Forrellad, Marina A; Barra, José L; Garrido, Mónica N; Domenech, Carlos E; Lisa, Angela T

    2005-05-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa phosphorylcholine phosphatase (PChP) is a periplasmic enzyme produced simultaneously with the hemolytic phospholipase C (PLc-H) when the bacteria are grown in the presence of choline, betaine, dimethylglycine or carnitine. Molecular analysis of the P. aeruginosa mutant JUF8-00, after Tn5-751 mutagenesis, revealed that the PA5292 gene in the P. aeruginosa PAO1 genome was responsible for the synthesis of PChP. The enzyme expressed in E. coli, rPChP-Ec, purified by a chitin-binding column (IMPACT-CN system, New England BioLabs) was homogeneous after SDS-PAGE analysis. PChP was also expressed in P. aeruginosa PAO1-LAC, rPChP-Pa. Both recombinant enzymes exhibited a molecular mass of approximately 40 kDa, as expected for the size of the PA5292 gene, and catalyzed the hydrolysis of phosphorylcholine, phosphorylethanolamine, and p-nitrophenylphosphate. The saturation curve of rPChP-Ec and rPChP-Pa by phosphorylcholine revealed that these recombinant enzymes, like the purified native PChP, also contained the high- and low-affinity sites for phosphorylcholine and that the enzyme activity was inhibited by high substrate concentration.

  14. Effects of azithromycin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa burn wound infection

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, DP; Caceres, S; Caverly, L; Fratelli, C; Kim, SH; Malcolm, KC; Poch, KR; Saavedra, M; Solomon, G; Taylor-Cousar, J; Moskowitz, SM; Nick, JA

    2013-01-01

    Background Cutaneous thermal injuries (i.e. burns) remain a common form of debilitating trauma and outcomes are often worsened by wound infection with environmental bacteria, chiefly Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Materials and Methods We tested the effects of early administration of a single dose of azithromycin, with or without subsequent anti-pseudomonal antibiotics, in a mouse model of standardized thermal injury infected with P. aeruginosa on both wound site and systemic infection. We also tested the antimicrobial effects of these antibiotics alone or combined in comparative biofilm and planktonic cultures in vitro. Results In our model, early azithromycin administration significantly reduced wound and systemic infection without altering wound site or circulating neutrophil activity. The antimicrobial effect of azithromycin was additive with ciprofloxacin but significantly reduced the antimicrobial effect of tobramycin. This pattern was reproduced in biofilm cultures and not observed in planktonic cultures of P. aeruginosa. Conclusion these data suggest that early administration of azithromycin following burn-related trauma and infection may reduce P. aeruginosa infection and potential interactions with other antibiotics should be considered when designing future studies. PMID:23478086

  15. AMINOGLYCOSIDE RESISTANCE GENES IN Pseudomonas aeruginosa ISOLATES FROM CUMANA, VENEZUELA

    PubMed Central

    TEIXEIRA, Bertinellys; RODULFO, Hectorina; CARREÑO, Numirin; GUZMÁN, Militza; SALAZAR, Elsa; DONATO, Marcos DE

    2016-01-01

    The enzymatic modification of aminoglycosides by aminoglycoside-acetyltransferases (AAC), aminoglycoside-adenyltransferases (AAD), and aminoglycoside-phosphotransferases (APH), is the most common resistance mechanism in P. aeruginosa and these enzymes can be coded on mobile genetic elements that contribute to their dispersion. One hundred and thirty seven P. aeruginosa isolates from the University Hospital, Cumana, Venezuela (HUAPA) were evaluated. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by the disk diffusion method and theaac, aadB and aph genes were detected by PCR. Most of the P. aeruginosa isolates (33/137) were identified from the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), mainly from discharges (96/137). The frequency of resistant P. aeruginosaisolates was found to be higher for the aminoglycosides tobramycin and amikacin (30.7 and 29.9%, respectively). Phenotype VI, resistant to these antibiotics, was the most frequent (14/49), followed by phenotype I, resistant to all the aminoglycosides tested (12/49). The aac(6´)-Ib,aphA1 and aadB genes were the most frequently detected, and the simultaneous presence of several resistance genes in the same isolate was demonstrated. Aminoglycoside resistance in isolates ofP. aeruginosa at the HUAPA is partly due to the presence of the aac(6´)-Ib, aphA1 andaadB genes, but the high rates of antimicrobial resistance suggest the existence of several mechanisms acting together. This is the first report of aminoglycoside resistance genes in Venezuela and one of the few in Latin America. PMID:27007556

  16. Comparative studies on growth and physiological responses of unicellular and colonial Microcystis aeruginosa to Acorus calamus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, S-H; Chang, J-J; Cao, J-Y; Yang, C-L

    2015-02-01

    In order to explore the growth inhibition and physiological responses of unicellular and colonial Microcystis aeruginosa during coexistence with Acorus calamus, algal densities, chlorophyll a contents, exopolysaccharide (EPS) concentrations, malondialdehyde (MDA) contents, catalase (CAT) activities, and peroxidase (POD) activities of the two algae strains were analyzed. Although the unicellular and colonial strains of M. aeruginosa were both inhibited by A. calamus, unicellular algae were more sensitive than the colonial algae. The measurement results for EPS, MDA, CAT, and POD showed that unicellular M. aeruginosa had higher levels of stress related damage than colonial strains when they were exposed to the same density of A. calamus, and the cellular defense system of colonial M. aeruginosa was stronger than that of unicellular M. aeruginosa. Natural blooms of Microcystis are typically composed of colonial forms of M. aeruginosa, therefore future efforts to control such blooms, possibly through the development of new algicides, should focus on the unique characteristics of colonial M. aeruginosa strains.

  17. Dissecting the Machinery That Introduces Disulfide Bonds in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Arts, Isabelle S.; Ball, Geneviève; Leverrier, Pauline; Garvis, Steven; Nicolaes, Valérie; Vertommen, Didier; Ize, Bérengère; Tamu Dufe, Veronica; Messens, Joris; Voulhoux, Romé; Collet, Jean-François

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Disulfide bond formation is required for the folding of many bacterial virulence factors. However, whereas the Escherichia coli disulfide bond-forming system is well characterized, not much is known on the pathways that oxidatively fold proteins in pathogenic bacteria. Here, we report the detailed unraveling of the pathway that introduces disulfide bonds in the periplasm of the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The genome of P. aeruginosa uniquely encodes two DsbA proteins (P. aeruginosa DsbA1 [PaDsbA1] and PaDsbA2) and two DsbB proteins (PaDsbB1 and PaDsbB2). We found that PaDsbA1, the primary donor of disulfide bonds to secreted proteins, is maintained oxidized in vivo by both PaDsbB1 and PaDsbB2. In vitro reconstitution of the pathway confirms that both PaDsbB1 and PaDsbB2 shuttle electrons from PaDsbA1 to membrane-bound quinones. Accordingly, deletion of both P. aeruginosa dsbB1 (PadsbB1) and PadsbB2 is required to prevent the folding of several P. aeruginosa virulence factors and to lead to a significant decrease in pathogenicity. Using a high-throughput proteomic approach, we also analyzed the impact of PadsbA1 deletion on the global periplasmic proteome of P. aeruginosa, which allowed us to identify more than 20 new potential substrates of this major oxidoreductase. Finally, we report the biochemical and structural characterization of PaDsbA2, a highly oxidizing oxidoreductase, which seems to be expressed under specific conditions. By fully dissecting the machinery that introduces disulfide bonds in P. aeruginosa, our work opens the way to the design of novel antibacterial molecules able to disarm this pathogen by preventing the proper assembly of its arsenal of virulence factors. PMID:24327342

  18. Isolation, characterization, and evaluation of multi-trait plant growth promoting rhizobacteria for their growth promoting and disease suppressing effects on ginger.

    PubMed

    Dinesh, Raghavan; Anandaraj, Muthuswamy; Kumar, Aundy; Bini, Yogiyar Kundil; Subila, Kizhakke Purayil; Aravind, Ravindran

    2015-04-01

    In this study, 100 PGPR strains isolated from different varieties of ginger (Zingiber officinale Rosc.) were first characterized for their morphological, biochemical, and nutrient mobilization traits in vitro. The PGPR were also screened in vitro for inhibition of Pythium myriotylum causing soft rot in ginger. Results revealed that only five PGPR showed >70% suppression of P. myriotylum. These 5 PGPR viz., GRB (Ginger rhizobacteria) 25--Burkholderia cepacia, GRB35--Bacillus amyloliquefaciens; GRB58--Serratia marcescens; GRB68--S. marcescens; GRB91--Pseudomonas aeruginosa were used for further growth promotion and biocontrol studies in the green house and field. The green house study revealed that GRB35 (B. amyloliquefaciens) and GRB68 (S. marcescens) registered markedly higher sprouting (96.3%) and lower disease incidence (48.1%) and greater rhizome yield (365.6 g pot(-1) and 384.4 g pot(-1), respectively), while control registered the lowest sprouting (66%), maximum soft rot incidence (100%) and lowest rhizome yield (134.4 g pot(-1)). In the field experiments also, GRB68 (S. marcescens) and GRB35 (B. amyloliquefaciens) registered the greatest sprouting (80% each), markedly lower soft rot incidence (5.2% and 7.3%, respectively) and higher yield (5.0 and 4.3 kg(3)m(-2), respectively) compared to chemicals like Streptomycin sulphate (73.0%, 18.5% and 2.3 kg(3)m(-2), respectively), Metalaxyl-Mancozeb (73.0%, 14.0% and 3.8 kg(3)m(-2), respectively) and control (73.0%, 25.1% and 2.2 kg 3m(-2), respectively). Overall, the results suggested that for growth promotion and management of soft rot disease in ginger, GRB35 B. amyloliquefaciens and GRB68 S. marcescens could be good alternatives to chemical measures. Since, the latter has been reported to be an opportunistic human pathogen, we recommend the use of B. amyloliquefaciens for integration into nutrient and disease management schedules for ginger cultivation.

  19. Zingerone silences quorum sensing and attenuates virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Lokender; Chhibber, Sanjay; Kumar, Rajnish; Kumar, Manoj; Harjai, Kusum

    2015-04-01

    Quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa plays an imperative role in virulence factor, biofilm formation and antimicrobial resistance. Blocking quorum sensing pathways are viewed as viable anti-virulent therapy in association with traditional antimicrobial therapy. Anti-quorum sensing dietary phytochemicals with may prove to be a safe and viable choice as anti-virulent drug candidates. Previously, our lab proved zingerone as potent anti-biofilm agent hence; further its anti-virulent and anti-quorum activities were evaluated. Zingerone, besides decreasing swimming, swarming and twitching phenotypes of P. aeruginosa PAO1, reduced biofilm forming capacity and production of virulence factors including rhamnolipid, elastase, protease, pyocyanin, cell free and cell bound hemolysin (p<0.001) indicating anti-virulent property attributing towards attenuation of virulence of P. aeruginosa. Further zingerone not only had marked effect on the production of quorum sensing signal molecules by clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa but also showed significant interference with the activation of QS reporter strains. To study the mechanism of blocking quorum sensing cascade, in silico analysis was carried out. Anti-QS activity was attributed to interference with the ligand receptor interaction of zingerone with QS receptors (TraR, LasR, RhlR and PqsR). Zingerone showed a good comparative docking score to respective autoinducer molecules which was even higher than that of vanillin, a proven anti-quorum sensing phytochemical. The results of the present study revealed the anti-quorum sensing activity of zingerone targeting ligand-receptor interaction, hence proposing zingerone as a suitable anti-virulent drug candidate against P. aeruginosa infections.

  20. Strong incidence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on bacterial rrs and ITS genetic structures of cystic fibrosis sputa

    PubMed Central

    Pages-Monteiro, Laurence; Marti, Romain; Commun, Carine; Alliot, Nolwenn; Bardel, Claire; Meugnier, Helene; Perouse-de-Montclos, Michele; Reix, Philippe; Durieu, Isabelle; Durupt, Stephane; Vandenesch, Francois; Freney, Jean; Cournoyer, Benoit; Doleans-Jordheim, Anne

    2017-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) lungs harbor a complex community of interacting microbes, including pathogens like Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Meta-taxogenomic analysis based on V5-V6 rrs PCR products of 52 P. aeruginosa-positive (Pp) and 52 P. aeruginosa-negative (Pn) pooled DNA extracts from CF sputa suggested positive associations between P. aeruginosa and Stenotrophomonas and Prevotella, but negative ones with Haemophilus, Neisseria and Burkholderia. Internal Transcribed Spacer analyses (RISA) from individual DNA extracts identified three significant genetic structures within the CF cohorts, and indicated an impact of P. aeruginosa. RISA clusters Ip and IIIp contained CF sputa with a P. aeruginosa prevalence above 93%, and of 24.2% in cluster IIp. Clusters Ip and IIIp showed lower RISA genetic diversity and richness than IIp. Highly similar cluster IIp RISA profiles were obtained from two patients harboring isolates of a same P. aeruginosa clone, suggesting convergent evolution in the structure of their microbiota. CF patients of cluster IIp had received significantly less antibiotics than patients of clusters Ip and IIIp but harbored the most resistant P. aeruginosa strains. Patients of cluster IIIp were older than those of Ip. The effects of P. aeruginosa on the RISA structures could not be fully dissociated from the above two confounding factors but several trends in these datasets support the conclusion of a strong incidence of P. aeruginosa on the genetic structure of CF lung microbiota. PMID:28282386

  1. VDUP1 exacerbates bacteremic shock in mice infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Piao, Zheng-Hao; Kim, Mi Sun; Jeong, Mira; Yun, Sohyun; Lee, Suk Hyung; Sun, Hu-Nan; Song, Hae Young; Suh, Hyun-Woo; Jung, Haiyoung; Yoon, Suk Ran; Kim, Tae-Don; Lee, Young-Ho; Choi, Inpyo

    2012-11-01

    Vitamin-D3 upregulated protein-1 (VDUP1) is a stress response protein. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) infection is a leading cause of death. Mice infected with live P. aeruginosa exhibit significantly decreased VDUP1 expression. However, the function of VDUP1 during P. aeruginosa-induced mouse bacteremic shock is unknown. To address the function of VDUP1 in P. aeruginosa-infected mice, we constructed a bacteremic shock model wherein both wild-type and VDUP1-deficient mice were infected intra-peritoneally with live P. aeruginosa. We found that VDUP1-deficient mice were more resistant to P. aeruginosa-induced bacteremic shock than wild-type mice, as shown by the increased survival, accelerated bacterial clearance and suppression of cytokine overproduction of the VDUP1-deficient mice. VDUP1 promoted the recruitment of neutrophils into the peritoneal cavities of infected mice. VDUP1 impeded the phagocytosis of non-opsonized P. aeruginosa via phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway in macrophages. P. aeruginosa infection induced the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and the increased production of ROS by the peritoneal cells of VDUP1-deficient mice was advantageous in clearing the bacteria. Overall, VDUP1 aggravates bacteremic shock; thus, VDUP1 can be considered a target molecule for the inhibition of P. aeruginosa-induced bacteremic shock.

  2. Toxicogenomic response of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to ortho-phenylphenol

    PubMed Central

    Nde, Chantal W; Jang, Hyeung-Jin; Toghrol, Freshteh; Bentley, William E

    2008-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) is the most common opportunistic pathogen implicated in nosocomial infections and in chronic lung infections in cystic fibrosis patients. Ortho-phenylphenol (OPP) is an antimicrobial agent used as an active ingredient in several EPA registered disinfectants. Despite its widespread use, there is a paucity of information on its target molecular pathways and the cellular responses that it elucidates in bacteria in general and in P. aeruginosa in particular. An understanding of the OPP-driven gene regulation and cellular response it elicits will facilitate more effective utilization of this antimicrobial and possibly lead to the development of more effective disinfectant treatments. Results Herein, we performed a genome-wide transcriptome analysis of the cellular responses of P. aeruginosa exposed to 0.82 mM OPP for 20 and 60 minutes. Our data indicated that OPP upregulated the transcription of genes encoding ribosomal, virulence and membrane transport proteins after both treatment times. After 20 minutes of exposure to 0.82 mM OPP, genes involved in the exhibition of swarming motility and anaerobic respiration were upregulated. After 60 minutes of OPP treatment, the transcription of genes involved in amino acid and lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis were upregulated. Further, the transcription of the ribosome modulation factor (rmf) and an alternative sigma factor (rpoS) of RNA polymerase were downregulated after both treatment times. Conclusion Results from this study indicate that after 20 minutes of exposure to OPP, genes that have been linked to the exhibition of anaerobic respiration and swarming motility were upregulated. This study also suggests that the downregulation of the rmf and rpoS genes may be indicative of the mechanism by which OPP causes decreases in cell viability in P. aeruginosa. Consequently, a protective response involving the upregulation of translation leading to the increased synthesis of

  3. Overproduction of individual gas vesicle proteins perturbs flotation, antibiotic production and cell division in the enterobacterium Serratia sp. ATCC 39006.

    PubMed

    Monson, Rita E; Tashiro, Yosuke; Salmond, George P C

    2016-09-01

    Gas vesicles are intracellular proteinaceous organelles that facilitate bacterial colonization of static water columns. In the enterobacterium Serratia sp. ATCC 39006, gas vesicle formation requires the proteins GvpA1, GvpF1, GvpG, GvpA2, GvpK, GvpA3, GvpF2 and GvpF3 and the three gas vesicle regulatory proteins GvrA, GvrB and GvrC. Deletion of gvpC alters gas vesicle robustness and deletion of gvpN or gvpV results in small bicone vesicles. In this work, we assessed the impacts on gas vesicle formation when each of these 14 essential proteins was overexpressed. Overproduction of GvpF1, GvpF2, GvrA, GvrB or GvrC all resulted in significantly reduced gas vesicle synthesis. Perturbations in gas vesicle formation were also observed when GvpV and GvpA3 were in excess. In addition to impacts on gas vesicle formation, overproduction of GvrA or GvrB led to elevated biosynthesis of the tripyrrole pigment, prodigiosin, a secondary metabolite of increasing medical interest due to its antimalarial and anticancer properties. Finally, when GvpG was overexpressed, gas vesicles were still produced, but the cells exhibited a growth defect. Further analysis showed that induction of GvpG arrested cell growth and caused a drop in viable count, suggesting a possible physiological role for this protein linking gas vesicle biogenesis and binary fission. These combined results demonstrate that the stoichiometry of individual gas vesicle proteins is crucially important for controlled organelle morphogenesis and flotation and provides evidence for the first link between gas vesicle assembly and cell division, to our knowledge.

  4. Growth of Serratia liquefaciens under 7 mbar, 0°C, and CO2-Enriched Anoxic Atmospheres

    PubMed Central

    Ulrich, Richard; Berry, Bonnie J.; Nicholson, Wayne L.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Twenty-six strains of 22 bacterial species were tested for growth on trypticase soy agar (TSA) or sea-salt agar (SSA) under hypobaric, psychrophilic, and anoxic conditions applied singly or in combination. As each factor was added to multi-parameter assays, the interactive stresses decreased the numbers of strains capable of growth and, in general, reduced the vigor of the strains observed to grow. Only Serratia liquefaciens strain ATCC 27592 exhibited growth at 7 mbar, 0°C, and CO2-enriched anoxic atmospheres. To discriminate between the effects of desiccation and hypobaria, vegetative cells of Bacillus subtilis strain 168 and Escherichia coli strain K12 were grown on TSA surfaces and simultaneously in liquid Luria-Bertani (LB) broth media. Inhibition of growth under hypobaria for 168 and K12 decreased in similar ways for both TSA and LB assays as pressures were reduced from 100 to 25 mbar. Results for 168 and K12 on TSA and LB are interpreted to indicate a direct low-pressure effect on microbial growth with both species and do not support the hypothesis that desiccation alone on TSA was the cause of reduced growth at low pressures. The growth of S. liquefaciens at 7 mbar, 0°C, and CO2-enriched anoxic atmospheres was surprising since S. liquefaciens is ecologically a generalist that occurs in terrestrial plant, fish, animal, and food niches. In contrast, two extremophiles tested in the assays, Deinococcus radiodurans strain R1 and Psychrobacter cryohalolentis strain K5, failed to grow under hypobaric (25 mbar; R1 only), psychrophilic (0°C; R1 only), or anoxic (<0.1% ppO2; both species) conditions. Key Words: Habitable zone—Hypobaria—Extremophiles—Special regions—Planetary protection. Astrobiology 13, 115–131. PMID:23289858

  5. An in-vitro study of carbapenem-induced morphological changes and endotoxin release in clinical isolates of gram-negative bacilli.

    PubMed

    Horii, T; Kobayashi, M; Sato, K; Ichiyama, S; Ohta, M

    1998-04-01

    One hundred clinical isolates, including Escherichia coli, Serratia marcescens, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus vulgaris and Proteus mirabilis, were exposed to carbapenems (imipenem, panipenem, meropenem and biapenem) at 0.5 x MIC for 3 h, then their morphology was examined and endotoxin release determined. Ceftazidime, which induces filament formation, was used as a control. Scanning electron microscopy showed that these carbapenems induced formation of spherical or ovoid cells, except for P. aeruginosa treated with meropenem and biapenem; these latter cells had a 'bulge' midway along them and we have termed them 'oval-centred'. There was a relationship between morphology and the amount of endotoxin released following exposure to carbapenems or ceftazidime. Of all the species investigated, P. aeruginosa showed the most variable morphological changes. P. aeruginosa exposed to biapenem were longer oval-centred in shape, and released significantly more endotoxin than those exposed to imipenem, panipenem (spherical) or meropenem (shorter oval-centred cells) (P=0.030, 0.017 and 0.002, respectively). In all strains except P. aeruginosa, carbapenems induced significantly less endotoxin release than ceftazidime (P < 0.05).

  6. Epinecidin-1 Has Immunomodulatory Effects, Facilitating Its Therapeutic Use in a Mouse Model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Chieh-Yu; Chen, Jian-Chyi; Sheen, Jenn-Feng; Lin, Tai-Lang

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are garnering attention as possible alternatives to antibiotics. Here, we describe the antimicrobial properties of epinecidin-1 against a multidrug-resistant clinical isolate of P. aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa R) and a P. aeruginosa strain from ATCC (P. aeruginosa ATCC 19660) in vivo. The MICs of epinecidin-1 against P. aeruginosa R and P. aeruginosa ATCC 19660 were determined and compared with those of imipenem. Epinecidin-1 was found to be highly effective at combating peritonitis infection caused by P. aeruginosa R or P. aeruginosa ATCC 19660 in mouse models, without inducing adverse behavioral effects or liver or kidney toxicity. Taken together, our results indicate that epinecidin-1 enhances the rate of survival of mice infected with the bacterial pathogen P. aeruginosa through both antimicrobial and immunomodulatory effects. PMID:24820078

  7. Does Pseudomonas aeruginosa use intercellular signalling to build biofilm communities?

    PubMed

    Kirisits, Mary Jo; Parsek, Matthew R

    2006-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative bacterial species that causes several opportunistic human infections. This organism is also found in the environment, where it is renowned (like other Pseudomonads) for its ability to use a wide variety of compounds as carbon and energy sources. It is a model species for studying group-related behaviour in bacteria. Two types of group behaviour it engages in are intercellular signalling, or quorum sensing, and the formation of surface-associated communities called biofilms. Both quorum sensing and biofilm formation are important in the pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa infections. Quorum sensing regulates the expression of several secreted virulence factors and quorum sensing mutant strains are attenuated for virulence in animal models. Biofilms have been implicated in chronic infections. Two examples are the chronic lung infections afflicting people suffering from cystic fibrosis and colonization of indwelling medical devices. This review will discuss quorum sensing and biofilm formation and studies that link these two processes.

  8. Pseudomonas aeruginosa dose response and bathing water infection.

    PubMed

    Roser, D J; van den Akker, B; Boase, S; Haas, C N; Ashbolt, N J; Rice, S A

    2014-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the opportunistic pathogen mostly implicated in folliculitis and acute otitis externa in pools and hot tubs. Nevertheless, infection risks remain poorly quantified. This paper reviews disease aetiologies and bacterial skin colonization science to advance dose-response theory development. Three model forms are identified for predicting disease likelihood from pathogen density. Two are based on Furumoto & Mickey's exponential 'single-hit' model and predict infection likelihood and severity (lesions/m2), respectively. 'Third-generation', mechanistic, dose-response algorithm development is additionally scoped. The proposed formulation integrates dispersion, epidermal interaction, and follicle invasion. The review also details uncertainties needing consideration which pertain to water quality, outbreaks, exposure time, infection sites, biofilms, cerumen, environmental factors (e.g. skin saturation, hydrodynamics), and whether P. aeruginosa is endogenous or exogenous. The review's findings are used to propose a conceptual infection model and identify research priorities including pool dose-response modelling, epidermis ecology and infection likelihood-based hygiene management.

  9. Flagellation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in newly divided cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Kun; Lee, Calvin; Anda, Jaime; Wong, Gerard

    2015-03-01

    For monotrichous bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, after cell division, one daughter cell inherits the old flagellum from its mother cell, and the other grows a new flagellum during or after cell division. It had been shown that the new flagellum grows at the distal pole of the dividing cell when the two daughter cells haven't completely separated. However, for those daughter cells who grow new flagella after division, it still remains unknown at which pole the new flagellum will grow. Here, by combining our newly developed bacteria family tree tracking techniques with genetic manipulation method, we showed that for the daughter cell who did not inherit the old flagellum, a new flagellum has about 90% chances to grow at the newly formed pole. We proposed a model for flagellation of P. aeruginosa.

  10. Transport of Aromatic Amino Acids by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Kay, W. W.; Gronlund, Audrey F.

    1971-01-01

    Kinetic studies of the transport of aromatic amino acids by Pseudomonas aeruginosa revealed the existence of two high-affinity transport systems which recognized the three aromatic amino acids. From competition data and studies on the exchange of preformed aromatic amino acid pools, the first transport system was found to be functional with phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan (in order of decreasing activity), whereas the second system was active with tryptophan, phenylalanine, and tyrosine. The two systems also transported a number of aromatic amino acid analogues but not other amino acids. Mutants defective in each of the two and in both transport systems were isolated and described. When the amino acids were added at low external concentrations to cells growing logarithmically in glucose minimal medium, the tryptophan pool very quickly became saturated. Under identical conditions, phenylalanine and tyrosine each accumulated in the intracellular pool of P. aeruginosa at a concentration which was 10 times greater than that of tryptophan. PMID:4994029

  11. Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Treated With Azithromycin

    PubMed Central

    Phelan, Vanessa V.; Fang, Jinshu; Dorrestein, Pieter C.

    2015-01-01

    In microbiology, changes in specialized metabolite production (cell-to-cell signaling metabolites, virulence factors and natural products) are measured using phenotypic assays. However, advances in mass spectrometry based techniques including imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) now allow researchers to directly visualize the production of specialized metabolites from microbial colony biofilms. In this study, a combination of IMS and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was used to visualize the effect of the macrolide antibiotic azithromycin (AZM) on colony biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. While previous research suggested that AZM may inhibit cell-to-cell signaling of P. aeruginosa and thereby reducing pathogenicity, we observed no clear decrease in specialized metabolite production. PMID:25801585

  12. Regulation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Virulence by Distinct Iron Sources

    PubMed Central

    Reinhart, Alexandria A.; Oglesby-Sherrouse, Amanda G.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a ubiquitous environmental bacterium and versatile opportunistic pathogen. Like most other organisms, P. aeruginosa requires iron for survival, yet iron rapidly reacts with oxygen and water to form stable ferric (FeIII) oxides and hydroxides, limiting its availability to living organisms. During infection, iron is also sequestered by the host innate immune system, further limiting its availability. P. aeruginosa’s capacity to cause disease in diverse host environments is due to its ability to scavenge iron from a variety of host iron sources. Work over the past two decades has further shown that different iron sources can affect the expression of distinct virulence traits. This review discusses how the individual components of P. aeruginosa’s iron regulatory network allow this opportunist to adapt to a multitude of host environments during infection. PMID:27983658

  13. Production and characterization of the slime polysaccharide of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Evans, L R; Linker, A

    1973-11-01

    The slime polysaccharides produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from a variety of human infections were investigated. Slime production in culture seemed optimal when adequate amounts of carbohydrate were present and under conditions of either high osmotic pressure or inadequate protein supply. The polysaccharides produced by the organisms were similar to each other, to the slime of Azotobacter vinelandii, and to seaweed alginic acids. They were composed of beta-1,4-linked d-mannuronic acid residues and variable amounts of its 5-epimer l-guluronic acid. All bacterial polymers contained o-acetyl groups which are absent in the alginates. The polysaccharides differed considerably in the ratio of mannuronic to guluronic acid content and in the number of o-acetyl groups. The particular composition of the slime was not found to be characteristic for the disease process from which the mucoid variants of P. aeruginosa were obtained.

  14. Alginate Overproduction Affects Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Hentzer, Morten; Teitzel, Gail M.; Balzer, Grant J.; Heydorn, Arne; Molin, Søren; Givskov, Michael; Parsek, Matthew R.

    2001-01-01

    During the course of chronic cystic fibrosis (CF) infections, Pseudomonas aeruginosa undergoes a conversion to a mucoid phenotype, which is characterized by overproduction of the exopolysaccharide alginate. Chronic P. aeruginosa infections involve surface-attached, highly antibiotic-resistant communities of microorganisms organized in biofilms. Although biofilm formation and the conversion to mucoidy are both important aspects of CF pathogenesis, the relationship between them is at the present unclear. In this study, we report that the overproduction of alginate affects biofilm development on an abiotic surface. Biofilms formed by an alginate-overproducing strain exhibit a highly structured architecture and are significantly more resistant to the antibiotic tobramycin than a biofilm formed by an isogenic nonmucoid strain. These results suggest that an important consequence of the conversion to mucoidy is an altered biofilm architecture that shows increasing resistance to antimicrobial treatments. PMID:11514525

  15. Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Treated with Azithromycin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phelan, Vanessa V.; Fang, Jinshu; Dorrestein, Pieter C.

    2015-06-01

    In microbiology, changes in specialized metabolite production (cell-to-cell signaling metabolites, virulence factors, and natural products) are measured using phenotypic assays. However, advances in mass spectrometry-based techniques including imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) now allow researchers to directly visualize the production of specialized metabolites from microbial colony biofilms. In this study, a combination of IMS and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was used to visualize the effect of the macrolide antibiotic azithromycin (AZM) on colony biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Although previous research suggested that AZM may inhibit cell-to-cell signaling of P. aeruginosa and thereby reduce pathogenicity, we observed no clear decrease in specialized metabolite production.

  16. The Psl economy in early P. aeruginosa biofilm development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Kun; Tseng, Boo Shan; Jin, Fan; Gibiansky, Max; Harrison, Joe; Parsek, Matthew; Wong, Gerard

    2012-02-01

    Psl from P. aeruginosa (PAO1) is a mannose- and galactose-rich exopolysaccharide (EPS). It has been shown that Psl plays an important role in bacterial surface adhesion. Here, we examine role of Psl in controlling motility and microcolony formation during early biofilm development, by translating video microscopy movies into searchable databases of bacterial trajectories. We use a massively-parallel cell tracking algorithm to extract the full motility history of every cell in a large community. We find that at early stages of growth, P. aeruginosa motility is guided by Psl and self-organize in a manner analogous to a capitalist economic system, resulting in a power law bacterial distribution where a small number of bacteria are extremely ``rich'' in communally produced Psl. By comparing overproducers and underproducers of Psl, we find that local Psl levels determine post-division cell fates: High local Psl levels drive the formation of sessile microcolonies that grow exponentially.

  17. [Water used for hemodialysis equipment: where is Pseudomonas aeruginosa?].

    PubMed

    Ducki, Sébastien; Francini, Nicolas; Blech, Marie-Françoise

    2005-05-01

    The water used in dilution of the dialysis solutions constitutes an essential element of the efficiency and the safety of this therapeutics. Water must be specifically treated, and some technical rules must be respected, such as disinfection of the equipment for water treatment, to guarantee a satisfying level for whole the installation. This article reports the investigations, which were led to find the spring of Pseudomonas aeruginosa which contamined in a recurring way the water feeding dialysis equipment. The observation of samples'chronology and an analysis of the sanitary pad suggested a contamination during disinfection. Sample of residual water from the pump used for the injection of Dialox identified this reservoir as origin of the contamination. To stop this contamination by P. aeruginosa, a pump maintenance revision and purges of the system were used.

  18. Airway epithelial control of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Campόdonico, Victoria L; Gadjeva, Mihaela; Paradis-Bleau, Catherine; Uluer, Ahmet; Pier, Gerald B

    2013-01-01

    Defective expression or function of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) underlies the hypersusceptibility of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients to chronic airway infections, particularly with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. CFTR is involved in the specific recognition of P. aeruginosa, thereby contributing to effective innate immunity and proper hydration of the airway surface layer (ASL). In CF, the airway epithelium fails to initiate an appropriate innate immune response, allowing the microbe to bind to mucus plugs that are then not properly cleared because of the dehydrated ASL. Recent studies have identified numerous CFTR-dependent factors that are recruited to the epithelial plasma membrane in response to infection and that are needed for bacterial clearance, a process that is defective in CF patients hypersusceptible to infection with this organism. PMID:18262467

  19. New Biocatalysts: Essential Tools for a Sustainable 21st Century Chemical Industry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    sp. Candida parapsilosis Fusarium oxysporum Pseudomonas putida Saccharomyces sake Alcaligenes faecalis Enterobacter aerogenes Erwinia carotovora...Rhodococcus rhodochrous Serratia marcescens Xanthobacter agilis Nocardia corallina Beauveria bassiana Rhodococcus erythropolis Alcaligenes sp., Pseudomonas

  20. The Immunogenicity of a Biological Simulant: Strategies for the Improvement of Antibody-Based Detection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    Yersinia pestis; SERMA, Serratia marcescens; ENTAE, Enterobacter aerogenes ; KLEPN, Klebsiella pneumoniae; BUCAP, Buchnera aphidicola; Cons, consensus...with other enterobacteria over a region of 200 amino acids that contains extracellular loops 1-4, showing characteristic sequence variability among the

  1. The Effects of Postoperative Activity on Subcuranious Tissue Oxygen Tension and Blood Flow in Orthopedic Surgical Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-01

    killing common surgical infection organisms as Staphylococcus aureus, E coli, Serratia marcescens, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus vulgaris , and...healing of wounded tissue is the maintenance of adequate tissue oxygenation. Abundant molecular oxygen must be present for cellular processes of oxidative

  2. A comparative study of characteristics of current-type and conventional-type cationic bactericides.

    PubMed

    Ohta, S; Misawa, Y; Miyamoto, H; Makino, M; Nagai, K; Shiraishi, T; Nakagawa, Y; Yamato, S; Tachikawa, E; Zenda, H

    2001-09-01

    We have synthesized new polycationic bactericides, polyloxyethylene(dimethyliminio)trimethylene(dimethyliminio)ethylene dichloridel (OXD) and poly(hexamethyleneguanidine phosphate) (HEP), in order to develop more active but less skin-irritative bactericides. The effects of these bactericides on Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Serratia marcescens, Klebsiella pneumoniae, methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and the degree of their irritations on skin were compared with those of a widely used low molecular-weight cationic bactericide, benzalkonium chloride (BAC), and a polycationic bactericide, poly[2-hydroxyethylene(dimethyliminio)methylene chloride] (2HYC). The minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of OXD for 10 min contact incubation was 16 microg/ml against P. aeruginosa, E. coli, S. marcescens and K. pneumoniae, and >1000 microg/ml against MRSA. The MBC of HEP for 10 min contact incubation was 16 microg/ml against P. aeruginosa, 32 microg/ml against E. coli and K. pneumoniae, and 64 microg/ml against S. marcescens and MRSA. Itch, edema, erythema, heat, injury, desquamation and keratinization caused by skin irritation were examined in 21 subjects by patch tests. Only one subject treated with OXD experienced edema, and one subject with HEP experienced keratinization. However, BAC caused itch in 3 subjects, edema in 1, erythema in 10 and desquamation in 2, indicating that the incidence of skin irritation of BAC was higher than that of OXD or HEP. OXD and HEP had sterilization ability similar to BAC, however, they were less skin-irritative than BAC. This indicates that OXD and HEP can be used as safe bactericides.

  3. Pseudomonas aeruginosa exoenzyme S induces proliferation of human T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Mody, C H; Buser, D E; Syme, R M; Woods, D E

    1995-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a gram-negative bacterium that is responsible for devastating acute and chronic infections, which include bronchiectasis in cystic fibrosis, nosocomial pneumonia, and infection of burn wounds. Previous studies have demonstrated that these patients have impaired host responses, including cell-mediated immune responses, which are important in anti-Pseudomonas host defense. The P. aeruginosa exoproduct, exoenzyme S, has a number of characteristics which suggest that it might be important in cell-mediated immunity. To determine whether exoenzyme S activates lymphocytes to proliferate, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from normal volunteers were stimulated with purified exoenzyme S, and the lymphocyte response was assessed by measuring [3H]thymidine uptake and by counting the number of cells after various times in culture. Ninety-five percent of healthy adult donors had a lymphocyte response to exoenzyme S. The optimal lymphocyte response occurred on day 7, with 4 x 10(5) PBMC per microtiter well when cells were stimulated with 10 micrograms exoenzyme S per ml. [3H]thymidine uptake correlated with an increase in the number of mononuclear cells, indicating that proliferation occurred. In unseparated PBMC, T cells, and to a lesser extent B cells, proliferated. Purified T cells proliferated, while purified B cells proliferated only after the addition of irradiated T cells. Thus, T lymphocytes are necessary and sufficient for the proliferative response to exoenzyme S. We speculate that exoenzyme S from P. aeruginosa is important in T-lymphocyte-mediated host defense to P. aeruginosa. In strategies to enhance impaired cell-mediated immunity, exoenzyme S should be considered as a potential stimulant. PMID:7537248

  4. Membrane proteomes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Dé, E; Cosette, P; Coquet, L; Siroy, A; Alexandre, S; Duncan, A; Naudin, B; Rihouey, C; Schaumann, A; Junter, G A; Jouenne, T

    2011-12-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are known for their intrinsic resistance to antibiotics. Between mechanisms involved in this resistance, diminished expression of outer membrane proteins and up-regulation of efflux pumps play an important role. The characterization of membrane proteins is consequently necessary because of their importance in the antibiotic resistance but also in virulence. This review presents proteomic investigations aiming to describe the protein content of the membranes of these two bacterial species.

  5. [Properties of a nitrite reductase inhibitor protein from Pseudomonas aeruginosa].

    PubMed

    Karapetian, A V; Nalbandian, R M

    1993-08-01

    The amino acid composition and major physico-chemical properties of the "nonblue" copper protein isolated earlier from Pseudomonas aeruginosa have been determined. It has been found that the azurin oxidase, cytochrome c551 oxidase and superoxide dismutase activities of the enzyme are inhibited by this protein. The inhibition seems to be due to the protein interaction with the electron-accepting center of nitrite reductase.

  6. Functionalized polyanilines disrupt Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus biofilms.

    PubMed

    Gizdavic-Nikolaidis, Marija R; Pagnon, Joanne C; Ali, Naseem; Sum, Reuben; Davies, Noel; Roddam, Louise F; Ambrose, Mark

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the antimicrobial effects of functionalized polyanilines (fPANIs) against stationary phase cells and biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus using homopolymer of sulfanilic acid (poly-SO3H) as a model. The chemically synthesized poly-SO3H was characterized using Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) and Ultraviolet-Visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopies. The molecular weight (Mw) and elemental analysis of homopolymer poly-SO3H were also examined. We found that poly-SO3H was bactericidal against stationary phase cells of P. aeruginosa and S. aureus at a concentration of 20 mgml(-1). Surprisingly, we discovered that the same concentration (20 mgml(-1)) of poly-SO3H significantly disrupted and killed bacterial cells present in pre-established forty-eight hour static biofilms of these organisms, as shown by crystal violet and bacterial live/dead fluorescence staining assays. In support of these data, poly-SO3H extensively diminished the expression of bacterial genes related to biofilm formation in stationary phase cells of P. aeruginosa, and seemed to greatly reduce the amount of the quorum sensing molecule N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone (3OC12-HSL) able to be recovered from biofilms of this organism. Furthermore, we found that poly-SO3H was able to effectively penetrate and kill cells in biofilms formed by the P. aeruginosa (AESIII) isolate derived from the sputum of a cystic fibrosis patient. Taken together, the results of the present study emphasise the broad antimicrobial activities of fPANI, and suggest that they could be developed further and used in some novel ways to construct medical devices and/or industrial equipment that are refractory to colonization by biofilm-forming bacteria.

  7. Enterobactin-mediated iron transport in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Poole, K; Young, L; Neshat, S

    1990-01-01

    A pyoverdine-deficient strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was unable to grow in an iron-deficient minimal medium in the presence of the nonmetabolizable iron chelator ethylene diamine-di(omega-hydroxyphenol acetic acid) (EDDHA), although addition of enterobactin to EDDHA-containing minimal media did restore growth of the pyoverdine-deficient P. aeruginosa. Consistent with the apparent ability of enterobactin to provide iron to P. aeruginosa, enterobactin-dependent 55Fe3+ uptake was observed in cells of P. aeruginosa previously grown in an iron-deficient medium containing enterobactin (or enterobactin-containing Escherichia coli culture supernatant). This uptake was energy dependent, was observable at low concentrations (60 nM) of FeCl3, and was absent in cells cultured without enterobactin. A novel protein with a molecular weight of approximately 80,000 was identified in the outer membranes of cells grown in iron-deficient minimal medium containing enterobactin, concomitant with the induction of enterobactin-dependent iron uptake. A Tn501 insertion mutant lacking this protein was isolated and shown to be deficient in enterobactin-mediated iron transport at 60 nM FeCl3, although it still exhibited enterobactin-dependent growth in iron-deficient medium containing EDDHA. It was subsequently observed that the mutant was, however, capable of enterobactin-mediated iron transport at much higher concentrations (600 nM) of FeCl3. Indeed, enterobactin-dependent iron uptake at this concentration of iron was observed in both the mutant and parent strains irrespective of whether they had been cultured in the presence of enterobactin.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:2174865

  8. Genetics of O-Antigen Biosynthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Rocchetta, H. L.; Burrows, L. L.; Lam, J. S.

    1999-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria produce an elaborate assortment of extracellular and cell-associated bacterial products that enable colonization and establishment of infection within a host. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) molecules are cell surface factors that are typically known for their protective role against serum-mediated lysis and their endotoxic properties. The most heterogeneous portion of LPS is the O antigen or O polysaccharide, and it is this region which confers serum resistance to the organism. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is capable of concomitantly synthesizing two types of LPS referred to as A band and B band. The A-band LPS contains a conserved O polysaccharide region composed of d-rhamnose (homopolymer), while the B-band O-antigen (heteropolymer) structure varies among the 20 O serotypes of P. aeruginosa. The genes coding for the enzymes that direct the synthesis of these two O antigens are organized into two separate clusters situated at different chromosomal locations. In this review, we summarize the organization of these two gene clusters to discuss how A-band and B-band O antigens are synthesized and assembled by dedicated enzymes. Examples of unique proteins required for both A-band and B-band O-antigen synthesis and for the synthesis of both LPS and alginate are discussed. The recent identification of additional genes within the P. aeruginosa genome that are homologous to those in the A-band and B-band gene clusters are intriguing since some are able to influence O-antigen synthesis. These studies demonstrate that P. aeruginosa represents a unique model system, allowing studies of heteropolymeric and homopolymeric O-antigen synthesis, as well as permitting an examination of the interrelationship of the synthesis of LPS molecules and other virulence determinants. PMID:10477307

  9. Effect of Tyrosol and Farnesol on Virulence and Antibiotic Resistance of Clinical Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Rhman, Shaymaa Hassan; El-Mahdy, Areej Mostafa; El-Mowafy, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Mixed-species biofilms could create a protected environment that allows for survival to external antimicrobials and allows different bacterial-fungal interactions. Pseudomonas aeruginosa-Candida albicans coexistence is an example for such mixed-species community. Numerous reports demonstrated how P. aeruginosa or its metabolites could influence the growth, morphogenesis, and virulence of C. albicans. In this study, we investigated how the C. albicans quorum sensing compounds, tyrosol and farnesol, might affect Egyptian clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa regarding growth, antibiotic sensitivity, and virulence. We could demonstrate that tyrosol possesses an antibacterial activity against P. aeruginosa (10 µM inhibited more than 50% of growth after 16 h cultivation). Moreover, we could show for the first time that tyrosol strongly inhibits the production of the virulence factors hemolysin and protease in P. aeruginosa, whereas farnesol inhibits, to lower extent, hemolysin production in this bacterial pathogen. Cumulatively, tyrosol is expected to strongly affect P. aeruginosa in mixed microbial biofilm.

  10. Light intensity adaptation and phycobilisome composition of Microcystis aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Raps, S.; Kycia, J.H.; Ledbetter, M.C.; Siegelman, H.W.

    1985-12-01

    Phycobilisomes isolated from Microcystis aeruginosa grown to midlog at high light (270 microeinsteins per square meter per second) or at low light intensities (40 microeinsteins per square meter per second) were found to be identical. Electron micrographs established that they have a triangular central core apparently consisting of three allophycocyanin trimers surrounded by six rods, each composed of two hexameric phycocyanin molecules. The apparent mass of a phycobilisome obtained by gel filtration is 2.96 x 10/sup 6/ daltons. The molar ratio of the phycobiliproteins per phycobilisome is 12 phycocyanin hexamers:9 allophycocyanin trimers. The electron microscopic observations combined with the phycobilisome apparent mass and the phycobiliprotein stoichiometry data indicate that M. aeruginosa phycobilisomes are composed of a triangular central core of three stacks of three allophycocyanin trimers and six rods each containing two phycocyanin hexamers. Adaptation of M. aeruginosa to high light intensity results in a decrease in the number of phycobilisomes per cell with no alteration in phycobilisome composition or structure.

  11. Heterogeneity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Brazilian Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Silbert, Suzane; Barth, Afonso Luis; Sader, Hélio S.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the diversity and genomic variability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients being treated at a university hospital in Brazil. Ninety-seven isolates of P. aeruginosa from 43 CF patients were characterized by macrorestriction analysis of chromosomal DNA by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and tested for susceptibility to 20 antimicrobial agents by broth microdilution. It was possible to evaluate single isolates from 20 patients and multiple isolates (two to seven) from 23 patients collected during a 22-month period. Among all of the unrelated patients, we detected only one pair of patients sharing a common strain. Among the 77 isolates from 23 patients who had multiple isolates analyzed, we identified 37 major types by PFGE, and five different colonization patterns were recognized. The isolates were susceptible to several antimicrobial agents, although consecutive isolates from the same patient may display differences in their susceptibilities. Mucoid isolates were more resistant (P < 0.001) than nonmucoid isolates to five antibiotics. Our results indicate that CF patients remain colonized by more than one strain of P. aeruginosa for long periods of time. In addition, the finding of several different genotypes in the same patient suggests that the colonizing strain may occasionally be replaced. PMID:11682517

  12. Exploitation of syndecan-1 shedding by Pseudomonas aeruginosa enhances virulence.

    PubMed

    Park, P W; Pier, G B; Hinkes, M T; Bernfield, M

    2001-05-03

    Cell-surface heparan sulphate proteoglycans (HSPGs) are ubiquitous and abundant receptors/co-receptors of extracellular ligands, including many microbes. Their role in microbial infections is poorly defined, however, because no cell-surface HSPG has been clearly connected to the pathogenesis of a particular microbe. We have previously shown that Pseudomonas aeruginosa, through its virulence factor LasA, enhances the in vitro shedding of syndecan-1-the predominant cell-surface HSPG of epithelia. Here we show that shedding of syndecan-1 is also activated by P. aeruginosa in vivo, and that the resulting syndecan-1 ectodomains enhance bacterial virulence in newborn mice. Newborn mice deficient in syndecan-1 resist P. aeruginosa lung infection but become susceptible when given purified syndecan-1 ectodomains or heparin, but not when given ectodomain core protein, indicating that the ectodomain's heparan sulphate chains are the effectors. In wild-type newborn mice, inhibition of syndecan-1 shedding or inactivation of the shed ectodomain's heparan sulphate chains prevents lung infection. Our findings uncover a pathogenetic mechanism in which a host response to tissue injury-syndecan-1 shedding-is exploited to enhance microbial virulence apparently by modulating host defences.

  13. Human immune response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa mucoid exopolysaccharide (alginate) vaccine.

    PubMed Central

    Pier, G B; DesJardin, D; Grout, M; Garner, C; Bennett, S E; Pekoe, G; Fuller, S A; Thornton, M O; Harkonen, W S; Miller, H C

    1994-01-01

    Chronic lung infection with mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the major pathologic feature of cystic fibrosis. Previous studies suggested that a failure to produce opsonic antibody to the mucoid exopolysaccharide (MEP; also called alginate) capsule is associated with the maintenance of chronic bacterial infection. Provision of MEP-specific opsonic antibodies has therapeutic potential. To evaluate the ability of MEP to elicit opsonic antibodies, humans were immunized with two lots of MEP vaccine that differed principally in molecular size. Lot 2 had a larger average MEP polymer size. Both vaccines were well tolerated, but lot 1 was poorly immunogenic, inducing long-lived opsonic antibodies in only 2 of 28 vaccinates given doses of 10 to 150 micrograms. In contrast, at the optimal dose of 100 micrograms, lot 2 elicited long-lived opsonic antibodies in 80 to 90% of the vaccinates. The antibodies elicited by both lots enhanced deposition of C3 onto mucoid P. aeruginosa cells and mediated opsonic killing of heterologous mucoid strains expressing distinct MEP antigens. These results indicate that the polymers of MEP with the largest molecular sizes safely elicit opsonic antibodies in a sufficiently large proportion of vaccinates to permit studies of active and passive immunization of cystic fibrosis patients against infection with mucoid P. aeruginosa. PMID:8063415

  14. Characterization of colony morphology variants isolated from Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    PubMed

    Kirisits, Mary Jo; Prost, Lynne; Starkey, Melissa; Parsek, Matthew R

    2005-08-01

    In this study, we report the isolation of small, rough, strongly cohesive colony morphology variants from aging Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 biofilms. Similar to many of the P. aeruginosa colony morphology variants previously described in the literature, these variants autoaggregate in liquid culture and hyperadhere to solid surfaces. They also exhibit increased hydrophobicity and reduced motility compared to the wild-type parent strain. Despite the similarities in appearance of our colony morphology variant isolates on solid medium, the isolates showed a range of responses in various phenotypic assays. These variants form biofilms with significant three-dimensional structure and more biomass than the wild-type parent. To further explore the nature of the variants, their transcriptional profiles were evaluated. The variants generally showed increased expression of the psl and pel loci, which have been previously implicated in the adherence of P. aeruginosa to solid surfaces. When a mutation in the psl locus was introduced into a colony morphology variant, the colony morphology was only partially affected, but hyperadherence and autoaggregation were lost. Finally, similar colony morphology variants were found in isolates from cystic fibrosis patients. These variants displayed many of the same characteristics as the laboratory variants, suggesting a link between laboratory and cystic fibrosis biofilms.

  15. Origin and Impact of Nitric Oxide in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The formation of the organized bacterial community called biofilm is a crucial event in bacterial physiology. Given that biofilms are often refractory to antibiotics and disinfectants to which planktonic bacteria are susceptible, their formation is also an industrially and medically relevant issue. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a well-known human pathogen causing acute and chronic infections, is considered a model organism to study biofilms. A large number of environmental cues control biofilm dynamics in bacterial cells. In particular, the dispersal of individual cells from the biofilm requires metabolic and morphological reprogramming in which the second messenger bis-(3′-5′)-cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP) plays a central role. The diatomic gas nitric oxide (NO), a well-known signaling molecule in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, is able to induce the dispersal of P. aeruginosa and other bacterial biofilms by lowering c-di-GMP levels. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the molecular mechanisms connecting NO sensing to the activation of c-di-GMP-specific phosphodiesterases in P. aeruginosa, ultimately leading to c-di-GMP decrease and biofilm dispersal. PMID:26260455

  16. Measuring antimicrobial susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa using Poloxamer 407 gel.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Hiroyuki; Koike, Naohito; Ehara, Tomoko; Matsumoto, Tetsuya

    2011-04-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative bacterium that causes various opportunistic infections. Chronic and intractable infections with P. aeruginosa are closely related to the high levels of resistance displayed by this organism to antimicrobial agents and its ability to form biofilms. Although the standard method for examining antimicrobial resistance involves susceptibility testing using Mueller-Hinton agar or broth, this method does not take into account the influence of biofilm formation on antimicrobial susceptibility. Poloxamer 407 is a hydrophilic, nonionic surfactant of the more general class of copolymers that can be used to culture bacteria with similar properties as cells in a biofilm environment. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare the antimicrobial susceptibility of bacteria cultured in Poloxamer 407 gel to those grown on Mueller-Hinton agar using the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method with 24 strains of P. aeruginosa. Antimicrobial sensibility differed between the two mediums, with >60% of the strains displaying increased resistance to β-lactams when cultured on Poloxamer 407 gel. In addition, scanning electron microscopy revealed that typical biofilm formation and extracellular polymeric substance production was only observed with bacteria grown on Poloxamer 407 gel. Therefore, antimicrobial susceptibility test using Poloxamer 407 gel may provide more accurate information and allow the selection of suitable antimicrobial agents for treating patients infected with biofilm-forming pathogens.

  17. Mycofabricated biosilver nanoparticles interrupt Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing systems

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Braj R.; Singh, Brahma N.; Singh, Akanksha; Khan, Wasi; Naqvi, Alim H.; Singh, Harikesh B.

    2015-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a chemical communication process that Pseudomonas aeruginosa uses to regulate virulence and biofilm formation. Disabling of QS is an emerging approach for combating its pathogenicity. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been widely applied as antimicrobial agents against human pathogenic bacteria and fungi, but not for the attenuation of bacterial QS. Here we mycofabricated AgNPs (mfAgNPs) using metabolites of soil fungus Rhizopus arrhizus BRS-07 and tested their effect on QS-regulated virulence and biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa. Transcriptional studies demonstrated that mfAgNPs reduced the levels of LasIR-RhlIR. Treatment of mfAgNPs inhibited biofilm formation, production of several virulence factors (e.g. LasA protease, LasB elastrase, pyocyanin, pyoverdin, pyochelin, rhamnolipid, and alginate) and reduced AHLs production. Further genes quantification analyses revealed that mfAgNPs significantly down-regulated QS-regulated genes, specifically those encoded to the secretion of virulence factors. The results clearly indicated the anti-virulence property of mfAgNPs by inhibiting P. aeruginosa QS signaling. PMID:26347993

  18. In vitro antimicrobial activity of LED irradiation on Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Petrini, Morena; Trentini, Paolo; Tripodi, Domenico; Spoto, Giuseppe; D'Ercole, Simonetta

    2017-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen responsible of many deaths due to nosocomial pneumonia each year. It is particularly resistant to many different classes of antibiotics and disinfectants. For all these reasons, there is the necessity to find novel approaches of treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of 880nm light emitting diodes (LED) irradiation on P. aeruginosa, in vitro. Different LED irradiation parameters (time, energy output and the addition of methylene blue and chlorhexidine) have been tested in order to evaluate the effects on this bacterium. After treatment, the colony forming units per milliliter (CFU mL-1) were recorded and the data were submitted to ANOVA and Bonferroni post hoc tests at a level of significance of 5%. A statistical significant reduction of bacterial count has been registered after 5min of LED irradiation. The antibacterial effect was directly proportional to irradiation time and the output energy. The pre-treatment with methylene blue, seems to be not effective against P. aeruginosa, independently from irradiation parameters. On the contrary, the contemporary action of LED and chlorhexidine has shown a great reduction of bacterial count that was statistical significant respect chlorhexidine and LED alone. The effect of LED irradiation was visible also after 24h, when a lower bacterial count characterized all irradiated samples respect controls.

  19. Indole and 7‐hydroxyindole diminish Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jintae; Attila, Can; Cirillo, Suat L. G.; Cirillo, Jeffrey D.; Wood, Thomas K.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Indole is an extracellular biofilm signal for Escherichia coli, and many bacterial oxygenases readily convert indole to various oxidized compounds including 7‐hydroxyindole (7HI). Here we investigate the impact of indole and 7HI on Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 virulence and quorum sensing (QS)‐regulated phenotypes; this strain does not synthesize these compounds but degrades them rapidly. Indole and 7HI both altered extensively gene expression in a manner opposite that of acylhomoserine lactones; the most repressed genes encode the mexGHI‐opmD multidrug efflux pump and genes involved in the synthesis of QS‐regulated virulence factors including pyocyanin (phz operon), 2‐heptyl‐3‐hydroxy‐4(1H)‐quinolone (PQS) signal (pqs operon), pyochelin (pch operon) and pyoverdine (pvd operon). Corroborating these microarray results, indole and 7HI decreased production of pyocyanin, rhamnolipid, PQS and pyoverdine and enhanced antibiotic resistance. In addition, indole affected the utilization of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus, and 7HI abolished swarming motility. Furthermore, 7HI reduced pulmonary colonization of P. aeruginosa in guinea pigs and increased clearance in lungs. Hence, indole‐related compounds have potential as a novel antivirulence approach for the recalcitrant pathogen P. aeruginosa. PMID:21261883

  20. Indole and 7-hydroxyindole diminish Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jintae; Attila, Can; Cirillo, Suat L G; Cirillo, Jeffrey D; Wood, Thomas K

    2009-01-01

    Indole is an extracellular biofilm signal for Escherichia coli, and many bacterial oxygenases readily convert indole to various oxidized compounds including 7-hydroxyindole (7HI). Here we investigate the impact of indole and 7HI on Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 virulence and quorum sensing (QS)-regulated phenotypes; this strain does not synthesize these compounds but degrades them rapidly. Indole and 7HI both altered extensively gene expression in a manner opposite that of acylhomoserine lactones; the most repressed genes encode the mexGHI-opmD multidrug efflux pump and genes involved in the synthesis of QS-regulated virulence factors including pyocyanin (phz operon), 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone (PQS) signal (pqs operon), pyochelin (pch operon) and pyoverdine (pvd operon). Corroborating these microarray results, indole and 7HI decreased production of pyocyanin, rhamnolipid, PQS and pyoverdine and enhanced antibiotic resistance. In addition, indole affected the utilization of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus, and 7HI abolished swarming motility. Furthermore, 7HI reduced pulmonary colonization of P. aeruginosa in guinea pigs and increased clearance in lungs. Hence, indole-related compounds have potential as a novel antivirulence approach for the recalcitrant pathogen P. aeruginosa.

  1. Strategies for improved rhamnolipid production by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA1

    PubMed Central

    Pereira Jr, Nei; Freire, Denise M.G.

    2016-01-01

    Rhamnolipids are biosurfactants with potential for diversified industrial and environmental uses. The present study evaluated three strategies for increasing the production of rhamnolipid-type biosurfactants produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PA1. The influence of pH, the addition of P. aeruginosa spent culture medium and the use of a fed-batch process were examined. The culture medium adjusted to pH 7.0 was the most productive. Furthermore, the pH of the culture medium had a measurable effect on the ratio of synthesized mono- and dirhamnolipids. At pH values below 7.3, the proportion of monorhamnolipids decreased from 45 to 24%. The recycling of 20% of the spent culture medium in where P. aeruginosa was grown up to the later stationary phase was responsible for a 100% increase in rhamnolipid volumetric productivity in the new culture medium. Finally, the use of fed-batch operation under conditions of limited nitrogen resulted in a 3.8-fold increase in the amount of rhamnolipids produced (2.9 g L−1–10.9 g L−1). These results offer promising pathways for the optimization of processes for the production of rhamnolipids. PMID:27257553

  2. Gallium induces the production of virulence factors in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    García-Contreras, Rodolfo; Pérez-Eretza, Berenice; Lira-Silva, Elizabeth; Jasso-Chávez, Ricardo; Coria-Jiménez, Rafael; Rangel-Vega, Adrián; Maeda, Toshinari; Wood, Thomas K

    2014-02-01

    The novel antimicrobial gallium is a nonredox iron III analogue with bacteriostatic and bactericidal properties, effective for the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in vitro and in vivo in mouse and rabbit infection models. It interferes with iron metabolism, transport, and presumably its homeostasis. As gallium exerts its antimicrobial effects by competing with iron, we hypothesized that it ultimately will lead cells to an iron deficiency status. As iron deficiency promotes the expression of virulence factors in vitro and promotes the pathogenicity of P. aeruginosa in animal models, it is anticipated that treatment with gallium will also promote the production of virulence factors. To test this hypothesis, the reference strain PA14 and two clinical isolates from patients with cystic fibrosis were exposed to gallium, and their production of pyocyanin, rhamnolipids, elastase, alkaline protease, alginate, pyoverdine, and biofilm was determined. Gallium treatment induced the production of all the virulence factors tested in the three strains except for pyoverdine. In addition, as the Ga-induced virulence factors are quorum sensing controlled, co-administration of Ga and the quorum quencher brominated furanone C-30 was assayed, and it was found that C-30 alleviated growth inhibition from gallium. Hence, adding both C-30 and gallium may be more effective in the treatment of P. aeruginosa infections.

  3. Mechanism of azithromycin inhibition of HSL synthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Jianming; Zhang, Ni; Huang, Bin; Cai, Renxin; Wu, Binning; E, Shunmei; Fang, Chengcai; Chen, Cha

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen and a leading cause of nosocomial infections. Unfortunately, P. aeruginosa has low antibiotic susceptibility due to several chromosomally encoded antibiotic resistance genes. Hence, we carried out mechanistic studies to determine how azithromycin affects quorum sensing and virulence in P. aeruginosa. lasI and rhlI single and double mutants were constructed. We then undertook a quantitative approach to determine the optimal concentration of azithromycin and culture time that can affect the expression of HSLs. Furthermore, based on the above results, the effect on quorum sensing was analyzed at a transcriptional level. It was found that 2 μg/mL azithromycin caused a 79% decrease in 3-oxo-C12-HSL secretion during cultivation, while C4-HSL secretion was strongly repressed in the early stages. Azithromycin acts on ribosomes; to determine whether this can elicit alternative modes of gene expression, transcriptional regulation of representative virulence genes was analyzed. We propose a new relationship for lasI and rhlI: lasI acts as a cell density sensor, and rhlI functions as a fine-tuning mechanism for coordination between different quorum sensing systems. PMID:27075730

  4. INHIBITION OF VIRULENCE FACTORS OF PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA BY DICLOFENAC SODIUM.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Hisham A

    2015-01-01

    Resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to antibiotics is a major problem. Targeting virulence factors is an alternative option to avoid the emergence of resistance to antibiotics. The effect of sub-inhibitory concentration of diclofenac sodium on the production of virulence factors of P. aeruginosa was investigated. The virulence factors included protease, haemolysin, pyocyanin and pyoverdin, in addition to pathogenic behaviors such as swimming and twitching motilities and biofilm formation. Diclofenac sodium showed significant inhibition of virulence factors as compared to the control. Diclofenac sodium decreased twitching and swimming motilities by 29.27% and 45.36%, respectively. The percentage of inhibition of pyocyanin by diclofenac sodium was 42.32%. On the other hand, pyoverdin was inhibited to a lesser extent (36.72%). Diclofenac sodium reduced protease by 52.58% and biofilm formation by 58.37%. Moreover, haemolytic activity in the presence of diclofenac sodium was 15.64% as compared to the control (100% haemolytic activity). The inhibitory activities may be due to inhibition of quorum sensing that regulates the expression of virulence factors. This study suggests the potential for the use of diclofenac sodium as an anti-virulence agent in the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections.

  5. Quorum sensing and policing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa social cheaters.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meizhen; Schaefer, Amy L; Dandekar, Ajai A; Greenberg, E Peter

    2015-02-17

    The bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen that uses a quorum sensing signal cascade to activate expression of dozens of genes when sufficient population densities have been reached. Quorum sensing controls production of several key virulence factors, including secreted proteases such as elastase. Cooperating groups of bacteria growing on protein are susceptible to social cheating by quorum-sensing defective mutants. A possible way to restrict cheater emergence is by policing where cooperators produce costly goods to sanction or punish cheats. The P. aeruginosa LasR-LasI quorum sensing system controls genes including those encoding proteases and also those encoding a second quorum-sensing system, the RhlR-RhlI system, which controls numerous genes including those for cyanide production. By using RhlR quorum sensing mutants and cyanide synthesis mutants, we show that cyanide production is costly and cyanide-producing cooperators use cyanide to punish LasR-null social cheaters. Cooperators are less susceptible to cyanide than are LasR mutants. These experiments demonstrate policing in P. aeruginosa, provide a mechanistic understanding of policing, and show policing involves the cascade organization of the two quorum sensing systems in this bacterium.

  6. Strategies for improved rhamnolipid production by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA1.

    PubMed

    Soares Dos Santos, Alexandre; Pereira, Nei; Freire, Denise M G

    2016-01-01

    Rhamnolipids are biosurfactants with potential for diversified industrial and environmental uses. The present study evaluated three strategies for increasing the production of rhamnolipid-type biosurfactants produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PA1. The influence of pH, the addition of P. aeruginosa spent culture medium and the use of a fed-batch process were examined. The culture medium adjusted to pH 7.0 was the most productive. Furthermore, the pH of the culture medium had a measurable effect on the ratio of synthesized mono- and dirhamnolipids. At pH values below 7.3, the proportion of monorhamnolipids decreased from 45 to 24%. The recycling of 20% of the spent culture medium in where P. aeruginosa was grown up to the later stationary phase was responsible for a 100% increase in rhamnolipid volumetric productivity in the new culture medium. Finally, the use of fed-batch operation under conditions of limited nitrogen resulted in a 3.8-fold increase in the amount of rhamnolipids produced (2.9 g L(-1)-10.9 g L(-1)). These results offer promising pathways for the optimization of processes for the production of rhamnolipids.

  7. Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Lectins As Targets for Novel Antibacterials

    PubMed Central

    Grishin, A. V.; Krivozubov, M. S.; Karyagina, A. S.; Gintsburg, A. L.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most widespread and troublesome opportunistic pathogens that is capable of colonizing various human tissues and organs and is often resistant to many currently used antibiotics. This resistance is caused by different factors, including the acquisition of specific resistance genes, intrinsic capability to diminish antibiotic penetration into the bacterial cell, and the ability to form biofilms. This situation has prompted the development of novel compounds differing in their mechanism of action from traditional antibiotics that suppress the growth of microorganisms or directly kill bacteria. Instead, these new compounds should decrease the pathogens’ ability to colonize and damage human tissues by inhibiting the virulence factors and biofilm formation. The lectins LecA and LecB that bind galactose and fucose, as well as oligo- and polysaccharides containing these sugars, are among the most thoroughly-studied targets for such novel antibacterials. In this review, we summarize the results of experiments highlighting the importance of these proteins for P. aeruginosa pathogenicity and provide information on existing lectins inhibitors and their effectiveness in various experimental models. Particular attention is paid to the effects of lectins inhibition in animal models of infection and in clinical practice. We argue that lectins inhibition is a perspective approach to combating P. aeruginosa. However, despite the existence of highly effective in vitro inhibitors, further experiments are required in order to advance these inhibitors into pre-clinical studies. PMID:26085942

  8. Proteolytic regulation of alginate overproduction in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Damron, F Heath; Goldberg, Joanna B

    2012-05-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a Gram-negative bacterium, is a significant opportunistic pathogen associated with skin and soft tissue infections, nosocomial pneumonia and sepsis. In addition, it can chronically colonize the lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Overproduction of the exopolysaccharide called alginate provides P. aeruginosa with a selective advantage and facilitates survival in the CF lung. The in vitro phenotype of alginate overproduction observed on solid culture media is referred to as mucoid. Expression of the alginate machinery and biosynthetic enzymes are controlled by the extracytoplasmic sigma factor, σ(22) (AlgU/T). The key negative regulator of both σ(22) activity and the mucoid phenotype is the cognate anti-sigma factor MucA. MucA sequesters σ(22) to the inner membrane inhibiting the sigma factor's transcriptional activity. The well-studied mechanism for transition to the mucoid phenotype is mutation of mucA, leading to loss of MucA function and therefore activation of σ(22) . Recently, regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP) has been recognized as a mechanism whereby proteolysis of the anti-sigma factor MucA leads to active σ(22) allowing P. aeruginosa to respond to environmental stress conditions by overproduction of alginate. The goal of this review is to illuminate the pathways leading to RIP that have been identified and proposed.

  9. General and condition-specific essential functions of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Samuel A.; Gallagher, Larry A.; Thongdee, Metawee; Staudinger, Benjamin J.; Lippman, Soyeon; Singh, Pradeep K.; Manoil, Colin

    2015-01-01

    The essential functions of a bacterial pathogen reflect the most basic processes required for its viability and growth, and represent potential therapeutic targets. Most screens for essential genes have assayed a single condition—growth in a rich undefined medium—and thus have not distinguished genes that are generally essential from those that are specific to this particular condition. To help define these classes for Pseudomonas aeruginosa, we identified genes required for growth on six different media, including a medium made from cystic fibrosis patient sputum. The analysis used the Tn-seq circle method to achieve high genome coverage and analyzed more than 1,000,000 unique insertion positions (an average of one insertion every 6.0 bp). We identified 352 general and 199 condition-specific essential genes. A subset of assignments was verified in individual strains with regulated expression alleles. The profile of essential genes revealed that, compared with Escherichia coli, P. aeruginosa is highly vulnerable to mutations disrupting central carbon-energy metabolism and reactive oxygen defenses. These vulnerabilities may arise from the stripped-down architecture of the organism’s carbohydrate utilization pathways and its reliance on respiration for energy generation. The essential function profile thus provides fundamental insights into P. aeruginosa physiology as well as identifying candidate targets for new antibacterial agents. PMID:25848053

  10. Mycofabricated biosilver nanoparticles interrupt Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing systems.

    PubMed

    Singh, Braj R; Singh, Brahma N; Singh, Akanksha; Khan, Wasi; Naqvi, Alim H; Singh, Harikesh B

    2015-09-08

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a chemical communication process that Pseudomonas aeruginosa uses to regulate virulence and biofilm formation. Disabling of QS is an emerging approach for combating its pathogenicity. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been widely applied as antimicrobial agents against human pathogenic bacteria and fungi, but not for the attenuation of bacterial QS. Here we mycofabricated AgNPs (mfAgNPs) using metabolites of soil fungus Rhizopus arrhizus BRS-07 and tested their effect on QS-regulated virulence and biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa. Transcriptional studies demonstrated that mfAgNPs reduced the levels of LasIR-RhlIR. Treatment of mfAgNPs inhibited biofilm formation, production of several virulence factors (e.g. LasA protease, LasB elastrase, pyocyanin, pyoverdin, pyochelin, rhamnolipid, and alginate) and reduced AHLs production. Further genes quantification analyses revealed that mfAgNPs significantly down-regulated QS-regulated genes, specifically those encoded to the secretion of virulence factors. The results clearly indicated the anti-virulence property of mfAgNPs by inhibiting P. aeruginosa QS signaling.

  11. Draft Genome Sequences of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from Wounded Military Personnel.

    PubMed

    Arivett, Brock A; Ream, Dave C; Fiester, Steven E; Kidane, Destaalem; Actis, Luis A

    2016-08-11

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a Gram-negative bacterium that causes severe hospital-acquired infections, is grouped as an ESKAPE (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter species) pathogen because of its extensive drug resistance phenotypes and effects on human health worldwide. Five multidrug resistant P. aeruginosa strains isolated from wounded military personnel were sequenced and annotated in this work.

  12. Quorum-sensing inhibition abrogates the deleterious impact of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on airway epithelial repair.

    PubMed

    Ruffin, Manon; Bilodeau, Claudia; Maillé, Émilie; LaFayette, Shantelle L; McKay, Geoffrey A; Trinh, Nguyen Thu Ngan; Beaudoin, Trevor; Desrosiers, Martin-Yvon; Rousseau, Simon; Nguyen, Dao; Brochiero, Emmanuelle

    2016-09-01

    Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections are associated with progressive epithelial damage and lung function decline. In addition to its role in tissue injury, the persistent presence of P. aeruginosa-secreted products may also affect epithelial repair ability, raising the need for new antivirulence therapies. The purpose of our study was to better understand the outcomes of P. aeruginosa exoproducts exposure on airway epithelial repair processes to identify a strategy to counteract their deleterious effect. We found that P. aeruginosa exoproducts significantly decreased wound healing, migration, and proliferation rates, and impaired the ability of directional migration of primary non-cystic fibrosis (CF) human airway epithelial cells. Impact of exoproducts was inhibited after mutations in P. aeruginosa genes that encoded for the quorum-sensing (QS) transcriptional regulator, LasR, and the elastase, LasB, whereas impact was restored by LasB induction in ΔlasR mutants. P. aeruginosa purified elastase also induced a significant decrease in non-CF epithelial repair, whereas protease inhibition with phosphoramidon prevented the effect of P. aeruginosa exoproducts. Furthermore, treatment of P. aeruginosa cultures with 4-hydroxy-2,5-dimethyl-3(2H)-furanone, a QS inhibitor, abrogated the negative impact of P. aeruginosa exoproducts on airway epithelial repair. Finally, we confirmed our findings in human airway epithelial cells from patients with CF, a disease featuring P. aeruginosa chronic respiratory infection. These data demonstrate that secreted proteases under the control of the LasR QS system impair airway epithelial repair and that QS inhibitors could be of benefit to counteract the deleterious effect of P. aeruginosa in infected patients.-Ruffin, M., Bilodeau, C., Maillé, É., LaFayette, S. L., McKay, G. A., Trinh, N. T. N., Beaudoin, T., Desrosiers, M.-Y., Rousseau, S., Nguyen, D., Brochiero, E. Quorum-sensing inhibition abrogates the deleterious impact

  13. Alginate Lyase Promotes Diffusion of Aminoglycosides through the Extracellular Polysaccharide of Mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Hatch, Richard A.; Schiller, Neal L.

    1998-01-01

    We demonstrated that a 2% suspension of Pseudomonas aeruginosa alginate completely blocked the diffusion of gentamicin and tobramycin, but not that of carbenicillin, illustrating how alginate production can help protect P. aeruginosa growing within alginate microcolonies in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) from the effects of aminoglycosides. This aminoglycoside diffusion barrier was degraded with a semipurified preparation of P. aeruginosa alginate lyase, suggesting that this enzyme deserves consideration as an adjunctive agent for CF patients colonized by mucoid strains of P. aeruginosa. PMID:9559826

  14. Virulence genome analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa VRFPA10 recovered from patient with scleritis.

    PubMed

    Murugan, Nandagopal; Malathi, Jambulingam; Umashankar, Vetrivel; Madhavan, Hajib Narahari Rao

    2017-06-01

    Infectious keratitis is a major cause of blindness, next to cataract and majority of cases are mainly caused by gram negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa). In this study, we investigated a P. aeruginosa VRFPA10 genome which exhibited susceptibility to commonly used drugs in vitro but the patient had poor prognosis due to its hyper virulent nature. Genomic analysis of VRFPA10 deciphered multiple virulence factors and P.aeruginosa Genomic Islands (PAGIs) VRFPA10 genome which correlated with hyper virulence nature of the organism. The genome sequence has been deposited in DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank under the accession numbers LFMZ01000001-LFMZ01000044.

  15. [Justification of the significance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa index in assessing the quality of drinking water].

    PubMed

    Ivanova, L V; Artemova, T Z; Gipp, E K; Zagaĭnova, A V; Maksimkina, T N; Krasniak, A V; Korneĭchuk, S S

    2013-01-01

    The analysis of literature data was carried out and performed research justifying the epidemic value of detection in water P. aeruginosa in drinking and domestic water use. The were revealed features of the vital activity of P aeruginosa in water bodies as opposed to conventional microbiological indicators. It was shown that the coliform group indices can not guarantee the epidemic safety of drinking water use in relation to P aeruginosa. The data obtained justify the need for the introduction of P aeruginosa as an additional index in monitoring the water quality of centralized and decentralized water supply.

  16. Fast and specific detection of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa from other pseudomonas species by PCR

    PubMed Central

    Jami Al-Ahmadi, G.; Zahmatkesh Roodsari, R.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important life-threatening nosocomial pathogen that plays a prominent role in wound infections of burned patients. We designed this study to identify the isolates of P. aeruginosa recovered from burned patients at the genus and species level through primers targeting oprI and oprL genes, and analyzed their antimicrobial resistance pattern. Over a 2-month period, wound samples were taken from burned patients and plated on MacConkey agar. All suspected colonies were primarily screened for P. aeruginosa by a combination of phenotypic tests. Molecular identifications of colonies were done using specific primers for oprI and oprL genes. Bacterial isolates were recovered from burn wound infections. Based on phenotypical identification tests, 138 (34%) P. aeruginosa isolates were identified; whereas by molecular techniques, just 128 P. aeruginosa yielded amplicon of oprL gene using species-specific primers, verifying the identity of P. aeruginosa; the others yielded amplicon of oprI gene using genus-specific primers, confirming the identity of fluorescent pseudomonads. This study indicates that molecular detection of P. aeruginosa in burn patients employing the OprL gene target is a useful technique for the early and precise detection of P. aeruginosa. PCR detection should be carried out as well as phenotypic testing for the best aggressive antibiotic treatment of P. aeruginosa strains at an earlier stage. It also has significant benefits on clinical outcomes. PMID:28289359

  17. Pseudomonas aeruginosa on vinyl-canvas inflatables and foam teaching aids in swimming pools.

    PubMed

    Schets, F M; van den Berg, H H J L; Baan, R; Lynch, G; de Roda Husman, A M

    2014-12-01

    Swimming pool-related Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections mainly result in folliculitis and otitis externa. P. aeruginosa forms biofilms on surfaces in the swimming pool environment. The presence of P. aeruginosa on inflatables and foam teaching aids in 24 public swimming pools in the Netherlands was studied. Samples (n = 230) were taken from 175 objects and analysed for P. aeruginosa by culture. Isolated P. aeruginosa were tested for antibiotic resistance by disk diffusion. P. aeruginosa was detected in 63 samples (27%), from 47 objects (27%) in 19 (79%) swimming pools. More vinyl-canvas objects (44%) than foam objects (20%) were contaminated, as were wet objects (43%) compared to dry objects (13%). Concentrations were variable, and on average higher on vinyl-canvas than on foam objects. Forty of 193 (21%) P. aeruginosa isolates from 11 different objects were (intermediate) resistant to one or more of 12 clinically relevant antibiotics, mostly to imipenem and aztreonam. The immediate risk of a P. aeruginosa infection from exposure to swimming pool objects seems limited, but the presence of P. aeruginosa on pool objects is unwanted and requires attention of pool managers and responsible authorities. Strict drying and cleaning policies are needed for infrequently used vinyl-canvas objects.

  18. Inactivation of Microcystis aeruginosa using dielectric barrier discharge low-temperature plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Pu, Sichuan; Chen, Jierong; Wang, Gang; Li, Xiaoyong; Ma, Yun

    2013-05-13

    The efficiency of Microcystis aeruginosa plasma inactivation was investigated using dielectric barrier discharge low-temperature plasma. The inactivation efficiency was characterized in terms of optical density. The influence of electrical and physicochemical parameters on M. aeruginosa inactivation was studied to determine the optimal experimental conditions. The influence of active species was studied. The proliferation of the M. aeruginosa cells was significantly decreased under plasma exposure. The morphologic changes in M. aeruginosa were characterized under scanning electron microscopy. These results suggest that the low-temperature plasma technology is a promising method for water pollution control.

  19. Pseudomonas aeruginosa forms Biofilms in Acute InfectionIndependent of Cell-to-Cell Signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Schaber, J. Andy; Triffo, W.J.; Suh, Sang J.; Oliver, Jeffrey W.; Hastert, Mary C.; Griswold, John A.; Auer, Manfred; Hamood, Abdul N.; Rumbaugh, Kendra P.

    2006-09-20

    Biofilms are bacterial communities residing within a polysaccharide matrix that are associated with persistence and antibiotic resistance in chronic infections. We show that the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa forms biofilms within 8 hours of infection in thermally-injured mice, demonstrating that biofilms contribute to bacterial colonization in acute infections. P. aeruginosa biofilms were visualized within burned tissue surrounding blood vessels and adipose cells. Although quorum sensing (QS), a bacterial signaling mechanism, coordinates differentiation of biofilms in vitro, wild type and QS-deficient P. aeruginosa formed similar biofilms in vivo. Our findings demonstrate that P. aeruginosa forms biofilms on specific host tissues independent of QS.

  20. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and caveolin-1 regulate epithelial cell internalization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Bajmoczi, Milan; Gadjeva, Mihaela; Alper, Seth L.; Pier, Gerald B.; Golan, David E.

    2009-01-01

    Patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) exhibit defective innate immunity and are susceptible to chronic lung infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. To investigate the molecular bases for the hypersusceptibility of CF patients to P. aeruginosa, we used the IB3-1 cell line with two defective CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) genes (ΔF508/W1282X) to generate isogenic stable, clonal lung epithelial cells expressing wild-type (WT)-CFTR with an NH2-terminal green fluorescent protein (GFP) tag. GFP-CFTR exhibited posttranslational modification, subcellular localization, and anion transport function typical of WT-CFTR. P. aeruginosa internalization, a component of effective innate immunity, required functional CFTR and caveolin-1, as shown by: 1) direct correlation between GFP-CFTR expression levels and P. aeruginosa internalization; 2) enhanced P. aeruginosa internalization by aminoglycoside-induced read through of the CFTR W1282X allele in IB3-1 cells; 3) decreased P. aeruginosa internalization following siRNA knockdown of GFP-CFTR or caveolin-1; and 4) spatial association of P. aeruginosa with GFP-CFTR and caveolin-1 at the cell surface. P. aeruginosa internalization also required free lateral diffusion of GFP-CFTR, allowing for bacterial coclustering with GFP-CFTR and caveolin-1 at the plasma membrane. Thus efficient initiation of innate immunity to P. aeruginosa requires formation of an epithelial “internalization platform” involving both caveolin-1 and functional, laterally mobile CFTR. PMID:19386787

  1. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and caveolin-1 regulate epithelial cell internalization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Bajmoczi, Milan; Gadjeva, Mihaela; Alper, Seth L; Pier, Gerald B; Golan, David E

    2009-08-01

    Patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) exhibit defective innate immunity and are susceptible to chronic lung infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. To investigate the molecular bases for the hypersusceptibility of CF patients to P. aeruginosa, we used the IB3-1 cell line with two defective CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) genes (DeltaF508/W1282X) to generate isogenic stable, clonal lung epithelial cells expressing wild-type (WT)-CFTR with an NH(2)-terminal green fluorescent protein (GFP) tag. GFP-CFTR exhibited posttranslational modification, subcellular localization, and anion transport function typical of WT-CFTR. P. aeruginosa internalization, a component of effective innate immunity, required functional CFTR and caveolin-1, as shown by: 1) direct correlation between GFP-CFTR expression levels and P. aeruginosa internalization; 2) enhanced P. aeruginosa internalization by aminoglycoside-induced read through of the CFTR W1282X allele in IB3-1 cells; 3) decreased P. aeruginosa internalization following siRNA knockdown of GFP-CFTR or caveolin-1; and 4) spatial association of P. aeruginosa with GFP-CFTR and caveolin-1 at the cell surface. P. aeruginosa internalization also required free lateral diffusion of GFP-CFTR, allowing for bacterial coclustering with GFP-CFTR and caveolin-1 at the plasma membrane. Thus efficient initiation of innate immunity to P. aeruginosa requires formation of an epithelial "internalization platform" involving both caveolin-1 and functional, laterally mobile CFTR.

  2. Inhibitory and toxic effects of volatiles emitted by strains of Pseudomonas and Serratia on growth and survival of selected microorganisms, Caenorhabditis elegans, and Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Popova, Alexandra A; Koksharova, Olga A; Lipasova, Valentina A; Zaitseva, Julia V; Katkova-Zhukotskaya, Olga A; Eremina, Svetlana Iu; Mironov, Alexander S; Chernin, Leonid S; Khmel, Inessa A

    2014-01-01

    In previous research, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by various bacteria into the chemosphere were suggested to play a significant role in the antagonistic interactions between microorganisms occupying the same ecological niche and between bacteria and target eukaryotes. Moreover, a number of volatiles released by bacteria were reported to suppress quorum-sensing cell-to-cell communication in bacteria, and to stimulate plant growth. Here, volatiles produced by Pseudomonas and Serratia strains isolated mainly from the soil or rhizosphere exhibited bacteriostatic action on phytopathogenic Agrobacterium tumefaciens and fungi and demonstrated a killing effect on cyanobacteria, flies (Drosophila melanogaster), and nematodes (Caenorhabditis elegans). VOCs emitted by the rhizospheric Pseudomonas chlororaphis strain 449 and by Serratia proteamaculans strain 94 isolated from spoiled meat were identified using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis, and the effects of the main headspace compounds--ketones (2-nonanone, 2-heptanone, 2-undecanone) and dimethyl disulfide--were inhibitory toward the tested microorganisms, nematodes, and flies. The data confirmed the role of bacterial volatiles as important compounds involved in interactions between organisms under natural ecological conditions.

  3. Expression, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic data analysis of PigI, a putative L-prolyl-AMP ligase from the prodigiosin synthetic pathway in Serratia.

    PubMed

    Han, Ning; Ran, Tingting; Lou, Xiangdi; Gao, Yanyan; He, Jianhua; Tang, Lin; Xu, Dongqing; Wang, Weiwu

    2014-05-01

    Prodigiosin, a member of the prodiginines, is a tripyrrole red pigment synthesized by Serratia and some other microbes. A bifurcated biosynthesis pathway of prodigiosin has been proposed in Serratia in which MBC (4-methoxy-2,2'-bipyrrole-5-carbaldehyde) and MAP (2-methyl-3-N-amyl-pyrrole) are synthesized separately and then condensed by PigC to form prodigiosin. The first step for the synthesis of MBC is the activation of L-proline by PigI, but its catalytic mechanism has remained elusive. To elucidate its mechanism, recombinant PigI was purified and crystallized. Crystals obtained by the sitting-drop method belonged to space group P1 and diffracted to 2.0 Å resolution, with unit-cell parameters a = 51.2, b = 62.8, c = 91.3 Å, α = 105.1, β = 90.1, γ = 92.2°. Matthews coefficient analysis suggested two molecules in the asymmetric unit, with a VM of 2.6 Å(3) Da(-1) and a solvent content of 52.69%.

  4. Structural problems of medical news reports in newspapers: a verification of news reports on an incident of mass nosocomial Serratia infection.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Yasuhiro; Narimatsu, Hiroto; Kishi, Yukiko; Kodama, Yuko; Murashige, Naoko; Yuji, Koichiro; Matsumura, Tomoko; Kami, Masahiro

    2010-04-01

    It is unclear how changes in the content and number of news reports over time affect the impressions made in the minds of newspaper readers. This study targeted news reports in major newspapers regarding an incident of mass nosocomial Serratia infection that occurred at one clinic. The trends in the total number of articles and total number of characters contained in the articles were congruent, with a peak on the day after the incident was disclosed and a rapid decrease thereafter. The numbers of articles and characters that appeared during the first 3 days corresponded to 45 and 51% of those that appeared during the entire study period. On day 9, it was published that Serratia liquefaciens propagated on medical instruments, and both the number of articles and the number of characters increased by approximately 40% in comparison to those published on the day after the initial report of the incident. The individual articles were deemed to be medically accurate; however, the main problem was that only part of the specific medical issue had been emphasized because of a poor balance in the number of news reports on this topic.

  5. Computational analysis of difenoconazole interaction with soil chitinases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlǎdoiu, D. L.; Filimon, M. N.; Ostafe, V.; Isvoran, A.

    2015-01-01

    This study focusses on the investigation of the potential binding of the fungicide difenoconazole to soil chitinases using a computational approach. Computational characterization of the substrate binding sites of Serratia marcescens and Bacillus cereus chitinases using Fpocket tool reflects the role of hydrophobic residues for the substrate binding and the high local hydrophobic density of both sites. Molecular docking study reveals that difenoconazole is able to bind to Serratia marcescens and Bacillus cereus chitinases active sites, the binding energies being comparable.

  6. Effect of Human Burn Wound Exudate on Pseudomonas aeruginosa Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Manuel R.; Fleuchot, Betty; Lauciello, Leonardo; Jafari, Paris; Applegate, Lee Ann; Raffoul, Wassim; Que, Yok-Ai

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Burn wound sepsis is currently the main cause of morbidity and mortality after burn trauma. Infections by notorious pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Acinetobacter baumannii impair patient recovery and can even lead to fatality. In this study, we investigated the effect of burn wound exudates (BWEs) on the virulence of those pathogens. BWEs were collected within 7 days after burn trauma from 5 burn patients. We first monitored their effect on pathogen growth. In contrast to A. baumannii and S. aureus, P. aeruginosa was the only pathogen able to grow within these human fluids. Expression of typical virulence factors such as pyocyanin and pyoverdine was even enhanced compared the levels seen with standard laboratory medium. A detailed chemical composition analysis of BWE was performed, which enabled us to determine the major components of BWE and underline the metabolic modifications induced by burn trauma. These data are essential for the development of an artificial medium mimicking the burn wound environment and the establishment of an in vitro system to analyze the initial steps of burn wound infections. IMPORTANCE Microbial infection of severe burn wounds is currently a major medical challenge. Of the infections by bacteria able to colonize such injuries, those by Pseudomonas aeruginosa are among the most severe, causing major delays in burn patient recovery or leading to fatal issues. In this study, we investigated the growth properties of several burn wound pathogens in biological fluids secreted from human burn wounds. We found that P. aeruginosa strains were able to proliferate but not those of the other pathogens tested. In addition, burn wound exudates (BWEs) stimulate the expression of virulence factors in P. aeruginosa. The chemical composition analysis of BWEs enabled us to determine the major components of these fluids. These data are essential for the development of an artificial medium mimicking the

  7. Effect of Human Burn Wound Exudate on Pseudomonas aeruginosa Virulence.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Manuel R; Fleuchot, Betty; Lauciello, Leonardo; Jafari, Paris; Applegate, Lee Ann; Raffoul, Wassim; Que, Yok-Ai; Perron, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Burn wound sepsis is currently the main cause of morbidity and mortality after burn trauma. Infections by notorious pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Acinetobacter baumannii impair patient recovery and can even lead to fatality. In this study, we investigated the effect of burn wound exudates (BWEs) on the virulence of those pathogens. BWEs were collected within 7 days after burn trauma from 5 burn patients. We first monitored their effect on pathogen growth. In contrast to A. baumannii and S. aureus, P. aeruginosa was the only pathogen able to grow within these human fluids. Expression of typical virulence factors such as pyocyanin and pyoverdine was even enhanced compared the levels seen with standard laboratory medium. A detailed chemical composition analysis of BWE was performed, which enabled us to determine the major components of BWE and underline the metabolic modifications induced by burn trauma. These data are essential for the development of an artificial medium mimicking the burn wound environment and the establishment of an in vitro system to analyze the initial steps of burn wound infections. IMPORTANCE Microbial infection of severe burn wounds is currently a major medical challenge. Of the infections by bacteria able to colonize such injuries, those by Pseudomonas aeruginosa are among the most severe, causing major delays in burn patient recovery or leading to fatal issues. In this study, we investigated the growth properties of several burn wound pathogens in biological fluids secreted from human burn wounds. We found that P. aeruginosa strains were able to proliferate but not those of the other pathogens tested. In addition, burn wound exudates (BWEs) stimulate the expression of virulence factors in P. aeruginosa. The chemical composition analysis of BWEs enabled us to determine the major components of these fluids. These data are essential for the development of an artificial medium mimicking the burn wound

  8. Characterisation of two quorum sensing systems in the endophytic Serratia plymuthica strain G3: differential control of motility and biofilm formation according to life-style

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL)-based quorum sensing (QS) systems have been described in many plant-associated Gram-negative bacteria to control certain beneficial phenotypic traits, such as production of biocontrol factors and plant growth promotion. However, the role of AHL-mediated signalling in the endophytic strains of plant-associated Serratia is still poorly understood. An endophytic Serratia sp. G3 with biocontrol potential and high levels of AHL signal production was isolated from the stems of wheat and the role of QS in this isolate was determined. Results Strain G3 classified as Serratia plymuthica based on 16S rRNA was subjected to phylogenetic analysis. Using primers to conserved sequences of luxIR homologues from the Serratia genus, splIR and spsIR from the chromosome of strain G3 were cloned and sequenced. AHL profiles from strain G3 and Escherichia coli DH5α expressing splI or spsI from recombinant plasmids were identified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. This revealed that the most abundant AHL signals produced by SplI in E. coli were N-3-oxo-hexanoylhomoserine lactone (3-oxo-C6-HSL), N-3-oxo-heptanoylhomoserine lactone (3-oxo-C7-HSL), N-3-hydroxy-hexanoylhomoserine lactone (3-hydroxy-C6-HSL), N-hexanoylhomoserine lactone (C6-HSL), and N-heptanoyl homoserine lactone (C7-HSL); whereas SpsI was primarily responsible for the synthesis of N-butyrylhomoserine lactone (C4-HSL) and N-pentanoylhomoserine lactone (C5-HSL). Furthermore, a quorum quenching analysis by heterologous expression of the Bacillus A24 AiiA lactonase in strain G3 enabled the identification of the AHL-regulated biocontrol-related traits. Depletion of AHLs with this lactonase resulted in altered adhesion and biofilm formation using a microtiter plate assay and flow cells coupled with confocal laser scanning microscopy respectively. This was different from the closely related S. plymuthica strains HRO-C48 and RVH1, where biofilm formation for both strains is

  9. Biodegradation of methyl parathion and p-nitrophenol: evidence for the presence of a p-nitrophenol 2-hydroxylase in a Gram-negative Serratia sp. strain DS001.

    PubMed

    Pakala, Suresh B; Gorla, Purushotham; Pinjari, Aleem Basha; Krovidi, Ravi Kumar; Baru, Rajasekhar; Yanamandra, Mahesh; Merrick, Mike; Siddavattam, Dayananda

    2007-01-01

    A soil bacterium capable of utilizing methyl parathion as sole carbon and energy source was isolated by selective enrichment on minimal medium containing methyl parathion. The strain was identified as belonging to the genus Serratia based on a phylogram constructed using the complete sequence of the 16S rRNA. Serratia sp. strain DS001 utilized methyl parathion, p-nitrophenol, 4-nitrocatechol, and 1,2,4-benzenetriol as sole carbon and energy sources but could not grow using hydroquinone as a source of carbon. p-Nitrophenol and dimethylthiophosphoric acid were found to be the major degradation products of methyl parathion. Growth on p-nitrophenol led to release of stoichiometric amounts of nitrite and to the formation of 4-nitrocatechol and benzenetriol. When these catabolic intermediates of p-nitrophenol were added to resting cells of Serratia sp. strain DS001 oxygen consumption was detected whereas no oxygen consumption was apparent when hydroquinone was added to the resting cells suggesting that it is not part of the p-nitrophenol degradation pathway. Key enzymes involved in degradation of methyl parathion and in conversion of p-nitrophenol to 4-nitrocatechol, namely parathion hydrolase and p-nitrophenol hydroxylase component "A" were detected in the proteomes of the methyl parathion and p-nitrophenol grown cultures, respectively. These studies report for the first time the existence of a p-nitrophenol hydroxylase component "A", typically found in Gram-positive bacteria, in a Gram-negative strain of the genus Serratia.

  10. [Advantages and disadvantages in the use of central venous catheters in children with malignant diseases].

    PubMed

    Sporisević, L; Hasanbegović, E; Hadzihasanović, E; Bajraktarević, A; Khatib, H; Hamamdzić, M

    1999-01-01

    The authors report the problem of central venous catheter appliance to the children with malignant diseases, employed for the first time in Bosnia and Herzegovina with the aim of pediatric oncologic patients treatment. During 1997 central venous catheter type Hickman was used in nine children between two and half to eleven years old (average six years and one months). The average time of catheter placement was six months, in two cases catheter were eliminated after two and three months respectively since application (spontaneous elimination and repeated septic attacks, caused bu resistant bacterial strains). Gram-positive bacteria have been isolated with eight children (Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis), and gram-negative enterobacteriaceae (Serratia marcescens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella oxytocia and pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Salmonella group C and Enterococcus faecalis) in samples taken from the catheter and hemoculture. The central venous catheter is useful in treating oncological patients, but may cause serious consequences, like local infections or septicaemia.

  11. Synthesis, characterization, antibacterial activity, SOD mimic and interaction with DNA of drug based copper(II) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Mohan N.; Dosi, Promise A.; Bhatt, Bhupesh S.; Thakkar, Vasudev R.

    2011-02-01

    Novel metal complexes of the second-generation quinolone antibacterial agent enrofloxacin with copper(II) and neutral bidentate ligands have been prepared and characterized with elemental analysis reflectance, IR and mass spectroscopy. Complexes have been screened for their in-vitro antibacterial activity against two Gram (+ve)Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, and three Gram (-ve)Serratia marcescens, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa organisms using the double dilution technique. The binding of this complex with CT-DNA has been investigated by absorption titration, salt effect and viscosity measurements. Binding constant is ranging from 1.3 × 10 4-3.7 × 10 4. The cleavage ability of complexes has been assessed by gel electrophoresis using pUC19 DNA. The catalytic activity of the copper(II) complexes towards the superoxide anion (O 2rad -) dismutation was assayed by their ability to inhibit the reduction of nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT).

  12. A photopolymerized antimicrobial hydrogel coating derived from epsilon-poly-L-lysine.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chuncai; Li, Peng; Qi, Xiaobao; Sharif, Abdul Rahim Mohamed; Poon, Yin Fun; Cao, Ye; Chang, Matthew W; Leong, Susanna Su Jan; Chan-Park, Mary B

    2011-04-01

    Hydrogels made from epsilon-poly-l-lysine-graft-methacrylamide (EPL-MA) have been found to have impressive wide spectrum antimicrobial activity against both bacteria (specifically Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Serratia marcescens and Staphylococcus aureus) and fungi (specifically Candida albicans and Fusarium solani). The EPL-MA hydrogel also possesses in vitro biocompatibility and EPL-MA solution is relatively non-hemolytic: the concentration needed for onset of human red blood cell (hRBC) hemolysis is 12,500 μg/mL so that the selectivity for the pathogenic microorganisms over hRBCs is 230-1560. Further, EPL-MA hydrogel can be conveniently ultraviolet-immobilized onto plasma-treated plastic surfaces to form thin highly adherent antimicrobial hydrogel coatings for medical devices and implants.

  13. Contact lens hygiene compliance and lens case contamination: A review.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yvonne Tzu-Ying; Willcox, Mark; Zhu, Hua; Stapleton, Fiona

    2015-10-01

    A contaminated contact lens case can act as a reservoir for microorganisms that could potentially compromise contact lens wear and lead to sight threatening adverse events. The rate, level and profile of microbial contamination in lens cases, compliance and other risk factors associated with lens case contamination, and the challenges currently faced in this field are discussed. The rate of lens case contamination is commonly over 50%. Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus, Bacillus spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Serratia marcescens are frequently recovered from lens cases. In addition, we provide suggestions regarding how to clean contact lens cases and improve lens wearers' compliance as well as future lens case design for reducing lens case contamination. This review highlights the challenges in reducing the level of microbial contamination which require an industry wide approach.

  14. Detection of gram-negative bacteremia by limulus amebocyte lysate assay: evaluation in a rat model of peritonitis.

    PubMed

    du Moulin, G C; Lynch, S E; Hedley-Whyte, J; Broitman, S A

    1985-01-01

    A spectrophotometric Limulus amebocyte lysate assay using lysis filtration and centrifugation has been developed for the detection of gram-negative bacteria in blood. The assay is directed at detection of endotoxin in viable and nonviable bacteria present in the blood-stream and not detection of free endotoxin in plasma. The assay was evaluated in a model of peritonitis in which rats were challenged with an inoculum consisting of sterilized human feces, barium sulfate, and one of eight species of bacteria. This assay was able to detect gram-negative bacteremia due to Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Serratia marcescens, Proteus mirabilis, and Klebsiella pneumoniae in the rat model when compared with sham-inoculated uninfected rats. The assay failed to detect bacteremia due to Bacteroides fragilis or Staphylococcus aureus, nor was there a significant rise in absorbance when a pellet containing sterilized feces was implanted in the rat.

  15. Effect of excimer laser on microbiological organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Keates, R.H.; Drago, P.C.; Rothchild, E.J.

    1988-10-01

    The effect of radiation emitted from an excimer laser filled with argon fluoride gas at 193 nm on Serratia marcescens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, streptococcus faecalis, Hemophilus influenzae, Candida albicans, and Aspergillus niger (collectively labeled the microorganisms) was examined. Colonies were subjected to a variable number of radiation pulses from the excimer laser applied after a 36-hour period of incubation at 37 degrees C, at which time the colonies were fully grown and showed no viability. The lack of viability was confirmed with a subculture from each area that received radiation; all subcultures were negative. The characteristics of the radiation paralleled those used by Serdavic, Darrell, Krueger, et al in 1985. This radiation treatment is believed to be within a therapeutic range, which suggests that the excimer laser, pending further investigation, may be useful in the treatment of corneal infections.

  16. Isolation of bacteria with antibiotic resistance from household cockroaches (Periplaneta americana and Blattella germanica).

    PubMed

    Pai, Hsiu-Hua; Chen, Wei-Chen; Peng, Chien-Fang

    2005-03-01

    Cockroaches may harbor and disseminate microorganisms to the environment. In this study, Periplaneta americana and Blattella germanica were collected from 40 households in Kaohsiung City and Kaohsiung County, Taiwan. Cockroach infestation was found in 50% of the studied households and 226 cockroaches (123 P. americana and 103 B. germanica) collected by trapping. P. americana was more often found in the kitchen (70.7%) whereas B. germanica in the storage room (51.5%) and kitchen (36.9%). There was no significant difference between the percentages of P. americana (99.9%) and B. germanica (98.0%) carrying bacteria. A total of 25 species of bacteria was isolated from P. americana and only 21 from B. germanica. Antibiotic resistance was found in Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus species, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Serratia marcescens, and Proteus species isolated from the cockroaches. These findings suggest a potential role of cockroaches in the transmission of pathogenic bacteria with antibiotic resistance in households.

  17. The removal of bacteria by modified natural zeolites.

    PubMed

    Milán, Z; de Las Pozas, C; Cruz, M; Borja, R; Sánchez, E; Ilangovan, K; Espinosa, Y; Luna, B

    2001-01-01

    The removal effect of natural and modified zeolites containing different heavy metals (Ni2+, Zn2+, Fe3+ and Cu2+) on pure cultures of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus in a solid medium was evaluated in this work. These experiments were carried out in a continuous mode treating municipal wastewater. Faecal coliform species and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were identified. The rate constants of heavy metal lixiviation were determined using a first order kinetic model. The removal effect of modified natural zeolites in both a solid medium and in continuous mode showed an increased elimination of the bacterial population. The results established a decreasing order of the removal effect as follows: Cu2+ > Fe3+ > Zn2+ > Ni2+. The best performance of columns was obtained for inlet bacterial concentrations below 10(6) cells/100 ml. Most of the identified bacterial species were affected by copper modified zeolites, although Serratia marcescens presented the highest sensitivity and Klebsiella pneumoniae the greatest resistance.

  18. Antimicrobial activity of naphthoquinones from fusaria.

    PubMed

    Baker, R A; Tatum, J H; Nemec, S

    1990-07-01

    Twenty-two naphthoquinone compounds isolated or derived synthetically from culture extracts of Fusarium solani and F. oxysporum were examined for antimicrobial activity. Fifteen exhibited antibiotic activity against Staphylococcus aureus, and 12 were active against Streptococcus pyogenes, but none were active at the highest rate of 128 micrograms/ml against Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Salmonella typhi, Proteus vulgaris, Serratia marcescens, or Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Of 8 plant pathogenic bacteria tested against 11 naphthoquinones, Corynebacterium poinsettiae was inhibited by 6 compounds, and Pseudomonas viridiflava was weakly inhibited by one. Only one of a group of 6 fluorescent soil pseudomonads was inhibited by one naphthoquinone. Antifungal activity of 10 compounds against 8 fungal plant pathogens was limited to inhibition of Phytophthora parasitica by one naphthopyran.

  19. Frequent Replenishment Sustains the Beneficial Microbiome of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Jessamina E.; Fischer, Caleb N.; Miles, Jessica; Handelsman, Jo

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT We report that establishment and maintenance of the Drosophila melanogaster microbiome depend on ingestion of bacteria. Frequent transfer of flies to sterile food prevented establishment of the microbiome in newly emerged flies and reduced the predominant members, Acetobacter and Lactobacillus spp., by 10- to 1,000-fold in older flies. Flies with a normal microbiome were less susceptible than germfree flies to infection by Serratia marcescens and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Augmentation of the normal microbiome with higher populations of Lactobacillus plantarum, a Drosophila commensal and probiotic used in humans, further protected the fly from infection. Replenishment represents an unexplored strategy by which animals can sustain a gut microbial community. Moreover, the population behavior and health benefits of L. plantarum resemble features of certain probiotic bacteria administered to humans. As such, L. plantarum in the fly gut may serve as a simple model for dissecting the population dynamics and mode of action of probiotics in animal hosts. PMID:24194543

  20. An unusual cause of ventriculoperitoneal shunt infection.

    PubMed

    Esmaeilzadeh, Majid; Islamian, Ariyan Pirayesh; Lang, Josef M; Hornef, Mathias; Suerbaum, Sebastian; Krauss, Joachim K

    2015-08-01

    Infection associated with ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt implantation can be a significant problem. VP shunt infection with Serratia marcescens, a gram-negative anaerobic rod, usually is related to underlying abdominal disease. This article describes treatment of two patients suffering from a VP shunt infection with S. marcescens without underlying abdominal disease.

  1. The increasing threat of Pseudomonas aeruginosa high-risk clones.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Antonio; Mulet, Xavier; López-Causapé, Carla; Juan, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of chronic and hospital-acquired infections produced by multidrug-resistant (MDR) or extensively drug-resistant (XDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. This growing threat results from the extraordinary capacity of this pathogen for developing resistance through chromosomal mutations and from the increasing prevalence of transferable resistance determinants, particularly those encoding carbapenemases or extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs). P. aeruginosa has a nonclonal epidemic population structure, composed of a limited number of widespread clones which are selected from a background of a large quantity of rare and unrelated genotypes that are recombining at high frequency. Indeed, recent concerning reports have provided evidence of the existence of MDR/XDR global clones, denominated high-risk clones, disseminated in hospitals worldwide; ST235, ST111, and ST175 are likely those more widespread. Noteworthy, the vast majority of infections by MDR, and specially XDR, strains are produced by these and few other clones worldwide. Moreover, the association of high-risk clones, particularly ST235, with transferable resistance is overwhelming; nearly 100 different horizontally-acquired resistance elements and up to 39 different acquired β-lactamases have been reported so far among ST235 isolates. Likewise, MDR internationally-disseminated epidemic strains, such as the Liverpool Epidemic Strain (LES, ST146), have been noted as well among cystic fibrosis patients. Here we review the population structure, epidemiology, antimicrobial resistance mechanisms and virulence of the P. aeruginosa high-risk clones. The phenotypic and genetic factors potentially driving the success of high-risk clones, the aspects related to their detection in the clinical microbiology laboratory and the implications for infection control and public health are also discussed.

  2. Pseudomonas aeruginosa EftM Is a Thermoregulated Methyltransferase*

    PubMed Central

    Owings, Joshua P.; Kuiper, Emily G.; Prezioso, Samantha M.; Meisner, Jeffrey; Varga, John J.; Zelinskaya, Natalia; Dammer, Eric B.; Duong, Duc M.; Seyfried, Nicholas T.; Albertí, Sebastián; Conn, Graeme L.; Goldberg, Joanna B.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative opportunistic pathogen that trimethylates elongation factor-thermo-unstable (EF-Tu) on lysine 5. Lysine 5 methylation occurs in a temperature-dependent manner and is generally only seen when P. aeruginosa is grown at temperatures close to ambient (25 °C) but not at higher temperatures (37 °C). We have previously identified the gene, eftM (for EF-Tu-modifying enzyme), responsible for this modification and shown its activity to be associated with increased bacterial adhesion to and invasion of respiratory epithelial cells. Bioinformatic analyses predicted EftM to be a Class I S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM)-dependent methyltransferase. An in vitro methyltransferase assay was employed to show that, in the presence of SAM, EftM directly trimethylates EF-Tu. A natural variant of EftM, with a glycine to arginine substitution at position 50 in the predicted SAM-binding domain, lacks both SAM binding and enzyme activity. Mass spectrometry analysis of the in vitro methyltransferase reaction products revealed that EftM exclusively methylates at lysine 5 of EF-Tu in a distributive manner. Consistent with the in vivo temperature dependence of methylation of EF-Tu, preincubation of EftM at 37 °C abolished methyltransferase activity, whereas this activity was retained when EftM was preincubated at 25 °C. Irreversible protein unfolding at 37 °C was observed, and we propose that this instability is the molecular basis for the temperature dependence of EftM activity. Collectively, our results show that EftM is a thermolabile, SAM-dependent methyltransferase that directly trimethylates lysine 5 of EF-Tu in P. aeruginosa. PMID:26677219

  3. Biotic inactivation of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa quinolone signal molecule.

    PubMed

    Soh, Eliza Ye-Chen; Chhabra, Siri R; Halliday, Nigel; Heeb, Stephan; Müller, Christine; Birmes, Franziska S; Fetzner, Susanne; Cámara, Miguel; Chan, Kok-Gan; Williams, Paul

    2015-11-01

    In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, quorum sensing (QS) regulates the production of secondary metabolites, many of which are antimicrobials that impact on polymicrobial community composition. Consequently, quenching QS modulates the environmental impact of P. aeruginosa. To identify bacteria capable of inactivating the QS signal molecule 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone (PQS), a minimal medium containing PQS as the sole carbon source was used to enrich a Malaysian rainforest soil sample. This yielded an Achromobacter xylosoxidans strain (Q19) that inactivated PQS, yielding a new fluorescent compound (I-PQS) confirmed as PQS-derived using deuterated PQS. The I-PQS structure was elucidated using mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy as 2-heptyl-2-hydroxy-1,2-dihydroquinoline-3,4-dione (HHQD). Achromobacter xylosoxidans Q19 oxidized PQS congeners with alkyl chains ranging from C1 to C5 and also N-methyl PQS, yielding the corresponding 2-hydroxy-1,2-dihydroquinoline-3,4-diones, but was unable to inactivate the PQS precursor HHQ. This indicates that the hydroxyl group at position 3 in PQS is essential and that A. xylosoxidans inactivates PQS via a pathway involving the incorporation of oxygen at C2 of the heterocyclic ring. The conversion of PQS to HHQD also occurred on incubation with 12/17 A. xylosoxidans strains recovered from cystic fibrosis patients, with P. aeruginosa and with Arthrobacter, suggesting that formation of hydroxylated PQS may be a common mechanism of inactivation.

  4. Regional Control of Chromosome Segregation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Lagage, Valentine

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome segregation in bacteria occurs concomitantly with DNA replication, and the duplicated regions containing the replication origin oriC are generally the first to separate and migrate to their final specific location inside the cell. In numerous bacterial species, a three-component partition machinery called the ParABS system is crucial for chromosome segregation. This is the case in the gammaproteobacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa, where impairing the ParABS system is very detrimental for growth, as it increases the generation time and leads to the formation of anucleate cells and to oriC mispositioning inside the cell. In this study, we investigate in vivo the ParABS system in P. aeruginosa. Using chromatin immuno-precipitation coupled with high throughput sequencing, we show that ParB binds to four parS site located within 15 kb of oriC in vivo, and that this binding promotes the formation of a high order nucleoprotein complex. We show that one parS site is enough to prevent anucleate cell formation, therefore for correct chromosome segregation. By displacing the parS site from its native position on the chromosome, we demonstrate that parS is the first chromosomal locus to be separated upon DNA replication, which indicates that it is the site of force exertion of the segregation process. We identify a region of approximatively 650 kb surrounding oriC in which the parS site must be positioned for chromosome segregation to proceed correctly, and we called it “competence zone” of the parS site. Mutant strains that have undergone specific genetic rearrangements allow us to propose that the distance between oriC and parS defines this “competence zone”. Implications for the control of chromosome segregation in P. aeruginosa are discussed. PMID:27820816

  5. Emergence of colistin resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa at Tabriz hospitals, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Goli, Hamid Reza; Nahaei, Mohammad Reza; Ahangarzadeh Rezaee, Mohammad; Hasani, Alka; Samadi Kafil, Hossein; Aghazadeh, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The prevalence of multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the main reason of new drugs resurgence such as colistin. The main objectives of this study were to determine the antibiotic resistance pattern and the rate of colistin resistance along with its correlation with overexpression of MexAB-OprM and MexXY-OprM efflux pumps among P. aeruginosa isolates. Materials and Methods: Hundred clinical isolates were collected from 100 patients during 6 months in 2014. Susceptibility to the eight antibiotics was investigated using Kirby-Bauer and agar dilution methods. The Quantitative Real-time PCR was used to determine the expression levels of efflux genes. Results: Resistance rates to various antibiotics were as follows: ticarcillin (73%), ciprofloxacin (65%), aztreonam (60%), ceftazidime (55%), gentamicin (55%), imipenem (49%), piperacillin/tazobactam (34%) and colistin (2%). In disk diffusion method, only two isolates were non susceptible to colistin, however in agar dilution method the two isolates were confirmed as resistant and two others were intermediate resistant. Sixty eight (68%) isolates were multi-drug resistant and 10 isolates were susceptible to all tested antibiotics. Both colistin resistant isolates showed overexpression of both efflux pumps, but two intermediate resistant isolates exhibited reduction of efflux genes expression. Conclusions: Emergence of colistin resistance is increasing in P. aeruginosa indicating great challenge in the treatment of infections caused by MDR strains of this organism in Iran. ParRS may promote either induced or constitutive resistance to colistin through the activation of distinct mechanisms such as MDR efflux pumps, and LPS modification. PMID:27092226

  6. Detection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in sputum headspace through volatile organic compound analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Chronic pulmonary infection is the hallmark of Cystic Fibrosis lung disease. Searching for faster and easier screening may lead to faster diagnosis and treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa). Our aim was to analyze and build a model to predict the presence of P. aeruginosa in sputa. Methods Sputa from 28 bronchiectatic patients were used for bacterial culturing and analysis of volatile compounds by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. Data analysis and model building were done by Partial Least Squares Regression Discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). Two analysis were performed: one comparing P. aeruginosa positive with negative cultures at study visit (PA model) and one comparing chronic colonization according to the Leeds criteria with P. aeruginosa negative patients (PACC model). Results The PA model prediction of P. aeruginosa presence was rather poor, with a high number of false positives and false negatives. On the other hand, the PACC model was stable and explained chronic P. aeruginosa presence for 95% with 4 PLS-DA factors, with a sensitivity of 100%, a positive predictive value of 86% and a negative predictive value of 100%. Conclusion Our study shows the potential for building a prediction model for the presence of chronic P. aeruginosa based on volatiles from sputum. PMID:23031195

  7. Predicting the growth situation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on agar plates and meat stuffs using gas sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Xinzhe; Sun, Ye; Tu, Kang; Dong, Qingli; Pan, Leiqing

    2016-12-01

    A rapid method of predicting the growing situation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is presented. Gas sensors were used to acquire volatile compounds generated by P. aeruginosa on agar plates and meat stuffs. Then, optimal sensors were selected to simulate P. aeruginosa growth using modified Logistic and Gompertz equations by odor changes. The results showed that the responses of S8 or S10 yielded high coefficients of determination (R2) of 0.89–0.99 and low root mean square errors (RMSE) of 0.06–0.17 for P. aeruginosa growth, fitting the models on the agar plate. The responses of S9, S4 and the first principal component of 10 sensors fit well with the growth of P. aeruginosa inoculated in meat stored at 4 °C and 20 °C, with R2 of 0.73–0.96 and RMSE of 0.25–1.38. The correlation coefficients between the fitting models, as measured by electronic nose responses, and the colony counts of P. aeruginosa were high, ranging from 0.882 to 0.996 for both plate and meat samples. Also, gas chromatography–mass spectrometry results indicated the presence of specific volatiles of P. aeruginosa on agar plates. This work demonstrated an acceptable feasibility of using gas sensors—a rapid, easy and nondestructive method for predicting P. aeruginosa growth.

  8. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa Pathogenicity Island PAPI-1 is transferred via a novel Type IV pilus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major cause of nosocomial infections, particularly in immunocompromised patients or in individuals with cystic fibrosis. The notable ability of P. aeruginosa to inhabit a broad range of environments including humans is in part due to its large and diverse genomic repertoi...

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Beneficial Rice Rhizosphere Isolate Pseudomonas aeruginosa PUPa3

    PubMed Central

    Uzelac, Gordana; Bertani, Iris; Kojic, Milan; Paszkiewicz, Konrad H.; Studholme, David J.; Passos da Silva, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PUPa3 is a rhizosphere-colonizing and plant growth-promoting strain isolated from the rhizosphere of rice. This strain has, however, been shown to be pathogenic in two nonmammalian infection models. Here we report the draft genome sequence of P. aeruginosa PUPa3. PMID:24994800

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of Beneficial Rice Rhizosphere Isolate Pseudomonas aeruginosa PUPa3.

    PubMed

    Uzelac, Gordana; Bertani, Iris; Kojic, Milan; Paszkiewicz, Konrad H; Studholme, David J; Passos da Silva, Daniel; Venturi, Vittorio

    2014-07-03

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PUPa3 is a rhizosphere-colonizing and plant growth-promoting strain isolated from the rhizosphere of rice. This strain has, however, been shown to be pathogenic in two nonmammalian infection models. Here we report the draft genome sequence of P. aeruginosa PUPa3.

  11. Network-assisted investigation of virulence and antibiotic-resistance systems in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Sohyun; Kim, Chan Yeong; Ji, Sun-Gou; Go, Junhyeok; Kim, Hanhae; Yang, Sunmo; Kim, Hye Jin; Cho, Ara; Yoon, Sang Sun; Lee, Insuk

    2016-05-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative bacterium of clinical significance. Although the genome of PAO1, a prototype strain of P. aeruginosa, has been extensively studied, approximately one-third of the functional genome remains unknown. With the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains of P. aeruginosa, there is an urgent need to develop novel antibiotic and anti-virulence strategies, which may be facilitated by an approach that explores P. aeruginosa gene function in systems-level models. Here, we present a genome-wide functional network of P. aeruginosa genes, PseudomonasNet, which covers 98% of the coding genome, and a companion web server to generate functional hypotheses using various network-search algorithms. We demonstrate that PseudomonasNet-assisted predictions can effectively identify novel genes involved in virulence and antibiotic resistance. Moreover, an antibiotic-resistance network based on PseudomonasNet reveals that P. aeruginosa has common modular genetic organisations that confer increased or decreased resistance to diverse antibiotics, which accounts for the pervasiveness of cross-resistance across multiple drugs. The same network also suggests that P. aeruginosa has developed mechanism of trade-off in resistance across drugs by altering genetic interactions. Taken together, these results clearly demonstrate the usefulness of a genome-scale functional network to investigate pathogenic systems in P. aeruginosa.

  12. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Its Bacterial Components Influence the Cytokine Response in Thymocytes and Splenocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Corinna; Mausberg, Anne K.; Dehmel, Thomas; Kieseier, Bernd C.; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Hofstetter, Harald H.

    2016-01-01

    Infections with Pseudomonas aeruginosa may cause many different diseases. The spectrum of such infections in general includes inflammation and bacterial sepsis. Hospital-acquired pneumonia, naturally resistant to a wide range of antibiotics, is associated with a particularly high mortality rate in mechanically ventilated patients. The pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa is complex and mediated by several virulence factors, as well as cell-associated factors. We have previously demonstrated that stimulation with different bacteria triggers the cytokine response of thymocytes. In this study, we investigated the effect of P. aeruginosa and its different components on the cytokine production of immature and mature immune cells. We found that the induced cytokine pattern in the thymus and the spleen after infections with P. aeruginosa is primarily mediated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of the outer cell membrane, but other components of the bacterium can influence the cytokine secretion as well. Stimulation with heat-killed P. aeruginosa and LPS does not influence the amount of cytokine-producing CD4+ T cells but instead suppresses the emergence of Th17 cells. However, stimulation with P. aeruginosa or its components triggers the interleukin-17 (IL-17) response both in thymocytes and in splenocytes. We conclude that infections with P. aeruginosa affect the cytokine secretion of immature and mature cells and that IL-17 and Th17 cells play only a minor role in the development of pathological systemic inflammatory disease conditions during P. aeruginosa infections. Therefore, other inflammatory immune responses must be responsible for septic reactions of the host. PMID:26902726

  13. Network-assisted investigation of virulence and antibiotic-resistance systems in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Sohyun; Kim, Chan Yeong; Ji, Sun-Gou; Go, Junhyeok; Kim, Hanhae; Yang, Sunmo; Kim, Hye Jin; Cho, Ara; Yoon, Sang Sun; Lee, Insuk

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative bacterium of clinical significance. Although the genome of PAO1, a prototype strain of P. aeruginosa, has been extensively studied, approximately one-third of the functional genome remains unknown. With the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains of P. aeruginosa, there is an urgent need to develop novel antibiotic and anti-virulence strategies, which may be facilitated by an approach that explores P. aeruginosa gene function in systems-level models. Here, we present a genome-wide functional network of P. aeruginosa genes, PseudomonasNet, which covers 98% of the coding genome, and a companion web server to generate functional hypotheses using various network-search algorithms. We demonstrate that PseudomonasNet-assisted predictions can effectively identify novel genes involved in virulence and antibiotic resistance. Moreover, an antibiotic-resistance network based on PseudomonasNet reveals that P. aeruginosa has common modular genetic organisations that confer increased or decreased resistance to diverse antibiotics, which accounts for the pervasiveness of cross-resistance across multiple drugs. The same network also suggests that P. aeruginosa has developed mechanism of trade-off in resistance across drugs by altering genetic interactions. Taken together, these results clearly demonstrate the usefulness of a genome-scale functional network to investigate pathogenic systems in P. aeruginosa. PMID:27194047

  14. Cellular responses and biodegradation of amoxicillin in Microcystis aeruginosa at different nitrogen levels.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Wang, Feng; Chen, Xiao; Zhang, Jian; Gao, Baoyu

    2015-01-01

    The influence of nitrogen on the interactions between amoxicillin and Microcystis aeruginosa was investigated using a 7-day exposure test. Growth of M. aeruginosa was not significantly (p>0.05) affected by amoxicillin at the lowest nitrogen level of 0.05 mg L(-1), stimulated by 500 ng L(-1) of amoxicillin at a moderate nitrogen level of 0.5 mg L(-1) and enhanced by 200-500 ng L(-1) of amoxicillin at the highest nitrogen level of 5 mg L(-1). The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the synthesis of glutathione S-transferases (GST) and glutathione (GSH) were more sensitive to amoxicillin and were stimulated at all nitrogen levels. At the lowest nitrogen level of 0.05 mg L(-1), superoxide dismutase and peroxidase were not effective at eliminating amoxicillin-induced ROS, resulting in the highest malondialdehyde content in M. aeruginosa. The biodegradation of 18.5-30.5% of amoxicillin by M. aeruginosa was coupled to increasing GST activity and GSH content. Elevated nitrogen concentrations significantly enhanced (p<0.05) the stimulation effect of amoxicillin on the growth of M. aeruginosa, the antioxidant responses to amoxicillin and the biodegradation of amoxicillin in M. aeruginosa. The nitrogen-dependent hormesis effect of the coexisting amoxicillin contaminant on the M. aeruginosa bloom should be fully considered during the control of M. aeruginosa bloom.

  15. Effects of sulfate on microcystin production, photosynthesis, and oxidative stress in Microcystis aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Gin, Karina Y H; He, Yiliang

    2016-02-01

    Increasing sulfate in freshwater systems, caused by human activities and climate change, may have negative effects on aquatic organisms. Microcystis aeruginosa (M. aeruginosa) is both a major primary producer and a common toxic cyanobacterium, playing an important role in the aquatic environment. This study first investigated the effects of sulfate on M. aeruginosa. The experiment presented here aims at analyzing the effects of sulfate on physiological indices, molecular levels, and its influencing mechanism. The results of our experiment showed that sulfate (at 40, 80, and 300 mg L(-1)) inhibited M. aeruginosa growth, increased both intracellular and extracellular toxin contents, and enhanced the mcyD transcript level. Sulfate inhibited the photosynthesis of M. aeruginosa, based on the decrease in pigment content and the down-regulation of photosynthesis-related genes after sulfate exposure. Furthermore, sulfate decreased the maximum electron transport rate, causing the cell to accumulate surplus electrons and form reactive oxygen species (ROS). Sulfate also increased the malondialdehyde (MDA) content, which showed that sulfate damaged the cytomembrane. This damage contributed to the release of intracellular toxin to the culture medium. Although sulfate increased superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities, expression of sod, and total antioxidant capacity in M. aeruginosa, it still overwhelmed the antioxidant system since the ROS level simultaneously increased, and finally caused oxidative stress. Our results indicate that sulfate has direct effects on M. aeruginosa, inhibits photosynthesis, causes oxidative stress, increases toxin production, and affects the related genes expression in M. aeruginosa.

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain RB, a Bacterium Capable of Synthesizing Cadmium Selenide Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ayano, Hiroyuki; Kuroda, Masashi; Soda, Satoshi; Ike, Michihiko

    2014-05-15

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain RB is a bacterium capable of synthesizing cadmium selenide (CdSe) nanoparticles and was isolated from a soil sample. Here, we present the draft genome sequence of P. aeruginosa strain RB. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a draft genome of a CdSe-synthesizing bacterium.

  17. Plasmid-Determined Resistance to Boron and Chromium Compounds in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Summers, Anne O.; Jacoby, George A.

    1978-01-01

    Plasmids determining resistance to arsenic, mercury, silver, and tellurium compounds in Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were tested for resistance to 40 other metal compounds. Resistance to trivalent boron and hexavalent chromium compounds was a property of certain P. aeruginosa plasmids. PMID:96730

  18. Effects of Microcystis aeruginosa on life history of water flea Daphnia magna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liping; Li, Kang; Chen, Taoying; Dai, Xilin; Jiang, Min; Diana, James S.

    2011-07-01

    Cyanobacterial blooms in eutrophic freshwater systems are a worldwide problem, creating adverse effects for many aquatic organisms by producing toxic microcystins and deteriorating water quality. In this study, microcystins (MCs) in Microcystis aeruginosa, and Daphnia magna exposed to M. aeruginosa, were analyzed by HPLC-MS, and the effects of M. aeruginosa on D. magna were investigated. When D. magna was exposed to M. aeruginosa for more than 2 h, Microcystin-LR (MC-LR) was detected. When exposed to 1.5 × 106, 3 × 106, 0.75 × 107, and 1.5 × 107 cell/mL of M. aeruginosa for 96 h, average survival of D. magna for treatments were 23.33%, 33.33%, 13.33%, 16.67%, respectively, which were significantly lower than the average 100% survival in the control group ( P < 0.05). The adverse effects of M. aeruginosa on body length, time for the first brood, brood numbers, gross fecundity, lifespan, and population growth of D. magna were density-dependent. These results suggest that the occurrence of M. aeruginosa blooms could strongly inhibit the population growth of D. magna through depression of survival, individual growth and gross fecundity. In the most serious situations, M. aeruginosa blooms could undermine the food web by eliminating filter-feeding zooplankton, which would destroy the ecological balance of aquaculture water bodies.

  19. Predicting the growth situation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on agar plates and meat stuffs using gas sensors

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Xinzhe; Sun, Ye; Tu, Kang; Dong, Qingli; Pan, Leiqing

    2016-01-01

    A rapid method of predicting the growing situation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is presented. Gas sensors were used to acquire volatile compounds generated by P. aeruginosa on agar plates and meat stuffs. Then, optimal sensors were selected to simulate P. aeruginosa growth using modified Logistic and Gompertz equations by odor changes. The results showed that the responses of S8 or S10 yielded high coefficients of determination (R2) of 0.89–0.99 and low root mean square errors (RMSE) of 0.06–0.17 for P. aeruginosa growth, fitting the models on the agar plate. The responses of S9, S4 and the first principal component of 10 sensors fit well with the growth of P. aeruginosa inoculated in meat stored at 4 °C and 20 °C, with R2 of 0.73–0.96 and RMSE of 0.25–1.38. The correlation coefficients between the fitting models, as measured by electronic nose responses, and the colony counts of P. aeruginosa were high, ranging from 0.882 to 0.996 for both plate and meat samples. Also, gas chromatography–mass spectrometry results indicated the presence of specific volatiles of P. aeruginosa on agar plates. This work demonstrated an acceptable feasibility of using gas sensors—a rapid, easy and nondestructive method for predicting P. aeruginosa growth. PMID:27941841

  20. Adaptation of the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa to light intensity

    SciTech Connect

    Raps, S.; Wyman, K.; Siegelman, H.W.; Falkowski, P.G.

    1983-01-01

    Light intensity adaptation (20 to 565 microeinsteins per square meter per second) of Microcystis aeruginosa (UV-027) was examined in turbidostat culture. Chlorophyll a and phycocyanin concentrations decreased with increasing light intensity while carotenoid, cellular carbon, and nitrogen contents did not vary. Variation in the number but not the size of photosynthetic units per cell, based on chlorophyll a/P/sub 700/ ratios, occurred on light intensity adaptation. Changes in the numbers of photosynthetic units partially dampened the effects of changes in light intensity on growth rates.

  1. [Necrotizing fasciitis caused by pseudomonas aeruginosa (an obervation)].

    PubMed

    Abada, A; Benhmidoune, L; Tahiri, H; Essalim, K; Chakib, A; Elbelhadji, M; Rachid, R; Zaghloul, K; Amraoui, A

    2007-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is an exceptional and severe form of subcutaneous gangrene which requires early diagnosis and emergency treatment. We report the case of a 24 year old woman presenting with necrotizing fasciitis after pansinusitis resistant to treatment. The germ detected was pseudomonas aeruginosa. The infection was controled with intensive care, antibiotics and surgical resection of necrotic tissues. The aim of this observation is to highlight the clinical characteristics of this disease, and to insist on the necessity to recognize the early symptoms and to start treatment as soon as possible.

  2. Phosphorylated tyrosine in the flagellum filament protein of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly-Wintenberg, K.; Anderson, T.; Montie, T.C. )

    1990-09-01

    Purified flagella from two strains of {sup 32}P-labeled Pseudomonas aeruginosa were shown to be phosphorylated. This was confirmed by autoradiography of flagellin protein in polyacrylamide gels. Thin-layer electrophoresis and autoradiography of flagellin partial hydrolysates indicated that phosphotyrosine was the major phosphorylated amino acid. High-pressure liquid chromatographic analysis confirmed the presence of phosphotyrosine in flagellum filament protein. Preliminary data indicated that less than one tyrosine per subunit was phosphorylated. No evidence was found for phosphorylation of serine or threonine. A function related to tyrosine phosphorylation has not been determined.

  3. Vaccines for Pseudomonas aeruginosa: A long and winding road

    PubMed Central

    Priebe, Gregory P.; Goldberg, Joanna B.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Despite the recognition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen, no vaccine against this bacteria have come to market. This review describes the current state-of-the-art in vaccinology for this bacterium. This includes a discussion of those at risk for infection, the types of vaccines and the approaches for empirical and targeted antigen selection under development, as well as a perspective on where the field should go. In addition, the challenges in developing a vaccine for those individuals at risk are discussed. PMID:24575895

  4. The Approach to Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Talwalkar, Jaideep S; Murray, Thomas S

    2016-03-01

    There is a high prevalence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in patients with cystic fibrosis and clear epidemiologic links between chronic infection and morbidity and mortality exist. Prevention and early identification of infection are critical, and stand to improve with the advent of new vaccines and laboratory methods. Once the organism is identified, a variety of treatment options are available. Aggressive use of antipseudomonal antibiotics is the standard of care for acute pulmonary exacerbations in cystic fibrosis, and providers must take into account specific patient characteristics when making treatment decisions related to antibiotic selection, route and duration of administration, and site of care.

  5. Bacteriophages of Pseudomonas aeruginosa: long-term prospects for use in phage therapy.

    PubMed

    Krylov, Victor N

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa, being opportunistic pathogens, are the major cause of nosocomial infections and, in some cases, the primary cause of death. They are virtually untreatable with currently known antibiotics. Phage therapy is considered as one of the possible approaches to the treatment of P. aeruginosa infections. Difficulties in the implementation of phage therapy in medical practice are related, for example, to the insufficient number and diversity of virulent phages that are active against P. aeruginosa. Results of interaction of therapeutic phages with bacteria in different conditions and environments are studied insufficiently. A little is known about possible interactions of therapeutic phages with resident prophages and plasmids in clinical strains in the foci of infections. This chapter highlights the different approaches to solving these problems and possible ways to expand the diversity of therapeutic P. aeruginosa phages and organizational arrangements (as banks of phages) to ensure long-term use of phages in the treatment of P. aeruginosa infections.

  6. [Studies on hyperspectral characteristics of Microcystis aeruginosa under the cultivation conditions with different phosphorus concentrations].

    PubMed

    Qin, Zhao-Yang; Liu, Xue-Hua; Zhao, Jin-Bo

    2013-02-01

    Microcystis aeruginosa is one of the most common species in the algae-bloom events of domestic lakes. Illumination incubator was used to cultivate M. aeruginosa under conditions of different phosphorus concentrations in the laboratory. Spectroscopic data of culture solutions were collected by GER1500 spectrometer under the sunlight. The study focused on the growth rhythm of M. aeruginosa and the characteristics of spectral variation in the culture solutions. The results showed that low phosphorus concentration (< or =10 microg x L(-1)) is a restricting factor for the growth and reproduction of M. aeruginosa. Moreover, the reflections of spectrum from culture solutions of M. aeruginosa showed significant changes along with cultivation period, such as at the wavelengths of 550, 610, 660, 700-710 and 760 nm.

  7. Assessment of biofilm formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by antisense mazE-PNA.

    PubMed

    Valadbeigi, Hassan; Sadeghifard, Nourkhoda; Salehi, Majid Baseri

    2017-03-01

    The hallmark patogenicity in Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) is biofilm formation that is not easy to eradicate, because it has variety mechanisms for antibiotic resistance. In addition, toxin-antitoxin (TA) system may play role in biofilm formation. The current study aimed to evaluate the role of TA loci in biofilm formation. Therefore, 18 P. aeruginosa clinical isolates were collected and evaluated for specific biofilm and TA genes. The analysis by RT-qPCR demonstrated that expression of mazE antitoxin in biofilm formation was increase. On the other hand, mazE antitoxin TA system was used as target for antisense PNA. mazE-PNA was able to influence in biofilm formation and was inhibit at 5,10 and 15 μM concentrations biofilm formation in P. aeruginosa. Therefore, it could be highlighted target for anti-biofilm target to eradicate P. aeruginosa biofilm producer.

  8. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 resistance to Zinc pyrithione: phenotypic changes suggest the involvement of efflux pumps.

    PubMed

    Abdel Malek, Suzanne M; Al-Adham, Ibrahim S; Matalka, Khalid Z; Collier, Philip J

    2009-08-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the involvement of an efflux pump in the development of Pseudomonas aeruginosa resistance to zinc pyrithione (ZnPT). In the presence of efflux inhibitor carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl-hydrazone (CCCP), the minimum inhibitory concentration of ZnPT for P. aeruginosa resistant cells is reduced significantly (p < 0.05). In addition, the concentration of ZnPT excluded by the resistant bacteria was reduced significantly (p < 0.01). However, the above reductions did not reach the levels measured for P. aeruginosa PAO1 sensitive strain. Furthermore, such changes in P. aeruginosa resistant cells were correlated with the overexpression of outer membrane proteins, reduced sensitivity toward imipenem (p < 0.01) and increased sensitivity toward sulphatriad and chloramphenicol (p < 0.05). In a continuation to a previous study, we conclude that P. aeruginosa resistance to ZnPT is multifactorial and involves induced efflux systems.

  9. Insights into the respiratory tract microbiota of patients with cystic fibrosis during early Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization

    DOE PAGES

    Keravec, Marlène; Mounier, Jérôme; Prestat, Emmanuel; ...

    2015-08-09

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa plays a major role in cystic fibrosis (CF) progression. Therefore, it is important to understand the initial steps of P. aeruginosa infection. The structure and dynamics of CF respiratory tract microbial communities during the early stages of P. aeruginosa colonization were characterized by pyrosequencing and cloning-sequencing. The respiratory microbiota showed high diversity, related to the young age of the CF cohort (mean age 10 years). Wide inter- and intra-individual variations were revealed. A common core microbiota of 5 phyla and 13 predominant genera was found, the majority of which were obligate anaerobes. A few genera were significantly moremore » prevalent in patients never infected by P. aeruginosa. Persistence of an anaerobic core microbiota regardless of P. aeruginosa status suggests a major role of certain anaerobes in the pathophysiology of lung infections in CF. Some genera may be potential biomarkers of pulmonary infection state.« less

  10. Insights into the respiratory tract microbiota of patients with cystic fibrosis during early Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization

    SciTech Connect

    Keravec, Marlene; Mounier, Jerome; Prestat , Emmanuel; Vallet, Sophie; Jansson, Janet K.; Bergaud , Gaetaqn; Rosec, Silvain; Gourious, Stephanie; Rault, Gilles; Coton, Emmanuel; Barbier, George; Hery-Arnaud, Geneveieve

    2015-08-09

    Abstract Pseudomonas aeruginosa plays a major role in cystic fibrosis (CF) progression. Therefore, it is important to understand the initial steps of P. aeruginosa infection. The structure and dynamics of CF respiratory tract microbial communities during the early stages of P. aeruginosa colonization were characterized by pyrosequencing and cloning-sequencing. The respiratory microbiota showed high diversity, related to the young age of the CF cohort (mean age 10 years). Wide inter- and intra-individual variations were revealed. A common core microbiota of 5 phyla and 13 predominant genera was found, the majority of which were obligate anaerobes. A few genera were significantly more prevalent in patients never infected by P. aeruginosa. Persistence of an anaerobic core microbiota regardless of P. aeruginosa status suggests a major role of certain anaerobes in the pathophysiology of lung infections in CF. Some genera may be potential biomarkers of pulmonary infection state.

  11. Impact of alginate-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa on alveolar macrophage apoptotic cell clearance.

    PubMed

    McCaslin, Charles A; Petrusca, Daniela N; Poirier, Christophe; Serban, Karina A; Anderson, Gregory G; Petrache, Irina

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection is a hallmark of lung disease in cystic fibrosis. Acute infection with P. aeruginosa profoundly inhibits alveolar macrophage clearance of apoptotic cells (efferocytosis) via direct effect of virulence factors. During chronic infection, P. aeruginosa evades host defense by decreased virulence, which includes the production or, in the case of mucoidy, overproduction of alginate. The impact of alginate on innate immunity, in particular on macrophage clearance of apoptotic cells is not known. We hypothesized that P. aeruginosa strains that exhibit reduced virulence impair macrophage clearance of apoptotic cells and we investigated if the polysaccharide alginate produced by mucoid P. aeruginosa is sufficient to inhibit alveolar macrophage efferocytosis. Rat alveolar or human peripheral blood monocyte (THP-1)-derived macrophage cell lines were exposed in vitro to exogenous alginate or to wild type or alginate-overproducing mucoid P. aeruginosa prior to challenge with apoptotic human Jurkat T-lymphocytes. The importance of LPS contamination and that of structural integrity of alginate polymers was tested using alginate of different purities and alginate lyase, respectively. Alginate inhibited alveolar macrophage efferocytosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner. This effect was augmented but not exclusively attributed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) present in alginates. Alginate-producing P. aeruginosa inhibited macrophage efferocytosis by more than 50%. A mannuronic-specific alginate lyase did not restore efferocytosis inhibited by exogenous guluronic-rich marine alginate, but had a marked beneficial effect on efferocytosis of alveolar macrophages exposed to mucoid P. aeruginosa. Despite decreased virulence, mucoid P. aeruginosa may contribute to chronic airway inflammation through significant inhibition of alveolar clearance of apoptotic cells and debris. The mechanism by which mucoid bacteria inhibit efferocytosis may involve alginate

  12. Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes Restrict Growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the Lungs of Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kragh, Kasper N.; Alhede, Morten; Jensen, Peter Ø.; Moser, Claus; Scheike, Thomas; Jacobsen, Carsten S.; Seier Poulsen, Steen; Eickhardt-Sørensen, Steffen Robert; Trøstrup, Hannah; Christoffersen, Lars; Hougen, Hans-Petter; Rickelt, Lars F.; Kühl, Michael; Høiby, Niels

    2014-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients have increased susceptibility to chronic lung infections by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, but the ecophysiology within the CF lung during infections is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to elucidate the in vivo growth physiology of P. aeruginosa within lungs of chronically infected CF patients. A novel, quantitative peptide nucleic acid (PNA) fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA-FISH)-based method was used to estimate the in vivo growth rates of P. aeruginosa directly in lung tissue samples from CF patients and the growth rates of P. aeruginosa in infected lungs in a mouse model. The growth rate of P. aeruginosa within CF lungs did not correlate with the dimensions of bacterial aggregates but showed an inverse correlation to the concentration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) surrounding the bacteria. A growth-limiting effect on P. aeruginosa by PMNs was also observed in vitro, where this limitation was alleviated in the presence of the alternative electron acceptor nitrate. The finding that P. aeruginosa growth patterns correlate with the number of surrounding PMNs points to a bacteriostatic effect by PMNs via their strong O2 consumption, which slows the growth of P. aeruginosa in infected CF lungs. In support of this, the growth of P. aeruginosa was significantly higher in the respiratory airways than in the conducting airways of mice. These results indicate a complex host-pathogen interaction in chronic P. aeruginosa infection of the CF lung whereby PMNs slow the growth of the bacteria and render them less susceptible to antibiotic treatment while enabling them to persist by anaerobic respiration. PMID:25114118

  13. Hydroxytyrosol from tyrosol using hydroxyphenylacetic acid-induced bacterial cultures and evidence of the role of 4-HPA 3-hydroxylase.

    PubMed

    Liebgott, Pierre-Pol; Amouric, Agnès; Comte, Alexia; Tholozan, Jean-Luc; Lorquin, Jean

    2009-12-01

    Hydroxytyrosol (HTyr) is a potent natural antioxidant found in olive mill wastewaters. Bacterial conversion of 4-tyrosol (2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-ethanol) to HTyr was reported in a limited number of bacterial species including Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In this work, we studied this conversion, taking as a model the newly isolated Halomonas sp. strain HTB24. It was first hypothesized that the enzyme responsible for 4-tyrosol hydroxylation in HTyr was a 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid 3-hydroxylase (HPAH, EC 1.14.13.3), previously known to convert 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (4-HPA) into 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (3,4-DHPA) in P. aeruginosa. Cloning and expression of hpaB (oxygenase component) and hpaC (reductase component) genes from P. aeruginosa confirmed this hypothesis. Furthermore, using cultures of HTB24 containing 4-tyrosol, it was shown that 4-HPA accumulation preceded 4-tyrosol hydroxylation. We further demonstrated that the synthesis of HPAH activity was induced by 4-HPA, with the latter compound being formed from 4-tyrosol oxidation by aryl-dehydrogenases. Interestingly, similar results were obtained with other 4-HPA-induced bacteria, including P. aeruginosa, Serratia marcescens, Escherichia coli, Micrococcus luteus and other Halomonas, thus demonstrating general hydroxylating activity of 4-tyrosol by the HPAH enzyme. E. coli W did not have aryl-dehydrogenase activity and hence were unable to oxidize 4-tyrosol to 4-HPA and HTyr to 3,4-DHPA, making this bacterium a good candidate for achieving better HTyr production.

  14. Magnetic fields suppress Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms and enhance ciprofloxacin activity.

    PubMed

    Bandara, H M H N; Nguyen, D; Mogarala, S; Osiñski, M; Smyth, H D C

    2015-01-01

    Due to the refractory nature of pathogenic microbial biofilms, innovative biofilm eradication strategies are constantly being sought. Thus, this study addresses a novel approach to eradicate Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNP), ciprofloxacin (Cipro), and magnetic fields were systematically evaluated in vitro for their relative anti-biofilm contributions. Twenty-four-hour biofilms exposed to aerosolized MNPs, Cipro, or a combination of both, were assessed in the presence or absence of magnetic fields (Static one-sided, Static switched, Oscillating, Static + oscillating) using changes in bacterial metabolism, biofilm biomass, and biofilm imaging. The biofilms exposed to magnetic fields alone exhibited significant metabolic and biomass reductions (p < 0.05). When biofilms were treated with a MNP/Cipro combination, the most significant metabolic and biomass reductions were observed when exposed to static switched magnetic fields (p < 0.05). The exposure of P. aeruginosa biofilms to a static switched magnetic field alone, or co-administration with MNP/Cipro/MNP + Cipro appears to be a promising approach to eradicate biofilms of this bacterium.

  15. [Allelopathy effects of ferulic acid and coumarin on Microcystis aeruginosa].

    PubMed

    Guo, Ya-Li; Fu, Hai-Yan; Huang, Guo-He; Gao, Pan-Feng; Chai, Tian; Yan, Bin; Liao, Huan

    2013-04-01

    The inhibitory effects and allelopathy mechanism of ferulic acid and coumarin on Microcystis aeruginosa were investigated by measuring the D680 value, the content of chlorophyll-a, the electrical conductivity (EC) and superoxide anion radical O*- value. Ferulic acid and coumarin had allelopathic effects on the growth of M. aeruginosa and promoted the physiological metabolism at low concentrations while inhibited the metabolism at high concentrations. Obvious inhibitory effects were observed when the concentration of ferulic acid or coumarin was over 100 mg x L(-1). The average inhibitory rates reached 80.3% and 58.0% after six days when the concentration of ferulic acid or coumarin was 200 mg x L(-1). The content of chlorophyll-a was decreased while the EC value and O2*- concentration were promoted by higher concentrations of ferulic acid or coumarin, suggesting that the growth of algae was inhibited probably by the damage of cell membrane, increase in the content of O2*- and decrease in the content of chlorophyll-a. In addition, seed germination test elucidated that Ferulic acid was safer than Coumarin.

  16. Non-apoptotic toxicity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa toward murine cells.

    PubMed

    Roy, Sanhita; Bonfield, Tracey; Tartakoff, Alan M

    2013-01-01

    Although P. aeruginosa is especially dangerous in cystic fibrosis (CF), there is no consensus as to how it kills representative cell types that are of key importance in the lung. This study concerns the acute toxicity of the sequenced strain, PAO1, toward a murine macrophage cell line (RAW 264.7). Toxicity requires brief contact with the target cell, but is then delayed for more than 12 h. None of the classical toxic effectors of this organism is required and cell death occurs without phagocytosis or acute perturbation of the actin cytoskeleton. Apoptosis is not required for toxicity toward either RAW 264.7 cells or for alveolar macrophages. Transcriptional profiling shows that encounter between PAO1 and RAW 264.7 cells elicits an early inflammatory response, followed by growth arrest. As an independent strategy to understand the mechanism of toxicity, we selected variant RAW 264.7 cells that resist PAO1. Upon exposure to P. aeruginosa, they are hyper-responsive with regard to classical inflammatory cytokine production and show transient downregulation of transcripts that are required for cell growth. They do not show obvious morphologic changes. Although they do not increase interferon transcripts, when exposed to PAO1 they dramatically upregulate a subset of the responses that are characteristic of exposure to g-interferon, including several guanylate-binding proteins. The present observations provide a novel foundation for learning how to equip cells with resistance to a complex challenge.

  17. Chromosomal DNA deletion confers phage resistance to Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Le, Shuai; Yao, Xinyue; Lu, Shuguang; Tan, Yinling; Rao, Xiancai; Li, Ming; Jin, Xiaolin; Wang, Jing; Zhao, Yan; Wu, Nicholas C; Lux, Renate; He, Xuesong; Shi, Wenyuan; Hu, Fuquan

    2014-04-28

    Bacteria develop a broad range of phage resistance mechanisms, such as prevention of phage adsorption and CRISPR/Cas system, to survive phage predation. In this study, Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA1 strain was infected with lytic phage PaP1, and phage-resistant mutants were selected. A high percentage (~30%) of these mutants displayed red pigmentation phenotype (Red mutant). Through comparative genomic analysis, one Red mutant PA1r was found to have a 219.6 kb genomic fragment deletion, which contains two key genes hmgA and galU related to the observed phenotypes. Deletion of hmgA resulted in the accumulation of a red compound homogentisic acid; while A galU mutant is devoid of O-antigen, which is required for phage adsorption. Intriguingly, while the loss of galU conferred phage resistance, it significantly attenuated PA1r in a mouse infection experiment. Our study revealed a novel phage resistance mechanism via chromosomal DNA deletion in P. aeruginosa.

  18. [Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteriaemia: new clinical and therapeutic aspects ].

    PubMed

    Janbon, F; Despaux, E; Lepeu, G; Jonquet, O; Santoni, A; Balmayer, B; Bertrand, A

    1982-06-01

    Fifty one cases of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteriaemia observed during the last 12 years are reported. Thirty five patients were over fifty years old; 92 p. cent were admitted for several days and about 50 p. cent were in post-operative period. A previous antibiotherapy and an impaired status are promotive factors. The respiratory or peritoneal origins are the most frequent. All patients were feverish; 24 have had an infectious shock which was inaugural in 12 cases. Seven pneumonitis, 3 endocarditis, one pericarditis and 2 osteitis were observed. An ecthyma gangrenosum was noted in three patients. Mortality was 70 p. cent. Comparison between recovered and died patients improved bad prognosis of old age, post operative period, neoplasic, previous organica weakness and pulmonary or peritoneal origins. Used alone, colimycin has seemed to be more effective than aminosid antibiotics; but their association with betalactamins was better. An in vitro study of the susceptibility of 100 Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains has proved the interest of piperacillin and cefsulodin; azlocillin, cefoperazone and ceftriaxone are just less effective.

  19. Type IV pili mechanochemically regulate virulence factors in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Persat, Alexandre; Inclan, Yuki F.; Engel, Joanne N.; Stone, Howard A.; Gitai, Zemer

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria have evolved a wide range of sensing systems to appropriately respond to environmental signals. Here we demonstrate that the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa detects contact with surfaces on short timescales using the mechanical activity of its type IV pili, a major surface adhesin. This signal transduction mechanism requires attachment of type IV pili to a solid surface, followed by pilus retraction and signal transduction through the Chp chemosensory system, a chemotaxis-like sensory system that regulates cAMP production and transcription of hundreds of genes, including key virulence factors. Like other chemotaxis pathways, pili-mediated surface sensing results in a transient response amplified by a positive feedback that increases type IV pili activity, thereby promoting long-term surface attachment that can stimulate additional virulence and biofilm-inducing pathways. The methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein-like chemosensor PilJ directly interacts with the major pilin subunit PilA. Our results thus support a mechanochemical model where a chemosensory system measures the mechanically induced conformational changes in stretched type IV pili. These findings demonstrate that P. aeruginosa not only uses type IV pili for surface-specific twitching motility, but also as a sensor regulating surface-induced gene expression and pathogenicity. PMID:26041805